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The Washington Post – November 16, 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Mostly sunny 59/38 • Tomorrow: Mostly sunny 53/41 B8
Zimbabwe
awaits fate
of detained
Mugabe
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
TWO IN GOP VOICE
OPPOSITION, DOUBTS
K EVIN S IEFF
P AUL S CHEMM
harare, zimbabwe — After ruling Zimbabwe for nearly four decades, leading the country from
the triumph of its independence
struggle to economic collapse, the
world’s oldest head of state became a prisoner of the military he
once commanded.
Robert Mugabe, 93, was detained along with his wife, according to a military announcement Wednesday. The move appears to end one of Africa’s most
controversial political dynasties
while raising questions about
what might come next — military
rule, a transitional government or
a settlement that would allow
Mugabe to return to power.
No matter what happens, this
appears to be a watershed moment for Zimbabwe and southern
Africa, which have suffered from
the tumult of Mugabe’s reign,
even as his hold on power sometimes seemed unshakable.
Zimbabweans awoke early
Wednesday to a televised announcement from an army general promising that there was “not
a military takeover,” although
Mugabe had been detained and
armored vehicles were rolling
into Harare, the capital.
Despite the assurances, the
ZIMBABWE CONTINUED ON A13
Crack of
gunfire led
to school’s
lockdown
. $2
Senate
tax bill
hits new
snags
Mourning a family’s loss
Army says it is pursuing
only ‘criminals’ around
long-ruling president
BY
AND
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
Defections would leave
no room for more dissent
BY D AMIAN P ALETTA
AND M IKE D E B ONIS
The Republican effort to overhaul the tax code suffered serious
setbacks Wednesday after a conservative senator unexpectedly
said he opposed the Senate plan
and a GOP moderate raised major concerns about it. The announcements cast doubt whether
Republicans would be able to
quickly pass what would be their
first
significant
legislative
achievement under President
Trump.
Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) said
he opposed both the Senate and
House versions of the tax legislation because they benefited corporations at the expense of other,
typically smaller companies. Earlier in the day, Sen. Susan Collins
(R-Maine) said Republicans had
erred when they changed their
tax bill this week to include a
repeal of the Affordable Care
Act’s individual mandate, which
requires every American to have
health insurance or pay a fine.
“This bill is a mixture of some
very good provisions and some
provisions I consider to be big
mistakes,” said Collins, one of
three Republicans who joined
with Democrats this summer to
vote down a Senate effort to scrap
much of the health-care law.
Without Johnson and Collins,
Republicans would need every
other member of their caucus to
vote for the plan — far from a
guaranteed outcome. And neither senator’s concern can be
easily addressed without changes
DARREN ABATE/REUTERS
Mourners walk past caskets for 10 members of the extended Holcombe family who were killed Nov. 5 in the mass
shooting inside First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Tex. Hundreds of relatives, neighbors, friends and
strangers came to pay their respects to the victims during Wednesday’s graveside service. Story, A3
Two more women accuse Moore of pursuing them
Now-Senate candidate
gained a reputation for
making overtures at mall
BY
S TEPHANIE M C C RUMMEN,
B ETH R EINHARD
AND A LICE C RITES
Gena Richardson says she was
a high school senior working in
the men’s department of Sears at
the Gadsden Mall when a man
approached her and introduced
himself as Roy Moore.
“He said, ‘You can just call me
Roy,’ ” says Richardson, who says
this first encounter happened in
the fall of 1977, just before or after
her 18th birthday, as Moore, then
a 30-year-old local attorney, was
gaining a reputation for pursuing
young women at the mall in Gadsden, Ala. His overtures caused
one store manager to tell new
hires to “watch out for this guy,”
another young woman to complain to her supervisor and Richardson to eventually hide from
him when he came into the Sears,
the women say.
Richardson says Moore — now
a candidate for the U.S. Senate —
asked her where she went to
school, and then for her phone
number, which she says she declined to give, telling him that her
father, a Southern Baptist preacher, would never approve.
A few days later, she says, she
was in trigonometry class at Gadsden High when she was summoned to the principal’s office
over the intercom in her classroom. She had a phone call.
“I said ‘Hello?’ ” Richardson recalls. “And the male on the other
line said, ‘Gena, this is Roy
Moore.’ I was like, ‘What?!’ He
said, ‘What are you doing?’ I said,
‘I’m in trig class.’ ”
Richardson says Moore asked
her out again on the call. A few
days later, after he asked her out
at Sears, she relented and agreed,
feeling both nervous and flattered. They met that night at a
movie theater in the mall after she
got off work, a date that ended
MOORE CONTINUED ON A8
BRYNN ANDERSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a statement, Roy Moore’s
Senate campaign cast the
growing number of allegations
as politically motivated.
Silence, so far: Senate GOP waits
for Trump to weigh in. A6
TAX PLAN CONTINUED ON A16
Tax overhaul: GOP gambles on
cuts for business, not families. A16
Robo-calls, deceptive texts:
Moore’s supporters hit back. A6
M ARK B ERMAN,
S USAN S VRLUGA
AND E LLIE S ILVERMAN
BY
Parents were dropping their
children off at Rancho Tehama
Elementary School, a tiny building in a rural stretch of Northern
California, when they heard the
first shot. Almost immediately,
two more gunshots cracked
through the morning air.
It was just minutes before
school was supposed to begin on
Tuesday. The secretary made a
snap decision: Lock down the
school. She quickly ushered nearly 100 children inside from the
quad and the playground, along
with teachers, aides and parents,
said Rick Fitzpatrick, superintendent of the Corning Union Elementary School District.
Children were still hurrying in
when the gunman’s white pickup
truck came tearing down the
street and crashed into the
school’s locked gate at 7:56 a.m. A
man later identified as Kevin J.
Neal jumped out, wielding a semiSHOOTING CONTINUED ON A4
CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK
Museum of the Bible
is strictly by the book
BY
KEVIN LAMARQUE/REUTERS
Israeli Eliezer Adam works with quill and ink to copy the Five Books of Moses at the Museum of
the Bible. The new attraction has some praiseworthy elements but also some shortcomings.
In THE NEWS
THE ECONOMY
THE NATION
In the six weeks since
the Las Vegas massacre,
no action has been taken
to ban bump stocks. A4
A bill to expand workplace protections on
Capitol Hill has been
proposed, following
several allegations of
sexual misconduct. A9
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Scherzer wins Cy Young The Nationals
right-hander is named the National League’s
top pitcher for the second straight season. D1
Bank regulator’s exit Richard Cordray said
he will step down as head of the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau. A15
THE WORLD
Lawmakers are
expressing fear that
planned personnel cuts
at the State Department
could threaten national
security. A13
Australians celebrated
the results of the country’s nonbinding refer-
endum on legalizing
same-sex marriage, with
more than 60 percent of
voters in favor. A14
Russian lawmakers
passed legislation allowing authorities to force
any foreign media organization to register as
a “foreign agent.” A14
Organic compounds
detected on 8,000-yearold jars in the Caucasus
showed that wine is
centuries older than
scientists had previously
thought. A14
China is sending an envoy to visit North Korea,
reopening a channel of
dialogue with the isolated regime. A14
Google’s Pixel Buds
wireless headphones offer a promising but not
perfect translation feature, a reviewer said. A17
THE REGION
Fears of terrorist
attacks and shootings
prompted an Ohio
school district to cancel
an eighth-grade class
trip to Washington. B1
Democrats are challenging the results of a
Virginia House race
after a county registrar
said 55 absentee ballots
that arrived the morning
after the election cannot
be legally counted. B1
Actress Rose McGowan was released on
$5,000 unsecured bond
P HILIP K ENNICOTT
When the Museum of the Bible
opens this weekend, it will set a
new standard for how this country’s museums fuse entertainment and education. The
$500 million, privately funded
project is as large as some of the
Smithsonian’s premier attractions, including the National Museum of African American History
and Culture. It is rich in content,
stocked with historic treasures
and carefully plotted to appeal to
audiences of all ages. It brings to
museum design the sophisticated
marketing intelligence of the
Oklahoma City-based Green family, who have used a fortune made
from the Hobby Lobby retail
after she turned herself
in to Virginia authorities
on a drug charge. B3
The Montgomery
County School Board
said it will trim two days
from spring break in
2019. B5
chain to promote evangelical
Christian causes. Their latest venture is a museum that offers a
one-stop-shopping cultural experience, with history, art, architecture, theater and music conveniently packaged under one
roof.
What it does well, it does as well
or better than any museum in the
country, and its failings, which are
significant, will be difficult to detect for anyone who isn’t a scholar,
or firmly committed secularist.
The new attraction is an up-todate version of an old-fashioned
museum, telling linear stories in a
complex and detailed way. It
doesn’t foreground trendy ideas
about multiculturalism, and it
MUSEUM CONTINUED ON A11
Inside
ST YLE
Confronting abuse
Eight women who reported
workplace harassment
share what happened. C1
OBITUARIES
John C. Raines, 84,
helped burglarize an
FBI office in 1971, taking the documents that
revealed an intimidation
campaign against civil
rights activists. B6
Jeremy Hutchinson,
102, who successfully
fought obscenity
charges in the “Lady
Chatterley’s Lover” case,
was among the last of
Britain’s lawyer-celebrities. B5
LOCAL LIVING
Soiree upgrades
Expert advice on how to
make a party look more
elegant than tailgating.
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A15
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES ......................... A20
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS.............................A12
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 346
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
6 8 5 3
A2
EZ
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson hosts 35 African
counterparts for talks regarding cooperation on
counterterrorism and increasing trade and investment in
the region. For developments, visit washingtonpost.com/
politics.
8:30 a.m.
New jobless claims are expected to decline to 236,000
this week, compared with 239,000 the previous week.
Visit washingtonpost.com/business for details.
11:30 a.m.
President Trump attends a closed-door meeting with
House Republicans on Capitol Hill, shortly before a vote is
expected on GOP tax overhaul legislation. Visit
washingtonpost.com/politics for developments.
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CO R R ECTI O N
The Literary Calendar in the
Nov. 12 Outlook section
incorrectly listed the late chef
Michel Richard as one of the
speakers at a discussion of the
book “Best Food Writing 2017” at
6 p.m. on Nov. 18. Tim Carman,
Jane Black, Joe Yonan and Todd
Kliman will be in conversation
with Holly Hughes, the book’s
editor. The listing also gave an
incorrect address for the event. It
will be at Politics and Prose at
the Wharf, 70 District Sq. SW.
The Washington Post is committed to
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newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
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A SSOCIATED P RESS
who have dealt with dozens of
protests in the two months since a
former officer was acquitted in the
death of a black suspect can’t shut
down nonviolent demonstrations
or use chemical agents simply to
punish protesters, a federal judge
ruled Wednesday.
A leader of the protest movement hailed U.S. District Judge
Catherine Perry’s temporary restraining order as a victory for the
protesters. “We want to be treated
like the Constitution says and not
like terrorists,” said Cori Bush of
the Frontline protest movement.
Koran Addo, spokesman for
Mayor Lyda Krewson, said the city
“will comply with the order of
preliminary injunction.” A police
spokeswoman declined to comment.
A judge’s ruling on Sept. 15 acquitted former police officer Jason
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
‘Bernie Bernstein’ is done with obscurity
It is time for us as
journalists to
come clean and to
recognize the
great debt our
profession owes
Dana
Bernie Bernstein.
Milbank
After years of
WASHINGTON toiling in
obscurity, Bernie
SKETCH
gained national
attention Tuesday
when an Alabama pastor shared
with a local TV station a voice
mail left by Bernie. “Hi, this is
Bernie Bernstein. I’m a reporter
for The Washington Post calling
to find out if anyone at this
address is a female between the
ages of 54 to 57 years old willing
to make damaging remarks
about candidate Roy Moore for a
reward of between $5,000 and
$7,000,” it said. “We will not be
fully investigating these claims.
However, we will make a written
report.”
This produced a rather harsh
response from Martin Baron,
The Post’s executive editor,
about the person “falsely
claiming to be from The
Washington Post. The call’s
description of our reporting
methods bears no relationship to
reality. We are shocked and
appalled that anyone would
stoop to this level to discredit
real journalism.” A Post article
about the episode piled on,
alleging that “there are no
Washington Post reporters or
editors named Bernie Bernstein,”
and a Post spokeswoman
dutifully explained that there is
“an explicit policy that prohibits
paying sources.”
I understand my colleagues’
reluctance to admit that The
Post gathers its news by making
robo-calls and paying people to
say bad things that we do not
confirm.
That is why, for decades,
Bernie Bernstein and his
colleague Woody Woodward
have toiled in The Post’s
basement, doing random-digit
dialing, 10 hours a day, seven
days a week. Bernie and Woody
the claims without fully
investigating them, to which
Bradlee replied, “I’m cool with
that.” In the movie “All the
President’s Men,” when Deep
Throat says “follow the money,”
he is in fact encouraging Bernie
and Woody to offer more cash on
their robo-calls.
Bernie says he was moved to
“I can’t believe Marty said I don’t exist!
‘No relationship to reality’? ‘No Washington Post
reporters or editors named Bernie Bernstein’?
I made this paper!”
Bernie Bernstein, the great, unheralded breaker of earthshaking news stories
broke scoop after scoop, yet they
were always hidden from view
while others got the credit.
Until now. Bernie is speaking
up. When I found Bernie in his
windowless office Wednesday, he
was distraught. “I can’t believe
Marty said I don’t exist! ‘No
relationship to reality’? ‘No
Washington Post reporters or
editors named Bernie
Bernstein’? I made this paper!”
Indeed, you can’t quarrel with
success. Bernie and Woody broke
the Watergate story, while
upstairs their more telegenic
colleagues Bob Woodward and
Carl Bernstein (no relation) got
the glory. Woody and Bernie
robo-called everybody in
Washington and offered $1,000
— it was cheaper back then — for
anyone willing to make
damaging remarks about
Richard Nixon. They told Ben
Bradlee that they would report
become a robo-caller in his
youth, when he heard inspiring
stories about people being
offered $20 a pop to make
damaging remarks about
President Franklin Roosevelt.
(Most homes didn’t have
telephones back then, so the
work was supplemented with
robo-telegrams.)
Bernie’s first major triumph
was the leak of the Pentagon
Papers (often falsely credited to
the New York Times). On one of
his routine days of random-digit
dialing, he reached Daniel
Ellsberg and offered him $2,000
to say damaging things about
Lyndon Johnson. Bernie was on
his way. Iran-contra, Monica
Lewinsky, black-site prisons, the
Walter Reed scandal: Bernie’s
robo-calls brought them all to
light.
Bernie caused great
controversy within The Post in
2016, when he obtained the
Access Hollywood tape and
exposed the many failures at
Trump’s charities — work
attributed to The Post’s David
Fahrenthold. When Bernie in his
robo-calls offered $4,000 to any
person willing to make
damaging remarks about Donald
Trump, the response was so large
that the payments threatened to
bankrupt The Post and owner
Jeff Bezos.
Bernie told me Wednesday
that he was particularly offended
by Baron’s denials because of
their long history. In 2001 and
2002, Baron, then editor of the
Boston Globe, contracted with
Bernie to make calls offering
$3,000 to anybody “willing to
make damaging remarks about”
a Catholic priest. Bernie’s
contribution produced the
extraordinary journalism
featured in the movie “Spotlight”
— but, as with “All the
President’s Men,” Bernie’s role
was edited out.
Even now, as Bernie pays
Alabamians to say damaging
things about Roy Moore, some
colleagues want to keep him
secret. It was long thought that
the American public simply
would not believe or accept that
the great journalism of recent
decades was accomplished by
one unknown man in a
basement, dialing random
phone numbers and, in an
exaggerated New York accent,
offering cash for malice he
promises not to corroborate.
But I think Bernie’s day has
finally come — because people
are ready and willing to believe
just about anything. They
certainly seem to be in Alabama.
Twitter: @Milbank
Jury finds Chicago police o∞cer shot friend in head
Judge limits tactics that St. Louis
police may use against protesters
st. louis — Police in St. Louis
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Stockley, who is white, of firstdegree murder in the death of
Anthony Lamar Smith, who was
black. Smith, the suspect in a drug
case, was fatally shot by Stockley
after a dangerous chase. Within
minutes of the announcement of
the ruling, protests broke out.
Some of the early demonstrations turned violent, with bricks
and bottles thrown at police, windows broken, and other damage.
Several officers reported minor to
moderate injuries. About 300 people have been arrested.
Many of those arrested claimed
police used heavy-handed tactics,
including unnecessary use of pepper spray and tear gas, and the
forcing of protesters to the
ground. A process known as “kettling” has also been called into
question. Kettling involves lines of
officers moving protesters into a
limited area before arrests are
made. Several journalists have
been among those arrested.
G E O R G E T O W N C O N S I G N M E N T D AY, D E C 1
We are currently accepting consignments for upcoming auctions in
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consignment, or to schedule a complimentary appointment,
please call our Georgetown office.
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3256 Prospect St. NW, Washington, DC 20007
Edmund Darch Lewis (American, 1835-1910),
View of Cuba, 1860. Sold for $53,125
David Webb, Gold, Black Enamel, Mabé Pearl
and Diamond Cuff. Est: $8,000-12,000
David Webb, Gold Cuff. Est: $6,000-8,000
Panel says city should
pay for keeping man on
force amid complaints
BY
T OM J ACKMAN
Most large police departments
have “early intervention” systems designed to detect troubled
young officers; they either retrain them or release them. Chicago has one, but the 19 citizen
complaints Officer Patrick Kelly
racked up in his first six years on
the streets did not result in any
action against him.
Then came the morning of
Jan. 12, 2010, when the off-duty
Kelly dialed 911 from his home to
report that his longtime friend
Mike LaPorta had just committed suicide. Except LaPorta, with
a gunshot through his brain,
lived. He spent months in a coma
and now uses a wheelchair, unable to read and speaking only
with difficulty. LaPorta and his
family would later contend that
it was Kelly who fired the gun.
Although no criminal charges
were ever filed against Kelly in
the LaPorta case, a federal jury in
Chicago found last month that
he shot LaPorta, that Chicago
police failed to implement an
early-warning system for its officers, and that the city should pay
LaPorta $44.7 million. Then on
Friday, the lawyers who represented LaPorta sued Chicago and
Kelly again, for an on-duty shooting in 2014 in which Kelly and
another officer shot a man eight
times in the back and buttocks,
killing him, according to the
lawsuit.
Kelly, 36, remains a Chicago
police officer. He was on the
street until last month, when his
decision on the witness stand to
invoke the Fifth Amendment
right not to incriminate himself
convinced the Chicago police to
investigate him for possible
truthfulness violations, a police
spokesman said.
“There is not an adequate
early-warning system that exists
in the city of Chicago,” said
Antonio Romanucci, who tried
the case for LaPorta and is suing
on behalf of the family of Hector
Hernandez, killed by Kelly and
Officer Antonio Corral in April
2014. “The city does have a
behavioral intervention system,
however the system is not disciplinary in nature,” Romanucci
said, noting that it frequently
provides only counseling or minimal retraining for miscreants,
“as opposed to discipline, which
would bring consequences for
bad behavior. That’s why we
went after the city of Chicago, for
not having an early-warning system which could flag patterns of
misconduct, such as the violent
conduct Patrick Kelly showed
both on and off duty.”
Two jurors who spoke to Chicago reporters after the verdict
said the $44.7 million award was
PHIL VELASQUEZ/CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Officer Patrick Kelly, left, leaves the federal courthouse in Chicago on Oct. 17. A jury ordered the city to
pay $44.7 million to a friend Kelly allegedly shot while off duty.
meant to send a message to the
city. “They can’t get away with
this,” juror Andrea Diven told the
Chicago Tribune. “It’s something
that’s embedded and it needs
to change.”
The verdict is believed to be
the largest ever against the embattled Chicago Police Department. The department also has
absorbed a sharply critical Justice Department report that the
city intends to use in shaping a
consent decree for federal oversight, and another harsh analysis
from a police accountability task
force formed by Mayor Rahm
Emanuel.
“It’s part of a larger issue we’ve
been trying to address,” Chicago
police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said. “We haven’t had a
robust early-intervention system. We’ve had pieces.” He said
the police were working with the
University of Chicago’s Crime
Lab to create a new intervention
program for police officers,
though he declined to discuss the
Kelly cases specifically. The city
has indicated its intention to
appeal.
Officials with the city’s law
department and the Chicago Fraternal Order of Police union
declined to comment. After the
verdict, city law department
spokesman Bill McCaffrey issued
a statement saying, “We are disappointed in the jury’s verdict,
and, as we argued in this case,
taxpayers should not be responsible for an off-duty officer’s
purely private actions.” But
LaPorta’s lawyers said taxpayers
won’t have to pay the verdict
because the city’s insurance will
cover it.
“The challenge is,” said Chuck
Wexler, executive director of the
Police Executive Research Forum, which studies and advises
big-city departments on tough
issues, “how do you measure
whether someone is a problem
employee? What are the warning
signs, what do you do about it? I
don’t know that departments
have perfected the intervention.”
He said some departments try to
fire officers, but appeal boards
and arbitration proceedings
“tend to be supportive of the
police officer.” Wexler also said
officers who work in tougher
neighborhoods may draw more
complaints, which might be unfounded, while officers in easier
areas attract less attention.
In Chicago, the police do not
investigate complaints against
officers. They were, until recently, referred to the Independent
Police Review Authority, or
IPRA, recently replaced by a new
board, the Civilian Office of Police Accountability, or COPA. But
officers often are witnesses in
cases of police abuse, leading to
allegations of a police “code of
silence,” and not one of the
complaints against Kelly was
ruled “sustained,” including an
off-duty assault on his girlfriend
and another on her brother. City
statistics showed that only 17
percent of domestic violence
complaints lodged against Chicago officers over an eight-year
period were sustained.
Kelly had a lot of complaints
against him, often involving
booze. “The facts of this case lend
themselves to an Alcoholics
Anonymous pamphlet,” the
judge in the LaPorta case, U.S.
District Judge Harry D. Leinenweber, wrote in a 71-page pretrial
order. Leinenweber also created
a chart in his order listing the
dates, allegations and outcomes
of 18 complaints against Kelly
between January 2005 and July
2009, including five of using
excessive force, as well as a 19th
case involving five officers abusing an arrestee. Kelly was not
disciplined in any of the 19 cases.
All that was before the nearfatal shooting of LaPorta, Kelly’s
best friend for years, inside Kelly’s home. The two men had been
drinking for hours, first in two
bars and then at Kelly’s home,
and LaPorta testified he remembered Kelly abusing his dog so
LaPorta got up to leave. Around
4:30 a.m., LaPorta was shot once
in the back of the head. Kelly
reported that his friend had shot
himself, though the entry wound
was on LaPorta’s left side and
LaPorta shot right-handed, and
other aspects of LaPorta’s location, blood spatter and gunshot
residue didn’t match with a
self-inflicted wound, his lawyers
said.
tom.jackman@washpost.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
SU
Politics & the Nation
Family that lost 10 in Texas church shooting is honored
have said Kelley was involved in a
domestic dispute with his in-laws
before the shootings; his motherin-law has attended the church,
and his wife’s grandmother was
among those he killed there. Kelley had attended a fall festival at
the church on Halloween just
days before he returned with a
semiautomatic assault-style rifle
and fired hundreds of rounds
inside. He was shot by a neighbor
who heard the gunfire. Kelley
fled in his car while being chased,
and ran off the road and shot
himself.
The small town has since begun burying many of its residents, while 20 people who were
shot continue to recover and
process what happened.
The service Wednesday afternoon was packed with hundreds
of relatives, neighbors, friends
and strangers paying their respects to Joe Holcombe’s son
Bryan and his wife, Karla Holcombe; Bryan and Karla’s son
Danny Holcombe and his 1-yearold daughter Noah Grace; Bryan
and Karla’s daughter-in-law
Crystal Holcombe, her unborn
child Carlin Holcombe and children Greg Hill, Emily Hill and
Megan Hill; and Tara McNulty, a
close family friend whose children were like grandchildren to
Bryan and Karla.
As attendees waited to get
inside, people left their spots in
line to hug and shake hands with
friends and neighbors; the attack
killed or injured many in the First
Baptist Church membership and
affected almost everyone in this
tiny town outside San Antonio.
Many of those who were killed
were in the church’s pews for
Sunday services.
“They were always happy, and
they loved the Lord with all their
hearts,” Jane Johnson, a close
family friend, said after the me-
trial here on charges of conspiracy to commit an offense against
the United States, conspiracy to
impede and injure a federal
officer, and extortion, among
other charges that, if they result
in convictions, could lead to life
sentences. Prosecutors argued in
opening statements this week
that the standoff was an attack
on the government; attorneys
representing the Bundys say the
gathering was an exercise of the
family’s right to protest.
U.S. attorney Steven Myhre
argued before a jury that the
Bundys gathered supporters by
putting out exaggerated propaganda that the family was “under
attack,” that the government had
snipers aiming at them, and that
the situation at the desert ranch
along the Arizona border had
“the potential to be the next
Waco or Ruby Ridge.” That message spoke to militias nationwide.
“This was not a protest,”
Myhre said. “A protest is when
you attempt to send a message
and do it peacefully.”
Bundy’s attorney, Bret Whipple, argued that the family and
protesters were peaceful. The
protesters, Whipple said, caused
the federal authorities to back off
and to release the cattle, ultimately defusing the situation.
Whipple said that the events
of April 2014 were the culmination of years of Bundy trying to
draw attention to what he saw as
federal overreach.
“His family was being at-
tacked. His family was being
abused,” Whipple said. “The
American spirit believes you can
stand up and speak your mind
anytime.”
Bundy’s troubles began in the
early 1990s, Myhre told the jury
in his opening statements, when
he stopped paying to graze his
cattle on federal public lands
managed by the Bureau of Land
Management.
The Bundy Ranch is a 160-acre
tract near the town of Bunkerville, south of Las Vegas. It’s a
remote swath of dusty, rocky red
desert, a place where water and
vegetation are hard to come by.
Like many ranchers, Bundy
leased allotments of the federal
land that surrounds his property
to graze his cattle — 587,000
The relatives, killed while
worshiping, ‘loved the
Lord with all their hearts’
BY
E VA R UTH M ORAVEC
floresville, tex. — Thousands of mourners said goodbye
and celebrated the lives of an
extended family that lost 10 of its
members nearly two weeks ago in
a mass shooting inside their
small-town Texas church.
Colorful caskets contained the
bodies of three generations of the
Holcombe family, from an unborn child and a 1-year-old to the
church’s 60-year-old associate
pastor. Mourners overfilled an
event center here, full of sorrow
and of hope, knowing that the
members of a deeply faithful
family — who had been praising
God when killed — were now
home in heaven.
The event was open to the
public but closed to the news
media as members of the community continued to heal from
one of the nation’s worst mass
shootings 10 days earlier. Those
who attended the ceremony said
the family patriarch — Joe Hol-
ERIC GAY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A procession of hearses passes along a country road to a graveside service for members of the
Holcombe family, who were killed in the Nov. 5 shooting at a church in Sutherland Springs, Tex.
combe — also prayed for the
family of Devin Patrick Kelley, the
26-year-old who took his life after
killing more than two dozen congregants at First Baptist Church
of Sutherland Springs on Nov. 5.
Kelley was cremated on Friday.
Law enforcement officials
Trial over 2014 standoff
at Bundy ranch begins
BY
L EAH S OTTILE
las vegas — More than three
years after Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy and hundreds of militiamen faced off with federal law
enforcement officers who had
repossessed Bundy’s cattle, the
71-year-old is finally seeing his
battle reach a courtroom.
The Bundy family has been at
the center of a long-running
dispute with federal authorities
over the use of public lands to
graze cattle, and Bundy gathered
with militia members from
around the country in April 2014
to directly challenge the federal
government. Wearing camouflage and flak jackets and carrying semiautomatic rifles, they
amassed in a dusty, washed-out
canyon beneath the overpasses
of Interstate 15, where two dozen
federal officers had corralled
Bundy’s cattle after he refused to
pay years of grazing fees.
Bundy; two of his sons, Ryan
and Ammon; and militia leader
Ryan Payne are facing federal
morial.
Many in the community have
turned to their faith to help cope
with their losses, and the church
decided not to hide the scene of
the crime; instead leaders had it
cleaned, painted and made into a
standing memorial for those
killed inside. White chairs embossed with the names of those
who died — along with single red
roses — stand solemnly in a
stark-white sanctuary.
The day of the shootings, Bryan Holcombe, the associate pastor, was filling in for the church’s
pastor, Frank Pomeroy, who happened to be out of town that day;
Holcombe was on his way to the
pulpit when he was killed. Both
he and wife Karla, 58, taught
their children to live their lives
for the glory of God, friends and
relatives said. Pomeroy buried
his 14-year-old daughter Annabelle — who was killed in the
attack — this week.
Bagpipers played “Amazing
Grace” while pallbearers slowly
rolled the caskets out to hearses
that took the victims to a private
burial. While many in attendance
dabbed their eyes with tissues —
individually bagged with a note
from schoolchildren — some
hummed along.
acres of land that belongs to
everyone, Myhre said. Until
1993, Bundy paid his grazing
fees.
“After that,” Myhre told the
jury, “he refused to do so.”
Ryan Bundy made the argument Wednesday that his family
was legally protesting what it
sees as infringement of basic
rights.
“In America, sovereignty lies
with the people,” he said. “The
government is ‘we the people’ . . .
we are their master . . . we are
not subjects, servants or slaves to
the government. We need to
remember that. When we have to
get permission to do everything
we do, that’s not freedom. That
means we are a subject.”
national@washpost.com
national@washpost.com
D I G ES T
OHIO
Inability to find a vein
postpones execution
Ohio called off the execution of
an ailing 69-year-old killer on
Wednesday after the
executioners could not find an
accessible vein to insert the IV
that delivers the lethal drugs.
It was only the third time in
modern U.S. history that an
execution attempt was halted
after the process had begun.
Alva Campbell, condemned to
die for killing a teenager during a
carjacking two decades ago, was
promptly given a new execution
date by Gov. John Kasich (R) that
is a year and a half away.
The execution team worked for
about 25 minutes to find a vein in
Campbell’s arms or his right
lower leg as he lay on a gurney in
the death chamber. Team
members used a locating device
with an ultraviolet light while
patting Campbell on the arm and
shoulder to comfort him.
Although it appeared that the
executioners had successfully
inserted a needle in his shin, the
warden instructed the team to
pull it out, said David Stebbins,
Campbell’s public defender.
Certain conditions can make it
difficult to find suitable veins,
including damage from drug
abuse, or dehydration. Stebbins
said Campbell’s poor veins and
other health ills are problems
that won’t go away anytime soon.
Campbell’s new execution date
is June 5, 2019.
Campbell’s attorneys had
warned that his execution could
become an unseemly spectacle
because of his poor health. He
suffers from breathing problems
from a longtime smoking habit
and uses a walker and a
colostomy bag, his attorneys said.
In 2009, the state called off the
execution of killer Romell Broom
after two hours of unsuccessful
attempts to find a usable vein.
Broom is back on death row with a
rescheduled execution date in
2020.
— Associated Press
PENNSYLVANIA
U.S. loses court fight
with ‘sanctuary city’
A federal judge on Wednesday
blocked the U.S. government
from withholding a major grant
that pays for public safety
equipment because Philadelphia
Add to your savings
before winter.
JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES
A girl watches as a volunteer loads donated food into a car at a food
bank in Santa Rosa, Calif. Hundreds of Sonoma County residents who
were affected by last month’s devastating wildfires lined up to receive
free Thanksgiving meals. Foster Farms contributed 40,000 pounds of
poultry and $100,000 to help survivors.
is a “sanctuary city.”
U.S. District Judge Michael
Baylson said in his decision that
he weighed the public interest
and possible harm that could
come from withholding such
funds.
“Both the federal government
and the city of Philadelphia have
important interests at stake here
and the court does not minimize
either of their concerns,” the
judge wrote. “In this case, given
Philadelphia’s unique approach
to meshing the legitimate needs
of the federal government to
remove criminal aliens with the
City’s promotion of health and
safety, there is no conflict of any
significance.”
The Justice Department is
reviewing the ruling and
determining the next steps,
spokesman Devin O’Malley said.
The Justice Department has
threatened to cut off millions of
dollars in federal grants to cities
if they don’t meet certain criteria
for cooperating with
immigration officials. The city
sued Attorney General Jeff
Sessions in August over the
conditions that had been added
to the grant program, calling
them unconstitutional.
— Associated Press
NEW YORK
Da Vinci work shatters
record price at auction
Leonardo da Vinci’s painting
“Saviour of the World” sold for
$450,312,500 Wednesday at
auction, Christie’s said. The price,
which includes a buyer’s
premium, makes it “the most
expensive painting ever sold at
auction,” the auction house said
in a statement.
The previous record for the
most expensive painting sold at
auction was $179,364,992 for
Picasso’s “Les Femmes d’Alger,”
according to Christie’s. The
highest price previously paid at
auction for a da Vinci was in 2001
for his “Horse and Rider,” which
went for $11,481,865.
The bidding for “Saviour of the
World” (“Salvator Mundi”),
coordinated out of Christie’s New
York office, lasted a little less
than 20 minutes, with two final
bidders battling it out. The bids
jumped from $370 million to
$400 million and then to the
final price. The identity of the
winning bidder was not known.
“Saviour of the World” is one of
some 16 known surviving
paintings, including the “Mona
Lisa,” by da Vinci, the master of
the Italian Renaissance. The
others are scattered throughout
the world’s museums.
Billed by the auction house as
“The Last da Vinci,” the painting
spent centuries in obscurity until
it was rediscovered in 2005 and
underwent a six-year restoration
and verification process. Painted
in the early 1500s, it quickly
inspired a number of imitations.
— Travis M. Andrews
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A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
Six weeks after massacre, Congress avoids action to ban bump stocks
Republicans try to push
issue to ATF, but agency
says it lacks authority
BY
S ARI H ORWITZ
It has been six weeks since Las
Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock
attached a device to his semiautomatic firearm that effectively turned his rifle into a battlefield machine gun and left 58
people dead and hundreds more
injured in a matter of minutes.
Within days, House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) and other
Republican lawmakers — including some of Congress’s most avid
supporters of gun rights — said
they would consider restrictions
on the accessory, known as a
bump stock.
Even the National Rifle Association unexpectedly joined the
effort to restrict bump stocks,
which are molded pieces of plastic or metal that, when attached,
allow a gun to fire up to 100
rounds in seven seconds.
“The NRA believes that devices
designed to allow semi-automatic rifles to function like fullyautomatic rifles should be subject to additional regulations,”
the NRA said in a statement
shortly after the shooting.
But no action has been taken
by Congress. Instead, Republican
lawmakers punted the responsibility to the Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which in turn says it cannot
regulate bump stocks unless Congress changes the law.
The only thing that has happened with bump stocks since the
Las Vegas shooting is that a
leading manufacturer of the device, Slide Fire, resumed selling
them. Slide Fire had announced
in the wake of the shooting that it
was temporarily suspending
sales.
Several retailers, including
RICK BOWMER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A bump stock attached to an semiautomatic rifle. Talk of banning the rapid-fire devices has not resulted in legislative action.
Walmart, removed bump stocks
from their shelves. But other gun
dealers reported that sales of
bump stocks spiked after Las
Vegas, and some stores sold out of
the devices quickly.
“We would like to take the time
to thank all of our customers for
their patience and support
throughout this past month,”
Slide Fire said in an email when
the company began selling bump
stocks again Nov. 1. The company
did not respond to requests for
comment.
Four days after the Las Vegas
shooting, Ryan, House Majority
Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.)
and House Judiciary Committee
Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.)
said they would consider restrictions on bump stocks.
“Fully automatic weapons
have been outlawed for many,
many years,” Ryan said. “This
seems to be a way of going around
that, so obviously we need to look
how we can tighten up the compliance with this law so that fully
automatic weapons are banned.”
But the next week, on Oct. 11,
Ryan backed away from his comments about legislative action.
Instead, he and many other
House Republicans said they
hoped ATF would act administratively to outlaw the devices.
“We think the regulatory fix is
the smartest, quickest fix, and
then, frankly, we’d like to know
how it happened in the first
place,” Ryan told reporters.
Nine senators wrote ATF’s acting director, Thomas E. Brandon,
asking that the agency “review
the Obama administration’s interpretation and issue your own
interpretation.”
In 2010, ATF said that it did not
need to regulate bump stocks
because they do not fit the legal
definition of a machine gun.
A 1986 law bans the sale of
machine guns manufactured after 1986 and restricts the sale of
machine guns made before then.
But bump stocks do not perma-
nently alter a gun’s trigger mechanism, so ATF says it does not fall
under the law. The companies
selling the device configured the
bump stock so it harnesses a
gun’s natural recoil, allowing it to
bounce back and forth off a
shooter’s trigger finger.
“No permanent modifications,” Slide Fire advertises in a
promotional video.
NRA spokeswoman Jennifer
Baker said she had no comment
beyond the organization’s original statement six weeks ago that
the devices “should be subject to
additional regulations.”
When asked what ATF is doing
in response to Congress’s concern
about bump stocks, a spokeswoman said she could not comment.
“ATF does not comment on
internal deliberations,” spokeswoman Mary E. Markos said.
“The Department of Justice is
reviewing its regulatory authority in this space. House and Senate
Judiciary Committee staffers
were recently briefed by ATF
regarding bump-stock-related
matters.”
But Sen. Dianne Feinstein
(Calif.), the ranking Democrat on
the Senate Judiciary Committee,
said that at a committee briefing
on Oct. 12, ATF officials told
senators that the agency had
concluded it lacks the authority
to ban bump stocks.
In addition, current and former ATF agents wrote a letter to
lawmakers, saying that it is Congress that must take action.
Under the law, they wrote, attaching a bump stock to a gun “does
not make it a machine gun,” so
ATF cannot regulate it.
“The law is very clear, and it
does not currently allow ATF to
regulate
such
accessories,”
Michael R. Bouchard, former
ATF assistant director and now
president of ATF Association,
wrote in the letter, which was
obtained by The Washington
Post.
Feinstein, who has long advocated stricter gun-control laws,
has introduced a bill that would
ban the sale and possession of
bump-stock equipment and other devices that essentially turn a
semiautomatic weapon into an
automatic one.
“I continue to believe that legislation to ban bump-fire stocks
is needed to save lives,” she said.
“Machine guns have been banned
for more than 30 years, so banning accessories that allow semiautomatic weapons to achieve a
fully automatic rate of fire should
be a no-brainer.”
Feinstein is still trying to find a
Republican co-sponsor.
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
As gunman approached, school quickly went on lockdown
arm in a “grossly negligent manner,” court records show.
When police searched Neal’s
home after the incident, they
found his wife’s body hidden under the floor of their home, Johnston said, shot several times.
During the investigation,
neighbors told police that they
believed “there was a domestic
violence incident” at the home
Monday, Johnston said. It was not
reported to police at the time, he
said, adding that such incidents
were “a very common thing with
this couple.”
SHOOTING FROM A1
automatic rifle and wearing a vest
packing ammunition, authorities
said.
As the head custodian looked
around a corner of the building
toward the sound of the crash,
Neal raised his rifle and pointed it
in the custodian’s direction. But
video of the incident shows that
the shooter struggled with the
gun, which appeared to have
jammed, Fitzpatrick said. By the
time Neal had fixed his weapon,
the last student was inside and
the school was locked down.
Within 10 seconds of the last
lock going into place, Neal was
standing in the quad where, moments earlier, children had been
playing. He began to fire.
Police said that in the hours
leading up to that moment, Neal
had killed his wife and hidden her
body beneath the floorboards of
their home. He later began a
bloody rampage across this community about 135 miles north of
Sacramento, ultimately killing
five people and injuring several
others.
As bullets shattered the
school’s windows, 32-year-old
Coy Ferreira, who was dropping
his daughter off and took shelter
inside a classroom, said he quickly ran toward the door.
“If he’s going to come in, he’s
going to come in killing me first,”
Ferreira said. “It’s going to be me,
and hopefully not the students . . .
and I was just praying to God he
wouldn’t be getting to the door.”
Neal tried to get inside the
school but wasn’t able to open the
doors.
Instead, he fired at the building for six agonizing minutes,
shattering windows and shooting
through wooden walls, authorities said.
People inside the classroom
with Ferreira soon realized that
one child had been shot in the
chest and leg. Others were
wounded by broken glass. Neal
eventually became frustrated and
abandoned the school, said Phil
Johnston, an assistant sheriff in
Tehama County.
The secretary’s decision to lock
down the building — a call usually made by law enforcement officials — helped keep the bloodshed from escalating into something even more horrifying: Another mass shooting at an
elementary school, one that
would have erupted just weeks
before the country marked five
years since the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre that
left 20 children and six adults
dead.
“It is monumental that that
school went on lockdown,” John-
RICH PEDRONCELLI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Randy Morehouse, maintenance and operations supervisor for the Corning Elementary School District, walks past the Rancho Tehama
Elementary School gate that Kevin Neal crashed through on Tuesday. Neal fired into the school for six minutes, authorities said.
ston said Wednesday. “I really,
truly believe that we would have
had a horrific bloodbath in that
school if that school hadn’t taken
the action when they did.”
Police say Neal drove around
the small community of Rancho
Tehama Reserve, firing for at
least 25 minutes at vehicles,
homes and people in his path,
targeting those he had quarreled
with and complete strangers
alike.
During his rampage, Neal intentionally crashed into a car and
then fired at passengers as they
got out, killing one, Johnston
said. At another point, he shot a
woman driving her children to
school, seriously injuring her and
wounding one of the young children in her back seat. School
officials believe those were the
shots heard at the nearby elementary school, triggering the lockdown.
“I really don’t know what his
motive was,” Johnston said
Wednesday. “I think he was just
on a rampage. I think he had a
desire to kill as many people as he
could.”
The attacks stopped when officers rammed Neal’s car and killed
him during an exchange of gunfire.
Red flags
Neal’s family had long worried
about his mental state, and he
had a number of run-ins with law
enforcement in North Carolina
before moving to California a decade ago.
Relatives had sought to get him
treatment for what they believed
was a mental illness, according to
his sister, Sheridan Orr. She described the tragedy of the past
two days as her worst fear come to
life.
“If you could’ve seen him in
those rages,” Orr, 46, said in a
telephone interview. “Anything
was possible.”
Neal’s behavior escalated from
a bad temper as a teenager to
something more uncontrollable
as he got older, Orr said. When he
would call family members in a
rage, they would tell him that he
needed to go to a mental health
facility and that he needed medication. He would always refuse
and never received an official diagnosis, Orr said.
“He never should have had
guns, and he should’ve been able
to get mental health care,” she
said.
Their mother would break
down and tell Orr that she didn’t
know what else to do or how to
help her son, whom she talked to
every day, Orr said.
“Her life’s work has been to try
to get Kevin some help and to find
a way for him to be happy,” Orr
said. “He had a very erratic and
uncontrollable temper that made
it difficult to deal with him, and
so it fragmented and fractured
our family for many years.”
Neal’s mother did not respond
to messages seeking comment,
and Orr said she was too upset to
speak further about the incident.
Neal’s mother had told the Associated Press that he called her
Monday to say “it’s all over now”
and that he was “fighting against
everyone who lives in this area.”
Orr said she had not seen Neal
in a decade and last spoke with
him months ago. But when they
were together, she said, it was
horrifying to watch him spiral out
of control. Something as simple
as using the washing machine
while he was trying to sleep could
set him off.
Police in Tehama County said
neighbors had alerted themto
sounds of gunfire coming from
Neal’s home in the past but that
he did not open the door for
officers.
“He was not law enforcementfriendly,” Johnston said. Officers
watched the house for a period
but did not see Neal emerge.
At the time of Tuesday’s attack,
Neal was out on bail for assaulting a neighbor with a deadly
weapon in January, police said.
That neighbor, whom police did
not identify, was among those
Neal killed during his rampage.
Authorities have not released the
name of the neighbor or other
victims, although they have said
no children were among the dead.
Johnston said officials recovered two semiautomatic rifles
that they believe Neal illegally
manufactured at his home, but it
is unclear if Neal built them or
modified existing weaponry. Neal
was prohibited from owning, possessing or buying firearms, according to a judge’s order issued
after the alleged assault. In addition to the assault, Neal was
charged with other felonies including false imprisonment by
violence and discharging a fire-
Targeting children
Neal is the latest in a long line
of mass shooters with histories or
allegations of domestic violence
charges. He is also the latest to
target children, according to people who track mass killings.
According to Everytown for
Gun Safety, a gun-control advocacy group, 1 in 4 victims of mass
shootings is a child. One reason,
they say, is that such attacks are
often rooted in domestic violence, with attackers often victimizing their own children. But
as these incidents grow deadlier,
some observers say killing children is a shooter’s way to increase
the shock value of the attack.
Perpetrators seem to try to kill
“with the highest impact, the
most extreme form of violence
and the biggest splash in their
twisted way of looking at things,”
said Ken Trump, a school security
consultant. “And one of those
ways, unfortunately, is looking at
children and looking at schools.”
Still, it’s a sign of the times that
even a tiny school in a remote
area has a plan for an active
shooter. Since the Columbine
shootings in 1999, people take
such planning seriously, having
drills and procedures in place.
When Don Bridges, president
of the National Association of
School Resource Officers, started
working in security in the mid1990s, the majority of schools had
no crisis plans, he said. At schools
today, he said, “it is just a very
natural process, and everyone
knows that it is something we
absolutely, positively have to do.”
After the shooting ended, Ferreira said, he praised his daughter for doing what she was told
during the attack at the school.
“She said, ‘Daddy, you told me
there would be no bad people at
school,’ ” Ferreira said, “and how
am I supposed to answer her?”
mark.berman@washpost.com
susan.svrluga@washpost.com
ellie.silverman@washpost.com
Julie Tate, Jennifer Jenkins and
Sandhya Somashekhar contributed
to this report.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
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A6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
GOP senators look to Trump to resolve Moore upheaval
S EAN S ULLIVAN,
P HILIP R UCKER
AND D AVID W EIGEL
BY
Senate Republicans turned to
President Trump on Wednesday
in hopes he would join their urgent attempt to force GOP nominee Roy Moore out of the Senate
race in Alabama following allegations of sexual misconduct — but
Trump did not oblige.
Instead, back in Washington
after a 12-day Asia trip, Trump
was silent on Moore, who has
been accused by two women of
initiating unwanted sexual encounters when Moore was in his
30s and they were 14 and 16.
Moore has denied the allegations.
His daughter Ivanka Trump,
however, voiced confidence in
Moore’s accusers and said there is
“a special place in hell for people
who prey on children” in comments to the Associated Press.
She did not call for Moore to step
aside.
In Alabama, Moore showed no
signs he was preparing to bow
out. His campaign sought to discredit one of his previous accusers at a hastily announced afternoon news conference where officials took no questions.
On Twitter, Moore sought to
align himself with Donald Trump,
charging that the same forces
that tried to defeat Trump as a
presidential candidate in 2016
are now trying to beat Moore with
“lies and smears.”
Moore said in a statement issued Wednesday night: “Are we at
a stage in American politics in
which false allegations can overcome a public record of 40 years,
stampede the media and politicians to condemn an innocent
man, and potentially impact the
outcome of an election of national importance?”
His Democratic opponent,
Doug Jones, told reporters in Alabama that “the statements made
by the women up in Etowah
County have much more credibility than the denials, whether by
Roy Moore himself or by his handlers.”
After days of forcefully repudiating Moore and urging him to
withdraw to no avail, Senate Republican leaders increasingly see
Trump as pivotal to restoring
some order to a race that has
BRYNN ANDERSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Phillip Jauregui, left, campaign attorney for U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, and campaign
chairman Bill Armistead speak at a news conference Wednesday in Birmingham, Ala.
spiraled quickly out of their control. Republicans are now at risk
of either losing a seat to Democrats that has long been in GOP
hands or being saddled with a
deeply controversial figure in
their ranks.
“I think he’s in a position to
exercise a good amount of influence on the race down there,” Sen.
John Thune (S.D.), the third-ranking Republican senator, said in
reference to Trump.
Thune added that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.) is “of a mind that the
president could be influential.”
McConnell and Trump spoke by
phone Wednesday.
Trump did not respond to
questions from reporters about
Moore after touting his Asia trip
at the White House on Wednesday afternoon. The president
sidestepped questions about
Moore during his travels.
After The Washington Post reported on the first accusations
last Thursday, White House press
secretary Sarah Huckabee Sand-
ers said the president believes
that if the allegations are true,
Moore “will do the right thing and
step aside.”
The White House consented to
the Republican National Committee pulling out of a joint fundraising committee with Moore’s
campaign and, according to one
administration official, discussions about Moore’s campaign
have been ongoing among White
House officials since Trump returned from Asia.
But there is consensus among
senior White House aides that the
president is in a bind. If he publicly calls on him to withdraw and
Moore demurs — or, worse for
Trump, wins the race nevertheless — the president could suffer
another embarrassment in Alabama. Yet continued silence from
Trump may not be tenable.
“There are no good options,”
said one White House official,
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity because of the sensitivity of the matter.
A person close to former White
House chief strategist Stephen K.
Bannon said that the Breitbart
chief believes Moore’s denials and
still supports him. But Bannon’s
circle has also made clear that
this support hinges on a continued belief that Moore is innocent
of any inappropriate relationships with teenagers and could
change in the future.
Inside the West Wing, presidential advisers believe that every
time McConnell calls on Moore to
withdraw, he may be motivating
voters in Alabama to, as one official put it, raise a collective middle finger to Washington. Trump’s
advisers worry that condemnations from the president could
only exacerbate the dynamic.
There is another risk for
Trump. If he were to say that he
believes the women’s accusations,
as McConnell and others have
done, it would raise comparisons
with the sexual harassment accusations that he has faced and
denied.
This week, Republican senators have been asked about the
allegations against Trump, creating discomfort and redirection
efforts.
“We’re talking about a situation in Alabama,” McConnell said
Tuesday when asked if he believes
the women who have accused
Trump. “And I’d be happy to address that.”
Still, some Republican senators think that Trump could be
helpful in persuading key GOP
officials in Alabama to turn on
Moore. Many local leaders have
defended him, in sharp contrast
to the response in Washington.
“He’s the head of the party,”
said Sen. Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.). “Yeah, it’d probably be
good if he’d say something.”
On social media, Moore
seemed to be lobbying Trump by
comparing his situation with
what the president faced last year.
“The Republicans and Democrats who did everything they
could to stop Donald Trump and
elect Hillary Clinton are the very
same people who are now trying
to take us down with lies and
smears,” he wrote on Twitter.
At a news conference in Birmingham, Ala., where members
of the state GOP were meeting to
discuss the race, Moore campaign
attorney Phillip Jauregui raised
questions about the validity of
accusations that Beverly Young
Nelson made against Moore this
week.
Nelson, now 56, accused Moore
70, of sexually assaulting her and
bruising her neck in the late 1970s
when she was 16 years old. In a
news conference, she showed a
copy of her high school yearbook
that she said Moore signed on
Dec. 22, 1977, with the inscription,
“To a sweeter more beautiful girl I
could not say ‘Merry Christmas.’ ”
It was signed, “Love, Roy Moore
D.A.”
Pending a review of the yearbook, Jauregui said it was possible that the signature had been
copied by a forger. He called for
Nelson and her attorney to send
the yearbook to a “neutral custodian” so a handwriting expert
could inspect it.
Moore, according to Jauregui,
had never signed “D.A.” after his
name, but had an assistant with
those initials who would write
them in Moore’s documents.
On his radio show Wednesday,
conservative host Sean Hannity
— who had said Tuesday he would
call for Moore to quit the race
unless he proved the allegations
wrong within 24 hours — said the
candidate had been smart to ask
for a forensics test.
“He’s now basically throwing it
in the hands of science,” Hannity
said.
It is too late to remove Moore’s
name from the ballot in the Dec.
12 special election. But if the state
Republican Party were to disqualify him, they could prevent any
votes for him from being certified. There have been no signs so
far that party officials are willing
to do that.
Senate Republican leaders
have singled out Attorney General Jeff Sessions as someone who
could wage a competitive write-in
campaign. But Sessions has
shown no public interest in the
prospect, and people in his orbit
have batted down the idea.
GOP leaders in Washington are
increasingly concerned about the
limited options before them. The
National Republican Senatorial
Committee conducted a poll this
week showing support weakening, with Moore trailing Jones by
51 percent to 39 percent, according to findings shared by a Republican familiar with the survey.
The survey was conducted Nov.
12-13 among 500 registered voters
reached by live interviews on landline and mobile phones.
The Post reported last week
that Leigh Corfman alleged that
Moore initiated a sexual encounter with her when she was 14 and
he was a 32-year-old assistant
district attorney. Moore has denied the accusation.
In addition, several other women interviewed by The Post in
recent weeks said Moore pursued
them when they were teenagers
and young women and he was in
his early 30s, episodes they said
they found flattering at the time
but troubling as they got older.
None of the three women said
Moore forced them into any sort
of relationship or sexual contact.
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
philip.rucker@washpost.com
david.weigel@washpost.com
Anne Gearan, Michael Scherer and
Mike DeBonis contributed to this
report.
Moore supporters wield anonymous threats, mysterious texts, falsehoods
Alabamians opposing the
Senate candidate are
attacked on social media
BY
M ARC F ISHER
A minister in south Alabama
gets a phone call from a man who
says he is a Washington Post
reporter offering cash for dirt
about Senate candidate Roy
Moore. A man who told an Alabama newspaper about Moore’s
alleged approaches to teenage
girls when he was in his 30s
receives texts falsely telling him
he is being sued for defamation.
On Twitter and Facebook, in
texts and in phone calls, Alabamians say they are on the receiving
end of a muddy river of threats,
dirty tricks and angry attacks, all
aimed at undermining allegations that Moore, the Republican
candidate in next month’s special
election to fill a U.S. Senate seat,
made sexual advances on teenagers decades ago.
After Blake Usry told AL.com,
an Alabama news site, that he
knew girls Moore tried to flirt
with, Usry received threatening
phone calls and Facebook messages, as well as texts informing
him that he had been sued for
defamation.
One text falsely claimed that
northern Alabama’s U.S. attorney, Jay Town, “has verified defamation cases” against Usry and
others who were quoted in news
articles.
“I just thought, here they go,
trying to intimidate me,” said
Usry, who lives in Gadsden,
where Moore lived and worked.
“It could be a religious zealot,
some right-wing nut, someone
from Roy Moore’s campaign, I
don’t know. It doesn’t intimidate
me, but it’s caused me misery all
day long.”
The claim that the U.S. attorney was moving against those
who spoke out about Moore is
“patently absurd,” Town said.
“My office has not received, nor
would we have the legal basis to
pursue, any such defamation cases.” Under federal law, defamation is a civil matter, not a crime.
In today’s politics of disbelief,
every burst of news is fodder for
an avalanche of pushback and
disinformation. In the Moore
case, that reaction has come in
the form of organized campaigns
BRYNN ANDERSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Roy Moore enters a church revival on Tuesday. Veterans of attacks on news reporting have rallied
around the embattled Senate candidate, with one tweeting, “Sexual harassment is the new race card.”
by Moore’s supporters defending
their candidate and grass-roots
expressions from individuals
who believe that any report in the
news media may be politically
motivated.
“People down here are pushing
back against The Washington
Post, the moderate liberal Republicans and the Washington establishment that thinks we’re all
stupid,” said Dean Young, a Republican political consultant in
Alabama who called himself
“Judge Moore’s number one adviser.” “They’re pushing back every way we can.”
Lawyers representing Moore
and his campaign have sent letters to news organizations, including AL.com and The Post,
warning that they are preparing
to file suit against the outlets for
“making false reports.”
Young said he doesn’t know
who is responsible for messages
from fake Post reporters, but he
suggested that it might be the
newspaper itself: “Who says you
all aren’t paying someone to do
that? Go pay more people to say
stuff. It’s a waste of money because people here know Judge
Moore and we know he does
believe in a Christian God, so that
fake stuff doesn’t work with us.”
Campaigns and their supporters have always defended them-
selves against allegations of
wrongdoing, but the range and
effect of tactics used to push back
against damaging news articles
has metastasized in this era of
polarized politics and social media.
Responding to controversy
with alternative narratives, conspiracy theories and attacks on
the messengers is as American as
the half-century of anguished
debate over who really killed
John F. Kennedy or the midnight
mullings over what really happened in the skies over Area 51.
Skepticism morphs into disbelief, and those who are inclined to
mistrust authority latch onto notions that may seem fantastic.
This long-standing tradition is
hypermagnified by the speed and
ease of Twitter, Facebook and
other social media platforms,
where any user can post “alternative facts” in the same format as
verified reporting.
The latest struggle over what
to believe follows The Post’s investigation, published last week,
in which four women said Moore
pursued them when they were
teenagers. The youngest of the
women, Leigh Corfman, said
Moore initiated a sexual encounter with her in 1979, when she
was 14 and he was 32. A fifth
woman came forward this week,
saying Moore sexually assaulted
her in the 1970s when she was 16.
An Alabama pastor named Al
Moore — no relation to the candidate — received a voice mail
Tuesday from “Bernie Bernstein,”
who identified himself as a Post
reporter and said he was looking
for women “between the ages of
54 to 57 years old willing to make
damaging remarks about candidate Roy Moore for a reward of
between $5,000 and $7,000.” The
voice mail, which showed up on
caller ID as a “private number,”
concluded with a phony email
address purportedly at The Post.
Al Moore said he could tell
right away that the call was fake.
He let a local TV station know
about the call because “it’s important that we let the public
know how ugly this thing has
gotten.”
Al Moore said he hasn’t decided whether to believe the allegations against Roy Moore.
“I’m a pastor and I’m conservative, and so is Roy Moore, but I’m
not dumb,” Al Moore said. “I’m on
the fence until we know more.
But the thing that bothered me is
that someone is so adamant to
bury this guy out there, that they
would even attempt to do this.”
The caller referred to himself
as “Bernie” but later gave his
email address as “Al Bernstein.”
(Al Moore tried to respond to the
email address, but his message
bounced back as undeliverable.)
There are no Post reporters or
editors named Bernie Bernstein
or Al Bernstein.
The Post’s executive editor,
Martin Baron, said the call was
bogus.
“The response to our meticulously reported story about Roy
Moore has been a stunning level
of deceit, deception and dirty
tricks,” Baron said. “The Moore
campaign and others have lied
about our motives and lied about
our methods. And at least one
individual — we’re still not sure
who — has also pretended to be a
Post journalist so as to falsely
portray our journalistic practices.”
A Moore campaign spokesman, John Rogers, did not respond to questions about the
various threats. He told WKRG,
an Alabama TV station, that he
had not heard about any robocalls.
Roy Moore’s wife, Kayla, complained in a Facebook post
Wednesday that “the Washington
Post is calling and harassing
anyone that has had any contact
with me, my husband, and other
family members.” She referred to
a real Post reporter who was
reporting an article about Kayla
Moore and had sent requests for
information to possible sources.
“The Washington Post is working on a profile of Kayla Moore,
not unlike other stories we’ve
done about spouses of high-profile candidates,” Post spokeswoman Kris Coratti said. “As part
of that reporting, The Post has
reached out to many people by
phone, email and through social
media.” Coratti called the reporter’s message “a straightforward,
respectful request for an interview.”
On social media, veterans of
past attacks on news reporting
have rallied around Moore. Mike
Cernovich, a prominent critic of
what he calls the “fake news
media,” tweeted that “sexual harassment is the new race card
and many GOP men will be
falsely accused.”
Much of the pushback from
the right has focused on trying to
discredit The Post’s reporting
about Moore. Breitbart quoted its
chairman, Stephen K. Bannon,
the former White House chief
strategist, calling reports about
Moore a “weaponized hit” organized by the news media and the
Republican establishment.
Gateway Pundit, a right-wing
site, spread a story from a Twitter
account, @umpire43, that said,
“A family friend in Alabama just
told my wife that a [Washington
Post] reporter named Beth offer
her $1,000 to accuse Roy Moore.”
The Post, like many other news
organizations, has a strict policy
against paying sources for information.
The @umpire43 account,
which has since been deleted,
had 18,000 followers and operated under the name “Doug Lewis
#MAGA.”
The account’s operator offered
often-shifting strands of autobiography, claiming at various
points to have been a Navy veteran, an associate of former
White House chief of staff Reince
Priebus, an owner of a polling
firm, and a baseball umpire. In a
report by the Daily Beast, several
of the employers that “Doug Lewis” claimed to have worked for
had no record of such a person.
A spokesman for Twitter
would
not
comment
on
@umpire43 but said “we carefully review all reported possible
violations of the Twitter rules and
take action as appropriate.”
The text messages that threatened Usry with a defamation
lawsuit came from a phone number that was created on Tuesday,
used to send seven texts, and was
then shut down Wednesday after
inquiries from a Post reporter,
according to Bandwidth.com, a
North Carolina company that
generates temporary phone
numbers for apps such as Burner.
David Morken, Bandwidth’s
chief executive who served on
President Trump’s transition
team for the Federal Communications Commission, said he was
unaware of the texts. He said the
number the texts were sent from
appeared to be one of his company’s 52 million phone numbers.
After The Post provided Bandwidth with the number used in
the Alabama case, Morken said
his company determined that the
texts were unwanted and harassing, and shut down the phone
number.
He said Bandwidth’s privacy
policy prevented him from identifying who had set up the account.
marc.fisher@washpost.com
Aaron C. Davis, Herman Wong and
Alice Crites contributed to this
report.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
M2
Kayla Moore emerges as husband’s fiercest defender
Role is a new one for
wife who has been happy
to yield the national stage
J ENNA J OHNSON,
E LLIE S ILVERMAN
AND L INDSEY B EVER
BY
Hours after a tearful Alabama
woman accused Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore of sexually assaulting her nearly 40 years
ago, the former judge gathered
with supporters at a volunteer fire
department near his home in
northeastern Alabama to label the
allegations “absolutely false.”
By his side, as always, was his
wife of 32 years, Kayla Moore. But
this time, she spoke up.
“He has never one time lifted a
finger to me. He is the most gentle,
most kind man that I have ever
known in my life. He’s godly. He’s
loving — and everybody in this community knows it,” Kayla Moore, 56,
said, looking around at the people
gathered that night. “These are our
church members, these are our family, these are our friends, these are
people that know him just like I do.”
Over the past week, as several
women have come forward to publicly accuse Roy Moore, 70, of pursuing them when they were teenagers
and he was in his 30s, Kayla Moore
has become her husband’s most visible and aggressive defender. In addition to her defense on Monday
night, she has used Facebook to
question the credibility of her husband’s accusers, threaten lawsuits
and spread information that sometimes turns out to be false.
This is a new role for Moore,
who until now has been happy to
yield the national stage to her
husband, a former Alabama Supreme Court judge who was removed from the court twice, first
for refusing to remove the Ten
Commandments from courthouse
grounds and then for encouraging
state probate judges to disregard
the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that
allowed same-sex marriage.
“She rarely injects herself into
the political fray,” said Mat Staver,
the founder and chairman of Liberty Counsel who represented Moore
in an ethics trial when he was most
recently suspended from the court.
“Her demeanor is more supportive
MARVIN GENTRY/REUTERS
Kayla Moore, arriving with her husband for a Veterans Day event in Vestavia Hills, Ala., last week, has
gone public with aggressive defenses of Roy Moore — and attacks on reporters and accusers.
than vocal.”
Staver and others who know the
Moores well say the accusations
against the former judge don’t
match the man they have known
for decades. As a growing number
of prominent Republicans have
called for him to drop out of the
race in the face of allegations of
sexual misconduct, defending
Moore has fallen chiefly to those
closest to him — especially his wife.
Friends describe Kayla Moore as
a deeply religious wife, mother and
grandmother who has devoted her
life to her family and gushes lovingly about her four children and five
grandchildren. She served on the
board of her husband’s Foundation
for Moral Law, which he founded to
promote Christian values, and
then took over the nonprofit as
president in January 2013, when
Roy Moore was elected to a second
term on the state Supreme Court.
For years, Moore has helped coordinate her husband’s political campaigns. In his race for the Senate this
year, the two have traveled nearly
everywhere together — with him
often at the wheel as she navigates.
“During these stressful times . . .
she remains steadfast and passionate,” said Jessie Deem, who is Kayla
Moore’s executive assistant at the
Foundation for Moral Law, “and
she’s very strong in her faith, and
she never wavers from that.”
Kayla Moore did not respond to
a request for an interview sent
through a campaign spokesman.
She has forcefully pushed back
against the scrutiny her husband
has faced during this campaign.
Upon learning that Washington
Post reporters were contacting
people she knows for this article,
Moore on Wednesday posted one
of the reporters’ personal cellphone numbers on her Facebook
page, and a commenter posted a
copy of that reporter’s résumé,
which included her home address.
Later in the day, Moore posted a
link to the campaign website
where people can now report any
interaction they have with a reporter.
“In the past month our hometown, county, and state have been
invaded by the Washington Post
and liberal media,” Moore wrote.
“We have had numerous reports of
phone calls, cellphone calls, Mes-
sages, emails, even to the point of
them showing up at peoples houses . . . It’s called a witch hunt. We
are filing suit.”
In an extensive report published
last week, The Post detailed allegations that Roy Moore initiated a
sexual encounter with a 14-yearold girl nearly four decades ago
when he was in his early 30s and
pursued three other girls around
the same time who were between
the ages of 16 and 18.
None of the women sought out
The Post. While reporting a story in
Alabama about supporters of
Moore’s Senate campaign, a Post
reporter heard that Moore allegedly had sought relationships with
teenage girls.
Over the ensuing three weeks,
two Post reporters contacted and
interviewed the four women.
The Moores met at a church
Christmas party in December 1984
in Alabama’s Etowah County,
where they both grew up and lived.
He was 37 and worked at a local law
firm. She was then known as Kayla
Kisor, a 23-year-old former beauty
pageant contestant with a 1-yearold daughter who had just separat-
ed from her husband, Chuck
Heald, who died in 2002.
At the party, Roy Moore read
aloud a holiday poem he had written but was distracted by Kisor,
who attended with her mother. He
recognized her and wondered if
she was the same woman he had
watched dance in a recital at Gadsden State Junior College years earlier.
“It was something I had never
forgotten,” Moore wrote in his 2005
autobiography “So Help Me God.”
“Anxious to meet her, I began with
the line, ‘Haven’t we met somewhere before?’ ‘I don’t think so,’ she
replied.”
Kisor was not interested in a
relationship at that point, Moore
wrote, but they met again early the
next year when she visited the law
firm where he worked.
“I was the only attorney available,” Moore wrote. “And I was very
available! We began to date soon
after that.”
Kisor filed for divorce on Dec.
28, 1984, according to court records, and her divorce was finalized
on April 19, 1985. The Moores married on Dec. 14, 1985.
Roy Moore loves telling the story
of how he proposed, said Allen Mendenhall, who worked as Moore’s
staff attorney at the state Supreme
Court and is now the associate dean
of the Faulkner University Thomas
Goode Jones School of Law.
“He was bashful about popping
the question, and said, ‘Well, would
ya?’ ” Mendenhall said in an email.
“’Would I what?’ she asked, forcing
him to formulate the operative
words. ‘You know,’ he said, ‘marry
me.’ ”
The newlyweds lived in the partially finished home that Moore
was building — which for the first
few years of their marriage did not
have a kitchen, forcing Kayla
Moore to cook on an electric plate
in the washroom, Moore wrote in
his book.
“Kayla did a remarkable job
transforming my cold, uninviting
house into a warm, comfortable
home,” Moore wrote.
The Moores had their first child,
Roy “Ory” Moore, in July 1987 —
followed by Caleb in 1990 and Micah in 1993. In 1992, Roy Moore
was appointed as a circuit court
judge, and in 1994, he won an election to keep the position. In 2000,
he was elected to the state Supreme
Court for the first time. He was
removed in 2003. In 2012, he was
elected a second time and then was
removed in 2016. Along the way,
Kayla Moore was always by his
side.
“We do everything together,”
Kayla Moore said in an interview
with Breitbart News this month. “It
was just me and him. . . . We were
always together. Always together.”
As the president of the foundation, Kayla Moore became more
politically active on her own. In
February 2016, she endorsed Sen.
Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) in the GOP presidential primaries because of his
stances on small government,
abortion and marriage. She has
also given speeches defending her
husband’s actions on the court, opposing same-sex marriage and calling for legislation that will block
transgender individuals from using the bathroom of their choice.
Moore and his wife have repeatedly questioned why the media are
scrutinizing him and why damaging
reports are coming out so soon before the special election on Dec. 12.
On Facebook, she has attacked
Gloria Allred, the prominent women’s rights lawyer who is representing Beverly Young Nelson, who accused Roy Moore of sexually assaulting her in the late 1970s behind the restaurant where she was
a waitress, the Old Hickory House,
when she was 16. Kayla Moore
posted a photo of Allred holding a
sign that reads “I support transgender equality” and then wrote:
“Gloria Allred; what it’s really
about!”
And Moore has posted articles —
often from little-known blogs with
names like “Activist Mommy” and
“USA News Magazine” — that aim
to refute some of the details from
the accusers’ statements, often
with unsubstantiated and flimsy
evidence.
Each time Moore posts, she receives a wave of positive messages,
promises of prayers and other tidbits of unconfirmed information.
“These things are false, and it’s
ugly,” Moore said at the end of her
brief comments at the firehouse on
Monday evening. “It’s the ugliest
politics that I’ve ever been in, in my
life.”
jenna.johnson@washpost.com
ellie.silverman@washpost.com
lindsey.bever@washpost.com
Alice Crites and Michael Scherer
contributed to this report.
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A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
A silent majority angry with Moore could give Doug Jones a victory in Alabama
Senate
Republicans have
been agonizing
PAUL KANE
over the possible
scenarios of
dealing with Roy
Moore. They are hoping the
Alabama Republican will
voluntarily withdraw his
controversial candidacy. If
Moore refuses, GOP leaders are
threatening expulsion hearings
once he gets to the Senate.
One scenario is not receiving
enough contemplation: Sen.
Doug Jones.
It is becoming increasingly
plausible that the former U.S.
attorney will overcome steep
odds and become the first
Democrat elected to the Senate
by Alabama voters in 25 years.
It’s still too early to say that
Jones is the front-runner, but
what had been a fairly
comfortable lead for Moore has
been upended since last week’s
Washington Post report about
allegations the former judge
pursued teenage girls when he
was a 30-something local
prosecutor, as well as a second
accusation of inappropriate
sexual contact.
It may take until after
Thanksgiving for polling to truly
capture the state of the race, but
much of the national media
focus over the last week has been
on Moore’s very staunch
defenders and their invocations
of odd religious comparisons to
explain away the accusations.
This has helped create an
assumption that there is a
backlash in Alabama against the
@PKCapitol
national media, boosting the
Republican nominee.
So have most voters in
Alabama been racing to defend
Moore?
“Maybe they’re not,” said Sen.
Richard C. Shelby (R-Ala.), a 31year veteran of the Senate and
his state’s elder political
statesman. Shelby suggested
Tuesday that there were likely
many voters that are “just as
concerned” with Moore’s alleged
behavior as there are staunch
defenders of the former judge.
But Shelby said Republicans
who believe the allegations are,
for now, staying quiet.
In this regard, Shelby fears
there is a silent majority opposed
to Moore that will show up at the
polls and soundly defeat him.
The next three weeks are sure
to be filled with more whipsaw
moments, possibly new
allegations and continued GOP
efforts to get Moore to withdraw
from the race.
But the one certainty is that,
as long as Moore stays in the
race, the contest is going to
continue to be a referendum on
his behavior and the allegations
against him — and not a
referendum on the state’s
traditional conservative posture
and the leftward lurch of
Democrats at the national level.
In essence, the more this
campaign takes on the tone of a
gubernatorial race, the better
Jones’s chances are of winning.
Those contests, in the Deep
South and other conservativeleaning states, have often been at
least a little more favorable for
BRYNN ANDERSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Doug Jones, seen Tuesday, would be the first Democrat elected to
the Senate by Alabama voters in 25 years.
Democrats than Senate races.
That’s because the issue set is
not so focused on national party
platforms and more about the
individual candidates and local
issues. That is what happened in
Louisiana’s governor’s race two
years ago, when Democrat John
Bel Edwards faced off against
then-Sen. David Vitter (R).
That contest focused on
Vitter’s personal behavior from
decade-old allegations of
connections to prostitute rings
in Washington and New Orleans
— Vitter had given only a vague
apology for this in 2007 but
never fully explained the
situation to his constituents.
Many expected Vitter to
overcome that controversy
because the state is so
conservative — Republican Mitt
Romney won it by 17 percentage
points in 2012, and President
Trump won by 20 percentage
points last year.
But in November 2015,
Louisiana voters rejected Vitter
and handed Edwards an easy
victory despite the state’s normal
deeply Republican voting
patterns. Soon after, his political
career in ruins, Vitter announced
he would not seek reelection to
the Senate in 2016.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.), aware of the
potential loss, said Tuesday that
Moore’s campaign was
“collapsing.”
While some have theorized
that McConnell is willing to lose
the seat — rather than deal with
the political tumult Moore could
cause in the Senate, under an
almost-certain ethics
investigation — the GOP leader
is always most obsessed with
winning and keeping the
majority.
That’s why he went from
having his allies and advisers
whispering about the idea of
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
returning to Alabama to run a
write-in campaign for the seat, to
openly endorsing the idea at a
Wall Street Journal event
Tuesday.
“The Alabamian who would fit
that standard would be the
attorney general,” McConnell
said.
But that step — which
Sessions has declined to
comment on — still requires
Moore to voluntarily ask to
withdraw from the campaign, at
which point state officials would
no longer count any of his votes.
It would also probably require
Moore to voluntarily and
publicly endorse Sessions, telling
his voters that they should write
in their former senator.
As of now, Moore has shown
no such willingness and is
instead digging in.
The question is whether he
can ever refocus the race on
Democratic values — Jones
supports abortion rights and
some restrictions on gun rights
— or if the race continues to
center on a debate over his own
behavior.
Alabama is even a touch more
conservative than Louisiana,
having favored Romney by 22
percentage points and Trump by
more than 25 percentage points.
But circumstances like
Moore’s, when a candidate’s
personal behavior is under fire,
can throw races up in the air and
also make turnout projections
useless.
In 2012, after Republicans
nominated Todd Akin, the
conservative congressman from
Missouri said during his Senate
campaign that women rarely
became pregnant from a
“legitimate rape” in explaining
his antiabortion stance in all
circumstances.
Akin also refused to abandon
the race, in part believing the
state’s conservative tilt would
bring him home to victory even
after all the GOP committees had
abandoned him. Romney went
on to win Missouri by more than
10 percentage points — but Akin
lost to Sen. Claire McCaskill (D)
by more than 15 percentage
points.
One key reason was a huge
drop-off of almost 150,000
ballots from those who voted for
the two major-party candidates
in the presidential race and in
the Senate race. Some of those
votes, in the Senate contest, went
to a third-party candidate who
was on the ballot, and some just
did not vote in the race.
On Dec. 12, as of now, there
are just two names on the ballot:
Moore vs. Jones.
If Shelby’s fears prove true, a
lot of Republican voters will
simply stay home and allow
Jones to score a victory.
paul.kane@washpost.com
Moore gained a reputation at Ala. mall for making overtures to young women
MOORE FROM A1
with Moore driving her to her car
in a dark parking lot behind Sears
and giving her what she called an
unwanted, “forceful” kiss that left
her scared.
“I never wanted to see him
again,” says Richardson, who is
now 58 and a community college
teacher living in Birmingham,
Ala. She describes herself as a
moderate Republican and says
she didn’t vote in the 2016 general
election or in this year’s Republican Senate primary in Alabama.
Moore’s campaign did not directly address the new allegations. In a statement, a campaign
spokesman cast the growing
number of allegations against
Moore as politically motivated.
“If you are a liberal and hate
Judge Moore, apparently he
groped you,” the statement said.
“If you are a conservative and love
Judge Moore, you know these
allegations are a political farce.”
Richardson, whose account
was corroborated by Kayla
McLaughlin, a classmate and
Sears co-worker, is among four
women who say Moore pursued
them when they were teenagers
or young women working at the
mall — from Sears at one end to
the Pizitz department store at the
other. Richardson and Becky
Gray, the woman who complained to her manager, have not
previously spoken publicly. The
accounts of the other two women
— Wendy Miller and Gloria
Thacker Deason — have previously been reported by The Washington Post.
Phyllis Smith, who was 18
when she began working at
Brooks, a clothing store geared
toward young women, said teenage girls counseled one another to
“just make yourself scarce when
Roy’s in here, he’s just here to
bother you, don’t pay attention to
him and he’ll go away.’ ”
T
he encounters described by
the women occurred be-
tween 1977 and 1982, when
Moore was single, in his early 30s
and an attorney in Etowah County in northeastern Alabama. In
October 1977, he was appointed
deputy district attorney.
In all, The Post spoke to a dozen
people who worked at the mall or
hung out there as teenagers during the late ’70s and early ’80s and
recall Moore as a frequent presence — a well-dressed man walking around alone, leaning on
counters, spending enough time
in the stores, especially on weekend nights, that some of the
young women who worked there
said they became uncomfortable.
Several of the women said they
decided to share their accounts
after reading a Post article last
week in which four women said
Moore pursued them as teenagers, including one who said she
was 14 and Moore was 32 when he
touched her sexually.
Since that article was published, another woman, Beverly
Young Nelson, appearing with
lawyer Gloria Allred, accused
Moore of sexually assaulting her
in his car when she was 16. A
lawyer for Moore’s campaign held
a news conference on Wednesday
to dispute Nelson’s account, suggesting that a signature in her
yearbook she said was Moore’s
might have been forged.
Moore has denied engaging in
any kind of sexual misconduct. In
an interview last week with Sean
Hannity of Fox News, Moore did
not rule out that he may have
dated teenage girls when he was
in his 30s, though he said he could
not recall. Moore said he doesn’t
remember “ever dating any girl
without the permission of her
mother.”
Moore has brushed off mounting calls from Republican leaders
in Washington to end his campaign, saying the news media and
the GOP establishment are
aligned against him. The reaction
in Alabama, among voters and
elected officials, has been more
mixed.
President Trump has not gone
as far as other Republican leaders, saying through press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
that Moore should drop out if the
allegations are true. Trump ignored questions Wednesday from
reporters asking if Moore should
quit the race.
T
he sprawling Gadsden Mall
opened in 1974 with a Sears
at one end, a Pizitz department store at the other, a movie
theater in the middle and plenty
of parking all around. It quickly
became a social hub for teenagers.
By 1977, Moore had returned
home from law school after attending the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and serving in
Vietnam. It was about that time,
people say, that he became a regular at the mall.
“It would always be on Friday
or Saturday night,” says Becky
Gray, who was then 22 and working in the men’s department of
Pizitz. “Parents would drop kids
off, let them roam the mall. Well,
he started coming up to me.”
She says Moore kept asking her
out and she kept saying no.
“I’d always say no, I’m dating
someone, no, I’m in a relationship,” says Gray, now 62, a retired
teacher and a Democrat who supports Moore’s opponent in the
Senate race. “I thought he was old
at that time. Anyone over 22 was
just old.”
Gray says he was persistent in a
way that made her uncomfortable. She says he lingered in her
section, or else by the bathroom
area, and that she became so
disturbed that she complained to
the Pizitz manager, Maynard von
Spiegelfeld. Gray says he told her
that it was “not the first time he
had a complaint about him hanging out at the mall.” Von Spiegelfeld has since died, according to a
relative.
Pizitz is also where Deason told
The Post last week that Moore
asked her out when she was 18
and working behind the jewelry
counter.
Beyond Pizitz was a long corridor of shops, including Brooks,
which sold rabbit fur coats and
fashions geared toward young
women. Smith, the onetime
Brooks employee, says she was
probably 19 when Moore began
coming into the store, which she
says employed many teenage
COURTESY OF KAYLA MCLAUGHLIN
Kayla McLaughlin, left, and Gena Richardson — seen in 1977 — worked at Sears during their senior
year of high school. Richardson says Moore visited her at the store and called her school to ask her out.
girls. She remembers him being
alone and had the strong impression he wasn’t looking to shop.
“I can remember him walking
in and the whole mood would
change with us girls,” says Smith,
59, who lives in Gadsden and says
she is a Democrat. “It would be
like we were on guard. I would
find something else to do. I remember being creeped out.”
Smith says Moore never approached her personally, but she
saw him chatting with other
young clerks, and that she would
tell new hires to “watch out for
this guy.” She says that occasionally, one of the store managers
would have to deal with bounced
checks, which meant going to the
district attorney’s office where
Moore worked. She says the managers would “draw straws” to decide who had to go talk to him
about the cases.
“It was just sort of a dreadful
experience,” she says.
At the center of the mall was a
photo booth, where Wendy Miller
earlier told The Post her mother
worked. Miller said she hung out
there with her mom when she was
16 and that Moore repeatedly
COURTESY OF PHYLLIS SMITH
Phyllis Smith said teenage coworkers at a clothing store
called Brooks counseled one
another to “make yourself
scarce when Roy’s in here, he’s
just here to bother you.”
asked her out on dates, which her
mother forbade. Miller’s mother,
Martha Brackett, confirmed her
account.
A
t the other end of the mall was
Sears, where Richardson
says she was among a clique
of Gadsden High girls who
worked at the store during their
senior year.
Richardson, whose maiden
name is Burgess, was assigned to
the men’s section, and her friend
and
classmate
McLaughlin
worked at the cosmetics and jewelry counter at the front of the
store with a view down the long
mall corridor.
“I could see when he came in,”
says McLaughlin, whose maiden
name was Shirley and who says
that she and Richardson usually
worked evening shifts on the
weekends. “He didn’t really talk
to me, he was over there visiting
with Gena a lot. And that got to be
a pattern.”
McLaughlin says she told her
friend to stay away from Moore. “I
hate to say this, but Gena was like
my little sister. She was raised by a
Southern Baptist preacher and a
little naive. So I’d let her know:
‘Here he comes.’ ”
When Richardson met Moore
she says he introduced himself as
an attorney, and says she found it
odd that he asked her to call him
“Roy.”
“That was strange in the first
place, because of the way we were
always taught to call someone
Mister or Missis,” she says.
When he asked for her number,
she says that she told him: “No,
my dad is so strict. Mm-mm. No.”
She and McLaughlin both say
they talked about Moore after
that, with McLaughlin telling her
friend: “You can’t go out with him.
He’s old.”
It was a few days later, Richardson says, when she was called out
of her trigonometry class.
Richardson says she was startled, thinking maybe her dad was
calling, and that when she realized it was Moore, “I felt like every
person in that office was staring
at me.”
“At that point, he said, ‘Would
you like to go out some time?’ ”
recalls Richardson, who says she
described the call right afterward
to McLaughlin, who confirmed
the account. “I said, ‘Well, I can’t
talk right now.’ And being so naive, and so not worldly, I said, ‘I’ll
be at work Friday or Saturday.’ ”
The next Friday or Saturday
night, she says, he visited the
Sears and asked her out again and
she again told him, “Look, my dad
is so strict.”
She recalls Moore suggesting
that they meet for a late movie
after she got off work. She says she
called her parents and told them
she was going out with friends.
Instead, she says she met
Moore at the movie theater. She
says she can’t remember what
they saw, but she remembers
clearly what happened after. She
says it was cold and Moore offered
to drive her to her car, which was
more than a football field’s distance away in a parking area
behind Sears. She says he parked
by her car and began chatting
with her, and she says she told
him again about her dad.
“I just explained to him that my
dad’s a minister, and you know, I
just can’t sneak around because
that’s wrong,” she recalls. “So I
thanked him and started to get
out and he grabbed me and pulled
me in and that’s when he kissed
me.
“It was a man kiss — like, really
deep tongue. Like, very forceful
tongue. It was a surprise. I’d never
been kissed like that,” she says.
“And the minute that happened, I
got scared then. I really did.
Something came over me that
scared me. And so I said, ‘I’ve got
to go, because my curfew is now.’ ”
She says she got out of the car
and into her own.
Richardson and McLaughlin
say they talked about it afterward,
and when Moore came into Sears
after that, McLaughlin would
warn her friend so she could hide
in the back of the store. “I would
call and say he’s coming this way,”
McLaughlin says. “She would go
to the back. She was uncomfortable.”
Richardson says she never
spoke to Moore again. She says
she first told her father about the
incident on Wednesday. She says
she never told her mother, who is
deceased.
“All these years, I thought that
was an isolated incident,” Richardson says. “Now, as a mother
and a grandmother, it just makes
me physically sick. I realize that it
didn't just happen to me.”
stephanie.mccrummen@washpost.com
beth.reinhard@washpost.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
Lawmakers push for more protections for harassment victims on the Hill
BY
M ICHELLE Y E H EE L EE
some for legislative employees. It
would also make public the
names of employing congressional offices that paid out settlements in harassment or discrimination cases. Employees no longer would be bound by confidentiality requirements or required to
go through mediation.
The legislation would also require members of Congress to pay
for harassment claim settlements
out of their own budgets rather
than the current source — a special fund in the U.S. Treasury.
“For all intents and purposes,
a staffer in the Capitol is powerless and gagged . . . Today, we are
going to end all of that,” said
Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Calif.), cosponsor of the House legislation
and an outspoken critic of the
current system. Speier has public-
ly described being forcibly kissed
by a chief of staff when she was a
congressional employee.
The bill aims to restore some of
the worker protections that Congress exempted for itself more
than two decades ago through the
1995 Congressional Accountability Act, which imposed a range of
civil rights, labor and workersafety laws on Capitol Hill for the
first time.
Under the current process,
claimants are bound by strict confidentiality requirements and
must undergo mediation to try to
resolve the claim out of court or an
administrative hearing. Worker
protections do not apply to
interns and fellows, and legislative employees do not have the
same whistleblower protection
that federal-agency employees do.
The effect, some lawmakers
and advocates say, is a system in
which victims are silenced and it
is difficult to hold perpetrators
accountable.
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.) has said the chamber will
adopt a policy change to make
anti-harassment training mandatory for all members and staffers.
Last week, the Senate for the first
time required members and their
aides to receive anti-harassment
training.
It’s unclear how much support
there will be for the legislation,
which was introduced by Speier,
along with Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand
(D-N.Y.) and Reps. Ryan Costello
(R-Pa.), Ann Kuster (D-N.H.) and
Bruce Poliquin (R-Maine).
But in recent weeks, Congress
has come under pressure to im-
prove working conditions on the
Hill.
“In examining it [the current
system], you come away understanding that the system is set up
to protect the perpetrator, not the
victim,” said Rep. Anna G. Eshoo
(D-Calif.). “So that’s an old-boysclub set of rules. That needs to be
completely done away with and a
whole new system set up.”
Other lawmakers said recent
claims about misconduct have
forced a new conversation about
harassment.
“I think there’s some awareness
that what has been common practice for some period of time may
not in the light of day be acceptable to the broader public,” said
Rep. Elizabeth Esty (D-Conn.).
More than 1,500 former congressional employees have signed
a letter urging Congress to require
anti-harassment training and to
overhaul the reporting process,
which advocates say is stacked
against the victim and designed to
protect the institution.
“Congress should never play by
its own set of rules. As elected
officials, we should be held to the
highest standards — not to the
lowest,” Gillibrand said.
U.S. reveals protocol
on secret software flaws
officials at the agency had years
earlier discussed whether the
flaw at the base of the tool,
EternalBlue, was so dangerous
that it should be revealed to
Microsoft.
Instead, the agency retained it.
In August 2016, a mysterious
group calling itself the Shadow
Brokers put online a set of “exploits,” or tools, that included
EternalBlue. That eventually led
the NSA to alert Microsoft, which
issued a patch in March. But not
enough people and companies
used the patch — especially in
Russia, India, Iran, Brazil and
other countries in Eastern Europe and Asia where computers
were infected by WannaCry or
other viruses based on the flaw.
Another major breach occurred in March, when the
anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks
dumped online a trove of CIA
hacking tools.
“A lot of companies whose software was affected were confused,” recalled Ari Schwartz, coordinator of the Coalition for
Cybersecurity Policy and Law,
which includes such firms as
Microsoft, Symantec, Intel and
Palo Alto Networks. “They were
taken aback that nobody from the
CIA had come to them and told
them. They found out about it
from the press.”
Joyce noted that at times the
government has alerted a company to a flaw only to be told, “That’s
great, but we’re telling customers
that they need to buy this shiny
next-generation [device], and so
they have no intention of patching their own equipment,” he
said.
All the government can do at
that point, he said, is put out a
Department of Homeland Security warning about the software
flaws.
Tech companies generally reacted favorably to Wednesday’s
move. “Getting the VEP right is
critical to fostering trust and cooperation between the tech sector
and the government,” said Heather West, senior policy manager at
Mozilla, which makes the widely
used browser Firefox. “This accomplishes a lot of things we were
asking for in terms of reform.”
A bipartisan group of lawmakers on Wednesday proposed a
sweeping expansion of workplace
protections in Congress — a direct
response to the recent groundswell of claims about unwanted
sexual advances, inappropriate
comments and other misconduct
on Capitol Hill.
The bill comes a day after a
public hearing in which female
lawmakers described sexual harassment as a pervasive problem
and suggested that current members of Congress have engaged in
misconduct.
The measure, the Member and
Employee Training and Oversight
On Congress Act, or Me Too Congress Act, aims to make the complaint-filing process less cumber-
BY
E LLEN N AKASHIMA
The White House on Wednesday made public for the first time
the rules by which the government decides to disclose or keep
secret software flaws that can be
turned into cyberweapons —
whether by U.S. agencies hacking
for foreign intelligence, moneyhungry criminals or foreign spies
seeking to penetrate American
computers.
The move to publish an unclassified charter responds to
years of criticism that the process
was unnecessarily opaque, fueling suspicion that it cloaked a
stockpile of software flaws that
the National Security Agency was
hoarding to go after foreign targets but that put Americans’
cybersecurity at risk.
“This is a really big improvement and an outstanding process,” said White House cybersecurity coordinator Rob Joyce, who
spoke at an Aspen Institute event
and issued a blog post on the
charter.
By making it public, he said,
“we hope to demonstrate to the
American people that the federal
government is carefully weighing
the risks and benefits” of disclosure vs. retention.
The rules are part of the “Vulnerabilities Equities Process,”
which the Obama administration
revamped in 2014 as a multiagency forum to debate whether
and when to inform companies
such as Microsoft and Juniper
that the government has discovered or bought a software flaw
that, if weaponized, could affect
the security of their product.
The Trump administration has
mostly not altered the rules under
which the government reaches a
decision but is disclosing its process. Under the VEP, an “equities
review board” of at least a dozen
national security and civilian
agencies will meet monthly — or
more often, if a need arises — to
discuss newly discovered vulnerabilities. Besides the NSA, the CIA
and the FBI, the list includes the
Treasury, Commerce and State
departments, and the Office of
Management and Budget.
The priority is on disclosure,
the policy states, to protect core
Internet systems, the U.S. economy and critical infrastructure,
unless there is “a demonstrable,
overriding interest” in using the
flaw for intelligence or law enforcement purposes.
The government has long said
that it discloses the vast majority
— more than 90 percent — of the
vulnerabilities it discovers or
buys in products from defense
contractors or other sellers. In
recent years, that has amounted
to more than 100 a year, according to people familiar with the
process.
But because the process was
classified, the National Security
Council, which runs the discussion, was never able to reveal any
numbers. Now, Joyce said, the
number of flaws disclosed and the
number retained will be made
public in an annual report. A
classified version will be sent to
Congress, he said.
“This represents a good step
forward in transparency and
shows the government getting
more comfortable and more
mature with this process,” said
Michael Daniel, who, as Joyce’s
predecessor, oversaw the revamped process. Daniel issued
the first blog post on the VEP in
April 2014 in large part to push
back against the misperception
that the Heartbleed bug, which
sparked fears of a massive security hole in the Internet, had been
kept secret by the NSA.
The debate raged anew this
year when it became public that
the malicious code at the heart of
the WannaCry virus that hit computer systems globally was developed by the NSA. The Washington Post reported in May that
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michelle.lee@washpost.com
The Washington Post is examining
workplace violations on Capitol Hill
and the process for reporting them.
To contact a reporter, please email
michelle.lee@washpost.com,
elise.viebeck@washpost.com or
kimberly.kindy@washpost.com.
Karoun Demirjian contributed to this
report.
ellen.nakashima@washpost.com
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Bible museum aims for apolitical despite Trump hotel gala
Some refuse to attend
opening affair because of
the president’s affiliation
BY
M ICHELLE B OORSTEIN
The leadership of the Museum
of the Bible has been working
hard in the run-up to this weekend’s opening to emphasize the
inclusive, academic, apolitical nature of the museum, which organizers say will be the world’s
largest dedicated to the Bible and
sits just off the Mall in Washington.
But its opening black-tie gala
Thursday night is presenting a
challenge: The $50,000-a-table
fundraising event is at the Trump
International Hotel.
Officials at the nonprofit museum say the decision was for
pragmatic, scheduling reasons.
But some museum employees
and academic consultants refused to enter the hotel affiliated
with the controversial president.
“I would rather not do things
that optically look like we’re
aligning with politics. I would
prefer we not make those choices,
but they’ve done it,” said one, who
requested anonymity so as not to
offend the museum leadership.
The person noted that the political and religious views of the staff
and advisers vary widely.
Museum officials said by the
time they started looking for
space, about a year ago, the
Trump hotel was the only ballroom vacant in Washington that
could accommodate such a big
group. The Thursday dinner gala
is expected to have about 750
people in attendance.
“We looked at several places to
accommodate our numbers, and
that was the only place available
for our date,” Steven Bickley, vice
president of the museum, said
last week during a tour at the
museum. “We were looking for a
venue, not a statement.”
According to Destination D.C.,
the city’s marketing organization,
of the top 10 hotel ballrooms in
the city, Trump is the eighth in
terms of size. Danielle Davis, a
spokeswoman for the group, said
she couldn’t confirm the availability schedule for other ball-
EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The Trump International Hotel in Washington will be the site of the museum’s opening gala Thursday.
rooms but said in some cases
ballrooms are booked years in
advance.
Linda Koldenhoven, director
of women’s initiatives at the museum and co-chair of the Grand
Opening Committee, said officials also wanted an elegant atmosphere. “We wanted it to be
beautiful, and [the Trump hotel
space] is beautiful and available.
It was the only thing available.”
The least expensive seat for
Thursday’s gala is $2,500 for a
single seat or $25,000 for a table
of 10, according to the ticket.
Other perks are offered for donors of $50,000, $100,000 or
$250,000, such as tickets to see
the Broadway musical “Amazing
Grace” in the museum’s new theater, tickets to the Friday dedication, and a VIP reception and
photo opportunity. Those donated funds will go to the museum,
and museum officials declined to
say how much they were paying
to rent the space. Hotel profits at
such events, however, come also
from the hotel room rentals, and
those attending the gala — if they
For some involved with
the museum, the
decision to host at the
Trump hotel highlights
the question of how the
museum will engage
with the increasingly
politicized debate about
the Bible and religion in
American public life.
booked at least two weeks ago —
could get rooms for rates ranging
from around $524 to $5,699 per
night.
The museum also has a new
ballroom that seats 420 for dinner. Organizers are hosting a
second black-tie gala Friday night
there that will have a similar
entertainment lineup as Thursday, including appearances by
gospel stars CeCe Winans and
Wintley Phipps.
For some involved with the
museum, the decision to host at
the Trump hotel highlights the
question of how the museum will
engage with the increasingly politicized debate about the Bible
and religion in American public
life.
“There’s a tendency and pressure to get involved politically
and that’s not our agenda — we
don’t want [the museum] to become a political football,” Steve
Green, president of the craft store
chain Hobby Lobby and chairman of the museum board, said
during a recent interview at the
museum.
A museum spokeswoman said
that as of Tuesday neither President Trump nor Vice President
Pence would attend the galas or
the private, official dedication
Friday of the museum, which is a
dramatic structure with cuttingedge technology, amusementpark-type rides and thousands of
biblical artifacts. Pence had been
invited to do the official ribboncutting “because he is a personal
friend of a number of board
members,” but he wasn’t able,
said Susan Davis, head of the
communications firm handling
the opening.
Leaders of both the House and
Senate from both parties were
invited, and all declined, Davis
said. All members of the administration were invited, and as of
Wednesday Davis expected Education Secretary Betsy DeVos,
Secretary of Housing and Urban
Development Ben Carson and
possibly Agriculture Secretary
Sonny Perdue to attend.
Koldenhoven, who also works
with Davis, said connections are
warm between the current White
House and the museum.
“They’re very happy to have us
here,” she said during an interview. As a friend of some Cabinet
members, she has heard them
mention that “it’s nice to have
something here getting people
back to the basics, the Ten Commandments, having people engage in God’s word.”
In several recent interviews
about the museum, Green has
lauded the Trump administration, including this week while
talking with the Christian Broadcasting Network.
“We are seeing that the current
administration with President
Trump is a friend of religious
freedom and has taken steps to
strengthen and confirm that we
are a nation that values the freedoms our founders gave us,”
Green said after being asked
about Trump.
Some Americans have praised
the administration for promising
to do more for Christians persecuted in the Middle East and
pushing to protect the ability of
religious opponents of LGBT
equality to discriminate based on
their spiritual convictions as part
of what they argue are their
Constitutional rights. Others
have lamented the administration’s push for immigration restrictions that appear to be aimed
at Muslims and its hesitation to
condemn neo-Nazi marchers,
among other things.
Although the Bible museum’s
leadership has said it doesn’t
want to get involved in politics,
the museum chose D.C. in part for
its proximity to government and
conversations about religion in
public life. One of its marquee
exhibits is called “Washington
Revelations,” in which visitors
stand on a moving ride that simulates flying over the city to see
biblical quotes on monuments
and other government buildings.
The museum also has as a core
aim to prove — and spur discussion around — the Bible’s relevance to American public and
political life.
It remains to be seen how the
museum will publicly engage
with that topic once it’s open.
Gordon Campbell, one of the
world’s experts on the King James
version of the Bible who has been
advising the museum, said he
plans to attend Thursday’s gala at
the Trump hotel. But he said he is
watching carefully to see how the
museum’s leadership balances itself politically.
“The Green family stands for a
series of political and religious
positions that are on one side of
the cultural divide. They’re absolutely entitled to those views, but
it would be unhelpful if the museum were to be associated with
those views,” he said this week.
The museum board is made up
almost exclusively of conservative evangelicals (mostly white
males), and the museum projects
an implicit and religious reverence for the Bible. However officials have reached out to and
hired a diverse group of scholars
and consultants, and shifted the
museum’s focus to a more academic, ecumenical — if still pious
— approach to the Bible.
According to financial documents and reporting by The
Washington Post, the primary donors to the museum are the Green
family and the National Christian
Foundation.
The Greens, who are heroes to
many religious conservatives, are
best known for their craft store
chain, which sued the Obama
administration successfully in
the Supreme Court, saying the
Affordable Care Act violated their
religious freedom rights because
it required providing employees
with types of birth control that
they see as murder.
michelle.boorstein@washpost.com
Sarah Pulliam Bailey contributed to
this report.
CONTENT
Growing food for a growing plane
The world’s population is increasing rapidly, and
more mouths need to be fed every day. But the
resources that put healthy food on our tables are
shrinking. Fortunately, new farming technologies
are making it easier to keep us all securely and
sustainably fed. Discover the tools empowering
modern farmers to feed our growing world.
About eight years ago, farmer Ned Hancock noticed
something strange in his orange groves following
ordinary thunderstorms. A significant portion of
his crop had fallen to the ground and piled up
underneath the trees. Later, during harvest time
at his midsize family farm in Dade City, Florida.,
as he surveyed the diminished size of his crop, he
knew the situation had escalated. “We would say,
‘there’s just got to be more oranges than that,’” said
Hancock.
It turns out that Hancock Groves, a fifth-generation
citrus farm, had become infected with Huanglongbing,
or citrus greening disease. And since 2005 nearly
every other citrus grove in Florida has been similarly
infected. The microbial disease, spread by the tiny
Asian citrus psyllid, causes citrus fruit to shrink and
fall off the tree prematurely (and thunderstorms
hasten the process).
Researchers are still actively in search of solutions
while growers are doing ever ything possible to
keep their farms going. Hancock, for example, is
rebuilding soil health with compost, but many others
have gone out of business and entire communities
are feeling the pinch. “The trickle-down effect has
been significant in what we call the heartland of
Florida,” said Hancock. Small businesses, whether
local mechanics or grocery stores, are struggling.
“We’re lagging behind the rest of the state in
economic opportunities,” he said.
Hurricane Irma, which struck Florida in September,
only made matters worse for farmers like Hancock,
whose trees were already under stress. “It looks
bad. A lot of groves in the southern part of the
state are literally under water,” he said. Some of
his efforts to ward off citrus greening disease had
been making a difference, but because of Irma, he
expected to lose 50 to 60 percent of the year’s crop.
“We really felt good about our crop coming into this
season, and we have verified that by the number of
pieces that are on the ground,” he said. “It’s kind of
a tough way to say, ‘yeah, I told you so’.”
Issues like these are a prime concern for the nation’s
farmers, because the U.S. is a major global supplier
of food. The effectiveness of our farms ties directly
to the quality and availability of what many of us eat.
When the growing size of the world’s population is
factored in, the ability of farmers to produce food is
critical. In 2017, the earth’s population is reported to
be around 7.5 billion, but it’s predicted to reach 9.8
billion by 2050. And the United Nations estimates
we’ll need to nearly double our current agricultural
output by then to feed everyone.
A significant par t of today’s farmers’ work is
successfully facing down big difficulties that
can destroy their crop yields. The land they
till to provide sufficient food production must
be sustainable through extreme weather and
dangerous long-term drought—a factor already
affecting one in five developing countries—as
well as resisting potentially devastating pests
and diseases that may be lurking in the fields.
Taking better aim at the right target
For tunately, creative forces are at work in the
agricultural-technology industr y to bring more
big data and digital innovation into farming. In
addressing this urgent need, they’re shaping the
future of global food production while also looking
out for the planet. With these innovations in hand,
American farmers are optimizing the health of their
land, improving their crop output and ensuring
consumers have safe and fair access to food for
their families.
“We have to squeeze out ever y advantage we
can to compete globally,” said Bill Horan, who
co-owns and operates a corn and soybean farm
outside of Rockwell City, Iowa, and also consults
with universities and agribusiness companies.
“Digitization has allowed us to generate analytics
to fine-tune the operation to make sure we have
the healthiest produce out there. It’s almost a daily
digestion of data and information.”
In 2015, it was reported that nearly a third of the
world’s land suitable for growing crops had been lost
to erosion and pollution in the previous 40 years.
Diminishing resources like that mean agricultural
intensification is necessary. In other words, growers
need to get the greatest possible output from the
land they already have access to, and to do it in a
sustainable manner.
In part, this requires mounting a swift and effective
defense against any factors like pests, insects and
diseases that might jeopardize crop production.
Growers often have used protective chemical
compounds known as pesticides to repel these
threats. But now, “precision-agriculture” tools are
helping farmers apply pesticides with much greater
accuracy than in the past. Instead of treating
fields uniformly, farmers can rely on data-collection
sensors and GPS and GIS systems in tractors and
aircraft sprayers to pinpoint, map and precisely
target pest infestations in the fields. This techenabled approach also helps farmers monitor soil
health before planting seeds.
Horan uses GPS and satellite technology to divide
his 3,500-acre farm into 1,333 “little fields,” as he
calls them. The 2.4-acre plots are each assessed
individually and treated with a unique prescription
of fertilizer and crop protection products. Then,
a satellite-guided, computer-equipped machine
traverses the farm, distributing precisely what each
plot needs for optimum growth. Once the crop has
come up, the same plot-by-plot technique is used to
apply products that protect crops from weeds and
insects.
Rober t Schrick is a strategic business lead for
North American corn and soy at Bayer, a company
that has developed high-tech tools to enable
farmers like Horan to make the most of data when it
comes to maximizing their crop yields. “With digital
information, we feel we can get to a point where
we’re only applying our weed-management products
to the infected area,” he said. “Or we can anticipate
an infestation of, say, insects or disease and save
yields by applying product at the appropriate time.”
Water: A steady stream of innovation
Precision agriculture will also be key to preserving
water in the future. Currently, 85 percent of global
water use is for agricultural irrigation, and as much
as 35 percent of that is considered unsustainable.
The United Nations predicts that continued use of
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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2017
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A great story that
could use footnotes
MUSEUM FROM A1
isn’t “thematic,” or focused on
broad ideas at the expense of
chronological clarity. It gives a
straightforward account of American history, from the first colonists to the civil rights era and
beyond, through the prism of the
Bible, but in a way that many
visitors will probably find more
compelling and accessible than
the dense cultural stew on view at
the Smithsonian’s Museum of
American History. When dealing
with the complexities of the Bible’s history, the curators don’t
scant the facts or lapse into the
useless generalities of other, more
populist museums.
The institution’s leaders have
stressed their desire for a professional and unbiased presentation.
“We want it to be as accurate as
possible, as fair as possible, and, if
you will, as nonsectarian as possible,” said Tony Zeiss, the museum’s executive director.
The museum nonetheless
aroused serious skepticism even
before it opened. Despite claims
that it would be nonsectarian, the
organization’s original mission
was explicitly evangelical, to “inspire confidence in the absolute
authority and reliability of the
Bible,” according to a 2010 federal
nonprofit filing.
The Green family’s role in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, a U.S. Supreme Court decision that allows
for-profit corporations to assert
religious freedom claims, including the right to deny contraception coverage to women, has made
some people dubious about the
larger purpose of the family’s
glamorous new project. And the
museum’s integrity was severely
damaged by a $3 million federal
court settlement against Hobby
Lobby after the family-owned corporation smuggled more than
3,000 antiquities from Iraq in a
way that suggested an intentional
effort to bypass federal law. Independent experts say that the money paid for the objects probably
fueled a black market for antiquities that is exploited by terrorist
groups, among others.
Today, the museum seems intent on rebranding itself as archi-
tecturally transparent and evenhanded in its presentation.
Museum leaders made a prescient decision in 2012 to buy the
1923 Terminal Refrigerating and
Warehousing Co. building in
Southwest Washington, a site
near the Mall and ripe for development as a tourist hub. By adding a glass atrium and two floors
atop the old structure, and connecting the floors with a sundrenched stairwell, the architects
of SmithGroup turned the largely
windowless structure into a successful museum space spread over
seven public floors, with a rooftop
restaurant and garden and multiple theaters and event spaces.
Two floors include exhibitions
that traffic mainly in the substance of biblical history, while a
third floor is devoted to immersive rooms with a stronger admixture of entertainment. There is a
re-creation of a New Testamentera village with faux olive trees
and a mikvah, or ceremonial bath,
and a multimedia space with
theaters that chronicle the early
history of the Jewish people. But
both the traditional and immersive exhibitions start with unstated assumptions: that the Bible is
the most important book in the
world, that there is concrete archaeological evidence to explain
its origins, that it has been transmitted through the ages with remarkably accuracy, and that it is
fundamentally a blessing to mankind.
Debates about the meaning of
the Bible are confronted openly
and without bias, so long as they
don’t undermine those assumptions. The “Impact of the Bible”
floor acknowledges the use of the
Bible to defend slavery, as well as
the role it played in the abolitionist movement. A descriptive panel
for a King James Bible edited for
use by enslaved people notes that
what has been excised — passages
that might have inspired resistance to authority — makes the
book “deeply manipulative.”
The role of women and the use
of the Bible to limit women’s political and cultural status is acknowledged, but there is no obvious discussion of how the Bible
has been used to oppress and
ESSDRAS M SUAREZ FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A staff member at the Museum of the Bible walks through part of the “World of Jesus of Nazareth” exhibit, which offers a one-stopshopping cultural experience. The venue near the Mall tells its story well, with an eye to clarity and entertainment.
marginalize gay, lesbian, bisexual
and transgender people.
Curators admit that the Bible
has been misused, but they consistently come down on the side of its
positive impact. In an exhibition
on science and the Bible, they cite
Johannes Kepler to justify not just
the importance of the Bible to
scientific inquiry, but also the
alignment of biblical ideas and
the rational order of the universe:
“God wanted us to recognize [the
laws of nature] by creating us
after his own image so that we
could share his own thoughts,”
said the Renaissance mathematician and astronomer, who might
blanch to think how his words
were being used today.
Even the case of Galileo, arrested and censored by the Inquisition for heresy after arguing that
the Earth moves around the sun,
is chalked up to intellectual infighting. He was, the museum
claims, a victim of “the politics of
the Italian academia, which generally adhered to Aristotelian
ideas.”
When it comes to the literal
truth of the Bible, things can get
slippery. Although there is little to
The Bible Museum has
come to town,
in all its technical
splendor, bearing with it
something that most
historians and museum
professionals may have
thought was long
discredited:
the “master narrative”
idea of history.
no material evidence to support
the narrative of the Jewish exile
and escape from Egypt recounted
in Exodus, the museum jumbles
together biblical texts about
Egypt with the uncontested fact
that there was significant cultural
exchange between Egypt and the
various peoples who lived in the
lands now associated with the
Jewish people.
In several places, including an
exhibition devoted to archaeological finds from the ancient city of
Khirbet Quifaya, small claims
based on material or scientific
evidence are juxtaposed with larger claims about the truth of biblical narratives in a way that confuses fact and speculation.
In expertly made animated videos, Bible narratives are presumed true, and there is little or
no discussion of their manifold
contradictions. One film recounts
tales from Genesis, projecting
hypnotic images of the natural
world on the front screen and the
undulating walls of the main auditorium. The story of man’s fall
through Eve’s treachery is told as
well as the two Genesis narratives
of creation, known as the Priestly
and Yahwist accounts. Skeptics
have argued that there are fundamental inconsistencies in these
two versions, including how God
made man and woman, but none
of that is mentioned.
There also is a lot of slippage
between claims that the Bible is
enormously influential (which is
indisputable) and that the stories
it tells are fundamentally true (a
claim disputed not just by atheists, agnostics, secular scholars
and scientists, but also by billions
of adherents of the world’s other
religions). Every resource of museum design and careful argumentation has been mustered to
sweep up these unrelated ideas in
one, big, overwhelming package.
This has implications for people in the museum business. The
Bible Museum has come to town,
in all its technical splendor, bearing with it something that most
historians and museum professionals may have thought was
long discredited: the “master narrative” idea of history, that there is
one sweeping human story that
needs to be told, a story that is still
unfolding and carrying us along
with it. It tells this seductive story
well, in many places with factual
accuracy, and always with an eye
to clarity and entertainment. It is
an exciting idea, and an enormously powerful tool for making
sense of the world.
Unless, of course, you don’t believe it.
philip.kennicott@washpost.com
T FROM BAYER
et
r
g
y
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groundwater, including that for agriculture, could
result in a 40 percent worldwide shortfall by 2030.
Some farmers are already taking a proactive
approach to irrigation challenges. Hancock installed
soil moisture sensors throughout his orange groves
that trigger water pumps to irrigate crops only when
they need it with just the right amount. “I really like
when you can positively impact the environment and
use less water while doing it efficiently,” he said.
Similar technology is also helping farmers in
drought-prone areas. “This is year 19 of a drought
out here, and if we did not get ahead of this, at some
point we were going to lose our natural resource,”
said Jay Hill, co-owner of Wholesome Valley Farms,
who raises a variety of different crops in Mesilla
Park, New Mexico. His home state has survived a
long-term water crisis, and Hill uses a combination
of technologies, including soil monitors that offer
real-time data on ground moisture levels and a
collapsible sprinkler system that has made watering
his lettuce fields a quick and efficient process. “I’m
seeing yields double if not triple with the use of drip
systems, where before I was struggling to make
enough yield to cover my operating expenses,” Hill
said. Another key decision has been continuing to
water crops using the drip system even when it’s
raining. “Continuing to irrigate while raining helps
to best utilize the rain water for efficient irrigation,”
he added.
Breeding seeds to do better
Agricultural scientists also are looking at
technologies implemented at the seed stage
of the growing cycle to increase efficiency. With
certain crops, scientists can boost productivity by
inserting genes that help the plants optimize critical
physiological processes like the efficient use of
sunlight that, in turn, can improve other traits, such
as grain size.
Scientists increasingly are turning their attention
to breeding new high-yield wheat seeds. About onethird of the global population depends on wheat as
a staple food, but demand is outstripping the growth
of yields. Growers working with the Hypercare farm
wheat breeding station in Sabin, Minn., are using
seed technology to develop hybrid wheat varieties
that can produce higher yields while also resisting
the temporary drought of the upper Midwest and
northern plains. Researchers are also attracting
diseases into the breeding process to compare the
response of different wheat varieties possessing
various genetic traits. The work could lead to the
farm’s first hybrid wheat product some time after
2023.
Other crops, including non-food varieties like cotton,
also are being optimized through biotechnology
methods, such as the use of genetically modified
organisms (GMOs). Genetic modification takes place
when the DNA of one organism is merged with that
of a different species to achieve desirable traits like
disease- and drought-resistance. Crops grown with
the assistance of GMOs can be hardy enough to
perform well in variable environments and fortified to
survive in drought-stricken areas like the American
Southwest. “The capacity to develop new varieties
is growing all the time,” said David Zilberman,
professor and Robinson Chair of the Department
of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the
University of California, Berkeley. And in the future,
as climate change continues, genetically engineered
varieties could potentially be critical. “Temperature
will go up about two degrees; you develop a seed
variety that can deal with it. You will need tools that
are fast and precise, and that’s what GMO can give
you,” he said.
The promise of more ag-tech transformation
could also be fulfilled by gene editing, a superprecise method of genetic modification that allows
scientists to edit the native genome of an organism.
Instead of introducing foreign genes from other
species, researchers can snip out unwanted genes
and attach new ones. Gene editing is being used to
develop cancer treatments and fix disease-causing
mutations in human embryos, but is also expected
to have a major impact on agriculture, giving
researchers the tools to produce new and stronger
plant varieties, such as drought-resistant corn and
allergen-free peanuts.
More innovation on the horizon
t
The next agricultural revolution may not be far
off, with agribusinesses, the biotech research
community, growers and ag-tech startups all focused
on meeting the food needs of the future. Food
scarcity is a global threat and their work is needed
more than ever. The sense of urgency is reflected by
investment in agricultural-technology, which topped
$25 billion in 2015, and the digital farming market
is growing at a 12 percent average annual rate.
g
These investments promise significant advances
in the U.S. ag-tech sector, but similar work also is
going on around the world. Next-generation tools
are changing the face of farming in Europe at places
like Bayer ForwardFarms, where growers, digital
engineers and biotech researchers are collaborating
to test new tech-driven efficiency and sustainability
methods. Azienda Agricola Moranda, a ForwardFarm
r
y
f
in Italy, uses smart digital traps to obtain real-time
data on insect population dynamics for more precise
interventions. And at Damianshof, a ForwardFarm in
Germany, growers know exactly when to apply crop
protection thanks to a weather station that monitors
temperature, rainfall and leaf surface wetness.
This type of cooperation among international players,
in both the lab and the field, is essential to charting
the path forward and implementing solutions that
will give safe and equitable food access to billions of
people. Adopting innovations in a way that benefits
the masses is no easy task, but it’s an issue that’s
too important to ignore. “Every morning when I get
up, my world is 100 percent different than it was
the day before,” said Hill. “It is always a challenge,
but the greatest part of that challenge is, at the end
of the day, I am feeding somebody. So that’s what
motivates me.”
This is just the beginning of the story. Discover
more about the ways American farmers are using
technology to help sustainably feed the world.
TO LEARN MORE, VISIT
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. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
The World
BY
D AVID F ILIPOV
Sochi: A $50 billion
dream come true?
sochi, russia — On a warm
autumn afternoon, skipper Anton Romanov nudged his 23-foot
Aquador powerboat out of the
relentless roll of the Black Sea
and toward the harbor.
Dead ahead lay the busy port
of Sochi, home of the 2014 Winter
Olympics and Russia’s most popular resort, with its restaurants,
shops, five-star hotels, and hawkers doing a surprisingly brisk
business selling trips on the pleasure boats lined up along the pier.
Beyond rose the jagged,
white-tipped pyramids of the
Western Caucasus range, a 45minute drive away along a river
lined with compact settlements,
each with more shops, restaurants, and alpine hiking trails
reached by ski lifts.
“You have to understand, there
was nothing here just a few years
ago,” Romanov said, pulling on a
cigarette as he sat atop the cabin,
legs dangling through the roof
hatch, steering with his feet. “And
nobody came here in October.”
They come now. Three years
after the 2014 Games raised an
outcry over the estimated
$50 billion price tag, three years
after the story of the Kremlin’s
Olympic folly was subsumed by
Moscow’s annexation of Crimea
from Ukraine, President Vladimir Putin has the all-seasons
vacation destination that he
promised in Sochi.
Sochi, prized for its subtropical climate and the thermal
springs where Joseph Stalin
treated his arthritis, was traditionally Russia’s most popular
summer destination. But it was
neither a popular, nor particularly accessible, winter holiday spot
before the 2014 Olympics.
“It was a summer resort. The
season ended in October, and
then you had to wait until the
warm weather came back the
next year,” said Andrei Ponomarenko, head of the G8 Language School in Sochi. “Now we
are truly a year-round resort.”
City officials say Sochi, home
to about 500,000 year-round
residents, is on track to receive
6.5 million visitors in 2017, the
same as in 2016. Hotels along the
Black Sea coastline sell out in the
summer, and the overflow is
picked up by the hotels in the
mountains, which provide shuttles to the beaches. The reverse
happens in winter, when shoreline hotels offer bargain rates and
transportation to the mountains
for skiers. Dmitry Bogdanov, a
Sochi travel consultant, says
some hotels in high season are
booked more than two years in
advance.
Between seasons, the city
hosts hundreds of events,
including Formula One racing,
singing competitions, festivals
and conferences, said Sergei Domorat, head of Sochi’s Department of Resorts and Tourism. A
recently opened casino just
held a poker tournament. The
Fisht Stadium, used for the Winter Olympics opening and closing
ceremonies, will host matches
when the FIFA World Cup is held
in Russia next year.
The result, according to a manager of a seaside luxury hotel who
spoke on the condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak on the behalf of the
company, is that the property,
filled to near-capacity in the
summer, gets enough business in
the offseason to average 60 percent occupancy for the year. “It’s
Putin said Olympics host city would become an all-seasons destination, and it has
Survivors
in crisis
after quake
in Iran
A SSOCIATED P RESS
ABOVE: ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP/GETTY IMAGES; BELOW: SOCHI DEPARTMENT OF RESORTS AND TOURISM
ABOVE: A man walks past a statue of Vladimir Lenin, the founder
of the Soviet Union, at an amusement park in Sochi. LEFT: Sochi’s
alpine resorts, such as the Gazprom Mountain Tourist Center, are
fully booked during ski season, tourism officials say.
enough to make a profit,” the
manager said.
In the past year, Domorat said,
resort-related activities had
pumped $55 million in tax revenue to the regional government. “The expenditures on
Olympic construction have been
justified,” he said.
It is hard to say exactly what
was spent and where it all went.
In 2013, opposition politicians
published a report saying that
Putin’s inner circle had made off
with $30 billion in what they
called “a monstrous scam.”
Putin denied that large-scale
corruption had taken place, and
government assessments of the
spending have always attributed
the cost to the difficulties of
creating the infrastructure for
the Games. The most costly item
was the rail and roadway link
to the mountains. Earlier, the
beaches and the mountains were
connected only by a narrow,
winding road.
The years-long project to
transform Sochi was controversial in other ways, too. Activists
said authorities ignored laws that
mandated
public
hearings
for construction projects, illegally evicted residents and damaged
the environment in their construction efforts. Human rights
organizations say that Russian
activists protesting the Olympics
were unfairly rounded up.
When the Olympics ended,
tourism did not take right away.
But Russia’s ensuing recession, terrorism in Egypt and
a diplomatic crisis with Turkey
steered Russians away from the
tourist destinations that had become popular after the fall of the
Soviet Union and toward Sochi.
The government also has done
its share, subsidizing tours for
state employees and coaxing pri-
vate companies to organize incentive trips and retreats to Sochi
that might once have been held
in Europe. Officially sponsored
events fill the calendar.
Last month, foreign policy experts and officials were convening at a Sochi mountain hotel
complex for a conference attended by Putin. The resort city was
hosting more than 25,000 participants in the World Festival of
Youth and Students.
One of those participants,
Margarita Murzina, a graduate
student from St. Petersburg, took
advantage of a break in the
program to ride a gondola
4,500 feet up a slope where
Olympic alpine events were held.
The ride itself was worth the trip:
The gondola soared over a beech
and oak forest of autumn yellows
and oranges set beneath the
snow-capped peaks. A snowboarding fan who had never been
to Sochi, Murzina said she would
definitely come back as a tourist.
Others had clearly chosen the
season. Nikolai and Lyudmila, a
retired couple from the southern city of Rostov-on-Don who
declined to provide their last
names, said Sochi in October
was a destination close to
home where, Nikolai said, “the
weather is nice, the service is
good and it’s not too expensive.”
And wealthier Russians?
There were plenty at the poker
tournament and the foreign pol-
icy conference. But would Russians who can afford to be choosy
choose Sochi over, say, Italy?
“If they have a choice to go to
Italy versus Sochi, I think they
will still go for Italy,” the luxury
hotel’s manager said. “Sochi is
very much alive. A great city to
have your holiday. Not on a world
level yet, but hard on its way to
get there.”
Not all of the changes are
positive. While investing in new
infrastructure and resort complexes, the government has allowed some of the grand old
Soviet-era spas that line a major
thoroughfare to the Black Sea to
fall into disrepair.
Russia’s new political realities
also have affected tourism in an
unexpected way. Sochi used to
see 30 or so foreign cruise ships
per year, Ponomarenko said, and
local businesses such as his that
cater to foreigners expected the
number to grow after the Olympics. But most of the cruises also
featured stops in Crimea, the
Black Sea peninsula that Russia
annexed from Ukraine.
Now, because of sanctions, European carriers skip Crimea, and
that makes the entire cruise
route less attractive to tourists,
Ponomarenko said. So instead of
the expected boom, Sochi sees at
most five ships per year.
“I had big plans for those
ships,” he said.
david.filipov@washpost.com
sarpol-e zahab, iran — Many
survivors in Iran were still awaiting badly needed aid Wednesday,
three days after a powerful earthquake along the border with Iraq
killed more than 530 people and
left thousands injured.
Desperate, some families tried
to set up temporary shelters, using straw collected from nearby
farms.
The delay in getting help to the
needy came as public order broke
down in many instances where
aid was being delivered in the
Iranian Kurdish region. Officials
said families that were not affected by the quake rushed in and
took some of the aid supplies.
Police said they deployed personnel to secure aid distribution
and prevent more outbreaks of
chaos.
Many in the Kurdish town of
Sarpol-e Zahab, home to half the
casualties from the temblor, said
that they still have not received
aid and that they needed help to
remove debris so they can try to
get to their damaged homes and
retrieve essential belongings.
Reports said more than 12,000
tents were distributed in the area,
although more than 30,000 houses were affected by the quake —
with 15,500 of them destroyed.
Iranian officials blamed the
slow distribution of aid in part on
the chaotic situation in the stricken region. Interior Minister Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli said during an open session of parliament
on Wednesday that a total of
36,000 tents had been sent to the
region, including those already
distributed.
Many families unaffected by
the earthquake went to aid distribution sites and took supplies
that were not meant for them,
Fazli added. Because of a lack of
public order, some dispatches of
aid deliveries were “blocked” before reaching their destination,
he said.
Morteza Salimi of the Iranian
Red Crescent told state TV that
despite there being enough aid
supplies, “there were some problems in distributing the relief. . . .
Safety and security were violated.”
Iran’s deputy police chief, Gen.
Eskandar Momeni, visited the
area and told reporters that his
forces would ensure “security for
the distribution of assistance.”
Deputy Health Minister Qasim
Janbabaei warned of the dangers
of waterborne infectious diseases
amid damage to health centers
and water chlorination plants. He
said the area also needs antibiotics.
The government on Wednesday approved loans worth the
equivalent of $10,000 to help survivors in the reconstruction of
their homes.
The region, which was already
rebuilt in the decades since Iran’s
1980s war with Iraq, was hit by
the 7.3-magnitude earthquake
Sunday night.
The temblor also killed nine
people and injured 550 in Iraq,
according to the United Nations.
DIGEST
FRANCE
Hariri invited to Paris
amid resignation crisis
French President Emmanuel
Macron on Wednesday invited
Saad Hariri and his family to come
to France after Hariri’s surprise
resignation as Lebanon’s prime
minister this month from Riyadh,
which stirred allegations that
Saudi Arabia was holding him
prisoner.
Hariri’s older brother,
meanwhile, broke his silence over
the resignation after speculation
that Saudi Arabia was grooming
the elder Hariri to fill the post.
Bahaa Hariri, in a statement to
the Associated Press, said he
supported his brother’s
resignation and thanked Saudi
Arabia for “decades of support”
for Lebanon’s institutions. He
accused Iran and the Lebanese
militant group Hezbollah of
seeking to “take control of
Lebanon.” Lebanon’s coalition
government includes Hezbollah.
France, Lebanon’s onetime
colonial ruler, has been trying to
mediate in the crisis between
Lebanon and Saudi Arabia.
Macron said that he was not
offering Saad Hariri political
“exile” but that it was paramount
to dispel fears that Saudi Arabia
had taken him prisoner.
Macron said the invitation
was extended to Hariri after
discussion between the two and
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed
bin Salman.
Lebanon’s president had
earlier accused Saudi Arabia of
detaining Hariri, calling it an act
of “aggression” and asking the
U.N. Security Council and
European governments to
intervene. It was the first time
that Michel Aoun had described
Hariri as a detainee since his
Nov. 4 resignation.
already launched a procedure of
its own amid concerns that new
laws in Poland undermine
judicial independence and the
rule of law.
Polish officials argue that the
ruling party has a democratic
mandate to change its own
country’s court system and that
Brussels has no right to interfere
in the affairs of sovereign nations.
The European Parliament’s
resolution called on Poland to act
on several points, including to
condemn a “xenophobic and
fascist march” in Warsaw on
Saturday that was organized by
extremist far-right groups and
included racist banners and
slogans.
— Associated Press
POLAND
E.U. moves to punish
Warsaw prompt anger
Poland hit back Wednesday
after the European Parliament
launched action over concerns
that the right-wing government
in Warsaw has compromised the
independence of the judiciary
and risks breaching fundamental
European values.
Polish Prime Minister Beata
Szydlo described the European
Parliament move as “scandalous.”
ALEX HOFFORD/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
A man checks his cellphone behind two large banners advertising
the “Cosmoprof” beauty show in Hong Kong. The four-day trade show
for the beauty industry runs through Thursday, with about 2,800
exhibitors from more than 50 countries and regions.
In a resolution adopted 438 to
152, with 71 abstentions, the
European lawmakers triggered
the first stage of a rule-of-law
procedure against the Polish
government on Wednesday. The
procedure could lead to the
suspension of Poland’s E.U. voting
rights.
The assembly’s Civil Liberties
Committee must draw up a legal
proposal to formally request that
the mechanism — Article 7 — be
activated because of a “clear risk
of a serious breach” of E.U. values.
The E.U.’s executive arm has
— Associated Press
ruled Angola since 1979, stepped
down this year.
Suicide bombers kill 14 in
northern Nigeria: Police in
Nigeria said four suicide bombers
struck in the Borno state capital,
killing 14 people and wounding
29. This was one of the largest
such attacks in Maiduguri, the
home of the Boko Haram
insurgency, in years. A police
spokesman said the two male and
two female bombers targeted
crowded parts of the Muna Gari
suburb. Nigeria’s military has
made progress in combating
Boko Haram, but the Islamist
extremist group continues to
carry out suicide attacks in
Maiduguri and elsewhere.
Angolan president removes
ex-leader’s kin from key post:
Flash floods kill 14 on Athens
outskirts: Flash floods on the
Angola’s new leader, João
Lourenço, has removed the
daughter of former president José
Eduardo dos Santos as chair of the
state-owned oil company, the
government announced in a
surprise move that appeared to
assert independence from one of
Africa’s longest-ruling families.
Isabel dos Santos has been
reported to be Africa’s richest
woman. Her father, who had
fringes of Greece’s capital killed
at least 14 people, inundated
homes and businesses, and
knocked out a section of a major
highway. The flooding came after
a severe overnight storm brought
driving rain to the area. A day
earlier, authorities had declared a
state of emergency on the small
Aegean Sea island of Symi amid
torrential rainfall.
— From news services
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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Public cautiously hopeful as Zimbabwe’s military steps in
ZIMBABWE FROM A1
ASSOCIATED PRESS
An armored personnel carrier is seen Wednesday in Harare, Zimbabwe’s capital. Troops were stationed around the city, and the army took
over the TV station. The detention of President Robert Mugabe and his wife came as a struggle over who will succeed him came to a head.
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events bore all the signs of a coup.
Troops were stationed around the
city. The army took over the television station. The army spokesman, Maj. Gen. Sibusiso Moyo,
said in his televised statement
that “criminals” in Mugabe’s regime were being targeted. Although there was little indication
of violence by Wednesday night,
many residents of the capital remained paralyzed — unsure
whether they should celebrate
Mugabe’s ouster or prepare themselves for a new era of undemocratic rule.
The commander of Zimbabwe’s military forces, Gen. Constantino Chiwenga, made the
move as a struggle over who will
succeed the country’s elderly
leader came to a head.
Mugabe led the country to independence from Britain in 1980,
fighting in a guerrilla war that put
an end to white minority rule.
Upon becoming president, he galvanized the population with fiery
speeches promising that “Zimbabwe will never be a colony again.”
But that mantra lost much of
its power in recent years, as
Mugabe’s presidency was marred
by allegations of corruption, nepotism and repression. Zimbabwe
went from being one of Africa’s
wealthiest nations to a country
reeling under one of the highest
inflation rates in modern history,
its currency so devalued that it
had to print a $100 billion note.
Mugabe recently purged some
key officials from the ruling party,
ZANU-PF, paving the way for his
52-year-old spouse, Grace, to succeed him. Many see that move as a
major miscalculation, alienating
Mugabe from the civilians and
military leaders on whom he had
long depended.
As of Wednesday night, the fate
of Mugabe and his wife was unclear. Neither had released a
statement.
South African President Jacob
Zuma, who announced that he
was sending high-level envoys to
Harare, said that he had spoken to
Mugabe and that he is “fine” —
albeit confined to his home.
“Mugabe and his family are
safe and sound, and their security
is guaranteed,” Moyo, the
Zimbabwean general, said in the
televised statement. An armored
200 MILES
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Maputo
Ocean
THE WASHINGTON POST
vehicle blocked the road in front
of Mugabe’s offices as soldiers
milled around.
“We are only targeting criminals around him who are committing crimes that are causing social
and economic suffering,” Moyo
continued.
The statement was played over
and over on state television and
radio, but no more details were
provided. Rumors spread that a
number of cabinet ministers had
been arrested. At least one, Fi-
nance Minister Ignatius Chombo,
was taken from his home by soldiers, according to an aide.
But the military remained
tight-lipped about Mugabe, his
wife and other members of
Mugabe’s inner circle.
“We are not saying these names
now,” said Overson Mugwisi, a
spokesman for the Zimbabwe Defense Forces.
World leaders were monitoring
the situation. The British foreign
secretary, Boris Johnson, said
that “nobody wants simply to see
the transition from one unelected
tyrant to a next.”
The U.S. State Department refrained from calling the action a
coup but said Washington was
“concerned by recent actions taken by Zimbabwe’s military forces”
and called on authorities to exercise restraint.
For decades, Mugabe had a
reputation as an unwavering critic of many Western policies and
international institutions. His
supporters hailed him for actions
such as the seizure of whiteowned farms. Although the farms
were meant to be given to black
families, many ended up in the
hands of Mugabe’s close associates, and within years a large
number had fallen fallow because
their new owners had no background or interest in farming.
On the streets of Harare, the
news of the military takeover was
greeted with cautious optimism
by many.
“We are happy that we are
going to have another leader,”
said a man in Harare’s Chitungwiza neighborhood who called
himself Yemurai. “Even if it’s going to be another dictator, we
accept a new one. Look, we are
jobless, hungry and povertystricken. All we want is something different.” Like most people
interviewed, he spoke on the condition that his full name not be
used.
But some people worried that
the military intervention could
lead to violence.
“This is a disaster,” said Baxon,
a man from the Glen View area.
“Solving one problem by creating
another. We don’t want another
war, but it seems we are headed
that way. We have heard there are
people in the army not in agreement with what Chiwenga did.”
But there were mounting signs
that Mugabe’s former allies were
quickly turning against him.
Victor Matemadanda, secretary general of the powerful War
Veterans Association, thanked
Chiwenga for intervening and
said Mugabe should be dismissed.
“We will be recalling President
Robert Mugabe as the first secretary of the party and the head of
state for the crimes he has committed,” Matemadanda said in a
news conference.
In Harare’s central business
district, residents said all seemed
normal.
Across the country, Zimbabweans exchanged frantic text messages asking for updates, debating whether Mugabe had finally
been toppled.
Political analyst Mike Mavura
said it was important for the
military to say this was not a coup
for reasons of international legitimacy.
“We are not in the 1960s and
1970s anymore, when coups in
Africa were left, right and center
— I think they are trying very hard
to appear progressive,” he said.
“However, of interest to democracy, the elections scheduled for
next year, will they take place?”
Zimbabwe’s political crisis
reached a boiling point last week
with Mugabe’s dismissal of Vice
President Emmerson Mnangagwa, clearing the way for Mugabe’s
wife to succeed the leader.
Mugabe told supporters he had
dismissed Mnangagwa for disloyalty and disrespect, as well as
using witchcraft to take power.
Mnangagwa later fled to South
Africa.
The move exacerbated divisions in the ZANU-PF party,
where the youth faction is firmly
on Grace Mugabe’s side, while
many older veterans of the struggle against white rule look to
Mnangagwa. As a former defense
minister, Mnangagwa has strong
support in the military.
Political commentator Maxwell Saungweme said by phone
that the military will probably try
to pressure Mugabe to step down
in favor of Mnangagwa as acting
president.
“But this plan may not pan out,
as Mugabe might resist this. So
the whole thing may be messy,” he
warned.
Didymus Mutasa, a former
presidential affairs minister who
was fired by Mugabe in 2014, said
he hoped that the military takeover would “help us start on a
democratic process.”
Zimbabwe was once a breadbasket for the region, but its economy and especially the agricultural sector have suffered in recent
years.
Meanwhile, Mugabe was seen
as being increasingly under the
influence of his wife, who is also
known as “Gucci Grace” for the
rumored extravagance of her foreign shopping trips. The country’s per-capita gross domestic
product is $1,008, according to
the World Bank.
In recent weeks, there have
been signs of an increased sensitivity to criticism of the government. Four people were detained
for booing Grace Mugabe at a
rally, and an American woman
was arrested for allegedly tweeting insulting comments about
Mugabe.
kevin.sieff@washpost.com
paul.schemm@washpost.com
Schemm reported from Addis Ababa,
Ethiopia. Brian Murphy in Washington
contributed to this report.
Planned State Dept. cuts cause fear
Lawmakers worry staff
reductions could harm
national security
BY
C AROL M ORELLO
A growing, bipartisan number
of lawmakers are expressing
alarm over anticipated personnel
cuts at the State Department, saying they have contributed to
plummeting morale and will undermine diplomacy and foreign
policy for years to come.
In the latest example, Sens.
Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) and
John McCain (R-Ariz.) urged Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on
Wednesday to lift a hiring freeze
and promote experienced Foreign
Service officers, requesting in a
letter more details about Tillerson’s reorganization plan.
Citing reports of declining morale, recruitment and retention
levels, the senators wrote that
“America’s diplomatic power is
being weakened internally as
complex, global crises are growing externally.” Tillerson’s management decisions, they say,
“threaten to undermine the longterm health and effectiveness of
American diplomacy.”
The letter reflects mounting
concern on Capitol Hill and
among foreign policy experts
about the loss of experienced diplomats under the Trump administration. On Tuesday, the Republican and Democratic heads of the
Senate Foreign Relations Committee said the State Department’s cuts are endangering the
nation.
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin
(D-Md.) called the cuts a risk to
national security and a “high-level decapitation of leadership.”
“Folks, this situation is alarming,” Cardin said. “We put our
country in danger.”
The Office of Management and
Budget has directed the State Department to slash its almost
76,000 employees by 8 percent. To
meet that goal beyond normal
attrition, the State Department is
offering buyouts and early retirement incentives of $25,000 — before taxes — to the first 641 eligible
people who sign up by April 30.
The buyouts are being directed by
the White House, not the seventh
floor of the Harry S. Truman
Building where Tillerson sits.
Tillerson, who has proposed
cutting almost 30 percent of his
budget, has described his “redesign” of the State Department as
his most important task. He has
disputed accounts of low morale
in Foggy Bottom, telling Bloomberg News recently, “I’m not seeing it, I’m not getting it.”
But anecdotes abound in the
agency’s halls. Former ambassadors recalled to Washington feel
humiliated about being assigned
menial jobs such as reviewing
Freedom of Information Act requests to clear a large backlog.
Competition for overseas jobs has
become fiercer as more young
diplomats seek to escape the turmoil for the next few years.
Many employees are still bristling over Trump’s assertion this
month that while a number of key
positions at the State Department
still have no nominees to fill them,
“I’m the only one that matters” in
formulating foreign policy.
Job opportunities also are
shrinking at the U.S. Agency for
International
Development,
which recently notified 97 applicants for overseas postings that
the positions had been canceled, a
tacit admission that the hiring
freeze will be in place for a long
time.
Nevertheless, State Department figures show that the number of employees remains about
the same as it was when Tillerson
took the reins in early February.
Two-thirds of the 76,000 employees are locally employed in 276
missions around the world, leaving almost 14,000 Foreign Service
officers and almost 11,000 civil
service employees.
Although the hiring freeze is
still in effect, Tillerson has mitigated the impact by approving
more than 2,300 exemptions to
the freeze as of late October.
Among the hires are about 300
new Foreign Service officers and
almost 150 civil service employees.
The numbers underscore a
flight of experienced leadership.
Barbara Stephenson, who heads
the American Foreign Service Association union, wrote in a recent
newsletter that senior leaders are
departing at a “dizzying speed.”
Among the figures she cited,
three of the five career ambassadors, the highest rank for diplomats, have quit or retired since
Tillerson took over. The number
of career ministers, the next level
down, also has decreased, from 33
to 19. The next-level ministers are
down by 62 diplomats, to 369, just
since Labor Day, “and are still
falling,” she wrote.
Stephenson also said that fewer
Foreign Service officers are being
recruited, and far fewer are taking
the entrance exam, although State
Department officials attribute
this to an improving economy
rather than a lack of interest.
Stephenson thinks the damage
will be felt for years.
“The talent being shown the
door now is not only our top talent
but also talent that cannot be
replicated overnight,” she wrote.
This is not the first time the
State Department has been hit
with big staff cuts. Under President Bill Clinton, the department
cut more than 2,000 employees,
largely by shuttering the U.S. Information Agency, and closed
consulates in 26 foreign cities.
USAID, which runs foreign aid
programs, closed 23 overseas missions.
According to congressional
aides who deal with State Department operations, the goal is again
to reduce the ranks by 2,000 people, a proposed cut that has held
steady since Trump came to office
and before Tillerson took over.
But the latest round of staff cuts is
far less transparent than previous
efforts, with almost no details
provided to Congress, they say.
“It’s being done behind the
scenes,” said one aide, speaking
on the condition of anonymity to
offer frank insight about what
they are hearing from State Department employees who don’t
normally speak to Congress.
“They dismiss the legitimacy of
Foreign Service officers. They
started working at breaking down
morale from the get-go. There’s
not a lot of trust there.”
In their letter to Tillerson, Shaheen and McCain cited the union’s
statistics to paint a picture of a
State Department floundering.
Shaheen sits on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and
McCain heads the Senate Armed
Services Committee.
“Taken together,” they wrote,
“questionable management practices at the Department of State;
the attitudes of some in the Administration on the value of diplomacy; declining morale, recruitment and retention; the lack of
experienced leadership to further
the strength and longevity of our
nation’s diplomatic corps; and reports of American diplomacy becoming less effective paint a disturbing picture.”
carol.morello@washpost.com
There’s more to the story.
On Sale Today
From New York Times bestselling author
and investigative journalist Luke Harding
Available wherever books are sold
VINTAGE
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
China to send envoy to N. Korea, reopening dialogue with isolated regime
Officials in Beijing say
trip is not connected
to Trump’s visit
BY
S IMON D ENYER
beijing — China is sending a
senior diplomat to visit North
Korea as an envoy of President Xi
Jinping, the Foreign Ministry
said Wednesday, reopening a
channel of dialogue with the
isolated regime.
Song Tao, who heads the
Communist Party’s external affairs department, will head to
Pyongyang on Friday to “inform”
the North Korean government
about the recently concluded
Communist Party Congress in
Beijing, the state-run Xinhua
news agency said.
The announcement comes a
week after President Trump visited China and asked Xi to work
hard to rein in North Korea’s
nuclear weapons program. But
the Foreign Ministry said this
trip was not connected to
Trump’s visit.
Beijing routinely undertakes
such trips to fellow communist
states after key party meetings,
and Song has already visited
Vietnam and Laos on similar
missions.
“The main purpose of the visit
is to report on the 19th Party
Congress,” said ministry spokesman Geng Shuang. He said it
was “traditional practice” for
China’s Communist Party to brief
the Korean Workers’ Party and
parties from other socialist countries after such events.
Asked if the envoy would meet
North Korean leader Kim Jong
Un, Geng said he was not aware
of the “detailed arrangements”
for the trip.
He implied that Song would
bring up North Korea’s nuclear
program.
“He will also exchange views
on issues of common interest,
such as relations between the
two parties and the two countries,” he told a news conference.
The visit represents an important opportunity for Beijing to
reopen a channel of dialogue
with the isolated regime, experts
said, as relations between the
countries have deteriorated significantly in recent years.
China has an official special
envoy to North Korea, Kong
Xuanyou, but he is not believed
to have visited Pyongyang since
taking the job in August. His
predecessor, Wu Dawei, last visit-
ed North Korea in February 2016.
Song’s visit will be the first by a
ministerial-level official since
then-Politburo Standing Committee member Liu Yunshan
went to Pyongyang and met Kim
in October 2015.
Xi is believed to be frustrated
with North Korea’s aggressive
development and testing of its
nuclear weapons and missiles,
and he has imposed a relatively
strict set of sanctions under U.S.
pressure and in line with U.N.
Security Council resolutions.
But China still dominates
trade with North Korea and is
unwilling to cut off the regime’s
economic lifeline, symbolized by
a pipeline that supplies the crude
oil keeping the country’s military
and industry afloat.
It does not want to see a fellow
communist regime and longstanding ally toppled, but it
equally does not want the current regime to turn hostile and
threaten China with its nuclear
weapons and missiles.
“They still want to balance
and they want to maintain some
channels,” said Paul Haenle, director of the Carnegie-Tsinghua
Center in Beijing. “Relations
have really deteriorated, and the
Chinese recognize that. They
don’t want relations to fall
apart.”
Haenle said the visit might
include some “sweet talk” for
Pyongyang about working together. But he predicted that the
Chinese would also make their
displeasure known.
Wang Sheng, a North Korea
expert at Jilin University in
Changchun, said communications between Beijing and
Pyongyang improved after the
Party Congress when Kim sent Xi
a congratulatory message and Xi
sent his thanks in return. He said
China could use the trip to
“persuade the North to return to
the negotiation table as soon as
possible.”
While in Beijing, Trump said
China can fix the North Korea
problem “quickly and easily,” and
he urged Xi to “work on it very
hard.”
“If he works on it hard, it will
happen,” Trump said. “There’s no
doubt about it.”
After leaving China, Trump
suggested that more action by
Beijing was coming. “President
Xi of China has stated that he is
upping the sanctions against
#NoKo. Said he wants them to
denuclearize. Progress is being
made,” he tweeted Saturday.
simon.denyer@washpost.com
Luna Lin contributed to this report.
Russian lawmakers pass
bill to curb foreign media
BY
A NDREW R OTH
moscow — Russian lawmakers
WILLIAM WEST/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Supporters of same-sex marriage gather at a Sydney park Thursday after a nonbinding referendum found that 61.6 percent of Australians
favor allowing gay couples to wed. “Love has had a landslide victory,” Alex Greenwich, a gay politician, said at one celebration.
Marriage vote celebrated in Australia
Vote isn’t binding, but
referendum draws
unusually large support
BY
A . O DYSSEUS P ATRICK
sydney — The Australian vote to
legalize same-sex marriage by a
substantial majority, overcoming
a well-organized religious campaign against it, triggered elation
in major cities Wednesday.
A nonbinding referendum conducted by mail found 61.6 percent
of Australians in favor of allowing
same-sex couples to wed. Even
though the measure was expected
to be approved, the size of the win
and the unusually large participation of 12.7 million Australians out
of the 16 million eligible voters
added to its political legitimacy.
Though the vote isn’t binding,
all major political party leaders
have promised to implement the
decision, which would make Australia one of about two dozen
countries that allow same-sex couples to wed.
“The people of Australia have
spoken, and I intend to make their
wish the law of the land by Christmas,” Prime Minister Malcolm
Turnbull said. “This is an overwhelming call for marriage equality.”
In a wealthy, urbanized country
where 52 percent of the people
regard themselves as Christian,
according to a census last year, the
vote marks a defeat for Australia’s
two big churches, the Catholic
Church and the Anglican Church,
whose leaders were behind a wellorganized campaign to defeat the
referendum.
It also demonstrated deep rifts
in Australian society. Opposition
was concentrated in suburbs with
high numbers of working-class
immigrants on the suburban
fringes, including locations popular with Islamic communities.
The largest levels of support
were found in the wealthy urban
hearts of Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth.
At Sydney’s Prince Alfred Park,
about 1,500 people gathered to
celebrate and hear speeches by the
organizers of the “yes” campaign
after the results were announced
on television.
“Love has had a landslide victory,” Alex Greenwich, a gay politician, said at the park while a popular 1970s John Paul Young song,
“Love Is in the Air,” played in the
background.
One of the biggest majorities in
favor of the referendum was in a
beachside Sydney district held by
former prime minister Tony Abbott, a conservative Catholic and
onetime trainee priest who helped
lead the “no” campaign.
Deposed two years ago by Turnbull after a series of blunders, Abbott has emerged as the prime
minister’s biggest internal critic.
He appeared to be using the samesex marriage vote to energize conservative opposition to his more
moderate leader inside their
center-right Liberal Party.
Commentators said the fairly
large majority would bolster Turnbull’s leadership. The prime minister, who said he voted yes, was
initially criticized by some gay activists for resorting to a referendum rather than asking Parliament to change the law, a move
that could have split his party.
The public vote energized both
sides, triggered a debate about
religious freedoms in a country
becoming more secular by the decade, and raised awareness that
many gay Australians don’t feel
fully accepted, even though samesex relationships have had the
same legal rights as conventional
marriages for years.
Factions within the ruling
Liberal-Nationals coalition are
now arguing over the drafting of a
new marriage law.
Conservatives wanted explicit
provisions protecting businesses
and organizations that refuse to
service or participate in same-sex
weddings on moral or religious
grounds. Moderates, with Turnbull’s backing, seem likely to limit
the protections to churches and
marriage celebrants.
The debate reflects the global
influence of the case of Colorado
baker Jack Phillips, who was
found to have violated state law by
refusing to create a cake to cel-
ebrate a same-sex wedding. The
baker said that doing so would
violate his religious beliefs. The
case is now before the U.S. Supreme Court. The Trump administration has sided with the baker.
Bakeries in Australia would be
allowed to display signs saying
they do not serve same-sex couples as a matter of conscience,
under the conservatives’ proposal.
Parents could withdraw their children from state-run schools that
teach them about gay sex, too.
Critics said the measures are
unnecessary, in part because of
existing laws protecting religion
expression and the fact that areas
with large numbers of Christians
voted for same-sex marriage, suggesting they don’t feel much
threat to their religion practice.
“The churches are misguided
because they are putting existing
privileges at risk by arguing for an
extension of religious privilege,
which risks a backlash,” Peter
Sherlock, the president of the
Melbourne-based University of
Divinity, said in an interview.
One of the unusual aspects of
the debate was the important role
business played. Risking a customer backlash, many large companies publicly endorsed samesex marriage. The most prominent was the national airline Qantas Airways, whose chief
executive, Irish-born Alan Joyce,
is in a long-term relationship with
a male ballroom dancer.
foreign@washpost.com
voted unanimously Wednesday to
pass legislation allowing authorities to force any foreign media
organization to register as a “foreign agent” under penalty of fines
or a possible ban on operations in
Russia.
The legislation, passed 414 to 0
in retaliation for the registration
of English-language Russian news
network RT under a similar statute in the United States, was drafted hastily and is likely to be signed
into law by Russian President
Vladimir Putin by the end of the
month.
The bill approved by the State
Duma, the lower house of the Russian parliament, did not include a
list of media organizations to be
targeted; lawmakers said they
would be chosen by Russia’s Ministry of Justice.
Likely targets are U.S. news organizations that receive government funding, including Voice of
America and Radio Free Europe,
as well as the privately owned
CNN.
Andrey Isayev, a lawmaker in
the ruling United Russia party, has
suggested that all three outlets, as
well as German public broadcaster Deutsche Welle, could be registered under the law.
The law also appears likely to be
used to selectively target media
from countries in conflict with the
Kremlin, especially if that conflict
involves the state-funded television station RT, formerly known
as Russia Today.
The law is considerably broader
than comparable U.S. legislation,
which targets only state-funded
organizations.
Pyotr Tolstoy, a former journalist turned lawmaker who led the
drafting of the legislation, said in
an interview that he expects the
law to apply to a small number of
news organizations at first. But he
said the list could grow if Russia
believes that more of its news outlets are being pressured abroad.
“This campaign looks like it’s
going to go on for a long time,”
Tolstoy said, referring to what he
called pressure on Russian journalists abroad. U.S. authorities accuse RT of carrying out a Kremlindictated influence campaign
aimed at U.S. citizens, a charge the
television channel denies.
“Every time, Russia is going to
take hard response measures,” he
said. “This is not a country you can
dictate terms to.”
He added that lawmakers were
also reviewing laws about advertising on Facebook and Twitter,
the latter having recently blocked
RT from advertising on the
site. “We are listening carefully to
the questions our colleagues in
[the U.S.] Congress are asking,” he
said, “and we have questions of
our own.”
The move comes in response to
a Justice Department requirement that RT register as a foreign
agent because of its alleged role in
interfering in U.S. affairs and the
2016 presidential election by
pushing the Kremlin’s agenda.
Russia denies it meddled in the
election campaign.
In Washington, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) denounced the new
Russian law, saying there is “no
equivalence” between RT and networks such as the Voice of America, CNN and the BBC, whose journalists “seek the truth, debunk
lies, and hold governments accountable.” By contrast, he said in
a statement, “RT’s propagandists
debunk the truth, spread lies, and
seek to undermine democratic
governments in order to further
Vladimir Putin’s agenda.”
andrew.roth@washpost.com
William Branigin in Washington
contributed to this report.
SERGEI ILNITSKY/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Pyotr Tolstoy, the Russian lawmaker who led the drafting of the
legislation, addresses the lower house of Russia’s parliament.
8,000-year-old jars found in Georgia show wine is even older than estimated
BY
B EN G UARINO
At the next holiday dinner,
when the discussion turns to politics and you reach for a second
glass of merlot, consider this: Your
social lubricant has 8,000-yearold roots. People were fermenting
grapes and storing wine in massive jugs as long ago as 6000 B.C.,
according to a study published
Monday in the Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences.
The new research pushes chemical evidence of wine 600 to 1,000
years before the previous oldest
estimates.
“This is a big time jump,” said
Patrick McGovern, an expert in
ancient wines at the University of
Pennsylvania Museum and an author of the new study. McGovern
and his colleagues analyzed pottery jars found in the Eurasian
country of Georgia that dated to
the early Neolithic period.
Ancient Georgians could have
stored 300 liters of wine in the
jars, which are about three feet
tall. Small clay bumps are clustered around the rim. These decorations, the researchers hypothesize, represent grapes.
“The radiocarbon dating is very
precise,” McGovern said, and
shows that the jars were created
between 6000 and 5800 B.C.
The new insights came from a
break in tradition. It is common
practice for archaeologists to
clean ancient pottery with a gentle
bath of a mild acid or base. The
corrosives reveal details in the
pottery often hidden beneath a
crust of accumulated minerals.
But these baths also erase any
traces of organic compounds
stuck to the pottery. In the latest
excavation, the archaeologists
skipped the chemical scrub. This
allowed researchers to extract
four organic compounds from the
potsherds: citric acid, malic acid,
succinic acid and tartaric acid.
Taken together, the relatively
high concentrations of these acids
point to wine. “The tartaric acid
establishes grapes,” said Andrew
Waterhouse, who studies the
chemistry of wine at the University of California at Davis and was
not a participant in the research.
Grapes are the only fruit in the
Georgian mountain region that
produce tartaric acid, McGovern
said. Although some dirt-dwelling
microbes can generate organic acids, soil samples showed no signs
of the chemicals at high concentrations.
Fermentation left its signature
in the form of succinic acid. The
combination of succinic and tartaric acid, Waterhouse said, “is
completely convincing that this is
grape wine.”
A few other clues pointed to
fermented grapes, too. The researchers found botanical evidence in ancient grape pollen,
starch and bits of grape skin.
“We can’t prove the alcohol,”
McGovern said. That evaporated
ages ago. But he doubts the Georgians were big into nonalcoholic
juice. Since the last Ice Age, winemaking conditions in this region
of the Caucasus have been ideal. In
a warm and mild climate, raw
grape juice starts to ferment in a
day or two. And it was unlikely, he
said, that the Georgians would
have allowed wine to ferment into
vinegar.
Wine flows through ancient
Georgians’ culture. They drank
wine to celebrate births and left
wine cups and pitchers in tombs.
In ancient Egypt, pharaohs and
kings drank wine; in ancient Geor-
gia, everyone did.
“It became economically important, just like the wine culture
in California and Oregon,” McGovern said. “Once these fermented
beverages take hold of a society,
they tend to become the heart of
the society.”
Waterhouse,
who
called
McGovern the “worldwide authority” on early wines, said that
this study probably pushes the
limits of what can be learned from
wine jar pottery. Pottery itself is
12,000 to 20,000 years old; before
that, humans used animal hide
and other materials to store liquids.
“Using leather to hold wine is
well-documented in the Bible and
elsewhere,” Waterhouse said. But
vessels made of skin don’t preserve as well as pottery.
McGovern said he would not be
surprised if humans consumed
fermented fruits before there was
pottery. He pointed to primates
who haven’t figured out pottery
but know about booze, like chimpanzees that use leaves to sponge
up fermented palm sap.
Grape cultivars in Georgia are
closely related to wine staples
such as Syrah and pinot noir
grapes. The experts guessed the
wine was cloudy with an aromatic
or fruity taste.
“Very freshly fermented wines
have a really distinctive fruitiness.
It actually doesn’t come from the
fruit. It comes from the fermentation process,” Waterhouse said. A
modern analogue would be a
Beaujolais nouveau, he said, bottled and sold as little as six weeks
after harvest.
ben.guarino@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Economy & Business
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Some security cameras
still exposed to hackers
With his signature, the buck starts here
Flaws found in spite of
FTC crackdown cause
new privacy concerns
BY
ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin shows his wife, Louise Linton, an uncut sheet of the first $1 bills to bear his
signature at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Washington. Holding another sheet of bills is U.S. Treasurer
Jovita Carranza, whose signature also is on the new bills, which are expected to go into circulation in December.
Cordray to quit consumer agency post
Obama-era regulator
clashed with Republicans
and financial industry
BY
R ENAE M ERLE
Richard Cordray, one of the few
remaining Obama-era banking
regulators, said Wednesday that
he plans to step down as head of
the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau by the end of the
month, clearing the way for President Trump to remake a watchdog
agency loathed by Republicans
and Wall Street.
Cordray’s turbulent six-year
tenure at the 1,600-person agency
was marked by aggressive efforts
to rein in banks, payday lenders
and debt collectors, often drawing
protests from the business community. His frequent clashes with
conservatives turned Cordray into
a favorite of Democrats and consumer groups and a villain to Republicans and the financial industry. A federal judge once said that
Cordray had “more unilateral authority than any other officer in
any of the three branches of the
U.S. government, other than the
president.”
“It has been a joy of my life to
have the opportunity to serve our
country as the first director of the
Consumer Bureau by working
alongside all of you here,” Cordray
said in a message to employees. “I
trust that new leadership will see
that value also and work to preserve it — perhaps in different
ways than before, but desiring, as I
have done, to serve in ways that
benefit and strengthen our economy and our country.”
Republicans had become increasingly exasperated that
Cordray, whose term does not end
until next summer, did not step
aside when Trump took office and
instead continued to press for aggressive rules disliked by the business community. Trump has on at
least two occasions griped about
Cordray in private and wondered
what to do about his tenure, according to two financial-industry
executives who attended meetings
where Trump raised his concerns.
Under the agency’s current structure, the president can fire the
director only for cause.
Cordray did not explain the timing of his decision, but it clears the
way for him to potentially run for
governor of Ohio; he previously
served as the state’s attorney general. It also comes just a month
after the CFPB suffered a major
rebuke from Republicans in Congress who took the unusual step of
blocking an agency rule that for
the first time would have allowed
consumers to sue their banks.
Cordray appealed to Trump directly not to sign the legislation
but was rebuffed.
With Cordray’s departure, the
regulatory structure put in place
by the Obama administration in
the aftermath of the global financial crisis has been nearly entirely
remade. The head of the Securities
and Exchange Commission has
been replaced by a former Wall
Street lawyer, and the Senate is
moving to approve Trump’s pick to
lead the Office of the Comptroller
of the Currency, another important banking regulator.
Trump is also remaking the
Federal Reserve. He has nominated Republican Jerome H. Powell, a
current governor on the Fed
board, to replace Janet L. Yellen as
chair of the Federal Reserve. His
pick for vice chairman of supervision, Randal Quarles, a former
private-equity investor, is likely to
be much friendlier to the banking
industry than his predecessor in
the role.
Rolling back regulations has
been a cornerstone of the Trump
administration, which argues that
excessive rulemaking strangles
economic growth. But Congress
has struggled to deliver sweeping
regulatory relief to the financial
industry. This week, Sen. Mike
Crapo (R-Idaho), the chairman of
the Senate Banking Committee,
announced a bipartisan deal to
SAUL LOEB/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Richard Cordray will leave his
job by the end of November.
free dozens of large financial institutions from some of the most
rigorous regulations put in place
after the financial crisis. Those
changes are, however, much more
modest than what many in the
banking industry have called for.
The most efficient way to remake the rules, industry officials
say, is through appointing new
regulators who can change an
agency’s focus, tone and priorities.
Cordray’s departure “will complete the Team Trump takeover of
the regulatory agencies. It should
mean by summer there are Republicans running all of the banking
agencies,” said Jaret Seiberg, an
analyst with Cowen Washington
Research Group.
The transformation coming to
the CFPB could be significant. The
agency was one of the central
achievements of the Obama administration after the 2008 financial crisis. Created under 2010’s
financial reform bill, known as
Dodd-Frank, it regulates the way
banks and other financial companies interact with consumers, policing areas as diverse as payday
loans and mortgages. The agency
has extracted billions of dollars in
fines from big banks, including
$100 million from Wells Fargo last
year for opening millions of accounts that customers did not request.
Cordray “held big banks accountable. He is a dedicated public servant and a tireless watchdog
for American consumers — and he
will be missed,” said Sen. Elizabeth
Warren (D-Mass.), who helped establish the bureau.
But the CFPB has been controversial among Republicans since
its inception. Critics complain
that the CFPB has made it more
difficult for people to get mortgage loans and has overstepped its
power to regulate some areas of
finance, including auto loans.
Republicans were particularly
frustrated that the CFPB continued to issue rules in the past year
despite the Trump administration’s focus on loosening regulations to spur economic growth.
Last month, for example, the
agency finalized wide-ranging
rules targeting the billions of dollars in fees collected by payday
lenders offering high-cost, shortterm loans. The rules would radically reshape the industry and
even “restrict” the industry’s revenue by two-thirds, according to
the CFPB.
Payday lenders and Republicans in Congress called the rules
excessive. “We didn’t always see
eye-to-eye with Director Cordray
and in particular with his actions,
which turned the Bureau into a
highly partisan agency,” said Dennis Shaul, chief executive of the
Community Financial Services
Association of America, which
represents the payday lending industry.
The group hopes Trump will
appoint a replacement who “will
listen to customers rather than
special interests,” Shaul said.
Under new Republican leadership, the agency is likely to focus
less on writing rules for the financial industry or extracting big
fines, industry experts say. The
CFPB has been working on rules
concerning debt collectors and
bank overdraft fees, for example,
but those efforts are likely to stall
under the new leadership, said
industry officials.
renae.merle@washpost.com
A ARON G REGG
Several widely available security cameras and wireless routers
can be easily hacked to reveal
customers’ video feeds online,
researchers disclosed Wednesday, reigniting privacy concerns
four years after the Federal Trade
Commission filed charges to
eliminate similar vulnerabilities.
A Maryland-based cybersecurity start-up called ReFirm said it
discovered the flaws in Internetconnected products sold in the
United States by manufacturers
TRENDnet, Belkin and Dahua.
The researchers said they
were able exploit weaknesses in
the gear to access video feeds
freely available on the Internet
from people’s security cameras.
Their report shows images of
what appear to be live video
feeds of a playground, a department store, a solar farm, an
industrial control system and
what appears to be the entrance
to a person’s home.
The cybersecurity firm alleged
that the cameras made by Dahua, a Chinese manufacturer,
contain what appears to be a
hard-coded “back door” to allow
outsiders to gain access to the
feeds.
Other vulnerabilities were
found in Belkin wireless routers
and cameras made by TRENDnet, which in 2013 settled FTC
allegations that it did not adequately protect consumer privacy. The settlement contained
no admission of wrongdoing.
ReFirm said it shared its findings with the companies before
releasing its report publicly. Dahua did not respond to requests
for comment. TRENDnet said in
a statement that the company
“takes consumer privacy and
security very seriously.”
TRENDnet’s
Internet-connected cameras are all “tested by
both an internal audit team, and
a leading 3rd party security
group,” the company said in a
statement.
“TRENDnet is currently reviewing the report to validate the
vulnerability claims; we will release a patch soon for any confirmed vulnerabilities.”
Belkin said it has taken action
to address the weaknesses.
“We provided firmware this
past June, shortly after we were
made aware of the findings,” the
company said in a statement.
“We also provided additional
firmware updates to all the vulnerabilities mentioned in the
report on Oct. 24. All three
vulnerabilities have been addressed and we recommend that
Belkin customers update their
routers to this latest firmware.”
Cybersecurity professionals
have warned for years that the
“Internet of things” — everyday
objects that can be controlled
through the Internet — presents
potential safety and privacy concerns for consumers.
“This is a problem that is often
endemic to the ‘Internet of
things,’ ” said Justin Brookman,
director of consumer privacy and
technology policy at Consumers
Union, an advocacy group.
“Companies connect things to
the Internet, and it isn’t until
later that they stop to think,
‘How could this go badly?’ ”
There have been no reports
that the cameras have been exploited by malicious hackers. In
its report, ReFirm documents
how it was able to gain access to
a security camera made by
TRENDnet by searching for
weaknesses in its firmware,
which is software embedded in a
piece of hardware. ReFirm researchers said they found a vulnerability that lets anyone gain
access to a TRENDnet camera by
typing 12 specified characters
into a Web browser, followed by
the Internet address of the video
camera, which can be found
relatively easily online.
“I wouldn’t even consider this
a hack,” ReFirm founder Terry
Dunlap said. “You’re not even
doing anything malicious. . . . it’s
just sloppy security.”
Dunlap said that once in, he
could easily have frozen the
camera feed, replaced it with
false footage or shut down the
device.
In a video shared with The
Washington Post, Dunlap and a
team of researchers can be seen
demonstrating the hack on what
they say is a TRENDNet camera
they purchased. In it, Dunlap
aims what is described as a
TRENDnet TV-IP344PI security
camera at two other people and
displays the video feed on a
nearby television. A click of a
button on Dunlap’s computer
freezes the camera’s display
screen — showing the two people
standing still — even as they
start dancing around in front of
the camera. Dunlap then replaces the feed with a video of 1980s
pop singer Rick Astley.
TRENDnet drew the attention
of regulators after a 2012 hack
that put hundreds of feeds from
the company’s home security
cameras and baby monitors online. The agency described the
resulting settlement as its first
against a marketer of an everyday product that can connect to
the Internet.
The settlement committed
TRENDnet to obtaining thirdparty assessments on its security
programs every two years for the
next 20 years. The settlement
also requires TRENDnet to notify consumers about security issues, and established possible
civil penalties of up to $16,000
for any future violations of the
settlement terms.
There are also concerns that
Chinese manufacturers could be
embedding “back doors” into
products at the behest of the
Chinese government. The Wall
Street Journal reported Monday
that a Chinese company called
Hangzhou Hikvision Digital
Technology, owned in part by the
Chinese government, had made
cameras that were used on U.S.
military installations in Afghanistan. Those cameras were removed from a list of approved
cameras, and the Department of
Homeland Security found a back
door, giving the camera its worst
security rating.
In an interview with the Wall
Street Journal, a Hikvision executive said the company does not
install back doors in its cameras
and cannot access customers’
video feeds.
Dahua, the focus of ReFirm’s
report, is a close competitor to
Hikvision in China. In its report,
ReFirm said it thought the back
door was added deliberately
based on the way the code was
written and the fact that it was
programmed into multiple other
Dahua products.
“This vulnerability is not the
result of an accidental logic error
or poor programming practice,
but rather an intentional backdoor placed into the product by
the vendor,” the report claims.
aaron.gregg@washpost.com
DIGEST
ECONOMY
Retail sales increase
for a second month
U.S. retail sales rose at a solid
pace last month, as consumers
bought more cars, furniture and
clothes.
Retail sales increased
0.2 percent in October, the
Commerce Department said
Wednesday, after a healthy
1.9 percent gain in the previous
month that was driven by big
increases in auto and gas sales in
the wake of Hurricanes Harvey
and Irma.
Americans are spending more
freely as confidence in the
economy has jumped in the past
year and the unemployment rate
is at a 17-year low. Excluding gas
station sales, which fell sharply as
prices dropped, retail sales rose
0.4 percent last month.
Consumers spent more at
electronics, grocery, clothing
and sporting goods stores.
Restaurants and bars reported a
healthy 0.8 percent increase, the
biggest gain since January.
Gas station sales fell
1.2 percent last month, the
retail sales report showed, mostly
because prices nationwide
dropped 2.4 percent.
Auto sales rose 0.7 percent.
— Associated Press
INTERNET
Man tied to ‘dark net’
faces federal charges
An Illinois man who federal
prosecutors say worked as a
spokesman for a “dark net”
marketplace for illicit Internet
commerce has been charged in
Atlanta.
Authorities have said AlphaBay
was the Internet’s largest dark net
site — trading in illegal drugs,
firearms and counterfeit goods,
among other things — before it
was taken down through an
international law enforcement
effort in July.
Federal prosecutors in Atlanta
charged Ronald L. Wheeler III of
Streamwood, Ill., with conspiracy
to commit access device fraud.
Wheeler, 24, pleaded not guilty
Wednesday before federal
Magistrate Judge Janet King. She
allowed him to remain free while
his case is pending, but said she
would require drug testing.
Wheeler’s lawyer, Phillip
Turner, said he had no additional
comment after the hearing.
Prosecutors wrote in a court
filing that Wheeler was paid a
salary in bitcoin by Alexandre
Cazes, the 25-year-old Canadian
owner of AlphaBay. From
May 2015 through July 3 of this
year, Wheeler worked with Cazes
and others to use AlphaBay to
traffic in personal access
information and use it without
authorization to obtain money,
goods and services, the court
filing says.
— Associated Press
ALSO IN BUSINESS
A dozen national and
Midwestern agricultural groups
sued on Wednesday to overturn a
California decision that could
force the popular weedkiller
Roundup to carry warning labels
that it can cause cancer. The
lawsuit filed in federal court in
Sacramento seeks an injunction
barring the state from enforcing
what the suit describes as a “false”
and “misleading” warning.
California’s Office of
Environmental Health Hazard
Assessment added Roundup
ingredient glyphosate to a list of
chemicals known to cause cancer.
Amazon is giving its Prime
members their first taste of
special discounts at its recently
acquired Whole Foods stores.
Amazon said it will email Prime
members a coupon starting
Wednesday to buy organic or
antibiotic-free turkeys for about
50 cents a pound cheaper than
other customers. Amazon said it
will also lower prices for all
Whole Foods customers on other
Thanksgiving staples, such as
canned pumpkin and organic
sweet potatoes. (Amazon chief
executive Jeffrey P. Bezos owns
The Washington Post.)
— From news reports
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
In political gamble, GOP gives permanent tax cuts to businesses but not people
The essential
gamble of
Republican plans
HEATHER
to overhaul the
LONG
tax code is now
becoming clear:
Big businesses get a large,
permanent tax cut, while
American families receive only
temporary tax relief that expires
as soon as 2023 in the House bill
and 2026 in the Senate bill.
In the House bill, the tax
increase would mostly hit
moderate- and middle-income
families because a credit
designed to help them expires
after five years. But in the
Senate plan, released late
Tuesday, virtually all Americans
would face higher tax rates
because the individual income
rate cuts go away entirely in
2026. The tax cuts for
corporations do not expire.
Public opinion polls already
show that many Americans
believe the tax bills are designed
to help the rich, not the middle
class. In a Quinnipiac poll
released Wednesday, 16 percent
think the plan will reduce their
personal taxes, and 61 percent
think the wealthy will benefit
the most, similar results to those
of many other recent polls about
taxes. On top of that, Democrats
are trying to hammer the GOP
for what they say are
Wonkblog
disproportionate benefits for
businesses and the wealthy.
Every tax bill requires
difficult trade-offs. The
centerpiece of President Trump
and congressional Republicans’
tax plan is lowering the
corporate rate from 35 percent
to 20 percent, which they say
will lead to faster growth and, as
a result, more jobs. But that has
to be paid for, or it would add
trillions of dollars to the U.S.
debt, a burden on future
generations that economists say
would slow growth down the
road.
“We cannot get a truly healthy
American economy — 3 percent
sustained growth — without tax
reform,” said Mick Mulvaney,
Trump’s budget director.
To make the finances work,
the Senate plan also includes the
repeal of the individual mandate
under the Affordable Care Act, a
change that saves the
government money but would
likely lead to 13 million
Americans becoming uninsured,
according to estimates from the
nonpartisan Congressional
Budget Office.
Republicans have said that
they expect Congress in the
future to extend these
temporary tax cuts for
individuals and families, but
that is not a given. America’s
fiscal situation could look even
worse than it does today, putting
more pressure on Congress to
increase revenue. Even under
current law, the deficit is
expected to grow to $1.5 trillion
by 2027 from $693 billion today,
according to the CBO.
Republicans have been
carefully crafting their tax plan
to limit the impact on the
package over 10 years, according
to projections by the Joint
Committee on Taxation.
Republicans may be counting
on a future Congress renewing
the tax cuts in 2025 or sooner.
That’s what Congress did,
partially, at least, in 2010 and
2012, when the George W. Bush
tax cuts, passed under a similar
mechanism, were set to expire.
Public opinion polls already show that many
Americans believe the tax bills are designed to help
the rich, not the middle class.
deficit. They face two basic
constraints. The first is that the
House and Senate have
authorized $1.5 trillion in
additional borrowing to finance
tax cuts over the next 10 years.
But Senate rules don’t
authorize legislation that adds
to the deficit after 10 years
without 60 votes, and no
Democrats are expected to vote
for the tax overhaul. Making the
individual tax cuts temporary
gets Republicans a large way
toward this goal.
By allowing the tax cuts to
individuals and families to
expire at the end of 2025, the
GOP plan shaves roughly $800
billion off the cost of the tax cut
If Congress did renew them, it
could add another $800 billion
to the federal debt.
Democrats and others
concerned about America’s
$20 trillion debt say it’s
disingenuous for Republicans to
make policy this way.
“Republicans have put
themselves between a rock and a
hard place: dramatic tax
increases on the middle class or
a huge hole in the deficit,” said
Senate Minority Leader Charles
E. Schumer (D-N.Y.). “Either tens
of millions of taxpayers will pay
significantly more the longer
this plan is in effect, or a future
Congress will extend the tax
breaks, making the deficit hole
they create massively deeper.”
If the tax cuts do expire, many
Americans might find
themselves worse off than they
are today. The rates would
return to today’s levels, and
another provision — a less
generous formula for calculating
inflation — will remain as part
of the law. That means people
will enter higher tax brackets
faster.
According to initial analysis
by Ernie Tedeschi, an economist
at research firm Evercore ISI
and a former Obama Treasury
Department official, about 57
percent of Americans would be
worse off by 2027 under this
revised Senate bill than they
would have been under the
original version.
Tedeschi’s calculations found
that almost 80 percent who earn
$50,000 to $75,000 would be
worse off.
Experts across the political
spectrum agree that the way
America taxes companies needs
a substantial change with lower
rates for U.S. corporations to be
more competitive against
foreign firms, but whether the
GOP plan needs to cut rates
from 35 percent to as low as 20
percent is an intense debate.
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine)
suggested a cut to 21 percent
might make more sense and
allow more middle-class tax
relief.
The average effective tax rate
that S&P 500 companies,
America’s largest publicly traded
firms, pay is just over 25
percent, according to S&P
Global.
It’s a tricky political calculus
for Republicans. They promised
higher growth — aiming for at
least 3 percent growth vs. the
roughly 2 percent the nation
saw under President Barack
Obama. But Republicans have to
sell a skeptical public that tax
cuts for corporations will help
the middle class.
“I don’t think it’s an optics
issue. I think again it’s just
critical that when we go from a
worldwide system to a territorial
system, it’s critical that it’s
permanent,” said Treasury
Secretary Steven Mnuchin. “I
think people understand that
we’ll fix the personal side.”
In 1986, the last substantial
overhaul of the U.S. tax code
under President Ronald Reagan,
Congress forced some
businesses to pay more to fund a
tax cut for individuals and
families. In 2017, the reverse is
happening: Individuals are
being asked to potentially
sacrifice so corporations can get
a better deal.
heather.long@washpost.com
Republicans continue to change Senate tax-cut proposal
TAX PLAN FROM A1
that could drive other Republicans to oppose the bill.
Adding additional tax breaks
for smaller businesses could appease Johnson, but it could force
the GOP to raise taxes elsewhere.
Leaving the Affordable Care Act
alone could make the measure
more attractive to Collins and
other moderates. But it would
run against the wishes of many
conservatives and Trump and
create other challenges in making the bill comply with Senate
rules allowing passage with fewer than 60 votes.
The opposition to the $1.5 trillion tax-cut bill threatened what
had been growing momentum
for the tax overhaul. The House is
expected to pass its own tax
overhaul measure Thursday. And
the Senate Finance Committee
hopes to do the same this week,
with the full Senate voting after
Thanksgiving.
Senate leaders made last-minute changes to their bill Tuesday
to solve several problems, including that it would run afoul of
Senate rules known as “reconciliation” that allow legislation to
pass with only a simple majority
if it doesn’t raise the deficit after
a decade.
Changes made Tuesday included removing the individual mandate, which would save the government $300 billion over the
next decade as it paid out less in
insurance subsidies for low- and
middle-income Americans, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. The
change would also, according to
the CBO, result in 13 million more
Americans going without coverage.
Senate leaders also changed
their bill to make tax cuts for
corporations permanent, but let
individual tax cuts sunset at the
end of 2025. The expiration
would also affect small businesses whose owners use tax law to
pay some of their income at the
individual rate, a change Johnson
said would unfairly penalize
small businesses.
Allowing those tax deductions
to expire would increase taxes
these companies pay by around
$45 billion per year in 2026 and
2027, according to a forecast put
out by the Joint Committee on
Taxation. House Republicans’
version of the tax legislation contains more generous, and permanent, tax cuts for these businesses, but Johnson said neither was
sufficient in its current form.
“These businesses truly are the
engines of innovation and job
creation throughout our economy, and they should not be left
behind,” Johnson said in a statement. “Unfortunately, neither the
House nor Senate bill provide fair
treatment, so I do not support
either in their current versions.”
The companies Johnson is referring to are often small businesses, but they can also be
companies such as hedge funds,
law firms, real estate companies
and other large businesses.
President Trump called the
Wisconsin
Republican
on
Wednesday evening to discuss
the concerns. It was not immediately clear whether Trump assuaged any of Johnson’s complaints, but the senator said earlier Wednesday that he held out
hope of voting for the bill if it was
fixed.
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah), right, listens to Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) Wednesday during a contentious markup session for the Republican
tax-cut plan. If the bill is passed by the Senate, it will still have to be reconciled with a House version that is different on some major issues.
Several other critical Senate
Republicans who might have reservations about the bill have not
said how they will vote. They
include Sen. Bob Corker (RTenn.), who has previously expressed concern about the tax
bill’s potential impact on the
deficit and said he would not
support a bill whose provisions
had an expiration date. Corker
said Wednesday he was still reviewing the bill.
Another potential holdout,
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), repeatedly declined to say whether
he would vote for a tax bill that
includes the proposed change to
the Affordable Care Act. McCain,
who voted against a previous
attempt to repeal the ACA, said
he wanted to review the tax bill as
a whole.
The GOP unrest comes as Senate Democrats exploded over the
late-night changes that Republicans made to the bill, saying the
new GOP plans would further
punish the middle class.
“Why do people think this is a
swamp?” Sen. Mark R. Warner
(D-Va.) said. “This is Swamp 101.”
Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin, meeting with lawmakers, said the bill would make
business cuts permanent because
companies needed long-term assurances of their tax rates for
planning purposes.
He also shrugged off concerns
that the public would balk at a
bill that would provide only temporary tax cuts to individuals.
Mnuchin, echoing other Republicans, predicted the individual tax
How taxation for individuals and companies will change annually compared
with current law...
... under the House bill:
... under the Senate bill:
+$50 billion
Tax hike
0
Tax cut
–50
–100
–150
2018
2027
Source: Joint Committee on Taxation
cuts would eventually be extended or made permanent.
“I don’t think it’s an optics
issue,” Mnuchin said. “I think
people understand that we’ll fix
the personal side.”
The
House,
meanwhile,
cruised toward passage of its own
version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs
Act, which differs significantly
from the Senate version.
The House legislation does not
touch the ACA, and only a small
portion of the individual tax code
would phase out. The bill, however, appears to violate Senate
budget rules because it would
add to the deficit after a decade.
If different House and Senate
bills pass, they will have to be
reconciled in a way that ultimately complies with Senate rules.
Still, House Republicans
seemed largely ready to pass the
bill and notch a legislative win.
As of Wednesday evening, fewer
than a dozen GOP members had
come out against the bill — most
of them from the high-tax states
of New York, New Jersey and
2018
2027
THE WASHINGTON POST
California, where the bill’s partial
elimination of a tax deduction for
state and local taxes is controversial.
But other members from those
states, including Reps. Jeff Denham (R-Calif.), John Katko
(R-N.Y.), Claudia Tenney (R-N.Y.)
and David Valadao (R-Calif.), said
in recent days they are supporting or leaning toward supporting
the bill.
House Majority Whip Steve
Scalise (R-La.) said the vote count
was “looking real good” in an
interview. “I think most people
know how important it is to cut
taxes and get the economy moving again, and this bill does that,”
he said.
Trump is expected to visit Capitol Hill on Thursday morning
and deliver a pep talk to House
Republicans moments before
they go to the House floor to
advance the legislation.
Scalise said a conference committee would probably be needed
to bridge differences with the
Senate. The Senate version of the
bill, for instance, eliminates the
state and local tax deduction, also
known as “SALT.”
“We have a lot of good members who are for this bill only
because we addressed and fixed
the SALT problem,” Scalise said.
“No knock on their bill, but it’s
not something they had to focus
on, and it will have to be in a final
product.”
In the upper chamber, the
debate over the Republican bill
grew heated Wednesday in the
Senate Finance Committee.
Committee Chairman Orrin G.
Hatch (R-Utah), typically one of
the chamber’s most collegial
members, bristled at attacks
from Democrats.
At one point, Hatch said he
was sick of Democrats pursuing
ways to add government spending while simultaneously lecturing Republicans about adding to
the debt.
“I’ve had enough of that to last
me the rest of my life,” he said.
Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.), a
member of the Finance Committee and the GOP Senate leadership, raised the possibility that
Republicans could hold a vote
once the bill comes to the Senate
floor to waive the budget rules
and allow the individual cuts to
be permanent. That would require 60 votes, forcing Democrats to decide whether to hold
firm in opposition or vote to
ensure middle-class tax cuts are
kept for the long term.
“All we need is a few Dems to
help us,” Thune said.
Republican leaders worry that
more GOP lawmakers could join
Johnson and Collins in raising
major objections to the bill.
Sen. Lamar Alexander (RTenn.) said Wednesday that he
would support the tax bill as
currently designed, but that it
was unclear if the changes to the
ACA would be allowed to remain.
“That’s yet to be determined,
whether that will be in the final
bill,” he said.
Alexander said he favored
passing the tax-cut bill with the
provision that repeals the individual mandate and then hold a
vote on a separate, bipartisan
measure that he has worked on
with Sen. Patty Murray (DWash.). That provision would resume funding of federal subsidies
to help people afford health insurance after the Trump administration halted those payments in
October.
Democratic support, however,
remains elusive. Sen. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.), a key moderate
broker, said he has been in touch
with White House aides in recent
days about supporting the plan,
but “I don’t see it improving.”
“Between the debt and the
insensitivity of this doing whatever they can to make sure that
people at the top of the food
chain are getting the tax breaks
and the people who benefit the
most are the people who need it
the least — it makes no sense,”
Manchin said.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
mike.debonis@washpost.com
Ed O’Keefe contributed to this report.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
Killing Obamacare mandate could cost upper middle class
GOP proposal may be
popular in short term but
could drive up premiums
BY
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
The Republican proposal to
strike the Affordable Care Act’s
least popular provision, the requirement that people maintain
health coverage or pay a fine,
could bring an immediate political victory — but would backfire
on upper-middle-class people
who buy individual insurance
and pay full price for their plans,
health policy specialists said.
“The market is stable, but you
need to define ‘stable.’ ‘Stable’ is
the insurance companies ramming the rates to holy hell,” said
Robert Laszewski, president of
Health Policy and Strategy Associates. “That’s a catastrophically
terrible market. This is a
screwed-up market, to the 16th
power. But it can continue this
way indefinitely. So, therefore, it’s
stable.”
In the near term, zeroing out
the penalty for not having insurance would provide relief to the
roughly 6.5 million people who
paid a fine in the tax year 2015,
while retaining the ACA’s more
popular elements: Insurers
wouldn’t be able to deny people
with preexisting conditions coverage, the federal subsidies to
help pay premiums would continue, and the Medicaid expansion would remain in place.
That means Republicans may
have finally found a politically
feasible way to undermine the
Affordable Care Act, after other
attempts sank amid consumer
and industry concerns about people getting kicked off health coverage.
Repealing the mandate would
probably be popular in the short
term. A new Kaiser Family Foundation poll found that 55 percent
of people supported eliminating
the mandate. Meanwhile, insur-
ers, hospitals and doctors’ groups
have warned political leaders
that there will be serious consequences to discontinuing the requirement.
“If you look at polling data, this
is the least popular part of the
ACA. Hospitals will be mad at
you, but individual people will
not be,” said Craig Garthwaite,
associate professor of strategy at
Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management.
In the Kaiser poll, popular
opinion shifted against repealing
the mandate when people were
told about the possible repercussions: 13 million fewer people
would be insured in 2027, and
premiums would rise an additional 10 percent most years.
But Robert Graboyes, a senior
research fellow at the Mercatus
Center at George Mason University, pointed out that premiums
have already been rising.
“There’s certainly an argument
that says if you remove the mandate and leave the other [parts of
the law] in place, you may be
creating a very unstable market
environment; the question is
whether the environment is already unstable, given the fact
that the mandate, as created in
the law, was extraordinarily
weak,” Graboyes said.
Over the long term, the federal
government would be on the
hook for increased premiums for
the 8.7 million Americans who
qualify for premium tax credits
from the federal government —
with incomes of up to about
$98,000 for a family of four for
next year. People who receive that
assistance are limited to paying a
percentage of their income
toward their premiums, and the
government pays the rest.
“The benefits of the ACA could
continue, so long as the federal
government is willing to keep
opening its wallet for increasing
premium subsidies,” said Larry
Levitt, a senior vice president at
the Kaiser Family Foundation.
“At some point, that doesn’t seem
sustainable.”
It’s the 6.7 million Americans
who buy plans that comply with
the Affordable Care Act without
government assistance who will
pay the full cost of premium
increases triggered by the lack of
a mandate.
“These are people who do have
a good understanding of their
place in the economy, and they do
have a good understanding of the
need for health insurance in particular — because life is uncertain, and things happen. They
know all these things, and yet
they are the ones who are going
to be most penalized by this
policy change,” said Joseph
Antos, a health policy expert at
the American Enterprise Institute.
President Trump’s recent executive order directs the government to create rules for shortterm plans that wouldn’t have to
comply with the Affordable Care
Act. That could bring cheaper
plans that don’t cover pregnancy,
mental health or substance abuse
and deny coverage to people with
preexisting conditions.
That might appeal to people
who don’t receive subsidies and
are healthy, who would always
have the option of buying the full
coverage of the ACA plans if they
needed more comprehensive coverage.
But if healthy people flocked to
the much cheaper short-term
plans and sick people to the
Affordable Care Act plans, the
ACA premiums would continue
to rise — and people needing
more comprehensive health coverage could be priced out. People
who receive subsidies, on the
other hand, would be protected.
“What they will have created is
a system that will work only
when you’re healthy, and will not
work when you’re unsubsidized
and sick,” Laszewski said. “If
you’re middle class and sick, it’s a
disaster — and who is Trump’s
base? Who told Trump to fix this?
He’s wrecked the system even
more for the people who asked
him to fix it, but in the short term
they won’t realize it.”
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
It’s not perfect, but the translation feature in Google’s Pixel Buds is promising
Google has set out
to make its mark
on the headphone
world with Pixel
HAYLEY
Buds — wireless
TSUKAYAMA
headphones that
can control your
phone and that claim to translate
conversations in real time. But
how do they stack up? Google
sent us a pair to review to find
out.
The most important thing you
should know about Pixel Buds is
their full features only work with
Google’s newest smartphone, the
Pixel 2. While they’ll function
with other phones, you must
have a Google Pixel phone — last
year's Pixels, the Pixel 2 or Pixel 2
XL (which, buyer beware, have
had some early quality-control
issues) — to access the Pixel
Buds’ marquee feature: real-time
translation.
To be honest, it’s not exactly
real-time. You call up the feature
by tapping on your right earbud
and asking Google Assistant to
“help me speak” one of
40 languages.
The phone will then open the
Google Translate app.
From there, the phone will
translate what it hears into the
language of your choice, and
you’ll hear it in your ear. So, if
you’re speaking to someone and
they say “Où est la bibliothèque?”
you will then hear “Where is the
library?” in your ear. Then, when
it’s your turn to speak, tap and
hold the right earbud to have
what you say translated and
broadcast out of your phone.
The translation feature is
promising but not perfect.
Translation doesn’t happen at
conversational speed — this is
not Star Trek’s universal
translator or Douglas Adams’s
The
Switch
Babel fish. Still, it is much better
than a phrase book. While
human translators need not fear
they may be without a job, it
could be good for travelers or
others who want to have a
simple, if somewhat halting, chat
in another language.
That said, needing a translator
is not a scenario that’s likely to
come up for most people
everyday.
If you don’t have a Pixel?
Well, these are far less
attractive. Pixel Buds can
connect to other Android phones
and iPhones but only, essentially,
as normal wireless ear buds.
On all phones, you can tap
your right earbud to call up your
virtual assistant — Google
Assistant on Android phones,
Siri on iPhones. Swipe forward
on your earbud to turn up the
volume, and back to turn it
down. Sound quality is about on
par with other Bluetooth
headphones I’ve tried, which is
to say not mind-blowing but
pretty good for listening to music
while doing other things.
The Pixel Buds don’t skimp on
volume; I rarely found cause to
crank them above 50 percent.
They are comfortable, with a
fabric loop that you can adjust to
fit into your ear.
I completed a workout
without them falling out.
Pixel Buds are the same price
as Apple’s AirPods at $159. Like
AirPods, Pixel Buds come with a
case that doubles as a quickcharging portable battery, so you
can juice them up on the go.
The headphones themselves
will give you about five hours of
juice, which you can extend by
popping them in the case.
I had little trouble getting
them to last a full day this way.
based volume control, which I
found more convenient than
asking Siri to adjust the volume
all the time.
On the flip side, the additional
controls make them more
complicated than AirPods, both
in setup and operation. There’s a
steeper learning curve in using
these than AirPods, and Pixel
Buds aren’t quite as smart about,
for example, pausing when
they’re not in your ears.
Finally, while Google Pixel
Buds don’t plug into your phone,
they do have a 20-inch cord
connecting the two buds.
Why get a pair of wireless
headphones with a cord?
Well, for me, it was a good
thing — I could drape them
around my neck and not worry
about losing one.
If you hate having a cord
resting on your neck or want
something completely wireless,
these aren’t for you.
Conclusion
Unless you’re really in need of
DAVID PAUL MORRIS/BLOOMBERG NEWS
An attendee at last month’s product launch wears a pair of Pixel Buds.
Google says its ear buds can translate conversations in real time.
Pixel Buds or AirPods?
The main factor in picking
between Apple’s AirPods and
Google’s Pixel Buds should be
what kind of phone you have.
Head-to-head, though, I have
three main observations.
I like the Pixel Buds’ touch-
’
E
TER
basic translation services — and
willing to pick up a Pixel 2 —
there are better wireless
headphones for a more
reasonable price.
That said, it’s worth realizing
the Pixel Buds are more than just
a pair of headphones.
They’re an early illustration of
what we can expect from Google,
which will try to make products
that stand out from the pack
with unusual artificial
intelligence services such as
translation.
They also show how Google,
like Apple, wants to create
products that work best with
other products that it makes —
and therefore encourage you to
pick sides in the technology
wars.
Neither of those points,
admittedly, are necessarily
relevant to how well they work
as headphones. Both are worth
keeping in the back of your mind
as Google continues to push out
products.
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A18
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
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Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
139.10
98.19
167.32
54.80
82.98
56.63
88.23
35.36
133.71
117.57
209.86
44.11
110.25
89.83
103.69
–0.3
0.9
–0.5
–0.3
–1.3
1.2
–0.7
–0.1
–0.1
–1.0
–0.9
–0.2
–1.5
–1.4
0.5
20.7
13.8
37.5
–6.9
33.5
11.4
4.9
8.9
9.2
7.3
31.1
–17.4
41.3
30.0
–0.5
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
0.8481
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1791
0.0088
1.3170
0.3016
0.7832
0.0520
0.0075
1.1170
0.2557
0.6642
0.0441
148.6220
34.0410
88.3810
5.8698
0.2290
0.5947
0.0395
2.5969
0.1717
Japan ¥ per
112.8500
133.0600
Britain £ per
0.7593
0.8952
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.3152
3.9101
0.0293
4.3635
Canada $ per
1.2769
1.5055
0.0113
1.6816
0.3851
Mexico $ per
19.2260
22.6690
0.1700
25.3204
5.8030
Mexico $
0.0664
15.0568
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 26,521.20
Russell 2000
1464.10
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 522.73
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
13.13
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
–0.5
–0.5
–0.5
13.3
YTD % Chg
13.9
7.9
16.9
–6.5
Daily
% Chg
–0.3
+0.1
–0.7
–0.4
–0.7
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
(Ticker) % Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.6300
$16.97
$9.7625
$0.1509
$4.3775
+1.0
–0.6
+0.9
–0.1
–1.7
day
$800
month
$1200
$1000
0.5
0.0
–0.2
–0.1
0.1
0.5
–0.2
2.3
–0.1
Gainers
Vitamin Shoppe Inc
Nektar Therapeutics
Cray Inc
Children's Place
AK Steel Holding
CDK Global Inc
World Acceptance
Chico's FAS Inc
Dick's Sprtg Goods
INC Research
Spectrum Pharma
Engility Holdings
AK Air
Oclaro Inc
Consolidated Comm
Aceto Corp
Cambrex Corp
AMAG Pharma
Foot Locker Inc
PetMed Express Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$3.95
$43.07
$19.75
$120.65
$4.37
$65.85
$76.12
$7.77
$26.86
$36.00
$19.66
$28.01
$64.44
$6.36
$13.70
$9.73
$47.35
$14.20
$31.20
$38.87
9.7
8.9
7.0
5.9
5.6
5.1
5.1
5.0
5.0
4.8
4.6
4.6
4.5
4.4
4.4
4.4
4.1
4.0
4.0
4.0
Losers
Acorda Therapeutics
Target Corp
Kulicke & Soffa
Denbury Resources
DHI Group Inc
Fred's Inc
Pioneer Energy Svcs
Kopin Corp
Natus Medical Inc
RH
DXP Enterprises Inc
Emergent Biosol
Diebold Nixdorf Inc
Veritiv Corp
SRC Energy Inc
Brooks Automation
Advance Auto Parts
LSC Communications
Insight Enterprises
TiVo Corp
Daily
Close % Chg
$17.00
$54.16
$25.77
$1.62
$1.75
$4.70
$2.00
$3.06
$38.35
$83.30
$25.01
$38.36
$16.15
$22.70
$7.88
$25.83
$91.58
$13.99
$35.40
$16.45
–39.7
–9.9
–9.6
–9.0
–7.9
–7.5
–7.0
–6.7
–6.1
–6.1
–5.2
–5.1
–4.7
–4.4
–4.4
–4.4
–4.3
–4.3
–4.1
–4.1
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Close
$3.0545
$3.5100
$55.33
$1,277.70
$3.08
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6400
2160
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.33
0.45
0.80
1.48
2.71
5.38
4.25%
Bank Prime
1.25%
Federal Funds
1.42%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.84%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.15%
10-year note
Yield: 2.32
2-year note
Yield: 1.68
5-year note
Yield: 2.03
6-month bill
Yield: 1.38
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.45%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
TRASHING ONE EGG WASTES
55 GALLONS OF WATER
F1275 12x10.5
Daily Stock Market Performance
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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Inside Scott Walker’s comeback strategy to ‘reengage’
Daily 202
green bay,
wis.— Scott
Walker hit
political rock
bottom in
September 2015,
soon after his
presidential campaign flamed
out. It was depressing to be one of
the first candidates to drop out of
a crowded Republican field that
eventually winnowed to Donald
Trump.
But the Wisconsin governor’s
first foray onto the national stage
also took a serious toll on his
standing back home. Less than a
year after getting reelected, his
job approval rating had fallen to
37 percent. Most Republicans in
the state hadn’t wanted him to
run in the first place, and many
felt like he cared more about
Iowa’s problems than
Wisconsin’s.
After two years of mending
fences, Walker has clawed his way
back. His numbers have inched
up, and his approval rating is
back in the mid-to-high 40s.
Last week I joined the
governor at three events over
three days as he launched his
campaign for a third term.
During an interview at a tailgate
party across the street from
Lambeau Field before the Green
Bay Packers played in “Monday
Night Football,” Walker talked
about how much extra work he
created for himself by running for
president.
“I even had a sympathetic
radio announcer ask me just
tonight: How did you get
reengaged? He said . . . he
thought that I would never run
for reelection again because I’d
become a national figure and
moved on,” Walker said. “You look
at our numbers . . . and we didn’t
go back up fast. We just
systematically moved our way up
— not through paid advertising
. . . but through just reconnecting
with the voters.”
JAMES
HOHMANN
ANGELA MAJOR/JANESVILLE GAZETTE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gov. Scott Walker (R) addresses supporters Nov. 7 in Janesville, Wis. Of his presidential campaign, the
Wisconsin governor said, “The biggest thing I learned there was that you need to be yourself.”
As the GOP primaries
continued without him, Walker
convened the first of more than
100 “listening sessions” in all 72
counties. His advance team
would set up two whiteboards in
the front of every room. The
governor would spend the first 20
minutes asking attendees to say
something positive about the
state. Then he’d spend the next
hour asking how Wisconsin could
be better, filling up the second
whiteboard. He tried to talk as
little as possible.
The governor offered several
proposals in his budget related to
the themes that came up, such as
opioid abuse and broadband
access. “I really felt like the
listening sessions gave us a
chance to reengage, for me to
hear but also for the people of the
state to see that, ‘This guy is
committed and focused,’ ” Walker
said.
Walker ate a bratwurst in a
supporter’s living room here as
he reflected on the lessons of his
presidential campaign and
outlined his theory of the case for
2018. He lamented that he
listened too much to the advice of
D.C. consultants. His campaign
got too hot, too fast and scaled up
too quickly. He tried to appeal to
every faction of the party and
never picked a lane, which
opened him up to criticism for
flip-flopping.
“The biggest thing I learned
there was that you need to be
yourself,” Walker said. “Not only
personally, but campaign-wise,
we had a really good thing going
here. Particularly during the
recall, we ran against some of the
best that our opponents could
throw at us. . . . One of the
challenges in the presidential was
that it’s really easy to get caught
up in people saying, ‘You’ve got to
do this, and you’ve got to do that,’
instead of just being who we were
and running the campaign that
we would normally run here.”
He noted that his 2018 team is
stocked with staffers from
Wisconsin, not outsiders. This
year, Walker also finally finished
paying off the debt from his
presidential run.
This is Walker’s sixth race in
nine years. After getting reelected
as Milwaukee County executive
in 2008, he won the governorship
in 2010. Then he survived the
2012 recall, faced a competitive
reelection fight in 2014 and
almost immediately kicked off his
presidential bid with a big Iowa
speech in January 2015. Now a
year out from Election Day, on his
50th birthday, he’s back on the
trail.
The song that plays at his
appearances is “Centerfield,”
which imagines a baseball player
pleading with his coach to put
him in the game. Walker both
loves sports metaphors and being
on the field.
Distilling his rationale for
seeking a third term, he said: “It’s
not like winning a championship
and then you keep coming back
and showing off your ring and
not getting ready for the next
season. We’re ready for the next
season!”
He argues that Wisconsin has
“a reform dividend” now because
of the battles early in his tenure,
especially his victories against
the public-sector employee
unions and their contracts.
Walker accepts that he’s a
polarizing figure and says that’s
the price of governing as an
uncompromising conservative in
a purple state. Former governor
Tommy Thompson (R) won his
third term in 1994 with
67 percent. Walker doesn’t even
pretend to think that’s in the
realm of possibility.
“We did fundamental,
transformational things that will
really make a difference. . . . Some
people don’t like that,” Walker
said. “I’ve always felt that you’re
able to govern whether you win
with 50 plus one, or you win with
55 percent of 60 percent. Legally,
you get to govern no matter
what.”
The governor has thrown in his
lot with Trump. He endorsed Sen.
Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) ahead of
Wisconsin’s May 2016 primary,
but then rallied vocally behind
Trump during a prime-time
speech at the Republican
National Convention in
Cleveland. Asked to offer an
appraisal of the president 10
months in, Walker said: “His
actions speak louder than words.
A lot of people get hung up on his
words or his tweets. If you look at
the actions from where I sit in
Wisconsin, this is a solid
administration with a good
Cabinet.”
Trump was the first
Republican presidential nominee
to carry the Badger State since
Ronald Reagan in 1984, but it was
close. He won by one percentage
point, or about 27,000 votes.
Walker knows it’s essential to
turn out the GOP base and run up
the score in rural areas, where
Trump remains popular.
Several Democrats who hope
to benefit from Walker fatigue
and Trump backlash are lining up
to run against him. The head of
the state firefighters’ union
announced on Monday. He joins a
field with no clear front-runner
that includes the state schools
superintendent, a Milwaukee
businessman, a state
representative from Eau Claire
and a former state Democratic
Party chairman.
“A year ago, people were saying
that Democrats didn’t have any
candidates. Now they are saying
we have too many,” said Melanie
Conklin of the Democratic Party
of Wisconsin. “ It shows that
Walker is vulnerable.”
The Democratic primary is not
until the middle of next August,
so whoever emerges is likely to
have depleted their resources,
and there is little time to pivot for
the general election. Walker
hopes to amass a huge war chest
that allows him to carpet-bomb
his eventual opponent. This week
he’s wrapping up a one-year
rotation as chairman of the
Republican Governors
Association, which allowed him
to cultivate major donors across
the country.
Walker has capitalized on GOP
majorities in the Wisconsin state
legislature to advance his agenda
in a way that Trump could only
dream of. But he’s worried that
every Republican on the ballot in
the midterms will suffer if
Congress doesn’t get its act
together.
“They absolutely have to get
tax reform done by the end of the
year,” he said. “Then I think that
gives them the leverage to take
another crack at repeal and
replace [of Obamacare] by the
early part of 2018.”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
This group thinks Trump needs to unravel more environmental rules
BY J ULIET E ILPERIN
AND B RADY D ENNIS
The activists gathered behind
closed doors in a Houston hotel
meeting room last week had long
existed on the political fringe.
They’d dismissed the science behind climate change, preached
the virtues of fossil fuels and
seethed about the Environmental
Protection Agency’s power and
reach.
They also had been largely ignored by many top federal officials. Until the election of Donald
Trump.
But now, at the private meeting
sponsored by a free-market think
tank, the Heartland Institute, the
activists were both giddy and
grumpy. Much of what the Trump
administration had done to roll
back Obama-era environmental
regulations was positive, they
agreed, as were the White House’s
efforts to promote the oil and gas
industry and halt federal action to
combat climate change.
Yet, they said, it wasn’t nearly
enough.
Heartland officials handed out
a three-page “Energy Freedom
Scorecard” that evaluated the ex-
tent to which Trump and his deputies had delivered on their top
policy priorities. As much as they
welcome the administration’s efforts, the scorecard made clear
that they think the president
could do more — much more.
The scorecard, obtained by The
Washington Post, and the private
discussion, which was recorded
and shared by a participant, highlight the extent to which those on
the right are pushing Cabinet
members, such as EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt and Interior
Secretary Ryan Zinke, to enact
more sweeping changes. They
show how conservatives are working to place key allies in top policy
posts in the White House and
elsewhere.
“There are ways to get names
in, and we’ve used every door and
window and crack in the wall we
can use,” David Schnare remarked
per the recording. Schnare served
on Trump’s beachhead team for
the EPA but abruptly quit the
agency this spring after clashing
with Pruitt.
The scorecard lists several
items as “done”: rescinding
Obama-era rules curbing carbon
emissions from power plants; opt-
ing out of the Paris climate agreement; and approving the Keystone XL pipeline as well as other
oil pipelines. Nineteen other
items fall into the “started” category, such as cutting “government funding of climate change
research”; repealing “unnecessary restrictions and state bans on
fracking”; and ending “conflict of
interest on scientific review
boards.”
But 15 goals listed “not done,”
include ending federal tax credits
to wind and solar producers and
no longer basing military planning and strategies “on the predictions of flawed climate models.”
Heartland Institute spokesman
Jim Lakely confirmed that the
group produced the scorecard but
declined to elaborate.
The fact that so many priorities
remain on the to-do list, which
was drafted on Oct. 15, helps explain why several attendees at the
private session still groused about
the administration’s pace.
Schnare and other participants
also railed about other issues.
Competitive Enterprise Institute
senior fellow Myron Ebell, who
headed the EPA’s transition team
for the administration, described
its “key failing” as a “totally dysfunctional personnel process.”
“We only got people nominated
to the subordinate positions at
EPA this summer,” Ebell said.
Schnare criticized both Pruitt
and the White House for not trying to revoke EPA’s 2009 “endangerment finding,” which provided
the scientific basis for the agency
to regulate greenhouse gases as a
pollutant under the Clean Air Act.
“So the question then becomes,
what pressure can you put on Mr.
Pruitt to make him do it?” Schnare
told the group, before starting to
mimic his former boss’s twang.
“The answer he gave me was,
‘Dave, if the president tells me to
do it, I’ll do it. Otherwise, I’ll
decide what I’m going to do.’ Well,
okay, and then I resigned.”
At another point, Schnare
raised the idea of using the threat
of litigation to force the EPA to act
— an approach conservatives have
dubbed “sue and settle,” and one
that Pruitt curtailed after criticizing it for benefiting environmental groups.
“If we come up with this case
and say, ‘Well, this is what we want
to do,’ and then we send a little
note off to Scott Pruitt and say, ‘We
are going to sue you; would you
like to sit down and talk?’ It’s not
exactly sue and settle, it’s just, ‘We
are going to sue your a–, and you
ought to settle,’ ” Schnare said on
the recording. His audience
laughed in response.
But Pruitt, in a video message
for the Heartland gathering, emphasized their shared sense of
mission.
“Think back to Nov. 8 of last
year, the lack of optimism, the
concern about where we were
headed as a country. And think
about where we are today,” Pruitt
said in the video. “So, I want to say
to you at the Heartland Institute,
thanks for what you’re doing to
advance energy. Thank you for
what you’re doing to advance natural resources.”
While neither Pruitt nor Interior Deputy Secretary David Bernhardt could make the meeting in
person, Interior energy policy
counselor Vincent DeVito did address the crowd.
Asked this week why DeVito
had chosen to speak to the conservative group, Interior spokeswoman Heather Swift said in an
email, “The summit was an opportunity to communicate the prog-
ress the Department has made on
energy and restoring multiple-use
and access to federal lands, as well
as share ideas and perspectives on
how to achieve energy dominance.”
The institute’s scorecard on energy issues, Swift added, reflected
that Interior “is making incredible
progress on restoring traditional
multiple uses and access to public
lands and toward cutting costly
and job-killing regulations on responsible energy development.”
One environmentalist had a
different take on the gathering’s
discussion. “You’d think these
guys would be happy,” Greenpeace
USA researcher Connor Gibson
said in an email Wednesday. Instead, “at a time when they have
extraordinary power, they have
formed a circular firing squad,
mocking each other for not holding extreme enough positions and
chastising Trump’s EPA for not
prioritizing an attack on the legal
mandate for EPA to control carbon emissions.”
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
brady.dennis@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
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Dealing with the deficit
EDITORIALS
Sneaking in Obamacare sabotage
If Republicans want to eliminate the individual mandate, they should pass it on its own, not slip it into a tax bill.
R
treasury would have otherwise spent on their health
care, such as by helping them buy health insurance or
offering them Medicaid — $338 billion over a decade.
Republicans want to use that cash to help finance the
rest of their tax bill. They could have removed some of
the bill’s expensive and unnecessary giveaways to the
wealthy, such as its rollback of the estate tax. But they
opted instead to raise money by ballooning the ranks
of uninsured.
Republicans can try to comfort themselves by
arguing that eliminating the mandate is good policy
on its own merits, simply allowing consumers who do
not want coverage to decline to buy it. But the move
would also price people who seek insurance out of the
market. Killing the individual mandate would encourage people to forgo buying insurance until they
got sick, which would drive up premiums for all those
who remain in the system. “The resulting increases in
premiums would cause more people to not purchase
insurance,” the CBO explained, estimating that premiums would rise an additional 10 percent per year.
Repealing the mandate would be the most spectacular instance yet of a GOP action that has the effect of
raising Obamacare prices, which the Republicans
What next
for Zimbabwe?
continually complain are too high. In October, President Trump halted payments the federal government
promised insurers in exchange for participating in
Obamacare markets, forcing insurance companies to
raise premiums to compensate. The Trump Department of Health and Human Services then sabotaged
this year’s open enrollment period, which could also
result in fewer people covered.
Some have tried to do better; a bipartisan group of
senators developed a compromise bill that would
help stabilize Obamacare markets. But it has not
passed. There is talk of marrying this compromise
bill with the individual-mandate repeal, but cutting
the mandate would do much more harm than the
compromise would do good.
If Republicans really believe that mandate repeal
is good health-care policy, they should seek to pass it
on its own, with hearings, markups and debate. But a
fair process would only clarify further that the policy
is ruinous. Republicans who in July recoiled at an
attempt to ram through the Obamacare “skinny
repeal” have even less reason to vote for this drastic,
ill-considered and last-minute attempt to sneak repeal into a tax bill.
TOM TOLES
The end of Mr. Mugabe’s rule offers
an opportunity to rescue his country.
A
MILITARY coup in Zimbabwe may have
ended — at last — the misrule of Robert
Mugabe. The 93-year-old president was
reported to be under house arrest Wednesday after the army sent troops into the streets of
Harare in an apparent move to prevent him from
installing his wife as his putative successor. Now the
question is whether his removal can pull a onceprospering country from the ditch into which
Mr. Mugabe drove it. Unfortunately, the prospects
don’t look good.
Mr. Mugabe was a hero of Zimbabwe’s independence struggle and took power in 1980. But he
wrecked his legacy with bloody campaigns of repression against opponents and the summary expropriation of white-owned farms, which destroyed the
country’s export business. Zimbabwe’s economy
nearly halved from 1998 to 2008, and unemployment rose past 80 percent; shortages of food and
other basic goods haunt a population of about
14 million, many of whom have fled abroad. Opposition movements have been brutally repressed, and
most elections have been rigged.
That horrific record, however, was not the reason
for the military coup. Rather, it was Mr. Mugabe’s
firing last week of Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who was vying for control of the ruling party
with Grace Mugabe, the president’s wife.
Ms. Mugabe has a reputation for lavish spending
and erratic behavior, and the 75-year-old Mr. Mnangagwa has the support of army commander Constantino Chiwenga. But both men have a history of
brutal behavior: Mr. Mnangagwa is blamed for the
killing of some 20,000 civilians in the 1980s, while
Mr. Chiwenga oversaw the bloody crackdown that
followed Mr. Mugabe’s loss in the first round of the
2008 election.
Many Zimbabweans and some in Western governments may welcome any change in the country
after 37 years of Mr. Mugabe. Some reports suggest
that Mr. Mnangagwa, if put in power, could reverse
some of the regime’s worst mistakes. A Reuters
article in September, sourced to reports by the state
intelligence agency, said he was contemplating
forming a unity government with opposition leader
Morgan Tsvangirai and reaching out to dispossessed white farmers in a bid to revive the agricultural economy.
Mr. Mnangagwa is not, however, committed to
competing in an election, according to the Reuters
report. Given his notoriety and the dire state of the
economy, he could easily lose a fair vote to
Mr. Tsvangirai. Yet without an election that provides
a genuine popular mandate, the chance for reforms
music festival were gunned down in Las Vegas. The
California gunman, having killed his wife the night
before, went on a 25-minute shooting spree in which
he killed neighbors with whom he had long quarrelled, shot randomly at people and stormed an
elementary school. Five people died, and 10, including a child at the school and another on his way to
school, were wounded.
Teachers and staff at Rancho Tehama Elementary
who herded and locked children into classrooms
must be commended. The same goes for the police
who chased and killed the gunman. But that doesn’t
answer the question of why those quick-thinking
teachers were forced to face such fearful circumstances or what needs to be done to prevent other
children from feeling the terror of having to hide
under their desks from gunfire.
The killer was known to authorities. He had been
that could revive the economy looks small.
That’s why the United States and other Western
governments should insist on a prompt restoration
of constitutional order and a firm commitment by
the military to holding internationally supervised
elections next year. The outside world has leverage,
including potential help with Zimbabwe’s defaulted
international debts. The end of Mr. Mugabe’s rule
offers a fragile opportunity to rescue an African
country — but only if it does not lead to the
installation of another strongman.
arrested in January and was out on bail on charges
that he stabbed a neighbor. There was a restraining
order against him. There had been complaints about
him firing rounds for days before Tuesday’s events.
And there had been a call to police about domestic
violence. Family members said he had a history of
mental illness and episodes of rage. Yet there he was
— a poster child for someone who shouldn’t have
guns — wearing a ballistic vest and equipped with at
least a semiautomatic rifle and two handguns.
How did that occur? The shooter had been
ordered by a court in April to surrender all his
firearms. Was there a breakdown in the system?
“There must be,” the killer’s sister said, “some gates
on people like this from getting guns. This is the
same story we’re hearing more and more.” Sadly,
though, it is one that has yet to register with
Congress.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
Join the debate at washingtonpost.com/local-opinions
Don’t blame the victims when evil is visited upon them
Regarding the Nov. 13 front-page article “The
love of his life was killed — then so was he”:
Though I appreciate that The Post has called
attention to the brutal, deliberate and unspeakably
evil murder of my friend O’Neil McGean, I do not
appreciate its resort to an easy and reflexive
“blame the victim” ordering of the universe. How
could The Post celebrate the charismatic, magnanimous, trusting, joy-filled beacon that we all knew
McGean to be — the character traits that led to
such a loving relationship between McGean and
Brian Betts — and then ask, “How could O’Neil fall
prey to the same trap that had claimed Brian six
years prior?”
McGean was the most accepting, loving, I-met-
The Nov. 13 front-page article “Difficult decisions loom on tax cuts” mentioned that the Senate
version of the GOP tax bill would add $1.5 trillion to
the debt. Just to be clear, that $1.5 trillion is in
addition to the already humongous deficit spending
that is baked in the cake with existing spending and
revenue projections.
When President Ronald Reagan’s tax-reduction
package passed in 1981, the total U.S. public debt was
about 25 percent of gross domestic product. The
projection by the Congressional Budget Office is that
the House tax-reform bill would result in public debt
of 97.1 percent of gross domestic product in 10 years.
Then-Rep. Jack Kemp (R-N.Y.) was a key figure in
the passage of legislation that embodied supply-side
economics: Federal revenue would increase after a
tax cut because of rapid economic growth. When the
deficit instead increased in the wake of the Reagan
tax cuts, Kemp said he did not “worship at the shrine
of a balanced budget.”
Given the current full-speed-ahead attitude of the
Republicans in Congress to cut taxes, an appropriate
update of the Kemp quote should be: “Republicans
now worship at the shrine of deficit spending.”
John Plashal, Great Falls
Regarding the Nov. 10 front-page article “Brain of
NFL star Hernandez ravaged by most severe CTE”:
Aaron Hernandez’s life had an abrupt ending at
the early age of 27, which is a huge loss to his family
but at the same time a huge gain for science. Thanks
to his family’s donation, scientists could study his
chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which was the
most severe ever found in a person his age. Hernandez’s brain has a pivotal role in how parents view the
harsh reality of what the sport of football does to
their children at an early age. This concerns me
because football has become a beacon of hope for
many low-income urban communities. Many young
athletes will look past these truths in hopes of giving
their family a better life through the talents they
were blessed with. Parents need to understand that
the evidence provided of repetitive head trauma
from football can lead to CTE, and they should keep
that in mind before encouraging their children to
participate in contact sports such as this.
Mireya Arroyo, Long Beach, Calif.
‘Only’ five people were killed in a Northern California rampage. Instead of relief, we should feel rage.
S
In his Nov. 12 op-ed, “The new repealand-replace,” George F. Will said that the next
“repeal-and-replace” target should be the tax code.
The current tax code has grown to an unwieldy
muddle of revenue-collection and social-engineering functions that should be separated. If the people,
through their representatives, see fit to subsidize
child-bearing, homeownership, support of local governments or other charities, etc., they should issue a
check to the deserving individuals under separate
legislation. The amounts should not increase with
individual income as they do under the current
deduction scheme. If the overt payments would
embarrass the proponents, so should the deductions.
Businesses should be free to conduct themselves
without contortions needed to avert taxation; profits should be taxed only when they reach individuals
(or are sent overseas). A single rate should be
applied to all income; those deemed to be too poor to
pay should receive an overt stipend. The rate should
be set to balance revenue and spending, plus or
minus a few percentage points depending on whether it is time to simulate the economy or to pay down
the deficit.
Imagine the spending discipline that would follow if each year’s budget were announced as the
(single) tax rate.
R.A. LeFande, Silesia
A warning on CTE
Yet another needless tragedy
O INURED has this country become to mass
shootings that when another person with a
semiautomatic weapon goes on a rampage,
we’re conditioned to focus on reactions, rather than root causes. In the case of an incident in
Northern California on Tuesday, we feel gratitude
that quick action by school officials saved children’s
lives, that police acted heroically and that this time
only five people were killed. Yet what ought to be
foremost is rage at the refusal of lawmakers to take
action that might prevent these needless tragedies —
and a renewed demand for sensible gun-control
regulations, including a ban on assault weapons and
comprehensive background checks with better enforcement.
The latest carnage came just a little over a week
after the slaughter of worshipers in a rural Texas
church and just 45 days after 58 people at an outdoor
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
EPUBLICAN SENATORS remade their tax
bill into an Obamacare repeal bill, announcing Tuesday that they inserted an Obamacare sabotage device into the text. In a
stroke, they turned a fiscally irresponsible tax plan
into a monumentally unwise piece of social policy
that would do much more than widen the deficit. If
passed, it would be the most significant health-care
shift since the 2010 Affordable Care Act — and in a
decidedly negative direction.
The Senate GOP’s new bill would eliminate
Obamacare’s “individual mandate,” which requires
all Americans to get health coverage if they can
afford it. Independent health-care analysts and the
Congressional Budget Office, Congress’s official
scorekeeper, agree that this move would deeply
undercut the Obamacare system. The CBO estimated last week that ending the mandate would lead to
13 million more Americans lacking health-care coverage.
Yet, for Republicans, the coverage loss is not a
regrettable side effect of an otherwise sensible policy.
It is the point. Fewer people covered means that the
federal government would save money that the
. THURSDAY,
you-10-seconds-ago-but-I-will-treat-you-as-a-lifelong-friend human I have ever known. The nuclearpowered love and joy he spread through our
community of friends not only inspired our love for
him but also generated an electrical grid of love and
caring between and among those lucky enough to
have had him in our lives. McGean trusted and
made himself vulnerable to us all. His willingness
to be vulnerable was the core of his loving
relationships. Anyone has the right to meet any
other person anywhere without fear of experiencing theft, torture and death. Neither McGean nor
Betts was to blame for the evil that was visited upon
them.
Joseph Hennessey, Chevy Chase
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
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Show a little compassion, please
Regarding the Nov. 8 news article “Trump to
N. Korea: ‘Do not underestimate us. And do not try
us.’ ”:
I watched the president’s address to the South
Korean National Assembly. During President
Trump’s lengthy diatribe about the brutality and
suffering of the North Korean people under Kim
Jong Un’s regime, some delegates in the audience
appeared to be weeping. It is likely that some
members of the assembly have relatives living in
North Korea. A mention of the horrendous conditions there may have been appropriate. Mr. Trump’s
unnecessarily long and graphic description of their
suffering, however, pointed out a monumental
absence of understanding of the realities in South
Korea. The separation of families is a personal pain
that many there live with every day. They deserved
some consideration and sympathy from our president.
John McAndrews, Vienna
The role of charitable foundations
As a physician for more than 35 years with a large
multiple sclerosis practice, I am more than familiar
with the increasing challenges my patients face in
accessing their critical treatments. And the Nov. 11
Economy & Business article “Pricey specialty
drugs force seniors to make hard choices” accurately
highlighted the incredible dilemma faced by seniors
on Medicare who need expensive specialty medications to treat their illnesses. Access to medically
necessary health care is critical for successful
patient outcomes, yet it is often impeded or blocked
by unaffordable deductibles, co-payments and coinsurance. For many Medicare beneficiaries, there
are no limits on the amount of cost sharing.
However, the article left out an important part of
the equation: Independent charitable patientassistance foundations offer a critical safety net to
the Medicare population and other underinsured
individuals by paying for a portion of their outof-pocket costs. Until there is a systemic fix to the
problem of underinsurance, patient-assistance programs will continue to play an essential role in
ensuring that hundreds of thousands of patients get
the care they need.
Donald A. Barone, Washington
The writer is chairman of the
Patient Access Network Foundation, a nonprofit
funded in part by pharmaceutical companies
that helps people pay for the out-of-pocket costs
of their medications.
Letters and Local Opinions: letters@washpost.com
Op-eds: oped@washpost.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Can we
tame our
algorithms?
BY
E.J. DIONNE JR.
Republicans: Enrage
your colleagues
T
C HRISTINE E MBA
“S
omething is wrong on the
internet,” declares an essay
trending in tech circles.
But the issue isn’t Russian
ads or Twitter harassers. It’s children’s
videos.
The piece, by tech writer James
Bridle, was published on the heels of a
report from the New York Times that
described disquieting problems with
the popular YouTube Kids app. Parents have been handing their children
an iPad to watch videos of Peppa Pig
or Elsa from “Frozen,” only for the
supposedly family-friendly platform
to offer up some disturbing versions of
the same. In clips camouflaged among
more benign videos, Peppa drinks
bleach instead of naming vegetables.
Elsa might appear as a gore-covered
zombie or even in a sexually compromising position with Spider-Man.
The phenomenon is alarming, to
say the least, and YouTube has said
that it’s in the process of implementing new filtering methods. But the
source of the problem will remain. In
fact, it’s the site’s most important tool
— and increasingly, ours.
YouTube suggests search results
and “up next” videos using proprietary algorithms: computer programs
that, based on a particular set of
guidelines and trained on vast sets of
user data, determine what content to
recommend or to hide from a particular user. They work well enough — the
company claims that in the past
30 days, only 0.005 percent of YouTube Kids videos have been flagged as
inappropriate. But as these latest reports show, no piece of code is perfect.
We’ve come to rely on these
proprietary bits of code
as shortcuts.
Similar algorithms serve as the
engine behind almost all of the most
successful tech companies, powering
everything from Facebook’s news feed
to Google’s search results. (Google,
incidentally, is the parent company of
YouTube.) Naturally, these mysterious
tools have become convenient scapegoats for many of the content problems we face today, from bizarre videos aimed at vulnerable children to
misinformation in news feeds during
the 2016 election.
Clearly, Silicon Valley has some
work to do. But in addition to demanding more accountability from
companies after their tools go awry,
we should demand more responsibility from ourselves. We need to think
about whether we want to reduce our
own reliance on corporate algorithms,
and if so, how.
As the Internet has become an
ever-larger part of our lives, we’ve
come to rely on these proprietary bits
of code as shortcuts for organizing the
world. Algorithms sort through information and make decisions for us
when we don’t have the capability (or
perhaps just the energy) to do it
ourselves. Need to distract the kids?
Send ’em to the wildly educational
world of YouTube. The app will pick
out the safe videos — probably. The
mechanism may be skewed by profit
motives, biased by its data sets or just
generally inscrutable, but is that any
reason to give it up?
Why aren’t we more alarmed by
this? Maybe because we’ve always
used decision-making shortcuts, and
they’ve always had flaws. How would
we have chosen a children’s video
before YouTube? Perhaps we’d act on a
recommendation from a librarian, or
a peer group, or even a National
Legion of Decency list. These sources,
too, were insular, subject to personal
biases and limited in scope.
Still, there were meaningful differences between those old-school shortcuts and today’s machine-learning algorithms. The former had at least
some oversight and regulation; it’s
unlikely that a public library would
lend out nursery rhyme snuff films.
Shared community values made it
clear which choices were being favored, and why. And human judgment
— today almost quaint — occasionally
allowed for serendipity in a positive
direction. One might come across a
resource not carefully calibrated to
agree only with one’s stated preferences, and be the better for it.
Is there any way to steer our current
algorithmic regime in that more human direction? It’s not clear how.
Some lawmakers have suggested that
companies release their algorithms
for public review; others propose regulating corporate algorithms. For
now, the lesson for everyday users
may just be an urgent need for increased awareness, a reminder that
maybe we shouldn’t place all of our
trust in a decision-making function
that we don’t fully understand. Frightening children’s videos are, among
other things, a wake-up call. If there’s
something wrong on the Internet, we
should do more than just watch.
Christine Emba is a Post opinions writer
and editor.
A21
RE
WIN MCNAMEE/GETTY IMAGES
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) in Washington on Tuesday.
The tax plan’s
five worst dangers
BY
R OBERT E . R UBIN
T
he deficit-funded tax cuts advancing through Congress are a fiscal
tragedy for which our country will
pay a huge price over time. While
the details of the tax plan remain in flux, its
fundamental contours will not change. Nor
will its $1.5 trillion of deficit funding, the
amount stipulated in the recently passed
budget resolution.
Perhaps it’s hopeless to expect those in
Congress who have long bemoaned deficits
and the debt to oppose the plan. If, however, as a matter of conscience or renewed
reflection they decide to take heed, here are
the fiscal dangers posed by the plan.
To start, the tax cuts will not increase
growth and, given their fiscal effects, would
likely have a significant and increasingly
negative impact. The nonpartisan Tax Policy Center’s latest report estimated that,
over 10 years, the average increase in our
growth rate would be roughly zero, counting the crowding out of private investment
by increasing deficits but not counting
other adverse effects of worsening our
fiscal outlook. The Penn Wharton Budget
Model, using the same approach, estimates
virtually no increase in long-term growth.
Goldman Sachs projects an increase of
0.1 percent to 0.2 percent in the first couple
of years and an average increase over
10 years of just 0.05 percent per year, not
counting any of the adverse fiscal effects.
These estimates reflect three underlying
views held by mainstream economists.
First, individual tax cuts will not materially
induce people to work more. Second, corporate tax cuts will likely have limited
effect on investment or decisions about
where to locate business activity, given the
many other variables at play. Third, deficitfunded tax cuts will have little short-term
effect on growth, except perhaps for some
temporary overheating, because we are at
roughly full employment.
With no additional revenue from increased growth to offset the tax cuts’ cost,
the publicly held debt of the federal government would increase by $1.5 trillion. An
additional danger is that the actual deficit
impact would be increased by abandoning
the Congressional Budget Office’s nonpartisan evaluation that has been used for
decades by both parties in favor of partisan
calculations by those pushing the tax cuts.
Adding $1.5 trillion or more to the federal debt would make an already bad situation worse. A useful measure of our fiscal
position is the ratio of publicly held government debt to economic output or gross
domestic product, called the debt/GDP
ratio. In 2000, the debt/GDP ratio was 32
percent. The ratio is now 77 percent. Looking forward, the CBO projects the debt/
GDP ratio to be 91 percent in 2027 and 150
percent in 2047. After $1.5 trillion of deficitfunded tax cuts, those future ratios have
been estimated to increase to roughly
97 percent in 2027 and 160 percent in 2047.
These estimates likely substantially understate the worsening of our fiscal trajectory.
That’s because they do not account for the
increasingly adverse effect on growth of the
difficult-to-quantify effects of fiscal deterioration.
Exacerbating our already unsustainable
fiscal trajectory with these tax cuts would
threaten growth in five respects. These are
highly likely to be substantial and to increase over time.
First, business confidence would likely
be negatively affected by creating uncertainty about future policy and heightening
concern about our political system’s ability
to meet our economic policy challenges.
Second, our country’s resilience to deal
with inevitable future economic and geopolitical emergencies, including the effects of
climate change, would continue to decline.
Third, funds available for public investment, national security and defense spending — a professed concern of many tax-cut
proponents — would continue to decline as
debt rises, because of rising interest costs
and the increased risk of borrowing to fund
government activities.
Fourth, Treasury bond interest rates
would be highly likely to increase over time
because of increased demand for the supply
of savings and increased concern about
future imbalances. That, in turn, would
raise private-sector interest rates, which
could also increase due to widening
spreads vs. Treasuries, further reflecting
increased concern about future conditions.
And even a limited increase in the debt/
GDP ratio could focus attention on our
fiscal trajectory’s long-ignored risks and
trigger outsize increases in Treasury and
private-sector interest rates. The ability to
borrow in our own currency, and to print it
through the Federal Reserve, may diminish
these risks for a while, as might capital
inflows from abroad. But these mitigating
factors have their limits; at some point,
unsound fiscal conditions almost surely
would undermine our currency and debt
markets.
Finally, at some unpredictable point,
fiscal conditions — and these market dynamics — would likely be seen as sufficiently serious to cause severe market and
economic destabilization.
We have an imperative need to address
our unsustainable longer-term fiscal trajectory with sound economic policies. Few
elected officials want to face this fact, but,
at the very least, they should not make
matters worse. We can only hope that
responsible elected officials will prevent
this irresponsible tax plan from being adopted.
The writer, a co-chairman emeritus of the
Council on Foreign Relations, was U.S. treasury
secretary from 1995 to 1999.
COMPOST
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost
Ways to interact
with females safely
“ ‘Cancel the holiday party,’ said Mr. Cunningham, 37, adding that he means just until it has
been figured out how men and women should
interact.”
— The New York Times
I sympathize with Mr. Cunningham. There
is always that feeling right before a party that
you have forgotten to do something important. Sometimes it is “bring the dip.” Other
times it is “figure out how men and women
should interact.”
I have been worrying all week about poor
Mr. Cunningham, and I would hate for his
holiday party to be canceled over such a small
and pesky concern. And he raises a good
question. What, after all, is a woman, and what
is it doing in the office? Is it some sort of new
and very inefficient copy machine whose function your supervisor has not yet explained? A
member of a secret sorority of sorcerers whose
services are occasionally necessary to control
the tides? A potential friend and fellow worker? An Alexa or a Siri who has escaped from her
case? An object of undetermined properties
that definitely wants to see your genitalia? No
one knows! Science has not yet managed to
plumb the depths of this mystery.
There are so many ways to approach females, and so many minefields. One female
loves it when you climb up onto a promontory
and toss your horns in a devil-may-care fash-
ion. Another female prefers if you open your
brood pouch for a six-second interval so that
the eggs may be deposited. Still another
doesn’t want any brood pouches to open but
would like you to warm an egg on your feet
while she goes off to traverse the ice floe.
Should you collect a series of bright beads
and feathers and form them into a nest, then
perform a choreographed dance in front of the
nest with your plumage on full display? Should
you tell the female to hunt a gazelle for you
while you lie in the sun grooming your mane?
What do the females desire? One wants one
thing, another wants another, and they expect
you to know without ever using words! Squirt
ink and run away? Writhe rhythmically in a
semicircle, contorting your torso and shaking
your slimy tail? Thump your chest and ROAR?
As a display of dominance, eat someone else’s
young, anyone else’s, doesn’t matter whose?
Scream aloud and release your genetic material?
Look, it’s very confusing and there is, indeed, a lot of guesswork involved. Does your
female love it when you pursue her on your
spindly green legs, or would she prefer if you
left small bits of glass in a decorative pile?
Would rolling a large ball of dung toward her
delight her beyond measure, or would it leave
her permanently displeased?
I guess I should have asked earlier: What
species are you?
Human? Oh. No. Just treat women as you
would any other co-worker you did not expect
to mate with. Have a good party.
— Alexandra Petri
he GOP bill that should be
called the Cut Taxes on President Trump and Other Very
Rich People Act of 2017 always had a secondary purpose: to
jack up the deficit so Republicans
could later cry out in horror, “Look at
that awful debt!” They would then use
the pools of red ink they created to
justify deep cuts in social programs.
But people who call themselves
conservative are shoveling out so
much money so fast to corporations
and the privileged that they needed
some health-care cuts upfront — at
the expense of coverage for millions
of our less fortunate brothers and
sisters.
And so on Tuesday, the Senate majority took an appalling bill and made
it even more atrocious. To their ungainly concoction of tax breaks for the
various interests that support them,
they added the repeal of the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate.
According to the Congressional
Budget Office, scrapping the mandate would reduce the number of
Americans with health insurance by
13 million over a decade. To which the
champions of redistributing money
to the boardrooms and the yacht
clubs say: Oh, goody!
This cutback in coverage would
save the government $318 billion.
The Republicans would use this money to pay part of the cost of making
their corporate giveaways permanent, thus getting around budget
rules. They also nudged up temporary
personal income tax rate cuts and
increased the child tax credit. The
idea is to disguise just how much this
bill tilts toward the wealthy.
It gets worse: The CBO says that
ending the individual mandate would
raise health insurance premiums by
10 percent — another way regular
folks are being asked to cough up cash
because of this bonanza for the wellheeled.
And while the child tax credit hike
sounds good, it, too, helps the betteroff more than lower-income Americans. Those who make less money
can’t qualify for most of the new
increase because they tend to pay
little in income taxes (even as they
often pay significant payroll taxes).
As Sharon Parrott of the Center on
Budget and Policy Priorities noted,
“some 10 million children in lowincome working families would get
$75 or less.” On the other hand, she
said in an interview, a “married couple with two children earning
$500,000 would newly receive a full
$4,000 child tax credit, even as many
are getting additional tax cuts from
other provisions.”
Then there is this sleight of hand:
While the Senate bill makes the corporate tax cut permanent, it sets all
the proposed reductions for individuals to expire at the end of 2025. This
artificially decreases the short-term
costs of the bill. If those tax cuts did
expire, Americans in large numbers
would eventually see their taxes go up
under this deal.
Let’s take a step back and ponder
the exceptional irresponsibility of
what’s transpiring here. The same
people who complained that more
than a year of hearings, analysis and
debate around Obamacare constituted “rushing” the bill are now recklessly
spiriting through the system a gigantic
piece of legislation that would touch
all corners of the American economy.
They are changing it willy-nilly,
day by day, to accommodate this or
that political problem. They are rationalizing their thrown-together product with false claims about everything from whom it will benefit to
how it will affect the long-term deficit. They are using a tax bill to punish
their political enemies (people in
high-tax blue states, major universities, low-income Americans) and
reward their friends and donors (corporations and the very affluent).
And the allegations of outrageous
past conduct by Roy Moore, their
Senate candidate in Alabama, and the
shifting stories about all things Russian from Attorney General Jeff Sessions are consuming so much media
energy that these truly radical policies and procedural abuses are floating by with minimal public scrutiny.
We are told that there still are
responsible Republicans. It’s to his
credit that Sen. Ron Johnson (Wis.),
usually a reliable conservative, came
out against the bill, citing its corporate bias. Sens. Bob Corker (Tenn.)
and Jeff Flake (Ariz.) have said they
are concerned about the deficits this
tax bill would create. Sens. John
McCain (Ariz.), Susan Collins (Maine)
and Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) had the
courage to block repeal of Obamacare. McCain has been especially eloquent about the need for “regular
order.”
Well, responsible Republicans,
your time has come. You have the
power to say a loud no to cavalier,
partisan legislating; no to budgetary
folly; no to wrecking the health-care
law; and no to a bill that would
impose real sacrifice on your constituents down the road. Yes, you’ll
enrage your colleagues. But history
will treat you better.
ejdionne@washpost.com
How to get the rich to pay up
BY
D
STEPHEN MOORE
emocrats attacking the
Trump tax cut have primarily voiced two objections:
first, that it is a tax cut for the
rich. And second, that it will blow a
hole in the deficit.
If Republicans get smart, they can
squash both of these arguments —
and strike a blow for a much more
ambitious, once-in-a-generation tax
reform than the plans now on the
table in the House and Senate.
To do so, they should revisit an
idea that was central to the original
Trump campaign plan that Larry
Kudlow and I helped to craft. In
every meeting, Donald Trump told us
he didn’t want a tax cut “for rich
people like me.” So we solved this
problem by putting a global cap of
$150,000 on all deductions and credits.
Under this approach, no deductions (such as for home mortgage
interest or charitable contributions)
would be eliminated from the tax
code. But families whose write-offs
exceeded the limit would have to
pick and choose which ones to use.
For at least 95 percent of taxpayers, the cap would be so high as to be
irrelevant — and, remember, because
of the doubling of the standard deduction, fewer than 2 in 10 Americans would itemize deductions at all
under the House GOP bill.
But for multimillionaires and,
even more so, billionaires, such a cap
would effectively end their deductions. This would raise hundreds of
billions of dollars a year in tax
collections and would end tax-avoidance schemes by those with armies of
tax lawyers. Internal Revenue Service statistics tell us that at least
one-third of the cost to the treasury
from tax write-offs come from the tax
returns of Americans in the top
1 percent of income.
In short, tax deductions are the
playpens of the very rich.
We ran the numbers on what this
buys you. The money raised could be
used to cut the highest income-tax
rate to 36 percent — without giving
the top 1 percent a net tax cut — and
help fund the tax cut for everyone
else.
This would eliminate with one
swipe almost all the thorny issues in
the current tax bill. No longer would
it be necessary to eliminate state and
local tax deductions (a tough vote for
Northeastern Republicans) or place
a lower cap on the mortgage deduction (anathema to the real estate
agents’ and home builders’ lobbies).
The middle class wouldn’t face any
new limitation on deductions for
medical expenses and student loan
expenses.
Sure, the housing lobby and
K Street will hate this idea. But let
them explain to the American people
why Warren Buffett, Taylor Swift and
LeBron James need a mortgage deduction to pay for their mansions.
The idea offers something for
Democrats, too: a much more progressive tax code. How could liberals
such as Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)
and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.),
who argue the rich don’t pay their
fair share, stand against this idea?
They would look extremely hypocritical if they did.
History shows that eliminating
loopholes is a far more effective and
less economically destructive way to
raise money from the wealthy than
raising tax rates. For example, in the
1980s, after tax rates came down
from 70 percent to 28 percent but
most loopholes were eliminated, the
share of taxes paid by the top 1 percent nearly doubled from 19 percent
to more than 35 percent.
Higher tax rates historically have
been at best a disappointing revenue
raiser — in part because they make
loopholes even more valuable and
thus more likely to proliferate. (At a
30 percent tax rate, a deduction saves
you 30 cents on the dollar, while at a
50 percent rate, you save 50 cents.)
This was a point that Democrats such
as former senators Bill Bradley and
Sam Nunn and former House majority leader Richard A. Gephardt made
persuasively in the 1980s.
Speaking of the 1980s, one of the
enduring lessons of the last great
bipartisan policy triumphs — the
1986 Tax Reform Act — is that sometimes the best way to roll over the
special interests is to take them all on
at once. My guess is that if the GOP
adopted this tax code cleanup, public
support would skyrocket across the
political spectrum.
The writer is a senior fellow at the
Heritage Foundation and an economic
consultant with Freedom Works. He
served as a senior economic adviser to
the Trump campaign.
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47 57 54 47°
°
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Precip: 5%
Wind: W
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.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
RE
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
D.C.’s Bright Beginnings
preschool aims to provide
stability for children and
parents in fiscal straits. B3
Actress Rose McGowan, a
Harvey Weinstein accuser,
surrenders to police on a
felony drug charge. B3
John C. Raines and others
stole FBI files and leaked
them to expose an agenda
of domestic intimidation. B6
Democrats
sue over
uncounted
Va. ballots
DISTRICT 28 RESULT
IN CONTENTION
Stafford registrar: Late
votes can’t be included
BY
PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Hard choices when an insurer leaves
Parents of a preschooler with leukemia
weigh moving or paying more for care
BY
C OLBY I TKOWITZ
F
our-year-old Colette Briggs bounded into the
dining room where her parents sat in the midst
of another distressing conversation. Oblivious
to their anxiety, she cheerily asked her mom to
retie one of the loose pigtails atop her head.
Ever since her brown locks regrew long enough for a
ponytail, hair has been a big deal around here, her
father, Christopher Briggs, said as Colette skipped off to
rejoin her older sisters.
To watch the bubbly preschooler play, a perma-smile
on her cherubic face, no one would know she was sick.
But for half of her young life, since the day a Lyme
disease scare uncovered aggressive leukemia, she has
been in and out of chemotherapy treatments.
Now, as the youngest of the Briggses’ nine children
battles cancer, her parents, Christopher and Michelle,
are in a desperate fight of their own.
The health insurance plans available to them on the
individual marketplace do not cover Inova Fairfax
Hospital, where Colette receives spinal tap chemo and
emergency care. For years, the Loudoun County family
purchased insurance from Anthem, but this year the
carrier decided to stop selling in Virginia. Under
pressure from the state, it returned to some counties
and cities that otherwise wouldn’t have had any options.
Autonomy
of Metro
watchdog
questioned
Senate panel, inspector
general express funding
and censorship concerns
BY M ARTINE P OWERS
AND F AIZ S IDDIQUI
FROM TOP: Colette Briggs, 4, eats a snack with her
siblings; asks her mother, Michelle, to tighten her
pigtails; and has a tea party with her sisters. Colette’s
parents are searching for a new health insurer.
most of those tools.
Like much of the machinery of
government, the provisions in
question are esoteric and scarcely noticed when working as intended. But threats to eliminate
them have stirred a backlash
among local officials, who say
they’re needed to fund housing
and infrastructure projects that
would not otherwise be commercially viable.
The debate stretches far beyond the Beltway and, unlike the
parallel discussion over whether
to preserve the federal deduction
for state and local taxes, is largely
absent of a partisan tint.
Instead, city, county and state
officials say the funding tools —
which also include tax credits for
The U.S. Senate’s chief oversight committee is questioning
whether Metro’s internal watchdog, the Office of Inspector General, has the independence to
properly perform its job — writing to Metro this week that
possible censorship by the agency’s board or staff, along with the
OIG’s lack of separate lawyers
and funding are hindering its
autonomy.
The criticisms came in a letter
to Metro General Manager Paul J.
Wiedefeld on Tuesday, written by
Sens. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) and
Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) of the
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. In the
letter, they concluded that Metro’s inspector general is “not
sufficiently independent” from
the rest of the transit agency.
“[The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority’s] apparent control over the OIG appears to limit the OIG’s ability to
act independently,” the senators
wrote, “and may ultimately hinder effective oversight and transparency of the agency.”
The senators’ criticisms echo
complaints raised nearly two
months ago by the inspector
general himself, Geoff Cherrington, who wrote to the panel
HOUSING CONTINUED ON B4
METRO CONTINUED ON B3
Jittery Ohio sta≠ drops House tax plan faces housing backlash
8th-graders’ trip to D.C. Proposal nixes tax credits
BY
J OE H EIM
Sometimes, fear itself wins out.
That’s one way of looking at a
decision by an Ohio school district
to cancel an eighth-grade class
trip to Washington. In a letter sent
to parents last week, the North
Ridgeville City school district said
it was calling off a three-day visit
to the nation’s capital in the spring
because of concerns over possible
terrorist attacks and mass shootings.
School officials told parents of
the 320 eighth-graders at the beginning of the year that the trip
would be canceled “if at any point
we felt that the safety of our students and staff may be compromised,” according to the letter
sent Nov. 8 by North Ridgeville
Academic Center Principal Amy
Peck, trip adviser Brittany Cioffoletti and Jim Powell, the school
district’s superintendent.
“Sadly, we have reached that
point,” the letter continued. “Since
our parent meeting, we have
TRIP CONTINUED ON B4
richmond — The morning after
an Election Day that left control of
Virginia’s House of Delegates in
doubt, the U.S. Postal Service delivered 55 absentee ballots to
Stafford County Registrar Greg
Riddlemoser.
The ballots, which arrived at
10 a.m. on Nov. 8, were 15 hours too
late. Under state law, they needed
to arrive by 7 the night before —
the hour polls closed — to be
counted in a tight delegate race
that could determine whether Republicans hang on to power in the
lower chamber.
But Riddlemoser, whose office
checked in with the post office
hourly until polls closed, was convinced something had gone wrong
when 55 landed all at once.
“There is no possible way in my
military mind that these ballots
should not have been available to
us on Election Day before close-ofpolls,” the retired Air Force colonel
wrote in an email to Virginia Elections Commissioner Edgardo
Cortés. “How can there be zero,
zero, zero — all afternoon and
evening and then suddenly 55? We
have a BOS [Board of Supervisors]
race with a tiny delta. We have a
HOD race with a very small delta.
Maybe 55 would have swung one
or both?”
Despite those concerns, Riddlemoser said the votes could not be
counted without violating state
VIRGINIA CONTINUED ON B2
INSURANCE CONTINUED ON B2
School district’s letter
to parents cites fears
of terrorism, shootings
L AURA V OZZELLA
that attract developers to
poorer neighborhoods
BY
P ETER J AMISON
The grand opening Wednesday
of Archer Park, an affordablehousing complex of 190 units in a
long-troubled neighborhood of
Southeast Washington, had the
trappings of similar ceremonies
in the past.
But along with oversize ribbon-cutting scissors and celebratory speeches, the gathering had
something less typical: an undertone of alarm over looming
changes to the federal tax code
that D.C. officials say would make
developments like Archer Park
impossible.
The development’s solar-paneled roof and immaculate workout room have replaced what was
once a set of squat brick buildings that hosted an open-air drug
market — but only with help from
a system of tax-exempt financing
that would be eliminated in
House Republicans’ proposed tax
overhaul.
The funding mechanism,
known as private activity bonds,
is one of several common tools of
municipal finance that would be
repealed under the House tax
plan, which is expected to come
to a vote this week. The Senate
plan, by contrast, would preserve
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
Limited health insurance options, less access to doctors
INSURANCE FROM B1
The Briggses’ Zip code was not
among those.
The only insurance option for
Christopher Briggs, who is a selfemployed communications consultant for nonprofit groups, is
Cigna. But Cigna does not cover
Fairfax Hospital, the only local
hospital with a dedicated pediatric cancer unit and where Colette
has been a patient for more than
two years.
“We have spent the last two
months on the ceiling trying to
figure out where the insurance is
going to come from,” Briggs said
one recent afternoon. “And I have
to solve this problem for myself.”
He pays Anthem $1,000 a
month after the subsidies he got
because of his large family, he
said.
The family’s distress is an extreme example of the pressures
facing health-care consumers this
year. The White House has threatened the Affordable Care Act,
changed rules and shortened the
window to shop for insurance to
Dec. 15. In response, carriers have
raised premiums and exited the
individual marketplaces in areas
that might not be profitable.
The exodus has left consumers
across the country who don’t get
their insurance through an employer with fewer health-care
choices, and in cases such as the
Briggses’ without access to the
care they had come to rely on for
chronic conditions.
In 2014, the first year the ACA
marketplaces were open, there
was an average of five insurers to
choose from in each state, according to Kaiser Family Foundation
data. In 2018, it will be three and a
half. Karen Pollitz, a senior fellow
at Kaiser, called it a “sleeper issue.”
“I’m not shocked to hear it,” she
said of the Virginia family’s predicament. “From the beginning,
the first year Obamacare opened,
there was a healthy mix [of
plans], and that started to constrict quickly. I always worried
that this was happening.”
The ACA included a guarantee
to consumers of “network adequacy standards” intended to ensure every marketplace had a
sufficient “number and types of
providers.” But those standards
have never been defined or enforced, Pollitz said. There are no
specific measures — such as how
long or how far it takes to get to
providers or what percentage of
in-network doctors a carrier has
to have.
“What we’re left with is just
words” about adequacy, Pollitz
said.
Ken Schrad, spokesman for the
Virginia State Corporation Commission’s insurance bureau, said
the state “has been fortunate to
PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: Colette Briggs, 4, with her sister Isabela in their house in
Purcellville, Va. Colette’s parents are searching for a health insurer
to replace the one that withdrew from Virginia. The plans available
to them do not cover Inova Fairfax Hospital, where Colette is being
treated for cancer.
LEFT: Cindy Jones with son Daniel Bowling. He is being treated
for leukemia at Virginia Commonwealth University Medical
Center, which until recently his only insurance option didn’t cover.
N/A/FAMILY PHOTO
have sufficient number of carriers
on the federal exchange.” But he
said it has been clear the entire
year that the uncertainty out of
Washington would have negative
effects on the marketplace individuals use to shop for coverage.
It is not uncommon for insurers to cut larger research-based
hospitals from their plans on the
exchanges as a way to cut costs.
By narrowing their networks, carriers avoid paying the higher
rates that academic medical centers charge.
But some consumers received
welcome news this week when
Cigna announced Wednesday
that it had reached an agreement
with Virginia Commonwealth
University Medical Center to
bring the Richmond-based hospital system in-network.
For Cindy Jones, the announcement ended months of stress.
When Anthem did not reenter
the market in Henrico County,
just outside Richmond where
Jones lives, she found herself in
the same predicament as the
Briggs family.
Her adult son, Daniel Bowling,
was diagnosed two years ago with
leukemia. He had been living and
working in Myrtle Beach, S.C., but
at 27 years old moved home so his
mother could care for him and he
could receive cancer treatments
at VCU. Too old to go on his
mother’s employer plan, he
bought highly subsidized Anthem
insurance — for about $30 a
month, his mother said — on the
individual marketplace.
Jones is Virginia’s director for
Medicaid, the state-federal partnership providing health-care
coverage to low-income and disabled residents. But even with her
deep connections, she was helpless when her son’s only option for
insurance didn’t cover VCU. She
even considered quitting her job
and moving with her son to North
Carolina so he could receive care
at Duke University Hospital.
The experience has made her a
better Medicaid director, she said,
because she is more empathetic
when people call in angst about
their coverage.
“The navigation of the healthcare system is almost as bad as the
disease,” she said. “We talk about
the number of people who might
have lost their care, but behind
each of those numbers is a family
under severe distress wondering
Virginia Democrats seek to have late ballots counted
VIRGINIA FROM B1
law. By a 2-to-1 vote, Stafford’s
electoral board agreed on Tuesday not to count them.
Now Riddlemoser’s email —
suggesting that the post office
somehow mishandled the ballots — has literally become Exhibit A in a federal lawsuit.
Democrats filed it late Tuesday
to challenge the outcome in the
race for the District 28 seat
being vacated by retiring House
speaker William J. Howell (RStafford). As it stands now, Republican Robert Thomas leads
Democrat Joshua Cole by
82 votes.
“Virginians should not be disenfranchised by errors made by
government officials,” said Marc
Elias, the lawyer for the Virginia
House Democratic Caucus,
which filed the suit on Cole’s
behalf in federal court in Alexandria. It seeks to have the 55
ballots counted.
A spokesman for House Majority Leader M. Kirkland Cox
(R- Colonial Heights), who is in
line to become speaker if the
GOP holds its majority, called
the lawsuit “unnecessary” given
that Democrats acknowledge
that the absentee ballots arrived
after the state deadline.
“The law on absentee ballots
is clear and was applied fairly by
a Democrat-controlled Electoral
Board,” said Parker Slaybaugh,
Cox’s spokesman. “You don’t get
to pick and choose which late
ballots to count; otherwise you
will have chaos across the entire
THE DAILY QUIZ
According to this week’s
gardening column on beans,
in the Local Living section, how
did the Turkey Craw southern
pole bean get its name?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click on
“Quizzes” to enter the correct response.
state.”
The Postal Service is aware of
the matter and is looking into it,
spokeswoman Darleen Reid
said.
In a letter to state elections
officials, Elias also asserted that
668 people eligible to vote in
District 28 were given ballots for
the wrong House race.
He said the claim was based
on vote totals posted on the state
elections website. The site indicates that two Fredericksburg
precincts that are entirely within District 28 erroneously operated as a split precinct, with
some voters given ballots for the
District 88 race and others for
the District 28 contest, Elias
said. A total of 354 voters in
Precinct 402 and 314 voters in
Precinct 201 cast ballots in the
District 88 race, a four-way contest that Del. Mark Cole (R-Fredericksburg) won with 14,022
votes over Democrat Steve Aycock (9,918 votes) and two distant third-party contenders.
“Obviously it is not a tolerable
situation for 668 voters to be
disenfranchised,” Elias said.
He has called on the state
Board of Elections to exclude
votes cast in the two precincts
from the District 88 totals, decline to certify a winner in
District 28, and take other, unspecified steps to ensure all
Virginians had the opportunity
to vote for the delegate who
represents them in Richmond.
The Fredericksburg Electoral
Board issued a statement
Wednesday acknowledging that
the board and registrar received
complaints “regarding House
Districts 28 and 88.” The board
conveyed those complaints to
Cortés, who advised them to
seek counsel from the Fredericksburg city attorney. “The City
Attorney advised the Electoral
Board to proceed with the election,” the statement said.
Cortés said Fredericksburg officials called his office late in the
afternoon on Election Day, saying, “We may have an issue here.”
He said the call came after a
voter in one of the two precincts
questioned whether he or she
had been given the proper ballot.
“Somebody thought they
should be in a different district
than what they got the ballot
for,” said Cortés, who said the
problem arose in an area that
borders both District 88 and
District 28. Cortés said the question could not be immediately
resolved, but his office has offered to help Fredericksburg sort
it out.
Republicans also were investigating.
“We are aware the Democrats
believe there is an issue and are
looking into it as well,” Slaybaugh said.
Slaybaugh said Democrats
had “misled people about the
types of ballots at issue” in
Stafford.
Democratic Party leaders initially asserted that the 55 absentee ballots were from active-duty
members of the military. They
held a conference call to high-
light the matter on Veterans Day,
assembling legislators with military backgrounds to speak on
the issue.
But Stafford officials said the
ballots came from absentee voters of all stripes.
On Wednesday, Democrats
said they had based that claim
on information that had come
from people “on the ground” in
Stafford. Elias said the lawsuit
does not claim the ballots were
“all military,” although some
may be.
The District 28 race is one of
three likely headed for a statefunded recount after the Nov. 7
election, in which Democrats
made huge gains in the House
and swept statewide offices for
governor, lieutenant governor
and attorney general.
Before the election, Republicans boasted a 66-to-34 majority
in Richmond’s lower chamber.
Now, the count is 49 Democrats
and 51 Republicans, putting
Democrats within striking distance of taking control. They
need one more victory to force a
power-sharing deal with Republicans and two more to take the
reins of the chamber for the first
time since 2000. Republicans
hold narrow leads in the
Thomas-Cole contest and two
other contested races. In those,
Del. Timothy D. Hugo (R-Fairfax) has a 106-vote lead over
Democrat Donte Tanner, while
Del. David E. Yancey (R-Newport
News) is up just 10 votes over
Democrat Shelly Simonds.
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
how we’re going to handle this
next. It doesn’t matter who you
are; when you have a sick child it’s
devastating.”
Briggs has spoken at length
with representatives at Cigna
who he said were sympathetic but
offered little guidance. In an
emailed statement to The Washington Post, Cigna said that it
does review “highly-specialized
cases” and works with members if
there’s a good reason they cannot
“immediately transition to another in-network health care professional.”
But until Cigna makes a similar
arrangement with Inova or grants
Briggs a special exception, Briggs
is on his own, desperately searching for a solution.
He has called the state insurance commission and his congressional representatives. The
office of Republican Barbara
Comstock sent him a form to fill
out before anyone would hear his
issue, he said. A constituent services representative in the office
of Sen. Mark R. Warner (D) was
kind, Briggs said, but couldn’t
offer a solution.
colby.itkowitz@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Baltimore o∞cer shot,
critically wounded
BY
C LARENCE W ILLIAMS
A Baltimore homicide detective was shot in the head and
gravely wounded Wednesday evening as he confronted a man
while investigating a killing in
Northwest Baltimore, according
to police officials.
Police Commissioner Kevin
Davis identified the officer only
as an 18-year veteran, who was
left fighting for his life after he
was wounded by a man the officer
believed “engaged in suspicious
behavior.”
The detective approached the
man to talk to him and at some
point, the “cold and callous” man
pulled a gun and fired, Davis said.
“Our 18-year homicide veteran
was shot in the head. He is in very,
very grave condition right now,”
Davis said at a news conference.
“That Baltimore police detective
was just doing his job on behalf of
this city. This is a dangerous
profession.”
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan
(R) said the shooter “will be
found, charged and prosecuted to
the fullest extent of the law.”
City leaders gathered at Baltimore’s R. Adams Cowley Shock
Trauma Center, where they offered prayers for the officer, his
wife and two children and asked
residents to help stop a cycle of
violence that has led to more than
300 homicides so far this year.
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To become a morning workout person, Gold’s Gym’s April 2017 issue
of Strength Exchange (Own the A.M.) suggests you banish blue light
and “power down” at least how many minutes before going to bed?
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Looking for steamy? Search no more.
Head to a play with a sassy score.
The Pajama Game at Arena Stage
Sports seductive dance numbers, the current rage.
Warner spokesman Kevin Hall
said the senator’s office reached
out to Cigna this month and received assurance that it would try
to work with the Briggs family.
“It’s heartbreaking that it’s
families like the Briggses bearing
the brunt of the confusion and
expense” of attempts to repeal the
ACA, Hall said. “We do what we
can; we try to ring the bells at a
higher level than individuals can
reach on their own.”
At his most desperate, Briggs
considered selling his home and
moving the family to another
county in Virginia that offers Anthem coverage or to another state
such as Pennsylvania or Texas,
which have top-tier children’s
hospitals.
Some health-care experts suggested he rent or buy a small
apartment in another county and
list it as his primary residence.
But he has no interest in committing insurance fraud, he said.
Even if Briggs could move his
11-person family to another Zip
code, which he’d have to do before
open enrollment closes in midDecember, it would feel like a
tenuous fix because there is no
guarantee the plan he would get
would be there next year.
He also considered resurrecting an academic research nonprofit organization he established in 2005 but never got off
the ground, and hiring a few
employees so he could be eligible
for group insurance. But raising
seed capital to get the organization going has proven impossible
in such a short window of time.
His final Hail Mary pass is to
give up his solo business and go
back to working for someone else.
He is in talks with a former client
to hire him so he can buy employer-based insurance. The premiums under the coverage from his
former client would be as much as
$3,000 a month, he said, triple
what he had paid Anthem.
It means giving up his independence, but the only thing that
matters now, he says, is Colette.
“If we lose her,” Michelle Briggs
began to say, her voice catching
and trailing off. “I’ll be happy we
had even five minutes,” Christopher Briggs said tearfully.
They joined Colette and her
two sisters in the playroom,
where the girls were hosting a tea
party. Colette pulled cutout photos of Disney characters from her
Make-A-Wish Foundation box.
She wants to sleep in Cinderella’s
castle and eat Mickey Mouseshaped waffles at Disney World.
But only if her siblings can come,
too.
Briggs stood in the doorway
and quietly watched his little girl
play, so full of life.
Then Colette asked her mom to
retie her pigtails.
EARN 5 POINTS AND A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES. Answer our Scavenger Hunt questions, then go to washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click “Quizzes” to enter your responses.
“We cannot have violent criminals running our streets,” Mayor
Catherine Pugh said. “Too many
guns on our streets. Too many
victims.”
Thomas Scalea, the head of the
trauma surgery team, said the
officer was on life support in the
intensive care unit.
“He is critically ill. We are
doing everything we can to work
on the injuries to his brain,”
Scalea said.
Police released a brief description of the gunman, saying he is a
black male who wore a black
jacket with a white stripe.
The Baltimore Sun reported
that the officer is a homicide
detective who was wounded in
the 900 block of Bennett Place, in
a Zip code the newspaper said has
had more than two dozen killings
this year.
Wednesday’s shooting is the
second officer shot this month in
Northwest Baltimore. About
12:45 a.m. on Nov. 4, off-duty D.C.
police Sgt. Tony Anthony Mason
Jr., 40, was fatally shot while
sitting with a woman in a car in
the 2800 block of Elgin Avenue in
West Baltimore.
“This investigation is very fluid; it’s ongoing, it’s complex,”
Davis said. “This is going to be a
long night for detectives and investigators at the scene of this
crime.”
clarence.williams@washpost.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
VIRGINIA
McGowan turns herself
in on felony drug charge
BY
D ANA H EDGPETH
Actress Rose McGowan, one of
the leading voices speaking out
against Hollywood producer
Harvey Weinstein, turned herself
in after a warrant was issued for
her arrest on a drug charge in
Virginia.
McGowan was charged with
felony possession of a controlled
substance after an incident in
January at Dulles International
Airport. She turned herself in
Tuesday at the Loudoun County
Adult Detention Center, according to Kraig Troxell, a spokesman
for the county sheriff ’s office,
and was released on a $5,000
unsecured bond.
According to Metropolitan
Washington Airports Authority
police, “the charge stems from a
police investigation of personal
belongings that tested positive
for narcotics and were left behind on a flight” on Jan. 20.
Last month, the MWAAP said
it had obtained a warrant for
McGowan’s arrest on Feb. 1.
They said they had tried to
reach McGowan so she could
respond to the charge.
The actress has claimed Weinstein, who has been accused of
sexual harassment spanning decades, raped her and later tried to
pay her in exchange for her
silence. In October, after learning of the charge, McGowan put
up messages on Twitter, saying,
“Are they trying to silence me?
There is a warrant out for my
arrest in Virginia. What a load of
HORSES---.”
The actress is well known for
her roles in the horror film
COURTESY OF LOUDOUN COUNTY SHERIFF
Actress Rose McGowan was
released on a $5,000 unsecured
bond after turning herself in.
“Scream” and in the TV series
“Charmed.”
James W. Hundley, a lawyer in
Vienna whose office said he is
representing McGowan on the
charges, did not respond to
phone calls Wednesday.
McGowan told the New Yorker
in a Tuesday article that she
didn’t respond to the February
warrant for months out of worry
she was being followed by people
Weinstein had hired.
She said she hired a private
investigator to “investigate
whether the warrant was real.”
In that article, McGowan and
lawyer Hundley said they believed the drugs, which were
found in McGowan’s wallet after
she left it behind when she got
off the plane, could have been
planted when she didn’t have
access to her wallet on the flight.
dana.hedgpeth@washpost.com
Perry Stein contributed to this report.
EZ
B3
M2
Preschool teaches kids, parents a path to stability
“If the parents
aren’t stable, the
children can’t be.”
Benita Garner
had neatly
distilled into nine
John
words the
Kelly's
philosophy of
Washington Bright Beginnings,
a unique
preschool on
M Street NW near North Capitol
Street.
When a family is poor or
homeless — or is just one financial
calamity away from losing its
home — it is often the children
who suffer the most. They grow up
experiencing the trauma that
poverty visits upon its victims.
They risk falling behind before
they’ve even started.
That’s what Bright Beginnings,
a partner in The Washington Post
Helping Hand, tries to prevent.
Garner’s son Dean started at
Bright Beginnings when he was
18 months old. At the time, the
family didn’t quite fit the image
many people have of
homelessness. They were never
living on the streets or in a shelter.
But they were certainly on thin
ice.
While caring for her sick
mother, Benita had to give up her
job working the night shift at a
post office. Money got tight, and
she and her kids ended up
crashing with various friends and
family members.
“I was used to having my own
household, and here I was living
with people,” she said. “You know,
you kind of overstay your
welcome.” (She and a friend now
share a house in Northeast.)
Garner learned about Bright
Beginnings and toured its facility.
It’s one of several social service
groups that share space in the
Perry School, a building that
JOHN KELLY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Benita Garner of D.C. and son Dean at Bright Beginnings, which
offers child care and preschool to children from homeless families.
began life in 1891 as the M Street
School, one of the first public high
schools for black Washingtonians.
“Just the feeling when I came
through the door felt welcoming,”
Benita said. “I’m like, okay, their
mission is to try to do family
stability. A lot of people just focus
on the kid, but they focus on the
whole family. That was a plus for
me.”
Parents can take advantage of
many programs at Bright
Beginnings. There are parenting
classes, financial literacy classes,
yoga classes, a club to learn about
healthy eating . . .
“You come in and you have an
action plan,” Garner said. “They
ask you what your goals are. . . .
They help you go to school if you
didn’t finish high school and even
have some certification classes
you can take.”
Garner was able to get funds for
training to be a medical assistant.
In January, with help from Bright
Beginnings, she will start classes
at the University of the District of
Columbia to become a childdevelopment associate. She has
spent so much time volunteering
at Bright Beginnings that she feels
her future is in the classroom.
“I can intern here, then get job
employment here,” she said.
Bright Beginnings has about 90
children in nine classrooms: six
for early Head Start (infants to 3year-olds) and three for Head
Start (3- to 5-year-olds). The hours
are 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.,
allowing parents to go to school or
hold a job.
“You think ‘day care’ and you
think it’s just watching kids sleep
and run around,” Garner said.
“No, it was structured. There was
literally like a schedule on the
board.”
Yasmin Shaffi, the education
director at Bright Beginnings, said
the goal is to make sure their
young graduates are ready for
kindergarten. That means
teaching them their letters and
Senate panel wonders if Metro is monitoring OIG
METRO FROM B1
on Sept. 26, saying a lack of
resources is one of the “challenges the OIG faces when attempting to carry out its duties to
oversee WMATA.”
In the four-page letter, a copy
of which was obtained by The
Washington Post, Cherrington
included a laundry list of shortages, obstacles and potential conflicts of interest that he believes
compromise the office’s independence.
The correspondence from the
Senate committee and Cherrington outline some of the ways
the OIG is beholden to the transit
agency it is intended to monitor.
For example, the OIG must rely
on Metro’s human resources department to compile and vet
candidates for investigative jobs
— a role that theoretically could
allow HR staff to weed out candidates with the experience and
know-how to aggressively investigate the agency.
The OIG does not have independent legal counsel and “relies
on WMATA’s General Counsel for
legal advice” — individuals who
also have a legal responsibility to
protect Metro.
The OIG must go through
Metro’s procurement department if it wants to buy supplies
or hire outside experts, a requirement that became a problem in
the past year, when the inspector
general wanted to hire an independent mechanic to inspect a
vehicle as part of an investigation. Procurement officials initially rejected that request; Metro managers ultimately had to
step in so the investigators could
bring in their own expert.
And the OIG must obtain approval from the Metro board
before it can publicly release an
audit or internal report — in
effect giving the panel authority
to decide whether to release
information that might be embarrassing to the transit agency.
Cherrington said the letter
“speaks for itself ” and declined
to comment further. But according to members of the Metro
Riders’ Advisory Council, Cherrington aired similar concerns at
a closed-door meeting with the
group last week, expressing frustration with Metro attorneys’ interference with the release of
OIG reports.
RAC member Colin Reusch
described the conversation,
which was intended to be private, but said he was compelled
to disclose it because of the
nature of Cherrington’s concerns.
“He did say that he had at least
one report that was [so] heavily
redacted by the general counsel’s
office . . . that it would not make
sense to release it in that form,”
Reusch said. “I think he was
frustrated by it. I think he very
much wants to be as independent
as possible.”
Reusch’s account was confirmed by a second RAC member
who attended the lunchtime
meeting.
On Wednesday, Wiedefeld said
he had not had a chance to delve
into the specifics of the Senate
committee letter, but said generally he believes the inspector
general’s office has the autonomy
necessary to perform its job unfettered.
“Anything that has been investigated by the IG’s office, we stay
out of the way, and [Cherrington]
has access to anything and everything,” Wiedefeld said.
The Senate letter also expressed concerns that Metro
might be monitoring the OIG
and its investigators. The letter
mentioned an incident five years
ago, when a Metro employee
secretly installed keyword tracking software on OIG computers.
The OIG operates on the same
information technology system
as the rest of Metro. Critics say
giving the office its own server
could lessen the threat of hacks
and other electronic intrusions.
Metro confirmed Wednesday
the keystroke tracking incident
took place and said the employee
“inappropriately
monitored
communication of the OIG.”
When then-Inspector General
Helen Lew discovered the unsanctioned monitoring, she
raised the issue with General
Manager Richard Sarles. The employee was fired.
Metro spokesman Dan Stessel
stressed the 2012 incident was
“the action of a single rogue
employee.” Still, he acknowledged that Metro continues to
have the ability to monitor the
OIG with network security technology that comes standard at
most major companies or organizations.
Cherrington’s September letter to the Senate makes several
requests. He wants to boost staffing levels “to include hiring special agents, criminal analysis and
forensic auditors,” and he asks
for “fixed and independent”
funding that management could
not cut.
Further, to carry out certain
covert investigations, he asks for
confidential funds “located in a
local bank to use for cameo roles
and undercover operations
where cash is needed immediately.” And probably drawing on
concerns about Metro tracking
the office’s moves, Cherrington
asks for IT independence, including an independent Metro email
address.
Finally, he asks the Senate to
give the OIG’s special agents law
enforcement authority.
“These positions require surveillance and other dangerous
operations, particularly in investigation of overtime and workers’
compensation fraud,” the letter
reads. “This also provides OIG
with investigative tools and databases not currently available.”
The Senate oversight panel
asked several questions about
the operations and funding of
Metro’s Quality Assurance, Internal Compliance and Oversight
department — a division of the
agency that also is tasked with
conducting internal audits and
spot-checks of worker activities
but that is directly responsible to
Wiedefeld.
The Senate letter suggests that
office and the OIG are performing duplicative tasks — a notion
Cherrington raised in his private
meeting with the Riders’ Advisory Council. Some say such
audits are a task better performed by an independent
group, like the OIG.
Cherrington, one RAC member said, “seemed to be surprised
that there was such a similar
division within the organization
to his own,” the rider advocate
said, in an exchange confirmed
by Reusch.
In its letter to Wiedefeld, the
Senate asks Metro to disclose
QICO’s annual budget — and if
the amount is more than the
inspector general’s budget, explain why.
Jim Corcoran, chair of the
Metro board’s audits and investigations committee, said he sees
VIRGINIA
DISTRICT
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the value of having dual offices —
a unit that can act at Wiedefeld’s
behest to investigate issues he
feels are important, and a separate and independent office that
can dive into systemic problems
the general manager may overlook.
“You need to have a little
separation of power,” Corcoran
said.
Corcoran also said he agrees
many of the issues raised in the
letter are legitimate concerns —
but that fixing them costs money.
Cherrington asked Wiedefeld
to increase funding for the OIG
from $4.7 million to $10.4 million
for the coming fiscal year, but the
amount was not included in the
general manager’s recently proposed budget.
“It shouldn’t be news that
Metro doesn’t have enough money to do everything they want to
do. It really does come down to
limited resources,” Corcoran
said.
“It would absolutely help them
to have all the resources we’re
talking about. But it’s something
we’re going to have to build in
gradually over time,” he said.
Metro board chairman Jack
Evans applauded Cherrington’s
efforts to root out corruption and
wasteful spending, and he asked
Congress to step in to provide the
funding Cherrington seeks.
“What I would say to Congress
is, ‘Give us more money,’ ” Evans
said. “I’m squeezed as it is in
every direction, so where am I
going to get more money for the
inspector general?”
martine.powers@washpost.com
faiz.siddiqui@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Police search for man
in double slaying
D.C. police are seeking help
identifying a person in
connection with a double fatal
shooting that occurred in July
near Sherman Circle in
Northwest Washington.
Authorities released a video
that shows a young man in a
white shirt and dark shorts
talking to two other men.
Police did not note the location
of the video, but it does not
appear to be at the scene of the
shootings, which occurred about
2 a.m. July 30 in the 4800 block of
Kansas Avenue NW.
Juan Carlos Osorio-Herrera,
24, of Northwest, died at the
scene. David Santiago AmayaMedano, 23, of Northwest, died
later at a hospital.
— Peter Hermann
MARYLAND
Two dead after
mobile-home fires
Two people died Wednesday in
separate incidents after fires at
mobile homes in Charles County,
Md., authorities said.
The first fire occurred in the
1700 block of Marshall Hall Road,
about five miles from Indian Head
Highway in the La Plata, Md., area.
The name of the victim, an
adult male, was not released,
pending the notification of
relatives. The cause of the fire was
under investigation. Bill Smith of
Charles County Fire and EMS
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said firefighters found the man
just inside the home and brought
him outside. He was pronounced
dead at the scene.
Another fire occurred
Wednesday on Golden Farm Lane
in Waldorf, Md., according to
Smith. That fire also killed one
person, Smith said, but was
unrelated to the first.
— Clarence Williams
State senator charged
with obstruction
A Maryland state senator
charged in a fraud case was
indicted on an additional count of
obstruction of justice Wednesday
after being accused of trying to
tip off someone under federal
investigation while cooperating
with the FBI.
The government alleges Sen.
Nathaniel T. Oaks, 71, had agreed
to record conversations with a
target under investigation from
January to March.
Oaks (D-Baltimore) later told
the person at a bar in Annapolis,
“What we talked about, just say,
‘no,’ ” according to a statement
from the U.S. attorney’s office in
Maryland. Later, in a state
government building, Oaks told
the same person, “I’m going to ask
you for something, just say, ‘no,’ ”
prosecutors said.
Investigators say Oaks’s
messages were an attempt to warn
the person to avoid criminal
activity because of the ongoing FBI
probe. Oaks was indicted in June
on nine counts of wire fraud and
violations of the Travel Act.
— Lynh Bui
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john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
WET BASEMENT
OR CRAWLSPACE?
MULTI-STATE GAMES
MARYLAND
A helpful beginning
Your tax-deductible contribution
to Bright Beginnings can help
more kids like Dean. To give, visit
posthelpinghand.com and click
where it says “Donate.” To give by
mail, make a check payable to
“Bright Beginnings” and send it
to: Bright Beginnings, ATTN:
Helping Hand, 128 M St. NW,
Suite 150, Washington, DC 20001.
LOC AL D I GE S T
L O T T ER IES
Results from Nov. 15
numbers, but it also means
getting them comfortable in the
classroom.
“We want children to be excited
about learning — really get them
motivated and curious,” Shaffi
said.
Dean graduated from Bright
Beginnings in 2015. When we met,
we discussed books — Dean’s
favorites are “The Giving Tree”
and “Supertruck,” about a garbage
truck that helps deliver mail in a
snowstorm — and what he
learned at Bright Beginnings.
“I learned how to show respect
and be gentle and how to be
responsible,” said Dean, a very
thoughtful 6-year-old.
We were at Bright Beginnings
— his brother Clint, 4, and sister
Taylor, 2, go there now — and I
asked him how his old school
compared with his new one,
where he’s in first grade.
Dean paused before answering,
weighing his words carefully.
“I like this school,” he said, “but
I like being in first grade.”
When I spoke with Shaffi later, I
told her what Dean had said.
“I feel very happy to hear that,”
she said. “It really makes me feel
he got the right start.”
And that’s the whole idea.
Call for your Free Estimate Today!
703-382-8266 VA | 202-991-5599 DC
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B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
Local o∞cials say tax plan
gets rid of funding tools Montgomery executive hopefuls make their pitches
MARYLAND
BY
HOUSING FROM B1
revamping historic buildings,
and the New Markets Tax Credit,
which lures developers to poor
neighborhoods — are equally important in urban, rural, red and
blue parts of the country.
“This is not a political issue,”
said Richard C. David, the Republican mayor of Binghamton, N.Y.
He said he worries in particular
about the loss of the Historic Tax
Credit, which he said is vital for
transforming aging buildings
downtown in his city of 46,000.
Among the current projects
that rely on such tax credits, he
said, is the redevelopment of a
public library into a culinary arts
center by SUNY Broome Community College.
“They are starving our
financing for airports,
ports and affordable
housing, at a time when
this country needs to be
investing in all of them.”
Matthew Chase, executive director of
the National Association of Counties
“I could give you a dozen
buildings in downtown Binghamton that I think are going to
be stagnant without the Historic
Tax Credit,” David said. The proposed elimination of those and
other tax credits “shows a disconnect” in congressional leaders’
understanding of local government needs, he said.
That sentiment was echoed by
Matthew Chase, executive director of the National Association of
Counties, who said many of the
local officials he represents have
been baffled and upset by proposals in the House plan to remove
the private activity bonds and
assorted tax credits for government-backed development.
“They’re extremely disappointed that at a time when the
White House is focusing on infrastructure, they’re attacking the
top tools that we use for economic development and infrastructure,” he said. “I think there
was a clear lack of awareness on
what these bond provisions fund.
They are starving our financing
for airports, ports and affordable
housing, at a time when this
country needs to be investing in
all of them.”
Arguing in favor of the tax bill
on the House floor Wednesday
evening, Rep. Kevin Brady (RTex.), chairman of the House
Ways and Means Committee, said
restructure was needed because
the current system has “trillions
of dollars in carve outs and loopholes” for “special interests.”
Lauren Blair Aronson, spokesman for the committee, said in a
written statement that the tax bill
“will continue to help state and
local governments finance important public works projects” by
maintaining the tax-exempt status of municipal bonds for those
projects. The bill would “deliver
greater accountability to taxpayers by removing this special status for private activity bonds,
which directly benefit private
individuals and entities,” she
said.
Officials in cities struggling
with a high cost of living say
private activity bonds are especially important for encouraging
private-sector developers to
build affordable housing.
D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser
(D) says approximately 9,000
units of affordable housing have
been created in the District since
2010 using private activity bonds.
In New York City, the loss of
private activity bonds would
threaten $2.6 billion annually in
funding for affordable housing,
an amount that translates into
thousands of units per year, said
Freddi Goldstein, a spokeswoman for Mayor Bill de Blasio (D).
Todd A. Lee, executive director
of the D.C. Housing Finance
Agency, said the tax-exempt
bonds — which effectively allow
developers to borrow at municipalities’ low interest rates — are
important both by themselves
and because their use can make
projects available for a 4 percent
tax credit for low-income housing. Combined, those breaks can
bring private investment to lowreturn projects that would otherwise never get off the ground, he
said.
“These 190 units would not be
here but for the 4 percent tax
credit,” said W. Christopher
Smith, chairman and chief executive of WC Smith, the real estate
company that developed Archer
Park. Speaking after the opening
ceremony for the complex, Smith
estimated that half of his colleagues who build affordable
housing are unworried by the
House plan, confident that
“there’s no way” Congress would
remove private activity bonds.
“The other half are just scared
to death,” he said.
peter.jamison@washpost.com
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R ACHEL S IEGEL
Six Democrats vying for Montgomery
County
executive
squared off Wednesday evening
to pitch how they would grow the
county’s economy, support small
businesses and widen the local
tax base.
In a debate that touched on
issues including transportation,
the minimum wage and Montgomery’s liquor monopoly, candidates placed particular emphasis
on how they would encourage
businesses to start — and stay —
in one of Maryland’s wealthiest
and most diverse jurisdictions,
albeit one pocketed by poverty
and economic disparity.
“My vision is of a county that is
rooted in our unique Montgomery County culture and values,
and yet has a thriving privatesector business economy and a
responsive constituent-centered
local government,” said state Del.
C. William Frick (D-Montgomery).
The debate marked a debut of
sorts for the race’s newest faces:
Rose Krasnow, deputy director of
the county’s planning department and a former three-term
mayor of Rockville, and David
Blair, a Potomac businessman
entering his first political race.
Over more than an hour and a
half of questioning, a divide
emerged among the three longtime County Council members
looking to defend their records
and the “outsiders” positioning
themselves as offering fresh perspectives one year after Montgomery voters overwhelmingly
supported term limits. The primary is June 26.
Among the current council
members — Marc Elrich (D-At
Large), George L. Leventhal
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
David Blair greets Rose Krasnow as C. William Frick, second from
left, talks with Marc Elrich after the Democratic debate for
Montgomery County executive. Other candidates for the job are
George L. Leventhal and Roger Berliner.
(D-At Large) and Roger Berliner
(D-Potomac Bethesda) — all promoted the body’s unanimous passage of a $15 minimum wage and
stood by its decision to raise
property taxes by nearly 9 percent in 2016.
Blair said he would not have
voted for the minimum wage bill
and that such an increase should
be a state or regional issue. Frick
reaffirmed his stance that the
minimum wage should be dealt
with in Annapolis. Krasnow said
she still had concerns over the
bill’s effect on working teenagers
but supported the legislation’s
final timeline.
There was no mistaking the
term-limited council members as
one solidified cohort. Answering
a question on the minimum
wage, Elrich and Leventhal
charged Berliner with taking too
much credit for the compromise
brokered earlier this month.
“He has greatly overstated his
role in the minimum wage outcome,” Leventhal said of Berliner.
In a separate instance, Berliner
criticized Elrich for his use of the
phrase “ethnic cleansing” at a
debate earlier this week. Elrich
had previously stated that the
Purple Line would result in “ethnic cleansing” if there was no
rent stabilization around station
stops.
“To equate potential gentrification with ethnic cleansing is
offensive, period,” Berliner said.
Krasnow agreed, saying “ ‘Ethnic
cleansing’ is not a good term to
use.”
The debate was hosted by
Bethesda Magazine and the
Greater Bethesda Chamber of
Commerce, with many in the
large crowd representing Montgomery’s business community.
Candidates repeatedly called for
a more inclusive county government that encouraged job creation and fostered a businessfriendly culture, even if they differed on how that could be
achieved. Elrich emphasized enhancing the quality of life in
Montgomery to attract and retain
businesses. Blair said that
through improved traffic congestion and telecommunication,
residents should be able to live
and work in the county.
“We don’t seem to be proud of
having a business community,”
Krasnow said, adding that county
restrictions on businesses — on
top of state regulations — push
workers into neighboring jurisdictions.
Talking about the need to “embrace the private sector,” Frick
said that none of the candidates
“could say with a straight face
that Montgomery County is a
business-friendly environment.”
Leventhal shot back: “I don’t
think our business climate improves with constant bad-mouthing of our business climate.”
Yet, in a wide-open race with
three months left before the filing deadline, the candidates used
their closing remarks as a unifying call to progressive Democrats
that they cannot meet their social
justice priorities without a strong
economy.
Krasnow said that while the
country “is going through difficult and trying times, we cannot
give up the good fight.” Elrich
said that while he was “as liberal
as you think I am, maybe more
liberal, but despite how liberal I
am, I can’t do anything without
money.”
“Imagine our county being all
it can be,” Berliner concluded.
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Jurors screened in trial of 6 accused in Jan. 20 riots
BY
K EITH L . A LEXANDER
AND P AUL D UGGAN
Jury selection began Wednesday for the cases of the first
defendants to face trial in Inauguration Day riots in downtown
Washington, with the judge
quickly asking prospective jurors about their views on President Trump.
“What are your feelings about
the president and Inauguration
Day and will those feelings keep
you from fairly and impartially
deciding on a case and viewing
evidence?” D.C. Superior Court
Judge Lynn Leibovitz asked the
70 panelists.
The six defendants, whose
trial could begin as soon as
Monday, are charged with felony
rioting in the Jan. 20 disruption
that left several businesses vandalized and resulted in thousands of dollars in damage.
In all, prosecutors charged
212 people in connection with
the riots. So far, 20 people have
pleaded guilty while prosecutors
dropped cases against another 20. Trials for the others, in
groups of five or more, are set to
occur almost monthly through
mid-2018.
Prosecutors allege a group
called Disrupt J20 helped plan
protests that pulled in participants from across the country.
They said some rioters used
“black bloc” tactics — wearing
all black and hiding their faces
with masks and goggles so it
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
D.C. Superior Court Judge Lynn
Leibovitz asked prospective
jurors about their views on
President Trump. Trial could
begin as soon as Monday for
defendants charged with rioting
on Inauguration Day.
would be harder to identify
them.
The first defendants to face
trial are Michelle Macchio, 26, of
Naples, Fla., Jennifer Armento,
38, of Philadelphia, Christina
Simmons, 20, of Cockeysville,
Md., Alexi Wood, 33, of Hyattsville, Md., Oliver Harris, 28, of
Philadelphia and Brittne Lawson, 27, of Pittsburgh.
The trial is expected to last
through mid-December.
The six defendants face felony
counts of inciting a riot and
destruction of property, charges
that carry a maximum penalty of
10 years each.
They also face lesser charges.
Six officers were injured during the riots.
On Wednesday, Leibovitz,
who is overseeing most of the
protest trials, interviewed the
potential jurors while two prosecutors, the co-defendants and
their attorneys listened and
asked additional questions.
Each prospective juror was
given an index card and a pencil
to write their answers.
Leibovitz asked if any of them
lived or worked in the downtown Washington area where
the rioting occurred. The jurors
were also asked if they had any
bias for or against police officers,
or would give any greater or
lesser weight to the testimony of
a police officer.
Many of the jurors said they
heard about the riots through
the media. Leibovitz said that
was expected.
“Based on what you heard, do
you think you would be unable
to be impartial as a juror in this
case,” she continually asked.
None of the jurors said they
would. One man who has multiple family members who worked
as police officers told Leibovitz
he would give “extra weight” to
the testimony of a police officer.
Leibovitz immediately dismissed him.
During the day, Leibovitz
stepped down from the bench
and sat at a table next to each
potential juror who was called to
speak. Several of the attorneys
for the defendants repeatedly
asked the judge to move away
because many of the jurors were
speaking softly and couldn’t easily be heard in the courtroom.
Leibovitz refused to move.
“I need to sit right next to
them. I want them to be committed to this process, and I want to
look them in them right in their
eye,” she said.
A woman who said she was
downtown at the time of the
riots was dismissed because she
said she saw several of the
damaged buildings. “I saw
things that looked like they
followed a violent aftermath,”
she said.
Another woman was sent
home after she said her nephew,
who is a police officer, was
injured in the riots.
The trial will ultimately include 16 jurors, including four
alternatives. A second day of
jury selection was scheduled for
Thursday.
By lunch break, some 17 of the
jurors were already qualified,
and after questioning of about
25 people, none expressed negative comments about the president. By the end of the day at
least 36 people were qualified to
serve.
keith.alexander@washpost.com
paul.duggan@washpost.com
Ohio school o∞cial: Safety fears outweigh benefits
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Fridays in
N0779 2x1.5
mourned with many across the
country at the loss of lives in Las
Vegas, Manhattan and Texas.
[Last week,] a man was arrested
near the White House after he
made threats to the lives of our
capital’s police force. All of these
incidents at ‘soft targets’ and
public places have led to our
difficult decision to cancel this
year’s trip. . . . As you know, the
safety of our students and staff is
our main priority, and we feel
that the risk of travel to Washington, D.C., is not worth the potential for tragedy.”
Powell, who made the decision, said in an interview Tuesday
that officials and teachers believed that Washington was a
large target for terrorists and that
the safety concerns outweighed
the benefits of sending students
on the trip.
“As a superintendent, every
time we send kids on these kind
of trips, I worry about it the whole
time they’re gone,” he said. “It’s
a lot of responsibility.”
Reaction to the decision to
cancel the trip to Washington,
which the school’s eighth-graders have made the past five years,
has been mixed.
“We had parents who said they
were not sending their children
on the trip because of concerns
for safety. But then there were
parents saying that we shouldn’t
make that kind of decision because it teaches children to fear
the world,” Powell said.
Parents interviewed by WJWTV in Cleveland embodied that
divide.
“Crime happens everywhere —
do we keep them home and just
home-school everyone?” one parent told the television station. “I
understand the metropolitan areas are a bigger target, but I don’t
think we can live under a rock
and not live our lives.”
But another parent told the
station, “I’d be afraid to send my
child, too, with all the terrorist
things going on.”
Powell said the school is considering a student trip to Columbus, the state capital, or to other
nearby locations. The decision to
cancel the D.C. trip won’t have
financial consequences, because
no money had been taken from
families and no deposits had
been paid, Powell said.
Washington has long been a
destination for middle school
students who travel with their
classes as a rite of civic passage.
“For eighth-graders focusing
on government, D.C. is the place
to go,” said Jonathan Gamza, the
president of eduSTAR Student
Tours, a New Jersey company
that has been arranging trips for
20 years. “We send thousands of
kids there every year from all
over the country.”
Gamza added that many student trips to numerous big cities
were canceled after the terrorist
attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, but relatively few cancellations in recent
years.
“From time to time, people get
spooked about issues around the
world and they will cancel a trip,”
he said. “Parents get nervous
about their kids, understandably
so. But it hasn’t had an impact on
my business.”
Fear hasn’t kept visitors away
from Washington. Last year, a
record 22 million tourists visited
— a 3.3 percent increase over
2015 and the seventh consecutive
year of climbing numbers, according to Destination DC, the
city’s tourism arm.
About 1.1 million students
come to the city annually, according to an estimate based on 2008
data, said Danielle Davis, Destination DC’s director of communications.
Kevin Donahue, the District’s
deputy mayor for public safety,
said he was disappointed that the
Ohio school had canceled its trip.
He reached out to the North Ridgeville school district in hopes it
will reconsider.
“I know what a big deal it is for
students to be able to come to
D.C. or come to a city with historic significance in this country,”
Donahue said in an interview. “As
a city, we have a long history of
preparing for any threats against
the country or the city.”
If the school changes its plans,
Donahue, the father of two middle schoolers, said he will invite
the North Ridgeville students to
visit his office and “learn more
about how the local government
in D.C. helps keep visitors and
residents safe.”
joe.heim@washpost.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
MARYLAND
B5
SU
VIRGINIA
Montgomery board trims spring break Jury: Defense worker was snubbed
BY
D ONNA S T. G EORGE
Spring break for Montgomery
County students will be cut by
two days in the 2018-2019 academic year, but public schools
will continue to close on the
Jewish holidays of Yom Kippur
and Rosh Hashanah, as part of a
calendar adopted this week by
the school board.
The shorter spring break departs from a longtime tradition
in the Maryland school system.
Usually, students are off for six
school days bracketing Easter,
including two that are required
under Maryland law: Good Friday and the Monday after Easter.
That meant they typically got a
complete week off, plus one more
day.
The break in 2019 is set for
Wednesday, April 17, through
Monday, April 22, with schools
open April 15 and 16, the Monday
and Tuesday of that first week.
“I can’t remember a time when
we didn’t have a full spring
break,” said Patricia O’Neill, a
school board member who has
served nearly two decades and
was part of a seven-member majority on the Board of Education
supporting the plan.
O’Neill and others said they
sought to balance competing interests and comply with an executive order from Gov. Larry Hogan (R) that school start after
Labor Day and wrap up by
June 15.
This is the second school calendar that reflects Hogan’s man-
date, and officials said it was
more challenging because of the
way holidays and other dates fell.
The intrusion into Montgomery’s spring break was a blow,
several families said Wednesday.
Supporters have described the
break as a breather after winter,
allowing down time, travel, family visits and tours of prospective
colleges.
“I am disappointed
because I do value
spring break. It’s kind
of a crucial time for
seeing colleges when
classes are really in
session.”
Jennifer Young, mother of two in
Rockville
“I am disappointed because I
do value spring break,” said Jennifer Young, a mother of two in
Rockville who will be taking a son
on college visits in spring 2019,
during the shorter break. “It’s
kind of a crucial time for seeing
colleges when classes are really in
session.”
The calendar approved for
2018-2019 sets the opening of
school on Sept. 4 and the last day
as June 13. It would close schools
on the two Jewish holidays,
which officials have done for
years, citing high levels of student and staff absenteeism.
It also would allow for two full
teacher work days, one of which
is intended to coincide with the
Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr in
June. Muslim community leaders
for years have pushed for a day off
on one of their faith’s two major
holy days.
The plan also identified makeup days that would be used to
compensate for snow-day closings. If there are more than two,
spring break would be further
shortened.
As school board members discussed options, they said the
trade-offs were difficult.
“I personally believe we should
be leaving spring break intact,”
board member Rebecca Smondrowski said. “It’s the one thing
I’ve heard from the majority of
people that they wanted preserved.”
Teacher Janelle Ryan, who followed the issue closely, said the
board sacrificed spring break unnecessarily. “They didn’t choose
the best calendar,” she said. “I’m
greatly disappointed.”
Smondrowski said Wednesday
that while it was not her top
choice, the calendar that was
adopted is a good one.
As the board considered calendar proposals in recent months,
the district asked for comments
from the public; more than 2,000
poured in.
donna.stgeorge@washpost.com
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
A federal jury in Virginia
found that a woman who works
at a government defense agency
was retaliated against for complaining of gender discrimination but awarded her only $1 in
damages.
Patricia Burke went to trial in
Alexandria federal court to demand compensation for emotional distress she said she suffered working in the counterintelligence division at the Defense
Security Service.
Although jurors on Wednesday agreed that she was subjected to a hostile work environment, they did not think she
deserved serious financial compensation for that experience.
The trial was a rare civil
challenge to the Defense Department, as most such cases end in
settlements.
Burke, a field support analyst,
testified that her issues began
when she returned from maternity leave and was unable to get a
schedule that would let her stay
home with her newborn on
Wednesdays — a day she previously had not been scheduled to
work. She filed a complaint.
After that, she said, she was
ostracized, isolated and given
busy work.
A former supervisor and other
co-workers corroborated that account, saying Burke was snubbed
in the office and assigned pointless tasks.
Her supervisors denied any
such retaliation, testifying that
they bent over backward to accommodate a difficult employee’s demands.
In fact, her bosses said that
several times, they allowed
Burke to modify her schedule,
just not in the way she desired.
“Patricia Burke did not like
being told ‘No,’ ” Assistant U.S.
Attorney Andrew Han said in his
closing argument.
“She continued to complain
over and over again because she
did not always get her way.”
Both Burke and the government agreed that her problems
began when a new group of
supervisors came into the office,
several of whom knew each other
from the Air Force.
“An agency within the Department of Defense went to war, not
with one of our adversaries but
with one of their own,” her
attorney, Jacob Small, said in
closing arguments.
Han countered that the only
problem was that new supervisors “actually made her follow
the rules.”
Burke had been working from
home while taking care of her
child, which was not allowed, the
government said. Sometimes,
she was also doing work for a
second job on agency time, Han
added.
“Filing an [employment discrimination] complaint does not
give you the right to thumb your
nose at the rules,” he said.
If she was occasionally given
the cold shoulder by the supervi-
sors she had accused of discrimination, Han said it was “at most a
petty slight” — not a pervasive
hostile work environment.
After nearly three full days of
deliberations, jurors appeared to
split the difference between
those points of view.
Attorneys for Burke still
claimed victory.
“The jury had clearly seen
what’s going on at DSS, and we’re
hopeful that this is the beginning
of change at the agency,” Small
said outside court.
The Defense Security Service,
part of the Defense Department,
oversees the protection of classified information by government
contractors.
In an internal agency survey
released in May, nearly half of
respondents described the DSS
counterintelligence division as
one where unprofessional behavior is common and employees
are afraid to take concerns to
management for fear of reprisal.
Several described the division as
one in which men in positions of
power favor their friends over
other employees.
Burke still works at DSS counterintelligence, in a different department but under one of the
same managers, William Stephens.
He testified that they have
gotten along well since this case
began. She disagreed, testifying
that he barely speaks to her and
recently slammed a door in her
face.
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
MARYLAND
WSSC sends three proposals for new rate plan to Montgomery, Pr. George’s
BY
K ATHERINE S HAVER
The board for Maryland’s largest water utility on Wednesday
recommended three proposals to
local officials for a new rate structure aimed at making bills more
predictable and less discriminatory for larger households.
With no discussion, the board
for the Washington Suburban
Sanitary Commission (WSSC)
forwarded to officials in Montgomery and Prince George’s
counties three staff recommendations for a new pricing system.
County officials are expected to
provide feedback this spring before the board approves a new
system in June.
In general, each of the three
proposals would result in higher
water bills for smaller households and lower bills for larger
ones. Depending on how much
water a home uses, projected
increases in quarterly bills would
range from about $2 to $10, and
potential savings would range
from $5 to $114.
WSSC provides water and sewer services to nearly 2 million
people in the Washington suburbs.
Under all three proposals,
WSSC would keep a tiered pricing
system designed to encourage
conservation by charging more
per gallon as people use more.
However, customers would pay
higher rates only for the number
of gallons that bump into each
tier. WSSC’s current system
charges the highest-tier price for
the entire quarter, going back to
the first drop, which can result in
drastic fluctuations in bills.
It was that provision, believed
to be unique among U.S. utilities,
that prompted the Maryland Public Service Commission in March
to order WSSC to devise a new
rate structure. The commission
agreed with a utility law judge
and a Bethesda resident that the
25-year-old pricing system violated Maryland law by being “unduly discriminatory” and “unreasonable” because larger households could end up paying more
per gallon.
The new rate structure would
take effect in July 2019.
The six-member board also
voted Wednesday to renew a controversial contract with a company that markets home pipe-repair
plans to WSSC customers. The
partnership with Connecticutbased HomeServe USA came under scrutiny in 2016, after reports
that HomeServe had paid more
than $400,000 to settle allegations that it misled consumers in
six states, including Maryland.
Under the contract, HomeServe may use WSSC’s logo in
mailings to utility customers.
Residents, not WSSC, are responsible for breaks or leaks in pipes
leading from the street to their
home.
Crystal Knight-Lee, WSSC’s
customer service director, told
the board about 73,000 residential customers — about 1 in 5 —
had bought HomeServe plans.
Customers pay a monthly fee
between $4 and $10 for plans that
cover repairs to water and sewer
lines or interior plumbing.
Knight-Lee said WSSC partnered with HomeServe to provide
customers an affordable way to
avoid thousands of dollars in
plumbing bills from emergency
repairs. She said the 2,800 claims
made under HomeServe plans so
far have saved WSSC customers
more than $2.3 million in repair
bills. HomeServe also has contributed more than $367,000
toward assisting low-income
WSSC customers who have a
plumbing emergency but can’t
afford a service plan, the utility
said.
Some customers had com-
plained that seeing WSSC’s logo
on HomeServe’s marketing materials left them confused about
whether WSSC thought their
pipes were vulnerable. Many of
the allegations from attorneys
general or state officials in Maryland, New York, Kentucky, Ohio,
Massachusetts and Georgia related to HomeServe’s solicitations
appearing to come from local
utilities or governments.
HomeServe officials have said
the company did not agree with
any of the allegations in reaching
financial settlements and has
changed the marketing materials
that drew scrutiny in 2010.
WSSC board members noted
that they had scrutinized how
large the WSSC logo could be on
HomeServe’s marketing materials and where it could be placed.
WSSC officials said Maryland’s
attorney general’s office hadn’t
received any new complaints
about the company since WSSC’s
contract started last year and that
a utility survey found that 86 percent of customers who had made
a claim under their HomeServe
plan were “very satisfied.”
Howard A. Denis, a Montgomery board member, said he would
support renewing the contract
for another year even though he
had “some lingering concerns.”
Those included complaints from
plumbers not affiliated with
HomeServe.
Denis said he hasn’t heard any
complaints recently but added,
“We’re putting HomeServe on notice that we’re continuing to monitor the activity.”
Omar M. Boulware, a commissioner for Prince George’s, said
he’s been “tremendously impressed” with the comments he’s
heard from HomeServe customers.
“People have been very appreciative,” he said.
katherine.shaver@washpost.com
obituaries
JEREMY HUTCHINSON, 102
British lawyer in ‘Lady Chatterley’s Lover’ case defied the ‘age of deference’
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
Jeremy Hutchinson, a British
lawyer who excelled as a silvertongued goad to high society and
a devilish advocate for spies and
drug smugglers, and who fought
legal battles during the countercultural ferment of the 1960s and
’70s that helped broaden freedom
of expression in Britain, died
Nov. 13 at his home in Lullington,
England. He was 102.
Thomas Grant, a lawyer who
wrote a 2015 book chronicling
some of Mr. Hutchinson’s bestknown cases, confirmed his
death but said he did not know
the cause.
Born into a wealthy family
who dined with poet T.S. Eliot
and members of London’s
Bloomsbury Group literary set,
Mr. Hutchinson was among the
last
of Britain’s lawyer-celebrities,
white-haired barristers whose
performances in the courtroom
were sometimes as closely followed as those of actors on the
stage.
He nearly matched the theatrics of his first wife, Shakespearean actress Dame Peggy Ashcroft,
captivating juries with a polished, mesmeric speaking style
and lightly mocking judges as
“old darling” — a habit that his
friend John Mortimer conferred
on the popular television character Horace Rumpole.
Yet Mr. Hutchinson’s talents
were not used in support of the
conservative establishment that
gave him the elite legal designation of queen’s counsel or, in 1978,
ennobled him as Baron Hutchinson of Lullington. Lord Hutchinson, as he was known, was a
liberal who once made an unsuc-
cessful attempt to run for Parliament as a member of the Labour
Party.
“He wanted to undermine the
age of deference — whether deference to political masters or to
censors — and to inject a certain
amount of freedom into public
life,” Grant said. “At a time when
the criminal advocate was not
necessarily conceived as the most
glamorous or important of occupations, he showed that it was an
absolutely critical part of constitutional arrangements, a bulwark of law and civil liberties.”
Mr. Hutchinson’s clients included Christine Keeler, a model
convicted of perjury for her role
in the 1960s political scandal
known as the Profumo affair, and
the Soviet spies George Blake and
John Vassall, for whom he unsuccessfully sought leniency.
He defended the Welsh drug
smuggler Howard Marks, making the successful (and, to many
observers, questionable) argument that his client had been
working for Britain’s MI6 intelligence service, and was equally
successfully in arguing that a bus
driver who took a Goya portrait
from the National Gallery in London hadn’t “stolen” the painting
but had planned to give it back
after a ransom was paid to charity.
Mr. Hutchinson was junior
counsel for his best-known case,
when he defended Penguin
Books against obscenity charges
in 1960 for publishing an uncensored version of D.H. Lawrence’s
novel “Lady Chatterley’s Lover.”
Originally released in Italy in
1928, the book featured detailed
sex scenes and, by one prosecutor’s count, no fewer than 30 uses
of an explicit four-letter word.
PA IMAGES/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO
Jeremy Hutchinson was among
the last of Britain’s captivating
lawyer-celebrities.
A ban on the novel had been
lifted in the United States one
year earlier, when an appeals
court established the standard of
“redeeming social or literary value” for works that verged on the
legally obscene. Mr. Hutchinson
— following after his father, a
lawyer who had rescued some of
Lawrence’s sexually explicit
paintings during an obscenity
case in the 1920s — sought to
make a similar case for “Chatterley’s” literary merit in Britain.
With lead defense attorney
Gerald Gardiner, he called upon
witnesses that included novelist
E.M. Forster and literary scholar
Richard Hoggart, and pressed for
the inclusion of female jurors. “I
found that women were far more
sensible,” he said later, “and had
very much less baggage than men
on matters of sex.”
He seemed to be proved right
when prosecutor Mervyn Griffith-Jones asked the jury, “Is it a
book that you would even wish
your wife or your servants to
read?” Several jurors burst out
laughing, and after rendering a
verdict of not guilty, “Lady Chatterley’s Lover” sold 200,000 copies on its first day of publication.
“No other jury verdict in British history has had such a deep
social impact,” human rights lawyer Geoffrey Robertson wrote in
Britain’s Guardian newspaper in
2010, noting that the case was
followed by liberal court decisions that legalized homosexuality and abortion.
He successfully defended
works including the scholarly
book “The Mouth and Oral Sex”
(1969), ridiculing the judge’s
question to a defense witness of
why a study of the sex act was
necessary, given that “we have
managed to get on for a couple of
thousand years without it.”
In his closing speech to the
jury, Mr. Hutchinson quipped,
“Poor His Lordship! Poor, poor
His Lordship! Gone without oral
sex for 1,000 years.”
Mr. Hutchinson’s legal battles
against censorship continued,
most memorably with his defense of Howard Brenton’s play
“The Romans in Britain,” which
premiered at London’s National
Theatre in 1980.
Conservative watchdog Mary
Whitehouse, the “queen of clean,”
charged the play’s director with
procuring “an act of gross indecency” during a scene that portrayed a Roman soldier’s anal
rape of a Celt. The key witness
claimed to have seen a flash of an
erect penis on the stage.
In court, Mr. Hutchinson pro-
ceeded to demonstrate that the
witness was sitting a full 90 yards
from the actors. Tucking his
hands under his gown and wiggling a thumb inside his fist, he
argued that the witness might
easily have mistaken one fleshy
protuberance for another.
The courtroom descended into
laughter, and the charges were
soon dropped.
Jeremy Nicolas Hutchinson
was born in London on March 28,
1915. His father was an art collector, and his mother was a cousin
of biographer Lytton Strachey.
Mr. Hutchinson studied at the
University of Oxford before beginning his legal career in 1939.
He served in the British navy
during World War II, surviving a
bombing run that sank his vessel
during the Battle of Crete. Floating in the water for hours before
rescue, he sang to maintain morale and clung to wreckage alongside the ship’s commander, Louis
Mountbatten.
Mr. Hutchinson’s marriage to
Ashcroft ended in divorce. His
wife of 40 years, the former June
Osborn, died in 2006. Survivors
include a son from his first marriage, Nicholas Hutchinson, and
several grandchildren.
In 2011, Mr. Hutchinson took
the unusual step of retiring from
the House of Lords. He spent the
past several decades focused
mainly on art, serving as a trustee
and chairman for the Tate museum and helping establish its
Tate Liverpool branch.
In recent years, he lamented
changes in Britain’s legal system,
particularly funding cuts to its
program of legal aid for poor
defendants. “The result,” he told
BBC Radio 4, shortly after celebrating his 100th birthday, “is
the criminal bar will only serve
people who have enough money
to pay for it.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
obituaries
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
OLIVER
FORD
. THURSDAY,
EDWARD S. OLIVER, M.D.
November 16, 1957 - July 4, 2011
Burglary in 1971 of FBI led
to exposure of citizen spying
BY
STRASZHEIM
E MILY L ANGER
For 43 years, John C. Raines, a
Temple University religion professor and ordained Methodist
minister, lived with an explosive
secret. On March 8, 1971, he and
his wife, Bonnie Raines, then the
parents of three young children,
had joined six other conspirators
in burglarizing an FBI office in
suburban Philadelphia.
The cache of documents they
stole revealed a sweeping campaign of intimidation by the FBI,
then led by J. Edgar Hoover,
against civil rights and antiwar
activists, communists and other
dissenters. One now-infamous
document told agents to ramp up
interviews with perceived subversives “to get the point across there
is an FBI agent behind every
mailbox.”
Calling themselves the Citizens
Commission to Investigate the
FBI, the burglars anonymously
distributed the stolen documents
to newspapers including The
Washington Post. On March 24,
1971, over the objections of Attorney General John N. Mitchell, The
Post became the first publication
to report on the FBI surveillance.
Other news accounts followed,
along with public outrage, and
eventually the formation of the
Church Committee led by U.S.
Sen. Frank Church (D-Idaho) that
uncovered widespread abuses in
the U.S. intelligence agencies.
Hundreds of FBI agents investigated the break-in but failed to
identify the burglars, who, if apprehended, would have faced
years in prison. Only years after
the fact — long after the statute of
limitations had expired — did Dr.
Raines reveal his identity to Betty
Medsger, the Post journalist who
had broken the news of the stolen
documents.
In 2014, Medsger published a
book-length account of the story,
“The Burglary: The Discovery of
J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI.” In
an interview, she described the
actions of Dr. Raines and his wife
as “one of the most powerful acts
of resistance in the history of the
country.”
Her account helped make Dr.
Raines, by then in the final years
of his life, a hero to civil libertarians. He died Nov. 12 at his home in
Philadelphia at 84. The cause was
congestive heart failure, according to his wife.
Dr. Raines credited his wife
with drawing him into their activism. “I was dragged along by her
enthusiasm,” he once told the Los
Angeles Times — an account she
seemed to confirm, quipping that
“he had more sleepless nights”
than she did. But Dr. Raines also
had a long history of civil rights
work.
He had participated in the
Freedom Rides to challenge segregation in interstate transit and
marched in Selma, Ala., in 1965,
when state troopers assaulted
protesters with clubs and tear
gas. He was angered by Hoover’s
antagonism to the movement,
and to the untouchable status the
FBI director maintained.
“Nobody in Washington was
going to hold him accountable,”
Dr. Raines told NPR in 2014. “It
was his FBI, nobody else’s.”
With his wife, Dr. Raines had
broken into draft board offices to
disrupt the Vietnam War draft.
But no act of civil disobedience
was as daring as the break-in at
the FBI office in Media, Pa.
The Raineses were recruited by
a Haverford College physics professor, William Davidon, who
knew of their protest activities.
“After the chin came off the floor
and we started talking about it, it
seemed more and more plausible,” Dr. Raines recalled.
The conspirators plotted the
break-in from the Raineses’ attic.
Bonnie Raines, who ran a day
care, managed to gain entry and
survey the FBI office in advance
by posing as a college student
seeking information about employment opportunities. In the
event of their arrest and imprisonment, the couple arranged for
Dr. Raines’s brother to care for
their children.
“We have a double responsibility,” Dr. Raines told CNN in 2014,
“yes, as parents to our children,
but also as citizens to the nation
those children are going to live in
and have children in.”
The group scheduled the
break-in to coincide with the boxing match in which Joe Frazier
would defeat Muhammad Ali —
astutely predicting that the momentous sporting event would
distract neighbors of the FBI office as well as police. Without
much trouble, they used a crowbar to break in, then carried out
LEO JOSEPH FORD “Baldy”
In Loving Memory
On the Occasion of his Birthday
MAHLON REID STRASZHEIM
November 16,1939-May 17, 2015
Of Washington DC, transitioned this life to be
with the Lord on Sunday, November 5, 2017.
Devoted brother of Lillian Miller, Gloria Bell,
William Ford (Jocelyn), James Ford (Crystal),
Roland Ford, Norris Ford (Pamela), Joyce Ford,
Brenda Blunt (Kenneth), Gerald Ford, and Sterling Ford. Also survived by three aunts, three
uncles and a host of nieces, nephews, other
family and friends. Visitation Saturday, November 18 at 9:30 a.m. until time of service
at 10:30 a.m. at Fort Lincoln Funeral Home,
3401 Bladensburg Road, Brentwood MD 20722.
Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
For as long as we live, you too will live,
for you are now a part of us.
Love always,
Janelle, Debbie, Gordon, Sarah,
Rebecca, David and your increasing
bounty of grandchildren
IN MEMORIAM
TIBBITS
SHEILA KAYE TIBBITS
September 9, 1958-November 16, 2006
You are constantly in our thoughts and in our
prayers. Your loving mother, stepfather, family
and friends will cherish the beauty of your life
in our memory forever.
DEATH NOTICE
BECKER
GOLATO
AL JAMES GOLATO
On Friday, November 10, 2017, of Bowie,
MD. Beloved husband of the late Vera M.
Golato; loving father of Donna Sondberg (John),
Denise Moroney (Ed) and James A. Golato. Dear
brother of Nicholas Golato and the late Louis,
Oger, Domenic and Angelo. Grandfather of
six grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.
Family will receive friends at the family-owned
BEALL FUNERAL HOME, 6512 NW Crain Hwy.
(Rte. 3 South), Bowie, MD on Thursday, November 16, 2017 from 5 to 8 p.m. A Funeral Mass
will be held at St. Pius X Catholic Church, 14710
Annapolis Rd, Bowie, MD, on Friday, November
17, 2017 at 11:30 a.m. Interment Crownsville
Veterans Cemetery, Crownsville, MD. In lieu of
flower a donation may be made to St. Pius X
Catholic Church or Wounded Warrior Project,
PO Box 758516, Topeka, KS 66675, Please view
and sign the family’s guestbook and read his
life story at:
www.beallfuneral.com
HARTSELL
KENNETH FRANKLIN HARTSELL
On November 12, 2017 passed away peacefully
surrounded by family. He was predeceased by
his wife Cheryl and will be dearly missed
by his loving wife Anne, daughter Stephanie;
step children, Andrea, Owen, Kevin, and Brian;
and his beloved grandchildren, Eamon, Will,
Rose, and Benjamin. Funeral Services will be
at 10 a.m. held at the Chapel within Norbeck
Memorial Gardens on Friday November 17,
2017 at 16225 Batchellors Forest Rd, Olney,
MD. 20832, interment to follow immediately
after. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation
to the American Cancer Society at www.cancer.org[cancer.org]. Arrangements by HinesRinaldi Funeral Home, LLC.
STELLA MARIE BECKER (Age 91)
FAMILY PHOTO
Dr. John C. Raines and his wife, Bonnie, in 1970. The following
year, the couple helped burglarize an FBI office in Philadelphia.
They kept their actions secret for 43 years.
On Monday, November 13, 2017,
of Hyattsville, MD. Beloved wife
of the late Julius Becker; mother
of Kevin Becker, Paul (Pat) Becker,
Chris Becker, Moira (Chris) Mayhew, Beth Becker, Susan (Erik)
Olson, and the late Jay, Tim and
George Becker; mother-in-law of Grace Becker;
grandmother of Julian Becker, Joseph Becker,
Erin Mayhew, Tia Becker, George Becker, Jack
Olson, and Sarah Olson. Relatives and friends
may call at St. Mark the Evangelist Church,
7501 Adelphi Road, Hyattsville, MD, Friday,
November 17, from 2 to 4 pm. and 7 to 9
p.m.; where the Memorial Mass will be held on
Saturday, November 18, at 10 a.m. Interment
private. Memorial contributions may be made
to S.O.M.E., 71-O Street, NW, Washington, DC
20001
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
HEMSLEY
ANTHONY REGINALD HEMSLEY
Anthony Reginald Hemsley, 56, transitioned on
November 12, 2017. Visitation will be held at
Takoma Park Baptist Church, 635 Aspen Street,
NW, Washington, DC on Saturday, November
18, 2017 at 10 a.m. until time of the Funeral
Service at 11 a.m. Interment held at Home
Place Cemetery, Jeffersonton, VA at 3 p.m.
Condolences for family and friends may be left
at
www.tibbsfuneralhome.com
ROSEMARY FRANCES BORGES
MICHAEL S. WIRTZ/PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
On Monday, November 13, 2017. Daughter of
the late Richard Anthony and Roselind Grace
Borges. Sister of Roberta Borges, Richard
Borges, Jr. and the late Kathleen Borges. Family
will receive friends from 10 to 11 a.m., Friday,
November 17, 2017 at Ascension Catholic
Church, 12700 Lanham Severn Rd., Bowie,
MD 20720. A Mass of Christian Burial will
be celebrated at 11 a.m. and interment will
follow at Resurrection Cemetery, Clinton, MD.
The family has requested in lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to Autism Awareness.
On Monday, November 13, 2017,
of Adelphi, MD. Beloved son of
Thomas Robert "Bob" Hewitt, Sr.
and the late Audrey B. Hewitt;
brother of William "Craig" Hewitt;
brother-in-law of Donna Hewitt;
uncle of Megan Hewitt and William Robert
"Bobby" Hewitt. Also survived by many cousins
and close family. Funeral Service at Oakdale
Emory United Methodist Church, 3425 Emory
Church Rd, Olney, MD 20832 on Friday, November 17 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to Oakdale Emory
UMC at the above address.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
“Within an hour,
we knew we hit
the jackpot.”
Dr. John C. Raines, discussing the
burglary of the FBI office that led
to the public revelation of the FBI’s
secret surveillance
of civil rights activists
Angeles Times. Only The Post
immediately published.
The documents contained early evidence of COINTELPRO,
short for Counterintelligence
Program, which, the FBI later
acknowledged, was “rightfully
criticized by Congress and the
American people for abridging
First Amendment rights.”
Among other revelations, the
materials showed that the FBI
had systematically surveilled and
harassed African Americans, particularly civil rights activists. In
one instance, it had attempted to
blackmail the Rev. Martin Luther
King Jr. by threatening to reveal
his extramarital affairs if he did
not commit suicide before collecting the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.
The Church Committee report,
issued in 1976, found that “too
many people have been spied
upon by too many government
agencies and too much information has been collected.”
The extent of the abuses confirmed to Dr. Raines the rightness
of what he and his collaborators
had done. But years later, reviewing Medsger’s book in the New
York Times, history professor Da-
vid Oshinsky was among those
who questioned the burglars’
methods.
They “committed a serious felony on the suspicion that a government bureau was engaging in
nefarious activities; they had no
evidence in hand. Would their
actions have been equally heroic
had they come up dry?” he wrote.
Furthermore, he observed,
“the burglars are portrayed as
devoted followers of civil disobedience and nonviolent resistance.
But one of the tenets of such
behavior is to take responsibility
for the act. I don’t recall Thoreau
adding: ‘Catch me if you can.’ ”
Dr. Raines replied in an impassioned letter to the editor.
“We certainly broke the law,
perhaps many laws,” he said. “But
those of us who were active in the
civil rights movement of the early
’60s had learned to differentiate
between breaking a law and committing a crime.”
John Curtis Raines, the son of a
Methodist bishop, was born in
Minneapolis on Oct. 27, 1933. He
received a bachelor’s degree in
English from Carleton College in
Northfield, Minn., in 1955, and a
doctorate in theology from Union
Theological Seminary in New
York in 1967. He was a professor of
religion at Temple for more than
40 years.
Survivors include his wife of
55 years, the former Bonnie Muir
of Philadelphia; four children,
Lindsley Raines, Nathan Raines
and Mary Raines, all of Philadelphia, and Mark Raines of Bedminster, N.J.; a brother; and seven grandchildren.
Filmmaker Johanna Hamilton
released a documentary about
the break-in, “1971,” in 2014. Dr.
Raines’s story had particular resonance at the time; the previous
year, intelligence contractor Edward J. Snowden had leaked a
massive trove of documents
about surveillance by the National Security Agency. Snowden later
obtained asylum in Russia.
Asked in 2014 if he had a
message for Snowden, Dr. Raines
replied, “From one whistleblower
to another whistleblower — Hi!”
emily.langer@washpost.com
JETER
BOYD
ALBERT JETER "Mousey"
JOHN GORDON BOYD (Age 81)
John Gordon Boyd, who for four decades,
worked in the Washington, DC office of IBM
Corporation, died October 8, 2017, at Avalon
House in Arlington, VA, after a long illness. No
service was held. Mr. Boyd was co-chair of a
White House task force that helped to bring
about the Reagan tax cuts of 1986. Born and
raised in Grand Rapids, Mr. Boyd was a 1959
graduate of the University of Michigan. After
moving to DC, he married his wife Alicia, also
a graduate of Michigan, in 1961. Mrs. Boyd
died in 1999. A resident of Georgetown for half
a century, Mr. Boyd married his second wife,
Anne, and in 2010, moved with her to Paris,
where she still resides.
On Thursday, November 9, 2017 of Lanham,
MD, formerly of Hyattsville, MD. Beloved
wife of the late Dominic "Nick" J. Leonardi.
She is survived by her brother-in-law,
Robert Leonardi; two sisters-in-law, Barbara
and Maureen Leonardi; numerous nieces,
nephews, and godchildren. She was proceeded in death by her three sisters, Caroline Spigone, Norma Schmidt, and Mae
Wingate. Friends may call at Gasch's Funeral Home, P.A., 4739 Baltimore Avenue,
Hyattsville, MD on Thursday, November 16,
from 3 to 6 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be
offered at St. Ambrose Catholic Church,
3107 63rd Avenue, Cheverly, MD on Friday,
November 17 at 10 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in her name
to Hospice of the Chesapeake, 90 Ritchie
Highway, Pasadena, MD 21122.
www.gaschs.com
MARCH
BRANDY CROWDER MARCH
Passed away on Tuesday, November 7, 2017. Beloved wife of Javon
March; devoted mother of
Romoan Crowder, Rashad Williams, Javon March, Jr., Ikeya and
Brooke March. Also survived by
granddaughter, Alani Crowder;
parents Henry Crowder and Juanita Parker;
sister, Beatrice Williar and a host of other
relatives and friends. Friends may visit with the
family on Friday, November 17 at Deliverance
Free Will Baptist Church, 3915 Holly Tree Rd.,
Temple Hills, MD from 10 a.m. until time of
funeral service 11 a.m. Interment Washington
National Cemetery. Arrangements by HODGES
& EDWARD FUNERAL HOME.
MULLIGAN
BARRY W. MULLIGAN
On November 11, 2017. Beloved husband of
the late Nancy Mulligan. Survived by children,
Tim, Brian (Katie), and Cathy Tedder (Tom) and
grandchild Megan Tedder. Funeral service to be
held November 20, 2017, 11 a.m. at Blessed
Sacrament Church, Washington DC. Memorial
donations to Gonzaga College High School, 19
I "Eye" St. N.W. Washington, DC 20001.
OLIVER
FLOYD OLIVER, JR.
Floyd Oliver, JR., of Washington, DC, passed
away suddenly, on May 29, 2017, at the age
of 60 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
Floyd was born to parents Floyd Oliver, Sr.
and Yoshimi Oliver (nee Suzuki) on September 14, 1956 and was raised in the District
of Columbia, the third oldest of five siblings
where he graduated from Bell Vocational
School (1974). He was a career veteran of
the US Army, with tours of Duty in Texas,
Alaska, Germany and Saudi Arabia as part
of Desert Storm.
Floyd is survived by his wife, Florence
“Shawn” Oliver (Washington, DC), daughter
Stacie Hamai Ramirez (St. Mary’s, Georgia),
step-son Shiloh Taj Kremer (Washington,
DC), brothers’ James Yancey (San Diego
CA) and Donald Yancey (Raleigh, North
Carolina), sisters Miyoko Quinones (Temple
Hills, MD) and Shizua Oliver (Washington,
DC), Aunt, many cousins, nieces and
nephews. He will be missed greatly by all.
A memorial service will be held at Arlington
National Cemetery on Friday, November 17,
2017 at 9 a.m.
If you wish to wish his family well, you can
make donations to the Cancer Society or
the Alzheimer’s Association in his name.
PILLOW
EDGAR PILLOW, JR. (Age 87)
Of Woodbridge, VA, died October 26, 2017.
Visitation November 18, 2017 from 10 a.m. to
service at 12 Noon at Miller Funeral Home,
3200 Golansky Blvd., Woodbridge, VA. Interment will be held at Arlington National Cemetery on November 20, 2017 at 2 p.m.
SCHREIBER
EDITH M. SCHREIBER
Bonnie Raines with an FBI rendering of herself. Dr. John C. Raines
sits beside her in this 2013 photo.
more than 1,000 files in suitcases.
Dr. Raines drove the getaway car
to a Quaker farm, where they
donned gloves and began combing through the documents.
“Within an hour, we knew we
hit the jackpot,” Dr. Raines recalled.
The burglars photocopied the
documents and sent them to Sen.
George S. McGovern (D-S.D.) and
Rep. Parren J. Mitchell (D-Md.),
as well as to reporters at The Post,
the New York Times and the Los
LEONARDI
HEWITT
THOMAS ROBERT HEWITT, JR. "Bobby"
(Age 69)
BORGES
DEATH NOTICE
FRANCES J. LEONARDI "Witty"
(Age 89)
Happy Birthday Spud
We love and miss you.
Maria, Danielle, Edward, and Mom
JOHN C. RAINES, 84
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
Mousey passed on November 9, 2017. Services
will be held at Galilee Baptist Church, 2101
Shady side Ave., Suitland, MD, on November
17, 2017, Viewing 10 a.m. Service 11 a.m.
JOHNSON
On Wednesday, November 15, 2017
of Rockville, MD. Beloved wife of
the late Irvin R. Schreiber. Devoted
mother of Rita (Leonard) Lavitt and
Phillip (Linda) Schreiber. Also survived by her grandchildren Robert
and Lauren and great-grandchildren Danielle,
Margot, Ethan and Julian. Graveside services
will be held on Friday, November 17, 2017,
1 p.m. at King David Memorial Gardens, 7482
Lee Hwy., Falls Church, VA. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to JSSA
Hospice.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
SPRIGGS
BOYD
JOETTER JOHNSON
(Age 77)
JOYCE O. BOYD (Age 70)
Of Washington, DC entered into
eternal rest on Tuesday, November 7, 2017. She is survived by
her loving and devoted son, Keith
Harris; siblings, Ruth and Nathan
Davis; two grandchildren and a
host of other relatives and friends. Visitation
Friday, November 17, 2017 from 10 a.m. until
service at 11 a.m. at Union Temple Baptist
Church, 1225 W. St., SE, Washington, DC 20020.
Services by DL McLAUGHLIN FUNERAL HOME.
Of Reston, VA passed away peacefully on
Friday, November 3, 2017 at Reston Hospital. Loving wife of George K. Johnson.
Beloved mother of Dr. Mark K. Johnson
(Decima) of Totowa, NJ, Tina D. Johnson
of Bowie, MD; devoted grandmother of Michael
Moody of Bowie, MD. She is also survived
by sister, Lucille Joyner of Ashburn, VA; a
sister-in-law, Virginia Ervin of Port Arthur, TX;
a niece, Michelle Dodge (David) of Bristow,
VA.; nephew, Lamont Joyner of Dallas, TX;
two great-nephews, Jason and Jared Dodge
of Bristow, VA; four cousins, Carrie Spence
Ledbetter of Whitsett, NC, James Parker of
Chicago, IL, Mary Earl Berry of Rocky Mount,
NC and Nancy Spence of Elizabeth, NJ; and a
host of other relatives and friends. Visitation
will be held on Friday, November 17, 2017 from
10 a.m. until time of service 11 a.m. at Heritage
Fellowship Church, 2501 Fox Hill RD., Reston,
VA 20191. Interment Private Arrangements
by Lyles Funeral Service, serving Northern
Virginia, Eric S. Lyles, Director, Lic MD VA DC
1800-388-1913
STERLING D. SPRIGGS
On Saturday, November 11, 2017. Sterling
D. Spriggs of Washington, DC passed away
surrounded by his family and friends. Loving
and devoted husband of Deborah M. Spriggs;
beloved father of Brandon and Christopher
Spriggs and brother of Gregory (Kamisha)
Spriggs. Mr. Spriggs was predeceased by
his parents, Alvin and Irene Spriggs. Mr Spriggs
will lie in state at Peoples Congregational
United Church of Christ, 4704 13th St. NW. on
Saturday, November 18, 2017 from 9 a.m. until
funeral service 10 a.m. Interment Ft. Lincoln
Cemetery.
www.mcguire-services.com
STITH
DEITELBAUM
RONALD HERBERT DEITELBAUM
Ronald Herbert Deitelbaum, born June 22,
1933 in Philadelphia PA. and died November
10, 2017 in Boca Raton FL. Only son of
Gertrude (née Sadel) and Nathan Deitelbaum
and known by his friends as Ron and longtime family members as “Ronnie,” he was
one of the great characters of his day.
Ron was raised in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington DC where he worked in
his parent’s grocery store. He graduated from
Western High School and attended George
Washington University while serving in the
US Navy during the Korean War. Ron was the
past Master of his Masonic Lodge and an
avid golfer at the Indian Spring Country Club.
He had a long and successful career in the
insurance and investment industry, owning
several businesses in the DC metropolitan
area. He was also involved in the entertainment industry, having played various roles in
TV/radio and films. Ron was very passionate
about the Washington Redskins. One of his
greatest moments was starting a merchandise business that generated revenue for the
charity “National Defense” with the Redskins
defensive players and produced a weekly
television show that supported the merchandise line.
He had a wonderful life with his wife of
41 years, Dianne (passed June 26, 2007),
residing on a farm in Laytonsville MD and
raising Thoroughbred race horses, one of
which was a Maryland Stakes Winner. Later
in life, Ron retired in Delray Beach, Florida
and became an enthusiastic world traveler.
He loved singing and dancing with his wife
Toby Lowenstein (married 2012). Ron and
Toby had many friends and enjoyed an active
social life at the Broken Sound County Club
in Boca Raton.
In this past September for Rosh Hashanah,
Ron realized a life-long dream by donating
a 100-year-old Torah to the Broken Sound
Hebrew Congregation where he sang in the
choir with Toby.
Ron is survived by his wife Toby Lowenstein;
his two sons, Jon (Brandis) and Todd; five
grandchildren, and Toby’s children, Wendi
(Eric), Gaye (Dori), and Lori.
Please be advised, there will be no services.
Donations may be made Keep Memory Alive,
www.keepmemorylive.org
LUCY A. STITH
On Thursday, October 26, 2017, our beloved
Lucy A. Stith, of Louisa, Virginia, passed away
at her home in Washington, DC, surrounded by
love. She is survived by her daughter, Hattie
T. Adams; Grandchildren, Robert R. Adams III,
(Kimberly) and Mardi D. Williams (Trai); greatgrandchildren, Ethan, Lucy, Layla, and Taylor,
along with a host of nieces, nephews, relatives
and friends.
Services will be held on Friday, November
17, 2017 at Refreshing Spring Church of God
in Christ, 6200 Riverdale Rd. Riverdale, Md.
20737, Viewing from 10 a.m. until the start of
service at 11 a.m. Interment at Fort Lincoln
Cemetery.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
DEATH NOTICE
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B7
RE
DEATH NOTICE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
TERCZAK
ZAMBRENY
WEBB
JORDAN
PAYNE
VEST
RAYMOND H. TERCZAK ,SR. (Age 69)
ROBERT W. ZAMBRENY
Robert Wilson Zambreny, 80, of Laurel,
Maryland, passed away on November 11,
2017.
He was born in 1936 to Wilson and Mildred
Zambreny in Washington, DC.
Bob was a member of Resurrection of
our Lord Roman Catholic Church
Retired Potomac Electric Power Company
He enjoyed spending time with his family
and friends, traveling with his wife, hanging
with his dog of 14 years; Scrappy, cheering
on his beloved Washington Redskins and
Washington Nationals, cooking, gardening
and going to the track.
Survived by his five children: Deborah,
Karen, Robert Jr, James and Christine; his
12 grandchildren, Taylor, Harrison, Amy,
Rebecca, Michael, Matthew, Heather,
Nick, John, Jessica, Anna and Grace; 11
great-grandchildren; his Aunt Dorothy Taylor and brother, Alan Zambreny.
Preceded by his wife of 54 years Mary
Patricia (Shoap), his parents Wilson and
Mildred Zambreny and his sister Nandine
Zambreny O'Neill.
CORNELIA ANN WEBB
Celebrating Eternal Life
DEATH NOTICE
BOWSER
A funeral mass will be celebrated on Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 10 a.m. at the
Resurrection of Our Lord Catholic Church,
8402 Brockbridge Road, Laurel, MD 20724.
Burial will follow in Union Cemetery, Burtonsville.
www.donaldsonfuneralhome.com
CARNEISHA LATRICE JORDAN “Trice”
(Age 35)
Was called to eternal peace on Sunday, November 5, 2017. She was a loving mother, daughter,
sister, niece, cousin and friend. Trice, our
“Soulful Song Bird”, is survived by her son,
Isaiah Jordan-Ali, whom loved and cared for
her deeply. For 21 years, Trice lived as a
silent survivor of Nephrotic Syndrome, a kidney
disorder. This illness did not define her life;
she had a magnetic, personable, energetic,
beautiful, smart, funny, and determined persona. She marched to her own beat and lived
her 35 years passionately. She is a champion of
courage, strength and hope to many and will be
remembered for how she lived. The stars are
brighter because she’s amongst them.
A Celebration of Life will be held Saturday,
November 18, 2017 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30
p.m. at J. B. Jenkins Funeral Home, 7474 Landover Road, Landover, MD 20785. Repast to
immediately follow.
TWITTY
JEFFREY PRESTON PAYNE
Departed this life on November 11, 2017.
A Memorial service will be held on Friday
November 17, at 11 a.m. at the Word of
God Baptist Church 6513 Queens Chapel Rd,,
University Park, MD 20782.
RANGANATHAN
LEWIS
SELMA A.TWITTY
St. Augustine Sodality mourns the
passing of Sodalist Selma A. Twitty.
Visitation from 10 a.m., until time
of Christian Burial at 11:30 a.m.
(Rosary at 11:15 a.m.) on Friday,
November 17, 2017, at St. Augustine Roman Catholic Church, 15th
and V Streets, NW, Washington, DC, 20009.
Rev. Patrick A. Smith, Moderator
Darlene P. Jackson, Prefect
VOPAT
IN MEMORIAM
EDWARD J. VOPAT
BATCHLOR
The officers and members of Local
#10 International Union of Elevator Constructors are hereby notified of the passing of Honorary
Brother Edward J. Vopat on
November 12, 2017. Officers and
members may call at the Frost
Home for Funeral, 610 Ellis Ave. Ashland, WI on
Saturday, November 18, visitation 5 to 8 p.m.
with services to follow.
Fraternally,
The Business Office
Peacefully passed away on Friday,
November 10, 2017. She is survived by two sons, Howard and
Paul; one daughter, Virginia; 14
grandchildren, 44 great-grandchildren and a host of other relatives, church family and friends. She will lie
in state Friday, November 17, 2017 10 a.m.
until time of service of celebration 11 a.m.
at The Greater Mount Calvary Holy Church,
610 Rhode Island Ave. NE. Bishop Alfred A.
Owens Jr., Pastor. Interment Quantico National
Cemetery on Monday, November 20, 2017.
Arrangements Entrusted to R.N. Horton Co.
Morticians Inc.
CALDWELL
WALTERS
DORIS ELAINE WALTERS
July 26, 1930 ~ November 2, 2017
Survived by her husband of 61 years, three
children, six grandchildren and one greatgrandchild. Services will be held at Holy
Trinity Catholic Church, Gainesville, VA on
Friday, November 17, 2017 at 10 a.m. In
lieu of flowers, donations can be sent to
Warrior Retreat at Bull Run, 571-248-0008.
JACQUELINE L. BATCHLOR
7/19/1930 ~ 11/16/2016
ELLIS
CAROL T. WEBB
On November 13, 2017 of Rockville, MD.
Daughter of the late Roy and Mildred
Thompson. She is survived by devoted
sister, Sue (Don) Grabner; beloved children
Donna (Mark) Buckeridge, David (Kim)
Webb, Todd Webb, and Matt (Tina) Webb,
along with cherished grandchildren Annie,
Michael, Brandon, Brittany, Emma, Addison
and Chase, and great-grandchild Jackson.
She lived in Twinbrook for over 50 years,
worked for Suburban Hospital for over
20 years, and Potomac Home Support for
over 10 years. A celebration of her life
will be held on Saturday, November 18.
Viewing at 12 noon and Service at 1 p.m. at
Pumphreys Funeral Home, 300 West Montgomery Avenue, Rockville, MD. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests that donations
be made to the American Diabetes Association in honor of Dr. Patricia Petrick, long
time dedicated Endocrinologist for Carol.
KENNETH C. McKENDREE
JOHN L. ELLIS, JR.
11/16/1940 ~ 12/3/2015
RUSCHAUPT
Departed this life on Monday, November
6, 2017. Loving husband of Patricia Wood;
beloved father of Jamelle Wood and Janeen
Wooden (John). Also survived by five grandsons and a host of other relatives and
friends. Services will be held on Saturday,
November 18, 2017, visitation 10 a.m. followed by funeral service at 11 a.m. at JOHN
T. RHINES FUNERAL HOME, 3005 12th St.,
NE. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery. In lieu
of flowers, memorial contributions may be
sent to The American Diabetes Association
or The American Heart Association.
ESSIE MAE CLARK (Age 76)
Peacefully passed away on Wednesday,
November 8, 2017. Survived by her children
Freda Williams (Bernard), Selena, Selene, and
Major Clark Jr.; seven grandchildren; two great
grandchildren and a host of other relatives and
friends. Visitation 9 a.m. until time of service
at 11 a.m. on Friday, November 17, 2017 at
Sampson-Hamline United Methodist Church,
4501 16th Street, NW. Interment Fort Lincoln
Cemetery.
www.johnsonandjenkinsfh.com
YOUNG-HALL-FORD
EMMA D. YOUNG-HALL-FORD
(Age 103)
DONALD C. RUSCHAUPT, SR.
April 20, 1933 ~ November 16, 2013
Four years have passed since we lost you
but we keep you in our everyday lives as
reminders of our life together. You would be
proud of your grandchildren, all of them, and
the fact that seven of them have visited OSU
and have sat in the “Shoe.” Walking down High
Street or walking across campus brings us
closer to you in so many ways. Keeping the
stories alive of our life together and telling the
grandchildren of those memories keeps you
with me always. We love and miss you so very
much. Sara, Kathleen, Chris, Donald, Bill,
Marty, Amy, Trish, Dianne, Abby, Natalie,
Kirsten, Nathan, Madison, Sophia. Nicky,
Grace, Charlie, and Olivia
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
On November 8, 2017, surrounded by his
family, at Capital Caring Hospice in Arlington,
VA. Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 1989,
Ken died of complications from this devastating disease. Born August 5, 1942 in Brookville,
PA, Ken was preceded in death by his parents,
Aldine McKendree and Clair McKendree (Marion). He is survived by his wife, Linda; his
sister, Barbara Beck (Gary); his children, Kevin
McKendree (Laura), Kathleen Stanton (Jeff),
Ashley McKendree and Patrick Curzio (Joy). He
is also survived by his grandchildren, Yates,
Nicholas, Rowan, River, Morgan (Kevin),
Cameron; and great grandson, Murphy. Ken
was loved and will be missed by many other
relatives and friends.
Ken grew up in the woods of Brookville, PA and
graduated from Brookville Area High School
in 1960. He attended Juniata College and
Penn State University and entered the United
States Army in 1964. While in the Army, he
attained the rank of Spec5. He was awarded
the Good Conduct Medal, National Defense
Service Medal and Sharpshooter (Rifle) Medal.
He graduated from the Army Language School
(DLIFLC) in Monterey, CA and earned his BA
from Syracuse University in 1967. Ken retired
from the Army in 1969 and went on to pursue a
career in accounting. He received his Certified
Public Accountant certificate in 1972. He
became a partner at Ross, Langan & McKendree, LLC, in McLean, VA where he served
for a period as Managing Partner. After a very
successful career at RLM, Ken retired in 2005.
Ken was enormously proud of all his children
and enjoyed listening to Kevin and Yates on
the piano and guitar. He loved rock and roll
and the blues and played saxophone in his
band in high school. When I-66 opened, it was
his personal speedway in his white Corvette
convertible. Ken was an avid outdoorsman and
a loyal Redskins, Nationals and Caps fan. One
of his favorite memories was a trip to Super
Bowl XVIII in 1984. The trip was a blast but the
Redskins…lost.
Ken’s family would like to thank Capital Caring
Hospice and Fair Oaks Hospital for their love
and support during a very difficult time. Capital
Caring Hospice was particularly wonderful.
If you care to make a donation in Ken’s name,
please consider Capital Carling Hospice or the
National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Thank you.
In keeping with Ken’s wishes, no funeral will be
held.
FREED
CHARLES NORMAN FREED (Age 82)
Passed away from cancer in the comfort
of his home in Olney, MD on November
14, 2017. He was surrounded by his wife,
Marlene Katzman Freed, two daughters
(Sharon Ledner and Nancy Hull), two sons
(Keith Hull and Cory Ledner) and five grandchildren (Josh St.Pierre, Nathan St.Pierre,
Sarah St.Pierre, Madeline Hull and Sam Hull)
all living locally. He is also survived by his
younger brother, Stephen Freed, wife
Paulette and three nephews/niece (Michael
Freed, Philip Freed and Karen Freed)
Chuck was born in Schenectady, NY on
November 19, 1935 to Florence Friedman
Freed and Albert Freed. He is an alumnus
of Penn State with a major in Metallurgical
Engineering. He continued his education
with a Masters from The Technion in Haifa,
Israel, where he lived with Marlene for three
years. He returned to the United States
working for the US Navy while getting a law
degree at night from The George Washington
University School of Law.
After graduation from Law School, he began
working for the newly created Environmental
Protection Agency in 1972. He worked most
of his 26 years with EPA in Mobile Source
Enforcement on inspections and investiga-
tions. He worked tirelessly to regulate fuel
quality and fuel emissions to better uphold
the new regulations in the Clean Air Act of
1970. During his career, he received several
commendations including the Bronze Medal
from Commendable Service in the field of air
pollution control through the development
and implementation of a nationwide enforcement system for unleaded gasoline. Also, the
Distinguished Career Award for exemplary
leadership and commitment to reduce
mobile source air pollution. Lastly a letter
from Senator Al Gore upon Chuck’s retirement to acknowledge his role in creating
and managing the motor vehicle and fuels
compliance and enforcement programs.
REMEMBER
YOUR LOVED ONES
After his retirement in 1998, his close friend
Li Pei introduced him to Professors at Tshingua University that began his second career
volunteering in Beijing, China a few months
every year for 17 years. There he was
given an adjunct professorial role lecturing to
graduate students in the field of Air Pollution.
In addition, he worked with fellow environmentalists helping to identify and solve air
pollution issues in the country. His many
Chinese colleagues have acknowledged his
substantial contributions to their clean air
effort.
TheWashington Post Magazine will publish
an Annual Commemorative Section.
Chuck’s passions included hiking, canoeing,
backpacking and reading. He traveled extensively to the National and State parks volunteering each year with the Trail Maintenance program with the US Parks Service.
His greatest passion however was spending
individual time each weekend with his grandchildren educating them in history, religion,
law, music and current events.
Family and Friends will gather inside the
chapel at The Judean Memorial, 16225
Batchellors Forest Rd., Olney, MD 20832 on
November 19 at 1 p.m.. The family invites all
to a Celebration of Life open house, 18315
Leedstown Way, Olney, MD 20832 directly
following the service until 8 p.m. In lieu of
flowers, memorials may be made to a charity
of your choice. Chuck was a true renaissance
man and his memory and legacy will always
be in our hearts.
SHUPE
SHIRLEY ANN WILDER "Ms Ann"
On November 6, 2017. Beloved mother of
Toni Wilder, Stephanie Turner, Howard Wilder,
Jr. (Melissa) and the late Sandra Wilder. Also
survived by her grandchildren, LeAndra (Garrett), Tiera, Rodney, Howard III, RaSheeda and
Dominique; great-granddaughter, Sani, sister,
Sadie Young, first cousins, Willie Allison and
Juanita McCain and a host of nieces, nephews
other relatives and friends. On Saturday,
November 18, 2017 friends may visit with
the family from 9 a.m. until time of funeral
service at 11 a.m. at Marshall-March Funeral
Home, 4308 Suitland Rd. Suitland, MD. Interment Lincoln Memorial Cemetery.
HAROLD CLINTON SHUPE
CLARK
JOSEPH V. WOOD
Online condolences may be made at
www.donaldsonfuneralhome.com
MARTHA R. CALDWELL (Age 73)
On Friday November 10, 2017. Survived by
a host of relatives and friends. Family will
welcome friends for a visitation 6 p.m. to 9
p.m. on Friday November 17, 2017 and funeral
service will be held Saturday November 18,
beginning at 9 a.m. both services will be held
at Greater People's Union Baptist Church, 1111
South Carolina Avenue, S.E. Interment National
Harmony Memorial Park Cemetery.
www.johnsonandjenkinsfh.com
WILDER
A service will be held at Donaldson Funeral
Home & Crematory, P.A., 1411 Annapolis Road,
Odenton 21113 on Saturday, November 18,
2017; 9 a.m. for religious rites and 10 a.m. for
funeral service. In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to a charity of your choice,
dedicated to orphaned children or displaced
people.
McKENDREE
Happy Birthday to My Dear Brother,
Gone, yet not forgotten, although we are apart
Your spirit lives within me forever in my heart.
Your Loving Sister, Joan
On Monday, November 6, 2017, Emma passed
peacefully at Carroll Manor Nursing Home in
Washington, DC. Dear Mother of Robin Young
Bailey of Washington, DC. Grandmother of
Kendall, Krystal and Kantrelle Bailey; greatgrandmother of Khai Hatcher and Luna Bailey.
She also leaves a host of nieces, nephews and
cousins. On Saturday, November 18, 2017 from
10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. friends may visit
with the family at Mt. Gilead Baptist Church,
1625 13th St. NW Washington, DC. Interment
Maryland National Memorial Park, Laurel, MD.
JOHNNIE LEWIS "Pastor Lewis"
On Saturday, November 11, 2017, God called
Pastor Lewis from labor to reward. Pastor
Lewis will be lovingly remembered by her
husband of 39 years, William H. Lewis; mother,
Gertrude Harrison; daughter, Lovette Harrison;
son, William A.D. Lewis; three granddaughters:
Davette, Brianna, and Brandi, sister-in-law,
Monika Parker; nieces: Genell and Tia; great
nieces: Shayla, Erica, Anika; God-Son:
Demetrius; family pet, Michi and a host of
family and friends. Pastor Lewis was preceased in death by her father, Johnie Harrison
and mother-in-law, Adele Lewis. Pastor Johnnie
Lewis was the founder and Pastor of Grace
Amazing Praise Empowerment Ministries.
Of Kenwood Park, Bethesda, Maryland dearly
beloved husband of Kanagambigai Ranganathan; devoted father of Nandhini, Nandhakumar, Kumudhini and Dhayalini; devoted
father-in-law to Arumuganathan, Janet, Mark
and Anpalakan; loving grandfather to Meera,
Angela, Priya, Serena, Aaron and Tara, passed
away peacefully, surrounded by family on Sunday, November 12, 2017. He lived a long and
rich life with his wife Kanaga for 62 years. Aged
88 on his passing, he is fondly remembered
by all who knew him. After working with
Aitken and Spence, Sri Lanka, he joined the
World Bank. He enjoyed his retirement with
his family, friends and travelled internationally.
Funeral services will be held on Saturday,
November 18, 2017, viewing 11 a.m. until
service at 12 Noon at the Remnant Community
Church, 4101 1st Street SE, Washington, DC
with Rev. D.A. Glasby officiating. Interment
will follow at Lincoln Cemetery, Suitland, MD.
One year ago, you left us and though our
hearts still mourn your passing, the love you
gave to each of us keeps your spirit alive.
Love, John, Cheryl, Gregg and Paco
WEBB
WOOD
AIYADURAI RANGANATHAN
MARTHA BOWSER (Age 101-1/2)
SUSAN W. VEST
Susan Wilkoff Vest, known for the last 18 years
as Guzy (Grandma Suzy), died at home early
Monday morning, November 6, 2017. Susan
was a woman of business, politics, and art, but
her family was her core. Born in Youngstown,
OH, Susan attended the Mary Burnham School,
in Northhampton, MA, then truly cultivated
her liberal ideals at Sarah Lawrence College
in Bronxville, NY. Susan was married for 45
years to C. Woods Vest Jr., and they resided in
Washington, DC where they raised their three
daughters. In her late 70’s, Susan relocated to
Cumberland Foreside, ME.
In the 1950’s, Susan was a social worker
for New York Presbyterian Hospital, where
she advocated for improved living and health
services for families in Harlem. Throughout
her life she promoted higher education and
curriculum change in secondary schools as a
volunteer and powerful voice on school boards
and local government in Washington, DC and
St. Croix, USVI.
Perhaps even more important than her community activism, was her unerring social and
artistic aesthetic. She was that friend who
was always interested, interesting and wellinformed, whether the topic was art, music,
politics, or language. She loved people, was
eminently socially adept and fiercely loyal.
Susan was filled with a quest for personal
development over a broad range of knowledge.
Throughout her life, she continuously sought
to improve her understanding and the lives of
those she loved. In an age of highly specialized
learning, skills, and social myopia, Susan’s
ability to relate to people and events transcended the social barriers of the twentieth
and twenty first centuries. She will be enormously missed by her family, friends and
community.
A memorial service will be held Friday, November 17 at 4 p.m. at the Kreeger Museum in
Washington, DC.
December 17, 2017
Harold Clinton Shupe, 77, of Rockville,
Maryland, passed away peacefully on Monday, November 13, 2017 at home. He
was retired from the National Park Service
where he worked for most of his adult life
maintaining and caring for trees. Harold
loved buying and fixing up old cars, going
deer hunting with his sons, grandson and
friends, as well as attending church fellowships. He is survived by his devoted wife,
Della McElyea Shupe, and three children,
Steve (Jackie) Shupe, Gilbert (Brenda) Shupe
and Patty (Sean) Hart. Harold was very
proud of his six grandchildren Megan Shupe
Goetz, Jessica Shupe, Caleb Shupe, Collin
Hart, Riley Hart and Brittany Dahlhauser,
as well as his four great grandchildren
Tucker Goetz, Graycin Combs, Bentley and
Oaklee Dahlhauser. He is also survived by
four siblings Inez Dorton, Faye Caudill, Mary
Helen Sutton, and Bobby Shupe as well
as many nieces and nephews. The family
will receive friends on Saturday, November
18, 2017 from 10 to 11 a.m. at Central
Baptist Church, 7271 Muncaster Mill Road,
Rockville, MD 20855 (301-670-1971). The
funeral service will immediately follow from
11 a.m. to 12 noon. He will be laid to rest at
Parklawn Memorial Park, 12800 Veirs Mill
Road, Rockville, MD 20853 following the
funeral service. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made in his name to
a charity of your choice or Central Baptist
Church.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
SIMMEL
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
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800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
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EMAIL:
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name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2017 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $502
4" - $545
5" - $680
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $535
4" - $621
5" - $770
6"+ for ALL color notices
$160 each additional inch wkday
$186 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
JOHN ROLAND SIMMEL, JR.
On November 11, 2017, John Roland Simmel
Jr, 89, of Olney, MD died peacefully with family
members by his side. Beloved husband of
the late Mary Rose Simmel. Devoted father
of Georgiana S. Tyler and her husband Ralph,
James T. Simmel, Marilyn S. Averi, Donald
J. Simmel and his wife Danette, William A.
Simmel and his wife Victoria, and the late John
R. Simmel III. Dear brother of Naoma McCarthy,
and the late Rosemary, Vincent, and Helen.
Loving Grandfather of Crystal Summers and
her husband Logan, Daniel Simmel, Michael
Simmel, Madeline Simmel, Natalie Averi, and
Blake Simmel. Great-Grandfather of Harper
Rose Summers.
On Monday, November 20, 2017, the family
will receive friends at 10 a.m., at Saint Peter’s
Catholic Church, 2900 Olney Sandy Spring Rd,
Olney, MD 20832, where a Mass of Christian
Burial will begin at 11 a.m. Interment at Gate
of Heaven Cemetery. Donations may be made
to Gilchrist Hospice, 555 Towsontown Blvd.,
Baltimore, MD 21204 in memory of John Roland
Simmel, Jr.
www.witzkefuneralhomes.com
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque.
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
Plan to be a part of this annual tradition!
RATES
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$150 B&W Photo
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Friday, November 17, 2017
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To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
Husband of Ninetta Marie (Floyd) Terczak, died
Thursday, November 9, 2017, at home.
He was born July 12, 1948, in Furth, Germany, a
son of Erika Anna Terczak and the late Aloysius
Terczak.
Prior to retirement, Mr. Terczak was employed
by the Metropolitan Police Department in the
special operations division with 30 years of
service. Following his retirement, he was
employed by the State Department Diplomatic
Security with 7 years of service.
He was a Master Mason with the East Gate
Lodge #34 and a member of the Fraternal
Order of Police.
In addition to his wife and mother, family
members include a son, Ray Terczak, Jr.; three
brothers, Frank, Tommy and his wife, Elizabeth,
and Pete Terczak; four grandchildren; a number
of nieces and nephews and great nieces and
nephews.
He was preceded in death by his father, Al
Terczak.
A funeral service will be conducted at 1 p.m.
Saturday, November 18, 2017, in the Henry
Funeral Home Chapel by the Rev. Reed Hopkins
with Masonic rites to be conducted by John
Maloney. Burial will follow in Oak Lawn Mausoleum and Memory Gardens.
Pallbearers will be Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia Honor Guard.
The family will receive friends from 12 noon
until 1 p.m. Saturday prior to the service in the
funeral home.
Ninetta would like to thank special caregivers,
friends, and family.
Memorials may be made to HEROES, Inc.,
1200 29th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20007.
Condolences may be sent to the family at
www.henryfuneralhome.net
B8
EZ
. THURSDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
The Weather
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Warmer and sunnier
Clouds should be mostly out of here
by sunrise, although we could still be
kicking some to the east. Sunshine is
the rule for much of the day. Despite
a gusty northwest wind,
temperatures should rise toward 60 in most
spots. Tonight, winds continue to breeze in from
the northwest. With mostly clear skies, we’ll see
temperatures trend a bit colder again, bottoming
in the 30s to near 40.
Today
Mostly sunny
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Mostly sunny
Saturday
Rain
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Partly sunny
Monday
Mostly sunny
Tuesday
Partly sunny
59° 38
53° 41
58° 47
50° 33
47° 34
56° 39
FEELS*: 56°
FEELS: 53°
FEELS: 49°
FEELS: 42°
FEELS: 43°
FEELS: 54°
CHNCE PRECIP: 5%
P: 0%
P: 70%
P: 10%
P: 0%
P: 10%
WIND: W 10–20 mph
W: WNW 6–12 mph
W: S 10–20 mph
W: WNW 12–25 mph
W: WNW 8–16 mph
W: SSW 7–14 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
52/35
Hagerstown
52/36
Davis
42/26
Su
M
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
58/38
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
57/34
Dover
59/35
Cape May
Annapolis
59/39
58/39
OCEAN: 58°
Washington
59/38
Charlottesville
60/34
Norfolk
65/42
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Virginia Beach
64/41
F
Sa
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
55° 2:03 p.m.
35° 5:38 a.m.
58°/41°
83° 1993
20° 1905
54° 2:29 p.m.
27° 6:00 a.m.
58°/36°
81° 1993
19° 1986
52° 2:39 p.m.
29° 4:35 a.m.
57°/37°
79° 1993
19° 1986
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 54°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Normal
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
1.91"
1.57"
35.01"
35.09"
0.0"
0.0"
0.00"
1.86"
1.68"
39.76"
36.85"
0.0"
0.0"
0.00"
1.95"
1.62"
37.13"
36.83"
0.0"
0.0"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
3 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, partly sunny, breezy. High 42–46.
Wind northwest 8–16 mph. Tonight, mostly clear, cold. Low
25–29. Wind northwest 6–12 mph. Friday, mostly sunny.
High 43–47. Wind northwest 4–8 mph. Saturday, variably
cloudy. High 48–52.
Atlantic beaches: Today, mostly sunny, becoming windy.
High 59–65. Wind west 10–20 mph. Tonight, mostly clear,
windy. Low 36–42. Wind northwest 12–25 mph. Friday,
mostly sunny, breezy. High 50–54. Wind northwest 10–20
mph. Saturday, afternoon showers. High 57–63.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly sunny, breezy.
Wind west 12–22 knots. Waves 2 feet or less. • Lower Potomac and
Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly sunny, breezy. Wind west 12–22
knots. Waves 1–2 feet on the lower Potomac, 2–4 feet on the
Chesapeake Bay.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls will be
3.4 feet, holding about steady on Friday. Flood stage at Little Falls
is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
12:56 a.m.
6:16 a.m.
1:07 p.m.
6:37 p.m.
Annapolis
3:14 a.m.
9:25 a.m.
4:05 p.m.
10:11 p.m.
Ocean City
5:41 a.m.
12:06 p.m.
5:55 p.m.
Norfolk
1:24 a.m.
7:49 a.m.
2:02 p.m.
8:07 p.m.
Point Lookout
5:30 a.m.
11:59 a.m.
6:37 p.m.
11:52 p.m.
none
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
World
High: Fitzroy Crossing, Australia 107°
Low: Tutonchany, Russia –45°
Yesterday's National
High: Kingsville, TX 89°
Low: West Yellowstone, MT 1°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
50/32/sh
71/47/s
27/18/sn
67/42/pc
81/65/sh
57/34/s
54/31/c
68/39/pc
43/30/pc
51/32/sh
49/36/r
42/27/sh
47/28/c
69/42/s
48/31/pc
66/36/s
65/43/s
41/33/pc
43/30/pc
43/31/r
73/64/sh
71/46/s
Tomorrow
41/22/s
72/40/pc
27/16/s
66/47/s
83/66/pc
52/34/s
40/26/sf
69/53/pc
40/19/c
46/27/pc
46/31/s
39/34/pc
36/24/pc
66/44/s
56/40/pc
61/40/s
55/23/c
44/42/r
52/45/pc
48/43/pc
81/64/pc
63/26/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
46/38/pc
43/27/c
78/52/s
14/10/sn
37/27/c
50/32/r
84/70/pc
81/65/pc
43/29/pc
75/53/pc
74/49/s
53/44/pc
78/63/pc
62/49/c
76/61/c
49/33/s
62/45/pc
83/71/c
41/33/pc
38/33/c
57/34/s
76/57/s
55/38/r
65/42/s
57/38/sh
44/41/c
81/54/s
13/–11/sn
38/18/sf
46/24/s
83/69/pc
83/68/pc
49/43/c
79/62/pc
75/52/pc
65/41/sh
76/48/pc
75/65/c
71/56/pc
57/53/sh
72/63/c
83/71/pc
45/40/r
45/29/r
65/56/pc
78/63/pc
49/36/s
54/38/s
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
60/54/c
51/42/pc
75/58/pc
58/38/pc
86/61/s
42/30/c
46/36/r
49/40/sh
53/34/r
65/35/s
56/29/r
62/34/s
61/42/sh
49/37/s
85/78/sh
62/47/c
76/61/pc
63/51/r
88/77/sh
48/40/c
43/32/c
46/27/sh
78/59/pc
58/51/pc
78/47/c
62/38/c
78/58/pc
50/36/s
84/59/pc
46/36/pc
42/21/pc
50/38/c
48/27/s
58/39/s
48/20/pc
54/37/s
60/35/s
58/54/c
84/76/sh
47/27/sn
72/57/c
62/46/s
88/76/sh
48/42/r
42/30/c
37/24/pc
80/62/pc
72/43/c
Nov 18
New
Nov 26
First
Quarter
Dec 3
Full
Dec 10
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
6:52 a.m.
4:50 a.m.
5:46 a.m.
3:38 a.m.
5:29 a.m.
9:22 a.m.
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
92/76/s
86/56/pc
62/46/s
85/65/pc
83/49/s
39/33/sh
42/30/s
62/59/r
86/76/t
39/35/pc
77/67/t
85/71/c
63/43/s
58/45/pc
43/25/c
44/37/pc
45/35/c
Today
Addis Ababa
76/44/pc
Amsterdam
54/39/c
Athens
67/57/t
Auckland
67/54/sh
Baghdad
79/52/s
Bangkok
91/78/t
Beijing
45/28/s
Berlin
49/38/pc
Bogota
66/48/r
Brussels
50/37/pc
Buenos Aires
73/56/s
Cairo
81/63/s
Caracas
74/66/pc
Copenhagen
48/39/sh
Dakar
87/77/pc
Dublin
48/34/pc
Edinburgh
47/36/sh
Frankfurt
42/33/pc
Geneva
47/31/pc
Ham., Bermuda 74/67/s
Helsinki
39/32/s
Ho Chi Minh City 91/76/pc
Tomorrow
76/44/pc
50/43/pc
65/59/t
71/57/pc
79/53/pc
93/79/pc
45/17/pc
46/35/sh
66/48/sh
49/36/pc
80/47/pc
82/63/pc
74/66/pc
47/40/sh
87/76/pc
46/39/pc
48/38/sh
44/30/c
49/34/s
75/65/sh
42/36/sh
91/77/s
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
80/75/c
71/46/t
62/54/c
74/54/pc
65/42/pc
44/32/sh
85/75/pc
75/70/r
87/77/t
71/61/pc
67/49/s
56/35/c
65/41/s
89/78/pc
73/46/pc
46/28/r
39/30/sn
92/75/pc
77/57/pc
81/59/pc
41/32/sh
43/20/c
50/40/pc
40/31/pc
81/74/s
73/47/s
62/54/c
75/55/pc
71/47/s
49/26/sh
85/76/pc
79/72/t
88/78/t
72/62/pc
68/50/s
48/35/pc
67/43/s
88/78/c
74/47/pc
34/22/pc
35/32/c
91/78/pc
77/59/pc
80/58/pc
42/29/pc
32/22/pc
52/35/pc
41/33/c
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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2017
.
SECTION C
EZ
SU
ILLUSTRATIONS BY DELPHINE LEE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Breitbart is
steadfast as
support for
Moore flags
BY
P AUL F ARHI
While the titans of the conservative media are tiptoeing uncomfortably away from Roy
Moore’s Senate candidacy, Breitbart News is holding fast, sticking
with the Alabama Republican
even as the allegations against
him mount.
Fox News’s Sean Hannity —
once a staunch Moore supporter
— began to head for the exit on
the former judge Tuesday night,
saying on his program that Moore
had 24 hours to reconcile “inconsistencies” in his account of dating teenage girls in the 1970s
when Moore was in his 30s. Rush
Limbaugh began backing away,
too (“Everybody thinks the creep
did the deed”), as did the Wall
Street Journal’s conservative editorial page (“The Roy Moore
Mess.”)
The Drudge Report put a dagger firmly into Moore on WednesMOORE CONTINUED ON C3
A filmmaker’s
message about
race at Hirshhorn
They reported
sexual harassment.
Here’s the outcome.
For some who raised claims about the actions of co-workers,
measures were taken. For others, the result was discomforting.
BY
J ESSICA C ONTRERA
This is a watershed moment for sexual harassment. Recent weeks have
brought a flood of stories about inappropriate advances, or even sexual assault,
in professional settings — perpetrated by and against well-known people.
With each new allegation comes media attention, public outrage and questions about how these incidents went unreported for so long.
But what happens when sexual harassment is reported, by victims who
aren’t in the spotlight? In many workplaces, the handling of these claims can
be a hushed process, shrouded by confidentiality agreements and legal proceedings that can go on for years.
Through news reports, advocacy organizations and attorneys, The Washington Post identified eight people who have reported harassment in the
workplace. They include an assembly-line worker. A prison guard. A nurse.
Here, these workers share their stories, as seen through their eyes and told
in their words. The Post did not interview their employers or others implicated
in their accounts — nor are we naming them. We identify the workers only by
their first names. The ages and locations are listed as they were when the
workers say the harassment began. For many, the decision to report was as
life-altering as the incident itself.
MUSIC REVIEW
Tangled up
in Bob at
the Anthem
BY
J OE H EIM
It’s hard to know what to make
of Bob Dylan these days. In that
sense, nothing has changed. Over
his six-decade career, the Hibbing, Minn., songwriter has perfected inscrutability — winning
over devoted fans with his genius
and frustrating them with his
studied mysteriousness. Even his
autobiography reads like a fable.
At the Anthem on Tuesday
night, the 76-year-old Nobel and
Pulitzer Prize winner only added
to his reputation for intrigue, performing a 20-song show that felt
both riveting and oddly removed.
Dylan has never been one for
engaging with an audience, but
over the years that lack of interest
has compounded. During the 90minute show, he neither acknowlDYLAN CONTINUED ON C4
HARASSMENT CONTINUED ON C3
CLAXTON TELLTALE
BY
A NN H ORNADAY
“It’s been better than a good
year.”
The cinematographer Arthur
Jafa is speaking on the phone
from Los Angeles, where he lives
within spitting distance of the
movie industry he holds at ambivalent arm’s length, despite being
one of its most revered practitioners, at least among aficionados.
Jafa, who is in his mid-50s, is best
known for collaborating with the
director Julie Dash to achieve the
gauzy, lyrical look of her 1991
classic, “Daughters of the Dust,”
and, a few years later, shooting
Spike Lee’s “Crooklyn” with a nostalgic palette of burnished earth
tones inspired by the sun-faded
Jet magazines of his youth. The
man friends and insiders know as
“A.J.” has come to recent prominence shooting music videos for
Solange Knowles, Jay-Z and Beyoncé, who paid homage to his
work with Dash in her visual
album “Lemonade.”
But those gigs haven’t made
JAFA CONTINUED ON C2
Bob Dylan never acknowledged
the audience at the Anthem.
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
The designer of Melania
Trump’s inaugural gown is
starting his own line. C2
BOOK WORLD
Caws of death: A crow’s
flights of fancy between
this world and the next. C2
CAROLYN HAX
“When he wouldn’t stop rubbing my shoulders every morning,
I called HR. I told them I wasn’t out to cause trouble;
I just wanted him to stop.”
Genece, 59, an assembly-line worker in Illinois
Her 17-year-old grandson
gave his girlfriend lingerie.
What can she say? C5
MUSIC REVIEW
Barbara Hannigan’s
sweet slice of early
20th-century repertoire. C8
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Designer of first lady’s inauguration gown
launching a collection of a dozen dresses
Breaking news for anyone
jonesing to closet the first lady’s
classic style and willing to shell
out major bucks to do so.
Herve Pierre, the Frenchborn designer who created
Melania Trump’s couture
inauguration gown, plans to
launch a capsule collection of a
dozen dresses this spring. The
black and navy frocks will have a
starting price of $1,700,
according to Women’s Wear
Daily.
Pierre, a fashion industry
veteran who the first lady once
described as “a real
professional,” made clear that
Trump was not directly involved
in the line.
“She doesn’t really know
exactly all of the details, but she
is aware,” Pierre told WWD. “She
is very excited, of course.” But the
designer stressed that his
collection, designed in
conjunction with Nicolas Caito,
“had nothing to do with” Trump.
“When I look at the collection,
maybe two pieces would be for
her. But I didn’t design with her
in mind. I believe a good
designer is also a good
merchandiser. You cannot put all
your eggs in the same basket,” he
said.
Still, there’s no denying that
the Trump basket has been a
boon for Pierre. He left Carolina
Herrera last year and, before the
recent announcement of this
new line, did not have his own
label. His sartorial relationship
to the first lady — as her stylist
and design collaborator — is a
significant one. Last month, he
was in Washington when the
dress he designed for Trump was
donated to the Smithsonian. The
White House connection kept his
name in the headlines and
etched in history.
EVAN AGOSTINI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alec Baldwin told a crowd at George Washington University that
nontraditional candidates may not have a shot at elected office.
Baldwin 2020? ‘I think I’d be a good
president, I really think I would.’
There’s no question that Emmy
winner Alec Baldwin has the
whole “president” thing down pat
— on TV. Thing is, the actor says
he could handle the gig in real life,
too.
“Would I think I’d be a good
president? Yeah, I think I’d be a
good president, I really think I
would,” answered Baldwin when
asked if he’d run for office during
a recent event at George
Washington University, according
to the Hill.
The actor was at his alma
mater promoting his new
especially long-titled book, “You
Can’t Spell America Without Me:
The Really Tremendous Inside
Story of My Fantastic First Year as
President Donald J. Trump (A SoCalled Parody).” Co-writer Kurt
Andersen was also on hand to
push the comedic tome, which
plays off Baldwin’s famous
portrayal of Trump on “Saturday
Night Live.” (You know, the
impression POTUS loves so
much.)
Despite the confidence in his
ability to run the country,
Baldwin, a Democrat, cited two
key factors that are giving him
pause. First, his family. The father
of four (with one of the way) said
it “doesn’t seem to be practical
with my lifestyle now with my
children.” Second, even if the
actor decided to run for the White
House, Trump may have ruined
the celebrity-turned-politician
model.
“I’m not quite sure that Trump
has left it open for nontraditional
candidates,” he said. “But really,
the pendulum might swing the
other way, and people are going to
want people with real bona fide
credentials as the head of a
statehouse, a governor.”
Andersen had a solution,
though. There’s another political
post would soon be open: mayor
of New York. But according to PJ
Media, Baldwin wasn’t sold on
tackling that challenge, either,
saying: “I’m just not quite sure
what the result of Trump would
be, electoral politics-wise.”
— Sarah Polus
SAUL LOEB/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
The exposure granted by
designing an inaugural gown is
undeniable, but it isn’t a golden
ticket to success. Past designers
plucked from mainstream
obscurity to the White House
stage have been tossed back into
the ponds whence they came.
Hillary Clinton’s 1992 gown
designer, Sarah Phillips, went
out of business. Laura Bush’s
Dallas-based dressmaker,
Michael Faircloth, had plans to
show in New York after the 2000
inauguration but never made it.
One exception is Jason Wu, who
designed both of Michelle
First lady Melania
Trump’s
inauguration gown,
designed by Herve
Pierre, right, was
donated to the
Smithsonian’s First
Ladies Collection at
the National
Museum of
American History.
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
BOOK WORLD
M ICHAEL D IRDA
A book-length historical fantasy about a crow? On the surface,
this may sound like a birdbrained idea. But consider its
author: John Crowley is one of
the finest writers of our time,
author of the youthfully romantic “Little, Big” — the most
admired American fantasy novel
of the past 40 years — and
“Aegypt,” a four-volume philosophical masterwork touching
on history, magic, sex and Gnosticism. Crowley has also published mainstream fiction, a
handful of stories and novellas
(including the dazzling Escherlike “Great Work of Time”) and
even an adaptation of the famous
Renaissance
allegory,
“The
Chemical Wedding.”
Still, “Ka” — an exploration of
the bond between the living and
the dead — may be a challenge
for some readers. First of all, it
really is told largely from the
viewpoint of a crow named Dar
Oakley who, phoenixlike, undergoes periodic rebirth. In each of
his incarnations he closely interacts and communicates with human characters who are all, more
or less, shaman figures; these
include a Druid priestess named
Fox Cap, a medieval monk called
the Brother, a Native American
singer of tales, a Civil War widow
turned medium, and the book’s
dying narrator, who lives in a
near future when the world is
falling apart. In each section,
Crowley’s avian hero accompanies his human friend on a
journey into the realm of the
dead.
In many cultures, crows have
long been regarded as “deathbirds.” Eaters of carrion and
corpses, they are sometimes even
said to convey the soul into the
afterlife. Crowley’s title itself alludes to this notion: Dar Oakley
croaks out “ka,” which isn’t just a
variant spelling of “caw,” but also
the ancient Egyptian word for
the spiritual self that survives
the decay of the body. Yet what
actually remains of us after our
bones have been picked clean?
Might our spirits then dwell in
some Happy Valley or will we
suffer in eternal torment? Could
death itself be simply an adventure-rich dream from which we
never awake? Who knows? The
narrator, who might be a writer,
says of his dead and muchmissed wife Debra that “the
KA
Dar Oakley in
the Ruin of Ymr
By John Crowley.
Illustrated by
Melanie
Newcomb
Saga. 464 pp.
$28.99
ultimate continuation of her is
me.” What, however, becomes of
Debra when he too is dead?
Time, Crowley knows, isn’t
just linear, it’s stratified.
Throughout his fiction he returns repeatedly to the notion of
recollection, whether of past
selves, lost wisdom or secret
history. As the centuries roll by,
Dar Oakley periodically realizes,
“where he now was he had been
before.” In the medieval “Saint of
the Foxes” the crow recognizes a
distorted memory of his old
friend, the priestess Fox Cap.
Because of her, Dar Oakley
first entered the Other Lands,
where the two searched for “the
Most Precious Thing,” the secret
of eternal life. He alludes to his
subsequent visits there with a
distinctly Crowleyan image: “He
knew how it would be: he would
go into Ymr, and the farther in he
went, the farther there would be
to go. It was never the same place
twice.” In fact, as another crow
reminds him, “you never do go
back anywhere. You only go on.”
Later, Dar Oakley tells a skeleton
that he can’t find the thing that
would keep him from death forever:
“Maybe not, said the Skeleton.
But look at it this way. When you
return home, you’ll tell the story
of how you sought it and failed,
and that story will be told and
told again. And when you’re dead
yourself, the story will go on
being told, and in that telling
you’ll speak and act and be alive
again.”
This is, of course, the dream of
all artists: immortality through
their work.
and has a thriving, multimilliondollar business.
Pierre seemed to acknowledge
the delicate balance between
fame and fashion business.
“I really don’t know where this
is going,” he told WWD. “If it’s
successful, of course I will have
the huge ego of a king and I will
be unbearable. But for the
moment, I am walking on
eggshells and I am trying to do
things step by step. For me, if
success comes, it will be from
people buying my clothes and
wearing them.”
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
A filmmaker’s
‘Message’ of
injustice and joy
Quoth the Crow ‘Evermore’
BY
Obama’s inauguration gowns
Again and again, “Ka” depicts
quiet loneliness — because Dar
Oakley connects human and
crow cultures he isn’t quite at
home in either — and achingly
evokes the spring-fever of dawning love. Dar Oakley never forgets his beloved mate Kits (who
turns out to be far more than she
seems). He even reenacts the
story of Orpheus and Eurydice
when he tries to bring a later
mate back into the world of the
living.
As that suggests, “Ka” is nothing if not syncretic. More than a
book of stories nested in stories,
it is, as the Skeleton implied, a
book about Story. Dar Oakley
discovers that he himself is “inside a story, which was also
inside him.” The well read will
pick up faint echoes and submerged allusions to, for example,
Robert Graves’s “The White Goddess,” the Brazilian myths decoded by anthropologist Claude
Lévi-Strauss, the legendary voyages of Saint Brendan, the allegorical visions of William Blake,
Native American legends, any
number of bird and animal fables, striking lines from Christopher Marlowe and Walt Whitman, and, at one point, wordplay
that recalls Wallace Stevens’s
famous poem about the snowman who beholds “nothing that
is not there and the nothing that
is.”
In sum, “Ka” is just the kind of
deeply moving, deeply personal
“late work” that a great artist
sometimes produces at the end
of his or her career. I mustn’t,
however, close without indicating something of the serene
beauty of Crowley’s prose. Here,
then, is a passage about the
19th-century Spiritualist view of
death:
“Those who die happy in the
company of their loved ones and
in the home they know often can
sense no passage at all between
earthly and heavenly life, and
can believe themselves still
among the living: here is the
flowered path to the familiar
door, here are the remembered
ones who went before us, in their
habits as they lived; here the
table is set, the good odors of
sustenance; here the apple tree
and the peach tree where once
they were, bearing fruit.”
mdirda@gmail.com
Michael Dirda reviews books every
Thursday for The Washington Post.
JAFA FROM C1
this “better than a good year” for
Jafa. Rather, it’s that his work has
been discovered and embraced in
the fine-art world he’s been alternately approaching and avoiding
for almost 20 years.
In November 2016, his sevenminute video installation “Love Is
the Message, the Message Is
Death” opened at Gavin Brown’s
Enterprise in New York, receiving
a warm welcome that culminated
in a rapturous review in the New
Yorker. That was followed by a
solo show at London’s Serpentine
Sackler Gallery and the inclusion
of his 2013 piece “Apex” at Art
Basel in June. “Love Is the Message, the Message Is Death” opens
Saturday for a five-month run at
the Hirshhorn Museum as part of
the exhibition “The Message:
New Media Works.”
Although Jafa is from Mississippi, his first museum show in
Washington represents something of a homecoming: An alumnus of Howard University, he’s
part of a generation of influential
cinematographers
to
have
emerged from the school’s film
program, from Ernest Dickerson
and Malik Sayeed to Bradford
Young. But just as he underplays
his role in the films and videos he
has made for others (“I worked
with filmmakers who had a vision
and I shot it”), he demurs when
asked if his D.C. museum debut
holds special meaning. “The
Hirshhorn is cool, but I wouldn’t
say that,” he says softly. “At this
point it’s just in a string of things.”
That string starts decades ago,
when Jafa began to explore the
idea of black cinema as a vernacular all its own, one focused on
African American people whose
images have historically been
erased, distorted, demonized or
ignored by a medium that, as Jafa
puts it, hasn’t evolved to address
their expressive needs. Inspired
by the experimental work of his
mentor Haile Gerima and L.A.
Rebellion
filmmaker
Ben
Caldwell, as well as the literary
theorist Stephen Henderson and
friends like the painter Kerry
James Marshall, Jafa has sought
to create an idiom that would
capture and convey the unique
experience of being black in
America in the 20th and 21st
centuries — a form that would be
more indebted to what Jafa has
called the “power, beauty and
ARTHUR JAFA AND GAVIN BROWN’S ENTERPRISE, NEW YORK/ ROME
Arthur Jafa in scene from “Love Is the Message, the Message
Is Death,” his video installation at the Hirshhorn Museum.
alienation” of black music than to
Hollywood conventions. (“Like,
what’s the cinematic equivalent of
Cecil Taylor or Jimi Hendrix or
James Brown?” Jafa explained to
me in an earlier conversation.)
In “Love Is the Message, the
Message Is Death,” it’s clear that
Jafa is onto something. Viewers
are barraged with a rapid-fire collage of found-footage images that
project pain, joy, brutal injustice,
virtuosity, deep pleasure, profound grief and bracing resilience
— all set to Kanye West’s “Ultralight Beam.” Mining clips from
silent films, Barack Obama
speeches, news footage of police
shootings, home movies, concerts
and basketball games, and presenting them in an almost dreamlike flurry of associative edits,
Jafa creates a portrait brimming
with life, trauma, oppression, resistance and survival. Despite its
brief running time, the piece feels
like a deep, textured, comprehensive summation of Jafa’s chief
project all these years — less a
manifesto than a “proof of concept,” as he puts it.
“I think so much of the black
experience has been, not just being the repository of [W.E.B.]
Dubois’s double consciousness,
but being the purveyors or beneficiaries of a kind of forced duality,”
Jafa observes. “We were chained
together on the slave ships, [but
that’s also] fellowship and congregation. It’s the same thing with
group performance versus solo
improvisation in jazz. [It’s] that
tense duality: pleasure and pain,
celebration and despair, which
are all very human, but also particular to black people’s existential circumstances in the West.”
Although viewers may be
tempted to interpret “Love Is the
Message, the Message Is Death” in
“sociopolitical” terms, Jafa adds,
he hopes that upon reflection, the
agony and ecstasy represented in
the work can be appreciated as
part of a lineage that includes
such artists as the Baroque sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini and the
pre-Renaissance painter Cimabue. “I want to make work with
black figures that’s as cerebral
and intellectual as anything else,”
he says, noting that he resists the
notion that only white subjects
can be universal. As an African
American artist, he says, “I don’t
want to vacate my specificity from
the things I’m interested in, in
order for it to be embraced.”
So far, “Love Is the Message, the
Message Is Death” has been embraced, by black and white audiences alike. Whereas in the past,
Jafa had been wary of the art
world (“Once I got it into my mind
that I was making s--- for rich
white people to put on their walls,
it just shut my practice down”),
he’s encouraged by the degree to
which audiences have accepted
and understood his work.
“I’m surprised by how many
white folks have been moved by it,
frankly,” he says. “I’ve been quite
pleasantly surprised by how
many people have been moved by
it. As human beings they’re
moved by it. So in one sense it’s
working, in terms of the aspirations I’ve had for black music
being the proper model for black
cinema, where we can be ourselves unconstrained, and other
folks can be moved by it. I think
there’s a model there.”
ann.hornaday@washpost.com
Arthur Jafa will discuss “Love Is the
Message, the Message Is Death” in a
conversation with jazz musician
Steve Coleman at 6:30 p.m. Friday in
the Hirshhorn’s Ring Auditorium,
Independence Ave and Seventh St.
SW. Free. All advance tickets are
claimed, but a limited number of
seats are available for walk-ups on a
first-come, first-served basis. Visit
www.hirshhorn.si.edu.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
SU
Varied outcomes for reports of harassment
HARASSMENT FROM C1
Rylinda, 41, customer-service
call center in Maryland: I was
good at the job. When customers
screamed at me on the phone, I
was calm and professional. Then
they moved me to another office,
where I’d be working with
technicians instead of customers.
On my first day, I knew it was
going to be different.
Genece, 59, assembly-line
worker in Illinois: I had been
working at the factory for nine
years when it started. I always
arrived an hour early for my
5 a.m. shift so I’d never be written
up for being late. I’d be sitting in
the break room, alone, and every
day, one of my co-workers would
come in and start rubbing my
shoulders.
Calissa, 19, restaurant
hostess in Maryland: I found a
job at a chain restaurant opening
up downtown. I was told to “dress
sexy,” so I’d wear skirts, like the
other hostesses. It seemed like the
better you looked, the more
attention the manager paid you.
One day, he asked me to come
into his tiny office and organize
the cabinets. I had to climb on a
step stool. He sat at his desk,
watching me and looking up my
skirt.
Shannon, 32, medical sales
representative in Washington
state: Almost all of my co-workers
were male. They would talk about
“eating taco.” When I came back
from having a child, one of them
said, “Can somebody cry like a
baby to make Shannon leak?” It
was a fraternity. You either played
along or you got maligned, and in
the end, I wasn’t playing along.
Maria, 26, bartender in
California: When my boss first
touched my butt, he played it off
like an accident. I didn’t think
much of it. Then he’d start
drinking, and he’d do it again and
again.
Amber, 24, nurse in Oregon: I
went behind the nursing desk to
get something from the file
cabinet. I bent over to reach it and
felt someone slap me squarely on
my ass. I flipped around,
thinking, “Oh, my God, what just
happened?” and looked at the guy
sitting behind me. I said, “What
are you doing?!” He said, “Oh,
sorry. I slipped.”
Jordan, 27, hospital
insurance coordinator in Texas:
The CEO of the hospital was
about to leave my office. When he
reached his arms toward me, I
thought, “Surely he’s just patting
me on the shoulder.” But he
pulled me into his body so my
breasts were pressed up against
his crotch. He held me there and
took the deepest, most disturbing
breath I have ever heard. I was
frozen. He began rubbing my
shoulders. He kissed me on the
forehead. He said, “Is there
anything else you need?”
Bonita, 57, prison guard in
Texas: He was the sergeant
responsible for making my
schedule, so it was easy for him to
put me somewhere where I would
be alone. The first time, he came
in and didn’t say a word. He just
started unbuttoning my shirt. I
told him to stop, and he started
undoing my belt. I screamed, and
that made him stop. As he walked
away, he said, “You need to
DELPHINE LEE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
change your attitude.”
Patterns
Calissa, hostess: I tried to
change. I saw the manager look
up the skirts of other hostesses,
too. I went to J.C. Penney and
bought multiple pairs of pants.
Rylinda, call center: My new
work environment was always
rowdy, always unprofessional.
But I was a single mother with
three kids to support. So I put up
with my co-workers talking about
their sex lives. I put up with them
cursing. And then one of them
came into my cubicle, hugged me
from behind, and as he was
letting go, he squeezed my
breasts.
Maria, bartender: Every shift
at the bar, I knew my boss might
try to touch me again. One day he
said to me, “One way or another,
I’m going to have sex with you.”
But I had a responsibility to send
money back to my parents in
Mexico. I needed this job.
“Four months after
I reported the CEO
to HR, I got a phone
call. ‘Did you hear?’
my co-worker asked.
‘They forced him to
resign.’ I cried and cried
because that part was
over. . . . Feeling unsafe
at work was over.
It was an amazing
feeling.”
Jordan, 27, a hospital insurance
coordinator in Texas
Jordan, hospital insurance
coordinator: After the CEO left
my office, I called my husband. He
was so pissed. He said, “I’m
coming down there.” I was
thinking about our two kids, and
how his salary had taken a hit
when the Texas oil industry had.
It was my job providing our
insurance. So I said, “No, you’re
not,” and I walked down to HR
instead.
Bonita, prison guard: The
sergeant started coming to find
me almost every night. When I
found ways to make sure I wasn’t
alone, he moved where I was
stationed. He raped me. When I
finally told a supervisor,
investigators came to my house
and asked me to sign a statement.
I couldn’t. I knew that if I did, I
would lose my job. I was raising
my granddaughter, and I was
going to send her to college.
Genece, assembly-line
worker: When he wouldn’t stop
rubbing my shoulders every
morning, I called HR. I told them
I wasn’t out to cause trouble; I
just wanted him to stop. They
said they couldn’t do anything if I
didn’t fill out a report. So I filled
out the report.
Amber, nurse: I told some of
the other nurses about being
spanked. They said, “Oh, yeah,
we’ve had a problem with that
guy.” I went to my supervisor and
said, “I don’t ever want to work
with him again.” After that, I
didn’t have to.
Jordan, hospital insurance
coordinator: When I told the
woman from HR what the CEO
did to me, she was wonderful.
Very apologetic, very
understanding, very supportive.
They began investigating and
meeting with me on a regular
basis.
Calissa, hostess: One night,
pants on, I tried to leave the
restaurant after my shift ended.
But the manager said I wasn’t
allowed to go until everyone else
did. He said, “You’re leaving with
me.” He was biting his lip, and the
way he was looking at me — I just
felt so uncomfortable. My dad
was outside waiting to pick me
up. So I walked out and never
went back. The next day, I called
the restaurant chain’s corporate
HR and told them what
happened. They said they would
let me know if they needed
anything else. They never called
back.
Maria, bartender: I quit. I
didn’t have another job to go to. I
didn’t know at that time that I
would be able to get legal help,
that I would file a lawsuit, that I
would get compensation and
move on with my life. I just knew I
didn’t want to be raped.
Genece, assembly-line
worker: The day after I wrote the
report about him rubbing my
shoulders, someone from HR told
me: “Everything’s taken care of.
He’s going to stop.” A week later,
they let him go. Right after that,
they let me go, too. They said my
position had been eliminated. My
husband still works at the factory,
so I know that’s not true.
Shannon, sales
representative: I wrote a seven-
page document for HR about the
hostile work environment.
Within a month, I was put on a
plan to “improve my
performance,” and my
commission was taken away.
Jordan, hospital insurance
coordinator: Four months after I
reported the CEO to HR, I got a
phone call. “Did you hear?” my co-
worker asked. “They forced him
to resign.” I cried and cried
because that part was over.
Walking through the halls with
the tape recorder app pulled up
on my cellphone in case he
confronted me was over. Calling
co-workers to walk with me to get
water from the cafeteria was over.
Feeling unsafe at work was over.
It was an amazing feeling.
Conclusions
Rylinda, call center: For
months after he grabbed my
breasts, I struggled with anxiety
and depression. I was diagnosed
as bipolar. I took medical leave. I
came back, I asked to be moved,
and it never happened.
Eventually, they told me I could
take a job in Richmond. I didn’t
go to Richmond. I went to the
Employment Justice Center, and
an attorney took my case.
Shannon, sales
representative: My brother
worked in employment law, so I
asked him what to do. He said:
“With these cases, they make you
out to be either a slut or a nut. So
you have to be prepared for that.”
I hired an attorney. And all I can
say about it now is that the
company and I came to a
“mutually beneficial agreement.”
Genece, assembly-line
worker: Getting terminated put a
huge damper on me financially. I
had to file for bankruptcy. My car
was repossessed. I sent a letter to
the [Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission], but I
don’t know. My husband still
works at the factory, and I don’t
want him to lose his job.
Bonita, prison guard:
Thirteen months went by
between the day I reported the
rape and the day the sergeant was
dismissed. Before that, he
received a promotion to
lieutenant. It was another three
years before my case settled in
court. I got $250,000. No criminal
charges were filed against him. I
feel numb. I don’t know what to
do with myself. He is still out
there, and I don’t know if he is
going to come and do something
to me. I want to start my life
again. I want to be normal. I don’t
know if I’ll ever be able to.
Rylinda, call center: In March,
we go to court. But I already feel
like I won. My children get to see I
didn’t allow myself to be a victim.
For a long time, I didn’t want to be
a woman. I didn’t want to be
viewed as a sexual vessel. Lately,
I’ve been able to wear less-baggy
clothes again.
Genece, assembly-line
worker: If I had known all of this
was going to happen, I never
would have called HR. If I could
go back, I wouldn’t say a word.
Jordan, hospital insurance
coordinator: It was hell. I found
out later that I wasn’t the only
one. But it stopped with me.
Because I reported, no one else
had to go through this.
Shannon, sales
representative: I look back, and I
just don’t see anything I could
have done to prevent it.
Calissa, hostess: I found
another job and I went to law
school. I’m an attorney now. I still
wear pants.
jessica.contrera@washpost.com
Don't Replace...
REFACE!
Support for
Roy Moore
diminishes
MOORE FROM C1
day; its lead headline referred to
him as “Judge Whore.”
That left Breitbart as the odd
man out, or possibly still in, in its
support of Moore’s troubled candidacy among the most influential organs of the right.
The website overseen by Stephen K. Bannon, President
Trump’s former chief strategist,
has remained steadfast even as
more allegations against Moore
have emerged since last Thursday, when The Washington Post
first reported that Moore had a
sexual encounter with a 14-yearold girl in the late 1970s and dated
three other teenagers. A fifth accuser, Beverly Young Nelson, said
on Monday that Moore had assaulted her when she was 16 in
late 1977. Moore has denied the
accusations.
Bannon and Breitbart have
long backed Moore as the antiestablishment Republican candidate, cheering him to victory in
the Republican primary over
Trump’s preferred candidate, Luther Strange. And it has been
fierce in its defense of his character; the site went so far as to post a
story critical of The Post’s story
before the newspaper had even
published its account last week.
As late as Wednesday afternoon, Breitbart was still keeping
up the fight for Moore. A prominent headline on the site read,
“Alabama Pastor Rips Republicans for Abandoning Roy Moore
— ‘What a Bunch of Sissies.’ ”
“This is just another desperate
attempt by [Senate majority leader] Mitch McConnell to keep power, and it’s not going to work,”
Bannon said on his Sirius XM
radio program on Monday, according to a transcript by the
Daily Beast. “You know, people in
Alabama see through this. The
good folks of Alabama are going
to be able to weigh and measure
this. . . . This is an orchestrated
hit from the Uniparty.”
But even Breitbart was showing signs that its enthusiasm is
wavering. The site sent two reporters to Alabama and spent
several days trying to discredit
The Post’s reporting, but it hasn’t
been able to come up with much
to blunt the basic narrative.
After articles defending Moore
dominated the site for days, Breitbart featured just one headline
about him — the item about the
Alabama pastor — atop its home
page at midday Wednesday.
“Steve is stuck between a rock
and a hard place,” said Kurt
Bardella, a former Breitbart
spokesman. “If he stands by him,
he’ll be completely alone and he’ll
be known as the guy who stood by
a child molester. Going forward,
Bannon’s endorsement will be
about as useful as David Duke’s
with that kind of stigma attached
to it.”
Bardella doesn’t think Breitbart or Bannon will abandon
Moore, but, he said, their loyalty
will be costly. Bannon’s ambitions
for the 2018 midterms were dependent on momentum for
Moore and demonstrating that he
could find and recruit viable candidates, he said.
“Now,” said Bardella, “that rationale has been obliterated. . . .
Bottom line, this debacle is devastating to Brand Bannon.”
Breitbart’s editor, Alex Marlow,
did not respond to requests for
comment.
Hannity’s apparent change of
heart comes amid an advertiser
boycott that picked up some momentum on Monday. On Tuesday
— following the departure of such
brands as Volvo and Keurig coffeemakers as sponsors of his
show — Hannity tempered his
comments.
“For me, the judge has 24
hours,” he said Tuesday. “He must
immediately and fully come up
with a satisfactory explanation
for your inconsistencies,” referring to his answers about dating
girls in his 30s. “You must remove
any doubt. If he can’t do that, then
Judge Moore needs to get out of
this race.”
Hannity is “attempting a rapid
pullback” after voicing supporting for Moore in the primary and
afterward, said Will Sommer,
who tracks conservative media
through his newsletter, Right
Richter. “I think we’re seeing him
try to course correct after getting
a little over his skis,” as he did in
promoting discredited theories
about the killing of Democratic
National Committee staffer Seth
Rich in May. (Neither Hannity nor
Fox has corrected its reporting of
that story, which spurred a shortlived advertiser pullout as well.)
Fox also did not respond to a
request for comment.
Sommer pointed out that conservative outlets that have never
liked Trump — including the National Review, Weekly Standard
and Redstate — weren’t supportive of Moore to begin with and
can easily distance themselves
from him now. They see Moore
“as an aberration from their preferred brand of conservatism anyway, so it’s not worth the effort to
expend their reputations trying
to save him,” he said.
With the big guns on the right
silenced or holding further fire,
the most loyal megaphones for
Moore have been the fringes of
right-wing Internet, according to
Sommer. Sites such as the conspiratorial Gateway Pundit haven’t wavered, and indeed have
become repositories of Moore
“trutherism,” he said.
Among the stories trumpeted
by Gateway Pundit: the false
claim that The Post was paying
people to accuse Moore; a handwriting expert’s analysis questioning whether Moore signed
Beverly Young Nelson’s high
school yearbook; and video of a
body-language expert disputing
the truthfulness of one of Moore’s
accusers.
paul.farhi@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
11/16/17
BARBARA NITKE/LIFETIME
burgeoning industry built around
used kitchen grease.
Gotham (Fox at 8) Professor Pyg
crashes an important fundraiser.
Jeff Ross Roasts the Border:
Live from Brownsville, Texas
(Comedy Central at 10) The
comedian visits the U.S.-Mexico
border to get a deeper
understanding of the immigration
debate, then analyzes the issues
through stand-up.
Young Sheldon (CBS at 8:30)
Sheldon discovers comic books
while reeling from a traumatic
experience.
Arrow (CW at 9) The Green Arrow
leads the team in a battle against a
technology thief known as
“Dragon.”
Mom (CBS at 9) Sparks fly between
Christy and her classmate (guest
star Michael Angarano).
Better Things (FX at 10) Pamela
Adlon’s dramedy ends its second
season.
LATE NIGHT
S.W.A.T. (CBS at 10) Jim Street
jeopardizes his career when he
agrees to do a favor for his
incarcerated mother. Sherilyn Fenn
(“Twin Peaks”) guest stars.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Julia
Roberts, Frankie Shaw, Manchester
Orchestra.
PREMIERE
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Debra
Messing, Taran Killam, Sam
Rockwell, Bebe Rexha, Florida
Georgia Line.
Back (Sundance Now streaming)
An underachieving man takes over
his family’s business in this
comedy from Simon Blackwell
(“Veep”).
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Ben Affleck,
Greta Gerwig, Dead & Company.
Fallon (NBC at 12:05) Chance the
Rapper, Tim McGraw, Faith Hill.
Meyers (NBC at 1:07) Chris Hayes,
Alex Lahey.
DOCUMENTARY
— Bethonie Butler
Hot Grease (Discovery at 9) This
documentary explores the
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
Dylan plays the Anthem,
but no one sings along
DYLAN FROM C1
edged the crowd nor spoke a single word. Even his superb fivepiece band went unintroduced. It
was almost as if they were playing
before an empty house.
At times, the approach felt passively hostile. Between every
song, the lights darkened and various band member would pluck at
strings or thump on a drum, creating a soundcheck cacophony that
soon melted into the next choice.
This was deliberate, but to what
end? A way to keep the crowd at
bay? Or just another artistic decision from the man of many
masks?
It didn’t always matter. The
songs connected even when the
singer didn’t. He and the band
galloped through “Desolation
Row’s” mad cast of characters and
delivered a blistering version of
“Early Roman Kings,” a 2012 song
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that felt as essential and intense
as anything Dylan has created.
And Dylan fully embraced his
latest incarnation as a broody
nightclub crooner with lovely covers of “Melancholy Mood,” “Once
Upon a Time” and “Why Try to
Change Me Now.” They’re all suffused with nostalgia and a sense
of mortality that even geniuses
can’t elude. None felt sadder than
“Autumn Leaves” a standard popularized by Frank Sinatra and Nat
King Cole that Dylan made his
own with a version as gritty as it
was haunting.
Some of Dylan’s own songs
didn’t fare as well. For many years
he has been putting his most famous compositions through a
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
blender, changing arrangements
and delivery so radically that the
songs become unrecognizable.
That’s an artistic choice to explore
different possibilities — or, more
likely, fend off crowds that want to
sing along. Depending on how
you view these things, it’s either
the height of artistry or the depths
of contempt. Either way, the results vary.
At times, as on “Highway 61
Revisited,” he sounded less like
Bob Dylan than someone doing a
comically bad Bob Dylan impression, complete with nasally
wheezes and froggy croaks. And
he and the band turned the perfect “Tangled Up in Blue” into a
choppy, bouncy mess. But no song
suffered as much as “Blowin’ in
the Wind,” a protest anthem that
had all of the power sucked out of
it by the defanged arrangement.
Is it worth nitpicking an artist
whose work shaped generations
and legitimized a genre more than
any other? Probably not. Why try
to change him now?
Opening for Dylan was the
great Mavis Staples, another septuagenarian who, along with her
family, has impacted American
music for decades. Unfortunately
for her, the arena was only halffilled for much of her show. It
wasn’t that people didn’t want to
see her, they just couldn’t get in.
Anthem is a handsome new venue
and a welcome addition to the
city, but it is still working out the
kinks. Many hundreds of fans
stood in long lines for 30 minutes
or more and missed the entirety of
Staples’s surging set.
With her snappy five-piece band,
Staples delivered the lovely “Build a
Bridge” from her new album “If All
I Was Was Black” and visited the
bluesy “Love and Trust” from last
year’s “Livin’ on a High Note.”
But it was her trip back to the
early ’70s for “I’ll Take You There,”
the biggest hit for the Staples
Singers, that was the set’s indisputable highlight — and a reminder that replicating the works
that connect most with your audience is often a good idea.
joe.heim@washpost.com
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Fri Nov 17 @ 8 PM
Sat Nov 18 @ 3 PM & 8 PM
Sun Nov 19 @ 3 PM
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“peerless”(-DCMTA) Dan Hoyle.
The Atlas Performing Arts Center
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www.mosaictheater.org
$20-$50
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Series
Fridays at Noon
Gypsy Spirit
Sat., Nov. 18 at 8:00 pm
Sun., Nov. 19 at 3:00 pm
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November: 17
December: 1, 8, 15
January: 5, 12, 19, 26
February: 2, 9, 16, 23
The Friday Morning Music Club invites you to our series of
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are most Fridays at noon from October through May.
The November 17 concert features an exciting collection of
classical works performed by a diverse group of talented
musicians.
Svetlana Nikonova conducts the Washington Balalaika
Society Orchestra in a concert with Romani flair, spice,
and passion featuring string virtuosi, Andrei Saveliev,
balalaika, and Peter Omelchenko, domra.
Calvary Baptist Church
755 Eighth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001
(202) 347-8355
Metro: Gallery Place
Nov. 18: Fitzgerald Theatre
603 Edmonston Dr., Rockville
Nov. 19: Kenmore Performing
Arts Center, 200 South Carlin
Springs Road, Arlington
Free and
open to
the public.
No tickets
required.
Garage parking near
church. Additional
concert information
available at
www.fmmc.org
$25 adults
$20 seniors
$15 students
Free for age
12 and under
Information and
group sales:
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MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
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Orchestra:
Noseda conducts
Gershwin’s “An
American in Paris”
Tonight at 7
Saturday at 8
Sunday at 3
Take a tour of Europe through works heavily inspired by Italy,
France, and Spain. Gianandrea Noseda explores Respighi's
Fontane di Roma (Fountains of Rome), Chausson's Poème,
Gershwin's An American in Paris, and Falla's The ThreeCornered Hat Suites No. 1 & 2.
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
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Concord-St. Andrews United
Methodist Church
5910 Goldsboro Rd.
Bethesda, MD
Gen. $40
Senior $35
Students
w/ID $15
ForeWords, with Ted Libbey. Beginning at 1:45 p.m. before
the Sun., Nov. 19 performance.
OPERA
Mozart’s
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Fri. Nov 17 at 7:30
Sat. Nov 18 at 7:30
An opera of love and courage, fully staged, sung in German
with supertitles with a string quartet, and with life size
Bunraku puppets.
www.belcantanti.com
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Tickets online and
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16-2898
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
Grandson’s lingerie gift to sweetie is his choice
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
Dear Carolyn:
My 17-year-old
grandson bought
his 17-year-old
girlfriend of
barely two
months lingerie from Victoria’s
Secret. I think this is very
inappropriate. He thinks I’m a
dinosaur. Guidance, please?
— Dinosaur
Carolyn
Hax
Dinosaur: I think if you were
his parent, then this would be a
great “last call” bell, telling you
that you’re about to have little to
zero say in your son’s sex life. If
you’re a grandparent but acting
as his guardian, then that
applies.
If you’re a grandparent in a
traditional grandparent role,
then you’ve got very little to say
here except as an academic
exercise.
Unless, that is, you’re able to
communicate with him — as
guardian or grand — not the
judgmental aspect of your
thinking, but the substance
behind it.
So, instead of shooting him
down as “inappropriate,” which
just begs him to get defensive
without providing much
enlightenment, try explaining
what you believe. Do it in as
accessible a way as you can: “It’s
your business what you buy with
your own money, of course. Be
careful about moving fast with
new people, though. It takes a
long time before you really know
someone, and when you fall
hard, it’s tempting to get serious
right away.” Or similar. Stick to
the message that gifts can speak
for us in ways we don’t intend.
This is, again, assuming
you’re able to communicate this
way with him. It’s another
reminder of why it’s so helpful
to establish early with kids that
they can talk to you about
difficult things without your
freaking out on them. That buys
you a lot of leeway when they’re
older and you have an I’mOlder-So-I-Know-type opinion
you think it’s important to
convey.
Would I use one of those
precious opportunities on this
specific issue? No, not unless
there were context to support
that his moving fast was a
pattern.
All this being said: If you just
think it’s too sexy for 17, then,
probably best to see this as a
stolen-horse/barn-locking-type
situation.
Re: Gift: I am a 35-year-old
woman who is not even close to
prudish, and I would be super
weirded out if a guy I was dating
for just barely two months
bought me lingerie. Can’t hurt to
have a conversation about the
relative intimacy of gifts.
— Weirded Out
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thanks.
Your being 35 vs. 17 could
make you more inclined,
though, not less, to see this as
too intimate.
There’s also the potential for
the 17-year-old girl herself to
respond to the gift as too much
too soon — and natural
consequences are generally
more effective teachers than any
third-party warning can be. Still,
it’s worth a well-meaning try.
Anonymous: . . . Or to process
the information he receives from
his girlfriend on its wrongness,
right?
Still, if it’s possible to do both
— to leave it up to him and also
to have open, ongoing
communication about life, love
and skivvies — then I think
we’re on to something.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Re: Gift: I just queried the 19-
year-olds in our office and they
all said ICK!!!!!
— Icked
Icked: I am irrationally smitten
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
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Happy Death Day (PG-13) 2:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:053:40-6:30-9:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:403:00-4:20-5:40-7:00-8:20-9:40
Marshall (PG-13) 2:45-5:30-8:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
7:00-10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 3:05-5:358:05-10:30
A Question of Faith (PG)
1:20-3:55
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn The
Broadway Musical 7:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
6:10-9:20
Regal Waugh Chapel
Stadium 12 & IMAX
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Justice League (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 1:00-4:00
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:20-9:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
3:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:10-2:00-4:20-4:50-7:107:50-9:55-10:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00
Wonder (PG) 7:00-9:45
Jigsaw (R) 12:10-2:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:105:00-7:40-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:401:50-3:50-4:30-7:20-9:10-9:50
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Stadium 20 & IMAX
6:30-9:30
900 Ellsworth Drive
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Justice League (PG-13) 7:007000 Arundel Mills Circle
Halloween (PG-13) 12:30
8:00-10:00-11:00
Justice League (PG-13) 11:15
Thor: Ragnarok The IMAX 2D
Wonder (PG) 7:00-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Experience (PG-13) 12:00-3:00
Daddy's
Home
2
(PG-13)
12:05XD: 12:05AM
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Sharknado 5: Global Swarming 2:45-5:25-8:05-10:45
Experience 6:00-9:00-12:00
Justice
League
in
3D
(PG-13)
10:30
Justice League & Wonder Woman
6:00-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 7:30Double Feature (PG-13) 3:00
Genesis:
Paradise
Lost
(PG)
7:00
11:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:40Justice League & Wonder
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Woman Double Feature (PG-13) 1:40-3:50-4:40-7:00-8:00-10:00
8:15
3:00
Regal Westview
Justice League (PG-13) XD:
Stadium 16 & IMAX
Regal Germantown
6:00-9:00
5243
Buckeystown Pike
Stadium 14
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:1520000 Century Boulevard
8:15-10:30
12:45-1:45-4:00-5:00-6:45-7:15Geostorm (PG-13) 1:00-4:00
Hoyt's West Nursery
8:15-10:15-11:15
Justice League (PG-13) 7:00Cinema 14
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
9:00-11:00
1591 West Nursery Road
3D (PG-13) 3:30-9:45
Thor:
Ragnarok
(PG-13)
12:00Justice League (PG-13) CC: 6:05Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
1:00-2:15-3:15-5:30-6:30-7:307:00-8:00-9:00-11:00-12:01
Experience (PG-13) 2:45
8:45-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:30-9:45
11:10-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:35- Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:00-2:30
3D
(PG-13)
4:15-10:30
6:30-7:30-9:25-10:25
Murder on the Orient Express
The Star (PG) CC: 5:00-7:10-9:30 The Star (PG) 5:00-7:30-10:00
(PG-13) 11:30-1:00-2:30-4:00Murder on the Orient Express
Murder on the Orient Express
5:30-7:00-8:30-10:00-11:15
(PG-13) 12:30-1:45-3:30-4:45(PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:40-4:20It (R) 10:15
7:45-9:15-10:45
7:05-9:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) 11:00AM
It (R) 2:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 7:10-9:50
Wonder (PG) 7:00-10:00
Wonder (PG) 7:10-10:15
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:00Jigsaw (R) 11:00-1:45-4:30
The Foreigner (R) 12:45-9:15
1:40-4:25
LBJ (R) 11:45-8:15-10:45
Jigsaw
(R)
12:30
Jigsaw (R) CC: 11:15-12:45Happy Death Day (PG-13)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
3:10-10:30
11:45-2:45
1:30-4:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:30-2:00-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:45- 11:30-1:00-2:15-3:45-6:45-8:002:00-3:15-4:30-7:15-10:00
11:30
9:30-10:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:2011:20-12:20-1:45-2:45-4:10-5:10- 6:00-8:00-10:00
1:15-2:00-3:45-4:45-6:30-7:30Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
6:45-7:45-9:10-10:10
9:15-10:15
Halloween
(PG-13)
12:00-2:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:25-4:10
Thank
You For Your Service
Thank You For Your Service (R) Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn The (R) 2:15
Broadway
Musical
7:30
CC: 1:00-4:05
Justice
League in 3D (PG-13)
PSV Garuda Vega (NR) 12:45-4:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
6:30-9:30
Justice League & Wonder
CC: 10:00
Tyler
Perry's
Boo 2! A Madea
Woman Double Feature (PG-13)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 1:30-4:15
3:00
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 11:10Genesis: Paradise Lost (PG) 7:00
Regal Hyattsville Royale
1:35-4:00-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok The IMAX 2D
Stadium 14
Let There Be Light (PG-13) CC:
Experience (PG-13) 11:30AM
6505 America Blvd.
11:00-1:50-4:15-10:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Geostorm
(PG-13)
1:15-4:00
Experience 6:00-9:00
Landmark
Justice League (PG-13) 7:00Justice League & Wonder
Bethesda Row Cinema
10:00
Woman Double Feature (PG-13)
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Thor:
Ragnarok
(PG-13)
3:003:00
Faces, Places (Visages, villages) 6:00-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 7:00-10:00
(PG) 1:20-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC: 3D (PG-13) 4:00-7:15
UA Snowden Square
1:00-7:20
Stadium 14
The Star (PG) 5:15-7:45-10:30
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 3:40
Murder on the Orient Express
The Square (R) CC: 12:50-6:40- (PG-13) 1:00-2:00-3:45-5:00-6:30- Justice League (PG-13) 6:309:35
7:30-9:30-10:30-11:00
8:00-9:30-10:45
Novitiate (R) CC: 3:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:00Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:15
National Theatre Live: Follies
12:30-1:00-1:30-3:15-4:15-4:45Wonder (PG) 7:15-10:30
2:00-7:00
6:20-8:00-8:50-9:40
Jigsaw (R) 12:30-8:15-10:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
(PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:15-7:30-10:05 1:15-4:00
3D (PG-13) 3:45-10:40
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:20-9:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:15
12:55-3:55-10:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:30- My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:00-2:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 4:15-6:45-9:30
Missouri (R) CC: 7:00-9:35
Murder on the Orient Express
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 1:3012:45-1:45-3:30-4:30-6:30-7:00- (PG-13) 12:20-1:20-3:00-4:306:15-7:15-9:10-10:10
4:25-7:10-9:50
9:00-9:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:15
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:50-3:20-4:40- Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
5:30-7:00-7:40-9:20-9:55
Wonder (PG) 7:00-9:50
6:00-9:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Old Greenbelt Theatre
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
12:40-1:10-3:10-3:40-5:40-8:10129 Centerway
Halloween (PG-13) 1:45-4:1510:40
7:15-10:00
Wonderstruck (PG) 3:00
Ittefaq (NR) 12:40-3:20
Justice League & Wonder
Paragon Kentlands
Woman Double Feature (PG-13) Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:10Stadium 10
1:15-2:40-3:45-5:10-7:45-10:20
3:00
629 Center Point Way
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:30- Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Geostorm (PG-13) 7:25-9:50
6:00-7:00-9:00-10:00
1:00-3:30-6:45-9:45-10:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 Halloween (PG-13) 12:20
5:10
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 6:00-8:35
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn The
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:30AM
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 4:20Broadway Musical 7:30
Justice League (PG-13) 7:005:45-8:30
Justice League & Wonder Woman
8:30-10:00
American Made (R) 4:50-7:20Double Feature (PG-13) 3:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:309:50
Xscape Theatres
11:45-12:20-3:00-6:30
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:05-9:10
Brandywine 14
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Murder on the Orient Express
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
1:45
3D
(PG-13)
(PG-13) 5:10-7:45-10:20
Geostorm
(PG-13) CC: (!)
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:25-9:45
It (R) 4:20-7:10-10:00
2:50-11:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Only the Brave (PG-13) 4:10Justice
League
(PG-13) CC: (!)
(PG-13) 12:05-1:05-3:05-3:457:00-9:50
6:00-8:50
3:50-6:30-7:05-9:35-10:20
Wonder (PG) 7:00-9:30
Thor:
Ragnarok
(PG-13) CC:
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 5:10- Wonder (PG) 7:15-10:10
(!) 10:10-10:50-1:10-1:50-4:50The Foreigner (R) 2:15
7:25-9:40
7:50-10:50
Jigsaw (R) 11:30AM
The Mountain Between Us (PGPhoenix Theatres Marlow 6
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
13) CC: 1:30
3899 Branch Avenue
11:45-2:15-4:55-7:35-10:05
555 11th Street NW
The Star (PG) Open Caption; CC: (!)
Justice
League
(PG-13)
8:00
Bow
Tie
Annapolis
Mall
11
Daddy's
Home
2
(PG-13)
11:30AMC Columbia 14
God's Own Country 1:10-4:10Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:00- 12:30-2:10-3:15-4:55-6:15-7:40- 5:00-7:20-9:40
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Murder on the Orient Express
7:10-9:40
1:55-2:55-4:50-5:50-7:45
9:15-10:25
Justice
League
(PG-13)
6:00(PG-13) CC: (!) 10:40-12:40-1:40Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!) 7:30-9:00-10:30
Jigsaw (R) 12:50-3:00-5:30-8:00 Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:00-1:00-3:00-4:00-6:00-7:004:40-7:30
Missouri (R) CC: 7:00-9:30
A
Bad
Moms
Christmas
(R)
6:00-9:15-10:40
Thor:
Ragnarok
(PG-13)
11:00Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 7:15-10:05
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-2:15-3:15- 9:05-10:00
12:25-2:50-5:25
11:30-2:00-2:30-5:00-8:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Justice
League
(PG-13)
CC:
(!)
Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 12:10-2:404:30-5:30-7:45-9:55
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 11:50AM
The Star (PG) 7:00-9:20
5:20-8:00-10:40
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R) 6:00-10:10
Halloween (PG-13) 2:00-4:30Justice League & Wonder
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Wonder (PG) 7:00-9:50
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
CC: 1:00-4:00
7:30
Woman
Double
Feature
(PG-13)
Daddy's
Home
2
(PG-13)
11:3011:00AM
Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 12:55- 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 2:00-8:10
Justice
League
in
3D
(PG-13)
3:00
12:10-12:30-2:10-3:10-3:30-4:40Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
3:55-7:00-9:30
8:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 3:30Experience (PG-13) (!) 11:30-2:30 5:40-8:10-10:40
(!) 10:20-11:40-1:20-3:00-4:20Jane 12:45-3:00-9:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:20 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:30- 7:15-10:30
Murder
on
the
Orient
Express
6:20-7:40-9:10-10:35
The Square (R) CC: 1:30-4:452:45-5:10-7:40
Regal Rockville Center
(PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:40-6:40-9:40 Thank You For Your Service
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: (!)
8:00
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
(R) 4:20
Stadium 13
It
(R)
CC:
10:00
10:30-11:50-1:00-3:50-5:40-6:50The Florida Project (R) CC: 1:0515200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
199 East Montgomery Avenue
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
The Foreigner (R) CC: 2:20
8:10-9:20
4:05-7:05-9:35
10:00
Justice League (PG-13) 6:00-9:00 Justice League (PG-13) 6:00-9:15 Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:10-2:20
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Landmark West End Cinema 10:55-4:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:00Wonder (PG) 7:00-10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
2301 M Street NW
Halloween (PG-13) 12:50-3:20
2:00-3:10-5:10-7:10-8:10
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!)
Justice League (PG-13) 7:00
Brimstone & Glory 1:45-3:45Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 6:45-10:00
11:35AM
10:00-11:20-2:00-3:40-4:30-7:005:45-7:45
3D (PG-13) 4:10-10:20
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn The 9:50-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
The Star (PG) 5:00
Broadway Musical 7:30
10:50-1:20-2:20-4:00-5:00-6:40- 1:00-4:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
CC: 2:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Murder on the Orient Express
7:35-9:15-10:10
Justice League & Wonder
7:00-9:50
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: (!) 3D (PG-13) 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00 (PG-13) 1:10-3:15-4:15-6:20-7:40- Woman Double Feature (PG-13) Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
2:15-4:45
9:25-10:30
3:00
11:30-12:30-2:10-3:10-4:40-7:20- Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:30-12:30-2:30-3:30-5:30-6:30Novitiate (R) CC: 4:30
8:00-11:00
Wonder (PG) 7:00-9:45
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:30-10:00
9:00-10:00
8:30-9:30
MARYLAND
Re: Gift: Nobody knows the
details of the couple’s sex life.
The guy is in the best position of
anyone to know if his girlfriend
would like it.
— Anonymous
Weirded Out: Absolutely,
MOVIE DIRECTORY
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
with this post.
iPic Pike & Rose
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) (!) 6:157:00-7:30-9:45-10:30-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:0012:45-3:30-4:00-6:45-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) (!) 12:00-1:45-3:00-5:008:00-11:10
Jigsaw (R) 1:00-3:45
Wonder (PG) (!) 7:15-10:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) (!) 2:004:45-7:45-11:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:154:15-6:30-9:30
Marshall (PG-13) 12:15-3:15
VIRGINIA
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 6:007:00-8:45-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
2:00-3:00-5:00-8:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 1:00-6:15-9:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 2:20-5:10-7:45-10:20
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 2:00
Jigsaw (R) CC: 4:00-5:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 7:00-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
1:15-3:40-8:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
2:00-4:30-7:20-9:45
Wonderstruck (PG) CC: 1:15-4:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 6:00
AMC Hoffman Center 22
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 7:008:00-10:30-11:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 7:00-9:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
6:30-7:30-8:30-10:00
Genesis: Paradise Lost 3D
(PG) 7:00
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn The
Broadway Musical 7:30
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience CC: 6:00-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 6:00-9:30
The Star (PG) 7:15; 5:00-6:45-9:30
AMC Potomac Mills 18
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Justice League (PG-13) 6:45-9:45
The Star (PG) CC: 5:00-7:20-9:30
Wonder (PG) CC: 7:00-9:35
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
8:15-11:15
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience CC: 6:00-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 7:3010:30
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
Thursday, November 16, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
The Florida Project (R) 2:00
Lady Bird (R) (!) 10:20-11:0512:45-1:30-3:15-3:45-5:25-6:107:45-8:30-9:50-10:45
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R)
(!) 11:10-4:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) (!)
11:20-2:10-4:40-7:30-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
10:20-11:30-1:15-2:10-3:45-4:507:15-9:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
XD: 6:00
Theeran Adhigaram Ondru
(NR) 8:00
C/O Surya (NR) 12:20-3:40
Qarib Qarib Single11:00-1:55
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) XD:
10:45-11:25-1:45-2:25
11940 Market Street
Justice League (PG-13) XD:
Justice League (PG-13) 10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:10- 7:05-9:00-10:05
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3:30-4:40-6:20-10:40
3D (PG-13) 12:15-3:15-5:25The Star (PG) 9:45
6:15-9:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Only the Brave (PG-13) 3:20
10:45
Wonder (PG) 7:00-9:50
Regal Ballston Common
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:30Stadium 12
4:30-7:30-10:10
671 N. Glebe Road
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) 7:001:20-2:20-4:20-5:20-7:20-8:208:00-10:00
9:50-10:45
Let There Be Light (PG-13) 12:30- The Star (PG) 5:00-7:20-9:40
3:20-6:30-9:05
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
6:00-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 7:0010:00
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn The
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:00
Broadway Musical 7:30
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Murder on the Orient Express
3D (PG-13) 1:40-7:40
(PG-13) 2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15
LBJ (R) 1:50-4:50-7:50-10:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:304:00-7:00-9:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
7:00
Regal Countryside
Murder on the Orient Express
Stadium 20
(PG-13) 1:40-2:15-4:40-7:30-10:30
45980 Regal Plaza
Cinema Arts Theatre
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
9650 Main St
12:05-2:35
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC: Justice League (PG-13) 6:10-9:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:007:10-9:40
4:00-6:15-7:00-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
(PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:00-2:305:00-7:30-9:50
3D (PG-13) 12:00-3:15-9:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
The Mountain Between Us (PG10:10-2:25-7:20
13) 12:35-3:20
The Square (R) CC: 1:00-9:35
American Made (R) 1:20-4:20Goodbye Christopher Robin (PG) 7:05-9:55
CC: 12:10-4:55
The Star (PG) 5:05-7:30-9:45
Faces, Places (Visages, villages) My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
(PG) CC: 9:50-2:00-4:00
2:10-4:45-7:15
The Florida Project (R) CC: 9:45- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 9:45
12:05-2:35-5:05-7:40-9:55
Murder on the Orient Express
Jane CC: 10:00-12:00-4:00-6:00- (PG-13) 12:45-1:45-3:40-4:258:00-9:45
6:20-7:05-9:15-9:50
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:05Golmaal Again (NR) 12:05-3:25
12:20-2:20-4:35-7:00-9:15
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:303:15-6:15-9:05
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
LBJ (R) 2:00-4:55-7:30-10:00
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Secret
Superstar (NR) 12:00-3:05
Geostorm (PG-13) 2:25-7:35
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:10- A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:504:25-7:25-10:00
2:45-5:15-7:50
Ittefaq (NR) 12:20-2:40-5:05Wonder (PG) 7:30
7:35-9:55
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
11:50-2:20-4:50-7:20
12:00-1:30-2:30-4:15-5:15-6:45Thank You For Your Service (R)
8:00-9:30
11:35-4:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:45- My Friend Dahmer (R) 2:05-4:3512:40-1:20-2:10-3:10-3:50-4:45- 7:20-9:50
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
5:35-8:00
6:30-9:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Theeran Adhigaram Ondru
8:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:30- (NR) 7:30
12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30-7:30 Vunnadhi Okate Zindagi (Unnadi
Justice League (PG-13) 6:00-7:00 Okate Zindagi) (NR) 12:05-3:206:40-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:25-12:55-2:15-3:40- PSV Garuda Vega (NR) 12:053:10-6:20-9:35
5:00-7:45
Let There Be Light (PG-13) 11:40- Qarib Qarib Single 12:05-2:455:25
2:00-4:40-7:05
Khakee (Telugu) (NR) 8:15
Justice League (PG-13) 7:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
6:00-9:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
4:15-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:15-7:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: (!) 1:30-4:15-10:15
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
2:00-4:30-7:15-9:55
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
2:15-5:00-7:45-10:10
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Manassas 4 Cinemas
CC: (!) 7:00-10:00
8890 Mathis Ave.
The Florida Project (R) 2:00A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
4:45-7:30
2:05-4:10-6:25
Lady Bird (R) (!) 1:00-2:30-3:30Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
5:00-7:30-9:45
2:10-4:50
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:107850e Tysons Corner Center
4:20-6:30
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
Let There Be Light (PG-13) 2:006:00-8:00-10:55
4:00-6:00
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 5:00-7:15Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
9:30
6201 Multiplex Drive
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 7:00-9:45
Justice League (PG-13) 6:00Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
7:00-9:00-10:00
CC: (!) 7:00-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:00Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn The
11:05-1:15-2:20-4:40-5:35-7:45Broadway Musical 7:00
8:50-11:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Experience CC: (!) 6:00-8:55
3D
(PG-13) 12:10-3:25
Justice League (PG-13) (!)
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:20
6:00-9:35
Murder on the Orient Express
AMC Worldgate 9
(PG-13) 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:1513025 Worldgate Drive
10:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
Jigsaw (R) 10:35-1:20-3:40
6:00-8:45
Wonder (PG) 7:00-9:40
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 5:00-7:10- A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
9:20
11:50-2:40-5:10-7:40-10:10
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema - Happy Death Day (PG-13) 10:20One Loudoun
12:50-3:15-5:40
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Ittefaq (NR) 12:00-2:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:25Justice League (PG-13) 6:001:55-4:25-7:00-9:30
8:00-9:50-11:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:15- Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:40-2:30-3:00-3:20-4:50-6:40- 8:00-11:00
8:20-11:40
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 10:50-1:25Justice League (PG-13) 7:003:55-6:30
10:50
Theeran Adhigaram Ondru
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
(NR) 8:05
12:25-3:40
C/O Surya (NR) 10:10-1:05-4:05
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:45-1:15-1:45-4:30Qarib Qarib Single 11:20-2:105:00-6:20-10:05
5:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Khakee (Telugu) (NR) 9:00
12:10-1:30-4:30-7:40-10:35
Rave Cinemas
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:00Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
11:55-2:00-2:50-5:40-8:40-11:35
11900 Palace Way
Wonder (PG) 7:20-10:20
Geostorm (PG-13) 10:25-4:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) 8:00
9:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:00Angelika Film Center Mosaic 12:55-4:05-4:40-6:55-7:45-8:252911 District Ave
9:55-10:50-11:20
Justice League (PG-13) 7:00-9:45 The Star (PG) 5:00-7:30-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) (!) 10:00- Kingsman: The Golden Circle
(R) 1:05
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:35-11:15-1:25-2:15(PG-13) (!) 10:55-1:40-4:254:20-5:05-7:25-7:55-10:15-10:40
7:10-9:55
Wonder (PG) 7:00-10:00
The Square (R) (!) 10:10AM
National Theatre Live: Follies7:00 Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
10:30AM
Last Flag Flying (R) (!) 11:30Jigsaw (R) 11:40-2:05
2:20-5:15-8:00-10:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
1:35-4:15
11:50-1:20-2:20-4:55-7:40-10:25
Regal Dulles Town Center 10
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Geostorm (PG-13) 2:50-5:30
Justice League (PG-13) 6:008:00-9:00-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 12:15-3:15-9:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:00-2:00-4:45-7:4510:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00
Wonder (PG) 7:00-9:45
Jigsaw (R) 11:40-12:30-4:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:15-2:40-5:15-8:15-10:50
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:501:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
7:00-10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 1:30-4:00
Justice League & Wonder Woman
Double Feature (PG-13) 3:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:152:30-4:15-6:15-7:15-10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:45-3:00-6:15-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 1:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:30-3:15
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:15-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:30-1:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
Wonder (PG) 7:00-10:00
Jigsaw (R) 12:15-5:15-10:15
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:453:45-6:45-9:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:153:45-6:30-9:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
11:45-12:45-2:15-3:15-4:45-5:457:15-8:15-9:45-10:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:151:45-2:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
10:30
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience 6:00-9:00
Regal Kingstowne
Stadium 16 & RPX
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:30-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15
Wonder (PG) 7:00-10:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:303:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Justice League & Wonder Woman
Double Feature (PG-13) 3:00
Justice League (PG-13) 9:00;
7:00-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
6:00-9:30
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
Justice League (PG-13) 7:0010:00
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:20-9:40
Wonder (PG) 7:00-9:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
8:00-11:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience 6:00-9:00
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 6:00-9:00
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:30-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:10-4:05-7:00-9:55
Wonder (PG) 7:00-9:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:304:15-7:15-9:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
6:30-9:30
Genesis: Paradise Lost (PG) 7:00
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn The
Broadway Musical 7:30
Justice League & Wonder
Woman Double Feature (PG-13)
3:00
Regal
Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
Justice League (PG-13) 6:00-9:00
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:25-9:45
Wonder (PG) 7:00-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
7:00-10:00
Justice League & Wonder
Woman Double Feature (PG-13)
3:00
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:55-3:506:30-9:20
Justice League (PG-13) 8:0011:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:00
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) 4:00
The Star (PG) 5:00-7:30-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:20-2:10-4:10-5:00-7:108:00-9:50-10:50
Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:054:05-7:05-10:05
Wonder (PG) 7:00-9:45
Jigsaw (R) 1:10
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:452:45-4:15-5:15-7:45-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
2:15-3:15-3:45-5:45-6:15-8:158:45-10:45
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10 Halloween (PG-13) 8:45
Justice League (PG-13) 6:00-9:00
4110 West Ox Road
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:304:30-5:30-7:30-8:30-10:30
1:20-4:05-6:50
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Murder on the Orient Express
3D (PG-13) 2:30
(PG-13) 12:00-1:00-2:40-3:455:30-6:40-7:50-9:25-10:35
Smithsonian - Airbus
IMAX Theater
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:3014390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
10:00
Wonder (PG) 7:00-9:55
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
LBJ (R) 12:10-2:45-5:15-10:45
11:10AM
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Thor: Ragnarok An IMAX 3D
12:05-2:35-4:00-5:05-7:35-10:05 Experience (PG-13) 3:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:20- A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
1:30-2:50-4:10-5:20-7:45-8:15Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
10:15-10:40
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30
Wonderstruck (PG) 12:30-7:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
Thank You For Your Service
2:20
(R) 1:15
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 9:40
Thor: Ragnarok The IMAX 2D
Let There Be Light (PG-13) 12:05- Experience (PG-13)
2:40-5:15-7:50-10:25
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn The Experience 7:00-9:30
Broadway Musical 7:30
University Mall Theatre
Regal Fox
Stadium 16 & IMAX
22875 Brambleton Plaza
10659 Braddock Road
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:202:35-4:35
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 1:45
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
CC: 12:00-2:15-4:30
Geostorm (PG-13) 2:30-7:30
The Mountain Between Us (PGThe LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
13) CC: 7:30
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:30
American Made (R) CC: 9:45
Justice League (PG-13) 6:457:30-9:45
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:00- CC: 7:00-9:45
2:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-9:00
It (R) CC: 7:15-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:103D (PG-13) 3:00
2:20-4:20
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH (D)
K93
Q72
QJ85
AQ4
EAST
Q 10 7 5
8
A 10 7 6
10 8 5 2
WEST
AJ8642
A4
9432
3
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
None
K J 10 9 6 5 3
K
KJ976
The bidding:
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
1
Pass
1
1 NT
2
4
Pass
Pass
5
Opening lead — 3
WEST
1
4
All Pass
CLASSIC PEANUTS
’m broadening my horizons,” Cy the Cynic told
me. “I’m taking a course in
levitation.”
“How’s that going?” I
asked.
“I rose straight to the top
of my class,” said Cy.
I should know not to take
anything Cy says seriously,
but I’m sure he would do well
to take a course in dummy
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
play. Cy always plunges
ahead without giving thought
to his play.
In today’s deal, Cy competed to five hearts. West led
his singleton club, and the
Cynic won and hurriedly led a
trump. West took his ace and
led a diamond, and East won
and gave West a club ruff.
Down one.
“Four spades would’ve
LIO
been down one,” Cy
shrugged, “but my hand
called for a bid.”
Cy’s bidding was fine, but
he didn’t rise to the occasion in the play. Since the
danger of a club ruff is clear,
Cy must win the first club
in dummy, lead the king of
spades and discard his king
of diamonds, a loser-on-loser.
East no longer has an entry
to give West a ruff, so Cy
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
loses only one more trick to
the ace of trumps.
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
“I
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
K93Q72
QJ85AQ4
Your partner opens one
heart. The next player passes. What do you say?
ANSWER: Once upon
a time, the hand would
have been ideal for a 2NT
response, showing a balanced 12 to 15 points with
stoppers in the unbid suits.
Now, many pairs treat 2NT
as an artificial forcing heart
raise; they would bid two
diamonds. Some players
wonder whether the natural,
forcing 2NT response is too
useful to give up.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | NOVEMBER 16
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year you are
beginning a new
life and luck cycle.
Traditionally, the first
year is one of the luckiest. If
you are single, and you decide
that you want to get involved
with someone, it will be so.
Take your time choosing a
potential suitor. If you are
attached, a tendency to go
overboard while enjoying life
could create some tension
between you and your sweetie.
A little self-discipline will go
a long way in helping your
relationship. A fellow Scorpio
connects with you deeply.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Deal with joint finances.
Others seem to acknowledge
your know-how and general
wisdom. Getting a “yes”
response is much easier right
now. Acting with the support
of friends and loved ones
makes you feel secure in your
choices.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Knowing when to defer to
others has become an art
for you. You understand that
allowing someone else to
act as he or she wants to
will bring positive results. As
you give others a nod, they
feel empowered. Watch what
happens.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Know what you must do
as opposed to what you
WEINGARTENS & CLARK would like to do. A fun call
or invitation could be quite
distracting. Try to postpone
this interaction until later,
when you can enjoy what is
happening.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Once more, your imagination
proves to be an unusual
source of resilience and
adaptability. Though you are
unlikely to encounter any
obstacles, you still will be
pondering how to make a
dream a reality.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You could be more concerned
about a personal problem than
you are letting on. However,
those who know you might be
seeing some cracks in your
facade. As a result, they might
start to express concern.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You’ll enjoy the company of a
contemporary. This person’s
spontaneous style might
be contagious. Your critical
ways could start falling to the
wayside.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
As opportunities present
themselves, regardless of
whether they involve finances
and/or romance, you won’t
be able to say “no.” Enjoy a
little fun and overindulgence.
Others will wish to be as
carefree as you are.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
The moon in your sign puts
you in the spotlight through
Saturday. Your magnetism and
charisma start to peak. Note
how compliant those around
you are becoming. If you have
a problem that needs to be
handled, the time is now.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You might have a secret
or some kind of exciting
possibility that is brewing. Until
this situation manifests, you
should remain quiet about it.
However, your mind is working
overtime.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You smile as your day ends,
and you might think that more
days should fall into place like
parts of today did. You might
be blurring the line between
your professional and personal
lives.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Pressure seems to build to
the extent that the issue at
hand becomes your main
focus. Recognize that what is
happening seems to be for the
better. Be aware that you are
accepting more responsibility
as you take charge.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Your mind keeps drifting to
other people and situations.
To stay present in the moment
will take self-discipline. In
pondering your options, your
imagination opens up. Start
jotting down ideas; some
gems of wisdom might be
forthcoming.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
The NFL made changes before this season to reduce
the number of breaks for TV commercials because
of research that showed fans lost interest with too
many interruptions.
It should be a bit warmer than
Wednesday until winds pick up in
the afternoon, bringing chilly air.
Government and nonprofit
groups set up a $25 million
fund to preserve African
American historic sites.
ILLUSTRATION BY JOSEPHINE WENCHEL, 10, WASHINGTON
Success is no
slam-dunk for
a superstar
turned coach
There’s a big story in
college basketball this
season: Patrick Ewing is
FRED BOWEN
returning to
Washington as the head
coach of the Georgetown Hoyas.
At 7 feet tall, everything about Ewing
seems larger than life. He was an allAmerican center who led Georgetown to
a national championship in 1984. Ewing
went on to an outstanding pro career as
an 11-time NBA all-star with the New
York Knicks.
So Ewing should be a great coach,
right?
Not so fast. A lot of NBA superstars,
including Elgin Baylor, Wilt
Chamberlain and Bob Cousy, were not
good NBA coaches.
And take a look at the best college
coaches. Most of them were not
superstar players. But a college coach
has to recruit players, teach them how to
play as a team and do a million other
things to make the team a winner.
Take a look at some of the best college
coaches.
Mike Krzyzewski (Duke): Coach K
has won more than 1,000 games and five
NCAA championships during his
legendary career. Krzyzewski was the
captain of his basketball team at the U.S.
Military Academy in the 1960s, but he
never played in the pros. Instead, he
served as an Army officer for five years
before he started coaching.
Tom Izzo (Michigan State): Izzo’s
teams always are near the top of the Big
Ten and the NCAA tournament. Izzo was
a walk-on — that means he was not even
recruited to play basketball — at his
college, Northern Michigan University.
He started his coaching career at a high
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
CRAIG BARRITT/GETTY IMAGES FOR GLAMOUR
The Score
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 El Misti’s land
5 Want as a
price
8 Debit card
action
13 Shock jock Don
14 Invoice stamp
16 Schumer’s
“Trainwreck”
co-star
17 Attend
18 News provider
in front of a
camera
20 Takes too much,
briefly
22 Field mouse
23 Head light
24 1993-2002
Ford-Nissan
minivan
28 Status symbol
suit
29 Pull
30 Lion’s home
31 Squad
35 Cut corners
39 Subj. for many
an au pair
40 Banish
42 __-wop
43 Best Picture
Oscar nominee
directed by
Ava DuVernay
45 Little chirp
46 Big name in
banking
47 __ de Triomphe
49 Musical works
51 Many a
Poe work
57 MLB playoff
event
58 Like webs
59 Bailed-out
insurance co.
60 Half a boilermaker ... and
what’s aptly
hidden in 18-,
24-, 40- and
51-Across
63 Avian crop
66 Like Wrigley
Field’s walls
67 Fraught with
danger
68 Luke’s sister
69 Works behind,
as a bar
70 List-ending
letters
71 Reef dwellers
Ibtihaj Muhammad was the first
American to compete at the
Olympics while wearing a hijab.
Doll honors fencer
who wore a hijab
DOUG PENSINGER/ALLSPORT
RAY STUBBLEBINE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Patrick Ewing led Georgetown to a national
championship in 1984. After an
outstanding pro career, he has returned to
Washington to coach the Hoyas.
Dawn Staley was a terrific college and
professional player and the winner of three
Olympic gold medals. Now she’s the coach at
the University of South Carolina.
school before moving into the college
coaching ranks.
Roy Williams (North Carolina):
Williams has led the Tar Heels to three
NCAA championships since he left
Kansas and returned in 2003 to North
Carolina, where he had spent 10 years as
an assistant coach. Williams played on
UNC’s freshman team, but he never
made it to the varsity. Like Izzo,
Williams started his coaching career at a
high school.
Other than Ewing, I can think of one
very successful college coach who was a
superstar player: Dawn Staley.
She’s the head coach of the University
of South Carolina Gamecocks, who won
the 2017 NCAA women’s championship.
Staley was a great player in her day. She
was a three-time all-American at the
University of Virginia and a five-time
all-star in the Women’s National
Basketball Association. Staley was also a
member of three gold-medal-winning
Olympic teams.
She can coach, too. Staley’s team was
10-18 (10 wins, 18 losses) in her first year
at South Carolina (2008-2009). But the
Gamecocks have had records of 34-3,
33-2 and 33-4 in the past three seasons.
So if Patrick Ewing wants a model of
someone who went from being a
superstar player to a superstar coach, he
should look at Dawn Staley.
kidspost@washpost.com
Bowen writes the sports opinion column for
KidsPost. He is the author of 22 sports books
for kids.
The maker of Barbie announced
this week that it will sell a doll
modeled after Ibtihaj Muhammad, an
American fencer who competed in
last year’s Olympics wearing a hijab.
Mattel said the doll will be
available next fall as part of the
Barbie “Shero” line, which honors
women who break boundaries.
“I had so many moments as an
athlete where I didn’t feel included,
where I was often in spaces where
there was a lack of representation,”
Muhammad said Monday. “So to be in
this moment, as a U.S. Olympian, to
have Mattel . . . diversify their toy line
to include a Barbie doll that wears a
hijab, is very moving to me.”
Muhammad, the first American to
compete at the Olympics while
wearing a hijab, won a bronze medal
in fencing at the 2016 Rio Games.
“There was so much about the doll
that was important to me,” she said.
“As a kid, I was bullied for having
larger legs, and sport taught me to
embrace my body and to love my body
and the strength that it could produce.
I think that having strong legs helped
me win a medal at the Olympic
Games, so I wanted my legs to be
larger, more athletic legs, toned legs.”
— Associated Press
By Jason Chapnick and C.C. Burnikel
ELMER DE HAAS
Barbara Hannigan performed a small, contained repertoire from early-20th-century Austria.
MUSIC REVIEW
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
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DOWN
Many a JPEG
file
Expressive
rock genre
Means of
spreading
dirt?
Wheels with a
history
On the mark
Shrewdly
informed
Former name
of the Mariinsky
Ballet
“Shameless”
network, briefly
Bellicose sort
Pet pendant
Comedy duo
Key & __
Computer
warning
Sub station
Hide
One rising at
dawn
Guys
Clear data
from
Actress Wilson
of “Sleepless in
Seattle”
11/16/17
27 Without a clue
32 Clairvoyance
letters
33 Put away
the dishes?
34 Stooge
with bangs
36 Contrarian’s
reply
37 Econo Lodge,
e.g.
38 Composure
40 Oakland
Raiders’ quarterback Derek
41 Informed about
44 Color that isn’t
an Earth tone?
46 Manicure
concern
48 Twenties, say
50 Vardon Trophy
org.
51 Order clothes
52 Advil alternative
53 Strand at a
chalet, maybe
54 Apple tablet
55 Girl in “Calvin
and Hobbes”
56 Like argon and
krypton
61 Burnable media
62 TiVo button
64 Feel sick
65 “That __ close!”
WEDNESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Marvelous sets from singer Hannigan
BY
A NNE M IDGETTE
There are singers, and there are
artists, and sometimes they are
the same person, and one is not
better than the other; but as a
description, this is a useful point
of departure. Barbara Hannigan
is an artist who sings. You can see
it from the moment she comes out
on stage, evocatively dressed in an
asymmetrical gown that exudes a
kind of careless glamour. Beauty,
be it physical or vocal, is incidental to what’s going on here — a
mere byproduct of an act of communication. “Da waren zwei
Kinder,” she sings, the opening
line of a song by Alexander Zemlinsky, but the words are almost
spoken — not in Sprechstimme,
that heightened hybrid of sung
speech that German composers
explored in the early 20th century,
but in an actual sung voice conveying words that demand this
particular kind of inflection, the
simple start of a tale that quickly,
in two verses, grows Gothic and
grim, while the singer’s voice blossoms, unobtrusively, into full-on
opera.
Hannigan is, for those in the
know, a marvel. In Washington,
not many, evidently, are in the
know, since the Terrace Theater,
where she appeared on Tuesday
night as part of Renée Fleming’s
ongoing “Voices” series, was not
quite full for her remarkable recital. No matter: those who were
there were, surely, converts. In
lieu of what’s become the
standard-issue classical vocal recital, a carefully balanced selection of sets taking a singer
through a range of styles and languages, Hannigan offered a small,
contained slice of repertoire from
early-20th-century Austria, intense and focused and bittersweet
as a slice of Sachertorte and a cup
of strong coffee in a Viennese cafe,
and imbued with the same evocative, lingering aftertaste.
It was a short program built
perfectly to scale. The first half
featured sets by Schoenberg, Webern and Berg, showing all of
those composers at early phases
when their music was still weaving its way through the languorous dissipating tendrils of late
Romanticism, clearing its way
through thickets of overripe tonality with little sharp edges of
expressionistic outbursts, working toward something sparer.
The second half offered songs
by Alexander Zemlinsky, who in
the juxtaposition sounded downright robust, as well as slightly
deranged in the intense angry
passion of “Entbietung” (Invita-
tion), followed by his sometime
student Alma Mahler. Mahler
showed something in common
with Hannigan in her willingness
to sacrifice poetic effect or mere
beauty to the cause of drama — in,
for example, “Ich wandle unter
Blumen” (I wander among the
flowers), in which the singer is so
distracted and dazed with love
that she sings in a near-monotone, offering each phrase on a
single, repeated note.
The final set comprised four
Mignon songs from Hugo Wolf’s
“Goethe Lieder,” which created, as
Wolf tends to do, four small, selfcontained, character-full minidramas, each limned as carefully
and completely as a carved medieval rosary bead: a world unto
itself.
The pianist — it is unjust to call
him an “accompanist” — was Reinbert de Leeuw, the acclaimed
conductor, pianist, and composer
from Holland, a tall, white-haired
figure with a crinkled face, who
folded himself at the piano and
with large hands brought forth
intimately scaled music, with a
jeweler’s precision. The two figures seemed almost unrelated on
stage, and yet operated in perfect,
confident sympathy. It was a marvelous and memorable evening.
anne.midgette@washpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
SECTION D
M2
Cowan
takes over
to power
Terrapins
Wizards
clamp down
for fourth
straight win
MARYLAND 79,
BUTLER 65
BY
WIZARDS 102,
HEAT 93
R OMAN S TUBBS
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
Maryland point guard Anthony
Cowan Jr. was 25 feet from the rim
with the ball in his hands late in
Wednesday night’s game against
Butler. The shot clock reached five
seconds, and the Terrapins led by
just five. A year ago, as a freshman
who often deferred in offensive
sets and shot just 32 percent from
three-point range, Cowan might
have hesitated to pull up in that
spot.
But this is an entirely new player, a sophomore who has become
the unquestioned leader of the
Terrapins, the type of player to
take matters into his own hands in
a 79-65 victory over the Bulldogs
in College Park. His team’s offense
was looking shaky, but Cowan
calmly pulled up beyond the
three-point line and let fly. He
barely offered a reaction as the
ball went through the net.
“I’m happy I made it tonight,”
Cowan said. “I wasn’t really tired. I
saw the time was going down
slowly. . . . I thought I was far
enough, so why not? Why not
shoot it?”
Cowan finished with a careerhigh 25 points and 10 rebounds,
which was crucial on a night when
Maryland committed 20 turnovers and forward Justin Jackson
struggled, scoring just four points.
But Cowan was the engine of a
full-throttle effort, especially on
the defensive end, where the Terrapins (3-0) held the Bulldogs
(2-1) to 34 percent shooting and
zero points in transition.
After Cowan hit that crucial
three-pointer to give his team a
64-56 lead with 6:06 remaining,
freshman forward Darryl Morsell
(13 points) stripped Butler star
Kelan Martin and finished a dunk
at the other end to extend the lead
to 10.
miami — The Washington Wiz-
MARYLAND CONTINUED ON D7
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D3
ards have shown a tendency
through 14 games to mirror the
play of their opponents. At times,
this has meant playing down to
the level of their foe. Other times,
such as Wednesday’s 102-93 road
win over the Miami Heat, it has
meant playing the same rugged
style as the other team.
The Heat played a defensiveminded game, so the Wizards
simply one-upped Miami. Although John Wall scored 27
points and Bradley Beal nearly
matched with 26, Washington’s
defense defined the win by limiting the Heat to seven field goals
in the final quarter and 41 percent shooting for the game. The
Wizards (9-5) won their fourth
straight, each time holding their
opponent under 100 points.
“We’ve been there for about
four games now,” Coach Scott
Brooks said, responding to how
the team “locked into” the defensive end. “Hopefully that continues.”
Through the first half, the
Wizards, playing their sixth
straight opponent with a losing
record, frustrated Miami leading
scorer Goran Dragic and served
up fast-paced play and deep
shots from beyond the arc. While
Dragic didn’t score until late in
the second quarter, the Wizards
made seven three-pointers in the
half and Wall pelted Miami with
fancy layups. However, after
building a 61-49 lead, Washington allowed Miami (6-8) to play
the aggressor.
The Wizards missed 10
straight shots to open the third
quarter, a cold stretch that extended to their defense as Miami
found its rhythm from beyond
the three-point arc. Despite the
Bucknell at Maryland
Saturday, 8:30 p.m., BTN
Heat at Wizards
Tomorrow, 7 p.m., NBCSW
Best version
of Maryland
needs Jackson
to be his best
Redskins
get fresh legs
as they retool
running game
There was plenty
to watch
Wednesday night
at Xfinity Center,
what with
Maryland’s Kevin
Barry
Huerter seeing
Svrluga
the floor like a
visionary, with
freshman Bruno Fernando
inciting the crowd — dressed all
in black — with his energy, with
the Terrapins making plenty of
their shots when they didn’t
turn the ball over, which was
often.
And then, finally, came what a
dozen NBA scouts in the
building came to see. Twelve
minutes had elapsed by the time
Justin Jackson, the Terps’ lanky
and alluring sophomore
forward, stuck a limb in front of
a Butler pass and headed
downcourt, gliding. It was all
there, athleticism and grace, an
easy layup after the sneaky steal.
Get out your notebooks and jot
down the ability, scouts. That’s
the highlight to show your
bosses in the personnel
department.
But what also must be noted:
That was Jackson’s first shot of
the night.
Wait a while, like, till
halftime.
And yet there was Jackson, in
the first showcase game of his
showcase sophomore season,
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Scherzer repeats
as NL Cy Young
Maximum e≠ort puts pitcher
on path to immortality
Max Scherzer, who won his third Cy
Young Award on Wednesday, may have
the most apt first name in baseball.
Scherzer goes to the maximum in
everything.
He’s max effort with every delivery,
Thomas
giving extra spin and speed to his
Boswell
pitches with a last-instant downward
snap of the neck to yank the most
torque out of his arm. He’s max emotion, stalking the
mound, glaring in, so wrought up that “punching out
the hitter” can seem like more than just a metaphor.
He’s also fanatic about conditioning and a max-out
student of advanced stats.
Now, Scherzer has maximized something else he
prizes — his chances of finding his proper place in
baseball history someday.
With three or more “Cys,” you’ll never be left out of
any discussion. Mad Max is now the 10th name on that
list, joining Sandy Koufax, Tom Seaver, Jim Palmer,
Steve Carlton, Roger Clemens, Greg Maddux, Pedro
Martinez, Randy Johnson and Clayton Kershaw. Those
BY
Third overall for Nats’ ace;
Indians’ Kluber wins in AL
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
lake buena vista, fla. — For the second straight
autumn, Max Scherzer’s season ended in a state of
wide-eyed shock. For the second straight autumn, a
dose of redemption arrived a few weeks later when
the Washington Nationals right-hander captured the
National League Cy Young Award. Indians righthander Corey Kluber beat out Red Sox lefty Chris Sale
and Yankees right-hander Luis Severino to win the
American League honor, his second.
Scherzer has won two Cy Youngs in the first three
years of his seven-year contract with the Nationals
and three overall (he won the AL Cy Young in 2013
while with Detroit). He became the sixth pitcher to
win the award in both leagues when he earned last
year’s honor. On Wednesday, he became the 10th
pitcher to win at least three. Of the other nine, only
Roger Clemens and the Los Angeles Dodgers’ Clayton
Kershaw, who finished second in this year’s voting,
are not in the Hall of Fame.
“This one is special. When you start talking about
BOSWELL CONTINUED ON D4
SCHERZER CONTINUED ON D4
L IZ C LARKE
A Washington Redskins running game that was struggling to
find its footing suffered a significant blow in Sunday’s loss to
Minnesota when Rob Kelley was
tackled by the full force and fury
of a 265-pound Vikings defensive
end, wrenching knee and ankle
ligaments in the process.
Less than 24 hours after Kelley
was placed on injured reserve,
bringing an end to his second
NFL season, the process of rebuilding the threadbare running
back ranks for the seven games
that remain was underway
Wednesday at Redskins Park.
“On the hop! On the hop!”
running backs coach Randy Jordan shouted at his contingent of
backs, which this week went from
two — rookie Samaje Perine and
third-down back Chris Thompson — to three with the addition
of Byron Marshall, a former
member of the Philadelphia Eagles’ practice squad.
Jordan paired them up in the
early phase of a two-hour practice, enlisting newly signed practice squad member LeShun Daniels, a rookie from Iowa, to make
a quartet for ball-security and
balance drills before the unit
joined the quarterbacks to work
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D5
Redskins at Saints
Sunday, 1 p.m., Fox
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D7
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
PRO FOOTBALL
HOCKEY
Georgetown moves to 2-0 in Ewing era
with a rout of Mount St. Mary’s. D7
UCLA suspends LiAngelo Ball, Cody Riley
and Jalen Hall from team indefinitely. D6
Cowboys’ Ezekiel Elliott drops appeal of
six-game ban, can next play Dec. 24. D6
After a solid 10-game run with Caps,
Chandler Stephenson might stick. D3
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
EARLY LEAD
Popovich
gets letters,
responds
to many
BY
Gri∞n
seeks job
as Texans’
fill-in QB
PRO FOOTBALL
C INDY B OREN
BY
Attention, haters: San Antonio
Spurs Coach Gregg Popovich has
seen most of the responses to his
withering critiques of President
Trump and the divisiveness in
America, and he’s actually hopeful.
“Just as you would expect: A
little bit of both, right? A lot of
both,” he said before the Spurs’
win over the Mavericks on Tuesday night in Dallas. “Some responses make you wonder what
country you live in, and other
responses make you very hopeful.
But there’s a lot more hopeful
than, ‘My gosh, how did this
person come up with this?’ So
overall it renews my feeling that
something can be done because
there are enough people willing to
listen and feel and compromise.”
Popovich has called out Trump
several times since the president
was inaugurated, saying he had
made the United States “an embarrassment to the world” and
calling him a “soulless coward”
when Trump said former presidents had not called the families
of military members who had
been killed. Popovich’s words
carried extra weight, coming
from an Air Force Academy graduate who served five years in the
military. He added that he tries
to read all the responses he gets.
“I do read everything, and I try
to respond,” he said. “It takes
time because there’s a lot of
letters. But the only ones I don’t
respond to are the ones that are
so courageous in their negativity
that there’s no address, just comments. That’s hard to respond to.
But there are people who have
responded and disagreed, and
say, ‘Why?’ And it’s erudite and
intelligible. ‘Yeah, you’ve got a
point.’ Those people deserve to
be written back. So I try. I
probably won’t get them all, but I
try.”
This being Popovich, he had a
quip when asked about the responses. “Every single person has
agreed with everything I’ve said,”
he said with a laugh. “I get
flowers. I get trinkets and gifts.”
BILL KOSTROUN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
After Ben McAdoo guided the New York Giants to the playoffs last season, his team is 1-8 in a nightmarish second year.
Coaching changes forthcoming?
BY
M ARK M ASKE
There hasn’t been a head-coaching
change made during this NFL season.
But there have been plenty of very bad
and extremely disappointing teams.
There undoubtedly are firings to come,
whether it’s during what remains of the
season or immediately after it.
The focus this week was on Ben
McAdoo, whose New York Giants lost for
the eighth time in nine games Sunday in
San Francisco. Giants co-owners John
Mara and Steve Tisch announced
Monday that they would retain McAdoo,
at least for now, and then make an
evaluation after the season. That’s
unlikely to turn the heat down much on
McAdoo in New York, however, amid a
Giants season in which Super Bowl
aspirations have given way to ugly
defeats, players being suspended for
violating team rules and accusations
that players have quit.
McAdoo has company on the
coaching hot seat with Cleveland’s Hue
Jackson, Indianapolis’s Chuck Pagano
and Tampa Bay’s Dirk Koetter. Here’s a
quick look at the case for and against
keeping each of them.
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Ben McAdoo, Giants
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
2017: 1-8 | Overall: 12-13
The case for: Is there one? Perhaps
not. But let’s give it a try. McAdoo led the
Giants to the playoffs last season. So
what’s happening this season cannot be
entirely his fault. NFL players are
supposed to be professionals, and
they’re supposed to act in a professional
manner. Returning from the bye week
on time and playing hard should be
givens. The Giants know as well as
anyone that making frequent coaching
changes is not a path to NFL success.
They stuck with McAdoo’s predecessor,
Tom Coughlin, through some tough
times, and he delivered two Super Bowl
triumphs.
The case against: It’s time for the
Giants to cut their losses. It was the
defense overseen by coordinator Steve
QUOTABLE
“The notion that I’m
going to gain an unfair
advantage is crazy.”
GREG OLSEN,
injured Panthers tight end, who will
work as a Fox analyst during Sunday’s
game between the Vikings and Rams.
Minnesota GM Rick Spielman said
Olsen’s presence in the booth is
“inappropriate.” Olsen will not have
access to production meetings or walkthroughs. (Via Early Lead)
Peru beat New Zealand, 2-0, on
Wednesday night to win a two-leg
playoff and earn the 32nd and
last spot in the 2018 World Cup
field in Russia.
Peru won at home in Lima
after tying, 0-0, on Saturday in
New Zealand. It last reached the
World Cup in 1982.
Earlier, Mile Jedinak
propelled Australia into the
World Cup with a hat trick in a 3-1
victory over Honduras in Sydney.
The Australia captain was in
doubt for the playoff series with a
groin injury but played a full
game in a 0-0 draw Friday and
took the free kick that broke the
scoring drought in the 54th
minute Wednesday. . . .
A former Argentine
government official killed
himself after being accused of
taking bribes, the latest fallout
from a widespread corruption
probe in professional soccer.
Jorge Delhon, a lawyer who
worked in the administration of
former Argentina president
Cristina Fernandez, killed
himself by jumping in front of a
train in Buenos Aires. . . .
Hue Jackson, Browns
2017: 0-9 | Overall: 1-24
The case for: This isn’t a coaching
issue. This is a roster-construction issue.
The Browns passed on Carson Wentz
and Deshaun Watson in the previous
two NFL drafts, and both appear to be
franchise quarterbacks. Jackson has
been left to try to build around Robert
Griffin III or Cody Kessler or DeShone
Kizer the past two seasons, and that’s an
impossible task. Don’t change the coach;
change the front office. Chase Kirk
Cousins in the offseason or use the lofty
draft choice that’s coming in next
spring’s NFL draft on one of the coveted
quarterbacks in this class and give
Jackson a reasonable chance.
The case against: The Browns are
1-24 under Jackson since the start of last
season. They’re the league’s only winless
team this season. It’s a front-office issue
and a coaching issue and a player issue.
It’s an everything issue. It’s time to
change everything and start over. Isn’t
that what 1-24 means? Do you really
want to give this regime another chance
to botch the quarterback situation?
Chuck Pagano, Colts
Dirk Koetter, Buccaneers
2017: 3-6 | Overall: 12-13
The case for: Yes, it has been a
disappointing season. The expected
development of quarterback Jameis
Winston into an NFL star has stalled,
and the Buccaneers, seemingly on the
cusp of being a playoff team, have taken
several significant steps backward. But
Winston already has had two head
coaches in his NFL career, Lovie Smith
and Koetter. The whole idea of
promoting Koetter after ousting Smith
was to maintain stability and continuity
around Winston. Entering this season,
Winston and the team certainly seemed
headed in the right direction. Don’t
overreact to one bad season and don’t
turn Winston’s NFL career into chaos.
The case against: Winston isn’t
getting better. The team isn’t headed to
the playoffs. And what if, say, Jon Gruden
is willing to leave the ESPN broadcast
booth and make a return to coaching
and to the Buccaneers? Wouldn’t the
organization owe it to Winston and to
itself to try to bring that about?
2017: 3-7 | Overall: 52-38
The case for: Andrew Luck hasn’t
played all season. Is it fair to judge a
mark.maske@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/nfl
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NFL
8:25 p.m.
Peru, Australia secure
final World Cup spots
Spagnuolo, not McAdoo’s offense, that
took the team to the playoffs last season.
The coach is in charge and is ultimately
responsible for what happens on the
field. If players lack discipline and don’t
appear to be fully invested, that reflects
on the coach. Maintaining continuity
merely for continuity’s sake is not
helpful when the coach is not getting the
job done.
coach without his franchise quarterback
on the field for a single play? The Colts
didn’t even have a viable Plan B, failing
to add a capable backup until trading for
Jacoby Brissett just before the season
and starting Scott Tolzien in the opener.
Brissett has had his moments.
The case against: Owner Jim Irsay
surprised just about everyone a few
years ago when he retained both Pagano
as his coach and Ryan Grigson as his
general manager. That was a mistake.
The Colts have gone from Super Bowl
contender to absolute pretender, and
Luck is facing an uncertain future. Irsay
righted his wrong at GM by firing
Grigson after last season and replacing
him with Chris Ballard. Pagano has had
plenty of chances, and it’s time for
Ballard to have an opportunity to hire
his coach.
His agent’s phone might not be
buzzing much these days, but
Robert Griffin III has not given up
on his NFL career. In fact, there’s
one team in particular he thinks
he could help.
The Houston Texans no sooner
found their quarterback in Deshaun Watson than they lost him
to a season-ending knee injury,
opening the door for, well, Tom
Savage. The Texans are 3-6 after
losing three in a row, including
two since Watson’s injury, but
Coach Bill O’Brien is sticking with
Savage, even though RGIII is offering his services.
“Deshaun’s an incredible player with a really bright future,”
Griffin told the Houston Chronicle’s John McClain this week. “I
feel like I could help him after my
experiences with Washington and
Cleveland. I feel like I could help
the team. I know a lot of their
guys. I think I can do a lot of things
they’ve been doing offensively.
Texas is home, and I’ve always got
a soft spot in my heart for Texas.”
Although his NFL career seems
distant now, Griffin, 27, was with
the Browns until March after
starting out with the Washington
Redskins. He continues to be
ready for a call that hasn’t come,
even in an NFL season in which
starting quarterbacks have gotten
injured and plenty of lesserknowns are being signed. He
brings less scrutiny than Colin
Kaepernick, who remains a free
agent, too, but he also hasn’t had
the NFL success that Kaepernick
has had.
RGIII’s Instagram feed remains peppered with the kinds of
phrases that drew attention in
Washington, things such as “#nopressurenodiamonds”
and
“#knowyourwhy,” but his profile
has been decidedly lower as he
works out in South Florida.
“I’ve been low key on purpose,”
he said. “The point was to keep my
head in the books and to focus on
getting better. In 2015, when I was
inactive the entire [season] in
Washington, I was able to show
growth and maturity. I’ve learned
a lot from what happened in
Washington. That experience
helped me 100 percent.”
It also was one that was difficult to turn loose. Griffin might
want badly to be a starter, but his
most likely spot is at backup, a
position that requires diplomacy
and an ability get along. His comments this fall about his relationship with former Redskins coach
Mike Shanahan, relayed by former teammate Santana Moss,
didn’t endear him to teams. “That
doesn’t help him,” a former NFL
front-office executive told The
Post’s Mark Maske shortly after
the season began.
The Los Angeles Chargers took
a pass after giving RGIII a workout over the summer.
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
D I G ES T
SOCCER
The cases for and against
NFL teams retaining McAdoo,
Jackson, Pagano and Koetter
C INDY B OREN
After failing to lead Italy to the
World Cup, coach Gian Piero
Ventura was fired.
COLLEGES
Representatives of a former
North Carolina football player’s
estate are suing the Atlantic
Coast Conference and the NCAA,
saying they ignored the dangers
of concussions and it led to Ryan
Hoffman’s death.
Sandra LaMountain and
Noah Hoffman brought the suit
on behalf of Ryan Hoffman’s
estate and filed it in U.S. District
Court in Greensboro, N.C. . . .
Arkansas fired athletic
director Jeff Long, ending a
nearly decade-long tenure that
included the scandalous ouster of
football coach Bobby Petrino
and the program’s continued
mediocrity under Bret Bielema.
BASEBALL
New Miami Marlins chief
executive Derek Jeter said the
team is listening to trade offers
for slugging outfielder Giancarlo
Stanton and must make changes
to stop losing money.
“A lot of this started when he
came out and expressed publicly
that he didn’t want to be part of a
rebuild,” the former New York
Yankees captain said. . . .
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
Tennessee at Pittsburgh » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11), NFL Network,
WJFK (1580 AM)
1:30 p.m.
NHL
9 p.m.
Washington at Colorado » NBC Sports Washington, WJFK (106.7 FM)
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Golden State at Boston » TNT
Houston at Phoenix » TNT
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
CURLING
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
Buffalo at Ball State » CBS Sports Network
Tulsa at South Florida » ESPN
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11:30 a.m.
11:30 a.m.
2 p.m.
5 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
8 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
9 p.m.
Puerto Rico Tip-Off: Illinois State vs. South Carolina » ESPN2
Charleston Classic: Auburn vs. Indiana State » ESPNU
Puerto Rico Tip-Off: Boise State vs. UTEP » ESPNU
Charleston Classic: Clemson vs. Ohio » ESPN2
Puerto Rico Tip-Off: Iowa State vs. Appalachian State » ESPNU
Nebraska at St. John’s » Fox Sports 1
2K Classic: Virginia Tech vs. Saint Louis » ESPN2, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Texas Southern at Ohio State » Big Ten Network
North Florida at Florida » SEC Network
Charleston Classic: Dayton vs. Hofstra » ESPNU
Puerto Rico Tip-Off: Tulsa vs. Western Michigan » ESPNews
Oral Roberts at Oklahoma State » MASN2
Xavier at Wisconsin » Fox Sports 1
2K Classic: Providence vs. Washington » ESPN2
Not even a World Series title
would have saved Joe Girardi’s
job managing the Yankees.
Owner Hal Steinbrenner said
the decision to end Girardi’s
tenure after a decade was
discussed long before the move
was announced Oct. 26, five days
after the loss to the Houston
Astros in Game 7 of the American
League Championship Series.
“It maybe would have been a
more difficult decision to make,”
he said, “but I still believe I would
have made it because I felt that’s
what’s best for the organization
going forward.” . . .
The Oakland Athletics traded
slugger Ryon Healy to the Seattle
Mariners for reliever Emilio
Pagan and minor league
shortstop Alexander Campos. . . .
PGA Tour: RSM Classic, first round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
7 a.m.
9 a.m.
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
NBA
Arkansas at Nebraska » Big Ten Network
GOLF
ATP World Tour Finals, doubles round robin » Tennis Channel
ATP World Tour Finals, singles round robin » Tennis Channel
ATP World Tour Finals, doubles round robin »Tennis Channel
ATP World Tour Finals, singles round robin » ESPN2
U.S. Olympic trials, men’s and women’s finals » NBC Sports Network
Major League Baseball hopes
to reach a new agreement on a
posting system with Japan by
early December, a deal that
would allow pitcher-outfielder
Shohei Otani, 23, to start
negotiations with MLB teams.
TENNIS
Grigor Dimitrov advanced to
the semifinals at the ATP Finals
by beating David Goffin, 6-0, 6-2,
in London. The sixth-seeded
Bulgarian will next face Pablo
Carreno Busta, who entered the
tournament after Rafael Nadal
withdrew because of a right knee
injury. Goffin will play Dominic
Thiem in Friday’s other match.
MISC.
The WNBA once again leads all
professional sports leagues in
hiring women and minorities for
coaching and front-office
positions. The league earned a
combined A grade for racial and
gender diversity in its hiring
practices, according to a report
card issued by the Institute for
Diversity and Ethics in Sports.
The league earned an A-plus for
racial hiring practices and an A
for gender hiring practices. . . .
A former Michigan State
University and USA Gymnastics
doctor accused of molesting girls
under the guise of medical
treatment is expected to change
his not-guilty pleas in a bid to
close the state’s criminal cases
against him.
Online court records show
change-of-plea hearings for 54year-old Larry Nassar are
scheduled for Wednesday and
Nov. 29 in two Michigan counties.
Jury selection was to begin in one
courthouse Dec. 4. . . .
France was selected to host the
2023 Rugby World Cup.
— From news services
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
Over 10 games, Stephenson solidifies his position
Waiver eligible again,
Capitals forward isn’t
likely to go anywhere
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
denver — Chandler Stephenson
settled into his stall in the visiting locker room at Bridgestone
Arena in Nashville and tried to
catalog the games. How many
had it been since he was recalled
from the Hershey Bears last
month? Had he now played one
game or two on a top line with
center Nicklas Backstrom and
T.J. Oshie? It can be easy to lose
track when the Capitals are playing roughly every other day and
you’re always in the lineup.
“I’m just trying to think about
every game,” Stephenson said.
But Washington’s game in
Nashville was a significant one
for Stephenson because it was
his 10th since he was recalled
Oct. 24, and that means the
Capitals would have to expose
Stephenson to the waiver wire if
they tried to send him back to the
American Hockey League.
Washington took that risk after Stephenson disappointed in
training camp and was beaten
out by other forwards, but with
two goals and four assists
through 10 games, Stephenson
has shown he’s a player the
Capitals should fear losing.
That the team seemingly
didn’t think twice about playing
him in his 10th game is an
indication that he’s not going
anywhere.
“He’s earned it,” Coach Barry
Trotz said. “You want players to
earn it. He’s earned the right to
dress and be in 10, and that’s
what you want players to do. You
want them to put you in positions where you have to make
some decisions one way or the
other. My decision’s been pretty
easy; he’s played very well and
he’s in the lineup.”
Stephenson admitted there
was some “bitterness” when he
was waived from the training
camp roster and 30 other teams
passed on him as he started the
season in Hershey. But Trotz also
said it was a strong “motivating
factor” for the 23-year-old, especially when injuries to Andre
Burakovsky and Brett Connolly
cleared the way for him to return
to the lineup. Stephenson was
with Washington for nine games
two years ago and then four last
season, occasionally in the lineup
when the team has been depleted,
but he has taken advantage of the
opportunity better this time.
He racked up one goal and
three assists — his first points in
the NHL — playing on a third
line with center Lars Eller and
Tom Wilson, and because Trotz
trusts him defensively, he was
then promoted to a line with
Backstrom and Oshie before the
Capitals hosted Pittsburgh last
week.
“I thought it was going to be a
little bit more nerve-racking,”
Stephenson said. “. . . I’ve never
had those kinds of players to play
with. Almost legends, you could
call them. I’ve never had anybody
like that, let alone been in the top
six. I try not to think about it. As
cliche as it is, just do you and play
your game as much as you can.”
Said Trotz: “I’ve got a lot of
trust with Stevie because he
makes those real quality wall
NBA ROUNDUP
Towns helps Minnesota
end skid vs. San Antonio
TIMBERWOLVES 98,
SPURS 86
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Karl-Anthony Towns had
26 points and 16 rebounds on his
22nd birthday, and the Minnesota
Timberwolves stopped a 12-game
losing streak to the San Antonio
Spurs with a 98-86 victory on
Wednesday night in Minneapolis.
Jeff Teague pitched in with
16 points and six assists as the
Timberwolves put together one of
their most complete performances with their fewest points allowed this season to beat the Spurs
for the first time since April 8,
2014, when Kevin Love and Ricky
Rubio were their top two players.
HAWKS 126, KINGS 80: Dewayne Dedmon scored a careerhigh 20 points and had 14 rebounds, and host Atlanta rode a
dominant first half to the most
lopsided win in franchise history.
The Hawks’ 46-point margin of
victory was two points better than
their previous best, a 141-97 win
over Detroit on Feb. 7, 1994.
THUNDER
92, BULLS 79:
Russell Westbrook had 21 points
and seven assists to lead host
Oklahoma City to its third straight
win.
Carmelo Anthony returned to
the Thunder lineup after missing
the previous game with a sore
lower back and finished with
18 points and 11 rebounds.
The Thunder led 27-7 at the end
of the first quarter to equal a franchise record for fewest points allowed in a quarter.
KNICKS 106, JAZZ 101: Tim
Hardaway Jr. scored 26 points,
including a key three-pointer with
32.9 seconds left, to help New York
rally in the second half at Madison
Square Garden.
Rodney Hood scored 30 points
off the bench for Utah.
RAPTORS
125, PELICANS
116: DeMar DeRozan scored 25
points, and Toronto kept sinking
three-pointers to prevail in New
Orleans.
The Raptors shot 16 for 34 on
three-pointers, with C.J. Miles going 5 for 9.
DeMarcus Cousins scored
25 points for the Pelicans.
CAVALIERS 115, HORNETS
107: LeBron James scored 31
points, Kevin Love had 22 points
and 10 rebounds, and visiting
Cleveland continued its dominance against Charlotte.
The Cavaliers have won seven
straight against the Hornets and
11 of 12. James is 40-6 in the regular season against Charlotte.
PACERS 116, GRIZZLIES
113: Darren Collison scored a sea-
son-high 30 points, Victor Oladipo
had 21 and Indiana built an early
lead before holding off a late rally
in Memphis.
BUCKS
99, PISTONS 95:
Khris Middleton finished with a
team-high 27 points and eight assists and Giannis Antetokounmpo
added 21 points as host Milwaukee
won its fourth straight.
The Bucks blocked 16 shots.
C A PITA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
at Colorado Avalanche
Today
9 NBCSW
vs. Minnesota Wild
Saturday
7:30 NBCSW
vs. Calgary Flames
Monday
7 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM),
WFED (1500 AM)
plays. He understands that in
certain moments, he’s got to
make a wall play, and at certain
moments, he’s got to read it and
be on the defensive side of pucks.
He can get to spaces offensively.
He’s got a mature game for a
young player. He’s earning a lot
more trust than maybe he did at
training camp.”
In that game against the Penguins, the trio went head-to-head
with Sidney Crosby’s line, and
after successfully limiting Crosby, Backstrom and Stephenson
connected for a goal in the 4-1
win. On Tuesday night in Nashville, Stephenson’s slick crosscrease pass to Oshie led to the
third goal of the game, a bright
spot in a 6-3 loss by Washington.
“Just trying to be Chandler as
much as I can,” Stephenson said.
“Just trying to not think about it
as much as I can and just think of
what got me here.”
Djoos likely out Thursday
Defenseman Christian Djoos
missed practice Wednesday because of an undisclosed “upperbody” injury he suffered in a
game against the Predators on
Tuesday. He’s expected to miss
Thursday night’s game at the
Colorado Avalanche, with veteran Taylor Chorney likely to
take his place in the lineup.
The injury is a hit to the
Capitals, who just got defenseman Matt Niskanen back from a
left hand injury that sidelined
him for 13 games. Djoos, a rookie,
has played in 16 games this
season, with two goals and one
assist while averaging more than
14 minutes of ice time. He played
just 5:48 against the Predators
before being ruled out for the
rest of the game. Thursday would
mark the first game he has
missed since his debut Oct. 11.
Washington already had eight
defensemen on the roster, so
even with Djoos’s injury, there’s
no immediate need for the team
to recall another blue-liner. But
depending on how long he’s expected to be out, the Capitals
could have an opportunity to get
a look at one of their other
defensive prospects. Earlier in
the season, General Manager Brian MacLellan indicated that he
wanted to get 2015 second-round
pick Jonas Siegenthaler some
NHL action this year.
Chorney skated on a pairing
with rookie Madison Bowey on
Wednesday. In Niskanen’s first
game back after missing a month
of the season, he played 20:33
and recorded four shots on goal.
“Things were moving fast for
me in the first period,” Niskanen
said. “I think it took me at least
three or four shifts five-on-five to
kind of get my feel back. . . . I
thought after the first, I got much
better. My legs felt good, my
injury felt good, and it was good
to be back out there.”
NHL ROUNDUP
Anisimov’s late scoring spurt
carries Chicago past New York
BLACKHAWKS 6,
RANGERS 3
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Artem Anisimov scored three
times in the third period against
his former team, Nick Schmaltz
had three assists and the Chicago
Blackhawks cooled off the visiting
New York Rangers with a 6-3
victory Wednesday night.
Alex DeBrincat, John Hayden
and Jonathan Toews also scored
for Chicago, which had dropped
three of four. Duncan Keith had
two assists and Corey Crawford
made 25 saves, helping the Blackhawks bounce back from an ugly
7-5 loss to New Jersey on Sunday.
New York had won six in a row
— the longest winning streak in
the NHL this season — and it
carried a 1-0 lead into the final
minute of the second period. But
the Blackhawks grabbed control
with four goals in a span of 6:06,
capped by Anisimov’s power-play
slam through Henrik Lundqvist’s
legs at 5:14 of the third.
Rick Nash had a goal and an
assist for the Rangers, who have
scored at least three times in 11 of
their past 13 games. Kevin Hayes
and Mika Zibanejad also scored,
and Lundqvist made 30 saves before he was replaced by Ondrej
Pavelec at 6:32 of the third.
DeBrincat started Chicago’s
scoring spree with a wrist shot
from the left circle at 19:08 of the
second. It looked as if Lundqvist
had made the stop, but the puck
rolled out from under him and
just across the goal line for the
rookie’s fourth goal in the last
three games.
The Blackhawks kept up the
pressure in the third. Anisimov
jumped on a puck and poked it by
Lundqvist for a 2-1 lead just 67
seconds into the period.
RED WINGS 8, FLAMES 2:
Anthony Mantha and Andreas
Athanasiou each scored twice as
Detroit routed visiting Calgary.
Gustav Nyquist, Dylan Larkin,
Justin Abdelkader and Luke
Glendening also scored for the
Red Wings, who raced to a 4-1 lead
in the first period.
Micheal Ferland and Johnny
Gaudreau had the goals for the
Flames in the opener of a sixgame road trip.
Athanasiou opened the scoring
when his cross-crease pass was
deflected by Flames defenseman
T.J. Brodie through the legs of
Calgary goalie Eddie Lack just
5:35 into the game.
Leafs’ Matthews nears return
Toronto forward Auston Matthews practiced Wednesday for
the first time since suffering an
upper-body injury eight days earlier and could be back in the
lineup when the Maple Leafs host
the New Jersey Devils.
Coach Mike Babcock said it
would be a game-day decision
Thursday night. . . .
Buffalo Sabres defenseman
Marco Scandella was fined
$5,000 by the NHL for a twohanded slash on Pittsburgh Penguins forward Patric Hornqvist.
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
Wizards’ defense clamps down in victory over Heat
WIZARDS FROM D1
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
feeble 10-point quarter, Washington recovered in the final
period, pulling ahead despite the
loss of Markieff Morris to an
ejection with 5:04 remaining.
Though the Wizards rallied
with a 15-3 run, Wall made the
play of the quarter by rejecting a
Dragic layup attempt near the
two-minute mark, protecting
the Wizards’ seven-point lead
and adding another chase-down
block to his season highlight
reel. Both teams hit 41 percent
for the game, but Washington
prevailed despite its shooting
mark.
Wall, too, couldn’t quite find
the touch while making 9 of 21
shots from the field. When Wall
studies the evidence on his laptop, he can see clearly what’s
happening with his shot.
At the free throw line, his busy
toes won’t stay still long enough.
His right hand seems to be in a
rush.
From his sweet spots in the
midrange, he barely elevates
higher than a phone book.
Against the Heat, he missed all
eight shots that he attempted
between the rim and the perimeter.
Despite a vigorous summer, a
prelude to what his friend and
bodyguard
had
originally
dubbed as “Wolf Season,” Wall
has not reaped the early returns
from those hours spent working
on his jump shot. However, when
Wall views clips sent to him by
vs. Miami Heat
Tomorrow
3:30 NBCSW
at Milwaukee Bucks
Monday
8 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
Wizards player development
coach David Adkins and his own
skills trainer, Rob McClanaghan,
he understands.
“It’s so simple because I watch
film and I watch in the games I’m
making shots, it’s about staying
on balance and having follow
through,” Wall said before the
win over the Heat. “The games I
don’t make shots: I don’t follow
through, I barely jump. . . .”
Wall may be able to see the
problems on playback, however
they continued in real time
against the Heat. Seven of his
nine makes were layups. Although one deserved even a
smile from Wall as he spun the
ball behind his back, fooling
Heat forward Justise Winslow
and finishing with the lefty fastbreak layup.
“He’s a trickster,” Beal said.
But the most difficult trick to
accomplish this season has been
replicating what he’s has done in
the two games against the Sacramento Kings. Beyond those per-
Home delivery makes good sense.
Washington ........................ 30
Miami ................................. 19
WASHINGTON
Morris
Porter Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Wall
Oubre Jr.
Mahinmi
Meeks
Frazier
TOTALS
7 NBCSW
at Toronto Raptors
Sunday
Wizards 102, Heat 93
31
30
10
25
MIN
FG
FT O-T
22:03 6-12 1-1 1-2
39:32
5-8 0-0 2-13
26:51
0-6 2-2 3-5
39:21 6-19 13-14 3-7
37:40 9-21 7-8 1-4
30:40
2-5 2-2 0-5
17:29
0-1 2-2 1-2
15:44
2-3 2-2 0-1
8:44
2-3 0-0 0-1
240 32-78 29-31 11-40
31 — 102
19 — 93
A PF PTS
0 6 15
0 1 12
0 3
2
1 1 26
6 2 27
2 1
7
0 3
2
0 1
6
0 1
5
9 19 102
Percentages: FG .410, FT .935. 3-Point Goals: 9-19, .474
(Porter Jr. 2-2, Wall 2-3, Morris 2-4, Frazier 1-1, Oubre
Jr. 1-2, Beal 1-6, Meeks 0-1). Team Rebounds: 10. Team
Turnovers: 12 (13 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Wall 2).
Turnovers: 12 (Beal 2, Mahinmi 2, Morris 2, Porter Jr. 2,
Frazier, Gortat, Meeks, Wall). Steals: 8 (Beal 2, Gortat 2,
Porter Jr. 2, Meeks, Wall). Technical Fouls: Morris, 7:26
fourth
MIAMI
Richardson
Winslow
Whiteside
Dragic
Waiters
T.Johnson
J.Johnson
Olynyk
Ellington
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
31:46
2-7 0-0 1-3 2 2
4
22:15
2-5 2-2 2-5 2 2
7
33:44
4-8 6-8 4-21 0 1 14
32:31 9-17 0-0 1-4 2 1 21
35:13 7-18 2-2 1-2 5 5 19
31:23 4-11 4-4 1-2 2 4 15
26:45
1-5 2-3 1-2 2 2
5
11:51
2-4 0-0 1-3 0 2
5
8:01
1-3 0-0 0-0 0 1
3
240 32-78 16-19 12-42 15 20 93
Percentages: FG .410, FT .842. 3-Point Goals: 13-30, .433
(Dragic 3-6, T.Johnson 3-7, Waiters 3-8, Ellington 1-1,
J.Johnson 1-1, Olynyk 1-2, Winslow 1-2, Richardson
0-3). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 17 (26 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 3 (T.Johnson, Whiteside, Winslow).
Turnovers: 17 (Waiters 5, Dragic 3, Whiteside 3,
Winslow 3, J.Johnson 2, Ellington). Steals: 3 (Dragic,
Olynyk, Richardson). Technical Fouls: T.Johnson, 1:23
fourth. A: 19,600 (19,600).
formances, in which Wall
drubbed defenders by hitting 15
of 21 shots, including nine from
beyond the three-point arc, he
has been mired in a shooting
funk.
Through his 12 games played
before Miami, Wall had made
only 44.3 percent from the field,
33.3 percent from three and a
surprisingly low 73.1 from the
free throw line. In midrange
attempts, his second favorite
destination on the floor behind
1-800-753-POST
his slingshots to the rim, Wall
had made just 17 of 55.
“Look at my career,” Wall said.
“My first couple games are never
good. The first six to 10 are never
good. Can’t make shots and stuff
like that, but then I find a rhythm
and then I’d be good.”
When evaluating Wall’s first 12
games played through the starts
of 2014 through 2016, he has not
shot better than 45 percent overall. Though Wall went into this
season with the hopes of ending
that trend, his extra shot attempts in the absence of Morris
only hurt his field goal percentage.
“I was taking more shots because I wanted to try to get off to
a good start and not have a bad
start like I did, and at times it
kind of hurts the team,” Wall
said. “But then you go back to
[thinking]: ‘You don’t have to do
that. Just play the way you play.
Shots are going to come your
way. You’re going to get everybody else shots and just get back
to winning and play the right
way.’ ”
The slow shooting start, however, doesn’t concern Wall. He
believes he’ll snap out of it —
just like last season when he did
so by December and laid the
groundwork for an all-NBA career year.
“I don’t know what the month
of December has for me,” Wall
said, smiling as he thought of the
upcoming month. “It’s always
like that. I don’t know [why].”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
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D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
baseball
Third time, a charm
BOSWELL FROM D1
names may constitute a majority
of the greatest pitchers of the past
60 years since the Cy Young
Award was created. If not, it’s
close.
What is becoming clear is that
Scherzer may eventually be
paired with Kershaw, who also
has three Cy Young Awards, as
one of the two best pitchers of the
2010s.
So far this decade, Scherzer
leads baseball in wins (132, one
more than Kershaw), starts and
strikeouts (1,909). Only Kershaw,
with 1,835 strikeouts, is within
239 of Scherzer’s total. That’s
dominance. “My goal is not ‘weak
contact’; it is always a strikeout,”
Scherzer said this spring.
Kershaw leads the decade in ERA
and Wins Above Replacement
with 52.1 to Scherzer’s secondplace WAR total of 39.7.
If Scherzer, 33, ages well, then
his Cy Young awards, along with
three seasons leading his league
in wins, plus National League
strikeout titles the past two years
with the Nationals, may be the
centerpiece for a Hall of Fame
candidacy. And Scherzer probably
knows it.
Cooperstown talk is a long way
off because Max was a bit of a late
bloomer who became good in
2010, then great by ’13 as he added
a curveball to his repertoire. At
the least, he will probably need to
remain first-rate during the final
four years of his current contract
to build a genuine Hall of Fame
case, although in some areas,
such as his ability to finish in the
top 10 in many categories in many
years, he already looks the part.
One of the key elements
considered for the Hall of Fame is
raw dominance of your era during
your six to eight peak seasons. In
his Nats years, with two no-hitters
and a 20-strikeout game (one of
just six in history), as well as
back-to-back Cy Youngs, that
period of Max domination has
come into clear focus.
Once you have built an athletic
career and a superstar identity,
it’s hard to change your methods
or your manner until age or
injury eventually forces your
hand. When you are also in the
third year of a seven-year,
$210 million contract, there is a
sense of internal responsibility to
justify your salary and status.
Scherzer is almost certainly in
the early stage of this tussle with
baseball mortality, weighing the
wisdom of pushing, always
pushing to construct historic
seasons against the need to be in
peak form for the postseason.
More than any of his other
years, the 2017 season may
epitomize Scherzer’s willpower,
tolerance for pain and willingness
to accept, and almost embrace,
risk.
“When you pitch, you’re always
right at the edge of your physical
limits. You’re like a racecar driver
going 200 miles an hour into a
banked turn,” Scherzer told me
this spring. “You have to push,
push, push. But if you push just a
little too hard, you crash. You
spend your career finding that
balance.”
Scherzer has never run as close
to that edge as he did this year.
The whole season seemed like one
continuous Scherzer injury scare,
yet he ended up with the best ERA
(2.51) of his career. Most
remarkable, the league batting
average against him of .178 was
one of the five best in 50 years.
Seldom has a man with so
many afflictions accomplished so
much. Scherzer spent the entire
offseason rehabilitating a broken
knuckle on his ring finger, an
injury, first thought to be a strain,
2013
FIRST
Nationals’ Scherzer is the 10th to win at least three
Cy Youngs and the second active pitcher to do so
CY YOUNG
240
strikeouts
21-3
2.90
W-L RECORD
ERA
0.97
WHIP
2016
SECOND
CAREER HIGH
CY YOUNG
284
strikeouts
20-7
2.96
The only NL pitcher
to win 20 games
ERA
0.97
WHIP
2017
THIRD
CY YOUNG
LED THE
LEAGUE
268
strikeouts
16-6
W-L RECORD
2.51
ERA
SECOND IN THE NL
0.90
that he endured through his final
11 starts of 2016. In spring
training, he still had to use a
three-fingered fastball grip so
that he could stick to an
aggressive regimen that would let
him pitch in the first week of the
season, though he couldn’t quite
be ready by Opening Day. Wise?
Or risky?
After that, hardly a month
passed without a Max mishap. In
May, Scherzer was drilled in the
left knee by a 100-mph line drive,
rolled on the ground and covered
his face. A broken leg? No, just
pain. Max stayed in the game and,
the next inning, struck out three
men on nine pitches — an
“immaculate inning.”
After pitching a scoreless
inning as the NL All-Star Game
starter, Scherzer hit his first
career home run Aug. 1 against
the Marlins. But the next inning,
he threw one warmup pitch and
then walked off the mound,
making a slashing motion across
his throat with a finger.
“I’m done,” he said. “I can’t go.”
Scherzer said he had pain in his
neck from sleeping on a new
pillow. Would he go on the
disabled list? No way. He took his
next two turns and won both. But
he couldn’t make his next start
because the pain had returned —
but had moved from the left side
of his neck to the right.
For the first time in eight years,
Scherzer went on the DL. General
Manager Mike Rizzo practically
had to hogtie him to make him
take 14 days off between starts.
Then, on Sept. 30, after just
54 pitches, Scherzer walked off
the mound again, this time
because of a hamstring cramp. He
wondered whether it might be
related to getting hit in the calf by
a liner a couple of weeks earlier,
but he continued to pitch.
“Eat your bananas: Monkeys
never cramp,” said Scherzer, who
recovered in time to start Game 3
of the NL Division Series. He took
a no-hitter into the sixth inning,
threw 98 pitches and got a nodecision in a 2-1 Nats loss.
Pitching in relief on two days of
rest, Scherzer lost Game 5 to the
Cubs, giving up four runs, two
unearned, in one inning. But he
was throwing 98 mph and
seemed fully healthy.
In hindsight, Scherzer’s
durability and toughness
probably gave him the 2002/3
innings — more than the 175 of
Kershaw and 1751/3 of Stephen
Strasburg — to mount up
additional high performance to
beat them for the Cy Young
Award.
Because Strasburg had a 0.00
ERA in two starts against the
Cubs while taking Scherzer’s spot
as the Game 1 starter, it requires
strained reasoning to think the
Nats would have fared better in
the postseason if Scherzer had
taken his foot off the gas every
time he went into a banked turn
at 200 mph and felt a twinge.
Who’s to say stiff necks and
crampy hamstrings wouldn’t
have happened anyway?
Over the next four seasons,
Scherzer and his Mad Max
willpower, his lust never to miss a
turn or flinch from a challenge,
may need some reexamination
and slight revision, some
compromise with advancing
baseball age.
Or not. Perhaps that’s just the
man himself. Maybe, as we’d
probably have done with those
other nine names on the Most Cy
Young Awards list, we should just
let him do it his way: always Maxed out.
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
For more by Thomas Boswell, visit
washingtonpost.com/boswell.
WHIP
PHOTOS BY EZRA SHAW/GETTY IMAGES; NICK WASS/ASSOCIATED PRESS; MIKE NELSON/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
Scherzer wins second straight NL Cy Young, besting Kershaw and Strasburg
SCHERZER FROM D1
winning it three times, I can’t
even comprehend it at this
point,” Scherzer said. “It’s such
an unbelievable feeling, unbelievable moment, you probably
can’t even process it until a year
later.”
Scherzer finished first in the
NL in strikeouts (268) and batting average against (.178) and
second in ERA (2.51) and strikeouts per nine innings (12.02).
Despite battling more injuries
than he had in his first two
seasons with the Nationals, beginning with a stress fracture in
his knuckle that truncated his
spring training, Scherzer threw
at least 200 innings for a fifth
straight season. Only seven
pitchers have compiled more
200-inning seasons than he has
since 2010.
Scherzer earned 27 of 30 firstplace votes. Kershaw finished
with the remaining three firstplace votes. Nationals teammate
Stephen Strasburg finished
third. Strasburg had a compelling case of his own, finishing a
point behind Scherzer in the
league’s ERA race and third in
batting average against. He
threw 35 scoreless innings during a five-game stretch in August
and September, the longest
streak in Nationals history. He
led the league in fielding independent pitching (FIP), a version
of ERA adjusted for the role of
defense and other factors outside
a pitcher’s control.
Kluber, meanwhile, led all major league starters with a
2.25 ERA and tied Kershaw for
the major league lead in wins
with 18. He became the first
Indians pitcher to win the award
twice, while Sale — who led the
majors in strikeouts — struggled
down the stretch, likely hurting
his candidacy in the minds of
Baseball Writers’ Association of
America voters. Kluber earned
28 of the 30 first-place votes, and
Sale got the other two. The
Nationals nearly traded for Sale
last winter, which would have
meant three of the top six votegetters for Cy Young would have
been in the same rotation —
though, of course, who knows
how that would have gone. The
Nationals are perfectly content
to have a three-time Cy Young
winner anchoring their pitching
staff.
While Kershaw and Strasburg
lost substantial time because of
injuries, Scherzer ascended to
the status of favorite. He managed minor injuries well enough
that he made just three fewer
starts this season than in 2016.
His season began with uncertainty, as the stress fracture that
formed in his knuckle late last
season was not fully healed when
he arrived for spring training.
Most of his first few weeks of
throwing came with something
smaller than a baseball, then
with a three-fingered grip he
only abandoned a few starts
before Opening Day.
“I really have to thank the
training staff. I dealt with a lot of
injuries that maybe weren’t at
the forefront of everyone’s
mind,” Scherzer said. “ . . . Everyone had a role in keeping me on
the field, and I’m very grateful
for all their hard work, as without their hard work, I probably
wouldn’t be here [winning the Cy
Young].”
While he was not ready to
make the Opening Day start,
Scherzer posted a 2.94 ERA in an
otherwise healthy April, settling
back in at the top of the rotation
with a 2.10 ERA in the season’s
first half, earning the start for
the NL at the All-Star Game. He
worked through neck soreness
and hamstring trouble in a
slightly less dominant second
half and was not healthy enough
to start until Game 3 of the NL
Division Series, in which he
threw 61/3 innings, allowed one
run and struck out seven. Then
his season ended in debacle, with
that calamitous fifth inning in
Game 5 of the NLDS that left him
stunned and stammering hours
afterward — unable to watch
more baseball for days, unable to
shake the feeling for weeks.
“You linger on it. If you didn’t,
I don’t think you’d be human. I
couldn’t even watch the LCS at
all. I couldn’t watch baseball for
the next 10 days. I am a baseball
fan, so I watched the World
Series, and it was an unbelievable World Series,” Scherzer said.
“But that series against the Cubs
will eat at me for the entire
offseason.”
Part of what makes Scherzer
an elite pitcher is the way failure
nags at him, and the way he
responds to it. That mentality,
and the relentless competitiveness it fosters, is part of what
made the Nationals decide he
was worth the seven-year,
$210 million investment before
the 2015 season. The 33-year-old
is now one of the most decorated
starters of the decade and a
legitimate Hall of Fame candidate who has left Nationals higher-ups confident that he has
more than justified the biggest
contract the team has doled out.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
MARYLAND 2A GIRLS’ SOCCER CHAMPIONSHIP
D5
M2
MARYLAND 2A BOYS’ SOCCER CHAMPIONSHIP
River Hill captures second title in row Despite hard work, Hawks fall short
RIVER HILL 3,
HEREFORD 0
BY
EASTERN TECH 2,
RIVER HILL 0
M IA O ’ N EILL
baltimore — Going into Wednesday’s 2A state championship game
against Hereford, the River Hill
girls’ soccer team faced the added
pressure of trying to win back-toback titles.
If there were any nerves, however, they didn’t show. A clinical
first-half performance lifted the
reigning state champions past the
Bulls, 3-0, at Loyola University for
their second straight crown.
It was the third state title for
senior captains Megan Chun, Vic
Tran and Carly Wetzel, who finished an illustrious four-year run
in the sweetest possible way.
“A lot of people don’t get to say
that they made it as far as we have,”
said Chun, who netted the second
of the Hawks’ three goals. “To win
three out of four years is really
crazy because it’s just something
to be so thankful for.”
For all three captains, the
team’s closeness off the field has
been key to its success.
“This team, out of all the clubs
I’ve played on, out of all the other
teams I’ve played on, has one of
the best team chemistries ever,”
Tran said.
That chemistry showed on the
field Wednesday. After a frantic
first few minutes in which the
teams exchanged scoring opportunities, River Hill (17-2) took the
lead at the end of a strong attacking sequence. Jules Grasso’s cross
found the team’s leading scorer,
Brigette Wang, who finished with
a header from close range to put
the Hawks up 1-0.
Following Wang’s opening goal,
BY
D ILLON M ULLAN
baltimore — With a steady
DOUG KAPUSTIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
River Hill cruised to its third state crown in four years to cap stellar
careers for senior captains Megan Chun, Vic Tran and Carly Wetzel.
Hereford (15-3-1) showed signs of
staging a comeback, but the Bulls’
efforts were subdued after Chun’s
strike doubled the Hawks’ lead
midway through the half.
From there, River Hill took control for the rest of the half, dominating possession and controlling
play through a strong midfield led
by Chung and Tran.
With just over four minutes left
in the first half, Grasso made it 3-0,
running onto a lofted ball over the
top and finishing with a side-footed volley off a bounce.
In the second half, Hereford
looked to have gained a second
wind, winning multiple corners
and attacking River Hill’s goal
with renewed urgency thanks to
the spirited play of freshman Payton Patrick.
The Bulls’ resurgence, along
with the more physical nature of
the second half, prevented the
Hawks from establishing the same
rhythm they had enjoyed before
the break. But a strong back line,
led by Wetzel, allowed the Hawks
to hold off the Bulls to claim the
championship.
“The girls were really composed
from the get-go,” River Hill Coach
Brian Song said. “I told the girls at
halftime, ‘Look, the game’s not
over. You still have to play a remaining 40 minutes. Keep the
composure and just keep the defense solid, and everything will
take care of itself.’ ”
For many River Hill players —
particularly the seniors — it’s a
fitting end to an unforgettable
journey.
“We’ve grown up together,”
Wetzel explained. “Just being able
to play with these girls who all
work so hard for each other is
really amazing.”
mia.oneill@washpost.com
stream of substitutes replacing
temporarily tired teammates,
Eastern Tech pressured River
Hill with fresh legs. High up the
field, the Mavericks chased down
the Hawks and blocked their
passing lanes in hopes of forcing
a costly mistake.
Without possession for the
vast majority of the Maryland 2A
boys’ soccer state final, River
Hill’s back line held together for
over an hour.
Then it finally faltered in a 2-0
loss at Loyola University.
“It was hard on the defense,
because we were working really
hard and then we had to work
twice as hard against a fresh
player,” senior defender Cory
Northrup said. “They outworked
us and were picking up a lot of
50-50 balls.”
With 15 minutes to play, a
bouncing cross fooled a handful
of No. 4 River Hill defenders and
squeezed past bodies to Eastern
Tech forward Mitchel Shanklin.
The junior fell to the turf as he
touched home the opening goal
from point-blank range.
Five minutes later, a River Hill
defender attempted to clear a
cross with a header, but the ball
floated into the top corner. The
Mavericks dictated the pace of
play all night, but the Hawks
were undone by two preventable
goals on balls that took wrong
bounces.
“It makes it harder in that we
know that we never gave up a
solid chance to them. Both their
DOUG KAPUSTIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
River Hill’s Alex Smedley (11) walks dejectedly from the field
Wednesday night as Eastern Tech players begin their celebration.
goals were off weird plays,” junior goalie Patrick Sherlock said.
“Defensively we were able to lock
them down relatively well; they
didn’t get a lot of clean looks on
goal. Defensively, that’s really
solid.”
After their only loss of the
year, the River Hill Hawks and
their eight seniors ripped off six
straight wins to reach their first
state final since 2014.
Wednesday night, the Hawks
(15-2-2) won a few early corners
and put together some late attacks in the Mavericks’ box but
could not create any clear-cut
scoring chances.
“I’m terribly disappointed for
my kids. They worked very, very
hard this year over three months
of blood, sweat and tears,” River
Hill Coach Matt Shagogue said.
“It’s difficult to end this way,
especially for the seniors. They
deserve better, but Eastern Tech
absolutely won the game. They
were very, very good tonight.”
The win gave Eastern Tech
(19-1) its first state title in boys’
soccer. Since reaching its first
state final a few months after it
opened its doors in 1996, River
Hill is now 9-2 in state championship matches in school history.
As the unfamiliar runner-up
feeling simmered among the
Hawks after loss, they used
scenes of the Mavericks’ postgame celebration as motivation
for next fall.
“I tried to get the younger guys
to pay attention to the emotions
[Eastern Tech] had. I tried to tell
them, ‘That’s going to be us next
year. Keep your head up,’ ” Sherlock said. “I was trying to keep
everything positive and reassure
everyone that losing this one
game isn’t going to affect our
team next year.”
dillon.mullan@washpost.com
R E D S K I NS NOTE S
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
Williams rests knee;
Reed has ‘a good day’
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
Rookie Samaje Perine, above, will be asked to do more and assume Rob Kelley’s multipurpose back role with Kelley on injured reserve.
With Kelley out, Redskins rebuild running game again
REDSKINS FROM D1
on handoffs and short passes.
Jordan said afterward that he
liked what he saw from Marshall,
24, a 5-foot-9, 201-pound former
Oregon back who had been waiting for a chance to prove his
mettle while on the Eagles’ practice squad this season and much
of last.
“I saw that natural instinct —
being able to find soft spots in the
defense,” Jordan said. “And he
showed me that he could run
some of the routes we ask Chris to
run, which is exciting. Now, the
hardest part will be picking up
the nuances of protections. We
ask our backs to do a lot when it
comes to protections.”
The Redskins will ask even
more of Perine, 23, who assumes
Kelley’s role as their multipurpose back for their late-season
push for a playoff berth.
At 4-5 heading into Sunday’s
game at 7-2 New Orleans, the
Redskins face long odds of earning a wild card. And the running
game hasn’t been a strength this
season, even when Kelley was
healthy.
In fact, the running game —
the proud calling card of the
Redskins during their Super
Bowl-contending years — hasn’t
been a strength of the offense
since Jay Gruden took over as
coach. It ranked 19th in the NFL
in 2014, Gruden’s first season,
and has slipped each year since:
20th in 2015; 21st in 2016 and
currently 23rd.
Efforts to bolster the rushing
game with the third-round selection of Matt Jones in the 2015
draft didn’t pan out. Jones brandished an imposing physical
presence, but his fumbling problems got him benched and eventually cut.
Kelley, undrafted out of Tulane, proved more reliable and
wrested the starting job for that
reason, even though his upside
wasn’t as dramatic. “He was never flashy, but he was always able
to play through pain,” Jordan
said. “Unfortunately, injury is a
part of the game.”
Perine, whom the Redskins
chose with their fourth-round
pick in the recent NFL draft,
represents a more significant investment. And he brings an impressive résumé as Oklahoma’s
career rushing leader, gaining
more than 1,000 yards each of his
three seasons.
What Jordan liked about
Perine was his powerful build —
5-11 and 236 pounds, anchored by
a low center of gravity that made
him tough for opposing college
defenders to bring down on an
initial tackle.
But Perine’s rookie campaign
got off to a rocky start with a
fumble in the preseason, following by another in the Week 3
victory over the Raiders.
Jordan professes full confidence in his rookie. “He has
worked extremely hard on it,”
Jordan said. “He is very conscious
of it.”
And he liked what Perine
showed Sunday against the Vikings’ third-ranked defense,
gaining 35 yards on nine carries
after stepping in for Kelley, who
was injured in the first quarter.
Given Perine’s size, Gruden
and Jordan both think he’s the
type of back whose production
will increase as his workload
increases. That was among the
traits that made former Redskins
back Alfred Morris so successful
in his prime.
“He’s just such a physical guy, I
think the more carries he gets,
he’ll wear down a defense,”
Gruden said. “He’s not so much a
‘spell’ guy; he’s more of a ‘run it,
run it, run it’ type guy.”
For Perrine to prove Jordan
right, the Redskins must run the
ball more than they’ve been doing of late.
Though he regrets the circumstance, Perine relishes the opportunity.
“You never want to see your
teammate go down, but at the
end of the day, the ball keeps on
rolling,” Perine said. “It’s next guy
up, and right now that’s me, C.T.
[Thompson] and the new guy
[Marshall]. We all just have to
step up.”
After rushing for just 64 yards
in the season-opening loss to
Philadelphia,
the
Redskins
topped 100 on the ground in their
next three games — 229 in the
victory over the Rams, 116 in the
victory over Oakland (with Perine
filling in for an injured Kelley)
and 111 in the loss at Kansas City.
Not surprisingly, the production has slipped over the last
three weeks, as injuries took a toll
on the offensive line.
“It’s a lot more intricate than
people would imagine,” Jordan
said of the interdependence of
the running game and offensive
line. “If one guy isn’t on the same
page, it’s hard to operate like that.
Then when you have guys coming
in and out of the lineup because
of injuries, it’s hard. [Offensive
line coach] Bill [Callahan] has
done a great job; he’s one of the
all-time best. But it’s not just
lining up and running the ball.”
liz.clarke@washpost.com
Eighteen names appeared on
the Washington Redskins’ injury
report Wednesday, including left
tackle Trent Williams, whose
lingering right knee pain
rendered him a sideline
spectator just days after he
played in the team’s 38-30 home
loss to the Minnesota Vikings.
Tight end Jordan Reed
(hamstring) also sat out
practice, and wide receiver
Jamison Crowder was excused
for personal reasons. Crowder is
expected back Thursday, Coach
Jay Gruden said.
Reed, who hasn’t played since
Week 8, is “progressing” and
had “a good day” Wednesday,
according to Gruden. “We’ll see
how he looks [Thursday].”
The timetable for Williams,
however, is far more unclear.
“It’s going to be a week-toweek thing for him, for sure,”
Gruden said of the 29-year-old
offensive lineman, who returned
to action against Minnesota
after missing Washington’s
previous two games.
“The challenge will be
[playing] Sunday, Thursday,
Thursday,” said Gruden,
referring to the team’s
upcoming schedule. “The next
three weeks will be a challenge.
Hopefully, we’ll get him this
week, then take it week by
week.”
Linebacker Zach Brown was
limited with an Achilles’ injury,
and Ryan Grant, Niles Paul and
Brian Quick (concussions) all
practiced on a limited basis.
With three games in 12 days
— starting Sunday with the New
Orleans Saints (7-2), followed by
the NFC East rival New York
Giants and Dallas Cowboys —
the Redskins (4-5) need all the
healthy bodies they can get.
In all, 12 players were limited:
Brown, Grant, Paul, Quick, T.J.
Clemmings (ankle), DeAngelo
Hall (knee), Matt Ioannidis
(hand), Anthony Lanier (knee),
Shawn Lauvao (stinger),
Spencer Long (knees), Montae
Nicholson (shoulder) and
Brandon Scherff (knee).
Hall expects to play
Hall left Sunday’s loss to
Minnesota with a bone bruise in
his knee and initially feared it
was something worse because of
the pain. He said he had trouble
straightening his leg and nearly
fell to the ground when he
jumped off the trainers’ table.
It was just Hall’s second game
this season since he came off the
physically unable to perform list
because of a torn anterior
cruciate ligament in his knee
suffered last season. Hall didn’t
return to the game, but he said
he should be ready to go Sunday
against the Saints.
“Anytime I straighten my
knee out, that sucker was killing
me,” Hall said. “Right now, I’m
good. . . . It was the weirdest
thing.”
— Kimberley A. Martin
and Master Tesfatsion
D6
EZ
NFL NOTES
Cowboys’
Elliott done
fighting his
suspension
Three freshmen are out
indefinitely following
arrest for shoplifting
BY
TIM BONTEMPS
los angeles — UCLA announced
AND STAFF REPORTS
Wednesday that it indefinitely
suspended LiAngelo Ball, Cody Riley and Jalen Hall from its men’s
basketball team after the three
freshmen were arrested last week
in China for shoplifting from three
stores, creating an international
incident that eventually saw President Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, get involved.
UCLA Coach Steve Alford announced the suspension Wednesday morning at what the school
billed as a news conference, but in
reality was a series of statements
from the three players, as well as
Alford and Athletic Director Dan
Guerrero. None of the five took
questions from the more than 50
reporters in attendance at Pauley
Pavilion, where the Bruins were
set to host Central Arkansas that
evening.
Alford said the three players
will not participate in workouts or
practices, will not travel with the
team and will not dress for home
games during the suspension,
which is indefinite because the
school is going through its legal
process with the three students.
“These men are going to have to
prove, through their words and
actions, that this isn’t who they
are, and that they will not let their
identity be defined by this incident,” Alford said. “I know [LiAngelo], Cody and Jalen well, and I
am confident they have already
begun to use this experience as a
life lesson. They are going to have
to regain the trust of this athletic
department, of this university, and
because this was such a high-profile international matter, that of
the general public. . . . My expectation is they will work hard to
demonstrate why they deserve to
be part of this program.”
The morning began with all
three players — first Riley, followed by Ball and Hall — giving
short, similar statements expressing remorse. All three admitted to
stealing from the stores and made
Jones accused of hurting NFL
The NFL is accusing Cowboys
owner Jerry Jones of engaging in
conduct detrimental to the league
in persisting in his efforts to obstruct the pending contract extension being negotiated between the
owners’ compensation committee
and Commissioner Roger Goodell.
The league, in a letter from one
of its attorneys, Brad S. Karp, to
Jones’s lawyer, David Boies, says
that Jones’s “antics” are “damaging the League and reflect conduct
detrimental to the League’s best
interests.” A copy of the letter was
obtained by The Washington Post.
— Mark Maske
Bills bench Taylor for rookie
Rookie Nathan Peterman has
replaced Tyrod Taylor as the Buffalo Bills’ starting quarterback in
an abrupt move Coach Sean McDermott said he made in a bid to
improve the team.
McDermott made the stunning
announcement when the Bills returned to practice to prepare to
play at the Los Angeles Chargers
on Sunday. Buffalo has a winning
record while holding down the
AFC’s sixth and final playoff spot.
“We are 5-4, I understand that,”
McDermott said. “It is always and
will be for the time that I’m here
about becoming the best team we
can possibly become.”
CHARGERS: Philip Rivers is
practicing, and Coach Anthony
Lynn is optimistic that the veteran
quarterback will play vs. Buffalo.
Rivers reported symptoms of a
possible concussion Monday, but
he participated in parts of a nonpadded practice Wednesday.
VIKINGS: Case Keenum will
start again at quarterback this
week, a natural decision with Minnesota on a five-game winning
streak and Keenum coming off a
four-touchdown performance.
— Associated Press
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
UCLA suspends players after return from China
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
Dallas Cowboys running back
Ezekiel Elliott has decided to serve
his entire six-game suspension by
the NFL under its personal conduct policy without making any
further legal attempts to have it
lifted or reduced, according to a
statement released Wednesday by
his representatives.
Elliott has served one game of
the suspension. He next will be
eligible to play Dec. 24.
“This decision arises from a
practical assessment of the current legal landscape,” the statement released by Rocky Arceneaux and Frank Salzano said.
“Mr. Elliott’s desire for closure in
this matter is in his best interests,
as well as the best interests of his
teammates, family and friends.
“This decision is in no way an
admission of any wrongdoing,
and Mr. Elliott is pleased that the
legal fight mounted by him and his
team resulted in the disclosure of
many hidden truths regarding
this matter.”
Elliott’s next appeal of the court
ruling denying him an injunction
had been scheduled for Dec. 1.
The NFL Players Association,
which had challenged the ban in
federal courts and managed to
delay its implementation for half
of the season, said that it likewise
was abandoning its legal fight.
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
LUCY NICHOLSON/REUTERS
Cody Riley, LiAngelo Ball and Jalen Hill will not practice or travel with the Bruins basketball team.
a commitment to trying to make
things right. They did not elaborate on what was stolen, though it
had been previously reported that
one of the items was a pair of
sunglasses from a Louis Vuitton
store.
“I’d like to start off by saying
sorry for stealing from the stores
in China,” said Ball, the younger
brother of Los Angeles Lakers
rookie Lonzo Ball. “I didn’t exercise my best judgment, and I was
wrong for that.”
In addition, all three players —
as well as Alford and Guerrero —
personally thanked Trump for his
support and help in bringing the
players home. As The Post reported Monday, Trump personally appealed to Xi to intervene on the
players’ behalf during the U.S.
president’s two-day state visit to
Beijing last week. Wednesday
morning, before the news conference at UCLA, Trump tweeted,
“Do you think the three UCLA
Basketball Players will say thank
you President Trump? They were
headed for 10 years in jail!”
Guerrero also thanked Trump’s
chief of staff, John F. Kelly, for
personally calling the three players while they were in China to
check on them.
For their part, the Chinese government wasn’t eager to say that
Xi had followed through on
Trump’s request to intervene.
“I am not aware of the details,
but I believe the Chinese police
would have handled the case in
ria Nevarez, where they were later
met by Alford and Chris Carlson,
UCLA’s associate athletic director.
Guerrero said the players were
released the morning of Nov. 8 on
bail of approximately $2,200, with
the conditions of release that the
students had to surrender their
passports and agree to travel restrictions. Chinese authorities did
not require the players to remain
at their hotel, but Guerrero said
the school chose to do so “out of an
abundance of caution, and respect
to the process.” He added that the
bail has since been refunded by
Chinese authorities.
Eventually, the school — with
permission of the players’ parents
— found them legal representation and escorted them through
the process. Carlson and Doug
Erickson, UCLA’s director of basketball administration, stayed
with the players while the rest of
the team and staff traveled to
Shanghai, about 100 miles away,
and then back to the United
States. After Ball, Riley and Hall
were given permission to come
home by Chinese authorities, the
school got them on a flight that left
Shanghai on Tuesday around 9
p.m. local time, and arrived at Los
Angeles International Airport at 5
p.m. to a horde of television cameras awaiting their return.
That the three escaped so lightly
can only be attributed to the fact
they are high-profile foreigners,
who could command support from
the presidents of the United States
strict accordance with the law,”
Foreign Ministry spokesman
Geng Shuang said at a news conference Wednesday, when asked if
Xi had intervened.
Guerrero laid out a timeline of
events Wednesday, officially spelling out what happened for the first
time.
On Nov. 6, players and staff
from UCLA and Georgia Tech —
the Bruins’ opponent for a game
Saturday in Shanghai — visited
the campus of Alibaba, the e-commerce giant that sponsored the
teams’ game and whose executive
vice president, Joseph Tsai, recently purchased 49 percent of the
Brooklyn Nets, as well as the option to buy a controlling interest in
the team. After the tour, Guerrero
said the teams returned to their
hotel, where players were allowed
90 minutes to explore the city.
During that time, Guerrero
said, the three players went to
three stores in the mall adjacent to
the hotel and stole the items before returning to the hotel. The
following morning, local police arrived and interviewed players
from UCLA and Georgia Tech to
determine which players had stolen the goods, before eventually
settling on Ball, Riley and Hall.
At that point, the players were
taken to a police station, where
they were further questioned.
They were joined at the station by
UCLA associate head coach Duane
Broussard and Pacific-12 Conference associate commissioner Glo-
and China, as well as Alibaba.
One significant question yet to
be answered is who will pay legal
fees and other expenses incurred
by the incident. Guerrero said
Wednesday that the school “provided the necessary resources to
ensure the timely release and safe
return of the UCLA athletes.
“We now have the task of working to reconcile who is ultimately
responsible of the cost incurred, in
addition to addressing any NCAA
implications.”
David Ridpath, an associate
professor of sports administration
at Ohio University and a veteran
college athletics administrator,
said he expected the NCAA would
rule in favor of UCLA being able to
pay for the expenses incurred.
While some could argue that it
was an extra benefit, he said the
unique circumstances involved
made it likely in his eyes that the
NCAA would look to put the issue
to bed.
“I guess you could say by the
letter of the law it’s an extra benefit, but I think it would fall under
actual and necessary benefits, and
the NCAA would look at this in a
vacuum and likely permit it,” Ridpath said in a phone interview. “I
don’t know if the NCAA wants to
come out and add more insult to
injury here and say these kids or
the kids’ families have to pay for
it.”
It does not appear, however,
that the players will be removed
permanently from the team or the
university. During their statements, all three sounded as if they
expected to be part of the program
again at some point, and neither
Alford nor Guerrero gave any indication that they had closed the
door on an eventual return to full
playing status.
Until the school’s legal process
plays out, however, the three will
remain in limbo. On that point,
Guerrero said the athletic department is working with the school’s
Office of Student Conduct to determine what the school’s ultimate punishment would ultimately be.
“We will work together and prudently come to some resolution in
short order,” Guerrero said.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
Simon Denyer in Beijing contributed to
this report.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP
Williams wins No. 400 at North Carolina as No. 9 Heels prevail
NORTH CAROLINA 93,
BUCKNELL 81
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Luke Maye scored 20 points,
and No. 9 North Carolina held on
to give Coach Roy Williams his
400th victory at the school, a
93-81 win over Bucknell on
Wednesday night in the on-campus round of the PK80 tournament in Chapel Hill, N.C.
Theo Pinson added a careerhigh 19 points for the Tar Heels
(2-0), who shot 47 percent and
welcomed back Final Four most
outstanding player Joel Berry on
the same day graduate transfer
Cameron Johnson was lost for
four to six weeks following knee
surgery.
North Carolina blew most of
an early 16-point lead but scored
nine straight points after the
Bison cut the lead to 71-67 on
Nate Sestina’s layup with six min-
utes remaining. Pinson started
the decisive burst with two free
throws, and Maye pushed it back
to double figures with his threepointer with 41/2 minutes remaining that made it 78-67.
Nana Foulland and Zack
Thomas scored 21 points apiece
for Bucknell (0-3). The Patriot
League favorites shot 46 percent
and were 11 for 28 from threepoint range to offset a serious
disadvantage inside.
Williams improved to 400-115
since returning to his alma mater
in 2003, and he won his 200th
game at Dean E. Smith Center.
SETON HALL 84, INDIANA 68: Desi Rodriguez scored
23 points, keying a balanced
scoring attack and leading the
No. 22 Pirates past the Hoosiers
in the Gavitt Tipoff Games in
Newark.
Rodriguez was one of four Pirates (3-0) to reach double figures. Angel Delgado added 19
points and 11 rebounds. Khadeen
Carrington scored 17 points, and
Bluejays surprised the No. 20
Wildcats in a Gavitt Tipoff Games
matchup in Rosemont, Ill.
Ty-Shon Alexander scored 14
points and Marcus Foster added
12 for Creighton (3-0).
Vic Law had a career-high 30
points and Bryant McIntosh added 24 for Northwestern (2-1).
Myles Powell tossed in 11.
Devonte Green paced Indiana
(1-2) with 16 points, and Robert
Johnson added 12.
The Pirates jumped out to a
10-2 lead over the first five minutes, thanks to Rodriguez, who
scored six points.
MINNESOTA 107, NIAGARA 81: Amir Coffey, Reggie Lynch
AU falls at No. 24 W. Virginia
Jevon Carter and Daxter Miles
scored 20 points each to lead
No. 24 West Virginia to a 98-64
victory over American in Morgantown, W. Va.
The Mountaineers (1-1) got off
to a slow start, staying competitive with the Eagles over the
opening 13:56.
West Virginia shot 12 for 32
(37.5 percent) from the field in the
first half and finished the game
shooting 32 for 63 (51 percent).
Sa’eed Nelson led American
(0-2) with 17 points, and Larry
Motuzis added 15.
“I thought that’s an outlier
game,” American Coach Mike
and Jordan Murphy all scored 18
points, and the No. 14 Golden
Gophers pulled away for a win in
Minneapolis.
Lynch and Murphy posted
double-doubles, with Lynch grabbing a team-high 12 rebounds
and Murphy checking in with 11.
Nate Mason added 15 points and
11 assists for Minnesota (3-0).
Kahlil Dukes hit five threepointers and led Niagara (1-1)
with 26 points.
CREIGHTON 92, NORTHWESTERN 88: Khyri Thomas
had a career-high 24 points and
added 11 rebounds and five assists, Martin Krampelj scored a
career-high 17 points and the
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100-34 romp over McNeese State
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OHIO STATE 99, IDAHO
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PENN 66, NAVY 45: Ryan
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points apiece, and the Quakers
(2-1) used a big first half to roll
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Hasan Abdullah led Navy,
which made just 6 of 27 shots in
the first half, with eight points.
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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
college basketball
Govan’s second straight double-double boosts the Hoyas
GEORGETOWN 102,
MT. ST. MARY’S 68
BY
A VA W ALLACE
All that Jessie Govan means to
this year’s Georgetown men’s basketball team was on display
Wednesday night in the span of
25 seconds late in the first half of
the Hoyas’ 102-68 win over
Mount St. Mary’s.
With five minutes left until
intermission and the Mountaineers bringing the ball down the
floor, the junior center barked
defensive instructions at freshman forward Jamorko Pickett,
reached to secure the rebound on
an
off-target
three-pointer,
arched his 6-foot-10 frame onto
his tiptoes to keep the ball inbounds, then heaved the ball back
up the floor. Sophomore guard
Jagan Mosely capped the sequence with a jumper that put the
Hoyas up 20 points and forced
the Mountaineers to take a timeout.
Govan showed himself to be a
veteran leader, the team’s best
defender and its offensive linchpin. If there was a takeaway from
Georgetown’s second game with
Patrick Ewing at the helm —
against a team it hasn’t lost to
since 1961 — it was that Govan is
the team’s engine, and he embraces the role.
“If I play my hardest and lead
this team,” Govan said, “then
we’re going to win.”
It helped that Mount St. Mary’s
was missing its best defender,
6-foot-8 senior forward Chris
Wray, who was out with a broken
wrist.
Without Wray to match up
against Govan, the big man went
off for 20 points, missing just two
of his nine attempts from the
field, sinking all three of his
three-pointers, pulling in a gamehigh 14 rebounds and dishing
four assists in 27 minutes. He
went out of the game for good
with just over six minutes remaining and walked to the bench
to scattered, but appreciative, applause from an announced crowd
of 5,064 at Capital One Arena.
It was the junior’s second double-double to open the season
after scoring 20 points and notching a team-high 15 rebounds in
Sunday’s season-opening win
over Jacksonville.
Ewing has long said Govan,
alongside junior forward Marcus
Derrickson, would be key to the
Hoyas’ success in his inaugural
season. He told Govan as soon as
he took the job in April that he
was going to be particularly hard
on the center. Govan sees the
attention as a positive.
“It’s a refresher, that Coach
Ewing has been really hard on
me,” Govan said. “He makes that
known, that he’s going to be hard
on me . . . so it’s nothing that I
haven’t expected so far. I know
everything that he’s trying to tell
me is for my own good. I’m just
trying to listen. He’s been successful at my position for so many
years, so I’ve just got to listen.”
The junior led a group of dynamic scorers that exploited a
size advantage against overmatched Mount St. Mary’s. Freshman Jahvon Blair earned his first
start of the season in place of his
classmate, Pickett, and scored 19
points on 8-of-15 shooting, including two three-pointers, and
had five assists. Mosely added 15
points and five assists off the
bench, and junior Kaleb Johnson
and Pickett had 14 points apiece.
Georgetown shot 57.4 percent
from the field to the Mountaineers’ 38.5 percent.
Senior guard Junior Robinson
led a young team — the Mountaineers have 12 freshmen on
their roster — with 26 points on
19 shots.
Georgetown played at the
high-tempo clip Ewing prefers,
but with that came 16 turnovers,
five of which were from starting
guard Jonathan Mulmore. When
asked what improvements he saw
from Sunday’s season opener
against Jacksonville, Ewing
chuckled, then said, “We didn’t
turn the ball over as much.”
The Hoyas had 18 turnovers
Sunday — figuring out how to
balance a fast pace and more
stringent ball security is one of
Ewing’s biggest concerns in this
nonconference slate.
“I want to push the pace, I want
it to be fast, but while we’re
pushing it I want to cut our
turnovers down,” he said. “If we’re
going to beat the elite teams that
we’re going to be facing in the Big
East, we have to cut our turnovers
down.”
Otherwise, Georgetown’s biggest improvement from Sunday’s
game came on the boards. The
Hoyas tied equally outsized Jacksonville with 37 rebounds in the
opener; against the Mountain-
eers, they enjoyed a 51-23 advantage.
“Jessie really set the tone rebounding,” said Johnson, who
had seven boards. “He was a big
presence down there. Me, [I was]
just trying to come in from the
outskirts because Jessie kind of
controlled the boards, especially
throughout the first half.”
Govan likes that his team depends on him. He viewed Ewing’s
hiring in the spring as something
of a second chance as he enters
the second half of his college
career. The New York native
avoided setting strict goals for
himself at the start of the season
— he simply wants to win.
“It’s good to have these guys to
look up to me,” Govan said. “I’ve
been here three years, so they
know I kind of know how college
basketball works and all that. I’m
trying to do my best to put them
in the right direction so we can be
successful.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
BARRY SVRLUGA
For U-Md. to be at its best,
Jackson has to be at his best
SVRLUGA FROM D1
with just that single shot.
The Terps beat Butler, 79-65,
and for the hardcore fan base,
there were lots of pleasant
discoveries upon dissection, not
least Anthony Cowan Jr.’s 25point, 10-rebound, five-assist
evening, and including 13 points
from intriguing freshman guard
Darryl Morsell. They crushed
Butler on the boards, 40-27.
They shot 57.4 percent and held
Butler to 34.3 percent. Very nice.
Very, very nice.
“I like my team,” Terps Coach
Mark Turgeon said, and that’s a
reasonable assessment.
These Terrapins are 3-0, and
it’s hard to ask more than they
have shown in their opening
week. But like any modern
college basketball team in midNovember — heck, in midJanuary — they are a living,
breathing, morphing, growing
thing.
“To be honest,” Huerter said
before the Butler game, “I don’t
know if we know the ceiling of
this team.”
What we do know, though, is
that whatever that ceiling is, it
can’t be reached without
Jackson asserting himself. Not
occasionally. Not when the
offense comes to him. Every
night.
His evening’s work on offense
Wednesday: four points on 2of-4 shooting with four
turnovers and not a single
assist.
Now, this isn’t to scold
Jackson for his performance
against the Bulldogs of the Big
East, because the 6-foot-7
forward led both teams with 11
rebounds, and in a matchup
with Butler senior forward
Kelan Martin, Jackson at least
didn’t force his shot, as Martin
occasionally did while missing
10 of his 15 attempts.
But this is about Jackson
continuing to understand not
just his potential but his ability
right now, this very minute. And
it’s about the Terps figuring out
a way to get that ability out of
him, say, 30 more times this
season.
“Zero assists, four turnovers is
not Justin,” Turgeon said.
“That’s really the thing that
sticks out to me. But I’m not
worried about him, because I
see him in practice making plays
and doing things. And the great
thing is he didn’t hang his head.
He kept defending and he kept
rebounding, so that’s a really
good sign for us moving
forward.”
A year ago, when Turgeon
first got Jackson on campus
from his home in Toronto, he
found a talented, introverted
freshman who, quite frankly,
didn’t understand what it took
to practice and prepare at the
Big Ten level. Every. Single. Day.
Not his fault. It just took time.
“There’s a huge difference,”
Turgeon says now. Turgeon
believes Jackson’s
communication is better. His
work ethic is better. His
understanding of what’s
expected is better.
“He’s really grown up,”
Turgeon said. “You’re forced to
do that when you’re a star player
at a high level like this.
And yet, Maryland’s starcaliber player has to play like a
star in order for the Terps to
max out. Xfinity Center doesn’t
organically come alive these
days. The Terrapins have to
bring it to a fever pitch with
their play. Jackson should be a
reason the fans explode, not a
reason they’re subdued.
“You’ve got to go out there
and be confident every time you
step on the court,” Jackson said
just before the start of the
season. This was during a
discussion about his supposed
transformation, his maturation.
Part of that came, he said, from
going to the NBA draft combine,
from competing against players
who were ready for the pros.
“You’ve got to know what you
bring to the table and know how
you can help your team,”
Jackson said. “And I feel like
that’s one of the things that I’ve
really tried to work on: Being
aggressive.”
So he understands it. He just
needs to do it.
This season, every single
game is an opportunity for
Jackson. Given the versatility
Turgeon has on his roster — able
to play a bruising lineup or a
finesse version — and the
versatility Jackson has in his
skill set, able to face up or post
up, Jackson will get the
opportunity to play both the
small and power forward spots,
creating mismatches along the
way. Learning the three, which
Jackson rarely played as a
freshman, puts a lot on his plate.
Both coach and player realize
that, so we can afford him some
time to adjust.
“Sometimes it’s tough,”
Jackson said. “But at the end of
the day, that’s what the next
level is looking for, people that
can play multiple positions, that
can guard multiple positions.
He’s just preparing me for the
next level.”
Before Jackson leaves,
though, before he’s prepared for
that next level, he must assert
himself at this level. On
Wednesday, Turgeon took the
blame for what looked like a
passive offensive performance
from his star.
“We can’t be great as we move
forward if Justin’s only taking
four shots a game,” Turgeon
said. “We need him to be a
better part of it. That’s my job,
to figure out how to get him
more shots.”
With just under seven
minutes remaining Wednesday
night, Jackson picked up his
fourth foul, and Turgeon sat him
down. A Maryland lead that had
been 13 points shriveled to five
on the ensuing free throws.
And then two things
happened: Cowan grabbed a
loose ball, looked at a dwindling
shot clock, and launched a 25footer — which he made. When
Butler brought the ball up,
Morsell slyly made a steal and
sailed into the open court for a
dunk.
Order was restored. The
16,317 on hand roared. The
Terps’ bench exploded.
“It just feels right,” Turgeon
said of his team. “It feels right to
me.”
That makes sense, in so many
aspects. Yet Jackson was on that
bench in those moments when
the game was decided. For this
growing, maturing, promising
Maryland team to be the best
version of itself, its growing,
maturing, promising sophomore
forward can’t allow that to
happen very often.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Bruno Fernando throws one down for two of his eight points Wednesday night for Maryland, which moved to 3-0 despite some sloppy play.
Terps overcome 20 turnovers in victory
MARYLAND FROM D1
Cowan also had five assists to
cap the most productive offensive
night of his career, which included
three three-pointers as Maryland
shot 57 percent from the field and
hit nine three-pointers. Cowan
also made 12 of 15 from the free
throw line, a sure sign that he
gleaned plenty from playing behind Melo Trimble for a season.
“Anthony is getting a great feel
for spacing,” Maryland Coach
Mark Turgeon said.
The win showcased the versatility of Turgeon’s team. Instead of
using size in his starting lineup as
he had in wins over Stony Brook
and Maryland-Eastern Shore to
begin the season, Turgeon opted
to start a three-guard lineup —
redshirt junior Dion Wiley made
his first start since 2014 — to counter a quick Butler team that didn’t
start any player over 6-foot-8.
But even as the Terps received
balanced scoring — Maryland had
27 field goals on 14 assists — Turgeon is still trying to forge an
identity around defense and physicality.
Not only did Wiley (11 points)
continue to provide aggressive
play on both ends of the floor, but
Morsell came off the bench and
helped Jackson shadow Martin,
who finished with just 12 points
on 15 shots. Cowan was lauded for
his effort guarding Butler guard
Kamar Baldwin, who finished
with 15 points on 21 shots.
And then there was Bruno Fernando, who Turgeon brought to
College Park specifically to help
change the mentality of his team.
The 6-10 power forward hit four of
five shots and finished with eight
points, but he made more of an
impression by altering shots on
the interior and clearing rebounding lanes for his teammates on a
night when they outrebounded
Butler 40-27.
“This team feels right defensively, and I think we’re going to
get better defensively as we get
deeper,” Turgeon said.
Most of Butler’s transition opportunities were met with resistance at the rim; after power forward Ivan Bender forced a missed
layup on a fast-break, Fernando
finished a layup at the other end to
give his team a two-point lead
with 12:45 remaining in the first
half. Morsell followed suit with a
block in transition later in the first
half, which led to a three-pointer
from Kevin Huerter to give Maryland a 10-point lead with 6:06
remaining in the first half.
Maryland led by as many as 13
but struggled to find rhythm in its
offensive sets in the second half;
Jackson only took four shots and
picked up his fourth foul with just
under seven minutes remaining.
Cowan knew he had to pick up the
pieces on the offensive end. After
Butler cut the deficit to 61-56 with
6:46 remaining, Maryland nearly
committed another turnover after
Wiley lost control of the ball. It
ended up in Cowan’s hands, who
was 25 feet from the basket. He
glanced at the shot clock and
didn’t hesitate.
“When the ball left his hands,”
Morsell said, “I was confident in
it.”
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 16 , 2017
SCOREBOARD
FOOTBA LL
BASKETBALL
NFL
Week 11 injury report
NBA
Knicks 106, Jazz 101
NFC
WASHINGTON REDSKINS
AT NEW ORLEANS SAINTS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
UTAH .................................. 30
NEW YORK ......................... 27
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 8
Dallas ............................ 5
Washington .................. 4
N.Y. Giants .................... 1
L
1
4
5
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.889
.556
.444
.111
PF
283
233
207
150
PA
179
205
232
238
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ................. 7
Carolina ......................... 7
Atlanta .......................... 5
Tampa Bay .................... 3
L
2
3
4
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.778
.700
.556
.333
PF
268
213
197
173
PA
165
180
179
208
NORTH
W
Minnesota ..................... 7
Detroit .......................... 5
Green Bay ..................... 5
Chicago ......................... 3
L
2
4
4
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.778
.556
.556
.333
PF
217
244
204
150
PA
165
210
207
194
WEST
W
L.A. Rams ...................... 7
Seattle .......................... 6
Arizona ......................... 4
San Francisco ................ 1
L
2
3
5
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.778
.667
.444
.100
PF
296
211
155
174
PA
162
165
223
260
EAST
W
New England ................. 7
Buffalo .......................... 5
Miami ............................ 4
N.Y. Jets ....................... 4
L
2
4
5
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.778
.556
.444
.400
PF
257
184
137
201
PA
195
196
224
222
SOUTH
W
Tennessee ..................... 6
Jacksonville .................. 6
Houston ........................ 3
Indianapolis .................. 3
L
3
3
6
7
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.667
.333
.300
PF
205
226
236
179
PA
213
134
241
280
NORTH
W
Pittsburgh ..................... 7
Baltimore ...................... 4
Cincinnati ...................... 3
Cleveland ...................... 0
L
2
5
6
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.778
.444
.333
.000
PF
187
190
149
143
PA
148
171
182
240
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 6
Oakland ......................... 4
Denver ........................... 3
L.A. Chargers ................ 3
L
3
5
6
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.444
.333
.333
PF
253
196
166
167
PA
208
214
239
172
AFC
WEEK 11
THURSDAY’S GAME
Tennessee at Pittsburgh (-7), 8:25
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Washington at New Orleans (-8), 1
Baltimore (-2) at Green Bay, 1
Arizona at Houston (PK), 1
Tampa Bay at Miami (PK), 1
Jacksonville (-8) at Cleveland, 1
Detroit (-3) at Chicago, 1
L.A. Rams at Minnesota (-2), 1
Kansas City (-10) at N.Y. Giants, 1
Buffalo at L.A. Chargers (-41/2), 4:05
New England (-61/2) vs Oakland at Mexico City, MX, 4:25
Cincinnati at Denver (-21/2), 4:25
Philadelphia (-31/2) at Dallas, 8:30
BYE: Indianapolis, San Francisco, Carolina, N.Y. Jets
MONDAY’S GAME
Atlanta at Seattle (-21/2), 8:30
Redskins: DNP: WR Jamison Crowder (not injury related), TE Jordan Reed (hamstring), T Trent Williams
(knee); LIMITED: LB Zach Brown (achilles), T T.J.
Clemmings (ankle), WR Ryan Grant (concussion), S
DeAngelo Hall (knee), DE Matt Ioannidis (hand), DE
Anthony Lanier (knee), G Shawn Lauvao (stinger), C
Spencer Long (knee, knee), S Montae Nicholson (shoulder), TE Niles Paul (concussion), WR Brian Quick
(concussion), G Brandon Scherff (knee); FULL: CB
Bashaud Breeland (shoulder), S Deshazor Everett (eye),
T Morgan Moses (ankle, ankle). Saints: DNP: LB A.J.
Klein (ankle); LIMITED: T Terron Armstead (not injury
related), CB De’Vante Harris (hamstring), S Kenny
Vaccaro (groin).
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................13
Toronto ........................................9
New York .....................................8
x-Philadelphia..............................7
Brooklyn.......................................5
L
2
5
6
6
9
Pct
.867
.643
.571
.538
.357
GB
—
31/2
41/2
5
71/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington .................................9
Orlando ........................................8
Miami...........................................6
Charlotte......................................5
Atlanta.........................................3
L
5
7
8
8
12
Pct
.643
.533
.429
.385
.200
GB
—
11/2
3
31/2
61/2
BALTIMORE RAVENS AT GREEN BAY PACKERS
CENTRAL
W
Detroit .......................................10
Milwaukee ...................................8
Cleveland .....................................8
Indiana .........................................7
Chicago ........................................2
L
4
6
7
8
10
Pct
.714
.571
.533
.467
.167
GB
—
2
21/2
31/2
7
Ravens: DNP: CB Jimmy Smith (achilles); LIMITED: T
Ronnie Stanley (concussion); FULL: TE Nick Boyle (toe),
WR Michael Campanaro (shoulder), S Chuck Clark
(thigh), RB Terrance West (calf), LB Tim Williams
(thigh). Packers: DNP: T Bryan Bulaga (knee), S Morgan
Burnett (groin), RB Aaron Jones (knee), RB Ty Montgomery (ribs); LIMITED: LB Ahmad Brooks (back), CB
Kevin King (shoulder), G Justin McCray (ankle), LB Nick
Perry (foot); FULL: DT Quinton Dial (chest), QB Brett
Hundley (hamstring), LB Joe Thomas (ankle).
TENNESSEE TITANS AT PITTSBURGH STEELERS
Titans: No players listed. Steelers: OUT: CB Joe Haden
(fibula); QUESTIONABLE: LB James Harrison (back), TE
Vance McDonald (ankle), S Michael Mitchell (ankle).
ARIZONA CARDINALS AT HOUSTON TEXANS
Cardinals: DNP: LB Karlos Dansby (not injury related),
DT Corey Peters (ankle); LIMITED: WR John Brown
(back), C A.Q. Shipley (shoulder), QB Drew Stanton
(knee), T John Wetzel (back); FULL: WR Brittan Golden
(groin), DT Frostee Rucker (toe, thumb). Texans: DNP:
LB Dylan Cole (hamstring), T Julien Davenport (shoulder), WR Will Fuller (ribs); LIMITED: G Jeff Allen (hand),
T Chris Clark (shoulder), LB Jadeveon Clowney (knee),
DE Joel Heath (knee), CB Kareem Jackson (shoulder), CB
Johnathan Joseph (knee); FULL: DT Brandon Dunn
(shoulder), WR Bruce Ellington (ribs), LB Ben Heeney
(elbow), LB Jelani Jenkins (hand), C Greg Mancz (knee),
QB Tom Savage (right shoulder), LB Brennan Scarlett
(knee).
BUFFALO BILLS AT LOS ANGELES CHARGERS
Bills: DNP: LB Lorenzo Alexander (not injury related), TE
Charles Clay (knee), T Cordy Glenn (foot, ankle), DE Jerry
Hughes (shin, calf), RB LeSean McCoy (not injury
related), RB Mike Tolbert (hamstring), DT Kyle Williams
(not injury related); LIMITED: CB E.J. Gaines (hamstring), WR Jordan Matthews (knee); FULL: WR Zay
Jones (ankle). Chargers: Practice Not Complete.
CINCINNATI BENGALS AT DENVER BRONCOS
Bengals: DNP: CB William Jackson (toe), CB Adam Jones
(concussion), WR Brandon LaFell (knee), DT Pat Sims
(calf), DE Chris Smith (ankle); LIMITED: DE Michael
Johnson (illness), LB Kevin Minter (elbow), S Shawn
Williams (hamstring). Broncos: DNP: RB Jamaal Charles
(not injury related), TE A.J. Derby (shoulder), TE Jeff
Heuerman (knee), DT Domata Peko (not injury related),
CB Aqib Talib (not injury related); LIMITED: WR Cody
Latimer (knee, achilles), QB Brock Osweiler (right
shoulder), T Donald Stephenson (calf), WR Demaryius
Thomas (knee); FULL: LB Todd Davis (ankle), WR Bennie
Fowler (ankle), DE Adam Gotsis (hamstring), G Ronald
Leary (elbow), LB Brandon Marshall (shoulder), LB
Shane Ray (wrist).
DETROIT LIONS AT CHICAGO BEARS
Lions: DNP: DE Ezekiel Ansah (back), RB Dwayne
Washington (hip); LIMITED: S Don Carey (knee), LB
Jalen Reeves-Maybin (ankle); FULL: G T.J. Lang (concussion). Bears: DNP: CB Bryce Callahan (knee), TE Dion
Sims (illness), LB Danny Trevathan (calf); LIMITED: LB
Sam Acho (shoulder), T Tom Compton (ankle), G Kyle
Long (finger), CB Sherrick McManis (hamstring), DE Roy
Robertson-Harris (hamstring).
WEEK 12
THURSDAY, NOV. 23
N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30
Minnesota at Detroit, 12:30
L.A. Chargers at Dallas, 4:30
SUNDAY, NOV. 26
Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1
Carolina at N.Y. Jets, 1
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 1
Miami at New England, 1
Buffalo at Kansas City, 1
Chicago at Philadelphia, 1
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:05
Jacksonville at Arizona, 4:25
Denver at Oakland, 4:25
New Orleans at L.A. Rams, 4:25
Green Bay at Pittsburgh, 8:30
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS
AT CLEVELAND BROWNS
Jaguars: DNP: LB Blair Brown (hamstring), WR Allen
Hurns (ankle), WR Marqise Lee (knee), G Patrick
Omameh (quadricep), T Jermey Parnell (knee), DE
Dawuane Smoot (knee); LIMITED: WR Arrelious Benn
(knee), RB Leonard Fournette (ankle), TE Marcedes
Lewis (knee), LB Lerentee McCray (ankle); FULL: QB
Blake Bortles (right wrist, illness), CB Jalen Ramsey
(back). Browns: DNP: T Shon Coleman (concussion), C
J.C. Tretter (shoulder, knee); LIMITED: WR Kenny Britt
(knee), RB Isaiah Crowell (shoulder), QB DeShone Kizer
(ribs); FULL: RB Duke Johnson (shoulder), DT Larry
Ogunjobi (groin), TE Randall Telfer (eye, knee).
MONDAY, NOV. 27
Houston at Baltimore, 8:30
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS AT NEW YORK GIANTS
Chiefs: DNP: DE Allen Bailey (knee), LB Dee Ford (back),
LB Tamba Hali (knee), WR Albert Wilson (hamstring);
FULL: TE Demetrius Harris (shoulder), DT Bennie Logan
(knee), C Mitch Morse (foot). Giants: DNP: LB B.J.
Goodson (ankle), DT Damon Harrison (ankle), G Justin
Pugh (back), LB Kelvin Sheppard (groin); LIMITED: CB
Donte Deayon (ankle), G D.J. Fluker (knee), LB Devon
Kennard (quadricep), LB Calvin Munson (quadricep), DE
Jason Pierre-Paul (knee), DT Dalvin Tomlinson (ankle).
NCAA
TUESDAY‘S RESULTS
MIDWEST
at Akron 37, Ohio 34
Cent. Michigan 42, at Kent St. 23
WEDNESDAY‘S RESULTS
LOS ANGELES RAMS AT MINNESOTA VIKINGS
MIDWEST
E. Michigan 27, at Miami (Ohio) 24
at N. Illinois 35, W. Michigan 31
Toledo 66, at Bowling Green 37
Rams: Practice Not Complete. Vikings: DNP: S Andrew
Sendejo (groin, hamstring); LIMITED: DE Everson Griffen (foot), S Anthony Harris (hamstring), T Mike
Remmers (concussion), G Jeremiah Sirles (knee); FULL:
DE Stephen Weatherly (knee).
THURSDAY‘S GAMES
SOUTH
Tennessee St. (6-4) at Jacksonville St. (9-1), 7
Nicholls (8-2) at SE Louisiana (5-5), 7
Tulsa (2-8) at South Florida (8-1), 7:30
MIDWEST
Buffalo (4-6) at Ball St. (2-8), 7
SOUTHWEST
Prairie View (4-5) at Incarnate Word (1-9), 7
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS
AT OAKLAND RAIDERS
Patriots: Practice Not Complete. Raiders: Practice Not
Complete.
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS AT MIAMI DOLPHINS
Buccaneers: DNP: DE William Gholston (neck), CB
Vernon Hargreaves (hamstring), QB Jameis Winston
(right shoulder); LIMITED: DE Robert Ayers (ankle, calf),
T Demar Dotson (hamstring), DT Gerald McCoy (shoulder, back), T Donovan Smith (knee), G J.R. Sweezy
(knee); FULL: CB Robert McClain (hamstring). Dolphins:
DNP: DE William Hayes (knee), RB Senorise Perry
(knee), DT Ndamukong Suh (knee); LIMITED: WR Jarvis
Landry (chest), CB Bobby McCain (hamstring), S Michael
Thomas (knee). FULL: G Jermon Bushrod (shoulder), LB
Mike Hull (shoulder, ankle), S Reshad Jones (groin,
shoulder).
FRIDAY‘S GAMES
SOUTH
Middle Tennessee (5-5) at W. Kentucky (5-5), 8
FAR WEST
UNLV (4-6) at New Mexico (3-7), 9:30
B A SE B A LL
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES AT DALLAS COWBOYS
2017 NL Cy Young voting
Total points on a 7-4-3-2-1 basis
Player.......................................1st 2nd
Max Scherzer, Nationals.......... 27 3
Clayton Kershaw, Dodgers......... 3 25
Stephen Strasburg, Nationals ....- 1
Zack Greinke, Diamondbacks ......- 1
Kenley Jansen, Dodgers ..............- Gio Gonzalez, Nationals ..............- Robbie Ray, Diamondbacks.........- Jacob deGrom, Mets ...................- Jimmy Nelson, Brewers ..............- Alex Wood, Dodgers....................- -
3rd
1
23
3
2
1
-
4th 5th
- 1 3 2
15 9
5 6
5 5
1 4
- 2
- 1
- 1
Tot
201
126
81
52
22
18
6
2
1
1
Eagles: FULL: CB Ronald Darby (ankle), TE Zach Ertz
(hamstring), S Jaylen Watkins (hamstring). Cowboys:
DNP: K Dan Bailey (right groin), WR Dez Bryant (knee), S
Jeff Heath (concussion), LB Sean Lee (hamstring), T
Tyron Smith (back, groin); LIMITED: DT Maliek Collins
(foot), TE Geoff Swaim (knee); FULL: CB Chidobe
Awuzie (hamstring).
ATP
At O2 Arena; In London
Purse: $8 million (Tour Final)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
2017 AL Cy Young voting
3rd 4th 5th
- - - - 20 6 1
1 16 8
3 6 11
6 2 5
- - 3
- - 2
Tot
204
126
73
43
32
27
3
2
THREE-TIME CY YOUNG WINNERS
SEVEN
Roger Clemens, Boston, 1986-87, 1991; Toronto 199798; N.Y. Yankees 2001; Houston, 2004.
FIVE
Randy Johnson, Seattle 1995; Arizona 1999-2002.
FOUR
Steve Carlton, Philadelphia, 1972, 1977, 1980, 1982.
Greg Maddux, Chicago Cubs, 1992; Atlanta, 1993-95.
THREE
Sandy Koufax, L.A. Dodgers, 1963, 1965-66.
Tom Seaver, N.Y. Mets, 1969, 1973, 1975.
Jim Palmer, Baltimore, 1973, 1975-76.
Pedro Martinez, Montreal, 1997; Boston 1999-2000.
Clayton Kershaw, L.A Dodgers, 2011, 2013-14.
Max Scherzer, Detroit, 2013; Washington 2016-17.
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................11
San Antonio .................................9
New Orleans ................................8
Memphis ......................................7
Dallas ...........................................2
L
4
6
7
7
13
Pct
.733
.600
.533
.500
.133
GB
—
2
3
31/2
9
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota....................................9
Portland .......................................8
Denver..........................................8
Oklahoma City .............................7
Utah .............................................6
L
5
6
6
7
9
Pct
.643
.571
.571
.500
.400
GB
—
1
1
2
31/2
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................11
x-L.A. Lakers................................6
L.A. Clippers.................................5
Phoenix ........................................5
Sacramento .................................3
L
3
8
8
10
11
Pct
.786
.429
.385
.333
.214
GB
—
5
51/2
61/2
8
x-Late game
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Boston 109, at Brooklyn 102
Toronto 129, at Houston 113
San Antonio 97, at Dallas 91
ROUND ROBIN — SINGLES
GROUP PETE SAMPRAS
Grigor Dimitrov (6), Bulgaria, def. David Goffin (7),
Belgium, 6-0, 6-2; Dominic Thiem (4), Austria, def. Pablo
Carreno Busta, Spain, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4; Standings: Dimitrov
2-0 (sets 4-1, games 30-17), Thiem 1-1 (3-3, 30-31),
Goffin 1-1 (2-3, 21-29), Pablo Carreno Busta, Spain 0-1
(1-2, 13-15), x-Nadal 0-1 (1-2, 17-19).
GROUP BORIS BECKER
Standings: Roger Federer 2-0 (4-1, 31-24), Alexander
Zverev 1-1 (3-3, 29-32), Jack Sock 1-1 (2-3, 28-28),
Marin Cilic 0-2 (2-4, 29-33); x-injured.
DOUBLES
GROUP WOODBRIDGE-WOODFORDE
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, and Marcelo Melo (1), Brazil, def.
Bob and Mike Bryan (5), United States, 6-4, 6-3; Jamie
Murray, Britain, and Bruno Soares (4), Brazil, def. Ivan
Dodig, Croatia, and Marcel Granollers (7), Spain, 6-1, 6-1;
Standings: Kubot-Melo 2-0 (4-0, 25-17), B.Bryan-M.Bryan 1-1 (2-3, 21-24), Murray-Soares 1-1 (3-2, 24-16),
Dodig-Granollers 0-2 (0-4, 12-25).
GROUP ELTINGH-HAARHUIS
Standings: Ryan Harrison-Michael Venus 2-0 (4-1,
26-21), Henri Kontinen-John Peers 1-1 (2-2, 24-25),
Pierre-Hugues Herbert-Nicolas Mahut 1-1 (3-3, 20-25),
Jean-Julien Rojer-Horia Tecau 0-2 (1-4, 24-23).
19 — 101
29 — 106
UTAH: Ingles 4-4 2-2 13, Jerebko 3-9 0-0 9, Favors 3-11
0-0 6, Rubio 4-10 4-4 13, Mitchell 8-17 0-0 19, O’Neale
0-0 0-0 0, Sefolosha 1-3 2-2 5, Udoh 0-1 0-0 0, Burks 1-4
4-4 6, Hood 10-20 4-5 30. Totals 34-79 16-17 101.
NEW YORK: Hardaway Jr. 7-15 9-10 26, Porzingis 8-19
5-6 22, Kanter 6-7 1-1 13, Lee 6-15 4-4 19, Jack 3-5 0-0 7,
McDermott 2-6 0-0 5, Thomas 1-3 1-2 3, O’Quinn 2-3 0-0
4, Ntilikina 3-8 1-2 7. Totals 38-81 21-25 106.
Three-point Goals: Utah 17-35 (Hood 6-12, Ingles 3-3,
Mitchell 3-6, Jerebko 3-7, Sefolosha 1-2, Rubio 1-4,
Burks 0-1), New York 9-21 (Lee 3-5, Hardaway Jr. 3-6,
Jack 1-1, McDermott 1-4, Porzingis 1-4, Ntilikina 0-1).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Utah 37 (Favors 10), New
York 45 (Porzingis 8). Assists: Utah 19 (Favors 5), New
York 18 (Hardaway Jr. 6). Total Fouls: Utah 23, New York
19. A: 18,695 (19,812).
Thunder 92, Bulls 79
CHICAGO .............................. 7
OKLAHOMA CITY ............... 27
27
31
22
19
23 — 79
15 — 92
CHICAGO: Pondexter 0-4 4-6 4, Markkanen 6-13 1-1 16,
Lopez 2-6 2-2 6, Jeri.Grant 1-5 4-4 6, Dunn 1-11 0-0 3,
Zipser 1-4 0-0 2, Felicio 3-3 2-2 8, Portis 2-8 0-0 5,
Blakeney 5-12 3-5 16, Valentine 5-9 0-0 13. Totals 26-75
16-20 79.
OKLAHOMA CITY: George 4-15 3-4 13, Anthony 3-10
11-12 18, Johnson 1-3 3-4 5, Westbrook 6-13 7-7 21,
Roberson 2-2 0-0 4, Huestis 1-5 0-0 2, Jera.Grant 5-9 5-6
15, Patterson 1-3 2-2 5, Felton 2-6 0-0 5, Abrines 1-5 1-2
4, Hamilton 0-1 0-0 0, Ferguson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 26-72
32-37 92.
Three-point Goals: Chicago 11-29 (Blakeney 3-6, Markkanen 3-6, Valentine 3-6, Dunn 1-3, Portis 1-3, Jeri.Grant
0-1, Zipser 0-1, Lopez 0-1, Pondexter 0-2), Oklahoma
City 8-30 (Westbrook 2-5, George 2-8, Anthony 1-2,
Felton 1-3, Patterson 1-3, Abrines 1-5, Huestis 0-2,
Jera.Grant 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Chicago 38
(Portis 9), Oklahoma City 48 (Jera.Grant, Anthony 11).
Assists: Chicago 16 (Jeri.Grant, Dunn 3), Oklahoma City
15 (Westbrook 7). Total Fouls: Chicago 27, Oklahoma
City 19. A: 18,203 (18,203).
DETROIT ............................. 23
MILWAUKEE ...................... 26
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Washington 102, at Miami 93
at Atlanta 126, Sacramento 80
at New York 106, Utah 101
at Oklahoma City 92, Chicago 79
Cleveland 115, at Charlotte 107
at Milwaukee 99, Detroit 95
Indiana 116, at Memphis 113
at Minnesota 98, San Antonio 86
Toronto 125, at New Orleans 116
at Portland 99, Orlando 94
Philadelphia at L.A. Lakers, Late
18
15
21
34
33 — 95
24 — 99
DETROIT: Johnson 1-2 0-0 2, Harris 4-11 3-3 13,
Drummond 4-9 5-8 13, Jackson 2-7 2-2 6, Bradley 8-18
6-6 28, Bullock 0-0 0-0 0, Moreland 0-2 0-0 0, Tolliver 3-8
1-1 9, Smith 2-11 0-0 4, Galloway 2-10 3-3 9, Kennard 4-7
0-0 11. Totals 30-85 20-23 95.
MILWAUKEE: Middleton 12-21 0-0 27, Antetokounmpo
8-16 5-6 21, Henson 5-9 0-4 10, Bledsoe 4-12 5-5 14, Snell
4-7 3-3 13, Wilson 0-0 0-0 0, Maker 1-2 0-0 2, Brogdon 4-9
2-2 12, Liggins 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 38-78 15-20 99.
Three-point Goals: Detroit 15-37 (Bradley 6-10, Kennard
3-4, Harris 2-4, Galloway 2-7, Tolliver 2-7, Johnson 0-1,
Smith 0-2, Jackson 0-2), Milwaukee 8-22 (Middleton
3-7, Brogdon 2-3, Snell 2-4, Bledsoe 1-4, Antetokounmpo
0-1, Maker 0-1, Liggins 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 45 (Drummond 17), Milwaukee 43
(Henson 10). Assists: Detroit 23 (Bradley 5), Milwaukee
24 (Middleton, Bledsoe 8). Total Fouls: Detroit 20,
Milwaukee 19. Technicals: Smith. A: 14,594 (18,717).
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Golden State at Boston, 8
Houston at Phoenix, 10:30
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Miami at Washington, 7
Detroit at Indiana, 7
L.A. Clippers at Cleveland, 7:30
New York at Toronto, 7:30
Utah at Brooklyn, 7:30
Charlotte at Chicago, 8
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 8
Minnesota at Dallas, 8:30
Portland at Sacramento, 10
New Orleans at Denver, 10:30
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
Pacers 116, Grizzlies 113
INDIANA ............................. 34
MEMPHIS ........................... 25
33
28
30
31
19 — 116
29 — 113
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 6-9 0-0 16, T.Young 2-8 1-2 5,
Turner 4-8 2-2 10, Collison 8-13 12-12 30, Oladipo 8-20
2-2 21, Leaf 1-1 0-0 3, Sabonis 6-10 1-1 13, Joseph 4-10
0-1 10, Stephenson 4-6 0-0 8, J.Young 0-0 0-0 0. Totals
43-85 18-20 116.
SATURDAY’S GAMES
MEMPHIS: Ennis III 1-2 0-0 2, Green 3-4 1-1 8, Gasol
12-24 8-9 35, Chalmers 4-9 0-0 8, Brooks 5-9 1-2 11,
Parsons 5-7 0-1 13, Wright 2-3 0-0 4, Evans 6-15 5-7 18,
Selden 0-1 2-2 2, McLemore 5-10 0-0 10. Totals 43-84
17-22 113.
L.A. Clippers at Charlotte, 7
Utah at Orlando, 7
Boston at Atlanta, 7:30
Golden State at Philadelphia, 7:30
Houston at Memphis, 8
Milwaukee at Dallas, 9
Sacramento at Portland, 10
Three-point Goals: Indiana 12-24 (Bogdanovic 4-6, Oladipo 3-7, Joseph 2-3, Collison 2-4, Leaf 1-1, T.Young 0-1,
Turner 0-2), Memphis 8-30 (Parsons 3-5, Gasol 3-7,
Green 1-2, Evans 1-5, Selden 0-1, Brooks 0-2, Chalmers
0-4, McLemore 0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Indiana 36 (Stephenson 7), Memphis 43 (Gasol 13).
Assists: Indiana 27 (Collison 7), Memphis 28 (Evans 9).
Total Fouls: Indiana 17, Memphis 19. Technicals: Stephenson, McLemore. A: 16,033 (18,119).
Hawks 126, Kings 80
SACRAMENTO ................... 16
ATLANTA ........................... 24
22
27
Bucks 99, Pistons 95
19
40
26
28
19 — 80
34 — 126
SACRAMENTO: Bogdanovic 3-8 0-0 7, Randolph 7-11 2-3
16, Cauley-Stein 2-6 2-2 6, Hill 4-11 3-3 12, Temple 1-7
0-0 3, Jackson 3-12 0-2 8, Labissiere 3-5 0-0 6, Koufos 3-3
1-4 7, Papagiannis 2-4 0-0 4, Fox 1-4 0-0 2, Mason 0-2 2-2
2, Richardson 0-7 1-2 1, Hield 2-8 1-2 6. Totals 31-88
12-20 80.
ATLANTA: Prince 5-8 1-2 14, Babbitt 5-7 0-0 13, Dedmon
9-10 1-3 20, Schroder 8-12 3-4 21, Bazemore 3-6 2-2 8,
Collins 7-9 0-0 14, Ilyasova 0-4 1-2 1, Cavanaugh 1-2 0-0
3, Delaney 4-7 0-0 10, Taylor 4-6 1-2 12, Belinelli 4-8 1-1
10. Totals 50-79 10-16 126.
Three-point Goals: Sacramento 6-28 (Jackson 2-7, Temple 1-3, Bogdanovic 1-4, Hield 1-4, Hill 1-5, Mason 0-1,
Richardson 0-2, Randolph 0-2), Atlanta 16-32 (Taylor
3-4, Babbitt 3-4, Prince 3-5, Delaney 2-4, Schroder 2-4,
Dedmon 1-1, Cavanaugh 1-2, Belinelli 1-4, Ilyasova 0-1,
Bazemore 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 29 (Randolph, Koufos, Jackson 4), Atlanta 53 (Dedmon 14). Assists: Sacramento 18 (Cauley-Stein, Temple
3), Atlanta 40 (Schroder, Prince 8). Total Fouls: Sacramento 19, Atlanta 23. A: 13,860 (19,049).
Cavaliers 115, Hornets 107
CLEVELAND ....................... 36
CHARLOTTE ....................... 30
25
37
27
17
27 — 115
23 — 107
CLEVELAND: James 12-24 3-3 31, Crowder 1-6 2-2 5,
Love 9-16 3-3 22, Shumpert 2-8 2-3 7, Smith 4-9 0-0 10,
Green 5-8 3-4 13, Frye 4-8 0-0 9, Korver 3-10 2-2 11,
Wade 2-8 3-3 7. Totals 42-97 18-20 115.
CHARLOTTE: Kidd-Gilchrist 10-14 2-2 22, Williams 3-7
2-2 9, Howard 3-5 2-6 8, Walker 7-17 3-6 20, Batum 7-15
1-2 18, Kaminsky 3-7 1-1 7, Zeller 2-5 3-4 7, Monk 2-5 0-0
5, Bacon 0-2 0-0 0, Lamb 4-9 5-5 13. Totals 41-86 19-28
107.
Three-point Goals: Cleveland 13-38 (James 4-7, Korver
3-10, Smith 2-6, Love 1-3, Crowder 1-3, Frye 1-4,
Shumpert 1-5), Charlotte 6-26 (Walker 3-9, Williams
1-3, Monk 1-3, Batum 1-6, Kaminsky 0-1, Bacon 0-1,
Lamb 0-3). Fouled Out: Howard. Rebounds: Cleveland 51
(Love 10), Charlotte 42 (Kaminsky, Kidd-Gilchrist 6).
Assists: Cleveland 25 (James 8), Charlotte 21 (Walker
8). Total Fouls: Cleveland 24, Charlotte 19. A: 19,427
(19,077).
NCAA men
NHL
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
EAST
BYU 65, Princeton 56
Georgetown 102, Mount St. Mary’s 68
Mass.-Lowell 76, Marist 73
Penn 66, Navy 45
Penn St. 70, Montana 57
Pittsburgh 70, UC Santa Barbara 62
Salisbury 94, Washington (Md.) 62
Seton Hall 84, Indiana 68
St. Bonaventure at Md.-Eastern Shore, ccd.
West Virginia 98, American U. 64
SOUTH
Maryland 79, Butler 65
North Carolina 93, Bucknell 81
Radford 73, East Carolina 66
South Florida 74, Stetson 72
UCF 68, Gardner-Webb 65
W. Carolina 76, Hiwassee 57
W. Kentucky 83, Kentucky Wesleyan 53
William & Mary 83, Hampton 76
MIDWEST
Minnesota 107, Niagara 81
Missouri St. 86, Southern U. 58
N. Iowa 72, Wartburg 43
Valparaiso 94, SIU-Edwardsville 69
W. Illinois 56, E. Illinois 54
SOUTHWEST
Oklahoma 168, Ball St. 69
SMU 81, Northwestern St. 35
TCU 76, South Dakota 71
UTSA 79, Texas St. 78
METROPOLITAN
W
New Jersey ................... 11
Columbus ...................... 11
Pittsburgh ..................... 10
Washington .................. 10
N.Y. Islanders ................. 9
N.Y. Rangers ................... 9
Carolina ........................... 7
Philadelphia .................... 8
L
4
7
7
8
6
8
5
8
OL PTS.
2
24
1
23
3
23
1
21
2
20
2
20
4
18
2
18
GF
61
57
55
56
60
63
46
50
GA
54
51
72
59
55
65
44
48
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 14
Toronto ......................... 12
Ottawa ............................ 8
Detroit ............................ 9
Montreal ......................... 8
x-Boston ......................... 6
Florida ............................. 6
Buffalo ............................ 5
L
2
7
3
8
9
6
9
9
OL PTS.
2
30
0
24
5
21
2
20
2
18
4
16
2
14
4
14
GF
71
72
59
57
47
44
57
44
GA
46
63
53
53
63
51
65
65
CENTRAL
W
St. Louis ........................ 13
Winnipeg ...................... 10
Nashville ....................... 10
Chicago ........................... 9
Dallas .............................. 9
Minnesota ....................... 8
Colorado .......................... 8
L
5
4
5
8
8
7
7
OL PTS.
1
27
3
23
2
22
2
20
1
19
2
18
1
17
GF
62
56
51
59
51
49
54
GA
51
47
49
52
52
44
55
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................. 11
Vegas ............................ 10
San Jose ........................ 10
Calgary .......................... 10
Vancouver ....................... 9
x-Anaheim ...................... 7
Edmonton ....................... 7
Arizona ........................... 2
L
5
6
6
8
7
7
9
15
OL PTS.
2
24
1
21
0
20
0
20
2
20
3
17
2
16
3
7
GF
57
59
44
53
46
48
46
46
GA
44
54
36
58
48
50
54
79
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Maryland 79, Butler 65
Butler (2-1)
Martin 5-15 0-0 12, Wideman 3-5 0-0 6, Baldwin 6-22 1-1
15, Jorgensen 1-5 0-0 2, McDermott 5-10 4-4 17, Brunk
0-0 0-0 0, Fowler 1-3 0-0 3, Thompson 1-5 4-4 6,
Gillens-Butler 0-0 0-0 0, Baddley 1-3 2-2 4. 23-68 Totals
11-11 65.
x-Late game
Maryland (3-0)
Jackson 2-4 0-2 4, Cekovsky 3-3 3-4 9, Wiley 4-7 0-0 11,
Huerter 3-9 1-2 9, Cowan 5-8 12-15 25, Bender 0-0 0-0 0,
Fernando 4-5 0-0 8, Morsell 6-10 0-0 13, Nickens 0-1 0-0
0. Totals 27-47 16-23 79.
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
at Nashville 6, Washington 3
at Pittsburgh 5, Buffalo 4 (OT)
at Florida 4, Dallas 3 (SO)
Columbus 2, at Montreal 1 (OT)
at Minnesota 3, Philadelphia 0
at Winnipeg 4, Arizona 1
at Edmonton 8, Vegas 2
Vancouver 3, at Los Angeles 2
Halftime: Maryland 42-35. Three-point goals: Butler
8-25 (McDermott 3-7, Baldwin 2-6, Martin 2-6, Fowler
1-3, Baddley 0-1, Jorgensen 0-2), Maryland 9-21 (Wiley
3-5, Cowan 3-6, Huerter 2-6, Morsell 1-2, Jackson 0-1,
Nickens 0-1). Fouled out: Huerter, Baldwin. Rebounds:
Butler 23 (Martin 6), Maryland 38 (Cowan 10). Assists:
Butler 9 (Thompson 5), Maryland 15 (Cowan 6). Total
fouls: Butler 17, Maryland 17.
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
at Detroit 8, Calgary 2
at Chicago 6, N.Y. Rangers 3
Boston at Anaheim, Late
Georgetown 102,
Mount St. Mary's 68
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Colorado, 9
New Jersey at Toronto, 7
Carolina at N.Y. Islanders, 7
Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 7:30
Dallas at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Arizona at Montreal, 7:30
Philadelphia at Winnipeg, 8
Nashville at Minnesota, 8
St. Louis at Edmonton, 9
Vegas at Vancouver, 10
Florida at San Jose, 10:30
Boston at Los Angeles, 10:30
Mount St. Mary's (0-3)
Planutis 0-0 0-0 0, Gomes 5-6 2-6 12, Carey 6-15 0-0 14,
Robinson 9-19 7-7 26, Antonio 2-15 0-0 6, Vukelich 0-2
0-0 0, Young 0-0 0-2 0, Stallings 0-1 1-2 1, Habwe 0-1 0-0
0, Leftwich 0-0 0-0 0, Alexander 3-6 0-0 9. 25-65 Totals
10-17 68.
Georgetown (2-0)
Derrickson 3-6 2-2 9, Govan 7-9 3-3 20, Blair 8-15 1-1 19,
Mulmore 2-2 0-0 5, Johnson 5-8 3-4 14, Walker 1-4 0-0 2,
Pickett 5-14 2-2 14, Muresan 0-0 0-0 0, Sodom 2-3 0-0 4,
Hines 0-0 0-0 0, Mosely 6-7 2-3 15. Totals 39-68 13-15
102.
Halftime: Georgetown 54-36. Three-point goals: Mount
St. Mary’s 8-33 (Alexander 3-6, Carey 2-7, Antonio 2-12,
Robinson 1-6, Vukelich 0-1, Habwe 0-1), Georgetown
11-22 (Govan 3-3, Blair 2-5, Pickett 2-5, Mulmore 1-1,
Mosely 1-1, Johnson 1-3, Derrickson 1-3, Walker 0-1).
Fouled out: Sodom. Rebounds: Mount St. Mary’s 21
(Antonio 5), Georgetown 51 (Govan 14). Assists: Mount
St. Mary’s 14 (Carey 6), Georgetown 25 (Blair, Mosely
5). Total fouls: Mount St. Mary’s 17, Georgetown 17. A:
5,064 (20,356).
FRIDAY’S GAMES
N.Y. Rangers at Columbus, 7
Buffalo at Detroit, 7:30
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Minnesota at Washington, 7:30
Calgary at Philadelphia, 1
Arizona at Ottawa, 2
Edmonton at Dallas, 2
New Jersey at Winnipeg, 3
Florida at Los Angeles, 4
Carolina at Buffalo, 7
Toronto at Montreal, 7
N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 7
Chicago at Pittsburgh, 7
Colorado at Nashville, 8
St. Louis at Vancouver, 10
Boston at San Jose, 10:30
No. 24 West Virginia 98,
American U. 64
American U. (0-2)
Iorio 2-3 4-4 9, Little 1-4 0-0 2, Diallo 2-4 0-0 6, Nelson
5-12 6-8 17, Motuzis 6-9 0-1 15, LaMont 1-4 0-0 3,
Macarchuk 1-2 0-2 2, Cimino 1-2 0-0 2, Brown 0-1 0-0 0,
Washington 0-2 3-4 3, Bragg 2-3 0-1 5. 21-46 Totals
13-20 64.
West Virginia (1-1)
West 1-4 10-13 12, Harris 3-8 2-4 8, Bender 1-3 0-0 2,
Miles 7-12 5-7 20, Carter 7-15 6-7 20, Hunter 0-1 0-0 0,
Routt 3-4 0-0 6, Allen 5-9 3-4 14, Bolden 5-7 3-4 16,
Harler 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-63 29-39 98.
Red Wings 8, Flames 2
CALGARY ................................. 1
DETROIT .................................. 4
Halftime: West Virginia 44-33. Three-point goals: American U. 9-25 (Motuzis 3-5, Diallo 2-4, Iorio 1-1, Bragg 1-2,
LaMont 1-4, Nelson 1-4, Brown 0-1, Cimino 0-1, Little
0-1, Washington 0-2), West Virginia 5-16 (Bolden 3-5,
Miles 1-2, Allen 1-3, West 0-1, Harris 0-1, Carter 0-4).
Fouled out: Little. Rebounds: American U. 24 (Diallo 6),
West Virginia 35 (Harris 8). Assists: American U. 13
(Nelson 6), West Virginia 17 (Carter 7). Total fouls:
American U. 23, West Virginia 20. A: 9,180 (14,000).
1
2
0 —
2 —
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Detroit, Athanasiou 3, 5:35. 2, Detroit,
Nyquist 6 (Mantha, Zetterberg), 7:25. 3, Calgary, Ferland
8 (Brodie, Gaudreau), 8:37 (pp). 4, Detroit, Mantha 9
(Green, Athanasiou), 15:44 (pp). 5, Detroit, Larkin 3,
17:17 (sh).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Detroit, Mantha 10 (Green, Nielsen), 4:27
(pp). 7, Calgary, Gaudreau 8 (Ferland, Hamilton), 12:34.
8, Detroit, Abdelkader 3 (Larkin), 19:16.
HI GH S C HOOLS
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 9, Detroit, Athanasiou 4 (Green, Larkin), 16:10
(pp). 10, Detroit, Glendening 4 (Booth, Jensen), 18:37
(pp).
GIRLS' SOCCER
MARYLAND
River Hill 3, Hereford 0
SHOTS ON GOAL
BOYS' SOCCER
CALGARY ............................... 11
10
7 — 28
DETROIT ................................ 12
8
7 — 27
Power-play opportunities: Calgary 1 of 5; Detroit 4 of 6.
Goalies: Calgary, Gillies 0-0-0 (11 shots-9 saves), Lack
1-1-0 (15-10). Detroit, Howard 6-5-1 (28-26).
MARYLAND
Eastern Tech 2, River Hill 0
TORONTO ........................... 29
NEW ORLEANS .................. 34
35
29
34
23
27 — 125
30 — 116
TORONTO: Anunoby 2-3 0-0 5, Ibaka 4-7 2-2 12,
Valanciunas 6-8 9-9 21, Lowry 6-12 6-6 22, DeRozan
11-18 1-1 25, McKinnie 0-0 0-0 0, Miles 6-11 0-0 17,
Siakam 5-9 0-0 10, Nogueira 0-0 0-0 0, Poeltl 1-2 1-2 3,
VanVleet 4-6 0-0 10, Wright 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 45-76
19-20 125.
NEW ORLEANS: Cunningham 4-8 1-1 10, Davis 8-15 2-2
19, Cousins 9-19 4-4 25, Rondo 2-4 0-0 4, Holiday 8-15 2-2
18, D.Miller 4-5 3-3 13, Diallo 4-7 0-0 8, Nelson 3-6 0-0 7,
Moore 4-12 0-0 10, Cooke 0-0 0-0 0, Jones 0-0 2-2 2.
Totals 46-91 14-14 116.
Blazers 99, Magic 94
ORLANDO ........................... 33
PORTLAND ......................... 24
14
27
24
24
23 — 94
24 — 99
ORLANDO: Fournier 8-17 4-4 22, Gordon 4-10 2-2 12,
Vucevic 5-11 0-0 11, Payton 6-11 0-0 14, Ross 2-5 0-0 5,
Speights 4-7 0-0 10, Biyombo 0-1 0-0 0, Mack 2-5 0-0 4,
Hezonja 0-1 0-0 0, Simmons 6-11 3-3 16. Totals 37-79 9-9
94.
PORTLAND: Harkless 3-4 0-0 6, Swanigan 0-0 0-2 0,
Nurkic 5-15 1-1 11, Lillard 9-21 3-4 26, McCollum 8-16
4-4 24, Davis 1-1 0-0 2, Vonleh 2-6 0-0 4, Napier 7-12 0-0
19, Connaughton 1-3 0-0 2, Turner 2-9 1-2 5. Totals 38-87
9-13 99.
Three-point Goals: Orlando 11-29 (Payton 2-3, Speights
2-4, Gordon 2-6, Fournier 2-6, Simmons 1-1, Ross 1-3,
Vucevic 1-4, Hezonja 0-1, Mack 0-1), Portland 14-27
(Napier 5-5, Lillard 5-10, McCollum 4-7, Nurkic 0-1,
Connaughton 0-2, Turner 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 41 (Vucevic 10), Portland 41 (Lillard
11). Assists: Orlando 19 (Payton, Vucevic 5), Portland 21
(Lillard 7). Total Fouls: Orlando 16, Portland 10. Technicals: Fournier, McCollum. A: 19,206 (19,393).
NCAA women
Field hockey
Blackhawks 6, Rangers 3
Westfield allowed a goal for the first time since Sept. 25
in its 2-1 Virginia Class 6 state title win over First
Colonial. . . . St. John's players Clara Morrison and Beth
Cornelius were named to the Washington Catholic
Athletic Conference offensive first team. . . . Chesapeake outscored opponents 13-2 through its four playoff
games en route to its second straight Maryland 3A state
title. . . . St. Stephen's/St. Agnes’s season came to an
end in the Virginia Independent Schools Athletic Association semifinals with a 1-0 loss to Trinity Episcopal
School. . . . Darcy Clement and Caroline Kerr scored
first-half goals to push South River to its second
straight Maryland 4A state championship. . . . Despite
returning only four starters from last season, Glenelg
won its first state title since 2012.
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 1
CHICAGO .................................. 0
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
Westfield
St. John's
Chesapeake
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes
South River
Glenelg
W.T. Woodson
Spalding
Good Counsel
Patuxent
0
1
2 —
5 —
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Rangers, Zibanejad 9 (Kreider, Buchnevich), 9:58.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Chicago, DeBrincat 7 (Panik, Keith), 19:08.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Chicago, Anisimov 7 (Schmaltz, Kane), 1:07.
4, Chicago, Hayden 2 (Franson, Keith), 1:53. 5, Chicago,
Anisimov 8 (Schmaltz, Franson), 5:14 (pp). 6, N.Y.
Rangers, Hayes 4 (Zuccarello, Nash), 7:08. 7, N.Y.
Rangers, Nash 7, 11:56. 8, Chicago, Anisimov 9 (Panik,
Schmaltz), 16:12. 9, Chicago, Toews 5 (Seabrook), 18:30.
Record
22-0
15-1
15-4
16-5
13-6
12-4
15-6
10-6-1
12-4
16-1
SHOTS ON GOAL
N.Y. RANGERS ....................... 11
8
9 — 28
CHICAGO .................................. 9
16
18 — 43
Power-play opportunities: N.Y. Rangers 0 of 3; Chicago 1
of 5. Goalies: N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 8-5-2 (34 shots-30
saves), Pavelec 1-3-0 (8-7). Chicago, Crawford 8-7-0
(28-25). A: 21,528 (19,717). T: 2:32.
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Timberwolves 98, Spurs 86
SAN ANTONIO ................... 24
MINNESOTA ...................... 18
19
39
22
18
21 — 86
23 — 98
SAN ANTONIO: Anderson 4-7 0-0 8, Aldridge 5-14 5-5 15,
Gasol 5-9 3-3 13, Mills 4-10 3-3 13, Green 4-8 0-0 11,
Bertans 0-1 0-0 0, Gay 3-8 1-2 7, Lauvergne 3-5 1-2 7,
Murray 1-5 0-0 2, Forbes 3-5 0-0 8, Paul 0-1 0-0 0, Ginobili
1-6 0-0 2. Totals 33-79 13-15 86.
MINNESOTA: Wiggins 4-11 2-4 11, Gibson 3-8 3-4 10,
Towns 10-18 4-6 26, Teague 7-13 0-0 16, Butler 2-13 2-2
6, Muhammad 4-5 0-0 9, Bjelica 5-9 0-0 11, Jones 2-5 0-0
4, Crawford 2-5 0-0 5. Totals 39-87 11-16 98.
Three-point Goals: San Antonio 7-24 (Green 3-6, Forbes
2-2, Mills 2-6, Murray 0-1, Lauvergne 0-1, Aldridge 0-1,
Bertans 0-1, Gasol 0-2, Ginobili 0-2, Gay 0-2), Minnesota
9-18 (Towns 2-2, Teague 2-4, Bjelica 1-2, Muhammad
1-2, Gibson 1-2, Crawford 1-2, Wiggins 1-2, Butler 0-1,
Jones 0-1). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 45
(Aldridge 10), Minnesota 41 (Towns 16). Assists: San
Antonio 20 (Mills 5), Minnesota 27 (Teague 6). Total
Fouls: San Antonio 18, Minnesota 16. Technicals: Minnesota coach Timberwolves (Defensive three second). A:
18,978 (19,356).
EAST
Binghamton 77, Penn 72
Harvard 75, Siena 67
SOUTH
Georgia Tech 86, Kennesaw St. 48
Morgan St. 60, Lincoln (PA) 41
NC State 87, UNC-Asheville 55
Northwestern St. 62, LSU-Shreveport 42
Penn St. 80, Marshall 65
Tennessee 89, James Madison 60
Wake Forest 85, Richmond 81
MIDWEST
Cincinnati 82, SE Louisiana 43
Illinois 66, Chicago St. 56
Illinois St. 49, N. Kentucky 37
Iowa 105, N. Illinois 80
Kansas 72, Texas Southern 37
Ohio St. 99, Idaho 56
Purdue 75, Miami (Ohio) 66
W. Michigan 65, Loyola of Chicago 47
SOUTHWEST
Texas 100, McNeese St. 34
Texas Tech 82, Florida A&M 63
Tulsa 74, UALR 61
FAR WEST
Arizona St. 81, Fresno St. 49
THE TOP 10
Canucks 3, Kings 2
Volleyball
Late Tuesday
Flint Hill completed its perfect season with a VISAA
Division 1 title. . . . Despite a rash of injuries, Northwest
won the Maryland 4A West region and will face Sherwood
in the state semifinals. . . . Loudoun County lost in five
sets to Millbrook in the Virginia 4A Region C championship game but won the rematch to earn a spot in the state
final. . . . The undefeated run continues for Arundel,
which will face Eleanor Roosevelt in the Maryland 4A
semifinals. . . . Atholton lost to Northern in the Maryland
3A semifinals. . . . Middleburg Academy lost to Peninsula
Catholic in the VISAA Division 2 final.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
Flint Hill
Northwest
Loudoun County
Arundel
Langley
Atholton
Middleburg
Holy Cross
Stone Bridge
Patriot
VANCOUVER ........................... 0
LOS ANGELES .......................... 2
2
0
1 —
0 —
35
Sailboats
2003 Homebuilt Sailboat 13' 4 spirit
sail and oars. storage paid through
04/18 on Potomac river MD. W/ trailer, very good condition $3,300 OBO
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1-800-753-POST SF
1408
Antiques & Classics
Triumph 1976 TR-6 Rare magenta,
Black interior, 91K miles, Heritage
cert, receipts back to new!! Body off
resto w/pics. Well sorted w/extensive upgrades. Bal. & b.p. engine,
rebuilt tran and rear end. Hi tech
shocks, sways, brakes, tires like new.
Elegant and fast. Driven reg, $45k
invst. $26,000 OBO. For details (540)
280-6606 Weyers Cave, Va. Near
Harrisonburg.
1447
Autos Wanted
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
donation helps local families with
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
Tax deductible. MVA License
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
1447
Autos Wanted
LOOKING TO BUY AN OLD FOREIGN
PROJECT CAR - In any condition,
running or not. Porsche, Jaguar,
Mercedes, Rolls-Royce, Ferrari,
and much more! Fast & easy
transaction, cash on the spot.
If you have any of these or any
other old cars sitting around,
please call 703-819-2698
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
1475
Commercial &
Specialized Vehicles
2013 INTERNATIONAL SHUTTLE BUS28 passengers. wheelchair access,
78,000 mi $35,000 obo
info@ceepco.com OR 301-931-1600
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1480
3
2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Los Angeles, Pearson 3, 0:23. 2, Los Angeles,
Kopitar 9 (Iafallo, Brown), 3:14 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Vancouver, H.Sedin 2 (Eriksson, Pouliot), 5:10.
4, Vancouver, Horvat 7 (H.Sedin, Boeser), 10:00 (pp).
Record
35-0
17-0
27-3
18-0
25-3
15-2
27-5
29-3
26-2
23-5
AUTOMOTIVE
washingtonpost.com/cars
Aviation, Boats, RVs
Motorcycles Directory
3
6
FIRST PERIOD
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Vancouver, Baertschi 6 (Vanek, Pouliot), 4:07 (pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
VANCOUVER ......................... 11
11
5 — 27
LOS ANGELES ........................ 10
7
15 — 32
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 2 of 3; Los Angeles
1 of 5. Goalies: Vancouver, Nilsson 4-1-0 (32 shots-30
saves). Los Angeles, Quick 9-5-1 (27-24). A: 18,230
(18,230). T: 2:37.
EFGHI
In partnership with
2
8
THE TOP 10
Raptors 125, Pelicans 116
Three-point Goals: Toronto 16-34 (Miles 5-9, Lowry
4-10, VanVleet 2-2, DeRozan 2-4, Ibaka 2-4, Anunoby
1-2, Siakam 0-3), New Orleans 10-27 (Cousins 3-7,
D.Miller 2-2, Moore 2-6, Davis 1-1, Nelson 1-3, Cunningham 1-5, Holiday 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Toronto 37 (Lowry 11), New Orleans 32 (Cousins 9).
Assists: Toronto 27 (Lowry 9), New Orleans 31 (Rondo
8). Total Fouls: Toronto 20, New Orleans 21. Technicals:
Toronto coach Raptors (Delay of game). A: 15,654
(16,867).
TEN N I S
NITTO FINALS
Total points on a 7-4-3-2-1 basis
Player .......................................1st 2nd
Corey Kluber, Indians................ 28 2
Chris Sale, Red Sox ..................... 2 28
Luis Severino, Yankees................- Carlos Carrasco, Indians ..............- Justin Verlander, Tigers/Astros.....- Craig Kimbrel, Red Sox ................- Ervin Santana, Twins...................- Marcus Stroman, Blue Jays.........- -
WESTERN CONFERENCE
30
23
H OC K E Y
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2017
Trucks
1490
Sports Utility Vehicles
CHEVY 2003 S10 Short Cab Pick Up,
Blue, 113,000 miles, good condition.
MD inspected. $3995/obo. Call 202246-9380
NISSAN 2005 PATHFINDER SE offroad, 4x4, loaded, 3 rows of
leather seats, 133k mi, black on
black, $5,200 OBO 301-526-9780
Wake up to
home delivery.
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
washingtonpost.com/
realestate
apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
washingtonpost.com/pets
355
Antiques
Tiffany Lamp, blue and white— $75,
Reston, VA, 703-402-9334
Appliances
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
Garage Sales, VA
Annandale—Epiphany Indoor
Holiday Flea Market! 3410 Woodburn Road, Annandale, VA, 70+
Tables! Something for Everyone!
11/18, 9 am-1pm, 571-212-0058
Vienna (22180)- MOVING SALE furniture, bike 411 Druid Hill Rd
Sat Nov 18 8AM - noon
215
358
Books, Music & Movies
How To Have Your Best Christmas
Ever—$12 "emotional Cinnabon!"
N. Beth. MD 240-246-5405
at 18515 Amidon Ave, Triangle, Va. ,
8:00am, 202-841-1756
360
Collectibles
CASSEROLE DISH—$25
VINTAGE.
GREEN/WHITE.
Alexandria, VA,
703-941-8206
CHRISTMAS VILLAGE—$100 MAKE
OFFER. 4 LARGE CERAMIC HOUSES. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Comic Book & Sports Card
Show—Sat. Nov. 18, 10am-3pm
Annandale Va. Fire House Expo Hall
7128 Columbia Pike 22003
Info: shoffpromotions.com
TEDDY BEAR TEA SET—$25 VINTAGE.
MINIATURE PORCELAIN. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Estate Sales
6797 Father John Ct
McLean, VA
TM SALES
Thurs - Sun, 9-4
Part two! Better than the first!
American antiques, Daum Crystal,
Signs painting and prints, incl
Millard Sheets, hundreds pieces
sterling jewelery, llardros, books,
oriental rugs. For more info see
www.estatesales.net
Reston, VA - 2409 Myrtle Lane
Fri-Sun, 10-3. Full house sale.
www.caringtransitionsnova.com
for pics and details.
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them 610
away. Call 571-830-5871
MOTOROLA RADIO—$25 VINTAGE IN
CABINET.
DOES NOT WORK.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Moving Sale
Triangle—Moving Sale-Sat. 11/18
Dogs for Sale
ACA COCKER SPANIEL PUPPIES ready 11/4, cute, friendly and
playful! vet checked and first shots.
beautiful colors. 814-793-4920
American Bulldog—M/F, Ready for
great family Dec 9th. A great ChristVERSAILLES MEMOIRS—$100 12 vol- mas gift. Great temperament, great
umes.
Collectors take notice! with kids. $500, 301-893-4702
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Bernedoodles—M/F, 8wks,
Vacs/
wormed. Brindle, Bi color, Black/
229
White, Tri color, sure to be show
stoppers, $1200+, 301-639-3808
Clothing, Shoes
& Accessories
GENTLY USED DESIGNER
FASHIONS AND ACCESSORIES FOR
WOMEN AND MEN.
www.iconicdesingerfashions.com
237
Firewood
Seasoned Hardwood 1/2 cord $110,
1 cord $200, 2 cord $380 Free
Delivery Call 703-520-3869
245
Electronics
Therapy Lamp - Popular—34 NatureBright Light and Ion Therapy Lamp
$34, Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
255
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
Acoustic Ceiling Tiles—$440, Winchester, VA, 540-664-3224 Armstrong Acoustical Ceiling Tile. New,
still in boxes. "Fine Fissured" (TM)
tongue + groove. BP 741. 520 sq. ft.
(13 boxes, 40 sq. ft./box). New cost
$900. Price is a bargain.
GLASS BLOCKS—$30
14 GLASS
BLOCKS. EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Brittany - AKC — Male, 6 wks, had 1st
health check & will have 2nd one.
Will make great family & hunting
dog. $900, 215-768-2131.Central VA.
Cavachon — Simply Beautiful
Cavachon puppies. 5yr Health warr
Raised w/ TLC local Virginia Cavachon breeder home. Best of the
Best & VA's Finest, $1250, 703-5771069, 9wk, www.DCDogFinders.com
ENGLISH BULLDOGS, M's, AKC,
Fat, Sassy, Lots of Wrinkles, S
& W, Health Guaranteed, Family
Raised, $1500+, Call or Text For
More Info. rdy 10/14 240-925-1545
F1B Goldendoodles & Labradoodles—
Available just in time for Christmas.
Red, apricot, white, cream &
chocolate colors avail. www.familydoodlesfirst.com 814-207-1061
Giant Schnauzer Pups- show quality
at pet prices, 9 weeks old $900 Mother and father on prem Call Ray 301752-9135
Huskys & more—Puppies On Sale
304-904-6289,Cash,CC,EasyFinance
wvpuppy.com 59 EastRd Martinsburg WV exit16E AcrossFromBigLots
Riding Mower ( 46" )—$185, New
battery, great for leaves.Reston, VA,
703-402-9334
RYOBI BENCH GRINDER—$30 Excellent condition. Alexandria, VA, 703941-8206
260
Furniture
Conference Room Table 8 x 4 feet—
$175.00, Alexandria, VA, 703-8380200
COUCHES - 3 leather couches, good
condition, asking $250 each. Cell
703-973-9623
LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPS- 9
wks, shots, vt chkd, 2 Fs left,
black, AKC reg. $600 each.
Call 540-810-6101
LOOKING TO PURCHASE Yorkshire
Puppy. Any color. Pls call to make
offer. Great Home avail, puppy will
never be alone. NOT A BREEDER.
DC area 202-363-2726
Newfoundland—Puppies.
Gentle
Giants, loving and loyal. Exp. Breeder
30+ yrs $1,500, 757-617-3932
Couch Pair—175.00 Full and 3/4
Couch. seldom used. You haul. Ger- ShihTzu Bichon—TeddyBear ShiChon
mantown, MD, 301-515-9235
Puppy(s) are ready. Local VA In home
breeder Cute puppies.
FAIRFAX CITY, DOWNSIZING - Persian
703-577-1069, $750up, 9wks
carpet, furniture, lots of collectibles,
www.DCDogFinders.com
rare books and fine linens. Items
available 11/15. Call 703-591-6321 SHIH TZU PUPPY - Female, Imperial
(under 10lbs), 11 weeks old, tracking
Large Desk—$200 OBO. L-Shaped all to be 5-6lbs full grown, 1st shots &
wood desk. Pics available. Manas- vet checked. Pet home only. $1500.
sas, VA. Call 571-358-9854
410-458-5883
or
410-876-7527
TV Cabinet—$40.00 Laminate wood 620
grain 34W,21D,39H. Excellent.
Springfield, VA, 703-451-4985
Cats
265
Home & Garden
CHRISTMAS TREE LED—$114 NEW!
700bulbs,7.5ft
colors
change
half/costco price! 301-455-6101
CUTLERY SET—$20 KUCHESTOLZ 6
PC SET W/CUTTING BOARD. NEW.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
DISHES—$60 CUNNINGHAMPICKETT
SPRINGVIOLET 6 PLATES/1 PLATTER
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
SIAMESE KITTENS- Perfect, playful,
loving siamese kittens, 12 weeks,
3 males, 1 female, feal point, born
to attentive parents, soc.with children, wormed & vacc & exam. by
vet. Avail now. $350. Please Call:
703-403-4568 or 703-670-5915
TIGER STAINLESS STEEL THERMAL AIR 622
POT—$25 3.0 LITER HOT/COLD
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
269
Jewelry & Watches
NECKLACES
HANDCRAFTED—$10
UP.
VARIETY STYLES/COLORS
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
275
Merchandise Wanted
4Paws—Adopt fr 30+ cat/
kitten Sat 1-5 $v Fairfax
Petco www.fourpaws.org
703-352-3300 CFC#34517
Event Planning-Rentals — $249,
forestville, MD, 202-670-8593 Party 815
Rentals Call for specials
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
Old Bottles of Bourbon—50 Seeking
full/sealed bottles of vintage bourbon and rye. Alex 443-223-7669
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
280
Musical Instruments
JUNIOR ZITHER—$25 CHILD'S EARLY
60'S HARBERT ITALIANA . ORIG.
BOX Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
PIANO VINTAGE STORY&CLARK—$49
Upright, neutral color,plays well,
free to char. org. 301-455-6101
Office & Business
Equipment
Office Furniture Removed—$195 PU
truck load. (Norm $229) N. Beth,
MD, 240-246-5405 1800junkrefund
291
Sporting Goods
& Services
Child Seats—34 Generic infant or
$44 Graco child car seat(74 both)
Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
295
Toys
TOMY TODDLIN TRAIN—$50 OLD.
RIDE-ON. TOOTS. EXCELL COND.
Alexandria VA 703-941-8206
345
Garage Sales, D.C.
HOLIDAY BAZAAR
Sat. Nov.18, 10- 3
CCUMC, 7001 Conn. Ave.
gifts, books, clothes, household
lunch, photo with Santa
350
Garage Sales, MD
Bethesda—BNS Rummage Sale
6314 Bannockburn Dr,
11/18, 9AM, 301-706-5720
COLLEGE PARK - 5004 CHEYENNE
PLACE Saturday 11/18 1-4PM
power tools, furniture, redskins
items and many more!
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
SHARON CALLICOAT DORFMANN
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
SHERI CALLICOAT DORFMANN
FAMILY LAW: 149181FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
BONTEMPI ORGAN—$50
CHILD'S
SMALL
BATTERY
OPERATED
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
284
Adopt Cats
SF
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Sharon Callicoat
Dorfmann to Sheri Callicoat Dorfman. The petitioner is seeking a
name change because: Never been
called Sharon my entire life. All
my legal documents say Sheri not
Sharon.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 1st day
of December, 2017. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 16th day of
November, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
SUZANNA CATHERINE SCHAIRER
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
SCHAI BELAIR TOUSSAINT-SCHAIRER
FAMILY LAW: 149168FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Suzanna Catherine Schairer to Schai Belair Toussaint-Schairer. The petitioner is
seeking a name change because:
I was adopted and never felt any
connection to my name that was
given to me.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 1st day
of December, 2017. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 16th day of
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
815
Legal Notices
November, 2017.
WATER
HEATER
ELECTRIC
40
GAL—$249 NEW in box 6yr warr.
Whirlpool 301-455-6101
225
EZ
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
208
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2017
the local expert
on local jobs
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
205
CLASSIFIED
D9
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
DAVID TIM LIU
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
DAVID JIARUI LIU
FAMILY LAW: 149129FL
Qiyuan Liu
Petitioner
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name of a
Minor in which he/she seeks to
change his/her name from David
Tim Liu to David Jiarui Liu. The petitioner is seeking a name change
because: We want to have my son's
Chinese name to become his middle name.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 1st day
of December, 2017. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 16th day of
November, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD
IN THE MATTER OF
BADR KHADER HABASH
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO:
BADR MOHAMMAD GHASSAN
ABU NABBOUT
FAMILY LAW: 148708FL
PUBLICATION NOTICE
The above Petitioner has filed a
Petition for change of Name in
which he/she seeks to change
his/her name from Badr Khader
Habash to Badr Mohammad Ghassan Abu Nabbout. The petitioner is
seeking a name change because:
It's my birth name I was born with
and to make obtaining documents
and certificates from schools and
colleges I went to under my birth
name. Easy and accurate.
Any person may file an objection to
the Petition on or before the 1st day
of December, 2017. The objection
must be supported by an affidavit
and served upon the Petitioner in
accordance with Maryland Rule 1321. failure to file an objection or
affidavit within the time allowed my
result in a judgement by default
or the grant of the relief sought.
This Notice is to be published the
the Washington Post newspaper of
general circulation in Montgomery
County, Maryland, one successive
week on or before the 16th day of
November, 2017.
/s/ Barbara H. Meiklejohn
CLERK, Circuit Court
Montgomery County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY, MARYLAND
ANDREA O'BRIEN
Plaintiff
v.
Case No. 140599-FL
EDWARD O'BRIEN
Defendant
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
A Complaint for Absolute Divorce
was filed with the Circuit Court for
Montgomery County, Maryland on
November 14, 2016. The Complaint
alleges , in substance: that the parties were married in March 1997
in Howard County, Maryland; that
the Plaintiff has been a resident of
the State of Maryland for at least
one (1) year prior to the filing
of this Complaint; that the parties
voluntarily separated no later than
December 31, 1997, and have continued to live separate and apart
without cohabitation for more than
one year prior to the filing of the
Complaint, and there is no hope or
expectation of reconciliation; that
there are no property issues; and
that no children were born of the
marriage. Plaintiff requests an
Absolute Divorce.
It is this 8th day of November,
2017, ORDERED, that the Plaintiff
cause a copy of this Notice to be
published at least once a week
for four consecutive weeks in a
newspaper of general circulation
published in Washington, DC; publication to be completed by December 7th, 2017; Defendant must file
a response on or before January
8th, 2018; Defendant must file a
response on or before January 8th,
2018; Defendant is warned that failure to file a response within the
time allowed may result in a default
judgment or the granting of the
relief sought.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court for
Montgomery County, Maryland
NOTICE OF
SPECIAL COMMISSIONER’S SALE
Pursuant to the terms and provisions of that certain Order entered
by the Circuit Court of Fauquier
County, Virginia on April 11, 2017,
Special Commissioner Ann M. Callaway will, on December 8, 2017, at
11:00 a.m., at the main entrance
of the Fauquier County Courthouse,
located at 40 Culpeper Street, Warrenton, Virginia 20186, offer for sale
at public auction, all that certain
tract or parcel of land, together with
improvements thereon and appurtenances thereunto appertaining,
situate, lying and being in the Town
of Warrenton, County of Fauquier,
Virginia, and more particularly
described as follows:
All that certain lot or parcel of
land lying and being situate on the
south side of Virginia State 690,
in Marshall Magisterial District
Fauquier County, Virginia and more
particularly described as follows:
ALL OF LOT 1-A, containing 5.58671
acres, more or less as shown on
plat entitled “Division of Lot #1 John
Benjamin Drake Division”, prepared
by Leslie C. Schuermann, L.S., under
seal dated of July 7, 2000 and
recorded in Deed Book 873 Page
1224 among the Fauquier County,
Virginia land records.
AND BEING the property acquired
by Rhys Jones from Mary Ruffo,
a/k/a Mary K. Ruffo, by deed dated
November 9, 2010, and recorded on
November 9, 2010, in Deed Book
1355 at page 1217 among the aforesaid land records.
Tax Map Identification Number:
6976-53-8601-000
The sale shall be contingent on
approval by the Circuit Court of
Fauquier County of the highest bid.
This sale is subject to any State,
Federal and/or special estate taxes,
and any real estate taxes.
Sale is subject to any valid filed
or unfiled mechanic's liens, if any,
and any matters of record recorded
prior to the deed of trust being
foreclosed upon.
NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY IS MADE TO THE CONDITIONS
OF THE PROPERTY OR ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON. THIS ADVERTISEMENT DOES NOT CONSTITUTE AN
INVITATION TO ANY PROSPECTIVE
BIDDER TO GO ON OR ABOUT THE
PREMISES.
This sale is subject to any conditions, restrictions, rights-of-way,
easements, and reservations contained in the Deeds, plats, and any
other documents forming the chain
of title.
TERMS OF SALE: All cash. Purchaser
shall pay all recording charges,
examination of title, settlement
fees, and all costs of conveyancing,
except the grantor’s tax. The real
estate taxes will be adjusted to the
date of sale. A deposit of $25,000,
in cash or by certified check will be
required of the successful bidder at
the time of sale and settlement in
full, in immediately-available funds,
815
Legal Notices
shall be made within fourteen (14)
days from the date of court
approval or the above deposit shall
be forfeited and the property will
be resold at the expense of the
defaulting purchaser. Special Commissioners may extend the deadline for closing. Successful bidder
shall be required to sign a statement of purchase upon final bid.
Additional
terms
may
be
announced on the day of sale. Special Commissioners reserve the
right to reject any or all bids.
PROPERTY TO BE SOLD "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY AND WITHOUT ANY
DUTY OF THE SPECIAL COMMISSIONER TO OBTAIN POSSESSION FOR PURCHASER. Property shall be conveyed by SPECIAL WARRANTY DEED
and subject to filed or unfiled
mechanic’s liens.
ANN M. CALLAWAY, P.C., Special
Commissioner, Ann M. Callaway,
P.C. 15 Garrett Street, Warrenton,
Virginia 20186; (540) 349-4100.
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001272
JAMES E. TILLERY, SR.
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
James E. Tillery, Jr., whose address
is 608 Roxboro Pl NW, Washington,
DC 20011, was appointed personal representative of the estate of
James E. Tillery, Sr., who died on
9/10/17 without a will and will
serve without Court supervision.
All unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
May 16, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 16,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
James E. Tillery, Jr.
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001238
ROLAND WOODS
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Phyllis T. Woods, whose address is
2649 Myrtle Ave. NE, Washington
DC 20018, was appointed personal representative of the estate of
Roland Woods, who died on 8/23/17
with a will and will serve without
Court supervision. All unknown
heirs and heirs whose whereabouts
are unknown shall enter their
appearance in this proceeding.
Objections to such appointment (or
to the probate of decedent's Will)
shall be filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor, Washington DC
20001, on or before May 9, 2018.
Claims against the decedent shall
be presented to the undersigned
with a copy to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register of Wills
with a copy to the undersigned,
on or before May 9, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Phyllis T. Woods
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001228
SUSAN Y. BEALE
Gary Altman, Esquire
11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 708
Rockville, Maryland 20852
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Henry B. R. Beale, whose address is
4354 Warren Street, NW, Washington, DC 20016, was appointed personal representative of the estate
of Susan Y. Beale, who died on
May 23, 2017 with a will and
will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
May 9, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 9,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Henry B.R. Beale
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001229
JOHN GLICK, AKA JOHN M. GLICK
Gary Altman
11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 708
Rockville, Maryland 20852
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Gail Glick, a/k/a Gail M. Glick, whose
address is 3818 Warren Street NW,
Washington, DC 20016, was
appointed personal representative
of the estate of John Glick aka John
M. Glick, who died on September
25, 2017 without a will and will
serve without Court supervision.
All unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
May 9, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 9,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Gail Glick aka Gail M. Glick
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
815
Legal Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001246
ADA LOUISE JOHNSON BOOKER
A/K/A ADA LOUISE BOOKER A/K/A
ADA J. BOOKER A/K/A ADA L.J.
BOOKER A/K/A ADA BOOKER
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Irma Meads, whose address is 6601
2nd Street, N.W. Washington, D.C.
20012, was appointed personal representative of the estate of Ada
Louise Johnson Booker a/k/a Ada
Louise Booker a/k/a Ada J. Booker
a/k/a Ada L. J. Booker a/k/a Ada
Booker, who died on October 19,
2016 with a will and will serve
without Court supervision.
All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
May 16, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 16,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Irma Meads
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001275
PHILIP G. LEVY
Gary Altman
11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 708
Rockville, MD 20852
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Richard Levy, whose address is
1321.5 Wisconsin Avenue, NW,
Washington, DC 20007, was
appointed personal representative
of the estate of Philip G. Levy, who
died on October 12, 2017 with a will
and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
May 16, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 16,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Richard Levy
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001224
JOHN DAVID SNYDER AKA
JOHN D. SNYDER
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Michele Mietus-Snyder, whose
address is 312 8th St. SE, Washington DC, 20003 was appointed personal representative of the estate
of John David Snyder aka John D.
Snyder, who died on July 20, 2016
without a will and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown
heirs and heirs whose whereabouts
are unknown shall enter their
appearance in this proceeding.
Objections to such appointment
shall be filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., Building A, 515 5th
Street, N.W., 3rd Floor, Washington,
D.C. 20001, on or before May 2,
2018. Claims against the decedent
shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register
of Wills or filed with the Register
of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before May 2, 2018, or
be forever barred. Persons believed
to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy
of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Michele Mietus-Snyder
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001223
ELAINE JOYCE CARTER
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Okorie Johnson, whose address is
920 Memorial Dr. SE Unit #8 Atlanta,
GA 30316 was appointed personal representative of the estate of
Elaine Joyce Carter, who died on
September 17, 2017 with a will
and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., Building A, 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd
Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001, on or
before May 2, 2018. Claims against
the decedent shall be presented to
the undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 2,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Okorie Johnson
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001240
MATTHEW RYAN HANSON
Gary Altman
11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 708
Rockville, Maryland 20852
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Jennifer P. Hughes, whose address
is 319 Mary's Oak Drive, Clarksville,
Tennessee 37042, was appointed
personal representative of the
estate of Matthew Ryan Hanson,
who died on 06/09/2016 without a
will and will serve with Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
815
850
Legal Notices
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
May 9, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 9,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Jennifer P. Hughes
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
VIRGINIA:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
STAFFORD COUNTY
Case No. CA17-30
by Samuel David Hillmon, Jr. and
Christina Marie Hillmon
(Petitioner's Name (s))
Respondent's name: Toderick Delee
Scypion (Natural Parent)
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
The object of this suit is to adopt
minor children.
And, it appearing by affidavit filef
according to law that diligence has
been used by the plaintiff to determine in what cityor county the
defendant is located without success, it is therefore ORDERED that
the defendant appear on or before
the 18th day of December, 2017,
before this Court and do what is
necessary to protect his interests.
And, it is further ORDERED that this
order be published once a week
for four successive weeks in the
Washington Post, a newspaper of
general circulation in the County
of Stafford; that a copy of this
order be posted at the front door of
the courthouse wherein this court
is held; and that a copy of this
order be mailed to the defendant at
the address shown by the aforesaid
affidavit.
Entered this 2nd day of November,
2017.
Kris Waldron
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Stafford County
820
Official Notices
MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COUNCIL
PUBLIC HEARING
December 5, 2017;
1:30 P.M.
Deadline to sign up to
speak is December 4 at
5pm
(1) Expedited Bill 32-17,
Taxation - Development
Impact
Tax
for
Transportation
and
Public
School
Improvements
Definitions
Senior
Residential, would replace
the
multifamily-senior
residential category used to
impose the development
impact tax for transportation
and
public
school
improvements with a senior
residential category; define
senior
residential;
and
generally amend the law
governing the categories of
residential dwelling units
used
to
impose
the
development impact tax for
transportation and public
school improvements.
(2) Expedited Bill 36-17,
Taxation - Development
Impact Tax - Exemptions
- Amendments, would
amend the applicability
provision
of
certain
development impact taxes;
and generally amend the law
governing
development
impact taxes.
The hearings will be held in
the Council Office Building,
100
Maryland
Avenue,
Rockville. To testify sign up
online
at
http://www.montgomery
countymd.gov/council/ph
signup.html or call 240-7777803. Documents available
at
www.montgomerycounty
md.gov/council. To arrange
for services needed to
participate in this activity,
call the Council Office at
240-777-7900 seven days in
advance (MD Relay – dial 711
or 800-201-7165).
825
Bids & Proposals
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL #RFP
7011085. PWMRADC Correctional
Reentry Services. RFP is available at
www.pwcgov.org/bid
The Virginia Department
of Transportation (VDOT)
is requesting proposals from
firms
to
provide
Occupational
Medical
and Substance Abuse
Testing Services and
Management.
All
proposals must be received
by 2:00 PM, December 1,
2017, at
the Virginia
Department
of
Transportation;
Central
Office Mail Center-Loading
Dock Entrance; 1401 East
Broad Street, Richmond,
Virginia
23219.
A
mandatory Pre-proposal
Conference will be held
at
10:00
AM
on
November 20, 2017. For
a copy of the Request for
Proposals (RFP # 154334DF), go to the website:
www.eva.virginia.gov
VDOT assures compliance
with Title VI Requirements
of non-discrimination in all
activities pursuant to this
advertisement.
For
questions
or
additional
information
email:
frederick.haasch@vdot.vir
ginia.gov
830
FREE UNDER $250
850
850
Montgomery County
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
19953 Drexel Hill Circle
Montgomery Village, MD 20886
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
JAINABA A. QUISTFYE, dated September 20, 2006 and
recorded in Liber 33077, folio 306 among the Land Records
of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.434086V;
Tax ID No.01-02556843 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850,
on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $43,900.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 552798)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
851
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
12141153
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ADRIENNE WARREN-DAVIS A/K/A
ADRIENNE WARREN A/K/A
ADRIENNE DAVIS
JOHN T DAVIS, JR A/K/A
JOHN T DAVIS JR
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-44315
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 5815
Kentucky Ave, District Heights, MD
20747, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 7th day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 7th
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $144,400.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #536
Clerk of the Circuit Court
ROSA M FREEMAN
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14084
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 5616
Coolidge St, Capitol Heights, MD
20743, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 7th day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 7th
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $105,500.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
12142599
Home delivery
is convenient.
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
JAMES FREEMAN, JR A/K/A JAMES
FREEMAN JR
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142597
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
vs.
RICHARD THOMAS HARLEY A/K/A
RICHARD THOMAS HARLEY JR
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14067
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 430
Balboa Ave, Capitol Heights, MD
20743, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 7th day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 7th
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $89,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142904
You, too, could have
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1-800-753-POST
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home delivery.
SF
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
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to home delivery.
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home delivery.
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home delivery.
If only you had home delivery.
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1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
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SF
SF
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SF
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Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Thomas W. Hodge, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs,
V.
William Reyes
Defendant(s).
Case No. CAEF1714731
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this 25th
day of October, 2017, that the sale
of the property in this case, 4802
51st Avenue, Hyattsville, Maryland
20781, reported by THOMAS W.
HODGE, GENE JUNG, LAURA D.
HARRIS, ROBERT M. OLIVERI,
CHRISTINE
JOHNSON, SCOTT
ROBINSON AND LOUIS GINGHER,
Substitute Trustees, be ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary be shown on or before
the 27th day of November, 2017
provided a copy of this Notice be
inserted in The Washington Post,
a newspaper published in Prince
George's County, Maryland, once
in each of three (3) successive
weeks on or before the 27th day of
November, 2017.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $175,100.00.
Sydney J. Harrison (#619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Prince Georges County, MD
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 Viking Drive
Suite 203
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 213-2959
Nov 2, 9, 16, 2017
12140023
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
SANDRA L. PRUITT
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-11044
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 7th day
of November 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 7406 Shady
Glen Terrace, Capitol Heights, MD
20743, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of December,
2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 7th day of
December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$139,300.00.
1-800-753-POST
SF
12141246
851
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
Wake up to
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SF
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1517 Castle Cliff Place
Silver Spring, MD 20904
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from VINCENT
DUNG DINH AKAVINCENT D. DINH AND YENLINH HOANG
NGUYEN AKA YENLINH H. NGUYEN, dated June 18, 2013
and recorded in Liber 47178, folio 072 ; LOAN MODIFICATION
AGREEMENT RECORDED IN LIBER 54012, FOLIO 245 among
the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.434809V; Tax ID No.05-02178245 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $36,100.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 565316)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SF
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Montgomery County
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
Special Notices
Lillian M. DeCosimo, M.D. /
About Care GYN Associates, PLLC
Announces the closure of her medical practice effective December 1,
2017. To request a copy of your
medical records please mail your
request to: P.O. Box 220925 Chantilly, VA 220925 or email: drdecosimo
@ outlook.com
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
Sydney J. Harrison #536
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
SF
12142909
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
D10
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
850
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
130 Finale Terrace
Silver Spring, MD 20901
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
STEVEN S. HOBBI AND ZAHRYA A. HOBBI, dated August
10, 2005 and recorded in Liber 30706, folio 312 among
the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.430679V; Tax ID No.05-02364734 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 562094)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. AUGUST,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
24305 Preakness Drive
Damascus, MD 20872
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from KAREN
M. FASH, dated May 31, 2005 and recorded in Liber 30030,
folio 436 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case
docketed as Case No.433850V; Tax ID No.12-02650148 ) the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $40,600.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 565752)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
850
Montgomery County
850
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11903 Ashley Drive
Rockville, MD 20852
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from HELGA
M. FERNANDEZ, dated April 19, 2005 and recorded in Liber
29765, folio 700 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.385422V; Tax ID No.04-00075185)
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND
AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $43,800.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 544689)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
5906 Old Croom Station Road
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
DWAYNE G. DOWTIN AND LAWANNA DOWTIN, dated January
26, 2007 and recorded in Liber 27215, folio 428 among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.CAEF17-12482; Tax ID No.03-0247239 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772, on
NOVEMBER 20, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 554331)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
KHALID D. WALKER,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
851
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
Prince Georges County
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legal notice in the
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Call:
12140169
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202-334-7007
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Prince Georges County
Prince Georges County
ORLANS PC
NOVEMBER 2, 9, 16, 2017
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
851
Prince Georges County
LEESBURG, VA 20175
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
703-777-7101
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
2311 Nicol Circle
vs.
Bowie, MD 20721
ESTATE OF CAROLE CLARKE
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from CHESTNUT C/O KEISHA K CLARKE
REP
BARBARA A. NESBITT, dated July 30, 2007 and recorded in (SUCCESSOR)PER
Defendant(s)
Liber 28368, folio 542 among the Land Records of PRINCE Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14066
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
NOTICE
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.CAEF17-18615; Tax
ID No.13-3333929 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
of November, 2017 by the Cirauction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE, day
cuit Court for the COUNTY OF
GEORGE'S, Maryland and
located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772, PRINCE
by the authority thereof, that the
on
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. BritNOVEMBER 20, 2017 at 9:30 AM
to, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements Real Property designated as 7000
Rd, Hyattsville, MD 20783,
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more Crosby
and reported in the above entitled
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to contrary thereof be shown on or
the 7th day of December,
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the before
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHsame, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
INGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Terms of Sale: A deposit $38,500.00 will be required at the Washington, DC, MD in said COUNOF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR TY
week for three successive weeks
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. before the 7th day of December,
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten 2017.
report states the amount of
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE The
the sale to be $200,804.04.
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
Clerk of the Circuit Court
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
& Brown, LLP
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by Shapiro
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address Manassas, Virginia 20109
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum 703 449-5800
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017 12142902
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid Plaintiff(s)
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note vs.
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the ESTATE OF JANE E SCOTT
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in C/O THOMAS J KOKOLIS
PER REP
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or (SUCCESSOR)
Defendant(s)
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-20080
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
NOTICE
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to day
of November, 2017 by the Cirexecute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, cuit Court for the COUNTY OF
GEORGE'S, Maryland and
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior PRINCE
by the authority thereof, that the
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
M. Savage, Gregory N. Britand the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit William
to, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Property designated as 12426
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent, Real
Ronald Beall Drive, Upper Marlboro,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association MD 20774, and reported in the
entitled cause, will be finally
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual above
ratified and confirmed, unless
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if cause to the contrary thereof be
on or before the 7th day
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed shown
of December, 2017 next; provided
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible a copy of this Order be inserted
THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser in
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
said COUNTY OF PRINCE
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date in
GEORGE'S once a week for three
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey successive weeks before the 7th
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in day of December, 2017.
report states the amount of
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned The
the sale to be $309,029.07.
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
BY THE COURT:
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576594)
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
JAMES E. CLARKE,
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
RENEE DYSON,
703 449-5800
HUGH J. GREEN,
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142596
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
BRIAN THOMAS,
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12141243 NOVEMBER 2, 9, 16, 2017
LEGAL NOTICES
12141155
851
Law Offices
ALLAN P. FEIGELSON, P.A.
Laurel Lakes Executive Park
8337 Cherry Lane
Laurel, Maryland 20707
301-362-2900
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY AND
ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
407 ROUND TABLE DRIVE
FT WASHINGTON, MD 20744
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from
PAULETTE Y. HEATH AND MELVIN D. HEATH, dated July 14,
2008 and recorded in Liber 30340, Folio 001, among the Land
Records PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, with an original
principal balance of $330,991.00 and an original interest rate
of 4.625 % default having occurred under the terms thereof,
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction,
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT:
14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
NOVEMBER 28, 2017 AT 1:00 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with an
buildings or improvements thereon situated in lot of ground
in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and described as 407
ROUND TABLE DRIVE FT WASHINGTON, MD 20744 and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for
a particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical
condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship,
materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing
codes or other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar
matters, and subject to easements, agreements, liens and
restrictions of record which affect the same, if any. The
property will be sold subject to any condominium and/or HOA
assessments.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $15,000.00 (CASH WILL NOT
BE ACCEPTED) acceptable payment will be in the FORM OF
CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY CASHIER'S CHECK will be required
from purchaser at time of sale, balance in immediately available
funds upon final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid
at the rate of 4.625% on unpaid purchase money from date of
sale to date of settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder,
shall not be required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser
(excluding the secured party) will be required to complete full
settlement of the purchase of the property within TEN (10)
CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit
Court, time being of the essence, otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement. Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall
be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to
post-sale review of the status of the loan. If any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions,
if applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale.
(File # 17-0034)
Allan P. Feigelson, Esquire
Substitute Trustee
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
Prince Georges County
12141161
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9710 Falls Road
Potomac, MD 20854
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from NASEEM
AHMAD, dated July 22, 2005 and recorded in Liber 30526,
folio 477 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case
docketed as Case No.10-00882183; Tax ID No.412622V ) the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 531325)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
851
12141244
851
12141247
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
515 Woodston Road
Rockville, MD 20850
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
MELANIE L. O'DONNELL ANDNATHANIEL S. PATCH, dated
August 4, 2006 and recorded in Liber 32993, folio 404
among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.435730V; Tax ID No.04-00181845 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $20,700.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576257)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2017
EZ
Montgomery County
e-mail:
legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x2
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x2
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Charles E. Parr
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF14-30992
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 2nd day of November 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 16318 Eddinger Road, Bowie,
Maryland 20716, made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, and Brian Thomas Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED and
CONFIRMED, unless cause to the
contrary be shown on or before
the 4th day of December, 2017,
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 4th day of
December, 2017.
12140082
851
Prince Georges County
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
FELIX AKI AKIWUMI
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF13-24999
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 8th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, Trustees, of the Real Property
designated as 6450 FOREST RD,
Cheverly, MD 20785, and reported
in the above entitled cause, will
be finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
8th day of December, 2017 next;
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in THE WASHINGTON
POST, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
three successive weeks before the
8th day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $292,331.27.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
851
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
12142906
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Prince Georges County
vs.
BELINDA PHILOGENE JONES
JOHN T JONES
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF15-31640
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 7707
Alloway Lane, Beltsville, MD 20705,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 7th day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $409,924.80.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #536
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142598
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Shannon Menapace
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Michael Joyner
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF14-02315
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 2nd day of November 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 5232 Daventry Terrace, District
Heights, Maryland 20747, made
and reported by James E. Clarke,
Renee Dyson, and Shannon Menapace, Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 4th day of December,
2017, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 4th day of
December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $164,160.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 9, 16, 23, 2017
12141538
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $486,332.23.
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 9, 16, 23, 2017
12141536
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
AKINOLA A. AKINDOYE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-14788
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 19th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 8961 Town
Center Circle, Unit 202, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774, will be ratified
and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 20th day of November, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 20th day of
November, 2017.
Notice is hereby given this 18th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 5922 Addison Road, Capitol Heights, MD
20743, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 20th day of November, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 20th day of
November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$341,513.64.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$181,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 2, 9, 16, 2017
12140022
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 2, 9, 16, 2017
12140021
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
GAVIN L. BROWN
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-16675
NOTICE
v.
KEVIN D. JACKSON
SILKINA B. JACKSON,
Defendant(s)
Notice is hereby given this 18th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 7405 Gambier Drive, Upper Marlboro, MD
20772, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 20th day of November, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 20th day of
November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$356,036.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 2, 9, 16, 2017
12140020
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
MARIA S. MAIZ
CLAUDIA CAMPOS
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-11059
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 18th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 9250
Edwards
Way,
Unit
405C,
Hyattsville, MD 20783, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 20th day of November, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 20th day of
November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$73,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 2, 9, 16, 2017
12140017
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
Notice is hereby given this 7th day
of November 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 9609 Woodyard Circle, Upper Marlboro, MD
20772, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of December,
2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 7th day of
December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$186,750.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #536
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142907
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
EMMANUEL
NJOKU
A/K/A
EMMANUEL NJOKU
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-14733
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 7th day
of November 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 1007 Balboa
Avenue, Capitol Heights, MD 20743,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 7th
day of December, 2017, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 7th day of December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$121,333.66.
Sydney J. Harrison #536
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142908
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
KELLI L. HOLBROOK
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-00094
NOTICE
Civil Action No. CAEF15-25193
NOTICE
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
12141543
851
SF
SF
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
22801 Christ Church Road
Aquasco, MD 20608
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from SHARON
R. TURNER-GILMORE AND THURIEL D. GILMORE, dated May
18, 2006 and recorded in Liber 25241, folio 219 ; AND
MODIFIED IN LIBER 35841, FOLIO 400; AND MODIFIED IN
LIBER 37414, FOLIO 370 among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.CAEF16-25391; Tax
ID No.08-0836213 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772,
on
NOVEMBER 20, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $39,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 560154)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. AUGUST,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1501 Aragona Boulevard
Fort Washington, MD 20744
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
GARY W. LAMPKINS AND MONICA D. LAMPKINS, dated July
27, 2006 and recorded in Liber 25722, folio 123 among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.CAEF16-01505; Tax ID No.05-0269894 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772, on
NOVEMBER 20, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $49,300.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 565727)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3700 Stonesboro Road
Fort Washington, MD 20744
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
MONIQUE Y. SKINNER-METCALF NKA MONIQUE Y. HARTGROVE, dated August 11, 2006 and recorded in Liber 26419,
folio 649 among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.CAEF14-09347; Tax ID No.090936179 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 14735
MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772, on
NOVEMBER 20, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $25,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 548522)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6501 Farmer Drive
Fort Washington, MD 20744
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from VEDA C.
JOY, dated June 1, 2007 and recorded in Liber 30120, folio 424
among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.CAEF17-12496; Tax ID No.12-1199447 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772, on
NOVEMBER 20, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $42,900.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 556354)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
852
Anne Arundel County
852
D11
Anne Arundel County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
4608 Ritchie Highway
Brooklyn, MD 21225
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from SUSAN
PARRISH AKA SUSAN RENE PARRISH AND JOHN PARRISH
AKA JOHN MARVIN PARRISH, dated October 11, 2006 and
recorded in Liber 18394, folio 217 among the Land Records
of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-17001964; Tax ID No.05-047-05458920 ) the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, located at 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401, on
DECEMBER 6, 2017 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $23,900.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 557163)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 2, 9, 16, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 2, 9, 16, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
12140187
852
www.hwestauctions.com
Anne Arundel County
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
NOVEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142539
www.hwestauctions.com
12140083 NOVEMBER 2, 9, 16, 2017
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6004 Maria Avenue
Suitland, MD 20746
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
DIANA DOCTOR, dated November 9, 2007 and recorded in
Liber 29014, folio 480 ; LOAN MODIFICATION AGREEMENT
RECORDED IN LIBER 35473, FOLIO 492; MODIFIED LOAN
MODIFICATION AGREEMENT RECORDED IN LIBER 36885,
FOLIO 413; AND MODIFIED LOAN AGREEMENT RECORDED IN
LIBER 38986, FOLIO 334 among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.CAEF17-18616; Tax
ID No.06-0554766 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772,
on
NOVEMBER 20, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $41,100.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576286)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12140184
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
727 Kaplan Court
Hyattsville, MD 20785
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from LINSEY
RAY LITTLE AND CATHERINE C. LITTLE, dated September
9, 2008 and recorded in Liber 30049, folio 289 among the
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.CAEF17-17874; Tax ID No.18-2054609 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772, on
NOVEMBER 20, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $18,200.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 575310)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3106 Glen Avenue
Glenn Dale, MD 20769
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
ANTHONY CHESTNUT, dated July 6, 2005 and recorded in
Liber 22957, folio 744 among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.CAEF17-13203; Tax
ID No.14-1653054 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772,
on
NOVEMBER 20, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $30,500.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
PURCHASER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO AN IRS RIGHT OF REDEMPTION. Balance of the
purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 577031)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
www.hwestauctions.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
NOVEMBER 2, 9, 16, 2017
(And your subscription up-to-date.)
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
12140167
12140092
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
S0833-1 6x2
NOVEMBER 2, 9, 16, 2017
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2589 Rutland Road
Davidsonville, MD 21035
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from LUKE
STEELE AND TERESA ALBERO, dated October 31, 2006 and
recorded in Liber 18977, folio 363 among the Land Records
of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-17001685; Tax ID No.02-000-05412430 ) the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, located at 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401, on
NOVEMBER 20, 2017 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 574972)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
KHALID D. WALKER
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12140166
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know.
NOVEMBER 2, 9, 16, 2017
Anne Arundel County
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
NOVEMBER 2, 9, 16, 2017
12140162
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
910 Marthas Vineyard Lane
Pasadena, MD 21122
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
HEATHER R. ESTERLING AND JOHN T. ESTERLING, dated
April 15, 2004 and recorded in Liber 14717, folio 706
; AND MODIFIED BY HOME AFFORDABLE MODIFICATION
AGREEMENT RECORDED IN LIBER 27218, FOLIO 376; AND
MODIFIED BY LOAN MODIFICATION AGREEMENT RECORDED
IN LIBER 28929, FOLIO 468 among the Land Records of ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-17-002369;
Tax ID No.03-380-90211246 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401, on
NOVEMBER 29, 2017 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO ANNUAL WATER FACILITIES
CHARGES IN THE AMOUNT OF $250.00 PAYABLE ON THE
1ST DAY OF JANUARY EACH AND EVERY YEAR FOR 33
CONSECUTIVE YEARS AND ANNUAL SEWER FACILITIES
CHARGES IN THE AMOUNT OF $250.00 PAYABLE ON THE
1ST DAY OF JANUARY EACH AND EVERY YEAR FOR 33
CONSECUTIVE YEARS.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $20,200.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576508)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
www.hwestauctions.com
WP 2x1
NOVEMBER 2, 9, 16, 2017
12140080
852
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
12141541
OPQRS
852
Anne Arundel County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
415 Valiant Circle
Glen Burnie, MD 21061
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
MICHAEL P. CORKHILL, dated August 29, 2005 and recorded
in Liber 16926, folio 0732 among the Land Records of ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-17-002240;
Tax ID No.03-378-90052492 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401, on
NOVEMBER 29, 2017 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $15,500.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 578170)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
856
856
Frederick County
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
DONYALE Y. HICKS
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-00095
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 7th day
of November 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 13124 Ripon
Place, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 7th
day of December, 2017, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 7th day of December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$190,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #536
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142910
852
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Andrew Loren Fecher
Karina Fecher
Defendants
No. C-02-CV-17-001512
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this
Wednesday, November 1, 2017 that
the sale of the property in the
proceedings mentioned, made and
reported by Mark D. Meyer, Substitute Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 1st
day of December 2017 next; provided, a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 1st day of December 2017 next.
The report states that the amount
of sale of the property at 8287
SEBRING COURT, SEVERN, MD 21144
to be $147,000.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Nov 9, 16, 23, 2017
12141555
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
1222 DEWBERRY DRIVE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated January 12, 2011,
in the original principal amount
of $206,457.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 201100001376 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on December
21, 2017, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND WITH ALL RIGHTS
AND PRIVILEGES THERETO APPURTENANT, SITUATE, LYING AND
BEING IN THE CHANCELLOR DISTRICT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, DESIGNATED AS LOT
124, SECTION FOUR, WILBURN
FARMS, AS SHOWN ON PLAT
THEREOF MADE FEBRUARY 12,
1985, BY SULLIVAN, DONAHOE
AND INGALLS, A COPY OF WHICH
PLAT IS DULY RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN PLAT BOOK 16,
PAGES 32 AND 33.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3152561.
Nov. 16, 23, 2017
8049 CHESTNUT GROVE RD.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Steven C.
Griffin, dated July 20, 2010 and recorded in Liber 8168, folio 416 among
the Land Records of Frederick County, MD, default having occurred under
the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the
undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick
St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
NOVEMBER 22, 2017 AT 1:00 PM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Samuel
P. Summers and Bonnie A. Robertson, dated August 1, 2007 and recorded
in Liber 6727, folio 302 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the
parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer
for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Frederick County, at the
Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick, MD 21701, on
NOVEMBER 22, 2017 AT 1:01 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $20,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5.12% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #17-601567).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 2, Nov 9 & Nov 16
12139291
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of
record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any
kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier's or certified check, or
in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their
sole discretion, for $27,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or
servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived.
Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of
the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Frederick County,
Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate
of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received
in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by
an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the
balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will
be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from
the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes,
ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district
charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be
responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost
of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges
shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable
to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser.
Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and
the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk
of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #15-617521).
Laura H. G. O'Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 2, Nov 9 & Nov 16
12139292
TRUSTEE'S SALE
In execution of the Deed of Trust dated July 26, 2016 and recorded August
19, 2016 in Liber 11319, folio 498, among the Frederick County land
records, the undersigned Substitute Trustees, any of whom may act, will
offer for sale at public auction on November 29, 2017, at 1:15 PM, at the
front of the Circuit Court for Frederick County, 100 West Patrick Street,
Frederick, Maryland, the following property:
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more
fully described in the aforementioned Deed of Trust.
TAX ID: 25-471385
The property and improvements will be sold in "as is" physical condition
without warranty of any kind and subject to all conditions, restrictions and
agreements of record affecting the same.
TERMS OF SALE: A non-refundable bidder's deposit of $15,000.00 by
cashier's/certified check required at time of sale except for the party
secured by the Deed of Trust. Risk of loss on purchaser from date and
time of auction. The balance of the purchase price together with interest
thereon at 2.750% per annum from date of sale to receipt of purchase
price by Trustees must be paid by cashier's check within 10 days after
final ratification of sale. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason.
All real estate taxes and other public charges and/or assessments to be
adjusted as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
If applicable, any condominium and/or homeowners association dues
and assessments that may become due after the date of sale shall be
purchaser’s responsibility. Purchaser shall pay all transfer, documentary
and recording taxes/fees and all other settlement costs. Purchaser
is responsible for obtaining possession of the property. If purchaser
defaults, deposit will be forfeited and property resold at the risk and cost
of the defaulting purchaser who shall be liable for any deficiency in the
purchase price and all costs, expenses and attorney’s fees of both sales.
If Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser's sole remedy is
return of deposit without interest. This sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan secured by the Deed of Trust including but not
limited to determining whether prior to sale a bankruptcy was filed; a
forbearance, repayment or other agreement was entered into; or the loan
was reinstated or paid off. In any such event this sale shall be null and void
and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of deposit without interest.
This communication is from a debt collector. (52767)
Richard A. Lash, Robert E. Kelly, and David A. Rosen, Substitute Trustees
Auctioneers:
Alex Cooper Auctioneers
908 York Road
Towson, MD 21204
410-828-4838
12143199
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
FROM "NO
SF
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
6101 TAVERNEER LANE,
SPOTSYLVANIA, VA 22551.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
8806 GENERAL COUCHS COURT,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 5, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$267,200.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 200600019945 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on December
7, 2017, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN TRACT
OR PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
AND
MORE
PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS LOT 41, SECTION
2, TAVERNEER, AS THE SAME IS
DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES
77 AND 78 AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS
OF
SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-1168701.
Nov. 16, 23, 2017
12143182
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated February 12, 2008,
in the original principal amount
of $535,500.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. LR 200800003427.
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on December
7, 2017 , at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT,
PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN CHANCELLOR MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, OF
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
AND DESCRIBED AS LOT 202, SECTION 6, PHASE 1, ESTATES OF
CHANCELLORSVILLE AT LAROQUE
RUN, AS SHOWN ON PLAT OF SURVEY MADE BY ATCS, PLC, DATED
DECEMBER 6, 2004, RECORDED
FEBRUARY 4, 2005 OF RECORD
AS DOCUMENT LR 20050004459,
IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3228711.
Nov. 9, 16, 2017
12141764
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
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SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
12140900
877
Spotsylvania County
1-800-753-POST
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
11074 SANANDREW DR.
A/R/T/A 11074 SAN ANDREW DR.
NEW MARKET, MD 21774
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated October
1, 2001 and recorded in Liber 2968, Folio 1277 among the Land Records
of Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $275,000.00
and a current interest rate of 2%, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for
Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick,
MD 21701, on
NOVEMBER 20, 2017 AT 10:46 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 206932-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF
UPCOMING SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 2, Nov 9 & Nov 16
12138813
IS YOUR
OLD CAR
HOLDING UP?
NO
Prince William County
YES
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All that
certain lot or parcel of land situated, lying and being in Prince William
County, Commonwealth of Virginia, and being more particularly described
as follows:
Lot 14-1, Section 3, Georgetown Village, as the same is duly dedicated,
platted and recorded in Deed Book 472 at Page 458, among the Land
Records of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
November 9, 16, 2017
878
878
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
102 SANDPIPER TERRACE,
STAFFORD, VA 22554.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated July 5, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$133,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR060022516 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on December 7, 2017, at 2:00
PM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
WITH ALL
BUILDINGS AND
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND
ALL RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES
APPURTENANT THERETO, SITUATE,
LYING AND BEING IN HARTWOOD
DISTRICT, STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DESIGNATED AS LOT 41,
SECTION 3, OLDE FORGE SUBDIVISION, ON AN AMENDED PLAT
OF
ASSOCIATED
ENGINEERS
DATED JULY 17, 1972, OF RECORD
IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN PLAT BOOK
5, AT PAGES 290-293, ALONG WITH
A DEED OF DEDICATION TO SECTION THREE, OLDE FORGE SUBDIVISION RECORDED ON MAY 8, 1973
IN DEED BOOK 237, AT PAGE 518,
AND AMENDED IN DEED BOOK
246, AT PAGE 153.
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated December 18, 2013,
in the original principal amount
of $328,028.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 140000152 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
December 7, 2017, at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN
ROCK HILL DISTRICT, STAFFORD
COUNTY,
VIRGINIA,
AND
DESCRIBED AS LOT 69, SECTION
ONE PORT AQUIA, AS THE SAME
IS SHOWN AND DESCRIBED ON
PLAY OF SUBDIVISION PREPARED
BY ERIC V. SULLIVAN, L.S., SULLIVAN DONAHOE AND INGALLS,
DATED DECEMBER 16, 2003, ENTITLED "PLAY OF SUBDIVISION SECTION ONE PORT AQUIA ROCK HILL
MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT STAFFORD
COUNTY, CIRGINIA". AS LAST
REVISED, AND RECORDED AS
PM040000184, IN THE CLERK‘S
OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3224781.
Nov. 16, 23, 2017
12143405
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3210441.
Nov. 16, 23, 2017
12143401
Career Training - Emp Svcs
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C
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could have
home
delivery.
The Washington
Post
1-800-753-POST
NO
SF
YES
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
North 77 degrees 34’ 29” West, 165.99 feet to a rebar, found in the
westerly line of McDonalds Corporation (Deed Book 694 at Page 76)
thence with said westerly line
North 12 degrees 25’ 31” east, 258.30 feet to a rebar, found marking
the division line between Sudha Investment, Inc. (Deed Book 1072
at Page 177) on the north and said Kees Development, Inc., on the
south; thence with the southerly line of said Sudha Investment, Inc.,
the following three courses
South 75 degrees 42’ 01” east, 98.22 feet to a rebar, found; thence
continuing
North 12 degrees 25’ 09” east, 160.74 feet to a rebar, found; thence
continuing
South 77 degrees 34’ 29” east, 254.81 feet to a rebar, found in the
westerly limits of said Dan Bell Lane; thence with said westerly limits
of Dan Bell Lane the following two courses
South 40 degrees 00’ 00” West, 347.85 feet to a p.k. nail found; thence
continuing
111.69 feet along a curve to the left, having a radius of 228.54 feet,
a delta of 28 degrees 00’ 04” and a chord bearing and distance of
south 25 degrees 59’ 58” west, 110.58 feet to the place of beginning,
containing 87,120 square feet or 2.0000 acres, more or less.
Tax Map Number: 63-A-66E
The personal property and non-real estate rights and interests to be
offered for sale by the Substitute Trustees consist of all forms of personal
property located upon or related to the real property and owned by the
owner of the real property, as more particularly described in the Deed
of Trust, excluding equipment or furnishings that may be leased, and
all other rights and interests as defined and described in the Deed of
Trust. No representations or warranties are made as to the existence
or condition of any such items, it being the sole responsibility of the
purchaser to make such determination. The Substitute Trustees reserve
the right to exclude certain personal property from inclusion in the
foreclosure sale of the Property. Such excluded items will be announced
at the time of the sale.
A deposit of $40,000.00 shall be required to qualify as a bidder prior to the
sale, except from the Noteholder or its subsidiary or affiliate. The deposit
must be in the form of a certified or cashier’s check.
This sale includes a buyer’s premium of ten percent (10%), which buyer’s
premium will be calculated on the highest bid and added to the highest
bid to become the final sale price for the Property.
The Property shall be sold “AS IS” and “WITH ALL FAULTS.” Neither
the Substitute Trustees nor the Noteholder make any representations
or warranties with respect to the Property including, without limitation,
representations or warranties as to the structural integrity, physical
condition, construction, workmanship, materials, habitability, fitness for
a particular purpose or merchantability of the Property, nor do the
Substitute Trustees make any representations or warranties as to the
legality of any subdivision or whether lots are buildable.
Conveyance of the Property shall be with special warranty and shall be
subject to all existing housing, building, zoning and other code violations,
if any, subject to all critical area and wetland violations, if any, subject
to all environmental problems and violations which may exist on or with
respect to the Property, if any, and shall be subject to all recorded and
unrecorded liens, encumbrances, security interests, easements, rights-ofway, covenants, agreements, conditions, restrictions, leases, occupancy
agreements and mechanics and materialmen’s liens, to the extent any of
the foregoing may lawfully apply to the Property being sold, or any part
thereof, and take priority over the liens and security interests of the Deed
of Trust.
Settlement shall be by certified or cashier’s check or wire transfer of
immediately available federal funds, and shall occur within thirty (30) days
from date of sale, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE. Settlement shall occur
in the offices of the Substitute Trustees or such other place as mutually
agreed upon. The Substitute Trustees reserve the right to extend the
date of settlement as may be necessary to complete arrangements for
settlement.
The purchaser shall pay all closing costs, including the preparation of
the Substitute Trustees deed and all taxes and recording costs assessed
thereon (including, but not limited to, the grantor’s tax), settlement fees,
title examination charges and title insurance premiums. Real estate taxes
prorated to the date of the foreclosure will be paid by the Substitute
Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for all real estate taxes due on
the Property from and after the date of the sale. The Substitute Trustees
will not deliver possession of all or any part of the Property being sold.
The deposit, without interest, shall be applied to the credit of the
successful bidder at settlement. If the successful bidder fails to complete
settlement the deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the costs of
the sale and the indebtedness secured by the Deed of Trust, and the
Substitute Trustees may resell the subject Property at the risk and cost
of the defaulting purchaser. After any such default and forfeiture, the
Property may, at the discretion of the Substitute Trustees, be conveyed to
the next highest bidder on the Property whose bid was acceptable to the
Substitute Trustees.
The Substitute Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids,
waive deposit requirements, extend time for settlement, and announce
additional terms of sale. Terms of sale announced at the public auction
will supersede all advertised terms of sale.
The risk of loss or damage to the Property by condemnation, fire or
other casualty shall be borne by the successful bidder from and after the
strikedown of the bid at the foreclosure sale. The Substitute Trustees
are not obligated to deliver possession of the Property to the successful
bidder, who shall be solely responsible for obtaining possession of the
Property.
At the time of sale, the successful bidder shall be required to execute
a Memorandum of Sale which shall include, by reference, all the terms
and conditions contained herein. The form of Memorandum of Sale is
available from the Substitute Trustees upon request and will be available
at sale time.
The information contained herein was obtained from sources deemed
to be reliable, but is offered for information purposes only. Neither the
Substitute Trustees, the secured party, nor any other party, makes any
representations or warranties of any kind whatsoever with respect to the
accuracy of the information contained herein.
Immediately upon the conveyance by the Substitute Trustees of each
Property to the purchaser at foreclosure, all duties, liabilities and obligations of the Substitute Trustees, if any, to the Purchaser with respect to
such Property shall be extinguished.
William H. Casterline, Jr.
Jeremy B. Root
James R. Meizanis
For Information contact:
William H. Casterline, Jr.
BLANKINGSHIP & KEITH, PC
4020 University Drive #300
Fairfax, Virginia 22030
(703) 691-1235
November 9, 16, 2017
C
JOBS
Call Bob Cranford
at 410-598-0364
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
To apply, go to
deliverthepost.com
or call
202-334-6100
(Please press “0”
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
For routes in
Olney, Silver Spring
& Rockville, MD
Excellent part-time
income!
1-800-753-POST
C054E 2x6
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers
are needed to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
Call Don Money at
301-674-0010
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE
FRIES?"
Beginning at a rebar, found in the westerly limits of Dan Bell Lane (a
50 foot ingress/egress and utility easement, Deed Book 1072 at Page
177) marking the division line between C & G Investment Properties,
L.C. (Deed Book 1482 at Page 344) on the south and said Kees
Development, Inc., on the north; thence
SF
Reliable transportation
required.
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
12141927
MARYLAND
Roommates
SPRINGDALE - 2 rooms for rent,
$200/wk shr BA, and $250/wk pvt
BA, temp rental, Female pref.
Call 336-708-5657, txts allowed.
TEMPLE HILLS- 23rd Pl. Near trans/
shops. Quiet, clean, furn.No smkg.
$200 dep. BR w/ BA,1 person, $700.
spacious bsmt equal to 2 rm w/ BA.
pref M, $800. Call 301-390-5608
UPPER MARLBORO- A lovely SFH,
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Carla 240-355-9525
VIRGINIA
Roommates
once connected)
MARYLAND
HE MEANS
SF
All that certain parcel or piece of ground situated at 6406 Dan
Bell Lane, Thornburg, Virginia, formerly being in the name of Kees
Development, Inc., a Virginia Corporation as recorded in Deed Book
1180 at Page 930, now in the name of Tower Group, LLC, a Virginia
limited liability company, recorded in Deed Book 1632 at Page 767,
among the land records of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, and being
more particularly described as follows:
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
Great part-time
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Transportation
required.
for the following
areas:
Spotsylvania County
All of that certain parcel or lot of land, together with all improvements
now or hereafter constructed thereon, and appurtenances and
privileges thereto belonging, located and situate in the County
of Spotsylvania, Commonwealth of Virginia, and more particularly
described as follows:
JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
877
In execution of a Supplemental Deed of Trust and Security Agreement
dated October 24, 2013, recorded as Instrument Number
LR201300024707 in the Clerk's Office (“Clerk’s Office”) of the Circuit
Court of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, as amended by a Modification of
Supplemental Deed of Trust in the amount of $1,500,000.00, recorded as
Instrument Number 170008792 in the Clerk’s Office (collectively, “Deed
of Trust”), the undersigned Substitute Trustees, any of whom may act,
will on December 7, 2017, at 11:00 a.m., at the location of the property
at 6406 Dan Bell Lane, Thornburg, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, 22565,
offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder the following real
property with improvements thereon and personal property (collectively
“Property”) located in Spotsylvania County, Virginia:
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
833 SLEDGEHAMMER DRIVE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22405.
Spotsylvania County
NOTICE OF TRUSTEES' SALE
FORMER FAST FOOD BUILDING AND PARKING LOT
LOCATED AT THE THORNBURG EXIT ON I-95
6406 DAN BELL LANE
THORNBURG, SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA 22565
12139301
WANT TO SELL IT?
KLMNO
SF
877
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
For routes in
Severn & Odenton,
MD
CLASSIFIED
1-800-753-POST
Prince William County
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
April 26, 2007, and recorded at Instrument Number 200705010052865
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $240,000.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
December 1, 2017 at 1:00 PM
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
873
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
16611 Geddy Court,
Woodbridge, VA 22191
Buonassissi, Henning & Lash, P.C.
1861 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 300
Reston, Virginia 20190
(703) 796-1341
116 9th Avenue
Brunswick, MD 21716
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2017
EZ
873
Frederick County
10418 PUTMAN RD.
THURMONT, MD 21788
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
877
856
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
NOV. 9, 16 & 23
www.hwestauctions.com
Frederick County
McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC
312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800
Laurel, Maryland 20707
www.mwc-law.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
877
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
12141248
856
Frederick County
Roommates
Arlington North— $900 room in
Clarendon Group house. 3br/1ba
3021 4th St N. 1yr lease
Call Mark 703-909-5337
ADELPHI - FURNISHED ROOM FOR
RENT. $820/mo all utilities included,
close to bus line. Call 240-280-5289
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CAPITAL HEIGHTS- House to share,
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pref. 301-537-5433 or 202-251-5441
DELAWARE
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THE DISTRICT EDITION
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2017
Local Living
RAISE YOUR GAME
Do your soirees look more like tailgates? Here’s how to elevate them, affordably. PAGE 8
Home A professional organizer shares five pieces
new parents regret buying for their child’s room
and suggests alternatives for the long haul. 6
Gardening It isn’t trendy,
but the dried bean
deserves some love. 12
Wellness Healthful,
distinctly American
foods to try this fall. 16
On Parenting What to do
when an ex’s behavior is
hurting the children. 17
2
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
Home
INSID E
DC
4
10
12
14
16
17
18
19
House Calls
How To
Gardening
Home Sales
Wellness
On Parenting
Crime report
Code violations
HOME FRONT
Talking interior design with Victoria Hagan
ON THE COVER
Photo by Jennifer
Chase for The
Washington Post
LOCAL LIVING
STAFF
Editor: Kendra
Nichols • Deputy
Editors: Amy Joyce,
Mari-Jane Williams
• Art Director:
Victoria A. Fogg
• Designer: J.C. Reed
• Staff Writers: Jura
Koncius, Megan
McDonough
• Columnists: Adrian
Higgins, Meghan
Leahy
ADVERTISING
Doug Coffelt, 202334-4440 • Email
localliving@
washpost.com
• Telephone 202334-4409 • Mail
Local Living
section, The
Washington Post,
1301 K St. NW,
Washington, D.C.
20071
Victoria Hagan
New York designer and author Victoria
Hagan joined
staff writer
Jura Koncius
last week on
our Home
Front online
chat. Here is an
it’s modern?
A: I use wallpaper in powder
rooms and bedrooms most
frequently. And absolutely.
Sometimes we use a couple of
different papers in one room to
accent a wall.
Q: I love your new book. It’s huge!
I’m wondering how you decided
on this size — it’s almost the
width of a coffee table.
A: Coffee table books are some of
my favorite accessories. The scale
was important to feel as though
you are experiencing these
homes. I wanted the book to be a
great escape.
edited excerpt.
Q: I know you decorated the vice
president’s residence for the
Bidens. How different was it
working in a historic house used
for governmental functions as
well as family living?
A: I certainly wanted to respect
the history and traditions of the
Naval Observatory, but at the
same time I wanted to convey a
welcoming feeling, as it was the
Bidens’ family home.
differently.
Q: My daughter and son-in-law
just bought their first house,
which is, shall we say, full of
potential. All the walls and floors
need to be cleaned, repaired,
refinished and/or painted, and
the possibilities are
overwhelming. How can they
come up with a plan for a blank
slate? They’re still in the studentloan-payoff stage, so they don’t
own a signature piece around
which to build a design.
A: I’ve done a lot of Ikea
shopping. You can find great
quality at a good price, and it’s
important to buy things that you
love. I know it sounds crazy, but I
still own all the pieces from my
first apartment — I just move
them around! That being said, a
nice sofgood sofa is always a good
starting point.
Q: I keep reading that white
kitchens are on their way out.
Any ideas for a modern and fresh
update?
A: I don’t tend to go with trends,
but we’ve done some soft grayblue kitchens, as well as soft sage.
I tend to use lighter finishes in
smaller spaces, but that’s just me.
If you like a white kitchen but
want to add some interest, you
could try changing the color of
the island or the base cabinets
and get the best of both worlds.
Q: What is the most unique
design that you’ve worked on?
A: To me, creativity is not about
escaping problems but solving
them. I always love a good
challenge, and sometimes when a
home or space is not working
architecturally, you need to go
back, review and get the bones
right. That’s when unique
projects come about — when you
have a team of professionals all
working their hardest to solve
problems creatively.
Q: What rooms are you likely to
use wallpaper in? Do you think
Q: Where do you see your brand
moving in the future?
A: My work is about lifestyles,
which are constantly evolving
and changing. When I see a need
for something in the
marketplace, I like to design a
piece that I can’t find. I always say
my day job is like working with a
focus group; I listen and try to
solve problems. Comfort and
scale are always important to my
work. It’s amazing what adjusting
a dimension by an inch can do.
Q: People seem to want their
bedrooms to be cozy sanctuaries.
What are ways to achieve this
without getting too fussy?
A: Lighting is important. I
typically like lamps that have
shades to soften the light. And
never overlook your bedding.
Make sure it’s something you’re
happy with. And use lots of soft
pillows and throws.
LISA ROMEREIN: FERGUSON & SHAMAMIAN ARCHITECTS
Q: What are your must-haves in
Although colorful kitchens are on trend, designer Victoria Hagan tends
to use lighter finishes in smaller spaces. She suggests homeowners who
want a white kitchen change the color of an island or base cabinets.
any interior design?
A: A comfortable sofa, a
comfortable chair and a great
reading light. The rest is easy.
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Q: Your modern interiors look
fresh and crisp. Would you share
some of your favorite white
paints with us?
A: Benjamin Moore Simply White
is the color in my Nantucket,
Mass., home — it’s crisp but
slightly warm. Benjamin Moore
Mountain Peak White is the
white I chose for the New York
pied-à-terre in my book — it’s
even warmer. But please
remember to make a sample;
finishes always turn out
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Q: I just received your new book
and love it! How did you select
CHAT CONTINUED ON 3
3
Home
DC
CHAT FROM 2
the 10 projects featured in it?
A: I wanted to share the fun I
have designing across the
country. I also wanted to share
my philosophy of how one can
design their own dream space.
downsize or move into an “active
adult” community within the
next 10 years or so. How do you
balance buying for quality and
longevity when one’s personal
longevity is questionable?
A: I think having a comfortable
sofa is important. I know the
fashion today is to have things
lower to the floor, but I don’t
know many people who really
love that. We typically like a 17inch seat height. I think there’s a
happy medium. I wouldn’t buy
Q: The powder room you posted
on Instagram is charming. Can
you tell us the sources you used?
Can you explain the combination
of cafe curtains and Roman
shades?
A: The wallpaper is from Gracie,
the sconces are from Marvin
Alexander, the faucets are from
P.E. Guerin, and the gilt mirror
was found antiquing in a local
shop. I use cafe curtains and
Roman shades quite often to
achieve a level of privacy while
still allowing light in. This was
the case in the Washington
townhouse, which has views onto
the street.
the most expensive or the least
expensive — shoot for somewhere
in the middle, and you will get
good quality. Just pick a fabric
that’s not so fragile you would
have to worry about it, and you
should be good for the long haul.
use w
s meth
ne lace in the world tha
localliving@washpost.com
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the rest of this transcript and
submit questions to the next chat,
Thursday at 11 a.m., at
live.washingtonpost.com.
y
pirin Homeowners Since 1961.
Q: I am trying to find a reclining
sofa that will fit well in my
modest family room. Most that
I’ve seen are overpoweringly
large. The room is 12 by 18, but
because of a sliding-glass door to
the back yard on one side and an
equally large entrance to the
living room directly opposite, the
space available for furniture is
really only 12 by 12. Would I be
better off with a sofa and
ottoman, so I could put my feet
up without having to get an
overstuffed, overly wide sofa?
A: I have never found a
comfortable reclining sofa — and
they do tend to eat up a space —
so I would definitely go for a
comfortable sofa and ottoman.
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FRANCESCO LAGNESE
Interior designer Victoria
Hagan says she uses wallpaper
most frequently in powder
rooms and bedrooms.
CaseDesign.com | 202.873.2020
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
Q: I’m 67 and shopping to replace
furniture I bought more than 30
years ago when I was young and
just starting out. My difficulty is
that while I can afford far better
quality than I could years ago,
realistically I might be looking to
4
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
DC
Home
SPLURGE . . .
HOUSE CALLS BY MARI-JANE WILLIAMS
Tight budget for tight space
Toledo desk chair in
black oak and
burnished brass
($395,
restorationhardware.
com).
1
Claudette desk in
white ($2,745,
shopcandelabra.com).
4
2
5
3
. . . OR SAVE
6
Kullaberg swivel
chair in black
($59.99, ikea.com).
1. Move the bed to the
wall with the soffit to
create a cozy niche
effect, and use the
longer wall for work and
storage.
2. An upholstered
headboard in a
neutral stripe adds
visual interest without
overwhelming the small
space.
3. A neutral palette
allows the eye to travel
over the room and take
in the vibe as opposed
to focusing on an
individual item. That
elevates the overall feel
of the space.
4. Place a small dining
table by the window to
take advantage of the
natural light and
scenery.
5. To keep a traditional
style looking fresh, add
pieces that have clean
lines or unusual
textures, such as this
Parsons-style desk and
a swivel chair.
6. When space is
limited, choose lightcolored furniture with
a small footprint to
avoid weighing down the
room.
THE CHALLENGE
SHOPPING GUIDE
Peggy
Davis
wants her
13-by-13foot D.C.
pied-àterre to be a
comfortable space where
she can relax after a long
day of work. She doesn’t
use the studio for
entertaining, so there is
no need to conceal the
bed, but she would like to
incorporate a small
seating area. Because it’s
a rental, the paint and
flooring can’t be changed,
but Davis is hoping to
replicate the feel of a
luxury hotel suite while
sticking to a tight budget.
Furniture: Beyla wicker bench ($175.99, wayfair.com);
Olivia upholstered queen bed in brush cabana taupe
($539.99), Hadley accent table with shelf in cream
($69.99), Harvester dresser ($369.99) and Safavieh
dining table in natural ($449.99), all from target.com;
Henriksdal chairs with birch frame and long cover in
Blekinge white ($89 each, ikea.com).
Accessories: Rustic numbered coat hooks ($51.99) and
Gaines hand-woven natural 6-by-9-foot area rug
($161.99), both from wayfair.com; column table lamp in
Blue Overalls ($44.99) and Sunburst Windsor decorative
wall mirror in gold ($88.99), both from target.com;
diamond damask removable and temporary wallpaper in
Blue Fog (from $56.25 per panel, swagpaper.com); Haxort
full/queen duvet cover and pillowcases in white and gray
($49.99), Knoppang framed posters in black ($49.99 for
set of eight) and Ekby Jarpen and Valter wall shelves in
white and black ($17.99 each), all from ikea.com; Beau
Leopard 14-by-20-inch throw pillows ($67.25 for two,
amazon.com); glass bottleneck vase in light blue ($28,
shopterrain.com).
THE SOLUTION
Designer Alison Giese infuses the space with a mixture of cool
blues and crisp whites, working around Davis’s rental restrictions
by using temporary wallpaper. She recommends different styles
and textures to create a calm and sophisticated retreat.
Contemporary twodrawer student desk
in white ($199.98,
overstock.com).
Designer Alison
Giese
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AND HOMEOWNER PHOTOS BY
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See past room makeovers at washingtonpost.com/housecalls. Tell us about your design challenge. Send photos, room dimensions and contact information to makeover@washpost.com.
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the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
DC
Home
ORGANIZING
ISTOCK
Avoid furniture faux pas when you’re expecting
BY
N ICOLE A NZIA
P
reparing for the arrival of
a baby is daunting for
many reasons, not the
least of which is buying so
many items you’ve never given a
single thought.
Everyone — your neighbor,
your great-aunt, your college
roommate — will give you advice.
It’s easy to be sold on the idea that
you need this, that and, oh, definitely that other thing. But as a
parent and professional organizer
watching children grow over the
past decade, I’ve realized many of
us wish someone had given us
different advice. Here is what I’ve
learned.
Dressers vs. changing tables
I recommend that new parents
skip the changing table and opt
instead for a large dresser with the
changing pad placed on top.
Choose a dresser that will accommodate your kids’ clothes as they
grow. If you get one sized for those
itty-bitty onesies and tiny tops and
pants, you’ll have to buy another
one when your kids are 4 or 5; the
clothes get bigger, too. Also think
about the furniture’s style and
whether the design will endure.
Pint-size bookshelves
The same concept holds for bookshelves. If you start small because
you have only a dozen board books,
you’ll find that you need to replace
or supplement the bookshelf within
three to five years. Instead, use the
vertical space in the room and buy
something taller. The higher shelves
are perfect for displaying photos,
special keepsakes and awards in the
years ahead. And even if the bookshelf sits half-empty for a year, it will
be full before you know it. Here
again, go for something with a timeless design, so that if you need to use
the bookshelf elsewhere, it will fit in
with the rest of your home’s decor.
Beds: Toddler, twin, trundle?
Although I think it’s wise to buy
a crib that converts into a toddler
bed, especially if you’re tight on
space, I know only a few people
who have actually converted their
crib to a toddler bed. They either
end up passing along the crib to a
second child or aren’t able to
It’s easy to be sold on the
idea that you need this,
that and, oh, definitely
that other thing. . . . Many
of us wish someone had
given us different advice.
make the conversion because
they’ve misplaced the necessary
components.
If your kids’ rooms are on the
small side or if they’re sharing a
room, a toddler bed can be ideal.
But if you have enough space, it’s
more cost-effective and less trouble to go straight to a twin bed
when you’re moving your child
out of the crib. It may mean that
the mattress sits on the floor for a
time during the transition or that
you find it necessary to buy a
bedrail. Bypassing the toddler bed
will not only save you money, but
you’ll also have one less thing that
requires effort to get rid of when
you’re finished with it.
When buying a twin bed, many
parents contemplate whether to
buy a trundle. Generally, I think
trundles are a wise investment,
and it’s best to buy them when
you’re buying the bed frame in
case the model is later discontinued. But your child is not going to
start having sleepovers at age 2 or
3, so hold off on buying the additional twin mattress with the
trundle and use it instead to store
blankets, stuffed animals or
clothes that your child has yet to
grow into.
Rockers and gliders
Another item people often regret buying is a rocker specifically
marketed for nurseries. It is nice
to have a chair in the baby’s room,
and if it rocks, that’s a bonus. But
the styles and fabrics of rockers
sold in baby stores don’t transfer
easily to another room once you’re
finished with them. Go with
something more conventional so
that it can grow with the child or
be used in another room eventually. Many of the popular chain
stores carry rockers and gliders in
a variety of colors and patterns
that don’t scream “baby rocker.”
Cutesy characters
Other items that have been
known to suck parents in are character-themed products. None of
us want to believe we’re sacrificing something fun or cute for our
children simply because it won’t
match our home’s aesthetic, so we
cave and buy the themed rug,
bookshelf, chair or lamp. But any
large item that is characterthemed is not going to be a great
investment. If your child is obsessed with a character, movie or
collection, go for themed throw
pillows, blankets or wall decals.
None of these decisions will
affect your child’s well-being, of
course, but they can affect yours.
Every parent will tell you how
quickly time flies when you’re
raising a child. It’s a good thing to
keep in mind as you buy furnishings for their room.
localliving@washpost.com
Anzia is a freelance writer and owner
of Neatnik. She can be reached at
nicole@neatnik.org.
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the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
DC
Home
BY
Cover story
M ARIE E LIZABETH O LIVER
D
isposable plates and red Solo
cups are fine for frat parties and
tailgates, but a host or hostess on
a budget shouldn’t have to resort
to a sweep of the paper goods
aisle. Take a cue from the experts and focus
your efforts on little upgrades that will make
a big impact.
“Some of the best events are simple with a
few beautiful details,” says Lauren Conrad,
whose book “Celebrate” features an approachable guide to entertaining. Conrad,
who also co-founded the nonprofit home
goods store the Little Market, loves combining low-cost accents, such as colorful paper
straws, with higher-end items, such as bamboo plates.
According to Sarah Ashley Schiear, an
A-list caterer turned founder of the lifestyle
and entertaining site Salt House Market, the
fact that more casual get-togethers are on
trend is good news for anyone looking to host
an event at home without breaking the bank.
“First and foremost, don’t take yourself too
seriously,” Schiear says. “There’s this old idea
in our minds where you have to get centerpieces and everything has to be perfect, but
that is not what’s modern.”
One of her favorite ways to avoid partyplanning burnout is to steer clear of anything
tied to one particular season or function.
“Nobody wants to be stuck buying things that
they have to store later,” says Schiear, who
suggests making sure anything you buy for
your event has an everyday use in your home.
Schiear recommends building your party
palette around a classic table setting and
adding greenery, votive candles and seasonal
fruit — she loves pomegranates. “That is a lot
less expensive than doing a big flower arrangement,” she adds.
Conrad agrees that adding even a small
number of strategically placed fresh flowers
can make an event feel special without the
need for heavy decorations. “Use small jars
and vases so you will only need to put a few
flowers in each piece,” she suggests. “A little
bit can go a long way.”
Ashley Rose of the DIY-inspired lifestyle
blog Sugar & Cloth says another way to keep
your decoration budget in check is to choose a
few focal point vignettes — and don’t be
afraid to mix and match items. “You can easily
clip greenery from around your home for
arrangements in a vase, mixed with a few key
pieces from your local produce section, such
as cherries, cranberries, artichoke and
squash.”
When it comes to special-occasion entertaining, however, experts agree that there are
a few things worth splurging on. Read on for
their top advice.
1. Perfect your plating
Whether you’re planning to serve simple
snacks or a sit-down dinner, the plates you
choose will set the tone for the event. “I’m a
big proponent of investing in a set of white
plates,” Schiear says.
And with an Ikea line starting at 99 cents
per plate, you don’t have much of an excuse.
If you must go with something disposable,
Rose recommends seeking out a set of
gold-foiled plates to add pizazz: “You’d be
amazed at what disposable party items you
can find these days that look like a million
bucks.”
The party upgrade
When hosting an event, try starting with a classic table setting. Here, glassware pairs nicely with decorated paper
plates, buffet napkins and wood flatware. Greenery, seasonal fruit and candles are all affordable accessories.
9
DC
Instead of paper plates, try:
Abstract Betsy large paper-and-foil plates
($6.50 for a set of eight, shopmerimeri.com).
Oftast tempered-glass plates (99 cents
each, ikea.com).
2. Set up a hydration station
Schiear says her go-to is chilled bottles of
San Pellegrino water served with citrus wedges. A pretty glass pitcher full of water or a
signature beverage can also serve as a functional focal point. “Style a bar cart with
inexpensive, pretty napkins, a drink dispenser and a few candles,” Rose says.
Instead of plastic water bottles, try:
San Pellegrino sparkling water ($1.79 per
one-liter bottle, target.com).
Libbey pitcher ($20.02, wayfair.com).
Tier one: Paper plates and napkins, plastic cutlery, red plastic cups and a disposable tablecloth. You’re ready for a tailgate.
3. Choose sturdier napkins
This is one detail that experts agree is
worth the price — and extra load of laundry.
Instead of paper napkins, try:
White buffet napkins ($9.99 for a set of
six, worldmarket.com).
Linen hemstitch napkins ($48 for a set of
four, potterybarn.com).
4. Forgo plastic flatware
Metallic cutlery can create an instant wow
factor. “It costs more, but you can use them
every day, and overall it makes a big impact,”
Schiear says.
If you’re not ready to make the investment,
try disposable wooden cutlery that comes in
an assortment of shapes and sizes and coordinates with most decor.
Instead of plastic cutlery, try:
Wooden cutlery ($4.95 for a 24-piece
pack of appetizer-appropriate “petite” forks,
knives or spoons or $6.80 for the larger
“deluxe” size, papereskimo.com).
Project 62’s Izon Mirror five-piece silverware set in gold ($19.99 for a five-piece set,
target.com).
Tier two: Paper-and-foil plates from Abstract Betsy, cloth buffet napkins, wooden cutlery, Chinet’s “cut crystal”
plastic tumblers and a natural muslin tablecloth. It’s a noticeable upgrade from frat party accoutrements.
6. Use a runner
Whether you prefer your table clothed or
bare, a simple runner can help tie everything
together. Schiear recommends something in
a natural color or fabric. “I’ve heard of people
finding things around the house,” such as old
curtains or drapes, she says.
Muslin fabric can also work in a pinch:
“The naturally frayed edges of the material
make it great for a quick, cut-and-go DIY
project,” Rose says.
Instead of a disposable tablecloth, try:
Natural muslin fabric ($3.81 per yard,
Amazon.com).
Natural fiber and Lurex table runner
($24.99, worldmarket.com).
localliving@washpost.com
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
PHOTOS BY JENNIFER CHASE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Tier three: Oftast tempered-glass plates, linen hemstitch napkins, Project 62’s Izon Mirror five-piece gold
silverware set, Marta glasses, and a natural fiber and Lurex table runner. This event is a classy affair.
5. Set out toast-worthy glasses
They may come in festive colors, but you
can do better than those plastic Solo cups.
Schiear says raiding your own cabinets (or
your friends’) for mismatched glassware can
create an eclectic vibe. She also loves classic,
European stackable glasses. If you need
something tossable, Rose recommends a classic tumbler that can do double duty for
cocktails and pre-made desserts.
Instead of red party cups, try:
Chinet’s “cut crystal” plastic tumblers
($21.96 for a pack of 100, Amazon.com).
Marta glass ($1.50 for a tasting glass, $1.95
for a double old-fashioned glass, cb2.com).
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
DC
Home
HOW TO
Looking for illumination on how to replace a broken skylight
BY
J EANNE H UBER
Q: I purchased a patio enclosure
from American Patio Rooms in
Rockville in July 1988. The
aluminum roof has two plastic or
acrylic skylights framed in
aluminum, each 2 feet by 4 feet
on the outside. One of the
skylights cracked last month,
and I am trying to get it
replaced.
I called the number for
American Patio Rooms in
Rockville, but it is no longer in
service. I contacted the
businesses that installed
replacement windows in our
house and replaced our roof, but
neither was able to help because
they have never seen skylights
like these and were reluctant to
try any repair without more
information. The product
information given to me by
American Patio Rooms does not
include information on the
skylights. An Internet search led
me to American Patio Rooms in
Akron, Ohio, but they were not
able to help. Do you have any
ideas?
Alexandria
A: Delray Glass in Alexandria
(703-683-1114; delrayglass.com)
can replace the skylight for you,
said Alexa Seyforth, who works
at the front desk. “It sounds like
plexiglass,” she said. “We work
with that all of the time.”
If you aren’t able to remove
the window and bring it in so a
replacement can be made, the
company can send someone to
measure it. You would then get
an estimate and be asked to pay
half the cost upfront. The total
cost, including installation,
would start at $295 but might be
higher if other materials need to
READER PHOTO
A reader would like to improve
the look of this brass sink drain.
READER PHOTO
A reader wants to replace this cracked skylight on their patio enclosure, purchased in 1988. A number for
the company they purchased the enclosure from is no longer in service, and product information is scarce.
be ordered, Seyforth said.
Q: We have a still-beautiful solidbrass faucet in our powder room.
It is in excellent condition except
for the brass ring that surrounds
the drain. We’re told we have no
recourse except to replace the
entire faucet simply because of
the appearance of the drain ring.
Is that correct?
Severna Park
A: It is true that some local
hardware stores might not carry
or even be willing to order
replacement drains unless you
order a whole new faucet set, but
that is not your only option.
Search online and you will find
plenty of brass drain rings. On
Amazon.com, for example, you
can buy a Danze Metal Pop-Up
Lavatory Drain Assembly With
Lift Rod and Overflow in
polished brass PBV for $28.46.
PBV is the company’s code for a
polished brass finish, with the
“V” signifying that the finish was
put on by physical vapor
deposition, or PVD, which
results in a corrosion-resistant
finish.
Or go to a company that
specializes in plumbing parts.
Thos. Somerville Co., a plumbing
supply company with a
showroom in Owings Mills (410363-3841; tsomerville.com), can
probably find an exact match. If
you don’t know the make and
model of your faucet, bring in a
picture and the staff may be able
to figure it out, said a woman
who works there. “Most
companies have replacement
parts. If it’s a Kohler, I would get
her a Kohler part,” she said. “But
there are also universal drain
rings.”
Virtually all residential
bathroom sinks have the same
size drain opening, 1½ inches, so
matching that is usually no
problem. However, brass is a
mixture of copper and zinc, so
the color can vary depending on
the specific alloy used in a faucet
set. If it’s not possible to identify
the manufacturer and model,
and if you are also very picky,
you might indeed need to replace
everything to get a perfect
match. But if you typically look
at the drain ring for only a few
minutes each morning before
you get on with the rest of your
day, close enough should be easy
to accomplish.
Have a problem in your home?
Send questions to
localliving@washpost.com. Put “How
To” in the subject line, tell us where
you live and try to include a photo.
HAVE YOU ACCOMPLISHED ANYTHING LATELY?
YES
WE HEAR YOU
GOT RID OF
NO
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12 MONTHS
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IT FOR DECENT CASH
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Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
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12
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
DC
Home
Beans, often overlooked, are ripe with history
I planted an
unnamed variety
of yellow wax bean
in late July —
about two dozen
seeds — and by
Adrian
late summer the
Higgins
vines were so
vigorous and
GARDENING
fruitful that I
couldn’t keep up
with them in the kitchen.
This surfeit was fine, because
with a winning bean like that, you
want to stop picking it a few
weeks before the end of the
growing season. This period
allows the beans inside to
develop, mature and ripen. Now,
at the garden’s end, the pods are
wizened and the beans ready for
winter. Some will be saved as seed
for next year; the rest will be put
aside to use in stews.
If I had a big garden, I’d grow
many more beans so that I could
harvest thousands of dried beans
and put them in Mason jars.
Releasing them from their dried
pods would be one of those lovely
Saturday morning chores,
undertaken in a warm room away
from but with a view of the
November drizzle.
The dried bean in all its forms
has none of the trendiness of kale,
blueberries or antique tomatoes. I
find this puzzling, because the
bean asks so little of us and gives
so much in return. Most varieties
will take the heat and humidity of
our summer garden — no small
thing — and grow as fine little
bushes or handsome curtains.
Some of them are hardly less
than jewels, in their forms and
coloration. The Hidatsa Red
Indian bean is the color of coral;
Nonna Agnes’s Blue Bean seems
made of lapis, and my yellow wax
bean is now a polished onyx
black. Yes, they are gems, waiting
in their glass cabinets for a winter
soup or to go back in the ground
next May or June.
I asked Rosalind Creasy, author
of the classic book “Edible
Landscaping,” to name a
beautiful bean and she picked the
Christmas lima, which is mottled
maroon and white and valued for
its nuttiness. “It has a lot more
flavor than white limas,” she said.
Limas and runner beans in
particular have spectacular
markings when dried, but so does
the common green bean in all its
guises. Some form pods as
strikingly marked as the seeds
within. Bird Egg beans have seeds
with dark red stripes; the pod is
cream mottled with a pinkraspberry hue. Dragon’s Tongue is
a Dutch wax bean with pods of
purple striations. Italian borlotti
beans are similar, grown as shell
beans and, when ripe, for winter
PHOTOS BY WILLIAM WOYS WEAVER
ABOVE: The Indian Hannah bean was saved from extinction by
William Woys Weaver's grandfather. BELOW: The Potawatomi Pole
Lima is another Indian bean held in Weaver’s collection.
soups and stews.
“It’s funny they aren’t revered
more,” said Lee Buttala, executive
director of Seed Savers Exchange,
the Decorah, Iowa, organization
dedicated to preserving America’s
heirloom varieties of fruits and
vegetables. If beans were fussier
to grow, use or store, they might
get more respect. Buttala is not
among the indifferent. “Beans
might be our way of staving off
Armageddon,” he said. This is
only part hyperbole. A bean
named the Cherokee Trail of Tears
sustained, to some degree, the
Cherokee Indians forced from
their tribal lands in the 19th
century. The black-seeded pole
bean is still available from
heirloom nurseries such as Baker
Creek.
Because they are selfpollinating, beans will come true
from seed. And the dried bean is
eminently portable, not only
between continents but
generations. There are thousands
of heirloom varieties of beans in
the United States, and each one
has a story.
Many originate from American
Indian tribes and were adopted
and altered through selection by
European settlers. Others may
have started out in the Americas
but were further developed in the
Old World before returning with
immigrants.
The bean is central to the fairy
tale about Jack and the Beanstalk,
but the histories of each variety
tend to be fabulous themselves. In
the 1860s, a southwestern
Pennsylvania matriarch was
preparing a goose for the oven
and found beans in its craw. They
were duly recovered and planted.
Still available, the Mostoller Wild
Goose bean is brown and white
and used for soups and as a baked
bean. “Her family grew it out for
six generations,” Buttala said.
William Woys Weaver is an
author, food historian and
gardener in Devon, Pa., who has
worked to preserve regional bean
varieties, particularly in the MidAtlantic, along with other
heirloom vegetables in the
Roughwood Seed Collection
started by his grandfather,
though named later.
Among them is the Indian
Hannah bean, saved from
extinction by his grandfather. Its
original grower was Hannah
Freeman, said to be the last
surviving Lenni-Lenape Indian in
Chester County, Pa. The collection
also holds another Native
American bean, the Potawatomi
Pole Lima. The beans are red and
black. “It’s just very pretty, and it
keeps that color pattern when you
cook it,” Weaver said. Limas like
the long hot season of the South,
Tip of the Week
The small vertical beaded strands
attached to trees and shrubs are
the egg cases of spiders and
should be left to populate the
garden next year. Spiders are
effective predators of pests such
as mosquitoes and are indicative
of a healthy and biodiverse garden
environment.
— Adrian Higgins
but this variety does well in the
Midwest, he said.
Seed Savers is the steward of
some 5,000 varieties of beans,
preserved year to year in cold
storage and grown out
periodically to refresh the genes.
A New Englander named John
Withee provided the core of the
stocks, donating 1,186 varieties in
1981, 12 years before his death. He
may be to the bean what Johnny
Appleseed was to the apple.
Spurred by a need to find a lost
variety named Jacob’s Cattle, he
traveled the Northeast searching
for beans that had been handed
down by generations. By 1975, he
had preserved 200 varieties. But
in retirement he devoted more
time to his quest, and within six
years his collection exceeded
1,000. It included the Mostoller
Wild Goose bean, a maroon and
white Virginia variety named
Good Mother Stallard, and a
southern pole bean named
Turkey Craw because, you
guessed it, it was retrieved from
the gullet of a wild turkey.
Jacob’s Cattle is also back in
broad circulation, a bush variety
whose beans dry to beige with
maroon-brown markings.
“All of our seeds are part of our
food tradition, but they are really
part of our memory, and John is a
perfect example of that. What
sent him on his quest was to find
a variety he remembered growing
up eating,” Buttala said.
I don’t attach any great
memories to my yellow wax bean
— I can’t even remember where I
got it — but I like that I can put
the seeds on the shelf to dry fully,
stick them in a bag in the fridge
and have them to sow next year.
Ros Creasy reminded me to put
them in the freezer for a few days
to kill the eggs of any weevils.
Once safely stored, they
represent self-sufficiency, which
in an indebted world is the
ultimate luxury. If I had been Jack
in the fairy tale, I think I would
have unloaded the cow for a few
beans myself.
@adrian_higgins on Twitter
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read past columns by Higgins at
washingtonpost.com/home.
13
Home
DC
GARDENING Q&A
Fixes for landscaping,
both edible and not
Gardening columnist Adrian
Higgins answered questions recently in an online Q&A. Here is
an edited excerpt.
Q: I’d like to add a few blueberry
plants for some edible
landscaping. Which varieties are
best for our area? Any other tips
on successfully adding them to
the landscape?
A: I devoted a whole story
recently to blueberries, and the
takeaway, as they say, is that in
our region you should try
southern highbush and
rabbiteye varieties, which are
highly productive and extend the
harvest season beyond the usual
northern highbush types. I
would add that blueberries are
harder to grow than you might
think, because they want acidic,
organically enriched soil that
stays moist but not wet. This is a
fine balancing act and has to do
with attentive mulching and
checking soil moisture,
particularly in a year such as
this, which started wet and then
became dry. The other issue is
you must protect the fruit
against birds, or it’s all over.
Some gardeners have a lot of
success with bridal tulle, of all
things.
Q: My poor ornamental
crabapple got hit just at blossom
time with that late freeze last
spring. There were only a few
blooms, but what worries me is
how sparsely it leafed out after
that. Do I hold out any hope that
it’ll recover, or plan to replace it
next spring?
A: The lack of leaf growth, if it
Q: I cleaned out the fireplace to
get ready for the winter season.
Can I spread wood ash in the
yard and/or garden?
A: Yes, a thin layer of wood ashes
will add potassium and other
elements to the soil. I like to dig
mine in the fall, along with
shredded leaves, so that the soil
is ready to go for spring planting.
According to some experts, you
shouldn’t add ash to the compost
pile, because its high pH inhibits
microbial life. If you have a wood
fire or stove, I would highly
recommend buying a large metal
bucket so that you can store
ashes that might still have
embers in them, which can
persist for days.
JUHKU/GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
Q: We put in a new raised bed
last year in our vegetable garden.
We filled the bed with soil. We
are building additional beds this
fall. Do you recommend filling
with soil, or should we consider
rocks and sand in the bottom
foot or so of the bed?
A: Definitely don’t add rocks for
drainage; you’ll be digging them
up for years to come. I am a big
fan of adding sand to vegetable
beds, not as a layer but mixed in
with compost and soil when I
create the beds. That would be
my recommendation, and use a
lot of it. Maybe one part of each.
Q: We have invasive English ivy,
some Japanese honeysuckle,
vinca and poison ivy that we’d
like to get rid of. Because we are
both highly allergic to poison ivy,
we will need to hire out the job.
What methods are most effective
for this project?
A: Poison ivy is easy to spot at
this time of year because it turns
a beautiful scarlet color. All these
vines can be cut to the ground
and the cut stem treated with
herbicide. If the ivy is on a fence
or tree, it’s best to let the severed
top growth die off over the
winter before ripping it down.
In the Washington area, southern highbush and rabbiteye blueberries can grow well but require delicate care.
Q: When we had the front of our
house professionally landscaped,
they planted one hydrangea
plant. I remember telling the
designer I wanted small and low
maintenance. It was really pretty
the first couple years but then
slowly grew and grew and grew.
It’s at the point where it’s
completely taken over the space
and doesn’t produce any blooms.
I’ve chopped it way down to
ground level for the winter, but I
really want to relocate it to the
back yard where it can go wild.
At what point can I move it? I’m
in Northern Virginia, and we
tend to have a lot of clay soil.
Also, the spot I want to move it
to is shadier than the current
spot.
A: This is my annual spiel about
hydrangeas. If you cut them back
hard now or in the winter or
spring, they won’t bloom next
June. If new growth is zapped by
a late frost in April, the flowering
will also be nonexistent or
diminished for the year. You
can’t treat a hortensia hydrangea
like a perennial and chop it back
hard; if it is twiggy and
congested, you should prune out
some of the older canes. I would
wait until the summer to do this
because these twigs offer some
extra hardiness in the winter and
spring. You can move your
hydrangea, but add some organic
matter to its new site, water it
well, add a little mulch, and be
patient. It will take a couple of
years to return to blooming size,
unless it is one of the newer
reblooming types. That’s doesn’t
sound the case, since it hasn’t
flowered for you. This lack of
blooming is probably due to
improper pruning.
Q: The late frost last spring got
the tulip magnolia in our yard.
Over the summer there were
some branches that never leafed
out. Are those branches likely
dead and in need of pruning?
A: Usually, a spring freeze will
kill the magnolia blooms, but if it
is hard enough, it will also kill
some of the branch tips. If you
can get to them without risking
your neck, you could trim them
off, but at this point you might
risk losing some of the young
flower buds. I’d just leave it, and
it will clean itself.
Q: I need to move my blueberry
plants into bigger pots. Is now a
good time to do it? If not, when?
A: I think I would wait until
March. If you do it now you
might risk the roots sitting in too
much damp soil over the winter
during dormancy and rotting.
Q: We’ve had a really hard time
getting fruiting cherry trees to
survive (one died last year and
another seems to be on the way
out now). We plant several yearold trees, not sticks, but after a
few months the leaves turn rusty
looking, yellow and drop off. Any
suggestions?
A: Cherry trees are among the
most disease- and pest-prone
members of the prunus genus in
our region, and especially sweet
cherries. It is important to select
disease-resistant varieties and
position them where they will
get good air circulation.
Sometimes, diseases are worse
one year than the next. Good
sanitation is important, in terms
of collecting and bagging leaves
that harbor fungal spores.
localliving@washpost.com
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
Q: We are getting rid of our
lawn-mowing service because
they continually cut the grass too
short. We’ve actually got some
bare patches where they mowed
when it was wet. Is now the time
to over-seed so we can get some
decent turf next year?
A: That sounds painful but,
sadly, not unexpected. A lot of
these landscape companies seem
lacking in knowledge of how you
grow things in this climate. Coolseason turf grasses shouldn’t be
cut lower than 21/2 inches;
otherwise, the blades don’t shade
each other and the grass
succumbs to sunscald. It’s really
too late for annual seeding; this
is best done from early
September until the end of
October. You could seed in
February or March for spring
growth, but plan to reseed in late
summer.
was for the entire season, is a
problem and may portend the
tree’s decline. I would give it
another year and see how it
comes back next April. I am a big
fan of crab apples, but it is
essential you pick the right
variety in our region because
many cultivars, including old
favorites, are bothered by rust
and fire blight. Two varieties
developed at the National
Arboretum offer superior
protection against those
diseases, Adirondack and
Narragansett.
14
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
DC
Home Sales
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
These sales data recorded by the
D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue
were provided by Black Knight
Financial Services. For information
about other residential real estate
transactions, visit
www.washingtonpost.com/
homesales.
NORTHEAST
A St., 1459, No. C-Sarah Morris
and Brent Meier to Denise M. Klein
and Michael C. Gustin, $432,700.
Chancellors Way, 2881-David J.
and Jeanne E. Woodhouse to Tanya
Sehgal and Tushar Kansal,
$770,000.
Chancellors Way, 3104-Bradley S.
and Jennifer A. Farnsworth to
Zachary Clark and Kimberly A.
Allen, $720,000.
D St., 407-Victoria Romaneko and
Jason Sims to Charlotte Watson,
$739,000.
D St., 1910-Douglas K. Constant to
Travis and Faith Hall, $615,000.
Delafield Pl., 1233-Vivek Narula to
Kari Lundstad-Vogt Coppersmith
and Philip Jacob Coopersmith,
$590,000.
F St., 1614-Olivia and Karl Wurster
to Kevin Robert Brown and Gelsey
Rose Bennett, $540,000.
Hawaii Ave., 227-Janis P. Speller
and Alicia A. Chisley to Janis P.
Speller, $151,115.
Hurston Lane, 2518, No. 17Sepehr S. Sepah to Akash Pathak,
$440,000.
Lee St., 4624-Pamela E. Bryant to
James A. Burwell and Veronica A.
Strong-Davis, $230,000.
Maryland Ave., 1109-Meg L.
Deronghe and Carl E. Eyster to
Hailey A. Snow and Patrick C. Reis,
$890,000.
Montana Ave., 1539-Sofronia Y.
Samples to Danielle D. Green,
$369,000.
Oates St., 1109-Suzanne
Chernauskas to Andrea D. and
Luke A. Lisell, $832,000.
Otis St., 1501-Justin A. Schaffer
and Mary Kalgler-Schaffer to
Rebecca V. Ylp and Desmond F.
Brown, $615,000.
Quincy Pl., 38-Michael K. Killoren
and Randall C. Nolan to Ana C.
Reyes and Whitney G. Woodward,
$985,000.
S St., 14, No. 203-Megan Horrigan
and Brennan Michael Ross to
Kevin Michael Waldrof, $366,000.
Taylor St., 1007-Norman and
Taylor Pentelovitch to Daniel M.
Friedman and Rebecca B. Vernon,
$725,000.
Vista St., 2920-Stanley Waite to
Vivienne Akwen Awasum,
$450,000.
Third St., 1956, No. 1-U.S. Bank for
LSF9 Mas to Chase Morelock,
$159,999.
Fourth St., 1904, No. 2-Jennifer M.
Pellillo and Khristopher Howard to
Deborah Bey, $442,500.
Seventh St., 705-Michael and
Tove Anderson to Carlyn O. Madden
and Brian C. Johnson, $910,000.
11th St., 424, No. R-Kerry and
Matthew Bovich to Catherine C.
Brack, $651,000.
12th St., 440, No. 304-Eric
Breckenfeld and Jenna Hahn to
Brandon Troy Neal, $460,000.
12th St., 4212-Joseph R. Ponzetti
and Alexandra H. Thompson to
Mary Gilbert and James Kaiser,
$760,000.
13th St., 705-Walter and Megan
Hasenzahl to Jonathan D.
Hoddenbagh and Rowena T. Day,
$780,000.
15th St., 614-William R. Strong to
Armel Castets and Romain Baty,
$700,000.
17th Pl., 3812-Berry Turner-Brock
to Thomas Charles Kost and
Vanessa Rose Warner, $631,000.
19th St., 781-Thai Trinh to Ana and
Maja Lojanica, $599,500.
30th St., 2836-Agnes Delores
Lewis and Alfred Vanderveer to
Marilyn Edmunds, $325,000.
51st St., 802-2414 Perry Street
Corp. to Mitsie Antonette Smith,
$310,000.
NORTHWEST
Albemarle St., 4534-Maria K. and
Diana M. Tasnadi to Bethel Adaeze
Enujioke Egwuatu and Obumneme
Egwuatu, $942,000.
Bates St., 108-108 Bates Street
Corp. to Kevin F. Kostyk and Sarah
M. Keller, $850,000.
California St., 1810, No. 305Frederick J. and Sarah G.
Baldassaro to Barnaby William Aste
Jopson and Celia Bedoya Del Olmo,
$407,000.
Cathedral Ave., 4201, No. 1108WFarzaneh Pirnia-Bomer to Fazil M.
and Sheriza Hussain, $285,000.
Cathedral Ave., 4201, No. 714WMilton and Frieda S. Raben to
Michael and Amy Dunham,
$695,000.
Cathedral Ave., 5008-Bernard A.
and Margaret S. Goodrich to
Silvana Rodriguez and Leonard
Payne, $881,000.
Clifton St., 1308, No. 514-Jeremy
Lee and Xiaofei Li to Kaitlin Mary
Oujo, $567,000.
Columbia Rd., 1423, No. 3-Megan
R. Kanagy and Robert A. Whitten to
Femanda Alonso and Katherine
Shats, $520,000.
Connecticut Ave., 2818, No. 502I-Wei Hsieh and Chunju Ting to
Catherine Yen, $751,000.
Connecticut Ave., 3701, No. 603Margaret Richardson to Maria
Lifsey, $280,000.
Corcoran St., 1442, No. 2-Martin
B. Cohen to Melissa L. Cohen,
$465,000.
Decatur St., 1218-1218 Decatur
Street NW Corp. to Gabriel D. Soll
and Julia E. Bogolin, $1.25 million.
Edmunds St., 4004, No. 8-Helen
Lowman to Maure Testaverde and
Domenico Miccolis, $720,000.
Eskridge Terr., 4948-Matthew T.
Weir to Jeffery and Nicole Mortier,
$2.5 million.
Fairmont St., 1340, No. 43-Ashok
Kumar and Joseph L. Dames to
Jasmine Emma Niernberger,
$303,000.
Florida Ave., 230-Joyce E. Mendez
to Laila A. Kassa, $735,000.
Foxhall Rd., 2834-2834 Foxhall
Road Corp. to Taylor L. and Susan
F. Burke, $2.23 million.
H St., 2401, No. 705-Kaushik and
Ami K. Patel to Dinara and
Lyudmila Mizakarimova,
$285,000.
Harrison St., 4430-Barbara Rotter
and Niki Wisemiller to Barbara
Rotter, $567,970.
Highland Pl., 3307-Lindsley
William and Linda Dodd-Major to
Daniel M. Goodman and Jennifer L.
Tobin, $1.45 million.
I St., 2141, No. 205-Chao Lung Hsu
and the Shiu Ching Kao-Baffa to
Khanh P. Tran, $207,000.
K St., 1150, No. 1211-Eric Smart
and Pamela Dubois to Gary Ian
Peng, $570,000.
Kalorama Cir., 82-Margaret
Eisenstein Delacy and Edward
Lewisohn Eisenstein to Daniel R.
and Maria L. Forman,
$2.62 million.
Lamont St., 448-Megan Lipka to
Mary Kay Hanson and Gaston Pierri
Gonsebatt, $650,000.
Loughboro Rd., 4935-Deblasio
Group and 4935 Loughboro Road
Trust to Marshall Owen Donley III
and Miriam Elizabeth Mims Donley,
$2.58 million.
Macarthur Blvd., 4753-Sarah F.
Robinson to Mattia Cavanna and
Lorenza Pieri, $800,000.
Madison St., 922, No. 302Daphne Bond and Phillip Godfrey to
Janine Jessica Harris, $336,000.
Massachusetts Ave., 4301, No.
5001-Merribel S. Ayres to Andrew
W. and Susan E. Lester, $205,000.
N St., 1225, No. B-Nicholas
Diblasio and Tony R. Lee to
Alexander Phillip Johnson,
$475,000.
N St., 3017-Yolande B. Fox to David
Wayne Hudgens, $5.25 million.
New Hampshire Ave., 1266Robert Lee Jones and Carolyn M.
Martin to Alexander J. Brittin and
Lisa Fentress, $1.7 million.
New York Ave., 437, No. 420Omar Khayat to Saurabh Prakash
and Elizabeth Jane Baxter,
$513,000.
Newton St., 1823, No. 101Benjamn and Keryn B. Gedan to
Shane Kimo Romig, $599,900.
Ogden St., 1456-Russell D. Builta
Jr. and Sandra S. Guzman to Jia
Ryu, $765,000.
P St., 306, No. 2-Dana Chieco to
Christina Farma, $599,000.
Park Rd., 718, No. 1-Seamus
Owens to Sean Cusack, $320,000.
Park Rd., 1808-Aurelio Frederico
Yepes and Efrain Alejandro Yepes
Siblings to Stanley E. and Kristin M.
Woodward, $1.14 million.
Porter St., 2902, No. 32-Shari Ann
Critchley and Richard A. Curd to
Samantha E. Follit, $422,900.
Q St., 1625, No. 107-G. Russell and
Ruth Kincaid to Sonia Galindo,
$680,000.
Quincy St., 505-Randa A. Kayyali
to Christopher E. Kemmitt and
Premal T. Dharia, $975,000.
Reno Rd., 4534-Brian T. and
Kristin L. Mann to Jonathan M. and
Alexis K. Samllridge, $1.43 million.
Rhode Island Ave., 1317, No. 103William H. Key Jr. to Ashley Caroline
Nunes Coe and Ross Evan Coe,
$549,900.
Rittenhouse St., 1380-HazelGoshen Corp. to Laquandra S.
Nesbitt, $679,000.
Rodman St., 3031-USAA Federal
Savings Bank and Joseph A.
Schifrin to Jennifer A. Leonard and
John R. Poirier, $780,000.
S St., 1451-Jordan M. Rosenstadt
and Andrew Sasso to Nicole
Christoff, $1.5 million.
Sheridan St., 1326-Linda Lindsay
and Michael Snipes to Julie Hill and
Kristopher L. Juric, $520,000.
Springdale St., 4438-Ruth G.
Saidman and Simone A. Dickstein
to Jason and Deborah Samenow,
$1.12 million.
T St., 1704, No. 301-Mohammad R.
Adshar-Khalaj to Shaun P. Hughes
and Kathleen A. Kelly, $664,900.
Tewkesbury Pl., 818-Noah
Raymond Scott to Kate Conway
and Christopher Harris, $497,250.
Unicorn Lane, 2729-Elizabeth K.
Clofine to Andrew J. and Jane Diehl
Greulich, $915,000.
Van Buren St., 863-Gaetan
Bucher and Al Cia Pita to Rabea
Sheikh and Rory Lawrence Skaggs,
$663,000.
Varnum St., 1418-Catherine A.
Williams to John W. Nullmeyer,
$800,000.
W St., 1439, No. 1-Verdo Group
Corp. to Emily M. Tatum,
$439,000.
Warren St., 3637-Ohio Conference
of Seventh-Day Adventist to A. K.
Farhad Ahmed and Rezina Perveen
Ahmed, $930,000.
Wisconsin Ave., 3010, No. 401Patrick T. Campbell to Alessandra
Domestici, $320,500.
First St., 1401, No. 2-Nicole
Elisabeth Snarski and Zackary
Kevin Brickhouse to Ori Gorfine,
$740,000.
Third St., 6001-B&B Inc. to Dale W.
Cockman and Kevin A. Powers,
$759,500.
Fourth St., 5813-Quality Fix and
Build to Steve Michael and
Samantha Jakhelln Aguayo,
$760,000.
Fifth St., 5307-Paige Morimoto to
Catharine Lynne Anderson,
$530,000.
Sixth St., 6500-RBL Ventures
Corp. to Satyaveda C. and Trinity B.
Bharath, $800,000.
Seventh St., 4215-James D. and
Diane J. Villars to Gregory S.
Kendall and Alexis C. Chappell,
$712,000.
Eighth St., 5422-5422 6th Street
Corp. to Marcia Bobb and Wanda
M. Wheeler, $606,000.
10th St., 1922-Adam C. and Robin
L. Watkins to Mina Niu, $865,000.
11th St., 2004, No. 125-Nelson O.
Bunn Jr. to Chetna
Chandrasekaran, $415,000.
12th St., 1901-Susan Tull to
Matthew C. Delaney, $925,000.
13th St., 1211, No. T1-Ruben O.
Plummer to Quang Nguyen,
$420,000.
13th St., 1325, No. 705-Katherine
L. Veeder to Thomas L. Harnisch,
$575,000.
13th St., 3633-George Neal to
Elizabeth A. Neff and Paul B.
Sotoudeh, $860,000.
14th St., 2125, No. 814-Emily D.
Furman to Caltagirone Lorenzo,
$850,000.
15th St., 1713-SMS Properties
Corp. to William M. and Alexandra
C. Johnson, $685,000.
16th St., 2440, No. 425-Bethany
Lesser to Emily Barnes, $349,000.
18th St., 1601, No. 205-Terence
and Jessica Wu to Patricia
Bobernieth, $315,000.
21st St., 1260, No. 909-Timothy E.
Emmet to Coura Fall, $350,000.
26th St., 955, No. 608-Elliott Chol
to Keeley McCarty, $485,000.
29th St., 6101-Jorge T. and
Michele Costa to John W. and
Allison F. Dunning, $1.04 million.
31st Pl., 6147-Katherine Anne
Kless Bradley and Neil Bradley to
Paolo Lombardo and Lori Ann
Conzo, $1.02 million.
32nd St., 6125-Christopher Eric
Root and Ellen Marie Novotny Root
to Nicholas R. and Allison C. Finelli,
$874,999.
39th St., 2817-Hudai Yavalar to
James R. Pollock and Alexis B.
Williams, $1.3 million.
39th St., 3801, No. F84-Tara A.
Stanton to Nicholas P. and Caitlin
S. Haugen, $500,000.
43rd St., 4220-Geert Van Der Kolk
and Olga B. Jonas to David Michael
Madden and Andrea Fitri
Woodhouse, $1.38 million.
SOUTHEAST
Alabama Ave., 646-Robert H. Brew
and Elizabeth Goldberg to Hanmin
Dong and Jun Wen, $269,000.
Bruce Pl., 1843-Linda Rogers to
Biniam Berhe, $306,550.
C St., 1127, No. 3-Christina
Hayunga to Lucinda C. Bradlow,
$506,000.
E St., 1335-Jeffrey Keil and Joel S.
Nelson to Claire Helen Pavlovic and
William Collins Perdue,
$1.35 million.
G St., 300-James and Theresa
Kossler to Audrey Draper and
William Cox, $685,000.
Hilltop Terr., 543-Jack Spicer
Properties Corp. to Korenne R. and
Eric J. Smith, $359,500.
K St., 1363, No. 201-Catherine
Martin Scott to Avantika Singh and
HOMES CONTINUED ON 21
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NOV 17, 18, 19, 2017
Montgomery Co. Fairgrounds
GAITHERSBURG, MD • EXIT 11 OFF I-270
Admission: $8 online; $10 at the door
Admission good all 3 days
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Fri. & Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-5
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16
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
DC
Wellness
NUTRITION
Seasonal, sustainable and uniquely American
BY
E LLIE K RIEGER
Eating locally, seasonably and
sustainably — a radical notion
just a few decades ago — is now
deeply woven into our mainstream definition of healthy. And
rightly so. When you eat that
way, you are probably getting the
freshest possible food, reducing
your carbon footprint and enjoying a balanced variety of edibles
based on their seasonality.
You are also connecting in a
meaningful way to your community and ecosystem. Few appreciate this more than Sean Sherman, founder of the Sioux Chef
and co-author of the new cookbook “The Sioux Chef ’s Indigenous Kitchen.” His mission is to
educate people about indigenous
food — the very essence of local,
seasonal and sustainable eating
— and to help people see the
health benefits, taste and abundance of the food that identifies
North America. With that in
mind, and with the fall harvest in
full swing, I decided to highlight
a handful of ingredients that are
uniquely American — some of
the foods that sustained people
on these lands for generations
and that are still widely available
today. Most are familiar ingredients you probably already have
in your kitchen, but being aware
of their heritage and health benefits can shed new light on them
and foster a new level of appreciation and inspiration.
Cranberries
The cranberry we know and
love is a unique species indigenous to North America, and its
tartness, brilliant hue and nutritional benefits are part of the
tapestry of Native American cuisine. Cranberries grow on a low,
vining perennial plant in bogs in
the cooler areas of the Northern
Hemisphere and are harvested in
the fall when they are crimson
red. They don’t grow underwater, though many people have
that impression because water is
often used to float the fruit to
make it more easily harvested.
Besides being turned into sauces
and eaten plain, cranberries have
been used by indigenous people
to make what could be considered the original energy bar — a
food called pemmican or wasna
that is a mixture of dried meat or
fish, berries, rendered fat, and
seasonings. The fruit is rich in
health-protective antioxidants
and a type of polyphenols that
may help prevent urinary tract
infections. It is also a source of
vitamin C, manganese and fiber.
DANIEL ACKER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Harvested cranberries are displayed in Camp Douglas, Wis. The fruit, native to the United States, is rich in antioxidants and a type of
polyphenols that may prevent urinary tract infections, and it also is a good source of vitamin C, manganese and fiber. Try
incorporating cranberries into a variety of fresh fall-themed meals and snacks, or dry or freeze them to enjoy them year round.
There is every reason to branch
out from the once-a-year cranberry sauce habit and incorporate this native fruit into a variety of meals and snacks fresh
throughout the fall and dried or
frozen any time of year.
Maple syrup
The native people of northeastern North America were the first
known to tap the maple tree to
harvest its sap and produce maple syrup and maple sugar. Other
trees, like birch, can also be
tapped, but maple yields the most
copious and concentrated sap.
Maple syrup not only has a distinctive, sweet caramel flavor, but
it also provides a small but significant amount of minerals, such as
calcium, magnesium and zinc,
and is an excellent source of
riboflavin and manganese. Still,
maple syrup is an added sweetener, and it is expensive, so use it
sparingly and as a replacement
for more highly refined sugars in
cereals, sauces, dressings and
baked goods. It also happens to be
delicious in coffee.
Wild rice
Wild rice is not technically a
true rice; it is the seed of an
aquatic grass native to the Americas. It is nutty, chewy and, like all
seeds, especially rich in protein
and minerals. In his book, Sherman details the sacred nature of
wild rice for indigenous people:
“It is the one traditional food
served at all the important ceremonies, weddings, funerals, and
There is every reason
to branch out from the
once-a-year cranberry
sauce habit.
births for many tribes that have
harvested it for centuries.” It is
traditionally served in a multitude of ways, such as simmering it
in soups or brewing it into healing teas. Try it instead of white
rice in a chicken-and-rice soup,
on its own or mixed with another
grain as a base for a grain bowl, or
in a pilaf. In fact, a delicious and
nourishing pilaf could be made
combining all the ingredients
mentioned here — wild rice and
dried cranberries in a maplesweetened vinaigrette.
Bison
European settlers of the American West called the large, shaggy bovines that roamed the Great
Plains buffalo, and the name
stuck. But the animals, which
have roamed North America for
thousands of years, are bison,
distant relatives of the buffalo.
Nowadays, you can find the meat
sold by either name in grocery
stores and on restaurant menus.
It has a rich, beefy taste but is
very lean, with many cuts having
less fat and fewer calories than
skinless chicken breast. Because
it’s so lean, it’s important not to
overcook the steaks — they are
ideally served medium-rare —
whereas bison stew meat is best
cooked low and slow in a braise.
In his book, Sherman quotes
Joseph Marshall, Native American poet and historian, saying:
“The bison is symbolic of the
relationship we have to the earth
and to each other. This animal
has kept us alive for generations,
providing us with food, clothing,
medicine and tools.” With that in
mind, next time you choose red
meat, try bison, perhaps with a
side of wild rice pilaf studded
with dried cranberries in a maple-sweetened vinaigrette. Not
only would it make a tasty,
healthful meal, but it would also
be an edible connection to the
gifts of this land — and a celebration of the culinary culture of its
indigenous people.
localliving@washpost.com
Krieger is a registered dietitian,
nutritionist and author who hosts
public television’s “Ellie’s Real Good
Food.” She blogs and offers a weekly
newsletter at elliekrieger.com. She
also writes weekly Nourish recipes in
The Washington Post’s Food section.
17
Family ON PARENTING
DC
An ex plays favorites,
and it leaves one child
toying with the other
BY
M EGHAN L EAHY
Q: My ex favors my 9-year-old daughter and occasionally
will deride my 12-year-old son (for example, calling him a
“drama king” for having strong emotions and “weird” for
having some minor preference he doesn’t agree with). This
is part of the reason for my initiating divorce, but can you
help me handle this behavior when it hurts both my
children? My daughter tends to take my ex’s side until I
correct her (“I don’t want to hear you call your brother a
‘drama king’ — strong feelings are okay”). My son will have a
period after episodes like this where he is pretty down on
himself. My kids are both in counseling and have been for a
while, so that’s good. Any thoughts?
A: I’m so sorry your ex is choosing
much as your ex is hurting him,
remember that your son can find
a safe emotional home in you. He
will make it through this. A
parent who is chronically unkind
and bullying will always have an
effect on a child. But the good
news is that your son is deeply
connected to you, too. Your
influence matters, and you can
help him get rid of his pain,
disappointment and confusion.
Humans are wired to
experience a wide variety of
emotions — even very hard and
upsetting emotions. And again,
although I wish your ex could see
how much he or she is hurting
your son, the real danger of deeply
hurt feelings is that they get stuck.
You see, when we have big,
difficult emotions and move
through them by talking, crying or
running, for instance, it helps the
mind to adapt to the pain but not
be controlled by it. This is why
therapy works so well. Therapists
aren’t changing the past or
changing you; they are helping
you move through your feelings.
As a parent, you are a
container for your son’s pain and
disappointment. You will have to
continuously reassure him that
these criticisms are more about
his other parent than about him.
You will have to walk the fine line
between defending your son
without completely trashing your
ex (and this would be very hard
for me, personally).
As his parent, you will have to
show him what vulnerability looks
like, and you will have to shoulder
some of the behaviors that may
result from his hurt feelings.
Because pain can easily manifest
as frustration and aggression, and
because your son feels safer
around you, you will have to dance
JAYESH/GETTY IMAGES
with any explosions he has. Not to
mention, your son is 12 years old,
and that is not an easy age. I
recommend reading Gary
Chapman’s “The 5 Love Languages
of Teenagers” to help you
understand the many ways you
can communicate with your soonto-be teen. The book focuses on
practical methods to connect to a
teen and keep that connection
strong. Down the road, it can also
give you a common language to
help you understand both your
son and daughter.
Although you don’t explicitly
ask for advice about your daughter,
she’s also caught in this emotional
mess. All children, no matter how
painful or lopsided the relationship is, will try to stay close to a
parent who is hurting them. This is
due to a biological need to stay
close to our connections, even if
these connections are hurtful. And
because your daughter is on the
winning end of the pain, it is all the
more confusing. But you don’t
have to look far for evidence of how
painful it is to be the openly favored child in a family. Although
the power feels good initially, a
child knows when it is hollow and
feels it even more in the face of a
sibling being put down.
There is no antidote for
helping your daughter through
this except keeping strong
boundaries around the language
that is acceptable and the
language that isn’t. You must
constantly negotiate between not
putting her down while also not
allowing her other parent to
stroke her ego at her brother’s
expense. Like her brother, your
daughter is going to have to learn
that her other parent loves her,
but this love is not a love that is
healthy. Again, this pain may be
acute, but a listening,
compassionate and boundaried
relationship with you, as well as
effective therapy, will go a long
way with your family.
Above all, believe that you are
up to this job. Your kids
desperately need you to act as a
buffer, so take very good care of
yourself. Good luck.
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the transcript of a recent live
Q&A with Leahy at
washingtonpost.com/advice, where
you can also find past columns. Her
next chat is scheduled for Nov. 22.
Send questions about parenting
to meghan@mlparentcoach.com.
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
favorites. (I can’t tell from this
question whether your ex is a
biological parent or a stepparent,
but my thoughts pertain to both.
I will write this as if your ex is the
other biological parent.)
What you are describing is far
more than choosing favorites; I
would argue that your ex is
bullying and/or verbally abusing
your son. Name-calling is not
okay, and it is especially galling
that he is getting bullied for
expressing an emotion.
He is 12 and soon may be able
to choose not to spend much time
with his other parent, but this is
an issue for you and your lawyers
to work through. I am hesitant to
suggest that a child not see his
mother or father, but I will
recommend that you keep
looking into your legal options.
Keep a thorough email record of
the name-calling and the
emotional toll it is taking on both
children.
You have two issues here: One
is the verbal abuse and
subsequent depression/anxiety of
your son, and the other is that
your daughter is caught between
the name-calling and her
allegiance to her other parent.
Both are difficult, and I’m glad
you have your kids in counseling.
Please assess whether the
counseling is adequate; the
relationship between a counselor
and child is a delicate one. When
it’s right, the therapist is a true
balm for a suffering child and can
offer coping strategies. When a
child does not feel connected to a
therapist, you are wasting time
and money. Check in on this
relationship frequently.
Let’s look at your son’s pain
and how you can help him. As
18
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
DC
Crime Report
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
These were among incidents
reported by D.C. police. For
information, call 202-727-9099.
NORTHEAST
ASSAULTS
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block, 8:07
p.m. Nov. 2. With knife.
G St., 1300 block, 8:15 a.m. Nov. 3.
H St., 1200 block, 11:30 p.m. Oct.
31. With gun.
Kenilworth Terr., 600 block, 4:40
p.m. Nov. 4. With knife.
Minnesota Ave., 3800 block,
12:36 a.m. Nov. 4.
New York Ave., 400-1229 blocks,
12:20 a.m. Nov. 2.
Quarles St., 4400 block, 1:46 p.m.
Nov. 4. With knife.
Queens Chapel Rd., 2100 block,
9:40 a.m. Nov. 1.
Rhode Island Ave., 3000-3133
blocks, 1:30 a.m. Nov. 1. With gun.
ROBBERIES
Banks Pl., 6100 block, 12:51 a.m.
Nov. 3. With gun.
Banneker Dr., 3100 block, 9:58
p.m. Oct. 31.
Cloud Pl., 5200 block, 9:41 p.m.
Nov. 1. With gun.
Division Ave., 200 block, 6:52 p.m.
Nov. 2.
Division Ave., 200 block, 12:39
p.m. Nov. 3.
Eads St., 4200-4399 blocks, 5:11
p.m. Nov. 6. With gun.
H St., 1300 block, 8:08 a.m. Nov. 7.
K St., 300 block, 6:46 a.m. Nov. 2.
Mount Olivet Rd., 900-1020
blocks, 9:41 a.m. Nov. 3.
Otis St., 1500 block, 9:04 a.m. Nov.
7. With gun.
First St., 700-999 blocks, 9:13 p.m.
Nov. 1.
45th St., 200 block, 11:59 p.m. Oct.
31. With gun.
BREAK-INS
Clay Terr., 5300 block, 5:24 p.m.
Nov. 3.
E St., 2300 block, 3:56 p.m. Nov. 2.
Market St., 2400 block, 12:32 a.m.
Nov. 7.
THEFTS
A St., 1600 block, 6:02 a.m. Nov. 1.
From vehicle.
Adams Pl., 2100-2299 blocks, 3:31
a.m. Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Ames St., 3500 block, 11:18 a.m.
Nov. 4.
Benning Rd., 1500-1699 blocks,
2:58 p.m. Nov. 5.
Benning Rd., 1500-1699 blocks,
1:01 p.m. Nov. 7.
Benning Rd., 1800 block, 2:05 p.m.
Nov. 6.
Benning Rd., 1800 block, 8 a.m.
Nov. 7.
Benning Rd., 3900 block, 4:10 p.m.
Nov. 2.
Benning Rd., 4200 block, 8:24
a.m. Nov. 3. From vehicle.
Bladensburg Rd., 1200 block,
10:10 p.m. Nov. 4.
Bladensburg Rd., 2500 block, 7:37
p.m. Nov. 3.
Bladensburg Rd., 2800-3200
blocks, 5:16 a.m. Nov. 4. From
vehicle.
Brentwood Rd., 1000-1249 blocks,
4:25 p.m. Nov. 1.
Brentwood Rd., 1000-1249 blocks,
12:56 a.m. Nov. 3.
Brooks St., 5100 block, 11:25 a.m.
Nov. 2. From vehicle.
Bryant St., 2000 block, 10:41 p.m.
Nov. 3. From vehicle.
Bryant St., 2000 block, 10:35 p.m.
Nov. 4. From vehicle.
C St., 2000 block, 6:09 p.m. Nov. 2.
Channing St., 1500-1699 blocks,
2:31 a.m. Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Channing St., 3000 block, 12:31
a.m. Nov. 4. From vehicle.
Constitution Ave., 1200 block,
1:37 p.m. Nov. 7.
Division Ave., 200 block, 8:30 a.m.
Nov. 7.
E St., 1300 block, 10:20 a.m. Nov.
3.
E St., 1300 block, 2:51 p.m. Nov. 3.
E St., 1600 block, 10:13 a.m. Nov. 7.
Eastern Ave., 900-1099 blocks,
6:46 p.m. Nov. 2.
Eastern Ave., 900-1099 blocks,
7:20 a.m. Nov. 5.
Edgewood St., 700 block, 7:39
p.m. Oct. 30.
Edgewood St., 700 block, 12:14
p.m. Nov. 3.
F St., 1500 block, 9:36 a.m. Nov. 2.
Florida Ave., 1300 block, 6:39 a.m.
Nov. 6.
Fort Totten Dr., 4800-4999 blocks,
9:50 a.m. Nov. 6. From vehicle.
G St., 700 block, 6:06 a.m. Nov. 3.
From vehicle.
Gales St., 2000 block, 2:35 p.m.
Nov. 1.
Gallatin St., 100 block, 10:45 a.m.
Nov. 4.
H St., 300 block, 3:31 p.m. Nov. 4.
H St., 600 block, 5:11 p.m. Nov. 1.
H St., 1200 block, 5:19 p.m. Nov. 2.
H St., 1300 block, 10:54 a.m. Nov.
5.
Hayes St., 5200 block, 7:46 a.m.
Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Holbrook St., 1600 block, 4:32
p.m. Nov. 6. From vehicle.
I St., 1100 block, 6 a.m. Nov. 4.
I St., 1200 block, 8:26 p.m. Nov. 2.
From vehicle.
Irving St., 900 block, 10:15 a.m.
Nov. 2. From vehicle.
Jackson St., 1200 block, 4:31 a.m.
Nov. 6. From vehicle.
John McCormack Rd., 3500-3899
blocks, 11:56 p.m. Oct. 31. From
vehicle.
K St., unit block, 12:41 a.m. Nov. 7.
L St., 1700 block, 4:55 a.m. Nov. 1.
Lawrence St., 1700 block, 12:58
p.m. Nov. 1.
M St., 100 block, 3:44 p.m. Nov. 6.
M St., 500 block, 7:47 a.m. Nov. 5.
Market St., 2400 block, 6:24 a.m.
Nov. 6.
Maryland Ave., 1300 block, 7:02
a.m. Nov. 3. From vehicle.
Michigan Ave., 600 block, 12:37
p.m. Nov. 7.
Minnesota Ave., 3700 block, 11:21
a.m. Nov. 3.
Minnesota Ave., 3700 block, 4:08
p.m. Nov. 4.
Minnesota Ave., 3800 block, 11:21
p.m. Nov. 4.
Minnesota Ave., 4600-4700
blocks, 9:26 a.m. Nov. 1. From
vehicle.
Monroe St., 1000-1199 blocks,
10:26 a.m. Nov. 4.
Montana Ave., 1500-1699 blocks,
11:28 a.m. Nov. 5.
New York Ave., 1600-1779 blocks,
2:44 a.m. Nov. 6. From vehicle.
New York Ave., 1800-2299 blocks,
9:11 a.m. Nov. 6.
New York Ave., 2300-3699 blocks,
11 p.m. Nov. 3. From vehicle.
North Carolina Ave., 1300 block,
1:49 p.m. Nov. 1. From vehicle.
Oneida St., 200 block, 7:57 a.m.
Nov. 5. From vehicle.
Patricia Roberts Harris Pl., 2600
block, 8:58 a.m. Oct. 24. From
vehicle.
Pierce St., unit block, 8:34 p.m.
Nov. 1.
Q St., unit block, 7:58 a.m. Nov. 2.
From vehicle.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
9:02 a.m. Nov. 3.
Rhode Island Ave., 1400 block,
3:58 a.m. Nov. 2.
Rhode Island Ave., 3000-3133
blocks, 10:45 p.m. Oct. 31.
Taylor St., 1800 block, 6:03 a.m.
Nov. 3. From vehicle.
Varnum St., 1000-1199 blocks,
12:37 a.m. Nov. 2.
West Virginia Ave., 1900 block,
7:04 a.m. Nov. 1.
First St., 1200 block, 5:03 p.m.
Nov. 2.
First St., 1200 block, 4:16 p.m. Nov.
6.
First St., 1200 block, 3:46 p.m.
Nov. 7.
Second St., 1800 block, 3:01 a.m.
Nov. 6. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 1100 block, 6:05 a.m.
Nov. 1.
Fifth St., 700 block, 6:59 p.m. Nov.
7.
Fifth St., 1100 block, 4:04 a.m.
Nov. 4. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 1200 block, 11:37 a.m.
Nov. 3.
Fifth St., 1200 block, 4:35 a.m.
Nov. 4. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 1300 block, 9:47 a.m.
Nov. 6.
13th St., 800 block, 9:45 a.m. Nov.
2. From vehicle.
16th St., 1200 block, 3:54 p.m.
Nov. 7. From vehicle.
17th Pl., 300 block, 7:50 p.m. Nov.
2.
17th St., 900 block, 2:51 p.m. Nov.
6. From vehicle.
17th St., 900 block, 4:15 p.m. Nov.
7.
18th St., 2400 block, 3:38 a.m.
Nov. 1. From vehicle.
20th St., 4300 block, 12:55 p.m.
Nov. 2. From vehicle.
22nd St., 2400 block, 4:58 p.m.
Nov. 7.
23rd Pl., 400 block, 4:15 a.m. Nov.
2. From vehicle.
24th Pl., 2100 block, 11:07 p.m.
Nov. 2. From vehicle.
24th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 2:38
a.m. Nov. 5. From vehicle.
40th St., 300-499 blocks, 4:13 p.m.
Nov. 4.
40th St., 300-499 blocks, 3:26
p.m. Nov. 7.
46th Pl., 1-199 blocks, 2:33 p.m.
Nov. 7.
47th St., 200 block, 7:19 a.m. Nov.
2.
61st St., 500 block, 6:11 a.m. Nov.
4. From vehicle.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Benning Rd., 3400 block, 2:08
p.m. Nov. 1.
Benning Rd., 4200 block, 1:53
a.m. Nov. 1.
Clay St., 6200 block, 10:36 a.m.
Nov. 1.
Foote St., 5500 block, 10:43 a.m.
Nov. 2.
Hayes St., 3700-3810 blocks, 4:39
p.m. Nov. 7.
I St., 800 block, 7:42 p.m. Nov. 6.
Irving St., 2400-2599 blocks, 4:48
p.m. Nov. 2.
Massachusetts Ave., unit block,
8:11 a.m. Nov. 4.
Meade St., 4200 block, 6:52 a.m.
Nov. 5.
Minnesota Ave., 3700 block, 5:51
p.m. Nov. 5.
Minnesota Ave., 4700 block, 2:53
p.m. Nov. 6.
Newton St., 1800-1999 blocks,
8:06 a.m. Nov. 6.
Riggs Rd., 100-299 blocks, 2:16
p.m. Nov. 6.
Trinidad Ave., 1700 block, 12:39
p.m. Nov. 2.
Seventh St., 4000 block, 12:30
p.m. Nov. 4.
Eighth St., 3400 block, 4:21 p.m.
Nov. 2.
24th St., 2700 block, 5:52 a.m.
Nov. 1.
NORTHWEST
HOMICIDES
Rittenhouse St., 1300 block, 7
p.m. Nov. 6. With gun.
Shepherd St., 900 block, 7 p.m.
Nov. 5. With gun.
ASSAULTS
Columbia Rd., 1600 block, 11:26
p.m. Nov. 3. With gun.
Georgia Ave., 5400 block, 5:55
p.m. Nov. 6. With gun.
Iowa Ave., 4300 block, 6:40 p.m.
Nov. 1.
K St., unit block, 10:08 p.m. Nov. 3.
With gun.
Kennedy St., 400 block, 5:28 p.m.
Nov. 7. With gun.
Kennedy St., 800 block, 10:36 p.m.
Nov. 4. With knife.
M St., 1800 block, 12:51 a.m. Nov.
5.
Wisconsin Ave., 1000 block, 11:54
a.m. Nov. 2.
Fifth St., 5400 block, 8:21 p.m.
Nov. 1. With knife.
15th St., 4500 block, 12:57 a.m.
Nov. 1.
ROBBERIES
Connecticut Ave., 1700 block, 1:06
p.m. Nov. 7.
E St., 300 block, 6:52 a.m. Nov. 5.
With knife.
F St., 800 block, 4:44 p.m. Nov. 1.
F St., 900 block, 6:36 p.m. Nov. 1.
Farragut St., 1300 block, 9:23 p.m.
Nov. 3. With gun.
Georgia Ave., 3300 block, 10:05
p.m. Nov. 5.
M St., 900 block, 8:54 a.m. Nov. 5.
N St., 2200 block, 5:53 p.m. Nov. 1.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1900 block,
2:33 p.m. Nov. 1.
Pennsylvania Ave., 2500 block,
10:23 p.m. Oct. 31.
Pennsylvania Ave., 2600-2799
blocks, 1:55 p.m. Nov. 7. With gun.
Reservoir Rd., 3800 block, 3:09
p.m. Nov. 1.
T St., unit block, 6:18 p.m. Nov. 2.
Seventh St., 1400 block, 5:36 p.m.
Nov. 1.
Ninth St., 1200 block, 6:39 a.m.
Nov. 1.
14th St., 1200 block, 1:27 a.m. Nov.
4.
18th St., 2400 block, 12:46 a.m.
Nov. 4.
20th St., 1400 block, 6:43 p.m.
Nov. 1.
21st St., 1400 block, 7:18 p.m. Nov.
1.
24th St., 900-1010 blocks, 6:20
a.m. Nov. 3.
33rd St., 1200 block, 10:24 p.m.
Nov. 2. With gun.
BREAK-INS
Connecticut Ave., 1000 block,
12:12 a.m. Nov. 7.
Illinois Ave., 4500 block, 11:42
p.m. Nov. 2.
North Capitol St., 1700 block, 7:13
a.m. Nov. 5.
Oregon Ave., 6200 block, 2:27
p.m. Nov. 1.
Otis Pl., 1300 block, 6:07 a.m. Nov.
4.
Sheridan St., 1400-1599 blocks,
10:04 a.m. Nov. 3.
Upshur St., 200 block, 9:14 p.m.
Nov. 2.
Seventh St., 4900 block, 6:41 p.m.
Nov. 1.
THEFTS
Adams Mill Rd., 2800-2999
blocks, 8:31 a.m. Nov. 7. From
vehicle.
Arkansas Ave., 4000 block, 6:13
a.m. Nov. 4. From vehicle.
Arkansas Ave., 4400 block, 2:10
a.m. Nov. 1. From vehicle.
Ashmead Pl., 2300 block, 8:49
a.m. Nov. 6. From vehicle.
Bates St., 100-299 blocks, 7:43
p.m. Nov. 2.
Brandywine St., 3500 block, 8:55
a.m. Nov. 2. From vehicle.
C St., 1800 block, 10:58 a.m. Nov.
4. From vehicle.
Calvert St., 1800 block, 9:28 a.m.
Nov. 6. From vehicle.
Cedar St., 200 block, 7:01 a.m.
Nov. 6.
Champlain St., 2300-2499 blocks,
10:06 a.m. Nov. 4.
Columbia Rd., 1300 block, 3:58
CRIME CONTINUED ON 20
19
Community News
DC
HEALTH CODE VIOLATIONS
These food establishments were
closed because of health code
violations. The list, compiled from
health department reports,
reflects actions taken by the
departments.
THE DISTRICT
Anacostia Market
1303 Good Hope Rd. SE
Closed Nov. 7 because of insects,
rodents and other pests.
Chen’s Gourmet
5117 MacArthur Blvd. NW
Closed Nov. 7 because of
circumstances that may endanger
public health and because of
insects, rodents and other pests.
Flippin’ Pizza
1250 Maryland Ave. SW
Closed Nov. 8 because of
circumstances that may endanger
public health.
FroZenYo
1634 I St. NW
Closed Nov. 6 for operating without
hot water. Reopened the next day.
Reopened last Thursday.
Park Place Gourmet
1634 I St. NW
Closed last Thursday because of
circumstances that may endanger
public health.
MARYLAND
El Mexireno
5494 St. Barnabas Rd., Oxon Hill
Closed Nov. 8 because of roaches.
Las Laureles
6575 Ager Rd., Hyattsville
Closed Nov. 8 because of roaches.
Reopened last Thursday.
VIRGINIA
No new closures were reported.
— Compiled by Terence McArdle
Life at Its Finest
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A MERIDIAN SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY
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1330 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20005
www.meridiansenior.com/the-residences-at-thomas-circle
License# ALR-0018
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
Independent Living • Assisted Living
Memory Care
Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitative Care
20
the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
DC
Crime Report
CRIME FROM 18
a.m. Nov. 6. From vehicle.
Columbia Rd., 1700 block, 7:28
p.m. Nov. 2. From vehicle.
Columbia Rd., 1700 block, 2:54
p.m. Nov. 6.
Columbia Rd., 1700 block, 1:57
p.m. Nov. 7.
Columbia Rd., 1800 block, 8:55
p.m. Nov. 2. From vehicle.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
10:53 p.m. Nov. 3.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
5:05 p.m. Nov. 4.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
12:06 p.m. Nov. 6.
Connecticut Ave., 1300-1699
blocks, 5:44 a.m. Nov. 1.
Connecticut Ave., 1300-1699
blocks, 8:48 p.m. Nov. 3. From
vehicle.
Connecticut Ave., 1300-1699
blocks, 11:59 a.m. Nov. 5.
Connecticut Ave., 1700 block, 8:14
a.m. Nov. 1.
Connecticut Ave., 1700 block, 1:22
p.m. Nov. 1.
Connecticut Ave., 1700 block,
8:02 p.m. Nov. 3.
Connecticut Ave., 5600 block,
12:15 p.m. Nov. 6.
Constitution Ave., 100 block, 5:50
p.m. Nov. 4.
Corcoran St., 1700 block, 8:46
a.m. Nov. 1.
Crittenden St., 1400 block, 3:18
p.m. Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Davis St., 3600 block, 5:25 a.m.
Nov. 2. From vehicle.
Dupont Cir., unit block, 4:28 p.m.
Nov. 1.
Dupont Cir., unit block, 2:44 a.m.
Nov. 5.
E St., 900 block, 12:27 p.m. Nov. 3.
E St., unit block, 4:22 p.m. Nov. 5.
From vehicle.
Euclid St., 800-999 blocks, 1:39
a.m. Oct. 29. From vehicle.
Euclid St., 800-999 blocks, 9:46
a.m. Oct. 30. From vehicle.
Euclid St., 1300 block, 3 p.m. Nov.
2.
Euclid St., 1300 block, 12:26 p.m.
Nov. 7.
F St., 1000 block, 11:43 a.m. Nov. 4.
F St., 2100 block, 11:42 a.m. Oct.
31.
Fairmont St., 700 block, 5:37 a.m.
Nov. 5. From vehicle.
Fairmont St., 1300 block, 3:25
a.m. Nov. 5. From vehicle.
Flagler Pl., 2200 block, 7:34 a.m.
Nov. 3.
Florida Ave., 2000 block, 5 a.m.
Nov. 1.
G St., 1200 block, 5:24 p.m. Nov. 4.
Garrison St., 4100 block, 4:05
p.m. Nov. 4.
Georgia Ave., 3200 block, 4:43
p.m. Nov. 2. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3400-3501 blocks, 8
a.m. Nov. 5.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 10:04
a.m. Nov. 2.
Georgia Ave., 3800 block, 6:07
a.m. Nov. 1.
Georgia Ave., 3900 block, 6:54
a.m. Nov. 2.
Georgia Ave., 6300 block, 12:34
p.m. Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 6400 block, 6:11
p.m. Nov. 4.
Georgia Ave., 6600 block, 10:03
p.m. Nov. 5. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 7300 block, 6:36
p.m. Nov. 2.
Girard St., 1400 block, 12:19 p.m.
Nov. 1.
Girard St., 1400 block, 10:26 p.m.
Nov. 4. From vehicle.
Gresham Pl., 500-699 blocks, 5:25
a.m. Oct. 16. From vehicle.
Gresham Pl., 700-999 blocks, 4:54
p.m. Nov. 6. From vehicle.
H St., 400 block, 11:29 a.m. Nov. 2.
From vehicle.
H St., 600 block, 7:37 a.m. Nov. 2.
H St., unit block, 2:12 a.m. Nov. 6.
Hiatt Pl., 3200 block, 1:26 a.m.
Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Hobart Pl., 500-699 blocks, 2:49
p.m. Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Hobart Pl., 700-999 blocks, 8:55
a.m. Nov. 5. From vehicle.
I St., 1100 block, 12:56 a.m. Nov. 4.
From vehicle.
I St., 1800 block, 1:59 a.m. Nov. 2.
I St., 2200 block, 11:46 a.m. Nov. 5.
Indiana Ave., 500 block, 12:37
p.m. Nov. 1.
Irving St., 1600-1799 blocks, 6:16
a.m. Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Jonquil St., 1600 block, 1:40 p.m.
Nov. 2. From vehicle.
K St., 1300 block, 11:05 p.m. Nov.
2. From vehicle.
K St., 1300 block, 4:31 p.m. Nov. 5.
From vehicle.
K St., 1400 block, 3:03 p.m. Nov. 2.
K St., 1400 block, 10:55 a.m. Nov.
6.
K St., 1700 block, 6:43 a.m. Nov. 1.
Kalorama Rd., 1600 block, 5:22
p.m. Nov. 2.
Kalorama Rd., 1700 block, 12:53
a.m. Nov. 3. From vehicle.
Kansas Ave., 4500 block, 9:27
a.m. Nov. 1.
Kansas Ave., 5500 block, 4:54
p.m. Nov. 3.
Kennedy St., 100 block, 3:57 a.m.
Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Kenyon St., 500-699 blocks, 6:56
p.m. Nov. 3.
Kenyon St., 1300 block, 5:04 a.m.
Nov. 2. From vehicle.
Kenyon St., 1300 block, 9:19 a.m.
Nov. 4.
Lamont St., 700-999 blocks, 12:40
p.m. Nov. 3. From vehicle.
Lamont St., 1000 block, 4:26 a.m.
Nov. 6.
Lamont St., 1100-1299 blocks,
7:21 a.m. Nov. 5.
Lanier Pl., 1700 block, 12:36 p.m.
Nov. 4.
M St., 1200 block, 1:50 a.m. Nov. 3.
M St., 3000 block, 4:02 p.m. Nov. 4.
M St., 3200 block, 7:41 a.m. Nov. 1.
M St., 3200 block, 6:41 p.m. Nov. 1.
M St., 3200 block, 10:37 a.m. Nov.
2.
M St., 3200 block, 7:51 a.m. Nov. 5.
M St., 3200 block, 12:02 p.m. Nov.
6.
M St., 3400 block, 11:53 p.m. Oct.
31.
Madison St., 1400-1599 blocks,
6:21 a.m. Nov. 4. From vehicle.
Manchester Lane, 1400 block,
7:02 a.m. Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
10:01 a.m. Nov. 2.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
5:54 a.m. Nov. 3.
Massachusetts Ave., 900 block,
5:21 p.m. Nov. 4.
Massachusetts Ave., 1200 block,
12:30 a.m. Nov. 3. From vehicle.
Massachusetts Ave., 3900-4099
blocks, 6:11 a.m. Nov. 4. From
vehicle.
Monroe St., 1000 block, 3:53 a.m.
Nov. 5. From vehicle.
Monroe St., 1100-1299 blocks,
9:35 a.m. Nov. 1.
Monroe St., 1100-1299 blocks,
4:44 p.m. Nov. 1.
Monroe St., 1400-1599 blocks,
11:01 a.m. Nov. 1. From vehicle.
Mount Vernon Pl., 700-899 blocks,
12:59 p.m. Oct. 31.
Mount Vernon Pl., 700-899 blocks,
8:08 a.m. Nov. 1.
N St., 3400 block, 9:33 p.m. Oct.
31.
New Hampshire Ave., 600-749
blocks, 2:17 p.m. Nov. 2.
New Hampshire Ave., 900 block,
4:38 p.m. Nov. 5.
New Mexico Ave., 3200 block,
11:17 a.m. Nov. 6.
New York Ave., 400 block, 2:21
p.m. Nov. 7.
Newton Pl., 400 block, 12:49 p.m.
Nov. 2.
North Capitol St., 1100 block, 1:08
a.m. Nov. 3. From vehicle.
North Capitol St., 1600 block,
12:47 p.m. Nov. 4.
North Capitol St., 1700 block, 6
a.m. Nov. 3.
North Capitol St., 2300 block,
2:35 p.m. Nov. 6.
O St., 3600 block, 5:16 p.m. Nov. 3.
Oak St., 1400 block, 12:49 p.m.
Nov. 4.
Ogden St., 1400 block, 3:29 a.m.
Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Oneida Pl., 700 block, 8:37 a.m.
Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Ontario Rd., 2300-2499 blocks,
2:25 p.m. Nov. 1.
Ontario Rd., 2300-2499 blocks,
4:23 p.m. Nov. 1.
Ontario Rd., 2300-2499 blocks,
12:10 p.m. Nov. 4.
Ontario Rd., 2300-2499 blocks,
10:40 a.m. Nov. 6.
Ontario Rd., 2300-2499 blocks,
3:35 p.m. Nov. 6.
P St., 1400 block, 11:17 a.m. Nov. 5.
P St., 2300-2599 blocks, 3:36 p.m.
Nov. 5. From vehicle.
Palmer Alley, 900 block, 2:04 a.m.
Nov. 1.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
7:27 a.m. Nov. 6. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1300 block,
5:44 p.m. Nov. 4. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1700 block,
9:30 a.m. Nov. 2.
Pierce St., 100 block, 11:19 a.m.
Nov. 7.
Piney Branch Rd., 6500 block,
10:28 a.m. Nov. 3.
Q St., 900 block, 10:33 p.m. Nov. 2.
From vehicle.
Q St., 2300-2699 blocks, 4:48 a.m.
Nov. 3.
R St., 1000 block, 5:51 a.m. Nov. 3.
From vehicle.
R St., 1200 block, 7:38 a.m. Nov. 4.
R St., 1900 block, 10:37 a.m. Nov.
2. From vehicle.
R St., 1900 block, 4:31 p.m. Nov. 2.
From vehicle.
Randolph Pl., 100 block, 12:53
a.m. Nov. 4. From vehicle.
Reservoir Rd., 3900-4399 blocks,
2:15 p.m. Nov. 5. From vehicle.
Reservoir Rd., 3900-4399 blocks,
5:14 p.m. Nov. 6.
Rhode Island Ave., 1500 block,
9:16 a.m. Nov. 3.
Rhode Island Ave., 1700 block,
8:53 a.m. Nov. 3.
Ridge St., 400 block, 6:05 a.m.
Nov. 3. From vehicle.
Riggs Pl., 1800 block, 6:26 a.m.
Nov. 1. From vehicle.
Sherman Ave., 2700 block, 10:59
a.m. Nov. 2. From vehicle.
T St., 900 block, 1:46 p.m. Nov. 4.
From vehicle.
T St., 1100 block, 12:08 p.m. Nov. 5.
From vehicle.
T St., 1200 block, 3:44 p.m. Nov. 5.
From vehicle.
T St., 1400 block, 1:36 p.m. Nov. 4.
T St., unit block, 9:58 a.m. Nov. 6.
From vehicle.
Taylor St., 900-1199 blocks, 7:29
a.m. Nov. 4. From vehicle.
Thomas Jefferson St., 1000 block,
10:55 a.m. Nov. 6. From vehicle.
Thomas Cir., unit block, 5:37 a.m.
Nov. 3.
Thomas St., 100 block, 3:48 a.m.
Nov. 2.
U St., 1300 block, 9:30 a.m. Nov. 3.
U St., 1700 block, 7:52 a.m. Nov. 5.
From vehicle.
Underwood St., 1200 block, 8:34
a.m. Nov. 2. From vehicle.
V St., 800 block, 1:41 p.m. Oct. 30.
From vehicle.
Vermont Ave., 1200 block, 8:39
a.m. Nov. 1. From vehicle.
Virginia Ave., 2400 block, 9:03
a.m. Nov. 4.
Water St., 3300 block, 2:10 p.m.
Nov. 5. From vehicle.
Water St., 3400-3599 blocks, 11
a.m. Nov. 4.
Whitehaven Pkwy., 3500-3699
blocks, 6:56 a.m. Nov. 6. From
vehicle.
Wisconsin Ave., 1000 block, 12:20
a.m. Nov. 3. From vehicle.
Wisconsin Ave., 1200 block, 3:51
p.m. Nov. 1.
Wisconsin Ave., 1200 block, 5:45
a.m. Nov. 6.
Wisconsin Ave., 1800-2008
blocks, 9:39 a.m. Nov. 1.
Wisconsin Ave., 2500 block, 5:04
p.m. Nov. 1.
Wisconsin Ave., 2500 block, 8:25
a.m. Nov. 5. From vehicle.
Wisconsin Ave., 3000-3199
blocks, 6:45 p.m. Nov. 2.
Wisconsin Ave., 4400 block, 3:04
p.m. Nov. 6.
Wisconsin Ave., 5200 block, 4
p.m. Nov. 2.
Wisconsin Ave., 5300 block, 1:52
p.m. Nov. 5.
First St., 1900 block, 6:31 a.m. Oct.
29.
First St., 1900 block, 6:31 a.m. Nov.
4. From vehicle.
Third St., 900 block, 8:09 a.m. Nov.
5. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 400 block, 8:14 a.m.
Nov. 6.
Fourth St., 800 block, 11:44 p.m.
Oct. 31. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 5200 block, 6:27 a.m.
Nov. 5.
Fourth St., 6900 block, 8:13 a.m.
Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 500 block, 2:19 p.m. Nov.
1.
Sixth St., 2300-2699 blocks, 3:25
p.m. Nov. 3. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 1400 block, 7:34 a.m.
Nov. 6.
Seventh St., 1900 block, 4:36 a.m.
Nov. 6.
Seventh St., 5600 block, 4:07 p.m.
Nov. 2. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 2100-2299 blocks, 7:37
a.m. Nov. 3. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 2100-2299 blocks, 6:28
a.m. Nov. 6. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 2100-2299 blocks,
11:22 a.m. Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 400 block, 3:04 a.m. Nov.
2.
Ninth St., 800 block, 7:12 a.m. Nov.
2.
Ninth St., 800 block, 9:33 p.m. Nov.
3.
Ninth St., 1200 block, 4:53 p.m.
Nov. 4.
Ninth St., 1900 block, 1:25 p.m.
Nov. 2.
Ninth St., 1900 block, 4:16 p.m.
Nov. 2.
Ninth St., 1900 block, 11:33 p.m.
Nov. 3. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 2000 block, 3:53 p.m.
Nov. 7. From vehicle.
10th St., 2100 block, 2:43 p.m.
Nov. 1.
11th St., 1300 block, 9:52 a.m. Nov.
6. From vehicle.
11th St., 1400 block, 6:32 a.m. Nov.
3.
11th St., 1500 block, 12:24 p.m.
Nov. 3.
11th St., 1900 block, 1:46 p.m. Nov.
3.
11th St., 2100 block, 2:38 p.m. Nov.
3.
11th St., 2700 block, 6:26 a.m. Nov.
2. From vehicle.
12th St., 600 block, 7:18 a.m. Nov.
7.
12th St., 1900 block, 11:15 p.m.
Nov. 3. From vehicle.
13th St., 2900 block, 8:47 a.m.
Nov. 4. From vehicle.
13th St., 3100 block, 5:29 p.m.
Nov. 3. From vehicle.
13th St., 3500 block, 8:48 a.m. Oct.
26. From vehicle.
CRIME CONTINUED ON 22
21
Home Sales
DC
HOMES FROM 14
Gurpartap Singh Deo, $298,000.
Lyndale Pl., 3141-Charon T. Ellis to
Charon T. Ellis and Aleesha Cade,
$177,700.
Mellon St., 616-Walwyn
Development Corp. to Fekadu
Tedesse Beyene and Amsalework
Yewondwoson, $400,000.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1391, No.
423-James W. Moore Jr. to Kristen
M. Schwendinger, $480,000.
Savannah St., 1214-1214
Savannah Street Corp. to Nutan
Patel, $360,000.
Southern Ave., 3726-James Henry
Johnson and Michelle R. Vailes to
Jack McLean and Corey Boney,
$465,000.
U St., 1300-Feleke Enterprises
Corp. and Hiwote Abera Degu to
Joseph C. Reisinger, $446,400.
Third St., 1110-Karen Conwell
Smith to Todd R. and Julie Baker
Rush, $1.07 million.
15th Pl., 3200-Matthew Jones to
Julian P. Purdy, $333,695.
16th St., 237-Julie A. Philp and
Nathan C. Powell to Dorsati
Hosseini Madani, $955,000.
18th Pl., 3315-Yama Ahmadullah
to Thomas Adams, $308,000.
Bestsellers in politics,
intrigue and more.
SOUTHWEST
G St., 350, No. N214-Dores A.
Farrow to Caitlyn E. Stephenson,
$384,000.
First St., 4015-A.J. Harris to David
Nathan Jordan, $250,000.
Fourth St., 800, No. N308Nicholas John Knowlton to Sean R.
Ongley, $340,000.
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the washington post . thursday, november 16 , 2017
DC
Crime Report
CRIME FROM 20
13th St., 4000 block, 8:58 p.m. Oct.
31.
13th St., 4900 block, 12:37 p.m.
Nov. 1.
14th St., 1400 block, 7:43 p.m. Nov.
4.
14th St., 1900 block, 12:09 p.m.
Nov. 7.
14th St., 2200 block, 9:15 a.m.
Nov. 5.
14th St., 2900 block, 12:15 a.m.
Nov. 6. From vehicle.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 10:24
a.m. Nov. 1.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 12:46
p.m. Nov. 1.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 11:03
p.m. Nov. 2.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 11:24
a.m. Nov. 6.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 6:45
p.m. Nov. 6.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 8:36
a.m. Nov. 7.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 10:22
a.m. Nov. 7.
14th St., 3300 block, 4:51 a.m.
Nov. 7. From vehicle.
14th St., 3600 block, 9:22 p.m. Oct.
31.
14th St., 3700 block, 4:18 p.m. Nov.
4.
14th St., 3900 block, 7:11 a.m. Nov.
6.
14th St., 4300 block, 5:40 p.m.
Nov. 2.
14th St., 6400 block, 9:44 a.m.
Nov. 7. From vehicle.
15th St., 600 block, 11:51 a.m. Nov.
1.
16th St., 1000 block, 3:30 p.m.
Nov. 2.
16th St., 1400 block, 10:38 a.m.
Nov. 4. From vehicle.
16th St., 3600 block, 7:36 a.m.
Nov. 7. From vehicle.
17th St., 1100 block, 2:42 p.m. Nov.
2. From vehicle.
17th St., 1300 block, 11:51 p.m.
Nov. 3. From vehicle.
17th St., 2400 block, 7:03 p.m.
Nov. 3. From vehicle.
18th St., 2300 block, 5:35 p.m.
Nov. 6.
19th St., 1200 block, 12:50 p.m.
Oct. 31.
19th St., 1800 block, 1:31 p.m. Nov.
6. From vehicle.
20th St., 1100 block, 7:09 p.m. Nov.
2.
20th St., 1700 block, 2:51 p.m. Nov.
2.
21st St., 1300 block, 8:57 p.m. Nov.
1. From vehicle.
22nd St., 800 block, 1:05 a.m. Nov.
3. From vehicle.
22nd St., 1700 block, 9:22 p.m.
Oct. 31. From vehicle.
23rd St., 900 block, 11:19 a.m. Nov.
7.
25th St., 1200 block, 8:28 p.m.
Nov. 1.
31st St., 1600 block, 6:20 a.m. Nov.
1. From vehicle.
32nd St., 6200 block, 2:38 a.m.
Nov. 1. From vehicle.
35th St., 1200 block, 12:23 p.m.
Nov. 5. From vehicle.
36th Pl., 2800 block, 10:37 a.m.
Nov. 1. From vehicle.
41st St., 2400 block, 8:19 a.m. Nov.
4. From vehicle.
41st St., 4700 block, 7:12 a.m. Nov.
6.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Calvert St., 1800-1999 blocks,
5:56 a.m. Nov. 6.
Connecticut Ave., 1300-1699
blocks, 1:34 a.m. Nov. 5.
Georgia Ave., 2700 block, 6:21
p.m. Nov. 4.
Georgia Ave., 3400 block, 9:57
a.m. Nov. 1.
Geranium St., 1400 block, 1:29
p.m. Nov. 1.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
8:47 a.m. Nov. 4.
Mount Pleasant St., 3300 block,
9:23 a.m. Nov. 5.
New Mexico Ave., 3200 block,
3:06 p.m. Oct. 12.
Park Rd., 1300 block, 1:43 p.m.
Nov. 7.
Quebec Pl., 700 block, 1:24 p.m.
Nov. 5.
Spring Rd., 1400-1599 blocks,
7:43 a.m. Nov. 5.
Summit Pl., 1700 block, 7:41 a.m.
Nov. 3.
Upshur St., 200 block, 4:27 p.m.
Nov. 2.
18th St., 3300 block, 7:58 p.m.
Nov. 5.
SOUTHEAST
ASSAULTS
Astor Pl., 5000 block, 3:52 p.m.
Nov. 7.
D St., 1900 block, 5:38 p.m. Oct. 31.
With knife.
Gainesville St., 2800 block, 8:21
a.m. Nov. 4. With knife.
Stanton Terr., 1700 block, 3:02
p.m. Nov. 6. With gun.
Sixth St., 4200 block, 10:53 p.m.
Nov. 4. With gun.
18th St., 1600 block, 8:21 p.m. Nov.
4. With knife.
24th Pl., 3000 block, 3:53 p.m.
Nov. 5. With gun.
ROBBERIES
Alabama Ave., 2500 block, 2:52
p.m. Nov. 3. With gun.
Alabama Ave., 2600-2799 blocks,
1:39 a.m. Nov. 2.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3100 block, 2
p.m. Nov. 7. With gun.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3800-3938
blocks, 11:06 a.m. Nov. 3.
Queens Stroll Pl., 5000 block, 1:57
a.m. Nov. 7.
Southern Ave., 1200 block, 9:46
p.m. Oct. 31.
Stanton Rd., 3100 block, 10:40
p.m. Nov. 2. With gun.
Valley Pl., 1300 block, 10:49 a.m.
Nov. 1.
24th St., 2300 block, 5:32 p.m.
Nov. 1.
30th St., 2700 block, 1:45 p.m.
Nov. 6. With gun.
BREAK-INS
Alabama Ave., 1400 block, 10:56
p.m. Nov. 4.
Alabama Ave., 1400 block, 12:50
a.m. Nov. 6.
Barnaby Rd., 700-4375 blocks,
12:24 p.m. Nov. 7.
Congress Pl., 1400 block, 10:22
p.m. Nov. 4.
Stanton Rd., 3000 block, 6:12 p.m.
Nov. 1.
Texas Ave., 2800 block, 1:07 p.m.
Nov. 6.
Ninth St., 3700-3851 blocks, 9:06
a.m. Nov. 7.
16th St., 300 block, 7:01 p.m. Oct.
31.
16th St., 1700 block, 6:31 a.m. Nov.
2.
THEFTS
Alabama Ave., 2600-2799 blocks,
3:44 p.m. Nov. 1.
Alabama Ave., 2800-2999 blocks,
2:45 p.m. Nov. 7.
Anacostia Rd., 200-499 blocks,
4:53 a.m. Nov. 2.
Anacostia Rd., 200-499 blocks,
4:49 a.m. Nov. 6.
Bass Cir., unit block, 11:20 a.m.
Nov. 5.
Chaplin St., 300 block, 4:58 a.m.
Nov. 5. From vehicle.
E St., 1300 block, 8:01 a.m. Nov. 7.
East Capitol St., 4100-4276
blocks, 4:12 p.m. Nov. 1.
Eaton Rd., 1100-1299 blocks, 7:03
a.m. Oct. 24. From vehicle.
Elmira St., 600 block, 5:19 p.m.
Nov. 1.
Ely Pl., 3700-3999 blocks, 8:02
p.m. Nov. 1.
G St., 300 block, 2:51 a.m. Nov. 7.
G St., 1000 block, 4:56 a.m. Nov. 7.
From vehicle.
G St., 1100 block, 7:20 a.m. Nov. 6.
From vehicle.
G St., 4900-5099 blocks, 11:21
a.m. Nov. 3.
Good Hope Rd., 2300 block, 6:19
a.m. Nov. 1. From vehicle.
Good Hope Rd., 2300 block, 1:46
a.m. Nov. 5. From vehicle.
Good Hope Rd., 2500-2720
blocks, 9:43 a.m. Nov. 2. From
vehicle.
Independence Ave., 300 block,
4:46 p.m. Nov. 3. From vehicle.
M St., 400 block, 2:44 a.m. Nov. 5.
Maple View Pl., 1200 block, 5:17
p.m. Nov. 5.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 2600
block, 3:52 p.m. Nov. 6.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 2600
block, 9:53 a.m. Nov. 7. From
vehicle.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 2900
block, 4:38 a.m. Nov. 5.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 3000
block, 8:07 a.m. Nov. 3.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 3400
block, 8:42 a.m. Nov. 2.
Minnesota Ave., 2200 block, 5:32
p.m. Nov. 6.
Mississippi Ave., 1000-1299
blocks, 12:56 p.m. Nov. 5. From
vehicle.
New Jersey Ave., 1100 block, 4:44
a.m. Nov. 1.
New Jersey Ave., 1100 block, 5:04
a.m. Nov. 6. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
5:14 p.m. Nov. 2.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
5:29 p.m. Nov. 2.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
7:03 a.m. Nov. 6.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1200 block,
8:33 a.m. Nov. 1. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3000 block, 5
p.m. Nov. 6. From vehicle.
Pitts Pl., 2300 block, 5:30 p.m.
Nov. 1.
Potomac Ave., 1300 block, 3:01
p.m. Nov. 2.
Potomac Ave., 1300 block, 4:37
p.m. Nov. 2.
Potomac Ave., 1300 block, 10:47
a.m. Nov. 6.
Potomac Ave., 1300 block, 4:59
p.m. Nov. 6.
Ridge Rd., 100-399 blocks, 11:46
p.m. Nov. 3.
Ridge Rd., 100 block, 12:06 a.m.
Nov. 3.
Shippen Lane, 1400 block, 4:14
a.m. Nov. 2. From vehicle.
Southern Ave., 3900 block, 7:03
p.m. Nov. 2. From vehicle.
Southern Ave., 4000-4123 blocks,
7:07 p.m. Nov. 1.
Stanton Rd., 3300 block, 11:51
a.m. Nov. 6.
Stanton Rd., 3400 block, 7:32 a.m.
Nov. 4. From vehicle.
Texas Ave., 4300 block, 7:37 a.m.
Nov. 1.
Texas Ave., 4500 block, 9:25 a.m.
Oct. 22.
U St., 1600 block, 6:08 a.m. Nov. 1.
V St., 1300 block, 8:36 a.m. Nov. 7.
From vehicle.
W St., 1300 block, 6:30 a.m. Nov. 6.
Water St., 300 block, 5:29 a.m.
Nov. 6.
First St., 3800 block, 7:49 a.m.
Nov. 7. From vehicle.
Third Pl., 1000 block, 9:33 a.m.
Nov. 4.
Fourth St., 3900 block, 10:10 p.m.
Nov. 2. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 1000 block, 12:30 p.m.
Nov. 6.
Seventh St., 200 block, 4:02 p.m.
Nov. 5.
Eighth St., 400 block, 3:28 p.m.
Nov. 1.
Eighth St., 400 block, 3:58 p.m.
Nov. 3.
Eighth St., 700 block, 3:54 p.m.
Nov. 6.
Ninth St., 700 block, 10:23 a.m.
Nov. 1. From vehicle.
10th Pl., 3300 block, 7:31 a.m. Nov.
2.
12th St., 500 block, 7:07 a.m. Nov.
2.
12th St., 500 block, 11:43 a.m. Nov.
7.
13th St., 400 block, 9:57 p.m. Nov.
2.
14th St., 400 block, 6:47 a.m. Nov.
5.
14th St., 500 block, 6:34 p.m. Oct.
31.
16th St., 300 block, 10:13 a.m. Nov.
4.
17th St., unit block, 11:24 a.m. Nov.
3.
19th Pl., 1900-2099 blocks, 4:23
a.m. Nov. 1. From vehicle.
21st St., 3400 block, 8:25 p.m.
Nov. 6. From vehicle.
27th St., 1600 block, 1:51 p.m. Nov.
4.
28th St., 1500 block, 11:33 a.m.
Nov. 3.
28th St., 1700-1899 blocks, 5:34
p.m. Nov. 2.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Alabama Ave., 1200 block, 12:20
p.m. Nov. 3.
Barnaby St., 800 block, 8 a.m. Nov.
3.
Benning Rd., 4700-4809 blocks,
11:03 a.m. Nov. 4.
Call Pl., 4900 block, 5:02 p.m. Nov.
2.
Douglass Rd., 2600 block, 5:53
p.m. Nov. 6.
E St., 5100-5299 blocks, 6:18 a.m.
Nov. 6.
Elvans Rd., 2400-2599 blocks,
11:38 p.m. Nov. 2.
Erie St., 1800 block, 9:59 a.m. Nov.
2.
G St., 4900 block, 10:40 a.m. Nov.
5.
Pennsylvania Ave., 2200-2305
blocks, 1:04 a.m. Nov. 7.
Ridge Rd., 100-399 blocks, 6:05
a.m. Nov. 3.
Ridgecrest Ct., 1900-2199 blocks,
3:10 a.m. Nov. 7.
Tingey St., 300 block, 4:47 a.m.
Nov. 7.
Tubman Rd., 1800 block, 6:59 a.m.
Nov. 7.
Valley Ave., 900-1299 blocks, 5:29
p.m. Nov. 2.
Seventh St., 700 block, 8:38 p.m.
Nov. 2.
34th St., 300 block, 4:15 p.m. Oct.
26.
SOUTHWEST
ASSAULT
Delaware Ave., 900 block, 9:57
p.m. Nov. 6. With gun.
ROBBERY
Ivanhoe St., 100 block, 9:37 a.m.
Nov. 7. With gun.
THEFTS
Delaware Ave., 1200-1399 blocks,
5:56 a.m. Nov. 2.
G St., 300 block, 5:15 p.m. Nov. 3.
From vehicle.
Joliet St., 100 block, 9:09 p.m. Nov.
5.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 4600
block, 6:36 p.m. Nov. 2.
Maryland Ave., 1200-1399 blocks,
5:32 p.m. Nov. 6. From vehicle.
South Capitol St., 1000-1299
blocks, 11:35 a.m. Nov. 5.
South Capitol St., 1000-1299
blocks, 6:54 p.m. Nov. 5.
First St., 4700 block, 1:05 p.m. Nov.
5.
Fourth St., 900-1199 blocks, 6:50
a.m. Oct. 31.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
E St., 300 block, 6:57 p.m. Nov. 2.
Irvington St., 100 block, 1:37 a.m.
Nov. 1.
23
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DC
FEATURED EMPLOYERS SPOTLIGHT
Washington
Post
Featured Employers are DC’s largest and most prominent organizations. They include employers
across a range of industries, like
IT, accounting, healthcare, and
government, and are hiring candidates today!
Booz Allen Hamilton
Government Contractor–You can join a company—or
you can join a mission. At Booz Allen, we’ve spent
more than a century exploring ocean depths and
outer space, transforming industries and governments, safeguarding the valuable, and strengthening the vulnerable. From analytics to cyber, digital
solutions to engineering, we’re empowering people
to change the world—starting with you. Whether
you love solving problems, engineering ideas, or
building solutions, there’s a place for you at Booz
Allen. Join us at careers.boozallen.com
Performance/AutoSATCOM
mated Test Engineer– Information AssurBelcamp
ance Analyst, Junior–
Job Description, Job Annapolis Junction
Number:
R0011538 Job Description, Job
Booz Allen Hamilton Number:
R0010559
has been at the fore- Booz Allen Hamilton has
front of strategy and been at the forefront of
technology for more strategy and technolthan 100 years Today, ogy for more than 100
the firm provides man- years Today, the firm
agement and technol- provides management
ogy consulting and...
and technology...
National Academies
Nonprofit–The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are private, nonprofit institutions that provide expert advice on some of the
most pressing challenges facing the nation and the
world. Our work helps shape sound policies, inform
public opinion, and advance the pursuit of science,
engineering, and medicine. The National Academies
of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are the nation's pre-eminent source of high-quality, objective
advice on science, engineering, and health matters.
Most of our work is conducted through seven...
Meetings Assistant Associate Program
Cooperative Research Officer – Energy and
Programs–
Environment–
Washington D.C.
Washington D.C.
The National Academy The National Academy
of Sciences, National of Sciences, National
Academy of Engineer- Academy of Engineering, and National Acad- ing, and National Academy of Medicine work emy of Medicine work
together as the Na- together as the National Academies of Sci- tional Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and ences, Engineering, and
Medicine to provide... Medicine to provide...
National Rifle Association
Associations–The National Rifle Association is an
organization of dedicated employees, thousands of
volunteers, and millions of NRA members all united
by the common goal of promoting the safe and responsible use of firearms and the rights of Americans under the Second Amendment. At the core of
NRA's culture is a value system that thrives on a
highly skilled and diverse work force. Our ability to
serve our members depends upon the skill, experience and dedication of each employee.The National
Rifle Association is committed to the development...
Legislative Staff
Manager, Event &
Assistant–Fairfax
Budget Analysis–
Summary:
Provides Fairfax
administrative support Summary: Responsible
to NRA legislative staff. for oversight and coorSCOPE: Pleasant man- dination of timely colner required as job in- lection,
maintenance
volves frequent contact and dissemination of
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staff, officials of other Field Staff and NRA
membership organiza- Foundation Finance to
tions, media rep...
ensure accuracy of...
This spotlight showcases a small
sample of our Featured Employers, allowing you to learn about
each company and some of the
thousands of jobs they are currently hiring for. Check out the FE
Spotlight each Sunday to discover
new DC area companies.
Hughes Network Systems
Engineering–Hughes is the world's leading provider
of broadband satellite services, products, and network solutions. Hughes Network Systems, LLC
(HUGHES) is the global leader in providing broadband satellite networks and services for large
enterprises, governments, small businesses, and
consumers. HughesNet encompasses all broadband solutions and managed services from Hughes,
bridging the best of satellite and terrestrial technologies. Hughes has shipped more than 1,000,000
systems to customers in over 100 countries. Its...
IT Administrator–
Designer II–
Germantown
Germantown
Hughes has an excit- Hughes is seeking a
ing opening for an IT Designer II to join the
Administrator to be lo- Hardware Engineering
cated at our headquar- team in Germantown,
ters in Germantown, MD. Creating, designMD. Support HA and DR ing, and developing destrategies for the Oracle tailed electro-mechandatabase environment. ical models, drawings,
Support database rep- artwork and/or doculication
technologies mentation for Mechani(e.g., GoldenGate,…
cal Product Designs…
Anne Arundel County Public Schools
Education–Anne Arundel County Public Schools
(AACPS) provides a challenging and rewarding educational experience for every child. We offer a comprehensive system-wide multicultural curriculum
from kindergarten through 12th grade. At every level, the focus is on success for every student. Quality
instruction, combined with teacher commitment,
provides excellence in our instructional programs.
Explore career opportunities with a progressive
school system dedicated to providing the very best
services to our students, our educators and...
Buyer II–
Benefits Assistant–
Washington D.C.
Washington D.C.
Position Summary: Is Position Summary: Is
this position exempt this position exempt
from overtime pay? from overtime pay? No
Yes Specialized under Performs a wide variety
commodities, services, of detailed administraor construction pur- tive tasks related to
chasing activities, and benefits processing for
reports directly to the employees and retirees
Lead or Senior Buyers. including data entry,
Responsible for con- computational
tasks
ducting the entire...
and customer service.
American Society of Clinical Oncology
Healthcare–From its inception in 1964 to its present
acclaim, the American Society of Clinical Oncology
(ASCO) is the world’s leading professional organization representing physicians who care for people
with cancer. With 325+ staff and numerous enduring programs, ASCO’s membership includes over
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Cyber Security
Associate DirecAnalyst–Alexandria
tor, Congressional
Job Title: Cyber Security Affairs–Alexandria
Analyst Job Type: Full- Job Title: Associate DiTime Location: Alexan- rector, Congressional
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help defend the organi- your lobbying and relazation from malicious tionship building skills
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AboutWeb
Technology and Software–AboutWeb is a Certified
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Sr. Java Software
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Delivery and Transportation–The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority operates the second
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Manager of Maintenance Contracts–
Washington D.C.
Job Description, Job
Title: Manager of Maintenance Contracts Job
ID: 170656 Location:
MD - Carmen Turner
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Deputy Chief - Maintenance of Way Work
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Washington D.C.
Job Description, Job
Title: Deputy Chief Maintenance of Way
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EMMES Corporation
Media / Journalism / Advertising–"Educate, amuse,
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American Speech-Language-Hearing
Association
Metropolitan Washington Airports
Authority
Governance
Operations Coordinator–
Rockville
Description: The purpose of this position is
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ASHA's
nominations
and elections process
for the Board of Directors (BOD) and...
Heavy Equipment
Mechanic (Electrical)–
Dulles
Heavy Equipment Mechanic (Electrical) (MWAA-17-12081) Job
Requisition ID: MWAA17-12081 Job Title:
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Type: F/T Permanent
Location: Washington
Dulles International...
Associations–The American Speech-LanguageHearing Association was founded in 1925. It is a
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Associate Business
Systems Analyst–
Rockville
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analysis, definition and
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Home-Based Clinical
Research Associate/
Protocol Monitor–
Frederick
The EMMES Corporation, organized in 1977,
is a privately owned
Contract
Research
Organization
(CRO).
Emmes is dedicated to
providing statistical and
epidemiological expertise, computer...
Home-Based Clinical
Research Associate/
Protocol Monitor–
Rockville
The EMMES Corporation, organized in 1977,
is a privately owned
Contract
Research
Organization
(CRO)
located in Rockville,
Maryland. Emmes is
dedicated to providing
statistical and...
Defense / Aerospace–The Airports Authority operates a two-airport system that provides domestic
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Ramp Controller/
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Software Architect/
Acquisition Security
Software Engineer–
Manager–Dayton
Lexington Park
In this position you will
Seeking
Engineers/ provide full-spectrum
Analysts to support Security Management
PMA209's Avionics Ar- Support for various
chitecture Team (AAT) USAF acquisition proIPT in establishing in- grams within the Intelteroperable and open ligence,
Surveillance
avionics architectures and
Reconnaissance
across the Naval Avia- and Special Operations
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