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The Washington Post – November 25, 2017

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ABCDE
Prices may vary in areas outside metropolitan Washington.
Cloudy 61/41 • Tomorrow: Sunny 52/36 B6
Embattled
Sessions
more than
perseveres
Democracy Dies in Darkness
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
SUFI MUSLIMS
SLAIN AT WORSHIP
Deadliest assault on
civilians in decades
BY
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
People tend to bodies following an attack on a mosque near the Egyptian town of Bir al-Abd. The assault began when a suicide bomber
detonated his charge, after which gunmen fired on worshipers gathered for Friday prayers. For more photos, go to wapo.st/egypt1125.
ANALYSIS
Islamic State’s losses could make it more extreme
BY G REG J AFFE
AND J OBY W ARRICK
SESSIONS CONTINUED ON A4
TURKEY
Nicosia
Detail
SYRIA
Beirut
Jerusalem
Tel Aviv
Amman
Alexandria
Cairo
Bir al-Abd
SAUDI
ARABIA
LIBYA
EGYPT
Luxor
a
SEAN SULLIVAN
Aleppo
M e d. S e a
250 MILES
SUDAN
M
and gunned down fleeing worshipers at a packed mosque in
Egypt’s northern Sinai Peninsula
on Friday, killing at least
235 people in the deadliest single
assault on civilians by suspected
Islamist extremists in Egypt’s
recent history.
There was no immediate claim
of responsibility for the attack,
which survivors described as a
sophisticated, terrifying and unprecedented assault on a mosque
that was frequented by Sufi Muslims: an attack planned, it appeared, to ensure that none of
the worshipers survived.
Egyptian security forces have
struggled for years against an
Islamic State affiliate based in the
Sinai Peninsula that has killed
hundreds of police and military
personnel in an insurgency
against the government of President Abdel Fatah al-Sissi. The
government has worked to keep
that war in the shadows, preventing journalists from accessing Sinai or the towns there that
have become battlegrounds,
amid frequent reports of militant
atrocities and heavy-handed tactics by the army.
But the dangers of the conflict
were impossible to conceal Friday, as the rising death toll was
announced in grim updates on
state television and Egyptians
mourned the largest loss of life
from a militant attack in decades. It surpassed the number of
dead in the downing of a Russian
airliner over Sinai in 2015 that
killed 224 and was claimed by
Islamic State-linked militants.
As condolence calls poured in
from world leaders, Sissi spoke
on television, vowing that
Egypt’s armed forces would respond with “brute force.”
“We cannot be intimidated,”
he said. “Our will cannot be
broken.”
After the attack, Egypt’s military carried out airstrikes in
northern Sinai concentrated in
mountainous areas around the
mosque, according to the Reu-
THE WASHINGTON POST
Dongola
SINAI CONTINUED ON A11
EGYPT CONTINUED ON A10
Revised guidance on HIV
proves life-transforming
birmingham, ala. — The Ensley
Park Recreation Center was beginning to come to life. The song
“Happy” and other upbeat tunes
boomed
through
the
loudspeakers.
And a crowd
was gathering
for a chance to
glimpse something
rarely
seen in conservative Alabama: a surg- Doug Jones
ing Democratic (D) is surging
candidate for in Alabama.
U.S. Senate.
But Donald Williams was skeptical.
The 75-year-old retired UPS
worker had come to cheer on
Democrat Doug Jones in a campaign that has captured national
attention. Has it also generated
energy in Alabama’s African
American communities?
“As of this day, I would say no,”
said Williams, who is black. “And
this is Doug Jones’s problem. He’s
got to get out and get the voters
energized.”
BY
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
On Black Friday, more options but fewer shoppers
People hunt for bargains at Tysons Corner Center in Fairfax County, Va. To counter the trend
toward online shopping, the mall offered new experiences and lower prices to get people through
the doors. But shoppers still noticed smaller-than-usual post-Thanksgiving crowds. Story, A13
JONES CONTINUED ON A6
IN sunday’s post
L ENNY B ERNSTEIN
Last year, Chris Kimmenez
and his wife asked their doctors a
simple question. Could Chris,
who has been HIV positive since
1989 but keeps the virus in check
through medication, transmit it
sexually to Paula?
They were pretty sure they
knew the answer. Married for
more than 30 years, they had not
always practiced safe sex, but
Paula showed no signs of having
the virus.
Their physicians were less certain. “They had a conversation,
and they did some research on
it,” Kimmenez said. “They came
back to us and said there may
still be a risk, but we’re comfortable enough” that unprotected
sex is safe.
“We knew that all along,” said
Kimmenez, 56, who works with
ex-offenders in Philadelphia.
Simple acknowledgments like
that one, spoken quietly in the
privacy of doctors’ offices, mark
the arrival of a historic moment
in the history of HIV: Medical
authorities are publicly agreeing
that people with undetectable
viral loads cannot transmit the
virus that causes AIDS.
The policy change has profound implications for the way
people view HIV. The change
promises not just unprotected
sex for couples like Kimmenez
and his wife, but also reduced
stigma for the 1.2 million Americans living with HIV. The policy
change also offers the hope that
more people will be tested and
begin treatment if they are found
to have the virus rather than live
in denial.
“There was something in me
that said I’m damaged and I
made a mistake, and people see it
and I’m a danger,” said Mark S.
King, 56, a writer and activist
who tested positive for HIV in
1985. But now, treatment has
HIV CONTINUED ON A6
Inside
Visions of America
Whether from Allentown or
Antwerp, these designers are
redefining U.S. fashion. Also,
the case for luxury: Many of
us scorn it. We should try
celebrating it. Magazine
Unsinkable after all
Twenty years after it hit
movie theaters and shattered
records, “Titanic” sails on in
the imaginations of its
devoted fans — and its
passionate detractors.
Arts & Style
A cyclist’s dream At the Giro
d’Italia — the Tour of Italy —
amateurs get to pedal on the
Passo dello Stelvio the same
day as the pros. Travel
MARC BAPTISTE FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Athens
Se
In the wake of the bloodshed,
government officials and outside
analysts were puzzling over the
strategy behind the group’s latest
horror.
The Sinai chapter is only a part
of a larger constellation of regional affiliates, and its high-profile
attack could be a sign of a broader
power struggle to take up the
Islamic State’s leadership mantle
now that the group’s self-declared
caliphate has been destroyed, intelligence officials and terrorism
experts said. Several local cells
already have begun preparations
to continue or even intensify their
fight, analysts said.
d
BY
The brazen attack on worshipers at an Egyptian mosque early
Friday showed the ability of the
Islamic State’s regional affiliates
to inflict death and exact revenge
for the loss of the group’s main
enclaves in Iraq and Syria.
There were no immediate
claims of responsibility for the
attack on the al-Rawda mosque in
Egypt’s sparsely populated Sinai
Peninsula, but there were many
reasons to suspect that the Islamic State was responsible.
The Egyptian affiliate, which
consists of up to 1,000 members,
in recent months has stepped up
attacks on Egyptian soldiers and
police in the region and laid siege
to Coptic Christian churches. Before Friday’s attack, the group was
best known for its suspected role
in the downing of Russia’s Metrojet Flight 9268 in 2015, which
killed 224 Russian tourists.
The attack on Friday represented a shocking escalation in the
carnage, with Egyptian officials
reporting 235 dead. It also represented a new and risky kind of
target for the Islamic State’s
Egyptian affiliate. The Egyptian
branch of the Islamic State appeared to be targeting fellow Sunni Muslim civilians at prayer.
Re
Doug Jones
needs black
voters. Will
they turn out?
H EBA F AROUK M AHFOUZ
AND K AREEM F AHIM
cairo — Militants set off a blast
BY MATT ZAPOTOSKY
AND SARI HORWITZ
Mueller as compliance officer
Lobbyists are moving to disclose
their work as foreign agents. A4
. $2
Militants kill 235 at mosque in Egypt’s Sinai
While most eyes are on
Russia, he’s reshaping
the Justice Department
For more than five hours, Attorney General Jeff Sessions sat in
a hearing room on Capitol Hill
this month, fending off inquiries
on Washington’s two favorite topics: President Trump and Russia.
But legislators spent little time
asking Sessions about the dramatic and controversial changes
in policy he has made since taking
over the top law enforcement job
in the United States nine months
ago.
From his crackdown on illegal
immigration to his reversal of
Obama administration policies
on criminal justice and policing,
Sessions is methodically reshaping the Justice Department to reflect his nationalist ideology and
hard-line views — moves drawing
comparatively less public scrutiny than the ongoing investigations into whether the Trump
campaign coordinated with the
Kremlin.
Sessions has implemented a
new charging and sentencing policy that calls for prosecutors to
pursue the most serious charges
possible, even if that might mean
minority defendants face stiff,
mandatory minimum penalties.
He has defended the president’s
travel ban and tried to strip funding from cities with policies he
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
MARINA ESMERALDO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
$72
DEATHS
ST YLE
Bittersweet brilliance
Memoir of a matriarch
Washington singer-songwriter
Tommy Keene, a master of 1980s
power pop, never hit it big. Here’s
why he’s still one of the greats.
Appreciation, C1; Obituary, B4
“Blackish” star Jenifer Lewis played
the mom, aunt or grandmother of
everyone from Will Smith to Tupac
Shakur, earning the moniker “the
Mother of Black Hollywood.” C1
BUSINESS NEWS ............................................. A13
COMICS ............................................................. C5
OPINION PAGES...............................................A15
LOTTERIES.........................................................B3
OBITUARIES.......................................................B4
TELEVISION.......................................................C3
WORLD NEWS....................................................A8
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 355
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B6
6 3 1 8
A2
EZ
I N CA S E Y OU M I S S ED I T
Some reports that you may have missed. Read more at washingtonpost.com.
Nebraska approves
Keystone route
Trump name coming
off Manhattan hotel
TransCanada’s $8 billion
Keystone XL pipeline got the goahead from the Nebraska Public
Service Commission on Monday,
but the commission rejected
TransCanada’s preferred route
and voted to approve an
alternative plan that would move
the pipeline farther east.
President Trump’s firm has
agreed to remove the Trump
name from its hotel in Lower
Manhattan and give up
management of the property
after that business has flagged
for months at Trump SoHo.
washingtonpost.com/national
washingtonpost.com/business
NFL owners could
change anthem policy
Uber waited a year
to reveal data breach
Some NFL owners could enact
an offseason change to the
league’s national anthem policy
if players’ protests during the
anthem persist, reverting to
keeping players in the locker
room while the anthem is played.
The ride sharing company
revealed Tuesday that it had
suffered a breach in 2016 that
exposed personal information
belonging to 57 million people.
washingtonpost.com/business
washingtonpost.com/sports
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In the Nov. 24 Weekend
section, the review for the Pixar
film “Coco” misspelled the last
name of the main character. It’s
Rivera.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
A recent spike in natural
gas extraction including
fracking is cited
BY
B EN G UARINO
An unnatural number of earthquakes have hit Texas in the past
decade, and the region’s seismic
activity is increasing.
Natural forces trigger most
earthquakes. But humans are
causing earthquakes, too. Mining, dam construction and natural gas extraction are the most
common suspects. A technique
known as fracking, or hydraulic
fracturing, produces a lot of
wastewater, which is injected
deep into the ground to get rid of
it. When wastewater works its
way into dormant faults, the
thinking goes, the water’s pressure nudges the ancient cracks.
Pent-up tectonic stress releases,
and the ground shakes.
But for any given earthquake,
it is virtually impossible to tell
whether humans or nature triggered the quake.
“It’s been a head-scratching
period for scientists,” said Maria
Beatrice Magnani of Southern
Methodist University in Dallas.
She and researchers at the U.S.
Geological Survey (USGS) attempted to better identify what
has been causing the rash of Texas
quakes, and they published their
work Friday in the journal Science Advances.
A cluster of earthquakes
around a drilling project can, at
best, suggest a relationship. “The
main approach has been to correlate the location to where there
has been human activity,” said
Michael Blanpied, a USGS geophysicist and co-author of the
new study.
The scientists took a different
approach in the new work — they
hunted for deformed faults below
Texas. They used a technique
called high-resolution seismic reflection imaging, which is the
same tool that allows extractors
to find oil and gas deposits in
underground structures.
For seismic reflection data, an
artificially generated wave ripples through the ground and reflects back to the surface, like
light off a mirror. The result is “a
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Flames light up the landscape at a fracking operation near Tilden, Tex. Wastewater works its way into
dormant faults, researchers say, causing pressure and unleashing pent-up tectonic stress.
little bit like an ultrasound,” Magnani said, revealing not baby toes
but twisted rock.
The scientists compared Texas
with Mississippi, another seismically active region that, like Texas,
is not close to a turbulent edge of
a tectonic plate. Unlike Texas,
though, north Mississippi has a
much longer history of recorded
earthquakes, going back to the
early 1800s.
An underground ultrasound
revealed that, beneath Texas, the
most recent signs of active faults
were in a geologic layer 300 million years old — 70 million years
before the first dinosaur took its
first step. The younger layers
above it were stable.
“All the displacement was stopping at a layer that is 300 million
years old,” Magnani said. “The
fault did not move after that layer
was deposited.”
In the Mississippi region, in
contrast, the rock told a story of
continuous fault activity for the
past 65 million years.
Given the lack of faults in the
most recent 300 million years of
Texas history, “there is no other
explanation” except that these
earthquakes are caused by human activity, Magnani said.
The study is in line with what
other earthquake experts have
surmised using different analyses. “We don’t expect a lot of
pushback” from the scientific
community, Blanpied said.
“This is a landmark contribution in the question of whether
the Fort Worth basin earthquakes
are man-made,” said Cliff
Frohlich, a geophysicist at the
University of Texas at Austin who
was not involved with the study.
Frohlich said this research eliminates the possibility, sometimes
raised by the oil and gas industry,
that the Texas quakes are part of a
natural cycle of faults that awaken every few thousand or million
years.
The seismic reflection data
provide a powerful argument
“that these earthquakes are
something new and different,” he
said, stemming from the injection of wastewater deep into
basement rock. “Most of the time
it’s the large volume injection,” he
said, “not the little frack jobs.”
In March 2016, the USGS published a map of the likely areas
BY
D AMIAN P ALETTA
Lunch session Tuesday
will come before
key votes on tax cut plan
Senate must pass identical versions of the bill before it can be
signed into law. If the Senate
passes its version this coming
week, the House can either attempt to pass an identical bill or
go into a conference process to
try to reconcile differences in the
legislation.
The bills have some similarities. Both offer steep and permanent tax cuts for corporations,
and would add between roughly
$1.4 trillion and $1.5 trillion to
the debt over 10 years, according
to numerous estimates.
But there are major differences between the House and Senate
bills. For example, the House
measure does not call for changes to the Affordable Care Act, and
it allows Americans to deduct up
to $10,000 in local property taxes
from their federal taxable income.
But before the House and the
Senate can formally negotiate
their differences, Senate Republicans must find a way to pass
their bill.
A majority of Senate Republicans are expected to support the
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where human-made earthquakes
will strike in the United States.
About 7 million people are at risk
of these events, with Texas and
Oklahoma among the most susceptible states.
“We hope that the response
from our colleagues will be to
deploy this [technique] elsewhere,” Blanpied said. Magnani
said she would like to apply seismic reflection to Oklahoma,
which also has experienced an
unusual uptick in earthquakes.
But seismic reflection data is
difficult and expensive to collect,
although the oil and gas industry
will sell the information. As for
why no one else had attempted to
do this before, the authors said
Magnani was simply the first
person to have the idea to use
seismic reflection to look for old
faults.
Any successful regulatory
process, Magnani said, will require an understanding of the
physical processes that trigger
human-made earthquakes.
ben.guarino@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
Trump to meet with GOP senators
President Trump will meet
with Senate Republicans on
Tuesday ahead of crucial votes in
the GOP effort to pass a massive
tax cut package, as conservatives
move even closer to notching a
major legislative victory.
The meeting will come during
a weekly lunch Republicans hold
as they go over their agenda.
There are 52 Republicans in the
100-seat Senate, and the GOP
needs a simple majority of votes
to pass its tax cut bill as soon as
Thursday or Friday.
A number of Senate Republicans have not expressed support
for the bill, and several of them
have chilly relationships with
Trump. But the president remains popular with the GOP
base, and his support is seen as
crucial in helping get the tax bill
pushed into law.
The Senate tax bill would cut
the corporate tax rate from
35 percent to 20 percent beginning in 2019. It would also lower
the rates individuals and families pay until 2025. It would also
repeal the “individual mandate”
provision of the Affordable Care
Act. This is the requirement that
Americans have health insurance or face a financial penalty.
The House of Representatives
has already passed its tax cut
package, and the House and the
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measure, but at least six have
stopped short of saying they will
vote for the tax cut package.
None of these lawmakers is seen
as intractable, but Republicans
can lose only two votes or the bill
will falter.
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (RAlaska) voted against a GOP
effort to repeal parts of the
Affordable Care Act several
months ago and has said she is
still reviewing the tax plan, but
she announced this week that
she was in favor of repealing the
individual mandate, which some
saw as a sign that she was
preparing to declare her support
for the GOP legislation.
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine)
also has expressed concerns
about the GOP tax cut plan, in
part because of the changes to
the Affordable Care Act, but she
has not said she will oppose it.
Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.)
vowed to oppose an earlier version of the Senate GOP tax bill
because he said there weren’t
enough benefits for certain types
of corporations, but he has recently signaled that there might
be changes to the bill that would
win him over.
Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) and
Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) have raised
concerns of their own over the
bill, particularly how it would
add to the government’s debt.
And Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.),
who opposed the earlier effort to
repeal the Affordable Care Act,
has not said how he plans to vote.
Trump has personally attacked most of these senators. In
a July Twitter post, after Murkowski’s opposition to the GOP
health-care effort, he wrote that
she “really let the Republicans,
and our country, down yesterday.
Too bad!” The president has
called Flake “Flake(y)” and predicted that he would vote against
the tax bill. He has called Corker
“Liddle,’ ” during a spat when
Corker charged that the White
House was run like an adult
day-care center.
The Senate GOP tax bill could
face a crucial procedural vote as
soon as Tuesday, when the Senate Budget Committee could vote
on a measure that effectively
sends the tax legislation to the
Senate floor. Both Corker and
Johnson are on that committee,
and if they oppose the legislation
at that stage it could effectively
stall the entire process.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
politics & the nation
Lead poison deaths up among New Hampshire loons
D I GE S T
CALIFORNIA
Dismembering suspect
charged in 2016 killing
Despite a 2016 law
to help revive population,
more birds died this year
BY
M ICHAEL C ASEY
concord, n.h. — More than a
year after New Hampshire
passed one of the nation’s toughest bans on using lead fishing
tackle, loons are still dying from
ingesting fishing weights and
lures.
The 2016 law prohibits the sale
and use of lead tackle in the state
as part of an effort to revive the
state’s loon population.
Loon Preservation Committee
senior biologist Harry Vogel says
eight loons have died this year
from lead poisoning, up from two
last year.
“The day this law was passed,
we knew we would continue to
see lead-poisoned loons,” Vogel
said. “As long as Grandpa’s old
tackle box is in the dusty corner
of the garage, some people will
just put lead tackle on the line
and continue to fish. The hope is
that it will become less and less
common over time.”
Loons are aquatic birds that
dive for their food, and they can
become poisoned by consuming
lead tackle in fish.
The common loon population
nationwide is relatively healthy
at around 14,000 pairs in
14 states. Several states, including New Hampshire, have struggled to grow their numbers.
There are only 300 breeding
pairs in the state — up from 204
pairs a decade ago — and lead
poisoning has been blamed on
stunting their recovery.
A paper out earlier this year in
the peer-reviewed Journal of
Wildlife Management found lead
fishing tackle was the leading
cause of death in New Hampshire loons. Of the 253 loons that
died from 1989 to 2012, the study
found nearly 49 percent died
from ingesting lead tackle.
That was more than all other
causes of death and six times the
next highest cause of death,
JIM COLE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Supporters of the law blame a lack of education and continued use of old tackle on the state’s lakes.
which was listed as trauma.
“We were flabbergasted. Nobody ever anticipated that it was
having that effect,” said Mark
Pokras, a wildlife veterinarian at
Tufts University who was a co-author on the paper with Vogel and
others and has studied the problem of lead in loons for 30 years.
“This one material is killing
enough loons so that it is decreasing the population,” he said.
Legislation is one of the best
ways to help the loons, and states
in the Northeast have led the
way.
New Hampshire, Vermont,
Massachusetts, New York and,
most recently, Maine have passed
or amended laws that limit or
outright ban lead in fishing gear.
Other states like Minnesota only
have education programs for anglers. Maine first banned lead
sinkers in 2002 and strengthened
the law in September.
As a result, adult loon mortality from lead poisoning has
dipped from more than 30 percent from 1987 to 2001 to less
than 20 percent from 2013 to
2016, according to a data from
the Tufts Wildlife Clinic and the
Biodiversity Research Institute.
In the final days of President
Barack Obama’s administration,
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
“We were flabbergasted.
. . . This one material
is killing enough loons
so that it is decreasing
the population.”
Mark Pokras, a wildlife veterinarian
at Tufts University
issued an order phasing out the
use of lead ammunition and
fishing tackle on national wildlife refuges by 2022. In March,
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke
signed an order revoking it, saying stakeholders had not been
significantly consulted.
“One of the issues is that a lot
of serious anglers do a lot of
traveling to fish,” Pokras said. “It
would be very easy to be in
Connecticut, New Jersey and other states and fill my tackle box
with lead fishing gear. They are
not going to have a special New
Hampshire tackle box.”
While the lead poisoning
deaths are up in New Hampshire,
Vogel and other supporters of the
law said it is changing attitudes
among anglers.
They noted the fishing community is on board with the new
regulations and that bait shops
across the Granite State have
complied with the ban. The state
Fish and Game Department put
up posters promoting the ban,
highlights the issue in its fishing
classes and offers tips on fishing
lead-free on its website.
— Associated Press
Associated Press reporter Patrick
Whittle in Portland, Maine,
contributed to this report.
A homeless man found
sleeping in a Kansas storage unit
with his children and his
dismembered wife’s remains is
suspected of killing a California
man who vanished last year.
Justin Tod Rey, 35, was
charged Wednesday in the death
of Sean Ty Ferel, a Palm Springs
resident who disappeared after
going on vacation with Rey in
2016. Ferel’s body hasn’t been
found, but his blood was
detected in the trunk of his
vehicle after Rey was involved in
an accident while driving it.
Rey is jailed on $1 million
bond in Kansas’s Johnson
County on child endangerment
charges. He’s also charged with
abandonment of corpse in
Missouri, where his wife died at a
hotel. Investigators allege Rey
took photographs with his wife’s
body and children, then
dismembered the body two days
later in a hotel bathtub.
A judge in California’s
Riverside County also set Rey’s
bail at $1 million. Palm Springs
police said they and county
prosecutors were working with
Kansas authorities on
extraditing Rey to face charges in
the California case.
Investigators said that after
Ferel went on vacation in May
2016, his friends noticed changes
in responses to texts and
suspected the messages were
coming from someone else. That
August, Rey had an accident with
Ferel’s vehicle in Los Angeles, but
it wasn’t until months later that
blood found in the trunk was
determined to be Ferel’s.
Palm Springs police said Rey
had Ferel’s cellphone, and that
Ferel’s wallet, credit cards,
letters, medication and other
possessions were found in a
storage unit Rey rented in
Kingman, Ariz. Surveillance
footage also showed Rey using
Ferel’s credit card, according to a
statement from police.
Rey hasn’t been charged with
killing his wife, Jessica Monteiro
Rey. Missouri and Kansas court
records don’t say how she died,
and Rey provided conflicting
information: He said his wife
killed herself after giving birth
on Oct. 20 at a hotel, but also
said she died during childbirth,
according to a probable cause
statement.
— Associated Press
Man postpones mission
to prove Earth is flat
A California man who planned
to launch himself 1,800 feet high
on Saturday in a homemade
scrap-metal rocket — in an effort
to “prove” that Earth is flat —
said he is postponing the
experiment since he couldn’t get
permission from a federal agency
to do so on public land.
Instead, Mike Hughes, 61, said
the launch will take place next
week on private property, albeit
still in Amboy, an
unincorporated community in
the Mojave Desert along historic
Route 66.
“It’s still happening. We’re just
moving it three miles down the
road,” Hughes told The
Washington Post on Friday. “This
is what happens any time you
have to deal with any kind of
government agency.”
Hughes claimed the Bureau of
Land Management said he
couldn’t launch his rocket as
planned on Saturday in Amboy.
He also claimed the federal
agency had given him verbal
permission more than a year ago,
pending approval from the
Federal Aviation Administration.
Representatives from the BLM
and the FAA did not immediately
respond to requests for comment
Friday.
Assuming the 500-mph, milelong flight through the Mojave
Desert does not kill him, Hughes
told the Associated Press, his
journey into the “atmosflat” will
mark the first phase of his
ambitious flat-Earth space
program.
Hughes’s ultimate goal is a
launch that puts him miles above
Earth, where the limousine
driver hopes to photograph proof
of the disc we all live on.
— Amy B Wang and Avi Selk
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
Mueller probe appears to be prompting lobbyists to register as foreign agents
BY M ATT Z APOTOSKY
AND T OM H AMBURGER
President Trump famously
promised that, if elected president, he would “drain the swamp”
— upending the culture in Washington that favors the well-connected.
It is special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III whose work seems to
be sending shock waves through
the capital, by exposing the lucrative work in which lobbyists from
both parties engage on behalf of
foreign interests.
The Mueller probe has already
claimed its first K Street casualty:
Tony Podesta. His lobbying firm,
the Podesta Group, a Washington
icon of power and political influence, notified its employees recently that the enterprise is shutting its doors.
Since Mueller was appointed,
more people and firms have either
filed or amended registrations
that make public their work on
behalf of foreign interests than
had done so over the same time
period in each of at least the past
20 years. Lobbyists, lawyers and
public relations professionals who
work for foreign companies and
governments say Mueller’s probe
has spooked K Street, and that
firms are likely to be more careful
in their compliance with public
disclosure standards.
“My colleagues are being contacted by waves of clients concerned about this,” said Joe Sandler, an ethics and lobbying lawyer
in Washington who specializes in
Foreign Agents Registration Act
issues.
The Podesta Group was famous
for providing access to Washington power, holding events for a
roster of high-profile domestic
and international clients who
helped make it one of the city’s
most successful lobbying firms.
Revenue declined after the 2016
election, but the firm remained a
powerhouse.
Tony Podesta, 74, the brother of
longtime Democratic adviser and
Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta, resigned on
the day Mueller announced charges against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort
and his business partner Rick
Gates.
The 12-count indictment included charges of failing to accurately report lobbying work for a
Ukrainian political party as required under FARA. That section
made reference to “Company A
and Company B,” later confirmed
to be the Podesta Group and Mercury, another lobbying dynamo
that includes Vin Weber, a former
Republican congressman from
Minnesota who worked on the
Ukraine account.
Mueller was appointed in May
to investigate possible coordination between the Kremlin and the
Trump campaign to influence the
2016 election, but his work and
similar congressional inquiries
have stretched into other areas.
The charges against Manafort and
Gates were unrelated to their
Trump campaign work.
According to the indictment,
the men used a Brussels-based
nonprofit organization, the European Centre for a Modern
Ukraine, to hide that they were
running a multimillion-dollar lobbying campaign for a Ukrainian
political party friendly to Russia.
Mueller’s team alleged that the
men hired the Podesta Group and
Mercury to lobby for the Ukrainians in the United States.
According to the indictment,
Gates told Mercury it would be
“representing the Government of
Ukraine,” and provided talking
points to the Podesta Group falsely describing how Manafort and
Gates merely provided an introduction to connect them with the
European Centre.
An official from the Podesta
Group wrote back that there was
“a lot of email traffic that has you
much more involved than this suggests,” adding, “we will not disclose.” The indictment alleges that
Gates and Manafort had weekly
phone calls and exchanged frequent emails with the two firms to
provide direction on specific lobbying steps they should take. The
men paid the firms, which have
not been publicly accused of any
crimes, more than $2 million from
offshore accounts they controlled.
Podesta officials have said they
initially thought the work they
2004 PHOTO BY JACQUELINE LARMA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tony Podesta founded the Podesta Group, a D.C. lobbying
powerhouse that recently announced plans to close.
were doing was solely for the European Centre and learned only
later of Gates’s connection to the
Ukrainian political party.
Even before Manafort and
Gates were charged, the Justice
Department had put pressure on
them to register as foreign agents
for their Ukraine work, and they —
along with the Podesta Group and
Mercury — did so retroactively
before indictments were issued.
Mueller’s team, though, still
charged Manafort and Gates with
including misleading statements
on their FARA form, such as the
assertion that their efforts did not
include outreach within the United States.
Officials from Mercury and Podesta have said for months that
they have been cooperating with
investigators and have a longstanding commitment to disclosure via FARA and the traditional
domestic lobbying disclosure system. They said they did not initially file under FARA in this case
based on the advice of counsel.
“We are continuing to fully cooperate as we have from the start,”
said Michael McKeon, a Mercury
partner.
On the day of the indictment,
Podesta announced his resignation from the firm he had founded,
telling employees, “It is impossible to run a public affairs firm
while you are under attack by Fox
News and the right-wing media.”
A week later, the chief executive
of the firm, Kimberley Fritts, told
the staff that the firm would be
closing and employees might not
be paid after Nov. 16. She announced that she was off to start
her own firm, Cogent Strategies,
which includes many former Podesta Group employees. That firm
is soon expected to launch publicly.
Earlier this month, Podesta employees, stunned by the sudden
implosion of the firm, were told to
immediately turn in their company laptops and security fobs. In a
statement, a Podesta spokesman
acknowledged Fritts’s departure
— and the end of an era.
“Tony and Kimberley worked
together for 22 years. He has tremendous affection, respect and
admiration for her and hopes that
she and her team of former Podesta Group colleagues will build a
firm that is even more successful
than the Podesta Group,” Podesta
spokeswoman Molly Levinson
said.
Criminal charges for noncompliance with FARA — such as those
faced by Manafort and Gates — are
rare. The law has been haphazardly enforced in recent years by a
Justice Department office that
mainly acts on news reports and
asks people to register voluntarily.
Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) noted at a hearing earlier this
year that only nine people in the
Justice Department work full time
on bringing about compliance
with the law, and a Justice Department Office of the Inspector General report last year found that
those in federal law enforcement
often don’t agree on how to do
that.
Between 1966 and 2015, the
OIG found, the Justice Department had brought only seven
criminal FARA cases. Kevin
Downing, Manafort’s attorney,
noted the rarity of such prosecutions when his client first appeared in court.
“Today, you see an indictment
brought by an office of special
counsel that is using a very novel
theory to prosecute Mr. Manafort
regarding a FARA filing,” he said,
adding that Manafort was “seeking to further democracy and to
help the Ukraine come closer to
the United States.”
Willfully failing to register,
though, is technically a felony that
can come with a five-year sentence. Even before Mueller
charged Manafort and Gates, his
work had long seemed to indicate
that he was taking a more aggressive approach in pursuing foreign
agents. Mueller’s probe also has
been looking at former Trump national security adviser Michael
Flynn, who retroactively registered as a paid foreign agent for
Turkish interests.
The special counsel’s office
wrote in a court filing in the
Manafort case that, “while criminal charges under FARA are not
often brought, the facts set forth in
the indictment indicate the gravity of the violation at issue based on
the dollar volume of earning from
the violation, its longevity, its
maintenance through creation of
a sham entity designed to evade
FARA’s requirements, and its continuation through lies to the FARA
unit.”
Not everyone who filed or
amended their filings after Mueller was appointed did so because
of fear of the probe. Some filings
are innocuous, such as firms signing new clients. Others are more
notable.
In late August, for example, the
law firm Sidley Austin amended
its filing to disclose that partner
Michael Borden had the previous
year met with staffers from the
Doubts
from boss
don’t slow
Sessions
SESSIONS FROM A1
considers too friendly toward undocumented immigrants.
Sessions has even adjusted the
department’s legal stances in cases involving voting rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues in a way that advocates
warn might disenfranchise poor
minorities and give certain religious people a license to discriminate.
Supporters and critics say the
attorney general has been among
the most effective of the Cabinet
secretaries — implementing
Trump’s conservative policy agenda even as the president publicly
and privately toys with firing him
over his decision to recuse himself from the Russia case.
While critics lambaste what
they consider misguided changes
that take the department back in
time, supporters say Sessions has
restored a by-the-book interpretation of federal law and taken an
aggressive stance toward enforcing it.
“The Attorney General is committed to rebuilding a Justice Department that respects the rule of
law and separation of powers,”
Justice Department spokesman
Ian Prior said in a statement, adding, “It is often our most vulnerable communities that are most
impacted and victimized by the
scourge of drug trafficking and
the accompanying violent crime.”
Immigration
In meetings with top Justice
Department officials about terrorist suspects, Sessions often has
a particular question: Where is
the person from? When officials
tell him a suspect was born and
lives in the United States, he typically has a follow-up: To what
country does his family trace its
lineage?
While there are reasons to
want to know that information,
some officials familiar with the
inquiries said the questions
struck them as revealing that Sessions harbors an innate suspicion
about people from certain ethnic
and religious backgrounds.
Sarah Isgur Flores, a Justice
Department spokeswoman, said
in a statement, “The Attorney
General asks lots of relevant questions in these classified briefings.”
BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Attorney General Jeff Sessions arrives to testify before members of the House Judiciary Committee earlier this month.
Sessions, unlike past attorneys
general, has been especially aggressive on immigration. He
served as the public face of the
administration’s rolling back of a
program that granted a reprieve
from deportation to people who
had come here without documentation as children, and he directed federal prosecutors to make
illegal-immigration cases a higher priority. The attorney general
has long held the view that the
United States should even reduce
the number of those immigrating
here legally.
In an interview with Breitbart
News in 2015, then-Sen. Sessions
(R-Ala.) spoke favorably of a 1924
law that excluded all immigrants
from Asia and set strict caps on
others.
“When the numbers reached
about this high in 1924, the president and Congress changed the
policy and it slowed down immigration significantly,” Sessions
said. “We then assimilated
through 1965 and created really
the solid middle class of America,
with assimilated immigrants, and
it was good for America.”
Vanita Gupta, the head of the
Justice Department’s civil rights
division in the Obama administration who now works as chief
executive of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human
Rights, said Sessions seems to
harbor an “unwillingness to recognize the history of this country
is rooted in immigration.”
“On issue after issue, it’s very
easy to see what his worldview is
of what this country is and who
belongs in this country,” she said,
adding that his view is “distinctly
anti-immigrant.”
Those on the other side of the
aisle, however, say they welcome
the changes Sessions has made at
the Justice Department.
Jessica Vaughan, director of
policy studies for the Center for
Immigration Studies, which advocates for moderating levels of
immigration, said she would give
the attorney general an “A-plus”
for his work in the area, especially
for his crackdown on “sanctuary
cities,” his push to hire more immigration judges and his focus on
the MS-13 gang.
“He was able to hit the ground
running because he has so much
expertise already in immigration
enforcement and related public
safety issues and the constitutional issues, so he’s accomplished a
lot in a very short time,” Vaughan
said.
Prior, the Justice Department
spokesman, said, “Clearly having
an immigration system that focuses on national security and the
national interest should be a matter of importance to the nation’s
highest law enforcement official.”
Police oversight, sentencing
Questions about Sessions’s attitudes toward race and nationality
have swirled around him since a
Republican-led Senate committee in 1986 rejected his nomination by President Ronald Reagan
for a federal judgeship, amid allegations of racism. In January, his
confirmation hearing to become
attorney general turned bitter
when, for the first time, a sitting
senator, Cory Booker (D-N.J.), testified against a colleague up for a
Cabinet position. Booker said he
did so because of Sessions’s record on civil rights.
Sessions ultimately won confirmation on a 52-to-47 vote, and he
moved quickly to make the Justice Department his own. Two
months into the job, he told the
department’s lawyers to review
police oversight agreements nationwide, currying favor with officers who often resent the imposition of such pacts but upsetting
those who think they are necessary to force change.
Similarly, Sessions imposed a
new charging and sentencing policy that critics on both sides of the
aisle have said might disproportionately affect minority communities and hit low-level drug offenders with stiff sentences.
Allies of Sessions say the policy
is driven not by racial animus but
by a desire to respond to increas-
ing crime. The latest FBI crime
data, for 2016, showed violent
crimes were up 4.1 percent over
the previous year and murders
were up 8.6 percent — although
crime remains at historically low
levels. The Bureau of Prisons projects that — because of increased
enforcement and prosecution efforts — the inmate population
will increase by about 2 percent in
fiscal 2018, according to a Justice
Department inspector general report.
Larry Thompson, who served
as deputy attorney general in the
George W. Bush administration
and is a friend of Sessions, said
that although he disagrees with
the attorney general’s charging
policy, he believes Sessions was
“motivated by his belief that taking these violent offenders off the
streets is the right way to address
the public safety issues.”
Civil rights, hate crimes
Sessions’s moves to empower
prosecutors have led to a concerted focus on hate-crimes prosecutions — a point his defenders say
undercuts the notion that he is
not interested in protecting the
rights of minorities or other
groups. Prosecutors have brought
several such cases since he became attorney general and recently sent an attorney to Iowa to
help the state prosecute a man
Senate Foreign Relations Committee and House Foreign Affairs
Committee, as well as a State Department official and two congressmen, on behalf of the Russian partially state-owned VTB
Bank to “discuss U.S. sanctions on
Russian institutions.” Borden declined to comment for this report.
Thomas J. Spulak, a partner at
King & Spalding specializing in
government advocacy, said more
clients have been calling since
Mueller began his work to ask, “Do
I have to register under FARA?” He
said an uptick in registrations
might be partially attributable to
new people wanting to influence a
new administration, but the special counsel was undoubtedly having an effect.
“I think it all goes back to Mueller — this is of acute concern after
Manafort and Podesta — and my
sense is that it’s going to continue
that way for some time,” Spulak
said. “If there’s a new normal for
foreign agents, it’s going to be to
pay a lot more attention to it.”
The Justice Department, too,
might be changing its posture.
Justice recently pressured the
company operating the website
and television channel RT — previously known as Russia Today —
to register under FARA.
When Attorney General Jeff
Sessions appeared before the
House Judiciary Committee, Rep.
Mike Johnson (R-La.), asked
whether — were it not for Mueller’s probe — the allegations
against Manafort, Gates and the
firms with which they did business would have stayed secret.
“The point is that a lot of these
things have stayed below the radar
because there’s not been appropriate focus and attention on it, and
the special investigation has
brought that, and in the view of
many of us, it’s long overdue,”
Johnson said, asking the attorney
general, “would you agree to work
with us — me and this committee
— to correct these very serious
problems, so we can update our
disclosure laws, so that the American people can see what’s going on
behind the veil?”
“I would,” Sessions replied.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
tom.hamburger@washpost.com
who was charged with killing a
gender-fluid 16-year-old high
school student last year. The man
was convicted of first-degree
murder.
But while civil rights leaders
praised his action in that case,
Kristen Clarke, president and executive director of the national
Lawyers’ Committee for Civil
Rights Under Law, said that it
“stands in stark contrast to his
overall efforts” to roll back protections for transgender people.
Shortly after he became attorney general, Sessions revoked federal guidelines put in place by the
Obama administration that specified that transgender students
have the right to use public school
restrooms that match their gender identity. In September, the
Justice Department sided in a
major upcoming Supreme Court
case with a Colorado baker, Jack
Phillips, who refused to bake a
wedding cake for a same-sex couple because he said it would violate his religious beliefs.
Sessions
recently
issued
20 principles of guidance to
executive-branch agencies about
how the government should respect religious freedom, including allowing religious employers
to hire only those whose conduct
is consistent with their beliefs.
About the same time, he reversed
a three-year-old Justice Department policy that protected transgender people from workplace
discrimination by private employers and state and local governments.
The Justice Department has
similarly rolled back Obama administration positions in court
cases over voting rights.
In February, the department
dropped its stance that Texas intended to discriminate when it
passed its law on voter identification. And in August, it sided with
Ohio in its effort to purge thousands of people from its rolls for
not voting in recent elections —
drawing complaints from civil liberties advocates.
At a recent congressional hearing, Sessions said the department
would “absolutely, resolutely defend the right of all Americans to
vote, including our African American brothers and sisters.”
Critics say, though, that his record shows otherwise. “We are seeing a federal government that is
pulling back from protecting vulnerable communities in every respect,” Clarke said. “That appears
to be the pattern that we are
seeing with this administration —
an unwillingness to use their enforcement powers in ways that
can come to the defense of groups
who are otherwise powerless and
voiceless.”
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
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. SATURDAY,
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Jones’s problem: Black voters don’t appear to be energized about Senate race
JONES FROM A1
With two-and-a-half weeks left
until Election Day, a once unthinkable victory in the heart of
the Deep South is within Jones’s
reach, thanks largely to a string of
sexual misconduct allegations
against Republican candidate
Roy Moore.
Jones’s campaign believes he
can win only if he pieces together
an unusually delicate coalition
built on intense support from core
Democrats and some crossover
votes from Republicans disgusted
with Moore. Crucial to that formula is a massive mobilization of
African Americans, who make up
about a quarter of Alabama’s electorate and tend to vote heavily
Democratic.
Yet, in interviews in recent
days, African American elected officials, community leaders and
voters expressed concern that the
Jones campaign’s turnout plan
was at risk of falling short.
“Right now, many African
Americans do not know there is an
election on December 12,” said
state Sen. Hank Sanders (D), who
is black and supports Jones.
The challenge for Jones is clear.
According to Democrats working
on the race, Jones, who is white,
must secure more than 90 percent
of the black vote while boosting
black turnout to account for between 25 and 30 percent of the
electorate — similar to the levels
that turned out for Barack Obama,
the country’s first black president.
As a result, Jones and his allies
are waging an aggressive outreach campaign. It includes targeted radio and online advertisements, billboards and phone calls.
Campaign aides are debating
whether to ask former first lady
Michelle Obama to record a
phone message for black voters.
The message emphasizes that
Jones prosecuted two Ku Klux
Klan members who bombed a
black church in Birmingham in
1963.
The Jones campaign expects to
intensify its black outreach in the
final stretch. Among the messages
under consideration for radio ads
and already included in mailers
that have been produced, according to campaign officials, are reminders that Moore once opposed
removing segregationist language
from the state constitution and
expressed doubt that Obama was
born in the United States.
The Moore campaign did not
respond to a request for comment.
A key question for Jones’s campaign is how to balance a more
partisan campaign message
aimed at energizing core Democrats, particularly blacks, with the
need to appeal to GOP voters with
a more middle-of-the-road approach. Not only must Jones come
close to matching Obama’s performance among blacks, but also
he must far surpass the former
president’s tallies among whites.
Exit polls show that Obama won
15 percent of the white vote in
Alabama in 2012 — and Jones,
according to Democratic strategists working on the race, may
have to win more than a third of
white voters to beat Moore.
The accusations Moore is facing from women who said he
made unwanted sexual contact
with them when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s, including one who said she was 14,
have opened the door for Jones to
peel away some of these Republican votes. Moore, 70, has denied
the allegations, and his allies have
argued that even skeptical GOP
voters should back him because
he will be a reliable conservative
vote.
Maximizing black turnout
“makes the rest of what he needs
to do more achievable,” said Zac
McCrary, a Democratic pollster
whose firm is working on the race
for the Democratic Senatorial
Campaign Committee.
The Democratic nominee does
not appear to be lacking in resources to make a closing pitch to
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
Doug Jones mingles with supporters in Birmingham, Ala., on Nov. 18. The U.S. Senate candidate must
court core Democrats without alienating Republicans who would consider crossing over.
black voters. According to a Democrat and Republican tracking the
ad war, both of whom spoke on the
condition of anonymity to describe their findings, Jones is on
pace to spend more than $4.7 million on ads between early October
and Election Day, compared with
about $636,000 by Moore and an
allied group.
The Jones campaign said it has
placed about 40 billboards across
the state, some of which show
photographs of the four young
black girls who were killed in the
1963 church bombing.
One recent ad on R&B radio
recounts Jones’s closing arguments as the lead prosecutor in
the case.
Meanwhile, the campaign is
targeting online ads at younger
African Americans by focusing
more on jobs and education.
“Turnout for a special election
is a problem across the board, and
we are putting as many resources
as we can behind making people
aware not only that there’s an
election, but with the opportunity
that Doug Jones presents for Alabama,” said Giles Perkins, the
chairman of the Jones campaign.
At a stop here in Birmingham
last week, a fish fry held inside a
rec center gym, Jones presented
himself to the crowd as a break
from Alabama’s painful past.
Jones said the differences between him and Moore “could not
be greater,” and he encouraged
backers to spread the word about
the election.
“We are at a tipping point,” he
told the crowd. Jones later added:
“We are on the right side of history
in this campaign.”
Jones, 63, is getting an assist on
the campaign from elected officials and organizations that are
prominent in the African American community.
He was joined at the fish fry by
Randall Woodfin, the 36-year-old
mayor-elect of Birmingham and a
rising political star in the state.
Rep. Terri A. Sewell, who is
African American and the only
Democratic member of the state’s
congressional delegation, said she
recently took Jones through six
churches in her home town of
Selma — and sought to introduce
Jones as an effective advocate for
their community.
“Doug is not a default candidate,” Sewell said.
The Alabama chapter of the
NAACP is also helping inform voters about Jones, even as it is not
officially endorsing a candidate in
the race. Benard Simelton, the
president of the Alabama State
Conference of the NAACP, said in
an interview his group is making
phone calls to what he termed
“sometimes voters,” meaning
those who tend to vote only in
presidential elections.
NAACP volunteers read from a
script that tells voters that Jones
prosecuted members of the KKK
and that Moore has twice been
removed from the state Supreme
Court and has said that Muslims
should not serve in Congress, Simelton said.
But Simelton voiced some reasons for concern that black turnout may not be as high as it needs
to be for Jones.
“I hate to say it: A lot of people
are apathetic about voting, because they don’t think their vote
counts,” he said.
Simelton also said the NAACP
was trying to encourage college
students to vote, but that the effort
might have “missed the boat a bit”
on that front when schools closed
for Thanksgiving ahead of the Nov.
27 registration deadline.
Kyle Campbell, 21, a University
of Alabama law student who has
been actively involved in Democratic politics in recent years, said
in an interview that energy in his
circles for the election is on par
with a presidential race.
“Every young, black voter that I
talked to who voted in 2016 is
going to vote in this election,”
Campbell said.
For Campbell, the election
could be a personal turning point
in deciding whether to stay in
Alabama long-term or move to
another state.
“If Roy Moore actually did win
— I couldn’t make any promises
about it — but it would be very
difficult for me to see the potential
for Alabama, even as someone
who has lived here most of my
life,” he said.
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
Michael Scherer contributed to this
report.
As HIV guidance shifts,
lives are being changed
HIV FROM A1
fully suppressed the virus.
“When I finally internalized this
message . . . something suddenly
lifted off of me that is hard to
describe. It was almost as if
someone wiped me clean. I no
longer feel like this diseased
pariah.”
Once considered a death sentence, HIV infection can now be
managed via medication, much
like chronic diseases such as
diabetes, and people with the
virus live full lives. The rate of
new infections in the United
States dropped by 10 percent
from 2010 to 37,600 in 2014,
according to the U.S. Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention.
Fewer than 7,000 people died of
HIV/AIDS that year.
In July, Anthony S. Fauci, head
of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and
one of the world’s leading authorities on HIV, publicly agreed
at an international conference
that people with undetectable
viral loads in their blood cannot
transmit the virus.
On Sept. 27, the CDC followed,
releasing a letter that said people
who take medication daily “and
achieve and maintain an undetectable viral load have effectively no risk of sexually transmitting the virus to an HIV-negative
partner.”
The influential British medical journal the Lancet HIV endorsed the idea in an editorial
this month. All told, more than
500 organizations in 67 countries now agree, according to
Bruce Richman, who is leading
the “Undetectable = Untransmittable” (U=U) campaign credited
with beginning to change public
perception of HIV transmissibility.
Like many developments in
the four-decade history of HIV,
this one has been slow to gain
acceptance among mainstream
health-care providers. Many are
not aware of it or must unlearn
the habit of drilling safe-sex
lessons into patients, as they
have been doing almost since the
AIDS epidemic began. HIV-positive people also must alter deeply
ingrained beliefs that nothing
good can come of revealing their
status.
The change in philosophy also
has sparked concerns, for which
there is some evidence, that
more condomless sex will lead to
an increase in other sexually
transmitted infections. And experts acknowledge that a few
people whose viral load is not
truly suppressed will eventually
transmit HIV to others.
Laws in many states also are
out of date. Many still criminal-
ize the failure to reveal HIV
status to a sex partner, even
when there is no danger of
transmissibility.
But on balance, authorities
said, the agreement that people
with HIV can prevent sexual
transmission by taking a single
pill each day is nothing less than
revolutionary.
“Nothing is completely riskfree,” Fauci said in an interview.
“What the community feels is
that all of the good that will come
from the lack of social stigmatization” is worth the risk. “This
means a lot to them. This has a
lot to do with their self-worth,
their identity.”
An undetectable viral load is
defined as fewer than 200 copies
of the virus in a milliliter of
blood. Generally, people with
HIV should maintain that level
or a lower level for six months
before beginning to consider
themselves incapable of transmitting the virus sexually.
Many who faithfully take antiretroviral medication and lead
healthy lifestyles can bring their
viral loads considerably lower, to
50 or even 25 copies.
But progress raises other
questions, said Jonathan Mermin, director of the CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral
Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention. What if a person forgets to
take medication for one day?
What about two, or more? How
long after resuming therapy
should someone wait before once
again considering himself or herself incapable of transmitting the
virus? And what about people
who go above and below the
200-copy threshold over time?
Studies show that to be the case
for about 10 percent of the
people with HIV, Mermin said.
As yet, there are no evidencebased answers to these questions, he said. “The public-health
challenge now is moving from
theory to implementation,” he
said. “Many questions arise following the information that
when a person with HIV has an
undetectable viral load, he has
effectively no risk of transmitting the virus.”
In 2008, Swiss experts announced that those with undetectable levels of HIV could not
transmit HIV through sex. But
the world was not ready to hear
the message then.
Starting in 2011, three large
studies confirmed the idea,
tracking more than 75,000 vaginal and anal condomless sex acts
without finding a single HIV
transmission to an HIV-negative
partner from someone whose
viral load was undetectable. The
initial 2011 study was named
“breakthrough of the year” by
PHOTOS BY BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Mark S. King hoists Henry the cat at home in Baltimore on Wednesday. King is HIV positive and considered noninfectious with proper
antiretroviral treatment. He and his husband, Michael Mitchell, below, embrace at their home. Increasing numbers of public health
agencies and clinicians are aware that those whose HIV is undetectable will not pass the virus on through sex. Video: wapo.st/HIVloads.
“This is a radical challenge to the status quo
and to 35 years of HIV and fear
of people living with HIV.”
Bruce Richman, who launched
the “Undetectable = Untransmittable” education campaign
Science magazine.
Now the challenge is to get the
message out to HIV-positive people, caregivers and the public.
And that process has been slow.
“I would tell everyone about
this, friends and family and people I wanted to date, and I was
coming across so much resistance, because major institutions
were saying this is wrong,” Richman said.
He launched U=U last year,
initially a lonely and sometimes
controversial campaign to let the
world know something that
many people with HIV had concluded for themselves. His breakthrough moment came in August
2016 when New York City’s
health department signed on.
Soon, other cities and organizations were joining.
Still, the message is moving
mainly from people with HIV to
health authorities and policymakers, rather than in the other
direction, Richman said.
“This is a radical challenge to
the status quo and to 35 years of
HIV and fear of people living
with HIV,” Richman said.
Brigitte Charbonneau, 71, of
Ottawa, found out this year that
she could not transmit the virus
after 23 years of being HIV
positive. “I thought, ‘My God, I’ve
been living with my man for 20
years, and we’ve been using condoms,’ ” the retired hairdresser
recalled. “And I phoned him
right that afternoon.”
Jennifer Vaughan of Watsonville, Calif., vividly remembers
the moment she learned she
could not transmit the virus to
her boyfriend. The mother of
three tested positive in February
2016 after she became critically
ill with what was finally determined to be AIDS. HIV was not
among the possibilities she or
her doctors considered, until a
blood test revealed the virus. She
thinks she was infected by a
previous boyfriend with a history of intravenous drug use.
Vaughan attended a speech
Richman gave and was talking
with him in a parking lot outside
a Starbucks.
“I’ll never forget him saying
those words, ‘You can’t transmit
the virus if you’re undetectable,’ ”
the 47-year-old substitute teacher recalled. “And I said, ‘Wait,
what?’
“It was like the sky opened.
Are you kidding? There’s, like,
zero risk? I don’t feel like I’m a
threat anymore. I don’t feel like
I’m dirty. I don’t feel like I’m a
dangerous person.”
leonard.bernstein@washpost.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
.
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. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
The World
A working mom’s
statement hits a
nerve in Japan
Assembly member’s decision to bring her son
to the office doesn’t sit well with male colleagues
BY A NNA F IFIELD
AND Y UKI O DA
tokyo — Yuka Ogata wanted to
make a point about the challenges working women face in Japan.
The men on the Kumamoto Municipal Assembly proved her
point for her — entirely inadvertently.
The 42-year-old assembly
member, on her first day back at
work after giving birth, walked
into the chamber Wednesday
and sat in her front-row seat with
her 7-month-old baby, Dogen, in
her arms. Video from the assembly session showed the boy sitting on her lap and watching the
goings-on, not making a sound,
while the men in the other rows
looked on in consternation.
Ogata had hardly sat down
before four men, including
Chairman Yoshitomo Sawada,
confronted her about bringing
the baby into the chamber. A fifth
man lingered behind them.
There, in one camera frame —
working moms versus the patriarchy.
“I wanted to appear in the
assembly hall with my baby and
represent the voices of mothers,
working and nonworking, who
tell me they’re struggling to raise
a child in Japan,” Ogata told The
Washington Post. “Women want
to be able to raise a child and
work happily without having to
sacrifice one of these things.”
Ogata, who holds a master’s degree in conflict resolution from
George Mason University, also
has a 4-year-old daughter.
Other politicians around the
world have made the point in
similar ways.
Licia Ronzulli, an Italian
member of the European Parlia-
ment, has been taking her daughter, Vittoria, into the chamber in
Strasbourg, France, since 2010,
when she was 1 month old.
Earlier this year, Larissa Waters became the first member of
Australia’s Parliament to take
advantage of new rules allowing
mothers to nurse their babies in
the chamber.
But Ogata’s move set up a
serious confrontation in etiquette-bound Japan, where rules
are rules and shall not be bent.
Ogata, who was elected to the
assembly in April 2015, had already made history — and waves
— in March when she remained
seated while asking questions in
the assembly. She was eight
months pregnant at the time.
Her actions illustrate the barriers that Prime Minister Shinzo
Abe must break down if he is to
achieve his “womenomics” goal
— increasing women’s participation in the Japanese workforce as
the country’s population shrinks.
Babies are not explicitly
banned from the assembly chamber, and Ogata said she had
asked the assembly secretariat to
allow members to bring their
children onto the floor or open a
day-care center in the assembly
building.
Her request was not without
precedent. The Kyoto and Akita
prefectural assemblies have
child-care facilities in their
buildings.
But her request was denied —
she was told that attending a
meeting with a child would “obstruct the operation of the assembly” — so she decided to take
her baby with her when she
returned to work anyway. Still,
she was surprised to have the
infant ejected from the chamber.
ASAHI SHIMBUN/GETTY IMAGES
Kumamoto, Japan, assembly member Yuka Ogata’s decision to bring her son to work with her Wednesday was met by protest from the
assembly’s chairman, Yoshitomo Sawada, center, and others. The assembly secretariat ruled that the baby was a visitor and could not stay.
The assembly secretariat ruled
that the baby was a visitor — and
visitors must sit in the gallery.
“The assembly has a rule that
only members can enter the assembly hall, so that’s why we
asked her to remove her child,”
Sawada, the assembly chairman,
told The Post. “It wasn’t appropriate.”
The session started 40 minutes late after Ogata asked to
accompany Sawada, with her
baby, to his office to discuss the
matter. Ogata returned — alone.
The baby was with a friend.
Sawada opened the session by
apologizing to the assembly
members for the delay. One of
them could be heard replying,
“You’re not the one who should
be apologizing,” according to local reports.
Politics is a difficult profession
for women in Japan. Only 10 percent of the lawmakers in the
lower house of the National Diet
are women, and little, if any,
consideration is given to accom-
“Women want to be
able to raise a child and
work happily without
having to sacrifice one
of these things.”
Assembly member Yuka Ogata
modating mothers.
Megumi Kaneko, then-vice
minister of internal affairs, was
sharply criticized earlier this
year when tabloid papers reported that she was taking her 1-yearold son to day care in her official
vehicle. It didn’t matter that the
day-care center was in the same
building as her Diet office. Newspapers accused her of using an
official vehicle for private purposes.
Kaneko apologized to anyone
who felt “uncomfortable” with
her efforts to find the right
work-life balance. She lost her
seat in last month’s parliamentary elections.
For her part, Ogata has at least
succeeded in raising awareness
about mothers in politics.
“Thanks to her, I learned there
are cases overseas where members can bring a child into the
assembly, so I hope we can consider her suggestions for improving the working environment for
female members in some way,”
Sawada said.
Ogata was not deterred by this
week’s events. She is determined
to make Japanese society accommodate working mothers.
“The whole reason why it’s so
difficult to raise a child and have
a career in Japan is because there
are no women with children
involved in the decision-making
process,” she said. “I’m determined to change that.”
anna.fifield@washpost.com
‘We dare not squander the moment,’
Zimbabwe’s new leader tells nation
A SSOCIATED P RESS
harare, zimbabwe — Zimbabweans must set aside “poisoned”
politics and work together to rebuild the nation and reengage the
world, new President Emmerson
Mnangagwa said Friday, delivering an inclusive message to an
exultant crowd that packed a stadium for his inauguration.
Mnangagwa, blamed for several of the crackdowns and damaging policies of his mentor and
predecessor, the ousted Robert
Mugabe, also promised that “democratic” elections will be held on
schedule in 2018 and that foreign
investment will be safe in Zimbabwe, a message aimed at laying
the groundwork for economic revival.
“We dare not squander the moment,” Mnangagwa said in a
speech whose sense of promise
matched the joyful mood of a nation hungry for change after
Mugabe’s 37-year rule. The former
leader resigned Tuesday after
pressure from the military, former
allies in the ruling party and massive street protests.
Helicopters and planes flew in
formation, an artillery unit fired a
21-gun salute, honor guards with
Emmerson Mnangagwa
pledged 2018 elections
and an economic revival
fixed bayonets high-stepped, and
Zimbabwean pop star Jah Prayzah had people dancing on a day
celebrating a new era in the nation’s history. Such an occasion
had seemed almost impossible to
contemplate for many Zimbabweans as the years dragged on under
the 93-year-old Mugabe, who took
power after the end of white minority rule in 1980.
Mugabe fired Mnangagwa, 75,
as vice president Nov. 6 in a dispute over the growing presidential ambitions of Mugabe’s unpopular wife, Grace Mugabe. The former justice and defense minister,
however, had been one of
Mugabe’s closest confidants, raising questions about just how
much change and reconciliation
there will be on his watch.
The new president praised
Robert Mugabe, who will remain
in the country but did not attend
the inauguration, for his “immense contribution” to Zimba-
bwe’s emergence as a nation after
a guerrilla war by black nationalists. However, Mnangagwa sought
to reinforce the idea of a “new
Zimbabwe,” a refrain commonly
heard in the streets of the capital.
“We must work together — you,
me, all of us who make up this
nation,” Mnangagwa said, urging
the millions of Zimbabweans who
have left the southern African
country to contribute to their
homeland’s reconstruction.
Mnangagwa referred to one of
Mugabe’s signature policies, saying farmers will be compensated
for the often-violent land seizures
starting around 2000 that drew
international condemnation and
sanctions, and which contributed
to the country’s economic slide. It
is unclear where Zimbabwe
would get the funds for such compensation.
The program that saw land
seized from white farmers and
given to black Zimbabweans will
not be reversed, but efforts to
make farms more productive will
be intensified, he said.
“As we bear no malice towards
any nation, we ask those who have
punished us in the past to reconsider their economic and political
sanctions against us,” said the
PHOTOS BY JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
president, who remains under
U.S. sanctions for his activities as
Mugabe’s enforcer, a role that
earned him the nickname “Crocodile.”
In a show of regional support
for Zimbabwe’s new leader, the
presidents of Botswana, Mozambique and Zambia attended the
inauguration, with the crowd
cheering Botswana’s leader, Ian
Khama, for his past calls for
Mugabe to step down.
Above, a
supporter of
Zimbabwe’s new
president,
Emmerson
Mnangagwa,
celebrates ahead
of Mnangagwa’s
inauguration, at
left, at the
National Sports
Stadium in
Harare.
DIGEST
IRELAND
Government may fall
before Brexit summit
Ireland’s minority government
looked set to collapse within
days Friday after the party
propping it up submitted a
motion of no confidence in the
deputy prime minister, weeks
before a summit on Britain’s
plans to leave the European
Union.
Prime Minister Leo Varadkar
said that if the motion was not
withdrawn by Tuesday, he would
be forced to hold an election
before Christmas, a prospect E.U.
officials say would complicate a
key summit Dec. 14-15 on Brexit.
“What that would mean is me
throwing a good woman under
the bus to save myself and my
own government, and that would
be the wrong thing to do,”
Varadkar told national
broadcaster RTE, dismissing
demands for his deputy, Frances
Fitzgerald, to quit.
Varadkar is due to play a
major role in the Brexit talks,
telling E.U. leaders whether
Ireland believes sufficient
progress has been made on the
future border between E.U.member Ireland and Britain’s
province of Northern Ireland.
— Reuters
POLAND
Lawmakers back bills
on replacing judges
Poland’s ruling party
lawmakers gave initial approval
Friday to two bills allowing
Parliament and the president to
replace top judges, plans the
opposition and the European
Commission denounced as a
threat to the rule of law.
Once approved and signed by
the president, the bills would
probably deepen the right-wing
government’s standoff with the
European Union, potentially
reducing E.U. development funds
for Poland.
Law and Justice (PiS) party
deputies sent the bills authored
by President Andrzej Duda, a PiS
ally, to parliamentary committees
after Duda vetoed PiS-sponsored
bills in July that would have
given the justice minister
extensive powers over judges.
Several thousand people in
more than 100 cities protested
the bills in July and again Friday
night, although the
demonstrations Friday fell short
of the mass summer rallies.
— Reuters
MEXICO
Istanbul district bans LGBT
Rights official seized in
2nd attack in a week
event: A Turkish district
governorship in Istanbul banned
a film screening event Friday
related to lesbian, gay, bisexual
and transgender issues, the day
before it was due to start, citing
risks to public safety. After the
announcement, a statement
from the venue where the film
and interviews were to take place
said they had been postponed.
Last week, the Turkish capital,
Ankara, banned the public
showing of films and exhibitions
related to LGBT issues until
further notice.
Assailants kidnapped an
official of the human rights office
of the western Mexico state of
Jalisco, in the second attack on a
rights worker in one week.
The National Human Rights
Commission called on
authorities to find the Jalisco
official, who was not named.
Local media said gunmen
stopped the official Friday when
he was driving to the offices of
the state rights commission and
apparently abducted him
On Monday, gunmen in Baja
California Sur state killed the
head of that state’s human rights
commission, Silvestre de la Toba
Camacho, and his son.
— Associated Press
Algeria’s ruling parties retain
majority: The ruling parties in
Algeria took more than
50 percent of the vote in local
elections, retaining their
majority, the interior minister
said Friday. Turnout in
Thursday’s vote reached
46.83 percent, slightly up from
42.92 percent in 2012, Minister
Noureddine Bedoui told
reporters. The elections come
amid continuing questions over
the health of President Abdelaziz
Bouteflika, who has been in
power since 1999 and has made
only rare appearances since
suffering a stroke in 2013.
Autopsy of protester shows he
drowned: Authorities in
Argentina say that an activist
found dead in a river drowned
and that they are ruling out foul
play. The forensic medical board
said Friday that Santiago
Maldonado died from “asphyxia
after being submerged” along
with hypothermia. Maldonado’s
family has said that border police
killed him.
— From news services
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
Mosque attack described as sophisticated, unprecedented
EGYPT FROM A1
ters news agency.
Egypt’s militants have targeted Coptic Christian churches in
the past, but strikes against
mosques have been rare in recent years. Nonetheless, orthodox Sunni Muslims and militant
factions consider Sufism, a mystical branch of Islam, to be
heretical, and last year Egyptian
Islamist militants beheaded an
elderly Sufi cleric in the northern Sinai.
The exact reason for the attack
on the mosque, called al-Rawda,
remained unclear. That the attack occurred near the town of
Bir al-Abd, an area dotted with
security outposts, underscored
the ability of militants to strike at
the heart of governmentprotected zones.
The assault had the hallmarks
of a highly coordinated operation. More than two dozen militants arrived at the mosque in
several four-wheel-drive vehicles, according to officials and
survivors. The attack started
when one of the militants, a
suicide bomber, detonated his
explosives during the Friday sermon. The other militants — who
fanned out around the mosque —
gunned down panicked worshipers as they fled, according
to Moemen Sharawy, whose relatives were at the mosque during
the assault.
Two of Sharawy’s uncles were
killed in the attack, including
Fathy el-Tanany, 62, who led the
call to prayer at the mosque, he
said.
Several of the militants also
entered the mosque and shot
worshipers inside, according to
Mohamed Elhor, a journalist
who lives in Bir al-Abd and
helped transport injured survivors to the hospital. Elhor said
that four of his relatives were
killed in the attack.
The mosque had been crowded with local residents as well as
people displaced by violence in
other parts of the northern Sinai,
said Elhor, who added that he
expected the death toll to
rise. One hospital had a list of
300 fatalities, he said. But other
bodies also were taken to hospi-
EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
In this image from video, people gather outside the al-Rawda mosque, the site of an attack near Bir al-Abd in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula that
killed at least 235. Egypt’s militants have targeted Coptic Christian churches in the past, but strikes against mosques have been rare.
tals miles away. After shuttling
the wounded from the mosque,
“my clothes were covered in
blood,” he said.
