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The Washington Post – November 29, 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Partly sunny 65/41 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 56/43 B8
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
. $2
Tax bill advances
in Senate as skeptics
signal their support
COMMITTEE VOTES TO SEND PLAN TO FLOOR
At Capitol, Trump tries to persuade holdouts
M IKE D E B ONIS,
E RICA W ERNER
AND D AMIAN P ALETTA
BY
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
President Trump heads to the Senate Republican Policy Committee lunch with Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.), left, and Senate Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). Trump was at the Capitol to help sway key lawmakers to support the tax bill.
Libyan found
guilty in 2012
attacks in
Benghazi
Abu Khattala convicted
of terrorism charges but
not 4 Americans’ deaths
BY S PENCER S . H SU
AND A NN E . M ARIMOW
A Libyan militant accused of
being a ringleader of the deadly
2012 attacks on U.S. facilities in
Benghazi was convicted on terrorism charges Tuesday. But the jury
declined to find him directly responsible for the deaths of U.S.
Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans.
The case was seen as a test of
detention and interrogation policies developed under the Obama
administration to capture terrorism suspects overseas for criminal
trial, with the outcome likely to
figure into decisions about whether to use civilian courts for similar
prosecutions.
Jurors in Washington deliberated for five days after a sevenweek trial. They convicted Ahmed
Abu Khattala, 46, in the attack
carried out on the night of Sept. 11
at a U.S. diplomatic mission,
where Stevens and State Department employee Sean Smith died
as a result of a fire, and in a second
attack before dawn Sept. 12 on a
nearby CIA annex, where agency
contractors Tyrone S. Woods and
Glen Doherty were killed in a mortar strike.
The jury acquitted Abu Khattala of all but four of 18 charges,
finding him not guilty of the most
serious ones, including murder.
Abu Khattala becomes the first
person convicted in the attacks,
but the mixed verdict shows the
challenge of investigating and
bringing such cases.
VERDICT CONTINUED ON A11
The Republican push to rewrite
the tax code gained momentum
Tuesday after a Senate panel advanced the measure and several
wavering lawmakers signaled that
they are leaning toward backing
the bill.
Republicans on the Senate
Budget Committee unanimously
voted to send the party’s tax package to the Senate floor, setting up a
final vote as soon as this week. The
measure moved forward when
two GOP senators on the committee who had threatened opposition, Sens. Bob Corker (Tenn.) and
Ron Johnson (Wis.), instead supported the legislation.
Corker said he had reached an
agreement with GOP leaders that
would limit the tax plan’s impact
Missile launch appears to put D.C. in range
North Korea’s ICBM tests
‘We will take care of it,’
Trump vows, as N. Korea
boasts of its ICBM leap
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — North Korea claimed
the entire United States mainland
was within reach after “successfully” testing a new kind of intercontinental ballistic missile, which it
called the Hwasong-15, and said
could carry a “super large heavy
warhead.”
While Pyongyang is prone to
exaggeration, its boast of having
all of the United States in range is
in line with experts’ calculations
that the missile launched Wednesday, which flew 10 times higher
than the International Space Station, could theoretically reach
North Korea fires its test missiles nearly straight up. On normal, lower
missile trajectories, they would have traveled much farther.
JULY 4
Projected range
up to 4,200 miles
Test altitude
(miles)
1,740
Anchorage
Test
distance
(miles)
580
0 1k 2k 3k 4k
NOV. 29
Projected range
up to 8,100 miles
JULY 28
Projected range
up to 6,800 miles
—2,796
—2,300
Seattle Chicago
D.C. Miami
Pro j
600
0 1k 2k 3k 4k 5k 6k 7k
e c te d r a ng e
596
0 1k 2k 3k 4k 5k 6k 7k 8k 9k
Source: David Wright, co-director of the Union of Concerned Scientists’ Global Security Program
Washington, D.C.
“With this system, we can load
the heaviest warhead and strike
anywhere in the mainland United
States,” North Korea’s most famous newsreader, Ri Chun Hee,
said in a special live broadcast on
state television. “This missile is far
more technologically advanced
than July’s Hwasong-14. This signifies that our rocket development
process has been completed.”
Kim Jong Un, the North Korean
leader, had personally authorized
the launch, Ri said, a photo of Kim
at his desk and the handwritten
order appearing on the screen.
Wednesday’s launch, the first in
more than two months, is a clear
sign that the North Korean leader
is pressing ahead with his nation’s
stated goal of being able to strike
the United States’ mainland and is
not caving in to the Trump administration’s strategy of applying
“maximum pressure.”
The missile logged a longer
flight time than any of its predecessors and went farther into the
atmosphere than ever before,
reaching a height of 2,800 miles.
The International Space Station,
by comparison, is 240 miles above
the Earth.
President Trump, together with
his counterparts in South Korea
and Japan and the U.N. secretary
general, condemned the latest
launch. “We will take care of it,” he
told reporters at the White House,
calling it a “situation we will handle.”
He later tweeted that DemoMISSILE CONTINUED ON A12
Some forms of contraception are impossible to find while others are prohibitively expensive
In recession-hit Venezuela, even sex is in crisis
BY M ARIANA Z UÑIGA
AND A NTHONY F AIOLA
caracas, venezuela — Yorlenis
Gutierrez, a 28-year-old mother,
spent months vainly scouring
pharmacies for a drug whose scarcity is complicating her sex life
and those of countless other Venezuelans. In a country beset by
shortages, this is one of the most
difficult: the disappearance of
contraceptives.
When she couldn’t renew her
supply of birth-control pills, Gutierrez and her husband made a
choice. Long-term abstinence was
not an option, they agreed.
They tried to be careful, but
soon she was pregnant with her
second child.
“We barely eat three times a day
now,” said a distraught Gutierrez,
MANU QUINTERO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Yusdelis, who did not share her last name, stands outside her home
in Los Teques, Venezuela, late last month. The 19-year-old said she
became pregnant because of a lack of access to contraception.
IN THE NEWS
THE NATION
SUSAN WALSH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A win for Trump A judge refused to prevent
Mick Mulvaney from leading the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau for now. A14
Pressure builds Party leaders urged Rep.
John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) to resign over
allegations of sexual harassment. A4
Shortly after the
inauguration, Michael
Flynn sought President
Trump’s backing for a
memo written by a former business associate,
administration officials
said. A2
Three former DEA
officials asked lawmakers to restore the agency’s power to freeze
shipments of opioids. A2
President Trump will
travel to Utah to lay
out his plans to shrink
Bears Ears and Grand
Staircase-Escalante
national monuments. A3
In the heart of coal
country, the Environ-
mental Protection
Agency got an earful
about the fate of the
Clean Power Plan. A7
Colleges are reporting
a surge in requests for
students to verify information on federal financial aid applications. A9
The Supreme Court
will examine whether
the digital era is redefining the right to privacy. A16
THE WORLD
A German mayor was
treated and released
after being stabbed in
what was called a political attack. A10
Kenya’s president was
sworn in for a second
term in office amid
violence between
protesters and pro-government forces. A10
In a speech in Burma
addressing the ethnic
strife there, Pope Francis did not mention the
Rohingya by name. A12
THE ECONOMY
The Trump administration announced two investigations into the
pricing of aluminum
products imported from
China. A13
The United States
dominates global trade
in digital services, but
the Trump administration’s NAFTA demands
could hurt companies
and stifle growth. A15
a former hair washer in a beauty
salon who lost her job because of
the economic crisis. “I don’t know
how we’re going to feed another
mouth.”
In Venezuela, a collapse in oil
prices, along with nearly two decades of socialist policies, has
sparked a severe recession and
one of the world’s highest inflation
rates. People often wait hours in
line to buy bread. Prices for staples
jump almost by the day. Medical
shortages range from antibiotics
to cancer drugs.
But the shortage of contraceptives has put Venezuelans in a
particularly bleak quandary:
Have sex — or don’t?
For the most part they are,
sometimes with dire consequences.
VENEZUELA CONTINUED ON A13
THE REGION
The Washington Archdiocese is suing Metro
after the transit agency
rejected a charitable ad
campaign featuring a
biblical scene. B1
Craft brewers in
Maryland, with the state
comptroller’s backing,
seek to lift a law that
limits their production
and that they say could
hamper a boom. B1
The man shot by U.S.
Park Police after a short
chase into Fairfax County died after 10 days on
life support. B1
A Maryland family
dropped a lawsuit it had
filed in objection to
school measures to
protect transgender
students. B4
on the debt. Johnson, who has
repeatedly threatened to vote
against the bill because he says it
favors corporations over other
businesses, said he continued to
have concerns but voted to “make
sure this process moves forward.”
While the bill now heads to the
Senate floor, it remains unclear
whether Republicans have the 50
votes they need for final approval.
GOP leaders still have to corral
several on-the-fence members of
their caucus, who have different
and contradictory demands.
But getting the legislation to the
floor represents a significant victory for President Trump and Republican leaders, who are trying
TAXES CONTINUED ON A6
The anger of a GOP holdout
Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) feels
little loyalty to leaders pushing the
tax-code overhaul. A6
Schumer and
Trump share
the schmooze.
Is it enough?
The New Yorkers speak
the same language, but
that alone won’t cut deals
BY
M ARC F ISHER
Donald Trump always had a
soft spot for his fellow outerborough kid who made it big. He
recalls giving Chuck Schumer
$500 when the young state legislator from Brooklyn first ran for
Congress — the first of several
donations. Trump attended a
fundraiser for Schumer thrown
by hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons. And Trump entertained
Schumer at parties and fundraisers in Trump Tower and at his
Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida.
Trump and Schumer were never pals, but they got along fine,
two power players who had never
quite been accepted in the inner
circle of their chosen fields, two
sharp-elbowed guys who led with
their mouths and won power in
part by mastering the art of being
in the news.
Now, as Trump enters a pivotal
passage in his new presidency,
champing for a big win ahead of
the 2018 congressional campaign, people in both parties
thought the relationship between Trump and Schumer, the
Senate minority leader, might
provide a path out of Washington’s political paralysis. But on
Tuesday, when Schumer and
SCHUMER CONTINUED ON A8
Spending negotiations tense
President Trump and Democrats
trade insults. A9
The rose-colored presidency
A confident Trump sees nothing but
victories, behind and ahead. A4
Inside
FOOD
Ambition in flour
Jonathan Bethony’s
Seylou Bakery & Mill may
be a game-changer. E1
ST YLE
A hand to hold
For women having an
abortion, doulas offer
emotional support. C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A14
COMICS........................................C7
OPINION PAGES..........................A18
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C5
WORLD NEWS ............................ A10
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 359
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
1 4 2 4
A2
EZ
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
8:30 a.m.
Real gross domestic product is expected to have
increased at an annualized rate of 3.3 percent in the third
quarter of 2017, compared with the previous estimate of
3 percent for the same quarter. Visit washingtonpost.com/
business for details.
10 a.m.
The Supreme Court hears oral arguments in Carpenter v.
United States, involving government access of cellphone
records without a warrant. Visit washingtonpost.com/
national for developments.
10 a.m.
Federal Reserve Chair Janet L. Yellen testifies on the
nation’s economic outlook before the Joint Economic
Committee on Capitol Hill. For details, visit
washingtonpost.com/business.
10:30 a.m.
The Senate Commerce Committee holds a hearing on
Capitol Hill on the nomination of AccuWeather chief
executive Barry Myers to be administrator of the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. For
developments, visit washingtonpost.com/politics.
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CO R R ECTI O N S
A Nov. 27 Page One article
about the potential terrorism
threat posed by women fleeing
the Islamic State caliphate but
remaining committed to its
ideology misstated the
nationality of a woman who said
that she left the Islamic State
only to give birth to her child and
hoped that her offspring would
grow up to be martyrs. The
woman is a Syrian national, not a
native of Kosovo.
A Nov. 27 A-section article
about the Lebanese militant
group Hezbollah misstated the
location of the town of
Qalamoun. It is in Syria, not
Lebanon.
TO REACH THE NEWSROOM
Metro: 202-334-7300;
metro@washpost.com
National: 202-334-7410;
national@washpost.com
Business: 202-334-7320;
business@washpost.com
Sports: 202-334-7350;
sports@washpost.com
Reader Advocate: 202-334-7582;
readers@washpost.com
A Nov. 27 Metro article about
the growth of science buildings
at Washington-area colleges and
universities misstated the cost of
a new science building at the
University of Southern
California. It was $185 million,
not $50 million.
TO REACH THE OPINION PAGES
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A Nov. 23 Page One article
about tens of thousands of
fugitives being purged from the
FBI’s background check database
said the names were taken out
because the FBI decided to
change its legal interpretation of
the term “fugitive from justice.”
The article should have said that
the Justice Department, which
oversees the FBI, changed its
legal interpretation of the term.
A Nov. 19 Washington Post
Magazine article about the
November 2013 protests in
Ukraine incorrectly stated that
Hillary Clinton was secretary of
state at the time of the unrest.
John F. Kerry was secretary of
state.
Washington Post
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. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
Defendant in sanctions case now witness for U.S.
BY
D EVLIN B ARRETT
A Turkish Iranian gold dealer is
expected to testify Wednesday in
federal court in Manhattan, the
star witness in what was to have
been his own trial on charges of
fraud and violating sanctions.
Now, he will give evidence against
others in a case that is likely to
further strain relations between
the U.S. and Turkish governments.
After weeks of secrecy concerning the whereabouts and intentions of Reza Zarrab, prosecutors
said Tuesday what many had long
suspected: Zarrab had flipped,
becoming a prosecution witness
against one of his alleged coconspirators, Mehmet Hakan
Atilla.
Given Zarrab’s cooperation,
Atilla is now the only defendant
on trial in the case. The charges
against Atilla stem from his work
as the deputy chief executive of
Halkbank, which is majorityowned by the Turkish government.
During opening statements in
the trial Tuesday, Assistant U.S.
Attorney David Denton said
Zarrab had pleaded guilty and
would testify against Atilla,
whose alleged lies “blew a billiondollar hole in the U.S. economic
sanctions against Iran.’’
The prosecutor said Atilla designed a “massively successful’’
scheme to disguise U.S.-dollar
transactions on behalf of the Iranian government.
Zarrab is described by U.S. authorities as well connected to senior members of the Turkish government, which in turn calls his
prosecution an attack on its country. Diplomatic experts anticipate
that, as the case wears on, the rift
between Washington and Ankara
will only widen.
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has personally lobbied the U.S. government to release Zarrab and has linked the
case to a 2016 coup attempt
against him, claiming that the
same forces behind the putsch —
which he blames on a cleric
named Fethullah Gulen — are
behind the sanctions case against
Zarrab.
This month, after it became
clear that Zarrab might be cooperating with U.S. investigators,
Turkey’s foreign minister called
him a “hostage’’ being forced to
testify against the Turkish government.
Turkish
prosecutors
announced Nov. 18 that they had
launched their own investigation
into two of the American prosecutors who have overseen the
Zarrab case to determine whether
evidence was illegally obtained —
remarks that U.S. Attorney Joon
H. Kim, one of the officials Turkey
claims to be investigating, called
“ridiculous on their face.”
Opening statements Tuesday
from prosecutors and defense
lawyers made clear that Zarrab’s
credibility would be a central
point of contention — and that
alleged corruption in the Turkish
government would be discussed
as part of the prosecution’s case.
Prosecutors said the sanctions-
busting scheme was uncovered by
police in Turkey, leading to corruption charges in that country in
2013. The case collapsed after an
internal purge led to some investigators being sent to prison.
Zarrab was arrested, but the
charges were ultimately dropped.
“Bribes got rid of the case,’’
Denton said, but they “could not
get rid of the evidence,” including
wiretapped conversations involving Zarrab. Now, prosecutors
said, Zarrab will explain to jurors
exactly how the scheme worked.
Atilla’s lawyer Victor Rocco
tried to convince jurors from the
outset that Zarrab’s account could
not be trusted. “Zarrab hopes he
can buy freedom, a shortcut back
to his lavish life with the rich and
famous,” Rocco said. “He’s a liar, a
cheat, a corrupter of men.’’
The lawyer said Zarrab was
cooperating only to save himself,
and possibly to remain in the
United States and join the government’s witness protection program.
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
Flynn pushed proposal from company he advised
BY G REG J AFFE,
C AROL D . L EONNIG,
M ICHAEL K RANISH
AND T OM H AMBURGER
The week after President
Trump’s inauguration, national
security adviser Michael Flynn
forwarded a memo written by a
former business associate and told
his staff to fashion it into a policy
for President Trump’s approval,
according to two people familiar
with the exchange.
The proposal — to develop a
“Marshall Plan” of investment in
the Middle East — was being
pushed by a company that Flynn
said he had advised during the
2016 campaign and transition.
The firm was seeking to build nuclear power plants in the region.
His advocacy for the project in
the White House surprised some
administration officials and
raised concerns that Flynn had a
conflict of interest. From August
to December 2016, he said he
served as an adviser to the company, IP3, reporting later on his disclosure forms that he ended his
association with the firm just
weeks before joining the administration.
To push the idea “in the first
week of the administration without any policy process made no
sense,” said a person familiar with
episode who, like others with
knowledge of the incident, spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
describe internal discussions. “It
was a business proposal in the
form of a policy paper.”
IP3 said in a statement that the
memo did not make a specific
request on behalf of the company.
A top House Republican last
month referred questions Democrats have raised about Flynn’s
involvement in the project to special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.
Last week, Robert Kelner, an
attorney for Flynn, shut down
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Then-national security adviser Michael Flynn, seen Feb. 1, boosted
a memo aiming to build nuclear power plants in the Middle East.
communications with Trump’s legal team, a sign that Flynn may be
willing to cooperate with the special counsel.
Kelner declined to comment. A
spokesman for Mueller declined to
comment. A White House attorney,
Ty Cobb, declined to comment.
A White House official said the
National Security Council staff
handled Flynn’s apparent conflict
of interest appropriately. “They
did their best to tamp it down,” the
official said.
IP3 said in a statement that the
company never paid Flynn and
that he did not accept its offer to
serve as an adviser, despite his
statement on the disclosure form
that he held such a role.
However, Flynn advocated for a
plan that would help the company
after entering the White House,
according to people familiar with
the exchange. In late January,
Robert “Bud” McFarlane, a cofounder of IP3 and a former adviser to President Ronald Reagan,
laid out in an email to Flynn what
he called a “Marshall Plan for the
Middle East,” IP3 officials said in a
statement. The memo, which the
company declined to provide but
was described to The Post by
someone who had read it, included a focus on nuclear nonprolifer-
ation, one of the IP3’s selling
points for its plan.
The memo was first reported
upon by the Wall Street Journal.
Flynn forwarded the email to
members of his National Security
Council staff and instructed them
to “essentially put it on White
House letterhead and send it to
the president for approval,” according to a person with knowledge of Flynn’s directions.
Some of those who worked with
Flynn on the National Security
Council were aware of Flynn’s connection to IP3 and another company pursuing a similar project.
John Eisenberg, a legal adviser to
the council, worried that Flynn
had a conflict and urged him to
recuse himself from the project
discussions, according to an administration official familiar with
the conversations. Eisenberg declined to comment.
IP3 said that in his memo,
McFarlane did not make a specific
request on behalf of the company,
adding it made sense to send it to
Flynn because of his role overseeing national security policy.
“Mr. McFarlane was asked to
prepare some thoughts on both
NSC process and more specifically
the Middle East, nuclear nonproliferation concerns and Rus-
sia’s aggressive movements in the
Middle East,” the company said.
“He provided this to the NSC team
at their request.”
Some of Flynn’s allies continued to pursue the idea, including
one aide, Derek Harvey, whom he
deputized to help work on the
policy document, according to a
person familiar with the efforts.
Harvey did not return a request
for comment.
It is unclear whether the proposal was ever presented to
Trump. An administration official
said the memo was not stored as a
permanent record by the National
Security Council. The idea to approve the use of U.S. nuclear technology on foreign soil lost momentum in the spring, the official said.
Before his association with IP3,
Flynn served as an adviser from
April 2015 until June 2016 to ACU
Strategic Partners, which had its
own plan to help build nuclear
plants in the Middle East, in conjunction with Russian interests.
In June 2015, he traveled to
Egypt and Israel on a trip paid for
by ACU to promote the plan. Flynn
later failed to disclose the trip in
his security clearance renewal application in 2016, according to
Democrats on the House Committee on Oversight and Government
Reform, an omission they said
may have violated federal law.
On Tuesday, the top Democrat
on the oversight panel, Rep. Elijah
E. Cummings (Md.), renewed his
request for information from the
White House about Flynn’s activities. He also wrote a letter to
McFarlane asking for all communications with Flynn, the Trump
transition team and administration regarding the proposed plan
for nuclear power plants in the
Middle East.
greg.jaffe@washpost.com
carol.leonnig@washpost.com
michael.kranish@washpost.com
tom.hamburger@washpost.com
Ex-DEA officials want anti-opioid tool restored
BY L ENNY B ERNSTEIN
AND S COTT H IGHAM
Light up her
season.
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
Three former Drug Enforcement Administration officials
urged Democratic lawmakers
Tuesday to repeal a 2016 law that
effectively took away the agency’s
most potent weapon against distributors and manufacturers of
prescription opioids.
The trio said the authority to
instantly freeze shipments of powerful painkillers was the DEA’s
most effective tool against giant
companies that ignored legal requirements to report suspicious
orders of the pills by pharmacies,
doctors and others who diverted
them for illegal use. Those “immediate suspension orders” not
only protected the public from the
most egregious abuse but deterred other companies as well,
they said at a session held by Sen-
ate Democrats.
“It’s not just about stopping the
individual [companies], it’s about
showing that we’re out there doing
that,” said Jonathan P. Novak, a
former DEA lawyer now in private
practice.
In a joint investigation published Oct. 15, The Washington
Post and “60 Minutes” described
how drug distributors worked
with a handful of lawmakers at the
height of the opioid epidemic to
push through a law that stripped
the DEA of its most feared weapon. The reports also said that a
drug company lawyer who previously worked for the DEA helped
write an early version of the law.
By changing a few words in the
law that governs drug distributors’ responsibilities, Congress
virtually eliminated the DEA’s authority to use immediate suspension orders, according to a law
review article written by DEA
Chief Administrative Law Judge
John J. Mulrooney II.
“This bill basically tore the
heart out of the diversion program,” Frank Younker, a former
supervisor in the DEA’s Cincinnati
field office who retired in 2014,
told senators Tuesday. Younker
and the other two speakers at
Tuesday’s session were quoted in
the Post and “60 Minutes” reports.
The effort to change the law was
led by Rep. Tom Marino (R-Pa.)
and Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah).
Hatch has noted that the law was
approved by unanimous consent
in both houses of Congress and
signed by President Barack
Obama, and that the DEA agreed
to compromise language.
Two days after the reports, Marino withdrew from consideration
to head the White House Office of
National Drug Control Policy.
Democratic lawmakers, 44 state
attorneys general and the association that represents drug manufacturers, among others, have
since called for the law’s repeal.
But prospects for repeal appear
bleak. Sen. Claire McCaskill (Mo.),
the ranking Democrat on the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee,
who convened Tuesday’s “roundtable” session, noted that no Republicans have signed on to her
repeal bill. No Republican senators attended Tuesday’s session.
Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa)
has promised a hearing on the law,
but it has not been scheduled.
McCaskill also said Tuesday
that she was “bitterly disappointed” that the DEA refused to allow
Mulrooney to appear.
Nearly 200,000 people died
from overdoses of prescription
opioids between 2000 and 2016.
The Post reported last year that 13
drug distributors — including
three companies that control
85 percent of all drug commerce in
the United States — knew or
should have known that hundreds
of millions of painkillers were being diverted to the black market.
On Tuesday, Joseph T. Rannazzisi, who for a decade ran the DEA
office that attempted to control
illegal diversion, traced the agency’s capitulation on the 2016 law to
the arrival of a new administrator,
Chuck Rosenberg, in 2015. Rosenberg soon replaced Rannazzisi,
who retired in October of that
year. Rannazzisi said that during
his tenure, the DEA strongly opposed the legislation.
“I’ve listened to members of
Congress say DEA had the opportunity to oppose the bill but didn’t.
This is very misleading,” he said.
Rannazzisi noted that while investigators have used immediate
suspension orders for nearly five
decades, they have been successfully challenged only five times.
All three speakers said morale
and effectiveness have plummeted in DEA field offices as investigators have felt the impact of the law
and a slowdown in enforcement
by DEA lawyers. Younker said field
personnel are now trying to handle cases themselves rather than
overcome those obstacles.
“Reinstate the immediate suspension orders,” Novak said. “I
think the DEA needs to get back on
its feet and start enforcing.”
leonard.bernstein@washpost.com
scott.higham@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
M2
Politics & the Nation
In Utah, Trump to outline
plans to shrink monuments
D I G ES T
FLORIDA
Tampa police arrest
man in serial killings
Authorities in Florida said
Tuesday night they have arrested
the man responsible for a
months-long killing spree that
left four people dead in a Tampa
neighborhood, marking the
potential end of a case that had
stumped investigators and
shaken the area to its core.
The suspect, whom Police
Chief Brian Dugan identified as
Howell Emanuel Donaldson III,
24, was picked up for questioning
Tuesday afternoon after a tipster
had reported that he had been at
a McDonald’s with a gun. It was
50 days after the first slaying, on
Oct. 9, in Tampa’s Seminole
Heights neighborhood.
Dugan said that Donaldson,
who is believed to have worked as
an employee at the McDonald’s,
would be charged with four
counts of first-degree murder for
the killings.
The slayings drew the
attention of national media to the
neighborhood as fearful residents
adjusted their daily routines. The
last of the four killings occurred
on Nov. 14.
— Eli Rosenberg
ILLINOIS
Gutiérrez won’t seek
reelection to House
Rep. Luis V. Gutiérrez (D-Ill.), a
longtime advocate for
comprehensive immigration
change and a strident critic of the
Trump administration,
announced Tuesday that he will
not seek reelection.
The congressman said he will
complete his term in Congress,
which expires in early 2019.
Gutiérrez made the
announcement in Chicago a day
after he held an event there
alongside Mayor Rahm Emanuel.
The 63-year-old congressman
has served his Chicago district
since 1993 and is a senior member
of the Congressional Hispanic
Caucus. Gutiérrez, who is of
Puerto Rican descent, is leading a
bipartisan push to send tens of
BY
SHANNON STAPLETON/REUTERS
Customers browse holiday displays at Bank of America Winter
Village in Manhattan’s Bryant Park. The village has a restaurant,
boutiques and New York City’s only free ice-skating rink.
millions of dollars in federal aid
to storm-ravaged Puerto Rico. He
was also arrested this year
outside Trump Tower in New York
for protesting the president’s
strict immigration enforcement
policy.
Gutiérrez also was among the
harshest liberal critics of
President Barack Obama, a fellow
Chicagoan, whom he called the
“deporter in chief” for ordering
immigration agencies to deport
hundreds of thousands of
undocumented immigrants.
— Ed O’Keefe
MASSACHUSETTS
Scaramucci resigns
from Tufts board
Anthony Scaramucci resigned
Tuesday from his role at Tufts
University after threatening to
sue a student who had written an
unflattering opinion piece about
him in the student newspaper.
Scaramucci, who was briefly a
spokesman for President Trump,
is a graduate of the university and
began serving on the Board of
Advisors for the Fletcher School
of Law and Diplomacy in 2016.
This fall, a petition circulated
among students, graduates and
some faculty asking that
Scaramucci be removed from the
board because they felt he had
displayed poor judgment on
several public occasions. A
student at Fletcher, Camilo
Caballero, wrote two opinion
pieces this month for the student
newspaper, the Tufts Daily, saying
that Scaramucci was unfit for the
role. An attorney retained by
Scaramucci sent a letter to
Caballero and to Gil Jacobson, the
editor in chief of the paper,
demanding a retraction and an
apology, and threatening a
defamation suit.
University officials had invited
Scaramucci to talk with students
Monday but canceled the
invitation after learning of
the letter.
— Susan Svrluga
University settles over death:
Ohio State University will pay
$450,000 to settle a negligence
claim over the death of a student
who died of accidental trauma
caused by diving into shallow
water during a traditional coldweather lake jump. Austin
Singletary, 22, died Nov. 25, 2015,
in the Mirror Lake jump, which
drew thousands of students.
Under the settlement the
university admits no liability and
will install a family-donated
bench on campus honoring
Singletary. Ohio State later said it
would end the lake event.
— Associated Press
J ULIET E ILPERIN
President Trump will travel to
Utah on Monday to lay out his
plans to cut the size of the Bears
Ears and Grand StaircaseEscalante national monuments,
according to individuals briefed
on the matter who spoke on the
condition of anonymity because
the trip had not been formally
announced.
Democratic presidents established the two national monuments in southern Utah under the
1906 Antiquities Act, and both
sites have generated considerable
controversy. Barack Obama in December established Bears Ears, a
1.35 million-acre expanse that is
home to tens of thousands of
ancestral Pueblo archaeological
sites, while Bill Clinton designated the nearly 1.9 million-acre
Grand Staircase-Escalante in
1996.
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke
recommended scaling back both
monuments, along with several
others, as part of a report he
delivered to the White House in
August. Since then, White House
officials have been working with
staffers at the Interior and Justice
departments to draft proclamations that they think have the best
chance of withstanding inevitable court challenges from conservation and tribal groups, according to a senior administration official.
White House spokeswoman
Kelly Love said in an email Tuesday that she had “no announcements at this time” about the
president’s travel plans to Utah.
While administration officials
have not announced how much
Trump plans to shrink either
monument, they have privately
indicated that he intends to shave
hundreds of thousands of acres
from each.
The president will reduce
Bears Ears by more than 1 million
acres, Interior officials have informed multiple individuals, who
spoke on the condition of ano-
ANDREW CULLEN/REUTERS
A hiker at Bears Ears National Monument last month. President
Trump will go to Utah on Monday but will not visit the monument.
nymity because they were not
authorized to talk on the record.
And Ron Dean, an aide to Sen.
Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah), testified
this month before the Utah legislature’s Commission for the Stewardship of Public Lands that the
size of Grand Staircase will probably be somewhere between
700,000 acres and 1.2 million under the revised designation.
State and local officials, nearly
all of whom are Republicans,
fought the designation of Bears
Ears as a national monument and
have lobbied the Trump administration to either rescind it or scale
it back significantly.
“We’re extremely grateful for
the president’s visit and the [interior] secretary’s work that led
up to this visit,” San Juan County
Commissioner Phil Lyman (R)
said Tuesday. “We feel like we’ve
been listened to, and that means a
lot to us.”
Trump does not intend to visit
the monuments, individuals
briefed on the plans said, but will
instead travel to Salt Lake City.
Environmentalists quickly decried the move to shrink the monuments and vowed to block it
through litigation.
“This illegal action will cement
Trump’s legacy as one of the worst
presidents in modern history,”
said Randi Spivak, public lands
program director at the Center for
Biological Diversity, an advocacy
group. “He’s shown his blatant
disregard for public lands, Native
Americans and the law. We look
forward to seeing him in court.”
Trump’s effort to cut Grand
Staircase-Escalante may face a
serious legal obstacle because
Congress passed legislation in
1998 that ratified a land exchange
between the federal government
and Utah as part of the monument’s designation and modified
its boundaries slightly. The federal land Utah acquired has generated hundreds of millions of dollars in state revenue over the past
two decades, including $1.5 million in monthly royalties from
coal bed methane development
for more than 10 years.
The administration is drafting
other proclamations under the
Antiquities Act that would alter
the size of some national monuments and change the way others
are managed. Those proclamations will be issued over a period
of several weeks following the
Utah trip, a senior administration
official said.
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
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A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
Amid the tumult, Trump paints rosiest reality
J OSH D AWSEY,
A SHLEY P ARKER
AND P HILIP R UCKER
BY
President Trump has expressed certainty that the specialcounsel probe into his campaign’s
possible collusion with Russia
will be finished by the end of the
year, complete with an exoneration from Robert S. Mueller III,
according to several friends who
have spoken with him in recent
days.
Trump has dismissed his historically low approval ratings as
“fake” and boasted about what he
calls the unprecedented achievements of his presidency, even
while chatting behind the scenes,
saying no president since Harry
Truman has accomplished as
much at this point.
Trump also has occasionally
questioned whether the “Access
Hollywood” video of him crowing
about assaulting women was doctored or inauthentic, asking confidants whether they think the
sexual braggart on tape sounds
like him, according to two people
who have heard him make the
comments.
In all these instances, as well as
other setbacks, Trump has sought
to paint the rosiest possible picture of his presidency and his
character — and has tried to will
others to see it his way, like the
big-promises salesman he once
was.
Sometimes, as with his comments about the “Access Hollywood” tape, which were first reported by the New York Times,
Trump simply rejects facts — and
his own past admissions — as he
spins a new narrative. His critics
accuse him of creating an alternative reality, though people close to
the president say he is simply a
savvy marketer protecting his
brand, as any businessman or
politician would.
This practice, however, could
prove problematic for a president
of the United States whose careless tweets or misleading statements can send the globe reeling.
“He creates his own reality and
lives in his own reality and tries to
bend reality around himself and
his own deep narcissistic needs,”
said Peter Wehner, a veteran of
three Republican administrations and a senior fellow at the
Ethics and Public Policy Center.
“But, of course, in the end reality
wins out, and trying to disfigure it
or reinterpret it doesn’t work.”
The first year of Trump’s presidency has brought tumult and
chaos, including the expanding
Russia probe, an absence of major legislative achievements and
instances of self-sabotage by the
president himself. But in recent
days, Trump has been in an unusually upbeat mood, according
to friends who visited with him.
At Mar-a-Lago, where he spent
the Thanksgiving holiday, Trump
again and again received congratulations from wealthy club members for the work of his administration, according to several people who spoke with him. They
assured him he was doing great
things and simply wasn’t being
appreciated by the media — a
view he was glad others shared.
Trump’s lifelong tendency to
E LISE V IEBECK,
M IKE D E B ONIS
AND E D O ’ K EEFE
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump at the White House this month. Trump has been in an upbeat mood recently, according to friends who visited with him.
project supreme confidence has
served him well, especially in the
worlds of real estate and celebrity,
where braggadocio and self-assurance are valuable commodities. And in some cases it has left
him vindicated, particularly in a
presidential bid the establishment mocked as destined for
defeat.
“Trump is a survivor. It’s one of
his great skills,” said Tim O’Brien,
author of the biography “TrumpNation” and executive editor of
Bloomberg View. “When you look
back on all the adversity he’s
overcome — he’s survived three
marriages, a brush with personal
bankruptcy, he’s overseen several
corporate bankruptcies, he’s been
through withering press coverage
. . . I think he tells fables to
himself, about himself, to create
the narrative he wants to see.”
Trump has taken special comfort in the reassurances of White
House lawyer Ty Cobb, who has
offered Trump an optimistic view
of the Russia probe, saying that
he expects Mueller’s investigation to wrap up by the end of the
year and that the White House
has little to fear, said two White
House officials with knowledge of
the conversations.
After Mueller’s indictment of
former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, Trump had a
number of conversations with his
attorneys and asked other advisers whether he was being served
well, according to one of the
White House officials, who spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
discuss sensitive matters.
Cobb — who initially said he
hoped the probe would have concluded by Thanksgiving — has
told Trump and other White
House officials that Mueller’s investigators will have completed
all of their interviews within two
weeks and that the special counsel’s office is no longer requesting
new documents, the White House
official said. Then, Trump’s legal
team has suggested, Mueller’s office could write a report clearing
the White House.
Hanging out at Mar-a-Lago
and at his South Florida golf
clubs, Trump told friends, “This
investigation’s going to be over
with pretty soon,” adding that his
attorneys, whom he praised as
“brilliant,” had assured him of it,
according to two people familiar
with the conversations.
Cobb declined to detail his
counsel to Trump. “At this stage
on the investigation, I don’t want
to interfere in the process of the
special counsel or talk about any
specific discussions that I’m having with the president,” Cobb said
in an interview.
Barry Bennett, a former Trump
campaign adviser, said: “There
are plenty of us who believe the
Mueller probe is a lot closer to an
end than people think. . . . We’ve
got a case where some people did
some stupid things, and none of
them involved anything as sinister as what the president’s been
accused of.”
Some Trump aides and confidants worry about the president’s
optimistic assessment of the situation, which he has repeated in
conversations in recent weeks,
waxing enthusiastically about
how he’s eager to be out from
under the Russia cloud by 2018.
One outside adviser to Trump
warned that the president would
“blow a gasket” if there was no
statement of exoneration by
year’s end.
Even when presented with irrefutable evidence, Trump finds a
way to question unflattering
A NNE G EARAN
NEW YORK — President
Trump is “actively considering”
how to follow through on his
pledge to move the U.S. Embassy
in Israel to Jerusalem, Vice President Pence said Tuesday, reopening a divisive question that puts
the president at odds with military and diplomatic advisers and
close allies.
Pence drew whoops and applause at an event marking the
70th anniversary of the United
Nations vote paving the way for
establishing the state of Israel
when he contrasted the Trump
administration’s stance on the
embassy to that of past U.S. administrations.
“While for the past 20 years,
Congress and successive administrations have expressed a willingness to move our embassy, as we
speak, President Donald Trump is
actively considering when and
how to move the American Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to
Jerusalem,” Pence said.
In 1995, Congress mandated
that the embassy be relocated
from Tel Aviv, the commercial hub
of Israel, to Jerusalem, located in a
disputed territory. Each president
since has deferred the move, citing national security risks. Trump
did the same in June, setting aside
a campaign promise to immediately order the relocation. He acted, reluctantly, on advice from
Cabinet heads, Jordanian King
Abdullah II and others who argued the move could ignite violence among Palestinians and
Leaders
pressure
Conyers
to resign
BY
facts.
Trump has occasionally told
senior advisers that the “Access
Hollywood” tape could be fabricated or may not be real, according to two people who have heard
him make the comments. At various moments — including during
huddles with his aides at Trump
Tower after he won the election
and before taking office — Trump
has sought to distance himself
from the tape.
Trump has asked others
whether they think the voice
sounds like him, suggesting that
it does not, and has wondered
aloud whether perhaps the tape
was doctored or edited in an
unfair way to villainize him.
“He would just assert it, and
people would kind of say, ‘Okay,
let’s move along,’ ” said one person who had heard the comments. “There’s no point in sitting
there and litigating it with him.”
A second person who has discussed the tape with Trump recalled, “He says: ‘It’s really not
me. I don’t talk like that.’ ”
After the tape was divulged by
The Washington Post in October
2016, Trump acknowledged its
authenticity and apologized for
his crude comments. Asked Monday about reports of the president’s private remarks, in which
he seemed to cast doubt on the
tape, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
said the president addressed the
“Access Hollywood” scandal during the campaign and won.
“This was litigated and certainly answered during the election
by the overwhelming support for
the president and the fact that
he’s sitting here in the Oval Office
today,” Sanders said Monday. “I
think if anything that the president questions the media’s re-
porting.”
Presidential historian Douglas
Brinkley said Trump’s shifting
stories about the “Access Hollywood” incident create whiplash.
“You can’t one minute have an
‘Access Hollywood’ tape and apologize for it, and then suddenly
send smoke signals that it’s not
you,” Brinkley said. “He just
makes up his own goal posts and
moves them around at will.”
On the campaign trail, aides
would often give Trump poll
numbers showing him losing to
or tied with Hillary Clinton, but
when he took the stage at rallies
he would pepper his speeches
with claims of polls showing him
winning.
As president, amid tumult
such as the repeated failures to
pass a health-care bill, Trump will
call advisers and friends to boast
about his successes and all but
ignore setbacks.
On Tuesday, Trump declared
on Twitter that no deal could be
reached with congressional Democrats, leading Democratic leaders to pull out of a bipartisan
meeting at the White House. Even
as a government shutdown appeared more likely, Trump put his
own spin on the day’s events,
which also included a trip to
Capitol to push the GOP tax bill
with Republican senators.
“We had a good day today,”
Trump told reporters. “We had a
phenomenal meeting with the
Republican senators. It was very
special, that meeting.”
The meeting was, the president
insisted, “somewhat of a lovefest.”
josh.dawsey@washpost.com
ashley.parker@washpost.com
philip.rucker@washpost.com
Robert Costa contributed to this
report.
Pence says Trump working on pledge to put embassy in Jerusalem
BY
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Vice President Pence spoke to applause at a commemoration of the
formation of the state of Israel on Tuesday in New York.
their supporters who claim part of
Jerusalem as a future capital.
At the time, the White House
said a move could jeopardize nascent administration efforts to restart Mideast peace talks.
Trump faces another deadline
on Friday to say what he will do
about the embassy, and Pence’s
remark suggests the president
may move ahead with a relocation
plan. On June 1, Trump signed a
waiver blocking the embassy
move for six months. He faces
another deadline on the waiver on
Dec. 1. Pence did not mention the
upcoming deadline, which comes
about two weeks before he will
visit Israel and deliver an address
to the Knesset. Trump visited Israel in May.
The commemoration placed
Pence before an enthusiastic
crowd that included Trump backer Ronald Lauder and other prominent conservative Jewish New
Yorkers. Lauder reminded the
crowd that he has known Trump, a
native New Yorker, for decades.
The event’s backstory, however,
is a reminder of the overwhelmingly liberal and raucously tribal
political climate of New York City.
The Queens Museum, site of the
1947 U.N. vote, had agreed to hold
the commemoration in June but
balked in August in a confusing
episode that included accusations
of anti-Semitism against the museum and its director.
The museum reversed the cancellation after reviewing whether
the event met the tax-exempt institution’s guidelines. Queens law-
makers, however, have continued
to criticize museum director Laura Raicovich. Two have called for
her removal.
“We are deeply committed to all
the communities we serve
through our meaningful arts programming and we are looking forward to making this a successful
event,” the museum’s Board of
Trustees chair, Mark Coleman,
said in a statement in August.
The museum closed on the day
of the Trump-Pence inauguration
in solidarity with an “artist strike”
against what organizers called the
intolerance of the incoming Republican administration. Raicovich has tweeted criticism of
Trump’s policies on immigration
and other issues. She was not part
of the program Tuesday, and there
was no mention of the event on the
museum’s “events” Web page.
Pence said nothing about that
controversy, but noted to applause
that the United States has taken a
tougher line in support of Israel at
the United Nations.
“The days of Israel-bashing at
the United Nations are over,” he
said, echoing a line that U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley uses frequently.
The world body has too often
countenanced
“anti-Semitism
and hatred,” Pence charged.
The U.S. ambassador to Israel,
former Trump bankruptcy lawyer
David Friedman, also recently reiterated the administration’s commitment to moving the U.S. Embassy, telling a pro-Israel audience
here earlier this month that the
move “is not a question of if; it is a
question of when.”
As a candidate, Trump had
vowed to treat Israel with greater
respect than he claimed President
Obama had. Trump said one example of his new approach would
be to finally override concerns
about the embassy move that he
cast as overly cautious.
“No one should consider this
step to be in any way a retreat from
the President’s strong support for
Israel and for the United States-Israel alliance,” a White House statement about the June 1 deferral
said.
The embassy, along with those
of many other nations, was built in
Tel Aviv as a signal that the United
States was not taking a position on
the future status of Jerusalem. Although the United States considers Jerusalem the Israeli capital,
its official position for decades has
been that the Israeli occupation of
East Jerusalem is illegitimate and
that the city’s status should be
resolved through negotiations.
In his address Tuesday, Pence
said the United States is committed to a peace settlement, but
made no mention of where that
long-deferred goal stands. The effort has been led by Trump son-inlaw and adviser Jared Kushner,
and special adviser Jason D.
Greenblatt.
As president, Trump has softened U.S. language dealing with
Israeli settlements in the occupied
West Bank, but also asked Israel to
refrain from building further in
the region to improve the climate
for peace talks.
anne.gearan@washpost.com
The political future of Congress’s longest-serving member,
Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.),
appeared precarious late Tuesday
as leaders pressured him to resign
over allegations he sexually harassed multiple female aides.
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.) and members of
the Congressional Black Caucus encouraged the veteran lawmaker to
step down as soon as this week after
a fourth accuser came forward
Tuesday morning, according to a
senior Democratic aide who spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
describe private conversations.
Although Conyers denies
wrongdoing and has insisted he
will not resign, he stepped down
as ranking Democrat of the House
Judiciary Committee on Sunday.
The move was seen as a concession
to critics who said he should no
longer occupy such a powerful
perch as allegations mount.
The 88-year-old lawmaker traveled back to Detroit from Washington on Tuesday night. He was
not spotted at evening votes,
where members of the CBC held a
rare huddle on the House floor.
Several members of the group
declined to say publicly whether
Conyers should step down.
“Resignation is a personal matter,” said Rep. Cedric L. Richmond
(D-La.), the chairman of the CBC.
“That’s a personal decision for him
and his family.” Richmond said in
a statement Tuesday that he had “a
very candid conversation” about
the seriousness of the allegations
against Conyers, “which he vehemently denies.”
“Any decision to resign from
office before the ethics investigation is complete is John’s decision
to make,” Richmond said.
Arnold Reed, Conyers’s attorney, said CBC members were not
trying to get him to resign.
“The tenor of the meeting was
to discuss how he was doing, how
he was handling things. They were
trying to determine how his family and how he is handling the
allegations. They are not trying to
force him to resign,” he said.
Conyers, an icon of liberal policymaking, has become a focus in
discussions about sexual harassment in Congress as decades of
misconduct and a pattern of secret
settlements between lawmakers
and staffers come to light on Capitol Hill. Although a growing number of female lawmakers are urging
congressional leaders to respond
swiftly, Conyers’s seniority and participation in the civil rights movement have given some colleagues
pause about calling for his resignation. Pelosi called him “an icon” on
Sunday talk shows, only to face
immediate criticism from women’s
rights advocates and others.
Saying she has “looked up to
Rep. Conyers
for
decades,”
Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.)
said Tuesday that he nonetheless
must step down, given the pattern
of misconduct alleged by former
aides.
“This is a watershed moment
where, finally, the country seems
to be waking up and realizing we
need to have a zero-tolerance policy toward sexual harassment,”
Jayapal, a member of the Judiciary Committee, said in a statement.
A report published Tuesday in
the Detroit News could make it
harder for Conyers to defy such
calls to step aside. The paper reported that Deanna Maher, who
worked for Conyers between 1997
and 2005, said he propositioned
her once and inappropriately
touched her twice.
Multiple allegations have surfaced since last week, when BuzzFeed reported that Conyers
reached a financial settlement in
2015 with a former employee who
said she was fired for refusing his
sexual advances.
In court documents filed earlier
this year, another woman, Maria
Reddick, accused Conyers of harassing her while she worked as
his scheduler.
And in an interview with The
Washington Post, a well-known
lawyer specializing in congressional ethics accused Conyers of
harassing and verbally abusing
her when she worked for him in
the 1990s.
The House Ethics Committee
has launched an investigation into
Conyers’s behavior, and on Tuesday, Pelosi urged the panel to probe
the sexual harassment allegations
“expeditiously as well as fairly.”
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
mike.debonis@washpost.com
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
Kimberly Kindy contributed to this
report.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
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K
. WEDNESDAY,
Senate could hold final vote on tax bill this week
TAXES FROM A1
to deliver a major legislative accomplishment after a year full of
misfires.
Trump on Tuesday visited Republicans at the Capitol to cajole
skeptical lawmakers. During his
visit, he clashed with Johnson over
the senator’s demands but appeared to make substantial progress toward winning another key
vote, from Sen. Susan Collins (RMaine).
In a private meeting with Collins before lunch, and again in
front of the larger group of Republicans, Trump signaled openness
to Collins’s demands, which include paying federal subsidies to
help lower-income Americans afford health coverage and allowing
Americans to continue deducting
up to $10,000 in property taxes
from their taxable income.
“It’s certainly progress,” said
Collins, who played a central role
in derailing GOP health-care bills
this year.
McConnell said Tuesday that he
intends to press forward with the
bill in the coming days, eyeing
passage by the week’s end.
“It’s going to have lots of adjustments before it ends, but the end
result will be a very, very massive
. . . tax cut,” Trump said.
Beyond bolstering support for
the bill, Republicans must also fit
the sweeping tax cut — most of it
aimed at businesses — into a tight
fiscal straitjacket because of their
decision to use special budget procedures to avoid a Democratic filibuster.
That means the changes sought
by Collins, Johnson and others
would require finding offsetting
revenue elsewhere in the bill. And
that could create problems for
other Republicans.
The House has already passed its
version of the tax plan, and the
Senate bill is certain to be considerably different. Republicans in the
two chambers would have to reach
an agreement on a consensus bill.
House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady (RTex.) said Tuesday that he expected a formal conference committee
to be appointed to hash out the
differences, even as more Republicans speculated that the House
would simply pass the Senate bill.
“We’re looking forward to finding common ground in conference, finalizing the details and
sending this historic legislation to
the president by the end of the
year,” Brady said in remarks to the
American Enterprise Institute.
The Senate tax bill would permanently slash the corporate tax
rate from 35 percent to 20 percent
starting in 2019 and temporarily
lower the tax rates paid by individuals and families through 2025. It
would also repeal a provision of
the Affordable Care Act that sets
up penalties if Americans don’t
have health insurance, a central
plank of the Obama administration’s signature health-care law.
MELINA MARA/THE WASHINGTON POST
The health-care provisions in
the bill prompted Collins to seek
legislation stabilizing insurance
markets, including a bipartisan
bill sponsored by Sens. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) that would make
federal payments to insurers, as
well as a measure Collins co-spon-
cans have predicted.
Some Republicans aired concerns that any such trigger could
cause a tax increase amid an economic downturn or complicate
companies’ ability to do long-term
planning and investment. Grover
Norquist, the influential president
of Americans for Tax Reform,
“It’s going to have lots of adjustments before it
ends, but the end result will be a very, very
massive . . . tax cut.”
President Trump
sored with Sen. Bill Nelson (DFla.) that would provide new reinsurance payments to subsidize
high-cost patients.
Those bills, however, cannot be
added directly to the tax package
because of fiscal and procedural
constraints. Collins said she wants
to see the health legislation pass
into law before the differences between the House and Senate tax
bills are resolved.
Meanwhile, few details have
emerged about the deal Corker
secured to blunt the tax plan’s
deficit impact. He had sought the
inclusion of a fiscal “trigger” that
would generate additional revenue if the bill failed to spark the
economic growth that Republi-
called the concept a nonstarter:
“No one invests in response to
‘maybe.’ A trigger that threatens
tax hikes is a self-fulfilling threat
to kill jobs.”
Corker would not discuss details of the proposal Tuesday but
assured reporters that his colleagues would find it palatable.
“There’s agreement in principle, very strong agreement, with
McConnell, with the Finance
Committee — and of course the
White House has been in the midst
of all this, too — but the agreement
was made with McConnell and the
Finance Committee leadership,”
Corker said.
No official analysis has been
released by the Treasury Depart-
ment or the nonpartisan congressional Joint Committee on Taxation to support the GOP claims
that growth would make up for
revenue losses. In a Tuesday
memo, the taxation committee
told Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) that
it might have a rough analysis
available by late Wednesday —
though that report would not include the latest changes to the
Senate legislation.
Wyden, the top Democrat on
the tax-writing Senate Finance
Committee, called the inclusion of
a trigger “another budget gimmick” that would obscure the true
cost of the GOP bill.
“What they have done for
months is resisted efforts to give
us anything resembling legitimate
scoring,” he said.
Johnson’s opposition is based
on his complaints that the bill
would not sufficiently lower taxes
for millions of businesses that are
effectively taxed through the individual income tax code. These
businesses, known as “passthroughs,” would receive temporary tax cuts that expire in 2025,
unlike the tax cuts for corporations, which would be made permanent.
Republicans control 52 votes in
the 100-seat Senate, and they can
afford to lose the support of just
two members if they want the
measure to pass.
The president and White House
officials have made entreaties to
some Democratic senators representing states that voted for
Trump last year, but they have yet
to persuade any to support the bill.
Various estimates show that the
tax plan would disproportionately
benefit corporations and the
wealthy, with many middle-class
Americans seeing their taxes increase over time. Republicans
have said they would not allow
taxes on the middle class to rise
and would change the bill if needed, but it has left an opening for
Democrats to attack the package.
“This legislation is a disastrous
and unfair piece of legislation that
gives huge tax breaks to the people
who need it the least — the very,
very wealthy,” said Sen. Bernie
Sanders (I-Vt.).
Budget Committee Democrats
unanimously voted against advancing the tax bill Tuesday, and
protesters disrupted the panel’s
meeting shortly before the vote,
chanting “Kill the bill.” But the
measure proceeded after the protesters were cleared, and Democrats were unable to slow it down
or change its design.
Describing the committee vote
at the White House on Tuesday,
Trump touted his party’s success.
“We had a unanimous vote — from
the Republican side, at least.”
mike.debonis@washpost.com
erica.werner@washpost.com
damian.paletta@washpost.com
Johnson, who is holding out, wants to see tax bill restructured
BY
E RICA W ERNER
Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.)
watched angrily last fall as his
fellow Republicans gave up on his
reelection campaign, convinced
he was doomed and that their
dollars and hours would be better
spent elsewhere. A year later,
Johnson is still in the Senate but
also a key holdout vote in the
Republican effort to overhaul the
tax code — and those political
calculations, along with the ill will
they bred, are coming back to
haunt Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell and his fellow
heads of the GOP.
Johnson surprised party leaders this month when he said he
would vote against the Senate version of the GOP tax plan, saying it
favors corporations over other
businesses. To vote for the bill, he
is asking for a large-scale restructuring that could add more than
$100 billion in benefits for certain
businesses.
Republican leaders, who probably can afford to lose a maximum
of only two GOP votes if they hope
to move their bill through the Senate, are working to win Johnson
over with a mixture of cajoling and
concessions. But as the leaders
negotiate, they’re working with a
senator who feels little obligation
to repay party favors.
“What I think is important to
understand is how much [Johnson] detests Senate leadership,”
said Charlie Sykes, a longtime Milwaukee-area conservative radio
host. “I do think a lot goes back to
last fall when they left him by the
side of the road politically dead.
Very liberating for him.”
When polling showed Johnson
trailing Democrat Russ Feingold,
GOP campaign operatives allied
with McConnell (R-Ky.) turned off
the money and channeled it into
states such as Indiana and Mis-
Tillerson
has harsh
words for
Russia
BY
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) had a private meeting with President Trump, who seemed open to her demands for the tax legislation,
including subsidies to help lower-income Americans afford health insurance. “It’s certainly progress,” said Collins.
SUSAN WALSH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) wants changes to the GOP tax bill that
could add more than $100 billion in benefits for some businesses.
souri.
As national Republicans expressed doubts about his reelection and pulled plans for expensive ad campaigns, Johnson
launched low-budget, homespun
spots he wrote and shot with the
help of his brother Dean Johnson,
the host of a PBS home-improvement program.
One ad showed Johnson changing his grandson’s diaper as his
wife and daughters sat in the family kitchen. “Just like Dad helps
out with the kids, he’s exactly the
guy we need to clean up the mess
in Washington,” a daughter said.
In the final weeks, the McConnell-allied Senate Leadership
Fund had gotten into the race with
millions to help Johnson. But it
was too late to convince the lawmaker that the party had his back,
as he privately fumed to associates
that he had been abandoned and
had had to win on his own. He
eventually did, comfortably defeating Feingold on the same night
that President Trump won.
The lingering tension exploded
Tuesday when Johnson clashed
with Trump during a closed-door
Capitol meeting of Senate Republicans.
Johnson stood up to complain
that he understood business and
figures better than others in the
Senate but that no one listened to
him, according to several GOP officials in the room or briefed on
the exchange.
Johnson angrily asserted that
“this body” doesn’t understand
numbers, the sources said.
Trump returned fire with fire,
telling Johnson, “You don’t get to
vote ‘no’ for a stupid reason like
that.”
Then Johnson complained that
no one would talk to him about the
negotiations, to which Trump said
he has called him and talked to
him.
“You’re the only one,” Johnson
said in a thinly veiled shot at McConnell.
Johnson is demanding better
treatment for certain businesses
that are effectively taxed through
the individual tax code rather than
with corporate rates — such as the
plastics manufacturing company
in Oshkosh, Wis., that he still partially owns.
The extraordinary exchange
with Trump took some fellow GOP
senators aback as the depth of
Johnson’s anger became clear.
And it left some Republican leaders and aides questioning whether
Johnson could ever get to “yes” on
the tax bill, even though as a conservative businessman he would
seem to be a natural constituency
for the legislation.
“It’s a big number, it’s north of a
hundred billion,” Sen. John Thune
(S.D.), the third-ranking Senate
Republican, said of the changes
Johnson is seeking.
Johnson wants “pass-through”
companies to be treated more like
other corporations that are seeing
their rates reduced from 35 percent to 20 percent under the GOP
legislation. Instead, the Senate bill
proposes that owners of passthrough companies can take a
17.4 percent tax deduction off
some of their income, a figure that
GOP leaders have proposed raising to 20 percent to mollify Sen.
Steve Daines (R-Mont.) and Johnson.
Johnson has said it’s not
enough and has said that he has
not been privy to such an offer.
“I’ve got no offers, I’ve received
no offers. None. No,” Johnson said
late Monday as he threatened to
vote against the legislation in the
Budget Committee on Tuesday,
which could have upended the
process and embarrassed leadership. “I know people are talking
about things, but I certainly haven’t received any offers other
than to give me information,
which has been pretty slow to
come.”
The Senate procedure Republicans aim to use to pass the bill
allows them to pass it with a simple majority, rather than the 60
votes typically needed to over-
come minority-party opposition.
But the procedure limits how
much the bill can add to the deficit, and that is complicating GOP
efforts to secure Johnson’s support, as adding new tax breaks for
pass-through companies requires
finding new revenue elsewhere —
changes that could drive other
members to oppose the bill.
The Senate tax bill would permanently slash the corporate tax
rate from 35 percent to 20 percent
starting in 2019 and temporarily
lower the tax rates paid by individuals and families through
2025. Multiple nonpartisan analyses have shown the bulk of the
benefits would be reaped by corporations and the very wealthy,
and many in the party are looking
for ways to redistribute the tax
cuts, leaving leaders scrambling
to accommodate individual demands without making the measure unpalatable to the party as a
whole.
Johnson has proposed paying
for his changes by eliminating
state and local property tax deductions for corporations, saying that
would raise more than enough
revenue to pay for them. And on
Tuesday he grudgingly cast a “yes”
vote in the Budget Committee,
saying he wanted to keep the process moving.
But Johnson left open the question of whether he would be a “yes”
vote in the end, leaving McConnell
and other GOP leaders to wonder
how or whether they can satisfy
him.
“Big complicated bills like this
are challenging,” McConnell said
Tuesday, but everyone has an opportunity to weigh in, he said —
adding that some were still doing
so.
erica.werner@washpost.com
Mike DeBonis and Paul Kane
contributed to this report.
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
C AROL M ORELLO
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on Tuesday accused Russia of
using “malicious tactics” against
the United States and European
allies, including election interference, poisoning relations to a low
reminiscent of the Cold War.
In a speech at the Woodrow
Wilson International Center for
Scholars in Washington, Tillerson cited a litany of Russia’s bad
behavior, including invasions of
neighboring
Georgia
and
Ukraine, its energy policy, cyberattacks and disinformation campaigns to undermine democratic
elections. He said the country’s
actions “are not the behaviors of a
responsible nation.”
“Our transatlantic unity is
meant to convey to the Russian
government that we will not
stand for this flagrant violation
of democratic norms,” Tillerson
said of Russia’s continued support for separatists in eastern
Ukraine. U.S. sanctions put in
place to punish Russia over annexing Crimea and its involvement in Ukraine, he said, “will
remain in place until Russia
reverses the actions that triggered them.”
Tillerson called attempts to
“reset” relations between Moscow and Washington elusive.
“I told Russia, we’re never going to get the relationship back to
normal until we address
Ukraine,” said Tillerson, who was
awarded Russia’s Order of
Friendship while he ran ExxonMobil. “It just sits there as an
obstacle.”
The stern language Tillerson
employed against Russia came
in a speech that was meant to
soothe worried Europeans in
advance of his trip to the continent next week. Many allies
remain uncertain about the
Trump administration’s commitment to their security, even
though President Trump has
softened his positions since early in his term when he questioned whether NATO countries
were pulling their weight in
defending themselves.
“Our security commitments
to Europe are ironclad,” Tillerson said, calling the NATO treaty’s mutual defense commitment “the best mechanism we
have to deter aggression.” He
said the United States will be
the first to respond if a NATO
ally is attacked, as Europe supported the United States after
the terrorist attacks on the
Pentagon and World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001.
But Tillerson also echoed
Trump’s insistence that NATO
nations must increase their defense spending to 2 percent of
their budgets. Tillerson acknowledged the harsh reviews that
accompanied Trump’s criticism
of NATO spending and priorities,
but he suggested it drove the
point home.
“The president’s message was
that we are committed to the
alliance; you need to get as committed to it as we are.”
In his remarks about Russia,
Tillerson expressed a harder line
than the president he serves.
Trump has repeatedly questioned whether Russia was involved in leaked emails and the
spread of false, often conspiratorial articles that permeated
many websites before last year’s
election.
“Russia has often employed
malicious tactics against the
United States and Europe to
drive us apart, weaken our confidence and undermine our economic successes since the end of
the Cold War,” Tillerson said.
In his visit to Europe next
week, Tillerson said he plans to
stress the importance of historical alliances and underscore
that the United States cannot
confront all the threats it faces
on its own.
“These alliances were forged in
shared blood and shared sacrifices — unlike many of our adversaries, who can count their allies on
less than the fingers on one
hand,” he said.
Tillerson singled out one
NATO ally whose relationship
with the United States has grown
strained: Turkey. The presidents
of Turkey, Iran and Russia met
recently to discuss ways to advance peace in Syria, and the
three regional neighbors have
grown closer. Tillerson allowed
that Turkey cannot “ignore” Iran
and Russia but suggested Ankara
give more priority to its NATO
allies.
“Iran and Russia cannot offer
the Turkish people the economic benefits” that the West
can, he said.
carol.morello@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
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In heart of coal country, EPA gets an earful about Clean Power Plan’s fate
BY
B RADY D ENNIS
charleston, w.va. — Coal ex-
Stanley Sturgill, former coal miner
CHRIS DORST/CHARLESTON GAZETTE-MAIL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Coal miners listen during an Environmental Protection Agency public
hearing on the Clean Power Plan on Tuesday in Charleston, W.Va.
He and his wife had risen before
dawn and driven several hours
from their home in Harlan County. He spoke of his own respiratory problems and how emissions
from coal-fired power plants and
other pollutants had wreaked
havoc on the health of friends,
family and neighbors.
“We need the EPA’s immediate
help, and not their abandonment,” Sturgill said. “Do I really
think that this administration
cares what this old, worn coal
miner has to say? I don’t know. I
doubt it.”
But Sturgill said as long as he
could draw a breath, even a
strained one, he intended to push
the EPA to put concerns about
public health above the wishes of
the fossil fuel industry.
“Our health, environment and
global climate are actively being
HHS nominee Azar has
roots in law, pharmacy
BY
A MY G OLDSTEIN
Alex M. Azar II faces his first
Senate hearing Wednesday on
his nomination by President
Trump to lead the Department of
Health and Human Services.
Azar, 50, would succeed the president’s first HHS secretary, Tom
Price, who resigned under pressure in late September amid
investigation of his use of noncommercial planes for official
business at taxpayers’ expense.
Azar’s session before the Senate’s Health, Education, Labor
and Pensions Committee is
called a courtesy hearing because the panel does not vote on
the nomination. That power
rests with the Senate Finance
Committee, which has not yet
scheduled its hearing.
Here is a primer on the nominee.
What kind of career has he
had?
All but one previous HHS
secretary has come out of politics
or academia. A lawyer by training, Azar would be the first with
a background in the pharmaceutical industry, plus previous senior roles at HHS.
Under President George W.
Bush, Azar was the department’s
general counsel from 2001 to
2005, then spent two years as its
deputy secretary.
From there, he was hired by
Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly as its
senior vice president of corporate affairs and communications,
and he rose to become president
of its largest affiliate, Lilly USA,
in 2012.
He resigned that position early this year, saying he wanted to
explore new leadership opportunities, and formed a consulting
firm.
How conservative is he?
Azar is regarded as bright and
competent by health-policy leaders across the ideological spectrum, and he has a history of
broad working relationships.
Still, he is a conservative’s conservative.
After Yale Law School, he
clerked for a noted conservative
on the Richmond-based U.S.
Court of Appeals for the 4th
Circuit, Judge J. Michael Luttig,
and then for Supreme Court
Justice Antonin Scalia.
Azar worked as an associate in
the law firm that included Kenneth W. Starr, whom Azar would
later refer to as a mentor. When
Starr was named independent
counsel in 1994 to pursue the
Whitewater investigation into
President Bill Clinton, Azar was
among the first people he hired
onto his staff.
In a 2005 questionnaire for his
confirmation to become HHS
deputy secretary, Azar wrote that
he was a member of the Federalist Society for Law and Public
Policy and had been an attorney
on the Bush-Cheney Recount
Committee in 2000.
During the 2016 campaign, he
first supported Jeb Bush and
served on his Indiana steering
committee.
After Trump’s nomination,
Azar donated $2,700 to the
Trump Victory committee. As the
head of a large Indiana-based
company, he already had a rapport with the man who would
become vice president: Gov.
Mike Pence.
With bipartisan concern
about drug prices, how aligned
is Azar with the pharmaceutical
industry?
In a financial filing with the
Office of Government Ethics,
Azar reported that he received
nearly $2 million from Lilly this
year in salary and bonus, plus a
$1.6 million severance payment.
He said he no longer owns Lilly
stock.
Over the years, he has been
wary of government intervention with drug companies.
“A vigorous and profitable
drug industry is not a problem to
be solved but a goal to be encouraged,” Azar said in a 2006 speech.
In those remarks, he said that
“governments lean too much
toward short-term savings and
succumb to the temptation to
control expenditures through direct price controls, cuts in reimbursement rates, delayed market
access and other subtle and notso-subtle practices that either
restrict the amounts paid for
innovative products or reduce
consumption of innovative medicines and devices.”
During his five years as president of Lilly USA, the list price of
its top-selling Humalog insulin
doubled.
The company was one of three
insulin manufacturers sued for
alleged overpricing in a class
action filed in January.
But allies point out that Azar
played a pivotal role as HHS
general counsel in rewriting a
federal rule that significantly
curbed the ability of brand-name
drugmakers to fend off competition from lower-priced generics.
Asked at an industry conference in May about drug pricing,
he replied: “We have a problem.
This is not something to put our
head in the sand about. . . .
Patients are paying out of pocket
too much money.”
The cause, he continued, was
not increases in pharmaceutical
prices but health insurance
changes that compel consumers
to pay more of the bill. Extending
drug rebates to help with those
out-of-pocket expenses is one
solution, he said.
A spokeswoman for the pharmaceutical industry’s main trade
group praised Azar’s nomination, citing his “broad health
expertise and extensive experience in the public and private
sectors.”
Where does he stand on the
Affordable Care Act?
Azar has shown no sign of
disagreeing with the president’s
intense opposition to the 2010
health-care law.
During the past several
months, he has said in interviews
that the Affordable Care Act is
“certainly circling the drain” and
a “fundamentally broken system” that should be replaced by
free-market principles and a
smaller federal role.
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
destroyed. And it is clear to me
that EPA Administrator Scott
Pruitt and President Trump are
accelerating and cheering on the
damage,” he told EPA officials. “I
have come here today to ask you
to stop. For the sake of my
grandchildren and yours, I call
on you to strengthen, not repeal,
the Clean Power Plan.”
The opening hours of a twoday hearing here, with testimony
spread across three separate
hearing rooms simultaneously,
encapsulated the controversy
that has long engulfed the plan
that Obama finalized in 2015 in
an effort to slash greenhouse gas
emissions that scientists agree
are fueling the planet’s warming.
Industry
representatives,
elected officials and workers who
rely on the coal industry here
excoriated it as a textbook exam-
ple of government overreach that
would cost jobs and harm families. To Pruitt’s proposal to ditch
it, they had a simple response:
Good riddance.
Yet environmental activists,
public health groups and a collection of ordinary citizens defended the rule as an essential element in the fight to combat
climate change, as well as a key
measure to improve air quality
and help the nation embrace
cleaner forms of energy and the
economic potential associated
with that shift.
Bobby May, who traveled from
Hurley, Va., with his brother,
called the Clean Power Plan “all
pain and no gain” for those who
rely on the coal industry.
“We are survivors of the Obama
administration’s war on coal,” said
May, who described himself as the
son and father of coal miners.
“Coal puts food on the table for my
family. It puts clothes on the back
of my grandchildren.”
That wasn’t the perspective of
Nick Mullins, a fifth-generation
coal miner from Kentucky. He
has no interest in his own son
following in his footsteps.
“I don’t want him to be a
sixth-generation coal miner,” Mullins testified, detailing the physical toll the work had taken on
members of his family. He said he
viewed the Clean Power Plan as a
pathway to safer, more diversified
job options for his children.
Back and forth it went. Kathy
Beckett, a West Virginia lawyer
and board member of the U.S.
Chamber of Commerce, called
the Clean Power Plan “unlawful
and a bad deal for America.” She
argued it would drive up electricity rates and impose billions of
dollars in compliance costs for
companies “without any significant reduction in global greenhouse gas emissions.”
Angie Rosser, executive director of the West Virginia Rivers
Coalition, said the plan’s benefits
easily outweigh its costs. “The
coal miners I talk to seem to
know coal jobs will continue to
dry up, with or without a Clean
Power Plan,” she said.
She characterized the EPA’s
decision to hold a lone hearing in
Charleston as a “public spectacle.”
“We’ve been pitted against
brady.dennis@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
EX OF
TE FE
ND R
ED
ecutive Robert Murray ambled
through the packed hearing
room inside the gold-domed capital complex here, past reporters
and photographers, past environmental activists and energy
lobbyists, past more than two
dozen of his miners in work
uniforms and hard hats who had
filled the seats.
Like the roughly 300 other
people signed up to speak about
the Environmental Protection
Agency’s proposal to withdraw
the Clean Power Plan — Barack
Obama’s signature effort as president to combat climate change by
limiting emissions from power
plants — Murray got three minutes to make his case.
He used them to rail against
the regulation and praise EPA
Administrator Scott Pruitt for
vowing to scrap it. He called the
Clean Power Plan the “linchpin”
of the “war on coal.” He argued, as
he has for years, that it would
have killed more jobs in an industry that has been shedding jobs
for years, mostly because of automation and the rise of natural
gas. He said it was past time to
bury the “illegal, excessive”
Obama-era regulation.
“God bless President Trump
and you coal miners. I love you,
fellas,” he said.
Minutes later, 72-year-old
Stanley Sturgill, who mined coal
for four decades in the hills of
Kentucky, took the seat on the
dais where Murray had spoken.
each other by being told we’ll
either have coal, or we’ll have
nothing,” Rosser said. “The clock
is ticking to do something different than leaning on a dying
industry.”
As Oklahoma attorney general, Pruitt joined more than two
dozen other state attorneys general and an array of industry
opponents in suing over the
Clean Power Plan. They argued
that the Obama administration
did not have legal authority to
force states to form detailed
plans to reduce CO2 emissions
from such sources as coal-fired
power plants.
In turn, the Obama White
House
and
environmental
groups insisted the EPA had authority under the Clean Air Act to
put such regulations in place and
noted the Supreme Court has
ruled the agency has an obligation to regulate carbon dioxide as
a pollutant. The Clean Power
Plan aims to cut carbon emissions from the nation’s electricity
sector by about a third by 2030,
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A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
From ‘He likes us’ to ‘Sad!’: The Trump-Schumer-Pelosi friendship falls apart
Everything
seemed to be
going so
PAUL KANE
smoothly just
after Labor Day.
President Trump tweeted
favorably about dealing with
“Chuck and Nancy,” and the two
Democrats returned the favor.
“He likes us. He likes me
anyway,” Senate Minority
Leader Charles E. Schumer (DN.Y.) said in mid-September. He
was caught on a live
microphone on the Senate floor
explaining to another senator
how he and House Minority
Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)
reached a pair of major fiscal
deals with Trump.
By Tuesday, every last ounce
of goodwill had been drained
out of the Donald-Chuck-Nancy
partnership. The implosion left
the fate of funding for the
Pentagon and domestic federal
agencies up in the air heading
into the holiday season. Perhaps
more important, it seemed to
poison the well for
reauthorizing a children’s health
program and resolving the fate
of hundreds of thousands of
undocumented immigrants who
were brought into the country
when they were children.
It also served as the latest
lesson in what it is like to
negotiate with a president
@PKCapitol
whose dealmaking experience
came in the real estate world,
where he was known to back
away from nearly cinched
agreements as a ploy to leverage
better deals.
Trump began the day by
denouncing the Democrats, on
Twitter, for wanting “illegal
immigrants” in the country. He
predicted that no deal would
come together on a year-end
package to fund the government
and the other key issues.
Schumer and Pelosi then
canceled plans to attend an
afternoon meeting with Trump,
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (RWis.) and Senate Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell (RKy.), fearing Trump no longer
saw the huddle as a chance to
map out final deals.
“We’re not going to sit down
just for a photo op. This is too
serious,” Schumer told reporters
later. And Pelosi went to Twitter
to express her dissent,
intentionally using the
president’s social-media tone.
“[H]e’s more interested in
stunts than in addressing the
needs of the American people,”
Pelosi tweeted. “Poor Ryan and
McConnell relegated to props.
Sad!”
It’s a long way from where
things stood in mid-September,
after Trump acquiesced to the
two Democratic leaders on a
plan for short-term funding of
the federal government and
allowing the Treasury to
increase its borrowing limits to
finance the national debt.
The president also told the
Democrats that he would
“The staffs were
making great progress
until the president
stepped in.”
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.),
Senate minority leader
support permanent legal status
and eventually a path to
citizenship for the “Dreamers,”
the young undocumented
immigrants, in exchange for
beefed-up funding for border
security.
These talks floored
Republicans. They wanted to
work on a longer timeline on
the fiscal disputes and were
flummoxed when, after his
harsh rhetoric on illegal
immigration during his
campaign, Trump sided with
Democrats whom he had
previously denounced as
supporting “open borders.”
Pelosi wanted clarity from
Trump after he gave Congress
six months to resolve the fate of
the Dreamers or he would end
the Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals program, an
Obama-era executive order
halting deportations for those
young undocumented
immigrants. So she asked the
president to tweet his support
for no deportations during that
period — and the tweet landed
in the middle of a House
Democratic caucus meeting.
“For all of those (DACA) that
are concerned about your status
during the 6 month period, you
have nothing to worry about,”
Trump wrote.
Most Democrats encouraged
their leaders to continue the
talks, but they also expressed
great concern about being set
up for a double-cross.
Particularly concerned were
members of the Congressional
Hispanic Caucus. They always
feared that a man who began
his campaign calling Mexicans
“rapists” would not keep his
word about signing legislation
formalizing the DACA
protections.
But Schumer maintained his
optimism as bipartisan
negotiations took place among
congressional negotiators,
suggesting this month that he
had little fear of a partial federal
government shutdown amid a
standoff over immigration. “We
won’t come to that. I think we’ll
have Republicans joining us to
support DACA,” he said.
That optimism came crashing
down Tuesday. “Chuck Schumer
and Nancy Pelosi did not show
up for our meeting today,”
Trump told reporters at the
White House. “I’m not really
that surprised. We have a lot of
differences. They’re weak on
crime, they’re weak on illegal
immigration. They want the
illegal folks to come pouring
into our border.”
So, what happened?
“The staffs were making great
progress until the president
stepped in. We were very close
on a number of issues,” Schumer
told reporters. He said that
Trump got in the way of what
were “serious, mature
negotiations” on a major piece
of legislation.
Sen. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.)
said that other Republicans had
told him Trump was stunned by
the negative reaction he got
from the conservative base after
he started wheeling and dealing
with the Democratic leaders.
“And since then his whole
rhetoric has changed,” Durbin
So far, mostly
stalemates for
outer-borough
native sons
SCHUMER FROM A1
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.) pulled out of a
scheduled meeting at the White
House, the limits of that relationship became palpably evident.
And the chances for a deal ahead
of a Dec. 8 spending deadline
grew that much smaller.
Schumer said he’s still open to
negotiating with Republicans in
Congress, but any quick New
Yorker-to-New Yorker agreement
to avert a government shutdown
and resolve the status of the
“dreamers,”
about
600,000
young undocumented immigrants who were brought to the
United States as children, appeared to be stillborn. Schumer
and Trump traded snippy remarks late Tuesday. The senator
called the president “a destructive force.” Trump, sitting between empty chairs set behind
Schumer’s and Pelosi’s nameplates, accused the two of being
“weak on military” and “all
talk . . . no action.”
The connection between Schumer and Trump has already been
among the most volatile, promising and surprising of many mercurial relationships in the short
history of the Trump administration. On the morning after this
month’s terrorist attack on Manhattan’s West Side, Trump tweeted a shot at Schumer, calling the
diversity visa lottery under
which the accused terrorist entered the United States “a Chuck
Schumer beauty.”
Whereupon Schumer opined
that “I guess it’s not too soon to
politicize a tragedy.” Following
which Trump’s spokesman, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, said the
president didn’t intend to blame
Schumer for the attack.
The sniping continued Tuesday, when the president tweeted
that “ ‘Chuck and Nancy’ . . .want
illegal immigrants flooding into
our Country unchecked, are
weak on Crime and want to
substantially RAISE Taxes. I
don’t see a deal!”
That prompted Schumer and
Pelosi to cancel the meeting with
Trump and Republican leaders.
But congressional Republicans,
who grumble privately about
Trump’s frequent attacks on his
own party, believe Trump may
yet find occasional alignment
with Schumer and the Democrats — on infrastructure, illegal
immigration or spending.
“If we’re going to get results,
it’s going to be from those two,”
said Rep. Peter T. King (R-N.Y.), a
Long Islander who says Trump
makes deals best when he’s at
ease with those on the other side.
“Trump has no patience for all
that polite circumlocution of
Washington. He didn’t realize
how much he really is a New
Yorker till he was away from the
city for a few months. With
Schumer, he can be a wiseguy.
They interrupt each other, finish
each other’s sentences. The president feels comfortable.”
Schumer has clearly been on
the president’s mind. At a meeting with six members of Congress just before his trip to Asia a
few weeks ago, Trump kept
bringing up Schumer’s name,
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Trump shakes hands with Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) as he signs Cabinet nominations at
the Capitol on Jan. 20. The two men come from New York, but their shared upbringings have not yet bridged their wide gap.
even though the senator was not
present. “He raised Schumer’s
name often, in a very personal,
very playful way,” said a Senate
source familiar with the meeting.
“He’d talk about something he
was going to do with China, and
he’d say, ‘Chuck’s not going to be
happy about that.’ ”
Schumer boasted to a Senate
colleague, in a conversation
caught by a C-SPAN microphone
earlier this fall, that Trump “likes
us. He likes me, anyway. . . . Oh,
it’s going to work out.”
But that same morning,
Trump had tweeted that “no deal
was made” with Schumer and
Pelosi to let the dreamers stay in
the country.
Is a jocular, comfortable vibe
enough to forge deals across
party lines?
“Neither the president’s attempts to flatter nor his namecalling have an effect on the
relationship,” said Matt House, a
spokesman for Schumer, who
declined to be interviewed for
this article. “What drives the
relationship and ultimately leads
to agreements or conflict is the
president’s policy proposals,”
House said.
If Trump proposes ideas that
“don’t violate Democrats’ values
and principles,” Schumer will
work with him, the spokesman
said. But “if the president continues to pursue an agenda that
takes us backwards, Senator Schumer will hold the line.”
Barbs and blame are routine in
the Trump-Schumer relationship, not because they are political enemies — after all, Trump
was a Democrat for much of his
career as a brash Manhattan
developer — but because of
where they’re from and how they
operate.
One of the roughest parts of
the president’s transition from
Trump Tower to the White House
has been finding his new posse. A
man of deeply ingrained habit,
Trump, despite his TV-polished
reputation for firing people, kept
the same tight circle of advisers
for decades. Many of those were
fellow New Yorkers.
The president, who often
grates against the stilted man-
ners and glacial pace of Washington, visibly loosens in the presence of fellow New Yorkers, especially outer-borough and Long
Island guys such as Fox News
host Sean Hannity or erstwhile
White House communications
director Anthony Scaramucci,
according to people who have
watched such encounters.
When Trump met with congressional Republicans in the
spring about health care, he told
Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) that
if he didn’t support Trump’s plan,
“I’m going to come after you.”
“A lot of Republicans grumbled about that,” King said, “and
the president said, ‘Hey, I’m kidding around.’ Those guys just
don’t get that kind of language.
But that’s how we are. When he’s
talking to Chuck, he doesn’t have
to worry about that. They both
just want to get the goddamn
thing done.”
Trump knows he can slam
Schumer as “head clown” or “Crying Chuck” and the senator will
keep talking to him. In a 40-minute meeting Trump held with at
least eight officials from New York
and New Jersey last month to talk
about transportation projects,
Schumer and Trump dominated
the conversation and Trump kept
reaching across economic adviser
Gary Cohn to shake Schumer’s
hand, according to a participant
in the meeting.
Schumer and Trump share a
classic outer-borough combination of tough talk and sensitivity
about not being taken quite as
seriously as the fancy guys from
Manhattan. Both of them spend
many hours on the phone,
schmoozing friends and foes
alike.
They also share an approach to
humor that can land with a thud
in Washington. At their dinner in
September, the president could
joshingly invite Schumer to “have
some meatballs — they’re kosher,”
without fear that he’d take offense, according to a guest who
witnessed the exchange.
“In the old World War II
movies, there was always some
numbskull from Brooklyn, the
straight-talking lug who everybody loved because you always
knew where you stood with
him,” said Jim Kessler, a former
Schumer senior staffer who
now works at Third Way, a
policy nonprofit. “Trump and
Schumer talk like that. Trump
can feel like he speaks a foreign
language to a lot of Americans,
but New Yorkers know that
language of insults.”
But two people can share a
sense of which barbs are just
jests and still be quite different.
“Trump is red carpet, and
Chuck is the Sheepshead Bay
co-op annual meeting,” Kessler
said. “Trump is fine china, and
Chuck is Chinese takeout.
Trump’s dad was a millionaire;
Chuck’s dad was an exterminator.”
Inside the White House, many
advisers remain wary of working
with Schumer. When Schumer
and Pelosi emerged from a Blue
Room dinner with Trump in
September and announced that
they had a deal to permit the
dreamers to stay in the country,
they went further than what
Trump had accepted, a White
House official said.
“There was a lot of warmth
and feeling in the dinner,” the
official said, but “Schumer and
Pelosi were under such pressure
to produce something that they
got ahead of themselves.” Yet
White House budget director
Mick Mulvaney emerged from
the dinner confirming that “we
have the makings of a deal” with
Schumer and Pelosi.
Both sides in the relationship
portray the other as being captive to his base. Schumer’s camp
argues that the president, left to
his own devices, would hew closer to the moderate Democratic
leanings he expressed most of his
life. Under pressure to cater to
the Republicans who put him in
office, they say, he reverts to a
hard line on immigration and
security issues.
Trump aides, however, say it’s
Schumer who can’t be flexible
because his base is dead set
against cooperating with the
president. Even before Trump
took office, protesters gathered
outside Schumer’s Brooklyn
home with signs that said, “Make
Us Proud or We’ll Primary You.
Don’t Cut Deals With the Devil.”
“They have a good rapport, but
it’s a complicated relationship,”
said Marc Short, the White
House legislative affairs director.
“If you look at confirmation of
our appointments, Schumer has
been as obstructionist as possible. It’s absurd. We haven’t see a
lot of cooperation.”
Schumer, 67, and Trump, 71,
grew up in the same New York
political arena. Trump’s developer father took his teenage son
with him to neighborhood Democratic clubs in Brooklyn on
weekends, visiting local party
chieftains whose help he might
someday need. Schumer’s mother volunteered in her neighborhood and pressed her son to
succeed by studying hard.
Schumer’s path took him from
valedictorian at his public high
school to a perfect 1600 on his SAT
and on to Harvard and Harvard
Law. He joined Sen. Eugene McCarthy’s (Minn.) 1968 campaign
for the Democratic presidential
nomination and soon made his
own run for a state Assembly seat.
Trump, never the studious type,
was already devoting much of his
time to the family business while
he was in college.
Once Trump broke off on his
own to build hotels and office
towers in Manhattan, he needed
political cover, just as his father
had. Even in his 20s, Trump
cultivated politicians, held fundraisers and invited officeholders
to his many news conferences.
When Republican Tom Kean
was governor of New Jersey in
the 1980s, he would run into
Schumer at Trump’s big parties.
“Trump would make sure the
rich and powerful were there, as
well as the politicians he might
need to get permits for his next
project,” Kean said. “He and
Schumer both liked to know
everybody.”
Trump even put Schumer up
as a prize on his TV reality show,
“The Apprentice.” In 2006, contestants on the show vied for an
awards package including a
meeting with the senator.
Between 1996 and 2010 —
when Schumer’s career was blossoming and Trump was variously
said.
Now it’s unclear whether
Trump wants to try to bring
about a shutdown of the federal
government — funding runs out
Dec. 8 — in a bid to force
congressional Democrats to
back funding of the border wall
that he has long supported.
That sort of confrontation,
something that most of the
public would despise, might be
exactly the kind of fight that
Trump’s base wants. It is
unclear whether Ryan and
McConnell are prepared to jump
into that abyss with the
president, knowing that it is
their members who are on the
ballot in next year’s midterm
elections.
Schumer always saw this
coming. In his hot-mic moment
in mid-September, he told his
colleague that he had warned
Trump about going to the “far
right.”
“If you have to step just in
one direction, you’re boxed. He
gets that,” Schumer said.
In a whisper, Schumer even
predicted his new negotiating
partner might transform
Congress. “Oh, it’s going to work
out, and he’ll make us more
productive, too,” he said.
That prediction remains very
much in doubt.
paul.kane@washpost.com
a Democrat, a Republican and an
independent — Trump donated
$9,000 to Schumer.
They came head to head on
New York issues only rarely. In
2007, they were on opposing
sides of a conflict over Starrett
City, the country’s largest subsidized housing complex, with
nearly 6,000 apartments in 46
buildings near Jamaica Bay in
Brooklyn.
Schumer sided with tenants
who feared that the sale of their
homes might mean huge rent
hikes or even eviction. Trump,
whose father had been a major
investor in the complex in the
1970s, still owned about 4 percent of the property and was
pleased to cash out.
Schumer called the decision to
sell disgraceful and accused the
owners of trying to “maximize
every nickel they can get at the
expense of the tenants.”
Trump’s retort: “You can’t stop
free enterprise. This is not Communist China.”
But the two men stayed on the
fringes of the issue. The complex
is now in the process of being
sold, a deal that could produce a
$14 million payoff to Trump.
In 2014, Trump and Schumer
found themselves on the same
side of an effort to keep the
Buffalo Bills in New York. Schumer was deeply involved for
months, calling owners, scouting
ways to ensure that the franchise
remained in Buffalo, one of the
league’s smaller, more frigid cities. Trump, who put himself forward as a possible owner of the
team, “never seriously pursued
it,” according to a source close to
Schumer.
Trump likes to do business
with people who, as he sees it,
can take a punch. “That’s who he
is,” said the Rev. Al Sharpton,
who has crossed swords with
Trump and occasionally found
common cause with him. “He
comes from construction workers and builders, that Queens
blue-collar, white-ethnic world.
He built himself into a New York
personality, an environment
where Page Six and the tabloids
mean something to him.”
Sharpton argues that Trump’s
affinity for fellow outer-borough
guys — and they are nearly always men — “comes out of a place
with a certain racial dynamic and
attitudes that are different from
the rest of the country.” Trump
“learned politics watching [former New York mayors] Ed Koch
and Rudy Giuliani, whereas he
looks at a McConnell or Ryan and
he just doesn’t get that.”
The feeling may be mutual.
Soon after Trump took office,
McConnell emerged from a
White House meeting and allowed that “I enjoyed the president and Sen. Schumer talking
about all the people they knew in
New York.”
Despite their common New
York DNA, the president and a
leader of the party that defines
itself as the resistance to Trump
may not be able to bridge the gulf
between them.
“Trump’s dealt all of his career
with the kind of bleeding liberals
that Chuck represents, the union
bosses he needed to get his
buildings built,” Sharpton said.
“But for them to make any deals,
Schumer’s got to come out of the
room with something to take
back to Brooklyn, and Donald
Trump’s got to take something
back to the 21 Club. Right now,
they’re in such different places
that it could just end with a series
of stalemates.”
marc.fisher@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
SU
To start a tense month of negotiations, Trump and Democrats trade insults
Pelosi and Schumer
back out of meeting after
president’s ‘verbal abuse’
BY E D O ’ K EEFE
AND S EAN S ULLIVAN
President Trump and top lawmakers Tuesday failed to craft the
outlines of a spending agreement
as Democrats backed out of a
planned meeting at the White
House amid growing acrimony
over a slate of year-end legislative
priorities, with a potential government shutdown looming over
the negotiations.
The impasse all but ensures
another holiday-season standoff
over legislation designed to keep
the government open and that
also is expected to settle complex
issues regarding immigration and
health care.
Failure to act in the coming
days could bring a partial shutdown of government operations,
jeopardize health-care services
for 9 million children and 370,000
pregnant women nationwide, and
further complicate the fate of
hundreds of thousands of children of illegal immigrants, known
as dreamers, who could start facing deportation in early March.
“We have a lot differences,”
Trump said in the White House’s
Roosevelt Room, flanked by two
empty chairs meant for House
Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (DCalif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.),
calling Democrats weak on crime,
immigration and the military.
Asked about the possibility of a
government
shutdown
this
month, the president said: “If that
happens, I would absolutely
blame the Democrats.”
The breakdown in talks between Trump and Democrats will
put more pressure on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.) and House Speaker Paul D.
Ryan (R-Wis.), who both attended
the White House meeting, to find
a way forward on spending negotiations while they also race to
wield their majorities to try to
pass a sweeping tax bill this
month.
After a rocky first year with no
major legislative achievements,
Republicans have a great deal at
risk as the year winds down and
the 2018 midterm election campaign ramps up.
While Republicans have control of Washington, GOP leaders
have conceded that they will
probably need Democratic votes
to help pass spending bills because of potential opposition
from conservatives in the House
and because Senate Democrats
can filibuster spending legislation.
“We need 60 votes in the Senate
to close off debate and so, with 52
Republicans, we can’t do it by
ourselves,” said Sen. John Cornyn
(R-Tex.), McConnell’s top deputy.
Schumer and Pelosi are using
this leverage to insist on adding
policy issues to win their support
for the year-end funding bill.
Tensions began rising early
Tuesday after Trump tweeted
ahead of the scheduled meeting
that Schumer and Pelosi “want
illegal immigrants flooding into
our Country unchecked, are weak
on Crime and want to substantially RAISE Taxes. I don’t see a deal!”
Democratic aides on Capitol
Hill spotted the president’s tweet
and, within hours, Schumer and
Pelosi agreed to skip the meeting,
saying that they would rather negotiate with McConnell and Ryan,
as they did in the spring to pass a
similar spending plan.
Trump “now knows that his
verbal abuse will no longer be
tolerated,” Pelosi tweeted. “His
empty chair photo opp showed
he’s more interested in stunts
than in addressing the needs of
the American people. Poor Ryan
and McConnell relegated to
props. Sad!”
The two GOP leaders faulted
Democrats for “antics” that were
putting government and military
operations at risk.
McConnell said at the White
House, “I think the Democratic
leaders in the House and Senate
need to understand the way the
government works, and the administration has to be a part of the
ultimate negotiation over what
the spending level is going to be
for the next year.”
Even before Tuesday’s standoff,
Republican and Democratic aides
predicted that leaders were unlikely to agree on setting new
spending levels this week, meaning that Congress is likely to pass a
short-term spending bill by Dec.
8, when current funding expires,
that would push off negotiations
until just before Christmas.
Calls to verify federal
financial aid forms rise
BY D ANIELLE
D OUGLAS- G ABRIEL
Colleges and universities are
reporting a surge in requests for
students to verify information on
their federal financial aid applications, a time-consuming process that school officials fear could
derail low-income applicants.
Every year, about one-third of
students who fill out the Free
Application for Federal Student
Aid, known as FAFSA, must provide further proof that the information they supplied is accurate.
The U.S. Education Department
can flag students for verification
at random, but the odds increase
if their applications are incomplete or contains discrepancies.
College financial aid administrators say they always anticipate
contacting some students for additional documentation, but the
numbers this year have skyrocketed, and they don’t know why.
Many university financial aid
administrators say they have received about the same number of
FAFSA submissions as they did
last year at this time, but the
number of students flagged has
doubled in some cases.
“The department has sophisticated people that we hope are
building in appropriate selection
criteria in the methodology, but
this year, there is no rhyme or
reason to what they’re doing,”
said Mary Sommers, director of
financial aid at the University of
Nebraska at Kearney. “Did something change? We’ve heard nothing to date.”
The Education Department’s
Office of Federal Student Aid said
it is aware of the issue and working to fix it. The department
bases verification selection on
several factors, including application patterns from the previous
cycle, and significant changes last
year affected this year’s selection.
Not only did the FAFSA season
kick off in October instead of
January, but changes were also
made in the requirements for tax
information. That meant the patterns of when and how people
applied for aid also changed, so
the formula the department used
for verification shifted.
In addition, the Internal Revenue Service Data Retrieval Tool,
a popular online resource that
lets students transfer tax return
information, was disabled because of hackers. Those factors
have contributed to the higherthan-usual number of verification requests, according to the
department.
Officials say that they are
working to make the appropriate
adjustments and that schools
should see a reduction in the
flagging of students in several
weeks. The Education Department’s student aid office plans to
issue guidance to colleges and
universities as soon as it has a fix
in place.
In October alone, several public and private four-year colleges
reported that the proportion of
FAFSAs flagged for verification
increased as much as threefold
compared with the year before,
according to data from the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators. The
trade group did not disclose the
names of the schools.
Around this time last year,
Sommers said about 15 percent of
new and returning students at
the University of Nebraska at
Kearney were selected for verification, but this year, 40 percent,
or 890 people, have been flagged.
The problem is especially acute
among students who automatically qualify for a “zero” expected
family contribution, meaning
their household income is less
than $25,000 a year. Out of 160
applications with that designation, 130 have been selected for
verification, Sommers said.
She worries that students who
are the first in their families to
attend college will be discouraged by the requests for verification and become weary of the
application process. Sommers
also works with Latino parents in
the midst of becoming citizens
who are nervous that verification
will negatively affect their
chances. Though she tries to allay
those fears, Sommers is concerned those families might persuade their children to consider
only schools they can pay for out
of pocket or forgo college
altogether.
With billions of dollars in
loans, grants and scholarships at
stake, verification is meant to
reduce the risk of fraud.
danielle.douglas@washpost.com
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Between two empty chairs — meant for Democratic leaders —
President Trump speaks Tuesday at the White House.
Currently, Congress may spend
no more than $549 billion for
defense programs and $516 billion for nondefense programs
next year, a cut from current levels. But the Trump administration
and defense hawks in both parties
want to boost Pentagon spending
to more than $600 billion, while
Democrats are demanding a dollar-for-dollar increase in domestic spending.
Trump has explicitly threatened a government shutdown
twice this year, and Tuesday’s
events signaled that prospect is
increasingly more realistic.
Among Democrats, there is
growing resolve to withhold support for a spending plan that fails
to address the fate of dreamers.
On Tuesday, Rep. Carlos Curbelo
(R-Fla.), who represents a swing
district in South Florida, became
the first Republican lawmaker to
say that he also will withhold his
support for a spending bill that
funds the government into next
year if a solution for dreamers has
not been enacted.
“Lives and livelihoods are on
the line, and time is running out.
We can and should get this done,”
Curbelo said at an immigration
policy summit at the University of
Miami.
Curbelo is expected to face one
of the toughest reelection fights
next year and has been a key
bipartisan broker on immigration
policy.
Trump announced in September that he is ending the Deferred
Action for Childhood Arrivals
program that granted temporary
legal status to roughly 600,000
young undocumented immigrants who were brought to the
United States as children. He has
given Congress until March to
enact a permanent fix or risk mass
deportations.
If Congress fails to act by March
5, DACA protections will begin to
lapse, with nearly 1,000 recipients
losing their status each day for
two years, according to estimates.
That would plunge dreamers into
limbo, potentially putting them at
risk of deportation while also creating havoc among businesses
that employ them.
Bipartisan proposals providing
permanent legal status to eligible
dreamers would permit them to
stay in the country, but not allow
illegal immigrants to flood into
the United States as Trump suggested Tuesday.
Cornyn said that resolving issues for dreamers should be handled separately from spending
matters.
“I think it deserves its own
consideration,” he said.
Another major sticking point
for Democrats is funding for the
Children’s Health Insurance Program, which began drying up on
Sept. 30. Many states have enough
money to keep their individual
programs afloat for at least a few
months, but five could run out in
late December if Congress fails to
act. Nearly 9 million children and
370,000 pregnant women nationwide receive care through the program.
Schumer stopped short of laying out ironclad demands that
must be met in the year-end deal
but hinted that a DACA replacement, bringing defense spending
increases to parity with domestic
spending, funding the children’s
health insurance program and
providing more money for stormravaged states are his top priorities.
“We believe there are some
things they want. There are some
things we want. If you’re serious,
we can negotiate a very good
timely deal. And we can do it now,”
he told reporters.
Schumer said he was “very
hopeful” a government shutdown
can be averted. He said that Republicans know “with them in
charge, a shutdown falls on their
back. They’re running the show.”
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
Josh Dawsey and John Wagner
contributed to this report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
The World
Kenya’s president
begins 2nd term
after divisive vote
As Kenyatta takes oath,
pro-government forces
fire on protesters
BY
R AEL O MBUOR
nairobi — Kenyan President
Uhuru Kenyatta was sworn in for
a second term Tuesday amid the
thunderous applause of supporters even as pro-government forces fired on protesters angered by
the contentious election process
that kept him in power.
The inauguration capped an
incredibly fraught few months
for Kenya that saw an election
whose results were annulled,
weeks of unrest, an opposition
boycott and, finally, a new election that gave Kenyatta 98 percent of the vote, but with a
turnout of less than 40 percent.
As Kenyatta was sworn in,
police across town opened fire on
opposition demonstrators, with
reports of at least one dead. An
impromptu rally later by opposition leader Raila Odinga was hit
by tear gas, forcing his abrupt
retreat to his vehicle.
Kenyatta took the oath on the
same Bible used by his father —
Kenya’s first president, Jomo
Kenyatta — in 1964, and the
capacity crowd erupted into
cheers in the 60,000-seat Kasarani stadium decked out in the red
and gold of Kenyatta’s party. Regional heads of state looked on,
including the leaders of Ethiopia,
Uganda, Rwanda and South Sudan.
In his speech, Kenyatta noted
that the past few months “have
been a trying time” but assured
the country that the elections
“are now firmly behind us.”
So many people tried to push
into the stadium for the event
that police fired tear gas outside
the venue to control the crowd.
“This is the day that we have
been waiting for. It’s finally here.
Our God had done this for us. The
elections have tormented and almost destroyed our country. We
hope that this will be the beginning of a new chapter,” said Marvin Muriithi Munyua, 30, a businessman. “Let’s now focus on our
country.”
The extended election season,
stretching from August until the
inauguration, exacerbated the
deep divisions in Kenya. Support
for Kenyatta and his opponent,
Odinga, broke along ethnic lines.
The business community also
backed Odinga, while many
in more-marginalized regions
turned to Odinga to try to stem
the endemic corruption in the
country.
Odinga attempted to stage a
parallel prayer rally during the
inauguration for those killed in
election-related violence. Some
70 people are estimated to have
died in confrontations with police over the past few months.
The government declared the
rally illegal and blocked the roads
leading to an area known as the
Jacaranda grounds, preventing it
from taking place.
Residents of the area said
police used live fire to disperse
protesters. The residents held up
spent cartridges as evidence that
gunfire had been used. At least
one body could be seen, and the
opposition placed the overall
death toll as high as five. This
figure could not be independently verified.
BEN CURTIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Supporters cheer during President Uhuru Kenyatta’s inauguration at the 60,000-seat Kasarani stadium in Nairobi.
The crowd chanted “Uhuru
must go” and “Thief.”
Odinga supporters barricaded
streets in the neighborhood with
stones and said the forces attacking them were the Mungiki, a
pro-government gang, rather
than police.
“They are following people
into the houses and killing them,”
said one man, who did not provide his name amid the chaos of
chanting protesters. “This is not
the country we are going to live
in. . . . This is more than a dictatorship.”
Before his convoy was hit by
tear gas, Odinga spoke briefly to
supporters, telling them that
“Kenyatta is not the president of
Kenya” and promising that he
himself would be sworn in as
president Dec. 12.
Odinga withdrew from the
Oct. 26 election rerun, saying
nothing had been done to address
the problems that led the first set
of election results to be annulled.
Within hours of Kenyatta’s victory, Odinga said his party, the
National Super Alliance, would
be transformed into a resistance
movement that would use civil
disobedience and boycotts to target the government and its corporate backers.
Kenya is East Africa’s most
diverse and richest economy, but
the election turmoil has harmed
economic growth.
foreign@washpost.com
SIMON MAINA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Paul Schemm in Addis Ababa,
Ethiopia, contributed to this report.
Kenyatta takes the oath of office. Only 40 percent of Kenyans voted
last month after the high court nullified the initial election results.
German mayor is stabbed by a critic of his pro-refugee policies
BY
G RIFF W ITTE
berlin — A German mayor who
has won accolades for his welcoming approach to refugees was
recovering Tuesday after being
stabbed in the neck in an attack
authorities said was politically
motivated.
Andreas Hollstein, a member
of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s
conservative Christian Democratic Union, was at a kebab shop
in the west German town of
Altena on Monday evening when
a man asked whether he was the
mayor, shouted criticism of his
asylum policies and then lunged
with a foot-long blade.
Hollstein was treated at a
hospital and released. At a news
conference Tuesday, he credited
the kebab shop owner, Abdullah
Demir, as well as Demir’s wife
and son, with helping to save
his life.
“I’m sure that if they hadn’t
reacted like that, I wouldn’t be
alive now,” Hollstein said, his
neck wrapped in bandages.
Demir, who is of Turkish origin, told the German tabloid Bild
that the mayor had just ordered a
Turkish kebab sandwich when
the perpetrator, who appeared to
be drunk, confronted him.
“I myself am hungry and
thirsty,” the assailant said, according to Demir, while the
mayor “keeps bringing more
refugees.”
Armin Laschet, the state premier of North Rhine-Westphalia,
said security officials think the
attacker, who was taken into custody, had a political motive.
Merkel tweeted Tuesday that
she was “outraged by the knife
attack on Mayor Andreas Hollstein, and very relieved that he
is able to be back with his
family. Thanks also to those
who helped him.”
Tweeted Justice Minister
Heiko Maas: “We must never
accept attacks on people who are
just helping others.”
The attack comes at a time of
growing concern about rightwing violence in Germany, two
years after the European refugee
crisis brought more than 1 million newcomers to the country.
The German daily Tagesspiegel
reported this year that authorities had a list of more than 12,000
potentially violent right-wing extremists, significantly more than
a year prior. The Interior Ministry said it had nearly 600 outstanding arrest warrants for
right-wing offenders.
In September, Alternative for
Germany became the first farright party to win seats in the
German Parliament in more than
half a century, having campaigned on an anti-Muslim, anti-
ULRICH HUFNAGEL/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Altena Mayor Andreas Hollstein, left, leaves a news conference on Tuesday. Hollstein was stabbed in
the neck Monday evening at a kebab shop; his attacker cited his asylum policies.
migrant platform.
Monday night’s attack on Hollstein echoed the stabbing two
years ago of Henriette Reker, who
was campaigning at the time to
be mayor of Cologne, Germany’s
fourth-largest city.
Like Hollstein, Reker was
stabbed in the neck in what
authorities described as a backlash against her pro-immigrant
stance. Reker, a Merkel ally, recovered from the attack and won
the election days later.
In June 2016, on the eve of
Britain’s Brexit vote, pro-refugee
British lawmaker Jo Cox was shot
and stabbed to death by a farright extremist.
Hollstein’s town, Altena, is in a
pretty but relatively poor area on
the banks of the Lenne River,
about 50 miles northeast of Cologne. The town of 17,000 has
struggled in recent years as factories have closed and the population has dwindled.
But amid the refugee crisis —
as Syrians, Iraqis, Afghans and
others driven by war from their
homes fled to Germany — Hollstein was adamant that the town
would do more than its share. It
took in 350 people, as mandated
by higher-level authorities, then
accepted 100 more.
Altena has received national
awards for its efforts to integrate
the refugees, including a townrun database that tracks newcomers’ skills and attempts to
match them to jobs.
Local media outlets reported
that Hollstein said Tuesday that
because of his welcoming attitude, he has been the target
of frequent abuse, receiving
“anonymous emails soaked in
hate.”
Even after the attack, Hollstein, who is in his mid-50s, said
he had received messages saying
that the attacker had done the
right thing.
“My interest is in looking after
the town’s interests,” he said.
“That’s what drives me.”
griff.witte@washpost.com
Luisa Beck contributed to this report.
DIGEST
HONDURAS
Vote outcome in limbo,
but challenger has lead
The result of Honduras’s
presidential election was still in
limbo early Tuesday, even after
initial results suggested that a
flamboyant TV host was on course
for a surprise victory over the
U.S.-friendly incumbent, Juan
Orlando Hernández.
With about 70 percent of ballots
counted, challenger Salvador
Nasralla was leading by five
percentage points, election official
Marcos Ramiro Lobo said Monday
afternoon, by which time updates
of the results had ground to a halt.
An initial tally encompassing
more than half of the ballots early
Monday gave Nasralla 45 percent
and Hernández 40 percent.
Later Monday, the president of
the electoral tribunal said it might
be ready to deliver more definitive
results by Thursday, a gap that
risks stoking tension in a nation
known for electoral strife.
Nasralla, a self-described
centrist leading a left-right
coalition, claimed victory Monday
— as did Hernández. Nasralla is
backed by leftist former president
Manuel Zelaya, who was ousted in
a 2009 coup.
Hernández’s bid for a second
term was made possible by a 2015
Supreme Court decision voiding a
single-term limit. He is credited
with lowering the nation’s high
homicide rate and boosting the
economy, but he was also accused
of ties to drug-related financing.
— Reuters
IRELAND
Deputy leader quits to
prevent snap election
The deputy prime minister of
Ireland resigned Tuesday to avert
a parliamentary vote that would
have collapsed the government
and triggered a snap election at a
crunch time for Brexit talks.
Frances Fitzgerald quit hours
before lawmakers had been due to
vote on a no-confidence motion
targeting her. It was filed by the
opposition party Fianna Fail.
Fitzgerald said she was
stepping down “to avoid an
unwelcome and potentially
destabilizing general election at
this historically critical time.”
Fianna Fail wanted her ousted
over a long-running police
scandal. It accuses a previous
government, in which she was
justice minister, of failing to
defend a whistleblower exposing
corruption in the nation’s police.
Prime Minister Leo Varadkar’s
Fine Gael party backed Fitzgerald,
and she denied wrongdoing.
The resignation comes at a
sensitive time in the Brexit
process. European Union leaders
will decide at a Dec. 14-15 summit
whether there has been enough
progress to start discussions over
Britain’s future ties with the bloc.
A key barrier to progress is the
Irish border. Varadkar is pressing
Britain to spell out how it can
keep the currently invisible
Ireland-Northern Ireland frontier
free of customs posts and other
barriers when it leaves the E.U.
while Ireland remains a member.
— Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS
WHO says fake drugs
are rife in poor nations
About 11 percent of medicines
in developing countries are
counterfeit and probably
responsible for the deaths of tens
of thousands of children from
diseases such as malaria and
pneumonia every year, the World
Health Organization said Tuesday.
It is the first attempt by the
U.N. health agency to assess the
problem. Experts reviewed 100
studies involving more than
48,000 medicines. Drugs for
treating malaria and bacterial
infections accounted for nearly
65 percent of fake medicines.
The WHO said the problem
affects mostly poor countries.
Between 72,000 and 169,000
children may be dying of
pneumonia every year after
receiving bad drugs. Counterfeit
drugs may be responsible for
116,000 malaria deaths, mostly
in sub-Saharan Africa, said
scientists working for the WHO.
Counterfeit drugs include
those that regulators have not
approved, fail to meet quality
standards or deliberately
misrepresent an ingredient,
according to the WHO, which
said the cases of fake drugs it
found are only “a small fraction.”
— Associated Press
Syrian opposition, U.N. open
talks in Geneva: The eighth
round of Syria peace talks got
underway with an opposition
team meeting with the U.N. envoy
in Geneva, but President Bashar
al-Assad’s delegation was absent.
The Syrian government said its
team would show up Wednesday.
Moscow has sought to organize
parallel talks, but those efforts
have sputtered.
Troops kill 14 militants after
Sinai massacre: Authorities in
Egypt said security forces killed at
least 14 Islamist militants in Sinai
and an adjacent province, after an
attack at a mosque in the northern
part of the peninsula last week
killed 305 people. The Interior
Ministry said 11 militants were
killed in Ismailia province and six
were arrested. A military
spokesman said three militants
were killed in central Sinai.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
SU
In mixed verdict, jury finds militant guilty of 4 of 18 charges
VERDICT FROM A1
At trial, his defense team said
Abu Khattala was drawn to the
fiery scene in his home town as a
bystander. They questioned the
credibility of three Libyan witnesses who testified that they saw
or heard Abu Khattala take steps
to plan, execute and claim responsibility for the attacks.
Prosecutors presented what
they called “indisputable” records
linking the times of calls on Abu
Khattala’s cellphone — but not
call contents — and surveillance
video from the attack at the diplomatic mission that they said
showed he was at least a key plotter. But they were pressed to prove
events that erupted over hours,
five years ago, overseas, in a place
where the U.S. government had
little presence and local authorities were weak and divided.
Abu Khattala faces up to life in
prison, including up to 15 years for
each of two counts of terrorism
and up to 20 years for destruction
of property. He also was convicted
of using a semiautomatic weapon
in a crime of violence, which is
punishable by up to life in prison
and carries a mandatory minimum term of 10 years to be served
on top of any other sentence.
Abu Khattala, wearing the
same type of off-white long-sleeve
shirt, gray pants and prison
sneakers in which he had appeared through most of the trial,
sat without expression as the verdicts were read, except to cast an
occasional glance into the courtroom gallery.
His defense team, led by Jeffrey
D. Robinson and assistant federal
defender Michelle M. Peterson,
declined to comment. Acting assistant attorney general for national security Dana J. Boente said
in a statement that Abu Khattala’s
“arrest and prosecution were critical steps in our efforts to identify
and hold accountable those who
were responsible for the terrorist
attacks on our facilities in Benghazi, Libya. Our work is not
done. We will not rest in our pursuit of the others” involved in the
attacks.
U.S. District Judge Christopher
R. “Casey” Cooper thanked the
members of the jury in his chambers, after which the jurors left the
courthouse a few blocks from the
U.S. Capitol without commenting.
POOL PHOTO BY MOLLY RILEY/GETTY IMAGES
The bodies of the slain Americans, including Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, below right,
at Joint Base Andrews in 2012. The jury acquitted Ahmed Abu Khattala, below left, of murder.
U.S. ATTORNEY’S OFFICE FOR THE DISTRICT
In an email to CIA employees
on Tuesday, the agency’s director,
Mike Pompeo, called the conviction “a small measure of justice.”
“It took intelligence to find
him, soldiers to assist in capturing
him, law enforcement to interview him, and a legal team to put
him away. [Abu Khattala’s] sentencing is to follow; but no term in
prison will bring our people back.”
Abu Khattala’s trial moved the
Benghazi inquiry from the partisan political realm, where Republican claims of a Democratic
coverup continued throughout
the 2016 presidential contest, into
a courthouse, where the jury of 12
District residents sorted through
six binders of exhibits and hours
of video evidence.
BEN CURTIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Abu Khattala was a leader in an
extremist brigade that was part of
a militia seeking to establish strict
Islamist rule in post-revolutionary Libya. U.S. intelligence assessments have reported that several
groups were involved in the attacks, including Abu Khattala’s
brigade and the larger militia.
Stevens and Smith died of
smoke inhalation after militants
overran the compound and set
fire to the diplomatic villa. Woods
and Doherty were killed on a roof
at the CIA annex in a predawn
mortar strike.
Abu Khattala was captured in
June 2014 by U.S. commandos and
interrogated and transported for
13 days aboard a Navy warship
traveling to the United States.
On board, he was questioned by
two teams, the first working in a
classified operation to extract intelligence and the second an FBI
team that collected evidence for
trial under the legal safeguards
provided to defendants in civilian
court.
Abu Khattala is the only person
brought to court in the attacks.
However, on Oct. 29, during his
trial, U.S. authorities brought a
second suspect, from Misurata,
Libya, for prosecution in Washington. That person, Mustafa alImam, has pleaded not guilty.
The Trump administration recently showed a willingness to
continue bringing terrorism cases
in civilian courts, including
against additional Benghazi sus-
pects. President Trump on Oct. 30
announced that “on my orders,”
U.S. forces captured Imam to “face
justice in the United States.”
Brian Egan, a senior White
House and State Department legal adviser during the Obama administration, said the mixed verdict will be “cold comfort” to Abu
Khattala, given the possibility of
lengthy imprisonment.
“This was done, in a very challenging case, through a criminal
justice system that is time-tested
and respected. I think that this is a
win for the U.S. government and
its care in effectuating Khattala’s
capture, interrogation, transfer
and prosecution,” Egan said.
Before the trial began Oct. 2,
Abu Khattala’s defense moved to
exclude statements he made while
in military and FBI custody, arguing that the shipboard interrogation without a lawyer present violated his legal rights and that the
circumstances were so coercive
that they negated his signed waiver of his rights to an attorney and
to refrain from self-incrimination.
The government won a critical
ruling when Cooper denied the
motion. The decision upheld the
government’s flexibility in handling terrorism suspects seized
abroad.
University of Texas law professor Stephen I. Vladeck, who has
written frequently about the handling of terrorism suspects, said
passing judgment on the effectiveness of the civilian prosecution before sentencing is premature. “To my mind,” he said, “the
verdict is much less important
than whether the government at
the end of the day is able to incapacitate someone like Abu Khattala,” who potentially could be
imprisoned for the remainder of
his life.
The judge’s pretrial rulings upholding the twofold questioning,
Vladeck said, are “the far more
important precedent,” from a civil
liberties perspective.
The trial featured dramatic testimony by surviving State Department and CIA operators, some
taking the stand under fake
names and disguised in wigs and
mustaches to protect their identities.
Prosecutors also relied heavily
on surveillance video taken by
overhead drones and cameras at
the diplomatic compound and on
cellphone records the U.S. government obtained from Libyan authorities.
Key testimony came from three
paid Libyan informants, all testifying under pseudonyms.
They included an undercover
Libyan businessman who received $7 million for aiding the
United States by approaching Abu
Khattala as a financial supporter
after the attacks, collecting incriminating statements from him
and luring him to his capture. The
witness, testifying as Ali Majrisi,
said he was present in 2013 when
Abu Khattala, on being urged to
conduct more attacks, like those
carried out by al-Qaeda in Iraq,
allegedly said of the Benghazi attacks: “I intended then to kill everybody [all the Americans] there,
even those who were at the [Benghazi] airport.”
The trial was preceded by
months of sealed litigation and
negotiations over tens of thousands of pages of classified documents that the government
turned over to the defense.
Most physical evidence at the
attack sites in Benghazi was
burned or otherwise destroyed or
looted, and FBI agents were given
only eight hours, three weeks after
the attacks, to access both sites,
one testified.
“It could also be, not a lot of
people in Benghazi wanted to cooperate with the U.S. prosecution
effort,” said Alice Hunt Friend,
who served as a Pentagon official
overseeing Africa security policy
matters during the Obama administration from 2009 to 2014.
One clear public lesson from
the trial, she added, is “how very,
very difficult it is to track individual terror threats to Americans”
and to collect either the very detailed intelligence needed to prevent an attack or the evidence
required to prosecute after one
takes place.
“To go through the details of
trying to marshal evidence sufficient to convict someone of a
crime is a window into the kind of
evidence needed in order to understand their tactics and to try to
prevent” other attacks, Friend
said. “It is an enormous challenge.”
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
ann.marimow@washpost.com
Greg Miller contributed to this report.
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A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
More danger to U.S. troops as Afghanistan plan shifts, general says
operations, outside the relative
safety of fortified military bases.
Once the new troops are in
place, more than 1,000 advisers
will be out conducting operations
with lower-level Afghan units,
including those from the army
and the Afghan Special Forces, at
any given time, Nicholson said.
Speaking in a video briefing
from Afghanistan, the general
said the changes would help local
troops “maintain a tempo that
will enable them to start retaking
80 percent of the country over the
next two years.”
Nicholson said the new strategy would seek to ensure that
more than three-quarters of Afghans live in areas under government control two years from now.
Currently, according to U.S. military estimates, only about 64 percent of Afghans live in locations
firmly in the grip of the Kabul
government.
He said the deployment of advisers with Afghan army units
would intensify the threat to
Americans, who will face the
threat of roadside bombs, militant ambush, artillery fire and
other dangers. “There will be
greater risk,” he said. “Absolutely.”
Even with the aerial surveillance, artillery, and air power
employed to minimize risks, Afghanistan has remained a dangerous place for U.S. forces. At
least 12 U.S. service members
have been killed in Afghanistan
this year.
Nicholson said the goal of expanded military operations was
to facilitate a settlement between
the government and the Taliban.
Pope skips ‘Rohingya’ mention in Burma speech
Belgian
court bars
effort to
expel imam
Substantial expansion
and open-ended mission
intended for region
BY
M ISSY R YAN
The Trump administration’s
new strategy for Afghanistan will
array significantly more U.S.
troops across the battlefield, increasing the risk to American
lives, a senior general said Tuesday.
Gen. John W. Nicholson Jr.,
who commands U.S. and NATO
forces in Afghanistan, told reporters at the Pentagon that President Trump’s new plan for Afghanistan would substantially expand how American advisers provide hands-on assistance to
Afghan soldiers.
Nicholson spoke as the U.S.
military seeks to showcase its
new, more aggressive approach
for the war in Afghanistan, now
in its 17th year. Seeking to signal a
break with the Obama administration, the White House in August authorized a sizable increase
in the U.S. troop presence and a
more expansive, open-ended mission to combat insurgent groups,
including the Taliban, al-Qaeda
and the regional Islamic State
affiliate.
There are now about 14,000
U.S. troops in Afghanistan, the
Pentagon said Tuesday, up from
about 8,400 at the end of the
Obama administration.
As part of the new strategy,
Nicholson said, the U.S. military
is planning to deploy new advisers to accompany Afghan army
forces as they conduct patrols and
SHAH MARAI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
“There will be greater risk. Absolutely,” said Gen. John W.
Nicholson Jr., commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan.
offensive operations in areas
where the Taliban poses a major
threat. Before that change, only
troops assigned to elite Afghan
commando units were permitted
to regularly take part in such
Bowing to local Catholics,
Francis doesn’t use
politically fraught term
BY
R ICK N OACK
Perhaps as important as what
Pope Francis said during his
speech in Burma on Tuesday was
what he didn’t say.
Speculation had circled about
whether the pope would use the
term “Rohingya” to describe the
country’s Muslim minority that
has been the target of a brutal
military “clearance operation.”
Rohingya Muslims are not
recognized as a minority in Burma — also known as Myanmar
— even though many have lived
there for generations. Burmese
officials and many among the
predominantly Buddhist population reject the label “Rohingya” and instead use “Bengalis”
in an effort to bolster their
claim that the Rohingya migrated illegally to the country from
Bangladesh.
To the relief of some and the
dismay of others, the pope refrained from using the term during an interfaith meeting and in a
subsequent speech Tuesday,
which he gave after a meeting
with Burma’s de facto leader,
Aung San Suu Kyi. The civilian
leader is accused of ignoring human rights violations in the
country.
The pope did use his speech to
urge respect for minority rights.
“The future of Myanmar must
be peace, a peace based on respect
for the dignity and rights of each
member of society, respect for
each ethnic group and its identity,
respect for the rule of law, and
respect for a democratic order
AUNG HTET/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Pope Francis, left, and Burmese leader Aung San Suu Kyi, right, attend an event in Burma’s capital. In
a speech, the pope called for dignity and respect but did not directly mention the Rohingya minority.
that enables each individual and
every group — none excluded — to
offer its legitimate contribution
to the common good,” the pope
said.
Burma’s small Catholic community had urged the pope to
refrain from using the term, as
such a move would probably have
been interpreted by the Burmese
leadership as foreign meddling in
domestic affairs.
But as a religious leader who
has repeatedly defied the restraint his predecessors often
showed, Francis could have still
emphasized his support for the
minority by deliberately using the
factually correct, politically
fraught term, observers said.
Francis had already prayed for
“our Rohingya brothers and sisters” ahead of his visit. But his
refusal to use the term while in
Burma was criticized as a contradictory signal by a figure who has
been a vocal supporter of refugees
across the globe and was previously quoted as saying that he
does not like “the contradiction of
“The future
of Myanmar must
be peace, a peace
based on respect.”
Pope Francis, in a speech
in Burma amid ethnic strife there
those who want to defend Christianity in the West, and, on the
other hand, are against refugees
and other religions.”
“The Pope missed an important
opportunity to tell Myanmar that
every group has the right to selfidentify, and to publicly refute the
unconscionable pressure by Aung
San Suu Kyi and the Myanmar
military to deny the Rohingya
their identity,” Phil Robertson, the
deputy Asia director of Human
Rights Watch, wrote in an email.
Whereas some had hoped that
the pope’s using the term would
increase pressure on Burma’s
leadership to refrain from further
repression and violence targeting
Rohingya Muslims, others feared
that such a move could have esca-
lated tensions.
More than 600,000 Rohingya
Muslims have fled across the border into Bangladesh in recent
months amid a violent military
crackdown. The U.S. government
classified the violence as “ethnic
cleansing” last week, and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson blamed
the Burmese government, military and local vigilantes for “horrendous atrocities” in Rakhine
state.
The Burmese military denies
that any atrocities have taken
place, and members of other religious groups in the country, such
as Buddhists and Hindus, claim
that they were in fact the targets
of violence by the Rohingya.
After meeting with the pope
Monday, Burmese Gen. Min Aung
Hlaing, commander in chief of
the armed forces, wrote in a post
on social media that there “is no
religious discrimination in Myanmar as the country ensures religious freedom.”
He said that in the course of the
meeting, “the pope prayed for
ensuring peace, tranquility and
development of Myanmar.” It was
unclear whether the pope raised
human rights concerns in the
meeting.
The pope will meet Rohingya
Muslims in Bangladesh later on
his six-day visit, which ends
Saturday.
Burma’s Catholic Church
leadership has refrained from
calling the violence against the
Rohingya minority “ethnic
cleansing” — probably because
of fears of repercussions that the
use of the term could have for
the Catholic minority, which
numbers 650,000 in a country of
53 million.
crats should join with Republicans to pass a spending measure
to avert a government shutdown. “After North Korea missile
launch, it’s more important than
ever to fund our gov’t & military!”
Trump has repeatedly said that
military options are on the table
for dealing with North Korea and
has suggested that time has run
out for a diplomatic solution to the
nuclear problem.
A growing chorus of voices in
Washington is calling for serious
consideration of military action
against North Korea, although
this is strongly opposed by South
Korea, where the Seoul metropolitan region — home to 25 million
people — is within the range of
North Korean artillery.
And Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Tuesday that “diplomatic options remain viable and
open, for now.” He added: “The
United States remains committed
to finding a peaceful path to denuclearization and to ending belligerent actions by North Korea.”
The missile was launched just
before 3 a.m. Wednesday from
South Pyongan province in the
western part of North Korea, where
Kim had recently visited a catfish
farm, according to state media.
It reached a height of about
2,800 miles before landing 54
minutes later some 620 miles
from the launch site, in waters
inside Japan’s exclusive economic
zone. The splashdown site was
about 130 miles off the coast of
Aomori prefecture.
This suggested that it had been
fired almost straight up — on a
“lofted trajectory” similar to
North Korea’s two previous intercontinental ballistic missile tests.
The Pentagon said that the projectile did indeed appear to be an
intercontinental ballistic missile,
or ICBM. The latest missile “went
higher, frankly, than any previous
shot they’ve taken,” Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said. He described
the launch as part of an effort to
build missiles “that can threaten
everywhere in the world.”
If the missile had flown on a
standard trajectory designed to
maximize its reach, it would have a
range of more than 8,100 miles,
said David Wright, co-director of
the global security program at the
Union of Concerned Scientists.
“Such a missile would have
more than enough range to reach
Washington, D.C.,” Wright said.
The U.S. capital is 6,850 miles
from Pyongyang. The previous intercontinental ballistic missile tested, the Hwasong-14 tested on July
28, was in the air for 47 minutes and
could have flown 6,500 miles were
it on a normal trajectory. Hwasong
means “Mars” in Korean.
The South Korean and Japanese governments both convened
emergency national security
council meetings after the launch,
and both leaders talked to Trump
by phone.
South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of
Staff said its military also conducted a “precision strike” launch exercise in response, firing missiles
into the sea.
Although it may be cold comfort, it is still unlikely that North
Korea is capable of delivering a
nuclear warhead to the U.S. mainland — despite Wednesday’s
claims. That still requires mastering reentry technology and the
difficult task of fitting a nuclear
warhead into a missile and have it
survive the extremes of temperature and vibrations involved with
LOFTED TRAJECTORIES
To avoid other
countries, North
Korea launches test
missiles at a much
higher-than-normal
trajectory — nearly
straight up — so that
missiles come down
in the Sea of Japan
(East Sea).
NOV. 29
2,796 miles
Landing position
not known
JULY 28:
2,300 miles
JULY 4:
1,740 miles
MAY 14:
1,300 miles
International Space
Station orbit:
250 miles
SOUTH KOREA
RUSSIA
CHINA
TAIWAN
JAPAN
—PHILIPPINES
P a c i f i c
O c e a n
—Guam (U.S.)
Source: GoogleEarth
leaving and coming back into the
Earth’s atmosphere.
But Pyongyang has been making rapid progress toward achieving that goal, saying it needs to be
THE WASHINGTON POST
able to protect itself from a “hostile” Washington. It has made observable advances this year, firing
two intercontinental ballistic missiles in July, the second of which
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/checkpoint
Judges cite lack of proof
that cleric poses a threat
BY
M ICHAEL B IRNBAUM
brussels — A Belgian court
was technically capable of reaching as far as Denver or Chicago.
Kelsey Davenport, director of
nonproliferation policy at the
Arms Control Association, said
that Trump’s pressure-centric approach was clearly not stopping
North Korea’s missile advances.
“Testing a ballistic missile capable of reaching Washington, D.C.,
is likely as much a psychological
victory for North Korea as it is a
technical advancement,” Davenport said.
However, there was a still a
question mark over whether
North Korea could reliably and
accurately deliver a nuclear warhead to a target, she said.
A senior South Korean official
said Tuesday that North Korea
could announce next year that it
has completed its nuclear weapons program.
“North Korea has been developing its nuclear weapons at a fasterthan-expected pace. We cannot rule
out the possibility that North Korea
could announce its completion of a
nuclear force within one year,” Cho
Myoung-gyon, the unification minister, who is in charge of the South’s
relations with the North, told foreign reporters in Seoul.
But for now, the North Koreans
still appear to be in the testing
stage, rather than the operational
one, said Markus Schiller, a German aerospace engineer who specializes in missiles. “If they are serious about their missile program,
they have to launch from time to
time, and at different times of the
day and in different weather.”
North Korea still has a way to go
with its missile program, Schiller
said. “Perhaps they can hit Washington, D.C., with this, but they
can’t fight a war with it,” he said.
announced Tuesday that it had
struck down an effort to deport
an imam at Belgium’s oldest
mosque, saying that Belgian immigration authorities had not
provided evidence the cleric
posed a serious threat to society.
The imam, Abdelhadi Sewif,
has worked at the Grand Mosque
of Brussels for 13 years. The
Belgian state secretary for asylum and migration, Theo Francken, accused Sewif of threatening
national security as he sought to
reject a residence permit renewal. Sewif has denied the charges
and said that he was never able
to review the evidence against
him, because it was classified
intelligence material.
The decision curbs the efforts
Belgian authorities have started
to make against the mosque,
which is Belgium’s largest and is
leased by the Belgian government to the Saudi royal family.
Belgian lawmakers and counterterrorism officials have raised
concerns about the unusual arrangement of foreign control of
the mosque, which they say
makes it less accountable to
national authorities.
The Belgian parliamentary
committee charged with investigating the causes of the March
22, 2016, bombings of the Brussels airport and subway recommended in October that Belgium
break the lease, which was
signed in the 1960s as a gesture
of goodwill to the country’s
growing Muslim population.
But Belgian counterterrorism
officials have said they have no
evidence that the mosque’s
imams have advocated violence
or lawbreaking. Tuesday’s announcement from the court,
which followed a formal Friday
court decision, said that authorities failed to provide specific
evidence that Sewif was a danger
to security.
Authorities must demonstrate
“how the personal conduct of the
person concerned concretely
constitutes present, real and sufficiently serious threat as to
affect the fundamental interest
of society. Such a proof cannot be
based on mere speculation or
general considerations,” the immigration court wrote in announcing its decision. “The existence of such a threat is not
demonstrated in this case.”
Sewif denied the charges
against him in an interview last
month, saying he had always
advocated an inclusive vision of
Islam.
On Tuesday, Sewif ’s lawyer
said the imam welcomed the
ruling.
“We are happy about the decision,” said Hicham Chibane, the
lawyer. “Imam Sewif is a person
of dialogue, a tolerant person.”
Although the ruling halts the
effort to force Sewif to leave the
country, it remains unclear
whether Belgian immigration
authorities will seek to expel the
cleric using different reasoning.
Sewif ’s residence permit expired
over the course of the court
procedures.
“We are analyzing the court
decision, and after that we can
decide on the next steps to take,”
said Katrien Jansseune, a
spokeswoman for Francken.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
michael.birnbaum@washpost.com
rick.noack@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/worldviews
South Korea, Japan call emergency meetings after launch
MISSILE FROM A1
missy.ryan@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Ivanka Trump
arrives with
Indian Prime
Minister
Narendra
Modi at a
global
business
summit in
Hyderabad,
India. Trump
led the U.S.
delegation to
the event. She
called for
greater
efforts to help
women start
companies,
but there was
no mention of
her firm’s use
of low-wage
garment
workers.
MONEY SHARMA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
In India, Ivanka Trump makes a push for women
BY
A NNIE G OWEN
hyderabad, india — Ivanka
Trump called Tuesday for greater
efforts to help women start businesses and contribute to the global economy, but there was no
mention of her company’s use of
low-wage garment workers.
The president’s daughter and
White House adviser was scheduled to be in India for two days,
dubbed “a royal visit” by the
Indian media. She came without
senior State Department officials, a departure from years past
when top-level U.S. envoys joined
the conference.
To some, her appeals for female empowerment contrasted
sharply with her own business
practices.
Trump’s apparel company,
which she still controls, exclusively relies on foreign factories
in places such as Bangladesh,
Indonesia, China and India,
where mostly female workers are
paid a few dollars a day for long
hours, industry experts have
said. The Washington Post reported this year that the Ivanka
Trump company lags behind
many others in the industry in
the way it monitors treatment of
its workers, most of them women.
Still, Trump was given a redcarpet welcome in one of India’s
tech hubs as Indian business
executives and political leaders
try to work out the Trump administration’s “America first” trade
policies.
She headlined an event focused on uplifting and supporting female entrepreneurs, but
there was no mention of her
apparel company’s use of lowwage workers in India and other
countries to stitch her clothes.
Entrepreneurs and business
leaders praised Trump, describing her as an elegant and professional working mother who built
her own business and has been a
strong advocate for women.
“She is a very fierce and independent woman. That’s what I
admire about her,” said Renuka
Diwan, co-founder of an agriculture start-up in Pune. “She’s successful in her own right. Nobody
has to introduce her as Donald
Trump’s daughter. She has made
a name for herself.”
Ivanka Trump shared the dais
at the U.S.-sponsored Global
Entrepreneurship Summit with
Indian Prime Minister Narendra
Modi, Defense Minister Nirmala
Sitharaman and business leaders, giving a keynote speech that
touched on her familiar themes
of women’s empowerment and
supporting entrepreneurship.
She touted the Trump administration’s work reducing “jobcrushing regulations” that hurt
small-business owners, its proposal for paid family leave and
her efforts to lobby to pass tax
cuts.
“We must ensure that women
entrepreneurs have access to capital, access to networks and mentors, and access to equitable
laws,” she said. She noted that if
India closed the gender gap of its
labor force by half, the economy
could grow by $150 billion in
three years.
But moments after her speech,
former president Barack Obama
confirmed details of his own
three-nation trip that will include a meeting this week in New
Delhi with Modi on issues such as
climate change — a clear jab at
Trump administration policies
such as its intention to withdraw
from the international Paris climate accord seeking to limit
greenhouse
gas
emissions.
Obama also planned meetings in
China and France.
Entrepreneurs from more
than 100 countries attended the
event in Hyderabad, nicknamed
“Cyberabad” because it is home
to facilities of such tech companies as Microsoft, Facebook and
Google. On Wednesday, Trump is
set to appear on a panel titled
“We Can Do It! Innovations in
Workforce Development and
Skills Training.”
President Trump announced
that his daughter would be leading the U.S. delegation to the
event after a White House meeting with Modi in June.
Her visit is seen here as an
opportunity for India to cement
ties with the Trump administration. But it was shadowed by
questions over political maneuverings back home. State Department officials and analysts speculated that the decision to leave
her without a high-powered team
was a snub by Secretary of State
Rex Tillerson.
On Tuesday, Trump met for the
second time with India’s minister
of external affairs, Sushma
Swaraj, and she was the guest of
honor at a glitzy dinner that Modi
hosted Tuesday at a hilltop marble palace that once belonged to a
Nizam, one of the monarchs who
ruled Hyderabad before India’s
independence from Britain.
In advance of the VIP visit,
officials tried to clear the streets
of Hyderabad of beggars — and
even stray dogs.
In India, a country of 1.3 billion
people, empowering women is
particularly challenging, analysts say. The rate of women
joining the workforce has
dropped, particularly in rural areas, even as incomes have grown.
Female entrepreneurs face specific challenges: Only about
A13
SU
14 percent of businesses are
headed by women, a third in the
agricultural sector.
Female business owners have
difficulty accessing capital and
being taken seriously in a business culture that is male-driven,
entrepreneurs say.
“There are many challenges,”
said Thejaswi S., a Bangalorebased entrepreneur creating a
line of affordably priced nutrition bars and who uses only his
second initial. “They say: ‘You are
female. This is the age you are
supposed to get married, not get
into business. You are too young
to head a company.’ This is what
people say, even in my own family.”
Women make up less than
25 percent of the enrollment in
higher education, notes Vijayaraghavan M. Chariar, a professor of rural development and
technology at the Indian Institute of Technology in New Delhi.
“There are a few success stories, but there are very serious
issues of patriarchy and gender
stereotyping that are preventing
a lot more creative women from
joining the ranks of entrepreneurs,” Chariar said.
Trump, he went on, “is a nice
Barbie doll. Everybody wants to
have a picture taken with her. But
there are much more substantial
women who are entrepreneurs
we ought to be celebrating.”
Trump launched her branded
empire in 2007 with a line of
high-end jewelry and gradually
expanded toward a line of more
affordable clothing, bags and
shoes that garnered $100 million
in retail revenue last year, according to Forbes.
annie.gowen@washpost.com
Brian Murphy in Washington
contributed to this report.
Administration probes
Chinese aluminum sales
BY
D AVID J . L YNCH
The Trump administration
took unusual action against what
it said were unfair Chinese trade
practices on Tuesday, dusting off a
weapon last used in 1991 and
announcing two investigations
into the pricing of aluminum
products imported into the United States.
The Commerce Department
move comes two weeks after President Trump, fresh from a 12-day
Asian tour, boasted of the rapturous welcome and lucrative business deals that had greeted him in
Beijing.
The actions — though highly
symbolic — had been widely expected for Trump, who accused
China of “raping” the U.S. economy during the presidential campaign and threatened to label the
country a “currency manipulator.”
“President Trump made it clear
from day one that unfair trade
practices will not be tolerated
under this administration,” Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said
on a conference call with industry
executives. “Today’s action shows
that we intend to make good on
that promise to the American people.”
Ross said the Chinese government has subsidized excess production of common alloy aluminum sheets, flooding the
U.S. market with products that
are sold well below fair value. The
flat-rolled aluminum sheets are
used in items such as gutters,
street signs and electrical boxes.
Such investigations, which
have risen 65 percent this year,
typically begin following a complaint from an affected U.S. industry. Ross said he took the first step
in the face of evidence that
U.S. producers were “suffering injury” because of the Chinese practices.
Tuesday’s actions may signal
the move from rhetoric to action
Trump’s supporters have craved.
“The act of starting the investigation itself — and not waiting for
the U.S. aluminum industry to
request it — is another signal that
the Trump administration is eager not only to impose trade protection, but also to confront China,” said Chad Bown of the Peterson Institute for International
Economics.
China could view the Commerce Department action as a
deliberate escalation of trade tensions and impose its own trade
barriers against U.S. companies,
he said.
The Commerce Department investigations could lead to the imposition of duties designed to
compensate for Beijing’s subsidies and prices that may be
56.54 percent to 59.72 percent
below fair value, the department
said.
Ross said he anticipated further complaints from U.S. indus-
tries bruised by Chinese trade
practices, and he invited executives on the call “to come forward
so that Commerce can defend
against such inequities.”
Today’s announcement is permitted under World Trade Organization rules. China is likely to
complain about any eventual duties since Commerce will judge it
as a “nonmarket” economy, despite Beijing’s long-standing insistence the state no longer determines prices.
Final decisions in both investigations are expected in late 2018.
For all his tough rhetoric on the
campaign trail, Trump struck a
conciliatory tone during his recent Beijing trip, praising Chinese
President Xi Jinping and blaming
his White House predecessors for
the U.S. trade deficit with China.
For all its symbolism, Tuesday’s
action was limited to just
$603.5 million in imports of one
product. The administration is
evaluating a host of other measures that could have far more
serious repercussions for the
$577 billion in two-way U.S. trade
with China, the world’s secondlargest economy.
Administration officials are
weighing whether to invoke national security considerations to
combat rising Chinese steel and
aluminum imports more broadly,
a move trade analysts fear could
trigger a wave of similar measures
by U.S. trading partners.
U.S. Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer also is investigating whether the U.S. should crack
down on China’s technology
transfer and intellectual property
policies for unfairly discriminating against U.S. companies.
The United States has long
complained about Chinese overcapacity in key industries.
Through energy subsidies and
cheap loans, Beijing has encouraged the growth of far more aluminum and steel production than
it can use at home.
From 2011 to 2015, Chinese aluminum production doubled,
eventually accounting for more
than half of total global production. That led to sharp declines in
world prices, the outgoing Obama
administration reported in January. In recent years, U.S. and Chinese officials repeatedly discussed potential remedies for the
excess aluminum including at a
September 2016 summit between
Xi and President Obama.
Tuesday’s move left some analysts wondering whether the administration’s goal is to persuade
China to change the policies that
are allegedly damaging U.S. companies or simply to shield an
embattled Rust Belt industry
from foreign competition.
“For this administration, protection may be an end in itself,”
said Edward Alden of the Council
on Foreign Relations.
david.lynch@washpost.com
With contraceptives scarce, Venezuelans face potentially life-changing choice
VENEZUELA FROM A1
There are no recent official statistics, but Venezuelan doctors are
reporting spikes in unwanted
pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases that are adding to
the country’s deepening misery.
Mainstream news media outlets have published articles about
the “counting method” of contraception that women can use to
calculate when they are ovulating
and likely to get pregnant. An article on the Venezuelan website
Cactus24 offered “15 home remedies to avoid pregnancy,” including eating papaya twice a day and
drinking two cups of tea with ginger.
Many Venezuelan women have
found a solution on social media.
Facebook, Instagram and Twitter
have become informal exchanges for the purchase or trading
of birth-control pills, intrauterine
devices and implants — albeit
at black-market prices.
Other women beg friends and
relations to bring them contraceptives from outside Venezuela.
“Last time, I got them from my
sister-in-law, who brought them
from Colombia,” said Alejandra
Moran, a 27-year-old Caracas publicist. “And I’ll be traveling to
Spain in December, so I’ll stock up
for myself and my friends.”
For years, oral contraceptives,
IUDs and condoms were available
free at many public hospitals or
through government programs.
But the cash-strapped government has largely suspended those
handouts, leaving some forms of
contraception impossible to find
and others prohibitively expensive.
“It’s hard for young people especially to access them,” said Vanessa
Diaz, a gynecologist at Caracas
University Hospital. “Contraceptives like condoms used to be giv-
MANU QUINTERO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A pharmacy in Los Teques, Venezuela, has a sparse supply of condoms. The disappearance of
contraceptives in the country amid a severe recession has complicated the lives of many Venezuelans.
en out and there were many
brands available, some of them
cheap. But that’s just not the case
anymore.”
The shortage, medical experts
say, has also fueled an increase in
dangerous attempts to terminate
pregnancies at home — not a surprising development given that
abortion is illegal in Venezuela
except when the mother’s life is at
stake.
Marissa Loretto, an OB/GYN at
Caracas’s Concepción Palacios
Maternity Hospital, said she recently treated a woman who had
tried to induce an abortion by
forcing parsley and laundry deter-
gent into her uterus.
The young woman had arrived
at the hospital bleeding, and with
contractions that ultimately
caused a miscarriage. As often
happens in such situations, Loretto said, she subsequently suffered
an infection.
“We ended up having to remove
her uterus,” Loretto said.
Officials at Venezuela’s Health
Ministry did not respond to emails
and phone calls seeking comment.
For years, most pharmacies
here
acquired
medications
through a system in which the
government set beneficial dollarexchange rates for the import of
foreign-made drugs. But that system has at least partly broken
down, meaning pharmacies have
few contraceptives to sell and often charge hundreds of times the
normal price. Overall, stocks of
oral contraceptives have fallen by
as much as 90 percent since 2015,
according to the Venezuelan Pharmaceutical Federation.
On a recent afternoon in central
Caracas, one pharmacy said it
hadn’t received birth-control
pills in more than a year.
Two blocks away at another
pharmacy, a female customer in
her 20s looking for pills was
told, “We only have the imported
ones” — implying they would be
sold at a black-market rate. The
manager offered her a single pack
of 21 pills for 120,000 bolívares.
That’s about $3, equal to one-third
of Venezuela’s monthly minimum
wage.
“They’re expensive, but I need
them,” the young woman said,
purchasing them anyway. She declined to give her name before
scurrying away.
Many name-brand condoms,
meanwhile, have disappeared
from store shelves. But the cheaper brands taking their place are
still imported, and therefore still
unaffordable for many. A threepack can now cost several days’
minimum-wage pay.
“I inherited my best friend’s
condoms when he left the country
to move to the United States,”
said Juan Noguera, 28, an unemployed economic researcher.
“Sometimes we just share them
between friends. This is the sharing economy.”
In Venezuela’s macho society,
many men refuse to wear condoms anyway. But now that they
cost more, experts say, the indexes
of unprotected sex are getting
even worse.
The cheaper brands can also be
unreliable. A few months ago, Andres Rodriguez, 28, said he was
en route to his girlfriend’s house
when he stopped to buy a pack of
condoms. All he could find was a
brand he had never heard of.
“I bought them anyway. I was
in a hurry,” he said. During sex, he
said, the condom broke — although his girlfriend did not get
pregnant.
“Can you imagine? In this economy?” he said of the prospect of a
pregnancy. “What a disaster.”
Doctors blame the situation for
a worrying increase in HIV cases
and sexually transmitted diseases
such as gonorrhea, syphilis and
herpes.
María Eugenia Landaeta, head
of infectious diseases at Caracas
University Hospital, said the number of HIV patients being treated
there has surged to 5,600 this year,
up from 3,000 in 2014.
“One of the causes is the lack of
prevention methods,” she said.
Diaz, the gynecologist from Caracas University Hospital, said the
number of patients with STDs she
is seeing has soared.
“In my private practice, out of
every 10 patients, five or six now
have an STD,” she said. “Two years
ago it was just two or three.”
Making
matters
worse,
drug shortages are so severe that
doctors often lack what they
need to treat patients with STDs.
“Something as simple as penicillin — the cheapest antibiotic in
the world — can’t be found in the
country,” said Moraima Hernández, an epidemiologist at Concepción Palacios Maternity Hospital.
In Venezuela, birth control usually is left up to the woman — and
nowadays, for many, that means
the black market or nothing. After
going months with sporadic access to birth-control pills, Lorena
Mendez, a 24-year-old economist,
decided she could no longer run
the risk of pregnancy. She used
Instagram to track down a blackmarket dealer of etonogestrel implants, rods inserted into the arm
that release a contraceptive hormone.
The device can function for as
long as three years. Mendez paid
600,000 bolívares for one — 300
times the official subsidized rate.
“It was extremely expensive.
Not many people have access to it,”
she said. “But it was worth it. Now
I have peace of mind.”
anthony.faiola@washpost.com
Faiola reported from Miami. Rachelle
Krygier contributed to this report.
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
Economy & Business
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Judge refuses to block Trump’s consumer watchdog pick
MULVANEY MAY REMAIN HEAD OF CFPB
Position grants budget director broad power
BY R ENAE M ERLE
AND T HOMAS H EATH
A federal judge on Tuesday refused to block President Trump’s
pick to be the temporary leader of
the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, denying a request by
a high-ranking agency employee
that she be put in charge instead.
In turning down Leandra English’s request for a temporary restraining order, U.S. District
Judge Timothy J. Kelly acknowledged that the case raised constitutional questions but he ruled
that budget director Mick Mulvaney can remain acting director.
Former CFPB litigation counsel
Deepak Gupta, representing English, said they would weigh their
options to resolve an issue they say
has left the six-year-old agency
and its 1,600 employees in legal
limbo.
“There needs to be an answer,
and there needs to be a final answer. There needs to be a resolution of this cloud of impropriety
hanging over the bureau,” Gupta
told reporters after the hearing
The Trump administration applauded the decision and said it
supports its contention that Mulvaney is the rightful acting director.
“It’s time for the Democrats to
stop enabling this brazen political
stunt by a rogue employee and
allow Acting Director Mulvaney to
continue the Bureau’s smooth
transition into an agency that truly serves to help consumers,”
White House spokesman Raj Shah
said in a statement.
Even before the decision, Mulvaney has been moving aggressively
to reshape an agency he has criticized in the past. On his first day in
the office, he announced a 30-day
freeze on the issuance of new rules
and hiring. On Tuesday, Mulvaney
started a new Twitter account —
@CFPBdirector — and posted a
picture of himself at a desk with a
U.S. flag in the background. “Busy
day at the @CFPB. Digging into the
details,” the tweet says.
“Anyone who thinks that a
Trump administration CFPB
would be the same as an Obama
administration CFPB is simply being naive,” he told reporters Monday. “Elections have consequences
at every agency, including the
CFPB.”
That is probably just the beginning of the changes the CFPB
could see under the Trump administration. Republicans and the
banking industry have complained that the agency, created in
reaction to the global financial
crisis, lacks accountability and
that its rulemaking made it harder
for consumers to get loans. House
Republicans approved legislation
earlier this year that would strip
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Mick Mulvaney will wear two hats as White House budget director
and acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
the CFPB of many of its powers.
“I would expect a sea change,”
said Alan Kaplinsky, head of the
consumer financial services
group for the law firm Ballard
Spahr. It could be “a very significant shift in direction, but it won’t
happen overnight.”
While Democrats and consumer groups acknowledge it is inevitable that a Trump nominee will
lead the agency, they worry the
White House could leave Mulvaney as acting director for months,
or longer, they say, before nominating a permanent replacement.
Instead, they say, the Trump
administration should be forced
to nominate someone who would
then have to go through an extensive vetting and Senate confirmation process. Then there would be
a better chance of securing a direc-
tor who is less hostile toward the
CFPB, they say.
“I do think there is a difference
between Mulvaney, and the actions he would try to take as acting
director, and a permanent Senateconfirmed nominee,” said Lisa
Donner, executive director of
Americans for Financial Reform.
“Some of the Trump nominees
have been rejected.”
The tug-of-war over leadership
began last week after former CFPB
director Richard Cordray resigned and promoted his chief of
staff, English, who he said would
run the department on an interim
basis. Trump quickly appointed
Mulvaney, a longtime critic of the
bureau, to the job instead. Each
side claimed the law was on their
side and that they were in charge.
In court, English’s attorney ar-
gued that the 2010 Dodd-Frank
Act that established the agency
after the financial crisis laid out a
specific plan of succession, authorizing the deputy director to take
over until a White House nominee
is confirmed by the Senate. Also,
they said, Mulvaney could not
wear two hats by simultaneously
leading the independent financial
regulator and serving as director
the Office of Management and
Budget.
Deputy Assistant Attorney
General Brett Shumate argued
that Trump had authority under
an earlier law, the 1998 Federal
Vacancies Reform Act, citing supporting opinions by the Justice
Department’s Office of Legal
Counsel and the CFPB’s general
counsel.
Kelly, a Trump appointee who
joined the federal court in Washington in September, sided with
the Trump administration, allowing Mulvaney to stay in place for
now.
The independent structure of
the agency, which Democrats
fought to keep under Cordray,
now gives Mulvaney a freer hand
to operate. Instead of having to
consult a multi-member board,
the acting director can make
many changes alone, industry experts and consumer advocates
note. While English would have
been likely to maintain the status
quo, they say, Mulvaney can now
make significant changes without
much oversight — such as abandoning investigations or shrinking the agency’s budget.
The CFPB, for example, has
been working on rules for the past
few years to address bank overdraft fees and the tactics used by
debt collectors. It has also finalized regulations targeting the billions of dollars in fees collected by
payday lenders offering high-cost,
short-term loans. Those regulations don’t go into effect until
2019, giving Mulvaney time to alter the rules or get rid of them,
consumer advocates say. “The
payday rule is certainly at risk,”
Donner said.
The agency has also announced
cases against dozen of financial
institutions that are still pending
in court or under investigation.
Mulvaney or another Trump appointee could decide to abandon
or rethink those efforts.
“I think he [Mulvaney] will take
a fresh look at all of the CFPB
pending investigations and decide whether or not CFPB should
continue them,” said Kaplinsky,
who has represented firms
against the CFPB.
The industry is also looking
toward more fundamental changes to the way the agency operates.
The banking industry, for example, has been critical of a CFPB
database of consumer complaints
against financial institutions.
They say the database sometimes
includes incorrect information or
unproven grievances. Community
banks have rumbled that the
agency unfairly hobbles them
with the same regulatory burdens
as their much larger competitors.
renae.merle@washpost.com
thomas.heath@washpost.com
Staff writer Spencer S. Hsu
contributed to this report.
Trump Fed nominee:
Wall St. regulations
are ‘tough enough’
Remark doesn’t sit well
with Democrats
at Senate hearing
BY
H EATHER L ONG
Jerome “Jay” Powell, President
Trump’s nominee to lead the
Federal Reserve, told senators
Tuesday that he thinks regulations on Wall Street banks are
“tough enough,” a remark that
made Democrats cringe. Much
like a Supreme Court nominee,
Powell needs a majority of senators to vote for him to be the
nation's top economic policymaker. If confirmed, Powell
would start in early February.
Republicans and Democrats
hammered Powell at his confirmation hearing over his thoughts
on regulating Wall Street. Trump
and many Republicans campaigned on rolling back regulations on banks, rules that they say
are too onerous and are preventing small businesses from getting
loans. But Democrats worry that
watering down the rules put in
place after the 2008-2009 financial crisis would trigger another
massive meltdown and taxpayer
bailout of the financial sector.
“Honestly, senator, I think they
are tough enough,” Powell said
when Sen. Elizabeth Warren (DMass.) pressed him on whether
he would like to see any regulations on banks strengthened.
“This worries me,” Warren responded.
Powell, a Republican with a
reputation in Washington as a
bipartisan consensus builder, has
tried to walk a careful line of
supporting many of the regulations put in place on banks after
the Great Recession, while also
signaling his willingness to make
the paperwork “more efficient,”
especially for smaller banks.
“The banking system is
healthy,” Powell said, adding that
he thinks the United States no
longer has any “too big to fail”
banks, because of the regulations
in place, including stress tests.
But later in the hearing he said
that “there’s certainly a lot of
regulatory burden” and that he
would support lessening regulations on smaller banks and “rewriting” the Volcker Rule, which
applies to large Wall Street firms
that want to engage in more-risky
trading behavior.
“I’m not going to characterize
what we are doing as deregulation,” Powell told the Senate
Banking Committee. “I’d rather
characterize it as looking back
over eight years of what [has
been] very innovative regulation
. . . and making sure what we did
makes sense.”
Trump made one of his boldest
moves yet on deregulation Friday
when he appointed White House
budget director Mick Mulvaney
as acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau,
an action that was upheld Tuesday in court. When asked whether the situation troubled him,
Powell said that it was “not something that's in my bailiwick” to
comment on. He punted on almost all the political questions
thrown his way, especially regarding
whether
Congress
should pass the GOP tax plan,
saying only that he is “very concerned” about the growing U.S.
ANDREW HARRER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Jerome “Jay” Powell, President Trump’s nominee to lead the Federal Reserve, waits for the start of his confirmation hearing before the
Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday. Powell, a current Fed governor, said he would support lessening regulations on smaller banks.
debt.
Many Democrats softened
their tone by the end of the
hearing, but some are likely to
vote against Powell's nomination,
because of regulatory concerns
and their preference that Trump
retain Fed Chair Janet L. Yellen.
Powell has close ties to Wall
Street, having been a former
partner at the Carlyle Group, a
major private-equity firm. As a
Fed governor, he has met frequently — 50 times in 2017 alone
— with top Wall Street executives, as several senators pointed
out in the hearing. He has not
met one-on-one nearly as often
with community bankers or consumer advocates.
Still, Powell is widely expected
to be confirmed by the Senate. He
was originally nominated to the
Fed board by President Barack
Obama in 2012 and has been
approved by the Senate several
times before. During the hearing,
he reiterated his strong support
for an independent Fed that is
not influenced by the White
House, Congress or anyone else,
and he agreed with Yellen that
growing inequality and the rising
U.S. debt are alarming problems
for the nation.
“Like all of us, I’m concerned
about the sustainability of our
fiscal path in the long run,” he
said. The United States’ debt
“needs to be on a sustainable
path.”
The Republican tax plan is
projected to add about $1.5 trillion to the nation’s debt over the
next decade. Powell repeatedly
said it is “not our role” to predict
what tax proposals in Congress
will do to the economy.
The stock market rallied as
Powell was speaking. He is expected to keep the central bank
on a slow and steady path to
raising interest rates. He strongly
hinted that the Fed is likely to
raise rates at its December meeting to a range of 1.25 to 1.5 percent (up from 1 to 1.25 percent
now), saying that “help is on the
way” for savers who are tired of
getting almost no interest on the
money in their savings accounts.
Overall, Powell sounded upbeat about the economy, predicting that growth will be 2.5 percent this year, about the same as
last year, and that it will continue
expanding at a slightly better
pace than it has in recent years.
sale. The Standard & Poor’s
CoreLogic Case-Shiller national
home price index, which was
released Tuesday, rose
6.2 percent in September from a
year earlier, the largest gain since
June 2014. In 13 of the 20 cities
tracked by the index, yearly price
gains in September were faster
than in August.
Home buyers are desperately
bidding up prices because so few
properties are available. The
number of homes for sale in
September was the fewest for
that month on records dating
back to 2001, according to the
National Association of Realtors.
Seattle, Las Vegas and San
Diego reported the highest yearover-year gains. Home prices
jumped 12.9 percent in Seattle,
9 percent in Las Vegas and
8.2 percent in San Diego.
heather.long@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
wonkblog
DIGEST
RETAIL
Report says 174 million
shopped over weekend
Nearly three in four Americans
went shopping — either online or
in person — over Thanksgiving
weekend, according to data
released Tuesday by the National
Retail Federation.
The 174 million Americans
who shopped between
Thanksgiving Day and Cyber
Monday spent an average of $335
per person during that five-day
period, the trade group said. The
biggest spenders, millennials
aged 24 to 35, paid out an average
of $419.52 per person.
“The fundamentals of the
economy remain strong,”
Matthew Shay, the chief executive
of the NRF, said in a media call
Tuesday afternoon. “Things are
setting up very well for a very
strong finale to the year.”
Consumer confidence,
meanwhile, continues to climb to
17-year highs. The consumer
confidence index rose to 129.5 in
November, up from 126.2 a
month earlier, according to data
released Tuesday by the research
group, Conference Board.
In all, Americans are projected
to spend about $680 billion this
holiday season, marking a
3.6 percent to 4 percent increase
from last year’s $655.8 billion,
according to NRF estimates.
— Abha Bhattarai
CURRENCY
Bitcoin tops $10,000
on some exchanges
Bitcoin soared to an all-time
high value above $10,000 on
Tuesday in some smaller
exchanges and digital currency
indexes.
On CEX.IO, which started out
as a cloud-mining provider,
bitcoin hit $10,234. On
cryptocurrency index
coinmarketcap.com, bitcoin
touched $10,050.
But bitcoin has not crossed
that $10,000 mark on Bitstamp;
Coinbase’s digital asset exchange
GDAX; or Gemini Exchange,
owned and operated by Cameron
and Tyler Winklevoss.
— Reuters
HOUSING
September home price
index hits 3-year high
U.S. home prices rose at the
fastest pace in more than three
years in September, lifted by a
record-low supply of houses for
— Associated Press
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Commerce
Department releases thirdquarter gross domestic product.
10 a.m.: National Association of
Realtors releases pending home
sales index for October.
2 p.m.: Federal Reserve releases
Beige Book.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
We must all fight to defend a key watchdog for financial fairness
I am an
unapologetic
advocate for the
Consumer
Financial
Protection
Michelle
Bureau, which
Singletary was created in
the wake of a
THE COLOR
crippling
OF MONEY
financial crisis
that I fear is
becoming a distant memory.
But we have to remember: It
was not that long ago when
financial institutions did some
funky stuff that pushed us into
the Great Recession.
Now the agency designed to
protect consumers — yes,
sometimes even from
themselves — is a hot mess.
The director of the CFPB,
Richard Cordray, stepped down
last week, and now there’s a
fierce fight to see who will
temporarily take his place until
a permanent leader is
nominated and confirmed.
President Trump appointed
Mick Mulvaney as acting
director, even though Mulvaney
already has another day job —
as head of the Office of
Management and Budget.
Trump’s motives seem clear:
Weaken the agency by sending
in Mulvaney, a former
congressman who voted to
abolish the agency.
Leandra English, who was
named acting director by
Cordray shortly before he left
office, filed a lawsuit Sunday to
block Mulvaney’s appointment.
On Tuesday, a federal judge
ruled against her. Her attorney
is now considering additional
legal steps.
This battle for the CFPB
leadership is like watching a
train derailment. But make no
mistake, folks: We are on this
train, too. Our interests will be
tossed to the side when the train
stops skidding.
Even if English is ultimately
successful in her lawsuit, the
CFPB, under the current
administration, won’t be what it
was intended to be: a tough
advocate for consumers.
Mulvaney said as much.
“Anybody who thinks that a
Trump administration CFPB
would be the same as an Obama
administration CFPB is simply
being naive,” he said at a news
conference. “Elections have
consequences.”
Despite the naysayers, the
CFPB is like a caped crusader
standing in the path of
predatory practices.
At the most basic level, the
agency is working to ensure that
the financial industry is
adequately informing you about
what products and services
you’re being sold. Yet the agency
has been vilified from Day 1 for
this mission by Republicans.
Here are the two main
arguments in favor of derailing
the CFPB:
Businesses can’t make enough
money off consumers. Already,
Mulvaney has issued a 30-day
freeze on new regulations. Why?
To make sure there isn’t a
“choking off ” of financial
services.
Think about this for a minute.
Not even a week into the job,
and Mulvaney is putting the
interests of corporations ahead
of those of consumers.
We are already a nation of
debtors. That’s part of the
reason we fell into a recession.
Everybody and their mama
could get a loan.
Some argue that Mama
should get the loan she wants.
It’s her choice. Except we all pay
when people are saddled with
debt they can’t afford. Surely
you haven’t forgotten the Wall
Street bailout?
Congress can’t control the
agency’s budget. The CFPB
funding comes from the Federal
Reserve, and it was set up that
way to purposefully avoid
partisan meddling and
influence peddling by the
financial industry, which the
agency is charged to police.
The crusade against the CFPB
has become so clever that I get
emails like this one from a
reader: “If I understand
correctly, you are advocating for
Uncle Sam to tell a grown
woman what she can or cannot
buy with her own money? If the
lender is truthful and the
woman is of sound mind, the
government needs to stay quiet.”
There was no question about
that “if.” Some companies
weren’t — and aren’t — truthful.
It was state and federal
oversight that finally caught
Wells Fargo, which was found to
have opened millions of
unauthorized bank and credit
card accounts.
The CFPB isn’t telling people
what they can do with their
money. It’s simply making sure
that companies clearly disclose
information people need to
make better financial decisions.
Partisan politics aside, please
remember why the agency came
about. It was part of the DoddFrank Act and was directed to
look at the rules governing
credit cards, mortgages, student
loans and other financial
products aimed at consumers.
We needed a superhero to put
us back on track.
In a tweet Monday, the
Leadership Conference on Civil
and Human Rights wrote, “If
the 2008 financial crisis showed
us anything, it’s that consumers
need and deserve a strong and
independent regulator to look
after the interests of American
consumers. #DefendCFPB”
Take to Twitter, the forum we
know Trump values. Use the
#DefendCFPB hashtag and let
your voice to be heard. If you
don’t speak up in defense of this
agency, you will lose an
important watchdog for
financial fairness.
hamza.shaban@washpost.com
DAVID RYDER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
A scene from the Microsoft Developers Build Conference in Seattle in May. Four companies — Amazon, Google, Microsoft and IBM —
dominate the $90 billion annual global cloud computing market, according to a U.S. International Trade Commission study.
duties on them. The financial
services industry is also seeking
NAFTA language that would bar a
country in most circumstances
from requiring that data gathered
within its territory be processed
and stored there.
“It is the ‘modernization’ in
modernizing NAFTA,” said Kevin
Propp, director of policy for BSA,
a trade group also known as the
The drive for new trade
rules reflects the
explosive growth of
Internet networks.
Software Alliance. “NAFTA is silent on this set of issues because
this form of the U.S. economy
didn’t exist 25 years ago.”
The stakes were evident earlier
this month when Amazon Web
Services suddenly announced it
was selling its cloud computing
servers in China to its Chinese
partner, Beijing Sinnet Technology, for $302 million. The U.S.
company acted to comply with
new Chinese prohibitions on
overseas data transfers.
The standoff is complicating a
push by U.S. companies to secure
trade rules that allow them to
store data wherever it makes the
most commercial sense — not
divided into separate and duplicative facilities in individual
countries.
Otherwise, the result could be
a balkanized Internet, as trading
partners in Asia and Europe favor
their own companies at the expense of the United States, some
executives say.
“It would be very damaging if
we weren’t able to reach agreement,” said Christine Bliss, president of the Coalition of Services
Industries.
The drive for new trade rules
reflects the explosive growth of
Internet networks. By 2015, crossborder data flows were 45 times
larger than a decade earlier and
were forecast to grow another
nine times by 2020, the McKinsey
Global Institute reported last
year.
“Flows of physical goods and
finance were the hallmarks of the
20th-century global economy, but
today those flows have flattened
or declined. Twenty-first-century
globalization is increasingly defined by flows of data and information,” McKinsey said.
Indonesia and Brazil have been
raising barriers to such trade:
Eighteen 18 countries block accounting, tax and financial information from transiting their electronic borders while 13 restrict
the flow of digitized personal
information, according to the
ITIF.
U.S. companies complain that
such localization measures force
them to invest in expensive and
redundant servers. They also
drive up computing costs in those
markets by 30 percent to 60 percent, according to a 2015 study by
the Leviathan Security Group.
“One reason that governments
do that is to favor their national
champions and their local banks,”
said one U.S. banking executive.
“Those are negotiations where,
frankly, we don’t have much leverage.”
On Nov. 18, the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce opposed the Brazilian
Central Bank’s proposed cybersecurity regulations that would bar
financial institutions such as Citibank and JPMorgan Chase from
using data processing and cloud
computing
services
based
abroad. The prohibition would
raise costs, make fraud detection
more difficult and place a “huge
burden” on banks, the chamber
said.
H AMZA S HABAN
david.lynch@washpost.com
D AVID J . L YNCH
While the president often
gripes about foreign traders taking advantage of Americans, the
United States last year enjoyed a
$159 billion surplus in the broadest measure of digital services
trade, including an $18 billion
bulge with Mexico and Canada,
according to Commerce Department figures.
More than half of the global
U.S. services surplus — and nearly
20 percent of total U.S. exports —
is linked to digital markets.
Mexico and Canada already
have agreed to new digital rules
in a separate trade deal, the 11-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership.
But Trump withdrew the United
States from that pact in January.
“We don’t have great rules on
digital trade,” Sarah Thorn, Walmart’s senior director of global
government affairs, told a recent
conference in Washington. “We’re
just starting to think . . . about
what’s going to happen in the
next 10 or 15 years, as technology
moves faster and faster and faster.”
For the United States, digital
services represent both a lucrative export and an essential operational tool. Four companies —
Amazon, Google, Microsoft and
IBM — dominate the $90 billion
annual global cloud computing
market, according to a U.S. International Trade Commission study
released in August.
Cloud storage is just one example of a business that did not exist
when NAFTA debuted in 1994.
NAFTA language allowing data to
flow beyond national boundaries
is needed so that other innovative
technologies, such as artificial
intelligence and algorithms, can
flourish, companies say.
But it’s not just Internet titans
such as Google and Facebook that
want new trade rules barring
countries from discriminating
against foreign providers of digital products or imposing customs
BY
Mexico and Canada have largely eschewed such trade barriers,
although the Canadian provinces
of British Columbia and Nova
Scotia require personal information collected by public agencies
to be stored on domestic servers.
China — home of “the Great
Firewall” that blocks services
such as Facebook and Google —
introduced a series of measures
designed to reduce data flows
after former NSA contractor Edward Snowden’s 2013 revelations
of widespread U.S. electronic spying.
Among them was a regulation
requiring all health and medical
data on Chinese citizens to be
stored on servers located inside
the People’s Republic.
A new Chinese cybersecurity
law this year extended the limits
on data transfer beyond health
care to all computer network operators.
“You’re not going to get ‘big
data,’ ” one executive said. “You’re
going to get ‘medium-sized data,’
and that leads to worse outcomes.”
Readers may write to Michelle
Singletary at The Washington Post,
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C.
20071 or
michelle.singletary@washpost.com.
To read previous Color of Money
columns, go to http://wapo.st/
michelle-singletary.
Administration’s demand for concessions from NAFTA partners could leave data-rich American firms without the rules they seek
In the nearly 10 hours that it
takes a Boeing 737 to fly from Sao
Paulo to New York, its twin engines will transmit a flood of
digital data roughly equivalent to
15,000 Blu-ray movies. That electronic Niagara provides a continuous readout on the jet’s performance, giving ground-based technicians a head start on unanticipated repairs and reducing costly
downtime.
This is a corner of the global
economy where the United States
is unmistakably dominant: the
trade in digital services such as
“big data,” cloud computing and
streaming video.
Now, President Trump’s trade
policy may be risking U.S. dominance in the data-rich industries
of the future in a bid to protect the
metal-bending businesses of the
past.
China, Russia, the European
Union and various nations are
erecting barriers to the free flow
of data that companies increasingly sell as a product or use as a
tool. Those obstacles threaten
roughly $400 billion of annual
U.S. exports and the bottom line
of companies including IBM, Citibank, Federal Express and Visa.
To combat such digital protectionism, the Trump administration wants to “modernize” the
23-year-old North American Free
Trade Agreement to prevent U.S.
trading partners from requiring
that data be processed or stored
within their borders. Such measures create the equivalent of
gated Internet communities,
hurting U.S. companies, driving
up technology costs and crimping
economic growth.
While NAFTA governs U.S.
trade with Mexico and Canada,
business leaders hope its digital
terms will serve as a model for
other agreements around the
globe.
But the NAFTA talks are
snagged on Trump’s demands for
concessions from Mexico and
Canada involving traditional industries such as automobiles,
raising the prospect of an impasse that could leave U.S. companies without the new digital
trade rules they seek. Trump has
repeatedly threatened to quit the
pact.
“It’s obviously clear that the
Trump administration has a set of
different priorities: autos, government procurement, etc., that
are designed in such a way that it
puts everything else at risk,” said
Nigel Cory, an analyst with the
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation.
Emily Davis, spokeswoman for
the administration’s chief trade
negotiator, Robert E. Lighthizer,
declined to comment on whether
the U.S. approach in the NAFTA
negotiations could jeopardize
digital free trade. But she noted
that the administration had identified the subject as one of its
objectives in the renegotiation.
In trying to update NAFTA,
which was written before the
Internet age began, negotiators
are grappling with questions
such as how freely computer data
can flow across national borders,
whether companies should be
compelled to provide foreign governments the blueprints or
“source code” for their software in
return for market access, and
whether third parties could be
held liable for what others publish on their websites.
Lawsuit is latest amid
other actions probing
delay in revealing theft
The city of Chicago and the
Cook County State’s Attorney are
suing Uber after the company
revealed that it waited more than
a year to disclose a massive data
breach and, according to multiple reports, paid the hackers
responsible $100,000 to stay quiet.
The legal action by Illinois
officials is the latest move in a
mounting backlash against the
company, which said last week
that the personal information of
57 million customers and drivers
had been stolen in October 2016.
Uber now faces at least four
lawsuits, including three seeking
class-action status, prompted by
the data breach. The attorneys
general of five states have
launched investigations, and the
Federal Trade Commission said
it is closely evaluating reports of
the hack.
The Chicago lawsuit alleges
that Uber failed to safeguard the
personal data of Illinois residents and further violated the
law by withholding for an extended period of time the announcement of the data breach
and concealing the hack through
its ransom payment to the intruders. The lawsuit claims that
Uber willfully exposed many Illinois residents to the risks of
financial fraud, identity theft
and tax scams.
According to Uber chief executive Dara Khosrowshahi, the
company identified the hackers
and “obtained assurances that
the downloaded data had been
destroyed.” But in the complaint, Illinois officials took aim
at what they described as a
deeply troubling arrangement
between Uber and the people
who stole personal data from
the company. “Any agreement
that Uber reached with the
criminal hackers couldn’t possibly be trusted to protect user
data. Nor did Uber require any
proof that the stolen data was,
in fact, deleted,” the suit stated.
The officials added that in the
digital age it is “impossible” for
Uber to know whether the hackers still have copies of customer
data.
An Uber spokesman did not
immediately respond to a request for comment.
The city seeks a declaration
that Uber broke the law and a
series of penalties that add up to
hundreds of millions of dollars.
The lawsuit asks the court to
fine Uber $10,000 a day for
every day the company failed to
notify Chicago and Illinois residents of the data breach, which
would amount to at least
$3,650,000. Uber also faces penalties of up to $50,000 per
individual violation, if the court
finds that the company intended to defraud Illinois residents.
Officials do not yet know how
many state residents were affected.
The lawsuit was filed on the
same day that a group of four
Republican senators, including
Orrin G. Hatch (Utah), chairman of the Finance Committee,
and John Thune (S.D.), chairman of the Commerce Committee, sent a letter to Uber asking
for more information about the
hack. The lawmakers want to
learn how Uber officials responded to the breach and the
purpose of the reported payment to hackers.
Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.)
also sent a letter to Uber describing “grave concerns” over the
data breach and asking for more
details of what took place.
Trump trade policy may imperil U.S. digital clout
BY
Chicago
sues Uber
over data
breach
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A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
Justices weigh whether digital era is redefining right to privacy
BY
R OBERT B ARNES
tower records that could reveal a
suspect’s whereabouts.
Privacy groups and civil libertarians are asking the court to
reconsider how precedents established in the days of rotary dials
and telephone nooks can be reconciled with a world in which
most Americans say they are usually within five feet of their smartphones.
“It’s 2017, not 1977, but people
have the right to expect that their
everyday
movements
and
thoughts will not be freely available to the government without a
warrant,” said Nathan Freed
Wessler, an American Civil Liberties Union lawyer who is arguing
Wednesday’s case.
Wessler represents Timothy
Carpenter, who is serving a 116year sentence for his role in armed
robberies in 2010 and 2011 at RadioShack and T-Mobile stores in
and around Detroit. The gang was
stealing, of all things, smartphones.
One of the men arrested named
Carpenter as the ringleader who
typically organized the robberies,
supplied the guns and acted as a
lookout. Authorities asked cellphone carriers for 127 days of records that would show Carpenter’s
use of his phone.
Such records indicate where a
cellphone establishes connections
with a specific cell tower and give
When the Supreme Court on
Wednesday undertakes a potentially landmark examination of
how law enforcement’s use of
technology impacts the American
notion of privacy, the terrain will
be familiar.
In 2012, when the government
argued that placing a GPS device
on someone’s car and tracking the
person’s whereabouts for weeks
raised no constitutional concerns,
some of the justices were taken
aback.
“Essentially, I think you answered the question that . . . any of
us could be monitored whenever
we leave our homes,” Justice Ruth
Bader Ginsburg told the government’s lawyer.
And when in 2014 the court
ruled that a search of someone’s
cellphone generally requires a
warrant, Chief Justice John G.
Roberts Jr. noted what every
smartphone owner knows.
“They could just as easily be
called cameras, video players,
Rolodexes, calendars, tape recorders, libraries, diaries, albums, televisions, maps or newspapers,”
Roberts wrote for a unanimous
court.
Now, the court is taking up a
case that in part combines those
concerns, asking whether authorities need a warrant to access cell
a fair representation of the vicinity of the user. In Carpenter’s case,
the mass of information showed
his phone at 12,898 locations, including close to where the robberies occurred when they took place.
Carpenter’s lawyers say that the
government’s actions violated
their client’s rights under the
Fourth Amendment, which protects
against
unreasonable
searches. Authorities should have
had to convince a judge that there
was probable cause to get the records, they say.
Instead, under the Stored Communications Act, authorities had
to meet a lesser standard: that
there were “reasonable grounds to
believe” that the records sought
“are relevant and material to an
ongoing criminal investigation.”
The government contends that
its actions fit squarely with the
Supreme Court’s prevailing precedents. In a 1979 decision in Smith
v. Maryland, the court ruled that
requesting records that showed
the numbers called from a traditional home phone did not constitute what would be considered a
“search” under the Fourth
Amendment.
Because the caller’s information was voluntarily transmitted
to a third party — the telephone
company — he or she had no
reasonable expectation that the
numbers called would remain pri-
vate. It is the same in Carpenter’s
case, Solicitor General Noel Francisco told the Supreme Court.
“Cell-phone users voluntarily
reveal to their providers information about their proximity to cell
towers so the providers can connect their calls,” the brief says.
“Users cannot reasonably expect
that the providers will not reveal
that business information to the
government.”
The companies are properly
seen as potential witnesses to a
crime, and requesting information from them should not require
a warrant, the government argues.
“The third-party doctrine does
not turn on what information the
government acquires and how
sensitive that information is, but
rather on how the government
acquires the information,” the
brief says. “Seeking information
about a suspect from a third-party
witness does not amount to a
Fourth Amendment search of that
suspect, no matter how revealing
or incriminating the evidence
may be.”
If that is right, the companies
are reluctant witnesses.
Leading technology companies
including Apple, Facebook and
Microsoft ask the court to “refine”
its Fourth Amendment doctrine
to recognize that “in the evolving
digital era, where such data is
disclosed to or collected by service
providers to provide technologies
that are increasingly integrated
into daily life, people reasonably
expect that their data will be
stored securely and remain private.”
While the technology companies take no position on Carpenter’s case, several organizations
say the court should use it to
curtail the government’s access to
the records.
The “sweeping implication” of
the government’s argument is
troubling, said a brief filed by the
Electronic Privacy Information
Center and three dozen technology and legal experts. “Sensitive
personal data — photos, emails,
location information, or otherwise — does not become less private simply because a cell phone
user entrusts that information to a
communications service provider.”
Former Maryland attorney general Stephen H. Sachs, who argued
and won Smith v. Maryland in
1979, said the precedent has outlived its value.
“When the Supreme Court decided Smith, in the pre-dawn of
the digital age, we didn’t know
about the Internet, smartphones,
cloud computing, Facebook or
Twitter,” Sachs wrote this week in
The Washington Post. “No one
involved in the case could foresee
the digital revolution that was to
come.”
There are indications those advocating a change will find a receptive audience.
In the GPS case decided in 2012,
Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote
that cellphone records provide a
“comprehensive record of a person’s public movements that reflects a wealth of detail about her
familial, political, professional, religious, and sexual associations.”
Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. noted
the increasing use of closedcircuit television monitoring, devices that allow cars to whiz
through toll plazas, tracking devices installed in case a vehicle is
stolen and the GPS function of
cellphones.
“The availability and use of
these and other new devices will
continue to shape the average person’s expectations about the privacy of his or her daily movements,”
he wrote.
And in the court’s 2014 ruling
on searches of cellphones, Roberts
announced that the future had
arrived.
Cellphones “are now such a pervasive and insistent part of daily
life that the proverbial visitor
from Mars might conclude they
were an important feature of human anatomy,” the chief justice
wrote.
The case is Carpenter v. U.S.
robert.barnes@washpost.com
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148.7840
34.6710
86.8850
6.0082
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0.5840
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–36.2
–7.4
–7.1
–4.8
–4.0
–3.8
–3.8
–3.3
–3.1
–2.7
–2.6
–2.5
–2.5
–2.5
–2.4
–2.4
–2.3
–2.3
–2.2
–2.2
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
$3.0985
$3.4975
$57.99
$1,299.20
$3.07
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6400
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
4.25%
Bank Prime
3.78%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.13%
1.25%
Federal Funds
15-Year fixed mortgage
1.48%
LIBOR 3-Month
1-Year ARM
3.13%
10-year note
Yield: 2.33
2-year note
Yield: 1.74
5-year note
Yield: 2.06
6-month bill
Yield: 1.44
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
M2
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
CFPB’s chaos boosts the
profile of agency’s creator
and her reelection bid
In 2007, a small
quarterly journal
published an
article by a littleJAMES
known
HOHMANN
bankruptcy
professor at Harvard Law School
named Elizabeth Warren that
called for a “Financial Product
Safety Commission” to protect
Americans from predatory
lenders and faulty mortgages the
same way that the Consumer
Product Safety Commission
protects them from toasters that
burst into flames.
Warren’s idea seemed
prescient a year later when
economic calamity struck, and
President Barack Obama pushed
to include it in what became the
2010 Dodd-Frank law. As a
special adviser to the Treasury
Department, Warren brought the
concept to life in what is now the
Consumer Financial Protection
Bureau.
The big banks and their allies
inside the Obama administration
blocked Warren from being
appointed to lead the agency
permanently. The job went
instead to Richard Cordray, but
Warren’s consolation prize
wasn’t bad: She got elected to the
U.S. Senate in 2012.
Now Cordray has stepped
down as director to go home to
Ohio so he can run for governor
next year. A legal battle has
broken out over who is in charge:
Cordray’s deputy Leandra
English or President Trump’s
budget director Mick Mulvaney.
Both are claiming to be acting
director.
When he showed up on
Monday, Mulvaney declared a
temporary freeze on hiring and
rulemaking. During a news
conference, he said Trump wants
the agency to stop “trampling on
capitalism.” In the past,
Mulvaney has been one of the
CFPB’s most outspoken critics,
calling it “a joke . . . in a sick, sad
way.” On Monday, the former
congressman said his views have
not changed.
The
Daily 202
Trump campaigned like a
populist but governs like a
plutocrat. Warren finds herself
increasingly well positioned to
prosecute that case for
Democrats. The effort to
dismantle the agency she
dreamed up pains her, and she
pledges to fight tirelessly to
protect it, but Mulvaney’s
takeover also offers a compelling
political rationale to build a 2020
campaign around — if she
chooses.
“Mick Mulvaney wants to take
the cop off the beat . . . and
whenever there are no cops, we
all know what happens. That’s
how the financial crisis of 2008
grew and then nearly blew up
our entire economy,” Warren said
in a telephone interview. “Here
we stand less than 10 years after
the Wall Street banks threw this
economy over a cliff and their
principal tool was cheating
American families on home
mortgages, and today Mick
Mulvaney says that the agency
designed to prevent that from
happening again should tilt more
in favor of Wall Street banks.”
Many of the white workingclass folks who turned out for
Trump did so because they
thought he was so wealthy that
he could thumb his nose at fatcat bankers. They took him at his
word that he’d be tougher on the
big banks and the billionaire
class than Hillary Clinton
because he didn’t need to give
paid speeches or raise money
from them for his foundation.
With a White House full of
Goldman Sachs alumni, the
reality has not matched the
rhetoric. The GOP tax plan,
which surmounted its first
Senate hurdle Tuesday, offers
additional data points.
“It’s a very stupid moment,”
Warren said. “Wall Street banks
hated the idea of this agency long
before it was born. They spent
more than a million dollars a day
lobbying against financial
reform, and the center of their
bull’s eye was the consumer
MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) speaks during a protest in front of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau headquarters on Tuesday.
agency. Lobbyists were
repeatedly quoted saying that
they knew there would be some
financial reform, but that the
consumer agency would never,
ever make it into law. And when
the agency was signed into law, a
lobbyist for one bank said, ‘The
game isn’t over. It’s just halftime.’
They have spent every day since
then trying to take the legs out
from underneath that agency . . .
“They have been spectacularly
unsuccessful,” she added. “The
agency has forced the big banks
to return more than $12 billion
directly to families they cheated,
and it’s handled more than a
million complaints against the
financial institutions.”
Trump seems fixated, even
obsessed, with Warren. He
mentions her all the time. During
a White House ceremony to
honor Navajo veterans who
served as code talkers during
World War II, he went off script
to insult her as “Pocahontas.”
“This was supposed to be a
ceremony honoring war heroes,”
Warren said to me afterward. “All
Men in treatment for ‘sexual addiction’
best cured by incentives against misdeeds
The science is in:
The
Men who engage
Health 202 in sexual
misconduct really
can help
themselves.
Despite the
excuses you might hear from
leaders in the political,
entertainment and media worlds
who are accused of sexually
harassing women (and some
men) — a list that seems to grow
daily — advances in brain
imaging have recently revealed
these kinds of behaviors are
simply not addictive in the same
way drugs or alcohol might be.
Here’s how researchers
identify when a behavior
is addictive: When that behavior
starts lighting up the part of the
brain connected to need instead
of pleasure. That’s what occurs in
the brains of people struggling
with substance abuse.
The same thing doesn’t occur
in people who say they have
sexual urges they can’t control,
researchers said.
“Now that we start to look at
the brains of people and see what
is going on, [sex addiction]
doesn’t fit the criteria of a mental
disorder,” Joye Swan, psychology
chair at Woodbury University,
told me.
Psychologists have become so
convinced of this that most of the
leading scientific bodies have
recently released papers or
statements saying what is called
“sex addiction” isn’t actually an
addiction. Last year, the
American Association of
Sexuality Educators, Counselors
and Therapists said there’s
insufficient evidence to support
classifying sex addiction as a
mental health disorder.
In 2012, the American
Psychiatric Association removed
“sex addiction” from DSM-5, the
handbook of mental health
disorders.
The science is something to
keep in mind in the #MeToo era,
as more and more women have
the courage to speak up about
their experiences with
rampant harassment and
misconduct — and the cultural
stigma begins shifting from the
PAIGE
WINFIELD
CUNNINGHAM
victims to the alleged instigators.
There’s an increasingly
crowded stage of powerful men
facing such charges — most
recently Sen. Al Franken (DMinn.), who yesterday took to
the mics to claim he doesn’t
recall instances in which four
women say he touched them
inappropriately — but also Rep.
John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.),
comedian Louis C.K., media
figures Mark Halperin and
Charlie Rose, actor Kevin Spacey,
and many others. President
Trump has also been accused of
sexual misconduct by 13 women.
Of course, the Hollywood
mogul whose past actions
triggered the recent wave of
accusations has appeared to
blame his own indiscretions (to
put it mildly) on a condition
outside his control. Movie
producer Harvey Weinstein
recently said he’s on a “journey”
to “conquer my demons” at a sex
addiction facility.
Now, there are personality
traits associated with sexual
misconduct. Psychologists refer
to narcissism, Machiavellianism
and psychopathy as the “dark
triad” of negative characteristics
that often show up in people
with tendencies toward
exploiting others sexually.
Research has also shown a
link between men in powerful
positions and their willingness
to take advantage of women.
“Thinking about power makes
them think about sex, and
thinking about sex makes them
think about power,” said John
Pryor, a psychology professor at
Illinois State University.
If it’s true that sexual
misconduct is a compulsion, not
an addiction, then addictionoriented treatment is unlikely to
work well, say experts, who
caution against regarding
Weinstein and others like him as
caught in behavior patterns they
can’t fix.
Such alleged perpetrators may
find it extremely hard to control
their impulses, but it’s not
impossible to do so, they say.
Such behaviors are “certainly
are not representative of some
sort of underlying mental
illness,” Pryor said.
Swan likens getting better to
skipping — every day — that ice
cream sundae you crave. It’s hard
to stop eating your favorite
sweets, but it’s doable with the
right kinds of strategies and
incentives.
“More and more we are
thinking these are people with
high libido but very low impulse
control,” Swan said.
Swan says therapy should
involve cognitive restructuring,
giving people tools to avoid
sexual misbehaviors while
stressing their personal
responsibility to act
respectfully toward others.
It’s a real problem, she says,
when the term “sex addiction” is
carelessly bandied about in
media and pop culture.
“If we as a culture say they
have a sickness and we allow
that to be the excuse, I think it
will keep perpetuating the cycle,”
Swan said.
There’s another key way to get
men to refrain from sexual
misdeeds: Create incentives
against it.
If Franken had guessed that
the actions he is accused of
might be exposed, he probably
wouldn’t have engaged in them,
Pryor said. The same is true for
other members of Congress who
have settled sexual harassment
complaints using millions in
taxpayer dollars from what has
been dubbed a slush fund for
workplace disputes (some
lawmakers are trying to make an
opaque system more
transparent).
If, for example, elected
officials had to settle such
disputes using their own funds,
they might think more carefully
before engaging in inappropriate
actions. If women continue
speaking up, men tempted to do
something untoward will be
increasingly aware of the
embarrassment that could
follow. Most people respond well
to consequences, and sexual
behavior is no exception.
“It certainly is a stigma to be
labeled a harasser,” Pryor said.
paige.cunningham@washpost.com
he had to do was smile and thank
them for their incredible service.
But he couldn’t make it through
the ceremony without throwing
in a racial slur. He thinks he’s
going to shut me up? It’s not
going to work.”
Every time the president
mentions the senator, he elevates
her. Not only does this help
Warren raise beaucoup bucks
from the progressive Net roots, it
also boosts her 2018 reelection
campaign in Massachusetts.
Warren says she would rather
talk about substance than
nicknames. During the interview,
slipping into law professor mode,
she offered an extended history
lesson to argue that Mulvaney is
not the legitimate acting
director.
The CFPB’s general counsel,
the Justice Department’s Office
of Legal Counsel and the White
House each argue that Mulvaney
can temporarily hold the job
under the Vacancies Reform Act
of 1998.
Warren says Dodd-Frank was
carefully written so that wouldn’t
be the case. She said the act
they’re citing applies only to
agencies that existed when it
passed. She noted that an early
draft of the statute creating the
CFPB would have applied it to
the agency, but this language was
stricken.
Warren noted that when the
first banking regulator was
established during the Civil War,
the Office of the Comptroller of
the Currency, it was carefully
designed to be insulated from
political pressure. “Congress has
always kept banking regulators
as far away from politics as
possible,” she said. “Funding for
all the banking regulators has
been outside the political
process.”
The president’s boosters say
he’s not being crazy — but crazy
like a fox. People close to the
White House say there’s a
method to the “Pocahontas”
madness. Trump would like to
face Warren in 2020 because he
thinks he could caricature her as
an out-of-touch liberal from
Taxachusetts. His allies say she
would be an ideal foil to get
recalcitrant Republicans to
support him as the lesser of two
evils.
But Trump may want to be
more careful about what he
wishes for.
Life sometimes plays out in
unpredictable ways. If Warren
had gotten her wish to run the
CFPB permanently, it’s
inconceivable that she’d be a toptier contender for the presidency
in 2020.
I asked whether she’s going to
endorse Cordray for governor,
assuming he runs. “Too early,”
she said. “Call me later!”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Turn down the lights
EDITORIALS
A wilderness to protect
Drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is lumped in with the mess of a GOP tax bill.
T
more lax.
But that principle does not justify drilling
everywhere there is a drop of recoverable oil. The
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge deserves special
protection. Known as “America’s Serengeti,” it is
one of the last pristine wildernesses in the world,
an expanse of rivers, permafrost and ocean-side
habitat that teems with life. Caribou, polar bears
and musk oxen depend on this untouched land.
Birds migrate to the refuge from all over the world.
Whales live just offshore. This zone is off-limits to
development.
For generations, Alaskan members of Congress
generally have wanted to exploit what may be
significant deposits of oil and gas beneath a coastal
plain in the refuge, while environmentalists have
fought to preserve it undisturbed. Today proponents insist that new technologies would enable
drillers to reach oil with a minimal footprint. Yet
successfully exploiting the refuge’s dispersed re-
Egypt’s misguided
terrorism answer
sources would likely require many wells distributed
across the coastal plain, linked by pipelines and
serviced by gravel mines and other infrastructure.
The warming climate would over time make icebased travel less useful, calling for more traditional
gravel road building. Oil development is simply
incompatible with what should be the purpose of
the refuge — preserving a unique environmental
marvel.
When some in Congress previously tried to open
the refuge, a broad group of lawmakers killed the
plans. If this issue were taken up on its own, drilling
would struggle to attract the 60 votes it would need
to overcome a Senate filibuster. But if the proposal
remains in the Senate tax legislation, it would be just
one small piece of a giant bill — a bill that requires
only 51 votes to pass. Senators who defended the
refuge in the past must insist on removing it — or,
better yet, simply vote against the whole unworthy
package.
The Nov. 25 front-page article “Embattled Sessions more than perseveres” validated my concerns
regarding our attorney general’s personal beliefs and
his underlying motives. The questions asked by
Attorney General Jeff Sessions during meetings
regarding terrorists’ lineage are astounding.
I live in Baltimore, where crime and immigration
are a daily concern, yet Mr. Sessions’s policies are
hurting our city when we are trying to make it better.
I am disgusted with most of President Trump’s
Cabinet appointments, but Mr. Sessions’s policies
are bigoted and partisan.
Mary Lohmann Edwards, Baltimore
C
tory. Tens of thousands of political activists, including prominent secular and liberal figures, have been
imprisoned, independent civil society stifled and the
media silenced.
Many Egypt experts have pointed to the desperate
need for development programs in Sinai to give hope
to a restive population. U.S. officials have argued for
years for a reorientation of the Egyptian military
toward counterterrorism training and tactics. Mr.
Sissi is deaf to all such appeals. An Egyptian scholar
who presciently warned of the dangers of repression
in Sinai, Ismail Alexandrani, has been jailed for more
than two years. The regime meanwhile continues to
spend billions on tanks, fighter jets, submarines and
other conventional gear that is of little or no use
against the Islamic State.
Though his administration was compelled by law
to cut some aid to Egypt several months ago,
Mr. Trump remains a fan of Mr. Sissi. He called the
strongman after the Sinai attack and tweeted, inexplicably, that it showed the need for “the WALL” and
“the BAN.” When it comes to preventing the growth
of the Islamic State in Egypt, Mr. Trump and Mr. Sissi
are partners in obtuseness.
Surprise us
There are sensible solutions before Congress on bump stocks and background checks.
A
LOOPHOLE in federal gun law allowed the
gunman in the Las Vegas mass shooting to
modify his weapons to perform like machine guns. A lapse in the national instant
background-check system allowed the gunman in
Sutherland Springs, Tex., to purchase his weapon
despite what should have been a disqualifying
conviction for domestic violence. Congress has
before it sensible solutions to address both problems. Will it enact them this time or, as after other
tragedies, fold under the pressure of the gun lobby?
After a gunman in Las Vegas killed 58 people and
injured hundreds on Oct. 1 by using bump stocks to
spray bullets into a crowd listening to country
music, congressional action seemed almost certain.
Bipartisan support emerged for legislation to ban
the devices, which essentially circumvent laws banning automatic weapons made or imported after
1986. Even the National Rifle Association said the
accessories should be subject to regulation. But the
momentum for action was short-lived, the NRA’s
seeming support was a subterfuge, and Congress has
failed to act, saying the matter was better left to the
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Never mind that agency says it lacks authority
under the law to do so.
Some states and cities are trying to fill the gap.
Massachusetts this month became the first state to
ban bump stocks since the Las Vegas massacre, and
several others are considering similar restrictions.
“We’ve come to the conclusion that Congress just
won’t act on this issue, gun control, so we’ve decided
to try to do as much as we can on a state level and on
a state-by-state measure,” said Massachusetts state
Rep. David Linsky (D).
The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a
hearing Dec. 6 on rules regulating firearm accessories, but prospects for action before Congress adjourns are not seen as good. Gun-control advocates
are more hopeful about legislation advanced by a
bipartisan group of senators that would require
federal agencies and states to improve their reporting of criminal offenses and other information to the
National Instant Criminal Background Check System. The failure of the Air Force to report the
conviction of the gunman in the Sutherland Springs
shooting underscored the holes in the system. That
Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.), a fierce opponent of most
gun control, is helping lead the effort is seen as
boosting its prospects.
Of course, neither of these modest measures
would be sufficient to address gun violence. Congress should reimpose the ban on the military-style
semiautomatic guns that have — even without bump
stocks — become the weapon of choice of mass
killers. This week the Supreme Court let stand a
Maryland law banning the sale of these weapons.
Hopefully that will encourage more states to take
similar action while they wait for Congress to do its
job.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
The problem of the Bladensburg Peace Cross
Regarding the Nov. 25 editorial “Let the cross
stand”:
My father was born in the South, served in the U.S.
Navy during World War I and was a proud member of
the Jewish War Veterans. I don’t think he would have
felt his service honored by a cross — a symbol used in
the Crusades and the Inquisition and by the Ku Klux
Klan.
The purpose that would be served by removal of a
war memorial cross from public land is very much
alive and recognized by the editorial: The cross
excludes those of different faiths, the antithesis of
this country’s First Amendment.
A. Gothard Loeb, Gaithersburg
There is a neat compromise to the situation with
The Post did a great service by highlighting the
recent research on the worldwide growth of light
pollution in the Nov. 23 Politics & the Nation article
“Increase in nighttime lighting could have consequences, scientists warn.” Satellite data show that
Earth’s artificially lit outdoor surface grew by
2.2 percent per year from 2012 to 2016, which
suggests that, although high-efficiency LED lighting has made an enormous impact on the lighting
market, overall urban growth is negating these
gains. The steady growth in light pollution adds to
the number of environmental stressors that will
surely affect Earth’s animal and plant life.
As noted in the article, the growth of light
pollution also has a profound impact on our ability
to carry out ground-based astronomical observations. This has become a race against time as
astronomers are on the verge of building the next
generation of large, billion-dollar-class telescopes
that will reveal new insights into stars that have
been visible since humans first glanced upward.
Fortunately, scientists and government officials
are beginning to collaborate on establishing dark
sky sanctuaries at prime observing sites such as
northern Chile. This could serve as a model for
stewardship of our dark skies and preserve, at least
for the near term, our ability to carry out
cutting-edge astronomical research.
William S. Smith Jr., Washington
The writer is a former president of the Association
of Universities for Research in Astronomy.
Mr. Sessions’s policies
TOM TOLES
Mr. Sissi’s response to a deadly
attack will not stem violence.
OUNTERTERRORISM AUTHORITIES have
long been concerned that as the Islamic State
loses territory in Iraq and Syria it will seek to
establish new bases in other parts of the
region. If so, Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula is looking like
fertile ground for the jihadists. For four years, brutal
but inept repression by the regime of Abdel Fatah
al-Sissi has served only to strengthen the Islamic
State’s “Sinai province,” made up of Egyptian as well
as foreign militants. Last Friday it staged its bloodiest assault yet, killing more than 300 worshipers at a
mosque in northern Sinai.
The merciless attack also reflected the incompetence that has characterized Egyptian security forces. A militant commander in Sinai publicly vowed to
“eradicate” the al-Rawda mosque, which is affiliated
with the Sufi Muslim strain. Weeks before the
assault, Islamic State leaflets were distributed in the
town threatening Sufis, according to The Post’s
Sudarsan Raghavan and Heba Farouk Mahfouz. But
Egyptian troops, who have saturated northern Sinai
under a state of emergency, never deployed in the
village of Rawda during Friday prayers — leaving the
mosque totally exposed to an assault by some 30 militants who reportedly arrived in pickup trucks.
Mr. Sissi’s response was familiar: an angry television speech promising “brute force,” a showy bombing raid, and attacks on media reporting. Following
the example of President Trump, the foreign ministry assailed CNN for its “deplorable coverage”; the
network had the temerity to question why Egyptian
authorities have banned most journalists from the
Sinai, making independent reporting on the fight
against the Islamic State virtually impossible.
Even when reported from a distance, the Sissi
regime offers a textbook example of how not to
respond to Islamist extremism. The army patrols
Sinai in tanks and armored personnel carriers;
rather than protecting the population, it is known
for summary executions, torture and wanton destruction of civilian infrastructure. In Cairo, the
regime has used terrorism as a pretext for the most
severe political repression in Egypt’s modern his-
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
HERE ARE already so many bad things in
the Senate GOP tax bill, what’s one more?
Well, ask the polar bears. On Tuesday, Republicans on the Senate Budget Committee
added to their already malformed tax legislation a
provision that would open the Arctic National
Wildlife Refuge to oil and natural gas drilling. This is
a poor idea that senators should resist sneaking into
law while most of Washington is preoccupied with a
major tax overhaul.
We do not oppose offshore drilling everywhere.
The policy then-President Barack Obama established shortly before leaving office was too strict. It
would be defensible for President Trump to loosen
restrictions on offshore drilling along the Atlantic
Coast and to maintain open waters in the Gulf of
Mexico. As long as the United States demands oil
and does not slake some of its appetite from
domestic production, even more drilling will occur
in places with environmental standards that are
. WEDNESDAY,
the Bladensburg Peace
Cross. The side arms of the
cross could be cut off and
patches applied to make
the sides smooth all the
way up. This would turn
the cross into an impressive pillar, and the name
could be changed to Peace
AMANDA VOISARD FOR
THE WASHINGTON POST
Pillar. Its function as a memorial to war dead would The Peace Cross
remain intact.
I favor the removal of all religious symbols from
government property, but suitable compromises can
help with this.
Alan E. Johnsrud, Arlington
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The Nov. 25 front-page article about Attorney
General Jeff Sessions quoted a Justice Department
statement saying that our “Attorney General is
committed to rebuilding a Justice Department that
respects the rule of law and separation of powers”
with a focus on “the scourge of drug trafficking and
. . . violent crime.” Heartening, indeed. However, one
sentence in the article softened reproach with perhaps sly humor. It said Mr. Sessions “has defended
the president’s travel ban and tried to strip funding
from cities with policies he considers too friendly
toward undocumented immigrants.”
Among the president’s responsibilities, he’s expected to keep his country safe. For President Trump,
lowering the risks from illegal immigrants and
potential terrorists was an immediate concern; the
courts apparently had other priorities. As for the “too
friendly” cities (defined later as “sanctuary cities”),
they are defying federal agencies while expecting the
government’s bounty to continue. It is the attorney
general’s job to support the president in such cases.
And, although some decisions and policies may be
controversial on the merits, comparing them with
those of “past attorneys general” implied a nostalgia
for the executive decisions of the previous administration, many of which have led to festering challenges today. From North Korea to the Middle East, we
live in “interesting times.”
Jonathan Myer, Alexandria
Americans want net neutrality
Regarding the Nov. 25 news article “FCC net
neutrality process was ‘corrupted’ by fake comments, officials say”:
I have little doubt that some public comments on
the Federal Communications Commission’s attempt
to repeal its rule on net neutrality, both pro and con,
are bogus. But for the FCC to pretend that it does not
know that a majority of U.S. citizens do not want this
repeal effort to succeed is disingenuous in the
extreme. Every poll of scientific merit has shown this
to be true.
FCC Chairman Ajit Pai previously worked at
Verizon and probably will return to the telecommunications industry when he has finished negating
citizens’ rights while being paid by those citizens to
protect those rights. To pretend that Congress can
act to restore equity to its constituents by opposing
principal campaign contributors is beyond disingenuous; it is perfidious.
The Trump administration and the Republicanmajority Congress seem dedicated to doing as much
damage to regular citizens as they can. I am torn
between a desire to see this effort fail and a
realization that the more it succeeds, the more likely
is a power turnover in the 2018 elections.
Frank Arsenault, Annapolis
The U.S. position on Zimbabwe
Regarding the Nov. 25 The World article “ ‘We dare
not squander the moment,’ Zimbabwe’s new leader
tells nation”:
Zimbabwe celebrates the end of the despotic rule of
Robert Mugabe. For decades, the world has decried
Mr. Mugabe’s open flouting of the rule of law and
egregious abuse of the democratic process and its
norms. However much Mr. Mugabe’s departure might
be welcomed, the extraconstitutional machinations
of entrenched elites who seek to keep their places at
the feeding trough in Harare have conferred power on
Emmerson Mnangagwa, who held no government
position and had fled Zimbabwe. They did so while a
constitutional successor to Mr. Mugabe, Zimbabwe’s
second vice president, was in place.
The African Union and Southern African Development Community must take action immediately, but
given that the South African election observers’ report on Zimbabwe’s 2002 elections was released only
in 2014 after a Constitutional Court ruling, Jacob
Zuma’s South Africa may play a spoiler role. Therefore, the position of the United States will be critical,
particularly as Mr. Mnangagwa is a specially designated national under U.S. law. But to date, the United
States has limited its statement to an ambiguous
“whatever short-term arrangements” might be determined, elections must follow. Short-term arrangements have a tendency to transform themselves from
tadpoles into frogs.
Joseph Sala, Washington
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
DAVID IGNATIUS
DAVID VON DREHLE
China’s plan
to rule
the world
Congress
needs
a reboot
T
T
he friendly words exchanged between Presidents Trump and Xi
Jinping this month softened the
edge of a Chinese economic and
military buildup that a recent study commissioned by the Pentagon described as
“perhaps the most ambitious grand strategy undertaken by a single nation-state in
modern times.”
At the Beijing summit on Nov. 9, Xi
repeated his usual congenial injunction for
“win-win cooperation,” and Trump responded in kind, calling Xi “a very special
man.” Trump also complained about the
Chinese trade surplus, but the visit was
mostly a serenade to Sino-American cooperation.
What caught my ear was Xi’s hint of
China’s big ambitions in his toast that night.
He quoted a Chinese proverb that “no
distance, not even remote mountains and
vast oceans, can ever prevent people with
perseverance from reaching their destination.” Xi then cited an adage from Benjamin
Franklin: “He who can have patience, can
have what he will.” That’s an apt summary
of China’s quiet but relentless pursuit of
becoming a global superpower.
China’s rise has been so rapid yet gentle
in tone that it’s easy to miss how fast Beijing
has expanded its ability to project power.
The mesmerizing go-slow style of the pre-Xi
years, summarized in the Chinese slogan
“hide and bide,” has been replaced by what
U.S. analysts now see as an open power play.
Trump’s “America first” strategy has facilitated China’s buildup, unintentionally. The
administration’s rhetoric on fair trade has
been strong, but the actual gains have been
modest. Meanwhile, Trump has shredded
the Trans-Pacific Partnership and stepped
back from other U.S.-led alliances — opening the way for China’s new network of
global institutions, including the “One Belt,
One Road” (OBOR) plan for Eurasian trade
and the Asian Infrastructure Investment
Bank to finance Chinese-led projects.
The scope of China’s challenge to the
American-led order is described in two
unpublished and unclassified studies commissioned by the Air Force.
Trump’s ‘America first’
strategy has facilitated
China’s buildup,
unintentionally.
One study argues that China’s Eurasian
reach is beyond that of the 1947 Marshall
Plan, which cemented American power in
postwar Europe. The report estimates that
the OBOR framework would provide up to
$1 trillion in Chinese support for more than
64 countries, while the Marshall Plan provided about $150 billion in current dollars,
mostly to six countries. The report describes OBOR as “a program of unprecedented size and scope with the strategic
intent of constructing a Chinese-led regional order in Eurasia.”
China is building the infrastructure of
power. The study describes, for example,
how Beijing is financing a string of ports in
the Indian Ocean region, including in Sri
Lanka, Malaysia, Pakistan, Burma, Djibouti, Kenya and the United Arab Emirates. The
proposed investment is nearly $250 billion.
China has also invested $13.6 billion in
Greece, buying control of the port of Piraeus
and big shares of Greek utilities and fiberoptics companies. “Greece serves as a strategic beachhead for China into Europe,”
notes the report.
The Asian infrastructure bank, meanwhile, has approved $16 billion in projects
in 10 countries, including long-standing
U.S. allies such as Egypt, India and Oman.
And the Chinese are building rail lines to
Europe and every part of Asia, allowing
them to bypass U.S.-controlled sea lanes.
China already has 40 rail routes to nine
European countries.
American dominance has been built
partly on the primacy of our scientific and
technological laboratories, which have
drawn the best and brightest from around
the world. But the Chinese are challenging
here, too. China is building at least 50 jointventure science and technology labs with
OBOR countries and plans over the next
five years to train up to 5,000 foreign
scientists, engineers and managers, the
study notes.
As foreign scientists pull back from some
U.S. labs because of visa and governmentgrant worries, the Chinese are doubling
down. According to the second Air Force
study, China surpasses the United States in
annual patent applications, is now No. 2 in
peer-reviewed research articles and in 2014
awarded more than twice as many degrees
in science, technology, engineering and
math.
China is mobilizing its best tech talent for
this global empire. China Telecom plans to
lay a 150,000-kilometer fiber-optic network
covering 48 African nations. IZP, a big-data
company, plans to expand soon to 120 countries. BeiDou, a government agency, is
building a GPS-like satellite navigation
system for all Eurasia.
There’s an eerie sense in today’s world
that China is racing to capture the commanding heights of technology and trade.
Meanwhile, under the banner of “America
first,” the Trump administration is protecting coal-mining jobs and questioning climate science.
Sorry, friends, but this is how empires
rise and fall.
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) protests in front of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Monday.
DANA MILBANK
Trump’s swampiest move yet
A
merican criminal law is
based on the cherished notion of habeas corpus, Latin
for “you shall have the
body.”
President Trump’s hostile takeover of the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau, by contrast, relies on the rather less cherished
legal principle of habeas cuppedia,
Latin for “you shall have the pastries.”
It’s not entirely clear that Trump’s
choice to run the CFPB, White
House budget director Mick Mulvaney, has legal authority to assume
the role. But he does have confections. Mulvaney showed up for his
first day on the job Monday carrying
a shopping bag full of Dunkin’
Donuts in Christmas-themed boxes.
This apparently was just the
sweetener Mulvaney needed to be
recognized as acting director, because his spokesman, John Czwartacki, tweeted out a photo showing
empty boxes of doughnuts (except
for one half-eaten chocolate-frosted
treat) and the message “Donuts
were a big hit at cfpb.”
Czwartacki also tweeted photos
of Putative Acting Director Mulvaney meeting with staff and holding
a lightly attended news conference,
an image showing Mulvaney’s name
atop the CFPB org chart, and an
article from Axios titled “Mulvaney
aide: CFPB transition ‘could not
have been smoother.’ ” The aide
quoted in the article: Czwartacki.
Doughnuts alone do not a director make. Under the statute that
created the CFPB, the watchdog
agency set up after the 2008 crash to
police lending abuses, it should now
be rightfully run by Leandra English, the deputy director who succeeds the just-resigned director,
Richard Cordray, until the Senate
confirms a permanent replacement.
Trump found another statute that
he says lets him appoint Mulvaney.
English filed suit to defend her
legitimacy, Mulvaney submitted
doughnuts, and a Trump-appointed
federal judge, to nobody’s surprise,
ruled in Trump’s favor. An appeal is
likely.
On the sidewalk Tuesday in front
of the CFPB offices, in a brutalist
structure a block from the White
House compound, a couple hundred demonstrators assembled by
the Progressive Change Campaign
Committee and led by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) denounced
the takeover.
“Mick Mulvaney is an impostor!”
bellowed Ben Wikler of the liberal
group MoveOn.org. “We are going
to fight this attempt at a coup at the
CFPB.”
But, ultimately, the “coup” will
succeed. Whether it’s Mulvaney
(who has called the bureau he now
proposes to lead a “joke”) or somebody else, Trump will eventually be
able to install a director who can
defang the watchdog — and Wall
Street bankers and corporate lobbyists will plant their flag of conquest
at another agency. Already, Mulvaney says he’s freezing new hiring
and new rules.
Even for this phony populist president, who instead of draining the
swamp stocked his White House
and Treasury Department with
Goldman Sachs executives and
sprinkled billionaires and lobbyists
across the government, the move on
the CFPB is brazen. That’s because
Trump’s legal justification for taking
control of the CFPB was written by a
lawyer who until just a few months
ago was defending a foreign payday
lender against the agency’s attempts
to punish it for lending abuses.
As the Intercept’s David Dayen
reported, Steven Engel, the Justice
Department lawyer who wrote the
memo justifying Trump’s takeover,
was a lead counsel for Canadian
payday lender NDG Financial,
which the CFPB cited for misleading and overcharging U.S. customers. The Intercept reported that
Engel was active in the case, which
remains in court, until August —
after he was nominated to serve in
the administration.
It’s difficult to imagine something swampier than a corporate
lawyer joining the government and
then orchestrating the disarming of
a federal agency in litigation with
his former client. NDG — and the
lenders who had to give back some
$12 billion to consumers because of
shady practices caught by the CFPB
— can celebrate.
There’s nothing the forgotten
man, thus swindled by Trump, can
do now to keep big banks from
regaining the upper hand over consumers. Outside CFPB headquarters, the demonstrators were doing
about the only thing that could be
done: shouting. They attempted to
settle on a rallying cry, alternating
between “Put consumers first/Mulvaney is the worst” and “Hey-hey,
ho-ho, Mick Mulvaney has got to
go.”
Warren, declaring that “no one
should get cheated,” punched the
air with her fist and pounded the
lectern so hard that she sent a
digital recorder crashing to the
ground.
Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) attempted a call-and-response with
the crowd: “There is a legitimate
director right now, and that person’s
name is?”
From the confused audience
came a muffled sound akin to
“Mush!”
“English,” Merkley coached. “Leandra English.”
The judge gave a different answer. And the federal government,
soon to be out of the business of
policing abusive lenders, will instead deliver them doughnuts.
lie, however, wouldn’t it be possible to
suggest the others were lying as well? If
The Post had run with the story without
confirming it, O’Keefe could prove that
The Post was biased against Moore for
publishing a fake story.
Again, none of this happened.
The lie was outed by the truth, while
O’Keefe’s own obvious agenda was revealed. Hating the media these days is
good business and good politics among
a certain constituency. If anyone
should feel betrayed by O’Keefe, however, it is all those people who have been
duped into believing that the mainstream media is the bad guys. Let’s be
very clear. The bad guys are the ones
who lie.
Recall that it was Trump who wielded the phrase “fake news” whenever he
didn’t like some story written about
him. Not that covering Trump requires
embellishment or fakery. Originally,
the term was used in real news stories
about fake stories being promulgated
through social media. But Trump’s marketing savvy — and his appreciation for
the fact that people tend to believe what
they want to believe — prompted him
to make “fake news” the battle cry of the
conservative right.
Excuse the echo, but this bears repeating: Those who would purposely
mislead or seek to confuse others are
bad people. Worse, they are evil.
Conspiracy theorists will always be
among us, and the credulous are in no
danger of extinction. However, that a
million people — or 60 million —
believe something doesn’t make it true.
Nor does crying “fake news” alter what
is. The proof is anyone’s for the asking.
kathleenparker@washpost.com
david.vondrehle@washpost.com
Twitter: @Milbank
Real fake news
T
DALTON BENNETT/THE WASHINGTON POST
James O’Keefe in Mamaroneck, N.Y.,
on Monday.
rather, the paper did what it’s supposed
to do and checked out the story. This
isn’t cause for trumpets and heraldry,
mind you. It’s what journalists do. As
opposed to what pseudo-journalists —
also known as typists — claim they do.
With a little footwork, Post reporters
were able to trace Phillips to Project
Veritas and demonstrated that her story was a fraud.
It was — you may now cue the horn
section — FAKE NEWS.
Thanks to O’Keefe, The Post also
showed a skeptical public just how
different real journalism is from the
effluvia produced by what would be
more aptly named Pretext Veritas. Perhaps there’s a place for him at Pravda.
Moore, meanwhile, might have
hoped to discredit all his accusers,
though O’Keefe refused to respond to
questions Monday regarding his relationship to Moore. If one woman would
On net neutrality,
a change of presidents
produces a screeching U-turn.
Lower courts ruled that pre-iPhone case
law was adequate to uphold Carpenter’s
conviction. Under existing law, if a person
passes information through another entity
— a “third party” such as a phone company
or shipping firm — the fact of the transaction is not private. If you send a letter, for
instance, the writing on the outside of the
envelope can be read. If you dial a phone
number, the fact of the call (though not its
content) is information owned by the
phone company. And the carrier can share
that fact with police.
Carpenter’s appeal is supported by big
tech firms, leading civil liberties groups
and digital privacy advocates. They argue
that the transformative capabilities of the
smartphone demand new protections
against search and seizure of our personal
digital property. If our entire lives — not
just conversations but also shopping,
studying, dating, navigating, playing, dining and documenting our experiences —
take place with and through these devices,
should all of it be public? Yet we have no
choice but to use these increasingly indispensable tools.
Justice Sonia Sotomayor saw this issue
coming. Writing in 2012, she found existing
law “ill suited to the digital age, in which
people reveal a great deal of information
about themselves to third parties in the
course of carrying out mundane tasks.”
No doubt other justices share this insight. Judges are human, after all, and few
humans with smartphones haven’t fretted
over the breadth and depth of the data
collected by our digital overlords. And the
problem doesn’t stop with collection. The
capacity to store nearly infinite amounts of
data assures that our virtual trails will
never go cold.
The need for new privacy protections
seems clear. But in such an intricate web of
issues, the courts aren’t well suited to
making policy. Their mandate is to decide
the discrete legal questions presented one
case at a time. A fully formed body of law
from the bench may require decades of
maturation through a series of cases.
Which brings us back to Congress — and,
more hopefully, to state legislatures. The
legislative branch is best equipped to define
big issues, gather research, hold hearings,
weigh competing interests and draft comprehensive reforms. Writing as a friend of
the court in the Carpenter case, George
Washington University law professor Orin
Kerr, an authority on the Fourth Amendment and writer for the Volokh Conspiracy
blog hosted by The Post, has urged the
justices to restrain themselves. “The Court
should continue to allow legislatures to
debate and decide how much protection
cell-site records should receive,” Kerr asserted, pointing out that California recently
passed very strict new privacy laws.
Partisan game-playing and mutual suspicion in Congress come at a high price.
Pressing decisions that ought to be made by
elected representatives in open deliberation are instead pushed into the cloistered
chambers of the Supreme Court. Lawmakers claim to resent judges who legislate
from the bench — but they’re making it a
last resort.
KATHLEEN PARKER
he phrase “the truth will out”
has always been at home in
American newsrooms where
journalists dedicate their days
to making it so.
Sometimes Truth needs a little
nudge, as was the case recently when an
anti-media organization, absurdly
named Project Veritas, apparently invented a story intended to impugn The
Post (and the media more broadly),
while also helping Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore.
Briefly, Project Veritas and its creator, the self-regarding (bad) actor
James O’Keefe, seems to have hired a
woman to say that Moore impregnated
her in 1992 and that she got an abortion
at 15. As if you could forget, Moore has
been accused by several women of
molesting them when they were teens
and he was in his 30s.
Jaime T. Phillips presented herself to
Post reporters with her scandalous tale,
apparently expecting them to concede
the paper’s bias against Moore, and,
voila, a scoop! O’Keefe surely would
have raced to present his findings, all
filmed on hidden camera, his usual
modus operandi, and launched a fresh
fundraising drive.
You see? O’Keefe’s mission has been
to prove that the media is biased. While
this may be true to the degree that all
human beings carry biases, The Post’s
editorial board isn’t coy about its positions. That said, the editorial and opinion pages shouldn’t be confused with
the reportorial staff, which adheres to
basic journalism tenets, including
“park your bias at the door.”
Essentially, Phillips baited The Post
and The Post declined to play. Or,
he Founding Fathers would be gobsmacked by an iPhone (although I
bet Ben Franklin would catch on
quickly). Yet if we asked them what
branch of government should take the lead
in adapting policy to a revolution in technology, they would say that’s a job for
Congress.
Alas, I reckon they would be gobsmacked
by today’s Congress, too. The august creation of Article I of the Constitution can’t
walk and chew gum at the same time.
Often, Congress can’t even walk. Gridlock
in Congress stalls all causes: the bitterly
divisive ones and the vital nonpartisan
ones, too. The mobile digital age presents
pressing issues, from privacy to the price of
broadband. But Congress does, basically,
diddly.
So the need for action falls to the executive branch and the courts — both of them
problematic.
Relying on executive-branch regulators
can result in radically shifting rules of the
road. The Federal Communications Commission is a good example. Under Trumpappointed Chairman Ajit Pai, the FCC is
preparing to reverse existing policy on “net
neutrality,” which requires that broadband
providers treat all data equally. A change of
presidents produces a screeching U-turn.
As for the courts, their limitations will be
on display Wednesday in Washington,
when the Supreme Court hears arguments
over cellphone privacy. You might not
realize that your cellular provider keeps
track of your travels even when you have
your GPS switched off. Each call, text, email
and alert that enters or leaves your phone
must pass through a nearby antenna.
In the case before the court, Timothy
Carpenter’s cellular provider supplied investigators a record of his smartphone’s
whereabouts. The pings placed Carpenter
in the vicinity of several armed robberies in
Ohio and Michigan. Now behind bars, he is
asking the justices to find this a violation of
his Fourth Amendment right to be safe
from warrantless searches of his private
domain.
A20
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
FROM
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ALLOWED."
TO
"HOW OLD ARE
THESE FRIES?"
C3748 6x21
You know us for shopping, and now Cars.com
is the site for the entire life of your car. So for
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KLMNO
METRO
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
High today at
approx. 2 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
47 60 62 52°
°
°
°
65°
Precip: 0%
Wind: WNW
7-14 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
MARYLAND
OBITUARIES
“Off came the manhole
cover.” Readers share
more tales of how they
retrieved their lost stuff. B3
After a years-long process,
some dispensaries are set
to begin selling medical
marijuana this week. B2
W. Marvin Watson Jr. was a
top White House aide and
one of Lyndon B. Johnson’s
most loyal confidants. B5
Police
shooting
fatal for
Va. man
BY
T OM J ACKMAN
The man who was shot by U.S.
Park Police after a short chase
into Fairfax County died Monday
night after 10 days on life support, and the man’s family said he
was unarmed when he was shot.
Bijan C. Ghaisar, 25, of
McLean, was an accountant for
his father’s firm and a graduate of
Langley High School and Virginia
Commonwealth University. Park
Police said they pursued his Jeep
sport-utility vehicle on the evening of Nov. 17 because it had
been involved in a hit-and-run
accident on the George Washington Memorial Parkway in Alexandria. The pursuit ended in the
Fort Hunt area of Fairfax County.
Ghaisar’s family said in a
statement that Ghaisar was shot
three times in the head and
suffered irreversible brain damage. A witness told The Washington Post last week that she saw
two officers approach the Jeep
and open fire at close range near
Fort Hunt Road and Alexandria
Avenue. Authorities have not
said why police fired.
POLICE CONTINUED ON B5
A full pour
Maryland’s craft brewers, with the state comptroller’s support, want to change a strict law that limits production
W
hen
California-based
Stone Brewing expanded
to the East Coast three
years ago, it chose Virginia. Maryland was never
in the running. And when the owners of
Union Craft Brewing, a small Baltimore
start-up, decided to expand, they settled
on a 50,000-square-foot space with a
smaller taproom than they originally
wanted.
“We would make a greater investment
and a greater commitment if we knew
there was certainty to allow us to grow,”
said Adam Benesch, founder of the
five-year-old brewery. “It didn’t make
sense to build a huge taproom if we’re not
allowed to sell enough beer to warrant
that size.”
Unlike neighboring Virginia, Pennsylvania and Delaware, Maryland strictly
limits how much craft-beer breweries can
produce, sell in taprooms and sell for
customers to take home, a set of restrictions that critics say is archaic.
While Maryland has taken advantage
of the exploding industry to some extent,
brewers and their supporters say there is
considerable untapped potential.
BY
O VETTA W IGGINS
PHOTOS BY MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
Workers, top, tend the product at Union Craft Brewing
in Baltimore. Adam Benesch, above, founder of the
five-year-old brewery, said that uncertainty about
production laws keeps him from expanding more.
That’s why Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot (D) has vowed to try again in
2018 to overhaul state law in hopes of
better attracting and retaining craft-beer
manufacturers.
This week he unveiled a legislative
package that, among other things, removes the caps on how much craft beer
can be sold and brewed, and changes the
hours and conditions for buying craft
beer in some locations.
Franchot said that Maryland brewers
support 6,500 jobs and account for
$228 million in wages and $58 million in
state and local revenue. The industry’s
total economic impact is $632 million
annually, he said, but could be much
more.
“We ought to start welcoming, appreciating and thanking this unbelievable
sector,” Franchot said this week at a news
conference attended by several local
brewers at Benesch’s new, still-empty
warehouse in Baltimore.
Kevin Atticks, a lobbyist for the Brewers Association of Maryland, said that
state laws have not kept up as the
craft-beer industry has grown over the
BREWERIES CONTINUED ON B8
Archdiocese
sues Metro
over ban on
holiday ad
BY
M ARTINE P OWERS
The Archdiocese of Washington
is suing Metro after the transit
agency rejected an ad for the organization’s annual “Find the Perfect Gift” charitable campaign,
which features a biblical Christmas scene.
In the lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court on Tuesday, attorneys
for the archdiocese argue that
Metro’s ban on subway and bus
ads that “promote . . . any religion,
religious practice or belief” has
infringed on the organization’s
First Amendment rights.
“The rejected ad conveys a simple message of hope and an invitation to participate in the Christmas season,” archdiocese spokesman Ed McFadden said.
The banner ads, designed to be
placed on Metrobus exteriors, are
relatively minimalist in their design. The display highlights the
LAWSUIT CONTINUED ON B2
More media outlets, but the same irksome coverage? Comstock emerges as
leader on harassment
As editor of a
thrice-weekly
online journal
about media and
diversity, Richard
Prince starts his
Courtland day perusing at
Milloy
least 30 newsrelated websites.
Working at a laptop from his
home in Alexandria, Va., to
produce Journal-isms, he checks
social media, reads newsletters
that arrived overnight by email
and tunes into a mix of
broadcast programs.
Despite the proliferation of
new media outlets, much of
what he sees is old and
tiresome. A lack of diversity in
top management, the
perpetuation of racial
stereotypes in coverage, a
penchant for ignoring the
pervasiveness of racism —
problems Prince says existed
when he began working as a
reporter at The Washington Post
in 1968.
That same year, a commission
appointed by President Lyndon
COURTLAND MILLOY JR./THE WASHINGTON POST
Richard Prince, editor of Journal-isms, an online journal about
diversity, says he continues to see a lack of it in management.
B. Johnson delivered a report on
civil disorders that included a
critique of the media, which still
resonates nearly 50 years later.
“The media report and write
from the standpoint of a white
man’s world,” the commission
said, adding that “the white
press,” as many black people call
it, “repeatedly, if unconsciously
reflect the biases, the
paternalism, the indifference of
white America.”
There has been some change.
Last month, while doing his
daily survey of the news
landscape, Prince saw an
announcement by NBC that the
network was creating a ninemember team to cover the
media industry. But “the only
person of color on the team was
an Asian woman with a
background in technology,”
Prince recalled.
Prince posted a news brief
about the NBC announcement,
with a headline that said it all:
“NBC Names Team to Cover
Media; Scant Diversity.” Last
week, much to his surprise, NBC
announced that Eric Deggans, a
well-known media critic who is
black, was being added to the
team.
“I won’t say I had anything to
do with it, but I think it’s great,”
said Prince, who at age 70 has
been editor of Journal-isms
since 1991. “That team needed
somebody who was attuned to
the importance of diversity and
racial issues in news coverage.”
Prince stressed that you don’t
have to be black to be attuned to
diversity issues. It’s just the
people initially selected for the
NBC team had backgrounds in
MILLOY CONTINUED ON B5
Va. representative hopes
to revamp Capitol Hill’s
complaint process
BY
J ENNA P ORTNOY
Wherever Rep. Barbara Comstock (R-Va.) goes these days, she’s
stopped by women who thank her
for speaking out about sexual harassment on Capitol Hill.
The two-term congresswoman
from Northern Virginia sits on the
House committee charged with
reforming a system that made it
possible for members to settle
complaints anonymously and
with taxpayer dollars.
But she drew national attention
two weeks ago during a committee
hearing when she recounted a story she had heard about a young
Hill staffer who abruptly quit after
a congressman exposed himself.
“I do think this is a watershed
moment,” she said in an interview
Tuesday in her Capitol office.
“What happened in Hollywood,
what happened in media, in other
industries sort of broke it all open
that it didn’t matter where you
came down politically, that a predator is a predator.”
Comstock, who has been making the rounds of the Sunday talk
shows, is working across party
lines to co-sponsor a resolution
with Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Calif.)
that would require members and
staff to complete mandatory antiharassment training. The full
House is expected to vote on the
resolution Wednesday.
Comstock and Speier have
called the resolution a first step
toward amending the process victims use to report harassment.
They want to overhaul the complaint process laid out in the Congressional Accountability Act of
1995, which will be the subject of a
COMSTOCK CONTINUED ON B3
B2
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
MARYLAND
State’s medicinal pot dispensaries get ready to open
BY R ACHEL S IEGEL
AND F ENIT N IRAPPIL
As they filed through the sleek
waiting room of Rise Silver
Spring, prospective patients —
the old, the young, the sick and
the curious — came upon deep
glass cases that looked like they’d
been designed for a high-end jewelry store.
Soon those cases will be
stocked with medicinal pot grown
and processed in Maryland.
The light-filled storefront on
Fenton Street is among the first
cannabis dispensaries set to open
in Maryland, nearly five years after state lawmakers legalized
marijuana for medical use.
Within the next week, Rise is
scheduled to begin selling a variety of cannabis products, such as
flowers, patches and oils. Four of
the state’s other eight dispensaries — including Potomac Holistics in Rockville — say they expect
to have medical pot delivered and
available for sale by Friday, marking the official launch in Maryland of an industry that is worth
billions nationwide. Two said they
expect to receive their initial
batch of marijuana from Curio
Wellness in Baltimore County,
which did not return messages
seeking comment.
“I’ve been waiting, just like you
guys,” former Baltimore Ravens
tackle Eugene Monroe told a
crowd of onlookers at the ribboncutting at the Rise dispensary,
hoisting a giant pair of red scis-
MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST
Ex-Raven Eugene Monroe, center, and businessman Andy Grossman, right, at the Rise ribbon-cutting.
sors.
Monroe is a partner in Green
Thumb Industries, Rise’s Illinoisbased parent company, and a
longtime advocate of cannabis for
pain management. He has spoken
out against over-prescription of
opioids and has called on the
National Football League to remove marijuana from its list of
banned substances.
In all, 14 growers, 12 processors
and nine dispensaries have been
licensed by the Maryland Medical
Cannabis Commission. About
15,000 people have signed up in
the hope of becoming patients,
with 8,500 already certified to buy
medical cannabis, according to
the commission. Nearly 550
health-care providers have registered with the state to recommend the drug to their patients.
Legal conflicts and bureaucratic hiccups slowed the launch of
the industry in Maryland. The
THE REGION
Union-backed bill aims to fix Metro
BY
R OBERT M C C ARTNEY
AND F AIZ S IDDIQUI
It seems everyone has a plan to
fix Metro. Up next, liberals and
labor unions.
Reps. Anthony G. Brown and
Jamie B. Raskin, both Maryland
Democrats, unveiled legislation
Tuesday that would redirect federal transit funds to allow Metro to
avoid cutting service or raising
fares.
The bill, drafted in coordination
with Amalgamated Transit Union
Local 689, would also require Metro to adopt a set of labor-backed
initiatives such as a pilot program
offering flat fares.
It urges a study that could lead to
reversing privatization of the
MetroAccess paratransit program.
And it would create two safety task
forces: one to review Metro’s ontrack safety and the other to review
bus safety. The task forces would be
named for train and bus operators
who were killed on the job in separate incidents.
The legislation was made public
at a news conference Tuesday
morning at the New Carrollton
Metro station with the two congressmen and ATU Local 689 Pres-
ident Jackie Jeter.
The bill seems to have little
chance of winning approval in
Congress, given Republican control of both chambers. Instead, it
appears designed primarily to call
attention to proposals advanced by
the union and grass-roots activists
who want federal, state and local
governments to pick up a bigger
share of the cost of Metro and relieve the burden on riders.
Brown, who introduced the bill,
represents a swath of Prince
George’s County that is home to a
large number of ATU members.
“I expect it will be quite a challenge” to pass the measure, he said.
“It’s an uphill battle [in Congress]
for a lot of progressive, meaningful
legislation.”
The legislation would give Metro the ability to use some of the
money it receives annually from
the Transportation Department
for operations instead of just capital improvements. “This would
give Metro broader discretion and
the ability to ‘flex’ its federal formula grant funds for operating costs
with the goal of avoiding service
cuts and fare increases,” according
to a summary of the bill prepared
by Brown’s office.
Metro would get such flexibility
with one important condition: The
District, Maryland and Virginia
would have to create a dedicated
funding source that covers more
than half of Metro’s operating
costs.
Metro is the only major transit
system in the nation that does not
obtain a significant share of its
funding from a dedicated source.
Metro General Manager Paul J.
Wiedefeld, the Metropolitan
Washington Council of Governments, business leaders and others
have urged dedicated funding to
cover Metro’s capital needs, but no
consensus has been reached within
the region on whether or how to
provide it.
Several of the proposals in the
Brown bill are adopted from the
union-backed “Fund It, Fix It,
Make It Fair” plan released by
ATU Local 689 in March.
The bill would establish a yearlong pilot program offering
$2.50 flat fares for trips originating
from three stations — one each in
the District, Virginia and Maryland
— to be selected by Metro. The
union plan called for a $2 flat fare
across the system. Flat fares
“would be a great way to lure riders
commission was overwhelmed by
a slew of applications from interested marijuana businesses, delaying the first batch of license
awards by more than six months.
Since then, regulators have fended off complaints from businesses
and lawmakers who said the process of choosing marijuana companies was unfair.
Green Thumb Industries filed a
lawsuit after it won a license to
sell the drug but was denied a
back to the system,” Raskin said.
The Brown bill proposes another rider-friendly initiative: free
transfers between bus and rail. It
would require Metro to establish a
pilot program offering free transfers between the two modes at certain stations. The union plan proposed free transfers between bus
and rail within a two-hour window.
Moreover, in its plan, the union
called for a reduced-fare program
for low-income riders that “takes
into account passengers’ ability to
pay.” The union notes that San
Francisco’s Municipal Transportation Agency offers a “Lifeline Pass”
— discounting its regular monthly
pass 50 percent for those whose
incomes are less than 200 percent
of the federal poverty level. Accordingly, Brown’s bill proposes a similar fare program.
One unusual feature of the legislation is that it would grant Congress’s consent to amend the Metro
Compact to carry out many of its
provisions — even though revising
the compact would not be necessary to do so.
Metro “could act on these if they
wanted to [without changing the
compact], but they haven’t,” Brown
spokesman Matthew Verghese
said. “We included it as a mandate
in the legislation to show congressional support for common-sense
ideas.”
robert.mccartney@washpost.com
faiz.siddiqui@washpost.com
Archdiocese sues over ban of biblical-scene bus ads
LAWSUIT FROM B1
phrases “Find the Perfect Gift”
and “#PerfectGift,” and includes a
link to the campaign’s website,
which encourages people to attend Mass or donate to a Catholic
charitable groups. The words of
the ad are overlaid on a tableau of
a starry sky; in the corner are three
figures bearing shepherd’s rods,
along with two sheep.
In the lawsuit, the archdiocese
argues that the ad posters “contain no explicit references to religion, religious practice, or belief.”
McFadden noted that Metro’s policies allow much more latitude for
Christmas-themed ads that are
commissioned by commercial entities seeking to get people to buy
their products.
“If Christmas comes from a
store . . . then it seems [the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit
Authority] approves,” McFadden
said. “But if Christmas means a
little bit more, WMATA plays
Grinch.”
The archdiocese is asking a
judge to declare that Metro’s ban
on religious ads infringes on the
Catholic organization’s freedom of
speech and religion, and it wants
the court to force Metro to accept
the ad within the next week.
Metro does not comment on
pending litigation, but spokesman
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(Hint: The ingredient is found in horse bread, a type
of bread to be sold at the forthcoming Seylou Bakery
& Mill.)
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Dan Stessel said the archdiocese is
free to submit another advertisement free of religious imagery.
“Metro is not in a position to
provide design guidance; however, if another version is submitted,
it will be considered,” Stessel said.
The dispute is the latest legal
fight prompted by the transit
agency’s aggressive enforcement
of stringent guidelines, adopted in
2015, governing what can be advertised on trains, buses and inside stations.
In the past year, Metro has been
sued by the American Civil Liberties Union, an abortion provider,
People for the Ethical Treatment
of Animals, controversial author
Milo Yiannopoulos and an Egyptian human rights advocate — all
because their respective ads were
rejected under the 2015 policy.
The sweeping clampdown on
any ads that could be considered
politically or socially charged is a
significant shift for the transit
agency. For years, the agency’s policy was relatively lax. Since the
1980s, the transit system’s stations, trains and buses have
played host to ads that mocked
President Ronald Reagan, criticized the Catholic Church,
claimed that abortions resulted in
breast cancer and promoted the
legalization of marijuana.
Then, starting in 2012, Metro
did an about-face. Transit agency
officials rejected several ads that
featured images considered intentionally incendiary and offensive
to Muslims. Officials feared that
posting the ads would spark violence or terrorism. (That fear
wasn’t without basis. When the
same images were displayed at a
2015 event in Texas, the venue was
attacked by two gunmen.)
A legal back-and-forth ensued,
and in 2015, the Metro board instituted broad changes to the agency’s advertising policy. It banned
“issues-oriented” advertising, as
well as anything related to religion
or politics, as part of an effort to
avoid legal wrangling altogether.
In recent months, Metro officials have defended the stance
with a simple argument: They’re
merely enforcing the policies that
were approved by the board two
years ago. If people want a different policy, they say, they need to go
to the Metro board.
Chairman Jack Evans said Tuesday that the policy serves its purpose of protecting the system
while still allowing free speech.
“I don’t have any interest in
revisiting the policy,” he said.
But in the lawsuit, attorneys for
the archdiocese argue that Metro
enforces the policy haphazardly,
allowing, for example, ads by the
Salvation Army, a Protestant char-
itable group. Metro also has recently approved posters that promote yoga and espouse the practice’s benefits as a means to “an
inner journey of self-discovery”
and “acknowledgment of one soul
to another,” the archdiocese said.
They also note that they successfully advertised with Metro in
the past, commissioning posters
in the system in spring 2015 —
months before the new policy was
implemented — that “highlight[ed] the importance of the
Sacrament of Reconciliation during the liturgical season of Lent.”
The ad submitted to Metro for
the most recent campaign was far
less explicitly religious than a similar promotional display that will
appear on bus shelters around the
region that are not owned by Metro. Those ads quote the Gospel of
Luke, telling passersby: “Behold, I
proclaim to you good news of great
joy.”
Metro’s rejection of the
Christmas-themed ad comes as officials are scrutinizing other parts
of the agency’s advertising policy
as part of an effort to raise cash to
help fund operations. Board members have offered tepid support for
a proposal to sell station naming
rights for multimillion-dollar fees,
although there has been no official
action.
martine.powers@washpost.com
license to grow it. Company officials originally said they would
not open a dispensary without a
cultivation license but have apparently reversed course.
Andy Grossman, a partner at
GTI, declined to comment on the
lawsuit Tuesday. He said the opening of the dispensary was a “great
day for the patients of Maryland”
who will have access to “quality
medicine in a safe and dignified
manner.”
Tuesday’s event was meant to
familiarize local residents with
Rise, because access to the dispensary will be restricted once marijuana products are in stock and
for sale.
Among those who came to look
around were Anne Quinlan and
Judd Juha, a married couple who
both have been battling cancer
and are eager to try medical marijuana to alleviate some of their
symptoms.
Juha, diagnosed three years
ago with lung cancer, hopes it will
quell the pain of “hot irons” in his
chest. And Quinlan, diagnosed in
August with Stage 4 non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, is desperate for
an appetite stimulant that can
help her regain the 20 pounds she
has lost.
“I’m just sad that we got here
before they sold anything,” Juha
said after filling out patient registration forms with his wife.
Bill Askinazi, principal of Potomac Holistics in Rockville, said he
expects about 2,000 customers to
buy flowers, oils and balms and
other products during the first
month his store is open. Askinazi
put his law practice on hold to
launch the dispensary, 20 years
after his son found that synthetic
cannabis could relieve his debilitating nausea.
For now, local handcrafted paraphernalia, including glassblown water pipes, line his shop’s
cabinets, and a copy of Marijuana
Business Magazine has been
placed in the waiting room. Askinazi said prospective patients
have knocked on the door in recent days, asking when sales will
begin. “We’re eager to get started,”
he said.
Sajal Roy, who runs a dispensary in rural Allegany County, said
he’s planning a low-key opening
day, limited to a small group of
preregistered patients, “instead of
having a line of 500 people and
causing mass chaos.”
Anthony Darby, who leads Peninsula Alternative Health on
Maryland’s Eastern Shore, said he
expects to begin sales soon but is
wary of promising a specific opening date.
“I have been in this situation at
least two other times, and because
of testing labs and other reasons,
product hasn’t gotten to us,” Darby said. “We are hopefully optimistic that this is different and the
delivery from Curio will happen.”
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
Aaron Gregg contributed to this
report.
MARYLAND
Pact keeps a≠ordable
housing on Purple Line
Government, businesses
also aim to create jobs
along transit corridor
BY
K ATHERINE S HAVER
Government, business and
community leaders from Montgomery and Prince George’s counties agreed Tuesday to preserve
affordable housing and create
jobs along the Purple Line corridor where construction is expected to drive up land values around
its 21 stations.
The agreement, thought to be
the second of its kind in the
country, isn’t legally binding. But
signatories called it a public commitment to help those who live
and work in the 16-mile light-rail
corridor stay and benefit from the
state’s $5.6 billion transit investment.
“There are billions of dollars
that will be invested to build this
shiny new transit system, and
that’s good. . . . The question is,
who’s going to be along the corridor in five years, 10 years, 15 years
when it’s built?” said David Bowers of the nonprofit group Enterprise Community Partners.
Without governments, foundations and developers working to
maintain affordable housing,
Bowers said, residents will be
displaced.
“We know it’s happening,”
Bowers said. “You can go 15 minutes down the road to the nation’s
capital and go neighborhood by
neighborhood.”
Prince George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III (D) said
he has heard from residents, particularly in the heavily Latino
Langley Park area, who welcome
the Purple Line but are concerned
about being priced out.
“This agreement says, ‘We hear
you,’ ” Baker said. “We’re looking
at ways . . . to give them every
opportunity they want to stay
there.”
Purple Line supporters have
long touted the light-rail project,
which started construction in August, as a way to rejuvenate aging
suburbs between Bethesda and
New Carrollton, in addition to
providing faster, more reliable
public transportation. It was no
coincidence that the signing occurred before nearly 200 people
amid the scent of new carpet at
The Hotel at the University of
Maryland, upscale lodgings that
opened two months ago on
Route 1 in College Park, near the
site of a future Purple Line sta-
2017 PostPoints Scavenger Hunt
Amen for The Reverend Horton Heat.
For blistering music the band can’t be beat.
Jim plays the guitar, Jimbo stand-up bass
While the foxy Heatettes add rockabllly grace.
Who will open for masters of rockabilly The Reverend Horton Heat
on Sunday, December 3 at 9:30 Club?
Frosty the Snowman is coming to town.
No matter the weather he sure gets around.
Book tickets now, treat the kids to a show.
It’s a story for all, one we’ll never outgrow.
What time is the first performance of Frosty the Snowman
on Sunday, December 10 at Adventure Theatre-MTC?
(Hint: See 930.com for the answer.)
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EARN 5 POINTS AND A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES. Answer our Scavenger Hunt questions, then go to washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click “Quizzes” to enter your responses.
tion.
But even Purple Line supporters say they are well aware that
the new hotels, restaurants, shops
and homes that the Purple Line
will attract could push aside
lower-income residents who most
need it to reach jobs and schools.
Officials said it took three years
to work out the agreement
reached by members of the Purple
Line Corridor Coalition, a group
formed by the University of Maryland’s National Center for Smart
Growth. It includes community
officials, nonprofit groups and
businesses along the route.
Gerrit Knaap, executive director of the National Center for
Smart Growth, said the discussions grew out of concerns voiced
by CASA, an immigrant rights
organization in Langley Park.
Knaap said the coalition modeled the pact on one in the Seattle
area.
“You can feel the energy here,”
Knaap said after the signing.
“People are here with the right
frame of mind and the tools to
really pull this off.”
The agreement doesn’t prescribe how the suburbs will accomplish the four goals: supporting and growing local businesses,
creating jobs, maintaining lowerincome and workforce housing
and supporting “vibrant, sustainable” communities.
All of them, Knaap said, will
require cooperation among governments, the private sector, nonprofit organizations and community groups.
Montgomery County Executive
Isiah Leggett (D) said he wished
that the county had had a similar
commitment in place to protect
small businesses as downtown
Silver Spring was redeveloped.
With the Purple Line coming,
Leggett said, “We’re trying to get
out in front of those bumps and
challenges.”
The Purple Line, which is estimated to cost $2.4 billion to build,
is scheduled to open in 2022. It is
being built as part of a 36-year
public-private partnership valued at $5.6 billion. A lawsuit
opposing the project’s ridership
projections is pending before the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.
Knaap said the smart-growth
center will continue to analyze
rents, home sales, wages, unemployment and other economic indicators annually as the Purple
Line is built and after it opens.
“Our goal is to hold us all
accountable,” Knaap said. “If it’s
not moving in the right direction,
we’ll change course.”
katherine.shaver@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
Losers get lucky: More tales of successful retrievals
I’m afraid today’s
column may leave
you with a sense
of loss. But it also
may help you find
yourself.
John
After recent
Kelly's
columns on things
Washington lost and things
found, I heard
from so many readers with
interesting stories that I decided
to share some more.
Years ago, while attending a
conference in Miami, Wayne
Johnson visited a park with the
woman who would become his
wife. Later, he noticed his college
ring was missing. (No, she hadn’t
swiped it.)
“That night, I dreamt that the
ring was at the park,” wrote
Wayne, of Silver Spring, Md. Back
to the park he went, straight to a
swing set he had sat on the
previous day. “I sat in the swing,
looked down and saw a faint
glimmer in the dirt. I moved the
dirt and there was my ring.”
Wayne, can you dream about
my black iPod? I haven’t seen it
for months.
My original column was on the
D.C. fire department trying to
help retrieve an iPhone that had
tumbled into a storm drain.
Some readers groused that
firefighters shouldn’t waste their
time on such things. But they’ve
been doing it for years.
Forty years ago, Susie
McMahon, of the District,
hopped into her Mazda RX3 and
leaned across the seat to open the
door for a friend. In one smooth
motion, her keys flew from her
hand and plummeted into a
storm drain.
“I was cooked and had no idea
what to do,” she wrote. She went
to a fire station on Connecticut
Avenue NW. “Next thing I knew,
myself and three firefighters
were marching back to my car,
parked at Rodman Street.”
The firefighters lifted the
manhole cover, spotted the keys
and pulled them out. “I was so
grateful,” Susie wrote. She now
carries her apartment keys and
car keys in two sets — “even
though I have been told it is a
nutty idea.”
Nancy Donovan’s sister-in-law
lost a ring — a family heirloom —
when it slipped off her finger and
into a grate on Independence
Avenue SW.
“We could see the ring resting
on a ledge but couldn’t reach it,”
wrote Nancy, of Oakton, Va. This
time, some folks from the
Smithsonian came to the rescue.
Nancy’s husband ran into a
nearby museum and returned
with three young people who
assembled a Rube Goldberg
contraption — a pole, a wire —
and then went sewer fishing and
retrieved the ring.
“It could easily have been
knocked down the drain and
been lost for good,” Nancy wrote.
“These good Samaritans had
steady hands and nerves of steel.”
The right tool makes all the
difference, such as the modified
tin can on a string for retrieving
baseballs I wrote about on
Monday. Dimitri Gontscharow
of Falls Church, Va., grew up in
New York City, where urchins
played stickball with a bouncy
ball called a Pinky (or Spaldeen).
To get one of those out of the
sewer, Dimitri would take a metal
hanger, stretch it out, create a
loop bent at the bottom and go
fishing. “We would walk around
just looking to find someone
else’s lost balls,” he wrote.
Dimitri, depending on what
Wayne dreams, can you bend a
hanger into the shape of an iPod?
Jeffrey P. McEvoy of
Middletown, Md., said he has
twice removed cellphones from
storm drains. The first time was
when his daughter’s flip phone
went down the drain in front of
Volt Restaurant in Frederick, Md.
“I used a tire iron to take off the
large, heavy manhole cover, and
climbed down into the large
drain myself in my Sunday
clothes, much to the amusement
of the Volt staff,” Jeffrey wrote.
Not too long after that, Jeffrey
was leaving his Frederick office
when he came upon a very
distressed young couple
agonizing over a storm drain that
had just swallowed a cellphone.
“Out came the tire iron, off
came the manhole cover,” he
wrote. “And then the muscular
boyfriend and I took his petite
girlfriend — the only one of the
three of us small enough for the
task — by the ankles and lowered
her headfirst into the storm
drain.”
When they lifted her out, she
had the cellphone in hand.
Jeffrey is an attorney in
Frederick, but I think his real
skill lies elsewhere. We have
plenty of lawyers, but how many
cellphone sewer retrievers do we
have?
Helping Hand
We are off to a great start to this
year’s Washington Post Helping
Hand campaign. I’m heartened
by the response to the stories I’ve
shared so far about Bright
Beginnings, N Street Village and
So Others Might Eat, our three
charity partners. Let’s keep the
momentum going!
You can learn more about the
work they do and make a taxdeductible donation by visiting
PostHelpingHand.com.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/people/john-kelly.
‘I can be their voice,’ Comstock says of Hill victims
COMSTOCK FROM B1
Dec. 7 hearing in the Committee
on House Administration.
The current system has allowed
sexual harassment to continue
without consequences for the perpetrators, Speier said.
Speier introduced the Me Too
Congress Act, or the Member and
Employee Training and Oversight
On Congress Act, to allow complaints to be made anonymously
and prohibit nondisclosure agreements as a condition of initiating a
complaint.
It would also take final approval
of settlements out of the hands of
committee leaders, who currently
must sign off on these agreements.
“This is a cultural revolution,”
Speier said in a phone interview.
The issue comes as Comstock
faces a tough reelection in 2018
and is working to cement a brand
distinct from President Trump,
who polls show is unpopular with
the suburban female voters who
are a significant voting bloc in her
Northern Virginia district.
Although Democrats have criticized her for not denouncing more
of Trump’s actions, Comstock was
among the first lawmakers to call
for then-candidate Trump to drop
out in October 2016 after he was
heard in the “Access Hollywood”
video bragging about groping
women. Since then, a tidal wave of
stories about sexual abuse and
harassment has washed through
the media, Hollywood and Capitol
Hill, implicating a variety of powerful men from television host
Charlie Rose and journalist Mark
Halperin to Hollywood producer
Harvey Weinstein and actor Kevin
Spacey.
Congress is grappling with
what to do if Roy Moore, the Senate candidate accused of initiating
sexual contact with teenagers as
young as 14, wins an Alabama
special election next month.
Former staffers of Rep. John
Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) have accused him of unwanted sexual advances, and Sen. Al Franken (DMinn.) has apologized after a
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
LOC AL D I GE S T
VIRGINIA
Indictment on murder
charge in hit-and-run
A man has been indicted on
murder charges in the April hitand-run killing of a woman who
might have been intentionally
struck in Fairfax County, police
said.
A Fairfax County grand jury
returned the indictment against
Kenan Ozcan, 32, of Fairfax this
month in the death of Maria
Ascencio, 75, of Fairfax, police
said. Ozcan has been in custody
since shortly after the incident.
Police said Ascencio was
crossing Rugby Road near
Route 50 at about 10:15 a.m.
April 14 when a Dodge Dart
struck her and then turned
around and struck her a second
time before fleeing. Ascencio was
pronounced dead at the scene.
A couple of hours later, officers
were called to a shopping center
in the 3900 block of Fair Ridge
Road for a report of a man acting
strangely, police said. The man
became agitated after a woman
took a picture of him and he
assaulted her, police said.
As the officers investigated,
one noticed damage to the front
end of the man’s car, police said.
Officers determined that Ozcan
had been involved in the earlier
hit-and-run, and he was taken
into custody.
Police said Ozcan didn’t know
the victim.
by police as Glenis Brown, Aleisha
Greenwood, Latasha Lawson and
Stephanie Winter.
— Dana Hedgpeth
MARYLAND
Trainer accused of
texting nude photo
A volunteer sports trainer for a
girls basketball team in Prince
George’s County has been
arrested in connection with the
texting of a full-body photo of
himself, naked, to a high school
student, according to police.
Carl Joseph, 26, of Baltimore,
has been charged with
solicitation of a minor and
displaying obscene nude pictures,
according to Prince George’s
County police.
Joseph was a volunteer trainer
and worked at Gwynn Park High
School in Brandywine for one of
the girls’ basketball teams, police
said. He does not work for the
Prince George’s County School
system, police said.
Online court records did not
list an attorney for Joseph.
A student who knew of the
photo reported it to a teacher,
police said. Prince George’s
County school security officials
notified the police, who
conducted an investigation.
Authorities ask anyone with
information about the case to call
301-772-4930 or 866-411-TIPS
(8477).
— Justin Juvenal
— Lynh Bui
Women allegedly stole
over $29,000 in goods
Funeral procession
for Baltimore officer
The four women hailed from
New York. Over the weekend, they
stole more than $29,000 in items
from more than a dozen different
stores at Tysons Corner Center,
authorities said.
Fairfax County police said the
four women might be part of an
“organized crime group that is
hitting stores across the country.”
The county police department
has a specialized group of officers,
known as its Christmas AntiTheft Team (CATT) that tracks
thieves at area malls during the
holiday season. Last year, the
CATT recovered over $315,000 in
stolen property and seized assets,
officials said.
This weekend’s group of
women stole items from at least
13 different stores at the mall,
police said. They did not say what
items were taken.
The four were charged with 23
felony and three misdemeanor
charges related to the thefts,
police said. They were identified
All main northbound lanes of
Interstate 95 north of downtown
Baltimore will be closed to traffic
for at least an hour midday
Wednesday as the funeral
procession for Baltimore
Detective Sean Suiter moves
between the city and a cemetery
in Timonium.
Rolling closures also will affect
the outer loop of Interstate 695,
the Baltimore Beltway, state
highway officials said.
Crowds of police officers and
other mourners are expected to
attend services at Mount Pleasant
Church and Ministries, 6000
Radecke Ave., about seven miles
north of Baltimore’s Inner
Harbor. The service is expected to
run from about 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
The procession is expected to
depart the church at about
1:30 p.m., and the Maryland State
Highway Administration warns
that motorists “should expect
major midday delays.”
— Peter Hermann
Rep. Barbara Comstock (R-Va.), second from right, has co-sponsored a resolution on anti-harassment training.
woman alleged that he groped her
during a 2006 United Service Organizations tour.
For all these reasons, Rep. Jamie B. Raskin (D-Md.), who also
sits on the House Administration
Committee and is co-sponsoring
the Speier-Comstock resolution,
likened the moment to a radical
culture shift.
“It should just be an unthinkable thing,” he said.
Asked about Conyers, the
longest-serving member of Congress, Raskin said the age of looking the other way is over.
“That is going to be a very painful process for people who are
used to the old norms,” he said in a
phone interview. “Some people’s
careers are going to end in a much
different way that they had perhaps expected.”
Comstock said she and former
Democratic congresswoman Donna F. Edwards of Maryland commiserated about the “everyday
sexism” and particular challenges
of being the only women in their
state’s House delegations. Comstock said her colleagues in the
regional delegation treat her differently than her male predecessors, something she attributes to
subtle sexism.
Yet Comstock, a former congressional intern, staffer and
counsel before becoming a member herself in 2015, said she was
shocked to read media reports
about years of abuse that Fox
News chief executive Roger Ailes,
who died this year, perpetrated
against women she knew, Laurie
Luhn and Kellie Boyle.
Stories of sexual harassment on
Capitol Hill are particularly disheartening for the congresswoman who started a summer program
to mentor young women in her
district.
“You come in, you’re excited,
you’ve been in the top of your
class, and you’re idealistic and
you’ve worked and volunteered,
and now you’re here to work for
your congressman, who’s an icon,”
Comstock said. “And you’re told
when you go home, ‘Well, everyone knows any young woman in
that office is there because you’re
sleeping with him.’ ”
Before the hearing earlier this
month, Comstock called Dorena
Bertussi, who filed the first successful harassment complaint in
1988.
“She just was really strong and
inspiring to talk to in real life,” she
said. “Wow, 30 years ago, that
would be hard to have stood up
and done all that and faced that.”
Comstock said she hopes to be
able to represent women who
have faced abuse but don’t yet feel
comfortable coming forward.
“For the people who can’t fight
back, I feel I can,” she said. “For the
person who’s afraid to say it, I can
be their voice.”
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
Jealous to run with ex-DNC vice chair
Hogan unveils competing
paid-sick-leave measure
Gubernatorial hopeful
picks Susan Turnbull for
lieutenant governor slot
BY
O VETTA W IGGINS
Maryland gubernatorial candidate Ben Jealous has chosen Susan W. Turnbull, a Democratic
stalwart who has held local, state
and national positions in the party, as his running mate in the
crowded June 26 primary.
The former NAACP president
is the first of the eight Democratic
candidates to announce his pick
for lieutenant governor. He said
he selected Turnbull, a former
vice chair of the Democratic National Committee and former
chair of the state Democratic Parheavily Democratic Montgomery
ty, because the two share a comCounty, provides a geographical
mitment to bringing people from
balance to Jealous, who has lived
diverse backgrounds together to
mostly in the Baltimore region
address the major problems facand, as the former president of
ing the state, including health
the NAACP, spent considerable
care, the opioid crisis and gun
time in Baltimore City.
violence.
Turnbull’s
selection
“Susan is a master
also offers Jealous, who is
coalition builder,” Jealseen as a party outsider, a
ous said. “Not long ago
tie to the Democratic eswe were getting big
tablishment. Jealous was
things done in Marya strong supporter of U.S.
land. And we can get
Sen. Bernie Sanders
back to doing big things
(I-Vt.) during the 2016
again by building a copresidential campaign
alition of Marylanders Susan W.
and has been endorsed by
that goes across the Turnbull
Sanders, U.S. Sen. Cory
lines of rural versus urBooker (D-N.J.) and Our
ban, black versus white and
Revolution, a progressive group
Christian versus Jewish.”
Sanders formed after his presiNeither Jealous, 44, nor Turndential run.
bull, 65, have held elected office.
“While Ben and I come from
Turnbull, a longtime resident of
different places, we wind up at
the same place: being the voice
for people who haven’t had a
voice,” Turnbull said. “You need to
pull together all kinds of groups
to solve problems.”
Turnbull has strong ties to the
Jewish community in Montgomery, a population that Gov. Larry
Hogan (R) has heavily courted
over the past year.
She has held leadership positions with Jewish Women International and the Jewish Council
for Public Affairs, advised elected
officials from city councils to the
White House and co-founded
Emerge Maryland, which recruits
and trains Democratic women to
run for office.
“I’ve worked in lots of roles,”
Turnbull said. “I can pick up the
phone and call anyone in our
state and get a call back.”
Under the main policy at issue,
bathrooms and locker rooms
should be available to students
according to their gender identity,
and alternatives are provided for
students who are uncomfortable.
The policy also covers topics involving privacy, preferred names,
dress codes for major events and
participation in sports teams.
Brad Young, president of the
Frederick County Board of Education, said Tuesday that he and
other officials were pleased that
the suit had been withdrawn and
would defend the policy again if
other legal action arose.
The case, filed in U.S. District
Court in Maryland, was dismissed
Nov. 6 without prejudice. Future
complaints could be filed by the
same parties or by others.
“We’re certainly happy to be
out of litigation and be able to go
back to what we are here for,
which is focusing on educating
our students,” Young said.
The policy adopted in June formalizes much of what Frederick
school officials say they were already doing on key issues such as
restrooms. Supporters say the official, written policy adds clarity
and will increase compliance.
Young said the board is concerned about all students who
may feel uncomfortable at school,
including students like the plaintiff. “We will do whatever we can
to make all of our students feel
welcome and safe and affirmed,”
he said.
The turn in the case was
cheered by James van Kuilenburg,
a 12th-grade transgender student
who led fellow students and other
allies in a push for the new policy.
“When everyone heard it was
dismissed, there was a big, collective sigh of relief,” van Kuilenburg
said. “It was scary to see something we were all so proud and
grateful to have might be gone.”
The Frederick effort started after the Trump administration revoked Obama-era guidance that
said transgender students have
the right to use public school
restrooms that match their gender identity.
“This policy is like a promise
from the school system to protect
every student, not just transgender students,” van Kuilenburg
said. “It gives all students the
freedom to be themselves in
school.”
After the lawsuit was filed, other groups filed motions to intervene in support of the county
school system. They included the
American Civil Liberties Union of
Maryland; FreeState Justice, an
LGBT advocacy organization; and
the Frederick County Teachers Association. The suit was dropped
shortly afterward.
donna.stgeorge@washpost.com
backdrop of golf resorts, McMansions and seemingly affluent conditions.”
The study, “Getting Ahead: The
Uneven Opportunity Landscape
in Northern Virginia,” found that,
overwhelmingly, it is those of
color who live in poorer neighborhoods. And these neighborhoods, despite their proximity to
resources and wealth, shape residents’ health and education outcomes.
The average life expectancy of
a child born in an affluent census
tract can be as much as 18 years
more than those in the poorest,
according to the report, ranging
from 71 to 89 years across Northern Virginia.
“Neighborhoods with lower
life expectancy tend to have other
poor health outcomes, including
not only illnesses and injuries
among children and adolescents,
but also higher rates of physical
disease, mental illness and pre-
mature death among adults — as
well as higher health-care costs to
treat these conditions,” the study
states.
A census tract has an average
of about 4,000 people, according
to the U.S. Census Bureau. The
portion of Northern Virginia included in the report has 513
census tracts.
In one Fairfax County tract, in
the Lake Barcroft neighborhood,
78 percent of residents have at
least a college degree, and more
than 80 percent of its 3- and
4-year-olds are enrolled in
school.
But in the neighboring Baileys
Crossroads census tract, 14 percent of residents have at least a
college degree, and virtually no
children ages 3 and 4 are enrolled
in school, the report says.
The report states that Hispanics and African Americans comprise 17 percent and 11 percent of
Northern Virginians, respective-
ly, yet minorities are often clustered into some of the region’s
poorest areas.
In a low-income tract of Arlandria, at the Alexandria and Arlington County line, 25 percent of
the population is Hispanic, and
42 percent black. In the Southern
Towers community in Alexandria, 72 percent of the population
is black. High housing costs make
it difficult for residents to leave
lower-income areas, according to
the report.
The report also found that
Asian Americans tended to live in
tracts that were more affluent
than those of other minorities.
For example, the Brambleton
area of Loudoun County is one of
the 20 wealthiest tracts in Northern Virginia, with a median
household income of $198,680. In
that tract, Asians make up 46 percent of the population, and
whites account for 40 percent.
Woolf said solutions to close
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
Suit against school transgender policy is dropped
D ONNA S T. G EORGE
A Maryland family that sued
over school measures to protect
transgender
students
has
dropped the lawsuit, citing stress
and potential humiliation that
stemmed from the legal action.
That means a district policy
described by advocates as among
the most progressive in the state
will remain intact.
The legal battle started after
the school board in Frederick
County, an exurb of Washington,
voted in June to adopt a comprehensive policy on school practices
that affect transgender students.
The board’s action was hailed
by supporters as an important
step at a time of fear and uncertainty. But critics in Frederick
County also spoke out, and a lawsuit was filed in August on behalf
of an unnamed 15-year-old girl
and her mother.
The lawsuit argued that the
policy violated the teenager’s
right to bodily privacy, saying she
fears for her safety and feels humiliated to undress in front of
“the opposite sex.” It also claimed
that her mother’s parental rights
to control her child’s upbringing
were violated, and at points made
references to totalitarian regimes
and Nazi death camps.
In asking that the case be withdrawn, the family’s lawyers said in
court documents that the teenager was exposed to “tremendous
stress and potential humiliation”
for bringing the case and that she
worried about being identified by
name at school or falsely maligned.
She came home from school in
tears one day after learning of a
newspaper interview in which
she felt she was portrayed as seeking to disrupt the education of
transgender students by “taking
away their right to be treated with
dignity,” the documents said.
The teenager “treats all people
with dignity, and has never been
and is in fact not discriminatory,
and has instead sought to defend
and protect her own privacy and
speech rights,” the court filing
said. “However, she does not believe that she can continue to
prosecute her case without an
increase in anxiety and fear of loss
of her privacy.”
The family’s attorney, Dan Cox,
an unsuccessful Republican candidate for Congress last year,
echoed those points in an interview Tuesday. “She felt bullied
with some of the negativity she
read in the paper,” he said.
Cox condemned the board policy, calling it a “radical change to
school practices” and suggesting
that Frederick County parents
will be watching closely to see
how it is implemented.
VIRGINIA
Pockets of poverty exist
amid a±uent counties
BY
P ERRY S TEIN
Northern Virginia boasts some
of the nation’s wealthiest counties, but nestled among the affluence are pockets of poverty with
an outsize effect on minority
residents, according to a new
report.
Loudoun County, the wealthiest in the country, boasts a median income of $122,238 and a
poverty rate of 4 percent. But in
one census tract near Leesburg,
20 percent of children live in
poverty, and just more than half
of residents have a high school
diploma.
The report, from Virginia Commonwealth University’s Center
on Society and Health and the
Northern Virginia Health Foundation, also examined data on the
city of Alexandria, as well as in
Arlington, Fairfax and Prince
William counties.
“Across this country, there has
been an increase in suburban
poverty, but the face of it looks
very different than what we are
used to seeing in urban and even
rural communities,” said Steven
Woolf, the lead author of the
study and director of the VCU
Center on Society and Health.
“This poverty exists against the
J OSH H ICKS
Maryland’s battle over requiring businesses to offer paid sick
leave entered a new phase Tuesday, with Gov. Larry Hogan (R)
proposing a less-generous alternative to a bill approved this
spring by the Democraticcontrolled state legislature.
Hogan vetoed that bill, which
would require businesses with at
least 15 employees to provide five
paid sick days a year and was
vocally opposed by parts of the
business community. Democratic
leaders say lawmakers will override the veto when the legislature
reconvenes in January.
But the bill passed the Senate
with exactly the number of votes
needed for an override, meaning
that the defection of even a single
lawmaker could leave Democrats
unable to enact the bill.
Hogan’s alternative proposal
would require businesses with at
least 25 employees to offer paid
sick leave, phasing in the rule
over three years by applying it to
companies of different sizes during that span. Businesses could
also get a waiver if they prove
that providing sick leave would
cause a significant financial
hardship.
The governor said he will propose legislation to create tax
credits for businesses with fewer
than 50 employees that provide
paid leave benefits. He said the
bill approved by the Democrats
would kill jobs and harm small
businesses and would also invade
workers’ privacy by requiring
them to tell employers why they
are requesting leave.
Democrats and advocates who
pushed for the 2017 bill said those
criticisms were unfounded, and
legislative leaders said they are
confident they have the votes to
keep the bill in place.
“We’re going to override the
governor’s veto in January,” said
Del. Luke H. Clippinger (D-Baltimore City), who sponsored the
vetoed measure. “We’re on the
right side of this issue.”
Five states and several cities
and counties, including the District, require businesses to provide paid sick leave.
Senate Finance Committee
Chair Thomas M. Middleton (DCharles) said the Democratic bill
is “not as anti-business as the
governor says it is. . . . What I
hear from advocates is that everyone who voted for the bill is
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Del. Luke H. Clippinger
(D-Baltimore City)
Hogan said his new plan is
based in part on findings from a
work group he created in May to
study how mandatory sick leave
would affect employers and
workers.
Advocates accused him of trying to weaken worker protections
while still showing voters that he
supports popular ideas ahead of
the 2018 election. “It strikes me
as a political stunt to muddy the
waters and confuse voters,” said
Maryland Working Families director Charly Carter.
A
Washington
PostUniversity of Maryland poll this
year found overwhelming support in Maryland for paid sick
leave.
Eighty-four percent of respondents approved of requiring the
benefit for businesses with at
least 15 workers, while 87 percent
backed such a mandate for businesses with at least 50 employees.
Additionally, 78 percent said they
would support tax benefits for
businesses with fewer than 50
workers that provide paid sick
leave.
josh.hicks@washpost.com
the disparities have to come from
the private and public sectors.
Basic needs — such as food,
housing and health care — must
be addressed, he said, as should
better access to employment and
education. Investments in infrastructure and public safety would
also help lift the region’s poorest
residents, the study says.
Woolf was critical of the Republican tax plan being hammered out, joining the plan’s
detractors, who say that it would
benefit big businesses and hurt
the nation’s most vulnerable people, including in Northern Virginia.
“We think there are business
opportunities in trying to invest
in improving these conditions,”
he said. “The government can do
more. I think the current direction that the government is taking is the opposite of what we
need.”
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Hogan introduced a measure
this year that would have required businesses with at least 50
employees to provide paid sick
days, with a tax incentive for
smaller businesses that agreed to
follow suit. The bill, which Hogan
said was the first sick-leave plan
proposed by a Republican governor, never moved out of committee.
Middleton said he is open to
discussing Hogan’s proposal for
providing tax credits to offset the
costs of providing paid sick leave.
“But if you give a tax credit, you
have to reduce services or find
additional sources of revenue,
and I don’t think there’s much
appetite for those things,” he
said.
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.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Family says man shot by
Park Police was unarmed
POLICE FROM B1
Ghaisar’s family said he had no
weapons in his vehicle. “The reason for the murder of our son has
yet to be determined,” the family
said, “though no reasoning could
possibly justify the actions of the
one or more Park Police officers
involved in this unthinkable act.”
The Park Police initially handled the investigation of the
shooting but last week turned the
case over to the FBI “in the
interest of objectivity.”
Authorities also have not released the names of two Park
Police officers involved in the
incident, nor have they shared
details of the initial traffic accident or final traffic stop. It is also
unclear whether one or both officers fired and whether a U.S.
attorney or Justice Department
officials will rule on whether the
shooting was
justifiable. Under
Virginia
law, Park Police
officers have
jurisdiction in
the Northern
Virginia counties
outside
Washington,
Bijan C.
not just parks
Ghaisar
territory.
The family’s statement said
Ghaisar, “a first-generation,
American-born citizen of Iranian heritage, was peaceful and
avidly anti-violence. He was unarmed. He presented no threat to
anyone.”
Negeen Ghaisar, Ghaisar’s older sister, said the family has been
given no information about any
aspect of the incident, from the
reported hit-and-run to the
shooting. “Nothing,” she said.
The shooting occurred in the
district of Rep. Don Beyer (D),
who said Tuesday that “the
death of Bijan Ghaisar has been
shrouded in an unacceptable
level of opacity. While I recognize that the matter is subject to
an ongoing investigation, the
public, particularly his family
and friends, deserve to know
what happened here, and I will
continue pressing the Park Police and the FBI until we get
those answers.”
The family’s statement expressed their hope that the FBI
investigation “will uncover what
happened and permit justice for
our son.” The shooting apparently was captured on in-car video by
two Fairfax County police officers
who were following the Park Police officers. The footage has apparently been turned over to the
FBI. The Park Police do not have
in-car or body-worn cameras, a
spokesman said.
Ghaisar attended Great Falls
Elementary School and Cooper
Middle School and then played
lacrosse at Langley High, graduating from there in 2010. His
sister said he was popular there
and was voted “Most Adorably
Clueless” by his class. He attended the University of Alabama for
one year, then transferred to Vir-
ginia Commonwealth University.
He graduated in 2015 with a
bachelor’s degree in accounting.
He worked with his father, James
C. Ghaisar, at the accounting firm
Caesar & Associates in McLean.
Bijan Ghaisar was a sports fan
who was “obsessed” with the New
England Patriots and attended
many
Washington
Wizards
games, said his sister, his only
sibling. His parents immigrated
to America decades ago, Negeen
Ghaisar said. Ghaisar’s grandfather was a police chief in Iran, she
said, and “we had a lot of respect
for police officers. Bij definitely
did. We’re all very patriotic people in my family. We always
believed in the system.”
With the case in the hands of
federal authorities, a decision
on charges and the release of
information about the incident
may take some time. After a
Fairfax County police officer
shot an unarmed man, John
Geer, in August 2013, the case
was turned over to federal authorities in January 2014. But
even with a grand jury involved
and police files released to the
Geer family, Justice Department
officials and the U.S. attorney’s
office in Alexandria did not
make any moves on the case
before Fairfax Commonwealth’s
Attorney Raymond Morrogh impaneled a special grand jury in
July 2015 and indicted the officer for murder, almost two years
after the shooting.
Negeen Ghaisar said that
members of the Park Police and
FBI, while revealing nothing
about the case, “have all been
very kind to us. I’m hoping that
they will be able to bring justice
for Bij.” She said her brother was
“very upbeat, full of positivity. He
had the biggest laugh, the biggest
smile. He’s the best person I’ve
ever known.”
The known details of the case
are few. Park Police said a hitand-run accident occurred at
George Washington Parkway and
Slaters Lane about 7:30 p.m. on
Nov. 17. A lookout for the Jeep
was broadcast, and a Park Police
officer soon spotted the vehicle
heading south on the parkway
and pursued it at 59 mph, according to radio transmissions captured by Broadcastify. A Fairfax
County officer then followed the
pursuit, according to the police
radio transmissions.
Park Police declined to specify
the route of the pursuit, but it
ended 11 minutes later with
Ghaisar’s Jeep on the side of
Alexandria Avenue at Fort Hunt
Road, witnesses said. At
7:41 p.m., the Fairfax officer radioed, “We’re at Fort Hunt and
Alexandria roads. The Park Police
are firing shots.” What sound like
gunshots can be heard in the
background. The Fairfax officer
called for an ambulance a moment later.
Ghaisar died Monday night at
Inova Fairfax Hospital, 10 days
after the shooting. He was born at
the same hospital, his family said.
tom.jackman@washpost.com
EZ
B5
RE
obituaries
W. MARVIN WATSON JR., 93
Trusted
adviser
to Lyndon
Johnson
BY MATT SCHUDEL
W. Marvin Watson Jr., a Texas
businessman who became one of
President Lyndon B. Johnson’s
most loyal confidants, served as his
chief of staff in all but name and
held the Cabinet position of postmaster general, died Nov. 26 at his
home in the Woodlands, Tex., near
Houston. He was 93.
The cause was not immediately
known, said a son, Lee Watson.
Mr. Watson recalled being
drawn to Johnson’s imposing personality from the moment they met
in 1948, when the future president
was campaigning for a U.S. Senate
seat.
It was in Waco, Tex., Mr. Watson
recalled, and Johnson made an indelible impression by circling the
city by helicopter — a novelty at the
time — then tossing out his Stetson
hat for the watchful crowd to race
after. Mr. Watson, a World War II
veteran studying business at Baylor University in Waco, was among
the horde.
“He radiated enormous energy,
more so than I have observed in
any other person before or since,”
Mr. Watson said in his 2004 memoir, “Chief of Staff,” written with
another former Johnson aide,
Sherwin Markman.
The strong connection was mutual. Johnson once called Mr. Watson “the most efficient man I have
ever known” and described him as
being “as wise as my father, gentle
as my mother and loyal to my side
as Lady Bird.”
Johnson rose to Senate majority
leader in the 1950s, was tapped as
John F. Kennedy’s running mate in
1960 and became president after
Kennedy’s assassination in 1963.
Meanwhile, Mr. Watson became
executive assistant to the president
of the Lone Star Steel Co. in Dallas
and a behind-the-scenes force in
Texas Democratic politics.
Mr. Watson was little known
outside Texas when Johnson invited him to join the White House
staff in January 1965, months after
the president’s first chief of staff,
Walter Jenkins, resigned after being arrested during a sexual encounter with another man.
Mr. Watson was a Southern Baptist deacon who neither drank nor
danced, as Time magazine reported, and “invariably wears a vest and
a buttoned-up air of rectitude.” Unlike other Washington operators
on the move, he deflected press
attention, telling a New York Times
reporter that he had “very little
power of decision. I try to remember that that’s a fact.”
Despite his modest title of appointments secretary, he became a
YOICHI OKAMOTO/LBJ PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY
President Lyndon Johnson, left, reads news from a ticker tape machine next to W. Marvin Watson Jr.
quiet power broker in his own
right, wielding enormous influence over the president’s schedule,
daily briefings, and political and
judicial appointments. Occupying
the office closest to the president’s,
Mr. Watson often worked 18-hour
days and was Johnson’s liaison to
the FBI and to Democratic operatives throughout the country and
on Capitol Hill. He was described
by the Times as “one of the least
known but most important men in
Washington.”
A conservative Democrat who
never ran for elective office, Mr.
Watson was not considered an architect of Johnson’s major legislative policies on civil rights and expansive social programs that came
to be called the Great Society. Instead, he seemed content to serve
as the president’s gatekeeper, or
Johnson’s “bureaucrat par excellence,” as historian Robert Dallek
wrote in his Johnson biography
“Flawed Giant.”
After helping during the 1960
campaign, Mr. Watson gained
Johnson’s trust by managing the
day-to-day details of the 1964 Democratic National Convention. He
took credit for blocking the influence of Kennedy loyalists he suspected of plotting to nominate
Johnson’s rival, Attorney General
Robert F. Kennedy, the assassinated president’s brother, in a
convention-floor coup.
No detail escaped Mr. Watson’s
discerning eye. While working at
the White House, he established
strict standards of accountability,
not all of which were popular.
“Responding to Johnson’s insistence on a leakproof administration,” Dallek wrote, Mr. Watson “required that White House operators
record all incoming and outgoing
calls, including the names of the
parties speaking to each other. He
insisted that White House chauffeurs report on the destination of
any staff member using official
transportation.”
Presidential foreign policy adviser McGeorge Bundy protested
the watchdog system in a memo to
Johnson, and political columnists
Rowland Evans and Robert Novak
exposed what they called Mr. Watson’s “gumshoe tactics” in 1966.
The practices were quickly
stopped.
Another time, after Johnson
casually remarked that he would
like to build a wall to keep nosy
reporters at bay, Mr. Watson ordered masons to start building a
barrier between the Executive Office Building and the White House.
Other members of the administration canceled the project.
Mr. Watson was a strong
behind-the-scenes force who
pushed several Kennedy holdovers
out of the administration. In his
memoir, Mr. Watson said he either
fired or helped engineer the dismissals of such top White House
advisers as Bundy, Richard Goodwin, Robert E. Kintner and press
secretary Bill Moyers.
After three years as de facto chief
of staff, Mr. Watson was appointed
postmaster general in April 1968,
serving in what was then a Cabinet
position until Johnson left office
the following January.
The teetotaling Mr. Watson tried
to shun the Washington party set,
but his proximity to the president
put him in constant demand. “In
this Administration, the next best
thing to getting invited to the
White House is a summons to socialize with Presidential Assistant
Marvin Watson,” Washington Post
society columnist Maxine Cheshire
wrote in 1968. “You can be almost
certain that President and Mrs.
Johnson are going to drop by before the evening is over.”
William Marvin Watson Jr. was
born in Oakhurst, Tex., on June 6,
1924. His father was an auto dealer.
A talented saxophonist in his
youth, Mr. Watson won a music
scholarship to Baylor but left to
serve in the Marine Corps during
World War II. After his discharge,
he reentered Baylor on the GI Bill
and received a bachelor’s degree
and then a master’s degree in economics in 1950.
While in college, he married
Marion Baugh. Besides his wife, of
the Woodlands, survivors include
three children, Lee Watson of Austin, Kimberly Rathmann of Cypress, Tex., and W. Marvin Watson
III of the Woodlands; four grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.
Mr. Watson managed the chamber of commerce in Daingerfield,
Tex., before becoming an executive
with Lone Star Steel, a company
that fired workers during a wildcat
strike in 1957.
When he worked in the Johnson
White House, Mr. Watson lobbied
in favor of certain pro-labor positions, despite being viewed by
some as a strikebreaker in his earlier life. “I’m for organized labor,” he
said, when pressed by a Times reporter in 1967. “I have never been
against organized labor.”
In 1969, Mr. Watson returned to
Texas and ran international operations of the Occidental petroleum
company. In 1976, he pleaded guilty
to a misdemeanor charge of trying
to cover up illegal contributions by
Occidental’s chairman, Armand
Hammer, to Richard M. Nixon’s
1972 reelection campaign.
Mr. Watson later held top positions with technology and pharmaceutical companies and was president of Dallas Baptist University
from 1979 to 1987. He served on the
boards of corporate, legal and religious organizations.
During his years at the White
House, Mr. Watson was known for
his mastery of detail. No job was
too small or too demeaning.
In a Post review of Mr. Watson’s
memoir, Ted Van Dyk, who had
been a member of Hubert H. Humphrey’s vice-presidential staff,
wrote that his office in the Executive Office Building “overlooked
the rear windows of the Oval Office
and the meshed-fence area behind
it in which LBJ’s beagles, Him and
Her, often frolicked.”
One day, either Him or Her — it
was impossible to know from a
distance — managed to jump over
the fence and run onto the White
House lawn toward the Ellipse.
“Johnson must have seen the
same thing I did,” Van Dyk wrote.
“Moments later Watson, wearing a
gray suit and vest and black wingtip shoes, broke running from the
West Wing basement door in the
direction the escaped beagle had
taken. Some 10 minutes later he
returned, sweating and rumpled,
carrying Johnson’s dog in his
arms.”
matt.schudel@washpost.com
Owned and Operated by
Professional Engineers since 1993
COURTLAND MILLOY
Tide may be beginning to turn for media diversity
MILLOY FROM B1
other areas, and black
journalists who were
experienced with diversity in the
media had been overlooked.
But one hire hardly makes a
dent in the problem that
troubles Prince the most.
More than 230,000
newspaper jobs were lost
between 2001 and 2016, more
than half of the industry’s
employment, according to the
Bureau of Labor Statistics. The
recession and the shift to digital
media contributed to significant
job losses for everyone, but
journalists of color were
disproportionately affected.
Between 1997 and 2013, the
number of black journalists
working at daily newspapers in
the country dropped 40 percent,
according to the American
Society of News Editors. That
represented a loss of almost
1,200 black journalists — from
2,946 in 1997 to 1,754 in 2013.
The rate of job losses for
white journalists was
34 percent, ASNE said. And in
the past 16 years, the ranks of
Hispanic and Asian journalists
have also declined, losing
13 percent and 2 percent,
respectively.
Nevertheless, whites still
make up more than 80 percent
of the nation’s newsroom
workforce, even though the
country is roughly 40 percent
people of color.
Among the nation’s growing
cadre of media watchdogs,
Prince stands alone with a
singular, 24/7 focus on making
newsrooms more diverse and
improving the coverage of
people of color, no matter what.
His interest in the issue dates
to the late ’60s, soon after his
graduation from New York
University. Newspapers in urban
areas throughout the country
were suddenly in need of black
reporters to cover riots.
In 1972, four years after
joining the Post’s local staff,
Prince and other black reporters
presented executive editor Ben
Bradlee with a memo containing
20 questions for him to answer.
Among the questions: Why
were there no black assignment
editors on the foreign, national,
sports, financial and style desks?
Why only one black reporter
assigned to the national desk?
Not satisfied with Bradlee’s
response, the group filed a racial
discrimination complaint with
the U.S. Equal Employment
Commission.
The commission found that
the reporters had grounds to
pursue the case in D.C. federal
court, but they lacked to funds
to pay an attorney.
Still, the reporters had made
their point.
Over the next few years, more
black reporters would be hired
— and some even promoted into
management. During the Great
Recession, however, newspapers
were especially hard-hit. After a
few rounds of buyouts, layoffs
and a hiring freeze, many of
those gains were erased.
Prince, who had returned to
The Post as a copy editor on the
foreign desk, was among those
who left.
But not for long. He had more
questions.
In May, he wrote an article for
Journal-isms headlined, “Where
Are the Black and Brown
Journalists Probing Trump?”
And he got answers, one from
Dean Baquet, executive editor of
Between 1997 and 2013,
the number of black
journalists working at
daily newspapers in the
country dropped
40 percent, according to
the American Society of
News Editors.
the New York Times, that
illustrate the complexities of
race and the media that Prince
wrangles with every day.
“There are not enough
investigative reporters who
happen to be African American
or Latino,” replied Baquet, who
is black.
When Prince asked what the
Times was doing to “increase
the pipeline of investigative
reporters,” Baquet wrote, “I
should point out three Black
editors — me, [national editor]
Marc Lacey and [deputy
international editor] Greg
Winter are deeply involved in
Trump Coverage.”
Scott Wilson, then-national
editor of The Washington Post,
also gave an upbeat answer,
emailing Prince to say that
diversity in the newsroom “is
well-represented on some of the
biggest beats and assignments
by African American and Latino
reporters.”
The Post does fare better on
diversity than any of its large
competitors.
Sixty-eight percent of the staff
is white, while journalists of
color make up 31 percent of the
staff. At both the New York
Times and the Wall Street
Journal, journalists of color
make up 18 percent of the staff.
Yet the answers from editors
at the nation’s top two
newspapers were thoughtprovoking, and they would
provide more grist for Prince to
probe how the media deals with
racial issues in the Age of
Trump.
“There were lots of stories
about the oppressed white
working class believing Trump
had the cure for their economic
woes,” Prince said.
“The black working class sure
didn’t believe it, but nobody
asked them.”
courtland.milloy@washpost.com
To read previous columns, go to
washingtonpost.com/milloy.
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EZ
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
BENNETT
BUTLER
DEATH NOTICE
FERGUSON
DOROTHY ELAINE BENNETT
BARBARA FERGUSON
Nov. 29, 1935 – Nov. 30, 2016
Happy Birthday & Love
Jim, Donna, Erin, Shannon
Passed away on Tuesday,
November 21, 2017. She is survived by her devoted children,
Pamela Skinner, Darryl, John,
India, Marc and Jeffery Butler
and Lynnette Gosa; siblings,
Patsy Newman, Middleton Russell, Henrietta Wherry and Deborah Moses;
15 grandchildren; 23 great grandchildren and
a host of relatives and friends. Visitation on
Friday, December 1, 2017 from 9 a.m. until
time of service 11 a.m. at Southern Friendship
Missionary Baptist Church 4444 Old Branch
Avenue, Temple Hills, MD. Interment is private.
www.briscoe-tonicfuneralhome.com
FLETCHER
FINDLEY
SHIRLEY L. BUTLER
Brian, Michael and Shawn
IN MEMORIAM
MACNABB
SANDY MACNABB
"Ode to Sandy MacNabb"
When I first met him I was impressed from the
start,
A jovial prankster who was way, way too smart.
He sized up everyone with little more than a
look,
The same was true here, he read me like a
book.
COMER
We hit it off from the start, from the very first
day,
And it didn’t take long before work came our
way.
We managed to win when no one thought that
we could,
As a team Sandy and I were far more than just
good.
Samoa and Indian country and even Scientology,
Failure and defeat were not part of his biology.
No matter how bad it got he was there at my
side,
Unabashedly pumping me with advice and with
pride.
I faced death threats and bombs and didn’t
think I could bear it,
But there was Sandy playing opera and lifting
my spirit.
He was kind to my family, my sons and my
daughters,
I confess that at times I revered him like a
father.
It’s hard to believe its been over a year,
Since he walked on from the midst of those he
held dear.
I’m sure St. Peter threw the heavenly gates
open wide,
Eager to welcome Sandy MacNabb inside.
His troubles are over and long since have been,
As for me I still miss him, my mentor, my friend.
Joseph P. O’Leary
Baraga County Prosecuting Attorney
Keweenaw Bay, Michigan
IRVING COMER
Peacefully on November 23, 2017 in Arlington,
VA. Survived by two daughters, Pamela Comer
Anderson and Angela Comer; mother, Mary
Ruth Comer; four sisters, Cynthia Turnage,
Robin White, Tammy Middleton and Deborah
Comer; one brother, Jerome Comer; five grandchildren and a longtime companion, Frankie
Long. Family will receive friends Friday, December 1 from 10 a.m. until time of service, 11:30
a.m. at Dale City Christian Church, 14022 Lindendale Rd., Woodbridge, VA 22193. Interment,
Monday, December 4, 11 a.m. at Quantico
National Cemetery. Online condolences:
www.joynesfuneralhome.com
Born February 17, 1928 in Torrington, CT, the
fourth child of Sallie Winslow and Martin Cummings. Passed away November 25, 2017.
He attended schools in Wallingford and Meriden, CT and spent two years at Quinnipiac
College before transpiring to George Washington University, Washington, DC where he
graduated in 1950.
He joined Payne Weber Jackson and Curtis
in Hartford working there until contracting
meningococcal meningitis in 1960- suffering
speech and locomotion loss his recuperation
took some months and he spent them at
his sister’s home at Andrew Air Force Base,
while there he met Dr. Robert Stevenson,
became his partner and they observed their
57th anniversary in Santa Fe this year.
In Washington, Martin was active in real estate
and was associated with J.F. Begg Co and Mary
White, Inc until he and Stevenson retired and
moved to Santa Fe, NM in 1993. In addition to
his partner he is survived by several nephews;
all of his siblings having predeceased him.
Cremation has taken place and according to
his wishes no funeral and memorial services
will be conducted. He asked that any remembrances take the form of local support for pet
neutering charities.
DeCORTE
MARILYN deGRUCHY DeCORTE
BROWN
HAROLD EUGENE BROWN
Entered into eternal rest on Sunday, November
19, 2017. Harold is survived by his loving companion, Bessie Martin; mother, Mary Taylor;
two daughters, Granada Brown and Kaeva
Keninard-Brown; one son, Harold Hine; eight
grandchildren, two sisters, Robin Dixon-Arroyo
(Osvaldo) and Terry Sutton (Michael); one
brother, Eric Brown (Ute); two uncles, Henry
"Dixon" Brown and David Brown (Ranee); a
host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends.
Mr. Brown will lie in state at Ebenezer AME
Church, 7707 Allentown Rd., Fort Washington,
MD, Friday, December 1 from 10 a.m. until
service at 11 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
DEMETRIOS JOHN GADONAS “Jim”
Passed away on Wednesday, the November
22, 2017 in Alexandria, VA. Born February
26, 1939 he was preceded in death by his
parents, John and Zoe Gadonas, sisters, Pauline
J. Gadonas, and Eugenia”Virginia” J. Gadonas.
Jim is survived by his two nephews, Gregory G.
Paspatis, and John D. Paspatis. A Visitation will
take place on Wednesday, November 29 from
5 to 8 p.m. with Trisagion prayers at EverlyWheatley Funeral Home. 1500 W. Braddock
Rd. Alexandria, VA 22302. Funeral services to
take place at St. Katherine’s Greek Orthodox
Church, 3149 Glen Carlyn Rd, Falls Church,
VA 22041, Thursday, November 30 at 12 p.m.
with interment to follow at Ivy Hill Cemetery,
Alexandria, VA.
GIGLIOTTI
GABRIELE GIGLIOTTI (Age 86)
Passed away peacefully in his home on November 23, 2017, after fighting a long battle with
Alzheimer’s Disease. He was born in Italy and
was a barber by trade in both his homeland,
as well as in Australia and the United States,
where he worked at the Pentagon for over
twenty years. He was a devoted husband and a
loving father.
He is preceded in death by his parents,
Francesco and Rosina Gigliotti, 6 sisters and 1
brother.
He is survived by his wife of 40 years, Petronilla;
his son Francesco (Rita); his brothers-in-law
Gildo Torchia (Margaret), and Tony Torchia;
sister-in-law Clelia Isaja (Benito); as well as
many nieces and nephews in the United States,
Italy and Australia.
In lieu of flowers memorial contributions can
be made to Cure Alzheimer’s Fund. For online
donations, a memorial page has been set up in
Gabriele’s name:
https://curealz.org/in-memory/gabrielegigliotti
Donations can also be made by check and sent
via mail to:
Cure Alzheimer's Fund
34 Washington St., Suite 200
Wellesley Hills, MA 02481
Please be sure to include Memorial:
Gabriele Gigliotti in the ‘memo.’
GRODIN
CUMMINGS
ARCHIBALD
GLORIA A. ARCHIBALD
GADONAS
Born in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Marilyn was
a force of nature, always helping others,
surviving four different types of cancer,
and living an active life with her husband,
horses, and family. Her joys included dancing, riding, children and traveling. In 1948 at
age 17 she traveled on her own to join her
family in Japan, from then on she traveled
to many countries.
Marilyn met Ernest in college. They were
married on Valentine’s day in 1951 at Oklahoma A&M. Marilyn and Ernie were very
much in love. Ernie lived for Marilyn and
Marilyn lived for Ernie. Ernie and Marilyn
were employed by the US Government in
June 1951 and postings included Okinawa,
Pakistan, Philippines, and Panama. Ernie
and Marilyn bought a farm in Hillsboro,
Virginia in 1969. The family ended up with
horses and cattle. They later moved to
Oregon, back to Virginia and spent many
happy years traveling abroad and between
the two states.
Marilyn deGruchy DeCorte passed away
peacefully after a short illness on November
11, 2017. She was predeceased by her husband Ernest DeCorte and is survived by
her children Michelle, Rodney, and Guy.
A Memorial service will be held Saturday,
December 2, 2017 at Hall Funeral Home
in Purcellville, Virginia at 1 p.m. All are
welcome to attend a celebration of her life.
FARRELL
JAMES
Of Ashburn, Virginia and Vienna, Virginia,
passed away on November 19, 2017 of
natural causes.
The funeral service will be held at 11 a.m.
on December 2, 2017 at Columbia Baptist
Church in Falls Church, Virginia. Visitation
will be held from 6 until 8 p.m. on Friday,
December 1, 2017 at Money & King Funeral
Home, Vienna, Virginia. Burial will be at
Arlington National Cemetery at a date to be
determined later.
Harry is survived by his wife Dolores; sister
Eunice James Holley; brother, Lynwood
James; his son, Gregory and daughter-inlaw Kathryn; grandchildren, Rachel and
Andrew; and many loving nieces and
nephews. Harry is preceded in death by a
son, Geoffrey; sisters Dorothy James Dickey
and Tessie James, and a brother, Greene B.
James.
In lieu of flowers memorial donations may
be given to the Air Force Aid Society, 241
18th Street South, Suite 202, Arlington, VA
22202.
KENNELLY
ANN MARIE WILLOUGHBY KENNELLY
On Thursday, November 23, 2017 of Bethesda,
MD. Beloved wife of the late Cletus W. Kennelly.
Beloved mother of Kathleen A. (husband,
Joseph) Schmidt, Cletus M. Kennelly, Patrick
T. (wife, Kathryn) Kennelly and Karen M. (husband, Robert) Lynch. Grandmother of 10, great
grandmother of three. Memorial Mass will be
held at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church,
7500 Pearl St., Bethesda, MD 20814 on Friday,
December 1, 2017 at 1:30 p.m. Interment
private. Memorial contributions may be made
to National Audubon Society, 225 Varick Street,
7th Floor, New York, NY 10014. Please view
and sign the family guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
KNODE
DANIEL RICHARD KNODE (Age 81)
Passed away on November 27, 2017. He is
survived by his loving wife of 62 years Barbara;
brothers Steven and Wayne; sons and spouses,
Scott, Ken, Doug and Liz, Glen and Carla, Jeff
and Kelly, Brian and Jennifer, Brett and Allison;
17 grandchildren and four great grandchildren.
Friends received on Thursday, November 30,
2017 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Raymond Funeral
Service Chapel, 5635 Washington Avenue, La
Plata, MD 20646 and where Funeral Service
will be held on Friday, December 1, 2017 at
12 Noon. Interment at Ft. Lincoln Cemetery
in Brentwood, MD. Memorials are asked to
Parkinson’s Disease.
Please view and sign the family online guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
Born in Ithaca, Michigan, he was the third
of three children in his family. His father, Dr.
Stanley Charles Brown, was a dentist, and his
mother, Marjorie Dorothy King Brown, was
a teacher and librarian. His parents and his
brother, Robert King Brown, all predeceased
Dave. One child died before he was born.
Proud of his Michigan roots, Dave excelled
at Ithaca High School, where he made the
Honor Roll, was elected president of the
senior class and served as editor of the high
school paper. After graduation from high
school in 1954, he attended the University
of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and graduated cum
laude with a B.A. in Political Science from the
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts in
January 1960. He was a member of Phi Beta
Kappa. A year later, he earned a Master’s in
Public Administration from Michigan. He also
served two years in the U.S. Naval Reserve as
a Communications Technician Second Class,
and was honorably discharged in June 1958.
In 1962, Dave joined the federal government
and worked for 29 years as a budget officer
with the U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development (HUD) and its predecessor, the Housing and Home Finance Agency.
In 1969, Dave received a one-year fellowship
from the National Institute of Public Administration for study at Harvard University. Dave
received numerous awards over the years at
HUD, including three certificates of superior
service and in 1977, the Distinguished Service Award, which is HUD’s highest honor.
At the time of this award, he oversaw four
programs with annual funding of more than
$4 billion. He also served under four Assistant Secretaries as Director of the program
budgeting division for the Office of Community Development.
co-directed the church’s Community Club
Mentoring Program, which brings together
public high school students of Washington
and pairs them with a volunteer adult mentor. Dave also served the church as a youth
counselor, member of the Board of Deacons,
Session, and as President of the Board of
Trustees.
Although Dave never married, he once said
that he took great joy in knowing that he
was able to help so many children. In 1983,
the D.C. City Council and then-Mayor Marion
Barry gave special recognition to Community
Club, and declared May 26, 1983, as “Dave
Brown Day.” In 1986, the Superintendent of
D.C. Public Schools recognized Community
Club for benefiting public school students. In
1990, Dave attended a White House signing
ceremony for National Volunteer Week, and
President George H.W. Bush commended
Dave in a note for being a “Point of Light”
and for his “selfless dedication to building
a better life for all Americans.” In 1997, the
U.S. Department of Education highlighted the
program in a national publication as a leader
for mentoring public school students.
After he retired from HUD in 1991, he continued to serve Community Club and the
church. Dave once said that he felt that his
greatest gift was “giving a listening ear and
words of support.”
Dave is survived by Janice Brown, his sisterin-law of Cambridge, MA; three nephews,
Stephen and his wife, Carmella Brown of
Andover, MA; Kenneth and his wife, Lisa
Brown of Hopkinton, MA; and Gerald and his
wife, Mary Brown of Stow, MA; and six grandnephews and two grand-nieces, all from the
Boston area, as well as numerous friends in
Washington.
A memorial service will be held at The New
York Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1313 New
York Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005,
on Sunday, December 3, at 1 p.m. Memorial
donations may be made to The New York
Avenue Presbyterian Church for the Cochran
Brown Scholarship Fund to benefit Community Club students or to the New York Avenue
Foundation, which also funds scholarships
for Community Club and other students.
CONRAD
PAUL S. KOZEMCHAK
Surrounded by the love of his family, Paul S.
Kozemchak, age 69, died on November 10,
2017 from injuries sustained after being struck
by an automobile in Arlington a week earlier.
PK, as he was known to his friends, was among
the longest serving members of the Defense
Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA),
where he had served for nearly 28 years
as a national security advisor to successive
directors. Born on February 29, 1948, in Allentown, Pennsylvania, Paul was the son of the
late Peter J. Kozemchak and Florentina T.
(Zahurak) of Emmaus. He is survived by three
children; Christopher of Falls Church, Virginia,
Kyra Fussell (Jarrett) of Annandale, Virginia,
Christiana Hardy (Richard) of Springfield, Virginia; and five grandchildren, nieces and
nephews. His 42-year marriage to Stephanie
Kozemchak ended in divorce in 2012.
Family will receive friends on Sunday, December 3, 2017 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Everly Community Funeral Care, 6161 Leesburg Pike, Falls
Church, VA, 22044 with a memorial service and
reception commencing at 3 p.m. Full obituary
and condolences at:
www.everlycommunity.com
MARGUERITE KEENAN CONRAD
"Peg"
Of McLean, VA devoted wife of nearly 60
years to the love of her life, Peter Conrad
(deceased) joined him on November 25, 2017
as she passed to the Lord.
Born in South Orange, New Jersey, Peg was
the cherished only child of Marguerite (Keatley) and Phillip Keenan. She grew up surrounded by her grandparents and many
uncles and aunts, forming a special bond
with her beloved aunt, Eleanor. Peggy attended Oak Knoll School of the Holy Child in
Summit, New Jersey and then matriculated
at Caldwell University where she earned a
B.A in English in 1952. It was while Peg was
at Caldwell that she met Pete at a Glee
Club concert beginning a lifelong devotion
that spanned decades. After graduation, Peg
became a first grade teacher, first at St
Columba’s in Newark, NJ serving economically challenged youth, and subsequently in Mountainside, NJ and Arlington, VA.
She was adored by her students, many
of whom attended her wedding. In 1954
she left New Jersey for good as she and
Pete relocated to Virginia. There she happily
raised five children and devoted herself to
the challenges and joys of a big family. She
was always a teacher at heart, devoting
long hours and energy fostering her own
children’s education and development. Peg
loved to tell stories, and if she didn’t have
a story she would happily make one up
on the spot! She loved reading (especially
mysteries!), music, travel, dancing and graciously entertaining her family and their
many friends; she talked to everyone and
was the life of every party. Despite this Peg
had an iron spirit and held high expectations
for those whom she loved, yet when the
chips were down she could always be counted on for unwavering support. Peg was a
devout Catholic who for many years was a
daily communicant and a “child of Mary,” to
whom she prayed the rosary daily for much
of her life. She would often be found tucked
away in the corner of the living room or on
the balconies at Sea Isle or Marco saying a
novena. Her faith, family and her long and
happy marriage to Pete were the sustaining
elements of her life.
Peg leaves her five beloved children, Marguerite Roach and her husband, James of
Sudbury, MA, Peter and his wife, Jane of
St. Louis, MO, Elizabeth Dubbelde and her
husband, John of Woodbridge, VA, Patricia
Rizzo and her husband, James of McLean,
VA and Robert and his wife, Piper of Vienna,
VA; and 15 grandchildren, Meredith, Keenan,
James, Jillian, John A, Molly, John P, Thomas,
Madeleine, Abigail, Meg, Peter, Luke, Phillip,
Sydney and great-grandson, Ben.
Relatives and friends are invited to Peggy’s
celebration of life at Money and King Funeral
Home, 171 Maple Ave, Vienna, VA on Sunday,
December 3 from 3 to 5 p.m. A Mass of
Christian Burial will be celebrated at St Luke
Catholic Church, 7001 Georgetown Pike,
McLean, VA on Monday, December 4 at 11
a.m. Interment will follow at Fairfax Memorial
Park. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be
made in her memory to the Alzheimer’s
Association (www.alz.org). Online condolences and fond memories of Peg may be
offered to the family at:
www.moneyandking.com
DAILEY
of organizations throughout her life including
the Loudoun Breast Health Network, the
Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, the
Loudoun
County
Democrats,
the
Obama/Biden Inaugural Committee, the
Boulder Crest Retreat for disabled veterans
and the Birthing Inn at Loudoun Hospital.
Although Carol spent her adult life in the
DC area, her love for the Pittsburgh Steelers
never wavered. Just recently she visited her
hometown after many years away and was
so thrilled by the black and gold displays of
team spirit around every corner.
GRETCHEN MARIE LOHMANN
On Tuesday November 21, 2017 of Silver
Spring, MD. Beloved daughter of Fay Lohmann,
and devoted sister of Karen (Murray) Siegel.
She was predeceased by her father, Capt.
Henry Lohmann, USCG. A Celebration of Life
will be held on December 2, 2017 from 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. at Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home, 11800
New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20904.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
Fisher House Foundation, Inc., 111 Rockville
Pike, #420, Rockville, MD 20850 or your charity
of choice.
CAROL WHITE DAILEY (Age 77)
Passed away on Sunday, November 19, 2017.
She was born in Pittsburgh, PA and moved to
Washington DC in her early 20’s to work in
downtown Washington, DC. She worked for
a number of companies in DC and Virginia
throughout her career, but was most proud
of her 10 years at AOL in the early days of
the internet. She liked to say that she was
“online before online was cool.”
LORD
Carol claimed she wasn’t much of a “joiner,”
but her lifelong advocacy and philanthropy
tells a different story. She was a staunch
advocate for breast cancer research and
awareness, and volunteered with a number
Carol was preceded in death by her parents,
Dolly M. White and Lawrence E. White. She
is survived by her children, Carey Tarbell
(Michael), Danny Torbett (Leslie) and Mark
Torbett (Diana); her grandchildren, Skyler,
Cassidy and Hunter Torbett and John and
Chloe Tarbell; her daughter-friend, Trisha
Staugler and her beloved “puppy-boy”, Olie
who is enjoying his new home with Carol’s
daughter and family.
A celebration of the formidable life force
known as Carol Dailey will be held at St.
David’s Episcopal Church, 43600 Russell
Branch Parkway, Ashburn, VA on Saturday,
December 2, 2017 at 2 p.m. If you wish to
make a donation in Carol’s name, please
contact the Loudoun Breast Health Network
at www.lbhn.org or by mail: P.O. Box 6154,
Leesburg, VA 20178. Online condolences and
fond memories of Carol may be offered to
the family at:
www.moneyandking.com
OLIVER
VINCENT JEROME OLIVER
MILDRED BOYDEN OLIVER
ETHEL GROVES (Age 84)
FRANCES SELMA YAGER KATZ LORD
"Frannie"
Born July 28, 1921, peacefully ended her journey at 96 years old on November 16, 2017,
at the home of her son and daughter-in-law
in Boynton Beach, Florida. Loving daughter
to Nathan and Rose Yager. Loving sister to
Blanche Kirchoff, now deceased. Devoted wife
to Joseph Katz for 17 years (deceased) and
Jerome Lord (deceased). Loving mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. Always with
a smile on her face, seeing the glass half full
never empty. Frannie lived her life with dignity,
grace and humor, she loved exercise well into
her 90's. An artist, a traveler and phenomenal
baker, Frannie had a passion for life, who only
saw good in others. Frannie's favorite charity
was St. Jude's Children's Hospital. Frannie will
be in our hearts forever! Services are private.
HELENE T. FARRELL (Age 97)
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may
be made to Asbury Foundation, 201 Russell
Avenue, Gaithersburg, MD 20877.
DAVID STANLEY BROWN
David Stanley Brown died on November 4,
2017 at age 81 in Washington, DC after
suffering from Alzheimer’s disease since
2006.
KOZEMCHAK
Of Sandy Spring, MD, formerly of Potomac, MD,
passed away on November 25, 2017. Wife of
the late Dr. John H. Farrell for 66 years; loving
mother of Brad Farrell of Brookeville, MD and
David Farrell of Lexington, SC; grandmother of
three and great grandmother of two.
Relatives and friends will be received at St.
Raphael Catholic Church, Falls at Dunster
Roads, Rockville, MD on Friday, December 1,
2017 from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. followed
by a Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m.
Interment in Arlington National Cemetery at a
later date.
DEATH NOTICE
Since 1961, Dave was a member of The
New York Avenue Presbyterian Church in
Washington. Committed to public service,
Dave was especially committed to helping
inner-city youth realize their potential. In
1962, he co-founded and, for over 40 years,
GROVES
Died at her home in Middletown,
MD, on Sunday, November 26,
2017. Her final days were spent
surrounded by family. She was
born in Montgomery County, MD,
in 1933 and was one of 12 children
of the late Lucian and Mamie Minnick. She
loved reading, vacations at the beach and
spending time with her family. She was the
loving wife of the late Franklin D. Groves
and devoted mother of John Ellinger, Gerald
Ellinger, Laurie Bates and Diane Fernandez.
Ethel will be greatly missed by her children,
nine grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren,
three siblings and numerous nieces and
nephews. Relatives and friends may call at
Collins Funeral Home, 500 University Boulevard
West, Silver Spring, MD, Saturday, December 2,
from 10 to 11 a.m., where a Funeral Service
will be held at 11 a.m. Interment following at
Parklawn Memorial Park.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
BROWN
HARRY C. JAMES (Age 89)
DOUGLAS M. GRODIN
Douglas M. Grodin, M.D.
passed away at Walter Reed
National Military Medical
Center on November 26,
2017. He is survived by his
loving
wife,
Maryann
Lawrence
Grodin;
their
beloved son, Benn; and his
sister and brother-in-law, Andrea and Dennis Anton. Born in Brooklyn, NY in 1942, he
graduated with honors from the University
of Pennsylvania and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and completed
his residency in psychiatry at Cornell University. A Navy Medical Corps Officer, he
served in Okinawa, Japan as Senior Medical
Officer for the Marine Corps; Director of
Inpatient Services at the Philadelphia Naval
Hospital where he was also an Associate
Professor of Psychiatry; Chief of Psychiatry
and Director of Medical Services at the
Newport Naval Hospital; head of the TriService Alcohol Rehabilitation Department
at the National Naval Medical Center,
Bethesda and Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry. His research was published
in the American Journal of Psychiatry and
he was an examiner for the American Board
of Psychiatry and Neurology and served as
an advisor to the Defense Programs Office
of Nuclear Safeguards and Security and to
the State Department Diplomatic Security
Office and as a physician member of the
Physical Evaluation Board. Retiring as a
Captain, his awards include the Legion
of Merit. Douglas Grodin was a superb
physician, a brilliant scholar, and a loving
husband and father. Interment will be
arranged at Arlington National Cemetery.
Donations in Dr. Grodin's memory may be
made to the Disabled American Veterans
dav.org or to Sharsheret Sharsheret.org.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
. WEDNESDAY,
DEATH NOTICE
LOHMANN
MARTIN WILLIAM CUMMINGS (Age 89)
DEATH NOTICE
On November 19, 2017 at age 85 of Berwyn
Heights, MD. Wife of the late Kenneth
Stewart Archibald; mother of Kenneth Lee
Archibald, Kenneth L. Thompson and sonin-law, Victor TeTe Gasch; sister of Shirley
Burris and James Spencer; grandmother
of Chrissy Gasch, Rebecca Bond, Kenneth
Lee Archibald, Jr. and Stephanie Archibald;
great-grandmother of Madison, Parker,
Aubry and Aurora. Preceded in death by
her daughter, Deborah Lynn Gasch and
a brother-in-law, Gerald Burris. A private
family gathering is scheduled.
www.gaschs.com
Brothers of Prince George’s Council 2809 are notified of a visitation
on Thursday, November 30 from
7 to 9 p.m. at Borgwardt Funeral
Home, Beltsville, MD. A Memorial
Mass will be celebrated on Friday,
December 1 at 11:30 a.m. at St.
Joseph Catholic Church, Beltsville, MD.
José Rivera, G.K.
The family will receive friends on November
30, 2017 from 4 to 7 p.m. at Everly Wheatley
Funeral Home, 1500 W Braddock Rd., Alexandria, VA. A mass of Christian burial will be
held on December 1 at 11 a.m. at Blessed
Sacrament Catholic Church, 1427 W. Braddock
Rd., Alexandria, VA. Interment Services will be
held at Mt. Comfort Cemetery.
The projects we handled were diverse and
complex,
But no matter the barriers they’d all end in
success.
Like a huge mountain cat he was regal, yet
scary,
When he lost his cool things quickly got hairy.
JOHN C. FINDLEY, HLM
DEATH NOTICE
Vincent Jerome Oliver, 97, died peacefully in
Washington, DC on June 30, 2013. Vincent
was born in Fulton, NY. At a young age, the
family moved to Washington, D.C. where he
graduated from McKinley Tech High School.
He then attended the University of Chicago,
earning Phi Beta Kappa honors, while studying physics and meteorology. Vincent was
asked to join the faculty. While teaching,
he met a new graduate student, Mildred
"Molly" Boyden, who shared his love of
meteorology. On November 28, 1942, the
two were married. With Molly having also
joined the faculty, the two of them collaborated on several papers and manuals on
operational forecasting. They also taught
members of the Army Air Corps who were
preparing to support the Allied cause in
World War II. After the war, Vincent continued
his career as Meteorologist in Charge in
Fairbanks, AK. Upon returning to the Washington, DC area, he worked with Ted Fujita
to develop the Fujita (or F) Scale, which
measured the severity of tornadoes, and with
Herbert Saffir and Bob Simpson to develop
the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale for hurricanes.
In 1962, Vincent became the Chief of the
Applications Branch of NOAA/NESS. In later
years, he became the world's expert in using
satellite pictures to predict the weather
and an important voice for world scientific
cooperation during the Cold War and the
Space Race urging meteorologists to share
information that could save millions of lives.
He retired from NOAA as Chief Scientist in
1982. Post-retirement, he continued teaching meteorology at Penn State University.
He was a life-long member of the American
Meteorological Society. He loved his family
and enjoyed gardening, sailing, music and
lending a helping hand to anyone in need.
Mildred Wetherbee Boyden, died peacefully
at home in Washington, D.C. on December
24, 2015. She was 95. Mildred was born in
New York City and at a young age was given
the nickname "Molly". Molly was raised in
New England and attended Lincoln School
in Providence, RI, graduating at the top of
her class in 1937. Molly went on to study
at Wellesley College graduating in 1941,
Summa Cum Laude. She was awarded the
prestigious Amelia Earhart scholarship by
Zonta International. In 1941, Molly obtained
her Master's degree in Meteorology from the
University of Chicago, and joined the faculty.
Sharing their passion for meteorology, along
with their love of ballroom dancing, brought
Vincent and Molly closer together. They were
married on November 28, 1942. She continued doing research and writing various
scientific papers while raising their seven
children. Throughout her life, Molly had a
very firm faith in God. She was very involved
at St. Paul's Rock Creek Episcopal Church,
serving on the Altar Guild and various other
committees. Later on, she was a faithful
member of St. John's Episcopal Church and
St. Columba's Episcopal Church.
Vincent and Molly were married for 70 years
until Vince passed away in 2013. They are
survived by their seven children: Lawrence
(Cheryl), Susanna (Di), Victoria, Christiana
(Garry), Jamia (Barry), Robert (Roberta), and
Emily (Dale), 12 grandchildren, 19 greatgrandchildren, and Molly's sister, Barbara
Wetherbee.
A private memorial service was held.
Because your loved one served proudly...
When the need arises, let families find you in
the Funeral Services Directory.
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
J. BARRIOS FLETCHER
ALMA JONES FLETCHER
In loving memory on the centennial
anniversary of our dad’s birth, we fondly cherish our parents for their innumerable acts of
love and sacrifice.
Passed away surrounded by her loving family
November 27, 2017.
Born in Pennsylvania in 1933, Shirley served
her country in the United States Air Force
during the Korean Conflict from 1951-1956.
After her and her late husband J.T. moved
to Arlington, VA. Shirley worked for AT&T
long lines for six years, and co-owned Butler
Decorators INC in Arlington Shirley was a Girl
Scout Troop Leader and Cub Scout Den Mother.
She loved spending her winters at her home
in Naples Florida. Shirley had many hobbies
and she built her own ceramics business
Shirley’s Ceramics, and retired in 1989. Her
Ceramic Piggy Bank was featured on the cover
of Washingtonian Magazine. Shirley started
building a ceramic Christmas village in the
late 1970’s at Powhatan Nursing Home in
Falls Church, VA. Her Husband and daughter
were employed there and it became the Butler
Family business in 1995. This village was one
of her proudest accomplishments. Shirley was
a resident of Powhatan since October of 2014.
She is survived by her sisters Jean Adams of
WV, Frances (Jim) Elliott of VA, her sister-inlaw Selvia Lewis of VA, and Mayblane Elkins of
AL; her daughter, Cynthia Butler (Gary Hall) of
VA and son Joel (Toni Dash) Butler of CO and
her grandchildren, Grace and Gabriel Butler of
CO, and Angela, Randy and Roxy Beach of SC,
her nieces and nephews, Robert (Roseanne)
Adams, Ronald (Ann) Adams, Richard Adams,
Earlene (Randall) Edwards, Bryan (Rita) Elkins,
Kenneth (Judy) Elkins, Boyd (Donna) Ware,
Missy Elliott, Donald Elliott, Diane Lewis (Mike)
Elmore, Katherine Lewis, and Andrea (Pete)
Summers and many great nieces and great
nephews. She is predeceased by parents, Donald Cameron and Dollie Lewis, her brother
Donald Richard Lewis and her husband, J.T.
Family will receive friends on Wednesday,
November 29 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at National
Funeral Home, 7482 Lee Hwy, Falls Church, VA
22042. Funeral services will be at 1 p.m. with
interment to follow at National Memorial Park.
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
To be seen in the Funeral Services Directory,
please call paid Death Notices at 202-334-4122.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B7
RE
DEATH NOTICE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
LUCAS
SCINTO
BERGIN
CLARKE
HARRISON
TRENCHER
DENISE A. LUCAS (Age 65)
Of Washington, DC, passed away on Thursday, November 23, 2017. She is survived
by her stepmother, Evelyn Lucas; sisters
Stephanie Pridgeon, Sherry (Michael) Pinckney; brothers Everett Lucas, Jr, Ronald
Lucas and Bryant Lucas. Family will celebrate her life on Friday, December 1,
2017 at The People’s Community Baptist
Church, 31 Norwood Rd., Silver Spring, MD,
Viewing at 10 a.m., Service at 11 a.m.
Interment at National Harmony Memorial
Park Cemetery, Hyattsville, MD. Services
entrusted to Snowden.
www.snowdencares.com
MAXWELL
JAMES HENRY MAXWELL
On Friday November 17, 2017. Beloved husband of Gladys Maxwell; devoted father of
Jerome, Jacqueline, Jocelyn, Anthony and
Kiana Maxwell. He is also survived by six grandchildren, Brionna Cavanaugh, Royce, Constance, Madison, Aurora and Athena Maxwell;
one great-grandson, James Barron Cavanaugh;
one son-in-law, Christopher Duncan; and a host
of other relatives and friends. Mr. Maxwell may
be viewed at Stewart Funeral Home, 4001
Benning Rd. NE. on Saturday, December 2
from 10 a.m. until service 11 a.m. Interment
Cedar Hill Cemetery. Online condolences may
be made at:
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
CAROL BLYTHE MURDOCK SCINTO
A wonderful woman. A wonderful, charming,
fascinating person. Your shining spirit holds
me together and brings loving memories.
I am proud to be your special friend --- forever!
Your Husband, Joe
TURNER
McNAMEE
WALLACE WILLIAM McNAMEE (Age 84)
Recently of Falls Church, VA died on Friday,
November 17, 2017. Memorial Service will be
held at St. Mary's Episcopal Church, 2609 N.
Glebe Rd., Arlington, VA, Saturday, December 2
at 2 p.m.
GERALD R. TURNER
NAZAK
MARTHA L. NAZAK (Age 77)
Of Mineral, Virginia passed away on Friday,
November 24, 2017.
Martha is survived by her daughters, Jennifer
L. Nazak and Leslie Spencer (Jeffery); her
son, Robert W. Nazak, her granddaughters,
Madeline K. and Sarah E. and her sister, Nancy
Mann.
Memorial services will be held at 11 a.m.
on Friday, December 1, 2017 at Woodward
Funeral Home, Louisa, VA. Inurnment will take
place in Arlington National Cemetery at a later
date.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to
the American Cancer Society or Take the Lead
(takethelead.org).
Visit www.woodwardfuneral.com for online
guestbook.
CHRISTOPHER EDWARD BERGIN
On Wednesday, November 22, 2017, Christopher Edward Bergin died in Aldie, Virginia. He
was 65 years old. Dear husband for 30 years
of Ulrike Bergin; loving father of CJ Bergin
(Richmond, VA) and Caroline Bergin (Clifton,
VA); loving brother of Paul Bergin (Winchester,
VA), Stephen Bergin (Tulsa, Oklahoma), Mary
Loughman (Pelham, NY), Ann Kilduff (Suffern,
NY) and Breta Bergin (deceased) and loving
uncle of his nieces and nephews. Chris was
born in New York City and grew up in New
Jersey. He was a graduate of Boston College,
Pace Law School and Columbia University
Graduate School of Business Executive Education Program. Chris worked for Tax Analysts, a
nonprofit publisher and the only independent,
nonpartisan multimedia organization dedicated to fostering an open and informed debate
on taxation. From 1991 to 2001 Chris served
as Editor of Tax Analysts’ flagship publication, Tax Notes. From 2001 to 2017 Chris
led the company as President and Publisher
and was responsible for the overall direction
and administration of the company which
flourished under his watch. A Memorial Service
will be held 11 a.m., Saturday, December 2,
2017 at the Murphy Funeral Home – Falls
Church, VA where the family will receive visitors Friday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. In lieu
of flowers, the family requests that donations
be made in Chris’s name to Johns Hopkins
Hospital.
GEORGE W. STITH, JR.
Peacefully passed on November 21, 2017.
Beloved husband of Virginia R. Stith; loving
father of Kelly Wilson Stith and Pier Stith. Also
survived by two grandchildren, Zachary and
Caroline Stith; his siblings, Dorothy Stith, Erma
Morgan, Eleanor Watson, Ronald Stith, Kathy
Menifee (Fred) and Wesley Stith and a host of
other relatives and friends. On Friday, December 1, 2017, friends may visit with the family
from 10 a.m. until time of funeral service at
11 a.m. at Marshall-March Funeral Home, 4308
Suitland Rd., Suitland, MD. Interment Resurrection Cemetery, Clinton, MD.
WILLIAMS
HENRY WILLIAMS, JR.
Entered into eternal rest on Monday, November 20, 2017. He is survived by his daughter,
Hilary C. Williams-Fagan; two sons, Byron M.
Williams and Giovanni E. Williams; 10 grandchildren, Marcel G. Williams, Antoine B. Fagan;
Brittany M. Logan; Giovanni E. Taylor; Wayne
Benbow, Patrick J. Roberts, Paris B. GoodwinWilliams, James Roberts, Makahi White and
Alyssa Williams; two great-grandchildren,
Wayne' Nikhi Benbow and Makae' Josiah Benbow; brother, Arthur L. Williams; sister, Saundra D. Moore and a host of other relatives and
friends. Mr. Williams will lie in state at First
Baptist Church of Marshall Heights, 4934 B
St., SE on Saturday, December 2 from 10 a.m.
until service at 11 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln
Cemetery. www.stewartfuneralhome.com
ABBE
GERALDINE BELLE DE FRANCISCI
(Age 90)
FRANCES VARIAN CAMPBELL (Age 92)
HARRIETTE ANN HOLMES ABBE
COREY DUANE WRIGHT (Age 53)
Suddenly on Sunday, November
26, 2017, of Silver Spring, MD.
Corey was a Senior Trade Specialist with the US Department
of Commerce for 30 years and
beloved husband of Jaylene Sarracino Wright; father of Majalene
and Julian Wright; son of Dwight and the late
Barbara Wright; brother of Darlene Rudolph
(Dennis), Charlene Barnes (Jim), Ray Wright
(Wendy), Russ Wright (Mary) and the late Diane
Wright; step-brother of Jeff Morgenroth (Debbie). Funeral Service at Calvary Lutheran
Church, 9545 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring,
MD, on Saturday, December 2, at 10:30 a.m.
Interment Mukwonago, Wisconsin at a later
date. Memorial contributions may be made
to Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, 118 Park
Street SE, Vienna, VA 22180 or www.patc.net.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
On November 24, 2017 in McLean, Virginia.
Widow of William B. Campbell, mother of Patricia Campbell of Churchville, MD, Barbara Hersh
of Columbus, NJ, Kevin Campbell and Larry
Campbell, both of McLean; grandmother of
Amy Whyte, Carrie Myer, Lauren Cassidy and
David Hersh and great-grandmother of 10. Mrs.
Campbell served 24 years as the Arlington
Diocesan Director of Special Religious Education (SPRED). Services were previously held. In
lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made in Fran’s name to The Endeleo
Project. Service information and online condolences may be made to:
www.murphyfuneralhomes.com
On Sunday, November 19, 2017, Geraldine
Belle De Francisci, of Silver Spring, MD.
Beloved wife of the late Christopher Litteri De
Francisci; loving mother of Chris De Francisci
(Nancy), Teresa Osborn (Bryant) and Michael
De Francisci (Cheri). Cherished grandmother
of Jason and Erica Osborn and Andrea De
Francisci; adored great-grandmother of Jackson Andrew Osborn. Funeral services will be
held on Friday, December 1, 2017, at 11:30
a.m. at Interfaith Chapel, 3680 S. Leisure World
Blvd., Silver Spring, MD. In lieu of flowers,
contributions may be made in her name to
local public libraries. Arrangements entrusted
to Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home, Inc. Interment
Private.
FITZGERALD
A celebration of her life will be held on
Thursday, November 30, at 11 a.m. at
Joseph Gawler’s Sons, 5130 Wisconsin
Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20016.
Memorial contributions may be made to
Montgomery Hospice’s Casey House, 1355
Piccard Drive, #100, Rockville, MD 20850.
Laird continued his public service with the
District of Columbia Library where he remained
for 30 years,retiring as the head librarian at
West End Branch Library.
Laird is survived by his companion of 25
years, Sheldon Campbell of Alexandria, Virginia
and his sister Miriam Giroux of Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania and dozens of nieces, nephews,
great-nieces, great-nephews and cousins. He
was preceded in death by his brother Robert
Horrell and sister Marita Vercellotti.
A memorial Mass will be celebrated at St.
Mary's Catholic Church, 310 S Royal Street in
Alexandria on Thursday at 10 a.m., November
30, 2017. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated in Pittsburgh on Saturday, December
2, 2017 at the Church of the Resurrection,
Brookline. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to: Mid-Atlantic Chinese
Shar-Pei Rescue Operation, the Alexandria Animal Welfare League, or to your local library's
support group.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
ALICE MARIE FITZGERALD (Age 73)
Passed away on November 23, 2017 in her
loving home in Alexandria, VA. Loving wife of
the late Curtis Allen Fitzgerald; and mother of
Michael and Mark. She also leaves behind two
granddaughters, Martha and Eleanor.
MIA CHASE
Entered into eternal rest on
Wednesday, November 15, 2017.
Beloved daughter of Leatrice
Anderson and Mark A. Chase, Sr.
(Veda). Also survived by brother,
Mark A. Chase, Jr. (Natasha); sisters, Micka C. Stephens (Cameron)
and Marquita L. Chase; seven nephews, four
nieces and a host of other relatives and friends.
Friends may visit with the family on Thursday,
November 30 at the From Heart Church Ministries, 5055 Allentown Rd., Suitland, MD from
10 a.m. until time of funeral service at 11 a.m.
Interment private. Arrangements by HODGES &
EDWARDS.
Dr. Machmer was born in Sunbury, Pennsylvania and subsequently spent his younger
years in Akron, Ohio until he enrolled in
Mount Union College in Alliance, Ohio as
an undergraduate student. After earning his
degree at Mount Union, he attended Cornell
University where he received a Doctorate
in International Law. He served for three
years in the Peace Corps in Nigeria and
Liberia, and was a member of the American
Foreign Service Association, the National
Peace Corps Association, and the Belle
Haven Homeowners’ Neighborhood Association.
A Senior Foreign Service Officer with the rank
of Minister Counselor, who served as USAID
Mission Director in seven overseas posts in
his 35-year career, including Sudan, Ethiopia,
Somalia, Afghanistan, Lebanon, Nepal, and
Tbilisi, Georgia, died November 18, 2017 in
his home in Alexandria, Virginia. He was 77.
The cause of death was complications from
pancreatic cancer, resulting in heart failure.
In addition to his role as USAID Director,
Dr. Machmer served as Director of the
USAID/Washington Office of Middle East
Affairs, an office which included Iraq in its
portfolio. At that time, he was also named
acting Deputy Assistant Administrator for
the Asia/Near East Bureau (a role that is
equivalent to a deputy assistant secretary of
state). His work as Senior Foreign Service
Officer includes extensive roles in the Middle
East – as Head of the 1994 U.S. Government
Delegation to the regional Middle East Peace
Conference in Cairo, Egypt; as USAID Disaster
Resistance Team (DART) leader for
Afghanistan (2001); and as Senior Development Advisor, Senior Deputy Civilian Representative, and Chief of the Office of Stabilization, Regional Command-East, Bagram
Airbase, Afghanistan (2009-2010). He also led
USAID disaster response efforts in Ethiopia
and Georgia in 2000.
In 2002, Dr. Machmer made a presentation
on the subject of civilian-military cooperation
in Afghanistan to the senior staff of the
U.S. Pacific Command in Hawaii, which culminated in an article— “Reflections of
Afghanistan,” on the pivotal period before
and after September 11, 2001. The piece
was published in The Liaison, a publication
of the Center of Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance in
Honolulu.
Dr. Machmer earned numerous awards during his career, including the 2001 State
Department Group Meritorious Honor Award
“For outstanding sustained effort to prevent
Rev. Dr. ORA B. WARREN
On November 17, 2017. Survived by her three
children; four grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; other relatives and friends. Visitation
Friday, December 1 from 6 to 9 p.m. at Little
Mt. Zion, 736 50th Street, NE and Saturday,
December 2, visitation 9 a.m.; service, 10:30
a.m. at Tried Stone Church, 256 13th Street,
NE. Interment: Maryland Veterans Cemetery,
Cheltenham, MD. Services by J.B. Jenkins .
CHASE
Visitation will be held at Everly Wheatley Funeral Home, Monday, December 4, 2017 from
10:30 to 11:30 a.m., funeral service to follow
at 11:30 a.m. Interment to follow at Ivy Hill
Cemetery.
HARRIS
CLYDE E. HOWARD, JR.
"Pookie" (Age 83)
Of Washington, DC transitioned peacefully
early November 18, 2017 at Capitol Caring
Hospice. The beloved husband of Marion E.
Howard; devoted father of Elizabeth L. Howard,
Clyde E. Howard, III and Patricia (Ralph) Chittams; brother of Kenneth L. Howard (April);
cherished grandfather of four grandchildren
and one great-grandchild. Also survived by
many relatives and friends. Visitation, Thursday, November 30 from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m.,
Pope Funeral Home, 5538 Marlboro Pike,
Forestville, MD and Friday, December 1, 2017,
visitation from 10 a.m. until time of service at
11 a.m. at Nineteenth Street Baptist Church,
4606 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC.
ROBINSON
a human catastrophe in Ethiopia,” the 1992
Presidential Meritorious Honor Award from
George H.W. Bush, a USAID Distinguished
Honor Award (1988), and, in 1985, a USAID
Superior Honor Award.
Dr. FREDERICK E. MACHMER, JR.
"Rick"
WARREN
Laird had a passion for opera, trains and
railroads of all sorts and ocean liners, particularly the Cunard Line which he cruised
frequently. He was an armchair Jeopardy!
champion just as often, and regretted that
he never tried out for the seniors tournament.
HOWARD
MACHMER
WILSON
WRIGHT
Harriet loved to travel with her husband,
Sid, and after his death with friends and
family. Her other interests included the arts,
antique collecting, volunteering, reading
historical fiction, and doing the New York
Times crossword puzzle in ink. Most of all,
she loved her family and friends, and she
was a magnet for those around her with her
charismatic personality, beautiful smile and
warmth.
LAIRD JOSEPH HORRELL
DEATH NOTICE
Passed away on November 27, 2017. Born on
November 27, 1925 in Kingsport, Tennessee,
to Charles Calvin and Mary Delano Holmes.
She married William Whipple Abbe in 1948 and
built a life and family together over 66 years.
She was a resident of Passavant Retirement
Community, Zelienople, PA, previously of Cambridge, MD, and Bethesda, MD. She was a
1947 graduate of Russell Sage College in Troy,
NY, where she received a B.S. in Nursing.
She worked at the following facilities: Bryan
Memorial Hospital in Lincoln, NE, Children’s
Hospital in Washington, DC, Suburban Hospital
in Bethesda, MD, and the Collingswood Nursing
Home in Rockville, MD. She accompanied her
husband during overseas assignments in Pakistan, Jordan and Thailand between 1960 and
1971. In Pakistan, she assisted in providing
health and eye care at refugee camps. From
1989 to 2003 Harrie and Whip lived in Cambridge, MD, where she opened and ran Drift
in Book Sales for a few years in downtown
Cambridge. She served as a member of the
Dorchester Hospital Auxiliary and as Chairwoman of the Robin Hood Shop. In 2003
Harrie and Whip moved to Zelienople, PA.
Harrie is survived by her five children, Charles
Cleveland Abbe of Scappoose, OR, Christopher
Holmes Abbe of Freeport, ME, Pamela Abbe
of Waynesburg, PA, Timothy Abbe of Port
Angeles, WA, and James Daniel Abbe of Plymouth, NH, and by four granddaughters, Shea
Abbe Zwerver, Cory Holmes Abbe, Carmen
River Abbe and Caroline Frances Abbe. Harriette was preceded in death by Whipple and
granddaughter, Leah Abbe Zwerver.
A memorial service will be held at 1:30 p.m.
on Friday, December 1, 2017 at the Seaman
Chapel, Passavant Retirement Community,
Zelienople, PA. In addition, a celebration of life
will be held in the Bethesda, MD, area at a time
and place to be determined. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to the Tall Tails Beagle
Rescue, 81 Pleasant Hill Road, Freeport, ME
04032, www.talltailsbeaglerescue.org or the
Community Foundation of Greene County,
Leah Abbe Zwerver Memorial Fund, P.O. Box
768, Waynesburg, PA 15370 (Checks to CFGC).
Condolences to the family may be directed to
Cleve Abbe, by US Mail to C.C. Abbe, 54472
Dahlgren Rd., Scappoose, OR 97056, or by
email to CCAbbe11@aol.com.
Funeral arrangements were entrusted to the
Boylan Funeral Home, Inc., 324 E. Grandview
Ave., Zelienople, PA 16063. Expression of sympathy may be shared with the family at
www.boylanfuneralhome.com
HARRIET TRENCHER (Age 90)
On November 18, 2017, Harriet Marion
Frankle Trencher of Bethesda, MD, formerly
of Chevy Chase, MD; Boca Raton, FL; and
Glen Cove, NY. Beloved wife of the late
Sidney Trencher; loving mother of Peter
Trencher of Los Angeles, CA, and Tracy
Trencher (Brian J.) Morra of McLean, VA,
and Sarasota, FL; sister of the late Anita
Frankle Vernon; devoted grandmother of
Thomas Coleman Perkins and Sarah
Trencher Perkins; step-grandmother of Lauren Colleen Morra (Zachary Stechly) and
Claire Elise Morra; step-great-grandmother
of Gabriel Christophe Stechly; longtime
companion of Dr. Harvey Horwitz; also survived by many nieces, nephews and
cousins, and their children and grandchildren.
Succumbed to cancer on November 26, 2017,
at Woodbine Rehabilitation & Healthcare Center in Alexandria, Virginia. Laird grew up in
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and entered the
Army. He served primarily in post-war Germany. After military service, Laird moved to
Washington, DC and attended the Catholic
University of America where he earned his
bachelor of arts and master of library science
degrees, having attended Catholic educational
institutions from first grade.
CAMPBELL
ROBERT ALLEN WILSON, JR.
On Sunday, November 26, 2017, ROBERT A.
WILSON, JR. of Washington, DC. Loving father
of Robin Exton (Charles) and Adrian Shaw. He
leaves to cherish his memory; two sisters,
Shirley Harris, and Mary Rollins; three granddaughters, Christina, Adriane and Taylor Exton;
one great-grandson, Egypt Exton and ex-wife,
Carolyn Calhoun. Also survived by a host of
other relatives and friends. Family will receive
friends on Thursday, November 30, 2017 at
11 a.m. for a graveside service at Heritage
Memorial Cemetery, 13472 Poplar Hill Rd.,
Waldorf, MD 20601. Arrangements by STRICKLAND FUNERAL SERVICES.
www.stricklandfuneralservices.com
HORRELL
1952-2005
SCHMIDT
STITH
RICHARD R. HARRISON, JR. "Rick"
(Age 75)
On November 23, 2017, of Silver Spring, MD.
Devoted husband of Gayle; loving father of
Jeffrey and Gina; cherished grandfather to
Maya, Morgan, Cole and Isabella. Also survived
by sister, Garrie. Friends may gather at HinesRinaldi Funeral Home, 11800 New Hampshire
Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20904 on Saturday,
December 2, 2017 from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
with memorial service at 11 a.m. Interment
private. Please sign and view the family guestbook at
www.hinesrinaldifuneralhome.com
De FRANCISCI
In loving memory of our brother, uncle and
friend – “JERRY T” who went home to Heaven
12 years ago. Jerry, we miss you very much.
Love always
ANTHONY JOHN DISALVO SCHMIDT
"Toni"
Of Bethesda, MD passed away November 18,
2017. Practiced law in Rockville, MD at Schmidt, Roth, Brennan & Carroccio for more than
40 years. Volunteered at numerous organizations, most recently on the Board of Seabury
Resources for Aging. Survived by his wife, Jane
Annesley Kean Schmidt; his children, Deana
Sullivan (David), Anthony Schmidt (Rhea) and
Jane Schmidt and his grandchildren. Services
will be held on Friday, December 1, 2017 at
11 a.m. at Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G
St., NW, Washington, DC. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to Seabury Resources
for Aging, P.O. Box 90726, Washington, DC
20090 or The Welcome Table at the Church of
the Epiphany. www.mcguire-services.com
VERONICA CLARKE
"Vickie"
Peacefully and surrounded by her family
and friends at her bedside on Wednesday,
November 22, 2017 after a brief illness was
called home. She was preceded in death
by her daughter, April Clarke; parents, Katie
McNair Brown and Adolphus Clarke and
stepfather, James Brown. She is survived
by her sisters, Jerrye Feliciana (Albert),
Pamela Smith and Cynthia Clarke Johnson
(Waldo); nephews, Wayne Vines (Tasha),
Jaison Feliciana, Kevin (Charlee) and
Christopher
(Whitney)
Smith;
a
niece, Kyanna Feliciana; devoted friends,
Anthony and LaToshia Motley and their
daughter,
Lauryn;
beloved
cousins,
Raymond Shofed, Trudy and Saundra
McNair; and a host of other relatives and
friends. Visitation on Thursday, November
30, 2017 from 10 a.m. until time of service
at 11 a.m. at Brighter Day Ministries - A.P.
Shaw Campus, 2525 12th Pl., SE., Washington, DC. Services by Stewart.
Dr. Machmer spent the nearly 25 years in
the Belle Haven neighborhood of Alexandria,
Virginia. He is survived by his beloved Golden
Labrador Retriever, Jessie, who has a new
home with a caring family in the neighborhood. Surviving relatives are cousins Joan
Altmayer (Parma, Ohio), Mike McDonnell
(Mashpee, MA), and Pat (McDonnell) Long
(Dade City, Florida). Most notably, Dr. Machmer will be greatly missed by family, friends
and colleagues throughout the world and his
neighborhood family, especially Mary Panus
and her husband, Dr. Thomas Wall. Ms.
Panus, cousin Joan Altmayer, Hospice nurses
and Certified Nurse Assistants cared for him
in his home over the last several months.
Ms. Altmayer, her niece Laura Marlow (Kent,
Ohio), her daughter Lyz Bly (Cleveland
Heights, Ohio), and her son Gary Bly
(Strongsville, Ohio) honor his memory as a
hero-humanitarian who sought and spread
peace throughout the world.
Dr. Machmer requested that no funeral service be held; his family and friends are
planning a celebratory gathering honoring
him in March (2018). He was an animal lover
and a proud graduate of Mount Union College
and Cornell; gifts to Cornell University Law
School, Mount Union College Scholarship
Fund, and The Muffin Fund of Belle Haven
Animal Medical Center may be made in his
honor.
Dr. Machmer’s home was his comfortable
refuge, with his muse, Petruk, a Javanesecreated character of the ancient Indian text
Mahabharata, displayed in front of the fireplace. Petruk was both a prankster and a
furious warrior of the people. His Indonesian
puppet wears this hand-written description
around his neck:
“PETRUK
All seeing inside night Jaga
Never sleeps
Keeps tab[s] on everything
Sometimes sees too much
Remains discreetly silent”
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MARJORIE ANN HARRIS (Age 92)
Passed away peacefully on Friday, November
25, 2017, at Inova Alexandria Hospital, after
a valiant fight with ovarian cancer. A native
Alexandrian, she was born on February 26,
1925 at Alexandria Hospital. She was the only
child of Max and Victoria Salomonsohn.
She was preceded in death by her first husband
Clyde Kenneth Warren; her second husband
Paul McNeil Harris; and her stepsons Stephen
Harris and Paul "PM" McNeil Harris, Jr. She is
survived by her devoted daughter, Vicki Lee
Warren (Jim Brigman); her stepsons, Michael
Harris (Lynda) and Phillip Harris; her stepgranddaughter, Asheley MacDougall (Sean);
her step-great-grandchildren, Teighan, Takota,
Tate, and Tristan; her adopted granddaughter,
Christine Wasilewski, and her adopted great
grandchild, Peyton.
Marjorie graduated from George Washington
High School in 1942. She graduated from
Strayer Business College and worked for Federal Housing until the birth of her daughter.
She loved her hometown and was an active
member of the community. She was a member
of Beth El Hebrew Congregation and their
Sisterhood; the Board of Lady Managers of
Inova Alexandria Hospital for 55 years, where
she served twice as President; the 1872 Society of Inova Alexandria Hospital; the Alexandria
Salvation Army Auxiliary, where she served as
President; the Symphony Orchestra League of
Alexandria; and the George Washington High
School Alumni Association. She enjoyed being
included in her daughter Vicki's T.C. Williams
High School Class of 1973 functions, since she
knew so many members of the class. She
was an avid Washington Redskins fan, having
season tickets since 1962, and a devoted
Alabama Crimson Tide fan.
She loved her life, her family and friends. She
was a strong, caring woman of faith. We are
thankful that she was a beautiful part of our
lives, and she will be greatly missed. Until we
meet again.
Friends may call at Everly-Wheatley Funeral
Home on Wednesday, November 29, 2017
from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. A memorial service will be held at Everly-Wheatley on
Thursday, November 30 at 12:30 p.m. Interment to follow at Home of Peace Cemetery,
701 S. Payne Street, Alexandria, VA.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to The Board of Lady Managers
(Cancer Fund) P.O.Box 16453, Alexandria, VA.
22302, Beth El Hebrew Congregation (Endowment Fund) 3830 Seminary Road, Alexandria,
VA 22304, or the charity of your choice.
To place a notice, call:
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ESTELLE C. ROBINSON
Passed away on November 26, 2017 in Washington, DC. Estelle was born on December 7,
1922 in Alexandria, VA.
She leaves her son, James Robinson and wife,
Penny; daughter-in-law, Peggy Robinson; her
sister, Margarete Browder; granddaughters,
Jennifer Pellegrini and her husband, Brian,
Katie Pence and her husband, Billie; grandsons,
Nicholas Robinson and his fiancée, Teal Tobler
and Jesse Robinson; great-grandchildren,
Grant Robinson, Cole Robinson and Ellie Pellegrini; as well as numerous nieces and
nephews.
Preceded by her parents, Anthony and Selma
Caporaletti, husband and life partner of 63
years, H. Boyd Robinson, son, Douglas Robinson, her brothers, Victor and wife, Ardis Caporaletti, Raymond Caporaletti, Robert Caporaletti and Oraziod Caporaletti, sister, Virginia Kapp
and her husband Gene Kapp.
The visitation will be held from 10:30 a.m. until
12:30 p.m. on Thursday, November 30, 2017.
The funeral service will be held on Thursday,
November 30, 2017 at 12:30 p.m. at Demaine
Funeral Home with the burial to follow at
Mount Comfort Cemetery in Alexandria, VA.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Sunny and pleasant
It’s another beautiful late November
day, with lots of sunshine and mild
temperatures. Highs are in the
low 60s to mid-60s. Winds are out of
the southwest early in the day but
turning to the northwest as a front passes later.
Tonight, expect a few clouds and lows ranging
from the mid-30s to mid-40s along with light
winds from the north.
Today
Partly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Thursday
Partly sunny
Friday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Saturday
Partly sunny
Sunday
Mostly sunny
Monday
Partly sunny
65° 41
56° 43
56° 36
55° 39
56° 36
55° 41
FEELS*: 65°
FEELS: 56°
FEELS: 54°
FEELS: 57°
FEELS: 54°
FEELS: 54°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
P: 10%
P: 0%
P: 25%
P: 15%
P: 0%
WIND: WNW 7–14 mph
W: SSE 4–8 mph
W: NNW 7–14 mph
W: S 4–8 mph
W: NW 7–14 mph
W: SSE 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
58/31
Hagerstown
59/35
Davis
49/31
Su
High
Low
Normal
Philadelphia
62/37
Charlottesville
66/37
Sa
Weather map features for noon today.
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
63/34
Dover
62/36
Cape May
Annapolis
58/36
62/38
OCEAN: 62°
Washington
65/41
Norfolk
68/46
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
61° 1:57 p.m.
39° 7:00 a.m.
53°/37°
74° 1973
15° 1930
63° 2:00 p.m.
30° 5:00 a.m.
52°/32°
71° 1990
19° 1996
63° 2:00 p.m.
32° 6:46 a.m.
51°/33°
73° 1990
15° 1951
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: –0.4° yr. to date: +2.9°
Precipitation
Virginia Beach
67/45
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 52°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
64/48
OCEAN: 52°
Normal
Snow, past 24 hours
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Low
Totals for season
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
1.99"
2.95"
35.09"
36.47"
0.0"
0.0"
0.00"
1.96"
3.17"
39.86"
38.34"
0.0"
0.0"
0.00"
2.13"
3.06"
37.31"
38.27"
0.0"
0.0"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
2 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, sunny. High 50–54. Wind northwest
6–12 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy. Low 31–35. Wind south
4–8 mph. Thursday, partly sunny, afternoon shower. High
43–47. Wind southwest 6–12 mph. Friday, mostly sunny.
High 44–48. Wind north 6–12 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, mostly sunny. High 57–68. Wind
west 6–12 mph. Tonight, mostly clear. Low 36–47. Wind
north–northeast 7–14 mph. Thursday, partly sunny. High
52–61. Wind east–southeast 4–8 mph. Friday, partly sunny.
High 53–57. Wind north–northwest 8–16 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly sunny. Wind west–
northwest 4–8 knots. Waves 1 foot or less. Visibility unrestricted.
• Lower Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly sunny. Wind
west–northwest 6–12 knots. Waves 1 foot on the Potomac and
Chesapeake Bay. Visibility unrestricted.• River Stages: Today, the
Little Falls stage will be around 3.2 feet, falling to 3.1 feet Thursday.
Flood stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
Annapolis
FORECAST
OCEAN: 49°
Richmond
67/38
Washington
ACTUAL
Ocean City
61/42
Lexington
63/37
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
F
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
3:34 a.m.
10:24 a.m.
4:03 p.m.
11:14 p.m.
12:34 a.m.
7:08 a.m.
1:31 p.m.
7:39 p.m.
Ocean City
3:16 a.m.
9:27 a.m.
3:34 p.m.
9:49 p.m.
Norfolk
5:11 a.m.
11:31 a.m.
5:36 p.m.
11:44 p.m.
Point Lookout
3:09 a.m.
9:25 a.m.
3:51 p.m.
9:23 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Edinburg, TX 86°
Low: Saranac Lake, NY –3°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
51/22/pc
56/38/pc
32/23/sf
68/52/s
73/42/pc
63/34/s
48/28/pc
72/54/pc
55/29/c
45/27/s
56/30/pc
44/29/s
45/21/pc
74/48/s
59/38/pc
71/42/s
53/23/pc
46/38/s
57/40/pc
48/34/s
68/45/c
58/26/pc
Tomorrow
43/35/pc
58/40/pc
26/18/s
69/54/pc
75/45/s
52/42/pc
48/32/pc
69/51/sh
50/26/s
45/31/pc
43/39/pc
48/35/r
41/34/pc
72/52/pc
62/38/sh
63/47/pc
47/33/s
51/31/pc
53/32/sh
51/35/sh
71/45/s
54/33/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
50/35/s
46/33/s
67/41/pc
7/1/c
48/33/c
55/23/pc
85/75/pc
79/51/pc
55/41/pc
74/57/pc
78/55/pc
50/37/pc
67/46/pc
67/48/c
75/54/pc
60/42/pc
69/54/pc
83/73/pc
44/36/s
44/36/s
68/48/pc
75/62/pc
59/36/s
68/46/s
52/29/s
47/32/sh
71/45/pc
4/–4/pc
44/27/s
42/36/pc
84/73/c
77/49/s
53/32/sh
74/52/c
77/54/pc
55/30/s
67/46/s
66/39/pc
76/54/s
57/36/sh
67/41/c
83/69/pc
49/32/pc
44/28/s
66/41/sh
75/57/sh
48/42/pc
61/46/pc
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
57/37/pc
52/31/s
80/62/pc
62/37/s
79/60/pc
52/32/pc
52/22/pc
50/37/pc
58/27/s
69/39/s
50/25/s
67/38/s
62/39/s
55/48/c
85/76/pc
47/27/s
68/55/pc
61/48/s
87/77/pc
50/42/c
40/29/pc
46/23/pc
83/65/pc
53/36/pc
60/36/pc
52/28/s
79/58/pc
51/42/pc
81/58/pc
53/33/sh
40/35/pc
47/38/r
46/39/pc
63/46/pc
55/29/s
59/42/pc
62/38/s
57/32/pc
85/75/pc
46/31/s
69/53/s
63/49/s
87/74/pc
48/41/r
39/31/c
46/37/r
82/62/pc
58/31/pc
Dec 3
Full
World
High: Telfer, Australia 109°
Low: Delyankir, