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The Washington Post – November 22, 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Mostly sunny 55/32 • Tomorrow: Mostly sunny 49/35 B8
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
Plan would let Internet
providers block websites,
charge for faster access
EMPHASIZES DENIAL
OF SEX ALLEGATIONS
B RIAN F UNG
The Federal Communications
Commission took aim at a signature Obama-era regulation Tuesday, unveiling a plan that would
give Internet providers broad
powers to determine what websites and online services their
customers see and use.
Under the agency’s proposal,
providers of high-speed Internet
services, such as Comcast, Verizon and AT&T, would be able to
block websites they do not like
and charge Web companies for
speedier delivery of their content.
The FCC’s effort would roll
back its net neutrality regulation,
which was passed by the agency’s
Democrats in 2015 and attempted to make sure all Web content,
whether from big or small companies, would be treated equally
by Internet providers.
The repeal of those rules
would be one of the more significant deregulatory efforts by Republicans since President Trump
took office. Ajit Pai, who was
nominated to head the FCC by
Trump in January, has said undoing the net neutrality rules was
one of his top priorities, arguing
that the regulation stifled innovation and was an example of
government overreach.
“Under my proposal, the federal government will stop micromanaging the Internet,” Pai said
in a statement Tuesday. The plan
could be approved by the Republican-led FCC as early as its
Dec. 14 meeting.
Pai’s remarks were cheered by
conservatives as well as cable,
FCC CONTINUED ON A14
‘We don’t need a liberal
person in there,’ he says
M ICHAEL S CHERER,
A SHLEY P ARKER
AND D AVID W EIGEL
BY
JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Zimbabwean lawmakers celebrate at the parliament in Harare after Robert Mugabe’s resignation. He had ruled since 1980.
Zimbabwe’s longtime leader steps down
BY
K EVIN S IEFF
harare, zimbabwe — Robert
Mugabe, Zimbabwe’s leader for
nearly four decades, resigned
Tuesday after being sidelined by
the military and cast out by his
own political party, marking the
end of a tumultuous reign that
lasted from the country’s independence through its economic
collapse.
The capital erupted in celebration, with crowds pouring
into the streets, dancing atop
military vehicles and singing
late into the night. Many people
cried tears of joy as news of
Mugabe’s resignation spread.
This nation of 16 million people now faces a deeply uncertain
period, with a fragmented opposition, no clear path to elections
People celebrate in the streets, but Mugabe’s exit
leaves his nation at a crossroads
and a controversial heir to power, but the nation was at least
momentarily united by the removal of its despotic leader.
Mugabe’s exit marks a historic
moment that will echo across
Africa, where he was among the
last surviving heroes of the anticolonial struggle to remain in
power, a man who was initially
lionized as a liberator but was
increasingly seen as autocratic
and brutal. He presided over the
stunning collapse of a nation
that was known as the breadbasket of the region at its 1980
independence.
His resignation could send a
message to other strongmen on
the continent who have clung to
power for years, defying or manipulating their constitutions.
Still, Mugabe’s likely successor,
former vice president Emmerson Mnangagwa, who was fired
by the president this month,
worked closely with him for
years and is not viewed as a
reformer.
“The dictator is gone!”
Takudzwa Jonasi, 32, a chemical
engineer, shouted as he celebrated with a jubilant crowd outside
parliament.
How Trump is building a wall of bureaucracy
“For our generation, we have
never seen any change. We were
not allowed to exercise our
rights,” he added. Like many
young Zimbabweans, Jonasi has
known no other leader.
“I have no words. We are finally free!” exclaimed Shoes Tazviwan, 36, a chef who had also
joined the demonstrations.
In the end, the world’s oldest
head of state was a victim of his
own allies. After years of purging
members of his inner circle,
Mugabe had alienated the leaders of Zimbabwe’s military, who
detained him and seized control
of the country’s government on
Nov. 14.
After days of negotiations —
and the largest anti-government
demonstration in the country’s
ZIMBABWE CONTINUED ON A10
BY M ARIA S ACCHETTI
AND N ICK M IROFF
Rentals have been called
one cause for shortage
of affordable housing
P
resident Trump’s vision of a
“big, beautiful” wall along
the Mexican border may
never be realized, and almost
certainly not as a 2,000-mile
physical structure spanning sea
to sea.
But in a systematic and less
visible way, his administration is
following a blueprint to reduce
the number of foreigners living
in the United States — those who
are undocumented and those
here legally — and overhaul the
U.S. immigration system for generations to come.
Across agencies and programs, federal officials are wielding executive authority to assemble a bureaucratic wall that
could be more effective than any
concrete and metal one. While
BY
WALL CONTINUED ON A12
EDUARDO MUNOZ/REUTERS
The decision to end the protected status for Haitians in the United States drew protest in New York.
IN THE NEWS
Trump’s recent speech
in Seoul. A11
THE NATION
ELLIDGE/EXPRESS/GETTY IMAGES
Teen idol dies David Cassidy was a heartthrob
in the early 1970s as the star of the musical
sitcom “The Partridge Family.” B6
A rural comeback? Democrats think they
have the candidate to pick up a House seat in
a conservative district in Pennsylvania. A4
A study concluded
that dark streaks cited
by NASA as “the best
evidence yet” for water
on Mars are merely
marks made by flowing
sand or dust. A2
A privacy watchdog
group’s effort to block
President Trump’s
election-integrity panel
from collecting voter
records drew skepticism from a panel of
federal judges. A4
Sen. Lisa Murkowski
(R-Alaska) said in an
op-ed that she supports
repealing the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate. A6
Three service members who went to Asia
with President Trump
have been reassigned
from the White House
over allegations of improper contact with foreign women. A7
Scientists studying the
passenger pigeon’s extinction found clues in
the bird’s genes. A7
THE WORLD
China convicted a
prominent human
rights lawyer amid an
ongoing crackdown on
dissent. A11
North Korea again
heightened its rhetoric
to criticize President
THE ECONOMY
Federal prosecutors
announced charges
against a hacker affiliated with the Iranian military, saying he is responsible for the HBO
data theft. A13
The blocking of
AT&T’s purchase of
Time Warner may not
be good news for other
tech giants. A13
Uber didn’t immediately report a hack that
exposed the personal
information of tens of
millions of people last
year. A14
Local officials across
the country are worried
about running out of
President Trump gave a boost
Tuesday to embattled Republican
candidate Roy Moore in the Alabama Senate race, warning
against a Democratic victory and
emphasizing that the former
judge “totally denies” allegations
of inappropriate relationships
with teenage girls.
“We don’t need a liberal person
in there, a Democrat,” Trump said
about Moore’s opponent, former
federal prosecutor Doug Jones,
who has led in some recent polls
in the state. “I’ve looked at his
record. It’s terrible on crime. It’s
terrible on the border. It’s terrible
on military.”
The comments came after a
week in which other Republican
leaders in Washington, including
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.), had cut ties with
Moore and called on him to exit
the race. They also stood in contrast to Trump’s own support for
MOORE CONTINUED ON A6
CBS, PBS drop
Charlie Rose
The moves
come in the
wake of sexual
misconduct
allegations. C1
Conyers accused of harassment
House ethics panel investigates
the Michigan Democrat. A6
Airbnb takes up residence in
D.C.’s debate on gentrification
Even if his border plan is a too-tall order, his administration is finding ways to shrink immigration
DHS watchdog’s findings
Agents violated court orders amid
confusion over first travel ban. A4
. $2
Trump
boosts
Moore
in Ala.
FCC moves
to end net
neutrality
standard
BY
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
R OBERT M C C ARTNEY
In the eight years since Airbnb
began operations in the District,
thousands of homeowners have
used it to become short-term
landlords, often illegally. But now,
a practice welcomed as a novel
way to augment income — and
maybe befriend tourists — has
become a flash point in the city’s
debate over gentrification.
Opponents of Airbnb and similar companies are backing legislation before the D.C. Council to
prohibit some short-term rentals
and regulate the rest. They say
that renting houses and apartments for brief stays gobbles up
living space that could ease the
city’s shortage of affordable
housing.
naloxone, a drug that is
used to treat opioid
overdoses. A15
Many residents also resent seeing a surge of transients disturb
the residential character of their
buildings or street blocks. Residents complain about noise, unfamiliar faces and loss of precious
parking spaces.
But Airbnb’s defenders turn the
gentrification argument on its
head. Given the city’s high housing costs, they say, people rent out
rooms in their primary residences, or in second and third
homes they own, to earn enough
money to remain in the District.
They also say that the housing
shortage has resulted not from
short-term rentals — which account for a small fraction of the
city’s total housing stock — but
from larger economic factors such
as the desire of millennials to live
in cities.
The dispute over online, shortterm rental services has erupted
at community meetings, on
neighborhood message boards, in
courtrooms, and in ads on television and radio. It pits entrenched
AIRBNB CONTINUED ON A16
Inside
LOCAL
THE REGION
The school district
that the new D.C. public schools chief left is in
financial straits that are
more severe than was
previously known. B1
Two “dreamers” have
filed a lawsuit in Northern Virginia alleging
that they unfairly lost a
chance to renew their
legal status. B1
The top doctor at the
District’s public hospital, who accused the facility’s contractor of
mismanagement and illegal overbilling, has
been fired, his attorneys
said. B1
Filling the pews
Since the 2016 election,
attendance has swollen
at churches such as St.
Margaret’s in D.C. B1
FOOD
We’re off today
The section will return
next Wednesday.
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A14
COMICS........................................C7
OPINION PAGES..........................A18
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C5
WORLD NEWS .............................. A8
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 352
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
5 9 2 8
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
After Hurricane Maria magnified telescope’s troubles, things are looking up
BY
S ARAH K APLAN
After years of financial uncertainty and weeks of hardship
caused by Hurricane Maria, staff
members at the legendary Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico
were relieved to find out Thursday that their telescope will remain operational.
For about a decade, the National Science Foundation, which
owns the observatory and supplies about two-thirds of its
$12 million budget, had been
mulling downsizing or even shuttering the telescope to free up
funds for other projects. Instead,
the NSF will continue scientific
operations at the facility in collaboration with an unnamed
partner organization, according
to a record of decision signed this
week.
Arecibo sustained $4 million
to $8 million in damage during
the hurricane, according to
James Ulvestad, acting assistant
director for the agency’s mathematical and physical sciences directorate. Some scientists worried that would weaken the case
for keeping the observatory operational.
But Ulvestad said the agency’s
record of decision reflects that it
has received viable partnership
proposals from one or more collaborators — though he would
not provide details about those
proposals. This announcement
allows the NSF to move forward
with negotiations on a new management contract.
Under the new plan, the agency will reduce its annual contribution to the observatory from
roughly $8.2 million to $2 million
over the next five years. It is also
committed to funding any repairs
required to restore Arecibo to its
pre-hurricane condition, Ulvestad said.
In deciding the future of the
observatory, the NSF conducted
an environmental impact statement and considered four alternatives to the current plan. Those
included operating Arecibo solely
as an educational facility, mothballing the observatory or demolishing it. Ulvestad said that finding a partner organization to
maintain scientific operations
was its preferred option.
“It was never our intention to
shutter Arecibo,” he added. “Getting viable collaborators identi-
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
The leaders of Turkey, Russia and Iran hold a trilateral
summit in Sochi, Russia, regarding the Syrian crisis. For
developments, visit washingtonpost.com/world.
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The Salvation Army and Safeway hold the 18th annual
“Feast of Sharing” at the Walter E. Washington Convention
Center. Volunteers serve free Thanksgiving dinner to 5,000
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2 p.m.
The Federal Reserve’s Federal Open Market Committee
releases the minutes from its October policy meeting. For
details, go to washingtonpost.com/business.
7 p.m.
The Washington Capitals host the Ottawa Senators at
Capital One Arena. Follow the action at postsports.com.
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fied through our solicitation
process is what enabled us to
make this decision and turn it
from a preferred alternative to
the alternative.”
In January, the NSF issued a
call for proposals from prospective partners to run the observatory. To maintain operations —
which include radio studies of
pulsars and Earth’s ionosphere —
any partner would have to make
up for the reduced NSF funds.
Arecibo also receives about
$3.5 million from NASA for its
planetary radar projects, such as
searching for near-Earth asteroids. According to Ulvestad, partners were given broad scope to
determine what kind of projects
the observatory would pursue under their management.
“Until we actually negotiate an
agreement and make that decision public, I can’t really speak to
exactly which programs” will continue, Ulvestad said. But, he added, “we have viable proposals that
we think will continue to deliver
the science that we are interested
in.”
The decision to keep Arecibo
open was met with jubilation
from scientists in Puerto Rico and
around the world.
“I AM LITERALLY CRYING AT
WORK! TEARS OF JOY!!! THE
OBSERVATORY SURVIVES!!!”
tweeted Ed Rivera-Valentin, a
planetary scientist who works at
Arecibo and the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston.
“Things are looking up for continued great science from Arecibo,” responded Bob Pappalardo of
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory
in Pasadena, Calif.
The observatory in northwestern Puerto Rico boasts one of the
world’s biggest radio telescopes,
and it looms large in the pantheon of astronomical instruments.
Arecibo’s huge primary dish, built
into a sinkhole in a mountain
range, has been used to discover
the first exoplanets and detect
organic molecules in a galaxy
millions of light-years away. It’s
where the fictional astronomer
Ellie Arroway got her start in the
movie “Contact” and where real
scientists Frank Drake, Jill Tarter
and Carl Sagan, among others,
launched efforts to detect extraterrestrial life.
Arecibo was battered, but not
broken, when Hurricane Maria
swept through Puerto Rico in
September, submerging roads,
knocking out power lines and
devastating communities. Several of the observatory’s 100 or so
staff members sheltered at the
observatory. They made it safely
through the storm, but some have
been living without reliable electricity, water and phone service in
the two months since the hurricane. Last week, the Universities
Space Research Association — a
group that helps run the observatory — sent 20 generators to its
employees who still lacked power
at their homes.
SRI International, another
group that helps manage the telescope, said in September that the
1,000-foot primary dish and other major structures were intact
after Maria, but some other instruments were destroyed by falling debris, including much of a
95-foot antenna and a smaller
radio dish.
Because of the damage to Puerto Rico’s power grid, the entire
observatory has been running on
generators since the storm, and it
still hasn’t resumed normal operations. Observations with the
main dish picked back up this
month — the journal Nature
pointed out that it has already
detected a fast radio burst, an
enigmatic astronomical phenomenon that is best observed by
large radio telescopes such as
Arecibo.
Given the high demand for
fuel on the island, though, the
dish is operating in a lowerpower mode, without the function that lets astronomers aim the
telescope at different areas of the
sky.
But the first priority is the
well-being of people in Puerto
Rico, not astronomy. According
to the journal Science, observatory staff members volunteered
their services, communicating via
ham radio and handing out water
in Maria’s aftermath. The observatory’s generators and storage space and fresh water from its
well have also been shared with
surrounding communities.
Ulvestad said that the NSF
aims to send program officers to
Puerto Rico sometime in the next
two months to assess the damage
to the observatory.
sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
Study: Streaks on Mars more like sand than water
BY
S ARAH K APLAN
In 2015, NASA announced it
had “the best evidence yet” for
water flowing on the surface of
Mars: Dark, apparently damp
streaks spotted on the Red Planet
contained salts associated with
liquid water.
The news had NASA’s head of
planetary science, Jim Green,
imagining future astronauts
slurping up the salty sludge as
they explored the Red Planet.
“Mark Watney could have taken advantage of this discovery,”
he told The Washington Post at
the time, referring to the central
character of the movie “The Martian.” Others suggested the
streaks might harbor microbial
life.
Then U.S. Geological Survey
scientists — those notorious
crushers of dreams — decided to
take a look. In a study published
Monday in the journal Nature
Geoscience, the USGS says those
promising streaks are merely
marks made by flowing sand or
dust. “This new understanding
. . . supports other evidence that
shows that Mars today is very
dry,” lead author Colin Dundas
said in a news release.
The finding is the latest disappointment for scientists who
hoped the streaks, technically
called “recurring slope lineae,” or
RSL, might indicate Mars isn’t
quite the desolate desert wasteland it’s commonly made out to
be.
While the streaks weren’t ever
direct evidence of water, they
seemed like a strong indicator.
Scientists had noticed that they
grew and shrank in response to
the seasons — almost as if salty
water was being heated by the
sun and then flowing down ridges and hills. Not only that, but the
streaks contained perchlorates —
molecules that help water stay
liquid over a broader range of
temperatures.
When Dundas and his colleagues examined images of dozens of RSL at multiple sites, they
found the “streaks” didn’t behave
like flowing water.
For one thing, they existed only
at the tops of very steep slopes.
For another, the streaks all
NASA VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
The finding by U.S. Geological Survey is the latest disappointment for scientists who hoped the streaks
might indicate Mars isn’t quite the desolate desert wasteland it’s commonly made out to be.
seemed to end when their slopes
matched the dynamic “angle of
repose” — the steepest angle at
which a given material can be
piled without slumping.
If you’ve ever tried to build a
sand castle, you’re familiar with
this concept. It’s why dry sand —
which has a very shallow angle of
repose — tends to slide out of
shape, but wet sand — with a
steeper angle of repose — can be
piled into towers and turrets.
“The RSL don’t flow onto shallower slopes, and the lengths of
these are so closely correlated
with the dynamic angle of repose,
it can’t be a coincidence,” co-author Alfred McEwen of the University of Arizona in Tucson told
Phys.org. McEwen is the principal investigator for HiRISE, a
camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter that was used to
image the RSLs.
The streaks aren’t created by
water, Dundas and McEwen concluded. Instead, they resemble
the markings left by dry grains
that slide down the sides of a sad,
slumping sand castle.
This doesn’t mean Mars is
totally dry. There is stronger evidence the Red Planet has frozen
water in polar ice caps, in the soil
below its surface, and perhaps
even in deep, shadowy craters.
There may even be a small
amount of water in the RLS
themselves, the USGS scientists
write. The tendency for these
streaks to appear in warm seasons, along with the presence of
perchlorates, suggest water
might help the streaks form.
“However, liquid water volumes may be small or zero,” the
authors say.
That fits with a study published last year in the journal
Geophysical Research Letters
that found the streaks could contain no more than 3 percent
liquid water — making them little
more than mildly damp, slightly
salty dirt.
Mars’s weird streaks probably
couldn’t keep an astronaut alive,
and they probably aren’t home to
tiny alien organisms. They’re still
worth studying, McEwen said.
“RSL probably form by some
mechanism that is unique to the
environment of Mars,” he told
Phys.org, “so they represent an
opportunity to learn about how
Mars behaves, which is important
for future surface exploration.”
sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
Judge blocks ban on military transgender surgery
BY
A NN E . M ARIMOW
A second federal judge has
halted the Trump administration’s proposed transgender military ban, finding that active-duty
service members are “already
suffering harmful consequences”
because of the president’s policy.
The ruling Tuesday by U.S.
District Judge Marvin J. Garbis
in a Maryland case comes just
weeks after another judge in
Washington blocked the administration’s proposal that would
have stopped military recruitment of transgender men and
women and possibly forced the
dismissal of current service
members, starting in March.
The preliminary injunction issued by the judge in Baltimore
on Tuesday goes further than the
earlier ruling by also preventing
the administration from denying
funding for sex-reassignment
surgeries after the order takes
effect.
In his 53-page order, Garbis
said the transgender service
members challenging the ban
have “demonstrated that they are
already suffering harmful conse-
quences such as the cancellation
and postponements of surgeries,
the stigma of being set apart as
inherently unfit, facing the prospect of discharge and inability to
commission as an officer, the
inability to move forward with
long-term medical plans, and the
threat to their prospects of obtaining long-term assignments.”
In July, President Trump surprised military leaders and
members of Congress when he
announced the proposal in a
series of tweets.
The challenge brought by six
active-duty service members in
Maryland was filed days after
Trump issued a formal order
reversing an Obama-era policy
allowing transgender men and
women to serve openly and to
receive funding for sex-reassignment surgery.
Justice Department lawyers
asked the court this month to
dismiss the lawsuit because the
policy is on hold pending a
review by the Defense Department. No decisions have been
made, government lawyers said,
about whether to discharge active-duty service members solely
because they are transgender.
The military is continuing to
provide transition-related medical care.
Garbis rejected the government’s argument that the challenge was premature.
In issuing the preliminary injunction, the judge found the
challengers likely to prevail in
asserting that the president’s
order violates equal-protection
guarantees in the Constitution as
well as the rights of service
members to medical care.
The judge agreed with the
government that the courts
should generally defer to the
president and Congress on military affairs, but it found that
“Trump’s tweets did not emerge
from a policy review,” according
to the opinion, which featured
images of the president’s July
tweets.
“A capricious, arbitrary, and
unqualified tweet of new policy
does not trump the methodical
and systematic review by military stakeholders qualified to
understand the ramifications of
policy changes,” wrote Garbis,
who was nominated to the bench
by President George H.W. Bush.
American Civil Liberties
Union attorney Joshua Block,
who is representing the service
members, called the decision a
“victory for transgender service
members across the country.”
Justice Department spokeswoman Lauren Ehrsam said in a
statement, “We disagree with the
court’s ruling and are currently
evaluating the next steps.” The
statement added: “None of the
plaintiffs have established that
they will be impacted by current
policies on military service.”
Even though U.S. District
Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly in
Washington had already put the
broad outlines of the proposal on
hold in late October, her decision
did not explicitly rule on whether the administration could stop
paying for sex-reassignment surgeries.
Garbis found that the proposed ban would harm plaintiffs
in the Maryland case who are
trying to schedule transition-related surgical care and will not
be able to receive surgery before
the policy’s March start date.
ann.marimow@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Justice investigates Harvard’s
a∞rmative-action policies
D I G ES T
NATIONAL SECURIT Y
Retrial for former
Blackwater guard
The U.S. government will retry
a former Blackwater Worldwide
security guard after a federal
appeals court threw out his firstdegree murder conviction in
shootings that killed 14 unarmed
Iraqi civilians in Baghdad’s
Nisour Square in 2007,
prosecutors told a federal judge
Tuesday.
Assistant U.S. Attorney Patrick
Martin of the District said the
government will seek a retrial of
Nicholas A. Slatten, 33, of Sparta,
Tenn., as early as May,
anticipating a six-week case with
50 witnesses, including about
15 from Iraq.
U.S. District Judge Royce C.
Lamberth scheduled a Dec. 14
hearing to set a trial date and
decide whether to conditionally
release Slatten from federal
prison in Sumterville, Fla., where
he had been serving a mandatory
life sentence.
A three-judge panel of the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the D.C.
Circuit on Aug. 4 tossed out
Slatten’s 2014 conviction on one
count of murder, saying the trial
court erred in not allowing him
to be tried separately from three
co-defendants, even though one
of them said he, not Slatten, fired
the shots that killed the first
civilian victim, leading a team of
U.S. security contractors to open
fire indiscriminately on vehicles
and pedestrians.
The court denied a
government request for a
rehearing before the full court
on Nov. 6.
— Spencer S. Hsu
PENNSYLVANIA
Manhunt nabs suspect
in police shooting
The man who authorities say
shot and killed a Pennsylvania
police officer was caught Tuesday
morning after a manhunt that
lasted three days.
Pennsylvania State Police
announced early Tuesday that
Department warns school
is out of compliance for
not providing documents
BY S USAN S VRLUGA
AND N ICK A NDERSON
CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A pedestrian on Tuesday walks through puddles reflecting a
projection on a video sculpture in Chicago’s Millennium Park. The
park kicks off the holiday season Friday with a Christmas tree lighting
and the opening of the McCormick Tribune Ice Rink.
authorities had apprehended
Rahmael Sal Holt, who is accused
of fatally shooting New
Kensington Police Officer Brian
Shaw, 25, following a Friday
night traffic stop about 20 miles
northeast of Pittsburgh.
Holt, 29, has been charged
with first-degree murder of a law
enforcement officer, murder of
the first degree, possession of a
firearm and carrying a firearm
without a license, according to
an online court docket.
Shaw had been with the New
Kensington Police Department
for less than a year.
Westmoreland County District
Attorney John Peck told
reporters that Holt was arrested
at a home in Pittsburgh. The
Pittsburgh Tribune Review
reported that several associates
and relatives, including the
suspect’s mother, Sherry Holt,
and another woman, Aysa
Benson, were also arrested and
accused of helping Rahmael
Holt. Court records show the two
have been charged with
hindering apprehension, a thirddegree felony.
The shooting happened just
after 8 p.m. Friday, when Shaw
tried to pull over an SUV. Holt,
who was the passenger, jumped
out of the moving vehicle and
Shaw ran after him, according to
an affidavit. A surveillance
footage shows Holt running to a
nearby parking lot, where
authorities said he shot Shaw.
Peck said Holt fired six shots,
striking Shaw multiple times.
The officer, who was wearing a
vest, was able to radio to the 911
center that he had been shot. He
was not able to return fire, Peck
told reporters.
— Kristine Phillips
Six killed in house fire: Four
children and two adults from the
same family died in a house fire
early Tuesday in rural northern
Illinois. Authorities received a
911 call just after midnight
reporting smoke in the basement
of a home outside Dixon in the
unincorporated community of
Lost Nation, according to the
Ogle County Sheriff’s Office.
Firefighters arrived to find the
home “fully engulfed” in the
blaze. Investigators haven’t
found anything suspicious about
the fire, Sheriff Brian VanVickle
said. The county coroner said the
bodies were so badly burned that
his office will need dental records
to determine identification.
— Associated Press
The Justice Department is investigating Harvard University’s
use of race in admissions, and is
warning the school that it is out of
compliance with federal civil
rights law because it has not
provided documents the department sought.
In two letters sent Friday, Justice officials said that Harvard
had not produced “a single document” that had been requested,
despite a Nov. 2 deadline, and
that the university’s attorney had
tried to “side-step Harvard’s Title
VI obligations.”
Because Harvard receives federal funding under the Civil
Rights Act of 1964, department
officials argue, the university
must comply with the agency’s
request. Title VI, part of the Civil
Rights Act, prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color or
national origin in programs that
receive federal funding.
The confirmation of the investigation, first reported Tuesday by
the Wall Street Journal, followed
months of signaling from the
department that it would challenge affirmative-action policies.
The highly charged questions
— battled in multiple U.S. Supreme Court cases — are whether
and to what extent colleges can
consider an applicant’s race as a
factor in admissions.
In June 2016, the court upheld
a University of Texas policy that
enables race to be a factor in
admission decisions. That 4-to-3
ruling was widely interpreted as
a green light for the use of
race-conscious policies in what
schools such as Harvard call
“holistic” admissions. But critics
said the ruling was narrow
enough that other lawsuits could
challenge affirmative action.
Harvard spokeswoman Anna
Cowenhoven said in a written
statement that the university has
“repeatedly made clear” that it
will comply with its legal obligations.
“In the process, we have an
obligation to protect the confidentiality of student and applicant files and other highly sensitive records,” she said, “and we
have been seeking to engage the
Department of Justice in the best
means of doing so.”
Seth P. Waxman, the attorney
representing Harvard, declined
to comment Tuesday.
Department spokesman Devin
M. O’Malley said in an email:
“The Department of Justice takes
seriously any potential violation
of an individual’s civil and constitutional rights, but we will not
comment at this time.”
In a pending lawsuit, an advocacy group called Students for
Fair Admissions has asked a federal judge to prohibit the use of
race in Harvard’s undergraduate
admissions, claiming the school
violates federal civil rights law
and intentionally discriminates
against Asian American students.
Harvard denies the allegations.
In a letter Friday, Matthew
Donnelly of the Justice Department’s civil rights division said
Waxman had erroneously challenged the agency’s right to investigate Harvard and had proposed
an unacceptable plan to give restricted access to limited documents. He also wrote that the
university has the documents
readily available because it already produced them for the
plaintiffs in the civil suit.
In a separate letter, John M.
Gore, acting assistant attorney
general for civil rights, warned
the department might sue Harvard to force the school to provide
access to records.
In early October, Waxman acknowledged in a letter to Gore
that university officials were well
aware of their obligations under
Title VI. But he said the opening
of an investigation under such
circumstances was “so outside
ordinary practices” that the university wished to clarify the authority and rationale for the department’s decision. Waxman, a
former U.S. solicitor general,
pointed out that identical issues
are being litigated in federal
court. He also noted the complaint that apparently triggered
the new investigation had been
brought 2½ years earlier, and
that the Education Department
had declined to investigate it at
the time.
Anurima Bhargava, who was
chief of the educational opportunity section in the Justice Department’s civil rights division under
the Obama administration,
echoed that point.
“It’s peculiar that you have a
situation in which the Department of Education has dismissed
a complaint and the Justice Department then decides to investigate under Title VI,” Bhargava
said.
Bhargava recently held fellowships at the Harvard Kennedy
School, but she said she is not
currently affiliated with the
school.
The Harvard admissions process routinely draws public attention because the university is one
of the world’s most selective. In
March, 2,056 students were offered admission to the fall 2017
freshman class, out of 39,506
applicants. That translates to an
admission rate of little more than
5 percent.
Of those admitted, 22.2 percent
were Asian American, the university said, while 14.6 percent were
African American, 11.6 percent
Latino and 1.9 percent Native
American.
susan.svrluga@washpost.com
nick.anderson@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
Democrats see chance for a rural revival in western Pa.
BY
D AVID W EIGEL
washington, pa. — On Sunday,
as Democrats drove south from
Pittsburgh’s suburbs to this city
for a nominating convention, a
garish billboard reminded them
why they were having a special
congressional election. Eightterm Republican Tim Murphy,
who resigned in October after
telling a mistress to terminate a
possible pregnancy, has been
commemorated beside Interstate
79 by the abortion rights group
Reproaction.
“Abortion: Not just for your
mistress!” read the sign.
Murphy’s shocking fall kicked
off this Congress’s sixth special
election, scheduled for March 13.
Local Democrats, who did not
even bother to oppose Murphy in
2016, believe they are running a
strong candidate — Conor Lamb,
a 33-year-old veteran of the Marines and a former assistant U.S.
attorney.
To Democrats’ surprise, Republicans passed over some rising stars to nominate a conservative state representative, 59-yearold Rick Saccone, who has boasted that he “was Trump before
Trump was Trump” and has
crossed swords with the area’s
powerful labor unions.
The result is a test that neither
party expected: a fight in the sort
of rural, conservative district that
national Democrats gave up on
years ago. Local Democrats, who
in 2016 watched their party hunt
for votes in more liberal suburbs,
want in on the “resistance” ahead
of 2018.
“The Republicans have nominated their weakest candidate,
their most extreme candidate,”
Rep. Mike Doyle (D-Pa.), who represents Pittsburgh and some of its
suburbs, said in a speech to the
convention that nominated Lamb
on Sunday. “Think about what it
means to be the first in the country to say: ‘We’re coming back!’ ”
The 18th District, drawn by
Murphy’s fellow Republicans to
reelect him without much drama,
has never seen a competitive race.
Murphy scrambled party loyalties, chairing the Congressional
Steel Caucus and winning over
labor unions — there are 76,000
organized workers in the district
— that otherwise tended to back
Democrats.
On Sunday, seven Democrats
battled for the chance to replace
Murphy. Lamb, who has never
before run for office, was a quiet
JEFF SWENSEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Conor Lamb speaks after winning the Democratic nomination for a special election in Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District. The
district was thought to be so safely Republican that Democrats did not even field a candidate in the 2016 election.
favorite; his rivals included a
pathbreaking female Navy veteran with some national backing,
a conservative Westmoreland
County
commissioner
who
bucked the anti-Democratic Party
tide, and marginal candidates
who said that only a left-wing
populist campaign could win
rural Pennsylvanians back from
Trump.
Lamb, said local Democrats,
won them over in part because he
did not pander. To win the nomination he had to court a majority
of 800-odd Democratic committee members (554 eligible members ended up trekking to the
convention).
Angela Aldous, a member of
the progressive post-2016 group
Voice of Westmoreland, said that
Lamb courted progressives but
rebuffed calls to endorse universal Medicare until he could be
convinced it was cost-effective.
“He listened,” said Aldous, 38.
“He wasn’t going to say, ‘Hey, I’m
the most far-left candidate you’re
ever going to see,’ just because a
lot of the people there were farleft.”
It worked, in part, because leftwing voters made up a tiny sliver
of the district’s activists.
The 18th District is one of
dozens, from the Deep South
through Appalachia, where Democrats once dominated local politics. For decades, conservative
voters remained in the party, reelecting antiabortion, pro-coal
Democrats and rejecting the party’s more liberal national nominees. Even that took awhile — in
1988, the last election until 2016
in which Democrats lost Pennsylvania, Mike Dukakis won the
counties that make up the 18th
District by a landslide. In recent
elections, its voters cast 55 percent of their votes for John Mc-
Cain, 58 percent for Mitt Romney
and 58 percent for Donald Trump.
Barack Obama’s victories
changed the Democratic map. By
2016, Democrats had become
confident they could win Pennsylvania by cutting loose conservative voters and converting suburban Republicans who agreed with
them on social issues.
“For every vote we lose in western Pennsylvania,” former governor Ed Rendell said in 2016, “we’ll
gain a vote in the Philadelphia,
Harrisburg and Pittsburgh suburbs.”
Democrats no longer talk like
that, although they remain skeptical about competing for rural
votes as long as the national party
moves left on abortion, environmental issues and gun rights.
In the 18th District, Democrats
came up with a solution: Don’t
move left. Lamb and his two
strongest rivals all blurred or con-
ceded on some social issues, and
the Democrats who decided the
race were fine with it.
“This region’s got a lot of farmers, miners, a lot of conservativetype people,” said Tom Murphy,
Westmoreland County’s recorder
of deeds, who backed county commissioner Gina Cerilli over Lamb.
“You need to talk to them if you’re
going to win.”
Lamb’s pitch to those voters
would not start with Trump. It
would start with Murphy, and the
bills moving through the Congress that he was forced to abandon. In his convention speech,
Lamb’s only reference to the president was about “fraud and hypocrisy” running rampant as Republicans pushed for an enormous tax cut.
“Tim Murphy and his crowd
seem to think we all have amnesia,” said Lamb. “They can deliver
tax cuts for the one percent, but
they can’t even produce an infrastructure bill.”
Local Democrats wanted Lamb
to stick to that argument and take
the openings Saccone would give
him. Darrin Kelly, the incoming
president of the Allegheny County AFL-CIO, said that labor leaders would meet with Lamb this
week and that there was little
chance of them backing Saccone.
Mike Mikus, a political strategist based in the district, said the
last Democrat to represent any
part of the area in Congress —
Mark Critz, who served from 2010
to 2013 — had secured the backing of the steelworkers’ and mineworkers’ unions and put their
logos in every ad.
“Lamb’s a fresh face with a
background as a Marine and prosecutor, and he’s running against
someone who is a Harrisburg
insider who voted to cut education by $1 billion,” Mikus said.
But if Lamb makes the race
competitive, he might present a
dilemma for national Democrats
and progressive groups. He has
bucked the party’s consensus on
abortion rights and guns, while
remaining somewhat slippery on
what sort of legal limits he would
support.
“I come from a Catholic background, [but] choice is the law of
the land,” Lamb said at a short
news conference after his victory.
Lamb, like his party, would
prefer to fight the election on the
heroin epidemic and on the issues
he handled as a prosecutor —
including sexual assault. Republicans, growing their numbers in
the district, would rather nationalize the race.
In the news conference, Lamb
said it was “too presumptuous” to
ask if he would back House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (DCalif.) for speaker if the party
regained a majority in the House.
In their first statement on Lamb’s
nomination, Pennsylvania Republicans called him “Nancy
Pelosi’s handpicked candidate”
and “a rubber stamp for Nancy
Pelosi.” A Pelosi spokesman said
she has never communicated
with Lamb.
Lorraine Petrosky, the chair of
Westmoreland County’s Democratic Party, said the first-time
candidate could stop Republicans
before that message got too much
traction.
“He was a Marine. That’s all we
have to say,” said Petrosky. “He
was a Marine, and he’s a Catholic.”
david.weigel@washpost.com
DHS watchdog: Agents erred amid travel-ban confusion
BY D EVLIN B ARRETT
AND C AROL D . L EONNIG
The Trump administration’s
botched rollout of its first travel
ban led federal agents to violate
court orders by telling airlines not
to let certain passengers board
U.S.-bound flights, according to
an internal watchdog.
In a letter Tuesday, the Department of Homeland Security’s inspector general, John Roth, notified lawmakers of the violations.
He also alerted them that his findings have become bogged down in
a battle with the department over
redactions that he said would obscure the true failures of the administration’s handling of the first
travel ban.
In the early days of the Trump
administration, the president
signed an executive order temporarily banning entry to the United
States by citizens of seven
majority-Muslim countries, as
well as refugees.
The move led to confusion and
alarm at airports, where immigration agents were unsure how to
enforce the order and passengers
were unsure whether they could
enter the United States. It also
sparked protests at some major
international airports.
The inspector general’s letter is
particularly critical of the leadership of the Customs and Border
Protection agency.
“While CBP was compliant at
U.S. ports of entry with travelers
who had already arrived, CBP was
very aggressive in preventing affected travelers from boarding aircraft bound for the United States,
and took actions that, in our view,
violated two separate court orders
that enjoined them from this activity,” Roth’s letter says.
For instance, after a federal
judge in Massachusetts issued a
temporary restraining order on
Jan. 29 instructing CBP not to
notify airlines that passengers will
be “detained or returned based
solely on the basis of the Executive
Order,” government documents
show that agents were doing precisely that two days later at Boston
Logan International Airport.
Swiss Airlines, for example, was
notified on Jan. 31 that a prospective passenger, a 31-year-old Iranian, would probably be denied entry to the United States. Dozens of
similarly eligible travelers were
not allowed to board flights that
they should have been able to
board, according to a person familiar with the inspector general’s
findings.
The letter notes that all airlines,
with one exception, obeyed the CBP
no-board instructions. Lufthansa
took the position that it would allow such passengers to board, and
mand, however, senior officials
seemed clueless at times about
what the president’s executive order actually said — who was allowed into the country and who
wasn’t, according to the inspector
general. As was reported at the
time, a key point of confusion
within the government was
The inspector general’s letter to lawmakers is
particularly critical of the leadership of the
Customs and Border Protection agency.
when they arrived in the United
States, they were permitted entry,
according to the letter.
The investigation seems to lay
the bulk of the blame for such
behavior not with CBP officers
stationed at airports but on senior
officials.
The inspector general did not
find evidence to support other
claims of misconduct by CBP officers and found some personally
paid for food and water for detained travelers.
Higher up the chain of com-
whether the executive order
barred entry of green-card holders, also called legal permanent
residents.
“The leadership of CBP, the
DHS entity primarily responsible
for implementation of the order,
had virtually no warning that the
Executive Order (EO) was to be
issued or the scope of the order,
and was caught by surprise,’’ Roth
wrote in his letter to lawmakers.
“During the early period of implementation of the order, neither
CBP nor the department was sure
Judges question effort to block Trump election panel
BY
A NN E . M ARIMOW
Federal judges questioned
Tuesday whether privacy advocates have the right to sue President Trump’s election-integrity
commission to try to block its
planned collection of millions of
voter records.
A three-judge panel of the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the D.C.
Circuit seemed skeptical of the
specific harm to a privacy watchdog group trying to protect voter
data the commission is seeking
from 50 states and the District,
including individual birth dates,
political affiliations and partial
Social Security numbers.
Judge Stephen F. Williams asserted that the commission’s
powers appeared limited to requesting — not demanding — the
information from states and said
its “potency seems very low.”
Judge Douglas H. Ginsburg
suggested the commission would
have access only to publicly available voter data.
“Isn’t this information already
public?” he asked the attorney for
the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC).
The Presidential Advisory
Commission on Election Integrity — led by Vice President Pence
and Kansas Secretary of State
Kris Kobach (R) — was created in
May to investigate unsubstantiated claims of widespread voter
fraud that Trump has said cost
him the popular vote in 2016.
In June, the commission asked
state election officials to hand
over information from voter registration files. More than a dozen
states, including Maryland and
Virginia, have partially or entire-
ly rejected the commission’s request, because of concerns about
data breaches and state laws limiting disclosures.
The lawsuit at issue Tuesday
was filed by the privacy group
EPIC and is one of several challenging the commission’s work,
citing concerns about the government’s ability to safeguard the
sensitive data and about how the
information will be used. Three
others are pending in court in
Washington. Some election experts and voting rights groups
worry the commission would use
the information to purge voter
rolls and suppress participation.
In court Tuesday, EPIC Executive Director Marc Rotenberg
called the sweeping nationwide
data collection “absolutely unprecedented” and said the organization is “in the dark” about
how the data would be stored and
who would have access to it.
The organization says the commission should have conducted
and published the results of a
privacy protection review required by law.
“EPIC has a critical role in
protecting the privacy of this
information, and that’s only possible if we have access to this
report,” Rotenberg said after the
hearing.
In court filings, the Justice
Department said that the commission is “only collecting voter
information that is already publicly available under the laws of
the states where the information
resides” and that responding to
the request was voluntary.
The challenge from the watchdog group relies on a 2002 law
designed to protect the privacy of
of the answers to basic questions
as to the scope of the order.’’
DHS spokesman Tyler Houlton
said in an email that officials “conducted themselves professionally,
and in a legal manner, as they
implemented an Executive Order
issued by the President.”
Having bungled the rollout of
the order, DHS is now trying to
keep the extent of the mismanagement hidden from the public, by
proposing to redact large sections
of his report on the subject, the
inspector general wrote.
A copy of the 87-page report by
Roth was sent to DHS leadership
on Oct. 6, but since that time he
has been locked in a battle with
department lawyers over the proposed redactions, according to the
letter. The Justice Department is
also reviewing the report.
Of particular concern, Roth
wrote, is that DHS is proposing
using the “deliberative process
privilege . . . which would prevent
us from releasing to you significant portions of the report. I am
very troubled by this development,” Roth wrote to Sens. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.), Tammy
Duckworth (D-Ill.) and Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.).
Roth said he had never before
encountered an agency trying to
use the deliberative-process privilege to keep secret parts or all of an
inspector-general report.
“Invoking the privilege can
mask . . . decisions made based on
illegitimate considerations, or evidence of outright misconduct,” he
wrote to the senators.
Houlton said: “Material within
the report is covered by privileges
afforded by well-recognized law.
This should come as no surprise as
many of the activities in implementing the Executive Order were
conducted amidst a large number
of lawsuits and, later, court orders
that shaped the Department’s response.”
After the first travel ban went
into effect, judges at the district
court and appeals court levels
found it was unconstitutional. In
response, the administration
launched a second and then a
third version of the order, changing which countries were affected
and the legal rationale for each.
Civil rights groups are still challenging the justification for the
current version.
individuals whose data might be
collected by the government and
that EPIC says requires “transparency” and “accountability.”
But Justice Department lawyer
Daniel Tenny said Tuesday that
the measure does not apply, because the election-integrity commission is a “classic advisory
commission” and not a federal
agency with independent authority.
“Federal advisory committees
have never been thought to fall
within the definition of ‘agency,’
and the commission in this case
exists solely to provide advice to
the president and exercises no
independent authority,” according to the Justice Department
filing.
After the commission’s initial
request, the White House clarified it had scrapped plans to use a
Pentagon-operated website to accept the data and had designed a
system inside the White House to
take the submissions.
The appeal to the D.C. Circuit
came after a federal judge in July
said the commission could go
forward in requesting voter data.
U.S. District Judge Colleen
Kollar-Kotelly concluded the
watchdog group had the right to
sue under the law for a privacy
review but said that because the
commission was a presidential
advisory panel — and not a federal agency — the privacy law did
not apply.
“The mere increased risk of
disclosure stemming from the
collection and eventual, anonymized disclosure of already publicly available voter roll information is insufficient” to block the
data request, Kollar-Kotelly
wrote.
The third judge on the D.C.
Circuit panel Tuesday was Judge
Karen LeCraft Henderson.
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
carol.leonnig@washpost.com
ann.marimow@washpost.com
Spencer S. Hsu contributed to this
report.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
Conyers faces ethics panel probe over harassment allegations Alaska
BY E LISE V IEBECK
AND M IKE D E B ONIS
The House Ethics Committee
launched a formal investigation
into allegations that senior Democratic lawmaker Rep. John
Conyers Jr. (Mich.) sexually harassed female aides and used office funds to settle a former
staffer’s claim that she was fired
after rejecting his advances.
Committee Chairwoman Susan
Brooks (R-Ind.) and ranking Democrat Ted Deutch (D-Fla.) announced the start of a probe into
Conyers, 88, the longest-serving
member of the House and top
Democrat on the powerful Judiciary Committee.
“The Committee is aware of
public allegations that Representative John Conyers Jr. may have
engaged in sexual harassment of
members of his staff, discriminated against certain staff on the
basis of age, and used official resources for impermissible personal purposes,” Brooks and Deutch
said in a statement.
Shortly after the probe was announced, BuzzFeed News reported a second allegation by a former
Conyers aide, who claimed in
court filings this year that he sexually harassed her. BuzzFeed reported the 2015 settlement between Conyers and an unnamed
former employee late Monday.
On Tuesday, Conyers initially
denied that he had settled sexual
harassment claims when asked by
an Associated Press reporter at his
Detroit home. Later in the day, he
reversed himself and acknowledged the settlement while emphasizing that he never admitted
fault.
Conyers said he would cooperate with a House investigation
into the matter.
“I expressly and vehemently denied the allegations made against
me, and continue to do so,” Conyers said in a written statement.
“My office resolved the allegations — with an express denial of
liability — to save all involved
from the rigors of protracted litigation. That should not be lost in
the narrative,” he stated.
Conyers’s
spokeswoman,
Shadawn Reddick-Smith, said
Conyers originally denied the existence of a settlement because he
was “under the impression the
reporter was speaking of recent
allegations of which he was unaware.”
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.), in a statement
Tuesday, did not address whether
she would ask Conyers to resign.
“As Members of Congress, we
each have a responsibility to uphold the integrity of the House of
Representatives and to ensure a
climate of dignity and respect,
with zero tolerance for harassment, discrimination, bullying or
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
Rep. John Conyers Jr. denies a
former staffer’s allegations.
abuse. As I have said before, any
credible allegation of sexual harassment must be investigated by
the Ethics Committee,” Pelosi
said.
Pelosi, House Democratic Whip
Steny H. Hoyer (Md.) and House
Democratic Caucus Chairman Joseph Crowley (N.Y.) urged the
House to overhaul the process for
reporting and resolving workplace violations with changes proposed by Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Calif.). Hoyer also called for the Committee on Administration to establish “new rules to protect
victims.”
Conyers paid his former employee more than $27,000 from
office funds after she made the
harassment accusation, listing
the payments as employee severance, according to House payroll
records compiled by LegiStorm, a
subscription-based data source.
“The resolution was not for millions of dollars, but rather for an
amount that equated to a reasonable severance payment. There
are statutory requirements of confidentiality that apply to both the
employee and me regarding this
matter,” Conyers said Tuesday.
Using office funds to settle a
claim may call into question the
accuracy of a settlement number
released earlier by the nonpartisan Office of Compliance. The office, which is charged with adjudicating workplace claims on Capitol Hill, recently said the government has paid more than $17
million to settle alleged rule violations in the past 20 years; however, that estimate did not account
for payments made directly from
members’ office budgets.
“Beyond the sexual harassment
allegations are allegations that
call into question the amount of
money that is used to settle sexual
harassment cases, and whether
some Members are using their
taxpayer-funded office budgets to
make settlements under the guise
of severance payments,” Speier
said in a statement.
“If this is true, the amount of
taxpayer money used to settle
these cases is even higher than the
number that’s been provided by
the Office of Compliance,” she
said.
The House last week said it
would require members and aides
to undergo anti-harassment
training for the first time. But
leaders have declined to take further concrete steps to address cascading allegations of sexual harassment in House offices.
Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.),
calling the original BuzzFeed report “extremely troubling,” noted
that the House Administration
Committee is reviewing congressional workplace policies with the
goal of making changes that will
curb harassment.
“Additional reforms to the system are under consideration as
the committee continues its review,” Ryan said in a statement
Tuesday. “People who work in the
House deserve and are entitled to
a workplace without harassment
or discrimination.”
On the Senate side, Judiciary
Committee Chairman Charles E.
Grassley (R-Iowa) indicated he
was looking into how he might
change the Congressional Accountability Act, a 1995 law he
wrote that established the procedures for reporting harassment,
to make it friendlier to victims.
“As author of underlying legislation I must look at the regulations on investigating sex harass
complaints that favor the aggressors,” Grassley tweeted.
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
mike.debonis@washpost.com
Trump comments
may signal outside
groups on Moore
MOORE FROM A1
the Republican National Committee’s decision last week to pull
resources from the state, including 14 paid staffers and expertise
in using party data to target voters
and model the election result.
There were no signs Tuesday
that the RNC would reverse
course, but a senior administration official said the president’s
comments could prompt a larger
effort to close ranks behind
Moore.
“Normally there would be an
outside group dumping $2 or
$3 million attacking Doug Jones’s
record,” the official said after the
president spoke. “And now that
the president has warned against
having a liberal Democrat in that
seat, that could be taken as signal
to the outside groups.”
Trump spoke as sexual harassment and abuse scandals continued to roil the nation’s political
landscape. In Congress, new allegations of harassment emerged
Tuesday against Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.), and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) released a statement calling
for an ethics investigation of the
matter. Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.)
also faces an ethics probe after
admitting to grabbing at the chest
of a woman for a photograph
while she slept before he was in
Congress.
Trump — who during the presidential campaign was accused by
11 women of unwanted touching
or kissing and was caught on tape
boasting of grabbing women’s
genitals without their consent —
declined to comment directly on
the allegations against Conyers or
Franken but said he was happy
that the misbehavior was becoming public.
“A lot of things are coming out,
and I think that’s good for our
society, and I think it’s very, very
good for women, and I’m very
happy a lot of these things are
coming out, and I’m very happy
it’s being exposed,” he said on the
South Lawn of the White House
before leaving for Florida, where
he will spend the Thanksgiving
holiday.
Just before the president spoke,
Moore campaign surrogates issued a statement in Montgomery,
saying they had evidence that cast
doubt on the allegations of Leigh
Corfman, who says she was
touched sexually by Moore when
she was 14 and he was in his 30s.
The evidence they presented did
not contradict Corfman’s story.
Ben DuPré, a longtime aide to
Moore, displayed documents he
said were from the Corfman family’s divorce file. The Post had
obtained and reviewed a copy of
the divorce file before publishing
Corfman’s story. He noted that her
parents had concerns at the time,
following a divorce, regarding
Leigh’s behavioral problems, a
fact that is not contested.
DuPré also claimed that Corfman lived nearly a mile away from
the intersection of Alcott Road
and Riley Street in Gadsden, Ala.,
where she says Moore picked her
up. It was not clear what address
DuPré was referring to. Corfman
and her mother told The Post they
lived at the time on Whittier
Street, which is just around the
corner from the alleged pickup
point.
DuPré also pointed to a Breitbart article in which Corfman’s
mother is quoted saying that
there was no phone in her daughter’s room at the time. Both Corfman and her mother have said
they had a phone on a long cord in
the hallway that could be brought
into Leigh Corfman’s room.
The RNC broke ties with Moore
on Nov. 14 as the president was
returning from Asia. There was,
however, some disagreement inside the administration at the
time about the best path forward.
“All the right political people were
not read into that decision,” said
the senior administration official,
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.
White House Chief of Staff
John F. Kelly knew about the decision and was part of the discussion. White House spokeswoman
Sarah Huckabee Sanders later
said the president supported the
decision.
But over the past week, the
White House position began to
change. In a “Fox & Friends” interview Monday morning, presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway
tacitly supported Moore by talking about the importance of keep-
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
“I’ve looked at his record. It’s terrible on crime,” President Trump told reporters, referring to Doug Jones,
the Democratic candidate for Senate, who is facing embattled former judge Roy Moore in Alabama.
ing Jones, whom she cast as a
“doctrinaire liberal,” from winning Alabama’s Senate seat — a
message that was deliberate, one
White House official said.
Conway alerted Trump in advance that she planned to make
the argument against Jones, and
the president agreed with the
strategy, saying he was eager to
see what the response was, the
official said.
White House aides also realized
that Trump had come around to
that approach — stressing the importance of keeping the seat in Republican control — when he began
making the argument privately.
Although his comments to the
news media Tuesday afternoon
were unplanned, aides were not
surprised when Trump made
them.
In recent days, Trump had also
begun expressing skepticism in
private about the allegations
against Moore. The president
pointed to the presence of Gloria
Allred — a well-known lawyer for
sexual misconduct cases, who is
representing one of Moore’s accusers — as well as the timing of
the accusations, so close to the
election, as indicators of a political attack on Moore.
Democrats have dominated the
broadcast airwaves in Alabama
for weeks, spending more than
seven times as much as Moore on
television and radio ads, according to a Democrat and a Republican tracking the ad data.
The latest ad by Jones plays
back criticism of Moore that Ivanka Trump, Attorney General Jeff
Sessions and Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R-Ala.) gave in the aftermath
of allegations that Moore made
unwanted advances on teenage
girls.
Ivanka Trump, the president’s
daughter, is quoted as saying of
the Moore allegations: “There’s a
special place in hell for people
who prey on children.” Sessions is
quoted from a congressional
hearing where he was asked about
the Moore story: “I have no reason
to doubt these young women.”
And Shelby, who has been critical
of Moore, is quoted about his plan
to write in another name on the
ballot.
The ad targets Republicans and
Republican-leaning voters who
make up a majority of the state.
The goal is to give them permission to vote for a Democrat in the
Dec. 12 special election.
“Most Alabamians haven’t voted for a Democrat for U.S. Senate
in a generation,” said Zac McCrary, an Alabama-based pollster
for the Democratic Senatorial
Campaign Committee. “You are
butting up against a generation of
Republican muscle memory,”
At a short Tuesday afternoon
news conference, Jones smiled
faintly as a reporter read back
Trump’s criticism of him as a “soft
on crime” liberal. As a federal
prosecutor, Jones obtained convictions in the early 2000s of two
members of the Ku Klux Klan for
their role in the 1963 bombing of
the 16th Street Baptist Church in
Birmingham, Ala., which killed
four young African American
girls.
New York truck-attack suspect faces more charges
BY M ATT Z APOTOSKY
AND D EVLIN B ARRETT
Federal prosecutors on Tuesday expanded and upgraded the
charges against the 29-year-old
Uzbek immigrant who they say
plowed a rented truck into people
on a New York City bike path,
killing eight, and for the first time
accused him of murder in aid of a
criminal enterprise.
In a 22-count indictment, prosecutors said that the Islamic State
was an enterprise engaged in organized crime and that Sayfullo
Saipov perpetrated the attack for
the purpose of gaining membership.
The Paterson, N.J., man was
charged with eight counts of murder in aid of racketeering, 12
counts of attempted murder in
aid of racketeering, one count of
providing and attempting to provide material support to the Islamic State and one count of
violence and destruction of a motor vehicle resulting in death.
Each of the murder charges,
along with the motor vehicle
charge, carries a possible death
sentence, though the Justice Department must still take other
steps to pursue that penalty.
“As alleged in this indictment,
Sayfullo Saipov murdered eight
innocent people and injured
many more in a calculated act of
terrorism in the heart of one of
our great cities,” Attorney General
Jeff Sessions said in a statement
announcing the indictment. “People have a right to safety walking
down a sidewalk or riding a bike,
and we will not change our resolve to confront these threats
both at home and abroad.”
Saipov was shot and wounded
by police and arrested after his
Halloween attack, and he has
been in custody since. He was
initially charged with providing
support to a terrorist organization and violence and destruction
of a motor vehicle resulting in
death.
By prosecutors’ telling, the 29year-old had been plotting an
attack for the Islamic State for
more than a year and chose Halloween so he could hit more pedestrians on the street. They say
he emerged from his truck shouting “Allahu akbar” — God is great
— and investigators found near
the vehicle a note in Arabic text
saying “No God but God and
“I feel like my record speaks for
itself,” Jones said. “I know my
record on crime and criminal justice issues. I know my record on
everything else. We’ve got three
weeks to go, and people are going
to make that judgment.”
Asked if he considered Moore
to be a sexual predator, Jones said
he was less interested in characterizing his opponent than in listening to the accusers.
“I believe the women. I think
that answers the question,” he
said. “I’m not going to call names.”
With three weeks to go until the
vote, it is unclear if a Republicanleaning outside group will invest
in the race to attack Jones.
Ed Rollins, chairman of the
pro-Trump Great America PAC,
said that while his group has not
made any decisions about what
money to invest in Alabama going
forward, any future ads probably
would be attacking Jones rather
than overtly supporting Moore.
“We think it’s always important
that you get someone who is going
to be a pro-Trump supporter,” Rollins said. “Obviously Alabamians
are going to make up their mind.
The only advertising we’ve done
to date has been anti-Jones. We’ve
not made any decisions, but if we
did anything else, it would be
along the same lines.”
michael.scherer@washpost.com
ashley.parker@washpost.com
david.weigel@washpost.com
Weigel reported from Huntsville, Ala.
Sean Sullivan and David Nakamura in
Washington contributed to this
report.
Muhammad is his Prophet” and
“Islamic Supplication. It will endure.”
Saipov said he was proud of
what he had done and even requested to display the Islamic
State flag in his hospital room,
federal authorities have alleged.
While the indictment indicates
prosecutors may seek the death
penalty, there is a process for
doing so that takes months. First,
the U.S. attorney must make a
formal recommendation that
they would like to seek the death
penalty in the case, then that
recommendation would have to
be approved by the attorney general.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
senator
is against
ACA rule
BY
D AMIAN P ALETTA
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said she would support repealing the Affordable Care Act’s
individual insurance mandate,
potentially giving a boost to the
Republican effort to pass a massive tax cut package next week.
“I believe that the federal government should not force anyone
to buy something they do not
wish to buy, in order to avoid
being taxed,” Murkowski wrote in
an opinion piece published Tuesday by the Fairbanks Daily NewsMiner.
Senate Republicans’ plan to
rewrite the tax code includes a
provision to repeal the individual
mandate, a part of the 2010
health-care law that requires almost all Americans to have some
form of health insurance or pay a
fine.
Murkowski was careful, however, to stop short of saying she
would vote for the Senate GOP
tax plan. She instead focused the
op-ed on her views about the
Affordable Care Act, emphasizing how Alaskans had paid
$21 million in penalties under
the law in 2014 and 2015 for
failing to purchase health insurance. She wrote that “eliminating
this tax would allow Alaskans to
have greater control over their
money and health care decisions.”
The Alaska moderate is a key
swing vote as Republican leaders
attempt to assemble support for
their tax plan. They need 50 votes
to move the measure through the
Senate, and they control 52 seats.
The bill would probably fail in
the Senate if three Republicans
oppose it, as Democrats are expected to unanimously oppose
the plan.
Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) said
last week that he planned to
oppose the bill because he felt tax
cuts for certain businesses
weren’t generous enough, but he
has recently signaled that his
opposition was softening.
By stating her support for repealing the individual mandate
in a home-state newspaper, Murkowski could be paving the way
to carefully articulating to Alaskans how she is moving closer to
Republican leaders on the tax
plan, which has become President Trump’s top economic priority.
The House of Representatives
has already passed a version of
the tax cut plan, but in one of
many critical differences from
the Senate measure, the House
legislation would not make
changes to the health-care law.
Senate Republicans included a
repeal of the measure in their
version, which was introduced
this month. The provision was
added suddenly, and some White
House officials feared it could
repel party moderates.
As recently as Sunday, White
House officials were unsure
whether the effort to repeal the
individual mandate would remain in the Senate bill. White
House Office of Management and
Budget Director Mick Mulvaney
said that the White House would
prefer that the tax bill repeal the
individual mandate but that they
would support removing the language if politically necessary.
Murkowski was one of three
senators this summer who joined
with Democrats to block a GOP
effort to repeal large parts of the
Affordable Care Act.
She wrote in her op-ed that the
Affordable Care Act has helped
some people in Alaska by making
it easier to purchase insurance,
expanding access to mental
health and substance abuse programs, and making it harder for
insurers to deny coverage. But
she said other parts of the 2010
law went too far and should be
changed, particularly the individual mandate.
“It is important to emphasize
that eliminating this tax penalty
does not take care away from
anyone. Instead, it provides important relief to those who have
been penalized for choosing not
to buy unaffordable insurance.”
Repealing the mandate would
result in 13 million fewer people
having health insurance and
drive up insurance premiums by
roughly 10 percent for many
Americans, according to projections from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.
The mandate repeal would
also save the government more
than $300 billion over the next
decade, according to the CBO, as
fewer people buying insurance
would mean the government
would pay out less in subsidies.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Disney creative chief taking leave after ‘missteps’
BY
S TEVEN Z EITCHIK
In a new sexual misconduct
scandal that could shake the economics of Hollywood, Disney said
Tuesday that animation chief
John Lasseter would be taking a
six-month leave of absence starting immediately.
The company acknowledged
unspecified “missteps” via a statement from Lasseter. But the Hollywood Reporter, which broke the
story, cited allegations that
Lasseter had made unwanted
contact with numerous female
colleagues and collaborators over
a period of years.
Lasseter is one of the most
important figures in modern entertainment, and a scandal that
sidelines him could have more
far-reaching implications for the
industry than many of the other
revelations of sexual misconduct
that have shaken Hollywood over
the past six weeks.
“It’s been brought to my attention that I have made some of you
feel disrespected or uncomfortable. That was never my intent,”
Lasseter wrote in a memo to his
staff Tuesday. Saying that “it’s
never easy to face your missteps,
but it’s the only way to learn from
them,” he added that he “especially want[ed] to apologize to anyone who has ever been on the
receiving end of an unwanted hug
or any other gesture they felt
crossed the line in any way, shape,
or form. No matter how benign
my intent, everyone has the right
to set their own boundaries and
have them respected.”
Citing a six-month “sabbatical,”
Lasseter closed the letter to employees saying he “look[s] forward to working together again in
the new year.”
It remains unclear whether
Disney could extend the leave or
make it permanent. A Disney
spokesman did not return a call
seeking comment.
The Lasseter scandal comes at
a critical time for the studio, as it
prepares to release “Coco,” its Día
de Muertos-themed tale from the
director of “Toy Story 3,” in theaters Wednesday. The movie is already the highest-grossing in the
history of Mexico and is expected
to take in at least $60 million over
the holiday weekend and potentially far more. It is also considered a prohibitive front-runner to
win this year’s animation Oscar.
BRENDAN MCDERMID/REUTERS
John Lasseter, the brains behind many Pixar and Disney blockbusters, apologized to his staff Tuesday.
Lasseter is officially the chief
creative officer at Walt Disney and
Pixar Animation Studios, but his
title only hints at his true influence. The 60-year-old is regarded
as almost singlehandedly ushering in the era of computer-generated animation. Some of the highest-grossing animated movies of
all time — “Frozen,” “Finding
Dory” and installments in the
“Toy Story” franchise — were
made directly under him.
He has long steered Pixar —
and, for the past decade, its sister
company Walt Disney Animation
— to numerous blockbusters.
Lasseter has served as a producer
and all-around creative force on
nearly every one of the several
dozen Pixar and Disney animated
films. He has also directed nearly
a half-dozen, including several in
the “Toy Story” and “Cars” franchises.
Last year Lasseter’s teams were
responsible for three of the 11
highest-grossing movies of the
year domestically — nearly
$1.1 billion in ticket sales — with
“Dory,” “Zootopia” and “Moana.”
Globally, the three movies took in
$2.7 billion at the box office.
Although Pixar has had a few
film blunders of late, including
“Cars 3” this year, Disney animation remains one of the company’s
big revenue drivers. Last year its
J OEL A CHENBACH
Martha, the last of her kind,
resides in a glass case at the
Smithsonian’s National Museum
of Natural History, perched on a
thin branch. She’s a passenger
pigeon, Ectopistes migratorius,
and in the final years of her life,
before her death in 1914 at the
Cincinnati Zoo, she achieved
fame as the last survivor of a
species once so populous that its
flocks could darken the noonday
sky.
Martha is small and gray, with
flecks of blue and green iridescence on the back of her neck.
She is looking sharply to the
right, as if looking over her
shoulder — as if a bit wary.
(You’re not being paranoid when
you’re the only one left.)
“Some people find her a little
plain looking,” said Helen James,
the curator of birds, who can put
her hands on more specimens of
passenger pigeons, older and unheralded, stored upstairs in the
museum’s ornithology collection.
How the passenger pigeon
died out is hardly a whodunit.
Humans exterminated them
through ruthless and efficient
hunting in the late 19th century.
We’ve driven plenty of species to
extinction, but the case of the
passenger pigeon is one of the
most perplexing. This had been
the most abundant bird in North
America and possibly the world.
A single flock could contain more
than 1 billion birds. Scientists
still wonder: Why didn’t some
pigeons survive in remote areas?
A new study of the passenger
pigeon’s genome, published last
week in the journal Science,
dives into the debate over this
famous extinction. The paper
argues that passenger pigeons,
contrary to what some scientists
have said in recent years, did not
suffer wild fluctuations in population before humans wiped
them out. Rather, the population
was stable for thousands of
years, even during periods of
dramatic climate change, the paper states.
The study also suggests that
passenger pigeons didn’t vary
much in their genes. “We have
this very large population size
but not very large genetic diversity,” said Gemma Murray, an evo-
3 from Army lose jobs at
White House amid inquiry
BY
studio division reported $9.4 billion in revenue, a chunk of that
from two areas: animation efforts
and the “Star Wars” franchise.
While there are other figures,
such as Disney animation President Ed Catmull, involved in Disney’s animation divisions, the
company’s movies are considered
the reflection of one man in a way
almost unheard of at a modern
Hollywood studio.
Along the way Lasseter has
created a cult of personality with
his signature Hawaiian shirts and
a big personality. But that personality, the accusers said, came with
unwanted contact and advances.
The Hollywood Reporter cited
one woman as saying Lasseter
was prone to “grabbing, kissing,
making comments about physical
attributes.” Another woman said
that Lasseter’s statement Tuesday
that centered on hugs minimized
the alleged offenses. Many of the
accusers were anonymous.
The story said that the writeractor Rashida Jones had left “Toy
Story 4” because of Lasseter’s behavior. A message to the actress’s
representative was not immediately returned.
The news, which began spreading after the market closed, did
not immediately affect Disney’s
stock price, which was slightly up.
The Lasseter scandal will be a
Billions or bust: New genetic clues
to the passenger pigeon’s extinction
BY
A7
SU
DONALD E. HURLBERT/SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
Martha, the last passenger
pigeon, at the Smithsonian.
lutionary biologist at the University of California at Santa Cruz
and the lead author of the Science paper.
The researchers studied the
nuclear DNA of four passenger
pigeon specimens and looked at
the mitochondrial DNA of an
additional 41 specimens. They
compared the genetic markers
with those of the extinct bird’s
relative, the band-tailed pigeon.
The study concluded that much
of the bird’s genetic code shows
signs of strong natural selection,
and simultaneously a low level of
genetic drift or “neutral” mutations — the kind of changes that
may not have any obvious adaptive advantage in the short run
but could serve as a hedge in the
future if the ecosystem changed.
The new study does not contend that the low level of genetic
diversity led to the demise of the
passenger pigeon. That’s an extra
leap. It may be that even a bird
with tremendous genetic diversity, nimble when ecosystems
change suddenly, could not have
withstood the onslaught of human predation.
“Our mass murder of them
over the course of decades was
just too fast for evolution to keep
up,” said Beth Shapiro, a professor of ecology and evolutionary
biology at UC-Santa Cruz and
another of the paper’s co-authors.
“This species was abundant
for tens of thousands of years in
the face of major environmental
changes to forest and climate,
and despite all of that this species was resilient,” said co-author
Ben Novak, an ecologist with
Revive and Restore, a nonprofit
organization that has explored
ways of bringing back the passenger pigeon through genetic
engineering.
He added, “It’s impossible to
adapt to gunfire.”
The passenger pigeon clearly
had evolved to live in large
populations. What’s unclear is
what the minimum viable population size would be. They did
exist for their last couple of
decades in small, isolated populations. But their survival strategy had always been based on
numbers: The birds far outnumbered their natural predators. No
predator could eat them all.
“Predator satiation” as a survival
strategy would presumably be
less effective in small numbers.
Shapiro said there’s a broader
lesson in this research: No one
should assume that numbers
alone are a buffer against extinction.
John James Audubon, awed by
the spectacle of passenger pigeons in Kentucky in the fall of
1813, wrote that “the light of
noon-day was obscured as by an
eclipse; the dung fell in spots, not
unlike melting flakes of snow;
and the continued buzz of wings
had a tendency to lull my senses
to repose.”
But in the decades that followed, hunters used new technologies to prey on the birds. By
telegraph, they wired news of the
migration of great flocks and the
locations where colonies were
roosting. By railroad, they sent
dead birds stuffed in barrels to
major cities for human consumption.
The last wild pigeons were
seen soon after the start of the
20th century. On Sept. 1, 1914,
Martha was found dead in the
bottom of her cage. Zoo officials
packed her in a 300-pound block
of ice and shipped her by rail to
the Smithsonian, according to
James. Martha can be seen in the
Objects of Wonder exhibition,
displayed in a case next to the
skulls of two mountain gorillas.
“This is a very American story,”
said Ed Green, a geneticist at
UC-Santa Cruz who co-authored
the new report. “And it’s a terrible American story of extinction.”
joel.achenbach@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
window into whether the industry can self-police its sexual misconduct, a subject of fierce debate
in social media and victims rights’
circles over the past month. Many
of the other scandals have involved either radically diminished outfits like the Weinstein
Co. or free-agent types like comedian Louis C.K. and actor Kevin Spacey — people who run small
production companies and were
quickly and relatively easily
shunned by outside partners.
But Lasseter is one of Hollywood’s top executives, in charge
of hundreds of people, making
discipline a more fraught affair.
The scandal, which appears to
have been brewing for years, also
comes just several weeks after
Disney was criticized for suppressing news coverage when it
imposed a short-lived coverage
ban on the Los Angeles Times
after the paper’s investigative series on the company’s business
dealings.
Disney did not send out its own
statement. Lasseter wrote in the
memo that the leave “will give me
the opportunity to start taking
better care of myself, to recharge
and be inspired, and ultimately
return with the insight and perspective I need to be the leader
you deserve.”
steven.zeitchik@washpost.com
C AROL D . L EONNIG,
D AN L AMOTHE
AND J ULIE T ATE
Three military personnel have
been reassigned from their
White House jobs amid allegations that they had improper
contact with foreign women
while traveling with President
Trump on his recent trip to Asia,
according to officials familiar
with the situation.
The service members worked
for the White House Communications Agency, a specialized military unit that helps provide the
president, vice president, Secret
Service and other officials with
secure communications.
The military is scrutinizing
three Army noncommissioned
officers who allegedly broke curfew during Trump’s trip to Vietnam this month, officials said.
Mark Wright, a spokesman for
the Defense Department, confirmed that the Pentagon is examining the behavior of personnel during the visit to Vietnam.
“We are aware of the incident,
and it is currently under investigation,” Wright said.
If found guilty, the service
members face the risk of losing
their security clearances or could
be subject to administrative discipline or courts-martial.
Trump visited Vietnam as part
of a 12-day swing through Asia.
The episode comes after four
military personnel on the same
White House team faced allegations related to their behavior
during a trip to Panama in
August with Vice President
Pence.
Those men — two from the
Army and two from the Air Force
— stood accused of taking foreign women after hours into a
secure area as they were preparing for Pence’s arrival, officials
said.
They were flown home before
Pence arrived and stripped of
their White House assignments
pending the findings of the investigation, officials said.
Army
Col.
Amanda
I.
Azubuike, a military spokeswoman, said an investigation
into the Panama case has been
closed and the findings forwarded to senior military officials for
review.
She said she was not aware of
the final conclusions or disciplinary action.
NBC previously reported that
military members on the Panama trip had been removed from
White House duty.
Service members with highlevel security clearances are expected to report contacts with
foreign individuals to ensure
that their interactions do not
compromise national security.
The mission of the White
House Communications Agency
is to prevent eavesdropping on
presidential
communications
and to ensure that White House
officials can be securely reached
worldwide at a moment’s notice.
The agency is part of the
White House Military Office, a
team of technical personnel traveling worldwide to support
presidential trips. The communications agency employs 1,200
staffers drawn from all branches
of the military. Many of its personnel are assigned to White
House duties on four-year tours.
Spokesmen for Trump and
Pence declined to comment and
referred questions to the office of
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis.
The alleged misconduct on
back-to-back White House trips
comes five years after a high-profile episode involving Secret
Service agents on a presidential
trip.
In April 2012, 13 Secret Service
agents and officers were flown
back to Washington from Cartagena, Colombia, after being accused of taking prostitutes back
to their hotel rooms. The men
were supposed to be preparing
for President Barack Obama’s
arrival for an economic summit
in the seaside resort. Ten lost
their jobs.
The scandal raised concerns
that prostitutes had access to the
agents’ rooms and possibly classified information about the
president’s movements. The Secret Service director at the time,
Mark Sullivan, testified to Congress that the episode was humiliating but said there was never a
risk to the president.
carol.leonnig@washpost.com
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
julie.tate@washpost.com
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
The World
Researchers uncover N. Korea’s nuclear secrets
Using satellite imaging and 3-D models, analysts can do the work of intelligence agencies in locating and confirming missile tests
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
monterey, calif. — There were
reports going around last month
that North Korea had tested another solid-fuel missile engine, a
type of engine that can be deployed much faster than the older
liquid-fueled ones.
Kim Jong Un’s media outlets
hadn’t bragged about it — as they
had done in previous tests — so
the experts at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies’
nonproliferation center got to
work.
They figured that the North
Korean rocket scientists would
have used the same immovable
concrete block they used for an
engine test last year.
Dave Schmerler — a researcher
nicknamed “Geolocation Jesus”
by Jeffrey Lewis, who runs the
center’s East Asia program — had
quickly located the site of the earlier test.
He’d made 3-D models of the
buildings in the North Korean
photos and noted the surroundings. Then he’d taken official reports about Kim’s recent public
activities — in that case, the leader
had just been to a machinery plant
near Hamhung on the east coast
— and wham, he pinpointed the
exact building on Google Earth.
Technology is making it possible for open-source analysts to do
the kind of work previously the
preserve of intelligence agencies
and, in the process, learn all sorts
of things about one of the most
impenetrable countries in the
world — one that wants to send
nuclear-tipped missiles to the
United States.
“Back in the day, if the government told you something, you had
to believe it. That’s how we got the
Iraq War,” said the voluble Lewis.
“Our animating principle is that
having a robust public debate
about nuclear and missile technology in other countries is going
to lead to better policies.”
Now, with unconfirmed reports
of another test, Lewis and
Schmerler and their colleagues
set out to confirm them.
Using near-infrared imagery
from Planet Labs, a San Franciscobased company that takes daily
images of the Earth, they scoured
the photos of the previous engine
test site, taken over several days in
the middle of October. Google
Earth might have better-quality
images, but they can be months
old.
Enhancing the Planet images
with near-infrared light, which
can differentiate between living
and dead vegetation, the experts
found signs of significant heat and
force going in one direction away
from the test site.
North Korea did, indeed, appear to have tested another rocket
engine.
Using these methods of “opensource intelligence,” Lewis’s team
has been able to spot developments and sound the alarm about
the rapid progress in North Korea’s missile program, while government officials and other analysts were saying Pyongyang was
still years away from making a
rocket that could reach the United
States.
“I find it really reassuring that
there are people who can do this in
open source,” said Melissa Han-
50 killed
in Nigeria
mosque
bombing
Attack, likely linked to
Boko Haram, among
area’s deadliest since ’15
R EUTERS
yola, nigeria — A suicide bomb-
ANNA FIFIELD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Dave Schmerler, nicknamed “Geolocation Jesus,” uses satellite images and 3-D models to find the locations of North Korea’s missile tests.
PLANET LABS
Two images show the test stand location near Hamhung, North Korea. The image on the left shows the test stand on Oct. 7. The image on
the right, from Oct. 17, shows that vegetation near the test stand has changed since the time of the reported test. Researchers at the
Middlebury Institute of International Studies use this near-infrared imagery from Planet Labs to confirm reports of missile tests.
ham, a senior researcher at the
center.
In one case, in October last year,
they used before-and-after satellite imagery enhanced with nearinfrared light and determined
that there was an even chance that
North Korea had just tested part
of an intercontinental ballistic
missile.
Eight months later, North Korea launched its first ICBM, one
that could reach Alaska. A few
weeks later, it fired one that had
Denver and Chicago in range.
Satellite photos provide the
analysts with lots of useful material. “I stare at North Korea all day,”
Schmerler said. “I look at what’s
happening and where it’s happening and everything beyond.”
North Korea also provides the
researchers with plenty of valuable data through photos and videos the regime publishes following successful missile and nuclear
tests.
“When we get pictures, we’re
able to start working to determine
what actually happened. And it
especially helps when they release
video,” said Shea Cotton, another
researcher on the team.
With video, software can measure how quickly the missile
launches off the pad. With that
information, analysts can calculate its thrust.
In photos, joints and lines on
the missiles can help them make
precise measurements of their
size. The Japanese crane used to
lift an intermediate-range missile
in May told them its maximum
weight.
The color of the flames from the
missile launches can reveal
whether the engine is powered by
liquid or solid fuel. Solid-fuel
rockets are faster to launch and
therefore harder to detect in advance.
Gleaning information about
North Korea’s nuclear weapons is,
however, much more difficult because warhead design is classified
by nature.
It’s impossible to tell whether
the peanut-shaped two-stage device that North Korea showed off
in September, just hours before it
detonated what it said was a twostage hydrogen bomb, was a
mock-up of the actual bomb that
was tested.
“We can’t prove whether it’s
real or not. We don’t have X-ray
vision,” Hanham said. “But they’re
trying to tell us that this is something they’re working on.”
Still, Nate Taylor, a graduate
student, spent hours making a 3-D
computer model of the “peanut,”
counting bolts and divots, adding
the 12 detonator wires. But, annoyingly, the device was photographed at an angle, not straight
on, making it more difficult to get
an accurate measurement.
Taylor worked with what he
had: Kim Jong Un’s face. He figured out the size of Kim’s face by
comparing it with the basketball
player who’s visited him — “because Dennis Rodman is our
known quantity” — and used
those numbers to calculate the
length and diameter of the bomb.
But this emerging field comes
with its own problems. If the experts figure out North Korea’s
mistakes, is it ethical to disclose
them? “It’s cool to make the models, but we don’t want to help solve
their problems for them,” Hanham said.
Although the bombs are difficult, Lewis’s team has been able
to determine some information
about where North Korea is showing them off — and there is some
evidence that Pyongyang may be
trying to thwart the team.
When Kim inspected the first
warhead North Korea publicized
— a round device nicknamed the
“disco ball” — it didn’t take
Schmerler long to find the building.
He counted the high beams on
the roof and measured the skylight windows and went “cruising” over North Korea and found
the exact building. Matching
beams, matching skylights.
The next time North Korea
published a photo of a warhead —
the “peanut” detonated in September — the photos were taken
in a completely white room where
there was nothing to measure. No
beams, no windows, just sloped
floors that suggested it was underground.
“Hats off,” said Schmerler (although he thinks he still figured
out the location).
anna.fifield@washpost.com
er killed at least 50 people in
northeastern Nigeria on Tuesday
in an attack on a mosque that bore
the hallmarks of a faction of the
Islamist militant group Boko
Haram.
The bombing in Mubi in Adamawa state was one of the deadliest in northeastern Nigeria since
President Muhammadu Buhari
came to power in 2015 vowing to
end Boko Haram’s years-long insurgency and its attacks on civilian and military targets.
There was no claim of responsibility for the attack.
Abubakar Othman, a police
spokesman in Adamawa, said the
death toll was at least 50 but added
that the tally could rise.
Eight people were critically injured, and more than 30 were hurt
but in stable condition, said Idris
Garga, northeast regional coordinator for the national emergency
agency.
Boko Haram held territory in
Adamawa in 2014. Troops pushed
the militant group out in early
2015, and the town of Mubi had
been relatively peaceful until
Tuesday’s bombing.
In a statement Tuesday, Nigeria’s president said the attack
was “very cruel” and gave assurances that his government would
do “everything required” to secure
the state from Boko Haram.
The group often mounts suicide
attacks in public places such as
mosques and markets. In December, two schoolgirls killed 56 people and wounded dozens at a market in Adamawa by blowing themselves up.
The mosque blast bears the
hallmarks of a Boko Haram faction led by Abubakar Shekau,
which forces women and girls to
carry out suicide attacks.
Boko Haram has waged an insurgency in northeastern Nigeria
since 2009 in its attempt to create
an Islamic state in the region. The
violence has killed more than
20,000 people and forced about
2 million to flee their homes.
The group split in 2016, and the
faction under Shekau is based in
the Sambisa Forest on the border
with Cameroon and Chad. It targets mainly civilians with suicide
bombers.
The other faction is based in the
Lake Chad region and is led by
Abu Musab al-Barnawi. It attacks
mainly military forces, after quietly building its strength over the
past year.
Overall, most attacks focus on
Borno state, the birthplace of the
insurgency. The group held land
about the size of Belgium in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states until early 2015 but was forced out by
Nigeria’s army and troops from
neighboring countries.
DIGEST
IRAQ
32 killed in bombing in
disputed town in north
A suicide bomber in a pickup
truck killed 32 people Tuesday at
a marketplace in an Iraqi town
claimed by both the central
government in Baghdad and the
Kurdish regional authorities, Iraqi
officials said.
The explosion in Tuz Khurmatu
also wounded at least 80 people.
No one asserted responsibility for
the attack.
The town is about 130 miles
north of Baghdad and historically
has been home to Kurds, Sunni
Arabs and Shiite Turkmens. But
since Saddam Hussein’s ouster
in 2003, it has also witnessed
outbreaks of deadly sectarian
violence that have escalated
since the Kurdish region’s
independence vote in September.
The Kurdish region and
Baghdad are at a military and
political standoff after the
referendum. Iraqi Prime Minister
Haider al-Abadi, calling the vote
unconstitutional, shut the
region’s airspace to international
commercial flights and retook
disputed territories.
The backlash forced Kurdish
Venezuela as well as ban trading
in two bonds the government
recently issued to circumvent its
growing isolation from Western
financial markets.
leader Masoud Barzani, who
spearheaded the referendum
campaign, to effectively step
down.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
VENEZUELA
RUSSIA
Acting Citgo president,
5 others detained
Venezuelan authorities
detained the acting president of
Citgo, the state-owned oil
company’s U.S. subsidiary, and
five other executives for alleged
involvement in a corruption
scheme, officials said Tuesday.
Chief prosecutor Tarek William
Saab said José Pereira and five
Citgo vice presidents have been
detained on suspicion of
embezzlement stemming from a
$4 billion agreement to refinance
company bonds.
According to Saab, the deal
provided “unconscionable and
unfavorable” terms for the state oil
giant PDVSA and offered Citgo
itself as a guarantee on repayment
without prior government
approval. Mediators of the
contract were purportedly eligible
for a 1.5 percent payoff of the total.
Saab described the Citgo
executives as facilitators for U.S.
Spike in radioactivity
confirmed in the Urals
PETER CZIBORRA/REUTERS
A man walks outside the Heydar Aliyev Center in Baku, the capital
of Azerbaijan. The cultural center, named for the country’s president
from 1993 to 2003, was designed by the late Iraqi-British architect
Zaha Hadid, whose designs are known for their sweeping curves and
open spaces. It contains auditoriums, a library and a museum.
international pressure on
Venezuela’s oil sector, “putting at
risk Citgo’s assets while obtaining
personal benefits.”
Citgo did not immediately
respond to a request for comment.
The detentions are part of an
investigation by authorities into
Venezuela’s oil sector, which has
struggled in recent years amid
mismanagement and declining
production.
The Trump administration
imposed sweeping sanctions
against Venezuela in August,
prohibiting financial institutions
from providing new money to the
government or PDVSA. The
sanctions also prohibit Citgo from
sending dividends back to
Russian authorities on Tuesday
confirmed reports of a spike in
radioactivity in the air over the
Ural Mountains while the
suspected culprit, a nuclear fuel
processing plant, denied it was the
source of contamination.
The Russian Meteorological
Service said it recorded the
release of ruthenium-106 in the
southern Urals in late September
and classified it as “extremely
high contamination.” Authorities
insisted, however, that the
amount of the isotope posed no
health risks.
France’s nuclear safety agency
said earlier this month that it
recorded radioactivity in the area
between the Volga River and the
Ural Mountains from a suspected
accident involving nuclear fuel or
the production of radioactive
material. It said the release of
ruthenium-106 posed no health or
environmental risks to Europe.
Last month, when reports of a
trace of ruthenium over Europe
first appeared, Russia’s statecontrolled Rosatom corporation
denied any leak. It reaffirmed
Tuesday that the ruthenium
emission registered by the state
meteorological service hadn’t
come from any of its facilities.
The Russian meteorological
office’s report noted high levels of
radiation in residential areas
adjacent to Rosatom’s Mayak
plant for spent nuclear fuel.
— Associated Press
Human rights official, son killed
in Mexico: Gunmen in Mexico
have killed a human rights official
and his son in the northern state
of Baja California Sur. State
officials said Silvestre de la Toba
Camacho and his family were
driving in an SUV in the state
capital, La Paz, when gunmen in
another vehicle opened fire. De la
Toba Camacho, 47, and his 20year-old son died at the scene.
De la Toba Camacho’s wife and
17-year-old daughter were
wounded. Baja California Sur has
seen an increase in violence as
drug cartels battle for turf.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
A Putin-Assad embrace launches Russia’s new bid to end the war in Syria
BY L IZ S LY,
L OUISA L OVELUCK
AND D AVID F ILIPOV
Russian President Vladimir
Putin launched a major new push
Tuesday to end the war in Syria
after an unannounced visit by
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad
to Russia that seemed to affirm
his future role in any eventual
settlement.
The Russian initiative builds
on an agreement reached with
President Trump this month in
which the United States effectively acknowledged Russia’s lead
role in Syrian diplomacy in return
for Russian acceptance of a continued U.S. role in Syria now that
the Islamic State is nearing defeat.
After Putin’s meeting with Assad, the Russian president spent
much of Tuesday on the phone
with regional and world leaders,
seeking their support for proposals that would parlay Russia’s
successful military intervention
on Assad’s behalf in 2015 into a
diplomatic victory that would
seal Russia’s role as an important
world player.
The spurt of diplomacy began
with an announcement by the
Kremlin that Assad had met with
Putin on Monday in the Russian
resort town of Sochi, where photographs released by Russian media showed the two men warmly
embracing.
Putin told Assad that the war in
Syria is as good as over and urged
him to turn his attention to securing a political solution to the
conflict, according to comments
broadcast by state media.
“As far as our joint work in
fighting terrorism on the territory of Syria is concerned, this
military operation is indeed nearing completion,” Putin said. “I
believe that the main task now is
to launch the political process.”
Putin then talked for more
than an hour on the phone Tuesday with Trump, a conversation
that focused mostly on Syria, according to readouts of the conversation from both the Kremlin and
the White House. Putin told
Trump he had secured a commitment from Assad to cooperate
with the Russian initiative, including constitutional reforms
and presidential and parliamentary elections, the Kremlin said.
MIKHAIL KLIMENTYEV/KREMLIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
On Monday, Russian President Vladimir Putin embraced Syria’s Bashar al-Assad during a meeting in
Sochi, Russia. On Tuesday, Putin called regional and world leaders, including President Trump.
The White House said the two
leaders reiterated their commitment to securing a settlement
within the parameters of the
U.N.-backed peace process in Geneva, as well as to ensuring a
Syria that is free of “malign intervention” — a reference to Iran’s
extensive influence there. “We’re
talking very strongly about bringing peace for Syria,” Trump later
told reporters in Washington.
Putin later telephoned Egypt’s
President Abdel Fatah al-Sissi
and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to relay details of
his conversations with Assad, and
was expected to call Saudi Arabia’s King Salman, the Kremlin
said.
Tuesday’s conversations came
on the eve of a key summit on
Syria between Putin, Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani and Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan that is also to be held in
Sochi, which is emerging as the
epicenter of the Russian push for
a Syrian solution. Iran and Turkey
are the regional players with the
biggest influence over the parties
AMER ALMOHIBANY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Smoke rises after an airstrike Saturday on the rebel-held town of
Arbin, in the Eastern Ghouta region on the outskirts of Damascus.
On Wednesday, a summit in Sochi with Iran and Turkey will kick
off events that Russia hopes will lead to a solution in Syria.
in Syria.
That summit will kick off
events in the coming weeks that
Russia hopes will lead to a grand
bargain over Syria, endorsed by
all the global and regional players
with a stake in the outcome of the
war as well as by Syrians.
Saudi Arabia is due to host a
gathering of opposition leaders in
Riyadh, also on Wednesday, in an
attempt to forge an almost entire-
ly new opposition body to represent the anti-Assad movement in
future negotiations. Nearly a
dozen leaders of the existing,
U.S.-backed opposition grouping
have submitted their resignations
ahead of the meeting to protest
what they fear is an abandonment of their allies’ commitment
to securing Assad’s departure.
On Nov. 28, the United Nations
is scheduled to host an eighth
round of peace talks in Geneva
between the government and the
revamped opposition, a process
that is ostensibly aimed at some
form of transition away from Assad’s rule.
But the Trump-Putin deal
omitted all references to any form
of “transition,” and the emphasis
now is instead on a process of
writing a new constitution that
will lead to elections.
On Dec. 2, Russia is planning to
host a gathering of about 1,300
Syrians representing the revamped opposition, the government and a range of other groups
to discuss the terms of a new
constitution. After the document
has been written, according to
drafts of the Russian proposals,
there will be elections in which
Assad will be allowed to compete.
The diplomacy was facilitated
by the agreement reached between Putin and Trump. The
United States wields influence
mainly over the northeastern corner of Syria, where a small contingent of U.S. troops has been helping Kurdish-led fighters battle the
Islamic State. At least some of
those troops are expected to remain behind now that the war is
nearly over to stabilize the area
pending a solution to the wider
Syrian war, Defense Secretary
Jim Mattis said last week.
Many questions remain however, including whether Assad is
willing to abandon his stated goal
of reconquering the territory that
fell out of his control during the
past six years of war. Though the
Russian proposals would leave
him in office, perhaps indefinitely, they would also dilute his
powers and give his opponents a
role in government.
Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters that Putin had
sought to assure world powers
that Russia is prepared to guarantee Syrian compliance with
any agreements reached. Russia
Now’s the time to
GET YOUR ROOF
READY FOR WINTER!
would “work with the Syrian leadership to prepare the groundwork for possible understandings,” Peskov said, to “make sure”
that any such agreements will be
“viable.”
But Assad appeared to hedge
his commitment to the process in
comments reported by Russian
media about his meeting with
Putin. “We are interested in promoting the political process,”
Assad said. “We hope Russia will
support us by ensuring the external players’ noninterference in
the political process, so that they
will only support the process
waged by the Syrians themselves.”
“We do not want to look back.
We will accept and talk with
anyone who is really interested in
a political settlement,” Assad added.
It is also unclear whether Iran,
Assad’s closest ally, will be willing
to comply with an international
deal that almost certainly would
include pressure on Tehran to
dilute the extensive influence it
has secured through its dispatch
of militias and money over the
past six years.
Securing opposition acceptance of a continued Assad role
will also be tough, even though
international support for his departure is waning, Turkey’s Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu
told reporters in Istanbul last
week.
“It is not only Russia and Iran
— now the U.S., even Saudi Arabia
and France are more flexible on
Assad,” Cavusoglu said. “But here
we shouldn’t be emotional. We
have to be very realistic. We need
to unite all the different groups,
and it seems it is not very easy to
unite everybody around Assad,
after seven years of civil war and
after this regime killed 1 million
Syrians.”
The war is widely estimated by
monitoring groups to have killed
between 300,000 and 500,000
Syrians, but the challenge of
bringing about any form of reconciliation is nonetheless immense.
liz.sly@washpost.com
louisa.loveluck@washpost.com
david.filipov@washpost.com
Loveluck reported from Beirut, and
Filipov reported from Moscow.
Kareem Fahim in Istanbul and David
Nakamura in Washington contributed
to this report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
Zimbabwe
celebrates
Mugabe’s
resignation
ZIMBABWE FROM A1
history — the 93-year-old leader
went quietly, sending his resignation letter to parliament, where it
was read by the speaker, Jacob
Mudenda.
The surprise announcement
came as parliament was debating
Mugabe’s impeachment. Shortly
before 5 p.m., the speaker halted
the discussion and announced the
president’s departure. The body
burst into cheers. Mudenda announced that a new president
would be named Wednesday.
According to the speaker,
Mugabe’s letter said he was resigning for “the welfare of the
people of Zimbabwe and the need
for a peaceful transfer of power.”
Mugabe’s resignation leaves
Zimbabwe at a crossroads — with
the military technically in charge
of the country and a wide array of
political groups now angling for
power.
Mnangagwa, the president’s
likely successor, is a longtime
Mugabe ally, nicknamed “the
Crocodile” for his reputation for
shrewd but often brutal tactics.
The State Department said in
2000 that he was “widely feared
and despised throughout the
country” and “could be an even
more repressive leader” than
Mugabe.
For the moment, Mnangagwa
appears to have the backing of
Mugabe’s former party and the
military, but Zimbabwe’s opposition remains fragmented, and
politicians and activists will now
try to seize upon the president’s
resignation to carve out their own
positions in whatever government comes next.
For the past week, Zimbabweans have been united by their
opposition to their long-ruling,
autocratic leader, and many here
expressed hope that the rare period of unity would lead to the
formation of a broad coalition.
“Let’s agree for this moment
that the enemy of my enemy is my
friend,” said Fadzayi Mahere, a
lawyer and politician.
MIKE HUTCHINGS/REUTERS
Zimbabwean civilians celebrate with soldiers in Harare after President Robert Mugabe stepped down. His former vice president is seen as a likely successor.
As soon as Mugabe’s resignation was announced on the radio,
car horns started blaring and
drivers pumped their fists in the
air. In front of the parliament,
people danced on car roofs and
blasted music, waving Zimbabwean flags as the sun set over Harare.
One man in a park fell to his
knees in celebration with his arms
outstretched. Another kissed the
ground.
“It’s a new day for us. I’ve been
carrying my exam results in my
purse looking for a job. There is
nothing. He has ruined our economy,” said Sibongile Tambudzi, 24,
who pulled out the results and
then vanished into a dancing
crowd.
“I don’t know what will happen
tomorrow,” said Precious Mazayi,
the owner of a security company.
“I don’t even know who the president is right now. But for now, let
us just celebrate. We have waited
so long for this.”
The celebrations only grew as
the night went on. But for some
older Zimbabweans who remembered the euphoria in 1980, when
Mugabe ascended to power after
independence from Britain and
the end of white-minority rule,
the excitement was tempered
with fear of what might follow.
“Right now, to be honest, I’m
apprehensive. We were happy in
1980, and we saw what happened
next,” said Vincent Tanyanyiwa,
45, a professor of environmental
policy at a Harare university.
“We need to be careful. We
have a new chance here. Let’s not
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The U.S. Embassy in Harare
said in a statement that Mugabe’s
departure marked a “historical
moment” for the country, but it
urged the new leadership to allow
elections in which people can
“voice their opinions without
fear.”
Mugabe’s life traced the changes that swept through southern
Africa in the 20th and 21st centuries. He was the son of a carpenter in the British colony of Southern Rhodesia and rose to lead the
fight against the white-minority
government of Rhodesia, as the
country was known then.
When he came to power in
1980, Mugabe was a self-identified Marxist-Leninist whose intellect and political flair brought
him support from across the
world. In 1983, then-Vice President George H.W. Bush called him
a “genuine statesman.” In 1994, he
was knighted by Queen Elizabeth
II.
But his government’s descent
was swift and dramatic. In the
early 1980s, he was accused of
backing the murder of 20,000
people of the Ndebele tribe, whom
he considered dissidents. In the
1990s, economic mismanagement brought hyperinflation to
Zimbabwe, resulting in the printing of bank notes of 100 trillion
Zimbabwean dollars.
In the early 2000s, in an effort
to satisfy his political allies and
reaffirm his anti-colonial bona fides, Mugabe presided over the
violent seizure of farmland belonging to white Zimbabweans.
Much of that land sat fallow after
it was redistributed. A country
once known for its agricultural
production was forced to start
importing food.
As Mugabe grew older and
more frail — and as opposition to
his presidency mounted —
Zimbabweans began talking
openly about how the reign of the
“old man” might end. For years,
rumors circulated that he was
critically ill, but Mugabe always
reemerged, giving cogent, if meandering, speeches into his 90s.
“Zimbabwe will never again be
a colony,” became his trademark
rallying cry, which meant little to
young Zimbabweans who found it
increasingly difficult to find work.
The unemployment rate soared
over 50 percent. More than 2 million Zimbabweans moved to
South Africa in search of jobs.
Few analysts predicted that his
presidency would end with a
coup. But after Mugabe fired his
vice president, Mnangagwa, paving the way for his controversial
wife, Grace Mugabe, to succeed
him, Zimbabwe’s security forces
revolted.
Since the army’s action a week
ago, there has been no sign of
Grace Mugabe, nicknamed “Gucci
Grace” for her expensive shopping
sprees. In 2015, she purchased a
$1.3 million diamond ring and
then demanded a refund when
she found it unsatisfactory. The
average per-capita gross domestic
product in Zimbabwe is $1,008.
It also remained unclear what
would happen to Robert Mugabe
— whether he would remain in
Zimbabwe or spend the rest of his
life in exile. Earlier this year, his
wife said he could run for reelection “as a corpse” if he died before
the vote.
But Tuesday, amid the celebrations outside his office, Mugabe’s
portraits were taken down from
shops and offices across the city,
and road signs bearing his name
were destroyed or vandalized.
“It’s a new era. Whatever comes
next, it’s a new era,” said Tanyanyiwa, the professor.
kevin.sieff@washpost.com
Brian Murphy and William Branigin in
Washington contributed to this report.
More of U.S. soldier’s remains found
Sgt. La David Johnson,
three colleagues died in
October ambush in Niger
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Partial human remains belonging to Army Sgt. La David T.
Johnson were found about five
weeks after he was killed in Niger,
the Pentagon disclosed Tuesday,
raising more questions about the
incident that claimed the lives of
four U.S. soldiers.
An investigative team from
U.S. Africa Command discovered
the remains Nov. 12 at the site
where Johnson’s body was found
outside the remote village of Tongo Tongo. He and the other Americans were killed there Oct. 4 in
an ambush by as many as 50
Islamist militants.
Five Nigerien soldiers also died
in the battle.
Johnson’s body was found two
days later. It is unclear how the
remains located Nov. 12 were
missed during the initial sweep.
Tuesday’s
announcement
comes after The Washington Post
reported that Johnson was found
by villagers with his hands bound
and with a gaping head wound,
raising the possibility that he was
captured alive and later executed.
It is unclear what remains the
team uncovered or whether they
produce additional evidence indicating a capture. Pentagon
spokeswoman Dana White disclosed the information in a written statement. The Pentagon has
not provided additional details or
addressed related questions.
“The Army takes tremendous
care to ensure our Gold Star
Families are treated with dignity
and compassion and that a casualty assistance officer provides
them with the latest information
available on the loss of their loved
JOE SKIPPER/REUTERS
The casket of U.S. Army Sgt. La David Johnson, a Special Forces
soldier, is borne to a gravesite in Hollywood, Fla., on Oct. 21.
one,” said Cynthia O. Smith, an
Army spokeswoman. “It would be
inappropriate to comment on information shared between the
casualty assistance officer and
the family of a fallen Soldier.”
The announcement does seem
to help explain the saga over
Johnson’s remains and what his
widow, Myeshia, described as the
military’s decision to block her
from viewing them.
“Every time I asked to see my
husband, they wouldn’t let me,”
Myeshia Johnson said in an interview with ABC’s “Good Morning
America.” “They told me that he’s
in a severe wrap — like I won’t be
able to see him. I need to see him
so I will know that that is my
husband.”
“They won’t show me a finger, a
hand,” she said at the time. “I
know my husband’s body from
head to toe, and they won’t let me
see anything. I don’t know what’s
in that box. It could be empty for
all I know.”
The Pentagon has said the soldiers were on a routine reconnaissance mission when the attack occurred. Under U.S. mili-
tary rules, American troops in
Niger are not supposed to go on
combat missions, but they can
“advise and assist” local forces
when the chance of enemy contact is low.
Air support from French Puma
helicopters and French jets took
an hour or longer to arrive. The
incident, which is still under investigation, has put pressure on
the Pentagon to explain whether
U.S. troops in remote and dangerous postings such as in Niger have
acceptable levels of air support
and medical evacuation capabilities.
About 800 U.S. service members are in Niger as part of a
contingent of 6,000 American
troops throughout Africa. They
include Special Forces soldiers,
who began arriving in 2012 to
provide counterterrorism training, as well as others who work on
a drone base in the desert.
About 4,000 French troops also
are based in the region.
alex.horton@washpost.com
Sudarsan Raghavan contributed to
this report.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
RE
Chinese human rights lawyer sentenced to 2 years Afghan o∞cials criticize
Taliban drug lab strikes
More than 200 have
been detained amid
crackdown on criticism
Some worry that civilians
could be harmed in joint
military campaign
BY E MILY R AUHALA
AND S IMON D ENYER
beijing — A Chinese court Tuesday convicted a prominent human rights lawyer of “inciting
subversion of state power,” a
vague charge often used to jail
critics of the Chinese Communist
Party, and sentenced him to two
years in prison.
Jiang Tianyong, 46, is the latest
lawyer known for defending government critics to be jailed. More
than 200 have been detained over
the past two years in the ongoing
crackdown on criticism in China.
The court in the central Chinese city of Changsha said Jiang
tried to “overthrow the socialist
system” by publishing articles on
the Internet, accepting interviews from overseas media outlets, smearing the government
and overpublicizing certain cases.
His defenders say his actions
are all normal for his job as a
lawyer.
The trial and sentencing are
seen by human rights experts as
an attack on what remains of the
country’s legal activist community and on liberal politics in general, as President Xi Jinping moves
to bolsters the Communist Party
and purge its critics.
“This case has been an absolute
travesty from the beginning, sustained by nothing other than pure
political persecution, not facts or
broken laws,” said Sophie Richardson, China director of Human
Rights Watch. “By putting Jiang
Tianyong behind bars, China
does him, his family and itself
irrevocable harm.”
“Jiang Tianyong’s trial was a
total sham,” William Nee, China
researcher at Amnesty International, said in a statement.
“Even with the most rudimentary examination of the facts, the
case against him crumbles,” Nee
said. “His so-called confession
and apology, most likely extracted under duress, were nothing
more than an act of political
theater directed by the authori-
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — North Korea on Tuesday criticized President Trump
in the way that only North Korean propagandists can, calling
him “an old lunatic, mean trickster and human reject” over a
speech he made in South Korea
this month.
This is not North Korea’s first
commentary on Trump’s 12-day
trip through the region. It already had denounced him for
traveling around Asia “like a
hungry wolf ” who was trying to
enrich the U.S. defense industry
“by milking the moneybags from
its subordinate ‘allies.’ ”
But it is North Korea’s most
hyperbolic tirade to date.
Trump’s “reckless remarks”
during his visits to Japan, South
Korea and China were “an open
declaration of war,” the Rodong
Sinmun, the mouthpiece of the
ruling Workers’ Party, said in a
commentary published Tuesday.
“Rabid dogs’ barking can never frighten the Korean people,” it
wrote, adding that North Korea
must “toughly react to any acts of
hostility.”
“The U.S. will have to bitterly
experience what it dislikes most
and witness what it thought of in
nightmare,” the commentary
said.
In a 35-minute speech to
South Korea’s National Assembly
this month, Trump devoted
22 minutes — by North Korea’s
count — to criticizing the regime
in Pyongyang.
The speech was filled with
words such as “twisted,” “sinister,” “tyrant,” “fascism” and
“cult,” and he called North Korea
“a hell that no person deserves.”
Most pointedly, Trump addressed leader Kim Jong Un
directly and, referring to founding president Kim Il Sung, said,
“North Korea is not the paradise
your grandfather envisioned.”
This was heretical for a country
where the Kims are treated like
demigods.
North Korea took apart the
speech in the commentary, listing four “crimes” that Trump had
committed.
“The worst crime for which he
can never be pardoned is that he
dared malignantly hurt the dignity of the supreme leadership of
the DPRK,” it said, using the
official abbreviation for North
Korea.
Calling Trump an “old slave of
campaign of U.S. and Afghan
airstrikes against Taliban-run
narcotic centers was met with
alarm and criticism Tuesday
from political leaders in Helmand province — the heart of
Afghanistan’s huge opium trade
— where officials said 10 such air
attacks were carried out in the
past week.
Some legislators and provincial representatives expressed
worries that civilians could be
harmed. Others dismissed the
campaign, announced by U.S.
military officials Monday, as a
dramatic but misplaced effort to
showcase Washington’s determination to go after insurgent bastions and criminal activities as
part of its new military strategy.
A spokesman for the Taliban,
Qari Yousef Ahmadi, was reported in some Afghan media as
having denied U.S. and Afghan
reports of targeting numerous
insurgent drug laboratories and
other facilities in the vast desert
province, where more than
75 percent of the world’s heroin
supply is reported to originate.
“We reject the existence of
heroin factories in all over Helmand. These are baseless reports
from the puppet regime,” Ahmadi
wrote on a WhatsApp account,
according to reports.
On Monday, the senior U.S.
military commander in Afghanistan, Gen. John W. Nicholson,
announced unexpectedly that
U.S. planes were targeting drug
production facilities in the country under a new strategy aimed at
cutting off Taliban funding. He
said the Taliban was “becoming a
criminal organization” that was
earning about $200 million a
year from drug-related activities.
Nicholson, in a news conference with the Afghan army chief,
said aerial raids were conducted
Sunday in Helmand, with both
NG HAN GUAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lawyer and activist Jiang Tianyong, seen here in 2012, was given a two-year sentence Tuesday. A court
said Jiang, a well-known defender of government critics, tried to “overthrow the socialist system.”
ties.”
Jiang is one of more than 200
lawyers, legal assistants and activists detained in what is known
as the “709 crackdown” for the
day the purge started — July 9,
2015.
Some were released, but several leading lawyers have been
charged
with
subversion,
smeared in the party-controlled
press and then subjected to what
critics call political show trials,
where they inevitably confess on
camera to whatever charges they
face.
In recent weeks, Chinese authorities stopped the child of another human rights lawyer who
was targeted, Wang Yu, from traveling abroad to study. Wang’s
lawyer, Li Yuhan, was detained in
October.
Jiang was known for his robust
defense of those criticizing the
Chinese government.
Xie Yanyi, a Chinese rights lawyer, called Jiang in a statement
the “soul of the 709 rescue effort”
for his determination to help colleagues in trouble. Jiang “spared
no effort” when it came to defending China’s most vulnerable
groups, Xie said.
Jiang disappeared into state
custody in November 2016 as he
traveled from Beijing to Changsha to advise another rights lawyer, Xie Yang, who had been detained.
In January, Xie’s attorneys published a transcript of their client
describing the torture he allegedly endured in custody. But at his
trial in May, Xie denied his own
account. Three months later at
his own trial, Jiang told the court
that he had helped Xie invent the
account.
Experts see the turnarounds in
Xie and Jiang’s testimonies as
further evidence that “709” lawyers are being tortured or otherwise coerced while in custody. At
his August trial, Jiang, looking
defeated, confessed to the court
— and the cameras — that he did
everything prosecutors claimed
and then meekly asked for mercy.
“We are concerned that
throughout the proceedings Jiang Tianyong has not been al-
N. Korea calls Trump ‘human reject’
BY
P AMELA C ONSTABLE
kabul — A newly announced
money,” the paper said he will be
“forced to pay dearly for his
blasphemy any moment.”
The other “crimes” include
hurting North Korea’s dignity,
painting “a black picture of the
happy life of the great Korean
people” and wanting to stifle
North Korea “by force of violence.”
North Korea would regularly
denounce previous U.S. presidents in the most colorful — and
often plainly offensive — terms,
but the regularity of its attacks
on Trump is notable, as is the
way the propagandists in Pyongyang are using Trump’s words
against him.
Instead of making America
great again, the Rodong Sinmun
recently noted, Trump is making
it “weak and poor.”
Kim and Trump seemingly
have been trying to outdo each
probably is associated with the
huge transfusions he needed after being shot by his compatriots
during his escape. He received 16
quarts of blood after arriving in
the hospital.
The soldier, who is in his 20s,
has opened his eyes and was able
to respond to questions, the
Dong-A Ilbo, one of South Korea’s biggest newspapers, reported Tuesday. He inquired with his
doctors if he was in South Korea
and asked to listen to South
Korean pop songs, the paper
reported.
The soldier last week made a
brazen escape through the truce
village of Panmunjom in the
DMZ, running across the border
line toward South Korea. But he
was shot five or six times by
North Korean soldiers, including
while he was down on the
ground.
lowed access to lawyers of his
own choosing and that he was
obviously prejudged through a
‘confession’ aired by Chinese TV
before his trial had even begun,”
German Ambassador Michael
Clauss said in a statement released at the time of trial. “Under
these circumstances, a fair trial is
impossible.”
Jiang’s wife, Jin Bianling, who
lives in Los Angeles, has written
to Matt Pottinger, an adviser to
President Trump, asking for help
with her husband’s case. “I am
entreating you to save my husband,” she wrote in a letter dated
Aug. 24.
Jin said she was able to briefly
speak with Jiang after the sentencing. She said she told him she
will wait for him and that she
hopes she will one day see him
again.
“He said he misses us,” she said.
emily.rauhala@washpost.com
simon.denyer@washpost.com
Yang Liu, Amber Ziye Wang and Luna
Lin in Beijing contributed to this
report.
Afghan and U.S. aircraft participating. The initiative was
launched under the Trump administration’s new policy that
expands the role, size and mandate of the U.S. military mission
here.
Afghan President Ashraf
Ghani strongly endorsed the new
campaign. “We’re determined to
tackle criminal economy and narcotics trafficking with full force,”
he said. “It’s the main source of
financing violence and terror.”
A spokesman for the Helmand
governor’s office said Tuesday
that the past week’s air operations had involved eight attacks
by coalition forces and two by
Afghan air force planes in three
districts. He said that there were
“direct strikes on Taliban hideouts and narcotics centers,” that
more than 40 Taliban fighters
were killed, and that a “main
processing center of narcotics
was destroyed” along with about
2,200 pounds of drugs.
But a number of Helmand
leaders said Tuesday that the
United States should be focusing
its efforts on the border-crossing
areas with Pakistan and Iran that
serve as international transit centers for drugs, especially Bahramchah, rather than on targets that
some described as rudimentary
rural sheds or buildings where
opium is processed.
“In the latest bombardments,
civilians have suffered. They are
caught in the middle between the
Taliban and the joint operations,”
said Habiba Sadat, a legislator
from Helmand. “Bahramchah is
the real place of big narcotics
factories, and people even transport drugs by planes. A big world
mafia is involved in this business.
Why is this area not being targeted?”
One main factor behind the
new military role is that poppy
and opium production have risen
exponentially in the past several
years, with a record amount of
9,000 tons of opium produced so
far this year, according to the
United Nations. The other is the
parallel increase in Taliban involvement in the drug trade,
which Taliban rulers once
banned.
pamela.constable@washpost.com
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“The worst crime for which he can never be
pardoned is that he dared malignantly hurt the
dignity of the supreme leadership of the DPRK.”
North Korean state-run Rodong Sinmun,
excoriating President Trump over his recent speech in Seoul
FRIDAY EXCLUSIVE
other with personal insults since
the U.S. president derided the
North Korean leader as “little
rocket man” in September, and
Kim responded by calling him
a “dotard.”
After the North Korean regime
recently dismissed Trump as
an “old lunatic,” the president
wondered aloud on Twitter why
Kim would “insult me by calling
me ‘old,’ when I would NEVER
call him ‘short and fat?’ ”
On Monday, Trump restored
North Korea to the list of state
sponsors of terrorism, a largely
symbolic act that is unlikely to
have a wide practical effect on a
country already under a heavy
yoke of existing sanctions.
Separately, the North Korean
soldier who was shot while
making a dash for freedom
across the demilitarized zone
last week has regained consciousness and is breathing on
his own, according to news
reports from Seoul.
However, the young soldier
has pneumonia and hepatitis B,
as well as blood poisoning that
He has had surgeries to repair
gunshot wounds in his elbow,
shoulder and the most serious
injuries in his abdomen. Those
procedures were complicated by
the fact that the man had a
severe infestation of parasites,
some of which were 11 inches
long.
The contamination in his abdominal cavity is severely complicating his recovery, doctors
have said.
The soldier is “struggling” to
recover from his injuries, the
Dong-A Ilbo reported, citing
medical officials at the Ajou
University
Medical
Center,
where he is being treated.
“His liver doesn’t work well,
and he has been diagnosed with
pneumonia and hepatitis B. He
even has blood poisoning,” an
official was quoted as saying.
“He’s in trouble.”
However, other reports suggested the soldier was responding well to antibiotics — perhaps
because he had never been treated with them before.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
Paths narrow for immigrants, even without a border wall
WALL FROM A1
some actions have drawn widespread attention, others have
been put in place more quietly.
The
administration
has
moved to slash the number of
refugees, accelerate deportations
and terminate the provisional
residency of more than a million
people, among other measures.
On Monday, the Department of
Homeland Security said nearly
60,000 Haitians allowed to stay
in the United States after a
devastating 2010 earthquake
have until July 2019 to leave or
obtain another form of legal
status.
“He’s building a virtual wall by
his actions and his rhetoric,” said
Kevin Appleby, migration policy
director for the Center for Migration Studies, a nonprofit think
tank.
Trump administration officials say they are simply upholding laws their predecessors did
not and preserving American
jobs. Previous Republican and
Democratic
administrations
were too soft on enforcement,
they say, and too rosy in their
view of immigration as an unambiguously positive force.
“For decades, the American
people have been begging and
pleading with our elected officials for an immigration system
that’s lawful and serves the national interest,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in Austin last
month. “Now we have a president who supports that.”
Bob Dane, executive director
of the Federation for American
Immigration Reform, which has
pushed for many of the Trump
administration’s main goals on
immigration, said the president
has “really scaled back this expansive view of immigration that
occurred under the Obama administration.”
The new restrictions could
significantly reduce the number
of foreign-born workers in the
U.S. labor force, but demographic experts say there is little
chance they will alter the country’s broader racial and ethnic
transformation, which Trump’s
critics say is his goal. Census
projections show the United
States will no longer have a
single racial or ethnic majority
by mid-century, according to the
Pew Research Center.
Still, by erecting tougher, taller administrative hurdles for foreigners seeking to move to the
United States or remain in the
country after arriving illegally,
the White House is attempting to
shift the country back toward the
tighter controls on immigration
in place before the 1960s.
“Within the administration
there are a number of key players
who are just looking for every
opportunity, every program . . .
every administrative or regulatory leeway they have to restrict
entry into the United States,”
said Linda Hartke, president and
MIKE BLAKE/REUTERS
U.S. resident Brian Houston married Evelia Reyes on Saturday under the watch of U.S. Border Patrol agents at Border Field State Park in
San Diego. The border agency opened a single gate in the fence along the U.S.-Mexico border to allow selected families time to visit.
TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Demonstrators in New York on Tuesday protest the Department of Homeland Security’s decision to
end Temporary Protected Status in 18 months for tens of thousands of Haitians in the United States.
chief executive of the Lutheran
Immigration and Refugee Service, which resettles refugees.
Even as they fight court orders
seeking to halt parts of Trump’s
immigration agenda, Sessions,
White House senior adviser Stephen Miller and other key players are finding ways to shrink the
immigration system. Miller was
an aide to Sessions before both
men joined the administration;
in less than a year, their immigration policy prescriptions have
moved from the realm of thinktank wish lists to White House
executive orders.
In October, the White House —
in a plan led by Miller — said it
had conducted a “bottom-up review of all immigration policies”
and found “dangerous loopholes,
outdated laws, and easily exploited vulnerabilities in our immi-
gration system — current policies that are harming our country and our communities.”
Trump has endorsed GOP legislation to cut annual, legal immigration by half, reducing the
number of green cards issued
annually from about 1 million to
500,000. More weight would be
given to immigrants with job
skills, as opposed to those with
extended family in the United
States.
The president cut the number
of refugees the United States is
willing to accept annually from
110,000 to 45,000, the lowest
level since 1980, and ordered the
implementation of a time-consuming “extreme vetting” system
that could mean the number of
refugees cleared each year is
much lower. In October, 1,242
refugees arrived in the United
States, down from 9,945 in October 2016.
Trump also eliminated a
smaller program specifically for
refugees fleeing violence in Central America. The Pentagon, citing concerns about vetting, suspended a recruitment program
offering skilled foreigners a fast
track to citizenship if they serve
in uniform.
Muzaffar Chishti, the director
of the Migration Policy Institute
at the New York University
School of Law, said nearly
350,000 of the newcomers who
arrive legally to the United States
each year are the spouses and
minor children of U.S. citizens
and permanent residents. Since
barring those arrivals is not
under consideration, Chishti
said, the government would have
to eliminate or sharply restrict
almost all other avenues to reduce the annual number of immigrants to 500,000.
In addition to this week’s decision on Haitians, the government earlier this month declined
to renew Temporary Protected
Status, a form of provisional
residency, for about 2,500 Nicaraguans. The State Department
says conditions in Central America and Haiti that had been used
to justify the protection for as
long as two decades no longer
necessitate a reprieve. Decisions
on more than 250,000 Hondurans and Salvadorans with the
provisional residency permits
are pending.
Trump is also ending Deferred
Action for Childhood Arrivals, or
DACA, the Obama administration program that granted work
permits to 690,000 young immigrants brought here as children.
Trump’s administration is expanding immigration courts and
detention centers and has ratcheted up deportations from the
interior of the United States,
where millions of undocumented immigrants with U.S.-born
children and no serious criminal
records held little fear of expulsion under President Barack
Obama.
Arrests by Immigration and
Customs Enforcement are up
more than 40 percent this year,
and the agency wants to more
than double its staff by 2023,
according to a federal contracting notice published this month.
ICE is calling for a major increase in workplace raids and
has signed more than two dozen
agreements with state and local
governments that want to help
arrest and detain undocumented
residents.
“If you’re in this country illegally and you committed a crime
by entering this country, you
should
be
uncomfortable,”
Thomas Homan, the top official
at ICE, told lawmakers this year.
“You should look over your
shoulder. And you need to be
worried.”
The president and his aides
have pressed forward despite an
outcry from advocates and Democratic lawmakers, who in states
such as California and Illinois
have instructed police and public
officials to shun cooperation
with ICE. The Trump administration has threatened to strip such
“sanctuary” jurisdictions of federal funding in an escalating
legal standoff.
Trump’s tough talk alone appears to be one of the administration’s best bulwarks: Illegal
crossings along the border with
Mexico have plunged to their
lowest level in 45 years, and U.S.
agents are catching a far greater
share of those attempting to
sneak in. Applications for H-1B
skilled visas and new foreignstudent enrollment have also
declined.
William Frey, a demographer
at the Brookings Institution,
said that until now U.S. immigration rates have largely spared
the country from the challenges
facing advanced industrial nations such as Japan and Germany that can’t replace aging
workers fast enough. By slashing
immigration, Frey said, the
country could end up with labor
shortages and other workforce
issues.
But although some of Trump’s
most fervent supporters see
curbing immigration as a way to
turn back the United States’
rapid racial and ethnic transformation, Frey said it is an unrealistic goal. By 2020, census projections show minorities will account for more than half of the
under-18 U.S. population, because of higher birthrates in
nonwhite populations. And by
2026, the number of whites is
projected to begin declining in
absolute numbers, he said, as
deaths exceed births.
“You can slow the rate of
Latino and Asian immigration,
but it won’t make the population
whiter,” Frey said. “It will just
become less white at a slower
pace.”
Trump continues to insist his
administration will build a border wall, despite exorbitant cost
projections and senior DHS officials saying a 2,000-mile structure is impractical.
His supporters say they admire the president for plowing
ahead in his overhaul efforts and
see a historic, generational shift
underway.
“There is more than one way
to get to the goal,” Dane said.
“Legislative solutions are all
great, but clearly the administration has done things behind the
scenes. . . . The results have been
dramatic.”
maria.sacchetti@washpost.com
nick.miroff@washpost.com
FBI probing border agent’s death
Agency looking at fatality
as ‘potential assault,’ but
‘full picture’ still unclear
THANKSGIVING SALE
BY R OBERT M OORE
AND N ICK M IROFF
el paso — The FBI said it is
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investigating the death of Border
Patrol agent Rogelio Martinez as
“a potential assault of a federal
officer,” but the agency cautioned
Tuesday it has not reached any
conclusions as to what happened
over the weekend along a desolate span of Interstate 10 in West
Texas.
“We call it potential because we
do not yet have the full picture yet
as to what transpired,” FBI Special Agent-in-Charge Emmerson
Buie Jr. said at a news conference
at El Paso’s FBI offices, about
135 miles west of the drainage
culvert where Martinez and another agent were found badly
injured late Saturday.
Martinez, 36, who died of devastating head injuries, was found
unconscious with broken bones,
according to the FBI. The other
agent, who has not been identified, also suffered severe head
trauma and is in critical but stable condition.
Border Patrol union officials
say that agent has no recollection
of what happened.
Those officials have said they
believe Martinez and the second
agent were bludgeoned, possibly
with rocks, in a savage desert
ambush.
The area where they were
found, about 50 miles north of the
border, is a well-known marijuana trafficking corridor, where
drug runners sometimes hide in
drainage culverts to await a rendezvous with a vehicle.
President Trump and other advocates of tougher border enforcement have used Martinez’s
death to renew calls for a wall
along the boundary with Mexico.
Trump tweeted Sunday that
Martinez was “killed,” while other
GOP leaders characterized the
incident as a brutal attack. Texas
Gov. Greg Abbott (R) called it a
case of “murder.”
Buie sidestepped questions
about whether Trump and other
Republican leaders were premature with their descriptions.
“I have not briefed the president. For information regarding
what information is being provided to the president, I’ll refer you
to the Department of Justice Of-
fice of Public Affairs,” he said.
The FBI said it is offering a
$25,000 reward for information
leading to a resolution of the case.
Officials with the National Border Patrol Council, which represents agents, have described the
incident near Van Horn as a “grisly” ambush and said the two
agents were attacked with rocks.
But Culberson County Sheriff
Oscar Carrillo, who was one of the
first law enforcement officers to
reach Martinez on Saturday
night, said there was no evidence
at the scene to support such
claims.
He said Martinez’s injuries
were consistent with a fall in
challenging desert terrain on a
moonless night. But the fact that
another agent was found badly
injured nearby could point to an
assault, the sheriff said.
The sheriff said the injuries to
the other agent raise questions
about whether both agents could
have fallen victim to an accident
or an attack.
“They were both hurt. What
hurt them, we don’t know,” Carrillo said.
nick.miroff@washpost.com
Miroff reported from Washington.
Devlin Barrett in Washington
contributed to this report.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
SU
Economy & Business
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HBO data theft
traced to Iranian
military hacker
CASE REVEALS DISAGREEMENTS IN JUSTICE
Some pushing to make public ongoing investigations
BY
QILAI SHEN/BLOOMBERG NEWS
A potential naming challenge
Guangzhou Automobile Group in China is preparing for U.S. sales of the Trumpchi GE3. The brand, which was established in
2010, has the car company weighing how American consumers might feel about an SUV with a name similar to their president’s.
Justice Dept. antitrust suit leaves tech firms wary
kets Institute, a think tank. “If
you’re a big tech company, the best
antitrust enforcement policy is no
antitrust enforcement policy.”
President Trump appeared to
endorse the Justice Department’s
action Tuesday, telling reporters:
“I’m not going to get involved in
litigation. But personally, I’ve always felt that that was a deal that’s
not good for the country. I think
your pricing is going to go up.”
The Justice Department’s suit
against AT&T, filed Monday,
marked a break from the recent
past of federal antitrust enforcement. Not for several decades had
the government filed suit to stop a
“vertical” merger, one between
companies that aren’t in the same
business. (“Horizontal” mergers,
such as AT&T’s 2011 effort to buy
fellow wireless carrier T-Mobile,
are more common targets for antitrust enforcement. Federal officials blocked that deal).
Monday’s lawsuit also was the
first major action for Makan Delrahim, Trump’s appointee to head
the Justice Department’s antitrust
division. He was confirmed by the
Senate in September.
Amazon won approval for its
purchase of grocer Whole Foods in
August from the Federal Trade
Commission, which shares responsibility for antitrust enforcement with the Justice Department. That deal sparked criticism
from some antitrust experts, who
warned about the dangers of allowing powerful tech companies
to spread their market power into
other parts of the economy.
That deal was the latest of many
tech acquisitions to survive federal scrutiny. Facebook acquired Instagram in 2012 and Whatsapp in
2014. Google acquired YouTube in
2006 and ITA, an airfare search
engine, in 2011. Google also
emerged from antitrust scrutiny
by the FTC in 2013 after agreeing
AT&T-Time Warner
case could signal more
aggressive enforcement
BY
C RAIG T IMBERG
The nation’s technology industry at first glance looked like a
winner in the Justice Department’s move this week to block
AT&T’s acquisition of Time Warner. A merged company probably
would be a stronger company, allowing it to control, for example,
both the creation of “Game of
Thrones” and the delivery of episodes to millions of fans.
Stopping that merger, experts
say, stands to help potential rivals,
including a cohort of ambitious
tech companies — such as Google,
Facebook and Amazon — that in
recent years have forced their way
into the battle for American entertainment dollars.
But whatever the stakes in that
merger fight, more aggressive federal enforcement of antitrust laws
may not prove to be good news for
tech giants that have grown wildly
profitable over the past decade as
they’ve squashed some rivals
while gobbling up others.
Many of those acquisitions
faced government review but were
permitted in an era when federal
officials drew criticism for not
more forcefully challenging burgeoning monopolies. If antitrust
enforcement is taking a more aggressive turn under the Trump
administration, such companies
could find themselves in the government’s sights, say experts.
“An administration that was interested in looking at monopolistic practices would have a very
rich field,” said Lina Khan, legal
policy director for the Open Mar-
to modest concessions.
The possibility of stricter federal enforcement caught the attention of many in Silicon Valley,
where companies frequently
change hands as they grow from
startups to bigger firms. “It’s very
troublesome,” said Joe Horowitz,
managing general partner of Icon
Ventures, of the suit against AT&T.
“If the government is going to start
to interfere with mergers that are
more vertically integrated, it is
worrisome because mergers are
an important element of how Silicon Valley works.”
AT&T’s deal for Time Warner
presents some particular issues,
including the Justice Department’s argument that prices
would inevitably rise for consumers, a key concern in antitrust law.
But some experts also see the possibility of a broader ideological
shift in how the federal government views the rising consolidation and power of tech companies.
“This signals an active Justice
Department, and that can’t be
great news for a company like
Facebook, which has a pretty wellknown reputation for wiping out
its competitors,” said Columbia
University law professor Tim Wu,
the author of “The Attention Merchants.” “Both Google and Amazon ring a few bells, but I think
Facebook rings the most.”
Google, Facebook and Amazon
declined to comment for this report. (Amazon’s chief executive,
Jeffrey P. Bezos, owns The Washington Post.)
As the AT&T-Time Warner case
unfolds, the market power of tech
companies is likely to be a major
subject of debate. Even though
Google, Amazon and Facebook operate mainly in different parts of
the tech industry, AT&T chief executive Randall Stephenson singled
out these companies as key competitors at a conference hosted by
the New York Times this month.
“What we’re trying to do is build
a platform that gives us an opportunity to compete with those
guys,” Stephenson said.
The underlying issue, experts
say, is that all of these companies
are competing for Americans’ attention. Amazon, though best
known for its online retail business, delivers movies, television
shows and music through streaming services. Google does the same
through YouTube and other
streaming services. Facebook delivers mainly videos uploaded by
users, but it has begun to produce
some of its own online content.
All of these companies ultimately compete for users’ time,
which they could otherwise spend
watching shows produced by
Time Warner properties such as
CNN or HBO, or by other content
producers delivering material
over AT&T’s cable network, its
wireless services or DirecTV,
which AT&T bought in 2015.
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark
Cuban, who has investments in
Amazon and Netflix, tweeted
Monday evening that Google and
Facebook would be “the big losers”
in the Justice Department lawsuit
against AT&T. These companies,
Cuban said, would face increased
scrutiny because of their powerful
positions in advertising, content
creation and distribution. He said
that AT&T is in the same business
as the tech companies — fighting
for Americans’ eyeballs at a time
when traditional television viewing is in decline.
“It’s getting harder and harder
to create substantial hits,” said
Cuban, who said time once spent
watching TV shows is now going
to the offerings of tech companies.
craig.timberg@washpost.com
Elizabeth Dwoskin contributed to this
report.
D EVLIN B ARRETT
Federal
prosecutors
announced
charges
Tuesday
against a hacker “mercenary”
affiliated with the Iranian military, saying he broke into HBO’s
computer network in the summer looking to extort millions
of dollars from the pay cable
channel.
An indictment unsealed in
New York on Tuesday said the
suspect, Behzad Mesri, “had
worked on behalf of the Iranian
military to conduct computer
network attacks that targeted
military systems, nuclear software systems, and Israeli infrastructure,’’ but the document
does not allege he attacked
HBO on behalf of the Iranian
government.
Mesri is not in custody, and
officials issued a “Wanted” poster seeking help arresting him.
Using a popular line from
HBO’s hit show “Game of
Thrones,’’ Joon H. Kim, acting
U.S. attorney for the Southern
District of New York, said: “Today, winter has come for Behzad
Mesri.’’
Because of the new indictment, Kim said, the suspect will
not be able to leave his home
country without risking arrest
and extradition to the United
States.
“For the rest of his life — and
he’s a relatively young man in his
late 20s — he will never be able to
travel outside Iran,’’ he said.
And Kim hinted at more
hacking charges to come
against other Iranian hacking
suspects.
“Unfortunately, I suspect this
will not be the last time that we
charge cyber offenses against
hackers with ties to the Iranian
government,” he said.
According to the indictment,
Mesri “was a member of an
Iran-based hacking group called
the Turk Black Hat security team.
As a member of that group, Mesri
conducted hundreds of website
defacements using the online
hacker pseudonym ‘Skote Vahshat’ against websites in the
United States and elsewhere
around the world.”
But in the HBO hack, authorities say his motives may have
been simpler: greed.
The indictment said Mesri
threatened to embarrass HBO by
publicly releasing unaired episodes of some of its shows, such
as “Ballers” and “The Deuce,” as
well as full scripts for the seventh
season of “Game of Thrones,”
unless HBO paid “a ‘non-negotiable’ ransom of approximately
$5.5 million worth of Bitcoin.’’
When that demand wasn’t
met, he raised his asking price to
$6 million and threatened to
destroy massive volumes of data
on HBO’s hard drives, the indictment said.
The HBO hack roiled the entertainment industry in August,
raising new concerns that studios’ hit shows could lose financial value when episodes leak out
early.
But the case has also revealed
disagreements inside the Justice
Department, where senior officials have been pushing in recent
weeks to make public a number
of ongoing investigations involving Iranian suspects.
As The Washington Post reported Sunday, the HBO case is
one of several that senior officials would like to unseal in
coming weeks. The push to announce Iran-related cases has
caused internal alarm, according to people familiar with the
discussions, with some law enforcement officials fearing that
senior Justice Department officials want to reveal the cases
because the Trump administration wants Congress to impose
new sanctions on Iran.
A series of criminal cases
could increase pressure on lawmakers to act, these people
said.
Asked about that report, Kim
did not give a direct answer,
saying he decided to unseal the
charges in the HBO hacking case
before the story published. He
did acknowledge the short
amount of time it took to unseal
the charges was unusual for
such a case but said that was
because of the FBI’s exemplary
investigative work.
Kim spent much of the news
conference saying the indictment posed dire potential consequences for the suspect, Mesri,
but he also admitted that they
have little chance of arresting
him anytime soon.
“We made that determination
that we were not likely to be able
to get him and we should go
public with it,’’ Kim said.
Some federal officials have
raised concerns that unsealing
cases now could imperil ongoing
investigative work or make it
harder to catch suspects who
might travel out of Iran, according to people familiar with the
matter who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss
active investigations.
Several people familiar with
the HBO hack case pointed out
that the Justice Department will
often wait a year — sometimes
several years — before unsealing
charges in an international computer hacking probe, while this
case was unsealed after three
months.
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
DIGEST
of Taiwan’s Foxconn Group,
worked voluntarily and received
benefits, but they worked longer
days than Chinese law permits,
Apple said in a statement. The
Financial Times reported
Tuesday that 3,000 students from
the Zhengzhou Urban Rail
Transit School were sent to work
at the local facility as interns.
“During the course of a recent
audit, we discovered instances of
LABOR
Apple says its supplier
used illegal teen labor
Apple said Tuesday that its
main supplier in Asia has been
employing high school students
working illegal overtime to
assemble the iPhone X.
Interns at a factory operated by
Hon Hai Precision Industry, part
Y
E
L
L
O
W
&
B
L
student interns working overtime
at a supplier facility in China,”
Apple said. “When we found that
some students were allowed to
work overtime, we took prompt
action.”
Six students told the FT that
they routinely worked 11-hour
days.
Foxconn said company policy
doesn’t allow interns to work
more than 40 hours a week on
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residential washing machines
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A14
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
When traveling to the family Thanksgiving table is just not in the budget
Like it or not,
this is the season
of a higher level
of expectation
and pressure to
visit family.
Michelle
But what if the
Singletary trip is too much
financially? Or
THE COLOR
even though you
OF MONEY
adore your family,
you just don’t
want to spend the money? How
do you tell your relatives this
without all the guilt or even
condemnation?
During my regular online
discussion, a reader wrote in
about a predicament caused by a
change in the Thanksgiving
dinner location.
“I am the only person in the
family who can’t reasonably
drive to either of our locations
(uncle’s house and cousin’s
house), so I am the only one who
has to buy an airline ticket,” the
reader wrote.
Here’s the thing: The family
had agreed where they were
going to gather for
Thanksgiving. The reader
bought an airline ticket.
But you know family.
“I got a call from my uncle
that they were switching to my
cousin’s house,” the chat
participant wrote. “I managed to
find a flight to my cousin’s
location on the same airline,”
but it cost the reader an extra
$212, including the change fee.
In this case, the reader had
plans for the extra money that
was used to rebook. “I really do
like my family. Thanksgiving is a
great time. I have only missed it
once in my entire life. But I am
saving to replace my TV. I want
to let it go. I know it isn’t that
big of a deal. Any suggestions
about how to just let it go? In
the end, it is just money. I know
I fall into the fortunate end of
things, and I’m not losing sleep
over the money. And yet, I’m still
irked.”
Here’s advice if you find
yourself in a similar situation
during the holidays.
Give yourself permission
to be irked. You have the right
to be vexed. And it’s important
to vent so that if you do decide
to go, you won’t carry your
irritation like an extra piece of
baggage.
You certainly don’t want to
board an airplane today on edge.
Snap at a flight attendant, and
you may find yourself being
dragged off the plane. (Okay, I’m
kidding. Airline folks are
dealing with a lot these days.
Those tiny seats alone are
enough to make anyone upset.)
The point is you want to leave
home without your anger.
Don’t let family spend your
money. If I had a dollar for
every time my relatives said,
“Oh, stop being cheap, you can
afford it,” I’d have more than
enough money for whatever it is
they think I am financially able
to spend.
It’s no big deal for them to
change plans because it’s not
their cash or credit on the line.
But spend your money the way
you want.
If plans were altered and you
can’t afford the extra expense,
don’t go. If there is a change in
plans for the holiday and you
weren’t consulted, you have my
permission to say, “Oh, I’m so
sorry, but this change, which
will add to my travel expenses,
isn’t in my budget.” No need to
explain any further or defend
your decision. It’s your money!
Don’t be embarrassed to say
you can’t afford a visit. You
might say: “I really wanted to
come. It’s just not in my budget.
But hopefully, I’ll get to see you
guys next year!”
If you’re the relative inclined
to say something like, “You
know you have the money,” I’m
going to need you to stop. Don’t
even go there, because unless
you have access to someone’s
bank account information, you
haven’t a clue what he or she
can afford. Even if it is the case
that your relative has the money,
don’t go there. As my
grandmother Big Mama used to
say to her financial meddlers,
“Stay out of my pocket.”
Focus on the good parts of
being present. I hate wasting
money, too. Still, I have to
remember to be thankful that I
have family I like spending time
around. I love being with them,
so I focus on the fun I have
when we get together. If you can
afford it, being financially
flexible builds relationships.
So, go ahead and be irked. I
think it’s healthy to exhale some
funky feelings. But once you
vent, let it go. Don’t even joke
about it, because you know
family. Somebody is likely to get
offended.
Then you’ve got to deal with
the issue at Christmas — when
it’s even tougher to exchange
your ticket.
michelle.singletary@washpost.com
FCC proposal would give Internet providers broad powers over content, speed
FCC FROM A1
broadband and wireless companies, which provide most of the
Internet service to American
homes, smartphones and other
devices.
“It’s a signature accomplishment for Pai’s chairmanship,”
said Fred Campbell, director of
the conservative think tank Tech
Knowledge. “This item represents the starkest policy difference between the Obama FCC . . .
and Chairman Pai.”
In a statement, Verizon
cheered Pai’s proposed “lighttouch regulatory framework for
Internet services.” The sentiment
was echoed by Comcast, though
the cable giant said it would
continue to treat all websites
equally.
Pai’s announcement set off a
firestorm of criticism from Internet companies and activists who
vowed to hold demonstrations
ahead of the FCC’s vote.
The Free Press Action Fund
and other net neutrality activist
groups said they would organize
protests outside Verizon stores
and accused Pai of doing the
company’s bidding. Pai served as
an associate general counsel at
Verizon for two years beginning
in 2001.
Former Democratic FCC chairman Tom Wheeler, who drafted
the 2015 net neutrality rules,
called Tuesday’s move “tragic,”
adding that “if you like your cable
company, you’ll love what this
does for the Internet.”
“The job of the FCC is to
represent the consumer,” he said
in an interview. “Tragically, this
decision is only for the benefit of
the largely monopoly services
that deliver the Internet to the
consumer.”
Technology giants also expressed dismay at the FCC’s plan.
“The FCC’s net neutrality rules
are working well for consumers,
and we’re disappointed in the
ZACH GIBSON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Ajit Pai, the Republican chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, announced a plan Tuesday that would undo the previous
administration’s net neutrality rules, drawing praise from giant Internet service providers. The FCC could pass the proposal in December.
proposal released today,” Google
said in a statement.
Pai’s plan would require Internet service providers to be transparent about their practices.
For example, if a provider
chose to block or slow certain
websites, or gave preferable
treatment to content that it
owned or had partnerships with,
that provider would have to inform consumers of its policy on
an easily accessible website.
Violations of the transparency
rule could lead to fines by the
FCC, said senior agency officials,
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity to discuss the matter
more freely.
But Matt Wood, policy director
for the net neutrality advocacy
group Free Press, likened these
proposals to the way that many
companies point consumers to
Meg Whitman stepping down
as CEO of HP Enterprise
She led a pioneering
Silicon Valley company
through its breakup
A SSOCIATED P RESS
BY
JACOB KEPLER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
In 2011, Meg Whitman took over what was then Hewlett-Packard.
On Feb. 1, she will depart as chief executive of HP Enterprise.
And she ruled out working for a
competitor.
“I’ve become quite loyal to
Hewlett-Packard and HewlettPackard Enterprise,” she said. “I
love this company and I wouldn’t
ever go to a competitor.”
start-up with just 30 employees
into a household name, beginning in 1998 and remaining until
2008. She also ran an unsuccessful California gubernatorial
campaign, which cost her
$144 million.
Forbes recently ranked Whitman No. 6 on its list of
U.S. women who made their own fortunes.
She was in the running to replace Travis Kalanick as chief executive of the ride-hailing company Uber, but that job went to Dara
Khosrowshahi in August.
Before HP, Whitman served as
chief executive of eBay, a company she steered from a fledgling
Forbes recently listed her net
worth as $3.2 billion. That makes
her No. 6 on the magazine’s list of
U.S. women who made their own
fortunes.
HPE’s stock dropped 6.5 percent in after-hours trading Tuesday following the announcement.
made to the public.
“The FTC stands ready to protect broadband subscribers from
anticompetitive, unfair, or deceptive acts and practices just as
we protect consumers in the rest
of the Internet ecosystem,” Maureen Ohlhausen, the acting chairman of the FTC, said Tuesday in a
statement after the announcement by her counterpart at the
FCC.
brian.fung@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
Uber waited a year to reveal
major hack of customer data
Information about
57 million people was
exposed, company says
new york — Meg Whitman, who
oversaw the breakup of one of
Silicon Valley’s pioneering companies, is stepping down as chief
executive of Hewlett Packard Enterprise.
HPE said Tuesday that Whitman will hand over the reins of the
company to its president, Antonio
Neri, on Feb. 1.
Whitman, 61, took over in 2011
at the former Hewlett-Packard, a
company founded in 1939 and for
years a tech bellwether. But it had
struggled to keep up with industry
trends toward mobile and cloud
computing, shedding thousands
of jobs in the process.
In 2015, Hewlett Packard was
split in two: one company, HP Inc.,
sells PCs and printers. The other
led by Whitman, HPE, is focused
on selling data-center hardware
and commercial tech gear to other
big organizations.
Since the breakup, Palo Alto,
Calif.-based HPE has furthered its
transformation, spinning off a big
chunk of its business software
lineup last year in an $8.8 billion
deal with Micro Focus International.
Both Whitman and Neri, 50,
will serve on HPE’s board.
Whitman said Tuesday she
plans on taking “a little bit of
downtime” after a 35-year career.
privacy policies.
“You need only look to how
privacy policies from websites
allow essentially any and all bad
behavior,” he said, “so long as it is
disclosed to users.”
The FCC’s proposal also would
shift some enforcement responsibility to the Federal Trade Commission, which can sue companies for violating the commitments or statements they have
Relying more heavily on the
public promises of Internet providers is a departure from current net neutrality rules, which
lay out clear bans against selectively blocking or slowing websites, as well as speeding up
websites that agree to pay the
providers a fee.
Repealing those rules would
allow Internet providers to experiment with new ways to
make money. In recent years,
some broadband companies,
such as AT&T, have tried offering discounts on Internet service to Americans if they agree to
let the company monitor their
Web browsing history, for example.
Other companies, such as Verizon, have tried to drive users to
their own apps by exempting
them from mobile data limits.
One major beneficiary of the
FCC’s rule change may be AT&T,
which is embroiled in a major
legal dispute with the Justice
Department over an $85 billion
purchase of the entertainment
conglomerate Time Warner.
Should AT&T’s acquisition of
Time Warner be allowed to close,
a repeal of the FCC’s net neutrality rules would give the telecom
giant greater power to promote
its new content properties in
myriad ways, several analysts
said.
The FCC’s proposal also puts
additional pressure on Capitol
Hill, where some lawmakers
have called for federal legislation
that would supersede any FCC
rules.
On Tuesday, Sen. John Thune
(R-S.D.) praised Pai’s effort but
renewed his call for a bipartisan
compromise on net neutrality,
saying it was the only way to
“create long-term certainty for
the Internet ecosystem.”
P ETER H OLLEY
The ride-hailing company
Uber said Tuesday that it had
suffered a breach in 2016 that
exposed the personal information of tens of millions of drivers
and customers.
The information included
names, email addresses and
phone numbers of 57 million
people around the world, according to a statement released by
Uber chief executive Dara Khosrowshahi.
The driver’s license numbers
of about 600,000 U.S. drivers
were included, the company said.
“Our outside forensics experts
have not seen any indication that
trip location history, credit card
numbers, bank account numbers, Social Security numbers or
dates of birth were downloaded,”
the statement said.
“At the time of the incident,” it
added, “we took immediate steps
to secure the data and shut down
further unauthorized access by
the individuals. We subsequently
identified the individuals and
obtained assurances that the
downloaded data had been destroyed.”
Travis Kalanick, Uber’s cofounder and former CEO, became
aware of the breach a month after
it occurred, according to Bloomberg News. Instead of reporting
the attack to regulators and victims last year, the company paid
the hackers $100,000 to delete
the data and keep the security
breach under wraps, Bloomberg
reported.
After the company learned of
the breach in October 2016, it
took steps to prevent further
access to the information, Uber
said.
The statement said users’ personal information was accessed
by two individuals via “a thirdparty cloud-based service” that
Uber uses.
Those individuals are no longer with the company, the statement noted.
According to Bloomberg: “Two
attackers accessed a private
GitHub coding site used by Uber
software engineers and then
used login credentials they obtained there to access data stored
on an Amazon Web Services account that handled computing
tasks for the company. From
there, the hackers discovered an
archive of rider and driver information. Later, they emailed Uber
asking for money, according to
the company.”
“None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it,” Khosrowshahi’s statement said.
“I’ve asked Matt Olsen, a cofounder of a cybersecurity consulting firm and former general
counsel of the National Security
Agency and director of the National Counterterrorism Center,
to help me think through how best
to guide and structure our security teams and processes going
forward,” the statement added.
Bloomberg reported that
Uber waited until this week to
inform New York’s attorney general and the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s top consumer watchdog, about the
hack.
For their role in keeping the
breach quiet, Uber removed Joe
Sullivan, the company’s chief security officer, and a deputy who
worked with him, Bloomberg reported.
The hack is the latest in a
series of massive breaches —
including this year’s Equifax
hack — that raise serious questions about companies’ ability to
keep customer data safe in the
digital age.
The damaging revelation arrives during a pivotal period for
the tech company, which is struggling to repair its reputation
after a series of scandals.
“They’ve enjoyed tremendous
success, but it’s come at a significant cost,” said Arun Sundararajan, a professor at New York
University’s Stern School of Business. Management’s focus “has to
remain on repairing the company’s brand and sort of convincing
the world that they are worthy of
the public trust,” Sundararajan
said.
“It’s important that they don’t
lose sight of the fact that there’s
important work to be done to
justify their extremely high valuation and the tremendous
amount of private venture capital they’ve raised pre-IPO,” he
added.
Kalanick declined to comment, his spokesperson said.
peter.holley@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
SU
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
23,750
Close
YTD
% Chg
23,590.83
+0.7
+19.4
22,500
21,250
20,000
18,750
Nasdaq Composite Index
7000
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6862.48
+1.1
+27.5
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Construction & Engineerng
Computers & Peripherals
Health Care Eqp & Suppl
Internet Software & Svcs
Airlines
Food Products
Diversified Telecomm
Water Utilities
Construction Materials
Diversified Consumer Svcs
0
–5.0%
+5.0%
4.36
1.76
1.76
1.60
1.57
–0.40
–0.54
–0.72
–0.79
–1.15
5800
5200
S&P 500 Index
2599.03
+0.7
+16.1
2620
2510
2400
2290
2180
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
74,594.62
16,076.65
48,134.15
1.6
0.5
0.6
388.10
5366.15
13,167.54
7411.34
0.4
0.5
0.8
0.3
5963.52
4217.70
29,818.07
22,416.48
0.3
1.8
1.9
0.7
YTD % Chg
–40%
0%
+40%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
234.09
94.41
173.14
266.99
137.60
115.17
36.65
45.78
71.26
80.87
17.83
238.02
172.86
151.95
44.94
1.1
0.5
1.9
0.9
0.5
0.4
0.4
0.7
0.6
0.4
–0.8
0.0
1.4
1.0
0.7
31.1
27.4
49.5
71.5
48.4
–2.1
21.3
10.4
24.5
–10.4
–43.6
–0.6
28.9
–8.5
23.9
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
138.34
98.93
168.30
54.27
83.72
59.39
88.72
35.54
130.63
117.04
212.60
46.18
111.45
96.52
103.00
0.3
–0.1
0.8
0.3
1.4
0.2
0.5
0.5
0.7
0.6
1.1
0.0
1.4
–1.0
0.2
20.1
14.6
38.3
–7.8
34.7
16.8
5.5
9.4
6.7
6.8
32.8
–13.5
42.8
39.6
–1.2
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
0.8517
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1742
0.0088
1.3242
0.3069
0.7823
0.0532
0.0076
1.1277
0.2617
0.6663
0.0453
148.8960
34.5064
87.9670
5.9834
0.2327
0.5908
0.0402
Japan ¥ per
112.4500
132.0300
Britain £ per
0.7552
0.8867
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.2541
3.8211
0.0288
4.3153
Canada $ per
1.2783
1.5008
0.0113
1.6927
0.3922
Mexico $ per
18.7932
22.0658
0.1670
24.8855
5.7670
Mexico $
2.5494
0.1732
0.0680
14.7034
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 26,954.41
Russell 2000
1518.89
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 532.71
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
9.73
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
0.7
1.0
0.9
–8.6
YTD % Chg
15.8
11.9
19.1
–30.7
+1.1
–0.1
+0.7
+0.5
–1.0
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
(Ticker) % Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.6675
$17.06
$9.8900
$0.1488
$4.4125
–0.3
+0.7
–0.1
–0.7
+0.6
day
month
$1100
$1000
$900
2.0
1.2
0.2
0.2
1.1
0.9
–0.1
–0.1
0.4
Gainers
OraSure Tech
Black Box Corp
Cubic Corp
DHI Group Inc
Iconix Brand Group
Movado Group Inc
Rayonier Adv Matrl
Jacobs Engineering
Cray Inc
Veritiv Corp
Diplomat Pharmacy
Nektar Therapeutics
TripAdvisor Inc
Kopin Corp
Proto Labs Inc
Raven Industries
NOW Inc
II-VI Inc
Synaptics Inc
REX American Res
Daily
Close % Chg
$16.55
$4.15
$60.75
$2.10
$2.55
$32.25
$18.47
$64.86
$23.30
$26.50
$17.17
$49.98
$32.81
$3.35
$92.50
$36.75
$10.47
$52.00
$40.10
$91.13
18.6
15.3
13.6
13.5
12.3
11.6
10.6
9.3
9.1
7.7
7.7
7.7
7.6
6.7
6.2
6.1
6.0
5.9
5.8
5.7
Losers
Signet Jewelers Ltd
Cytokinetics Inc
DSW Inc
Bill Barrett Corp
Campbell Soup
Enanta Pharma
Tailored Brands Inc
Dress Barn Inc
FTD Cos Inc
Under Armour Inc
Fossil Group Inc
Express Inc
Shoe Carnival
Vitamin Shoppe Inc
Under Armour Inc
Hibbett Sports Inc
Cogent Comm
Brinker Intl
Cracker Barrel Old
Intuit Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$52.79
$8.25
$19.55
$5.68
$45.84
$45.65
$15.90
$2.16
$6.82
$11.36
$7.27
$7.67
$26.89
$3.90
$12.85
$18.60
$46.45
$32.67
$150.79
$151.79
–30.4
–25.7
–13.2
–8.2
–8.2
–8.2
–6.7
–6.5
–6.1
–5.9
–5.8
–5.3
–5.0
–4.9
–4.4
–4.4
–4.2
–4.2
–4.1
–3.8
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
$3.1505
$3.5625
$56.83
$1,281.70
$3.02
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6400
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.32
0.45
0.80
1.48
2.71
5.39
4.25%
Bank Prime
1.25%
Federal Funds
1.45%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.84%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.16%
10-year note
Yield: 2.35
2-year note
Yield: 1.77
5-year note
Yield: 2.10
6-month bill
Yield: 1.44
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.24%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
Health o∞cials fear running out of drug for opioid overdoses
BY
K ATIE Z EZIMA
A drug used to reverse opioid
overdoses has been hailed for
saving thousands of lives nationwide, but some municipalities are
having trouble accessing it.
There has been a widespread
push to distribute the drug,
naloxone, to first responders and
civilians in places that have been
affected by the opioid crisis. Walgreens stocks the drug in pharmacies nationwide and can dispense it over the counter in 46
states.
But in some places, the strain
on municipal budgets and the
need for an increasing amount of
naloxone have made it difficult to
keep enough in stock.
In Baltimore, public health officials have fewer than 10,000
doses available for use between
now and July 2018 because they
do not have the money to buy
more. One dose costs between
$70 and $90 for the type of the
drug the city purchases, which is
administered as a nasal spray.
“Every day I have to make
decisions about who has access to
this medication and who does
not,” said Leana Wen, the Baltimore city health commissioner,
who has made it a priority to
provide universal access to the
drug.
The nation, she said, is in the
middle of a public health emergency because of opioid abuse. If
it were any other situation, she
said, an inadequate supply of
medication would be unacceptable.
“We are rationing our very
limited supply of naloxone at a
time when people are dying every
day,” Wen said.
Part of the issue, public health
officials said, is the price of the
drug. Two doses of an injectable
form of naloxone, Evzio, cost
$4,500, up from $690 in 2014.
The prices of other forms of the
drug, including the nasally ad-
ministered Narcan, typically
range from $70 to $150 per dose.
The drug also comes in a syringe
that allows it to be injected intravenously.
The rise of fentanyl, a powerful
synthetic opioid that is now driving overdose deaths, has made it
necessary for first responders
and others to have more naloxone
on hand. The drug is so powerful
that it can take multiple doses of
naloxone to reverse an overdose.
“With fentanyl you need more
doses,” said Tom Miller, the West
Virginia director of the National
Volunteer Fire Council. Miller
said that many in the state have
“trouble getting it and getting it
replaced.”
In Washington, N.C., Doug Bissette, battalion chief of the city’s
fire and EMS services, said there
has been concern that the city —
about 100 miles east of Raleigh —
might run out of naloxone because of the high demand for the
drug in the area.
“We want to make sure we
don’t run out on our trucks, and
while there’s enough to keep on
the trucks, we have to keep
enough in our supply closet,” he
said. “We have not run out of any,
but we have come close.”
Bissette said he has just one
dose in his storage room, but the
department’s trucks are fully
stocked — and he is expecting five
more doses this week.
In a statement, Kaléo, which
manufactures the auto-injector
naloxone known as Evzio, said it
has donated more than 280,000
naloxone auto-injectors to public
health departments, first responders and nonprofit organizations.
Thom Duddy, director of communications for Adapt Pharma,
which makes naloxone in nasal
spray form, said there have been
no shortages of its form of the
drug. He said the drug has 94
percent insurance coverage, including with Medicare and Medicaid, and about 75 percent of
patients pay a $10 co-pay, or less,
for it. The company also has
brokered direct purchasing deals
with a number of municipalities.
A box of the drug, which contains
two doses, costs $75.
Duddy said grant money and
State Dept. workers protest child-soldiers ruling
Tillerson removed
3 countries from list in
human-trafficking report
BY
C AROL M ORELLO
The State Department on Tuesday defended Secretary of State
Rex Tillerson’s removal of three
countries from a list of those
using child soldiers, after officials
upset about his decision wrote a
critical dissent memo saying the
action violates U.S. law.
The dispute centers on the
recruitment and use of child soldiers in Afghanistan, Burma and
Iraq. All were included on an
original list compiled by senior
officials within the State Department and embassies around the
world and passed along to Tillerson with the recommendation
they be included. Under the Child
Soldier Prevention Act of 2008,
the State Department must publish a list of offending countries
every year, making them ineligible for some types of military aid.
When the annual human-trafficking report came out in June,
however, Tillerson had overruled
the recommendations, and the
original list of 11 nations was
whittled down to eight.
His decision prompted a
memo filed to the State Department's dissent channel, a vehicle
established during the Vietnam
War for employees to voice their
objections to policies they considered wrong. It was addressed to
Brian Hook, the director of policy
planning within the State Department, and eventually was shown
to Tillerson.
She said it was in part because
the numbers of child soldiers
reported in each country were
low and unverified and in part
because the countries were considered to be making progress in
combating the problem.
“No one in the U.S. government
likes the use of child soldiers,”
Nauert said. “It is abhorrent.”
Later, Nauert issued a statement saying the eight countries
on the list all met the statutory
“It has risked sending a message to . . . all three
countries that minimal efforts are enough.”
Three State Department employees in a dissent memo
The dissent memo said there
was sufficient evidence to include
the three countries stripped from
the list.
“It is difficult to defend the
decision not to list those countries as a legal matter,” said the
memo, which was first reported
by Reuters and has been viewed
by The Washington Post.
State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said Tuesday
that Tillerson based his decision
on the “technical” merits of each
case.
requirement, while Tillerson
deemed the other three did not.
“He made this decision after
considering the credibility of all
the information available to him
from multiple sources,” she said.
“With regard to Iraq, Burma and
Afghanistan, the Secretary thoroughly reviewed all the evidence
and made a determination about
whether the facts justified a listing pursuant to the law.”
One of the signatories of the
dissent memo on Monday filed a
complaint with the State Depart-
ment inspector general, according to John Tye, who represents
the official through his organization, Whistleblower Aid. Tye said
the official, who remains anonymous, aims to get Tillerson to
amend the human-trafficking report by re-listing the three countries.
“This is not an abstract policy
issue,” Tye said. “Within weeks of
being delisted, the Burmese military began the cleansing of the
Rohingya. A lot of the Burmese
child soldiers who were cut out of
the report within weeks were
forced to start ethnic cleansing.”
The authors of the dissent
memo said the decision to remove Iraq, Afghanistan and Burma weakens U.S. credibility and
undermines the State Department's efforts to tackle the issue.
“It has risked sending a message to the authorities in all three
countries,” the memo said, “that
minimal efforts are enough; that
we as a government are not
interested in upholding international norms, nor in holding
countries accountable for ongoing abuses against children;
and that we are willing to neglect
the legal foundations and principles guiding our advocacy and
diplomacy.”
carol.morello@washpost.com
federal funding are available to
municipalities to purchase the
drug. The company donated
30,000 doses of naloxone to Hamilton County, Ohio, earlier this
year, and researchers plan to
study how availability of the drug
affects the overdose rate there.
“We need to help educate these
folks on where the money’s at and
where there’s available funding,”
he said.
But Robin Pollini, an associate
professor at the West Virginia
University School of Medicine,
said the funding system can be
burdensome. She said West Virginia received $1 million to distribute 8,250 naloxone kits earlier this year; they were all gone in
four months.
“We give them out, and then we
wait for the next funding opportunity,” she said.
She said the state is dependent
on the federal government putting out requests for grant proposals, which are cumbersome
and take time. The national request model doesn’t take into
account local need: Some places
might need to equip their police
with naloxone, while other places
might want to give it to the
friends and family members of
known drug users.
Places like West Virginia, she
said, need to face the reality that
the opioid crisis is getting worse
with the introduction of fentanyl
and will require long-term investment.
“We don’t have a long-term
established distribution and
funding plan for this drug for the
state,” she said.
Clif Johnson, director of clinical compliance and physician services at Southeast Missouri Behavioral Health, said his center
has expanded thanks to a twoyear federal grant given to the
state. But three months later, the
center has nearly reached its
patient limit, and Johnson can’t
find money to help local law
enforcement get the opioid antidote.
“There still is not funding to
help cover those costs,” Johnson
said. “The firefighters and the
police have to foot their own bill
for Narcan.”
katie.zezima@washpost.com
There’s no FOOD today
Live chat today!
This week’s Food section was published early,
on Sunday. But its staff will answer Thanksgiving
questions in a special two-hour live chat with readers
at live.washingtonpost.com beginning at noon today.
See you next Wednesday!
N1473 2x6
Growing need, high costs
leave cities struggling to
keep naloxone in stock
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
Both sides of a≠ordable housing debate invoke Airbnb
regulations, according to District
officials and D.C. Council members. The city has mostly turned a
blind eye to the violations, saying
it doesn’t have the resources to
enforce the laws.
In residential zones, where
many Airbnbs operate, a single-family home typically can offer short-term rentals only if it
obtains a bed-and-breakfast license with a home occupation
permit. Many hosts lack such licenses, or are not serving breakfast to their guests, as the permit
requires.
“The estimated number of
short-term rentals being offered
do exceed the number of licenses
that would cover that type of activity,” the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs
(DCRA) said in a statement.
The fine for operating without
a license is $2,000, but the regulation is rarely enforced. In the past
two years, the DCRA has issued
$30,000 in fines for individuals or
business operating unlicensed
short-term rentals.
The DCRA said enforcement is
“complaint driven,” and investigations “generally require considerable time to develop.” The new
legislation, if approved, “would
require considerable additional
staffing to implement,” the DCRA
said.
AIRBNB FROM A1
interests in the hotel industry and
their union against an upstart
competitor in a classic example of
how a new technology can threaten an established business model.
At the core of the controversy
are the same questions that grip
the District over how redevelopment is transforming neighborhoods, raising housing costs, adding to congestion, and altering the
city’s economic and racial demographics.
“Most of the Airbnb folks don’t
fit into the neighborhood that
well,” said the Rev. H. Lionel Edmonds, pastor of Northwest D.C.’s
Mount Lebanon Baptist Church,
who is helping lead a grass-roots
campaign in favor of tough regulations. “They don’t invest in the
community. . . . It increases the
gentrifying component.”
Necessary extra income
The short-term rental market
has exploded in the District since
Airbnb got its start with homeowners renting space to visitors
for President Barack Obama’s first
inauguration in 2009. Last year,
the number of Airbnb guest arrivals jumped almost 80 percent,
from 160,000 to 287,000. The
number of people who hosted at
least one trip jumped from 3,900
to 4,900.
Although Airbnb is the largest
and best-known short-term rental
service in the city, other companies such as HomeAway and
VRBO are active, as well.
The rapid growth has stirred
concerns. Brenda E. Shields, an
advisory neighborhood commissioner in the low-income Congress Heights neighborhood in
Southeast Washington, says Airbnbs victimize the needy citizens
she sees when she volunteers at
her church food pantry or delivers
clothing and toiletries to the
homeless. She’s willing to let people rent rooms in their homes but
wants a ban on Airbnbs in multiunit buildings.
“You’re taking away an apartment that somebody could live in,
who’s living in the streets,” Shields
said. “You’re taking away from
those people and giving to people
who are here for a weekend or a
week.”
Airbnb was a hot topic at a
summer meeting of the Congress
Heights Community Association,
which was unable to reach a consensus.
Mary Cuthbert, vice president
of the association and an advisory
neighborhood
commissioner,
warned that short-term rentals
bring in transients who dilute a
neighborhood’s residential character and pose safety risks.
“You see all sorts of strange
people coming and going” at Airbnbs, Cuthbert said. “Somebody
may want to rent a room who is a
psycho killer.”
She said short-term rentals
were also contributing to a
change in the racial makeup of the
community.
“You have people coming in,
and rents being pushed up, and
minorities moving out to Maryland,” Cuthbert said.
But a short drive away, in River
Terrace in Northeast, Shaun Johnson said he can afford to stay in
the city only because of the extra
income he makes as an Airbnb
host. Johnson regularly rents out
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Brenda E. Shields is an advisory neighborhood commissioner for an area of Congress Heights in Southeast Washington. Shields says
Airbnb is affecting housing stock as landlords take short-term rentals and don’t offer the properties to locals.
two bedrooms and the basement
in his rowhouse and describes the
extra $40 or $50 a night per rental
as a “godsend” in meeting his
mortgage payments.
Johnson, a baggage ramp employee for American Airlines at
Reagan National Airport, also
says he has befriended many of his
guests and especially enjoys introducing Washington to foreigners.
“I feel like I’m an ambassador
for the city and black Americans,”
he said.
Johnson resents the accusation
that he is contributing to a lack of
affordable housing in the city. He
says the government and big developers, not little guys trying to
make a buck from Airbnb, are to
blame for high housing costs.
“Why should the burden of affordable housing be on me? I can
barely keep a roof over my head in
my own house,” Johnson said.
On Capitol Hill, which has the
most short-term rentals of any
neighborhood in the city, Dunnzy
Levin is concerned because the
proposed legislation would bar
her and her husband from operating a building they own that has
six units for corporate furnished
rentals and short-term Airbnbs.
“It’s a huge deal for the income,”
Levin said. “It’s giving us a little
bit of a cushion to put some money away, because living in the city
is kind of hand to mouth.”
If the legislation sets a limit
lower than six for the number of
units that a host can rent — as
council members say is practically
certain — then, Levin said, she
and her husband would “change
our business model.”
Another host concerned about
the bill is Ruth Hamilton, who
uses Airbnb to rent out one of two
units in a rowhouse in Southwest
that she and her husband own, in
addition to the rowhouse where
they live nearby. The Hamiltons’
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Airbnb landlord Shaun Johnson talks with tenant Taylor Valencia,
of San Francisco, at his property in Northeast Washington.
experience shows the financial incentive to rent through Airbnb
rather than through a traditional,
long-term lease.
The downstairs unit, which is
rented long-term, has been fetching the couple $1,500 a month — a
rate they expect to jump to between $1,700 and $1,900 a month
with the next tenant.
But the upstairs unit, which
they rent on Airbnb, yields an
average of about $117 a night, and
the unit is rented about threequarters of the year. That works
out to more than $2,500 a month.
“I do make more on that apartment than I would if I rented it out
on a long-term basis,” Hamilton
said. The extra money has helped
cover her son’s college costs.
“It’s really enabled us to do that
without debt,” she said. “I understand the concerns about big
apartment buildings going Airbnb and the need for affordable
units. In our circumstances . . .
our real estate is our way of making ends meet in the city.”
The implementation
The legislation before the D.C.
Council was the subject of a lively
hearing in April. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson (D) expects
the council to act on it by January.
Both supporters and detractors
say the bill could result in a satisfactory compromise. In theory, it
would permit individuals and
small operators to take advantage
of the “sharing economy” by renting out their primary residence,
while insisting that they meet basic safety and licensing requirements.
At the same time, it would prohibit large-scale commercial operators from using short-term
rental services as a way to operate
as hotels while dodging strict regulatory standards required in that
business.
“We definitely want to go after
the bad actors,” said council member Kenyan R. McDuffie (D-Ward
5), who wrote the bill. People
would still be free to market their
property, provided they “submit
to a clear, concise regulatory
framework,” he said.
But there is no resolution of
several major questions over how
far the law would go.
The outcome will affect whether large numbers of hosts can
continue to rent out rooms and
houses and whether it will still be
profitable to do so.
It hasn’t been decided how
many nights each year an absentee host could rent their primary
residence. The bill would set a cap
of 15 nights, although McDuffie
expects that will be amended to
60 or 90. The industry is pushing
for at least 180 nights a year.
The biggest dispute may be
over whether people can rent out
a second home. The bill says no,
and McDuffie wants to keep it that
way. But Airbnb wants hosts to be
able to rent at least three “entire
home” units. That typically means
a house, apartment or basement
with its own entrance, as opposed
to a single room in a residence.
Short-term rental companies
are also worried that new licensing and inspection requirements
will discourage too many owners
from taking advantage of the service. They say the hotel industry
and its allies are stirring up exaggerated arguments about housing
costs to protect a monopoly at
consumers’ expense.
“We find the bill really onerous
and overly restrictive for the vast
majority of our hosts who occasionally rent out their home or
room in their home,” said William
D. Burns, the public policy director for Airbnb.
One potential advantage of the
bill is that it would make it easier
to get a license for short-term
rentals — a legal requirement that
is widely ignored.
A large but unknown number
of hosts are renting rooms or
houses in violation of city zoning
‘We have to look to the future’
Much of the debate over shortterm rentals has addressed the
extent to which they are contributing to the city’s chronic lack of
affordable housing.
Airbnb issued a report in April
suggesting the impact was minimal. It found that of more than
300,000 housing units in the city,
fewer than 9,000 “entire home”
listings have hosted a trip via Airbnb.
The results were reassuring to
the Coalition for Nonprofit Housing and Economic Development,
which supports low-cost housing
and requested the study from
Airbnb.
“We don’t see alarming numbers,” said Stephen Glaude, executive director of the coalition.
Short-term rentals “do not have a
major impact on the housing
stock.”
But opponents note the housing shortage is so severe that it’s
harmful to lose even a small number of apartments or homes.
For instance, in 2016, according
to Airbnb, 1,242 “entire homes”
were rented for 90 days or more.
That is more than the approximately 1,000 affordable housing
units created or preserved each
year under Mayor Muriel E. Bowser’s (D) much-praised $100 million annual contributions to the
Affordable Housing Trust Fund.
Burns, of Airbnb, said there
was no guarantee that the Airbnb
units would be affordable if rented long term.
McDuffie says that even if the
numbers are comparatively small,
the rapid growth in short-term
rentals is a threat to the city in the
long run.
“They are taking homes off the
long-term rental market in favor
of more lucrative short-term rentals,” he said. “If that phenomenon
continues without sensible regulations, it’s going to have an impact. We have to look to the future.”
robert.mccartney@washpost.com
Long before hedge funds, cattle and horses drove inequality, study finds
After agriculture’s dawn,
they offered wealth that
could beget more wealth
BY
S ARAH K APLAN
Ask archaeologists where economic inequality comes from,
and most probably will blame
farming. The dawn of agriculture
roughly 10,000 years ago, they
say, precipitated a dramatic shift
in the way humans lived and
organized themselves. With the
sedentary, agrarian lifestyle came
surpluses to be managed, land to
be controlled and free time to be
spent on art, religion and other
specialties. That led to the evolution of hierarchies, the explosion
of cities and the emergence of
taxation, politics, slavery, war.
All over the world, they say,
wherever a person planted a seed,
inequality inevitably sprouted.
A study published Wednesday
in the journal Nature offers a
potential second culprit: animals. Specifically, large domesticated ones such as cattle and
horses — creatures that could
pull plows and carry warriors,
enhancing the kinds of activities
that give rise to differences and
discrimination.
That conclusion came out of an
analysis of inequality in 63 societ-
ies spanning some 10,000 years of
human history. According to
Binghamton University archaeologist Randy McGuire, who was
not involved in the study, it is the
most comprehensive effort to
quantify inequality in the ancient
world. And it might have some
lessons for people today.
In the modern world, economic inequality has long been
described by a single number. If
everyone in the community
makes the same amount of money, this number, called the “Gini
coefficient,” is zero. If one person
has everything and all the rest are
penniless, the Gini coefficient is 1.
In the United States, the Gini
coefficient for income inequality
is about 0.39. In South Africa, it’s
0.62. In Iceland, it’s 0.25.
A few years ago, Washington
State University archaeologist
Tim A. Kohler wondered what he
would find if he applied the
formula to the periods just before
and after the adoption of agriculture. Conventional wisdom
would suggest that the Gini coefficients for farming cultures
would be higher than those of
hunter-gatherer societies. But by
how much? And how might they
differ across geography and time?
Since inhabitants of ancient
societies were not earning weekly
paychecks, Kohler and his colleagues had to find a proxy measure. They settled on house size,
the logic being that the richest
people in a community would
have the largest homes.
Then began the painstaking
work of studying the layouts of 63
archaeological sites in North and
Central America, Europe, the
Middle East and Asia. These included spare hunter-gatherer settlements, the small 11,600-yearold Syrian villages of Jerf elAhmar, and more-modern metropolises such as Pompeii and
the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan.
As predicted, the Gini coefficients increased as societies
evolved from settlements into
states. This fits with an idea in
economics called the “inequality
possibility frontier”: As communities produce more surplus, they
expand their capacity for inequality. In places that barely eked out
an existence via subsistence
farming, the inequality possibility frontier was low because few
people had much spare time or
resources to distinguish themselves from everyone else around
them. But the more resources
there are to go around, the easier
it was for one group to control
them.
Kohler’s analysis also revealed
an unexpected trend: Societies in
Eurasia and North Africa were a
lot more unequal than those in
the Americas. Take, for example,
Tenochtitlan in Mexico and the
ancient Egyptian city Kahun:
Each site represents a point in
time roughly 6,000 years after
agriculture arose in their region.
But Kahun’s Gini coefficient is
close to 0.7 — roughly twice the
value for Tenochtitlan.
“At that point we scratched our
heads,” Kohler said. “What could
be the cause of this differentiation?”
He looked at what Europe and
Asia had that the Americas
lacked and found his answer.
Horses, sheep, cattle, mules and
goats are all native to the Eastern
hemisphere. Societies in North
and Central America had domesticated dogs and turkeys, and
cultures of the Andes (which were
not included in Kohler’s survey)
had llamas and alpacas, “but
none of those animals are suitable for plowing,” he said. “And
the breakthrough, we think . . .
was when people began to use
oxen or cattle for plowing in the
Old World.”
With a horse or an ox pulling a
plow, a farmer can till a lot more
land and plant a lot more crops in
the same amount of time. This
“extensification” of agriculture
generated larger surpluses that
allowed for larger cities and
raised the inequality possibility
frontier.
The new system encouraged
people who had a beast of burden
(or a dozen) to buy up more land,
given that they now had the
capacity to cultivate bigger plots.
These farmers also could rent out
their oxen or mules to less fortu-
nate neighbors. If someone had a
horse, they could travel atop it,
use the animal to carry heavy
goods long distances or become a
mounted knight and ride it into
battle. There were countless ways
to accumulate money and power
if you had a good, strong animal
to help.
Meanwhile, those who couldn’t
afford a draft animal might work
just as hard as their ox-owning
peers, but they would never earn
as much. They wound up selling
their land — or having it taken
outright — and became laborers
for a landowner rather than
working for themselves. These
conditions accelerated the stratification of Eurasian societies into
classes of powerful landowners
and mounted warriors on one
hand and poor, landless peasants
on the other.
Having animals around “increases the wealth of the wealthiest and decreases the wealth of
the poorest,” Kohler said.
Michelle Elliott, an archaeologist at the University of Paris who
was not involved in the study,
said that she finds Kohler and his
colleagues’ argument compelling
but that she would like to see the
Gini formula applied to more
sites. “They’ve got this basic
framework,” she said. “Now we
need to fill in the blank spots with
more data to see if this pattern
holds up.”
The implications of his find-
ing, Kohler said, go beyond academic interest. How much the
inhabitants of ancient Egypt
were able to earn depended largely not on their work but on their
wealth — the sum of all the
physical and intangible assets
they possessed, including livestock. If you owned a team of
oxen, you could plow more land,
sell more crops, buy yet more
oxen and more land, employ
more workers and generate more
profit. And you could pass all of
that wealth — the oxen, the land
— to your descendants, who in
turn could use them to earn more
in their lifetimes.
Today, ownership of a big bovine doesn’t make you rich. But
people profit from other kinds of
wealth: nice houses that accrue
value, fancy educations that lead
to great jobs, bank accounts,
hedge funds. Research suggests
that the best way to understand
inequality in today’s society —
including racial inequality — is
not by comparing incomes but by
looking at wealth.
From that perspective, the
United States doesn’t look so
good. According to a 2015 report,
the Gini coefficient for wealth
inequality in the United States is
0.8 — higher even than Kahun in
ancient Egypt.
sarah.kaplan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
New ‘acting director’ at Interior o∞ce worries advocates for public lands
Last fall, when
President-elect
Donald Trump
was weighing
DINO
whom to
GRANDONI
nominate as
Interior secretary,
an early candidate for the job,
Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (RWash.), generated concern
among some hunting and fishing
advocates for her stance on who
should control the more than
500 million acres under Interior
Department management.
Like some other Republicans
in Congress, McMorris Rodgers
thinks the federal government
controls too much land and
should sell parcels to private
interests who will better harness
its natural resources and raise
revenue for the government — or
at least transfer some to the
states, which will have local
interests at heart.
At the intervention of his son
Donald Trump Jr., who like other
hunters worried that an Interior
secretary in favor of land transfer
would limit sportsmen’s access to
federal lands, the president-elect
settled on the congressman from
Montana, Ryan Zinke, to be
Interior secretary. Zinke says he
would never sell or otherwise
transfer public lands.
Now, nearly a year later, the
Interior Department’s choice to
temporarily run the Bureau of
Land Management (BLM), a
division that administers about
half the agency’s land holdings,
has raised eyebrows among
public land advocates.
Last week, Interior named
Brian Steed as interim BLM
director. Before that
appointment, Steed was chief of
staff to Rep. Chris Stewart
Energy
202
(R-Utah), an advocate for land
transfer who co-founded a
congressional caucus called the
Federal Land Action Group,
intent on crafting legislation to
put federal holdings under local
control.
Some environmental groups,
which prefer to see public lands
managed by the federal
government instead of industryfriendly states, are concerned by
Steed’s appointment.
“Secretary Zinke has just
promoted a champion of
disposing America’s public lands
into state and private hands,”
Jennifer Rokala, executive
director of the Center for
Western Priorities, said in a
statement. “Secretary Zinke’s
actions speak far louder than his
words.”
In an email, an Interior
Department spokeswoman,
Heather Swift, said Zinke has not
wavered in his stance on public
lands.
“The Secretary’s position is
unchanged,” Swift wrote.
Despite being an early
supporter of Trump during the
presidential campaign,
Zinke resigned as a delegate to
the Republican National
Convention because of the party’s
position on land transfer.
After a draft GOP platform
emerged that read, “Congress
shall immediately pass universal
legislation providing a timely and
orderly mechanism requiring the
federal government to convey
certain federally controlled
public lands to the states,”
Zinke withdrew from the
nominating convention in
Cleveland.
“What I saw was a platform
that was more divisive than
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said he would never sell or otherwise transfer public lands, but the new
interim director of the Bureau of Land Management has taken a different stance on that issue.
uniting,” Zinke told the Billings
Gazette at the time. “At this point,
I think it’s better to show
leadership.”
That position does not appear
to entirely square with Steed’s.
“We have these federal
overlords,” Steed said in speech
last year. “How do we have them
be a little more responsive to the
needs that we have?”
“We know there’s a variety of
things that could be done, one of
which is seeking large-scale
transfer,” he continued before
detailing other potential policies
short of land transfer that could
give ranchers better access to
public lands.
One of the names floated to
lead BLM permanently has
generated concern among land
transfer opponents, too. Karen
Budd-Falen, a Wyomingbased lawyer who in the past
represented rancher Cliven
Bundy in his fights against the
federal government, has
acknowledged she is under
consideration for the job.
Last month, Land Tawney,
president of Backcountry
Hunters & Anglers, said he trusts
Zinke is going to stay “strong” on
public lands issues, but he
worried about “potential
nominees for BLM director that
don’t necessarily share those
values.”
“I think that’s something that
we’ll need to watch,” Tawney
added.
In an email on Monday,
Tawney called the appointment
of Steed “troubling at best” while
adding that “Ryan Zinke has
repeatedly affirmed his support
of our public lands and waters,
and many of his past actions are
consistent with his stated
position, which we respect.”
There’s another potential issue
with Steed’s appointment. Some
conservation groups say that
installing him as acting director
of the agency violates federal law.
Under the Federal Vacancies
Reform Act, an agency employee
must work at an office for a
certain period of time before
ascending to an interim role
running the bureau. Given
Steed’s brief tenure at BLM — he
began as deputy director there
only this autumn — he should be
ineligible to temporarily run the
agency, the groups say.
“Even if President Trump
nominated someone for the
position today,” said Center for
Western Priorities spokesman
Aaron Weiss, “Brian Steed
wouldn’t be able to become
acting director until he’s been at
the agency for 90 days.”
After the news site E&E News
published a story on the
vacancies issue, Swift,
the Interior spokeswoman,
justified Steed’s appointment by
saying that Zinke delegated the
responsibilities of the office to
Steed without giving him the
formal title of director.
“Technically he is acting with
the full delegated functions,
duties, responsibilities and
authority of the BLM director but
does not have the title of ‘acting
BLM director,’ ” Swift told E&E
News.
But when Steed’s promotion at
BLM was first announced,
BLM.gov listed him as “acting
director” on its website.
“Brian’s position is not ActingDirector,” Swift told The Post by
email.
Bobby McEnaney, a senior
deputy director at the Natural
Resources Defense Council, said
even with that clarification, it is
“still not clear to me how DOI [is]
not violating the law.”
dino.grandoni@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/
powerpost
To a skeptical Wall Street, GOP tax plan would just create a ‘fiscal sugar high’
Beltway number
crunchers haven’t
been kind to GOP
tax proposals.
Republicans can
TORY
wave off some of
NEWMYER
those analyses as
partisan products.
But Wall Street economists are
echoing some of the criticisms
that the tax cuts the party is
pushing are ill-timed and too
expensive.
The dearth of independent
amens for the Republican tax
plan, either from Washington or
beyond, spells potential trouble
ahead for the party if it can
wrench the proposal across the
congressional finish line and
then sell it to a so-far skeptical
public.
Last week, the Joint
Committee on
Taxation, Congress’s nonpartisan
analysts, found that the Senate
bill will end up raising taxes on
those earning less than $75,000
on average after a decade. On
Monday, the Tax Policy Center, a
joint effort by the Urban Institute
and the Brookings Institution,
similarly found the cuts in the
measure skewed toward the
richest, with half of taxpayers
paying more by 2027.
“TPC, in static analysis of
Senate bill: 9% of taxpayers see
tax hike in year 2, 50% in year 10,”
tweeted the New York Times’ Jim
Tankersley.
“The largest cuts as a share of
The
Finance
202
income go to those in the 95th to
99th percentiles of the income
distribution,” Vox.com’s Dylan
Scott quoted from the report.
Arguably more problematic for
the bill’s prospects, the group also
projected it would generate
$169 billion in revenue through
new growth over the next decade,
well short of the $1.4 trillion the
bill adds to the deficit. (Ditto for
recent studies from the Penn
Wharton Budget Model and the
Committee for a Responsible
Federal Budget.)
Top administration officials
continue to claim that the bill will
more than pay for itself by
unleashing a flood of economic
activity that expands the tax base.
The tax group’s findings suggest it
barely begins to do that — a
conclusion that, if affirmed by the
Joint Committee on Taxation,
could jeopardize the support of a
critical few self-declared Senate
Republican deficit hawks.
Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin laid out the Trump
team’s case on “Fox News
Sunday,” saying, “This isn’t about
the deficit, because we think this
is all about creating growth, and
we’ll create economic growth to
pay down the deficit.”
But Mnuchin’s former
colleagues on Wall Street do not
agree. They say that an economy
already humming along doesn’t
need a massive injection of new
stimulus from Washington. And
not only do they see the plan
JEWEL SAMAD/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Pedestrians are seen in New York’s financial district, where skepticism has greeted GOP assertions
that proposed tax cuts would stimulate the economy and yield more revenue for the government.
failing to pay for itself through
added growth, financiers also
pointed to a near-term downside
resulting from all the new deficit
spending the cuts will require, as
federal borrowing could crowd
out private investment in the
economy.
“I can’t see this is the moment
when you want the most fiscal
stimulus in the market, when
we’re kind of mostly at full
employment, when GDP last
registered at 3 percent,” Goldman
Sachs chief executive Lloyd
Blankfein said in a Bloomberg
News interview this month. The
United States can afford some
deficit spending now, he added,
“but not so much of it that we
make inflation inevitable down
the road.”
In a research note Friday, Bank
of America economists said the
tax proposals would supply a
“fiscal sugar high.” The House
and Senate bills would add about
0.3 to 0.4 percent to economic
growth next year and in 2019, the
economists said. But the federal
government’s additional
borrowing could lead the Fed to
raise interest rates.
“Tax cuts are not necessary to
keep the US economy on track
and would result in exacerbating
the federal debt outlook,” the
report says. “The impact of deficit
financing on longer-run growth
will be determined by how much
government borrowing will
‘crowd out’ private investment.
There are varying opinions on
this topic but mainstream
economic thinking would expect
the ‘crowd out’ effect to be
material and lower trend growth.”
Morgan Stanley economists
sound a similar note. “We think
most investors would view a
larger-than-expected stimulus (or
even the passage of any tax cut) to
be a bullish catalyst. But we think
this would be short-lived. After a
large-scale tax cut, we struggle to
see another catalyst to make
investors even more optimistic.
And such a surprise opens the
door to tighter monetary policy,”
bank economists wrote in a
recent research note. “While a
failure of tax reform would likely
cause a short-term market
pullback, this scenario is actually
the best one for extending the
cycle, reducing the risk of
overheating conditions, and
allowing policy tightening to
remain gradual.”
So failure would spook
investors but benefit the economy
in the longer term — a bracing
assessment for a project whose
purpose is driving growth.
tory.newmyer@washpost.com
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Confronting sexual harassment
EDITORIALS
Kicking Haiti while it’s still down
By moving to expel 60,000 Haitians, the United States torments its poorest neighbor.
M
from the country of their birth and upbringing.
In announcing the decision, the Department of
Homeland Security said it had decided to terminate
the humanitarian program, known as Temporary
Protected Status, because conditions in Haiti had
improved. “Since the 2010 earthquake, the number of
displaced people in Haiti has decreased by 97 percent,” the department said in a statement. It also said,
“Significant steps have been taken to improve the
stability and quality of life for Haitian citizens, and
Haiti is able to safely receive traditional levels of
returned citizens.”
That assertion is not just unsubstantiated; it is
specious.
According to the World Bank, nearly a quarter of
Haitians live on less than $1.23 per day, a level of
extreme poverty rare in the Western Hemisphere;
almost 60 percent live under the national poverty
line of $2.41 per day. Unemployment is thought to be
in the range of 40 percent. The agricultural sector,
which accounts for more than a fifth of the economy
and nearly 40 percent of its workers, is anemic. About
Mr. Sessions’s
pointless battle
half the country’s population is undernourished, and
chronic malnutrition among children is widespread.
Acting homeland security secretary Elaine Duke
issued her decision just 13 months after Hurricane
Matthew ripped across Haiti, inflicting damage
equivalent to a third of the country’s gross domestic
product. Partly because of the natural disasters,
economic growth has slowed to just 1 percent.
How can Haiti absorb the nearly 60,000 people
who now have temporary protected status in the
United States, to say nothing of their nearly 30,000
children? In short, it cannot. A country with few jobs
and little opportunity, it suffers from chronic corruption and inept economic management. In the World
Bank’s ease of doing business index, Haiti ranks 181st
of 190 countries.
Under those circumstances, the administration’s
decision to rescind the humanitarian status that
allowed so many Haitians to live in the United States
amounts to an act of cruelty. It is a beggar-thyneighbor policy unworthy of a great power and
unsuited to a nation with a tradition of compassion.
TOM TOLES
The Justice Department keeps
doubling down on sanctuary cities.
I
N ITS crusade against so-called sanctuary
jurisdictions, the Trump administration is on an
impressive judicial losing streak, having been
slapped down in federal courts from San
Francisco to Philadelphia. It remains undeterred, as
the Justice Department girds for more battles whose
stakes — a few million dollars in federal funds
withheld from offending cities — make a mockery of
the dire rhetoric deployed by officials in Washington.
The administration is wrong on the law and the
principle. It has no valid legal justification for its
insistence that state and local law enforcement
officers act as proxies for federal immigration agents
and no basis for threatening to withhold funding if
they refuse. By seeking to compel such conduct, the
administration ignores police and prosecutors who
warn that driving a wedge between law enforcement
and immigrant communities will erode public
safety. On Monday, a federal judge in San Francisco
permanently blocked President Trump’s executive
order seeking to deny funding to uncooperative
localities, but the administration shows no sign of
giving up the fight.
Just last week, the Justice Department threatened
to withhold grant funding from three states (Illinois,
Oregon and Vermont) and the District of Columbia,
as well as 25 localities in California, Mississippi,
Kentucky, Florida, New Mexico, Massachusetts and
Washington state. It has suggested, without evidence, that sanctuary policies are driving up crime.
After a federal judge in Philadelphia last week
slapped down the administration’s threat to pull
$1.6 million in law enforcement grants, a Justice
Department spokesman, Devin O’Malley, issued a
statement attempting to link the city’s spike in
murders this year to its policies.
In fact, there is zero evidence that rising homicides in Philadelphia are related to noncitizens —
who commit crimes at no greater rate than citizens,
according to the city’s police commissioner — let
alone to undocumented immigrants who might be
in federal custody if not for local policies. It’s worth
noting that undocumented immigrants are arrested, prosecuted and convicted with no less fervor
than citizens, even in so-called sanctuary localities.
The administration hopes it can bully localities
into more cooperation with federal deportation
agents by threatening to withhold funding. But
several of the most common so-called sanctuary
policies — for instance, barring local police from
inquiring about a suspect’s immigration status and
refusing to detain prisoners beyond their jail terms
at the request of federal agents — are not prohibited
by any federal law.
in government roles directly related to the bureau’s
work. Mr. Brunell has not.
These facts have led many to wonder why Trump
administration officials might want Mr. Brunell
running the bureau. The answer may lie in his past
work helping Republicans in electoral map cases, or
in some of his views on voting issues. Mr. Brunell has
criticized partisan gerrymandering — but also early
voting and nonpartisan redistricting commissions.
Something of an iconoclast in his field, he is most
notable among political scientists for arguing that
electoral districts should be drawn to maximize the
proportion of like-minded voters in each, limiting
the number of competitive seats on electoral maps.
None of this proves that Mr. Brunell would run a
partisan Census Bureau. But his political affiliations
and previous work would nevertheless harm perceptions of the bureau’s integrity, an institution in
which Americans must have complete faith. His
possible appointment has inflamed preexisting worries that the Trump administration will meddle with
Most jurisdictions seek to balance informationsharing and other forms of cooperation with federal
authorities with their interest in forging ties to
immigrant communities. The judge in Philadelphia,
in ruling against the administration’s threat to
withhold funding, found the city had done just that,
creating no conflict.
As it happens, the grants the feds wanted to
withhold in that case would have covered, among
other items, drugs used by first responders to save
the lives of opioid overdose victims. How would that
have been in the public interest?
the count. Of particular concern is the possibility
that the president would order that census forms ask
about immigration status, which would result in low
response rates and, potentially, massive undercounts in minority communities.
Republicans in Congress have badly underfunded
the census the past several years, leading the bureau
to cancel or put off important programs, which
could harm the quality of the 2020 count. This fact
alone argues for picking Census Bureau leaders
seasoned in government operations and ready to
take on a huge management challenge.
Mr. Brunell, Politico reported, was considered for
the Census Bureau’s top job, but opposition in
Congress nixed that plan. Unlike candidates for the
director’s job, those picked to be deputy director do
not need Senate confirmation. If tapped, Mr. Brunell
could start immediately, even while the bureau lacks
a confirmed director. That would be damaging to an
enterprise already at risk. Mr. Trump should find
someone else.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
These dogs shouldn’t have been allowed near each other
The Nov. 19 Metro article “Suit says dog was more
than property” described the tragic death of a 12year-old teacup Yorkie at a cagefree boarding facility. As a fellow
dog lover, I feel deeply for the owner’s loss and agree that dogs are not
property but members of the family.
But I disagree that the incident
was an attack, as the article described. My understanding of
“cage-free” boarding is that dogs of
similar size and compatible temperaments are grouped together. A
dog that little should never have
been allowed anywhere near the Labrador-mix puppy that picked up the Yorkie with its mouth or any
larger, young dog. The 4.5-pound Yorkie probably
In her Nov. 19 op-ed, “How should they be
punished?,” Ruth Marcus commented that the alleged sexual battery by Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) of
Leeann Tweeden took place in an “atmosphere” that
was “sexualized.” Over the past half-century, that
atmosphere has been extended beyond the entertainment and advertising industries and has entered
just about every area of American life. It is known
generally as the Sexual Revolution.
I am surprised that, for all the exhaustive coverage
The Post has given the issue of sexual battery and
harassment recently, there has been no mention of
the father and mother of that revolution and the
atmosphere created by it: the late Hugh Hefner and
the late Helen Gurley Brown, who were lionized upon
their deaths for their “contributions” in this area. We
should, after all, give credit where credit is due.
Noel James Augustyn, Chevy Chase
The Nov. 19 front-page article “Defiant Alabama digs in for Moore” did not go far enough in
examining the rationale of citizens who support a
Senate candidate who is accused of sexually abusing
young girls. Those individuals who have “disdain for
outside forces” are successors to those who thought it
perfectly fine to enslave other human beings and
deny them basic civil rights and dignity, even decades
after they were freed.
So it is not surprising to me that many Alabamians
would simply look away in the face of these allegations. One wonders when the sick psyche that permitted these past and current abominations will end.
Ronald Glaser, Haymarket
The 2020 count, already at risk, needs professionals at the helm.
O
Alyssa Rosenberg was correct in her Nov. 17
Washington Forum essay, “No senator is irreplaceable,” that Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) is not irreplaceable. Initially, I believed that he should not be
replaced based only on the incidents with Leeann
Tweeden on a USO tour in 2006. But that was before
the subsequent claim that he grabbed a woman’s
buttocks after he became a senator.
I still hope there is a Senate ethics inquiry, not just
for Mr. Franken but one that also looks into the
behavior of other legislators and their staffs. I have
no doubt that some or even most of those investigating his actions have also engaged in unwanted
touches, looks and comments toward women or
jokes about their anatomy. Not that I expect any of
them to step forward with an “#IHave” confession.
That would be wishful thinking.
Perhaps some good can come of this moment.
Mr. Franken claims to be “an ally and supporter and
champion of women.” Whether he remains in the
Senate or leaves, he could retain or augment that role
— not despite his indiscretions but because of them.
He, Louis C.K. and other men who have admitted
wrongdoing could work to educate men and boys to
see and treat women and girls as equals and not
objects. Then, instead of being part of the problem,
they could become part of the solution. If this message is delivered effectively, it could be their greatest
legacy.
Kasha Helget, Alexandria
Regarding Kate Harding’s Nov. 19 Outlook
essay, “Women are better off with Franken in office”:
Isn’t this the same situation that many victims
have found themselves in: unable or unwilling to
refuse unwanted sexual advances because of fear and
vulnerability? It’s ironic that Ms. Harding finds
herself in the unenviable position of having to
tolerate offensive behavior toward women to protect
her feminist agenda. And so it goes.
Lynn Streett, Springfield
A poor choice for the Census Bureau
NE OF the most important functions the
federal government performs is the decennial census, which not only provides a
demographic snapshot of the country but
also determines how much representation each
state gets in Congress. It has been a thankfully
nonpartisan effort in past years, run by experienced
professionals who offered critics little basis on
which to accuse them of tilting the count. The Trump
administration might soon break that tradition.
The latest reason for concern came into view
Tuesday, in a Politico report revealing that President
Trump might name Thomas Brunell, a professor at
the University of Texas at Dallas, to be deputy
director of the Census Bureau. He would be a poor
choice.
Though he is a serious academic, there is nothing
in Mr. Brunell’s background suggesting he is qualified to run a large government bureaucracy in
general or the Census Bureau in particular. Previous
Census Bureau leaders generally served extensively
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
AKE NO mistake about the meaning of the
Trump administration’s decision Monday
to expel nearly 60,000 Haitians who have
lived legally in the United States since a
massive earthquake devastated their homeland in
2010: The world’s richest and most powerful country
is intentionally giving the Western Hemisphere’s
poorest and most vulnerable nation a gratuitous kick
in the rear end.
It is doing so despite the pleadings of the Haitian
government and the assessment of experts, including
those in the U.S. government, who portray Haiti and
its supine economy as ill-equipped to absorb the wave
of migrants that may be triggered by the administration’s move. It is doing so despite the additional
calamities nature has visited upon Haiti since the
earthquake — namely, a lethal cholera epidemic and,
last year, a direct hit from a ferocious hurricane. It is
doing so despite the fact that most of the Haitians are
gainfully employed. And those facing removal have
nearly 30,000 U.S.-born children — American citizens who will be separated either from their family or
. WEDNESDAY,
appeared to be a stuffed toy to the 18-pound puppy.
The puppy probably was playing, but any dog as
small as the Yorkie runs the risk of
being injured when interacting
with larger dogs, even if it is just by
being stepped on.
I rescue Akitas, and I would not
want any of my large dogs, even the
mildest of them, running loose with
small dogs who could incite my
dogs’ prey drive with high barks
and quick movements.
Boarding can be a stressful situation for many dogs, and that stress
may make them prone to actions that they would not
take in their usual environment.
The 4.5-pound Yorkie
probably appeared to
be a stuffed toy to the
18-pound puppy.
Jodi Marcus, Woodbridge
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Ms. Cosgrove’s cause
The Nov. 17 Reliable Source article “Miranda
Cosgrove for marine mammals” highlighted the
actress for lobbying to protect marine mammals
from seismic surveys (essentially at-sea explosions
by the oil and gas industry to find oil and gas
deposits).
But the article didn’t discuss the reason she was
lobbying: a bill (H.R. 4239) that could be disastrous
for marine mammal protection. The provisions of the
bill would remove the legal restrictions on limiting
“takes” (including harassment and injury) of marine
mammals (whales, dolphins, seals, manatees, sea
otters and polar bears) to just small geographic areas
and small numbers, they would make it harder for
government agencies to properly review the impacts
of activities, and they would make it much harder for
agencies to require mitigation measures to protect
marine mammals from harm.
These provisions, tucked into an energy bill, could
be disastrous for U.S. populations of marine mammals, especially the critically endangered North
Atlantic right whale and the recently discovered Gulf
of Mexico Bryde’s whale (sometimes referred to as
the Great American whale or Gulf whale). It would be
good to see this environmentally devastating bill
seriously discussed elsewhere in The Post.
E.C.M. Parsons, Fairfax
How to help the Rohingya
Regarding the Nov. 18 editorial “Welcome words on
the Rohingya”:
I agree with all the international human rights
organizations that believe Aung San Suu Kyi’s government is not capable of, nor will it be permitted by the
Burmese military to carry out, an independent inquiry into the atrocities committed by Burma’s security
forces. The Rakhine state’s former military commander is probably about to be made a scapegoat, and
the killings and persecution of the defenseless Rohingya people will likely be said to be the act of a
“rogue” officer.
It is clear that the centuries-old deep-seated prejudices of the Buddhist people in Burma have come to
the fore. The saddest part is that Aung San Suu Kyi,
with her silence, is complicit with the military in
promoting and encouraging the rogue elements of
the Buddhist clergy to join extremist nationalists in
the political arena with the long-desired aim of
making Burma a Buddhist state.
Our congressional leaders must impose targeted
sanctions on the senior military leaders of Burma and
work with like-minded governments around the
world to impose an international arms embargo on
the country. The government of Bangladesh needs
strong financial support to look after the almost
1 million Rohingya refugees who will not be going
home anytime soon.
Bilal M. Raschid, Reston
The writer is past president of the Burmese Muslim
Association and the Committee
for the Restoration of Democracy in Burma.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
KATHLEEN PARKER
DAVID IGNATIUS
Trump built a wall.
Her name is Sarah.
Tillerson is
still standing
W
does not matter if there are others he did.
There are plenty of people the Zodiac Killer
did not murder.
Refocusing attention on what Franken
did right just distracts from what he did
wrong. It also assumes a harasser abusing
everyone he comes into contact with is the
norm. That paints an inaccurate picture of
workplace harassment, and it lowers the
bar by suggesting that a bad man isn’t so
bad after all if he’s bad only to some
people.
“Sincere appreciation”? “Gratitude”?
The letter-writers are thanking Franken
for not groping them, instead of insisting
that women should be able to take a
grope-free atmosphere for granted.
The problem is, men who do the right
thing sometimes can do the very, very
wrong thing at other times. That’s why in
the face of assault allegations it’s important to remember it’s not about the man —
who the world thinks he is or who he has
been. It’s about his victim and what he did
to her. The Franken support letter reminds
us of a matching reality: It’s not about who
didn’t get hurt. It’s about who did.
funny thing happened to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
on the way to the exit door:
He didn’t leave. He may be a
dead man walking, as many Washington analysts assume. Yet he’s still pursuing the same list of quiet but mostly
correct diplomatic goals as when he
took the job 10 months ago.
Tillerson has had a catastrophically
bad encounter with official Washington. The White House disdains him;
the State Department resents him; the
press corps mostly scorns him. Tillerson presses on as if he doesn’t care.
Many officials claim they don’t give a
damn about “inside the Beltway”
opinion; Tillerson seems to mean it.
The latest instance of Tillerson
clashing with his subordinates, according to Reuters, was a dissent
memo from about a dozen Foreign
Service officers accusing him of giving
Iraq, Burma and Afghanistan a pass
on a federal law opposing the use of
child soldiers. That’s just one example
of internal criticism from the unhappiest State Department I’ve seen in
more than 30 years of covering Foggy
Bottom.
Tillerson often seems out of sync
with President Trump on major issues, including North Korea, Iran,
Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Lebanon.
And White House insiders have been
predicting for months that this marriage can’t last. Yet it not only continues, but on many areas of supposed
disagreement, Trump has ended up
adopting, more or less, the diplomatic
course that Tillerson recommended.
Tillerson has one secret survival
weapon: He’s running a three-legged
race, figuratively speaking, alongside
Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis, who
respects Tillerson’s judgment and
stays aligned with him through all the
palace intrigue. Trump may not be a
soul mate of his secretary of state, but
he’s not going to pick a fight with
Mattis.
Two policy areas where Tillerson’s
approach seems to have the president’s support, despite noise to the
contrary, are dialogue with China on
the North Korea crisis and cooperation with Russia to stabilize Syria.
Administration policy could change
at any moment, given the “iron whim”
of the man in the Oval Office. But the
persistence of diplomacy is one of the
little-noted facets of this most undiplomatic president’s first year.
U.S. engagement with China was
the centerpiece of Trump’s Asia trip
this month. But observers overlooked
one of Tillerson’s signature initiatives:
During the Beijing visit, the United
States continued a high-level, secret
dialogue with China about how to
secure North Korea’s nuclear weapons if the regime implodes.
Tillerson lobbies China to encourage talks with the Kim Jong Un regime, even as the administration
keeps escalating pressure. Two more
turns of the screw came this week: On
Monday, Pyongyang was returned to
the list of state sponsors of terrorism;
on Tuesday, the United States applied
new sanctions to Chinese and North
Korean companies. But Tillerson cautioned that even as the United States
seeks more pressure points, there’s no
“silver bullet.”
Asked how the Chinese are helping,
a U.S. official noted last weekend’s
visit to Pyongyang by a high-level
Chinese emissary. The message was
that the administration is still pursuing the Sino-American diplomatic
track, along with sanctions and military options.
Trump and Tillerson also share the
unpopular but probably inescapable
view that the United States must work
with Russia to stabilize Syria. Russia’s
centrality in the miserable Syrian war
was dramatized anew by President
Vladimir Putin’s meeting Monday
with President Bashar al-Assad, who
thanked the Russian leader for “saving our country.” Putin will enhance
his leverage as regional broker when
he meets Wednesday with Turkish
President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani.
Putin has emerged as a dominant
force in Syria, and he wants to play the
peacemaker there now, but he doesn’t
hold all the cards. U.S. allies control
big swaths of Syrian territory, and
they’re the missing pieces of Putin’s
peace process. Tillerson, working
with America’s partners, has pushed
for a resumption of U.N.-organized
peace talks in Geneva. A meeting
there is now scheduled for Nov. 28,
followed by a gathering in Sochi, Russia, on Dec. 2. These talks aren’t a
cure-all; but they can help reduce
Syria’s violence and begin a gradual
political transition.
Trump made the Russia connection
personal with an hour-long phone call
Tuesday with Putin, discussing Syria,
Ukraine and North Korea. Trump may
get hammered for it, but the conversation was sensible, and it capitalized on
Tillerson’s patient spadework.
Tillerson is famously a former Boy
Scout. He talked in 2014 about the
character-building value of suffering
in silence, during a “frog-strangler”
downpour as a 12-year-old Scout.
Trump has tested Tillerson’s determination and dignity, but this Thanksgiving, the secretary of state is still at
the table.
— Molly Roberts
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
hen White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
asked the press corps Monday
to preface their daily briefing
questions with a statement of thankfulness, reporters obliged.
Or, should we say, obeyed.
For this, no doubt, Sanders was grateful.
Yet again, she controlled the crowd,
though this time by candy-coating her
usual condescension with faux fellowship.
I’m thankful I wasn’t in the room.
My first impulse when someone asks
me to share is to not-share. This isn’t
because I’m not a sharing person — you
can have my cake and eat it, too — but
because sharing, like charity, should be
voluntary. For a press secretary to require
professional journalists to essentially beg
for their supper, surrendering their adversarial posture like a dog commanded to
Drop The Bone, is an infantilizing tactic.
The effect is to neutralize the opposition.
Yes, I said opposition. The press, by
definition, is oppositional. As Mr. Dooley,
the turn-of-the-century fictional bartender created by columnist Finley Peter
Dunne, is often paraphrased: “The newspaper’s job is to comfort the afflicted and
afflict the comfortable.”
Yet, from the interplay between the
media and the Trump administration, one
would think reporters were supposed to
be taking dictation. Seen and not heard.
Sanders, whose persistently arched brows
convey an air of constant disapproval,
routinely brushes reporters’ questions
aside. During any given news briefing, one
is likely to hear words to these effects:
“I think he’s addressed that pretty thoroughly, yesterday,” she’ll say. Or “We don’t
have any announcements on that.” Or my
personal favorite, which came in response
to a query about White House Chief of
Staff John F. Kelly’s controversial remarks
about Florida Democratic Rep. Frederica
S. Wilson, “If you want to get into a debate
with a four-star Marine general, I think
that’s something highly inappropriate.”
One peers into Sanders’s fantasy movie,
where the reporter, abashed, shrinks into
the folds of his trench coat, muttering,
“What an impudent, incompetent fool I
am!”
If Sanders isn’t evading, she’s scolding.
Like a parent weary of her 3-year-old’s
constant “why?,” her tone and expression
telegraph: “Because I say so, case closed.”
Sanders’s sudden shift from press secretary to minister’s daughter a few days
before Thanksgiving coincides with her
apparent image evolution from a woman
unconcerned with vanity to a more polished version. One can almost hear the
hive of consultants discussing how to
imperceptibly adapt this no-frills yeoman
to the shallower requirements of a visual
medium.
If one were Sanders’s employer, meanwhile, one surely would be pleased. She’s
everything a terrible person — or, say, an
unpopular president — could hope for in a
public relations artist. She says nothing;
gives away nothing; looks fierce and dutifully repeats falsehoods as required. Her
resistance to flinching or blinking is stateof-the-art.
Yet, even as Sanders declines to enlighten the press corps, she manages to inspire
admiration for her toughness and effectiveness — from a certain perspective. To
President Trump’s base, she’s the a la
mode on a slice of apple pie, the pom-pom
and confetti at a freedom rally, or, perhaps, the elfin princess who can read and
direct a person’s thoughts by hypnotizing
them with her magic pearls. Her daily
humiliation of the press, making them
seem like churlish children, is a booster
shot of “fake news” animus that also
apparently inoculates against viral truths.
To the media, she is the wall Trump
promised to erect and, increasingly, it
seems, we are the swamp he seeks to
drain. Out with the media, out with free
speech, out with facts! For these purposes,
Sanders is perfectly cast. Where there is
the prolonged car alarm of “fake news,”
there is bound to be a fake news officer.
Such is not always the case. In fact, the
most successful press secretaries were
journalists first.
Jay Carney, formerly of Time magazine,
comes to mind, as does Tony Snow, previously of Fox News. Both men were wellknown, respected and liked by their media peers before crossing over to the Dark
Side. They also understood what reporters needed and tried to provide it. When
they couldn’t, they were at least selfeffacing and seemed sincere in regretting
limitations imposed by the job. Most
important, they fully understood and appreciated the sanctity of the First Amendment, without which all freedoms fail.
To this testament, a note of personal
gratitude. Today, not just on our national
feast day, I’m thankful for the freedom to
speak without (undue) fear of retribution.
Let’s not let the turkeys whittle it away.
kathleenparker@washpost.com
DANA MILBANK
Thank you, George W. Bush
and Sally Yates
“S
o this is how it’s going to work
today,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders informed the press corps
Monday. She told reporters that “if you
want to ask a question,” you should “start
off with what you’re thankful for.”
Like good little girls and boys, several
obliged. The reporters were grateful for
their children, their spouses, their health
and the privilege of getting to ask questions at the White House. Then there was
John Gizzi of Newsmax, thankful to his
wife “for saying yes on the fourth request.
My question is about Zimbabwe . . . ”
I prefer to share my thoughts of gratitude with my family at the Thanksgiving
table, rather than when commanded to by
a Trump mouthpiece. But maybe Sanders
was onto something with her infantilizing
of the press corps. Maybe in this week of
Thanksgiving, we all should speak about
what we are grateful for in public life. I’ll
start.
Sarah, I am thankful for the checks and
balances the Founders put in place, for
they are what stand between us and despotism when a demagogic president’s instincts would take us there. And I am
profoundly grateful to the many men and
women who, often at great personal cost
and risk, have stood up to the authoritarian in the White House. President Trump
has done much damage, particularly to our
international standing and our civil culture, but it would be so much worse without these profiles in courage.
I’m thankful for James B. Comey, who
was fired because he refused to be bullied
by Trump into curtailing the FBI’s investigation into Russian interference in the
2016 election.
I’m thankful for Rod J. Rosenstein, the
deputy attorney general, who after an initial stumble redeemed himself by naming a
special counsel to carry on the Russia probe.
I’m thankful for Robert S. Mueller III,
like Comey a veteran of both Republican
and Democratic administrations, who is
pursuing the probe without yielding to
Trump’s trash talk.
I’m thankful for Angela Merkel, Emmanuel Macron, Justin Trudeau and others who are trying to maintain international order and to fill the void in world
leadership left by Trump’s retreat.
I’m thankful for Sally Yates, who forced
Trump to fire her as acting attorney general rather than enforce his unconstitutional
ban on travelers from Muslim-majority
nations.
I’m thankful for Judge James L. Robart,
a George W. Bush appointee, who blocked
the travel ban and endured taunts from
Trump of being a “so-called judge” who
should be blamed if violence occurred.
I’m thankful that the U.S. Court of Ap-
peals for the 9th Circuit upheld Robart’s
ruling.
I’m thankful for Sens. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.)
and Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), whose outspoken criticism of Trump derailed their political careers, and to Sen. John McCain
(R-Ariz.), fighting Trump’s “half-baked,
spurious nationalism” even as he fights
brain cancer, and to GOP Sens. Susan
Collins (Maine), Lisa Murkowski (Alaska),
Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.) and Ben Sasse
(Neb.) for resisting Trump’s excesses.
I’m thankful to Republican Govs. John
Kasich (Ohio), Brian Sandoval (Nev.), Charlie Baker (Mass.) and others who fought
Trump-backed efforts to repeal Obamacare without an adequate replacement.
I’m thankful to Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis for maintaining some international
stability while Trump spreads chaos, and
to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson for
reportedly calling Trump a “moron” and
national security adviser H.R. McMaster
for reportedly calling Trump an “idiot”
with the intelligence of a “kindergartner.”
I’m thankful for the life of Heather
Heyer, killed in Charlottesville as she protested white supremacists. And I’m thankful for Veterans Affairs Secretary David
Shulkin, who denounced the neo-Nazis
forcefully when Trump and others in the
administration wouldn’t.
I’m thankful for George W. Bush, who
spoke out against the “nativism,” “casual
cruelty,” “bigotry” and “conspiracy theories and outright fabrication” that have
risen with Trump.
I’m thankful for my colleagues Michael
Gerson, Jennifer Rubin, George F. Will and
Charles Krauthammer and for many other
conservative intellectuals who routinely
denounce Trump’s betrayal of conservatism and decency.
I’m thankful for my many colleagues in
the Post newsroom and elsewhere (even at
the failing New York Times) who have
exposed the administration’s abuses, and
for the fearless editors and owners who let
them do that work.
I’m thankful for the many civil servants
in the federal government who refuse to
bend the facts to suit this administration’s
whims, and for the whistleblowers and, yes,
the “leakers” who reveal Trump’s abuses.
I’m thankful to the voters of Virginia
and elsewhere, who gave us a first sign that
Trump’s scourge of nationalism and racebaiting can be repelled.
And I’m profoundly thankful that Trump
and so many of his appointees have turned
out to be incompetent, unable to implement some of his most dangerous ideas.
In short, Sarah, I am thankful that a
combination of brave people, brilliant
Framers and dumb luck have prevented
your boss from doing much worse.
Twitter: @Milbank
A
ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG
President Trump speaks before pardoning Drumstick the turkey in the
Rose Garden of the White House on Tuesday.
Packing the courts
like a turducken
BY
R ONALD A . K LAIN
C
onservatives have a new courtpacking plan, and in the spirit
of the holiday, it’s a turducken
of a scheme: a regulatory rollback hidden inside a civil rights reversal stuffed into a Trumpification of the
courts. If conservatives get their way,
President Trump will add twice as
many lifetime members to the federal
judiciary in the next 12 months (650)
as Barack Obama named in eight
years (325). American law will never
be the same.
The “outer turkey” in the plan is the
ongoing Trumpification of the courts.
In the final two years of Obama’s
presidency, Senate Republicans engaged in tenacious obstruction to
leave as many judicial vacancies unfilled as possible. The Garlandto-Gorsuch Supreme Court switch is
the most visible example of this tactic
but far from the only one: Due to GOP
obstruction, “the number of [judicial]
vacancies . . . on the table when
[Trump] was sworn in was unprecedented,” White House Counsel Donald McGahn recently boasted to the
conservative Federalist Society.
Trump is wasting no time in filling
the 103 judicial vacancies he inherited. In the first nine months of Obama’s
tenure, he nominated 20 judges to the
federal trial and appellate courts; in
Trump’s first nine months, he named
58. Senate Republicans are racing
these nominees through confirmation; last week, breaking a 100-yearold tradition, they eliminated the
“blue slip” rule that allowed homestate senators to object to particularly
problematic nominees. The rush to
Trumpify the judiciary includes nominees rated unqualified by the American Bar Association, nominees with
outrageously conservative views and
nominees significantly younger (and,
therefore, likely to serve longer) than
those of previous presidents. As a
result, by sometime next year, 1 in
8 cases filed in federal court will be
heard by a judge picked by Trump.
Many of these judges will likely still be
serving in 2050.
But even this plan — to fill approximately 150 judicial vacancies before
the 2018 elections — is not enough for
conservatives.
Enter the next element of the courtpacking turducken: a new plan written by the crafty co-founder of the
Federalist Society, Steven Calabresi.
In a paper that deserves credit for its
transparency (it features a section titled “Undoing President Barack
Obama’s Judicial Legacy”), Calabresi
proposes to pack the federal courts
with a “minimum” of 260 — and possibly as many as 447 — newly created
judicial positions. Under this plan, the
228-year-old federal judiciary would
increase — in a single year — by 30 to
50 percent.
Never mind that Republicans saw
no urgency in filling judicial vacancies
while Obama was president. Never
mind that they ignored pleas from
conservative Chief Justice John G.
Roberts Jr. to fill positions in courts
facing “judicial emergencies.” Now,
conservatives want a 30 to 50 percent
increase in the number of federal
judgeships. And they have a clear idea
of who should fill this massive number of new posts: “President Trump
and the Republican Senate will need
to fill all of these new judgeships in
2018, before the next session of Congress.”
Almost overnight, the judicial
branch would come to consist of almost equal parts judges picked by
nine presidents combined — Johnson,
Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush 41,
Clinton, Bush 43 and Obama — and
judges picked by one: Donald J.
Trump. The effect on our civil rights
and liberties would be astounding.
And a continuation of the pattern of
Trump’s nominees to date — more
white and more male than any president’s in nearly 30 years — would roll
back decades of progress in judicial
diversity.
But even that isn’t enough for the
Turducken Court Packers. They have
jammed one more “treat” inside this
turkey.
Calabresi has also proposed that
Congress abolish 158 administrative
law judgeships in federal regulatory
agencies, such as the Environmental
Protection Agency, Food and Drug
Administration, Federal Communications Commission, and Securities and
Exchange Commission, and replace
these impartial fact-finders with a
new corps of 158 Trump-selected judges who — unlike current administrative law judges — would serve for life.
These new Trump administrative
law judges would have vast power
over environmental, health and safety, fair competition, communications,
labor, financial and consumer regulation for decades. Unlike the existing
administrative law judges, selected as
nonpartisan members of the civil
service, Calabresi’s replacement corps
would all be picked in a single year, by
a single man: Donald J. Trump.
And if this breathtaking transformation of our federal judicial system
isn’t jarring enough, Calabresi has one
final treat: a proposal that Congress
do all of this in the tax-cut bill that
Congress is trying to pass before it
leaves for the holidays.
Progressives need to mount a more
cohesive and effective plan to slow
down the Trump train of judicial
transformation. Otherwise, we’ll have
a court-packing turducken for
Thanksgiving, and a revolutionary
rollback in rights and regulation for
Christmas.
The writer, a Post contributing columnist,
served as a senior White House aide to
Presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton
and was a senior adviser to Hillary
Clinton’s 2016 campaign.
POSTPARTISAN
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan
A faulty defense of Franken
Well, he didn’t do anything to me.
That, in so many words, is what three
dozen women who worked on “Saturday
Night Live” said in a letter supporting
Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) on Tuesday.
“What Al did was stupid and foolish, and
we think it was appropriate for him to
apologize to Ms. Tweeden, and to the
public,” the women wrote. And later, “We
would like to acknowledge that not one of
us ever experienced any inappropriate behavior; and mention our sincere appreciation that he treated each of us with the
utmost respect and regard.”
Good, I guess? Franken has been accused of unwanted sexual contact by two
women, including radio host Leeann
Tweeden, but apparently he refrained from
groping at least 36. Though this character
testimony may at first seem relevant to any
accounting of Franken’s misdeeds, look
closer and it’s not the least bit helpful.
It’s unclear what the letter seeks to
prove. (The writers, at least, acknowledge
that Franken mistreated Tweeden.) The
number of women a man didn’t assault
A20
EZ
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EZ
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
MARYLAND
OBITUARIES
An actress in “The Pajama
Game,” an Arena musical
about labor rights, has
deep roots in the cause. B3
Farm owners shut down a
conference after learning of
white nationalist Richard
Spencer’s involvement. B5
Oscar-winning composer
Luis Bacalov scored dozens
of Italian crime movies
and spaghetti westerns. B6
Virginia House tosses gendered titles
Lawmakers to be called
‘delegate’ as transgender
female Roem is seated
BY
A NTONIO O LIVO
With Virginia’s first openly
transgender elected official preparing to take her seat in the
House of Delegates, the Republican leader of that chamber says it
B
SU
is time to end a tradition of addressing lawmakers by formal
male and female pronouns.
Instead of the “gentleman” or
“gentlewoman” from a given jurisdiction, lawmakers will all be referred to as “delegate” if Republicans maintain control of the
chamber, House Majority Leader
M. Kirkland Cox (R-Colonial
Heights) said through a spokesman Tuesday.
Conservative lawmakers hailed
the change as a way to avoid what
they said could be a potentially
Chancellor
scrutinized
over debt
at old job
awkward situation. But one of the
longest-serving House Democrats
called the decision “shameful”
and said lawmakers “ought to be
big enough to get over these hangups we have.”
Cox’s office said he had been
considering the change since
ROEM CONTINUED ON B6
MILLIONS MORE CUT
IN CALIF. DISTRICT
Danica Roem, left, and Demi
Lovato at the American Music
Awards. Lovato said she likes
Roem’s respect-for-all message.
DANNY MOLOSHOK/REUTERS
Wilson minimized deficit
when hired for D.C.
BY
V ALERIE S TRAUSS
Antwan Wilson came to Washington nine months ago to become chancellor of the city’s
school system, a surprise choice
by Mayor Muriel E. Bowser, who
said she picked the Oakland,
Calif., public schools chief because he was a “proven manager”
who brought fiscal stability to
that district.
But just a few months after
Wilson left Oakland, the perennially troubled district is in such
severe financial straits that the
Board of Education on Nov. 8
ordered $15.1 million in immediate budget cuts — on top of
millions of dollars in reductions
made earlier in the year.
Mental-health services, computer labs, librarians and supplies are now being pared or
eliminated at some campuses,
and the fiscal pain is expected to
continue into the 2018-2019
school year, with additional cuts
ordered by the school board. A
recent analysis of the district’s
finances by state auditors concluded that “the district has lost
control of its spending.”
Wilson, who became superintendent of the 37,000-student
Oakland district in 2014 after
working as a teacher and principal in other states, through a
SCHOOLS CONTINUED ON B4
PHOTOS BY MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Finding sanctuary in the church
Since last year’s election, houses of worship have seen an influx of ‘seekers’ of solace and solidarity
BY
J ULIE Z AUZMER
A
year ago, in the days after the
shock of learning that Donald Trump would be the next
president, Charleen Ward
was afraid.
And come Sunday, she was in church.
“I was really scared. I felt that things
were going to be drastically changed for
me as an African American woman, as a
gay woman,” she said. “I needed to come
after the election. I knew there would be
many who felt the way I did. I needed to
have that family support of the church.”
The pews were packed in churches
across the country on the Sunday after the
election, filled with Trump supporters
giving thanks for the turning of a page in
America, with stunned liberals seeking
TOP: The Rev. Richard Weinberg shuts the doors of the
parish hall at St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church in the
District. ABOVE: Pamela Perry, left, and Patrice
Eubanks talk during a St. Margaret’s choir rehearsal.
New history lessons are
adding a dose of reality
Columbus
discovered
America. Pilgrims
were loyal friends
to Native
Americans. The
Courtland relationship
Milloy
between John
Smith and
Pocahontas was a love story with
a happy ending.
Like many of us, 16-year-old
Tori Blakeney accepted those
accounts as truths.
At the Capital City Public
Charter High School in the
District, where he is an 11thgrader, such “truths” have given
way to a new reality. Students
are getting to see history from
the perspective of people and
groups who are often left out of
the traditional American
narrative — African Americans,
Hispanics, Asians and women,
among others.
In addition to standard-issue
textbooks, teachers draw on
resources provided by the
progressive Zinn Education
Project (ZEP), named for the
MILLOY CONTINUED ON B5
solace, and with many who simply felt
compelled to be together in community in
an emotional moment.
Surely, the election didn’t mark any
sort of spiritual awakening in America.
There’s been no big turn in the tide of an
increasingly secular younger generation.
But there was a slight shift: In churches
across America, some of the people who
walked through the doors for the first
time in many years on that Sunday after
Election Day stuck around. In quiet ways
in the past year, the church has changed
them. And they have changed the church.
That’s apparent at St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church in the District’s Dupont
Circle area, where Ward found community on that Sunday after the election. The
church has so many new members —
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
At 26, Nurimaro Park was living paycheck to paycheck, helping
support his undocumented parents on a tutor’s salary. So when
his work permit expired in May,
he waited to renew it because the
rules allowed for that. He needed
time to save up the $495 fee.
Now, he and thousands of oth-
BY
P ETER J AMISON
tion, a policy laid out on the U.S.
Citizenship and Immigration Services website.
“Money is a huge issue; $495 is
hard to save up,” said Park, who
lives with his parents in Fairfax
County. “You have a year of grace
period . . . and I was taking advantage of that.”
Then, on Sept. 5, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that
the program would end in six
months. Although immigrants
whose permits are set to expire
before March 5 were given the
chance to renew them one last
time, anyone whose permit had
already expired could not.
DACA CONTINUED ON B3
HOSPITAL CONTINUED ON B5
CHURCH CONTINUED ON B2
ers who let their Deferred Action
for Childhood Arrivals permits
expire are without legal status in
the United States. He and another
young immigrant in Northern
Virginia are suing the Trump administration in federal court in
Alexandria, saying their due process rights have been violated.
“You can’t change the rules on
someone without giving them a
heads-up first,” said Simon
Sandoval-Moshenberg, an attorney for the Legal Aid Justice Center representing the two.
Until September, DACA recipients, known as “dreamers,” could
file a renewal of their two-year
permits up to a year after expira-
Physician had accused
firm of mismanaging the
medical facility
The chief medical officer at the
District’s public hospital, who
this month accused the contractor running the facility of mismanagement and illegal overbilling of federal insurance programs, has been fired, his attorneys said Tuesday.
Julian Craig, the top doctor at
United Medical Center in Southeast Washington and a past president of the Medical Society of
D.C., received a letter during the
weekend from hospital board
Chairwoman LaRuby May saying
that his contract won’t be renewed. As a result, his employment will end Dec. 18.
D.C. Council members, some of
whom cited Craig’s testimony
against Veritas of Washington as a
key factor in their Nov. 7 vote not
to extend its contract, said they
were troubled by the hospital
board’s action.
“This looks like a classic retaliation to me,” said council member
Mary M. Cheh (D-Ward 3), one of
seven council members who voted
to sever the city’s relationship
with Veritas.
“You shouldn’t be fired for being a whistleblower,” said council
member Elissa Silverman (I-At
Large). “Dr. Craig provided valuable testimony about the operations at UMC.”
Craig’s attorney, Debra S. Katz,
said his firing is “absolutely chilling for whistleblowers” and that
‘Dreamers’ file suit in Va. over DACA
Two immigrants’ case is
the first to focus on the
issue of expired permits
Top doctor
is fired
from D.C.
hospital
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
Churches are seeing new faces and new energy
CHURCH FROM B1
many of whom voice their commitment to progressive priorities
loud and clear, but don’t have
quite as firm a grasp on church
tradition — that the clergy just
launched a series to teach them,
over drinks, about the theology
behind their social justice
causes.
“It comes out of the requests
from our 20- and 30-somethings,
who are kind of new to church.
They’re not new to advocacy.
They’re not new to activism,” said
the Rev. Richard Weinberg.
“They have commitments. But
they don’t have the theological
language and background.”
Average Sunday attendance
jumped from 98 in the month
leading up to Trump’s inauguration to 122 in the following
month, Weinberg said. “I would
say that there is more of an
energy and a commitment to the
resistance movement. Young
folks and not-young folks alike
are coming.”
Seeking community
It’s a pattern echoed across the
city and across the country, in
congregations of many stripes. In
many Jewish and Muslim congregations, some young people
who didn’t think much about
their identities before drew closer to their communities in the
face of rising anti-Semitism and
Islamophobia. At All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church in the
District, the Rev. Robert Hardies
said that Sunday attendance is 33
percent higher this fall than it
was before last year’s election.
The Rev. Susan FrederickGray, president of the Unitarian
Universalist Association, said
that’s the case at most congregations across the country in the
liberal Unitarian Universalist
church. Her own church in Phoenix saw a 20 percent increase in
Sunday attendance after the election.
“A lot of people who are members but hadn’t been attending
regularly or hadn’t attended in a
while are all coming back to the
community,” she said.
She thinks the stress of politics
is driving women and immigrants in particular to church.
“When people are afraid, when
they’re facing trauma, when
they’re in the midst of tremendous challenge and difficulty,
they seek out communities that
will support them,” FrederickGray said. “They seek out religious community. And I believe
people are experiencing trauma
in this political environment.”
When The Washington Post
asked women who participated
in the January Women’s March to
write in about what actions
they’ve taken since Trump’s inauguration, at least a dozen mentioned getting more involved in a
church.
“At this time in our lives, this
whole political climate is so distressing, a bit frightening, and so
un-Christian to me that it is
heartbreaking. So many people
profess to believe in God but
speak and act in ways that Jesus
would never condone,” wrote
Tami Garrow, 57, of Yuma, Ariz. “I
just don’t get it. At all. . . . So I go
PHOTOS BY MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
to church, write my elected officials, send money, pray, and try to
figure out how to be relevant in a
world that suddenly feels a bit
foreign to me.”
Many mainline Protestant
churches, as well as mosques and
synagogues, have redoubled
their social action activities, attracting new members who want
a place to get involved. Church
committees across the country
have been busy hosting rallies
about climate change and racism, writing and calling legislators about health care and taxes,
and offering direct aid to refugees and immigrants.
“I hear that constantly from
pastors, that they’ve seen an
“I hear that constantly
from pastors, that
they’ve seen an
uptick in attendance
post-election.”
The Rev. Jennifer Butler, of the group
Faith in Public Life
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THE DAILY QUIZ
(Hint: Sign in to your account for the answer.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click on
“Quizzes” to enter the correct response.
Senate bill
would slash
tuition aid
program
uptick in attendance postelection,” said the Rev. Jennifer
Butler, who chaired a White
House faith council during the
Obama administration and now
leads the liberal organization
Faith in Public Life.
“I think what’s helping is that
there’s also a larger public witness of, I guess you would call it,
‘progressive religion’ — which I
think has given people some
comfort and some feeling of confidence in the church, that the
church is going to practice what
it preaches,” Butler said.
Affirming values and beliefs
At St. Margaret’s, members
have joined some of the protest
marches and have reached out to
Muslim and Jewish leaders to
show solidarity. But often the
volunteer opportunities are less
obviously political, like serving
meals to hungry neighbors.
Jade Williams, 27, has started
going to St. Margaret’s on both
Thursdays and Sundays to serve
meals and chat with the homeless guests. She came to the
church recently, soon after she
moved from the Bahamas to the
District to work for the Bahamian Embassy here and spotted a
sign on the church’s door. It
matches many of the yard signs
that sprang up in the District
after the election: “Black Lives
Matter . . . Love is Love, Science
is Real.” But it ends with an
additional line: “God’s Grace is
Everything.”
“That’s what drew me there
and really keeps me there,” she
said about the sign.
Recently, Williams had a harrowing experience that left her
grateful for the church. She, her
husband and relatives went to
the Jefferson Memorial to take
family photos and were shocked
when a group of about 20 protesters, in town for a white nationalist demonstration, started
taunting the family.
“Growing up, I went to a
Catholic school. One of the songs
we used to sing when we went to
Mass in the morning, that’s
what’s been on my mind these
last few weeks — ‘They’ll Know
We Are Christians by Our Love,’ ”
she said.
“I think that relationship with
the church home is incredibly
significant and important to me,
after that occurred,” Williams
said. “It made me appreciate the
work that St. Margaret’s is doing,
its message. Every single message every Sunday morning has a
social justice theme.”
On a recent Sunday, as the first
anniversary of the election approached, Weinberg was the one
delivering that message. He
spoke of finding a message of
liberation in that week’s Bible
passage, from the Book of Revelation.
“That indeed is a good-news
message, but . . . consider how
each of us is called to the service
of liberating work and faithful
resistance in the face of injustice,” he preached, naming rallies
and marches as part of that work.
“For those who have fled their
homes and found little welcome
in the xenophobic West, liberation is coming. . . . For those who
work so many damn jobs and still
can’t make ends meet, liberation
is coming. . . . For our suffering
planet, liberation is coming.”
Then the Rev. Kym Lucas explained Communion and the collection — taking care to demystify the rituals for those who are
new to church services — and a
member of the congregation
made an announcement.
A year ago, that church member was brand-new herself. “I
was so completely devastated by
the election,” said the 40-year-old
mother, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because she
works for the federal government and doesn’t want her name
published. “I wanted to come to a
place where I could start to put
together what had happened in a
way that wasn’t just the political
horse race but was about my
values and my beliefs.”
She was raised in the Catholic
Church, and while she hadn’t
attended a church in many years,
she says her liberal political beliefs are very much rooted in her
religious faith. After Trump won,
she wanted to practice that tradition again. Now, she and her
daughter are regular churchgoers, and she says the sermons
have challenged her to think
more deeply about her charitable
donations.
Lucas describes the newcomers, like that federal employee, as “seekers.” Many of
them are looking for a community to spur them to action, but also
simply for solace.
“For a lot of people there’s
been this sense of depression and
sadness. We’ve had to remind
ourselves that there is hope,”
Lucas said.
That’s what Ward, as a lesbian
mother concerned about raising
her 8-year-old daughter in
Trump’s America, felt she needed.
“The last year has felt like a
nightmare,” she said. “The
church really became a haven.”
julie.zauzmer@washpost.com
danielle.douglas@washpost.com
2017 PostPoints Scavenger Hunt
Tour Tomb of Christ from afar
Virtually so no-holds-barred.
Enjoy a film in 3-D
And learn the church’s histoy.
Explore Tomb of Christ: The Church of the Holy Sepulchre Experience though
August 15, 2018 at National Geographic. The first entry time is scheduled for
10:12 a.m. daily with subsequent entry times occurring how often thereafter?
(Hint: See NatGeoMuseum.org for the answer.)
D ANIELLE D OUGLASG ABRIEL
A tuition aid program that has
helped thousands of D.C. residents afford college will face a
substantial cut in federal dollars if
a Senate panel gets its way.
The Senate Appropriations
Committee introduced a spending
bill Monday that would cut the
program’s funding by one-fourth.
The federal government provides $40 million to the D.C. Tuition Assistance Grant program,
which gives city students — who
don’t have access to a robust instate university system — affordable college options. The Senate
plan, which mirrors legislation
passed by the House, would whittle appropriations for the program
to $30 million, and it calls on the
District to make up the difference.
The proposed cut drew a sharp
response Tuesday night from D.C.
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser’s office.
“You can’t say [you’re] for the
middle class and then cut grants
for college tuition,” the mayor’s
spokeswoman, LaToya Foster, said
in a statement. “We will stand
shoulder to shoulder with Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton and fight to save full funding
for this program, which has given a
fair shot to thousands of young
District residents.”
Senators say the 18-year-old program is not living up to expectations, with the college graduation
rate among award recipients below the national average. About 51
percent of participants graduated
within six years, compared with 60
percent of students nationwide, according to a Senate document explaining the rationale for the plan.
“It is important for the program
to realize a return on its investment, wherein every grantee
earns a college degree,” the Senate
document said.
The committee is directing the
U.S. Government Accountability
Office to review the program to
assess trends in eligibility, enrollment, performance and outcome,
and to consider other available
resources for the program.
Since its inception, the tuition
program has awarded more than
$350 million and helped more
than 26,000 students enroll at 578
colleges. Students can receive as
much as $10,000 a year to attend
public universities outside the
city, or up to $2,500 to enroll in a
private college. The grants are
available to all District students
from families earning below
$1 million a year, but student advocates say the money makes the
biggest difference for low-income
residents.
“We really don’t have a lot of
financial aid in D.C.,” said Argelia
Rodriguez, president and chief executive of the District of Columbia
College Access Program, a college
advising group widely known as
DC-CAP. “Being able to actually
afford to go to these institutions is
an important part of what [the
tuition assistance program] is
about, and taking that away would
have a tremendous impact.”
Before the program started, few
colleges and universities sent recruiters to D.C. public schools, Rodriguez said. The tuition aid program, she said, helped colleges
recognize D.C. students probably
could afford to attend. That has
meant greater access and choice
for D.C. students.
The D.C. Office of the State Superintendent of Education, which
oversees the tuition program, says
the most recent data show that
nearly 56 percent of award recipients who entered college in 20072008 graduated within six years.
That number is higher than the
overall six-year graduation rate
for students from D.C. public high
schools, the office said.
The tuition assistance program
has faced its share of troubles in
recent years. A 2014 audit identified weak financial controls and
management problems at the city
agency that administers the program. At the time, officials in the
superintendent’s office could not
document or explain nearly
$10 million in expenses since
2004. They say the problems documented in the audit have been
addressed.
MHIC #125450 | DC #67004413 | VA #2705 108835A | WVA #036832
Three lucky PostPoints members will win
a pair of tickets to Folger Consort Presents:
Lo How a Rose E’er Blooming: Seasonal Early
Music of Germany at the Folger Shakespeare
Library. When was the Folger Consort early
music ensemble-in-residence established?
THE DISTRICT
BY
TOP: Isabelle Melese-d’Hospital, facing the camera at center, embraces Charleen Ward during a
service at St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church in the District. “I needed to come after the [2016]
election. . . . I needed to have that family support of the church,” Ward said. ABOVE: Helen
Templin, left, and other members of the choir rehearse between services on a recent Sunday.
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
At Mosaic: Two new plays
Check them out, reserve today.
Performing now: Actor Dan Hoyle
On politics and turmoil.
The Real Americans (Dan Hoyle) and Draw the Circle (Mashuq Mushtaq
Deen) are part of what special series at Mosaic Theater in Washington, DC?
(Hint: See MosaicTheater.org for the answer.)
EARN 5 POINTS AND A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES. Answer our Scavenger Hunt questions, then go to washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click “Quizzes” to enter your responses.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
This musical about labor strife features a chip o≠ the old block
THE DISTRICT
Teen charged with
shooting student, 17
D.C. police arrested a man
Tuesday and charged him with
shooting and critically wounding
a 17-year-old student walking
home from Ballou High School
this month in Southeast
Washington.
Jerail Stroud, 18, of Southeast
was charged with assault with
intent to kill.
The victim, who has not been
identified, was shot about
3:45 p.m. Nov. 9 in the 3200
block of Fourth Street SE.
— Peter Hermann
Two men assault
and rob woman
Days before Thanksgiving,
two thieves assaulted a woman
and stole her belongings in the
Petworth neighborhood, D.C.
police said.
The thieves made off with an
iPhone 6, several credit cards,
$240 in cash and a $43 bottle of
champagne. They also stole a
$3 bag of turkey stuffing.
The crime occurred just after
3 a.m. Tuesday in the 4000 block
of 14th Street NW, near Taylor
Street.
Police said that two men
approached the woman from
behind and that one of them
grabbed her. She fell to the
ground, and one of the men hit
her on the head.
The woman refused medical
treatment, according to police.
— Dana Hedgpeth
VIRGINIA
Two of three teens
have been found
Two of the three teenagers
who were reported missing from
Prince William County this
month have been found. One
remains missing, county police
said.
Ashley Sarahy Lemus, 17, was
found safe in Fairfax County on
Tuesday, Prince William police
said. They said Breonia Andreia
Thomas, also 17, was found
Monday in the District.
Still missing, police said, is
Chamareya Rontavia Wright, 18.
Police said the three were
reported as runaways on Nov. 12
when they left the Bristow area
of Prince William. On Friday,
they were listed as endangered.
The reason was not disclosed.
The FBI was brought into the
case after authorities said they
thought the three had crossed
state lines.
— Dana Hedgpeth
and Martin Weil
FBI to probe shooting
involving Park Police
The FBI said Tuesday that it is
investigating the shooting by
U.S. Park Police officers on Friday
night in Fairfax County that left a
man critically wounded.
Two Park Police officers
opened fire after pursuing a car
that they said was connected to a
hit-and-run crash in Alexandria.
No official explanation has
been given as to why the officers
fired.
In a statement, the FBI’s
Washington Field Office said it
“will ensure that the
investigation is conducted in a
fair, thorough and impartial
manner.”
— Martin Weil
I was trying to
think of an
analogy for the
role Nancy
Anderson plays in
“The Pajama
John
Game,” the
Kelly's
musical that’s at
Washington Arena Stage
through Dec. 24.
Not Nancy’s
role in the cast — she’s Gladys,
the factory boss’s secretary — but
the odd bit of family history she
brings to the part. Let’s see: It’s
sort of like if Nancy’s greatgrandfather had been an
itinerant trombone salesman
and she was in “The Music Man.”
Or her great-great-grandfather
had been a Cockney flower seller
and she was in “My Fair Lady.” Or
her great-great-great-greatgreat-great-great-(etc.)grandfather had been a knight of
the Round Table and she was in
“Camelot.”
Nancy is the greatgranddaughter of Orrice Abram
Murdock Jr.
Okay, so that may not have the
same cachet as being descended
from Sir Lancelot, but it is a
particularly fitting bit of
Washington wonk heritage.
Democrat Abe Murdock was a
three-term U.S. representative
from Utah who then served a
single term in the U.S. Senate. In
1947, President Truman
nominated Murdock to a seat on
the National Labor Relations
Board, the federal agency that
oversees workers’ rights and
polices unfair labor practices.
That’s apropos, given that
1955’s “The Pajama Game” is
about a bitter contract dispute at
the Sleep-Tite Pajama Factory.
There was partisan grumbling
about Murdock before his
confirmation hearings, with
some GOP senators questioning
his impartiality.
“Ever since [Murdock] was
MARGOT SCHULMAN/ARENA STAGE
first elected to Congress in 1932,
he has been an ardent champion
of labor,” Arthur V. Watkins, the
Utah Republican who took his
Senate seat, said in a committee
hearing.
Joseph H. Ball of Minnesota
complained that when Murdock
was a senator, he had been
unsympathetic to the TaftHartley Act, which cracked down
on some union activities.
Nevertheless, Murdock was
confirmed and served a decade
on the board.
Said Nancy: “He was known as
‘Abe the Dissenter.’ All these
labor rags from the 1940s and
1950s were talking about their
hero, Abe the Dissenter.”
Nancy grew up in a strong
union family. Her father was a
musician who “wouldn’t even
play a church without getting a
union wage,” she said. And as a
professional thespian, she’s a
member of two unions: Actors’
DACA FROM B1
The DACA program, created by
President Barack Obama in 2012,
allowed hundreds of thousands of
immigrants brought to the United
States as children to work legally
and attend college.
Although several lawsuits have
been filed challenging the termination of the program, this is the
first specifically focused on the
issue of expired permits. According to the Department of Homeland Security, 50,000 immigrants
whose DACA permits expired by
Sept. 4 did not renew before that
date. The new suit asks a judge to
allow those recipients who could
have renewed under the old system to have that chance now.
It was from a Korean advocacy
group, the National Korean
American Service & Education
Consortium (NAKASEC), that
Park learned he was once again
“just illegal.”
Park’s parents brought him to
Northern Virginia from Korea
when he was 9 years old. They
tried to get legal status but never
did, after falling prey to a greencard scam that ensnared more
than 100 Korean immigrants in
the area in the late 1990s.
He learned of his illegal status
in middle school. But the full
import of his situation didn’t sink
in until late high school, when he
realized he would not be able to
drive a car or afford college.
Park had been the model immi-
grant child, wanting to live up to
the opportunity his parents had
given him. Senior year, he said, “I
was hopeless.” He stopped trying
in school and withdrew from his
friends.
Park managed to make some
money tutoring and working at an
auto shop, paid illegally. He applied to Northern Virginia Community College and got an associate degree in computer science,
paying an international student’s
tuition. (Virginia began allowing
DACA recipients to pay in-state
tuition at state schools in 2014.)
When Obama announced the
DACA program, Park hesitated
about applying, not wanting to
put his parents at risk. But they
wanted him to. “It was the right
thing to do,” he said.
He got legitimate jobs at two
tutoring companies and began
saving in hopes of going to the
University of Virginia for a bachelor’s degree.
Unless this lawsuit succeeds or
until the administration changes
its policy, he could be deported at
any moment.
The realization brought Park
back to the despair he felt in high
school. But now, he said, he’s “a bit
more mature.” Instead of giving
up, he became politically active.
For years, he said, he was too busy
and too scared of deportation.
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Sweet charity
A week ago we raised the curtain
on this year’s Helping Hand
campaign. That’s where The
Washington Post partners with
three local nonprofits to share
their stories. Here are the
charities I’m shining a light on:
Bright Beginnings, a preschool
that helps homeless kids and
their parents; N Street Village, a
shelter and support network for
women experiencing
homelessness; and So Others
Might Eat, which offers meals
and more for poverty-stricken
Washingtonians.
To learn more about them and
make a donation, visit
posthelpinghand.com.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/john-kelly.
Day/Pick-3:
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EPISCOPAL
CHRIST CHURCH, GEORGETOWN
Corner of 31st and O Street, N.W.
(202) 333-6677
www.christchurchgeorgetown.org
THANKSGIVING DAY
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Thursday, November 23, 2017
Cash 4 Life:
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Lucky for Life:
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MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
Nurimaro Park meets with his
attorney, Simon SandovalMoshenberg, right, of the Legal
Aid Justice Center. SandovalMoshenberg is also the attorney
for the other immigrant suing.
He has begun working with
NAKASEC to advocate for immigration reform and is planning to
move to Los Angeles to take a
bigger role in the organization,
despite his fear of taking a public
10:00 a.m.
C H U R C H S E RV I C E S
PRESBYTERIAN
You’re invited!
ROMAN CATHOLIC
Reverend Monsignor Walter R. Rossi, Rector
23 November 2017
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23
Thanksgiving Day
10 a.m.
Masses 9 am & 10:30 am
Solemn Mass 12 noon
Collecting nonperishable
food for local charities.
Shrine closes at 3 pm Cafeteria & Shops closed
No Scheduled Confessions or Tours
400 Michigan Avenue Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia
202-526-8300 www.nationalshrine.com Brookland-CUA Metro
Free Parking Bookstore Gift Shop Cafeteria Guided Tours
4606 16th Street, NW
Thursday, November 23, 2017
Thanksgiving Day
Service –10:00 a.m.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
4101 NEBRASKA AVE. NW
(202) 537-0800
www.nationalpres.org
ROMAN CATHOLIC
Call
Melissa Abell 202-334-7024 / ReligionAdvertising@washpost.com
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Find out what’s happening this
.
profile as an undocumented immigrant.
“It’s like a wake-up call,” he
said. “I’m worried, but I feel like
it’s a risk I have to take.”
thanksgiving
VIRGINIA
DISTRICT
is essentially management. “But
I’m not very bright, and my
character is mainly there for a lot
of song-and-dance relief,” she
said. (It’s Gladys who delivers the
sultry “Hernando’s Hideaway.”)
Some people may dismiss
musical comedies as mere “light
entertainment,” Nancy said, but
the classic American musical is
often rooted in real history —
real messy history.
“ ‘Oklahoma!’ has the
underpinnings of a really
contentious time in American
history,” she said. Just think of
Laurey: a single girl on the plains
at the edge of the frontier.
“That’s a very serious
position,” Nancy said. “It’s why
Curly and Jud are fighting over
her. She’s a landowner, and they
want that land. Even the most
frothy musical requires very high
stakes. As an actor, you have to
play it like it’s Shakespeare.”
Shakespeare with a step-ballchange.
Suit argues ‘dreamers’ unfairly lost chance to renew legal status
LOTTER I ES
Results from Nov. 21
NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD
TOP: Nancy Anderson and Tim
Rogan in “The Pajama Game”
at Arena Stage. ABOVE:
Anderson’s great-grandfather
Abe Murdock was a Democratic
U.S. representative and senator
who also served on the National
Labor Relations Board.
Equity and SAG-AFTRA.
Nancy’s grandfather — Abe’s
son William — was a lawyer who
handled labor disputes. When
Nancy was going through some
old family papers, she found
letters from William recounting
his experiences.
“I realized that everything that
this play is about was in these
letters,” she said.
The correspondence starts in
1942 with idealistic missives
about the value of a strong
union. Two years later, William
sounded disappointed, having
encountered union leaders who
he felt were “hoodlum types”
more interested in riding their
own gravy train than helping
their members.
“The Pajama Game” is a love
story, but it’s also “very prounion,” Nancy said. “People are
fighting for a 71/2-cent raise.”
Nancy said that as the boss’s
secretary, her character, Gladys,
URCH
CH
O
L O C A L D IG ES T
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Mon.):
Lucky Numbers (Tue.):
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DC-4 (Tue.):
DC-5 (Mon.):
DC-5 (Tue.):
B3
M2
5601 Massachusetts Ave., Bethesda
Principal Celebrant & Homilist:
Archbishop Christophe Pierre, Apostolic Nuncio
Mass - 10:00 am
Musical Prelude - 9:30 am Choir, Organ &Brass
lfparish.org
Ample Parking
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
Principal in Wilson’s former district calls him ‘culpable’
SCHOOLS FROM B1
spokeswoman declined requests
for comment over the past week.
Bowser’s office did not reply to
requests for comment.
Carmelita Reyes, the principal
of Oakland International High
School, described Wilson as “culpable” in the budget debacle.
“Certainly, there has been financial dysfunction in Oakland
that predates him, and I don’t
want to let everybody else off the
hook,” said Reyes, who is co-chair
of the Principals Advisory Committee in Oakland and a member
of the District Budget Advisory
Committee.
“We do not have adequate
checks and balances in our system. We don’t have technology
tracking our spending. We don’t
have adequate human resources
tracking our spending,” Reyes
said. “And we have a school board
that ultimately had oversight of
him, approving salaries and contracts. But he bears a lot of responsibility.”
John Sasaki, communications
director for the Oakland school
district, said in an email: The
district “is learning from past
mistakes and working to reestablish fiscal stability and vitality. . . .
In fact, there have been internal
warnings about fiscal issues for
several years that were not fully
addressed. As a result, we have
spent beyond our means and depleted savings to the point where
immediate action is necessary.”
Because Wilson’s tenure in the
District is still measured in
months, no firm opinions have
formed about his leadership of
the 48,000-student district.
It was no secret that when
Wilson departed the Oakland
Unified School District 2½ years
after arriving, he left a budget
deficit of about $30 million behind. But he played it down in
public, saying it was part of the
annual budget process.
He told The Washington Post
in January 2017 that some cuts
would be necessary but noted
that Oakland’s financial trouble
was not as bad as years earlier,
when the state had to bail out the
district. In 2003, the state government lent the Oakland district
millions of dollars to cover its
deficit at the time, which was
$37 million.
In recent months, however, the
extent, causes and effects on
schools of the current deficit have
come into sharper focus as auditors and others have dug into the
ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Chancellor Antwan Wilson of the D.C. Public Schools talks to teacher Brenda Rison during a visit to Washington Metropolitan High
School in August. The extent of his former school district’s debt has been unfolding since he was hired in the District.
spending, and as the Oakland
Post and San Francisco Chronicle
have written about the issues.
This is the portrait of Wilson’s
leadership in Oakland that
emerges from sources including
the Board of Education, auditors,
newspapers, parent activists,
principals and state data:
Wilson brought in dozens of
executive staff members from
outside the Oakland district, creating new positions and departments that were not budgeted,
and paying more than was customary in the district, according
to reports finance officials gave to
the school board. In 2013, before
Wilson arrived in Oakland, four
administrators earned more than
$200,000; two years later, at least
26 did, according to data from
transparentcalifornia.com, a pay
and pension website. (He brought
at least two administrators from
Oakland to the District with him,
one now earning $221,000 annually and the other $134,000, according to D.C. data. Both salaries
appear to be comparable to others in similar positions in the
school district.)
While Wilson was superintendent in Oakland, the district
overspent its budget in some areas but spent substantially below
budgeted amounts in other categories, according to data from the
Board of Education. During the
2016-2017 school year, $10.4 million was budgeted for “classified
supervisors and administrators”
while $22.2 million was spent,
according to the Board of Education. In the same year, $21.4 million was budgeted for professional and consulting services, but
$28.2 million was spent.
But the board data show less
was spent on books and supplies
for classrooms than was budgeted
— and the gap grew the longer
Wilson remained superintendent.
In 2015-2016, $18.6 million was
budgeted, but $12.3 million was
spent, according to board data. In
2016-2017, $20.1 million was budgeted for books and other school
supplies; $6.8 million was spent.
An Aug. 15, 2017, fiscal health
risk analysis of the Oakland district conducted by the state-run
Fiscal Crisis and Management
Assistance Team, which helps local school districts with data
management, said: “Based on the
information in this report, the
district has lost control of its
spending, allowing school sites
and departments to ignore and
override board policies by spending beyond their budgets. . . . During the former superintendent’s
tenure, this behavior has permeated to the site administration, causing a lack of consistency
in appropriate site size, staffing,
class offerings and budgets. The
principals’ accountability to distract administration has eroded
to the point that they criticize
district administrations in open
board sessions.”
At the same time a consulting
firm was doing work for the Oakland district, Wilson hired the
head of that firm to act as the
facilities manager of the district at
a cost of $30,000 a month in
salary, according to Kim Davis,
founder of a parent organization
called Parents United for Public
Schools and a member of a blueribbon advisory commission assessing district facilities and programs. The hiring was first reported in 2015 by the San Francisco
Chronicle. His pay was more than
the superintendent’s base salary.
Wilson had a total annual compensation package in Oakland of
more than $400,000, making him
one of the highest paid K-12 public employees in California. His
base pay in 2015 was $294,000,
more than what he accepted in
the District. His D.C. contract
includes a base salary of
$280,000, a $14,000 signing bonus and the potential for a performance bonus of 10 percent —
or $28,000 — in his second year as
chancellor.
Wilson’s administration overestimated by hundreds of students the number who would
enroll in fall 2016 and staffed
accordingly. But a decision was
made to lay off very few of the
several dozen teachers that
should have been let go, according
to GO Public Schools, a nonprofit
organization of parents, educators and community allies who
work to provide quality education
in California’s historically underserved communities. That cost
the district $3.2 million, it said.
Wilson accepted the job in the
District in November 2016 but
stayed in Oakland until early February 2017. Shortly after he
agreed to become the D.C. chancellor, according to Reyes, Oakland principals were told their
budgets were frozen.
“There was a very tight correlation between Antwan leaving and
our budgets being frozen,” she
said. “He was getting out of
Dodge.”
Bowser’s selection of Wilson
was a surprise to many in the D.C.
education world. Mary Levy, a
lawyer who has provided analysis
of the District’s education budgets for more than 25 years, said
the mayor had provided “no public information” about the candidates she was considering to replace Kaya Henderson, the superintendent who left in fall 2016
after more than five years. Many
in the city believed Bowser would
tap an insider.
Wilson is a reformer in the
same vein as Henderson and her
predecessor, Michelle Rhee,
meaning they believe in standardized testing, charter schools and
employing principles common in
for-profit companies to manage
public schools.
Bowser announced the appointment of Wilson in a Nov. 22,
2016, news release that said Wilson had brought “a newfound
fiscal stability” to Oakland. And
in an interview that day with The
Washington Post, Bowser said she
wanted a superintendent “who
was bold and strategic and open
and transparent, and always out
into the community and focused
on closing the achievement gap”
and that “[w]e think Antwan really embodies all of those things.”
Trish Gorham, president of the
Oakland Education Association,
a teachers union, said a number
of factors went into creating the
mess that now confronts Oakland.
“You had a school board that
doesn’t assert its authority and a
superintendent who over-asserted his,” she said.
valerie.strauss@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Jury sides with Fairfax police o∞cer who shot suspect in back with Taser
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
More than two years ago, Fairfax police officer Alan Hanks was
responding to a call when he was
captured on video firing a Taser
at Elton Cansler’s back.
After a year of litigation, two
days of testimony and 16 hours of
deliberation, a federal court jury
in Alexandria this week decided
Hanks acted reasonably and
should not be forced to pay
damages.
The trial illustrated how difficult it is to determine the truth of
an encounter between a police
officer and a suspect, even when
the incident is recorded.
Hanks said he feared for his
life, believing Cansler was reaching for a knife. Cansler said he
did everything he was told to do.
At trial last week, both men
were accused of lying on the stand.
“I don’t think Officer Hanks
was truthful . . . and I think you
should punish him for it,” plaintiff ’s attorney Victor Glasberg
told jurors in his closing argument.
“Mr. Cansler is not telling the
truth,” responded Kimberly Baucom, an attorney for Fairfax
County defending Hanks.
Jurors sided with Hanks, who
testified for hours about the
encounter, which lasted about
70 seconds.
Both sides agreed on some
facts. Cansler took a pair of
sunglasses off a desk in a bank in
the Rose Hill Shopping Center,
during what he later described as
an anxiety-provoked delusional
episode. (Cansler suffers from
cerebral palsy, as well as intellectual disabilities.) The police were
called.
Jurors decided
Alan Hanks acted
reasonably and should
not be forced
to pay damages.
When Hanks responded, he
came upon Cansler some distance from the bank. He asked
about the sunglasses; Cansler
gave them to him. Hanks walked
Cansler to his police car, holding
his arm, and pressed him against
the car. When Hanks backed up
and took out his Taser, Cansler
turned around and put his hands
in the air. He then turned back
toward the car and put his hands
on the hood. Hanks shot the
Taser, and Cansler fell.
The last part of the interaction
was recorded on video by a
bystander.
“The video was played out of
context,” Hanks testified last
week.
He said the footage does not
show that as they approached
the car, Cansler repeatedly put
his hands in his pockets, where
the shiny clip of a knife was
visible. When he pushed Cansler
against the car, Hanks said, the
suspect pulled his arm away and
ignored commands to put his
hands behind his back.
Hanks testified that he moved
to get his Taser because of that
resistance. He said Cansler then
turned around and appeared
ready to charge at him.
“I firmly believe that he was
going to come at me,” Hanks said.
He said that, in that moment,
he believed Cansler decided that
to combat the Taser, he would
need his knife. That’s why he
thought Cansler turned back
toward the car.
“He looked down at his right
pocket,” Hanks testified. “He was
going for the knife.” That’s when
the officer deployed the Taser.
When Cansler testified, he
said Hanks knew about the knife,
not because it was visible but
because he told the officer about
it. He said he “tensed up” when
Hanks was walking to the police
car because the pressure on his
arm was painful. Otherwise, he
said, he followed the officer’s
commands.
Glasberg pointed out that
Hanks had initially described
Cansler as engaging in “passive
resistance” and had left some
details out of his interviews with
the department’s internal-affairs
office.
Hanks chalked up those discrepancies to his fatigue the day
of the event.
In truth, he said, “there was a
lot of force between he and I.”
After the incident, Cansler was
charged with assault on an officer, but the charge was later
dropped. He pleaded guilty to
misdemeanor theft.
racher.weiner@washpost.com
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VIRGINIA
MARYLAND
Fairfax o∞cers get body Farm owners shut down white nationalist’s event
cameras in pilot program
BY
BY
A NTONIO O LIVO
Police body cameras will
make their debut in two Fairfax
County districts over the next
three months, the latest step in
the county’s response to the
fatal 2013 shooting of an unarmed man outside his home.
The $685,000 pilot program
was approved by unanimous
vote at a Fairfax County Board
of Supervisors meeting that also
included the announcement of a
new executive to run Virginia’s
most populous jurisdiction.
Bryan J. Hill, who is county
administrator for James City
County, Va., will become Fairfax
County executive in January.
Hill, 50, will take the $250,000a-year post vacated by Edward
L. Long Jr., who retired this
year. Kirk W. Kincannon, the
executive director of the county
park authority, has been filling
the role on an interim basis.
The body camera pilot program will equip randomly selected police officers in the
Mount Vernon and Mason police districts with 230 body
cameras. Researchers from
American University will analyze the footage from those
cameras to determine their effects on use-of-force incidents,
the number of abuse complaints
and how officers go about their
jobs.
“The cameras are important
to understand how we get into
these situations,” Police Chief
Edwin C. Roessler Jr. said.
This
year,
the
county
launched two civilian bodies to
monitor investigations into allegations of excessive force, harassment and other misconduct. In all, Fairfax is pursuing
$35 million in police reforms as
a result of the John Geer shoot-
ing.
Roessler said use-of-force incidents stem in most cases from
attacks on police officers, which
he said the body cameras will be
able to confirm.
The use of police body cameras has been controversial in
some communities, including
Fairfax, mainly due to privacy
concerns over accidentally filming people who aren’t suspected
of a crime.
Fairfax officials said they’ve
researched what they legally
can and can’t do under the
program.
Anyone in a public area can
be filmed. A police officer will
also be allowed to film someone
in their home as long as the
police have the legal authority
to be there.
Anyone who isn’t suspected
of a crime and has a reasonable
expectation of privacy may decline to be recorded, unless the
officer is there as part of a
criminal investigation or an
arrest, county police officials
said.
An officer may turn on the
camera any time use of force is
initiated or anticipated, police
said.
The county board reserved
the option of extending the pilot
program another three months
if officials believe not enough
data was collected to decide
whether to permanently equip
the county’s police force of
about 1,400 officers with body
cameras.
“We have a population of over
1 million people, so when we’re
trying something, we’re trying
something big,” said the board’s
chairman, Sharon Bulova (D).
“If it fails, it can be a major,
expensive failure.”
antonio.olivo@washpost.com
P ERRY S TEIN
A weekend conference organized by white nationalist Richard Spencer was shut down after
the owners of the Maryland farm
he rented discovered he was behind the event.
The think tank Spencer leads,
the National Policy Institute,
hosted the conference for about
100 people at Rocklands Farm, a
winery and events venue in
Montgomery County. Spencer
said in an interview that a thirdparty logistics company contacted Rocklands Farm on behalf of
the National Policy Institute this
month and didn’t reveal that
white nationalists were affiliated
with the event when they booked
it. The company told the farm’s
management only that it was a
“corporate” gathering, according
to Spencer.
The conference started about
11 a.m. Sunday and was scheduled to continue until 8 p.m.
Caterers at Rocklands Farm
served brunch, and participants
recapped 2017. At about 4 p.m.,
Spencer said, someone working
the event learned that Spencer
was there and management told
everyone to leave.
“We didn’t lie, we didn’t deceive and we certainly did not
break any rules while we were
there,” Spencer said. “We had
sharp words and were obviously
disappointed, but there was no
confrontation of any kind.”
The farm refunded the group’s
money after asking it to leave.
The owners of Rocklands Farm
didn’t comment on the incident
beyond a statement on their website Monday, which says it proudly does “business according to
family values, including welcoming people of all backgrounds,
race, ethnicities, cultures, and
EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A third-party firm didn’t tell a rental space that white nationalists
were affiliated with the conference Richard Spencer had planned.
religions.”
The statement continued:
“Throughout our history of hosting private events, we have never
had to ask a group to leave.
However, yesterday, November 19, we discovered that a
private event held here was, in
reality, a gathering of an organization that is strongly in opposition to our values. We immediately and politely asked the
group to leave. We are grateful
that the group agreed to peacefully leave.”
The National Policy Institute
booked space at Rocklands Farm
after the property manager at the
Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, a federal facility in the District, told the
organization it couldn’t host its
conference in the building. The
two sides had been communicating for months before a private
management company rejected
the request over safety concerns.
Spencer’s public appearances
have been a lightning rod in
recent months, both for the content of his speeches and questions over free speech. His events
often attract large numbers of
protesters.
The University of Florida reluctantly agreed last month to
allow Spencer to speak on campus after initially rejecting his
request. Spencer and his attorney
challenged the initial decision,
citing First Amendment concerns. The university paid hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars for
security at the event.
Spencer described the Rocklands Farm gathering as a policy
conference, for which attendees
paid $225. Before the event,
Spencer said that it was to feature Daniel Friberg, the European editor of AltRight.com, and
Kevin MacDonald, described by
the Southern Poverty Law Center
as “the neo-Nazi movement’s favorite academic.”
The organizers didn’t publicly
disclose beforehand that the
event would be held at Rocklands
Farm, Spencer said. Instead, organizers arranged for vans to
pick up attendees at various locations and take them to the farm.
After Rocklands Farm management told them to leave, the
vans then shuttled the conference attendees to another private
space outside the District before
going to dinner at a restaurant,
Spencer said.
“I’m not mad, but if I were a
business owner, I would not do
that,” Spencer said. “If communists came to my establishment,
but they were civilized, I couldn’t
imagine kicking them out. So I’m
certainly disappointed, but we
are not going to retaliate. It’s just
life in 2017 for us.”
Spencer was one of the leaders
of a white-nationalist rally in
Charlottesville in August. The
march at the University of Virginia — with participants chanting “Jews will not replace us!” —
touched off violence between
demonstrators and counterprotesters that turned deadly the
next day when a man drove into a
crowd, killing a woman and injuring others. Two police officers
who were monitoring the protests died when their helicopter
crashed.
perry.stein@washpost.com
Council members troubled by hospital chief’s firing
COURTLAND MILLOY
History students learning
there’s more to the story
MILLOY FROM B1
pioneering historian Howard
Zinn, author of “A People’s
History of the United States.”
The organization offers
hundreds of lesson plans and
guides that teachers can
download free from the ZEP
website. There are also lists of
recommended, age-appropriate
books, films and websites.
The impact on students can be
profound.
“When I was growing up, I saw
the [Disney] movie about
Pocahontas and thought, ‘This is
how it happened,’ ” Tori recalled.
“John Smith was portrayed as a
good man, and everybody lived
happily ever after. Then I began
reading about what really
happened to the Native
Americans, and I was shocked.
The genocide, the slaughter made
me sad, and I started thinking
about what could be done to
compensate for all that
suffering.”
A classmate, 16-year-old Kiara
Accad, said she had come to the
United States from the
Philippines believing that
Columbus had discovered an
uninhabited land.
“It makes me angry that most
schools just go along with what
the textbook says and don’t give
students the whole story,” she
said. “I wish schools were more
open-minded about U.S. history,
because we could better
understand how it affects us
today.”
Bill Bigelow, a former public
school teacher and co-director of
the Zinn Education Project,
agrees.
“We have to question the old
stories we have been taught — the
stories told about who we are as a
people,” he said.
“Kids will say, ‘If I have been
lied to about Columbus, what
about women’s history, black
history?’ ” Bigelow said. “Some
students may become cynical and
conclude that ‘they’re all a bunch
of liars.’ ”
“But there are others who
become more hopeful,” he added.
“They focus not just on the
oppressors, but those who
resisted oppression and the social
movements that sought to make
this a better world. They begin to
see that everything decent in our
society is because people
organized and fought for it.”
More than 75,000 teachers
have used resources from the
Zinn Education Project, which
was launched in 2008.
At the SEED Public Charter
School in the District, history
teacher Bill Stevens used a ZEP
role-playing guide to teach
students about the struggle of the
Standing Rock Sioux to block
construction of the Dakota
Access oil pipeline. During the
lesson, students took on the roles
of five groups with different
positions on the pipeline.
Critical-thinking skills were
emphasized as they engaged in
lively debate.
In March, the class joined
hundreds of other students from
throughout the Washington area
in a show of support for the
#NativeNationsRise march to the
White House. Some of them have
also begun a campaign to change
the name of the Washington
football team, convinced that the
“Redskins” name is racist.
At Capital City Charter,
students put Columbus on trial in
mock court for terrorism, slavery
and murder. The evidence
against him was overwhelming,
and a jury found the 15th-century
explorer unworthy of a national
holiday.
They began a petition drive to
rename the second Monday in
October to Indigenous Peoples’
Day. So far, they have collected
about 500 signatures. They also
asked the D.C. Council to hold
hearings on the issue.
“It’s ridiculous to honor
Columbus,” Kiara said. “There’s a
statue of him at Union Station.
It’s like saying, ‘Welcome to
Washington. We like racists.’ ”
The students say they know
the road ahead will be difficult.
Behind every cherished historical
myth is an ugly truth many
simply cannot face.
We will gather with our
families Thursday to celebrate
Thanksgiving, yet few will
acknowledge — or remember —
that after Native Americans
offered help to those early,
starving colonists, the colonists
would attempt to wipe out Indian
tribes.
But the students at Capital City
Charter are determined to spread
the message of a more-inclusive
history, the good and the bad.
And in learning how ordinary
people waged heroic struggles
against oppression in the past,
they are learning how to fight for
their future.
“I’m grateful for all the people
in the past, even people that I
have not heard about, who were
brave enough to stand up for
what is right,” Tori said. “To live
in a world where we are not
discriminated by color or sex, I
will have to be like them.”
courtland.milloy@washpost.com
To read previous columns, go to
washingtonpost.com/milloy.
HOSPITAL FROM B1
Craig is “considering his legal options.”
May declined to comment on
Craig’s firing. A spokeswoman for
Veritas referred questions to the
hospital board.
Craig, a soft-spoken doctor of
internal medicine who has overseen the hospital’s clinical care
since the summer of 2015, became
an unlikely central figure in the
political battles over UMC earlier
this month.
At a Nov. 3 hearing of the council’s health committee, Craig made
an unheralded appearance to accuse Veritas of improperly cutting
his hours and disregarding hospital programs designed to ensure
patient safety. He also alleged that
Veritas employee Luis Hernandez
encouraged doctors to admit patients who did not need treatment
in an effort to boost revenue.
Veritas owner Chrystie Boucrée
has denied those allegations, say-
ing in a letter to the chairwoman
of the hospital board that they are
part of a “remarkably self-serving
and false narrative” designed to
aid Craig in a legal dispute with
hospital managers.
She said Veritas was not responsible for cuts to hospital personnel that Craig said had diminished the hospital’s safeguards for
quality of care, and that an investigation by an “independent legal
team” had cleared Hernandez of
wrongdoing. Hospital officials
have not responded to The Washington Post’s requests for records
of that investigation.
UMC is owned by the District
and governed by a board with 11
voting members. The mayor appoints six of the board’s members
and picks its chairman.
The D.C. Council voted Nov. 7
not to extend the $300,000-permonth Veritas contract, citing incidents that included regulators’
closure of the obstetrics ward in
August because of dangerous
INSULATION SALE
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
The firing of Julian Craig, the chief medical officer at United
Medical Center, was termed “retaliation” by one council member.
medical errors and the recent
death of a nursing home patient
who was left on the floor by his
nurse after crying out for help.
Council members said Craig’s testimony was also an important factor in their decision.
Although the Veritas contract
ends Nov. 30, the hospital board
voted unanimously this week to
extend the firm’s contract for up to
60 more days while a new management company is found.
peter.jamison@washpost.com
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GOP says
‘delegate’ is
the more
timely title
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
obituaries
DAVID CASSIDY, 67
‘Partridge Family’ star, 1970s teen heartthrob
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
ROEM FROM B1
shortly after he was chosen as the
party’s designee for speaker, a title
he would assume if the GOP retains control over the House after
three close races are decided.
His statement to The Washington Post on Tuesday came in response to questions about how
Del.-elect Danica Roem (D) — who
in a campaign ad spoke about the
power of being referred to as “the
gentlewoman” from Prince William County — would be referred
to when the legislative session begins in January.
“All members will be afforded
the same respect and courtesy
that this nearly 400-year-old institution commands,” Cox spokesman
Parker
Slaybaugh
said. “Speaker-designee Cox believes the ‘gentlelady’ and ‘gentleman’ terminology is outdated, and
that referring to everyone as ‘delegate’ is more timely and appropriate.”
Political analysts said Virginia
Republicans have been caught in a
bind since Roem defeated conservative Del. Robert G. Marshall
(R-Prince William), becoming one
of the first openly transgender
state lawmakers in the country.
Marshall repeatedly referred to
Roem as male during the campaign, while a flier paid for by the
Republican Party of Virginia that
also used male pronouns accused
her of trumpeting her transgender
identity to win more votes.
“They’re trying in some way to
thread a needle with their own
base,” said Bob Holsworth, a former Virginia Commonwealth University political-science professor.
“They’re willing to change the tradition in this sense before they will
explicitly acknowledge Danica
Roem as a woman.”
Roem said she thinks it’s remarkable that Republicans are
willing to upend years of tradition
because of her victory. But, she
added, in the end it doesn’t matter
much as long as other transgender
people know that it’s possible to
win elected office.
“What matters the most is that
I’m there,” she said. “I will be the
delegate from Prince William, and
I will conduct myself as the gentlewoman from Prince William.”
The formal references to “gentleman” and later, “gentlewoman”
in the General Assembly have long
been a way to impose civility in
what can be raucous debates, historians said. The Virginia senate
does not use similar honorifics.
Del. Kenneth R. Plum (D-Fairfax), a 36-year lawmaker, said he
was “really disappointed” to hear
of the change.
“If Danica Roem had not won
the election we would still be doing the same thing we have done
for 400 years,” Plum said, “calling
each other gentleman or gentlelady. It’s unfortunate that we, in
effect, have to single out her election, as unique as it is.”
Republicans said that it is better to leave gender references behind. “There are always changes
going on,” said state Sen. Richard
Black (R-Loudoun,) one of the
staunchest conservatives in Richmond. “We sometimes refer to
women by the term ‘Ms.,’ which
didn’t exist until some years ago. It
used to be ‘Miss’ or ‘Mrs.’ Then, it
was ‘Ms.’ ”
Since her underdog victory,
Roem has tried to strike a balance
between capitalizing on the national attention her win has gotten
and delving into the more mundane aspects of her new office.
On Sunday, she walked the red
carpet at the American Music
Awards in Los Angeles with pop
singer Demi Levato, who said she
appreciated and wanted to promote Roem’s respect-for-all message. She flew back to Virginia
immediately after the awards
show to make an early-morning
meeting on teacher pay and class
sizes with the Prince William
County School Board.
Roem said she was initially reluctant to engage too much in the
calls for media appearances and
other invites that have come her
way since her victory.
But the opportunity to help Lovato promote an anti-bullying
message seemed too good to pass
up. Roem said she also thinks that
a national platform could make it
easier to advocate for the issues
she cares about.
Besides alleviating Route 28
traffic, she wants to increase state
education funding, improve state
government
transparency
and prohibit health insurance
companies from denying coverage
for doctor-prescribed treatment
received by transgender patients.
antonio.olivo@washpost.com
Jenna Portnoy contributed to this
report.
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
David Cassidy, an actor and
singer who became a teeny-bopper
heartthrob in the early 1970s, starring as shaggy-haired guitarist
Keith Partridge on the musical
sitcom “The Partridge Family,”
died Nov. 21 at a hospital near Fort
Lauderdale, Fla. He was 67.
His publicist, Jo-Ann Geffen,
said he died of liver failure. Mr.
Cassidy announced earlier this
year that he was suffering from
dementia and would stop touring.
At the height of his popularity,
Mr. Cassidy commanded a rabid
fan base that drew comparisons to
those of Elvis Presley and the Beatles, with the New York Times reporting that after a 21-year-old Mr.
Cassidy’s gallbladder was removed in 1971, fans called for the
singer’s gallstones to be covered in
bronze and sold alongside clippings of his hair.
Mr. Cassidy’s entrails remained
off the market, but for several
years his likeness was emblazoned
on posters, push-out cards, coloring books and lunchboxes, as the
band he led on television — the
Partridge Family, a true family
outfit that featured his stepmother Shirley Jones — became one of
the decade’s defining pop music
acts, beloved by a mostly female
audience and derided by critics
who heard only bubble-gum
blandness.
Loosely inspired by a six-sibling
pop band called the Cowsills, the
group was a spiritual successor to
the Monkees, the “prefab four,”
who became a hit act in the 1960s
after starring in a television show
of the same name.
Jones, an Oscar-winning dramatic actress from “Elmer Gantry” (1960) who was better known
for her wholesome star turns in
the movie musicals “Oklahoma!”
(1955), “Carousel” (1956) and “The
Music Man” (1962), played a widow who performs with her five
musical
children,
traveling
aboard a psychedelic bus from
venues that ranged from a feminist rally to a maximum-security
prison.
Mr. Cassidy was the group’s lead
singer and guitarist. A skinny 20year-old who still looked like a
teenager, he said he had little in
common with the staid, occasionally doltish youngster he played on
television. The son of divorced
show-business parents — his father was Tony-winning actor Jack
Cassidy — he nurtured a love of
rock music and artistic pretensions, hoping to parlay his television work into more serious acting.
LOIS RAIMONDO/THE WASHINGTON POST
David Cassidy, who played Keith Partridge on “The Partridge Family,” at the Warner Theatre during
his comeback tour in 2002. The actor and musician retired in 1974, but then returned to performing.
His character was joined on the
show by siblings Laurie (Susan
Dey), Tracy (Suzanne Crough),
Chris (Jeremy Gelbwaks, later replaced by Brian Forster) and Danny (Danny Bonaduce), the wisecracking middle child whose
clashes with manager Reuben
Kincaid (Dave Madden) provided
much of the program’s humor.
The quintet sported matching
vests and shoulder-length hair,
and it scored its first chart-topper
with “I Think I Love You” (1970), a
breezy pop song written by Tony
Romeo for the program’s eighth
episode:
Do you think I have a case?
Let me ask you to your face
Do you think you love me?
I think I love you!
Featured on the first of eight
studio albums by the Partridge
Family, the song was recorded
with Mr. Cassidy, Jones and a
group of studio musicians who
replaced their younger counterparts on the show. It was followed
by hits including “Doesn’t Somebody Want to Be Wanted,” “I’ll
Meet You Halfway” and “I Woke
Up in Love This Morning.”
Mr. Cassidy at times pushed
back against the show’s familyfriendly brand of bubble-gum pop,
initially refusing to record
“Doesn’t Somebody Want to Be
Wanted” because he thought it
might affect his cool-guy image.
Cutting a deal with the show’s
producers, he embarked on a solo
career beginning with the 1971
record “Cherish” and began performing to sold-out dance halls
and stadiums.
“Attendance at a David Cassidy
concert is an exercise in incredulity,” Life magazine reported in 1971.
“Hordes of girls, average age 11
and a half, with hearts seemingly
placed inside their vocal cords,
shout themselves into a frenzy. . . .
After, being unable to rip off a
piece of David’s clothing or a hunk
of his hair or a limb of his body,
they rush out to buy David Cassidy
records or posters or send away for
mysterious items like the David
Cassidy Lover’s Kit” — a souvenir
that included a purported childhood photo album of Mr. Cassidy.
The singer donned form-fitting
white jump suits on stage and
became increasingly freewheeling
in
interviews,
appearing
seminude on the cover of Rolling
Stone in 1972 and telling the magazine about his use of “grass and
speed and psychedelics” in an accompanying article.
Mr. Cassidy later described
himself as “emotionally stunted”
and “paranoid” during this period, overwhelmed by the attention
of his fans and the simultaneous
demands of touring and acting. “I
feel burnt up inside,” he told Britain’s Daily Mail newspaper in
1974, announcing his retirement
from performing. “I’m 24, a big
star . . . in a position that millions
dream of, but the truth is I just
can’t enjoy it.”
Soon after the interview, a farewell concert in London ended in a
near-riot and the death of a 14year-old girl who suffered a heart
attack.
Mr. Cassidy, free of performance duties and acting, underwent a period of depression that
he said culminated two years later
with the death of his estranged
father in a fire.
He veered from television to
theater to music, eventually finding solace in breeding horses and
slowly coming to terms with what
he described as his unbreakable
connection with Keith Partridge
— “a shallow airhead,” as Mr.
Cassidy described the character to
Interview magazine in 1991, who
was “supposed to be funny.”
“I didn’t ever think that people
would assume I was that guy,” he
continued, “but they did.”
David Bruce Cassidy was born
in Manhattan on April 12, 1950.
LUIS BACALOV, 84
Oscar-winning composer
scored Italian films
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
Luis Bacalov, an Argentineborn composer whose lilting
score for the international hit
romance “Il Postino” earned him
an Oscar, and whose ominous
guitar melodies for dozens of Italian crime movies and spaghetti
westerns were used in films by
Quentin Tarantino, died Nov. 15 at
a hospital in Rome. He was 84.
The Orchestra della Magna
Grecia in Taranto, Italy, where Mr.
Bacalov was principal conductor,
said in a statement that Mr. Bacalov had suffered ischemia, a
condition of restricted blood flow.
A wide-ranging composer and
pianist, Mr. Bacalov’s scores for
blood-splattered B-movies were
complemented by works for the
leading Italian directors Federico
Fellini and Pier Paolo Pasolini,
orchestral compositions inspired
by the Catholic Mass, Italian
prog-rock records and a one-act
opera, “The Mother Was There,”
about women whose sons were
killed in Argentina’s “dirty war”
during the 1970s and ’80s.
Mr. Bacalov was born near Buenos Aires but spent nearly all his
working life in Italy, where he
incorporated a twist of tango into
works such as his score for “Il
Postino,” about a lonely postal
worker (Massimo Troisi) who delivers mail to poet and political
exile Pablo Neruda (Philippe
Noiret) on a tiny Italian island.
The film, which featured a gentle melody on the accordionlike
bandoneon, premiered in Italy in
1994 and opened in the United
States one year later as “The
Postman,” introducing Mr. Bacalov to a mass audience that had
eluded him for much of his career.
“Bacalov was a solid craftsman
who could work in any genre,”
film-soundtrack historian Jon
Burlingame said in an email,
pointing out two of the composer’s signature scores: “We Still Kill
the Old Way” (1967), in which Mr.
Bacalov counterpointed the film’s
mobster violence with “a haunting theme for piano and strings,”
and his “lighthearted, jazzy and
fun” soundtrack for the 1980 Fellini movie “City of Women.”
Mr. Bacalov’s Oscar win, Burlingame said, “ushered in a new
era of foreign-born composers
winning Academy Awards,” including Gabriel Yared (Lebanon),
Tan Dun (China), Gustavo Santaolalla (Argentina) and Dario
Marianelli (Italy).
Though he was often overshadowed by his friend Ennio Morricone, whose electric guitars and
whip-crack percussion came to
define the spaghetti western
sound, Mr. Bacalov composed
some of the most memorable
tracks of Italy’s 1960s and ’70s
western filmmaking boom.
His title song for “Django”
(1966), a Franco Nero movie that
was so bloody it was banned in
England for nearly three decades,
featured what director Tarantino
later described as a “quasi-Elvis
style” vocal part from Rocky Roberts: “(Django!) Django, have you
always been alone? (Django!)
Django, have you never loved
again?”
The song was one of three by
Mr. Bacalov that Tarantino used
for “Django Unchained” (2012), a
revisionist western that starred
Jamie Foxx as a revenge-seeking
former slave loosely inspired by
Nero’s character of the same
name.
Tarantino, fond of eclectic
soundtracks, had previously used
a pair of Mr. Bacalov’s songs for
his “Kill Bill” movies.
“I’ve always loved this song,”
Tarantino told the Los Angeles
DAMIAN DOVARGANES/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Luis Bacalov holds the Oscar for best original dramatic score for
the film “Il Postino,” which introduced him to a mass audience.
Times in 2012, describing his affection for “Django.” “I have to
say, when I came up with the idea
to do ‘Django Unchained,’ I knew
it was imperative that I open it
with this song as a big opening
credit sequence . . . Any spaghetti
western worth its salt has a big
opening credit sequence. In fact,
if it doesn’t, I don’t really want to
see it.”
Luis Enríquez Bacalov (his
middle name is sometimes
spelled Enrique) was born in San
Martin on August 30, 1933. His
family had emigrated from Bulgaria at the turn of the century,
according to the reference guide
“Encyclopedia of Film Composers,” and he began playing the
piano as a 5-year-old, studying
under conductor Daniel Barenboim’s father, Enrique.
Mr. Bacalov was a radio and
television composer in Colombia
before moving to Italy in 1959,
where he worked as an arranger,
composer and pianist for singers
such as Gianni Morandi, Rita
Pavone, Claudio Villa and the
red-haired chanteuse Milva.
On-screen, he had his first major success with the score for
Pasolini’s “The Gospel According
After his parents divorced, he
moved to California with his
mother, actress Evelyn Ward. He
then returned to New York after
completing high school and appeared in the disastrous 1969
Broadway musical “The Fig
Leaves Are Falling.”
Written by parodist Allan Sherman, the show ran for just four
performances but helped Mr.
Cassidy land an audition for “The
Partridge Family” later that year.
Mr. Cassidy experienced a brief
television resurgence in the late
1970s, when he was nominated for
a best-actor Emmy for his role as
an undercover police officer in the
NBC anthology series “Police Story.” The part resulted in a spinoff
program, “David Cassidy: Man
Undercover,” that was canceled in
1979 after one season.
Returning to the stage, he performed the title role in the Broadway production of “Joseph and the
Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat”
— replacing another former teen
idol, Andy Gibb, in 1982 — and a
decade later appeared alongside
his half brother Shaun Cassidy in
the Willy Russell musical “Blood
Brothers.”
A self-titled album appeared in
1990, featuring the hit “Lyin’ to
Myself,” and Mr. Cassidy steadily
reestablished himself as a performer, singing his “Partridge”-era
classics while appearing in programs such as the Donald Trump
reality series “Celebrity Apprentice.”
He acknowledged a struggle
with alcohol in recent years and
found himself in the news for his
tumultuous personal life, including drunken-driving charges and
a hit-and-run charge. His driver’s
license was suspended, and he
was sentenced to take alcoholeducation courses.
His marriages to actress Kay
Lenz, Meryl Tanz and Sue Shifrin
ended in divorce. Mr. Cassidy
had a daughter, actress Katie
Cassidy, from a relationship and
had a son, Beau Cassidy, from his
third marriage. A complete list of
survivors was not immediately
available.
Publicity, Mr. Cassidy said, was
not something he wanted after his
time on “The Partridge Family.” In
its place he sought a certain degree of anonymity.
“I have always tried to be someone who doesn’t get noticed,” he
told the Times of London in 2006.
“I wear a hat and glasses all the
time. I try to be part of our society
so I can exist without being a
freak.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
to St. Matthew” (1964). The movie
drew its dialogue from the Bible
and featured an insistently
anachronistic soundtrack — including a Congolese interpretation of the “Gloria” of the Latin
Mass, arranged by Mr. Bacalov —
that was nominated for an Academy Award.
Mr. Bacalov continued composing into his 80s, reuniting
with “Il Postino” director Michael
Radford to write the score for the
romantic comedy “Elsa & Fred”
(2014). At the same time, he faced
a years-long legal battle over his
acclaimed melody to “Il Postino.”
The song’s opening bars
seemed to mirror those of “Nelle
mie Notti” (“In My Nights”), a
popular 1974 song by Mr. Bacalov’s former collaborator, Sergio Endrigo, who sued him for
plagiarism. Mr. Bacalov acknowledged the resemblance but denied plagiarizing, comparing the
songs’ relationship to that of a
Mozart sonata and a reworking
by Verdi.
“Fortunately, I’m capable of
writing 100,000, 500,000 pieces
in real time because God gave me
this gift,” he told Reuters in 1996.
“Why would I need to copy someone else?”
Mr. Bacalov at one point organized a news conference in which
Morricone insisted the songs
were not “the same,” and courts in
Rome initially ruled in the composer’s favor. On appeal, however,
a court found in favor of Endrigo,
who demanded about $6 million
in restitution.
Legal wrangling continued until 2013 — five years after Endrigo’s death — when Mr. Bacalov
acknowledged using motifs by
Endrigo and reached an out-ofcourt settlement with the singersongwriter’s family.
A complete list of survivors was
not immediately available.
“There are many fantastic musicians but not a lot who have the
feeling and approach to apply
that to film,” Mr. Bacalov told the
Hollywood Reporter in 2002, describing the difficulties of his
craft. “It’s sort of a sixth sense.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
IN MEMORIAM
ORTTUNG
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
EZ
B7
RE
DEATH NOTICE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DeBOESER
RAWLINGS
CAREY
RAYMOND
YANCEY
EDWARD VINCENT DeBOESER, JR.
(Age 82)
WILBUR HAYWOOD RAWLINGS, SR.
Of Gettysburg, PA died Friday morning, November 17, 2017 at his home.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be held 11
a.m., Saturday, November 25, 2017 at St.
Mary’s Catholic Church, 256 Tract Rd., Fairfield,
PA. The family will receive friends from 10
a.m. until the time of Mass Saturday at the
church. Col. DeBoeser will be interred in the
Arlington National Cemetery at a future time.
The Monahan Funeral Home is in charge of the
funeral arrangements and the full obituary and
online condolences may be made at
www.monahanfuneralhome.com
Peacefully passed on Monday, November 13,
2017. Service will be held on Saturday, November 25, 2017 at Valley Brooks Community
Church at 7065 Deepage Drive, Columbia, MD
21045; Family Hour 10 a.m., Service 11 a.m.
Interment to be held on Monday, November
27, 2017 at Cedar Hill Cemetery Park, Suitland,
MD. Professional services handled by Howell
Funeral Home, 10220 Guilford Road, Jessup,
MD 20794.
SCHOOLS
IRVIN WILLIAM SCHOOLS (Age 67)
FELDESMAN
NICOLE KATHERINE ORTTUNG
February 15, 1995 - November 22, 2016
You are always in our thoughts and hearts.
Mom, Dad and Joseph
…………………
For sweet Nicole
I don't know why
Everything turned upside down.
Why you, so kind, intelligent, and beautiful
saw yourself as just the opposite.
Why your life, so full of promise
appeared to you so hopeless.
Why your love of life
was replaced by a desire to die.
I don't know...
why we couldn't wake you up to see the truth.
I do know...
that we will love you forever.
And I do believe...
that you have come through the darkness, into
the light.
And I pray...
that you are now at peace.
JACK FELDESMAN
On Saturday, November 18, 2017,
JACK FELDESMAN of Potomac,
MD. Beloved husband of Alice
Feldesman; loving father of Lauren
and Tracy Feldesman; dear brother
of Lillian Sholkoff. Graveside services were held at Cedar Park Cemetery, Paramus, NJ. Contributions may be made to
Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer
Center. Arrangements entrusted to TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202-541-1001
GILL
SARA JANE GILL (Age 62)
Of Olney, MD passed away November 7, 2017.
She was preceded in death by her father,
Francis M. Gill and her brother, Patrick Gill. She
is survived by her mother, Barbara Ann Gill;
her sister, Michelle Crane; her brother, Martin
Gill; her aunt, Nancy Hillyard; her nephew,
Michael Crane; nieces, Barbara Crane and
Patricia Crane. Memorial Service will be held
Monday, November 27, 11 a.m. at Francis J.
Collins Funeral Home, 500 University Blvd., W,
Silver Spring, MD 20901.
Of Herndon, VA, passed away on November 18,
2017.
Irvin was born in Washington, DC to Russell
Irving Schools and Thelma Gooden Schools
on April 21, 1950. He went to high school
at Herndon High School and continued his
education at George Mason University. Irvin
proudly served in United States Marine Corps.
The owner of H&S Plumbing, Irvin was passionate about his business and the customers he
served. He cherished time with friends and
family and loved watching the Washington
Nationals.
Irvin is survived by his wife, Linda Schools
of Herndon, VA and sons Jimmy Schools of
Herndon, VA and Jason Schools (Kim Hayes) of
Falls Church, VA. Irvin is also survived by his
siblings Frieda (Ronnie) Wolfe of Herndon, VA
and Rebecca Schools of Leesburg, FL. Irvin is
also survived by his niece Dee Ann Schools and
nephews Rodney Wolfe and Rick Wolfe.
The family will receive friends from 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. Friday, November 24, 2017 at AdamsGreen Funeral Home, 721 Elden St. Herndon,
VA 20170 where a funeral service will take
place at 11 a.m. Saturday, November 25, 2017.
Interment will be private. Email condolences
can be made at www.adamsgreen.com
BETTY CERAMI GLORIOSO (Age 82)
On Saturday, November 18, 2017,
of York, PA formerly of Silver
Spring, MD. Beloved wife of the
late Anthony R. Glorioso; mother
of Rita G. (Terry) Carman of Laurel,
MD and Robert C. (Judith) Glorioso
of York, PA. Grandmother of
Andrew R. (Emilie) Carman, Michael A.
(Rachael) Glorioso, Allison M. (Tripp) Usry,
Kathryn E. Glorioso, Heather M. (Eric) VanRite,
Christopher S. Carman and the late Daniel
J. Glorioso. Also survived by six great-grandchildren. Visitation will be held at Wallace
Presbyterian Church, 3725 Metzerott Road,
College Park, MD, Saturday, November 25,
2017, from 10 to 11 a.m. where Funeral Service
will be held at 11 a.m. Interment Private. In
lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be
made to Wallace Presbyterian Church, MEMO
Deacons Fund at the above address.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
DEATH NOTICE
KLOCK
Of Forestville, MD, passed away on Monday,
November 20, 2017, surrounded by her loving
family. Beloved wife for 33 years of Wesley
G. Stanton; loving mother of Jeffrey Drury
(Robin) and John Drury (Chrissy). Also survived
by four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Family invites friends to Lee Funeral
Home Calvert, Owings, MD, on Friday, November 24 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m.; with Funeral
Services on Saturday, November 25 at 10 a.m.
Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Suitland, MD.
www.Leefuneralhomes.com
STEIGMAN
MERYL STEIGMAN
Meryl Steigman, lover and best friend of
Andrew Steigman of Bethesda, MD; mother
of Daria Steigman of Washington, DC and
Jonathan Steigman of Mountain View, CA;
sister of Elaine Kramer of New York City;
grandma to Daniel, died peacefully on
November 19, 2017. Meryl was fortunate to
have had many good friends over the years
and was grateful for the love which she
gave and received.
Of St. Leonard, MD, formerly of Forestville, MD,
passed away on Monday, November 20, 2017.
Beloved wife of the late Thomas I. Klock; loving
mother of Donna, Thomas, Jr. and Steven.
Grandmother of six grandchildren; seven greatgrandchildren and dear friend of Fritz Entwistle.
Family invites friends to Lee Funeral Home
Calvert, Owings, MD on Sunday, November 26
from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m.; where Funeral
Services will be held on Monday, November
27 at 10 a.m. Interment at Epiphany Episcopal
Church Cemetery, Forestville, MD. Memorial
contributions may be made to Calvert Hospice,
P O Box 838, Prince Frederick, MD 20678.
www.Leefuneralhomes.com
GLENDORA EDDINE CLEMONS (Age 81)
Of Wheaton, MD passed away peacefully on
November 14, 2017 at Suburban Hospital in
Bethesda, MD.
Rex is survived by daughter, Nicole; son, Daniel;
mother, Nancy; sisters, Holly (Steven) Mikulski,
Camille (Ed) Kalb; brother, Erik Jefferson White
along with fiance, Judith Levi; Uncle, Regis
(Susan) White; Aunt, Ann Barber and several
nieces, cousins and an abundance of friends.
Rex was preceded in death by father, Ralph;
sister, Theresa and brother, Ralph Anthony.
Rex loved motorcycles, sound systems and
exercising his hippie soul.
Please sign and view the online guestbook at
www.hinesrinaldifuneralhome.com
WILLIAMS
JOHN T. BARBER, Ph.D
DEATH NOTICE
LITTLE
DEBRA DENISE LITTLE
Peacefully on Monday, November 13, 2017.
Family will receive friends on Friday, November
24 at the Freeman Celebration Center Chapel,
7201 Old Alexandria Ferry Rd., Clinton, MD.
Visitation 10 a.m. service 11 a.m. Interment
Washington National Cemetery.
McGINNIS
VICTOR R. McGINNIS "Mr. Vic"
On Thursday, November 9, 2017,
VICTOR R. McGINNIS of Hyattsville,
Maryland entered peacefully into
eternal rest. Loving father of Alicia
(Carlton, Sr.) Bowlding and Camilla
(Ken) Logan. Also survived by two
grandchildren, Carlton Jr. and
Amara; two sisters, Juanita and Maxine; other
relatives and friends. Family will receive friends
on Friday, November 24 from 10 a.m. until the
time of funeral service at 11 a.m. at WISEMAN
FUNERAL CHAPEL, 7531 Old Alexandria Ferry
Road, Clinton, Maryland. Interment private.
www.wisemanfuneralhome.net
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
JOSEPH F. McLEAN (Age 70)
Of Alexandria, Virginia passed away peacefully
at home on Sunday, November 19, 2017.
Joseph was preceded in death by his parents
Thomas and Mary McLean. He is survived by
his wife, Jeaneen McLean; daughter, Alison
McLean; siblings, Thomas McLean (June), Sandra Booher, and Helen Talbert (Raymond). A
memorial service will be held at Jefferson
Funeral Chapel, 5755 Castlewellan Drive,
Alexandria,VA 22315 on Saturday December
2, 2017 at 11 a.m. Please view and sign the
family guestbook at
www.jeffersonfuneralchapel.com
CROSBY
SHERYLL ANN CROSBY
(Age 68)
Passed away peacefully on November 9, 2017.
She was predeceased by her husband,
Thomas. She leaves behind her four children,
Sunny, Kevin, Michael, and Matthew as well as
nine grandchildren.
Sheryll was born in Rhode Island and received
her BA and teaching accreditation from the
University of Rhode Island. Sheryll taught at
multiple schools, last teaching high school
science at Hayfield Secondary School in Fairfax, VA. Sheryll enjoyed spending time with
her family, especially her beloved dogs, Cooter,
Sherry, and Checkers.
Burial will be at Arlington Cemetery at a later
date, where she will be reunited with her
husband Thomas.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to the Chance Foundation Dog Rescue.
PAID DEATH
NOTICES
HOLIDAY HOURS
Thursday,
November 24, 2016
11 a.m. ~ 3 p.m.
HELEN ERMINA ANASTASI (Sugie)
(Age 74)
Of Berwyn Heights, MD, passed on November
15, 2017 at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring,
MD with her loving family at her side.
She was born on March 4, 1943 to George J.
Zois and Alma M. Godbout of Capital Heights,
MD.
On December 23, 1960, Sugie married her
late beloved husband, Joseph Anastasi. She
is survived by her children, Anthony Anastasi
(Tracy), Joanna Shaulis (Robert), and Annette
Rease (Paul); She is also survived by 15 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; four siblings, Marie Zois Baker (Clayton), Harry Zois,
James Zois (Gail and Socrates Zois (Linda);
and many, many more nieces, nephews and
extended friends. She was preceded in death
by her two oldest children, Christine Hammond and Patrick Anastasi; her youngest sister,
Annette Zois and one grandchild, Vinnie.
She worked for the Prince Georges County
Public School System as the Cafeteria Manager
for 30 (plus) years.
Sugie’s family was her greatest love, she
enjoyed looking after everyone. She was an
excellent cook, preparing many delicious
meals especially for the holidays.
She was a woman without words left unsaid,
what she said she meant it. Her motto was
“what came up, came out!”
Family will receive guest at Fort Lincoln Funeral
Home, 3401 Bladensburg Road, Brentwood,
MD 20722 on Friday, November 24, 2017 from
2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Funeral services
will be held on Saturday, November 25, 2017 at
Holy Redeemer Catholic Church 4902 Berwyn
Road, College Park, MD 20740 at 10 a.m. In leiu
of flowers donations may be made to St Jude.
Internment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
CHARLES DAVID WALSH (Age 68)
Better known to his friends and family as “C.D.”,
passed away unexpectedly at his home on
November 20, 2017 with his beloved Suzanne
by his side.
C.D. was born in Troy, NY on January 21, 1949,
the youngest son of Richard & Angela Walsh.
He was the much loved baby brother of Richard
and Anthony Walsh. He was an avid sports
enthusiast and a gifted athlete- serving as
captain of his high school baseball and basketball teams and as a club All American
football player at Georgetown University. After
graduating in 1972, C.D. remained in the Washington, DC area and became a larger than
life personality in the local bar and restaurant
industry.
No matter who you were- the boss or the busboy- CD always took the time to listen to
you. We will miss his infectious laugh and his
sarcastic jabs. God Bless CD and God speed.
Family will receive friends on Friday, November 24, 2017 between 6 to 8 p.m. at Murphy
Funeral Home, 4510 Wilson Blvd., Arlington,
VA. A mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 2 p.m., Saturday, November 25, 2017, at
St. Anthony Catholic Church, 3305 Glen Carlyn
Rd., Falls Church, VA 22041.
Photo Deadline:
1 p.m.
NO EXCEPTIONS
To place a notice,
call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 Ext.
4-4122
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
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EMAIL:
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of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
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3 p.m. Sa-Su
BERG
Departed this life on November 10, 2017.
Family will gather together to celebrate her
life on November 25, 2017 at Mt. Zion Baptist
Church, 5101 14th St. NW, Washington, DC
20011, Viewing 10 a.m., Funeral 11 a.m. Interment at Lincoln Memorial Cemetery. Services
entrusted to Cedar Hill Funeral Home.
McLEAN
DEATH NOTICE
Family will receive friends Friday, November
24 at JB Jenkins Funeral Home Chapel, 7474
Landover Rd., Hyattsville MD, 20785 Visitation
3:30 p.m. Service 4:30 p.m.
WALSH
ANNIE MAE WILLIAMS
Entered into eternal rest on Tuesday, November 7, 2017. He is survived by his wife, Barbara
Gaston; two daughters, Jamila Barber and
Rashida Gaston; two grandsons, Ricardo Facey
and Jabari Hamilton; aunt, Robbie Walker King
and a host of other relatives and friends. Mr.
Barber may be viewed at STEWART FUNERAL
HOME, 4001 Benning Rd., NE on Friday, November 24 from 10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m.
Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
Of Prince William, VA, passed away on Friday,
November 17, 2017. Glendora Clemons was
born August 10, 1936 in Paraiso, Panama to
Thomas A. Woods and Eddine B. Woods. She
is preceded in death by her mother, father,
and brother, Carlton Woods. She is survived by
her husband of 61 years, Vernon Clemons Sr.;
her sister, Eutrene Woods; her children, Eddine
Carter (Larry), Vernon Clemons Jr. (Pamela),
Valerie Evans (Bob), Gail Robinson (Robert); 13
grandchildren; numerous great grandchildren,
nieces, nephews, cousins, and dear friends.
The family will receive guests on Tuesday,
November 28 for visitation at 10 a.m. at First
Mount Zion Baptist Church of Dumfries, VA.
Funeral service will follow at 11 a.m. Arrangements by Ames Funeral Home, Manassas, VA.
In lieu of flowers the family respectfully
requests donations be sent to the American
Diabetes Association or the American Breast
Cancer Foundation in memory of Glendora
Clemons.
WHITE
REX ANDREW WHITE (Age 53)
DR. ROBERT W. YANCEY, JR
On Saturday, November 18, 2017 at his home in
Upper Marlboro, MD. Survived by wife, Angela
Yancey; children, Jennifer-Camille, Robert III
and Anthony; Mother Josephine (Theartic); siblings, Michael (Barbara), Joseph (Connie), Karl
(Rene) and Valerie; and a host of nieces;
nephews; other relatives and friends.
ANASTASI
STANTON
ELIZABETH V. KLOCK "Betty" (Age 83)
CLEMONS
DEATH NOTICE
QUEENIE ELIZABETH RAYMOND
(Age 86)
Passed peacefully on November 16, 2017. She
was a resident of Catonsville, MD; formerly of
Millersville, MD. Beloved wife of Henry James
Raymond for 63 years; mother of Henry J.
Raymond II (Ann); Darryl K. Raymond (Connita)
and step-mother to LaSandra Davis. Grandmother to Alex, Amber and Austin, step-grandmother to Stephanie and Sheryl and step-great
grandmother to Michelle and Christopher. She
is also survived by her sister Emma Arthur St.
Bernard. She leaves to cherish her memory
a host of family and friends. Services will
be private. Messages of condolence may be
sent to 719 Maiden Choice Lane, BR 236,
Catonsville, MD 21228.
AUDREY CLAIRINE STANTON (Age 82)
GLORIOSO
BARBER
RACHEL CAREY
On November 22, 2016 Lady Rachel Carey,
beloved wife of Reverend Doctor Abner J.
Carey, Jr., mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, mother-in-law and First Lady of the
New Grove Missionary Baptist Church in Washington, DC transitioned into her heavenly
reward. Lady Carey is missed beyond measure
by the host of family, friends, neighbors and
parishioners who knew and loved her dearly
but take great comfort in knowing that she is
with her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ! Until we
see you again...
IN MEMORIAM
BRAXTON-WHITE
CURRENT 2017 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
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1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
DORIS R. WILKINS
ALOUISE BEATRICE BERG (Age 96)
Of Arlington, VA died on Monday, November
20, 2017 at Sunrise at Hunter Mill of Oakton,
VA after a short illness. Loving wife of the late
Kaare J. Berg for 42 years; devoted mother
of Glenn (Kathy) Berg; cherished grandmother
of Jane L. Berg and Alan R. (Melissa) Berg;
great-grandmother of Dylan A. and Grayson A.
Berg. She was predeceased by her parents,
Frederick and Beatrice Wieneke and siblings,
Berdina Smith and August "Joe" Wieneke.
Alouise belonged to the McLean Arts, C&P
Telephone Pioneers and Resurrection Evangelical Lutheran Church in Arlington. She was
telephone supervisor and interior decorator for
the telephone company.
Relatives and friends are invited to Alouise's
Life Celebration at MONEY & KING FUNERAL
HOME, 171 W. Maple Ave., Vienna, VA, Sunday,
November 26 from 3 to 5 p.m. Funeral Service
will be held at Resurrection Evangelical Lutheran Church, 6201 Washington Blvd., Arlington,
VA 22205 on Monday, November 27 at 11
a.m. Interment will follow at Columbia Gardens
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be
made in her name to the loving caregivers at
Sunrise at Hunter Mill, 2863 Hunter Mill Rd.,
Oakton, VA 22124.
Online condolences and fond memories of
Alouise may be offered to the family at:
www.moneyandking.com
On Saturday, November 11, 2017. Beloved
mother of Cyril "Tony" Briscoe, Kevin, Marcus
and Raymond "Tyrone" Wilkins; devoted sister
of Pearl Ihekwoaba and Kenneth Briscoe. She
is also survived by a host of grandchildren;
great-grandchildren; nieces; nephews; other
relatives and friends. The family will receive
friends at Redeemer Baptist Church, 2409 Cool
Spring Rd., Adelphi, MD on Friday, November
24 for a memorial service at 11 a.m. Rev.
Dr. Daryl E. Watson, Officiating. Online condolences may be made at
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
WILSON
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
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-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
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4" - $545
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-----SUNDAY
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4" - $621
5" - $770
6"+ for ALL color notices
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Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
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complimentary memorial plaque.
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
CLEMENTINE AVOLIA GORMAN
WILSON
EUELL
On November 17, 2017, CLEMENTINE AVOLIA
GORMAN WILSON quietly and peacefully went
home to be with the Lord. Service will be
held on Saturday, November 25, 2017, wake
10:30 a.m.; service 11 a.m., at Queen’s Chapel
United Methodist Church, 7410 Old Muirkirk
Rd., Beltsville, MD 20705. Interment Monday,
November 27, 2017, 11 a.m. at Maryland
National Memorial Park, Laurel, MD 20707.
Professional services entrusted to Howell
Funeral Home, 10220 Guilford Road, Jessup,
MD 20794, 301-604-0101.
NOLAN
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
DEATH NOTICE
JOHN EDWARD NOLAN
Washington DC lawyer, Marine Corps veteran
and Civil Rights Activist John Edward Nolan,
90, passed away of natural causes in the
early hours of November 18, 2017 at home
surrounded by his family.
Survived by his wife of 67 years Joan Nolan,
and children Carol Nolan Klatt (Michael), Kelly
Nolan Spencer (Robert), Richard Nolan (Mary),
Patricia Nolan McNeill (Christopher) and eight
grandchildren David Klatt, Andrew Klatt (Faith),
Elizabeth Spencer, Michael Spencer, John
“Jack” Nolan, Kelly Nolan, John “Nolan”
McNeill, and Henry McNeill. His eldest son
John Nolan died in 1980.
ROGERS
Born on December 9, 1933, in Springfield,
Ohio, to George Louis Brain and Mila Hooper
Shropshire, Kent was raised in Tomkins Cove,
New York, and went on to graduate from
Chatham Hall (1951), Smith College (1955),
and Columbia University Teachers College
(1956). Kent’s association with French and
Paris was lifelong: she spent her junior year
of college studying at the Sorbonne, met
the love of her life at the French Club at
Columbia, and returned to Paris twice for
diplomatic postings. She applied her tremendous breadth of interests and talents to
teaching in Fairfax County, Virginia, and New
Delhi, India, and to being a full partner in her
husband’s career.
RAYMOND PAUL EUELL
JANE BRAXTON-WHITE
July 30, 1924 ~ November 22, 2016
In memory of Jane Braxton-White, who passed
November 22, 2016 at the young age of 92.
Your Children love and miss you very much.
Peacefully on November 19, 2017. There will
be a celebration of Life held Friday, November
24, 2017 at 1 p.m. held at Pope Funeral Homes
Washington Chapel, 2617 Pennsylvania Ave,
SE, Washington, DC 20020 to honor Raymond's
life.
A memorial Mass will be held at 11 a.m.
Saturday, December 9 at St Jane Frances de
Chantel Church, 9701 Old Georgetown Road,
Bethesda, MD 20814.
The family has requested that in lieu of flowers
that donations be made in his name, John
Nolan, to the Red Cloud Indian School at
the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, the Jewish
Social Service Agency (JSSA/Hospice) or to a
charity of the donor’s choice.
KENT BRAIN ROGERS
Kent Brain Rogers was a much beloved wife,
mother, grandmother, and more. In her 62year partnership with her husband, Stephen
H. Rogers, a US Foreign Service officer, she
raised and nurtured four children, providing
a home filled with love and support as they
moved around the world. The family's adventures, from their home base of Annandale,
Virginia, to diplomatic posts in India, France,
England, Mexico, South Africa, and Swaziland, fit well with -- and fueled -- her fascination with travel, language, and history.
Her other passions included family history
and genealogy, education (particularly of gifted children), painting, indoor and outdoor
gardening, dollhouses, and needlework.
POST YOUR
CONDOLENCES
Now death notices on
washingtonpost.com/obituaries allow you
to express your sympathy with greater ease.
Visit today.
Because your loved one served proudly...
GHI
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
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Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
Everywhere, Kent became involved in groups
ranging from embassy wives and PTA to
churches and community associations. She
also encouraged her children’s academic and
musical endeavors, passing on her love of
learning and always providing an appreciative audience.
After she and Steve retired to Annandale,
Kent served as president of the Sleepy Hollow Woods Civic Association. They continued
to explore the world and enjoy old and new
connections, including with Steve’s Princeton class. Throughout, Kent maintained close
ties to family and friends from all parts of her
life.
Kent died unexpectedly on November 13,
2017. She is survived by Stephen Rogers;
children Kryston Fischer (Tim), Halsey
(Aromie Noe), Julie (Ralph Nelson), and John
(Gigi Garcia-Rogers); grandchildren Sam
(Chelsea Ball) and Will Fischer, Tajin and
Tayae Rogers, Liz Nelson, and Kyle and Lucas
Garcia-Rogers; and brother Jeffrey Brain
(Anne) and sister-in-law Nancy Langston. Her
elder brother George W. Brain predeceased
her.
A memorial service will be held at a future
date at the Little River United Church of
Christ (LRUCC) in Annandale. In lieu of flowers, she requested donations to LRUCC, her
beloved church home for 61 years.
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Breezy and colder
Rain should be ending by the
morning rush, but it could linger a
little, especially east of Interstate 95.
Look for clearing skies by midday.
Winds kick up out of the northwest,
blowing about 15 mph with higher gusts. Highs
range from about 52 to 58. Overnight,
temperatures will drop into the mid-30s in the
city and the upper 20s in the outer suburbs.
Winds will be from the north about 5 mph with
mostly clear skies.
Today
Mostly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Thursday
Mostly sunny
Friday
Sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Saturday
Mostly sunny
Sunday
Partly sunny
OFFICIAL RECORD
Monday
Sunny
Temperatures
55° 32
49° 35
54° 41
60° 41
49° 34
51° 36
FEELS*: 50°
FEELS: 51°
FEELS: 56°
FEELS: 60°
FEELS: 40°
FEELS: 48°
CHNCE PRECIP: 10%
P: 5%
P: 5%
P: 15%
P: 15%
P: 0%
WIND: NW 10–20 mph
W: WNW 4–8 mph
W: SSW 4–8 mph
W: SW 7–14 mph
W: WNW 10–20 mph
W: NW 7–14 mph
°
°
°
°
°
NATION
Harrisburg
48/27
Hagerstown
46/28
Davis
36/14
Sa
Su
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
56/30
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
54/26
Dover
55/28
Washington
55/32
FORECAST
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
62° 3:07 p.m.
40° 5:00 a.m.
56°/40°
79° 1900
18° 1872
60° 3:00 p.m.
34° 7:00 a.m.
55°/34°
76° 2007
16° 1969
61° 2:39 p.m.
29° 4:07 a.m.
54°/35°
79° 1900
16° 1951
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –0.7° yr. to date: +2.9°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 59°
Ocean City
57/31
OCEAN: 48°
Lexington
52/24
Richmond
59/30
Norfolk
62/39
Virginia Beach
62/38
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 48°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
60/42
OCEAN: 56°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
1.98"
2.21"
35.08"
35.73"
0.0"
0.0"
0.00"
1.96"
2.38"
39.86"
37.55"
0.0"
0.0"
0.00"
2.12"
2.28"
37.30"
37.49"
0.0"
0.0"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
3 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly sunny. High 38–43. Wind
northwest 7–14 mph. Tonight, mostly clear. Low 20–24.
Wind northwest 4–8 mph. Thursday, mostly sunny. High
39–45. Wind west 6–12 mph. Friday, mostly sunny. High
45–50. Wind southeast 5–10 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, morning rain north, clearing,
windy. High 56–62. Wind northwest 12–25 mph. Tonight,
mostly clear. Low 28–39. Wind northwest 10–20 mph.
Thursday, mostly sunny. High 42–50. Wind northwest 6–12
mph. Friday, mostly sunny. High 49–55.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, small craft advisory, mostly
sunny. Wind northwest 8–16 knots, higher gusts. Waves a foot.
Visibility good. • Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, small
craft advisory, mostly sunny. Wind northwest 15–25 knots. Waves
1–2 feet on the Lower Potomac, 2–4 feet on the Bay.• River Stages:
Today, the stage at Little Falls will be 3.4 feet, falling slightly to 3.3
feet on Thursday. Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
5:11 a.m.
10:25 a.m.
4:49 p.m.
10:23 p.m.
Annapolis
1:46 a.m.
6:59 a.m.
1:16 p.m.
8:03 p.m.
Ocean City
ACTUAL
Cape May
55/31
Annapolis
56/31
Charlottesville
56/28
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
F
REGION
AVERAGE
3:16 a.m.
9:41 a.m.
4:07 p.m.
10:01 p.m.
Norfolk
5:15 a.m.
11:38 a.m.
6:02 p.m.
11:54 p.m.
Point Lookout
3:15 a.m.
8:49 a.m.
3:49 p.m.
10:56 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Riverside, CA 93°
Low: Bredette, MT –3°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
Tomorrow
45/20/c
62/39/s
16/13/s
63/44/pc
63/36/s
54/26/s
60/46/c
58/32/s
56/25/i
64/48/c
52/28/r
34/27/c
42/23/sn
71/47/pc
44/24/pc
64/34/s
61/42/pc
36/30/s
41/26/s
37/28/pc
58/38/s
66/39/pc
39/28/pc
66/40/s
19/14/sn
58/41/pc
70/41/s
47/28/s
65/40/pc
59/35/s
59/41/pc
63/40/pc
41/32/s
38/31/c
36/29/pc
58/44/r
47/29/pc
54/34/pc
64/47/s
44/32/pc
46/29/pc
43/30/pc
70/46/s
71/44/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
41/30/pc
38/28/pc
67/40/s
8/–2/sn
33/17/sn
49/23/r
83/70/pc
67/40/pc
40/27/s
62/32/s
75/59/c
43/33/s
78/56/s
52/28/s
94/67/s
45/30/s
50/30/s
85/71/pc
35/29/s
34/24/pc
50/30/s
67/44/pc
53/31/r
62/39/pc
49/39/s
40/29/pc
72/42/s
1/–13/c
37/33/pc
42/25/s
83/70/pc
67/41/s
45/29/pc
60/34/s
69/56/r
56/42/s
78/56/s
60/36/s
94/63/s
51/33/pc
55/36/s
84/71/t
44/32/pc
40/34/pc
54/32/s
64/44/s
44/35/s
48/35/pc
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
51/34/s
44/31/pc
80/64/c
56/30/pc
86/59/s
38/23/pc
46/23/r
61/53/sh
57/27/r
62/33/pc
72/46/pc
59/30/pc
69/51/pc
43/32/s
86/77/pc
63/42/pc
84/60/s
69/55/pc
87/75/pc
63/56/sh
55/48/sh
37/24/sf
80/67/c
49/33/s
67/42/s
54/43/s
76/64/t
46/33/s
87/59/s
40/28/pc
39/26/pc
58/46/r
43/29/s
50/31/pc
69/42/pc
48/31/s
69/51/pc
54/35/s
86/77/pc
65/45/s
82/59/s
67/56/pc
85/77/sh
57/46/sh
55/38/r
38/30/pc
76/66/t
67/44/s
World
High: Telfer, Australia 113°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –65°
Nov 26
First
Quarter
Dec 3
Full
Dec 10
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Dec 18
New
Set
4:50 p.m.
8:20 p.m.
4:16 p.m.
2:56 p.m.
3:48 p.m.
6:33 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
76/49/pc
Amsterdam
55/46/pc
Athens
62/50/s
Auckland
69/57/c
Baghdad
69/45/s
Bangkok
88/75/t
Beijing
47/24/s
Berlin
49/40/c
Bogota
68/49/r
Brussels
55/48/pc
Buenos Aires
79/60/pc
Cairo
69/57/pc
Caracas
75/67/pc
Copenhagen
51/43/r
Dakar
86/76/pc
Dublin
57/37/r
Edinburgh
50/35/r
Frankfurt
51/39/pc
Geneva
56/37/s
Ham., Bermuda 76/70/sh
Helsinki
34/30/sf
Ho Chi Minh City 92/75/pc
Tomorrow
74/48/pc
56/45/pc
65/50/s
72/58/pc
65/44/s
87/72/c
43/24/pc
55/45/pc
68/48/r
58/47/pc
83/46/s
70/55/pc
76/65/pc
51/43/r
86/76/pc
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San Salvador
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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
C
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
COUNTRY MUSIC
THEATER REVIEWS
CAROLYN HAX
At Sally Quinn’s Grey
Gardens estate sale,
even Red Hot Chili
Peppers stand in line. C2
Women in Nashville
defend Keith Urban’s
“Female” after Stephen
Colbert lampoons it. C2
“Annie” at Olney Theatre
Center; “Misterman” at
Solas Nua; and Second
City’s “Nothing to Lose.” C3
Her husband took the
money and ran, but then
he came back. That’s still
a form of abuse. C4
CBS and PBS cut ties with Charlie Rose
BY
J . F REEDOM DU L AC,
E LAHE I ZADI
AND B EN T ERRIS
PBS said Tuesday it was parting ways
with Charlie Rose, and CBS announced it
fired the 75-year-old broadcaster for “extremely disturbing and intolerable behavior” following an extensive Washington Post report that detailed his alleged
unwanted sexual advances toward women.
His firing was announced by CBS News
Veteran newsman fired
a day after eight women
allege sexual misconduct
President David Rhodes, who wrote in a
midday memo to the network’s staff that
it was “effective immediately.”
“Despite Charlie’s important journalistic contribution to our news division,
there is absolutely nothing more important, in this or any organization, than
ensuring a safe, professional workplace —
a supportive environment where people
feel they can do their best work,” Rhodes
wrote. “We need to be such a place.”
PBS terminated its relationship with
Rose and canceled distribution of his
programs “in light of yesterday’s revelations,” spokeswoman Jennifer Rankin
Byrne said in a statement. Rose’s namesake interview program is produced by
Charlie Rose Inc., an independent televi-
sion production company.
“PBS expects all the producers we work
with to provide a workplace where people
feel safe and are treated with dignity and
respect,” Byrne said.
Rose — best known for his award-winning interview program on PBS — had
co-hosted “CBS This Morning” since the
show’s launch in 2012 and was a contributing correspondent for the network’s
Sunday-night newsmagazine, “60 Minutes.”
ROSE CONTINUED ON C5
ART REVIEW
At the Portrait Gallery: The thankless jobs
‘Sweat of Their Face’ shows
exploited American workers
BY
ANDY KROPA/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Journalist Charlie Rose is best known
for his interview program on PBS.
BuzzFeed’s
source was
‘far-right’
Cernovich
BY
P HILIP K ENNICOTT
O
nce upon a time, there was a
promise that man’s dominion
over the world would lead to
shared prosperity and leisure.
As we made machines to do our
bidding, we would gain time to tend to
our families and communities and pursue
the improvement of our minds and spirit.
That promise never came to pass, and
today the mechanization of labor is increasing more rapidly than ever, dragging
legions of once middle- and workingclass people into unemployment and despair. The great promise of technical
mastery of the world has led to increasing
inequality, and for many, penury and new
forms of peonage.
And so we have exhibitions like “The
Sweat of Their Face” at the National
Portrait Gallery, which looks at how workers have been represented in this country
since the early days of the republic. At one
end of the spectrum is a dramatic 1829
painting by John Neagle called “Pat Lyon
at the Forge.” It depicts a ruddy, healthy,
well-knit middle-aged man standing at a
glowing forge with a hammer in his hand,
staring straight at the viewer with a look
of steely, democratic self-confidence. At
the other end is a Lewis Hine photograph
from around 1910, showing small girls at
labor on the bare dirt floor of a tobacco
barn, stringing leaves together at a crude
table that is almost as tall as they are.
Pat Lyon was a moderately wealthy
artisan and entrepreneur who embraced
his identity as a worker over any pretensions to upper-class refinement. The
young girls in Hine’s photograph are
anonymous toilers, exploited and miserable. The success of America, as an ideology, is that when we think of work, we
tend to think of the dignity of Pat Lyon,
not the hundreds of millions for whom
work is degrading, dehumanizing and
destructive.
The exhibition, organized by curators
David C. Ward and Dorothy Moss, is more
than a history of labor through pictures.
It grapples with the difficulty of defining
what is a portrait, and with the fact that
NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART
Journalism can make for strange bedfellows. Case in point: BuzzFeed and
Mike Cernovich.
Cernovich — a controversial far-right
figure who has promoted blatantly false
conspiracy theories, such as the discredited “Pizzagate” hoax — was the source of
a big BuzzFeed scoop Monday night. The
popular news and features website reported that legendary liberal Rep. John
Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) made repeated
sexual advances toward female staffers
and secretly reached a financial settlement with one accuser. The story was
based largely on documents and affidavits supplied by Cernovich to BuzzFeed’s
reporters.
The BuzzFeed-Cernovich connection
is odd, to say the least — something like
Michael Moore dropping damning info
about President Trump to Fox News.
Even that doesn’t quite capture the jagged journalistic history of Cernovich,
whom “60 Minutes” described earlier
this year in a story about fake news as “a
magnet for readers with a taste for stories
with no basis in fact.”
The agreement between Cernovich
and BuzzFeed appears to have come with
a hidden facet: Cernovich acquired the
congressional documents after offering
to pay $10,000 for them.
The offer was made in a series of
now-deleted tweets last week. “I will pay
$10,000 for the details of these settlements. Cash or Bitcoin or check or whatBUZZFEED CONTINUED ON C4
BOOK WORLD
From Allende:
Love in the air
and a body
in the trunk
ART REVIEW CONTINUED ON C4
HOOD MUSEUM OF ART, DARTMOUTH COLLEGE
PENNSYLVANIA ACADEMY OF THE FINE ARTS
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: John George Brown’s 1879 oil “The Longshoremen’s Noon”; John Neagle’s “Pat Lyon at the Forge” (1829);
and Lilly Martin Spencer’s “The Jolly Washerwoman” (1851), from the National Portrait Gallery exhibition “The Sweat of Their Face.”
No bones about it: Trump continues turkey-pardon tradition
BY
J ESSICA C ONTRERA
The first presidential pardon granted
by President Trump went to a sheriff
convicted of criminal contempt for failing to heed a federal court order to cease
a discriminatory practice of detaining
suspected illegal immigrants.
The second went to a turkey named
Drumstick.
“Over the past 10 months Melania and
I have had the pleasure of welcoming
many, many special visitors to the great
White House,” Trump said in a ceremony
in the Rose Garden on Tuesday. “We have
hosted dozens of incredible world leaders, members of Congress and, along the
way, a few very strange birds. But we
have yet to receive any visitors quite like
our magnificent guest of honor today,
Drumstick.”
He extended his arm toward the fowl
with a grand flourish.
“Hi, Drumstick,” he said. “Oh, Drum-
P AUL F ARHI
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump’s daughters, Tiffany, second from left, and Ivanka, right,
with her daughter, Arabella Kushner, get a closer look at Drumstick, one of
two turkeys that were pardoned in the Rose Garden.
stick, I think, is going to be very happy.”
The president was taking part in one
of the White House’s longest-running
holiday traditions: the presentation —
and more recently, the pardoning — of a
turkey. This year’s bird was a 47-pound
male raised in western Minnesota. He
was gifted the name Drumstick and,
after winning a social media contest
against the backup bird named Wishbone, was declared the National Thanksgiving Turkey.
Rather than become Thursday dinner,
Drumstick and Wishbone will live out
their predictably short lives at a facility
at Virginia Tech, along with last year’s
pardoned birds, Tater and Tot.
“As many of you know, I have been very
active in overturning a number of executive actions by my predecessor,” Trump
said. “However, I have been informed by
the White House counsel’s office that
Tator and Tot’s pardons cannot under
any circumstances be revoked. So, we’re
PARDON CONTINUED ON C10
BY
R ON C HARLES
The emotional range of Isabel Allende’s new novel is stretched so wide
that it’s a miracle the book’s spine
doesn’t break. We’re used to dark comedies, the ironic mingling of humor and
despair, but “In the Midst of Winter” is a
light tragedy, an off-kilter mix of sweetness and bleakness held together only by
Allende’s dulcet voice.
The title comes from a line by Camus,
who knew something about the oscillations of joy and sadness himself: “In the
midst of winter,” he wrote, “I finally
found there was within me an invincible
summer.” That’s an inspiring sentiment,
a hopeful promise to those in darkness
and a truism for anyone who has
emerged from it stronger. But the challenge for a novelist is how to convey that
gospel without trivializing life’s horrors
or falsifying the possibilities of happiness.
“In the Midst of Winter,” which is No.
7 on The Washington Post bestseller list,
opens on a snowy day in Brooklyn.
Lucia, a Chilean professor “blessed with
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C9
IN THE MIDST
OF WINTER
By Isabel Allende
Translated from the
Spanish by Nick Caistor
and Amanda Hopkinson
Atria. 352 pp. $28
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
At Grey Gardens, even rock stars stand in line
T
he estate sale that helped
empty out the historic Grey
Gardens in the Hamptons
in New York this weekend was
hardly your typical yard sale.
One indication? Washington
antiques dealers Tom Preston
and David Bell didn’t just scoop
up a few decor finds: They
acquired a couple of unlikely
soul mates.
The partners in David Bell
Antiques in Georgetown were so
enamored of “Grey Gardens,” the
1975 documentary about the
home’s eccentric inhabitants,
mother-daughter socialites Big
Edie and Little Edie, that they
were the first two people in line,
arriving at 4 a.m. Friday, six
hours before the doors opened to
the public.
The third and fourth people to
join the queue happened to be
Red Hot Chili Peppers guitarist
Josh Klinghoffer and a pal of
his, in from L.A. just for the sale,
in which Sally Quinn (the widow
of Washington Post executive
editor Ben Bradlee), who
restored the home after the Edies
left it in squalor, was cleaning it
out after its recent sale. The four
line-standers quickly realized
they were like-minded “Grey
Gardens” fiends, Preston says.
DAVID WILLIAMS/BLOOMBERG
“We’ve always been obsessed
with the movie,” he says. “And
they were on our level.”
Klinghoffer scored a desk that
had belonged to Bradlee. Preston
and Bell scooped up some of Big
Edie’s hatboxes and a pair of
original wicker chairs. Brunch
plans soon followed the bonding.
Susan Wexler, whose auction
house ran the sale, said she came
to realize that buyers weren’t just
there for the merchandise. When
security officers informed buyers
lined up to get into the house
Sunday that there was nothing
left, many decided to wait their
turn anyway.
“Plenty of people said, ‘We just
want to see the house and
gardens,’ ” Wexler said. “It was
like a museum.”
Shoppers line up to
enter the estate sale
at the Grey Gardens
house in East
Hampton, N.Y., on
Friday.
Thirty-six ‘SNL’ alumnae: Al Franken
treated us with ‘respect and regard’
Three dozen women who
worked with Sen. Al Franken on
“Saturday Night Live” released a
statement late Monday
supporting the Minnesota
Democrat following accusations
that he groped two women.
The statement came after
Leeann Tweeden, a radio news
anchor and former model, said
the former comedian forcibly
kissed her and later grabbed her
breasts while she slept on the
flight home during a 2006
overseas United Service
Organizations tour. Franken
apologized publicly and asked to
meet with Tweeden, and he
agreed to face a Senate ethics
investigation.
The SNL alumni, who included
cast members, writers and
production staff , disavowed
Franken’s actions but said he had
handled the revelations properly.
“What Al did was stupid and
foolish, and we think it was
appropriate for him to apologize
to Ms. Tweeden, and to the
public,” they wrote.
“After years of working with
him, we would like to
acknowledge that not one of us
ever experienced any
inappropriate behavior; and
mention our sincere appreciation
that he treated each of us with the
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
utmost respect and regard,” they
wrote.
Signers included Jane Curtin,
a comedian and actress who was
an original SNL cast member in
1975 and went on to film and TV
projects.
Franken on Monday faced a
second accusation, from a woman
who told CNN that Franken had
grabbed her when they posed for
a photo at the 2010 Minnesota
State Fair. Franken said he didn’t
remember the incident but told
CNN, “I feel badly that [she] came
away from our interaction feeling
disrespected.”
Unlike many other powerful
men accused in recent weeks of
inappropriate behavior, Franken
is getting public support from
women who have worked with
him: Eight former Senate staffers
co-signed a statement on Friday
similarly vouching that their
onetime boss had treated them
“with the utmost respect.”
Many people — Britons included — are in the dark about Churchill, says ‘Darkest Hour’ star
At a press tour stop in
Washington this month, actor
Gary Oldman — who’s been
known to have somewhat, shall
we say, interesting views on
political correctness — actually
shied away from any overt
mention of politics on the red
carpet for his new movie ‘The
Darkest Hour.” Oldman, a
cinematic chameleon, stars as
Winston Churchill in the biopic
about the newly minted British
prime minister in the early days
of World War II.
What do you want
audiences to take away from
the film?
It highlights the fortitude and
resilience and the humanity of
its leader, Winston Churchill.
We screened the movie, and I
could forgive the Americans for
not knowing the history, but I
was amazed that Britons didn’t
really know it either.
What don’t they know?
They didn’t realize how close
we came to some living
arrangement with Hitler.
That’s a nice way of
putting it.
We came right down to the
wire, and I was amazed that
that was not common
knowledge.
Especially since you
consider yourself a bit of a
history buff, right?
My mum, God bless her, is 98
and lived through “The Blitz,”
and my dad fought on warships
in Okinawa. So I feel somewhat
a connection there, and growing
up in the ’60s we were taught
that Churchill was the man who
saved the world. That’s what I
hope people will take away: To
see the film and realize, “Oh boy,
we came very close to a different
way of living.”
What did you learn about
Churchill while shooting the
film?
His stock rose considerably. I
realize that this was a man, he
was incomparable. I don’t know
if you could equate him or
contrast him with other leaders.
I think perhaps he’s there up
with Washington and Lincoln.
The achievements. He was a
man who held almost every
major political position, was in
politics for over 50 years and
wrote 50 books — all of them
readable. You’re looking at a
man who painted 540 paintings,
16 exhibitions at the Royal
Academy, won the Nobel Prize
in literature.
He was a superman. An
indispensable figure.
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
LUCY NICHOLSON/REUTERS
British actor Gary Oldman
stars in “The Darkest Hour.”
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
‘Female’ gets a backlash,
and then backlash-back
BY
E MILY Y AHR
Two weeks ago, country singer
Kalie Shorr had an unexpectedly
emotional reaction when she
heard Keith Urban’s new song
“Female,” a ballad that urges
respect for women. Watching
Urban perform it at the Country
Music Association Awards, Shorr
and her friends talked about how
the message hit home (“When
you hear a song that they play
saying you run the world, do you
believe it? Will you live to see
it?”), especially coming from an
influential artist in country music, where there’s a noticeable
lack of women played on the
radio or signed to record labels.
“All of us in some way have
been slighted by the Nashville
music industry, just by being
women,” said Shorr, 23. “I’ve
walked into offices on Music Row
and had someone look me in the
eye and say, ‘I think you’re a
superstar and you’d be amazing
at this, but you’re a woman and
we just can’t take on another one
right now.’ ”
So Shorr and her singer-songwriter friends enlisted several
other members of the Song Suffragettes, a weekly all-female
concert series, to record a cover
of “Female” that now has 55,000
views on YouTube and was just
released to iTunes. The Nashville
artists’ excitement about Urban’s
song (which flew into the top 30
on country radio) parallels a
similar sentiment from country
fans — and the polar opposite
reaction from some outside
Nashville.
Since the song’s release, some
on social media have declared
that the ballad is “terrible” or
“mansplaining.”
Publications
such as Elle, the Verge and the
Pool were not fans of the chorus,
in which Urban lists descriptors
of women: “Sister, shoulder,
daughter, lover . . . secret keeper,
fortuneteller, Virgin Mary, scarlet letter.” CBS’s “Late Show With
Stephen Colbert” devoted a segment to mocking the ballad.
Colbert called it “the first song
ever written by dumping out a
bin full of inspirational throw
pillows” and sang a parody called
“She-Person.”
“Ladies of the world, you got a
raw deal. Too many times, your
voices have been silenced,” Colbert intoned. “Well, I want to let
you know, I hear you. Now be
quiet while I explain you to you.”
The ridicule doesn’t make
sense to those involved with the
song, who have started to push
back against the criticism —
especially the negativity about
Urban delivering the song, which
also includes lines such as
“When somebody laughs and
implies that she asked for it, just
cause she was wearing a skirt, is
that how that works?”
Late-night TV’s Stephen
Colbert called it “the
first song ever written
by dumping out a bin
full of inspirational
throw pillows” and
sang a parody called
“She-Person.”
“I don’t consider myself to be a
watered-down feminist at all. I’m
pretty hardcore about it. So I
kind of feel like, ‘Oh, wow, are
y’all really looking at this [song]
like it’s a bad thing?’” Shorr said,
adding that it will “take men to
help us overcome” the gender
imbalance in country music.
“Keith Urban is the vessel, but
the message and song is from one
of the most powerful women in
Nashville.”
Shorr is referring to Nicolle
Galyon, who wrote the track with
fellow hit songwriters Shane
McAnally and Ross Copperman
in October. McAnally brought
the idea of the title “Female” —
he’s still not sure how he came up
with it — and explains that,
despite initial reports, the song is
not really centered on Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein’s sexual misconduct allega-
tions, which were revealed a few
days before they sat down to
write.
“We were talking about Harvey Weinstein, that was in the
news, but that led to a much
greater conversation. He had
nothing to do with the story,”
McAnally said. The trio didn’t
write the song with a particular
artist in mind, but were thrilled
when Urban was interested —
and wondered if it might make
more of an impact for a male
artist singing about women’s
equality.
“When Shane said ‘Female,’ I
didn’t think instantly about everything that was going on in the
world. I was thinking for me
about the women that I knew,
and the woman that I am, and
the one I’m trying to raise,” said
Galyon, who has a young daughter. “I was thinking, ‘How would I
want someone to describe me as
a female?’ ”
Colbert in particular made fun
of the list of words in the chorus
(his version: “Lady-woman,
vagina-owner, lipstick, bangs, organ donor”) although he emphasized that he’s a big fan of Urban.
“I think his heart is in the right
place,” Colbert said. “His lyrics,
not as much.”
To Galyon, Colbert missed the
point of why the song is a
positive development for country music, which is inundated
with male singers crooning,
“Hey, girl, what’s up?” songs, as
Galyon put it; she has helped
write many of them. So that’s
why it’s critical to include a
different viewpoint, she said, and
one that “celebrates women.”
“To be honest, I felt like the
Stephen Colbert thing was unnecessary,” Galyon said. “It felt
unaware of our genre. Because if
you’re going to pick a song to
criticize on this topic, this is the
last song that you should pick.”
emily.yahr@washpost.com
Keith Urban performs “Female”
at the CMA Awards. The song
has been criticized as
“mansplaining,” but some
women in Nashville say critics
are missing the bigger picture.
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
THEATER REVIEW
‘Annie’ is middle-of-the-pack despite a voice in the top 1%
BY
N ELSON P RESSLEY
The rapport between Kevin
McAllister’s commanding Daddy
Warbucks and Noelle Robinson’s
plucky Annie is by far the best
thing in Olney Theatre Center’s
dutiful “Annie” revival. McAllister’s gorgeous classical singing
voice gives his Daddy Warbucks a
daunting formality that also
makes the billionaire character
sound super-rich. Then he melts
just right in the face of Robinson’s funny, irresistible little optimist.
Not much of the rest of this
“Annie” is as inspired. You’ll admire the gaggle of orphan girls
tromping around and singing
“It’s a Hard Knock Life,” but
Rachel Leigh Dolan’s choreography is distractingly hard-working. More charming is the girls’
“You’re Never Fully Dressed
Without a Smile”; It’s lighter and
more graceful. You can actually
enjoy the kids, rather than feeling
as though you should be as impressed as a gymnastics judge.
That magic touch keeps skirting just out of reach in Jason King
Jones’s production. The versatile
Rachel Zampelli seems made to
order as the drunk orphanage
matron Miss Hannigan, yet Hannigan’s scenes are less amusing
than creepy.
Wilson Jermaine Heredia, the
original Angel in Broadway’s
“Rent,” is plainly ready to dance
as Hannigan’s conniving brother
Rooster, so why doesn’t his
louche vaudeville “Easy Street”
with Dani Stoller’s cheap tart Lily
spin up into a joyous showstopper?
Why do the housekeepers’
skirts twirl up awkwardly around
their hips as they prance through
the Warbucks mansion? Why
does the stage seem so dim (as it
did for Olney’s “My Fair Lady,”
come to think of it), and why is so
much of the dancing marches,
spins and lifts?
It’s a big show; the program
lists 32 actors (the orphans are
double-cast) and two dogs. All the
singing is good; the nine-piece
orchestra adequately serves up
the durable Charles Strouse-Martin Charnin score; and Rob McQuay is particularly enjoyable as
an Annie-charmed Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Annie’s ballad
“Maybe” and her anthem “Tomorrow” are American musical cornerstones that every kid should
hear, but that doesn’t quite vindicate Olney taking a second run at
the show in seven years. When
McAllister sings and the sunny,
amusing Robinson cracks his severe Warbucks facade, you almost forget about all that.
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
STAN BAROUH
Kevin McAllister, Noelle Robinson and Patricia Hurley in a scene from Olney’s “Annie.”
Annie, book by Thomas Meehan,
music by Charles Strouse, lyrics by
Martin Charnin. Directed by Jason
King Jones. Scenic/projection
designer, Daniel Ettinger; costumes,
Seth M. Gilbert; lights, Sarah
Tundermann; sound design, Roc Lee.
About 21/2 hours. Through Dec. 31 at
the Olney Theatre Center, 2001
Olney-Sandy Spring Rd., Olney.
Tickets $42-$84. Call 301-924-3400
or visit olneytheatre.org.
THEATER REVIEW
The dark aims of Enda Walsh are partly achieved in Solas Nua’s ‘Misterman’
BY
P ETER M ARKS
Above a funky strip of delis and
furniture stores, on a stretch of
14th Street NW that’s off the beaten cultural path, a couple of
plucky, artistically proven companies are claiming another
Washington neighborhood for
theater.
Crestwood is the destination,
and the two groups, Solas Nua and
Pointless Theatre Co., are exploring the dramatic and drawingpower possibilities of a warehouselike location, Dance Loft on
14, on 14th Street NW, a mile
northwest of the Petworth Metro
station. Until now, the loft has
been a home for dance, but with
the shuttering of Flashpoint and
the Mead Theatre Lab — lost in
CulturalDC’s sale of its Penn Quarter space to a developer — these
worthy, itinerant troupes had to
scour the city for alternative affordable accommodations.
The spirited imagists at Pointless arrive at Dance Loft in Janu-
ary with “Imogen,” their new take
on Shakespeare’s storybook-like
“Cymbeline,” and then follow up
in April with a fresh interpretation of Igor Stravinsky’s centuryold ballet “The Rite of Spring.”
Christening the space for theater,
though, is the Irish-centric company, Solas Nua, offering up a
technically polished if not entirely
persuasive handling of Enda
Walsh’s “Misterman,” a portrait of
a diseased mind in a stifling Irish
village.
The rawness of the loft is right
for “Misterman,” one of Walsh’s
twisted stories of personality disorder fueled by isolation and anguish. Solas Nua produced it once
before, as it has other Walsh oneacts, such as “Bedbound,” about
an agitated furniture salesman
who holds his disabled daughter
prisoner in a tiny bedroom.
“Misterman” scampers about
the consciousness of Thomas
Magill, an inhabitant of one of
those rugged, sparsely populated
villages that seem impervious to
DJ COREY PHOTOGRAPHY
Thomas Keegan plays Thomas Magill in Solas Nua’s “Misterman,” a
portrait of a diseased mind in a stifling Irish village. Keegan
masters some of the more arduous demands of the role.
THEATER REVIEW
You have everything to gain
from seeing ‘Nothing to Lose’
BY
N ELSON P RESSLEY
Good comedians have a gift for
cutting to the heart of problems,
and that’s what happens over and
over in Second City’s surprising
“Nothing to Lose (but Our
Chains).” The brand-new show is
a memoir by performer Felonious
Munk, and true to the Second City
brand, it’s funny.
“I look like an extra in ‘Tyler
Perry Presents Spike Lee’s Do the
Right Thing,’ ” cracks Odinaka
Ezeokoli, wearing torn denim
and a backward ball cap as he
plays Munk’s conscience.
“Nothing to Lose” is Munk’s
tell-all about dealing drugs,
shooting a man and serving six
years in prison, and that conscience keeps popping up to con-
tradict some of the evidence. It’s
serious.
That double-barreled approach makes “Nothing to Lose”
arguably the finest work the busy
Second City company has done in
D.C. Audiences wandering in expecting comedy won’t be disappointed; Munk and company occasionally take to the microphone
for passages of straight-up standup, and they nail one-liners about
bad decisions ranging from adoption matters to shooting a thief in
the backside.
Not a laughing matter? Munk
knows it. The consciousness in
this show is ultrasharp, and nothing goes unexamined, particularly Munk’s own culpability. “How
ungrateful,” runs a refrain that
means different things at differ-
SCOTT SUCHMAN
McKenzie Chinn in “Nothing to Lose (but Our Chains).” Playing at
Woolly Mammoth, it is perhaps Second City’s best D.C. offering yet.
ent times.
Riffing at the mic doesn’t mean
Munk’s necessarily cracking
jokes. The writing is ruthlessly
confessional, and it seems so
Mooch management: Family edition
Dear Heloise: If
Hints from one of our family
Heloise
members calls
and asks to come
over and bring the
kids, we usually say “yes,” because
we’re not busy. Then after a while
they’ll say, “Where are we going
for lunch?” We’re always put off,
because “lunch” wasn’t part of
the plan, but we graciously go to a
restaurant and eat with them.
When the bill arrives, they always
hesitate and never offer to pay, so
my husband pays the bill. How do
we stop this selfish behavior from
moochers?
A Reader, Lebanon, Ohio
Here are some suggestions from
my staff:
Schedule all arrivals after 2
p.m. If they ask where you’re
going for lunch or dinner, tell
them, “Anyplace you can afford to
take us.” (Say it while smiling.)
When they ask where you’re
going for lunch, say you’re not
hungry but you don’t want to
stop them from going out to
lunch.
When they ask if they can
come over, say: “Not today. We’re
busy” (or “just about to walk out
the door”).
Go out to lunch and request
separate bills. Pay only for your
lunch. Or, when the bill arrives,
just say, “Your half is [whatever
the amount happens to be].”
Dear Heloise: Here’s my method
for cleaning my garbage disposal:
1. Rinse with cold water.
2. Sprinkle a generous amount
of powdered cleanser in the
disposal.
3. Pack the disposal with ice
cubes, and run the water.
4. Turn on the garbage
disposal.
Voilà — clean, fresh disposal!
Buck J., Kernville, Calif.
Buck J.: Cover your eyes, nose
and mouth to ensure you don’t
ingest any powdered cleanser, or
better yet, use my tried-and-true
household helper, baking soda!
It’s cheap, nontoxic and available
everywhere.
FYI: Baking soda cleans
without scratching, and
deodorizes, too!
Dear Heloise: How much
nutritional value is there in
iceberg lettuce?
Merriann S., Montezuma, Kan.
Merriann S.: According to the
Penn State College of Agricultural
Sciences, iceberg lettuce has very
little nutritional value. One and a
half cups of iceberg lettuce has 10
calories, 0 grams of total fat, 2
grams of carbs and 0 grams of
protein. It has about 6 percent of
the daily value of vitamin A,
2 percent of vitamin C, 2 percent
of iron, 0 percent of vitamin D
and 0 percent of calcium.
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Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box
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Does this page look familiar? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
NF407 6x.75
fresh that Munk pauses now and
then as if he’s still checking
whether he wants to share some
of this stuff in front of an audience. He says some rough (and
change. Embodied here by the indemand Washington actor Thomas Keegan, Magill is arguably the
only personage in the 65-minute
play. Why that’s debatable is that
in his shabby house reside the
voices of relatives, friends and
neighbors, on strategically placed
cassette and reel-to-reel tape recorders — as well as in Magill’s
head. They vie for Magill’s attention with the religious visions that
preoccupy him in his solitude, a
separation from reality exacerbated by the mistreatment he recounts, at the hands of his mother
and other locals.
Some of the arduous demands
of the role come naturally to Keegan: He masters the requirements
of memorization, acrobatic dexterity, dialect and physical timing.
But the tics possessed by the gallery of weird and brooding characters he must convey are a taller
order. He easily conjures a sense of
Magill’s innocence, and yet
this open-faced and vigorous actor is not able to surround himself
as convincingly with demons. We
have to believe Magill to be as
broken and haunted as the place
itself, a man who has metabolized
suffering to a chilling degree. That
facet of the play does not feel
adequately served.
Rex Daugherty is credited as
both director and choreographer,
and in the realm of meticulously
plotting out Magill’s narrative,
this “Misterman” is unassailable.
On the scale of macabre fascination, though, the production still
has a few dark steps to climb.
apparently true) things about his
mother, but then as his mom,
Angela Elise, gets to push back
fiercely.
The stories about his crimes
and his punishment in prison are
particularly gripping, in part because Munk doesn’t labor to
make them exciting. Swaggering
with a gun, flashing wads of cash
he made dealing — he just tells it,
and you can picture it.
It looks like it still hurts when
Munk listens to some crazy stuff
said by his wildly irresponsible
father, played in sketch comedy
bursts by Calvin Evans. Yet the
show, performed in front of a
stark prison wall created by designer Colin K. Bills and in
prisonlike jumpsuits by costumer
Robert Croghan, is capable of
absurd heights. It even bursts
into song as the cast swirls
around Munk bellowing, “Apologize! Apologize!”
The truth of it all starts to feel
so deep, even detailing Munk
among the protesters in Ferguson, Mo., that the opening-night
audience responded audibly to
the show’s final lessons and reckonings (with many of the most
potent passages going to McKenzie Chinn). “Nothing to Lose” fits
the tradition of literary memoir
by people atoning for Very Bad
Things even while being a Second
City sendup; director Anthony
LeBlanc lets both tones flow freely, and incredibly, they get along.
Munk says at one point that his
aim was just to become a decent
person. In context, that sounds
both exalted and humble. What
more should any of us be? In
looking at how it happened, he’s
made a rewardingly decent show.
peter.marks@washpost.com
Misterman, by Enda Walsh. Directed
and choreographed by Rex Daugherty.
Set, Jimmy Stubbs; lighting, Marianne
Meadows; sound, Neil McFadden;
props, Patrick Kavanagh. With the
voices of Nanna Ingvarsson, Brian
Hemmingsen, Madeleine Carr,
Stephanie Mokey, Kiernan McGowan,
Amanda Forstrom, Zoe Evers. About
65 minutes. $35-$45. Through Dec. 9
at Dance Loft on 14, 4618 14th St.
NW. Visit SolasNua.org.
nelson.pressley@washpost.com
Nothing to Lose (but Our Chains)
written by Felonius Munk. Directed by
Anthony LeBlanc. Lights, Colin K.
Bills; sound design and original
music, Jesse Case. About two hours.
Through Dec. 31 at Woolly Mammoth
Theatre Company, 641 D St. NW.
Tickets $49-$89, subject to change.
Call 202-393-3939 or visit
woollymammoth.net.
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
‘Pizzagate’ promulgator
gave BuzzFeed its scoop
BUZZFEED FROM C1
ever you want,” he tweeted.
Cernovich declined Tuesday to
say whether he actually paid anyone; he also said he didn’t know
whether BuzzFeed knew about
his offer.
BuzzFeed editor Ben Smith
said Tuesday he was not aware of
the offer. A BuzzFeed spokesman
said the site “would never pay for
information,” adding, “We also
aren’t going to discuss or engage
in hypotheticals that could in any
way shed light on the identity of
sources.”
Mainstream news organizations like BuzzFeed consider paying sources an ethically dubious
practice because it can induce
sources to say more than they
know and because it creates incentives for sources to engage in
potentially criminal behavior to
obtain information. But there is
no prohibition on a news organization accepting information that
a third party, such as Cernovich,
has paid for.
In an interview earlier Tuesday,
Smith said his site “carefully vetted” all the documents Cernovich
first offered last week, just as it
would a tip by any other source.
“We were extremely careful,”
he said, noting that BuzzFeed
ensured that the documents Cernovich provided weren’t forged
or altered. They weren’t, Smith
said.
While news organizations
need to be wary of any tipster’s
motives, Smith said, they can’t
ignore newsworthy information,
no matter the source.
“I’m not comparing this to Watergate,” he said, but he noted that
Mark Felt — the senior FBI official who became the anonymous
source known as Deep Throat —
“had some very complicated and
notorious motives” in talking to
The Washington Post’s Bob
Woodward.
Smith declined to say from
whom and how Cernovich, a lawyer who lives in Southern California, got the information he
passed on to BuzzFeed.
Cernovich, in an interview
Tuesday, said it was more important for the story to be taken
seriously than for him to “get the
glory” by reporting it himself.
Aware that his reputation could
raise questions about the story’s
credibility, he said, he decided to
pass the documents to BuzzFeed.
“I knew Conyers would deny it
if I broke it,” he said. “Everyone
would call me fake news. . . . My
thinking was: ‘Let’s keep our eye
on the prize and not make this
about me. Let’s make this the
Harvey Weinstein story about
Congress.’ I knew if I gave it to
BuzzFeed, it would be bulletproof.”
He also declined to say who his
source was.
Cernovich’s role is spelled out
to BuzzFeed readers about halfway through the lengthy story.
News organizations typically
don’t reveal their sources on sensitive stories, but BuzzFeed did so
in an effort to be “transparent,”
Smith said. Cernovich said the
publication assured him that he
CARLOS BARRIA/REUTERS
Mike Cernovich speaks at a free-speech rally near the White House in June. He says he gave BuzzFeed
the story about Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) because “everyone would call me fake news.”
would be credited.
The story says: “The documents were first provided to
BuzzFeed News by Mike Cernovich, the men’s rights figure
turned pro-Trump media activist
who propagated a number of false
conspiracy theories including the
‘Pizzagate’ conspiracy. Cernovich
said he gave the documents to
BuzzFeed News for vetting and
further reporting, and because he
said if he published them himself,
Democrats and congressional
leaders would ‘try to discredit the
story by attacking the messenger.’
He provided them without conditions. BuzzFeed News independently confirmed the authenticity
of the documents with four people directly involved with the
case, including the accuser.”
The “men’s rights” reference is
to Cernovich’s advocacy of male
“dominance” over women, as expressed through such essays as
“Misogyny Gets You Laid” (since
deleted) and tweets such as “date
rape does not exist.” The New
Yorker identified Cernovich as a
champion of the “GamerGate”
campaign, in which men, usually
anonymously, viciously attacked
women in the video-game industry. Cernovich has indicated that
he has broken with the movement.
In addition to promoting the
discredited Pizzagate story, Cernovich’s blog, Danger and Play,
was active in spreading other
false stories about Hillary Clinton
during the presidential campaign
last year. One headline on his site
read, “Hillary Clinton has Parkinson’s disease, physician confirms.” As “60 Minutes” noted, the
story was sourced to an anesthesiologist who had never met Clinton.
He also spread a baseless story
about a government and media
coverup of a second shooter in the
Pulse nightclub massacre in Orlando in which 49 people were
killed.
But Cernovich said his reporting and writing have evolved.
“During the campaign, I
viewed myself as a political operative who viewed things as open
warfare,” he said. “Someone
asked me if I would have broken
Sweat inequity: A look at
workers through years
ART REVIEW FROM C1
workers were not often the subject of portraits, especially in the
days before photography. And
even with the advent of the camera, photographers weren’t necessarily using the lens to capture
workers with the same dignity,
intimacy and personality that one
finds in photographs of the bourgeoisie. Rather, photographers
and especially photojournalists
sought out types, ethnographic
evidence and social data. The
“worker” didn’t exist within the
formal understanding of portraiture throughout much of American history.
Images of workers abound in
paintings, but they aren’t always
portraits, and they don’t necessarily give us much insight into personality or character. Consider
the women gathered in a field in
the early light of day in Winslow
Homer’s “Old Mill (The Morning
Bell).” Are they merely decorative?
Is the buxom, smiling figure in
Lilly Martin Spencer’s 1851 “The
Jolly Washerwoman” a real person or a caricature inserted to
enliven a picture dominated by
the tools of her trade, the washboard, soapy wooden bucket and
metal pails of wet clothes?
The story of labor in America is
mainly one of misery, from the
turmoil of industrialization to the
vicissitudes of the market economy with its periodic and horrendous crashes and the alignment of
state power with the corporate
class. The foul synergy of racism,
sexism and classism continues
still. Propagandists would occasionally attempt to imbue the
worker with dignity, and from
time to time, America would face
a crisis that required it to treat
workers with a modicum of humanity. So we have images such as
J. Howard Miller’s “We Can Do It!”
poster made during the Second
World War, which glamorizes the
wartime factory service of women, who filled in for men who were
fighting the Axis powers. And
there are images made by progressive artists to assert the inviolable
humanity of workers, no matter
how exploited and brutalized by
the economic forces arrayed
against them, including Dawoud
Bey’s powerful and melancholy
images of small shop owners in
Harlem made in the 1970s.
But in several images, we also
have telltale signs of the true status of the American worker, beguiled by promises of rising prosperity, seduced into the fiction
that work is essential to our humanity, traduced by greed and
disempowered by the close alliance of politics to commerce.
Trash, seen in the foreground,
becomes a visual metaphor for the
worker as entirely expendable.
One sees it in the crumpled paper
on the pavement in front of Henry
Inman’s 1841 “News Boy” and in
the oyster shells and discarded
newspaper in John George
Brown’s 1879 “The Longshoremen’s Noon.” In a haunting photograph by Hine, made around 1910,
a small, barefoot girl in an orphanage makes the connection
explicit: She is in the foreground,
almost tipping into our space outside the image, and she is grimy,
vulnerable and forlorn, a social
castoff. A quarter century later,
Edward Weston photographed a
cement worker’s glove, cast off,
torn and covered in solidified
grime. The worker isn’t even present. Someone has taken out the
trash.
SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY
With “We Can Do It!” by J. Howard Miller, created during World War II,
propagandists sought to imbue the American worker with dignity.
It’s hard to locate any golden
age of the American worker in this
exhibition. The early days o f the
independent artisan-patriot, seen
in Pat Lyon’s portrait, were brief, if
they ever existed at all. Images of
workers during the postwar boom
years of the 1950s and 1960s must
be seen in the context of those
who didn’t share in the upper
mobility, the migrant farmworkers who put the iceberg lettuce on
the Formica tables and the street
sweepers and janitors who swept
up the McDonald’s wrappers and
mopped up the ketchup spatters.
And what of our new age, this
precipice on which we stand and
wait for automation to displace
the teamsters and taxi drivers and
waiters and cleaning staff and fry
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
the ‘Access Hollywood’ tape [of
Trump bragging about groping
women] if I’d had it. Back then, I
wouldn’t have. I definitely would
now. Now I just want to call it
straight.”
As Smith notes, Cernovich has
in recent months broken several
legitimate stories.
He was the first to report, for
example, the news in July that
White House Chief of Staff Reince
Priebus was about to be fired by
Trump. He also was first to report
in August on a memo written by
erstwhile White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci outlining his press strategy.
Cernovich also first reported in
April that former national security adviser Susan E. Rice had
requested the “unmasking” of the
identities of Americans, including some related to the Trump
campaign and transition team, in
classified intelligence reports.
The revelation was celebrated by
people in Trump’s orbit, including
Donald Trump Jr., who suggested
on Twitter that Cernovich should
win a Pulitzer Prize for it.
But Cernovich has also been
critical of administration officials, particularly national security adviser H.R. McMaster,
whom Cernovich has called “a
globalist warmonger” intent on
regime change in Syria through
an American military invasion.
As part of his journalistic transition, Cernovich said, he rejects a
label frequently applied to him:
alt-right, a description typically
referring to a racist, misogynist
worldview.
“I’m not alt-right,” he said Tuesday, offering “far right” or “conservative” as alternatives. “Those
people are lunatics, and I’ve realized they’re lunatics.”
paul.farhi@washpost.com
cooks and fast-food workers and
bank tellers and all the rest of the
last residue of the old blue-collar
class? And what of disruption,
this idea celebrated by our new
oligarchs as essential to progress,
but which amounts only to more
destruction of community and
more disintegration of family life
for so many people?
In his assembled sculpture,
“Nine to Five,” artist Josh Kline
shows us a janitorial worker
printed in 3-D, dismembered and
jumbled up with his cleaning
brushes and detergents and Lysol
bottle, a perfect dystopian image
of the future. Sam Comen shows
us an army of farmworkers, wooden poles in hand, about to savage
the almond trees of California for
the last of the harvest. Perhaps
someday they will carry more
than poles, but in service to what?
There are intimations of anger
and even rebellion in some of the
last images of this exhibition, but
anger is merely a force, not an
idea, and it is easily co-opted and
misdirected and put to purely selfdestructive uses.
One wishes for some kind of
utopian image to end the show,
something that says: It didn’t
have to be this way. Something
that reminds us that the market
economy isn’t like the weather or
gravity, a given of the natural
world. It could be tamed and
made to serve us all better, so that
we might spend less of our life
working and more of it fully engaged with our true humanity. But
that would be naive and a fool’s
dream. For as long as it was profitable to structure America like a
workhouse, we had work. Now
that the possibility of mass leisure
is upon us, we have unemployment, opioids and death.
philip.kennicott@washpost.com
The Sweat of Their Face:
Portraying American Workers is
on view at the National Portrait
Gallery through Sept. 3, 2018. For
more information visit npg.si.edu.
A husband leaving with all the family’s money? Yes, that is abuse.
Dear Carolyn: My
sister stays home
with her two small
children (2 and 1)
while her partner
works. Recently,
Carolyn
during a fight, he
Hax
took all of their
money — not
much under any circumstances —
and left. He has since returned
and they have patched things up
for now. But they fight frequently
and she is on edge about what he
will do next.
Is this something that would
be considered domestic abuse? Is
there a reputable organization or
help line that she could talk to
about how to protect herself/
make a contingency plan? I can
tell her to open her own bank
account and save $50 per month,
but that won’t get her far in an
emergency.
— Anonymous
Anonymous: Yes, it’s abuse —
textbook. Here’s why:
Control of the money is
control of the other person. His
working while she stays home
with the kids gives him
significant leverage already. Most
working parents have the
decency and emotional good
health not to abuse this power
over stay-at-home partners they
chose to love and children they
chose to raise together, of course.
But when he absconded with the
family money in anger, this guy
made it clear he will cross that
line if that’s what it takes to “win”
an argument with your sister.
Uncontrolled temper is
control of the other person. You
say it perfectly yourself — “she is
on edge about what he will do
next.” Emotional volatility is a
form of threat, and that threat
has your sister watching her
every move so as not to upset her
partner. Using threats to control
others is abuse.
His disregard for others’ wellbeing is control of other people.
Whether it’s an emotional or
financial or some other line, and
whether he crosses it with his
partner and kids or publicly with
others — a neighbor, wait staff,
the kids’ teachers, his exes — the
fact of his crossing it declares that
he will hurt anyone he decides is
hurting him. (“The Godfather:
Part II” is the most ruthlessly
watchable study of this
character.) And that sends your
sister the chilling message that
he’ll hurt her, too.
So, yes. Urge a hotline, exit
plan, emergency cash. The
National Domestic Violence
Hotline can help her find help
locally, 800-799-SAFE, as can the
Rape, Abuse and Incest National
Network, 800-656-HOPE. Among
other things, they can make sure
she understands — and plans for
accordingly — that getting out of
this risky situation is necessary
and risky unto itself, since leaving
activates an abuser’s need to win.
For your part, you can make
sure your sister knows she can
call you, 24/7, when she needs
you. Call one of the hotlines
yourself; they also guide family
and friends.
Dear Carolyn: How should I deal
with my in-laws who hate me and
a husband who always puts them
first? They can do no wrong.
However, everything I do isn’t
good enough. He acts as though
they’re his family and I’m
beneath them.
I feel like moving to another
country just to get away from
them.
— In-Law
In-Law: Good therapy (solo)
sounds a lot easier to me. As do
discretion and a good attorney.
Take a deep breath, take
precautions and recognize there
are times when others’ contempt
leaves you with only one
reasonable choice — to prioritize
taking care of yourself.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her column
delivered to your inbox each morning
at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
11/22/17
7:00
7:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
8:00
◆ News
◆ Hollywood
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
Mod Fam
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ J’pardy!
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆ ET
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
14.1 WFDC (UNI) Enamorándome de Ramón
◆ FamFeud
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) ◆ FamFeud
◆ MotorWeek
22.1 WMPT (PBS) ◆ Business
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
32.1 WHUT (PBS) The Rock Newman Show
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) Law & Order
◆ Saturday Night Live
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Big Bang
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Nature
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France 24 Programming
The Scent of Rain in the
The 60s Generation
◆ iHeartRadio Music Festival Night 1
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10:00
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◆ Dateline
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CABLE CHANNELS
KEVIN MAZUR/GETTY IMAGES FOR IHEARTMEDIA
iHeartRadio Music Festival (CW at 8) Harry Styles performs during this
annual Las Vegas concert, which was taped in September. The lineup also
includes Pink, Coldplay, Chris Stapleton and the Weeknd.
A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving
(ABC at 8) Charlie Brown hosts a
Thanksgiving feast for the Peanuts
gang in this animated classic.
The Wall (NBC at 8) A pair
competes for big bucks in a new
episode of this Chris Hardwickhosted game show.
Survivor (CBS at 8) Alliances are
put to the test.
With Love, Christmas
(Hallmark at 8) A Christmasthemed assignment draws two ad
execs together in this movie for
viewers ready to kick the holiday
season into high gear.
PREMIERE
Godless (Netflix streaming) Jeff
Daniels is the leader of a band of
outlaws who want revenge against
Roy Goode (Jack O’Connell), the
protege who betrayed them, in
this seven-episode Western.
Michelle Dockery (“Good
Behavior,” “Downton Abbey”) stars
as a prominent figure in the New
Mexico town where Roy seeks
refuge.
Property Brothers at Home:
Drew’s Honeymoon House
(HGTV at 9) This five-episode
series follows the Property
Brothers as they undertake a topto-bottom renovation of a historic
1920s home in Los Angeles where
Drew intends to live with his
fiancee, Linda Phan.
SPECIAL
Barbra: The Music . . . The
Mem’ries . . . The Magic! (Netflix
streaming) Hello, gorgeous. Barbra
Streisand talks about her career
and performs her biggest hits
alongside a roster of special
guests, including Jamie Foxx, in
this concert film, which follows the
end of the legendary singer’s 13city tour.
RETURNING
Polar Bear Town
(Smithsonian at 8) Season 3.
LATE NIGHT
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Denzel
Washington, Allison Williams, Talib
Kweli, Rick Ross, Yummy
Bingham.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Gayle
King, Elton John.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Krysten
Ritter, Josh Hutcherson.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Tim
Meadows, Kenny DeForest.
— Bethonie Butler
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage
Storage
Ozzy & Jack’s
Ozzy & Jack’s World Detour
A&E
(6:00) Movie: Titanic ★★★★ (1997)
Movie: Titanic ★★★★ (1997)
AMC
Animal Cribs
Animal Cribs
Treehouse Masters: Branched Out
Treehouse Masters
Animal Planet
Movie: Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son ★ (2011)
Face
50 Central Face Value
50 Central
BET
Movie: Maid in Manhattan ★★ (2002)
Movie: Maid in Manhattan ★★ (2002)
Movie: Ocean’s Eleven
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King of Hill
Amer. Dad
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
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Burgers
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Family Guy
Cartoon Network (6:00) Kung Fu Panda 2
Erin Burnett OutFront
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CNN Special Report
The History of Comedy
CNN
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South Park
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Homestead Rescue
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(10:05) Homestead Rescue (11:05) Homestead Rescue
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Movie: Tangled ★★★ (2010)
(8:40) Tangled: The Series
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Stuck/Middle Liv-Mad.
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Movie: White Chicks ★★ (2004)
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NBA Basketball: Golden State Warriors at Oklahoma City Thunder
NBA Basketball: Lakers at Kings
ESPN
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Iron Chef America
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(6:45) Movie: Despicable Me ★★★ (2010)
(8:50) Movie: Elf ★★★ (2003)
The 700 Club
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Movie: Pitch Perfect 2 ★★ (2015)
FX
Coming Home for Christmas Movie: With Love, Christmas (2017)
Movie: Marry Me at Christmas (2017)
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A Happy Yule Log
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(5:30) Split
VICE
Movie: The Dark Knight ★★★★ (2008)
(10:35) Movie: Mechanic: Resurrection
HBO
Property Brothers
Property Brothers at Home Property Brothers
Hunters
Hunt Intl
Property Brothers
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Swamp People
Forged in Fire: Bladesgiving
History
Grey’s Anatomy
Little Women: Dallas
Little Women: Dallas
Little Women: Atlanta
(11:02) Little Women: Dallas
Lifetime
Orioles Classics
Ftbl
Coach K
Boxing
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
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Catfish
(7:45) Catfish: The TV Show
(8:55) Catfish: The TV Show Are You the One?
(11:01) Movie: American Pie
MTV
The Story of Us
The Story of Us
Explorer XL
The Story of Us
Nat’l Geographic The Story of God
Caps
Caps Overtime (Live)
Caps in 30 Redskins
NBC SportsNet WA NHL Hockey: Ottawa Senators at Washington Capitals (Live)
Paradise
Paradise
Movie: The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water
Fresh Prince Fresh Prince Friends
Friends
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Friends
Friends
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Friends
Shannara Chronicles
Shannara Chronicles
X-Men: The Last Stand ★★
Spike
(6:55) Movie: Salt ★★★ (2010)
(8:57) Movie: Skyfall ★★★ (2012)
Syfy
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
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Full Frontal
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(6:00) Movie: Shenandoah Movie: The Glenn Miller Story ★★★ (1953)
(10:15) Movie: Harvey ★★★ (1950)
TCM
Long Lost Family
90 Day Fiancé: Extended
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90 Day Fiancé: Extended
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(5:30) Remember the Titans Movie: King Kong ★★★ (2005)
(11:01) Movie: 10,000 B.C.
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Expedition Unknown
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Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers
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King
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Movie: A Royal Family Christmas (2015)
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USA Network
Black Ink Crew: Chicago
Black Ink Crew: Chicago
Black Ink: Chicago
Dinner
Black Ink Crew: Chicago
Coming
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ABC
News
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at
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Govt. Matters On Your Side
WNC8
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Cops
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High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
Rose, who was fired by PBS and CBS, had issued apology
ROSE FROM C1
CBS News suspended Rose on
Monday, shortly after The Post’s
story published. Bloomberg TV
terminated its rebroadcast agreement with Charlie Rose.
Eight women, who were either
employees or aspired to work for
Rose at the “Charlie Rose” show,
told The Post that he made unwanted sexual advances to them
between the late 1990s and 2011.
Those advances included lewd
phone calls, walking around naked in their presence, or groping
their breasts, buttocks or genital
areas, the women said.
In a statement provided to The
Post on Monday — and later posted on social media — Rose said: “I
deeply apologize for my inappropriate behavior. I am greatly embarrassed. I have behaved insensitively at times, and I accept responsibility for that, though I do
not believe that all of these allegations are accurate. I always felt
that I was pursuing shared feelings, even though I now realize I
was mistaken.”
In the nearly two months since
the New York Times published an
exposé on Harvey Weinstein and
his history alleged sexual misconduct, the country has been going
through a national reckoning
with such behavior. Powerful men
from across industries — media,
Hollywood, and politics among
them — have been implicated,
including household names such
as Louis C.K., Kevin Spacey and
Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.).
It has become almost a daily
occurrence to see a powerful man
in the headlines facing accusations of misconduct. On the very
same day Rose’s scandal broke,
the New York Times suspended
star journalist Glenn Thrush for
allegedly crossing the line with
young female colleagues, and
BuzzFeed News reported that
Rep. John Conyers Jr., the Democratic dean of the House of Representatives, had settled a wrongful
termination suit with a woman
who claimed to have been fired for
rebuffing his advances.
In less than 24 hours since The
Post reported on allegations
against Rose, the situation was
acknowledged on “CBS Evening
News,” where interim anchor Anthony Mason said Monday “the
wave of sexual abuse allegations
we’ve been reporting from Hollywood to Washington have now
touched CBS News.”
On Tuesday morning, in a remarkable segment, Rose’s broadcast partners on “CBS This Morning” slipped out of their roles as
newswomen to speak as people,
full of anger and bewilderment
CBS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“There is no excuse for this alleged behavior. It is systematic and pervasive,” said Norah O’Donnell,
left, with Charlie Rose and fellow “CBS This Morning” co-host Gayle King.
and betrayal.
“This is a moment that demands a frank and honest assessment about where we stand and
more generally the safety of women,” Norah O’Donnell said. “Let
me be very clear: There is no
excuse for this alleged behavior. It
is systematic and pervasive. . . .
This has to end. This behavior is
wrong. Period.”
Her co-host, Gayle King, said
she had barely slept. The Post
article, King said, “was deeply
disturbing, troubling and painful
for me to read.”
She added: “I am deeply rocked
by this.”
Rhodes, the CBS News president, wrote in his staff memo that
the network’s news operation
“has reported on extraordinary
revelations at other media companies this year and last. Our credibility in that reporting requires
credibility managing basic standards of behavior. That is why we
have taken these actions.
“Let’s please remember our obligations to each other as colleagues. We will have human resources support today and every
day, and we are organizing more
personal and direct training
which you will hear about from
senior management shortly.”
He added: “I’m deeply disappointed and angry that people
were victimized — and that even
people not connected with these
events could see their hard work
undermined. If all of us commit to
the best behavior and the best
work — that is what we can be
known for.”
Rose was one of the best-regarded names in TV news. His
2013 interview with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad won him
both an Emmy and a Peabody
Award, and in 2015 he received
the Walter Cronkite Excellence in
Journalism Award.
j.dulac@washpost.com
elahe.izadi@washpost.com
ben.terris@washpost.com
THEATRE
Curve of
Departure
Written by Rachel Bonds
Directed by Mike Donahue
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Begins Next Week!
Nov. 29 through Jan.7
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3
The night before a funeral, family members gather in a single
hotel room in New Mexico, shuffling sleeping arrangements,
dealing with absent family members, and preparing for their
uncertain futures. A play about the moments you decide how
much you will give to someone you owe nothing to. Straight
from its world premiere production at South Coast Rep, Curve
of Departure returns the playwright and director of The Wolfe
Twins to Studio.
After the turkey and stuffing, explode with laughter
Thanksgiving weekend at this wildly popular interactive
comedy whodunit. New clues and up to the minute
improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after night.”
(Washington Post)
Reserve now, holiday shows sell out early!
Studio Theatre
1501 14th Street NW
Washington, DC 20005
202.332.3300,
studiotheatre.org
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
$20-$85
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
"The gifted Rachel
Bonds has a unique
sensitivity to dialogue
and modern
locutions. "
—DC Metro Theatre
Arts (about The Wolfe
Twins)
Added Show:
Fri, Nov 24 at 5PM
Great Group Rates
for 15 or More
16-2898
C6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
When their son makes a lot of noise, the downstairs neighbor makes even more
Miss
Manners
Dear Miss
Manners: My
wife and I live
with our 18month-old son on
the third floor of
a 20-unit
apartment
complex in a
major city. On
weekdays, we both work, leaving
our son with a responsible adult
who takes him on outings.
When we get home and begin
to prepare our family dinner,
our son sometimes screams out
of excitement or frustration. Of
course, we try to do everything
we can to prevent this, including
JUDITH
MARTIN,
NICHOLAS
MARTIN AND
JACOBINA
MARTIN
taking him outside for a walk or
additional playtime.
But now our immediate
downstairs neighbor (a single,
older woman without children)
has started shouting from her
unit for us to quiet our son,
sometimes using a harsh tone
and words. I have calmly
explained (from our balcony)
that we are doing all we can to
keep our son quiet but that it is
not possible at all times, that we
understand that the noise
upsets her and that it upsets us
as well.
Her response is to continue to
shout from her balcony. She
even suggested that if we spent
more time with our son, perhaps
he would be more quiet.
While I am sympathetic to
our neighbor (no one wants to
listen to prolonged shouting), I
feel this comment crossed the
line and was offensive to both
myself and my wife, as we would
both prefer to be at home with
our son as opposed to at work.
The neighbor’s shouting and
comments have caused our
family stress, but I do not see
any point in further dialogue
between balconies. Accordingly,
we have decided to simply
ignore our neighbor and carry
on as best we can. I am not sure
what further action we should
take. Does Miss Manners have
any advice for us as to how to
politely address this issue?
Your neighbor’s comment was
impolite, but perhaps she is
tired. And perhaps, like Miss
Manners, she noticed that
instead of apologizing for the
noise, you chose to explain to
her that babies sometimes cry
and that your inconvenience is
equal to her own.
You should apologize and —
for the sake of the other 18
tenants — do so in writing. This
will also give you the
opportunity to say that while
you are doing your best to calm
your son, your neighbor’s
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Medal of Honor Theater NMMC
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
12:00-12:05-2:00-7:00-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:30-3:00-5:55-7:50-9:35
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 11:50-2:504:50-7:50-8:50-11:00
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 12:10-1:304:30-10:25
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: (!) 12:00-2:35-5:107:55-10:35
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 12:00-2:405:20-8:00-10:35
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
2:20-4:45-7:10-10:40
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: (!) 5:00
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 7:30
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air & Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
Angelika
Pop-Up at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:45-2:10-4:30-7:00-9:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
12:00-3:30
My Friend Dahmer (R) 12:002:30-4:45-7:20-9:35; 12:00-2:304:45-7:20-9:35
Fate/Stay Night: Heaven's Feel
- I. Presage Flower 7:30-10:00;
7:30-10:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:003:30-5:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:45-2:10-4:30-7:00-9:20
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Lady Bird (R) 11:00-1:15-3:305:45-8:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:35-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:50-2:15-4:407:10-9:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:153:30-7:00-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
12:30-2:40-5:00-7:45-10:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
12:05-2:25-4:50-7:20-9:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
11:55-2:25-4:55-7:30-10:05
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
God's Own Country 1:15-4:157:15-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 12:30-1:00-3:304:00-6:30-7:00-9:15-9:40
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R)
CC: 4:10
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-2:15-3:154:30-5:30-6:50-7:45-9:00-9:50
BPM (Beats Per Minute) (120
battements par minute) (NR)
2:00-8:15
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 1:20-4:20-7:20-9:45
The Square (R) CC: 5:00
The Florida Project (R) CC: 1:10
MARYLAND
AFI Silver Theatre
Cultural Center
8633 Colesville Road
An American Tail (G) 5:00
Bluebeard (Haebing) (NR) 7:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:00-2:20-4:407:05-9:25
The Villainess (AK-Nyeo) (NR) 9:25
Lady Bird (R) 11:20-1:20-3:205:20-7:20-9:20
Rebecca (1940) (NR) 2:00
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
10:00-11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 12:00-2:154:30-6:45-9:00
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:00-11:302:30-4:00-7:00-8:45
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 10:05-10:151:00-3:25-3:45-6:00-6:30-9:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
(!) 5:30-8:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 11:15-2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 1:00-9:55
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) (!)
1:45-7:15
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:00-1:45-4:30-7:30-10:30
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:45-6:00
Coco 3D (PG) (!) 3:00-9:00-9:15
AMC Columbia 14
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:00-11:15-2:15-5:00-6:00-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:40-1:40-2:50-6:20-7:20-9:40
The Star (PG) CC: 10:15-12:403:10-5:40-7:55-10:15
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:00-11:30-1:102:45-5:30-6:30-7:10-8:30-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express (PG13) CC: 11:05-2:00-4:55-7:35-10:30
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:50-4:407:20-10:05
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
4:40-10:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:50-2:20-4:50-7:40-10:25
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: (!) 10:35-1:254:15-7:05-9:55
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) (!)
9:00; 12:15-3:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 10:10-1:10-4:10-7:10-10:10
Coco 3D (PG) (!) 4:10
Lady Bird (R) (!) 10:05-12:30-2:555:25-7:55-10:20
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 10:45-9:30
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) (!) 10:30-1:454:45-7:45-10:45
Justice League (PG-13) (!) 4:007:00-10:00
Coco (PG) (!) 10:00-1:00
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:45-11:50-12:55-3:45-5:25-6:356:45-8:15-9:25-9:35
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:25-2:35-5:35-7:05-8:35-10:05
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 10:55-11:452:20-3:05-4:35-5:20-7:00-7:459:15-10:00
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:10-11:3511:40-1:10-2:10-2:35-4:10-5:10Landmark West End Cinema 7:10-8:10-10:10
2301 M Street NW
Murder on the Orient Express (PGThe Adventures of Robin Hood 13) CC: 11:35-2:20-5:05-7:50-10:35
(1938) (NR) 1:30-4:30-7:30
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 11:50-1:35Mudbound (R) CC: 1:15-4:00-7:00 2:45-4:15-4:20-7:00-7:05-9:45Bill Nye: Science Guy 7:30
9:50
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 4:15 A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Jane 1:45
11:15-1:55-4:45-7:20
Dear Miss Manners: How long
after the death of a relative does
one offer condolences? When I
mention in conversation to an
acquaintance that my mother
died 28 years ago, he or she
almost always says, “Oh, I’m
sorry.’’ It seems odd to me.
Deaths that occurred a very
long time ago and, so far as you
know, in the natural course, do
not require acknowledgment
beyond a sympathetic mien.
That would include a parent, but
not, by contrast, a child — the
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:05-1:45-5:30-8:00-10:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00Missouri (R) CC: (!) 11:20-2:0511:00-12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00 4:55-7:40-10:25
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:45-1:00-3:00-4:10-6:15-7:15Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
Regal Gallery Place
9:30
(!) 2:35-2:45-3:15-5:25-5:35-6:05Stadium 14
8:15-8:25-8:55
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
701 Seventh Street NW
11:20-1:20-2:20-7:20
Justice League (PG-13) 3:00-8:40 The Man Who Invented ChristThor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:10- mas (PG) (!) 10:50-2:25-5:003D (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:10-7:15
7:35-10:10
2:40-5:35-8:30
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-12:40-4:45- The Star (PG) 11:30-2:05-4:25Lady Bird (R) (!) 11:30-2:00-4:507:00-8:00-11:00
7:15-9:40
6:45-9:05
Murder on the Orient Express
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 12:10-3:10Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 10:55-1:40-4:405:10-5:40-6:10-8:10-8:40-9:10
(PG-13) 12:30-3:20-6:05-9:00
7:30-10:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Wonder (PG) 11:40-2:25-5:10Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:30 8:00-10:40
(!) 11:35-1:25-4:30-7:25-10:15
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:35- Coco (PG) 11:15-2:45-3:30-6:00- Justice League: The IMAX 2D
7:25-10:15
Experience (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:007:00-9:00
1:50-4:40-7:30-10:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:15-4:10-7:00-9:40
Verna (!) 9:55
12:15-2:40-5:05-7:30-9:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:25- The Ghost Bride (NR) (!) 12:30
12:00-2:30-5:10-7:45-10:20
Coco (PG) (!) 12:40-3:40
2:55-5:20-7:45-10:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
AMC Loews
Missouri (R) CC: 10:35-1:25-4:15- 12:00-12:15-3:05-5:50-5:55-8:45
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
7:15-10:05
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11115 Mall Circle
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:50-7:20-10:30
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
4:20-10:20
Coco 3D (PG) 12:00-10:05
10:00-4:45-7:45-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) 11:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:20
2:00-4:50-7:40-10:30
11:45-3:00-6:00-9:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:40The Star (PG) CC: 11:00-1:3010:30-1:55-5:15-8:10-11:00
3:35-6:30-9:30
5:30-6:45-10:45
Lady Bird (R) 10:30-2:10-5:15Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:45-12:30Smithsonian
Lockheed
Martin
7:40-10:10
IMAX Theater
3:30-6:30
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:45-10:00
601 Independence Avenue SW
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
(PG-13) CC: 11:55-2:45-3:45D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:208:00-10:30
(NR) 2:40
3:20-6:25-9:30
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the Wonder (PG) CC: 10:15-1:15-4:15Justice League (PG-13) 5:157:15-10:15
Sea
3D
(NR)
11:00-1:15-3:30
8:15-11:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Dream Big: Engineering Our
Coco (PG) 10:00-1:15
World: An IMAX 3D Experience 11:45-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:20
12:25
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
AMC Loews Uptown 1
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:25- (!) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:30
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
11:50-2:05
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Justice League: The IMAX 2D Ex- (!) 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-9:15
1:10-7:30
perience (PG-13) 4:20-6:35-8:55 Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 9:30-1:45Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
6:30-9:30
4:20-10:30
AMC Magic Johnson
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
shouting from the balcony
exacerbates, rather than
improves, the situation.
Capital Center 12
800 Shoppers Way
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:304:15-7:00-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
3:40-6:45-9:40
Coco (PG) CC: 1:30-6:30-7:30-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:00-6:40-9:35
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:15-1:25-4:004:15-6:45-9:15
Jigsaw (R) CC: 2:35-7:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
2:00-4:20-6:50-9:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
2:30-5:30-8:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 4:45-9:35
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
1:15-4:00-7:00-9:45
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:45-4:30
Justice League: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 3:00-6:00-9:00
The Star (PG) 3:00-5:15-7:309:35-9:45
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Coco (PG) 10:00-1:00-4:007:00-9:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:00-1:50-4:40-7:30-10:20;
11:05-1:50-4:40-7:35-10:20
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Justice League (PG-13) 11:002:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:1011:10-1:10-2:10-4:10-5:10-7:108:10-10:15
The Star (PG) 10:20-12:50-3:256:50-9:10
Coco (PG) 10:30-11:30-1:20-2:404:20-6:30-7:30-9:30-10:30
Wonder (PG) 10:40-1:30-4:307:20-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:0511:05-12:40-1:20-3:40-4:40-6:407:40-9:20-10:20
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
4:00-10:00
Justice League (PG-13) 10:001:00-7:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:40AM
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:50-1:50-5:007:50-10:30
The Man Who Invented
Christmas (PG) 11:00-2:00-4:307:10-9:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:30-1:20-4:20-7:30-10:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
2:20-4:40-9:45
Last Flag Flying (R) 10:10-1:104:00-6:50-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:20-4:10-6:50-9:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:40-7:00
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-4:507:20-10:10
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Justice League (PG-13) 2:20-8:10;
12:00-2:20-2:55-5:50-8:10-8:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:25-5:15
Justice League (PG-13) XD:
10:50AM
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:25-12:35-3:30-5:15-6:25-9:20
Hoyt's West Nursery
Cinema 14
1591 West Nursery Road
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
11:20-12:20-1:20-2:10-3:104:10-5:00-6:05-6:55-7:45-8:509:40-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:00-4:05-6:30-9:25
The Star (PG) CC: 11:00-1:554:30-7:00-9:10
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-12:00-1:001:55-3:00-3:50-4:45-6:40-7:358:45-9:30-10:25
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:05-1:45-4:407:20-10:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:40-3:004:20-6:05-7:00-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
11:50-2:20-4:50-7:40-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:30-2:00-4:35-7:05-9:30
The Man Who Invented
Christmas (PG) CC: 11:00-1:306:45-9:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
11:00-12:50-4:00-6:55-9:50
Landmark
Bethesda Row Cinema
7235 Woodmont Avenue
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:15-7:20-10:05
Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 1:304:25-7:10-9:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 1:00-2:00-4:004:50-7:00-7:30-9:35-10:00
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 1:20-3:55-7:15-9:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:10-1:50-3:204:40-5:40-6:50-7:45-9:20-9:55
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
The Florida Project (R) 2:305:15-7:45
Paragon Kentlands
Stadium 10
629 Center Point Way
Justice League (PG-13) 11:5012:45-2:25-3:20-5:00-5:50-7:358:30-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:454:30-7:15-10:00
The Star (PG) 12:45-2:50-4:557:00-9:05
Coco (PG) 12:05-2:30-4:557:20-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:00-2:35-5:10-7:4510:20
Wonder (PG) 12:10-2:40-5:107:40-10:10
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:30-2:50-5:10-7:30-9:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:402:55-5:10-7:25-9:40
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
3899 Branch Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 11:001:45-2:45-4:30-7:15-8:15-10:1510:55
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:154:05-7:00-10:10
Coco (PG) 2:00-4:55-7:50-10:40
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:00-5:30
Coco 3D (PG) 11:05AM
Wonder (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:507:30-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:302:55-5:20-7:40-10:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
10:45-12:00-2:30-4:15-5:15-7:459:45-10:15
Wonder (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:307:30-10:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:00-1:00-3:00-6:00-7:00-9:00
Theeran Adhigaram Ondru (NR)
3:00-6:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
Khakee (Telugu) (NR) 11:30-10:00
Coco 3D (PG) 1:30-10:30
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Stadium 14
6505 America Blvd.
Justice League (PG-13) 12:301:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:004:00-7:00-10:00
The Star (PG) 12:30-3:00-5:308:00-10:30
Coco (PG) 12:45-1:15-3:45-4:157:00-7:30-10:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 2:00-4:45-7:45-10:30
Wonder (PG) 12:30-3:45-7:0010:15
Jigsaw (R) 1:15-4:15-7:30-10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:454:45-7:30-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:004:30-7:15-10:15
Marshall (PG-13) 12:30-3:306:45-9:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
2:15-3:30-5:30-6:30-8:30-9:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Coco 3D (PG) 10:00
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 11:152:30-4:00-6:30-7:15-10:00-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:453:00-6:45-10:15
The Star (PG) 11:25-1:45-4:157:00-9:45
Coco (PG) 11:00-12:10-2:15-3:306:15-7:00-9:35
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:30-10:25
Wonder (PG) 11:00-2:00-4:557:50-10:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
11:30-2:00-4:45-7:50-10:35
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:302:00-4:30-7:20-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:20-1:00-4:30-7:45-10:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:00-3:45-7:30-10:40
Coco 3D (PG) 10:10
Regal Rockville Center
Stadium 13
199 East Montgomery Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 12:0012:30-3:00-3:45-6:00-6:45-9:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:153:30-6:30-9:30
The Star (PG) 12:15-2:45-5:007:15-9:45
Coco (PG) 12:00-12:30-3:00-6:007:00-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:45
Wonder (PG) 12:00-2:40-5:158:00-10:45
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
12:45-3:30-7:15-10:15
Justice League (PG-13) 1:30Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:303:30-4:30-7:30-9:30-10:30
3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 3:00Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
3:45-6:00-6:45-9:00-9:45
Missouri (R) 12:45-4:15-7:30The Star (PG) 2:20-4:40-7:10-9:40 10:15
Coco (PG) 1:15-4:15-6:00-7:15Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
10:15
1:15-4:30-7:30-10:00-10:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Lady Bird (R) 12:15-2:45-5:15(PG-13) 1:05-2:10-3:50-6:407:45-10:15
7:45-9:50
Coco 3D (PG) 3:45-10:15
Wonder (PG) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Regal Waugh Chapel
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:25Stadium 12 & IMAX
5:20-7:55-10:30
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:05Justice League (PG-13) 11:004:35-5:00-7:05-9:30-10:30
2:00-5:00-8:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:402:30-5:30-6:30-8:30
3:40-6:45-9:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
The Star (PG) 10:10-11:15-1:501:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
4:10-6:30-8:50
Coco 3D (PG) 3:00-9:00
Coco (PG) 10:20-11:50-1:20-2:55Regal Cinemas Majestic
6:05-7:30-9:10
Stadium 20 & IMAX
Murder on the Orient Express
900 Ellsworth Drive
(PG-13) 11:30-2:25-5:20-8:15Justice League (PG-13) 4:55-8:00 11:10
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) Wonder (PG) 10:00-10:45-1:4012:05-4:05
4:30-7:15-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
(PG-13) 1:05-4:15-7:15-10:10
12:30-3:10-5:50-8:30-11:15
Wonder (PG) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:15Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:40- 12:50-3:30-6:15-9:20
3:10-5:50-8:30-11:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 12:00-3:00-5:55-9:00-11:00
Missouri (R) 1:00-2:40-5:25Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
8:15-11:00
10:30-1:30-4:40-7:45-10:50
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Coco 3D (PG) 4:25-10:35
12:00-1:50-2:55-6:00-9:05-10:55 Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:0012:25-3:35-6:45-9:55
4:00-7:00-10:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Regal Westview
Experience (PG-13) 1:20-4:25Stadium 16 & IMAX
7:30-10:35
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:00- Justice League (PG-13) 1:453:00-6:00-7:00-9:10-10:10
4:45-7:45
Coco (PG) 12:12-3:20-4:33-6:30- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:157:43-9:40
12:00-1:30-3:30-4:30-6:45-8:00Coco 3D (PG) 1:25-10:53
9:45-11:00
Regal Germantown
Murder on the Orient Express
Stadium 14
(PG-13) 1:15-4:15-7:30-10:45
20000 Century Boulevard
The Star (PG) 10:15-1:00-3:306:30-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 11:002:00-4:00-5:00-8:00-10:00-11:00 Coco (PG) 10:45-12:30-2:00-5:007:15-8:15-10:30-11:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
11:30-1:00-2:45-4:15-6:00-7:30- Wonder (PG) 10:45-1:45-4:459:15-10:45
7:45-10:45
Murder on the Orient Express
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
(PG-13) 11:15-1:30-2:15-5:1511:45-2:30-5:45-8:30-11:15
7:00-8:15-11:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15The Star (PG) 11:45-2:15-4:453:00-6:00-9:00
7:15-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Coco (PG) 10:30-12:00-3:00-4:30- Missouri (R) 11:30-2:30-5:308:15-11:10
6:00-7:30-9:00
The Man Who Invented
Christmas (PG) 11:00-2:00-4:307:15-10:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
10:45-12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15-11:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:00-2:15-5:15-8:15-11:20
Lady Bird (R) 10:00-11:30-2:155:00-7:30-10:00
Coco 3D (PG) 10:00-3:45
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:004:00-7:00-10:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:45-2:35-5:05-7:40-10:10
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:25-5:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 10:50-1:50-4:407:20-10:05
My Friend Dahmer (R) 2:20-8:05
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
2:30-8:30
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 10:30-1:10-3:456:35-9:25
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
UA Snowden Square
10:20-1:20-4:20-7:30-10:30
Stadium 14
Lady Bird (R) 11:40-2:05-4:259161 Commerce Center Drive
6:45-9:20
Justice League (PG-13) 10:30Coco 3D (PG) CC: 12:00-1:0011:00-1:30-2:00-4:30-7:30-8:00- 3:00-5:00-6:00-7:00-8:00-9:00
10:30
Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 11:50Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:40- 3:00-6:05-9:05
3:50-6:45-10:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Murder on the Orient Express
Experience (PG-13) CC: 10:00(PG-13) 10:10-12:50-3:40-6:30- 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
9:10
The Ghost Bride (NR) 11:30-5:30
The Star (PG) 10:50-1:10-3:30Justice League (PG-13) 4:556:00-8:30
7:45-10:45
Coco (PG) 10:00-12:00-1:00-4:00- The Star (PG) 12:05
6:15-7:15-10:15
Coco (PG) 11:00-2:00; 11:30-2:30;
Wonder (PG) 10:00-10:40-1:20- 5:30
4:10-7:00-9:45
AMC Potomac Mills 18
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
10:05-12:30-3:20-6:00-8:45-11:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:00- Justice League (PG-13) 10:4512:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, The Star (PG) CC: 11:00-1:30Missouri (R) 10:45-1:50-4:503:50-6:10-8:40
7:50-10:50
Coco (PG) CC: 10:15-4:30-10:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:20-12:3012:20-3:30-5:00-6:30-9:30-11:00 1:00-3:15-3:45-6:15-6:30-9:00Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
9:15
10:20-1:40-4:40-7:45-10:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Lady Bird (R) 10:15-12:45-3:10- 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
5:40-8:15-10:40
Coco 3D (PG) 1:20-7:45
Coco 3D (PG) 3:00-9:20
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14 Experience (PG-13) CC: 11:307710 Matapeake Business Drive
2:30-5:30-8:30-11:30
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
AMC Shirlington 7
11:20-2:10-5:00-6:30-7:50-9:202772 South Randolph St.
10:40
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
(!) 4:30
10:20-12:20-1:20-3:30-6:50Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
10:20-11:20
(!) 1:45-7:15-10:00
The Star (PG) Open Caption; CC: (!)
AMC Tysons Corner 16
11:00-1:30-4:10-6:40-9:00
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:00-12:50-3:40
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
(PG-13) CC: (!) 10:30-3:00-6:20- 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
9:30
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:15-12:30-6:40
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 11:10-1:55- Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 10:40-1:404:35-7:20-10:15
4:30-7:15-10:00
Jigsaw (R) CC: 2:30-5:10-8:20- Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
11:00
(!) 11:30-2:30-5:30-8:30-11:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 3:35-9:45
10:45-1:45-4:50-7:40-10:30
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: (!) Experience (PG-13) (!) 10:00-1:0012:10-2:40-5:30-8:10-10:45
4:00-7:00-9:50-10:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
AMC Worldgate 9
(!) 10:10-10:50-1:00-1:40-3:5013025 Worldgate Drive
4:30-7:00-8:00-9:50-10:50
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 9:40
12:00-1:00-3:00-6:00-7:00-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:50-2:50-4:20-5:40-7:10-8:30- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:15-3:30-6:30-9:40
10:00-11:30
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:40-11:403D (PG-13) CC: 4:30-10:00
1:50-4:40-7:30
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 12:30-2:45iPic Pike & Rose
5:00-7:15-9:30
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) (!) 12:30- Coco (PG) CC: (!) 1:30-7:10-7:30
Murder on the Orient Express
4:00-7:45-11:00-11:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) (!) 11:15- (PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:20-6:15-9:05
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 1:20-4:053:00-6:30-10:00
6:45-9:35
Coco (PG) (!) 12:15-3:45-7:15Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
10:45
12:00-2:25-4:50-7:20-9:50
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) (!) 12:00-3:30-6:45-10:15 Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 1:15-4:10-7:05-9:55
Wonder (PG) (!) 11:30-2:30Coco 3D (PG) (!) 10:30-4:15-4:306:15-9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) (!) 2:00- 10:00-10:30; (!) 4:15-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) (!)
5:00-8:00-11:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 4:00-10:00
Missouri (R) (!) 11:45-3:15-7:00Alamo Drafthouse Cinema 10:30
One Loudoun
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) (!)
20575 East Hampton Plaza
1:00-4:15-7:30-11:00
Justice League (PG-13) 10:151:20-4:40-8:00-11:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:40AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
4:00-6:20-10:20-10:30
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Justice League (PG-13) 12:203:40-7:00-10:35
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
10:45-1:30-4:15-5:15-7:00-9:45- Coco (PG) 11:10-12:20-12:4010:45
2:25-2:35-3:00-5:50-6:00-9:25Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
9:50-10:00
10:45-1:40-4:30-7:30-10:30
Murder on the Orient Express
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:40-10:50-1:50-2:10(PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:305:25-7:20-11:25
7:15-10:00
Wonder (PG) 11:00-2:10-5:10Wonder (PG) CC: 10:50-1:30-4:15- 8:20-11:15-11:25
6:50-9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: 10:15-10:30-1:20-1:40-4:35-8:351:15-8:30-11:00
10:50-10:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
10:50-2:45-3:45-6:10
10:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Lady Bird (R) 10:00-12:40-12:45Missouri (R) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:45- 3:20-3:25-6:40-9:30-9:35
7:30-10:15
A Streetcar Named Desire (PG)
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC: 7:40
12:00-8:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Missouri (R) 10:30-1:40-4:5011:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
8:00-11:10
VIRGINIA
AMC Hoffman Center 22
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
10:45-12:15-1:45-3:15-6:15-9:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:15-1:15-4:15-7:15-8:45-10:15
The Star (PG) CC: 11:00-11:0511:15-1:15-1:20-3:15-3:30-3:355:15-5:45-5:50-7:15-8:00-8:059:15-10:15-10:20
Coco (PG) CC: 10:00-10:15-12:003:00-4:00-6:00-9:00-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:20-12:45-2:153:30-5:05-6:20-7:50-9:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
1:30-8:10
It (R) CC: 4:55-10:35
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:307:15-10:00
Jigsaw (R) CC: 10:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
11:50-2:40-5:20-7:55-10:25
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
2911 District Ave
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) (!) 10:15-11:30-1:003:45-5:45-6:30-8:20-9:15-10:55
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) (!) 11:15-2:00-4:307:15-9:55
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) (!)
11:20-2:15-5:05-8:00-10:40
National Theatre Live: Follies(!) 2:00
Lady Bird (R) (!) 10:45-1:15-3:256:00-8:30-10:35
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:551:55-4:55-7:55-10:55
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) (!) 11:30-2:20-5:00-7:4010:45
Justice League (PG-13) (!) 1:157:00-9:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) (!)
10:30-4:05
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX
11940 Market Street
often incorrect, but polite,
assumption being that
generations neatly pass away in
order.
The acknowledgment itself
can be large or small, tailored to
the bearing of the person
revealing the information. But
Miss Manners notes that there is
never any harm in expressing
sympathy for a loss when you
first learn of it.
New Miss Manners columns are
posted Monday through Saturday on
washingtonpost.com/advice. You
can send questions to Miss Manners
at her website, missmanners.com.
© 2017, by Judith Martin
Wednesday, November 22, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
4:00-7:00-10:00
Theeran Adhigaram Ondru (NR)
Justice League (PG-13) 2:003:10-6:20
5:00-10:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:50- 1:15-4:15-7:30-10:30
1:50-4:50-7:50-10:50
Lady Bird (R) 12:35-3:00-5:30The Star (PG) 10:10-1:10-4:108:00-10:30
7:10-9:20
Coco 3D (PG) 3:45-9:45
Coco (PG) 10:40-1:40-4:40-7:40- Khakee (Telugu) (NR) 12:00-9:40
10:40
PSV Garuda Vega (NR) 12:30Murder on the Orient Express (PG- 3:30-6:35-9:50
13) 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Verna 12:05-3:35-6:50-10:15
Wonder (PG) 10:20-1:20-4:20Regal Dulles Town Center 10
7:20-10:20
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:55Justice League (PG-13) 10:001:55-4:55-7:55-10:25
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
The Man Who Invented
Christmas (PG) 11:00-2:00-5:00- Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:15-3:15-6:15-10:20
8:00-10:35
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:30Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:45-3:45-6:45-10:00
11:00-8:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:10-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:40
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:00Lady Bird (R) 11:30-2:30-5:303:00-6:00-8:30
8:30-11:10
Coco (PG) 10:30-1:15-4:15-7:15
Justice League (PG-13) 10:00Wonder (PG) 10:15-1:00-4:001:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
7:00-9:45
Cinema Arts Theatre
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
9650 Main St
Missouri (R) 11:30-2:45-5:30Justice League (PG-13) CC: 9:40- 8:15-11:00
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:50-10:10
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Murder on the Orient Express
11:15-12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
(PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:00-2:30-5:00- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
7:30-9:50
10:45-1:45-4:45-7:45-10:50
Wonder (PG) CC: 9:50-12:10-2:25- Coco 3D (PG) 10:15
4:50-7:20-9:40
Regal
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 2:20
Fairfax Towne Center 10
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:054110 West Ox Road
12:20-4:35-7:00-9:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:00-1:45-2:45-5:30Missouri (R) 9:45-12:05-2:357:15-8:15
5:05-7:40-9:55
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Lady Bird (R) 9:55-12:15-2:2512:15-2:50-5:25-8:00-10:35
4:45-7:10-9:25
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:30Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
4:15-4:45-6:45-9:20-10:00
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Wonder (PG) 12:55-3:50-6:55-9:40
The Star (PG) 11:15-1:40-4:15Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
6:50-9:15
Missouri (R) 1:25-4:30-7:35-10:20
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:25-4:204:00-6:00-7:00-8:00-9:00-10:00
7:25-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:10-1:45-4:30-7:10-9:50 The Man Who Invented
Christmas
(PG) 12:00-2:35-5:15Wonder (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:507:50-10:25
7:30-10:10
Roman
J.
Israel,
Esq. (PG-13)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:50-3:55-7:00-10:00
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:45-10:15
Let
There
Be
Light
(PG-13) 1:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:503:40-6:30-9:15
2:15-4:45-7:15-9:40
Regal Fox
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Stadium 16 & IMAX
11:20-2:20-5:05-7:50-10:40
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Coco 3D (PG) 11:00-5:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:00- Despicable Me 3 (PG) 10:1512:30-2:45-5:15
1:50-4:40-7:40-10:35
Justice League (PG-13) 11:00Justice League (PG-13) 11:402:00-3:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-11:00
1:30-2:30-4:20-5:30-7:20-8:30Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:1510:20
11:45-1:15-2:45-4:15-5:45-7:15Coco (PG) 2:00-8:00
8:45-10:15
Coco 3D (PG) 11:00-5:00
The Star (PG) 11:30-1:45-4:00Manassas 4 Cinemas
6:15-8:30-10:45
8890 Mathis Ave.
Coco (PG) 10:30-12:00-1:30-3:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:00- 4:30-6:00-7:30-10:30
2:10-4:20-6:30-8:40
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) 11:00(PG-13) 10:45-1:45-4:45-7:451:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
10:45
Coco (PG) 11:00-1:35-3:10Wonder (PG) 11:15-12:30-2:155:45-7:20
3:30-5:00-6:30-7:45-9:30-10:30
Wonder (PG) 11:00-1:25-3:50A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
6:15-8:40
7:30-10:00
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:156201 Multiplex Drive
12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
Coco (PG) 10:20-1:15-7:05-10:00 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Coco 3D (PG) 4:10
Missouri (R) 10:00-12:45-3:306:15-9:15
Rave Cinemas
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme The Man Who Invented
Christmas (PG) 10:30-1:00-3:4511900 Palace Way
Coco (PG) 10:40-4:35-7:30-10:25 6:45-9:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Coco 3D (PG) 1:40
12:00-9:00
Regal Ballston Common
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Stadium 12
10:15-1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
671 N. Glebe Road
Coco 3D (PG) 9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 10:30Justice League: The IMAX 2D
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:05- 4:00-7:00-10:00
1:05-4:10-7:15-10:20
Regal Kingstowne
The Star (PG) 11:15-1:45-4:15Stadium 16 & RPX
6:45-9:15
5910
Kingstowne Towne Center
Coco (PG) 10:00-11:30-1:00-4:00Geostorm (PG-13) 3:55-9:35
5:30-7:00-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express (PG- Justice League (PG-13) 1:504:45-7:45
13) 11:25-2:20-5:10-8:00-10:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:5511:15-12:30-2:15-3:45-5:30-6:452:35-6:15-9:55
LBJ (R) 10:20-1:35-4:40-7:45-10:40 8:30-9:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:45- Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:10-2:00-5:00-7:451:20-3:55-6:30-9:05
10:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:20-6:05
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Lady Bird (R) 10:15-11:10-12:45- The Foreigner (R) 12:45-6:50
The Star (PG) 11:00-1:30-3:502:00-3:15-4:35-5:45-7:10-8:156:15-8:50
9:45-10:45
Coco (PG) 11:30-2:55-4:15-6:00Coco 3D (PG) 2:30-8:30
7:25-9:05
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
Wonder (PG) 11:35-1:20-4:2545980 Regal Plaza
7:15-10:10
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:0511:50-2:20-5:00-7:50-10:25
2:45-5:45-8:15-10:45
Justice League (PG-13) 12:15A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
1:00-3:15-6:30-10:00
3:10-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:50- The Man Who Invented
4:05-7:05-10:10
Christmas (PG) 11:45-2:30-5:15The Star (PG) 11:45-2:15-4:358:00-10:35
7:15-9:35
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Coco (PG) 11:00-12:45-2:00-5:15- 11:00-10:40
6:45-8:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) 12:10-3:15-6:20-9:15
11:30-2:05-4:50
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:35-5:10Murder on the Orient Express
7:50-10:15
(PG-13) 12:20-3:25-6:15-9:00
Coco 3D (PG) 12:50-10:25
Tumhari Sulu (NR) 11:20-2:30Justice League (PG-13) 1:006:05-9:15
Secret Superstar (NR) 11:35-2:45- 4:00-6:30-7:00-9:30-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
6:00-9:05
12:30-3:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Regal Manassas
7:45-10:20
Stadium 14 & IMAX
Ittefaq (NR) 12:40-3:05-5:4511380 Bulloch Drive
8:05-10:25
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:15- Justice League (PG-13) 1:303:00-4:20-5:50-7:15-8:45-10:10
1:45-4:30-7:20-9:55
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:20My Friend Dahmer (R) 11:054:30-7:30-10:30
1:50-4:45-7:35-10:05
The Man Who Invented Christ- The Star (PG) 12:00-2:30-4:40mas (PG) 12:25-3:20-5:50-8:30
7:10-9:50
Coco (PG) 1:00-2:15-4:00-7:008:15-10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:10-3:50-6:45-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:403:20-6:50-10:15
Wonder (PG) 11:20-2:00-5:007:45-10:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
11:45-2:10-4:50-7:40-10:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:503:30-6:20-9:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:40-3:40-6:30-9:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:10-3:10-6:15-9:10
Coco 3D (PG) 11:15-5:15
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 11:30-2:205:10-8:00-10:50
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
11:00-12:45-3:30-6:05
Justice League (PG-13) 11:3012:50-3:55-4:30-7:00-7:40-10:0010:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
11:40-1:20-2:50-4:20-6:00-7:309:10-10:35
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:00-2:30-5:10
The Star (PG) 5:20-7:50
Coco (PG) 11:00-12:20-1:00-4:056:30-7:10-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:25-3:15-6:15-7:559:00-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:40-9:05
Wonder (PG) 12:40-3:50-6:40-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 8:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:504:25-7:15-9:55
Marshall (PG-13) 11:45-6:10
The Man Who Invented
Christmas (PG) 11:00-1:35-4:106:50-9:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:10-1:25-3:20-6:20-9:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:15-4:15-7:20-10:25
Coco 3D (PG) 3:25-9:40
The Star (PG) 11:00-12:30-2:5510:10
Regal
Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
Justice League (PG-13) 10:3011:30-1:30-4:30-5:30-7:30-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:004:40-7:50-10:50
The Star (PG) 11:00-1:20-3:506:20-9:00
Coco (PG) 11:40-6:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:50-2:00-4:50-7:5010:40
Wonder (PG) 10:55-1:40-4:357:20-10:05
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
11:10-1:50-4:20-7:10-9:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:401:10-4:10-6:50-9:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:50-4:00-7:0010:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:30-2:30-3:30-6:30-8:30-9:30
Lady Bird (R) 11:50-2:20-5:007:40-10:10
Coco 3D (PG) 2:50-9:10
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
Justice League (PG-13) 12:303:30-6:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:4512:45-1:45-3:45-4:45-6:45-7:459:45-10:45
The Star (PG) 10:20-2:20-4:406:50-9:10
Coco (PG) 10:15-11:15-12:151:15-3:15-4:15-6:15-7:15-9:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:30-3:50-6:40-9:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
11:45-2:45-5:45-8:15-10:40
Wonder (PG) 10:10-12:50-3:406:20-9:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:502:30-5:15-8:00-10:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:00-1:40-4:207:10-9:50
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
9:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:00-1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Coco 3D (PG) 10:15
Justice League (PG-13) 10:301:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Smithsonian - Airbus
MAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-4:00
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience2:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 4:55-7:20-9:45
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
12:00-2:15-4:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 7:30-10:15
It (R) CC: 7:15-9:50
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:102:20-4:20
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:20-2:35-4:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 7:00-10:10
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C7
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
NEITHER SIDE VULNERABLE
NORTH
5
KQ4
A K 10 3
Q7532
EAST (D)
86
A 10
9542
AKJ86
WEST
Q 10 9 7 3
J9862
None
10 9 4
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
AKJ42
753
QJ876
None
The bidding:
EAST
SOUTH
WEST
1
1
Pass
Pass
3
Pass
All Pass
Opening lead — 10
NORTH
2 NT
5
CLASSIC PEANUTS
y friend the English professor says a word to
the wise is sufficient. But the
merely intelligent may require
a paragraph, and the oblivious a full-page essay.
Today’s West might have
led a trump against five
diamonds if he’d had one.
South ruffed the club lead
and began a crossruff: A-K of
spades, spade ruff high. East RHYMES WITH ORANGE
threw the 10 of hearts.
Declarer continued with a
club ruff, a spade ruff high,
a club ruff and a spade ruff
high. Dummy next led the
king of hearts, and East won
and led another club. South
ruffed for his ninth trick and
cashed the queen of trumps,
but when he tried to take the
queen of hearts, East ruffed
and had the rest. Down one. LIO
Here’s the word. Before
you crossruff, take your sidesuit winners. South must
lead a heart to the king at
Trick Two. If East wins and
leads a trump, South wins
and takes the queen of
hearts. He can then crossruff
for 11 tricks.
A word to the wise will do.
The enlightened need only a
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
slight meaningful gesture.
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
M
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
5KQ4
A K 10 3 Q 7 5 3 2
You are the dealer. What is
your opening call?
ANSWER: This is a mandatory opening bid. Many
players would open one
diamond, planning to bid
two clubs over the likely
BLONDIE
response of one spade. But
partner would correctly take
a two-diamond preference
with A 7 6 4 2, A 9 6 3, 6 4,
9 4, reaching a silly contract.
I would open one club and
rebid 1NT over a one-spade
response or raise a one-heart
response.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C8
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | NOVEMBER 22
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year your words
carry a lot of weight
and meaning. Others
lean in to listen. Your
excellent communication also
could play into your financial
well-being. If you are single,
you will meet many people
whom you are emotionally
drawn to. You will be more
fortunate in finding romance
closer to summer. If you are
attached, the two of you need
to share your vulnerabilities
with each other more often.
Ask your sweetie to open up
more about his or her feelings.
Capricorn knows how to push
your buttons.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You have the right approach
but the wrong plan of action.
Be as direct as possible when
dealing with controversy.
Explain why you have made
your decision. Listen to what is
being shared.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
One-on-one interactions
remain favored. You could get
certain matters straightened
out that you had nearly given
up hope of resolving. Listen,
and share more of yourself.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You have carried a key
responsibility as long as you
have needed to. If others
feel as if they have a better
approach, let them take over.
Strong feelings could run
WEINGARTENS & CLARK rampant.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Touch base with a partner or
loved one. This person has the
same values as you, but he
or she takes a very different
approach. You might not have
all the right answers, but
perhaps you don’t even care.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You have a lot to accomplish.
The more creative your
approach, the better the
outcome. You finally gain
clarity about a certain issue
that has been difficult to
understand.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You could be looking for a
different answer or a new
approach to a recurring
problem. Your vision of what
is necessary might not be
completely grounded. Tap into
your imagination for help, but
first test out your ideas on
others.
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You are likely to express
yourself with a great deal
of composure. Look within
yourself and figure out what it
is that you really desire. There
could be an internal conflict
going on that you could be
projecting outward.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Handle a financial situation
with care. If one does not have
the innate intelligence to work
through hassles, one cannot
succeed. Allow your sixth
sense to kick in; you might
like what you see. Be more
forthright and direct.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You have more going for you
than you realize. You might
want to change some of
the financial and emotional
implications of an issue that is
swirling around you. Be careful
about your approach if you
want to greet success.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Your sense of dignity will
carry you through a problem,
but it does not necessarily
guarantee success. Your
frustration level remains high
when dealing with others. You
can and will clear up many
of the issues you have been
encountering as of late.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You are in a very fulfilling
phase, where change seems to
happen when you visualize it.
Events might not always play
out as you think they should,
but nevertheless, they do work
out. Someone at a distance
might overwhelm you.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Zero in on your desires.
Friendship could play a
key role in your decisionmaking process. Honor
fast changes, and make sure
that you proceed with greater
clarity and understanding.
See a personal matter for
what it is.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C9
RE
book world
When Lucia Met Frosty the Snowman . . .
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
the stoic character of her people,”
hates the cold weather and feels
cooped up in her basement
apartment. “She missed sex, romance, and love,” Allende writes.
“The first of these she could
obtain every so often, the second
was a matter of luck, and the
third was a gift from the gods
that would probably never happen.” Lucia would much rather
be upstairs with Richard, the
depressed colleague who hired
her to teach at NYU four months
ago, but he’s already rebuffed her
not-so-subtle entreaties. “Afraid
of falling into the trap of romanticism,” Allende explains, “he
never asked himself why he rejected love, because the answer
seemed obvious: it was his inescapable penance.”
From Chaucer to Shakespeare
to Austen to countless funny
movies, Allende is following the
classic rom-com structure: a vivacious woman and a dyspeptic
man who claims he’ll never love
again. And “In the Midst of
Winter” develops that late-in-life
romance between Lucia and
Richard with all the humor and
charm one could ask for.
The catalyst is a minor traffic
accident in which Richard runs
into the back of a Lexus driven by
a young Guatemalan nanny who
works for a New York gangster.
She immediately drives off but
then shows up later at Richard’s
apartment, terrified and begging
for help because she didn’t have
permission to drive her boss’s
car.
And there’s a dead body in the
trunk.
Richard “had lived in a perfectly controlled environment
where there were no surprises or
upheavals,” but clearly that’s
about to change. Ill-equipped to
handle this panicked young
woman (or the body in the
Lexus), he calls down to Lucia in
his basement apartment, and
we’re off and running!
If this were the circumference
of “In the Midst of Winter,” it
would be a delightful madcap
comedy: “Arsenic and Spanish
Lace.” But every other chapter,
Allende interrupts the presentday zaniness with the backstories on each of her three protagonists — and those stories are not
zany or comic; they’re scaldingly
tragic. We learn, for instance,
that Richard isn’t merely a
grouch; he’s traumatized by an
unspeakable accident that no
one would be expected to sur-
STOCK IMAGES/THE WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION/GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
Allende interrupts
the present-day
zaniness with the
backstories that
are not zany or
comic; they’re
scaldingly tragic.
vive. Lucia, meanwhile, lost her
brother in Augusto Pinochet’s
reign of terror, and the young
nanny whom she and Richard
are trying to help was subjected
to torture in Guatemala that
shattered her mind and body.
Lacing such horrors into a
novel as sweet as “In the Midst of
Winter,” another author might be
accused of galling naivete, but
Allende knows these crimes as
well as she knows grief. She
survived the 1973 coup in Chile; a
cousin, President Salvador Allende, did not. Her daughter died
in 1992 at the age of 28. In more
Found in the mists of time: A history
of the umbrella, sprinkled with humor
BY
M ICHAEL L INDGREN
T
oday’s entry in the whatwill-they-think-of-next?
category is “Brolliology:
A History of the Umbrella
in Life and Literature,” by Marion
Rankine. Her charming book presents a whimsical and thoughtful
survey of, yes, the umbrella — or
“brolly” in the British author’s
parlance. This may be information you didn’t know you needed,
but you’ll enjoy it anyhow.
“Brolliology” is not, blessedly,
one of those ambitious tomes that
purports to explain the whole of
civilization via some quotidian
element such as salt or coffee.
Instead, Rankine deftly combines
a sociological touch with a survey
of the umbrella in literature from
Defoe to Roald Dahl and beyond,
explaining that “it was not the
objects themselves — beautiful as
they may be — that fascinated me,
but the meanings behind them.”
The author begins by considering the class and gender implications inherent in the humble
accessory. A delightful raconteur,
Rankine points out that umbrellas have at various times signified
both status and lack of status,
with one observer writing in 1894
that “it is the habitual carriage of
the umbrella that is the stamp of
Respectability,” while another
considers them the hallmark of
“the more fussy and nervous type
of old fellow.” In an adroit close
reading of a passage from “Howard’s End,” a misplaced umbrella
comes to signify unbridgeable
chasms of economics and education.
A typical chapter skims the
metaphysical and the dialectical,
with the umbrella described variously as creating a “portable
MELVILLE HOUSE
In India, an Ajanta Cave fresco
from between the 2nd and
6th centuries shows a woman
being shaded by an umbrella.
BROLLIOLOGY
A History of the
Umbrella in
Life and
Literature
By Marion
Rankine
Melville. 192 pp.
$16.99
room,” as a “private sky” and “a
hat with a handle.” Its combination of replaceability and contingency even “reads like a textbook
symptom of late capitalism.” An
early-19th-century article by J.S.
Duncan classified umbrella
wielders into familiar types such
as the Sky-Striker and the ShieldBearer, both of which species
remain alas all too common to
this day. And Rankine does not
neglect such memorably sinister
instances as the mysterious Umbrella Man present at Kennedy’s
assassination and the 1978 murder of Bulgarian dissident Georgi
Markov by way of a poisoned
ferrule.
The
color
illustrations
throughout “Brolliology” are
marvelously selected and reproduced, leaning heavily toward the
opulent style of commercial illustration common to Edwardian
Britain. And like the umbrella
itself, which seems in some essential way both eccentric and comical, Rankine’s book has a very
English affect — both amused
and amusing, droll in temperament, maybe slightly dotty.
The performance is so polished
as to skirt weightlessness. One
comes away from “Brolliology”
with a quiverful of cocktail-partyready facts: Did you know that
umbrella parts were found in a
Chinese tomb dated to 25 B.C.?
That Japanese folklore features
evil, sentient umbrellas known as
“kasa-obake”?
But best of all, “Brolliology”
offers the feeling of having consumed something delicious but
light: a tea sandwich, perhaps.
than a dozen books, starting with
her debut novel, “The House of
the Spirits,” Allende has written
about the trials of the oppressed
and dispossessed, winning tens
of millions of readers around the
world and garnering a Presidential Medal of Freedom and many
other honors. She writes with
dramatic detail and moving sympathy about the plight of people
risking their lives to come to the
United States. She understands
the powerlessness and fear of
immigrants at risk of being sent
back into the hell they have
escaped.
But can such atrocities be
woven into a romantic comedy in
which a dead body is sometimes
thrown around like a hot potato?
One minute we’re laughing, the
next we’re weeping, until that
jumble of tones feels like watching 99 TV channels spin by.
And then, finally, the summer
begins: “Enough wallowing in
the sorrows of the past,” Lucia
demands. “The only cure for so
much misfortune is love.” It’s as
though Allende has shifted from
magical realism to magical
feelism, some kind of synthetic
hopefulness that asks us to brush
off the agonies that her novel’s
alternate chapters so indelibly
portray.
“In the Midst of Winter”
doesn’t challenge our faith in the
ultimate triumph of love so
much as our credulity about how
that love might be attained and
how unfettered it might arise.
There’s a neatness to this story
that the standards of romantic
comedy demand but the history
of these characters won’t allow.
bookworld@washpost.com
Ron Charles is the editor of Book
World.
P O E TR Y
BY
E LIZABETH L UND
Inheriting the War: Poetry
and Prose by Descendants of
Vietnam Veterans and Refugees
empathy and remembrance and
may encourage, as the book’s
editor Laren McClung notes in
her introduction, “the first step
toward healing.”
(W.W. Norton) gives voice to
many still suffering from the
legacy of the conflict in Vietnam.
As Yusef Komunyakaa, Pulitzer
Prize-winning poet and Vietnam
veteran, writes in the foreword:
“Whatever one witnessed in
battle became a silence carried
within. Soldiers are always
dreaming themselves into the
future as a way
of getting
beyond this, or
moving
forward.” For
many of their
descendants,
the future
meant years of
searching,
literally or
figuratively, for a parent. Gardner
McFall, the daughter of a Navy
pilot, beautifully captures this
longing in her poem “Missing”: “I
imagined he had ditched/ the
plane and was living on a distant/
island, plotting his way back/
with a faithful guide; or, if/ he
didn’t have a guide, he was
sending/ up a flare in sight of an
approaching ship.” Others
searched for a lost homeland,
language or family history. Prose
pieces by some of our most
important poets — including Nick
Flynn, Ada Limón, and Terrance
Hayes — show how, as Hayes
notes, those who were left behind
“have to make everything up.”
Together, these vital works create
a powerful mosaic that urges
Poet in Spain (Knopf ) is the
first new volume since 1991 of
translations of the work of
Federico García Lorca, one of
most important Spanish poets of
the 20th century. In this
bilingual edition, awardwinning poet Sarah Arvio gives
readers her version of Lorca,
who was
executed by
nationalists
when he was
38, by focusing
on his
“moonlit
earthbound
Spanish poems
about love and
death” and
others that capture a Spanish
voice and landscape. The book
includes many chiseled lyrics,
selections from “Poem of the
Cante Jondo” — a sequence
about the Andalusian music
known as flamenco — and
Lorca’s famous Gypsy Ballads
and Dark Love Sonnets. The
complex play “Blood Wedding” is
here as well, along with a
detailed introduction and notes
about the poems. Those who are
new to Lorca’s work may benefit
most from this collection, which
highlights his dexterity with
imagery and color, as in these
lines from the poem
“Woodcutter,” where the speaker
recalls hunting bright stars “And
when the hills fell asleep/ I came
back/ with all the stars/ on my
back.”
Earthling (W.W. Norton) by
James Longenbach opens with
several delightful poems that
combine plain-spoken language
and imaginative vistas as the
speaker begins to explore what it
means to live on Earth at this time.
Whether the subject is a suitcase or
a crocodile reflecting on why it likes
silence, the writing always captures
both a ground-level perspective
and a more aerial view. Here
Longenbach,
who has
published four
other books of
poems and six
collections of
criticism,
reflects on
mortality and
the lack of
control we have
over the forces — good and bad —
that impact our lives. One of the
things the speaker does know, as
his heart and intellect remind him,
is that “Things seem bad when
really/ They’re at variance with
other things./ With things we may
not see/ They’re in accord.” Literary
references and allegorical
narratives add to the surprises in
this book, which shifts perceptively
in each section yet ultimately
reminds readers that “when you
love one thing deeply, a/ person, a
place/ Ultimately you love them
all.”
bookworld@washpost.com
Elizabeth Lund writes about poetry
every month for The Washington Post.
bookworld@washpost.com
Michael Lindgren is a frequent
contributor to The Washington Post.
Literary Calendar
FRIDAY AT NOON. Joan Waites and Lezlie Evans will read from the Christmas-themed pictures books, at Scrawl
Books, 11862 Market St., Reston.
C10
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
“Home Alone” raked in $286 million at U.S.
theaters after it was released in 1990. That’s
more than any other Christmas movie has
earned.
Brisk winds will make this a chillier
day than Tuesday, but there should
be plenty of sunshine.
ILLUSTRATION BY DILARA BRANNON, 9, WASHINGTON
Holiday cheer: Plenty of films are worth a look
KERRY BROWN/BLEECKER STREET
BY
C HRISTINA B ARRON
Dan Stevens, left, plays Charles
Dickens and Christopher Plummer
appears as Ebenezer Scrooge in “The
Man Who Invented Christmas.”
T
here have been years when the
holidays weren’t so bright for
kids hoping to go to the movies.
Animated
sequels
(or
“threequels”) can seem like the
glitter-glue ornaments you made in preschool: They might have been cute the
first year. Now they’re just embarrassing.
Thankfully, this is not one of those years.
There’s more than a handful of movies for
kids. We’ve picked five that include humor,
history and fantasy. Most are new or reimagined stories. The big exception is “Star
Wars,” with sequels and side stories appearing at near light speed. But we couldn’t
ignore “The Last Jedi.” Anticipation is so
high that grown-ups have turned to new
Lego building sets for plot clues.
With these offerings and more — a
parent can visit goingoutguide.com for
reviews — movie-loving kids can truly be
thankful. Hollywood’s gifts this season are
more than shiny wrapping.
The Star
Jesus’ birth is the definition of a Christmas tale, but this animated version isn’t the
typical Sunday school story. It’s the manger
story according to Bo, a donkey (voiced by
Steven Yeun) with big dreams. Bo escapes
boring village life in search of a royal caravan. Instead, he ends up meeting Mary and
Joseph, who has just been told that Mary is
expecting a baby, who is the Son of God. Bo
and a barnyard of misfits are drawn into
the couple’s journey to Bethlehem and evil
Herod’s plot to find the newborn king of the
Jews. (Opened November 17, rated PG )
The Man Who Invented Christmas
“A Christmas Carol,” the story of Tiny
Tim and Ebenezer Scrooge, was an instant
hit for Charles Dickens when it was published in 1843. And its popularity hasn’t let
up. But months before the book was published, the celebrated author (played by
Dan Stevens) had little to cheer about. He
was overdue for a bestseller, and his debts
were growing. The author decides late in
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Minty Derby
drink
6 Shopping
extravaganza
11 ABC show for
early risers,
briefly
14 “Ditto,” more
formally
15 “Can’t win
’em all”
16 Conniving
“2001”
computer
17 Copperfield’s
field
18 Last one in, so
they say
20 Complain
22 __ extra cost
23 Banged shut
27 Cover the
spread?
28 More unsure
29 Bad thing
to end on
32 Feels lousy
33 Casual “You
game?”
34 Serious
carelessness,
in tort law
41 Westminster
landmark
42 Indifferent
responses
43 Place at the
very bottom
47 Letter-shaped
shoe fastener
49 Tablet download
50 Becomes
depleted
51 “Tickle Me” toy
52 Tries one’s
hand (at)
55 Trait of one
given to
obscenities
57 Held the deed to
62 Dawn goddess
63 Naturally lit
lobbies
64 Connect with
65 Apt. divisions
66 Oyster bead
67 Reaction to the
starts of the five
longest puzzle
answers
DOWN
1 Traffic snarl
2 Mex. neighbor
the year to write a Christmas story, and so a
frenzied Dickens must invent characters
and then talk them into helping him finish
the tale. (Opens November 22, PG)
Ferdinand
The story of the gentle bull has been
charming readers since your grandparents
were little. The big bovine (voiced by John
Cena) is content to spend his days smelling
the flowers with a girl named Nina on her
family’s farm in Spain. An accident takes
him far away from her, to the world of
bullfighting. Ferdinand has a chance to
become a star, but he has to figure out where
his heart lies. (Opens December 15, PG)
BLUE SKY STUDIOS/TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX
In “Ferdinand,” John Cena lends his voice to the bull who has an adventure to find his way home.
LUCASFILM LTD.
NIKO TAVERNISE/TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX
ABOVE LEFT: In the latest Star Wars episode, Rey (Daisy Ridley) seeks help from jedi Luke Skywalker to understand the
power of the Force. ABOVE RIGHT: Hugh Jackman stars as circus co-founder P.T. Barnum in “The Greatest Showman.”
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Rey (Daisy Ridley) seeks help from jedi
Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) to understand the power of the Force. But will she use
it to aid not the Resistance but the New Order
and its rising star, Kylo Ren (Adam Driver)?
Filmmakers have revealed little of the plot,
and serious “Star Wars” fans have suggested
that movie trailers are purposely misleading.
Thanks to Lego, we do know that Kylo Ren
gets a sleek fighter plane and that new character Vice Admiral Holdo (Laura Dern) has
purple hair. Keeping fans in the dark seems
to be a force-ful tool to get them into theaters.
(Opens December 15, PG-13)
The Greatest Showman
The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey
Circus was known for its parading elephants
and its tigers leaping through fire. But circus
co-founder P.T. Barnum started his career
not with exotic animals but with human
oddballs. Hugh Jackman plays Barnum as
he discovers his calling to turn unusual acts
— including the daring feats of an acrobat
played by Zendaya — into a moneymaking
spectacle. (Opens December 20, PG)
kidspost@washpost.com
By Johanna Fenimore
The fate of
Drumstick
won’t be
the oven
PARDON FROM C1
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
3 Fall behind
4 Old U.K. record
label
5 Hand raiser’s cry
6 Fathered
7 Devious
scheme
8 Campus
cadets’ org.
9 Bk. before Job
10 Summer
on the Seine
11 “In the __”:
Elvis hit
12 Refrigerator art
holder
13 Climate Reality
Project
chairman
19 Indian flatbread
21 Bible transl., e.g.
23 Party loot
24 Den
25 Guthrie of folk
26 __ Piggy
27 Rock climber’s
handhold
29 “Full House”
actor
30 Like a child
without siblings
31 Start of a cycle?
33 Woven traps
35 Polio vaccine
pioneer
36 Kevin Durant’s
org.
37 CPR
specialists
38 Geek
39 Sear
40 Award for
athletes
43 Sailor’s jacket
44 Flowering
11/22/17
45 Half a rhyming
“easy to do”
phrase
46 Menthol
cigarette
brand
47 Harbor helper
48 Highfalutin
50 1986 Indy 500
winner Bobby
52 Table d’__:
fixed menu
53 Mystical
glow
54 Cookbook verb
56 “The Amazing
Race” prop
58 LPGA golfer
Michelle
59 Japanese tech
company
60 And more:
abbr.
61 [Facepalm]
TUESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
not going to revoke them.”
The audience chuckled; Barron
Trump, who stood beside his father, did not. When everyone
clapped for the young women
from the 4-H chapter who helped
raise the birds, Barron kept his
arms at his sides. Like Malia and
Sasha Obama before him, he
seemed unimpressed with his father’s jokes and with this nonsense entirely.
His father, however, appeared
to be thoroughly enjoying himself.
“Wow, wow, big bird! That’s a
big bird,” Trump said as he approached the turkey, perched on a
cloth-covered table. “Are we allowed to touch? Wow. I feel so
good about myself doing this.”
Trump has, in recent days,
shown a fondness for not killing
animals. On Friday, he halted a
decision that would have lifted a
ban on importing hunted elephant carcasses as trophies from
two African nations. His administration had already lifted a ban on
importing lion carcasses last
month — but, well, not a lot of
people noticed. The elephants, in
contrast, were showered with bipartisan outrage, after which the
lifting of the ban was paused.
Trump tweeted Sunday that he
will make a decision about “this
horror show” later in the week.
That decision will apparently
be issued from Mar-a-Lago, his
private club in Palm Beach where
the Trump family was headed later Tuesday. Trump, who is said to
prefer his meat well-done and
doused in ketchup, will enjoy his
turkey in “the Winter White
House” on Thanksgiving and will
stay in South Florida through the
weekend.
The presentation of a Thanksgiving turkey has been a presidential tradition for 70 years. Wars,
recessions, elections, natural disasters — no matter the moment in
history, the birds have made it to
the White House. Until George
H.W. Bush made the pardon an
official ritual in 1989, the vast
majority of the birds succumbed
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
In the White House Rose Garden, Arabella Kushner, with her
mother, Ivanka Trump, and brother Joseph, inches close to
Drumstick, one of the pardoned turkeys, but did not pat the bird.
to the fate that some 46 million
American turkeys meet every
Thanksgiving: They were eaten.
On Drumstick’s day in the spotlight, Trump had plans to speak
on the phone with Russian President Vladimir Putin, and his administration was likely to be reviewing the latest message from
North Korea, published earlier in
the day, which called Trump “an
old lunatic, mean trickster and
human reject.”
One could envision Drumstick’s forefathers looking down
from a palatial sawdust pile in the
sky, remembering their own
places in history: The very first
turkey gifted to a president by the
National Turkey Federation that
Harry S. Truman ate in 1947 at the
dawn of the Cold War. The turkey
that ended up in the stomach of
Richard M. Nixon in 1973, the
week after he told America “I am
not a crook.” The 1995 bird Bill
Clinton called “the most multicolored best-looking turkey we’ve
had here since I’ve been president,” the same month his relationship with Monica Lewinsky
began.
Could those birds have imagined what was to come?
What does Drumstick know?
For now, he seemed only passingly aware that he was being
patted by Tiffany Trump, and then
patted by Ivanka Trump. Barron
Trump was walking away. Cameras were flashing. Ivanka urged her
6-year-old daughter, Arabella, to
inch a little closer to Drumstick. It
seemed, for a moment, as if he was
looking her in the eyes. She did
not pat him. She did not eat him.
And with that, the cameras turned
off and Drumstick was taken
away.
jessica.contrera@washpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
SU
D
D. C. SPORTS BOG
PRO FOOTBALL
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
On the NFL Network’s “A Football Life,”
Joe Gibbs shares some regrets. D2
The Broncos make a QB change, turning
to Paxton Lynch this week vs. Oakland. D3
The new playoff rankings offer very little
change among the top four. D5
Maryland bounces back from U-Conn.
loss by dominating Howard, 111-49. D7
Redskins are best in NFL . . .
at being completely mediocre
NFL owners may alter anthem policy
BY
The Philadelphia
Eagles are 9-1.
Wonder what that
feels like.
“The players
right now just
Barry
have that
Svrluga
confident mindset when they take
the field on game day that they’re
not going to be denied,” secondyear Coach Doug Pederson told
reporters after Sunday night’s
trouncing of the Cowboys in
Dallas. “That’s something that’s
special that this group really has.”
Meanwhile, down I-95 in the
Washington burbs, Jay Gruden
considered the mood in the
building where he works. He
ticked off the disappointments:
late losses to Kansas City and
Minnesota and Dallas, the
crowbar to the shins he just took
against New Orleans. He rubbed
his hand over his face, and wiped
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D3
Giants at Redskins
Tomorrow, 8:30 p.m., NBC
More injuries: Busy stretch arrives
with four more players hitting IR. D3
M ARK M ASKE
Some NFL owners believe
there is a strong possibility they
will enact an offseason change to
the league’s national anthem policy if players’ protests during the
anthem persist through the end
of this season, reverting to a
previous approach of keeping
players in the locker room while
the anthem is played, according
to several people familiar with
the league’s inner workings.
“If players are still kneeling at
the end of the year, then it could
very well happen,” said one per-
PLAYERS WOULD REMAIN IN LOCKER ROOMS
Changes could be implemented for next season
son familiar with the owners’
deliberations on anthem-related
issues.
That person said it was “too
early to tell” for certain whether
the change to the anthem policy
will be made by owners and the
league. The person was “not sure”
whether a formal vote of the
owners would be required to enact such a change but said, “I
think most owners would support it, particularly if players
continue to kneel this season.”
Those sentiments were echoed
by several others with knowledge
of the owners’ thinking on the
matter. They said they did not
know at this point exactly how
many owners would favor such
an approach, and they cautioned
there have been no detailed dis-
cussions yet about leaving teams
and players in the locker room for
the anthem because owners did
not consider it appropriate to
make an in-season change to the
policy.
But they agreed that if the
protests last all season and remain intensely controversial
among fans, the issue will be
raised during the offseason and a
policy change to having players
remain in the locker room until
the anthem’s conclusion would
have the support of a significant
number of owners. They said the
ANTHEM CONTINUED ON D5
From lottery-pick bust to indispensable ‘glue man,’ Otto Porter Jr. has turned himself into . . .
The pro’s pro
MIKE EHRMANN/GETTY IMAGES
Everybody would like to
get better at something.
Some of us would like to
get better at several things.
But the Washington
Wizards’ Otto Porter Jr.
Thomas
wants to get better at
Boswell
everything every year.
What sets Porter apart is
that he’s done it for five straight seasons,
going from the bust of the 2013 draft to
the brink of understated stardom.
After his latest improvements, it’s
becoming a challenge to evaluate him.
Although he depends on the brilliance of
John Wall and Bradley Beal more than
they depend on his diligent
fundamentals-first game, Porter may now
approach, or even equal, them in total
value to the Wizards.
There are even several advanced stat
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Wizards Coach Scott Brooks on Otto Porter Jr. (22): “He’s everybody’s
favorite player. If you don’t love Otto, you are the problem.”
Wizards at Hornets | Today, 7 p.m., NBC Sports Washington Plus
Tattooed, dreadlocked recruiting analyst, and Mississippi State fan, exposes a rival program
Meet the bulldog who helped topple Ole Miss
BY W ILL H OBSON
IN JACKSON, MISS.
W
hen they heard a bookstore here was hosting
their favorite author —
the one who broke story after
story about the NCAA investigation of recruiting violations at Ole
Miss, and then uncovered the
phone call to an escort service
that toppled a coach — Mississippi State fans from across the
region made the time.
A car salesman took a break in
the middle of his shift to get his
copy signed, confessing this was
the first book he had read since
college. Three women in their
50s, avid followers of the author’s
work covering Mississippi State
metrics that say Porter is inching into the
top 20 players in the NBA because so
many areas of his game are among the
league’s most efficient, including his
defense, and almost none are weak. But
there’s no reason to push the Porter case
too hard. We’ll get to that.
Right now, he’s just a pleasure to watch
— that is, if you can find him. He blends
and complements others so well, hustling,
diving for a ball or defending that he’s the
rare player who fills up a box score
without ever needing the ball — except in
the instant he catches and shoots it,
rebounds it or steals it from you.
“You can’t put a price on his value to
our team just because of that,” Wizards
Coach Scott Brooks said of a player who
averages 15.8 points, 7.3 rebounds and 1.8
steals while focusing on teammates and
ANDREA MORALES FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Author and journalist Steve Robertson hangs out with fans at
a book signing in Jackson, Miss. Hugh Freeze is not a fan.
recruiting, asked whether he’d
had any death threats lately, and
expressed concern about his safety. In what has become a common
occurrence, one Mississippi State
fan got one book signed for himself, and then placed a stack of
additional copies on the table —
taunting gifts for friends and relatives who root for Ole Miss — and
asked the author to write, in each
copy, “You deserve it.”
In a normal year, the Egg Bowl
coinciding with Thanksgiving
would cause stress for those planning holiday gatherings across
this state, raising concerns that
passions inflamed by the Ole
Miss-Mississippi State rivalry
could inspire altercations over
ROBERTSON CONTINUED ON D6
BOSWELL CONTINUED ON D7
Trying to keep it together,
Caps’ stars remain apart
Slumping Ovechkin, Backstrom on different lines
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
When Alex Ovechkin and Nicklas Backstrom have been separated as linemates in the past, it
always felt temporary, a decadelong marriage needing the occasional break. The top center and
superstar winger have played together for the majority of their
careers, helping make the Washington Capitals one of the most
successful franchises in the NHL
during that time.
This season may feature a more
permanent divorce. The Capitals
have a .500 record through 22
games, and Coach Barry Trotz has
avoided starting a game with
Ovechkin and Backstrom on a
line together, even when the team
has been in the middle of losing
stretches. Washington has lost
three of its past four games as the
even-strength production from
its stars has slumped. But in
Tuesday’s practice, the forward
combinations were the same as
those used during Monday’s 4-1
loss to the Calgary Flames.
Trotz was asked why he has
been hesitant to reunite OvechCAPITALS CONTINUED ON D5
Senators at Capitals
Tonight, 7 p.m., NBCSW
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
PRO FOOTBALL
Warriors’
Thompson
is man on
the street
BY
Defeat may
signal end
of an era
for Seattle
D.C. SPORTS BOG
C INDY B OREN
BY
The collapse of one of Manhattan’s ubiquitous construction
scaffolds Sunday in SoHo left reporters scrambling for those “man
on the street” interviews, the ones
in which people share their hopes,
fears and innermost thoughts in
exchange for a few moments of TV
time.
One lucky reporter happened
upon a man who has given a great
deal of consideration to those scaffolds. Oddly, that man was Golden
State Warriors guard Klay Thompson, who was in town for a game
Sunday against the Brooklyn Nets.
“I usually observe if the piping
and stuff is new,” he told the Fox 5
reporter. “Sometimes, you know, if
something looks like it’s been
there awhile, I kind of try to avoid
that.”
At least Fox 5 knew who it had in
Thompson. Sometimes, that
doesn’t immediately click for reporters. Like when KPRC’s Jake
Reiner, the son of director Rob
Reiner and grandson of Carl Reiner, headed out to the streets of
Houston to interview people about
road rage. He found a young motorist at a gas station, and, being a
well-trained reporter, he asked the
man to say and spell his name.
It was George Springer. You
know, the Houston Astros’ World
Series MVP.
“It was,” Reiner, who moved to
the city only seven months ago
from California, said, “both the
most embarrassing and the coolest MOS [man on the street] I’ve
ever done.
“When he said who he was, I
immediately went into adoring
fan mode. A lot of people on social
media thought I was faking my
reaction when he told me who he
was. There were some funny comments like, ‘Send Jake Reiner back
to a Triple-A station,’ and, ‘Send
Jake back to State Farm,’ all in
good fun. Honestly, I was geeking
out because professional athletes
are the only people I get starstruck by. And I’m a big Springer
fan. . . . Nonetheless, I will never
not recognize George Springer
ever again!”
RICH LIPSKI/THE WASHINGTON POST
Joe Gibbs, shown here with assistant Jim Hanifan, second-guesses himself about the family time he missed as Redskins coach.
Gibbs wonders: Was it too much?
BY
D AN S TEINBERG
An NFL Films treatment often goes
down as smoothly as hot cocoa and
fresh-baked cookies, and the newest look
at Joe Gibbs radiates that happy and
familiar warmth. NFL Network’s hourlong look at the Hall of Fame coach’s
career will debut Friday at 9 p.m., part of
its “A Football Life” series of profiles, and
Washington Redskins fans will bathe in
the program’s comforting nostalgia: the
interviews with Riggo and Dexter and
Bobby Beathard and John Kent Cooke,
the audio of Frank Herzog, the paeans to
“70 Chip” and the counter trey, the
archived testimonials from Bill Walsh
and Bill Parcells, those glorious old clips
from a delirious RFK.
“Without a doubt, the best head coach
of all time,” Gary Clark says at one point,
and if you thought that before watching
the film, it sure won’t convince you
otherwise. This fan base may be
preoccupied with the past, but all that is
forgiven as you watch that squeakyvoiced square progressing through one
of the best decades any NFL team has
known.
And yet there are tiny detours from
the warm fuzzies, brief moments at the
beginning and end of the film when
Gibbs grapples not just with his
greatness but with some regret. When he
wonders whether he balanced his nearly
unmatched professional career well
enough with being the father and
husband he wanted to be. Those were the
questions that sparked his shocking first
resignation in Washington, and
something similar later caused him to
leave the team a second time.
“The thing I second-guess the most
about my life was the time I missed being
with family,” Gibbs says as the movie
begins. “I probably didn’t have to do it
the way I did it.”
He didn’t? Because the way he did it —
the meeting rooms without clocks, the
pull-out sofa in his office, the coaching
conferences interrupted by middle-ofthe-night garbage trucks, the singlemindedness that caused him not to
recognize Oliver North when he visited a
practice during the height of his celebrity
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“Packers fans are
at least somewhat
responsible.”
SCOTT BELL,
GM of the Bavarian Bierhaus in
suburban Milwaukee, where no one
pays for beer until the Packers score.
Bell estimates about 300 servings of
free beer were provided to the
200 people taking in Green Bay’s
23-0 loss to Baltimore on Sunday.
(Via Early Lead)
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Cuonzo Martin.
Missouri star Porter
out for rest of season
The 6-foot-10 forward played
only two minutes of Missouri’s
season-opening win over Iowa
State before missing the last
three games with the injury.
before the season that he was not
necessarily a one-and-done
player who would leave next year
for the riches of the NBA.
The standout Missouri
freshman will have plenty of
downtime to consider his future
after the school announced
Tuesday that he would miss the
rest of the season after lower
back surgery. The procedure,
called a microdiscetomy, was
scheduled in Dallas and the
expected recovery time is three
to four months.
The injury is a staggering blow
for last year’s top high school
recruit, just as it is for a Missouri
program excited for the future
following his arrival and the
talented recruiting class that
followed him to Columbia.
Porter signed with Missouri
after originally being committed
to Washington, doing so after
former Huskies coach Lorenzo
Romar was fired in March. His
father, Michael Porter Sr., was
an assistant coach at Washington
at the time and was later hired by
first-year Missouri Coach
— remains so central to everything we
think about Gibbs. Could he really have
had the same success without that
obsessive single-mindedness?
“I think that’s a great question,” Gibbs
said Tuesday afternoon during a wave of
interviews to promote the movie. “As I
reflect back on it, I really feel like I
probably could have done it different. I
could have taken some time off on
Tuesdays to go have lunch with my kids
— which I tried to do with [younger son]
Coy some, and I missed it with J.D.
“But I sat down with both my boys a
few years back,” Gibbs went on. “They
both have four kids apiece. I said, ‘Don’t
do what I did.’ I said, ‘I apologize for all
the time I missed. Listen, stay close to
your kids.’ And one thing I’m trying to
do now is with my grandkids, I am
trying to stay close with them and be a
part of their life, and so I try to
encourage both my boys to do that. But I
think it’s the one thing that I’ll go to my
grave second-guessing, and not really
knowing. Hey, could I have done it a
different way?”
If the question adds a philosophical
undertone to the movie — with Gibbs
revisiting it at the end — the guts of the
piece celebrate the way he did do it.
There are all the usual themes,
accompanied by brilliant visuals: the
self-deprecation
(“very
average
intelligence,” Gibbs says of himself in one
old interview), the knack for motivation
(Gibbs talking about the team’s “leather
balls” award is snicker-out-loud funny),
the ability to plow through adversity
(there are great shots from those games
he won with replacement players in
1987), and the decade of domination.
This film is yet another reminder of
how far away those glory days seem, and
just how special they were.
When I suggested that Gibbs is one of
the few Washington sports figures whose
image is nearly unstained, he scoffed.
“It’s not all kind of what you see in
something like this,” he said. “You realize
when you get to do all the things that I’ve
done, you’ve just been fortunate to be
around the right people. And you also
have made a lot of mistakes in the
process.”
The film doesn’t dwell on any of those,
although it takes viewers through his
decision to leave the NFL, the success
that followed in NASCAR, his return to
the team and the many health problems
his family has dealt with in recent years.
There’s also that recurring question of
whether Gibbs could have found such
success without making such personal
sacrifices. The film shows his wife, Pat,
making tape recordings at home so
Gibbs could listen to things he had
missed; it shows him near tears as he
talks about missing Coy’s football games.
I asked Gibbs what advice he might
offer today’s coaches, many of whom
share that work ethic that was so
celebrated during Washington’s glory
years.
“I would say to ’em, do everything you
can — and I say this to people all the time
— to try to stay close to your kids,” Gibbs
said. “You know, today they could be
texting them. They could spend a special
time where they come over and you have
a dinner with them at night. Just a lot of
things I could have done, but I was so
focused on what I was doing [at work].
You go charging through life. I look back
at it now; I feel like I could have done it a
different way.”
Which is how he’s done things with his
grandkids. Gibbs is shown rooting them
on at the racetrack, and playing catch
with them, and spending time on the
water with them. And even when he talks
about his football life, his family is where
he winds up.
“What we’re gonna leave on this earth
is the influence on others, and it’s gonna
be those grandkids,” he says in the final
scene, and it’s as warm a moment as any
NFL Films highlight.
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
In the five seasons before this
one, the Seattle Seahawks won 56
regular season games, claimed the
NFC West title three times, won a
Super Bowl and went to another.
They became a consistent force at
the top of the NFL, a modern dynasty by the standards of any franchise outside New England. They
were defined by aggression and
noise, defiance and improvisation.
They played like nobody else, but
better than almost everyone.
On Monday night, cornerback
Richard Sherman watched from
the sideline with his right leg in a
boot, supported by a scooter. Kam
Chancellor didn’t play either, out
with a neck injury. Russell Wilson
scampered all over the field, desperate, keeping pace with the Atlanta Falcons’ offense by himself.
Wilson led a 49-second touchdown drive to pull Seattle within
three points. The Seahawks’ defense mustered a stop. Wilson
pushed the ball back up the field
until seconds remained, and he
left a 52-yard field goal try for
kicker Blair Walsh.
The kick looked true when it left
Walsh’s toe. If it sailed through the
uprights, the Seahawks would
head to overtime. It twirled end
over end and crossed in front of
the crossbar. Short. Barely short.
Seattle’s 34-31 loss to Atlanta
felt, in the immediate aftermath,
like the last gasp of an era. Given
their current injuries and future
contractual considerations, the
Seahawks as we know them likely
will break up. Seattle’s famed “Legion of Boom” secondary will not
play together again.
After coming up short Monday,
the Seahawks face an uphill climb
to avoid missing the playoffs for the
first time since 2011. At 6-4, they’re
tied with the Falcons and Detroit
Lions in the wild-card race but
sitting behind both in tiebreakers.
The Seahawks needed a victory
Monday night. They were banged
up, but they were at home and
playing a close competitor in the
playoff race. Now, they have to
play on short rest, on the road,
against a San Francisco 49ers
team coming off a bye. Wilson’s
brilliance makes anything seem
possible, but the Seahawks face
long odds given how injuries have
ravaged their defense.
Seattle suffered a key blow Monday with the surfacing of Coach
Pete Carroll’s brand of optimism
and boldness. At the end of the first
half, with seven seconds left, the
Seahawks faked a 35-yard field
goal, pitching to tight end Luke
Willson. The Falcons diagnosed
the play and threw Willson down
behind the line. Those three points
turned out to be the difference.
So often, Seattle has seen the
unconventional work. But it’s possible the version of the Seahawks
that defined this NFL era has
come to an end.
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nfl
D I G ES T
Michael Porter Jr. insisted
‘A Football Life’ celebrates
Redskins legend’s greatness
while mixing in some regret
A DAM K ILGORE
GYMNASTICS
Olympic champion gymnast
Gabby Douglas says she is
among the group of athletes
sexually abused by a former team
doctor.
Douglas, the 2012 Olympic allaround champion and a threetime gold medalist, wrote in an
Instagram post Tuesday that she
waited so long to reveal the
abuse by Larry Nassar because
she was part of a group
“conditioned to stay silent.”
Douglas included the
revelation in an apology for
comments made on social media
last week that suggested women
dress modestly to help prevent
abuse.
SOCCER
Defending champion Real
Madrid advanced again to the
Champions League knockout
stages after beating APOEL, 6-0,
in Group H, and Tottenham piled
the misery on Borussia
Dortmund, 2-1.
Besiktas also progressed,
TELEVISION AND RADIO
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7 p.m.
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WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
Washington at Charlotte » NBC Sports Washington Plus, WFED (1500 AM)
Golden State at Oklahoma City » ESPN
Los Angeles Lakers at Sacramento » ESPN
NHL
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Ottawa at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Chicago at Tampa Bay » NBC Sports Network
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
2 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
5 p.m.
6 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
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12:30 a.m.
(Thurs.)
Battle 4 Atlantis quarterfinal: Tennessee vs. Purdue » ESPN2
Battle 4 Atlantis quarterfinal: Villanova vs. Western Kentucky » ESPN2
Maui Invitational, seventh-place game: California vs. Chaminade » ESPNU
Maui Invitational, fifth-place game: VCU vs. Michigan » ESPN2
Cancun Challenge, third-place game: George Mason vs. Fresno State »
CBS Sports Network
Wofford at Texas Tech » MASN2
Arkansas State at Indiana » Big Ten Network
Belmont at Providence » Fox Sports 1
Maui Invitational, third-place game: Marquette vs. Notre Dame-LSU loser
»ESPN2
Fort Wayne at Kentucky » SEC Network
Cancun Challenge, championship game: Louisiana Tech vs. Evansville »
CBS Sports Network
Maui Invitational, championship game: Wichita State vs. Notre Dame-LSU
winner » ESPN2, WTEM (980 AM)
MGM Grand Main Event, third-place game: Rice vs. Mississippi »ESPNU
MGM Grand Main Event, championship game: UNLV vs. Utah » ESPN2
drawing with Porto, 1-1, in Group
G to reach the last 16 for the first
time. Also in Group G, last
season’s semifinalist, Monaco,
crashed out after losing to
Leipzig, 4-1.
In Group E, Liverpool looked
set to join the list of the last 16
teams as it led Sevilla by three
goals at halftime, but the Spanish
side pulled off a remarkable
comeback to draw, 3-3. Now
Liverpool can’t afford to lose to
Spartak Moscow at Anfield next
month. Spartak was held to a 1-1
draw by last-place Maribor.
In Group F, Napoli beat
Shakhtar Donetsk, 3-0, and both
sides will have to wait until the
final match day to see which one
joins group winner Manchester
City in the next round.
Xavier at Minnesota » Big Ten Network
GOLF
8 p.m.
PGA Tour of Australasia: Australian Open, first round » Golf Channel
1 a.m. (Thurs.) European Tour: Hong Kong Open, first round » Golf Channel
SOCCER
Noon
2:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
UEFA Champions League: Chelsea vs. Qarabag FK » Fox Sports 2
UEFA Champions League: Barcelona vs. Juventus » Fox Sports 1
UEFA Champions League: Manchester United vs. Basel » Fox Sports 2
UEFA Champions League: Paris Saint-Germain vs. Celtic » MASN2
TENNIS
3 p.m.
WTA: Hawaii Open, early-round play » Tennis Channel
WOMEN’S COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
Alabama at Missouri » SEC Network
Auburn at Florida » ESPNU
Manchester City beat Feyenoord,
1-0. . . .
Toronto FC and the host
Columbus Crew played to a 0-0
draw in the first leg of the MLS
Eastern Conference final.
The second of two legs of the
aggregate-goals series is Nov. 29
at Toronto.
The visiting Seattle Sounders
beat the Houston Dynamo, 2-0,
in the first leg of the West final.
The second leg is Nov. 30 at
Seattle.
TENNIS
Grand Slam tournaments are
planning to return to seeding
only 16 players, instead of 32, as
of 2019, and now will give a
player who is a late withdrawal
because of an injury 50 percent
of the first-round prize money.
Also among the
announcements by the Grand
Slam Board: A player who retires
from a first-round match or
“performs below professional
standards” could face a fine as
high as the entire prize money
due a loser in that round.
FIGURE SKATING
World champion Evgenia
Medvedeva may miss the Grand
Prix Final next month because of
a broken foot.
Widely considered the favorite
for the Olympic gold medal in
February, the Russian is
unbeaten in two years.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
professional Football
This franchise has a knack
for being consistently mediocre
SVRLUGA FROM D1
nothing away.
“It’s hard,” he said.
Gruden’s Redskins enter
Thanksgiving as the Redskins —
nothing more, nothing less,
exactly as would be expected. You
can believe the roster and the
front office are fundamentally
more stable than they have been
in a generation, and that injuries
have stunted the growth we
otherwise would be seeing. You
can accept that Kirk Cousins is
playing the best quarterback
Washington has seen since —
pick a time, Brad Johnson or
Mark Rypien or Doug Williams
or Joe Theismann — and retain
hope that he will remain here for
the entirety of his career. And you
can think that looking back to
previous iterations of this
bumbling franchise has no
impact on Gruden’s team or
Gruden’s future.
But if you’re a fan of this group
and it feels like you have been
here before, it’s because you have.
This is the NFL team that, every
fall, puts its supporters through
wash-rinse-repeat torture. If
you’re a fan of this team, you
must look around the league and
wonder, “Why can’t we, just once,
have the start the Eagles are
having? Or the Vikings? Or the
Saints or Patriots or Steelers or —
for goodness sake — the &%$#@!
Jaguars?”
“It doesn’t matter what our
record is or who we are playing,”
Gruden said Tuesday.
Except that record at this point
in the season is almost always the
same.
Consider that, after the entire
league completed 10 games, eight
teams are 7-3 or better. Those
teams, be they the old-hat
Patriots or the upstart Jaguars,
engender some measure of hope
for those who follow them. It
might be muted — such as, say, in
Carolina, where 7-3 has the
Panthers only looking up in the
NFC South at the Saints. But any
of those eight teams can
reasonably say, “We’re good.
Doesn’t guarantee anything over
the next month and a half. But
we’re good.”
The last time, 10 games into a
season, Washington was 7-3 or
better?
1996.
Bill Clinton was president,
Gruden was a quarterback for
the Tampa Bay Storm in the
Arena Football League, “ER” beat
out “Seinfeld” as the top-rated
television show long before “The
Apprentice” was even a concept,
let alone a path to the presidency.
And it’s not just that
Washington hasn’t returned to
that point, confidently poised for
the playoffs with the holidays not
yet here. It’s that nearly everyone
else has been there. Of the 32
NFL teams, only the Cleveland
Browns haven’t posted a start of
at least 7-3 since 1996. Shoot,
more than half the teams in the
league have been 7-3 or better at
least once in the past three
seasons.
The NFL is built for parity. It’s
just that parity leaves
Washington behind.
Yes, Gruden’s team from a year
ago started 6-3-1, and if you want
to nitpick that such a start was
just a hair away from an arbitrary
7-3 point of demarcation, fine. If
you want to say that what
happened in 1997 under Norv
Turner or 2001 under Marty
Schottenheimer or 2003 under
Steve Spurrier or 2005 under Joe
Gibbs or 2008 under Jim Zorn or
2012 under Mike Shanahan has
no bearing on what happens
under Gruden in 2017, you have a
case.
But I’d make three points:
Such consistently mediocre
starts set up what a fan base
expects from its team; and those
middling-to-pessimistic
expectations can contribute to
the (lousy) environment at its
home games; and it necessitates
runs to the postseason that are
both desperate and unlikely, even
if they (occasionally) work out.
“It starts with this,”
cornerback Josh Norman said. “If
we get these guys, then it’s a
domino effect.”
Norman said this on a Tuesday
in November 2017, and he was
talking about Thursday’s
Thanksgiving game against the
New York Giants — and then the
five winnable games that follow.
But he could have been any
Redskins cornerback from any
season over the past 20 years,
essentially addressing the same
scenario. In the 21 seasons since
they last started 7-3, the Redskins
have been somewhere between
3-7 and 6-4 19 times. They don’t
invite confidence. They invite, at
best, trepidation.
So tell me that doesn’t have an
impact on the home crowds, on
their spirit and optimism. It has
to. Since 1996, just three teams
have fewer home wins in
December than Washington
(excluding the Texans, who only
entered the league in 2002).
The middling starts lead to
invariably middling finishes.
Washington’s last season with at
least 11 victories came in 1991, the
season that led to its most recent
Super Bowl title. Since then, the
31 other teams have produced 172
seasons with at least 11 victories,
at least one from every franchise.
Washington has zero.
That’s not Jay Gruden’s fault.
It’s not Doug Williams’s fault. It’s
not Kirk Cousins’s fault.
But it also completely absolves
fans of feeling at fault for
annually feeling defeated
entering December. Their team’s
playoff appearances are
invariably scrambles: a 5-1 finish
to snare a division title in 2015, a
7-0 sprint behind Robert Griffin
III in 2012, Todd Collins stepping
in for Jason Campbell to win the
last four games in 2007, Mark
Brunell and Clinton Portis
helping finish 2005 with five
straight wins, including the last
three against NFC East foes.
Maybe those runs could
produce some optimism that it
can happen again. None of
Washington’s remaining
opponents — the Giants twice,
Cowboys, Cardinals, Chargers
and Broncos — has a winning
record. So . . . maybe. That’s
repeatedly the best that can be
hoped around here.
So whatever the specifics, here
we are. Again. The particulars
this time: Giants (2-8) at
Redskins (4-6) on Thanksgiving
night.
“What more could you want?”
Cousins asked.
You could want a season like
virtually every other franchise
has enjoyed. You could want
what the Eagles and Patriots and
Vikings and Saints and — for
goodness sake — the Rams have
right now: that confident mindset when they take the field on
game day that they’re not going
to be denied. That’s something
special that Washington, for a
generation, never has had.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
Hobbled Redskins face tough stretch
BY
M ASTER T ESFATSION
It was on Trent Williams’s
mind nearly three weeks ago.
While discussing the subject of
Thursday night games, he noted a
stretch in which the Redskins
would play three games in 12
days.
“That’s absurd,” the left tackle
said Nov. 2. “That’s probably one
of the hardest things anybody on
this team is going to ever have to
do.”
Now, it’s here. Coming off Sunday’s meltdown in New Orleans,
Washington has just three days to
recover before hosting the New
York Giants on Thanksgiving.
Then, it hits the road for another
Thursday night NFC East matchup against the Dallas Cowboys
next week.
The stretch occurs at the same
time the Redskins placed four
players on injured reserve — running back Chris Thompson (fibula), wide receiver Terrelle Pryor
Sr. (ankle), center Spencer Long
(knees) and left guard Shawn Luavao (stinger) — and have another
18 players on the injury report.
“It’s not easy,” Redskins Coach
Jay Gruden said. “It’s the way the
NFL decided to do business.
Thanksgiving games are great,
but when you’re in a bind like we
are with the injury situation and
having two days to get new players ready for a guy like Coach
[Steve] Spagnuolo and Coach
[Ben] McAdoo is not easy, but we
will do it.”
Washington will not practice
this week. Instead, it held the first
of two closed walk-throughs Tuesday for its on-field preparations.
To make matters even more difficult, the Redskins will likely use
their third center of the season
against the Giants. Rookie Chase
Roullier, who made the last four
starts replacing Long, is expected
to be out for at least a week after
undergoing surgery on his right
hand Monday. Roullier, who had
his right arm in a sling Tuesday,
suffered the injury to his snapping hand against the Saints.
If Roullier can’t play, he would
be the eighth offensive lineman to
miss a game this season. Tony
Bergstrom, who signed with
Washington last month, is in line
to start at center. The Redskins
Swearinger wants to
end Thursday games
The human body can only take
so much punishment, says D.J.
Swearinger.
And for that reason, the
Washington Redskins safety
wants to see the NFL do away
with “Thursday Night Football”
games altogether.
“They need to throw the
Thursday night games out,” said
Swearinger. “They’re definitely
too hard on our bodies, speaking
for us, speaking for any other
NFL team. It’s harder when you
just get off the field on Sunday
and you’ve got to prepare in two
or three days for another
physical game. Our bodies are
definitely hurting right now. So
we’ve just got to do to the best we
can trying to get healthy and be
ready to play Thursday.”
The key, he said, is preparing
one’s mind and body for the
grueling toll of game-week
preparation. But despite what
Swearinger will have to put
himself through to get ready for
Washington’s Thursday night
meeting with the New York
Giants, he also acknowledged
he’s lucky to be in this position.
“Two years ago, I was on the
couch on Thanksgiving,” said the
safety, who was waived by Tampa
Bay on Nov. 17, 2015 and signed
to Arizona’s practice squad two
weeks later. “But I’m here now.
So it’ll be a big game for me.
Never played on Thanksgiving.
But it’ll definitely be in the back
of my mind that two years ago I
was on the couch.
“I’ll definitely be wired and
ready to go on Thursday with a
lot of emotion.”
Still, if Swearinger had his
way, he and his teammates
wouldn’t have to suit up
also signed Demetrius Rhaney on
Tuesday as another option at the
position.
“It’s one thing to have a lot of
guys go on IR, which we have,”
Gruden said. “But it’s another
thing having guys with one or
two-week injuries who are inactive and then you have got to get
guys ready. You have got to try to
get your practice squad to match
what you need at practice to even
have a practice. That’s been the
hardest part.”
Washington will need to do all
of this while coming off an exhausting overtime loss to the
Saints. It blew a 15-point lead
with less than six minutes left,
eventually falling, 34-31, in overtime at the Superdome against
one of the best teams in the NFL.
“It’s hard, but these guys have
shown the ability to bounce back
and continue to prepare and work
hard,” Gruden said. “I don’t think
it is going to matter — it doesn’t
matter — what our record is or
who we are playing. These guys
are going to prepare the same way
and get after it and give it all
they’ve got. It’s the only thing they
can do.”
For players who will suit up in
such a short time frame, recovery
will be critical. Safety D.J. Swearinger has a weekly treatment routine that can include a trip to the
chiropractor, acupuncture, cupping, cryotherapy, an infrared
sauna with oxygen pumping into
his nostrils and an hour in a
saltwater float tent.
“It’s basically like you’re floating in the sea,” Swearinger said.
“Saltwater basically heals your
body, gets the inflammation out
and helps you recover better.”
Swearinger will have to cram
this process into three days as a
result for this Thursday night
game.
“They need to throw the Thursday night games out,” Swearinger
said. “They’re definitely too hard
on our bodies, speaking for us,
speaking for any other NFL team.
It’s harder when you just get off
the field on Sunday and you’ve got
to prepare in two or three days for
another physical game. Our bodies are definitely hurting right
now. So we’ve just got to do to the
best we can trying to get healthy
and be ready to play Thursday.
“It’s a brutal game. Guys really
gotta tune in on taking care of
their bodies the best they can.
Whatever treatment they’re getting, try to get it at an all-time
high and try to get extra. It’s
definitely a brutal stretch, three
games in 12 days. We just gotta be
pros and handle it the way we
handle it.”
Swearinger, who also shared
his appreciation to be playing on
Thanksgiving after spending this
holiday out of the league two
years ago, said he’s got family in
town. On top of taking care of his
body, Swearinger has to find ways
to make time for them while preparing his mind for the Giants.
“It’s definitely backed up,”
Swearinger said. “You don’t have
too much time at the house. When
I get home, I want to relax. But
when I get home [this week], you
want to spend time with the family and at the same time still
watch film to try to get as much
knowledge as I can before Thursday.”
master.tesfatsion@washpost.com
NFL NOTES
Broncos to start Lynch at quarterback vs. Oakland
A SSOCIATED P RESS
It’s time to see conclusively if
quarterback Paxton Lynch is a
bust or just a late bloomer.
The Denver Broncos’ former
first-round draft pick will make
his first start of the season this
weekend at Oakland, a person
with knowledge of the decision
told the Associated Press on Tuesday.
General Manager John Elway
moved up in the first round of the
2016 NFL draft to select Lynch
with the 26th overall pick, but the
former Memphis quarterback
proved to be a project.
Trevor Siemian, a 2015 seventhrounder from Northwestern,
handily beat out Lynch in 2016
and again this season. Shortly after coming up short in Denver’s
quarterback competition for the
second time, Lynch bruised his
throwing shoulder against Green
Bay in a preseason game.
That led to the re-signing of
Peyton Manning’s longtime backup, Brock Osweiler, who had been
released by Cleveland following a
trade from Houston.
R ED S K I N S N O TES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Offensive tackle Trent Williams called the Redskins’ stretch of three games over 12 days “absurd.”
midweek. And he’s not alone.
Bills guard Richie Incognito
ripped the league following
Buffalo’s Nov. 2 blowout loss to
the Jets, saying: “These Thursday
night games — they suck. They
throw a wrench in our schedule.
It’s absolutely ridiculous that we
have to do this. As physical as
this game is, as much work and
preparation that goes into this,
to force us to play games in fourday weeks is completely unfair.
. . . But, you know, whatever. The
league makes money off of it.
That’s all they care about,
anyway.”
A week later, Seahawks wide
receiver Doug Baldwin said
prime time Thursday games
should be banned after several of
his teammates were injured in
Seattle’s 22-16 win over Arizona
on Nov. 9. “This [expletive]
should be illegal,” Baldwin told
reporters after the game. “It is
not okay.”
— Kimberley A. Martin
RAIDERS: Oakland fired defensive coordinator Ken Norton
Jr. on Tuesday in a staff shake-up
during a disappointing season.
Coach Jack Del Rio called the
move a difficult decision and said
that assistant head coach for defense John Pagano will take over
as coordinator leading into this
week’s home game against the
Denver Broncos.
There has been little improvement on the field as the Raiders
(4-6) have been one of the league’s
biggest disappointments after entering the season as a contender in
the AFC.
BROWNS: Every day he stays
committed and sober, Josh Gordon takes another step toward
playing again in the NFL.
The wide receiver, who squandered millions in potential earnings and derailed a promising career because of substance abuse,
will practice with the Browns on
Wednesday for the first time in 14
months.
Gordon was recently reinstated
on a conditional basis by NFL
Commissioner Roger Goodell after being suspended for the past
two seasons.
SEAHAWKS: Seattle made
an unexpected roster move, waiving veteran defensive end Dwight
Freeney just four games after signing him to help boost its pass rush.
Freeney was signed in late October to boost Seattle’s pass rush
after Cliff Avril was lost to a neck
injury earlier in the season.
Freeney had three sacks in his first
two games, moving into 17th on
the all-time sack list.
FALCONS: Atlanta waived
cornerback Jalen Collins after his
second suspension ended for violating the NFL policy on performance-enhancing substances.
Collins did not play this season.
JAGUARS: Jacksonville wide
receiver Allen Hurns missed a
fourth consecutive practice and is
unlikely to play at Arizona.
Hurns was wearing a walking
boot on his sprained right ankle
Tuesday.
HALL OF FAME: First-year
eligibles Ray Lewis and Randy
Moss are among 27 semifinalists
for induction into the Pro Football
Hall of Fame.
Others in their initial year of
eligibility who made this cut are
Brian Urlacher, Richard Seymour,
Steve Hutchinson and Ronde Barber.
Four previously eligible players
made the semifinals for the first
time: LeRoy Butler, Leslie O’Neal,
Simeon Rice and Everson Walls.
The other semifinalists are
Steve Atwater, Tony Boselli, Isaac
Bruce, Don Coryell, Roger Craig,
Brian Dawkins, Alan Faneca, Torry Holt, Joe Jacoby, Edgerrin
James, Jimmy Johnson, Ty Law,
John Lynch, Kevin Mawae, Karl
Mecklenburg, Terrell Owens and
Hines Ward.
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D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
nfl rewind
NFC East
AFC East
DALLAS (5-5)
PHILADELPHIA (9-1)
BUFFALO (5-5)
NEW ENGLAND (8-2)
September
10: N.Y. Giants, 19-3
17: at Denver, 17-42
25: at Arizona, 28-17
October
1: L.A. Rams, 30-35
8: Green Bay, 31-35
15: Bye
22: at San Fran., 40-10
29: at Washington, 33-19
November
5: Kansas City, 28-17
12: at Atlanta, 7-27
19: Philadelphia, 9-37
23: L.A. Chargers
30: Washington
December
10: at N.Y. Giants
17: at Oakland
24: Seattle
31: at Philadelphia
September
10: at Washington, 30-17
17: at Kansas City, 20-27
24: N.Y. Giants, 27-24
October
1: at L.A. Chargers, 26-24
8: Arizona, 34-7
12: at Carolina, 28-23
23: Washington, 34-24
29: San Fran., 33-10
November
5: Denver, 51-23
12: Bye
19: at Dallas, 37-9
26: Chicago
December
3: at Seattle
10: at L.A. Rams
17: at N.Y. Giants
25: Oakland
31: Dallas
September
10: N.Y. Jets, 21-12
17: at Carolina, 3-9
24: Denver, 26-16
October
1: at Atlanta, 23-17
8: at Cincinnati, 16-20
15: Bye
22: Tampa Bay, 30-27
29: Oakland, 34-14
November
2: at N.Y. Jets, 21-34
12: New Orleans, 10-47
19: at L.A. Chargers, 24-54
26: at Kansas City
December
3: New England
10: Indianapolis
17: Miami
24: at New England
31: at Miami
September
7: Kansas City, 27-42
17: at New Orleans, 36-20
24: Houston, 36-33
October
1: Carolina, 30-33
5: at Tampa Bay, 19-14
15: at N.Y. Jets, 24-17
22: Atlanta, 23-7
29: L.A. Chargers, 21-13
November
5: Bye
12: at Denver, 41-16
19: at Oakland, 33-8
26: Miami
December
3: at Buffalo
11: at Miami
17: at Pittsburgh
24: Buffalo
31: N.Y. Jets
NEW YORK (2-8)
WASHINGTON (4-6)
MIAMI (4-6)
NEW YORK (4-6)
September
10: at Dallas, 3-19
18: Detroit, 10-24
24: at Philadelphia, 24-27
October
1: at Tampa Bay, 23-25
8: L.A. Chargers, 22-27
15: at Denver, 23-10
22: Seattle, 7-24
29: Bye
November
5: L.A. Rams, 17-51
12: at San Fran., 21-31
19: Kansas City, 12-9 (OT)
23: at Washington
December
3: at Oakland
10: Dallas
17: Philadelphia
24: at Arizona
31: Washington
September
10: Philadelphia, 17-30
17: at L.A. Rams, 27-20
24: Oakland, 27-10
October
2: at Kansas City, 20-29
8: Bye
15: San Fran., 26-24
23: at Philadelphia, 24-34
29: Dallas, 19-33
November
5: at Seattle, 17-14
12: Minnesota, 30-38
19: at N. Orleans, 31-34 (OT)
23: N.Y. Giants
30: at Dallas
December
10: at L.A. Chargers
17: Arizona
24: Denver
31: at N.Y. Giants
September
17: at L.A. Chargers, 19-17
24: at N.Y. Jets, 6-20
October
1: New Orleans, 0-20
8: Tennessee, 16-10
15: at Atlanta, 20-17
22: N.Y. Jets, 31-28
26: at Baltimore, 0-40
November
5: Oakland, 24-27
13: at Carolina, 21-45
19: Tampa Bay, 20-30
26: at New England
December
3: Denver
11: New England
17: at Buffalo
24: at Kansas City
31: Buffalo
September
10: at Buffalo, 12-21
17: at Oakland, 20-45
24: Miami, 20-6
October
1: Jacksonville, 23-20 (OT)
8: at Cleveland, 17-14
15: New England, 17-24
22: at Miami, 28-31
29: Atlanta, 20-25
November
2: Buffalo, 34-21
12: at Tampa Bay, 10-15
19: Bye
26: Carolina
December
3: Kansas City
10: at Denver
17: at New Orleans
24: L.A. Chargers
31: at New England
KEITH SRAKOCIC/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Antonio Brown had three touchdown grabs as the Steelers beat the Titans, 40-17, on Thursday for their fifth straight win.
NFC North
CHICAGO (3-7)
GREEN BAY (5-5)
September
10: Atlanta, 17-23
17: at Tampa Bay, 7-29
24: Pittsburgh, 23-17 (OT)
28: at Green Bay, 14-35
October
9: Minnesota, 17-20
15: at Balt., 27-24 (OT)
22: Carolina, 17-3
29: at New Orleans, 12-20
November
12: Green Bay, 16-23
12: Bye
19: Detroit, 24-27
26: at Philadelphia
December
3: San Fran.
10: at Cincinnati
16: at Detroit
24: Cleveland
31: at Minnesota
September
10: Seattle, 17-9
17: at Atlanta, 23-34
24: Cincinnati, 27-24 (OT)
28: Chicago, 35-14
October
8: at Dallas, 35-31
15: at Minnesota, 10-23
22: New Orleans, 17-26
29: Bye
November
6: Detroit, 17-30
12: at Chicago, 23-16
19: Baltimore, 0-23
26: at Pittsburgh
December
3: Tampa Bay
10: at Cleveland
17: at Carolina
23: Minnesota
31: at Detroit
DETROIT (6-4)
MINNESOTA (8-2)
September
10: Arizona, 35-23
18: at N.Y. Giants, 24-10
24: Atlanta, 26-30
October
1: at Minnesota, 14-7
8: Carolina, 24-27
15: at New Orleans, 38-52
22: Bye
29: Pittsburgh, 15-20
November
6: at Green Bay, 30-17
12: Cleveland, 38-24
19: at Chicago, 27-24
23: Minnesota
December
3: at Baltimore
10: at Tampa Bay
16: Chicago
24: at Cincinnati
31: Green Bay
September
11: New Orleans, 29-19
17: at Pittsburgh, 9-26
24: Tampa Bay, 34-17
October
1: Detroit, 7-14
9: at Chicago, 20-17
15: Green Bay, 23-10
22: Baltimore, 24-16
29: at Cleveland, 33-16
November
5: Bye
12: at Washington, 38-30
19: L.A. Rams, 24-7
23: at Detroit
December
3: at Atlanta
10: at Carolina
17: Cincinnati
23: at Green Bay
31: Chicago
NFC South
ATLANTA (6-4)
NEW ORLEANS (8-2)
September
10: at Chicago, 23-17
17: Green Bay, 34-23
24: at Detroit, 30-26
October
1: Buffalo, 17-23
8: Bye
15: Miami, 17-20
22: at New England, 7-23
29: at N.Y. Jets, 25-20
November
5: at Carolina, 17-20
12: Dallas, 27-7
20: at Seattle, 34-31
26: Tampa Bay
December
3: Minnesota
7: New Orleans
18: at Tampa Bay
24: at New Orleans
31: Carolina
September
11: at Minnesota, 19-29
17: New England, 20-36
24: at Carolina, 34-13
October
1: at Miami, 20-0
8: Bye
15: Detroit, 52-38
22: at Green Bay, 26-17
29: Chicago, 20-12
November
5: Tampa Bay, 30-10
12: at Buffalo, 47-10
19: Wash., 34-31 (OT)
26: at L.A. Rams
December
3: Carolina
7: at Atlanta
17: N.Y. Jets
24: Atlanta
31: at Tampa Bay
CAROLINA (7-3)
TAMPA BAY (4-6)
September
10: at San Fran., 23-3
17: Buffalo, 9-3
24: New Orleans, 13-34
October
1: at New England, 33-30
8: at Detroit, 27-24
12: Philadelphia, 23-28
22: at Chicago, 3-17
29: at Tampa Bay, 17-3
November
5: Atlanta, 20-17
13: Miami, 45-21
19: Bye
26: at N.Y. Jets
December
3: at New Orleans
10: Minnesota
17: Green Bay
24: Tampa Bay
31: at Atlanta
September
17: Chicago, 29-7
24: at Minnesota, 17-34
October
1: N.Y. Giants, 25-23
5: New England, 14-19
15: at Arizona, 33-38
22: at Buffalo, 27-30
29: Carolina, 3-17
November
5: at New Orleans, 10-30
12: N.Y. Jets, 15-10
19: at Miami, 30-20
26: at Atlanta
December
3: at Green Bay
10: Detroit
18: Atlanta
24: at Carolina
31: New Orleans
AFC North
NFL power rankings
Each week, national NFL writer Mark Maske provides his ranking and commentary on all 32 teams. Dive deeper daily on
washingtonpost.com/sports.
1. Eagles, 9-1 PREVIOUS: 1
It took Philadelphia a half to shake off the rust from its bye week,
but once the Eagles got things revved up Sunday night at Dallas,
they again looked very much like the NFL’s most complete team.
2. Patriots, 8-2 PREVIOUS: 2
There’s no question now that the Patriots and Steelers are the
AFC’s top two teams. For each, the rest of the regular season is
all about which one will host the AFC championship game.
3. Saints, 8-2 PREVIOUS: 3
New Orleans suddenly can do no wrong, even when it finds itself
trailing by 15 points late in the fourth quarter at home to what
should have been an overmatched opponent in Washington.
4. Steelers, 8-2 PREVIOUS: 5
Pittsburgh looked very good Thursday night against Tennessee,
and the Steelers are now rolling with five straight victories. They
should be able to keep that going Sunday night vs. Green Bay.
5. Vikings, 8-2 PREVIOUS: 6
Their lopsided triumph over the Rams reinforces the possibility
that the Vikings could become the first team to play a Super
Bowl in its own stadium. But there’s a long way to go.
6. Jaguars, 7-3 PREVIOUS: 7
The Jaguars did what had to be done to win in Cleveland. The
schedule only gets marginally tougher with games against the
Cardinals and Colts the next two weekends.
7. Panthers, 7-3 PREVIOUS: 8
Carolina returns from its bye to face the Jets on Sunday at the
Meadowlands. The Panthers can’t afford a misstep, not with key
games against the Saints and Vikings looming.
8. Rams, 7-3 PREVIOUS: 4
The loss Sunday at Minnesota was not a promising beginning to
the rugged stretch of the schedule that will show how the Rams
stack up against the other top NFC contenders.
9. Falcons, 6-4 PREVIOUS: 12
Atlanta just held on Monday night in Seattle. The Falcons are a
factor again in the NFC playoff race, but they still don’t inspire
much confidence when they’re playing with a lead.
10. Lions, 6-4 PREVIOUS: 13
The Lions are back in a good groove with three straight wins. But
the level of competition increases considerably with the
Thanksgiving visit from the Vikings.
11. Ravens, 5-5 PREVIOUS: 19
The fact that Baltimore is back in the AFC wild-card race speaks
mostly to the mediocrity of the conference’s middle-class teams.
12. Titans, 6-4 PREVIOUS: 9
Tennessee isn’t ready to compete with the AFC’s best teams.
That was evident during Thursday night’s ugly loss at Pittsburgh,
in which QB Marcus Mariota threw four interceptions.
13. Seahawks, 6-4 PREVIOUS: 11
When Blair Walsh’s would-be game-tying field-goal try fell
agonizingly short in Monday night’s loss to the Falcons, the
Seahawks were left looking an awful lot like a non-playoff team.
14. Chiefs, 6-4 PREVIOUS: 10
Kansas City is good enough to win the surprisingly feeble
AFC West but simply isn’t good enough to challenge for AFC
supremacy. The team’s 1-4 downward spiral has made that clear.
NFC West
ARIZONA (4-6)
SAN FRANCISCO (1-9)
September
10: at Detroit, 23-35
17: at Indy, 16-13 (OT)
25: Dallas, 17-28
October
1: San Fran., 18-15 (OT)
8: at Philadelphia, 7-34
15: Tampa Bay, 38-33
22: at L.A. Rams, 0-33
29: Bye
November
5: at San Fran., 20-10
9: Seattle, 16-22
19: at Houston, 21-31
26: Jacksonville
December
3: L.A. Rams
10: Tennessee
17: at Washington
24: N.Y. Giants
31: at Seattle
September
10: Carolina, 3-23
17: at Seattle, 9-12
21: L.A. Rams, 39-41
October
1: at Arizona, 15-18 (OT)
8: at Indy, 23-26 (OT)
15: at Washington, 24-26
22: Dallas, 10-40
29: at Philadelphia, 10-33
November
5: Arizona, 10-20
12: N.Y. Giants, 31-21
19: Bye
26: Seattle
December
3: at Chicago
10: at Houston
17: Tennessee
24: Jacksonville
31: at L.A. Rams
LOS ANGELES (7-3)
SEATTLE (6-4)
September
10: Indianapolis, 46-9
17: Washington, 20-27
21: at San Fran., 41-39
October
1: at Dallas, 35-30
8: Seattle, 10-16
15: at Jacksonville, 27-17
22: Arizona, 33-0
29: Bye
November
5: at N.Y. Giants, 51-17
12: Houston, 33-7
19: at Minnesota, 7-24
26: New Orleans
December
3: at Arizona
10: Philadelphia
17: at Seattle
24: at Tennessee
31: San Fran.
September
10: at Green Bay, 9-17
17: San Fran., 12-9
24: at Tennessee, 27-33
October
1: Indianapolis, 46-18
8: at L.A. Rams, 16-10
15: Bye
22: at N.Y. Giants, 24-7
29: Houston, 41-38
November
5: Washington, 14-17
9: at Arizona, 22-16
20: Atlanta, 31-34
26: at San Fran.
December
3: Philadelphia
10: at Jacksonville
17: L.A. Rams
24: at Dallas
31: Arizona
15. Buccaneeers, 4-6 PREVIOUS: 20
Tampa Bay is playing better since Ryan Fitzpatrick took over for
Jameis Winston at quarterback, but things get tougher this
weekend with a visit to Atlanta.
NFC Statistics
16. Chargers, 4-6 PREVIOUS: 24
The Chargers are approaching respectability with wins in four of
six games since their 0-4 start. They visit Dallas on Thanksgiving.
17. Texans, 4-6 PREVIOUS: 27
Tom Savage is making everyone forget about Deshaun Watson.
Okay, not really. Not even close. But at least Houston finally won
a game with Savage at quarterback.
18. Bengals, 4-6 PREVIOUS: 28
Even as disappointing as the Bengals have been, their season is
not totally, completely over. They can get back to within a game
of .500 if they beat the Browns on Sunday
19. Redskins, 4-6 PREVIOUS: 18
The botched intentional grounding call against Kirk Cousins
does not account entirely for Washington squandering a 15-point
lead late in the fourth quarter Sunday at New Orleans.
20. Raiders, 4-6 PREVIOUS: 14
Oakland’s performance against the Patriots in Mexico City was
dreadful. The title contender talk was nothing more than that.
21. Jets, 4-6 PREVIOUS: 22
The Jets, with their pre-bye loss to the Buccaneers and Ryan
Fitzpatrick, finally seemed to be getting on board with that
alleged plan to tank the season. But now it’s too late.
22. Cowboys, 5-5 PREVIOUS: 16
You know how NFL teams say that those dreaded distractions
must be avoided at all costs? What about when the owner of the
team is the person creating the off-field turbulence?
Rush
144.0
144.6
120.4
123.3
104.2
102.6
113.7
79.8
140.4
80.8
127.6
69.3
101.5
102.4
92.0
131.8
Pass
271.7
233.0
255.0
249.2
263.4
256.8
245.4
263.0
201.8
257.6
209.0
258.9
224.4
206.4
216.5
170.4
DEFENSE
Yards
Carolina .............................. 278.0
Minnesota .......................... 290.5
Philadelphia ....................... 306.8
Seattle ............................... 314.9
Atlanta ............................... 316.7
Chicago .............................. 319.0
New Orleans ...................... 326.7
Dallas ................................. 331.6
L.A. Rams ........................... 335.0
Green Bay .......................... 340.1
Arizona .............................. 344.2
Detroit ............................... 354.5
Washington ....................... 363.6
San Francisco ..................... 379.8
Tampa Bay ......................... 383.5
N.Y. Giants ......................... 396.6
Rush
80.6
77.7
71.0
99.8
115.9
106.0
115.4
115.7
123.3
105.7
101.3
114.2
114.6
133.5
107.2
132.7
Pass
197.4
212.8
235.8
215.1
200.8
213.0
211.3
215.9
211.7
234.4
242.9
240.3
249.0
246.3
276.3
263.9
PASSING
ATT-CMP
Brees, NOR .............. 341/244
Wentz, PHL ............. 318/190
A. Rodgers, GBY ...... 193/128
Cousins, WAS ......... 345/230
Goff, LA ................... 318/195
Stafford, DET .......... 360/227
R. Wilson, SEA ........ 377/236
M. Ryan, ATL ........... 326/218
Keenum, MIN .......... 300/197
PCT
71.6
59.7
66.3
66.7
61.3
63.1
62.6
66.9
65.7
YDS TD INT RATE
2783 15 5 104.3
2430 25 5 103.4
1385 13 3 103.2
2796 17 5 101.8
2610 16 4 98.9
2760 19 5 98.4
2801 21 7 96.0
2567 15 8 95.7
2194 12 5 93.7
23. Packers, 5-5 PREVIOUS: 15
Just think how terrible the Green Bay offense would be with Brett
Hundley at quarterback if Coach Mike McCarthy had not
invested all that time in Hundley’s development.
24. Bills, 5-5 PREVIOUS: 17
In benching QB Tyrod Taylor in favor of Nathan Peterman, Coach
Sean McDermott let down a team that had — and has — a
chance to reach the playoffs.
25. Cardinals, 4-6 PREVIOUS: 21
When a team eagerly awaits the return of QB Drew Stanton, that
tells you all that you need to know.
26. Colts, 3-7 PREVIOUS: 26
Indianapolis is returning from its bye to finish its season because
NFL rules say the Colts have to do so.
27. Bears, 3-7 PREVIOUS: 23
Chicago is 2-4 since rookie Mitchell Trubisky took over as the
starting quarterback, but there have been glimpses of his promise.
28. Giants, 2-8 PREVIOUS: 31
So maybe the Giants haven’t given up, after all.
29. Dolphins, 4-6 PREVIOUS: 25
Miami is reeling, and there’s little realistic hope that matters will
improve when the Dolphins play Sunday at New England.
30. Broncos, 3-7 PREVIOUS: 29
If Denver players don’t like what John Elway said about them
being soft, maybe they should do something about it on the field.
31. 49ers, 1-9 PREVIOUS: 30
Isn’t it about time to see QB Jimmy Garoppolo in a game?
mark.maske@washpost.com
RECEIVING
NO YDS AVG
Thielen, MIN .......................... 62 916 14.8
Ju. Jones, ATL ....................... 54 786 14.6
Fitzgerald, ARI ...................... 69 768 11.1
Mic. Thomas, NOR ................ 65 753 11.6
R. Woods, LA ......................... 47 703 15.0
Tate, DET ............................... 59 691 11.7
Baldwin, SEA ......................... 56 673 12.0
Mi. Evans, TAM ..................... 45 624 13.9
M. Jones, DET ....................... 38 622 16.4
LG TD
65 3
53 1
37 4
33 2
94 4
45 3
54 4
41 4
43 6
RUSHING
J. Howard, CHI .....................
Ingram, NOR ........................
Gurley, LA ............................
E. Elliott, DAL ......................
Hyde, SNF ............................
Blount, PHL .........................
D. Freeman, ATL .................
Abdullah, DET .....................
Darkwa, NYG .......................
Stewart, CAR ......................
LG TD
53 5
51 8
36 8
30 7
61 4
68 2
44 5
34 3
47 2
18 1
NO YDS AVG
192 841 4.4
155 806 5.2
187 791 4.2
191 783 4.1
141 592 4.2
122 561 4.6
116 515 4.4
144 491 3.4
101 489 4.8
138 460 3.3
Rush
106.0
118.4
160.6
102.4
128.5
94.4
112.9
117.5
89.7
101.6
117.7
95.9
101.2
80.4
114.6
68.0
Pass
304.5
252.5
201.5
255.1
221.5
246.9
216.9
209.9
236.8
205.3
184.4
204.9
199.5
211.9
165.2
197.6
DEFENSE
Yards
Jacksonville ....................... 275.6
Denver ................................ 283.2
Pittsburgh .......................... 287.6
Baltimore ........................... 306.0
Cleveland ........................... 313.7
Cincinnati ........................... 323.0
Tennessee .......................... 330.4
Miami ................................. 339.2
Houston ............................. 344.8
N.Y. Jets ............................ 346.9
L.A. Chargers ..................... 348.7
Buffalo ............................... 366.8
Oakland .............................. 367.0
Kansas City ........................ 383.0
Indianapolis ....................... 385.8
New England ...................... 401.9
Rush
113.6
85.5
97.6
120.8
91.7
122.4
89.2
109.9
92.0
117.9
138.9
119.9
113.8
129.2
111.3
119.9
Pass
162.0
197.7
190.0
185.2
222.0
200.6
241.2
229.3
252.8
229.0
209.8
246.9
253.2
253.8
274.5
282.0
September
10: Pittsburgh, 18-21
17: at Baltimore, 10-24
24: at Indianapolis, 28-31
October
1: Cincinnati, 7-31
8: N.Y. Jets, 14-17
15: at Houston, 17-33
22: Tennessee, 9-12 (OT)
29: Minnesota, 16-33
November
5: Bye
12: at Detroit, 24-38
19: Jacksonville, 7-19
26: at Cincinnati
December
3: at L.A. Chargers
10: Green Bay
17: Baltimore
24: at Chicago
31: at Pittsburgh
CINCINNATI (4-6)
PITTSBURGH (8-2)
September
10: Baltimore, 0-20
14: Houston, 9-13
24: at Green Bay, 24-27 (OT)
October
1: at Cleveland, 31-7
8: Buffalo, 20-16
15: Bye
22: at Pittsburgh, 14-29
29: Indianapolis, 24-23
November
5: at Jacksonville, 7-23
12: at Tennessee, 20-24
19: at Denver, 20-17
26: Cleveland
December
4: Pittsburgh
10: Chicago
17: at Minnesota
24: Detroit
31: at Baltimore
September
10: at Cleveland, 21-18
17: Minnesota, 26-9
24: at Chicago, 17-23 (OT)
October
1: at Baltimore, 26-9
8: Jacksonville, 9-30
15: at Kansas City, 19-13
22: Cincinnati, 29-14
29: at Detroit, 20-15
November
5: Bye
12: at Indianapolis, 20-17
16: Tennessee, 40-17
26: Green Bay
December
4: at Cincinnati
10: Baltimore
17: New England
25: at Houston
31: Cleveland
HOUSTON (4-6)
JACKSONVILLE (7-3)
September
10: Jacksonville, 7-29
14: at Cincinnati, 13-9
24: at New England, 33-36
October
1: Tennessee, 57-14
8: Kansas City, 34-42
15: Cleveland, 33-17
22: Bye
29: at Seattle, 38-41
November
5: Indianapolis, 14-20
12: at L.A. Rams, 7-33
19: Arizona, 31-21
27: at Baltimore
December
3: at Tennessee
10: San Fran.
17: at Jacksonville
25: Pittsburgh
31: at Indianapolis
September
10: at Houston, 29-7
17: Tennessee, 16-37
24: Baltimore, 44-7
October
1: at N.Y. Jets, 20-23 (OT)
8: at Pittsburgh, 30-9
15: L.A. Rams, 17-27
22: at Indianapolis, 27-0
29: Bye
November
5: Cincinnati, 23-7
12: L.A. Chargers, 20-17 (OT)
19: at Cleveland, 19-7
26: at Arizona
December
3: Indianapolis
10: Seattle
17: Houston
24: at San Fran.
31: at Tennessee
INDIANAPOLIS (3-7)
TENNESSEE (6-4)
September
10: at L.A. Rams, 9-46
17: Arizona, 13-16 (OT)
24: Cleveland, 31-28
October
1: at Seattle, 18-46
8: San Fran., 26-23 (OT)
16: at Tennessee, 22-36
22: Jacksonville, 0-27
29: at Cincinnati, 23-24
November
5: at Houston, 20-14
12: Pittsburgh, 17-20
19: Bye
26: Tennessee
December
3: at Jacksonville
10: at Buffalo
14: Denver
23: at Baltimore
31: Houston
September
10: Oakland, 16-26
17: at Jacksonville, 37-16
24: Seattle, 33-27
October
1: at Houston, 14-57
8: at Miami, 10-16
16: Indianapolis, 36-22
22: at Cleveland, 12-9 (OT)
29: Bye
November
5: Baltimore, 23-20
12: Cincinnati, 24-20
16: at Pittsburgh, 17-40
26: at Indianapolis
December
3: Houston
10: at Arizona
17: at San Fran.
24: L.A. Rams
31: Jacksonville
AFC West
32. Browns, 0-10 PREVIOUS: 32
Cleveland didn’t quite achieve a perfect 0-16 season a year ago,
but it is making another run at it this season.
OFFENSE
Yards
New England ...................... 410.5
Kansas City ........................ 370.9
Jacksonville ....................... 362.1
Pittsburgh .......................... 357.5
Houston ............................. 350.0
L.A. Chargers ..................... 341.3
Denver ................................ 329.8
Tennessee .......................... 327.4
Oakland .............................. 326.5
N.Y. Jets ............................ 306.9
Buffalo ............................... 302.1
Indianapolis ....................... 300.8
Cleveland ........................... 300.7
Miami ................................. 292.3
Baltimore ........................... 279.8
Cincinnati ........................... 265.6
CLEVELAND (0-10)
September
10: at Cincinnati, 20-0
17: Cleveland, 24-10
24: at Jacksonville, 7-44
October
1: Pittsburgh, 9-26
8: at Oakland, 30-17
15: Chicago, 24-27 (OT)
22: at Minnesota, 16-24
26: Miami, 40-0
November
5: at Tennessee, 20-23
12: Bye
19: at Green Bay, 23-0
27: Houston
December
3: Detroit
10: at Pittsburgh
17: at Cleveland
23: Indianapolis
31: Cincinnati
AFC South
AFC Statistics
OFFENSE
Yards
New Orleans ...................... 415.7
Philadelphia ....................... 377.6
L.A. Rams ........................... 375.4
Minnesota .......................... 372.5
Seattle ............................... 367.6
Washington ....................... 359.4
Atlanta ............................... 359.1
Tampa Bay ......................... 342.8
Dallas ................................. 342.2
Detroit ............................... 338.4
Carolina .............................. 336.6
Arizona .............................. 328.2
San Francisco ..................... 325.9
Green Bay .......................... 308.8
N.Y. Giants ......................... 308.5
Chicago .............................. 302.2
BALTIMORE (5-5)
PASSING
ATT-CMP
Brady, NE ................ 380/261
Al. Smith, KC ........... 333/231
D. Watson, HOU ...... 204/126
McCown, NYJ .......... 313/216
Ty. Taylor, BUF ........ 279/178
Dalton, CIN .............. 296/183
Rivers, LAC .............. 355/214
D. Carr, OAK ............ 319/204
Roethlisberger, PIT . 351/217
PCT
68.7
69.4
61.8
69.0
63.8
61.8
60.3
64.0
61.8
YDS TD INT RATE
3146 22 2 110.9
2674 18 3 107.6
1699 19 8 103.0
2242 14 8 93.7
1842 11 3 91.4
2158 16 8 90.7
2514 17 7 89.6
2191 14 8 88.2
2597 16 10 87.8
RECEIVING
NO YDS AVG
A. Brown, PIT ........................ 70 1026 14.7
D. Hopkins, HOU .................... 62 879 14.2
Cooks, NE .............................. 45 786 17.5
K. Allen, LAC ......................... 56 755 13.5
A. Green, CIN ......................... 48 743 15.5
Kelce, KC ................................ 59 738 12.5
T. Hilton, IND ........................ 36 725 20.1
T. Hill, KC ............................... 47 685 14.6
Dem. Thomas, DEN ............... 53 633 11.9
LG TD
51 6
72 9
64 4
50 3
77 6
44 5
80 3
75 4
40 3
RUSHING
Bell, PIT ...............................
K. Hunt, KC ..........................
Fournette, JAC ....................
McCoy, BUF .........................
Gordon, LAC ........................
L. Miller, HOU ......................
C.. Anderson, DEN ...............
A. Collins, BAL .....................
Gore, IND .............................
Jay Ajayi, MIA .....................
LG TD
27 5
69 4
90 6
48 4
87 5
21 2
40 2
50 1
21 2
21 0
NO YDS AVG
232 886 3.8
173 873 5.0
175 740 4.2
170 709 4.2
167 633 3.8
162 604 3.7
139 573 4.1
113 570 5.0
144 509 3.5
138 465 3.4
DENVER (3-7)
LOS ANGELES (4-6)
September
11: L.A. Chargers, 24-21
17: Dallas, 42-17
24: at Buffalo, 16-26
October
1: Oakland, 16-10
8: Bye
15: N.Y. Giants, 10-23
22: at L.A. Chargers, 0-21
30: at Kansas City, 19-29
November
5: at Philadelphia, 23-51
12: New England, 16-41
19: Cincinnati, 17-20
26: at Oakland
December
3: at Miami
10: N.Y. Jets
14: at Indianapolis
24: at Washington
31: Kansas City
September
11: at Denver, 21-24
17: Miami, 17-19
24: Kansas City, 10-24
October
1: Philadelphia, 24-26
8: at N.Y. Giants, 27-22
15: at Oakland, 17-16
22: Denver, 21-0
29: at New England, 13-21
November
5: Bye
12: at Jacks., 17-20 (OT)
19: Buffalo, 54-24
23: at Dallas
December
3: Cleveland
10: Washington
16: at Kansas City
24: at N.Y. Jets
31: Oakland
KANSAS CITY (6-4)
OAKLAND (4-6)
September
7: at New England, 42-27
17: Philadelphia, 27-20
24: at L.A. Chargers, 24-10
October
2: Washington, 29-20
8: at Houston, 42-34
15: Pittsburgh, 13-19
19: at Oakland, 30-31
30: Denver, 29-19
November
5: at Dallas, 17-28
12: Bye
19: at N.Y. Giants, 9-12 (OT)
26: Buffalo
December
3: at N.Y. Jets
10: Oakland
16: L.A. Chargers
24: Miami
31: at Denver
September
10: at Tennessee, 26-16
17: N.Y. Jets, 45-20
24: at Washington, 10-27
October
1: at Denver, 10-16
8: Baltimore, 17-30
15: L.A. Chargers, 16-17
19: Kansas City, 31-30
29: at Buffalo, 14-34
November
5: at Miami, 27-24
12: Bye
19: New England, 8-33
26: Denver
December
3: N.Y. Giants
10: at Kansas City
17: Dallas
25: at Philadelphia
31: at L.A. Chargers
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
Miami, Clemson swap spots in rankings
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
A sole wrinkle in a sea of form
marked the latest College Football
Playoff rankings, released Tuesday evening. While the top 12 kept
the same teams and almost the
same order, the selection committee took Miami and Clemson and
inverted them, 12 days ahead of
their highbrow quarrel in Charlotte in the Atlantic Coast Conference championship game.
Miami (10-0) edged upward to
No. 2, and Clemson (10-1) slipped
slightly to No. 3. Everybody else,
from No. 1 Alabama (11-0), to No. 4
Oklahoma (10-1), No. 5 Wisconsin
(11-0), No. 6 Auburn (9-2) and No.
7 Georgia (10-1) and five steps
beyond, remained stationary. The
top four teams, after the final
rankings of Sunday, Dec. 3, will be
in the national semifinals at the
Sugar Bowl in New Orleans and
the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif.
In an uneventful weekend that
came between the selection committee’s third set of rankings (last
week) and fourth set (Tuesday),
Miami tore through a 28-14 deficit
to Virginia and won, 44-28, having tested itself at the hard art of
coping with fresh success after
impressive wins over Virginia
Tech and Notre Dame. Clemson,
meanwhile, got a 61-3 win over
The Citadel.
While Virginia is a 6-5 team
from the ACC, with one win over a
ranked team (No. 23 Boise State),
The Citadel is a 5-6 team from the
Football Championship Subdivision, effectively college football’s
College Football Playoff rankings
RELEASED TUESDAY
Record
1. Alabama................................................................. 11-0
2. Miami..................................................................... 10-0
3. Clemson ................................................................. 10-1
4. Oklahoma............................................................... 10-1
5. Wisconsin .............................................................. 11-0
6. Auburn ..................................................................... 9-2
7. Georgia................................................................... 10-1
8. Notre Dame ............................................................. 9-2
9. Ohio St. .................................................................... 9-2
10. Penn St. ................................................................. 9-2
11. Southern Cal ........................................................ 10-2
12. TCU......................................................................... 9-2
13. Washington St. ..................................................... 9-2
14. Mississippi St. ....................................................... 8-3
15. UCF....................................................................... 10-0
16. Michigan St............................................................ 8-3
17. Washington ........................................................... 9-2
18. LSU......................................................................... 8-3
19. Oklahoma St. ......................................................... 8-3
20. Memphis ................................................................ 9-1
21. Stanford................................................................. 8-3
22. Northwestern ........................................................ 8-3
23. Boise St.................................................................. 9-2
24. South Carolina ....................................................... 8-3
25. Virginia Tech.......................................................... 8-3
The College Football Playoff selection committee will
issue weekly rankings each Tuesday, with the final
rankings being announced Sunday, Dec. 3 (Noon Eastern). The playoff semifinals will match the No. 1 seed vs.
the No. 4 seed, and No. 2 will face No. 3. The semifinals
will be hosted at the Rose Bowl and Sugar Bowl on Jan. 1,
2018. The championship game will be played on Jan. 8,
2018, at Atlanta.
third tier.
That difference played into
what committee chairman Kirby
Hocutt, the athletic director at
Texas Tech appearing on ESPN,
called a “narrow separation”
among top teams.
As Miami and Clemson aim to
make the ACC the first conference
in the four-seasons-old playoff
concept to place two teams in the
same playoff, both travel this
week. On Friday, Miami will leave
its home stadium for the first time
in nearly a month and visit Pitt
(4-7), the same program which, on
its way to an 8-5 season a year ago,
dealt eventual national champion
Clemson its lone loss. On Satur-
day night, Clemson will visit an
ambitious South Carolina (8-3),
which debuted on the chart this
week at No. 24.
That matchup of ranked teams
will be one of four this rivalry
weekend, with No. 13 Washington
State (9-2) playing at No. 17 Washington (9-2), No. 8 Notre Dame
(9-2) visiting No. 21 Stanford (8-3)
and, in the loudest of the lot, No. 1
Alabama going across its fervent
state to No. 6 Auburn.
For now, though, even the lesscelebrated slots held firm, unprecedented since a committee
began deciding these things in
2014: No. 8 Notre Dame, No. 9
Ohio State (9-2), No. 10 Penn State
(9-2), No. 11 Southern California
(10-2) and No. 12 TCU (9-2) remained in the same positions they
were last week.
Oklahoma State (8-3) was the
highest-ranked team to lose Saturday, at home to Kansas State
(6-5), and so the Cowboys fell
from No. 13 to No. 19. Into their
place came the higher-ranked
team for this weekend’s Apple
Cup rivalry in Seattle, Washington State, just ahead of Mississippi State (8-3) at No. 14, and perhaps a pocket of griping at No. 15.
There stands UCF (10-0), which
the committee has kept subdued
in the first four sets of rankings,
despite the gaudy record. UCF
began at No. 18, held at No. 18,
leapt to No. 15 and now has held at
No. 15. Its lone win over a Power
Five school came by 38-10 at
Maryland, and its suffering might
owe partly to the hurricane-relat-
ed cancellation of its mid-September bout with Georgia Tech (5-5).
On Friday, UCF will fight for an
American Athletic Conference title-game spot against a strong
opponent, at South Florida (9-1).
Meanwhile, No. 14 Mississippi
State, the highest-ranked threeloss team, suffered its defeats
against No. 1 Alabama, No. 6 Auburn and No. 7 Georgia, fueling its
status but also epitomizing the
challenge inherent for programs
from the Group of Five, represented by those members of the second tier of the Football Bowl Subdivision. The Group of Five placed
two other teams in the rankings:
Memphis (9-1) at No. 20, and
Boise State (9-2) at No. 23. In the
three previous seasons, the top
Group of Five teams wound up at
No. 20 (Boise State), No. 18 (Houston) and No. 15 (Western Michigan).
Two teams toppled off the list:
North Carolina State, from No. 19
last week, and Michigan, from No.
24. That latter case could prove
pertinent down the line as Michigan was one of only two ranked
teams beaten by No. 5 Wisconsin,
as the Badgers’ schedule has spent
the season in mass question. The
other, Northwestern (8-3), inched
from No. 23 to No. 22 this week.
In place of the Wolfpack and
the Wolverines, in came South
Carolina at No. 24 and Virginia
Tech (8-3) at No. 25. The latter had
been ranked 13th and 17th the
first two weeks before dropping
off last week.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
NFL owners mulling changes to anthem procedure
ANTHEM FROM D1
matter could be addressed at the
annual league meeting in March.
“It would certainly have to be
considered very strongly,” said an
official with an NFL franchise
who is familiar with the thinking
of that team’s owner on the matter.
The NFL declined to comment.
The change to having players
and coaches on the sideline for
the anthem was made in 2009.
The current league policy says
that players must be on the sideline for the anthem. It suggests
but does not require that players
stand for the anthem.
At various points this season
some players, including full
teams, have remained off the field
during the playing of the anthem.
They have not been fined or
otherwise disciplined by the NFL.
The league has been under
intense pressure from President
Trump and some fans to require
players to stand during the anthem. In September, Trump said
during a campaign speech in Alabama that owners should fire any
player who protested during the
anthem. His fiery speech included a reference to such a player
being a “son of a bitch,” and it
fueled an intense national controversy over the issue.
The pressure from the White
House has not relented. After
Oakland Raiders running back
Marshawn Lynch refused to
stand for the U.S. anthem before
Sunday’s game against the New
England Patriots in Mexico City,
Trump offered critical comments
Monday on Twitter.
“Marshawn Lynch of the NFL’s
Oakland Raiders stands for the
Mexican Anthem and sits down
to boos for our national anthem,”
Trump wrote. “Great disrespect!
Next time NFL should suspend
him for remainder of season.
Attendance and ratings way
down.”
Owners held a series of meetings last month in New York
focused on the anthem and related topics. Owners met with representatives of the players, then
held their regularly scheduled fall
owners’
meeting.
Owners
emerged from those meetings
without enacting a rule requiring
players to stand for the anthem.
But even without such a requirement, NFL Commissioner Roger
Goodell and owners said they
wanted players to stand.
Players and owners have not
had a face-to-face meeting since
then and have not completed a
formal policy for league support
of players’ activism. But the conversations have continued, and
an agreement could be coming.
The players’ protest movement
began last season with quarterback Colin Kaepernick, then with
the 49ers. He refused to stand for
the anthem to protest racial inequality in the U.S. and the treatment of African Americans by
police. Kaepernick was not
signed by an NFL team this season and has filed a grievance
accusing teams of collusion.
The NFL’s current policy is in
its game operations manual, sent
by the league to teams, and not in
its publicly available rule book.
The policy says: “The national
anthem must be played before
every NFL game, and all players
must be on the sideline for the
national anthem.
“During the national anthem,
players on the field and bench
area should stand at attention,
face the flag, hold helmets in their
left hand, and refrain from talking. The home team should ensure that the American flag is in
good condition. It should be
pointed out to players and coaches that we continue to be judged
by the public in this area of
respect for the flag and our country. Failure to be on the field by
the start of the national anthem
may result in discipline, such as
fines, suspensions, and/or the forfeiture of draft choice(s) for violations of the above, including first
offenses.”
One NFL sponsor, Papa John’s,
recently criticized the NFL for a
lack of leadership related to the
players’ protests, although the
pizza maker later issued an apology to those who believed its
stance was divisive. With TV ratings sagging and Jones citing the
league’s current financial circumstances as a reason for his bid to
stall Goodell’s pending five-year
contract extension with the owners, some owners have acknowledged that the anthem controversy and the protests have had
an effect on the business of the
NFL.
“We know how important this
is to our sponsors, our partners,
our licensees,” Goodell said at last
month’s owners’ meeting. “It’s
important to us, also. We all share
that.”
mark.maske@washpost.com
Ovechkin, Backstrom will remain apart
CAPITALS FROM D1
kin and Backstrom so far this
season. He said he hasn’t been,
pointing to the two skating some
shifts together in Colorado last
week during a loss to the Avalanche. Primarily the top line for
the past two seasons, the trio of
Ovechkin, Backstrom and T.J. Oshie has been on the ice together
only for less than 15 minutes at
five-on-five this season, according to NHL statistical site Corsica.
Why hasn’t Trotz started a
game with Ovechkin and Backstrom on a line together?
“Don’t feel like it,” he said with
a shrug.
Trotz’s patience with the current configuration of the top two
lines — Ovechkin has been beside
center Evgeny Kuznetsov and
right winger Devante Smith-Pelly,
while Backstrom has centered
Oshie and Chandler Stephenson
— is especially odd considering
the group’s collective struggles.
Ovechkin, Kuznetsov and SmithPelly haven’t scored an evenstrength point in the past six
games.
“Just not enough possession
time,” Trotz said. “A good example
of it is when there’s a chance, right
now they’re just, for the most
part, a rush line right now. Need a
little more forecheck out of them.”
Meanwhile, Backstrom has
just four assists and no goals in
the past 15 games, and two of
those assists have been on the
power play. Backstrom’s average
of 0.71 points per game has him
on pace for the worst season of his
career.
“Against Minnesota [on Saturday], he could’ve had a hat trick,
and they’re not going in easy for
him,” Trotz said. “I think you get
PATRICK SMITH/GETTY IMAGES
Capitals forwards Alex
Ovechkin, left, and Nicklas
Backstrom have rarely played
together at even strength this
season as Coach Barry Trotz
has tried to spread out his
offensive stars.
more concerned when you’re not
getting any chances. . . . Would I
like more? Yeah, absolutely.”
“I don’t think anyone here is
worried about Nick staying off the
score sheet for too much longer,”
Oshie said.
Oshie has been more productive, but his even strength production in the past 17 games is
one goal and four assists. As
Washington has lost three of its
past four games, Oshie has been
the only top-six forward to score
at five-on-five. Oshie said he
wouldn’t object to a line with him,
Ovechkin and Backstrom making
a comeback.
“I think we know that we can
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have success playing us three together,” Oshie said. “So, yeah,
whatever the lines are is fine with
me.”
It’s possible that with less
depth this season, Trotz would
rather not put his three top scorers on one line and weaken the
Kuznetsov line. There could be
concern that Ovechkin, Backstrom and Oshie are lacking in
terms of speed when used together, which would explain why the
smooth-skating Stephenson is on
a line with Oshie and Backstrom.
Backstrom typically draws the
responsibility of going head-tohead with the opposition’s top
trio, and he gets significantly
more defensive zone starts than
Kuznetsov, so perhaps Trotz
trusts Oshie and Stephenson
more defensively. Trotz hasn’t
provided a clear explanation for
why the two biggest stars remain
separated despite their respective
struggles apart this year.
“Just not ready for it,” Trotz
said when he was asked two
weeks ago.
The Capitals play seven of their
next eight games at home, and
every game is against a team
that’s either in playoff position or
made the playoffs last season.
More than a quarter of the way
into the season, it’s a critical
stretch in which Washington
could separate itself in the jampacked standings, for better or
worse.
“It’s usually this time of year
you need to make a push,” Backstrom said Monday night. “We’ve
got to make a push. It’s as simple
as that.”
Said Trotz: “We do need production from our top guys. As I
said to the group today, if you’re a
goal scorer, I don’t just need your
goal-scoring, I need the whole
game. I need the whole thing. If
you’re a playmaker, I need the
whole thing. We need the goals,
we need the physicality, we need
the total game. We can’t have half
your game. We’ve got to just pull it
together.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
ALEX BRANDON/ASSOCIATED PRES
Former Braves general manager John Coppolella was placed on the
permanently ineligible list by Commissioner Rob Manfred.
Braves lose 13 prospects
in sanctions by MLB
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
The Atlanta Braves lost 13 prospects, and former general manager John Coppolella was banned for
life by Major League Baseball on
Tuesday for circumventing international signing rules from 2015
to 2017.
Former Atlanta special assistant Gordon Blakeley, who was the
team’s international scouting
chief, was suspended from baseball for one year by Commissioner
Rob Manfred.
Sanctions imposed by Manfred
leave the Braves unable to bargain
at full strength for a top Latin
American prospect until 2021.
Manfred said MLB’s investigation determined the Braves funneled extra signing bonus money
to five players in 2015-16 by giving
the funds first to another player
considered a foreign professional
under baseball’s rules and having
the money redistributed to the
other five.
Most notable among the players the Braves will lose is Kevin
Maitan, an infielder from Venezuela who signed for $4.25 million in 2016.
HALL OF FAME: Joe Morgan
is urging voters to keep “known
steroid users” out of Cooperstown.
A day after the Hall revealed its
33-man ballot for the 2018 class,
the 74-year-old Hall of Fame second baseman argued against the
inclusion of players implicated
during baseball’s steroid era in a
letter to voters with the Baseball
Writers’ Association of America.
“Steroid users don’t belong
here,” Morgan wrote in the letter.
“What they did shouldn’t be accepted. Times shouldn’t change
for the worse.”
YANKEES: Slugger Aaron
Judge is expected to be ready for
spring training after he had arthroscopic surgery on his left
shoulder.
The operation was performed
Monday by orthopedic surgeon
Neal ElAttrache in Los Angeles.
The Yankees said the procedure
involved a loose-body removal
and cartilage cleanup.
Werth not expected back
Shortly after the Nationals were
eliminated in the National League
Division Series for the fourth time
in six years, a stunned Jayson
Werth, knowing he had probably
just played his last game in the
team's uniform, proclaimed he
was proud to call himself a National.
That was more than five weeks
ago, before the offseason machine
began churning, before what
seemed like the inevitable conclusion to Werth’s seven-year tenure
in Washington was official.
The conclusion isn’t official yet,
but the Nationals don’t envision
fitting Werth into their plans for
2018, according to a person with
knowledge of the situation. His
days as a National, barring something unexpected, are over.
Werth will celebrate his 39th
birthday in May. He is coming off
an injury-plagued season in which
he batted .226 with a .715 on-baseplus-slugging percentage in 70
games.
He went 3 for 18 with four walks
in the postseason.
— Jorge Castillo
NHL ROUNDUP
Vancouver hands Flyers
their fifth straight loss
CANUCKS 5,
FLYERS 2
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Brock Boeser scored twice and
Daniel Sedin inched closer to an
NHL milestone, leading the Vancouver Canucks to a 5-2 win over
the slumping Flyers in Philadelphia on Tuesday night.
Sedin had a goal and an assist to
leave him four points shy of 1,000
for his career. Sven Baertschi
scored a power-play goal, Henrik
Sedin had two assists and Loui
Eriksson added an empty-net goal
and an assist for the Canucks.
Ivan Provorov and Jakub Voracek scored for the Flyers, who
lost their fifth straight and fell
below .500 (8-9-4) for the first
time this season.
Michal Neuvirth took the loss,
allowing four goals on 22 shots. He
was replaced by Brian Elliott with
5:20 left in the second period.
BLUES 8, OILERS 3: Vladimir Tarasenko had two goals and
two assists and got in a rare fight,
helping host St. Louis rout Edmonton.
Brayden Schenn also had two
goals and two assists, and Jake
Allen stopped 26 shots for the
NHL-leading Blues.
Tarasenko’s fight came in the
second period. In just the third
scrap of his six-year career, Tarasenko tangled with Matt Benning
and landed a solid right hand
much to the crowd’s delight.
Tarasenko was reacting to Benning’s near-collision with Schenn
that was almost a knee-on-knee
hit.
St. Louis (16-5-1) scored two
goals in each of the first two periods before adding four in a wideopen third.
The Oilers pulled goaltender
Cam Talbot after he allowed two
goals on three shots. Laurent Brossoit gave up the final six goals.
STARS
3, CANADIENS 1:
Devin Shore and Jason Spezza
scored 59 seconds apart late in the
second period to lift host Dallas
over Montreal.
Shore had no goals in the first 19
games this season but scored for
the second straight game to tie it 1
at 18:22 of the second. Spezza, who
also has scored in consecutive
games after netting only one goal
in the first 19, put in a rebound just
less than a minute later.
Shore had an assist on Spezza’s
goal. So did Tyler Seguin, who
scored into an empty net with 27
seconds to play.
Ben Bishop made 29 saves for
Dallas on his 31st birthday. He
allowed only a power-play goal by
Brendan Gallagher at 12:04 of the
second.
Malkin will sit Wednesday
Pittsburgh Penguins center Evgeni Malkin will miss at least one
game with an upper-body injury.
Coach Mike Sullivan announced the injury Tuesday. Malkin will sit out Wednesday night
when the Penguins host Vancouver.
Sullivan said Malkin will be reevaluated Thursday. Pittsburgh
visits Boston on Friday and hosts
Tampa Bay on Saturday.
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
NBA
Westbrook concentrates
on Thunder, not Durant
BY
MORRY GASH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bradley Beal made his 700th career three-pointer in Monday night’s win, becoming the youngest player in NBA history to reach the mark.
With milestone, Beal proves he is a shooting star
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
milwaukee — The three-point-
ers, they’re beginning to pile up
into one big stack of memories for
a veteran like Bradley Beal.
Through 341 games played in the
NBA stretching over five-plus seasons, Beal has made plenty of big
shots in his career, and when
asked to recall the most meaningful, he gets stumped. But Monday
night offered an easy choice to
place atop his mind’s mantel as
Beal made the 700th three-pointer in his career, becoming the
youngest player in league history
to reach that mark.
“It’s an amazing accomplishment. I’m proud of it,” Beal said
after scoring 23 points in the
Washington Wizards’ 99-88 win
over the Milwaukee Bucks.
“There’s a lot of guys who shoot a
lot of threes in the league and a lot
of guys who make a lot, so I’m in
good company. At the same time, I
always feel like I’ve got more to do,
so I want to continue to see how
far I can get. Be up there with
Reggie [Miller] and Ray [Allen]
and all those guys who set the
milestones for us guys nowadays.
It’s a great accomplishment, and I
just want to keep rolling.”
The names Miller and Allen are
synonymous with lights-out
shooting, but Beal first joined,
and now ranks above, the panthe-
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on of today’s three-point makers
that includes Kevin Durant, Kyrie
Irving and J.R. Smith. At 24 years
and 145 days old, Beal reached the
700 milestone almost two months
earlier than Durant (24 years, 198
days), and his coach believed it
should’ve happened sooner.
“That’s pretty cool,” Wizards
Coach Scott Brooks said upon
hearing about Beal’s accomplishment. “He’s a great shooter. I think
he should’ve got there probably 25
games ago because he doesn’t
shoot enough threes. I keep telling him you should be averaging
nine to 10 a game.”
According to basketball-reference.com, Beal scored 25 or more
points for the 69th time in his
career in Sunday’s 100-91 loss to
the Toronto Raptors, more than
Allen or Stephen Curry had before
their 25th birthdays. However,
the latest young man’s milestone
held greater significance for Beal
because today’s league has grown
younger with players entering the
NBA at 18 years old, while the
game has evolved around threepoint shooters.
As one who started his career
with a reputation as a shooter,
Beal wanted the honor once he
learned about it earlier Monday.
He admitted this led to some eagerness through the first half.
Though the Wizards led 47-46 at
halftime and Beal had made 5 of 7
attempts from within the arc, he
missed both looks from three.
“I kind of pressed a little bit
earlier in the game,” Beal said.
“Trying to get one off and trying to
make one, but when I did it was an
amazing feeling for sure.”
That wave of achievement hit
Beal at the 10:57 mark of the third
quarter. Thanks to a screen by
center Marcin Gortat, who held
off Beal’s defender Tony Snell as
well as his own with one move,
Beal popped free beyond the left
arc, and muscle memory took
over.
“My mom taught me to shoot
when I was a pup, a baby,” Beal
said of his mother, Besta. “So just
having the same mechanics, and
just practicing and perfecting it
each and every single day to
where it’s second nature. Sometimes I just close my eyes and
shoot it. That’s kind of how my
mentality is.”
On the Bucks’ telecast, a faint
voice could be heard calling Beal’s
shot “short,” but it landed exactly
where he had intended — with the
unmistakable sound of a ball ripping through nylon. John Wall has
heard that sound often as Beal’s
teammate through his entire Wizards career, and he credited Beal’s
work ethic for creating the touch.
“He puts a lot of work into it,”
Wall said. “That’s one thing I
could say. He’s a guy that puts in
work before practice, after practice, after shoot-around, those
types of things. He deserves it.
Congratulations to him. I told him
that right when I came in [the
locker room] and seen it. He’s got
a lot more milestones to reach.”
After thinking about it hard,
Beal finally came up with one
three-pointer that stood out. It
happened in the Wizards’ 2014
Eastern Conference semifinal series against the Indiana Pacers.
Playing at home, Beal took a three
from the top of the key, and the
swish was drowned out by the
roar of the fans.
“I just remember the crowd just
going bananas off that three,” Beal
said, but he added with a smile: “I
don’t know, it’s a lot of them. So
many I don’t even remember.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
C LIFF B RUNT
oklahoma city — Russell Westbrook isn’t focused on the fact
that his Oklahoma City Thunder
will face former teammate Kevin
Durant and the Golden State Warriors on Wednesday.
Westbrook’s mind is on the
Thunder’s early struggles. Oklahoma City entered the season
with high hopes after the team
added Paul George and Carmelo
Anthony in trades. Despite the
infusion of talent and Westbrook’s
still electric play, the Thunder has
stumbled to a 7-9 start.
“It really don’t matter who we
have next, it’s about us,” said Westbrook, the reigning MVP. “Regardless of what other teams do,
when we play the way we’re supposed to play for 48 minutes, it’s
hard to beat us. That’s all I worry
about is our team.”
Westbrook has been his usual
self in many ways. He’s averaging
20.1 points, 8.7 rebounds and 9.7
assists. After setting the singleseason record with 42 triple-doubles last season, he leads the
league with five this year.
But he is not dominating fourth
quarters as he did last year, and
the Thunder is losing the close
games he so often willed the team
through with his scoring flurries.
All nine of Oklahoma City’s losses
this season have been by nine or
fewer points. Westbrook averaged
10 points in the fourth quarter last
season; this season, that average
is down to 5.4.
Thunder Coach Billy Donovan
SUE OGROCKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ROBERTSON FROM D1
Well-connected — and inked
A native of Columbia, a small
city in southern Mississippi, Robertson worked in management for
a retail furniture company before
striking out as a recruiting reporter for Gene’s Page, a Mississippi
State fan site affiliated with 24/7
Sports. He broke the stories of
big-time commitments, including
future star defensive tackle Fletcher Cox and quarterback Dak
Prescott, and developed a strong
following for his podcast, The
Boneyard.
Robertson cuts a bit of an unusual profile, with his arms and
hands covered in tattoos referencing his twin loves: Mississippi
State and 1980s hair metal bands.
(Acts referenced among Robertson’s tattoos include Motley Crue,
Warrant, Ratt, Whitesnake and
Ozzy Osbourne.)
ANDREA MORALES FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Lifelong Mississippi State fan Steve Robertson was the go-to source for updates on the NCAA’s years-long probe of Ole Miss football.
“I know, I look like something
out of a Korn video,” he said.
Among Ole Miss fans, Robertson acquired the nickname “Rose
Bowl,” a mocking reference to his
prediction that the 2001 Mississippi State team would win the Southeastern Conference and play in the
BCS championship game in Pasadena. The Bulldogs finished 3-8
that season.
Like many Mississippi State
fans, Robertson looked on with
suspicion in 2013 when Ole Miss
landed one of the top recruiting
classes in the country. Then he
started getting tips about an
NCAA investigation that, Robertson claims, he repeatedly tried to
pass along to reporters at the
Jackson Clarion-Ledger, among
other papers. He couldn’t get a
reporter interested, he said, so he
started telling his audience what
he was hearing, via his podcast
and social media.
As tips kept coming in, Robertson started filing open records
requests at Ole Miss in an attempt
to learn the identities of the boosters involved in the NCAA investigation. When the university would
release documents only with
names redacted, Robertson took
Ole Miss to the state ethics commission, arguing it was violating
the state’s open records law.
He won, forcing Ole Miss to
disclose the names of more than a
dozen boosters and Oxford-area
businesses accused of providing
impermissible benefits to Rebels
recruits. The Clarion-Ledger story
about the disclosures cited Robertson’s legal battle.
As news of Robertson’s public
records battles with Ole Miss circulated, one of his friends connect-
ed him with someone else engaged
in a legal tussle with the university: Thomas Mars, an Arkansas
attorney who represented former
Ole Miss football coach Houston
Nutt.
As the NCAA investigation progressed, several news stories citing
anonymous sources reported that
Nutt was largely responsible for
the violations. Nutt, believing
Freeze and others at Ole Miss were
the anonymous sources, filed a
defamation lawsuit against the
school.
Mars needed help sifting
through Freeze’s phone records,
obtained through an open records
request, and Robertson agreed to
help. The men wanted to see
whether Freeze had spoken with
reporters around the time Ole
Miss received an updated notice of
allegations from the NCAA on Jan.
— Associated Press
“It really don’t matter who we have next, it’s about us,” said Russell
Westbrook, whose Oklahoma City team is off to a 7-9 start.
Robertson breaks a few eggs and a few stories
the dinner table. This year, those
concerns are particularly acute,
thanks to Steve Robertson, a Mississippi State recruiting reporter
and author of “Flim Flam: The
Truth Behind the Blind-Faith Culture That Led to the Explosive
NCAA Investigation of Ole Miss
Football.”
The book is the story behind
how Robertson, a 45-year-old father of four and lifelong Mississippi State fan who lives in Starkville,
became the go-to source for updates on the NCAA’s years-long
investigation of Ole Miss football,
and then unwittingly uncovered
the evidence that led to former
Rebels coach Hugh Freeze’s ouster
this summer.
As far as Robertson knows, his
story of a fan of one team figuring
prominently in events that heighten tensions in a rivalry is without
precedent in college football history, unless you count Harvey Updyke, the Alabama fan who poisoned the iconic oak trees overlooking Toomer’s Corner at Auburn.
“And I reject that comparison
on principle. That guy’s crazy, and
I was doing journalism,” Robertson said while driving around
Starkville one day recently. “But
yeah, that’s the only thing I can
think of.”
knew Westbrook would have to
give up some elements of his game
to accommodate the new talent.
Anthony is a 10-time all-star who
was the scoring champion in 2013.
George is a four-time all-star who
was the face of the Indiana Pacers’
franchise. Donovan said Westbrook is playing as hard as ever,
and he’s had the right attitude
during the adjustment process.
“I think Russell has done a
really good job, just in terms of the
sacrifices that he’s tried to make to
make the group better and to try
and help our group,” Donovan
said.
Thunder center Steven Adams
said Westbrook is trying his best
to put the Thunder in position to
win, but little things are getting in
the way.
“He’s doing a great job,” Adams
said. “He’s making the right decisions, from what I’m seeing. The
plays that are set — it’s not like
he’s doing anything crazy and
deviating from the play. He’s doing an amazing job.”
Westbrook doesn’t expect
Oklahoma City to keep struggling
and noted that the Thunder has
been one of the NBA’s best defensive teams.
He said he’s encouraged that
the team is in the game at the end
so often, but disappointed in the
losses and the execution at critical
times.
“We know we have the talent,”
he said. “That’s always great, but
you’ve got to put the work in and
do what it takes to win games.”
23, 2016. They decided to request
Freeze’s phone records for the day
before and the day after. Mars
asked for the wrong days, though:
Instead of asking for Jan. 22
through 24, he requested Jan. 19
through 21.
Robertson searched through
the records anyway, and there, on
Jan. 19, he saw a number with a
Detroit area code. Robertson
typed the number into Google, and
results showed the number was
linked to a series of ads for a
Tampa-area escort service. Ole
Miss, prompted by Mars, reviewed
more of Freeze’s university phone
records and discovered a pattern
of similar phone calls. On July 20,
within days of Robertson’s discovery, Freeze resigned.
“The phone record heard
around the world,” Robertson said.
Around Oxford, Freeze was re-
vered both for beating Alabama
twice in three years, and for his
public persona as a pious Christian. His resignation left the program reeling. Ole Miss is 5-6 this
season and opened as a 17-point
underdog to 8-3 Mississippi State
in Thursday night’s game.
Robertson said his lawyer has
advised him to avoid visiting Oxford for the foreseeable future.
“He says if anything ever happens, we won’t be able to find a
witness to support my version of
the events,” Robertson explained.
Although Freeze is gone, the
NCAA’s enforcement case against
Ole Miss continued. The NCAA’s
Committee on Infractions held a
hearing on the case in September
and could issue its ruling any day.
A hero in their midst
Among Mississippi State fans at
the signing, there was a deep sense
of euphoria at Robertson’s role in
bringing about Freeze’s downfall.
One man told Robertson he was
his hero. Another asked for his
email, so he could send along other
tips about Ole Miss recruiting violations.
After the signing, Robertson
read a few passages from the book,
and then took questions.
One man, who wore a “Rose
Bowl Was Right” shirt, stood and
shook the book with reverence.
“I just want to tell you to keep
doing what you’re doing,” he said.
“There are generations of Mississippi State faithful that are so
thankful for this book.”
Robertson’s publisher, a whitehaired man in jeans and a denim
shirt, stood in the background,
cheerily discussing sales figures.
“Flim Flam” — named for a line in
Ole Miss’s Hotty Toddy Cheer —
debuted No. 1 on the “Mississippi
reads” list in the Clarion-Ledger.
Plans for a sequel are in the works.
When the publisher learned he
was speaking with a reporter, however, he asked his name not be
used, out of concern the revelation
that he was involved with the book
would ruin business relationships
with Ole Miss fans. He specifically
set up the publishing house under
a corporation that didn’t list his
name, he explained, to avoid a
paper trail connecting him to the
book.
“It’s a real good book, and we’re
real proud of it,” the publisher said.
“I just thought it best I stay incognito on this.”
will.hobson@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
NATIONAL ROUNDUP
Holiday boosts No. 23 Bruins at the buzzer; No. 3 Jayhawks cruise at home
UCLA 72,
WISCONSIN 70
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Aaron Holiday spent most of
the game trying to get his teammates involved, even forcing a
couple of passes when UCLA
Coach Steve Alford reckoned he
should have taken the shot.
Well, he took one when it meant
the most.
The Bruins’ sparkplug guard
got a scooping layup to drop just
before the final buzzer Tuesday
night, capping an impressive oneman show down the stretch and
giving No. 23 UCLA a 72-70 victory
over Wisconsin in the third-place
game of the Hall of Fame Classic in
Kansas City, Mo.
“The first half I didn’t play how I
should have. I let my teammates
down, I felt like,” said Holiday, who
finished with 18 points and five
assists without a turnover. “In the
second half I came out to be aggressive, make the right plays, and
that’s what I did.”
The Bruins (4-1) trailed 65-59
with about four minutes left, but
Holiday knocked down two threepointers and converted two free
throws to spur the comeback.
Ethan Happ had 19 points and
nine rebounds to lead Wisconsin
(2-3), which has lost three straight
games, all to ranked teams.
Texas Southern’s Demontrae
Jefferson led all scorers with 24
points.
KANSAS
114,
TEXAS
SOUTHERN 71: Svi Mykhailiuk
21 points and 10 rebounds to lead
the No. 16 Aggies (4-0) past the
Nittany Lions in the championship game of the Legends Classic
at Barclays Center in New York.
Despite a career-high 31 points
from Tony Carr, Penn State (5-1)
lost its first game.
scored 21 points, Udoka Azubuike
added 20, and the No. 3 Jayhawks
rolled in the first game of the
Hoophall Miami Invitational in
Lawrence, Kan.
Lagerald
Vick,
Devonte’
Graham and Marcus Garrett all
finished with a double-double for
Kansas (4-0).
WICHITA STATE 80, MARQUETTE 66: The No. 6 Shockers
used tenacious defense in the second half to defeat the Golden Eagles (2-2) and reach the final of the
Maui Invitational in Lahaina, Hawaii. The Shockers (4-0) needed a
big rally just to get to the semifinals after a slow start against California in its opener.
TEXAS A&M 98, PENN
STATE 87: Robert Williams had
CHARLIE RIEDEL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
UCLA’s Aaron Holiday eludes Wisconsin’s Brad Davison here, then
in the final second he scored on a scooping layup to win the game.
MINNESOTA 100, ALABAMA A&M 57: Jordan Murphy
had his fifth straight double-dou-
No. 15 Terps bounce back in convincing fashion
MARYLAND 111,
HOWARD 49
BY
A VA W ALLACE
Not yet two weeks into the
season but with some of its
toughest competition already behind it, the Maryland women’s
basketball team rebounded from
a tough loss to Connecticut with
a resounding 111-49 win over
Howard at Xfinity Center on
Tuesday night.
The win sends Maryland into a
two-week stretch on the road
with some momentum. No. 15
Maryland (3-2) isn’t on its home
court again until a Dec. 6 game
against Mount St. Mary’s.
The Terrapins leave Wednesday for a Thanksgiving tournament in Miami and face Virginia
in Charlottesville on Nov. 29 in
the Big Ten/ACC Challenge.
On Tuesday, they shot 55 percent from the field and dominated the winless Bison (0-4) in
every category.
“The biggest thing is the effort
play,” Coach Brenda Frese said.
“We saw when we played Niagara, we had a really slow start and
didn’t play that game hard for 40
minutes, where tonight I
thought we pushed through the
fatigue and set the standard
ourselves and never really let off.
That’s the difference, continuing
to set our bar and our standard
of, we want to play as hard as we
can to keep creating great habits.”
After one practice and a
lengthy film session dissecting
Sunday’s 25-point loss at Connecticut, Maryland entered Tuesday’s game focused on controlling what it could control —
things like rebounds and effort —
as Frese continues to develop a
young roster.
The Terps outrebounded Howard 53-32 and scored 40 points
off the Bison’s 25 turnovers, 10 of
which came in the first 10 minutes. They committed 13 turnovers themselves to balance out
15 steals.
“It’s a great feeling when you
can share the basketball like we
did, you know, 27 assists, and
with the unselfishness we displayed,” Frese said. “A lot of
ble with 20 points and 10 rebounds as the No. 14 Golden Gophers (5-0) routed the Bulldogs
(0-4) in Minneapolis.
LOUISVILLE 84, SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 42: Jordan Nwo-
ra came off the bench to score a
career-high 18 points, Deng Adel
had 16, and the No. 19 Cardinals
(3-0) coasted past the Salukis (2-1)
in Louisville.
ALABAMA 77, UT-ARLINGTON 76: In Tuscaloosa, Ala., Col-
lin Sexton scored 29 points and
the No. 25 Crimson Tide rallied to
improve to 4-0.
No. 10 Oregon women roll
Ruthy Hebard scored 22 points
while not missing a shot, and Lexi
Bando added 14 to lead No. 10
Oregon to an 81-40 victory over
Eastern Washington in Eugene,
Ore. Hebard went 7 for 7 from the
field and 8 for 8 at the foul line for
the Ducks (4-1).
AREA ROUNDUP
Nelson lifts
Eagles to
first win
this season
AMERICAN 74,
NEW HAMPSHIRE 70
F ROM N EWS S ERVICES
Sa’eed Nelson had 26 points
and eight rebounds to power
American to its first win, a 74-70
victory over New Hampshire in
Durham, N.H., Tuesday night.
Nelson had 15 points in the first
half to stake American (1-3) to a
14-point halftime lead over the
Wildcats (1-3).
VCU
83, CALIFORNIA 69:
De’Riante Jenkins had 27 points
and 11 boards, and the Rams (3-2)
beat the Bears (2-3) in the Maui
Invitational in Lahaina, Hawaii.
VCU will play Michigan in the
fifth-place game Wednesday.
LOUISIANA TECH 77,
GEORGE MASON 64: Jacobi
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Boykins scored 18 points with five
three-pointers, and the Bulldogs
(4-0) beat the Patriots (3-2) in the
opening round of the Cancun
Challenge in Cancun, Mexico.
George Mason will play Fresno
State in a consolation game
Wednesday.
Ieshia Small splits the Bison defense for two of her 11 points Tuesday night. Maryland rebounded from its loss to top-ranked Connecticut.
CINCINNATI 75, RICHMOND 48: Cane Broome led a
career highs for a lot of players.”
Maryland controlled the game
from the start and put forth a
much more balanced offensive
effort than the loss to the Huskies, during which sophomore
Kaila Charles led with 29 points.
On Tuesday, the guard took a
back seat and scored 12 points in
22 minutes while teammates
Stephanie Jones (24), Blair Watson (18) and Brianna Fraser (24)
notched career highs in points.
Jones shot 10 for 14 from the field
to record her second 20-point
game of the season, and Fraser
had a team-high 11 rebounds.
Watson did most of her damage from the perimeter, making a
career-high five three-pointers.
“I mean, I do like the jumper,”
balanced attacked with 13 points,
and the No. 12 Bearcats (5-0)
rolled past the Spiders (1-3) and
into the championship game of
the Cayman Islands Classic in
Georgetown, Cayman Islands.
Richmond will face Louisiana
in Wednesday’s third-place game.
she said with a shrug, “I’m not
going to lie.”
The game played out like a
tuneup for Maryland, which took
just more than four minutes to
gain a 10-point lead and never
wavered. The Terps led by 57
early in the fourth quarter and
improved to 27-1 all-time against
the Bison in their first game in
the series since 2009.
Howard is still struggling to
find its offense under third-year
Coach Ty Grace, who is working
with two new assistants on her
staff this year. Grace rotated
through 12 players in an effort to
crack Maryland’s defense, which
keyed in efficiently on freshman
guard Curstyn Moore, the Bison’s
leading scorer. Moore, who aver-
ages 14 points and 17 free throws
per game, was held to just four
points on 2-for-5 shooting in 22
minutes and had one free throw
attempt.
Sophomore forward Imani
Bryant led the Bison with eight
points and five rebounds in 19
minutes off the bench.
Maryland now looks to the
Miami Thanksgiving Tournament, where the Terps will play
Kennesaw State on Friday and
Miami on Sunday. With two
Miami natives on the team, the
Terps will be treated to home
cooking — Thanksgiving dinner
at freshman point guard Channise Lewis’s house and a meal
Friday at senior guard Ieshia
Small’s.
For Maryland, it’s a chance to
continue developing the type of
chemistry that was on display
Tuesday, which first sparked
when the Terrapins took a trip to
Taiwan for the World University
Games over the summer.
“This is, obviously, the fourth
team I’ve been on here,” senior
guard Kristen Confroy said.
“This team is the most fun to be
around. Our chemistry is phenomenal, and I think a lot of it
has to do with our trip to Taiwan
— there were eight of us in one
room, it really brought us all
together. Coach has really been
challenging us to take that chemistry onto the court, and I think
we did that really well tonight.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
TECH
99,
HOUSTON BAPTIST 73: Justin
Bibbs scored 25 points to carry the
Hokies (3-1) past the Huskies (1-4)
in Blacksburg, Va.
Cavaliers women edge Pirates
Jocelyn Willoughby scored 15
points on 6-for-9 shooting, and
Virginia beat Hampton, 66-62, in
Charlottesville.
The Cavs (3-2) held the Pirates
(1-2) to 34.4 percent shooting.
THOMAS BOSWELL
Porter is holding the Wizards together with an unwavering ethic to improve
BOSWELL FROM D1
seldom having a play run for him.
“Otto is the glue man. Like
‘Elmer’s Glue,’ he holds things
together,” said Brooks, not
known for being effusive. “Otto
always thinks the purity of the
game. He’s everybody’s favorite
player. If you don’t love Otto, you
are the problem.”
Not long ago, everyone hated
Otto. When you’re picked third
overall after being an allAmerican at Georgetown, then
average 2.1 points while getting
your 190-pound frame pushed
around or injured, you get tagged
as a flop.
But it’s amazing what taking
1,000 shots a day, year-round will
do for your accuracy, or how
adding 28 hard pounds to a lean
6-foot-8 frame will help you
become a fine rebounding small
forward and the team’s bestrated defender, too.
In the Wizards’ 99-88 victory
over Milwaukee on Monday,
Porter had 12 points and 11
rebounds and, in much of the
second half, also adequately
guarded 6-11 Giannis
Antetokounmpo, who averages
29.7 points a game. With Porter
on the floor, the Wizards
outscored the Bucks by 22 points.
No other starter was more than
plus-5. The Glue Man.
Usually, a line of numbers is
boring. But to any hoops lover,
these season sequences should
be thrilling. Porter’s shooting
percentage in his five seasons on
two-pointers: .414, .491, .536, .576
and .592. His shooting
percentage on three-pointers:
.190, .337, .367, .434 (fourth in the
NBA) and now up to .470.
Combine those two and you get
Effective Field Goal Percentage,
the current NBA grail since the
value of threes has been fully
appreciated. There, he’s .385,
.495, .541, .608 to .632. Ninth in
the NBA.
By last year his game grew so
much that multiple teams gave
him nine-figure offer sheets. To
keep him, the Wizards matched:
a four-year, $106.5 million deal.
Would he become complacent
or feel pressure? No, he’s just
kept improving. “It’s been a
journey,” Porter said since that
rookie year he still calls
“motivation.”
Back then, Kobe Bryant asked
Porter how many shots he took a
day. Otto said 500.
“No. It’s got to be 1,000,’”
Bryant said. “That stuck with me
ever since: Oh, there it is, ” Porter
said. “If you want to be better at
every aspect of the game, you’ve
got to put in the time.”
That applies 365. Weight work,
too.
Brooks believes many players
only have such a work ethic in
response to a shooting slump.
“They get bored with making
[thousands of ] shots . . . I’m a
believer to the day I’m dead that
you need diligent consistency
every day,” Brooks said. “Success
breeds complacency. But the
great ones don’t get bored. With
Otto I don’t see [complacency].
He’s as consistent as anyone you
will ever be around.”
Porter has great strengths,
such as ranking No. 1 in the NBA
in steal-to-turnover ratio,
meaning he makes a fool out of
you more than twice as often as
you dupe him. And with his
accurate shooting and low
turnovers, he’s among the top 10
in Offensive Rating. In theory, a
team of Porters would score 126.6
points a game.
But Porter has limits, too. He’s
not a prolific scorer and probably
never could be. He seldom
creates his own shot, but spots
up for three-pointers on passes
from Wall or benefits from the
room created by the threat of
Beal (24.2 ppg). He trails the fast
break for put-backs. His low-post
game has grown, but it’s
incidental damage.
“A big part of the low
turnovers is that [Wall and Beal]
make a lot of plays for us, and we
need them to. They’re elite guys.
As they go, we go,” Porter said.
“They make my job a lot, lot
easier.”
But Porter makes their lives
easier, too. Wall and Beal need
the ball — a ton — to be their
best; Porter barely needs it at all
(eighth on the Wizards in “usage
percentage”). Hence, synergy.
“He’s a true professional,” Beal
said. “You can plug him
anywhere and he gels. And he
guards some of the best on
defense.”
One game, treat yourself. Just
watch Porter, the invisible glue of
the Wizards. On defense, he’s
usually the Wizard closest to his
man, pressuring, disrupting, or
else the one measuring how he
can sneak over to help a
teammate. He runs the floor
ceaselessly; his long lope lets him
cruise past others. When he gets
in the action, he finds an extra
last-instant gear to change a
shot, react first to a loose ball.
“When I came up, it was never
about me. It was about winning
and the team,” said Porter, who
played for Scott County Central
High School in Missouri which,
despite an enrollment of only
180, has won 18 boys and six girls
state basketball titles. “That’s the
values that I had growing up.”
Those are also the values —
long-range shooting efficiency,
eliminating mistakes, creating
synergy, defense, hustle plays
with no stat attached — that
modern NBA front offices such as
San Antonio and Golden State
prize and also try to find ways to
measure with advanced metrics.
I’m still leery of NBA stats like
Wins Shares, Box Score PlusMinus and Value-OverReplacement-Player that try to
combine every skill into one
number. But it’s only fair to
Porter to note that he’s ranked
14th, 10th and 10th in the NBA in
those categories, often ahead of
far more famous players, helped
in all cases by his defense.
How long, and how much can
Porter keep improving? Ask Otto,
whose main coaches growing up
were his late uncle Larry Mosley
and father Otto Sr., and he just
gives a list of his imperfections:
pick-and-rolls, pin downs,
scoring off the dribble, when to
spot a mismatch at the threepoint line and take his man to the
low post. And then there’s his left
hand. He chuckles and says, “A
work in progress.”
The Wizards, however, don’t
need, or even want Porter to
change too much.
“He’s just a great person,”
Brooks said, “who happens to be
a really, really . .. ” The coach
stopped. He was going to say,
“good player,” but as all those stat
progressions show, Porter just
keeps outgrowing old
perceptions.
“He’s a great person,” Brooks
amended, “who happens to be a
great basketball player.”
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
For more by Thomas Boswell, visit
washingtonpost.com/boswell.
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 22 , 2017
scoreboard
FOOTBA LL
BASKETBALL
2018 HALL OF FAME SEMIFINALISTS
NFL
NFC
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 9
Dallas ............................ 5
Washington .................. 4
N.Y. Giants .................... 2
L
1
5
6
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.900
.500
.400
.200
PF
320
242
238
162
PA
188
242
266
247
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ................. 8
Carolina ......................... 7
Atlanta .......................... 6
Tampa Bay .................... 4
L
2
3
4
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.700
.600
.400
PF
302
213
231
203
PA
196
180
210
228
NORTH
W
Minnesota ..................... 8
Detroit .......................... 6
Green Bay ..................... 5
Chicago ......................... 3
L
2
4
5
7
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.600
.500
.300
PF
241
271
204
174
PA
172
234
230
221
WEST
W
L.A. Rams ...................... 7
Seattle .......................... 6
Arizona ......................... 4
San Francisco ................ 1
L
3
4
6
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.700
.600
.400
.100
PF
303
242
176
174
PA
186
199
254
260
EAST
W
New England ................. 8
Buffalo .......................... 5
Miami ............................ 4
N.Y. Jets ....................... 4
L
2
5
6
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.500
.400
.400
PF
290
208
157
201
PA
203
250
254
222
SOUTH
W
Jacksonville .................. 7
Tennessee ..................... 6
Houston ........................ 4
Indianapolis .................. 3
L
3
4
6
7
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.700
.600
.400
.300
PF
245
222
267
179
PA
141
253
262
280
NORTH
W L
Pittsburgh ..................... 8 2
Baltimore ...................... 5 5
Cincinnati ...................... 4 6
Cleveland ...................... 0 10
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.500
.400
.000
PF
227
213
169
150
PA
165
171
199
259
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 6
L.A. Chargers ................ 4
Oakland ......................... 4
Denver ........................... 3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.600
.400
.400
.300
PF
262
221
204
183
PA
220
196
247
259
AFC
L
4
6
6
7
2018 modern-era semifinalists for the Pro Football Hall
of Fame’s Class of 2018. Number of times the individual
has been named a semifinalist in parentheses:
Steve Atwater, S: 1989-1998 Denver, 1999 NY Jets (7)
Ronde Barber, CB/S: 1997-2012 Tampa Bay (1)
Tony Boselli, OT: 1995-2001 Jacksonville, 2002 Houston (3)
Isaac Bruce, WR: 1994-2007 LA/St. Louis Rams, 2008-09
San Francisco (4)
LeRoy Butler, S: 1990-2001 Green Bay Packers (1)
Don Coryell, Coach: 1973-77 St. Louis, 1978-1986 San
Diego (10)
Roger Craig, RB: 1983-1990 San Francisco, 1991 LA
Raiders, 1992-93 Minnesota (10)
Brian Dawkins, S: 1996-2008 Philadelphia, 2009-2011
Denver (2)
Alan Faneca, G: 1998-2007 Pittsburgh, 2008-09 NY Jets,
2010 Arizona (3)
Torry Holt, WR: 1999-2008 St. Louis, 2009 Jacksonville (4)
Steve Hutchinson, G: 2001-05 Seattle, 2006-2011 Minnesota, 2012 Tennessee (1)
Joe Jacoby, OT: 1981-1993 Washington (8)
Edgerrin James, RB: 1999-2005 Indianapolis, 2006-08
Arizona, 2009 Seattle (4)
Jimmy Johnson, Coach: 1989-1993 Dallas, 1996-99 Miami (5)
Ty Law, CB: 1995-2004 New England, 2005, 2008 NY
Jets, 2006-07 Kansas City, 2009 Denver (4)
Ray Lewis, LB: 1996-2012 Baltimore (1)
John Lynch, FS: 1993-2003 Tampa Bay, 2004-07 Denver (6)
Kevin Mawae, C/G: 1994-97 Seattle, 1998-2005 NY Jets,
2006-09 Tennessee (4)
Karl Mecklenburg, LB: 1983-1994 Denver (7)
Randy Moss, WR: 1998-2004, 2010 Minnesota, 2005-06
Oakland, 2007-2010 New England, 2010 Tennessee,
2012 San Francisco (1)
Leslie O’Neal, DE: 1986, 1988-1995 San Diego, 19961997 St. Louis, 1998-1999 Kansas City (1)
Terrell Owens, WR: 1996-2003 San Francisco, 2004-05
Philadelphia, 2006-08 Dallas, 2009 Buffalo, 2010 Cincinnati (3)
Simeon Rice, DE: 1996-2000 Arizona, 2001-06 Tampa
Bay, 2007 Denver, 2007 Indianapolis (1)
Richard Seymour, DE/DT: 2001-08 New England, 20092012 Oakland (1)
Brian Urlacher, LB: 2000-2012 Chicago (1)
Everson Walls, CB: 1981-89 Dallas, 1990-92 NY Giants,
1992-93 Cleveland (1)
Hines Ward, WR: 1998-2011 Pittsburgh (2)
MIDWEST
at Akron 24, Kent St. 14
Miami (Ohio) 28, at Ball St. 7
at E. Michigan 34, Bowling Green 14
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Tennessee (-31/2) at Indianapolis, 1
Carolina (-41/2) at N.Y. Jets, 1
Cleveland at Cincinnati (-8), 1
Tampa Bay at Atlanta (-10), 1
Miami at New England (-161/2), 1
Buffalo at Kansas City (-10), 1
Chicago at Philadelphia (-131/2), 1
Seattle (-7) at San Francisco, 4:05
Jacksonville (-5) at Arizona, 4:25
Denver at Oakland (-5), 4:25
New Orleans at L.A. Rams (-21/2), 4:25
Green Bay at Pittsburgh (-14), 8:30
MONDAY’S GAME
Houston at Baltimore (-7), 8:30
SO C C E R
MLS playoffs
KNOCKOUT ROUND
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Wednesday, Oct. 25: New York 4, at Chicago 0
Thursday, Oct. 26: Columbus 0, at Atlanta 0, Columbus
advanced on 3-1 penalty kicks
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Wednesday, Oct. 25: at Vancouver 5, San Jose 0
Thursday, Oct. 26: at Houston 1, Sporting KC 0, OT
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Home-and-home
FIRST LEG
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Monday, Oct. 30: Toronto 2, at New York 1
Tuesday, Oct. 31: at Columbus 4, New York City FC 1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Sunday, Oct. 29: Vancouver 0, at Seattle 0, tie
Monday, Oct. 30: at Houston 0, Portland 0, tie
SECOND LEG
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Sunday, Nov. 5: New York 1, at Toronto 0; 2-2 aggregate;
Toronto advanced on 1-0 away goals
Sunday, Nov. 5: at New York City FC 2, Columbus 0,
Columbus advanced on 4-3 aggregate
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Thursday, Nov. 2: at Seattle 2, Vancouver 0, Seattle
advanced on 2-0 aggregate
Sunday, Nov. 5: at Portland 1, Houston 2, Houston
advanced on 2-1 aggregate
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
Home-and-home
EASTERN CONFERENCE
FIRST LEG
Tuesday’s result: Toronto 0, at Columbus 0, tie
SECOND LEG
Wednesday, Nov. 29: Columbus at Toronto, 7:30
WESTERN CONFERENCE
FIRST LEG
Tuesday’s result: Seattle 2, at Houston 0
SECOND LEG
Thursday, Nov. 30: Houston at Seattle, 10:30
MLS CUP
Saturday, Dec. 9: at higher seed, 4
Toronto 0 FC, Crew 0
TORONTO
0
0
0
COLUMBUS
0
0
0
First half: None.
Second half: None.
Goalies: Toronto, Alexander Bono; Columbus, Zack
Steffen.
Yellow Cards: Artur, Columbus, 33rd minute; Santoa,
Columbus, 52nd; Mensah, Columbus, 54th; Osorio, Toronto, 68th; Edwards, Toronto, 85th.
Red Cards: None.
A: 21,289 (19,968)
Toronto, Alexander Bono; Nicolas Hasler (Armando
Cooper, 81st), Drew Moor, Chris Mavinga; Steven
Beitashour, Marco Delgado (Eriq Zavaleta, 70th), Michael Bradley, Victor Vazquez, Justin Morrow (Raheem
Edwards, 84th); Tosaint Ricketts, Jonathan Osorio.
Columbus, Zack Steffen; Harrison Afful, Jonathan Mensah, Josh Williams, Jukka Raitala; Wil Trapp, Artur,
Pedro Santos (Kekuta Manneh, 78th), Federico Higuain,
Justin Meram; Ola Kamara.
Sounders 2, Dynamo 0
SEATTLE
2
0
2
HOUSTON
0
0
0
First half: 1, Seattle, Swensson 2 (Lodeiro), 11th
minute. 2, Seattle, Bruin 12 (Jones), 42nd.
Second half: None.
Goalies: Seattle, Tyler Miller; Houston, Joe Willis.
Yellow Cards: Elis, Houston, 29th; Martinez, Houston,
44th; Tolo, Seattle, 64th; Torres, Seattle, 88th.
Red Cards: Anibaba, Houston, 28th.
A: 22,661 (22,661)
Seattle, Tyler Miller; Kelvin Leerdam, Roman Torres,
Chad Marshall, Nouhou Tolo; Cristian Roldan, Gustav
Svensson, Nicolas Lodeiro, Clint Dempsey (Victor Rodriguez, 46th), Joevin Jones (Lamar Neagle, 79th); Will
Bruin (Henry Wingo, 91st).
Houston, Joe Willis; Jalil Anibaba, Adolfo Machado,
Philippe Senderos (Dylan Remick, 59th), DaMarcus
Beasley; Eric Alexander (Romell Quioto, 72nd), Juan
Cabezas, Alex (Leonardo, 32nd), Tomas Martinez, Alberth Elis; Mauro Manotas.
T RA NSA C T I ONS
NBA
New York Knicks: Named Dan Sabreen vice president of
public relations.
NFL
Cleveland Browns: Placed DL Jamie Meder and Emmanuel Ogbah on injured reserve. Signed DB Justin Currie.
Signed DL Tyrone Holmes from the practice squad and
DB Jacob Hagen to the practice squad.
Los Angeles Rams: Waived TE Johnny Mundt.
New England Patriots: Signed DL Eric Lee from the
Buffalo Bills practice squad. Released DE Cassius Marsh.
Oakland Raiders: Fired defensive coordinator Ken Norton Jr.
Pittsburgh Steelers: Activated DB Cam Sutton from
injured reserve.
NHL
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................16
Toronto ......................................11
New York .....................................9
Philadelphia .................................9
Brooklyn.......................................6
L
2
5
7
7
10
Pct
.889
.688
.563
.563
.375
GB
—
4
6
6
9
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................10
Orlando ........................................8
Charlotte......................................7
Miami...........................................7
Atlanta.........................................3
L
7
9
9
9
14
Pct
.588
.471
.438
.438
.176
GB
—
2
21/2
21/2
7
CENTRAL
W
Detroit .......................................11
Cleveland ...................................10
Indiana .......................................10
Milwaukee ...................................8
x-Chicago .....................................3
L
6
7
8
8
11
Pct
.647
.588
.556
.500
.214
GB
—
1
11/2
21/2
61/2
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................13
San Antonio ...............................11
New Orleans ................................9
Memphis ......................................7
Dallas ...........................................3
L
4
6
8
9
15
Pct
.765
.647
.529
.438
.167
GB
—
2
4
51/2
101/2
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................10
Portland .....................................10
Denver........................................10
Oklahoma City .............................7
Utah .............................................7
L
7
7
7
9
11
Pct
.588
.588
.588
.438
.389
GB
—
—
—
21/2
31/2
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................13
x-L.A. Lakers................................7
Phoenix ........................................7
L.A. Clippers.................................5
Sacramento .................................4
L
4
10
11
11
13
Pct
.765
.412
.389
.313
.235
GB
—
6
61/2
71/2
9
WESTERN CONFERENCE
MONDAY’S RESULTS
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
at New Orleans 34, Washington 31, OT
Baltimore 23, at Green Bay 0
Detroit 27, at Chicago 24
at Minnesota 24, L.A. Rams 7
Jacksonville 19, at Cleveland 7
at Houston 31, Arizona 21
Tampa Bay 30, at Miami 20
at N.Y. Giants 12, Kansas City 9, OT
at L.A. Chargers 54, Buffalo 24
Cincinnati 20, at Denver 17
New England 33, Oakland 8, in Mexico City
Philadelphia 37, at Dallas 9
BYE: Indianapolis, San Francisco, Carolina, N.Y. Jets
THURSDAY’S GAMES
N.Y. Giants at Washington (-7), 8:30
Minnesota (-3) at Detroit, 12:30
L.A. Chargers at Dallas (PK), 4:30
NCAA women
Late Monday
SENIOR FINALISTS
Robert Brazile, LB: 1975-1984 Houston Oilers)
Jerry Kramer, G: 1958-1968 Green Bay Packers)
NCAA
WEEK 12
Nuggets 114, Kings 98
EASTERN CONFERENCE
x-Late game
THURSDAY’S RESULT
at Pittsburgh 40, Tennessee 17
MONDAY’S RESULT
Atlanta 34, at Seattle 31
NBA
CONTRIBUTOR FINALIST
Bobby Beathard, general manager/personnel administrator
Washington 99, at Milwaukee 88
at Charlotte 118, Minnesota 102
Cleveland 116, at Detroit 88
Indiana 105, at Orlando 97
at Philadelphia 107, Utah 86
at New York 107, L.A. Clippers 85
at New Orleans 114, Oklahoma City 107
Portland 100, at Memphis 92
Boston 110, at Dallas 102, OT
at San Antonio 96, Atlanta 85
Denver 114, at Sacramento 98
WEEK 11
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
THURSDAY‘S GAMES
TUESDAY’S RESULT
SOUTH
Edward Waters (1-9) at Alabama St. (4-7), 3
Mississippi (5-6) at Mississippi St. (8-3), 7:30
Chicago at L.A. Lakers, Late
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Charlotte, 7
Brooklyn at Cleveland, 7
Portland at Philadelphia, 7
Boston at Miami, 7:30
L.A. Clippers at Atlanta, 7:30
Toronto at New York, 7:30
Dallas at Memphis, 8
Denver at Houston, 8
Golden State at Oklahoma City, 8
Orlando at Minnesota, 8
San Antonio at New Orleans, 8
Chicago at Utah, 9
Milwaukee at Phoenix, 9
L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 10:30
FRIDAY’S GAMES
EAST
Miami (10-0) at Pittsburgh (4-7), Noon
Ohio (8-3) at Buffalo (5-6), 1
SOUTH
South Florida (9-1) at UCF (10-0), 3:30
Texas St. (2-9) at Troy (8-2), 4
W. Kentucky (6-5) at FIU (6-4), 7
Virginia Tech (8-3) at Virginia (6-5), 8
MIDWEST
W. Michigan (6-5) at Toledo (9-2), 11:30 a.m.
N. Illinois (8-3) at Cent. Michigan (6-5), Noon
Iowa (6-5) at Nebraska (4-7), 4
SOUTHWEST
Navy (6-4) at Houston (6-4), Noon
Baylor (1-10) at TCU (9-2), Noon
Missouri (6-5) at Arkansas (4-7), 2:30
Texas Tech (5-6) at Texas (6-5), 8
FAR WEST
New Mexico (3-8) at San Diego St. (9-2), 3:30
California (5-6) at UCLA (5-6), 10:30
THURSDAY’S GAMES
No games scheduled.
Three-point Goals: Denver 15-32 (Barton 5-6, Harris 3-7,
Lyles 2-4, Hernangomez 2-4, Jokic 2-6, Murray 1-3, Mudiay
0-2), Sacramento 8-20 (Hill 3-5, Bogdanovic 2-5, Fox 1-1,
Jackson 1-2, Mason 1-2, Randolph 0-1, Richardson 0-1,
Temple 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Denver 49
(Jokic 14), Sacramento 34 (Randolph 6). Assists: Denver
18 (Barton 5), Sacramento 18 (Mason 6). Total Fouls:
Denver 13, Sacramento 19. A: 17,583 (17,608).
NCAA men
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
American U. 74, New Hampshire 70
Army 88, Columbia 78
Buffalo 96, UAB 91, OT
CCSU 74, Coppin St. 71, OT
Delaware 88, NC Wesleyan 70
Loyola (Md.) 97, Goucher 45
Montana St. 74, Binghamton 64
Mount St. Mary’s 91, York College of Pennsylvania 80
Oklahoma St. 73, Pittsburgh 67
Rutgers 83, Bryant 54
St. Francis (Pa.) 96, Franciscan University of Steubenville 54
Towson 79, Penn 71
U-Mass. 85, W. Carolina 76
Wagner 107, College of Staten Island 64
SOUTH
Bethune-Cookman 87, Grambling St. 78
FAU 77, N. Illinois 67
Gardner-Webb 93, Brevard College 70
Georgia Southern 78, UMKC 75
Jacksonville St. 77, Chattanooga 75, OT
Louisiana Tech 77, George Mason 64
Louisville 84, S. Illinois 42
Middle Tennessee 85, Florida Gulf Coast 72
Morgan St. 82, Goldey-Beacom 67
North Florida 101, Edward Waters 77
Savannah St. 101, Alabama St. 97
Tennessee St. 60, Canisius 52
The Citadel 116, Trinity Baptist 66
UNC-Greensboro 71, Longwood 40
Virginia Tech 99, Houston Baptist 73
William & Mary 103, Shenandoah 54
Winthrop 104, Mars Hill 49
MIDWEST
Cincinnati 75, Richmond 48
IUPUI 67, Morehead St. 61
Kansas 114, Texas Southern 71
Loyola of Chicago 63, MVSU 50
Michigan 102, Chaminade University 64
Minnesota 100, Alabama A&M 57
Missouri St. 69, Manhattan 65
North Dakota 79, Northland College 48
S. Dakota St. 80, Iowa 72
SE Louisiana 70, Kent St. 66
SE Missouri 74, CS Northridge 59
Valparaiso 88, Samford 67
Wichita St. 80, Marquette 66
Youngstown St. 91, Westminster (PA) 83
SOUTHWEST
Texas A&M 98, Penn St. 87
FAR WEST
UCLA 72, Wisconsin 70
Utah 83, Mississippi 74
VCU 83, California 69
Wyoming 70, Louisiana-Lafayette 61
Halftime: Virginia Tech 44-38. Three-point goals: Houston Baptist 7-19 (DuBose 3-5, Caraher 3-6, W.Gates 1-1,
Jordan 0-1, Emili 0-1, McKenzie 0-2, J.Gates 0-3),
Virginia Tech 16-26 (Hill 5-8, Robinson 3-5, Bibbs 3-5,
Horne 1-1, Jackson 1-1, Bede 1-1, Blackshear 1-1,
Alexander-Walker 1-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds:
Houston Baptist 25 (Ibarra 7), Virginia Tech 30 (Hill 7).
Assists: Houston Baptist 14 (Bonds 7), Virginia Tech 21
(Robinson 7). Total fouls: Houston Baptist 18, Virginia
Tech 12. A: 4,951 (10,052).
VCU 83, California 69
PORTLAND ......................... 23
MEMPHIS ........................... 24
32
22
17
25
28 — 100
21 — 92
PORTLAND: Harkless 2-3 0-0 4, Vonleh 4-8 3-4 11, Nurkic
3-13 4-5 10, Lillard 5-15 10-10 21, McCollum 8-17 5-5 24,
Leonard 4-4 0-0 8, E.Davis 1-2 1-2 3, Napier 5-13 5-6 16,
Connaughton 1-2 0-0 3, Turner 0-6 0-0 0. Totals 33-83
28-32 100.
MEMPHIS: Parsons 2-8 0-0 6, Green 4-10 3-3 11, Gasol
7-20 2-4 19, Chalmers 7-12 6-7 21, Brooks 2-3 0-0 4,
Ennis III 0-2 0-0 0, Martin 0-3 0-0 0, D.Davis 1-1 1-2 3,
Harrison 0-3 0-0 0, Evans 7-15 5-6 20, McLemore 3-9 1-1
8. Totals 33-86 18-23 92.
0 — 31
0 — 34
Bowling Green: Cleveland 15-150, Clair 12-47, Wilson
1-7, Doege 3-5. E. Michigan: Vann 16-117, Eriksen
24-104, Stiebeling 7-48, Banham 2-10, (Team) 3-(minus
3), Roback 1-(minus 10).
PASSING
Bowling Green: Doege 21-34-1-256. E. Michigan: Roback
5-11-1-75, Stiebeling 8-16-0-49.
RECEIVING
Bowling Green: Miller 8-98, Guyton 5-112, Wilcox 3-2,
Te.Redding 1-20, Cleveland 1-9, Folkertsma 1-6, Pough
1-5, Clair 1-4. E. Michigan: Bailey 4-37, A.Porter 3-24,
Buschman 2-17, Sexton 1-34, Holder 1-7, Daugherty 1-6,
Banham 1-(minus 1).
Miami (Ohio) 28, Ball St. 7
0 — 28
7— 7
MOH: S.Martin 11 pass from Ragland (Sloman kick),
11:59 first.
MOH: Murphy 7 pass from Ragland (Sloman kick), 2:10 first.
MOH: Gardner 14 pass from Ragland (Sloman kick), 6:05
second.
MOH: J.Allen 49 interception return (Sloman kick), 1:16
second.
BALL: Dunner 28 run (M.Hagee kick), 10:54 fourth.
A: 5,374 fourth.
MIAMI (OHIO)
First Downs ..................................... 14
Rushes-Yards ........................... 29-125
Passing .......................................... 148
Comp-Att-Int .......................... 15-27-0
Return Yards .................................... 33
Punts-Avg. ............................... 6-33.66
Fumbles-Lost .................................. 0-0
Penalties-Yards ............................ 2-15
Time Of Possession .................... 25:03
SACRAMENTO: Temple 1-7 1-1 3, Labissiere 2-6 1-2 5,
Randolph 6-12 0-0 12, Fox 4-9 3-3 12, Hill 6-10 1-1 16,
Jackson 3-5 0-0 7, Koufos 7-9 2-2 16, Cauley-Stein 1-7
0-0 2, Mason 5-7 0-0 11, Bogdanovic 4-11 0-0 10,
Richardson 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 41-86 8-9 98.
Virginia Tech (4-1)
Blackshear 2-3 4-4 9, Alexander-Walker 2-6 1-2 6,
Robinson 5-9 2-3 15, Bibbs 11-13 0-0 25, Hill 5-10 4-4 19,
Horne 2-2 2-2 7, Fullard 0-0 0-0 0, Jackson 2-2 0-0 5, Bede
3-4 6-6 13, Ammerman 0-1 0-0 0, Wilson 0-0 0-2 0, Clarke
0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-50 19-23 99.
Late Monday
RUSHING
0
0
DENVER: Barton 9-15 2-3 25, Faried 1-7 4-4 6, Jokic 7-12
0-0 16, Murray 6-10 5-5 18, Harris 8-13 1-2 20, Lydon 0-0
0-0 0, Hernangomez 4-9 1-2 11, Lyles 3-7 0-0 8, Plumlee
2-6 1-2 5, Mudiay 1-6 1-2 3, Beasley 1-1 0-0 2. Totals
42-86 15-20 114.
Trail Blazers 100, Grizzlies 92
BOWLING GREEN E. MICHIGAN
First Downs ........................................ 22
22
Rushes-Yards ............................. 31-209
53-266
Passing ............................................. 256
124
Comp-Att-Int ............................. 21-34-1
13-27-1
Return Yards ..................................... 127
112
Punts-Avg. ................................. 3-40.66
5-34.8
Fumbles-Lost .................................... 1-1
2-0
Penalties-Yards .............................. 8-78
4-55
Time Of Possession ....................... 25:45
34:15
14
0
33 — 114
28 — 98
Houston Baptist (1-4)
Caraher 4-10 1-4 12, Ibarra 6-14 1-6 13, W.Gates 4-4 0-1
9, Bonds 5-7 0-0 10, DuBose 6-13 0-0 15, McKenzie 0-3
0-0 0, Emili 0-1 2-2 2, Myles 2-4 0-0 4, Jordan 0-2 0-0 0,
Saladin 0-0 0-0 0, J.Gates 0-3 0-0 0, Lynch-Daniels 2-4
2-2 6, O’Suji 0-0 2-2 2. 29-65 Totals 8-17 73.
Portland at Washington, 7
Orlando at Philadelphia, 7
San Antonio at Charlotte, 7
Toronto at Atlanta, 7:30
Boston at Indiana, 8
New York at Houston, 8
New Orleans at Golden State, 8:30
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8:30
Milwaukee at Utah, 9
L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 10
BGN: Cleveland 72 run (Suder kick), 9:46 first.
EMC: Bailey 18 pass from Roback (Fricano kick), 9:06 first.
EMC: FG Fricano 30, 5:39 first.
EMC: FG Fricano 39, 3:49 first.
BGN: FG Suder 30, :25 first.
BGN: Doege 2 run (Suder kick), 10:57 second.
EMC: Eriksen 1 run (Fricano kick), :58 second.
EMC: Eriksen 17 run (Fricano kick), 8:49 third.
BGN: Te.Redding 20 pass from Doege (Suder kick), 6:36 third.
BGN: Guyton 62 pass from Doege (Suder kick), 4:35 third.
EMC: Eriksen 7 run (Fricano kick), :00 third.
MIAMI (OHIO) ....................... 14
BALL ST. .................................. 0
34
23
BALL ST.
23
56-293
98
13-29-2
25
5-31.8
2-1
6-55
34:57
Three-point Goals: Portland 6-15 (McCollum 3-6, Connaughton 1-1, Napier 1-2, Lillard 1-4, Harkless 0-1,
Turner 0-1), Memphis 8-30 (Gasol 3-8, Parsons 2-4,
Evans 1-3, Chalmers 1-3, McLemore 1-4, Ennis III 0-1,
Martin 0-2, Green 0-2, Harrison 0-3). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Portland 60 (Vonleh 18), Memphis 35 (Gasol
12). Assists: Portland 11 (Lillard 4), Memphis 23 (Gasol
7). Total Fouls: Portland 23, Memphis 26. Technicals:
Chalmers, Gasol. A: 15,785 (18,119).
Spurs 96, Hawks 85
ATLANTA ........................... 22
SAN ANTONIO ................... 24
16
22
27
24
20 — 85
26 — 96
ATLANTA: Prince 8-13 0-3 18, Babbitt 0-3 0-0 0, Dedmon
5-8 0-1 11, Schroder 6-14 0-0 14, Bazemore 2-13 0-0 5,
Bembry 0-1 0-0 0, Collins 10-12 1-2 21, Ilyasova 2-3 0-0 5,
Cavanaugh 0-0 0-0 0, Delaney 0-5 0-0 0, Belinelli 4-13 2-2
11. Totals 37-85 3-8 85.
SAN ANTONIO: Anderson 5-8 2-2 13, Aldridge 11-24 0-0
22, Gasol 2-6 2-2 6, Mills 3-8 0-0 8, Green 5-16 0-0 14, Gay
1-3 2-2 4, Bertans 0-1 0-0 0, Lauvergne 1-2 0-0 2, Murray
1-2 0-0 2, Forbes 4-7 0-0 9, Ginobili 7-11 0-0 16, Paul 0-1
0-0 0. Totals 40-89 6-6 96.
Three-point Goals: Atlanta 8-30 (Schroder 2-3, Prince
2-7, Dedmon 1-1, Ilyasova 1-2, Bazemore 1-5, Belinelli
1-6, Babbitt 0-3, Delaney 0-3), San Antonio 10-31 (Green
4-8, Ginobili 2-5, Mills 2-7, Anderson 1-2, Forbes 1-4,
Gasol 0-1, Paul 0-1, Bertans 0-1, Aldridge 0-2). Fouled
Out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 38 (Collins, Dedmon 9),
San Antonio 52 (Aldridge 11). Assists: Atlanta 21
(Schroder 9), San Antonio 29 (Anderson 10). Total Fouls:
Atlanta 15, San Antonio 17. A: 18,418 (18,418).
Pelicans 114, Thunder 107
32
33
21
30
21 — 107
27 — 114
OKLAHOMA CITY: George 9-17 2-2 26, Anthony 7-19 3-4
19, Adams 7-9 1-2 15, Westbrook 6-19 8-10 22, Roberson
1-1 0-0 2, Huestis 0-1 0-0 0, Grant 4-7 2-4 10, Patterson
0-1 0-0 0, Johnson 0-2 0-0 0, Felton 2-7 2-2 6, Abrines 2-6
2-2 7. Totals 38-89 20-26 107.
NEW ORLEANS: Moore 5-9 1-2 12, Davis 9-19 18-22 36,
Cousins 7-17 4-4 18, Rondo 2-4 0-0 4, Holiday 7-16 2-3 18,
Cunningham 0-1 0-0 0, Miller 4-5 0-0 11, Nelson 4-5 0-0
9, Allen 3-4 0-1 6. Totals 41-80 25-32 114.
Three-point Goals: Oklahoma City 11-35 (George 6-10,
Westbrook 2-7, Anthony 2-9, Abrines 1-4, Huestis 0-1,
Grant 0-1, Felton 0-3), New Orleans 7-25 (Miller 3-4,
Holiday 2-7, Nelson 1-2, Moore 1-4, Cunningham 0-1,
Davis 0-1, Rondo 0-1, Cousins 0-5). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Oklahoma City 40 (Westbrook 16), New
Orleans 49 (Davis 15). Assists: Oklahoma City 22
(Westbrook 12), New Orleans 26 (Rondo 8). Total Fouls:
Oklahoma City 25, New Orleans 22. Technicals: Oklahoma City coach Thunder (Defensive three second) 2.
Ejected: Cousins. A: 16,765 (16,867).
Celtics 110, Mavericks 102 (OT)
Late Monday
19
27
16
28
27
19
14 — 110
6 — 102
RUSHING
BOSTON: Tatum 6-11 3-4 15, Morris 3-11 1-1 8, Horford
1-5 0-0 3, Irving 16-22 10-11 47, Brown 8-13 3-6 22,
Nader 0-1 0-0 0, Ojeleye 0-0 0-0 0, Theis 0-0 0-0 0,
Baynes 0-1 0-0 0, Larkin 0-1 0-0 0, Rozier 1-4 0-0 3, Smart
3-15 4-4 12. Totals 38-84 21-26 110.
Miami (Ohio): Bester 8-67, L.Ross 13-42, Niemiec 3-8,
Ragland 3-7, Murphy 1-3, (Team) 1-(minus 2). Ball St.:
Huntley 25-159, Dunner 11-60, Plitt 9-52, Milas 9-51,
Hall 1-4, M.Hagee 1-(minus 33).
DALLAS: Barnes 10-21 10-10 31, Kleber 0-1 0-0 0, Nowitzki
7-12 0-0 14, Smith Jr. 4-16 0-0 8, Matthews 6-14 2-3 18,
Powell 3-5 0-0 6, Mejri 1-2 1-2 3, Harris 0-5 0-0 0, Barea
6-13 2-3 16, Ferrell 2-7 2-2 6. Totals 39-96 17-20 102.
PASSING
Three-point Goals: Boston 13-36 (Irving 5-7, Brown 3-6,
Smart 2-11, Horford 1-1, Rozier 1-3, Morris 1-4, Larkin
0-1, Nader 0-1, Tatum 0-2), Dallas 7-33 (Matthews 4-11,
Barea 2-7, Barnes 1-5, Kleber 0-1, Harris 0-1, Nowitzki
0-1, Ferrell 0-3, Smith Jr. 0-4). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Boston 53 (Brown, Tatum, Morris 9), Dallas
45 (Nowitzki 12). Assists: Boston 24 (Smart 8), Dallas
18 (Barea, Smith Jr. 4). Total Fouls: Boston 24, Dallas 22.
Technicals: Irving, Matthews. A: 20,302 (19,200).
Miami (Ohio): Ragland 15-27-0-148. Ball St.: Milas
8-17-1-39, Plitt 5-12-1-59.
RECEIVING
Miami (Ohio): Murphy 7-83, Bester 4-14, Gardner 2-28,
S.Martin 2-23. Ball St.: Hall 5-46, R.Miller 2-13, Givan 2-11,
K.Newton 1-17, Dunner 1-7, Schrank 1-5, Hurt 1-(minus 1).
California (2-3)
Lee 5-12 1-2 11, Sueing 2-5 6-8 11, Okoroh 3-7 0-0 6,
McNeill 4-6 0-0 10, Coleman 8-16 4-6 21, Davis 1-2 1-2 3,
Anticevich 0-1 0-0 0, McCullough 0-1 0-0 0, Harris-Dyson
1-4 1-2 3, Hamilton 2-3 0-0 4, Winston 0-3 0-0 0. Totals
26-60 13-20 69.
Halftime: VCU 55-29. Three-point goals: VCU 12-29
(Jenkins 5-8, Mobley 3-5, Crowfield 2-7, Maye 1-2,
Simms 1-4, Williams 0-1, Tillman 0-1, Lane 0-1),
California 4-15 (McNeill 2-4, Sueing 1-3, Coleman 1-4,
McCullough 0-1, Harris-Dyson 0-1, Winston 0-1, Anticevich 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: VCU 34
(Jenkins 11), California 32 (Lee 12). Assists: VCU 14
(Williams 8), California 9 (Sueing, Okoroh, McNeill,
Anticevich 2). Total fouls: VCU 20, California 15. A: 2,400
(2,400).
Louisiana Tech (4-0)
Washington 2-6 3-4 8, White 1-4 0-0 2, Boykins 5-11 3-3
18, Harris 3-6 2-5 10, Bracey 4-12 2-4 10, Duruji 0-0 0-0 0,
Pemberton 0-0 0-0 0, Powell 3-5 1-2 7, Jean 7-9 1-2 17,
Archibald 0-0 0-0 0, Christon 2-4 0-0 5. 27-57 Totals
12-20 77.
George Mason (3-2)
Mar 4-8 9-9 17, Grayer 6-14 0-1 14, Boyd 2-10 3-4 9,
Livingston 3-8 9-10 15, Kier 2-7 0-0 4, Calixte 1-1 0-0 2,
Wilson 0-2 3-7 3, Greene 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 18-54 24-31
64.
Halftime: Louisiana Tech 42-24. Three-point goals:
Louisiana Tech 11-24 (Boykins 5-10, Jean 2-3, Harris 2-3,
Christon 1-2, Washington 1-3, Powell 0-1, Bracey 0-2),
George Mason 4-25 (Grayer 2-7, Boyd 2-7, Wilson 0-1,
Kier 0-1, Mar 0-3, Livingston 0-3, Greene 0-3). Fouled
out: None. Rebounds: Louisiana Tech 29 (Washington 8),
George Mason 35 (Grayer, Mar, Boyd 8). Assists:
Louisiana Tech 11 (Bracey 5), George Mason 7 (Livingston 3). Total fouls: Louisiana Tech 22, George Mason 14.
Technical fouls: George Mason coach Dave Paulsen. A:
842 (0).
American U. 74,
New Hampshire 70
Late Monday
OKLAHOMA CITY ............... 33
NEW ORLEANS .................. 24
VCU (3-2)
Tillman 4-10 1-1 9, Lane 2-4 3-4 7, Williams 3-6 3-5 9,
Jenkins 11-15 0-0 27, Crowfield 3-8 0-0 8, Santos-Silva
0-1 0-0 0, Mobley 3-5 0-0 9, Djonkam 0-1 0-0 0, Jackson
0-1 0-0 0, Maye 2-4 2-3 7, Simms 3-7 0-0 7. 31-62 Totals
9-13 83.
Louisiana Tech 77,
George Mason 64
Late Monday
BOSTON ......................... 34
DALLAS ......................... 22
EAST
Harvard 80, Boston U. 70
Hofstra 69, Holy Cross 63
St. Bonaventure 59, Bucknell 48
Towson 95, UMBC 64
SOUTH
Florida 87, Richmond 80
Georgia 76, W. Carolina 50
Georgia Tech 75, Georgia St. 51
LSU 65, Nicholls 50
Loyola (Md.) 61, Norfolk St. 58
Maryland 111, Howard 49
Miami 76, New Orleans 46
Mississippi 96, Troy 93
UNC-Greensboro 74, VCU 61
Virginia 66, Hampton 62
William & Mary 71, East Carolina 65
MIDWEST
Creighton 89, N. Iowa 78
Miami (Ohio) 77, Valparaiso 68
Michigan St. 97, Detroit 60
Pittsburgh 66, Cincinnati 46
W. Illinois 77, Illinois 67
SOUTHWEST
Rice 79, Sam Houston St. 50
SMU 65, Abilene Christian 44
Yale 82, TCU 72
FAR WEST
BYU 75, Utah Valley 54
S. Utah 70, Utah St. 67
American U. (1-3)
Iorio 3-5 2-2 10, Little 1-2 0-0 2, Motuzis 5-15 6-10 20,
Diallo 0-2 3-4 3, Nelson 8-20 6-11 26, LaMont 0-2 0-2 0,
Macarchuk 1-1 0-0 2, Cimino 0-1 0-0 0, Bragg 5-6 0-0 11.
23-54 Totals 17-29 74.
New Hampshire (1-3)
Armstrong 1-2 7-9 9, Camara 6-9 8-10 20, Leissner 2-11
13-20 18, Jordan 1-2 0-0 3, Reed 1-5 0-0 3, Watkins 0-0
0-0 0, Hopkins 1-5 0-0 3, Ogwuche 3-8 1-1 8, Stewart 0-0
0-0 0, Burns 2-3 0-0 6. Totals 17-45 29-40 70.
Halftime: American U. 46-32. Three-point goals: American U. 11-30 (Nelson 4-9, Motuzis 4-12, Iorio 2-4, Bragg
1-2, Diallo 0-1, LaMont 0-2), New Hampshire 7-23
(Burns 2-3, Jordan 1-1, Leissner 1-4, Ogwuche 1-4,
Hopkins 1-5, Reed 1-5, Armstrong 0-1). Fouled out:
Camara, Iorio, Macarchuk. Rebounds: American U. 32
(Nelson 8), New Hampshire 32 (Camara 11). Assists:
American U. 11 (Iorio 3), New Hampshire 8 (Jordan 5).
Total fouls: American U. 29, New Hampshire 18. A: 474
(3,500).
No. 15 Maryland 111,
Howard 49
Howard (0-4)
Moore 2-5 0-1 4, Myles 1-5 0-0 2, Dopson 2-4 1-2 5,
Edmond 2-9 0-2 5, Johnson 3-7 0-0 7, Bryant 3-4 2-2 8,
Fitzgerald-Greer 0-2 0-0 0, Griffin 0-1 4-4 4, Johnson 0-0
2-2 2, Jacobs 0-2 0-0 0, McCants 2-6 4-12 10, Williams
1-10 0-0 2, 16-55 Totals 13-25 49.
Maryland (3-2)
Jones 10-14 4-7 24, Charles 6-11 0-0 12, Confroy 7-13 1-1
19, Lewis 1-5 0-0 3, Watson 5-8 3-4 18, Ellison 0-1 0-0 0,
Fraser 8-11 8-11 24, Myers 0-5 0-0 0, Small 4-7 2-6 11,
41-75 Totals 18-29 111.
HOWARD .............................. 6 13 17 13
—49
MARYLAND ........................ 33 23 35 20 —111
Three-point goals: HOWARD 4-17 (Dopson 0-1, Edmond
1-6, Johnson 1-3, McCants 2-4, Williams 0-3), MARYLAND 11-20 (Jones 0-1, Charles 0-1, Confroy 4-7, Lewis
1-1, Watson 5-7, Myers 0-1, Small 1-2). Assists:
HOWARD 8 (Edmond 2), MARYLAND 27 (Confroy 6).
Fouled out: None. Rebounds: HOWARD 32 (Bryant 5),
MARYLAND 53 (Fraser 11). Total fouls: HOWARD 20,
MARYLAND 17. A: 3,517.
Virginia 66, Hampton 62
Hampton (1-2)
Brown 1-5 2-2 5, Finney-Smith 6-14 0-0 17, Sayle 3-8 1-2
7, James 4-12 3-5 13, Starr 3-11 2-4 9, Bates 2-5 1-2 5,
Willis 2-6 0-0 6, 21-61 Totals 9-15 62.
Virginia (2-3)
Moses 4-7 1-2 9, Huland El 3-9 2-2 10, Tinsley 3-5 0-0 6,
Toussaint 5-11 3-6 14, Willoughby 6-9 2-2 15,
Jablonowski 2-3 0-0 4, Aiyeotan 1-2 0-0 2, Brown 2-6 0-0
6, 26-52 Totals 8-12 66.
HAMPTON .......................... 14 12 22 14
—62
VIRGINIA ............................ 16 20 16 14
—66
Three-point goals: HAMPTON 11-28 (Brown 1-4, FinneySmith 5-11, James 2-5, Starr 1-2, Bates 0-1, Willis 2-5),
VIRGINIA 6-16 (Huland El 2-3, Tinsley 0-1, Toussaint
1-6, Willoughby 1-1, Brown 2-5). Assists: HAMPTON 11
(James 4), VIRGINIA 11 (Toussaint 6). Fouled out:
VIRGINIA Willoughby. Rebounds: HAMPTON 40
(Finney-Smith 9), VIRGINIA 32 (Willoughby 6). Total
fouls: HAMPTON 14, VIRGINIA 18. A: 2,546.
Richmond (3-2)
Duggan 3-7 0-0 8, Wike 0-2 0-0 0, Fee 3-6 0-0 8, Murphree
2-5 0-0 5, Parson 5-14 7-8 17, Hinds-Clarke 2-6 2-2 6,
Hudalla 3-4 1-2 8, Truesdale 0-0 0-0 0, Curry 1-3 0-0 2,
Hatcher 3-6 2-2 8, Parson 7-13 1-1 18, 29-66 Totals 13-15
80.
Florida (2-2)
Lorenzen 4-10 6-6 14, Anderson 4-9 4-6 13, Hersler 4-10
1-3 11, Nakkasoglu 8-11 2-2 25, Washington 5-11 3-5 16,
Hayes 0-1 0-0 0, Thomas 2-4 0-0 5, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0,
Portakal 0-0 0-0 0, Searcy 1-4 0-0 3, 28-60 Totals 16-22
87.
RICHMOND ......................... 18 21 24 17
—80
FLORIDA ............................. 24 18 20 25
—87
Three-point goals: RICHMOND 9-22 (Duggan 2-5, Fee
2-4, Murphree 1-3, Hudalla 1-1, Hatcher 0-1, Parson 3-8),
FLORIDA 15-30 (Lorenzen 0-2, Anderson 1-3, Hersler
2-5, Nakkasoglu 7-9, Washington 3-6, Thomas 1-2,
Searcy 1-3). Assists: RICHMOND 12 (Duggan 3), FLORIDA 16 (Anderson 6). Fouled out: None. Rebounds:
RICHMOND 37 (Duggan 8), FLORIDA 37 (Lorenzen 10).
Total fouls: RICHMOND 17, FLORIDA 14. A: 332.
HI GH S C HOOLS
Richmond (1-3)
Stansbury 2-4 3-6 7, Golden 2-8 0-0 4, Gilyard 3-9 4-4 12,
Buckingham 2-7 1-2 6, Sherod 1-5 0-0 2, Madrid-Andrews 0-0 0-0 0, Friendshuh 0-0 0-1 0, Kirby 2-2 0-0 6,
Fore 0-0 1-2 1, Cayo 3-4 0-0 6, Johnson 1-3 1-2 4. 16-42
Totals 10-17 48.
Cincinnati (5-0)
Clark 2-5 2-2 8, Brooks 1-2 0-0 2, Cumberland 2-7 0-0 6,
Jenifer 3-4 0-0 9, Evans 5-8 0-0 12, Washington 2-2 2-2 6,
Bart 1-2 0-0 3, Scott 1-1 2-4 4, Nsoseme 0-0 0-1 0,
Williams 0-2 1-2 1, Martin 0-0 2-2 2, Moore 3-6 0-0 9,
Broome 5-7 3-4 13. Totals 25-46 12-17 75.
Halftime: Cincinnati 40-14. Three-point goals: Richmond
6-16 (Kirby 2-2, Gilyard 2-4, Johnson 1-2, Buckingham
1-3, Stansbury 0-1, Golden 0-1, Cayo 0-1, Sherod 0-2),
Cincinnati 13-24 (Jenifer 3-4, Moore 3-6, Clark 2-3,
Evans 2-5, Cumberland 2-5, Bart 1-1). Fouled out: None.
Rebounds: Richmond 19 (Buckingham 7), Cincinnati 33
(Clark, Moore 8). Assists: Richmond 11 (Buckingham 3),
Cincinnati 20 (Clark 7). Total fouls: Richmond 18,
Cincinnati 21.
L
5
7
8
7
10
6
9
9
OL PTS.
3
27
1
27
3
25
2
24
1
23
4
22
2
22
4
20
GF
67
62
59
73
62
57
66
58
GA
63
53
75
66
70
53
67
61
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 15
Toronto ......................... 14
Detroit .......................... 10
Ottawa ............................ 8
Boston ............................. 8
Montreal ......................... 8
Florida ............................. 7
Buffalo ............................ 5
L
3
8
8
5
7
12
11
12
OL PTS.
2
32
0
28
3
23
6
22
4
20
2
18
2
16
4
14
GF
80
80
63
62
51
52
61
48
GA
52
67
58
62
57
77
72
74
CENTRAL
W
St. Louis ........................ 16
Winnipeg ...................... 12
Nashville ....................... 12
Dallas ............................ 11
Chicago ......................... 10
Colorado ........................ 10
Minnesota ....................... 9
L
5
5
6
9
8
8
8
OL PTS.
1
33
3
27
2
26
1
23
2
22
1
21
3
21
GF
78
67
65
61
61
66
59
GA
58
56
60
62
53
65
55
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................. 12
Vegas ............................ 12
Calgary .......................... 12
Anaheim ....................... 10
Vancouver ..................... 10
San Jose ........................ 10
Edmonton ....................... 7
Arizona ........................... 5
L
7
6
8
7
8
8
12
15
OL PTS.
2
26
1
25
0
24
3
23
3
23
1
21
2
16
3
13
GF
64
68
62
58
56
47
53
58
GA
50
58
63
56
59
44
72
86
2
0
1 —
1 —
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Calgary 4, at Washington 1
Arizona 4, at Toronto 1
Columbus 3, at Buffalo 2
at Nashville 5, Winnipeg 3
New Jersey 4, at Minnesota 3 (OT)
Anaheim 3, at San Jose 2 (SO)
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Vancouver 5, at Philadelphia 2
at St. Louis 8, Edmonton 3
at Dallas 3, Montreal 1
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Ottawa at Washington, 7
N.Y. Rangers at Carolina, 7
Minnesota at Buffalo, 7
Toronto at Florida, 7
Vancouver at Pittsburgh, 7
Calgary at Columbus, 7
Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, 7
Boston at New Jersey, 7
Edmonton at Detroit, 7
Chicago at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Montreal at Nashville, 8
Dallas at Colorado, 9
San Jose at Arizona, 9
Winnipeg at Los Angeles, 10:30
Vegas at Anaheim, 10:30
THURSDAY’S GAMES
No games scheduled
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Tampa Bay at Washington, 5
Pittsburgh at Boston, 1
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 4
Colorado at Minnesota, 4
Winnipeg at Anaheim, 4
San Jose at Vegas, 6
Vancouver at New Jersey, 7
Ottawa at Columbus, 7
Detroit at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Edmonton at Buffalo, 7
Toronto at Carolina, 7:30
Nashville at St. Louis, 8
Calgary at Dallas, 9
Los Angeles at Arizona, 9
Canucks 5, Flyers 2
VANCOUVER ........................... 2
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 1
5
2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Philadelphia, Provorov 4 (Konecny, Filppula),
8:00. 2, Vancouver, D.Sedin 4 (Virtanen, H.Sedin), 9:42.
3, Vancouver, Boeser 8 (Edler, Pouliot), 10:01.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Vancouver, Boeser 9 (H.Sedin, D.Sedin), 1:56
(pp). 5, Vancouver, Baertschi 8 (Eriksson, Vanek), 14:40
(pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Philadelphia, Voracek 6 (Giroux, Sanheim),
9:56. 7, Vancouver, Eriksson 1 (Gagner), 19:39.
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
PRIVATE
Washington Waldorf 31, Hebrew Academy 28
SHOTS ON GOAL
GI R L S ' B A S K E TBALL
NONLEAGUE
WASHINGTON WALDORF 31,
HEBREW ACADEMY 28
H (1-1) Lowenstein 8, Mellman 8, Fleisher 5, Guberman
4, Raskin 3 Totals 10 8-20 28.
WW (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 31.
Halftime: Hebrew Academy, (11-8).
Three-point goals:
VANCOUVER ........................... 9
16
11 — 36
PHILADELPHIA ...................... 16
16
6 — 38
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 2 of 3; Philadelphia 0 of 2. Goalies: Vancouver, Markstrom 6-7-2 (38
shots-36 saves). Philadelphia, Neuvirth 2-4-1 (22-18),
Elliott 6-5-3 (13-13). A: 19,278 (19,543). T: 2:32.
Blues 8, Oilers 3
EDMONTON ............................. 0
ST. LOUIS ................................. 2
0
2
3 —
4 —
3
8
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, St. Louis, Tarasenko 11 (Schenn, Schwartz),
3:13. 2, St. Louis, Jaskin 2 (Bortuzzo, Sundqvist), 7:35.
THE TOP 10
SECOND PERIOD
Boys’ soccer
Scoring: 3, St. Louis, Schwartz 11 (Tarasenko, Schenn),
3:52. 4, St. Louis, Schenn 9 (Schwartz), 19:30.
Bethesda-Chevy Chase senior Liam Brocker scored with
86 seconds left to lift the Barons to a 1-0 victory over
Severna Park in the Maryland 4A state final. . . . Landon
senior Nico Kenary was named Interstate Athletic
Conference player of the year. . . . Severna Park was the
top-ranked team from early September into November
but lost to Bethesda-Chevy Chase in the Maryland 4A
state final. . . . Gonzaga started the season 1-5-1 but
ended it with 11 straight wins, including the WCAC and
DCSAA finals. . . . Wilson defeated opponents from the
WCAC, Montgomery County, the PVAC, the MAC, the
Public Charter School Athletic Association and the
DCIAA this fall.
Rank
Team
Record
1
Bethesda-Chevy Chase
14-3-3
2
Landon
15-2-2
3
Severna Park
18-1-1
4
Gonzaga
17-6-3
5
Wilson
16-1-1
6
River Hill
15-2-2
7
Meade
14-3
8
Sherwood
12-2-1
9
Whitman
11-2-2
10
Bowie
15-4
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Edmonton, Lucic 4 (Caggiula, McDavid), 6:09.
6, St. Louis, Upshall 3 (Thorburn, Brodziak), 7:39. 7, St.
Louis, Tarasenko 12 (Schwartz, Pietrangelo), 12:21. 8,
St. Louis, Schenn 10 (Parayko, Tarasenko), 14:37 (pp). 9,
Edmonton, Draisaitl 6 (Nugent-Hopkins, Russell), 15:11.
10, St. Louis, Stastny 5 (Steen, Parayko), 16:58. 11,
Edmonton, Nurse 1 (Draisaitl, Nugent-Hopkins), 18:49.
SHOTS ON GOAL
EDMONTON ............................. 7
7
15 — 29
ST. LOUIS ............................... 12
14
14 — 40
Power-play opportunities: Edmonton 0 of 1; St. Louis 1
of 3. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 7-10-1 (3 shots-1
saves), Brossoit 0-2-1 (37-31). St. Louis, Allen 12-5-1
(29-26). A: 18,819 (19,150). T: 2:27.
Stars 3, Canadiens 1
MONTREAL .............................. 0
DALLAS .................................... 0
1
2
0 —
1 —
1
3
SECOND PERIOD
THE TOP 10
Scoring: 1, Montreal, Gallagher 9 (Hudon, Morrow),
12:04 (pp). 2, Dallas, Shore 2 (Lindell, Klingberg), 18:22.
3, Dallas, Spezza 3 (Shore, Seguin), 19:21.
Girls’ soccer
THIRD PERIOD
St. John's finished the season with two trophies and an
undefeated conference record. . . . Broadneck captured
the Maryland 4A championship with a 2-1 win over
Urbana. . . . River Hill won its second straight Maryland
2A title last Wednesday with a victory over Hereford. . . .
Huntingtown fell to Linganore on penalty kicks in the
Maryland 3A championship. . . . Atholton just missed
out on a place in the Maryland 3A final with a 1-0
semifinal loss to Huntingtown. . . . After a disappointing
loss to St. John’s in the WCAC championship, Paul VI
regrouped to win the Northern Virginia Independent
Schools championship, 2-1, over The Potomac School.
. . . Quince Orchard lost in overtime of the Maryland 4A
semifinals to eventual runner-up Urbana.
Rank
Team
Record
1
St. John's
20-1-1
2
Broadneck
17-2-1
3
River Hill
17-2
4
Huntingtown
16-2-1
5
Atholton
13-4-1
6
Paul VI
15-4-2
7
Potomac School
15-2-2
8
Quince Orchard
11-4-2
9
Whitman
14-1-1
Scoring: 4, Dallas, Seguin 9 (Radulov), 19:33.
10
Calvert
15-2
SHOTS ON GOAL
MONTREAL .............................. 7
14
9 — 30
DALLAS .................................... 9
15
5 — 29
Power-play opportunities: Montreal 1 of 5; Dallas 0 of 3.
Goalies: Montreal, Lindgren 3-4-1 (28 shots-26 saves).
Dallas, Bishop 9-6-0 (30-29). A: 18,532 (18,532). T: 2:41.
Ducks 3, Sharks 2 (SO)
Late Monday
ANAHEIM .......................... 0
SAN JOSE .......................... 1
2
0
0
1
0 — 3
0 — 2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, San Jose, Donskoi 6 (Couture), 3:31.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Anaheim, Perry 4 (Rakell, Montour), 0:45. 3,
Anaheim, Rakell 8 (Perry, Montour), 11:39.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, San Jose, Donskoi 7 (Hertl, O’Regan), 8:19
(pp).
THE TOP 10
No. 12 Cincinnati 75,
Richmond 48
METROPOLITAN
W
New Jersey ................... 12
Columbus ...................... 13
Pittsburgh ..................... 11
N.Y. Islanders ............... 11
Washington .................. 11
Carolina ........................... 9
N.Y. Rangers ................. 10
Philadelphia .................... 8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Florida 87, Richmond 80
SATURDAY’S GAMES
E. Michigan 34, Bowling Green 31
14
14
25
25
Virginia Tech 99,
Houston Baptist 73
Portland at Brooklyn, 12
New York at Atlanta, 7:30
Orlando at Boston, 7:30
Charlotte at Cleveland, 8
Detroit at Oklahoma City, 8
Miami at Minnesota, 8
Toronto at Indiana, 8
Memphis at Denver, 9
New Orleans at Phoenix, 9
Chicago at Golden State, 10:30
EAST
Boston College (6-5) at Syracuse (4-7), 12:20
Michigan St. (8-3) at Rutgers (4-7), 4
SOUTH
Florida St. (4-6) at Florida (4-6), Noon
Georgia (10-1) at Georgia Tech (5-5), Noon
Louisville (7-4) at Kentucky (7-4), Noon
East Carolina (3-8) at Memphis (9-1), Noon
Duke (5-6) at Wake Forest (7-4), 12:30
Southern Miss. (7-4) at Marshall (7-4), 2:30
Old Dominion (5-6) at Middle Tennessee (5-6), 3
Alabama (11-0) at Auburn (9-2), 3:30
Penn St. (9-2) at Maryland (4-7), 3:30
North Carolina (3-8) at NC State (7-4), 3:30
Vanderbilt (4-7) at Tennessee (4-7), 4
Texas A&M (7-4) at LSU (8-3), 7:30
UTSA (6-4) at Louisiana Tech (5-6), 7:30
Clemson (10-1) at South Carolina (8-3), 7:30
MIDWEST
U-Conn. (3-8) at Cincinnati (3-8), Noon
Ohio St. (9-2) at Michigan (8-3), Noon
Indiana (5-6) at Purdue (5-6), Noon
Iowa St. (7-4) at Kansas St. (6-5), 3:30
Wisconsin (11-0) at Minnesota (5-6), 3:30
Northwestern (8-3) at Illinois (2-9), 4
SOUTHWEST
Kansas (1-10) at Oklahoma St. (8-3), Noon
Tulane (5-6) at SMU (6-5), Noon
North Texas (8-3) at Rice (1-10), 1
West Virginia (7-4) at Oklahoma (10-1), 3:45
Temple (5-6) at Tulsa (2-9), 4
FAR WEST
UNLV (5-6) at Nevada (2-9), 3
Boise St. (9-2) at Fresno St. (8-3), 3:30
Idaho (3-7) at New Mexico St. (4-6), 4
Arizona (7-4) at Arizona St. (6-5), 4:30
Wyoming (7-4) at San Jose St. (1-11), 5
Oregon St. (1-10) at Oregon (6-5), 7
Notre Dame (9-2) at Stanford (8-3), 8
Washington (9-2) at Washington St. (9-2), 8
BYU (3-9) at Hawaii (3-8), 9
Colorado (5-6) at Utah (5-6), 10
Utah St. (6-5) at Air Force (4-7), 10:15
7
7
DENVER .............................. 22
SACRAMENTO ................... 22
FRIDAY’S GAMES
SATURDAY‘S GAMES
BOWLING GREEN .................. 10
E. MICHIGAN .......................... 13
H OC K E Y
SHOOTOUT
Volleyball
Flint Hill's perfect season included the ISL AA league
title, the Metro City championship and the VISAA
Division 1 championship. . . . Jenaisya Moore and Janiece
Jefferies led Northwest to a third straight Maryland 4A
state championship Saturday. . . . Loudoun County raced
past Grafton to win the Virginia Class 4 championship in
three sets. . . . Langley's five-set championship comeback ended with a dominant 15-1 win in the final set. . . .
With great defense and some timely kills, Northern beat
Westminster for the Maryland 3A title. . . . Tuscarora
knocked off Princess Anne in three sets to win the
Virginia Class 5 title.
Rank
Team
Record
1
Flint Hill
35-0
2
Northwest
19-0
3
Loudoun County
28-3
4
Langley
26-3
5
Arundel
19-1
6
Northern
19-1
7
Middleburg
27-5
8
Holy Cross
29-3
9
Tuscarora
16-6
10
Stone Bridge
26-2
Anaheim 4 (Perry G, Rakell NG, Silfverberg NG, Fowler G,
Roy NG, Montour G, Shaw NG, Manson NG, Vermette G),
San Jose 3 (Couture NG, Pavelski NG, Donskoi G, Burns
G, Labanc NG, Heed G, O’Regan NG, Tierney NG, Hertl
NG).
SHOTS ON GOAL
ANAHEIM ........................ 10
13
7 — 30
SAN JOSE .......................... 6
13
20
3 — 42
Power-play opportunities: Anaheim 0 of 2; San Jose 1 of
3. Goalies: Anaheim, Berra 1-1-0 (42 shots-40 saves).
San Jose, Jones 8-5-1 (30-28). A: 17,257 (17,562). T:
2:49.
BOXI NG
FIGHT SCHEDULE
FRIDAY
At Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand, Chayaphon Moonsri
vs. Tatsuya Fukuhara, 12, for Moonsri’s WBC minimumweight title.
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
815
815
Legal Notices
840
Legal Notices
Department of Justice
Antitrust Division
Take notice that the United States has filed a proposed Final Judgment
in a civil antitrust case in the United States District Court for the
District of Columbia, United States of America v. CenturyLink, Inc.
and Level 3 Communications, Inc., Civil Action No. 1:17-cv-02028. On
October 2, 2017, the United States filed a Complaint alleging that
CenturyLink’s proposed acquisition of Level 3 would violate Section
7 of the Clayton Act, 15 U.S.C. § 18. The proposed Final Judgment,
filed at the same time as the Complaint, requires CenturyLink and
Level 3 to divest to an acquirer or acquirers all assets used by
Level 3 exclusively or primarily to support provision of fiber-based
telecommunications services to enterprise and wholesale customer
locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico; Boise, Idaho; and Tucson,
Arizona, and to provide to an acquirer an indefeasible right to use
twenty-four (24) strands of intercity dark fiber between each of thirty
(30) specified city pairs, along with certain tangible and intangible
assets. A Competitive Impact Statement filed by the United States
describes the Complaint, the proposed Final Judgment, the industry,
and the remedies available to private litigants who may have been
injured by the alleged violation.
Copies of the Complaint, proposed Final Judgment, and Competitive
Impact Statement are available for inspection on the Antitrust
Division’s website at http://www.justice.gov/atr and at the Office
of the Clerk of the United States District Court for the District of
Columbia.
Interested persons may address comments to Scott Scheele, Chief,
Telecommunications and Broadband Section, Antitrust Division,
Department of Justice, 450 Fifth Street NW, Suite 7000, Washington,
DC 20530 (telephone: 202-616-5924) within 60 days of the date of this
notice. Such comments, including the name of the submitter, and
responses thereto, will be posted on the Antitrust Division’s website,
filed with the Court, and, under certain circumstances, published in
the Federal Register.
820
820
Official Notices
Official Notices
Fort Detrick Forest Glen Annex
Restoration Advisory Board Meeting
Wednesday, December 6th, 2017 at 6:30 pm
Coffield Community Center
2450 Lyttonsville Road, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910
Fort Detrick Forest Glen Annex will hold a Restoration Advisory Board
meeting on Wednesday, December 6th at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will
be held at the Gwendolyn Coffield Community Center located at 2450
Lyttonsville Road, Silver Spring, Md.
Topics for this meeting include updates on the ongoing Remedial
Investigation and other projects.
RAB meetings are held to keep the public informed and involved in the
Forest Glen Annex cleanup activities and to provide opportunities for
public involvement in its environmental restoration program.
Interested citizens who would like to learn more about the restoration
program or would like to become a RAB member are encouraged to
attend the meeting.
For
more
information,
call
301-619-2018
usarmy.detrick.usag.mbx.pao@mail.mil
or
email
NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY
WASHINGTON DULLES INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR
ROUTE 28 AREAS 4 & 5
The Virginia Department of Transportation is proposing to construct a
segment of Phase III of the Route 28 Corridor Improvement Program
(Areas 4 and 5). A real estate easement for construction, operations,
and maintenance associated with the proposed project to construct
the last segment of the Route 28 Corridor Improvement Program is
being requested to increase the capacity of Route 28 and improve
the Level of Service throughout the corridor. The improvements that
make up this phase include widening the existing Route 28 from a six
(6) lane Principal Arterial, to an eight (8) lane Principal Arterial in Areas
4 & 5. The project is located in Fairfax and Loudoun Counties starting
0.38 miles north of the intersection of Route 50 and Route 28 and
ending 0.121 miles north of the intersection of Sterling Boulevard and
Route 28. Approximately 3.5 miles of the project is located adjacent
to, or within Washington Dulles International Airport property. Phase
III includes northbound Route 28 improvements from three (3) lanes
to four (4) lanes from just north of Route 50 to just north of the
Sterling Boulevard. Some minor adjustments to the current Airport
Authority’s transportation easement for Route 28 are necessary to
complete Phase III Areas 4 & 5. The proposed project will require the
addition of 4.948 acres of easement to accommodate the roadway
widening and associated transportation easements.
In conformance with the provisions of the National Environmental
Policy Act, an Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared. After
careful consideration of the information contained in the Final EA, the
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has determined that significant
environmental effects will not result from the proposed action.
Therefore the FAA has issued a Finding of No Significant Impact
(FONSI).
The Final EA and FONSI can be viewed at: www.28freeway.com
Beginning November 18, 2017, hard copies of the final EA and
FONSI are available at Centreville Regional Library (14200 St. Germain
Dr. Centreville, VA), Chantilly Regional Library (4000 Stringfellow
Rd. Chantilly, VA), and Fairfax City Regional Library (10360 North
Street Fairfax, VA). Please direct any requests for the FONSI or
questions to Ms. Kim Larkin, Senior Project Manager, Dewberry
Consultants LLC, 8401 Arlington Boulevard, Fairfax, VA 22031,
klarkin@dewberry.com, (703)645-9737.
825
825
Bids & Proposals
Bids & Proposals
PUBLIC BIDDING # 24 YEAR 2017 –
File CQ17-1440/5
Contracting organization: ARGENTINE ARMY – US
ATTACHE’S OFFICE
Bid Objective: ACQUISITION OF MULTIMODAL TRANSPORT SERVICE OF GOODS IN A 40 FT STANDARD DRY
VAN-TYPE CONTAINER, STORAGE INCLUDED.
BID OPENING AT: ARGENTINE ARMY- 1810 Connecticut
Ave NW, Washington D.C 20009
Date and Time: December 13th, 2017 at 09:00 AM
Specifications
can
be
downloaded
at
www.amilusa.com/contracts/ and
www.argentinacompra.gov.ar
1405
C
Cars
PORSCHE
PORSCHE 2017 911 CARERRA
COUPE- All blue, w/glass sunrf &
wiper, min. perfection, $81,000.
incl. 4 yr paid service 7700 miles.
Call 240-401-0707
1447
Autos Wanted
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
donation helps local families with
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
Tax deductible. MVA License
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
DONATE VEHICLES. Your donation
trains disadvantaged at-risk youths
in auto repairs, also provides vehicle donations to low-income families. Tax-deductible. MVA License#
8000113006823. 301-355-9333
www.auted.org
Career Training - Emp Svcs
ATTEND AVIATION COLLEGE
- Get FAA approved Aviation
Maintenance training. Financial aid for qualified students.
Job placement assistance.
Call AIM for free information
888-896-7869
C
JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Severn & Odenton,
MD
Call Bob Cranford
at 410-598-0364
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers
are needed to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Olney, Silver Spring
& Rockville, MD
JOBS
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
Great part-time
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Transportation
required.
To apply, go to
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Reliable transportation
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Experience preferred,
excellent pay, benefits.
Call between 7-9 AM
for more information
410-381-3100 ext. 157
EEO/AA Employer; Minority/
Female/Vets/Disabled
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ADRIANE MINCEY
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-11050
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 6011
Emerson St #504, Bladensburg, MD
20710, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 7th day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 7th
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $62,665.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142571
Home delivery
is convenient.
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.,
5301 WISCONSIN AVENUE, N.W., SUITE 750
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20015
202-364-0306
www.alexcooper.com
ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGEE’S SALE OF A COMMERCIAL BUILDING known as 106 13th St., SE Washington, D.C. 20003.
By virtue of a certain Mortgage, Assignment of Leases
and Rents and Security Agreement duly recorded October
8, 2015 as Instrument No. 2015103182 (the "Mortgage")
among the Land Records of the District of Columbia (the
"Land Records"), and in accordance with Public Law 90566 notice recorded October 25, 2017, a default having
occurred in the payment of the indebtedness secured
thereby and the covenants contained therein, and at the
request of the party secured thereby (the "Noteholder"),
the undersigned Attorney for the Mortgagee, will sell,
at public auction, within the office of ALEX COOPER
AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5301 WISCONSIN AVENUE, N.W.,
SUITE 750, WASHINGTON, D.C. on
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2017 at 1:00 PM
the following described land and premises situated in the
District of Columbia and known as Lot 60 in Square 1036 in
the subdivision made by Henry M. Baker of the original Lot
10, 12 per plat recorded in Liber the Office of the Surveyor
for the District of Columbia
TOGETHER WITH any and all buildings, structures, improvements or appurtenances now erected on the abovedescribed land, including, without limitation, all equipment,
apparatus, machinery and fixtures of any kind or character
forming a part of said buildings, structures, improvements
or appurtenances, and any furniture, furnishings, equipment, machinery and other personal property owned and
located in, upon or about the above-described land and
any buildings thereon all as more particularly described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust (the "Property").
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. The bid which yields the
highest price for the Property will be accepted by the
Attorney for the Mortgagee (unless the sale is postponed or
cancelled) and all bids will be provisional until acceptance.
Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Attorney for the Mortgagee absolutely reserves the right to postpone the sale
and/or cancel the sale at any time until the auctioneer
announces that the Property is "sold" and the deposit in
the required amount and form is received by the Attorney
for the Mortgagee. A deposit in the amount of $75,000 will
be required at the time of sale. Such deposit must be by
cashier's check or certified check or in such other form as
the Attorney for the Mortgagee may determine in her sole
discretion. The Noteholder secured by the Deed of Trust
(or any related party) shall be exempted by the Attorney
for the Mortgagee from submitting any bidding deposit.
The Attorney for the Mortgagee will, as a condition of the
sale, require all potential bidders except the Noteholder to
show their deposit before any bidding begins. The retained
deposit of the successful purchaser shall be applied,
without interest, to the successful purchaser's credit at
settlement, provided, however, that in the event the
successful purchaser fails to consummate the purchase in
accordance with the terms of sale as herein provided, such
deposit, at the option of the Attorney for the Mortgagee,
will be forfeited. The terms of sale must be complied with
and settlement consummated thereon within 30 days from
day of sale unless extended at the sole discretion of the
Attorney for the Mortgagee. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.
The balance of the purchase price over and above the
retained deposit, with interest thereon at a rate of 8.00%
per annum from the date of sale through the date of
receipt of the balance of the purchase price, will be due
at settlement in cash or certified funds; and if not so paid,
the Attorney for the Mortgagee reserves the right to retain
the deposit and resell the Property at the risk and cost of
the defaulting purchaser, after such advertisement and on
such terms as the Attorney for the Mortgagee may deem
proper, and to avail themselves and the Noteholder of any
legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser.
The Property is sold subject to the rights, if any, of
parties in possession, if such rights have priority over the
Deed of Trust, and to any and all covenants, conditions,
restrictions, easements, rights of way, and limitations of
record. The Property will be sold "WHERE IS" and in "AS
IS" condition without any warranty as to condition, express
or implied, and without any representation or warranty as
to the accuracy of the information furnished to prospective
bidders by the Attorney for the Mortgagee or any other
party and without any other representations or warranty
of any nature. Without limiting the generality of the
foregoing, the Property will be sold without representation
or warranty as to (i) title to the Property, (ii) the nature,
condition, structural integrity, or fitness for a particular
use of any improvements, fixtures or personal property
included within the Property, (iii) the environmental condition of the Property or the compliance of the Property
with federal, state and local laws and regulations concerning the presence or disposal of hazardous substances,
(iv) compliance of the Property with the Americans with
Disabilities Act or any similar law, or (v) compliance of
the Property with any zoning laws or ordinances and any
and all applicable safety codes, and acceptance of the
Deed to the Property by the successful purchaser shall
constitute a waiver of any claims against the Attorney for
the Mortgagee or the Noteholder concerning any of the
foregoing matters. The successful purchaser recognizes
that any investigation, examination or inspection of the
Property is within the control of the owner or other parties
in possession of the Property and not within the control of
the Attorney for the Mortgagee or the Noteholder.
Conveyance shall be by Deed, without covenant or warranty, express or implied. The risk of loss or damage by
fire or other casualty to the Property from and after the
date of sale will be upon the successful purchaser. The
Property will be sold subject to all taxes, ground rents,
public charges, assessments, sewer, water, drainage and
other public improvements whether assessments have
been levied or not. The Noteholder and Attorney for
the Mortgagee assume no liability for fuel, gas, electricity,
utilities and other operating charges accrued before or
after the sale and all such charges shall be the sole
responsibility of the purchaser from the date of sale.
All costs incident to the settlement and conveyancing
including, without limitation, examination of title, conveyancing, all recordation taxes and charges, all transfer
taxes and charges, title insurance premiums, notary fees,
settlement fees and all other costs incident to settlement
shall be at the cost of the successful purchaser. If
the Attorney for the Mortgagee cannot convey title, the
purchaser's sole remedy is a return of deposit. Further
particulars may be announced at the time of sale. For
further information, please contact Lisa D. Sparks, Esq. at
410-659-1322 lsparks@wcslaw.com.
Lisa D. Sparks
Attorney for the Mortgagee
Washington Post
November 17, 20, 22, 24, 27, 2017
12142638
Roof Mechanic and
Roofing Laborer
SF
Excellent part-time
income!
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2017
CONSTRUCTION
1-800-753-POST
Call Don Money at
301-674-0010
CLASSIFIED
1-800-753-POST
SF
D9
ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.
5301 WISCONSIN AVE. NW, #750
WASH., DC 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
FORECLOSURE SALE OF CONDOMINIUM UNIT 2128 Suitland Terrace, SE, Unit 202, Washington, DC 20020
Pursuant to District of Columbia Condominium Act of 1976,
Section 313 (as amended) and by the Declaration of FAIRFAX
VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II dated November 11, 1974 and
recorded January 1, 1974 as Instrument No. 7400025603 among
the land records of the District of Columbia; and those certain
By-Laws of FAIRFAX VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II dated November
11, 1974 and recorded January 1, 1974 as Instrument No.
7400025603 among the aforementioned, and by Plat recorded
in Liber 3, Folio 4, in the Office of the Surveyor of the District
of Columbia, and in accordance with Public Law 90-566 and
D.C. Code 42-1903.13 (as amended), notice filed October 25,
2017, we shall sell at public auction on November 28, 2017 at
10:04 A.M., at the office of Alex Cooper, 5301 Wisconsin Ave.,
NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20015, the following premises:
Condominium Unit 2128 Suitland Terrace, SE, Unit 202, Washington, DC 20020, assessed and taxed as Lot 2171 in Square
5672, in the FAIRFAX VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II, a condominium
regime instituted and established under the Condominium Act
of 1976 of the District of Columbia and via the Declaration
and By-Laws identified above, together with an undivided
interest in the general common elements and any and all
interest in the limited common elements appurtenant to said
Condominium Unit as noted in the Declaration of FAIRFAX
VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II,
aid Condominium 2128 Suitland Terrace, SE, Unit 202, Washington, DC 20020, is a portion of the condominium known as
FAIRFAX VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II, and is the same property
conveyed to Erin J. Matthews by Deed recorded with the District
of Columbia Recorder of Deeds on March 23, 2006 as Instrument
No. 2006038312.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold subject to any prior
liens, encumbrances, and/or municipal assessments if any, but
NOT subject to the first mortgage lien. Pursuant to the District
of Columbia Code Section 42-1903.13, the Condominium is
foreclosing on six months’ worth of assessments and the
related fees and costs, and thus the sale is NOT subject to
the first deed of trust. The Condominium’s lien on which the
foreclosure is proceeding holds a higher priority than the lien
created by the first deed of trust and if the foreclosure sale
generates insufficient proceeds to satisfy any prior liens, the
foreclosure sale will extinguish the lien created by the prior
deeds of trust or other liens.
It is solely the purchaser's responsibility to determine the condo
fees obligations, priority, significance, and effect on auction sale.
The property is sold as-is as to conditions and occupancy. A
deposit of $10,000 will be required at time of sale, such deposit
to be in cash or certified check. All conveyances, recordings,
recordation tax, transfer tax, etc. at purchaser's cost. The
balance of the purchase price, together with interest at the
rate of 10% per annum from date of sale to date of receipt
of the balance of the purchase price, must be paid in cash
or by cashier's or certified check and all other terms to be
complied with by purchaser within 30 days, otherwise deposit
is forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and resold at the discretion of the Unit Owner's Association and
at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. Association
shall convey a deed pursuant to 42 D.C. Code 1903.13 as
amended, and makes no further representations or warranties
as to title. The Association cannot guarantee clear title or the
purchaser's ability to obtain Title Insurance. The purchaser may
not be able to obtain financing and must be able to pay the
purchase balance in any case within 30 days. The 30 day period
may be extended for any reason at the sole discretion of the
Association. In the event of failure on the part of the Association
to convey such deed purchaser's sole remedies shall be the
return of the deposit.
Brian R. Fellner, Nagle & Zaller, P.C.
7226 Lee Deforest Drive, Suite 102, Columbia, MD 21046
(410) 740-8100 x110 / brian@naglezaller.com
Attorney for FAIRFAX VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II
Washington Post
Nov. 17, 22, 27, 2017
12142633
840
840
Trustees Sale - DC
850
Trustees Sale - DC
ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.
5301 WISCONSIN AVE. NW, #750
WASH., DC 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
FORECLOSURE SALE OF CONDOMINIUM UNIT 2126 Suitland Terrace, SE, Unit 102, Washington, DC 20020
Pursuant to District of Columbia Condominium Act of 1976,
Section 313 (as amended) and by the Declaration of FAIRFAX
VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II dated November 11, 1974 and
recorded January 1, 1974 as Instrument No. 7400025603 among
the land records of the District of Columbia; and those certain
By-Laws of FAIRFAX VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II dated November
11, 1974 and recorded January 1, 1974 as Instrument No.
7400025603 among the aforementioned, and by Plat recorded
in Liber 3, Folio 4, in the Office of the Surveyor of the District
of Columbia, and in accordance with Public Law 90-566 and
D.C. Code 42-1903.13 (as amended), notice filed October 25,
2017, we shall sell at public auction on November 28, 2017 at
10:02 A.M., at the office of Alex Cooper, 5301 Wisconsin Ave.,
NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20015, the following premises:
Condominium Unit 2126 Suitland Terrace, SE, Unit 102, Washington, DC 20020, assessed and taxed as Lot 2163 in Square
5672, in the FAIRFAX VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II, a condominium
regime instituted and established under the Condominium Act
of 1976 of the District of Columbia and via the Declaration
and By-Laws identified above, together with an undivided
interest in the general common elements and any and all
interest in the limited common elements appurtenant to said
Condominium Unit as noted in the Declaration of FAIRFAX
VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II,
Said Condominium 2126 Suitland Terrace, SE, Unit 102, Washington, DC 20020, is a portion of the condominium known as
FAIRFAX VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II, and is the same property
conveyed to Lafonda Tolson by Deed recorded with the District
of Columbia Recorder of Deeds on March 31, 2005 as Instrument
No. 2005044716.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold subject to any
prior liens, encumbrances, and/or municipal assessments if any,
INCLUDING subject to the first mortgage lien.
It is solely the purchaser's responsibility to determine the condo
fees obligations, priority, significance, and effect on auction sale.
The property is sold as-is as to conditions and occupancy. A
deposit of $10,000 will be required at time of sale, such deposit
to be in cash or certified check. All conveyances, recordings,
recordation tax, transfer tax, etc. at purchaser's cost. The
balance of the purchase price, together with interest at the
rate of 10% per annum from date of sale to date of receipt
of the balance of the purchase price, must be paid in cash
or by cashier's or certified check and all other terms to be
complied with by purchaser within 30 days, otherwise deposit
is forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and resold at the discretion of the Unit Owner's Association and
at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. Association
shall convey a deed pursuant to 42 D.C. Code 1903.13 as
amended, and makes no further representations or warranties
as to title. The Association cannot guarantee clear title or the
purchaser's ability to obtain Title Insurance. The purchaser may
not be able to obtain financing and must be able to pay the
purchase balance in any case within 30 days. The 30 day period
may be extended for any reason at the sole discretion of the
Association. In the event of failure on the part of the Association
to convey such deed purchaser's sole remedies shall be the
return of the deposit.
Brian R. Fellner, Nagle & Zaller, P.C.
7226 Lee Deforest Drive, Suite 102, Columbia, MD 21046
(410) 740-8100 x110 / brian@naglezaller.com
Attorney for FAIRFAX VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II
Washington Post
Nov. 17, 22, 27, 2017
12142630
ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.
5301 WISCONSIN AVE. NW, #750
WASH., DC 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
FORECLOSURE SALE OF CONDOMINIUM UNIT 3916 Southern Ave.,
SE, Washington, DC 20020
Pursuant to District of Columbia Condominium Act of 1976,
Section 313 (as amended) and by the Declaration of FAIRFAX
VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II dated November 11, 1974 and
recorded January 1, 1974 as Instrument No. 7400025603 among
the land records of the District of Columbia; and those certain
By-Laws of FAIRFAX VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II dated November
11, 1974 and recorded January 1, 1974 as Instrument No.
7400025603 among the aforementioned, and by Plat recorded
in Liber 3, Folio 4, in the Office of the Surveyor of the District
of Columbia, and in accordance with Public Law 90-566 and
D.C. Code 42-1903.13 (as amended), notice filed October 25,
2017, we shall sell at public auction on November 28, 2017 at
10:00 A.M., at the office of Alex Cooper, 5301 Wisconsin Ave.,
NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20015, the following premises:
Condominium Unit 3916 Southern Ave., SE, Washington, DC
20020, assessed and taxed as Lot 2192 in Square 5672, in
the FAIRFAX VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II, a condominium regime
instituted and established under the Condominium Act of 1976
of the District of Columbia and via the Declaration and ByLaws identified above, together with an undivided interest in the
general common elements and any and all interest in the limited
common elements appurtenant to said Condominium Unit as
noted in the Declaration of FAIRFAX VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II,
Said Condominium 3916 Southern Ave., SE, Washington, DC
20020, is a portion of the condominium known as FAIRFAX
VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II, and is the same property conveyed
to Perla Nino by Deed recorded with the District of Columbia
Recorder of Deeds on August 8, 1991 as Instrument No.
9100040101.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold subject to any
prior liens, encumbrances, and/or municipal assessments if any,
INCLUDING subject to the first mortgage lien.
It is solely the purchaser's responsibility to determine the condo
fees obligations, priority, significance, and effect on auction sale.
The property is sold as-is as to conditions and occupancy. A
deposit of $10,000 will be required at time of sale, such deposit
to be in cash or certified check. All conveyances, recordings,
recordation tax, transfer tax, etc. at purchaser's cost. The
balance of the purchase price, together with interest at the
rate of 10% per annum from date of sale to date of receipt
of the balance of the purchase price, must be paid in cash
or by cashier's or certified check and all other terms to be
complied with by purchaser within 30 days, otherwise deposit
is forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and resold at the discretion of the Unit Owner's Association and
at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. Association
shall convey a deed pursuant to 42 D.C. Code 1903.13 as
amended, and makes no further representations or warranties
as to title. The Association cannot guarantee clear title or the
purchaser's ability to obtain Title Insurance. The purchaser may
not be able to obtain financing and must be able to pay the
purchase balance in any case within 30 days. The 30 day period
may be extended for any reason at the sole discretion of the
Association. In the event of failure on the part of the Association
to convey such deed purchaser's sole remedies shall be the
return of the deposit.
Brian R. Fellner, Nagle & Zaller, P.C.
7226 Lee Deforest Drive, Suite 102, Columbia, MD 21046
(410) 740-8100 x110 / brian@naglezaller.com
Attorney for FAIRFAX VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM II
Washington Post
Nov. 17, 22, 27, 2017
12142626
851
851
Prince Georges County
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ESTATE OF GILBERT E SAUNDERS
C/O MARK SAUNDERS
(SUCCESSOR) PER REP
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-12467
NOTICE
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 3513
Mullin Ln, Bowie, MD 20715, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 7th day of December,
2017.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 155
Potomac Passage, UNIT 622, Oxon
Hill, MD 20745, and reported in the
above entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 6th day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 6th
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $302,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142572
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
vs.
WILLIE S BAILEY
IDA M LUMPKIN A/K/A
IDA M BAILEY
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-35870
NOTICE
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $340,480.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142569
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
COULD YOU USE
SOME EXTRA CASH?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054B 2x2
Montgomery County
850
EZ
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13705 Modrad Way, Unit 33
Silver Spring, MD 20904
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
SAMIHA MUHAMMAD, dated May 22, 2008 and recorded
in Liber 35771, folio 520 among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.414026V; Tax ID
No.05-02771718 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $22,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 559161)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11800 Old Georgetown Road #1533
North Bethesda, MD 20852
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
GABRIEL ROMERO, dated October 25, 2010 and recorded
in Liber 40423, folio 322 among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.416868V; Tax ID
No.04-03546840 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $39,700.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 568449)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. AUGUST,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142534 NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142537
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
611 Whetstone Glen Street
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from STELLA
BROWN, dated June 23, 2006 and recorded in Liber 32900,
folio 263 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case
docketed as Case No.433940V; Tax ID No.09-03547285 ) the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $21,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
PURCHASER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO AN IRS RIGHT OF REDEMPTION. Balance of the
purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 556271)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
BRIAN THOMAS,
KHALID D. WALKER,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
12609 Hill Creek Lane
Potomac, MD 20854
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
LEONARD JAIGOBIN AND RAJDULARI S. JAIGOBIN, dated
January 10, 2007 and recorded in Liber 33742, folio 652
among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.434197V; Tax ID No.06-03432402 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 577380)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142413 NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
12144713
D10
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3210 N. Leisure World Blvd., Unit 311
Silver Spring, MD 20906
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
MARILYNN P. FAUST, dated October 9, 2012 and recorded
in Liber 45255, folio 224 among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.435309V; Tax ID
No.13-0334446 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $20,900.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 578279)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
864 College Parkway, Unit 101,
Rockville, MD 20850
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to DENNIS F. HARDIMAN, Trustee(s),
dated December 20, 2012, and recorded among the Land
Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
45986, folio 209, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED FEBRUARY 1, 2013 IN LIBER 45986, FOLIO
209.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (54906)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
12140003
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
12144281
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
23723 CLARKSMEAD DRIVE
CLARKSBURG, MD 20871
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE SERVICES, INC. ,
Trustee(s), dated December 27, 2006, and recorded among the
Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
33592, folio 200, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT 26 IN BLOCK "O" AS SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED,
"LOTS 29 THROUGH 53 AND PARCEL A & D, BLOCK 'F', LOTS
9 THROUGH 24 AND PARCEL A, BLOCK 'O', CLARKSBURG
TOWN CENTER" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED PLAT
22228
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of
the purchase price with interest at 6.375% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (55486)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9240 Three Oaks Drive
Silver Spring, MD 20901
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to RECON TRUST COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated
October 19, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35001, folio
594, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-THREE (33) IN BLOCK LETTERED
"C" IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION SEVEN (7),
SLIGO PARK HILLS" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 90 AT PLAT 9730
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 5% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (30944)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
12140001
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
12140008
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HOLDING UP?
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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2017
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6306 BROOKE JANE DR.
CLINTON, MD 20735
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
7418 PARKWOOD ST.
HYATTSVILLE, MD 20784
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Bruce
Edwards Phillips and Pamerly G. Phillips dated April 20, 2004 and recorded
in Liber 23078, folio 123 among the Land Records of Prince George's
County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's
County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance,
located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:55 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Gregorio
Ceja a/k/a Gregorio G. Ceja dated November 27, 2006 and recorded in
Liber 26693, folio 706 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Jesse
Dupree, Jr. dated April 7, 2004 and recorded in Liber 19465, folio 96 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:51 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-0916031.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-0188094.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #15-1724590.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $15,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66555.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
9102 GRANDHAVEN AVE.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $21,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 57789.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12138329
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12140457
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13004 MARQUETTE LA.
BOWIE, MD 20715
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
7403 HAWTHORNE ST.
HYATTSVILLE, MD 20785
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Joemade
Scott-Carter a/k/a Joemade P. Scott-Carter dated April 17, 2015 and
recorded in Liber 36988, folio 91 among the Land Records of Prince
George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince
George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing
entrance, located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 12, 2017 AT 10:43 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Burnett
Dockery dated August 23, 2007 and recorded in Liber 29151, folio 292
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:52 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #14-1612472.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66497.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 22, Nov 29 & Dec 6
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65175.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 8, Nov 15 & Nov 22
12139683
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
204 JOHNSBERG LA.
BOWIE, MD 20721
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Pamella
Sharpe dated November 20, 2013 and recorded in Liber 35502, folio 572
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
NOVEMBER 28, 2017 AT 10:49 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-0673210.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $27,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66858.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 8, Nov 15 & Nov 22
12139692
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3217 SYCAMORE LA.
SUITLAND, MD 20746
3540 EDWARDS ST.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20774
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Marsha
E. Jackson and Frederick T. Jackson dated May 23, 2007 and recorded in
Liber 28972, folio 496 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 12, 2017 AT 10:46 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-0771386.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $89,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 39275.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
12143086
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Dorothy
McClendon, Fred D. Brown, as Remainderman and Harold T. McClendon,
as Remainderman dated April 26, 2007 and recorded in Liber 27738, folio
294 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main
St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.),
on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #20-2233906.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $34,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68846.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12140479
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13009 BELLE MEADE TRACE
BOWIE, MD 20720
10333 HALTON TERR.
LANHAM, MD 20706
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Mary
Akisanya and Sunday Akisanya dated January 31, 2005 and recorded in
Liber 21509, folio 123 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Angelina
Ogu and Longinus Ogu dated January 12, 2007 and recorded in Liber
26878, folio 636 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 12, 2017 AT 10:44 AM
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:49 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-3530672.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #20-2283182.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $66,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $84,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 22230.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 47595.
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 22, Nov 29 & Dec 6
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64586.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
12140460
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2407 BERMONDSEY DR.
BOWIE, MD 20721
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 22, Nov 29 & Dec 6
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #13-3237468.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
NOVEMBER 28, 2017 AT 10:48 AM
12142641
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
legalnotices@washpost.com
851
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12141677
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12140884
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Herbert
Castro and Esperanza Castro dated April 25, 2005 and recorded in Liber
22205, folio 636 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
NOVEMBER 28, 2017 AT 10:47 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-0513861.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 63172.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 8, Nov 15 & Nov 22
12139997
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8477 GREENBELT RD., UNIT #T2
GREENBELT, MD 20770
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Patrice
A. Mathews dated August 26, 2005 and recorded in Liber 23284, folio 703
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:54 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD
and described as Unit Numbered 8477-T2 Greenbelt Road of plan of
condominium entitled "Chelsea Wood Condominium" and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #21-2303881.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66064.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12139289
851
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #18-2046399.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66149.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 8, Nov 15 & Nov 22
12139176
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
6743 VILLAGE PARK DR.
GREENBELT, MD 20770
NOVEMBER 28, 2017 AT 10:50 AM
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66534.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 8, Nov 15 & Nov 22
12139174
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
413 CLOVIS AVE.
CAPITOL HEIGHTS, MD 20743
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Mathew
Keel, Jr. dated September 8, 2006 and recorded in Liber 26361, folio 537
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:48 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #18-2055507.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $28,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 58800.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12141160
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9406 BRANDYWINE RD.
CLINTON, MD 20735
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Rolando V.
Lee dated February 8, 2007 and recorded in Liber 27487, folio 377 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:53 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-0868901.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 58742.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12139286
Anne Arundel County
852
D11
Anne Arundel County
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Francis
Hunte and Donovan Johnson dated May 25, 2007 and recorded in Liber
27949, folio 403 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
NOVEMBER 28, 2017 AT 10:54 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Norma
J. Young and Charles J. Young dated April 22, 2008 and recorded in Liber
20190, folio 72 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the
Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
NOVEMBER 28, 2017 AT 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-3636008.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $76,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 55986.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 8, Nov 15 & Nov 22
12139100
Prince Georges County
851
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ABESS NASRALLA
ALBERTA M NASRALLA
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-43764
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 13002
Bay Hill Drive, Beltsville, MD 20705,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 6th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 6th day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $763,703.73.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142567
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
JOSEPH JENKINS, JR A/K/A JOSEPH
JENKINS JR
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-43765
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 5204
Church Road, Bowie, MD 20720,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 6th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 6th day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $357,200.00.
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ANTHONY H PHIPPS
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-03325
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 16308
Baden Westwood Road, Brandywine, MD 20613, and reported in
the above entitled cause, will be
finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
6th day of December, 2017 next;
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post,
1150 15th Street, Washington, DC,
MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 6th
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $218,450.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142565
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
JOHN N TAYLOR
MARION S TAYLOR
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF15-09178
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 6618
Horseshoe Rd, Clinton, MD 20735,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 6th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 6th day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $496,789.23.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142568
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
BERNARD HERMAN JAMES
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14108
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 7314
15th Pl, Takoma Park, MD 20912,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 7th day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $270,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142574
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
DENETTA M JAMES
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14812
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 7209
Cross Street, UNIT 7209, District
Heights, MD 20747, and reported
in the above entitled cause, will
be finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
7th day of December, 2017 next;
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in THE WASHINGTON
POST, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
three successive weeks before the
7th day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $123,378.20.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142575
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #21-2819548.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $31,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
852
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
28 JUMPERS HOLE RD.
MILLERSVILLE, MD 21108
851
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Wilma
Denise Lee dated December 21, 2006 and recorded in Liber 27623, folio
185 and re-recorded in Liber 30095, folio 288 among the Land Records
of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772
(Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
14617 ARGOS PL.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20774
6712 DRYLOG ST.
CAPITOL HEIGHTS, MD 20743
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Kennise
Foster dated June 19, 2008 and recorded in Liber 29911, folio 86 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
NOVEMBER 28, 2017 AT 10:52 AM
851
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
852
12142566
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
John E. Driscoll, III, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Darrell A. Holtz
Defendant
No . C-02-CV-17-001720
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Tuesday, November 14, 2017, that the
sale of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Robert A. Jones, Substitute
Trustee
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 14th day
of December 2017 next, provided
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive
weeks on or before the 14th day
of December 2017 next. The report
states the amount of sale of the
property at 9 LEEWARD COURT,
ANNAPOLIS, MD 21403 to be
$231,374.00
Robert P Duckworth
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Anne Arundel County, MD
Nov 22, 29, Dec 6, 2017
12144186
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
John E. Driscoll, III, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Edward L. Vasquez
Defendants
No . C-02-CV-16-003480
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Tuesday, November 7, 2017, that the sale
of the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported by
Robert A. Jones, Substitute Trustee
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 7th day
of December 2017 next, provided
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive
weeks on or before the 7th day
of December 2017 next. The report
states the amount of sale of the
property at 510 Imperial Square,
Odenton,
MD. 21113 to be
$149,000.00
Robert P Duckworth
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Anne Arundel County, MD
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142781
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #03-793-90212748.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $31,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 61818.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Nov 8, Nov 15 & Nov 22
12139173
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1496 MARA VISTA CT., UNIT #112
CROFTON, MD 21114
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Alice M.
De Seve dated March 13, 2006 and recorded in Liber 17637, folio 1 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and
described as Unit 112XC, in Building B, as set forth in "Declaration
Establishing a Plan for condominium Ownership of Crofton Mews Condominium No. 1" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Tax ID #02-208-90005863.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $12,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68086.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12141159
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
657 CADBURY DRIVE
ODENTON, MD 21113
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to LESLIE J. KEIDEL, Trustee(s), dated
May 21, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26281, folio
0386, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH
CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 22A, BLOCK L, AS SHOWN UPON THE PLAT OF MAPLE
RIDGE, SECTION NO. 3, AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, IN PLAT BOOK 32,
FOLIO 68.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (45429)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
12140984
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
748 MILLHOUSE DRIVE
GLEN BURNIE, MD 21060
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust, dated August 26, 2015, and recorded among
the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 28783, folio 291, RE-RECORDED ON JUNE 15,
2016 IN LIBER 29700 AND FOLIO 371, the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401 ON,
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED SEPTEMBER 8, 2015 IN LIBER 28783, FOLIO
291.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (46621)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
853
853
Calvert County
Calvert County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11730 MILL BRIDGE RD.
LUSBY, MD 20657
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Sylvester
R. Phillips and Theo Phillips dated November 11, 2009 and recorded in
Liber 3428, folio 221 among the Land Records of Calvert County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Calvert County, at the Court
House Door, 175 Main St., Prince Frederick, MD 20678, on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 3:31 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Calvert County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-020625.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $28,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Calvert County. Interest to
be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the
Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64808.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12141679
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
241 LAUREL DR.
LUSBY, MD 20657
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Ethel M.
Long and Laronda Willett dated April 25, 2008 and recorded in Liber 3163,
folio 450 among the Land Records of Calvert County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Calvert County, at the Court House Door,
175 Main St., Prince Frederick, MD 20678, on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 3:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Calvert County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-055461.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $39,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Calvert County. Interest to
be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the
Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 53184.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12141678
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
7106 Oberlin Circle
Frederick, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
TIMOTHY MICHAEL MESZAROS AND MEGAN R. SHULZ,
dated May 7, 2010 and recorded in Liber 7869, folio 0301
among the Land Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.10C14003292; Tax ID No.28-572603 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the FREDERICK COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK,
MD 21701, on
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 1:15 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $21,500.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 548055)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
529 Bay Dale Court
Arnold, MD 21012
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to BRYAN D. LESLIE, Trustee(s), dated August
7, 2015, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28710, folio 438, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401 ON,
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
UNIT 20, BUILDING 2, PHASE 3, PLAT NUMBER 1, SECTION 2,
AS SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED, BAY HILLS TOWNHOUSES,
OAKMONT, SECTION 2, PLAT 1, AND RECORDED IN THE LAND
RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, IN PLAT BOOK E22,
FOLIO 13.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.99% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
www.hwestauctions.com
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
NOVEMBER
22,
29,
DECEMBER
6, 2017
12142095
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (54773)
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
1-800-753-POST
SF
www.hwestauctions.com
If only you had home delivery. A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
1-800-753-POST SF NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
12142050
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x2
12142412
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2017
OPQRS
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
856
857
Frederick County
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142407
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
S0833-1 6x2
GREENSPOONMARDER, P.A.
ORLANS PC
10015 OLD COLUMBIA ROAD, SUITE B-215
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
COLUMBIA, MD 21046
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
509 Postoak Road
11808 PINE TREE COURT
Frederick, MD 21703
MONROVIA, MD 21770
Under
a
power
of
sale
contained in a Deed of Trust from MARY
DECEMBER 8, 2017 AT 1:00 PM
A. PERE AND WILFRED M. PERE, dated October 17, 2008 and
By virtue of a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from recorded in Liber 7105, folio 0082 among the Land Records of
SHAWN M. LYLES AND FRANCES A. LYLES, dated JANUARY FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
17, 2006, and recorded in the Land Records of Frederick (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.10C17001906; Tax ID
County, Maryland, at Liber 5861, Folio 731, default having No.02-089971 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustee will sell at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W.
at public auction, at the front of the Frederick County courthouse PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
located at 100 W. Patrick Street, Frederick, MD. All that FEE
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 1:15 PM
SIMPLE lot of ground and the improvements thereon, situated in
Frederick County and being more fully described in the aforesaid ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
Deed of Trust.
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
ALL THAT PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE, LYING described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
AND BEING IN FREDERICK COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND, The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS TO WIT: BEGINNING FOR THE conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
SAME AT THE REAR NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 6, NEW same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
MARKET VIEW, A PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK Terms of Sale: A deposit $19,000.00 will be required at the
4, PLAT NO. 49, THENCE WITH THE NORTH SIDE OF LOT 6; 1. time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
N 60 DEGREES 48’ 07” W -310.36 FEET TO A POINT ON PINE CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
TREE COURT, THENCE WITH SAID COURT; 2. 45.00 FEET ON of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
115.51 FEET, CHORD N 45 DEGREES 25’ 50” W-44.72 FEET, COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
THENCE LEAVING SAID COURT AND RUNNING WITH LIBER purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
1076 AT FOLIO 415 THE TWO FOLLOWING COURSES AND property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
DISTANCES; 3. N 61 DEGREES 39’ 16” E - 727.66 FEET, The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
THENCE; 4. S 50 DEGREES 49’ 18” E - 72.00 FEET, THENCE; first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
5. S 39 DEGREES 10’ 42” W - 622.80 FEET TO THE PLACE OF provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
BEGINNING, CONTAINING 3.10 ACRES OF LAND.
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
THE PROPERTY IS BEING SOLD SUBJECT TO A 120 DAY sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
RIGHT OF REDEMPTION BY THE IRS.
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the loan shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered into by including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale is void which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without interest. purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
Purchaser must obtain possession and assumes risk of loss or from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
damage to the property from the date of the auction forward.
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
The property will be sold in an “as is” condition, without express any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
or implied warranty as to the nature and description of the for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
improvements as contained herein, and subject to conditions a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, but above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
omitting any covenant or restriction based on race, color, execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, if any, prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
and with no warranty of any kind.
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,000.00 by cash, certified and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
check or cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser, if without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
other than the note holder, at time and place of sale, balance transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
in immediately available funds upon final ratification of sale water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
by the Circuit Court for Frederick County, Maryland, interest to dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
be paid at the rate of 12.5% on unpaid purchase money from basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
date of sale to date of settlement. The secured party herein, if applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit. Third party thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
purchaser (excluding the secured party) will be required to for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
complete full settlement of the purchase of the property within assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
TWENTY (20) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification of the sale of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser’s deposit shall be insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
of the defaulting purchaser. All other public charges and private deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
rent, taxes, if any, to be adjusted to date of sale. Cost of is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 578413)
all documentary stamps and transfer taxes and all other costs
JAMES E. CLARKE,
incident to the settlement shall be borne by the purchaser. If
RENEE DYSON,
applicable, condominium and/or homeowner association dues
HUGH J. GREEN,
and assessments due pursuant to Md. Real Property Article
SHANNON MENAPACE,
11-110 and those that may become due after the time of
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Purchaser must
BRIAN THOMAS,
obtain possession and assumes the risk of loss or damage to
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
the property from the date of sale forward. If the sale is
rescinded or not ratified for any reason, including post sale
lender audit, or the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey good
and marketable title, or a resale is to take place for any reason,
the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to a
refund of the aforementioned deposit. The purchaser waives all
www.hwestauctions.com
rights and claims against the Substitute Trustee whether known
12142405
or unknown. These provisions shall survive settlement. Upon NOVEMBER 15, 22, 28 2017
857
refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect, 857 Howard County
Howard County
and the purchaser shall have no further claim against Substitute
ORLANS PC
Trustee. The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
the loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
LEESBURG,
VA 20175
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
703-777-7101
is void and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, may be
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
announced at the time and date of sale. (File #41145.0066 /
10C16001949)
7204 Old Friendship Way
Elkridge, MD 21075
Erin M. Shaffer,
Substitute Trustee
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
SENITHEA R. HILLIARD, dated January 25, 2008 and recorded
in Liber 11148, folio 646 among the Land Records of HOWARD
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.13C16110069; Tax ID No.01298763 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
12142086 COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 11:15 AM
ORLANS PC
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
LEESBURG, VA 20175
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
3755 Maplecrest Drive
Knoxville, MD 21758
Terms of Sale: A deposit $26,800.00 will be required at the
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from BONNIE time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
J. TEAGUE AND GARY A. TEAGUE, dated March 13, 2009 and BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
recorded in Liber 7443, folio 0216 among the Land Records of Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.10C16002833; Tax ID HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
No.12-297203 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W. property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 1:15 PM
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
Terms of Sale: A deposit $29,000.00 will be required at the from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
PURCHASER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT THE PROPERTY IS SUB- any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
JECT TO AN IRS RIGHT OF REDEMPTION. Balance of the for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK COUNTY. above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the purchaser execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property shall prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. The purchaser knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
waives personal service and accepts service by first class mail and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
and certified mail addressed to the address provided by said without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property.In dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, including, but applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus which may arise thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
date of sale to the date funds are received by the Substitute of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or any law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed for deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes a for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 568764)
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
JAMES E. CLARKE,
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
RENEE DYSON,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
HUGH J. GREEN,
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
SHANNON
MENAPACE,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
KHALID D. WALKER,
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
BRIAN
THOMAS,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
www.hwestauctions.com
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
12144274
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 572814)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know.
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
(And your subscription up-to-date.)
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
857
Howard County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
873
Prince William County
873
Prince William County
Southbridge Plaza
17165, 17171 and 17247 Wayside Drive
Dumfries, Virginia 22026
Tax ID Nos. 8289-36-2339; 8289-36-4320 and 8289-35-3480
7857 MARIOAK DR.
ELKRIDGE, MD 21075
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Paul A.
Myers and Tiffany F. Myers n/k/a Tiffany Fuchsia Flannigan dated May 29,
2009 and recorded in Liber 11838, folio 245 among the Land Records of
Howard County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction, AUCTION SALE TO BE HELD AT THE
THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD 21045, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 AT 9:31 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-198068.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $21,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66111.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 8, Nov 15 & Nov 22
12139172
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
7944 PETTIGREW STREET
Elkridge, MD 21075
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LYNDE SELDON, Trustee(s), dated May 27,
2015, and recorded among the Land Records of HOWARD
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 16270, folio 525, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX
ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
DECEMBER 8, 2017 at 12:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 108, IN
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT OF RE-SUBDIVISION
BLUE STREAM LOTS 1-125, OPEN SPACE LOTS 126 & 127
AND BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL J-1, A RE-SUBDIVISION
OF BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL J-2 "BLUE STREAM", PLATS
21737-21738, BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL K, "BLUE
STREAM", PLATS 21558-21564, AND EASEMENTS ON PARCEL J-1, "BLUE STREAM", PLATS 21737-21738", AS PER
PLATS THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT NOS. MDR 21981,
MDR 21984 AND MDR 21986.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $37,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.875% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-05601)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson,
Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
In execution of a Deed of Trust and Security Agreement from
Premier Southbridge, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company,
as successor-in-interest to Southbridge Commercial Property LLC
(the “Borrower”), dated as of October 24, 2006, recorded in the
Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court of Prince William County, Virginia
(the “Clerk’s Office”) as Instrument No. 200610240151846 (the
“Deed of Trust”), the undersigned Substitute Trustees, either of
whom may act, will offer the Property (as defined in the Deed
of Trust) for sale at public auction at the front entrance of the
Prince William County Judicial Center located at 9311 Lee Avenue,
Manassas, Virginia 20110 on Friday, December 8, 2017, at 11:30
a.m. (the “Date of Sale”), consisting of the land identified by the tax
parcel numbers referenced above located in Prince William County,
Virginia, and all improvements thereon, including the two buildings
located thereon, and all other rights, easements and appurtenances
benefiting and\or burdening the Property (collectively, the “Land
and Improvements”), and together with all of the Substitute
Trustees’ right, title and interest in and to, at the direction of
the Noteholder (as hereinafter defined), all fixtures and items of
personal property, if any, described in the Deed of Trust, and further
described as “Collateral” under the Financing Statement perfecting
the Noteholder’s interest therein filed with the Delaware Department
of State as File Number 2008-0864684 (collectively, the “Personal
Property”); provided, however, that fixtures and other personal
property of tenants-in-possession, if any, are not included in this
sale except to the extent of the Borrower’s interest therein. The
Land and Improvements and the Personal Property are hereinafter
referred to collectively as the “Property”. Reference is made to the
Deed of Trust for the exact legal description by which the Land and
Improvements will be conveyed by the Substitute Trustee.
Terms: ALL CASH except that, subject to the requirements of
Section 55-59.4 of the Code of Virginia, 1950, as amended, the
holder of the note secured by the Deed of Trust (the “Noteholder”)
shall be entitled to apply any of the debt secured by the Deed
of Trust as a credit to the successful bid for the Property (the
“Sales Price”). To participate in the bidding for the Property, a
deposit in the amount of $300,000 (the “Deposit”), in cash or
a certified or cashier’s check payable (or endorsed) to either of
the Substitute Trustees, will be required at the date of sale (other
than from the Noteholder). The balance of the Sales Price shall
be paid in cash, wired funds or by certified or cashier’s check, at
settlement, to be held no later than twenty-one (21) days after the
Date of Sale at the office of the Substitute Trustees (the “Date of
Settlement”), TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE. To those who provided
the Deposit to the Substitute Trustees but were not the successful
bidder, the Substitute Trustees will return such deposit promptly
after completion of the bidding. The Substitute Trustees reserve
the unilateral right, among other rights reserved to the Substitute
Trustees as provided in a Memorandum of Sale and Deposit Receipt
(the “Memo of Sale”) further described below, to waive the Deposit
required to participate in the auction as to any registered bidder or
to cancel the sale at any time.
All closing costs, other than preparation of the deed (which shall be
paid out of the proceeds of sale), shall be borne by the successful
bidder, including the grantor’s tax on the deed (unless the Noteholder
is the successful bidder). Real estate taxes shall be prorated to the
Date of Sale and the successful bidder will also be obligated to add
to its successful bid amount any real estate taxes and storm water
fees, if any, that have been paid for the period from the Date of
Sale through the end of the calendar or fiscal year, as applicable.
The Land and Improvements shall be conveyed by special warranty
deed and the Personal Property shall be conveyed by bill of sale,
without warranty. The risk of loss or damage to the Property by
condemnation, fire or other casualty shall be borne by the successful
bidder from the acceptance of the Deposit on the Date of Sale.
Delivery of physical possession of the Property will not be performed
by the Substitute Trustees but will be the responsibility of the
successful bidder.
The successful bidder will be deemed to have accepted (and
required to execute) a Memo of Sale concerning the purchase of
the Property, a copy of which will be made available for review upon
request to the information contact person below or immediately
before announcing the sale of the Property on the Date of Sale.
Bidders should be sure to request and review a copy of the
Memo of Sale which contains additional terms and conditions of
the sale and important disclaimers, which terms, conditions and
disclaimers are incorporated into this Advertisement as if fully set
forth herein. The Substitute Trustees were substituted by Deed of
Appointment of Substitute Trustees dated as of September 6, 2015,
and recorded in the Clerk’s Office on May 4, 2016, as Instrument No.
201605040032565.
David L. Lingerfelt, Esq.
Substitute Trustees
c/o Setliff & Holland
4940 Dominion Boulevard
Glen Allen, VA 23060
Telephone: 804-377-1277
Stephen E. Scarce, Esq.
Substitute Trustee
c/o Parker Pollard Wilton & Peaden,
P.C.
6802 Paragon Place, Suite 300
Richmond, Virginia 23230
Telephone: 804-261-7308
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Matthew P. Rash, Esquire
McGuireWoods LLP
800 East Canal Street
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Telephone Number: (804) 775-4300
November 19, 20, 21, 22, 2017
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of LOT ONE
HUNDRED EIGHT-EIGHT (188), DEER PARK, AS THE SAME APPEARS DULY
DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED IN INSTRUMENT NO. 635 AT PAGE
968, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
November 22, 29, 2017
12142022
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
12735 Crossman Creek Way,
Bristow, VA 20136
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 41,
CROSSMAN CREEK, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and
recorded in Instrument No. 200303110044512, among the Land Records
of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
November 15, 22, 2017
12141542
Clarke County
111 Honeysuckle Lane,
Bluemont, VA 20135
www.hwestauctions.com
873
Prince William County
873
12140508
Prince William County
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
dated November 22, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number
200612120172688 in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $240,000.00. The
appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer
for sale at public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
December 13, 2017 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 118,
Section 2, West Gate of Lomond, as the same appears duly dedicated,
platted and recorded in Deed Book 95 at Page 369, among the Land
Records of Prince William County, City of Manassas, VA, and as more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
November 22, 29, 2017
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
November 25, 2006, and recorded in Deed Book 471, Page 487 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Clarke County, VA, securing a loan
which was originally $189,000.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE,
Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at main
entrance of the Circuit Court for Clarke County located at 102 N. Church
Street Berryville, VA 22611-0189 on:
December 14, 2017 at 11:00 AM
Improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of THE
FOLLOWING DESCRIBED REAL PROPERTY SITUATE IN THE CITY OF BLUEMONT, COUNTY OF CLARKE, AND COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, TO WIT:
LOTS 9, 10 AND 11, BLOCK 4, UNIT 1, AS SHOWN ON PLAT DATED MARCH
5, 1952 RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF CLARKE COUNTY IN DEED BOOK 41, PAGE 506 TAX ID#: 17A2-10-10;
17A2-10-11, and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
8151 Claremont Street,
Manassas, VA 20110
12143325
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
November 22, 29, 2017
Prince William County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
4410 Coventry Glen Drive
Woodbridge, VA 22192
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$880,000.00, dated May 4, 2007,
recorded among the land records
of the Circuit Court for Prince William County on May 10, 2007,
as
Instrument
Number
200705100056961, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on December
22, 2017 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Lot 1, COVENTRY GLEN, as the same appears
duly dedicated, platted and
recorded as Instrument number
200406090097389 and Plat as
Instrument
number
200406090097390, as confirmed
by
Instrument
number
200408180141494, among the
Land Records of Prince William
County, Virginia. Tax ID: 8193-352565.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $17,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: Conv/Conv (Trustee #
567412)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $162,500.00, dated October 13,
2005, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on October
20, 2005, as Instrument Number
200510200181318, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on December
22, 2017 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Condominium Unit No. 6-57, SOMERSET AT
WESTRIDGE, a Condominium, and
the limited common elements
appurtenant thereto, established
by Condominium Instruments
recorded September 16, 1988, in
Deed Book 1599 at Page 931,
among the land records of Prince
William County, Virginia. Tax ID:
8193-63-8038.01.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $10,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: Conv/FHLMC (Trustee #
580383)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0593
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
June 28, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200607050100102 and
a Loan Modification recorded on November 15, 2012 at Instrument Number
201211150110216, in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $622,000.00. The
appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer
for sale at public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
December 6, 2017 at 1:00 PM
874
November 22, 29, December 6, 2017
873
12144742
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated July
26, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200608030114926 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County, VA, securing
a loan which was originally $345,600.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction
at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
December 13, 2017 at 1:00 PM
12142637
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
11/22/2017, 11/29/2017 12144634
877
Spotsylvania County
12140048
MARYLAND
Roommates
BETHESDA/Tacoma Park- Bsmt/room.
$695+. Text or Call 301-717-2996
professionalexperts@gmail.com
CAPITAL HEIGHTS - Senior home to
share. Furn rooms. $600. + $300
SD W/D.Privacy sence. All utils incl.
Near Metro. N/S inside. 1 wk free.
Text/Call
202-568-0792
CAPITAL HEIGHTS- House to share,
Near Metro, $165-$185/wkly, male
pref. 301-537-5433 or 202-251-5441
FT. WASHINGTON - Large furnished
room, carpet, cable TV/wifi, N/S.
$150/wk + $100 dep. 301-919-5150
Germantown-furn1BR, all util incl, wifi, cable. 1st & last mo rent req move
in. 240-671-3783 or 301-916-8158
LANDOVER - room for rent
$500 + utilities,
Call Carla 240-355-9525
LANHAM- 1BR in house $700.
Bsmt $850. All util incl. 7304
Galileo Way. Call 240-997-3826
UPPER MARLBORO- A lovely SFH,
2 BR, $800 + utilities. free pkng.
Carla 240-355-9525
VIRGINIA
Roommates
FALLS CHURCH CITY - N/S, M, share
clean, quiet house near rtes 7&29,
unfurn. $750 incl util. 703-244-1942
SPRINGFIELD / FT. BELVOIR /
WOODBRIDGE - Responsible person
to share 3 bedroom house.
$630 util & cable incl. 703-919-4381
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
255
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
Acoustic Ceiling Tiles—$440, Winchester, VA, 540-664-3224 Armstrong Acoustical Ceiling Tile. New,
still in boxes. "Fine Fissured" (TM)
tongue + groove. BP 741. 520 sq. ft.
(13 boxes, 40 sq. ft./box). New cost
$900. Price is a bargain.
265
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
275
Merchandise Wanted
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
610
Dogs for Sale
AKC Silver Labs—$1200, 3Females, 4 weeks old, 540212-3549 or silverdragon
labs.weebly.com
Bichon Poo Puppies — Shots,
wormed, vet checked. Cream and
black with highlights. Hypoallergenic. Home raised with loving
attention. $650. (540) 222-6555
Brittany - AKC — Male, 6 wks, had 1st
health check & will have 2nd one.
Will make great family & hunting
dog. $900, 215-768-2131.Central VA.
Cane Corso — $800/OBO,
3 Months old beautiful blue/brindle
puppies looking for great forever
homes. Vet health check, shots, tails
docked & dewormed. Contact
Larnell Johnson 202-207-7410
CORSO MIXED PUPPIES
8.5 weeks old, 7 females, 2 males,
multi-colors, S/W. Ready to go.
$200. Call Mark 240-460-7009
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
8404 BROADMORE LANE,
SPOTSYLVANIA, VA 22553
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated October 28, 2010,
in the original principal amount
of $641,363.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 100019174 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Spotsylvania County,
9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia on December 21,
2017 , at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PARCEL OF TRACT OF LAND WITH ALL
RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES THERETO
APPURTENANT, AND ALL BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS THEREON, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING
IN COURTLAND MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, KNOWN AND DESCRIBED
AS LOT 69, SECTION TWO, SAWHILL
SUBDIVISION, AS THE SAME IS
DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND
RECORDED IN PLAT FILE 3, PAGES
13 AND 14, IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE
OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3098451.
Nov 15, 22, 2017
12136806
DC H SOUTHEAST
Apartments
Condos H Co-ops
French Bulldogs - 9 weeks, AKC,
brndle,1 M, 1 F, $2,500 each
301-252-9213
FRENCH BULLDOGS- AKC, M/F,
all colors, $3500+, 8 weeks +
timeoutkennels.com 240-447-7615
GREAT PYRENEES PUPPIES.
6 M & 4 F, 11 weeks old, vet
checked and shots. $425 each
540-636-4897 or 540-622-1060
Huskys Morkies Shihpoo & more —
Black Friday Puppy Sale ALL WEEK
304-904-6289. Cash, CC,Easy
Finance wvpuppy.com
LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPPIES aca,yellow chocolate & black, family
raised and good with children, $1000
each 540-383-4203
LAB RET/GOLDEN RET CROSS& AKC
GOLDEN PUPS & ADULTS
8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
Morkie Puppies—Thanksgiving Pups.
1-Female $1400, 3-Males $1200 ea.
8 wks on Nov 23rd. Call Jon @ 831682-1254. Dumfries, Va 22025.
POM-CHI'S & POMERANIAN PUPSShots/dewormed, 12 weeks,
adorable teacup sized, $650.
540-538-1037, Fredericksburg, VA
YORKSHIRE TERRIER PUPS & ADULTSAKC reg., champ blood lines,pet
only. 4mons-5 yrs old. $700-$1200
Call 540-672-0902
640
Birds & Other Animals
AFRICAN PARROT MALE GREY, with
cage, 15 years olds, reasonable price
negotiable, 202-396-4233
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
CONGRESS HEIGHTS - 2BR, 1BA.
$1120 1443 Savannah St SE Ste
102. Minimum annual income
$33,600. DW, hdwd flrs, cats only,
Near Public Transp. Appt only 202561-4843.
Mon-Fri
8-5
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
LEGAL NOTICES
Orange County
Pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage
Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart
B, and the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, I
will conduct a COMMISSIONER’S SALE of 104 Colonial Court, Locust Grove,
VA. In execution of a certain deed of trust by William J. McAuliffe and Eileen
M. McAuliffe dated March 14, 2005, recorded in the County of Orange,
Virginia, as Instrument No. 050002745, and the Assignment recorded in
the Circuit Court of Orange County, Virginia in favor of the Secretary of
Housing and Urban Development recorded January 25, 2013 as Instrument
No. 130000799, default having occurred in the payment of the Note
thereby secured and at the request of the holder, the undersigned
Foreclosure Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction in the front
of the building housing the Circuit Court of Orange County, VA located at
110 North Madison Road, Suite 300, Orange, VA on December 13, 2017 at
1:00 P.M., the property described in said deed of trust, located at the above
address, with improvements thereon and more particularly described as
follows: Lot 306, Sec 5, Lake of the Woods, Tax Map # 012A0000503060,
for which a further description is attached to the deed of trust in this
case. TERMS OF SALE: Neither the FORECLOSURE COMMISSIONER nor the
holder of the note secured by the deed of trust will deliver possession
of the property to the successful bidder. The purchaser at the sale will
be required to pay all closing costs. Real estate taxes, water/sewer fees
and other public charges will be prorated as of the date of sale. The risk
of loss or damage to the property passes to the purchaser immediately
upon the conclusion of the sale. Terms: A bidder's deposit of ten percent
(10%) of the sale price in the form of certified funds payable to the
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and must be present at
the time of sale. Foreclosure Commissioner shall have no duty to obtain
possession for purchaser. The property and the improvements thereon
will be sold "AS IS" and without representation or warranties of any kind.
The sale is subject to all liens, encumbrances, conditions, easements and
restrictions, if any, superior to the mentioned deed of trust and lawfully
affecting the property. Sale is subject to post-sale confirmation that the
borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior
to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination
of whether the borrower(s) reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.
In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser's
sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser's
deposit without interest. Additional terms to be announced at the sale.
HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant. Anderson Law,
Foreclosure Commissioner, 2492 N. Landing Rd, Ste 104, Virginia Beach,
VA 23456, 757-301-3636 Tel, 757-301-3640 Fax. Add to run November 22,
2017, November 29, 2017, and December 6, 2017.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
4175 Churchman Way
Woodbridge, VA 22192
8629 Liberia Avenue,
Manassas, VA 20110
Clarke County
881
Orange County
11/15/2017, 11/22/2017 12140754
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
874
881
Towne #: 5000.0063
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2017
EZ
Howard County
Roommates
NE DC- Furnished room. Good bus
location. $250 per week and
utilities included. 202-526-8268
WP 2x1
D12
856
Frederick County
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
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