An injured survivor of the
attack, interviewed by a local
Sinai news outlet, said he saw
between seven and 10 masked
gunmen inside the mosque,
wearing military uniforms and
carrying the black flags favored
by Islamic State militants. “They
started shooting inside the
mosque, and people started falling everywhere,” said the man,
who was not identified in the
video.
Footage of the aftermath of
“They started
shooting inside the
mosque, and people
started falling
everywhere.”
An injured survivor of the attack,
who said he saw seven to
10 masked gunmen inside the
mosque wearing military
uniforms and carrying the black
flags favored by Islamic State
militants
the assault showed dozens of
bodies, covered with blankets or
bloodied sheets, in rows inside
the mosque. Some of the injured
were ferried away in cars and in
the beds of pickup trucks.
“Horrible and cowardly terrorist attack on innocent and defenseless worshipers in Egypt,”
President Trump wrote in a
tweet. “The world cannot tolerate terrorism, we must defeat
them militarily and discredit the
extremist ideology that forms
the basis of their existence!”
In a subsequent tweet, Trump
tied the carnage to his administration’s strict immigration pol-
icies. “We have to get TOUGHER
AND SMARTER than ever before, and we will. Need the
WALL, need the BAN! God bless
the people of Egypt,” he wrote.
He called Sissi to offer his condolences Friday.
Egypt’s insurgency gathered
momentum after a military coup
in 2013 that ousted Mohamed
Morsi, the country’s first democratically elected president and a
leader of the Islamist Muslim
Brotherhood.
The militants have repeatedly
mounted large-scale, complex attacks on security personnel.
Since July 2013, at least 1,000
members of the security forces
have been killed in attacks in
Sinai, according to data compiled by the Tahrir Institute for
Middle East Policy.
The northern Sinai, a stretch
of the country neglected by successive Egyptian governments,
remains one of the lingering
strongholds for the Islamic State
as the group’s self-proclaimed
caliphate in Syria and Iraq has all
but collapsed under air and
ground attacks.
Even as the government has
tightened its grip on Sinai and
claimed to have killed thousands
of suspected jihadists, the threat
from the militants has grown. In
the past year, Islamic State militants have killed hundreds of
security officers while broadening their attacks on Christians,
killing dozens in bomb attacks
on churches in Cairo, Alexandria
and other parts of Egypt. The rise
of another militant group, called
the Hasm Movement, which has
targeted judges and security officials, has further challenged
Sissi’s government.
The bloodshed Friday raised
the specter of further mass killings of civilians.
It also highlighted fears for
the safety for millions of adherents of Sufi Islam in Egypt,
whose practices have made
them a target of Sunni militants.
Last year, Islamic State militants asserted responsibility for
two beheadings near Arish, including the killing of the elderly
Sufi cleric, Sulaiman Abu Haraz.
The al-Rawda mosque, while
closely associated with Sufis, was
also linked to members of a Sinai
tribe that had opposed the Islamic State militants, said Elhor, the
local journalist.
The attack on the mosque was
unusual because the Islamic
State militants “believe it’s not
religious to blast a house of God,”
he said. But the militants also
considered it their religious duty
to kill “the devious ones, like
Sufis, because of their beliefs,” he
added.
kareem.fahim@washpost.com
Fahim reported from Istanbul. Brian
Murphy in Washington contributed
to this report.
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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
AMR NABIL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Relatives surround Sheikh Sulieman Ghanem, 75, injured in the attack on the al-Rawda mosque during
Friday prayers, as he is treated at Egypt’s Suez Canal University hospital in Ismailia.
Attack shows ability of ISIS
affiliates to avenge defeats
SINAI FROM A1
“The Sinai attack underscores
that the elimination of the ISIS
caliphate will have little effect on
the group’s regional affiliates,
whose success or failure depends
on local conditions,” said Daniel
Benjamin, a former coordinator
for counterterrorism at the State
Department and a professor at
Dartmouth College. The Sinai
branch, like most of the regional
chapters, existed long before the
Islamic State declared the establishment of its caliphate in 2014.
To other analysts, the timing of
the attack, which occurred during
Friday prayers, and the choice of
target, a Sufi mosque, reflected a
new level of desperation and frustration among the Islamic State’s
remaining adherents.
The group views Sufi Muslims
as apostates and has attacked Sufi
shrines in northern Africa and
Iraq. But the Islamic State has
generally not targeted Sufis in
Egypt, where the strain of Sunni
Islam has deep roots that date
back centuries and broad popular
appeal.
“As you get more desperate,
you also get internal feuding over
who is more puritanical,” said
Bernard Haykel, a professor at
Princeton University who has
studied the Islamic State’s religious roots. “Everyone is trying to
compete to show they are truer to
the cause. They want to cast
themselves as the hardest of the
hard-liners.”
Until recently, Islamic State
militants in Egypt had made an
effort to appeal to disaffected
Islamists who had supported the
Muslim Brotherhood or opposed
Egyptian President Abdel Fatah
al-Sissi’s tight grip on power. The
al-Rawda mosque attack suggested that the group was almost
entirely focused on amassing
body counts rather than holding
territory or winning new followers.
“On its face, it’s a really dumb
thing to do,” Haykel said. “What
do you stand to gain other than
the hatred and contempt of Muslims all over the world?”
One purpose of the attack may
have been to demonstrate that
the Islamic State, despite the collapse of its armies in Iraq and
Syria, remains deadly and rel-
evant. “One way to do that is by
turning to increasingly brutal
and savage terrorist attacks,” said
Shadi Hamid, the author of “Islamic Exceptionalism” and a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution.
U.S. officials have been carefully monitoring some of the more
significant affiliates in recent
weeks to see how they might be
affected by the fall of the core
group’s capital in Raqqa, Syria.
One concern is the possibility that
substantial numbers of Islamic
State fighters — including perhaps the senior leadership —
could resurface in a new location.
Officials also are worried that one
of the regional affiliates may seek
to launch a major attack against
Western targets as an act of revenge for the deaths of comrades
in Iraq and Syria.
“We say that the Islamic State
has been defeated, but only as a
military force,” said a senior U.S.
counterterrorism official who
spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss security assessments. “Homegrown insurgencies are going to go on for a while
and will be harder to defeat. The
hope is that we can get to the
point where local forces can contain the threat on their own,
without support from the international coalition or U.S. advisers.”
The U.S. military has been
largely successful in preventing a
second Islamic State caliphate
from taking hold in Libya. But
last month, Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, told reporters that
other affiliates remain worrisome, including “an ISIS concentration in Sinai that Egypt has
been working on” for some time.
There has been little evidence
in recent months that the core
organization is providing money
or logistical support to its regional affiliates, but the group’s ideology and brutal tactics remain a
common bond, the officials said.
“What ISIS is absolutely trying
to do is leverage local insurgencies now to rebrand themselves,”
Dunford said. “They are trying to
maintain relevance.”
The Sinai chapter presents an
exceptionally difficult challenge,
because of the group’s growing
capabilities and Egypt’s seeming
inability to contain them — or to
even acknowledge the seriousness of the threat, U.S. counterterrorism officials said.
Friday’s mosque attack occurred in northern Sinai, in Bir
al-Abd, a town in a coastal area
noted for its heavy security presence. The assailants’ ability to
inflict a savage blow in such a
place suggested to some current
and former U.S. officials that the
momentum lies with the terrorists, despite a two-year campaign
by the Sissi government to destroy the group.
“For whatever reason, the
Egyptians have not worked closely with us in the northern Sinai,”
said Stuart Jones, a former deputy chief of mission at the U.S.
Embassy in Cairo and vice president at the Cohen Group. “This
just shows that the Egyptians
need our help with training and
the special kinds of equipment it
takes to defeat insurgencies.”
He envisions a program similar
to the one U.S. troops have been
executing in Iraq.
In the wake of the attack, President Trump suggested that more
American help might be on the
way. “The world cannot tolerate
terrorism, we must defeat them
militarily and discredit the extremist ideology that forms the
basis of their existence!” he tweeted. “We have to get TOUGHER
AND SMARTER than ever before.”
But it was unclear exactly what
kind of program the president
wants to see. His tweet went on to
call for the construction of a border wall and an immigration ban.
In Egypt, Sissi’s approach has
been to launch a broad campaign
against all Islamist groups, including Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, which has renounced violence in recent years. The net
effect has been to drive even
moderate Islamists to support the
extremists. Friday’s attack is likely to lead Sissi, with Trump’s
support, to get even tougher.
James Jeffrey, a former ambassador to Iraq and senior fellow at
the Washington Institute, said
the attack “will serve as an argument for Sissi to continue his
draconian crackdown and authoritarian rule.”
greg.jaffe@washpost.com
joby.warrick@washpost.com
U.S. backpedals on closing PLO o∞ce
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The Trump administration
backtracked Friday on its decision
to order the Palestinians’ office in
Washington to close, instead saying it would merely impose limitations on the office that it expected
would be lifted after 90 days.
Last week, U.S. officials said the
Palestine Liberation Organization
mission couldn’t stay open because the Palestinians had violated a provision in U.S. law requiring the office to close if the Palestinians try to get the International
Criminal Court to prosecute Israelis. The move triggered a major
rift in U.S.-Palestinian relations
that threatened to scuttle President Trump’s ambitious Mideast
peace effort before it ever got off
the ground.
Yet the United States delayed
shuttering the office for a week
while saying it was working out
the details with the Palestinians,
before abruptly reversing course
late Friday, as many Americans
were enjoying a long Thanksgiving Day weekend. State Department spokesman Edgar Vasquez
said the United States had “advised the PLO Office to limit its
activities to those related to
achieving a lasting, comprehensive peace between the Israelis
and Palestinians.”
Vasquez said that even those
restrictions will be lifted after
90 days if Washington determines
that the Israelis and Palestinians
are engaged in serious peace talks.
The White House, in an effort led
by Trump adviser and son-in-law
Jared Kushner, has been preparing a comprehensive peace plan to
present to both sides in the coming months.
“We therefore are optimistic
that at the end of this 90-day period, the political process may be
sufficiently advanced that the
president will be in a position to
allow the PLO office to resume full
operations,” Vasquez said.
The reversal marked a serious
departure from the administration’s interpretation of the law
only a week earlier. Officials had
said then that, one way or another,
the office had to close because
Palestinian President Mahmoud
Abbas, in a U.N. speech in September, had called on the ICC to investigate and prosecute Israelis. That
same law, though, says that the
president can let the office reopen
after 90 days despite an ICC push
if serious Israeli-Palestinian talks
are underway.
There were no indications that
the Trump administration had initially moved to close the office as
part of a premeditated strategy to
strengthen its hand in eventual
peace talks. Instead, officials explained the move by saying that
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, in
a strict interpretation of the law,
determined that Abbas’s speech
had crossed the legal line.
The chaos that ensued, with
U.S. officials unable for several
days to explain whether the office
was truly closing and when, indicated the announcement had
caught much of the government
off-guard.
It led the Palestinians to issue
an angry response last weekend.
Senior Palestinian negotiator
Saeb Erekat accused the administration of bowing to pressure from
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu’s government “at a
time when we are trying to cooperate to achieve the ultimate deal.”
Vasquez said the original position had never been intended to
create leverage or impose pressure. The State Department said
that the administration is actively
working to pursue lasting IsraeliPalestinian peace.
SU
A11
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
Pleasing Turkey, U.S. will stop arming Kurds who fought ISIS
BY
AND
C AROL M ORELLO
E RIN C UNNINGHAM
The Trump administration is
preparing to stop supplying
weapons to ethnic Kurdish fighters in Syria, the White House
acknowledged Friday, a move reflecting renewed focus on furthering a political settlement to
the civil war there and countering
Iranian influence now that the
Islamic State caliphate is largely
vanquished.
Word of the policy change long
sought by neighboring Turkey
came Friday, not from Washington but from Ankara. Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu
told reporters at a news conference that President Trump had
pledged to stop arming the fighters, known as the YPG, during a
phone call between Trump and
his Turkish counterpart, Recep
Tayyip Erdogan.
“Mr. Trump clearly stated that
he had given clear instructions,
and that the YPG won’t be given
arms and that this nonsense
The White
House said
Friday that
President
Trump has
agreed to stop
sending
weapons to
Kurdish
militias known
as the YPG that
have been
fighting in
Syria.
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
should have ended a long time
ago,” the Associated Press quoted
Cavusoglu as saying to reporters
following the call.
Initially, the administration’s
national security team appeared
surprised by the Turks’ announcement and uncertain what to say
about it. The State Department
referred questions to the White
House, and hours passed with no
confirmation from the National
Security Council.
In late afternoon, the White
House confirmed the weapons
cutoff would happen, though it
provided no details on timing.
“Consistent with our previous
policy, President Trump also informed President Erdogan of
pending adjustments to the military support provided to our partners on the ground in Syria, now
that the battle of Raqqa is complete and we are progressing into
a stabilization phase to ensure
that ISIS cannot return,” the
White House statement said, re-
ferring to the recent liberation of
the Syrian city that had served as
the Islamic State’s de facto capital.
The decision to stop arming the
Kurds will remove a major source
of tension between the United
States and Turkey, a NATO ally.
But it is likely to further anger the
Kurds, who already feel betrayed
since the United States told them
to hand over hard-won territory
to the Syrian government.
Turkey has pointed to the YPG’s
affiliation with the Kurdistan
Workers’ Party — a Kurdish rebel
group that has fought the Turkish
state for decades — as evidence of
its terrorist ties. The YPG, which
formed amid the chaos of the
Syrian civil war, has worked with
U.S. forces to oust the Islamic
State from key areas there.
The Obama administration began arming the Syrian Democratic Forces, which is dominated by
the Kurdish YPG militia, because
they were considered the most
effective fighters against Islamic
State militants.
The phone call between Trump
and Erdogan followed a summit
on Syria held this week in Sochi,
Russia. It was attended by Erdogan, Russian President Vladimir
Putin and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. Russia and Iran
backed the government of Syrian
President Bashar al-Assad and
helped Syrian forces to rout the
Islamic State.
The two powers, along with
Turkey, have forged an alliance
that is advancing its own peace
plan, in which the United States
would play little role beyond being an observer. They have said
U.S. troops should leave Syria
now that the Islamic State’s defeat
appears imminent.
But a U.S. withdrawal without
a peace plan well on its way would
be victory for Assad, and by extension, Iran and Russia.
So U.S. officials have said they
plan to keep American troops in
northern Syria — and continue
working with Kurdish fighters —
to pressure Assad to make concessions during peace talks brokered
by the United Nations in Geneva,
stalemated for three years now.
“We’re not going to just walk away
right now,” Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis said last week.
James Jeffrey, the U.S. ambassador to Turkey from 2008 to
2010, said the decision to cease
supplying weapons to the Kurds
appears to reflect an evolving
strategy to keep playing a productive role in Syria and weaken
Iranian-backed militias and Hezbollah, both of which fought
alongside Syrian forces to regain
territory from the militants.
“Fighting ISIS was such a priority, we had to focus on that
before other things,” he said, using a common acronym for the
Islamic State. “Now as the conventional fight is over, we’re trying to come up with a bigger
policy. We can’t do it without
Turkey. It’s pure geography. We
have to mend fences with the
Turks if we want to remain in
Syria.”
carol.morello@washpost.com
erin.cunnigham@washpost.com
As holiday season opens, a scare
on London’s busy Oxford Street
BY K ARLA A DAM
AND W ILLIAM B OOTH
london — During a fretful hour
Friday afternoon, Londoners
braced for confirmation of yet another attack, something that has
become familiar in the British
capital this year. Amid rumors of
gunshots, shoppers fled down Oxford Street, one of the busiest retail districts in the world on one of
the busiest shopping days of the
year.
In the end, it appeared to be a
false alarm. London’s Metropolitan Police said they could not find
evidence of shots fired or casualties.
The police said that at
4:38 p.m., they received several
calls reporting gunshots in the
area.
“Given the nature of the info
received we responded as if the
incident was terrorism,” the police
said in a tweet. Armed officers
poured into the crowded Oxford
Street area in the heart of London
and ordered people to take shelter.
False reports of gunshots
shut down shopping
district for an hour
The scenes in the ensuing hour
were ones of panic. Video from
Oxford Circus uploaded to social
media showed pedestrians fleeing
the area as armed police officers
arrived. Many people jumped on
Twitter and other social media
sites to say that they were holed up
in nearby department stores and
offices.
Emily Hooper, 39, was one of
hundreds of people who work in
the area whose offices were in
lockdown as police scrambled to
figure out what was happening.
“We heard so many different
stories — it’s quite frustrating,”
she said minutes after she was let
out of her building. She said there
were rumors of gunshots and of a
truck mowing down pedestrians.
“It’s just madness that people say
that kind of stuff when it’s not
actually happening. It fuels the
frenzy and fear and stampede that
follows.”
After a little more than an hour
of instructing Londoners to stay
inside, police gave an all-clear signal.
Several attacks this year have
put England’s capital city on edge.
In September, a homemade bomb
was detonated on a subway car at
the Parsons Green station, injuring nearly 30 commuters. Three
vehicle attacks, one in March and
two in June, left 12 people dead
and dozens of others wounded.
Minutes after the police lifted
the cordon around Oxford Street,
normal life resumed. The parked
double-decker buses started up
their engines. Some storekeepers
opened their shops. Thousands of
people carrying shopping bags
flooded back into the area to seek
out Black Friday sales.
But there were still signs of the
panic that gripped the area earlier.
At H&M, for instance, the doors
remained locked as staff swept up
SIMON DAWSON/REUTERS
An officer moves under police tape on London’s Oxford Street. Police said they received reports of
gunshots in the area shortly after 4:30 p.m. and that they “responded as if the incident was terrorism.”
broken glass that covered the
floor. Another store also remained
closed as staff cleaned up plant
vases that had been smashed. Outside, a pair of shoes was aban-
doned on the sidewalk.
Hooper acknowledged that the
city felt jittery even before the
incident Friday. But at the end of
the day, she said, Londoners just
get on with daily life: “You just
have to keep carrying on. You can’t
not live.”
karla.adam@washpost.com
william.booth@washpost.com
Germany’s center-left party may throw a lifeline to chancellor
BY
G RIFF W ITTE
berlin — The impasse that has
gripped German politics all week
showed signs of breaking Friday
as a main center-left party
backed down from pledges that it
would not consider teaming with
Chancellor Angela Merkel to
form a government.
The shift gives Merkel a potential path out of a crisis that has
been called the worst of her
12-year tenure. It also lessens the
chance that Germans will go back
to the polls in early 2018 after
an inconclusive September election left the country without an
obvious formula for a stable government.
Merkel’s center-right Christian
Democratic Union (CDU) remains
the dominant party, but it still
needs to work with other parties to
cobble together a governing partnership.
Since the September vote, the
center-left Social Democrats
(SPD) have insisted they will go
into opposition rather than form
another “grand coalition” with the
CDU.
That pledge was repeated as
recently as Monday after talks
broke down among the CDU, the
pro-business Free Democrats and
the environmentalist Greens.
This left Merkel without negotiating partners as she seeks to
extend her leadership of Germany to a fourth term.
But Friday, after days of armtwisting by President Frank-Walter Steinmeier and a marathon
eight-hour meeting of the party’s
leadership, the SPD said for the
first time it is ready to talk.
“The SPD will not say no to
discussions,” said party General
Secretary Hubertus Heil.
That willingness does not
mean Germany is headed for
another grand coalition of the
sort that has run the country for
eight of the past 12 years.
Top party officials, including
SPD leader Martin Schulz, are
reported to adamantly oppose
such an arrangement. They
blame their position as Merkel’s
junior partner for the party’s
downward slide in the polls, including a September result that
was its worst since World War II.
But the party is also reluctant
to contest another election so
soon after its September drubbing. And after the Free Democrats pulled out of talks for a
“Jamaica coalition” — the parties’
colors matched those of the island nation’s flag — a change of
heart by the SPD appeared to be
the only way for Germany to
avoid another vote.
Later Friday, Schulz said the
party was shifting its stance because of “its responsibility to the
country.” He said any agreement
to back Merkel will be subject to a
vote from the party’s membership, which has been highly skeptical of the idea.
Short of another grand coalition in which the SPD and the
CDU govern together, the SPD
also could prop up Merkel by
agreeing to support her government on a vote-by-vote basis. But
Merkel had said in a Monday
night interview that she would
prefer a new election to the
uncertainty of a minority government.
This past week’s impasse has
no direct precedent in Germany’s
postwar political history.
It has stirred speculation over
how long Merkel can hang on to
the chancellorship and whether a
new vote might give even more
impetus to the far-right Alternative for Germany party. It also has
spawned anxiety across Europe,
where governments are looking
to Germany for leadership on the
continent’s biggest challenges.
But markets have been relaxed
about the turmoil. The euro has
risen in recent days even as Europe’s most important economic
and political player struggled
with a level of uncertainty that is
common elsewhere across the
continent but is virtually unknown in Berlin.
Steinmeier, the president, has
played a crucial role in recent
days in steadying the country.
Although his position is largely
ceremonial, he has stepped in
this past week to prod the parties
back to the negotiating table.
As a former SPD foreign minister, he has had particular influence with the Social Democrats.
Germany’s oldest party has been
badly divided over whether to
enter talks.
Steinmeier is expected to con-
vene a meeting next week between Merkel and Schulz.
Any deal is likely to involve
weeks or perhaps even months of
negotiation. It also could involve
a change in leadership for the
SPD, as Schulz has come under
fire for ruling out talks for the
past two months even as many in
his party favored them.
Christian Ude, the former SPD
mayor of Munich, said the party
that has long represented the
interests of German workers
lacked “self-confidence” and direction, with no clarity about its
goals.
“I don’t think everyone should
just be blaring out solutions into
the world,” he told Deutschlandfunk radio Friday, “because
that’ll just reinforce the image of
an agitated heap of chickens.”
griff.witte@washpost.com
Luisa Beck contributed to this report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
SU
Economy & Business
DOW 23,557.99
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Consumer bureau has
two acting directors.
Which one is in charge?
Each side cites federal
rules, as Trump seeks
to install an agency critic
BY
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Casey Pasigna, 9, center, and her mother, Miricor, enjoy a game of Connect Four with Audrey Hall, center left, at a 94.7 Fresh FM radio
station booth during Black Friday festivities at Tysons Corner Center. For more Black Friday photos, visit wapo.st/blackfridaygallery.
Black Friday: All fun and games?
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
Like millions of other Americans, Zahid Khattak headed to
the mall early the day after
Thanksgiving. But unlike many
others, he wasn’t stocking up on
holiday presents. That, he said,
he would do later, online.
“This is just an event — an
excuse to come out,” he said, as he
waited for his 7-year-old daughter to get a purple butterfly painted on her cheek. “We don’t really
need to buy anything.”
Instead, the family waited in a
line for face-painting. They lined
up for an artist who turned
balloons into pink and green
swords. They walked to Santa’s
workshop, complete with interactive displays.
Elsewhere, there were free
makeovers, spin classes, pizza
samples and a selfie stop hosted
by radio personality Tommy McFly in front of the Lord & Taylor.
Managers at Tysons Corner
Center in Northern Virginia began planning this year’s Black
Friday festivities more than a
year and half ago as it became
clear more shoppers were choosing to buy online. Their goal: to
remind people that going to the
mall can be fun, even if there’s no
shopping involved.
“Long before there was Cyber
Monday, there was Black Friday,”
said Bob Maurer, the mall’s marketing manager. “We want to
bring back that excitement and
show people how wonderful it
can be in a physical place.”
The number of Americans who
go to stores on Black Friday has
declined steadily in recent years.
This year, 35 percent of consumers who plan to shop during
Thanksgiving week say they will
do so on Black Friday, down from
51 percent last year and
59 percent the year before, according to professional services
giant PWC.
Meanwhile, online shopping is
growing rapidly. By 10 a.m. on
Black Friday, Americans had already spent $640 million online
that day, an 18 percent increase
from last year, according to Adobe Analytics. Most of those purchases — 61 percent — were made
using smartphones and tablets.
As fewer people venture to
stores, retailers are looking for
ways to attract customers. Walmart is hosting “parties” and
offering extra discounts for shoppers who pick up items in stores.
Nordstrom’s newest Los Angeles
store comes stocked with bartenders, manicurists and tailors,
but no merchandise. At Apple,
executives say the company’s
newest stores — which it calls
“town squares” — have outdoor
plazas, boardrooms, forums and
workshops, all aimed at getting
people to linger.
Many mall staples, including
Macy’s, Sears and J.C. Penney,
have closed hundreds of stores
this year, leaving landlords with
plenty of room to get creative.
“There are all kinds of interactive displays this year — cosmetics tastings, coffee bars, massages
for achy feet,” said Summer Taylor, a director at the accounting
and consulting firm Deloitte.
“Malls are really trying to diversify their offerings. They have to, to
bring in more customers.”
The shift comes as retailers —
and shoppers — treat the holiday
shopping season as more of a
weeks-long slog than a one-day
sprint. Discounts have spread
out, both in stores and online, as
consumers demand lower prices
and greater convenience, which
means the Black Friday frenzy
isn’t nearly as pronounced as it
once was. That was certainly the
case in the morning at Tysons.
“We can’t believe it,” said Shadon Petty, 45, who has been going
shopping on Black Friday with
her sister for at least 20 years.
“We walked in and were like,
‘What’s going on? Is something
wrong? Did we come to the
wrong place?’ ”
They knew this year was different, her sister added, as soon as
they pulled into the parking lot.
“This is the first year we’ve actually been able to choose where we
park because there were so many
empty spots,” Stephanie Graham
said. “It’s like nobody cares about
Black Friday anymore.”
Although many retailers were
promoting sweeping discounts —
50 percent off everything at Hollister and Ann Taylor, $1 books at
the American Girl store — customers seemed largely unfazed.
The stores with the biggest
crowds — Apple and beauty company Lush, among them — lacked
Black Friday specials.
Meanwhile, business appeared
slow at Lacoste (where everything was 40 percent off ) and
Kay Jewelers (25 percent off )
Friday morning. L.L. Bean was
offering free paracord-making
workshops, but 30 minutes in,
nobody had visited the company’s booth.
“It feels more like a Saturday
than Black Friday,” said Ruby
Scribner, 25, who works at
Spencer’s, the chain that specializes in gag gifts. “I honestly
thought it would be different.”
Mae Thamer-Nall of Potomac
had thought so, too. She had
avoided going to the mall on
Black Friday her entire life, she
said, because she had feared
large crowds. But Friday was
shaping up to be different.
“We can’t believe how few
people are at this mall,” she said.
“It’s actually kind of pleasant.”
There is also a growing movement to get Americans to think
beyond shopping on Black Friday. REI, the outdoor goods
chain, closed its stores for the
third year and encouraged employees and customers to spend
the day outside.
But it’s not just retailers that
are offering alternatives: State
parks in Minnesota are offering
free admission. In Milwaukee, 11
craft breweries are spending the
day unveiling their newest beers.
The state of Washington,
meanwhile, has filled its lakes
with thousands of “large” trout to
encourage residents to grab their
fishing lines instead of their credit cards the day after Thanksgiving.
“Let’s face it: If you’re going to
get up early and wait around, you
might as well go fishing,” said
Jason Wettstein, a spokesman for
the Washington Department of
Fish and Wildlife. “Shopping can
wait.”
Amira Tohan, 12, thinks so, too.
She had arrived at Tysons early
Friday with a friend — but instead of shopping, she was getting her hair blow-dried at a
Dyson pop-up.
“We saw the blowouts and
were like, why not?” she said.
“The stores are pretty empty, so
we can go shopping later.”
Eventually, she said, she
planned to stop by Lululemon,
Sephora and Bath & Body Works.
She was hoping for discounts but
said it would be fine if she went
home empty-handed.
“It’s just fun to be here,” she
said. “Even if you don’t buy anything, the experience of going
shopping gets you in the Christmas spirit.”
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
R ENAE M ERLE
President Trump and the outgoing head of the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau
both named acting directors to
head the watchdog agency on
Friday, throwing its leadership
into disarray.
Legal analysts were split over
whether the White House or the
CFPB had the authority to name
an acting director, with each side
citing the fine print of dueling
federal rules. Some added that
the laws were open to interpretation and that the courts ultimately would have to decide the
matter.
Trump proposed his White
House budget director, Mick
Mulvaney, as the acting director
of the CFPB — an agency that
Mulvaney once called a “joke”
and said he wished didn’t exist.
Several defenders of the agency
said they were worried that Mulvaney, if given the helm of the
CFPB on a temporary basis,
would gut its powers.
The series of events began
Friday when the CFPB’s longtime
director, Richard Cordray, announced that he would leave at
the end of the day — instead of at
the end of the month — and
promoted his chief of staff, Leandra English, to become deputy
director. Cordray said in a letter
to CFPB staff members that English would serve as the agency’s
acting director until a replacement was confirmed by the Senate.
“I have also come to recognize
that appointing the current chief
of staff to the deputy director
position would minimize operational disruption and provide for
a smooth transition given her
operational expertise,” Cordray
said in his letter.
The move was widely seen by
analysts as an attempt to block
Trump from immediately putting a Republican in charge of
the agency without Senate confirmation.
But a few hours later, the
White House announced that
Mulvaney, the director of the
Office of Management and Budget, would take over.
“The President looks forward
to seeing Director Mulvaney take
a common sense approach to
leading the CFPB’s dedicated
staff, an approach that will empower consumers to make their
own financial decisions and facilitate investment in our communities,” according to a White
House statement.
Mulvaney is also expected to
remain head of the OMB until a
permanent CFPB director is
nominated and confirmed by the
Senate, according to the White
House.
The Dodd-Frank regulatory
reform bill, passed in 2010,
states that a deputy director will
“serve as acting director in the
absence or unavailability of the
director.”
But legal experts said that the
word “unavailability” could be
open to various interpretations.
For instance, that phrase could
be interpreted to be about the
director’s health, rather than the
director’s retirement.
“The courts will likely have to
resolve which interpretation is
accurate,” said Mike Calhoun,
president of the Center for Responsible Lending.
Others argued that the Federal
Vacancies Reform Act gives the
president wide latitude to appoint an acting director.
“President Trump is the only
person allowed to name the new
head of the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau (CFPB). Any
attempt to circumvent that authority by Cordray runs counter
to the fundamental principles of
American governance,” said Rick
Manning, president of Americans for Limited Government.
Regardless, Cordray’s resignation gives Republicans an opportunity to remake an agency they
have long complained is too
powerful, whether under a temporary or permanent director.
“As in my role at OMB, the
priority during this transition is
to put the American people first,”
Mulvaney said in a statement. “I
believe Americans deserve a
CFPB that seeks to protect them
while ensuring free and fair
markets for all consumers.”
Mulvaney has been one of the
agency’s toughest critics. When
he was a Republican congressman in 2015, he co-sponsored
legislation to get rid of the agency and said at a House hearing: “I
don’t like the fact that CFPB
exists, I’ll be perfectly honest
you.”
In a 2014 video interview with
the Credit Union Times, Mulvaney complained that it could be
difficult even to have the CFPB
return a phone call.
“It has been a truly adversarial
relationship. The CFPB, by virtue
of the fact that they don’t need
Congress to exist,” is difficult to
hold accountable, he said. “The
place is a wonderful example of
how a bureaucracy will function
if it has no accountability to
anybody.”
The agency is a “joke . . . in a
sick, sad way,” he said.
But supporters of the CFPB
say it is one of the central
achievements of the Obama administration after the 2008 financial crisis. Created under the
2010 Dodd-Frank bill, it regulates the way that banks and
other financial companies interact with consumers, policing
payday loans and mortgages,
among other things.
The CFPB has extracted billions in fines from big banks,
including $100 million from
Wells Fargo last year for opening
millions of sham accounts that
customers didn’t ask for.
renae.merle@washpost.com
DIGEST
TRANSPORTATION
Uber faces lawsuits
over huge data breach
After revealing that it paid
hackers $100,000 to keep quiet
about stealing the personal
information of 57 million
customers and drivers, Uber is
facing at least three potential
class-action lawsuits and separate
investigations by the attorneys
general of New York, Missouri,
Massachusetts, Connecticut and
Illinois. Uber said it also has been
in contact with the Federal Trade
Commission.
The legal actions against Uber
come as the beleaguered ridehailing company is still reeling
from high-profile sexual
harassment complaints and
ongoing federal probes of
possible bribery, theft of trade
secrets and discriminatory
pricing.
Uber waited more than a year
to disclose the massive data
breach. Hackers accessed the
names, email addresses and
phone numbers of millions of
passengers, and about 600,000
driver’s license numbers were
compromised. Adding to
concerns about the delay in
notifying the public, elected
officials and security experts are
scrutinizing Uber’s decision to
pay a ransom to the hackers in
exchange for deleting the stolen
data and keeping the incident
secret.
— Hamza Shaban
TELEVISION
Dish, CBS reach
contract agreement
Dish Network and CBS agreed
to a new multiyear contract,
ending a blackout that would
have left millions of satellite-TV
subscribers without the nation’s
most-watched network and its
popular football programming.
The agreement, which does not
include online channels on Dish’s
Sling TV, allows Dish to use CBS
content in various U.S. cities,
according to a statement late
Thursday. No financial details
were revealed. CBS and its local
stations in 18 cities were pulled
from Dish’s service late Monday
after failing to agree on a price
that Dish would pay to carry the
broadcast network.
Media companies and pay-TV
Washington Post. His wealth,
largely based on his Amazon
holdings, began the year around
$65 billion. Amazon’s rise
followed Friday’s broad market
push that saw the Standard &
Poor’s 500-stock index reach a
record at 2602.
providers are tussling over how to
split revenue from cable and
satellite customers as
subscriptions decline. Dish has
lost 468,000 TV subscribers this
year as consumers switch to
streaming options such as Netflix.
CBS has fared better, with
revenue up 1.3 percent as fees
from viewers and deals to license
programs have more than offset
falling audience ratings and ad
sales.
The standoff occurred at one of
the year’s most popular viewing
times, featuring big college
football games throughout the
Thanksgiving weekend and an
NFL doubleheader Sunday.
— Bloomberg News
WEALTH
Bezos’s fortune rises
above $100 billion
The net worth of Amazon.com
founder and chief executive
Jeffrey P. Bezos climbed above
$100 billion Friday as shares in
his online retail giant surged on
optimism over holiday sales.
Bezos’s ascent marks the first
time anyone has crossed the
$100 billion threshold since
— Thomas Heath
TRADE
China cuts tariffs on
many consumer goods
IRHAM/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Workers in Jakarta, Indonesia, take a break outside a
construction site Friday. The central bank reported that it expects the
Indonesian economy to have grown by 5.1 percent in 2017.
Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates
did it in 1999, according to
Bloomberg News, whose
Billionaire’s Index follows the
real-time net worth of the world’s
500 wealthiest people.
Amazon shares were up
2.5 percent to $1,186 at Friday’s
1 p.m. market close. Stock
exchanges closed early Friday
because of the Thanksgiving
holiday weekend. Amazon shares
are up more than 58 percent this
year, consequently boosting
Bezos’s wealth.
Bezos, 53, is the owner of The
China’s new plan to slash
import taxes on a wide range of
consumer goods promises to
boost the prospects of
multinationals in the Chinese
market, with items as varied as
Procter & Gamble’s diapers and
Diageo’s whiskey becoming more
affordable to local consumers.
Tariffs for 187 product
categories will drop from an
average 17.3 percent to 7.7 percent
after the cut takes effect Dec. 1,
the Ministry of Finance said in a
statement Friday, citing the need
to help consumers obtain highquality and specialty products
that are not widely produced
locally.
— Bloomberg News
A14
EZ
. SATURDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
U.S. Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
23,620
1 Year
% Chg
23,557.99 +0.9
+23.4
Close
23,570
23,520
23,470
23,420
23,370
Nasdaq Composite Index
6900
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Weekly
% Chg
6889.16
+1.6
+28.0
Weekly
% Chg
Industry Group
Health Care Technology
Internet & Catalog Retail
Construction & Engineerng
Computers & Peripherals
Metals & Mining
Food & Staples Retailing
Construction Materials
Media
Leisure Equipment & Prod
Diversified Consumer Svcs
–8%
0%
+8%
7.9
3.9
3.2
2.5
2.3
–0.6
–0.7
–1.0
–1.1
–1.7
6820
6780
S&P 500 Index
2602.42
+0.9
+18.0
2609
2603
2597
2591
2585
2579
Mon.
Tue.
Wed.
Thur.
Fri.
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Weekly
% Chg
74,242.27
16,112.31
47,769.48
1.1
0.7
–0.2
386.63
5390.46
13,059.84
7409.64
0.7
1.3
0.5
0.4
5982.55
4104.20
29,866.32
22,550.85
1 Year % Chg
–40%
0%
+40%
Company
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
% Chg
231.38
93.48
174.97
265.88
137.39
116.51
36.49
45.88
71.16
81.42
18.19
235.95
172.33
151.84
44.75
0.9
–0.2
2.8
1.4
0.9
1.6
1.6
0.4
0.6
1.5
–0.1
–0.9
2.7
1.9
0.3
34.3
28.3
57.3
77.6
42.8
5.0
22.8
11.6
31.6
–6.3
–42.0
11.1
31.3
–6.3
27.1
Company
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
138.01
98.32
169.11
54.35
83.26
59.32
88.45
35.49
129.83
116.91
212.51
47.01
111.97
96.62
102.64
0.0
0.2
1.4
–1.5
1.0
0.2
0.0
0.3
–0.1
0.3
1.2
3.5
2.0
–0.9
–0.8
22.1
24.7
40.8
–11.8
37.8
15.5
7.0
13.0
14.8
8.1
38.4
–6.4
40.7
36.4
4.5
US $
0.4
–0.4
2.3
0.7
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1925
0.0089
1.3330
0.3094
0.7872
0.0538
0.0075
1.1178
0.2594
0.6601
0.0452
148.6970
34.5187
87.8060
6.0087
0.2321
0.5905
0.0404
2.5439
0.1741
EU € per
0.8386
Japan ¥ per
111.5500
133.0200
Britain £ per
0.7502
0.8945
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.2314
3.8540
0.0289
4.3079
Canada $ per
1.2704
1.5149
0.0113
1.6935
0.3931
Mexico $ per
18.5641
22.1380
0.1660
24.7462
5.7440
Mexico $
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 26,990.54
Russell 2000
1519.16
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 530.52
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
9.67
1 Year % Chg
17.6
13.2
20.3
–22.2
Weekly
(Ticker) % Chg
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Close
Weekly
% Chg
$1.6615
$17.09
$9.9325
$0.1545
$4.3475
–0.4
–1.6
+0.3
+0.5
–2.0
week
$700
$1000
year
$1300
0.8
3.4
0.9
3.1
3.8
1.8
–0.1
–7.3
–0.7
0.0684
Company
Celsion Corp
CASI Pharma
Novavax Inc
Rexahn Pharma
Emergent Biosol
Rosetta Stone Inc
Spherix Inc
USA Mobility Inc
Osiris Therapeutics
Freddie Mac
GP Strategies Corp
Gladstone Invst
Fannie Mae
Urban One Inc
Altimmune Inc
Comstock Holding
Close
Weekly
% Chg
$3.26
$3.42
$1.54
$2.32
$41.68
$12.01
$1.44
$18.45
$5.72
$2.60
$23.60
$10.83
$2.70
$1.40
$2.06
$1.68
63.0
31.5
19.4
11.5
10.4
8.8
8.3
7.9
–1.9
–2.4
–2.5
–2.9
–2.9
–3.1
–4.2
–4.4
week
$0
$1000
year
$2200
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Consumer Rates
Weekly % Chg
1.0
1.8
1.2
–15.4
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
14.6131
Interest Rates
Other Measures
+3.3
0.0
+4.2
–0.4
–9.2
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
Cross Currency Rates
US $ per
Weekly
% Chg
Local Gainers and Losers
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
$3.1915
$3.5500
$58.95
$1,291.80
$2.81
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6860
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.33
0.45
0.80
1.49
2.70
5.46
4.25%
Bank Prime
3.80%
1.25%
Federal Funds
3.14%
1.46%
LIBOR 3-Month
30-Year fixed mortgage
10-year note
Yield: 2.34
2-year note
Yield: 1.74
5-year note
Yield: 2.06
6-month bill
Yield: 1.44
15-Year fixed mortgage
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
3.25%
1-Year ARM
FCC net neutrality process was ‘corrupted’ by fake comments, o∞cials say
Agency critics fear that
submissions interfered
with policymaking
BY
B RIAN F UNG
As the Federal Communications Commission prepares to
dismantle its net neutrality rules
for Internet providers, a mounting backlash from agency critics
is zeroing in on what they say are
thousands of fake or automated
comments submitted to the FCC
that unfairly skewed the policymaking process.
Allegations about anomalies in
the record are quickly becoming
a central component of a campaign by online activists and
some government officials to discredit the FCC’s plan.
“The process the FCC has employed . . . has been corrupted by
the fraudulent use of Americans’
identities,” New York Attorney
General Eric Schneiderman
wrote this week in a letter to the
FCC.
For six months, Schneiderman
continued, the New York Attorney General’s Office has been
reviewing the comments filed at
the FCC on net neutrality. It
found that “hundreds of thousands” of submissions may have
impersonated New York residents — a potential violation of
state law. But, he said, the FCC
has declined to provide further
evidence that could help move
the investigation forward, such
as data logs and other information.
Some consumers have complained in letters to the FCC that
their names or addresses were
hijacked and used to submit false
comments to the FCC that they
did not support. Opponents of
the FCC’s plan have pointed to
the bizarre appearance of comments submitted by people who
are deceased. Public comments
play an important role at the
FCC, which typically solicits feedback from Americans before it
votes to make significant policy
changes.
Brian Hart, an FCC spokesman, said the agency lacks the
resources to investigate every
comment. Supporters of net neutrality rules are not blameless
either, he added, pointing to
7.5 million comments filed in
favor of the regulations that appeared to come from 45,000 distinct email addresses, “all generated by a single fake e-mail generator website.” Some 400,000
comments backing the rules, he
said, appeared to originate from
an email address based in Russia.
“The most suspicious activity
has been by those supporting
Internet regulation,” Hart said.
At its Dec. 14 meeting, the FCC
plans to repeal Obama-era regulations aimed at ensuring that all
websites, large and small, are
treated equally by Internet providers. Some consumer groups
fear that without the rules, Internet providers could begin charg-
ZACH GIBSON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has said repeatedly that when it comes to
public comments on net neutrality, the commission’s rulemaking
process would favor quality over quantity.
ing some websites or services
more to reach their customers —
regular Internet users, who may
ultimately bear the cost of the
new fees. They also say Internet
providers could artificially speed
up services they own or have
special relationships with, to the
detriment of start-ups and small
businesses. For their part, Internet providers have promised not
to block or slow down content
they do not like.
But Internet providers also
have spent significant time and
money lobbying for the regula-
tions to be reversed. And some of
the public comments, critics say,
bear a striking resemblance to
industry talking points.
“It was particularly chilling to
see these spam comments all in
one place, as they are exactly the
type of policy arguments and
language you expect to see in
industry comments on the proposed repeal,” Jeff Kao, a data
scientist who published a study
of the pro-repeal comments
Thursday, said in a blog post.
Like Schneiderman, Kao performed an analysis of the net
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neutrality comment record. Kao
said he used an algorithm to sort
out duplicate entries, then applied another algorithm to identify the remaining comments
that could be considered
“unique.” Further analysis revealed that even some of the
unique submissions shared common language and syntax, suggesting they weren’t unique at
all but perhaps written by a
computer program in ways that
made each submission appear
slightly different. In total, Kao
estimated that more than 1 million comments supporting FCC
Chairman Ajit Pai’s effort to
repeal net neutrality may have
been faked.
For example, one submission
read, “Citizens, as opposed to
Washington bureaucrats, should
be empowered to buy whatever
products they prefer.” Another
retained much the same format
but with certain words rearranged: “Individual citizens, as
opposed to Washington bureaucrats, should be able to select
whichever services they desire.”
Although it is common for
advocacy campaigns to recruit
people to sign and submit form
letters to the FCC, Kao said those
who supported keeping the rules
were far more likely to write
personal, heartfelt messages. Despite the polarizing nature of the
policy fight, few commenters
who supported the repeal were
moved to develop their own, original messages — an indication to
Kao that many in the pro-repeal
camp may have been bots or
spam.
“It’s scary to think that organic, authentic voices in the public
debate are being drowned out by
a chorus of spambots,” Kao said.
Pai has said repeatedly that
when it comes to the comments
on net neutrality, the agency’s
rulemaking process would favor
quality over quantity.
But Jessica Rosenworcel, a
Democratic FCC commissioner
who supports keeping the rules,
said Pai needs to do more.
“They need to get out from
behind their desks and computers and speak to the public directly,” Rosenworcel said in a Los
Angeles Times op-ed. “The FCC
needs to hold hearings around
the country to get a better sense
of how the public feels about the
proposal.”
Calling the FCC comment system “a mess,” Rosenworcel added
that about 50,000 consumer
complaints appear to have disappeared from the agency’s records.
She also highlighted a Government Accountability Office probe
into an alleged denial-of-service
attack that the FCC said prevented consumers from filing submissions on the net neutrality plan.
brian.fung@washpost.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Free For All
Don’t jump
to electoral
conclusions
Hardly derogatory
The Nov. 3 Book World review “María Dueñas
cultivates an intoxicating ‘Vineyard’ ” [Style] was
misleading in its description of the term “Indiano” as
derogatory.
Basic knowledge of Spain — and Latin America —
tells us that Indiano, far from being demeaning, is
simply the word used to portray a Spaniard who
sought — and very often found — riches in the
Americas. Columbus thought he had arrived in the
“Indies,” so those who went there were “Indianos.”
When one travels to Spain, especially to Asturias
and Cantabria, one encounters the magnificent
villas or “casas de indianos” that were built with
wealth gained in the Americas. If anything, the
term Indiano is based on admiration tinged with
envy.
Laura Maria Herrera, Bethesda
NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION
Nine members of the 369th Infantry Regiment, also known as the Harlem Hellfighters, posed for this
photograph in 1919 upon their return from World War I.
FAMILY PHOTO
Leigh Corfman, shown in 1979, says a then-32year-old Roy Moore assaulted her when she was 14.
What’s alleged was not dating
Readers opened their papers Nov. 11 to the
front-page headline “Moore does not rule out that he
dated teen girls.” While the accusations against
Republican Alabama Senate nominee Roy Moore
have not been proved, to use the word “date” implied
that the interaction was normal and consensual. A
powerful man in his 30s does not “date” teenage
girls, especially 14-year-olds. That’s not dating.
That’s taking advantage, harassing and abusing. It’s
also not normal. When The Post chose to use the verb
“dated,” it sanctioned Moore’s claim that he, as a
30-something-year-old man in a position of power,
was “dating” these girls. He was not.
Margaret Henoch, Bethesda
Undermined by physics
Regarding Bill McKibben’s Nov. 12 book review,
“Under water” [Outlook]:
One has to be concerned with the statement “To
review the basic physics: Warm air holds more water
vapor than cold air does,” when the basic physics is
wrong. The saturation vapor pressure of water at
higher temperatures is certainly greater than it is at
colder temperatures, but air has no capacity to
“hold” water vapor. Dry air is inert with respect to
water vapor. There is no mechanism for air to hold
water vapor.
Notwithstanding the merits of the rest of the
piece, if we scientists want to contribute to making
public policy, then maybe we should get our science
correct first.
Patrick Rhoads, Alexandria
The ‘Harlem Hellfighters’ writ large
In a Retropolis essay that hinged on a photograph,
the decision to present the photo of nine World War I
heroes known as the Harlem Hellfighters in an approximately one-inch-square space was disappointing [“Archivist uncovers story of WWI ‘Harlem Hellfighters’
soldiers in photo,” Metro, Nov. 12]. The actual photo
was so compelling that it inspired a retired archivist,
Barbara Lewis Burger, to research each soldier’s back
story. “The faces just captured me,” she said.
Contrast that with the comparatively huge [9-by6-inch] photo on the same page that showed members
of a color guard awaiting the start of Vietnam Veterans
Memorial anniversary events.
By presenting the World War I photo so small, The
Post did a disservice to the memory of the Harlem
Hellfighters, undermined the impact of the essay and
short-changed its readers.
Arminda Valles-Hall, Arlington
In his Nov. 12 The Sunday Take
column discussing the recent Virginia
election results, “For GOP, Trump effect
diminishes the ability to lead,” Dan
Balz made the following observation
about Virginia: “Its population includes more college graduates than
many states, and the proximity to the
nation’s capital affects attitudes about
the federal government. It is not Pennsylvania or Michigan or Wisconsin,
states with different electorates, as the
2016 results demonstrated.” With this
comment, Balz repeated the conventional wisdom that the voters’ support
for President Trump in those three
states indicated some kind of shift in
the electorate.
I disagree. The difference between
Trump and Democratic presidential
nominee Hillary Clinton in those three
states: Pennsylvania, 68,000 votes;
Michigan, 10,000 votes; Wisconsin,
27,000 votes. The votes for Libertarian
nominee Gary Johnson and Green
Party nominee Jill Stein in those three
states: Pennsylvania, 190,000 votes;
Michigan, 223,000 votes; Wisconsin,
136,000 votes. In each of those three
critical states, the pivotal voters did not
turn to Trump over Clinton: they
turned away from Clinton and voted
instead for someone other than Trump
or Clinton, probably because they
thought Clinton would win anyway.
It’s a mistake to interpret those
states as having different electorates
from Virginia; for one reason or another, they could not vote for Trump
but did not want to vote for Clinton.
George Chuzi, McLean
It’s actually
not a feast day
I appreciate that Ray Billingsley,
in his Nov. 16 “Curtis” comic, included a Jewish holiday in the list of
holidays Americans celebrate with
great food. Too bad it was Yom
Kippur — a day of fasting.
Sherri Deck, Rockville
The Nov. 16 “Sally Forth.”
A gentle reminder on a sensitive subject
RAY BILLINGSLEY
The Nov. 16 “Curtis” featured
Thanksgiving and other holidays.
Kudos to Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe, creators
of the “Sally Forth” comic strip. The strip recently has dealt
with the many aspects of a parent’s death and its immediate
impact on the family when the decedent has made known no
plans for a funeral and the myriad other details attendant
with the death of a parent.
All too frequently, family members, especially elderly
parents, avoid making those plans or even discussing any
issues associated with death, funeral planning, etc. In the
past few weeks, the comic strip has addressed those issues in
a sensitive manner.
I know I have to do more in that regard concerning my
own eventual death, but at least as it stands now, my children
have documents that contain my immediate desires. The
strip has been a good reminder to finish the project; for many
others, I hope the strip has also provided the impetus to
begin or complete such planning.
No child wants to receive that dreadful call in the middle
of a night and then to have to begin with a blank sheet of
paper.
Thanks for the gentle reminder.
David Garner, Woodbridge
Rescue dogs are wonderful
The Nov. 19 Metro article “Suit says dog was more than
property” emphasized twice that the Labrador-mix puppy
involved in the tragic death of a teacup Yorkie was a rescue: “The
Labrador, a rescue, was screened before it came to Wagtime and
never displayed aggressive behavior, she said. After the incident,
the dog was evaluated by a canine-behavior specialist who also
found no sign of violence in the rescue dog.” A reader could infer
from this that rescue dogs are more likely to be aggressive and
prone to violent and antisocial behavior than purchased,
purebred dogs. That’s just not true. It’s highly unlikely that the
fact that one of the dogs was a rescue was a factor in what
happened at the District’s Wagtime Too.
Dogs, like people, have different personalities and traits and
get along with other dogs in varying ways. My personal
experience has taught me that rescue dogs are usually more
likely to get along well with other dogs and with humans.
Marion Herz, Bethesda
The writer is a volunteer at the
Montgomery County Humane Society.
CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
A woman visits a memorial to the 26 people killed
in a mass shooting at the Sutherland Springs
First Baptist Church in Texas on Nov. 5.
Drop the gun show ads
Bravo to The Post for devoting its Nov. 12 editorial
page to identifying some victims of gun violence
[“The list grows again”].
But that same issue carried an advertisement for a
local gun show — “Over 2 miles of guns, knives &
accessories!” — which, among other features, included the availability of courses on concealed-carry
permits.
Would it be asking too much for The Post to stop
carrying these ads in much the same way that it
stopped carrying ads for adult entertainment many
years back? Yes, I recognize that advertising revenue
has suffered in the digital age. That is still no excuse.
Carlos Bonilla, Chevy Chase
A titanically insensitive fail
I am usually a big fan of the comic “Wumo.”
However, I found the Nov. 15 strip to be thoughtless
and offensive. It served only to perpetuate the belief
that those in our transgender community are simply
opportunists who change situationally to best suit
their needs. This could not be further from the truth.
Even as understanding and acceptance increases,
the transgender community continues to experience
high levels of discrimination, stigma and systemic
inequality in all areas of their lives. Any instance that
hinders acceptance and equality is unacceptable.
The Post may not have intended disrespect, but
publishing this strip was a titanic fail.
Sheri Langford, Fairfax
Letters to the editor: letters@washpost.com
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
The last United Airlines 747 lands at Dulles International Airport on Oct. 19.
No wonder he was Chipper
Thanks to Lori Aratani for her beautiful
Nov. 12 Retropolis column, “The end of an era:
Farewell to the 747” [Metro]. Amid all the
negative reporting on politics, religion and
race, Aratani’s piece took me back to the
summer my family flew home to California
from New York.
Of course we all dressed up because this
was an airplane ride. After takeoff, we were
allowed to explore.
Imagine our surprise when, upon reaching
the second floor, we discovered not only a
piano bar but also our 60-pound English
springer spaniel, Chipper. Apparently the
airline thought first class was a better place
for our dog than for us. We happily petted
him, surrounded by the gentle, smiling faces
of first-class passengers, and then returned to
our coach seats.
I’m pretty sure to this day Chipper is our
only family member to fly first class.
Nancy Ferrell, Fairfax Station
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
A Lucky Dog Animal Rescue volunteer in Arlington holds
Nala, a 2-year-old Chihuahua mix rescued from Texas during
Hurricane Harvey.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Don’t make her a scapegoat
EDITORIALS
In China, rule by fear and force
Another human rights lawyer is crushed by Beijing’s relentless campaign against dissent.
C
indictment said he had “speculated” on politically
sensitive cases, “incited others to illegally gather in
public places” and “stirred up” public opinion, as
well as “seriously harmed state security and social
stability” by “attacking and slandering the current
political system, and attempting to overthrow the
socialist system.” Mr. Jiang’s crimes were no more
than words, but in today’s China, words can be
trouble. His friends and family say he published
articles, gave interviews to foreign journalists and
criticized the government. He also generously
defended human rights activists, including Chen
Guangcheng, the blind lawyer-advocate who was
punished for helping his fellow citizens fight for
their rights.
Mr. Jiang was known for being careful, cognizant
of the limits and navigating within them. However,
over the past two years, the authorities have waged
a relentless and dirty campaign — known as the
709 crackdown, for the date it began in 2015 —
against more than 200 human rights lawyers. They
have been detained, tortured, coerced into confessions, subjected to show trials, convicted and
incarcerated.
To not just round up dissidents but stalk their
lawyers, too, is a harsh tactic, to be sure. But it has
failed to squelch dissent; even as they grow more
single-minded, China’s leaders can’t or won’t
grasp the simple fact that dissent is not a passing
whim to be eradicated by more police and arrests.
It is a profound and enduring response to tyranny.
Mr. Jiang was described as the “soul of the
709 rescue effort” by Chinese rights lawyer Xie
Yanyi, and there will be more souls to follow in his
footsteps.
Mr. Xi declared in his report at the party congress
that China would “take center stage in the world.”
He may shoulder his way onto that stage. But as
long as he practices rule by fear and force, he will
earn little respect in the spotlight.
Let the
cross stand
An appeals court’s ruling needlessly
targets a war memorial.
T
HE PEACE CROSS, a towering, rose-hued
monument that has stood on a state-owned
median strip a mile east of the District for
nearly a century, is becoming the focal point
of a jurisprudential war over what constitutes
governmental endorsement of religion. The case in
fact presents a close call: The cross is an irrefutably
sectarian symbol that does incontestable double
duty as a secular memorial to 49 men from Prince
George’s County who died in World War I, their
names inscribed on a bronze tablet at the statue’s
base, along with a quotation from President Woodrow Wilson.
In a 2-to-1 ruling, a federal appeals court last
month ruled that the Peace Cross, overlooking a busy
interchange in Bladensburg, is unconstitutional.
“The sectarian elements easily overwhelm the secular ones,” the court said, parting ways with a lower
court judge who, in 2015, called the cross a historically important war memorial and declined to order
it removed. The Supreme Court, for its part, has tied
itself into knots wrestling over similarly ambiguous
memorials and monuments. In 2005, it disallowed
Ten Commandments displays in two Kentucky
courthouses and, on the very same day, upheld a Ten
Commandments monument on the Texas statehouse grounds.
In the instance of the Peace Cross, however, the
balance of precedent and circumstance argues for
leaving the memorial in place. In a strikingly similar
case, in 2010, the court, divided along ideological
grounds then as now, let stand an eight-foot cross on
a high outcropping of federal land in California’s
Mojave National Preserve, also to honor America’s
fallen soldiers in World War I. “Placement of the
cross on Government-owned land was not an attempt to set the imprimatur of the state on a
particular creed,” Justice Anthony M. Kennedy
I am the daughter of Juanita Pitchford, the former
voter registrar scapegoated in the Nov. 21 Metro
article “Certifying of 2 close Va. races delayed.”
It is unclear why there are so many questions. Most
of the members of the Board of Elections were in
office prior to 2016 and are still there. Most of the staff
in the Fredericksburg registrar’s office is still there or,
at the very least, still alive. Moreover, there was no
mention of any records being reviewed.
Blaming my mother seems entirely based on the
word of Elections Commissioner Edgardo Cortés.
Furthermore, even if the erroneous assignments are
true, they were not put in context. Was this number
outside the normal margin of error? The article noted
that it’s not clear how many of the “erroneously
assigned” voters actually voted in the disputed race.
My mother retired in January and died in April.
Why are these “errors” just coming to light now? We
know that dead (wo)men tell no tales, but apparently,
they make great scapegoats.
Aliya Wong, Washington
All aboard for regional planning
In his Nov. 12 Local Opinions essay, “Building our
next supercity,” Ted Leonsis offered a 60,000-foot view
of how the region should maintain economic competitiveness, via a “supercity” stretching from Baltimore
to Richmond linked by public transportation.
Our suburban counties offer opportunity to house
the future businesses and the workforce to fuel that
vision. However, opposition to development hinders
progress and threatens to leave the area behind. Public
engagement takes too long and is fraught with politics.
Suburbanites resist changes that would create complete, sustainable neighborhoods. The infrastructure
that supports our sprawling, single-purpose neighborhoods can be maintained only with revenue created by
more intense, higher tax-paying development.
Decades ago, journalist Neal Peirce coined the
term “citistate” and reviewed 25 metro areas for their
competitive strengths and weaknesses. Mr. Peirce’s
approach coincided with the federal Empowerment
Zone program that had metro areas come together for
funding. We should consider a plan outlining strategic locations for new infrastructure to leverage
private investment. Critical to this approach is public
engagement on a regional scale. Communities that
don’t want to be left behind should focus not on
whether a building is eight or 10 floors but, rather, on
how that building will contribute to quality of life,
innovation, jobs and infrastructure improvement.
Rollin Stanley, Silver Spring
The author was the planning director
of Montgomery County from 2008 to 2012.
Proud to spread the message
AMANDA VOISARD FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The Peace Cross in Bladensburg.
wrote for the plurality of the court. “Rather, those
who erected the cross intended simply to honor our
Nation’s fallen soldiers.” He added that “the goal of
avoiding governmental endorsement [of a particular religion] does not require eradication of all
religious symbols in the public realm.”
Mr. Kennedy’s standard is a reasonable one,
though it must be exercised with caution. In the case
of the Peace Cross, it is no use denying that the
monument, taken by itself and divorced from context and intent, is religious. It’s a Latin cross, a
symbol as synonymous with Christianity as the Star
of David is with Judaism or the crescent moon and
star with Islam.
But the purpose of the American Legion and the
local families who erected it in 1925 was not
primarily religious. Built shortly after the Great
War’s end, it was meant not as a tribute to Christianity but rather as a remembrance of sacrifice and the
values remembered on the base’s four sides: valor,
endurance, courage and devotion.
Granted, the cross excludes those of different
faiths — notably, American Jews, several thousand
of whom died in World War I. Yet having stood for
92 years, what purpose is served now by its removal?
Let it stand.
T A X R EF O R M
Nothing but bad news in the GOP tax plan
Regarding the Nov. 21 editorial “A tax plan gut
check”:
I’ve got questions. With the debt increased by no
less than $1.5 trillion over the next decade, what will
Republicans do on those many occasions when they
will have to confront increases in the debt ceiling?
How low is the likelihood that they will just sign off
on them? Who will get the blame (and these things
always are about blame), especially when the Democrats retake the White House? And what compensating budget cuts will they righteously insist on? Will
they be from Medicare or Medicaid or, perhaps, from
preschool programs? What will be the increased
frequency and duration of government shutdowns? Is there any dialogue about these things?
David Cohen, Arlington
$1.5 trillion to America’s $20 trillion (and growing)
debt. Whatever happened to discussion of the
Simpson-Bowles plan to reduce the national debt?
Launched in 2010 by President Barack Obama, this
bipartisan commission produced a plan with six
major components, including discretionary spending cuts, lower income and corporate tax rates, and
Social Security reform. Simpson-Bowles, if implemented, would have reduced the federal deficit by
nearly $4 trillion by 2020, stabilized the growth of
debt held by the public by 2014, and reduced debt
60 percent by 2023 and 40 percent by 2035. Why not
reopen consideration of the Simpson-Bowles plan
instead of trying to push the deeply flawed Republican proposal through Congress?
Gary Usrey, Arlington
Steve Pearlstein’s Nov. 19 Business column,
“The business lobby’s chance to do right by America,”
about the Business Roundtable and the Republican
tax proposal, made a substantial contribution to
public understanding of the pitfalls of Congress’s
direction. By pointing out that these proposals will
create either “runaway federal debt” or meaningful
reductions in essential government services, he shifted the burden back to the business lobbyists who
support the current tax legislation.
Mr. Pearlstein’s argument is backed up with concrete data. In their work on U.S. competitiveness,
Michael Porter and Jan Rivkin of the Harvard Business School found that while business leaders generally think corporate tax reform is needed, they feel
equally strongly about a responsible federal budget.
A reckless gamble on tax cuts that is projected to
contribute to an increase of our national debt from
$20 trillion today to $33.1 trillion in the next 10 years
(based on Tax Policy Center figures) is not likely to
enhance business confidence and encourage leaders
to make the investments necessary to elevate the
growth in our economy.
Alexander Boyle, Chevy Chase
The writer, who retired as vice chairman of the
Chevy Chase Bank, is a member of the Leadership
Council of the Tax Policy Center.
In her Nov. 17 op-ed, “For humans, this tax plan is
going to hurt,” Catherine Rampell described the two
tax-reform bills in Congress. Her salient point was
that the vast majority of the $1.5 trillion in tax cuts are
headed to companies and are permanent. The minority of cuts go to individuals and are temporary.
GOP leaders claim that companies will invest their
money to increase productivity and worker compensation. We are a “demand” economy, not a “supply”
economy. We don’t have middle-class buyers with
cash aching for a greater supply of cars or major
home upgrades, as was the case after World War II.
Most executives are not going to invest to increase
supply without new demand. Instead, they’ll put
tax-cut money into stock buybacks and dividends —
not more jobs. Those who do invest in supply without
new demand are looking to cut labor costs. That
suggests fewer jobs, not more.
The Nov. 21 news article “Here are the 5 key
questions about the Republican tax plan” laid out the
main deficiencies that endanger the plan’s chance of
passage, including its negative effect on many
middle-class taxpayers and the fact that it would add
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
HINESE PRESIDENT Xi Jinping offered
14 “fundamental principles” behind the new
doctrine of “Xi Jinping Thought” unveiled
at the recent 19th National Congress of the
Communist Party of China. Among them, according
to the official Xinhua news service, was “ensuring
every dimension of governance is law-based.” In a
democratic society, rule of law is essential and
means no one is above the law. In the Chinese
approach, rule of law means the Communist Party
holds the upper hand and crushes individuals who
dare to question its monopoly on power.
On Nov. 21, Jiang Tianyong, a prominent human
rights lawyer and activist became the latest individual to be crushed under the Chinese steamroller of
surveillance, coercion and repression. Mr. Jiang
was convicted in Changsha, the capital of Hunan
province, of subversion of state power, a charge
often used to silence critics of the party. He was
sentenced to two years in prison. The court’s
. SATURDAY,
Responsible members of the middle class are not
going to make major purchases unless their standard
of living is improved sustainably. But their tax cuts
are temporary. That has no lasting impact on jobs.
So in all these ways to deploy tax-cut money, the
impact on jobs is near zero or negative.
Walt Culver, Reston
How many middle-class Americans realize that
removing deductions for property taxes and restricting mortgage-interest deductions will depress the
value of their homes? In my case, the loss could easily
be more than $100,000.
I resent the Republican attempt not only to increase the taxes I must pay but also to depress the
value of the property I own.
It is said, “Give a poor man $100 and he will spend
it because he must. Give a rich man $100 and he will
save it because he can.” The Republican tax bills will
shift money from active circulation to stagnation in
interest-bearing accounts. It sounds like bad economics to me.
Melvin F. Houston, Ellicott City
Take from the poor and give to the rich. In a
nutshell, that’s the Republican tax bill — a reverse
Robin Hood plan. This was outlined clearly in the
Nov. 22 The Finance 202 blog excerpt, “To a skeptical
Wall Street, GOP tax plan would just create a ‘fiscal
sugar high’ ” [Power Post], which reported that after
a decade, the plan would raise taxes on those earning
less than $75,000.
The only mystery remaining is this: Where is the
outrage from hard-working Americans?
David Tate, Arlington
ABCDE
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Regarding the Nov. 22 news article “Democrats
see chance for a rural revival in western Pa.”:
Reproaction could not be more proud of our
“Abortion: Not just for your mistress!” billboards
running in Pittsburgh, the back yard of disgraced
former congressman Tim Murphy (R-Pa.).
Mr. Murphy spent years working to limit access to
reproductive care and abortion, only to be discovered privately advocating the procedure for his
mistress. Between this and the passionate defenses
of Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore emerging
from supposedly pro-life leaders around the country,
the hypocrisy and moral bankruptcy of archconservatives could not be on more flagrant display.
Access to abortion is a good thing, and it is critical
for equality and justice for all people in this country.
One in 4 women will have an abortion by the time she
is 45. Mothers, daughters, sisters and, yes, mistresses.
Erin Matson, Arlington
The writer is co-director of Reproaction, a directaction group that seeks to increase access
to abortion and advance reproductive justice.
Keep the elephant trophy ban
The analysis of President Trump’s decision to roll
back the ban on trophy-hunted elephant imports
was based on the flawed premise that this new policy
is merely poorly timed [“A reprieve for elephants,”
editorial, Nov. 20].
The editorial suggested that under better circumstances, had the Zimbabwean government not just
experienced an apparent military coup, “wellmanaged” trophy hunting could benefit African elephant populations. However, the political turmoil in
Zimbabwe is not the only flaw in the administration’s
abrupt — and now halted — policy change. African
elephants are listed under the Endangered Species
Act as a threatened species; trophy hunting cannot
and should not be added to the long list of threats they
face. To allow sport hunting is a violation of the
protections elephants are granted under the law.
Furthermore, Zimbabwe has a history of problems
with poaching and insufficient law enforcement.
I welcome Mr. Trump’s reconsideration of the
lifting of the trophy import ban and urge the editorial
board to condemn the Interior Department’s failure
to put forth effective conservation policy.
Cathy Liss, Washington
The writer is president of the
Animal Welfare Institute.
Spain needs a new constitution
Regarding Pedro Morenés’s Nov. 20 letter, “Spain
is far from its past darkness”:
The acts of violence committed by the national
police sent to Catalonia to prevent the Catalan people
from voting on Oct. 1 indeed brought memories of
past darkness. As for the current Spanish constitution that President Mariano Rajoy embraces, it is a
rigged document, written under coercion in the
post-Franco years when the top military followers of
the dictator clearly supervised its writing. The constitutional committee that wrote it was led by a majority
of Francisco Franco’s persuasion (one, Manuel Fraga
Iribarne, had been a member of Franco’s cabinet and
later founded Mr. Rajoy’s party). Spain is not a
republic because Franco decided so, and King Juan
Carlos was specifically selected by Franco to be king
after his death. And while the majority of Spaniards
voted for the constitution, what was the alternative?
A continuation of Franco’s oppressive policies?
It is time for Spaniards to tear down this constitution and replace it with one that would better
delineate the rights and responsibilities of the various states within Spain and that would ensure a clear
separation of the three branches of government
(executive, legislative and judicial).
Thomas T. Rubio, Washington
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
COLBERT I. KING
EZ
A17
RE
Socrates
just wouldn’t
get it
DRAWING BOARD
Don’t treat
Trump’s latest
Twitter tantrum
as comic relief
BY
D AVID R . K AHN
R
T
o relieve the dramatic tension created in his
tragedies, Shakespeare would use comic
relief to calm down the audience. The tragic
performance unfolding in today’s White
House is also producing tension, riling up some of
the strongest emotions about an American president in modern history.
It might be tempting, therefore, to regard this
week’s staging of the byplay between LaVar Ball and
President Trump over UCLA basketball players in
China as the use of comedy to allow for the release of
emotions built up in the viewing of the ongoing
Trump tragedy.
That would be a mistake. The Ball-Trump scene
should not be treated as comedy, even though the
show put on by the two men might have served to
distract. There was nothing humorous about it.
It was a dreadful performance.
To recap: Three UCLA basketball players were
arrested for shoplifting during a team trip to China
this month. One of the players, LiAngelo Ball, is the
son of LaVar Ball, owner of Big Ballers Brand, which
sells athletic shoes and clothes.
While in China during his Asia tour, Trump raised
their case with President Xi Jinping, including the
possibility of their returning home. The players
were released and promptly suspended by their
team.
That should have been the end of the story.
Not, however, with someone as self-centered and
emotionally needy as Donald Trump. When he got
back home from his 12-day Asian trip, Trump
tweeted, “Do you think the three UCLA Basketball
Players will say thank you to President Trump? They
were headed for 10 years in jail!”
Ten years? As The Post reported, the sunglasses in
the Louis Vuitton store where the alleged shoplifting took place are priced around 4,900 yuan ($750).
Under Chinese law, anyone stealing goods worth
between 4,000 and 7,000 yuan faces a maximum of
two years in jail.
Be that as it may. To think: the president of the
United States fishing for compliments from a trio of
rightfully shamed college athletes. They did, however, thank Trump and apologize for their actions
during a news conference the day after they arrived
home.
Again, it should and would have ended there were
it not for the dad who played down Trump’s role in
securing his son’s release. Asked by ESPN about
Trump’s intervention, Ball said: “What was he over
there for? Don’t tell me nothing. Everybody wants to
make it seem like he helped me out.”
In reality, most people had never given LaVar Ball
a thought before his son got busted.
And the father would have faded by the next news
cycle were it not for Trump’s need to have all eyes on
him, to be seen as a savior and have his gratitude
recognized.
The president weighed in with a tweet storm:
“LaVar Ball, father of LiAngelo, is unaccepting of
what I did for his son and that shoplifting is no big
deal. I should have left them in jail!”
“Should have gotten his son out during my next
trip to China instead. . . . Very ungrateful!”
Honey is to bees what a big talker such as LaVar
Ball is to ratings-hungry TV shows. And CNN was all
over that honeycomb.
Monday’s interview with Ball must have had
producers in the CNN control room jumping for joy.
Ball was having the time of his life mixing it up with
Chris Cuomo, making digs at Trump, all while
promoting his brand. Thanks to Trump’s dust-up
with Ball, Apex Marketing Group president Eric
Smallwood estimated that the Big Baller Brand has
received about $13.2 million in free digital and TV
advertising since the two blowhards began trading
barbs.
The interview tipped an already unbalanced
Trump over the edge. In early Wednesday morning
tweets, Trump denounced Ball as an “ungrateful
fool.” He took full credit for the release of the players
— “IT WAS ME. Too bad” — along with a swipe at the
father: “LaVar is just a poor man’s version of Don
King, but without the hair.”
“Who do these uppity black men think they are?”
Trump seemed to be asking. “There’s that Colin
Kaepernick and those arrogant NFL players standing
up by kneeling down in defiance of white benefactors, and that loudmouthed father with the temerity
to talk back to a powerful white man who went out of
his way to do him and his kid a favor. Don’t they know
their place? Well, I’m going to put them back in it.”
All this from Trump, as cascading accounts of
sexual misconduct roil the nation, an alleged predator of young girls is poised to enter the Senate, major
legislation is stirring Congress and challenges are
pressing abroad.
And therein lies the tragedy: The Twitterer who
believes he is faultless, accepts only praise, rages at
criticism, demands gratitude, puffs up himself and
deprecates everybody else is president of the United
States.
BY DANA SUMMERS
etired at last, after 36 years
teaching at a private school just
north of Washington, I’d like to
offer some advice from
“Mr. Chips.”
In June, when I taught Plato’s “Dialogues” to my last students in my last
class, I told them that what Socrates
said some 2,500 years ago is just as
relevant today. Some of the definitions
might have shifted a bit — what
Socrates meant by “piety” is not quite
what we mean today — but what lies
behind the word choices is every bit as
important.
Then it occurred to me that the old
boy is probably better off dead.
What would happen, I wondered, if
we hired Socrates to teach in a modern
high school?
He probably would get in trouble
with the counselors for beating up on
the students’ self-esteem — never giving
them an answer, just pointing out
where their arguments failed.
“If Euthyphro never experiences success, how can he ever come to understand piety? You need to ease up there,
Soc.”
Socrates was capable
of dealing with only one type
of learner. The learning
specialists would be all over
him for that.
BY CLAYTOONZ.COM
BY LUCKOVICH FOR THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION
BY DANZIGER FOR THE RUTLAND HERALD
kingc@washpost.com
Socrates did not run a studentcentered classroom.
It’s clear that Socrates was capable of
dealing with only one type of learner.
The learning specialists would be all
over him for that.
When Phaedo asked about the nature
of the afterlife, weren’t Socrates’ “questions” a bit . . . constrictive? Had Phaedo
been allowed to write a poem, create a
mobile, or cut out and paste up the front
page of an imaginary newspaper that
one might read when one gets . . .
wherever . . . Socrates could have appealed to Phaedo’s “multiple intelligences” and Phaedo could have “experienced success.”
Crito found it difficult to accept
Socrates’ definition of justice. It’s a
strict one, all right. No problem, says
today’s academic adviser: Drop the
class. You don’t want it lowering your
grade-point average, and you don’t need
the dialogue to graduate.
Charmides and Socrates discussed
the meaning of self-control. That’s easy,
says the school nurse: There is no such
thing. Everything is biologically determined. Charmides can’t be held responsible for most of what he does. As soon
as we get his medications figured out,
maybe then. The counselor agrees. As
does the learning specialist.
Timaeus would have been glad to
write his three-page paper on the nature
of the physical world, due today, but he
had another paper due for his creative
writing class and he hadn’t felt inspired.
And he has a test tomorrow. Plus, those
pesky college essays are hanging over
his head, so his parents have called him
in sick today. He will be in this afternoon for the soccer game, though.
Meno has his college essays done, has
no tests or papers coming soon, and is
ready and eager to talk about the nature
of virtue. But he has a field trip, so he’ll
be gone all day. But it’s Tuesday, a “B
day,” so Socrates’ class doesn’t meet
anyhow. Maybe tomorrow? No — tomorrow Meno and all of the sophomores are meeting all day with the
group from Spartans Are People Too!
They’ll break up into small groups, form
some affinity groups, paste some Post-it
notes on the walls and publish their
ideas online. Maybe we could ask Meno
to come in after the game?
Nah. He’ll be tired. After all, he’s the
goalie. The poor guy. All those balls
coming at his head.
The writer retired in June from Sandy
Springs Friends School in Sandy Springs.
ALEXANDRA PETRI
I’m President Trump, and I think women are very special
“Women are very special. I think it’s a very special
time because a lot of things are coming out, and I
think that’s good for our society, and I think it’s very,
very good for women, and I’m very happy a lot of
these things are coming out, and I’m very happy it’s
being exposed.”
— President Trump
“W
omen are very special.” “It’s a very
special time.” “A lot of things are
coming out.”
This is some form of code or
cipher. I do not understand it.
At the same news briefing, President Trump said
he does not want to see a “liberal person” in what
could be Roy Moore’s Senate seat, in spite of the
grotesque and predatory things that women (even
Trump voters!) say that Moore has done.
“We don’t need a liberal person in there,” Trump
said. It was 40 years ago, he said. We have to listen to
Moore, too, he said.
But “it’s a very special time.” It is “good for our
society.” It is “good for women.” “Very happy it’s
being exposed.”
These are the words to a picture book for children,
but the pictures are all wrong. Even the words don’t
really go together. Maybe it is a villanelle. Maybe it is
a nonsense verse, or an overlong haiku.
“Women are very special.”
Trump faces allegations of a range of sexual
misconduct from 17 women. We remember the tape.
I remember the tape. Does Trump remember the
tape? “When you’re a star, they let you do it,” he said.
He said other things, too, that I don’t need to repeat,
because you know what they are.
“It’s a very special time.”
Trump thinks it would be better not to have a
liberal person in the Senate seat.
[Begins to laugh hysterically. Cannot stop laughing. Frogs begin to fall out of throat. Walks into a
cave and screams until throat is hoarse. Continues to
scream for a long time until the echoes die away.
Turns into a bat and flies off into the sun.]
“A lot of things are coming out.”
There are allegations against Moore that are
coming out, but Moore is denying them and that is
what matters to Trump. That, and the “R” next to
Moore’s name. Trump is forever preserving the
wrong elephants.
It is “good for our society.” “It’s very, very good for
women.” “Very happy it’s being exposed.”
These words mean nothing. They are a yearbook
signature. “Very happy it’s being exposed.” Have a
great summer. We don’t need to see a liberal person
in what could be Moore’s seat.
Sometimes I think words have meaning. But
maybe that is foolish of me. I should know better,
now, than to think that what people say should have
some relation to reality.
“Special time.” “Special” is one of the six words
Trump seems to be well acquainted with. He wheels
it out all the time, and it means all kinds of things.
Women are special, which might mean special like a
relationship with Britain or special like a golf
tournament or special like an evening with a foreign
despot.
Perhaps it is no surprise Trump would use
“special” in a context such as this. The word is
cheerfully meaningless and does not contain too
many syllables.
Why am I sitting here expecting words from
Trump’s mouth to have meaning?
“Very happy it’s being exposed.”
“A lot of things coming out.” “That’s good for our
society.”
Phlegm. Hat stand. Timpanum. Litotes.
Maybe this has broken me. I want to open a print
dictionary and see whether the words are even still
there. I want to go stand on the side of a cliff and
scream and scream and see whether there is an echo.
It’s a very special time.
Alexandra Petri writes the ComPost blog at
washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost.
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
Fidelity’s chief moves o∞ce out of the executive suite
BY
J ENA M C G REGOR
Workplace consultants have a
frequent suggestion for chief executives managing the aftermath
of sexual harassment allegations:
Get involved. Own the messaging.
Make sure everyone knows this is
a priority at the top, and not just in
human resources.
Fidelity Investments chief executive Abigail Johnson is taking
that to the next level — literally.
Within the past two weeks, the
top executive of the investment
management giant — which saw
the departure of two fund managers in recent months after allegations of sexual harassment or inappropriate behavior — has
moved her office at the company’s
Boston headquarters from the
seventh floor senior executive
suite up to the 11th floor, where
key portfolio managers, analysts
and traders sit.
It’s one of several actions that
Johnson, one of the most powerful women in finance, has taken
since the privately held invest-
ment firm terminated a prominent fund manager after sexual
harassment allegations and another portfolio manager departed
following accusations of inappropriate sexual comments.
Johnson has also formed a new
way for employees to report concerns, initiated a culture survey,
and is mandating sexual harassment training.
“As Abby stated last month, she
and the senior management team
consider this a top priority and
made it clear we don’t tolerate any
kind of harassment in Fidelity,”
Fidelity spokesman Vincent
Loporchio said.
The physical move of her office
space is what caught the eye of
workplace consultants.
“It’s a creative way of sending a
message that ‘I’m not above you.
I’m here with you, and I’m going to
keep my eye on what’s going on,’ ”
said Jonathan Segal, a Philadelphia-based employment lawyer.
Others said her proximity could
help model the kind of behavior
that’s expected and set the right
. SATURDAY,
tone, particularly amid the kind of
hard-charging workplace atmosphere often associated with investment traders. “You can’t
change systems from the outside;
you have to become part of a
system,” said Terri Hartwell Easter, a workplace consultant based
in Bethesda, Md.
While workplace advisers
thought the benefits of the move
would overcome the risks, the
decision is not without them.
For one, it’s possible an employee version of the “observer
effect” could take place, where
people change their behavior only
while the top executive is around,
and not when she leaves.
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
“She can’t be like one of those
police cars that gets parked at an
intersection, where people tend to
slow down” before speeding
again, said David Lewis, who runs
a human resources consulting
firm in Norwalk, Conn.
He also suggested top executives who follow Johnson’s lead
take care not to send the wrong
message, such as that human resources isn’t doing its job or that
employees can’t be trusted.
Still, he thinks the positives are
likely to outweigh the negatives.
“It reinforces what I say regularly,
which is that this is a top-down
issue,” he said.
jena.mcgregor@washpost.com
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KLMNO
METRO
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
High today at
approx. 2 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
61°
8 p.m.
Precip: 20%
41 55 58 53°
°
°
°
Wind: WSW
6-12 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
THE REGION
MARYLAND
OBITUARIES
Metro is doing away with
negative balances on
SmarTrip cards amid a
push to enforce its fares. B2
A U-Md. Baltimore County
chemical engineering
student is the school’s
first Rhodes Scholar. B4
Record executive George
Avakian orchestrated the
success of dozens of jazz
and rock musicians. B4
Young voters’ turnout a GOP hurdle
BY
G REGORY S . S CHNEIDER
richmond — As bad as the overall outcome of Virginia’s recent
election was for Republicans,
there was one facet of the vote
that raises special alarm for the
party’s future.
That’s the performance of
young voters, who came out in
historic numbers and overwhelmingly cast their ballots for
the Democratic candidate for governor, Ralph Northam.
While Republicans have been
wrestling with an aging demographic for some time, analysts
say the unpopular actions of President Trump are pushing away a
B
RE
Party urged to focus on
mainstream issues to
retain a new generation
new generation.
“One of the biggest challenges
facing the Republican Party in
Virginia and nationwide is that
the Republican Party has become
toxic to a lot of young voters,” said
Bob Holsworth, a longtime Virginia political scientist. “I think
Trump has exacerbated a trend
that was emerging, and it has
become very problematic.”
Northam defeated Republican
Ed Gillespie by an overall margin
of 54 percent to 45 percent, as
certified this week by the state
Board of Elections.
Young voters — who are often
among the least-engaged, especially in a nonpresidential election — had a turnout rate of
34 percent, according to an analysis of exit polling by a group at the
Tisch College of Civic Life at Tufts
University. That’s up from 26 percent in the 2013 governor’s race
and double the youth turnout in
2009.
And that surge of millennials
was a windfall for Democrats:
MILLENNIALS CONTINUED ON B3
Catholic U.
mostly
cleared in
rape case
WOMAN CLAIMED
RIGHTS VIOLATIONS
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
Nearly 70 percent of millennial voters supported Ralph Northam,
Virginia’s governor-elect, seen at his victory rally on Nov. 7.
But feds say school failed
accused male student
BY
N ICK A NDERSON
Federal investigators found
insufficient evidence to conclude
that Catholic University violated
a student’s civil rights after she
reported in late 2012 that she had
been raped on campus.
But the Education Department’s civil rights unit determined that the university failed
to uphold the rights of the accused male student, in violation
of the anti-discrimination law
known as Title IX.
The report from the Office for
Civil Rights, or OCR, was issued
Oct. 31, culminating an investigation of nearly four years into
an incident that involved two
students, alcohol and a dispute
over sexual consent. The case
drew the Vatican’s university in
America into the national debate
over how schools handle reports
of sexual violence.
Catholic said it was pleased
with the outcome. “The findings
reflect what we have consistently
held: that the university responded promptly and equitably” to the woman’s allegations,
the school said this week in a
statement.
The young man was not
charged with any crime, and the
university cleared him in 2013 of
an allegation of sexual misconduct.
The young woman in the case,
Erin Cavalier, who is now 23,
went public with her account in a
2014 article in The Washington
Post.
Catholic was one of dozens of
colleges and universities named
that year when the Obama administration disclosed a list of
schools under federal investigation related to sexual violence
and Title IX, a 1972 law that bans
Fast food
ASSAULT CONTINUED ON B2
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
A bald eagle catches a meal on the Susquehanna River at the base of the Conowingo Dam in Maryland. The dam is about 50 miles
northeast of Baltimore, and it is a prime breeding, nesting and foraging site for the bird of prey, according to the dam operator.
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Erin Cavalier said she was
raped on campus after a night
of drinking five years ago.
Gang ties examined in 2 D.C. slayings Arlington trims parking-space rules
Court documents
link suspects to STC,
notorious 15 years ago
BY P ETER H ERMANN
AND C LARENCE W ILLIAMS
Two suspects charged with killing a 16-year-old earlier this
month in the Brightwood neighborhood are affiliated with a violent street gang known as STC, or
Street Thug Criminals, with roots
in El Salvador, according to court
documents.
In addition, police said the
shooting of Yoselis Regino Barrios, on Nov. 7, and the fatal shooting of a man Nov. 8 involved
people from the same crew, raising the possibility of an intragang feud. Arrests have been
made in both cases, and police are
involved different subsearching for another
sets of STC. The gang
person in Barrios’s slayand others were notoriing.
ous in the District in the
The
back-to-back
late 1990s through the
shootings about a mile
mid-2000s. In 2004,
apart along the Georgia
prosecutors sent several
Avenue corridor frightpeople from gangs, inened residents and led to
cluding STC, to prison
a packed community
meeting at which home- Yoselis Regino after four killings caused
by jealousy over a girl.
owners pressed police Barrios, 16.
On Wednesday, police
and other D.C. officials
arrested Kevin Sorto, 20, of
for answers. Early on, police had
Northwest, and charged him with
raised the possibility that the
first-degree murder in the shootviolence was linked to gangs, aling of Barrios. The teen and a
though they were vague about
friend were shot the night of Nov.
particulars.
7 in an alley behind rowhouses.
The newly filed court docuIn the arrest affidavit, police
ments do not offer a motive for
said they tracked a red car seen
the shooting of Barrios, killed
being driven away and internear his home in the 1300 block of
Rittenhouse Street NW, or of viewed a witness who said he saw
Sorto live on Instagram saying,
Jonathan Vilchez, 22, fatally shot
“We got them [expletive] scored.”
the next day inside the Lucky
On Thursday, police issued an arCorner Market in the 5400 block
rest warrant for a second suspect,
of Georgia Avenue NW.
It was not clear if the violence
SHOOTING CONTINUED ON B6
Some new projects
could go forward with
up to 50% reduction
BY
P ATRICIA S ULLIVAN
Once upon a time, a new apartment or condominium came with
one or even two parking spaces,
often free, a reflection of America’s love for and dependence on
automobiles.
But now, parking in urbanized
areas is scarce and expensive, and
walkable is in. Bike lanes have
gobbled up on-street parking
spaces. Short-term car-sharing
services such as Zipcar and
Car2Go, and paid ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft, have
sprouted in city and suburb alike.
And municipalities across the
country are allowing developers
to build apartments, condos and
townhouses with far less parking,
eager to cut the cost of housing
and convinced that fewer spaces
are needed.
Arlington County is the latest
local government to take action.
On Nov. 18, the County Board
voted to allow developers of some
new projects along the BallstonRosslyn and U.S. 1 corridors to cut
the parking they provide by as
much as 50 percent, so long as
they offer bicycle parking, on-site
car sharing and unlimited Metrorail or Metrobus passes for residents.
“Keeping excess parking . . . has
really high costs for the county,”
said Katie Cristol (D), the board’s
vice chair, who described the
change as “not a cudgel, but a
series of carrots. We’re not trying
to badger anybody into a lifestyle
that doesn’t match their needs.”
The same thing is happening
across the Potomac and in other
nearby jurisdictions. The District
last year rezoned minimum parking requirements for multifamily
residences in many areas and reduced parking minimums close to
Metro or bus routes in other parts
of the city to less than one space
for every five units. Fairfax County
limited the maximum number of
parking spots at buildings within
a quarter-mile of Metro stations
in Tysons Corner seven years ago,
and is considering lowering the
minimum parking requirements
near other transit stations.
In Montgomery County, multifamily buildings must provide
one parking space per bedroom,
but less parking is required for
affordable units and age-restricted buildings. Prince George’s
County is working on a proposal
to remove all minimum parking
requirements for buildings near
certain regional transit zones.
In Buffalo, minimum parking
PARKING CONTINUED ON B3
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
RELIGION
‘Justice League’ delivers a first: A Jewish superhero
BY
N OAH B ERLATSKY
Flash in the new “Justice
League” film is the first Jewish
superhero.
I’m sure this statement will
provoke some disagreement
among people who pay attention
to firsts in films. Depending on
how you look at it, you could
argue the first superhero was also
the first Jewish superhero. Superman, after all, was created by two
Jews, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster,
and fans have found some (often
overstated) traces of Jewish cultural influence in his creation.
There’s also Thing of “The Fantastic Four,” who wasn’t officially
declared Jewish in the comics
until the 2000s, and hasn’t been
identified as Jewish in the films.
He was often seen by fans as a
working-class ethnic stand-in for
his creator, working-class ethnic
Jew Jack Kirby. The X-Man Kitty
Pryde was Jewish in the 1980s,
and the X-Man villain Magneto
was retconned into a Holocaust
survivor at about the same time.
Flash, though, is the first character in our ongoing superhero
film frenzy who is identified specifically as Jewish — he mentions
he’s Jewish quickly, offhand,
when he first meets Batman (Ben
Affleck). Magneto is the only other Jewish character I can think of
in major films so far, and he’s a
villain. Moreover, Magneto has
been played by Ian McKellen and
Michael Fassbender, neither of
whom is Jewish. However, Ezra
Miller, who plays Flash, is Jewish.
So what does it mean to finally
have a Jewish hero almost two
decades into the superhero
boom?
For most people, including
most Jews, it’s probably no big
deal. People of color struggle to
get meaningful roles in Hollywood, but that’s not the case for
white Jews. Gal Gadot (Wonder
Woman) and Scarlett Johansson
(Black Widow) are both Jewish
actors with high-profile superhe-
Ezra Miller, who is Jewish,
portrays Flash in “Justice
League,” which hit movie
theaters last week. Flash is the
first character in the ongoing
superhero film frenzy who is
identified specifically as
Jewish, almost 20 years into
the superhero boom.
CLAY ENOS/DC COMICS
ro roles, for example. The fact that
their characters aren’t Jewish just
underlines the extent to which
white Jews are treated like any
other white ethnic group.
In Hollywood, Irish people can
play Italians, Italians can play
Jews, Jews can play Greeks from
mystical Amazon islands. Flash’s
Jewishness is hardly noted in the
film because Jewishness, in Hollywood films, is hardly notable.
White Jews are just read as white
(and black Jewish people are almost completely invisible.)
Still, given the history of superheroes, it seems a little odd that
there have been so few superheroes identified as Jewish, even if
only in an aside.
Jews, after all, created the superhero genre. Siegel, Shuster
and Kirby are probably the three
most influential creators in the
genre. Marvel writer and editor
Stan Lee is Jewish. Batman creators Bob Kane and Bill Finger
were Jewish as well.
These Jewish creators, though,
generally did not create Jewish
heroes. Jews still faced widespread discrimination in the
1940s, ’50s, and ’60s, which is why
many artists had to work in comics, rather than in more prestigious illustration careers. Jewish
creators also often saw themselves
primarily as Americans and didn’t
see a need to emphasize their Jewish backgrounds.
Superheroes have traditionally
been less about presenting Jews
as heroes and more about presenting white Jews as continuous
with a nonspecific, non-ethnic
Americanness. Jews in popular
culture are stereotypically portrayed as victims or as wimps and
Feds fault CU for appeal in rape case
ASSAULT FROM B1
sex discrimination in schools
that receive federal funding.
This year, the Trump administration has declared a shift in
federal guidance on Title IX,
saying it wants to work more
closely with colleges to ensure
the due-process rights of all
students — including the accused — are protected in sexual
violence cases.
Cavalier said this week she
was disappointed in the outcome
of the federal investigation of
Catholic. “The report was less
than honest,” she said.
In a footnote, the federal report said a number of students
interviewed by OCR raised concerns that the university’s department of public safety could
be “insensitive and intimidating”
when questioning victims. That
echoed what Cavalier described
as her own experience. The report said federal investigators
encouraged the university to ensure that public safety officers
were trained in how trauma can
affect victims of sexual harassment or sexual violence.
“We are appreciative that the
report included reference to the
intentional and measurable
steps we have taken to strengthen our resources for the prevention of and response to sexual
harassment and assault,” Catholic said in its statement.
In Cavalier’s telling, she went
on a drinking binge that night in
December 2012, downing wine,
tequila, vodka and beer within a
short time, and becoming severely intoxicated before her encounter with the male student. She
said a blood-alcohol analysis the
nerds; Holocaust survivors or the
class brain. Jews are comedians,
but not action stars. Americans
have an ideal of heroism that is
white, male, heterosexual, and
default gentile. Jews don’t fit.
There have been some deliberate efforts to push back against
this; Jeff Goldblum in “Independence Day,” for example, or (nonJewish actor) Daniel Craig in “Defiance.” Jewish superhero creators, working in an earlier time,
rarely went this route.
Instead, Jewish superhero stories are mostly parables about
leaving identifiable Jewishness
behind in a successful bid for
(white) Jewish assimilation.
Clark Kent is a nebbishy awkward Jewish stereotype until he
turns into perfect gentile specimen Superman. Steve Rogers
(created by Kirby and Joe Simon,
For Metro, no more negative balances
BY
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
next morning provided strong
evidence that she was too incapacitated to consent to sex.
Cavalier contended that Catholic mishandled her case, overlooking key evidence about her
level of intoxication and dragging out its review of the incident. She fought for several
months to get a formal hearing
into her claim that she had been
raped.
Initially, university officials
had decided that a hearing was
unnecessary. Eventually, pressed
by Cavalier to reconsider, they
reversed that decision. The university board that reviewed the
incident in October 2013 found
no wrongdoing.
“OCR did not find that the
delays affected the fairness of the
process overall for the complainant,” the federal report said.
But the federal report faulted
Catholic for reversing its initial
decision not to hold a hearing.
Federal investigators said the
reversal deviated from the university’s written procedures at
the time, which did not allow for
an appeal. The civil rights office
said the reversal appeared to
have been driven by Catholic’s
effort to be “responsive” to Cavalier’s concerns and “bring satisfactory closure for all parties.”
But in doing that, the civil
rights office said, the university
“subjected the accused to an
inequitable process, in violation
of Title IX.” The university later
rewrote its procedures to allow
for appeals.
The young man, who has not
been publicly identified, could
not be reached for comment.
Cavalier graduated from Catholic in May 2016 with a bachelor’s
degree in politics. In October
2016, she sued the university in
U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, alleging the
school violated her Title IX
rights and seeking financial
damages for “negligent and intentional infliction of emotional
distress.” That suit, separate
from her civil rights complaint,
is still pending. Catholic has
denied wrongdoing and is seeking to dismiss the suit.
Despite the legal battle, Cavalier has not severed ties with her
alma mater. This year, she enrolled again at the 6,000-student
university in Northeast Washington. She is now a graduate student seeking a master’s degree in
business analysis. She is considering a career in project management consulting or marketing. “I
would like to just be able to do
what I set out and planned to do,”
Cavalier said.
nick.anderson@washpost.com
Noah Berlatsky is author of “Wonder
Woman: Bondage and Feminism in
the Marston/Peter Comics.” Follow
him on Twitter: @nberlat
THE REGION
On Jan. 8, riders without
sufficient funds must
reload SmarTrips to exit
Catholic University says it has strengthened its resources “for the
prevention of and response to sexual harassment and assault.”
also a Jew) is a spindly, nerdy
Jewish stereotype, unfit for military service, until the super-soldier formula transforms him into
the literal quintessence of Americanism.
When Jewish superhero creators imagined themselves as heroes, then, they imagined themselves as non-Jewish heroes.
Whether this was because of social prejudice or personal preference, the fact remains that superheroes are rarely Jewish.
To be heroic, Jews are supposed
to lose their Jewishness, and become something else, as Gadot
and Johannson become heroes by
playing non-Jews.
Flash, to some degree, supports
this idea that heroes can’t be Jewish. The most famous version of
Flash in the comics wasn’t Jewish; he was a blond, gentile police
scientist named Barry Allen.
The film’s Jewish version is less
advanced in his career; he’s down
on his luck and his dad’s in prison.
He’s also younger, smaller and
notably less confident.
Miller plays the character with
a bit of Woody Allen self-deprecation and a bit of Mel Brooks/Jerry
Seinfeld fast talk. He’s the Yiddish
comic relief.
He’s also, not coincidentally,
the least heroic of all the collected
heroes. One of the best lines of
“Justice League” is his quavering
admission, “It’s really cool you
guys seem ready to do battle and
stuff, but, full transparency, I’ve
never done battle. I’ve just pushed
some people and run away.”
Batman has to give him a pep
talk to help him find his inner
hero. The billionaire gentile
teaches the working-class Jew
how to be brave and care for other
people. The fact that the billionaire was created by working-class
Jews is just another twist of the
batarang. Jews can write heroic
narratives as long as they put
someone else at their center.
In a telling “Justice League”
scene, Victor/Cyborg (Ray Fisher)
and Flash are deputized to unpleasant midnight grave-digging
duty. Barry awkwardly tries to
give Victor a fist-bump, which
Victor spurns, leaving Barry babbling awkward apologies for being racially insensitive.
The two then bond, though,
about their origins. Barry was hit
by lightning, and Victor was injured in an unspecified disaster
that killed his mother. “We’re the
accidents,” Barry says.
Barry isn’t black, the scene
makes clear, but there’s some
common ground between black
people and white Jews. Heroes
are supposed to be white and
gentile.
In that context, both Victor and
Barry look like mistakes or blips.
They’re not supposed to be there.
Yet, Victor does get to be a hero;
he figures out how to save the
world. Barry, much to his own
surprise, gets to be heroic as well.
He rescues people, he pushes
some bad guys and runs away, he
risks his life and runs super fast
and trades quips with the greatest
heroes ever.
Barry’s still a bit of a stereotype,
and the script struggles, despite
itself, with the supposed disconnect between heroism and Jewishness. Nonetheless, some 80 years
after two Jewish kids created Superman, there’s a Jewish superhero played by a Jewish actor on the
big screen.
Flash may not have been quick,
but he did get there first.
F AIZ S IDDIQUI
Metro announced Friday that it
will soon stop allowing negative
balances on SmarTrip cards amid
a larger push to crack down on
fare evaders.
While not technically fare evasion, negative balances have cost
Metro an estimated $25 million
over the past 17 years, agency officials said. Fare evaders have cost
the system $25 million per year in
lost revenue.
But the cash-strapped agency
said no amount of lost revenue is
too small to recover. Metro estimates it will save $1 million per year
by outlawing negative balances.
“In an environment where every dollar counts, we are taking a
common-sense approach to ensure that Metro is properly collecting the value of the transportation
it provides to reduce the demand
on Metro customers and the region for additional funding,” Metro Chief Financial Officer Dennis
Anosike said in a statement.
Metro will begin enforcing the
rule Jan. 8.
SmarTrip cards allow riders to
take one trip resulting in a negative balance. For example, a rider
taking a $3.25 trip with only $3 on
their SmarTrip card could exit the
system with a 25-cent negative
balance. But beginning next year,
fare gates won’t open for riders
with insufficient funds on their
SmarTrip cards. Those riders will
instead be directed to exit-fare
machines. And bus riders who
don’t have the $2 fare loaded on
their SmarTrip cards will be met
with a buzz at the farebox, the
agency said.
In announcing the change, Metro reminded riders that exit fare
machines accept cash and coins
only, unlike the fare-vending machines in the front of stations,
some of which accept credit cards.
The agency has no plans to
equip exit-fare machines with
credit card technology. However,
Metro spokeswoman Sherri Ly
said, “if a customer only has a debit
or credit card, the station manager
will allow access to a machine on
the opposite side of the fare gates.”
“We anticipate that our customers will quickly adapt to the new
rule just as they did in 2013 when
we enacted the $1.50 negative limit for Metrorail trips,” she said. At
that time, according to Metro, the
number of exit-fare transactions
increased slightly the week the
change was enacted, but quickly
returned to normal levels.
Riders with preloaded passes
such as SelectPass, daily and
weekly passes and student passes,
will not be permitted to enter the
system if they have a negative balance on their card.
Metro also announced the expansion of the SelectPass program, which allows riders to prepay for a month of unlimited travel at a certain price ceiling and
below. The flexible monthly pass
will now be available at every price
point from $2 to $6, with a month
of unlimited travel costing as
much as 18 round-trip commutes.
The pass was previously available
at price points from $2.25 to $4
per trip, and at the system’s
then-$5.90 ceiling. (The maximum fare increased to $6 beginning in July.)
Ly said SelectPass trips now account for 7 percent of rail ridership. Riders loaded more than
6,500 SelectPasses onto SmarTrip
cards in October, accounting for
$800,000 in sales, Ly said.
faiz.siddiqui@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Anti-Semitic gra∞ti found in park
BY
S HIRA S TEIN
As David Abrams, 63, was
walking his dog, Gabe, on
Thanksgiving morning, he came
across graffiti at Rose Park.
“Dear Jews stop pushing war
with Russia,” the message read.
It was written in two places on
a black storage box near first base
at the softball field at Rose Park in
Northwest Washington.
Abrams, who is Jewish, said he
was “disgusted, just totally, totally disgusted.”
Not only is the park a part of
Abrams’s community, but he also
lives across the street and is a
member of the Friends of Rose
Park board of directors.
Anti-Semitism is “happening
here in D.C., and it’s happening
in our front yard,” Abrams said.
He said he walked along 26th
Street to the park a few minutes
after 9 a.m. to talk with a neigh-
bor who was also walking her
dog.
When he glanced at the box, he
spotted the graffiti.
Abrams sent an email to local
community members, Advisory
Neighborhood
Commission
members, the D.C. Department
of Parks and Recreation and the
D.C. Department of General Services reporting the incident and
asking that the graffiti be
cleaned up.
Abrams’s neighbor Oz Malkesman wrote back after seeing the
email about the graffiti. He said
he had stretched against a post
facing the black storage box
about 8:30 a.m. before going on a
run and did not see anything on
the box. Malkesman told Abrams
it is unlikely that he would have
missed the graffiti had it been
there when he was stretching.
Abrams said: “The speculation
is that it happened in broad
daylight between 8:30 and 9:05.”
Later in the day, Abrams reported the graffiti to the D.C.
police, who created an incident
report. Abrams said the police
told him that the person who
wrote the graffiti could be
charged, if found, with a hate
bias offense and defacing D.C.
government property.
Jim Wilcox, a member of
ANC 2E, said, “Obviously, everybody is opposed to graffiti, and
we’re even more opposed to
anti-Semitic graffiti.”
“We hope to eliminate the
problem as soon as possible,”
Wilcox said.
The city’s Department of General Services has created a work
order to have the graffiti removed.
“I never thought I would live
to see something like that,”
Abrams said.
shira.stein@washpost.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Millennials’ votes this month ushered in more female lawmakers in Virginia
MILLENNIALS FROM B1
Sixty-nine percent of those voters
supported Northam, vs. 30 percent for Gillespie.
The same trend held when
measured in different ways. In
precincts adjacent to college campuses, turnout was up 8 points
over 2013 and Northam won 72
percent of the vote for governor.
Young voters didn’t surge in New
Jersey — turnout of 18 percent
was similar to the past two governor’s elections there — but 73
percent of them voted for the
Democrat, according to the Tufts
analysis.
“Young people have increasingly moved away from the Republican Party, given its perceived status as being the anti-immigrant
party and not being tolerant of
alternative lifestyles,” said Mark
Rozell, dean of the Schar School of
Policy and Government at George
Mason University.
“I find even with my students
who are Republican-leaning, on
social or cultural issues they’re
very libertarian for the most
part,” Rozell said. “As long as the
Republican Party is seen as not
embracing or accepting people as
they are, be they gay, transgender,
immigrants and the like, that’s a
big turnoff to young voters these
days.”
The Virginia results, he said,
are “a wake-up call to the Republican Party about the way things
are going to go for them next year”
in congressional races across the
country.
Some Republicans get the message. David Ramadan, a former
Republican delegate to the General Assembly who supported
Gillespie for governor, said the
youth turnout “is one number
that certainly has popped out. I’ll
summarize that with one word for
the GOP: trouble.”
Ramadan has long warned that
his party has a problem wooing
minority voters. “But this election
shows that it’s not just a minority
problem, it’s a youth problem” —
and even broader than that, he
added.
Those problems were accelerated this year by “the Trump effect,” he said.
Trump is extremely unpopular
in Virginia, with a 34 percent
approval rating in a recent Washington Post-Schar School poll.
And his rhetoric appeared to influence Gillespie to shift his campaign toward issues of illegal immigration, Latino gangs and support for Confederate statues.
That was a losing formula for
wooing young voters, Ramadan
said. Millennials care about reducing student debt, finding a
comfortable job and being able to
have an easy commute to work, he
said.
“Unless Republicans get back
to mainstream issues instead of
sanctuary cities and Confederate
statues, we’re going to lose elections,” he said.
Republican pollster Gene Ulm
said he was most concerned
about “young suburbanites” in
the Virginia results. “We basically
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
Supporters of Democrat Ralph Northam erupt in joy Nov. 7 at a rally at George Mason University after
it was announced that he beat GOP challenger Ed Gillespie to become the next governor of Virginia.
had 300,000 people show up who
don’t normally vote in a gubernatorial election,” he said. “We won
85,000 of them and lost the other
215,000.”
There was one silver lining:
Exit polls show Gillespie won
about 12 percent of the African
American vote, higher than most
recent GOP candidates.
By Ulm’s calculation, that
would roughly translate to nearly
63,000 votes — a small number
but far more than any Republican
statewide candidate in recent
years.
“Ed Gillespie got more black
votes when he lost than the last
Republican governor got when he
won,” Ulm said, referring to former governor Robert F. McDonnell, who got fewer than 29,000
black votes in 2009 by his reckoning.
But the overall trend of young,
white and suburban voters is a
bad sign for the party going into
next year’s congressional races,
he said. “That affects certainly
Barbara Comstock,” he said, referring to the Northern Virginia congresswoman, a Republican whose
district went for Northam. “But
there’s a lot of other districts in
America where that’s going to
play a role,” Ulm said.
There are a host of progressive
and grass-roots groups aiming
specifically to get a large turnout
of young voters for Democratic
candidates, and they were taking
credit for the big showing.
Arlington’s action on parking leads some to raise mobility issues
PARKING FROM B1
requirements were eliminated
with a zoning ordinance
11 months ago. About one-third of
apartments built recently near Seattle’s downtown had no parking,
under a decade-old policy to reduce traffic and developers’ costs
so they could build more affordable residences.
In Arlington, where the median
housing value is $651,400, according to the online real estate company Zillow, and where the cost of
entry-level condos has zoomed
out of reach of many young professionals, one underground parking
spot costs between $30,000 and
$60,000 to build, a county report
estimated. The board’s new guide-
lines will allow the county to grant
approval to developers of multifamily-housing in the two Metro
corridors to build between 0.2 and
0.6 spaces per unit, down from 0.8
to 1.25 spaces per unit.
Arlington residents pride
themselves on living a walkable
lifestyle, taking transit whenever
possible and bicycling for personal transportation and recreation.
But some who testified before the
board said the loss of parking
spaces would be difficult, especially for those who are less mobile.
“Please do not discourage
young families and parents with
kids from living in this area by
encouraging a ‘car-free diet’ to an
extreme,” said Puja Valiyil, 35, a
mother of four.
Elfreda Baptist, a resident of
Arlington’s Court House neighborhood, said the proposal overlooks the needs of dual-income
couples who work outside areas
reachable by Metro, as well as the
elderly and people with disabilities.
“This will have the biggest impact on the seniors who cannot
ride a bike, who need to carry
heavy groceries, who feel unsafe
to take Metro at night, who have to
visit doctors or family or friends
outside the Metro area,” she said.
“This envisions a Metro corridor
filled with young, active, healthy
people.”
Others noted that even residents without cars sometimes
need parking spaces, to accommodate contractors, caregivers and
guests.
Board chair Jay Fisette (D) said
the changes will be “incremental
and prudent,” and reminded concerned residents that guidelines
will not affect existing residential
parking. “I think a lot of angst and
excitement about this is overblown,” he said.
A years-long county study
showed that Arlington households within easy walking distance of Metro had fewer vehicles
and didn’t use them as much as
households farther away from the
rail lines.
Many senior citizens and people who live in affordable housing
don’t own cars, the report said,
and many multifamily residential
complexes are near underused
commercial parking garages.
Since summer, Arlington has
had street-legal electric golf carts
that ferry people free of charge
along the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor.
Cheryl Cort, policy director for
the Coalition for Smarter Growth,
said that reducing the number of
required parking places will give
developers and residents “better
choices.”
“So people who choose not to
have a car don’t end up paying for
a lot of unused parking, and we
can have some buildings oriented
to car owners and drivers,” Cort
said.
patricia.sullivan@washpost.com
LOTTER I ES
VIRGINIA
Results from Nov. 24
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Thu.):
Lucky Numbers (Fri.):
DC-4 (Thu.):
DC-4 (Fri.):
DC-5 (Thu.):
DC-5 (Fri.):
3-9-9
0-6-9-2
8-6-8-1-2
6-8-6
4-4-9
0-2-0-3
6-7-1-5
6-9-9-8-9
7-2-4-3-7
MARYLAND
Day/Pick 3:
9-4-4
Pick 4:
4-6-7-5
Night/Pick 3 (Thu.):
3-5-0
Pick 3 (Fri.):
6-7-7
Pick 4 (Thu.):
7-9-2-6
Pick 4 (Fri.):
4-2-2-4
Multi-Match (Thu.): 13-15-20-29-30-35
Match 5 (Thu.):
4-7-12-20-26 *29
Match 5 (Fri.):
13-15-23-25-39 *33
5 Card Cash:
10H-4H-2C-AC-8C
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5 (Fri.):
Night/Pick-3 (Thu.):
Pick-3 (Fri.):
Pick-4 (Thu.):
Pick-4 (Fri.):
Cash-5 (Thu.):
Cash-5 (Fri.):
2-5-7
7-0-6-1
2-11-12-13-24
2-2-8
1-0-2
8-9-8-9
4-0-4-4
9-14-26-30-33
3-6-14-15-32
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
4-33-56-58-59 ¶4
Mega Millions:
16-36-54-61-64 **22
Megaplier:
3x
Lucky for Life:
10-15-19-43-44 ‡8
*Bonus Ball
**Mega Ball
¶Cash Ball
‡Lucky Ball
For late drawings and other results, check
washingtonpost.com/local/lottery
LOCAL DIGEST
THE DISTRICT
MARYLAND
Fatal shooting in
Southeast parking lot
Man found fatally shot
in car is identified
A man was shot and killed
Thursday night in Southeast
Washington, D.C. police said.
Joseph Phill Smith, of
Northwest was killed around
7 p.m. in a parking lot at the
Forest Ridge Vista apartments in
the 2400 block of Elvans Road,
according to police. A second
man was wounded.
Two vehicles and an
apartment were struck by
bullets, according to a police
report.
Police have identified a man
found fatally shot in a car on
Thanksgiving.
Officers found Aaron Taylor,
20, of Forest Heights, about 6
a.m. in the 100 block of Cree
Drive after someone reported a
suspicious car, according to
Prince George’s County police.
Taylor was pronounced dead
at the scene.
— Lynh Bui
Seat Pleasant woman
pulled from fire dies
A Seat Pleasant woman in her
70s, pulled from a house fire
early Friday, died at a hospital.
The fire broke out in a twolevel, single-family home in the
6800 block of Wilburn Drive,
Prince George’s County Fire
Department spokesman Mark
Brady said.
Firefighters tried to put it out
as they searched for a woman
who was reportedly trapped,
Brady said. The fire was
apparently accidental, he said.
The victim was not named.
— Peter Hermann
— Lynh Bui
RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRECTORY
ABSOLUTE MONISM
Self-Revelation Church
of Absolute Monism
Golden Lotus Temple Yoga Philosophy
Swami Premananda of India, Founder
“PILGRIM SOUL”
Church and Sunday School Services, 11 AM
WWW.SELFREVELATIONCHURCH.ORG
301-229-3871, 4748 Western Ave., Bethesda, MD
BAPTIST
MT. PLEASANT BAPTIST
215 R.I. Ave., N.W., Wash., D.C. 202-332-5748
Office Hours: M-F 8:30-5 pm
Rev. Terry D. Streeter, Pastor
November 26, 2017
7:45 am A Picture of Perilous Times
II Timothy 3:1-5
10:45 am
3:00 pm
Mercy to a Stiff-Necked People
Exodus 33:1-6
Pastor to Zion Hill Baptist
Visit our website at www.MPBCDC.org
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
RELIGIOUS SERVICES
DIRECTORY
Don't miss our special Christmas Issues!
Advertise Christmas Eve and Christmas Day services and events in our Special Christmas Church
Services Directory appearing in
Express newspaper
Friday, Dec. 15 and Wednesday, Dec. 20
Washington Post Metro Section
Saturday, Dec. 16 and Saturday, Dec. 23
Call Melissa Abell 202-334-7024
ReligionAdvertising@washpost.com
BAPTIST
Shiloh
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
ALL SOULS CHURCH, UNITARIAN
Shiloh Baptist Church
9th & P Streets, N.W.
Wallace Charles Smith
Senior Minister
Sunday, November 26, 2017
7:45 & 10:55 AM
Rev. Wallace Charles Smith
Preaching
9:30 AM
Church School Classes for All Ages
Understanding Justice through the Lens of Christ
Interpreting Service for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing
#ShilohDC
www.shilohbaptist.org
BAPTIST
November 26 9:30 AM & 11:15 AM (ASL interpreter @ 11:15) n
"The Year the Buddha Came for Thanksgiving"
Rev. Dr. Robert M. Hardies
16th & Harvard NW; 202.332.5266; all-souls.org
ROMAN CATHOLIC
“At least three voter registration and mobilization groups had
a presence on our campus, and
there may have been more at
some of the bigger campuses,”
said Quentin Kidd, a political scientist at Christopher Newport
University in Newport News.
At Virginia Tech, in fact, the
progressive group NextGen Virginia staged a petting zoo to get
students to come out to vote. The
group spent $3.3 million statewide and knocked on 350,000
doors as part of its efforts.
After Northam’s win, NextGen
crowed in a letter to supporters
that “it’s clear young people and
people of color made the difference in this historic election. . . . If
anger at Donald Trump and the
GOP continues to drive turnout
up through the 2018 election cycle, when young people will be the
largest bloc of eligible voters, we
could be looking at a progressive
wave powered by millennial voters.”
Kidd said evidence of the youth
trend’s staying power can be
found in the crop of new Democrats elected to the General Assembly, who are far younger —
and more female — than the current legislature.
“Half these new delegates are
probably millennials,” he said.
“The impact of the millennial
generation on the electorate is
going to be pretty profound, and
Democratic candidates tend to be
the beneficiary of this far more
than Republicans are.”
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
THE REGION
Robberies
carried out
on Black
Friday
BY
M ARTIN W EIL
On Black Friday, a day of retail
frenzy, stores provide goods in
return for money. But the streets
of the Washington region saw a
kind of reverse Black Friday, as
several people tried to get money
in return for nothing but threats.
In Alexandria, police said a
robber with a gun took cash from
a business around 8 p.m. in the
200 block of W. Glebe Road.
In Annapolis, according to
police there, someone walked
into a bank on Bay Ridge Road
and offered a note, demanding
money. None was given, and the
individual left, police said.
In Washington, according to
D.C. police, someone showed interest in cash at a store in the 900
block of Bladensburg Road NE at
2:25 a.m. They said he displayed
a pistol, got money and left.
What might be described as
illicit Black Friday observances
took place in other places, too.
D.C. police said property was
snatched about 6:40 p.m. near
the Navy Memorial. In addition,
robberies were carried out by
creating fear in the 1200 block of
Eaton Road SE and by showing a
knife in the 2300 block of Wagner Street SE, police said.
martin.weil@washpost.com
ROMAN CATHOLIC
Basilica of the National Shrine
of the Immaculate Conception
Reverend Monsignor Walter R. Rossi, Rector
PRESBYTERIAN
4101 NEBRASKA
AVE NW
Tenleytown Metro
Plenty of Parking
202.537.0800
“Worship the King!”
Dr. Quinn Fox
Sunday Worship:
9 A.M. | 10:50 A.M. | 11 A.M.
Sunday School:
9:30 A.M.
26 November 2017
Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ,
King of the Universe
Masses 5:15 (Vigil)
7:30 , 9 , 10:30 12 (Choir)
1:30 (Spanish) & 4:30 Confessions 10 -12 _____________
, 12:30-1:30 (Spanish) & 2-4 Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
1 December 2017
Annual Christmas Concert for Charity
Rev. Darryl D. Roberts, Ph.D., preaching
7:30 Great Upper Church
Nineteenth Street
4606 16th Street, NW
Church School 8:45 a.m.
BROADCAST LIVE AT:
www.nationalpres.org
Be sure to visit www.everyblessing.org
A freewill offering will benet
Catholic Charities, USA - Hurricane Relief
METAPHYSICAL
Broadcast on EWTN
DIVINE SCIENCE CHURCH
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2025 35th St. NW, Washington, DC 20007
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B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
MARYLAND
UMBC gets its first Rhodes scholar
Naomi Mburu plans to
work toward a doctorate
in engineering science
BY
S ARAH L ARIMER
Earlier this week, Lee Blaney
showed up for a morning class at
the University of Maryland Baltimore County, where he works as
an associate professor. He was at
the front of the room getting
ready, doing professor stuff. Then
he heard his students begin to
cheer.
“I was like, ‘What’s happening?’ I looked up, and Naomi had
walked in,” Blaney said. “She stole
the show.”
Honestly, maybe Naomi Mburu should get used to that, because the 21-year-old chemical
engineering major has become a
bit of a celebrity at the school. She
was this month named a Rhodes
scholar, becoming the first UMBC
student to win the prestigious
award.
“The whole department is very
proud of her accomplishments,”
Blaney said. “We’re hoping to find
more Naomis in the coming
years.”
The Rhodes Scholarship,
which sends recipients to study at
the University of Oxford in England, is a remarkable achievement, both for Mburu and the
institution that has shepherded
her. After Mburu’s friends
learned she had earned the
Rhodes, they threw her a surprise
party in her apartment. When the
president of her university
learned, he began to cry.
“It was so meaningful to so
many,” university President Freeman Hrabowski said. “Everybody
gets excited about athletics, but
we need to get as excited about
the life of the mind, and about
preparing leaders. And we are
passionate here about that.”
Mburu, the daughter of immi-
grants from Kenya, is one of 32
American students to receive the
Rhodes and one of a handful with
Washington-area ties this year.
This year’s group of Rhodes scholars includes 10 African American
students, the most ever elected in
an American class, according to a
Rhodes Trust news release.
Mburu learned she was a winner after she and other finalists,
including the Naval Academy’s
Nathan Bermel, went through interviews for the scholarship.
Mburu and Bermel played Uno
as they awaited the decision.
When their names were announced, he asked her to pinch
him, to make sure this was real.
She did. It was.
“I’ve just been getting a lot of
text messages and emails and
calls from people, some people I
don’t even know, just congratulating me and telling me how
much it means to not just me, but
to the entire UMBC community,
and also the African American
community,” Mburu said.
MARLAYNA DEMOND FOR UMBC
Naomi Mburu, 21, is also
interested in educational issues
and may go into policy work.
At her university, Mburu, a
senior from Ellicott City, Md.,
serves as a peer mentor for
younger students interested in
chemical engineering. She is passionate about supporting education and diversity in STEM —
science, technology, engineering
and math.
Mburu said she hopes her
Rhodes achievement serves as an
. SATURDAY,
inspiration to young African
American girls. Maybe it already
has.
“I’ve had so many African
American young females contact
me saying, ‘Oh my God, that’s so
inspiring,’ ” she said.
Mburu picked the University of
Maryland Baltimore County, a
public school with more than
13,000 students, over a number of
top
institutions,
including
Princeton, she said.
“That whole process, that was
difficult for us,” said her father,
Joseph Mburu. “Obviously, we
wanted her to go to the best
school that she can. And being
admitted to a few Ivy League
schools, we were thinking among
ourselves and wondering, is this
the best thing for her?”
It worked out okay, seems like?
Mburu’s mother, who works at
the university as an accounting
manager, described her daughter
as studious and focused, hardworking and deliberative about
her life choices. Joyce Mburu said
she has heard from members of
the Kenyan community who are
excited about her daughter’s accomplishment.
“Everybody just wowing about
how much it means to them and
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
their children, and how inspired
they are for their children, that
they can achieve this,” she said.
At Oxford, Mburu would like to
work with a professor who is
developing heat-transfer systems
for nuclear fusion reactors —
basically, cooling systems. She
plans to work toward a doctorate
in engineering science.
She is also interested in educational issues and how resources
are distributed. Mburu wants to
help create more opportunities
for students, and she would like
to go into policy work someday so
she can help influence that.
Hrabowski, the university
president, said the country has an
“unbelievably large pool of children” from all sorts of backgrounds who have the potential
to some day win a Rhodes, like
Mburu did. He mentioned an
“old-fashioned message” that
needs to be remembered: When a
student has family members who
offer their support, teachers who
care and professors who love her,
anything is possible.
“We must be reminded of that
for every child. It’s so important,”
he said. “And that’s why I cry. Out
of hope.”
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
obituaries
GEORGE AVAKIAN, 98
Groundbreaking jazz producer, record executive helped popularize the LP
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
George Avakian, a producer
and record executive who helped
define the jazz canon and redefine the album, popularizing everything from long-play vinyl records to live albums and liner
notes, died Nov. 22 at his home in
Manhattan. He was 98.
His daughter Anahid Avakian
Gregg confirmed the death to the
Associated Press but did not disclose the cause.
A soft-spoken son of Armenian
immigrants, Mr. Avakian was
among the most impactful behind-the-scenes figures of 20thcentury music, credited with popularizing a sweeping number of
innovations and an astonishing
variety of musicians.
At Columbia Records, where
Mr. Avakian led the once-floundering pop and international division for much of the 1950s, he
assembled a roster that included
pianist Dave Brubeck and trumpeter Miles Davis and oversaw
retrospective releases that revitalized interest in Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington and Bessie Smith.
He produced saxophonist Sonny Rollins’s 1962 comeback hit
“The Bridge”; signed rock musicians Bill Haley and the Everly
Brothers to Warner Bros. Records; assembled one of the bestselling comedy albums in history,
“The Button-Down Mind of Bob
Newhart” (1960); and for several
years in the 1970s managed jazz
and classical pianist Keith Jarrett
and saxophonist Charles Lloyd.
Mr. Avakian orchestrated the
commercial success of dozens of
jazz, rock and international artists, successfully betting that Davis could overcome a heroin addiction and that a teenage Johnny Mathis could become a star.
“Have found phenomenal 19year-old boy who could go all the
way,” Mr. Avakian wrote in an
oft-cited 1955 telegram to Columbia after seeing Mathis sing at a
San Francisco club. “Send blank
contracts.”
But he was also a single-minded jazz scholar who taught one of
the earliest jazz history courses
and sought to elevate the music
he loved as a teenager into an art
form that commanded the same
critical respect as classical music.
Nearly all the technical innovations he championed were adopted in the service of jazz. While
studying at Yale University, he
waged a letter-writing campaign
to record executives, complaining about the lack of full-length
jazz albums. The only records on
the market were low-quality singles, heavy shellac discs known as
78s for their revolutions per minute.
Mr. Avakian eventually persuaded the label Decca to let him
record an album of his own:
“Chicago Jazz” (1940), a set of six
10-inch discs that featured guitarist Eddie Condon and is widely
considered the first full-length
jazz record in history.
The album also marked one of
the earliest examples of liner
notes, with Mr. Avakian crafting
an accompanying 12-page booklet that offered listeners the
wealth of information that had
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Columbia Records executive George Avakian was a
force behind jazz and pop music starting in the 1950s.
long eluded him as a young jazz
fan, including details on the record’s performers and composition. The annotations became a
staple of Mr. Avakian’s releases
and would later win him a Grammy Award, for his scholarly liner
notes to a 1996 Davis and Gil
Evans box set that described recording sessions Mr. Avakian had
originally overseen.
A young Mr. Avakian went on
to connect with Columbia, whose
factory was just 20 miles down
the road from Yale’s campus, and
reissue a series of “Hot Jazz
Classics” that put old recordings
by Bix Beiderbecke, Armstrong
and other early jazz artists in
wide release.
The records formed the bedrock of a jazz canon Mr. Avakian
spent much of his early career
codifying, strolling the archives
of Columbia’s factory and record
library to seek out long-forgotten
albums that soon became hits.
“When Woody Allen told us in
his movie ‘Manhattan’ that ‘Potato Head Blues’ ” — a classic track
by Armstrong — “was one of the
things that made life worthwhile,
maybe it was because Mr. Avakian enabled him to hear it at an
impressionable age,” Wall Street
Journal contributor John McDonough wrote in 1997.
As an executive at Columbia,
Mr. Avakian oversaw the release
of 100 long-play (LP) jazz and pop
records in 1948, seizing on the
new technology as a way to deliver longer musical numbers and
higher-quality sound to listeners.
The albums, also known as 33s,
soon became the industry standard and enabled Mr. Avakian to
release classic live records such
as Benny Goodman’s “Famous
1938 Carnegie Hall Jazz Concert”
(1950) — groundbreaking as an
early reissue, as one of the earliest live records and double albums, and as one of the first jazz
records to sell more than 1 million copies.
It was followed by landmark
recordings such as “Louis Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy” (1954)
and “Ambassador Satch” (1956),
albums on which Mr. Avakian
collaborated with his longtime
hero, Armstrong, in what Mr.
Avakian described as “one of the
greatest privileges of my life.”
“I was born at the right time,”
he told CNN in 2001, “had the
right opportunity, and thank God
I was able to take advantage of it.”
George Mesrop Avakian was
born in Armavir, Russia, on
March 15, 1919. His parents were
cloth traders who had fled western Persia at the start of World
War I. Raised in New York, he
began listening to jazz in high
school, drawn to the music in
part, he said, because its “strange
sounds resembled the Armenian
records that my parents had
brought with them.”
Mr. Avakian served in the
Army during World War II and
returned to work at Columbia
Records, remaining there until
1958. The following year, Mr.
Avakian collaborated with his
younger brother, film editor and
director Aram Avakian, on “Jazz
on a Summer’s Day,” one of the
earliest feature-length documentaries about a music festival.
Aram died in 1987. Mr. Avakian’s wife of 68 years, violinist
Anahid Ajemian, died in 2016.
They had three children. A complete list of survivors was not
immediately available.
Mr. Avakian was one of the
founders of what is now the
Grammy-giving Recording Academy and contributed to recording
sessions and reissues until shortly before his death.
He received a National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Masters
award in 2010, “a culminating
honor,” he said, that confirmed
his “long-held belief: Live long
enough, stay out of jail, and you’ll
never know what might happen!”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
TOMMY KEENE, 59
Prolific musician had a career spanning decades
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
Tommy Keene, a power-pop
guitarist and singer whose wistful,
warmly melodic rock songs placed
him at the fore of the District’s
local music scene in the 1980s,
when he seemed poised to reach a
national audience that eluded him
throughout his four-decade career, died Nov. 22 at home in Los
Angeles. He was 59.
His partner, Michael Lundsgaard, said Mr. Keene died in his
sleep. The cause is not yet known.
A native of Bethesda, Md., Mr.
Keene developed a jangling, arpeggiated guitar style while playing with local bands the Rage and
the Razz, honing a sound that
melded the gentle melodies of early Beatles records with the harddriving guitar rock of the Who.
Describing himself as a “cynical
romantic,” he recorded a dozen
solo albums that were generally
well received by critics but
reached only a small, deeply devoted group of listeners, leading
the Phoenix New Times to christen him “the patron saint of neglected and overlooked powerpop stars.”
“He finds himself between rock
and the hard place,” Washington
Post music critic Richard Harrington wrote in 1984. “His music
is almost too commercial for those
who support alternative music
styles, and not calculated enough
for those who control the nation’s
airwaves.”
Mr. Keene appeared to have his
breakthrough record with the
1984 EP “Places That Are Gone,”
which featured a rollicking,
ERICA L. BRUCE
Tommy Keene performs during the 30th anniversary concert at the
9:30 Club on May 31, 2010, in the District.
nostalgia-tinged title track and
landed atop a year-end Village
Voice critics poll.
The album earned a four-star
review in Rolling Stone, which
called it “a critical link between
the ringing glories of ’60s rock
melodists like the Beatles and
Monkees and the more twisted
renewal of guitar pop in the ’80s,”
and it resulted in a major-label
deal with Geffen Records.
Label and artist never seemed
to fit, however. Mr. Keene accused
Geffen of trying to make him into
an American version of Canada’s
Bryan Adams, the rock singer behind “Cuts Like a Knife,” and maintained a strained relationship with
superstar producers T-Bone Burnett and Geoff Emerick — a former
Beatles collaborator who took Mr.
Keene and his bandmates to record at George Martin’s Montserrat
studio in the Caribbean.
The resulting records, “Songs
From the Film” (1986) and “Based
on Happy Times” (1989), featured
few radio-ready singles, although
Mr. Keene scored some muchneeded exposure with a cameo
performance in the Anthony Michael Hall thriller “Out of Bounds”
(1986).
Mr. Keene eventually moved to
Los Angeles, where he put out a
steady stream of well-crafted rock
and pop records for smaller labels.
He also moonlighted as a guitarist and touring partner, playing alongside leading alternativemusic acts such as Matthew
Sweet, the Goo Goo Dolls, Robert
Pollard of Guided by Voices and
Paul Westerberg of the Replacements.
Thomas Clay Keene was born in
Evanston, Ill., on June 30, 1958,
and grew up in Bethesda. His father worked as a Defense Depart-
ment contractor, and his mother
was killed by a drunk driver when
Tommy was a teenager. Her death
“provided the genesis of Tommy’s
creativity,” said his older brother
Bobby Keene.
Mr. Keene joined with songwriter Richard X. Heyman to form
the Rage while studying at the
University of Maryland, but he
soon jumped to the new-wave
band the Razz, opening for punk
acts such as the Ramones and Patti
Smith before releasing his solo
debut, “Strange Alliance,” in 1982.
Survivors include his partner,
Lundsgaard of Los Angeles; his
father, Robert Keene, and stepmother, Dorothy Keene, both of
Bethesda; and his brother.
Mr. Keene released a live album,
“Showtunes,” in 2000, and continued recording until shortly before
his death. A two-disc retrospective, “Tommy Keene You Hear Me,”
was released in 2010.
“I’ve hung in there,” Mr. Keene
told The Post in 2006, shortly after
the release of his album “Crashing
the Ether.” “Although I haven’t
made a lot of money, I feel I’ve
attained an honorary status where
people let me hang out. I’m a
Cancer, so I think I’m really tenacious.”
“I’ll entertain the idea all the
time of ‘God, how much longer can
I keep doing this?’ ” he continued.
“At the end of the day, I always
want to go back in and make another record and try again and see
if I can do it this time, see if I can
crack it.
“Maybe this time it will be different.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
IN MEMORIAM
GAILLIOT
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
CHRISTOPHER B. GAILLIOT "Chris"
November 25, 1983 - January 25, 2015
B5
RE
DEATH NOTICE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DELANO
HAWKINS
LONG
JONES
NITOWITZ
HARVEY DELANO, II
JOHN HAWKINS, III
Major General USA (Ret.)
LAVERNE S. LONG
May 29, 1918 - November 25, 2005
Richard Ernest Jones, age 96 died November 14, 2017 at his home in Washington,
DC. He was born March 1, 1921 in Calloway
County, KY to the late Willie Ray and Commodore Jones. His two younger sisters,
Lauretta and Lavinia, preceded him in
death. Mr. Jones graduated from the University of Kentucky at age 19. He was
inducted into the Kappa Delta Pi fraternity,
and following college he served as an
agricultural teacher in Kentucky schools.
Mr. Jones enlisted in the Army Air Force in
1942. He became an A-20 pilot and flew
65 missions over Europe. He received a
Distinguished Unit Badge, two Silver Oak
clusters, two Bronze Oak clusters, and
European Theatre ribbon with six battle
stars, American Theatre Ribbon, World War
II Victory ribbon, and the Distinguished
Flying Cross. He was named Chevalier in
the French Legion of Honor. He resigned
from the U.S. Air Force in 1955 with the
rank of Major.
On November 8, 2016 in Sacramento, California. Harvey was born on July 4, 1956
in Washington, DC. His parents, Captain
Victor Delano (USN Ret.) and Jacqueline
Stinson Delano, both predeceased him.
Harvey is survived by his sister, Katherine
Delano Jahnig, his brother-in-law, Frederick
Jahnig, his niece, Leigh Jacqueline Jahnig,
and his nephew, Peter Delano Jahnig. Harvey will be interred at Arlington National
Cemetery on Monday, November 27, 2017
at 10 a.m. Please meet at the Administration Building by 9:30 a.m. before proceeding to the Columbarium.
We take comfort knowing he is in a place
of light, a place of green pastures, a place
of rest where all pain, sorrow and sighing
have fallen away. May his memory be eternal!
EZ
DIOUS
REGINALD A. DIOUS
On Wednesday, November 15, 20017. Beloved
brother of Tijuana Wright, Dorine WootenParker, Robert Dious, Jr. and Tyrone Wooten. He
is also survived by a host of other relatives and
friends. Mr. Dious may be viewed at Stewart
Funeral Home, 4001 Benning Rd, NE on Monday, November 27 from 1 p.m. until service
2 p.m. Online condolences may be made to:
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
On February 3, 2017. Graveside service with
full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery will be held on Tuesday, November 28,
2017. Meet at Administration Building at 12:15
p.m. Arrangements by McGUIRE.
MAZZA
LINDA MARIE MAZZA (Age 73)
Of Rehoboth Beach, DE, passed away Thursday,
November 23, 2017. Mass of Christian Burial
will be offered Wednesday, November 29, 2017
at 11 a.m. at St. Edmond Roman Catholic
Church, King Charles and Laurel Streets,
Rehoboth Beach, DE. A visitation will be held
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 from 2 to 4 p.m.
and 7 to 9 p.m. at the Parsell Funeral Homes
& Crematorium, 16961 Kings Highway, Lewes,
DE. Entombment will follow the Mass at Gate of
Heaven Cemetery, Dagsboro, DE. Contributions
are suggested to St. Jude Children's Research
Hospital, PO Box 1893, Memphis, TN 38101 or
donors@stjude.org. Please visit Mrs. Mazza's
Life Memorial Webpage and sign the online
guest register at:
www.parsellfuneralhomes.com
RICHARDSON
RICHARD ERNEST JONES
As the former First Lady of the Mt. Airy
Baptist Church, your congregation and
community will remember your leadership, faithfulness, and devotion to Christian works. As your family, we will cherish
forever your guidance and love.
Daughters, Cheryl M. Long &
Patricia L. Tucker
Grandson, Michael W. Tucker, II
DEATH NOTICE
ADDISON
HARRIS
ADAMS
Mr. Jones is survived by his wife of 52 years,
Jane Sundelof Jones; two children, Richard
and Jennifer, and four grandchildren, Rachel
and Jane Jones and Richard and Marshall
Platt.
BLANCHE M. ADAMS, PM
AILSTOCK
LAVERNE G. AILSTOCK (Age 91)
On Sunday, November 19, 2017. Loving and
devoted mother of Sandra B. Lee, Janice Y.
Baker, Margaret B. Ailstock and Charles A.
Ailstock (Maria); beloved sister of Alyce S.
Paige and the late Margaret S. Harley. She is
also survived by two grandchildren; four greatgrandchildren; other relatives and friends. Mrs.
Ailstock will lie in state at the Galilee Baptist
Church, 2252 Minnesota Ave., S.E. on Wednesday, November 29 from 10 a.m. until funeral
services at 11 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln
Cemetery. Services by Stewart.
COMPTON
PHILIP ROBINSON COMPTON
"Phil" (Age 97)
Of Front Royal, Virginia passed away on Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at Commonwealth
Senior Living in Front Royal. Visiting hours are
5 to 7 p.m., Tuesday, November 28, 2017 at
Maddox Funeral Home, with services at 11
a.m., Wednesday, November 29, 2017 at the
Front Royal United Methodist Church. Arrangements are being handled by Maddox Funeral
Home, Front Royal.
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HARRY A. RICHARDSON, SR.
MOLLYANNE NORTHROP HARRIS
Entered into Eternal Life in Jesus Christ on
Sunday, November 19, 2017 at her second
home in Port Tobacco, Maryland at age 94,
of natural causes. The widow of the late
Ralph Edward Harris, Jr. and the daughter
of the late John DeWolf Northrop, and
MaryAnne Mayo Northrop. Left to cherish
her memory are her loving and devoted
children, a son Ralph Edward Harris III and
wife, Sharon, and a daughter, Mollyanne
Harris Margolis and husband, Martin L. Sr
and seven loving and adoring grandchildren. Sean M. Harris and wife, Danielle,
Kristen L. Harris, Angela G. Kelsey, Susan
G. Burgoyne, Rachel A. Perez and husband,
Michael, Martin L. Margolis Jr and wife,
Sheila, and Todd M. Margolis and fiancée,
Socorro Reyes and 18 great-grandchildren
and a host of others whose lives she
touched. She retired as Grants Officer, Neurology Institute, National Institutes of
Health, after a 30 year career. Everyone
claimed her as their favorite and said, “She
was practically perfect in every way.” Born
a true lady, an angel of kindness, who ended
all of her prayers with, “And keep us ever
mindful of the needs of others.”
Relatives and friends will be received at
Pumphrey's Bethesda Chevy Chase Funeral
Home, 7557 Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda, MD
20814 on Sunday, November 26 from 3
to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service will
be held at All Saints Episcopal Church, 3
Chevy Chase Cir., Chevy Chase, MD 20815
on Monday, November 27 at 12 noon.
Interment at Rock Creek Cemetery, 201
Allison St. NW, Washington, DC 20011.
Reception 2:30 p.m. Church Great Hall.
Memorial contributions may be made in her
name to the American Red Cross, PO Box
37839, Boone, IA 50037-0839.
Please visit and sign the family guestbook
at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
He was an Army veteran and worked for
many years in law enforcement. He retired as
the Chief of the Protective Services Branch
at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in
Washington, D.C.
He is survived by his wife of 30 years, Joy;
his three sons Michael Sr. (Valencia), Donald
(Nora), and Harry Jr. (Buddy) (Natasha); five
grandchildren Michael Jr., Michael C. (Lanette),
Tosha, Christian, and Marley; and three greatgrandchildren Kamal, Gabriel, and Nia; and two
sisters Rosemary Gleaton and Ernestine Doby..
The funeral service will be held on Saturday,
November 25, at 10 a.m. at St. Mary’s Baptist
Church, 8008 Eastern Avenue, Washington,
D.C. with viewing and visitation at 9 a.m. A
fellowship meal will follow the service.
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
Longtime resident of Washington, DC, passed
away on November 18, 2017. She was predeceased by her husband of 51 years, Frederick
Barry Shay, in 2007. She is survived by her
children, David M. Shay of Silver Spring, MD,
Joseph G. Shay (Susan) of Waltham, MA and
Mary Shay Doughty (Chris) of North Andover,
MA, and by seven grandchildren. Friends may
call at DeVol Funeral Home, 2222 Wisconsin
Avenue, N.W., on Sunday, November 26 from
6 to 8 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be
offered at The Shrine of the Most Blessed
Sacrament, 3630 Quesada St., NW on Monday,
November 27 at 11 a.m. Burial will be at
Arlington National Cemetery on a date to
be determined. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to Madonna House,
220 C St., NE, Washington, DC. 20002 or
to Dorothy Day Catholic Worker House, 503
Rock Creek Church Rd., N.W. Washington, D.C.
20010.
Thus began his 54-year career in Emergency
Medicine, 45 years of which he worked with
INOVA in varying hospitals and Emergency
Care Centers around Northern Virginia.
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Directory, please call
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at 202-334-4122.
He was born in Trenton City, NJ, and grew
up with a love of music, baseball, and
photography. After graduating from Trenton
Catholic Boys High School, he went on to
attend La Salle University where he met
his lifelong friends DJ and Gini McMenamin.
His passion for helping others inspired him
to pursue his medical degree from Seton
Hall School of Medicine. He then began
his service in the U.S. Marine Corps, 2nd
Marine Division, first training at the U.S.
Naval Hospital in Philadelphia, and later
traveling the world as a Battalion Surgeon.
After leaving the Marine Corps, he began
working at Monmouth Medical Center
where he was one of the founding physicians to charter the newly created Emergency Medicine Department, one of the first
departments in this specialty at the time.
It was while he was working at Monmouth
Medical Center that he met the love of his
life, Nancy, whom he married on October 3,
1971. They made their home in Oakton, VA,
where they raised their two children. Larry
loved to travel to San Francisco, Monterey,
and Carmel, CA, and more recently to Italy,
Austria, and France. His dry and sometimes
zany sense of humor, hatred of all things oil
and garlic, inability to pass a piano without
stopping to play, respect for his fellow
doctors and nursing staff, love of animals
(particularly his family pets), and dedication
to his friends and family endeared him to
everyone he met.
He truly loved his brothers- and sisters-inlaw: Louise Conrad, Rick and Layne Conrad,
and Steven Conrad; as well as his nieces and
nephews: Kimberly and Ben Saari; and Cole,
Whitney and Reid Conrad. Also close to his
heart were: Steve and Ingrid McMenamin;
Eddie and Ellen McMenamin; Linda and
Anthony DiValerio; Diane and Tom Reagan;
Gina and Yves Lefranc; Erin, Matthew and
Joseph McMenamin; AJ, Alex and Morgan
DiValerio; and Brendan and Sidney Lefranc.
VIRGINIA BEYER LAUGHLIN
PAUL RAYFORD ANDREWS JR.
On Sunday, November 12, 2017, our beloved
Paul suddenly passed away.
Husband of the late Jeanne, he was the beloved
father to daughters, Kimberly Nofsinger and
Kelly Skibbie; sons, Paul and Brian, and the
proud grandfather of five grandchildren,
Andrew and Grace Skibbie, Ryan Nofsinger,
Amy and Evan Andrews. Also survived by
sister, Joyce Ellwanger and devoted companion
and best friend, Marilu Nicholas.
A native Washingtonian, Paul attended Wilson
High and graduated from Gettysburg College
where he was a loyal Sigma Chi and supporter
of the college. He spent 40 years as a financial
advisor and retired from Morgan Stanley as
Senior Vice President.
His fondest memories were at the home he
called “The Sand Trap” in Bethany Beach where
he was a near daily presence on the beach
for over 30 years. His door was always
open to family and friends and he enjoyed
watching everyone enjoy the fun, sun and
special memories created at the shore.
Known for always enjoying a good joke, Paul
was also a lifelong DC sports fanatic. With so
many friends throughout the area, Paul would
always so humbly say. Everyone loved him!
A mass of remembrance will be held on
Saturday, December 2, 11 a.m. at St.
Bartholomew Catholic Church, 6900 River
Road, Bethesda, MD.
Memorials may be made in his memory to
National Kidney Foundation, 5335 Wisconsin
Avenue, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20015
On Monday, November 20, 2017 of Rockville,
MD. Jeanette is survived by her beloved
husband of 66 years, Donald B. Williams;
loving sister of Mary Agnus Mudd; loving aunt
of William, James, John (Ellen), Robert, and
Maryrose; great-aunt to Annarosa, MarieTherese (David Witte), Steven, Alisa, and
Nicholas (Melanie Rose Singh); great greataunt to Andrew, Marianna, and Jackson
I wish Heaven had a phone
So I could hear your voice again,
I thought of you today
But that is nothing new.
Jeanette was predeceased by her siblings
Rose M. Trotta and Ralph M. Trotta.
All I have are memories and
A picture in a frame.
Your memory is a keepsake
From which I’ll never part.
Jeanette was born January 17, 1932 in her
parent’s bedroom in the family home at
Fourth and Franklin St, NE. Her father delivered her and was the first to see his newest
child.
Jeanette attended St. Anthony’s Catholic
grade school and St. Patrick’s Academy in
Washington, DC.
She met her husband to be Donald (Don)
Williams, soon after graduation and was married on June 30, 1951. Their marriage lasted
66 years and five months. Regrettably, three
babies were lost to miscarriage.
I thought of you yesterday
And days before that too.
I think of you in silence
I often speak your name.
God has you in his arms….
I have you in my heart
A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at
St. Jane France de Chantal, 9601 Old Georgetown Rd., Bethesda, MD 20814 on Tuesday,
November 28, 2017 at 11 a.m. Inurnment will
take place at Arlington National Cemetery at
a later date.
Please view and sign online family guestbook
at:
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
TOM SCAMORDELLA
February 1951 - October 6, 2017
Tom Scamordella, a resident of Gaithersburg,
MD, passed suddenly October 6, 2017, at the
age of 66.
Those left to cherish his love and memories are
his three children, James Scamordella, Tara
Scamordella Stephanie Scamordella; siblings,
Paula Bradford, Gloria Cooper, Jim Scamordella, Pamela Seaman, Lynn Lipford, Gary Frank;
grandchildren and his loving fiancée, Adrienne
Tiller and her son, Philip Tiller of Bethesda, MD.
Prayer services will be held on Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 12 noon at Saint Sophia Greek
Orthodox Church, 2815 36th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20007. In lieu of flowers, please
donate to your favorite charity.
STEWART
Mrs. Laughlin is survived by her children,
Patricia Bair of Toledo, Ohio, Cary Kuhar
of Fuquay-Varina, NC, Susan Reynolds of
Easley, SC and John Laughlin (Salome) of
Germantown, MD; grandchildren, Kate
Bishop (Alex) of New Haven, CT, Scott
Reynolds of Ashland, OH, Laura Emilie Nelson (Howard) of Apex, NC and Gregory Bair
of Toledo, OH; great-grandchildren, Sophia
Katherine Mellado, Hazel Summerlyn Nelson, and Monroe Elizabeth Reynolds; and
many cousins in the Midwest.
light of her family and mother of her children, Joel and Lindsay. She loved making
their long-time residence on Leland Street
in Chevy Chase a warm, comforting home
where everyone in the family felt free to
work, play, have friends over, rest, or do
whatever else he or she wanted. And she
spent much time with Joel and Lindsay
ensuring that they had the attention, guidance, and care they needed to grow and
develop. For example, she worked to find
good schools and other educational experiences and opportunities for them and then
to provide them any support they needed to
take full advantage of those opportunities.
But she gave them their most valuable
lesson through her own example. She loved
life and enjoyed every day as much as she
could, and they saw this and learned from it.
In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation
to the Seton Hall-Hackensack Meridian
School of Medicine. Gifts in memory of
Lawrence Bruther, M.D. can be mailed to
Seton Hall University Advancement, 457
Centre Street, South Orange, N.J. 07079,
or made online at http://advancement.shu.edu/give/give-online.
Jeanette’s life was taken by Diverticular
Disease. Care by her surgeon and all the
wonderful nurses and technicians who
attended her after surgery was provided with
love, compassion, and kindness. Even with
such specialized professional treatment the
illness was too strong for her frail body to
overcome.
Throughout her life, Virginia was involved in
many church activities and civic affairs. She
was a charter member of Adelphi Friends
Meeting in MD, where she had been a
member since 1955, and also, since 1990,
at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation
of Frederick, MD. After her retirement from
the State of MD in 1983, she volunteered
at the Prince Georges County Cooperative
Extension Service as a Master Gardener,
and at the Frederick Memorial Hospital
Patient Relations Department.
MOORE
"We make a living by what we get, we make
a life by what we give." Winston Churchill
Jeanette’s love for babies and their attachment to her is probably her crowning
achievement. She was like the Pied Piper
to children. Children would crowd as close
to her as possible; clinging to her skirt to
insure they were acknowledged (hopefully
the first to be).
Mrs. Laughlin was born in Philadelphia, PA,
graduated from Douglass College in New
Brunswick, NJ, and obtained her Master
of Social Work degree from the University
of MD in Baltimore. She married William
H. Laughlin on August 20, 1947 in
Moorestown, NJ.
Arrangements by Thomas Funeral Home.
NC. Condolences may be left at:
thomasfuneral.com
A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated
at 11 a.m., Tuesday, November 28 at St.
Mark Catholic Church 9970 Vale Rd, Vienna,
VA 22181.
Jeanette was very active in politics. A life
long Democrat, she revived a floundering
Woman’s Democratic Club to brilliance,
working tirelessly to insure its success in
assisting Democrats to win seats locally and
nationally.
Virginia Beyer Laughlin, former clinical
social worker at Spring Grove Hospital Center and coordinator of Aftercare Services
at the Northwestern Community Mental
Health Center in Baltimore County, MD,
died on Saturday, November 18, 2017 at the
age of 94. A Memorial service will be held
at 2 p.m. on Saturday, December 2, 2017 at
Thomas Funeral Home, 401 N. Ennis Street,
Fuquay-Varina, NC.
Donations, in lieu of flowers, may be sent to
the American Friends Service Committee.
WILLIAMS
JEANETTE CECILIA TROTTA WILLIAMS
(Age 85)
January 17, 1932- November 20, 2017
SCAMORDELLA
SHAY
BRUTHER
LAWRENCE JAMES BRUTHER, M.D.
LAUGHLIN
MARY JANE SHAY (Prah)
DEATH NOTICE
Of Oakton, VA, passed into the hand of
God on Thursday, November 16, 2017. He
is survived by: his wife, Nancy L. Bruther
(Conrad); his daughter, Shannon L. Wahler;
her husband Joe; and his three beautiful
granddaughters: Regan, Harper, and Brenna
Wahler. He was preceded in death by his
son, Kevin J. Bruther.
YOLANDA M. ADDISON
Of Upper Marlboro, Maryland died with her
loving husband by her side, on November 18,
2017. Mother to Yvette Shelton and sister
to Cecilia Watkins. Yolanda had a career in
healthcare that spanned for more than 45
years. Yolanda was fond of jazz music, but
loved all music. She also enjoyed cooking, and
spending time with her family. A memorial
service will be held at Chambers Funeral
Home, in Riverdale, Maryland on Wednesday,
November 29, 2017 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Yolanda is survived by her loving husband,
Anthony Addison; devoted daughter, Yvette
Shelton; sister, Cecilia Watkins; niece, Leslie
Watkins and nephew, Ernest Watkins; along
with other relatives and a tremendous amount
of friends and former patients.
AISMIE A. POWELL (Age 67)
Aismie Alva Powell, Founder and CEO of Intown
Reality LLC, passed away peacefully at her
home on Wednesday, November 15, 2017. She
was dedicated to her family and her work,
touching and affecting countless lives. Aismie
is survived by her beloved mother, Ina Notice;
stepfather, Eric Notice; companion, George
Fenton; sisters, Geraldine, Jackie, Christine,
and Carlette; brother, Orville; special cousin,
Mildred; nieces, nephews, several other
cousins, relatives and friends. The family will
receive friends on Wednesday, November 29,
2017 from 10 a.m. until time of service, 11
a.m., at Silver Spring United Methodist Church,
8900 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring, MD. Interment
at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Silver Spring, MD.
www.mcguire-services.com
ANDREWS
DEATH NOTICE
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
6"+ for ALL color notices
$160 each additional inch wkday
$186 each additional inch Sunday
A service with Military Honors will be held
at Arlington National Cemetery at a later
date to be announced.
Harry A. Richardson, Sr. departed this life on
Friday, November 10, 2017. Born in Washington, D.C., on January 9, 1927, he was the son of
the late Julian and Mary Richardson.
CURRENT 2017 RATES:
( PER DAY)
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $502
4" - $545
5" - $680
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $535
4" - $621
5" - $770
POWELL
He next managed a ranch in Texas until his
employment as a Staff Engineer with the
TRW Energy & Systems Group in McLean,
Virginia. He joined the Department of Energy in 1976, retiring in 1996. His marriage to
Marvel Weeks ended in divorce.
DEATH NOTICE
Queen Esther Chapter #1, OESPHA is notified of the services
of our beloved member. Wake,
Monday, November 27 from 9
a.m. until service, 11 a.m.; OES
Service, 10:30 a.m. at First Baptist
Church of Highland Park, 6801
Sheriff Rd., Landover, MD.
AM Bernada A. Bassett, PM
WP Leonard L. Young, PGWP
PGWM Dianne Marshall Streat, Sec’y
HAROLD A. NITOWITZ
"Nitty"
On Thursday, November 23, 2017 of College
Park, MD. Beloved husband of Patti; father
of Catherine (Eric) Lupfer, Jacqueline Nitowitz,
Harold (Tracy) Nitowitz, Jr.; grandfather of
Leah Lupfer, Evan Lupfer, Jacob Lupfer, Cody
Nitowitz and Caitlyn Nitowitz. He was a dedicated fan of the Washington Nationals. He
played 1st base for a minor league. A Memorial
Service will be held at Gasch's Funeral Home,
4739 Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville, MD 20781
on Friday, December 8, 2017 at 2 p.m.
JANET ABNEY MOORE
Janet Abney Moore, beloved wife, mother,
grandmother, sister and friend, died November 21, 2017, after a long illness.
Janet was born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma,
and spent her early years there, and
throughout her life she retained some Sooner pride in her home state and its people.
In her mid-teens she moved with her family
first to Nashville, Tennessee for a year, then
to Toledo, Ohio, where her father, Louis D.
Abney, Jr., had a long career as an executive
for the Toledo Blade newspaper. In Toledo
Janet excelled at Maumee Valley Country
Day School, and she remained a proud alum
and supporter of the school for the rest of
her life.
She went to Sweetbriar College for two
years, then, deciding she wanted to attend a
much larger school with more activities, she
transferred to the University of Michigan.
At a mixer shortly after she transferred she
met her future husband, Bill Moore, a law
student, and perhaps this was one reason,
among many others, why she had a great
time at Michigan as well as getting an
outstanding education there, graduating in
1969.
Then she had a completely different and
very significant experience. For a year she
volunteered to serve with the Red Cross
in Vietnam. With other volunteers she entertained troops there, often flying by helicopter to remote fire bases to do so. This
was both frightening and deeply satisfying,
and she was understandably proud of it for
the rest of her life. In later years she went to
a number of events at the Vietnam Veterans
Memorial and elsewhere commemorating
the soldiers and others who served in Vietnam.
In 1970 she and Bill married, and shortly
thereafter they moved to the Washington,
DC area. And here she flourished even more.
Her most important role was as the guiding
Janet also found time to teach aerobic dancing and did so for over thirty years. Music
was another of her passions—she played
the piano and guitar as well as being a fine
singer—and it was a joy to her to learn
dance routines for many of her favorite
songs and then to dance to them with her
enthusiastic students. A number of those
students became lifelong friends.
ANNE PEPPER STEWART
Anne Eustis Pepper of Washington, DC,
fondly known as "Wendy", died peacefully
on November 12, 2017, surrounded by
her loving family. Born in Dayton, Ohio,
and raised in Washington, Wendy was a
graduate of the Potomac School, the
Madeira School, and the University of Washington. She was an artist who proudly
forged her own path in life. A finalist on
season one of Project Runway, Wendy
designed and hand-sewed exceptionally
beautiful clothes for children and adults.
She was a chef, a writer, and a life-long
entrepreneur. Her wit and humor were
unmatched, as was her generosity of spirit.
Wendy is survived by her parents, Anne
Livingston Emmet of Washington and
Charles Willing Pepper of Palm Beach, FL;
her loving daughter, Finley M. Stewart, of
Middleburg, VA; her brothers Wing Pepper,
Stacy Lloyd and Thomas Lloyd; her sister,
Edith Pepper Goltra; and many adoring
nieces and nephews.
Funeral service Friday, December 1 at 10:30
a.m., Christ Church, Georgetown, 3116 O
St., NW, Washington, DC 20007.
TALLEY
Janet also became an accomplished artist.
For years she had made gift cards for family
and friends that portrayed them humorously
engaged in characteristic activities. Then she
took several courses in drawing and painting
at the Corcoran Gallery of Art to develop
her natural talent. This led to another parttime occupation doing portraits of clients
or members of their families. She also did
portraits of members of her own family, and
one of her father won an award at a juried
exhibition.
But no list of accomplishments and activities
can capture Janet as a whole. There was so
much more—her engaging smile, her playful
sense of humor, her vivacity, her optimism,
her caring and thoughtfulness, her strong
principles, her quiet dignity, her grace and
beauty. Because of these qualities she was
not only loved very much by her family but
had many devoted friends.
Survivors include her husband; her son, Joel,
and his wife, Rageshree Ramachandran and
their daughter, Irene; her daughter, Lindsay,
and Lindsay’s husband, Jeff Dehoff; her sister, Mary Lou Abney; her brother, Louis D.
Abney III; and her sister-in-law and brotherin-law, Widney and Glenn Moore.
A memorial service for Janet will be held
at the United Methodist Church, 7001 Connecticut Avenue, Chevy Chase, at 11 a.m.
on Saturday, December 9, and a reception
will follow at La Ferme Restaurant, 7101
Brookville Road, Chevy Chase.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
the Red Cross, the Wounded Warrior Project,
or Smile Train.
LEAH EVELYN TALLEY
On Thursday, October 26, 2017, Leah Evelyn
Talley, died peacefully in hospice care at Holy
Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, MD. Leah was
born on January 13, 1927 in Pottstown, PA.
Her family moved to Jamaica, NY where she
was educated. She moved to Washington,
DC in 1946 and resided in Silver Spring, MD
until her death. She worked for the Federal
Government for 50 years, retiring from the
Defense Department in 1988. She was preceded in death by sons Marcus Dwight, Anthony, daughter Crystal, and one granddaughter,
Crystin, She leaves to mourn her beloved
daughter Deborah Holmes, two stepdaughters
Patricia Brunson and Marguerite Jones, two
grandchildren, Jefre Holmes and Leah Johnson,
and two great-grandchildren, Edward Malachi
Johnson, III and Demi Marie Johnson; along
with a host of family and special friends. Her
Celebration of Life will be held on Monday,
November 27 at Metropolitan AME Church,
15th and M Streets, NW, Washington, DC commencing promptly at 10 a.m. Interment at
Gate of Heaven Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
contributions may be made to the Marcus
Dwight Talley Scholarship Fund at Dupont Park
Seventh Day School, 3985 Massachusetts Ave.,
SE, Washington, DC 20019.
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
The fall seesaw continues
Today should start off with a good
deal of sunshine. A front
approaching from the west will send
increased cloudiness and perhaps a
few late-day sprinkles. The air mass
is rather dry, and the front isn’t that impressive,
so any rainfall should be brief. Temperatures
should reach the mid-50s to near 60. Sunday
should be another classic late-autumn kind of
day, with lower temperatures than Saturday.
Today
Cloudy
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Sunny
Monday
Sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Tuesday
Sunny
Wednesday
Sunny
Thursday
Partly sunny
61° 41
52° 36
56° 37
60° 44
61° 40
60° 45
FEELS*: 60°
FEELS: 47°
FEELS: 54°
FEELS: 58°
FEELS: 61°
FEELS: 61°
CHNCE PRECIP: 20%
P: 0%
P: 0%
P: 5%
P: 10%
P: 20%
WIND: WSW 6–12 mph
W: WNW 10–20 mph
W: WNW 6–12 mph
W: S 7–14 mph
W: W 6–12 mph
W: SE 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
56/36
Hagerstown
55/37
Davis
48/28
Tu
W
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Normal
Philadelphia
58/40
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
57/37
Dover
59/39
Washington
61/41
FORECAST
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
53° 3:00 p.m.
32° 6:00 a.m.
55°/39°
74° 2014
13° 1880
55° 3:00 p.m.
24° 6:41 a.m.
54°/33°
74° 1979
9° 1989
54° 3:00 p.m.
25° 6:30 a.m.
53°/34°
73° 1979
13° 1989
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –1.1° yr. to date: +2.8°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 56°
Ocean City
57/40
OCEAN: 49°
Lexington
60/32
Richmond
64/38
Norfolk
64/45
Virginia Beach
64/46
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 48°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
60/47
OCEAN: 53°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
1.99"
2.53"
35.09"
36.05"
0.0"
0.0"
0.00"
1.96"
2.72"
39.86"
37.89"
0.0"
0.0"
0.00"
2.13"
2.62"
37.31"
37.83"
0.0"
0.0"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
3 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, increasing cloudiness. High 48 to 54.
Wind west 7–14 mph. Tonight, decreasing cloudiness,
breezy. Low 27 to 31. Wind northwest 15–25 mph. Sunday,
mostly sunny, cooler. High 40 to 46. Wind northwest 7–14
mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, partly sunny. High 55 to 65. Wind
southwest 7–14 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy, breezy. Low 40
to 45. Wind west–northwest 10–20 mph. Sunday, mostly
sunny, breezy, cooler. High 47 to 54. Wind northwest 10–20
mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, increasing cloudiness.
Wind west 7–14 knots. Waves a foot or less. Visibility unrestricted. •
Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, partly sunny. Wind west
7–14 knots. Waves a foot or less on the lower Potomac, 1–2 feet on
the Bay. Visibility unrestricted.• River Stages: Today, the Little Falls
stage will be around 3.2 feet, holding steady through Sunday. Flood
stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
7:00 a.m.
12:26 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
none
Annapolis
4:02 a.m.
9:26 a.m.
3:38 p.m.
10:12 p.m.
5:37 a.m.
11:56 a.m.
Ocean City
ACTUAL
Cape May
57/42
Annapolis
58/42
Charlottesville
62/36
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
M
REGION
AVERAGE
6:28 p.m.
none
Norfolk
1:25 a.m.
7:29 a.m.
1:49 p.m.
8:17 p.m.
Point Lookout
12:21 a.m.
5:41 a.m.
11:15 a.m.
5:58 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
52/36/pc
68/39/s
14/3/s
65/42/pc
78/49/s
57/37/pc
53/39/pc
64/39/pc
52/27/s
55/46/pc
57/42/pc
47/31/c
46/31/sh
70/47/pc
57/33/c
67/39/pc
56/40/pc
46/28/s
54/30/s
48/33/c
73/47/s
61/42/pc
Tomorrow
38/29/pc
68/42/s
15/13/pc
62/39/s
73/45/s
50/32/s
63/48/pc
62/35/s
54/34/pc
59/41/c
45/32/pc
38/33/c
32/26/sf
65/38/s
46/30/s
61/33/s
68/43/pc
48/34/s
48/34/s
43/34/pc
72/49/s
73/44/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
56/34/s
47/30/pc
77/44/s
–13/–20/pc
38/27/s
54/36/pc
82/73/sh
81/56/s
51/29/s
70/43/s
73/48/pc
60/36/s
80/56/pc
68/38/s
81/58/s
59/34/s
64/39/s
81/65/s
43/27/pc
40/28/s
62/37/s
71/52/s
56/42/pc
64/45/pc
59/38/s
42/33/pc
74/45/s
–7/–10/s
40/27/pc
43/25/pc
83/72/pc
76/49/s
49/35/s
68/37/s
72/48/s
62/40/s
79/56/c
65/38/s
77/58/pc
54/37/s
63/39/s
80/66/s
47/34/pc
45/31/pc
58/34/s
69/49/s
48/36/pc
54/37/s
Police: Feud within gang a possibility
SHOOTING FROM B1
Victor Hernandez, 17, who is
charged as an adult with first-degree murder. He was still being
sought Friday afternoon.
The day after Barrios was
killed, two men fired at each other
in the corner store about a mile
away. Vilchez was killed, and Mario Alfaro, 23, was wounded. Police have charged Alfaro with
second-degree murder.
The court documents say that
Sorto and Hernandez, charged
with killing the teen on Rittenhouse, along with both Alfaro and
Vilchez, who police say shot at
Victor
Hernandez
each other inside the store, are
“all affiliated with the same street
gang, known as STC.”
The documents also say that
Alfaro is a “known associate” of
Sorto and Hernandez.
The documents do not mention the slain 16-year-old, Barrios,
as being a member of a gang. His
cousin, Anna Figueroa, 25, said
Barrios is not in a gang and that
the family believes the gunman
mistook him for someone else.
Figueroa said her family knows
the suspects in her cousin’s killing
and that the dispute among them
involved money. She said Yoselis
“was not involved in any of it.”
Attorneys for Sorto and Alfaro
did not return calls seeking comment.
peter.hermann@washpost.com
clarence.williams@washpost.com
MD: 301-637-2870
VA: 703-382-8505
THE DAILY QUIZ
The cover story of the Real Estate section
highlights hospitals around the country
that have been converted into housing.
According to the story, how much has the
number of hospitals in the United States
declined in the past four decades?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click on
“Quizzes” to enter the correct response.
110+
World
High: Marble Bar, Australia 110°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –64°
Yesterday's National
High: Miramar MCAS, CA 94°
Low: Alamosa, CO 13°
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
64/37/s
57/34/s
75/53/s
58/40/pc
86/58/s
49/31/c
51/37/pc
50/45/r
58/41/pc
65/40/s
70/46/pc
64/38/pc
72/55/pc
60/37/s
85/76/pc
63/44/pc
75/57/s
70/60/pc
86/75/pc
53/46/r
46/40/r
48/31/c
76/59/s
63/37/s
67/44/s
60/36/s
74/53/s
49/34/pc
88/59/s
40/31/pc
41/24/sf
53/39/r
47/28/pc
59/33/s
65/43/c
55/31/s
62/51/r
60/42/s
85/76/s
70/53/c
73/59/s
64/52/r
86/75/s
54/41/r
53/35/r
34/29/sf
76/57/s
66/40/s
Nov 26
First
Quarter
Dec 3
Full
Dec 10
Last
Quarter
Dec 18
New
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:02 a.m.
12:17 p.m.
6:08 a.m.
3:30 a.m.
5:03 a.m.
8:51 a.m.
Set
4:48 p.m.
11:05 p.m.
4:15 p.m.
2:49 p.m.
3:38 p.m.
6:22 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
73/46/pc
Amsterdam
44/39/r
Athens
63/52/pc
Auckland
73/60/c
Baghdad
68/48/c
Bangkok
89/74/s
Beijing
45/26/s
Berlin
45/33/r
Bogota
67/46/pc
Brussels
43/34/r
Buenos Aires
76/54/s
Cairo
72/57/pc
Caracas
76/65/pc
Copenhagen
43/35/r
Dakar
85/77/pc
Dublin
41/33/pc
Edinburgh
40/31/pc
Frankfurt
46/31/r
Geneva
50/34/r
Ham., Bermuda 76/70/sh
Helsinki
39/34/pc
Ho Chi Minh City 92/76/t
Tomorrow
74/44/s
45/41/sh
63/56/pc
70/60/c
63/49/c
90/74/pc
40/21/s
41/36/pc
67/48/r
43/35/pc
84/60/s
72/58/pc
77/66/pc
43/39/pc
89/77/pc
45/38/pc
42/37/pc
40/32/pc
40/31/pc
76/68/pc
41/35/sh
92/74/pc
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
67/62/c
76/49/pc
61/51/s
61/46/pc
61/47/t
55/31/pc
86/77/pc
81/56/pc
86/75/t
73/63/pc
65/54/pc
45/36/pc
61/36/pc
89/78/pc
72/43/s
42/25/r
27/23/pc
92/72/pc
75/57/pc
79/51/pc
36/31/pc
43/20/r
45/35/r
46/32/sh
71/64/pc
75/49/s
62/52/s
60/48/pc
70/52/pc
57/28/s
86/76/pc
82/58/pc
89/76/pc
73/63/pc
66/53/pc
46/41/pc
55/35/pc
90/78/pc
70/39/s
31/24/sf
29/25/pc
94/75/pc
76/59/pc
78/52/pc
36/27/pc
29/23/c
45/39/pc
39/31/pc
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
86/74/s
67/50/s
65/52/pc
87/65/pc
89/55/s
51/39/pc
49/32/r
61/47/c
84/74/t
36/29/pc
80/68/pc
71/68/r
50/33/s
57/45/pc
47/28/sh
53/36/pc
51/40/pc
91/75/pc
71/55/s
60/37/sh
87/65/pc
85/55/s
50/29/r
46/19/s
62/46/s
82/75/c
36/32/pc
80/70/pc
72/66/r
50/37/c
63/49/c
37/29/c
42/33/c
43/31/sh
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
THE DISTRICT
Segregation linked to private schools
Study has implications
in a city where 40%
attend charter schools
BY
M ORIAH B ALINGIT
It’s no secret that the District’s
public schools are highly segregated, with a recent analysis
showing that nearly three-quarters of black students attend
schools where they have virtually
no white peers.
But a recent report examines
the role that enrollment in private schools, which are disproportionately white, plays in the
city’s segregation woes. The report was released last month by
the Albert Shanker Institute, a
nonprofit endowed by the American Federation of Teachers, a
major teachers union.
The study found that up to
one-third of citywide segregation
in the 2011-2012 school year
could be attributed to the demographic imbalance at the city’s
private schools.
There is growing evidence that
the nation’s public schools are
resegregating, with some studies
suggesting that U.S. public
schools are as segregated by race
as they were in the 1960s.
A Government Accountability
Office report released last year
found that the share of schools
that are majority black and majority Latino is growing.
Much of the research on segregation focuses on segregation
among public schools, said Matthew Di Carlo, who co-authored
the research brief with Kinga
Wysienska-Di Carlo. The pair
sought to determine how big a
role private school enrollment
plays in contributing to citywide
segregation.
“We were wondering what segregation would look like if we
looked at all students in a big city
like D.C.,” Di Carlo said.
The study has implications for
a city that has become a testing
ground for school choice — with
about 40 percent of students attending charter schools — and
for a federally funded private
school voucher program that allows a small number of students
from low-income families to attend private schools. The researchers said the voucher program is too small to significantly
affect school segregation but
added that “our results might
certainly inform the ongoing debates about vouchers and segregation.”
Di Carlo and his colleague
examined the demographics of
all students who attended school
in D.C. in 2011-2012, the last year
for which private school enrollment data were available, and
found that private schools look
radically different from the city
overall. They are significantly
whiter: While white students
made up about 15 percent of all
students in the city, they represented nearly 60 percent of private school enrollment. Black
students accounted for nearly 70
percent of all students that year
but made up just 28 percent of
private school enrollment. Hispanic students made up 12 percent of all students but just 8
percent in private schools.
The portrait becomes more
dramatic still when looking at
public schools in isolation: During that school year, the city’s
public schools were more than
three-quarters black, 13 percent
Hispanic and 8 percent white.
“That’s a rather large imbalance,” Di Carlo said. “That matters for segregation.”
The researchers concluded
that even if public schools in D.C.
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were perfectly integrated — if
every school reflected the exact
demographic makeup of the public school student body — they
would still be far less diverse
than the city’s student body as a
whole.
The study counted all students
going to schools in D.C., even if
their families lived outside the
city and would not have been
eligible to attend the city’s public
schools.
Di Carlo said he does not
believe that many students fell
into that category.
The study recommends that
the city’s public schools continue
to work to attract more private
school families and that private
schools work to increase diversity, using scholarships and financial aid to recruit more students
of color. Without changing the
imbalance of demographics between public and private schools,
“there may be what amounts to
an impermeable ceiling on the
citywide impact of big city public
school integration efforts,” the
report concludes.
The city’s public schools have
been working hard to attract
more families, including those
who may have opted to send
their children to private school,
and their efforts appear to be
paying off: Enrollment in city
schools reached a peak of nearly
90,500 last year, up from about
75,000 when the study was done.
Tomeika Bowden, a spokeswoman for the city’s Public Charter School Board, said charter
schools are working hard to
attract students from across the
city by replicating successful
charter school models and with
marketing.
Charter school enrollment
was up to 41,677 last year, up
from fewer than 30,000 in the
2011-2012 school year.
moriah.balingit@washpost.com
KLMNO
Style
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
For D.C.-area
restaurateur,
dining is only
one course
BY
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
SU
C
“She’s blooming like a rose because that’s what she really is, a rose.”
Whoopi Goldberg, talking about Jenifer Lewis, her co-star in the “Sister Act” movies
T IM C ARMAN
Steve Salis has a phrase to describe
his approach to business: “Everything is
under attack.”
The co-founder and former chief
executive of &pizza doesn’t suffer from
siege mentality. It’s just his way of saying
that every facet of every business he
owns and operates — a growing list that
includes the small Ted’s Bulletin chain,
which he recently bought from Matchbox Food Group — is subject to an
unblinking scrutiny, no matter how
successful they already are.
During a wide-ranging interview, Salis referred to his attack plan repeatedly,
whether talking about Ted’s Bulletin or
the barbecue that pitmaster Rob Sonderman serves at Federalist Pig, another
Salis venture. On one level, Salis’s audits
are a proactive way to keep improving
his businesses. On another level, the
audits are a reflection of Salis’s concern
that his businesses may lag behind in a
hospitality industry that’s evolving by
the day — and by every data point that
reveals a new trend to exploit.
Salis says he has no interest in being a
standard restaurateur. The era of empire
builders, who amassed a wide number of
concepts under a single ownership,
belongs to previous generations. The
34-year-old has different ambitions. Yes,
he owns Federalist Pig, Ted’s Bulletin,
Kramerbooks & Afterwords Cafe and
still holds a position with &pizza, but
Salis also is also a home builder and
developer. His goal is to combine the
talents of his various businesses into an
all-in-one community in which people
live, work and play.
“Right now, a lot of our [businesses]
have been focused on what I call the
‘play’ side of the ecosystem. These are
the restaurant and leisure businesses
that require discretionary income,” Salis
said. “We really want to focus on the big
picture of how can we potentially be the
first company to build a multidimensional, multifaceted ecosystem.”
You’ll have to forgive Salis for throwing around phrases that seem swiped
from a marketing executive’s PowerSALIS CONTINUED ON C2
PHOTOS BY ANDRE CHUNG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Jenifer Lewis: Mom-ish
The woman who wrote the book about her role as ‘The Mother of Black Hollywood’
Q&A
‘Wonder’s’ target
demographic:
The outsider
inside all of us
BY
M ICHAEL O ’ S ULLIVAN
Filmmaker Stephen Chbosky is a
kind of Child Whisperer. He adapted his
semi-autobiographical 1999 novel of
alienated adolescence, “The Perks of
Being a Wallflower,” into a movie and
directed it. That was followed by a
screenplay for this year’s live-action
Disney adaptation of “Beauty and the
Beast.” Chbosky’s latest film, “Wonder,”
is an adaptation of R.J. Palacio’s 2012
bestseller about a fifth-grader named
Auggie Pullman, who has a craniofacial
difference caused by Treacher Collins
syndrome.
The message of the movie, which is
told from the perspectives of Auggie
(Jacob Tremblay), his best friend, Jack
Will (Noah Jupe), the class bully, Julian
(Bryce Gheisar), and other non-adult
characters, is simple: “When given the
choice between being right and being
kind, choose kind.” (That’s self-help
guru Wayne Dyer, who is quoted in the
film.)
While in town recently to promote
“Wonder,” Chbosky, 47, and Palacio, 54,
sat down to talk about how they get
inside the heads of children and the
importance of teaching empathy in an
age of division.
BY
K EITH L . A LEXANDER
When casting Tina Turner’s mom in the 1993 film “What’s Love
Got to Do With It?,” the director turned to a relative unknown by
the name of Jenifer Lewis.
The actress, who had done just a few small film and TV parts
after arriving in Hollywood via Broadway and cabarets, is only
about two years older than the film’s star, Angela Bassett. So
when she got the call, she almost slammed down the phone. That
is, until they told her how much she was going to be paid.
“Hell, for that money,” Lewis recalled, “I would have played the
daddy.”
That film established Lewis in what was to become her
signature role: the matriarch. Armed with her penchant for
delivering memorable one-liners, Lewis launched a nearly 25year career of playing the mother, auntie or grandmother to such
stars as Will Smith, Tupac Shakur and Whitney Houston. These
days, she plays Anthony Anderson’s mother on the ABC show
“Blackish.”
Last weekend, the energetic 60-year-old actress-dancer-singer blew into Washington as part of a mini-tour to promote her
new memoir, “The Mother of Black Hollywood,” based on diaries
that she has kept since she was in the seventh grade. She
chronicles her life as a 1980s musical theater performer, watching hundreds of her theater friends die of AIDS. She writes about
being molested as a teen by the pastor of her childhood church,
LEWIS CONTINUED ON C2
ABOVE: Jenifer Lewis, screen mom to Angela Bassett (“What’s Love Got to Do
With It?”), Anthony Anderson (“Blackish”), Tupac Shakur (“Poetic Justice”) and
Whitney Houston (“The Preacher’s Wife”), at a book signing in Georgetown.
APPRECIATION
The bittersweet brilliance of Tommy Keene
BY
Q: R.J., the idea for your book came
from seeing one of your children react
badly to seeing another child with a
craniofacial difference. What exactly
happened?
Palacio: It was just a brief encounter with
a little girl. I never spoke with her, but my
son got a little afraid and started to cry.
The little girl didn’t even realize what had
happened, because I whisked my son
away rather quickly, in an effort to shield
her from seeing his reaction. That got me
thinking about what it must be like to get
stared at and pointed at — and worse —
wherever you go. What must it be like for
her sister, and her mother, for her family
and friends? I started writing that night.
Q: Stephen, do you think there’s
something universal about feeling like
an outsider?
WONDER CONTINUED ON C3
COURTESY OF 9:30 CLUB
Tommy Keene never achieved the fame of some “power pop” contemporaries,
but he did achieve musical excellence mixed with nostalgia, wonder and vitality.
J OHN D AVIS
There is reliable romance in the story of
a brilliant musician who never got the full
appreciation he was due. With the death of
Tommy Keene, it might be easy to look at
his career and wonder why he remained
solely a cult figure among fans of the
earnest, infectious branch of rock-and-roll
that is insufficiently dubbed “power pop.”
To do so would be folly: There is only joy in
reflecting on a man who brought us elegiac yet ebullient songs like “Places That Are
Gone” and “Hanging On to Yesterday,”
among so many others.
Keene, 59, died in his sleep Wednesday
at his home in Los Angeles, according to a
statement on his website. A gifted singer
and songwriter whose elegant compositions shared a bittersweet hue, the Bethesda-bred Keene never won the same hosannas as peers and collaborators like Paul
Westerberg, Matthew Sweet or Robert
Pollard, let alone the commercial success
of fellow rock classicists like Bryan Adams
or Tom Petty. That didn’t seem to bother
Keene much. He continued to release rel-
evant and inspiring music throughout the
years, still actively touring as recently as
this fall.
He first drew notice in Washington’s
nascent late-1970s punk scene, playing
guitar in bands like the Razz before breaking out on his own. Always a critical
favorite, Keene was a hot property in the
early years of his solo career, signing a
contract with Geffen Records and working
in the studio with powerhouse producers
such as T-Bone Burnett and Geoff Emerick. The latter’s engineering work with the
Beatles made him a seemingly ideal collaborator for Keene, who never shied from
announcing his affection for the timeless
rock of his youth while still striving to craft
modern and progressive pop songs.
Sometimes somber, sometimes hopeful, Keene’s tunes ached with a mixture of
nostalgia, wonder and vitality. “Places
That Are Gone” — a 1984 song that was
about as close as Keene came to a radio
hit — distills everything that was so
powerful about his music into one magnificent blast. It opens with an insistent,
KEENE CONTINUED ON C4
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
Jenifer Lewis’s signature: One ‘n,’ many mother figures
LEWIS FROM C1
Mother wit
her battle with bipolar disorder
and sex addiction and her gradual
emergence as a Hollywood mainstay.
And while her face and her
booming voice may be recognizable to some, her name is still one
that escapes many — especially
the unusual way of spelling her
first name with one “n.” In the
small town of Kinloch, Mo., Dorothy Mae Lewis named her youngest of seven children after the
1940s actress Jennifer Jones. But
she wanted her daughter to be
unique and so, “My mother wanted something different in my
name,” Lewis said.
The spelling still confuses people. Lewis’s managers make sure
everyone knows about it and regularly enter dressing rooms before
her, just to ensure there aren’t any
signs misspelled. If there are, they
are ripped down before Lewis sees
them.
Lewis grew up watching allaround entertainers such as Judy
Garland, Sammy Davis Jr. and
Pearl Bailey, and trying to master
acting, singing and dancing.
“I have had that charisma and
that presence since I was born,”
she said. “I came out my mama
singing a . . . Ethel Merman song,”
she said. “I didn’t cry. I sang:
‘You’ll be swell. You’ll be great.’
Then I looked at the nurse and
said, ‘Now hit me, bitch, and see
what happens.’ The doctor said,
‘She’s all right,’ and handed me to
my mother.”
“She is a force of nature,” said
Whoopi Goldberg, who has
worked with Lewis in four projects, including both “Sister Act”
movies. “She is one of the most
talented persons in the world.”
“She defies characterization,
but Hollywood didn’t know what
to do with her,” Goldberg added.
“Until now. Now she’s blooming
like a rose because that’s what she
really is, a rose.”
In addition to her mom roles,
Lewis’s dramatic alto has found a
home in animation, as she’s voiced
such memorable characters as Flo
in the Disney/Pixar film “Cars”
and Mama Odie in Disney’s “The
Princess and the Frog.” Plus, last
year she put out a homemade YouTube music video with R&B singer
Brandy and actress Roz Ryan, “In
These Streets,” an answer to haters who try to throw up hurdles on
their road to success. The three
filmed the video at Lewis’s home
last year, and its popularity led to a
string of follow-up videos.
With 68 movies, 300 TV shows, four
Broadway shows and various
cabaret and musical shows around
the country, Jenifer Lewis has been
busy since booking a role in the
musical “Eubie!” in 1979. The title of
her memoir, “The Mother of Black
Hollywood,” is a nod to her career of
maternal roles in Hollywood. In an
interview with The Washington Post,
she shared her thoughts on some of
her on-screen babies:
Will Smith, aunt, “The Fresh Prince
of Bel-Air” (1991-1996): “Happy.
Bouncy. Very disciplined. I love him.
He was very protective of me on the
set. I know I played his aunt, but he
treated me like his mom.”
Angela Bassett, mother, “What’s
Love Got to Do With It?” (1993): “I’m
proud of her. One of our most
dramatic actresses. One of our
finest.”
Tupac Shakur, mother, “Poetic
Justice” (1993): “Genius. Lots of
weed. And well-raised. A total
gentleman. He had such respect for
me.”
Whitney Houston, mother, “The
Preacher’s Wife” (1996): “All I wanted
to do was hold her and rock her and
love her. Protect her. Sing her
lullabies. Tell her it was going to be all
right,” Lewis said and began wiping
tears that ran down her face. “She
scored our lives. Our souls soared
when she sang. And she was
beautiful.”
Jill Marie Jones, mother,
“Girlfriends” (2002-2006): “Who?”
she said as her thunderous laugh
filled the room. “I’m just kidding. I
don’t know what to say about Jill
Marie. The girls on ‘Girlfriends’ were
all my babies.”
Raven-Symoné, grandmother,
“That’s So Raven” (2004): “She’s
quick. She doesn’t miss a beat. She
was trained well. I love her
professionalism. She’s a bundle of
joy on set. Like I said, on set.”
Taraji P. Henson, mother, “Not
Easily Broken” (2009): “She’s a bad
bitch. Real. Amazing. Brilliant. We
love each other. She has showed me
her strength. Taraji don’t have time
for no kind of bulls---. She wears her
heart of gold. That’s the kind of bitch
she is.”
Anthony Anderson, mother,
“Blackish” (2014-present): “A damn
fool. We have chemistry like I have
had with no other actor. I guess
cause I’m a fool, too.”
ANDRE CHUNG FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Jenifer Lewis speaks to a group of women at a brunch and book signing at the Ritz-Carlton in Georgetown.
“I told those two heffers they
could come by my house for dinner. You know how we do,” Lewis
said, rolling her eye and waving
her right hand. “But I didn’t mean
it. Then, they showed up, and all I
had in the refrigerator was a hardboiled egg.”
In person, Lewis comes across
as a combination of the over-thetop onstage persona of Bette Middler (with whom Lewis toured as a
backup singer in the 1980s) and
the street-smart, bawdy Cookie
from Fox’s “Empire,” with a dash
of the self-help mother love of
Iyanla Vanzant.
In a meeting last week with
about 20 students from the Duke
Ellington School of the Arts in
Georgetown, Lewis warned them
to avoid hard drugs and negative
people and to eat healthy foods
and exercise. “And carry your booties to bed and get some sleep,” she
snapped. “That’s called taking
care of yourself.”
Plus, she added, “Don’t think
you’re going to be happy when you
get something. You have to be
happy on your way to happy. I
don’t leave a room unless I leave a
smile. I want to leave them laughing.”
Later, 300 people who had paid
$25 each to see Lewis burst onto
the Ellington school stage for an
event that was less book signing
and more one-woman comedy
bathroom. I tell people, you come
to see Jenifer Lewis, you wear
Depends.”
Lewis spares few details in the
book, including her anger over
“Today” show host Jane Pauley’s
on-air crack in 1986 that Lewis’s
gold earrings weren’t real. She
also recalls playing Effie White
her. It was the same day she
learned her mother had died.
These days, she’s focusing on
her health. She still takes two pills
each day to avoid the manic highs
and depressive lows. Professionally, in addition to her steady work
with “Blackish,” she’s just completed a new Disney animated TV
series based on the movie “Big
Hero 6,” and there are plans for a
possible “Jackie’s Back! 2,” a follow-up to her comedic 1999 Lifetime movie that has a cult following among her fans.
She also has one more dream: A
one-woman show on Broadway.
Her name, all in lights, with one N.
I have “this ability to hold people in the palm of my hand. But I
wanted to put them in my heart.
So when I get the audience in my
palm, it’s my responsibility to put
them in my heart, too,” she says
and then refers to her book.
“This is my story. This is my
song,” she said. “I came through
the fire. And now, I’m skipping,
bitches.”
“I came out my mama singing a . . .
Ethel Merman song. I didn’t cry. I sang:
‘You’ll be swell. You’ll be great.’ ”
“Blackish” star Jenifer Lewis
show meets revival meeting.
If anyone arrives at one of her
events late, as this crowd found
out, Lewis stops and looks at
them. “What time does your ticket
say,” she yelled to one latecomer,
then followed up with her loud
laugh and, as she often does, referred to herself in the third person. “And don’t get up to go to the
during the workshop version of
“Dreamgirls,” before losing the
role to Jennifer Holiday for Broadway (though she thinks Holliday
sings “And I Am Telling You I’m
Not Going” better than she did).
She also writes about how, in 2015,
she found out her then-boyfriend
of five months had a history of
theft and had stolen $50,000 from
keith.alexander@washpost.com
Among Salis’s moves:
Adding noted pastry chef
SALIS FROM C1
Point. By “ecosystem,” he apparently means a development that
features housing, office space,
retail shopping, and dining — a
village inside a city, all potentially built by Salis and outfitted
with his restaurant brands and
other potential acquisitions.
“We’re in talks with a lot of
developers,” he said. “There are
some things that you will most
likely be hearing about in the
coming months around how to
take things to the next level. . . .
We’re not going to do things that
are always safe. We need to
continue to push forward.”
For now, Salis is focused on
more immediate projects: the
makeover of Ted’s, the five-restaurant chain that trades on
nostalgia and family fare, and
the renovation of Kramerbooks,
the beloved Dupont Circle institution he purchased last year.
(Salis declined to share his legal
team’s review of complaints at
Kramerbooks, which led to the
resignation of the old management team.)
His crew is conducting a topto-bottom review of Ted’s. One
area Salis wants to improve is
dinner service, which lags behind breakfast and lunch in
terms of sales.
“The business today does approximately 80 percent of its
revenues systemwide during
breakfast and lunch,” he said. “I
think there’s been a lot of hubris
prior [to us] getting involved in
the business as it pertains to the
brand. . . . We need to push the
envelope and really focus on
dinner.”
winning pastry chef for the bakery. Salis can’t name the person
yet because the contract has not
been finalized but offered a hint:
“They’re here now, but their
claim to fame was out of New
York, working with a world-renowned chef,” he said.
Salis is also set to launch a
major renovation of Kramerbooks next year, which has been
no simple task.
“Kramerbooks is in three different buildings, with three different landlords,” he said. “You
could only imagine trying to get
everyone on the same page.”
Salis’s goal is to upgrade the
space, the products and the cafe
to prepare it for the next 40-plus
years.
Kramerbooks
was
launched in 1976, the year of the
country’s bicentennial, and was
thought to be the first D.C.
business to combine a bookstore
with a restaurant.
He is promising that its Afterwords Cafe will be “a high-sensory cultural experience” — but not
necessarily one with a big-name
chef.
BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Steve Salis is aggressive in pursuing ways to improve and expand
the businesses he owns, which include Kramerbooks and
Afterwords Cafe, the Ted’s Bulletin chain and Federalist Pig.
Which is not to say that Salis is
satisfied with the breakfast and
lunch side of Ted’s. Possible
changes include adding more
savory products in the bakery or
upgrading the bar service for
those customers who just want
to drop in for a late-night drink.
One imminent change is the
hiring of a James Beard Award-
“I’m very big on letting the
brands stand for themselves,” he
said. “One individual should never be bigger than any of our
brands, and that includes me.”
So what about that famous
pastry chef at Ted’s?
“I’m not shying away from
bringing in other big names,” he
explained. “What I’m simply saying is, how do they play a role in
our business?”
At present, Sonderman is the
biggest name among the chefs in
Salis’s restaurants, and the pitmaster’s responsibilities could
increase with a possible expansion of Federalist Pig.
Can we assume that future
locations will feature a real wood
smoker, and not a gas-wood
hybrid oven, like the one in the
Adams Morgan restaurant?
“One million percent,” Salis
said. “We want to be able to up
the ante a bit. . . . Everything is
always under attack, and that
means, how can we produce even
better barbecue than we’re producing now?”
tim.carman@washpost.com
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DALE ROBINETTE/LIONSGATE
Julia Roberts as mother Isabel and Jacob Tremblay as son Auggie
in “Wonder.” Author R.J. Palacio says she purposefully chose to tell
the story through the children and not the parents.
Movie’s message
of kindness
resonates today
WONDER FROM C1
Chbosky: On some level, if you
ask anybody who’s ever lived,
“Was there ever a day when you
felt different, when you felt like
the only sane person in the
world, or the only crazy person,
was there a day when you felt
ugly?” the answer would be yes.
If the book were only about
Auggie’s story, it would be a
lovely, lovely, lovely story. But
R.J. goes through so many
different points of view,
brilliantly. Every voice is
authentic. It shows the benefit
of regarding each other with
respect, and listening to each
other’s stories. That is the nature
of empathy, and that is the gift
of this book.
Q: “Wonder” is told through the
perspectives of several
characters, but not Auggie’s
parents. Why?
Palacio: I purposely chose not to
focus on the parents, because
this is the world of children.
When you start writing from the
point of view of adults, that
becomes a totally different
world. As an author, I like
letting careful readers read
between the lines to get what
was going on with Isabel [Julia
Roberts] and Nate [Owen
Wilson]. You can intuit a lot by
what’s not said.
Q: You’ve said that Isabel is the
heart of the story, at least for
you. How so?
Palacio: I relate the most to her.
You don’t have to be the mother
of a child with a craniofacial
difference to know what it’s like
to worry about your child.
There’s a point of entry for
everybody here.
Chbosky: R.J. and I never talked
about this, but my rule was that
the only people in the movie who
got their own “chapter” are the
people who have secrets. Julian
has no secret in the movie. Isabel
doesn’t, either.
Q: Stephen, in the foreword to
the movie tie-in rerelease of the
book, you write that “Wonder”
shines a ray of light “in our
troubled times.” You don’t
specifically mention Trump but
—
Palacio: [Laughing] But it’s
implied, right?
Q: I hate to make this political,
but for some people, the book’s
message of choosing kindness
doesn’t seem to have sunk in as
they got older.
Palacio: I’m happy to talk about
that. I could go on and on.
Chbosky: We had many
discussions about it. It’s
remarkable.
Palacio: It’s not that this movie
is made for these times, because
we began the process well before
the election. But it is an
appropriate movie for the times.
The theme of kindness runs
throughout the book and the
movie. Kindness is compassion,
empathy, tolerance, forgiveness
— and love — for those who are
different. All of those things, in
the times we’re living in now,
seem to be ridiculed. What
happened to kindness toward
refugees? Kindness toward
people who need health care?
Kindness toward people who
can’t afford basic necessities?
The mark of a great country is
how well it takes care of its
weakest citizens. I find the
current lack of compassion, at
the highest level of government,
astounding, and I can’t wait
until it’s over.
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Q: How do we teach kindness?
Palacio: I think it’s something
that can be “Trojan-horsed” into
a lot of things. It can be as
simple as choosing stories that
have characters that we aspire to
be like.
Chbosky: Kindness is eternal,
but in this high-tech age, the
ways in which we can be cruel to
each other have become very
sophisticated. As technology
changes, the ways in which we
teach kindness have to evolve.
The message of R.J.’s book is
going to last a lot longer than
anyone’s tweets.
michael.osullivan@washpost.com
Wonder (PG, 113 minutes). At area
theaters.
Guest’s comments about your weight
are the real elephant in the room
Adapted from a
recent online
discussion.
Adult Children” [Woititz/
Garner].
— Anonymous
Dear Carolyn:
Anonymous: Can’t argue with
that, thank you.
My sister and her
wife, “Sue,” will be
visiting soon. I’m
looking forward
to seeing my
sister, but feeling anxiety about
Sue’s visit.
Sue has a habit of making
comments about my weight and
what I’m eating — commenting
on my portion size, how many
helpings, my weight, how often I
exercise, etc. I’m not interested
in getting in a fight about it and
really want to see my sister.
Any suggestions on an
effective, short statement or
comeback after the first
comment to try to cut her off at
the pass? I’m really happy with
my weight but always end up
feeling disappointed, fat and
unhealthy by the end of a visit.
— Weight Shaming Shutdown
Carolyn
Hax
Weight Shaming Shutdown:
“My weight is not interesting to
me. Let’s talk about something
else.” Repeat verbatim as needed.
I also like reflecting it back on
her. “You have a lot to say about
my body.”
There’s also liberation in the
whole truth, when you’re ready:
“I look forward to these visits,
but I also dread them because I
know you’re going to make
comments on my weight,
appearance, portion sizes and
food choices. These are no one’s
business but my own, so please
respect that by choosing a
different conversation topic.
Hi, Carolyn! I kept my last
NICK GALIFIANAKIS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Thank you.”
Regardless of your approach,
you might feel better about it if
you talk to your sister first. Just
a “Hey, she brings this up a lot
and I’d appreciate it if she didn’t,
so any suggestions?” Sue might
not realize she’s pressing on a
sore spot, and she might respond
better to hearing it privately
from her wife.
Re: Weight Shaming: Anyone
who has been enduring ongoing
comments about her weight,
eating habits, exercise regiment,
ad nauseam, and didn’t shut
that down immediately with a
firm “No comments about my
weight. If I want your opinion,
I’ll ask for it,” and is afraid of
“getting in a fight about it,”
needs a solid lesson in
boundaries. If she’s putting up
with these outrageous boundary
violations in this area, she’s
almost certainly doing it in lots
of other areas, too. Time to
consider one of Carolyn’s
favorite books, “Lifeskills for
name when I got married, and
my husband has a hyphenated
last name (his parents’
surnames). We’re discussing
starting a family, and this last
name issue is tripping us up.
There are many valid answers
here: using his full hyphenated
last name, hyphenating my last
name with one of his last names,
using my last name, trying to
combine names into one unholy
hybrid, etc. Each of these options
has its pros and cons, and each
packs a distinct emotional
punch in some way. How do we
navigate something like this?
— Tripped Up
Tripped Up: What does each of
you want? You can’t honor your
own and each other’s priorities
without knowing what they are.
Simplicity? His family? Your
family? Your family unit?
Feminism? Tradition?
Yourselves? Each other? Decide
what matters and work from
there.
Consider what you’re foisting
on the future little Smith-JonesJonze-Smythes, too, please.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com.
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 __ cord
7 Considered,
with “on”
13 Leader
of the track
15 “To the end
of the block!
C’mon!”
16 Immediate
slap shot
after receiving
a pass, in
hockey
18 Biology
notebook
doodle
19 __ Mahal
20 Parsons
School
sketches
22 __ Kan:
Alpo rival
23 “A Jug of
Wine ...”
poet
25 Brought
along
26 Plural
contraction
27 Desk
accessories
30 Blue ghost in
Pac-Man
31 Recycling
center debris
33 Opposite of
hastens
34 Gets under
control
35 “This doesn’t
concern you”
37 Order of
encyclopedias
38 Shaking one’s
head, maybe
42 Cook seen on
TV specials
43 Cut down
44 Cover on
the street
45 GI grub
46 Like the
most substantial sum
49 Social post
50 Leaning
to the right,
in a way
52 Cheese
from the
Italian for
“sheep”
By Greg Johnson
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
54 Entertain
lavishly
55 Strength
56 Puts up
57 Golfer’s
short irons
DOWN
1 100% correct
2 Southernmost
location in
continental
North America
3 It may delay
river traffic
4 Realize
5 Sour
6 “That’s so
weak!”
7 Engine
part often
connected
to a flywheel
8 Stage
embarrassments
9 Prefix with
tourist
10 Time off for
many
11 Boards a ship
12 Dallas plaza in
1963 headlines
14 Lead-in to a
promise
17 Gets out
of control
21 Calls it a night
24 Do some
window
maintenance
26 Evidencegathering
device
28 Tactic
11/25/17
29 Some partners’
workplaces
32 “The Kite
Runner” boy
33 Pre-metalworking period
35 First course
36 Spring festival
focus
37 Esteem
39 Recording
40 Show clearly
41 Red herrings,
perhaps
46 Arcade game
ender
47 Harbor hauler
48 Handy bag
51 “Hotel du __”:
Anita Brookner
novel
53 Light color
FRIDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
C4
EZ
The places
that are gone
remained on
Keene’s map
KEENE FROM C1
chiming guitar riff, before the rest
of the band steps in to underpin
Keene’s vocals — delivered in a
voice that sounds cool and assured, while still brimming with
unshakable longing. Paraphrasing John Lennon, Keene sings
“these are places that are gone/
now we can go on and on,” taking
us backward and forward in time,
all at once, as the great songwriters can so deftly do.
I love the picture of Keene on
the cover of his 1986 EP, “Run
Now.” He stands poised on a Metro
platform, beneath the streets of his
home town, looking intently down
the tunnel into the near future.
Although the photo captured a
young man waiting for something
that seemed imminent, Keene’s
music career took a different path
than what seemed widely expect-
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ed by fans and record industrytypes at the time. As most D.C.
residents know, sometimes the
trains don’t arrive when you expect they will. Instead of taking his
place among rock’s royalty, Keene
ushered in the 1990s by being
dropped by Geffen Records, an
indignity he brushed off while patiently continuing to propel a career that remained ever potent
and interesting.
When I was fortunate enough to
share a stage with Keene in 2013
for a one-off cover of the Rolling
Stones’ “Ruby Tuesday,” it was an
unforgettable pleasure to bask in
his easy, confident and graceful
DISTRICT
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11:20-1:20-2:20-7:20
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10:45-1:00-3:00-4:10-6:157:15-9:30
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Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:30
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CC: 4:20-10:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
10:30-1:55-5:15-8:10-11:00
Lady Bird (R) 10:30-2:10-5:157:40-10:10
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:45-10:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:203:20-6:25-9:30
Justice League (PG-13) 5:158:15-11:15
Coco (PG) 10:00-1:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:20
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Ave N.W.
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
10:00-1:00-7:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 4:00-10:10
Wonder (PG) CC: 9:45-1:15-4:157:15-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:45-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: (!) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-9:15
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 1:45-3:306:30-9:30
IMAX Theater
Coco (PG) (!) 10:00AM
601 Independence Avenue SW
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
(NR) 2:40
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
12:25
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-2:05
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 5:15-7:359:55
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Ctr 12
800 Shoppers Way
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
12:15-3:15-5:15-6:15-9:15-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:00-1:50-4:50-7:45-10:40
The Star (PG) CC: 10:20-12:302:45-5:00-7:25-9:30
Coco (PG) CC: 12:00-1:00-4:006:00-7:00-9:00
Jigsaw (R) CC: 4:45-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:05-6:45-9:40
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:35-1:103:45-6:30-9:10
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
8633 Colesville Road
10:40-1:05-3:30-6:05-8:30-10:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
The Third Man (NR) 3:30-9:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, CC: 11:25-2:15-8:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Missouri (R) 12:30-2:50-5:1010:30-11:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
7:30-10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Kid Boots (NR) 5:45
Lady Bird (R) 11:20-1:20-3:20- Halloween (PG-13) CC: 2:10-7:10
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 10:00-3:005:20-7:20-9:20
10:00
The Dixie Flyer (NR) 7:45
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Funny Face (NR) 1:15
Experience (PG-13) CC: 10:15The Wizard of Oz (1939) (G)
1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
11:00AM
Coco (PG) 10:15AM
AMC Academy 8
MARYLAND
6198 Greenbelt Road
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
10:00-11:00-4:30-10:00-11:00
AMC Mazza Gallerie
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
10:30-1:30-4:35-7:35-10:30
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 12:00-2:1511:00-4:40-10:20
4:25-6:45-9:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:00-11:3010:10-1:10-4:10-7:10-10:10
2:30-4:00-7:00-8:45
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 10:50-1:05- Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 10:05-1:003:20-5:40-8:00-10:15
3:25-6:00
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:05-1:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
4:00-10:00
12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
(PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:20-5:00CC: (!) 5:30-8:15
7:40-10:25
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 10:00-11:50- (!) 11:15-2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15
2:30-5:10-7:50-10:30
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 1:00-9:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) (!)
12:40-3:10-5:45-8:10-10:40
1:45-7:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
AMC Center Park 8
CC: (!) 1:50-7:30
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 7:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Albert Einstein Planetarium - 10:45-12:15-3:15-6:15-7:30-9:20
National Air and Space Museum
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:45-1:30-6:00
Dark Universe Space Show (NR) Murder on the Orient Express
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30 (PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:15-5:00Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00- 7:45-10:25
1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:15-2:00The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM 4:45-7:30-10:15
One World, One Sky: Big Bird's Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
Adventure (NR) Please Call
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:15
Angelika Pop-Up
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
at Union Market
CC: 4:30-10:30
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
11:00-1:50-4:50-7:40-10:30
My Friend Dahmer (R) 12:00Coco 3D (PG) CC: 10:30AM; (!)
2:30-5:00-7:35-9:40
3:00-9:00
Novitiate (R) 4:45
Fate/Stay Night: Heaven's Feel AMC Columbia 14
I. Presage Flower 11:00AM
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Last Flag Flying (R) 2:15-7:20Justice
League (PG-13) CC: (!)
9:45
11:15-6:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
(PG-13) 11:30-2:00-4:20-7:0011:40-1:40-2:50-6:20-7:20-9:40
9:20
The Star (PG) CC: 10:15-12:40Avalon Theatre
3:10-5:40-7:55-10:15
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:30-2:15-2:45Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 5:30-8:30
Missouri (R) 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45 Murder on the Orient Express
Lady Bird (R) 1:15-3:30-5:45-8:00 (PG-13) CC: 2:00-4:55-7:35-10:30
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:50Landmark
4:40-7:20-10:05
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
807 V Street, NW
4:40-10:25
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:00-11:50-1:45-4:25-7:2011:50-2:20-4:50-7:40-10:25
9:50-10:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Missouri
(R) CC: (!) 10:35-1:2511:30-2:10-4:50-7:35-7:45-10:20
4:15-7:05-9:55
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
(PG-13) CC: 11:40-2:15-2:30CC: 12:15-3:15; (!) 9:00
4:40-5:00-7:10-9:35
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
(!) 10:10-1:10-4:10-7:10-10:10
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Lady Bird (R) (!) 10:05-12:30-2:555:25-7:55-10:20
11:15-1:50-4:30-7:15-9:55
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 10:45-6:20-9:30
Landmark E Street Cinema
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
555 11th Street NW
Experience (PG-13) (!) 10:30The Breadwinner (PG-13) 10:30- 1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
12:45-3:00-5:15-7:30-9:45
Justice League (PG-13) (!) 4:00God's Own Country 10:35-1:15- 7:00-10:00
4:15-7:15-9:50
Coco (PG) (!) 10:00-1:00; 10:00AM
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
Missouri (R) CC: 10:15-12:309811 Washingtonian Ctr.
1:00-3:30-4:00-6:30-7:00-9:15Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
9:40
11:45-2:35-5:25-6:45-8:15-9:35
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: 11:25CC: 10:25-4:10-9:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:45-12:00- 2:35-5:35-7:05-8:35-10:05
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 10:55-3:051:00-2:15-3:15-4:30-5:30-6:455:20-7:45-10:00
7:45-9:00-9:55
The Man Who Invented Christ- Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:10-11:40-1:10mas (PG) CC: 10:20-1:20-4:20- 2:10-4:10-5:10-7:10-8:10-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express (PG7:20-9:45
13) CC: 11:35-2:20-5:05-7:50-10:35
The Florida Project (R) CC:
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 11:50-12:4510:15-1:10-7:10
2:45-3:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
Landmark West End Cinema
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
2301 M Street NW
1:55-4:45-7:20-9:55
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:45Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
1:00-3:15-5:30-7:45-9:50
11:05-1:45-5:30-8:00-10:30
Jane 11:00-1:10-3:20-5:30Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
7:40-9:45
Missouri (R) CC: (!) 11:20-2:05The Square (R) CC: 11:00-2:00- 4:55-7:40-10:25
5:00-8:00
The Man Who Invented Christmas
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC (PG) (!) 10:50-2:25-5:00-7:35-10:10
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) CC:
(!) 12:25-3:15-6:05-8:55
We, the Marines (NR) 10:0011:00-12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00 Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 11:35-1:25-4:30-7:25-10:15
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14
Lady Bird (R) (!) 11:30-2:00-4:50701 Seventh Street Northwest
7:15-9:40
The Polar Express (G) 12:00
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 12:10-3:10Justice League (PG-13) 11:00- 6:10-9:10
2:00-4:45-7:30-10:30
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:30- Experience (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:002:35-6:00-9:00
1:50-4:40-7:30-10:20
Wonder (PG) 11:15-2:05-4:40Coco (PG) (!) 11:00AM; (!) 12:40-3:40
7:15-9:50
AMC Loews
The Star (PG) 11:20-1:45-4:00St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
6:15-8:40-11:05
11115 Mall Circle
Coco (PG) 10:15-1:30-3:30-5:00Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
7:00-8:00-11:00
10:00-4:45-7:45-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
(PG-13) 11:30-2:45-5:30-8:1511:45-3:00-6:00-9:00
11:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:20- The Star (PG) CC: 11:00-1:305:30-6:45-10:45
2:30-5:20-7:45-10:10
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:45-12:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Murder on the Orient Express
10:00-1:00-3:45-6:30-9:30
(PG-13) CC: 11:45-2:45-3:45Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
8:00-10:30
10:25-1:25-4:30-7:55-11:00
Tommy
Keene, who
cut his teeth
in D.C.’s late’70s punk
milieu,
performs at
the 9:30
Club’s 30thanniversary
concert in
2010.
style@washpost.com
John Davis is a Washington musician
and performing-arts archivist at the
University of Maryland.
KYLE GUSTAFSON
FOR THE
WASHINGTON POST
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Coco 3D (PG) 12:00-10:05
Justice League (PG-13) 12:003:00-5:45-8:30-11:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:0012:55-3:50-6:45-10:05
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:45-3:15-8:50-11:20
Justice League (PG-13) 6:00
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Justice League (PG-13) 9:25AM
The Star (PG) 9:15-11:10-2:354:35-6:35-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:502:40-8:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:15-12:25-2:55-5:407:45-8:35-10:10
Coco (PG) 2:05-5:00
Wonder (PG) 9:00-11:20-12:001:50-2:45-4:30-5:35-7:05-8:209:15-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
10:20-2:50
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 9:501:10-5:25-7:35-10:40
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 9:10-10:05-12:102:25-3:25-4:55-6:00-8:05-10:1511:05
Justice League (PG-13) 8:0010:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 9:305:20-10:00-11:00
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:45
Coco (PG) 9:20-10:00-1:00-4:007:00-7:30-9:40-10:25
Lady Bird (R) 10:25-12:35-3:155:25-7:25-8:10-10:35
Justice League (PG-13)
11:25-12:40-2:00-3:00-4:45-5:307:15-9:35
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 9:05-10:30-11:352:15-4:40-8:05-9:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
11:05-12:05-1:45-4:50-7:40-10:20
Coco 3D (PG) 11:00AM; 12:303:30-6:30
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Justice League (PG-13) 11:0012:10-2:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-11:0011:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:1011:10-1:10-2:10-4:10-5:10-7:108:10-10:20-11:20
The Star (PG) 9:50-12:20-2:405:10-7:25-9:50
Coco (PG) 9:30-10:30-12:30-1:203:30-4:20-6:30-7:30-9:30-10:30
Wonder (PG) 9:20-10:20-1:304:30-7:20-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 9:4010:40-12:40-1:40-3:40-4:40-6:207:40-9:05-10:40-11:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
3:00-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 10:001:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
The Wizard of Oz (1939) (G)
11:00AM
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 10:50-1:50-5:007:50-10:30
The Man Who Invented
Christmas (PG) 11:00-2:00-4:307:10-9:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:30-1:20-4:20-7:30-10:20
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
2:20-4:40-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:20-1:00-3:40-6:40-9:40
Last Flag Flying (R) 10:10-1:104:00-6:50-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 7:00
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-4:507:20-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:00-4:05-6:30-9:25
The Star (PG) CC: 11:10-1:557:00-9:10
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-12:00-1:001:55-3:00-3:50-4:45-6:40-7:358:45-9:30-10:25
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:05-1:45-4:407:20-10:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:403:00-4:20-6:05-7:00-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
11:50-2:20-4:50-7:40-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:30-2:00-4:35-7:05-9:30
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 11:00-1:30-4:156:45-9:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
11:00-12:50-4:00-6:55-9:50
Landmark
Bethesda Row Cinema
7235 Woodmont Ave
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
10:20-12:55-3:55
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 10:40-1:40-4:157:20-10:00
Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 10:351:30-4:25-7:10-9:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 10:20-11:001:00-2:00-4:00-4:50-6:30-7:007:30-9:35-10:00
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 10:50-1:20-3:557:15-9:45
Lady Bird (R) CC: 10:20-11:101:10-1:50-3:20-4:40-5:40-6:507:45-9:00-9:25-9:55
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
The Florida Project (R) 2:305:15-7:45
Paragon Kentlands Stadium 10
629 Center Point Way
Justice League (PG-13) 11:5012:45-2:25-3:20-5:00-5:50-7:358:30-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:454:30-7:15-10:00
The Star (PG) 12:45-2:50-4:557:00-9:05
Coco (PG) 12:00-2:45-5:30-8:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:00-2:35-5:10-7:4510:20
Wonder (PG) 12:10-2:40-5:107:40-10:10
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:30-2:50-5:10-7:30-9:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:402:55-5:10-7:25-9:40
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
3899 Branch Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 11:001:45-4:30-7:15-9:30-10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:154:05-7:00-10:10
Coco (PG) 12:00-2:00-2:50-4:555:45-7:50-10:40
Coco 3D (PG) 11:05AM
Wonder (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:507:30-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:302:55-5:20-7:40-10:05
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
Justice League (PG-13)
11:10-12:10-2:10-3:10-5:10-6:108:10-9:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:302:55-6:20-9:20
The Star (PG) 11:50-2:15-4:306:50-9:30
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:15-4:15-6:007:15-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:40-2:25-5:15-8:0010:45
Wonder (PG) 11:05-1:50-4:407:35-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:004:50-7:25-10:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:202:50-5:20-7:50-10:35
Marshall (PG-13) 11:20-2:155:05-7:55-10:40
My Friend Dahmer (R) 11:352:20-5:00-7:40-10:25
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
1:10-4:10-7:10-10:10
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:00-12:40-3:50-7:00-10:20
Coco 3D (PG) 3:00-9:00
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Stadium 20 & IMAX
900 Ellsworth Drive
The Polar Express (G) 12:00
Justice League (PG-13) 10:451:45-4:55-8:00-9:40-11:05
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:452:05-3:15-6:40-8:15-8:45-11:45
Coco (PG) 11:30-12:10-1:102:30-3:20-4:20-5:05-6:30-7:309:40-11:25
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:00-2:00-4:45-7:4010:30
Wonder (PG) 10:30-1:20-4:107:15-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:15Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD 12:45-6:15-9:15
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Justice League (PG-13) 2:40-8:45 Missouri (R) 11:30-2:40-5:35Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 3:458:30-11:15
10:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital 2:55-5:55-11:45
3D (PG-13) 12:35-6:55
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
The Star (PG) 10:15-12:55-3:30- 10:15-1:30-4:35-7:45-10:55
5:50-8:20-10:40
Coco 3D (PG) 10:10-10:30
Coco (PG) 11:00-2:15-5:30-7:50- Justice League: The IMAX 2D
8:50-11:00
Experience (PG-13) 10:00-12:55Murder on the Orient Express
3:55-7:00-10:20
(PG-13) 10:30-1:40-4:50-8:00Regal Germantown Stadium 14
10:55
20000 Century Boulevard
Wonder (PG) 10:00-1:00-4:00The Polar Express (G) 12:00
7:25-10:20
Justice
League (PG-13) 11:00A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:0011:45-12:00-2:00-3:00-5:00-6:0012:40-3:25-6:10-9:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:40- 6:15-8:00-9:00-9:30-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:001:30-4:10-7:20-10:35
12:30-2:00-3:30-5:00-6:30-8:00Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
9:30-11:00
10:00-1:15-4:30-7:40-10:50
Coco 3D (PG) 12:05-3:20-6:35-9:50 The Star (PG) 10:30-11:45-5:158:30-10:45
Justice League (PG-13) 10:5512:10-1:25-1:55-2:40-3:15-4:35- Coco (PG) 10:30-2:15-4:30-7:30
Murder on the Orient Express
4:55-6:20-7:35-8:45-9:25-10:45
(PG-13) 10:30-1:15-4:00-6:45Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
9:45
11:30-5:45
Wonder (PG) 10:45-1:30-4:15Coco (PG) XD: 9:55-1:10-4:25
7:15-10:15
Justice League (PG-13) XD:
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:158:10-11:10
1:45-4:15-7:15-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:30-12:45-3:50-5:45-7:00-10:00 Marshall (PG-13) 3:30-6:45-9:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
1591 West Nursery Road
My Friend Dahmer (R) 12:00Justice League (PG-13) CC:
2:45-5:30-8:15-11:00
11:20-12:20-1:20-2:10-3:10Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
4:10-5:00-6:05-6:55-7:45-8:5010:45-1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
9:40-10:30
Coco 3D (PG) 1:30-10:30
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Stadium 14
6505 America Blvd.
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:00-12:30-3:40-6:309:10
Wonder (PG) 10:00-10:40-1:20The Polar Express (G) 12:00
Justice League (PG-13) 10:00- 4:15-7:00-9:45
12:30-1:00-3:00-4:15-6:15-7:15- A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 3:106:00-8:45-10:50
9:15-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:45- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:0012:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
1:45-4:45-7:45-11:00
The Star (PG) 10:00-10:30-12:50- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:15-2:15-5:153:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
Coco (PG) 10:15-1:15-3:45-5:35- 8:15-11:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
7:00-8:35
12:00-3:20-6:30-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
(PG-13) 10:45-1:30-4:30-7:1510:30-1:45-4:45-7:45-10:15
10:00
Lady Bird (R) 10:15-12:40-3:15Wonder (PG) 10:15-1:00-3:455:40-8:15-10:40
6:45-9:45
Coco 3D (PG) 2:50-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:002:45-6:30-10:30
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
7710 Matapeake Business Dr
11:15-4:15-6:45-9:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:30- Justice League (PG-13) CC:
(!)
11:20-2:10-5:00-6:30-7:502:15-4:45-7:30-10:15
9:20-10:40
My Friend Dahmer (R) 11:15Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
10:20-12:20-1:20-3:30-6:50Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
10:20-11:20
11:00-2:00-5:15-8:15
The
Star (PG) Open Caption; CC: (!)
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:00-1:30-4:10-6:40-9:00
10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-10:45
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:00-12:50Coco 3D (PG) 2:15-10:15
3:40
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12 Murder on the Orient Express
14716 Baltimore Avenue
(PG-13) CC: (!) 10:30-3:00-6:20The Polar Express (G) 12:00
9:30
Justice League (PG-13) 11:10- Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 11:10-1:552:20-3:00-5:30-6:30-8:45-9:45
4:35-7:20-10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:20- Jigsaw (R) CC: 2:30-5:10-8:201:15-4:20-7:25-10:30
11:00
The Star (PG) 11:00-1:15-3:40A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
6:45-9:15
10:45-1:45-4:50-7:40-10:30
Coco (PG) 11:30-12:15-1:00-2:30- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: (!)
3:30-4:15-6:15-7:30-9:30
12:10-2:40-5:30-8:10-10:45
Murder on the Orient Express
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(PG-13) 10:45-1:30-4:20-7:00(!) 10:10-10:50-1:00-1:40-3:509:50
4:30-7:00-8:00-9:50-10:50
Wonder (PG) 10:15-1:05-4:00Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 9:40
7:15-10:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
11:50-2:50-4:20-5:40-7:10-8:306:45-9:20
10:00-11:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:15- Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:40-11:401:45-4:10-7:25-10:15
1:50-4:40-7:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
iPic Pike & Rose
10:30-1:40-4:45-8:00-11:10
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Justice
League
(PG-13) (!) 12:3010:10-1:20-4:30-7:45-11:00
4:00-7:45-11:15
Coco 3D (PG) 10:00-10:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:15Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13 3:00-6:30-10:00
199 East Montgomery Avenue
Coco (PG) (!) 12:15-3:45-7:15The Polar Express (G) 12:00
10:45
Justice League (PG-13) 11:15- Murder on the Orient Express
1:00-2:00-5:00-11:00; 8:00
(PG-13) 12:00-3:30-6:45-10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 7:45
Wonder (PG) (!) 11:30-2:30The Star (PG) 10:15-12:00-2:30- 6:15-9:30
5:00-7:45-10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:00Coco (PG) 10:00-11:30-12:305:00-8:00-11:30
2:45-3:45-6:00-7:00-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Wonder (PG) 10:45-1:30-4:30Missouri (R) (!) 11:45-3:15-7:007:30-10:15
10:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) (!)
Missouri (R) 10:00-12:45-3:45- 1:00-4:15-7:30-11:00
6:45-9:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
3:15-4:00-6:30-9:45-10:30
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
Explosion (Yin Bao Zhe) (NR)
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
10:00-12:45-3:30-6:45-9:30
Lady Bird (R) 10:15-12:30-3:30- Justice League (PG-13) CC:
6:15-9:00
10:45-1:30-4:15-5:15-7:00-9:45Coco 3D (PG) 9:00
10:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
4:15-10:45
10:45-1:40-4:30-7:30-10:30
Murder on the Orient Express
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:30Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:45- 7:15-10:00
2:15-5:15-8:15-10:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:50-1:30Justice League (PG-13) 7:15
4:15-6:50-9:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Regal Waugh Chapel
1:15-8:30-11:00
Stadium 12 & IMAX
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
1419 South Main Chapel Way
10:50-2:45-3:45-6:10
The Polar Express (G) 12:00
Justice League (PG-13) 12:00- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:452:00-5:00-8:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:40- 7:30-10:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
3:40-6:45-9:50
CC: 12:00-8:00
The Star (PG) 11:15-1:50-4:10Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
6:30-8:50
Coco (PG) 10:20-11:50-1:20-2:55- 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
AMC Hoffman Ctr 22
6:05-7:30-9:10
Murder on the Orient Express
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
(PG-13) 11:30-2:25-5:20-8:15Justice League (PG-13) CC:
11:10
10:45-12:15-1:45-3:15-6:15-9:15
Wonder (PG) 10:45-1:40-4:30Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
7:15-10:10
10:15-1:15-4:15-7:15-8:45-10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 3:10- The Star (PG) CC: 11:05-1:205:50-8:30-11:15
3:35-5:50-8:05-10:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:15- Coco (PG) CC: 10:00-4:00-5:0012:50-3:30-6:15-9:20-11:05
8:00-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Murder on the Orient Express
11:00-3:00-5:55-9:00-11:00
(PG-13) CC: 11:20-12:45-2:15Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
3:30-5:05-6:20-7:50-9:10
10:30-1:30-4:40-7:45-10:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
Coco 3D (PG) 4:25-10:35
1:30-8:10
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
It (R) CC: 4:55-10:35
Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:00- Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:454:00-7:00-10:00
4:30-7:15-10:00
Jigsaw (R) CC: 10:40
Regal Westview
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Stadium 16 & IMAX
11:50-2:40-5:20-7:55-10:25
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
The Polar Express (G) 12:00
11:45-2:35-5:05-7:40-10:10
Justice League (PG-13) 10:45Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:25-5:10
1:45-4:45-7:45-11:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
10:15-1:30-3:30-4:30-6:45-8:00- Missouri (R) CC: 10:50-1:50-4:407:20-10:05
9:45-11:00
My Friend Dahmer (R) 2:20-8:05
The Star (PG) 10:15-1:00-3:30The
Man Who Invented Christ6:30-9:00
mas (PG) CC: 10:30-1:10-3:45Coco (PG) 12:30
6:35-9:25
Murder on the Orient Express
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(PG-13) 10:00-1:15-4:15-7:3010:20-1:20-4:20-7:30-10:30
10:45
Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 11:50Wonder (PG) 10:30-1:45-4:453:00-6:05-9:05
7:45-10:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 11:45- Lady Bird (R) 11:40-2:05-4:256:45-9:20
2:30-5:45-8:30-11:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:30- Coco 3D (PG) CC: 12:00-1:003:00-6:00-7:00-9:00
2:45-5:15-8:00-10:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 10:00Missouri (R) 11:15-2:30-5:301:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
8:30-11:25
The Man Who Invented Christmas Justice League (PG-13) 4:55(PG) 11:00-2:00-4:30-7:15-10:15 7:45-10:45
The Star (PG) 12:05
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Coco (PG) 11:00-2:00
12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:30-2:30-5:30-8:30
10:00-1:15-4:30-7:45-11:00
Coco (PG) 11:30-2:30; 5:30
Lady Bird (R) 11:30-2:15-5:007:30-10:00
AMC Potomac Mills 18
Coco 3D (PG) 3:45-10:30
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 10:50AM
Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:00- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
4:00-7:00-10:00
10:30-1:00-1:50-5:00-7:15-8:15
Coco (PG) 10:00-10:45-2:00-5:00- Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
7:15-8:15-11:15
3D (PG-13) CC: 4:00-10:30
UA Snowden Square
The Star (PG) CC: 10:50-1:30Stadium 14
6:00-8:15-10:25
9161 Commerce Center Dr
Coco (PG) CC: 10:15-12:15-4:307:00-10:00-10:40
The Polar Express (G) 12:00
Justice League (PG-13) 10:20- Murder on the Orient Express
11:00-1:30-2:00-4:30-5:00-7:30- (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:457:25-10:10
8:00-10:30-11:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:45- Wonder (PG) CC: 10:20-11:201:00-2:00-3:45-4:45-6:30-7:303:50-6:45-10:45
9:15-10:15
The Star (PG) 10:50-1:10-3:30Jigsaw (R) CC: 10:50
6:00-8:30
Coco (PG) 10:00-11:45-1:00-4:00- A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
6:15-7:15-10:00
11:20-3:10-5:40-8:15-10:50
So handy. So reliable. Home delivery.
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
glow. I remember standing on
stage harmonizing with him and
glancing over in disbelief. I was
singing with Tommy Keene! As I
gushed to him backstage about
this after the show, he smiled humbly and shrugged, as if to say, “Aw,
who am I?”
Who were you, Tommy? One of
the greats, even if you were too
humble to say so, and this world
didn’t always recognize you as it
should have. That’s who you were.
MOVIE DIRECTORY
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K St N.W.
. SATURDAY,
VIRGINIA
1-800-753-POST
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:10-1:40-4:10-6:40-9:10
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 10:50-1:30-4:106:45-9:20
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 2:00-5:00-8:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
11:00-1:50-4:40-7:30-10:20
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 8:20
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) CC: 11:302:30-5:30-8:30
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
The Star (PG) 3:45
Coco (PG) 10:45-1:45-4:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Coco 3D (PG) 1:20-7:40
Justice League (PG-13) 10:301:15-4:15
Coco (PG) 11:15AM
Justice League (PG-13) 7:4510:45
Coco (PG) 5:15; 2:15
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
10:15-4:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
10:15-1:45-3:30-7:00-9:00
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:30-4:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45-4:307:15-10:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 10:30-1:154:15-7:15-10:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: (!) 10:45-1:304:15-7:00-9:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: (!) 1:00-7:30-10:15
Lady Bird (R) 11:15-1:15-4:456:30-10:00
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 1:30-6:4510:00
Coco (PG) 10:00-1:00-4:007:00-9:50
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:50-1:50-4:50-7:5010:40
Wonder (PG) 10:30-1:30-4:307:30-10:25
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 9:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:451:05-3:30-6:05-8:45-11:10
The Man Who Invented
Christmas (PG) 10:40-1:40-4:407:40-10:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:20-1:20-4:20-7:20-10:20
Justice League (PG-13) 10:101:10-4:10-7:10-10:00
Lady Bird (R) 10:55-1:15-3:406:10-8:30-10:50
Saturday, November 25, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:453:00-6:00-9:10
The Star (PG) 11:35-2:05-4:257:00-9:20
Coco (PG) 11:00-12:45-2:00-5:006:45-8:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:15-3:10-6:20-9:00
Tumhari Sulu (NR) 11:30-2:456:15-9:25
Ittefaq (NR) 12:50-3:15-5:358:00-10:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:151:45-4:15-7:15-9:55
My Friend Dahmer (R) 11:202:15-4:50-7:20-10:00
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) 12:35-3:20-5:50-8:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:40-4:00-9:50
Cinema Arts Theatre
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
9650 Main St
12:25-3:55-7:25-10:30
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 9:40- Theeran Adhigaram Ondru (NR)
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:50-10:10
3:05-6:25
Murder on the Orient Express
Lady Bird (R) 12:05-2:50-5:20(PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:00-2:307:55-10:25
5:00-7:30-9:50
Coco 3D (PG) 3:45-9:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 9:50-12:10Hey Pillagada (NR) 12:30-3:302:25-4:50-7:20-9:40
6:30-9:40
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Mental Madhilo (NR) 11:05-1:552:20
4:45-7:40-10:35
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:05Khakee (Telugu) (NR) 11:50-9:35
12:20-4:35-7:00-9:15
Balakrishnudu 11:55-2:55Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 6:05-9:30
Missouri (R) 9:45-12:05-2:35Verna 12:20-3:50-7:05-10:15
5:05-7:40-9:55
Napoleon (Telugu) (NR) 11:10Lady Bird (R) 9:55-12:15-2:251:50-4:30-7:30-10:10
4:45-7:10-9:25
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Dr
Justice League (PG-13) 1:004:00-7:00-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:001:50-4:50-7:45-10:40
The Star (PG) 11:00-12:00-2:104:20-6:30-9:00
Coco (PG) 1:15-2:30-4:15-7:158:30-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:20-3:10-6:15-9:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:453:20-6:50-10:20
Wonder (PG) 11:10-1:40-4:407:30-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
11:40-2:40-5:10-7:40-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:201:45-4:10-6:45-9:20
My Friend Dahmer (R) 11:502:50-5:40-8:15-10:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:10-3:00-6:00-8:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:15-3:40-7:10-10:10
Coco 3D (PG) 11:30-5:30
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 11:15-2:005:00-8:00-10:50
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
The Polar Express (G) 12:00
Justice League (PG-13) 12:50Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
3:55-7:00-10:00
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:401600 Village Market Boulevard
The Polar Express (G) 12:00
2:50-6:00-9:10-12:00
The Star (PG) 11:15-1:40-4:15Justice League (PG-13) 1:30The Star (PG) 11:00-5:20-7:50
6:50-9:15
4:30-7:30-10:30
Coco
(PG) 11:00-1:40-4:40-7:35Murder on the Orient Express
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 9:4510:45
(PG-13) 11:10-1:45-4:30-7:1012:45-3:30-6:30-9:45
Murder
on the Orient Express
9:50
Murder on the Orient Express
Wonder (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:50(PG-13) 10:00-12:45-3:45-6:45- (PG-13) 11:10-2:05-5:00-7:557:30-10:10
10:40-12:00
10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Coco (PG) 10:30-1:00-2:30-4:00- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:40-9:05
AMC Tysons Corner 16
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:45-10:15
Wonder (PG) 11:00-2:00-4:355:30-7:00
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:50- A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
7:30-10:15
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
2:15-4:45-7:15-9:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
8:30-11:00
9:15-10:45-12:15-1:45-3:15-5:25- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 9:50- 11:00-3:30-6:05-8:55
6:15-9:05-12:00
11:20-2:20-5:05-7:50-10:40
12:30-3:15-6:15-8:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Coco 3D (PG) 11:00-5:00
Wonder (PG) 10:15-1:15-4:151:55-4:25-7:15-10:05
10:30-1:30-4:45-7:45-10:45-12:40 Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:00- 7:15-10:00
Marshall (PG-13) 11:45-6:10
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 9:15-12:05- 1:50-4:40-7:40-10:35
Three Billboards Outside Ebb- My Friend Dahmer (R) 11:202:20-4:50-7:05-9:25
Justice League (PG-13)
ing, Missouri (R) 11:15-2:152:00-4:45-7:25-10:20
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 9:30-12:30-4:20- 11:40-1:30-2:30-4:20-5:30-7:20- 5:15-8:00-10:50
The Man Who Invented
6:40-8:25-10:35-11:25
8:30-10:20
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Christmas
(PG) 11:00-1:35-4:10Murder on the Orient Express
Coco 3D (PG) 11:00-5:00
12:00-3:00-9:00
6:50-9:30
(PG-13) CC: (!) 10:15-1:25-4:15- Coco (PG) 12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
7:20-10:20-12:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
4:00-6:00-7:00-8:00-9:00-10:00; 10:45-1:45-4:45-7:45-10:40
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 9:10-10:40- 2:00-8:00
12:10-3:20-6:20-9:20
Coco 3D (PG) 9:30
12:40-1:40-3:25-4:30-6:05-7:15Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13)
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8:50-10:00-11:35
11:00-1:15-4:15-7:20-10:25-12:00
10:00-6:00
8890
Mathis
Ave.
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Coco 3D (PG) 3:25-9:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:40Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
4:35-7:10-9:45-12:20
Justice League (PG-13) 1:303:20-6:00-8:40
4110
West
Ox
Road
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
4:30-7:40-10:35-12:00
9:45-12:20-5:50-8:20-10:55-12:45 Justice League (PG-13) 11:00The Polar Express (G) 12:00
The Star (PG) 12:30-2:55-9:55
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Murder on the Orient Express
Coco
(PG) 12:20-1:00-4:05-6:30Missouri (R) CC: (!) 11:05-1:55- Coco (PG) 10:30-1:05-3:40(PG-13) 11:25-1:30-2:15-5:007:10-10:10-11:30
6:05-8:45
4:40-7:25-10:10-12:55
6:45-7:45-10:30
Wonder
(PG)
11:00-1:25-3:50Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
Wonder (PG) 11:00-12:45-1:556:15-8:40
CC: (!) 11:30-2:30
3:30-4:40-6:30-7:30-9:15-10:15
6500 Springfield Town Ctr
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 5:20- The Polar Express (G) 12:00
CC: (!) 11:25-2:15-5:05-8:008:05-10:40
6201 Multiplex Drive
Justice League (PG-13) 10:3010:50-11:55
Justice League (PG-13) 10:00- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
11:30-1:30-4:30-5:30-7:30-10:30
Lady Bird (R) (!) 9:05-12:10-2:40- 12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-6:00- 11:00-12:00-2:30-4:15-5:15-7:55- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:005:00-7:30-10:05
9:55-10:25
7:00-8:00-9:00-10:10
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 10:20-3:35- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:15- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 4:40-8:00-11:00
The Star (PG) 11:00-1:20-3:407:35-9:40
Missouri (R) 11:05-1:50-4:351:25-4:30-7:35-10:40
6:20-9:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
The Star (PG) 10:10-12:25-2:40- 7:20-10:05
Coco (PG) 10:00-10:05-11:40Experience (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:05- 4:55-7:20-9:35
My Friend Dahmer (R) 11:5512:40-3:50-6:00-7:00-10:10
1:00-4:00-7:00-9:50-12:50
2:50-5:30-8:15-10:55
Coco (PG) 10:20-1:15-5:10-7:05Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) (!)
The Man Who Invented
8:05-10:00
8:10-11:00
Christmas (PG) 11:10-1:45-4:25- (PG-13) 10:50-2:00-4:50-7:50Murder on the Orient Express
Coco (PG) (!) 11:00-2:00-5:10; (!) (PG-13) 10:50-1:35-4:20-7:3010:40
7:10-9:50
10:00AM; (!) 9:00-1:20; (!) 2:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Wonder (PG) 10:55-1:40-4:3510:15
12:30-3:45-7:00-10:00
7:20-10:05
AMC Worldgate 9
Wonder (PG) 11:15-1:55-4:35Let There Be Light (PG-13) 2:40 Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:407:15-9:55
13025 Worldgate Drive
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX 1:10-4:10-6:50-9:20
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
10:05-3:55-6:50
22875 Brambleton Plaza
10:00-1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Daddy's
Home
2
(PG-13)
12:15Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
Justice League (PG-13) 11:00- Missouri (R) 1:00-4:00-7:10-10:00
2:45-5:15-7:45-10:25
12:20-3:30-6:30-9:40
2:00-3:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-11:00 Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
The Star (PG) CC: 11:10-1:40Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:15- 2:30-3:30-6:30-8:30-9:30
11:00-5:00-10:55
4:10-6:50-9:00
Coco 3D (PG) 2:50-9:10
11:45-1:15-2:45-4:15-5:45Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:30-1:307:15-8:45-10:15
Lady Bird (R) 2:20-5:00-7:4010:40-1:45-4:45-7:50-10:45
2:30-7:30
The Star (PG) 11:30-1:45-4:00- 10:20
Coco 3D (PG) 11:20-2:15-4:10Murder on the Orient Express
6:15-8:30-10:45
Regal Virginia Gateway
11:00
(PG-13) CC: 10:10-1:10-4:05Coco (PG) 10:30-12:00-1:30Stadium 14 & RPX
Mental Madhilo (NR) 12:45-9:30 3:00-4:30-6:00-7:30-10:30
6:45-9:30
8001 Gateway Promenade Pl
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 12:30-3:15Murder
on
the
Orient
Express
Rave Cinemas
5:30-8:15-9:15
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme (PG-13) 10:45-1:45-4:45-7:45- The Polar Express (G) 12:00
Justice League (PG-13) 12:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
10:45
11900 Palace Way
10:45-1:15-3:45-6:15-9:05
Justice League (PG-13) 10:00- Wonder (PG) 9:50-11:15-12:30- 3:00-6:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
2:15-3:30-5:00-6:30-7:45-9:30Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:4512:50-2:35-6:40-8:25-9:35-11:20
CC: 6:00-11:00
10:30
1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: 10:50-11:45-2:05-5:05-6:25-8:10- A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
The Star (PG) 10:10-2:20-4:40(!) 10:20-1:20-4:20-7:15-10:10
9:50-12:15-2:45-5:15-8:006:50-9:10
9:40-11:10
Coco 3D (PG) (!) 10:30-4:30-10:30 The Star (PG) 10:15-12:35-2:55- 10:30
Coco (PG) 10:15-11:15-12:30Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema - 5:15-7:35-10:30
1:15-3:30-4:15-6:30-7:15-9:30
One Loudoun
Coco (PG) 11:20-2:15-4:35-7:30- 10:15-12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15Murder on the Orient Express
10:45
20575 East Hampton Plaza
8:05-10:25
(PG-13) 10:40-1:20-4:10-7:10Three
Billboards
Outside
EbbMurder on the Orient Express
Coco (PG) 2:15
ing, Missouri (R) 10:00-12:45- 9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:50- (PG-13) 10:35-1:30-4:45-7:55A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 5:103:30-6:15-9:15
10:50
5:05-8:20-11:35
7:40-10:05
The Man Who Invented
Justice League (PG-13) 12:20- Wonder (PG) 11:00-1:55-4:35Wonder (PG) 10:30-11:30-12:4510:30-1:00Christmas
(PG)
7:25-10:10
3:40-7:00-10:25
1:30-3:45-4:30-6:45-7:30-9:453:45-6:45-9:15
Coco (PG) 11:30-2:45-4:05-5:30- A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Justice League in 3D (PG-13) 10:30
10:30-1:20-3:55-6:30
6:00-8:55-9:30
Daddy's
Home 2 (PG-13) 10:2012:00-9:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:15Murder on the Orient Express
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) 2:30-5:30-8:10-10:40
1:45-4:30-7:40-10:35
(PG-13) 10:40-1:40-4:50-8:00Three
Billboards
Outside Ebbing,
10:15-1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:10
Coco 3D (PG) 9:00
Missouri (R) 11:20-2:15-5:15XD: 10:05
Wonder (PG) 11:50-1:50-5:40Justice
League:
The
IMAX
2D
8:15-10:55
Lady
Bird
(R)
10:45-1:35-4:258:40-11:35
Experience (PG-13) 10:00-1:00- Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:00- 7:20-10:00
4:00-7:00-10:00
9:00
Coco 3D (PG) 10:40-1:40-5:103:20-6:20-9:20
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Regal Kingstowne
11:00
Lady Bird (R) 11:20-2:00-4:40Stadium 16 & RPX
Mental Madhilo (NR) 3:10-9:00
10:50-1:50-4:50-7:50-10:50
7:20-10:00
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
Coco 3D (PG) 10:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Justice League (PG-13) XD:
11:05-2:00-4:55-7:15-7:50-10:45 The Polar Express (G) 12:00
Missouri (R) 10:45-2:45-7:45Justice League (PG-13) 10:00Coco (PG) XD: 10:05-1:10-4:05
10:45
Justice League (PG-13) 1:301:00-4:00-7:00-10:00-11:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Coco (PG) 11:00AM
4:30-7:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:40-3:45-5:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:00- 11:00-2:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
Angelika Film Ctr Mosaic
2:15-3:20-5:15-6:45-8:35-10:00
Regal Ballston Common
2911 District Ave
Smithsonian - Airbus
Murder on the Orient Express
Stadium 12
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
IMAX Theater
(PG-13) 11:30-2:45-5:30-8:15671 N. Glebe Road
Missouri (R) (!) 10:15-11:5514390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
11:00
Justice
League
(PG-13)
10:301:00-2:40-3:45-5:15-6:30-8:15D-Day:
Normandy
1944 3D (NR)
The
Star
(PG)
10:40-1:00-3:151:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
9:15-10:50
11:10-4:00
6:00-8:30-10:45
Fate/Stay Night: Heaven’s Feel - Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:05- Coco
(PG)
10:45-12:55-1:45-4:00A
Beautiful
Planet
3D (G) 12:35
1:05-4:10-7:15-10:20
I. Presage Flower 11:00AM
4:50-7:00-7:55-10:55
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
The Man Who Invented Christ- The Star (PG) 11:15-1:45-4:15Wonder
(PG)
10:20-1:35-4:20Sea
3D
(NR)
10:20-1:30-3:10
6:45-9:15
mas (PG) (!) 11:15-2:00-4:30Dream Big: Engineering Our
Coco (PG) 10:00-11:30-1:00-4:00- 7:15-10:15
7:15-9:55
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) (!) 5:30-7:00-10:00
11:45-2:30-5:45-8:10-10:40
2:20
Murder on the Orient Express
11:20-2:15-5:05-8:00-10:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:35- Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
Lady Bird (R) (!) 10:45-1:15-3:25- (PG-13) 11:05-2:20-5:10-8:001:20-3:50-6:20-9:00
10:50
Justice League: The IMAX 2D Ex6:00-8:30-10:35
My
Friend
Dahmer
(R)
11:15Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:55- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:55perience (PG-13) 4:55-7:20-9:45
1:50-4:25-7:05-9:50
2:35-6:15-9:55
1:55-4:55-7:55-10:55
University Mall Theatre
The
Man
Who
Invented
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 10:45Murder on the Orient Express
Christmas (PG) 10:10-12:45-3:3010659 Braddock Road
(PG-13) (!) 2:20-5:00-7:40-10:45 1:20-3:55-6:30-9:05
6:15-9:15
The
LEGO
Ninjago Movie (PG)
Justice League (PG-13) (!) 10:30- Marshall (PG-13) 10:20-1:15Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 12:00-2:15-4:30
4:20-7:10-10:05
1:15-4:05-7:00-9:45
10:30-10:30
Kingsman:
The Golden Circle (R)
My
Friend
Dahmer
(R)
11:00Bow Tie
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:40-4:40-7:45-10:40
CC: 7:30-10:15
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
10:15-1:15-4:15-7:25-10:35
Justice
League
in
3D
(PG-13)
It
(R)
CC:
7:15-9:50
11940 Market Street
Lady Bird (R) 11:40-2:00-5:0011:25-2:40-6:00-9:00
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:10The Wizard of Oz (1939) (G)
Lady Bird (R) 10:15-12:45-3:15- 7:45-10:20
2:20-4:20
Coco 3D (PG) 10:00-10:05
11:00AM
5:45-8:15-10:45
Justice League (PG-13) 11:05- My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Justice League (PG-13) 11:10- Coco 3D (PG) 2:30-8:30
12:20-2:35-4:40
2:05-5:05-6:35
2:10-5:10-8:10-11:00
Regal Countryside Stadium 20 Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 7:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 2:2045980 Regal Plaza
10:10
10:00-12:50-9:45
5:20-8:20-11:15
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
Justice League (PG-13) 11:40- Justice League (PG-13) 3:45The Star (PG) 9:50-12:00-2:202:30-5:30-6:50-8:45
(R) 12:00AM
5:15-7:35
8:05-11:00
washingtonpost.com/subscribe
SF
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C5
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
10 8 6 4
K6
AQ5
Q763
WEST (D)
KJ
Q 10 8 7 5 2
K76
A2
EAST
93
93
J9832
K 10 5 4
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
AQ752
AJ4
10 4
J98
The bidding:
WEST
NORTH
EAST
1
Pass
Pass
Pass
3
Pass
All Pass
Opening lead — A
SOUTH
1
4
CLASSIC PEANUTS
can’t believe it,” Wendy,
my club’s feminist,
grumbled. “After all the times
Cy has seen Minnie and her
glasses do him in, he let
declarer make four spades.”
Minnie Bottoms, our
senior member, wears old
bifocals that make her mix
up kings and jacks, often to
her opponents’ dismay. Cy
the Cynic has been Minnie’s
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
chief victim.
Wendy and Cy were EastWest in a penny game.
Against four spades, Cy did
well to lead the ace and a
second club to Wendy’s king.
“On the next club,” Wendy
told me, “the Cynic ruffed ...
with the jack of trumps.”
South won Cy’s heart shift
and was sure Cy had the king
of trumps: With two kings,
LIO
East would have responded
to the opening bid. So South
banged down the ace of
trumps and won the rest
when the king fell.
“Men are like government
bonds,” Wendy said. “They
never seem to mature.”
Cy must ruff the third club
with the king, the card South
can infer that he holds. When
South gets back in, he will
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
lead dummy’s 10 of trumps
and let it ride in case Wendy
has J-9-3.
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
“I
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
K J Q 10 8 7 5 2
K76A2
Your partner opens one
club, you respond one heart
and he bids one spade. What
do you say?
ANSWER: You might survive
a jump to 3NT, but partner’s
BLONDIE
hand is not well-defined, and
your best contract might be
four hearts or a slam. As
most pairs agree, a jump
to three hearts would be
invitational, not forcing. Bid
two diamonds, the “fourth
suit,” asking partner to make
another descriptive bid.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C6
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | NOVEMBER 25
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
This year you often
respond to others,
and you enjoy sharing
ideas, events and
funny happenings. People
enjoy your sociability and
often want to be around you. If
you are single, your popularity
certainly helps you to meet
people. Be smart and don’t
settle unless you are sure you
have met Mr. or Ms. Right. If
you are attached, the two of
you find a lot to talk and laugh
about. You simply enjoy each
other’s presence. Aquarius
listens carefully when you
speak.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You often seem to stir the pot,
or at least certain friends think
you do. However, you also
simultaneously encourage
others to reflect on the cause
of your impulsiveness. Unless
you explain yourself, your pals
might never figure it out.
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You might feel pushed by
an older friend or relative
to step up to the plate.
This responsibility does not
constitute your vision of a
perfect Saturday.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You willingly hop in your car to
take off and explore a fair or
a flea market. Invite a friend
or loved one to join you. You
could be surprised by what
comes up for you when you
WEINGARTENS & CLARK put yourself in a different
environment.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You prefer one-on-one relating
and do not want to get hung up
in crowds. You and a loved one
might opt to take the day off
together. Depending on what
you enjoy doing, make plans
accordingly.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Your popularity continues
to skyrocket. You have high
energy and are quite directed.
You know what you want,
and you express those needs
clearly. Conversations are
started easily, though you
might be surprised by others’
reactions.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You continue to want to
take care of the details of a
project, as you are precise
and meticulous. A roommate,
neighbor or family member is
likely to become difficult and
withdrawn.
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You might not be able to
convince others of the
rightness of your thinking, so
don’t even try. However, if you
simply let your personality
and sense of fun come out,
you and those around you are
likely to have a memorable
time.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Deal with a domestic issue.
You could have a lot to do.
Your skills and abilities might
be needed, even if it’s just to
think through a problem. You
might feel as if you can’t meet
others’ needs, but know that
you can and probably will.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
A close friend values you
and lets you know. Initiate
a conversation that seems
especially significant or
important to you. As a result,
you’ll get honest and perhaps
even surprising feedback.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You could be in a situation
where you want to head in
a new direction. Just don’t
overthink the issue. You might
feel constrained by a situation
at home, but know that the
other party involved is likely to
help you through it.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You are the lead player, no
matter which way you turn.
Others seek you out, and
though you seem withdrawn,
you still remain a source of
compassion. A loved one
might attempt to shake up the
status quo in order to get an
emotional response from you.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Don’t feel as if you need to
do anything a certain way. A
serious approach works well
for you, as it allows you to slow
the pace and make strong
choices. If someone decides
to create uproar, don’t pay any
attention.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
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KLMNO
SPORTS
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
PRO BASKETBALL
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
HIGH SCHOOLS
John Wall has an MRI
exam on his knee and
is questionable for the
Wizards on Saturday. D2
The Maryland women
roll past Kennesaw State,
but the men fall to
St. Bonaventure. D3
Navy’s offense compiles
just 79 yards in the
second half of a 24-14
loss at Houston. D6
No. 1 Wise, No. 8 Quince
Orchard and No. 14
Tuscarora advance in the
football playoffs. D6, D10
Playo≠s? Norman remains confident. Redskins say surface is a ‘non-issue’
BY
K IMBERLEY A . M ARTIN
Josh Norman believes, even if
you don’t.
There are more than enough
reasons to write off him and the
rest of the Washington Redskins,
more than enough injuries and
erratic efforts to assume they are
destined to stumble toward the
finish line of the regular season.
But despite all of those setbacks
and their many self-inflicted
wounds, Norman remains confident that he and his teammates
still can make the playoffs.
“Why would you not?” the
cornerback asked, flashing a
smile, inside a buoyant Redskins
locker room Thanksgiving night.
In the aftermath of an ugly,
mistake-prone affair with the
reeling Giants — a prime-time
matchup that featured quarterback Kirk Cousins getting sacked
six times and throwing an interception that was returned for a
touchdown — there was nothing
but optimism among Washington players.
All that mattered to them was
the final score — 20-10 — and
what lies ahead: another Thursday night showdown with an
NFC East rival, this time the
Dallas Cowboys.
It will be the third game in
12 days for the Redskins (5-6).
But it also will serve as another
chance to prove they can fight
through hardships and be victorious.
“When you come out here and
you still have those injuries and
you put teams away, that again
speaks for itself,” Norman said.
“So if we can continue this, with
the injuries that we have, nobody
has anything [negative] to say
about our team.
“We’ve just got to keep going
and just keep fighting. Because at
the end of the day, we’ve just got
to be resilient. I think that’s the
thing that’s going to determine
our team: resiliency. If we can
have that . . . with the guys that
went down, then you’ve got to
put us up there. You really do.”
The likelihood of the Redskins
making the playoffs is slim considering the NFC playoff picture.
The Philadelphia Eagles (9-1),
Minnesota Vikings (9-2), New
Orleans Saints (8-2) and Los
Angeles Rams (7-3) are atop
their respective divisions, while
the Carolina Panthers (7-3) and
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D4
BY
AND
L IZ C LARKE
M ARK M ASKE
More than the game’s 16 punts
or 26 incompletions, what
caused so many viewers to voice
alarm via social media about the
NFL’s Thanksgiving nightcap between the Washington Redskins
and New York Giants was the
threadbare condition of the playing surface at FedEx Field.
Captured by aerial cameras,
the field appeared more dirt than
grass, with a charred, brown
streak running the length of its
heavily traveled middle third.
And when quarterback Kirk
Cousins threw his lone interception while leading the Redskins
to a 20-10 victory over their
foundering NFC East rival, it
appeared he had gotten a foot
snagged in what passed for turf.
Coach Jay Gruden acknowledged Friday that Cousins’s footslip “very well could have” played
a part in the turnover. But the
coach made clear he saw nothing
amiss about the field and had no
vantage point for gauging, noting, “I’m not out there with cleats
on,” and saying he was content to
leave field conditions to the
grounds crew.
But the NFL Players Association “will take a look at the
matter,” a person familiar with
the situation said.
“That turf has been an issue
off and on for some time,” the
person said, speaking on the
condition of anonymity because
no formal inquiry by the league
or union had been announced.
The Redskins asked The
Washington Post on Friday to
send its inquiry about the field
via email. In response to seven
questions — about the type of
turf, the date of its last re-sodding and plans for future re-sodding, among other issues — Redskins spokesman Tony Wyllie
called it “a non-issue.”
“Our field was in good condition last night, although a recent
freeze made the Bermuda grass
turn brown between the numbers,” said Wyllie, Redskins senior vice president of communications, in explaining the team
FIELD CONTINUED ON D4
Redskins at Cowboys
Thursday, 8:25 p.m., NBC
Dan Steinberg: Turkey leg in hand,
Kerrigan was living a dream. D4
Hokies’
streak vs.
Cavaliers
reaches 14
VIRGINIA TECH 10,
VIRGINIA 0
Shutout is second in
the rivalry in seven years
BY
G ENE W ANG
charlottesville — Virginia
BRYNN ANDERSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
KEVIN C. COX/GETTY IMAGES
Two quarterbacks from Texas — Auburn’s Jarrett Stidham, left, and Alabama’s Jalen Hurts, right — will square off Saturday in the Iron Bowl.
So much more than in-state rivalry
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
In the colossus of a game coming
Saturday in eastern Alabama, two Texan
quarterbacks will try to solve the defenses.
One will try to elude a frightening Floridian linebacker and a horrifying Georgian
defensive tackle, while a defensive back
and defensive brain from New Jersey will
plot to thwart the other.
When those defenses prevail, one team
(Alabama) will turn to a punter the Auburn coach calls “probably the best punter
in college football,” a Coloradan, while the
With stakes far exceeding bragging rights,
Iron Bowl between Alabama and Auburn
has secured spot as national game of year
COLLEGE FOOTBALL SATURDAY
9 Ohio State
10 Penn State
at Michigan
Noon, Fox
at Maryland
3:30, BTN
1 Alabama
at 6 Auburn
3:30, CBS
3 Clemson at
24 S. Carolina
7:30, ESPN
Miami falls: Loss to Pittsburgh damages playoff hopes. D6
other team (Auburn) has a kicker the
Alabama coach calls “a weapon in and of
himself,” also a Coloradan.
Alabama figures to hand the ball frequently to a Kentuckian, its leading rusher, or throw it toward a Floridian, its
runaway leading receiver. Auburn figures
to throw it toward a Floridian, its runaway
leading receiver, but more so to hand it to a
1,172-yard rusher from Alabama, and even
that’s kind of complicated.
“Both my parents are from Florida,”
Kerryon Johnson, a calming presence
IRON BOWL CONTINUED ON D5
Early gift for Grubauer: A win, finally
CAPITALS 3,
LIGHTNING 1
BY
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Capitals goalie Philipp Grubauer made 25 saves Friday against
the Lightning for his first victory in his seventh start of the season.
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
It was so low that it could have
been mistaken for boos, the
sound of Capital One Arena uniformly belting “Gru” after every
save as encouragement. Goaltender Philipp Grubauer had had a
rough start to the season, skating
off as the loser every time he had
been in net. His 26th birthday is
Saturday, and tapping him to
start against the NHL’s best team
Friday seemed like Coach Barry
Trotz’s cruel idea of a present.
But with his father in town
from Germany, Grubauer recorded his first win of the season, 3-1
over the Tampa Bay Lightning,
and the Washington Capitals
seemed to turn a corner of sorts.
Consistency has been an issue
for Washington, good wins often
followed by bad losses. This
marked the Capitals’ second
straight win, a second game in a
row in which they have shown
flashes of the talented team that
won the most regular season
games over the past three years.
On Friday night, they did it
against this season’s early Stanley Cup favorite.
“The team did unbelievable,”
Grubauer said. “If we play like
this the whole year, we are going
to be really tough to beat.”
For how well Grubauer has
played in some losing efforts this
season, it was sort of poetic that
his first win came in a game in
which he didn’t have much work.
He faced just 16 shots through
two periods, while the Capitals
put up 30.
But after a good start, Washington flatlined in the third period, failing to record a shot for the
first 9:30 as the Lightning fired
away at Grubauer. That’s when
he was at his best, the recipient
Tech’s players had heard all week
how this finally might be the year
Virginia, in the midst of a revival,
would end an ignominious losing streak against its contentious
in-state rival.
The Hokies instead made certain the result fell in line with the
previous 13 games, leaving Virginia to wonder how much longer it must endure finishing a
distant second in the series.
Controlling the line of scrimmage defensively, Virginia Tech
celebrated a 10-0 triumph Friday
at Scott Stadium for its second
shutout of the Cavaliers in the
past seven meetings.
“I think this is probably the
best team win of the year,” said
Hokies defensive tackle Ricky
Walker, part of a unit that
pitched its third shutout this
year. “I think this probably is one
of the special, special wins of the
season, and I’ll remember this
one forever.”
Virginia Tech (9-3, 5-3 ACC)
limited Virginia to five rushing
yards in capturing its 14th consecutive Commonwealth Cup.
The robust performance was all
the more convincing given the
Hokies were missing several injured starters on defense.
Quarterback Josh Jackson
connected with tight end Chris
Cunningham for the game’s only
touchdown, and the Hokies
amassed 345 yards of offense,
including 202 rushing. Jackson
completed 14 of 21 passes for 143
yards, with Steven Peoples and
Deshawn McClease adding 71
yards rushing apiece in front of
an announced crowd of 48,609.
Virginia Tech has won 18 of 19
against Virginia. Its only loss in
that span was 35-21 on Nov. 29,
2003.
“The first thing that comes to
my mind is that it’s an honor,”
Virginia Tech Coach Justin Fuente said of extending the streak.
HOKIES CONTINUED ON D5
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D2
RYAN M. KELLY/GETTY IMAGES
Capitals at Maple Leafs
Today, 7 p.m., NBCSW Plus, NHLN
The Hokies’ Josh Jackson
threw for 143 yards and a score.
D2
EZ
D I G ES T
GOLF
Day in hunt, Spieth
falls back in Australia
Jason Day and Jordan Spieth
went in opposite directions
Friday at the Australian Open in
Sydney.
Day had four consecutive
birdies on the back nine,
including a 30-footer, for a 3under-par 68 that left him a
stroke out of the second-round
lead. Australian Lucas Herbert,
who shot 66, is in front with a 9under total of 133 on The
Australian course.
First-round leader Cameron
Davis, who shot 72, is another
stroke behind in third.
Defending champion Spieth
earlier failed to take advantage of
ideal morning scoring conditions
and had a 71 to fall further behind
the leaders — eight strokes
behind Herbert.
Spieth, who hasn’t played since
the Presidents Cup in late
September, has won the
Australian Open two out of the
last three years and finished
second the other time.
Day, who had seven birdies and
four bogeys, is aiming to win his
first Australian Open title in his
first competitive appearance on
home soil since 2013. . . .
S.S.P. Chawrasia extended his
lead at the Hong Kong Open to
two strokes after a 4-under 66 in
the second round of the opening
event of the European Tour
season.
Chawrasia, who had led by one
at the Hong Kong Golf Club, is at
9-under 131 overall and took as
much as a five-stroke lead at one
point.
Thomas Aiken (64) is second,
followed by Alexander Bjork
(66), Joakim Lagergren (66),
Poom Saksansin (68) and Julian
Suri (67) at 5-under 135.
SOCCER
Cheikhou Kouyate equalized
before the break to earn West
Ham a 1-1 draw against visiting
Leicester for David Moyes’s first
point in his second game in
charge of the struggling Premier
League club.
Moyes’s side got off to a terrible
start with Angelo Ogbonna
failing to clear Jamie Vardy’s
cross, allowing Marc Albrighton
to slide in for Leicester’s opener
in the eighth minute.
Leicester continued to
dominate to home fans’
frustration and might have had a
penalty when Albrighton went
down under Arthur Masuaku’s
challenge.
But West Ham gradually
improved, and Ogbonna forced a
save from Kasper Schmeichel.
Kouyate equalized with a
header after a Manuel Lanzini
corner before the interval.
West Ham stays 18th in the 20team league ahead of the rest of
the 13th round, while Leicester
moved up to 11th. . . .
Manchester United midfielder
Michael Carrick said he hasn’t
played since September because
of an irregular heartbeat.
Carrick said he underwent
tests after “feeling strange”
during a League Cup match
against Burton Albion on Sept 20.
He then had a procedure called a
cardiac ablation.
The game against Burton was
the 36-year-old Carrick’s only
appearance this season. . . .
Iago Aspas scored a penalty to
give Celta Vigo a 1-0 win over
Leganes in the Spanish league.
Aspas fired his spot kick just
inside the post in the 27th minute
after Leganes’ Erik Moran fouled
Jonathan Castro from behind in
the area.
Celta moved into eighth place,
one spot ahead of Leganes.
After only losing twice in the
first nine rounds, Leganes has
now lost four straight. . . .
The San Jose Earthquakes of
Major League Soccer hired
Mikael Stahre as their new head
coach to replace Dominic
Kinnear, who was fired in June.
Stahre, 42, of Sweden, has 11
years of coaching experience in
European leagues, most recently
as head coach with BK Hacken in
Sweden’s Allsvenskan league.
TENNIS
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga swept past
Steve Darcis, 6-3, 6-2, 6-1, to put
France level with Belgium on the
opening day of the Davis Cup
final in Lille, France.
Tsonga’s win evened the tie at
1-1 ahead after Belgium’s top
player David Goffin had
dispatched Lucas Pouille in
straight sets, 7-5, 6-3, 6-1.
WINTER SPORTS
Frenchman Adrien Theaux
had the fastest run in training for
the season-opening World Cup
downhill Saturday in Lake
Louise, Alberta.
Theaux finished in 1 minute
51.54 seconds. The racers finally
hit the course after the scheduled
first two practice sessions were
wiped out Wednesday and
Thursday because of weather and
poor snow conditions.
Austria’s Matthias Mayer of
Austria was second in 1:51.89 and
Norway’s Kjetil Jansrud third in
1:52.23.
A super-G is set for Sunday. . . .
Chris Spring and Neville
Wright won a World Cup twoman bobsled race in Whistler,
B.C., leading a gold-silver finish
for the host Canadians.
Spring and Wright barely held
off countrymen Justin Kripps
and Alexander Kopacz, winning
by just two-hundredths of a
second. Oskars Melbardis and
Daumants Dreiskens of Latvia
earned the bronze. . . .
American skaters Nathan
Chen and Adam Rippon hold the
top two spots at Skate America
following the short program in
Lake Placid, N.Y.
Chen leads with a 104.12
points, and Rippon is next at
89.04. Both Olympic hopefuls are
still trying to qualify for the
Grand Prix Final in Japan next
month.
Russia’s Sergei Voronov is in
third place at 87.51.
MISC.
World champion Lewis
Hamilton posted the fastest time
in the floodlit second practice for
Formula One’s Abu Dhabi Grand
Prix with Sebastian Vettel
second.
After Vettel posted a lap record
during the first practice in sunny
conditions — beating his own
mark from 2009 — Hamilton
bettered it with 1:37.877.
Vettel was .149 seconds behind
Hamilton, and Daniel Ricciardo
was .303 back in third. . . .
High jumper Mutaz Essa
Barshim of Qatar and
heptathlete Nafissatou Thiam of
Belgium have been named the
International Association of
Athletics Federations’ world
athletes of the year, while retiring
great Usain Bolt was given the
president’s award.
Barshim and Thiam also each
won world titles in London this
year.
Barshim, 26, completed an
undefeated season across 11
competitions and won the
Diamond League title. Thiam, 23,
opened the year by taking the
European indoor pentathlon title.
— From news services
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
Wizards’ Wall has an MRI exam on ailing left knee
F ROM STAFF REPORTS
Washington Wizards all-star
point guard John Wall had an MRI
exam on his left knee Friday, causing him to miss practice and putting his status for Saturday’s game
against Portland in doubt.
“Yeah, he’s sore . . . just wanted
to make sure he got some treatment and see how he feels,” Coach
Scott Brooks said. “He wasn’t going
to practice today due to the knee.
But we’ll see how he feels [Saturday]. . . . It’s too early to say any-
thing now.
“One thing I know about John,
he’s a warrior.”
Wall’s knee has been bothering
him for a few weeks, and he sat out
Sunday’s loss in Toronto. But he
returned for the Wizards’ win in
Milwaukee the next day and scored
15 points on 5-for-13 shooting to go
along with six assists.
“I was great. I was cool,” Wall
said about his health. “I missed
some easy early shots, but I was
fine.”
On Nov. 11, Wall received intra-
venous fluids to help with an illness, and his knee began to swell
soon after that. He has had the
knee drained several times since.
Nevertheless, he played 41 minutes in an overtime loss to the
Hornets on Wednesday and finished with 31 points and 11 assists.
Wall missed the start of the
2012-13 season with a knee injury
and had surgery on both knees
after the 2015-16 season. Still, he
played at least 77 games in all four
seasons between 2013 and 2017.
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Portland Trail Blazers
Today
7 NBCSW
at Minnesota Timberwolves
Tuesday
8 NBCSW
at Philadelphia 76ers
Wednesday
7 NBCSW, NBATV
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
— Matt Bonesteel
NBA ROUNDUP
Rose leaves Cavaliers with no timetable for return
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Derrick Rose’s injuries may
have pushed him to a breaking
point.
The former league MVP, who
has been trying to revive his career
with the Cleveland Cavaliers, left
the team this week to handle a
personal matter. A team spokesman said Friday that Rose has
been excused since Wednesday
and there is no timetable for his
return.
ESPN reported that Rose is taking personal time “to evaluate his
future in the NBA.” A team source
told ESPN that Rose’s numerous
injuries are “taking a toll on him
mentally.”
Rose has played in just seven of
Cleveland’s 18 games this season
because of a left ankle injury the
point guard sustained while driving to the basket Oct. 20 in Milwaukee. He’s averaging 14.3 points
per game in his first season with
Cleveland.
Rose’s career has been slowed
by knee injuries. He sat out the
2012-13 season in Chicago and
played only 10 games the following year due to injury.
Cavs win seventh straight
LeBron James had 27 points, 16
rebounds and 13 assists, J.R. Smith
made the tiebreaking free throw
with 48 seconds left, and host
Cleveland extended its winning
streak to seven with a 100-99 victory over Charlotte on Friday night.
James had season highs in rebounds and assists in his 57th
career triple-double. He’s 41-6 in
the regular season against the
Hornets, and the Cavaliers have
won 12 of 13.
CELTICS 118, MAGIC 103: In
Boston, Kyrie Irving scored 17 of his
30 points in a blistering first half,
and the Celtics jumped to an early
lead and coasted past Orlando.
BLAZERS 127, NETS 125: Damian Lillard scored 34 points,
Jusuf Nurkic added 29, including
eight in the fourth quarter, and
Portland rallied from a six-point
deficit late to edge host Brooklyn.
HAWKS
116, KNICKS 104:
Dennis Schroder scored 26 points,
and Atlanta used a 30-point third
quarter to beat New York at home
to snap a three-game losing streak.
Kristaps Porzingis finished with
28 points for the Knicks.
HEAT
109,
TIMBERWOLVES 97: Wayne Ellington
scored 21 points and made six
three-pointers off the bench as Miami rode a season-best shooting
effort from behind the arc (19 for
39) to victory in Minneapolis.
PISTONS 99, THUNDER 98:
Andre Drummond had 17 points
and 14 rebounds, and Detroit overcame a 15-point deficit to win in
Oklahoma City.
PELICANS 115, SUNS 91: Anthony Davis had 23 points and nine
rebounds, DeMarcus Cousins added 19 points and 10 boards and New
Orleans won in a rout in Phoenix.
PACERS 107, RAPTORS 104:
Victor Oladipo scored 21 points,
and Bojan Bogdonavic added 19 as
Indiana won in Indianapolis.
NUGGETS 104, GRIZZLIES
92: Nikolo Jokic scored 14 of his 28
points in the fourth quarter and
had 13 rebounds to help host Denver upend Memphis.
Grubauer gets first win as Capitals slow Lightning
CAPITALS FROM D1
of several low and appreciative
chants of his name from the
stands. He finished with 25
saves.
“It’s not an easy position to be
a backup goalie,” defenseman
Matt Niskanen said. “He’s kept a
good attitude throughout this,
even though we haven’t played
well in front of him. I think
everyone’s smiles were a little bit
bigger tonight for him. He played
really well, and he earned it, too.”
Grubauer typically starts the
second game of back-to-back
sets, when the team in front of
him often is fatigued and sluggish, but Trotz said the goaltender “deserved” a start at home, so
he put Grubauer in net against
the NHL-best Lightning, with
Braden Holtby slated to play at
Toronto on Saturday.
In Grubauer’s previous five
starts, the Capitals never played
with a lead or supplied more
than two goals. On Friday night,
Washington did both.
After the score was tied at 1
following one period, forward
Devante
Smith-Pelly
gave
Grubauer a lead to work with
late in the second. He drove to
the net as Jay Beagle unfurled
the shot, and he was in perfect
position to swat in the rebound.
That marked Smith-Pelly’s first
goal in nine games and his first
point in eight.
Beagle then added muchneeded insurance, an empty-net
goal with 2:08 left. The Lightning had been averaging 3.95
goals entering this contest, and
Grubauer allowed just one.
“He’s been standing on his
head,” Beagle said. “It’s just unfortunate the way it’s been going
for him at the beginning of the
season, but he’s been standing on
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
The bench celebrates Friday night with Capitals right wing Devante
Smith-Pelly, who scored his first goal since Nov. 6 against Arizona.
C A P I TA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
at Toronto Maple Leafs
Today
7 NBCSW Plus,
NHL Network
vs. Los Angeles Kings
Thursday
7 NBCSW
Capitals 3, Lightning 1
TAMPA BAY ............................ 1
WASHINGTON ......................... 1
0
1
0 —
1 —
1
3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Tampa Bay, Namestnikov 10 (Hedman,
Kucherov), 1:22 (pp). 2, Washington, Ovechkin 15
(Backstrom, Wilson), 18:36. Penalties: Orpik, WSH,
(hooking), 0:44; Palat, TB, (hooking), 13:27.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Washington, Smith-Pelly 3 (Orlov, Beagle),
14:36. Penalties: Gourde, TB, (hooking), 8:37; Namestnikov, TB, (tripping), 11:15.
THIRD PERIOD
vs. Columbus Blue Jackets
Dec. 2
7 NBCSW
Scoring: 4, Washington, Beagle 3 (Niskanen), 17:52.
Penalties: Kuznetsov, WSH, (high sticking), 11:06;
Kuznetsov, WSH, (slashing), 18:11.
SHOTS ON GOAL
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM)
his head and playing unreal. He
obviously deserves a big win, and
he was huge again tonight. Made
some big saves at some big
times.”
While the Capitals find themselves in the middle of a crowded
standings picture in the Eastern
Conference, the Lightning is the
only team to have separated from
the pack. Entering Friday’s game,
Tampa Bay had 34 points in 21
TAMPA BAY ............................ 7
9
10 — 26
WASHINGTON ....................... 16
14
8 — 38
Power-play opportunities: Tampa Bay 1 of 3; Washington 0 of 3. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 15-3-1 (37
shots-35 saves). Washington, Grubauer 1-5-1 (26-25).
A: 18,506 (18,277). T: 2:25.
games — nine more than Washington in two fewer games. Its
top line has MVP candidates in
Steven Stamkos (league-leading
36 points) and Nikita Kucherov
(league-leading 17 goals).
Tampa Bay has dominated the
start of the season the same way
Washington did the previous
two. When Capitals defenseman
Brooks Orpik was called for
hooking 44 seconds into the
game and Kucherov banked in a
power-play goal off Vladislav
Namestnikov, it looked like it
could be a long night for Washington.
“It went through my mind
where it’s like, ‘We can’t let this
happen to Grubi again,’ ” Niskanen said.
But after the Lightning scored
just 1:22 into the game, the
Capitals controlled play for the
rest of the period, peppering
goaltender Andrei Vasilevskiy
with 16 shots on goal. Tampa
Bay’s high-powered top line has
rightfully gotten a lot of hype,
but it was Washington’s No. 1 trio
that was most noticeable. Alex
Ovechkin’s nine shots on goal
were more than Kucherov, Stamkos and Namestnikov had combined (four).
Center Nicklas Backstrom and
Ovechkin were reunited in
Wednesday’s 5-2 victory over the
Ottawa Senators after playing on
separate lines for the season’s
first 22 games, and along with
right wing Tom Wilson, the
threesome had another strong
performance Friday night. On a
three-on-two with less than two
minutes left in the first period,
Backstrom drove down the center of the ice, enabling Wilson to
get a pass over to Ovechkin in his
left-faceoff-circle office.
Ovechkin’s one-timer made it
a tie game after an eventful first
period. And that was the 573rd
goal of Ovechkin’s career, moving
him into a tie with Mike Bossy
for 21st on the all-time scoring
list.
“We just continued pushing,”
Ovechkin said. “We moved our
legs. We did the right things.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
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COLLEGE FOOTBALL, LISTINGS D6
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6 p.m.
8 p.m.
Morehead State at Virginia Tech » WJFK (106.7 FM)
Emerald Coast Classic third-place game: Maryland vs. New Mexico »
WTEM (980 AM)
Georgetown at Richmond » WNEW (99.1 FM)
Boston College at Providence » Fox Sports 1
SOCCER
9:30 a.m.
9:55 a.m.
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
12:15 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
2:40 p.m.
German Bundesliga: Schalke at Dortmund » Fox Sports 1
English Premier League: Brighton at Manchester United »
NBC Sports Network
English Premier League: West Brom at Tottenham » CNBC
Spanish La Liga: Malaga at Real Madrid » beIN Sports
Turkish Super Lig: Alanyaspor at Galatasaray » beIN Sports
English Premier League: Chelsea at Liverpool » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
Italian Serie A: Inter at Cagliari » beIN Sports
GOLF
8 p.m.
PGA Tour: Australian Open, final round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
8 a.m.
7 p.m.
Davis Cup finals: France vs. Belgium, rubber 3;
WTA: Hawaii Open quarterfinals » Tennis Channel
WTA: Hawaii Open, singles semifinals and doubles final » Tennis Channel
FIGURE SKATING
4 p.m.
9 p.m.
Skate America » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
Skate America, ladies’ short program » NBC Sports Network
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
Formula One: Abu Dhabi GP, qualifying » NBC Sports Network
NHL ROUNDUP
Columbus extends its winning streak to six games
BLUE JACKETS 5,
SENATORS 2
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Cam Atkinson scored twice Friday to lift host Columbus over the
Ottawa Senators, 5-2, extending
the Blue Jackets’ league-high winning streak to six games.
Sergei Bobrovsky turned back
24 shots for his 14th win in 19
starts as Columbus improved to
15-7-1. It leads the Metropolitan
Division with 31 points.
Ottawa’s Craig Anderson
stopped 27 shots as the Senators
lost their fifth straight.
DEVILS
3, CANUCKS 2:
Brian Boyle scored one of the
most meaningful goals of his career to help New Jersey beat
Vancouver in Newark.
The Devils were celebrating
“Hockey Fights Cancer Night”;
that’s a battle quite meaningful to
Boyle, who was diagnosed with
chronic myelogenous leukemia
during training camp and missed
the first 10 games of the season.
The Prudential Center erupted
when Boyle scored at 10:17 of the
second period to snap a 1-1 tie.
BRUINS
4, PENGUINS 3:
Matt Grzelcyk scored his first
career goal, and host Boston
stretched its winning streak to
four by beating Pittsburgh.
David Pastrnak’s goal on a
breakaway 5:06 into the third
broke a 3-3 tie, and Anton Khudobin shut out the Penguins the
rest of the way to win his fourth
straight start.
Sidney Crosby had a goal and
an assist for Pittsburgh, which
tied it with three goals in the
second period. Jake Guentzel and
Phil Kessel also scored for the
Penguins, who lost their third
straight.
ISLANDERS 5, FLYERS 4
(OT): Nick Leddy snapped a shot
past Philadelphia goalie Brian
Elliott 2:44 into overtime to give
visiting New York a victory.
Mathew Barzal, Cal Clutterbuck, Jordan Eberle and Andrew
Ladd scored in regulation, and
Thomas Greiss made 26 saves to
help the Islanders win for the
fifth time in six games.
Claude Giroux, Wayne Simmonds, Shayne Gostisbehere and
Sean Couturier scored in the second period for the Flyers, who
blew a 4-2 lead in the third to lose
for the seventh straight time.
RANGERS 2, RED WINGS
1 (OT): Mats Zuccarello scored 37
seconds into overtime to give host
New York a victory over Detroit.
Chris Kreider also scored for
New York, and Henrik Lundqvist
made 41 saves. Tomas Tatar
scored for Detroit, and Jimmy
Howard stopped 29 shots.
STARS 6, FLAMES 4: Tyler
Seguin had a hat trick, scoring his
last two goals in the final six
minutes as host Dallas rallied
past Calgary.
PREDATORS
2, BLUES 0:
Ryan Johansen scored less than
three minutes in, Austin Watson
added an empty netter in the final
minute, and Pekka Rinne made
34 saves as Nashville blanked
host St. Louis.
JETS 4, DUCKS 1: Nikolaj
Ehlers scored two goals in the
first five minutes, and streaking
Winnipeg, which has won six of
seven, beat host Anaheim.
WILD 3, AVALANCHE 2
(SO): Charlie Coyle and Chris
GOLDEN KNIGHTS 5,
SHARKS 4 (OT): Jonathan
Stewart scored in the shootout to
give Minnesota a victory over
Colorado in St. Paul, Minn.
SABRES 3, OILERS 1: Robin
Lehner stopped 29 shots, and
host Buffalo snapped a sevengame skid by beating Edmonton.
Marchessault poked the gamewinning goal past Aaron Dell as
the Golden Knights handled San
Jose in overtime in Las Vegas.
Christian Fischer scored 2:43 into
overtime to lift Arizona over Los
Angeles in Glendale, Ariz.
MAPLE
LEAFS 5, HURRICANES 4: James Van Riemsdyk
had a goal and an assist to help
Toronto beat Carolina in Raleigh,
N.C.
COYOTES 3, KINGS 2 (OT):
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
NATIONAL WOMEN
No. 3 Gamecocks overcome nerves, slow start to get past the Scarlet Knights
SOUTH CAROLINA 78,
RUTGERS 68
A SSOCIATED P RESS
A’ja Wilson had a confession
after the game: Yes, No. 3 South
Carolina was a bit rattled at times
by Rutgers.
It didn’t show.
Wilson scored a career-high 33
points as the Gamecocks survived
a serious test before beating the
Scarlet Knights, 78-68, on Friday
in the quarterfinals of the Gulf
Coast Showcase in Estero, Fla.
The reigning national champion Gamecocks (5-0) shot 64 percent in the fourth quarter and
extended their winning streak
that started last season to 16
games.
Wilson was 9 for 15 from the
field, 15 for 17 from the foul line for
South Carolina, which shook off a
bit of a slow start and was down by
six midway through the opening
quarter.
Tyler Scaife scored 20 points for
Rutgers (4-1).
LOUISVILLE 115, MURRAY STATE 51: The Cardinals
dominated the Racers from the
opening tip as No. 4 Louisville’s
bench spurred a record-breaking
performance at home.
Kylee Shook scored a careerhigh 21 points, one of five Cardinals bench players to post a career
best in points in Louisville’s rout of
the Racers.
The Cardinals (6-0) set a school
record for points in the victory.
MISSISSIPPI
STATE 90,
COLUMBIA 54: With their team
struggling in the first half, Victoria
Vivians and Teaira McCowan took
over.
Vivians scored 23 points while
McCowan added 21 points and 10
rebounds to help the seventhranked Lady Bulldogs (5-0) rout
the Lions at the Cancun Challenge
in Mexico.
Camille Zimmerman had 26
points to lead Columbia (2-4).
NOTRE DAME 77, EAST
TENNESSEE STATE 46: Jessica
Shepard scored 15 points to lead
four players in double figures, and
the sixth-ranked Fighting Irish
(4-0) moved into the semifinals of
the Gulf Coast Showcase with a
rout of the Bucs (4-2).
Erica Haynes-Overton scored
13 points for East Tennesse State.
TEXAS 75, LSU 66: On Friday against the Tigers, the secondranked Longhorns seemed on a
slow cruise control.
And despite turning it over 23
times, Texas earned a hard-fought
win at the Las Vegas Shootout.
Ariel Atkins scored 17 points
and Jatarie White added 14 to lead
Texas (4-0), which never trailed.
Chloe Jackson scored a seasonhigh 23 points for LSU (2-3).
UCLA 64, KANSAS STATE
55: Monique Billings had 17 points
and 12 rebounds to lead the fifthranked Bruins (4-1) past the Wildcats in the South Point Shootout in
Las Vegas.
Kayla Goth led Kansas State
(4-1) with a season-high 19 points.
OHIO STATE 104, FLORIDA GULF COAST 62: Kelsey
Mitchell scored 34 points and became the NCAA all-time leader for
three-pointers made as the ninthranked Buckeyes (6-1) routed the
Eagles (6-1) in the Play4Kay Shootout in Las Vegas.
NATIONAL MEN
AREA MEN
Bagley helps the Blue Devils escape
Bonnies hand Terrapins
their first loss of season
DUKE 85,
TEXAS 78 (OT)
ST. BONAVENTURE 63,
MARYLAND 61
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Duke Coach Mike Krzyzewski
calls Marvin Bagley III a treasure.
The freshman big man had a
career-high 34 points and added
15 rebounds, and No. 1 Duke
rallied to defeat Texas, 85-78, in
overtime Friday at the Phil
Knight Invitational in Portland,
Ore.
“I knew he was going to be
good, but coaching him every
day, he’s a treasure, really,”
Krzyzewski said. “Because he
wants to be really good. All of his
teammates love him because he’s
as hard of a worker as we have.”
Gary Trent Jr. added 17 points
for the Blue Devils (7-0), who
trailed by 16 points in the second
half and were forced to play five
freshmen once senior Grayson
Allen fouled out.
Dylan Osetkowski had 19
points and seven rebounds for
Texas (4-1), which fell short of its
first victory against a top-ranked
team.
Bagley had consecutive dunks
to give the Blue Devils a 78-73
lead in overtime. Andrew Jones’s
layup pulled Texas within 78-77
with 1:20 left. Wendell Carter’s
putback dunk pushed Duke’s lead
to 82-78, and Trent’s free throws
with 11 seconds left sealed the
win.
PURDUE
89, ARIZONA 64:
Dakota Mathias scored 24 points
to help the No. 18 Boilermakers
roll past the No. 2 Wildcats in the
seventh-place game at the Battle
4 Atlantis, sending Arizona home
with three losses in three days in
Paradise Island, Bahamas.
The Boilermakers (5-2) struggled with their shooting in two
tournament losses but shot 57
percent and made 11 of 22 threepoint attempts Friday. Carsen Edwards had 22 points in what
could have been a possible titlegame matchup in the eight-team
tournament.
Arizona, which got 22 points
from DeAndre Ayton, fell to 3-3.
KANSAS 102, OAKLAND
59: Udoka Azubuike had 21
points and 10 rebounds, and the
No. 3 Jayhawks routed the overmatched Golden Grizzlies in
Lawrence, Kan.
Lagerald Vick had 15 points
and seven rebounds, while Devonte Graham had 14 points and
seven assists for the Jayhawks
(5-0), who won their 24th
straight nonconference home
game. Kendrick Nunn scored 23
for the Golden Grizzlies (2-3).
VILLANOVA 64, NORTHERN IOWA 50: Mikal Bridges
scored 18 points as the No. 5
Wildcats pulled away down the
stretch to beat the Panthers in the
Battle 4 Atlantis title game in
Paradise Island, Bahamas.
Jalen Brunson added 16 points
and was named tournament
MVP. The Wildcats (6-0) led most
FROM S TAFF R EPORTS
AND N EWS S ERVICES
Courtney Stockard made a
layup with 3.2 seconds remaining
to lift St. Bonaventure to a 63-61
victory over Maryland in the semifinals of the Emerald Coast Classic
in Niceville, Fla.
Stockard scored 14 points for
the Bonnies (3-1), and Matt Mobley finished with a team-high 16.
Anthony Cowan Jr. scored 13
points for Maryland, which inbounded the ball after Stockard’s
basket but never got a shot off to
drop its first game of the season
after five straight victories.
The game was close throughout, with the Terps holding their
biggest advantage at 47-40 following a Kevin Huerter three-pointer
with 8:52 remaining in the game.
Huerter finished with five points.
The Terrapins will play New
Mexico in the third-place game
Saturday at 4 p.m.
VIRGINIA 70, RHODE ISLAND 55: Isaiah Wilkins scored a
STEVE DYKES/GETTY IMAGES
Marvin Bagley III had 34 points and 15 rebounds to help top-ranked Duke beat Texas in overtime.
of the way, then used an 8-0 run
in the final four minutes to turn
away the Panthers.
Juwan McCloud scored 13
points to lead the Panthers (5-2).
NORTH CAROLINA 87,
ARKANSAS 68: Luke Maye had
career highs with 28 points and
16 rebounds, Kenny Williams had
16 of his 19 points in the second
half, and the No. 9 Tar Heels
slowed the high-scoring Razorbacks in the Phil Knight Invitational in Portland, Ore.
Maye carried the Tar Heels
(5-0) for the first 25 minutes
before Williams and Joel Berry II
got going. Maye made 11 of 16
shots, and 11 of his rebounds
came at the defensive end. Berry
shot just 3 of 12 shots, but he
made 7 of 8 free throws.
Jaylen Barford led Arkansas
(4-1) with 21 points.
MINNESOTA 69, MASSACHUSETTS 51: Jordan Murphy
scored 16 points and grabbed
nine rebounds to spark the No. 14
Golden Gophers to a rout of the
Minutemen at the Barclays Center Classic in New York.
Amir Coffey added nine for the
Golden Gophers (6-0), who never
trailed as they won their sixth
straight game.
Following a Luwane Pipkins
layup and free throw that cut
Minnesota’s lead to 18-14 with
8:04 left in the first half, the
Golden Gophers ended the period on a 22-7 run. Pipkins led the
Minutemen (3-2) with 18 points.
ARIZONA STATE 102,
XAVIER 86: Tra Holder scored a
career-high 40 points to lead the
Sun Devils past No. 15 Xavier in
the championship game of the
Las Vegas Invitational.
Holder scored 23 of his points
in the second half for Arizona
State (6-0), which shot 55.9 percent. The senior guard shot 14 of
22 from the field, including 5 of 8
from three-point range, and added four rebounds and four assists.
The Sun Devils trailed by 15
points in the first half but closed
the half on a 15-2 run — capped by
a three-pointer at the buzzer by
Holder — and headed into the
locker room trailing 46-44.
TEXAS
A&M 81, PEPPER-
DINE 65: DJ Hogg scored 18
points, and Tyler Davis had seven
of his 15 in a key second-half
stretch to lead the No. 16 Aggies
(5-0) past the pesky Waves (2-4)
in College Station, Tex.
Kameron Edwards scored 20
points to lead the Waves, who
trimmed their deficit to six twice
in the second half.
LOUISVILLE 84, SAINT
FRANCIS (PA.) 72: Ray Spald-
ing had 19 points and a careerhigh 13 rebounds before leaving
midway through the second half
with an injury, Deng Adel and
Jordan Nwora each made a key
three-pointer late, and the No. 19
Cardinals (4-0) held off the Red
Flash (2-3).
Spalding’s layup provided a
66-44 lead with 12:38 remaining,
but the junior forward went to
the locker room several minutes
later with what appeared to be an
ankle injury. Saint Francis took
advantage with a 23-10 run to get
within 74-66, but Nwora and Adel
answered with five points, and
Anas Mahmoud made consecutive blocks in one sequence to
help the Cardinals pull away.
Keith Braxton had 25 points
for the Red Flash.
SETON HALL 72, VANDERBILT 59: Desi Rodriguez
had 27 points, and Angel Delgado
added 15 as the No. 20 Pirates
(5-1) handled the Commodores
(2-4) in the NIT Season Tip-Off in
New York.
WASHINGTON STATE 84,
SAINT MARY’S 79: Malachi
Flynn scored 26 points, and the
Cougars held off the No. 21 Gaels
to reach the title game of the
Wooden Legacy in Fullerton,
Calif.
In the opening round, Flynn
hit a go-ahead three-pointer with
five seconds remaining to seal a
75-71 win against Saint Joseph’s
after the Cougars rallied from 20
points down. This time, the Cougars (5-0) put the Gaels (5-1) in a
16-point hole, and they stayed
cool when Saint Mary’s got within three on a three-pointer by
Jordan Ford with 47 seconds left.
Sophomore Blair Watons hit six
three-pointers and scored a career-high 20 points, Kaila Charles
added 18 points and No. 15 Maryland rolled to an 89-35 win over
Kennesaw State on Friday in the
Miami Thanksgiving tournament
in Coral Gables, Fla.
Watson added four steals for
the Terrapins (4-2). Junior Brianna Fraser picked up her second
straight double-double with 10
points and a career-high 12 rebounds.
scored 12 of his 16 points in the
second half when Shawn Anderson had 10 of his 13, and the Midshipmen turned back the Terriers
in the round-robin FGCU Shootout in Fort Myers, Fla.
Navy (4-2) was down by two at
halftime but shot 61 percent and
made 16 of 22 free throws in the
second half. George Kiernan had
five points and Lacey four in a 9-0
burst that put the Midshipmen up
56-45 with 13:19 to play. Navy kept
the lead around 10 most of the way
against St. Francis Brooklyn (1-3).
KANSAS
STATE
67,
GEORGE WASHINGTON 59:
Kamau Stokes led a balanced attack with 19 points as the Wildcats
won the consolation game of the
Las Vegas Invitational.
Kansas State (5-1) led by 15
points midway through the second half and appeared to have the
game in control but eventually
saw its lead cut to 56-54 with 5:03
remaining after a pick-and-roll
layup by George Washington’s Arnaldo Toro.
The Wildcats closed the game
on an 11-5 run, using their man-toman defense and clutch free throw
shooting to secure the win.
The Colonials (2-4) outrebounded Kansas State, 37-26,
but shot just 38.5 percent in the
second half. Toro had 21 points
and nine rebounds to pace George
Washington.
Bolden scored 17 points, Jevon
Carter had 16 and the No. 23
Mountaineers (5-1) routed the
Knights (4-1) in the semifinals of
the Advocare Invitational in Lake
Buena Vista, Fla.
ALABAMA
71, BYU 59:
John Petty scored 16 points to
spark the No. 25 Crimson Tide
(5-0) past the Cougars (3-2) in the
Barclays Center Classic in New
York.
T H E WA L L S A R E
No. 15 Terrapins romp to easy victory in Florida
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
NAVY 85, ST. FRANCIS
BROOKLYN 76: Tom Lacey
WEST VIRGINIA 83, CENTRAL FLORIDA 45: James
AREA WOMEN
MARYLAND 89,
KENNESAW STATE 35
career-high 19 points, and the Cavaliers (6-0) pulled away in the
second half to win the Preseason
NIT in New York.
“On the scouting report, I saw
they were a little bit smaller than I
was,” the stepson of NBA Hall of
Famer Dominique Wilkins said. “I
just wanted to take full advantage
of that.”
The 6-foot-7 senior made 7 of 9
shots in 23 minutes and was
named MVP of the tournament.
Wilkins entered as Virginia’s fifthleading scorer at 6.8 points a game
but surpassed his previous career
best of 15 points set Feb. 1 against
Virginia Tech.
“He brings so much,” Cavaliers
Coach Tony Bennett said. “His stat
line usually doesn’t show it. It
showed it today. He’s usually making a huge impact.”
Wilkins impacted things by
capitalizing on a mismatch as
Rhode Island started four guards
— all listed at 6-foot-3 or shorter.
He hit four jumpers and converted
a tip-in and a pair of layups.
Wilkins also made 5 of 6 free
throws and grabbed six rebounds.
“It was big time; it was huge,”
said Virginia guard Devon Hall,
who added 18 points. “We were
trying to get it into him early. I
don’t know if he scored our first
bucket or not, but we tried to get it
to him early so he could take advantage of it.”
Wilkins put the emphatic finish
on the win with a three-point play
with 69 seconds left and a block
with 13 seconds remaining.
Maryland, which plays Miami
on Sunday, had six different players score in a 15-0 run in the first
quarter en route to a 19-2 lead. The
Terrapins then had an 8-0 burst
that turned into a 25-2 run in the
second quarter and led 47-15 at the
half.
The Terrapins held a 50-29 rebounding advantage over the
Lady Owls (1-5).
GEORGE
WASHINGTON
WISCONSIN 46: Kelli
Prange scored 18 points, and
freshman Neila Luma added 16
along with eight rebounds to lead
the Colonials past the Badgers in
the Paradise Jam at Smith Center.
George Washington (3-3) outscored Wisconsin 15-3 in the second quarter for a 29-16 halftime
61,
lead. The Badgers (2-3) committed
11 turnovers in the opening half.
Cayla McMorris led the Badgers
with 14 points.
GEORGE
MASON
87,
DRAKE 75: Natalie Butler scored
26 points and grabbed 11 rebounds as the Patriots rallied from
18 down to beat the Bulldogs (2-3)
at the Rocky Mountain Hoops
Classic in Boulder, Colo.
Jacy Bolton and Nicole Cardano-Hillary added 21 points apiece
for George Mason (6-1), which has
won six in a row for just the second
time in 24 years.
AMERICAN 64, VERMONT
62: Emily Kinneston’s last-second
basket lifted the Eagles to victory
at the TD Bank Classic in Burlington, Vt. Cecily Carl led American
(3-2) with 21 points and 10 rebounds. Cassidy Derda had 17
points for the Catamounts (3-3).
BUTLER 79, VIRGINIA
TECH 77: Kristen Spolyar scored
20 points, including a late basket
that was the game-winner for the
Bulldogs at the Paradise Jam in
Melbourne, Fla.
Taylor Emery paced the Hokies
(5-1) with 20 points. Tori Schickel
had 27 points and 15 total rebounds for Butler (4-2).
AUURN 60, GEORGETOWN 40: Unique Thompson
and Jessica Jones scored 12 points
apiece to pace the Tigers (3-1) over
the Hoyas at the Challenge in Music City in Nashville. Mikayla Venson led all scorers with 19 points
for Georgetown (2-2).
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
professional football
Some say Turkey leg in hand and a win secured, Kerrigan was living the dream
surface has
long been
an issue
FIELD FROM D1
would offer no further details.
Among the viewers jarred by
the roughness of the field was
former Redskins offensive lineman Tyler Polumbus, now retired, who also played for Denver, Seattle and Atlanta during
an eight-year NFL career.
“Having played on the Redskins field for 4 years, it blows
my mind that they haven’t
switched to turf . . .” Polumbus
tweeted midgame.
On Friday morning, in response to follow-up questions on
social media, Polumbus tweeted:
“The field is a joke and a danger.
Just go to artificial turf. Been this
way forever.”
The NFL, however, saw nothing amiss with the field Thursday
night and received no complaints about it, according to
Michael Signora, the league’s
vice president of football communications. In an email exchange Friday, Signora wrote
that the league was aware that
the Redskins had recently resodded the field, referring a
question about the date to the
team, which declined to answer.
According to Signora, the field
complied with NFL standards
when it was tested as part of the
league’s mandatory field practices.
“NFL Football Operations personnel at the game observed no
issues with the quality of the
field,” Signora wrote, “and we
have received no complaints
about the surface, either yesterday or today.”
In terms of aesthetics, however, the field looked neglected and
served as a squalid stage for a
nationally televised game hosted
by the league’s fourth-most valuable franchise.
According to Forbes magazine’s 2017 valuation of sports
franchises, the Redskins are
worth $3.1 billion — trailing only
the Dallas Cowboys, New England Patriots and Giants.
Redskins owner Daniel Snyder and his partners bought the
team in 1999 for roughly $800
million. Snyder also owns FedEx
Field, which is expected to be
replaced in the next decade.
Speaking on 106.7 the Fan’s
“Grant and Danny Show” on
Friday, Cousins conceded that
the playing surface “probably
doesn’t look like a professional
NFL field should, first of all.”
Cousins predicted it would
pose “a bigger challenge” in the
two remaining home games,
Dec. 17 and 24, as winter weather
intensifies.
“I don’t know why it is that
way or what causes it,” Cousins
said. “I’ve kind of learned to
accept it and understand it’s part
of the deal. Playing here on the
field has never been that great in
the second half of the season for
whatever the reason.”
The condition of the Redskins’
home field has been a source of
controversy and late-season unsightliness for years.
A 2015 ranking of NFL fields
by Sports Illustrated, compiled
with experts in field quality and
construction, ranked the FedEx
surface 26th among the league’s
32 teams.
“The warm-weather [Bermuda] turf has turned to nearly all
hard dirt during past winters, a
process easily navigated through
with money allocated for re-sodding,” Sports Illustrated wrote.
“A wealth of turf farms in the
area should mean that Washington has a better natural field, but
the fact they don’t is on the
ownership.”
The article also cited the catastrophic knee injury suffered by
former Redskins quarterback
Robert Griffin III in a January
2013 playoff loss to Seattle. A
Seahawks defender tore his anterior cruciate ligament on the
same surface, and speculation
turned to the turf ’s role in both
injuries.
“It’s a horrible field,” Seahawks Coach Pete Carroll told a
Seattle radio station the next day.
“It’s as bad as a field can get for
being dry. And it’s too bad. It’s
really too bad, and we deserve
better. . . . It just was worn out.
And there was a lot of slipping
and all that kind of stuff.”
Griffin, who was never quite
the same quarterback after the
injury, was asked about the condition of the surface after the
game and said with a smile: “It’s
just part of our home-field advantage.”
liz.clarke@washpost.com
mark.maske@washpost.com
It’s okay to laugh
about
Washington’s 2010 win over the
Giants on
Thursday night. I
Dan
sure did, between
Steinberg my three servings
of FedEx Field
press box mashed potatoes
mixed with some sort of corn
casserole that I probably
shouldn’t have been eating after
10 p.m. (Or before 10 p.m.,
either.) The field had a dirt
mohawk, and the teams needed
more than 38 minutes to score a
touchdown, and Washington’s
timeout-into-delay-of-game
sequence was still more
appealing than about two dozen
things the Giants did on offense.
Some of it was funny, and
laughing beats crying.
But it’s also okay to feel good
for the Redskins for winning
that game and especially for
those merry players gladhanding NBC’s drumsticks on
the field after the game. Their
laughs weren’t the LOL variety.
They radiated genuine
happiness. And maybe none of
them was happier than Ryan
Kerrigan.
“Growing up, you always see
[John] Madden with the
turducken and all that, and you
see guys eating it after they
played a good game, and so I’m
thinking, ‘I want to do that,’ ”
Kerrigan said 30 minutes after
it ended, still wearing his full
uniform. “I don’t know; the little
kid in me was thinking back to
those days. And I wanted to
make it happen.”
Around the final whistle, a
Redskins PR staffer found
Kerrigan and told him he was
needed on that goofy NBC set,
the one with the Thanksgiving
meal as a centerpiece. And
when he heard that news,
Kerrigan “did a little fist pump
to myself.” Not an ironic one,
either.
“It’s kind of a small dream
come true,” he said. “You see
that so many times growing up.
And then to have you be the guy
eating the turkey, it was almost
surreal, in a way. Really. It was
really cool to me.”
That’s an unusually juicy
offering from Kerrigan, whose
answers are often the lockerroom equivalent of dry biscuits.
Intentionally, too. After his first
big high school game as a
sophomore in Indiana, he told a
reporter that he knew the
opposing offensive lineman was
a lot slower than he was and
that he just tried to exploit that
mismatch.
“After that, I felt really
embarrassed,” Kerrigan said,
“and I always just tried to be PC
from there.”
That hasn’t changed. When I
tried to compliment him for
Thursday night’s performance —
he sacked Eli Manning twice,
spearheading a Washington
pass rush that made the Giants
look even less competent than
usual — Kerrigan stiff-armed me
into Bowie.
“Well, I’m not trying to be
hard on myself, but I’m thinking
about a couple [of sacks] that I
thought I should have had,” he
said. “Can’t all be winners, I
guess.”
Guess not. Kerrigan, though,
won often enough to prompt a
brief surge of Thanksgiving
night appreciation for what he
has done in his career. This isn’t
news. But his accomplishments
— his whole career, really —
have been so easy to overlook
that it’s worth a periodic
NICK WASS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ryan Kerrigan, left, on his postgame chomp on live television: “It
was damn good turkey. Warm, too. I thought it’d be a little colder.”
reminder.
Because, through all of this
team’s offensive drama,
Kerrigan is just always there.
Washington has only six players
who have started every game
this season; Kerrigan has
started every game over his
entire seven-year career. His
streak of 107 straight starts is
the longest for any active NFL
linebacker. He’s the first
Redskins player in at least 47
years to begin his career with
more than 100 straight regular
season starts. Since 2011, he has
played 16 more games than any
other active Washington player
— an entire season’s worth.
And he’s not just riding along.
There might be games you don’t
notice him, but there are never
seasons in which he vanishes.
He has had at least 71/2 sacks
every year of his career, and he
is fourth in the NFL in sacks
since he entered the league —
behind only Von Miller, J.J. Watt
and Cameron Wake. One more
sack this season and he will
have three seasons of doubledigit sacks; only Charles Mann
and Dexter Manley have done
that in Redskins history.
Kerrigan already has the
second-most sacks through
seven seasons of any Redskins
pass rusher, with an outside
chance to catch Manley for first.
“He’s a giant, man. He’s been
a monster in the league for
years,” said Junior Galette, his
fellow pass rusher.
“Seeing him from afar, I
already knew he was a dog,” said
safety D.J. Swearinger, a firstyear teammate. “You know, he’s
just doing what I’ve always seen.
Every time we play in prime
time, he’s going to get a sack.”
Maybe not every time;
Kerrigan has 51/2 sacks in
Washington’s past seven primetime games. And with the
offenses Thursday night
operating with all the potency of
your napping uncle, that left
lots of airtime for Kerrigan,
whom NBC analyst Cris
Collinsworth said was “running
circles” around inexperienced
Giants tackle Chad Wheeler.
That segment of NBC’s
broadcast probably would have
embarrassed Kerrigan. The endof-broadcast feast didn’t. Some
of the offensive linemen took
theatrical bites of the turkey.
Swearinger lustily grabbed a
drumstick, although that was
for show. (“I’m on my vegan
right now,” he explained. “I got a
leg, but you know, I had to do it
for the camera. I didn’t eat it,
though. I left it, man. It already
had a bite out of it.”)
Kerrigan, on the other hand,
had been waiting his entire life
for this moment. Plus, he hadn’t
eaten any food since he had
some chicken more than five
hours before kickoff. He was
there to eat.
“It was damn good turkey,” he
said. “Warm, too. I thought it’d
be a little colder. I didn’t know
how long they had it ready. . . . I
noticed everyone else kind of set
theirs down, so I kind of felt like
the idiot that was still just
munching away.”
This all was exciting enough
that Kerrigan was anxious to
find images of himself with the
gnawed drumstick and maybe
even post them on his usually
quiet Twitter account.
Eating turkey, in uniform, on
national television, on
Thanksgiving night?
“Hell yeah,” Kerrigan said. “It
was awesome.”
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
For more by Dan Steinberg, visit
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog.
Norman
still expects
Redskins
to make run
REDSKINS FROM D1
Atlanta Falcons (6-4) are in good
position to earn the two wildcard spots. Six other teams —
Seattle (6-4), Detroit (6-5),
Green Bay (5-5), Dallas (5-6),
Arizona (4-6) and Tampa Bay
(4-6) — remain in the wild-card
hunt along with the Redskins.
“We’ve got to keep winning,”
safety D.J. Swearinger said, reiterating his confidence in Washington’s ability to make a run at
the postseason. “This last stretch,
these last five games, we’ve got to
be on point. Every game is a
playoff game from here on out if
we want to make a run. So we’ve
just got to stay the course.”
Each week, it seems, the length
of the Redskins’ injured-reserve
list grows. And each week, Coach
Jay Gruden is charged with plugging roster holes with backups
and unproven no-names. Washington is the walking wounded, a
team that has featured 23 offensive starters this season — tied
for most in the NFL. But adversity hasn’t weakened the Redskins’
resolve. Not even after last week’s
crushing, 34-31 overtime loss at
New Orleans.
“Confidence is the key to everything, no matter who you’re
facing that week, regardless of
who you have on the field with
injuries,” Norman said. “Everybody seems to be on IR. It’s the
craziest thing ever.
RUSTY COSTANZA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“I’m tired of this good-bad-good,” Josh Norman, right, said of the Redskins’ inconsistency. “We’ve got to keep going in the right direction.”
“But guys come in off the
street, they get plugged in, and
the next couple of days they’re
playing a football game —
against stars. It’s the craziest
thing ever. And they’re holding
their own. And we’re out here
balling. . . . Sometimes we blow
those [leads], but tonight we
didn’t.”
Gruden, however, did his best
to steer the postgame conversation away from postseason chatter. A day later, he still cautioned
against looking too far ahead.
But he acknowledged the Redskins “definitely have something
to play for — there’s no doubt
about it.”
“That’s what we play for: We
play for a chance to go the
playoffs and win a Super Bowl,”
Gruden said on a Friday afternoon conference call with reporters. “But obviously we’ve put
ourselves in a position right now
where we’re in a game-by-gametype scenario. We have to take
care of one game at a time
without a doubt — coach-speak
— but that’s the only way we can
approach it. You start looking
ahead, you’ll forget about the
team that you’re playing against.
“We play a good Dallas team
that we’ve had trouble with the
last three meetings. They’ve
beaten us three in a row. So we’ve
just got to set our goals high. And
our goal right now is only to beat
the Dallas Cowboys.”
Getting a win Thanksgiving
night was paramount. But if the
Redskins hope to have any shot
of sneaking into the playoffs,
they will need to be far more
productive and efficient than
they were against the equally
depleted Giants (2-9).
“We can’t waver,” Norman said
after the game. “I’m tired of this
good-bad-good. We’ve got to keep
going in the right direction.”
And if Washington somehow is
able to pull off the improbable
over the next month, it’s “going to
make this thing so much better,”
Norman added. “And make this
thing so much [more] special.”
kimberley.martin@washpost.com
NFL NOTES
Cutler remains in concussion protocol, ruled out against Patriots
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Miami Dolphins quarterback
Jay Cutler was ruled out of Sunday’s game at New England because of a concussion, and backup
Matt Moore will make his second
start of the season.
Cutler practiced Friday but remains in the concussion protocol.
He threw three interceptions in
Sunday’s loss to Tampa Bay before
he left at halftime because of his
injury.
Moore threw for 282 yards and
a score in the second half. He
started for an injured Cutler three
weeks ago at Baltimore, and Miami lost, 40-0.
The Dolphins (4-6) take a fourgame losing streak to New England.
FALCONS: Atlanta running
back Devonta Freeman was ruled
out for the second straight week
with a concussion and won’t play
against Tampa Bay.
Atlanta (6-4) will rely again on
Tevin Coleman and third-stringer
Terron Ward when the Falcons
(6-4) host Tampa Bay (4-6) on
Sunday.
Freeman, the NFL’s highestpaid running back, looked good as
he worked on the side during Friday’s practice.
SAINTS: New Orleans ruled
out both of its top two cornerbacks
for Sunday’s road game against
the Los Angeles Rams.
Marshon Lattimore, the top
cornerback selected in last
spring’s NFL draft at 11th overall,
has not practiced since twisting
his left ankle during a victory over
the Washington Redskins last
Sunday.
Ken Crawley, a second-yearpro, also has not practiced this
week. He has an abdominal injury.
CHIEFS: Kansas City linebackers Dee Ford and Terrance
Smith have been ruled out for
Sunday’s game against Buffalo,
while newly signed cornerback
Darrelle Revis could be active for
the first time this season.
Chiefs Coach Andy Reid said
after Friday’s final practice that
Revis, who signed a two-year deal
on Wednesday, moved around
well in practice. Reid said it was
clear the seven-time Pro Bowl pick
has been out for a while, but “he
looked good moving around.”
The Chiefs are hopeful Revis
can start opposite Marcus Peters
once he’s up to speed.
JETS: New York running back
Matt Forte will be a game-time
decision to play against the Carolina Panthers because of his ailing
right knee.
Forte returned to practice Friday on a limited basis, which
marked slight progress after he
had not practiced or played since
running for a season-high 77 yards
against Buffalo on Nov. 2.
BILLS: Buffalo Coach Sean
McDermott isn’t ruling out Kelvin
Benjamin from playing at Kansas
City on Sunday even though the
wide receiver has not practiced
since hurting his right knee last
weekend.
McDermott said Benjamin is
considered day-to-day and was
listed as questionable on Friday.
Benjamin was hurt while being
tackled after making a 20-yard
catch during Buffalo’s opening
drive in a 54-24 loss at the Los
Angeles Chargers on Sunday.
JAGUARS: Jacksonville cornerback Jalen Ramsey said he will
not play Sunday against Arizona.
Ramsey was added to the team’s
injury report Friday after jamming his hand on a pass play in
practice.
He was limited in practice and
is listed as questionable for the
Jaguars’ matchup against the Cardinals.
RAIDERS: Oakland cornerback David Amerson will miss
Sunday’s game against the Broncos — his fourth straight — with a
foot injury.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
After he went viral, former Penn State kicker Julius discovered his voice
Now away from the game,
he’s opening up about his
battle with binge eating
BY
R OMAN S TUBBS
state college, pa. — The plan
had been to swallow 50 sleeping
pills and end it. That’s what Joey
Julius kept telling himself in
March, when he walked into
Penn State’s football facility on a
Monday morning and stepped on
a scale for the first time in weeks.
The number mortified him.
He no longer cared that he was
the Nittany Lions’ kicker affectionately nicknamed “Big Toe.”
He no longer cared whether he
lived. He told a team trainer that
if he was left to return to his
apartment alone, to his stash of
pills, he would attempt suicide
for the second time in three
years.
Less than eight months later —
after turning over the pills and
checking into a rehabilitation
clinic in St. Louis, leaving behind
State College and a college football program in the midst of its
return to national prominence —
Julius returned to campus and
stepped on an auditorium stage
on a Monday night in November.
He nervously held a microphone
and began reading a speech to
hundreds of his peers, tracing the
arc of his descent into a bingeeating disorder. His voice was
hurried at first. He wore a burgundy sweater and khakis, telling
the crowd that it takes him an
hour to pick out clothes every day
until he finds something that
makes him look skinny enough to
appear in public.
“My body image has never
been good,” Julius said.
But maybe the most startling
confession Julius made was that,
for the first time in his 22 years,
he is starting to learn how to love
himself. Public speaking has
been therapeutic. So has his retreat to Harrisburg, about a 90minute drive away, where he
attends a Penn State satellite
school and roots for the Nittany
Lions every weekend.
Julius finds peace in the fact
that he played a role in the
program’s rebuild into one of the
best in the country. But he is
more concerned with rebuilding
himself, a process that has
turned Julius into a powerful
voice in the fight to bring awareness to eating disorders among
males and athletes.
“I know that’s what he wants to
do, because he has this platform
now,” said his mother, Patty Julius.
‘I saw videos everywhere’
Joey Julius joked on stage that
he was afraid of his mother, that
he would hide food from her
starting at an early age. She
would move the large wooden
bed in his room to clean and find
countless empty food wrappers.
She could see signs that her son
was obsessed with food: He
would memorize restaurant
signs and blurt them out in the
car, and he would often eat secret
meals with his father, Larry, after
soccer practice before Joey returned home to eat what his
mother had cooked for dinner.
because of the way I looked. . . . I
saw videos everywhere. Basically
people . . . talking only about my
weight and not about my play,”
Julius said.
PAUL SPINELLI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joey Julius said he attempted suicide once — and then considered
it a second time — while grappling with an eating disorder.
Joey said his relationship with
his father was complicated by his
struggle with binge eating — and
that Larry, a former professional
soccer player, had helped hook
him on diuretics and diet pills.
“As a child, I looked for approval from everyone. I even went to
my own father and found no
approval and actually found conditions set by him, where I had to
lose weight in order to earn his
love,” Joey Julius said.
The feeling wasn’t limited to
his own household. His pediatrician made jokes about his weight.
A youth soccer coach made him
keep a weight journal. As a teenager, when he starred in soccer
and football at Lower Dauphin
High in Hummelstown, Pa., some
colleges offered him scholarships
but attached weight stipulations.
Julius was binge eating so often
that he had gained 40 pounds in
the few months before he arrived
at Penn State to walk on as a
kicker.
It only got worse once he
started college with an unlimited
meal plan and freedom from his
parents for the first time. His
weight fluctuated between 240
and 280 pounds for much of the
next three years, which seemed to
bring one harrowing experience
after another. In the fall of 2015,
he attempted suicide for the first
time by overdose. After Penn
State was upset by Temple in the
season opener, his first game as
the team’s kicker, he returned to
the locker room and heard people
snickering. He checked his
phone. It was nearly dead. He had
thousands of Twitter notifications.
“I became a viral sensation
‘It can be very isolating’
By 2016, Julius was listed at
5-foot-10 and 258 pounds, his
national profile revolved around
his weight, and his binge eating
was spiraling out of control. He
attended McCallum Place, a
treatment facility in St. Louis
with programs tailored to men
and athletes, for the first time.
Julius was focused on returning
to football throughout his treatment, and he returned after a
couple of months.
He went public with his struggle for the first time in a Facebook post in October 2016. He
also made national headlines by
delivering crushing hits on kick
returns and bearing the brunt of
several late hits by players at
Minnesota and Maryland. For the
first time in his career, it finally
appeared he was garnering attention for his play, not his weight.
But Julius continued to struggle with binge eating, which
brought on depression and anxiety, and it wasn’t until he brought
up his suicidal thoughts to Tim
Bream, Penn State’s head athletic
trainer, in March that he realized
football would not fill the void in
his life.
He returned to McCallum
Place with a new mind-set. He
started group therapy and returned to a regimented eating
plan. There were only two other
male adults, he said, but the key
was that Julius befriended two
younger boys who had checked
into the facility. He never tried to
tell them how to get better. He
just tried to be a friend. They
played countless games of Phase
10. They put together puzzles.
They colored in coloring books.
“Sometimes there is a stigma
and some shame with the struggles that oftentimes individuals
with eating disorders experience
prior to treatment. It can be very
isolating,” said Riley Nickols, a
psychologist who oversees the
Victory Program, the sports-specific wing at McCallum Place
where Julius was admitted.
“Shared experiences can be a
powerful agent to change and
healing.”
Unlike the first time Julius was
released from McCallum Place,
he wasn’t driven to return to
football the second time. He just
wanted to get better. He moved to
Harrisburg to begin new classes
and to be closer to his family. He
might return to State College in
the spring, but he won’t kick for
the football team again.
Julius still sometimes struggles with buying food in public —
“I could be buying salads, and I’ll
still have anxiety about it,” he
said — but Julius is beginning to
accept his body for the first time.
It remains an everyday struggle.
It was a struggle even as he took
the stage and spoke in State
College earlier this month, when
he earned a standing ovation
after giving the crowd a parting
piece of advice.
“Compare and despair,” he
said. “I am not like you; you are
not like me. And If I keep trying
to be like somebody that I’m not,
then I will not be anything.”
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
Commonwealth Cup belongs to the Hokies for the 14th consecutive season
HOKIES FROM D1
“It’s an honor to get a chance
to build on something special
and to be a part of something
bigger than yourself, whether
it’s the streak or just Virginia
Tech and this football program.”
Virginia lost its third game in
a row and for the fifth time in its
past six to close the regular
season. The last time the Cavaliers (6-6, 3-5) did not score was
in a 38-0 loss to Virginia Tech in
2011.
The Hokies took a 10-lead
early in the third quarter after
securing their first turnover of
the game when safety Reggie
Floyd jarred the ball loose from
running back Chris Sharp. Defensive end Houshun Gaines
recovered, and Virginia Tech
was in business at the Virginia
40-yard line.
Jackson completed a 25-yard
pass to wide receiver Hezekiah
Grimsley on first down and ran
for seven yards on the next play.
On third and three, Jackson
delivered a strike to Cunningham in the back left of the end
zone with 12:44 to go.
Virginia Tech missed out on a
chance to claim a commanding
lead on its next possession. The
Hokies elected to go for it on
fourth and one from the Virginia 36, and Jackson gained 19
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
unless you aspire to tackle him,
told a room of reporters in Auburn, Ala., this week. “My dad’s
from Tallahassee, so we were
really Florida State fans. My sister married a guy that went to
Auburn, so that kind of put Auburn in the mix, and now I’m
here.
“So I guess we’re pro-Auburn,”
he concluded with a hint of a grin.
It’s their game, the country
often has concluded of fervent
Alabamians and their Iron Bowl,
which figures to soar more than
ever Saturday. Do not forget that
the rosters still teem with Alabamians, 53 for Auburn and 41
for Alabama.
Yet as Alabama has become the
Paris of five-star recruiting with
players from 25 states (including
Hawaii but not Alaska, its Alaskan recruiting perhaps suspect)
and as Auburn has sustained its
habit of mining Georgia and Florida and welcomed players from
12 states and as the College Football Playoff hovers newly over the
proceedings, it’s ever more the
country’s game, too.
It’s not only No. 1 Alabama
against No. 6 Auburn, with that
decisive numeral — four, the
number of slots in the playoff
format, dangling between. In seven of the past eight seasons,
somebody from the Iron Bowl has
reached whatever we called the
C.J. Carroll on an out pattern to
the right sideline.
Indicative of the emotion of
the rivalry was Virginia being
assessed three personal fouls.
The last of those came against
senior defensive end Andrew
Brown, who swung at McClease
late in the fourth quarter and
was ejected.
Cavaliers senior wide receiver
Doni Dowling, in a show of
frustration, also was called for a
personal foul for shoving defensive end Trevon Hill. On the
previous play, Dowling had a
16-yard reception overturned
when officials determined the
ball hit the ground.
“I couldn’t be more proud of
my guys, and I couldn’t be
happier for them,” Blanding said
one year after Virginia lost to
the Hokies, 52-10, in the most
lopsided outcome in the series
since 1983. “We went out there,
and we fought. That’s the bottom line. Sometimes things
don’t go our way, but at the end
of the day, no one can tell me we
didn’t fight the whole game.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
Virginia Tech’s Hezekiah Grimsley stretches high to haul in a pass in front of a Virginia defender.
on a bootleg around the right
side.
But McClease lost three yards
on first down, and circumstances worsened for the Hokies
when center Eric Gallo snapped
the ball well above Jackson’s
head. Jackson had not been
expecting the snap and did well
simply to retreat and dive on the
ball at the Virginia 36.
“We never quit,” Virginia linebacker Micah Kiser said. “I
mean, I’m not mad at my guys.
We played our hearts out. I
Iron Bowl is much more than just an in-state rivalry
IRON BOWL FROM D1
wanted to win, of course, but I’m
really proud of the way we
fought.”
The only points in a mostly
uneventful first half belonged to
Virginia Tech: Brian Johnson
kicked a 30-yard field goal with
11:50 to go in the second quarter.
He has been filling in at times
for senior Joey Slye, who is
nursing a sore hamstring that
kept him out of last week’s 20-14
win against Pittsburgh.
A fumble by running back
Jordan Ellis on a balky exchange
late in the second quarter nearly
cost Virginia precious field position, but the junior fell on the
loose ball for a loss of three
yards. Quarterback Kurt Benkert’s pass on third and 13 fell
incomplete, and Virginia punted for the fifth time.
Officials called Virginia’s Joe
Spaziani for unnecessary roughness on the punt, and the Hokies
took over at the Virginia 47 with
5:49 to play. Three snaps later,
Virginia
cornerback
Juan
Thornhill collected an interception when he broke on Jackson’s
pass intended for wide receiver
national championship game at
the time, even as one of them has
reached it more than the other
(Alabama, by 5-2) as its devotees
might just know.
In the new cliche about football programs being universities’
front porches, these are humongous front porches.
It seemed plausible that even
while Texas remains large, the
two Texan quarterbacks from
249 air miles apart might have
met one another along the way.
Asked in a media session in
Tuscaloosa this week if he ever
met Auburn quarterback Jarrett
Stidham, from Stephenville,
Jalen Hurts, from Channelview,
offered the following, complete,
effusive answer: “No.” Hearing
that, it seemed as much a sprawling national game as a vivid
neighborhood squabble, even
with the latter more alluring.
As Alabama safety and defensive leader and defensive back
and as-good-a-football-player-asyou-could-want Minkah Fitzpatrick put it: “Honestly, I watched
the game, when I was back at
home in New Jersey, in high
school and stuff, but I never really
realized how much it meant to
everybody down here. It’s almost
another holiday to people down
here.”
This will be the New Jerseyan’s
third Alabama-holiday appearance. He knows how it works. As
Alabama Coach Nick Saban fa-
mously said on the Southeastern
Conference teleconference: “Let
me ask you a question: Do you
think there’s any player on our
team who doesn’t know what
happens with this game?”
Hurts prepared to understand
it long ago. He committed to
Alabama in June 2015 from Channelview, the Houston suburb rich
in oil refineries that got attention
in the 1990s over a murder plot
linked to junior-high cheerleading. On Rivals.com, Hurts ranked
ninth among dual-threat quarterbacks, behind seven who haven’t starred as much just yet and
one (Arizona’s Khalil Tate, No. 4
then) who has. “I’m from Texas,”
Hurts told reporters in Tuscaloosa, “so I grew up watching the
Texas A&M-Texas game,” which
ceased after 2011. “We’ve got a lot
of good rivalries around the
country, and the Iron Bowl is
one.”
He debuted in the Iron Bowl
last year, completing 27 of 36
passes for 286 yards, two touchdowns and two interceptions and
rushing 12 times for 37 yards and
a touchdown. Alabama won, 3012, in Tuscaloosa, and now he is at
home in the noise.
Stidham’s path wound more.
He committed to Texas Tech in
December 2014, then decommitted, then committed to Baylor
nine days later, all from Stephenville, the town 63 miles southwest
of Fort Worth that got attention
in the 2000s over various reported sightings of UFOs. It also was
the birthplace of Ben Hogan, in
1912, as well as the spot where Art
Briles became a phenomenon
while spreading the field portentously to help the Stephenville
High Yellow Jackets to four state
titles in the 1990s. Stidham was
ranked sixth by Rivals.com
among dual-threat quarterbacks,
behind such hopefuls as Florida
State-bound No. 1 Deondre Francois and just ahead of Southern
California’s Sam Darnold (No. 8)
and Clemson’s Kelly Bryant
(No. 11).
Citing “a difficult decision,”
Stidham transferred from Baylor
after that one 2015 season and
75 completions in 109 attempts
with 12 touchdown passes and
two interceptions. To reporters in
Auburn this week, he said: “This
is exactly why I came here, to play
in a game like this, with these
kinds of implications. This is why
you play Division I football, especially at a place like Auburn, in
this setting, against Alabama.”
It will become his first Iron
Bowl. The football intelligentsia
regard his upgrade of Auburn’s
recent quarterbacking as among
the reasons Auburn might end its
three-game Iron Bowl losing
streak that stretches back to the
indelible Kick Six game of 2013.
In a mobile world, that’s quite a
place for a Texan to find himself.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
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D6
EZ
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
Panthers upend the No. 2 Hurricanes
TOD A Y ’ S TV G A M ES
EARLY SHIFT
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
12:20
12:30
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
No. 7 Georgia at Georgia Tech » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
No. 9 Ohio State at Michigan » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
Kansas at No. 19 Oklahoma State » Fox Sports 1
East Carolina at No. 20 Memphis » ESPNU
Florida State at Florida » ESPN
Indiana at Purdue » ESPN2
Louisville at Kentucky » SEC Network
Connecticut at Cincinnati » ESPNews
Tulane at SMU » CBS Sports Network
Boston College at Syracuse » WDCA (Ch. 20)
Duke at Wake Forest » NBC Sports Washington
The Georgia-Georgia Tech rivalry has produced some closely contested
yet odd results in recent years. The Yellow Jackets have won the past two
games played in Athens but haven’t beaten the Bulldogs at home since
1999, which was well before Coach Paul Johnson got to Georgia Tech.
Only two of the nine games involving Johnson have been decided by
more than eight points, and three of the past four were decided either in
the final minutes or in overtime. Georgia will take a win of any margin to
remain in the hunt for a College Football Playoff berth, though a win over
Alabama or Auburn in next weekend’s SEC championship game
obviously would be more meaningful. . . . Ohio State needs to beat
Michigan on Saturday and then Wisconsin in the Big Ten title game to
have any shot at the playoff, and with two losses already, both wins
probably need to be convincing. That certainly has been the nature of
the Buckeyes’ past two victories, over Michigan State and Illinois by a
combined 100-17. Michigan probably will turn back to John O’Korn at
quarterback because of injuries to Wilton Speight and Brandon Peters.
O’Korn already has been benched once this season and completed only
2 of 8 passes in relief of a concussed Peters last weekend against
Wisconsin.
PITTSBURGH 24,
MIAMI 14
BY
W ILL G RAVES
pittsburgh — Miami spent the
better part of 13 months putting
together the nation’s longest winning streak behind a series of comebacks that returned the swagger to
“The U” in all of its “Turnover
Chain” glory.
Sluggish throughout the first
half against Pittsburgh on Friday,
the Hurricanes figured they’d come
out for the third quarter, hit the gas
and survive just the way they’ve
done time and again during their
rebirth under second-year Coach
Mark Richt.
Nope.
Miami’s perfect season is over.
The second-ranked Hurricanes can
only hope their shot at College
Football Playoff berth isn’t gone
too.
Freshman quarterback Kenny
Pickett ran for two touchdowns
and threw for another as the Panthers pulled out a decisive 24-14
stunner that sent Miami reeling
into next week’s ACC title game
showdown with defending national champion Clemson.
“I still think there’s an awful lot
to play for,” Richt said. “We have no
idea what’s going to happen in the
big picture; how many teams lost a
game on a Friday and came back
and got in the top four? How many
teams lost one game and won a
conference championship and got
right back in it?”
A chance to put together the
program’s first unbeaten regular
season since 2002 vanished at
chilly but hardly cold Heinz Field.
Malik Rosier completed just 15 of
34 passes for 187 yards and two
touchdowns and was briefly pulled
in the fourth quarter. The Hurricanes (10-1, 7-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) managed just 232 yards, a
season low, and trailed 10-7 at halftime.
The Panthers put together a pair
of long touchdown drives engineered by Pickett, and the emphatic response from Miami never materialized.
“There’s multiple times where
we play lackadaisical in the first
half and in the second half we come
out and explode, and it just didn’t
happen,” Rosier said. “That’s something I’ve got to fix. I’ve got to
motivate those guys in the first half
so the second half doesn’t have to be
some type of miracle second half.”
Miami stressed it had learned an
important lesson after spotting Virginia a two-touchdown lead last
week before recovering to extend
the nation’s longest winning streak
to 15 games. Yet the Hurricanes
walked onto the Heinz Field turf in
a weird spot.
The ACC Coastal Division champions are well aware their meeting
with No. 3 Clemson next Saturday
will serve as the ultimate arbiter on
whether the Hurricanes are worthy
of consideration for the College
Football Playoff. The loss to Pittsburgh might not matter as long as
they beat the defending national
champions.
Time to test the theory.
“We want to focus on Clemson,
and if we win and we get in, great,”
Rosier said. “If we win and we don’t,
that’s just something we have to
live with. It was our play that got us
to where we’re at.”
The Hurricanes have a glittery
record and marquee wins over Virginia Tech and Notre Dame, but
they’ve lived dangerously all year.
Their uninspired performance
with a perfect season at stake probably closes the door on two ACC
teams getting into the playoff.
The Panthers (5-7) will miss a
bowl game for the first time since
2007, but the future is promising.
Pitt only loses eight seniors on the
two-deep chart, and the aggressive,
dominant defense Coach Pat Narduzzi promised when he was hired
three years ago may be coming
around. Pitt only allowed one of its
final nine opponents to go over 300
yards passing.
— Associated Press
SWING SHIFT
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:45
4
4
4
4
No. 10 Penn State at Maryland » Big Ten Network
No. 1 Alabama at No. 6 Auburn » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
No. 5 Wisconsin at Minnesota » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
No. 23 Boise State at Fresno State » CBS Sports Network
Iowa State at Kansas State » ESPN2
North Carolina at North Carolina State » ESPNU
West Virginia at No. 4 Oklahoma » ESPN
No. 16 Michigan State at Rutgers » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
No. 22 Northwestern at Illinois » Fox Sports 1
Vanderbilt at Tennessee » SEC Network
Temple at Tulsa » ESPNews
There are two reasons for Alabama to be worried against Auburn in one
of the more important Iron Bowls ever. One is all the injuries. All-American
defensive back Minkah Fitzpatrick sat out last weekend’s Mercer game
with a hamstring injury. He practiced Monday and proclaimed himself
“good” afterward but also described the season as being “a bruiser.” Place
kicker Andy Pappanastos (pulled muscle) and left guard Ross
Pierschbacher (ankle) were considered day-to-day at the start of the week.
Linebackers Christian Miller (torn biceps), Terrell Lewis (elbow) and Mack
Wilson (foot) haven’t been cleared to play as of this writing, either. And
then there’s the fact that Alabama doesn’t really have a receiving option
beyond superb wideout Calvin Ridley, who has 52 catches for 858 yards
and three scores. The Tide wide receivers who follow Ridley on the stat
sheet — Robert Foster, Cam Sims and Jerry Jeudy — have just 35 catches
for 545 yards and three touchdowns combined. Auburn has been stellar at
shutting down No. 1 wide receivers this season, with only LSU’s D.J. Clark
doing any damage.
NIGHT SHIFT
7
7:30
7:30
7:30
8
8
9
10
10:15
Oregon State at Oregon » ESPN2
No. 3 Clemson at No. 24 South Carolina » ESPN
Texas A&M at No. 18 LSU » SEC Network
UTSA at Louisiana Tech » ESPNU
No. 8 Notre Dame at No. 21 Stanford » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
No. 13 Washington State at No. 17 Washington » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
BYU at Hawaii » CBS Sports Network
Colorado at Utah » Fox Sports 1
Utah State at Air Force » ESPN2
Washington State can advance to the Pacific-12 title game for the first
time with a win over rival Washington in the Apple Cup, and Cougars
Coach Mike Leach said his team is prepared. “You do your best all the
time, so there really hasn’t been any holding back effort, focus with
regard to our team,” he said this week. Also this week, Leach spent
multiple minutes talking to reporters about how men can’t win during
wedding preparations. Both pies and invitation colors were mentioned,
and it was another breathtaking digression by America’s weirdest
coaching mind. . . . If Washington State loses, Stanford will play Southern
Cal in the Pac-12 title game no matter the result of Saturday’s game
against Notre Dame. Both games kick off at the same time, so it will be
interesting to see how much scoreboard watching the Cardinal does.
Stanford running back Bryce Love leads the nation at 172.3 rushing
yards per game and averages a gaudy 8.8 yards per carry, but it remains
to be seen how much he plays Saturday. He has been dealing with ankle
injuries all season and sat out the fourth quarter of last weekend’s game
against California.
— Matt Bonesteel
Enjoy the Breeze
in Your New
Screen Room
NATIONAL ROUNDUP
Knights, 0-12 in 2015,
end regular season 11-0
CENTRAL FLORIDA 49,
SOUTH FLORIDA 42
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Mike Hughes returned a kickoff
95 yards for the final touchdown
with 1:28 remaining as No. 15 Central Florida completed the first unbeaten regular season in program
history with a wild 49-42 victory
over South Florida on Friday in Orlando to clinch the American Athletic Conference’s East Division title.
The Knights (11-0, 8-0 AAC) will
host Memphis in the conference
title game Dec. 2.
“This place is really special, and
tonight I saw a glimpse of what it
could be,” said UCF Coach Scott
Frost, who inherited a team that
finished 0-12 in 2015. “We started at
the bottom two years ago. I knew we
could be good but not that it could
happen this fast.”
Hughes’s touchdown capped a
crazy 53-second span where the
Knights took an eight-point lead,
South Florida tied it and then the
Knights took the lead for good.
The Bulls (9-2, 6-2) tied it at 42
when Quinton Flowers connected
with Darnel Salomon for an 83yard touchdown. Flowers finished
with 605 yards of total offense.
On the ensuing kickoff, Hughes
found an opening on the right side
and scored.
“It’s a blur,” Frost said. “I’m going
to have to watch a replay to remember all of what happened.”
MISSOURI 48, ARKANSAS
45: After five disappointing sea-
sons, Razorbacks coach Bret Bielema was fired moments after a season-ending loss to the Tigers in Fayetteville, Ark.
The loss left Arkansas with a 4-8
record, capping only the second losing season of Bielema’s 12-year career. It also left him with a 29-34
record in his five seasons with the
Razorbacks, including 11-29 in the
Southeastern Conference.
Tucker McCann made a 19-yard
field goal with five seconds remaining to extend Missouri’s winning
streak to six games.
The win capped a remarkable
turnaround from a 1-5 start to the
season for the Tigers (7-5, 4-4 SEC),
who were led by quarterback Drew
Lock’s 448 yards passing and five
touchdown throws.
Lock completed 25 of 42 passes
and threw his 43rd touchdown pass
of the season to set the SEC’s singleseason record. The previous record
of 40 was set in 2007 by Kentucky’s
Andre Woodson.
IOWA
56, NEBRASKA 14:
The Hawkeyes did their part to put
the finishing touches on the Cornhuskers’ worst season in six decades with a 42-point second half in
Lincoln, Neb.
Akrum Wadley ran for 159 yards
and three touchdowns for Iowa in
what could have been Coach Mike
Riley’s last game with Nebraska.
The Hawkeyes (7-5, 4-5 Big Ten)
won for the first time in three games
since their upset of Ohio State on
Nov. 4. The Huskers (4-8, 3-6) lost
four straight to end the season, finished with their fewest wins since
1961 and lost five home games for
the first time since 1957.
TCU 45, BAYLOR 22: Kenny
Hill threw touchdown passes to
three different receivers and ran
three yards for another score in Fort
Worth as the No. 12 Horned Frogs
clinched a spot in the Big 12 championship game.
TCU (10-2, 7-2 Big 12) will play
No. 4 Oklahoma for the Big 12 title
Dec. 2. That will come three weeks
after the Horned Frogs’ 38-20 loss to
the Sooners.
Baylor (1-11, 1-8) jumped out to a
9-0 lead within the game’s first two
minutes, including a safety when
Hill was sacked and fumbled in the
end zone. But TCU was ahead for
good after Hill’s seven-yard touchdown pass to Jarrison Stewart
made it 14-9 with 26 seconds left in
the first quarter.
Cougars’ defense is able
to hold Mids in check
HOUSTON 24,
NAVY 14
A SSOCIATED P RESS
houston — Houston’s defense
slowed Navy in the second half,
and the offense carried the momentum from there.
D’Eriq King threw for 277 yards
and a touchdown and ran for two
more scores to lead Houston to a
24-14 win over Navy on Friday.
King completed 21 of 27 passes
and found Steven Dunbar for a
61-yard touchdown pass to give the
Cougars (7-4, 5-3 American) a 21-14
lead with 14 minutes left in the
game. King hit Dunbar in stride
along the right sideline, and Dunbar broke one tackle at the Navy 40
and went untouched from there
for the score.
“The defense played great all
day,” King said. “We got momentum off the defense. We saw those
guys make plays, and we wanted to
help them by making plays ourselves.”
Houston’s defense shut Navy
out in the second half and held the
Midshipmen to 79 yards and six
first downs.
“It was tackle or dive there to get
what you can get,” Ed Oliver, who
finished with 14 tackles, said. “We
stopped the dive. We were really
locked in on our assignments, and
we shut it down.”
The 14 points were a season low
for Navy.
Malcolm Perry rushed for 82
yards and a touchdown on 15 carries, and Anthony Gargiulo added
71 yards and a touchdown on 16
carries to lead Navy (6-5, 4-4),
which has lost five of its last six.
“Obviously, a disappointing
loss,” Navy Coach Ken Niumatalolo said. “We left some points out
there in the first half that came
back to bite us.”
The Midshipmen outrushed
Houston 217-103 but had 167 of
those rushing yards at the half.
“Consistent four quarters, con-
sistent play,” Houston Coach Major
Applewhite said. “For us to be able
to create that many stops and punt
opportunities is tremendous.”
Dunbar finished with 142 yards
receiving on eight catches.
King, who started his third
straight game, rushed for 57 yards
and scored on runs of nine and two
yards, with the second tying it at 14
with 3:27 left in the third and capping a 14-play, 90-yard drive.
Caden Novikoff tacked on a 35yard field goal with 7:57 remaining
to up the lead to 24-14.
“We made plays in the passing
game,” Applewhite said. “Quarterback made some runs. Duke [Catalon] ran the ball well. We played
like we could play.”
Perry tied it 7-7 with a 12-yard
touchdown run with 13:42 left in
the second, and Gargiulo gave the
Midshipmen a 14-7 lead with six
minutes remaining in the first half.
“Houston played well defensively,” Niumatalolo said. “We just
can’t sustain ourselves. It’s kind of
the story of our season. We can’t
put stuff together consistently. Obviously, Houston knew that. They
kept their safeties back to see if we
could grind it out and we couldn’t.
We couldn’t execute the whole way
downfield.”
Linell Bonner finished with
eight catches for 98 yards for
Houston, which won its third out
of the last four games.
Houston outgained Navy, 380291, in total yardage.
The Midshipmen were able to
run the triple option with success
in the first half, finishing two
drives with touchdowns, but Navy
couldn’t keep it going, rushing for
50 yards in the second half. Zach
Abey started and ran the option
well, rushing for 33 yards, but trailing in the fourth quarter, Navy
used Perry and Garret Lewis under
center. Navy won the turnover battle, recovering two fumbles, but
was unable to convert either turnover into points.
Navy has two weeks off before
facing Army on Dec. 9 in Philadelphia.
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K YLE M ELNICK
When Stone Bridge cornerback
Ajani Gillis returned Tuscarora’s
kickoff to his foe’s 35-yard line
with under 1:50 remaining Friday
afternoon, Huskies Coach Michael Burnett flashed back to his
team’s previous game.
Last week, Broad Run reached
the Tuscarora 5-yard line with
under two minutes to play, but the
Huskies stuffed their opponent
before the Spartans missed a field
goal and the Huskies qualified for
the Virginia 5C region championship game.
On Friday, No. 14 Tuscarora
took a one-point lead before allowing No. 4 Stone Bridge onto its
side of the field. But again, the
Huskies stopped their foe. The
Bulldogs missed a 36-yard field
goal, lifting Tuscarora to a 28-27
win and its first regional title
since 2014. It’ll play the winner of
Brooke Point vs. Stafford in the
Virginia 5A semifinals next weekend.
“The kicking gods were in our
favor,” Burnett said.
Tuscarora’s defensive stand
came after Stone Bridge (12-1),
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Tuscarora’s Max Skirkanich kicks the decisive extra point as Stone
Bridge’s Kyle Tokarchic dives in vain in the fourth quarter.
which lost in the state championship game the previous two years,
rallied for 20 unanswered secondhalf points. Wide receiver Daniel
Thompson, who finished the season with 1,454 receiving yards,
scored two touchdowns after intermission.
Stone Bridge, however, missed
the extra point on two of those
three touchdowns, allowing Tuscarora (11-2) to come back. After a
turnover on downs and defensive
pass interference placed the Huskies on the 36-yard line, Tuscarora ran three plays, capped by run-
ning back Leron West’s eight-yard
touchdown run, to take the lead
with 1:58 remaining.
When Gillis ran back his deep
return, cornerback Alex Lee, who
guarded Thompson, knew the
game would come down to his
coverage. The Huskies perform
one-on-one drills in practice and
train against their top offensive
players, so the senior had the
confidence to knock the ball out of
Thompson’s hands on second
down.
After a sack, two incomplete
passes and a field goal attempt
that fell short with 35.2 seconds
remaining, the Huskies sprinted
to their sideline and pointed to
their fans while a group of Bulldog players sat on the field.
“I don’t know how we won that
game,” Burnett told his team.
While Tuscarora’s offense carried it throughout the regular season, the defense was still forming
its identity early in the year. The
unit’s versatile packages for speed
on the outside and power up the
middle has helped it save Tuscarora’s season the past two weeks.
Stone Bridge defeated Tuscarora, 14-13, on Oct. 20. The officials
called back one of the Huskies’
touchdowns in the second quarter because they said the ball
didn’t cross the goal line.
The Huskies were tired of media and fans around Northern
Virginia lauding Stone Bridge as
it steamrolled through the regular season. But as Tuscarora contends for its first state championship appearance since 2014, talk
in the area will probably circulate
around the Huskies.
“We were just kind of like,
‘We’re Tuscarora, we know who
we are,’ ” said wide receiver Kyle
Jenkins, who caught three firsthalf touchdown passes. “ ‘Let’s
just go practice hard and . . . shock
the world.’ ”
kyle.melnick@washpost.com
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
scoreboard
FOOTBA LL
BASKETBALL
NFL
Houston 24, Navy 14
NFC
NAVY ........................................ 0
HOUSTON ................................ 7
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 9
Dallas ............................ 5
Washington .................. 5
N.Y. Giants .................... 2
L
1
6
6
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.900
.455
.455
.182
PF
320
248
258
172
PA
188
270
276
267
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ................. 8
Carolina ......................... 7
Atlanta .......................... 6
Tampa Bay .................... 4
L
2
3
4
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.700
.600
.400
PF
302
213
231
203
PA
196
180
210
228
NORTH
W
Minnesota ..................... 9
Detroit .......................... 6
Green Bay ..................... 5
Chicago ......................... 3
L
2
5
5
7
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.818
.545
.500
.300
PF
271
294
204
174
PA
195
264
230
221
WEST
W
L.A. Rams ...................... 7
Seattle .......................... 6
Arizona ......................... 4
San Francisco ................ 1
L
3
4
6
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.700
.600
.400
.100
PF
303
242
176
174
PA
186
199
254
260
AFC
EAST
W
New England ................. 8
Buffalo .......................... 5
Miami ............................ 4
N.Y. Jets ....................... 4
SOUTH
W
Jacksonville .................. 7
Tennessee ..................... 6
Houston ........................ 4
Indianapolis .................. 3
14
0
0
7
0 — 14
10 — 24
HOU: King 9 run (Novikoff kick), 2:21 first.
NAV: Perry 12 run (B.Moehring kick), 13:42 second.
NAV: Gargiulo 13 run (B.Moehring kick), 6:00 second.
HOU: King 2 run (Novikoff kick), 3:27 third.
HOU: Dunbar 61 pass from King (Novikoff kick), 14:00 fourth.
HOU: FG Novikoff 35, 7:57 fourth.
NAVY
First Downs ..................................... 19
Rushes-Yards ........................... 60-217
Passing ............................................ 74
Comp-Att-Int .............................. 3-8-1
Return Yards .................................... 16
Punts-Avg. ............................... 6-36.16
Fumbles-Lost .................................. 1-0
Penalties-Yards ............................ 4-32
Time Of Possession .................... 36:31
HOUSTON
16
32-103
277
21-27-0
70
4-32.5
2-2
4-43
23:29
RUSHING
Navy: Perry 14-81, Gargiulo 16-71, Abey 16-33, High 5-16,
Joh.Brown 2-14, Jos.Brown 4-9, D.Bonner 1-3, Scott 1-(minus 5), Lewis 1-(minus 5). Houston: King 16-57, Catalon
7-27, McLemore 1-13, Car 7-7, (Team) 1-(minus 1).
PASSING
L
2
5
6
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.500
.400
.400
PF
290
208
157
201
PA
203
250
254
222
L
3
4
6
7
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.700
.600
.400
.300
PF
245
222
267
179
PA
141
253
262
280
NORTH
W L
Pittsburgh ..................... 8 2
Baltimore ...................... 5 5
Cincinnati ...................... 4 6
Cleveland ...................... 0 10
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.500
.400
.000
PF
227
213
169
150
PA
165
171
199
259
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 6
L.A. Chargers ................ 5
Oakland ......................... 4
Denver ........................... 3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.600
.455
.400
.300
PF
262
249
204
183
PA
220
202
247
259
L
4
6
6
7
WEEK 12
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
Minnesota 30, at Detroit 23
L.A. Chargers 28, at Dallas 6
at Washington 20, N.Y. Giants 10
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Tennessee (-31/2) at Indianapolis, 1
Carolina (-51/2) at N.Y. Jets, 1
Cleveland at Cincinnati (-71/2), 1
Tampa Bay at Atlanta (-10), 1
Miami at New England (-161/2), 1
Buffalo at Kansas City (-10), 1
Chicago at Philadelphia (-131/2), 1
Seattle (-61/2) at San Francisco, 4:05
Jacksonville (-51/2) at Arizona, 4:25
Denver at Oakland (-4), 4:25
New Orleans at L.A. Rams (-2), 4:25
Green Bay at Pittsburgh (-14), 8:30
Navy: Abey 2-4-0-45, Lewis 1-4-1-29. Houston: King
21-27-0-277.
Pittsburgh 24, No. 2 Miami 14
MIAMI ...................................... 0
PITTSBURGH ........................... 3
7
7
0
7
PIT: FG Kessman 46, 6:45 first.
MFL: Richards 23 pass from Rosier (Badgley kick), 7:03
second.
PIT: Pickett 6 run (Kessman kick), :35 second.
PIT: Ollison 5 pass from Pickett (Kessman kick), 1:47 third.
PIT: Pickett 22 run (Kessman kick), 2:54 fourth.
MFL: Berrios 39 pass from Rosier (Badgley kick), 2:16 fourth.
A: 35,978 fourth.
MIAMI
First Downs ..................................... 14
Rushes-Yards ............................. 23-45
Passing .......................................... 187
Comp-Att-Int .......................... 15-36-0
Return Yards .................................. 109
Punts-Avg. ............................... 10-33.6
Fumbles-Lost .................................. 1-1
Penalties-Yards ............................ 6-52
Time Of Possession .................... 23:30
PITTSBURGH
20
45-152
193
18-29-0
41
6-37.33
2-1
5-54
36:30
Miami: Rosier 12-31, Homer 7-12, Dallas 3-4, Shirreffs
1-(minus 2). Pittsburgh: Ollison 14-62, Pickett 13-60,
Hall 10-30, Q.Henderson 4-23, (Team) 4-(minus 23).
10
7
3
14
0 — 22
10 — 45
BAY: safety, 14:10 first.
BAY: B.Lynch 54 pass from Brewer (Martin kick), 13:26 first.
TCU: Hicks 4 run (Bunce kick), 8:59 first.
TCU: Stewart 7 pass from Hill (Bunce kick), :26 first.
TCU: Olonilua 32 run (Bunce kick), 11:30 second.
BAY: Ebner 58 pass from Brewer (Martin kick), 5:23
second.
BAY: FG Martin 48, :00 second.
TCU: D.White 14 pass from Hill (Bunce kick), 12:32 third.
BAY: FG Martin 23, 9:56 third.
TCU: Reagor 30 pass from Hill (Bunce kick), 1:39 third.
TCU: Hill 3 run (Bunce kick), 13:36 fourth.
TCU: FG Bunce 23, 8:45 fourth.
A: 43,015 fourth.
BAYLOR
First Downs ..................................... 14
Rushes-Yards ............................. 29-79
Passing .......................................... 314
Comp-Att-Int .......................... 21-34-2
Return Yards .................................... 90
Punts-Avg. ............................... 7-38.71
Fumbles-Lost .................................. 1-1
Penalties-Yards .......................... 10-75
Time Of Possession .................... 27:14
NCAA
FRIDAY'S RESULTS
TCU
25
36-112
325
26-36-0
93
5-41.4
2-0
3-23
32:46
RUSHING
EAST
Pittsburgh 24, Miami 14
Buffalo 31, Ohio 24
SOUTH
UCF 49, South Florida 42
Troy 62, Texas St. 9
FIU 41, W. Kentucky 17
Virginia Tech 10, Virginia 0
MIDWEST
Toledo 37, W. Michigan 10
Cent. Michigan 31, N. Illinois 24
Iowa 56, Nebraska 14
SOUTHWEST
Houston 24, Navy 14
TCU 45, Baylor 22
Missouri 48, Arkansas 45
Texas Tech 27, Texas 23
FAR WEST
San Diego St. 35, New Mexico 10
Baylor: Brewer 9-49, Ebner 6-15, Schrepfer 1-9, Hasty
9-9, Lovett 1-5, Te.Williams 1-2, Z.Smith 2-(minus 10).
TCU: Olonilua 10-71, Hill 9-20, Turpin 1-18, Hicks 10-11,
Snell 3-2, Niang 0-0, Muehlstein 1-(minus 2), S.Boyd
1-(minus 2), Slanina 1-(minus 6).
PASSING
Baylor: Brewer 19-29-1-301, Z.Smith 2-5-1-13. TCU: Hill
26-36-0-325.
RECEIVING
Baylor: Ebner 6-89, B.Lynch 4-110, Atkinson 3-49, Mims
2-26, Nicholson 2-15, Wainright 2-12, M.Jones 1-12, Hasty
1-1. TCU: Stewart 6-72, D.White 4-69, Reagor 4-39,
Olonilua 3-40, Slanina 2-33, Austin 2-18, Hicks 1-26,
Diarse 1-17, Ta.Williams 1-7, C.Hunt 1-4, Thomas 1-0.
EAST
Boston College (6-5) at Syracuse (4-7), 12:20
Michigan St. (8-3) at Rutgers (4-7), 4
SOUTH
Florida St. (4-6) at Florida (4-6), Noon
Georgia (10-1) at Georgia Tech (5-5), Noon
Louisville (7-4) at Kentucky (7-4), Noon
East Carolina (3-8) at Memphis (9-1), Noon
Duke (5-6) at Wake Forest (7-4), 12:30
UTEP (0-11) at UAB (7-4), 1
FAU (8-3) at Charlotte (1-10), 2
Appalachian St. (6-4) at Georgia St. (6-3), 2
Southern Miss. (7-4) at Marshall (7-4), 2:30
Old Dominion (5-6) at Middle Tennessee (5-6), 3
Alabama (11-0) at Auburn (9-2), 3:30
Penn St. (9-2) at Maryland (4-7), 3:30
North Carolina (3-8) at NC State (7-4), 3:30
Vanderbilt (4-7) at Tennessee (4-7), 4
Texas A&M (7-4) at LSU (8-3), 7:30
UTSA (6-4) at Louisiana Tech (5-6), 7:30
Clemson (10-1) at South Carolina (8-3), 7:30
MIDWEST
U-Conn. (3-8) at Cincinnati (3-8), Noon
Ohio St. (9-2) at Michigan (8-3), Noon
Indiana (5-6) at Purdue (5-6), Noon
Iowa St. (7-4) at Kansas St. (6-5), 3:30
Wisconsin (11-0) at Minnesota (5-6), 3:30
Northwestern (8-3) at Illinois (2-9), 4
SOUTHWEST
Kansas (1-10) at Oklahoma St. (8-3), Noon
Tulane (5-6) at SMU (6-5), Noon
North Texas (8-3) at Rice (1-10), 1
West Virginia (7-4) at Oklahoma (10-1), 3:45
Temple (5-6) at Tulsa (2-9), 4
Prairie View (5-5) at Texas Southern (2-8), 7
FAR WEST
UNLV (5-6) at Nevada (2-9), 3
Boise St. (9-2) at Fresno St. (8-3), 3:30
Idaho (3-7) at New Mexico St. (4-6), 4
Arizona (7-4) at Arizona St. (6-5), 4:30
Wyoming (7-4) at San Jose St. (1-11), 5
Oregon St. (1-10) at Oregon (6-5), 7
Notre Dame (9-2) at Stanford (8-3), 8
Washington (9-2) at Washington St. (9-2), 8
BYU (3-9) at Hawaii (3-8), 9
Colorado (5-6) at Utah (5-6), 10
Utah St. (6-5) at Air Force (4-7), 10:15
FOOTBALL
FCS PLAYOFFS
MARYLAND 4A
FIRST ROUND
CCSU (8-3) at New Hampshire (7-4), 2
Lehigh (5-6) at Stony Brook (9-2), 2
Furman (7-4) at Elon (8-3), 1
Samford (8-3) at Kennesaw St. (10-1), 2
South Dakota (7-4) at Nicholls (8-3), 4
W. Illinois (8-3) at Weber St. (9-2), 4
Monmouth (NJ) (9-2) at N. Iowa (7-4), 5
San Diego (9-2) at N. Arizona (7-4), 8
QUINCE ORCHARD 40, NORTH POINT 21
3
0
MARYLAND 1A
Fort Hill 34, Lackey 33
MARYLAND 2A
Damascus 42, Glenelg 7
MARYLAND 3A
Linganore 51, Oxon Hill 14
MARYLAND 4A
Quince Orchard 40, North Point 21
Wise 42, Howard 7
VIRGINIA 1A REGION B
Riverheads 42, William Campbell 14
VIRGINIA 2A REGION A
Poquoson 21, Goochland 10
VIRGINIA 2A REGION B
Lee-Staunton 38, Luray 6
VIRGINIA 2A REGION C
Appomattox 26, Glenvar 14
VIRGINIA 3A REGION C
Heritage-Lynchburg 62, Brookville 20
VIRGINIA 3A REGION D
Staunton River 49, Lord Botetourt 31
VIRGINIA 4A REGION A
Lafayette 17, King's Fork 7
VIRGINIA 4A REGION B
Louisa County 37, Dinwiddie 28
VIRGINIA 4A REGION C
Sherando 33, Liberty 21
VIRGINIA 4A REGION D
Salem 33, Blacksburg 32
VIRGINIA 5A REGION A
Nansemond River 28, Salem-Virginia Beach 27
VIRGINIA 5A REGION B
Highland Springs 24, Hermitage 14
VIRGINIA 5A REGION C
Tuscarora 28, Stone Bridge 27
VIRGINIA 6A REGION A
Oscar Smith 38, Landstown 0
VIRGINIA 6A REGION B
Colonial Forge 48, Manchester 27
0 — 10
0— 0
VT: FG Johnson 30, 11:50 second.
VT: Cunningham 8 pass from J.Jackson (Johnson kick),
12:44 third.
A: 48,609 third.
VIRGINIA TECH
First Downs ..................................... 20
Rushes-Yards ........................... 53-202
Passing .......................................... 143
Comp-Att-Int .......................... 14-21-1
Return Yards ...................................... 0
Punts-Avg. ............................... 6-30.66
Fumbles-Lost .................................. 0-0
Penalties-Yards ............................ 4-20
Time Of Possession .................... 37:16
VIRGINIA
9
20-5
186
17-34-0
0
7-38.14
2-1
4-50
22:44
GB
—
5
51/2
6
10
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................10
Miami...........................................9
Charlotte......................................8
Orlando ........................................8
Atlanta.........................................4
L
8
9
10
11
15
Pct
.556
.500
.444
.421
.211
GB
—
1
2
21/2
61/2
CENTRAL
W
Detroit .......................................12
Cleveland ...................................12
Indiana .......................................11
Milwaukee ...................................9
x-Chicago .....................................3
L
6
7
8
8
13
Pct
.667
.632
.579
.529
.188
GB
—
1/
2
11/2
21/2
8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................14
San Antonio ...............................11
New Orleans ..............................11
Memphis ......................................7
Dallas ...........................................4
L
4
7
8
11
15
Pct
.778
.611
.579
.389
.211
GB
—
3
31/2
7
101/2
NORTHWEST
W
Minnesota..................................11
Portland .....................................11
Denver........................................11
Oklahoma City .............................8
Utah .............................................8
L
8
8
8
10
11
Pct
.579
.579
.579
.444
.421
GB
—
—
—
21/2
3
PACIFIC
W
x-Golden State...........................13
L.A. Lakers ...................................8
L.A. Clippers.................................6
Phoenix ........................................7
Sacramento .................................5
Pct
.722
.421
.353
.350
.278
GB
—
51/2
61/2
7
8
x-Late game
19 7
0 14
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Miami at Chicago, 3:30
Phoenix at Minnesota, 3:30
Brooklyn at Memphis, 6
MONDAY’S GAMES
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7
Orlando at Indiana, 7
Detroit at Boston, 7:30
Portland at New York, 7:30
Brooklyn at Houston, 8
Dallas at San Antonio, 8:30
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
Sacramento at Golden State, 10:30
Trail Blazers 127, Nets 125
PORTLAND ......................... 23
BROOKLYN ......................... 32
28
21
41
39
35 — 127
33 — 125
PORTLAND: Connaughton 2-2 0-0 4, Vonleh 3-5 1-2 7,
Nurkic 12-19 5-10 29, Lillard 10-19 10-11 34, McCollum
10-19 5-6 26, Layman 1-4 0-0 2, Harkless 3-5 0-1 6, Davis
0-2 1-2 1, Napier 1-6 3-3 5, Turner 6-15 0-0 13. Totals
48-96 25-35 127.
BROOKLYN: Carroll 4-8 2-5 10, Hollis-Jefferson 8-13 1-1
17, Zeller 4-8 2-2 10, Dinwiddie 9-20 1-2 23, Crabbe 5-14
0-0 12, Booker 5-9 0-0 10, Allen 3-10 3-4 9, Harris 4-6 2-2
13, Kilpatrick 3-6 1-1 7, LeVert 5-6 3-4 14. Totals 50-100
15-21 125.
Three-point Goals: Portland 6-15 (Lillard 4-6, Turner 1-2,
McCollum 1-4, Napier 0-3), Brooklyn 10-25 (Dinwiddie
4-9, Harris 3-5, Crabbe 2-6, LeVert 1-1, Kilpatrick 0-1,
Booker 0-1, Carroll 0-1, Zeller 0-1). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Portland 45 (Nurkic 15), Brooklyn 47 (Carroll
9). Assists: Portland 24 (Lillard 9), Brooklyn 25 (Dinwiddie 6). Total Fouls: Portland 16, Brooklyn 22. A: 15,246
(17,732).
Celtics 118, Magic 103
ORLANDO ........................... 26
BOSTON ............................. 40
21
33
22
26
34 — 103
19 — 118
28
35
19
30
18 — 104
27 — 116
ATLANTA: Prince 4-14 2-2 13, Collins 6-10 1-1 13,
Dedmon 6-8 3-4 16, Schroder 11-18 3-5 26, Bazemore
5-13 0-0 11, Bembry 1-7 0-0 2, Cavanaugh 3-6 0-0 8,
Ilyasova 4-9 0-0 10, Magette 1-2 0-0 2, Belinelli 6-12 0-0
15. Totals 47-99 9-12 116.
Three-point Goals: New York 12-30 (Porzingis 4-8,
Hardaway Jr. 3-9, Lee 2-3, Ntilikina 1-1, Jack 1-3,
McDermott 1-5, Thomas 0-1), Atlanta 13-31 (Belinelli
3-5, Prince 3-6, Cavanaugh 2-5, Ilyasova 2-6, Schroder
1-2, Dedmon 1-2, Bazemore 1-3, Bembry 0-2). Fouled
Out: None. Rebounds: New York 38 (Hernangomez 7),
Atlanta 40 (Prince 8). Assists: New York 30 (Jack 14),
Atlanta 30 (Schroder 8). Total Fouls: New York 19,
Atlanta 16. Technicals: Porzingis. A: 14,355 (19,049).
DETROIT ............................. 25
OKLAHOMA CITY ............... 29
WISE 42, HOWARD 7
0
6
0
15
0
0
—
—
7
42
Virginia Tech: McClease 13-71, Peoples 22-71, J.Jackson
8-38, Holston 3-17, Phillips 1-10, McMillian 2-5, Clark
1-4, Grimsley 1-4, (Team) 2-(minus 18). Virginia: Ellis
10-9, Sharp 1-4, Reed 2-(minus 2), Benkert 7-(minus 6).
PASSING
VIRGINIA 5A REGION C
Virginia Tech: J.Jackson 14-21-1-143. Virginia: Benkert
17-34-0-186.
TUSCARORA 28, STONE BRIDGE 27
RECEIVING
Tuscarora (11-2, 4-2) ......... 0
Stone Bridge (12-1, 6-0) .... 0
21
7
0
8
7
12
—
—
28
27
Virginia Tech: Grimsley 5-56, Phillips 3-46, Carroll 2-12,
McClease 1-9, Kumah 1-9, Cunningham 1-8, McMillian
1-3. Virginia: Zaccheaus 4-39, Butts 3-9, Levrone 2-59,
Dowling 2-18, Reed 1-23, Hamm 1-10, Cowley 1-9, Jana
1-9, Dubois 1-6, Ellis 1-4.
RUSHING LEADERS: T: West 19-93, Lundy 4-8, Allen 4-2. SB:
Mell 18-70, Johnson 4-19, Tatum 14-7. PASSING LEADERS:
T: Allen 10-29-169. SB: Tatum 12-29-1-193. RECEIVING
LEADERS: T: Jenkins 4-84, Thorne 4-65, Davis 1-12, Coombs
1-8. SB: Thompson 9-162, Williams 2-23, Mell 1-8.
CHARLOTTE: Kidd-Gilchrist 7-15 3-4 17, Williams 5-9
2-2 17, Howard 7-14 6-9 20, Walker 6-21 1-4 15, Lamb
4-15 2-3 11, Zeller 2-6 0-0 4, Kaminsky 0-3 0-0 0, Monk
0-0 0-0 0, Bacon 1-1 1-2 4, Carter-Williams 4-10 1-3 11.
Totals 36-94 16-27 99.
CLEVELAND: James 10-20 4-7 27, Crowder 5-11 0-0 12,
Love 3-6 4-4 11, Calderon 1-2 0-0 3, Smith 6-13 1-2 16,
Osman 0-0 0-0 0, Green 3-7 0-0 6, Frye 1-2 0-0 2, Wade
5-11 0-0 10, Korver 4-11 2-2 13. Totals 38-83 11-15 100.
Three-point Goals: Charlotte 11-29 (Williams 5-7, Carter-Williams 2-2, Walker 2-11, Bacon 1-1, Lamb 1-6,
Kaminsky 0-2), Cleveland 13-39 (Korver 3-7, James 3-8,
Smith 3-9, Crowder 2-7, Calderon 1-2, Love 1-3, Wade
0-1, Green 0-1, Frye 0-1). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Charlotte 55 (Howard 13), Cleveland 45 (James 16).
Assists: Charlotte 24 (Walker 8), Cleveland 25 (James
13). Total Fouls: Charlotte 17, Cleveland 24. Technicals:
Howard. A: 20,562 (20,562).
Pacers 107, Raptors 104
TORONTO ........................... 25
INDIANA ............................. 29
35
21
20
31
24 — 104
26 — 107
TORONTO: Anunoby 3-5 2-2 8, Ibaka 5-10 0-1 10,
Valanciunas 2-4 2-2 6, Lowry 6-12 7-7 24, DeRozan 6-16
1-2 13, Siakam 2-6 0-0 5, Nogueira 0-0 0-0 0, Poeltl 3-4
0-0 6, Brown 0-0 0-0 0, VanVleet 6-10 2-3 16, Powell 7-14
1-3 16. Totals 40-81 15-20 104.
INDIANA: Bogdanovic 8-16 2-3 19, T.Young 5-11 1-1 12,
Turner 2-7 2-2 7, Collison 6-10 3-4 17, Oladipo 8-15 3-5
21, Sabonis 2-10 9-12 13, Leaf 0-2 0-0 0, Joseph 0-3 0-0 0,
Stephenson 7-9 0-0 18. Totals 38-83 20-27 107.
Three-point Goals: Toronto 9-30 (Lowry 5-9, VanVleet
2-5, Siakam 1-4, Powell 1-5, Ibaka 0-2, Anunoby 0-2,
DeRozan 0-3), Indiana 11-26 (Stephenson 4-4, Oladipo
2-4, Collison 2-4, T.Young 1-2, Turner 1-4, Bogdanovic
1-5, Joseph 0-1, Sabonis 0-1, Leaf 0-1). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: Toronto 42 (Lowry 10), Indiana 41
(Turner 10). Assists: Toronto 17 (Lowry 8), Indiana 19
(Collison 8). Total Fouls: Toronto 20, Indiana 18.
Technicals: Toronto coach Raptors (Defensive three
second). A: 16,523 (18,500).
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
Portland 127, at Brooklyn 125
at Atlanta 116, New York 104
at Boston 118, Orlando 103
at Cleveland 100, Charlotte 99
Detroit 99, at Oklahoma City 98
at Indiana 107, Toronto 104
Miami 109, at Minnesota 97
at Denver 104, Memphis 92
New Orleans 115, at Phoenix 91
Chicago at Golden State, Late
NEW YORK: Hardaway Jr. 8-16 3-3 22, Porzingis 9-18 6-8
28, O’Quinn 1-3 0-0 2, Jack 4-8 1-1 10, Lee 11-14 2-2 26,
Thomas 0-2 0-0 0, McDermott 2-10 0-0 5, Hernangomez
3-4 0-0 6, Ntilikina 2-4 0-0 5. Totals 40-79 12-14 104.
40
21
17 — 99
17 — 100
NCAA men
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
NEW YORK ......................... 39
ATLANTA ........................... 24
—
—
25
29
No games scheduled.
Pistons 99, Thunder 98
7
0
29
27
THURSDAY’S RESULT
Hawks 116, Knicks 104
NP: 5 run ( kick )
QO: McGonagle 33 pass from Bonner ( Judge kick )
QO: Bonner 3 run ( Judge kick )
QO: Wade 64 pass from Bonner ( Judge kick )
QO: Dennis Jr. 80 interception return ( kick failed )
QO: Bonner 18 pass from McGonagle ( run failed )
NP: Lawrence 31 pass from Jones ( kick )
QO: Bonner 1 run ( Judge kick )
NP: Lawrence 4 pass from Jones ( kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: QO: Cooper 21-114, Bonner 15-112,
Wade 5-18. NP: Jones 20-122, Lawrence 1-14. PASSING
LEADERS: QO: Bonner 11-17-1-213, McGonagle 1-1-18.
NP: Jones 12-25-3-130. RECEIVING LEADERS: QO: Wade
2-69, McGonagle 2-60, Jones 2-45, Terry 2-23, Bonner
1-18, Williams 2-13, Derwin 1-3. NP: Lawrence 4-74,
Garnes 2-23, Riley 2-10, Poole 1-7.
Howard (12-1, 9-0) ............ 7
Wise (13-0, 6-0) ................. 21
L
5
11
11
13
13
Three-point Goals: Orlando 9-24 (Speights 4-9, Afflalo
2-2, Payton 1-1, Fournier 1-2, Simmons 1-4, Gordon 0-1,
Hezonja 0-1, Augustin 0-1, Biyombo 0-1, Vucevic 0-2),
Boston 17-42 (Rozier 5-7, Tatum 3-4, Brown 2-4, Irving
2-4, Nader 1-1, Horford 1-3, Morris 1-4, Smart 1-7,
Ojeleye 1-7, Yabusele 0-1). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Orlando 51 (Vucevic 11), Boston 46 (Baynes 11). Assists:
Orlando 21 (Mack 8), Boston 27 (Horford 10). Total
Fouls: Orlando 16, Boston 20. Technicals: Boston coach
Brad Stevens. A: 18,624 (18,624).
W: Lytton, Jr. 24 pass from Williams ( Martinez kick )
H: Agbai 37 pass from Porter ( Peter kick )
W: Oliver 57 run ( Martinez kick )
W: Oliver 5 run ( Martinez kick )
W: Oliver 5 run ( pass failed )
W: Oliver 1 run ( kick failed )
W: Rhodes 92 fumble return
RUSHING LEADERS: H: Dawkins 21-109, Ray 1-5. W: Oliver
14-128, Medley 8-43, Williams 4-16. PASSING LEADERS: H:
Porter 6-13-66. W: Williams 8-10-115. RECEIVING LEADERS: H: Agbai 1-37, Jones 3-20, O'Connor 1-5, Dawkins 1-4.
W: Lytton, Jr. 4-66, Morsell 3-33, Oliver 1-26.
RUSHING
Pct
.850
.611
.588
.556
.333
BOSTON: Tatum 4-7 0-0 11, Morris 4-13 0-0 9, Horford
2-5 0-0 5, Irving 9-15 10-10 30, Brown 5-14 1-2 13, Nader
1-1 0-0 3, Ojeleye 2-8 2-6 7, Baynes 6-9 1-2 13, Yabusele
0-1 0-0 0, Rozier 8-11 2-3 23, Smart 1-7 1-2 4. Totals
42-91 17-25 118.
FOOTBALL
Quince Orchard (12-1, 6-0) 7
North Point (12-1, 1-0) ...... 7
7
0
L
3
7
7
8
12
ORLANDO: Fournier 3-13 0-0 7, Gordon 2-10 7-8 11,
Vucevic 6-13 0-0 12, Payton 4-8 3-4 12, Ross 2-3 1-2 5,
Speights 4-9 0-0 12, Biyombo 4-9 0-0 8, Mack 3-4 0-2 6,
Augustin 3-4 0-0 6, Simmons 6-14 1-2 14, Hezonja 1-2
0-0 2, Afflalo 3-6 0-1 8. Totals 41-95 12-19 103.
HIGH SCHOOLS
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Virginia Tech 10, Virginia 0
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................17
Toronto ......................................11
Philadelphia ...............................10
New York ...................................10
Brooklyn.......................................6
Portland at Washington, 7
Orlando at Philadelphia, 7
San Antonio at Charlotte, 7
Toronto at Atlanta, 7:30
Boston at Indiana, 8
New York at Houston, 8
New Orleans at Golden State, 8:30
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8:30
Milwaukee at Utah, 9
L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 10
BAYLOR ................................... 9
TCU ......................................... 14
MONDAY, DEC. 4
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 8:30
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Miami: Shirreffs 0-2-0-0, Rosier 15-34-0-187. Pittsburgh: Pickett 18-29-0-193.
TCU 45, Baylor 22
SUNDAY, DEC. 3
Detroit at Baltimore, 1
Tampa Bay at Green Bay, 1
Minnesota at Atlanta, 1
San Francisco at Chicago, 1
Denver at Miami, 1
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1
Houston at Tennessee, 1
Kansas City at N.Y. Jets, 1
New England at Buffalo, 1
Cleveland at L.A. Chargers, 4:05
Carolina at New Orleans, 4:25
L.A. Rams at Arizona, 4:25
N.Y. Giants at Oakland, 4:25
Philadelphia at Seattle, 8:30
NHL
CHARLOTTE ....................... 28
CLEVELAND ....................... 27
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Miami: Berrios 4-61, Richards 3-47, C.Herndon 3-41,
D.Harris 3-29, Irvin 1-7, Homer 1-2. Pittsburgh: Weah
6-80, Q.Henderson 3-36, Ollison 3-17, Clark 2-25, AraujoLopes 2-21, Mathews 1-9, Hall 1-5.
THURSDAY’S GAME
Washington at Dallas, 8:25
Cavaliers 100, Hornets 99
EASTERN CONFERENCE
PASSING
RECEIVING
WEEK 13
VIRGINIA TECH ........................ 0
VIRGINIA .................................. 0
7 — 14
7 — 24
RUSHING
MONDAY’S GAME
Houston at Baltimore (-7), 8:30
NBA
RECEIVING
Navy: Perry 2-34, Carmona 1-40. Houston: Dunbar 8-142,
L.Bonner 8-98, McLemore 2-27, Catalon 2-10, Car 1-0.
H OC K E Y
24
30
24
18
26 — 99
21 — 98
DETROIT: S.Johnson 4-6 0-0 11, Harris 6-15 0-0 13,
Drummond 8-14 1-3 17, Jackson 3-9 4-4 12, Bradley 4-13
2-2 11, Moreland 0-0 0-0 0, Tolliver 3-7 0-0 8, Smith 7-11
0-0 15, Galloway 3-4 0-0 9, Kennard 1-5 0-0 3. Totals
39-84 7-9 99.
OKLAHOMA CITY: George 7-17 0-0 16, Anthony 9-24 0-0
20, Adams 6-10 0-0 12, Westbrook 10-29 6-7 27,
Roberson 4-5 0-0 10, Huestis 0-2 0-0 0, Grant 4-5 0-1 8,
Patterson 1-2 0-0 3, Felton 1-2 0-0 2, Abrines 0-2 0-0 0.
Totals 42-98 6-8 98.
Three-point Goals: Detroit 14-37 (Galloway 3-4, S.Johnson 3-5, Jackson 2-6, Tolliver 2-6, Smith 1-1, Kennard 1-3,
Harris 1-6, Bradley 1-6), Oklahoma City 8-32 (Roberson
2-3, Anthony 2-6, George 2-8, Patterson 1-2, Westbrook
1-10, Huestis 0-1, Grant 0-1, Abrines 0-1). Fouled Out:
None. Rebounds: Detroit 43 (Drummond 14), Oklahoma
City 45 (Adams 12). Assists: Detroit 22 (Jackson, Smith
4), Oklahoma City 22 (Westbrook 11). Total Fouls: Detroit
17, Oklahoma City 12. A: 18,203 (18,203).
Heat 109, Timberwolves 97
MIAMI ................................ 28
MINNESOTA ...................... 24
30
24
23
22
28 — 109
27 — 97
MIAMI: Richardson 3-9 1-1 7, Winslow 2-3 2-2 8,
Whiteside 6-8 4-4 16, Dragic 7-14 1-2 20, Waiters 7-15
0-0 17, J.Johnson 2-8 1-2 5, Olynyk 4-7 2-2 12, Ellington
6-9 3-3 21, T.Johnson 1-7 0-0 3. Totals 38-80 14-16 109.
MINNESOTA: Wiggins 6-14 6-8 18, Gibson 4-7 0-0 8,
Towns 6-14 6-7 18, Brooks 1-4 0-0 3, Butler 7-17 3-6 18,
Muhammad 4-7 0-0 10, Dieng 2-4 0-1 4, Jones 3-6 0-2 8,
Crawford 4-11 1-2 10. Totals 37-84 16-26 97.
Three-point Goals: Miami 19-39 (Ellington 6-9, Dragic
5-8, Waiters 3-8, Winslow 2-2, Olynyk 2-3, T.Johnson
1-5, J.Johnson 0-1, Richardson 0-3), Minnesota 7-17
(Muhammad 2-2, Jones 2-3, Brooks 1-1, Butler 1-1,
Crawford 1-3, Gibson 0-1, Wiggins 0-3, Towns 0-3).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Miami 42 (Whiteside 10),
Minnesota 44 (Towns 11). Assists: Miami 29 (J.Johnson
8), Minnesota 21 (Jones 6). Total Fouls: Miami 24,
Minnesota 16. A: 18,978 (19,356).
EAST
Md.-Eastern Shore 66, Jackson St. 63
Missouri 90, St. John’s 82
Navy 85, St. Francis Brooklyn 76
Nebraska 84, Marist 59
Penn St. 86, Oral Roberts 48
Rutgers 61, East Carolina 47
Virginia 70, Rhode Island 55
West Virginia 83, UCF 45
SOUTH
Alabama 71, BYU 59
Auburn 119, Winthrop 85
Clemson 84, Texas Southern 77
Florida Gulf Coast 79, Denver 71
Florida St. 113, The Citadel 78
Georgia Tech 63, North Texas 49
Jacksonville 92, Fairfield 84
Louisville 84, St. Francis (Pa.) 72
South Florida 72, Arkansas St. 61
St. Bonaventure 63, Maryland 61
Tennessee 67, NC State 58
UMBC 89, Nicholls 88
Wake Forest 81, UNC-Greensboro 75
MIDWEST
Butler 71, Portland St. 69
Illinois 86, NC Central 73
Indiana 87, E. Michigan 67
Kansas 102, Oakland 59
Kansas St. 67, George Washington 59
Minnesota 69, U-Mass. 51
Northwestern 81, Sacred Heart 50
Ohio 96, Mount St. Mary’s 77
South Dakota 84, Southern Miss. 71
Villanova 64, N. Iowa 50
SOUTHWEST
Duke 85, Texas 78, OT
North Carolina 87, Arkansas 68
Oklahoma 93, Portland 71
TCU 69, New Mexico 67
Texas A&M 81, Pepperdine 65
W. Kentucky 63, SMU 61
FAR WEST
Arizona St. 102, Xavier 86
Colorado St. 72, Northwestern St. 60
Gonzaga 86, Ohio St. 59
Long Beach St. 74, Oregon St. 69
San Diego St. 89, Sacramento St. 52
San Diego St. 75, Georgia 68
Utah 85, E. Washington 69
Utah St. 71, Northeastern 67
Washington 89, Seattle 84
Washington St. 84, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 79
Virginia 70, Rhode Island 55
Bruins 4, Penguins 3
PITTSBURGH ........................... 0
BOSTON ................................... 2
METROPOLITAN
W
Columbus ...................... 15
New Jersey ................... 13
N.Y. Islanders ............... 13
Washington .................. 13
N.Y. Rangers ................. 12
Pittsburgh ..................... 11
Carolina ........................... 9
Philadelphia .................... 8
L
7
5
7
10
9
10
8
9
OL PTS.
1
31
4
30
2
28
1
27
2
26
3
25
4
22
6
22
GF
68
72
82
70
74
64
62
65
GA
55
68
73
73
69
84
64
70
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 16
Toronto ......................... 15
Boston ........................... 10
Detroit .......................... 10
Ottawa ............................ 8
Montreal ......................... 8
Florida ............................. 8
Buffalo ............................ 6
L
4
8
7
9
7
12
11
13
OL PTS.
2
34
1
31
4
24
4
24
6
22
3
19
2
18
4
16
GF
84
86
58
66
66
54
63
55
GA
57
73
62
66
72
80
73
80
W
16
14
14
11
12
11
10
L
6
5
6
8
10
8
8
OL PTS.
1
33
3
31
2
30
3
25
1
25
2
24
3
23
GF
78
73
70
67
67
71
63
GA
60
58
62
61
69
68
56
PACIFIC
W
Vegas ............................ 14
Los Angeles .................. 12
Calgary .......................... 12
Vancouver ..................... 11
San Jose ........................ 11
Anaheim ....................... 10
Edmonton ....................... 8
Arizona ........................... 6
L
6
8
9
9
8
9
13
16
OL PTS.
1
29
3
27
1
25
3
25
2
24
3
23
2
18
3
15
GF
77
67
66
63
54
61
60
62
GA
64
55
70
64
50
64
77
91
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
St. Louis ........................
Winnipeg ......................
Nashville .......................
Minnesota .....................
Dallas ............................
Colorado ........................
Chicago .........................
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
No games scheduled.
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
at Washington 3, Tampa Bay 1
at Boston 4, Pittsburgh 3
N.Y. Islanders 5, at Philadelphia 4 (OT)
at Minnesota 3, Colorado 2 (SO)
Winnipeg 4, at Anaheim 1
at Vegas 5, San Jose 4 (OT)
at New Jersey 3, Vancouver 2
at Columbus 5, Ottawa 2
at N.Y. Rangers 2, Detroit 1
at Buffalo 3, Edmonton 1
Toronto 5, at Carolina 4
Nashville 2, at St. Louis 0
Calgary at Dallas 6, 4
Los Angeles 3, at Arizona 2 (OT)
Maryland (4-2)
Jones 4-10 1-4 9, Charles 7-11 2-2 16, Confroy 3-5 0-0 8,
Lewis 3-7 2-2 10, Watson 7-14 0-0 20, Ellison 1-1 1-2 3,
Fraser 5-9 0-0 10, Myers 2-3 0-0 5, Small 3-9 2-4 8, 35-69
Totals 8-14 89.
Kennesaw St. (1-5)
Gianolla 2-6 0-0 4, Dan 0-0 2-2 2, Street 1-15 0-0 2,
Walker 1-4 2-3 4, Young 0-5 0-0 0, Mann 2-6 2-2 6, Omusi
1-2 0-0 3, Poole 2-7 1-1 5, Hoover 3-8 1-1 9, Landby 0-0
0-0 0, 12-53 Totals 8-9 35.
MARYLAND ........................ 22 25 20 22
—89
KENNESAW ST. ................... 8
7 13
7
—35
Three-point goals: Maryland 11-25 (Charles 0-1, Confroy
2-4, Lewis 2-5, Watson 6-11, Myers 1-2, Small 0-2),
Kennesaw St. 3-16 (Street 0-4, Young 0-4, Omusi 1-1,
Hoover 2-7). Assists: Maryland 20 (Lewis 8), Kennesaw
St. 7 (Street 2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Maryland
50 (Fraser 12), Kennesaw St. 29 (Poole 8). Total fouls:
Maryland 15, Kennesaw St. 12. A: 676.
Scoring: 7, Boston, Pastrnak 11 (Spooner, Nash), 5:06.
SHOTS ON GOAL
PITTSBURGH ........................... 4
8
8 — 20
BOSTON ................................. 14
14
5 — 33
Power-play opportunities: Pittsburgh 1 of 1; Boston 0 of
2. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 11-7-1 (33 shots-29
saves). Boston, Khudobin 7-0-2 (20-17). A: 17,565
(17,565). T: 2:35.
Devils 3, Canucks 2
VANCOUVER ........................... 0
NEW JERSEY ........................... 0
1
3
1 —
0 —
2
3
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, New Jersey, Hall 7, 2:15. 2, Vancouver,
D.Sedin 5 (H.Sedin, Edler), 5:36. 3, New Jersey, Boyle 2
(Hall, Butcher), 10:17 (pp). 4, New Jersey, Severson 3
(Hischier, Hall), 15:45.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Vancouver, Horvat 9 (Boeser, D.Sedin), 10:37
(pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
VANCOUVER ........................... 9
5
11 — 25
NEW JERSEY ......................... 10
10
6 — 26
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 1 of 3; New Jersey
1 of 3. Goalies: Vancouver, Markstrom 6-8-2 (26
shots-23 saves). New Jersey, Schneider 9-4-3 (25-23).
A: 16,514 (16,514). T: 2:25.
0
1
0
0
0 — 2
0 — 3
Scoring: 4, Minnesota, Niederreiter 9 (Granlund, Koivu),
5:02 (pp).
SHOOTOUT
Colorado 0 (MacKinnon NG, Rantanen NG), Minnesota 2
(Koivu NG, Coyle G, Stewart G).
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 7
Buffalo at Montreal, 7
Chicago at Florida, 7
Washington at Toronto, 7
N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 7
New Jersey at Detroit, 7
Vegas at Arizona, 8
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8
Calgary at Colorado, 10
Winnipeg at San Jose, 10
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10:30
SHOTS ON GOAL
COLORADO ........................ 9
11
10 — 30
MINNESOTA ...................... 7
11
3
6 — 27
Power-play opportunities: Colorado 0 of 3; Minnesota 1
of 2. Goalies: Colorado, Bernier 4-4-1 (27 shots-25
saves). Minnesota, Stalock 2-2-1 (30-28). A: 19,084
(18,064). T: 2:32.
Blue Jackets 5, Senators 2
OTTAWA .................................. 1
COLUMBUS .............................. 1
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Nashville at Carolina, 1
Vancouver at N.Y. Rangers, 2
Edmonton at Boston, 5
1
1
0 —
3 —
2
5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Ottawa, Pyatt 4 (Brassard, Stone), 10:56. 2,
Columbus, Atkinson 5, 11:22.
MONDAY’S GAMES
SECOND PERIOD
Florida at New Jersey, 7
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7
Columbus at Montreal, 7:30
Minnesota at Winnipeg, 8
Anaheim at Chicago, 8:30
Scoring: 3, Columbus, Nutivaara 1 (J.Anderson, Murray),
7:28. 4, Ottawa, Hoffman 8 (Dzingel), 9:00.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Columbus, Atkinson 6 (Savard), 10:40. 6,
Columbus, Foligno 4 (Milano), 13:27. 7, Columbus, Motte
3 (Sedlak, Bjorkstrand), 19:10.
Islanders 5, Flyers 4 (OT)
1
4
2
0
1 — 5
0 — 4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Islanders, Barzal 6 (Mayfield, Ladd),
19:43.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Philadelphia, Giroux 10 (Hagg), 3:49. 3,
Philadelphia, Simmonds 7 (Patrick, Gostisbehere), 6:28.
4, N.Y. Islanders, Clutterbuck 4 (Mayfield, Seidenberg),
7:56. 5, Philadelphia, Gostisbehere 2 (Couturier, Voracek), 12:11. 6, Philadelphia, Couturier 13 (Voracek,
Giroux), 12:30.
THIRD PERIOD
OVERTIME
SHOTS ON GOAL
N.Y. ISLANDERS ................ 7
11
16
3 — 37
PHILADELPHIA ................ 10
7
12
1 — 30
Power-play opportunities: N.Y. Islanders 1 of 3; Philadelphia 0 of 1. Goalies: N.Y. Islanders, Greiss 8-2-2 (30
shots-26 saves). Philadelphia, Elliott 6-5-5 (37-32). A:
19,643 (19,543). T: 2:36.
Jets 4, Ducks 1
No. 15 Maryland 89,
Kennesaw St. 35
THIRD PERIOD
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 9, N.Y. Islanders, Leddy 6 (Ho-Sang, Tavares),
2:44.
EAST
American U. 64, Vermont 62
Auburn 60, Georgetown 40
George Washington 61, Wisconsin 46
Louisiana Tech 71, Penn St. 59
Mississippi St. 90, Columbia 54
South Carolina 78, Rutgers 68
Syracuse 84, Vanderbilt 78
Villanova 60, James Madison 57
West Virginia 75, Drexel 42
SOUTH
Bowling Green 59, Norfolk St. 50
Buffalo 61, Clemson 41
Butler 79, Virginia Tech 77
DePaul 81, Memphis 67
Elon 60, Alabama 55
FAU 80, St. Francis Brooklyn 60
Florida St. 101, Sacred Heart 52
Georgia St. 61, VCU 56
Jacksonville 74, Monmouth (NJ) 65
Louisville 115, Murray St. 51
Maryland 89, Kennesaw St. 35
Miami 80, Maine 70
Missouri 73, Coppin St. 50
Notre Dame 77, ETSU 46
S. Dakota St. 75, NC State 67
Southern Miss. 72, Alcorn St. 67
MIDWEST
Cent. Michigan 85, San Diego St. 76
Chattanooga 61, Northwestern 44
George Mason 87, Drake 75
Illinois 65, UC Irvine 59
Indiana 71, UAB 63
Iowa St. 67, Tulane 64
Marquette 87, Montana 68
Nebraska 55, Coastal Carolina 47
Ohio St. 104, Florida Gulf Coast 62
Southern Cal 58, Purdue 46
St. John’s 76, W. Michigan 48
UCLA 64, Kansas St. 55
Washington 67, Creighton 64
SOUTHWEST
Houston 75, Liberty 68
N. Illinois 69, UTSA 55
North Dakota 73, Lamar 70
Rice 58, UALR 51
SMU 73, UC Riverside 51
TCU 68, Arizona 59
Tennessee 79, Oklahoma St. 69
Texas 75, LSU 66
Texas Southern 66, New Mexico St. 50
Texas-Arlington 67, Fresno St. 54
UTEP 64, Arkansas 61
FAR WEST
California 87, Manhattan 66
Colorado 85, MVSU 48
Denver 60, E. Michigan 54
Gonzaga 77, Kent St. 57
Green Bay 61, Arizona St. 48
Loyola Marymount 84, Miami (Ohio) 71
Nevada 95, Sacramento St. 68
New Mexico 76, Wichita St. 62
Pacific 106, San Jose St. 97
Saint Mary’s (Cal) 89, UC Santa Barbara 59
South Florida 82, Washington St. 45
Utah 90, Incarnate Word 31
Scoring: 3, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 9 (Letang, Crosby), 1:02
(pp). 4, Boston, Grzelcyk 1 (DeBrusk, Krejci), 10:31. 5,
Pittsburgh, Kessel 9 (Sheahan, Schultz), 14:07. 6,
Pittsburgh, Crosby 7 (Hornqvist, Hunwick), 17:44.
Scoring: 1, Minnesota, Zucker 12 (Reilly, Staal), 1:13. 2,
Colorado, Compher 3 (Landeskog), 10:23 (sh). 3, Colorado, Comeau 5 (Barrie, Soderberg), 15:54.
Rhode Island (3-2)
Berry 5-9 2-7 12, Dowtin 3-9 0-0 7, Garrett 4-8 2-2 11,
Terrell 4-11 1-1 11, Robinson 4-4 0-2 8, Preston 1-1 0-0 2,
Akele 1-4 0-0 2, Russell 0-4 2-2 2. Totals 22-50 7-14 55.
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
SECOND PERIOD
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 7, N.Y. Islanders, Eberle 8 (Pelech, Bailey), 4:12
(pp). 8, N.Y. Islanders, Ladd 5 (Barzal, Eberle), 12:11.
NCAA women
3
4
Scoring: 1, Boston, Krejci 2 (DeBrusk, Cehlarik), 6:13. 2,
Boston, Kuraly 3 (McAvoy), 10:51.
COLORADO ........................ 2
MINNESOTA ...................... 1
Virginia (6-0)
Wilkins 7-9 5-6 19, Salt 1-3 1-2 3, Guy 2-8 0-0 5, Hall 5-9
6-7 18, Jerome 1-3 4-4 6, Diakite 3-5 1-1 7, Johnson 4-8
2-2 12, Hunter 0-1 0-0 0. 23-46 Totals 19-22 70.
Halftime: Virginia 30-27. Three-point goals: Virginia
5-12 (Hall 2-2, Johnson 2-4, Guy 1-4, Wilkins 0-1, Jerome
0-1), Rhode Island 4-10 (Terrell 2-2, Dowtin 1-3, Garrett
1-3, Russell 0-2). Fouled out: Robinson. Rebounds:
Virginia 31 (Salt 8), Rhode Island 21 (Berry 7). Assists:
Virginia 9 (Guy, Johnson 3), Rhode Island 11 (Terrell 6).
Total fouls: Virginia 15, Rhode Island 20. Technical fouls:
Diakite, Terrell.
0 —
1 —
Wild 3, Avalanche 2 (SO)
SATURDAY’S GAMES
N.Y. ISLANDERS ................ 1
PHILADELPHIA .................. 0
3
1
FIRST PERIOD
WINNIPEG ............................... 2
ANAHEIM ................................ 0
1
1
1 —
0 —
4
1
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Winnipeg, Ehlers 9 (Little, Laine), 0:40. 2,
Winnipeg, Ehlers 10 (Myers, Little), 4:59 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Anaheim, Beauchemin 1 (Rasmussen, Liambas), 5:46. 4, Winnipeg, Little 3 (Ehlers, Myers), 12:06
(pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Winnipeg, Connor 6, 18:20.
SHOTS ON GOAL
OTTAWA .................................. 4
8
14 — 26
COLUMBUS ............................ 15
10
7 — 32
Power-play opportunities: Ottawa 0 of 3; Columbus 0 of
2. Goalies: Ottawa, C.Anderson 7-7-3 (31 shots-27
saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 14-4-1 (26-24). A: 17,084
(18,500). T: 2:29.
Maple Leafs 5, Hurricanes 4
TORONTO ................................ 0
CAROLINA ............................... 0
4
1
1 —
3 —
5
4
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Toronto, Hyman 5 (Kadri, Gardiner), 0:53. 2,
Toronto, Leivo 1 (Borgman), 7:14. 3, Toronto, Hainsey 2
(Bozak, J.van Riemsdyk), 11:37. 4, Carolina, Ryan 5
(Williams, Skinner), 13:35. 5, Toronto, J.van Riemsdyk
12 (Hainsey, Nylander), 18:24.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Carolina, Staal 7 (Faulk, Teravainen), 3:08. 7,
Toronto, Marleau 9 (Gardiner, Matthews), 5:27 (pp). 8,
Carolina, Lindholm 6 (Hanifin, McGinn), 13:58. 9, Carolina, Hanifin 3 (Williams, Skinner), 15:49.
SHOTS ON GOAL
TORONTO ................................ 4
12
9 — 25
CAROLINA ............................. 14
13
20 — 47
Power-play opportunities: Toronto 1 of 2; Carolina 0 of 2.
Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 13-7-1 (47 shots-43 saves).
Carolina, Darling 6-6-4 (9-8), Ward 3-2-0 (16-12). A:
15,241 (18,680). T: 2:22.
Sabres 3, Oilers 1
EDMONTON ............................. 0
BUFFALO ................................. 0
0
1
1 —
2 —
1
3
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Buffalo, Josefson 1 (Okposo, Nolan), 14:16.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Buffalo, Eichel 7 (Kane, Ristolainen), 0:43. 3,
Buffalo, Okposo 3 (Kane, Ristolainen), 19:09. 4, Edmonton, Auvitu 1, 19:40.
SHOTS ON GOAL
SHOTS ON GOAL
WINNIPEG ............................. 12
13
11 — 36
ANAHEIM ................................ 8
12
11 — 31
Power-play opportunities: Winnipeg 2 of 3; Anaheim 0 of
2. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 12-2-2 (31 shots-30
saves). Anaheim, Gibson 7-8-1 (35-32).
EDMONTON ............................. 4
11
15 — 30
BUFFALO ............................... 11
13
7 — 31
Power-play opportunities: Edmonton 0 of 3; Buffalo 0 of
3. Goalies: Edmonton, Brossoit 0-3-1 (30 shots-28
saves). Buffalo, Lehner 5-9-2 (30-29). A: 19,070
(19,070). T: 2:42.
Predators 2, Blues 0
Stars 6, Flames 4
NASHVILLE .............................. 1
ST. LOUIS ................................. 0
0
0
1 —
0 —
2
0
CALGARY ................................. 0
DALLAS .................................... 1
3
2
1 —
3 —
FIRST PERIOD
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Nashville, Johansen 3 (Forsberg, Subban),
2:32.
Scoring: 1, Dallas, Roussel 3 (Pitlick), 18:22.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Nashville, Watson 2 (Johansen), 19:12.
SHOTS ON GOAL
NASHVILLE ............................ 12
7
9 — 28
ST. LOUIS ................................. 6
13
15 — 34
Power-play opportunities: Nashville 0 of 0; St. Louis 0 of 3.
Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 13-3-2 (34 shots-34 saves). St.
Louis, Hutton 4-1-0 (27-26). A: 19,033 (19,150). T: 2:27.
4
6
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Calgary, Ferland 9 (Monahan), 0:39. 3, Calgary,
Gaudreau 11, 2:53. 4, Dallas, Seguin 10 (Klingberg,
Janmark), 4:20. 5, Calgary, Monahan 13 (Brouwer, Gaudreau), 17:31 (pp). 6, Dallas, Radulov 8 (Shore), 18:30.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 7, Calgary, Monahan 14 (Gaudreau, M.Smith),
6:04. 8, Dallas, G.Smith 2 (Ritchie), 12:12. 9, Dallas,
Seguin 11, 14:03. 10, Dallas, Seguin 12 (Radulov), 19:00.
SHOTS ON GOAL
Rangers 2, Red Wings 1 (OT)
DETROIT ............................ 0
N.Y. RANGERS ................... 0
0
0
1
1
0 — 1
1 — 2
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Detroit, Tatar 7 (Zetterberg, Kronwall), 4:05
(pp). 2, N.Y. Rangers, Kreider 8 (Buchnevich, Skjei),
10:17.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 3, N.Y. Rangers, Zuccarello 4 (Skjei, Miller),
0:37.
SHOTS ON GOAL
DETROIT .......................... 17
10
14 — 41
N.Y. RANGERS ................... 6
16
8
1 — 31
Power-play opportunities: Detroit 1 of 4; N.Y. Rangers 0
of 2. Goalies: Detroit, Howard 8-6-3 (31 shots-29 saves).
N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 11-6-2 (41-40). A: 18,006
(18,006). T: 2:41.
CALGARY ............................... 12
14
12 — 38
DALLAS .................................. 13
18
10 — 41
Power-play opportunities: Calgary 1 of 3; Dallas 0 of 4.
Goalies: Calgary, M.Smith 11-7-1 (40 shots-35 saves).
Dallas, Bishop 10-7-0 (38-34). A: 18,532 (18,532). T: 2:38.
Golden Knights 5, Sharks 4 (OT)
SAN JOSE .......................... 1
VEGAS ............................... 2
3
2
0
0
0 — 4
1 — 5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Vegas, Theodore 1 (Eakin, Leipsic), 2:33. 2,
Vegas, Neal 12 (Haula, Marchessault), 11:16 (pp). 3, San
Jose, Hertl 4 (Vlasic, Donskoi), 17:08.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Vegas, Karlsson 11 (Tuch, Smith), 0:10 (pp).
5, Vegas, Karlsson 12 (Marchessault), 6:55. 6, San Jose,
Burns 1 (Thornton), 8:08. 7, San Jose, Tierney 5 (Ward,
Braun), 15:34. 8, San Jose, Boedker 3 (Thornton,
Pavelski), 19:10 (pp).
OVERTIME
Coyotes 3, Kings 2 (OT)
LOS ANGELES .................... 0
ARIZONA ........................... 1
1
1
Scoring: 9, Vegas, Marchessault 7 (Neal, Theodore), 1:21.
1
0
0 — 2
1 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Arizona, Ekman-Larsson 4 (Stepan, Fischer),
10:17 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
SHOTS ON GOAL
SAN JOSE .......................... 8
15
3 — 26
VEGAS ............................. 12
10
9
2 — 33
Power-play opportunities: San Jose 1 of 2; Vegas 2 of 4.
Goalies: San Jose, Jones 9-5-1 (14 shots-11 saves), Dell 2-3-1
(19-17). Vegas, Lagace 5-5-1 (23-19), Subban 3-0-0 (3-3).
Scoring: 2, Los Angeles, Kopitar 10 (Muzzin, Gaborik),
2:53. 3, Arizona, Perlini 7 (Goligoski, Rieder), 17:50.
BOXI NG
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Los Angeles, Lewis 7 (Doughty, Andreoff),
2:42.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 5, Arizona, Fischer 6 (Demers, Dvorak), 2:43.
SHOTS ON GOAL
LOS ANGELES .................... 7
8
10 — 25
ARIZONA ......................... 12
10
7
4 — 33
Power-play opportunities: Los Angeles 0 of 1; Arizona 1
of 4. Goalies: Los Angeles, Kuemper 3-0-2 (33 shots-30
saves). Arizona, Wedgewood 2-2-1 (25-23). A: 12,285
(17,125). T: 2:33.
FIGHT SCHEDULE
SATURDAY
At the Theatre at Madison Square Garden, New York
(HBO), Sergey Kovalev vs. Vyacheslav Shabranskyy, 12,
light heavyweights; Sullivan Barrera vs. Felix Valera, 10,
light heavyweights; Jason Sosa vs. Yuriorkis Gamboa,
10 rounds, junior lightweights; Yuriorkis Gamboa vs.
Jason Sosa, 10, super featherweights.
DEC. 2
At Madison Square Garden, New York (HBO), Miguel
Cotto vs. Sadam Ali, 12, for Cotto’s WBO World junior
middleweight title; Rey Vargas vs. Oscar Negrete, 12s,
for Vargas’ WBC junior featherweight title.
EFGHI
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
washingtonpost.com/
realestate
apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
washingtonpost.com/pets
Happy Days
Hoping to reach Latasha Renee
Murray-Jones- 11/19/91 or any relatives. I am former foster mother
and have over 500 pics of her from
birth to two years plus. Would like to
forward same. Please contact Elizabeth De Rocco 5411 Cedar Tree
Lane, Emerald Isle, NC 28594.
225
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
265
Home & Garden
Persian Rugs—Persian rugs for sale,
some handmade, never used, purchased in Turkey, $75+, Laurel, MD,
contact (301)974-7936 if interested
358
SNOW BLOWER- Sears Craftsmen,
21", elec start, like new, exc cond,
$350. FILE CABINET- 5 drawers,
steel, $50. IBM ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER- Like new, $50. DESK excellent condition steel gray, approx 3'
x 5'. $200 CASH ONLY. 410-953-9264
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
ANTIQUES
&
AUCTIONS
Call 202-334-7029 or email
merchandise@washpost.com
KENSINGTON
ANTIQUE ROW
Christmas
Open House
Friday Dec 1st, 7-9pm
Antiques & Specialty Shops
Antique & Vintage Furniture.
Lighting, Jewelry, Art, Linens,
China, Silver, Mirrors, Books...
Multi-Dealer Mall B Stay 4 Lunch
KensingtonAntiqueRow.com
E. Howard Ave., Kensington, MD
N. on Conn., R. on Howard,
2 mi. N of Beltway (I-495)
Free Parking!
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
610
Moving Sale
Dogs for Sale
815
HAPPY THANKSGIVING!
2 GREAT SALES DEC 1-3.
Web 4 details.
www.FOURSALES.com
703-256-8300
1308 Rockalnd Terrace McLean, VA
TM SALES
Fri - Sun, 9-4
kitchenaid oven ,refirgeration and
nicrowave. interior fixtures,
lanscaping, 1000+ collector plates,
american antiques, paintings and
prints, silver, wedgwood, art
pottery. For more info see
www.estatesales.net
French Bulldogs - 9 weeks, AKC,
brndle,1 M, 1 F, $2,500 each
301-252-9213
HOWARD CO. ANIMAL CONTROL
If you have lost an animal in the
Howard County/
Washington Metro area:
CALL 410-313-2780
MONTGOMERY CO. ANIMAL SHELTER
If you have lost an animal in the
Washington Metro area: Please call
the Montgomery Co. Animal Shelter
at 240-773-5960 or online for found
animals at www.mchumane.org
Dogs for Sale
Cane Corso — $800/OBO,
3 Months old beautiful blue/brindle
puppies looking for great forever
homes. Vet health check, shots, tails
docked & dewormed. Contact
Larnell Johnson 202-207-7410
Chesapeake Bay Retriever— M/F, 8
wks. Elite Pedigree Field & Show.
All Health clearances. Ready Nov
30. $750, call/text 443-975-1160
English Bulldog x, Huskys &
more—Puppies on Sale. 304-9046289, Cash, CC, EasyFinance, 59 East
Rd, Martinsburg WV, wvpuppy.com
Legal Notices
Take notice that the United States has filed a proposed Final Judgment
in a civil antitrust case in the United States District Court for the
District of Columbia, United States of America v. CenturyLink, Inc.
and Level 3 Communications, Inc., Civil Action No. 1:17-cv-02028. On
October 2, 2017, the United States filed a Complaint alleging that
CenturyLink’s proposed acquisition of Level 3 would violate Section
7 of the Clayton Act, 15 U.S.C. § 18. The proposed Final Judgment,
filed at the same time as the Complaint, requires CenturyLink and
Level 3 to divest to an acquirer or acquirers all assets used by
Level 3 exclusively or primarily to support provision of fiber-based
telecommunications services to enterprise and wholesale customer
locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico; Boise, Idaho; and Tucson,
Arizona, and to provide to an acquirer an indefeasible right to use
twenty-four (24) strands of intercity dark fiber between each of thirty
(30) specified city pairs, along with certain tangible and intangible
assets. A Competitive Impact Statement filed by the United States
describes the Complaint, the proposed Final Judgment, the industry,
and the remedies available to private litigants who may have been
injured by the alleged violation.
Copies of the Complaint, proposed Final Judgment, and Competitive
Impact Statement are available for inspection on the Antitrust
Division’s website at http://www.justice.gov/atr and at the Office
of the Clerk of the United States District Court for the District of
Columbia.
Found
FAIRFAX CO. ANIMAL SERVICES
LAB RETR MIX M YEL
FFX CO
AM STAFF MIX F TN/W
FFX CO
CHIHUA, SH MIX M TN/W
FFX CO
ENGL BULLDOG F W/BR
FFX CO
SHIH TZU MIX F BLK/W
FFX CO
ROTTWEILER M BLK/TN
FFX CO
DMH MIX M ORG
FFX CO
DSH MIX U BLK/W
FFX CO
COCKATIEL F W
FFX CO
GUINEA PIG M BR/BLK
FFX CO
FOR MORE INFO CALL (703) 830-1100
815
Legal Notices
Department of Justice
Antitrust Division
Estate Sales
Need a Quality Sale?
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
MD, TP, 11/25-26/2017, 10-5, Furn,
stereo syst, sm appliances and more
360
610
Antiques
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
Takoma Park—39 Oswego Ave,
602
205
EZ
the local expert
on local jobs
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
102
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2017
FRENCH BULLDOGS- AKC, M/F,
all colors, $3500+, 8 weeks +
timeoutkennels.com 240-447-7615
GREAT PYRENEES PUPPIES.
6 M & 4 F, 11 weeks old, vet
checked and shots. $425 each
540-636-4897 or 540-622-1060
LAB PUPS - yellow & black,
Champion line, ready Nov 29. 3
rounds of worming, first 2 shots.
AKC registered, vet certified, family
raised 443-952-0338
LABRADOR RETRIEVER PUPPIES aca,yellow chocolate & black, family
raised and good with children, $1000
each 540-383-4203
Interested persons may address comments to Scott Scheele, Chief,
Telecommunications and Broadband Section, Antitrust Division,
Department of Justice, 450 Fifth Street NW, Suite 7000, Washington,
DC 20530 (telephone: 202-616-5924) within 60 days of the date of this
notice. Such comments, including the name of the submitter, and
responses thereto, will be posted on the Antitrust Division’s website,
filed with the Court, and, under certain circumstances, published in
the Federal Register.
610
Dogs for Sale
YORKSHIRE TERRIER PUPS & ADULTSAKC reg., champ blood lines,pet
only. 4mons-5 yrs old. $700-$1200
Call 540-672-0902
612
Adopt Dogs
It is ORDERED that EDWIN EFRAIN
MALAVE appear at the abovenamed court and protect his/her
interests on or before DECEMBER 4,
2017.
OCTOBER 13, 2017, DATE
Kathleen M. Sterne, CLERK
Cockapoo—Free to a good home. 835
F, 4 yrs old, Chocolate. Friendly,
affectionate, attention loving. She is
Suddath Relocation Systems of
fixed, current shots. 703-935-9620
Maryland LLC
815 South Main St.
640
Jacksonville, Florida 32207
Public Sale Notices
Birds & Other Animals
LAB RET/GOLDEN RET CROSS& AKC
GOLDEN PUPS & ADULTS
8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
Morkie Puppies—Thanksgiving Pups.
1-Female $1400, 3-Males $1200 ea.
8 wks on Nov 23rd. Call Jon @ 831682-1254. Dumfries, Va 22025.
POM-CHI'S & POMERANIAN PUPSShots/dewormed, 12 weeks,
adorable teacup sized, $650.
540-538-1037, Fredericksburg, VA
Yorkshire Terriers— Female & Male,
9 weeks old, Health guarantee, registered, playful and lovable, parents
on premises. $1,350. 540-631-1415
AFRICAN PARROT MALE GREY, with
cage, 15 years olds, reasonable price
negotiable, 202-396-4233
815
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
STAFFORD COUNTY
1300 COURTHOUSE ROAD
STAFFORD, VA 22554
Commonwealth of Virginia, in re
HENDERSON, LEIDY MORICE
v.
MALAVE, EDWIN EFRAIN
UNKNOWN
Case No. CL17001646-00
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
The object of this suit is to:
TO OBTAIN NAME CHANGE FOR
MINOR CHILD
ADVERTISEMENT OF
WAREHOUSEMAN’S LIEN SALE
Suddath Relocation Systems of
Maryland, LLC, will conduct a warehouseman’s lien sale, as authorized
by state statute, at 11:00 A.M. on
Saturday December 9, 2017 at 3850
Penn Belt Place, Forestville, MD
20747. Notice is hereby given that
beginning on Saturday, December 9,
2017, inspection and review will be
held from 9:00 A.M. to 10:30 A.M.,
and bidding shall start at 11:00 A.M.
and continue from day to day until
all articles have been sold.
The name(s) of the storage depositors whose property will be sold to
the highest bidder and a description
of the property to be sold, as set
forth
on
the
warehouse
receipt/storage contract and inventory, are as follows:
835
y
C
Public Sale Notices
Altimore, Anthony whose belongings include table, love seat, sofa
and various other items.
Brice, Troy whose belongings
include bedroom and dining room
furniture, flat screen TV, clothing
and various household good items.
Brown, Randall whose belongings
include one Suzuki motorcycle,
bedroom, dining room and living
room furniture, outdoor furniture
and various household good items.
Carle, Charles whose belongings
include various household items.
Coleman, John whose belongings
include several paintings.
Daniels, Shante-whose belongings
include kitchen items, clothing,
home and patio furnishings, and
outdoor yard equipment.
Fontana, Joe whose belongings
include a sewing machine, some
bedroom furniture and a mirror.
Hanna, Kevin whose belongings
include shelves, books various furniture items.
Hasty, Jason whose belongings
include one washer, one dryer,
clothing and some bedroom furniture.
Hurd, Darlene whose belongings
include Insignia TV, living room furniture, chairs and various household items.
Jenkins, Karen whose belongings
include some bedroom and dining
room furniture
Kiess, Lynnda whose belongings
include one desk and one sofa.
Mays, Eleanor whose belongings
include some bedroom furniture
and miscellaneous household good
items.
Poli, Michael whose belongings
include living room, dining room
and outdoor furniture, books and
various household good items.
Rogers, Sharon whose belongings
include dining room furniture,
kitchen items and toys.
Rock Creek Baptist Church whose
belongings include piano and organ,
church pews and various other
items.
Simpson, Margaret whose belongings include clothing, kitchen table
and chairs, and various bedroom
furnishings.
Unicorn Harmony whose belongings
include various items.
Wright, Alice whose belongings
include Toshiba 57” TV, dining room
furniture, bedroom furniture, clothing and holiday decorations.
The property to be sold is presently
stored in the Suddath Relocation
Systems of Maryland, LLC, warehouse located at 3850 Penn Belt
Place Forestville, MD 20747.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
FREE UNDER $250
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
C
JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers are needed
to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
JOBS
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
Great part-time
income opportunity!
Transportation
required.
To apply, go to
deliverthepost.com
or call
202-334-6100
(Please press “0”
For routes in
Severn & Odenton,
MD
once connected)
Call Bob Cranford
at 410-598-0364
Membership is rewarding.
PostPoints takes you
to special exhibits.
General Jobs
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
Reliable transportation
required.
Greenskeeper - Temporary, fulltime 2/12/18-11/30/18. 18 jobs w/
Four Streams, LLC, Beallsville,
MD in Montgomery cnty. Maint.
grounds and turf of golf course
in playing condition: till/cultivate/
grade turf. Apply lime/chemicals/
mow/dig/rake rough, greens &
fairway. Connect hose/sprinkler
systems. Grade/clean traps/repair
roadbeds. Plant/trim/spray trees/
shrubs. Entry lvl/req. sprvsn.
Lift/carry 50 lbs, when nec.
Emplyr-pd drug test req'd prior to
starting work. Background check
req'd. No exp req’d/will train. 40
hr/wk 6 AM-2:30 PM M-F.
Sat/Sun work req'd, when nec.
Wage is no less than $13.64/hr (OT
varies @ $20.46/hr). Raise/bonus
at emplr discretion. Transport
(incl. meals &, as nec, lodging) to
place of employ provided or paid
to wkrs residing outside normal
commute distance by completion
of 50% of job period. Return transport provided or paid to same wkrs
if wkr completes job period or is
dismissed early. Wkrs guaranteed
offer of 3/4 of work hrs each 12wk period. Tools, supplies, equip
& uniform provided at no cost.
Interview req'd. Fax resume to
(301) 349-2917 or apply at: Montgomery Cnty American Job Center, 11002 Veirs Mill Road,
Wheaton, MD 20902, (301) 9294350. JO#744034.
Home delivery is so easy.
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If only you had home delivery.
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Newspaper Delivery
Carriers
are needed to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Olney, Silver Spring
& Rockville, MD
Call Don Money at
301-674-0010
Excellent part-time
income!
SF
From dinosaur bones and
space shuttles to panda
bears and modern art,
discover great ways to
save money, win tickets
and have fun at museums.
washingtonpost.com/postpoints
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25 , 2017
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Quince Orchard’s Doc Bonner, leaping over a North Point defender,
had two touchdowns passing and rushing and another receiving.
MARYLAND 4A SEMIFINAL
SAVE BIG
THIS MONDAY!
QUINCE ORCHARD 40,
NORTH POINT 21
BY
C ALLIE C APLAN
Doc Bonner had just scored Friday night at North Point to extend
Quince Orchard’s lead to 26 points,
and the Cougars quarterback
looked to the student section.
There were still about 14 minutes left in the Maryland 4A semifinal game, and Bonner didn’t like
that his supporters already were
focusing on next week’s nemesis:
No. 1 Wise.
So he waved his arms in disapproval, and rounds of “We want
Wise”
chants
immediately
stopped. The students were silent.
That exemplified Bonner’s control during No. 8 Quince Orchard’s
40-21 victory against No. 6 North
Point in Waldorf. The senior, a
three-year starter, played a part in
five touchdowns and finished with
325 yards of offense to lead the
Cougars to a repeat state championship game appearance.
“Of course, we want to face
Wise,” Bonner said. “And we knew
we were going to face them as we
got later into tonight, but in our
heads, we were trying to finish this
game first.”
The score that sparked the chant
was perhaps the Dartmouth commit’s most dynamic.
Bonner rushed for two touchdowns and threw for another pair,
but this play involved him moving
without the ball. On a trick play,
wide receiver Brendan McGonagle
found Bonner running down the
right sideline for an 18-yard touchdown pass.
Coach John Kelley said his team
had been practicing the look for
months but hadn’t used it because
the Cougars were averaging nearly
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2018
Cougars get another shot
at Wise in the title game
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callie.caplan@washpost.com
MARYLAND 4A SEMIFINAL
Oliver gives No. 1 Pumas
a chance to make history
WISE 42,
HOWARD 7
APRIL 12
48 points a game with their contributors playing their usual roles.
But Friday night’s trickery added a spark to a game Quince Orchard (12-1) had hoped to reach
throughout the season.
Last year, the Cougars faced
Wise at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in the 4A final, losing,
42-7, to one of the area’s deepest
and most successful teams. So after
ending the first state semifinal appearance for North Point (12-1) in
disappointment, Kelley reminded
his players that they, too, were perennial contenders.
Then Bonner interrupted.
“I’m thankful you guys got me
back here,” he yelled from the middle of the huddle, referring to the
concussion he suffered in last
year’s state final that required an
emergency helicopter ride from
the field in Annapolis to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma
Center in Baltimore. “Now it’s revenge, revenge, revenge.”
“He’s a special player,” Kelley
said. “He’s an elite player, and when
you’re an elite player, you can make
the plays like he made tonight.”
Bonner completed 64.7 percent
of his passes for 213 yards and
added 112 on the ground. One of his
final carries, a one-yard touchdown rush with about seven minutes left in the game, angered the
Eagles.
After the extra point ended in
some verbal sparring, Kelley pulled
his team in to regain its focus.
When Bonner emerged from the
sideline huddle, he looked to the
student section and waved his
arms up and down to the thrill of
the crowd.
“I knew this game was going to
decide it all whether I would actually be able to finish my career next
week,” Bonner said. “I knew I had to
go all out and hype up.”
BY
M ICHAEL E RRIGO
A few minutes after his third
touchdown of the first half erased
any and all momentum once held
by Howard, Wise running back
John Oliver walked up his sideline
and silently flashed three fingers
to one of the two dozen former
Pumas football players who had
gathered for this Maryland 4A
semifinal game.
What’s unclear is whether Oliver’s signal represented the three
times he had knifed through the
Lions’ defense for a score or the
fact that his first-half performance had all but sealed top-ranked
Wise’s third straight trip to the 4A
title game.
The senior running back would
add a fourth rushing touchdown
in the second half of a 42-7 victory
Friday in Upper Marlboro. The
win marks the third straight time
Wise (13-0) has ended Howard’s
season, having beat it in the 2016
semifinals and the 2015 final. Both
of those contests ended with a
running clock.
“I looked up to all those guys
when they were here, so I knew I
had to carry on a tradition for
them,” Oliver said.
The Pumas will be traveling to
Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis on Friday to
face off against Quince Orchard in
a rematch of last year’s championship game. If they can take down
the Cougars for a second time,
Wise will become the first 4A team
to go undefeated and win three
straight championships in the
modern, four-tiered Maryland
playoff system.
“We have one more game to do
something that ain’t been done,”
Coach DaLawn Parrish told his
team after the game. “Do you get
that? Do you understand the importance of that?”
Wise’s 41st straight win came in
familiar fashion. On offense, the
Pumas found a rhythm early
thanks to Oliver. After the No. 12
Lions (12-1) tied the score at 7 in
the first quarter, the senior took a
first-down handoff 57 yards to give
his team the lead. A few minutes
later, he scored from five yards
out, then again from 15 yards. Oliver finished with 14 carries for 128
yards and four touchdowns.
“He’s instant offense,” Parrish
said. “He complements our receivers and quarterback well, and
sometimes he can go — bam, gone.”
On defense, Wise shut down the
Lions’ passing game and got three
big fourth-down stops. The Pumas
showed their big-play ability on
the last play of the third quarter
with Howard facing a third and
goal. Lions quarterback Robby
Porter was left exposed on a broken play, and the defense
pounced. Junior defensive end Nigel Johnson sprinted around the
edge and blindsided the quarterback, knocking the ball loose.
Linebacker Christopher Rhodes
scooped it up and took it back 92
yards for a touchdown. The Pumas
entered the fourth quarter with a
running clock.
With one tradition continued,
Wise now turns its attention to a
familiar foe and a shot at history.
When told after the game that
Quince Orchard was up big and
asked whether he liked a rematch,
the Pumas’ star smiled.
“We’re ready,” Oliver said. “Do
they want a rematch? That’s the
question.”
michael.errigo@washpost.com
THE WASHINGTON POST . SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2017
Real Estate
Hospitals’ second
chance at life
The converted medical centers, including
one in Northeast D.C., can offer residents
convenience and posh amenities. 8
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
WHERE WE LIVE: SHOUSE VILLAGE
HARNEY
BUYING NEW
Holiday parties help newcomers in this Vienna,
Va., community get to know their neighbors. 3
Identity-theft victims file
suit against Equifax. 6
Houses in Clinton, Md.,
for under $500K. 4
3.92%
30-year rate falls. 2
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2
EZ
Town Square
Real Estate News & Notes
Affordable house of the week:
Single-family home in Rockville, Md.
Home buyers in the Washington area
want to live within walking distance of a
Metro station and other amenities, but
when they start seriously shopping for a
property, they discover that proximity
usually means higher prices. Some
exceptions can be found, particularly if
you’re willing to compromise on the size
or condition of a property.
For example, the single-family house at
327 S. Horners Lane in Rockville is about
two blocks from the Rockville Metro
station and just five blocks from Rockville
Town Square. The Town Square has a
market, restaurants, shops, a two-story
library, a movie theater and an outdoor
plaza for summer concerts that is
converted into an ice-skating rink in
winter. The house, priced at $395,000,
was built in 1918 and is in the Croydon
Park community. Annual taxes are $4,672.
The two-bedroom, two-bathroom house
has 928 square feet, a new roof with a 30year warranty, new gutters and
downspouts, and a new venting skylight
in the master bedroom.
The house can use updating, but the
price has been reduced by $55,000 since it
was first listed.
The first floor includes one of the
TRUPLACE
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25, 2017
This 1918 single-family house in
Rockville, Md., at 327 S. Horners Lane,
is listing for $395,000 and is convenient
to Metro and Rockville Town Square
bedrooms and one of the bathrooms, as
well as a laundry room, an eat-in kitchen,
living room and dining room. The second
bedroom and bathroom are upstairs.
Utilities include electric central air
conditioning, and gas heat, cooking and
hot water. There is a driveway for offstreet parking and the house has a
basement for storage.
Assigned schools include Maryvale
Elementary, Earle B. Wood Middle and
Rockville High, all rated average or above
average by greatschools.org.
For more photos, visit https://
RE AL ESTAT E
Real Estate Editor:
V. Dion Haynes, dion.haynes@washpost.com
Art Director:
Dwuan June
Advertising Manager:
Howard J.S. Bomstein,
howard.bomstein@washpost.com
To contact us:
realestate@washpost.com
Mail:
The Washington Post, Real Estate Section
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
boxing gym, a spinning studio, a virtual
golf room, an art gallery, a playroom, a
teen center, two movie theaters, a
swimming pool, lounges, a spa and a
beauty salon. The Aston Martin will also
include a private yacht marina.
For information, visit
astonmartinresidences.com.
HOUSELENS
The two rowhouse condos at 240 Q St. NW in D.C.’s Shaw, listing for $995,900 and
$1,249,900, are wrapped in windows and look more like an office than a residence.
Sleekly contemporary condos in Shaw
Transforming a rowhouse into condos
is nothing new in the District, but the
former rowhouse at 240 Q St. NW in Shaw
stands out for two reasons: First, the twounit building is wrapped in walls of
windows that look a little more like an
office than a residence. Second, each unit
has a private entrance, one on either side
of the building, for more privacy.
Built by Better Living Development,
both units have two bedrooms, three
bathrooms, wood floors, walls of floor-toceiling windows, an open floor plan, a
washer and dryer, and an assigned
parking space.
Unit 1, priced at $995,900, has 1,755
square feet on two levels. The main level
includes an open floor plan with a kitchen
with a center island at one end, a dining
tour.truplace.com/property/278/58957/
?Branding=0.
For information, contact associate
broker Alan Bruzee with Long & Foster
Real Estate at 301-254-7800.
Aston Martin zooms
into condo project
Miami condo buyers
with deep pockets will
be able to live out their
James Bond fantasies
once the Aston Martin
Residences are
completed in 2021. The
British luxury sports car
company is expanding
its brand in its first real
estate project in
downtown Miami.
The Aston Martin
design team, which is
working with G&G
Business
Developments, is
incorporating elements
such as materials and
colors from its sports
cars into the building,
area, a living area and a sitting area with a
bay window at the opposite end. This level
also has a powder room and a closet.
Upstairs are two master suites, each with
a walk-in closet and a full bathroom. This
unit has a private patio.
Unit 2, priced at $1,249,900, has 1,899
square feet on two levels, with an
additional third level with two roof decks
that add more than 900 square feet of
living space. This unit has an open floor
plan with a kitchen, living area and dining
area on the first level. The second level has
two master suites, each with a walk-in
closet and a full bathroom.
For information, contact real estate
agent Jack Shoptaw of Century 21 New
Millennium at 202-821-9791.
including door handles, carbon-fiber
furniture and residence number plates.
The glass-and-steel sail-shaped
building at 300 Biscayne Blvd., set on one
of the last pieces of developable land on
the downtown Miami
waterfront, was designed by
Revuelta Architecture and
Bodas Maini Anger.
Construction is underway
on the 66-story tower, which
will eventually have 391
units priced from $600,000
to more than $50 million.
The broad range of prices is
reflected in condo sizes,
ranging from 700 to 19,000
square feet. The waterfront
condo building includes
seven penthouses and one
triplex penthouse.
The condos will have
floor-to-ceiling windows,
glass balconies and white
marble flooring.
RENDERING COURTESY OF ASTON MARTIN/
Four floors of the building
G&G BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
will be devoted to resident
Construction is underway
amenities, such as a twoon Miami’s 66-story Aston
level fitness center
Martin Residences.
overlooking the ocean, a
Online program offers all-in-one
mortgage loan and home purchase
Navigating the home search process
can be stressful enough without the added
pressure of lining up mortgage financing
and negotiating a purchase.
Now OfferPad, a direct online home
purchase program, has partnered with
LoanDepot, the second largest non-bank
consumer lender, to offer a new digital
financing option for buyers.
OfferPad Home Loans, available to
buyers on the OfferPad site, allows
customers to apply for a loan when they
are shopping for a home. Homeowners
can request a purchase offer through
OfferPad and receive one within 24 hours
through the platform. Once they accept
the offer, the sellers can choose a closing
date. If they are moving locally, OfferPad
will pay for their move.
In addition to providing digital
mortgage loan application services
through LoanDepot, the companies are
also offering bridge loans to help sellers
overcome the obstacle of timing the
purchase of a new home with the sale of
an existing home. Homeowners with an
instant offer from OfferPad can apply for a
bridge loan through LoanDepot because
they have the security of a guaranteed
offer for their home.
The two companies plan to introduce
other initiatives in the future. In addition
to providing direct connections between
buyers and sellers, OfferPad can connect
buyers with a local real estate agent to
help them with the purchase process.
OfferPad, currently available in
Charlotte, Atlanta, Tampa, Orlando, Los
Angeles, Las Vegas, Salt Lake City and
Phoenix, intends to expand to additional
markets.
For information, visit offerpad.com.
— Michele Lerner
To pass on a tip or item, contact us at
realestate@washpost.com and put “Town
Square” in the subject line.
Weekly averages for popular
mortgage types
5%
3.92
4
30-YEAR FIXED
3.32
15-YEAR FIXED
3.22
3
5-YEAR ARM
2
1
0
’16
Source: Freddie Mac
THE WASHINGTON POST
’17
Where We Live
3
EZ
Shouse Village
Drawing
families,
avid online
searches
Neighborhood near Wolf Trap,
Tysons is a place where ‘people
really look out for each other’
L ESTER D AVIS
ATWO
OD RD
.
ra
Transit: Shouse Village is less than
three miles from the Spring Hill Station on
Metro’s Silver Line. The community is also
served by a Metrobus stop at the entrance
of the community at Route 7 and Towlston
Road.
676
DU
LL
E
Meadowlark
Gardens Regional
Park
Detail
Md.
Wolf Trap
National
Park
D.C.
Va.
1,000 FT.
maps4news.com/©HERE
Source: maps4news.com/here
THE WASHINGTON POST
Crime: In the past six months, there has
been one report of an assault and one
report of theft from a vehicle in the area
that includes Shouse Village, according to
Fairfax County Police.
realestate@washpost.com
To see more photos of Shouse Village, go
to washingtonpost.com/realestate.
NOVEMBER 25, 2017
Schools: Colvin Run Elementary, Longfellow Middle and McLean High.
SHOUSE
VILLAGE
. SATURDAY,
north, Towlston Road on the east, and the
intersection of Tuba Court and Laurlin
Court to the west.
In the past 12 months, eight properties
have sold in Shouse Village, ranging from a
1,646-square-foot, four-bedroom, threebathroom split-level house for $660,000
to a 2,800-square-foot, four-bedroom,
three-bathroom Colonial for $868,000,
said Stewart, the resident and real estate
agent.
There are no homes on the market or
under contract in Shouse Village, Stewart
said.
p Creek
PI
KE
THE WASHINGTON POST
Living there: Shouse Village is roughly
bordered by the Dulles Access Road (Route
267) on the south, Shouse Drive and homes
along Towlston Road up to Route 7 on the
LE
ES
BU
RG
702
D.
LR
OL
Tysons Corner and Wolf Trap National
Park for the Performing Arts, Shouse
Village, which was developed in the late
1960s and early 1970s, and named after
Wolf Trap founder Catherine Filene
Shouse, offers a wide range of split-levels,
Colonials and ramblers, said Paula Stew-
art, a real estate agent with Weichert
Realtors.
Stewart, who lives in Shouse Village,
said that buyers, especially those with
children, are drawn to the community
because they feel that it’s a welcoming
place for families.
“Our family feels very safe in the neighborhood, and you will often see residents
walking or children biking on the sidewalk-lined streets,” she said.
Ray Hwang, who moved to Shouse
Village in January, said that his family has
really taken to the neighborhood and has
enjoyed themed parties in celebration of
Valentine’s Day, Easter and Halloween.
“Residents recognize new faces and are
really welcoming,” said Hwang, who lives
in a four-bedroom, three-bathroom Colonial. “There are quite a bit of opportunities
for new residents to move in and meet lots
of friendly people.”
Suzanne Keating, president of the
Shouse Village Community Association
and a 27-year resident, said that a healthy
mix of newcomers easily combines with
longtime residents to help maintain a
shared sense of belonging.
“It is a community that you can age in,
and I have,” said Keating, who lives in a
“decent-sized” five-bedroom, three-bathroom, split-level house on Towlston Road.
“People really look out for each other. If
somebody needs help with their gutters or
something else, we take care of each other.”
ST
Welcoming to families: Located near
JUSTIN T. GELLERSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Shouse Village’s recreation center and its pool are a focal point of community activity. The neighborhood, developed in the late
1960s and early 1970s, offers a wide range of split-level houses, Colonials and ramblers.
lft
Wo
While the oft-quoted axiom “no pain, no
gain” is typically associated with pursuits
of physical fitness, the spirit behind the
phrase seemed to perfectly sum up Colleen
Ganjian’s desperate attempts several years
ago to purchase her dream home, she said.
Ganjian, who along with her husband
was raising a 3-year-old daughter, had her
sights set on finding a single-family house,
with a two-car garage, in the Vienna
neighborhood of Shouse Village.
The only problem, she soon discovered,
was that a lot of other buyers seemed to
have the same idea, leaving relatively few
real estate options in this sought-after
section of Northern Virginia.
“Every night, I’d sit at my computer, eyes
red and tired, and Google the neighborhood searching for a house,” said Ganjian,
who at the time had just sold her townhouse in Alexandria’s Cameron Station
and was living with her husband and
daughter in her mother’s basement.
“I did a ton of research and determined
that Shouse Village would be the perfect
place to move, but it was really difficult
finding a home.”
One night, while Ganjian searched for
properties online, a house that fit her
checklist popped up. Within 12 hours,
she’d made a full-price offer and crossed
her fingers, she said.
“We didn’t get it and I was so upset. It
was devastating.”
She resumed her nightly searches and a
few weeks later saw an ad on Craigslist for
a house that would soon hit the market.
She found an email address for the listing
agent and sent a heartfelt pitch note.
Finally, Ganjian had found her new
home.
“Honestly, the house was kind of a train
wreck inside. We had to put in a fortune to
renovate it, but the neighborhood is so
great that we just couldn’t ask for a better
place,” said Ganjian, who moved two years
ago to a 2,900-square-foot, six-bedroom,
four-bathroom Colonial.
TOW
LST
ON
RD.
BY
4
EZ
Buying New
The Vineyards
Woods and greenery, 30 miles from the District
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25, 2017
K
BY
A UDREY H OFFER
The Vineyards is a 90-acre property in
Clinton, Md., in Prince George’s County,
about 30 miles southeast of the District and
five miles south of Joint Base Andrews. It will
comprise 64 single-family houses when
completed.
“We think this is a very convenient location. Access to JBA is excellent, the Beltway is
close, and it’s easy to get to downtown,” said
Tim Bates, Mid-Atlantic division president
for CalAtlantic Homes, which is developing
the site. The company was formed in 2015
through a merger of Standard Pacific Homes
in Orange County, Calif., and Ryland Homes
in Maryland. Today, the headquarters is bicoastal — in Irvine, Calif., and Arlington, Va.
The land is in the early stages of development. The main streets through the community are paved, and there are a few stakes
with numbered home sites, which average
about 0.22 acres. Many back to wooded
areas, and the overall scene is lovely rural
greenery. Prospective buyers can drive or
walk the property with map in hand —
available for pickup at the sales office — and
select the spot that most appeals to them.
Five homes have been sold, and construction will begin soon. Fifty-nine are for sale.
This is Phase II of the Vineyards. Phase I,
which is adjacent, consists of 90 homes
completed and occupied some time ago,
Bates said.
Ideal for entertaining: Buyers can
choose from five floor plans — Dawson,
Patuxent, Harlow II, Prescott II and Barrington. The furnished model, Dawson, is a
traditional two-story center-hall Colonial.
An open floor plan seamlessly melds family
room, morning room and kitchen, which
run across the rear of the house. “It’s a good
layout for entertaining, because people can
hang out in the kitchen around the large
island while a meal is prepared,” said John
Stuart, CalAtlantic’s Mid-Atlantic vice president for sales and marketing.
A popular option is a deck or patio, where
you can grill for dinner or sit around a fire pit
afterward looking up at the stars.
The double garage opens into a mudroom
off the kitchen. Kids can drop their backpacks, store muddy shoes, hang up coats and
march directly into the kitchen for cookies
and milk after school.
Entering the front door leads to the foyer,
the living room on the immediate left and
the dining room on the right. The staircase to
the second level is off-center to the right.
Four spacious bedrooms, plus an owner’s
suite sitting room, form the core of the floor.
“A lot of people will choose a fifth bedroom
option in place of the sitting room,” Stuart
said.
The basement comes unfinished but can
be built out with a den, playroom, media
room, or another bedroom and bathroom.
“One of the biggest amenities we offer is
the expandability of the home and its entertainment value,” Stuart said.
Parkland: Twenty-five acres out of the
90-acre property were donated to the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning
Commission as parkland. “That land will be
the state’s property,” Bates said, “and the
state has the flexibility to decide what recre-
PHOTOS BY BENJAMIN C. TANKERSLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The living room of the Vineyards model home in Clinton, Md. Phase II of the development will have 64 single-family houses when
completed and offer convenient access to the Beltway and Joint Base Andrews. Below, the model home’s exterior.
ational opportunities to put in for Prince
George’s County residents to enjoy. Maybe
there’ll be trails or a soccer field. The result
for our residents is a lot of open space right
outside their front door.”
In addition, the 690-acre Cosca Regional
Park offers a nature center, ballfields, a playground and picnic shelters. Boardwalks are
built over wetlands in Piscataway Park, enabling one to see fragile vegetation and
water wildlife up close. Rosaryville State
Park, with 982 acres, has miles of trails for
hiking, biking and horseback riding.
Shopping: Clinton Plaza and Coventry
Plaza offer many shopping, dining and commercial options a short drive from the Vine-
yards. Walmart isn’t too far north of Clinton.
Schools: Waldon Woods Elementary, Stephen Decatur Middle, Surrattsville High.
Transit: “A great thing about the community is that it’s kind of tucked away. It’s quiet
and peaceful but also close to major hubs to
D.C., Annapolis, Interstate 495 and JBA,”
Stuart said. Temple Hills is seven miles away,
Oxon Hills is nine, National Harbor is 12 and
Baltimore-Washington International Marshall Airport is 39.
realestate@washpost.com
To see more photos of the Vineyards, go to
washingtonpost.com/realestate.
THE VINEYARDS
6407 Summer Sweet Dr., Clinton, Md.
There will be 64 single-family houses ranging
from $404,990 to $491,990. Five have been
sold. Current incentives include $15,000
toward the Design Center and $10,000
toward closing costs with use of the builder’s
affiliated mortgage and title service.
Builder: CalAtlantic Homes
Features: The houses have two-car garages,
a Carrier gas furnace and electric air
conditioning, and vinyl single-hung, doublepaned windows with tilt-in feature for easy
cleaning. Carbon monoxide and smoke
detectors, a 55-gallon electric water heater
and Honeywell programmable thermostats
are installed. Ceilings are nine feet high on
all levels. Hardwood floors run through the
entry foyer, powder room and kitchen. Light
fixtures are brushed nickel by Progress. The
kitchens have Whirlpool appliances, granite
counters and choice of sink between a
stainless-steel offset or nine-inch single bowl.
Moen Chateau faucets are installed in the
bathrooms and the kitchen.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 4 to 7 / 3 to 6
Square footage: 2,520 to 3,407
Homeowners association fee: $50 per
month
View model: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.
Contact: Cliff Martin at 443-883-1762 or
calatlantichomes.com.
5
EZ
New Home. New Traditions.
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ADDITIONAL SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE ON MOVE-IN READY HOMES
At Van Metre, we want you to live in the home of your dreams, not fix up someone else’s dream home.
That’s why we invite you to take a look at a newly-built Van Metre home, where you’re free to start
living the life you want. Find the right house, in the right neighborhood at a price that’s right for
you—truly. This is your last chance to save up to ﹐ on upgrades for your dream kitchen or
a home entertainment package. Offer ends November .
VanMetreHomes.com/Fall-Festival
THE WASHINGTON POST
LET OUR FAMILY BUILD A HOME FOR YOURS
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25, 2017
*Available only for new contracts wrien and accepted at Van Metre Homes communities between October and November A maximum of toward a kitchen upgrade
or home entertainment package for single-family homes, townhomes or a multi-family home purchased, notwithstanding the number of purchasers for a specific new home. Purchasers shall not
be entitled to any rebate, refund or other consideration in the event that the full value of the credit is not used. Other terms and conditions may apply. Maximum credit varies by community.
Visit VanMetreHomes.com/Fall-Festival or see a Sales Manager for details.
6
EZ
Market Analysis
Class-action suit accuses Equifax of failing to protect consumers
The scenario that personal
finance and credit experts
feared most about the heist
of consumer data from
Equifax may already be
underway: Criminals are
The
using the stolen
Nation's
information to apply for
Housing
mortgages, credit cards
and student loans, and
KENNETH R.
tapping into bank debit
HARNEY
accounts, filing insurance
claims and racking up
substantial debts, according to a major
new class-action lawsuit.
The lawsuit pulls together dozens of
individual complaints from consumers in
all 50 states plus the District and suggests
that cybercriminals aren’t wasting time
using the Social Security numbers, credit
card accounts, driver’s license numbers
and other sensitive personal information
they siphoned out of the credit bureau’s
reputedly secure databases on
145.5 million Americans.
Filed in federal district court in
Equifax’s home territory of Atlanta, the
suit is intended to create a single, giant
national class action against the company.
It alleges violations of federal and state
laws and cites claims by more than 50
individual plaintiffs whose information
was hacked that significant financial
damage already is occurring. A few
examples:
Bridgette Craney of Virginia says that
since the Equifax breach, she has
experienced “multiple fraudulent
charges” on five of her credit card
accounts and had two fraudulent store
credit accounts opened in her name.
Robert Hunt of Georgia claims that
multiple “unauthorized mortgages” have
been applied for using his stolen
information.
Jennifer Wise of Vermont says she has
been getting dunned by collection
agencies for “loans that she never
opened.”
Manuel Lucero of Mississippi says
criminals have applied for student loans
using his identity; Kyoko Yamamoto of
New York claims “at least two”
unauthorized charges have been made
using her debit card; and Jasmine Guess
of Louisiana says fraudulent insurance
claims have been made using her stolen
identity information.
The suit, Allen et al v. Equifax, charges
that the company “failed spectacularly” in
its legal responsibilities to protect
consumers’ confidential data. It also
alleges that the company failed to take
steps to upgrade its security protocols,
such as installing a remedial patch
provided by a software maker, and then
delayed informing consumers about the
breach, thereby preventing them from
taking steps to minimize the damage.
Through Equifax’s negligence,
according to the suit, cybercriminals
gained access to data that now “permits
thieves to create fake identities,
fraudulently obtain loans, swipe tax
refunds and destroy” consumers’
creditworthiness. Among the most
vulnerable potential and actual victims:
home buyers and mortgage applicants,
who “tend to have significant information
on file with credit bureaus” and as a result
are “especially at risk” for identity theft
after the Equifax data breach.
An Equifax representative had no
comment on the litigation. Lawyers
representing the individual plaintiffs also
declined to comment. The potential size
of the class represented by the lawsuit is
enormous — “all residents of the United
States whose personal information was
compromised as a result of the data
breach announced by Equifax.” The
allegations include violations of the
federal Fair Credit Reporting Act, the
Federal Trade Commission Act and state
consumer protection laws as well as rules
regarding deceptive practices and data
breaches, all of which are recounted in
the 323-page filing.
The suit is particularly harsh in its
criticism of Equifax’s alleged failures to
heed red flags indicating that its systems
were not secure. In April 2017, according
to the suit, cyber-risk analysis firm
Cyence rated the probability of a security
breach at Equifax at 50 percent in the
next 12 months. Credit analytics firm
FICO gave Equifax low marks on data
protection: an enterprise security score
around 550 on a scale of 300 to 850. In
2014, Equifax “left private encryption
keys on its server,” potentially allowing
hackers to decrypt sensitive data,
according to the suit.
How might this suit affect you? If you
own a home, have a mortgage or received
information from Equifax that your files
were accessed, you are probably part of
the class. You needn’t do anything to join.
Keep in mind, though: The case may
sound like a slam-dunk, but it might not
be. Lawyers will need to demonstrate a
link between plaintiffs’ claims of identity
theft and the Equifax breach, which may
be challenging to prove.
In the meantime, remember that it’s
not too late to get defensive. If you’re like
the vast majority of consumers who have
not yet placed freezes on their files at
Equifax, Experian, TransUnion and
Innovis, consider doing so now. For
information on how to proceed, go to
consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0497-creditfreeze-faqs.
Ken Harney’s email address is
kenharney@earthlink.net.
www.homeaidnova.org
HOMEAID NORTHERN VIRGINIA
16TH ANNUAL GALA & AUCTION
CONGRATULATIONS!
to the winners of the 2017 Presidents’ Circle Awards!
The HomeAid Northern Virginia Presidents’ Circle Awards
recognizes those in our community who have gone the extra
mile to further HomeAid’s mission of building new lives for
the homeless.
Presidents’ Award
Brian Davidson
Group President of Van Metre Homes
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25, 2017
PRESENTED BY
Trade Partner of the Year Award
Buhl Electric Co, Inc.
Non-Profit Project of the Year Award
Community Lodgings
OFFICIAL CHARITY OF
BIG THANKS!
to the 50 sponsors
and 400+ supporters
who attended our 16th
Annual Gala & Auction!
We are grateful for your
commitment to helping
us end homelessness
in our community.
Miller & Smith • Granite Source • Mid South Building Supply, Inc. • The Roof Center
MCGUIREWOODS • United Bank • Walsh, Collucci, Lubeley & Walsh, p.c. • KTGY
Burgess Lighting • Brookfield Residential • Van Metre • Atlas Plumbing
Century Tile • Metrostudy • William A. Hazel, Inc. • Tamko
Hometown Title & Escrow, LLC/Keegan & DeVol, PLC
Hall Mechanical & Associates • Exceptional Choices • Heritage Contracting
Gaf • W.C. Ralston Architects • Fulton Bank • Weyerhaeuser Co. • Builders Design
Troutman Sanders • Springfield Marble & Granite • Walker Title • Jones Day
7
House of the Week
EZ
A home in a community with a storied history
BY
K ATHY O RTON
HOMEVISIT PHOTOS
The four-bedroom house in the Merry-Go-Round Farm community in Potomac, Md., includes a pool and a flagstone wraparound porch.
beams in the coffered ceiling
overlays stained wood slats, providing a contrast to the rugged
stone fireplaces. The end-grain
teak butcher block island in the
kitchen is beautiful as well as
practical.
The home is ideal for entertaining. The owner annually
hosts a sit-down dinner for 40
people at Hanukkah.
The lower level has a media
room and a 700-bottle wine cellar.
The outdoors includes a flagstone
terrace, a pool with fountains, a
spa, pool house and fireplace.
The four-bedroom, six-bathroom, 8,200-square-foot-home
on 0.66 acre is listed at $3.65 million. The monthly homeowners
association fee is $387.
kathy.orton@washpost.com
NOVEMBER 25, 2017
The living room of the house, which has an open floor plan. Merry-Go-Round Farm was owned by
famed newspaper columnist Drew Pearson. The community has 140 acres of pastures and rolling hills.
. SATURDAY,
13309 DREWS LANE,
POTOMAC, MD.
$3.65 million
Features: The cedar siding and
stucco home has a wraparound
porch. The spacious interior has
the flow of an open floor plan with
the coziness of defined spaces.
The outdoor areas include a
flagstone terrace, a pool with
fountains and a fireplace. The
community features an equestrian
center, tennis courts and miles of
walking and horse trails.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 4/6
Approximate square footage:
8,200
Lot size: 0.66 acre
Agent: Adam Gelb, Long & Foster
For more photos of this home
and other houses for sale in the
area, go to washingtonpost.com/
wherewelive.
THE WASHINGTON POST
The sniper attacks that terrorized the Washington area 15 years
ago caused a family that originally planned to build this house in
the Merry-Go-Round Farm community of Potomac, Md., to rethink their decision to move here.
They bought the land and paid an
architect to design the home, but
after the attacks, they put it back
on the market. A contractor
bought the plans and the land,
and was almost finished with the
house when the current owner
bought it.
Merry-Go-Round Farm was
once owned by newspaper columnist Drew Pearson. The name of
the community comes from his
column, “Washington Merry-GoRound,” which was carried in 625
newspapers and ran for 30 years,
until his death in 1969.
Pearson, once described as the
nation’s best-known political
muckraker, bought the 279-acre
farm in 1936. It was a weekend
home for the columnist and later
became a working farm during
World War II, when he added
horses and dairy cattle. He put up
a sign on River Road advertising
fertilizer for sale that read, “Drew
Pearson’s manure, all cow, no
bull, better than the column.”
When he died, The Washington
Post and the New York Times
each wrote editorials about him.
“The simple truth is that he was
more effective in his way than any
man in his profession over the
nearly 40 years that he was practicing it, and that at the time of his
death at the age of 71, when other
men might have begun to ease off
a bit, he was still on top, with
nearly twice the readership of his
closest competitor,” The Post’s editorial said.
Construction began on the development in 1993. By 2000, 28
houses had been built. It has now
grown to nearly 80 homes.
From the beginning, the community was designed with very
specific criteria. No McMansions.
No oversize lots. Instead, homes
are clustered to create a neighborhood feel.
Merry-Go-Round Farm features 140 acres of pastures and
rolling hills, with nine miles of
walking and horse trails, lakes,
streams and views of the Potomac
River. The community includes
an equestrian center, lighted tennis courts and a gym.
The Craftsman-style house has
stucco and cedar siding, a flagstone wraparound porch and a
mahogany front door.
An abundance of wood warms
the interior. In the living and
dining rooms, the grid of white
8
EZ
Cover Story
PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Bringing ailing hospitals back to life
Medical facilities are becoming upscale living spaces, raising concerns about urban patients’ options
BY P HIL G ALEWITZ
AND A NNA G ORMAN
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25, 2017
Kaiser Health News
When Laura Kiker rented a
new apartment in September, a
few blocks from the Capitol, she
knew she was moving into a historical neighborhood.
She had no idea, though, that
her new home, at 700 Constitution Ave. in Northeast Washington, was a former hospital dating
back nearly a century.
Today, she loves living in what
used to be a patient room at what
once was known as Eastern Dispensary Casualty Hospital, in a
four-story building with wide
hallways, high ceilings and restored post-World War II-style architecture. A spacious rooftop
deck, a yoga studio and an indoor
dog wash are added bonuses for
Kiker and her dog, Stella. “There
is so much history in this town, it’s
nice to live in a place that has its
own,” said Kiker, 30, a management consultant.
Across the country, hospitals
TOP: The entryway to Laura Kiker’s apartment building has
murals of famous D.C. sites. ABOVE: Her home, at 700
Constitution Ave. NW, was a hospital decades ago.
that have shut their doors are
coming back to life in various
ways: as affordable senior housing, as historical hotels and as
condos, including some costing
tens of millions in the heart of
New York’s Greenwich Village.
The trend of converting hospitals to new uses has accelerated as
real estate values have soared in
many cities. At the same time, the
demand for inpatient beds has
declined, with the rise of outpatient surgery centers and a move
toward shorter hospital stays.
As health systems consolidate
for financial reasons, they might
prefer that patients visit their
flagship hospital while buildings
of smaller hospitals in their orbit
get sold off — especially if the
latter have a disproportionate
share of indigent patients.
David Friend, chief transformation officer at the consulting
firm BDO in Boston, said that real
estate is one of urban hospitals’
most valuable assets. “A hospital
could be worth more dead than
alive,” he said.
9
EZ
PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Cozy seating arrangements make up the common area of Laura Kiker’s apartment building, which was once a section of Specialty
Hospital-Capitol Hill. “There is so much history in this town, it’s nice to live in a place that has its own,” said Kiker, seen below.
Gorman reported from Los Angeles. Kaiser
Health News, a nonprofit health newsroom
whose stories appear in news outlets
nationwide, is an editorially independent part of
the Kaiser Family Foundation.
To see more photos of 700 Constitution,
go to washingtonpost.com/realestate.
NOVEMBER 25, 2017
realestate@washpost.com
. SATURDAY,
shower heads. All the units have LED track
lighting and granite countertops, and
washers and dryers. There is a parking
garage below the building.
Other amenities in the building include a
yoga studio, fitness center and a spacious
living room area on the ground floor with
large television and a billiards table. The
lighted rooftop is complete with plants and
outdoor furniture, including chaise
longues, as well as two large gas grills. From
the roof, residents enjoy great sunsets and
view of the Capitol, the Washington Monument and the Library of Congress. There is
also patio seating in the courtyard in the
back of the building.
The building is halfway between Lincoln
Park and Stanton Park, less than a 10-minute walk to Eastern Market Metro and less
than 15 minutes from Union Station. Nearly
half of the 139-unit building, where onebedroom apartments rent for nearly
$2,600 per month, is already leased.
Sophie White, 28, who moved into 700
Constitution in the summer, watched the
building’s transformation and renovation
from a rental property a few blocks away.
“It used to be a blight on the neighborhood with unsavory people milling around
it,” she said. Now, “it’s really a cool place to
live.”
THE WASHINGTON POST
babies since it opened shortly after the Civil
War, closed in 2002 and reopened in 2006
as condos with a rooftop swimming pool.
Some former hospitals are used for purposes other than housing.
In Santa Fe, N.M., St. Vincent Hospital
moved into a new facility in 1977, and the
old structure downtown was reborn as a
state office building. Later, it was abandoned, and locals listed it as one of the
spookiest places in town. In 2014, the
building reopened yet again as the 141room Drury Plaza Hotel.
After Linda Vista Community Hospital,
in Los Angeles’s Boyle Heights neighborhood, closed in the 1990s, the abandoned
six-story building fell into disrepair — its
empty patient rooms, discarded medical
equipment and aging corridors serving as
sets for movies such as “Pearl Harbor” and
“Outbreak.” AMCAL Multi-Housing bought
the property in 2011 and redeveloped it into
a low-income senior apartment house
called Hollenbeck Terrace.
“They really rescued a building with
tremendous history . . . while providing
really needed low-income senior housing,”
said Linda Dishman, chief executive officer
of the Los Angeles Conservancy, a group
dedicated to preserving and revitalizing
historic structures. “It is such an iconic
building in the neighborhood.”
Nicky Cymrot, president of the Capitol
Hill Community Foundation, a neighborhood group in Washington, said that when
Specialty Hospital Capitol Hill sold off a
little-used 100,000-square-foot wing of its
facility that became 700 Constitution,
neighbors weighed in with concerns about
aesthetics and traffic. But by the time the
apartment building opened early this year
after a five-year, $40 million renovation,
the response was positive.
The original building, located at 700
Constitution Avenue NE, was built in 1905
when it was established as the Eastern
Dispensary Casualty Hospital. Other additions date to 1928 and 1956. It was renamed
Rogers Memorial Hospital in the 1950s and
later became Specialty Hospital-Capitol
Hill.
The developers restored the 1928 portion of the building, and 1956 additions
were altered with a rear addition and roof
deck constructed. Specialty Hospital, renamed BridgePoint Hospital, a long-term
care facility, remains open next door.
The apartments are brand new, with
stainless-steel appliances, including refrigerators, microwaves and gas stoves. A key
feature of the units is thick walls that keep
things quiet. The bathrooms have modern
shower stalls with glass doors and large
K
The number of hospitals in the United
States has declined by 21 percent over the
past four decades, from 7,156 in 1975 to
5,627 in 2014, according to the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention.
Even when the conversions make medical sense, they pull at the heartstrings of
communities whose residents have an
emotional attachment to hospitals where
family members were born, cured or died.
But they sometimes create health deserts in
their wake.
St. Vincent’s Hospital in New York treated survivors of the Titanic’s sinking in 1912,
the first AIDS patients in the 1980s and
victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in
2001. But it filed for bankruptcy protection
and closed seven years ago. Developer Rudin Management bought it for $260 million
and transformed it into a high-end condo
complex that opened in 2014. Former Starbucks chief executive Howard Schultz
bought one of the condos for $40 million.
Jen van de Meer, an assistant professor at
the Parsons School for Design in New York,
who lives in the neighborhood, said residents’ protests about the conversion were
not just about the optics of a hospital that
had long served the poor being repurposed.
“Now, if you are in cardiac arrest, the
nearest hospital could be an hour drive in a
taxi or 20 minutes in an ambulance across
the city,” van de Meer said.
St. Vincent’s is one of at least 10 former
hospitals in New York City that have been
turned into residential housing over the
past 20 years.
Closing a hospital and converting it to
another use is not exactly like renovating
an old Howard Johnson’s, said Jeff Goldsmith, a health industry consultant in
Charlottesville. “A hospital in a lot of places
defines a community — that’s why it’s so
hard to close them,” said Goldsmith, who
noted that after Martha Jefferson Hospital
closed its downtown facility in 2009 to
move closer to the interstate highway, an
apartment building took its place.
But many older hospitals are too outmoded to be renovated for today’s medical
needs and patient expectations. For example, early 20th-century layouts cannot accommodate large operating room suites
and private rooms, Friend said.
“It’s all about location, location, location,” Terry Busby, chief executive officer of
Arlington-based Urban Structures, said
when asked why former hospitals are being
bought and redeveloped as housing. They
are often in city centers near transits
Moreover, the buildings, with their wide
hallways and high ceilings, are often easy to
remake as luxury apartments.
In some circumstances, a conversion
provides a much-needed lift for the community. New York Cancer Hospital, which
opened on Central Park West in 1887 and
closed in 1976, was an abandoned and
partially burned-out hulk by the time it was
restored as a condo complex in 2005. Developer MCL Cos. paid $24 million for the
property, branded 455 Central Park West.
“The building itself is fantastic and a
landmark in every sense of the word,” said
Alex Herrera, director of technical services
at the New York Landmarks Conservancy.
He said that it retained some of its original
19th-century architecture.
Likewise, Columbia Hospital for Women
in the District’s fashionable West End,
which had delivered more than 250,000
10
EZ
Construction
To find a trustworthy builder, put your investigative skills to work
This column will help
prevent the agony
caused when a builder
abandons a job.
TIM CARTER
Consider the house
on my street that sits
unfinished. The builder started
construction in May 2016, and it should
have been occupied by last Christmas, as
it’s not a very big or complicated house.
I met the owner, a single mom, back in
March as the building site was covered in
slush. She told me she was having a tough
time getting the builder to show up each
day. She was bound and determined to
move in by May 31, yet there were
thousands of man-hours of work still left to
do. Not knowing her at all, I didn’t have the
heart to tell her that she’d be lucky to be in
by Labor Day, having seen how slowly the
project was moving.
The progress on this home has now
ground to a halt. There’s been no activity
for weeks.
My wife, Kathy, and I drove by it recently
on our way home from church. As I was
pulling into the garage, Kathy said: “That
poor woman’s life has been ruined by the
builder. I don’t want this to happen to
Meghan and Brent.”
Meghan is our oldest daughter, and
Brent is her husband. They were planning
to fly in from California and take Kathy
and me on an adventure to Mount Desert
Island on the coast of Maine, where they
intend to buy a lot to build a home on. They
invited Kathy and me to help guide them so
they don’t make a mistake and buy a bad
piece of land.
There’s another problematic job site I
pass each time I go into town. The
foundation was installed three years ago,
and after that, the house sat. Construction
has finally resumed in the past six weeks. I
don’t know any facts about this situation,
but I know how to avoid it. And I know
from reading thousands of distressing
emails that many homeowners suffer from
this predicament.
I shared the following advice with
Meghan and Brent. It’s important to realize
the issue is complex. In the first place, you
need to perform due diligence to find a
professional builder who drives a project
like a determined marathon runner runs a
race.
Generally speaking, the first thing to do
is talk with the general manager or owner
of the largest lumberyard in the town or
neighborhood where you’ll be building.
You ask this person for the names of
builders who pay their bills early, only buy
the best materials and are the only builders
whom the general manager or lumberyard
owner would have bid on their own homes.
It must be remembered that the people
running the lumberyards know whom the
true professionals are. They also know the
builders whom are to be avoided like the
plague. It’s best to visit two lumberyards, if
possible, to see if you can get one builder’s
name to pop up twice.
It’s equally important to obtain a very
detailed cost breakdown of the new home.
I created a spreadsheet years ago that’s
available at my website. This document has
100-plus rows where you enter a crisp
number for each thing that needs to be
done to build a home.
For example, the spreadsheet forces you
to put in numbers for the costs of the
foundation, windows and plumbing
fixtures, the rough carpentry labor, and all
the other necessities to build the home.
You must have this information so you
can control the flow of money as the
project proceeds. You should pay only for
items that have been installed to your
satisfaction as the home is being built. If
you have a construction loan, the lender
will usually issue checks only for work
that’s been complete, but, believe me, their
inspectors can be fooled.
Money is the only real motivator you
have when building. You never have to
worry if you have hired a professional.
However, having a chokehold on the flow
of money allows you to sleep at night in the
event your builder walks off the job or
slows the project down. You’ll always have
enough money to bring in another builder
to complete the project.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25, 2017
Ask the
Builder
The lumberyard people know
whom the true professionals
are and whom to avoid.
ISTOCK
To find a reliable builder, get recommendations from lumberyard owners, obtain a
detailed cost breakdown of the home and have detailed written specifications.
A point often overlooked is that it’s vital
to have excellent plans and written
specifications. A great set of house plans
might contain 20 or more pages. Written
specifications cover all the things that
don’t show up on the plans. These
documents allow you to avoid
confrontations or change orders that can
cause delays and frustration.
It’s equally important to have a simple
paragraph in the contract that allows you
to void the contract with the builder if no
progress is made for a specified amount of
time. There are certain weather conditions
that might lead to a delay, but that should
be discussed before you sign the contract
with the builder.
In the final analysis, there’s more you
have to do to protect yourself. The most
important thing, in my opinion, is to spend
the time up front asking tough questions of
the lumberyard managers and top local real
estate agents. You might even talk with a
few of the local residential architects who
regularly work with builders.
All of these professionals know who the
best builders are. Put on your Columbo
trench coat and do the detective work
required to find the best builder. Rest
assured, I’ll be starting that process along
the coast of Maine!
Need an answer? All of Tim’s past columns are
archived for free at AsktheBuilder.com. You can
also watch hundreds of videos, download Quick
Start Guides and more, all for free.
TIM CARTER
Construction on this site started three
years ago, when the foundation was
installed. After that, the house sat
untouched until construction resumed in
the past several weeks.
11
EZ
NEW. AFFORDABLE. LANGLEY.
LUMINOUS.
1052 HANCHEL TERRACE, GREAT FALLS | $1,725,000
Over 6000 Square Feet of Lavish Living with a Designer Kitchen, Professional Range and Oversized Island, Luxury Master
Suite with Ribbon Fireplace, Sunlit Conservatory, Covered Deck with Outdoor Fireplace and Finished Lower Level.
THE WASHINGTON POST
This beautiful home is listed below appraised value for community closeout.
Settlement in 30-45 days. All offers considered. Vashtu certified.
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25, 2017
Inquiries: 571.293.1234 | jgulick@gulickgroup.com | gulickgroup.com | MRISID: FX9798325 | Brokers Warmly Welcomed
12
EZ
Refinancing
Homeowners
are returning
to cash-out
loan habits
BY
J ILL C HODOROV K AMINSKY
Warning: Your home is not an ATM.
Pulling cash out of the equity in the
home was a factor that led to the market
crash in 2008. Nevertheless, cash-out refinance loans are on the rise — again.
Using cash-out refinancing, homeowners pay off an existing mortgage by
creating a new mortgage with a higher loan
balance. The homeowner keeps the difference between the old mortgage and the
new one and can pocket (or spend) the
cash.
As an example, you can refinance a
$300,000 loan with a $350,000 one, walking away with $50,000 cash minus closing
costs.
The amount of money Americans are
pulling out of equity is significant.
In the second quarter of 2017 alone, the
nationwide total dollar volume of equity
ISTOCK
Holiday Cuisines from
Around the World
Fox Hill Open House
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 25, 2017
Celebrate the season with
GLOB
Sunday, December 3
2:00 to 4:00 p.m.
RSVP today!
Call 301-918-5571 or visit
www.foxhillresidences.com/openhouse
Complimentary valet parking is available.
Taste your way around Fox Hill’s Open House!
As you travel from one of Fox Hill’s beautifully designed
spaces to another, enjoy holiday culinary traditions
from around the world. Meet Fox Hill condominium
owners and staff who will welcome you to tour the
entire community, including world-class amenities and
elegantly furnished model condominiums.
8300 Burdette Rd. | Bethesda, MD 20817
301-918-5571 | www.foxhillresidences.com
Brokerage services provided by Solutions Real Estate
13
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cashed out was $15 billion, up $1.2 billion
from the first quarter of 2017, according to
Freddie Mac’s most recent quarterly refinance statistics report.
The Washington region isn’t immune to
this trend.
In 2016, 34 percent of refinance loans in
our region involved pulling out equity, up
from 16 percent in 2013. Freddie Mac
releases percentage statistics annually,
thus the 2017 numbers are not yet available.
Those numbers are nowhere near the
peak in 2006, when cash-out refinancing in
our region accounted for 92 percent of all
refinance mortgages.
But the current trend is concerning
nonetheless.
According to the American Enterprise
Institute’s International Center on Housing Risk, the July 2017 refinance national
mortgage risk index (NMRI) has climbed
back to the same high risk level experienced in the crash, primarily driven by a
leap in cash-out refinancing.
The NMRI determines how likely a borrower originating a loan would go into
default, if we were under the same economic conditions as during the crash.
“We were at a 6.8 percent risk in 2012
when we started measuring refinance risk
levels,” said Edward Pinto, co-director of
the Washington-based International Center on Housing Risk. “Today, that risk level
has doubled to 13.6 percent, and FHA
cash-out loans are at a 26 percent risk level.
A risk level of 12 percent is considered
extremely high.”
result of limited supply and robust demand, the report says.
Rising home prices are good for homeowners, right?
Not necessarily, according to Pinto.
“Homeowners with lower-priced properties and first-time home buyers are being
hurt the most,” Pinto said. “Lower-priced
properties have gone up in value 11 percent
year over year.”
As home prices increase, the amount of
equity homeowners think they have increases, Pinto said.
“In addition, homes are being appraised
at higher prices for refinancing, without an
actual home sale taking place. Thus, the
increased value is on paper only and is not
based in reality,” Pinto said.
Pinto warned that this is unsustainable
with no end in sight.
So what are homeowners doing with the
money?
“Home renovations have become a cashout motivation,” Eric Strasser, a mortgage
loan consultant with SunTrust Mortgage in
Rockville, Md., said in an email. “People
realize that in a tight purchase market, they
can often improve or customize their current homes rather than selling to buy a new
home.”
In recent years, homeowners with sufficient equity in their properties have refinanced to take advantage of low interest
rates. For some, this was a good financial
move, helping lower monthly mortgage
payments or consolidate debt, Strasser
said.
Pinto, who is very concerned about the
recent increase in cash-out refinance loans,
said he thinks a severe market correction is
inevitable.
“We don’t know when the market will
crash next, but we are definitely in a boom,”
Pinto said.
Len Kiefer, deputy chief economist at
Freddie Mac, is less concerned with the
current rate of cash-out refinancing.
“If you look at the amount of cash out in
dollars, adjusted for inflation, it is fairly
low where we are today,” Kiefer said. Cash
out in dollars reached almost $90 billion in
2006.
According to Kiefer, Freddie Mac has
been tracking cash-out refinancing going
back to the 1990s. It is instructive to look at
the trends historically to understand how
homeowners have behaved over the long
term.
“The current trending up is a return to
normalcy. As I see it today, it doesn’t strike
me as particularly alarming,” Kiefer said.
How are homeowners able to pull so
much money from their homes?
Credit it to rising home values and high
appraisals.
According to the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s house finance index, home
prices rose an average of 6.6 percent nationwide from the second quarter of 2016
to the second quarter of 2017. A recent
outlook report published by Freddie Mac
says that price growth in many markets has
topped 10 percent on a year-over-year basis
since the market crash in 2008. This is a
There are other reasons Americans are
pulling equity from their homes.
Many aging Americans who own homes
are choosing to age in place. Some are
pulling out equity in their homes to remodel, making their homes safer and more
usable, considering their future needs.
Other homeowners are paying off or
consolidating credit card debt and student
loans.
Despite his optimism, Kiefer agreed that
homeowners should be disciplined — that
we should not view increased equity in our
homes as a financial windfall.
But not all Americans are disciplined
with their money.
According to a 2017 credit card debt
study by WalletHub, credit card debt is
trending up toward pre-recession habits.
“As of [the second quarter of 2017], outstanding credit card debt is at the secondhighest point since the end of 2008, and
we’re on a collision course with the $1 trillion mark,” the study says.
Some Americans are pulling out equity
from their homes to pay off credit cards,
only to rack up balances on credit cards
again.
“This is not a virtuous process,” Pinto
said.
Jill Chodorov Kaminsky, an associate broker
with Long & Foster in Bethesda and a licensed
real estate agent with CORE in New York, writes
an occasional column about local market
trends and housing issues. Jill can be reached
at jchodorov@me.com.
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