close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

The Washington Post – November 23, 2017

код для вставкиСкачать
expanded thanksgiving issue
TECH GIFT GUIDE
GIFTS FOR THE HOME
A WORLD OF WASTE
How to make smart
choices on intelligent
devices. SPECIAL SECTION
Useful and beautiful
holiday pairings for
all budgets. LOCAL LIVING
How six cities deal
with a mounting
problem. SPECIAL SECTION
ABCDE
Prices may vary in areas outside metropolitan Washington.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Mostly sunny 48/34 • Tomorrow: Sunny 55/41 B8
U.S. plans
to maintain
a presence
in Syria
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
“We believe that everybody matters, and that it’s our duty to go out and find them.”
Brett Feldman
Once ISIS is defeated,
troops could aid effort
to resolve civil war
BY
. $5
Change
by FBI
a≠ects
gun law
FUGITIVES PURGED
FROM DATABASE
K AREN D E Y OUNG
AND L IZ S LY
The Trump administration is
expanding its goals in Syria beyond routing the Islamic State to
include a political settlement of
the country’s civil war, a daunting
and potentially open-ended commitment that could draw the United States into conflict with both
Syria and Iran.
With forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his Russian and Iranian allies now bearing down on the last militantcontrolled towns, the defeat of the
Islamic State in Syria could be
imminent — along with an end to
the U.S. justification for being
there.
U.S. officials say they are hoping
to use the ongoing presence of
American troops in northern Syria, in support of the Kurdishdominated Syrian Democratic
Forces (SDF), to pressure Assad to
make concessions at United Nations-brokered peace talks in Geneva. The negotiations there are
set to resume at the end of this
month after sputtering along for
more than three years.
Assad’s forces, with crucial aid
from Iranian-sponsored militias,
have regained control over much
of the rest of the country in their
separate war with Syrian rebels
fighting to end the president’s autocratic rule.
An abrupt U.S. withdrawal
could complete Assad’s sweep of
Syrian territory and help guarantee his political survival — an outcome that would constitute a win
for Iran, his close ally.
To avoid that outcome, U.S. officials say they plan to maintain a
U.S. troop presence in northern
Syria — where the Americans have
trained and assisted the SDF
against the Islamic State — and
establish new local governance,
apart from the Assad government,
in those areas.
When political negotiations began in Geneva more than three
years ago, the rebels — with some
assistance from Western and
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
Thousands previously
blocked can buy weapon
BY
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Nurse Laura LaCroix and physician assistant Brett Feldman check the blood pressure of Mark Mathews, 57, who became homeless several
years ago and lives in a patch of woods in Allentown, Pa. Feldman leads the “street medicine” program at Lehigh Valley Health Network.
N
urse Laura LaCroix was
meeting with one of her
many homeless patients in a
downtown Dunkin’ Donuts when
he mentioned that a buddy was
lying in agony in the nearby
woods.
“You should check on him,” said
Pappy, as the older man is known.
“But don’t worry, I put him on a
tarp, so if he dies, you can just roll
him into a hole.”
LaCroix called her boss, Brett
Feldman, a physician assistant
who heads the “street medicine”
program at Lehigh Valley Health
Network. He rushed out of a meeting, and together the two hiked
into the woods. They found Jeff
Gibson in a fetal position, vomiting green bile and crying out in
pain from being punched in the
stomach by another man days
earlier.
Feldman told him he had to go
to the hospital.
“Maybe tomorrow,” Gibson replied.
“Tomorrow you’ll be dead,”
In the
shadows,
help for the
homeless
Growing field of street medicine
brings care to the marginalized
BY
L AURIE M C G INLEY
IN ALLENTOWN, PA.
Feldman responded.
Months later, the 43-year-old
Gibson is still in the woods, but
this time showing off the six-inch
scar — for a perforated intestine
and peritonitis — that is evidence
of surgical intervention. He greets
Feldman warmly. “You’re the only
person who could have gotten me
to the hospital,” he says. “You’re
the only person I trust.”
Pappy and Gibson are “rough
sleepers,” part of a small army of
homeless people across the country who cannot or will not stay in
shelters and instead live outside.
And LaCroix and Feldman are part
of a burgeoning effort to locate
and take care of them no matter
where they are — whether under
bridges, in alleyways or on door
stoops.
“We believe that everybody matters,” Feldman says, “and that it’s
our duty to go out and find them.”
Most of the time, members of
his team provide basic primary
care to people who live in dozens
MEDICINE CONTINUED ON A6
SYRIA CONTINUED ON A16
S ARI H ORWITZ
Tens of thousands of people
wanted by law enforcement officials have been removed this
year from the FBI criminal background check database that prohibits fugitives from justice from
buying guns.
The names were taken out
after the FBI in February
changed its legal interpretation
of “fugitive from justice” to say it
pertains only to wanted people
who have crossed state lines.
What that means is that those
fugitives who were previously
prohibited under federal law
from purchasing firearms can
now buy them, unless barred for
other reasons.
Since the National Instant
Criminal Background Check System (NICS) was created in 1998,
the background check system
has prevented 1.5 million people
from buying guns, including
180,000 denials to people who
were fugitives from justice, according to government statistics.
It is unclear how many people
may have bought guns since
February who previously would
have been prohibited from doing
so.
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
sent a memo Wednesday to the
FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives instructing them to take
several steps to improve NICS.
The system, he said, is “critical
for us to be able to keep guns out
of the hands of those . . . prohibited from owning them.”
The criminal background
check system has come under
scrutiny in recent weeks after the
Air Force said it failed to follow
policies for alerting the FBI about
the domestic violence conviction
of Devin P. Kelley, who killed more
than two dozen churchgoers in
Sutherland Springs, Tex., this
FUGITIVES CONTINUED ON A18
Woman recorded Barton
talking of involving police
would negatively affect my career.”
The woman described encounters and contact spanning a fiveyear period that began online after she posted a message on Barton’s Facebook page in 2011, leadBY M IKE D E B ONIS
ing to the sexually explicit
AND E LISE V IEBECK
exchanges and ultimately a pair of
physical sexual encounters in
Rep. Joe Barton (R-Tex.), who
Washington and Texas. Over time,
apologized Wednesday for a lewd
she said, she became aware of and
photo of him that circulated on
corresponded with multiple other
the Internet, told a woman to
women who engaged in
whom he had sent sexurelationships with Barally explicit photos, vidton, who represents a
eos and messages that he
suburban Dallas district
would report her to the
and is one of the most
Capitol Police because
senior Republicans in the
she could expose his beHouse.
havior, according to a reThe woman, who is not
cording reviewed by The
married, spoke on the
Washington Post.
condition of anonymity
The woman spoke to Joe Barton
to protect her privacy.
The Post after the lewd
In the 2015 phone call, Barton
photo was published Tuesday by
confronted the woman over her
an anonymous Twitter account.
communications with the other
She shared a secretly recorded
women, including her decision to
phone conversation she had with
Barton in 2015 in which he share explicit materials he had
sent. In that context, he menwarned her against using the explicit materials “in a way that
BARTON CONTINUED ON A4
Congressman feared
exposure of secret sex life
U.N. COMMAND/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Video footage shows a North Korean soldier running to cross the demarcation line Nov. 13. The defector was shot five times as he fled.
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — No medical drama
is complete without a bold-yetsensitive heartthrob doctor in a
leading role. The incredible tale
of a North Korean soldier’s escape across the demilitarized
zone last week is no exception.
The McDreamy in this case is
Lee Cook-jong, the trauma surgeon who has operated on the
soldier several times and provided updates along the way —
including a video showing Lee
picking 10-inch-long parasitic
worms out of the man’s intestines
and his declaration Wednesday
that the defector will survive.
“The patient is not going to
die,” Lee told reporters at Ajou
University Hospital south of
BUSINESS NEWS..........................A19
CLASSIFIEDS..................................D9
COMICS..........................................C6
A defector, a doctor and
made-for-TV drama
South Koreans hang hopes on a famed
surgeon to save soldier who fled from North
Seoul, announcing that the man
had regained consciousness and
was stable.
Although he remains in the
intensive care unit, he could be
transferred to a general ward as
soon as this weekend.
The 24-year-old North Korean
soldier, who has been identified
only by his surname, Oh, was shot
CROSSWORD ....................................C8
KIDSPOST ...................................... C8
LOTTERIES.....................................B3
five times as he made his brazen
escape Nov. 13.
Closed-circuit television footage released by the U.S. military
on Wednesday showed Oh driving a jeep southward before the
vehicle became stuck in a ditch
yards from the Military Demarcation Line that forms the border.
Oh jumped out and started
MOVIES..........................................C5
OBITUARIES...................................B6
OPINION PAGES...........................A25
running for the line. Four North
Korean border guards tried to
stop him, firing more than 40
rounds at him. One guard briefly
crossed the line, violating the
armistice that ended the Korean
War in 1953.
The video showed Oh lying
wounded in a pile of leaves
against a building on the southern side. Then three South Korean soldiers crawled out and
dragged him to safety.
From there, he was put in a U.S.
Army Black Hawk helicopter and
flown 50 miles south to the hospital in Suwon, where Lee was
waiting.
“If it weren’t for their emergency measures, he would have died
before arriving at the hospital,”
SPORTS..........................................D1
TELEVISION....................................C4
WORLD NEWS ................................ A8
ESCAPE CONTINUED ON A10
DAILY CODE
Details, B2
6 5 3 3
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post
Year 140, No. 353
A2
EZ
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
U.S. financial markets are closed for the Thanksgiving
holiday. For the latest news, visit washingtonpost.com/
business.
All day
President Trump spends Thanksgiving at his Mar-a-Lago
estate in Palm Beach, Fla., where he is scheduled to
remain through Sunday. Visit washingtonpost.com/politics
for developments.
8:30 a.m.
So Others Might Eat holds its annual “Thanksgiving Day
Trot for Hunger” fundraiser in Washington, with the race
starting at Freedom Plaza. For details, visit
washingtonpost.com/local.
9 a.m.
The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade airs live from
New York on CBS and NBC. Follow the festivities at
washingtonpost.com/entertainment.
11 a.m.
The Community for Creative Non-Violence hosts its
annual Thanksgiving dinner for people experiencing
homelessness in Washington. Visit washingtonpost.com/
local for details.
8:30 p.m.
The Washington Redskins take on the New York Giants
at FedEx Field. Follow the game at postsports.com.
KLMNO
CO R R ECTI O N
NEWSPAPER DELIVERY
For home delivery comments
or concerns contact us at
washingtonpost.com/subscriberservices or
send us an email at
homedelivery@washpost.com or call
202-334-6100 or 800-477-4679
A preview in the Nov. 24
Weekend section, which was
printed in advance, of the
upcoming Jay-Z and Xscape
shows at Capital One Arena
listed an incorrect website for
the venue. The official website
for tickets is
capitalonearena.monumental
sportsnetwork.com.
TO SUBSCRIBE
800-753-POST (7678)
TO ADVERTISE
washingtonpost.com/mediakit
Classified: 202-334-6200
Display: 202-334-7642
The Washington Post is committed to
correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in
contacting the paper for that purpose
can:
Email: corrections@washpost.com.
Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be
connected to the desk involved —
National, Foreign, Metro, Style, Sports,
Business or any of the weekly sections.
Comments can be directed to The
Post’s reader advocate, who can be
reached at 202-334-7582 or
readers@washpost.com.
MAIN PHONE NUMBER
202-334-6000
TO REACH THE NEWSROOM
Metro: 202-334-7300;
metro@washpost.com
National: 202-334-7410;
national@washpost.com
Business: 202-334-7320;
business@washpost.com
Sports: 202-334-7350;
sports@washpost.com
Reader Advocate: 202-334-7582;
readers@washpost.com
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
Ex-Conyers aide cites mistreatment, verbal abuse
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
All day
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
TO REACH THE OPINION PAGES
Letters to the editor:
letters@washpost.com or call
202-334-6215
Opinion:
oped@washpost.com
Published daily (ISSN 0190-8286).
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to
The Washington Post, 1301 K St. NW, Washington,
D.C. 20071.
Periodicals postage paid in Washington, D.C., and
additional mailing office.
Lawyer says complaints
about congressman’s
behavior were ignored
K IMBERLY K INDY,
S TEVE H ENDRIX
M ICHELLE Y E H EE L EE
BY
AND
A high-profile Washington
lawyer specializing in congressional ethics said Wednesday
that Rep. John Conyers Jr. (DMich.) harassed and verbally
abused her when she worked for
him on Capitol Hill in the 1990s
and that her repeated appeals for
help to congressional leadership
were ignored.
“There was nothing I could do
to stop it,” Melanie Sloan said in
an interview. “Not going to leadership, not going to my boss, not
going to a women’s group, not
going to a reporter. I was dismissed and told I must be mentally unstable.”
Sloan, the former executive
director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington
(CREW), was hired by Conyers in
1995 as minority counsel to the
House Judiciary Committee,
where he served as the ranking
Democrat. She held the job until
1998.
During that time, Sloan said,
she witnessed and experienced
behavior by Conyers similar to
episodes described in claims
against him that on Tuesday
prompted the House Ethics Committee to open an investigation.
In addition to accusations of
sexual misconduct, the claims
against Conyers included “mistreatment of staff.” Sloan said she
did not believe she was sexually
harassed by the congressman,
but she said his behavior toward
her was inappropriate and abusive. She said she was speaking
publicly after seeing Conyers dismiss former staff members’ accounts of misconduct.
Sloan said that Conyers routinely yelled at and berated her,
often criticizing her appearance.
On one occasion, she said, he
summoned her to his Rayburn
Building office, where she found
him in his underwear.
“I was pretty taken aback to see
my boss half-dressed,” she said. “I
turned on my heel and I left.”
60%
70%
OFFER EXPIRES 12/ 8 /17
60%
FALLS CHURCH
ALEXANDRIA
2843 Rogers Dr.
Falls Church, VA 22042
7525 Richmond Hwy
Alexandria, VA 22306
Gasfireplaces.com
Arnold Reed, Conyers’s legal
counsel, denied Sloan’s allegations and said Conyers will address complaints about his conduct after Thanksgiving. “Representative Conyers has never done
anything inappropriate to Melanie Sloan,” he said.
Sloan is the first former Conyers staff member to speak on the
record about the 88-year-old congressman, the longest-serving
member of the House and the top
Democrat on the Judiciary Committee. She said she kept quiet
about the incidents for 20 years
because her earlier complaints
were not taken seriously. She
agreed to speak about her experience with Conyers after a Washington Post reporter contacted
her.
“The reason I decided to go on
the record is to make it easier for
other people,” she said. “People
are afraid to come forward. So
much about working in Washington is about loyalty, and you are
supposed to shut up about these
things.”
Sloan said she complained repeatedly about Conyers’s behavior to her supervisor and contacted a senior staff member in the
office of then-Rep. Richard A.
Gephardt (D-Mo.), the House minority leader at the time.
Gephardt said Wednesday that
he did not recall Sloan raising
concerns and was unaware of
issues in Conyers’s office. But he
said congressional leadership
needs to see through proposed
legislation to change how harassment and abuse allegations are
handled on Capitol Hill.
“This behavior, whenever it
occurs, is reprehensible and can’t
be tolerated,” Gephardt said.
The accusations against Conyers are surfacing as liberals
and conservatives in Congress
wrestle with mounting pressure
to change Capitol Hill culture.
At a hearing this month, female
lawmakers said current members of Congress had groped
and exposed themselves to female staffers. Lawmakers have
introduced bills that would
change the handling of sexual
harassment and abuse complaints.
After leaving Capitol Hill,
Sloan played a leading role in
congressional ethics investigations as CREW’s executive director. She wrote the 2004 complaint that led the House Ethics
Committee to admonish thenRep. Tom DeLay (R-Tex.) and a
2011 complaint against Sen. John
Ensign (R-Nev.), who was forced
to resign. She now is senior
adviser to another Washingtonbased watchdog group, American Oversight.
The Conyers investigation began less than 24 hours after
BuzzFeed News reported a 2015
settlement between Conyers and
an unidentified former employee
over claims of sexual harassment. On Tuesday morning, Conyers initially denied to the Associated Press that he had settled
kimberly.kindy@washpost.com
steve.hendrix@washpost.com
michelle.lee@washpost.com
Julie Tate and Alice Crites
contributed to this report.
The Washington Post is examining
workplace violations on Capitol Hill
and the process for reporting them.
To contact a reporter, please email
kimberly.kindy@washpost.com,
michelle.lee@washpost.com or
elise.viebeck@washpost.com.
D I GE S T
PENNSYLVANIA
Fraternity found guilty
in fatal hazing case
NEXT DAY INSTALLS AVAILABLE*
1.888.902.8773
MEREDITH DAKE/CQ ROLL CALL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington ethics lawyer Melanie Sloan, shown in 2015, worked
for Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) from 1995 to 1998.
sexual harassment claims, but he
later acknowledged the settlement.
“I expressly and vehemently
denied the allegations made
against me, and continue to do
so,” Conyers said in a statement.
In addition to the unidentified
employee in the settlement, a
former scheduler, Maria Reddick, filed a legal claim against
Conyers in February saying that
Conyers engaged in inappropriate sexual advances toward her
and created a hostile work environment. Her complaint alleged
that Conyers engaged in behavior
such as “rubbing on her shoulders, kissing her forehead, making inappropriate comments,
covering and attempting to hold
her hand.”
She said she requested to go
through the formal counseling
process run by the congressional
Office of Compliance and subsequently requested mediation, the
next step. It is unclear whether
the claim was resolved.
Reddick, representing herself
in the case, asked the judge to
seal the case to protect Conyers’s
reputation. The judge denied her
motion. Reddick voluntarily dismissed her lawsuit in March.
Reddick did not return calls for
comment. The lawsuit was first
reported by BuzzFeed News,
which did not name Reddick.
Conyers’s spokeswoman said,
“The former staffer voluntarily
decided to drop the case.”
Sloan said she feels a responsibility to speak up now because
she knows that many young
women on the Hill — frequently
in low-level, low-paying positions — have less power than she
did as a practicing attorney
there.
“If that happened to me, and
I’m a pretty strong person, what
is happening to everyone else?”
she said.
Showroom Hours:
A Baruch College fraternity
has been found guilty of
involuntary manslaughter and
other offenses for the 2013 hazing
death of a pledge in a rented
home in Pennsylvania’s Pocono
Mountains.
Jurors announced the verdict
Tuesday against the Pi Delta Psi
fraternity after six days of
testimony in the death of
freshman pledge Chun “Michael”
Deng of New York.
The fraternity was also found
guilty of aggravated assault,
hazing, hindering apprehension
and conspiracy. It was acquitted
of the most serious offenses it
faced, third-degree murder and
voluntary manslaughter.
Its lawyer told the Pocono
Record the fraternity plans to
appeal.
Four members of the nowclosed fraternity chapter from
the New York college previously
pleaded guilty to voluntary
manslaughter and await
sentencing.
Authorities have said Deng
was knocked unconscious and
suffered a fatal head injury
during a “gantlet” ritual in
which he was blindfolded and
carried a weighted-down
backpack across a yard in the
home about 100 miles west of
New York.
The newspaper said Deng had
to get past groups of fraternity
brothers who shoved or tackled
him, and witnesses said he was
subjected to the most violence
because he fought back.
Court records indicate
fraternity members tried to
revive him on their own, changed
his clothes and searched online
for information about his
symptoms before driving him to
a hospital an hour later. He died
the next day of a brain injury.
Prosecutors are seeking a fine
and a statewide ban when the
fraternity is sentenced.
Mon - Sun 9am-7pm
EXPERIENCE THE WARMTH
OVER 300 DISPLAYS THROUGH OUT
OUR SHOWROOMS CONVENIENTLY LOCATED
FALLS CHURCH, ROCKVILLE & ALEXANDRIA
Visit Nearest Showroom or Call To Schedule a FREE In Home Estimate!
— Associated Press
NEW MEXICO
Body cam video unfair
to officers, sheriff says
The sheriff of New Mexico’s
most populous county will not
require his deputies to use body
cameras because he said the
ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Travelers move through Reagan National Airport in Washington
on Wednesday. It’s expected that 28.5 million passengers will fly on
U.S. airlines during the Thanksgiving holiday, up 3 percent from 2016.
media would use the footage to
unfairly criticize the officers.
Bernalillo County Sheriff
Manuel Gonzales told KOAT-TV
in a story Tuesday that the video
“gives a lopsided, one-sided story,
which I think is a disservice to
the whole community.”
His stance has drawn criticism
from the American Civil Liberties
Union and the New Mexico
Foundation of Open
Government.
Deputies from Bernalillo
County — which includes
Albuquerque, the state’s largest
city — have been involved in nine
shootings in the last four months.
In the most recent, 50-year-old
Matthew Scudero was fatally shot
after authorities said he opened
fire on deputies on Nov. 10.
A family member of Scudero’s
has questioned the sheriff’s office
about why it doesn’t have video
of the encounter.
Deputies do record audio
during their interactions with
citizens. The sheriff’s office has
not yet released the audio related
to the shooting from earlier this
month.
— Associated Press
OHIO
Two men are convicted
in firefighter’s death
An Ohio homeowner and his
nephew were convicted
Wednesday of murder and arson
for a 2015 blaze that led to a
firefighter’s death.
Butler County jurors found
Lester Parker and William “Billy”
Tucker guilty after getting the
case late Tuesday in Hamilton,
about 30 miles north of
Cincinnati. A judge sentenced
both men to life in prison, with a
minimum of 15 years before
either one is eligible for parole.
Parker and Tucker were
charged in the Dec. 28, 2015, fire
that started in the basement of
the home owned by Parker and
resulted in the death of Hamilton
firefighter Patrick Wolterman,
who died after falling through a
floor in the burning home.
Prosecutors said that Parker,
67, was having financial
problems and solicited Tucker to
set the fire to collect insurance
money. Parker and Tucker, 50, of
Richmond, Ky., both pleaded not
guilty to murder and aggravated
arson charges. They testified in
their own defense, denying any
involvement in the fire.
— Associated Press
Thieves steal 1,800 gallons of
vodka from distillery: Police are
searching for thieves who swiped
more than 1,800 gallons of vodka
from a Los Angeles distillery.
Investigators say the suspects
sawed through deadbolts to get
inside a storage room at the Fog
Shots distillery. A company
representative said the thieves
made away with about
90 percent of its holiday
inventory, worth about $278,000.
KABC-TV reported Wednesday
that detectives are examining
surveillance footage that shows
three men behind a razor wire
fence. One of them climbs the
fence and knocks the camera
over before the break-in.
— Associated Press
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Wild turkeys may be declining in the woods, but they’re boss in the ’burbs
BY
K ARIN B RULLIARD
Wild turkeys are causing troubles across the American suburbs.
The birds of late have been
accused of cracking roof tiles outside Sacramento, dangerously
disrupting traffic in western New
York and “terrorizing” residents
near Akron, Ohio. Reports of turkey aggression in the Boston area
have spiked in the past three
years, forcing authorities to use
lethal force at least five times, the
Associated Press found. When the
Cambridge, Mass., city council
took up the matter recently, one
member told of a turkey that
chased a child and her dog outside
of a church, and another recounted coming face-to-beak with a
bird outside a community gathering where the large fowl had been
discussed.
“It was like the turkey was waiting for me,” Councilor Dennis Carlone said from the dais. “They’re
clearly strategizing.”
But at the same time, the National Wild Turkey Federation
(NWTF) and researchers say the
U.S. wild turkey population is
gradually declining, probably due
to development that is carving up
their habitats while also making
life easier for predators, such as
foxes and raccoons. In 2004, the
federation says, wild turkeys
numbered nearly 7 million; by
2014, that had dipped to as low as
6 million.
So which is it? Are turkeys trailing off — or taking over?
It turns out that both trends are
true, to a degree. Both are also
related to the fact that wild turkeys in America exist mostly so
people can hunt them.
First, some history. European
settlers who arrived on these
shores centuries ago probably
found a land brimming with wild
turkeys, though the migrants almost certainly did not dine on the
birds at the first Thanksgiving. At
that time, these ground-nesting
birds were likely gobbling up
nuts, berries and snails across
what are now 39 of the Lower 48
states. Soon, however, the colonists were gobbling up turkeys
and razing their landscapes. By
the early 20th century, the birds
had vanished from 18 of those 39
states, and their population had
BILL DISBROW/SAN FRANCISCO GATE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The National Wild Turkey Federation says that in 2004, U.S. wild turkeys numbered nearly 7 million; by 2014 that number dipped to 6 million.
dropped to about 200,000 animals found mostly in remote areas, according to the NWTF.
Things changed after World
War II, and wild turkeys are now
viewed as one of the nation’s big
conservation successes. Wildlife
managers, alarmed at the near
disappearance of a popular game
animal, worked over decades with
the NWTF to bring back the birds,
mostly by trapping more than
200,000 of them and releasing
them in spots with turkey deficits.
The birds are now found and
hunted in every state except Alaska, proof of their ability to thrive
in various landscapes and climates.
But the wild turkey population
— which state agencies usually
track by counting young birds,
called poults, or by counting turkeys bagged by hunters — has
dipped over the past decade. Mark
Hatfield, director of conservation
administration for the NWTF,
said his organization and state
agencies are “working collectively
to try and figure this out, because
we never want to go back to a
restoration effort.”
The decline has been most pronounced in the Midwest, Northeast and Southeast, said Michael
Chamberlain, a University of
Georgia wildlife ecology and
management professor who’s involved in studies that track wild
turkeys in five states, mostly in
the Southeast. The researchers,
who strap little GPS backpacks on
turkeys, are seeing what he called
very poor “nest success”: Only
about 30 percent of eggs hatch,
and then only about 25 percent of
chicks survive.
“The data very clearly show
there’s been a long-term, well over
a decade, decline in production
across the Southeast,” Chamberlain said. The likely reason, he
added, is that “in the last 20, 30,
40 years, we’ve taken broad ex-
panses of forest and fragmented it
and chopped it up into little pieces.”
How do those suburban turkey
gangs fit into this? They don’t.
They’re not counted in wild
turkey censuses, Chamberlain
said, because wildlife agencies
monitor rural turkeys — the kind
that are hunted and help fund
state budgets. Turkeys like the
ones that recently stalked a police
car in Bridgewater, Mass., aren’t
hunted and are instead viewed as
“nuisance birds,” he said.
“They’re really two different
populations,” Chamberlain said.
“I don’t know of any states that
actually monitor the status of nuisance birds, except to deal with
the problem . . . their interest is
from hunters who are using rural,
public lands, not subdivisions.”
If turkey-human conflicts seem
to be increasing, Chamberlain
and Hatfield say, it’s because urban and suburban birds are not
hunted and so do not view humans as threats. Also, turkeys are
generalists that can get by quite
nicely so long as they have trees to
roost in at night and space to strut
— particularly in the spring, when
males woo females with a show
that requires a sizable stage.
“They want open areas. Well,
lawns and golf courses? All of
these are great open spots for wild
turkeys,” Hatfield said. “Suburban
areas are pretty good habitats.”
Problems can bubble up in the
fall, when hens return from a
summer raising poults and reunite with their families, Hatfield
said. But relations with people are
most tense during spring breeding season, when toms are amped
up on testosterone, ready to challenge any perceived competitor
and often travel in sibling groups
that include a few males. A bird
gobbling in the back yard is “gobbling to establish dominance,”
Hatfield said. A turkey that charg-
es a car — or crashes through the
window of a Rhode Island orthodontics office — might be charging its own reflection.
“I would say, to get into a turkey’s brain, you’ve got to think
very simple,” Hatfield said. “More
than likely, these birds are trying
to biologically exist, and we are
somehow in their way.”
So if you’re a turkey hunter
concerned about the overall population, you might consider advocating for more large wild spaces.
If you’re a suburbanite worried
about rogue turkeys on your turf,
make sure you’re not feeding
them — remove or clean up bird
feeders, and definitely do not offer
handouts. (Montana recently
passed a statewide ban on feeding
turkeys.) The Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife,
which receives many calls about
problem turkeys, also suggests removing shiny objects in which
birds might spot their reflections,
and scaring turkeys with yelling,
brooms, hoses and even leashed
dogs.
“Don’t let turkeys intimidate
you,” a MassWildlife handout
says. “You can harass turkeys
searching for food in your gardens.”
Not that everyone would be
willing to do so. Wild turkeys, for
the record, do have some fans.
Nicolas Gonzalez, a National
Audubon Society spokesman, insists that birdwatchers enjoy
spotting them and “submit lots of
photos of gorgeous displaying
males and groups doing interesting things like roosting together”
during the society’s annual Great
Backyard Bird Count. The trafficstopping turkey in western New
York has his own Facebook page,
as does Kevin, a Colorado turkey
who hung out in the parking lot of
a King Soopers grocery store until
recently.
Kevin, it seems, was being fed,
and he was in danger of becoming
more nuisance bird than wild
bird. Earlier this month, wildlife
officials trapped him and released
him in the woods, adding one
more turkey to the rural population.
karin.brulliard@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/animalia
Increase in nighttime lighting could have consequences, scientists warn
BY
C HRISTOPHER I NGRAHAM
The distinction between day
and night is disappearing in the
most heavily populated regions
of Earth, a rapid shift with
profound consequences for human health and the environment, according to a paper published Wednesday in the journal
Science Advances.
“We’re losing more and more
of the night on a planetary scale,”
journal editor Kip Hodges said in
a teleconference on the paper’s
findings.
From 2012 to 2016, the artificially lit area of Earth’s surface
grew by 2.2 percent per year,
according to the study led by
Christopher Kyba of the German
Research Centre for Geosciences.
Kyba and his team analyzed
high-resolution satellite imagery
to measure the extent of artificial
outdoor lighting at night. The
study also found that areas of the
planet already lit grew even
brighter, increasing in luminosity at a rate of 2.2 percent per year.
“Earth’s night is getting
brighter,” Kyba said.
Much of the increase in nighttime lighting is concentrated in
the Middle East and Asia.
These observations probably
understate the true increase in lit
areas and light intensity because
the satellites used in the study
are not sensitive to blue light
wavelengths emitted by LED
lights.
The trend shows no sign of
relenting.
“In the near term, it appears
that artificial light emission
into the environment will continue to increase, further eroding Earth’s remaining land area
that experiences natural daynight light cycles,” the paper
concludes.
The past few years have seen
the rapid adoption of highly
efficient LED lights for indoor
and outdoor use. LEDs use a
small fraction of the electricity
of traditional incandescent
lights — a 20-watt LED bulb can
generate the same amount of
’ ALIA YACHT • LIKE NEW
light as a 100-watt incandescent, representing an energy
savings of 80 percent. Beyond
that, LEDs also last 10 to 20
times longer than incandescent
bulbs, representing more cost
savings.
But the rapid increase in
nighttime lighting observed by
Kyba and his colleagues suggests
that people are responding to
cheaper lighting options by simply adding more light.
“While we know that LEDs
save energy in specific projects,”
Kyba said at the teleconference,
“when we look at our data and
we look at the national and the
global level, it indicates that
these savings are being offset by
either new or brighter lights in
other places.”
The shift from incandescents
to LEDs has been directly observable from space.
Images comparing the level of
lighting over the city of Milan in
2012 with that in 2015 show
widespread adoption of LED
lighting. The latter image is
bluer, a product of the shortwavelength blue light emitted by
most LEDs. Because our eyes are
particularly attuned to this type
of light, it has been implicated in
sleep deficiencies and other human health problems. Last year,
the American Medical Association issued a warning about
health risks associated with this
type of light.
Bright nighttime lighting
started becoming widespread
only about 100 years ago, meaning we have little idea how
humans or other species adapt to
Add sparkle
to her
season.
LIVE
it at an evolutionary level.
“Artificial light at night is a
very new stressor,” said Franz
Holker, one of the paper’s authors. “The problem is that light
has been introduced in places,
times and intensities at which it
does not naturally occur and
[for] many organisms, there is no
chance to adapt to this new
stressor.”
The news isn’t all bad. Studies
have shown, for instance, that
judicious use of low-level LED
lighting can reduce light pollution without compromising peo-
ple’s sense of safety. Lighting
companies have been introducing “warm” LED lights that emit
much less of the potentially
harmful short-wavelength blue
light.
“In the longer term, perhaps
the demand for dark skies and
unlit bedrooms will begin to
outweigh the demand for light in
wealthy countries,” Kyba and his
colleagues write.
christopher.ingraham@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/wonkblog
starts today!
Black Friday
AREA RUG SUPER BUYS
75%off
reg.
prices
ABSOLUTE
AUCTION
Shop hand-crafted wool pile rugs &
machine-woven reproductions from around
the world in a variety of sizes, designs
& colors. Bring your fabric swatches, room
sizes & color ideas–our rug specialists are
ready to find your perfect rug. Best of all,
you can take your rug home with you today!
ON-SITE
LIVE
LIVE
ABSOLUTE
AUCTION
ON-SITE
ON-SITE
SATURDAY DECEMBER AT AM EST
1600 SE 15th St, Fort Lauderdale, FL
PREVIEWS EVERY WEEKEND from - PM
Private Appointments & Phone Bidding Available
V I D EO TO U R & D E TA I L S
AT D ECA R OAU C T I O N S CO M
Wave Pendant
with Genuine Hawaiian Koa Wood Inlay
and Shimmer Diamond in
14K Yellow, White or Rose Gold $699
Chain included
Matching Earrings available
In cooperation with
This yacht is listed for sale by Hank Halsted of Northrop & Johnson. All descriptive materials provided by Northrop and Johnson
and DeCaro Auctions are believed to be correct but not guaranteed. It is the responsibility of the purchaser to independently
verify to his satisfaction, that the Yacht and her furnishings are suitable for its purposes. DeCaro Auctions International, Inc. is a
licensed Florida Auction Firm (#AU3074), a marketing agent for the seller, and not a yacht broker. DeCaro Auctions International
is working in concert with Northrop & Johnson to market the yacht and perform auction and auction-related services. Northrop
& Johnson is not providing any product or service in connection with this event other than as required by applicable law. Brokers
are fully protected and encouraged to participate. Review the Terms and Conditions for further details at DeCaroAuctions.com.
Tysons Corner Center
Upper Level near Macy’s, 703-893-4803
NaHoku.com
REG. PRICES ARE OFFERING PRICES, AND SAVINGS MAY NOT BE BASED ON
ACTUAL SALES. SUPER BUYS END 11/27/17. Super buys on floor stock, Dynasty,
Signature Nomad & Sanford collections only. Selection varies by store. Styles shown
representative of group. Delivery not available on floor-stock rugs. Area rugs are not in
all stores. For locations, use the store locator at macys.com
A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
Trump’s Thanksgiving: An airing of grievances and calls for gratitude — for him
White
House
Debrief
palm beach,
fla. — This
Thanksgiving,
President Trump
doesn’t seem to be
JENNA
thankful for very
JOHNSON
much — and
seems frustrated
that Americans aren’t expressing
more gratitude for him.
At a time when many reflect
on the blessings in their lives and
help those in need, the president
has thanked himself for the
booming stock market and
promised to cut welfare
programs. He has demanded
more credit for the release of
three college basketball players
who were arrested for allegedly
shoplifting in China — tweeting
Wednesday that “IT WAS ME”
who got them out — and called
the father of one of the players an
“ungrateful fool.” He also revived
the controversy over football
players who kneel during the
national anthem to protest racial
inequality and sought to cast
doubt on the women who have
accused Senate candidate Roy
Moore of preying on them when
they were teenagers.
The holiday week, in other
words, serves as a reminder that
Trump doesn’t take a break from
airing his grievances — not even
in the days leading up to
Thanksgiving. As he tweeted in
2013: “Happy Thanksgiving to all
— even the haters and losers!”
Of course, that’s why many of
his supporters adore him. They
love that he doesn’t waste time
uttering flowery holiday
sentiments pulled from greeting
cards and instead speaks his
mind without any filter, or a
spell-checker.
But ahead of Thanksgiving —
the all-American celebration of
gratitude, unity and family — the
president’s attacks and
provocations may remind some
Americans of that one
troublemaking uncle they will
soon have to face.
The president has not
completely opted out of the
warm and fuzzy parts of
Thanksgiving. Before leaving
Washington on Tuesday, Trump
good-naturedly participated in
one of the White House’s more
ridiculous traditions by
pardoning a turkey named
Drumstick. Standing in the Rose
Garden, Trump recognized a food
pantry near the White House and
thanked members of the military,
law enforcement officers, first
responders and the “wonderful
citizens of our country.”
“This Thursday, as we give
thanks for our cherished loved
ones,” Trump said in scripted
remarks, “let us also renew our
bonds of trust, loyalty and
affection between our fellow
citizens as members of a proud
national family of Americans.”
Just before Trump formally
pardoned the bird, he said, “I feel
so good about myself doing this.”
Trump has yet to participate in
another presidential
Thanksgiving tradition:
volunteering at a food pantry,
helping serve meals to the
homeless or visiting members of
the military. (On Wednesday,
Vice President Pence visited
Walter Reed National Military
Medical Center.)
On Thanksgiving Day or in the
days leading up to it, Barack
Obama and his family would
volunteer at a food bank or help
serve a hot meal to the homeless.
George W. Bush made a surprise
visit to Baghdad on
Thanksgiving in 2003 to have
dinner with troops serving there.
During Bill Clinton’s first
Thanksgiving in the White
House in 1993, he and his family
helped prepare dinner for the
homeless at a church in
Washington.
Such events are often viewed
as nothing more than photo ops
and logistical nightmares for
organizers. But as Trump spent
Wednesday firing off angry
tweets from what he calls “the
winter White House” and then
retreating to one of his private
golf courses, social media
platforms filled with photos and
remembrances of how previous
presidents spent this time of
year.
Trump kicked off the week
with a 6:25 a.m. tweet Monday
reviving the controversy over
professional football players
kneeling in protest. He called for
the National Football League to
suspend an Oakland Raiders
player who, Trump alleged,
“stands for the Mexican Anthem
and sits down to boos for our
national anthem.”
Thirty minutes later, Trump
shifted into third person to tweet
a prediction: “Under President
Trump unemployment rate will
drop below 4%. Analysts predict
economic boom for 2018!” He
didn’t mention how he often said
during the campaign that the
unemployment rate was an
inaccurate measure of what
American workers were actually
experiencing.
Later that day, Trump
announced at a Cabinet meeting
that once Republicans pass a tax
bill — which analysts say will
mostly benefit the wealthy — he
wants them to overhaul welfare.
The White House has yet to
explain what that would entail
and which programs would face
changes.
On Tuesday, after pardoning
Drumstick, Trump was preparing
to board Marine One on the way
to Florida when he was stopped
by a question from a reporter:
“Mr. President, are you ready to
talk about Roy Moore at all?”
After avoiding the topic for
more than a week, Trump
decided to engage, attacking
Moore’s Democratic opponent
and noting that the Alabama
candidate for Senate has denied
the allegations against him,
which include pursuing teenage
girls as young as 14 when he was
in his 30s and sexually assaulting
a 16-year-old waitress.
“Look, he denies it,” Trump
said. “He says it didn’t happen.
And, you know, you have to listen
to him also.”
Trump did not have that sort
of patience for three basketball
players from the University of
California at Los Angeles who
were arrested in China after
allegedly stealing designer
sunglasses. The players were
released soon after the
president’s visit to China earlier
this month, and Trump has taken
full credit — while accusing the
players, who are all black, of not
being adequately grateful to him.
Barton
tried to
stifle sex
photos
BARTON FROM A1
tioned the Capitol Police, a comment the woman interpreted as
an attempt to intimidate her.
“I want your word that this
ends,” he said, according to the
recording, adding: “I will be completely straight with you. I am
ready if I have to, I don’t want to,
but I should take all this crap to
the Capitol Hill Police and have
them launch an investigation.
And if I do that, that hurts me
potentially big time.”
“Why would you even say that
to me?” the woman responded.
“The Capitol Hill police? And
what would you tell them, sir?”
Said Barton: “I would tell them
that I had a three-year undercover
relationship with you over the
Internet that was heavily sexual
and that I had met you twice while
married and had sex with you on
two different occasions and that I
exchanged inappropriate photographs and videos with you that I
wouldn’t like to be seen made
public, that you still apparently
had all of those and were in position to use them in a way that
would negatively affect my career.
That’s the truth.”
In a statement late Wednesday,
Barton said a transcript of the
recording provided by The Post
may be “evidence” of a “potential
crime against me.”
He said that he received word
Wednesday that the Capitol Police
are opening an inquiry. While
there is no federal law prohibiting
the disclosure of intimate photos
of adults without consent, the
Dallas Morning News on Wednesday reported that the Twitter pho-
BILL CLARK/CQ ROLL CALL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rep. Joe Barton (R-Tex.) sent sexual photos and videos to a woman and later told her to stop sharing the material with other women he knew.
to of Barton could violate a 2015
Texas law banning so-called “revenge porn,” which is the portrayal of another person’s intimate
body parts and distributing the
images without consent.
“This woman admitted that we
had a consensual relationship,”
Barton said. “When I ended that
relationship, she threatened to
publicly share my private photographs and intimate correspondence in retaliation. As the transcript reflects, I offered to take the
matter to the Capitol Hill Police to
open an investigation. Today, the
Capitol Police reached out to me
and offered to launch an investigation and I have accepted. Because of the pending investigation, we will have no further comment.”
The woman said she never had
any intention to use the materials
to retaliate against Barton.
A request for comment from
the Capitol Police was not immediately returned late Wednesday.
Earlier Wednesday, Barton acknowledged “sexual relationships
with other mature adult women”
that he said took place while he
was “separated from my second
wife, before the divorce.”
“Each was consensual,” he said
in a statement. “Those relationships have ended. I am sorry I did
not use better judgment during
those days. I am sorry that I let my
constituents down.”
Barton, 68, is the fifth-longest
serving Republican in the House,
now in his 17th term. He is a
former chairman of the House
Energy and Commerce Committee and now serves as vice chairman of the panel.
The Texas native has built a
reputation on Capitol Hill as a
fierce advocate for the oil and gas
industry and a reliable vote for
conservative legislation. A member of the Freedom Caucus, Barton regularly receives top scores
from socially conservative groups
such as the Family Research
Council that analyze members’
stances on positions such as abortion and gay rights.
But he is not known as an outspoken culture warrior. In 1998,
amid the scandal over President
Bill Clinton’s affair with a White
House intern, Barton was quoted
in the Los Angeles Times saying,
“I personally don’t care a fig about
what he does in his bedroom with
his wife or any other sexual partners he may have, but I do care if
he lies under oath.”
Barton was still married to his
second wife when his relationship
with the woman began. His wife
filed for divorce in April 2014,
according to court records; the
divorce was made final in February 2015. A spokeswoman for Barton did not respond to a question
about when his separation began.
Besides the recording of the
phone call, the woman shared text
and social media messages she
exchanged with Barton, as well as
a 53-second cellphone video Barton recorded of himself while
masturbating. The conspiracy
theory website Infowars obtained
LaVar Ball, the father of one of
the players, has played down
Trump’s role in the release,
evidently infuriating the
president.
“It wasn’t the White House, it
wasn’t the State Department, it
wasn’t father LaVar’s so-called
people on the ground in China
that got his son out of a long term
prison sentence — IT WAS ME.
Too bad! LaVar is just a poor
man’s version of Don King, but
without the hair,” Trump tweeted
at 5:25 a.m. Wednesday, referring
to the boxing promoter who
campaigned for Trump during
last year’s election.
“Just think,” the president
continued, overflowing into a
second tweet, “LaVar, you could
have spent the next 5 to 10 years
during Thanksgiving with your
son in China, but no NBA
contract to support you. But
remember LaVar, shoplifting is
NOT a little thing. It’s a really big
deal, especially in China.
Ungrateful fool!”
Later in the day, after a visit to
his golf club here in South
Florida, came a Thanksgiving
reflection: “51 Million American
to travel this weekend — highest
number in twelve years (AAA).
Traffic and airports are running
very smoothly!”
jenna.johnson@washpost.com
a copy of the video and published
it Wednesday night, though the
video appeared to have been removed from the site later.
The lewd Twitter photo that
Barton acknowledged on Wednesday appears to have been captured from that video. The woman
said she did not post the image
herself. She shared phone numbers for Barton that match his
personal and government-issued
cellphones. Barton was not abusive or coercive in his interactions,
the woman said, but said she felt
he was “manipulative and dishonest and misleading” in his dealings with her and other women.
“It’s not normal for a member of
Congress who runs on a GOP platform of family values and conservatism to be scouring the Internet looking for a new sexual liaison,” she said, explaining her motive for coming forward.
The woman said Barton first
reached out to her in 2011 after she
posted a comment about politics
on his Facebook page. As the two
struck up a friendship, they would
exchange messages for hours, including when he was on the House
floor or in committee meetings,
she said.
Soon, Barton began flirting,
making suggestive comments and
sending explicit messages, she
said. She described feeling uncomfortable with his advances at
first.
“He says to me, ‘Do you want me
to send you a picture of myself?’ I
said, ‘Oh no, no. Please do not do
that.’ It kind of started there,” she
said.
In the spring of 2012, the woman flew to Washington, where he
gave her a tour of the Capitol
building, she said. The two slept
together during that visit, and he
reimbursed her in cash for her
flight, she said.
In 2014, she visited him in Texas, where the two slept together
for the second and final time. He
again paid for her travel, she said.
“I was kind of unwittingly drawn
into it with him because of just the
amazement of having a connection to a congressman,” she said.
mike.debonis@washpost.com
Alice Crites, Julie Tate and Michelle Ye
Hee Lee contributed to this report.
Some politicians accused of misconduct are turning to an old survival strategy
Faced with a wide
range of personal
or ethical
PAUL KANE
questions, some
politicians are
trying out an old strategy that
has long been considered
obsolete: hiding out.
Rather than publicly confront
the issues, they have had aides
issue statements — sometimes
denying allegations, sometimes
apologizing — and then have
simply declined to talk much
further about the issues.
The strategy appears designed
in part to avoid saying something
that could be contradicted by
others, but there is also an
underlying sense that voters
cannot pay attention to one thing
for long in the nonstop-news era
of President Trump — that if they
just keep their heads down,
particularly over the holiday
weekend, people will forget
about the unanswered questions.
There’s Sen. Al Franken (DMinn.), who felt compelled to
apologize when two women
accused him of inappropriate
sexual conduct. Franken was last
seen in public on the morning of
@PKCapitol
Nov. 16 at a hearing of the Senate
Judiciary Committee, on which
he sits. He disappeared before
the hearing began, just before
the first allegation against him
appeared online.
Franken’s apologies have
included suggestions that he
remembers the incidents
differently, but he has declined to
explain his side of things, even to
news media in Minnesota. He
has not returned to the state and
is instead holed up in his family’s
home in Washington’s
Tenleytown neighborhood this
week, even though Congress is
not in session.
Republican Senate nominee
Roy Moore of Alabama has
issued repeated denials since The
Washington Post published a
story two weeks ago in which
four women said he pursued
them romantically when they
were teenagers and Moore was in
his 30s. Several more similar
allegations have surfaced since,
but Moore has submitted to only
one detailed interview about the
allegations, on Sean Hannity’s
radio show.
It went poorly, prompting
most leading Republicans in
Washington to declare that they
believe Moore’s accusers and to
ask him to withdraw from the
race.
This head-in-the-sand
approach has confounded some
in the capital.
“Sen. Al Franken crisis
strategy: hide out in DC for
Thanksgiving, hoping this blows
over and people quickly forget.
Better to hold a Minnesota news
conference before Turkey Day
and apologize to voters who
elected you,” Ron Bonjean, a
Republican crisis
communications expert, tweeted
Sunday.
Bonjean has experienced these
matters firsthand. Fifteen years
ago, he served as a top adviser to
Trent Lott (R-Miss.), who was
poised to reclaim the post of
Senate majority leader after the
GOP’s successful 2002 midterms.
But about a month later, Lott
made a racially insensitive joke
at a celebration of Sen. Strom
Thurmond’s 100th birthday,
leading to a reevaluation of Lott’s
previous statements on civil
rights.
Rather than quickly making a
public appearance to explain
himself, as some friends
suggested, Lott chose to issue a
few prepared statements and
then went on a private trip to
Florida before flying home to
Mississippi for the holidays.
Almost 10 days into the
scandal, Lott finally gave in to
demands from his colleagues and
did a TV interview. He went on
BET with Tavis Smiley and tried
to answer every painful question.
The damage was already too
deep. He resigned his leadership
post three days later.
Lott rejected then what had
become a commonly accepted
practice of getting out in front of
bad news on your own terms.
Another violation of this
principle is happening in Detroit,
where Rep. John Conyers Jr. (DMich.) is not explaining what
happened in his office to cause a
nearly $30,000 payout to a
former female staffer who said
he sexually harassed her. Conyers
answered the door to his home
Tuesday when the Associated
Press sought him out, but his
answers were contradictory and
confused. Since then, he has
spoken only through legalistic
statements issued by his staff.
“What Franken, Conyers and
Moore are underestimating is the
anger of female voters out there.
It’s not going away for these
guys,” Bonjean said in an
interview. “Better to deliver your
message on your own terms.”
In Kentucky, Sen. Rand Paul
(R) has refused to talk about an
attack on him allegedly by a nextdoor neighbor in Bowling Green
during which six of Paul’s ribs
were broken. Paul is the victim
here, not the assailant, but for
nearly three weeks, his silence
has helped propel speculation.
On Wednesday, his wife, Kelley
Paul, published an op-ed saying
her husband now has
pneumonia and denying that
there was any “ongoing dispute”
with the neighbor. She called the
attack “deliberate” and
complained about media
coverage of the matter.
Her comments contradict the
suggestions of the senator’s own
friends that it was a property
dispute that has lasted for years.
The prototype for handling
controversy may be the case of
Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho), who
was arrested for drunken driving
in Alexandria, Va., in December
2012, far away from his
apartment on Capitol Hill. He
went on what his aides called an
“apology tour” that included
interviews with Idaho media.
Crapo is a Mormon who had
said he does not drink alcohol,
and his standing could have
fallen apart under perceptions of
hypocrisy. It is still unclear why
he went for a drive far away from
his apartment after drinking
shots of vodka, but his voters
accepted his full-fledged apology.
Last year, his opponent raised
questions about the arrest.
Virginia’s disclosure laws are so
restrictive that Idaho media
could not obtain the detailed
police report.
The senator obtained the
report himself and gave it to the
media, leading to more stories
about the most embarrassing
night of his political career. He
apologized again.
He then won reelection by
more than 35 percentage points.
paul.kane@washpost.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
RE
Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas
available with XFINITY On Demand
Is your home ready for the holidays? With XFINITY, it can be.
When all your guests arrive, will your home be ready? XFINITY is America’s Best Internet Provider,
according to Speedtest.net, and delivers speed and reliability for everyone’s devices. And, by
simply speaking into the X1 Voice Remote, your friends and family will have quick and easy access
to Netflix and YouTube, and everyone can enjoy their favorite shows, movies and videos.
So who will have you ready for the holidays? XFINITY will.
SA L E E N D S N OV E M B E R 2 8 T H
XFINITY TV & Internet
$
79
Ask how to get
99
a month /
24 months
Add X1 DVR™ service
FREE for 1 year
500
$
card
with 2-year agreement
Equipment, taxes and other charges extra,
and subj. to change. See details below.
when you add XFINITY Mobile
XFINITY X1 now has Netflix in 4K Ultra HD
Go to xfinity.com, call 1-800-XFINITY or visit your local XFINITY Store today.
Studio XFINITY Store
715 7th St. NW, Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C. Stores
Cleveland Park 3400 Connecticut Ave NW
Rhode Island Row 2350 Washington Place NE, Suite 105N & 106N
Virginia Store
Arlington 1515 N Courthouse Road
Maryland Store
Riverdale Park 4555 Van Buren Street
Restrictions apply. Not available in all areas. New residential customers only. Limited to Digital Starter TV and Performance 25 Mbps Internet. Early termination fee applies if all XFINITY services (except XFINITY Mobile) are cancelled
during the agreement term. Equipment, taxes and fees, including Broadcast TV Fee (up to $7.00/mo.), Regional Sports Fee (up to $5.00/mo.) and other applicable charges extra, and subject to change during and after promo. After
applicable promo, or if any service is cancelled or downgraded, regular rates apply. Comcast service charge for X1 DVR service (including HD Technology Fee) is $19.95 more/mo. (subject to change). Service limited to a single
outlet. May not be combined with other offers. TV: Limited Basic service subscription required to receive other levels of service. Access to Netflix on XFINITY X1 requires an eligible X1 set-top box with XFINITY TV and Internet
service. Netflix and YouTube on X1 uses your Internet service and will count against any XFINITY data plan. Netflix requires streaming membership. Streaming content limited to the U.S. Internet: Best Internet service provider
claim based on download speeds measured by over 111 million tests taken by consumers at Speedtest.net. Actual speeds vary and are not guaranteed. Mobile: New XFINITY Internet customers limited to up to two lines pending
activation of Internet service. Prepaid card offer ends 12/4/17 and is limited to new residential customers. Must subscribe to Starter TV (or above) and XFINITY post-paid Internet service with term agreement. Limited to new XFINITY
Mobile residential customers adding a new mobile line with purchase of mobile device. Porting existing mobile number required. Mobile order required within seven days of installation of XFINITY Internet. Call for restrictions and
complete details. © 2017 Comcast. All rights reserved. Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas (PG) ©2001 Universal City Studios Productions. All Rights Reserved. NPA208980-0015
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Under a bridge in downtown Allentown, Pa., outreach specialist Bob Rapp Jr., left, works with Brett Feldman, center, and nurse Laura LaCroix to help homeless patients in a street medicine program.
MEDICINE FROM A1
of encampments throughout eastern
Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley. During
their street rounds, they apply antibiotic
ointment to cuts, wrap up sprains and
treat chronic conditions such as blood
pressure and diabetes.
But they also help people sign up for
Medicaid, apply for Social Security disability benefits and find housing. Three or four
times a month, they deal with individuals
threatening to commit suicide. After heavy
rains, they bail out “the Homeless Hilton,”
a campsite under an old railroad tunnel
that frequently floods — and where two
rough sleepers once drowned. Many days,
they simply listen to their patients, trying
also to relieve emotional pain.
Street medicine was pioneered in this
country in the 1980s and 1990s by
homeless advocates Jim O’Connell in
Boston and Jim Withers in Pittsburgh.
Yet only in the past five years has it
caught fire, with a few dozen programs
becoming more than 60 nationwide. A
recent conference on the topic in Allentown drew 500 doctors, nurses, medical
students and others from 85 cities, including London, Prague and New Delhi.
Most programs are started by nonprofit
organizations or medical students.
Even as it comes of age, street medicine faces new challenges. A younger set
of leaders is less interested in cultivating
a bleeding-heart image than in establishing the approach as a legitimate way to
deliver health care not only to the homeless — whose average life expectancy is
about 50 — but also to other underserved
people. Backers say street medicine
should be considered a subspecialty,
much like palliative care is, because of
the unique circumstances of treating its
target population.
Proponents also are pressing for much
more financial support from hospitals,
which can benefit greatly when homeless
individuals receive care that helps keep
them out of emergency rooms. Feldman’s
program — which includes the street
team, medical clinics in eight shelters
and soup kitchens, and a hospital consultation service — has slashed unnecessary
emergency room visits and admissions
among its clientele. The result, to the
surprise of Lehigh Valley Health Network officials, was a $3.7 million boost to
the bottom line in fiscal 2017.
Perhaps the biggest issue facing street
medicine, however, is figuring out how to
provide more mental-health services.
About one-third of homeless people are
severely mentally ill, and two-thirds have
substance-use disorders. Long waiting
times for psychiatric evaluations delay
needed medications and, in some cases,
opportunities to get housing.
Psychiatrist Sheryl Fleisch is working
on that problem. In 2014, she founded
Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s
street psychiatry program, one of a few
such initiatives in the country. Every
Wednesday morning, Fleisch and several
medical residents visit camps in Nashville, handing out shirts, blankets —
anything that can build trust.
Then they split up to talk one-on-one
with people waiting on park benches, at
bus stops and in fast-food restaurants,
providing a week’s worth of prescriptions
as needed. Fleisch says these homeless
patients seldom miss an appointment.
Many “have been thrown out of other
programs or are too anxious to go to
regular office sessions,” she said. “We
have some patients who will get up and
sit down 15 times during our appointments. We don’t give up on them.”
O
n a muggy fall morning, Feldman’s
team makes its way from the Hamilton Street Bridge in downtown
Caring for the homeless, wherever they are
Sixty-year-old “Duckie” checks her hair. She is a former waitress and apartment manager who has struggled with
unemployment and personal problems. The medical team helped her get hospital care last year for Norwegian scabies,
an especially severe and contagious skin infestation. During this visit, the team arranged for a psychiatrist to visit her.
Allentown to a swath of mosquito-infested woods between the railroad tracks
and the Lehigh River. A few blocks away,
an extensive redevelopment project,
complete with a luxury hotel and arena
for the minor-league Phantoms hockey
team, is revitalizing parts of the long-depressed area.
Bob Rapp Jr., who has worked extensively with homeless veterans and knows
the location of many campsites, is the
advance man. “Good morning! Street
medicine!” he calls out.
Feldman carries a backpack full of
medicines. LaCroix uses her “Mary Poppins bag” to try to coax people out of their
tents: “We’ve got supplies — socks, toilet
paper, tampons!”
A thin woman with striking blue eyes
pops out of a tiny tent, pulling at her
wildly askew blonde hair as she glances
in a mirror propped against a tree. Her
toenails are painted gold. A Phillies cap
and a Dean Koontz book, “Innocence,” sit
on one of her two chairs.
“Tampons!” exclaims the woman, who
identifies herself only as Duckie. “I just
turned 60. I don’t think I need tampons!”
She hugs LaCroix, with whom she bonded after the nurse helped her get new
clothes and emergency treatment for a
virulent, highly contagious skin infestation called Norwegian scabies.
Feldman kneels in front of Duckie
with his stethoscope to check her lungs;
the last time he saw her, the longtime
smoker had bronchitis. No breathing
problems this time, but Feldman tells her
he wants a psychiatric evaluation. If the
doctor confirms that she has bipolar
disorder, depression or post-traumatic
stress disorder — all diagnoses Duckie
says she has heard over the years — she
will be able to get the drugs she needs
and perhaps transitional housing.
“I self-medicate,” she shrugs. But she
likes the idea of moving inside with
winter coming.
“It stinks out here,” she says. “It’s cold.
I have to watch out for rats and raccoons
and people.” She agrees to see a psychiatrist — a volunteer who comes out once a
month — at her tent the following week.
Later in the day, the team goes to see a
favorite patient. When the group approaches his plastic-covered hut in the
woods, Mark Mathews frantically orders
them to stop. “I don’t want to be caught
with my pants down!” he yells from
within.
Moments later, khakis on, the 57-yearold emerges. The son of a successful
Allentown actor, the gray-bearded
Mathews spent years playing Santa Claus
in malls. He also worked for a high school
theater department and in the 1980s was
part of a local cable comedy show, “Sturdy Beggars.”
He became homeless after having a
falling out with his sister four years ago.
“The money ran out, and I couldn’t get
another job,” he says.
LaCroix takes his blood pressure. The
reading is high, something Mathews
blames on not having taken his bloodpressure medicine that morning. The
team will be back in two days to do a
recheck, which is fine with him. “I enjoy
their company,” he says.
Once, LaCroix carried a mattress
across an old railroad trestle and up a
steep hill to deliver it to his hut. Like
other patients out here, Mathews has the
team’s cellphone numbers. He frequently
texts LaCroix to tell her jokes or alert her
to someone’s possible health problem.
Mathews is sure his life has purpose. “I
try to help other people,” he says. “I lend
people phones if they don’t have them. I
help them get to their appointments. I
should be nominated for sainthood.”
A
Physician assistant Brett Feldman bandages Jeff Gibson’s injured finger at
a homeless encampment. Street medicine is growing swiftly, with a few
dozen programs becoming more than 60 nationwide in five years.
bout 550,000 people in the United
States were homeless in 2016 on a
given night — according to the
most recent estimate by the Department
of Housing and Urban Development —
and about a third of them were sleeping
outside, in abandoned houses or in other
“unsheltered” places not meant for human habitation. In Santa Barbara, Calif.,
so many people live in their cars that the
local street medicine team provides care
in automobiles.
Federal and regional estimates for the
number of homeless people in the Lehigh
Valley — which includes the cities of
Allentown, Bethlehem and Easton —
range from more than 700 to almost
twice that number. But that’s probably a
big undercount.
A research study of people who sought
care at three area emergency rooms
during the summer of 2015 and the
following winter identified 7 percent as
homeless. Feldman, who led the study,
said the finding suggested that more
than 9,200 of the health system’s emergency room patients were homeless
sometime during the year — in communities with no permanent emergency
beds for couples and fewer than two
dozen for women.
The LVHN Street Medicine program,
which he founded, takes care of about
1,500 people a year. Since 2015, it has
pursued its mission relentlessly, taking
laptops into the woods to get homeless
patients insured, usually through Medicaid; today, 74 percent have coverage.
Over the same period, emergency room
visits by the program’s patients have
fallen by about three-quarters and admissions by roughly two-thirds.
It has taken Feldman years to get to this
point. In high school, he began lifting
weights after getting into a car accident
and fracturing three vertebrae. In 2000, as
a freshman at Pennsylvania State University, he won the National Physique Committee teen championship.
“It gave me laser focus, but I was the
only person who was helped,” he said. “It
was very unfulfilling, and I decided that
whatever I did after that would be
different.”
His close collaborator is his wife,
Corinne Feldman, a physician assistant
who is an assistant professor at DeSales
University. When they first moved to the
Lehigh Valley in 2005, the couple wanted
to work with the homeless but couldn’t
find them — until realizing they were in
campsites in the woods. These days, one
encampment is even in the shadow of a
defunct Bethlehem Steel facility.
The Feldmans started by setting up
free clinics in shelters where they worked
without pay. But a 2013 Boston conference on street medicine sharpened their
focus. They would go to wherever the
homeless were.
“We thought, ‘This is all we want to do
with our lives,’ ” he recounted.
By then a physician assistant at Lehigh
Valley Hospital, Brett Feldman got a
grant from a local philanthropy, the
Dorothy Rider Pool Health Care Trust,
that allowed him to do street medicine
one day a week. Over time, he received
more grants, as well as backing from the
health system to set up a full-time street
medicine program. It launched in 2014.
There have been numerous disappointments and heartbreaks: Two patients at an encampment in Bethlehem
froze to death. A man with third-degree
burns from sleeping on a heating vent
fled rather than have his badly infected
lower leg amputated. And before the
psychiatrist could come out, Duckie disappeared.
At the same time, there have been
poignant victories. When a 50-year-old
man, living in a drainage pipe, was given
a diagnosis of advanced colon cancer, he
declined treatment but eventually was
able to move into an apartment, where
the street-medicine team provided him
palliative care. When his symptoms
worsened and Feldman said it was time
to go to hospice, the man replied, “First, I
have to clean up the apartment because
the landlord was so nice.”
The team helped him do the cleaning
and then took him to hospice, where he
died a peaceful death.
“Most of our folks think they will die
alone, that their future is canceled,”
Feldman says. “Bringing hope is more
important than any medicine.”
laurie.mcginley@washpost.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
RE
University of Michigan considers renting space to white nationalist speaker
BY
S USAN S VRLUGA
The University of Michigan will
consider allowing white nationalist Richard Spencer to hold an
event on its campus, the latest
public school grappling with how
to balance constitutional rights
and campus safety with a speaker
they didn’t invite and don’t want
to host.
“His views, and those of his
organization and its followers, are
antithetical to everything we
stand for at the University of Michigan,” the school’s president, Mark
Schlissel, wrote in a letter to the
campus Tuesday. But he also
wrote, “We are legally prohibited
from blocking such requests
based solely on the content of that
speech, however sickening it is.”
Schlissel said university administrators would begin discussions
with Spencer’s National Policy Institute about holding an event at
the state flagship school. “If we
cannot assure a reasonably safe
setting for the event, we will not
allow it to go forward,” Schlissel
said.
Last Friday, the attorney representing a supporter of Spencer,
Cameron Padgett, wrote Schlissel.
“I am disgusted and dismayed
that the First Amendment to the
United States Constitution is being flippantly disregarded by you
and your colleagues because of the
political viewpoint of the speakers
who would attend the proposed
event and the heckler’s veto which
is being utilized by left-wing individuals who are detractors of
Padgett and Spencer,” said Kyle
Bristow, the attorney.
On Tuesday, the university’s
board of regents held a special
public meeting to discuss Spencer’s request.
His supporters have asked to
rent space for events at several
universities this fall, after he led a
torchlight march in August
through the University of Virginia
that turned violent. Several
schools denied his request, citing
imminent safety concerns.
The University of Florida allowed Spencer to speak, leading
the state’s governor to declare a
state of emergency before Spencer
arrived on campus and forcing the
school to absorb more than
$500,000 in security costs.
After other schools in recent
months denied Spencer’s request
to make appearances, lawsuits
HUNTER DYKE/ANN ARBOR NEWS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A protester yells as the University of Michigan Board of Regents
discusses an appearance by white nationalist Richard Spencer.
were filed against Michigan State,
Penn State and Ohio State universities, seeking to force them to allow the white nationalist to speak.
Earlier this year, a federal judge
overturned Auburn University’s
decision to cancel a speech by
Spencer, ruling the ban was unconstitutional because it was
predicated on the content of the
speech. The judge also found no
evidence that Spencer promoted
violence.
The Michigan Daily, the student newspaper, showed a room
full of students at the board of
regents meeting Tuesday holding
up handmade cardboard signs opposing Spencer, and quoted the
Black Student Union on campus
as demanding in an email that
Schlissel deny the request: “Allowing such a person to speak on this
campus is a threat to the physical
and emotional safety of many students on campus. Too many times
already have students of color
been placed under emotional distress due to racist campus climate,” the black student group
wrote, citing racist graffiti and
Snapchats and white-supremacist
fliers at the Ann Arbor campus.
In his letter later that evening,
Schlissel wrote: “I personally detest and reject the hateful white
supremacy and white nationalism
expressed by Mr. Spencer as well
as his racist, anti-Semitic and otherwise bigoted views, as do the
regents and the entire leadership
of this university. Many followers
who show up at his rallies share
his repugnant beliefs and should
be shunned by our community.”
The Michigan president said
that denying the request “would
provide even more attention to the
speaker and his cause, and allow
him to claim a court victory.”
Spencer did not immediately
respond to a request for comment
Wednesday.
Bristow wrote in an email
Wednesday that he had accepted
the university leader’s request to
extend the deadline until Dec. 8
but would not extend it again.
“On my watch the freedoms
guaranteed by the United States
Constitution will not be usurped
by left-wing bureaucrats who cater to the juvenile and tyrannical
threats of left-wing students,”
Bristow wrote, and reiterated his
intention to sue if the university
does not publicly agree to let Spencer speak there.
Many of the regents issued public statements. “As a human being,
and as a Jew, whose family was
murdered by the Nazis, I reject his
hateful views with every fiber of
my being,” regent Ron Weiser
wrote. “However, I believe that the
university has a fundamental duty
to fulfill our obligations under the
Constitution of the state of Michigan and the Constitution of the
United States of America, namely,
the First Amendment right to free
speech, even if that speech is hateful.”
Schlissel wrote, “As painful as it
is to allow this speaker to rent our
space, a democratic society without free speech is unimaginable.”
susan.svrluga@washpost.com
Citing harassment allegations, professors urge students not to apply to school
BY
B EN G UARINO
Hundreds of professors are urging their students not to apply to
the University of Rochester, a private research university in western New York. The boycott comes
after allegations that Florian Jaeger, a professor in the brain and
cognitive science department,
preyed on female students. Eight
current and former Rochester researchers filed an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
complaint against the university
in September for what they viewed
as the administration’s failure to
adequately protect its students.
Signatories of the boycott letter,
posted online last week, said they
“cannot in good conscience encourage our students to pursue
educational or employment opportunities at the University of
Rochester.” More than 400 professors and instructors from around
the world have signed the docu-
ment. The letter’s authors delivered it to two board of trustees
members Monday.
“We, as academics, engage in
ongoing promotion of other institutions all the time. It’s part of our
jobs,” said Robin Panneton, a psychology professor at Virginia Tech
and one of the letter’s four coauthors. Professors often write letters of recommendation and suggest which graduate or postdoctoral programs their students
might apply to. Educators also advise students to steer clear of certain institutions. “There’s nothing
about this letter that isn’t already
ongoing all the time,” Panneton
said.
But it is unprecedented for
these discussions to occur openly.
This is the first time academics
have issued this sort of public
statement, said Heidi Lockwood, a
Southern Connecticut State University professor of philosophy
and co-author of the letter.
In September, Mother Jones
broke the news of the EEOC complaint. One of the complainants,
cognitive scientist Celeste Kidd,
alleged that Jaeger sent her sexually explicit messages.
The university had investigated
claims against the scientist twice
in the past two years. Yet, while
doing so, it promoted Jaeger. Officials concluded in June 2016 that
Jaeger had sexual relationships
with a graduate student and a
prospective student. They also determined that Jaeger was not in
violation of university harassment
policies. Richard Aslin, a former
Rochester psychologist and one of
the complaintants, stood up in a
faculty meeting in December 2016
and resigned in protest.
After the EEOC letter was filed,
Joel Seligman, University of Rochester’s president, issued a statement on Sept. 11, saying that he
stood by the school’s investigation. “Allegations are not facts,
and as we saw in Rolling Stone’s
withdrawn story about sexual assault at the University of Virginia,
even established media outlets
can get it wrong.” The next day,
Seligman apologized for comparing news reports to the discredited
Rolling Stone article. Seligman
also said that Jaeger’s promotion
while he was under investigation
for sexual harassment was a “mistake,” the Rochester Democrat &
Chronicle reported on Sept. 30.
On Sept. 13, University of Rochester senior Lindsay Wrobel began
a six-day hunger strike in protest.
“For me, that was the watershed
moment,” Lockwood said.
“Instead of protecting individuals who came forward and enforcing the University’s values, the administration sought to diminish
the reported events and created a
hostile environment for the victims, their advocates, and many
other members of the campus
community,” the letter’s authors
wrote.
Jaeger was placed on administrative leave on Sept. 19. In an
email obtained by the Chronicle of
Higher Education, he apologized
to his students “for the emotional
turmoil you must be experiencing,
following the allegations raised
against me in the EEOC complaint
as well as news coverage.”
The university has commissioned another investigation, led
by attorney Mary Jo White, a former chair of the Securities and
Exchange Commission.
Lockwood said the investigation is tainted by Seligman’s relationship with the SEC; Seligman
has published histories of the
agency and, Lockwood noted, is at
work on another book related to
the agency. “The claim that there’s
no conflict of interest is ridiculous,” she said.
White “has accepted the assignment on conditions of unconditional independence and unfet-
tered access to all witnesses, documents and information within the
University’s control,” a representative for the University of Rochester told The Washington Post.
The representative also said:
“Many students, faculty and administrators at the University do
not recognize the institution described in the letter circulating on
the Internet. . . . It is regrettable
that the letter is signed by many
people who do not have direct
knowledge of the actual circumstances here.”
Panneton said this boycott has
caused “collateral damage” to University of Rochester researchers
who feel unfairly punished. “It’s
costing me friendships,” she said.
“But I’ve tried to get them to turn
their anger against their own administration.”
ben.guarino@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
TM
All Brands In Stock
For Fast Delivery!
®
7000 Wisconsin Ave. 2nd Floor • Chevy Chase, MD 20815
(301) 654-8989
www.parvizianfinerugs.com
Mattress and Adjustable Bed Sale
GOING ON NOW!
All Adjustable Beds On Sale! We Sell a BETTER Mattress FOR LESS!
PRICE DROP!
Top-of-Line model with remote
control and massage function
$799
899
Queen
Twin XL
$
ADJUSTABLE BEDS
Regal Plush P/Top or
Dreamer Memory Foam
399
$
Twin Set
$299
Full Set
$349
Queen
Set
King Set
$699
1598 King (2 Twin-XL)
$
Portofino Ultra Firm,
Symphony Luxury Firm P/Top
or Premier + Gel
499
$
Twin Set
$329
Full Set
$449
899
Twin Set
$699
Full Set
$849
Queen
Set
King Set
$1199
999
$
Twin Set
$799
Full Set
$949
King Set
$799
Twin Set
$499
King Set
$999
1099
$
King Set
$1299
Twin Set
$899
Twin, Full, Queen or King
Full Set
$649
Queen
Set
Legacy +Gel
Queen
Set
ANY SIZE, ONE PRICE!
Ultra Rest Firm
699
$
Queen
Set
Tranquility +Gel Revitalize +Gel
$
Rejuvenate +Gel
Full Set
$1049
99
$
Queen
Set
King Set
$1399
Each Piece
(SOLD IN SETS)
Q, F, T -2pc, K-3pc
We BEAT Any Competitor’s PRICE by 25% - GUARANTEED!*
All Tempur-Pedic Models and
Adjustable Bases In-stock & Ready
for Immediate FREE Delivery!
Check out our Healthy Rest mattress line at healthyrestmattress.com
Sterling/Ashburn/Leesburg/Great Falls/Reston/Herndon
(703) 430-7177 • 22195 Shaw Road • STERLING, VA 20166
(next to Belfort Furniture)
Springfield/Annandale/Kingstowne/Burke/Fairfax Station
(703) 912-1208 • 6842 Franconia Road • SPRINGFIELD, VA 22150
(By Beltway & 395)
Bailey’s X-Roads/Arlington/Falls Church/Alexandria/D.C.
Potomac Mills/Woodbridge/Lakeridge/Dumfries/Dale City
(703) 492-4044 • 2709 Potomac Mills Circle • WOODBRIDGE, VA 22192 (703) 778-5096 • 5520-A Leesburg Pike • FALLS CHURCH, VA 22041
(Across from Toys-R-Us, next to Party City)
(Behind Silver Diner across from Nordstrom Rack)
*Free delivery requires minimum purchase of $799. Price guarantee excludes Tempur-Pedic® products. Offers valid
while supplies last. See store for complete details.
Bailey’s X-Roads/Arlington/Falls Church/Alexandria/D.C.
(703) 778-0406 • 5816 Seminary Road • FALLS CHURCH, VA 22041
(Intersection of Carlin Springs Rd & Seminary Rd)
@HealthyRestMattresses
M-F 10-9 | Sat 10-8 | Sun 11-6
Daily
Drawing for
FREE Rug!
Like us on Facebook
for Live updates!
T
THANKSGIVING
KS V
CLEARANCE
AUCTION
3 DAYS ONLY!
Millions of Dollars of fine
Oriental Rugs to be auctioned off!
TWO HOUR PREVIEW EACH DAY
Friday, November 24th, 2017 at 1:00PM
Saturday, November 25th, 2017 at 1:00PM
Sunday, November 26th, 2017 at 1:00PM
*Call or visit store for terms and conditions
AUCTION to be held at 7000 Wisconsin Ave, 2nd Floor • Chevy Chase, MD 20815!
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
The World
Mugabe’s fired deputy returns to Zimbabwe
Emmerson Mnangagwa, expected to be named president, promises democracy but warns that the ruling party will stay in control
BY KEVIN SIEFF
harare, zimbabwe — The man
expected to lead Zimbabwe after
the dramatic toppling of longtime
president Robert Mugabe returned from abroad on Wednesday, promising democracy but
also warning that the ruling party
would remain firmly in control.
Emmerson Mnangagwa’s arrival in Harare marked the beginning of an era that many here
were already referring to as a
rebirth. After 37 years of Mugabe’s
increasingly authoritarian rule,
the nation of 16 million was jubilant at the prospect of more freedom and an improvement in the
fragile economy.
But Zimbabwe is entering a
deeply uncertain period. Its new
leader is a man with a dubious
legacy, who was appointed
through a shadowy, closed-door
process. He faces immense challenges in resurrecting an economy that shrank during decades of
political turbulence and is burdened by $11 billion in debt.
Mnangagwa is a longtime
Mugabe ally, nicknamed “the
crocodile” because of a reputation
for savviness and a willingness to
use harsh tactics.
He is expected to be appointed
president within days, becoming
the country’s second leader since
independence from Britain in
1980. Mnangagwa was dismissed
several weeks ago by Mugabe,
precipitating a military takeover
that on Tuesday led to the longtime president’s resignation.
Mnangagwa then left the country
over concerns for his safety.
On his return Wednesday, he
delivered a short, ebullient speech
in front of a roaring crowd at the
headquarters of the ruling party,
ZANU-PF, which has nominated
him as the country’s next leader.
“Today we are witnessing the
beginning of a new unfolding democracy in our country,” he said,
after flying in from South Africa.
“I pledge myself to be your
servant,” Mnangagwa added. “I
appeal to all genuine parties in
Zimbabwe to come together and
work together. No one is more
important than the other. We are
all Zimbabweans.”
But switching from English to
the local Shona language, Mnangagwa took a darker turn, belittling the opposition.
“Those who oppose us will bark
and bark,” he said. “They will
continue to bark, but the ZANUPF train will roll on, ruling and
ruling while they bark.”
Many Zimbabweans have questioned the legality of his ascent —
Mnangagwa had no formal position in government after being
fired, and he is not in the constitutional line of succession. But the
ruling party, which Mugabe ran
for nearly four decades before it
abandoned him last week,
claimed that it had the authority
to appoint the next president.
Mnangagwa arrives in power at
a time of extraordinary unity in
Zimbabwe.
For the first time in decades,
white farmers, activists, soldiers
and opposition groups marched
together through the streets of
Harare this past week in defiance
of Mugabe. Many people have
concerns about Mnangagwa but
Families of
Argentine
sub’s crew
in anguish
A SSOCIATED P RESS
mar del plata, argentina —
PHOTOS BY JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Emmerson Mnangagwa, center left, with supporters in Harare. He has a reputation for being savvy and being willing to use harsh tactics.
Supporters gather to greet Mnangagwa, who delivered a short,
ebullient speech. Many Zimbabweans have questioned the legality
of his ascent, as the country enters a period of deep uncertainty.
have largely accepted the inevitability of his leadership and are
hoping for the best.
Mnangagwa and Mugabe were
part of the cadre of liberation
When Mugabe was elected
prime minister, Mnangagwa also
began to climb the ranks of government. Opposition politicians
and human rights activists have
“Today we are witnessing the beginning of a new
unfolding democracy in our country. . . . I appeal to
all genuine parties in Zimbabwe to come together.”
Emmerson Mnangagwa
leaders who fought to oust the
white-minority
government
when the country was known as
Rhodesia. For his role in the
movement, Mnangagwa served 10
years in Harare Prison, including
some time with Mugabe.
accused him of helping to engineer a crackdown on the Ndebele
tribe, whose members were seen
to be against the Mugabe regime
in the early 1980s. The operation
resulted in the murder of about
20,000 members of the Ndebele
tribe. Mnangagwa has denied responsibility for the mass killings.
“Mnangagwa was the man to
execute all of Mugabe’s dirty
work,” said Rugare Gumbo, another liberation fighter who was
imprisoned with the two men and
worked for the ruling party until a
falling out with its leadership in
2014. “We hope when he comes
back now, he will be a changed
man.”
In 2003, Mnangagwa, along
with dozens of other members of
Mugabe’s government, was sanctioned by the United States for
“undermining democratic processes or institutions.”
He will now be in a position to
rebuild his relationship with the
West — a critical step in improving the nation’s battered economy.
In his short speech on
Wednesday, Mnangagwa said,
“We need the cooperation of our
friends outside the continent” —
a bold request for assistance after years of Mugabe’s anti-Western rhetoric.
In 2000, a State Department
cable described Mnangagwa as
“widely feared and despised
throughout the country,” a man
who “could be an even more repressive leader” than Mugabe.
But American officials have
indicated that they are prepared
to work with Mnangagwa as he
assumes the leadership of Zimbabwe.
“We are always willing to give
someone a fresh start,” the U.S.
ambassador to Zimbabawe, Harry
K. Thomas Jr., said in an interview. “You can’t forget the past.
You just cannot. But this is an
opportunity for a fresh start. This
is an opportunity to show the
world that you have the capacity
to lead in a free and fair way that’s
friendly to business as well as the
common person.”
Thomas described the country
as being in an “economic abyss,”
an assessment that both Zimbabwean and foreign analysts
echoed.
At the heart of the country’s
economic woes was the government’s weakening of property
rights, which led to the eviction of
thousands of white farmers from
their lands and the disintegration
of the country’s once-powerful agricultural sector. Foreign banks
fled the country when their loans
were not repaid.
Zimbabwe’s government then
tried to solve the crisis by printing
more money. What followed was
one of the most extreme cases of
hyperinflation in modern times.
Eventually, the country was producing 100 trillion-dollar bills in
Zimbabwean currency. By 1999,
Zimbabwe began defaulting on its
foreign debt and lost access to
loans from institutions such as
the World Bank and International
Monetary Fund.
“Mnangagwa needs to give the
right to own property back to the
people,” said John Robertson, a
Zimbabwean economist. “If you
have an asset base that helps guarantee the repayment of loans, international banks can lend to local banks and local banks can lend
to people.”
Aside from the economic questions, much else remains unclear
in post-Mugabe Zimbabwe.
For now, elections are scheduled in 2018. But Mnangagwa has
not said whether he plans to delay
them.
kevin.sieff@washpost.com
Paul Schemm in Addis Ababa,
Ethiopia, contributed to this report.
The families of 44 crew members
aboard an Argentine submarine
that has been lost in the South
Atlantic for seven days are growing increasingly distressed as
experts said the crew might be
reaching a critical period of low
oxygen Wednesday.
The ARA San Juan went missing Nov. 15 when it was sailing
from the extreme southern port
of Ushuaia to the city of Mar del
Plata, about 250 miles southeast
of Buenos Aires. The Argentine
navy and outside experts worry
that oxygen for the crew would
last only seven to 10 days if the
submarine were intact but submerged. Authorities still do not
know whether the vessel rose to
the surface to replenish oxygen
and charge batteries with its
diesel motors.
The German-built dieselelectric TR-1700-class submarine
was set to arrive Monday at a
naval base in Mar del Plata,
where residents have come with
blue-and-white Argentine flags
and messages of support for
relatives of the crew anxiously
awaiting news.
More than a dozen international aircraft and ships have
joined the maritime search despite stormy weather that has
caused powerful waves exceeding 20 feet in height.
The U.S. government has sent
two P-8 Poseidon aircraft, a naval
research ship, a submarine rescue chamber and sonarequipped underwater vehicles to
help in the effort.
Sailors from the San Diegobased Undersea Rescue Command also are helping.
Hopes were lifted after brief
satellite calls were received and
when sounds were detected deep
in the South Atlantic. But experts
later determined that neither
signal was from the missing
submarine.
A U.S. Navy P-8 Poseidon later
spotted flares, and a life raft was
found in the search area, but
authorities said they did not
come from the missing submarine.
The false alarms have rattled
nerves among distraught family
members. As the search enters a
critical phase, some have begun
to complain that the Argentine
navy responded too late.
“They took two days to accept
help because they minimized the
situation,” said Federico Ibáñez,
the brother of 36-year-old submarine crew member Cristian
Ibáñez.
The navy has said that the
submarine reported a battery
failure before it went missing as
it journeyed to the naval base in
Mar del Plata. Authorities have
no specific details of the problem.
“I feel like authorities let too
much time pass by and decisions
were taken late,” Ibáñez’s sister,
Elena Alfaro, said outside the
base. “And yet, I still carry some
hope.”
DIGEST
YEMEN
Saudi-led coalition to
reopen key airport, port
The Saudi-led military coalition
fighting Shiite rebels in Yemen
said Wednesday that it will reopen
the war-torn country’s main
airport and a vital Red Sea port to
some humanitarian aid
shipments, easing a blockade
imposed after rebels fired a
missile toward the Saudi capital
earlier this month.
The easing is to begin
Thursday. The airport — in the
capital, Sanaa — would reopen to
U.N. aircraft, the coalition said,
and the port of Hodeida would be
able to receive urgent
humanitarian aid.
It was not immediately clear,
however, whether port operations
would return to the pre-blockade
level.
“It is good news, but we are still
waiting to see the specific details,”
Jamie McGoldrick, the U.N.
humanitarian chief for Yemen,
said of Wednesday’s
announcement.
In an interview just before the
coalition made the
announcement, McGoldrick said
a continued blockade would make
Yemen’s long-suffering population
even more vulnerable to cholera
and famine.
About 7 million people in
Yemen — which has a population
of 27 million — depend entirely on
food aid, and 4 million rely on aid
groups for clean water.
It was not clear whether fuel
imports, crucial for supplying
clean water, would resume as part
of the easing of the blockade,
McGoldrick said.
ITALY
Berlusconi, government
spar in European court
— Associated Press
PAKISTAN
Court orders release of
alleged Mumbai plotter
A Pakistani court on
Wednesday rejected the
government’s plea to extend for
three months the house arrest of a
U.S.-wanted militant who
founded a banned group linked to
the 2008 Mumbai terrorist
attacks.
The United States has
designated Hafiz Mohammad
Saeed a terrorist and offered a
$10 million bounty for him.
Saeed ran Jamaat-ud-Dawa, an
organization widely believed to
be a front for the Lashkar-e-Taiba
militant group, which was behind
KIRSTY WIGGLESWORTH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Philip Hammond, Britain’s chancellor of the exchequer, walks to his
car with his traditional red dispatch box before delivering his annual
budget speech to Parliament. Hammond, under pressure to ease
austerity in spending plans, unveiled a budget that includes measures
to help first-time home buyers, about $59 billion in capital investment
in housing and about $3.7 billion more for the National Health Service.
the attacks in Mumbai. The
attacks killed 166 people.
Pakistan put Saeed and four of
his aides under house arrest in
Lahore in January.
His spokesman said a threejudge panel dismissed the
government’s extension plea.
Saeed’s detention ends Thursday.
His aides were released earlier.
It is unclear whether
Wednesday’s development could
open the way for Saeed’s
extradition to India or the United
States.
— Associated Press
Attorneys for Silvio Berlusconi
and the Italian government
sparred Wednesday in Europe’s
human rights court in an unusual,
high-profile case that could help
the 81-year-old tycoon’s attempted
political comeback.
Berlusconi, a three-time Italian
prime minister, says Italy’s
government violated his rights by
barring him from public office
over a tax fraud conviction. He is
appealing to the France-based
European Court of Human
Rights, though he said
Wednesday that he is determined
to weigh in on Italy’s upcoming
electoral campaign regardless of
what the court decides.
Berlusconi, who has emerged
from the political shadows in the
run-up to the 2018 elections, has
asked Italy’s president to delay
general elections until late spring
in hopes that the court will make
a decision in time to allow him to
run on his Forza Italia ticket.
His attorney argued
Wednesday that Italy violated
Berlusconi’s human rights in
multiple ways, notably by means
of a 2012 law preventing anyone
sentenced to more than two years
in prison from holding or running
for public office for at least six
years.
Berlusconi in 2013 was stripped
of his Senate seat and barred from
holding public office after a tax
fraud conviction.
An attorney for Italy’s
government insisted that the
eligibility rules “were not
introduced to persecute, and there
was nothing personal about it.”
— Associated Press
Philippines to extradite priest
accused of molesting U.S. boys:
The Philippines is preparing to
extradite to the United States a
Philippine Catholic priest accused
of sexually molesting two boys in
North Dakota churches in the
1990s, an official said. Chief State
Counsel Ricardo Paras said
Fernando Laude Sayasaya was
arrested over the weekend and
will be flown back to the United
States. He was charged in a North
Dakota court over alleged sexual
advances toward two underage
siblings from 1995 to 1998 in two
churches, according to Philippine
Court of Appeals documents that
cited a U.S. investigation.
— From news services
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
U.S. 7th Fleet cargo plane carrying 11 crashes into Pacific
Eight rescued off Japan;
forces from both nations
search for the missing
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — Eight people have been
rescued and are in “good condition” after a U.S. Navy cargo plane
carrying 11 crew members and
passengers crashed into the Pacific Ocean off Japan, the U.S.
Navy’s 7th Fleet said Wednesday.
The search for the remaining
three people is continuing.
It was the latest accident to
befall the 7th Fleet, which
is based in the Japanese port of
Yokosuka, south of Tokyo, and has
endured multiple collisions at sea
this year, including two that involved guided-missile destroyers
and left 17 sailors dead.
The C-2A Greyhound aircraft
was on a routine flight from Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni in
southern Japan to the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier, which
is in the Philippine Sea for exercises with Japan’s Maritime Self-
Defense Force.
It crashed at 2:45 p.m. local
time Wednesday, the 7th Fleet
said in a statement. The cause of
the crash was not immediately
known, it said, and an investigation will be conducted.
The eight who were rescued
were transferred to the Reagan
for medical evaluation. They were
later described by the Navy as
being in “good condition.”
The Reagan crew and Japanese
forces were conducting searchand-rescue operations Wednesday afternoon to recover the remaining crew members and passengers. “We are monitoring the
situation. Prayers for all involved,” President Trump wrote in
a Twitter post.
“The Maritime Self-Defense
Force is currently searching with
U.S. forces,” Japanese Defense
Minister Itsunori Onodera said,
according to public broadcaster
NHK. “We received information
from U.S. forces that the cause is
possibly engine malfunction.”
Onodera voiced concern about
the frequency of aircraft accidents involving U.S. forces, saying
he would ask the American military to take more care with safety
EDUARDO OTERO/U.S. NAVY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A photo taken last week shows a C-2A Greyhound plane launching
from the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan in the Philippine Sea.
issues. This was an apparent reference to last month’s crash on
Okinawa, when a transport helicopter caught fire during a training flight and crashed 300 yards
from houses. No one was injured.
The C-2A, a twin-engine cargo
plane designed to transport people and supplies to and from aircraft carriers, crashed 93 miles
northwest of Okinotori island,
about halfway between Okinawa
and Guam, according to the Okinawa Defense Bureau.
The 7th Fleet has been conducting exercises linked to the
recent rise in tensions with North
Korea. This month, for the first
time in a decade, it carried out
a three-carrier strike exercise in
the sea between Japan and the
Korean Peninsula — a show of
force that North Korea has decried as warmongering.
Wednesday’s crash is just the
latest such incident involving the
7th Fleet this year.
Ten sailors were killed when
the USS John S. McCain collided
with an oil tanker near Singapore
in August, and seven died when
the USS Fitzgerald ran into a
much heavier container ship off
the coast of Japan in June.
The month before, the guidedmissile cruiser USS Lake Champlain collided with a South Korean fishing vessel off the Korean Peninsula, and the guidedmissile cruiser USS Antietam
ran aground in Tokyo Bay in
January.
Most recently, a Japanese tug
lost propulsion and drifted into
the USS Benfold, another guidedmissile destroyer, during a towing
exercise last week. No one was
injured on either vessel, and the
Benfold sustained minimal damage, the 7th Fleet said in a statement on Saturday.
The 7th Fleet has about 50 to 70
ships assigned to it and is responsible for an area that spans 36
maritime countries and 48 million square miles in the Pacific
and Indian oceans, according to
the Navy.
The Navy removed the admiral
in charge from his position in
August, citing a “loss of confidence” in his ability to lead, and
the Navy’s top admiral ordered a
fleetwide review of seamanship
and training in the Pacific after
the McCain collision.
A survey released last month of
sailors on the USS Shiloh, a cruiser, painted a damning picture of
life in the 7th Fleet. The sailors
say they are overworked and undertrained.
“I just pray we never have to
shoot down a missile from North
Korea,” one sailor lamented, according to the Navy Times, “because then our ineffectiveness
will really show.”
The crew members described
dysfunction from the top, suicidal
thoughts, exhaustion, despair
and concern that the Shiloh was
being pushed to sail while vital
repairs remained incomplete, the
paper reported.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
Yuki Oda contributed to this report.
International tribunal on war crimes in Balkans convicts Mladic of genocide
Serb ex-general known
as ‘Butcher of Bosnia’
receives life sentence
BY
G RIFF W ITTE
berlin — Ratko Mladic, a former
Serb warlord who commanded
forces that carried out some of the
worst atrocities of the Balkan
wars, was found guilty of genocide
and other crimes against humanity by an international tribunal
Wednesday.
Mladic, 74, was sentenced to
life in prison for his role in the
bloodiest chapter of European
history since World War II.
His conviction on 10 of 11
counts marks the last major prosecution by the International
Criminal Tribunal for the Former
Yugoslavia, which the U.N. Security Council set up more than two
decades ago.
The verdict was hailed as a
victory for justice — even if it was
long delayed.
“Mladic is the epitome of evil,
and the prosecution of Mladic is
the epitome of what international
justice is all about,” said U.N. human rights chief Zeid Ra’ad alHussein.
Mladic, whose attorneys had
sought to block Wednesday’s
judgment on the grounds that he
was too ill to attend trial, had been
removed from the courtroom before the verdict was read following an angry outburst in which he
shouted insults at the presiding
judge, Alphons Orie. Mladic’s attorneys said he will appeal the
verdict, and they continued to
deny the charges.
Also at The Hague to witness
the verdict were survivors, including those who had been held in
concentration camps and mothers who lost their children during
a merciless years-long military
campaign against Bosnian Muslims that the court ruled amounted to an extermination attempt.
Survivors applauded and wept
as the decision by the three-judge
panel was read, with many saying
it represented a just punishment
for a man dubbed the “Butcher of
Bosnia.”
Orie said in reading the verdict
that Mladic’s crimes “rank among
the most heinous known to humankind.” The judgment came after a trial that lasted more than
four years, and involved testimony from nearly 600 witnesses.
They recounted a litany of horrors carried out by forces under
Mladic’s command during the
war in Bosnia from 1992 to 1995,
which claimed upward of 100,000
lives. The atrocities included sniper attacks, indiscriminate shelling, mass executions, and imprisonment in camps where people
died of malnourishment and disease.
Perhaps most horrific was the
Mladic-directed July 1995 massacre of more than 7,000 Bosnian
Muslim men and boys at Srebrenica, a supposed U.N. safe haven.
Mladic was also convicted of orchestrating the destruction of Sarajevo, the Bosnian capital,
through a four-year siege punctuated by shelling and sniper fire.
“Burn their brains!” witnesses
reported Mladic, a career military
man, shouting as he watched his
troops shell the city.
Mladic, an ultranationalist,
viewed the war as a chance for
Serbs to avenge hundreds of years
of occupation by Muslim Turks.
Wednesday’s judgment found
that he persecuted Croats and
PETER DEJONG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ratko Mladic shouted at the
presiding judge in The Hague.
AMEL EMRIC/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Graffiti on a street in Sarajevo, Bosnia, recalls the Mladic-directed July 1995 massacre of more than 7,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys.
Muslims with the intent to create
“ethnically clean” territories.
“Circumstances were brutal,”
Orie said in reading the verdict.
“Those who tried to defend their
homes were met with ruthless
force. Mass executions occurred
and some victims succumbed after being beaten. Many of the perpetrators who had captured Bosnian Muslims showed little or no
respect for human life or dignity.”
The prosecutions of Balkan war
criminals are considered the most
important war crimes cases in
Europe since the Nuremberg trials of Nazi perpetrators. Of the 161
people indicted by the tribunal on
war crimes charges, none remain
at large today.
In many cases, the perpetrators
were tracked down after exhaustive international manhunts that
extended for a decade or more.
Mladic went into hiding in 1997
and was apprehended in 2011,
when Serb police found him living
in a cousin’s village near the Romanian border.
Wednesday’s decision was
praised by human rights advocates.
Amnesty International called
the sentence a “landmark moment for justice.”
The New York-based Physicians for Human Rights, which
sent teams to exhume mass graves
across the former Yugoslavia and
supplied crucial evidence to the
tribunal, also cheered the decision.
“After more than two decades,
today’s verdict offers a measure of
justice for all those who suffered
from Mladic’s unconscionable
crimes,” said Susannah Sirkin, the
group’s director of international
policy and partnerships.
But the verdict was denounced
by right-wing parties in Serbia,
where nationalist sentiment has
again been on the rise. The Serbian Radical Party, which won
8 percent of the vote in elections
last year, described Mladic as “a
war hero.”
“The verdict is political,” party
leader Vojislav Seselj said.
Serbian President Aleksandar
Vucic, meanwhile, appealed for
his countrymen to “not choke on
tears over the past.”
“My call to people in Serbia
today is to start looking to the
future,” Vucic told Serbian reporters.
Mladic’s conviction follows
that of the Serb political leader
who took his country to war in
Bosnia. Radovan Karadzic was
convicted by the tribunal last year
of crimes against humanity, and
sentenced to 40 years in prison.
Although Mladic was cleared
on one charge of genocide related
to accusations of mass killings in
several Bosnian municipalities,
he was convicted of the charge as
it related to Srebrenica.
The salt-mining town, which
supposedly was under the protection of U.N. forces, became a byword for the inability of the international community to prevent
ethnic cleansing.
Mladic handed out sweets and
offered reassuring words to the
town’s Muslim children just hours
before his forces executed thousands of men and boys there.
Many of the victims were shot in
the back of the head, their arms
bound behind them.
In addition to genocide, Mladic
was convicted on numerous other
counts, including murder, deliberately causing terror and taking
U.N. personnel hostage. The judgment said that his troops had
engaged in the rape of Muslim
women and girls, the destruction
of homes and mosques, and the
forced deportation of civilians.
The war broke out in 1992 as
the former Yugoslavia collapsed,
and regions including Bosnia declared independence. Serb forces
initially sought to defend Bosnian
Serb territory but soon spread
violence across the country.
Mladic had looked relaxed as
he entered the courtroom
Wednesday, smiling and flashing
a thumbs-up. But after the judge
rejected a request from his attorney for the session to be postponed because the defendant was
suffering from high blood pressure, the suit-and-tie-clad former
general stood up and began
shouting.
“You’re lying!” Mladic said, as
he was escorted from the courtroom.
Mladic then watched on television in an adjacent room as the
judge announced his fate.
griff.witte@washpost.com
Luisa Beck contributed to this report.
OYSTER
PERPETUAL 39
rolex oyster and perpetual
are ® trademarks.
A10
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
The thin ribbon of land that separates North and South Korea
RUSSIA
O
K
H
i z e d
a r
t
i
R
CH IN A
N OR TH
K OR EA
Beijing
Pyongyang
S OUTH
K OR EA
D e
m
Approximate range
of North Korean
artillery (44 miles)
(DMZ)
Z o n
e
Hasean
Hasea
asse
ea
ean
n
Peace
Pea
Pe
P
ea
ace
Dam
Da
D
am
m
i
Che
Cheorwon
eorwo
rwo
won
wo
won
K
O
R
E
okc
kch
Sokcho
S
o
ok
k
kc
ch
A
Sea of Japan
(East Sea)
H
10 MILES
T
U
O
Kaseong
seong
o
Camp
Ca
C
Cam
amp
pC
Casey
Cas
Ca
ase
asey
assey
eyy
Camps
amps
p Caseyy and Red Cloud —
both
oth within
ot
hin 20
2 miles of the DMZ —
have
av more than 6,000 U.S.
soldiers
old e stationed there.
S
Han Estuary
Ca
Camp
Red
Re
Red
Cloud
Cl d
Cl
In 1990, a 6-by-6-foot North
Korean tunnel was
discovered in the northern
s
part of the Hasean
basin
e it
i could be
e
valley before
completed. It was the
urth suspected
suspecte
cted invasion
s
fourth
el found in the
e
t DMZ.
DM
tunnel
Gangneung
y
PyeongChang
Ha
nR
ive
r
Incheon
Sea of Japan
(East Sea)
DETAIL
Yellow
Sea
Kosong
Im n
Imnan
D m
Dam
Da
A
E
l
R
O
Vladivostok
JAP AN
T
N
More than 25 million South
Koreans live under constant
threat from North Korean
artillery, much of it in fortified
positions along the border as
shown by the dots on this
map. The weapons are
precise and have a range of
up to 44 miles.
Imnam Dam, on the Bukhan River
in North Korea, was completed in
2003. Fearing an intentional
release of massive amounts of
water, South Korea constructed
Peace Dam 22 miles to the south.
The Sepo stockbreeding
zone recently expanded
livestock facilities to
increase production of
meat for the country,
where food shortages are
common.
The Joint Security Area is
overseen by the United
Nations and is where
diplomatic discussions
between the two countries
take place. It’s the only
place where North and
South Koreans stand face to
face. South Korean guards,
ust be black belts in
i
who must
ondo and meet
taekwondo
n height requirements,
requireme
em
eme
ments,
me
ent
certain
m
preventt anybody from
ng the border..
crossing
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
200 MILES
The Korean Demilitarized Zone was established as a buffer zone between North Korea and South Korea following the 1953 armistice in the
Korean War. It divides the peninsula roughly in half and is about 160 miles across and 2.5 miles wide.
An unintentional benefit of
no people and no
development for nearly 65
years: The slender DMZ is a
nearly pristine ecological
habitat. Several endangered
species live there, including
red-crowned and
white-naped cranes and
Amur gorals, which are
related to goats.
. THURSDAY,
Seoul
Yongs
ngsan
ngs
g an Garrison
so
o
Yongsan
Sources: North Korea data courtesy of Curtis
Melvin of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns
Hopkins SAIS and 38 North. Map imagery from
European Space Agency Sentinel satellite.
Demilitarized zone data from OpenStreetMap.
Yongsan Garrison, in the heart of
Seoul, has served as the
headquarters for the U.S. military
in South Korea. Because it lies
within the North’s artillery range,
the U.S. has begun moving
operations to a new garrison in
Pyeongtaek, roughly 35 miles to
the south.
The 2018 Winter Olympics
in PyeongChang are just
over 50 miles from the
DMZ. South Korea plans to
increase cybersecurity and
mobilize more than 5,000
members of its armed
forces to protect the
venues.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Pop songs part of prescription for North Korean defector
ESCAPE FROM A1
Lee said.
It was still touch-and-go when
Oh arrived at the hospital. His
blood pressure was so low after
losing so much blood that the
doctors did not even have time to
check his blood type. Instead,
they pumped about 40 units —
between three and four times the
amount of blood contained in a
human body — of type O into
him.
He has had three surgeries,
including an attempt to repair his
damaged internal organs and
stop the contamination caused by
the parasites and the injuries.
Through it all, the trauma
surgeon, often in scrubs, has been
giving regular updates on the
soldier’s condition.
The revelation that the man
had a severe parasitic infection —
Lee said he had never seen such a
case except in medical textbooks
— and that his stomach contained raw corn kernels prompted widespread shock in South
Korea. North Korean front-line
soldiers were supposed to be elite
troops, yet this man had worms
not seen in South Korea since the
1970s and had been eating uncooked corn?
Oh also has tuberculosis and
hepatitis B, Lee said. And, at
5 feet 5 inches tall and weighing
about 130 pounds, he is several
inches shorter and 20 pounds
lighter than the average male
18-year-old South Korean.
There is intense interest in the
soldier, and military intelligence
officers reportedly are eager to
question him about his escape,
but Lee has been fending them
off. The soldier is showing signs
of depression and post-traumatic
stress, and it will take about a
month before he is well enough to
answer questions, the doctor
said.
For now, Lee is keeping the
conversation light — talking
about the way things are done in
South Korea rather than asking
him about North Korea — and
trying to cheer him up.
The medical staff played him
“Gee,” a peppy pop song by Girls’
Generation — featuring lyrics
The revelation that the
defector had a severe
parasitic infection and
that his stomach
contained raw corn
kernels prompted
widespread shock in
South Korea that frontline soldiers faced such
conditions in the North.
YONHAP NEWS AGENCY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
South Korean doctor Lee Cookjong, who performed surgery
on the North Korean soldier
shot as he tried to defect,
speaks at Ajou University
Hospital in Suwon, south of
Seoul, last week.
such as, “Oh, it’s too pretty, your
soul’s too pretty/It’s love at first
sight” — and he declared that he
liked girl bands.
Lee also said Oh has been
watching the American TV series
“CSI” and the action movie “The
Transporter,” in which a former
special-forces operative hires
himself out as a mercenary.
The staff also has hung a South
Korean flag in his room to reassure him he really is in the South.
This is not Lee’s first time in
the spotlight. The surgeon became a national hero in 2011
when he saved the life of a ship
captain who had been shot by
Somali pirates.
After pirates seized a chemical
freighter near the Gulf of Aden in
2011, South Korean commandos
stormed the ship and the pirates
shot the captain six times during
the rescue attempt.
Lee was waiting at a hospital in
Oman and saved the captain’s
life, earning a reputation as the
country’s leading trauma surgeon. There was even a popular
medical drama based on this
story, “Golden Time.” The title
was a reference to Lee’s frequent
reminder that it is the hour after
a severe injury that is most important for saving someone’s life.
The 48-year-old Lee, who is
blind in one eye and renowned
for working 36-hour shifts, was
also the inspiration for a character in another drama, “Romantic
Doctor, Teacher Kim,” released
last year. He became such a celebrity that even octogenarians with
diabetes were trying to get in to
see him.
Lee became a doctor in South
Korea but trained as a criticalcare surgeon at the University of
California at San Diego Medical
Center in 2003. He then went on
to the Royal London Hospital’s
trauma center.
Returning home, he realized
that there was no equivalent facility at any hospital in South
Korea and estimated that about
30,000 trauma patients were dying in the country each year
because of treatment delays and a
lack of dedicated trauma units.
He persuaded authorities to
fund proper trauma centers, in-
cluding his unit at Ajou University Hospital. Now, 20 percent of
revenue from traffic fines goes to
trauma centers in the country.
But for a trauma surgeon, Lee
faces a predicament that is unimaginable for American ER doctors: He seldom gets to treat
gunshot wounds, because South
Korea has very strict rules on gun
ownership.
Ten murders with a firearm
were reported in South Korea
between 2010 and 2015, compared with 8,592 in the United
States, according to figures from
the Small Arms Survey.
Instead, the relatively few gunshot wounds he has treated have
been sustained by South Korean
and U.S. soldiers hurt during
military drills, he told the Korea
Times in 2015. Still, that appears
to have been enough practice to
save the North Korean soldier’s
life.
Now, South Koreans are waiting for Lee’s next statement on
the soldier’s prognosis.
In online forums, South Korean “netizens” have been sending their best wishes to Lee and
his patient.
“A Korean who put his life on
the line to cross over to the south.
Hopefully he can be saved!” wrote
one in an online medical forum.
Another added, “Please survive
so you can live in South Korea!”
anna.fifield@washpost.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
COLOSSAL
A11
®
BlackFridayy SALE
FURNITURE SHOWROOMS
§ Living Rooms § Dining Rooms § Bedrooms § and More
(
Doors Open 7AM
FREE DELIVERY
Shop Early Save Even More!
AND SET-UP
Black Friday
Black FFriday
d
Black
k FFriday
SAVE*
SAVE*
SAVE*
EVERYTHING
EVERYTHING
7AM-3PM 3PM-6PM 6PM-11PM
60
%
OFF
EVERYTHING
55 OFF 50 OFF
%
%
NOCREDITN
EEDED
No C
®
redit Check!
NO INTEREST
FINANCING
®
Capitol Heights, MD
Ritchie Station Marketplace
1859 Ritchie Station Court
240-492-3441
Next to Dave & Busters
FURNITURE SHOWROOMS
Shop Online Today. RegencyFurniture.com
Glen Burnie, MD
Woodbridge, VA
13191 Gordon Blvd.
2301 Salem Church Rd.
In Langley Park Plaza at Intersection of Rt. 301
University & New Hampshire.
and Cedarville Rd.
Gordon Plaza near intersection of Rt. 1 and Rt. 123
Exit 130 off 95S. Go 1 mile on Rt. 3
turn left onto Salem Church Rd.
Langley Park, MD
301-445-8031 301-782-3500
Catonsville, MD
703-492-6434
Largo, MD OUTLET
7740 Ritchie Hwy.
6501 Baltimore Natl. Pike
Largo Town Center
In Harundale Plaza off
Ritchie Hwy. (MD 2N).
In 40 West Plaza next to
Office Depot.
Exit 17A (Rt. 202). At 4th light,
(Arena Dr.) turn right.
443-270-9301
Fredericksburg, VA
Waldorf, MD
8003 New Hampshire Ave. 7900 Cedarville Rd.
443-514-0410
301-333-6412
540-785-3537
Black Friday Hours
November 24th • 7AM-11PM
Major Credit Cards • Financing
*Savings are based on comparable prices. Minimum purchase required for free local delivery. See store for details. Not to be combined with any other promotional offers.
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
Lebanon’s prime minister holds o≠ on resigning
Hariri, back in Beirut,
vows to hold ‘dialogue’
to resolve crisis
BY L OUISA L OVELUCK
AND S UZAN H AIDAMOUS
beirut — Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri on Wednesday
suspended his shock resignation
delivered weeks earlier from Saudi Arabia, marking a stunning
return to Beirut after weeks of
speculation over his freedom of
movement.
Hariri’s Nov. 4 announcement
from Riyadh blindsided political
allies and foes alike, and stoked
regional tensions amid suggestions that he had been coerced by
his main regional patron.
But in the marble hallway of
Beirut’s presidential palace
Wednesday, Hariri said that he
had agreed to delay his resignation to hold a “dialogue” that
would lead Lebanon out of crisis.
The announcement appeared
to roll back a bold push by Saudi
Arabia in recent weeks aimed at
countering Iranian influence
across the region.
“There is nothing more pre-
cious than our country,” Hariri
told supporters in Beirut. “I am
staying with you, and I will keep
going with you to be the first line
of defense of Lebanon, its stability and its Arab nature.”
Hariri had initially blamed his
resignation on Iran, accusing it of
sowing “sedition, devastation and
destruction in any place it settles
in.” But Lebanese politicians and
Western officials saw the catalyst
as Saudi Arabia’s desire to contain
Hezbollah, an Iranian proxy
around the region and a powerful
political force in Lebanon.
Hariri’s three-week absence
marked the most bizarre twist yet
in the life of a politician who has
outlived an assassinated father
and spent years in self-imposed
exile after an earlier spell as prime
minister was ended by a Hezbollah walkout from government.
The Nov. 4 resignation was
followed by two weeks spent in
Riyadh, much of it out of sight,
which sparked frenzied speculation over whether Hariri was
being held there against his will.
In an emotional interview last
week, the 48-year-old politician
looked exhausted.
Hariri made no mention
Wednesday of the speculation
over his constrained movements
within Saudi Arabia. But Paula
Yacoubian, the journalist who interviewed him, said that she had
not dealt with any Saudi officials
at his residence, and described
the prime minister as largely relaxed during her time there, although he had clearly lost weight.
As a Lebanese-Saudi national,
Hariri’s personal business interests have long been buoyed and
buffeted by Saudi politics, with
the family’s Saudi Oger firm falling heavily into debt as the kingdom’s oil fortunes have fallen and
Saudi Crown Prince Mohamed
bin Salman spearheads economic
changes.
Hariri’s speech appeared to signal that Saudi Arabia’s regional
ambitions could now end his
political career, too.
Within hours of the speech, Saudi authorities began a far-reaching
campaign of arrests within Saudi
Arabia, many of its targets appearing to be Mohamed’s political rivals. It also tightened an already
devastating humanitarian blockade on Yemeni ports and airspace,
increasing pressure on Iranbacked rebels that Saudi Arabia is
fighting there, and alarming aid
officials who warned that 7 million
people could be pushed into famine as a result.
The prime minister’s return to
Beirut appeared to have been
helped by French diplomatic efforts. Hariri spent the weekend in
Paris, and stopped for talks in
Egypt and Cyprus before touching down on Lebanese soil late
Tuesday, in time for the country’s
Independence Day.
The Trump administration,
while not advocating Hariri’s side
trip to Paris, had made clear to
the Saudis, and to Hariri himself,
that “getting back to Beirut was
essential,” a U.S. official said. “We
accepted Paris as an alternative,
but we just wanted to make sure
it was temporary. We were not
comfortable with a life in exile.”
French President Emmanuel
Macron, who spoke directly to the
crown prince about Hariri’s return, “was one factor,” said the
official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to comment on
diplomatic efforts.
The White House sees Saudi
Arabia as key to two major foreign
policy goals: bringing Iran to heel;
and forging a settlement between
Israel and the Palestinians. But the
administration is less than pleased
about recent actions by Riyadh
that it considers distractions from
those objectives. In addition to the
Hariri episode, it has pushed Saudi
Arabia to settle its ongoing dispute
with Qatar and to ease its blockade
of Yemen to allow passage of hu-
U.S.: Attacks on Rohingya are ‘ethnic cleansing’
Tillerson ramps up
warnings over violence
against Burma Muslims
BY C AROL M ORELLO
AND M AX B EARAK
The United States on Wednesday declared the violence and
atrocities against the Rohingya
Muslim minority in Burma to be a
campaign of “ethnic cleansing,”
and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson warned that U.S. sanctions
may be forthcoming.
Tillerson blamed the Burmese
military and security forces as well
as local vigilantes for what he
called “horrendous atrocities”
that have caused more than
600,000 Rohingya to flee Burma’s
western Rakhine state for the safety of neighboring Bangladesh. But
he placed most of the blame on the
government, demanding that security forces respect human rights
and punish the guilty.
“Those responsible for these
atrocities must be held accountable,” he said in a statement, reiterating his call for an independent
investigation into what has caused
a refugee crisis in which Rohingya
men have been executed, women
raped and their babies murdered.
“The United States will also
pursue accountability through
U.S. law, including possible targeted sanctions,” he added, suggesting sanctions might be directed
against specific Burmese officials.
Many members of Congress
and human rights groups had
been urging Tillerson for months
to adopt the “ethnic cleansing”
terminology.
State Department officials noted that ethnic cleansing is not
recognized internationally as a
crime and triggers no punitive
measures against Burma, which is
also known as Myanmar.
But it sets the stage to exert
more pressure on Burmese officials if they fail to take actions
such as giving humanitarian
groups and the news media access
to Rakhine state and guaranteeing
safety to those who voluntarily
return home.
Tillerson made a brief visit last
week to Burma, where he talked
with State Counselor Aung San
Suu Kyi and the head of the armed
forces. The Burmese military has
denied committing atrocities during “clearance operations” to battle Muslim insurgents in the pre-
dominantly Buddhist nation. An
internal investigation cleared the
military of wrongdoing.
On Aug. 25, militants belonging
to the extremist Arakan Rohingya
Salvation Army attacked outposts
of Burmese security forces. According to human rights groups, those
forces responded with a brutal and
indiscriminate crackdown on Rohingya communities, drawing in local Buddhist mobs as they went.
“No provocation can justify the
horrendous atrocities that have
ensued,” Tillerson said in his
statement.
Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh and many still in Burma have
provided chilling testimony of the
campaign, which they say was accompanied by widespread arson,
rape and summary executions.
Human rights groups applauded Tillerson’s decision to start us-
BILALA HUSSEIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A supporter of Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri chants
slogans outside his residence in Beirut on Wednesday.
manitarian aid.
Hariri’s
announcement
Wednesday that he would be staying in his post appeared to signal
that the Saudi gambit had failed.
Hours later, Riyadh announced
that the blockade on Yemen’s ports
and airspace would be eased —
although aid agencies warned that
the humanitarian effects would
remain disastrous.
In a sign of just how confusing
his three-week absence has been,
even those close to Hariri said
that they were surprised by his
announcement.
“Yesterday we had the impres-
ing the term “ethnic cleansing,” but
they said more action was needed.
Eric P. Schwartz, president of
Refugees International, said the
move could be used by Washington to pressure other countries to
take stronger measures, including
a global arms embargo and the end
of military-to-military relations.
“Secretary Tillerson’s statement is a necessary first step,” he
said. “However, until the abuses
against the Rohingya people end
and full access is given to the
international humanitarian aid
and the U.N. fact-finding mission,
such pressure and requisite actions will continue to be essential.”
The term “ethnic cleansing” is
largely descriptive and dates from
the conflict in the 1990s in the
former Yugoslavia.
“Ultimately these things come
down to the politics of it,” said
David Bosco, an associate professor at Indiana University’s School
of Global and International Studies and author of a number of
sion that he was going to resign.
. . . It is clear that a compromise
was reached,” Yacoubian said.
By midmorning Wednesday,
crowds of supporters in downtown Beirut erupted in celebration, raising banners and blasting
songs from the back of pickup
trucks. “We were very worried for
him the whole time he was gone,”
said Rana Alamadin, 45. “But
now? It’s a beautiful day.”
louisa.loveluck@washpost.com
Karen DeYoung and Brian Murphy in
Washington contributed to this
report.
books on international law.
Even if the United States declared a genocide in Burma, Bosco
added, “it’s really just a question of
whether that helps generate pressure for action.”
The timing of Tillerson’s statement was rife with symbolism. It
coincided with the International
Criminal Tribunal for the Former
Yugoslavia’s sentencing of former
Bosnian Serb commander Ratko
Mladic, who was convicted of
genocide and crimes against humanity, to life in prison.
“The U.S. government should
find more facts to declare the persecution against Rohingya is
genocide,” said Ro Nay San Lwin, a
Rohingya blogger and activist
based in Europe. “Myanmar’s military commanders must be punished as Ratko Mladic was.”
carol.morello@washpost.com
max.bearak@washpost.com
Adam Taylor and Brian Murphy
contributed to this report.
BLACK FRIDAY SALE!
B
UP TO
Come visit one of our locations to see 56 Live Burning Showroom
Displays, and let Cyprus Air convert your existing Fireplace to Gas.
VISIT ONE OF OUR
AWARD WINNING SHOWROOMS
FALLS CHURCH ALEXANDRIA
FREE REMOTE!
ROCKVILLE
We service Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, DC.
WHEN YOU PURCHASE
A QUALIFYING
GAS FIREPLACE
$175 OFF
*
MAKE SURE YOUR
R
GAS FIREPLACE IS SA
AFE!
SAVE 70%
NOT HAPPY WITH YOUR
EXISTING FIREPLACE?
24 INCH
VIRGINIA
OAK
UP TO 70% OFF
GAS LOG SET
T
PLUS $175 OFF
LIST PRICE $4270
Upgrade your current Gas
Fireplace and SAVE!
Price includes Product, Gas Line
Installation 10’, Permits, and Inspections.*
Realistic Looking Logs That
Really Heat Your Home!
OFFER EXPIRES 12/8/17
Serving Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, DC Since 1967
Visit Our Showroom or Call to Schedule a
Free In Home Estimate!
EXPERIENCE THE WARMTH
OVER 300 DISPLAYS
THROUGHOUT OUR SHOWROOMS CONVENIENTLY
LOCATED FALLS CHURCH, ROCKVILLE & ALEXANDRIA
1.888.430.5164
Gasfireplaces.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
EPIC
BLACK
FRIDAY
DOORS OPEN 7am FRIDAY
The Earlier You Shop
The More You Save
off
ALL FURNITURE
u
Door
Buster
Specials
5
Klovar
60
Black Friday Only
Pc. Queen Bedroom
Includes 3 Pc. Bed, Dresser
and Mirror
395
$
PLUS
FREE
Delivery
595
5
$
Neolan 2 Pc. Living Room
and Set-Up
Both
Pieces!
Black Friday Only
Includes Sofa and Loveseat
Pinella TV Media Center
Wall Recliner
Available in 9 Colors
195
Tori Cove Firm
Queen Mattress Set
195
$
$
OPEN BLACK FRIDAY AT 7AM UNTIL 11PM
Capitol Heights
240-455-0749
Waldorf
Falls Church
Gaithersburg
301-591-0460
703-933-8842
240-607-1896
Ritchie Station Marketplace St. Charles Towne Plaza 5871 Crossroads Center Way 534 N. Frederick Ave.
Visit Our
Other Area
Showrooms
White Marsh
410-918-0421
8823 Pulaski Hwy.
From I495 take Exit 7A-7B follow
MD-5 S. and US 301 (14 miles) to
1240 Smallwood Dr., Waldorf, MD.
Glen Burnie
443-270-0137
7425 Ritchie Hwy.
From I-395 Take Route 7Leesburg Pike to Baileys Crossroads,
turn right into Crossroads Center.
Bel Air
410-638-8441
615 Baltimore Pike
Catonsville
410-788-7779
6610 Balt. Nat’l Pike
Intrsctn. of N. (Rt. 355) Frederick Ave. &
Perry Pkwy in Gaithersburg. Near I-270
across from Lake Forest Mall.
Hagerstown
Easton
301-733-3540 410-822-9003
1501 Wesel Blvd.
29602 Dover Road
Adjustable Base
Head & Foot • Queen Size
275
$
Ashley Furniture HomeStore
Off Ritchie Marlboro Road (I-495) to Exit 13, turn
left at light, 1/4 mile to shopping complex,
1711 Ritchie Station Ct., Capitol Heights, MD.
%
Fairfax
703-667-9308
9900 Fairfax Blvd.
1/2 mile west of Fairfax Circle.
Near 495 & Rt. 66. Across from
Fairfax High School
Frederick
301-662-3342
1305 W. 7th Street
*Savings are based on comparable pricing. Doorbuster Specials are already discounted. and limited quantities. **Free delivery is available in the regular delivery area and requires a minimum
purchase. Not to be combined with any other promotional offers. Advertised prices are for new purchases only. HomeStores are independently operated. ©2017 Ashley HomeStores Ltd.
495
$
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
IN STORE ONLY: TOMORROW, 7AM—1PM
A LARGE SELECTION OF ITEMS.*
IN STORE TOMORROW AFTER 1PM—NOVEMBER 26
ONLINE TOMORROW ALL DAY—NOVEMBER 25
ON A LARGE SELECTION OF ITEMS.**
TAKE
WHEN YOU SPEND
20% OFF......... $200 OR MORE
15% OFF............ $100–$199.99
PLUS, FREE SHIPPING FOR EVERYONE!
*25% offer valid in store only on November 24, 2017, 7AM–1PM. Offer excludes Cosmetics, Fragrances, Women’s Designer Collections, Designer Fine Jewelry, Luxury Watches, Men’s Tech and Electronics, Men’s Activewear, Cutlery, Furniture, Mattresses, Small Electrics, Sterling Silver and Rugs. Certain designer, brand and leased department exclus
Mattresses, Small Electrics, Sterling Silver and Rugs. Certain designer, brand and leased department exclusions apply; see a sales associate for details. Reg./Orig. prices reflect offering prices. Savings may not be based on actual sales. Intermediate markdowns may have been taken. Savings off regular, original and already-reduced price
store. No home items or luggage at Soho, Beverly Center, Glendale Galleria, Santa Monica and North Michigan Avenue. A limited home selection available at Chevy Chase. No fashion at Medinah. Not valid at Bloomingdale’s The Outlet Stores. Employees of Bloomingdale’s and its affiliates are excluded. Prices, savings and selectio
PLEASE VISIT BLOOMINGDALES.COM OR CALL STORES FOR HOURS. C H E V Y C H A S E , 5 3 0 0 W E S
T
.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
EZ
A15
RE
NOT COMBINABLE WITH OUR BUY MORE, SAVE MORE OFFER.
Women’s Denim
Women’s Cashmere
Women’s Down & Wool Coats
Reg. $159–$230
Reg. $158–$178
Reg. $167–$250
SALE
SALE
SALE
$89
$59.99
Valid on select styles.
Valid on select styles from AQUA
and C by Bloomingdale’s.
Valid on select styles.
UGG® Jaylyn Booties
Men’s Coats & Jackets
Men’s Cashmere
Reg. $210
Reg. $545–$645
Reg. $198–$225
SALE
SALE
SALE
$399.99
$99
Valid on select styles.
Valid on select styles from
The Men’s Store at Bloomingdale’s.
$119
$125
Special Occasion Dresses
Nespresso Inissia Bundle
Stuart Weitzman
Villepentagon Boots
Reg. $180–$300
Reg. $250
Reg. $765
SALE
SALE
SALE
$129
$89.99
$399.99
Valid on select styles.
sions apply; see a sales associate for details. **Buy More, Save More offer valid online November 24–25, 2017, and in stores on November 24 after 1PM through November 26, 2017. Offer excludes Cosmetics, Fragrances, Women’s Designer Collections, Designer Fine Jewelry, Luxury Watches, Men’s Tech and Electronics, Men’s Activewear, Cutlery, Furniture,
es. Some items may be included in sales already in progress or in future sales. No adjustments to prior purchases. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other certificate offer. †Black Friday Specials valid November 24, 2017 in store & online. Offer may not be combined with other offers. Quantities may be limited; not all styles in all stores; colors vary by
on may differ on bloomingdales.com. ††Receive free Standard Shipping on online purchases placed by 5pm EST on December 20, 2017. Excludes Furniture, Mattresses and Gift Cards. Offer not valid in store, when shipping to multiple addresses or on prior purchases. U.S. stores only. See bloomingdales.com/shipping for complete details.
S T E R N AV E N U E , M A RY L A N D , 2 4 0 - 7 4 4 - 3 7 0 0 • T Y S O N S C O R N E R C E N T E R , M C L E A N , 7 0 3 - 5 5 6 - 4 6 0 0
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
U.S. eyes
longer role
for military
in Syria
SYRIA FROM A1
Sunni Arab backers — controlled a
hefty amount of Syria and were in
a far better position to demand
Assad’s removal as part of a settlement.
Russian air power and Iranianallied ground forces, however,
have sharply turned the situation
to Assad’s advantage both on the
battlefield and at the negotiating
table. Russia and Iran have also
indicated they plan to stay.
In addition to extending the
U.S. presence in Syria, the administration is also seeking new cooperation with Russia. Earlier this
month, President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin
signed a joint statement backing
the Geneva process. The two leaders spoke again by telephone Tuesday, just hours after Putin was
photographed embracing Assad
when the two met in the Russian
resort of Sochi.
Russia, together with Iran and
Turkey, is hosting its own political
conference this week on Syria, a
gathering that could lock in positions that would make U.S. objectives harder to achieve.
U.S. officials emphasized that
an ongoing military presence in
Syria is necessary to ensure that
Islamic State remnants are
mopped up and that repopulated
communities are stabilized under
local governance. “The fight with
ISIS is not over,” one official said,
using an acronym for the group.
But the official, one of several
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity to discuss planning
and initiatives, described the indefinite mission of U.S. forces as
“twofold.”
The Islamic State’s original expansion was enabled by the vacuum of authority left by the Syrian
civil war, the official said. “That
vacuum was created by the lack of
a legitimate political process,” and
the militant group, or its successors, will fill it again if the “political aspect” is not resolved.
Asked last week how long U.S.
troops would stay in Syria, De-
OMAR HAJ KADOUR/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Syrian rebel fighters have been battling government forces near the village of Arafa, east of the city of Hama, in central Hama province, in a conflict that began in 2011.
fense Secretary Jim Mattis said:
“We’re not just going to walk away
right now” before a political settlement is reached between Assad
and the Syrian opposition. “We’re
going to make sure we set the
conditions for a diplomatic solution. . . . Not just, you know, fight
the military part of it and then say
good luck on the rest of it.”
The official number of U.S.
troops currently deployed to Syria
is 503, sent to train and assist the
SDF. The actual number is believed to be far higher, including
hundreds of additional Special
Operations forces, forward air
controllers, artillery crews and
others sent for months-long temporary deployments.
Mattis said there has been no
decision on how many troops will
remain. They will wait until “the
Geneva process has cracked,” he
said. “That doesn’t mean everyone
stays there. That doesn’t mean . . .
certain troops are leaving.”
Plans for a continuing troop
presence indicate a shift in mission from defeating the Islamic
State to a broader White House
strategy aimed at countering Iranian influence, said Nicholas
Heras of the Washington-based
Center for a New American Security.
“The conditions are there for
the counter-ISIS campaign to
morph into a counter-Iran campaign,” Heras said. “The U.S. has
no master plan to stay, but isn’t in
any hurry to leave, either,” he said.
“By placing no timeline on the end
of the U.S. mission . . . the Pentagon is creating a framework for
keeping the U.S. engaged in Syria
for years to come.”
In recent months, the United
States and Russia have established a cease-fire zone in southwestern Syria near the borders
with Israel and Jordan. The agreement requires opposition and government troops — along with their
allies from the Iran-backed Lebanese Hezbollah militia — to freeze
in place.
Israel has said the agreement
does not go far enough toward
satisfying its concerns about Iran’s
massively extended influence in
Syria as a result of the civil war,
which includes the deployment of
Iranian Revolutionary Guard
Corps advisers and allied militias
in large parts of the country controlled by the Assad government.
Some of those forces are within six
miles of Israeli-occupied territory
in the Golan Heights.
Washington and Moscow also
have negotiated deconfliction
lines in the east, where government forces, aided by Russian airstrikes, have advanced against the
Islamic State toward the border
with Iraq in the same area where
the SDF, with its American backers, is pushing south against the
militants.
In angry statements last week,
Russian Foreign Minister Sergei
Lavrov and the Russian Defense
Ministry accused the United
States of directly aiding Islamic
State forces that have come into
conflict with the Syrian forces
pushing toward the Iraqi border,
and of allowing terrorists to escape from U.S.-backed offensives
against them in both Syria and
Iraq. The U.S. Defense Department just as angrily denied the
charges.
The United States and Russia
have chosen to emphasize different parts of the agreement between Trump and Putin, signed
earlier this month when they met
at an Asian regional conference,
committing their governments to
support for the Geneva process.
The administration has hailed
Russian support for negotiations
that it believes will ultimately
bring Assad’s departure. It is
banking in part on provisions on
the Geneva negotiating table that
allow the Syrian diaspora, including millions of anti-Assad refugees who have fled the violence
there, to vote in eventual elections
to be held under international
monitoring.
For its part, Russia has noted
the agreement’s recognition of
Syria’s sovereignty and territorial
integrity. Lavrov last week pointed
out that both Russia and Iran,
unlike the United States, are in
Syria at the invitation of its government. The Syrian government
routinely denounces U.S. troops as
“occupiers” and threatens to drive
them out.
The agreement also calls for the
eventual removal of foreign forces
from Syria, but Russia has made
clear that provision applies only to
the southwest cease-fire zone and
the positioning of militias farther
from the Israeli border.
Russia, on Assad’s behalf, has
long insisted that the Geneva negotiations be held without preconditions — code for leaving open
the door for Assad’s continuation
in power. During his 2016 campaign, Trump appeared to agree,
indicating that the United States
could find common purpose with
Assad and his allies in fighting
against the Islamic State.
“Our priority is no longer to sit
and focus on getting Assad out,”
Nikki Haley, Trump’s U.N. ambassador, said in March. At the same
time, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.)
asserted that the new administration was headed toward a “Faustian bargain with Assad and Putin,
sealed with an empty promise of
counterterrorism cooperation.”
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
liz.sly@washpost.com
BLACK FRIDAY EVENT
THE AREA'S LARGEST SELECTION OF MOST CUSTOMIZABLE FURNITURE BRANDS
Take30-45%OFF*
SPECIAL ORDER OR
IN-STOCK MERCHANDISE
$1,048
$4,368
3PC ITALIAN LEATHER SECTIONAL WITH
2X POWER RECLINERS & ADJUSTABLE HEADRESTS
SWIVEL LEATHER POWER RECLINER
WITH POWER HEADREST
MSRP $2,029
Also available in sofa and other configurations
MSRP $8,599
$845
MODERN TRACK ARM SOFA
Also available as a sectional and in your choice
of fabrics
MSRP $1,659
SAVEUP
to$400
on certain
Stressless®
styles.
FALLS CHURCH
703.820.8000
* Off MSRP and cannot be combined with other promotions. Does not apply to Stressless products.
CHANTILLY
703.766.8000
TYSONS
703.556.3900
ROCKVILLE
301.881.3900
HamiltonsSofaGallery.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
$39.99
G OING ON NOW
WOMEN’S
CASHMERE
SWEATERS
ORIG. $108-$174
YOU SAVE
OVER $65
SALE
STARTING AT
$59.99
WOMEN’S
PUFFERS
TAHARI • VINCE CAMUTO
AND MORE
ORIG. $200-$280
T H O US A N D S O F N E W LY R E D U C E D ST Y L E S
TOTAL SAVINGS UP TO 80% ON WOMEN’S
SPORTSWEAR, INTIMATES & SLEEPWEAR
40%
OFF
YOU SAVE OVER $140
$29.99
EXCLUSIVELY OURS
BLACK BROWN
1826 MERINO
SWEATERS
MEN’S
LEVI’S
DENIM
ORIG. $79
STARTING AT
$29.99
STARTING AT
$19.99
BOOTS
ORIG. $89-$130
HANDBAGS
YOU SAVE OVER 65%
ORIG. $48-$198
$99.99
YOU SAVE UP TO 70%
UGG®
ARIELLE
ORIG. $170
YOU SAVE OVER $70
THE FIRST 500 SHOPPERS TODAY, TOMORROW & SATURDAY GET A
$20 DOORBUSTER CARD
USE IT ON AN IN-STORE PURCHASE OF $40 OR MORE – EVEN ON BEAUTY*
FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ONLINE
PURCHASES NOW THROUGH SUNDAY
ONLINE & IN STORE S
NEW! CARDHOLDER EXCLUSIVE
Holiday Reward $20 Bonus Card †
EXTRA SHOPPING HOURS:
Doors open at 5pm TODAY,
5am Friday & 7am Saturday.
Go to lordandtaylor.com to see all extended holiday store hours
With every $200 you spend with your Lord & Taylor credit card.
Earn now through December 31 by providing your email with your
next in-store purchase.
Want A Holiday Reward Bonus? Who doesn’t? Apply for a
Lord & Taylor card and provide your email to start earning.
B U Y O N L I N E , P I C K U P IN STORE
**
SIGN UP FOR EMAILS AT LORDANDTAYLOR.COM / GETONTHELIST
Unless otherwise noted, all offers are select styles only. Go to lordandtaylor.com to see all extended holiday store hours. Specials available only while supplies last, through Sunday, November 26. *Doorbuster Card valid in-store Thanksgiving,
November 23; 5am-1pm Friday, November 24; 7am-1pm and Saturday, November 25. All offers, unless otherwise specified, are not valid at Lord & Taylor Outlet Stores and FIND@Lord&Taylor. No adjustments to prior sale purchases. Savings off original and regular
prices. Intermediate markdowns may have been taken. Selected collections; not every style in every store. Our regular and original prices are offering prices only and may or may not have resulted in sales. Advertised merchandise may be at sale prices in upcoming
sale events. Prices, savings and selection may differ by store and on lordandtaylor.com. For the Lord & Taylor nearest you, visit our website or call 1-800-223-7440. **Buy Online, Pick Up In Store: In-store pickup service is available at all Lord & Taylor stores; not valid at
Lord & Taylor Outlet stores and Find@Lord&Taylor. Items are ready for pickup the same day, provided that the order is placed before 3PM local time. Email confirmation is sent when the order is ready to be picked up. Photo ID is required for in-store pickup. †Credit approval required. Complete program details available
at www.lordandtaylor.com/exclusions and in store.
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
Thousands formerly blocked by FBI may now buy guns
FUGITIVES FROM A1
month. Because his conviction
was not entered into NICS, Kelley
was allowed to buy firearms.
Two years ago, Dylann Roof,
who killed nine people at a
historic black church in Charleston, S.C., was able to buy his gun
after errors by the FBI and local
law enforcement led to his name
not being entered into criminal
record databases when he was
arrested and had admitted to
drug possession.
The interpretation of who is a
“fugitive from justice,” a category
that disqualifies people from
buying a gun, has long been a
matter of debate in law enforcement circles — a dispute that
ultimately led to the February
purging of the database.
“Any one of these potentially
dangerous fugitives can currently walk into a licensed gun
dealer, pass a criminal background check, and walk out with
a gun,” Robyn Thomas, executive
director of the Giffords Law
Center to Prevent Gun Violence,
wrote in a letter to FBI Director
Christopher A. Wray on Wednesday. The Giffords organization,
founded by former Arizona congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords,
called on the FBI and ATF to
“correct this self-inflicted loophole” and recover all guns illegally purchased this year because of
the purge of names from the
database.
For more than 15 years, the
FBI and ATF disagreed about
who exactly was a fugitive from
justice.
DOMINICK REUTER/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Rifles are for sale at a shop in Merrimack, N.H. After the FBI changed its interpretation of a gun law, tens
of thousands with outstanding arrest warrants were purged from its criminal background check database.
The FBI, which runs the criminal background check database,
had a broad definition and said
that anyone with an outstanding
arrest warrant was prohibited
from buying a gun. But ATF
argued that, under the law, a
person is considered a fugitive
from justice only if they have an
outstanding warrant and have
also traveled to another state.
In a 2016 report, Inspector
General Michael E. Horowitz
urged the Justice Department to
address the disagreement “as
soon as possible.” Late last year,
before President Trump took office, the Justice Department Office of Legal Counsel sided with
ATF and narrowed the definition
of fugitives, according to law
enforcement officials. The office
said that gun purchases could be
denied only to fugitives who
cross state lines.
After Trump was inaugurated,
the Justice Department further
narrowed the definition to those
who have fled across state lines
to avoid prosecution for a crime
or to avoid giving testimony in a
criminal proceeding.
On Feb. 15, the FBI directed its
employees in the Criminal Justice Information Services Division to remove all entries of
fugitives from justice from the
background check database and
said that “entries will not be
permitted” under that category
until further notice. Before the
FBI memo, there were about
500,000 people identified as fugitives from justice in the database — and all of those names
were removed.
Now there are 788.
“Even if the FBI’s revised definition of fugitive from justice is
assumed to be legally correct,
purging the NICS database of
every single individual previously identified as a fugitive from
justice was an unjustifiable,
alarmingly overbroad, and dangerous decision,” the Giffords
group’s Thomas and Robin F.
Thurston of the Democracy Forward Foundation wrote in the
letter to the FBI.
Federal law enforcement officials say that about 430,000
names of wanted people removed from the database were
from Massachusetts.
Commissioner James Slater of
the Massachusetts Department
of Criminal Justice Information
Services said that the reason that
his state had so many fugitives in
the FBI database is that state
policy required sending the bureau the names of all people with
an outstanding warrant, whether it was for misdemeanors or
felonies.
Because Massachusetts state
law prevents fugitives from buying guns, those individuals have
now been added back to the
federal database under the “state
prohibitor” category and will be
prevented from purchasing a
firearm, he said.
Of the 70,000 others whose
names have been purged, the FBI
is working with the states to
identify which people might
have crossed state lines and
could be put back into the federal
database for that or other reasons.
“The Justice Department is
committed to working with law
enforcement partners across the
country to help ensure that all
those who can legally be determined to be prohibited from
receiving or possessing a firearm
be included in federal criminal
databases,” said a Justice Department official who would discuss
the matter only on the condition
of anonymity.
Sessions in his memo directed
the FBI and ATF to work with the
Defense Department and other
government agencies to improve
reporting and identify any other
measures that could be taken to
prevent guns getting into the
wrong hands.
David Chipman, a former ATF
official who now works as a
senior adviser to the Giffords
group, said that, given the confusion over the definition of a
fugitive, Congress should pass a
new law that makes clear whether people with outstanding arrest warrants can buy a gun.
“I would imagine 99 percent of
Americans don’t want people
who have a warrant out on them
to be able to buy a gun,” Chipman
said. “I can’t believe there is a
constituency for wanted people.
Wanted people are particularly
dangerous. They’ve already proven that they’ll break the law.”
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
Federal judge blocks Texas law that bans commonly used abortion method
A SSOCIATED P RESS
austin — A federal judge on
Wednesday blocked a new Texas
law that would have banned a
commonly used abortion method.
It is the latest court defeat for a
state legislature that has attempted to make it as difficult as possible to have an abortion in Texas,
the country’s second-most-populous state.
Austin-based U.S. District
Judge Lee Yeakel extended indefinitely a temporary ban he previously issued before the law was
set to take effect Sept. 1. That
overturns — for now — a law that
Gov. Greg Abbott (R) signed in
June banning a second-trimester
abortion procedure known as dilation and evacuation. Texas is set
to appeal, but federal courts in at
least four other states already had
blocked similar laws.
Yeakel’s ruling followed a trial
this fall in which the judge heard
arguments from Texas, which defended the law, and from abortion
rights groups who argued that it
unconstitutionally burdens women seeking abortions.
Federal judges have already
ruled against Texas’s past attempts to change the disposal of
fetal remains and deny Medicaid
funding to Planned Parenthood
over videos secretly recorded by
an antiabortion group. Last year,
the U.S. Supreme Court gutted
most of a sweeping antiabortion
law approved in Texas in 2013 that
helped force the closure of more
than half of the state’s abortion
clinics.
Texas for years approved tight
abortion restrictions, arguing
they would protect pregnant
women. After the Supreme Court
defeat, the legislature this session
began backing proposals aimed at
protecting fetuses, but always
with top Republicans’ stated goal
of reducing the number of abortions performed in their state to
as close to zero as possible.
The Texas law that Yeakel suspended uses the nonmedical term
“dismemberment abortion” to describe a procedure in which forceps and other instruments are
used to remove the fetus from the
womb. The office of Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R) had
argued that “prohibiting this inhu-
mane procedure does not impose
any significant health risks or burdens on women” while citing alternative procedures that abortion
providers say are less safe and
reliable.
Federal courts previously
blocked bans of the dilation-andevacuation procedure in Alabama, Kansas, Louisiana and
Oklahoma. Texas has about 20
abortion clinics, down from 41 in
2012.
Transform your Garage
Make Your Garage an Extension of Your Home
Professional-grade floor coating & organizers NO DIRT • NO GREASE • NO CRACKS
BEFORE
WE DO IT ALL!
✓ We empty your garage
✓ Apply a professional grade
floor coating – 8 color choices
✓ Add cabinets, organizers or
workbenches to complete
the look
mygaragewizard.com
50LABOR
GARAGE
WIZARD
FREE CONSULTATION
Schedule now!
888.247.4195
% OFF
expires 12/31/17
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
Economy & Business
DOW 23,526.18
DOWN 64.65, 0.3%
NASDAQ 6867.36
UP 4.88, 0.1%
S&P 500 2597.08
DOWN 1.95, 0.1%
GOLD $1,296.80
UP $10.60, 0.8%
CRUDE OIL $58.02
UP $1.19, 2.1%
10-YEAR TREASURY
CURRENCIES
UP $3.30 PER $1,000, 2.32% YIELD $1=111.20 YEN; EURO=$1.182
Female-led board is suggested for Weinstein Co.
Bidder Maria Contreras-Sweet, who led SBA under Obama, says women would be ‘significant investors’ and control voting stock
BY
J ENA M C G REGOR
Maria Contreras-Sweet, who
led the Small Business Administration under President Barack
Obama, has submitted a bid to
acquire the Weinstein Co., the
film studio grappling with multiple allegations of sexual harassment or assault against its former
co-chairman, Harvey Weinstein.
The bid includes a group of investors with female leaders from
private equity, venture capital
and Hollywood, according to a
source familiar with the deal. It
proposes retaining the firm’s employees and has the blessing of
lawyer Gloria Allred, who is representing some of Weinstein’s accusers.
But one aspect of the bid is
getting the most attention: its
proposal to install a majorityfemale board of directors, with
Contreras-Sweet as chairman.
“I believe we have now reached
a crossroads where it is imperative that a woman-led board acquire control of the company and
create content that continues to
inspire audiences around the
world, especially our young girls
and boys,” Contreras-Sweet wrote
in her proposal letter. Women,
she wrote, would be “significant
investors in the new company
and control its voting stock.”
If the bid is successful, it would
represent a major overhaul for an
all-male board that has faced
multiple resignations and questions regarding what was known
about the allegations. (As part of
a statement published in media
reports in October, the board
called the allegations an “utter
surprise”; a spokesman for the
Weinstein Co. declined to comment on Contreras-Sweet’s bid.
Weinstein has apologized for
some of his behavior; in a separate statement, a spokesperson
said that “any allegations of nonconsensual sex are unequivocally
denied by Mr. Weinstein.”)
And, advisers and researchers
on women in leadership say,
packing the board with women
could send a big signal from the
new owners about what will
change. “The company has to do
something to signal that it is
changing in a fundamental way,”
said Marianne Cooper, a sociologist at the Clayman Institute for
Gender Research at Stanford
University. “It would take something on the order of a complete
cleaning of house, and putting
more diversity in key powerful
roles. Starting with the board is
not a bad place to start.”
That’s partly because, some
researchers argue, having more
women in leadership roles is a
better answer to solving sexual
harassment problems than installing more training programs
BY
WIN MCNAMEE/GETTY IMAGES
The background of Maria Contreras-Sweet, who has made a bid for the Weinstein Co., suggests a leader who would be attuned to diversity
issues: She founded ProAmerica Bank, which focused on helping small- and medium-size businesses in the Latino community.
or anti-harassment policies. Research has shown that having
male-dominated management
teams can lead to the tolerance of
a sexualized environment, said
Alexandra Kalev, a professor at
Tel Aviv University and the coauthor of a recent Harvard Business Review article on the topic.
“Having more women in management increases the share of women who can work to promote
women and create a working
environment that allows women
to flourish,” she said.
Moreover, Kalev said, having
more than just one or two token
women on the board is important
for female board members’ contributions to be heard and for
them to not be viewed as outsiders who represent a woman’s
point of view. She said research
has shown that companies are
actually more likely to adopt a
diversity program when they
have no women on the board
than when 5 percent of the board
is women. Having a single woman makes boards feel as though
they’ve taken some action, and
they “feel less of an urge to adopt
programs that increase diversity.”
It’s not until they get to 15 or 20
percent of directors that they
start to make a difference, Kalev
said. “They’re not seen as representing their gender anymore,
but representing the board,” she
said. “It mainstreams women in
positions of power.”
Frequently cited research from
2006, based on interviews with
female directors, also found that
it seems to take at least three
women to create “a critical mass
where women are no longer seen
as outsiders” and can influence
decision-making.
At many companies, women
on boards are still absent or in the
distinct minority. Only 21 percent
of directors at companies in the
S&P 500 are women, according to
research from Catalyst. More
than 600 companies in the Russell 3000 still have no female
directors. Just 27 companies in
the Russell 3000 have reached
“gender parity,” with at least half
of directors being women, or
have majority-female boards, according to data from Equilar.
More boards are giving sexual
harassment, discrimination and
broader cultural issues more
weight, particularly in recent
months as a wave of allegations
have surfaced, said Brande Stellings, who leads advisory services
for Catalyst, a research and consulting organization focused on
women in leadership.
“We now see very squarely that
issues of sexual harassment and
gender discrimination are investor
issues, and really are board issues,”
she said. “All of that is up for play in
a way that feels quite different than
it did just a few months ago. It feels
like a watershed moment in terms
of having conversations at the level
of the board.” (Stellings is a member of the newly named Fox News
Workplace Professionalism and Inclusion Council, which will serve as
an oversight panel and provide
written reports to directors at 21st
Century Fox, which also has grappled with sexual harassment allegations.)
Researchers cautioned, however, that boards need both men
and women of different racial
and ethnic backgrounds to be
diverse and that putting a
majority-female board in place is
only a first step, particularly at a
company facing as big a crisis as
the Weinstein Co.
“It’s a perfectly reasonable
place to start, and it does signal
that massive changing is on the
horizon, but you have to move
from the board to inside the
organization and make sure the
board holds the leaders accountable,” Cooper said.
If successful, Contreras-Sweet,
who was not available to answer
questions, would be executive
chairman, taking on management responsibilities. And her
background suggests a leader
who would be attuned to diversity issues: She founded ProAmerica Bank, which focused on serving small- and medium-size businesses in the Latino community;
and she served as a U.S. Senate
appointee on the Federal Glass
Ceiling Commission in the 1990s.
Although it may be encouraging for those who research or
advise on board diversity to hear
about another majority-female
board, some noted the irony that
it was the part of the bid getting
the most attention. Said Sukhinder Singh Cassidy, a former
Google executive who founded
the BoardList, which manages a
directory of female board members: “Nobody comments on a
majority-male board.”
jena.mcgregor@washpost.com
DIGEST
FEDERAL RESERVE
Many Fed officials
expect third rate hike
Federal Reserve officials
generally believe that it will soon
be time for another increase in
the Fed’s key interest rate.
However, a few thought that any
further rate hikes should be
delayed until they see inflation
moving higher, details from their
last meeting revealed.
Minutes of the Fed’s Oct. 31Nov. 1 meeting, released
Wednesday, showed that many
officials believed a third rate
increase this year will probably
be warranted if incoming data
leave the medium-term economic
outlook unchanged. But “a few”
officials remained worried that
inflation has failed to accelerate
toward the Fed’s 2 percent goal as
expected. They suggest that the
central bank needs to remain
cautious in pushing rates higher.
The Fed meets again on
Dec. 12-13, and private
economists widely expect it will
raise rates.
The minutes showed that a
division remains between those
who are worried that the Fed
might be moving too slowly amid
low unemployment and those
still concerned that inflation is
falling short of expectations.
The central bank has raised
rates twice so far this year, in
March and June, pushing its
benchmark rate to a still-low
level of 1 percent to 1.25 percent.
But at three meetings since then,
the Fed has left rates unchanged
FTC weighs
claims that
site deleted
rape stories
as officials debated the future
course of inflation.
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Insurers for American
Airlines, United Airlines and
other aviation defendants have
agreed to pay $95 million to
settle claims that security lapses
led planes to be hijacked in the
Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The
settlement was described in
papers filed Tuesday in
Manhattan federal court.
Developers of the new World
Trade Center buildings had once
demanded $3.5 billion from
aviation-related companies after
hijacked planes destroyed three
skyscrapers among five
demolished buildings.
— Associated Press
ENERGY
Joint effort announced
to reduce emissions
ExxonMobil joined European
peers, including Royal Dutch
Shell and Total, in a new
initiative to find ways to reduce
potent emissions in their rapidly
growing natural gas operations.
BP, Italy’s Eni, Exxon, Spain’s
Repsol, Shell, Norway’s Statoil,
France’s Total and Germany’s
Wintershall “committed to
further reduce methane
emissions from the natural gas
assets,” they said.
Methane, one of the most
potent greenhouse gases emitted
into the atmosphere, is released
during the extraction, processing
and transporting of natural gas.
For example, about 10 percent
of gas transformed into liquefied
natural gas is released into the
atmosphere between production
and consumption, according to
Shell.
The new initiative is the latest
step by the world’s leading oil
and gas companies to reduce
carbon emissions from their
operations to help meet U.N.backed goals to limit global
warming.
Last year, a group of 10
companies representing more
than 20 percent of the world’s
production set up the Oil and Gas
Climate Initiative.
— Reuters
REUTERS
A villager hangs handmade noodles to dry in Linyi in China’s
Shandong province. China’s economy cooled further last month after
the government cracked down on factory pollution and debt risks.
ECONOMIC INDICATORS
Capital goods orders
declined last month
New orders for key U.S.-made
capital goods unexpectedly fell in
October after three straight
months of hefty gains, but a
sustained increase in shipments
pointed to robust business
investment and economic
momentum as the year winds
down.
The economy’s prospects were
bolstered by other data on
Wednesday showing a decline in
the number of Americans filing
claims for unemployment
benefits. Strong business
investment and tightening labor
market conditions will probably
keep the Federal Reserve on
track to raise interest rates.
Also on Wednesday, the
Commerce Department said
orders for nondefense capital
goods excluding aircraft, a
closely watched proxy for
business spending plans,
declined 0.5 percent last month.
That was the biggest drop since
September 2016 and followed an
upwardly revised 2.1 percent
increase in September.
— Reuters
Ride-hailing firm Lyft has
secured a permit to test
autonomous vehicles in
California, taking it one step
further in the race with several
other companies to bring selfdriving cars to the masses. Lyft’s
permit, reflected on the
California Department of Motor
Vehicles website, comes two
months after it announced plans
to offer a self-driving car as a
ride option in the San Francisco
area.
Tractor maker Deere forecast
strong earnings on Wednesday
for the coming fiscal year as it
reported fourth-quarter results
that exceeded analyst
expectations amid improving
demand for farm machinery.
Deere forecast net sales for fiscal
2018 to jump 19 percent and
earnings to rise to about
$2.6 billion.
— From news services
H AMZA S HABAN
A top consumer watchdog is
assessing a news report claiming
that TripAdvisor had deleted
posts by travelers who spoke of
rapes, blackouts and injuries they
said they suffered at some resorts
in Mexico, according to a recent
letter by Federal Trade Commission Chairman Maureen Ohlhausen.
Published earlier this month,
an investigative report by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel documented several instances of the
travel review website apparently
removing firsthand accounts by
customers who said they were
sexually assaulted while on vacation. One woman told the Journal
Sentinel that in 2010, she had been
raped by a security guard in a
resort complex. Four years after
that, another woman said she was
sexually assaulted at the same resort, after she and her husband
suddenly blacked out in broad
daylight after only a few drinks,
according to the report.
In both cases, the women said
TripAdvisor blocked their warning messages: The first was taken
down by a TripAdvisor moderator
who deemed the post in violation
of the company’s “family friendly”
guidelines; the other was labeled
by the company as “hearsay,” the
report said. The 2010 TripAdvisor
post was republished last month,
according to the Journal Sentinel,
but it went back online chronologically, alongside other posts from
December 2010, on the forum's
2,608th page. Dozens more travelers have come forward with their
own accounts since the initial investigation, according to the Journal Sentinel. The newspaper unearthed the claims about TripAdvisor after it began to investigate
the mysterious death of a Wisconsin college student who was vacationing in Mexico this summer.
Prompted by the reports, Sen.
Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.) wrote to
the FTC this month, urging the
agency to investigate the company
to determine whether its practices
violate consumer protection laws.
Baldwin also noted that the allegations of censorship on TripAdvisor’s platform are especially concerning because the company has
a financial incentive to maximize
positive reviews, as its revenue
relies in part on hotel bookings.
“The practice of limiting or removing reviews that detail unsafe
conditions could put future travelers, who look to TripAdvisor for
accurate information, at risk,” she
told The Washington Post in a
statement. “I am concerned this
may be a case of prioritizing profits over providing an open, honest
forum for traveler reviews that its
users expect.”
The FTC declined to comment
on whether it is investigating the
company. But in response to Baldwin’s letter, Ohlhausen wrote, “I
assure you that the Commission
will consider the information you
have provided carefully to determine whether enforcement or
other action, such as additional
business guidance, is appropriate.” Ohlhausen’s Nov. 17 letter was
first reported earlier this week by
the Journal Sentinel.
Mary Engle, a top official in the
Bureau of Consumer Protection at
the FTC, said in a statement Tuesday: “Claims that a user review
website makes about its services
may violate the FTC Act if they are
false or misleading. Whether taking down negative reviews violates the FTC Act would depend
on the particular facts.”
TripAdvisor said it has not been
contacted by the FTC and is not
aware of an investigation. “TripAdvisor is committed to ensuring our
users have complete and accurate
information to plan their travel.
This is especially true in matters
related to health and safety,” the
company said. TripAdvisor also
said there are published reviews
that include “horrific experiences
by travelers” that were selectively
left out of news coverage about the
company blocking such posts.
Since the Journal Sentinel report, TripAdvisor began placing
warning notifications on the review pages of hotels where claims
of rape and other safety incidents
have been reported. The company
has also altered its customer review system, allowing people who
have had their posts removed to
appeal the takedown.
hamza.shaban@washpost.com
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
23,750
Close
YTD
% Chg
23,526.18
–0.3
+19.0
21,250
20,000
18,750
6867.36
+0.1
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Health Care Technology
Diversified Telecomm
Distributors
Diversified Consumer Svcs
Internet & Catalog Retail
Commercial Svcs & Suppl
Auto Components
Real Estate Mgmt & Dev
Automobiles
Electrnc Eqp, Instr, Comp
22,500
Nasdaq Composite Index
7000
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
+27.6
0
–6.0%
+6.0%
5.02
1.67
1.08
1.05
1.04
–0.63
–0.69
–0.77
–0.80
–0.99
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
5800
5200
S&P 500 Index
2597.08
–0.1
+16.0
2620
2510
2400
2290
2180
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
Close
Daily
% Chg
74,518.79
16,073.58
48,179.60
–0.1
0.0
0.0
387.06
5352.76
13,015.04
7419.02
–0.3
–0.2
–1.2
0.1
5986.41
4227.57
30,003.49
22,523.15
0.4
0.2
0.6
0.5
YTD % Chg
–40%
0%
+40%
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
231.58
93.82
174.96
265.15
138.01
115.91
36.45
45.84
70.60
81.10
18.15
236.43
172.06
151.77
44.65
–1.1
–0.6
1.1
–0.7
0.3
0.6
–0.5
0.1
–0.9
0.3
1.8
–0.7
–0.5
–0.1
–0.6
29.7
26.6
51.1
70.3
48.8
–1.5
20.6
10.6
23.4
–10.1
–42.6
–1.3
28.3
–8.6
23.1
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
137.29
98.64
169.05
54.37
83.11
59.07
88.33
35.43
130.01
116.73
211.22
47.10
110.82
96.41
102.74
–0.8
–0.3
0.4
0.2
–0.7
–0.5
–0.4
–0.3
–0.5
–0.3
–0.6
2.0
–0.6
–0.1
–0.3
19.2
14.3
38.9
–7.6
33.7
16.2
5.1
9.1
6.2
6.5
32.0
–11.8
42.0
39.5
–1.4
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1823
0.0089
1.3323
0.3101
0.7874
0.0535
0.0076
1.1269
0.2622
0.6660
0.0453
148.1690
34.4870
87.5540
5.9596
0.2328
0.5910
0.0402
2.5388
0.1734
EU € per
0.8458
Japan ¥ per
111.2000
131.4900
Britain £ per
0.7506
0.8874
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.2248
3.8134
0.0290
4.2963
Canada $ per
1.2701
1.5016
0.0114
1.6922
0.3939
Mexico $ per
18.6589
22.0638
0.1680
24.8615
5.7870
Mexico $
0.0681
14.6915
Other Measures
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
–0.1
–0.1
–0.5
1.5
$3.1590
$3.5700
$58.02
$1,296.80
$2.97
+0.3
+0.2
+2.1
+0.8
–1.6
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.6675
$17.22
$9.9725
$0.1528
$4.4075
0.0
+0.9
+0.8
+2.7
–0.1
day
month
$1200
$1000
$800
–0.3
0.6
0.2
0.2
1.8
1.0
0.6
–2.5
0.6
Gainers
Copart Inc
Frontier Comm
Carrizo Oil & Gas
TiVo Corp
AMAG Pharma
Avon Products
Chico's FAS Inc
Flotek Industries
Kindred Healthcare
Cerner Corp
SM Energy Co
Almost Family Inc
Titan International
LHC Group Inc
Denbury Resources
Harmonic Inc
Tetra Technologies
QEP Resources Inc
Enanta Pharma
FTD Cos Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$41.01
$7.90
$20.16
$18.90
$14.65
$2.10
$8.36
$4.81
$8.20
$70.03
$21.05
$64.35
$11.63
$71.29
$1.77
$4.45
$4.03
$9.38
$47.68
$7.12
11.7
11.6
7.2
7.1
6.5
6.1
6.0
5.9
5.1
5.0
5.0
4.9
4.9
4.9
4.7
4.7
4.7
4.6
4.4
4.4
Losers
Iconix Brand Group
Guess? Inc
Black Box Corp
Movado Group Inc
HewlttPckrdEntrprse
DHI Group Inc
Kirkland's Inc
iRobot Corp
HP Inc
Zumiez Inc
Vitamin Shoppe Inc
Seneca Foods
Bel Fuse Inc
Axcelis Tech
Cytokinetics Inc
Diebold Nixdorf Inc
Univ Health Realty
Brooks Automation
Daktronics Inc
Avis Budget Group
Daily
Close % Chg
$2.05
$15.62
$3.75
$29.55
$13.10
$1.95
$12.21
$68.50
$21.34
$18.60
$3.75
$31.60
$27.85
$35.35
$7.98
$18.50
$74.41
$28.02
$9.51
$34.77
–19.6
–13.0
–9.6
–8.4
–7.2
–7.1
–6.7
–6.3
–5.0
–3.9
–3.8
–3.7
–3.5
–3.4
–3.3
–3.1
–3.1
–3.1
–3.1
–3.0
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 26,936.00
Russell 2000
1516.76
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 530.07
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
9.88
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6400
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
0.32
0.45
0.80
1.48
2.70
5.39
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
YTD % Chg
15.7
11.8
18.5
–29.6
4.25%
Bank Prime
1.25%
Federal Funds
1.45%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.82%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.16%
10-year note
Yield: 2.32
2-year note
Yield: 1.73
5-year note
Yield: 2.04
6-month bill
Yield: 1.44
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.25%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
FCC could relax rules meant to keep AT&T could score a double win soon
TV broadcasters from getting too big Antitrust case’s outcome,
Proposal would allow
media companies to
reach more households
BY
B RIAN F UNG
Even as the Federal Communications Commission released a
proposal Tuesday to give Internet providers more control over
what their customers can see and
use online, another equally major proposal by the agency could
relax key rules for the media
industry.
The FCC said Tuesday that it
will revisit key regulations determining how many TV stations a
single company can own. Revising or rolling back these rules
may lead to more consolidation
in broadcast media, analysts say
— which could help financially
struggling stations survive but
also perhaps end up reducing the
number of independent voices
on the air.
The FCC proposal takes aim at
two related policies. The first is a
limit on the number of U.S.
households that a given broad-
caster can reach. The second is
what is known as the UHF
discount, which is essentially an
accounting method used to calculate how close a broadcaster
may be to reaching the limit.
Both are intended to ensure that
no single TV broadcaster gets too
big.
The national limit says that
companies owning multiple TV
stations may reach only 39 percent of all U.S. households. Tuesday’s proposal by the FCC explores whether to raise the limit,
and even contemplates getting
rid of it. Doing away with the
limit would make it legal for one
TV broadcaster to beam its programming into many more
homes.
“A comprehensive review of
the rule is warranted in light of
considerable
marketplace
changes, such as technological
developments and increased video programming options for consumers, since the cap was last
modified in 2004,” FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said in a statement.
The FCC proposal also would
revisit the UHF discount, a policy that effectively increases the
number of stations a company
may own by making certain
stations count less toward the
limit. Stations that transmit signals over UHF channels contribute only half as much to reaching
the limit as stations broadcasting on VHF channels.
The proposal is in its early
stages, with a vote on it unlikely
before next year. But one major
beneficiary of the policy change
may be Sinclair, a conservative
broadcaster whose $3.9 billion
bid to acquire Tribune Media
would allow it to reach nearly 3
out of 4 households in the United
States.
The proposal also could help
other broadcast media entities
that might want to merge in the
future. Sinclair and the National
Association of Broadcasters declined to comment.
The FCC’s proposed changes
come after votes to relax other
media rules.
Earlier this month, for instance, the agency voted to lift
restrictions that prevented a single media company from owning
both a daily newspaper and a TV
station in the same market, as
well as rules limiting mergers
involving multiple TV stations in
the same market.
brian.fung@washpost.com
LIMITED TIME ONLY!
1.45% APY
1
ON YOUR MONEY
12-MONTH CD
2
$10,000 MINIMUM BALANCE1
CALL 240-283-0416 & OPEN AN ACCOUNT TODAY
OR VISIT A BRANCH NEAR YOU: ROCKVILLE • N. BETHESDA • WASHINGTON, DC • COLUMBIA
VISIT WWW.CAPITALBANKMD.COM/LOCATIONS TO SEE ADDRESSES
1. MINIMUM BALANCE IS REQUIRED TO OBTAIN THE ANNUAL PERCENTAGE YIELD (APY). A PENALTY MAY BE IMPOSED FOR EARLY WITHDRAWALS.
FEES MAY REDUCE EARNINGS. INTEREST RATES LISTED AS OF 10/30/2017 AND ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT ANY TIME WITHOUT NOTIFICATION.
THE RATE IS APPLICABLE TO NEW MONEY ONLY. MAXIMUM ORIGINAL PRINCIPLE BALANCE CANNOT EXCEED $249,000.00.
2. CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT.
repeal of net neutrality
rules would benefit firm
BY
B RIAN F UNG
The future of AT&T could be
shaped by two big decisions in
Washington this coming week,
with the Justice Department suing the telecom giant Monday to
block its $85 billion purchase of
Time Warner and the Federal
Communications Commission
announcing a plan Tuesday to roll
back net neutrality rules, handing
a big win to Internet providers.
Some analysts said the combined actions could deliver a double victory for AT&T. If it wins its
antitrust case, AT&T could buy
Time Warner without offering
concessions to the government. It
could then benefit from the repeal
of the government’s net neutrality
rules, allowing it to leverage Time
Warner’s massive library of
shows, television stations and
films as few other companies
could.
That scenario could turn AT&T
into a uniquely powerful force
spanning the entertainment and
telecommunications industries.
Several Wall Street analysts
have said that AT&T has a very
good chance of winning in court
against antitrust officials. The
Justice Department has not successfully used the courts to stop
two different kinds of companies
from merging since the 1970s,
when the government prevented
Ford Motor from buying a chunk
of a sparkplug maker.
On top of that, “the rollback of
the [net neutrality] rules might
give AT&T more flexibility to obtain more benefit from the merger with Time Warner,” said Randolph May, president of the Free
State Foundation, a conservative
think tank.
The net neutrality rules, passed
by a Democratic-led FCC in 2015,
were designed to ensure that all
websites, large and small, would
be treated equally. Repealing that
regulation would enable Internet
providers, such as Comcast, Verizon and AT&T, to block websites
they do not like and charge Web
companies for speedier delivery
of their content.
Several analysts said the rollback of net neutrality rules under
a Republican-led FCC is surely
good for AT&T, but they are divided on exactly how the repeal
would affect the company. Some,
such as May, say that the loosened
regulations would allow AT&T to
market Time Warner’s content in
new and different ways that could
theoretically help Americans.
Others argue that the combination of a bigger AT&T with a more
relaxed regulatory environment
could simply increase the firm’s
incentive to harm competitors in
the marketplace.
Still others say that AT&T
wouldn’t dare use its newfound
size to take unfair advantage of
the relaxed regulations, partly because it could provoke a backlash
from policymakers and customers.
Some Wall Street analysts said
that the strong net neutrality
rules passed by the Obama-era
FCC left Internet providers
spooked. Those companies will be
cautious about doing anything
that could lead to the restoration
of the rules, said Craig Moffett, an
industry analyst at MoffettNathanson.
“One can’t imagine that there
are any broadband providers who
would be eager to test the limits of
what is now allowable under this
regulatory regime, given the enormous risk of popular and/or regulatory or legislative backlash,”
Moffett said.
Still, consumer advocates say
relying on after-the-fact enforcement is no substitute for clear,
preemptive rules that seek to prevent consumers from being
harmed in the first place.
“Taking FCC [rulemaking]
power off the table leaves us with
only antitrust authority to rely on
to protect consumers,” said Susan
Crawford, a law professor at Harvard University. “Which won’t be
enough, in the long run.”
That is the primary worry of
the Justice Department. In its
lawsuit against AT&T, the agency
said that unless the company
agrees to shed some of Time Warner’s properties, the combined
company could use its newfound
control over HBO, CNN and TNT
to hurt channels that it didn’t
own, as well as rival Internet and
subscription television providers
who need access to Time Warner’s
channels. This could lead to higher prices for consumers and more
limited choices.
This critique becomes more urgent in a world without the FCC’s
clear rules on net neutrality, according to Gigi Sohn, a former
Democratic FCC official, because
AT&T could not only disadvantage competing TV channels
through the normal cable marketplace but also hinder those same
channels from reaching viewers
over the Internet.
“AT&T would be free to favor its
[Time Warner and DirecTV] content” without the FCC’s rules,
Sohn said. “It could do this both as
a cable provider . . . and as an ISP
providing fast lanes.”
Under this theory, AT&T could
make it easier for broadband or
wireless customers to access Time
Warner’s content, making competing channels relatively less attractive by comparison. It could
also actively demote other channels that tried to distribute their
content through online streaming apps; because AT&T controls
its own broadband network, the
company could slow down those
apps and speed up its own content. That type of selective treatment of Internet traffic was explicitly banned under the Obamaera net neutrality policy.
Critics of that theory, however,
say it would be counterproductive
for AT&T to discriminate against
channels it didn’t own, saying
that any company that did so
would get “clobbered in the marketplace.”
“Its customers, its competitors,
and regulators and lawmakers
would rain hellfire,” said a broadband industry official, speaking
on the condition of anonymity to
talk freely. “Even if you accept the
premise that ISPs have incentive
to favor their own content, there’s
a consequence to blocking, and
those consequences are not beneficial to the business, the brand
or the bottom line.”
“The math wouldn’t work even
if AT&T could convince all of its
rivals’ video subscribers who regularly watch Time Warner shows
to switch to DirecTV,” Campbell
wrote.
AT&T chief executive Randall
Stephenson has said that the goal
of purchasing Time Warner is to
build an advertising behemoth
that can compete with Google and
Facebook. The company benefits
when more people, not fewer, can
see Time Warner content.
“Our objective with Time Warner is to take that content and
broaden distribution, not to refine and limit distribution,” said
Stephenson in a news conference
Monday. AT&T declined to comment further.
Other analysts say that will be
true only until AT&T can find a
business case to behave differently.
“The problem from the point of
view of DOJ is that if the deal is
approved, it will be very hard to
police any commitment by AT&T
to make sure that [its content is]
available to all eyeballs and so on,”
said Nicholas Economides, a professor of economics at New York
University’s Stern School of Business. “The record of such commitments is very poor. The companies do whatever they want. And
that’s well understood by everybody.”
brian.fung@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/the-switch
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A21
SU
Russia warns Google about Facebook announces new tool
de-ranking RT and Sputnik to identify Russian posts, ads
BY H AMZA S HABAN
AND D AVID F ILIPOV
The Russian telecom regulator
said Tuesday that it will retaliate
against Google if the search giant
lowers the search ranking of the
Kremlin-backed news outlets RT
and Sputnik.
The agency’s remarks come
after Eric Schmidt, the executive
chairman of Google’s parent
company Alphabet, said over the
weekend that the company
would de-rank the two Russian
media outlets in its search results. Speaking at the Halifax
International Security Forum,
Schmidt said that Google is
working to curb misleading and
exploitative content, as well as
material that is likely to have
been “weaponized” for nefarious
purposes.
When asked why Russianbacked sites enjoy favorable
placement on Google’s platforms, Schmidt said, “We are
working on detecting this kind
of scenario . . . de-ranking those
kinds of sites. It’s basically RT
and Sputnik are the two.” He
added that the company does
not want to ban the outlets. And
according to Google, the company does not re-rank individual
websites.
The Russian regulatory agency
on Tuesday did not take kindly to
Schmidt’s comments, saying it
intended to push back if it discovers that Google is acting in an
“unfriendly” way.
Alexander Zharov, head of the
agency, Roskomnadzor, said it
would ask Google to explain the
concept of ranking as it is applied
to RT and Sputnik. “We’ll hope
that our opinion will be heard
and we won’t have to resort to
more serious measures,” Zharov
said, according to the Interfax
news agency.
Later, a spokesman for
Roskomnadzor said that it had
sent Google a note demanding an
explanation, and said that it was
drafting “retaliatory measures”
in case it decides that RT and
Sputnik are being treated unfairly.
Margarita Simonyan, the editor of RT, made it clear that she
considers Google’s actions discriminatory. “If that’s not censorship, I don’t know what is,”
she told Russian television. Simonyan has denied the conclusion by U.S. intelligence agencies in January that RT and
Sputnik, along with a network
of “quasi-government trolls,”
interfered on the Kremlin’s behalf in the 2016 election by
Uber is not alone in
paying hackers’ price
BY
P ETER H OLLEY
It may have been the most
arresting detail in a story full of
them: Not only did Uber allow
hackers to make off with the
personal data of 57 million customers and drivers, but the ridehailing company also had paid
those same criminals $100,000 to
delete the data and keep their
mouths shut about the entire
episode.
If it sounds like an old-school
crime wrapped in a new-school
mold — blackmail for the digital
era — that’s because it is, according to cybersecurity experts. The
only new thing about hacks and
subsequent hush money is the
belief among cybersecurity professionals that similar payments
are occurring with increasing
frequency.
“In the security practice, paying a ransom is usually cheaper
than paying the price of corrective actions after a successful
breach,” said Csaba Krasznay, a
security evangelist at Balabit,
referring to the price of public
and regulatory scrutiny that
could come from announcing a
breach. “That is why the cyber
crime model works: ‘We have
your data, pay us X bitcoins and
we won’t publish it on the dark
net.’ Or: ‘We started a [distributed denial-of-service] attack
against your service, pay Y bitcoins and we’ll stop it.’ ”
He added, “Based on the rumors, more and more companies
have their own bitcoin wallets for
such cases.”
Experts said there is no way to
know how many companies have
resorted to paying off attackers,
but as the volume of cyber attacks
skyrockets, they reason that so
would the number of companies
being forced into desperate scenarios in which their data and
their reputations are at stake.
The FBI revealed that ransomware payments — often made
after malware arrives via email —
have increased dramatically in
recent
years,
“approaching
$1 billion annually.”
Hackers aren’t confining their
efforts to tech companies. Last
year, Hollywood Presbyterian
Medical Center in Los Angeles
paid hackers nearly $17,000 after
its network was infiltrated and
disabled.
Uber officials were also willing
to pay after it became clear last
year that two attackers had accessed names, email addresses
and phone numbers of 57 million
people around the world, according to a statement released by the
company’s chief executive, Dara
Khosrowshahi. The driver’s license numbers of about 600,000
U.S. drivers were also included.
Uber removed Joe Sullivan,
the company’s chief security officer, and a deputy who worked
with him for their role in keeping
the breach quiet, according to
Bloomberg.
“None of this should have
happened, and I will not make
excuses for it,” Khosrowshahi
said in the statement.
Uber did not immediately respond to a request for comment
about its decision to pay off the
hackers.
HANNAH MCKAY/REUTERS
About 57 million users of the Uber
app had their names, email
addresses and phone numbers
stolen by hackers in 2016.
For a company such as Uber,
experts said, that is already
struggling to navigate waves of
bad publicity, there may have
been few good options in the
wake of last year’s attack.
“Most companies know that by
paying the ransom does not necessarily mean the attack is over,”
said Travis Jarae, the chief executive of the research and strategy
company One World Identity. “A
fear of public shame, reputation
loss and potential regulatory action outweighs notification and
admission of guilt.”
But Jarae and other experts
agreed that by agreeing to pay
the ransom, Uber and other companies are putting all companies
— and the public data that they
rely on — at greater risk.
“Hackers talk to each other,”
said Mark Orlando, the chief
technology officer for cyberservices at Raytheon. “By staying
silent, Uber has empowered
them for a year, where they could
have brought this into the light,
raised public awareness of the
threat and made some good come
of this. Instead, the company
gave its attackers exactly what
they wanted — a lot of money,
and a reason to try this again and
again.”
There’s another reason to disclose a hack, experts said: Regulators can slap companies with
millions in fines if they fail to
notify the proper authorities.
David Murakami Wood, a surveillance and security expert at
Queen’s University in Canada,
said he doesn’t have concrete
numbers but suspects that such
payments “are very widespread.”
For a company such as Uber,
he said, the reason officials
should have avoided paying off
hackers is the same reason companies try to avoid paying off
nondigital criminals: because
they’ll return, next time asking
for more.
A year later, he said, Uber finds
itself worse off than it was after
the hack.
“They’re in a quite a fragile
position right now,” he said.
“Their business model requires
them to convince cities that they
should not be subject to the same
kinds of regulations as conventional taxi companies, but what
they’re showing is that they can’t
be trusted to and can’t manage
their own data. They’re unable to
self-regulate, and that’s exactly
what they’re telling these cities
they can do.”
peter.holley@washpost.com
peddling anti-American propaganda.
Google declined to comment,
but referred The Washington Post
to a company blog post from April
outlining changes to its search
results.
Google isn’t the first global
technology company to take recent action against Russian-affiliated media. Last month,
Twitter announced that RT and
Sputnik would be barred from
buying advertisements on its
platform. The company said it
based its decision on the U.S.
intelligence assessment that the
outlets acted as propaganda
tools.
Google search ranking is just
the latest battlefield where a
brewing dispute between the
United States and Russian governments is playing out. Russian
lawmakers unanimously passed a
bill earlier this month that would
allow authorities to force any
foreign media organization to
register as a “foreign agent” after
RT was forced to register under a
similar statute in the United
States. Russian President Vladimir Putin will probably sign the
measure into law by the end of the
month.
hamza.shaban@washpost.com
david.filipov@washpost.com
Portal will allow users to
see if pages they ‘liked’
were made by troll farm
BY
C RAIG T IMBERG
Facebook is creating an online
tool to allow users to determine
whether they might have been
exposed to Russian disinformation during the 2016 presidential
election and its fractious aftermath, the company announced
Wednesday.
The new tool, which the company said will be available by the
end of the year, is the latest move
by Facebook to respond to public
and political pressure to reveal
the extent of the Russian disinformation campaign waged on
its social media platform and on
Instagram, which Facebook
owns.
Together, nearly 150 million
Facebook and Instagram users
may have had pieces of Russian
disinformation — both paid ads
and free posts — reach their
accounts, the company has said,
though it also has said there is no
way to know how many saw that
content.
The new tool will be an online
portal, available through Facebook’s “Help Center.” It will allow
users to see if pages or accounts
they “liked” or followed between
January 2015 and August 2017
were created by the Internet
Research Agency, a St. Petersburg troll farm that Russian
operatives used to pump out
divisive content on race, religion,
gun rights and immigration, as
well as other issues, into the
American online political conversation.
Some of the Russian pages and
accounts explicitly called for the
election of Republican Donald
Trump or denigrated his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton,
and some others called for realworld political rallies — many
peopled heeded those calls by
showing up at the time and
places dictated by the Russian
trolls.
“It is important that people
understand how foreign actors
tried to sow division and mistrust using Facebook before and
after the 2016 US election,” Facebook said in its announcement
Wednesday. “That’s why as we
have discovered information, we
have continually come forward
to share it publicly and have
provided it to congressional investigators. And it’s also why
we’re building the tool we are
announcing today.”
Several Democratic lawmakers — including Sens. Jack Reed
(R.I.) and Richard Blumenthal
(Conn.), as well as Rep. Terri A.
Sewell (Ala.) — had pushed Facebook to find a way alert its users
about their exposure to Russian
disinformation.
Blumenthal sent a letter calling on Facebook to find a way to
alert its users, setting Wednesday as a deadline for the company to take action.
Sewell, a member of the House
Intelligence Committee, asked
Facebook’s general counsel, Colin Stretch, in a hearing on Nov. 1
whether the company had “an
obligation to notify” its users.
Stretch replied, “We have tried
to notify people about the issue
broadly through information on
the website through our white
paper last April and hard questions blog and working with the
committee; we’re open to all of
this information being released
publicly.
“It’s a much more challenging
issue to identify and notify reliably people who may have been
exposed to this content on an
individual basis.”
craig.timberg@washpost.com
Ellen Nakashima contributed to this
report.
A22
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
Venezuela arrests executives of Citgo SoHo hotel to drop Trump branding
Corruption case against 6
may be linked to struggle
over political loyalties
BY R ACHELLE K RYGIER
AND A NTHONY F AIOLA
caracas, venezuela — The arrests here of six top executives of
Citgo, the U.S. subsidiary of Venezuela’s state-owned oil giant,
amount to a dramatic shake-up in
the leadership of the oil interests
that have been keeping embattled
President Nicolás Maduro in power. The move suggests a possible
attempt by the government to ensure the loyalty of Citgo’s management, observers say.
Venezuelan authorities on
Tuesday arrested the six — including Citgo’s chief executive — alleging that they had sought to defraud the nation through a $4 billion financial deal. Several of the
men are U.S. citizens. In a news
conference, Venezuela’s chief
prosecutor, Tarek William Saab,
said the executives, who were in
Caracas for a meeting, were detained for putting Citgo “in danger.”
On Wednesday, Maduro named
Asdrúbal Chávez, a cousin of late
president Hugo Chávez, the new
president of Citgo in an event
broadcast on state television.
Chávez, a former minister of oil
and mining and now a member of
parliament, will be heading to the
United States to “reconstruct” Citgo in the coming days.
The arrests marked the biggest
steps taken so far in an effort by
Venezuelan authorities to target
corruption in the all-important oil
sector, which has been suffering
falling output because of deteriorating infrastructure. In recent
months, Saab’s office has filed corruption charges against 50 individuals, including several managers, linked to Petróleos de Venezuela S.A., the state-owned oil
and gas company known as PDVSA.
Observers said, however, that
the arrests of such high-level officials could be linked to a tug of war
for loyalties in the upper ranks of
Venezuela’s government. Maduro
was the handpicked successor of
Chávez, the leftist firebrand who
ARIANA CUBILLOS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chief prosecutor Tarek William
Saab outlined charges in the case.
died in 2013. But especially in recent months, high-profile Chávez
followers — known as Chavistas —
have broken with Maduro.
The men arrested, analysts say,
appeared to be loyal to Rafael
Ramírez, a former president of
PDVSA and longtime Chávez ally
who is Venezuela’s representative
at the United Nations. Ramírez is
seen as subscribing to a more
moderate brand of Chávez’s leftist-nationalist ideology, known as
Chavismo. On Sunday, Ramírez
published an article on the leftleaning website Aporrea in which
he appeared to criticize Maduro’s
handling of the economy.
“From my perspective, this
looks like a fight between factions
of Chavismo for control over the
oil industry,” said Henkel García,
director of the Caracas-based consulting firm Econométrica.
Saab alleged that the men, using a Swiss-based intermediary,
orchestrated a deal to refinance
bonds issued in 2014 and 2014
through two firms: Frontier Management Group and Apollo Global
Management.
Saab said they had not sought
permission for the deal, in which a
5 percent cut would have gone to
the Swiss intermediary. He suggested that the executives — Citgo’s acting president and chief executive, José Ángel Pereira, and
five vice presidents: Tomeu Vadell,
Alirio Zambrano, Jorge Toledo,
Gustavo Cárdenas and José Luis
Zambrano — had links to the
Swiss-based group, Mangore Sarl.
“This is corruption that should
be sanctioned and punished,”
Saab said. “We’re talking about the
management of our biggest subsidiary of PDVSA, a fundamental
pillar for our economy.”
At least five of the detained
executives are U.S. citizens, according to an official familiar with
the situation who spoke on the
condition of anonymity because of
the sensitivity of the issue. In televised comments, Maduro said one
of the men had claimed that he
could not be arrested because he
was a naturalized U.S. citizen, although born in Venezuela. He described their acts as “treason.”
“When the intelligence police,
with orders from the chief prosecutor, arrived to arrest the directors for corruption, one of them,
born in the state of Falcón, said he
couldn’t be detained because he’s
an American citizen,” Maduro
said. “Can you imagine how far
this treason goes?”
In a statement, Citgo said, “We
are looking into the current investigation related to CITGO officials
by the Venezuelan Prosecutor’s Office to better understand the situation.”
The company added: “Our priority is to protect the interests of
our company and our employees.
CITGO is a U.S.-based company
that operates independently, and
to the standards and regulations
set in the U.S. We have procedures
in place to ensure ongoing operations and the continuous supply of
product to our customers.”
Houston-based Citgo has been
a wholly owned subsidiary of Venezuela’s oil giant since 1990. The
Venezuelan government has
sought to maintain its control and
influence over the company even
as Caracas’s relationship with
Washington has eroded.
Venezuela’s oil industry has become an even more important
source of hard cash here as
the Trump administration has
tightened sanctions that were imposed during the Obama administration, including a measure that
strictly limits the ability of Venezuela to finance its debt through
U.S. institutions. Venezuela is trying to renegotiate its debt while
facing a crippling economic crisis
and shortages of food and medicines.
rachelle.krygier@washpost.com
anthony.faiola@washpost.com
Faiola reported from Miami.
Business has flagged
at spot that was once a
high-profile luxury draw
BY
AND
J ONATHAN O ’ C ONNELL
D AVID A . F AHRENTHOLD
President Trump’s company
has agreed to remove the Trump
name from its hotel in Lower
Manhattan and give up management of the property, the most
visible sign yet of the toll his
presidency has taken on his
brand.
The decision, announced by
the company Wednesday afternoon, follows signs that business
has flagged for months at Trump
SoHo, beginning during his polarizing campaign last year.
The hotel’s sushi restaurant
closed. Professional sports teams,
once reliable customers, began to
shun the property. The hotel
struggled to attract business for
its meeting rooms and banquet
halls, according to reporting by
radio station WNYC.
Trump SoHo has emerged as
one of the clearest examples of
how Trump’s divisive politics have
redefined his luxury hotel and
real estate company, which spent
years courting upscale customers
in liberal urban centers where he
is now deeply unpopular.
The Trump name appears
poised to come off the SoHo hotel
before the president celebrates
his first year in office. “The transition is anticipated to take place by
year-end,” the Trump Organization and the property’s owners
said in a statement.
The change was first reported
Wednesday afternoon by the New
York Times.
The deal to remove the Trump
name was made with the Trump
SoHo condominium board and
the property’s majority owner,
CIM Group, a California-based
real estate investment firm. The
hotel is divided into condominiums whose owners allowed them
to be rented out as hotel rooms.
“We recognize and sincerely
appreciate [the Trump Organization’s] contributions to this exceptional asset,” Bill Doak, CIM
Group’s first vice president of hotels, said in a statement.
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
The Trump SoHo hotel in New York, shown in February.
The release did not specify
what the building would be renamed or who would run it.
Trump Organization and CIM
Group officials declined to answer questions about the reasons
for the move.
Officials described the transaction as a “buyout” but did not
specify whether any money
changed hands between the
Trump Organization and the
building’s owners. The president’s business now receives
5.75 percent of the hotel’s operating revenue as a management fee,
according to company documents
posted online by Reuters.
This will be the third time since
Trump’s election that his name
has been removed from a building. In July, the Trump name was
taken off the Trump International
Hotel in Toronto after the property’s owner reached a similar buyout deal. The hotel will be reopened as a St. Regis, according to
the Toronto Star.
And last year, the owners of
three Trump Place apartment
buildings in New York announced
that those properties would be
renamed after tenant complaints.
Trump’s company no longer had a
business relationship with the
buildings.
In the United States, the Trump
name still adorns hotels in Honolulu, Las Vegas, Chicago, New
York and Washington. The Washington hotel, opened last year, has
been a bright spot in the company’s portfolio. Flush with business
from Christian groups, trade associations and foreign clients, its
profits have greatly exceeded expectations.
Elsewhere, the Trump Organization has seen greens-fee revenue fall at its golf courses in Los
Angeles and the Bronx, and it has
lost dozens of customers who
rented out banquet rooms for parties or golf courses for charity
tournaments.
One of the biggest changes has
happened at Mar-a-Lago, the
president’s for-profit social club,
which doubles as the “winter
White House” in Palm Beach, Fla.
Last summer, 19 charities canceled galas or other fundraisers
they had planned for this winter
at Mar-a-Lago, costing the Trump
Organization hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost revenue.
The SoHo hotel was once a
jewel of the Trump empire.
Opened in 2010, it offered Hudson
River views, a spa named after
Ivanka Trump and a location in
one of New York’s most fashionable neighborhoods. Trump promoted the property on his reality
show “The Apprentice.”
In 2012, prosecutors in the
Manhattan district attorney’s office scrutinized the property’s development as part of an investigation into whether Trump’s children Ivanka and Donald Trump
Jr. committed fraud by misleading condo buyers about the project, according to a report last
month from ProPublica, WNYC
and the New Yorker. District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. decided
not to pursue charges.
jonathan.oconnell@washpost.com
david.fahrenthold@washpost.com
Never Clean Your
Gutters Again®
America’s 1
#
†
Gutter Protection Company
One Time Investment • Lifetime of Benefits
3 Get a permanent maintenance-free solution
3 Tested to handle up to 22 inches of rain per hour
3 Installs over new or existing gutters
3 Installed by mfr. trained & certified technicians
3 Triple lifetime NO clog performance warranty
FREE Estimates
Senior, Military & Federal Discounts Available
888-417-0653
www.HarryHelmet.com
*Subject to credit approval, minimum job sizes apply. Interest will accrue during the promotional period but all interest is waived if paid
in full within 12 months. Lednor is neither a broker nor a lender. Financing is provided by 3rd party lenders, under terms & conditions
arranged directly between the customer and such lenders, satisfactory completion of finance documents is required. Offer must be
presented attime ofestimate and expires 11/30/17. Cannot becombined withany otheroffers and subjectto change without notice.Void
where prohibited by law. †Based on an independent 2014 national marketing study. DC# 420218000007 MD MHIC #48622
VA #2705036173 © 2017 Lednor Corporation.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A23
M2
Economists: Debt would grow faster than economy under GOP tax plans
BY
J EFF S TEIN
An overwhelming majority of
academic economists say in a
new survey that the Republican
tax proposals would cause America’s debt to grow by one critical
measure.
Thirty-seven of 38 experts surveyed by the University of Chicago’s Initiative on Global Markets
agreed that the GOP tax bills in
Congress would cause U.S. debt
to increase “substantially” faster
than the economy.
Only one economist — Stanford’s Liran Einav — said that he
was “uncertain” whether the bills
would exacerbate America’s
debt-to-GDP ratio. But after the
survey’s release, Einav said that
his response had been a mistake
and that he agrees with the
economists who expect the debt
ratio to soar. (Four other economists in the IGM panel didn’t
answer the question.)
“I did it too fast and didn’t
read the question properly,” Einav said in an email.
(The survey results mirror an
episode in May, in which 35 of 37
economists concluded that the
tax cuts would not pay for themselves in terms of their impact on
the federal budget. The two who
disagreed later said they misread
the question and had meant to
answer with the majority.)
The growing expert consensus
that the bills would balloon the
deficit — even in the absence of a
Congressional Budget Office report — has real implications for
the bills’ chances of becoming
law.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) needs 50 votes
to move a pending GOP tax plan
through the Senate, giving him
little room for defections because his party controls only 52
of the chamber’s 100 seats. And
several Republicans have said
their support for any tax measure
will be influenced by its longterm impact on the national
debt. Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.)
has vowed not to vote for a bill
that adds “one penny” to the
deficit. Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.)
has similarly expressed concern
over the bill’s impact on the
deficit, and President Trump said
on Twitter on Sunday night that
Flake is a “no.”
Republicans say their tax
plans will spark enough economic growth to offset the lower
tax rates they plan to charge
corporations and some businesses and individuals, but that
claim is widely contested.
The nonpartisan Tax Policy
Center said in an analysis released this week that even after
accounting for economic growth,
the bill the House passed would
increase the debt by $1.3 trillion
over a decade. An analysis by the
Penn Wharton Budget Model,
which accounts for the effects of
growth, found the Senate bill
would increase the national debt
by between $1.4 trillion and
$1.6 trillion.
The surveyed economists were
broadly skeptical that the bill
would produce the type of economic growth Republicans are
promising. Fifty-two percent of
economists surveyed disagreed
with the claim that GDP would
be “substantially” higher under
the House or Senate bills, while
36 percent said they were “uncertain” they would substantially
increase gross domestic product.
“The idea that these cuts
would unleash huge growth is
not very well supported, either
theoretically or empirically,” said
Oliver Hart, an economist at
Harvard and one of the experts
who responded to the survey.
“Almost everyone is extremely
doubtful this is going to come out
well. This is wishful thinking.”
Only one economist, Stanford’s Darrell Duffie, said he
agreed that the GOP bill would
substantially increase GDP, and
in his answer he raised other
concerns about the plan’s impact
on the fairness of the tax code.
“A reduced corporate tax reduction is likely to grow GDP,”
Duffie wrot in the survey.
“Whether the overall tax plan is
distributionally fair is another
matter.”
The conservative-leaning Tax
Foundation projected the House
bill could add up to 3.5 percent to
GDP growth, but several other
analyses have put that number
much lower. An estimate from
Penn Wharton, for instance, said
the House bill would increase
GDP by between 0.4 percent and
0.9 percent.
Senate Republicans are reportedly eyeing a vote on their
bill as early as next week, in the
hope of accomplishing one of the
party’s major goals before the
Christmas recess.
jeffrey.stein@washpost.com
Expiring tax provisions could erase relief GOP promised
BY
D AMIAN P ALETTA
Congressional
Republicans
have implanted nearly 50 expiring provisions in their tax-cut
bills that, if left unaddressed,
would transform what Republicans promised would be middleclass tax relief into a law that
raises taxes for tens of millions of
Americans.
More than 80 percent of the tax
breaks set to go away would be
taken from households. The perks
for corporations are generally
permanent, including the biggest
single benefit in the bill: a permanent reduction of the corporate
tax rate from 35 percent to 20 percent.
Democrats have accused the
GOP of offering only illusory benefits for families, but White House
and Republican leaders in recent
days have repeatedly insisted that
lawmakers in future sessions of
Congress would extend the cuts or
make them permanent. Future
lawmakers, they argue, would be
unwilling to let large-scale tax
increases targeting the middle
class take effect.
“We have a lot of confidence
that Congress will do the right
thing,” Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin told Fox News. “And,
again, the priority for the moment
is middle-income tax cuts.”
But in Congress’s current polarized state, no congressional action can be guaranteed, even if
both parties agree on its merits.
And if Congress were to let the
cuts expire, the total bills aimed at
individuals would be massive.
The issue, since it came to light
a week ago, is causing consternation with Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.),
who thinks the party has designed
the bill to get around Senate rules
but in a way that could add much
more to nation’s debt in the future.
Because of these concerns,
Flake told Fox News Radio on
Wednesday that he is undecided
on whether he will support the
bill.
He said he is uncomfortable
with the design of a five-year tax
break on new investments for
companies that will expire in
2022. The tax break saves companies between $10 billion and
$40 billion a year, the Joint Committee on Taxation has found.
When major tax cuts would expire
Some of the largest personal tax cuts in congressional Republicans’ tax bills
would expire after a few years.
HOUSE PROPOSAL
0
2018
2022
2024
2027
-$50 billion
The $300 family flexibility credit
expires Dec. 31, 2022, leaving a
$1,600 child tax credit.
SENATE PROPOSAL
2018 2019
2025
2027
0
17.4% deduction
for pass-through firms
-50
Expanded child tax credit
-100
Doubled
standard deduction
Lower tax rates
-$150 billion
Many Senate changes to individual
taxes expire Dec. 31, 2025
Source: Congress’ Joint Committee on Taxation
“It will likely be extended,”
Flake told Fox News Radio. “We
do that all the time. . . . And if we
do extend that that’s a big expenditure that wouldn’t do well for
our debt or deficit. So I’m looking
for ways to be more honest, frankly, about that expensing provision.”
In the GOP bill the Senate is
considering, many of the tax
breaks for families are set to expire in 2025. Over a decade, the
phased-in tax increases would
add up to nearly $700 billion. And
by 2027, half of American households would pay higher taxes under the Senate tax bill than they
would if the current tax code were
left in place, according to the
nonpartisan Tax Policy Center.
In the House bill, a $300 perperson tax credit expires after
2022, a change that would drive
up taxes on tens of millions of
THE WASHINGTON POST
Americans.
Republicans set the individual
cuts to expire to comply with
procedural rules limiting how
much a tax bill can add to the
deficit and still pass in the Senate
with 50 votes, rather than the 60
typically needed.
The GOP kept the corporate
rates permanent, they say, to encourage companies to make the
type of investments that create
economic growth.
“If you are a business, you have
a 10-year plan because you have to
make business decisions and you
want to be certain what your costs
are,” said Rohit Kumar, a former
top tax adviser to Senate Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.)
and now leader of the tax policy
services practice at PwC. “If you
are an individual, you aren’t going
to say, ‘I’m not going to take this
job, because in five years my taxes
are going up.’ ”
Democrats argue it’s a ploy to
game Senate rules that would
leave future political leaders with
vexing decisions about whether to
allow sharp tax increases on
Americans or continue adding
hundreds of billions of dollars
each year to the debt.
“It was a gimmick,” said Sen.
Mark R. Warner (D-Va.), who has
opposed the bill. “This is to try to
keep within the budget constraints but what they have done
in effect is set up a whole new set
of ‘fiscal cliffs.’ ”
The perks set to expire are
some of those Republicans touted
as key to helping families. And
their expiration would more
acutely affect low- and middle-income families, who face drastic
tax increases if political brinkmanship thwarts a compromise
to extend them.
In the Senate bill, lower tax
rates and the ability to double the
standard deduction would expire
for individuals and families at the
end of 2025, eliminating more
than $265 billion in annual tax
breaks and driving up taxes on
families.
Extending those benefits, however, would create a set of problems for the GOP as it tries to keep
its plan in line with Senate rules.
Republicans control only 52
seats in the chamber, and to move
their measure with a simple majority, they can’t add more to the
debt than they’d agreed to in a
budget resolution. In this case,
that’s $1.5 trillion over the next
decade.
Another Senate restriction,
known as the “Byrd rule,” also
requires that the tax bills cannot
add anything to the debt after 10
years unless 60 senators agree to
bypass the rule.
The Penn Wharton Budget
Model at the University of Pennsylvania found that the Senate
GOP tax bill would add $1.3 trillion to the debt in the first decade,
complying with the first Senate
rule, and contains enough expiring provisions that it could avoid
violating the Byrd rule as well.
“It’s politically brilliant, and
that’s infuriated the left,” said
Steve Moore, one of President
Trump’s top economic advisers
during the campaign, adding that
it was the only way for Republi-
cans to get all the tax cuts they
wanted in one package.
“How else are you going to fit a
$3 trillion tax cut into a $1.5
trillion box?” he said.
The expiring provisions would
set up a series of future fiscal
cliffs, Washington shorthand for
an abrupt change in tax or spending policy that has the potential to
disrupt economic growth.
Past cliffs have created hightension negotiations over which
perks to be extended and which
would go away. Lawmakers often
wait until the final days before tax
benefits expire before deciding
whether to extend them, waiting
for a moment of maximum political leverage.
The last time Congress had a
major showdown over expiring
tax breaks came at the end of 2012,
when President Barack Obama
and Republicans in Congress
clashed over what to do with expiring Bush-era tax cuts. Obama
wanted to allow taxes to increase
for upper-income Americans, and
many Republicans tried to oppose
him, worried that allowing taxes
to rise on wealthy Americans
would violate pledges many of
them made not to support a tax
increase.
They eventually reached an
agreement, but not until Jan. 1,
2013, the day the higher taxes
were set to go into effect for everyone.
White House officials and Republican leaders have mostly
brushed off concerns about the
expiring provisions, saying they
are confident Congress will step
in to ensure that the expiring tax
cuts are extended in the future.
“One of the ways to game the
system is to make things expire,”
White House Office of Management and budget director Mick
Mulvaney told NBC on Sunday.
He added that “What we tell
folks is this: If it’s good policy, it
will become permanent. If it’s bad
policy, it will become temporary.”
There are examples of lawmakers allowing tax cuts to expire.
Obama successfully pushed for
a payroll tax cut in 2011 and 2012
that lowered taxes, but it expired
after that. But that package was
more narrowly designed. The
House and Senate GOP tax plans
are broader, and they have described the temporary cuts as
placeholders that they expect will
be made permanent.
These expiring tax breaks are
just some of the many elements of
the GOP tax plans that would
require future congressional action to stave off severe tax and
spending changes that would affect the middle class, low-income
people and the elderly.
The House GOP tax bill would,
as currently designed, trigger
$136 billion in spending cuts in
2018 because the changes widen
the deficit, according to the Congressional Budget Office. This is
because the tax plan would violate
a 2010 law that prohibits new tax
cuts from adding to the debt without offsets.
Of those spending cuts, roughly $25 billion would come out of
Medicare, the government-run
health-care program for older
Americans.
Democrats have used this CBO
finding to say that the GOP plans
would cut taxes for the wealthy in
exchange for spending cuts that
affect the elderly. Republicans
have tried to dismiss these concerns, saying Congress will move
to waive the spending-cut rules,
as they have in the past. But waiving the automatic spending cuts
would require support from Democrats, as 60 votes are needed.
If both parties become further
entrenched, or a bill to waive the
spending cuts is tacked onto a
partisan bill, passage is not assured.
“If there is a deficit, and that
happens, and it very well could,
well, Congress will have to work
its will. That’s what Congress is
for, and we will,” Senate Finance
Committee Chairman Orrin G.
Hatch (R-Utah) said last week as
his panel debated the bill.
Senate Republicans hope to
pass their bill next week, and GOP
lawmakers have said they plan to
introduce an amendment that
would make the temporary tax
cuts permanent. That would require Democrats to vote along
with Republicans to waive Senate
rules, something they have not
signaled they would do.
Warner, for his part, said he
would not support waiving the
spending-cut rules.
“They will have to own the
results of this,” he said.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
Senate bill gives corporations more tax breaks if revenue exceeds expectations
BY
H EATHER L ONG
One of the most controversial
parts of the Senate Republican
version of the tax bill is that it
makes most tax cuts for businesses permanent, while the breaks
for families and individuals go
away after a few years. A change
inserted in the bill the night before the Senate Finance Committee voted on it would make tax
breaks even more generous for
large corporations if more money
comes in than expected.
In a section titled “Revenue-Dependent Repeals,” the Senate
plan gives an additional $120 billion in tax breaks to businesses in
2026 and 2027 if the U.S. government hits certain tax revenue
“triggers.”
Republicans say it’s a sign of
fiscal responsibility. The additional corporate tax cuts kick in only if
the government is bringing in
more money than expected.
But Democrats say it’s another
indication of how the bill is slanted in favor of multinational corporations. Instead of using any extra
money to help the middle class —
who would lose their tax cuts
entirely in 2026 — any additional
revenue is used to aid businesses.
“Corporations would get another $79 billion in tax cuts in
2027. That’s before Republicans
would devote a single dollar to
protect low- and moderate-income households from the tax
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
A stack of tax code books sits next to a Senate staffer as the Finance Committee debates the tax bill.
increases they would face under
this bill,” says Chye-Ching Huang,
deputy director of federal tax policy at the Center on Budget and
Policy Priorities, a left-leaning
think tank.
The Senate tax bill is expected
to add $1.4 trillion to the U.S. debt
over the next decade, according to
the official experts at the Joint
Committee on Taxation. If tax revenue from businesses and individ-
uals comes in better than expected by 2026 — reducing the total
price tag by about half — then the
trigger goes into effect and businesses get a larger tax cut.
The tax cut could still lose money and hit the trigger level, but it
would have to lose less than $1.4
trillion.
The provision was inserted in
the bill by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin G. Hatch
(R-Utah) at the same time that he
included the repeal of the individual mandate that requires most
Americans to buy health insurance or pay a penalty. The Congressional Budget Office predicts
that 13 million people will lose
their health insurance if the bill
goes into effect.
The trigger provision was at the
back of the list of changes and
received almost no attention until
Huang and David Kamin, a tax
law professor at New York University who previously worked in the
Obama administration, blogged
about it Wednesday.
“This is a one-sided bet, a onesided giveaway to business,” says
Kamin, who says he thinks Republicans were probably trying to
hide it.
A senior GOP aide on the Senate Finance Committee who
spoke on the condition of anonymity to share details of behindthe-scenes negotiations said the
triggers are meant to be a “failsafe” to “ensure that corporations
are subject to tax hikes” to fill any
revenue gaps. In other words, if
revenue falls short, businesses
would end up paying $120 billion
in taxes those years, not getting a
discount.
But if the trigger does go into
effect, corporations would get all
the benefits. They would be able
to take larger deductions for operating losses, research and meals
for employees. They also wouldn’t
have to pay such high taxes on
income earned abroad in low-tax
countries. The Senate bill includes many protections to try to
stop big companies from paying
lower taxes by shifting their profits and intellectual property overseas. If the triggers kick in, some
of those guardrails are weakened.
Republicans say that the tax
cuts are likely to cause the U.S.
economy to grow much faster. If
tax receipts are strong by 2026
because the tax cuts are working,
it would be wise to lower the
burden on businesses. But Huang
says that “it’s another signal as to
who is going to get taken care of
first” by Republicans.
Although the vast majority of
economists say the tax cuts will
not generate that much additional government revenue, it’s possible that other factors could result
in higher tax receipts.
One sticking point is whether
this trigger provision will even be
allowed to stay in the bill. Republicans are trying to pass the bill
under a process known as reconciliation, which requires only a
simple majority of senators to
vote yes instead of 60 senators, as
most bills done under “regular
order.” But using reconciliation
means the bill must satisfy the
“Byrd Rule,” which says the bill
cannot add to the deficit after a
decade.
In the past, triggers have typically not been allowed because
they make it difficult to determine
whether a bill violates the Byrd
Rule. The Senate parliamentarian
will have the final say on whether
the trigger is allowed this time
under the Byrd Rule. There is no
trigger in the bill to raise additional revenue if government tax receipts fall substantially short of
the Joint Committee on Taxation’s
projections.
heather.long@washpost.com
A24
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
#Metoo may lead to a new holder of Year of the Woman title
The daily stream
of revelations
about sexual
harassment
JAMES
should be viewed,
HOHMANN
at least in part, as
a belated backlash
to Donald Trump’s 2016 victory,
which came despite the
emergence of the “Access
Hollywood” video and several
women who accused him of
misconduct.
In October 1991, Anita Hill
testified during Clarence
Thomas’s confirmation hearing
that he had sexually harassed
her when she worked for him at,
of all places, the Equal
Employment Opportunity
Commission. Thomas denied
wrongdoing, and he was
confirmed for the Supreme
Court. The backlash didn’t come
until 13 months later.
Women across the country
were disgusted by how poorly
Hill was treated by lawmakers
from both parties, including
then-Senate Judiciary
Committee Chairman Joe Biden.
There were only two women in
the Senate then. Four were
elected to join them in
1992. Many women were elected
to the House: 24, the largest
number voted into that chamber
in any single election. Nationally,
11 women won major-party
Senate nominations and 106
women were on the ballot for
House slots in the general
election.
That one high-profile case
propelled many other women to
get involved in public service.
Now there are dozens of highprofile cases of alleged sexual
misconduct, from the U.S. House
to statehouses and from the
military to the media. It stands
to reason that this could lead to
bigger backlash at the polls in
2018 and 2020 than we saw
during what’s known as the Year
of the Woman.
The Daily
202
OLIVER CONTRERAS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The Women’s March on Washington drew thousands of people to the nation’s capital soon after President Trump took office in January. An
increasing number of women have since decided to seek public office and pursue other types of civic engagement.
The massive women’s marches
on the Saturday after President
Trump’s inauguration were a
harbinger of bigger things to
come.
Democratic victories in this
month’s off-year elections were
driven by women. Exit polls
showed a big swing in the party’s
direction among married women
and white women with college
degrees.
Lots of women won down-
ballot races. A nurse decided to
run against a county
commissioner in New Jersey
because of an offensive Facebook
post about the women’s march.
She beat him.
The filing deadline to run for
Congress next year has not yet
come in most states, and there
are many highly qualified female
candidates in crowded primary
fields who are vying to take on
male incumbents.
In her 1991 book “Backlash:
The Undeclared War Against
American Women,” the author
Susan Faludi documented
widespread reactionary
blowback to the feminist
movement that was being fed by
false narratives emanating from
conservative think tanks, fashion
magazines, the mainstream
media and Hollywood. A year
later, there was backlash to the
backlash. After Trump won,
there was widespread fear
among women’s advocates that it
would have a chilling effect on
victims of sexual assault having
the courage to come forward.
The past few weeks have shown
that they were perhaps overly
pessimistic.
Men have been treating
women unfairly since Adam
blamed Eve for eating the apple
in Genesis. The behavior that’s
being described in the reports
this fall didn’t start in the past
few years. It has been going on
forever. It’s coming to light in a
way that makes clear it’s
endemic and systemic, not a oneoff here and there. Leaders in
most industries recognize that
they cannot keep covering for
the bad actors in their midst or
continue pretending that the
problem doesn’t exist. This
represents a sea change in
corporate America.
Now the open question is how
voters will respond. After
Thomas was confirmed, the
public conversation eventually
moved on. Many Democrats
looked the other way when Bill
Clinton’s misconduct came to
light.
Many Republican voters are
now looking the other way, as
well. A new Quinnipiac
University poll suggests that
sexual harassment is less of a
dealbreaker for the party’s grass
roots in the Trump era than it
was before: By 63 percent to
29 percent, GOP voters say they
would oppose trying to remove
Trump from office even if the
multiple sexual harassment
allegations against him were
proven true. Half of Republican
voters nationally think GOP
senators should let Roy Moore of
Alabama serve in the Senate if he
is elected next month. And
43 percent of Republicans say
they would “still consider
voting” for a candidate who
faced multiple sexual
harassment allegations, as long
as they agreed with the
candidate on the issues. In
contrast, 81 percent of
Democrats said they definitely
would not vote for such a
candidate, as did 61 percent of
independent voters.
The coming year will provide
a gauge of how much things have
changed. The first test will come
in three weeks in Alabama.
james.hohmann@washpost.com
Speech rights of antiabortion pregnancy centers on trial Snapshot of ACA enrollment
Here’s a question
The
that spins both
Health 202 ways. Can liberal
states target
antiabortion
counselors? Can
conservative
states target
doctors who provide abortions?
Early next year, the Supreme
Court will hear a high-profile
lawsuit from dozens of “crisis
pregnancy centers” that are
suing the state of California
over a law requiring them to
publicly post or notify patients
of the availability of low-cost or
free abortions. These centers say
California is violating their freespeech protections, while the
state says it’s simply ensuring
basic health information is
provided to women.
At its heart, this case is about
the speech of health
professionals and the ability of
the government to regulate it.
The key question: Can a state
compel doctors or counselors to
promote certain things they
may not personally agree with?
“Can the government compel
people to speak a message they
don’t agree with and then
punish them if they don’t?” is
PAIGE
WINFIELD
CUNNINGHAM
how Denise Harle, legal counsel
for the Alliance Defending
Freedom, framed it to me.
The ADF represents more
than 100 pregnancy centers
petitioning the high court to
reverse a decision by the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the
9th Circuit in favor of
California.
The appeals court said
California has a right to regulate
professional speech.
Furthermore, the court noted,
the law doesn’t require centers
to advocate for abortions — only
to say they’re available.
Under the 2015 law, licensed
health centers in California
must either post or hand out a
notice that says: “California has
public programs that provide
immediate free or low-cost
access to comprehensive family
planning services (including all
FDA-approved methods of
contraception), prenatal care
and abortion for
eligible women.”
The notice must also include
the telephone number for the
local county social services
office. This straightforward
notice is perfectly within the
bounds of what a state can
require health providers to
display, California Attorney
General Xavier Becerra told me.
The state says the wording is
short, neutral and factual,
neither advocating nor
discouraging a woman from
getting an abortion.
Its defenders note medical
facilities are required to post all
sorts of information, such as
where parents can get a car seat
installed. “Trust is built on facts
and knowledge, and it’s critical
in making informed, healthy
decisions,” Becerra said during a
phone interview Tuesday. “So
how do you trust anyone trying
to give you information if
they’re not giving you all the
facts?”
To Becerra’s point, when
California legislators passed the
Reproductive Freedom,
Accountability, Comprehensive
Care and Transparency (FACT)
Act, they had in mind
pregnancy centers across the
state that counsel women
against getting abortions.
These centers often confuse,
misinform and intimidate
women about their options,
preventing them from making
fully informed decisions,
n
As See h
a
r
p
O
On
e
and Th
Today
Show!
THE EASY, SIMPLE AND
ACCURATE 10-MINUTE
BODY SCAN
Find Diseases in their Early Stages like Cancer,
Heart Disease, Aneurysms and Abnormalities
Before Any Symptoms Occur.
TOTAL FULL BODY SCAN AND VIRTUAL COLONOSCOPY
Only
$1595
Regular price
Appointments Scheduling Only
Not Covered by Insurance
Special Promotion Price
$300 OFF
Limited Time Offer Restrictions may apply
ELIGIBLE PATIENTS MUST:
Weigh less than 350 lbs • Be older than 30 years old • Not be pregnant
North Bethesda Place I
11400 Rockville Pike, Suite 105
North Bethesda, MD 20852
301-864-6661 MD
Appointments Only
Monday - Friday
8am - 6pm
Saturday 8am - 2pm
supporters of the FACT Act said.
Licensed health centers must
post the notice about the
availability of low-cost
abortions, contraception and
prenatal care, and those that are
unlicensed must acknowledge
they are unlicensed.
“Here we have centers not
even licensed and out there
professing to dole out very
crucial information and advice
about a woman’s health,”
Becerra said. “So, at minimum a
woman should know whether a
facility is licensed.”
The law applies to all licensed
health facilities, yet the
pregnancy centers say it’s
designed to target them because
it exempts other types of
facilities, such as those with
Medicaid patients or health
centers that have a relationship
with the state.
Pregnancy centers say it puts
them in the awkward position of
displaying the availability of a
procedure — abortion — that
they exist to advise women
against. If they don’t comply,
they are fined.
“They are singling out people
with a viewpoint, saying, ‘We
are going to compel you speak
something you don’t agree
with,’ ” Harle said.
The Supreme Court hasn’t
publicly announced a date for
oral arguments, but they
probably will take place in
February or March.
It’s a particularly interesting
case because it raises questions
about what doctors and
counselors can be required by
states to tell their patients.
Both Republican-led and
Democrat-led states have passed
laws to this end.
Under an Illinois law that
went into effect in January,
providers must offer a “standard
of care,” which includes telling
patients of their medical option
to get an abortion.
Until it was struck down by a
court in 2014, a North Carolina
law required doctors to perform
an ultrasound and describe the
image of the fetus to the woman
before providing her with an
abortion.
Both sides say their aim is
simply to provide women with
all the available information as
they make such an important
decision. We’ll soon have a
better idea of what the Supreme
Court thinks about this sticky
question.
shows it outpacing last year’s
BY
A MY G OLDSTEIN
The number of Americans signing up for health-care plans under
the Affordable Care Act continues
to run ahead of last year’s number
in states relying on the federal
insurance exchange, according to
federal figures released Wednesday that span nearly half of an
abbreviated enrollment season.
Between the start of the current
sign-up period on Nov. 1 and Saturday, nearly 2.28 million people
chose health-care plans for the
coming year — slightly more than
during the first four weeks of the
ACA enrollment period a year ago,
reports from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services show.
The latest enrollment “snapshot” shows a mild dip in the
one-week sign-up figures this fall,
with less than 800,000 people selecting plans during the third
week, about 78,000 fewer than the
week before. The proportion of
newcomers to ACA insurance
crept up, rising from 23 percent of
the enrollment during the first
two weeks to nearly 28 percent
during the third week.
The latest evidence of persistent consumer interest in ACA
coverage was immediately embraced by advocates for the 2010
health-care law.
The figures do not, however,
solve the mystery of why enrollment figures are defying widespread predictions that the Trump
administration’s assertive opposition to the law — including a
90 percent cut in advertising and
other outreach strategies to encourage people to sign up — would
dampen Americans’ response.
It is possible the higher enrollment so far reflects public understanding this sign-up season lasts
six weeks, half as long as in the
past few years, so people are hurrying to act early before the
Dec. 15 deadline. Only when the
final total becomes available will it
become clear whether the availability of ACA health-care plans,
which are subsidized for millions
of people, has become entrenched
enough in the American consciousness that enrollment can
withstand months of naysaying by
President Trump and confusion
sowed by congressional Republicans’ unsuccessful efforts to dismantle major parts of the law.
The figures include people
choosing ACA plans for 2018 in the
39 states that rely on HealthCare.gov, the website for the federal marketplace. The figures exclude enrollment in the remaining
states and the District, which run
their own insurance marketplaces
under the law. The count refers to
people who have selected a plan.
Based on past years’ experience,
most but not all of those people
will go on to start paying monthly
premiums that will put their insurance into effect. The coverage,
sold by private insurers, is intended for individuals and families
who do not have access to affordable health benefits through a job.
For the first time this season,
Wednesday’s figures include a
state breakdown. It shows that
places with lots of ACA customers
in the past are drawing a lot again.
Floridians have chosen the
most health plans so far this season — about 498,000. North Carolina is next, with 139,000 signing
up, followed by Georgia, Pennsylvania and Virginia.
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/powerpost
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/powerpost/
Aneeta Malcolm talks with Eduardo Gamero, a certified navigator,
in Silver Spring on Nov. 1 to help negotiate renewing her coverage.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A25
RE
washington forum
Instant change,
everywhere
and at once
BY
D
Thanksgiving
in Trump Country
BY
Another Thanksgiving, another season
of bracing for dinnertime conversation
with your favorite right-wing uncle. Or so
the shopworn liberal trope would have it.
Let’s pause to imagine the other half of the
story, which the media somehow manages
to overlook.
J IM H OAGLAND
marrakesh, morocco
riverless cars and trucks rule the
road, while robots “man” the factories. Super-smartphones hail Uber
helicopters or even planes to fly
their owners across mushrooming urban
areas. Machines use algorithms to teach
themselves cognitive tasks that once required human intelligence, wiping out millions of managerial, as well as industrial,
jobs.
These are visions of a world remade — for
the most part, in the next five to 10 years —
by technological advances that form a
fourth industrial revolution. You catch
glimpses of the same visions today not only
in Silicon Valley but also in Paris think
tanks, Chinese electric-car factories or even
here at the edge of the Sahara.
Technological disruption in the 21st century is different. Societies had years to
adapt to change driven by the steam engine,
electricity and the computer. Today, change
is instant and ubiquitous. It arrives digitally
across the globe all at once.
Governments at all levels on all continents are suddenly waking up to how social
media and other forms of algorithms and
artificial intelligence have raced beyond
their control or even awareness. (See the
Trump campaign and Russia, 2016, for one
example.)
This realization that American lives are
on the cusp of technological disruptions
even more sweeping than those of the past
decade was driven home to me by being
part of a research project on technology and
governance at the Hoover Institution at
Stanford University this year. “Autonomous” (i.e., driverless) cars, the cloud, and
swarming drones that deliver goods to your
doorstep or transform naval and ground
war-fighting strategy are well-known concepts. But the reality that they are breathing
down my — and your — neck came as
something of a surprise.
So did the startling visions of change
outlined in the cozy confines of Silicon
Valley that were also on the agenda here on
Africa’s Atlantic shoulder when France’s
Institute of International Relations held its
annual World Policy Conference this
month.
The usual suspects — global balance-ofpower politics, the European Union’s woes,
President Trump’s foreign-policy brutishness, Brexit — shared pride of place with the
Internet of Cars (the on-wheels version of
the Internet of Things) and the vulnerability of the 5,000 military and civilian satellites now in orbit.
These were not abstract subjects for the
conference’s host country. Morocco this
month became the first African nation to
launch a spy satellite into space. And the
kingdom is a key player in U.N.-sponsored
efforts to organize a global containment
strategy for climate change.
China’s policies toward Taiwan and India
were not dwelled upon here. Instead it was
noted that China produces more electricpowered automobiles than the rest of the
world combined in a determined campaign
to reduce pollution. “China is becoming a
global laboratory as well as a global factory,”
said one speaker, pointing to Beijing’s surging development of artificial intelligence in
all civilian and military forms.
The world’s major powers offer sharp
contrasts in harnessing technological
change to their national interests and histories. The result is a new bipolar world
based on technology rather than nuclear
arsenals. Today’s superpowers are the United States and China.
The U.S. government has kept out of the
way and let market forces develop giant
technology companies with global reach.
China has chosen to compete head to head,
keeping Facebook, Google and others out of
its markets while capturing U.S. intellectual
property for its national firms. Europe lets
U.S. technology companies in and regulates
them rather than competing. Russia has
weaponized information technology, adding social media to its arsenal of troops,
missiles and tanks.
Diplomats and strategists have begun to
patrol this expanding intersection of technology and international affairs, hoping to
find ways to adapt the Cold War rules of
deterrence and arms-control agreements to
threats from cyberspace. Some experts
shudder at the thought of artificial intelligence being incorporated into national
command-and-control systems, further reducing the time humans have to respond to
hostile missiles— or laser beams.
There were also calls for governments to
begin to grapple with urgent earth-bound
problems created by the disruptive impact
of technology on domestic labor markets
and increasingly fragile political systems.
The jobs that artificial intelligence and
automation create while destroying outmoded ones often require constant retraining and multiple career and location changes. U.S. employers report that 6.1 million
jobs currently sit vacant largely because
applicants lack either the skills or mobility
needed.
And there was clear recognition from
Palo Alto, Calif., to Marrakesh that the
communication revolution embodied in social media has hollowed out the political
parties in democracies, enabling demagogues to whip up mobs by remote control.
The world turns, as always. But now it
turns on a dime, or rather a computer chip.
Jim Hoagland is a contributing editor for The
Post.
G ARY A BERNATHY
T
COURTESY OF LYN HUTCHINSON
Trey Lefler at the University of the South at Sewanee commencement in 2004.
The gifts my brother
gave after his death
BY
L AURA L EFLER H ERZOG
T
en years ago on Thanksgiving
Day, my 25-year-old brother,
Trey, died after a car accident.
Trey was handsome and
popular — a high school valedictorian
and college basketball player with a
coveted job working for Sen. Lamar
Alexander (R-Tenn.). But what stood
out most about Trey was his innate
capacity to love his neighbor as himself.
This condolence note captures Trey
well: “I do janitorial and maintenance
work in the building that houses the
Alexander campaign office. Trey and I
would often speak in passing or occasionally make small talk. After a few
weeks, he took the time to introduce
himself to me. Trey was always polite,
mannerable and usually had a smile
on his face. In short, he was an impressive individual. I am of a different
generation, race and probably differ
on some political issues, and all too
often today people allow these things
to solely define them and separate
them from others. I did not see that
with Trey. I consider myself honored to
have known him.”
The Thanksgiving timing of Trey’s
death was significant, framing our
grief through a lens of gratitude. Trey’s
boss, Sen. Alexander (whom I also
worked for as press secretary), likes to
quote his friend Alex Haley, who said,
“Find the good and praise it.”
We found “good” when we learned
Trey would die the same way he lived
— by loving and giving. Only 3 in 1,000
people die in a way that allows for
organ donation. If you knew Trey, it
wouldn’t surprise you that he marked
“yes” to organ donation when he renewed his driver’s license the previous
May. His girlfriend also recalled an
eerily relevant conversation with him
just a few weeks before the accident
affirming his decision. “I’ll be with the
Big Guy,” he told her. “Give it all.”
As a result, five people — two single
mothers in their 40s, a 56-year-old
mother of two, a 36-year-old uncle,
and a 62-year-old doctor and father of
four — received a Thanksgiving mira-
cle: a life-giving organ from my brother.
More than 116,000 men, women and
children are on the national transplant
waiting list, and 20 people die waiting
each day. But here’s the stat that hits
home for me: 95 percent of American
adults support organ donation, but
only 54 percent are signed up as
donors. When I flipped my driver’s
license over the day Trey died, it wasn’t
signed.
If you haven’t already, I urge you to
register as an organ donor and to share
your wishes with loved ones. Talking
about organ donation may feel morbid
and unnecessary, but it mattered to my
family. We were able to carry out Trey’s
wishes with peace and confidence. I
struggled with the decision to donate
his eyes. It seemed so invasive. But he
had made it clear he wanted to “give it
all.” Now, somewhere out there is a
person seeing the world through Trey’s
eyes.
In a divine plot twist, one of Trey’s
kidneys went 250 miles away to a man
living down the street from my mother
and stepfather. We were advised that
donors and recipients typically remain
confidential, but as people in the small
town learned that Trey had died on
Thanksgiving and donated his organs
and that a local doctor had finally
received a long-awaited kidney the
same day, the connection was unavoidable.
On her birthday that March, my
mom was out for dinner when she saw
the physician for the first time. She
introduced herself, and he thanked
her for the gift Trey had given him.
Ten years later, he is enjoying remarkably good health. He remarried,
watched his grandchildren grow and
continued his 40-year medical practice, now serving veterans.
It turned out the “stranger” Trey
helped with the gift of a kidney wasn’t
a stranger. He was a neighbor. It’s
made me realize there are no strangers, only neighbors awaiting our love
and kindness in ways big and small.
Laura Lefler Herzog is a resident of the
District.
PO S T P A R T I S A N
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan
Hold the harasser in chief
accountable
President Trump just can’t help himself. For almost two weeks, he kept
largely silent about allegations that Roy
Moore, the Alabama Republican nominee for Senate, sexually assaulted underage women while he was in his 30s.
But Tuesday the president came out
against Moore’s Democratic opponent,
Doug Jones, arguing that “we don’t
need a liberal person in [the Senate
seat], a Democrat.” Besides, Trump told
reporters, Moore “says it didn’t happen
and you have to listen to him, also.”
It’s bad enough that the president is
backing an accused child molester for
Senate; we’ll find out whether Alabama voters agree with him next
month. Trump’s words are also a reminder that, in the national conversation about sexual harassers, the president’s record needs to be at the center.
And, yes, that means investigations.
The evidence against Trump is
damning. Seventeen women have accused him of sexual harassment and
assault. He admitted on tape that he
could grope women without their consent because “when you’re a star, they
let you do it.” He confessed to entering
pageant rooms when contestants were
naked.
Most of this information came to
light last fall. Trump promised to sue
the accusers at the time, but he hasn’t.
His defenders have not found anything
exculpatory, and Lord knows they’ve
tried. No wonder Trump emphasized
that Moore “says it didn’t happen” —
it’s the only defense either has.
Yet even as allegations of sex abuse
reached Capitol Hill and state legislatures around the country, many have
been reluctant to revive the accusations against Trump. There should be
no such reluctance. The many reckonings abusers will face and the many
reforms that industries will promise to
adopt in the coming months will mean
far less if the president’s history remains undiscussed.
Trump’s statement that “when you’re
a star, they let you do it” showcases the
power imbalance many of these stories
have. The abusers use their influence to
coerce victims, to hush witnesses and
investigations, and to protect themselves from consequences. Reversing
this culture starts with abusers publicly
facing repercussions, not just to make
other would-be abusers think twice but
also to encourage other victims and
witnesses that if they come forward
they will be believed.
The recent downfalls of titans of
various industries have begun to chip
away at the power imbalance. But as
influential as someone such as Harvey
Weinstein may be, no position compares to the president of the United
States. What message does it send to
victims that the Oval Office’s occupant
shrugged off 17 women? What do they
think when he publicly doubts the
thoroughly
reported
allegations
against Moore? And what better way to
shake the system that seems to have let
Trump get away with his record than
finally forcing him to face consequences?
— James Downie
hillsboro, ohio
he aroma of turkey wafts from the
kitchen as aunts, uncles, nieces,
nephews, cousins and their various spouses spread out on couches
and chairs inside the old southern Ohio
farmhouse, admiring the 13-point buck
mounted on the wall, reminiscing about
how Cousin Johnny bagged it when he was
only 10.
The room is filled with chatter and
laughter, loud enough to drown out the
sounds of kids playing in the back room.
Outside, the assorted pickup trucks with
their gun racks and a couple of SUVs with
oversized tires are parked awkwardly
around the big front yard. Several sport
bumper stickers: “He Won, Get Over It,”
“Trump 2020,” “Deplorables for Trump,”
“Build the Wall, Enforce the Law,” “God
Fearin’ Bible Believin’ Gun Packin’ America Lovin’.”
It’s almost noon when Uncle Joe leans
over to Cousin Danny and asks, “You think
she’ll show?”
A hush descends on the room. After a
few seconds, Danny replies, “Who knows.
Every year she says she won’t come back,
but she always does.”
“Dinner’s on!” Grandma hollers, and
the adults march into the big dining room
while the kids run to their seats at a small
folding table nearby.
“Grandpa, say grace,” Grandma orders.
“Bow your heads.”
“Dear Lord, we thank you for this day
and we ask — .”
Grandpa is suddenly interrupted by the
front door banging open.
“I made it!” shouts Aunt Louise. “Traffic
on the interstate was horrible, but I’m
here!”
Uncle Joe exchanges a look with Cousin
Danny. Louise tosses her coat on a chair in
the corner and squeezes into a seat between Aunt Katie and Cousin Johnny.
“We were just saying the blessing,” says
Grandma. “Go ahead, Grandpa.”
Grandpa clears his throat. “We thank
you for our family and ask your blessing on
this food and the hands that prepared it. In
Jesus’ name, amen.”
“Amen,” add a few voices.
Everyone starts digging in, the plates
and bowls clinking as they’re passed
around the big oak table.
“So, Louise, you still like livin’ in Chicago?” Cousin Johnny asks.
“Love it,” says Louise, her fork stabbing
at a plate filled with salad and vegetable
sides but studiously avoiding the turkey.
“Oh, Grandma,” she says, “I hope you don’t
mind, I plugged my Volt into the outlet on
the patio.”
“That’s fine,” Grandma replies, shooting
Joe a look that warns him to keep quiet.
Joe looks out the window at Louise’s car,
with a sticker on the rear window: “Deport
Trump, Keep the Immigrants.”
“Hey, Louise, glad you ain’t been shot
yet, livin’ in Chicago and all,” says Cousin
Danny.
“Chicago’s as safe as anywhere,” says
Louise. “Safer than walking around these
parts during deer season.”
“Well, if Hillary had won, she’da probably outlawed deer season,” says Cousin
Johnny.
“Hillary did win, by 3 million votes,”
says Louise, sipping from the bottled
water she had tucked in her purse. “She
should be president.” The others grumble.
“You wouldn’t be saying that if the
situation was reversed,” Cousin Danny says.
Uncle Joe can’t help himself. “What they
need in Chicago is a law that makes
everybody carry a gun,” he says. “Wouldn’t
have all the shootings if the criminals
knew everybody was packing.”
“That’s right,” several voices chime in.
“Seriously, Joe, Grandma must have
dropped you on your head when you were
little,” says Louise.
“Children!” Grandma scolds. “Behave.
It’s Thanksgiving.”
The discussion gradually turns to kids,
doctor visits and how bad the coming
winter might be.
After dessert — homemade pumpkin
pie and chocolate cake — and another
hour of small talk, Louise says, “I have to
head back. Long drive to Chicago, and they
say it might snow.”
“Don’t rush off,” Grandma pleads. “You
just got here.”
But Louise gathers her coat, hugs
Grandma and Grandpa, and kisses the
children. Joe walks her to the door.
“Hey, Louise,” he says, as they step
outside.
Louise turns, bracing herself for a parting shot. But Joe just says softly: “We love
you.”
Joe notices that Louise blinks against
the cold. She smiles and walks back to the
door, giving Joe a hug and a peck on the
cheek.
“I love you, too,” she says. As she
unplugs the cord to her Chevrolet Volt, she
adds, “I’ll see you next Thanksgiving.”
“Okay,” says Joe, “but Christmas is just
next month.”
Louise smiles and says, “We’ll see.”
Joe rejoins the family, and they chuckle
about their crazy Chicago relative. They
loudly agree on how misguided she is as
they quietly reflect on how much they miss
her.
Gary Abernathy, a contributing columnist for
The Post, is publisher and editor of the
(Hillsboro, Ohio) Times-Gazette.
GARRISON KEILLOR
Be happy
For evolution, the Constitution,
And the ATMs of banks,
The Times and Post and the whole West
Coast,
I want to give sincerest thanks.
A Mozart sonata, my inamorata,
And a first-rate BLT.
For Silverman (Sarah) and the Obama
era,
I give thanks most thankfully.
I’m a fraud, a fake, a big mistake, a
creep.
I’m over a barrel but I care a lot for
Meryl Streep.
A
nd so, once again, the feast of
gratitude for the gifts of Providence — profiteroles, procreation,
Prokofiev, the profession of faith,
the prospect of progress, procrastination,
Proverbs and Providence (R.I.) itself — I
was there last week, a very snazzy town —
and also for tragic mistakes you might’ve
made and did not and here you are,
basically okay, with a slab of turkey and
cranberry and a gravy lake in your mashed
potato. It’s a good place to be.
I wasted hours of my youth playing golf,
and what if I had gotten good at it? I’d be a
loudmouth yahoo in yellow plaid pants
with a double Scotch in hand watching
“Hannity” and putting my faith in insanity. Thank you, Lord, for those shanked
3-iron shots.
Of course I am sorry about those millions of turkeys, the miserable lives they
led, imprisoned, deprived of basic rights,
and I am sorry about the undocumented
workers who had to slaughter and clean
them at minimum wages so that our young
people would be free to post on Facebook
their grievances against the world, but
face it: Those turkeys had reached their
intellectual peak and were not going to
have great careers and it was merciful to
kill them and not put them into nursing
homes to wind up on life support. And for
us Americans, something about turkey
says, “Thank you, Lord, for your abundant
mercy, undeserved though it be.” Kale does
not say that. It just plain doesn’t.
It’s a great country. Take a train sometime and see for yourself. We are not at
war. The economy is worrisome but it
always has been: Worry is what economists do for a living. Longevity is getting
longer. People read books, more than ever.
They still know the words to “The Battle
Hymn of the Republic,” even the verse
about building Him an altar in the evening
dews and damps and the flaring lamps. So
let us come before His Presence with
thanksgiving and make a joyful noise — in
other words, tell jokes. The air is polluted
because so much of it has passed through
saxophones. A Northern zoo has descriptions of the animals and a Southern zoo
has recipes. The mathematician brought a
bomb on the airplane because that decreased the chances of there being another
one. There are thousands of them!
It helps to get old so you gain some
perspective on life. I was lucky to come
along when open-heart surgery was available and there were blood thinners to
reduce the risk of strokes. If I had been
born in 1880, I’d be dead now. I did my best
to die young like Keats and F. Scott
Fitzgerald and Buddy Holly but common
sense kicked in and, praise the Lord, I
burned the smokes and poured the whiskey in the sink.
We Keillors are doing okay, thank you.
We came down from Canada 137 years ago
because a Keillor in Minnesota needed
help, her husband had tuberculosis; it was
simple loyalty on our part and had nothing
to do with escaping oppression or seeking
opportunity. And we have made the best of
it. Many of us became schoolteachers,
following in the footsteps of Grandma. We
produced a CEO or two, a physician, a PhD
in psychology, an architect, a lawyer,
engineers, an astrophysicist, some computer whizzes, and me, an excellent speller
with very good handwriting. I married
well. It took several tries but I made it. She
is sharp and on top of things. She can be
blunt. She is lively and witty, a runner, a
musician, she looks terrific. And she is in
love with me and has forgiven my excesses.
This is my message for today: If you find
a good partner, you are pretty much set for
life. And now here you are, looking at each
other across the table. Be happy. The
Rockies may crumble, Gibraltar may tumble, and Trump’ll soon fade away, but
thank God we’re living, cling to your
sweetie, draw up a treaty, and happy
Thanksgiving Day.
Garrison Keillor, a contributing columnist for
The Post, is an author and radio personality.
A26
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Trial by limo fire?
EDITORIALS
Decency before politics
What a presidential president might have said about Mr. Moore.
H
can matter more than basic human decency.
“Americans enjoy the presumption of innocence
in criminal cases. But in the court of public opinion
— and at the ballot box — we all get to make our own
judgments. The allegations against Mr. Moore have
only become more credible, and Mr. Moore’s denials
less believable, since Leigh Corfman accused him of
inappropriately touching her when she was 14 years
old and he was 32. The volume and consistency of
complaints that have emerged since, along with
comments from those who knew him at the time,
such as a colleague who said ‘it was common
knowledge that Roy dated high school girls,’ have
only bolstered their stories.
“It is true that Mr. Moore has strongly denied the
allegations. But vociferousness and bluster do not
translate into innocence. If those accused of sexual
misconduct were judged on the vehemence of their
denials, then only the contrite would suffer consequences, and very few victims would ever see justice.
“The nation is experiencing a long-overdue moment in which women are recounting upsetting
Germany’s
political crisis
stories that they have hidden, sometimes for many,
many years. The age of their stories does not
discredit them. It can be hard for women to speak up.
They often have nothing to gain — and much to lose,
particularly when powerful people have hurt them.
“As one revelation follows another, it becomes
ever more obvious that existing practices have not
protected women. That is why today I am establishing a presidential commission to draw up recommendations to systemically fight the too-pervasive
problem of sexual harassment and assault, especially in the workplace. I will expect a report with
concrete recommendations in three months.
“And let’s be clear: This is not a partisan issue, as
recent revelations in Congress show, and none of us
should seek partisan advantage from it. Instead, we
should thank Leigh Corfman and all the others who
have had the courage to come forward — and we
should honor their bravery by insisting on higher
standards of behavior in public life. That starts with
making sure that a predator such as Roy Moore
never takes a seat in the U.S. Senate.”
TOM TOLES
A weak government in Berlin is the
last thing the West needs right now.
much to create the present political impasse. While
the Christian Democratic vote slumped in this year’s
election, that of the far-right Alternative for Germany spiked. Coalition negotiations foundered in
part over disagreements about how much to limit
future flows of refugees.
The crisis reveals that Germany, too, is vulnerable
to the polarization that is infecting Western politics.
Where once two big parties and a couple of smaller
ones encompassed its politics, seven now have seats
in Parliament — including former Communists as
well as the far right. The extremes collected only
about 20 percent of the vote in the last election —
compared with more than 40 percent in France — but
that has proved enough to destabilize the system.
The uncertainty in Berlin could go on for months.
If new elections are held, they won’t be scheduled
before next year, and current polls show they might
produce similar results. No doubt the enemies of
Western democracy, led by Vladimir Putin, will seek
to take advantage of the situation. As for those
Americans who have looked to Ms. Merkel as an ally
against the excesses of Mr. Trump, it may be time to
scale expectations back.
A sublime goal for Thanksgiving
Let us show a bit more ‘humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience.’
T
HE MEDIA and various websites are full of
advice this time of year on how to achieve a
“hassle-free,” or at least less stressful,
Thanksgiving. In the words of one such
guide, “Thanksgiving dinner is a simple meal to
prepare. All it takes to pull it off is some advance
Thanksgiving dinner planning. The best advice to
reduce the stress is to write down everything you
need to do and then prioritize.”
As many have learned over the years, this isn’t as
easy as it sounds. The basics of the traditional
Thanksgiving dinner in themselves present a challenge to all but the most practiced cooks: making
sure the oversize fowl doesn’t dry out during its long
stint in the oven (or, worse, prove to be seriously
underdone when the carving ceremony is performed), getting every dish on the table at the proper
temperature and showing full regard for the allergies and convictions (vegetarian, paleo, pescatarian)
of all the guests.
Maybe it is true that by careful planning, and by
delegating various tasks to others, one can indeed
make this a hassle-free event. And yet, as has become
painfully evident over four centuries of American
Thanksgivings, even the best planning is unlikely to
take account of certain possibilities. For instance,
the chance that mother-in-law’s green-bean casserole will be inadvertently left off the table. That
Uncle Walter will find the gin. That the family
beagle, product of centuries of breeding that enable
him to track elusive game over land, water and
chain-link fences, will see a temporarily unattended
roast turkey on the dining-room table as easy prey.
That the afternoon’s football game will erupt into
loud laments and recrimination when the referees
decide, after half an hour’s film study, that the
receiver “juggled” the ball in the course of catching it
— a question that would be better left to theologians
or physics PhDs. That attempts to calm the situation
with a nice game of bridge will trigger further
conflict when the declarations of “trump” and “no
trump,” drifting from one room to another, are
misinterpreted.
We live in troubled times, but less so than the
pilgrims at Plymouth plantation, who were thankful
simply that their first harvest would keep them alive
through the winter, and who wondered how long
their good luck would last. The venture they helped
launch has lasted quite a while, as it turns out, and
may continue to do so, if we can only show a bit more
of what Abraham Lincoln called “humble penitence
for our national perverseness and disobedience” and
refocus ourselves on the sublime goal set forth in his
Thanksgiving proclamation of 1863: “the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquility and Union.” It
might help if we wrote down everything we needed
to do and then prioritized.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
The significance of the Bible goes beyond conflict
The reduction in the Nov. 19 front-page article “At
the Museum of the Bible, first public visitors walk
between the covers” of the Bible to the book “at the
center of three religions and two
millennia of conflict,” while tightly
constructed prose, was unfair to
readers of faith and to history.
The Bible is the center of three
religions, but how does one miss the
centrality of the Bible to the moral
foundations of our civilization and
reduce it solely to a source of conflict? Historian Paul Johnson described the impact of the second
half of the Bible when he suggested
“the salient virtues of the message Jesus conveyed . . .
percolated through society, leaving precious traces of
The Nov. 20 Metro article “Trial to begin in
Jan. 20 protests,” about the first of many trials of
Inauguration Day protesters, unfortunately propagated a common misunderstanding. The more than
200 people — including protesters, as well as
journalists, legal observers and other citizens —
who were arrested that day were confined by the
police in a tactic known as “kettling” before 11 a.m.
Much later that afternoon, around 4 p.m., a
limousine was set on fire. Although the initial
charging indictment pointed to this limo fire as
justification for the mass arrest, the superseding
indictment does not mention it. Presumably the
prosecution realized that the limo was not set on
fire by a group that was at the time confined by
police without access to food, water or bathrooms.
It shouldn’t matter, because guilt by association is
not how our system works, and 200 people did not
light a vehicle on fire. But the image has been
falsely used to paint these protesters in a bad light.
Beth Kingsley, Washington
Charities would be affected too
The Nov. 18 front-page article “Local worries over
tax changes” reported that municipalities were
protesting the Republican plan to eliminate state
and local tax deductions, and with good reason. But
where are the protests from the recipients of
charitable tax deductions? Even though donations
by individual taxpayers to qualified institutions
would remain deductible under the House plan, a
Nov. 7 memorandum prepared by the Joint Committee on Taxation estimates that under the present law,
40.7 million taxpayers will be taking about $241 billion in charitable deductions next year, but if the law
were to be changed, only about 9.4 million taxpayers
would take an estimated $146 billion in charitable
deductions. That is too bad.
All is not lost, however, because it does not appear
corporations will lose their charitable deductions.
John R. Maney Jr., Springfield
The Second Amendment’s true intent
G
ERMAN CHANCELLOR Angela Merkel has
quietly served as one of the checks and
balances on Donald Trump’s presidency.
While cultivating a cordial relationship with
Mr. Trump — who has boasted about his good
relationship with her — Ms. Merkel has assumed
leadership in areas from which the United States has
stepped back. She has stoutly opposed Russian
aggressions and championed humane treatment of
refugees and action on climate change. She has
appeared to keep Europe’s most powerful country on
a centrist course even while other Western democracies were riven by populism.
All that means that Ms. Merkel’s failure to form a
new governing coalition following September’s elections, which has plunged Germany into an unprecedented postwar political crisis, is a problem for
Americans as well. Though there is little danger that
the result will be an extremist government, it could
very well be a weak one — which is the last thing the
West needs at a time when Britain and the United
States are both hamstrung by political turmoil.
Ms. Merkel’s own future may be in doubt after a
dozen years in power. Having failed to form a
four-party coalition including the leftist Greens party and pro-business Free Democrats, she faces unpalatable choices, including a minority government or a
second election after failing to form a government —
neither of which has happened in stability-craving
Germany since 1945. She said on Monday that she
favored a new election and would run again for
chancellor. But a rebellion by her Christian Democratic Union party cannot be ruled out.
Her departure would almost certainly be a blow to
transatlantic relations. Raised in East Germany,
Ms. Merkel is instinctively pro-American and skeptical of Russia — qualities that many German leaders,
including her predecessor Gerhard Schroeder, decidedly lack. Though her governance has been marked
by moderation and caution, she took a moral stand in
welcoming refugees to Germany in 2015. More than a
million came, and the resulting political backlash did
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
ERE IS how President Trump responded
Tuesday to questions about Roy Moore, the
Alabama GOP nominee for U.S. Senate
accused of sexually molesting, assaulting
and harassing teenage girls when he was in his 30s:
President Trump: “I can tell you one thing for
sure: We don’t need a liberal person in there, a
Democrat . . .”
Q: “Is Roy Moore, a child molester, better than a
Democrat? He’s an accused —”
President Trump: “Well, he denies it. . . . He denies
it. And, by the way, he totally denies it. . . . Forty
years is a long time. He’s run eight races, and this has
never come up.”
Here is what a presidential president might have
said:
“I cannot in good conscience support Roy Moore.
As Marc Short, my director of legislative affairs, put
it earlier this month, ‘There’s no Senate seat more
important than the notion of child pedophilia.’ I
have many policy disagreements with Mr. Moore’s
opponent, Democrat Doug Jones, but none of them
. THURSDAY,
love and neighborliness, mercy and forgiveness, courage in suffering and faith in goodness.”
Or, sticking to the “center of three religions” theme,
author Bruce Feiler described an
interfaith conversation in which the
participants realized “they needed a
foundation that all three traditions
revered equally, that embodied the
monotheistic ideals of faith in God
and righteous behavior toward humanity, and that existed before the
religions themselves existed.” They
found that in the Abraham of the
Bible. There are any number of
things that divide society, precious
few that unite us. The Post should leave room for them.
How does one miss the
centrality of the Bible to
the moral foundations
of our civilization?
Keith W. Mines, Alexandria
News pages:
MARTIN BARON
Executive Editor
CAMERON BARR
Managing Editor
EMILIO GARCIA-RUIZ
Managing Editor
TRACY GRANT
Deputy Managing Editor
SCOTT VANCE
Deputy Managing Editor
BARBARA VOBEJDA
Deputy Managing Editor
Editorial and opinion pages:
FRED HIATT
Editorial Page Editor
JACKSON DIEHL
Deputy Editorial Page Editor
RUTH MARCUS
Deputy Editorial Page Editor
JO-ANN ARMAO
Associate Editorial Page Editor
Vice Presidents:
JAMES W. COLEY JR......................................................................................Production
L. WAYNE CONNELL..........................................................................Human Resources
ELIZABETH H. DIAZ ................................................. Audience Development & Insights
GREGG J. FERNANDES........................................................Customer Care & Logistics
STEPHEN P. GIBSON...................................................................Finance & Operations
SCOT GILLESPIE .......................................................................................... Engineering
JED HARTMAN.......................................................................................Client Solutions
KRISTINE CORATTI KELLY...................................................Communications & Events
JOHN B. KENNEDY.................................................................General Counsel & Labor
MIKI TOLIVER KING.......................................................................................Operations
SHAILESH PRAKASH...............................Digital Product Development & Engineering
STEVE STUP.......................................................................................Digital Advertising
The Washington Post
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071 (202) 334-6000
I appreciated the Nov. 17 news article “Some common ground in contentious gun debate” and fully
support any bipartisan attempt at gun regulation. But
we will never find consensus so long as those who defy
gun control believe that the Second Amendment is on
their side. This falsehood is too often reinforced by the
media. Responsible reporting on the Second Amendment and gun issues should recognize the debate is
over its original intent and not promote that onesided interpretation.
In an excellent paper in the Journal of Constitutional Law, Nathan Kozuskanich noted, “Whatever
one may think about originalism as a theory, there is
little question that any evaluation of its potential
depends on the degree to which it accurately reflects
history.” He documented, through an exhaustive
search of newspapers, pamphlets and public records
of the time, that the term “bear arms” was reserved
for militia action and never used in the context of an
individual’s right to own a gun for hunting or personal defense. For example, Rhode Island required that
men ages 16 to 50 “bear Arms in the respective
Trained Bands whereto by Law they shall belong.”
Mr. Kozuskanich’s paper was published just before
the Supreme Court’s decision in the District of
Columbia v. Heller, in which the “originalist” Justice
Antonin Scalia prevailed in a 5-to-4 decision to
restrict the District’s right to regulate guns. Just
because someone calls himself an originalist doesn’t
make it so. The framers of our Constitution never
intended to limit states’ rights to regulate guns.
Gary Krauss, Fairfax
The battle over cyberspace
David Von Drehle was correct in his Nov. 19 op-ed,
“We’re at cyberwar, and the enemy is us,” that the
United States and its allies are engaged in cyberwar
with the Russians. He also was right that we are our
own worst enemy, and one of the reasons is that the
United States and Russia define the battle space for
cyber-conflict differently.
For the United States, cyberwar must involve physical damage to computers and networks and contain
an element of violence. Russia, in contrast, focuses on
the “information space,” which includes cyberspace
but is much broader and includes all sources of
information that influence how people think. We no
longer recognize “information war” to be part of
cyberwar and, thus, are stymied in developing an
effective response. By waiting for a cyberattack equivalent to Pearl Harbor before we engage in cyberconflict, we have outsmarted ourselves and given the
Russians a significant advantage in their ongoing
efforts to use information as a weapon to disrupt the
United States and other Western governments. While
waiting for cyberwar, we are losing the information
war.
Terry L. Thompson, Clarksville
The writer teaches global cybersecurity at
Johns Hopkins University and the
University of Maryland Baltimore County.
David Von Drehle provided an invaluable overview of various cyberwar issues that face us: foreign,
domestic, political, technical and social, as well as
leadership voids in the White House and Congress. We have not had a Pearl Harbor or 9/11 to unite
and rouse us to this threat. I fear that by the time we
encounter an equivalent cyber-event, it will be too
late.
But Russian President Vladimir Putin baffles
me. He runs a kleptocracy that thrives on the success
of the West. If the West fails, what happens to the
value of all of his and his cronies’ properties in New
York, London and around the world? What happens
to the Russian economy if he were to send us into a
depression and there were no need for his oil and gas?
Why would he kill the goose that lays his golden eggs?
I fear Russian leadership is using new technologies
to fight an old war. But it appears that leadership on
both sides is failing the nations and people of the
world by wishing it were 1950.
Robert Pokras, Silver Spring
Letters can be sent to letters@washpost.com.
Submissions must be exclusive to The Post and should
include the writer’s address and day and evening
telephone numbers. Because of the volume of material we
receive, we are unable to acknowledge submissions;
writers whose letters are under consideration for
publication will be contacted.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A27
RE
GEORGE F. WILL
E.J. DIONNE JR.
Another year
of American
hilarity
A moment
of thanks
for journalists
T
T
ryptophan, an amino acid in turkey, is unjustly blamed for what
mere gluttony does, making
Americans comatose every
fourth Thursday in November. But before nodding off, give thanks for another
year of American hilarity, including:
A company curried favor with advanced thinkers by commissioning for
Manhattan’s financial district the “Fearless Girl” bronze statue, which exalts
female intrepidity in the face of a rampant bull (representing (1) a surging
stock market or (2) toxic masculinity).
Then the company paid a $5 million
settlement, mostly for paying 305 female
executives less than men in comparable
positions. New York’s decrepit subway
system took action: Henceforth, genderneutral announcements will address
“passengers” rather than “ladies and gentlemen.” Washington’s subway banned a
civil liberties group’s ad consisting entirely of the text of the First Amendment,
which ostensibly violated the rule
against ads “intended to influence members of the public regarding an issue on
which there are varying opinions.”
California now can jail certain caregivers who “willfully and repeatedly fail
to use a resident’s preferred name or
pronouns.” A Massachusetts librarian
rejected a donation of Dr. Seuss books
because they are “steeped in racist propaganda,” and the New Yorker discovered
that “Thomas the Tank Engine” is “authoritarian.” Always alert about planetary crises, the New Yorker also reported: “The world is running out of sand.”
A food truck offering free lunches to
workers cleaning up after Hurricane
Irma was banished from a Florida town
because its operator had no government
permit to do that. United Airlines said:
Assault? Don’t be misled by your eyes.
That passenger dragged off the plane was
just being “re-accommodated.”
Even Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) went
to Mississippi, to the Nissan plant in
Canton, to help the United Automobile
Workers with yet another attempt to
convince Southern workers of the delights of unionization. The workers,
80 percent of whom are black, voted
2-to-1 against the UAW. A New York
Times tweet about the South reported a
shooting at a nightclub “in downtown
Arkansas.” Louisiana’s Democratic Party
joined the virtue-signaling by changing
the name of its Jefferson-Jackson Day
dinner.
In toney and oh-so-progressive Malibu, Calif., the city council voted to become a sanctuary city. The councilwoman who made the motion for protecting
illegal immigrants said: “Our city depends on a Hispanic population to support our comfortable lifestyle.” In moreprogressive-than-thou Oregon, where
you can get state-subsidized gender reassignment surgery at age 15 without parental permission, the legislature made
21 the age at which adults can buy
cigarettes.
UCLA researchers warned that because Americans’ pets eat meat, they
endanger the planet by generating
64 million tons of carbon dioxide. Fortytwo years after the government began
(with fuel economy standards) trying to
push Americans into gas-sipping cars,
the three best-selling vehicles were the
Ford, Chevrolet and Ram pickup trucks.
A year after a NASA climatologist (from
the “settled” science of climate) said
California was “in a drought forever,”
torrential rains threatened to break
dams.
Pierce College in Los Angeles was sued
after it prevented a student from giving
away Spanish-language copies of the U.S.
Constitution because he was outside the
.003 percent of the campus designated a
“free speech zone.” Two years after social
justice warriors convulsed the University of Missouri in Columbia, freshman
enrollment was down 35 percent. An
Arizona State University professor allowed some students in her human
rights class to stage anti-Donald Trump
protests in lieu of final exams. The
University of Arizona guide directed
instructors to encourage students to say
“ouch” when something said in class
hurts their feelings. Clemson University’s diversity training washed brains
with this idea: Expecting punctuality
might be insensitive because in some
cultures time is considered “fluid.” The
Chronicle of Higher Education reported
that student snowflakes are not the only
victims of academic suffering. It seems
that after the nine-month school year,
professors endure isolation, solitude and
depression during their three-month vacations.
Massachusetts continues to be surprised that the smuggling of cigarettes
into the state increased when state cigarette taxes increased. Although San Francisco’s hourly minimum wage has not yet
reached its destination of $15, the city is
surprised that so many small businesses
have closed. McDonald’s probably was
not surprised when its shares surged
after it announced plans to replace cashiers with digital ordering kiosks in
2,500 restaurants.
Finally, Domino’s Pizza is going to
need bigger menus. Government labeling regulations require calorie counts for
every variation of items sold, which
Domino’s says (counting different topping and crusts) includes about 34 million possible combinations. None, however, has excessive tryptophan.
georgewill@washpost.com
JENNIFER CHASE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
DAVID VON DREHLE
1967’s holiday-table lesson
T
his column comes to you from
my local library, where the
view through the window is
incandescent leaves falling in
a playful wind against a sky of cloudless blue. I find myself floating with
the leaves as half a century slips away.
Like that, I’m standing beside the
farm canal that was my boyhood
Amazon, peering up at an old cottonwood tree and waiting for leaves as
big as salad plates to lose their grip in
the autumn breeze. This is how the
season of Thanksgiving begins.
Teacher assigns us to collect leaves of
red, gold, orange and russet. After
pressing them for a few days between
the pages of the encyclopedia, we’ll
paste them to sheets of construction
paper for display on the bulletin
board.
It’s 1967 and the world is going to
hell: race riots, senseless murders, a
faraway war, an unpopular president.
Somewhere across the ocean there’s a
nuclear missile aimed in my direction. But I have other business laid
out for me. There is the delicate
matter of tracing my hand and transforming it into a turkey — more
construction paper, more paste. And
there’s a pageant to rehearse involving a story (partially true) about a
ship called Mayflower, a cold and
deadly winter, and a friendly Native
American named Squanto.
The world is going to hell, but the
adults in my life have something
more important to teach a 6-year-old
boy in dungarees and PF Flyers. I’m
being initiated into a venerable tradition, a season of rituals leading up to a
solemn moment. After the leaves and
the tracing and the pageant will come
the baking of the pies, the stuffing of
the bird, the setting of the formal
table. In the kitchen, Mom’s culinary
marathon will stretch from early
morning well into the afternoon amid
dizzying scents of roasting turkey,
warming rolls and bubbling greenbean casserole.
Then her starched and ironed tablecloth will disappear beneath a
jigsaw puzzle of platters, serving
bowls, bread baskets and butter dishes. I will be delirious with hunger and
excitement and visions of the gravy
lake I’ll build in my mashed potatoes.
But wait. Not yet.
Not a bite will be eaten until every
person at the table takes a turn at
giving thanks.
Today, I am thankful for that initiation, which pointed me toward a
truth I might have needed years, or
even a lifetime, to work out for myself.
Long before scientists devised experiments to measure the health effects of
gratitude, I was steered to an understanding that happiness is not something we acquire, nor is it bestowed
on us. It’s a muscle to be exercised, a
habit to be formed.
Over the past two decades, researchers have confirmed the cultural wisdom conferred through pipecleaner turkeys and pumpkin pies. In
studies of adults and children — even
patients with debilitating diseases —
expressions of gratitude have been
found to ease depression, lower blood
pressure and foster a sense of wellbeing. Grateful people are more likely
to exercise regularly and sleep soundly. In spite of the butter, sugar and
salt, Thanksgiving may be the healthiest holiday of all.
A confounding fact of modern life
is that abundance can make it harder,
rather than easier, to be grateful. The
more stuff there is, the more of it we
don’t have. People say the United
States has lost its manufacturing
edge, but no one beats us at the mass
production of envy. If it’s true, as
some experts say, that the millennial
generation values life experience over
piling up things, this will be the
sanest generation in my lifetime.
For if you listen to folks at their
Thanksgiving tables, it’s not swag or
merch they care about most. People
are grateful for human connections
and moments of beauty. We give
thanks for role models and mentors
and people who care. After the floods
of Texas and fires of California, I
spent a couple of days asking people
what they would grab if their home
was about to be destroyed. No one
said the flat-screen TV or the Honyaki
sashimi knife. They all mentioned
keepsakes and mementos of loved
ones.
What’s more, the further I get from
that long-ago boy with his eye on the
golden leaves, the more grateful I am
for things I didn’t receive, and the
thwarting of some dreams. If I had
gotten everything I wished fervently
for at some point in my life, I would
have attended the wrong college,
pursued the wrong career, married
the wrong woman. Garth Brooks is
right when he sings about the gift of
unanswered prayers.
Now the sky outside the window
has gone gray. The sun is low and the
leaves have stopped glowing. I leave
that boy under the tree beside the
canal and return to 2017 — where the
world is still going to hell, and it’s a
wonderful time to give thanks.
david.vondrehle@washpost.com
A voice for refugee children
BY
M UZOON A LMEHELLAN
I
still remember clearly the day my
father decided to leave Syria: Feb. 27,
2013.
I didn’t want to flee my beloved
country, because my country is my identity. It’s where my childhood is and
where my memories are. And I was sad to
leave my friends and my school behind. I
knew that if I lost my education that
would be the end of my story.
Before leaving our house in Daraa, my
father asked all of us to pack the things
we needed the most. It mustn’t be heavy,
he said. But I told myself to pack my
schoolbooks, because I realized that my
education would be the most powerful
thing in my life.
We walked on foot to reach the border
with Jordan. I was carrying my bag, but
my father noticed that I was struggling.
He asked me if I needed help, but when
he picked it up he said, “It’s too heavy.
What did you bring with you?”
“My books!” I replied.
My father was shocked; he told me I
was crazy. But I said, “If I can’t find a
school in the camp, I’ll study by these
books.”
When we arrived at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, I was shocked. It was
difficult to start a new life from nothing,
a life completely different from the one I
had come from. We had no electricity. We
slept, ate, studied and welcomed guests
in the tent where we lived.
But my only concern was my education. I asked people if there was a school,
and the moment I found out I could
continue my education was the moment
I realized I could face these challenges. It
was the moment I realized it was not the
end of my story, but the beginning.
I thought all children would be glad to
be able to go back to school, but that
wasn’t the case. Most of the families and
children in the camp thought that education wasn’t a priority, because once
you’ve become a refugee, it’s not important for you to be an educated person.
That saddened me. Because education
was very important to me, I had thought
KHALIL MAZRAAWI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE VIA GETTY IMAGES
Syrian refugee children at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan on Nov. 13.
it was important to all. I told myself that
I needed to make a change, to persuade
my society to believe in education. If no
one thinks that they can make a difference, then no one will.
When I started, I knew that I would
face many challenges and that many
people wouldn’t hear my voice. But I
believed that one voice was strong
enough to make a change — and not only
a small one. I had nothing but my voice,
so I used it to speak with every child,
asking every mother and father to go
back to school and to consider education
a priority. I was going from tent to tent to
fight for education.
The Zaatari camp wasn’t my final stop.
After living there for more than a year,
my family and I moved to Azraq, another
camp in Jordan, where I found the same
challenges that existed in Zaatari. And
after living for three years in Jordan, I
had the opportunity to move to Britain.
When I arrived in England, I had to
start everything again, and those changes have not been easy. Yet day by day,
everything becomes easier. And I haven’t
forgotten about the people who are still
living in the camps in Jordan, those who
have no voice. So I’m trying to raise my
voice from Britain — to share my story
and let people hear the voices of children
all over the world.
I am 19 years old now. Since April, I’ve
traveled with UNICEF to many places,
but one trip that meant a lot to me was
my recent visit to Jordan, where everything started. I met with wonderful girls
who told me they want to go back to Syria
to rebuild. Sarah, who is 16 years old, told
me she goes to the Makani UNICEF
center in Amman. She loves the community, but is sad — she didn’t find a place at
a school. Yet she said, “I’ll keep fighting.”
Those are strong words. I expect a great
future for Syria with children such as
her.
Monday was U.N. World Children’s
Day. To everyone who will read my story,
I ask this: Please, help children in need.
Please, raise your voices to help those
who cannot speak out. Please, stand for
peace and for equality. Education is the
greatest weapon to solve these challenges, and it’s the only way to build a global
peace.
The writer is a UNICEF goodwill ambassador.
hanksgiving is a splendid holiday, but also a useful one. It
reminds us that gratitude is a
virtue. We owe the most satisfying parts of our lives to others and fool
ourselves if we imagine otherwise.
We usually begin, rightly, by thanking
our families since they are (if we are
lucky) both the original and ongoing
sources of love and nurture. But we
should also be aware of our debt to
institutions and their stewards. This
year, a peculiar candidate for acknowledgment kept forcing its way into my
thinking: journalism.
Since you are reading this in a newspaper or online at a media site, you might
chuckle derisively at my presumption.
The guy makes a living from journalism,
so of course he’s grateful.
True enough, but the political crisis we
confront has encouraged a great many
who are neither scribes nor broadcasters
to consider why journalism matters to a
democracy. Among the many helpful
books and articles on this subject, I
particularly recommend a 2009 essay by
Paul Starr, a Princeton University professor.
One of his central observations, from
cross-national studies: The lower the
circulation of newspapers in a given
country, the higher the level of corruption. Journalism, it turns out, is an
essential restraint on abuses by the powers-that-be, and all the more so when the
checks and balances inside government
are faltering.
Journalism is an essential
restraint on abuses by the
powers-that-be, and all the
more so when the checks and
balances inside government
are faltering.
Since journalists are human beings,
we are by our very natures flawed. It’s not
hard to point to our shortcomings. So in
the interest of offering a model of what
journalism is supposed to be (and, in the
spirit of Thanksgiving, to express appreciation to someone I hold dear), permit
me to introduce you to Shelly Binn, one of
the best editors I will ever know.
Shelly, who died 11 years ago at the age
of 83, was the New York Times’ metropolitan political editor back when I covered
state and local politics for the paper. One
dramatic example will suffice to give you
a sense of his devotion to service — and
also of how much he loved politics.
On Nov. 3, 1944, Shelly, an Army
antitank gunner, was gravely wounded
in Holland and lost an eye. He was
unconscious for four days, and when he
finally came to, his very first question
was not about his condition. He wanted
to know if Franklin Roosevelt had won
reelection.
Shelly believed passionately that an
essential journalistic task was to provide
citizens with unbiased information so
they could influence the decisions that
affected them. At one news meeting, he
and his colleagues pondered an article
for the next day’s paper about a proposed
master plan for development of Manhattan’s West Side.
It was not the most exciting account,
and one asked, “Can’t we wait until they
decide on it?”
To which Shelly shot back: “What the
hell are we, Pravda?”
It’s a question I hope we ask every day.
Journalism shouldn’t wait for some powerful “they” to settle things.
The best lesson Shelly ever taught me
came when I shared information with
him about alleged corruption by a politician. I knew another newspaper had it,
too, but I wasn’t sure it all checked out.
Shelly said something more editors
should be willing to say in this age of
instant publication online: “Sometimes,
it’s better to be second.”
He was not trying to quell my competitive instincts. He very much wanted us to
be first when we were right. But above all,
he didn’t want us to be wrong, especially
when someone’s reputation was at stake.
The competing paper published the
charges first — and they turned out to be
false.
Shelly had a delightful way of signaling that a seemingly harebrained idea
came from above. “This is high church,”
he would say. He was telling us that we
had to deal with the idea somehow, but
that he’d back us up if we reached
conclusions the top brass had not expected. And he always did.
It might surprise regular readers that
one of my very favorite editors was rather
conservative in his politics as he became
disillusioned with what he saw as liberalism’s failures.
But his personal politics never shaped
his view of what constituted a valuable
story. The writer Charles Kaiser, also a
Shelly fan, noted that he “was so utterly
straight that his judgment was never
clouded by ideology” or, more miraculously, by “internal politics.”
This is what day-to-day reporting
strives for, and I give thanks that I
encountered someone early on who truly
took this mission to heart.
ejdionne@washpost.com
A28
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
G
R
E
V
E
E
L
A
S
Y
A
D
I
R
BLACK F
Our most AMAZIN
DOORS OPEN 7 AM
CHOOSE
FREE
50''
HDTV
SAVE
PLUS
%*
50OFF
PLUS
ALL FURNITURE
OR
$500
IN FREE
FURNITURE
FREE
OR
DELIVERY *
50 MONTHS
INTEREST FREE
FINANCING*
on purchases with your Marlo
Furniture credit card made
between 11/24-11/26/17. 50 equal
monthly payments required.
Amazing furniture. Huge selection and ultra-affordable monthly payments*.
FURNITURE & SLEEP GALLERY MARLOFURNITURE.COM
ROCKVILLE, MD
725 Rockville Pike
(301) 738-9000
ALEXANDRIA, VA
5650 Gen. Washington Dr.
(703) 941-0800
LAUREL, MD
13450 Baltimore Ave.
(301) 419-3400
FORESTVILLE, MD
3300 Marlo Lane
(301) 735-2000
FREDERICKSBURG, VA
LIQUIDATION CENTER
4040 Plank Road
540-785-2635
*Minimum purchase for free local delivery and tv/free furniture offer is $1799. Financing on purchases with your Marlo Furniture credit card between 11/24-11/26/17. 50 equal monthly payments required. Financing offer applies only to single-receipt qualifying purchases. No interest will be charged on promo purchase and equal monthly payments are required equal to initial promo purchase amount divided equally by the number of months in
promo period until promo is paid in full. The equal monthly payment will be rounded to the next highest whole dollar and may be higher than the minimum payment that would be required if the purchase was a non-promotional
purchase. Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases. For new accounts: Purchase APR is 26.99%; Minimum interest charge is $2. Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. Subject to credit approval. See store for details.
KLMNO
METRO
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
High today at
approx. 2 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
36 44 46 42°
°
°
°
48°
Precip: 0%
Wind: NW
4-8 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
THE DISTRICT
OBITUARIES
Childhood poverty gave
this D.C. priest a purpose:
helping others through
So Others Might Eat. B3
School leaders say a plan
to curb suspensions could
endanger teachers and
undermine discipline. B5
Russian baritone Dmitri
Hvorostovsky was one of
the most celebrated opera
singers in modern times. B6
Judge won’t block certification of Va. elections Police:
MS-13
cut out
heart
BY L AURA V OZZELLA
AND R ACHEL W EINER
richmond — A federal judge
refused Wednesday to issue a
temporary restraining order to
stop Virginia’s board of elections
from certifying the results in two
House of Delegates races in
which more than 300 voters were
apparently assigned to the wrong
races.
It is unclear how many of
Despite voters assigned
to wrong race, U.S. ruling
a setback for Democrats
those voters cast ballots on
Nov. 7.
The ruling was a setback for
Democrats, whose hopes for taking control of the chamber could
rest on one of the two seats. “The
job of the board is to certify the
count,” Judge T.S. Ellis III of U.S.
District Court in Alexandria said
in a hearing conducted by telephone. “Let the state process run
its course.”
But the judge let the lawsuit
stand, meaning Democrats could
return to the court after the
results are certified by the state
board of elections to challenge
the outcome and request a new
election.
“We don’t have a clear picture,
exactly, of the scope of the problem,” Ellis said.
Republicans had unsuccessfully argued the case should be
dismissed like two others
brought by Democrats or their
allies since the Nov. 7 elections.
Amid questions about voting
irregularities, the state board of
elections has twice delayed certifying the results in the two
Fredericksburg-area House races. It is expected to meet Monday.
State elections officials have
said 83 Fredericksburg voters
were erroneously assigned to the
88th House District instead of
the neighboring 28th. It was not
clear how many of the 83 voted,
but the mix-up has drawn intense
scrutiny because one of the races
was a squeaker that could tip the
balance of power in the House.
HOUSE CONTINUED ON B2
ONE OF 10 SUSPECTS
TO APPEAR IN COURT
Members plotted murder
for weeks, officials say
BY
PHOTOS BY JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
House of wax
BY
P ERRY S TEIN
V
inyl records had their day. Then
they nearly died. Then they were
revived. Now investors are so confident in the resiliency of the
revival that they are investing
millions of dollars so the record industry can
keep spinning in abundance.
And a big part of the future of this nearly
bygone medium could unfold in the Washington suburbs.
Eric Astor of Falls Church is opening a
record-pressing facility early next year in
Fairfax County that he says eventually could
increase the production of records in the
country by almost 20 percent. The United
States produces about 50 million records
annually, and his business, Furnace Record
Pressing, will have the capacity to make
about 9 million a year.
The sprawling 50,000-square-foot plant
would help relieve an industry stymied by a
supply chain that can’t keep up with increasing demand. Record-pressing machines are
expensive and bulky, and businesspeople
Virginia will be home to one of the biggest
record-pressing factories in the country
TOP: Construction workers pass through the factory,
which could increase the production of records in the
United States by almost 20 percent. ABOVE: Eric
Astor, chief executive of Furnace Record Pressing.
The side-dish
preferences of vice
presidents
don’t
THERESA
normally make
VARGAS
the news.
But 1959 was no
ordinary time. It was the year a
tiny berry caused Americans to
take a massive look at potential
carcinogens in their food and
care enough about the culinary
choices of lawmakers that
Richard Nixon’s dinner selection
one night in November
warranted a front-page story in
The Washington Post.
“Vice President Has
Cranberries in Wisconsin,” read
the above-the-fold headline on
Nov. 13, 1959.
Nixon’s indulgence in not just
one, but four helpings of
cranberries in a state that grew
the crop came just days after
Arthur S. Flemming, secretary of
what was then known as the U.S.
Department of Health, Education
and Welfare, warned the public
that some cranberries in the
Pacific Northwest had been
contaminated by a weedkiller
that was known to cause cancer
in rats. He advised housewives
“to be on the safe side” and avoid
buying cranberries with
uncertain origins.
The announcement, made just
weeks before Thanksgiving,
immediately set off a nationwide
scare and delivered a massive
upset to, at that time, a
$50 million industry. The
Washington Post and the New
York Times both ran front-page
stories on the issue for weeks. An
article even appeared after a pie
containing a mix of apples and
cranberries was served “in error”
in the Agriculture Department
cafeteria. A manager in the story
promised that no more would be
served until the controversy was
cleared up.
CRANBERRIES CONTINUED ON B4
As many as 10 members of the
MS-13 street gang lured a man into
a park in Wheaton, Md., spoke
with one another over walkie-talkies as he arrived, stabbed him
more than 100 times, decapitated
him and then cut out his heart,
according to police documents
made public Wednesday in Montgomery County District Court.
The first alleged attacker to be
arrested, Miguel “Timido” Angel
Lopez-Abrego, 19, was charged
with first-degree murder and
held in jail after a brief hearing
Wednesday.
“He is noted as being the first
individual to thrust a knife into
the chest of the decedent,” Assistant State’s Attorney Kelly McGann said in court. Police continue to search for other suspects.
Police found the body buried in
a grave, deep in the woods of
Wheaton Regional Park, that the
attackers dug before the slaying,
according to court records. Authorities have not been able to
identify the victim, who they believe may have been from Annapolis. He was wearing a sweatshirt,
and those who knew him would
have noticed he was missing a
lower tooth near the front of his
mouth, police said.
The investigation began in early September, when detectives
spoke to an informant who said
he knew of an MS-13 murder that
occurred in the spring of this year
in the park. The informant led
detectives to the gravesite, according to court records. The
MS-13 CONTINUED ON B4
like Astor are starting to become confident
enough in the industry’s longevity to invest
in such costly equipment.
“I’ve known this is real for a long time, and
our customers are now finally saying we
need more vinyl,” Astor said. “You either step
up or they’ll go somewhere else.”
Astor started Furnace MFG, which is now
Furnace Record Pressing, in 1996, manufacturing DVDs and CDs in Fairfax County.
About a decade ago, he started manufacturing records, but because he doesn’t have the
machinery in-house, he outsources the
pressing to a plant in Europe. The packaging
and distribution are then managed from the
Virginia facility.
Furnace Record Pressing has contracts
with bands such as Metallica and record
companies including D.C.-based Dischord
Records, a mostly punk label that represents
local artists.
Brian Lowit, the label manager for Dischord Records, said that in recent years his
label has had to wait as long as six months to
receive records because of a backlog at the
VINYL CONTINUED ON B3
1959, the year of cranberry ‘hysteria’
Retropolis
D AN M ORSE
U.S. FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
Signs attesting to the safety of cranberries were posted in the
nation’s grocery stores during the 1959 berry scare.
Detective
was shot
with his
own gun
Baltimore’s Sean Suiter
was killed a day before
testifying against officers
BY
P ETER H ERMANN
A Baltimore police detective
was shot in the head with his
own gun at close range while
struggling with a man and died
with his radio still clutched in his
left hand, the city’s top law
enforcement
official
said
Wednesday.
Detective Sean Suiter’s death
came a day before he was set
to testify before a grand
jury in an ongoing federal
investigation
of police corruption
and
drug
shake- Suiter
downs by an
elite gun recovery unit.
Police Commissioner Kevin
Davis said he was assured by
prosecutors and the FBI that
Suiter, an 18-year veteran of the
force, was not a target of the
investigation that has led to the
indictments of eight current officers. Four have pleaded guilty to
racketeering charges.
SHOOTING CONTINUED ON B5
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
PHOTOS BY BOB BROWN/RICHMOND TIMES-DISPATCH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Render unto Richmond
LEFT: Hailey Shingleton, 8, of Mechanicsville, Va., inspects a deer presented to Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe on Wednesday by the Mattaponi and Pamunkey Indian tribes as part of the 340th annual
tax tribute ceremony, in which the tribes give wild game in lieu of paying taxes in accordance with a 1677 treaty. RIGHT: McAuliffe cradles 3-month-old Kaidence Bush, the youngest of the Mattaponis.
VIRGINIA
School district urged to help student after hijab incident
Group: Teen who accused
teacher of pulling off head
covering bullied online
BY
D EBBIE T RUONG
Leaders of a Muslim civil rights
group are calling on a Northern
Virginia school district to protect
a student who they say faced
online threats and bullying after
accusing a teacher of pulling off
her hijab.
The Council on AmericanIslamic Relations says the teen
has been bullied online by other
students and at least one educator at the school, according to a
letter the civil rights group sent to
the school district Tuesday.
The alleged incident and resulting protests have stirred controversy at Lake Braddock Secondary School in Burke.
The teacher accused of pulling
off the hijab was placed on leave
while the Fairfax County Public
School system investigated. On
Wednesday, Scott Brabrand, the
district superintendent, sent a
message to Lake Braddock parents that the teacher would return to school after Thanksgiving
break.
“Based on the investigation of
the events, a long-serving and
well-respected teacher made a
mistake. While there does not
appear to be any intent to act
maliciously, nor to engage in any
disrespect or infringement on religious beliefs, the teacher did
violate [Fairfax school district]
policies and practices,” Brabrand
said in the message. “The teacher
has been disciplined, was placed
on leave and will return to the
classroom.”
The menacing tweets toward
the student, some of which expressed anti-Muslim sentiments,
included at least one profane
tweet, according to the Council
on American-Islamic Relations.
The Northern Virginia case has
drawn parallels to similar incidents elsewhere in the country,
including one that surfaced earlier this month in Tennessee.
“Schools are not impervious to
the general anti-Muslim climate
in the country and, unfortunately,
With 3 close races in Va.,
parties battle for control
HOUSE FROM B1
Republican Bob Thomas holds
an 82-vote lead over Democrat
Joshua Cole for the 28th District
seat, which is being vacated by
retiring speaker William J. Howell (R-Stafford).
The Thomas-Cole contest is
one of three close races that
could determine which party
controls the General Assembly’s
lower chamber following a wave
of Democratic House wins.
At Wednesday’s hearing, lawyers for the state indicated more
voters were affected than previously reported, saying at least
384 voters in the 28th and 88th
districts had been assigned to the
wrong district.
Elections Commissioner Edgardo Cortés did not immediately respond to a request for
comment about the higher number.
In addition to requesting a
new election, the loser in the
28th District also could contest
the outcome in the General Assembly, Ellis said, though he
THE DAILY QUIZ
According to this week’s Local Living
story on fire safety, Underwriters
Laboratories says you have how long
to escape a burning house?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click on
“Quizzes” to enter the correct response.
acknowledged that “partisan”
considerations might be an obstacle.
“We are in uncharted territory,” said Heather Hays Lockerman, of the Virginia Attorney
General’s Office. Members of the
board, she said, will probably
have “some significant heartburn” when certifying the results, knowing there were problems.
House Republicans have
threatened to file a lawsuit of
their own if the board does not
certify the two elections Monday.
Del. Kirkland M. Cox (R-Colonial
Heights), who is in line to become speaker if the GOP holds
onto the majority, blasted the
board for the delays.
“The State Board of Elections
exists to be an independent arbiter of our elections, but after the
last three days no one could be
faulted for questioning the independence of a Board that seems
to be working in lockstep with
legal counsel for the Democratic
Party,” Cox said Wednesday.
Board Chairman James Alcorn
some schools are failing at creating a climate that rejects these
kinds of disgusting incidents,”
said Gadeir Abbas, a Council on
American-Islamic Relations attorney who is representing the
student.
After the alleged incident in
Fairfax, the student wrote on
Twitter that she had been talking
with a friend when the male
teacher approached from behind
and pulled off the hjiab. He remarked, according to her, “Oh,
your hair is so pretty.”
“I felt so infuriated, upset and
mostly shocked,” the Nov. 15 tweet
read, sparking scores of online
responses, including ones that
mirrored her outrage and offered
sympathy.
Abbas declined to make the
student available for an interview. School authorities have not
publicly identified the student or
teacher.
Another Twitter user, who
claimed to have witnessed the
incident, wrote that the Muslim
student’s hijab fell off as the
teacher jokingly pulled down the
hood of her sweatshirt.
“I’m Muslim, too, and I know
how important a hijab is, but he
didn’t intend on ripping it off
your head,” the tweet read.
In the week since, Lake Braddock students have defended the
teacher and circulated a hashtag
on Twitter. They accused the student of overreacting to an unintentional act and harming the
teacher’s career.
Last week, students staged a
protest at the school, according to
the Muslim civil rights group and
social media accounts. In video
footage posted online, students
crowded into a hallway and were
addressed by a man the rights
group identified as the school’s
principal, David Thomas.
“I hear you. And I will advocate
for you. But . . . we need to get to
class,” the man in the video says.
A school district spokesman
declined to make Thomas available for comment.
Thomas sent a letter to parents
last week, asking them to keep
their children from sending personal attacks on social media
about the incident.
“Together, we will work to
maintain a safe and non-threatening learning environment for
said the board needed extra time
to “sort out potential irregularities,” as state code allows and
said the board was an impartial
arbiter.
“As a Board, we attempt to
make our decisions in a transparent, nonpartisan, consensus driven manner,” Alcorn wrote in an
email to The Washington Post.
“For somebody to state that the
Board is not independent is just a
false allegation.”
The pending lawsuit, filed
against the board and Cortés,
asserts that voters were cheated
out of their right to cast a ballot
in the proper race.
“These voters were disenfranchised from voting for the delegate who is to represent them,”
said Marc Elias, attorney for
House Democrats and Cole. “We
have requested that the court
issue a temporary restraining
order to prevent the State Board
of Elections from certifying the
results in HD-28 until all voters
who were disenfranchised have
been given a reasonable opportunity to cast a ballot in the appropriate House District.”
The election is probably headed for a recount, although that
cannot begin until after the results have been certified.
Trevor M. Stanley, a lawyer for
House Republicans and Thomas,
contends that state law leaves the
board little choice but to certify
results, which he termed a “ministerial process.”
He said certification must take
place before any voting irregularities can be rectified — either
through a recount or by contesting the results in the House.
“Although we appreciate the
Board’s concern that votes be
properly counted, delaying certification is counterproductive and
harms the ability of interested
parties to resolve any issues because, without a certification of
the results, any recount or contest cannot proceed in the proper
forum,” Stanley wrote in a letter
to the board. “Once these results
are certified . . . my clients will
proudly work to ensure that
every lawful vote cast by eligible
voters counts in this election.”
But Alcorn contends that the
board “does have some discretion.” He pointed to 2008, when
the elections board refused to
count certain ballots that Chesterfield County had included in
its totals for the presidential
primary. The discounted ballots
had been drawn by hand, after
polling places ran out of official
ballots.
According to Cortés, in the
spring of 2016 Fredericksburg
registrar Juanita Pitchford erro-
“Based on the
investigation of
the events, a
long-serving and
well-respected
teacher made a
mistake. . . . The
teacher did violate
[Fairfax school
district] policies
and practices.”
Scott Brabrand, district
superintendent
debbie.truong@washpost.com
neously assigned 83 voters from
the 28th House District to the
88th. Pitchford died in April.
Elections officials said they
were, at least initially, at a loss to
explain why she made the changes. They also said they would look
into whether other voters had
been misassigned.
The mix-up is not expected to
threaten the outcome in the
88th District, where Del. Mark
Cole (R-Fredericksburg) won re-
“We are in
uncharted territory.”
Heather Hays Lockerman, of the
Virginia Attorney General’s Office
election by a wide margin. Mark
Cole is no relation to Joshua Cole.
The Democrats’ lawsuit is filed
on behalf of three Fredericksburg
voters. Kenneth and Dolores
Lecky intended to vote for Joshua
Cole, the suit says, but they were
given District 88 ballots because
the poll book incorrectly listed
them for that district. The third
plaintiff is Phillip Ridderhof,
who also planned to vote for
Joshua Cole.
He was properly identified in
the poll book as a 28th District
2017 PostPoints Scavenger Hunt
Browse thousands of works and a research center
At NMWA, bring a friend or mentor.
From Cassatt to Fontana, you’ll see it all.
Covet art by women? You’ll have a ball.
What current exhibition implemented by artist Mónica Mayer inspires
community-based advocacy to reduce violence against women?
Tour the Pulitzer Prize Photographs Gallery
At the Newseum; don’t dillydally.
Tap audio clips and video, too.
This visitor favorite is waiting for you.
(Hint: See NMWA.org for the answer.)
(Hint: See Newseum.org for the answer.)
all students,” Thomas wrote. “We
will continue to have discussions
with students about appropriate
uses of technology and supervise
technology usage in school. However, we need your assistance as
much of this activity takes place
outside the school day.”
Thomas’s apparent support of
the students, according to Tuesday’s letter from the Council on
American-Islamic Relations, put
the credibility of the investigation
in doubt.
Abbas, the attorney for the civil
rights group, said the teacher
acted inappropriately.
“A male teacher rips off a female student’s article of clothing
— that should never, ever happen,” Abbas said. “We need to
believe it was a deliberate act.”
On Wednesday, Abbas said that
by reinstating the educator, the
school is sending a message that
it “will not take seriously reports
of misconduct” by students. The
civil rights group is conducting
its own investigation.
“We’re going to do what apparently the school district won’t,”
Abbas said.
The Newseum’s Pulitzer Prize Photographs Gallery features the most
comprehensive collection of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs ever assembled,
including photographs from every Pulitzer Prize-winning entry since what year?
EARN 5 POINTS AND A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES. Answer our Scavenger Hunt questions, then go to washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click “Quizzes” to enter your responses.
voter, but a poll worker erroneously gave him a ballot for the
88th.
Elias and the NAACP Legal
Defense and Education Fund
separately filed two other suits in
the race. One asserted that 55
late-arriving absentee ballots
should have been counted.
The other said voters who cast
provisional ballots were given
confusing instructions for how to
ensure their votes were counted.
Judges threw out both complaints.
Before the election, Republicans enjoyed a 66-to-34 majority
in the House. Now the count is 49
Democrats and 51 Republicans,
with the 28th District race and
two others likely headed for recounts. Democrats, who also
swept statewide offices for governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general, need one more
House win to force a power-sharing deal with Republicans and
two more to take control of the
chamber for the first time since
2000.
In the other two close races,
Del. Timothy D. Hugo (R-Fairfax)
has a 106-vote lead over Democrat Donte Tanner, while Del.
David E. Yancey (R-Newport
News) is up just 10 votes over
Democrat Shelly Simonds.
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Priest’s childhood poverty led him to a vocation of hope at So Others Might Eat
For years in the
1970s, people
would show up at
all hours of the
day and night at a
low, stone
John
building in the
Kelly's
unit block of O
Washington Street NW hoping
to drop off stray
dogs and cats.
The building had once been an
animal shelter but now served a
two-legged clientele: people who
were hungry and knew they
could find a meal at a charity
called So Others Might Eat.
The Rev. John Adams, the
president of SOME, still
chuckles at the memory. (“We
told them they had to go up to
Oglethorpe Street” where the
new animal shelter was, he
said.)
The nonprofit has grown a lot
in the 40 years since then, not
just in real estate but in scope: If
you are poor or experiencing
homelessness or addiction in
Washington, you can probably
get help at SOME, a partner in
The Washington Post Helping
Hand.
It’s easy for Adams to imagine
the forces that can tip someone
into poverty. His father was a
millworker in Erie, Pa., turning
coal into coke for the furnaces of
the steel industry.
“He was injured very, very
badly and had many years of not
being able to work,” said Adams,
76. For a while, the family —
father, mother, seven kids —
found itself without a home.
“The nuns and the priest were
pretty good about helping us in
lots of different ways,” he said.
“My mother didn’t even think we
could go to Catholic school. The
pastor insisted we all go.”
Tuition money was found, and
the Adams family continued its
parochial schooling. It was that
experience — being destitute,
getting help — that inspired
Adams to become a priest.
He studied social work in
college. His first assignment was
as a psychiatric social worker at
a Chicago hospital that was
home to 500 children. By the
early 1970s he was working with
homeless men and families in
Alexandria, Va.
In 1974 he was invited to lend
a hand to a fledgling operation
that had been launched four
Deer will be culled
in Rock Creek Park
The National Park Service
said Wednesday that its annual
program to reduce the whitetailed deer population in Rock
Creek Park will begin Dec. 1 and
run through March 31.
“Trained firearms experts
from the U.S. Department of
Agriculture will be working . . .
to conduct reduction actions at
night when the park is normally
closed,” the Park Service said in
a statement.
Over the past 20 years, the
deer population in the park has
exploded, and the animals have
been devouring plants and
seedlings. The deer, which have
no natural predators in the
park, have also been seen
wandering through nearby
neighborhoods.
A population of “15-20 deer
per square mile is needed to
allow regeneration in a healthy
. . . forest,” the statement said.
Spokeswoman Megan Nortrup
said the Park Service is counting
the number of deer in the park.
She said that for safety
reasons, officials do not
announce the particular nights
that the sharpshooters will be
hunting. But roads will be
closed and access to the park
will be restricted at those times.
— Michael E. Ruane
Police seek suspects
in seven robberies
D.C. police are searching for
three young men suspected in
seven robberies and attempted
robberies that occurred Oct. 30
and Nov. 1 in Northeast and
Northwest Washington.
In several of the attacks,
police said the men assaulted
victims, including knocking
them to the ground. In one case
in downtown Washington, a
video shows that at least one of
the men escaped on a red
Capital Bikeshare bicycle.
The first robbery occurred
shortly after 9:30 a.m. Oct. 30,
when a person walking along
the Metropolitan Bike Trail near
S Street NE was assaulted from
behind, police said. One of the
men took property from the
victim’s pockets, police said.
Another robbery occurred about
2 a.m. Nov. 1 in the 700 block of
First Street NE during which
the victim was assaulted, police
said.
Later on Nov. 1, police said,
years earlier by the Rev. Horace
McKenna. He would hand out
sandwiches from the back door
of the rectory at Gonzaga, the
Jesuit boys school on North
Capitol Street.
The operation — So Others
Might Eat — needed more space,
so it relocated to that former
animal shelter. Under Adams, it
started to expand its scope, too.
Adams thought involving
others would help. He composed
the three men robbed or
attempted to rob five people in a
matter of hours, starting at
8:15 p.m. in the 2200 block of
N Street NW in the West End.
Police said that was followed by
attacks at 8:55 p.m. in the 1400
block of 21st Street NW; at
9 p.m. in the 2100 block of
Q Street NW near Dupont
Circle; at 9:30 p.m. in the 1400
block of 20th Street NW; and at
9:50 p.m. in the 900 block of
F Street NW.
— Peter Hermann
MARYL AND
Man is fatally shot;
police seek motive
A man died after being shot
in a wooded area behind a
townhouse development in
District Heights on Tuesday,
police said.
Officers were called to the
6300 block of Sunvalley Terrace
at 9:18 p.m. and found the man,
who was in his 20s, suffering
from gunshot wounds, District
Heights police said in a
statement.
The man, whom authorities
have not identified, was
pronounced dead shortly
thereafter, police said.
No suspect has been
identified, and police are trying
to determine a motive in the
case. Prince George’s County
homicide detectives have taken
over the investigation.
Authorities ask anyone with
information to call 301-772-4925
or 866-411-TIPS.
— Lynh Bui
‘Hamburglar’ suspect
is charged in theft
She was dubbed the
“Hamburglar” after a
surveillance video showed how
she crawled through a
McDonald’s drive-through
window on Nov. 5, poured
herself a drink and then stole
$1,400, food and some Happy
Meal toys. Now she has been
caught, authorities say.
Police in Howard County
arrested and charged Jessica M.
Cross, 27, of Springdale with
burglary and theft. She was
taken into custody last
Thursday after the surveillance
video went viral on social
media.
The video has had millions of
Facebook views since it was
posted on news outlets across
the country and in Britain.
presses. Lowit said Dischord has
always posted steady vinyl sales,
but in recent years, the bigger,
mainstream labels have also
turned to vinyl, clogging the small
number of presses in the country.
Dischord uses Furnace Record
Pressing to make some of its
records, and Lowit said that when
the new plant opens, it will probably have more of its albums
pressed at Furnace.
“What they’re doing will obviously speed up the turnaround
time,” Lowit said. “It’s exciting to
have a vinyl plant down the street
from us. And I think it’ll be good
for other local bands and labels.
It’ll make things more accessible.”
The massive record-pressing
plant almost never happened. Astor, who played in punk bands in
his teens and 20s, said he struggled to find the proper machinery
to press records.
In early 2015, he connected
with a man in Mexico who had
purchased press machines. The
goal originally was for the two to
partner and press records in Mexico, but the man decided it was
too much work, and Astor bought
the machines from him.
He schlepped the machines to
the Washington area and refurbished them. The new plant will
have 16 new and refurbished machines, each weighing about a ton
and measuring about 6 feet long,
4 feet wide and 5 feet tall.
Manufacturing records is a
hands-on process that also involves boilers and chillers. Furnace Record Pressing employs
30 people and will begin adding
about 35 more to its payroll when
the new plant opens in January.
“The hardest part is finding
good people who can understand
the trade,” Astor said. “You can’t
turn on a machine and expect
records to come out perfectly. The
room can have too much humidity. Someone can open a door and
the room can then be too cold.”
Michael Kurtz, co-founder of
the international Record Store
5-6-5
9-2-2-6
8-0-5-9-4
4-0-0
4-7-6
2-3-9-2
6-7-7-8
3-5-5-0-5
3-3-5-6-5
Mid-Day Pick 3:
3-1-7
Mid-Day Pick 4:
0-9-6-4
Night/Pick 3 (Tue.):
7-5-5
Pick 3 (Wed.):
0-7-9
Pick 4 (Tue.):
4-1-5-1
Pick 4 (Wed.):
1-2-3-7
Match 5 (Tue.):
13-16-23-27-38 *29
Match 5 (Wed.):
6-7-8-9-23 *10
5 Card Cash:
KD-7D-6D-9H-3C
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5:
Night/Pick-3 (Tue.):
Pick-3 (Wed.):
Pick-4 (Tue.):
Pick-4 (Wed.):
Cash-5 (Tue.):
Cash-5 (Wed.):
Bank a Million:
Mega Millions:
Megaplier:
Powerball:
Power Play:
*Bonus Ball
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/johnkelly.
FURNACE RECORD PRESSING
Day — an annual day in April that
celebrates independently owned
record stores — said it is millennials driving the boom in vinyl
sales. He said that streaming services such as Spotify present a
different listening experience
than vinyl and that the two aren’t
in competition.
Kurtz started Record Store Day
in 2008 to promote the more than
1,400 independently owned record stores in the country. The
event has grown to six continents,
and each year’s sales have outpaced the previous one. In 2015,
12 million new and used records
were sold on that day, Kurtz said.
“When Record Store Day
launched in 2008, record production was typically less than a
million per year worldwide,” he
said. “What Record Store Day did
7-3-1
7-0-5-8
5-7-12-21-32
1-8-9
1-1-6
0-7-3-0
2-6-3-8
14-24-26-31-34
4-12-15-26-30
6-7-8-12-25-33 *27
3-7-22-27-50 **3
3x
35-37-46-51-61 **13
2x
**Mega Ball
†Powerball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
was prove that people were willing to buy records. Record labels
started printing more, and it allowed the industry to blossom.”
“I think it’ll be good for
other local bands and
labels. It’ll make things
more accessible.”
Brian Lowit, label manager for
D.C.-based Dischord Records
The Fairfax facility, near the
interchange of the Beltway and
Interstate 395, has been under
construction for more than a year,
and Astor said crews are in the
process of moving and installing
the pressing machines. Manufacturing records requires large
amounts of energy, and Astor said
he had to get permission from
Washington Gas to double the
building’s energy allotment.
Because of this, Astor said he
would be donating 5 percent of
Furnace Record Pressing’s revenue to environmental advocacy
organizations.
The new pressing facility will
also have a listening room and a
small area where local bands can
occasionally perform.
“I’ve never seen a format for
music grow as fast as vinyl,” Astor
said. “For the last 30 years, we’ve
been hearing this compressed
piece of garbage. Now you’re listening to it for the first time.”
perry.stein@washpost.com
Thanksgiving closings
CLOSED EVERYWHERE
Banks
Most
Federal
government
offices
Post offices
Courts
No mail delivery except
for Express Mail.
Except for adult arraignments and new
juvenile referrals in the District.
VARIED RESTRICTIONS
MARYLAND
VIRGINIA
Traffic, parking
Rush-hour restrictions lifted. No city
parking enforcement except along the
D.C. Streetcar line.
DISTRICT
Meters not enforced in Montgomery
and Prince George’s except at New
Carrollton lots, National Harbor and the
Prince George’s Dept. of Corrections.
HOV restrictions lifted on I-66 and I-395.
Meters not enforced in Arlington and
Alexandria.
Trash, recycling
Pickups slide one day to the end of the
week. Fort Totten Transfer Station
closed.
No county collections. In Anne Arundel,
Thursday pickups are on Friday. In
Montgomery, Howard and Prince
George’s, pickups slide one day to the
end of the week. Landfills and
Montgomery County Transfer Station
closed.
Regular collections in Arlington and
Fairfax counties and in Alexandria. No
collections in Fairfax City. Landfills
closed.
Liquor stores
Open at owner’s discretion.
Montgomery County ABC stores closed.
Open elsewhere at owner’s discretion.
Closed.
Schools
Closed Thursday and Friday.
Closed Thursday and Friday.
Closed Thursday and Friday.
Libraries
Closed.
Closed.
Closed.
Local
government
offices
Closed.
Closed.
Closed.
— Dana Hedgpeth
MULTI-STATE GAMES
MARYLAND
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
Furnace Record Pressing in Falls Church will feature 16 vinyl presses. The machines are expensive and
bulky, but chief executive Eric Astor is confident enough in the industry’s longevity to invest in them.
VIRGINIA
DISTRICT
You can help
The SOME dining room is open
today, Thanksgiving. It will
serve holiday meals to nearly
1,200 people. They will give
thanks.
There’s something you can
give, too: a gift to So Others
Might Eat. To donate online,
visit posthelpinghand.com and
click on “Donate.” To donate by
mail, make a check payable to
“So Others Might Eat” and send
it to SOME, Attn: Helping Hand,
71 O St. NW, Washington, D.C.
20001.
VINYL FROM B1
LOTTER I ES
Results from Nov. 22
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Tue.):
Lucky Numbers (Wed.):
DC-4 (Tue.):
DC-4 (Wed.):
DC-5 (Tue.):
DC-5 (Wed.):
a letter to local Catholic parishes
inviting them to provide one
meal a month. His board of
directors wondered why he
planned to send it only to
Catholic churches.
“I said, ‘Well, I don’t know any
Protestant places. I don’t know
any Jewish people,’ ” Adams
remembered. “Give me names.”
(Such was the insularity of many
Catholic clergy at the time.)
A broader mailing list was
is a tapestry embroidered with a
passage from Isaiah 58: “I want
you to share your bread with the
hungry, open your homes to the
homeless, remove the yoke of
injustice, let the oppressed go
free.”
I asked Adams why he chose
that particular verse to adorn
his wall.
“Because that’s really what
we’re all about,” he said.
The vinyl revival comes to Va. in the form of a factory
LOCA L D I G ES T
THE DISTRICT
JOHN KELLY/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Rev. John Adams is president of So Others Might Eat, a
partner in The Washington Post Helping Hand.
assembled and today, SOME is
nondenominational, with
volunteers from many faiths —
and corporations, too. Last year,
more than 380,000 meals were
served at its dining room and in
its other programs.
Next came a dental clinic and
a medical clinic to serve those
who couldn’t afford health care.
Last year, there were 8,493 visits
to a doctor or dentist in SOME’s
clinics.
“A lot of people were
alcoholic,” Adams said. “There
were a lot of drugs going on in
the city. So we started a pretty
good program and have really
advanced it quite a bit now.”
Last year, 241 men and women
engaged with SOME’s addiction
recovery services.
Of course, there was
something else, something
obvious.
“When you’re homeless, you
need a home,” Adams said.
That was the next initiative,
started in 1989. In 2016, 146
families with 336 children, as
well as 543 single adults, lived in
safe, affordable housing
provided by SOME.
On the wall in Adams’s office
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
· Metrorail runs from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. on a Sunday schedule with off-peak fares in effect. Metrobus is on a Sunday schedule. MetroAccess is on a regular
schedule but subscription trips are canceled.
· Ride On and Fairfax Connector are on a Sunday schedule.
· DASH, CUE, The Bus (Prince George’s), PRTC Omniride, Loudoun Bus, MARC and VRE are not running.
· MTA Commuter Bus is not running except for Route 201 on a Weekend/Holiday schedule.
· ART is running Routes 41, 45, 51, 55 and 87 only on a Sunday schedule.
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
MS-13
accused in
stabbing,
beheading
MS-13 FROM B1
remains were exhumed and examined by the Maryland Medical
Examiner’s Office.
“The victim had been stabbed
over one-hundred times, decapitated, dismembered, and his
heart had been excised from his
chest and thrown into the grave,”
detectives wrote in court papers.
Although the victim’s identity
was unknown, Montgomery detectives developed Lopez-Abrego
as a suspect.
On Sept. 29, patrol officers
stopped a car driven by another
MS-13 member in which LopezAbrego was a passenger. Detectives interviewed Lopez-Abrego,
but he denied any involvement in
the park murder, the court records state.
Montgomery police tried to
find Lopez-Abrego after that interview but couldn’t find him.
Law enforcement agents, looking for a different MS-13 suspect
from Maryland — Milton PortilloRodriguez, accused of a murder
in Anne Arundel County —
tracked that man to Avery County, N.C.
On Nov. 4, a group of about 10
agents from the U.S. Marshals
Service and the local sheriff ’s
office arrived at a condominium,
Avery County Sheriff Kevin Frye
said in a telephone interview
Wednesday.
“The victim had been
stabbed over 100 times,
decapitated,
dismembered, and his
heart had been excised
from his chest and
thrown into the grave.”
An informant led
detectives to the
gravesite.
From detectives’ court documents
A person — but not the suspect
— answered the door. The deputies and agents found PortilloRodriguez, Lopez-Abrego and a
third MS-13 member from Maryland attempting to hide inside,
Frye said.
The third suspect is accused in
a different attack in the same
Wheaton park.
In that incident, as many as 15
assailants surrounded two victims, punching them, kicking
them and striking them with
large tree limbs, according to
arrest records.
The victims were hospitalized
but survived.
Police identified the suspect in
that assault as Edwin RuizUrrutia, 19. He is being held on
no-bond status in Montgomery
County on charges including
attempted second-degree murder
and first-degree assault.
Frye, the Avery County sheriff,
said the three alleged gang members found in the apartment
hadn’t made much of an impact.
“They were new arrivals, and no
one really knew who they were,”
he said.
Lopez-Abrego is a citizen of El
Salvador, is in the United States
illegally and is currently in immigration proceedings, officials
from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said Wednesday.
The charging documents do
not cite a motive in the slaying in
the park, but investigators believe
that the suspects had planned to
carry it out for about two weeks.
They also alleged that LopezAbrego helped dig the grave and
“waited near the edge of the wood
line
with
a
handheld
walkie-talkie radio to alert the
other suspects of the victim’s arrival.” He also used a 15-inch knife
in the attack, according to police.
Investigators said the victim
was a Hispanic man, about 5foot-2 and weighing 126 pounds.
He had short, dark brown hair.
At the time of the killing, the
victim was wearing a gray sweatshirt with “First United Methodist Church Laurel” written on the
upper left side.
A rosary or necklace was also
found on his body, said police,
who had previously distributed
photos of the victim’s sweatshirt
and muddied blue shorts in an
effort to identify his remains.
dan.morse@washpost.com
Dana Hedgpeth contributed to this
report.
MATT GENTRY/ROANOKE TIMES/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A post-pardon paradise
Mallory White, a Virginia Tech poultry science graduate student, watches over Drumstick — a 47-pound turkey raised in western Minnesota and pardoned Tuesday by
President Trump — at Gobblers Rest in Blacksburg, Va. “Wow. I feel so good about myself doing this,” the president said.
RETROPOLIS
How a cranberry crisis changed the way Americans regard food
CRANBERRIES FROM B1
Across the country, grocery
chains removed cranberry
products from their shelves,
restaurants dropped the item
from their menus, and suddenly
lawmakers made powerful
statements by simply closing
their mouths and chewing.
“I see no reason for hysteria
over cranberries on any
consumer’s part,” Nixon said
after his dinner in Wisconsin
Rapids, according to media
accounts at the time. “I am
certain the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare is
working rapidly to separate those
comparatively few contaminated
cranberries, and I, like other
Americans, expect to eat
traditional cranberries with my
family on Thanksgiving Day.”
Not to be outdone, especially
with a presidential election
looming, Sen. John F. Kennedy
(D-Mass.), who was 30 miles
away on that night, drank two
glasses of cranberry juice.
The Post, in a story the next
day, called it a “bi-partisan
cranberry consumption.”
Kennedy had joked to groups
about being on a mission with
Nixon to test cranberries,
according to the book “Humor in
the White House.”
“Well, we have both eaten
them, and I feel fine,” Kennedy
reportedly said. “But if we both
pass away, I feel I shall have
performed a great public service
by taking the Vice President with
me.”
Finding the humor in the
panic was not hard, especially for
political cartoonists.
But, in serious ways, the
cranberry crisis marked a shift in
the nation’s relationship with
food. The innocent consumer
was suddenly replaced with the
well-informed one. Suddenly, the
public’s vocabulary included the
word “aminotriazole,” the
U.S. FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
Government chemists tested cranberries around the clock in the
weeks before Thanksgiving in 1959. Days before the holiday, the
FDA said it had approved more than 7 million pounds of berries.
“Well, we have both eaten them, and I feel fine.
But if we both pass away, I feel I shall have
performed a great public service by taking the
Vice President with me.”
Then-Sen. John F. Kennedy (D-Mass.), after he and Vice President Richard
M. Nixon (R) took part in bipartisan “cranberry consumption” before
Thanksgiving in 1959
herbicide that had been detected
on some of the crops in the
Pacific Northwest.
Ruth Desmond was a
homemaker in Arlington, Va.,
when the crisis pushed her to
form the Federation of
Homemakers. The organization
would later take on nitrates in
baby food and the ingredients in
peanut butter, but at that time,
Desmond was just hoping to find
healthy food to cook for her
husband who had beaten bladder
cancer, her daughter Janet
Swauger recalled recently.
Cranberries may have pushed
her mother to join the
conversation on food regulation,
said Swauger, who still lives in
Arlington, but once she found
her voice, she used it to testify
against General Mills with
confidence and gave gripping
speeches without notes.
“She always said, ‘I’m just a
housewife and a grandmother,’ ”
Swauger said. “That’s all she
spoke as, but, boy, could she
speak.”
The time also marked a pivotal
change for the government
agency, said Suzanne Junod, a
historian with the Food and Drug
Administration, who this month
unveiled a public display on the
1959 crisis at the agency’s White
Oak headquarters. The cranberry
crisis pushed the FDA into the
public consciousness, and once it
was there, it remained.
“They knew to perk their ears
up and pay attention if the FDA
said something,” Junod said. “It
was the start of a trajectory that
was taking the agency into a
more prominent position.”
The FDA had detected the
herbicide that started the public
scare, and it would fall to the
agency to find a way to test
massive amounts of the berries in
time for Thanksgiving. The
daunting task caught many FDA
employees off guard, said Junod,
pointing to quotes from former
employees. One district and
regional supervisor said: “Here I
was, I didn’t even like
cranberries, had never seen one
grow. I was thrown into the
breach, as was every other
investigator, in November of
1959.”
At one point, the agency
dedicated a fourth of its staff just
to cranberries, and the agency’s
chemists worked around the
clock testing volumes that could
be measured by trainloads.
Meanwhile, Thanksgiving
loomed, and the public’s menu
remained uncertain.
Newspapers ran recipes of
alternative side-dish options.
Among them: lingonberries,
pickled pears and spiced
cherries.
Days before Thanksgiving, the
government declared that it had
cleared more than 7 million
pounds of canned and bagged
cranberries. It also announced it
had approved an emergency
labeling program “to tell the
housewife whether she’s buying
tested, taint-free cranberries,”
according to a front-page
Washington Post article.
In the end, the FDA’s efforts
and Nixon’s four servings of
cranberries would not be enough
to help the industry avoid major
losses. By January, the cranberry
industry reported $20 million in
losses, and Ocean Spray
announced it had laid off a third
of its workforce. Sales had
plummeted 70 percent below
normal for Thanksgiving and
50 percent below normal for
Christmas.
It probably didn’t help that the
Associated Press ran a story
about what Mamie Eisenhower
served alongside her turkey. She
went with applesauce.
theresa.vargas@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/
retropolis
MARYLAND
Elections board fines Hogan campaign for fundraising email
BY
J OSH H ICKS
Maryland’s board of elections
has fined Republican Gov. Larry
Hogan’s reelection committee for
an email soliciting donations on
behalf of the campaign during the
annual legislative session, when
fundraising for state elections is
prohibited.
The board, which explained its
decision in a letter to the campaign on Monday, said it found
“no evidence that the Governor or
his authorized candidate cam-
paign committee” approved the
solicitations or had knowledge of
their content or timing.
“While we strongly disagree
with the decision, we are pleased
they acknowledge that the campaign committed no violation
whatsoever,” said Hogan campaign manager Jim Barnett.
Elections officials determined
that Maryland Insurance Commissioner Al Redmer, who was
not on the campaign’s staff but
had agreed to organize a fundraiser for the governor, violated
state law by emailing a fundraising invitation for the campaign
eight days before the April 10 end
of this year’s legislative session.
Redmer, who served 12 years as
a state delegate, argued that the
email was an effort to organize
the fundraiser rather than solicit
donations.
But elections officials pointed
out that the invitation told recipients they could become members
of the host committee by making
financial commitments to the
campaign.
Although the board acknowledged that the campaign explicitly told Redmer he could not distribute the invitations during the
legislative session, it said state
law requires them to hold the
campaign responsible because it
benefited from the solicitation.
Elections officials said Redmer’s actions were on behalf of
Hogan’s campaign regardless of
“whether the solicitation resulted
from Mr. Redmer’s inattention, or
to his conscious decision to skirt
the in-session fund-raising re-
strictions.”
The board, which sought advice on the matter from the office
of Maryland Attorney General
Brian E. Frosh (D), fined Hogan’s
campaign $250 for the offense.
The governor’s reelection committee has 30 days to contest the
decision. Barnett said the campaign is considering its options.
Redmer, who left the legislature in 2003 to serve as insurance
commissioner, is running for Baltimore County executive in 2018.
josh.hicks@washpost.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
THE DISTRICT
VIRGINIA
Council tackles school suspensions
Man convicted of two
slayings granted parole
Proposal would limit the
ability of school officials
to toss unruly students
BY
M ORIAH B ALINGIT
The District’s school leaders
are decrying a D.C. Council proposal that would limit administrators’ authority to suspend and
expel unruly students, saying it
could endanger teachers and
usurp their ability to discipline
students.
D.C. Council member David
Grosso (I-At Large) wrote the
measure, which would prohibit
out-of-school suspensions for
what he calls minor offenses.
Grosso described it as an effort to
push schools to adopt alternative
disciplinary practices. Critics of
suspensions say they derail a
child’s educational progress
while doing little do address
underlying causes of misbehavior.
“What we’re trying to do is
getting people in K though 8 to
invest in accountability mechanisms like restorative justice,”
said Grosso, referring to a practice of getting students to talk
out conflicts with teachers or
students. He also worries about
disparate use of suspensions:
Black students in the District are
seven times as likely as their
white peers to face suspension.
“We’re really afraid that this
disparity in suspensions is a
result of racial bias,” said Grosso,
whose measure is co-sponsored
by three other members of the
13-member council.
School leaders called the bill
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
D.C. Council member David Grosso (I-At Large) says he is worried
about racial disparities in public schools’ disciplinary practices.
shortsighted and onerous, saying
it impinges upon their ability to
effectively deal with students
who disrupt learning. They point
out that they have made progress
in reducing school suspensions.
The D.C. schools chancellor,
Antwan Wilson, said the bill
could have unintended consequences. Schools barred from
suspending children for more
than 20 days, as the bill outlines,
may instead expel them.
“Requiring a one-size-fits-all
approach could lead to some
challenges for schools that have
other approaches that work,”
Wilson said.
The District has recorded a
drop in student suspensions and
expulsions in recent years. A
January report from the Office of
the State Superintendent of Education found that about 7,300
students were suspended in the
2015-2016 school year in the
District’s schools, including traditional and charter schools. A
year before, the district recorded
8,400 suspensions. The numbers
were not entirely comparable
because different methods were
used to count suspensions, but
officials at the time said they
represented a significant decline.
Wilson and Scott Pearson, executive director of the D.C. Public Charter School Board, said
the numbers show they are addressing school discipline issues
and do not need the D.C. Council’s intervention.
Pearson said discipline decisions “need to be made by the
people who are best situated to
make those decisions.”
D.C. Public Schools faced scrutiny after a Washington Post
investigation found that seven
high schools had hidden suspensions by using “do not admit”
lists, sending students home and
barring them from campus without officially suspending them.
At some schools, students were
not allowed to return unless they
came with a parent, which led to
extended absences for students
whose parents were unable to get
time off work. Grosso’s measure
would bar that requirement.
Wilson said Wednesday that
he has made clear to schools that
they are to properly document
suspensions. He has also called
for an audit of a sample of
schools to ensure that they are
complying with the District’s discipline policies.
Grosso’s bill would bar schools
from suspending students until
high school. An exception would
be made if a child threatens or
causes “significant bodily injury
or emotional distress.”
Under Grosso’s proposal, high
schools would be given more
latitude to suspend students
than elementary and middle
schools have, but they would be
prohibited from kicking students out of high school for
infractions such as dress code
violations, tardiness, rowdiness
and insubordination.
Patrice Wedderburn, a staff
attorney with Advocates for Justice and Education, a group that
helps special-education students
and their families, said many
schools have stopped suspending children unnecessarily. But
the proposed measure could
force what she calls “the bad
actors” to change their ways.
“We really want to see pressure on schools to create alternatives to suspensions,” she said.
moriah.balingit@washpost.com
Ex-boat worker had
confessed in deaths
of Norfolk mother, child
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
A convicted double murderer
who came within two days of
sitting in Virginia’s electric chair
will soon be a free man.
Joseph M. Giarratano, who
won support from around the
world fighting his 1979 conviction in the Norfolk slayings, was
granted parole Monday.
“I’m confident there’s no other
prisoner like him in the commonwealth of Virginia,” said his
attorney, Stephen A. Northup,
who represented Giarratano before the parole board.
Giarratano was a 21-year-old
scallop boat worker when he
confessed to killing his roommates, 44-year-old Barbara Kline
and her 15-year-old daughter,
Michelle. But his confessions
were inconsistent with each other and with the physical evidence, which did not tie him to
the crime. He later said that after
waking up from a drug-induced
stupor and finding the bodies, he
simply assumed he was the killer.
His attempts to win freedom
attracted the support of actor
Jack Lemmon, singer Joan Baez
and conservative newspaper columnist James J. Kilpatrick,
among others. In 1991, then-Gov.
L. Douglas Wilder granted Giar-
ratano a commutation, changing
his sentence from death to life
and making him eligible for parole after serving 25 years.
However, Virginia Attorney
General Mary Sue Terry declined
to grant Giarratano a new trial,
saying she was still convinced of
his guilt.
In prison, the uneducated Giarratano taught himself the law
and advocated for fellow prisoners. He helped secure representation for Earl Washington Jr.,
another death row inmate, who
was eventually exonerated by
DNA evidence.
Giarratano sought to have similar evidence tested in his case,
but it had been destroyed by the
time he was allowed to file such a
request.
Adrianne L. Bennett, chairwoman of the Virginia Parole
Board, told the Richmond TimesDispatch that the parole decision
should not be read as confirming
Giarratano’s innocence.
Although Northup is confident that his client did not commit the murders, he said he
believes that Monday’s decision
has more to do with a parole
board that is more open than in
the past to freeing prisoners who
have behaved admirably behind
bars.
Now, Northup said, Giarratano plans to move to Charlottesville and work as a paralegal with
lawyer Steven D. Rosenfield.
He also hopes to work with the
University of Virginia Law
School’s Innocence Project.
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Aide accused of assault
on autistic student, 12
child was not disclosed; authorities generally do not reveal the
names of young victims.
Lee is the third Fairfax schools
employee arrested this week for
allegedly harming a child who
has autism.
An aide, Edmund Bailey, 35,
and a school bus driver, James
BY D EBBIE T RUONG
Duffy III, 62, both of Lorton,
were charged with one count
A school bus aide in Fairfax
each of assault and battery, poCounty has been charged with
lice said. Bailey and Duffy are
assaulting a 12-year-old autistic
accused of assaulting an 11-yearstudent, law enforcement auold boy who is autistic twice in
thorities said Wednesday.
Hyung Lee, 57, of Fairone week.
fax was charged with
Police said those incitwo counts of assault
dents and Lee’s accused
and battery in connecassault are not related.
tion with two incidents
John Torre, a spokesin October, according to
man for the school disa news release from the
trict, said in an email
Fairfax County Police
that drivers and attenDepartment. Lee, who
dants who help transwas suspended without Hyung Lee
port special education
pay, turned himself in to
students are being repolice Tuesday.
trained in proper restraint and
The boy’s mother discovered
intervention.
bruises on her son’s arms and
The school district’s transporreported the injury to school
tation office “will continue to
closely monitor the special eduofficials, said police spokeswomcation bus routes to ensure the
an Reem Awad.
safety and well-being of all stuA supervisor reviewed school
dents and staff,” Torre said.
bus surveillance footage that
“When parents put their chilshowed two encounters between
dren on a school bus, it is with
the boy and Lee — one on Oct. 10
the understanding that they will
and the second nine days later,
arrive at their destination safely
according to police. The mother
and on time,” Torre said. “Regretthen filed a police report, Awad
tably, the charges filed in these
said.
separate cases fall short of those
A school district spokesman
expectations and are breaches of
declined to disclose the school
the valued trust of our parents.”
the student attends, citing student privacy. The identity of the
debbie.truong@washpost.com
Fairfax schools worker is
third this week arrested
in autism-related cases
PHOTOS BY PATRICK SEMANSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
An officer walks near the scene of Detective Sean Suiter’s shooting death in Baltimore. Suiter was shot with his own weapon, officials said.
Slain Baltimore detective ‘was clearly in distress’
SHOOTING FROM B1
Davis said Suiter’s testimony
was to have been about an incident several years ago involving
some of the indicted officers. The
commissioner sought to dispel
notions Suiter was targeted the
afternoon of Nov. 15 and said
evidence gathered so far refutes
the notion of a conspiracy.
“The encounter with a man
was a spontaneous observation
of a man behaving suspiciously
and a spontaneous decision to
investigate his conduct,” Davis
said. But, he said, “I understand
the speculation that exists.”
Suiter and his partner were in
the Harlem Park neighborhood
canvassing about a December
2016 triple killing when they
happened to twice notice a man
acting suspiciously within a span
of about 20 minutes, Davis said.
The
department’s
chief
spokesman said Suiter, 43 and a
married father of five, was not
lured to Bennett Place, where he
was shot, and that he had no
appointment set there. Davis
said Suiter confronted the man
in an empty lot between two
rowhouses but did not say what
made him stand out.
The mystery surrounding
Suiter’s death continues after a
week with no arrests, no detailed
description of the shooter and
the fact that it appears only one
gun was involved. A funeral for
Suiter, who is originally from the
District, is scheduled for
Wednesday.
Davis said there was evidence
Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis speaks to reporters Nov. 16
in Baltimore to announce the death of Detective Sean Suiter.
found on Suiter’s shirt that indicated a struggle he called “brief
and violent” and lasted mere
seconds. Suiter made a radio
transmission before he was
killed that included what Davis
said he believes are gunshots in
the background. The commissioner said the words in that call
have not been deciphered but
that the recording is being analyzed with help from the FBI.
“He was clearly in distress,”
Davis said of the sounds on
Suiter’s radio call.
Authorities have previously
stated that investigators found
three shell casings that matched
Suiter’s weapon, which was recovered at the scene. An autopsy
Sunday ruled the death a homicide, Davis said, and also provided information about the trajec-
tory of the bullet that caused
police to return to the crime
scene for another search. That
repeat search recovered the bullet that killed Suiter, Davis said
Wednesday.
Suiter’s partner, who has not
been named publicly by the department and is considered a
police witness in the shooting,
Davis has said, took cover at the
sound of gunfire and called in
the shooting on his cellphone.
The partner has been continually talking with detectives, Davis said, and provided the spare
description police said they have
of the suspect as a black male
wearing a black coat with a white
stripe.
A reward for information leading to Suiter’s killer has reached
$215,000, and Davis urged peo-
ple to come forward.
In the days since the shooting,
police have focused on Harlem
Park, a small and violent patch of
depressed real estate west of
downtown in a city that ranks
near the nation’s top in homicides per capita. Police kept the
crime scene active for five days,
restricting residents’ movements
as they searched for the killer.
The neighborhood is marked by
more vacant houses than occupied homes.
“There is nothing we won’t
consider,” Davis said. “Right now,
the evidence that’s available to us
is indicative of a homicide.” He
said it would be entirely plausible for it to be coincidental that
Suiter was killed in a random
encounter unrelated to his pending grand jury appearance.
“It’s a very dangerous area,”
Davis said. “He was following up
on a brutal murder in 2016.
Detective Suiter was not interviewing schoolteachers and
mailmen.”
The commissioner said conspiracy theories swirling around
the investigation are “certainly a
distraction for leadership” and
are “very hurtful for the Suiter
family and friends.”
Suiter was a U.S. Navy veteran
who had grown up in Washington and lived with his wife and
family in Pennsylvania.
The commissioner said he met
with homicide detectives Monday night on the investigation
and that “they are determined to
get it right.”
peter.hermann@washpost.com
You, too, could have home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
obituaries
DMITRI HVOROSTOVSKY, 55
Russian rock star of opera thrilled listeners around world
BY
E MILY L ANGER
Dmitri Hvorostovsky, a Russian baritone who was one of the
most celebrated opera singers of
the modern era, dazzling audiences with a voice that was by
turns brooding and delicate, died
Nov. 22 near his home in London.
He was 55.
His death was confirmed by
his office in a statement. Mr.
Hvorostovsky announced in 2015
that he had been diagnosed with
a brain tumor. His medical treatment and failing sense of balance
forced him to cancel many engagements, but he rallied for a
number of acclaimed performances before his death.
Among them was a surprise
appearance at the Metropolitan
Opera’s 50th anniversary gala in
May. Peter Gelb, the opera company’s general manager, introduced Mr. Hvorostovsky, observing that he had “defied all the
odds and the gods” to be there.
His rendition of “Cortigiani, vil
razza dannata” from Giuseppe
Verdi’s “Rigoletto” received an
ovation that ranked among the
most emotional moments in recent operatic history.
Mr. Hvorostovsky was a rock
star of opera — a singer whose
talents satisfied even the most
exacting buff, and whose physical
charisma, accentuated by his leonine silver mane, thrilled listeners who had once gotten their
opera fix at Three Tenors concerts held in athletic stadiums.
He burst onto the world’s musical stage in 1989, when he
defeated the Welsh bass-baritone
and hometown favorite Bryn Terfel in the Singer of the World
competition in Cardiff, Wales.
The coup transformed Mr.
Hvorostovsky from the pride of
Siberia into the envy of the opera
world.
He was hailed at times as a
successor to Luciano Pavarotti,
the centerpiece of the Three Tenors, who perhaps more than any
other opera singer before or after
helped take opera to mass audiences. Elle magazine described
Mr. Hvorostovsky as the “Elvis of
opera,” and People magazine
ranked him among the 50 most
beautiful people in the world.
Baritone roles, unlike tenor
ones, are not ready-made catapults to operatic stardom. But
Mr. Hvorostovsky’s vocal cords
were their own springboard.
“There have been many beautiful voices, but in my opinion
none more beautiful than Dmitri’s,” Renée Fleming, the American soprano, once told the New
Yorker magazine.
When Mr. Hvorostovsky first
performed at New York City’s
Alice Tully Hall in 1990, so many
musical professionals turned out
for the show that reportedly few
tickets remained for the general
public.
He debuted at the Met in 1995
as Prince Yeletsky in Tchaikovsky’s “The Queen of Spades.” The
role became a calling card of Mr.
Hvorostovsky’s Russian repertoire, along with the title role in
Tchaikovsky’s “Eugene Onegin.”
He also distinguished himself
in the works of Verdi, including
as Germont in “La Traviata,” the
hunchbacked jester in “Rigoletto,” the Count di Luna in “Il
Trovatore,” Rodrigo in “Don Carlo,” Renato in “Un Ballo in
Maschera” and the title character
of “Simon Boccanegra.”
At the Met and elsewhere, he
sang opposite the most noted
sopranos of his generation,
among them Fleming, Anna Netrebko, Sondra Radvanovsky and
Angela Gheorghiu.
Washington Post classical music critic Tim Page lauded Mr.
Hvorostovsky for “his dark and
unmistakable voice” and “the
wild, fierce intensity of his interpretations.” So great was his
breath control that some listeners were left wondering when,
exactly, he planned to breathe.
His extensive recordings in-
SHIHO FUKADA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dmitri Hvorostovsky performs during a dress rehearsal for the opera “Eugene Onegin” in New York in
2007. Deemed the “Elvis of opera,” the beloved baritone was hailed as a successor to Luciano Pavarotti.
cluded numerous solo albums
featuring Russian sacred and folk
music, as well as operatic selections. He had a particular sensitivity for the music of wartime in
his homeland.
“The older I become,” he told
the New York Times, “the closer I
feel to Russia.”
Dmitri Alexandrovich Hvorostovsky was born in Krasnoyarsk,
a Siberian factory city, on Oct. 16,
1962. His father was a chemical
engineer and amateur singer,
and his mother was a gynecologist. Because of their demanding
careers, Mr. Hvorostovsky lived
mainly with a grandmother, who
taught him folk songs, and her
alcoholic husband.
Mr. Hvorostovsky told the
WALLY MCNAMEE/THE WASHINGTON POST
Robert Kennedy, left, stands by Jacqueline Kennedy as President
John F. Kennedy’s coffin is transferred from Air Force One.
Times that he took up vodka
when he was 14 and joined a
gang. He wished to study in
Moscow, but his parents objected.
“They worried that I would live
a dangerous life and lose my
talent,” he said.
He risked doing exactly that by
joining a heavy metal band and
singing, Freddie Mercury-style,
in a high-pitched voice.
All the while, Mr. Hvorostovsky nurtured an abiding interest in classical music, and he
studied piano and conducting
before enrolling at an arts institute in Krasnoyarsk. Because Soviet authorities preferred to minimize Western European influences on culture, the Times re-
ported, he studied the bel canto
traditions of opera independently.
He sang widely in the Soviet
Union, including at factories.
“The men and women sitting
in that audience in their heavy
boots and big fur hats had never
even heard of Verdi, and their
tears were more precious to me
than all the applause I could ever
get again,” Mr. Hvorostovsky told
the New Yorker. “Where else but
in Russia would an entire factory
stop working at midday to pack a
concert hall?”
Irina Arkhipova, the Russian
mezzo-soprano, encouraged him
to enter the Cardiff contest.
“Hvorostovsky
looks
like
Nureyev and sings like God,”
emily.langer@washpost.com
MCNAMEE FAMILY
WALLY MCNAMEE/THE WASHINGTON POST
The funeral procession for John F. Kennedy crosses Memorial
Bridge toward Arlington National Cemetery on Nov. 25, 1963.
John Shirley-Quirk, the acclaimed bass-baritone, was said
to have remarked after the performance, invoking the Soviet
ballet dancer.
As his international schedule
intensified, Mr. Hvorostovsky
was often debriefed by KGB
agents.
“It was really, really hated
from all of the society, particularly our society of singers and
young musicians, who were rebelling and progressive,” he once
told The Post. “And on the other
hand, I understood that I
wouldn’t get there otherwise, so I
would have to say, yes, yes, yes,
and sign the papers and stuff. It
was terrible.”
Mr. Hvorostovsky intimated
that he regretted his publicity as
a sex symbol, while acknowledging that the promotion propelled
his international career. He also
described overcoming a battle
with alcohol that he traced to his
infatuation with fame.
His marriage to Svetlana
Hvorostovsky, a ballet dancer,
ended in divorce. Survivors include his second wife, Florence
Illi, a soprano; their two children,
Maxim and Nina; twin children
from his first marriage, Daniel
and Alexandra; and his parents.
In fall 2015, after falling ill, Mr.
Hvorostovsky returned to the
Met for three performances as
the Count di Luna, one of his
favorite roles, leaving many in
the house in tears.
The next year, Mr. Hvorostovsky sang a recital at New
York’s Carnegie Hall. One of his
numbers was the song “To Molly,”
by the Russian composer Glinka.
“Do not demand songs from
the singer/When troubles of life/
Have sealed his lips/To joy and
inspiration,” the lyrics warn.
But they go on to promise that,
with the gift of hope, “in a wild
flood will words flow,” and “louder than thunder the skies will
resound.”
Wally McNamee, shown in an undated photo, was on The Post’s
photo staff from 1955 until he left for Newsweek in 1968.
WALLY MCNAMEE, 84
Prizewinning photographer covered 10 presidents, war, Olympic Games
BY
B ART B ARNES
Wally McNamee, a prizewinning photographer for The Washington Post and then for Newsweek who covered presidents,
soldiers in combat, Olympic athletes and ordinary men and women going about their daily lives,
died Nov. 17 at a hospital in
Fairfax County, Va. He was 84.
The cause was pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer, said a son,
Bruce “Win” McNamee II.
Mr. McNamee covered 10 presidents from Dwight D. Eisenhower to George W. Bush and the
Olympic Games from 1976 to
1996. He was a Marine Corps
photographer during the Korean
War and later photographed
combat operations during the
Vietnam War.
Among his most memorable
pictures was a photograph of first
lady Jacqueline Kennedy disembarking from Air Force One at
Andrews Air Force Base on Nov.
22, 1963, hours after President
John F. Kennedy’s assassination
in Dallas. The president’s brother
Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy is holding her hand, and she
is still wearing the suit stained
with the president’s blood. Mr.
McNamee later described it as “a
graphic touch to this horrible
moment.”
On the day of the president’s
funeral, Mr. McNamee was posted atop the Lincoln Memorial
from which he photographed the
Kennedy funeral cortège crossing
Memorial Bridge to Arlington
National Cemetery.
“It was a perfect geometric
layout,” Mr. McNamee told Bertrand Guez and Julie Asher in a
2014 interview, describing the
horse-drawn caisson bearing the
president’s body, accompanied by
military honor guards moving in
a straight line across the bridge to
what would be the president’s
burial site and the eternal flame.
Mr. McNamee was on The
Post’s photo staff from 1955 until
he left for Newsweek in 1968. He
retired there after 30 years but
continued to work as a contractor
through the early 2000s. He took
more than 100 Newsweek cover
photographs. Four times he won
the White House News Photographers Association’s Photographer of the Year Award. He was
one of only a handful of photographers who accompanied President Richard M. Nixon on his
historic 1972 trip to China.
He was resourceful in getting
himself to a vantage point or
location where taking a good
picture was possible. When the
United States invaded Grenada
in 1983, no photographers were
allowed to accompany the military. So Mr. McNamee, another
Newsweek photographer and a
reporter paid the owner of a
small boat from a nearby island
$10,000 to take them to the
Caribbean island nation, where
they waded ashore only to be
greeted by a gruff U.S. Marine
Corps sergeant who was less than
welcoming.
Besides, the sergeant said, he
had a grudge against Newsweek.
He had been promised a small
pocket calculator as a giveaway
for subscribing to the magazine,
but he never received it.
Mr. McNamee reached into a
tote bag and pulled out a small
pocket calculator of his own.
“We’ve been looking all over the
world for you, sergeant,” he said.
“Here it is.”
He issued an epithet, then let
the journalists through.
Wallace William McNamee
was born in Harrisonburg, Va., on
Nov. 29, 1932. His father was an
insurance salesman. The family
moved to Arlington when he was
a child, and he graduated from
Washington-Lee High School. He
attended George Washington
University and worked as a copy
aide at The Post, then joined the
Marine Corps, serving in Korea
and Japan. He returned to The
Post in 1955.
A longtime Arlington resident,
Mr. McNamee moved to Hilton
Head, S.C., soon after he retired
but returned to the Washington
area for medical care.
His marriage to the former
Janet Regan ended in divorce.
His second wife, Nikki Johnson
McNamee, died in 2013 after 39
years of marriage.
Survivors include three chil-
dren from his first marriage,
“Win” McNamee II of Arlington,
Kimberly Mack of Falls Church,
Va., and Julia McNamee of Trumbull, Conn.; and six grandchildren.
In the Guez-Asher interview,
Mr. McNamee spoke of his years
as a White House photographer
in the Kennedy administration.
He would describe Kennedy as
unusually “comfortable being
photographed . . . even during
unguarded moments with his
family.”
This, Mr. McNamee said, “humanized him even more as a
president . . . loved easily by people because he was so natural.”
On the weekend of Kennedy’s
assassination and funeral, when
it was all over, Mr. McNamee said,
“I cried a little . . . for the first
time.”
newsobits@washpost.com
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
O F NO T E
Obituaries of residents from the
District, Maryland and Northern
Virginia.
Morton Smith,
Foreign Service officer
Morton Smith, 86, a Foreign
Service officer who served as a
public affairs, press and cultural
officer in many countries in Asia
and who also served as deputy
chief of mission in Singapore
from 1979 to 1983, followed by
several years as deputy director
of Voice of America, died Sept. 26
at a hospital in Bethesda, Md.
The cause was cancer, said a son,
Dan Smith.
Mr. Smith, a Bethesda
resident, was born in Brooklyn.
In 1955, he joined the U.S.
Information Agency but spent
most of his career on loan to the
State Department and other
agencies. In the final years of his
career, he was a diplomat-inresidence at Reed College in
Portland, Ore., and a visiting
professor at the National War
College. He retired in 1993 and
worked as a consultant
afterward.
Gary McGarrity,
research scientist
Gerard “Gary” McGarrity, 77, a
medical research scientist who
chaired the National Institutes of
Health committee that in 1990
approved the use of gene therapy
to treat fatal diseases, died
Sept. 21 at his home in
Gaithersburg, Md. The cause was
complications from pulmonary
fibrosis, said a son, Gerard
McGarrity.
Dr. McGarrity was born in
Brooklyn. He was a specialist in
gene therapy research and
former president of the Coriell
Institute for Medical Research in
Camden, N.J., while serving on
the NIH committee. “This is a
historic decision,” he told the
Associated Press at the time.
“What we have done today is add
gene therapy to vaccines,
antibiotics and radiation in the
medical arsenal.”
In 1991, Dr. McGarrity moved
to the Washington area to
become a senior vice president at
Genetic Therapy Inc./Novartis.
Later he held senior executive
positions at other bio tech
companies, retiring about 2010
from VIRxSYS.
Pamela Woodruff,
GWU professor
Pamela Woodruff, 75, a
psychology lecturer and
professor at George Washington
University from 1979 to 2016,
died Oct. 1 at a hospital in Olney,
Md. The cause was pulmonary
hypertension and renal failure,
said a daughter, Sarah Woodruff.
Dr. Woodruff, a resident of
Sandy Spring, Md., was born
Pamela Patton in Washington.
From 1964 to 1976, she was a
researcher at the National
Cancer Institute, then a graduate
student in clinical psychology at
GWU for three years. She was a
lifelong member of the Girl
Scouts, a troop leader and day
camp coordinator for the Scouts
in Montgomery County.
William Marsh,
Foreign Service officer
William Marsh, 86, a Foreign
Service officer who served in
Vietnam during the early years
of the war when the embassy was
subject to bombings and attacks
and later with the U.S. delegation
to the Vietnam peace talks in
Paris, died Sept. 26 at his home
in Mitchellville, Md. The cause
was complications from
hydrocephalus, said a son,
Andrew Marsh.
Mr. Marsh was born in
Scranton, Pa. He joined the
Foreign Service in 1960 and
served 36 years, retiring as U.S.
permanent representative to the
U.N. Food and Agriculture
Organization in Rome, where he
received a presidential award for
oversight of airdropped food
provisions to starving refugees in
Kosovo.
In retirement, he spent nine
years as a senior adviser for
European affairs to the U.S.
delegation to the U.N. General
Assembly.
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
AKOWSKEY
MATUS
ANASTASI
JAREB
OWENS
JOSEPH P. AKOWSKEY
WILLIAM D. AKOWSKEY, SR.
JOHN A. and THELMA E. MYERS
In loving memory of our Dad, Mom, Stepdad
and Brother, Bill, who have departed from us.
Our prayers are with you all.
Happy Thanksgiving
Jim, Pat, Ruth and Joe Akowskey
EDGERLEY
BRIAN K. EDGERLEY
Good night, Safety Foot.
I love you. Always. S.
TAYLOR
Dr. ALICIA MERCEDES MATUS
Dr. Alicia Mercedes Matus passed away on
November 20, 2017, with her family by her
side. Dr. Matus graduated from medical
school in Nicaragua and continued in a
long and successful career in psychiatry.
She immigrated to the United States in
1970 with her husband, Dr. Roberto J.
Matus. After raising five children, she
returned to her medical career until her
retirement in November 2015. She is
survived by her husband, Roberto, her
children Ana, Roberto, Gabriel, Sandra and
Marvin, daughters-in-law Arlen, Alexie and
Rosibel, son-in-law Brian, and grandchildren Emilia, Alicia Valentina, Gustavo, Marvin David, Gavin and Magnolia. A mass
will be held at St. Raphael Catholic Church
in Rockville, MD on Saturday, November
25, 2017 at 1:30 p.m. In lieu of flowers,
the family asks that donations be made
in her honor to The Saint Raphael School
Fund (www.straphaelschoolmd.org) or
The Arms of Love (www.armsoflove.org).
HELEN ERMINA ANASTASI (Sugie)
(Age 74)
RICHARDSON
BRENDA JEAN TAYLOR
January 22, 1945 - November 23, 2006
11 years have sadly passed since you were
called away. But fondest memories still remain
and hopes to meet in heaven-some day.
Love Sons, Tracy and Terrance & Family
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
DEATH NOTICE
ARAPIAN
STEPHEN GRAHAM ARAPIAN (Age 67)
Of Germantown, MD, passed away
on November 20, 2017. Husband of
Linda Arapian; father of Stephanie
Arapian, Michael Arapian (Andrea),
and Jennifer Arapian; grandfather of Caiden
and Dominick; and brother of Edward L., Jr.,
Suzanne, Christopher, and Cynthia. Visitation
on Friday, November 24, from 5 to 7 p.m.,
and Mass of Christian Burial on Saturday,
November 25, at 10 a.m., both at Our Lady
of the Visitation, 14139 Seneca Road,
Darnestown, MD. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to Montgomery
Hospice or Montgomery County Arapian Calcium CT Screening Fund (c/o Office of the Fire
Chief). For full obituary, please visit
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
EGAN
BARBARA M. EGAN
On Sunday, November 20, 2017. The loving
mother of Michael (Anne) Egan and Kelly
(Mark) Donoway, also survived by six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.
Friends are invited to celebrate Barbara's
life on Sunday, November 26 from 2 to
4 p.m. at the Kalas Funeral Home, 2973
Solomons Island Rd., Edgewater, MD. A
Mass of Christian Burial will be offered on
Monday, November 27 at 10:30 a.m. at
St. John Neumann Catholic Church, 620
Bestgate Rd., Annapolis, MD. Interment in
Spencer, MA. In lieu of flowers donations
may be made to the Sherwood Forest
Endowment Fund, 134 Sherwood Forest
Rd, Sherwood Forest, MD 21405. On line
condolence can be made at:
KalasFuneralHomes.com
HARRY A. RICHARDSON, SR.
Harry A. Richardson, Sr. departed this life on
Friday, November 10, 2017. Born in Washington, D.C., on January 9, 1927, he was the son of
the late Julian and Mary Richardson.
He was an Army veteran and worked for
many years in law enforcement. He retired as
the Chief of the Protective Services Branch
at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in
Washington, D.C.
He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Joy;
his three sons Michael Sr. (Valencia), Donald
(Nora), and Harry Jr. (Buddy) (Natasha); five
grandchildren Michael Jr., Michael C. (Lanette),
Tosha, Christian, and Marley; and three greatgrandchildren Kamal, Gabriel, and Nia; and two
sisters Rosemary Gleaton and Ernestine Doby..
Of Berwyn Heights, MD, passed on November
15, 2017 at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring,
MD with her loving family at her side.
She was born on March 4, 1943 to George J.
Zois and Alma M. Godbout of Capital Heights,
MD.
On December 23, 1960, Sugie married her
late beloved husband, Joseph Anastasi. She
is survived by her children, Anthony Anastasi
(Tracy), Joanna Shaulis (Robert), and Annette
Rease (Paul); She is also survived by 15 grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; four siblings, Marie Zois Baker (Clayton), Harry Zois,
James Zois (Gail and Socrates Zois (Linda);
and many, many more nieces, nephews and
extended friends. She was preceded in death
by her two oldest children, Christine Hammond and Patrick Anastasi; her youngest sister,
Annette Zois and one grandchild, Vinnie.
She worked for the Prince Georges County
Public School System as the Cafeteria Manager
for 30 (plus) years.
Sugie’s family was her greatest love, she
enjoyed looking after everyone. She was an
excellent cook, preparing many delicious
meals especially for the holidays.
She was a woman without words left unsaid,
what she said she meant it. Her motto was
“what came up, came out!”
Family will receive guest at Fort Lincoln Funeral
Home, 3401 Bladensburg Road, Brentwood,
MD 20722 on Friday, November 24, 2017 from
2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Funeral services
will be held on Saturday, November 25, 2017 at
Holy Redeemer Catholic Church 4902 Berwyn
Road, College Park, MD 20740 at 10 a.m. In leiu
of flowers donations may be made to St Jude.
Internment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
BOWMAN
MILLIE
MERYL STEIGMAN
WILLIAMS
ANNIE MAE WILLIAMS
Departed this life on November 10, 2017.
Family will gather together to celebrate her
life on November 25, 2017 at Mt. Zion Baptist
Church, 5101 14th St. NW, Washington, DC
20011, Viewing 10 a.m., Funeral 11 a.m. Interment at Lincoln Memorial Cemetery. Services
entrusted to Cedar Hill Funeral Home.
LYNETTE P. CHAMBERS
On Friday, November 17, 2017,
PATRICIA ANN GRAY of Upper Marlboro, Maryland passed away
peacefully into eternal rest. Loving
mother of Erneka (Robert Jr.) Robinson. Also survived by two grandchildren, Lalia and Tianna Robinson; one brother, Gene Gray; one sister, Carole
Joyner; and many other relatives and friends.
Family will receive friends on Saturday, November 25 for a Service of Remembrance at WISEMAN FUNERAL CHAPEL, 7531 Old Alexanderia
Ferry Road, Clinton, MD. Family hour at 12
Noon, Service of Remebrance at 1 p.m. Interment private.
www.wisemanfuneralhome.net
Lynette P. Chambers, age 85, departed this
life on Thursday, November 16, 2017. Surviving
relatives include her son, Brett E. Chambers;
daughter, Vikki Chambers-Williams and grandchild, Arielle Ivory Chambers.
Funeral service will take place on Friday,
November 24, 2017 at St. John Baptist Church,
917 Onslow Street, Durham, NC 27705, beginning at 12 noon. A visitation with family and
friends will be held one hour prior to the
service. Interment services will take place on
Monday, December 4, 2017, at Cheltenham
Veteran Cemetery, 11301 Crain Hwy, Cheltenham, MD 20623, beginning at 10:45 a.m.
Scarborough & Hargett Celebration of Life
Center, Inc. is assisting the family with arrangements. Online condolences may be expressed
at scarboroughhargettcelebration.com.
CARLTON LATANE COFFEY
C O RRE C T ION
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
C0979 2x3
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
Library of Congress
Curator and Art Historian
After a long life filled with love, laughter,
friendship and adventures Elena left this life
peacefully on November 12, 2017. Elena,
known as "Auntie Lane" to her family and
"Speedy" to her friends, touched many
lives with her wisdom, caring, laughter and
compassion. She was adored and loved
by all who knew her. Born in Greenwich
CT, she attended Greenwich Country Day,
Emma Willard and graduated from the University of North Carolina with a degree in
Art History. She had a long career as an
accomplished art historian, starting at the
National Gallery of Art moving to the Library
of Congress to serve as a Curator in the
Poster and Prints Division for more than 3
decades. She collaborated, commentated,
forwarded, authored and curated many
exhibitions, collections, books and papers
including Nagel: The Art of Patrick Nagel,
The Polish Poster and Eyes of the Nation.
An active member of many organizations,
including 6th Church of Christ Scientist,
Sulgrave Club, Evermay, Friends of Stratford
Hall, Washington Studies Group, DAR, D.C.
Society of Colonial Dames, Evergreen Garden Club and many more, she was beloved
by many. In addition to a robust career
and active life of service Elena was an avid
gardener, reader, world traveler, art expert
and wonderful friend to all. She is survived
by her sister Lee G. Day, brother Julian C.
Gonzalez and devoted nieces and nephews
Jonathan, Neva and Julia Day; and Kelemn
and Makenna Taylor-Gonzalez. One of her
dearest friends sums her up best "a day
spent with Elena was a good day". She will
be sadly missed and joyfully remembered.
A private family service will be held. In
lieu of flowers, a donation can be made in
her name to Lynn House of Potomac Valley.
COFFEY
KING
EDNA L. MOODY
Thursday,
November 23, 2017
DEATH NOTICE
MOODY
Four years ago today, God called you Home.
The pain is unbearable, but I'm so thankful to
have had you to call Mom.
Happy Thanksgiving!
Love, Beverly and Family
HOLIDAY HOURS
DEATH NOTICE
GEORGE ROBERT KING "Sonny"
George Robert “Sonny” King, in the early morning of October 29, 2017 peacefully passed into
eternal life. Preceded in death by his wife,
Jacqueline, and his son, Kevin, he is survived by
daughters Robin (Glen) and Natalie; grandson,
Sean and brother Austin F. “Punky” King (Irma).
Burial will be at Arlington National Cemetery in
the Spring of 2018 followed by a celebration
of life and gathering of family and friends
in Manassas, VA at that time. Please visit
www.hallfh.com for updates and further information. Memorial contributions are welcome
and can be directed to HeroHomes (Loudoun),
125 Hirst Road, Suite 3C, Purcellville, VA 20132
or via their website at herohomesloudoun.org.
Arrangements by Hall Funeral Home, Purcellville, VA.
PAID DEATH
NOTICES
ELENA G. MILLIE
CHAMBERS
JONES-ROBINSON
JESSIE ADELAIDE
JONES-ROBINSON
Family will receive friends Friday, November
24 at JB Jenkins Funeral Home Chapel, 7474
Landover Rd., Hyattsville MD, 20785 Visitation
3:30 p.m. Service 4:30 p.m.
MART L. BOWMAN
"Marty"
On Thursday, November 16, 2017, Mart L. Bowman of Bristow, VA. He leaves to cherish his
memory one sister, Patricia B. Evans (Elton);
one brother, Amando Bowman (Nikki); motherin-law, Evelyn Morse; an adopted daughter,
Jamie Mathieu (Robert) and a host of other
relatives and friends. Family will receive friends
on Saturday, November 25, 2017 at Strickland
Funeral Services, 6500 Allentown Rd., Camp
Springs, MD from 10 a.m. until time of funeral
service at 11 a.m. Interment Maryland National
Cemetery, Laurel, MD. Arrangements by Strickland Funeral Services.
www.stricklandfuneralservices.com
IN MEMORIAM
Passed away peacefully in her sleep on
the morning of November 23, 2015. She
was predeceased by her daughter, Marilyn
RIngell; and sisters, Mary Freeman, Sylvia
Blackburn and Gretchen Jones. She is survived by her son, Charles Robinson; sisters,
Jean Hicks and Edith Booker. She is also
survived by her grandchildren, Kassia and
Case Ringell and her son-in-law and daughter-in-law, Richard and Margo Ringell; many
other relatives and friends. Adelaide was
a graduate of Dunbar High School, Miner
Teachers College and served as an elementary school teacher for 31 years. She
was an avid lover of Washington, DC and
identified herself as a proud second generation Washingtonian.
YANCEY
DR. ROBERT W. YANCEY, JR
STEIGMAN
Meryl Steigman, lover and best friend of
Andrew Steigman of Bethesda, MD; mother
of Daria Steigman of Washington, DC and
Jonathan Steigman of Mountain View, CA;
sister of Elaine Kramer of New York City;
grandma to Daniel, died peacefully on
November 19, 2017. Meryl was fortunate to
have had many good friends over the years
and was grateful for the love which she
gave and received.
PATRICIA ANN OWENS
Patricia Ann Owens transitioned from labor
to heavenly reward on November 14, 2017.
She was born the second oldest of seven
children on July 8, 1957 to Mary Frances and
the late James Garey, Sr. She is survived by
her beloved husband of 31 years, Garland
Owens, Sr.; her four children, Erika, Corinne,
Jessica and Garland, Jr.; a son-in-love, Ian
Douglas; her mother, Mary Frances; four
brothers, James, Jr. (Michelle), David
(Jacqueline), Wesley (Deanna) and Brian
(Colleen); two sisters, Sharon (Barry) and
Melissa; a mother-in-law, Annabelle; five
brothers-in-law, Kent (Gayle), Gary, Scott,
Patrick and Rodney; two sisters-in-law,
Rhonda and June (George, Jr.); other relatives, friends and colleagues.
The Owens Family will receive friends at
Goshen United Methodist Church, 19615
Goshen Rd., Gaithersburg, MD 20879 for
a visitation service on Sunday, November
26 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and on Monday,
November 27 from 9 a.m. until service
at 11 a.m. Interment, All Souls Cemetery.
Arrangements entrusted to SNOWDEN
FUNERAL HOME.
www.snowdencares.com
On Saturday, November 18, 2017 at his home in
Upper Marlboro, MD. Survived by wife, Angela
Yancey; children, Jennifer-Camille, Robert III
and Anthony; Mother Josephine (Theartic); siblings, Michael (Barbara), Joseph (Connie), Karl
(Rene) and Valerie; and a host of nieces;
nephews; other relatives and friends.
GRAY
PATRICIA ANN GRAY
JERE JAREB "Jerome"
Jere "Jerome" Jareb, professor emeritus of
history at St. Francis University, died Monday, November 20, 2017 in Charlottesville,
VA at the age of 95. Dr. Jareb was born May
3, 1922 in Prvic Šepurine, Dalmatia, Croatia,
the son of Marko and Tade (Kursar) Jareb.
He was a leading scholar of modern Croatian history, a co-founder and past president of the Croatian Academy of America,
and co-managing editor of the Journal of
Croatian Studies for many years. He came
to the United States in 1952 and studied at
Columbia University (BS, 1955; MA, 1958;
PhD, 1964). He was a lecturer at Rutgers
University before joining the faculty at St.
Francis University in Loretto, PA in 1966. He
became chair of the History and Political
Science department there in 1968 and
remained in that role until his retirement in
1992. He continued his historical research
work into his early 80's including two book
publications, one in 1997 and another in
2001, and numerous articles, some as
recent as 2005.
Preceding him in death were his brother
Andjelo Jareb, husband of Nedeljka Paskov,
and his sisters Marija Mijat, wife of Mihovil,
and Anka Mijat, wife of Vlade. He is survived
by his beloved wife of 58 years, Olga
(Zivkovic), daughter Helena Jareb, widow
of Peter Benda, of Silver Spring, MD; son,
Anton Jareb and wife Cara (Yankus) of
Clifton, VA; son, Ivan and wife, Annette
(Couch) of Charlottesville, VA; son Mark and
wife Patricia (Alfieri) of Waterbury, CT; and
grandchildren, Aaron Benda, Jacob Benda,
Colin Jareb, Caroline Jareb, Della Jareb, Saša
Jareb, Samuel Jareb, and Nathan Jareb. He
is also survived by his sister, Nedo Mijat,
wife of Tugomir, and numerous nieces and
nephews.
A funeral Mass will be celebrated at the
Church of the Incarnation, 1465 Incarnation
Drive, Charlottesville, VA 22901 at 1 p.m. on
November 25, 2017. Hill and Wood Funeral
Service is assisting the family. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests that memorial
donations be made to Saint Francis University, 117 Evergreen Drive, Loretto, PA 15940
or francis.edu/makeagift.
The funeral service will be held on Saturday,
November 25, at 10 a.m. at St. Mary’s Baptist
Church, 8008 Eastern Avenue, Washington,
D.C. with viewing and visitation at 9 a.m. A
fellowship meal will follow the service.
— From staff reports
The Nov. 22 obituary of actor
and singer David Cassidy
incorrectly referred to the size of
his television band, the Partridge
Family. The group was a sextet,
not a quintet.
B7
RE
Died peacefully on November 19, 2017 at
his home in Keswick, VA, with his family
by his side. He was diagnosed with Lewy
Body Dementia. He was born on October
31, 1923, in the old Alexandria Hospital, and
was named for the doctor who delivered
him. Carlton was the ninth child of the late
Charles Franklin Coffey and Georgia Anne
Campbell Coffey and he boasted that he was
the only one born in a hospital. He grew up
in the Rosemont section of Alexandria, VA,
and in Washington, DC where he attended
Western High School.
As a grade school boy, Carlton became a
dedicated fan of the Washington Senators
(now Nationals). Betting a nickel on games
and winning with his older brothers was
an incentive to closely follow the season’s
schedule. He remained an avid fan of the
Redskins and of all sports throughout his
life. He played basketball in college, and
many Sunday afternoons were spent on the
Washington Monument grounds playing softball with the “P Street Boys.”
When Carlton was 17 years old, he enlisted
in the U.S. Coast Guard at the outset of World
War II and was trained as a Radioman. He
served aboard an LST (Landing Ship Tank)
in the Mediterranean ports of North Africa
and Italy. In Anzio, he was wounded from
shrapnel when his ship was strafed. He also
participated in the Normandy invasion and
was proud to have served his country.
Carlton attended the old Wilson Teachers
College (now UDC) and George Washington
University. He had a long and successful
career with Home Life of New York as a
Certified Life Underwriter (CLU). Being a
real people person, he was a great help
to many young families after WWII with a
new concept in life insurance at the time-estate planning. Success inspired him to
continually take classes to grow in his chosen
profession and after completing a course he
was often asked to be the instructor. In 1987,
Carlton became a Certified Financial Planner
(CFP). He was a life member of The Million
Dollar Round Table.
One of Carlton’s greatest loves was spending
leisure time with family and close friends at
the “Coffey Grounds” cabin in the Blue Ridge
Mountains near Tyro and Crab Tree Falls,
VA. While living in Fairfax Station, tennis and
bridge were other pleasurable pursuits. His
collection of tennis medals in the Senior
Olympics amazed his family. He played tennis
with the Fairfax Racket Club for many years.
Carlton and Libby moved to the Glenmore
community near Charlottesville in 2012 and
he was able to practice his bridge skills at the
Glenmore Country Club.
He was proud to have been one of the first
to be baptized in the new Vienna Baptist
Church in 1957 and enjoyed teaching young
boys in Sunday School there. Carlton and
Libby had many memorable trips together-the highlight being a safari in Botswana for
their 50th wedding anniversary and cruising
down the Danube on their 60th Anniversary.
His family was always first place in his
heart. At his 90th birthday celebration, the
five grandchildren told about their treasured
relationships with their Granddad.
Carlton is survived by his loving wife of
69 years, Elizabeth (Libby) Kornegay Coffey,
and three children, Mark Carlton Coffey of
Austin, TX, Elizabeth Lynn (Betsy) CoffeyChaudet and her husband Roy Chaudet of
Waterford, VA, Virginia Lee (Ginny) Coffey and
her husband Mark Stoddart of Charlottesville,
VA. He also is survived by five grandchildren,
Powell Coffey, Elise Chaudet, Elizabeth (Liza)
Taylor, Quinn Taylor, and Emma Taylor; and
four step-grandchildren, Cameron Stoddart,
Caleb Stoddart, Shelly Hamler, Skyler Stoddart, and one step-great granddaughter, Zaya
Hamler. He will be greatly missed by his
cherished niece, Beverly Beeton.
The family would like to give grateful thanks
to his wonderful caregivers who kept him
comfortable with kindness and loving care.
Very special thanks to Charlotte Gregory who
became a part of the family in the three years
she took care of Carlton. The family is deeply
grateful to Legacy Hospice for their valuable
guidance, concern and love.
Funeral services will be held at Hill & Wood
Funeral Home in Charlottesville, VA, at 12
Noon on Saturday, November 25, 2017 with
Pastor Margarete Gillette conducting the services. The family will receive friends one
hour prior to the service and a reception will
follow. Interment in the Culpeper National
Cemetery will be private, with Chaplain Allison Jackson officiating.
No flowers, please. Donations may be made
to Legacy Hospice, 500 Faulconer Drive, Suite
100, Charlottesville, VA 22903, or a charity of
your choice.
11 a.m. ~ 3 p.m.
Photo Deadline:
1 p.m.
NO EXCEPTIONS
To place a notice,
call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 Ext.
4-4122
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2017 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $502
4" - $545
5" - $680
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $535
4" - $621
5" - $770
6"+ for ALL color notices
$160 each additional inch wkday
$186 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque.
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
B8
EZ
. THURSDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Sunny, breezy and a bit cool
This is on the cool side for our
Thanksgivings, especially of late, but
this is a treat for the holiday. No
weather to worry about! Sunny skies
and relatively light winds team up
and deliver the goods. High temperatures are in
the mid-40s and upper 40s. Tonight, the weather
continues to cooperate with any after-dinner
plans you might have. Nothing to see but mostly
clear skies and light winds, with overnight lows
dipping to the upper 20s to low 30s.
Today
Mostly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Friday
Sunny
Saturday
Mostly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Mostly sunny
Monday
Sunny
OFFICIAL RECORD
Tuesday
Sunny
Temperatures
48° 34
55° 41
62° 42
51° 33
52° 38
60° 44
FEELS*: 50°
FEELS: 56°
FEELS: 63°
FEELS: 44°
FEELS: 51°
FEELS: 59°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
P: 5%
P: 10%
P: 5%
P: 0%
P: 10%
WIND: NW 4–8 mph
W: S 4–8 mph
W: SW 6–12 mph
W: NW 10–20 mph
W: SSW 6–12 mph
W: SSW 7–14 mph
°
°
°
°
°
NATION
Hagerstown
45/31
Davis
40/22
Charlottesville
49/30
M
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
47/28
Dover
45/30
Cape May
Annapolis
44/32
46/32
OCEAN: 60°
Washington
48/34
Su
Weather map features for noon today.
Philadelphia
45/34
Harrisburg
44/28
Norfolk
49/33
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
59° 10:09 a.m.
48° 5:00 p.m.
55°/39°
77° 2007
12° 1880
56° 10:22 a.m.
44° 5:00 p.m.
55°/34°
75° 2007
14° 2014
57° 11:30 a.m.
46° 5:00 p.m.
54°/35°
76° 1940
15° 1880
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –0.4° yr. to date: +2.9°
Precipitation
Virginia Beach
49/30
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 51°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
49/35
OCEAN: 55°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.01"
1.99"
2.32"
35.09"
35.84"
0.0"
0.0"
0.00"
1.96"
2.49"
39.86"
37.66"
0.0"
0.0"
0.01"
2.13"
2.40"
37.31"
37.61"
0.0"
0.0"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
3 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly sunny. High 37 to 41. Wind west
6–12 mph. Tonight, mostly clear. Low 26 to 31. Wind west–
northwest 4–8 mph. Friday, sunny. High 44 to 48. Wind
south–southwest 4–8 mph. Saturday, partly sunny. High 47
to 51.
Atlantic beaches: Today, mostly sunny. High 43 to 49.
Wind northwest 7–14 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy. Low 31 to
35. Wind west–northwest 7–14 mph. Friday, mostly sunny,
warmer. high 50 to 58. Wind northwest 4–8 mph. Saturday
mostly sunny. High 55 to 63.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly sunny. Wind west–
northwest 6–12 knots. Waves a foot. Visibility unrestricted. • Lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly sunny. Wind northwest
7–14 knots. Waves 1–2 feet on the Lower Potomac, 2–4 feet on the
Bay.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls will be 3.3 feet,
holding steady through Friday. Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
5:46 a.m.
11:02 a.m.
5:27 p.m.
11:01 p.m.
Annapolis
2:30 a.m.
7:41 a.m.
1:59 p.m.
8:44 p.m.
4:52 p.m.
10:45 p.m.
3:59 a.m.
10:24 a.m.
Norfolk
5:55 a.m.
12:18 p.m.
6:44 p.m.
none
Point Lookout
4:01 a.m.
9:32 a.m.
4:29 p.m.
11:38 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Camarillo, CA 99°
Low: Aberdeen, SD 0°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
39/28/pc
66/41/s
17/12/pc
60/42/pc
69/41/s
47/28/s
64/41/pc
61/37/s
62/44/pc
62/44/pc
43/32/s
40/33/c
36/29/pc
58/45/c
47/28/s
57/33/pc
65/48/s
43/33/pc
45/30/s
43/31/pc
68/46/s
71/47/s
Tomorrow
47/33/pc
69/43/s
21/9/s
61/44/s
77/45/s
54/35/s
53/32/pc
66/43/s
55/26/pc
56/44/c
47/40/pc
48/40/c
44/37/c
63/41/c
59/40/s
59/38/s
59/35/pc
56/39/s
54/40/s
52/41/s
78/50/s
68/34/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
53/41/s
40/30/pc
73/43/s
–2/–13/c
44/37/pc
42/25/s
82/70/pc
66/42/s
45/29/s
60/35/s
68/57/r
59/44/s
78/57/pc
58/36/s
92/64/pc
50/32/s
55/35/s
84/71/t
43/33/pc
42/36/pc
54/32/s
63/44/s
44/36/s
49/33/pc
66/38/c
49/40/s
76/47/s
–7/–19/pc
50/26/pc
48/33/s
83/71/pc
74/48/s
53/42/pc
68/41/s
70/49/t
70/38/pc
78/57/pc
67/44/s
83/62/pc
58/44/s
63/45/s
83/68/pc
54/38/pc
52/32/c
62/44/s
66/45/s
50/42/s
57/42/s
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
68/43/s
58/46/s
75/64/t
45/34/s
87/59/s
40/28/c
40/25/pc
59/44/r
45/29/s
53/30/pc
71/42/pc
50/30/s
69/53/c
55/36/s
85/77/pc
67/46/pc
85/60/pc
67/58/c
86/75/sh
56/45/r
57/37/r
38/28/c
75/65/t
69/45/s
75/43/s
66/34/pc
74/58/t
53/39/s
86/59/s
51/39/s
45/34/pc
54/42/c
50/38/s
57/37/s
67/47/pc
57/38/s
69/51/pc
66/42/s
85/76/s
61/43/c
76/58/pc
68/58/pc
87/76/pc
52/42/r
46/31/pc
47/35/pc
75/61/t
75/41/pc
World
High: Marble Bar, Australia 113°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –57°
Nov 26
First
Quarter
Dec 3
Full
Dec 10
Last
Quarter
Today
Tomorrow
Addis Ababa
77/50/pc
Amsterdam
56/43/c
Athens
65/50/s
Auckland
73/59/pc
Baghdad
65/45/s
Bangkok
89/73/pc
Beijing
44/25/pc
Berlin
55/45/pc
Bogota
68/47/r
Brussels
58/44/c
Buenos Aires
86/44/t
Cairo
70/55/pc
Caracas
76/65/pc
Copenhagen
50/42/c
Dakar
85/77/c
Dublin
45/30/pc
Edinburgh
41/30/c
Frankfurt
57/48/pc
Geneva
55/41/pc
Ham., Bermuda 77/69/pc
Helsinki
36/35/sn
Ho Chi Minh City 94/75/pc
76/49/pc
47/38/r
64/50/pc
74/60/c
65/46/s
88/72/pc
43/27/s
56/42/c
67/48/pc
51/38/r
70/51/s
71/59/pc
76/66/pc
46/36/r
84/77/c
41/32/pc
40/31/pc
53/44/r
53/45/c
75/69/s
45/37/sh
93/74/sh
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
69/58/pc
72/44/pc
59/48/pc
55/45/pc
75/57/pc
60/30/pc
85/78/t
80/56/pc
87/76/t
73/64/c
68/58/t
54/41/pc
61/48/pc
91/79/pc
64/38/pc
33/29/c
24/19/c
92/73/pc
77/57/c
75/50/pc
46/33/r
34/25/c
59/50/pc
52/41/pc
Immigrants find
refuge on the field
Soccer Without Borders
offers respite for children
who are undocumented
J EFF B ARKER
baltimore — The Patterson
High School soccer player pulled
off his hoodie to reveal a dark
blue jersey bearing the name of
Neymar, his favorite player, and
joined his teammates on the sunny practice field.
While the jersey offers the 17year-old a connection, if mostly in
his dreams, to the Brazilian superstar, the sport itself provides
the undocumented immigrant
from Guatemala something more
tangible: a respite from anxiety at
a time of stepped-up immigration
enforcement.
“Maybe they can separate me
from my mother. That makes me
afraid,” said the player, who asked
to be identified only as Duglas
because of his immigration status. He said he arrived in the
United States in 2015.
President Trump has called for
more aggressive immigration enforcement to reduce the numbers
of undocumented immigrants in
the country, estimated by the Pew
Research Center at 11.3 million
people in 2016.
Fear of arrest or deportation
among immigrants who are in the
country illegally is particularly
evident in the area’s soccer communities. The world’s most popular sport attracts players in the
area who grew up playing the
game in other countries and consider it part of their cultural
heritage.
“We’ve noticed a trend of lots of
anxiety or fear,” said Casey Thomas, director of the Baltimore office
of Soccer Without Borders.
The international nonprofit organization helps refugees and
other immigrants acclimate to
the United States through the
sport. The Baltimore program
has 350 participants — boys and
girls, most in grades six through
12.
Because some families are split
among members who are in the
country legally and those in the
country illegally, Thomas said, “a
large or looming stress is worrying about whether their parents,
uncles or grandparents are going
to be there when they get home.”
The program includes refugees
from Syria and other countries.
Some spent extended periods in
resettlement camps before making their way into the United
States.
Owing partly to its location in
the densely populated Washington-to-New York corridor and a
reputation among immigrants
for being affordable, Baltimore is
a landing spot for many families
fleeing strife in their home countries or seeking better educational or job opportunities in the
United States.
Baltimore schools serve about
1,700 immigrants — students
born outside the country who
have been in U.S. schools less
than three years. The figure accounts for 2.1 percent of the total
enrollment, according to a recent
analysis conducted for the school
system.
More than 1,400 Baltimore students were born in Honduras, El
Salvador, Guatemala or the Dominican Republic. There is no
available breakdown on how
many are undocumented.
Soccer Without Borders, which
receives funding from local foundations, individual donors and
other sources, organizes sessions
to listen to local immigrants and
advise them of their rights. Earlier this year, Thomas said, she
accompanied an undocumented
16-year-old Honduran boy on a
check-in with immigration authorities. The boy didn’t have an
attorney.
Many of the youths endured
“traumatic journeys” coming to
the United States, Thomas said,
and now are subject to bullying or
isolation at their Baltimore
schools. She said the program
offers them “the opportunity to
play — to have a space where they
can be crazy and rambunctious”
and act like kids.
Mohamed, a 16-year-old Syrian
refugee, said he spent four years
in a resettlement camp in Turkey
before arriving legally in the
United States last December. He
asked to be identified by only his
first name because he and the
program didn’t want him singled
out.
He hopes to go to college and
one day become a nurse.
“We have, like, family” in Soccer Without Borders, he said.
In Southeast Baltimore, home
to many of the immigrants in
Soccer Without Borders’s program, concerns spiked this summer after authorities arrested Lizandro Claros-Saravia, a high
school soccer player in Montgomery County. He was deported to El
Salvador in August.
Claros-Saravia, 19, had a scholarship to play soccer at Louisburg
College in North Carolina. He and
his brother, Diego Claros-Saravia,
22, were arrested in July at what
they believed what would be a
routine check-in with Immigration and Customs Enforcement
officials in Baltimore, their legal
adviser said.
Brett Colton coached Lizandro
Claros-Saravia on the Bethesda
Soccer Club.
“I got a text from one of my
players the day after he had been
detained saying, ‘Did you hear
what happened to Lizandro?’ ” he
said.
Colton said the deportation
rattled other undocumented
players.
“There is a tremendous
amount of anxiety,” he said. “Now
that this is out there, there is a
reality that they could have the
Dec 18
New
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
6:59 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
6:03 a.m.
3:32 a.m.
5:09 a.m.
8:58 a.m.
Set
4:49 p.m.
9:12 p.m.
4:16 p.m.
2:54 p.m.
3:44 p.m.
6:29 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
MARYLAND
BY
FORECAST
OCEAN: 50°
Richmond
50/30
Ocean City
ACTUAL
Ocean City
45/32
Lexington
49/28
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
Sa
REGION
AVERAGE
PHOTOS BY KIM HAIRSTON/BALTIMORE SUN
TOP: Duglas, 17, arrived in the United States from Guatemala in
2015 with his mother. ABOVE: Christian, 16, at left, and Duglas at
soccer practice at Patterson High School. Said Duglas: “When I
play soccer, I forget everything.”
same fate.”
Colton, who spoke with ClarosSaravia before he was deported,
called him “a fantastic kid. I think
he missed two practices in four
years — when he had multiple
exams the same day.”
There were hugs and tears in
July as his soccer teammates and
their family members protested
the arrest outside the Department of Homeland Security headquarters in Washington.
“Stop Separating Families,”
one protester’s sign read.
ICE officials said the brothers
were caught by Customs and Border Protection at a New York
airport in 2009 “attempting to
fraudulently use a Guatemalan
passport and visa under a different identity.”
The brothers didn’t have criminal records. Officials say they
were granted stays in 2013 that
allowed them to remain in the
country for another year. But
subsequent stays were denied,
and deportation officers instructed them to purchase tickets to
leave the country.
ICE said it focuses its enforce-
65/60/c
73/47/s
59/47/s
58/46/pc
74/55/t
60/32/c
87/76/t
80/57/pc
88/77/t
75/64/pc
68/54/sh
47/35/pc
62/50/pc
89/79/c
68/42/s
40/34/pc
23/15/s
93/76/pc
77/59/pc
76/51/pc
37/28/pc
40/36/pc
55/41/r
55/39/pc
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
77/67/c
67/51/t
64/49/pc
86/64/pc
90/52/s
49/30/pc
40/23/sf
54/39/s
84/75/t
46/36/c
78/66/sh
65/60/r
57/40/t
57/46/r
39/29/pc
47/35/pc
49/38/pc
82/71/pc
64/51/c
64/51/pc
86/63/s
83/53/s
51/30/pc
38/22/pc
55/42/pc
84/75/t
43/32/c
82/68/s
64/61/r
51/35/c
57/44/pc
47/41/s
47/39/pc
50/42/pc
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
ment on national security, border
security and threats to public
safety. But officials also said that
anyone in violation of immigration laws can be arrested and
possibly deported.
The pair arrived in the United
States too late to qualify for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the Obama-era program
that protected hundreds of thousands of people who were
brought to the country as children from deportation. The
Trump administration has rescinded the program, effective
next March.
“There was no consideration
given to the humanitarian factor,”
said Nick Katz, senior manager of
legal services at CASA and an
adviser to the brothers. “The reality is we’re seeing across the
board mothers deported, people
who have been here 20 years
deported.”
Those who know the brothers
say they left El Salvador this fall
to attend the Nicaraguan campus
of an American college.
Trump made his pledges to
remove undocumented immigrants, end DACA and build a
wall on the southwest border
central elements of his presidential campaign last year. Supporters lauded his toughness on the
issue.
The international soccer players at Patterson High School were
paying attention to Trump, said
Dan Callahan, coach of the varsity
boys soccer team.
“I know with some of the kids
there was that anxiety with the
policy changes and the travel ban
and all the ICE stuff that was
happening,” Callahan said. “Kids
were talking about it.”
A recent practice included a
spirited, small-sided game —
meaning the field was shorter
than the regulation pitch, and
there were fewer than 11 on a side.
Patterson doesn’t have practice
jerseys, so players wore their own
jerseys, shorts or sweats. They
argued good-naturedly and generally acted like teenagers.
“When we’re playing a real
game I don’t like them to kind of
be showboats,” Callahan said.
“And so they have to play more
like a team. But these games, they
like to show their friends up and
dribble between their legs and
that kind of stuff. It’s an outlet for
them.”
On the field, Duglas said, his
worries recede.
“When I play soccer, I forget
everything,” he said.
— Baltimore Sun
KLMNO
Style
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
C
‘A way of life,’ not a trendy cuisine
Native American chefs
lament ‘Columbusing’
of indigenous foods
BY
M AURA J UDKIS
Earlier this fall, Karlos Baca, an
indigenous food activist known
for cooking beautiful foraged
meals using traditional Native
American ingredients and cooking methods, was approached by a
regional food magazine: Would he
like to provide a recipe for their
Thanksgiving issue?
“Instead of getting a recipe
from me, they got three pages of
activism,” he says. Baca, along
with some other Native Americans who see the holiday as whitewashing the harm colonists did to
indigenous people, refers to it as
“Takesgiving” or “Hatesgiving.”
Typically, he won’t participate in
the dinner: “I have a tradition of
fasting,” he says.
But this year, Baca, who is Diné/
Tewa/Nuche and lives in south-
west Colorado, will be serving a
seven-course meal in New York.
The event was planned by the
I-Collective, a group of native
herbalists, seed-keepers and
chefs, though he rejects that last
label. (“A chef is a French European concept that I’m not even
interested in anymore,” he says.) It
follows on the heels of a six-course
October dinner at the James
Beard House by Oglala Lakota
chef Sean Sherman, who is known
as the Sioux Chef, a homonym to
another French culinary concept.
Native American chefs, whose
foodways the culinary establishment has long neglected, have
lately found themselves in high
demand by a food media hungry
to churn out trend pieces and by
food-savvy urbanites eager to try
cuisines they view as “exotic.” First
it was Filipino food, then Hawaiian, then Jamaican. Now, recent
coverage in food publications is
calling Native American food the
next big thing. And that’s precisely
the problem.
“This is not a trend,” says Sherman. “It’s a way of life.”
CHEFS CONTINUED ON C3
/RINA OH FOR THE JAMES BEARD FOUNDATION
Thanksgiving is “the one time of the year that people . . . are largely
making indigenous-based foods,” says chef Sean Sherman.
“Blessed be the fruit!”
From Hulu to protests,
Margaret Atwood’s
dystopian novel
“The Handmaid’s Tale”
came to life.
Beyoncé blessed
us with not one
but two new
additions to her
Beyhive.
With 280
characters on
Twitter, we can
be twice as
opinionated as
before.
This little hot dog
danced his way into
our hearts and our
Snapchats.
Thanksgiving Day
Parade
What comes to mind when you think of
Thanksgiving? A long table surrounded by friends
and family? Eating yourself into a food coma?
Football on the big screen? How about waking up
early to watch the streets of New York come to life
with the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade? With
characters such as Santa Claus and Snoopy, the
annual parade is a treat for people of all ages.
This year, we’re bringing you our very own
parade. Earlier this month, we asked Washington
Post readers and staff members what events or
pop-culture references from 2017 they’d want to
see float down Sixth Avenue. We got some funny
responses, some serious ones and others that didn’t
make a lot of sense. We worked with illustrator Al
Murphy to bring our favorite ideas to life.
— Aviva Loeb
We all scrambled to
buy glasses for the
Great American
Eclipse.
AL MURPHY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
For Cassidy, the role was
greater than the music
A MY A RGETSINGER
Like all good actors, he had an
interesting face. Wide-set eyes,
narrow and lashy, that gave him a
wryness beyond his years. When
he kept the smile in check for
troubled-young-man roles on
“Bonanza” or “Marcus Welby,
M.D.,” his masterful sulk could
pierce the small screen. But that
smile, when it erupted, was quite
a thing, too, all those dimples and
cheekbones setting off ripples of
Did you really
even get a
Unicorn
Frappuccino
if you didn’t
Instagram it?
FLOATS CONTINUED ON C2
APPRECIATION
BY
And the Academy
Award for best
picture goes to . . .
the great Oscars
mix-up of 2017.
light and shadow.
I was not a David Cassidy fan.
He was the yucky grown-up boy
in the afternoon rerun I watched
religiously because it’s what was
on. Even then I hated the hair.
And yet of all the Partridge faces,
my eyes kept going to his. Now I
understand why.
A lot of what we credit as good
acting is just charisma. But here’s
how you know Cassidy could act:
Watch him sing.
The songs on “The Partridge
MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES
David Cassidy died Tuesday of
liver failure at age 67.
Family” were so lame (I’m sorry,
it’s true), but Cassidy owned
them. He’d be fake-performing
with his TV siblings — a whole
passel of younger, cuter faces on
the stage with him — but while
they stood there basically inert
with their unplugged instruments, big brother Keith Partridge was totally rocking out. In
real life, Cassidy was a Hollywood 20-something with far
cooler musical tastes, but he
never seemed less than fully committed to this bubblegum pop,
keeping fluidly in sync with the
beat of the music and the emotions of the song.
And that made him the biggest
star in the world — for about two
years.
No, really — he was huge. He
topped the charts, sold out Madi-
son Square Garden, posed naked
for Rolling Stone, and had girls
running through the streets and
screaming for him.
Now it feels like alternate history — did this really happen?
David Cassidy? Even more surreal is to read the critics of
1971-1973, gamely trying to compare him to Elvis or Sinatra,
other guys who’d inexplicably
made girls scream. But how
could they have known better?
Rock was still new, relatively;
teen idols hadn’t yet grown old.
Only five years had passed from
the Beatles at Shea Stadium to
the “Partridge Family” premiere.
Everyone else was willing to wager this David Cassidy moment
could endure.
Except that, ultimately, there
CASSIDY CONTINUED ON C5
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
A fantasy Thanksgiving:
funny-awkward instead
of awkward-awkward. C2
BOOK WORLD
Alan Bennett’s charming
memoir “Keeping On
Keeping On.” C3
TELEVISION
The Netflix reboot of
“She’s Gotta Have It” does
all the right things. C4
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Fantasy casting your
Thanksgiving dinner table
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/
ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHIL MCCARTEN/INVISION
FOR THE TELEVISION ACADEMY
RICHARD SHOTWELL/INVISION/
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Christopher Plummer
Bon vivant Bill Murray
Comedian Tina Fey
Your cranky
grandparents
Your crazy uncle
The aunt and uncle
from out of town
Bill Murray because
Bill Murray.
Gram and gramps
driving you nuts on Turkey
Day? Switch them out for a
new matching set. We’re
thinking Christopher
Plummer as granddad
because if the man can
step in and replace
embattled actor Kevin
Spacey less than two
months before the film “All
the Money in the World” is
set for theaters, then he
can definitely spearhead a
three-hour meal without a
problem. And as grandma
we’re casting Jane Fonda
who proved on “Megyn
Kelly Today” that she can
shut down an awkward
conversation like a pro.
Forget James Carville
and Mary Matalin, or
even Mika and Joe. This is
the nonconfrontational
Thanksgiving, remember?
So we’re swapping out the
quirky aunt and uncle who
spend all dinner arguing
about which highway they
should’ve taken with a
more entertaining version.
Why not comedian Tina
Fey and her musician
husband, Jeff Richmond?
The duo worked together
on the musical version of
“Mean Girls,” so they’ll
have jokes and show tunes
ready.
Reality is garbage. Your [insert longtime personal hero here] is, in fact, a horrible,
horrible person. That restaurant you love so much is serving up sexual harassment behind
the kitchen doors. The president is at war — on Twitter — with everyone. Nothing is sacred
and nobody’s safe. We’re officially in the Upside Down.
But that’s okay! If the president can live in a world where inconvenient facts have ceased
to exist and where everyone admires him, save for the losers and haters, then we can, too!
You’ve heard of fantasy football (hey, even watching the big game post-turkey could spark a
political debate), well, this is your Thanksgiving Fever Dream.
Instead of a table starring your crazy uncle and tension you can carve with a knife, we’re
casting the holiday meal complete with shinier, nonconfrontational relatives and
conversation that won’t get someone cut. Use this dream scenario as a mental vision board
when things go all wonky IRL. You’re welcome.
CHARLES DHARAPAK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
White House shutterbug
Pete Souza
JIM WATSON/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/
GETTY IMAGES
NETFLIX
Ivanka Trump
“Stranger Things” actor
Millie Bobby Brown
The cousin who won’t
let anyone sit down or
eat until she’s snapped
a photo for “the ’gram”
The political
adversaries
And finally, the kids
table
Since Ivanka and
Chelsea, buds on opposite
Former White House
shutterbug and social
media gadfly Pete Souza is
the unofficial family
photographer everyone
wishes they had. Instead of
catching you with pie on
your face, he’ll capture you
at your very best. And
maybe someday it’ll go
viral.
sides of the political
planet, are probably too
busy even for our
Thursday fantasy, we’re
replacing those two guests
who grate each other with
a more cuddle-friendly
option. Sarah Silverman
(stay with us, folks) and
Kid Rock. The liberal
comedian recently said she
“fell in love” with Trump
supporters, and the
conservative musician
recently admitted that his
run for Senate was actually
just a marketing ploy. We
figure they’ll have a lot to
agree on.
Rowdy nether table of
spilled gravy and incessant
whining no more. With the
young cast of Netflix’s
“Stranger Things” filling in
for your annoying little
cousins, the pre-req table
will no longer be the meal’s
eyesore. Actually the whipsmart Eleven, Dustin, Will,
Lucas and Mike might
make the sheer concept of
a kids’ table so 2016.
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
Let’s float
some cultural
references
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
It’s a bird, it’s
a plane, it’s
Lady Gaga’s
(pre-recorded)
Super Bowl dive.
FLOATS FROM C1
Zombie Taylor made
her undead debut just
in time for Halloween.
CHANTICLEER
A Chanticleer Christmas
There’s no group like Chanticleer
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 AT 8 P.M.
More than 1 million
protesters gathered in
D.C. and around the
world during the
Women’s March.
NFL players
protested
systemic injustice
in the United
States by taking a
knee during the
national anthem.
AMERICAN FESTIVAL
POPS ORCHESTRA
Holiday Pops: Songs of the Season
Jovial. Festive. Merry
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9 AT 8 P.M.
ff
VIENNA BOYS CHOIR
Christmas in Vienna
Glorious voices
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 17 AT 2 P.M.
ff
888-945-2468
CFA.GMU.EDU
OR
ff Family Friendly performances that
are most suitable for families with younger children
Millennials beware:
Consumption of avocado
toast may reduce your
chances of homeownership.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
BOOK WORLD
Alan Bennett, smarter and funnier than the average bear
BY
M ICHAEL D IRDA
The work of England’s Alan
Bennett, now in his early 80s,
remains a cause for thanksgiving.
As a young man he was part of the
now legendary four-man comedy
revue “Beyond the Fringe.” His
audiobook readings of children’s
classics, such as “The Wind in the
Willows” and “Winnie-the-Pooh,”
are revered as classics in their
own right. Bennett’s many
award-winning plays include the
historical drama “The Madness
of King George” and the bittersweet comedies “The Lady in the
Van” and “The History Boys,” all
three made into critically acclaimed films. His novella “The
Uncommon Reader” — a comic
tour de force — imagines the
consequences of Queen Elizabeth
suddenly becoming a bookworm.
Not least, over the past three
decades Bennett has brought out
three exceptionally winning volumes containing his diaries,
memoirs and occasional journalism: “Writing Home,” “Untold
Stories” and now “Keeping On
Keeping On.” Each has been a
major bestseller in England.
Lucky England.
To some people, Bennett
comes across as a kind of intellec-
tual teddy bear, partly because of
his boyish looks and shy demeanor. The less charitable describe
him as “twee,” meaning quaintly
sentimental. In one diary entry
Bennett himself notes: “Robert
Hanks, the radio critic of the
Independent, remarks that personally he can have too much of
Alan Bennett. I wonder how he
thinks I feel.” That self-deprecation is characteristic, but “Keeping On Keeping On” — which
covers the years 2005 to 2015 —
also shows us this kindly, cultured man enraged and despondent over the state of England
and its increasing “nastification.”
As he notes ruefully, “one criterion for judging this (or any other)
government is how often it
makes one feel ashamed to be
English.”
Having grown up in Leeds, the
son of a butcher and the beneficiary of public libraries and statefunded education, Bennett thoroughly despises the Conservative
Party, whose leaders have been
gutting the nation’s social services, kowtowing to the interests
of the rich and generally ignoring
the poor and nonwhite. To this
ruling elite, in Bennett’s view,
poverty is simply a “moral failing.” and he strongly seconds a
KEEPING ON
KEEPING ON
By Alan Bennett
Farrar Straus
Giroux. 719 pp.
$40
commentator who reviles the Tories as “tribal and ruthless.” Nevertheless, the former Labour
prime minister Tony Blair elicits
nearly comparable scorn as a
sanctimonious egotist in the
pocket of the United States.
Bennett’s political views can be
roughly summed up as “backward-looking radicalism and
conservative socialism.” At a London farmers market, he feels
repulsed by the middle class
“hugging themselves in self-congratulation at the perfection of
their lives.” He deeply mistrusts
the police, who are far too
trigger-happy, especially toward
people with dark skin. Rightly
appalled, the diarist angrily protests the government’s shuttering
of neighborhood libraries, supposedly justified because they
aren’t needed any longer and,
besides, the buildings offer
“prime retail opportunities.” Yet
what could be more important
than a place where children can
read, learn and dream? Closing
libraries, Bennett contends, is
nothing less than “child abuse.”
When Margaret Thatcher dies
and her courtiers genuflect to her
one last time in St. Paul’s Cathedral, Bennett shows no pity.
Remarking on her pompous selfregard, he writes:
“To have no sense of humour is
to be a seriously flawed human
being. It’s not a minor shortcoming; it shuts you off from humanity. Mrs. Thatcher was a mirthless
bully and should have been buried, as once upon a time monarchs used to be, in the depths of
the night.”
That may sound shocking, yet
the aging Bennett recognizes that
no matter what he says or does, “I
shall be thought to be kindly, cosy
and essentially harmless. I am in
the pigeon-hole marked ‘no
threat’ and did I stab Judi Dench
with a pitchfork I should still be a
teddy bear.”
Nonetheless, Bennett resists
becoming “an Old Git,” adding,
“but they don’t make it easy.”
Mostly he deals with the vicissitudes of age — cancer checkups,
surgery for a stomach aneurysm,
worsening deafness — while getting on with new work, including
a play, “The Habit of Art,” about
poet W.H. Auden and composer
Benjamin Britten. Once closeted,
Bennett now describes the quiet
pleasures of a “civil partnership”
with journalist Rupert Thomas.
He makes sandwiches to take
along on their weekend trips to
Yorkshire or on visits to old
churches and Saxon towers. He
paints the rooms of their new
home in Primrose Hill.
Still, there’s an increasing
sense of the valedictory in these
pages: Mentors, colleagues and
friends die and Bennett goes to
all their funerals. He tidies up his
papers for donation to the Bodleian Library. While riding his
bike, the longtime cyclist suffers
an absurd accident and crashes
to the ground. Immediately afterward, he scribbles: “It’s now ten
thirty; my coat is filthy and so am
I. I imagine that in the future
there is going to be more of this.”
Such dry humor, about himself
For some,
a vexing
food trend
hinking of Native American
food as a trend perpetuates a
number of misguided notions: first, that Native American
food is a monolithic thing. The
food of our nation’s indigenous
people — some, like Baca, do not
like the term “Native American,”
because his ancestors predate the
naming of America — is as diverse
as the country’s 567 federally recognized Native American nations.
Outsiders tend to think of them in
the aggregate, noting fry bread, a
fried dough with various toppings,
as one food that many share.
Around Thanksgiving, one of the
few times that schools teach students about Native Americans,
many include fry bread as part of
the curriculum.
But Baca, Sherman and other
chefs reject fry bread, which they
see as a symbol of resilience under
colonial oppression. The fried
dough recipe, Sherman writes in
his recently released cookbook,
“The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous
Kitchen,” is the product of the
government commodities that
Native Americans were given during their forced migration, which
separated tribes from their traditional foods. Baca and Sherman
are among the Native American
chefs who serve “decolonized”
meals, prepared with no pork,
beef, dairy, processed cane sugar
or wheat flour, ingredients that
Europeans introduced into native
diets. Avoiding these ingredients
is also healthier, they say.
The colonists “purposely destroyed food systems, first as a
means of control, and the aftermath of it is horrendous,” says Sherman, noting that Native Americans
have an average life expectancy
four years shorter than all other
races and ethnicities in America.
According to the Indian Health
Service, they also die at higher rates
than other Americans of such ailments as liver disease and diabetes.
But because of the chefs’ focus
on health, the native food sovereignty movement has been conflated with faddish diets — native
foods are seen as “superfoods,” or
they’re likened to the Paleo diet,
whose adherents eat only things
our Paleolithic ancestors could
have eaten.
Native American diets “have
been here for a long time, whereas
the Paleo diet was designed as a
food trend,” says Sherman, scoffing
at the idea of “Captain Caveman’s
diet.”
And reducing a deeply spiritual
food culture to its trend potential
or its nutritive value is another
example of a phenomenon called
“Columbusing” — the practice
among white people of acting as if
something created by people of
color didn’t exist until they took
note of it, like the intrepid explorer
who “discovered” America, where
indigenous people had been living
for centuries. This happens frequently to food that becomes suddenly trendy: pho, collard greens
and matcha have all been Columbused in the past year, becoming
the domain of bearded white chefs
with full-sleeve tattoos. And now,
Native American food is going
through the same thing.
“I’ve seen some pop-up restau-
mdirda@gmail.com
Michael Dirda reviews books every
Thursday for The Washington Post.
Moreover, preparing a meal is
about much more than techniques
and ingredients. It’s about spirituality: Sherman, for example, starts
every dinner with a prayer and an
offering of a “spirit plate,” with samplings of all the food. It’s also about
teaching guests the history of the
food and the native people, which
can get into some uncomfortable
conversations for people on either
side of the hospitality relationship:
You can’t tell the story of decolonizing Native American food without
talking about genocide.
“It’s not necessarily that I do it
over every dinner, but we do just lay
it out there that this is stuff that has
happened,” says Sherman, though
the subject wasn’t part of his
speech at the $175-a-plate James
Beard House dinner, where he
served braised elk leg and maple
red corn pudding.
Frank says she tends to avoid the
topic.
“I don’t want to dwell in the place
of what happened,” she says. “I find
that when people feel the hurt and
the trauma, they’re paralyzed.”
CHEFS FROM C1
T
and the world around him, is
typical of Bennett:
“Roy Keane has the face of a
mercenary. Meet him before the
walls of fifteenth-century Florence and one’s heart would sink.”
“9 July. Going round some
primary-school paintings:
“Me: There’s a good name.
James Softely Haynes.
“Maya (my guide, aged nine):
Excuse me. Are we looking at Art
or are we looking at Names?”
While the first half of this
massive volume is devoted to
Bennett’s diaries, the latter 300
or so pages reprint talks about
books, the opera and theater, the
texts of two unproduced plays
and notes made during the filming of “The History Boys.” Admittedly, some of this material will
mystify all but the most Anglophile readers. Nonetheless,
“Keeping On Keeping On” is the
perfect book at bedtime, providing bite-size diary entries, lively
anecdotes and, yes, a quite comforting teddy-bearishness — if
you allow for the occasional
swipe from some surprisingly
sharp claws.
RINA OH FOR THE JAMES BEARD FOUNDATION
A bean dish served at a six-course October dinner at the James Beard House by Oglala Lakota chef Sean Sherman.
rant start-ups start to come around
where nonnative people are trying
to do Native American food,” says
Sherman. “And we had a conversation with them — ‘You know, you
can do whatever you want to do,
but if you call your food Native
American food and you don’t even
have any native people on your
staff, then it’s completely cultural
appropriation.’ ”
N
SMITHSONIAN’S NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN
Freddie Bitsoie, chef for Mitsitam Cafe at the National Museum of the American Indian,
bemoans a lack of respect from chefs with European training.
“When you want to learn people’s culture, it’s so much
easier to approach it through food.”
Sean Sherman, a chef who is Native American
ot all native chefs share Sherman’s view. For Lois Ellen
Frank, a longtime Kiowa native chef and researcher who lives
in Santa Fe, N.M., it doesn’t matter
who’s making the food as long as
Native American providers, such as
wild rice harvesters and salmon
fishermen, are reaping benefits.
“The truth is, we’ve been sharing
recipes for millennia,” she says.
“How is someone else cooking a
rack of venison and using a chokecherry reduction appropriation? If
that encouraged them to buy their
wild rice from a native organization, I’ve succeeded. I haven’t been
appropriated.”
Freddie Bitsoie, the Diné (Navajo) executive chef at the National
Museum of the American Indian’s
Mitsitam Cafe, says that seeing
nonnative chefs step in “lit a fire
under native chefs, and got them to
open their own places.” But he bemoans a lack of respect from chefs
with European training, which
doesn’t acknowledge that Native
American cooking uses different
techniques.
“It’s part of the technique to use
as much as possible. We don’t peel
the carrots, we don’t de-slime the
cactus,” says Bitsoie. “Native chefs
are told they’re doing things
wrong.”
S
o for native chefs, the focus is
on moving forward. For Sherman and his partner, Dana
Thompson, it means founding
North American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems, or
NATIFS, a culinary nonprofit
group designed to help tribes preserve their foodways. It will offer
education, grants and business
plans for the tribes to start food
businesses that will bring jobs and
money to reservations, which
have high rates of unemployment.
They’re also working with scientists to cultivate rare heirloom
seeds that were part of the tribes’
pre-migration agriculture.
“For us, part of it is righting a
wrong, part of it is putting something back” into the community,
says Sherman. And part of it is
showing people the beauty of what
nature provides to the Native
American menu. “When you want
to learn people’s culture, it’s so
much easier to approach it through
food.”
So Thanksgiving is both a sore
spot, and an entry point.
“It’s the one time of the year that
people, whether they know it or
not, are largely making indigenousbased foods,” says Sherman.
“There’s turkey, squash, cranberries — and all these pieces that
represent indigenous America.”
That’s why Bitsoie has planned
a big Thanksgiving meal at the
Mitsitam Cafe, with maple-andthyme-glazed turkey, wild rice salad and corn bread. It’s another
chance to tell that story, and honor
the ingredients.
“Even though Thanksgiving is
the biggest lie in American history,” he says, “it’s a lie told over
dinner.”
maura.judkis@washpost.com
G Street Fabrics
& Home Decorating Center
25
25%
50%
%
OFF
HOLIDAY SALE
STARTS
TOMORROW!
DAPHNE HOUGARD PHOTOGRAPHY
Chef and researcher Lois Ellen Frank says it doesn’t matter who is making the food as long as
Native American providers such as wild rice harvesters are reaping benefits.
Up
To
G Street Fabrics
12220 Wilkins Avenue
Rockville, MD 20852
OFF
• MOST BERNINA™
Sewing Machines
• Sergers
• Accessories
CUSTOM LABOR on
• Draperies
• Upholstery
• Bedding
• Slipcovers
Extra Savings Coupons
www.gstreetfabrics.com
OFF
301-231-8998
• MOST FABRICS
• Notions
• Buttons
• Trims
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
11/23/17
PBS
Supernatural (CW at 8) Sam and
Dean encounter a familiar enemy
while searching for Jack.
Young Sheldon (CBS at 8:30)
Sheldon navigates newfound
popularity after using statistics to
help his father coach the school
football team to victory.
NFL football (NBC at 8:30) Giants
at Redskins.
Mom (CBS at 9) Bonnie struggles
with cable withdrawal after
switching to basic to help Christy
pay for her law school applications.
PREMIERES
She’s Gotta Have It (Netflix
streaming) Spike Lee expands on
his 1986 feature directorial debut
— about a Brooklyn artist
(DeWanda Wise) juggling multiple
suitors — in this compelling and
ambitious 10-episode series.
LATE NIGHT
Fallon (NBC at 12:05) Jerry
Seinfeld, Robert Irwin.
Meyers (NBC at 1:07) Josh Meyers,
Hilary Meyers, Larry Meyers.
— Bethonie Butler
Lee’s vivacious update
of ‘She’s Gotta Have It’
We needed Nola Darling in
2017. We just didn’t know it.
Nola Darling is the protagonist
of Spike Lee’s 1986 feature directorial debut “She’s Gotta Have It,”
which starred Tracy Camilla Johns
as a young Brooklyn woman who
unabashedly maintains a rotating
cast of suitors. The veteran director
has brought Nola’s story into the
present with a captivating and adventurous 10-episode Netflix series
that begins streaming Thursday.
DeWanda Wise (“Shots Fired”)
is effervescent as Nola, a struggling artist and self-dubbed “sexpositive, polyamorous, pansexual.” Her “loving bed” (adorned with
an alarming number of candles, as
it was in the original) plays host to
three very different men — the
nurturing businessman Jamie
Overstreet (Lyriq Bent), the narcissistic model/photographer Greer
Childs (Cleo Anthony) and the basketball-obsessed bike messenger
Mars Blackmon (Anthony Ramos).
The film version was shot in
black-and-white, save for one
scene, and on Netflix Lee quite
literally expands Nola’s world into
full color. As in the film, the series
explores the inherent complications of Nola’s unconventional sex
life — and the way society reacts to
a woman who dares to enjoy sex.
In that regard, not a lot has
changed in the past three decades.
But over 10 episodes (all
helmed by Lee), we get to know
Nola in new ways. There’s more
emphasis on her art — we see her
creative process and the hustling
she has to do to support it. And we
get more intimate portraits of the
other people in her life: her close
friends Clorinda (Margot Bingham) and Shemekka (Chyna
Layne), whose own story unfolds
with an air of tragicomedy similar
to “Bamboozled,” Lee’s underappreciated 2000 sendup of the entertainment industry.
Nola’s Fort Greene neighborhood also helps make her story feel
of-the-moment. Lee never lets us
forget that this is gentrified Brooklyn, and we see the effects of a
changing community on Nola and
her artist parents, Septima (Joie
Lee, who played Clorinda in the
film) and Stokely (Thomas Jefferson Byrd). It might seem heavyhanded, but Lee, one of gentrification’s most outspoken critics, knows
Brooklyn better than anyone.
“She’s Gotta Have It” is full of
cheeky references to the director
(who makes an amusing cameo)
and his work. In one scene, Nola
and Greer riff on Denzel Washington’s 1993 Oscar snub for “Malcolm X,” which Lee directed. Ramos (of the original “Hamilton”
cast) does a fantastic job of filling
Mars’s trademark Air Jordans — a
necessary win for the iconic character that Lee himself originated.
This time around, Mars’s cycling
hat says “Crooklyn” — the title of
Lee’s semiautobiographical 1994
dramedy — instead of “Brooklyn.”
The series marks a feminist triumph for Lee, whose most recent
feature film, “Chiraq,” faced criticism for (among other things) a
premise that seemed to put unfair
pressure on black women. Nola is
as confident as she was in 1986,
but she’s also vulnerable in a way
that’s refreshing. In one standout
episode, while reeling from a violent incident of street harassment,
Nola buys a little black dress that
spurs telling reactions from Jamie, Greer and Mars, who suggest
that she’s dressing for the attention of men.
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
News
Fox 5 News
News
◆ J. Kimmel
News
◆ Late-Colbert
News
◆ Noticiero
Noticias
◆ Law & Order: Criminal Intent
Farm-Harvest
You Are the Universe
The Undertaker
Democracy Now!
◆ Mom
Two Men
Blue Bloods
CABLE CHANNELS
TV REVIEW
B ETHONIE B UTLER
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
8:00
Live PD
Live PD
Live PD
Live PD
Live PD
Live PD
Live PD
Live PD
Live PD
Live PD
A&E
(5:30) Movie: The Godfather ★★★★ (1972)
Movie: The Godfather, Part II ★★★★ (1974)
AMC
Tanked: Tanksgiving
Tanked: Tanksgiving
Tanked: Tanksgiving
Tanked
Tanked
Animal Planet
Movie: Life ★★ (1999)
Anniversary
Nutty Prof. 2
BET
(5:30) Movie: Sex and the City 2 ★★
Movie: Sex and the City 2 ★★ (2010)
School
Bravo
Teen Titans
King of Hill
Amer. Dad
Cleveland
Amer. Dad
Burgers
Burgers
Family Guy
Family Guy
Cartoon Network Teen Titans
Anthony Bourdain Parts
Anthony Bourdain Parts
Anthony Bourdain Parts
Anthony Bourdain Parts
Anthony Bourdain Parts
CNN
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
South Park
Comedy Central South Park
Homestead Rescue
Alaska: The Last Frontier
Alaska: The Last Frontier
Discovery
(6:00) Movie: Descendants (8:05) Movie: Disney’s Descendants 2 (2017)
Stuck/Middle Liv-Mad.
Bizaardvark Raven
Disney
Movie: The Other Guys ★★★ (2010)
Movie: The Other Guys ★★★ (2010)
E!
SportCtr
College Football: Mississippi at Mississippi State (Live)
SportsCenter (Live)
Basketball
ESPN
College Basketball: Butler vs Texas (Live)
SportsCenter SC Featured College Basketball: Florida vs Stanford (Live)
ESPN2
Chopped
Chopped
Chopped
Beat Flay
Beat Bobby Beat Bobby Beat Bobby
Food Network
The Story With Martha
OBJECTified
OBJECTified
OBJECTified
Special Report
Fox News
(6:40) Movie: Elf ★★★ (2003)
(8:50) Movie: National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation
The 700 Club
Freeform
Movie: Minions ★★ (2015)
Movie: Minions ★★ (2015)
Movie: The Sitter ★ (2011)
FX
The Sweetest Christmas
Movie: The Mistletoe Inn (2017)
Movie: A Gift to Remember (2017)
Hallmark
Movie: Journey Back to Christmas (2016)
Movie: Operation Christmas
Hallmark M&M Movie: Christmas in the Air (2017)
(5:45) Movie: The Shack
Movie: Hidden Figures ★★★ (2016)
(10:10) Movie: John Wick: Chapter 2 ★★★ (2017)
HBO
Fixer Upper
Flip/Flop
Flip/Flop
Flip. Texas
Flip/Flop
Hunters
Hunt Intl
Hunters
Hunt Intl
HGTV
Forged in Fire
Forged in Fire: Bladesgiving
History
(6:00) Movie: Dear Santa
Movie: Christmas With the Kranks ★★ (2004)
(10:02) Movie: The Flight Before Christmas (2015)
Lifetime
(5:30) Nationals Classics
Football
Bensinger
ESPNWS
MASN
Dateline Extra
Dateline Extra
Dateline Extra
Dateline Extra
Dateline Extra
MSNBC
Ridiculous.
(7:45) Ridiculousness
Ridiculous.
(8:55) Movie: The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift ★★ (2006)
MTV
Running Wild-Bear Grylls
Running Wild-Bear Grylls
Running Wild-Bear Grylls
Running Wild-Bear Grylls
Nat’l Geographic Running Wild-Bear Grylls
Redskins Kickoff (Live)
NHL Hockey: Ottawa Senators at Washington Capitals
On Ice
Redskins
NBC SportsNet WA Game Plan
SpongeBob SquarePants
Movie: Annie ★ (2014)
Fresh Prince Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Movie: Meet the Parents ★★★ (2000)
Meet Fockers
Spike
(6:02) Movie: Skyfall ★★★ (2012)
(9:05) Movie: Shooter ★★ (2007)
Syfy
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Seinfeld
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Conan
TBS
(5:45) Movie: National Velvet Movie: Cheaper by the Dozen ★★★
(9:45) Movie: Yours, Mine and Ours ★★★ (1968)
Life Fathr
TCM
Long Lost Family
Long Lost Family
Long Lost Family
Long Lost Family
(11:02) Long Lost Family
TLC
(6:00) Jurassic Park III ★★ Movie: Avatar ★★★ (2009)
Lost World
TNT
Food Paradise
Mysteries-Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
Mysteries at the Museum
Travel
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
Carbonaro Carbonaro
Carbonaro
Carbonaro
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
Raymond
King
King
TV Land
Movie: Jumping the Broom ★★ (2011)
Movie: Jumping the Broom ★★ (2011)
A Royal Family Holiday
TV One
Chrisley
Chrisley
Chrisley
Chrisley
Chrisley
Chrisley
Chrisley
Cromarties Mod Fam
Mod Fam
USA Network
(6:30) Movie: Grease ★★★ (1978)
(9:05) Movie: Pretty Woman ★★★ (1990)
Ferris Bueller
VH1
On Your Side On Your Side Govt. Matters On Your Side SportsTalk
ABC News
News at 10pm
Govt. Matters On Your Side
WNC8
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
WGN
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
BY
7:30
◆ News
◆ Football
Redskins
NFL Football: New York Giants at Washington Redskins (Live)
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
◆ Gotham
Mod Fam
(9:01) ◆ The Orville
News
News
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆
◆
◆
◆ The Good Doctor
Wheel
J’pardy!
Kevin (Probably) Saves the ◆ The Good Doctor
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Big Bang
Sheldon
Mom
Life in
S.W.A.T.
9.1 WUSA (CBS) NFL Football
Dando Gracias
La Rosa de Guadalupe
14.1 WFDC (UNI) La Rosa de Guadalupe
◆
◆
◆
◆
Family
Feud
Family
Feud
Fox
5
News
Page
Six
Big
Bang
Big
Bang
Law
& Order: Criminal Intent
20.1 WDCA (MNTV)
◆ Movie: Anne of Green Gables: The Good Stars (2017)
Money
Vera
22.1 WMPT (PBS) ◆ Business
JFK: The Lost Inaugural Gala
Andrea Bocelli -- Landmarks Live
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
France 24 Programming
Nestor Burma
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
The Carpenters: Close to You & Christmas Memories
32.1 WHUT (PBS) Motown 25 (My Music Presents)
◆ Supernatural
◆ Arrow
◆ Seinfeld
News
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
Blue Bloods
Blue Bloods
Blue Bloods
66.1 WPXW (ION) Blue Bloods
Anne of Green Gables: The Good Stars (MPT at 8) L.M. Montgomery’s
free-spirited heroine, Anne Shirley (Ella Ballentine), navigates her first year
as a teenager in this feature-length movie. Martin Sheen also stars.
The Mistletoe Inn (Hallmark at 8)
An aspiring romance novelist (Alicia
Witt) signs up for a writing retreat at
a Vermont inn, where she runs into
her soon-to-be-published ex — and
an intriguing new love interest.
7:00
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
DAVID LEE/NETFLIX
Lee also gives a welcome update to Opal Gilstrap, a lesbian
with whom Nola experimented
sexually in the film and whose
character smacked of stereotype.
Nola and Opal (Ilfenesh Hadera)
share a deeper connection here,
and their relationship has a profound impact on Nola’s personal
growth.
Incidentally, Lee has credited
his wife, Tonya Lewis Lee, an executive producer on the series, with
persuading him to adapt “She’s
Gotta Have It” for television.
Given the format, it’s tempting
to breeze through the installments, but I’d recommend taking
your time. The series takes some
detours from its largely linear format — one episode reflects on the
election of President Trump with a
five-minute montage that combines character reactions with
Stew’s scathing “Klown Wit Da
Nuclear Code,” while another fea-
DeWanda Wise, with co-star
Anthony Ramos, plays Nola,
the struggling artist at the
center of Netflix's
“She’s Gotta Have It.”
tures an unexpected dance break
that also functions as a tribute to
the late pop legend Prince.
There are a lot of additional
touches to appreciate — from Lee’s
trademark aesthetic (those wellplaced floating dolly shots) to the
thoughtfully curated soundtrack.
“She’s Gotta Have It” was shot on
a shoestring budget and clocks in at
just over 84 minutes. The TV version has a lot more resources to pull
from, and Lee uses them with gusto.
And despite its whimsy, the series
never loses sight of its intention: to
tell Nola’s story in her own words.
bethonie.butler@washpost.com
She’s Gotta Have It (10 episodes)
begins streaming Thursday on Netflix.
THEATRE
Round House Theatre
presents
Nov 29 – Dec 24, 2017
The Book of Will
Tues – Thu at 7:30 pm
Fri & Sat at 8 pm
Sat & Sun at 2 pm
By Lauren Gunderson
Directed by Ryan Rilette
Mosaic Theater Presents
The Real
Americans
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
What if Shakespeare’s works had been lost forever? After the
death of their friend and mentor, two actors are determined
to compile the First Folio and preserve the words that shaped
their lives. They’ll just have to borrow, beg, and band together
to get it done. Lauren Gunderson, playwright of last season’s
runaway hit Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley, weaves
a hilarious and heartfelt story inspired by the true story of
Shakespeare’s First Folio.
Fri Nov 24 @ 8 PM
Sat Nov 25 @ 3 & 8 PM
Sun Nov 26 @ 3 & 7:30 PM
“smart, entertaining, funny, insightful, and surprising”
(The New Yorker). Created by and starring the
“peerless”(DCMTA) Dan Hoyle.
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3
After the turkey and stuffing, explode with laughter
Thanksgiving weekend at this wildly popular interactive
comedy whodunit. New clues and up to the minute
improvisation deliver “shrieks of laughter night after night.”
(Washington Post)
Reserve now, holiday shows sell out early!
Vicuna & The
American
Epilogue
Written by
Jon Robin Baitz
Fri Nov 24 @ 8 PM
Sat Nov 25 @ 3 PM & 8 PM
Sun Nov 26 @ 3 PM &
7:30 PM
Don’t miss “the first top-drawer political play of the Trump
era” (Peter Marks, WP)! Trump-inspired satire starring
the “brilliant” (DCMTA) John de Lancie (Star Trek), Brian
George (The Orville), Haaz Sleiman (Nurse Jackie), and local
favorites Laura C. Harris & Kim Schraf. Running in tandem
with The Real Americans.
Round House Theatre
4545 East-West Highway
Bethesda, MD 20814
Tickets from
$30
240.644.1100
roundhousetheatre.org
The Atlas Performing Arts Center
1333 H St NE;
202-399-7993
mosaictheater.org
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Mosaic Theater Company at
The Atlas Performing Arts Center
1333 H St NE
202-399-7993 ext 2
www.mosaictheater.org
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
$20-$50
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
$20-$65
“Lauren Gunderson
is such a rare
theatrical talent.”
– The New York
Times
Valet Parking
available at
1360 H St NE.
Added Show:
Fri, Nov 24 at 5PM
Great Group Rates
for 15 or More
Valet Parking
available at 1360 H
St NE! Info about
discussions at
mosaictheater.
org/discussions
16-2898
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
David Cassidy owned the role of teen idol, even late in life
CASSIDY FROM C1
just wasn’t much there musically.
A perfectly nice voice, and you
can hear his early Broadway experience in the way he emotes
through “I Think I Love You” —
an enchantingly neurotic ballad
(I woke up with this feeling I
didn’t know how to deal with,
and so I just decided to myself, I’d
hide it to myself) that helped a
generation of young women
make excuses for bad boyfriends
yet to come. But the other songs
were fairly generic, and he had no
real band to lend him cred.
A critic for the New York Times
caught his act in 1972 and pretty
much had his number: “The significant element here is sensuality and theater, not music. . . . His
understanding of the implicit
dramatics that he can stimulate
when he struts around the stage
in his gleaming white jump suit
reveals a markedly mature familiarity with the core qualities of
show business.”
Quickly he was on the path
that other teen idols would follow — it’s just that Cassidy had to
travel it first. The awkward attempts to seem more edgy; the
fizzled follow-ups; the retreats to
Japanese and British fan bases
after he’d fallen off American
playlists; the painful, public bat-
tle with addiction. He tried to
reboot his acting career and
scored an Emmy nomination
with a dramatic made-for-TV
movie role. But a cop procedural
built around him — “David Cassidy: Man Undercover” — didn’t
last a full season.
Some of the other teen idols
internalized the lessons of Cassidy. Bobby Sherman saw the work
drying up and got himself trained
as a paramedic. Cassidy’s halfbrother Shaun stowed his Top 40
earnings into real estate and
leapt for dear life into an enduring career as a producer before
he hit his Tiger Beat expiration
date.
David Cassidy, meanwhile,
came out the other end and
found his footing in the booming
nostalgia industry of the 1990s.
Once again he forged a new path
for washed-up teen idols: guest
stints on Broadway, kitschy
memoirs, oldies tours — all of
them in full embrace of his Keith
Partridge past.
It had taken him a long time to
come to terms with that role. “I
couldn’t understand,” he told The
Washington Post in 2002, “how
people didn’t see that I was a guy
playing a part.” But that was the
gig. And once again, David Cassidy owned it.
amy.argetsinger@washpost.com
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:45-1:00-3:00-4:10-6:15-7:159:30
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
11:20-1:20-2:20-7:20
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
3D (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:10-7:15
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-12:40-4:457:00-8:00-11:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 10:55-1:40-1:45-4:407:30-10:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:30
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:357:25-10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
12:15-4:10-7:00-9:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
12:00-2:30-5:10-7:45-10:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 10:35-1:25-4:157:15-10:05
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
4:20-10:20
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
10:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
10:30-1:55-5:15-8:10-11:00
Lady Bird (R) 10:30-2:10-5:157:40-10:10
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:45-10:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:203:20-6:25-9:30
Justice League (PG-13) 5:158:15-11:15
Coco (PG) 10:00-1:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:20
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
10:00-1:10-7:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 4:20
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
12:00-2:00-7:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:30-3:00-5:55
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 11:50-2:504:50-7:50-8:50
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 12:10-1:30-4:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: (!) 2:35-5:10-7:55
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 12:00-2:405:20-8:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
2:20-4:45-7:10
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: (!) 5:00
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 7:30
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
Angelika Pop-Up at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Coco 3D (PG) 12:00-10:05
Justice League (PG-13) 11:002:00-4:50-7:40-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:403:35-6:30-9:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:30-3:50-7:20-10:30
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
IMAX Theater
601 Independence Avenue SW
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
(NR) 2:40
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
12:25
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-2:05
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 4:20-6:35-8:55
MARYLAND
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Center
8633 Colesville Road
The Third Man (NR) 2:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:00-2:20-4:407:05-9:25
Faces, Places (Visages, villages)
(PG)
Lady Bird (R) 11:20-1:20-3:205:20-7:20-9:20
The King of Comedy (PG) 4:30
Funny Face (NR) 6:45
The Wizard of Oz (1939) (G)
12:00-9:00
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
10:00-11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1:30-10:30
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 12:00-2:154:30-6:45-9:00
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:00-11:302:30-4:00-7:00-8:45-9:15
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:05-10:3012:40-3:25-4:30-6:30-7:35; (!)
10:05-10:15-10:30-12:40-1:003:25-3:45-4:30-6:00-6:30-7:35-9:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
(!) 5:30-8:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 11:15-2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 1:00-9:55
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) (!)
1:45-7:15
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
10:45-12:15-3:15-6:15-7:30-9:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:45-1:30-6:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:15-5:007:45-10:25
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:457:30-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
4:30-7:30-10:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 11:00-1:50-2:00-4:50-5:00-7:407:45-10:30-10:35
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 10:30AM; (!)
3:00-9:00
My Friend Dahmer (R) 12:00-2:304:45-7:20-9:35
Fate/Stay Night: Heaven's Feel - I.
Presage Flower 9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:301:30-3:30-5:30-7:30-9:30
AMC Columbia 14
Murder on the Orient Express
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
(PG-13) 11:45-2:10-4:30-7:00-9:20 Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:15-6:00
Avalon Theatre
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Lady Bird (R) 1:15-3:30-5:45-8:00 11:40-1:40-2:50-6:20-7:20-9:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, The Star (PG) CC: 10:15-12:403:10-5:40-7:55-10:15
Missouri (R) 2:15-5:00-7:45
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:30-2:15-2:45Landmark Atlantic Plumbing Cinema 5:30-8:30
807 V Street, NW
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
(PG-13) CC: 11:05-2:00-4:5511:10-1:45-4:25-7:20-9:50
7:35-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:50-4:4011:30-2:10-4:50-7:30-10:10
7:20-10:05
Murder on the Orient Express
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
(PG-13) CC: 11:40-2:15-4:404:40-10:40
7:10-9:35
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:00- 11:50-2:20-4:50-7:40-10:25
3:30-7:00-10:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Missouri (R) CC: (!) 10:35-1:2512:30-2:40-5:00-7:45-10:00
4:15-7:05-9:55
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
11:15-1:50-4:30-7:15-9:55
12:15-3:15; (!) 9:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Landmark E Street Cinema
(!) 10:10-1:10-4:10-7:10-10:10
555 11th Street NW
Lady Bird (R) (!) 10:05-12:30-2:55God's Own Country 1:15-4:155:25-7:55-10:20
7:15-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Coco 3D (PG) CC: 10:45-6:15-9:30
Missouri (R) CC: 12:30-1:00-3:30- Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) (!) 10:30-1:454:00-6:30-7:00-9:15-9:40
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R) 4:45-7:45-10:30
Justice League (PG-13) (!) 4:00CC: 4:10-9:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-2:15-3:15- 7:00-10:00
Coco (PG) (!) 10:00-1:00
4:30-5:30-6:50-7:45-9:00-9:50
BPM (Beats Per Minute) (120
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
battements par minute) (NR)
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
2:00-8:15
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
The Man Who Invented Christmas (!) 11:45-12:55-3:45-5:25-6:45(PG) CC: 1:20-4:20-7:20-9:45
8:15-9:35
The Square (R) CC: 5:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
The Florida Project (R) CC:
11:25-2:35-5:35-7:05-8:35-10:05
1:10-7:10
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 10:55-3:05Landmark West End Cinema 5:20-7:45-10:00
2301 M Street NW
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:10-11:401:10-2:10-4:10-5:10-7:10-8:10Mudbound (R) CC: 1:15-4:0010:10
7:00-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Bill Nye: Science Guy 4:30(PG-13) CC: 11:35-2:20-5:057:30-9:50
7:50-10:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 11:10-11:501:30-4:15
1:55-2:45-4:15-4:35-7:00-7:20Jane 1:45-7:15-9:30
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC 9:45-10:05
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
11:15-1:55-4:45-7:20
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:00- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
11:05-1:45-5:30-8:00-10:30
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
701 Seventh Street Northwest
Missouri (R) CC: (!) 11:20-2:05Justice League (PG-13) 3:00-8:40 4:55-7:40-10:25
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:10(!) 2:35-3:15-6:05-8:55
2:40-5:35-8:30
The Man Who Invented Christmas
The Star (PG) 11:30-2:05-4:25(PG) (!) 10:50-2:25-5:00-7:35-10:10
6:45-9:05
Lady Bird (R) (!) 11:30-2:00-4:50Murder on the Orient Express
7:15-9:40
(PG-13) 12:30-3:20-6:05-9:00
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 12:10-3:10Wonder (PG) 11:40-2:25-5:106:10-9:10
8:00-10:40
Coco (PG) 11:15-2:45-3:30-6:00- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 11:35-1:25-4:30-7:25-10:15
7:00-9:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:15- Verna (!) 9:55
The Ghost Bride (NR) (!) 12:30
2:40-5:05-7:30-9:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:25- Justice League (PG-13) (!) 11:5012:55-3:45-6:35-9:25
2:55-5:20-7:45-10:10
Coco (PG) (!) 11:35-1:10-2:35-4:10Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:00-12:15-3:05-5:50-5:55-8:45 7:10-10:10
GLENN PINKERTON/LVNB/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
David Cassidy performing in Las Vegas in 2000. He blazed the trail
to obscurity that many teen heartthrobs would follow.
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) (!)
2:45-5:35-8:25
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) (!) 11:00-1:504:40-7:30-10:20
Coco (PG) (!) 12:40-3:40
Justice League (PG-13) 12:001:15-1:55-2:20-2:55-4:10-4:505:50-7:05-8:10-8:45-10:10
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:25-5:15
Justice League (PG-13) XD:
AMC Loews St. Charles Town Ctr. 9 10:50-7:50
Coco (PG) XD: 1:45-4:50
11115 Mall Circle
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:25-12:35-3:30-5:15-6:25-9:20
10:00-4:45-7:45-10:00
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1591 West Nursery Road
11:45-3:00-6:00-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
The Star (PG) CC: 11:00-1:3011:20-12:20-1:20-2:10-3:10-4:105:30-6:45-10:45
5:00-6:05-6:55-7:45-8:50-9:40Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:45-12:3010:30
3:30-6:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Murder on the Orient Express
12:00-4:05-6:30-9:25
(PG-13) CC: 11:55-2:45-3:45The Star (PG) CC: 11:10-1:558:00-10:30
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:15-1:15-4:15- 4:30-7:00-9:10
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-12:00-1:007:15-10:15
1:55-3:00-3:50-4:45-6:40-7:35Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
8:45-9:30-10:25
11:45-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC: Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:05-1:45-4:40(!) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: 7:20-10:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:40-3:00(!) 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-9:15
4:20-6:05-7:00-9:45
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 9:30-1:45A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
3:30-9:30
11:50-2:20-4:50-7:40-10:10
AMC Magic Johnson
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Capital Center 12
11:30-2:00-4:35-7:05-9:30
800 Shoppers Way
The Man Who Invented Christmas
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:30- (PG) CC: 11:00-1:30-6:45-9:20
4:15-7:00-9:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:00-12:50-4:00-6:55-9:50
3:40-6:45-9:40
Landmark Bethesda Row Cinema
Coco (PG) CC: 12:45-1:30-6:307235 Woodmont Avenue
7:30-9:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:00-6:40-9:35 10:20-12:55-3:55-6:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:25-4:15(PG-13) CC: 10:40-1:40-4:15-7:206:45-9:15
9:30-10:05
Jigsaw (R) CC: 2:35-7:15
Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 10:35Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
1:30-4:25-7:10-9:50
2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 10:20-11:002:30-5:15-8:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Hal- 1:00-2:00-4:00-4:50-7:00-7:309:35-10:00
loween (PG-13) CC: 4:50-9:35
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: The Man Who Invented Christmas
(PG) CC: 10:50-1:20-3:55-7:151:15-4:00-7:00-9:45
9:45
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:45-4:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:20-11:10Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 3:00-6:00-9:00 1:10-1:50-3:20-4:40-5:40-6:50The Star (PG) 3:00-5:15-7:30-9:35 7:45-9:20-9:55
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
The Star (PG) 11:10-2:50-5:257:10-9:10
Coco (PG) 10:00-1:00-4:00-7:007:30-9:45-10:25
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:15-12:25-2:55-5:357:45-10:10
Wonder (PG) 11:15-12:00-1:452:25-4:30-5:15-7:05-8:20-9:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:202:45-10:25
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:051:10-4:50-7:40-9:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:10-11:55-2:303:25-4:55-6:00-8:05-10:15
Justice League (PG-13) 8:0010:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:252:10-5:10-7:50-10:00-10:35
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:00-11:05-1:50-4:40-7:30-7:3510:20
Lady Bird (R) 10:25-12:30-3:105:20-7:25-8:10-10:30
Justice League (PG-13)
11:20-12:35-2:00-3:00-4:45-5:307:15-9:35
The Man Who Invented Christmas
(PG) CC: 10:30-11:35-2:15-4:357:55-9:40
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
CC: 12:15
Coco 3D (PG) 12:40-3:30-6:30
Coco (PG) 2:05-5:00
Coco 3D (PG) 11:00AM
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
The Florida Project (R) 5:15
Paragon Kentlands Stadium 10
629 Center Point Way
Justice League (PG-13) 11:5012:45-2:25-3:20-5:00-5:50-7:358:30-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:454:30-7:15-10:00
The Star (PG) 12:45-2:50-4:557:00-9:05
Coco (PG) 12:00-2:45-5:30-8:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:00-2:35-5:10-7:4510:20
Wonder (PG) 12:10-2:40-5:107:40-10:10
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:302:50-5:10-7:30-9:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:402:55-5:10-7:25-9:40
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
3899 Branch Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 11:001:45-4:30-7:15-9:30-10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:154:05-7:00-10:10
Coco (PG) 12:00-2:00-2:50-4:555:45-7:50-10:40
Coco 3D (PG) 11:05AM
Wonder (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:507:30-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:302:55-5:20-7:40-10:05
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
Justice League (PG-13) 12:301:30-3:30-4:30-7:30-9:30-10:30
Justice League (PG-13) 11:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:002:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
3:00-3:45-6:00-6:45-9:00-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:10The Star (PG) 11:50-2:20-4:4011:10-1:10-2:10-4:10-5:10-7:10- 7:10-9:40
8:10-10:15
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:15-4:15-6:00The Star (PG) 10:20-12:50-3:25- 7:15-10:15
6:50-9:10
Murder on the Orient Express
Coco (PG) 10:30-11:30-1:20-2:40- (PG-13) 1:05-2:10-3:50-6:404:20-6:30-7:30-9:30-10:30
7:45-9:50
Wonder (PG) 10:40-1:30-4:30Wonder (PG) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
7:20-10:10
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:40Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:05- 2:25-5:20-7:55-10:30
11:05-12:40-1:40-3:40-4:40-6:40- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:307:40-9:20-10:20
2:05-4:35-5:00-7:05-9:30-10:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
1:00-10:00
11:30-2:30-5:30-6:30-8:30
Justice League (PG-13) 10:00Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
4:00-7:00
12:20-1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Coco 3D (PG) 3:00-9:00
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:40-1:20-4:10-6:50-9:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:204:40-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:50-11:40-1:505:00-7:00-7:50-10:30
The Man Who Invented Christmas
(PG) 11:00-2:00-4:30-7:10-9:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:30-1:20-4:20-7:30-10:20
Last Flag Flying (R) 10:10-1:104:00-6:50-10:00
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-4:507:20-10:10
Regal Cinemas
Majestic Stadium 20 & IMAX
900 Ellsworth Drive
Justice League (PG-13) 4:55-8:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:05-4:05
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:05-4:15-7:15-10:10
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:00-1:50-2:55-6:00-9:05-10:55
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 1:20-4:257:30-10:35
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:003:00-6:00-7:00-9:10-10:10
Coco (PG) 12:12-3:20-4:33-6:307:43-9:40
Wonder (PG) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:403:10-5:50-8:30-11:00
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Justice League (PG-13) 2:20-8:10 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 3:05-9:45 Missouri (R) 1:00-2:40-5:25Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 8:15-11:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
3D (PG-13) 11:50-6:20
12:25-3:35-6:45-9:55
The Star (PG) 11:40-2:30-5:00Coco 3D (PG) 1:25-10:53
7:25-10:00
Coco (PG) 10:50-11:30-2:45-6:00- Regal Germantown Stadium 14
20000 Century Boulevard
7:50-9:15-11:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) 11:00(PG-13) 11:00-1:55-4:45-7:402:00-4:00-5:00-8:00-10:00-11:00
10:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
Wonder (PG) 10:55-1:45-4:4011:30-1:00-2:45-4:15-6:00-7:307:30-10:20
9:15-10:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:05- Murder on the Orient Express
3:00-5:45-8:30-11:05
(PG-13) 11:15-1:30-2:15-5:15Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15- 7:00-8:15-11:00
3:00-5:40-8:20
The Star (PG) 11:45-2:15-4:45Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
7:15-9:45
XD: 10:45
Coco (PG) 10:30-12:00-3:00-4:30Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
6:00-7:30-9:00
11:45-3:00-6:15-9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
Coco 3D (PG) 12:40-3:55-7:0010:45-12:00-2:30-4:15-5:15-7:4510:10
9:45-10:15
Wonder (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:307:30-10:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:00-1:00-3:00-6:00-7:00-9:00
Theeran Adhigaram Ondru (NR)
3:00-6:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
Khakee (Telugu) (NR) 11:30-10:00
Coco 3D (PG) 1:30-10:30
The Star (PG) 10:50-1:10-3:306:00-8:30
Coco (PG) 10:00-12:00-1:00-4:006:15-7:15-10:15
Wonder (PG) 10:00-10:40-1:204:10-7:00-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:0512:30-3:20-6:00-8:45-11:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:0012:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Regal Hyattsville Royale Stadium 14 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:45-1:50-4:506505 America Blvd.
7:50-10:50
Justice League (PG-13) 12:30Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
12:20-3:30-5:00-6:30-9:30-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:00Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
4:00-7:00-10:00
10:20-1:40-4:40-7:45-10:45
The Star (PG) 12:30-3:00-5:30Lady Bird (R) 10:15-12:45-3:108:00-10:30
5:40-8:15-10:40
Coco (PG) 12:45-1:15-3:45-4:15Coco 3D (PG) 3:00-9:20
7:00-7:30-10:30
Murder on the Orient Express
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14
(PG-13) 2:00-4:45-7:45-10:30
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
Wonder (PG) 12:30-3:45-7:00Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
10:15
11:20-2:10-5:00-6:30-7:50-9:20Jigsaw (R) 1:15-4:15-7:30-10:15 10:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:45- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
4:45-7:30-10:15
10:20-12:20-1:20-3:30-6:50Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:0010:20-11:20
4:30-7:15-10:15
The Star (PG) Open Caption; CC: (!)
Marshall (PG-13) 12:30-3:3011:00-1:30-4:10-6:40-9:00
6:45-9:45
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:00-12:50-3:40
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Murder on the Orient Express
2:15-3:30-5:30-6:30-8:30-9:30
(PG-13) CC: (!) 10:30-3:00-6:20Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
9:30
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 11:10-1:55Coco 3D (PG) 10:15
4:35-7:20-10:15
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 Jigsaw (R) CC: 2:30-5:10-8:2014716 Baltimore Avenue
11:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) 11:152:30-4:00-6:30-7:15-10:00-10:30 10:45-1:45-4:50-7:40-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: (!)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:4512:10-2:40-5:30-8:10-10:45
3:00-6:45-10:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
The Star (PG) 11:25-1:45-4:15(!) 10:10-10:50-1:00-1:40-3:507:00-9:45
Coco (PG) 11:00-12:10-2:15-3:30- 4:30-7:00-8:00-9:50-10:50
6:15-7:00-9:35
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 9:40
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
(PG-13) 12:30-3:45-7:30-10:25
11:50-2:50-4:20-5:40-7:10-8:30Wonder (PG) 11:00-2:00-4:5510:00-11:30
7:50-10:45
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:40-11:40A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:30- 1:50-4:40-7:30
2:00-4:45-7:50-10:35
iPic Pike & Rose
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:3011830 Grand Park Avenue
2:00-4:30-7:20-10:00
Justice League (PG-13) (!) 12:30Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
4:00-7:45-11:00-11:15
12:20-1:00-4:30-7:45-10:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) (!) 11:15Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
3:00-6:30-10:00
12:00-3:45-7:30-10:40
Coco (PG) (!) 12:15-3:45-7:15Coco 3D (PG) 10:10
10:45
Regal Rockville Center Stadium 13 Murder on the Orient Express
199 East Montgomery Avenue
(PG-13) (!) 12:00-3:30-6:45-10:15
Justice League (PG-13) 12:00Wonder (PG) (!) 11:30-2:3012:30-3:00-3:45-6:00-6:45-9:15
6:15-9:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:15Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) (!) 2:003:30-6:30-9:30
5:00-8:00-11:30
The Star (PG) 12:15-2:45-5:00Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
7:15-9:45
Missouri (R) (!) 11:45-3:15-7:00Coco (PG) 12:00-12:30-3:00-6:00- 10:30
7:00-9:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) (!)
Murder on the Orient Express
1:00-4:15-7:30-11:00
(PG-13) 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:45
Wonder (PG) 12:00-2:40-5:158:00-9:00-10:45
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:453:30-6:15
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:30- Justice League (PG-13) CC:
3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
10:45-1:30-4:15-5:15-7:00-9:45Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 10:45
Missouri (R) 12:45-4:15-7:30Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:15
10:45-1:40-4:30-7:30-10:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:50-1:30-4:151:15-4:30-7:30-10:00-10:45
6:50-9:30
Lady Bird (R) 12:15-2:45-5:15A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
7:45-10:15
1:15-8:30-11:00
Coco 3D (PG) 3:45-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
10:50-2:45-3:45-6:10
Regal Waugh Chapel
Stadium 12 & IMAX
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Missouri (R) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:457:30-10:15
Justice League (PG-13) 12:00Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
2:00-5:00-8:00
12:00-8:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:40Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
3:40-6:45-9:50
The Star (PG) 10:10-11:15-1:50- 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
4:10-6:30-8:50
AMC Hoffman Center 22
Coco (PG) 10:20-11:50-1:20-2:55206 Swamp Fox Rd.
6:05-7:30-9:10
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Murder on the Orient Express
10:45-12:15-1:45-3:15-6:15-9:15
(PG-13) 11:30-2:25-5:20-8:15Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:10
10:15-1:15-4:15-7:15-8:45-10:15
Wonder (PG) 10:00-10:45-1:40The Star (PG) CC: 11:05-1:204:30-7:15-10:10
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:30- 3:35-5:50-8:05-10:20
Coco (PG) CC: 10:00-10:15-12:003:10-5:50-8:30-11:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:15- 3:00-4:00-5:00-6:00-7:00-8:009:00-10:00-10:20
12:50-3:30-6:15-9:20
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
(PG-13) CC: 11:20-12:45-2:1511:00-3:00-5:55-9:00-11:00
3:30-5:05-6:20-7:50-9:10
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
10:30-1:30-4:40-7:45-10:50
1:30-8:10
Coco 3D (PG) 4:25-10:35
It (R) CC: 4:55-10:35
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:00- Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:307:15-10:00
4:00-7:00-10:00
Jigsaw (R) CC: 10:40
Regal Westview
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Stadium 16 & IMAX
11:50-2:40-5:20-7:55-10:25
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) 1:4511:45-2:35-5:05-7:40-10:10
4:45-7:45
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:25-5:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:15Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
1:00-1:30-4:00-4:30-7:15-8:00Missouri (R) CC: 10:50-1:50-4:4010:15-11:00
7:20-10:05
The Star (PG) 10:15-1:00-3:30My Friend Dahmer (R) 2:20-8:05
6:30-9:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Murder on the Orient Express
1:45-2:30-4:45-7:45-8:30-10:45
(PG-13) 10:00-1:15-4:15-7:30The Man Who Invented Christmas
10:45
(PG) CC: 10:30-1:10-3:45-6:35Wonder (PG) 10:45-1:45-4:459:25
7:45-10:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:45- 10:20-1:20-4:20-7:30-10:30
2:30-5:45-8:30-11:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:00- Lady Bird (R) 11:40-2:05-4:256:45-9:20
12:35-3:00-6:00-9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Coco 3D (PG) CC: 12:00-1:00-3:006:00-7:00-9:00
Missouri (R) 11:30-2:30-5:30Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 11:508:15-11:10
The Man Who Invented Christmas 3:00-6:05-9:05
(PG) 11:00-2:00-4:30-7:15-10:15 Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 10:00Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
10:45-12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15-11:00 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
The Ghost Bride (NR) 11:30-5:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) 4:5511:00-2:15-5:15-8:15-11:20
7:45-10:45
Lady Bird (R) 10:00-11:30-2:15The Star (PG) 12:05
5:00-7:30-10:00
Coco (PG) 11:00-2:00; 11:30-2:30;
Coco 3D (PG) 10:00-3:45
5:30
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:00AMC Potomac Mills 18
4:00-7:00-10:00
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Coco (PG) 10:45-12:30-2:00-5:00- Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 10:50AM
7:15-8:15-10:30-11:15
Justice League (PG-13) 10:30UA Snowden Square Stadium 14 10:45-1:15-1:45-4:15-4:45-7:459161 Commerce Center Drive
10:45
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
Justice League (PG-13) 10:3011:00-1:30-2:00-4:30-7:30-8:00- 3D (PG-13) CC: 4:00-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:30
10:30-1:00-1:50-5:00-7:15-8:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:40The Star (PG) CC: 10:50-1:303:50-6:45-10:00
6:00-8:15-10:25
Murder on the Orient Express
Coco (PG) CC: 10:15-12:15-4:30(PG-13) 10:10-12:50-3:40-6:307:00-10:00-10:45
9:10
VIRGINIA
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:457:25-10:10
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:20-11:201:00-2:00-3:45-4:45-6:30-7:309:15-10:15
Jigsaw (R) CC: 10:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
11:20-3:10-5:40-8:15-10:50
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:10-1:40-4:10-6:40-9:10
The Man Who Invented Christmas
(PG) CC: 10:50-1:30-4:10-6:459:20
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15; 2:00-5:008:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
11:00-1:50-4:40-7:30-10:20
Coco 3D (PG) 1:20-7:45
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 11:302:30-5:30-8:30-11:30
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 8:20
Justice League (PG-13) 7:4510:45; 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
The Star (PG) 3:45
Coco (PG) 10:45-1:45-4:45; 11:155:15; 2:15
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
10:45-4:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:15-1:45-3:30-7:00-9:00
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:30-4:30-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:307:15-10:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:30-1:15-4:157:15-10:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
(!) 1:45-7:15-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: (!) 10:45-1:304:15-7:00-9:45
Lady Bird (R) 11:15-1:15-4:456:30-10:00
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 1:30-7:15
AMC Tysons Corner 16
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
9:15-10:45-12:15-1:45-3:15-5:255:30-6:15-9:10-9:15-12:00-12:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:30-1:30-4:45-7:45-10:45-12:40
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 9:10-10:2512:45-3:00-5:20-7:40-9:50
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 9:30-12:30-4:206:40-8:25-10:35-11:25-12:35
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: (!) 10:20-1:25-4:157:20-10:20-12:15
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 9:50-10:4012:35-1:40-3:25-4:30-6:05-7:158:50-10:00-11:35
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
4:35-7:10-9:45-12:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
9:45-12:20-5:50-8:20-10:55-12:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: (!) 11:05-1:554:40-7:25-10:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
(!) 11:30-2:30-5:30-8:30-11:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 11:25-2:15-5:05-8:00-10:5012:10
Lady Bird (R) (!) 9:05-12:10-2:405:00-7:30-9:50
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 10:15-3:357:35-9:40
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:001:00-4:00-7:00-9:50-10:00-12:50
Justice League (PG-13) (!)
8:10-11:05
Coco (PG) (!) 11:00-2:00-5:10;
9:00AM
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:55AM
Coco (PG) (!) 1:15-2:50
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) (!) 11:30-2:20-5:00-7:4010:45
Justice League (PG-13) (!) 1:157:00-9:45
Bow Tie Reston Town Center
11 & BTX
11940 Market Street
Justice League (PG-13) 2:005:00-10:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:501:50-4:50-7:50-10:50
The Star (PG) 10:10-1:10-4:107:10-9:20
Coco (PG) 10:40-1:40-4:40-7:4010:40
Wonder (PG) 10:20-1:20-4:207:20-10:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:551:55-4:55-7:55-10:25
The Man Who Invented Christmas
(PG) 11:00-2:00-5:00-8:00-10:35
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 10:001:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:3010:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:00-8:00
Lady Bird (R) 11:30-2:30-5:308:30-11:10
Cinema Arts Theatre
9650 Main St
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 9:4012:10-2:40-5:10-7:50-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:00-2:30-5:007:30-9:50
Wonder (PG) CC: 9:50-12:10-2:254:50-7:20-9:40
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 2:20
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:0512:20-4:35-7:00-9:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 9:45-12:05-2:35-5:057:40-9:55
Lady Bird (R) 9:55-12:15-2:254:45-7:10-9:25
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The Star (PG) 11:15-1:40-4:156:50-9:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:10-1:45-4:30-7:10-9:50
Wonder (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:507:30-10:10
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:102:40-5:10-7:45-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:502:15-4:45-7:15-9:40
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:20-2:20-5:05-7:50-10:40
Coco 3D (PG) 11:00-5:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:001:50-4:40-7:40-10:35
Justice League (PG-13) 11:401:30-2:30-4:20-5:30-7:20-8:3010:20
Coco 3D (PG) 11:00-5:00
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:00-2:00-3:004:00-6:00-7:00-8:00-9:00-10:00;
2:00-8:00
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8890 Mathis Ave.
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:002:10-4:20-6:30-8:40
Justice League (PG-13) 11:001:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Coco (PG) 10:30-1:05-3:406:05-8:45
Wonder (PG) 11:00-1:25-3:506:15-8:40
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
6201 Multiplex Drive
Justice League (PG-13) 10:0012:00-1:00-3:00-4:00-6:00-7:009:00-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:151:20-4:30-7:35-10:40
AMC Worldgate 9
The Star (PG) 10:10-12:25-2:4013025 Worldgate Drive
4:55-7:20-9:35
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
Coco (PG) 10:20-1:15-5:10-7:0512:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
8:05-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:15-3:30-6:30-9:40
11:55AM
The Star (PG) CC: 11:20-1:45Murder on the Orient Express
5:00-7:15-9:30
(PG-13) 10:50-1:35-4:20-7:30Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:00-1:30-2:00- 10:15
Wonder (PG) 11:15-1:55-4:357:05-7:10-7:30
7:15-9:55
Murder on the Orient Express
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:15(PG-13) CC: 10:50-1:35-4:202:45-5:15-7:45-10:25
7:05-9:50
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 10:35-1:20- Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:00-2:00-5:00-8:00-10:55
4:05-6:45-9:35
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
10:40-1:45-4:45-7:50-10:45
10:15-12:45-3:20-6:05-9:05
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC: Coco 3D (PG) 11:20-2:15-4:1011:00
4:00-6:55-9:55
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Mental Madhilo (NR) 2:30-6:059:30
(!) 12:35-3:30-6:20-9:15
Coco 3D (PG) (!) 10:30-4:15-4:20Rave Cinemas
4:30-10:00-10:30
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
Alamo Drafthouse
Cinema - One Loudoun
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Justice League (PG-13) 1:20-4:4010:50-2:25
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:001:40-3:40-7:00-10:35-10:55
Planes, Trains & Automobiles
(R) 8:00
Justice League (PG-13) 10:4010:50-2:00-5:30-9:15
Coco (PG) 10:20-11:10-11:20-1:052:35-2:40-4:50-5:00-6:00-8:209:25-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:15-1:10-1:15-4:305:15-7:40-10:20-10:50
Wonder (PG) 10:25-10:30-1:254:20-7:20-10:15-10:50
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:1512:20-3:25-6:20-9:15-9:35-10:35
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) 9:00
Lady Bird (R) 10:05-12:30-12:403:10-3:15-5:50-6:20-8:40-9:009:15-11:20-11:30-11:35
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:05-2:05-2:10-4:358:35-10:55-11:40
11900 Palace Way
Justice League (PG-13) 10:0012:50-2:35-6:40-8:25-9:35-11:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:5011:30-2:05-5:05-8:10-11:10
The Star (PG) 10:15-12:35-2:555:15-7:35-10:30
Coco (PG) 10:40-11:20-2:15-4:357:30-10:25
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:35-1:30-4:45-7:5510:50
Wonder (PG) 11:00-1:55-4:407:25-10:10
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:502:20-5:00-7:45-10:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:151:45-4:30-7:40-10:35
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
XD: 10:05
Lady Bird (R) 10:45-1:35-4:257:20-10:00
Coco 3D (PG) 1:40-5:10-8:05-11:00
Mental Madhilo (NR) 2:30-6:059:30
Justice League (PG-13) XD:
11:05-2:00-4:20-4:55-7:15-7:5010:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:40-3:45-5:30
Coco (PG) XD: 10:05-1:10
Thursday, November 23, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:552:35-6:15-9:55
LBJ (R) 10:20-1:35-4:40-7:4510:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:451:20-3:55-6:30-9:05
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Lady Bird (R) 10:15-11:10-12:452:00-3:15-4:35-5:45-7:10-8:159:45-10:45
Coco 3D (PG) 2:30-8:30
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
45980 Regal Plaza
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
6:05-8:40
Justice League (PG-13) 12:151:00-3:15-6:30-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:504:05-7:05-10:10
The Star (PG) 11:45-2:15-4:357:15-9:35
Coco (PG) 11:00-12:45-2:00-5:156:45-8:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:30AM
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:20-3:25-6:15-9:00
Tumhari Sulu (NR) 11:20-2:306:05-9:15
Secret Superstar (NR) 11:35-2:45
Ittefaq (NR) 12:40-3:05-5:458:05-10:25
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:151:45-4:30-7:20-9:55
My Friend Dahmer (R) 11:05-1:504:45-7:35-10:05
The Man Who Invented Christmas
(PG) 12:25-3:20-5:50-8:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
4:00-7:00-10:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:15-4:15-7:30-10:30
Theeran Adhigaram Ondru (NR)
3:10-6:20
Lady Bird (R) 12:35-3:00-5:308:00-10:30
Coco 3D (PG) 3:45-9:45
Mental Madhilo (NR) 12:00-3:156:30-9:45
PSV Garuda Vega (NR) 12:30-3:55
Khakee (Telugu) (NR) 12:00-9:40
Balakrishnudu 3:00-6:30-9:45
Verna 12:05-3:35-6:50-10:15
Napoleon (Telugu) (NR) 8:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:00-10:40
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:10-3:15-6:20-9:15
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:35-5:107:45-10:15
Coco 3D (PG) 12:50-10:25
Justice League (PG-13) 1:00-4:006:30-7:00-9:30-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:30-3:30
Regal Manassas Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
Justice League (PG-13) 1:30-3:004:20-5:50-7:15-8:45-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:451:20-4:30-7:30-10:30
The Star (PG) 12:00-2:30-4:407:10-9:50
Coco (PG) 1:00-2:15-4:00-7:008:15-10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:15-12:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:45-3:50-6:45-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:403:20-6:50-10:15
Wonder (PG) 11:20-2:00-5:007:45-10:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:405:20-7:50-10:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:203:30-6:20-9:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:40-3:40-6:30-9:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:10-3:10-6:15-9:10
Coco 3D (PG) 11:15-5:15
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 11:30-2:205:10-8:00-10:50
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
11:00-12:45-3:30-6:05
Justice League (PG-13) 11:3012:50-3:55-4:30-7:00-7:40-10:0010:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
11:40-1:20-2:50-4:20-6:00-7:309:10-10:35
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:00-2:30-5:10
The Star (PG) 5:20-7:50
Regal Dulles Town Center 10 Coco (PG) 11:00-12:20-1:00-4:056:30-7:10-10:15
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) 10:00(PG-13) 12:25-3:15-6:15-7:551:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
9:00-10:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:30Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:40-9:05
12:45-3:45-6:45-10:00
Wonder (PG) 12:40-3:50-6:40-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 8:55
(PG-13) 10:00-12:15-3:15-6:15Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:5010:15
4:25-7:15-9:55
Coco (PG) 10:30-1:15-4:15-7:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:30- Marshall (PG-13) 11:45-6:10
The Man Who Invented Christmas
5:15-8:00-10:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:00- (PG) 11:00-1:35-4:10-6:50-9:30
3:00-6:00-8:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Wonder (PG) 10:15-1:00-4:0012:10-1:25-3:20-6:20-9:20
7:00-9:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 1:15-4:15-7:20-10:25
Missouri (R) 11:45-2:45-5:30Coco 3D (PG) 3:25-9:40
8:15-11:00
The Star (PG) 11:00-12:30-2:55Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
10:10
11:15-12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
Regal Springfield Town Center 12
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
6500 Springfield Town Center
10:45-1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
Justice
League (PG-13) 10:30Coco 3D (PG) 9:00
11:30-1:30-4:30-5:30-7:30-10:30
Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10 Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:004110 West Ox Road
4:40-7:45-10:45
Murder on the Orient Express
The Star (PG) 11:00-1:20-3:50(PG-13) 12:00-1:45-2:45-5:306:20-9:00
7:15-8:15
Coco (PG) 11:40-6:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:15- Murder on the Orient Express
2:50-5:25-8:00-10:35
(PG-13) 10:50-2:00-4:50-7:50Wonder (PG) 12:55-3:50-6:55-9:40 10:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:30Wonder (PG) 10:55-1:40-4:354:15-4:45-6:45-9:20-10:00
7:20-10:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:10Missouri (R) 1:25-4:30-7:35-10:20 1:50-4:20-7:10-9:40
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:25-4:20- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:407:25-10:10
1:10-4:10-6:50-9:20
The Man Who Invented Christmas Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
(PG) 12:00-2:35-5:15-7:50-10:25 Missouri (R) 12:50-4:00-7:00Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:00
12:50-3:55-7:00-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Let There Be Light (PG-13) 1:00- 12:30-2:30-3:30-6:30-8:30-9:30
3:40-6:30-9:15
Coco 3D (PG) 2:50-9:10
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX Lady Bird (R) 11:50-2:20-5:0022875 Brambleton Plaza
7:40-10:10
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 10:15Regal Virginia Gateway
12:30-2:45-5:15
Stadium 14 & RPX
Justice League (PG-13) 11:008001 Gateway Promenade Place
2:00-3:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-11:00
Justice
League (PG-13) 12:30Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:1511:45-1:15-2:45-4:15-5:45-7:15- 3:30-6:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:458:45-10:15
12:45-1:45-3:45-4:45-6:45-7:45The Star (PG) 11:30-1:45-4:009:45-10:45
6:15-8:30-10:45
Coco (PG) 10:30-12:00-1:30-3:00- The Star (PG) 10:20-2:20-4:406:50-9:10
4:30-6:00-7:30-10:30
Coco (PG) 10:15-11:15-12:15-1:15Murder on the Orient Express
3:15-4:15-6:15-7:15-9:15
(PG-13) 10:45-1:45-4:45-7:45Murder on the Orient Express
10:45
(PG-13) 10:05-1:05-3:50-6:40-9:40
Wonder (PG) 11:15-12:30-2:15A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:453:30-5:00-6:30-7:45-9:30-10:30
2:45-5:45-8:15-10:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Wonder (PG) 10:10-12:50-3:407:30-10:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:15- 6:20-9:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:5012:45-3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 2:30-5:15-8:00-10:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:00-12:45-3:30Missouri (R) 11:00-1:40-4:206:15-9:15
The Man Who Invented Christmas 7:10-9:50
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) 9:30
(PG) 10:30-1:00-3:45-6:45-9:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
10:00-1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
12:00-9:00
Coco 3D (PG) 10:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) 10:3010:15-1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Coco 3D (PG) 9:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:00- 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
4:00-7:00-10:00
Smithsonian - Airbus IMAX Theater
Regal Kingstowne Stadium 16 & RPX
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:55-9:35
Justice League (PG-13) 1:504:45-7:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
11:15-12:30-2:15-3:40-5:30-6:458:30-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
(PG-13) 11:10-2:00-5:00-7:452911 District Ave
10:45
The Star (PG) 11:00-1:30-3:50Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Regal Ballston Common Stadium 12 6:15-8:50
Missouri (R) (!) 10:15-11:55671 N. Glebe Road
Coco (PG) 11:30-2:55-4:15-6:001:00-2:40-3:45-5:15-6:30-8:157:25-9:05
9:15-10:50
Justice League (PG-13) 10:30Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:20-6:05
The Man Who Invented Christmas 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
(PG) (!) 11:15-2:00-4:30-7:15-9:55 Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:05Wonder (PG) 11:35-1:20-4:257:15-10:10
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) (!) 1:05-4:10-7:15-10:20
11:20-2:15-5:05-8:00-10:40
The Foreigner (R) 12:45-6:50
The Star (PG) 11:15-1:45-4:15Justice League in 3D (PG-13) (!) 6:45-9:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
10:30-4:05
Coco (PG) 10:00-11:30-1:00-4:00- 3:10-9:50
Lady Bird (R) (!) 10:45-1:15-3:25- 5:30-7:00-10:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:056:00-8:30-10:35
2:45-5:45-8:15-10:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:25-2:20-5:10-8:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:55The Man Who Invented Christmas
(PG) 11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:35
1:55-4:55-7:55-10:55
10:50
11:10-4:00
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
2:20
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 4:55-7:20-9:45
University Mall Theatre
10659 Braddock Road
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
12:00-2:15-4:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 7:30-10:15
It (R) CC: 7:15-9:50
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:102:20-4:20
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:20-2:35-4:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 7:00-10:10
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH (D)
AQ52
K73
J6
A962
EAST
96
A Q 10 5
K43
J874
WEST
84
J94
Q852
K 10 5 3
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
K J 10 7 3
862
A 10 9 7
Q
The bidding:
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
1
Pass
1
2
Pass
3
4
All Pass
Opening lead — 2
WEST
Pass
Pass
CLASSIC PEANUTS
oday’s declarer reminds
me of a philosopher who
refused to cry over spilled
milk, consoling himself with
the thought that the milk was
four-fifths water.
Against four spades, West
led the deuce of diamonds:
six, king, ace. South next
drew trumps and led another
diamond. West took his
queen and knew South had
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
the 10 (East would have
played the 10 at Trick One if
he had held it) and maybe
the nine.
So, seeing the need for
fast heart tricks, West shifted
boldly to the jack. East took
three hearts for down one.
South was philosophical;
he made the time-honored
remark about spilled milk.
But the spillage was his own LIO
fault: South must refuse the
first diamond.
If East shifts to a trump,
South draws trumps, takes
the ace of diamonds and
leads the 10, planning to
pitch a heart from dummy
if West plays low. If instead
West covers, South ruffs in
dummy and later discards
a heart from dummy on the
nine of diamonds. He can
lose no more than two hearts HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
and a diamond.
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
T
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
AQ52K73
J6A962
Your partner opens one
spade, you respond 2NT (a
conventional forcing raise)
and he bids three hearts.
What do you say?
ANSWER: Most partnerships agree that after
responder’s 2NT, opener’s
bid of a new suit shows a
singleton there. The idea
is to help responder judge
whether he has useful cards.
Since your king of hearts is a
“duplicated” value opposite
partner’s singleton, sign off
at four spades.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | NOVEMBER 23
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year a heaviness
that has marked
the recent past
suddenly lifts. You
often are surprised by events
that occur. You also make
an excellent friend or loved
one, which others recognize.
If you are single, there is no
lack of potential suitors for
you to choose from. Others
find you very attractive. If you
are attached, the two of you
enjoy each other more and
more. Take vacations, go on
excursions and enjoy dinners
out together. Aquarius makes
your life more upbeat than it
has been in a while.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You receive praise from family
and friends. You have the
Thanksgiving routine down
pat. An exciting possibility
lies in the fact that you seem
very connected to loved ones
right now. If you sense any
awkwardness, you’ll move
right in and change the mood.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Don’t forget about the loved
ones who can’t spend this
holiday with you. Whether the
issue is time or location, close
the distance by reaching out to
these people. Make plenty of
time for a partner who wants
to be closer to you.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
One-on-one relating is
highlighted this Thanksgiving.
WEINGARTENS & CLARK Take the time to befriend
each person around you
and find out how he or she
really is.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You love Thanksgiving, as
this holiday involves family
and friends, home and an
appreciation of good food.
A close loved one appears
to be changing right in front
of you.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
A partner fills the moment with
goodwill and kindness. Friends
seem to stop by unexpectedly
to wish you well. Get into
the moment, and don’t be
surprised to have an extra
guest or two show up at your
dinner table.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Allow your playful side to
emerge around others. You
might need to deal with a
loved one who seems to
have a case of the grumps.
Understand that you cannot
change this person’s mood,
but you can give him or her
the space to calm down.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You’ll keep your eye on the
fundamentals of a personal
matter. Allow your fun
personality to emerge this
Thanksgiving holiday. Whether
you invite others over or opt
to go out, you will enjoy the
moment.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Be sensitive to a neighbor
or sibling who needs to
vent. You might have to
adjust your schedule in
order to spend some more
time with this person
away from all the holiday
happenings.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Keep smiling, and you’ll help
others stay upbeat. Allow
yourself to take more risks
and get into the more social
nature of the moment. Keep
conversations moving, and
do not allow someone else’s
malaise to affect you.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You realize that you need to
spend some time away from
all of the holiday celebrations.
You might consider visiting
with a friend or loved one who
could be alone for a good part
of the day.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You perk up in the afternoon.
Your fatigue over getting the
holiday dinner ready lessens
once you start sharing the
workload with a friend. News
emerges that could be rather
exciting.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Use the morning to the max,
when you feel more prepared
to visit with the cast of
characters who make your
holiday special. By the time the
turkey is carved, you will be
thinking deeply about a friend
or loved one at a distance.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
In 2013, pitcher Masahiro Tanaka signed the
biggest contract ever given to a Japanese player
when the New York Yankees agreed to pay him
$155 million over seven years.
Happy Thanksgiving. Be grateful for
plenty of sunshine even though
temperatures are on the chilly side.
Check out the best new toys,
games and puzzles, and get
some ideas for your holiday
wish list.
ILLUSTRATION BY CHARLOTTE SOPHIA MINNIGH, 10, WASHINGTON
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
School tries to
revive language of
Massachusetts tribe
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, PRINTS & PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION
ABOVE: Babe Ruth was the rare player
who excelled as a pitcher and later as a
hitter. LEFT: Shohei Ohtani has been
doing both of those things well in
Japan, and he will try to do the same
next year in American baseball.
KAZUHIRO NOGI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Like Babe Ruth, he can hit and he can pitch
Have you heard the big
baseball news? Babe
Ruth is coming.
FRED BOWEN
Not the real Babe
Ruth. The New York
Yankees legend, who was the most
famous athlete in the United States
during the 1920s and ’30s, died in 1948.
No, Shohei Ohtani is going to play
baseball in America next year.
Who’s Shohei Ohtani? He’s the Babe
Ruth of Japan.
Babe Ruth was the rare baseball player
who was a star both as a hitter and as a
pitcher. Most baseball fans know that
Ruth was a great slugger. He blasted 714
home runs while batting .342 and driving
in 2,214 runs.
But some folks forget that Ruth started
The Score
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 They’re
often run on
weekends
8 Stump
14 Keep in
office
15 ADHD
treatment
16 *Passionate
kiss
17 Ballpark
18 Actress Davis
19 Long narrative
20 Large body
of eau
21 Put __ act
22 *Net profit
or loss
25 Cardiff natives
27 “Luck __ Lady”:
“Guys and
Dolls” song
28 “As I Lay Dying”
father
29 Newsroom VIPs
30 Pelvic bones
32 Marsh grasses
34 *Take for a spin
36 Relaxing
39 Time long past
40 Flight
connection
word
43 Actor LaBeouf
44 Eye of el tigre
45 Many spam
messages
47 *Password,
essentially
51 Equipment
not used in
“Unplugged”
albums
52 Metal
precioso de
El Dorado
53 Uninspiring
54 Key letter
56 Result of
a hung jury,
often
58 Compressed
data ... and
what the ends
of the answers
to starred clues
form?
60 Oberon’s
queen
61 Underwriter
62 Be short
with
63 Untouched by
time
his career as a standout pitcher for the
Boston Red Sox at age 19. He won 89
games and helped the Sox win three
World Series championships. Most
baseball experts think Ruth would have
made the Hall of Fame as a pitcher if he
had stayed on the mound.
Like the Babe, Ohtani is also a terrific
hitter and hurler. At age 23, he has
already played several years for the
Hokkaido Nippon Ham Fighters in the
Japanese professional baseball league.
Ohtani was named the most valuable
player of Japan’s Pacific League in 2016,
when he batted .322 with 22 home runs.
He also pitched 140 innings that
season, finishing with a record of 10-4 (10
wins, four losses) and an impressive 1.86
earned run average. Ohtani struck out 174
batters with an eye-popping fastball that
has been measured at 102 miles per hour.
That’s faster than almost any American
major-leaguer.
So the team that gets Ohtani will get a
player who can pitch right-handed and
swing the bat left-handed. In Japan, where
starters pitch only once a week — in
America they pitch every five days —
Ohtani usually was the team’s designated
hitter on Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday. Then he would rest up on Friday
and Saturday to pitch Sunday.
Imagine if starting pitchers Max
Scherzer or Stephen Strasburg could help
the Washington Nationals by blasting
home runs on their days off.
Or maybe Ohtani’s new team will play
him in the field — he can play first base
and the outfield — and then use him as a
pitcher in the late innings to blow away
batters with his high-speed heater.
So which team will Ohtani play for
next season? It’s hard to tell. American
League teams such as the Yankees, Texas
Rangers and Baltimore Orioles may have
an advantage because American League
rules allow the designated hitter and the
National League’s do not.
But wherever Ohtani plays, he will be
fun to watch.
After all, he may be the next Babe
Ruth.
The Massachusetts tribe whose
ancestors shared a Thanksgiving
meal with the Pilgrims nearly 400
years ago is reclaiming its long-lost
language, one schoolchild at a time.
The Mukayuhsak Weekuw, or
“Children’s House,” is an immersion
school for pre-K and kindergartenage children that was launched two
years ago by the Mashpee
Wampanoag (WAHM-puh-nawg)
tribe, whose ancestors hosted a
harvest celebration with the Pilgrims
in 1621 that helped form the basis for
the country’s Thanksgiving tradition.
The 19 children from
Wampanoag households are being
taught exclusively in
Wopanaotooaok (WOH-pah-nah-ohtoo-ohnk), a language that had not
been spoken for at least a century
until the tribe started an effort to
reclaim it more than two decades
ago.
The language brought to English
such words as “pumpkin” (spelled
“pohpukun” in Wopanaotooaok) and
“Massachusetts” (“masachoosut”),
but, like other native tongues, it was
lost through centuries of
colonialism.
— Associated Press
kidspost@washpost.com
STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bowen writes the sports opinion column for
KidsPost. He is the author of 22 sports books
for kids.
Students do their work at a Native
American tribe’s school that uses a
language that had died out.
By Craig Stowe
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
15
19
21
23
24
26
31
DOWN
Schubert’s
“The __ King”
Ruled
Strikes down
Gracie and
Woody
Like Crayola’s
Laser Lemon or
Shocking Pink
1983 Mr. T
comedy
Wall St.
purchase
Game with
cards
Starting squad
Business card
number
On fire
Driving need
Menu heading
Ranchero’s
rope
Reliable income
source
Run a tab,
say
End piece?
Work on the
docks
Scurries
D-Day transport
11/23/17
32 Title of honor
33 December has
two big ones
34 Hint of
remorse
35 Cross
36 Puts in order
37 “__ our letters
do not well
agree”: Brutus
38 Stuffing in
stuffed shells
40 Anne Rice
character
41 Destroys,
as a 40-Down
42 Aesop’s
“The __ in the
Lion’s Skin”
44 Florida
horse-breeding
city
46 Detergent
measure
48 Ritzy Twin
Cities suburb
49 Characteristic
50 Just making,
with “out”
55 Stained glass
setting
57 Knock
58 ’70s-’80s
Pakistani leader
59 Critical care
ctrs.
WEDNESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Visiting sister won’t lend a hand
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
Dear Carolyn: I
live overseas with
my husband and
two boys. My
sister visits often
due to work travel
and generous vacation benefits.
Sounds great — especially as I
have no other family member
who can visit as often, and I
would like my kids to know my
part of the family.
The problem is my sister. Her
visits cause extreme exhaustion
for both my husband and me.
She doesn’t help or take care of
herself in any way while visiting.
So in addition to juggling work
and two kids, we find ourselves
with another “kid” to cook for,
clean up after and entertain.
I have tried being more direct
— asking her to set the table or
pick up her stuff — but it doesn’t
work. I am now not being as
welcoming for when she offers to
visit, and will try to limit the
time she can come; I can take
three days max before I go crazy.
What else can I do?
— Sister Crazy
Carolyn
Hax
Sister Crazy: Have you tried
being direct-direct vs. just “more
direct”?
“Your visits are really
important to me, and I love that
my kids have a chance to know
you, but between work and kids I
don’t have the energy to be a
host in the traditional sense.
What I’d really like is for you to
pitch in as if you’re a member of
the household. Would you be
willing to do that? Another
option is a nearby hotel, but I’d
rather make it work with you
here.”
As I was typing this, all I could
think was that if you could say
this to her without her getting
defensive, then you probably
would have long since done so —
or, even better, she would have
had the self- and otherawareness to recognize that you
don’t treat working parents of
two kids as your chef, maid and
concierge on your travels.
But, since you’re already in the
process of cutting your sister off
by silent means, you might as
well take a shot at keeping her
close through communication
means.
That effort also can include
being more forceful in
establishing your limits. “I’m
cooking tonight, but I have a late
meeting tomorrow. Would you
please take charge of dinner?”
If she doesn’t get huffy in
response to clearer expectations
but also doesn’t get any more
considerate of your time and
effort — some people just can’t,
or won’t or mysteriously don’t
see the connection between the
domestic labors that occur in
their presence and the decency
in assuming their share of them
— then you can of course keep
pulling back on the visits.
You also, though, can just pull
back on the time and effort you
put into them. Don’t “host” in
the classic sense, don’t entertain
her, don’t clean up after her (till
she leaves, of course, and
consider hiring that out). Just
establish new terms for the visits
and live by them yourselves,
thereby leaving her to choose
between acting more like a
member of the family and
pitching in more toward your
household when she’s there, or
remaining in the guest role and
enjoying fewer comforts therein.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com.
KLMNO
SPORTS
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
JOHN FEINSTEIN
PRO BASKETBALL
OLYMPICS
TENNIS
Jim Harbaugh: Michigan’s conquering
hero who hasn’t conquered anything. D3
Celtics’ 16-game winning streak is halted
by the Heat in Miami, 104-98. D4
Ex-USA Gymnastics physician Larry
Nassar pleads guilty to sexual assault. D5
An appreciation of the sublime skill and
powerful will of the late Jana Novotna. D5
Wizards
run out
of gas
on road
last man standing
HORNETS 129,
WIZARDS 124 (OT)
Collapse comes with club
up nine late in fourth
BY
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
Samaje Perine’s NFL draft profile included this description, from an unidentified scout, of his running style: “All bully with very little ballerina.”
Football at FedEx
on Thanksgiving?
Bring on the weird.
“What should we do for
Thanksgiving?” isn’t
always a question, but
this year, the Gradert
family — parents Brad
and Courtney, kids
Dan
Madison and Hunter —
Steinberg had no obvious answer.
One side of the family
lives in the extreme northwest corner
of Iowa, something like a 12-hour
drive from the Graderts’ suburban
Indianapolis home. The other side
lives in Florida, which didn’t seem
feasible. So after the Graderts ordered
a new storm door and the installer
never showed up, a new idea was
hatched: They would return the door
and use that money to buy four tickets
to an NFL game being played several
hundred miles away.
Look, inspiration comes in many
forms.
(I know, a Thanksgiving game
preview column should focus on
football. Say, Washington’s backfield.
Which will feature No. 2 back Byron
Marshall and No. 3 back LeShun
Daniels, who have logged a combined
11 days on Washington’s active roster.
New starting center Tony Bergstrom,
who will become the 10th offensive
lineman to start a game this season, is
approaching his one-month
anniversary with the team, which I
STEINBERG CONTINUED ON D6
With a backfield decimated by injury, the Redskins turn
to Perine, a rookie with an old soul and a punishing style
BY
L IZ C LARKE
O
ne by one, they have disappeared from the Washington
Redskins’ roster the past four
months — Keith Marshall,
Matt Jones, Mack Brown, Rob
Kelley and Chris Thompson — amounting to a case study in why running backs
have the shortest NFL careers.
They’re battered virtually each time
they touch the ball or block for a teammate. And whether casualties of seasonending injury, poor performance or a
business-driven roster move, they’re often viewed as easily replaced.
Now comes rookie Samaje Perine — a
5-foot-11, 236-pound bulldozer of a back
with a running style described by an
unidentified NFL scout in his pre-draft
profile as “all bully with very little ballerina” — who may prove sturdier stuff.
Perine was anointed the Redskins’ lead
running back after Kelley’s season ended
with knee and ankle injuries. Perine
showed a veteran’s patience and grit in
Sunday’s overtime loss at New Orleans,
rushing for 117 yards (the first Redskins
back to break 100 since Kelley in Week 11
last year against Green Bay) and recording his first touchdown on the ground.
On Thursday night against the New
York Giants, the pressure on Perine will
get more intense. With Thompson joining Kelley on injured reserve after breaking his right leg against New Orleans,
Perine is now the most experienced back
in Coach Jay Gruden’s offense.
That’s a tremendous weight for an
athlete who turned 22 in September. But
since childhood, Perine has had the manner and maturity of someone much older.
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D6
The Redskins’ offensive backfield has been a revolving door, mostly because of injuries.
Keith Marshall was put on injured reserve in preseason, and Matt Jones was released.
PLAYER
STARTS
CAR.
YDS.
Robert Kelley
Chris Thompson
Samaje Perine
7
1
2
62
64
89
194 3.1
294 4.6
327 3.7
AVG.
TD
STATUS
3
2
1
On IR with knee, ankle injuries
On IR with broken right leg
Current starter
Thanksgiving football menu
Vikings at Lions
Chargers at Cowboys
Giants at Redskins
12:30 p.m., Fox
4:30 p.m., CBS
8:30 p.m., NBC
Lineups, matchups and story lines: Everything to get you ready for tonight’s game. D7
GENE WANG
charlotte — The Washington
Wizards played for the third time
in four days Wednesday night,
and before tip-off, Coach Scott
Brooks indicated fatigue was all
but inevitable, though he wasn’t
about to offer it as an excuse for
poor execution.
Neither did Wizards players
following a 129-124 overtime loss
to the Charlotte Hornets in
which Washington failed to preserve a nine-point lead in the
final minutes of regulation at
Spectrum Center.
“We were probably a little
weary, but this is us. This is our
life,” guard Bradley Beal said.
“We’ve got to be ready to go no
matter who we’re playing, what
day it is, what time it is. Fatigue
was probably a little bit of a
factor, but at the same time we’ve
got to go out and do whatever it
takes to win.”
Charlotte took the lead for
good at 119-116 on point guard
Kemba Walker’s three-pointer
with 3:20 left in overtime. Backup guard-forward Jeremy Lamb
followed with a layup, and Washington (10-8) got no closer than
two the rest of the way.
The Wizards allowed 15 points
in the five-minute overtime, and
the Hornets’ total marked the
second-most Washington has allowed this season. The loss
wrapped up a 1-2 trip, and the
team now gets two days to regroup before hosting Portland on
Saturday night.
The Hornets (8-9) got to the
free throw line 18 more times
than Washington and held a
33-17 advantage in makes.
“You’ve got to fight through
the mental parts of the game,”
Brooks said. “We scored enough
to be tired, so we needed to
defend enough. They got 40 free
throws. Put them on the free
throw line too much. It’s all
about being disciplined. Getting
them on the free throw line is not
by choice. It’s a mistake. Give
them credit. They were getting
there.”
Beal and John Wall shook off
early misses to combine to score
13 of the Wizards’ final 15 points
in regulation. The all-star backcourt duo had concluded the first
half shooting 6 for 22 but finished with 53 points overall in
front an announced crowd of
16,041.
Wall had a season-high
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D4
Trail Blazers at Wizards
Saturday, 7 p.m., NBCSW
As James Madison can attest,
real college playo≠ is possible
These are the
words of Kyre
Hawkins, senior
linebacker for
James Madison
University, who
Barry
will finish practice
Svrluga
in Harrisonburg,
Va., on Wednesday
morning, travel home to
Baltimore for Thanksgiving with
family and friends and then
return for another week’s work
Saturday: “Everybody starts a
new, second half of the season
0-0.”
In the Football Championship
Subdivision — Division I-AA to
you old-school types — that
second half of the season means
everything, and out-of-the-way,
marginal bowl games are scoffed
at. Pay attention to what JMU
already has done (winning last
year’s national title) and will try
to do over the next six weeks
(back that up with a perfect,
undefeated season) because this
is a model others could — or
perhaps should — try to copy.
The upcoming weekend in
football brings NFL games both
meaningful (Vikings-Lions) and
mediocre (Giants-Redskins),
college games with an impact on
the national championship
(Alabama-Auburn) and rivalries
named after groceries (the Egg
Bowl, the Apple Cup, etc.).
But those teams starting the
“second half of the season,” as
Hawkins said and knows? They’re
all from the FCS.
“The regular season is done,”
JMU Coach Mike Houston said by
phone Monday. “We obviously
had a very special one and
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D3
Ovechkin-Backstrom pairing
reunited, and it feels so good
CAPITALS 5,
SENATORS 2
BY
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Nicklas Backstrom, above, and Alex Ovechkin were linemates for
the first time this season, and the switch helped spark Washington.
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
It was as if the clock turned
back to last season — or any of the
past 10. There was Alex Ovechkin,
stick raised, leg kicked up, fist
pumping. And there was Nicklas
Backstrom, arms raised as he
skated to meet Ovechkin and
envelop him in a hug. They have
spent the past decade as the
Capitals’ dynamic duo, playing
the majority of their careers on a
line together. Reunited on
Wednesday night, they picked up
right where they left off.
Washington
had
played
22 games with Ovechkin and
Backstrom on separate lines, and
with both players slumping and
the team having lost three of four,
Capitals Coach Barry Trotz returned to his tried and true pairing. The result was a rejuvenated
top-six forward corps in Washington’s 5-2 win over Ottawa.
After Backstrom and Ovechkin
got a break from each other for
the first quarter of the season,
Trotz described the rekindling of
their on-ice marriage as such: “If
you love something, set it free. If
it comes back, it was meant to be.”
“I don’t think there was any
doubt,” Ovechkin said. “We understand each other, how we have
to play. Obviously, we played [together] a long time. So I think it
worked out perfectly today.”
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D4
Lightning at Capitals
Tomorrow, 5 p.m., NBCSW
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
EARLY LEAD
Russians
lose medals
for doping
violations
BY
Louisville
recruit
won’t play
for school
NATIONALS
M ATT B ONESTEEL
The International Olympic
Committee stripped Russians Alexander Tretyakov and Elena Nikitina of their skeleton medals
from the 2014 Sochi Olympics over
doping violations.
Tretyakov is the second Russian
to have his Sochi gold medal taken
away, joining cross-country skier
Alexander Legkov. Nikitina won a
bronze medal. Both sliders, who
were seen as medal contenders at
next year’s PyeongChang Winter
Games, also are banned from future Olympics.
Barring an appeal, two Americans will move up in the final
skeleton results from 2014, with
Matthew Antoine improving from
bronze to silver in the men’s competition and Katie Uhlaender
moving from fourth to the bronze
medal in the women’s. Uhlaender
missed out on the bronze by
0.04 seconds and said this month
that she was still coming to grips
with the thought of becoming an
Olympic medalist 31/2 years after
the fact.
“I can’t even put my head there,”
she told the Associated Press.
Russians won 33 medals in
Sochi, the most of any country. Six
have been taken away after evidence of a state-sponsored doping
operation both leading up to and
during the Games was uncovered.
The United States, with 28 medals,
now leads the Sochi table after
Wednesday’s skeleton announcements.
The IOC will announce early
next month whether it will ban
Russian athletes from next year’s
Games as further punishment for
the doping scheme. It did not issue
a blanket ban of Russian athletes
for last year’s Summer Olympics
in Rio de Janeiro, ruling that individual sports federations could
decide whether specially vetted
Russians could compete as “neutral” athletes. That option apparently is on the table again, though
Russian sports leaders have said
they would boycott the PyeongChang Games if their athletes
aren’t allowed to compete under
the Russian flag.
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“If I can do it with my
circumstances, surely
you can do it.”
CAM NEWTON,
Panthers quarterback, who posted his
mug shot on Instagram on Tuesday to
mark the nine-year anniversary of
when he got arrested for allegedly
stealing a laptop. Newton aimed to
inspire people to overcome their own
troubles. (Via Early Lead)
BY
MASTERPRESS/GETTY IMAGES
Shohei Ohtani soon will be free to sign with any of MLB’s 30 teams, but some have an advantage in recruiting him.
Will the Nationals pursue Ohtani?
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
Late Tuesday, Major League Baseball
and Nippon Professional Baseball came
to an agreement on a new posting
system, according to reports by the New
York Post, Yahoo Sports and others.
That agreement will allow Japanese
star Shohei Ohtani to sign with any of
the 30 MLB teams and consequently
will set off an unprecedented recruiting
frenzy for what many describe as an
unprecedented talent.
Ohtani, 23, is known for his prolific
power and prolific fastball, which has
hit 102 mph. He tantalizes dreamers
with the promise of a legitimate twoway player not seen since Babe Ruth
and entices professional evaluators
with the potential for a front-line
starter who can chip in offensively now
and then, too. Any team could use a
player like that, including the
Washington Nationals. Will they pursue
him?
The short answer is sure. Who
wouldn’t? One of Nationals General
Manager Mike Rizzo’s most-used
phrases is “due diligence,” which
usually refers to showing an interest in
a free agent or making calls on potential
trades. You call. You ask. You see what it
would take. The Nationals will do their
due diligence on Ohtani, whatever they
determine that is.
But logistically, they simply cannot
mount the kind of pursuit that other
teams can. Under the reported terms of
that posting agreement, whichever
team signs Ohtani must pay his
Japanese team, the Hokkaido NipponHam Fighters, $20 million. For the
Nationals, conservative and slow
moving in their spending, that fee
sounds prohibitively high.
Even if it weren’t, the Nationals are
crippled by their recent international
spending. The Nationals blew by their
2016 international bonus pool when
they spent nearly $5 million on more
than a dozen players in a year they were
allotted just $2.35 million — a signing
The two-way Japanese star
will be coming to MLB soon,
but is D.C. a realistic option?
class those within the organization
think could yield one or two bona fide
major leaguers, though they are still
teenagers and therefore years away.
But in keeping with the penalties
outlined in the old collective bargaining
agreement — penalties that carry over
into this year’s July 2 international
signing period — the league penalized
the Nationals by limiting them to a
maximum of $300,000 on any one
bonus over the next two seasons. As a
result, they can only offer Ohtani
$300,000 as a signing bonus. The Texas
Rangers and New York Yankees, not
under penalty and with the two biggest
international pools available, can
commit about $3.5 million.
Still, had Ohtani waited two years
until he was 25, he would not have been
subject to signing bonus limits that
govern the way teams acquire younger
international talent.
If money were the only concern, he
would have waited two seasons, at
which time he could have earned tens of
millions more. The former Nippon
Professional Baseball MVP is reportedly
more interested in the chance to
compete in the world’s most talent-rich
league and to do so both as a pitcher and
hitter.
In that realm, like the financial one,
the Nationals can offer Ohtani far less
than other teams. Their starting lineup
is all but set. Their rotation, while in
need of help, is not desperate for a
front-line starter around which they
would be willing to reconfigure their
schedule so that Ohtani — used to
pitching once a week — could transition
comfortably. American League teams
can offer the designated hitter and
wouldn’t need Ohtani to play the field
as he did as an outfielder for the
Fighters.
Besides, the Nationals do not have a
history of chasing Asian-born players
under Rizzo’s watch. Much like their
reticence to spend on Cuban players,
who command huge deals before
proving anything in MLB, the Nationals
have been cautious in their approach to
Asian talent, largely because of the
belief that comparable, more proven
talent is available in other marketplaces
— for more manageable prices.
In other words, Ohtani seems
unlikely to find his way to Washington.
But he is not the only remarkable talent
available on the international market.
On Tuesday, MLB announced the
results of its investigation into the
Atlanta Braves’ international dealings.
Among the punishments levied on the
Nationals’ division rivals was the
release of a dozen international
prospects the Braves signed during the
past three international signing
periods. One of them, Venezuelan Kevin
Maitan, is a highly touted 17-year-old
shortstop the Braves signed for
$4.2 million. Maitan was ranked 72nd
on Baseball America’s midseason top
100 but received less-positive reviews as
a professional than he did during his
much-discussed amateur days.
According to reports from the
Athletic, the New York Post and others,
the released Braves prospects will be
subject to the same bonus pool rules as
any other — though teams can use
either their remaining money from
their 2017-18 July 2 funds or from next
season’s (but not a combination of
both). The Nationals’ penalties for
overspending in 2016 extend to next
season, meaning the most they can offer
any of the former Braves prospects is
$300,000. Other teams probably will be
willing and able to offer Maitan and
others more.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
nationals
Barcelona wins group
in Champions League
Barcelona secured the top spot
in Group D of the Champions
League on Wednesday in Turin,
Italy, with a 0-0 draw at
Juventus, which will have to wait
until the final round to qualify
for the knockout stages.
Barcelona, which rested
Lionel Messi for the first half,
was closest to breaking the
deadlock when Ivan Rakitic hit
the post with a free kick. Paulo
Dybala almost scored a
stoppage-time winner for
Juventus, but Marc-Andre Ter
Stegen palmed his effort around
the post.
Juventus remained second in
the group but is only a point
ahead of Sporting Lisbon, which
beat Olympiakos, 3-1. The Italian
side — which reached the final in
two of the past three seasons —
visits Olympiakos in the final
round. . . . .
Neymar scored twice as host
Paris Saint-Germain produced
its biggest win in the Champions
League with a 7-1 thrashing of
Celtic. . . .
In Baku, Azerbaijan, Willian
helped move Chelsea to the
Brian Bowen, the heralded basketball prospect whose recruitment led to an FBI investigation
and the firing of Hall of Fame
Louisville coach Rick Pitino, will
not play for the Cardinals, the
school announced Wednesday. In
a statement, the school said it will
allow Bowen to remain at Louisville and continue to receive his
athletic scholarship. It also will
give Bowen written permission to
contact other programs about
transferring if he desires to leave.
But he will not be allowed to practice or play for Louisville “at any
point in the future.”
“Brian has been a responsible
young man for the institution
since he enrolled,” interim Louisville athletic director Vince Tyra
said in the statement. “He has
endeared himself to his teammates and the men’s basketball
staff with a positive attitude during a very difficult period.”
Bowen, a forward from Indiana
who was the 19th-ranked recruit
in the class of 2017 by 247 Sports,
surprised many when he announced his intention in June to
play for the Cardinals. But according to a criminal complaint unveiled by the U.S. Justice Department in September, Bowen agreed
to attend Louisville only after Adidas executive Jim Gatto promised
to pay the player’s family
$100,000. Pitino, who had a longtime relationship with Adidas, has
said he had no knowledge of such
a scheme, but a federal indictment
unveiled earlier this month said
Pitino agreed with the plan to pay
Bowen.
Louisville placed Pitino on administrative leave with the intention of firing him one day after the
Justice Department revealed the
results of its investigation. The
school formally cut ties with the
two-time NCAA champion a few
weeks later. It also suspended Bowen from the team. Bowen’s attorney announced this month that
the FBI had cleared Bowen of any
wrongdoing, which seemingly
could have cleared a path for him
to return. But according to ESPN’s
Jeff Goodman, the school never
sought reinstatement for Bowen.
Gatto is one of 10 college basketball assistants, shoe-company executives and financial advisers to
be charged in the wide-ranging
federal investigation into college
basketball recruiting. He faces
four counts of wire fraud and
money laundering.
Louisville also announced
Wednesday that it has “parted
ways” with associate head coach
Kenny Johnson, who was not
named in the FBI’s criminal complaint but was placed on administrative leave after the school said it
was looking into his role in the FBI
investigation. Johnson is the second Louisville assistant to be dismissed over the investigation.
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NFL
DIG ES T
SOCCER
M ATT B ONESTEEL
knockout stage of the
Champions League, winning a
game-changing penalty and
scoring twice in a 4-0 victory
over Qarabag. . . .
Antoine Griezmann scored as
host Atletico Madrid defeated
Roma, 2-0, to keep alive its hopes
of advancing in the Champions
League. . . .
Manchester United lost, 1-0, to
Basel in the Champions League
in Basel, Switzerland, leaving all
of the qualification places open
in Group A with a game left. . . .
New Zealand coach Anthony
Hudson resigned a week after
his team’s loss to Peru in a World
Cup playoff. Hudson, a 36-yearold who coached two seasons for
Real Maryland, has been linked
to the Colorado Rapids of Major
League Soccer. . . .
World Cup-bound Saudi
Arabia fired coach Edgardo
Bauza. The Saudi Arabia
Football Federation announced
the Argentine’s exit after only
five friendlies.
COLLEGES
Injured Florida quarterback
Luke Del Rio decided to end his
college career. Del Rio posted on
Twitter that he will participate in
senior day activities before the
team’s season finale Saturday
against Florida State. Del Rio, a
fifth-year senior, had been
granted a sixth year of eligibility.
The son of Oakland Raiders
Coach Jack Del Rio also spent
time at Alabama and Oregon
State in his college career. . . .
Tennessee dismissed wide
receiver Jauan Jennings from
the team after he ripped the
coaching staff in a profanitylaced video on Instagram. . . .
Kent State football coach Paul
Haynes was fired after five
losing seasons. . . .
The Georgia Tech men’s
basketball team, which already
has two players suspended for
NCAA violations, announced
sophomore guard Justin Moore
will miss two games for an
undisclosed rules violation. Also,
assistant coach Darryl LaBarrie
was placed on administrative
leave while the school
investigates an alleged violation.
TENNIS
Maria Sharapova is being
investigated by police in India in
a cheating and criminal
conspiracy case involving a real
estate company that used the
star to endorse a luxury housing
project that never took off.
Real estate firm Homestead
Infrastructure is accused of
taking millions of dollars from
home buyers for a project named
“Ballet by Maria Sharapova,” a
luxury apartment complex with
its own helipad, tennis academy
and other amenities.
Piyush Singh, a lawyer
representing one of the home
buyers, said Sharapova’s
celebrity was the reason most
people put their money into the
project. Singh said his client,
Bhawana Agarwal, paid
Homestead Infrastructure
$81,678 in 2013 because she was
impressed by Sharapova’s
association with the project.
Agarwal spent the next three
years chasing the builders for
updates on her investment, but
they stopped taking her calls,
Singh said.
BASEBALL
The Baltimore Orioles
acquired pitcher Konner Wade
from the Colorado Rockies for
$500,000 in international
signing bonus pool allocation.
Also, Baltimore acquired
outfielder Jaycob Brugman from
the Oakland Athletics for cash or
a player to be named. . . .
The Philadelphia Phillies
hired Pedro Guerrero, 28, as
assistant hitting coach.
— From news services
12:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45), WJFK (106.7 FM)
Los Angeles Chargers at Dallas » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13), WJFK (106.7 FM)
New York Giants at Washington » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11),
WTEM (980 AM), WMAL (630 AM and 105.9 FM)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
Mississippi at Mississippi State » ESPN
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
11:30 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
2 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
3 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
5 p.m.
5 p.m.
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
9 p.m.
10 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
11:30 p.m.
Midnight (Fri.)
1 a.m. (Fri.)
AdvoCare Invitational: Missouri vs. Long Beach State » ESPN2
Battle 4 Atlantis semifinal: Tennessee vs. Villanova » ESPN
AdvoCare Invitational: St. John’s vs. Oregon State » ESPNU
PK80 Invitational, Victory bracket: North Carolina vs. Portland » ESPN
Battle 4 Atlantis semifinal: North Carolina State vs. Northern Iowa » ESPN2
NIT Season Tip-Off: Virginia vs. Vanderbilt » ESPNU
Wooden Legacy: Harvard vs. Saint Mary’s » ESPNews
PK80 Invitational, Motion bracket: Duke vs. Portland State » ESPN
Las Vegas Invitational: Xavier vs. George Washington » Fox Sports 1
PK80 Invitational, Victory bracket: Arkansas vs. Oklahoma » ESPN2
NIT Season Tip-Off: Seton Hall vs. Rhode Island » ESPNU
PK80 Invitational, Motion bracket: Butler vs. Texas » ESPN2
Las Vegas Invitational: Kansas State vs. Arizona State » Fox Sports 1
AdvoCare Invitational: West Virginia vs. Marist » ESPNews
PK80 Invitational, Victory bracket: Connecticut vs. Oregon » ESPNU
PK80 Invitational, Motion bracket: Florida vs. Stanford » ESPN2
Wooden Legacy: Georgia vs. Cal State Fullerton » ESPNews
PK80 Invitational, Victory bracket: Michigan State vs. DePaul » ESPN
PK80 Invitational, Motion bracket: Ohio State vs. Gonzaga » ESPN2
Wooden Legacy: Sacramento State vs. San Diego State » ESPNU
GOLF
8 p.m.
1 a.m. (Fri.)
PGA Tour of Australasia: Australian Open, second round » Golf Channel
European Tour: Hong Kong Open, second round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
3 p.m.
WTA: Hawaii Open, doubles quarterfinals » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
3 p.m.
UEFA Europa League: Koln vs. Arsenal » Fox Sports 1
UEFA Europa League: Konyaspor vs. Olympique de Marseille » Fox Sports 2
UEFA Europa League: Everton vs. Atalanta » Fox Sports 1
UEFA Europa League: AC Milan vs. Austria Wien » Fox Sports 2
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
At Michigan, Harbaugh was seen as a conquering hero. Is he running out of time?
It is almost
impossible to
believe that there
may be the tiniest
shred of doubt
creeping into the
John
voices of
Feinstein
Michigan football
fans when they
speak of Jim Harbaugh.
After all, when Harbaugh
returned to coach Michigan
almost three years ago, the
question wasn’t if he would lead
the Wolverines back to national
glory but when.
Almost arrived last fall when
Michigan took a 10-1 record into
its annual life-or-death battle
with Ohio State — which was
also 10-1 on that November
Saturday. The Big Ten East
division title was at stake, as
was a potential shot at the
national championship.
The Buckeyes, playing at
home, escaped, 30-27, in
overtime, picking up a do-or-die
fourth down by perhaps an
inch. Going into that game,
Harbaugh was 20-4 in two
seasons.
One year later, as the
Wolverines prepare to host the
Buckeyes on Saturday, Ohio
State already has clinched the
Big Ten East but is on the
outside of the College Football
Playoff race. Michigan is 8-3 and
has gone 8-5 beginning with
that memorable game a year
ago. The Wolverines are
unranked and almost certainly
are looking at a spot in one of
those bowls that exist only to fill
up TV time during the holiday
season.
A fall from grace? Not quite.
And there are certainly
explanations for the sputtering
season: 10 starters graduated on
the defensive side of the ball;
quarterbacks have been falling
like trees in a forest — or
quarterbacks in College Park,
depending on your point of
view.
So what’s gone wrong? Has
anything actually gone wrong?
Certainly, three seasons into the
Era of Harbaugh, it is way too
soon to panic. Or is it?
There is almost no way to
exaggerate the hype and hope
that surrounded Harbaugh’s
return to Michigan in December
2014. Harbaugh, who played
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Jim Harbaugh went 20-4 in his first 24 games as head coach at Michigan but has gone 8-5 since and has fallen short of lofty expectations.
quarterback for the revered Bo
Schembechler during the 1980s,
leading the Wolverines to a
21-3-1 record during his junior
and senior seasons, had known
nothing but success as a head
coach, going 29-6 in three
seasons at the University of San
Diego; 29-21 in four seasons at
Stanford, where he took a
moribund program from 4-8 his
first season to 12-1 his last; and
44-19-1, including a trip to the
Super Bowl, during his four NFL
seasons in San Francisco.
When it became apparent
that Brady Hoke had worn out
his welcome as Michigan’s coach
after his record got a bit worse
in each of his four seasons, the
only name bandied about
among Michigan people was
Harbaugh’s, spoken in whispers
and written in capital letters.
There was a book about
Harbaugh’s homecoming
published before Harbaugh
coached a game in Ann Arbor.
He did everything but ride into
town on a white horse — or,
even better, a maize-and-blue
horse.
In many ways, Michigan’s
wanderings in college football’s
minor-bowl desert had started
on the day Schembechler died:
Nov. 17, 2006. The night before,
the legend had given his annual
pre-Ohio State pep talk to the
team, emotionally telling them
that they should all grow up to
be like Tom Slade, who had been
Michigan’s quarterback in 1971
and had died earlier that week.
If you do that, Schembechler
said, you will be “true Michigan
men.”
A day after Schembechler’s
death, the undefeated
Wolverines lost, 42-39, to the
undefeated Buckeyes.
It has never been quite the
same at Michigan since.
Lloyd Carr, who had won a
national championship in 1997
and produced consistent
winning teams for 13 years, was
eased out as coach after a 9-4
record in 2007 — and a sixth
loss in seven years to Ohio State.
Rich Rodriguez, who had won
big at West Virginia, was hired
to replace him. Three years
later, after going a shocking
15-22, Rodriguez was run out of
town. In came Hoke, who
promptly went 11-2 his first
season largely with players
recruited by Rodriguez.
Order had been restored. Not
quite. Under Hoke, Michigan
bottomed at 5-7 in 2014. Enter,
Harbaugh. Cue the trumpets.
For 24 games, it was all good
as Harbaugh — largely with
Hoke recruits — brought back
much of the glory. Then came
the heartbreaking loss at Ohio
State a year ago followed by a
33-32 loss in the Orange Bowl to
Florida State.
A chink in the armor?
Perhaps. But back-to-back 10-3
seasons still looked pretty good.
Then 11 players moved on to
the NFL. Everyone at Michigan
knew there would be some
rebuilding needed this fall. But
no one dreamed that the
Wolverines would be just a step
up from absolute mediocrity.
Even their victories have been
unimpressive. A year ago,
Michigan outscored the Big
Ten’s new doormats, Maryland
and Rutgers, by a combined
137-3. This year, Michigan still
won both games easily, but the
total margin was 70-24. A win is
a win, but the difference was
noticeable.
Regardless of Saturday’s
outcome, next season probably
will be the first since
Harbaugh’s coronation that he
will come under some scrutiny.
Almost every Michigan player
will be a Harbaugh recruit. For
various reasons, Harbaugh has
never stayed any place as a head
coach beyond his fourth season.
He draws a lot of attention to
himself, much of it good, some
of it not so good. Everyone who
knows him — everyone — knows
he can be a tough nut.
After Jim’s 49ers faced older
brother John in the Super Bowl
five years ago and John’s
Baltimore Ravens won, 34-31 —
the game climaxing when the
49ers, down 34-29, stalled at the
Baltimore 5-yard line — Jim
complained loudly about the
officiating. It was several weeks
before the brothers spoke on the
phone. When John was asked in
a radio interview how the
conversation had gone, his
answer was honest: “Not very
well.”
Harbaugh will be beloved as
long as he wins, and at
Michigan, that doesn’t mean 8-4
and a minor bowl trip or even
10-3 with one of the losses to
Ohio State.
He isn’t being paid more than
$7 million a year to get to the
meaningless fill-in-thecorporate-name bowl. He is
supposed to be the Michigan
man leading the Wolverines to
where Schembechler and Carr
led them.
Not long ago, there were
those who would have willingly
changed the words in the iconic
fight song to “Hail to the
Harbaughs valiant.” Those
Harbaughs — or victors — are
supposed to march to victories
over teams like Alabama, Notre
Dame, Southern California and
— most of all — Ohio State.
No one at Michigan hails
wins over Maryland and
Rutgers. Year 4 in the Era of
Harbaugh will be fascinating.
sports@washpost.com
For more by John Feinstein, visit
washingtonpost.com/feinstein.
BARRY SVRLUGA
Expanded playoffs actually can happen
SVRLUGA FROM D1
achieved some great things. But
we push that over to the side now,
and you’re starting a new season.”
Why couldn’t Alabama,
Clemson, Oklahoma and
Wisconsin be the top four seeds in
a thrilling, 16-team, month-long
College Football Playoff? After all,
the NCAA already sponsors one —
with even more teams — just a
rung below.
The 24-team FCS tournament
begins Saturday with eight oncampus games across the country.
Watching those games intensely
will be the eight teams that
earned byes — including JMU, the
top seed, which awaits the winner
of Stony Brook-Lehigh. That
second-round game will be
played Dec. 2 in Harrisonburg.
“It’s going to be exciting,” JMU
quarterback Bryan Schor said. “I
know our students love the
playoffs and the home games. I
recommend they bring a jacket.”
And off we go. The Dukes have
earned the right to host as many
as three playoff games,
culminating in the national
semifinals the weekend of Dec. 16.
That leads to the national title
game in Frisco, Tex., on Jan. 6, two
days before Atlanta hosts the title
game for the (absurdly named)
Football Bowl Subdivision.
Yet doesn’t the larger
tournament produce a more
legitimate champion?
“I love it,” Schor said. “I think
it’s a great way to end the season,
and it’s exciting for the entire
country to watch. It’s almost a
little bit like March Madness. You
get to see a bunch of different
matchups. And in the end, you
feel confident that the best team
in the country is the national
champion.”
What a concept.
The Alabamas and Ohio States
of the world are a lot more
confident that their national
champion is determined on the
field than they were even five
years ago because the four-team
College Football Playoff at least
provides a mini-tournament to
crown a victor.
The fourth version of the
College Football Playoff awaits us
New Year’s Day, and it comes at a
time when the powers that run it
aren’t really talking about
expanding to eight or 16 teams.
The FBS schools aren’t giving up
their conference title games, and
they’re not giving up their
lucrative ties to the roughly
348,152 bowl games that
occasionally pit 6-6 teams against
each other to determine who has
a losing season.
So the presidents and athletic
directors from FBS schools
present expanding beyond a fourteam playoff as an impossibility,
conveniently leaning on obstacles
such as “student-athlete welfare”
and “academics” as potential
obstacles.
And yet programs such as
James Madison balance all those
needs while potentially playing
15 games — or, if one of the teams
that didn’t earn a bye advanced to
the title game, 16 games — just
fine.
“We do a good job of handling
all the different types of
scenarios,” said Hawkins, the
senior linebacker. “We’re good at
handling a distraction. We enjoy
something when we have time to,
but at other times, we block out
the distractions, and when it’s
time to get down and handle
business, we do that.”
The business, during the
playoffs, can include final exams
— a hurdle presidents at FBS
schools have cited as a problem in
expanding the highest-level
playoff (even though not all
schools are on the same academic
calendar). Last year, James
Madison’s national semifinal
game coincided with the school’s
exam week, when the Dukes were
in Fargo, N.D., to face North
Dakota State, which had won five
national championships in a row.
So the Dukes brought along an
associate athletic director to help
coordinate academic issues and
several academic support staff
members to proctor exams.
Hawkins, for example, took his
Italian final in the dining area of a
Fargo hotel.
“It was just like being in the
classroom,” Hawkins said. “We
still had to tend to our
schoolwork.”
Hawkins tended to his exam
Thursday. On Friday, the Dukes
tended to North Dakota State,
winning, 27-17.
Still, 15 games is a lot of
football. JMU’s opponent in last
year’s title game, Youngstown
State, didn’t have the first-round
bye, so it played 16 times.
“If the FBS schools wanted to
go to a [larger] playoff system,
they’d have to do something
about the regular season,”
Houston said. “If you get to where
you’re playing 18 games or
something like that, I worry
about student-athlete well-being.
We try to be very, very
conscientious about the work we
do with our kids as we get deeper
into the playoffs.”
So how to set up an FCS-style
playoff for the FBS schools?
Take, say, Alabama. Should the
Crimson Tide reach the national
title game for the third straight
year, it likely would play
15 games: 12 in the regular season,
the Southeastern Conference
championship game (should the
Tide beat Auburn on Saturday),
and then two games in the
College Football Playoff.
We already know, however,
that NCAA officials (who don’t
run the College Football Playoff )
have sanctioned 16-game seasons.
Witness Youngstown State, 2016.
So adding a national quarterfinal
game wouldn’t be that hard, and
JMU’s experience juggling an
exam week on the road easily
could be applied to an Alabama.
So allow the Tide to host a
national quarterfinal in
Tuscaloosa. Grant the champs of
each of the Power Five
conferences automatic bids and
issue invitations to three at-large
programs, each of them worthy.
Getting to eight is easy. Getting
to 16? That requires more work,
but it’s doable. Ax one of the
(meaningless) nonconference
games the Power Five programs
play. Did Alabama need to play
Mercer the week before it travels
to Auburn? A scoreboard that
read 56-0 and a box score that
showed the Tide with a 530-161
advantage in total yards would
say no. Taking away one regular
season game would allow for it
all: a conference title game, then
as many as four playoff games.
What a world.
For now, that’s all a dream.
Unless you play at James
Madison’s level.
“We have a chance to do
something very, very special,”
Houston said.
And they have a special format
in which to do it.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
WA S H I N G T O N R E D S K I N S V S . N E W Y O R K G I A N T S
NOVEMBER 23
/
8:30 PM
/
GAME PRESENTED BY
FEDEXFIELD
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
Tried and true line helps Capitals cruise
CAPITALS FROM D1
Despite the Capitals’ recent
struggles, they entered the game
just three points out of first place
in the Metropolitan Division.
Wednesday’s win means Washington will maintain a hold on its
playoff position with 25 points a
quarter through the season, significant because, since the NHL
expanded to 30 clubs in 2000,
roughly 80 percent of playoff
teams on Thanksgiving go on to
make the postseason.
Against the Senators, the Capitals got some much-needed production out of their reconstructed top two lines. Ovechkin had
been skating with center Evgeny
Kuznetsov and Devante SmithPelly, but that trio entered without an even-strength point in its
past six games. Backstrom’s
slump has been especially prolonged — just four points and no
goals in the past 15 games. But
when Trotz was asked Tuesday
why he hasn’t started a game with
Ovechkin and Backstrom on a
line together, he coyly responded,
“Just don’t feel like it.”
Trotz told players about the
lineup shake-up Wednesday
morning. Tom Wilson completed
the top trio with Ovechkin and
Backstrom. Kuznetsov then centered T.J. Oshie and Jakub Vrana.
“We needed that,” Backstrom
said. “It wasn’t working the way
we had played, so I’m sure the
coaching staff felt that way, and
they wanted to switch things up.”
Both lines scored in the first
period to give the Capitals an
early 2-0 lead. Less than a week
ago, Vrana was a healthy scratch
in Washington’s game against the
Colorado Avalanche, breathing
heavily through a lengthy conditioning skate in the thin Denver
air as Trotz tried to send a message that he wanted to see more
from the 21-year-old rookie.
Though Washington lost Monday’s game against Calgary, Vrana’s play was a bright spot; he
collected the primary assist on
the Capitals’ only goal. He turned
that into a promotion back into
the top-six forward corps against
the Senators. Vrana went to the
front of the net and then punched
in the rebound from a Kuznetsov
shot to lift the team to a 1-0 lead
15:21 into the game.
The long-awaited Ovechkin-
. THURSDAY,
NHL ROUNDUP
Anderson’s goal extends
Columbus’s win streak
BLUE JACKETS 1,
FLAMES 0 (OT)
A SSOCIATED P RESS
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
It was like old times as the Capitals’ Alex Ovechkin, left, had a goal and was paired with Nicklas Backstrom.
Capitals 5, Senators 2
OTTAWA .................................. 0
WASHINGTON ......................... 2
1
2
1 —
1 —
2
5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Washington, Vrana 5 (Kuznetsov, Oshie),
15:21. 2, Washington, Ovechkin 14 (Backstrom, Chiasson), 19:55.
C A PITA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
vs. Tampa Bay Lightning
Tomorrow
5 NBCSW,
NHL Network
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Washington, Kuznetsov 6 (Carlson, Oshie),
7:41 (pp). 4, Washington, Vrana 6 (Orlov, Kuznetsov),
9:55. 5, Ottawa, Dzingel 6 (Chabot, Burrows), 16:37.
THIRD PERIOD
at Toronto Maple Leafs
Saturday
Scoring: 6, Ottawa, Hoffman 7 (Stone, Brassard), 12:46.
7, Washington, Chiasson 3 (Orpik), 18:29.
7 NBCSW Plus,
NHL Network
vs. Los Angeles Kings
SHOTS ON GOAL
OTTAWA ................................ 11
11
9 — 31
WASHINGTON ....................... 11
6
8 — 25
Power-play opportunities: Ottawa 0 of 3 Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 7-6-3 (24 shots-20 saves). Washington,
Holtby 12-5-0 (31-29). A: 18,506 (18,277). T: 2:27.
Backstrom connection came
next. In the last minute of the first
period, Backstrom passed the
puck up to Alex Chiasson as
Washington broke out of its own
zone. Chiasson hit Ovechkin in
stride, springing him for a partial
breakaway on Senators goaltender Craig Anderson. With five
seconds left until intermission,
Ovechkin’s shot went off the
crossbar and in the net, snapping
a six-game goal drought.
“That’s something they’ve developed over a long time, and just
naturally, their skill sets complement each other,” Capitals defenseman Matt Niskanen said. “I
Nov. 30
7 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM),
WFED (1500 AM)
think they’ve been with each other so long that it’s just instinct
now of where the other one is
going to be, what areas of the ice
they look for. They read well off
each other because they’ve been
together for a long time. No
surprise that they got on the
board.”
That was the 218th time Backstrom has assisted on a goal by
Ovechkin. Backstrom often has
the defensive responsibility of
going head-to-head with the opponent’s top trio, so he gets considerably more defensive zone
starts than Kuznetsov. But while
that may not naturally suit
Ovechkin’s game, it wasn’t an
issue against Ottawa; the line
with Derick Brassard was kept in
check all game. Washington started to look like its old self for
stretches of the game, putting
together extended offensive zone
shifts as a way to wear down its
opponent.
The Capitals continued to
build on their lead in the second
period, adding a power-play goal
by Kuznetsov for his second point
of the game. Then 9:55 into the
period, Vrana unfurled a shot that
seemed to magically disappear.
The puck had gotten past Anderson, wedged underneath the
cage’s water bottle but nevertheless inside the net to give Washington a 4-0 lead. After several
seconds of confusion, the goal
horn went off and Vrana
shrugged with a smile.
It was just that kind of a night
for Washington’s new top two
lines.
“When they change the lines, it
always is a little bit of a wake-up
call that things aren’t working
and we’ve got to find something
that can stick and work,” Oshie
said. “Tonight it did.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
After missing training camp because of a contract dispute, Josh
Anderson has performed at a consistently high level for the Columbus Blue Jackets.
Anderson scored two minutes
into overtime to give Columbus its
fifth straight win, 1-0 over the
Calgary Flames, on Wednesday
night in Columbus, Ohio.
Sergei Bobrovsky had 22 saves
for the Blue Jackets in his third
shutout this season. Mike Smith
stopped 40 shots for the Flames.
“Josh has come in and handled
himself really well,” Columbus
Coach John Tortorella said of his
23-year-old winger. “That was a
good shot. Smitty does not give
them much.”
The Blue Jackets, who improved
to 7-1 in overtime, outshot the
Flames 2-1 for much of the game.
Calgary, however, dominated puck
possession in the first 90 seconds
of overtime before Columbus
pushed into the offensive zone.
The Flames’ T.J. Brodie sought
to set up play from behind his own
net, but the puck rolled off onto
the stick of Nick Foligno, who sent
it to Anderson for the winner.
“I saw the opening on the high
glove,” said Anderson, who has
eight goals in 20 games after scoring 17 in 2016-17, his first full season. “I tried to put it in place, and it
went in.”
BRUINS
3, DEVILS 2 (SO):
Charlie McCoy scored in the
11th round of a shootout to lift
Boston to a victory over New Jersey in Newark.
Anton Khudobin made 40 saves
as the Bruins improved to 9-7-4
with their third straight win.
The Devils have lost three of
their past five in falling to 12-5-4.
In other Devils news, right wing
Kyle Palmieri will miss up to six
weeks with a broken right foot.
ISLANDERS 4, FLYERS 3
(OT): Josh Bailey scored 32 sec-
onds into overtime to give New
York a home victory over Philadelphia, extending the Flyers’ losing
streak to six games.
Bailey’s fifth goal of the season
improved the Islanders’ home record to 7-0-2. Bailey also had two
assists for New York.
CANUCKS
5, PENGUINS 2:
Rookie Brock Boeser scored two
more goals to lead visiting Vancouver to a win over Pittsburgh.
Boeser, after scoring twice
against Philadelphia on Tuesday,
added two more goals and has
11 this season.
Vancouver won in Pittsburgh
for the first time since Dec. 4, 2014.
Jake Guentzel scored twice for
the Penguins. Pittsburgh has just
four wins in its past 12 games.
PANTHERS
2,
MAPLE
LEAFS 1 (SO): Nick Bjugstad
scored Florida’s only goal in regulation and the game-winning goal
in a shootout as the Panthers beat
Toronto in Sunrise, Fla.
LIGHTNING 3, BLACKHAWKS 2 (OT): Brayden Point
scored a power-play goal 3:25 into
overtime, and Tampa Bay rallied
again to beat Chicago in Tampa.
Patrick Kane scored twice for
the Blackhawks, who blew leads in
losing both games between the
teams last season.
PREDATORS 3, CANADIENS 2 (SO): Filip Forsberg
scored a pair of power-play goals
and Kyle Turris had the only goal
in a shootout to lead host Nashville to a victory over struggling
Montreal.
Pekka Rinne made 27 saves in
regulation and overtime, then denied all three Canadiens shootout
attempts as the Predators won for
the eighth time in nine games.
Montreal has lost its past five.
RANGERS
6,
HURRI-
CANES 1: Chris Kreider and Jesper Fast scored two goals apiece,
and New York rolled to a victory
over Carolina in Raleigh, N.C.
The Rangers won for the eighth
time in their past 10 games.
WILD 5, SABRES 4: Nino
Niederreiter and Mikael Granlund each scored two goals to lead
Minnesota to a victory at Buffalo.
Niederreiter has scored in five
straight games.
OILERS
6, RED WINGS 2:
Jujhar Khaira scored to break a tie
in the second period, and Edmonton went on to beat host Detroit.
Weary
NBA ROUNDUP
Boston’s 16-game run
finally stopped by Miami Wizards
HEAT 104,
CELTICS 98
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Goran Dragic scored 27 points,
Dion Waiters had 26 with a pair of
big three-pointers in the final
minutes, and the host Miami Heat
held on to beat Boston, 104-98, on
Wednesday night, snapping the
Celtics’ 16-game winning streak.
Tyler Johnson scored 16 points
for Miami, which saw what was an
18-point lead cut to one in the
final moments. The Heat shot
49 percent and outrebounded the
Celtics 48-37.
Kyrie Irving scored 23 points
for Boston.
Down by 14 midway through
the fourth, the unflappable Celtics went on a 13-0 run in just about
three minutes — getting to 91-90
when Smart made one of two free
throws with 3:14 remaining.
THUNDER 108, WARRIORS 91: Russell Westbrook
scored a season-high 34 points
and added 10 rebounds and nine
assists to help Oklahoma City roll
past Golden State at home.
It was Oklahoma City’s first win
over the Warriors since Kevin Durant left the Thunder to join the
Warriors after the 2015-16 season.
Golden State won all four meetings last season by an average of
nearly 20 points.
CAVALIERS
119, NETS 109:
LeBron James shook off a blow to
the face and scored 23 points in
the fourth quarter — including
18 straight for host Cleveland — as
the Cavaliers won their sixth
straight.
James needed stitches in the
third quarter to close a gash above
his lip that drew blood. He
punched back at the Nets in the
fourth and finished with
33 points.
76ERS 101, TRAIL BLAZERS 81: Joel Embiid had 28
points, 12 rebounds and two
blocks, and fast-starting Philadelphia handled another Western
Conference opponent with relative ease at home.
Coming off a 21-point victory
over Utah on Monday night, the
76ers scored the game’s first 16
points.
Damian Lillard had 30 points
for Portland.
PELICANS
107, SPURS 90:
Anthony Davis had 29 points and
11 rebounds, DeMarcus Cousins
added 24 points and 15 rebounds,
and host New Orleans beat San
Antonio.
Jrue Holiday scored 13 points
for the Pelicans, who have won
two straight.
KNICKS 108, RAPTORS
100: Tim Hardaway Jr. scored a
career-high 38 points, including
12 during a 28-0 run in the third
quarter that sent New York to
victory at Madison Square Garden.
Kyle Lowry scored 25 points for
the Raptors, who had their fourgame winning streak snapped.
CLIPPERS 116, HAWKS
103: Blake Griffin had 26 points,
10 rebounds and 10 assists, Wesley Johnson scored a season-high
24 points, and Los Angeles
snapped a nine-game skid with a
victory in Atlanta.
Los Angeles handed out a season-high 30 assists.
Marco Belinelli finished with
20 points for the Hawks.
MAVERICKS 95,
ZLIES 94: Harrison
GRIZ-
Barnes
banked in a 30-footer at the buzzer to lift Dallas to a win in Memphis.
Memphis suffered its sixth
straight loss after squandering an
18-point lead in the first half.
TIMBERWOLVES
124,
MAGIC 118: Jimmy Butler tied a
season high with 26 points, Taj
Gibson scored a season-high 24,
and Minnesota held off Orlando
in Minneapolis.
ROCKETS
125, NUGGETS
95: Trevor Ariza had a season-
high 25 points to vault Houston at
home.
Ariza was 7 for 10 from threepoint range. Chris Paul had 23
points and 12 assists.
Beverley sidelined for season
Los Angeles Clippers guard Patrick Beverley is expected to miss
the rest of the season after having
arthroscopic surgery on his right
knee.
Beverley had surgery Wednesday in Houston to repair a lateral
meniscus. The procedure was performed by Walt Lowe at Memorial
Hermann-Texas Medical Center.
can’t hold
late lead
WIZARDS FROM D1
31 points on 13-for-26 shooting.
He missed all five of his threepoint attempts but added 11 assists and went 5 for 6 from the
free throw line.
Forward Markieff Morris had
14 points, and reserve forward
Mike Scott chipped in 13 points,
making 3 of 5 three-pointers.
Charlotte placed seven players
in double figures, led by Dwight
Howard’s 26 points and 13 rebounds. Walker and Lamb each
scored 24 points in the Hornets’
third consecutive win and just
their fourth in their past
11 games against Washington.
“That was an exciting game,”
Charlotte Coach Steve Clifford
said. “A lot of guys contributed.
Dwight was again just a force at
both ends of the floor. Guys hung
in there and fought hard.”
The Wizards held a 111-102
lead with 3:32 left in the fourth
quarter after Wall’s 17-foot jumper, but Charlotte scored the next
six points, capped by two free
throws from Walker.
Beal made 1 of 2 free throws
for a 114-112 lead, and Walker’s
two foul shots, the first of which
rattled around the rim and
through, with two seconds left
tied it. Beal had a chance to win
the game in regulation, but Howard blocked his baseline jumper
at the buzzer.
Beal shot 7 for 22 and had
three of Washington’s 12 turnovers.
“We were a little disappointed
with our fouling situation,” he
said. “We felt like we were being
aggressive and weren’t getting
the calls that they were getting.
We felt like were the more aggressive team, and we were attacking the basket. It didn’t end
up in our favor, but we still can’t
give up nine-point leads.”
Marcin Gortat started his
100th straight game. It’s the
fourth-longest active streak in
the league behind Karl-Anthony
Towns (181), Andrew Wiggins
(174) and Jeff Teague (167), all
PHOTOS BY JEREMY BREVARD/USA TODAY SPORTS
Marcin Gortat and the Wizards did little on defense vs. the Hornets’ Jeremy Lamb, who had 24 points.
Hornets 129, Wizards 124 (OT)
Washington ................... 26
Charlotte ........................ 25
WASHINGTON
Morris
Porter Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Wall
Oubre Jr.
Scott
Mahinmi
Meeks
Frazier
TOTALS
33
30
29
29
26
30
10 — 124
15 — 129
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
34:15 6-10 1-1 1-8 1 3 14
27:44
4-9 2-2 0-4 1 3 12
36:45
4-4 0-0 3-11 3 3
8
40:56 7-22 5-7 1-4 2 2 22
41:08 13-26 5-6 1-1 11 4 31
23:14
3-9 2-2 1-4 1 4
9
18:45
5-7 0-0 0-4 0 3 13
16:15
1-2 1-2 2-5 1 5
3
14:06
4-9 1-2 0-0 2 0
9
11:52
1-1 0-0 0-2 3 2
3
265 48-99 17-22 9-43 25 29 124
Percentages: FG .485, FT .773. 3-Point Goals: 11-33, .333
(Scott 3-5, Beal 3-8, Porter Jr. 2-3, Frazier 1-1, Morris
1-3, Oubre Jr. 1-3, Meeks 0-5, Wall 0-5). Team Rebounds:
8. Team Turnovers: 12 (16 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6
(Gortat 2, Beal, Frazier, Morris, Wall). Turnovers: 12
(Beal 3, Frazier 2, Morris 2, Gortat, Oubre Jr., Porter Jr.,
Scott, Wall). Steals: 4 (Beal 2, Mahinmi, Wall). Technical
Fouls: None.
CHARLOTTE
Kidd-Gilchrist
Williams
Howard
Batum
Walker
Lamb
Kaminsky
Carter-Williams
Zeller
Bacon
TOTALS
Wizards guard John Wall scored a season-high 31 points on 13-for26 shooting despite missing all five of his three-point attempts.
with the Minnesota Timberwolves.
The 6-foot-11 center renewed
acquaintances with Clifford, who
served as an assistant with the
Orlando Magic during Gortat’s
first three seasons in the NBA.
He joined the Magic in 2007 after
playing two seasons in Germany
and having his rights dealt to
Orlando from the Phoenix Suns,
who picked him 57th overall in
the 2005 NBA draft.
In addition, Gortat played
with Howard in Orlando and had
the rugged assignment of guarding the eight-time all-star. How-
ard was coming off 25 points and
20 rebounds in Monday’s 118-102
win against the Timberwolves.
“You’ve got to be really focused
about that guy,” Gortat said. “You
can’t let this guy just roll to the
paint easily and run down the
court for early seals and postups. There has to be an effort of
the whole team, and obviously I
have to slow him down. You’ve
got to use fouls smart, and I
think I could have used two or
three more, but for some reason I
didn’t. It’s a tough cover, bottom
line.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
36:17 6-11 0-1 3-7 2 2 12
30:18
3-7 4-4 2-4 4 1 12
37:18 10-13 6-10 5-13 3 2 26
13:48
1-6 0-0 0-3 1 2
2
40:26 8-22 5-6 2-5 5 2 24
37:15 9-17 3-3 0-7 5 5 24
22:58
3-7 6-6 1-5 2 1 12
18:14
2-4 5-6 0-0 0 1 11
15:44
0-2 4-4 1-3 1 1
4
12:41
1-2 0-0 0-1 0 3
2
265 43-91 33-40 14-48 23 20 129
Percentages: FG .473, FT .825. 3-Point Goals: 10-28, .357
(Lamb 3-8, Walker 3-8, Carter-Williams 2-2, Williams
2-5, Kaminsky 0-2, Batum 0-3). Team Rebounds: 12.
Team Turnovers: 11 (19 PTS). Blocked Shots: 5 (Lamb 3,
Howard, Kidd-Gilchrist). Turnovers: 11 (Carter-Williams
2, Howard 2, Kaminsky 2, Walker 2, Bacon, Lamb, Zeller).
Steals: 5 (Carter-Williams 3, Kidd-Gilchrist, Williams).
Technical Fouls: Walker, 10:32 third.
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Portland Trail Blazers
Saturday
7 NBCSW
at Minnesota Timberwolves
Tuesday
8 NBCSW
at Philadelphia 76ers
Wednesday
7 NBCSW, NBATV
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
SU
Nassar pleads guilty to seven counts
Former USA Gymnastics
team physician will face
at least 25 years in prison
BY
W ILL H OBSON
Former Olympic gymnastics
team physician Larry Nassar,
accused of sexual assault by more
than 130 women, including several Team USA gymnasts, pleaded guilty to seven sexual assaults
Wednesday in Michigan in a deal
that will send him to prison for at
least 25 years.
The guilty plea to seven counts
of first-degree criminal sexual
conduct was the first admission
by Nassar, a 54-year-old father of
three and formerly one of the
most respected sports physicians
in elite gymnastics, that he was
not performing legitimate medical therapy as he touched his
victims, often without gloves.
“For all those involved, I’m so
horribly sorry that this was like a
match that turned into a forest
fire out of control,” Nassar said
during the hearing in Lansing,
not far from the clinic on the
campus of Michigan State, where
many of his accusers encountered him.
Nassar could be sentenced to
up to 40 years for his admissions
of guilt Wednesday, while also
facing likely prison sentences in
two other courts. Nassar faces
PAUL SANCYA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Larry Nassar was accused of sexual assault by more than 130
women and pleaded guilty to first-degree criminal sexual conduct.
similar charges in another county in Michigan, and a plea hearing in that case could occur next
week, and he also faces a sentencing hearing in December in
federal court for three child pornography crimes he pleaded
guilty to this summer.
Since one woman first publicly
accused Nassar of assault in
September of last year, dozens
have come forward in lawsuits
against him, USA Gymnastics
and Michigan State, where he
worked full time and treated
local athletes at a campus clinic.
Several Olympic gymnasts
have come forward alleging they
were assaulted by Nassar, including McKayla Maroney, Aly Raisman and, just this week, Gabby
Douglas.
While the criminal proceedings against Nassar could be
nearing an end, the fallout from
his case may continue for the two
institutions facing dozens of lawsuits by victims: USA Gymnastics
and Michigan State.
In March, USA Gymnastics
chief executive Steve Penny resigned as he faced rising criticism for waiting five weeks in
2015, after receiving a complaint
about Nassar, to inform law enforcement, and for not informing
officials at Michigan State, where
Nassar continued to work with
young athletes until August 2016.
Nassar was a volunteer with
USA Gymnastics, his time working with elite athletes covered as
part of an “outreach” component
of his job at Michigan State. USA
Gymnastics ended the arrangement in 2015.
The Nassar case stoked outrage in Congress and led to
proposed legislation, still under
consideration in the House, to
strengthen abuse prevention
measures throughout Olympic
sports organizations.
At Michigan State, officials
have drawn criticism over allegations victims complained about
Nassar’s treatment as far back as
1997 but were assured they were
receiving legitimate therapy.
In 2014, a woman filed a
complaint about Nassar with the
university’s Title IX office, but
that inquiry concluded the woman had misunderstood Nassar’s
treatment. Michigan State has
commissioned an independent
inquiry into how university employees handled allegations
about Nassar but has set no
timetable on when that inquiry
will be completed, and university
officials have said there are no
plans to publicly release the
inquiry’s findings, citing concerns about the dozens of lawsuits the school faces.
will.hobson@washpost.com
APPRECIATION
RUI VIEIRA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jana Novotna, above, beat Nathalie Tauziat for the 1998 Wimbledon crown. Afterward, the Duchess of Kent told her, “I’m so proud of you.”
Novotna faced her humanity and won
Czech player, who died Sunday, overcame Wimbledon collapse in 1993 to capture title five years later
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
The words “Wimbledon champion” describe so few human beings that they alone make for a
lavish compliment even when
they are simply accurate. Yet in
the case of Jana Novotna, who
died of cancer at 49 on Sunday,
they remain insufficient. For a
Czech player probably obscure to
Americans who seldom follow
tennis, Novotna came to live as a
towering emblem of a crucial
sports tenet.
High among the reasons we
bother with sports, from the
Olympics to high schools, is the
idea that we might witness somebody overcome something or
even a lot of something. This
might inspire us fleetingly or lastingly. For anyone who would look
— and people forever should —
Novotna’s five-year path to her
1998 Wimbledon title was a marvel because it was so graphically
human.
She overcame the frightful
beast of her own central nervous
system. Every single one of us
7 billion can identify with that.
As a storytelling flourish in
that, Novotna accomplished this
with the serial company of a picture of elegance, the Duchess of
Kent, the first cousin-in-law of
Queen Elizabeth II. In the enduring image of Novotna’s career, the
Duchess, in presenting Novotna
the runner-up plate in 1993,
pulled a sobbing Novotna to her
exquisitely dressed shoulder. She
assured her that she would win
Wimbledon someday. In the
grand, royal, formal history of
Wimbledon trophy presentations,
it came as a beautiful outlier.
The idea of pulling a sublime
athlete and a Wimbledon runnerup to a shoulder made sense because of the garish nature of the
preceding defeat. “A Kafkaesque
self-destruction,” the Independent of London called it. Playing
against Steffi Graf, that rare human who had a central nervous
system under otherworldly command, Novotna lost the first set in
a tiebreaker, 8-6. She then proceeded with 12 games of some of
the most exquisite serve-and-volley, grass-court tennis yet seen.
She won 10 of those games. It
carried the match all the way to
6-7 (8-6), 6-1, 4-1, Novotna, who
also had 40-15 that looked like the
verge of 5-1.
“I felt I lost already the match,”
Graf would tell Bud Collins in the
traditional post-match interview,
also saying, “I thought, ‘Okay, I’m
not going to get out of this one.’
She was playing unbelievable tennis.”
What followed was an unmistakable choke, a human term with
a connotation undeservedly bad,
probably because those who excoriate chokes operate from a standpoint of fear, aware of the human
omnipresence of choking. Novotna served a gasp of a double fault,
about which she would tell Collins, “I felt that the double fault I
made on the point for 5-1 was
absolutely not necessary. I don’t
see the reason why that I made it.”
A missed volley that followed —
hauntingly, drastically, almost
nauseatingly out — was the kind
of horror that turns up in earlymorning nightmares. Novotna
won no more games, and Graf
won 17 of the final 21 points. Graf,
winning her fifth of seven Wimbledon titles, made a comment of
insight and grace: “It was disappointing for me in a way because
she played so well and she didn’t
make it.”
From there, Novotna’s plight to
win Wimbledon, the Grand Slam
always best suited for her, became
a matter of upgraded curiosity.
She would have to surmount not
only her inner goblins and her
outer opponents but also the
frightful 4-1, 40-15 in the third,
still ricocheting in the skull.
In 1994, she lost a quarterfinal,
5-7, 6-0, 6-1, to Martina Navratilova, whom Novotna had beaten in
the 1993 semifinals. In 1995, she
lost a semifinal to Graf, 5-7, 6-4,
6-2. In 1996, she lost a quarterfinal to Graf, 6-3, 6-2. In 1997, with
Graf sidelined, Novotna reached
the final but lost to 17-year-old
Martina Hingis, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3,
prompting the Duchess’s famous
greeting of, “Third time lucky.”
The third time came 12 months
later. If you happened by that final
flipping channels, you reasonably
might have found it tepid. It had
the No. 3 seed, Novotna, against
the No. 16 seed, the wily veteran
Nathalie Tauziat of France. Novotna, playing expertly realized
grass-court tennis, had made her
way past 18-year-old Venus Williams in the quarterfinals and
top-ranked Hingis in the semifinals, losing no sets to either. Natalia Zvereva, the unpredictable
sort once mauled, 6-0, 6-0, by Graf
in a French Open final, had
cleared out both Graf and Monica
Seles before losing to Tauziat. Sit
there for that final, and you might
have winced at your luck, pining
for superstars.
That would have been wretchedly shortsighted. Novotna’s 6-4,
7-6 (7-2) win did not qualify as
eye-pleasing. Yet surely there has
never been any more evocative
public display of the terrible battle we all wage against the self. Of
course, when serving for the
match at 5-4 in the second, Novotna could not serve it out. Of
course, when Novotna struck one
final forehand return to win it,
then fell to her knees, she couldn’t
remember how she had won it. Of
course, she said, “You know, the
whole match was extremely difficult.”
And of course, her losses had
magnified her win, in that odd
capability of all losses. She had
become both a one-time Grand
Slam champion and unforgetta-
ble. The perseverance, the overcoming, all the things that make
competition so compelling, all
filled Centre Court. For all the
understandable memory of when
a duchess pulled a runner-up to
her shoulder, it’s also worth remembering the Duchess of Kent’s
words when fixing to present Novotna with the champion’s Venus
Rosewater Dish.
Even a novice lip-reader could
discern them:
“I’m so proud of you.”
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
Mount St. Mary’s
wears out path to DMV
Md. college is recruiting well in basketball hotbed
BY
J ESSE D OUGHERTY
From just a row behind the
visitors’ bench, Matt Becht could
see his future and all that solidified it.
The O’Connell senior guard
watched Mount St. Mary’s, the
school he signed with two weeks
ago, take on Georgetown at Capital One Arena on Nov. 15. He
watched the Mountaineers wrestle with their third high-major
opponent in as many games, a
rare out-of-the-gate schedule for
a Northeast Conference team.
And he watched six freshmen
from the D.C.-Maryland-Virginia
area — known in basketball circles and otherwise as the DMV —
cycle on and off the court, crack
into the box score and cheer from
the sideline.
“You see all these kids from the
area, all these kids you know, and
you think, if those guys can play
there and if they can be successful, I think I can be, too,” Becht
said. “It was just really weird how
they are all from this area. Like, a
good weird. There are so many
DMV guys on the team and more
coming.”
Becht, upon signing his letter
of intent, is now part of a trend.
No, call it a wave. Mount
St. Mary’s has three DMV players
signed to its 2018 class, with
Becht being joined by Bullis point
guard Vado Morse and St. Albans
forward
Chidozie
“Collin”
Nnamene. The three of them will
then join the six DMV freshmen
on the team this season: guard
Donald Carey (Douglass), forward Omar Habwe (St. James
School), guard James West IV
(Freedom-Woodbridge), forward
Nana Opoku (Potomac in Virginia), forward Ace Stallings
(Sidwell Friends) and forward
Ross Young (also Sidwell
Friends).
Mountaineers Coach Jamion
Christian, a Virginia native, has
canvassed the DMV for talent
throughout his six seasons with
the program. But his recent success is a major uptick, shows the
depth of the area’s talent and
promises even more growth at
the small college in Emmitsburg,
Md.
“I think it’s the best area for
basketball in the country, so we’re
just going to keep trying to protect it,” Christian said last week.
“When we did research a few
years back on the Northeast Conference and who wins the championship, they always had a guy
from the DMV. So I just said,
we’re going to make sure we do a
great job keeping guys from going
to other schools around our
league. Our whole recruiting
strategy is keeping guys right
here.”
Emmitsburg is tucked just inside the Maryland-Pennsylvania
border and is only about 11/2 hours
away from Washington. It is convenient for the Mountaineers’
staff, on a recruiting budget that
can’t compete with those of power-conference schools, to drill the
District, Maryland and Virginia
for kids. It is also very smart.
Last season, Mount St. Mary’s
finished with 20 wins for the first
time since 1995-96. The Mountaineers were among the others
receiving votes with four points
in the Associated Press poll last
week. Mount St. Mary’s (2-3)
started 0-3 after the 102-68 loss
Nov. 15, and all three of those
games — Marquette, Notre Dame
and Georgetown — were televised.
“I just think he’s a brilliant
mind with all of this,” Potomac
Coach Keith Honore, who
coached Opoku in high school,
said of Christian. “The out-ofconference schedule attracts
kids, his style of play is attractive,
and he is smart to just really
pound the streets in the DMV.
That’s a testament to that staff’s
hard work that they put in, and
they are reaping the benefits of
it.”
This recruiting surge has a lot
of layers. Christian pointed to the
team’s recent success on the
court. Local high school and AAU
coaches nodded to Christian’s
ability to build relationships — he
was the lead recruiter for Becht
and Nnamene, a role usually assumed by an assistant coach —
and the whole staff’s constant
presence at events throughout
the winter, spring and summer.
The local players are drawn to the
Mountaineers’ style of play:
Christian wants his team to attempt 35 three-pointers a game
and uses a relentless full-court
press to frazzle opposing guards.
The recruits also like the idea
of playing with guys they have
faced or teamed up with in high
school or on the AAU circuit.
Becht remembered seeing Carey,
who now starts for Mount
St. Mary’s as a freshman, fill up
stat sheets at AAU events. When
Becht orally committed in July, he
immediately told Nnamene, his
AAU teammate with Team Takeover, to join him.
Nnamene’s eventual commitment gave the Mountaineers nine
DMV players in their past two
recruiting classes and a little bit
of everything in their 2018 group.
Morse is a speedy point guard
who can stretch defenses and
knife through them. Becht is a
deadeye shooter. Nnamene, at
6 foot 9, can work in the pick and
roll and protect the rim. And
Brayden Inger, a 6-8 wing from
New Zealand and the class’s final
piece, thrives in transition.
“Matt and Collin, they saw guys
from the area who they knew, and
I know that helped persuade
them to choose Mount St. Mary’s,”
said Darryl Prue, who coached
Becht and Nnamene with Team
Takeover this past spring and
summer. “Now the next kids are
going to see Matt and see Collin,
and it will just continue like that.
There’s definitely a ripple effect
when you recruit a specific area
hard.”
With a break in the action with
15:55 left in the second half
against
Georgetown,
Becht
walked up the steps in Section
121. He went to get Nnamene,
who was stuck in rush-hour traffic but still made it for some of the
game. Right after the two of them
sat down together, Mount
St. Mary’s went on a run that cut
Georgetown’s lead to 14 points.
Becht and Nnamene’s heads
swung back and forth, as if they
were watching a tennis match
instead of a college basketball
game. The Mountaineers pushed
the tempo. They canned threes.
Christian paced along the sideline, smacked his hands together
and yelled high-pitch directions
that reached deep into the scattered crowd. For a short stretch,
before the Hoyas built their lead
back up, Mount St. Mary’s loudly
announced itself at the center of
the country’s most fertile high
school basketball hotbed.
But really, the Mountaineers
have been here for some time.
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
WET BASEMENT
OR CRAWLSPACE?
FREE 40 point
inspection and written estimate
$100 OFF any job over $1,000
$300 OFF any job over $2,000
$500 OFF any job over $3,000
No Pressure. No Obligation. Free Quote.
Keeping Homeowners Dry Since 1990!
Local Family Owned Business
6 Months Same-As-Cash
with approved credit
Must mention coupon when scheduling
estimate, must be present at initial inspection,
cannot be combined with any other offer,
Expires 11-30-17
Call for your Free Estimate Today!
703-382-8944 VA | 202-991-5644 DC
301-264-5386 MD
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
professional football
DAN STEINBERG
Why spend Thanksgiving night at FedEx Field? These people have their reasons.
STEINBERG FROM D1
believe qualifies him for a gold
watch. Ten current members of
the 53-man active roster weren’t
on that roster when Bergstrom
arrived. One player, Arthur Jones,
was signed and knocked out for
the year during the Bergstrom
Era; Jones lasted just 11 days in
Washington, exactly as long as
the Mooch. And who wants to
read 1,100 words about all that?)
Anyhow, back to the Graderts.
“We do things as a family on
Thanksgiving, and we don’t have
family nearby, so this is going to
be our Thanksgiving together as a
family,” said Brad, a 44-year-old
Iowa native who fell in love with
the Redskins in the early 1980s
and never wavered. “And I think
it’s something they’re going to
remember for the rest of their
lives. When they lower me into
the ground, my kids are going to
say, ‘My dad was such a big
Redskins fan. I remember him
taking us to a football game for
Thanksgiving.’ ”
And not just any football game,
either. This is the first
Thanksgiving NFL game
Washington (or Landover) has
ever hosted, featuring teams with
a combined 6-14 record — the
worst combined winning
percentage for any Thanksgiving
matchup in more than a decade.
It’s the night game, in a town that
often empties out for the week,
featuring two teams that
probably will miss the playoffs, on
an evening when temperatures
are scheduled to dip into the 30s.
Which is why one secondary
marketplace, TickPick, reported
Wednesday that this game’s
average ticket price is less than
half that of the day’s other games
and the lowest of any
Thanksgiving game in at least
three years.
“If they’re winning and they’re
really good, I couldn’t touch these
tickets for that amount of money,”
noted Gradert, who spent a total
of $120 for four seats in the
second row of the upper deck.
(Back to football: Are injuries
just an excuse, as the team’s
harshest critics have argued?
Sure, I guess. Same way “I got hit
by a bus” would be just an excuse
for not doing your homework
because you got hit by a bus.
Excuses are sometimes
enlightening. By my count, just
three NFC teams have more than
a dozen players on the IR: the 1-9
49ers, the 2-8 Giants and the 4-6
Redskins, who also happen to
have played the league’s most
wicked schedule.)
But you know all that. Which is
why I’m going to instead tell you
about Matt Alley. His first date
with his future wife happened to
be at a brutal FedEx Field holiday
night game between the Redskins
and Giants, a 34-28 seasonending loss on the night before
New Year’s Eve in 2006.
“It was the cheapest first date
you could ever imagine: free
tickets, the cash lot and Kentucky
Fried Chicken right in the back of
my truck,” Alley joked this week.
“That was my very first game, my
first experience at a professional
football game. I’ll be honest with
you: Ever since that day, I’ve been
a huge Redskins fan. I pretty
much owe it to her.”
Matt and Jennifer fell in love
and became shared Redskins
fanatics and decided this first
Thanksgiving home game was
something they couldn’t miss,
even though it fell not just on
Thanksgiving but also on their
10-year wedding anniversary. So
they will celebrate said
anniversary by driving from
Richmond to Harrisonburg for an
early Thanksgiving lunch with
Jennifer’s family, then driving
from Harrisonburg to FedEx
Field in time for a parking lot
dinner of leftover turkey
sandwiches and some priceless
reminiscing.
“If it was up to me, I’d be there
at 12 o’clock when they open the
parking lot,” Alley noted. “But I
don’t want to push it too much.”
(“But the Packers lost Aaron
Rodgers!” note the cynics, with
the implication that other teams
also have suffered crushing
injuries. Right. It’s true. And the
Packers just scored zero points at
home. Because crushing injuries
are crushing.)
Noon already will be well into
the day for my pal Ted Abela, who
plans to arrive at FedEx Field
around 9 a.m. so he can start
cooking 19 (not a typo) turkeys for
his 215 tailgating guests, plus
about 100 first responders he has
promised to feed. “Tailgate Ted,”
as he’s known, is one of the
parking lot stars, and very little
sets him on edge anymore. This
week is different.
“I have never been more
freaked out and nervous in my
life for a tailgate,” he said during a
break in his Tuesday night
preparations. “Cooking 19 turkeys
in a parking lot? I mean, when I
told the turkey place how many I
needed, they looked at me like I
was crazy.”
Ted, though, hit on something
I’m guessing is true: This won’t be
a typical night in any way. Not
just because of the parking lot
Thanksgiving parade featuring
Larry Michael and Redskins
cheerleaders and alumni. Not just
because of these injury-ravaged
rosters, with perhaps the six most
famous pass catchers on the two
teams all probably sitting out.
Turkey day football is ingrained
in Detroit and Dallas, part of the
routine. It’s new here. Absent a
sexy matchup and with bargain
prices, the game probably will
draw a higher number of newbie
fans and a smaller percentage of
regulars.
There are thus season ticket
holders, such as David Schneider,
who stay at home and eat their
tickets. (Metaphorically. Unless
they run out of sides.) Schneider’s
dad didn’t want to go, and the
prices on the secondary market
didn’t seem worth the bother,
plus they didn’t want to sell to
Giants fans. So they will watch
the game on television in Chevy
Chase, their tickets unused.
“I mean, I asked my brothers
who are in town; I asked my
cousins from out of town who are
Redskins fans; and it’s just
something that no one’s really
into,” Schneider said. “We have
Thanksgiving dinner, and it’s
hard to just leave the whole
family behind to go to the game.”
If some in-town regulars are
unsure, some out-of-town firsttimers feel differently. Such as
Kyle Saulmon, a 24-year-old
Redskins fan from the West Coast
who finds himself living in
Tennessee and who has never
been to FedEx Field. His plan:
drive seven hours to see his
family in Haymarket and then
drive by himself from dinner to
the game before heading home
Friday.
That’s not all that different
from what the Graderts have
NFL NOTES
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
For more by Dan Steinberg, visit
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog.
R E D S K I NS NOTE S
Chiefs sign
Revis to boost
28th-ranked
pass defense
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
Reed, three others
ruled out vs. Giants
tient, wants to be “the guy” at his
position. Perine regrets the circumstances, voicing remorse over
the loss of Kelley and now Thompson, who was ferried off the Superdome field on a cart Sunday, his
shattered leg in an air cast.
“Now it’s just me from the original group,” he mused. “It’s tough —
especially for a guy like C.T. He’s a
hard-working, loving guy who
never wants to hurt anyone, never
wants to do wrong by anyone. Just
to see him go down like that, with
the kind of season he was having,
it was really tough.”
Perine had wanted to win the
game for Thompson, and he did
his best. But after exceeding
100 yards, he slammed into an
immovable force when two Saints
defenders broke free on a thirdand-one run with just over two
minutes remaining. A first down
would have sealed a victory for
Washington, and the play has
been second-guessed since.
“They had some very unorthodox things they did on defense,”
Perine said. “We just got mixed up.
They just came free. At that point,
I did what I could, but it wasn’t
quite enough.”
Nearly 150 relatives and friends
made the three-hour drive from
Alabama to New Orleans for the
game. Although Gloria Perine
hasn’t missed a Redskins home
game this season, she will be with
her parents and relatives in Alabama this Thanksgiving and will
watch the Redskins-Giants game
on TV.
She will give thanks for her life’s
many blessings and for Samaje’s
health. She has begged him over
the years, to no avail, to run out of
bounds when the game gets ugly.
“Can you not?” she will ask.
Each time, her son replies,
“Mom, it’s the way I play. I’m physical.”
Redskins tight end Jordan Reed
(hamstring), defensive lineman
Terrell McClain (toe), safety
Montae Nicholson (concussion)
and offensive lineman Chase
Roullier (hand surgery) were
officially ruled out Wednesday for
Washington’s Thanksgiving night
game against the New York Giants.
It will be the fifth missed game
this season for Reed, who caught
one pass for five yards against the
Dallas Cowboys on Oct. 29 before
he suffered the hamstring injury.
Eleven players were listed as
questionable for Thursday night’s
game, including offensive
linemen Trent Williams (knee),
Brandon Scherff (knee), Morgan
Moses (eye/ankles) and Ty
Nsekhe (core muscle); running
back Samaje Perine (finger); and
linebacker Martrell Spaight
(ankle). Meanwhile, the Giants
ruled out offensive linemen D.J.
Fluker (toe) and Justin Pugh
(back) and linebacker B.J.
Goodson (ankle).
Redskins Coach Jay Gruden
estimated that the statuses of at
least “seven or eight” of his
players will be game-time
decisions. “We’ll get them out
there before the game around
5 o’clock, 6 o’clock, whenever it is,
and have them run around, and
we’ll make a decision on them,”
he said. “The player will,
obviously, have the ultimate say,
the trainer, and then we’ll go from
there. But we have backup plans
for everybody that’s on the
questionable list.”
To account for all of the
offensive line injuries, Arie
Kouandjio will start at left guard
and Tony Bergstrom will serve as
Kirk Cousins’s center with
Roullier hurt and Spencer Long
on injured reserve.
“He’s been here a couple weeks,
so he’s ready to go,” Gruden said
of Bergstrom, who was with the
Oakland Raiders from 2012 to
2015 before brief stops with
Houston, Arizona and Baltimore.
“He’s played a lot of football. . . .
He’s been in NFL games before.
But with Kirk — cadence, snaps
all of that — he hasn’t gotten a lot
of practice. But I think he’ll be
fine.”
Asked how he is managing to
craft a game plan on a short week
with so many injuries, Gruden
joked: “Does it look like I’ve slept
a lot?
“We have to figure it out. That’s
the hardest part with Jordan and
all these other guys [being
injured]. We have a base
foundation of a core offense that
we can go to that everybody’s
comfortable with doing. It’s just a
matter of how many new
wrinkles can you put in. That’s
the hard part.”
Linebackers Ryan Anderson
(knee) and Zach Brown
(Achilles’), defensive linemen
Matt Ioannidis (hand/thigh) and
Anthony Lanier (knee) and wide
receiver Ryan Grant (calf) are also
listed as questionable for the
Redskins.
liz.clarke@washpost.com
— Kimberley A. Martin
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The Kansas City Chiefs needed
help in their leaky defensive backfield. Darrelle Revis was ready to
provide it.
So the AFC West leaders signed
the seven-time Pro Bowl cornerback Wednesday, a surprising
midseason move involving a bigname player. Revis played for the
New York Jets last season, but his
massive salary cap number combined with a decline in his performance led to his release in late
February.
Still, the Chiefs were desperate
to find a cornerback to play opposite Marcus Peters. Terrance
Mitchell, Kenneth Acker, Steven
Nelson and Phillip Gaines all have
failed to hold down the spot.
“He’s ready to go now,” Chiefs
Coach Andy Reid said on a conference call with reporters.
Reid did not rule out Revis playing Sunday against the Buffalo
Bills. Revis is familiar with defensive coordinator Bob Sutton’s system, having played for him with
the Jets.
The Chiefs enter the game with
the 28th-ranked pass defense in
the league.
BILLS: Coach Sean McDermott reversed course. Quarterback Tyrod Taylor will start at
Kansas City on Sunday, a week
after McDermott’s decision to
start rookie Nathan Peterman
backfired.
McDermott called his decision
to return to Taylor “the right thing
for our team.” Peterman threw five
interceptions in a 54-24 loss at the
Los Angeles Chargers on Sunday.
49ERS: San Francisco plans
to give rookie C.J. Beathard his
fifth consecutive start Sunday
against the Seattle Seahawks,
Coach Kyle Shanahan said.
That means Jimmy Garoppolo
probably will be the backup for at
least another week after being acquired in a trade with the New
England Patriots at the Oct. 31
deadline.
TEXANS: Houston placed
rookie running back D’Onta Foreman on injured reserve and
claimed veteran running back Andre Ellington off waivers from Arizona.
Foreman ruptured his left
Achilles’ tendon Sunday during a
touchdown run vs. the Cardinals.
Ellington’s cousin Bruce Ellington
is a wide receiver for the Texans.
BROWNS: Wide receiver
Josh Gordon, suspended for the
past two seasons, practiced with
Cleveland for the first time in
nearly 450 days.
LIONS:
Detroit
added
Dwight Freeney off waivers from
Seattle. The Lions need help at
defensive end in part because Ezekiel Ansah is questionable with a
back injury that has kept him out
of the last two games.
PATRIOTS: Tom Brady sat
out practice with what the team
says is an Achilles’ tendon injury.
planned. They will leave
Indianapolis around 4 a.m.
Thursday, stop in their Silver
Spring hotel and then figure out
what to do for Thanksgiving
dinner. Maybe they will find a
Denny’s. Maybe they will pack
some turkey sandwiches. Maybe
they will run into Tailgate Ted in
the parking lot, and they all can
discuss the potential of Redskins
center Demetrius Rhaney, who —
like Marshall and Daniels — will
be making his first trip to FedEx
Field with his new team. The
newbies won’t only be in the
parking lot.
I have been to a lot of Redskins
games at that place, and many of
them have been weird. This one
could set weirdness records. But
before you turn cynical, think of
9-year-old Hunter Gradert. When
his father told him they were all
going to the game, Hunter put his
head in his hands. His parents
weren’t sure what was going on.
Turns out he was crying tears of
joy.
Sweet, right? And what does
the rest of the family think about
this unlikely Thanksgiving plan?
“We haven’t told them,” Brad
Gradert told me. “They’d kill us if
they knew we were going to a
football game.”
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Samaje Perine scored his first NFL touchdown in October on a catch against the 49ers. His first on the ground came Sunday at the Saints.
Rookie Perine acts, plays like a veteran
REDSKINS FROM D1
“I get that a lot,” Perine said this
week, breaking into a broad smile
and offering a low-pitched chuckle.
As his mother, Gloria, explains,
Samaje was an only child, reared
largely by his grandparents in
Jackson, Ala. She was young when
she gave birth, and her parents
urged her to finish school and not
give up her college plans, insisting
they take care of their grandson
until she was established. Today,
she credits Samaje’s old-school
persona to his beloved grandfather, Sam, after whom he patterned himself.
“My dad is a just a hard-working man who really loves family
and always did what he could for
all six of us kids,” Gloria Perine
said.
Samaje was always big for his
age, thick and stocky to the point
that no one believed he was just 8
years old when Gloria Perine
signed him up for Pop Warner football in Texas after she had earned
her degree and Samaje had come
to live with her.
At 11, he decided he wanted to
get bigger still, so he asked for a set
of dumbbells. And rather than ask
his mother for a heavier set when
he could handle those, he taped
bricks to the barbells to add
weight.
Perine added track to his regimen at Hendrickson High in suburban Austin, where football players were required to play a second
sport in the offseason to stay in
shape year-round. He ran sprints,
competed in the triple jump and
long jump and was part of a relay
team, finding a crossover benefit
in mastering the baton handoffs it
required.
As a freshman at Oklahoma in
2014, he set a Football Bowl Subdivision record by rushing for
427 yards (and five touchdowns)
in a 44-7 rout of Kansas. Solitary by
nature, he shied from the spotlight
and, when pressed about the feat,
raved about the Sooners’ offensive
line. It earned him the nickname
“Humble Beast” in a SoonerSports.com profile by John Rohde,
who wrote that the freshman had
such an adult comportment that
he had been mistaken for a recruit’s father when he first appeared on campus.
What made Perine special at
Oklahoma, where in three seasons
he set the school’s career rushing
record (4,122 yards) and completed all but eight credit hours
toward his degree in human relations (he has enrolled in classes to
complete it in the spring), was
largely what attracted the Redskins to him once he entered the
2017 draft: a low center of gravity,
balance to stay upright after initial
contact and production despite
being paired with standout Joe
Mixon.
When Redskins scouts called
Oklahoma director of sports enhancement Jerry Schmidt, who
serves as strength coach for the
football team, he raved about
Perine’s maturity. Yes, his strength
was shocking: He bench-pressed
440 pounds — a typical back might
lift 350 — and squatted 540. But
Perine always wanted to get better,
he told them, and had a pro’s
seriousness about his diet and
year-round fitness.
“He understands how important it is to be strong at the end of
the year,” Schmidt said in a telephone interview. “The way he
takes care of himself and trains, as
other people start to get weaker,
he’s going to get faster and be able
to play a high level at the end of the
season. . . . That’s what I told the
Redskins: ‘He’s going to change
your locker room because he’s always looking to get better. He’s
always positive. And he’s the same
guy every day.’ That’s who he was
at 17, and that’s who he is.”
Perine had no idea he was on
the Redskins’ radar until they
chose him in the fourth round, but
he soon realized his good fortune,
he said, after being welcomed by
teammates who spared him the
rough treatment and cold shoulder that many NFL rookies receive.
That didn’t make his preseason
debut any easier. Unaccustomed
to running from formations with
the quarterback under center — as
opposed to the shotgun, where the
back can see far more — he fumbled once and dropped a pass
against Baltimore.
Ball security is Gruden’s top priority for backs; blocking is No. 2.
And the coach wanted to be sure
Perine could handle both before
relying on him. Perine understood, so he didn’t flinch when he
was limited to special-teams duty
for a stretch.
Kelley and Thompson “were the
guys and have more experience
than I do in the offense,” Perine
explained. “As long as I was helping the team in some way, special
teams, I was good with it.”
With the Redskins (4-6) winless
against NFC East opponents heading into Thursday’s game against
the Giants (2-8), Perine will be
asked to help in a more significant
way.
Asked this week whether Perine
had earned his trust, Gruden
cracked: “Well, Kirk [Cousins]
threw an interception, too, one
time, and I still trust him. We can’t
just bash these players because
they have a turnover or make a
mistake; otherwise, we wouldn’t
have any players or coaches left. I
think you just learn from your
mistakes. . . . I don’t think it is an
issue right now.”
Every NFL player, however pa-
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
SU
NFL WEEK 12
Giants (2-8) at Redskins (4-6)
Time: 8:30 p.m. TV: NBC. Radio: 105.9 FM, 630 and 980 AM. Line: Redskins by 71/2.
For in-game analysis, live stats and discussion, our live blog launches at 7 p.m. and
updates frequently. washingtonpost.com/redskins
REDSKINS ON OFFENSE
Perine
36.6
Sprinkle
47.8
Cousins
83.5
Davis
61.6
Crowder
74.0
Moses
72.4
Scherff
86.3
Bergstrom
37.4
Cockrell
71.2
Pierre-Paul
73.8
Tomlinson
83.7
Kouandjio
81.0
Williams
81.4
Doctson
70.6
Harrison
90.7
Vernon
79.9
Jenkins
75.2
Kennard
70.2
Munson
40.6
Casillas
38.4
Collins
86.5
Thompson
75.6
Hall
37.0
Swearinger
75.2
REDSKINS ON DEFENSE
Brown
47.3
Spaight
40.3
Smith
77.5
Kerrigan
80.1
Breeland
72.6
Ioannidis
80.4
Hood
40.3
McGee
67.0
Norman
80.6
Lewis
63.0
Flowers
55.5
Jerry
65.4
Jones
72.5
Halapio
54.9
Wheeler
45.3
King
53.7
Ellison
73.3
Manning
79.3
Engram
40.8
Darkwa
76.4
Projected lineups and key matchups
Player grades (on a scale of 0-100) are provided by Pro Football Focus, which evaluates an NFL player based on
his effectiveness on every play.
ELSA/GETTY IMAGES
BY
M ARK M ASKE
PASSING
Cmp
Cousins .................. 230
Team ...................... 230
Opp ......................... 215
With Jordan Reed ruled out, Davis
will have a significant role in the
offense. Along with running back
Chris Thompson, who suffered a
season-ending leg injury Sunday,
Davis has been one of the few
reliable options for quarterback
Kirk Cousins. He leads the team in
receiving yards with 527 and has
proved he’s still a threat to rip off
big plays, given his average of
16 yards per reception.
Redskins can learn
from visiting Giants
about motivation
When their fourth-quarter lead melted
away Sunday in New Orleans and they suffered a dispiriting overtime defeat to the
Saints, the Washington Redskins lost more
than a game. They lost a season.
Their chances of finding their way back
into the NFC playoff chase all but disappeared. The rest of their season will be about
playing for dignity and for a job next season.
The key considerations now are pride and
professionalism. That begins Thursday with a
far-from-glamorous Thanksgiving night
matchup with the New York Giants, from
whom the Redskins could learn a thing or two
about finding motivation in a broken-beyondrepair season.
The 2-8 Giants are even further out of the
postseason race than the 4-6 Redskins. But
the Giants have had longer to come to grips
with their plight. And the Giants actually are
feeling a little bit better about themselves
these days, coming off a stunning 12-9 overtime triumph Sunday at MetLife Stadium
over the AFC West-leading Kansas City Chiefs.
“We could smell it,” quarterback Eli Manning said. “We could taste it. It was there for
us. And we went and got it.”
Manning delivered what his teammates
have described as an emotional pregame
speech Sunday. That was out of character for
the usually soft-spoken quarterback. But he
was urged to do it by Coach Ben McAdoo, and
Manning’s words led to a spirited Giants
effort against the Chiefs one week after a loss
in San Francisco to the previously winless
49ers.
“We talked about it a little bit during the
week, just that we’ve got to do a better job
keeping the energy up,” Manning said after
the game Sunday. “It’s easy to start with a lot
of energy. [But] second half, third quarter,
celebrate the stops. Get the offense going.
Communicate a little bit more. Just keep the
excitement going and take that the whole
game.”
The Giants remain firmly in playing-outthe-string mode. Co-owners John Mara and
Steve Tisch have said they will wait until after
the season to evaluate the status of the
beleaguered McAdoo, who guided the team to
the playoffs last season as a rookie head
coach. Manning’s future with the organization is likewise uncertain. The Giants could
Redskins’ statistics
Giants SS Landon Collins
vs. Redskins TE Vernon Davis
The Giants scored an upset overtime victory against the Kansas City Chiefs on Sunday,
proving they were able to find the inspiration to play hard in a largely meaningless game.
use the lofty draft pick that’s coming their way
to select their quarterback of the future, even
if they opt to keep Manning and have that
young quarterback sit and learn.
Giants players had been accused in recent
weeks of quitting on McAdoo and on the
season. McAdoo had been accused, after
suspending defensive backs Janoris Jenkins
and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie at separate times for violations of team rules, of
losing control of the locker room. But Jenkins
and Rodgers-Cromartie were in the lineup
Sunday, and Jenkins contributed an interception as the Giants limited the Chiefs to three
field goals.
“I think the defense, they came out and
they played inspired football,” McAdoo said.
“They played tremendous football. They
leaned on each other. They challenged each
other. They played their techniques well. They
played fast. They played aggressive. You
know, we missed some tackles. . . . But the
second, the third and the fourth guy were to
the ball pretty fast. That’s a pretty big part of
it.”
The Giants players did not give the impression that they felt they were playing to save
McAdoo’s job. Safety Landon Collins said
members of the Giants’ defense stuck together but didn’t rally around any one person in
particular. But whatever the approach was, it
worked. The result was, for one of the few
times this season, an effort that matched the
level to which the defense played last season.
“We’re going to definitely try to keep
pushing it and keep doing the same things
every week out from here on out,” Collins said.
Playing well is far from a given for teams
having the type of season that the Giants —
and now the Redskins — are having. About
the best that can be expected from such a
team is displaying some enthusiasm, giving
maximum effort and then seeing where
things go from there. That is the standard on
which players and coaches on teams in such
predicaments are judged.
The Redskins are about to begin dealing
with that. The Giants, to their dismay, have
had plenty of experience with it already this
season.
“I know we played hard,” McAdoo said
Sunday. “I could see that we played hard from
where I was standing. We played inspired
football.”
mark.maske@washpost.com
The Giants will mix man and zone
coverage, but when they use man,
Collins will be charged with
keeping Davis in check. Collins
has improved drastically since his
rookie year and has become one
of the best strong safeties in the
NFL. He had five interceptions last
year and had his second of this
season Sunday against the Chiefs.
Davis will have to be sharp with
his breaks and make sure he is in
sync with Cousins, or Collins will
be ready to capitalize.
Rtg
101.8
101.0
91.0
Avg
3.7
4.6
3.1
4.3
5.8
3.6
2.0
2.0
3.9
4.3
Lg
30
61t
21
18
11
11
5
2
61t
36t
TD
1
2
3
3
0
0
0
0
9
8
RECEIVING
No.
Thompson .................... 39
Crowder ........................ 39
Davis ............................ 33
Grant ............................ 30
Reed ............................. 27
Pryor ............................. 20
Doctson ........................ 19
Perine ............................. 7
Quick .............................. 4
Paul ................................ 4
Kelley ............................. 4
Harris ............................. 2
M.Brown ......................... 1
Sprinkle .......................... 1
Team .......................... 230
Opp. ............................ 215
Yds
510
420
527
338
211
240
300
64
60
40
18
50
11
7
2,796
2,641
Avg
13.1
10.8
16.0
11.3
7.8
12.0
15.8
9.1
15.0
10.0
4.5
25.0
11.0
7.0
12.2
12.3
Lg
74
41
69
40t
20
44t
52t
25
31
32
9
36t
11
7t
74
69
TD
4
0
1
3
2
1
3
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
17
18
11
5
Yds
32
3
24
10
2
0
0
SACKS
Kerrigan
Smith
Ioannidis
Z.Brown
McClain
Allen
Galette
Lanier
Foster
Hood
Swearinger
71 1 Team
60 1 Opp.
TD
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
PUNTING
No.
Way .................................... 43
Team .................................. 43
Opp. .................................... 41
Avg.
45.0
45.0
44.7
SCORING
TD XP-Att FG-Att
Hopkins .......................... 0 12-13 9-11
Rose ............................... 0 13-14 8-9
Thompson ...................... 6 0-0
0-0
Cousins ........................... 3 0-0
0-0
Doctson .......................... 3 0-0
0-0
Grant .............................. 3 0-0
0-0
Kelley ............................. 3 0-0
0-0
Perine ............................. 2 0-0
0-0
Reed ............................... 2 0-0
0-0
Davis .............................. 1 0-0
0-0
Harris ............................. 1 0-0
0-0
Kerrigan ......................... 1 0-0
0-0
Pryor ............................... 1 0-0
0-0
Sprinkle .......................... 1 0-0
0-0
Team ............................ 27 25-27 17-20
Opp. .............................. 29 23-24 21-28
No.
7.0
4.5
3.5
2.5
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
0.5
0.5
0.5
24.0
25.0
Net
38.5
38.5
41.9
In20
16
16
17
S
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Pts
39
37
36
18
18
18
18
12
12
6
6
6
6
6
238
266
STORY LINES
Take Giants seriously
Giants CB Janoris Jenkins
vs. Redskins WR Josh Doctson
The Redskins have started to get
Doctson more involved in recent
weeks. Against the Saints on
Sunday, he had four catches for
81 yards, including a spectacular
catch down the sideline on an
opportunity ball from Cousins.
Cousins is starting to trust
Doctson’s ability to win jump balls
more and more every week —
hence his increased production.
Doctson will face Jenkins, who has
two interceptions on the season,
including one last week against
the Chiefs.
— Mark Bullock
Rosters: Redskins’ and Giants’
active rosters. D8
Int
5
5
11
Yds
327
294
194
141
35
29
4
2
1,026
1,146
Team
Opp.
One of the few bright spots in an
otherwise terrible Giants season
has been the development of
Darkwa. He is having a strong
year, averaging nearly five yards
per carry. While the Giants have
lost wide receivers Odell Beckham
Jr. and Brandon Marshall for the
year, Darkwa has been able to run
the ball effectively and has been
their most consistent threat on
offense. Brown leads the league
with 101 combined tackles and
has been a force for Washington
in defending the run. He will be
tasked with keeping Darkwa in
check and forcing New York to
throw the ball.
TD
17
17
18
RUSHING
Att
Perine ........................... 89
Thompson .................... 64
Kelley ........................... 62
Cousins ......................... 33
Crowder .......................... 6
M.Brown ......................... 8
Paul ................................ 2
Marshall ......................... 1
Team .......................... 265
Opp. ............................ 264
INTS
No.
Swearinger ............ 3
Fuller ..................... 3
Kerrigan ................ 1
Foster .................... 1
Compton ................ 1
Dunbar ................... 1
Nicholson .............. 1
Giants RB Orleans Darkwa
vs. Redskins LB Zach Brown
Giants’ statistics
Yds
2,796
2,796
2,641
Att
345
345
341
The Redskins, with their thin
playoff prospects still alive, are
favored. The Giants have no
postseason shot. Which team will
bring more intensity to the field:
the Redskins, battered after
squandering a 15-point, fourthquarter lead over the Saints, or the
Giants, who ignored questions
about Coach Ben McAdoo’s job
security to upset the Chiefs as
double-digit underdogs on Sunday?
Best from ailing O-line
Injuries along the offensive line
have been a concern since the
Week 4 loss to the Chiefs. Concern
turned to alarm this week when the
Redskins placed two starters — left
guard Shawn Lauvao (shoulder)
and center Spencer Long
PASSING
Cmp
Manning ................. 234
Vereen ....................... 0
G.Smith ...................... 0
Team ...................... 234
Opp ......................... 221
Yds
2,298
0
0
2,298
2,713
Att
368
1
2
371
354
TD
14
0
0
14
20
Int
6
1
0
7
7
Rtg
87.0
0.0
39.6
85.0
96.0
RUSHING
Att
Darkwa ....................... 101
Gallman ........................ 54
Vereen .......................... 27
Perkins ......................... 32
Manning ......................... 7
Shepard .......................... 3
Beckham ......................... 1
King ................................ 2
Berhe .............................. 1
G.Smith .......................... 1
Raymond ........................ 1
Team .......................... 230
Opp. ............................ 303
Yds
489
223
97
61
26
13
8
3
2
-1
-1
920
1,327
Avg
4.8
4.1
3.6
1.9
3.7
4.3
8.0
1.5
2.0
-1.0
-1.0
4.0
4.4
Lg
47
15
12
14
14t
12
8
11
2
-1
-1
47
36
TD
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
6
RECEIVING
No.
Engram ......................... 41
Shepard ........................ 38
Vereen .......................... 32
Beckham ....................... 25
Marshall ....................... 18
Lewis ............................ 17
Darkwa ......................... 14
Gallman ........................ 12
King .............................. 10
Ellison ............................ 9
Perkins ........................... 7
Rudolph .......................... 6
J.Adams ......................... 4
Raymond ........................ 1
LaCosse .......................... 0
Eagan ............................. 0
Team .......................... 234
Opp. ............................ 221
Yds
452
475
192
302
154
221
84
55
111
78
35
66
61
12
0
0
2,298
2,713
Avg
11.0
12.5
6.0
12.1
8.6
13.0
6.0
4.6
11.1
8.7
5.0
11.0
15.2
12.0
0.0
0.0
9.8
12.3
Lg
31
77t
20
48t
18
34
13
10
19
14
7
19
38
12
0
0
77t
83t
TD
5
1
0
3
0
2
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
14
20
INTS
No.
Jenkins .................. 2
Collins ................... 2
Harrison ................ 1
Thompson ............. 1
Vernon ................... 1
Team
Opp.
7
7
Yds
60
21
9
0
0
SACKS
Pierre-Paul
Kennard
Vernon
Berhe
Bromley
Harrison
Munson
Wynn
RodgersCromartie
90 1 Team
36 0 Opp.
TD
1
0
0
0
0
PUNTING
No.
Wing ................................... 54
Team .................................. 55
Opp. .................................... 39
Avg.
45.9
45.0
44.6
SCORING
TD XP-Att FG-Att
Rosas .............................. 0 14-15 12-17
Engram ........................... 5 0-0
0-0
Beckham ......................... 3 0-0
0-0
Darkwa ........................... 2 0-0
0-0
Lewis .............................. 2 0-0
0-0
Ellison ............................ 1 0-0
0-0
Gallman .......................... 1 0-0
0-0
Jenkins ........................... 1 0-0
0-0
King ................................ 1 0-0
0-0
Manning ......................... 1 0-0
0-0
Shepard .......................... 1 0-0
0-0
Team ............................ 18 14-15 12-17
Opp. .............................. 27 25-26 20-25
No.
4.5
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
0.5
14.0
22.0
Net
38.1
37.4
41.6
In20
10
10
21
S
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
Pts
50
30
18
14
12
6
6
6
6
6
6
162
247
(quadriceps) — on injured reserve.
Worse, backup center Chase
Roullier broke a hand at New
Orleans and has been ruled out.
That brings up Tony Bergstrom, a
six-year NFL veteran signed Oct. 25
as a backup guard and tackle.
Strong game by Perine
After a fumble in his preseason
debut, Perine appears to have
earned Coach Jay Gruden’s trust.
Gruden had little choice after
placing starter Rob Kelley on
injured reserve Nov. 14. Taking
over as the lead back at New
Orleans, Perine became the team’s
first to top the 100-yard rushing
mark this season. The pressure
intensifies with Chris Thompson
lost for the season (broken leg) and
recently signed Byron Marshall
moving into Thompson’s role.
— Liz Clarke
Redskins’ schedule
SEPT. 10
L
PHI
30-17
SEPT. 17
SEPT. 24
W W
@LAR
27-20
OAK
27-10
OCT. 2
L
@KC
29-20
OCT. 8
OCT. 15
— W
BYE
SF
26-24
OCT. 23
OCT. 29
NOV. 5
NOV. 12
L
L
W
L
@PHI
34-24
DAL
33-19
@SEA
17-14
MIN
38-30
NOV. 19
NOV.
NOV.
DEC.
DEC.
DEC.
DEC.
L 23 30 10 17 24 31
@NO
34-31 (OT)
NYG
8:30, NBC
@DAL
8:25, NBC
@LAC
4:05, CBS
ARI
1, Fox
DEN
1, CBS
@NYG
1, Fox
D8
EZ
. THURSDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
SCOREBOARD
FOOTBA LL
BASKETBALL
H OC K E Y
NFL
Week 12 injury report
NBA
Heat 104, Celtics 98
NFC
NEW YORK GIANTS
AT WASHINGTON REDSKINS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
BOSTON ............................. 16
MIAMI ................................ 27
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 9
Dallas ............................ 5
Washington .................. 4
N.Y. Giants .................... 2
L
1
5
6
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.900
.500
.400
.200
PF
320
242
238
162
PA
188
242
266
247
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ................. 8
Carolina ......................... 7
Atlanta .......................... 6
Tampa Bay .................... 4
L
2
3
4
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.700
.600
.400
PF
302
213
231
203
PA
196
180
210
228
NORTH
W
Minnesota ..................... 8
Detroit .......................... 6
Green Bay ..................... 5
Chicago ......................... 3
L
2
4
5
7
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.600
.500
.300
PF
241
271
204
174
PA
172
234
230
221
WEST
W
L.A. Rams ...................... 7
Seattle .......................... 6
Arizona ......................... 4
San Francisco ................ 1
L
3
4
6
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.700
.600
.400
.100
PF
303
242
176
174
PA
186
199
254
260
EAST
W
New England ................. 8
Buffalo .......................... 5
Miami ............................ 4
N.Y. Jets ....................... 4
L
2
5
6
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.500
.400
.400
PF
290
208
157
201
PA
203
250
254
222
SOUTH
W
Jacksonville .................. 7
Tennessee ..................... 6
Houston ........................ 4
Indianapolis .................. 3
L
3
4
6
7
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.700
.600
.400
.300
PF
245
222
267
179
PA
141
253
262
280
NORTH
W L
Pittsburgh ..................... 8 2
Baltimore ...................... 5 5
Cincinnati ...................... 4 6
Cleveland ...................... 0 10
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.500
.400
.000
PF
227
213
169
150
PA
165
171
199
259
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 6
L.A. Chargers ................ 4
Oakland ......................... 4
Denver ........................... 3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.600
.400
.400
.300
PF
262
221
204
183
PA
220
196
247
259
AFC
L
4
6
6
7
WEEK 12
THURSDAY’S GAMES
N.Y. Giants at Washington (-7), 8:30
Minnesota (-3) at Detroit, 12:30
L.A. Chargers (-2) at Dallas, 4:30
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Tennessee (-31/2) at Indianapolis, 1
Carolina (-41/2) at N.Y. Jets, 1
Cleveland at Cincinnati (-71/2), 1
Tampa Bay at Atlanta (-10), 1
Miami at New England (-161/2), 1
Buffalo at Kansas City (-91/2), 1
Chicago at Philadelphia (-131/2), 1
Seattle (-61/2) at San Francisco, 4:05
Jacksonville (-5) at Arizona, 4:25
Denver at Oakland (-4), 4:25
New Orleans at L.A. Rams (-21/2), 4:25
Green Bay at Pittsburgh (-14), 8:30
Giants: OUT: G D.J. Fluker (toe), LB B.J. Goodson (ankle),
OL Justin Pugh (back). DOUBTFUL: LB Calvin Munson
(quad). QUESTIONABLE: LB Jonathan Casillas (neck),
LS Zak DeOssie (trap), DT Damon Harrison (ankle/elbow), WR Sterling Shepard (illness), LB Kelvin Sheppard
(groin), DE Olivier Vernon (shoulder). Redskins: OUT: DL
Terrell McClain (toe), S Montae Nicholson (concussion),
TE Jordan Reed (hamstring), C Chase Roullier (hand).
QUESTIONABLE: LB Zach Brown (Achilles), LB Martrell
Spaight (ankle), T Trent Williams (knee), LB Ryan
Anderson (knee), WR Ryan Grant (calf), DL Matt
Ioannidis (hand/thigh), DL Anthony Lanier II (knee), T
Morgan Moses (eye/ankles), T Ty Nsekhe (core muscle),
RB Samaje Perine (finger), G Brandon Scherff (knee).
REDSKINS’ ROSTER
5
6
8
12
13
14
18
22
23
24
26
29
31
32
34
35
36
38
40
45
46
47
50
52
53
55
56
57
58
60
64
66
67
68
71
72
73
74
75
76
79
80
83
84
85
86
87
90
91
92
94
97
98
Way, Tress
Rose, Nick
Cousins, Kirk
McCoy, Colt
Harris, Maurice
Grant, Ryan
Doctson, Josh
Everett, Deshazor
Hall, DeAngelo
Norman, Josh
Breeland, Bashaud
Fuller, Kendall
Moreau, Fabian
Perine, Samaje
Marshall, Byron
Nicholson, Montae
Swearinger, D.J.
Holsey, Joshua
Harvey-Clemons, Josh
Robertson, Pete
Daniels, LeShun
Dunbar, Quinton
Spaight, Martrell
Anderson, Ryan
Brown, Zach
Carter, Chris
Vigil, Zach
Sundberg, Nick
Galette, Junior
Kouandjio, Arie
Francis, A.J.
Bergstrom, Tony
Reid, Caraun
Catalina, Tyler
Williams, Trent
Lanier, Anthony
Roullier, Chase
Rhaney, Demetrius
Scherff, Brandon
Moses, Morgan
Nsekhe, Ty
Crowder, Jamison
Quick, Brian
Paul, Niles
Davis, Vernon
Reed, Jordan
Sprinkle, Jeremy
Hood, Ziggy
Kerrigan, Ryan
McGee, Stacy
Smith, Preston
McClain, Terrell
Ioannidis, Matthew
P
K
QB
QB
WR
WR
WR
SS
FS
CB
CB
CB
CB
RB
RB
SS
FS
DB
LB
LB
RB
CB
ILB
OLB
ILB
LB
LB
LS
LB
OG
DT
C
DT
OG
OT
DE
C
C
OG
OT
OT
WR
WR
TE
TE
TE
TE
NT
OLB
DE
OLB
DT
DT
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-1
6-3
6-0
6-2
6-0
5-10
6-0
5-11
5-11
6-0
5-10
5-9
6-2
5-10
5-11
6-4
6-2
6-0
6-2
6-0
6-2
6-1
6-1
6-2
6-0
6-2
6-5
6-5
6-5
6-2
6-6
6-5
6-6
6-3
6-2
6-5
6-6
6-8
5-9
6-3
6-1
6-3
6-2
6-5
6-3
6-4
6-3
6-5
6-2
6-3
216
190
202
215
200
204
206
195
200
200
195
198
198
236
201
216
205
195
226
243
225
197
243
253
251
240
238
256
254
316
337
315
298
325
320
286
317
301
319
335
338
177
218
242
244
246
252
305
259
341
265
302
305
GIANT S’ ROSTER
MONDAY’S GAME
Houston at Baltimore (-7), 8:30
WEEK 13
THURSDAY, NOV. 30
Washington at Dallas, 8:25
SUNDAY, DEC. 3
Detroit at Baltimore, 1
Tampa Bay at Green Bay, 1
Minnesota at Atlanta, 1
San Francisco at Chicago, 1
Denver at Miami, 1
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1
Houston at Tennessee, 1
Kansas City at N.Y. Jets, 1
New England at Buffalo, 1
Cleveland at L.A. Chargers, 4:05
Carolina at New Orleans, 4:25
L.A. Rams at Arizona, 4:25
N.Y. Giants at Oakland, 4:25
Philadelphia at Seattle, 8:30
MONDAY, DEC. 4
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:30
NCAA
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
MIDWEST
at Akron 24, Kent St. 14
Miami (Ohio) 28, at Ball St. 7
at E. Michigan 34, Bowling Green 14
THURSDAY‘S GAMES
SOUTH
Edward Waters (1-9) at Alabama St. (4-7), 3
Mississippi (5-6) at Mississippi St. (8-3), 7:30
FRIDAY’S GAMES
EAST
Miami (10-0) at Pittsburgh (4-7), Noon
Ohio (8-3) at Buffalo (5-6), 1
SOUTH
South Florida (9-1) at UCF (10-0), 3:30
Texas St. (2-9) at Troy (8-2), 4
W. Kentucky (6-5) at FIU (6-4), 7
Virginia Tech (8-3) at Virginia (6-5), 8
MIDWEST
W. Michigan (6-5) at Toledo (9-2), 11:30 a.m.
N. Illinois (8-3) at Cent. Michigan (6-5), Noon
Iowa (6-5) at Nebraska (4-7), 4
SOUTHWEST
Navy (6-4) at Houston (6-4), Noon
Baylor (1-10) at TCU (9-2), Noon
Missouri (6-5) at Arkansas (4-7), 2:30
Texas Tech (5-6) at Texas (6-5), 8
FAR WEST
New Mexico (3-8) at San Diego St. (9-2), 3:30
California (5-6) at UCLA (5-6), 10:30
2
3
5
9
10
12
18
19
20
21
22
24
26
27
28
29
33
34
37
38
41
43
45
46
47
48
51
52
54
58
59
63
67
68
69
72
73
74
75
76
77
83
85
87
88
89
90
91
93
94
96
98
99
Rosas, Aldrick
Smith, Geno
Webb, Davis
Wing, Brad
Manning, Eli
King, Tavarres
Lewis, Roger
Rudolph, Travis
Jenkins, Janoris
Collins, Landon
Gallman, Wayne
Apple, Eli
Darkwa, Orleans
Thompson, Darian
Perkins, Paul
Berhe, Nat
Adams, Andrew
Vereen, Shane
Cockrell, Ross
Deayon, Donte
Rodgers-Cromartie, Dominique
Smith, Shane
Skinner, Deontae
Munson, Calvin
Sheppard, Kelvin
Ayers, Akeem
DeOssie, Zak
Casillas, Jonathan
Vernon, Olivier
Grant, Curtis
Kennard, Devon
Wheeler, Chad
Pugh, Justin
Hart, Bobby
Jones, Brett
Wynn, Kerry
Greco, John
Flowers, Ereck
Halapio, Jon
Fluker, D.J.
Jerry, John
Raymond, Kalif
Ellison, Rhett
Shepard, Sterling
Engram, Evan
Adams, Jerell
Pierre-Paul, Jason
Moss, Avery
Goodson, B.J.
Tomlinson, Dalvin
Bromley, Jay
Harrison, Damon
Thomas, Robert
K
QB
QB
P
QB
WR
WR
WR
CB
SS
RB
CB
RB
FS
RB
FS
FS
RB
DB
DB
CB
TE
LB
MLB
LB
LB
LS
OLB
DE
LB
OLB
OT
OG
OT
C
DE
OT
OT
OT
OG
OG
WR
TE
WR
TE
TE
DE
DE
MLB
DT
DT
DT
NT
6-2
6-3
6-5
6-3
6-5
6-1
6-0
6-0
5-10
6-0
6-0
6-1
5-11
6-2
5-11
5-11
5-11
5-10
6-0
5-9
6-2
6-1
6-1
6-0
6-2
6-3
6-5
6-1
6-2
6-2
6-4
6-7
6-5
6-4
6-2
6-5
6-4
6-6
6-3
6-5
6-5
5-9
6-5
5-10
6-3
6-5
6-5
6-3
6-1
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-1
221
221
230
192
220
192
203
190
190
218
210
201
219
208
213
195
205
205
191
163
203
241
241
241
249
247
250
226
262
249
256
312
311
316
312
264
318
325
315
345
335
160
255
201
240
254
275
271
241
317
314
341
331
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................16
Toronto ......................................11
New York ...................................10
Philadelphia ...............................10
Brooklyn.......................................6
L
3
6
7
7
11
Pct
.842
.647
.588
.588
.353
GB
—
4
5
5
9
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................10
Charlotte......................................8
Miami...........................................8
Orlando ........................................8
Atlanta.........................................3
L
8
9
9
10
15
Pct
.556
.471
.471
.444
.167
GB
—
11/2
11/2
2
7
CENTRAL
W
Detroit .......................................11
Cleveland ...................................11
Indiana .......................................10
x-Milwaukee ................................8
Chicago ........................................3
L
6
7
8
8
13
Pct
.647
.611
.556
.500
.188
GB
—
1/
2
11/2
21/2
71/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................14
San Antonio ...............................11
New Orleans ..............................10
Memphis ......................................7
Dallas ...........................................4
L
4
7
8
10
15
Pct
.778
.611
.556
.412
.211
GB
—
3
4
61/2
101/2
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................11
Portland .....................................10
Denver........................................10
Oklahoma City .............................8
Utah .............................................8
L
7
8
8
9
11
Pct
.611
.556
.556
.471
.421
GB
—
1
1
21/2
31/2
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................13
x-L.A. Lakers................................8
x-Phoenix.....................................7
L.A. Clippers.................................6
x-Sacramento ..............................4
L
5
10
11
11
13
Pct
.722
.444
.389
.353
.235
GB
—
5
6
61/2
1/
82
x-Late game
TUESDAY’S RESULT
SATURDAY‘S GAMES
EASTERN CONFERENCE
EAST
Boston College (6-5) at Syracuse (4-7), 12:20
Michigan St. (8-3) at Rutgers (4-7), 4
SOUTH
Florida St. (4-6) at Florida (4-6), Noon
Georgia (10-1) at Georgia Tech (5-5), Noon
Louisville (7-4) at Kentucky (7-4), Noon
East Carolina (3-8) at Memphis (9-1), Noon
Duke (5-6) at Wake Forest (7-4), 12:30
Southern Miss. (7-4) at Marshall (7-4), 2:30
Old Dominion (5-6) at Middle Tennessee (5-6), 3
Alabama (11-0) at Auburn (9-2), 3:30
Penn St. (9-2) at Maryland (4-7), 3:30
North Carolina (3-8) at N.C. State (7-4), 3:30
Vanderbilt (4-7) at Tennessee (4-7), 4
Texas A&M (7-4) at LSU (8-3), 7:30
UTSA (6-4) at Louisiana Tech (5-6), 7:30
Clemson (10-1) at South Carolina (8-3), 7:30
MIDWEST
U-Conn. (3-8) at Cincinnati (3-8), Noon
Ohio St. (9-2) at Michigan (8-3), Noon
Indiana (5-6) at Purdue (5-6), Noon
Iowa St. (7-4) at Kansas St. (6-5), 3:30
Wisconsin (11-0) at Minnesota (5-6), 3:30
Northwestern (8-3) at Illinois (2-9), 4
SOUTHWEST
Kansas (1-10) at Oklahoma St. (8-3), Noon
Tulane (5-6) at SMU (6-5), Noon
North Texas (8-3) at Rice (1-10), 1
West Virginia (7-4) at Oklahoma (10-1), 3:45
Temple (5-6) at Tulsa (2-9), 4
FAR WEST
UNLV (5-6) at Nevada (2-9), 3
Boise St. (9-2) at Fresno St. (8-3), 3:30
Idaho (3-7) at New Mexico St. (4-6), 4
Arizona (7-4) at Arizona St. (6-5), 4:30
Wyoming (7-4) at San Jose St. (1-11), 5
Oregon St. (1-10) at Oregon (6-5), 7
Notre Dame (9-2) at Stanford (8-3), 8
Washington (9-2) at Washington St. (9-2), 8
BYU (3-9) at Hawaii (3-8), 9
Colorado (5-6) at Utah (5-6), 10
Utah St. (6-5) at Air Force (4-7), 10:15
FIRST LEG
Tuesday’s result: Toronto 0, at Columbus 0, tie
SECOND LEG
Wednesday, Nov. 29: Columbus at Toronto, 7:30
THURSDAY’S GAMES
No games scheduled.
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Portland at Brooklyn, 12
New York at Atlanta, 7:30
Orlando at Boston, 7:30
Charlotte at Cleveland, 8
Detroit at Oklahoma City, 8
Miami at Minnesota, 8
Toronto at Indiana, 8
Memphis at Denver, 9
New Orleans at Phoenix, 9
Chicago at Golden State, 10:30
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Portland at Washington, 7
Orlando at Philadelphia, 7
San Antonio at Charlotte, 7
Toronto at Atlanta, 7:30
Boston at Indiana, 8
New York at Houston, 8
New Orleans at Golden State, 8:30
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8:30
Milwaukee at Utah, 9
L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 10
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Miami at Chicago, 3:30
Phoenix at Minnesota, 3:30
Brooklyn at Memphis, 6
Saturday, Dec. 9: at higher seed, 4
Sounders 2, Dynamo 0
Cavaliers 119, Nets 109
BROOKLYN ......................... 17
CLEVELAND ....................... 20
29
25
31
32
2
0
0
0
2
0
First half: 1, Seattle, Swensson 2 (Lodeiro), 11th
minute. 2, Seattle, Bruin 12 (Jones), 42nd.
Second half: None.
Goalies: Seattle, Tyler Miller; Houston, Joe Willis.
Yellow Cards: Elis, Houston, 29th; Martinez, Houston,
44th; Tolo, Seattle, 64th; Torres, Seattle, 88th.
Red Cards: Anibaba, Houston, 28th.
A: 22,661 (22,661)
Seattle, Tyler Miller; Kelvin Leerdam, Roman Torres,
Chad Marshall, Nouhou Tolo; Cristian Roldan, Gustav
Svensson, Nicolas Lodeiro, Clint Dempsey (Victor Rodriguez, 46th), Joevin Jones (Lamar Neagle, 79th); Will
Bruin (Henry Wingo, 91st).
Houston, Joe Willis; Jalil Anibaba, Adolfo Machado,
Philippe Senderos (Dylan Remick, 59th), DaMarcus
Beasley; Eric Alexander (Romell Quioto, 72nd), Juan
Cabezas, Alex (Leonardo, 32nd), Tomas Martinez, Alberth Elis; Mauro Manotas.
L.A. CLIPPERS .................... 29
ATLANTA ........................... 30
33
33
26
21
28 — 116
19 — 103
L.A. CLIPPERS: W.Johnson 8-10 2-2 24, Griffin 9-19 5-8
26, Jordan 6-6 2-2 14, Rivers 7-12 1-4 18, L.Williams 7-15
3-3 20, Dekker 3-6 0-0 6, Reed 1-2 0-0 2, Evans 2-3 0-0 4,
C.Williams 1-2 0-0 2, Thornwell 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 44-76
13-19 116.
ATLANTA: Prince 1-7 0-0 2, Collins 7-9 0-0 14, Dedmon
6-8 2-4 17, Schroder 8-21 2-2 19, Bazemore 5-9 0-0 14,
Bembry 1-4 0-0 3, Ilyasova 0-1 0-0 0, Cavanaugh 4-5 0-0
8, Magette 1-4 2-2 4, Delaney 0-4 2-2 2, Belinelli 7-11 5-5
20. Totals 40-83 13-15 103.
Three-point Goals: L.A. Clippers 15-30 (W.Johnson 6-7,
Rivers 3-5, L.Williams 3-6, Griffin 3-8, Evans 0-1,
Thornwell 0-1, Dekker 0-2), Atlanta 10-29 (Bazemore
4-6, Dedmon 3-4, Bembry 1-2, Schroder 1-4, Belinelli 1-5,
Magette 0-1, Cavanaugh 0-1, Prince 0-3, Delaney 0-3).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 33 (Jordan
16), Atlanta 36 (Collins 10). Assists: L.A. Clippers 30
(Griffin 10), Atlanta 26 (Schroder 7). Total Fouls: L.A.
Clippers 15, Atlanta 20. Technicals: Atlanta coach Hawks
(Defensive three second). A: 12,675 (19,049).
Michigan 68, VCU 60
32 — 109
42 — 119
BROOKLYN: Carroll 4-12 2-2 10, Hollis-Jefferson 8-11
4-5 20, Zeller 2-4 2-2 7, Dinwiddie 3-7 0-0 8, Crabbe 6-12
0-1 15, Acy 2-7 2-2 8, Allen 3-3 0-0 6, Harris 7-10 0-2 18,
Kilpatrick 3-6 0-0 8, LeVert 4-9 1-2 9. Totals 42-81 11-16
109.
CLEVELAND: James 11-17 7-9 33, Crowder 4-5 3-3 14,
Love 7-18 4-6 18, Calderon 2-4 0-0 5, Smith 1-4 0-0 3,
Green 2-6 0-0 5, Holland 0-0 0-0 0, Osman 1-2 0-0 2, Frye
4-7 0-0 9, Zizic 0-0 0-0 0, Korver 3-7 4-5 12, Wade 8-13
1-4 18. Totals 43-83 19-27 119.
Three-point Goals: Brooklyn 14-37 (Harris 4-7, Crabbe
3-6, Kilpatrick 2-4, Acy 2-5, Dinwiddie 2-5, Zeller 1-1,
Hollis-Jefferson 0-1, LeVert 0-2, Carroll 0-6), Cleveland
14-34 (James 4-7, Crowder 3-3, Korver 2-6, Wade 1-1,
Frye 1-3, Green 1-3, Smith 1-3, Calderon 1-3, Osman 0-1,
Love 0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Brooklyn 42
(Zeller, LeVert 7), Cleveland 33 (Love 10). Assists:
Brooklyn 26 (Dinwiddie 10), Cleveland 21 (James, Wade
5). Total Fouls: Brooklyn 21, Cleveland 19. A: 20,562
(20,562).
23
24
20
20
24 — 81
31 — 101
Late Tuesday
SEATTLE
HOUSTON
Clippers 116, Hawks 103
Blue Jackets 1, Flames 0 (OT)
CALGARY ........................... 0
COLUMBUS ........................ 0
EASTERN CONFERENCE
METROPOLITAN
W
Columbus ...................... 14
New Jersey ................... 12
N.Y. Islanders ............... 12
Washington .................. 12
Pittsburgh ..................... 11
N.Y. Rangers ................. 11
Carolina ........................... 9
Philadelphia .................... 8
L
7
5
7
10
9
9
7
9
OL PTS.
1
29
4
28
2
26
1
25
3
25
2
24
4
22
5
21
GF
63
69
77
67
61
72
58
61
GA
53
66
69
72
80
68
59
65
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 16
Toronto ......................... 14
Detroit .......................... 10
Boston ............................. 9
Ottawa ............................ 8
Montreal ......................... 8
Florida ............................. 8
Buffalo ............................ 5
L
3
8
9
7
6
12
11
13
OL PTS.
2
34
1
29
3
23
4
22
6
22
3
19
2
18
4
14
GF
83
81
65
54
64
54
63
52
GA
54
69
64
59
67
80
73
79
W
16
13
12
11
10
10
11
L
5
6
5
8
8
8
10
OL PTS.
1
33
2
28
3
27
1
23
3
23
3
23
1
23
GF
78
68
67
69
64
63
61
GA
58
62
56
65
59
56
65
PACIFIC
W
x-Los Angeles ............... 12
x-Vegas ......................... 12
Calgary .......................... 12
Vancouver ..................... 11
San Jose ........................ 11
x-Anaheim .................... 10
Edmonton ....................... 8
Arizona ........................... 5
L
7
6
8
8
8
7
12
16
OL PTS.
2
26
1
25
1
25
3
25
1
23
3
23
2
18
3
13
GF
64
68
62
61
50
58
59
59
GA
50
58
64
61
45
56
74
89
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
St. Louis ........................
Nashville .......................
x-Winnipeg ...................
Colorado ........................
Minnesota .....................
Chicago .........................
Dallas ............................
x-Late game
Knicks 108, Raptors 100
TORONTO ........................... 34
NEW YORK ......................... 26
25
22
10
41
31 — 100
19 — 108
TORONTO: Anunoby 1-2 0-0 3, Ibaka 4-14 1-2 9,
Valanciunas 4-8 0-0 8, Lowry 7-15 7-8 25, DeRozan 7-15
2-6 18, Miles 4-10 0-0 11, Siakam 4-8 0-0 8, Nogueira 0-0
0-0 0, Poeltl 0-1 0-0 0, VanVleet 3-8 0-0 7, Powell 3-6 2-2
11. Totals 37-87 12-18 100.
NEW YORK: Hardaway Jr. 13-27 8-10 38, Porzingis 8-21
5-5 22, Kanter 5-9 1-1 11, Jack 1-6 0-0 2, Lee 7-12 0-1 15,
Thomas 1-3 0-0 3, McDermott 4-7 0-0 8, O’Quinn 1-3 0-0
2, Ntilikina 3-5 0-0 7. Totals 43-93 14-17 108.
Three-point Goals: Toronto 14-38 (Lowry 4-10, Powell
3-4, Miles 3-8, DeRozan 2-4, Anunoby 1-2, VanVleet 1-4,
Siakam 0-1, Ibaka 0-5), New York 8-24 (Hardaway Jr.
4-9, Thomas 1-2, Lee 1-2, Ntilikina 1-3, Porzingis 1-4,
McDermott 0-2, Jack 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Toronto 42 (Lowry 10), New York 47 (Porzingis 12).
Assists: Toronto 21 (Lowry 5), New York 29 (Lee,
Hardaway Jr. 7). Total Fouls: Toronto 23, New York 19. A:
19,812 (19,812).
VCU (3-3)
Tillman 3-9 0-0 6, Lane 5-5 3-5 13, Crowfield 2-5 1-2 6,
Williams 3-13 0-0 6, Jenkins 6-13 0-0 12, Santos-Silva
1-3 0-0 2, Mobley 0-1 0-0 0, Djonkam 0-0 0-0 0, Jackson
0-1 0-0 0, Maye 1-1 1-2 3, Simms 4-5 2-2 12. 25-56 Totals
7-11 60.
Michigan (5-1)
Wagner 5-10 1-1 12, Brooks 2-4 1-2 5, Matthews 4-9 3-8
11, Abdur-Rahkman 4-11 0-0 10, Robinson 7-13 2-2 18,
Livers 0-0 0-0 0, Teske 3-4 2-5 8, Poole 0-0 0-0 0, Simpson
0-1 2-2 2, Simmons 0-1 0-0 0, Watson 0-0 2-2 2. Totals
25-53 13-22 68.
Halftime: Michigan 36-30. Three-point goals: VCU 3-11
(Simms 2-2, Crowfield 1-3, Mobley 0-1, Jenkins 0-2,
Williams 0-3), Michigan 5-20 (Abdur-Rahkman 2-5,
Robinson 2-8, Wagner 1-3, Brooks 0-1, Simpson 0-1,
Matthews 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: VCU 31
(Lane 8), Michigan 32 (Wagner 9). Assists: VCU 6
(Williams, Jenkins 2), Michigan 10 (Abdur-Rahkman 4).
Total fouls: VCU 20, Michigan 14. A: 2,400 (2,400).
at Washington 5, Ottawa 2
N.Y. Rangers 6, at Carolina 1
Minnesota 5, at Buffalo 4
at Florida 2, Toronto 1 (SO)
Vancouver 5, at Pittsburgh 2
at Columbus 1, Calgary 0
at N.Y. Islanders 4, Philadelphia 3 (OT)
Boston 3, at New Jersey 2 (SO)
Edmonton 6, at Detroit 2
at Tampa Bay 3, Chicago 2 (OT)
at Nashville 3, Montreal 2 (SO)
San Jose 3, at Arizona 1
at Colorado 3, Dallas 0
Winnipeg at Los Angeles, Late
Vegas at Anaheim, Late
CALGARY ......................... 10
3
7
2 — 22
COLUMBUS ...................... 14
12
13
2 — 41
Power-play opportunities: Calgary 0 of 1; Columbus 0 of
2. Goalies: Calgary, Smith 11-6-1 (41 shots-40 saves).
Columbus, Bobrovsky 13-4-1 (22-22). A: 16,290
(18,500). T: 2:19.
Canucks 5, Penguins 2
VANCOUVER ........................... 2
PITTSBURGH ........................... 1
2
0
1 —
1 —
Scoring: 1, Vancouver, Boeser 10 (Del Zotto, Baertschi),
3:52. 2, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 7 (Letang, Kessel), 6:28
(pp). 3, Vancouver, Eriksson 2 (Vanek), 8:33.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Vancouver, Pouliot 1 (Vanek, Del Zotto), 7:08
(pp). 5, Vancouver, Boeser 11 (H.Sedin, Edler), 9:47 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 8 (Crosby, Kessel), 1:24
(pp). 7, Vancouver, Sutter 2, 18:40.
SHOTS ON GOAL
VANCOUVER ......................... 18
5
14 — 37
PITTSBURGH ......................... 18
12
15 — 45
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 2 of 3; Pittsburgh
2 of 5. Goalies: Vancouver, Nilsson 5-1-1 (45 shots-43
saves). Pittsburgh, Murray 11-6-1 (36-32). A: 18,606
(18,387). T: 2:29.
2
2
0
0
0 — 3
1 — 4
Scoring: 3, Philadelphia, Raffl 1 (Couturier, Provorov),
0:46. 4, N.Y. Islanders, Boychuk 3 (Bailey, Tavares), 7:13
(pp). 5, N.Y. Islanders, Ho-Sang 2 (Beauvillier, Pelech),
11:05. 6, Philadelphia, Voracek 7 (Simmonds, Giroux),
13:54 (pp).
OVERTIME
Scoring: 7, N.Y. Islanders, Bailey 5 (Tavares, Leddy),
0:32.
SHOTS ON GOAL
PHILADELPHIA ................ 12
10
16 — 38
N.Y. ISLANDERS .............. 16
13
8
2 — 39
Power-play opportunities: Philadelphia 1 of 2; N.Y.
Islanders 2 of 5. Goalies: Philadelphia, Elliott 6-5-4 (39
shots-35 saves). N.Y. Islanders, Greiss 7-2-2 (38-35). A:
12,462 (15,795). T: 2:41.
THURSDAY’S GAMES
No games scheduled.
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Tampa Bay at Washington, 5
Pittsburgh at Boston, 1
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 4
Colorado at Minnesota, 4
Winnipeg at Anaheim, 4
San Jose at Vegas, 6
Vancouver at New Jersey, 7
Ottawa at Columbus, 7
Detroit at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Edmonton at Buffalo, 7
Toronto at Carolina, 7:30
Nashville at St. Louis, 8
Calgary at Dallas, 9
Los Angeles at Arizona, 9
Panthers 2, Maple Leafs 1 (SO)
TORONTO .......................... 0
FLORIDA ............................ 0
0
1
1
0
0 — 1
0 — 2
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Florida, Bjugstad 5 (Haapala, Trocheck),
15:16.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Toronto, Kadri 11 (Marleau, Brown), 13:58.
SHOOTOUT
Toronto 1 (Matthews NG, Marner NG, Marleau G, Bozak
NG), Florida 2 (Huberdeau NG, Barkov G, Trocheck NG,
Bjugstad G).
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Toronto, 7
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 7
Buffalo at Montreal, 7
Chicago at Florida, 7
N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 7
New Jersey at Detroit, 7
Vegas at Arizona, 8
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8
Calgary at Colorado, 10
Winnipeg at San Jose, 10
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10:30
SHOTS ON GOAL
TORONTO .......................... 7
12
21
2 — 42
FLORIDA .......................... 15
11
13
3 — 42
Power-play opportunities: Toronto 0 of 3; Florida 0 of 3.
Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 12-7-1 (42 shots-41 saves).
Florida, Luongo 5-4-1 (42-41). A: 15,256 (19,250). T:
2:45.
Bruins 3, Devils 2 (SO)
BOSTON ............................. 2
NEW JERSEY ..................... 1
3
0
1 —
0 —
6
2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Detroit, Tatar 6 (Abdelkader, Zetterberg),
7:25 (pp). 2, Edmonton, Nurse 2 (McDavid, Lucic), 8:25.
3, Edmonton, Maroon 6 (Draisaitl, Auvitu), 11:05. 4,
Detroit, Kronwall 2 (Nyquist, Abdelkader), 18:25.
SECOND PERIOD
0
0
0
1
0 — 3
0 — 2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Boston, DeBrusk 5 (Grzelcyk), 1:25. 2, Boston,
Bergeron 5 (Pastrnak, Heinen), 11:02. 3, New Jersey,
Bratt 6 (Boyle, Henrique), 17:10 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, New Jersey, Gibbons 10 (Severson), 15:16.
SHOOTOUT
THIRD PERIOD
Boston 2 (Bergeron NG, Pastrnak G, Krejci NG, DeBrusk
NG, Spooner NG, Cehlarik NG, Nash NG, Heinen NG,
Schaller NG, Vatrano NG, McAvoy G), New Jersey 1 (Hall
G, Bratt NG, Stafford NG, Boyle NG, Zacha NG, Hischier
NG, Henrique NG, Butcher NG, Gibbons NG, Severson
NG, Zajac NG).
Scoring: 8, Edmonton, Puljujarvi 2 (Strome), 18:55.
SHOTS ON GOAL
SHOTS ON GOAL
BOSTON ........................... 10
12
5
2 — 29
NEW JERSEY ................... 15
9
15
3 — 42
Power-play opportunities: Boston 0 of 4; New Jersey 1 of
3. Goalies: Boston, Khudobin 6-0-2 (42 shots-40 saves).
New Jersey, Schneider 8-4-3 (29-27). A: 16,514 (16,514).
T: 2:51.
Scoring: 5, Edmonton, Khaira 2 (Auvitu, Strome), 10:24.
6, Edmonton, Letestu 4 (Cammalleri, Kassian), 14:22. 7,
Edmonton, Caggiula 4 (Russell, McDavid), 18:16.
EDMONTON ............................. 8
14
6 — 28
DETROIT ................................ 11
3
8 — 22
Power-play opportunities: Edmonton 0 of 1; Detroit 1 of
2. Goalies: Edmonton, Talbot 8-10-1 (22 shots-20
saves). Detroit, Howard 8-6-2 (19-15), Mrazek 2-3-1
(9-7). A: 19,515 (20,000). T: 2:26.
Lightning 3, Blackhawks 2 (OT)
George Mason (3-3)
Mar 7-11 2-2 17, Grayer 4-11 2-2 12, Boyd 7-15 2-2 18,
Kier 1-7 3-6 5, Livingston 6-10 4-5 18, Calixte 0-1 3-4 3,
Wilson 0-2 0-0 0, Greene 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 25-58 16-21
73.
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Rangers, Kreider 6 (Miller, Smith), 0:52.
2, N.Y. Rangers, Zibanejad 11 (Skjei), 2:26. 3, Carolina,
Aho 5 (Teravainen, Faulk), 8:50 (pp). 4, N.Y. Rangers,
Carey 1 (Holden, Vesey), 10:47.
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 3
CAROLINA ............................... 1
0
0
3 —
0 —
6
1
FIRST PERIOD
THIRD PERIOD
0
1
0
1
0 — 2
1 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Chicago, Kane 7 (Anisimov, Rutta), 3:49. 2,
Chicago, Kane 8 (Franson, Keith), 15:54 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Tampa Bay, Palat 6 (Callahan, Hedman), 4:27
(sh).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, N.Y. Rangers, Kreider 7 (Zibanejad, Zuccarello), 0:20 (pp). 6, N.Y. Rangers, Fast 2 (Hayes, Nash),
5:45. 7, N.Y. Rangers, Fast 3 (Kampfer), 12:26.
SHOTS ON GOAL
N.Y. RANGERS ....................... 11
5
11 — 27
CAROLINA ............................. 17
7
9 — 33
Power-play opportunities: N.Y. Rangers 1 of 2; Carolina 1
of 5. Goalies: N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 10-6-2 (33
shots-32 saves). Carolina, Darling 6-5-4 (27-21). A:
11,398 (18,680). T: 2:25.
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Wild 5, Sabres 4
MINNESOTA ............................ 3
BUFFALO ................................. 1
CHICAGO ............................ 2
TAMPA BAY ...................... 0
2
2
0 —
1 —
5
4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Buffalo, Eichel 6 (Kane, Pominville), 6:55. 2,
Minnesota, Ennis 4 (Foligno, Coyle), 8:59. 3, Minnesota,
Granlund 4, 12:28. 4, Minnesota, Niederreiter 7 (Koivu,
Suter), 14:28 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Buffalo, Nolan 1 (Okposo, Josefson), 2:01. 6,
Minnesota, Niederreiter 8 (Staal, Zucker), 7:57. 7,
Minnesota, Granlund 5 (Koivu, Suter), 15:56 (pp). 8,
Buffalo, Reinhart 5 (Larsson, McCabe), 18:25.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Tampa Bay, Kunitz 3 (Callahan, Coburn), 0:31.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 5, Tampa Bay, Point 9 (Stamkos, Namestnikov),
3:25 (pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
CHICAGO .......................... 13
6
10
2 — 31
TAMPA BAY .................... 11
10
13
4 — 38
Power-play opportunities: Chicago 1 of 4; Tampa Bay 1 of
6. Goalies: Chicago, Crawford 9-7-1 (38 shots-35 saves).
Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 15-2-1 (31-29). A: 19,092
(19,092). T: 2:33.
Predators 3, Canadiens 2 (SO)
MONTREAL ........................ 1
NASHVILLE ........................ 1
0
0
1
1
0 — 2
0 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Montreal, Benn 2 (Hudon, Danault), 12:47. 2,
Nashville, Forsberg 10 (Johansen, Subban), 19:58 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Nashville, Forsberg 11 (Smith), 3:16 (pp). 4,
Montreal, Morrow 3, 19:04.
SHOOTOUT
Scoring: 9, Buffalo, Nolan 2 (Beaulieu), 13:55.
Montreal 0 (Byron NG, Drouin NG, Pacioretty NG),
Nashville 1 (Fiala NG, Forsberg NG, Turris G).
SHOTS ON GOAL
SHOTS ON GOAL
MINNESOTA .......................... 13
14
5 — 32
BUFFALO ............................... 14
11
9 — 34
Power-play opportunities: Minnesota 2 of 3; Buffalo 0 of
3. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 9-6-2 (34 shots-30
saves). Buffalo, Johnson 1-4-2 (13-10), Lehner 4-9-2
(19-17). A: 17,418 (19,070). T: 2:29.
MONTREAL ........................ 7
9
12
1 — 29
NASHVILLE ........................ 9
8
13
3 — 33
Power-play opportunities: Montreal 0 of 4; Nashville 2 of
4. Goalies: Montreal, Niemi 0-4-1 (33 shots-31 saves).
Nashville, Rinne 12-3-2 (29-27). A: 17,113 (17,113). T:
2:45.
EFGHI
AUTOMOTIVE
In partnership with
washingtonpost.com/cars
1405
Cars
1447
CARS • TRUCKS • SUVS & MORE
EZ
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
Autos Wanted
PORSCHE
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
donation helps local families with
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
Tax deductible. MVA License
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
PORSCHE 2017 911 CARERRA
COUPE- All blue, w/glass sunrf &
wiper, min. perfection, $81,000.
incl. 4 yr paid service 7700 miles.
Call 240-401-0707
DONATE VEHICLES. Your donation
trains disadvantaged at-risk youths
in auto repairs, also provides vehicle donations to low-income families. Tax-deductible. MVA License#
8000113006823. 301-355-9333
www.auted.org
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
5
2
FIRST PERIOD
SECOND PERIOD
Rangers 6, Hurricanes 1
EAST
Army 79, NJIT 49
Boston College 79, Houston 74
Cornell 67, Canisius 59
Navy 71, Air Force 64
Providence 74, Wright St. 69
Temple 69, La Salle 52
SOUTH
Duke 84, Old Dominion 51
Elon 71, UCF 57
George Mason 56, Illinois St. 37
Kentucky 86, Morehead St. 53
North Carolina 86, UNC-Wilmington 60
Ohio 54, Marshall 52
Oregon St. 97, NC Central 44
Richmond 100, Savannah St. 63
Stetson 85, Florida 71
MIDWEST
Akron 62, E. Kentucky 45
Iowa 90, Morgan St. 46
Kansas 81, Delaware St. 49
Michigan 78, Oakland 69
Northwestern 57, Santa Clara 47
Toledo 68, Dayton 50
SOUTHWEST
Texas A&M 66, UALR 49
Texas Tech 93, Mass.-Lowell 65
SHOTS ON GOAL
Scoring: 1, Philadelphia, Leier 1 (Sanheim, Laughton),
6:02. 2, N.Y. Islanders, Barzal 5 (Bailey, Leddy), 18:53
(pp).
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Fresno St. (3-2)
B.Williams 7-13 1-2 15, Bowles 8-12 3-4 21, Hopkins 4-6
1-2 9, Bittner 0-1 0-0 0, D.Taylor 7-12 6-9 23, Carter 0-0
0-0 0, J.Taylor 3-6 2-4 11, McWilliams 0-5 0-0 0. 29-55
Totals 13-21 79.
NCAA women
0 — 0
1 — 1
FIRST PERIOD
Fresno St. 79, George Mason 73
Halftime: Fresno St. 43-29. Three-point goals: Fresno St.
8-22 (J.Taylor 3-6, D.Taylor 3-6, Bowles 2-5, Bittner 0-1,
McWilliams 0-4), George Mason 7-19 (Livingston 2-3,
Grayer 2-5, Boyd 2-5, Mar 1-3, Kier 0-1, Wilson 0-1,
Greene 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Fresno St. 29
(B.Williams 10), George Mason 30 (Grayer 9). Assists:
Fresno St. 10 (Bowles, D.Taylor 3), George Mason 9
(Livingston 3). Total fouls: Fresno St. 20, George Mason
20. A: 982 (0).
0
0
Scoring: 1, Columbus, Anderson 8 (Foligno), 2:02.
PHILADELPHIA .................. 1
N.Y. ISLANDERS ................ 1
Vancouver 5, at Philadelphia 2
at St. Louis 8, Edmonton 3
at Dallas 3, Montreal 1
EDMONTON ............................. 2
DETROIT .................................. 2
0
0
OVERTIME
Islanders 4, Flyers 3 (OT)
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
Oilers 6, Red Wings 2
Three-point Goals: Portland 7-26 (Lillard 6-13, Napier
1-2, Layman 0-1, Leonard 0-2, Harkless 0-2, Turner 0-3,
McCollum 0-3), Philadelphia 11-32 (Redick 3-6, Saric 3-7,
Covington 2-8, McConnell 1-1, Embiid 1-3, LuwawuCabarrot 1-4, Bayless 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Portland 48 (Vonleh, Nurkic 11), Philadelphia 57 (Embiid
12). Assists: Portland 14 (Napier 4), Philadelphia 23
(Simmons 9). Total Fouls: Portland 17, Philadelphia 21.
A: 20,605 (21,600).
MLS CUP
Three-point Goals: Boston 9-26 (Tatum 3-4, Brown 2-3,
Rozier 2-6, Morris 1-3, Horford 1-4, Ojeleye 0-1, Smart
0-2, Irving 0-3), Miami 10-28 (Waiters 4-10, T.Johnson
2-2, Dragic 2-4, Ellington 2-6, Olynyk 0-1, Winslow 0-1,
Richardson 0-4). Fouled Out: Brown. Rebounds: Boston
37 (Horford 9), Miami 48 (Whiteside 10). Assists:
Boston 19 (Tatum, Horford, Smart 4), Miami 20 (Waiters 6). Total Fouls: Boston 19, Miami 22. Technicals:
Tatum, Dragic. A: 19,704 (19,600).
EAST
Boston College 83, Colgate 79
Bucknell 87, Ball St. 83
Delaware 65, Longwood 57
Miami 57, La Salle 46
NJIT 116, Kean 63
Navy 110, Washington (Md.) 45
Princeton 60, Lafayette 46
Providence 66, Belmont 65
Stony Brook 77, Brown 64
Syracuse 72, Toledo 64
Vermont 90, Maine-Fort Kent 54
SOUTH
Cincinnati 78, Wyoming 53
Coastal Carolina 70, St. Andrews 34
Elon 77, Radford 74
Florida St. 98, Kennesaw St. 79
Georgia Tech 78, Texas Rio Grande Valley 68
Iowa 95, UAB 85
James Madison 105, Appalachian St. 99 (2OT)
Kentucky 86, Fort Wayne 67
Louisiana-Lafayette 82, Richmond 76
Marshall 92, NC Central 84
Mississippi St. 80, Stephen F. Austin 75
South Florida 75, Howard 52
Tennessee 78, Purdue 75 (OT)
Towson 70, Georgia Southern 67
Troy 73, ETSU 65
Tulane 80, Miami (Ohio) 59
Villanova 66, W. Kentucky 58
MIDWEST
Detroit 72, Saint Louis 70
Illinois 96, Augustana (Ill.) 62
Indiana 87, Arkansas St. 70
Michigan 68, VCU 60
Montana St. 88, SE Missouri 82
N. Dakota St. 80, Florida A&M 66
N. Illinois 70, Manhattan 68
SOUTHWEST
Prairie View 71, Georgia St. 56
Texas Tech 79, Wofford 56
FAR WEST
Cent. Michigan 71, Sam Houston St. 60
Chaminade 96, California 72
Fresno St. 79, George Mason 73
Marquette 94, LSU 84
NC State 90, Arizona 84
PHILADELPHIA: Covington 3-11 1-2 9, Saric 3-10 2-2 11,
Embiid 11-19 5-5 28, Simmons 8-20 0-2 16, Redick 4-10
0-0 11, Johnson 2-4 0-1 4, McConnell 5-7 2-2 13, Bayless
0-3 0-0 0, Luwawu-Cabarrot 3-6 0-1 7, Korkmaz 0-0 2-2 2.
Totals 39-90 12-17 101.
FIRST LEG
Tuesday’s result: Seattle 2, at Houston 0
SECOND LEG
Thursday, Nov. 30: Houston at Seattle, 10:30
MIAMI: Richardson 0-5 0-0 0, Winslow 4-6 0-0 8,
Whiteside 4-5 0-0 8, Dragic 8-17 9-10 27, Waiters 11-24
0-0 26, J.Johnson 2-3 0-1 4, Olynyk 3-5 0-0 6, Ellington
3-7 1-1 9, T.Johnson 5-9 4-4 16. Totals 40-81 14-16 104.
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
PORTLAND: Harkless 0-3 1-2 1, Vonleh 1-2 0-0 2, Nurkic
6-13 2-7 14, Lillard 11-27 2-3 30, McCollum 1-14 3-3 5,
Layman 2-4 0-0 4, Leonard 0-2 0-0 0, Davis 1-6 2-4 4,
Collins 0-0 0-0 0, Swanigan 1-2 0-1 2, Napier 4-6 4-4 13,
Connaughton 1-3 0-0 2, Turner 2-7 0-0 4. Totals 30-89
14-24 81.
WESTERN CONFERENCE
BOSTON: Tatum 5-11 5-5 18, Horford 3-10 0-2 7, Baynes
1-3 0-0 2, Irving 11-22 1-4 23, Brown 6-10 0-0 14, Morris
3-9 7-8 14, Ojeleye 0-1 0-0 0, Theis 1-1 1-2 3, Larkin 0-0
2-2 2, Rozier 2-8 2-2 8, Smart 3-9 1-2 7. Totals 35-84
19-27 98.
NCAA men
at Charlotte 129, Washington 124 (OT)
at Cleveland 119, Brooklyn 109
at Philadelphia 101, Portland 81
L.A. Clippers 116, at Atlanta 103
at Miami 104, Boston 98
at New York 108, Toronto 100
Dallas 95, at Memphis 94
at Houston 125, Denver 95
at Oklahoma City 108, Golden State 91
at Minnesota 124, Orlando 118
at New Orleans 107, San Antonio 90
at Utah 110, Chicago 80
Milwaukee at Phoenix, Late
L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, Late
PORTLAND ......................... 14
PHILADELPHIA .................. 26
Home-and-home
35 — 98
25 — 104
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
76ers 101, Trail Blazers 81
CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
22
25
at L.A. Lakers 103, Chicago 94
S O C C ER
MLS playoffs
NHL
25
27
SF
SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
washingtonpost.com/
realestate
apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
washingtonpost.com/pets
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
815
Legal Notices
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
820
Legal Notices
Copies of the Complaint, proposed Final Judgment, and Competitive
Impact Statement are available for inspection on the Antitrust
Division’s website at http://www.justice.gov/atr and at the Office
of the Clerk of the United States District Court for the District of
Columbia.
Interested persons may address comments to Scott Scheele, Chief,
Telecommunications and Broadband Section, Antitrust Division,
Department of Justice, 450 Fifth Street NW, Suite 7000, Washington,
DC 20530 (telephone: 202-616-5924) within 60 days of the date of this
notice. Such comments, including the name of the submitter, and
responses thereto, will be posted on the Antitrust Division’s website,
filed with the Court, and, under certain circumstances, published in
the Federal Register.
815
Happy Days
Hoping to reach Latasha Renee
Murray-Jones- 11/19/91 or any relatives. I am former foster mother
and have over 500 pics of her from
birth to two years plus. Would like to
forward same. Please contact Elizabeth De Rocco 5411 Cedar Tree
Lane, Emerald Isle, NC 28594.
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
265
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
610
Dogs for Sale
AKC Silver Labs—$1200, 3Females, 4 weeks old, 540212-3549 or silverdragon
labs.weebly.com
Bichon Poo Puppies — Shots,
wormed, vet checked. Cream and
black with highlights. Hypoallergenic. Home raised with loving
attention. $650. (540) 222-6555
Cane Corso — $800/OBO,
3 Months old beautiful blue/brindle
puppies looking for great forever
homes. Vet health check, shots, tails
docked & dewormed. Contact
Larnell Johnson 202-207-7410
CORSO MIXED PUPPIES
8.5 weeks old, 7 females, 2 males,
multi-colors, S/W. Ready to go.
$200. Call Mark 240-460-7009
FRENCH BULLDOGS- AKC, M/F,
all colors, $3500+, 8 weeks +
timeoutkennels.com 240-447-7615
French Bulldogs - 9 weeks, AKC,
brndle,1 M, 1 F, $2,500 each
301-252-9213
GREAT PYRENEES PUPPIES.
6 M & 4 F, 11 weeks old, vet
checked and shots. $425 each
540-636-4897 or 540-622-1060
Huskys Morkies Shihpoo & more —
Black Friday Puppy Sale ALL WEEK
304-904-6289. Cash, CC,Easy
Finance wvpuppy.com
LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPPIES aca,yellow chocolate & black, family
raised and good with children, $1000
each 540-383-4203
LAB RET/GOLDEN RET CROSS& AKC
GOLDEN PUPS & ADULTS
8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
Morkie Puppies—Thanksgiving Pups.
1-Female $1400, 3-Males $1200 ea.
8 wks on Nov 23rd. Call Jon @ 831682-1254. Dumfries, Va 22025.
POM-CHI'S & POMERANIAN PUPSShots/dewormed, 12 weeks,
adorable teacup sized, $650.
540-538-1037, Fredericksburg, VA
YORKSHIRE TERRIER PUPS & ADULTSAKC reg., champ blood lines,pet
only. 4mons-5 yrs old. $700-$1200
Call 540-672-0902
SUSAN Y. BEALE
Gary Altman, Esquire
11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 708
Rockville, Maryland 20852
Birds & Other Animals
AFRICAN PARROT MALE GREY, with
cage, 15 years olds, reasonable price
negotiable, 202-396-4233
815
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY, MARYLAND
ANDREA O'BRIEN
Plaintiff
v.
Case No. 140599-FL
EDWARD O'BRIEN
Defendant
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
A Complaint for Absolute Divorce
was filed with the Circuit Court for
Montgomery County, Maryland on
November 14, 2016. The Complaint
alleges , in substance: that the parties were married in March 1997
in Howard County, Maryland; that
the Plaintiff has been a resident of
the State of Maryland for at least
one (1) year prior to the filing
of this Complaint; that the parties
voluntarily separated no later than
December 31, 1997, and have continued to live separate and apart
without cohabitation for more than
one year prior to the filing of the
Complaint, and there is no hope or
expectation of reconciliation; that
there are no property issues; and
that no children were born of the
marriage. Plaintiff requests an
Absolute Divorce.
It is this 8th day of November,
2017, ORDERED, that the Plaintiff
cause a copy of this Notice to be
published at least once a week
for four consecutive weeks in a
newspaper of general circulation
published in Washington, DC; publication to be completed by December 7th, 2017; Defendant must file
a response on or before January
8th, 2018; Defendant must file a
response on or before January 8th,
2018; Defendant is warned that failure to file a response within the
time allowed may result in a default
judgment or the granting of the
relief sought.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court for
Montgomery County, Maryland
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Henry B. R. Beale, whose address is
4354 Warren Street, NW, Washington, DC 20016, was appointed personal representative of the estate
of Susan Y. Beale, who died on
May 23, 2017 with a will and
will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
May 9, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 9,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Henry B.R. Beale
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
815
Legal Notices
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Section 14 of
the District of Columbia’s Wastewater System Regulation
Amendment Act of 1985, as amended (D.C. Law 6-95;
D.C. Official Code §8-105.13), and the requirements of the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the following facility
was found to be in Significant Noncompliance with the
District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority’s Industrial
Wastewater Pretreatment Program requirements in 2016:
Naval Support Facility Carderock (NSFC) located at
9500 MacArthur Blvd, West Bethesda, MD, was issued
Wastewater Discharge Permit No. 028-10 on April 27 2016
(“Permit”) and failed to conduct the required Permit monitoring for mercury during the July to September 2016
monitoring period. This violation constitutes Significant Noncompliance. Enforcement action included an Administrative
Order with additional monitoring for mercury.
Inquiries may be directed to:
DC Water and Sewer Authority
Pretreatment Program Manager
Department of Wastewater Treatment
5000 Overlook Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20032
202-787-4177
815
815
Legal Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001240
JAMES E. TILLERY, SR.
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Jennifer P. Hughes, whose address
is 319 Mary's Oak Drive, Clarksville,
Tennessee 37042, was appointed
personal representative of the
estate of Matthew Ryan Hanson,
who died on 06/09/2016 without a
will and will serve with Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
May 9, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 9,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Jennifer P. Hughes
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001229
JOHN GLICK, AKA JOHN M. GLICK
Gary Altman
11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 708
Rockville, Maryland 20852
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Gail Glick, a/k/a Gail M. Glick, whose
address is 3818 Warren Street NW,
Washington, DC 20016, was
appointed personal representative
of the estate of John Glick aka John
M. Glick, who died on September
25, 2017 without a will and will
serve without Court supervision.
All unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
May 9, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 9,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Gail Glick aka Gail M. Glick
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
ROLAND WOODS
PRO SE
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
James E. Tillery, Jr.
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001246
ADA LOUISE JOHNSON BOOKER
A/K/A ADA LOUISE BOOKER A/K/A
ADA J. BOOKER A/K/A ADA L.J.
BOOKER A/K/A ADA BOOKER
PRO SE
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Irma Meads, whose address is 6601
2nd Street, N.W. Washington, D.C.
20012, was appointed personal representative of the estate of Ada
Louise Johnson Booker a/k/a Ada
Louise Booker a/k/a Ada J. Booker
a/k/a Ada L. J. Booker a/k/a Ada
Booker, who died on October 19,
2016 with a will and will serve
without Court supervision.
All
unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
May 16, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 16,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Phyllis T. Woods, whose address is
2649 Myrtle Ave. NE, Washington
DC 20018, was appointed personal representative of the estate of
Roland Woods, who died on 8/23/17
with a will and will serve without
Court supervision. All unknown
heirs and heirs whose whereabouts
are unknown shall enter their
appearance in this proceeding.
Objections to such appointment (or
to the probate of decedent's Will)
shall be filed with the Register of
Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor, Washington DC
20001, on or before May 9, 2018.
Claims against the decedent shall
be presented to the undersigned
with a copy to the Register of Wills
or filed with the Register of Wills
with a copy to the undersigned,
on or before May 9, 2018, or be
forever barred. Persons believed to
be heirs or legatees of the decedent
who do not receive a copy of this
notice by mail within 25 days of its
first publication shall so inform the
Register of Wills, including name,
address and relationship.
Phyllis T. Woods
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001275
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
Richard Levy, whose address is
1321.5 Wisconsin Avenue, NW,
Washington, DC 20007, was
appointed personal representative
of the estate of Philip G. Levy, who
died on October 12, 2017 with a will
and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs
whose whereabouts are unknown
shall enter their appearance in this
proceeding. Objections to such
appointment (or to the probate of
decedent's Will) shall be filed with
the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
May 16, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 16,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Wake up to
home delivery.
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
SF
815
Legal Notices
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
130 Finale Terrace
Silver Spring, MD 20901
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
STEVEN S. HOBBI AND ZAHRYA A. HOBBI, dated August
10, 2005 and recorded in Liber 30706, folio 312 among
the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.430679V; Tax ID No.05-02364734 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 562094)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. AUGUST,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
851
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
815
12141153
815
Legal Notices
MEGBAR ZEWDE CHERENET
Plaintiff,
v.
Civil Action No.: CL17-8038-00
MEAZA GETACHEW TILAHUN
Defendant.
The object of this suit is to adopt
minor children.
And, it appearing by affidavit filef
according to law that diligence has
been used by the plaintiff to determine in what cityor county the
defendant is located without success, it is therefore ORDERED that
the defendant appear on or before
the 18th day of December, 2017,
before this Court and do what is
necessary to protect his interests.
And, it is further ORDERED that this
order be published once a week
for four successive weeks in the
Washington Post, a newspaper of
general circulation in the County
of Stafford; that a copy of this
order be posted at the front door of
the courthouse wherein this court
is held; and that a copy of this
order be mailed to the defendant at
the address shown by the aforesaid
affidavit.
Entered this 2nd day of November,
2017.
Kris Waldron
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Stafford County
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
815
Legal Notices
VIRGINIA:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
VIRGINIA:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
STAFFORD COUNTY
Case No. CA17-30
Legal Notices
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Legal Notices
Home delivery
is convenient.
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
The object of the above-styled suit
is for a divorce based on the parties
having lived separate and apart,
continuously
without
marital
cohabitation and without interruption, for a period or more than one
year. And it appearing by affidavit
filed according to the law, that
Meaza Getachew Tilahun, the
above named Defendant, is a nonresident individual, other than a
nonresident individual fiduciary
who has been appointed a statutory
agent under § 64.2-1426 of the
Code of Virginia. It is therefore
ORDERED that the Defendant,
MEAZA GETACHEW TILAHUN, appear
on or before the December 28, 2017
before this Court and do what is
necessary to protect her interests
herein; and it is further, ORDERED
that this Order be published once a
week for four (4) successive weeks
in the Washington Post, a newspaper of general circulation in the
County of Prince William; that a
copy of this order be posted at
the front door of the courthouse
wherein this court is held; and that
a copy of this order be mailed to the
defendant at the address shown by
the aforesaid affidavit.
Entered this 8th day of November,
2017
Tammy E. Ramsey
Deputy Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Prince William County
820
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
24305 Preakness Drive
Damascus, MD 20872
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from KAREN
M. FASH, dated May 31, 2005 and recorded in Liber 30030,
folio 436 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case
docketed as Case No.433850V; Tax ID No.12-02650148 ) the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $40,600.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 565752)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ADRIENNE WARREN-DAVIS A/K/A
ADRIENNE WARREN A/K/A
ADRIENNE DAVIS
JOHN T DAVIS, JR A/K/A
JOHN T DAVIS JR
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-44315
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 5815
Kentucky Ave, District Heights, MD
20747, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 7th day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 7th
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $144,400.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #536
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Special Notices
Lillian M. DeCosimo, M.D. /
About Care GYN Associates, PLLC
Announces the closure of her medical practice effective December 1,
2017. To request a copy of your
medical records please mail your
request to: P.O. Box 220925 Chantilly, VA 220925 or email: drdecosimo
@ outlook.com
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
851
Prince Georges County
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
JAMES FREEMAN, JR A/K/A JAMES
FREEMAN JR
ROSA M FREEMAN
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14084
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 5616
Coolidge St, Capitol Heights, MD
20743, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 7th day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 7th
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $105,500.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142597
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12141247
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
12142599
Official Notices
This is second notice of the
continued 2017 Annual Meeting of the Members of the
Fallsreach Homeowners Association, Inc. scheduled to be
held on Sunday, December 10,
2017 at 6:30pm at the Bindemann Suburban Center, 11810
Falls Road, Potomac, MD. At
this continued meeting, the
members present in person
and by proxy shall constitute a
quorum. Contact Community
Association Services at 301840-1800 with questions.
830
1-800-753-POST
SF
850
Montgomery County
www.hwestauctions.com
SF
1-800-753-POST
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
FREE UNDER $250
www.hwestauctions.com
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
850
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
815
Home delivery
is convenient.
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1517 Castle Cliff Place
Silver Spring, MD 20904
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from VINCENT
DUNG DINH AKAVINCENT D. DINH AND YENLINH HOANG
NGUYEN AKA YENLINH H. NGUYEN, dated June 18, 2013
and recorded in Liber 47178, folio 072 ; LOAN MODIFICATION
AGREEMENT RECORDED IN LIBER 54012, FOLIO 245 among
the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as
Case No.434809V; Tax ID No.05-02178245 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $36,100.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 565316)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
Richard Levy
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
Legal Notices
850
Montgomery County
by Samuel David Hillmon, Jr. and
Christina Marie Hillmon
(Petitioner's Name (s))
Respondent's name: Toderick Delee
Scypion (Natural Parent)
PHILIP G. LEVY
Gary Altman
11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 708
Rockville, MD 20852
NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND
NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS
1-800-753-POST
SF
James E. Tillery, Jr., whose address
is 608 Roxboro Pl NW, Washington,
DC 20011, was appointed personal representative of the estate of
James E. Tillery, Sr., who died on
9/10/17 without a will and will
serve without Court supervision.
All unknown heirs and heirs whose
whereabouts are unknown shall
enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such
appointment shall be filed with the
Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th
Street, NW, Building A, 3rd Floor,
Washington DC 20001, on or before
May 16, 2018. Claims against the
decedent shall be presented to the
undersigned with a copy to the
Register of Wills or filed with the
Register of Wills with a copy to the
undersigned, on or before May 16,
2018, or be forever barred. Persons
believed to be heirs or legatees of
the decedent who do not receive a
copy of this notice by mail within 25
days of its first publication shall so
inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.
Irma Meads
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Anne Meister
REGISTER OF WILLS
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001238
1-800-753-POST
Legal Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001272
MATTHEW RYAN HANSON
Gary Altman
11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 708
Rockville, Maryland 20852
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
850
Official Notices
ANNUAL LIST OF INDUSTRIAL USERS
IN SIGNIFICANT NONCOMPLIANCE FOR
THE CALENDAR YEAR 2016
815
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
820
Official Notices
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
WATER AND SEWER AUTHORITY
Legal Notices
NOTICE OF
SPECIAL COMMISSIONER’S SALE
Pursuant to the terms and provisions of that certain Order entered
by the Circuit Court of Fauquier
County, Virginia on April 11, 2017,
Special Commissioner Ann M. Callaway will, on December 8, 2017, at
11:00 a.m., at the main entrance
of the Fauquier County Courthouse,
located at 40 Culpeper Street, Warrenton, Virginia 20186, offer for sale
at public auction, all that certain
tract or parcel of land, together with
improvements thereon and appurtenances thereunto appertaining,
situate, lying and being in the Town
of Warrenton, County of Fauquier,
Virginia, and more particularly
described as follows:
All that certain lot or parcel of
land lying and being situate on the
south side of Virginia State 690,
in Marshall Magisterial District
Fauquier County, Virginia and more
particularly described as follows:
ALL OF LOT 1-A, containing 5.58671
acres, more or less as shown on
plat entitled “Division of Lot #1 John
Benjamin Drake Division”, prepared
by Leslie C. Schuermann, L.S., under
seal dated of July 7, 2000 and
recorded in Deed Book 873 Page
1224 among the Fauquier County,
Virginia land records.
AND BEING the property acquired
by Rhys Jones from Mary Ruffo,
a/k/a Mary K. Ruffo, by deed dated
November 9, 2010, and recorded on
November 9, 2010, in Deed Book
1355 at page 1217 among the aforesaid land records.
Tax Map Identification Number:
6976-53-8601-000
The sale shall be contingent on
approval by the Circuit Court of
Fauquier County of the highest bid.
This sale is subject to any State,
Federal and/or special estate taxes,
and any real estate taxes.
Sale is subject to any valid filed
or unfiled mechanic's liens, if any,
and any matters of record recorded
prior to the deed of trust being
foreclosed upon.
NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY IS MADE TO THE CONDITIONS
OF THE PROPERTY OR ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON. THIS ADVERTISEMENT DOES NOT CONSTITUTE AN
INVITATION TO ANY PROSPECTIVE
BIDDER TO GO ON OR ABOUT THE
PREMISES.
This sale is subject to any conditions, restrictions, rights-of-way,
easements, and reservations contained in the Deeds, plats, and any
other documents forming the chain
of title.
TERMS OF SALE: All cash. Purchaser
shall pay all recording charges,
examination of title, settlement
fees, and all costs of conveyancing,
except the grantor’s tax. The real
estate taxes will be adjusted to the
date of sale. A deposit of $25,000,
in cash or by certified check will be
required of the successful bidder at
the time of sale and settlement in
full, in immediately-available funds,
shall be made within fourteen (14)
days from the date of court
approval or the above deposit shall
be forfeited and the property will
be resold at the expense of the
defaulting purchaser. Special Commissioners may extend the deadline for closing. Successful bidder
shall be required to sign a statement of purchase upon final bid.
Additional
terms
may
be
announced on the day of sale. Special Commissioners reserve the
right to reject any or all bids.
PROPERTY TO BE SOLD "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY AND WITHOUT ANY
DUTY OF THE SPECIAL COMMISSIONER TO OBTAIN POSSESSION FOR PURCHASER. Property shall be conveyed by SPECIAL WARRANTY DEED
and subject to filed or unfiled
mechanic’s liens.
ANN M. CALLAWAY, P.C., Special
Commissioner, Ann M. Callaway,
P.C. 15 Garrett Street, Warrenton,
Virginia 20186; (540) 349-4100.
SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
PROBATE DIVISION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-2131
2017 ADM 001228
640
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
Take notice that the United States has filed a proposed Final Judgment
in a civil antitrust case in the United States District Court for the
District of Columbia, United States of America v. CenturyLink, Inc.
and Level 3 Communications, Inc., Civil Action No. 1:17-cv-02028. On
October 2, 2017, the United States filed a Complaint alleging that
CenturyLink’s proposed acquisition of Level 3 would violate Section
7 of the Clayton Act, 15 U.S.C. § 18. The proposed Final Judgment,
filed at the same time as the Complaint, requires CenturyLink and
Level 3 to divest to an acquirer or acquirers all assets used by
Level 3 exclusively or primarily to support provision of fiber-based
telecommunications services to enterprise and wholesale customer
locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico; Boise, Idaho; and Tucson,
Arizona, and to provide to an acquirer an indefeasible right to use
twenty-four (24) strands of intercity dark fiber between each of thirty
(30) specified city pairs, along with certain tangible and intangible
assets. A Competitive Impact Statement filed by the United States
describes the Complaint, the proposed Final Judgment, the industry,
and the remedies available to private litigants who may have been
injured by the alleged violation.
225
EZ
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
Department of Justice
Antitrust Division
102
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
the local expert
on local jobs
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
815
CLASSIFIED
D9
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
SF
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $89,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142904
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ESTATE OF CAROLE CLARKE
CHESTNUT C/O KEISHA K CLARKE
(SUCCESSOR)PER REP
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14066
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 7000
Crosby Rd, Hyattsville, MD 20783,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 7th day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $200,804.04.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142902
SF
SF
Notice is hereby given this 7th day
of November 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 7406 Shady
Glen Terrace, Capitol Heights, MD
20743, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of December,
2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 7th day of
December, 2017.
Notice is hereby given this 7th day
of November 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 9609 Woodyard Circle, Upper Marlboro, MD
20772, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of December,
2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 7th day of
December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$139,300.00.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$186,750.00.
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 430
Balboa Ave, Capitol Heights, MD
20743, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 7th day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 7th
day of December, 2017.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
GAVIN L. BROWN
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-16675
NOTICE
1-800-753-POST
SF
vs.
RICHARD THOMAS HARLEY A/K/A
RICHARD THOMAS HARLEY JR
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14067
NOTICE
Prince Georges County
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
SANDRA L. PRUITT
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-11044
NOTICE
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
12141161
851
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
851
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Sydney J. Harrison #536
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142909
Sydney J. Harrison #536
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142907
OPQRS
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
19953 Drexel Hill Circle
Montgomery Village, MD 20886
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
JAINABA A. QUISTFYE, dated September 20, 2006 and
recorded in Liber 33077, folio 306 among the Land Records
of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.434086V;
Tax ID No.01-02556843 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850,
on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $43,900.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 552798)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
850
Montgomery County
850
851
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9710 Falls Road
Potomac, MD 20854
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from NASEEM
AHMAD, dated July 22, 2005 and recorded in Liber 30526,
folio 477 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case
docketed as Case No.10-00882183; Tax ID No.412622V ) the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 531325)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Prince Georges County
851
12141243
12141246
www.hwestauctions.com
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
515 Woodston Road
Rockville, MD 20850
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
MELANIE L. O'DONNELL ANDNATHANIEL S. PATCH, dated
August 4, 2006 and recorded in Liber 32993, folio 404
among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.435730V; Tax ID No.04-00181845 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $20,700.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576257)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
12141244
COULD YOU USE
SOME EXTRA CASH?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054B 2x2
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
910 Marthas Vineyard Lane
Pasadena, MD 21122
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
HEATHER R. ESTERLING AND JOHN T. ESTERLING, dated
April 15, 2004 and recorded in Liber 14717, folio 706
; AND MODIFIED BY HOME AFFORDABLE MODIFICATION
AGREEMENT RECORDED IN LIBER 27218, FOLIO 376; AND
MODIFIED BY LOAN MODIFICATION AGREEMENT RECORDED
IN LIBER 28929, FOLIO 468 among the Land Records of ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-17-002369;
Tax ID No.03-380-90211246 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
located at 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401, on
NOVEMBER 29, 2017 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO ANNUAL WATER FACILITIES
CHARGES IN THE AMOUNT OF $250.00 PAYABLE ON THE
1ST DAY OF JANUARY EACH AND EVERY YEAR FOR 33
CONSECUTIVE YEARS AND ANNUAL SEWER FACILITIES
CHARGES IN THE AMOUNT OF $250.00 PAYABLE ON THE
1ST DAY OF JANUARY EACH AND EVERY YEAR FOR 33
CONSECUTIVE YEARS.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $20,200.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 576508)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
12141543
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
www.hwestauctions.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
12141541
4608 Ritchie Highway
Brooklyn, MD 21225
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from SUSAN
PARRISH AKA SUSAN RENE PARRISH AND JOHN PARRISH
ORLANS PC
AKA JOHN MARVIN PARRISH, dated October 11, 2006 and
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
recorded in Liber 18394, folio 217 among the Land Records
LEESBURG, VA 20175
of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred
703-777-7101
thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-17001964; Tax ID No.05-047-05458920 ) the Sub. Trustees
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
will sell at public auction at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
COURTHOUSE, located at 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
415 Valiant Circle
21401, on
Glen Burnie, MD 21061
DECEMBER 6, 2017 at 11:15 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements MICHAEL P. CORKHILL, dated August 29, 2005 and recorded
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more in Liber 16926, folio 0732 among the Land Records of ANNE
fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.C-02-CV-17-002240;
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the Tax ID No.03-378-90052492 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $23,900.00 will be required at the located at 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401, on
NOVEMBER 29, 2017 at 11:15 AM
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and more
days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE fully described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address Terms of Sale: A deposit $15,500.00 will be required at the
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for ANNE
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, ARUNDEL COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent, any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity, basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 557163)
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
JAMES E. CLARKE,
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
RENEE DYSON,
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
HUGH J. GREEN,
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
SHANNON MENAPACE,
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
BRIAN THOMAS,
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 578170)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
12141155
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
www.hwestauctions.com
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
BRIAN THOMAS,
NOVEMBER 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142539
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know.
(And your subscription up-to-date.)
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
S0833-1 6x2
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11903 Ashley Drive
Rockville, MD 20852
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from HELGA
M. FERNANDEZ, dated April 19, 2005 and recorded in Liber
29765, folio 700 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.385422V; Tax ID No.04-00075185)
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND
AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
NOVEMBER 27, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $43,800.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 544689)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
852
Law Offices
ALLAN P. FEIGELSON, P.A.
Laurel Lakes Executive Park
8337 Cherry Lane
Laurel, Maryland 20707
301-362-2900
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY AND
ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
407 ROUND TABLE DRIVE
FT WASHINGTON, MD 20744
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from
PAULETTE Y. HEATH AND MELVIN D. HEATH, dated July 14,
2008 and recorded in Liber 30340, Folio 001, among the Land
Records PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD, with an original
principal balance of $330,991.00 and an original interest rate
of 4.625 % default having occurred under the terms thereof,
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction,
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT:
14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
NOVEMBER 28, 2017 AT 1:00 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with an
buildings or improvements thereon situated in lot of ground
in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and described as 407
ROUND TABLE DRIVE FT WASHINGTON, MD 20744 and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for
a particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical
condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship,
materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing
codes or other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar
matters, and subject to easements, agreements, liens and
restrictions of record which affect the same, if any. The
property will be sold subject to any condominium and/or HOA
assessments.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $15,000.00 (CASH WILL NOT
BE ACCEPTED) acceptable payment will be in the FORM OF
CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY CASHIER'S CHECK will be required
from purchaser at time of sale, balance in immediately available
funds upon final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid
at the rate of 4.625% on unpaid purchase money from date of
sale to date of settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder,
shall not be required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser
(excluding the secured party) will be required to complete full
settlement of the purchase of the property within TEN (10)
CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit
Court, time being of the essence, otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement. Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall
be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to
post-sale review of the status of the loan. If any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions,
if applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale.
(File # 17-0034)
Allan P. Feigelson, Esquire
Substitute Trustee
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
EZ
Prince Georges County
856
856
Frederick County
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
Frederick County
Buonassissi, Henning & Lash, P.C.
1861 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 300
Reston, Virginia 20190
(703) 796-1341
TRUSTEE'S SALE
116 9th Avenue
Brunswick, MD 21716
In execution of the Deed of Trust dated July 26, 2016 and recorded August
19, 2016 in Liber 11319, folio 498, among the Frederick County land
records, the undersigned Substitute Trustees, any of whom may act, will
offer for sale at public auction on November 29, 2017, at 1:15 PM, at the
front of the Circuit Court for Frederick County, 100 West Patrick Street,
Frederick, Maryland, the following property:
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, Maryland and more
fully described in the aforementioned Deed of Trust.
TAX ID: 25-471385
The property and improvements will be sold in "as is" physical condition
without warranty of any kind and subject to all conditions, restrictions and
agreements of record affecting the same.
TERMS OF SALE: A non-refundable bidder's deposit of $15,000.00 by
cashier's/certified check required at time of sale except for the party
secured by the Deed of Trust. Risk of loss on purchaser from date and
time of auction. The balance of the purchase price together with interest
thereon at 2.750% per annum from date of sale to receipt of purchase
price by Trustees must be paid by cashier's check within 10 days after
final ratification of sale. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason.
All real estate taxes and other public charges and/or assessments to be
adjusted as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
If applicable, any condominium and/or homeowners association dues
and assessments that may become due after the date of sale shall be
purchaser’s responsibility. Purchaser shall pay all transfer, documentary
and recording taxes/fees and all other settlement costs. Purchaser
is responsible for obtaining possession of the property. If purchaser
defaults, deposit will be forfeited and property resold at the risk and cost
of the defaulting purchaser who shall be liable for any deficiency in the
purchase price and all costs, expenses and attorney’s fees of both sales.
If Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser's sole remedy is
return of deposit without interest. This sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan secured by the Deed of Trust including but not
limited to determining whether prior to sale a bankruptcy was filed; a
forbearance, repayment or other agreement was entered into; or the loan
was reinstated or paid off. In any such event this sale shall be null and void
and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of deposit without interest.
This communication is from a debt collector. (52767)
Richard A. Lash, Robert E. Kelly, and David A. Rosen, Substitute Trustees
Auctioneers:
Alex Cooper Auctioneers
908 York Road
Towson, MD 21204
410-828-4838
NOV. 9, 16 & 23
851
12140900
Prince Georges County
851
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
DONYALE Y. HICKS
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-00095
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 7th day
of November 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 13124 Ripon
Place, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 7th
day of December, 2017, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 7th day of December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$190,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #536
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142910
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees
v.
EMMANUEL
NJOKU
EMMANUEL NJOKU
Defendant(s)
A/K/A
Notice is hereby given this 7th day
of November 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 1007 Balboa
Avenue, Capitol Heights, MD 20743,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 7th
day of December, 2017, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 7th day of December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$121,333.66.
Sydney J. Harrison #536
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142908
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ESTATE OF JANE E SCOTT
C/O THOMAS J KOKOLIS
(SUCCESSOR) PER REP
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-20080
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 12426
Ronald Beall Drive, Upper Marlboro,
MD 20774, and reported in the
above entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 7th day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 7th
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $309,029.07.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
12142596
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
FELIX AKI AKIWUMI
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF13-24999
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 8th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, Trustees, of the Real Property
designated as 6450 FOREST RD,
Cheverly, MD 20785, and reported
in the above entitled cause, will
be finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
8th day of December, 2017 next;
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in THE WASHINGTON
POST, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
three successive weeks before the
8th day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $292,331.27.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
12142906
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Shannon Menapace
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Michael Joyner
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF14-02315
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 2nd day of November 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 5232 Daventry Terrace, District
Heights, Maryland 20747, made
and reported by James E. Clarke,
Renee Dyson, and Shannon Menapace, Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 4th day of December,
2017, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 4th day of
December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $164,160.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 9, 16, 23, 2017
12141538
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Charles E. Parr
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF14-30992
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 2nd day of November 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 16318 Eddinger Road, Bowie,
Maryland 20716, made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, and Brian Thomas Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED and
CONFIRMED, unless cause to the
contrary be shown on or before
the 4th day of December, 2017,
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 4th day of
December, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $486,332.23.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Nov 9, 16, 23, 2017
12141536
852
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
BELINDA PHILOGENE JONES
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Diane S. Rosenberg, et al.
Substitute Trustees
JOHN T JONES
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Versus
CIVIL NO: CAEF15-31640
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 7707
Alloway Lane, Beltsville, MD 20705,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 7th day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $409,924.80.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #536
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Nov 16, 23, 30, 2017
Civil Action No. CAEF17-14733
NOTICE
12142598
No. C-02-CV-17-001512
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this
Wednesday, November 1, 2017 that
the sale of the property in the
proceedings mentioned, made and
reported by Mark D. Meyer, Substitute Trustee.
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 1st
day of December 2017 next; provided, a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, once in each
of three successive weeks before
the 1st day of December 2017 next.
The report states that the amount
of sale of the property at 8287
SEBRING COURT, SEVERN, MD 21144
to be $147,000.00.
/S/Robert P Duckworth
Circuit Court for
Anne Arundel County, MD
Nov 9, 16, 23, 2017
12141555
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Andrew Loren Fecher
Karina Fecher
Defendants
1-800-753-POST
How about some
home delivery?
SF
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
NOVEMBER 9, 16, 23, 2017
12141248
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
WP 2x1
D10
850
Montgomery County
Home delivery
is convenient.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
857
Howard County
OPQRS
EZ
857
Howard County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
5067 Columbia Road, Unit 18-12
Columbia, MD 21044
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
HENRY T. GIDDINS JR AND TIFFANY L. PAULEY , dated
November 10, 2006 and recorded in Liber 10371, folio 500
among the Land Records of HOWARD COUNTY, MD, default
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case
No.13C17112715; Tax ID No.15-087927 ) the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING,
9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 562432)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Howard County
857
877
Howard County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11905 Mekenie Court
Marriottsville, MD 21104
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
SYED Z. ZEESHAN, dated November 16, 2005 and recorded in
Liber 09693, folio 172 among the Land Records of HOWARD
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.13C17111570; Tax ID No.03334678 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 560084)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Spotsylvania County
877
878
Spotsylvania County
878
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
1222 DEWBERRY DRIVE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
6101 TAVERNEER LANE,
SPOTSYLVANIA, VA 22551.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
833 SLEDGEHAMMER DRIVE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22405.
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
102 SANDPIPER TERRACE,
STAFFORD, VA 22554.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated January 12, 2011,
in the original principal amount
of $206,457.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 201100001376 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on December
21, 2017, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND WITH ALL RIGHTS
AND PRIVILEGES THERETO APPURTENANT, SITUATE, LYING AND
BEING IN THE CHANCELLOR DISTRICT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, DESIGNATED AS LOT
124, SECTION FOUR, WILBURN
FARMS, AS SHOWN ON PLAT
THEREOF MADE FEBRUARY 12,
1985, BY SULLIVAN, DONAHOE
AND INGALLS, A COPY OF WHICH
PLAT IS DULY RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN PLAT BOOK 16,
PAGES 32 AND 33.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 5, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$267,200.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 200600019945 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on December
7, 2017, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN TRACT
OR PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
AND
MORE
PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS LOT 41, SECTION
2, TAVERNEER, AS THE SAME IS
DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES
77 AND 78 AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS
OF
SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated July 5, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$133,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR060022516 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on December 7, 2017, at 2:00
PM, the property described in said
Deed of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
WITH ALL
BUILDINGS AND
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND
ALL RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES
APPURTENANT THERETO, SITUATE,
LYING AND BEING IN HARTWOOD
DISTRICT, STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DESIGNATED AS LOT 41,
SECTION 3, OLDE FORGE SUBDIVISION, ON AN AMENDED PLAT
OF
ASSOCIATED
ENGINEERS
DATED JULY 17, 1972, OF RECORD
IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN PLAT BOOK
5, AT PAGES 290-293, ALONG WITH
A DEED OF DEDICATION TO SECTION THREE, OLDE FORGE SUBDIVISION RECORDED ON MAY 8, 1973
IN DEED BOOK 237, AT PAGE 518,
AND AMENDED IN DEED BOOK
246, AT PAGE 153.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3224781.
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated December 18, 2013,
in the original principal amount
of $328,028.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 140000152 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
December 7, 2017, at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN
ROCK HILL DISTRICT, STAFFORD
COUNTY,
VIRGINIA,
AND
DESCRIBED AS LOT 69, SECTION
ONE PORT AQUIA, AS THE SAME
IS SHOWN AND DESCRIBED ON
PLAY OF SUBDIVISION PREPARED
BY ERIC V. SULLIVAN, L.S., SULLIVAN DONAHOE AND INGALLS,
DATED DECEMBER 16, 2003, ENTITLED "PLAY OF SUBDIVISION SECTION ONE PORT AQUIA ROCK HILL
MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT STAFFORD
COUNTY, CIRGINIA". AS LAST
REVISED, AND RECORDED AS
PM040000184, IN THE CLERK‘S
OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3210441.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3152561.
Nov. 16, 23, 2017
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-1168701.
Nov. 16, 23, 2017
12143182
12143199
Nov. 16, 23, 2017
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
12143405
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
12144269
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
1-800-753-POST
JOBS
SF
1-800-753-POST
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
Great part-time
income opportunity!
Transportation
required.
To apply, go to
deliverthepost.com
or call
202-334-6100
(Please press “0”
once connected)
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers
are needed to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Olney, Silver Spring
& Rockville, MD
Call Don Money at
301-674-0010
SF
Roommates
SPRINGFIELD / FT. BELVOIR /
WOODBRIDGE - Responsible person
to share 3 bedroom house.
$630 util & cable incl. 703-919-4381
Florida Gulf Coast Beach Vacation
Home 2 blocks from Manasota Key
Beach. Newly remod, 2BR, 1BA,
lanai w/ hot tub. $2,000/mo. All
inclusive. Avail Jan 1- March 31.
304-268-9440
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
Home
delivery
is
convenient.
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
DC H SOUTHEAST
Apartments
Condos H Co-ops
CONGRESS HEIGHTS - 2BR, 1BA.
$1120 1443 Savannah St SE Ste
102. Minimum annual income
$33,600. DW, hdwd flrs, cats only,
Near Public Transp. Appt only 202561-4843.
Mon-Fri
8-5
1-800-753-POST
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Roommates
SF
NE DC- Furnished room. Good bus
location. $250 per week and
utilities included. 202-526-8268
MARYLAND
Roommates
BETHESDA/Tacoma Park- Bsmt/room.
$695+. Text or Call 301-717-2996
professionalexperts@gmail.com
CAPITAL HEIGHTS - Senior home to
share. Furn rooms. $600. + $300
SD W/D.Privacy sence. All utils incl.
Near Metro. N/S inside. 1 wk free.
Text/Call
202-568-0792
FORT WASHINGTON - Rooms with
pvt BA. Kitn. Vets welcome. 5 min
to Nat'l Harbor. Inc cable/internet.
Starts @ $850. Call 301-292-6147
You, too,
could have
home
delivery.
Germantown-furn1BR, all util incl, wifi, cable. 1st & last mo rent req move
in. 240-671-3783 or 301-916-8158
For routes in
Severn & Odenton,
MD
LANHAM- 1BR in house $700.
Bsmt $850. All util incl. 7304
Galileo Way. Call 240-997-3826
Call Bob Cranford
at 410-598-0364
Silver Spring- Furn, W/D, internet/
cable. N/S. Kitch, near trans. Safe.
$300 bi-wkly. Sam 240-286-5451
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
D11
FT. WASHINGTON - Large furnished
room, carpet, cable TV/wifi, N/S.
$150/wk + $100 dep. 301-919-5150
for the following
areas:
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
ATTEND AVIATION COLLEGE
- Get FAA approved Aviation
Maintenance training. Financial aid for qualified students.
Job placement assistance.
Call AIM for free information
888-896-7869
The Washington
Post
1-800-753-POST
www.hwestauctions.com
12144265 NOVEMBER 23, 30, DECEMBER 7, 2017
12143401
Career Training - Emp Svcs
C
1-800-753-POST
www.hwestauctions.com
Nov. 16, 23, 2017
VIRGINIA
JOBS
1-800-753-POST
SF
NOVEMBER 23, 30, DECEMBER 7, 2017
C
Stafford County
SF
1-800-753-POST
SPRINGDALE -2 rooms for rent,
master bdrm w prvt BA $650. 2nd
room w shrd BA, $550. F pref
336-708-5657, okay to text
VIRGINIA
Roommates
FALLS CHURCH CITY - N/S, M, share
clean, quiet house near rtes 7&29,
unfurn. $750 incl util. 703-244-1942
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
FROM
"NO FOOD ALLOWED."
TO
"HOW OLD ARE THESE FRIES?"
You know us for shopping, and now Cars.com is the site for
the entire life of your car. So for every turn, turn to Cars.com.
C3748 6x10.5
857
D12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 23 , 2017
NATIONAL ROUNDUP
Beverly sparks decisive run as Wolfpack stuns No. 2 Wildcats in the Bahamas
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Freshman Braxton Beverly
scored a season-high 20 points
and sparked the decisive late run
that helped North Carolina State
upset No. 2 Arizona, 90-84, in
Wednesday’s first round at the
Battle 4 Atlantis in Paradise Island, Bahamas.
Allerik
Freeman
scored
24 points to lead the Wolfpack
N.C. STATE 90
ARIZONA 84
(5-0). But it was Beverly — who
missed the first two games in an
NCAA eligibility dispute tied to the
summer courses he took at Ohio
State before coming to N.C. State —
who led the way in the critical
moments.
ranked Wildcats failed to speed up
the Hilltoppers’ controlled tempo
and struggled to make shots
through the first half of their Battle 4 Atlantis debut.
Jalen Brunson scored 18 points
while Villanova finally got loose in
transition after halftime to beat
Western Kentucky.
The Wildcats (4-0) found themselves in a close game until early in
the second half. That’s when they
Beverly hit the go-ahead threepointer with 4:19 left, part of a
stunning 13-1 run that put the
Wolfpack up 86-76 with 1:48 left.
He also hit six free throws and
assisted on another basket during
the spurt.
Allonzo Trier scored 24 of his
27 points after halftime for the
Wildcats (3-1).
VILLANOVA 66, WESTERN KENTUCKY 58: The fifth-
ran off a 13-2 burst to push ahead
by double figures.
Darius Thompson scored
16 points for the Hilltoppers (2-2).
KENTUCKY 86, FORT
WAYNE 67: Nick Richards had
career highs of 25 points and 15 rebounds, and 70 percent first-half
shooting propelled the eighthranked Wildcats (5-1) to a rout of
the Mastodons (3-2) in Lexington,
Ky.
BLACK FRIDAY
SAVINGS
Start Now!
Why Wait? All Prices Guaranteed Thru Black Friday
Kentucky’s 19-for-27 shooting
from the field before halftime
countered the Mastodons’ eight
three-pointers that kept them
close for a while.
MIAMI 57, LA SALLE 46: A
line of fans wearing Reading High
state championship sweatshirts
had formed more than 90 minutes
before tip-off. They were eagerly
awaiting a chance to get inside and
see the local kid who has brought so
much pride to struggling Reading,
Pa.
That Lonnie Walker IV was held
to five points and 2-for-8 shooting
didn’t dampen the enthusiasm on
a night that was bigger than basketball. The prized freshman
struggled in his return home, but
Dewan Huell scored 16 points and
No. 11 Miami (4-0) did just enough
to get by La Salle (3-3).
CINCINNATI 78, WYOMING 53: Gary Clark scored
17 points, Kyle Washington had
16 points and 11 rebounds, and the
12th-ranked Bearcats (6-0) won
the inaugural Cayman Islands
Classic in George Town, Cayman
Islands.
Clark was named MVP of the
three-game event with 49 points,
28 rebounds and seven assists.
Hayden Dalton led the Cowboys (4-1) with 15 points.
TENNESSEE 78, PURDUE
75 (OT): The Volunteers kept at-
Proudly Closed
Thanksgiving Day
to Honor Our
Employees, Their
Families, and
America!
tacking the glass and playing aggressive defense on the Boilermakers’ shooters.
Once Grant Williams got going,
Tennessee had enough scoring
punch, too.
Williams scored all 22 of his
points after halftime and hit the
go-ahead shot with 14.5 seconds
left in overtime to lift Tennessee
past No. 18 Purdue in the opening
round of the Battle 4 Atlantis.
The Volunteers (3-0) trailed by
11 points in the first half, needed to
make a late three-pointer to force
overtime and fell behind by five in
the extra period before rallying for
the win.
21
FOR
Limit 1 per household
AREA ROUNDUP
Mids break
two records
in a rout of
D-III team
WOW!
WOW! GET
GET BOTH
BOTH FOR
FOR JUST
JUST
1999
$
Whoa! Two TVs
for just $1999!
NAVY 110,
WASHINGTON COLL. 45
F ROM
NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
They Even Beat
Amazon’s & Best Buy’s Prices!
WE DOUBLE THE LENGTH
OF YOUR TV WARRANTY
FREE
OUR PRICES BEAT
BEST BUY,
AMAZON, &
WAREHOUSE CLUBS
Prices lower than or equal to any authorized dealer plus
The Big Screen Store’s free double warranty. Sales tax excluded.
We take Samsung’s standard one year warranty,
and double it to two years FREE! Applies to TVs $999 and over.**
AMAZING SELECTION
CINEMA SEATING, ALL-WOOD
CREDENZAS AND WALL UNITS
Evan Wieck and Shawn Anderson each scored 14 points, and
21 Navy players got into the game
during a 110-45 victory over Division III Washington College on
Wednesday in Annapolis.
The game marked the secondlargest margin of victory in program history and the most points
scored in Alumni Hall. The Midshipmen (3-2) also set a program
record with 33 assists.
Derrick Carter had eight points
for Washington College.
MICHIGAN
68, VCU 60:
Moritz Wagner scored six points
during a closing 11-0 run, helping
the Wolverines (5-1) beat the Rams
(3-3) for fifth place in the Maui
Invitational in Lahaina, Hawaii.
Khris Lane had 13 for VCU (3-3).
LOUISIANA LAFAYETTE
82, RICHMOND 76: Frank Bart-
ley IV (23), Justin Miller (15) and
Marcus Stroman (15) combined
for 53 points as the Ragin’ Cajuns
(4-2) came from six down to defeat
the Spiders (1-4) and claim third
place in the Cayman Islands Challenge in George Town, Cayman
Islands. Grant Golden led Richmond with 24.
FRESNO
STATE
79,
GEORGE MASON 73: Deshon
Comfy Seats and Killer Sound,
at a price less than
you’ve ever imagined!
HOME THEATRE
EXPERTS FOR
ANY ROOM
O p e n F r i d a y 9 - 9 | S a t u rd a y 1 0 - 8 | S u n d a y 1 1 - 6
| Mond
ay
FAIRFAX
TheBigScreenStore.com
Limit 1 - 70” TV per family.
11053 Lee Highway
Fairfax, VA, 22030
703-218-2400
I-97 AT BWI
851 Cromwell Park Dr.
Glen Burnie, MD 21061
(Inside The Sofa Store)
WINCHESTER
173 Kernstown Commons Blvd
Winchester, VA, 22602
540-868-7656
FREDERICKSBURG
1485 Carl D. Silver Parkway
Fredericksburg, VA, 22401
540-785-6161
ROCKVILLE
11134 Rockville Pike
Rockville, MD, 20852
301-881-1199
TYSONS/VIENNA
8344 Leesburg Pike
Vienna, VA, 22182
703-506-0171
ELLICOTT CITY
8540 Baltimore
National Pike
410-203-9700
WALDORF
2443 Crain Highway
Waldorf, MD, 20601
301-638-7344
STERLING
45591 Dulles Eastern Plaza
Sterling, VA, 20166
703-421-5311
Second year coverage does not apply to two for one promotion above
** Our 2nd year labor & parts coverage acts the same as Samsung’s first yr warranty coverage. Full details at thebigscreenstore.com.
10-9
ANNAPOLIS
New Location
1125 West St.
(Next to Toyota) 1/2 mi. East of
Chinquapin Round Rd.
Annapolis, MD, 21401
410-571-0100
Taylor scored 23 points as the Bulldogs (3-2) held off the Patriots (3-3)
for third place in the Riviera Division of the Cancun (Mexico) Challenge. Otis Livingston and Ian
Boyd scored 18 apiece for Mason.
SOUTH
FLORIDA
75,
HOWARD 52: In Tampa, Stephan
Jiggetts (Bishop McNamara) had
16 points and six rebounds as the
Bulls (3-2) handled the Bison (0-6)
in the Hoosier Tip-Off Classic. RJ
Cole had 17 points for Howard.
Mason women win again
The George Mason women (5-1)
stretched their winning streak to
five games with a 56-37 victory over
Illinois State (1-2) at EagleBank
Arena. Natalie Butler had 13 points
and 15 rebounds for her fifth
straight double-double for George
Mason.
NAVY
71, AIR FORCE 64:
Kaila Clark finished with 15 points
as the Midshipmen (4-0) grabbed
a 12-point lead after the first quarter and held on to beat the Falcons
(0-5) in Alumni Hall.
KLMNO
a world of waste
The mounting problem
that’s impossible to ignore
STORY AND PHOTOS BY
K ADIR VAN L OHUIZEN • NOOR
S
ince early 2016, I have traveled to six major cities around the world (Jakarta, Tokyo, Lagos, New
York, Sao Paulo and Amsterdam) to investigate how they manage — or mismanage — their waste.
There are some remarkable differences. And a question emerges: Is this just garbage, or is it a
resource? ¶ The world generates at least 3.5 million tons of solid waste a day, 10 times the amount a
century ago, according to World Bank researchers. If practices aren’t changed, that figure will grow to
11 million tons by the end of the century, the researchers estimate. On average, Americans throw away
their own body weight in trash every month. In Japan, meanwhile, the typical person produces only twothirds as much. It’s difficult to find comparable figures for the trash produced by mega-cities. But clearly,
New York generates by far the most waste of the cities I visited: People in the broader metropolitan area
throw away 33 million tons per year, according to a report by a global group of academics published in
2015 in the journal of the National Academy of Sciences. That’s 15 times the Lagos metropolitan area,
their study found. ¶ With a sharp increase in the world population and many economies growing, we are
producing more waste than ever. In Europe and the United States our trash is largely invisible once it’s
tossed; in other parts of the world it is more easily seen in waste dumps, sometimes in the middle of cities.
WASTE CONTINUED ON H16
LAGOS
A city works to slow its
rising tide of trash. H2
NEW YORK
Can the Big Apple really
reach “Zero Waste”? H6
SAO PAULO
Relying on people power
to ease trash troubles. H8
JAKARTA
At massive dump, there’s
nowhere to go but up. H10
AMSTERDAM
It burns its garbage but
looks to recycle more. H12
TOKYO
With little space to spare,
a proactive approach. H14
H2
EZ
ABOVE: The
Olusosun landfill is
the largest in Lagos,
receiving between
3,000 and 5,000 tons
of garbage per day.
The landfill was once
well outside the city
limits, but as the
population of Lagos
has exploded, the city
has swallowed it up.
RIGHT: Lagos’s
Makoko slum on the
bay is home to tens of
thousands, many
living in homes built
on stilts. The
government doesn’t
pick up waste here,
and the trash that
doesn’t end up in the
sea is often used to
form makeshift land
masses.
EE
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
EZ
H3
EE
LAGOS
As its population explodes, a city works
to slow its rising tide of trash
Lagos has a population of around 21 million people but
produces only around 2.5 million tons of waste a year, according
to a study by a global group of academics published in the journal
of the National Academy of Sciences. Some estimates are higher.
One of the fastest-growing cities in the world, Lagos struggles not
only with how to deal with its own waste but with garbage sent to
Nigeria illegally from Europe and the United States.
The biggest landfill in Lagos, Olusosun, is near capacity, and there is no viable
alternative set to take its place in the near future. It receives about 3,000 to 5,000
tons of trash per day, officials say.
The thousands of scavengers who work at the landfill help the recycling efforts,
albeit under harrowing conditions. What looks apocalyptic is actually a
well-organized work site. What is surprising is that the landfill doesn’t smell as
bad as others do around the world. This is largely due to the fact that Nigerians
hardly waste any food.
The city is planning to close the landfill and build transfer and sorting stations
and incinerators — as well as another major dump 40 miles away, in the city of
Badagry — but these steps will take years. In the meantime in some areas of Lagos,
people use waste to create land, building homes on it.
— Kadir van Lohuizen
PHOTOS BY KADIR VAN LOHUIZEN/NOOR
TOP: Many of the
people who make
their livings at
Lagos’s Olusosun
landfill actually live
there, in tentlike
structures that sit
atop the trash.
ABOVE: A worker
folds plastic bags at
Richard Newman
Investments, a small
company that recycles
plastics, making the
pellets and flakes that
later are used to make
new products. The
company says it also
produces up to a
million plastic bags a
day.
LEFT: A man carries
away a large haul of
plastic bottles from
the Olusosun landfill.
H4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
LAGOS
In Africa’s
largest city, an
‘eyesore’ and
an opportunity
BY
K EVIN S IEFF
lagos, nigeria — As this port city grew, its slums
expanding across the muddy coastline, its skyline rising
in glass and metal, residents ran into a problem plaguing
all of the world’s great metropolises: What should they do
with the trash?
Years ago, there was a seemingly easy fix. Trucks drove
the waste far outside town, depositing it at the 100-acre
Olusosun dumpsite. That began in 1992, when Lagos’s
population was just over 7 million. Now it’s about
21 million, and this is Africa’s largest city.
Lagos has expanded well beyond Olusosun, and the
cavernous dump now finds itself in the center of the city,
a hospital on one side, a primary school on another, and
homes hovering just over its precipice. It is directly off
the main highway, and a whiff of burning trash
sometimes blows across the city’s standing traffic jams.
The world now produces more than a billion tons of
garbage a year, which it incinerates and buries and
exports and recycles. In New York, barges transport as
much as 3,600 tons of waste down the Hudson River
every day. In the Netherlands, which has a sophisticated
recycling system, residents throw away the equivalent of
more than 400,000 loaves of bread per day. In Jakarta,
residents refer to the Indonesian city’s growing dump
simply as “the Mountain.”
The world’s garbage crisis — documented over two
years by photographer Kadir van Lohuizen — is predicted
to grow exponentially in the coming decades as people
become richer and increasingly move to urban areas. By
2025, according to a World Bank study, the waste
produced by cities around the globe will be enough to fill
a line of rubbish trucks 3,100 miles long every day.
Africa, the fastest-urbanizing continent, is full of cities
struggling to balance their extraordinary growth with
sustainable waste management. Every year, improper
garbage disposal contributes to devastating epidemics of
mosquito-borne malaria, yellow fever and other potentially fatal diseases. This year, Lagos has had two
outbreaks of Lassa fever, a sometimes deadly virus,
spread by rodent urine or feces, that has been linked to
poor sanitation.
In August, Nigeria’s Guardian newspaper ran the
headline “Epidemic looms in Lagos over piling heaps of
waste.”
The city’s garbage problem had become impossible to
conceal.
It wasn’t just Olusosun. With the population surging,
some of the city’s coastal slums had run out of usable land
and started filling in swampy areas with rubbish.
Residents of one community, Bariga, agreed a few years
ago to allow garbage collectors to use their neighborhood
as a dumpsite. They took the trash and extended their
property into the bay, covering it with sawdust and
building homes on top.
Walking on Bariga’s reclaimed land feels like balancing
on a trampoline, the ground sinking slightly beneath
your feet with each step. Children play barefoot in the
trash that hasn’t been covered yet. Earlier this year, a
flood swept tons of garbage from the city’s lagoons into
some of its main streets.
“This is development for us. We have no other land to
live on,” said Ibrahim Abadu, 42, a Bariga resident.
Still, if Lagos is a symbol of the worst reactions to the
world’s garbage problems, it also represents some of the
best solutions. It is a city where waste has become an
enormous public policy challenge, a source of grave
diseases but also a valuable commodity. Across the city,
local entrepreneurs and international businesses have
opened sorting and recycling plants that export plastics,
metals and paper to China and India.
The garbage economy
Perhaps nowhere are the dangers and opportunities of
trash so clear as in Olusosun, by far the biggest of the
city’s landfills.
The dump is a dystopian sight, a tower of garbage 10
stories tall with an endless stream of trucks arriving to
unload heaps of waste.
“It’s an eyesore,” Lagos’s environment minister, Babatunde Adejare, said in an interview. The government has
announced that it will shut down Olusosun by 2022.
Today, more than 4,000 people work there, living in
tentlike structures atop the trash. When trucks arrive,
crowds of men with iron bars and plastic bags pounce on
the back, convinced that the most aggressive workers
will get the most valuable materials, such as metal cans
and plastic bottles. They will then sell those to
middlemen, part of a long chain of commercial activity
that typically ends on a barge, with recyclable materials
on their way to China to be melted and turned into
bottles, sandals or clothes.
In the past, some garbage pickers have died or lost
limbs when the dump trucks’ hydraulics failed and the
vehicles’ containers crashed down on them. Other
workers have fallen ill of unidentified diseases. As
Olusosun has grown, it has become associated with the
city’s darker side. Human body parts have shown up in
the trash heap. So have mysterious bags of cash and the
relics of witch-doctor experiments, such as herbs and
animal skulls.
Still, for decades, people have come from all over
Nigeria to work at Olusosun and other nearby dumps,
insinuating themselves into a strict hierarchy, with
garbage pickers on the bottom and kingpins, running
their own small garbage enterprises, at the top. In Lagos,
for all the horrors involving waste management, trash is
still seen as an enormous economic opportunity.
In 1988, Abdul Rashid Garba arrived in Lagos from
northern Katsina state. First, he pushed a wooden cart
with trash, making $4 a day. Then he became a
scavenger, or “a picker,” at the city’s dumpsites. By the
early 1990s, he moved onto the dump at Olusosun,
sharing a makeshift tent with other laborers, spending
his day filling bags with anything of value, which meant
anything recyclable.
“I was here to make money, to do work, even if it was
difficult,” Garba said.
He climbed the ranks. After a few years, Garba started
organizing his own group of pickers, and then a coalition
of groups that reported to him. Now he is in charge of
over 400 pickers and truck drivers and sorters. He earns
ABOVE: Pickers surround the
newly arrived refuse at the
Olusosun landfill in Lagos,
Nigeria, looking for anything
that may be recyclable.
LEFT: A worker removes labels
from bottles at a RecyclePoints
collection area in Lagos. The
organization provides coins to
collectors in exchange for
recyclable items, and those coins
can be exchanged for household
items such as appliances.
ALGERIA
MAURITANIA
MA
A
NIGER
MALI
CHAD
NIGERIA
Abuja
C.A.R.
Lagos
Atlantic Ocean
1,000 MILES
Olusosun
Landfill
Lagos
Lagoon
L ag
Lagos
gos
Lagos
Island
Atlantic Ocean
Source: maps4news.com/here
2 MILES
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
EZ
H5
EE
PHOTOS BY KADIR VAN LOHUIZEN/NOOR
$40,000 per year. He has built two houses back in his
home state.
A new industry
Around the world, in the 1990s and early 2000s,
recycling became an increasingly profitable business.
And in Nigeria, where the average yearly salary is $2,000,
thousands were drawn to the industry despite its often
brutal conditions. It also helped the city eliminate some
of its trash, draw foreign investors and win accolades
internationally.
“This is what comes from a burgeoning middle class,”
said Lolade Oresanwo, the chief operating officer of the
recycling and waste management firm WestAfricaENRG,
as she walked around bags of the most valuable materials
at one of the city’s waste-sorting sites.
In a warehouse outside Olusosun, Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola runs Wecyclers, a business that collects and recycles
plastic, paper and metal. Born in Lagos and educated at
MIT, she estimates that scrap metal and plastic in Lagos
is worth about $700 million per year. Her company has
launched a fleet of vehicles and bicycles to pick up
recyclable material across the city, compensating people
with household goods and appliances.
“Before people just saw plastic as being useless,”
Adebiyi-Abiola said. “Now they say, ‘This is money.’ ”
But only roughly a tenth of Lagos’s waste is recycled,
and there are massive challenges facing companies such
as Wecyclers. The electricity necessary to turn plastic
bottles into exportable pellets is unreliable in Lagos. And
the companies are largely dependent on China’s demand
for recycled plastic, which the country has pledged to
stop importing as part of its campaign against “foreign
garbage.” China says such trash harms the environment
and serves as a public health hazard.
That leaves a growing pile of waste at Olusosun and
many more tons of garbage dumped illegally, including in
slums such as Bariga. But recently the government has
come up with a new plan.
It has identified a new dump site in the city of Badagry,
40 miles from Olusosun. It would be a world away,
hidden from the growing city, at least in the short term.
“It won’t be another eyesore,” promised Adejare, the
environment minister.
kevin.sieff@washpost.com
H6
EZ
ABOVE: Plastics are
transported by barge
from the Bronx to a
recycling center in
Brooklyn. Barges
transport as much as
3,600 tons of waste
down the Hudson
River every day.
RIGHT: Bags of
cardboard and other
material lie on the
sidewalk awaiting
pickup in Manhattan.
According to
researchers, the New
York area produces
more garbage per
year than any other
major metropolitan
area in the world —
about 33 million tons.
EE
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
EZ
H7
EE
New York
The Big Apple, a prolific producer of trash,
eyes culture change with ‘Zero Waste’ plan
The New York metropolitan area produces 33 million tons of
garbage per year, according to a group of global scientists that
calculated all the trash being tossed out by the city and its
sprawling suburbs and exurbs. That puts it well ahead of the rest
of the world’s major mega-cities, according to the researchers.
The United States is one of the planet’s biggest generators of
waste, and New York presents a particular challenge because it is so densely
populated. In most parts of the world, growing wealth is associated with an
increased output of trash. But in the United States, the poorer population also
contributes a considerable amount of garbage, much of it fast-food packaging.
Food waste is also a huge issue, in New York and the rest of the country.
Despite its problems, New York does better in some ways than other U.S. cities
when it comes to trash: Paper, plastic bottles and cans are often separated for
recycling, even though the recycling industry is limited in size. Most of New York’s
waste goes to landfills or to incinerators out of state.
Under Mayor Bill de Blasio (D), New York City has begun its “Zero Waste”
initiative, which among other things will aim to reduce the amount of
non-compostable trash and improve recycling. The city’s goal is to eliminate the
transfer of garbage to out-of-state landfills by 2030.
— Kadir van Lohuizen
PHOTOS BY KADIR VAN LOHUIZEN/NOOR
TOP: Trash is
collected from a
street in Manhattan.
The job is often done
by private
contractors. With its
“Zero Waste”
initiative, New York
aims to reduce the
amount of noncompostable trash
and improve
recycling.
ABOVE: An
incinerator at the
Covanta Delaware
Valley facility in
Chester, Pa. The
company says it
handles 1.2 million
tons of garbage a
year. It separates out
steel and aluminum;
the rest is burned,
generating electricity.
LEFT: Garbage
covers acres at the
Covanta Delaware
Valley facility. Most
of New York’s waste
goes to landfills or
incinerators like this
one. But the city
wants to eliminate
the transfer of
garbage to out-ofstate landfills by
2030.
H8
EZ
SAO PAULO
City relies on people power
to help ease its trash troubles
About 21 million people live in the Sao
Paulo metropolitan area in Brazil. As the
number of middle- and upper-class residents has grown over the past decade,
Sao Paulo has produced ever more waste.
Most of it has ended up at landfills.
Sao Paulo is one of the few cities where “garbage
picker/scavenger” is an officially recognized profession.
Such workers are organized in cooperatives and collect
mainly plastic, cans and paper from the streets, to be sold
to companies that handle recycling. The scavengers are
seen as a solution to the problem.
— Kadir van Lohuizen
ABOVE: The skyline
of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
The metropolitan
area is home to an
estimated 21 million
people.
RIGHT: A wastetransfer and sorting
station operated by
the LOGA company in
Sao Paulo. The task of
separating recycled
materials mostly falls
to collectors.
EE
THE WASHINGTON POST
.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
EZ
H9
EE
LEFT: The Franciscan-run Recifran cooperative in Sao
Paulo recycles plastic, cans and paper, employing
homeless people to help them reintegrate into society.
FAR LEFT: The owners of this facility in Sao Paulo say it
processes about 30 tons of aluminum a month. According
to the Brazilian Aluminum Association, the country
recycles nearly 98 percent of the aluminum cans it uses,
which would be one of the highest rates in the world.
PHOTOS BY KADIR VAN LOHUIZEN/NOOR
LEFT: Waste piles up
alongside a dumpster
in the Jardim Elisa
Maria area in
northern Sao Paulo.
H10
EZ
EE
JAKARTA
At massive dump in Indonesian capital,
the garbage has nowhere to go but up
Jakarta, Indonesia’s capital, has grown extremely fast in
recent years, partly because of a national economic boom. Most
of Jakarta’s waste ends up at Bantar Gebang, one of the biggest
landfills in the world: It covers 272 acres and receives over 6,000
tons of trash per day.
The thousands of people who scavenge at Bantar Gebang work
in dangerous conditions, navigating mountains of unstable trash at risk of
toppling in avalanches of garbage.
Jakarta doesn’t have incinerators and has no space for another landfill. And the
scavengers who work in the streets and at the landfill play an important role in
recycling, in a city with hardly any formal recycling industry.
Waste flowing into the canals and rivers of Jakarta also causes issues. The
waterways clog, causing extensive flooding. For the past two years, Jakarta has
made a big effort to clean the garbage from its waterways.
Indonesia is one of the world’s biggest sources of plastic that is dumped into the
oceans.
— Kadir van Lohuizen
TOP: Flattened
motor-oil bottles are
bound together at the
PT Elastis Reka Aktif
plastics plant in
South Cikarang,
Indonesia, outside
Jakarta.
ABOVE: Plastic
pellets produced from
recycled materials are
used to make plastic
bags at the Elastis
Reka Aktif factory.
RIGHT: Trash clogs a
waterway in the Pluit
area of northern
Jakarta. Residents of
the coastal slums
often use the garbage
to form small land
masses, but during
heavy rains the gluts
contribute to flooding
problems.
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
EZ
H11
EE
PHOTOS BY KADIR VAN LOHUIZEN/NOOR
ABOVE: Scavengers
dig through the trash
at Jakarta’s Bantar
Gebang, one of the
largest landfills in the
world. Residents of
the Indonesian
capital’s growing
dump simply know it
as “the Mountain.” It
covers 272 acres and
receives over 6,000
tons of trash per day.
LEFT: Waste, mainly
plastic, is collected by
cleaning teams at the
bay of Muara Angke
in Jakarta. There is
so much plastic
floating around that
it can form artificial
islands, dense enough
to stand on.
Indonesia is a major
source of ocean
plastic pollution.
H12
EZ
ABOVE: A ship
bound for Turkey is
loaded with scrap
metal at HKS Metals,
a recycling and
exporting company in
Amsterdam.
RIGHT: Employees
with the city’s water
company work to
keep Amsterdam’s
famous canals clear
of waste.
EE
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
EZ
H13
EE
Amsterdam
A city that burns most of its garbage
takes steps to recycle more
Amsterdam has a population of around 900,000, a number
that swells to over 2 million if the surrounding area is included.
Much of what people throw in the garbage goes to an
incinerator, with metals removed. There are plans by the end of
this year to open a new facility that will take out plastics and other
recyclables, but it will not be able to handle all the city’s garbage.
The incinerator also receives British household waste: Britain doesn’t have
enough incinerators, and Amsterdam has surplus capacity. Because the Dutch use
waste as a source of fuel, they might be less likely to separate out recyclable
material, burning it instead.
Paper and glass are pretty well separated by the residents of Amsterdam, and
they are starting to set aside plastic. At shops you have to pay for plastic bags.
About 28 percent of the city’s waste is recycled.
Food waste is a huge issue in Amsterdam and around the world. The Dutch
alone throw away more than 400,000 loaves of bread per day.
— Kadir van Lohuizen
PHOTOS BY KADIR VAN LOHUIZEN/NOOR
TOP: A crane
operator guides
materials into an
oven at the AEB
incinerator in
Amsterdam. The
facility also receives
waste from Britain.
ABOVE: Old trains
are dismantled at
HKS Metals.
LEFT: Metals left
over after the
incineration process
at AEB. A new facility
set to open this year
in Amsterdam will
separate out plastics
and other recyclables.
H14
EZ
ABOVE: This
swimming facility in
the center of Tokyo
gets power from the
nearby Toshima
incinerator.
Authorities tout the
cleanliness of the
incinerator facilities.
There are 48 in the
city.
RIGHT: Kaori
Kimchi removes dirt
from among the
bottles on the line at
the Showa Glass
company. She has
worked at the
company in
Ryugasaki, outside
Tokyo, since 2001.
EE
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
EZ
H15
EE
TOKYO
Population-dense city with little space
to spare takes the proactive approach
The Tokyo metropolitan area is one of the most populous in
the world, with at least 36 million people, and produces around
12 million tons of waste a year, according to a report published in
the journal of the National Academy of Sciences.
Constrained by a lack of space, Tokyo puts a lot of emphasis on
recycling. It has 48 incinerators, which also convert garbage into
energy. Authorities claim that the facilities are very clean and don’t pose a threat
to public health. Households separate their waste into categories — such as
burnable, nonburnable, bottles and cans, and oversize items — that are collected
on different days.
There are 12 landfills, the largest of which is on reclaimed land in Tokyo Bay and
is expected to last for about 50 years.
— Kadir van Lohuizen
PHOTOS BY KADIR VAN LOHUIZEN/NOOR
TOP: Material
produced from
recycled plastic
bottles sits in vats at
the Oyama Chemical
company in Tokyo.
The plastic fibers are
to be used for
automobile interiors.
ABOVE: The Toyo
company in Kashiwa,
outside Tokyo,
produces new bottles
from recycled glass.
LEFT: Hundreds of
thousands of people
pass through
Shinagawa Station in
Tokyo every day. The
city’s metropolitan
area is home to at
least 36 million
people.
URSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM
The metropolitan area of
Jakarta, Indonesia, is home to
about 31 million people. Most of
Jakarta’s waste ends up at
Bantar Gebang, one of the
biggest landfills in the world. It
covers more than 270 acres and
receives over 6,000 tons of trash
per day. Scavengers comb
through the mountains of
garbage searching for recyclable
materials. The challenges for
Jakarta and other major cities
will only grow. By 2025,
according to a World Bank study,
the waste produced by cities
around the globe will be enough
to fill a line of garbage trucks
3,100 miles long every day.
EZ
WASTE FROM H1
Dumps are a problem because they release methane, a
potent greenhouse gas that traps heat in the atmosphere.
Burning trash outdoors is also harmful, to the environment
and people’s health.
Landfills and waste dumps are quickly filling up — with many
of the largest receiving on average 10,000 tons of waste per day.
As a country becomes richer, the composition of its waste
changes — more packaging, electronic components, broken
toys and appliances, and relatively less organic material.
New York and San Francisco now have a goal of “zero waste”
to be achieved by a reduction in trash and more recycling, but
they still have a long way to go. In New York, plastic shopping
bags are still provided in almost every store. The world
produces over 300 million tons of plastic each year, of which
only a small fraction is recycled.
By 2050, there will be so much plastic floating in the ocean it
will outweigh the fish, according to a study issued by the World
Economic Forum. Scientists estimate that there are at least
5.25 trillion plastic particles — weighing nearly 270,000 tons —
floating in the oceans right now.
On average, a person in the United States or Western Europe
uses about 220 pounds of plastic per year, according to the
Worldwatch Institute, a research organization. The packaging
industry, growing thanks to the rise of online stores and other
EE
factors, poses a huge challenge.
About one-third of the food produced in the world gets
thrown away or otherwise wasted, according to U.N. data. The
Dutch toss out the equivalent of over 400,000 loaves of bread
per day, on average. The United States wastes by far the most
food, due in part to fast-food restaurants at which employees
and consumers dump unsold items or leftovers.
Most waste in Africa, the United States and Asia ends up in
dumps, many of which are already at capacity. Europe sends
less of its waste to dumps or landfills and more to incinerators.
While some of them are relatively clean, many are a threat to
the environment and public health. Tokyo has more than 20
garbage incinerators in the metropolitan area. The city says
they are not hazardous to public health, because they burn
mostly organic material and use an advanced system to filter
out damaging gases.
But if the world is not prepared to think about waste
reduction and actually treat garbage as a resource, future
generations will drown in their own waste.
About the author
Kadir van Lohuizen is an Amsterdam-based freelance photojournalist
and founding member of the social documentary photography
agency Noor. For videos and more photos, go to wapo.st/global-waste.
THE DISTRICT EDITION
THE WASHINGTON POST
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2017
Local Living
Holiday gifts for the home
16 pretty and practical ideas PAGE 6
Home Professional organizers recommend
five ways to tame clutter and create a tranquil
oasis amid the chaos of the season. 13
Gardening A Georgetown
landscape architect looks
back on 50 years of work. 15
Parenting What to do
when sibling rivalry makes
an appearance. 16
Wellness How to get
enough protein, even if
you don’t eat meat. 17
2
INSID E
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
DC
4
10
11
15
16
17
18
22
Home Front
Splurge or Save
Home Sales
Gardening
On Parenting
Wellness
Crime Report
Code Violations
ON THE COVER
Illustration
by iStock
LOCAL LIVING
STAFF
Editor: Kendra
Nichols • Deputy
Editors: Amy
Joyce, Mari-Jane
Williams • Art
Director: Victoria
Adams Fogg
• Designer: J.C.
Reed • Staff
Writers: Jura
Koncius, Megan
McDonough
• Columnists:
Adrian Higgins,
Meghan Leahy
ADVERTISING
Doug Coffelt,
202-334-4440
• Email
localliving@
washpost.com
• Telephone
202-334-4409
• Mail Local
Living section,
The Washington
Post, 1301 K St.
NW, Washington,
D.C. 20071
Home
HOW TO
Repair or replace a wooden finial
BY
J EANNE H UBER
Q: The finial on a newel in my
home was damaged. I’m not sure
what happened, but I’m
wondering whether this is
something I can fix with a wood
filler or whether I should
disassemble the finial and
replace the damaged part. If
replacement is the best option,
how difficult is it to do, and
where am I likely to find a
matching finial?
Washington
A: You could replace the missing
wood with two-part epoxy, but
to give the repair a finished look,
you’d probably need to paint at
least the cap. To keep the
natural wood look, though,
you’d need to pry off the cap and
replace it.
If you opt for a patch, first cut
a plastic putty knife or an old
credit card so you can use one
edge as a shaper to form the
profile you need to match. The
plastic needs to have the
negative shape if you consider
the wood the positive shape.
After that, the steps are simple
enough: Brush on a bonding
agent if recommended with the
epoxy you buy, mix the epoxy
components, push the epoxy
into place with a putty knife or a
gloved hand, then shape the fill.
Because you need only a little
filler, options include the sixounce kit for PC-Woody wood
epoxy paste ($9.45 at Home
Depot) or even the 1.5-ounce kit
of PC-Woody brown epoxy
adhesive ($5.64 at Lowe’s).
If you opt to replace the cap,
use a thin prying tool, such as
the Grip eight-inch pry bar/nail
puller ($17.99 at Woodcraft) to
remove the damaged trim. You’ll
need to poke around a bit to
figure out whether there is
mitered trim around the base
that you can remove to give you
access for lifting the top of the
cap. Or you might find that the
cap was installed as one unit.
Slip a putty knife blade
underneath the pry bar as you
work so that you don’t damage
the post.
It might be possible to hunt
down a ready-made replacement
at a store that specializes in
salvaged building materials,
such as Community Forklift in
Hyattsville (301-985-5180;
communityforklift.org). If you
have only one newel post, the
replacement cap wouldn’t
necessarily need to be a perfect
match; it would just need to fit
over the post and have a style
that wouldn’t look odd given the
READER PHOTO
Fixing or replacing the broken finial on a newel is a reasonably easy do-it-yourself job.
rest of the staircase. However, it
might be more time-efficient to
simply make a new cap in
matching wood, which from the
picture you sent appears to be
oak.
A furniture repair company
can make a duplicate piece. Or
you might want to investigate
using the facilities of Woodcraft
of Rockville, through its
Woodworkers Club (301-984-
9033; woodworkersclub.com) or
TechShop DC-Arlington (703302-8780; techshop.ws/
arlington). Both offer access to
woodworking tools once you
have been checked out on safety.
If you can’t justify the
membership fees, perhaps an
existing member would make
the replacement piece for you as
a favor. Or maybe there is a
woodworker in your
neighborhood or among your
friends. Whoever does the
fabrication, be sure to save scrap
wood so that you can test stains
to get as close a match as
possible to the post.
Have a problem in your home?
Send questions to localliving@
washpost.com. Put “How To” in the
subject line, tell us where you live
and try to include a photo.
3
DC
12/3/17
12/14/17
Cyprus Air Heating and Cooling
150 Reviews as of 11/20/2017
12/3/17
!" #! !$ $% &! '(%)* % +*" ,"%% $-(!.% %'/.0% !" 123 &*$%4*5 6 '%7%
"FREE ESTIM'll: NLY FR NEW SSTEM REPLACEMENT -CA FR DETAIS CERT� TeRMSANO CONOITIONS APLY. APPROV R FINANClfG NT GUARANTEED 9$49 CUPON EXCWDES DC RESl>ENTS ANO SS EXCLUSIVEL$ FR NEW CUSTOMERS
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
4.3
4
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
DC
Home
HOME FRONT
How the Remodelistas get a closetful of shoes to toe the line
Julie Carlson and Margot Guralnick, editors at Remodelista.com
and authors of “Remodelista:
The Organized Home,” joined
staff writer Jura Koncius last
week on our Home Front online
chat. Here is an edited excerpt.
that allows individuals to list
items is Chairish (chairish.com);
in this case, you post your own
photos and descriptions of the
items for sale. Finally, there’s
always eBay; especially if you’re
selling name-brand items (i.e.
china from Tiffany) that buyers
frequently search for.
Q: What is your favorite way to
organize shoes in a closet?
A: (Julie Carlson) This is one of
Q: I might be a hoarder — the
mail and the paper seems to be
never-ending and
overwhelming. Add that to a
very busy 3-year-old, laundry
and life, and I feel like I’m
drowning. Any hints?
A (MG): We feel you! To help
combat the onslaught, we
suggest installing well-ordered
systems for dealing with the
mail, laundry, toys, etc. Make
them easy and accessible: for
example, generous mail baskets
(divided, so things get sorted on
arrival), several good-looking
catchall bins for toys that even
your 3-year-0ld can use, and a
laundry area with baskets for
dark, light, etc.
the biggest organization issues.
Our favorite (but unfortunately
priciest) way to stash shoes is in
glass-fronted drawers in a walkin closet. These keep them
protected from dust, but visible.
For more economical ideas,
consider other solutions: storing
shoes in a cubby unit from the
Container Store (you can insert
a couple in your closet); in a
large, attractive basket (this is
good for the entryway); a
storage bench with a lid; or
lined up on a metal tray. In the
closet, we’re also fans of canvas
shoe organizers (both the ones
that you hang from a closet rod
or on the back of a door).
Q: What are some of the things
that are hardest for you to part
with?
A: (Margot Guralnick) I hate to
part with sentimental objects of
all sorts — my daughter’s dolls,
my mother’s old coat, my
husband’s grandmother’s vases,
etc. — but that’s not to say I
want to keep all of this stuff. In
fact, rather than holding on to
the things I know I’ll never use,
I prefer to have them go to
someone who wants them and
will put them back into daily
circulation. Donating to
charities is a great easy answer.
But for me, holding a yard sale
is the way to go, because I get to
meet people, share the story of
the object, earn a bit of cash and
see where my beloved but
unwanted objects are going.
Q: Do you save nice paper
shopping bags? How many is it
reasonable to save?
A: (J.C.) Yes, we believe in saving
nice paper shopping bags! We
use them for all sorts of
purposes; taking clothes to the
dry cleaner, delivering gifts or a
bottle of wine, or sending dinner
guests home with leftovers.
How many is it reasonable to
save? I think it depends on how
much storage space you have. If
you have just a tiny closet, I
would suggest limiting your
collection to 20 or so (and store
them flattened in your favorite
bag).
Q: Any thoughts on organizing
books? How many is too many?
MATTHEW WILLIAMS
Julie Carlson advises designating a drawer or shelf for your spices
and keeping them in uniform containers with washi-tape labels.
Is it worth trying to sell them
online?
A: (M.G.) We love living with
books and believe in Anthony
Powell’s famous line: “Books do
furnish a room.” That being said,
how many to keep and how best
to arrange them is a personal
matter. Organizing by color
looks great but makes it hard to
find the volume you’re looking
for. So if you’re constantly
reaching for your books,
organize by category or type
(while stepping back and
assessing the overall look).
As for what is too many? You
know when your stacks are
taking over the floor and
beginning to crowd you out it’s
time to do some deaccessioning.
Selling online is a good option
for valuable editions. All else
can be hard to sell. Consider
donating to a library (that holds
book sales) or a school or
hospital.
Q: When my mother died, she
left me with a lot of expensive
china, silver and glassware, but
neither my grown children nor I
will use any of these pieces.
Where is the best place to sell
these items?
A (J.C.): We hear about this issue
Carlson and Margot Guralnick’s
new book, “Remodelista:
The Organized Home.”
over and over again. My first
piece of advice is to pick a few
(even just one or two) things to
keep. Tastes change, and in the
future you may regret not
having a couple of things that
will remind you of your mother.
We list places to sell high-end
items, including Everything but
the House (ebth.com), which is
an online estate sale site, in our
new book. They come to your
house, photograph and
catalogue everything, and create
an online sale. Another good site
Q: I have issues figuring out
how to organize my craft
supplies. I have a variety of
bottles of paint. Most are the
same size, but I have some
larger, taller bottles. How do I
store them all together so they
look good? I’d also like to build a
storage cabinet for organizing
and storing 12-by-12 papers. I
am interested in finding a
company that will manufacture
it. Do you have any suggestions
how to find one?
A: (M.G.) If I were you, I’d
simply organize my paint bottles
by size, so they line up well if
they’re not perfectly uniform.
(To get that perfectly uniform
look, you could consider
decanting the ones that are odd
sizes, but I realize that may be a
tall order.) Paints are pretty, so I
think you should just aim for
what makes them easiest for you
to access, such as on a shelf
rather than in tins.
As for having your storage
cabinet built, you can definitely
find a cabinetmaker willing to
take on the job! Post a service
request on Craigslist, if need be.
You have to come up with a wellfinessed prototype before you
can begin trying to sell to
manufacturers. But if you love
the results, consider starting
your own small business on
Etsy, or teaming up with
someone in your area who has
an Etsy business. If you fill a real
need, your design should have a
market. Wishing you luck!
Q: My spice collection has
outgrown its Lazy Susan on the
counter. What’s a good way to
keep all the spices together and
organized?
A: (J.C.) We’re big believers in
corralling your spices in one
place; sounds as though you
need to create a designated
spice drawer or shelf in your
kitchen, if possible. We like to
buy spices in bulk at places such
as Whole Foods or specialty
stores and store them in
uniform containers, such as
small glass paint jars from art
supply stores with washi-tape
labels.
We just featured chef David
Tanis on Remodelista, and we’re
obsessed with his spice drawer.
He stores them in glass jars,
arrayed upside down in a
drawer, so the contents are
visible. That way he doesn’t have
to label them, he says.
Q: Any good ideas for keeping
vitamins where I usually take
them, but not on display?
A: (J.C.) We believe in keeping
vitamins in the kitchen; several
of us at Remodelista have a
designated cabinet above the
sink, so we can easily run a glass
of water. If you have young
children, make absolutely sure
the vitamins have childproof
caps. If you don’t have to worry
about children getting into your
vitamin stash, you can always
decant the vitamins into
attractive jars or bottles labeled
with washi tape.
Q: My husband’s clutter makes
me nuts. I’m perpetually having
piles of stuff tumble out of
random places or seeing our
belongings get damaged. Any
tips for getting some measure of
buy-in from a clutterbug?
A: (M.G.) Yours is a situation
that calls for kindergarten and
dolphin-training tactics! Read
our book for tips on how a
grade-school teacher gets his
students to pick up after
themselves.
We also recommend reading
the New York Times Modern
Love column called “What
Shamu Taught Me About a
Happy Marriage.” It was such a
popular article that it led to a
book, and I’ve heard a movie is
in the works. The bottom line:
Consider applying child- and
animal-training methods to get
your husband to mend his ways!
localliving@washpost.com
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the rest of this transcript and
submit questions to the next chat,
Nov. 30 at 11 a.m., at
live.washingtonpost.com.
DC
5
12/8/17
1.888.821.5708
12/8/17
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
12/8/17
6
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
DC
Home
Great gifts for the home
BY
K ENDRA N ICHOLS
The best home gifts are both useful and beautiful. We searched our reporter’s notebooks, Pinterest boards and favorite shops to compile these ideas. Think host or hostess gift; then take it up a notch. Your usual bottle of wine is paired
with a handy pouring/preserving set or carrying tote. Those ubiquitous holiday nuts become chic in a stainless-steel
server. Succulent planter? How about one that hangs on the wall and doubles as living art? We shopped with different
tastes, budgets and living situations in mind, and hopefully you’ll find something you love among these suggestions.
This simple 4-inch-wide rubberwood piggy bank is intended to
teach financial responsibility to children, but we could also see
it sitting pretty on a Scandinavian-inspired bookshelf, resting
among books and other accessories. The maker, PlanToys, is
committed to using sustainable materials without chemicals
($15, anthropologie.com).
This 4.5-inch-wide brass-finish catchall could corral keys,
loose change or jewelry, while adding a bit of shine and whimsy
to an entry console or vanity. Consider the idea of thoughtful
pairings depending on the recipient, such as stackable rings for
a preteen or a leather keychain for the new homeowner ($29,
westelm.com).
When The Washington Post asked experts about their favorite
water glasses earlier this year, chef Cathal Armstrong revealed
that he uses Duralex’s nearly indestructible tumblers at home.
This Museum of Modern Art exclusive presents Duralex’s
popular glasses in a festive rainbow of colors: crimson, mint,
yellow, lavender, gray and cobalt. And they’re dishwasher-safe
($36 for a set of six, store.moma.org).
Williams Sonoma’s arbequina olive crate includes a potted
arbequina olive tree, a bottle of the store’s house olive oil, and
hand cream and soap from Blithe and Bonny, a family-run
California company. You’ll want to check whether your
recipient has the right growing conditions (listed on Williams
Sonoma’s site); outside the Gulf states and California, the tree
would need to be brought inside over the winter ($99.95,
williams-sonoma.com).
PHOTOS BY BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
7
DC
Anyone could love the compact but functional size (7.25 inches
tall by 4.75 inches wide) and the sweet farmhouse style of this
enamel pitcher. Instead of wrapping this gift, tie a bow around
its neck and present it filled with flowers or berry branches. It
could also be used as a utensil crock ($28, gincreekkitchen.com).
Designed after old-fashioned ink pots, these little but luxe vases
come in white or black and are the perfect size for a flower or
two. They are hand-thrown by artist Jasmine Crowe and
painted with 14-karat gold. You’ll love the feel of them — dainty
but not fragile ($22, shop.beekman1802.com).
It’s not a real plant, but for some of us, that’s for the best. This
retro neon desk light by SunnyLife can be powered by a USB
cable or four AAA batteries and stands about 10 inches tall. Gift
it alone or with a planter pot (as the base is a bit simple). It
made us smile ($26 for small, $60 for large, amazon.com).
When The Post asked experts for their favorite wine stoppers,
master sommelier Laura Maniec recommended Vacu Vin’s Wine
Saver/Stopper, which she uses at all three locations of her wine
studio, Corkbuzz. The brand’s Wine Essentials gift set pairs a
similar Vacu Vin wine saver with a cooler, pourer, corkscrew
and two stoppers — a good value for the price ($31.80,
amazon.com).
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
PHOTOS BY BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
8
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
DC
Home
FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
Heather Auchter, a California succulent grower and designer,
created this fun take on a plant trend. The wood-framed
planter can be hung on a wall or placed on a table as a
centerpiece. Post staffers had a blast arranging and rearranging
the succulents in the moss. Note: They take about eight to 12
weeks to root in place ($118, uncommongoods.com).
Tea lovers deserve a to-go option. This dishwasher-safe glass
travel mug by Artland can be filled with tea leaves and hot
water on one end and enjoyed from the other. A silicone sleeve
insulates it and makes it comfortable to hold. You could even
add fruit or a cinnamon stick and use it as an infuser ($17.98 for
black, other colors available, Amazon.com).
CB Station’s embroidered canvas wine tote is a gift and gift
bag in one. Stock it with two of your favorite bottles and you’re
done. Each of the bag’s compartments, which are separated by
a Velcro divider, holds one standard-size wine bottle ($16,
tnuck.com).
This bedside water carafe set pairs a curvy glass carafe with a
drinking glass that tidily inverts on top of it when not in use,
perfect for a small nightstand. Thoughtful hosts might find it
handy for a guest room. It can be monogrammed with a single
letter at no additional cost ($40, shop.nordstrom.com).
PHOTOS BY BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
9
DC
These cute dog appetizer plates were designed by Draper
James, actress Reese Witherspoon’s Southern-inspired lifestyle
brand. The set includes four patterns: dachshunds, Scottish
terriers, French bulldogs and bloodhounds ($65 for a set of
four, crateandbarrel.com).
A trip to the Philip Johnson Glass House in New Canaan, Conn.,
is a must for a design lover, its gift shop being an added benefit.
Luckily the shop’s wares are online, too. We were intrigued by the
Verso snack server, designed by Mario Taepper for Carl Mertens.
Not only does it look sleek on a table, it also prevents your guests
from having to root around in a bowl for a handful of nuts ($60,
designstore.theglasshouse.org).
Brooklyn-based artist
and designer Danielle Kroll’s champagne apron is a fun take
on a useful item. It’s sure to be put to use when New Year’s rolls
around ($32, anthropologie.com).
Tsubota Pearl’s Queue is just about the prettiest lighter we’ve
ever seen. These made-in-Japan stick lighters come in several
high-gloss color combinations. Note: Lighter fluid isn’t
included ($28, home-coming.com).
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
PHOTOS BY THE RETAILERS
10
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
DC
Home
SPLURGE OR SAVE
Set the bar, if not the budget, high
BY
These days, it seems as though every home featured in a
design blog or magazine has a beautifully designed bar area,
and it’s not surprising to see why. A stocked home bar —
complete with fun coasters, cocktail shakers and stirrers —
lends itself to gathering, entertaining and celebrating.
“A stocked and stylish bar cart invites guests to make
themselves at home,” says Los Angeles-based interior designer
Jessica McClendon, right.
As the founder of the interior design service and blog
$295
Modern shagreen
desk tray in dove
(aerin.com)
$790
$56
Harmonie round
whiskey decanter
(neimanmarcus.com)
Four Curvature
DOF glasses
(anthropologie.com)
MEGAN MCDONOUGH
Glamour Nest, McClendon is all about creating down-to-earth
spaces with a dash of decadence. She recommends building a
bar area in the living room, dining room or even bedroom.
“For my busy clients who have kiddos, the bedroom can
sometimes be the perfect place to unwind with a cocktail after
everyone else goes to bed,” says McLendon. “It may be
unconventional, but it’s an easy reminder to kick back and
relax.”
Here are her top bar accessories.
$44
White rim lacquer
trays (rectangle) in
slate (westelm.com)
$29.95
Four Soiree double
old-fashioned glasses
(zgallerie.com)
$28
Two slivered
geode coasters
in white quartz
(anthropologie.com)
$195
Two Kivita coasters
in crystal and gold
(shophorne.com)
More Splurge or Save online
e
For more of McClendon’s picks,
s,
e.
go to washingtonpost.com/home.
megan.mcdonough@washpost.com
m
$39.95
Stud decanter
(cb2.com)
Home Sales
D I S T RIC T OF C OL UMB I A
These sales data recorded by the
D.C. Office of Tax and Revenue
were provided by Black Knight
Financial Services. For information
about other residential real estate
transactions, visit
www.washingtonpost.com/
homesales.
NORTHWEST
Alton Pl., 4444-Daniel Barlow
Burke Jr. to Yahia Khairi Said and
Sarah Bamat, $981,000.
Bates St., 200-Mandi L. Wiggins to
Bayan C. Misaghi, $700,000.
Belmont St., 1451, No. 311-Stacey
L. Bielick to Donald R. Arrington,
$494,000.
California St., 1839-Samuel
Rodriguez to Marc S. Forni and
Vica R. Bogaerts, $1.65 million.
Cathedral Ave., 2244-Miriam
Elizabeth Mims Donley and
Elizabeth Donley to Amy and
Matthew Girgenti, $1.5 million.
Cathedral Ave., 4200, No. 807Abrahm J. and Sarah M. Vogel to
Alexander Richard Jue and Kaitlyn
Larson Evans Jue, $330,000.
Cathedral Ave., 4201, No. 120WJanice L. Austin to Kelly Mack,
$285,000.
Cathedral Ave., 4201, No. 721WCarolyn L. Reinhardt to Beth P.
Brown, $249,900.
Cedar St., 343, No. 303Christopher E. Dickerson to ElizTalida Serif and Francisco
Orellana, $450,000.
Clifton St., 1427, No. 1-Kristen
Brady to Zachary Clay and Laura
Page Weeks, $601,972.
Columbia Rd., 1901, No. 105Michael Scott Garrison to Brandon
and Molly Green, $559,500.
Connecticut Ave., 3701, No. 715Karen Renee Benner to Vaishnavi
Rao, $250,000.
Cortland Pl., 2801, No. 304Kimberley K. Allen to Maximilian
Robert Ziemer and Ani Avetisyan,
$374,500.
Dexter St., 4520-Susan Elaine
Foote Burke to Michael and
Elizabeth Clifton, $2.02 million.
DC
Edmunds St., 4004, No. 9-David
Dunipace and Lauren Barros to
Samira Georgi, $685,000.
Euclid St., 907, No. 103-Erlk A.
Knapp and Chelsea K. LooperStockwell to Kalissa Hendrickson,
$351,000.
Farragut St., 811-Elvira Cooper to
John Kenneth McCoy and Megan
Ryan Melly McCoy, $525,000.
Florida Ave., 237-Dilan
Investment Corp. to Colin R.
MacDonald and Nadra E. Wass,
$1.34 million.
Garfield St., 2918-Forrest T.
McKennie to Choon Kyu and Eun
Hui Kim, $1.57 million.
Hamilton St., 24-Marie A. Vodicka
to Jacqueline and Nathan Ward,
$470,000.
Harvard St., 1450, No. E-Gregory
W. and Elizabeth S. Warr to Angela
and Hendrik Bennink, $674,000.
Hobart St., 1745-Faith Payne and
Mark Naegeli to Elizaveta Perova,
$777,000.
Illinois Ave., 4010-Marc F.
Schleifer and Amber D. Latner to
Brian P. O’Connor and Mallori
Merandino, $800,000.
Irving St., 1636, No. 4BChristopher Weber to Anne Kolker,
$439,000.
K St., 2515, No. 305-Bhagya
Laksumanage to Clare Orvis,
$337,500.
Kenmore Dr., 4628-Jessie Kane
and Dieter Schellinger to Eva
Nimmons Kasten, $1.6 million.
L St., 1001, No. 606-Sartaz Ahmed
to Megan Whittemore and Gary
Anthony Nuzzi Jr., $546,000.
Lamont St., 1651, No. 1E-Evan M.
and Megan P. Belser to Dana
Catherine Mueller, $490,000.
Longfellow St., 317-Joseph Tam
Lung to Pamela Jeanne Bender,
$516,000.
M St., 910, No. 117-Luke A. and
Andrea D. Lisell to Megan Carey
Connor, $616,783.
Macarthur Blvd., 5067-Kevin
Carey and Sara Sklaroff to David
Gorodetski, $850,000.
Mansion Dr., 4066-Evelyn Hirsch
to Anthony Nuland and Alexandra
Simmonds, $1.68 million.
Massachusetts Ave., 4301, No.
8007-Mary C. Hutchinson to Nancy
M. Whiting, $291,450.
Mount Pleasant St., 3155, No.
202-Jill Kronstadt to Timothy M.
Ballard, $415,000.
N St., 1300, No. 519-Thomas T.
Troke to Alexander Manners,
$455,000.
New Hampshire Ave., 1725, No.
706-Karen L. Sheive to Thomas E.
Burton Jr., $382,000.
New York Ave., 61-Patrick E.
Sandoval and Douglas A. Vasquez
to John E. McGlothlin, $651,000.
Newton St., 1417, No. 104-Marilyn
T. Brown to Marisa Meyers,
$350,000.
O St., 1107, No. 3-Patrik
Ringstroem and Manjari Goenka to
David E. and Amy Bauch Griggs,
$797,500.
Ontario Rd., 2450, No. 4-Suzanne
Wen-Li Chang and Michael David
Alpern to Matthew Michael Ladra,
$851,000.
P St., 3018-Hugo Antuna and Sofia
Isabel Antuna Owen to Outerbridge
Horsey and Georgina Owen,
$1.49 million.
Park Rd., 1328, No. A-Amrithi
Devarajan and Ken Furuya to
Anamika Dwivedi, $693,000.
Park Rd., 2023-2023 Park Road
Corp. to Daniel Villar Vallenas,
$1.5 million.
Porter St., 2902, No. 36-Zachary
M. and Alexandria Walton Radford
to Shin-Je Ghim, $621,500.
Q St., 801, No. 1-Thomas M. Foye
to Benjamin Russell Stickel and
Rebecca Helene Williams,
$770,000.
Q St., 1625, No. 205-Anita and
Dinesh J. Bhat to James M.
McCarthy and Cong Xiao You,
$700,000.
Q St., 3250-Christopher R. Molitor
to Mahesh Balakrishna and Pallavi
Tyagi, $1.1 million.
R St., 1738-John Brooks and
Giuseppe Perrone to Matthew E.
Shkor, $2.35 million.
Rhode Island Ave., 5, No. 202Marcine V. Hunter to Zaheer
Tajani, $327,900.
Rhode Island Ave., 1322, No. 8Danny N. Price to Christopher
Schneller and Matthew Mitter,
$725,000.
Rittenhouse St., 1421-Cesar
Parrado Marinas and Lyana M.
Maso-Martinez to Susan
Tahmasebi, $560,000.
Rodman St., 3514-Michael S. and
Elizabeth H. Clifton to Matthew
David Strickler and Samantha
Carey, $1.61 million.
Scott Cir., 1, No. 109-Lisa Iswari
Budiman to Thomas M. Dow,
$250,000.
Shepherd St., 1611-Lucas C.
Grodsky to Adam James Broecker
and Ana Sifia Carteiro Alves,
$1.26 million.
Sherier Pl., 5514-Hanlon Design
Build Inc. to Farleigh J. and William
B. Cunningham, $2.77 million.
Springdale St., 4451-Andrew I.
Killgore and Marjorie N. Killgore to
Paul and Laura Lynn Profeta,
$1.04 million.
Taylor St., 310-John and Tiffany A.
Yowell to Philip and Julie V. Bolin,
$529,393.
Tunlaw Rd., 2610, No. 302-Beth
Joseph Walton and Johnny W.
Joseph to Erica R. Oakley and
Kristian S. Rogers, $380,000.
Van Ness St., 2939, No. 326-Mary
Janet Conley and John James
Dicarlo to David T. and Maryl A.
Shoneman, $310,000.
Varnum St., 1826-Mary B. Barnes
and Christopher M. Vatidis to
Boriana Yontcheva and Jules Erik,
$1.57 million.
W St., 4403-Rory L. and Lauren B.
Pillsbury to Galina Perova Kingston
and Albina Perova, $1.54 million.
Westminster St., 908-Kevin M.
Dailey and Clare R. Donelan to
Nancy Connors, $1.16 million.
Willard St., 1731, No. 301-Daniel
L. Goldberg to Scott T. Sweitzer,
$399,999.
Wisconsin Ave., 3024, No. 207Timothy Slattery to Fiona Ciliotta,
$280,000.
Third St., 6009-John Newton
Thurber and Pamela T. Duncan to
Toby Rogers and Andrew Howard,
$750,000.
Fifth St., 1334-Monarch Building
and Development to Roger L.
McClung and Mary L. Brown,
$1.46 million.
Sixth St., 715, No. 301-Anthony
Ortman to Tanya Tiwari, $429,900.
Seventh St., 5124-Hillside Road
SE Corp. to Ellen Tarquinio,
$649,900.
10th St., 2116-Praveen Goyal to
Robert D. Horvath Jr.,
$1.34 million.
11th St., 2101, No. 401-Kyle and
Christine Andres to Prajakta A.
Chitre, $685,000.
12th St., 2130-Joanna S. and
Ryder F. Riess to Sumitra Siram
and Emil Kerenji, $960,000.
13th St., 1225, No. 213-Eric A.
Lundin to Bjorne M. and Anatoly M.
Levkov, $387,500.
13th St., 1705, No. 1-Benjamin
Singer and Susan K. Park to
Christopher Creenough and Sarah
A. Roberto, $789,250.
13th St., 3916, No. 2-Brendan
Selby to Jo E. Gutterman and
Robert D. Levy, $746,000.
14th St., 2750, No. 608-Katherine
Hua-Pekno and Peter Chih-Chao
Kuo to Caroline Sara Kim,
$585,000.
16th St., 2440, No. 501-Andrew S.
Leben to George K. Philips,
$585,000.
21st St., 1321, No. 6-David B.
Stewart to Alexandra Tana
Bosshard, $982,000.
28th St., 2850-Nathaniel C. Fick
and Margaret B. Angel to Stephen
Michael Pezzi and Abigail Mia
Dosoretz Pezzi, $1.73 million.
30th St., 1077, No. 309-Sherrie L.
Rhine to Justin Lee and Marianne
Ranere Bacon, $815,000.
31st Pl., 6353-Aidan H. and
Constance D. O’Connor to
Benjamin and Christina Scher,
$1.27 million.
35th St., 1318, No. 5-Ryan Russell
Raybould and Brooke Ila Carroll to
Danielle L. Clausnitzer, $500,000.
39th St., 3531, No. C501-Susan
Griffin and Byron Sandford to
Donald Fredericks Jr., $430,000.
40th Pl., 2339, No. 202-William A.
Nisbet II to Kevin J. Buckley,
$321,916.
45th St., 3006-Timothy C. and
Kathryn D. Luwis to James P. and
Ellen B. Patterson, $3.08 million.
SOUTHEAST
B St., 4824-Gerald S. Brown to
HOMES CONTINUED ON 22
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
NORTHEAST
A St., 1614-Trevor A. Moe and Traci
J. Crockett to Brent Parton and
Brennan Alexandra McMahon,
$625,000.
Ames St., 5342-C and B Holdings
Corp. to Eugene Fertelmeyster and
Danielle Poole, $412,180.
Buchanan St., 832-832 Buchanan
Street NE Corp. to James F. Gehrke
and Coleen Kelly, $605,000.
Chancellors Way, 2891-Andrew H.
Salzman and Elspeth D. LeechBlack to Daniel and Rina Rodriguez
Mehdi, $795,000.
D St., 419-Stephanie D. Hui and
Benjamin A. Rohrbaugh to
Elizabeth Barrett and Roger Shane
Karr, $837,777.
Dakota Ave. S., 2925-Belinda
Alfaro to Brandi Phipps and
Rebecca Ward, $710,000.
Delafield Pl., 1236-Leroy A.
Bagley to Gerardo A. Zarceno
Martinez, $370,000.
Duncan St., 1422-Dilan
Investment Corp. to Brian Gregory
Evans and Eric A. Nicole Oleszczuk
Evans, $675,000.
Evarts St., 401, No. 301-Bethany
and Ryan Evans to Gerardo
Evaristo Cruz-Ortiz and Elena Maria
Muzzi, $310,000.
Girard St., 635-Patricia Ward and
Renee James to Anne Knapke and
Mark Copeland, $450,000.
Hawthorne Dr., 3133-Renee S.
Kinder to Amir Ali Ebadi,
$345,000.
Hurston Lane, 2521-Andrew
Opoku-Agyemang to Kofi Marfoh,
$226,505.
Lyman Pl., 1748-Elaine D. Fields to
Ricky A. Tillery, $323,000.
Maryland Ave., 1125, No. 4-Amy
E. Pope to Valerie Winschel,
$285,000.
Regent Pl., 567-Michael and PaiJiun Belcher to Daren Purnell and
Amanda Kimball, $760,000.
Sargent Rd., 4820-Todd K. Bell
and Alisha M. Lutat to Marcus and
Caribbean Ross Moon, $515,000.
Taylor St., 2020-Christopher
Jordan Rash to Latoya Huggins and
Michael Huggins, $509,000.
V St., 314, No. 206-Fernando Nsi
Gomez to Caitlin M. Haney,
$229,500.
W St., 1340-Fred Smith Jr. and Eli
J. Guiterman to Rezene Medhani
and Alganesh Medhani-Kuflom,
$202,900.
Third St., 2425-2425 3rd St. Corp.
to Stephane Verani and Van Anh
Vu Hong, $805,000.
Fourth St., 2827-Tyrone Hall to
Matthew David Watts and Emily
Adams Crowley, $525,000.
Seventh St., 3009-Brian C.
Bonner and Samatha Spiiney to
Travis W. Ollom and McKenzie
Haynes, $631,000.
10th St., 4822-Mae S. Barnes and
Brenda J. Colwell to Jared
Edmonds, $300,000.
11th St., 430-Dilan Investment
Corp. to Albert J. Muldoon III and
Ashleigh M. De La Torre,
$1.48 million.
12th St., 528-Eileen Kessler and
Joan Calvano to Nikhil Kekre,
$873,750.
13th Pl., 2302-Willco Properties
Corp. to Angela Montfort,
$554,000.
13th St., 3630-Elenora Giddings to
Anthony and Ginger Gaines-Cirelli,
$984,500.
16th St., 308-Eric Garcia to Adam
D. and Alexandra S. Miller,
$879,000.
17th St., 108-Cedence Ventures
Inc. to Bradford Dayspring,
$770,000.
20th St., 817-Miguel Rubiano and
Serena Mehra to David A. Doher
and Lindsay N. Smith, $569,000.
25th Pl., 531-Kia L. Smith to
Jennifer L. Rellis, $593,000.
11
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
12
DC
13
Home
DC
THE HOME EDIT
Five ways to organize your holidays now
BY
ou might already have a
plan for your holiday
cookie baking or new garland doorway display.
But some of the most satisfying
preparations for the holidays involve more mundane pursuits:
making order in a small corner of
your home, stocking what you’ll
need for a seasonal chore or decluttering unneeded or worn-out
items.
Clea Shearer and Joanna Teplin
are experts in this kind of orderly
living. They run the Home Edit, a
home organization company
based in Nashville that takes a
stylized approach to editing and
arranging, and they’re also home
organizing consultants for Target.
They know how to make ordinary
stuff look good: They have clients
throughout the country (including Gwyneth Paltrow and Rachel
Zoe) and more than 330,000 followers on Instagram.
Says Shearer, “The holidays are
supposed to be a joyous time. To
make that happen, the most won-
derful thing to do is to cleanse
your house of things you don’t like
or don’t need.”
The fast-paced weeks ahead
will be more pleasant if you strategize ways to accomplish your holiday to-do list in calm, not chaos.
“We all know what’s coming is
not like a random birthday party;
it’s like a lot of birthday parties all
at once,” Teplin says. “Set yourself
up for success this year.”
There are five lifestyle suggestions from the Home Edit team
that could help.
Purge as many items as you
can. Now is the time to take toys
your kids don’t use to a donation
center or donate your outgrown
coats to a shelter. You’ll be making
way for new toys and new clothes.
Get nonprofit groups that have
donation trucks to pick up at your
house and finally get rid of bulky
unused items such as doll houses.
For gently worn clothes and smaller items, they suggest packing
them into shopping bags or boxes
and immediately getting them out
of your house by placing them in
your car. You’ll be sure to drop
them off sooner rather than later,
Teplin says.
Set up a gift-wrapping station.
Even if it’s a corner of a desk, the
back of a closet or a mere plastic
tub, designate a place for all things
gift wrap. “It doesn’t have to be a
Beverly Hills mansion-style wrapping room,” Shearer says. “Just
keep all the stuff together and you
can wrap on the floor or kitchen
table.” In addition to rolls of paper
and gift bags and tags, make sure
you have several pairs of scissors
and at least two rolls of tape on
hand. They suggest choosing a
festive paper, maybe in gold or
silver, that would be appropriate
for either Christmas or Hanukkah, plus other occasions.
Revisit your coat closet. The
front-hall closet is often the repository of sports equipment, boots
and vacuums. With company on
its way, you’ll need that space for
puffy coats and hooded parkas.
Transition into the winter season
by emptying it and putting away
sunscreen and baseball hats. Put a
bin or tray for boots in the bottom.
Get extra hangers for visiting
coats. “Buy heavy-weight hangers,
not something flimsy,” Shearer
says. “For coats, you really need a
wooden hanger.”
Dedicate an area to holiday
correspondence. If exchanging
cards is one of your favorite parts
of the holiday season, make the
process easier. You can order your
cards from an online stationer,
adding in your own photos.
(Shearer and Teplin use Minted.)
Technology has changed how
many of us store and update addresses, from keeping contacts on
a cellphone to maintaining an online database. If you’re diligent,
you update your addresses all
year. But for those who can’t keep
up, Shearer suggests using a custom card service that will email
every person in your database before sending out your cards to
make sure their address is correct.
If you write your own cards,
gather them and your stamps in
one place. Create a basket to col-
lect cards you receive. You can
display cards on a mantel or bulletin board, or get creative: Hang a
wire and pin cards on it with
clothespins.
Edit holiday decorations and
entertaining supplies as you put
them out. The Home Edit team is
convinced that you’ll be more diligent about evaluating your holiday decorations when you are
decking your halls. They suggest
decorating your tree with a shopping bag nearby that you’ll fill
with the Santas that are looking a
bit tired and the reindeer that
have lost their sparkle.
“If you wait, in the rush to clean
up the holiday at the end of the
year, you’ll probably just shove
stuff in boxes and bags just to get it
packed up for the season,” Shearer
says.
Teplin advises clients to “take
out holiday serving pieces and tableware, wash them and have
them ready to use.” If you find a
chipped dinner plate or two, she
says, now’s the time to order more.
jura.koncius@washpost.com
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
Y
J URA K ONCIUS
14
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
DC
Home
Houses burn faster these days, so get out fast
BY
E LISABETH L EAMY
Family fire drills. Practice
your evacuation plan so that everyone in the family not only
knows how to get out, but also
reverts to the plan instead of
panicking during a fire.
I
f your house is on fire, how
many minutes do you think
you have to get out alive?
If you’re like 80 percent of
Americans surveyed, you’ll say
five or 10 minutes. Wrong! According to Underwriters Laboratories, which conducts state-ofthe-art fire safety testing, you
have three minutes or less. “Most
people underestimate the speed
and power of fire and smoke,”
according to the National Fire
Protection Association. You
shouldn’t fumble with the fire
extinguisher, grab your photo albums or even rescue your cat.
GET OUT!
That’s what Audra Fordin did
when a faulty electrical wire
started a devastating fire in her
Roslyn Heights, N.Y., home.
“When my husband yelled ‘fire,’
my body went into ‘go’ mode,”
said Fordin. “I scooped up my
three children and flew outside,
hurdling 18 steps and two landings.” Fordin says she would not
have known to act so fast had it
not been for a kindergarten project of her daughter’s that required the family to do a home
fire drill.
UL says that 30 years ago, you
had up to 17 minutes to escape a
house fire, but today’s homes
burn faster. Why? Open floor
plans provide oxygen and
don’t provide barriers. And synthetic building materials and furnishings burn at a much faster
rate than the natural products
used decades ago. UL videotaped
a dramatic side-by-side experiment that showed how rapidly a
modern living room went up in
flames compared with a vintage
one.
“You want to have an escape
plan and practice it regularly
because there is a limited time
window to act,” said Stephen Kerber, director of UL’s Firefighter
Safety Research Institute. “We
can’t emphasize enough: If you
can get out, get out.”
The stakes are high. Residential fires kill more people than
any other kind, according to the
Federal Emergency Management
Administration. In fact, roughly
seven Americans die every day in
house fires.
Some of those people die because they try to fight the fire
themselves. Fire extinguishers
are wonderful tools, but most of
us don’t know when or how to use
them. I once did an experiment at
a fire training center, thrusting
fire extinguishers into the hands
of unsuspecting volunteers and
yelling for them to put out a fire.
Every single one made critical
mistakes. FEMA says you should
Clear
address
numbers.
Drive past your house at night
and see if the address is clearly
visible from the street for emergency crews to find you. If not,
install better numbers or lighting.
Close
doors while you sleep.
Fires that break out while you are
sleeping can be particularly devastating. Closing your door keeps
smoke out and temperatures
down, giving you precious extra
minutes to evacuate.
Designate
a meeting place.
Everyone in the family should
know of a spot nearby — but out
of fire range — where you will
meet if you evacuate separately in
a fire.
During a fire
Block smoke: If you are stuck
in a room, close the doors and
windows, and put wet fabric over
openings where smoke can get in.
Get low: Bend way down or
crawl as you evacuate because
smoke rises and kills more people
than fire itself.
Check doors: Look for smoke
and feel for heat at closed doors, a
sign that there’s fire on the other
side. If so, exit through another
door or window.
Close doors/windows behind you. Close doors and win-
dows as you escape to minimize
the amount of oxygen that can
fuel the fire.
Exit windows wisely. Crawl
out backward facing the house.
Then lower yourself until you are
hanging from the window sill.
This puts your feet as close to the
ground as possible before you
drop.
Don’t go back in. No matter
what — or who — don’t go back in.
Instead, alert firefighters so they
can rescue people trapped inside.
localliving@washpost.com
BLEND IMAGES/ALAMY
only use a fire extinguisher if:
• You are trained in how to use
the extinguisher.
• You can put out the fire in five
seconds or less.
• The fire is small and contained — like in a wastebasket.
• There is no flammable debris
or hazardous material nearby.
• You have the right type of
extinguisher for the type of fire.
• There are two ways to exit the
area quickly if you fail.
Montgomery County, Md., fire
investigator Donny Boyd has seen
the aftermath when people fail.
“Fire doubles in size every minute,” said Boyd. “You may think
you can manage it, but I’ve seen
people who have perished in the
heat and gases, trying to fight the
fire themselves.” Boyd says people
who spend time struggling with a
fire extinguisher often delay calling 911, which compounds the
problem.
Your priority should be surviving the fire, not putting out the
fire. Here are several steps
you can take — before and during a fire — to increase your
chances.
Before a fire
• Interconnected smoke detectors. You should have smoke
alarms in every sleeping room,
outside each sleeping area and on
every level of your home. And
those alarms should be wirelessly
connected to one another, so that
if there’s a fire in your basement,
for example, the alarm in your
bedroom will go off.
Two exits per room. Map out
two ways to get out of every room
in your house, even if one of them
is a window, and keep those exits
clear.
Elisabeth Leamy hosts the podcast
“Easy Money” and is a 25-year
consumer advocate for programs
such as “Good Morning America” and
“The Dr. Oz Show.” Connect with her
at leamy.com and @ElisabethLeamy.
No Home Front chat Our weekly
online Q&A on decorating and
household advice takes a break for
Thanksgiving, returning Nov. 30.
Submit questions and read previous
chat transcripts at
live.washingtonpost.com.
At Home newsletter Go to the
Home & Garden page to subscribe to
our email newsletter, delivered every
Thursday.
15
Home
DC
A landscape architect returns to the scene of his prime
Tip of the Week
Many garden centers and
hardware stores discount spring
bulbs still left on the shelves. You
can plant bulbs until the ground
freezes, but the sooner they are
planted and watered the better.
Bulbs can deteriorate in storage.
They should feel firm and be free of
mold.
— Adrian Higgins
ADRIAN HIGGINS/THE WASHINGTON POST
After more than five decades, landscape architect Gordon Riggle is still crafting Georgetown gardens.
that was also in the book. In an
L-shaped garden of quite
different character, more open
and sunny, Wheeler had used
brick, boxwood and Venetian
statuary to create a little
neoclassical jewel, a sitting
terrace by the veranda, of perfect
scale and felicity.
“Washington gardens are all
derived from Savannah and
Charleston,” said Riggle.
Back in the 1990s, it would
have been natural to think of
Riggle’s work as a vestige of an
earlier age. But that would have
been a misreading. He is a
designer informed by that
tradition, but he wasn’t stuck in
the past. As if to reinforce that, I
received a letter from him earlier
this month inviting me to drop
by his latest Georgetown project.
This was a multifaceted
garden around a Gothic
Victorian house on 31st Street.
He had installed it in the early
2000s, when the house was being
renovated and its imposing side
porch, once removed in a
contemporary phase, returned.
The formal front garden was
marked by an aerial hedge of
clipped lindens. To the side, an
In such enclosed urban
environments, the
garden spaces must feel
not just harmonious but
also obvious, as if they
had always been there.
elevated terrace was defined by a
wall fountain and koi pond. The
back side of the house, once the
location of a small swimming
pool, was now a boxwood knot
garden in a frame of pea gravel. A
hidden retaining wall allowed
him to keep a trellis screen along
the property line and to raise the
rear lawn to a formal grassy
panel. The alley beyond was
screened with a row of Cleveland
pears.
In such enclosed urban
environments, the garden spaces
must feel not just harmonious
but also obvious, as if they had
always been there. A big part of
pulling this off is in the choice of
materials and attention to detail.
One of the key horticultural
skills is the fine pruning of the
trees. Perhaps because he is old
school, Riggle involves himself in
the construction of his gardens,
whether it’s guiding crane
operators or placing grading
stakes for the earth-moving
machines.
At his garden in Fairfax, Va.,
he once taught me how to dig a
root ball for an established
boxwood to be moved, a
procedure that includes the art
of burlap wrapping and drumlacing the ball.
In returning to the
Georgetown garden, Riggle had
been asked to simplify the space
to reduce its maintenance
burden. When I arrived, he
looked much the same as he
always had, tall, upright and
wearing one of his trademark
wide-brimmed Amish hats. His
steps were more labored and
shorter than I remembered. “I’ll
be 80 next year,” he said.
His solution for the garden
was to remove half the lindens
and 150 linear feet of boxwood
edging. He directed his crew to
take out three of four Japanese
cherry trees and to reduce the
overgrown pears to high stumps,
which will produce a flush of
new growth next year. He also
thinned the canopies of a
number of trees that had grown
thick over the past 15 years. Even
after all this lightening, he noted,
the garden still retains its
essential elements and character.
He designed it as an homage to a
Parisian town garden.
The owner, Shannon
Fairbanks, credits Riggle with
“being able to create different
rooms in a tiny space that are
continuously showing
themselves in a different way. I
think that’s the most enchanting
aspect.”
But seeing these adjustments
was a reminder of the ethereal
nature of things. The historic
ambiance of Georgetown hides
the fluid nature of the properties,
the shifting interiors of the
homes and the unstoppable
aging of the gardens. Of those I
featured in the book with the
photographer Mick Hales, all
have changed in some way, and
some have been erased.
I couldn’t help but think of the
parallels between the scaling
back of the Fairbanks garden and
the winding down of Riggle’s
creative journey. We sat on a
chilly terrace, warmed by
reminiscence. “I have had a
charmed life because so many
people carried me along,” he said.
He arrived in town as a freshfaced farm boy from Ohio and
found himself at the center of the
free world, when Georgetown
was an intoxicating highball of
society, politics and intrigue.
Wheeler, an urbane Southerner,
moved easily in these circles, at
cocktail parties by night and in
the gardens by day.
“I was very shy and didn’t ask
a lot of questions. I should have
quizzed him more,” Riggle said.
“You mean, on his design
principles?” I asked.
“No,” said Riggle, shaking his
head just a little. “On the gossip.”
adrian.higgins@washpost.com
@adrian_higgins on Twitter
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read past columns by Higgins at
washingtonpost.com/home.
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
I spent a lot of
time in
Georgetown
gardens in the
early 1990s for a
book I was
Adrian
working on. It
Higgins
soon became
evident that for all
GARDENING
of the historic
district’s outward
red-brick conformity, no two
gardens were the same.
Some Federal-era mansions
still had imposing and highly
crafted gardens, all different, but
it was the rowhouses built later
in the 19th century that were, in
some ways, more interesting.
The outdoor areas were first
formed as leftover spaces of
utility — yards — and the
challenge for landscape
designers, when they arrived on
the scene, was to create
functioning gardens of privacy
and beauty while bringing unity
to disjointed spaces, some of
them dark and cramped.
Among these smaller gardens
featured in the book, some had
been newly reworked by
contemporary garden designers.
They hewed more to limestone
than brick and were less florid
and more rectilinear. They were
in every way edgier, and being
somewhat callow and greatly
enthusiastic, I was drawn to
them.
Other town gardens were
older, more conservative and
inspired by Colonial Revival
ideas of simple brickwork,
geometry and boxwood
enclosure. By the 1990s, they
were period pieces: quiet, safe,
graceful but old-fashioned.
Around this time I became
acquainted with a landscape
architect, Gordon Riggle, who
had come to Washington in the
early 1960s. He found himself
under the wing of the masterful
designer Perry Wheeler, a
gardening pal of such
tastemakers as Bunny Mellon
and Jackie Kennedy.
One of Riggle’s gardens was
featured in my book (“The Secret
Gardens of Georgetown”), an Lshaped lot created when an
addition was built on a
rowhouse. The rear space was
defined by a swimming pool
terrace. In the narrow side yard,
Riggle built a Japanese-style
viewing garden, to be enjoyed
from indoors. The two gardens
were separated by a moon gate.
The viewing garden was
distinguished by fluid swirls of
brick paving, moving like the
incoming tide around upright
Zen stones.
The brickwork’s plastic quality
recalled a garden by Wheeler
16
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
DC
Family
ON PARENTING
Sports and sibling jealousy: What’s really at play here?
BY
M EGHAN L EAHY
Q: My older child, 7, has recently fallen
head over heels for a sport, and her world
has started revolving around it. My
preschool-aged younger child (who wants
nothing more than to be like her big sister)
has started picking up on that enthusiasm
and trying to copy her. She is too young to
join this sport, so there is no immediate
potential rivalry. However, my older child
is always trying to physically interfere with
her younger sister whenever she sees her
trying to “practice” things that my older
daughter had just been doing, telling my
younger daughter that she is not allowed
to ever like the sport, and that she would
never be good at it anyway, and generally
expressing extreme jealousy at the thought
of her sister going down the same path.
She has started telling us that she is
worried that her sister will be better than
her, because she gets to start learning
training exercises earlier, and my older
daughter doesn’t want to be eclipsed in a
sport that she loves so much. Any
suggestions on how to help her focus on
her own pursuits and not worry so much
about her sister?
A: Ah, jealousy between siblings,
it’s a tale as old as time
(especially between same-gender
siblings). I would like to write
that I can help you eradicate
jealousy or envy between sibs,
but that’s simply not going to
happen. As long as children live
together, there is a strong
likelihood that there will be
jealousy and jostling for power
throughout their lives. It’s
human nature.
So, do we throw our hands in
the air and hope that these girls
just work this out? No, absolutely
not. You don’t have to look far to
find an adult who carries the
pain of a ruined relationship
with a sibling from jealousy run
amok. These adults will often tell
you how their parents either sat
by and did nothing or worse, fed
the jealousy with preferential
treatment. So yes, I want you to
do something about this.
Why do siblings get jealous of
each other? There are two
systems at work that we should
pay attention to. Number one,
the deepest desire of a child is to
belong to her parent. If the child
gets positive attention by being
good at soccer, for instance, that
child laps up this positive
connection and attention. The
other sibling wants to belong,
too, and so will repeat whatever
is working for that older sibling,
whether or not it makes rational
sense. A 3-year-old cannot
rationally think through all
these implications; she is acting
on impulse. Does she want to be
like her big sister? Yes, but she
also wants to bask in the
sunshine of the attention you
are giving to the big sister. In
many ways, younger sibs are
often playing a case of catch-up,
even when we are doing our
darndest to spread the love
around equally.
The next issue we have is one
of power. In any given family, the
parent or caregiver is the one
meant to be in charge. The
parent is the one who leads, who
instructs and who provides the
moral compass. If a child even
perceives that the adult is
dropping the leadership ball,
that child will assume a
leadership role in the family.
ISTOCK/WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION
This is all well and good, but a
child is in no position to lead a
family, especially a 7-year-old. Do
I see a bit of this in your letter?
Yes. Your eldest is prescribing
what your preschooler can and
cannot do, even as far as not
allowing her to like this special
sport. This possessiveness is
normal, but you also need to
bring it into line.
The good news here? Your
eldest is talking to you about
what worries her and she is
stating it quite clearly. Ah, what a
blessing! Listen to that clarity! Is
she actually worried about her
sister being good at, say, soccer?
No. She doesn’t want her sister to
be better. Your eldest daughter
wants to keep her status as
special, as having something that
is hers and hers alone. Who
hasn’t felt like that?
So, you have a wonderful
opening here for conversation
and action to dissipate some of
this jealousy. Here are some
ideas:
1. Create some firm
boundaries, right away. Everyone
under your roof is allowed to
play whichever and whatever
sport they want, whenever they
want. Your mantra is: All are free
to try activities in this house.
Your 7-year-old will bristle at
this, but that is okay. She can be
upset.
2. Because your daughter is
talking about her feelings with
you, you are going to listen and
reflect, listen and reflect. It may
sound like, “It sounds like you
are worried you won’t be the best
at soccer…” and “Yes, I have felt
this way before, too. It’s hard to
know other people may love
what you love, too.” Your eldest
daughter is experiencing the
tough reality of sharing
attention, space and talent, and
it is okay if she doesn’t love that.
You can absolutely agree that
this is not fun. Yes, it is annoying
when little sisters want
everything you want. Yes, it is
tiring to be patient with her.
Agree with all of these feelings.
3. Now, this is critical: Create
special time with her where all
you do is practice this sport, just
you two. No little sister around,
no distractions. As you practice,
make a little conversation about
how she is special. No one in the
history of the world has been
made to feel special by someone
saying, “You’re special.” No, you
are going to want to find the Love
Language (see Gary Chapman
for more about this) that resonates with your daughter; what
makes her feel special? Is it
touch? Is it telling stories? Is it
hot chocolate? What we are creating is the message that says,
“Soccer or no soccer, you are my
daughter and I love you unconditionally. I love you, no matter
what.” It is not shocking to realize this, but when a child has this
wide safety net (unconditional
parental love), sibling jealousy
tends to lessen.
Keep your heart soft and your
boundaries strong. Good luck.
Also at washingtonpost.com
Read the transcript of a recent live
Q&A with Leahy at
washingtonpost.com/advice, where
you can also find past columns. Her
next chat is scheduled for Dec. 6.
Send questions about parenting
to meghan@mlparentcoach.com.
Wellness
17
DC
KIDS & NUTRITION
Meat-free ways to meet your protein needs
BY
C ASEY S EIDENBERG
LEXEY SWALL/GRAIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Grains such as quinoa, served here with roasted Brussels sprouts and pomegranate seeds, provide five to eight grams of protein per cup.
cashews, pumpkin seeds, pistachios, sunflower seeds, almond
butter, hemp, chia and flax seeds.
Beans and legumes (7-10
grams per half-cup): black beans,
white beans, lentils, chickpeas,
hummus and green peas.
Grains (5-8 grams per cup):
quinoa, brown rice, oats, millet
and barley.
Soy (9-16 grams per ½ cup):
tofu, edamame and tempeh.
Fruits and veggies such as
avocado (4 grams per cup), dark
leafy greens (about 5 grams per
cup) and broccoli (4 grams per
cup).
Dairy (milk, yogurt, cheese)
and eggs provide 6-9 grams of
protein per serving.
Here’s a surprise: Raw cacao
nibs provide 4 grams of protein
(plus antioxidants, vitamins and
minerals) per 1-ounce serving.
According to the Institute of
Medicine, we should all consume
between 10 percent and 35 percent of our daily calories from
protein. This really is not that
much and can be easily achieved
with the non-meat foods listed
above.
Babies: 10 grams a day.
School-age kids: 19-34 grams a
DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
When you need a snack, pistachios and other nuts are a good
choice. Nuts and seeds have four to 10 grams of protein per ounce.
day.
Teenage boys: 52 grams a day.
Teenage girls: 46 grams a day.
Adult men: 56 grams a day.
Adult women: 46 grams a day
(more if pregnant or breastfeeding).
There are many benefits to
eating a well-balanced vegetarian
diet including cost savings, loads
of fiber (which aids in digestion),
less saturated fat (good for the
heart), and a wider variety of
vitamins and minerals proven to
reduce diabetes, cancer and heart
disease.
Just last month, New York City
Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) announced a pilot program to bring
meatless Mondays to 15 public
schools. His isn’t the first city to
take this approach; Baltimore,
Vancouver, Pittsburgh, Sacramento and many other towns
have launched similar programs
in an effort to reduce obesity and
halt climate change.
De Blasio is onto something:
People can reduce their carbon
footprints by cutting back on
meat just once a week. According
to the United Nations, the meat
industry generates nearly a fifth
of the man-made greenhouse gas
emissions that are accelerating
climate change worldwide. And
approximately 1,800 to 2,500 gallons of water go into making a
pound of beef, far surpassing the
amount needed for vegetables
and grains.
I don’t eat a lot of meat; in fact,
my 13-year-old son loves to tease
me for eating so many vegetables.
If I say I’m hungry, he encourages
me to roast the potted plant in
our hallway. I am doing just fine,
even though I eat more vegetarian proteins than “pig on pig,” and
so will his newly vegetarian
friend.
localliving@washpost.com
Seidenberg is co-founder of Nourish
Schools, a D.C.-based nutrition
education company, and co-author of
“The Super Food Cards,” a collection
of healthful recipes and advice.
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
One of my son’s eighth-grade
friends recently became a vegetarian. He joins the approximately 4 percent of youths in this
country (up from 2 percent
10 years ago) who eat meatless. As
much as my boys respect his
choice and recognize his passion
for the environment that spurred
the decision, neither of them truly understands it.
Although my sons eat plenty of
vegetables, their most requested
dinners include sausage, pork or
ground beef. In fact, their favorite
meal is grilled pork tenderloin
with bacon corn relish. We call it
“pig on pig.” We eat it with loads
of green vegetables and rotate
fish, chicken and quinoa on other
nights. But I won’t lie: I make it a
lot.
The boys asked how their
friend could put on enough muscle, possess enough energy or be
such a good athlete without meat.
I told them that meat can be very
good for growing boys and athletes, as its protein helps to build
muscle, repair tissue, provide energy and balance mood — but it is
by no means necessary. If he’s
eating enough vegetarian sources
of protein, iron and B vitamins,
their friend will perform just as
well. In fact, the Academy of
Nutrition and Dietetics’ position
on vegetarian diets is that “wellplanned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during
all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy,
childhood, and adolescence, and
for athletes.”
There are many athletes who
have risen to the top ranks of
their sports while being meatfree, including tennis legend
Martina Navratilova, football
hero Joe Namath, 1998 Heisman
Trophy winner Ricky Williams,
Olympic track star Carl Lewis,
baseball slugger Prince Fielder
and tennis icon Venus Williams.
In 2011, Venus Williams was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease that caused her to step off
the court for a period. She attributes her strong return to tennis
to her mostly vegan diet and
better lifestyle choices such as
rest days. Ricky Williams told
Men’s Journal that going meatfree “changed my game, and it
changed my body. I had tons of
energy.”
There is no doubt that meat
provides protein, but so do beans,
eggs, nuts, yogurt and even broccoli. The following non-meat
foods contain plenty of protein:
Nuts and seeds (4-10 grams
per 1 ounce serving): walnuts,
18
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
DC
Crime Report
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
These were among incidents
reported by D.C. police. For
information, call 202-727-9099.
NORTHEAST
ASSAULTS
Benning Rd., 1900-2099 blocks,
7:59 a.m. Nov. 13. With knife.
New York Ave., 2300-3699 blocks,
10:38 p.m. Nov. 8. With gun.
New York Ave., 2300-3699 blocks,
8:21 a.m. Nov. 14. With gun.
W St., 400 block, 4:47 p.m. Nov. 14.
With gun.
35th St., 200 block, 4:50 p.m. Nov.
8. With gun.
44th St., 600 block, 11:03 p.m.
Nov. 13. With gun.
56th St., 200-399 blocks, 3:10
p.m. Nov. 14. With gun.
ROBBERIES
Bladensburg Rd., 800 block, 3:43
p.m. Nov. 9.
Bladensburg Rd., 1100-1210
blocks, 4:55 p.m. Nov. 8.
Bladensburg Rd., 1200-1699
blocks, 1:45 p.m. Nov. 9. With gun.
Central Ave., 4600 block, 11:39
p.m. Nov. 12. With gun.
Douglas St., 2200-2399 blocks,
8:15 p.m. Nov. 11. With gun.
Hamilton St., 900-1099 blocks,
9:22 a.m. Nov. 14.
Jay St., 3500-3899 blocks, 1:32
a.m. Nov. 11. With gun.
Meade St., 4800 block, 6:25 a.m.
Nov. 14.
Nash St., 4900 block, 8:27 a.m.
Nov. 9. With gun.
Perry St., 1000-1199 blocks, 12:19
p.m. Nov. 12.
Third St., 1900 block, 4:47 p.m.
Nov. 10. With gun.
10th St., 800 block, 3:50 p.m. Nov.
10. With gun.
22nd St., 2600 block, 6:35 a.m.
Nov. 13. With gun.
25th Pl., 2200 block, 10:06 p.m.
Nov. 11. With gun.
BREAK-INS
Benning Rd., 2400 block, 8:36
a.m. Nov. 10.
Clay St., 5200 block, 10:28 p.m.
Nov. 12.
Florida Ave., 1000 block, 2:50
p.m. Nov. 8.
Minnesota Ave., 4000-4121
blocks, 3:10 p.m. Nov. 14.
Washington Pl., 2300-2499
blocks, 4:37 a.m. Nov. 11.
THEFTS
A St., 1300 block, 10:04 a.m. Nov.
9. From vehicle.
Benning Rd., 1500-1699 blocks,
7:43 a.m. Nov. 12.
Benning Rd., 1500-1699 blocks,
1:09 p.m. Nov. 14.
Benning Rd., 1700 block, 6:49
p.m. Nov. 10.
Benning Rd., 1800 block, 7:17 a.m.
Nov. 8.
Benning Rd., 1800 block, 3:27
p.m. Nov. 12.
Benning Rd., 3900 block, 8:38
a.m. Nov. 8.
Benning Rd., 3900 block, 1:23
a.m. Nov. 11.
Benning Rd., 4200-4399 blocks,
3:58 a.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Benning Rd., 4400 block, 4:27
a.m. Nov. 13.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block, 3:30
p.m. Nov. 11.
Bladensburg Rd., 900 block, 4:46
p.m. Nov. 11.
Bladensburg Rd., 1200 block,
2:47 p.m. Nov. 11. From vehicle.
Bladensburg Rd., 1200 block,
9:34 a.m. Nov. 12.
Bladensburg Rd., 2100-2299
blocks, 3:48 p.m. Nov. 12.
Bladensburg Rd., 2100 block,
8:02 p.m. Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Bladensburg Rd., 2100 block,
8:59 p.m. Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Bladensburg Rd., 2800-3200
blocks, 9:19 a.m. Nov. 14. From
vehicle.
Bladensburg Rd., 2800 block,
9:34 a.m. Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Bladensburg Rd., 2800 block,
4:56 a.m. Nov. 14.
Blaine St., 4500 block, 9:30 a.m.
Nov. 9. From vehicle.
Brentwood Pkwy., 1400 block,
5:43 a.m. Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Brentwood Rd., 900 block, 8:35
a.m. Nov. 8.
Brentwood Rd., 1000-1249
blocks, 8:42 a.m. Nov. 11.
Bryant St., 2000 block, 12:12 p.m.
Nov. 9. From vehicle.
Chancellor’s Way, 2900 block, 5
a.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Chillum Pl., 5500 block, 1:35 p.m.
Nov. 10.
D St., 1100 block, 7:12 a.m. Nov. 11.
From vehicle.
Douglas St., 4500 block, 7:28 a.m.
Nov. 9.
E St., 1300 block, 3:40 p.m. Nov. 8.
From vehicle.
Edgewood St., 600 block, 5:39
a.m. Nov. 10.
Fitch Pl., 4900 block, 11:58 a.m.
Nov. 11.
Franklin St., 1300 block, 8:34 a.m.
Nov. 10.
Gallatin St., unit block, 7:38 a.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Galloway St., 300-499 blocks,
3:05 a.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Girard St., 1500 block, 3:55 a.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
H St., 300 block, 6:46 p.m. Nov. 11.
H St., 300 block, 3:54 p.m. Nov. 13.
H St., 600 block, 8:09 a.m. Nov. 8.
H St., 600 block, 4:32 p.m. Nov. 8.
H St., 600 block, 9:53 a.m. Nov. 11.
H St., 600 block, 12:25 p.m. Nov.
14. From vehicle.
H St., 700 block, 5:12 a.m. Nov. 10.
H St., 1200 block, 8:34 p.m. Nov. 9.
H St., 1200 block, 12:13 p.m. Nov.
12. From vehicle.
Harewood Rd., 4000-4299 blocks,
1:43 p.m. Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Harry Thomas Way, 1500 block,
6:49 a.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Hawaii Ave., 300 block, 10:04 p.m.
Nov. 8.
Hunt Pl., 4100 block, 1:20 p.m.
Nov. 10. From vehicle.
I St., 200 block, 6:47 a.m. Nov. 8.
I St., 1100 block, 6:26 p.m. Nov. 14.
From vehicle.
K St., 200 block, 8:35 a.m. Nov. 13.
K St., 200 block, 3:29 p.m. Nov. 14.
Lee St., 5000 block, 5:26 a.m. Nov.
13. From vehicle.
M St., 600 block, 8:36 a.m. Nov. 9.
From vehicle.
Market St., 2400 block, 8:47 a.m.
Nov. 8.
Market St., 2400 block, 2:40 p.m.
Nov. 11.
Market St., 2400 block, 2:43 p.m.
Nov. 12.
Maryland Ave., 1500 block, 3:28
p.m. Nov. 10.
Maryland Ave., 1600 block, 12:13
p.m. Nov. 10.
Maryland Ave., 1600 block, 12:13
p.m. Nov. 10.
Maryland Ave., 2100 block, 4:19
a.m. Nov. 9. From vehicle.
Massachusetts Ave., 200 block,
10:44 a.m. Nov. 12.
McLean Pl., 6000 block, 10:25
a.m. Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Michigan Ave., 600 block, 3:16
p.m. Nov. 9.
Michigan Ave., 600 block, 10:39
a.m. Nov. 10.
Minnesota Ave., 3900 block, 6:18
p.m. Nov. 12.
Monroe St., 600 block, 12:06 p.m.
Nov. 10.
Monroe St., 600 block, 12:20 p.m.
Nov. 10.
Monroe St., 600 block, 10:34 a.m.
Nov. 11.
Monroe St., 700 block, 1:10 a.m.
Nov. 9.
Monroe St., 700 block, 9:04 a.m.
Nov. 10.
Monroe St., 1800-1999 blocks,
9:36 a.m. Nov. 10.
New York Ave., 400-1229 blocks,
10:45 p.m. Nov. 9. From vehicle.
New York Ave., 1600-1779 blocks,
4:20 p.m. Nov. 9.
New York Ave., 2300-3699 blocks,
6:09 a.m. Nov. 12.
Orren St., 1100 block, 4 p.m. Nov.
13. From vehicle.
Orren St., 1100 block, 4:16 p.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Otis St., 1500 block, 6:21 a.m. Nov.
12.
Q St., unit block, 3 p.m. Nov. 13.
From vehicle.
Quincy Pl., unit block, 9:21 a.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
R St., 200 block, 3:45 a.m. Nov. 10.
From vehicle.
Rhode Island Ave., 400 block,
12:48 p.m. Nov. 12.
Rhode Island Ave., 500-799
blocks, 8:25 a.m. Nov. 13.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
11:56 a.m. Nov. 10.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
12:35 p.m. Nov. 10.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
4:50 a.m. Nov. 11.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
7:46 a.m. Nov. 11.
Rhode Island Ave., 900 block,
11:09 a.m. Nov. 13.
Rhode Island Ave., 3000-3133
blocks, 5:06 p.m. Nov. 13.
Rhode Island Ave., 3000-3133
blocks, 8:37 a.m. Nov. 14. From
vehicle.
South Dakota Ave., 4500 block,
1:54 p.m. Nov. 11.
Tennessee Ave., 500 block, 4:37
p.m. Nov. 10.
Trinidad Ave., 1400 block, 3:10
a.m. Nov. 9. From vehicle.
Urell Pl., 100 block, 8:27 a.m. Nov.
12.
Varnum St., 100 block, 2:30 p.m.
Nov. 8. From vehicle.
First St., 1200 block, 1:13 p.m.
Nov. 11.
First St., 1600 block, 8:30 a.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Third St., 900 block, noon Nov. 8.
Third St., 1800 block, 6:05 a.m.
Nov. 10.
Fifth St., 1200 block, 2:45 p.m.
Nov. 12.
Seventh St., 3200 block, 9:16 a.m.
Nov. 12. From vehicle.
10th St., 4200 block, 12:01 a.m.
Nov. 14. From vehicle.
17th Pl., 300 block, 8:42 a.m. Nov.
7. From vehicle.
17th St., 3000 block, 7:04 a.m.
Nov. 9.
18th St., 300 block, 11:40 a.m.
Nov. 13.
18th St., 2400 block, 4:41 p.m.
Nov. 14.
20th St., 2400 block, 2:42 p.m.
Nov. 9. From vehicle.
24th St., 2500 block, 10:09 p.m.
Nov. 11. From vehicle.
24th St., 2600 block, 4:07 a.m.
Nov. 11. From vehicle.
24th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 2:38
a.m. Nov. 5. From vehicle.
26th St., 3600 block, 5:12 p.m.
Nov. 9.
35th St., 100-222 blocks, 9:53
a.m. Nov. 14.
40th St., 300-499 blocks, 5 p.m.
Nov. 11.
45th Pl., 1300 block, 8:30 p.m.
Nov. 11.
49th St., 100 block, 3:26 a.m. Nov.
11.
56th St., 200-399 blocks, 3:44
a.m. Nov. 12. From vehicle.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
Apple Rd., 3100 block, 4:41 a.m.
Nov. 10.
Banneker Dr., 3100 block, 4:34
a.m. Nov. 12.
Benning Rd., 3000-3399 blocks,
8:47 a.m. Nov. 9.
Channing St., 2800-2999 blocks,
6:29 a.m. Nov. 13.
Clay St., 3400 block, 3:55 a.m.
Nov. 11.
Franklin D. Roosevelt Pl., 3700
block, 11:52 p.m. Nov. 10.
H St., 2100-2399 blocks, 4:39 p.m.
Oct. 15.
Hayes St., 3600-3764 blocks, 6:25
p.m. Nov. 13.
Irving St., 1800-1999 blocks, 9:13
a.m. Nov. 14.
Massachusetts Ave., unit block,
8:26 p.m. Nov. 9.
Mount Olivet Rd., 1200 block,
9:42 a.m. Nov. 12.
17th Pl., 300 block, 3:19 p.m. Nov.
9.
25th Pl., 2200 block, 10:44 a.m.
Nov. 10.
34th St., 400 block, 4:10 p.m. Nov.
13.
40th St., 300-499 blocks, 11:02
p.m. Nov. 10.
45th Pl., 1300 block, 1 p.m. Nov.
12.
46th Pl., 1-199 blocks, 3:54 a.m.
Nov. 11.
NORTHWEST
HOMICIDE
Georgia Ave., 5400 block, 7 p.m.
Nov. 8. With gun.
ASSAULTS
Connecticut Ave., 2600 block,
3:01 p.m. Nov. 12.
Georgia Ave., 3100 block, 4:21
p.m. Nov. 14.
Georgia Ave., 3500 block, 12:02
a.m. Nov. 8.
Georgia Ave., 3500 block, 10:20
p.m. Nov. 12. With knife.
Girard St., 1300 block, 5:58 p.m.
Nov. 10. With gun.
K St., 1600 block, 11:28 a.m. Nov.
13. With knife.
Keefer Pl., 600 block, 4:27 p.m.
Nov. 11. With knife.
Lamont St., 1000 block, 1:35 a.m.
Nov. 14. With knife.
M St., 3200 block, 2:42 p.m. Nov.
9.
P St., 1400 block, 11:11 a.m. Nov.
11. With knife.
Seventh St., 1700 block, 5:21 a.m.
Nov. 10.
Ninth St., 1200 block, 8:37 p.m.
Nov. 12.
10th St., 3500 block, 5:23 p.m.
Nov. 14. With gun.
ROBBERIES
Fessenden St., 3600 block, 3:08
p.m. Nov. 8.
Georgia Ave., 5500 block, 10:06
p.m. Nov. 13.
Indiana Ave., 500 block, 7:26 a.m.
Nov. 14.
Jefferson St., 1100 block, 6:08
a.m. Nov. 10. With gun.
Kennedy St., 500-699 blocks,
5:33 p.m. Nov. 10. With gun.
North Capitol St., 400 block, 9:15
a.m. Nov. 10. With gun.
Parkwood Pl., 1400 block, 8:26
p.m. Nov. 13.
Seaton Pl., 100 block, 8:45 p.m.
Nov. 8.
V St., 200-399 blocks, 4:07 a.m.
Nov. 11.
Sixth St., 700 block, 2:33 p.m. Nov.
8.
Eighth St., 1500 block, 4:47 p.m.
Nov. 8.
13th St., 2000 block, 4:59 p.m.
Nov. 8.
14th St., 1300 block, 10:55 a.m.
Nov. 14. With knife.
BREAK-INS
Adams Mill Rd., 3200 block, 2:38
a.m. Nov. 13.
Buchanan St., 800 block, 8 a.m.
Nov. 11.
Connecticut Ave., 5500 block,
CRIME CONTINUED ON 19
19
Crime Report
DC
31st St., 1500 block, 5:52 a.m.
Nov. 10.
CRIME FROM 18
3:53 a.m. Nov. 10.
Farragut St., 500-699 blocks,
10:19 a.m. Nov. 9.
Georgia Ave., 4800 block, 6:43
a.m. Nov. 13.
S St., unit block, 6:20 a.m. Nov. 8.
Eighth St., 1900 block, 2:43 a.m.
Nov. 13.
14th St., 3600 block, 3:40 a.m.
Nov. 14.
17th St., 3200 block, 4:35 a.m.
Nov. 14.
THEFTS
Adams Mill Rd., 1800 block, 3:39
p.m. Nov. 8.
Alaska Ave., 7800 block, 11:50
a.m. Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Albemarle St., 4100 block, 11:04
a.m. Nov. 9.
Albemarle St., 4100 block, 5:07
a.m. Nov. 14.
Barry Pl., 900 block, 7:28 p.m.
Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Biltmore St., 1800 block, 6:31 a.m.
Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Blair Rd., 7000 block, 12:18 p.m.
Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Bryant St., unit block, 11:42 a.m.
Nov. 12. From vehicle.
California St., 2200 block, 1:02
a.m. Nov. 8. From vehicle.
Cedar St., 200 block, 4:32 p.m.
Nov. 9.
Champlain St., 2300-2499 blocks,
3:23 p.m. Nov. 8.
Champlain St., 2300-2499 blocks,
2:03 p.m. Nov. 9.
Chapin St., 1400 block, 7:36 a.m.
Nov. 12.
Chesapeake St., 4000 block, 5:33
p.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Columbia Rd., 1100-1299 blocks,
12:15 p.m. Nov. 8.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
10:53 p.m. Nov. 3.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
12:46 p.m. Nov. 11.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
2:33 p.m. Nov. 13.
Connecticut Ave., 1100 block,
5:06 p.m. Nov. 14.
Connecticut Ave., 1200 block,
8:18 p.m. Nov. 10.
Connecticut Ave., 1300-1699
blocks, 1:48 p.m. Nov. 9.
Connecticut Ave., 1700 block,
12:41 p.m. Nov. 8. From vehicle.
Connecticut Ave., 1800 block,
7:20 a.m. Nov. 9.
Connecticut Ave., 2600 block,
5:14 a.m. Nov. 12.
Connecticut Ave., 2600 block,
6:45 a.m. Nov. 12.
Connecticut Ave., 3300-3499
blocks, 12:41 p.m. Nov. 9.
CRIME CONTINUED ON 20
Life at Its Finest
Steps away from the White House, a short walk to
museums, in the heart of Washington, DC, you will
find seniors enjoying a life of leisure and luxury at The
Residences at Thomas Circle. Rich with first-class
amenities and stimulating conversations, our downtown
community empowers residents to live life on their own
terms – with all the comforts and conveniences they need
to call it home.
This lifestyle awaits you – without any costly buy-ins; just
an affordable monthly fee.
T he R esidences
AT t HOMAS c IRCLE
Come see for yourself.
IN-TOWN SENIOR LIVING
A MERIDIAN SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY
Call today and schedule
your personalized tour.
202.858.0676
1330 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20005
www.meridiansenior.com/the-residences-at-thomas-circle
License# ALR-0018
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
Independent Living • Assisted Living
Memory Care
Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitative Care
20
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
DC
Crime Report
CRIME FROM 19
Connecticut Ave., 4200-4399
blocks, 8:48 a.m. Nov. 14.
Connecticut Ave., 4900 block,
2:35 a.m. Nov. 11.
Connecticut Ave., 5300 block,
12:47 p.m. Nov. 4.
Connecticut Ave., 5400 block,
8:04 a.m. Nov. 9.
Davenport St., 3700 block, 12:52
p.m. Nov. 8. From vehicle.
E St., 1900 block, 12:06 p.m. Nov.
9.
Elm St., 400 block, 8:15 p.m. Nov.
10. From vehicle.
Emerson St., 1200 block, 9:09
a.m. Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Euclid St., 700-898 blocks, 3:57
p.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Euclid St., 700-898 blocks, 8:35
p.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Euclid St., 1100 block, 9:31 a.m.
Nov. 12.
F St., 600 block, 6:11 p.m. Nov. 10.
F St., 600 block, 11:51 a.m. Nov. 11.
From vehicle.
F St., 900 block, 5:34 p.m. Nov. 11.
F St., 900 block, 4:40 p.m. Nov. 14.
F St., 1000 block, 6:31 p.m. Nov. 9.
Fairmont St., 700 block, 5:48 p.m.
Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Fairmont St., 700 block, 10:24
p.m. Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Fern Pl., 800-999 blocks, 6:09 p.m.
Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Florida Ave., 400-509 blocks, 9:04
a.m. Nov. 10.
Florida Ave., 900 block, 7:44 p.m.
Nov. 9.
Fuller St., 1600 block, 10:47 a.m.
Nov. 9. From vehicle.
G St., 1300 block, 3:14 p.m. Nov.
13.
Georgia Ave., 2400-2599 blocks,
1:11 p.m. Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 2600 block, 3:57
a.m. Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 2800 block, 10:51
a.m. Nov. 10.
Georgia Ave., 2800 block, 8:21
a.m. Nov. 14.
Georgia Ave., 2900 block, 4:10
p.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3200 block, 5:49
p.m. Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 10:17
a.m. Nov. 10.
Georgia Ave., 3600 block, 1:41
p.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 3900 block, 12:02
p.m. Nov. 8.
Georgia Ave., 4000 block, 5 p.m.
Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Georgia Ave., 4100 block, 10:28
a.m. Nov. 10.
Georgia Ave., 5100 block, 1:14
p.m. Nov. 10.
Georgia Ave., 5200 block, 10:56
a.m. Nov. 8.
Georgia Ave., 5300 block, 6:23
p.m. Nov. 11.
Georgia Ave., 5300 block, 7:22
p.m. Nov. 12.
Georgia Ave., 6500 block, 2:19
a.m. Nov. 13.
Georgia Ave., 7400-7599 blocks,
3:57 p.m. Nov. 13. From vehicle.
H St., 1700 block, 11:12 a.m. Nov. 9.
H St., unit block, 3:14 p.m. Nov. 8.
H St., unit block, 4:22 a.m. Nov. 13.
H St., unit block, 5:45 p.m. Nov. 13.
Harvard St., 1400 block, 5:35 p.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Hiatt Pl., 3200 block, 6:38 a.m.
Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Hillyer Pl., 2000 block, 12:40 p.m.
Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Hobart Pl., 500-699 blocks, 11:10
a.m. Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Hobart Pl., 700-999 blocks, 9:22
a.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Hobart Pl., 700-999 blocks, 3:30
p.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Hobart St., 1600-1899 blocks,
1:20 a.m. Nov. 11.
Hopkins St., 1400 block, 4 p.m.
Nov. 14. From vehicle.
I St., 400 block, 11:40 p.m. Nov. 11.
From vehicle.
I St., 1200 block, 5:52 a.m. Nov. 14.
I St., 1400 block, 5:46 p.m. Nov. 9.
From vehicle.
Iowa Ave., 4500 block, 12:29 p.m.
Nov. 14.
Irving St., 400 block, 2:36 p.m.
Nov. 9.
Irving St., 1400 block, 5:28 p.m.
Nov. 10.
Irving St., 1400 block, 5:12 p.m.
Nov. 11.
K St., 700-899 blocks, 10:48 p.m.
Nov. 10.
K St., 1500 block, 10:04 a.m. Nov.
14.
K St., 3100 block, 1:30 p.m. Nov.
14. From vehicle.
Kennedy St., 100 block, 6:06 a.m.
Nov. 13.
Kenyon St., 1100-1299 blocks,
5:52 p.m. Nov. 13. From vehicle.
L St., 400 block, 7:35 p.m. Nov. 9.
L St., 1100 block, 12:39 p.m. Nov.
5. From vehicle.
L St., 2000 block, 9:26 p.m. Nov. 8.
Lamont St., 700-999 blocks, 4:34
p.m. Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Lamont St., 1000 block, 7:32 a.m.
Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Laurel St., 6800 block, 6:18 p.m.
Nov. 14. From vehicle.
M St., 1500 block, 7:34 a.m. Nov.
12.
M St., 1800 block, 2:56 p.m. Nov.
14.
M St., 2400 block, 10 a.m. Nov. 10.
M St., 3100 block, 12:56 p.m. Nov.
8.
M St., 3100 block, 1:22 p.m. Nov.
10.
M St., 3100 block, 10:26 p.m. Nov.
10.
M St., 3200 block, 12:46 p.m. Nov.
10.
M St., 3200 block, 2:18 a.m. Nov.
11.
M St., 3200 block, 12:54 p.m. Nov.
11.
M St., 3200 block, 3:06 p.m. Nov.
11.
M St., 3200 block, 10:18 a.m. Nov.
13.
M St., 3200 block, 9:46 a.m. Nov.
14.
M St., 3200 block, 4:35 p.m. Nov.
14.
Maple St., 6900 block, 5:42 p.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
3:10 p.m. Nov. 8.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
5:14 a.m. Nov. 12.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
6:05 p.m. Nov. 13.
Massachusetts Ave., 500 block,
5:15 a.m. Nov. 13.
Massachusetts Ave., 1300-1499
blocks, 12:12 p.m. Nov. 8.
Massachusetts Ave., 4200-4349
blocks, 6:06 a.m. Nov. 13.
N St., 1900 block, 1:13 p.m. Nov. 9.
From vehicle.
N St., 2100 block, 1:22 p.m. Nov. 9.
From vehicle.
N St., 2100 block, 3:51 a.m. Nov.
14.
New York Ave., 100 block, 7:20
a.m. Nov. 14.
New York Ave., 600 block, 10:23
p.m. Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Newark St., 2900-3099 blocks,
6:02 a.m. Nov. 9. From vehicle.
Newton Pl., 400 block, 5:07 p.m.
Nov. 8. From vehicle.
Newton St., 1700 block, 6:26 p.m.
Nov. 10.
North Capitol St., 5100 block,
7:31 p.m. Nov. 9. From vehicle.
O St., 1300 block, 8:55 a.m. Nov. 8.
From vehicle.
O St., 1500 block, 6:40 a.m. Nov. 9.
From vehicle.
O St., 3600 block, 10:08 a.m. Nov.
12.
Ontario Pl., 1800 block, 11:38 a.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Oregon Ave., 6200 block, 6:39
a.m. Nov. 12.
Oregon Ave., 6200 block, 11:40
a.m. Nov. 12.
Otis Pl., 1300 block, 5:10 p.m. Nov.
12. From vehicle.
P St., 800 block, 6:41 a.m. Nov. 14.
P St., 1400 block, 8:31 p.m. Nov. 7.
P St., 1400 block, 6:04 p.m. Nov. 9.
P St., 1400 block, 7:16 p.m. Nov.
10.
P St., 1500 block, 4:03 p.m. Nov.
12. From vehicle.
Palmer Alley., 900 block, 7:32
a.m. Nov. 13.
Park Rd., 1300 block, 5:50 a.m.
Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Parkwood Pl., 1300 block, 11:30
a.m. Nov. 11. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 700-899
blocks, 11:54 a.m. Nov. 10.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1200 block,
2:12 a.m. Nov. 13.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1700 block,
7:21 a.m. Nov. 11.
Pennsylvania Ave., 2000 block,
12:22 p.m. Nov. 8. From vehicle.
Piney Branch Rd., 6500 block,
8:05 a.m. Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Quincy St., 800 block, 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 13.
R St., 500 block, 7:34 a.m. Nov. 10.
From vehicle.
Reservoir Rd., 3800 block, 8:16
a.m. Nov. 10.
Reservoir Rd., 3800 block, 2:55
p.m. Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Rhode Island Ave., 1400 block,
6:13 a.m. Nov. 8. From vehicle.
Ridge St., 400 block, 6:16 a.m.
Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Riggs Pl., 1800 block, 8:59 p.m.
Nov. 9.
S St., 600 block, 5:26 p.m. Nov. 14.
From vehicle.
S St., 1300 block, 5:04 p.m. Nov.
12.
S St., 1600 block, 4:17 p.m. Nov. 11.
From vehicle.
Sherman Ave., 2200 block, 8:05
a.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Sherman Ave., 2300-2599 blocks,
10:14 p.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
T St., 600 block, 5:30 p.m. Nov. 10.
From vehicle.
T St., 900 block, 9:13 a.m. Nov. 8.
From vehicle.
T St., unit block, 7:58 a.m. Nov. 9.
U St., 900 block, 4:42 a.m. Nov. 8.
From vehicle.
U St., 1000 block, 7:17 a.m. Nov.
10.
U St., 1000 block, 7:45 a.m. Nov.
13.
U St., 1100 block, 2:07 p.m. Nov.
14.
U St., 1300 block, 9:01 p.m. Nov. 7.
U St., 1300 block, 9:20 a.m. Nov.
11.
U St., 1400 block, 4:23 a.m. Nov.
10.
Underwood St., 1200 block, 6:45
p.m. Nov. 13. From vehicle.
V St., 1300 block, 8:53 p.m. Nov.
10. From vehicle.
Veazey St., 3800 block, 9:09 a.m.
Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Wallach Pl., 1300 block, 11:31
a.m. Nov. 8. From vehicle.
Willard St., 1700 block, 1:27 p.m.
Nov. 10.
Willow St., 6900 block, 4:12 p.m.
Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Wisconsin Ave., 1000 block, 8:38
a.m. Nov. 13.
Wisconsin Ave., 1600 block, 8:21
a.m. Nov. 9.
Wisconsin Ave., 1800-2008
blocks, 2:24 a.m. Nov. 14.
Wisconsin Ave., 5300 block,
12:26 p.m. Nov. 13.
Second St., 5100 block, 8:11 a.m.
Nov. 9. From vehicle.
Fifth St., 3800 block, 5:50 a.m.
Nov. 9.
Sixth St., 800 block, 4:40 p.m. Nov.
13. From vehicle.
Sixth St., 1100 block, 4:18 a.m.
Nov. 8. From vehicle.
Seventh St., 700 block, 5:30 p.m.
Nov. 8.
Seventh St., 700 block, 9:13 a.m.
Nov. 13.
Seventh St., 700 block, 11:29 a.m.
Nov. 14.
Seventh St., 1300 block, 3:59 p.m.
Nov. 9.
Seventh St., 1400 block, 11:27
a.m. Nov. 8.
Seventh St., 5000 block, 9:39 a.m.
Nov. 13.
Eighth St., 1500 block, 7:39 a.m.
Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 1900 block, 11:36 a.m.
Nov. 8.
Eighth St., 2100-2299 blocks, 5:58
a.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 5100 block, 6:35 a.m.
Nov. 9. From vehicle.
Eighth St., 5400 block, 6:03 p.m.
Nov. 8.
Eighth St., 5700 block, 5:28 p.m.
Nov. 8.
Ninth St., 700 block, 5:27 p.m. Nov.
14.
Ninth St., 1500 block, 4:39 p.m.
Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 1700 block, 7:02 p.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 1900 block, 9:10 a.m.
Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 2300-2599 blocks,
11:05 a.m. Nov. 8. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 3700 block, 12:23 p.m.
Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Ninth St., 5000 block, 5:29 a.m.
Nov. 10. From vehicle.
11th St., 600 block, 3:42 p.m. Nov.
9.
11th St., 1500 block, 5:37 p.m.
Nov. 9.
11th St., 1800 block, 9:26 p.m.
Nov. 9. From vehicle.
11th St., 1900 block, 5:07 p.m.
Nov. 12. From vehicle.
11th St., 2000 block, 4:33 p.m.
Nov. 10.
11th St., 2900 block, 6:54 a.m.
Nov. 10.
12th St., 500 block, 7:31 a.m. Nov.
12.
12th St., 1800 block, 11:11 p.m.
Nov. 11. From vehicle.
12th St., 2000 block, 7:53 a.m.
Nov. 8. From vehicle.
13th St., 600 block, 1:01 a.m. Nov.
11.
13th St., 600 block, 12:47 p.m.
Nov. 14.
13th St., 2100 block, 12:22 a.m.
Nov. 11. From vehicle.
13th St., 2500 block, 6:27 a.m.
Nov. 8.
13th St., 2500 block, 1:16 a.m.
Nov. 11. From vehicle.
13th St., 4100 block, 8:52 a.m.
Nov. 14. From vehicle.
14th St., 1300 block, 10:28 a.m.
Nov. 9.
14th St., 1600 block, 7:33 a.m.
Nov. 14.
14th St., 1800 block, 9:27 a.m.
Nov. 9.
14th St., 1900 block, 1:30 p.m.
Nov. 9.
14th St., 2100 block, 9:17 a.m. Nov.
9.
14th St., 2100 block, 1:41 p.m.
Nov. 13.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 1:28
p.m. Nov. 8.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 6:24
p.m. Nov. 8.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 10:38
a.m. Nov. 9.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 11:36
a.m. Nov. 9.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 2:43
p.m. Nov. 9.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 11:17
a.m. Nov. 10.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 2:59
p.m. Nov. 10.
CRIME CONTINUED ON 21
21
Crime Report
DC
SOUTHEAST
CRIME FROM 20
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
California St., 1800 block, 5:24
p.m. Nov. 12.
Decatur St., 1600 block, 1:28 p.m.
Nov. 10.
F St., 600 block, 8:25 a.m. Nov. 14.
Massachusetts Ave., 400 block,
2:16 p.m. Nov. 8.
N St., 3300 block, 12:26 p.m. Nov.
11.
New Hampshire Ave., 900 block,
3:32 p.m. Nov. 6.
Taylor St., 1800 block, midnight
Nov. 12.
Vermont Ave., 2100 block, 2:35
p.m. Nov. 12.
13th St., 2500 block, 1:55 p.m.
Nov. 10.
29th St., 2700 block, 7:20 a.m.
Nov. 8.
30th St., 1500 block, 5:02 a.m.
Nov. 8.
35th Pl., 1900 block, 4:47 a.m.
Nov. 13.
Barnaby Rd., 700-4375 blocks,
11:38 p.m. Nov. 10. With gun.
Barnaby Terr., 1000-1389 blocks,
10:29 a.m. Nov. 9. With knife.
Bowen Rd., 2600 block, 1:35 p.m.
Nov. 14. With knife.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 3600
block, 3:49 p.m. Nov. 12. With gun.
S St., 1700 block, 6:44 p.m. Nov. 9.
With knife.
Fourth St., 3200 block, 12:57 p.m.
Nov. 9. With gun.
12th Pl., 3200 block, 4:59 p.m.
Nov. 14. With gun.
13th Pl., 3400 block, 11:54 p.m.
Nov. 7. With knife.
ROBBERIES
Alabama Ave., 1400 block, 3:11
p.m. Nov. 8.
Bass Pl., 5400 block, 6:31 p.m.
Nov. 8. With gun.
Bellevue St., 800 block, 4:46 p.m.
Nov. 10. With gun.
Bruce Pl., 1800 block, 6:05 p.m.
Nov. 11. With gun.
Chesapeake St., 600-718 blocks,
8:13 p.m. Nov. 11.
H R Dr., 800 block, 2:37 p.m. Nov.
9. With gun.
Massachusetts Ave., 4100 block,
12:38 a.m. Nov. 11. With gun.
Mellon St., 500-699 blocks, 6:25
p.m. Nov. 8.
Mellon St., 500-699 blocks, 3:58
p.m. Nov. 14.
Pennsylvania Ave., 1400 block,
4:59 a.m. Nov. 13.
Potomac Ave., 1400 block, 1:20
p.m. Nov. 14.
Fourth St., 4200 block, 12:19 a.m.
Nov. 12. With gun.
Ninth St., 3000 block, 4:29 p.m.
Nov. 14.
BREAK-INS
Brandywine St., 400-599 blocks,
4:04 p.m. Nov. 8.
C St., 5300 block, 2:30 p.m. Nov.
11.
Elvans Rd., 2400-2599 blocks,
4:30 p.m. Nov. 13.
Hilltop Terr., 800 block, 2:28 p.m.
Nov. 11.
Independence Ave., 1900-2099
blocks, 6:09 a.m. Nov. 13.
Kimi Gray Ct., 5000 block, 12:12
p.m. Nov. 10.
Malcolm X Ave., 200 block, 7:38
a.m. Nov. 12.
Stanton Rd., 3000 block, 4:42
p.m. Nov. 14.
Seventh St., 4200-4399 blocks,
2:25 a.m. Nov. 14.
Eighth St., 700 block, 10:26 a.m.
Nov. 9.
22nd St., 3400-3683 blocks, 2:19
p.m. Nov. 13.
23rd St., 3200 block, 9:55 p.m.
Nov. 9.
37th Pl., 200 block, 7:26 p.m. Nov.
13.
THEFTS
A St., 1400 block, 6:24 a.m. Nov.
12.
A St., 3400 block, 7:32 a.m. Nov.
11.
Alabama Ave., 2800-2999 blocks,
6:51 a.m. Nov. 9.
Alabama Ave., 2800-2999 blocks,
3:33 a.m. Nov. 10.
Alabama Ave., 2800-2999 blocks,
5:01 p.m. Nov. 11.
Atlantic St., 100 block, 8:59 a.m.
Nov. 9.
Bass Pl., 4600 block, 3:29 p.m.
Nov. 11. From vehicle.
Beck St., 4100 block, 2:40 p.m.
Nov. 11. From vehicle.
Benning Rd., 4500 block, 11:57
a.m. Nov. 13.
Brandywine St., 600-898 blocks,
8:24 p.m. Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Brothers Pl., 3500 block, 4:02
p.m. Nov. 9.
Bruce Pl., 1900 block, 8:36 a.m.
Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Buena Vista Terr., 3000-3299
blocks, 5:17 p.m. Nov. 13. From
vehicle.
Central Ave., 5500-5698 blocks,
6:02 p.m. Nov. 8.
D St., 1900 block, 8:17 a.m. Nov. 9.
D St., 5000 block, 5:24 p.m. Nov. 9.
E St., 800 block, 3:43 a.m. Nov. 10.
From vehicle.
E St., 1300 block, 7:50 a.m. Nov. 9.
From vehicle.
E St., 4000 block, 11:45 a.m. Nov.
10.
East Capitol St., 1500 block, 4:48
a.m. Nov. 8.
East Capitol St., 1500 block, 3:23
p.m. Nov. 11.
East Capitol St., 4100-4276
blocks, 7:17 a.m. Nov. 9. From
vehicle.
East Capitol St., 4100-4276
blocks, 11:17 a.m. Nov. 14. From
vehicle.
Ely Pl., 3400 block, 8:25 a.m. Nov.
13. From vehicle.
Ely Pl., 3500-3699 blocks, 8:27
a.m. Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Good Hope Rd., 2500-2720
blocks, 5:55 a.m. Nov. 8.
Good Hope Rd., 2500-2708
blocks, 10:11 a.m. Nov. 9. From
vehicle.
Gorman Terr., 4300 block, 5:12
a.m. Nov. 12. From vehicle.
Hartford St., 2700-2899 blocks,
9:35 a.m. Nov. 8. From vehicle.
Jasper Rd., 2800 block, 7:09 a.m.
Nov. 14.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 2400
block, 5:06 p.m. Nov. 11.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 26002701 blocks, 11:25 a.m. Nov. 11.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 26002701 blocks, 4:10 a.m. Nov. 13.
Minnesota Ave., 1400 block, 6:45
a.m. Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Minnesota Ave., 2900 block, 5:47
p.m. Nov. 13.
Mississippi Ave., 1800-1916
blocks, 7:17 a.m. Nov. 8. From
vehicle.
New Jersey Ave., 1100 block,
12:21 p.m. Nov. 9.
New Jersey Ave., 1100 block, 5:37
p.m. Nov. 12.
New Jersey Ave., 1100 block, 6:21
p.m. Nov. 12.
New Jersey Ave., 1100 block, 6:52
a.m. Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Pennsylvania Ave., 600 block,
6:55 p.m. Nov. 13.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3200 block,
4:51 p.m. Nov. 8.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3200 block,
5:24 p.m. Nov. 13.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3800-3938
blocks, 8:50 a.m. Nov. 10.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3800-3938
blocks, 6:48 a.m. Nov. 13.
Pennsylvania Ave., 3900 block,
10:29 a.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Pomeroy Rd., 2400-2699 blocks,
3:14 a.m. Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Pomeroy Rd., 2400-2699 blocks,
4:19 p.m. Nov. 13.
Potomac Ave., 1300 block, 5:16
a.m. Nov. 14.
Prout St., 2200 block, 9:10 a.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
S St., 1600 block, 6:39 p.m. Nov.
10.
Southern Ave., 700-855 blocks,
2:11 p.m. Nov. 8.
Southern Ave., 800 block, 3:07
p.m. Nov. 8. From vehicle.
Southern Ave., 800 block, 6:38
a.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Southern Ave., 3600 block, 7:37
a.m. Nov. 11. From vehicle.
Stanton Rd., 2600 block, 5:56
p.m. Nov. 9.
Stanton Rd., 3500 block, 4:57
a.m. Nov. 10. From vehicle.
Young St., 2100 block, 6:11 a.m.
Nov. 11.
First St., 1000 block, 5:36 a.m.
Nov. 11. From vehicle.
First St., 1100 block, 9:57 a.m.
Nov. 14. From vehicle.
Second St., 3800 block, 4:37 a.m.
Nov. 8. From vehicle.
Third St., 4000-4399 blocks, 1:57
p.m. Nov. 10.
Fourth St., 1300 block, 9:42 a.m.
Nov. 10.
Fourth St., 4200 block, 11:58 p.m.
Nov. 11.
Eighth St., 400 block, 2:50 p.m.
Nov. 9.
Eighth St., 400 block, 4:16 p.m.
Nov. 11.
Eighth St., 400 block, 7:38 p.m.
Nov. 11.
Eighth St., 400 block, 11:42 p.m.
Nov. 11.
Ninth St., 3700-3851 blocks, 8:32
p.m. Nov. 7. From vehicle.
10th Pl., 3400 block, 2:43 a.m.
Nov. 14.
12th St., 500 block, 5:12 p.m. Nov.
8.
12th St., 500 block, 9:03 a.m. Nov.
9.
12th St., 500 block, 9:49 a.m. Nov.
9.
12th St., 500 block, 8:22 a.m. Nov.
10.
12th St., 500 block, 5:57 a.m. Nov.
13.
12th St., 500 block, 7:58 a.m. Nov.
13.
14th St., unit block, 1:45 p.m. Nov.
13.
16th St., 2300 block, 6:28 p.m.
Nov. 10. From vehicle.
17th Pl., 1600 block, 7:14 p.m. Nov.
12.
23rd St., 3200 block, 7:33 p.m.
Nov. 9.
24th Pl., 3000 block, 1:30 p.m.
Nov. 10.
25th St., 2400-2501 blocks, 4:28
a.m. Nov. 11.
28th St., 1600 block, 6:30 a.m.
Nov. 10.
33rd Pl., 1700 block, 7:04 a.m.
Nov. 11. From vehicle.
46th St., 1200 block, 11:48 a.m.
Nov. 12.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFTS
B St., 4900 block, 11:58 a.m. Nov.
14.
Gainesville St., 3000 block, 5:14
a.m. Nov. 13.
I St., 400 block, 4:37 a.m. Nov. 11.
Kentucky Ave., 100 block, 9:32
a.m. Nov. 8.
L St., 1300 block, 12:39 p.m. Oct.
28.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 2600
block, 6:28 p.m. Nov. 8.
Nelson Pl., 2900 block, 4:35 a.m.
Nov. 12.
Railroad Ave., 2200 block, 7:47
a.m. Nov. 10.
Savannah St., 1300 block, 5:05
p.m. Nov. 10.
Fourth St., 3700 block, 5:07 a.m.
Nov. 14.
23rd St., 3200 block, 1:02 p.m.
Nov. 11.
30th St., 2700-2899 blocks, 6:24
p.m. Nov. 13.
SOUTHWEST
ASSAULTS
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 3900
block, 5:26 p.m. Nov. 11. With knife.
Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., 3900
block, 3:20 p.m. Nov. 14.
BREAK-IN
Galveston Pl., 1-153 blocks, 5:47
a.m. Nov. 8.
THEFTS
Galveston St., 1-199 blocks, 7:15
p.m. Nov. 8. From vehicle.
Ivanhoe St., 100 block, 8:10 p.m.
Nov. 13.
L’Enfant Plaza, 400-999 blocks,
3:20 p.m. Nov. 11.
Q St., 100 block, 3:44 p.m. Nov. 8.
From vehicle.
Q St., 100 block, 9:20 a.m. Nov. 10.
South Capitol St., 1000-1299
blocks, 12:50 a.m. Nov. 10.
South Capitol St., 1000-1299
blocks, 6:57 p.m. Nov. 10.
South Capitol St., 1400 block,
10:33 a.m. Oct. 26.
South Capitol St., 3800-3999
blocks, 3:51 p.m. Nov. 9.
South Capitol St., 4200 block,
4:40 a.m. Nov. 8. From vehicle.
First St., 1500 block, 9:36 a.m.
Nov. 11. From vehicle.
First St., 1500 block, 9:21 a.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
Fourth St., 900-1199 blocks, 1:47
p.m. Nov. 9.
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT
G St., 500-626 blocks, 9:47 p.m.
Nov. 10.
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 9:22
a.m. Nov. 13.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 2:55
p.m. Nov. 13.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 8:14
a.m. Nov. 14.
14th St., 3100-3299 blocks, 9:11
a.m. Nov. 14.
14th St., 3500 block, 4:38 p.m.
Nov. 9.
14th St., 3600 block, 12:57 p.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
15th St., 2400-2537 blocks, 2:20
p.m. Nov. 12.
16th St., 1400 block, 8:17 p.m. Nov.
11. From vehicle.
16th St., 1800 block, 7:36 a.m.
Nov. 10. From vehicle.
16th St., 2000 block, 6:52 a.m.
Nov. 11.
16th St., 4000 block, 4:47 a.m.
Nov. 12. From vehicle.
17th St., 3300 block, 3:39 p.m.
Nov. 13.
18th St., 1200 block, 1:03 p.m.
Nov. 11.
18th St., 1300 block, 11:02 a.m.
Nov. 10.
18th St., 2300 block, 12:01 a.m.
Nov. 12.
18th St., 2400 block, 3:50 p.m.
Nov. 11.
18th St., 2400 block, 2:27 p.m.
Nov. 12.
18th St., 3200 block, 7:27 a.m.
Nov. 11.
20th St., 1500 block, 6:37 a.m.
Nov. 9. From vehicle.
22nd St., 500 block, 12:24 p.m.
Nov. 14. From vehicle.
24th St., 900-1010 blocks, 4 p.m.
Nov. 13.
25th St., 1200 block, 9:28 a.m.
Nov. 12.
26th St., 1000 block, 1:27 a.m.
Nov. 10.
26th St., 1000 block, 10:29 a.m.
Nov. 11. From vehicle.
34th St., 1700 block, 3:32 p.m.
Nov. 13.
39th St., 2500 block, 7:12 a.m.
Nov. 13. From vehicle.
ASSAULTS
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
DC
Home Sales
Community News
HOMES FROM 11
Diane Jenkins, $250,000.
Bass Pl., 4815-Domestic
Renovation to Jack Britton and
Max Pastore, $330,000.
Burke St., 1822-Katie Mae Brown
and Jerry Hunter to Declan Shine,
$560,000.
C St., 1352, No. A-Frank E.
Kulbaski to Juli Tomaino and Mark
Ascione, $779,000.
Carolina Ave. N., 619-Brenda G.
Boone to Michael and Kristen
Powers, $1.49 million.
Cook Dr., 1034-NVR Inc. to
Ramona Barber, $426,360.
Elvans Rd., 2315-Hubert G.
Bishop to Calvin Hines Jr. and
Kyndall Elam, $390,000.
Gessford Ct., 3-Teresa J. Peeler to
Jessica Centella and Joshua
Holmes Kiffer, $605,000.
Hanna Pl., 5118-Joy Solo 401(k)
Trust to Vincent Campbell,
$272,950.
Howard Rd., 1456-Dale R. Watson
to Joshua D. Mitchell and Joycelyn
B. Martinez Moreira, $203,000.
M Pl., 3108- Frances P. Kearney
and Burnice S. Kearney to Michael
Tynes, $256,250.
Minnesota Ave., 2312-Elijah W.
Thorne to Beatriz Otero-Lemos and
Fernando A. Lemos, $300,000.
Ridge Pl., 1920-Joyce B. Wiseman
to Paul and Abigail Conner,
$282,000.
Sayles Pl., 2517, No. 7-Laura
Sweeney Yu to Brad and Elisabeth
Russo, $300,000.
Southern Ave., 4370-Phoebe May
to Frank Kelly and Sheila Bryant,
$317,500.
Xenia St., 100-Crystal S. Hughey to
Janet Basilan Gardose, $315,000.
Fourth St., 916-Nicholas A. Bever
and Rachel L. Alfonso to Alexandre
Steven Ejan Thibau, $975,000.
16th St., 2351, No. 102-Kondaur
Capital Corp. to Ricky Lee Williams
Jr., $130,000.
18th St., 321, No. 1-Stacy J.
Sanders to Daniel Gershman and
Aneesha Badrinarayan, $425,000.
34th St., 2530-3919 NEH Corp. to
Eliezer Joshua and Melissa Lee
Lee, $530,000.
SOUTHWEST
Carrollsburg Pl., 1226-DC
Southwest Development Corp. to
Robert C. and Alison Kavanaugh,
$750,000.
G St., 350, No. N413-Jennifer R.
McKinney and Christina M. Wells
to Pamela Britton, $399,999.
M St., 300, No. N413-Henry L. Ines
and Rachelle M. Valencia to Ellen
Opdyke, $206,000.
Second St., 3972-6709 Stanton
Road Corp. to Ashley T. White,
$358,000.
Fourth St., 800, No. N403-Le
Quan and Timothy M. Turner to Le
Quan Turner, $120,730.
ONLY
$
Valid for these games:
29
2
vouchers for
Great American
Cookies
Sunday, December 17, 2017
4 p.m. vs. Penn State
A Bloomin’ Sandwich Cafe
2141 K St. NW
Closed Sept. 15 because of gross
unsanitary conditions, including
vermin. Reopened Nov. 13.
Anacostia Market
1303 Good Hope Rd. SE
Closed Nov. 7 because of insects,
rodents and other pests. Reopened
Nov. 13.
Chen’s Gourmet
5117 MacArthur Blvd. NW
Closed Nov. 7 because of
circumstances that may endanger
public health and because of
insects, rodents and other pests.
Reopened the next day.
Saturday, February 24, 2018
6 p.m. vs. UMass
City Cafe
499 South Capitol St. SW
Closed Nov. 14 for operating without
hot water. Reopened the next day.
Flippin’ Pizza
1250 Maryland Ave. SW
Closed Nov. 8 because of
circumstances that may endanger
public health. Reopened Nov. 10.
Swaad Palace
1548 First St. SW
Closed Nov. 15 because of gross
unsanitary conditions including
vermin.
MARYLAND
CVS
1910 Crain Hwy., Bowie
Closed Nov. 13 because of
adulterated food sales and rodents.
Reopened the next day.
Iron Age
1054 Rockville Pike, Rockville
Closed last Thursday because of
mice and unsanitary conditions.
Reopened the next day.
Redwood Restaurant
7121 Bethesda Lane, Bethesda
Closed Friday for operating without
hot water. Reopened the next day.
VIRGINIA
Crepes & Karak Cafe
280 Cedar Lane SE, Vienna
Closed Nov. 13 for operating without
a certified food manager. Reopened
the same day.
— Compiled by Terence McArdle
All games at EagleBank Arena,
George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia
We Promise
HURRY!
t5PEFMJWFSZPVSQBQFSCZ BN.POEBZ
UISPVHI'SJEBZ BNPO4BUVSEBZ
4VOEBZBOEIPMJEBZT
Offer ends December 13, 2017!
Not valid on prior purchases and cannot be combined with any other offers
t5PEFMJWFSBESZ8BTIJOHUPO1PTU
Name _______________________________________________________________________________
t5PIPOPSZPVSWBDBUJPOSFRVFTUT
Address _____________________________________________________________________________
t5PQMBDFZPVSOFXTQBQFSBUB
D POWFOJFOUMPDBUJPO
City_____________________________________________State____________Zip _________________
Daytime Phone (
THE DISTRICT
7-Eleven
5501 South Dakota Ave. NE
Closed Nov. 14 because of insects,
rodents and other pests.
Bobby’s Burger Palace
2121 K St. NW
Closed Nov. 15 because of insects,
rodents and other pests and for
operating without a manager on
duty. Reopened Friday.
From The Washington Post and George Mason Basketball!
2
These food establishments were
closed because of health code
violations. The list, compiled from
health department reports, reflects
actions taken by the departments.
Auntie Anne’s Pretzel Perfect
50 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Closed Nov. 15 for operating without
hot water. Reopened that day.
Sweet Deal!
Get
tickets
...and
HEALTH CODE VIOLATIONS
) _____________________________E-mail_______________________________
*GZPVSFB8BTIJOHUPO1PTUIPNFEFMJWFSZ
TVCTDSJCFSZPVTIPVMEIBWFFYQFDUBUJPOT
PGVT-FUVTLOPXJGXFGBMMTIPSU$BMM
$VTUPNFS$BSFBU202.334.6100
PSWJTJU4VCTDSJCFS4FSWJDFTBU
www.washingtonpost.com/subscribe
BOEXFMMNBLFJUSJHIU
Please send me ____ 2-ticket package(s) at $29 per package:
J 1 package for $29 J 2 packages for $58 J 3 packages for $87 J 4 packages for $116 J Other
J VISA J MASTERCARD All mailed orders must be picked up at Will Call Window on game day (West Entrance at EagleBank Arena.)
Acct.#_______________________________Exp. ___________ 3-Digit Code___________Signature ____________________________
Mail to:
Mason Athletics Ticket Office • 4400 University Drive, MS 3A5 • Fairfax, VA 22030
Or bring this coupon to the EagleBank Arena Box Office, West Entrance. No phone orders.
All orders must be received by Wednesday, December 13 for the December 17 game.
E1468 3x7
22
S646 2x4
23
DC
Your official
Washington Post
T-shirts
washingtonpost.com/tshirts
M1336 5x12
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
Now available
24
washingtonpost.com/jobs
the washington post . thursday, november 23 , 2017
DC
FEATURED EMPLOYERS SPOTLIGHT
Washington
Post
Featured Employers are DC’s largest and most prominent organizations. They include employers
across a range of industries, like
IT, accounting, healthcare, and
government, and are hiring candidates today!
Booz Allen Hamilton
Government Contractor–You can join a company—or
you can join a mission. At Booz Allen, we’ve spent
more than a century exploring ocean depths and
outer space, transforming industries and governments, safeguarding the valuable, and strengthening the vulnerable. From analytics to cyber, digital
solutions to engineering, we’re empowering people
to change the world—starting with you. Whether
you love solving problems, engineering ideas, or
building solutions, there’s a place for you at Booz
Allen. Join us at careers.boozallen.com…
EO/IR Imaging
IA Engineer, Mid–
Systems Technology
Aberdeen
Consultant–Arlington
Job Description, Job
Job Description, Job Number:
R0017896
Number:
R0003588 Booz Allen Hamilton
Booz Allen Hamilton has been at the forehas been at the fore- front of strategy and
front of strategy and technology for more
technology for more than 100 years Today,
than 100 years Today, the firm provides manthe firm provides man- agement and technolagement and technol- ogy consulting and enogy consulting and…
gineering services to…
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit
Authority
Delivery and Transportation–The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority operates the second
largest rail transit system and the fifth largest bus
network in the United States. Safe, clean and reliable, "America's Transit System" transports more
than a third of the federal government to work and
millions of tourists to the landmarks in the Nation's
Capital. Metro has earned a worldwide reputation
for security and architectural beauty. WMATA is…
Bus Maintenance
Training Instructor–
Washington D.C.
Job Description, Job
Title: Bus Maintenance
Training Instructor Job
ID: 170641 Location:
MD - Carmen Turner
Facility Full/Part Time:
Full-Time Posting OpenClose 11/03/2017 11/20/2017 Union 002
Regular/Temporary:…
Sparks Group
Assistant Counsel I/ II
(Procurement
Counsel)–
Washington D.C.
Job Description, Job
Title: Assistant Counsel
I/ II (Procurement Counsel) Job ID: 170663 Location: DC-Jackson Graham Bldg-2nd Fl Full/
Part Time: Full-Time
Posting
Open-Close
11/03/2017 -…
Other–Bringing the Best People and the Best Companies Together Since 1970. Sparks Group (formerly
SPARKS, Sparks IT Solutions, and Sparks Personnel)
is the Washington DC Area's leading temporary
staffing and full-time recruiting services provider.
Whether you are seeking your next opportunity or
looking to add talent, Sparks Group is the ideal partner for you! Each of our four divisions (Sparks Office,
Sparks Accounting & Finance, Sparks IT, and Sparks
Creative) specializes in placing professionals in temporary/contract, temporary-to-full-time,…
Medical ReimbursePolished Administrament Analyst–Dulles
tive Assistant–
Job
Summary/Com- Prince Georges County
pany: Our client, a dy- Job
Summary/Comnamic leader in Health- pany: Are you a tenured
care Services, has an administrative profesimmediate need for sional who is currently
experienced and ex- looking for their next
ceptional Medical Reim- career
move?
Are
bursement Analysts in you someone with a
their Dulles, VA location. solid foundation of job
If you are looking for full knowledge who is eastime hours, enjoy…
ily adaptable and able…
This spotlight showcases a small
sample of our Featured Employers, allowing you to learn about
each company and some of the
thousands of jobs they are currently hiring for. Check out the FE
Spotlight each Sunday to discover
new DC area companies.
To view a complete list of our Featured Employers’ job listings, visit www.washingtonpost.com/jobs. To register
online, create a job seeker profile
and upload your resume visit
washingtonpost.com/resume.
Motley Fool
AboutWeb
Conservation International
Washington Hospital Center
Media / Journalism / Advertising–”Educate, amuse,
enrich.” That’s our global mission, carried out
through our award-winning website, best selling
books, NPR radio show, syndicated newspaper
column, and a growing series of market-beating
subscription newsletters. We communicate common-sense money management skills and superior
investment ideas in plain English. We spend our
days puncturing pretensions. So it follows that our
Alexandria, Virginia HQ is an unpretentious place to
work. No suits. No neckties. No pantyhose. No…
Front End UI
Full-Stack PHP
Designer–
Developer–Alexandria
Alexandria.
Highly skilled, detail oriThe Motley Fool is ented PHP Developer
seeking a talented UI well versed in Object
Designer to join our Oriented
Programexisting web and prod- ming & best practices.
uct team. The ideal Familiarity with writing
candidate is a creative code for WordPress as
thinker who is passion- a CMS, knowledge of
ate about using code to core actions & filters
craft intuitive web solu- and how to create pltions. We are looking… ugins using OOP.…
Nonprofit–Conservation International (CI) is a nonprofit organization with a mission to conserve the
Earth's living natural heritage, our global biodiversity, and to demonstrate that human societies are
able to live harmoniously with nature. For two decades, we have worked with our partners to protect
life on Earth. We've saved some of the most critical
sites, more than 200 million protected hectares on
land and at sea. We are proud to have some of the
most original and passionate minds in conservation,
trendsetting leaders, bold explorers, and…
Manager, Grants–
Media Asset Inges22201
tion Associate–22201
Manager Grants Con- Media Asset Ingestion
servation International Associate Conservation
(CI) has been protecting International (CI) has
nature for the benefit been protecting nature
of all for over 30 years. for the benefit of all for
Through science, policy, over 30 years. Through
and partnerships, CI is science, policy, and
helping build a health- partnerships, CI is helpier, more prosperous ing build a healthier,
and more productive more prosperous and
planet. POSITION…
more productive…
American Society of Clinical Oncology
Healthcare–From its inception in 1964 to its present
acclaim, the American Society of Clinical Oncology
(ASCO) is the world’s leading professional organization representing physicians who care for people
with cancer. With 325+ staff and numerous enduring programs, ASCO’s membership includes over
35,000 medical professionals worldwide. ASCO is a
stable, forward-thinking organization with opportunities for professional development. Apply now to
become part of our family and enjoy the rewards of
supporting the fight against cancer. Who We Are:…
Cyber Security
Associate Director,
Analyst–Alexandria
Congressional
Job Title: Cyber Security Affairs–Alexandria
Analyst Job Type: Full- Job Title: Associate DiTime Location: Alexan- rector, Congressional
dria, VA Job Description: Affairs Job Type: FullASCO is looking for a Time Location: AlexanCyber Security Analyst dria, VA Job Description:
to join our team and Do you want to use
help defend the orga- your lobbying and relanization from malicious tionship building skills
activity. This individual to help conquer cancer
must be a team…
and make a…
Technology and Software–AboutWeb is a Certified
HUBZone Small Business Government Contractor as
well as a leading provider of cybersecurity solutions,
information technology consulting and product development. Our areas of expertise include IT Solutions, Staff Augmentation and IT Training. Our teams
have experience providing solutions for government
agencies, commercial entities, and associations.
Our HUBZone certification combined with two decades of IT solutions expertise and over ten years of
Prime Government Contracting experience…
Microsoft Dynamics
Senior Manager Customer RelationCorporate Systems–
ship Manager–
Washington D.C.
Arlington
The primary purpose
The primary purpose and function of this job:
and function of this Oversee timely delivery
job: The position re- of quality technical supquires deep technical port services to internal
expertise in Microsoft clients and stakeholdDynamics
Customer ers. Such support serRelationship Manager vices may include the
(CRM), a corporate sys- end user computing
tem, and related…
environment and…
Searching for talent?
Join some of DC’s top companies
on the area’s #1 job board. Washington Post Jobs has over 1.5 million registered online jobseekers
across a variety of industries, occupations and career levels.
Axiom Resource Management, Inc.
Government Contractor–Established in 1996 by experts in military healthcare acquisition, Axiom Resource Management (AXIOM) provides superior program management and analytical support to clients
in both the government and private sector. AXIOM’s
cadre of experienced healthcare analysts, epidemiologists, and public health analysts are recognized
throughout the Military Health System (MHS) and
are strategically located across the United States
supporting clients in San Antonio, Texas; San Diego,
California; Aurora, Colorado…
Project Administrator– Project Engineer–
Arlington
Falls Church
Axiom Resource Man- We are seeking a projagement is currently ect engineer to support
seeking
a
Project the DHA Medical ComAdministrator to sup- munity of Interest (Medport product software COI) Medical Device
development.
Suc- Transition (MDT) projcessful candidate will: ect. The Med-COI MDT
Schedule and manage project is the coordinameetings including take tion of the migration of
meeting minutes and the Solution Delivery
conducting…
Division’s Electronic…
Ford Agency
Washington Post Jobs’ Featured
Employer packages offer a valuable and unique way to source
qualified candidates. Become an
FE today and leverage the power
of Washington Post media. Contact your Jobs account rep and call
202-334-4101.
Holy Cross Hospital
Healthcare–At Holy Cross Health, we seek to become the most trusted provider of health care in
the communities we serve. For more than 50 years,
every employee of Holy Cross Health has played a
vital role in ensuring we earn that trust while achieving our shared organizational objectives. When we
bring new colleagues on board, we have the opportunity to hire talented, dedicated individuals
who embody our values of reverence, commitment
to those who are poor, justice, stewardship and integrity
Inventory Controller– Manager Financial
Germantown
Reporting–Silver Spring
Position Purpose: Job Position Purpose: Job
Description
Details: Description
Details:
General Summary: Pre- General
Summary:
pares, monitors and Manages the general
coordinates all the in- accounting
function
ventory status reports consisting of manage(including vendor back- ment of accounting
order, storeroom not in staff, gathering and
stock, and critical low reporting of accurate fireports) and takes pro- nancial information, enactive approach to…
suring the accuracy…
EMMES Corporation
Healthcare–When you work with the most experienced, the difference is monumental. At Washington Hospital Center, we're committed to practicing
healthcare without boundaries. Our patients come
to us from every walk of life, with needs that vary
greatly in scope and complexity. As a member of
our team, you'll be able to practice on an extremely
diverse patient base, in a fast-paced, high-adrenaline hospital environment that's considered one of
the best in the nation. Besides our location in the
bustling Washington, D.C. metro area, Washington…
Clinical Nurse–
MedStar Flight
Washington D.C.
Clinical Nurse–
General summary: De- Washington D.C.
livers proficient nurs- General summary: Deing care to patients livers proficient nursand families whose ing care to patients
needs range from un- and families whose
complicated to highly needs range from uncomplex.
MINIMUM complicated to highly
REQUIREMENTS EDU- complex.
MINIMUM
CATION AND SKILL RE- REQUIREMENTS EDUQUIREMENTS: Gradua- CATION AND SKILL REtion from a basic…
QUIREMENTS :…
Other–Since 1978, The Ford Agency has provided
Washington’s competitive business market with
unparalleled recruiting services. A woman-owned
small business, The Ford Agency is proud of its ability to adapt to changing trends while always maintaining the highest level of recruiting standards for
both our clients and our candidates. Our team of
knowledgeable professionals provides customized
recruiting services to clients and candidates, including direct hire, temporary-to-hire, and temporary
placement, and we approach each type with…
Legal Administrative
Paralegal - Temporary–
Assistant - Temp-toWashington D.C.
Hire–Washington D.C.
The Ford Agency is lookThe Ford Agency is ing for an experienced
looking for a seasoned, paralegal to support the
proactive Administra- general counsel at one
tive Assistant to join of the nation's oldest
the busy legal team non-profits. Candidates
at a Bethesda-based with 5-7 years' expeinvestment firm. Can- rience and excellent
didates with excellent computer skills are enMicrosoft Office and da- couraged to apply. This
tabase management… open ended…
Science–The EMMES Corporation, organized in 1977,
is a privately owned Contract Research Organization
(CRO) located in Rockville, Maryland, just outside of
Washington, D.C., a short distance from NIH, FDA,
and the Route I-270 biotechnology corridor. EMMES
is dedicated to providing statistical and epidemiological expertise, computer systems development,
data management, study monitoring, regulatory
guidance, and overall operational support to clients
engaged in clinical and biomedical research.
The Endocrine Society
Montgomery College
Pentagon Federal Credit Union
Nonprofit–Endocrine Society is the world's largest
and most active professional organization of endocrinologists in the world. Founded in 1916, the Society is internationally known as the leading source of
state-of-the-art research and clinical advancements
in endocrinology and metabolism. We are dedicated
to promoting excellence in research, education and
clinical practice in the field of endocrinology. Society membership continues to grow with more than
17,000 members from over 100 countries. These
professionals are dedicated to the research and…
Specialist, Education– Education Program
Washington D.C.
Coordinator - ANCC–
Under the direct super- Silver Spring
vision of the Associate Implements, evaluates
Director, Education, this and manages the adposition
administers ministrative processes
both live and online and outcomes related
educational programs. to educational proThis position will also grams and associated
be engaged in identify- products and services.
ing opportunities for Creates and manages
derivative products or databases and develcontent integration…
ops reports related to…
Education–Montgomery College is Maryland’s premier community college, serving more than 60,000
students each year through credit and noncredit
programs. We are dedicated to providing an exceptional education for all of our students, and we recognize that our faculty and staff are integral to our
continued success. We give employees the environment, tools, and opportunities they need to make
a difference. Join us in our mission of empowering
students and enriching the community. Positions
are available at our campuses in Germantown,…
Temporary Student
Literacy-GED®
Information Specialist Program Part-time
II– 20850
Faculty–Offutt
Montgomery
College Montgomery
College
is Maryland's premier is Maryland's premier
community
college, community
college,
serving
more
than serving
more
than
60,000 students each 60,000 students each
year through credit and year through credit and
noncredit programs. We noncredit programs. We
are dedicated to provid- are dedicated to providing an exceptional edu- ing an exceptional education for all of our…
cation for all of our…
Home-Based Clinical
Research Associate/
Protocol Monitor–
Frederick
The EMMES Corporation, organized in 1977,
is a privately owned
Contract
Research
Organization
(CRO).
Emmes is dedicated to
providing statistical and
epidemiological expertise, computer…
Home-Based Clinical
Research Associate/
Protocol Monitor–
Rockville
The EMMES Corporation, organized in 1977,
is a privately owned
Contract
Research
Organization
(CRO)
located in Rockville,
Maryland. Emmes is
dedicated to providing
statistical and…
Financial Services and Banking–Established in 1935,
PenFed today is one of the country’s strongest and
most stable financial institutions with over 1.4 million members and over $19 billion in assets. We
serve members in all 50 states and the District of
Columbia, as well as on military bases in Guam,
Puerto Rico and Okinawa. We are federally insured
by NCUA and an equal housing lender. And we are
available to members worldwide via the web seven
days a week. 24 hours a day. In simple terms, we
see every day as an opportunity to help our…
Bilingual Mortgage
Social Media StrateServicing Loan Care
gist–Tysons Corner
Specialist (Spanish)–
Summary: PenFed is
Alexandria
looking for a Social
Full
Time
position Media Strategist in
Schedule is Monday - Mclean, Va.The primary
Friday
9:30am
to purpose of this job is
6:00pm with some flex- to grow, engage and
ibility. Occasional eve- retain PenFed’s audinings and weekends. ences through a variety
Summary PenFed is hir- of social channels and
ing a Bilinugal Mortgage positioning PenFed as a
Servicing Loan Care…
thought leader in the…
Visit washingtonpost.com/jobs to view complete details and to apply to these and thousands of other listings.
Документ
Категория
Журналы и газеты
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
53 130 Кб
Теги
The Washington Post, newspaper
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа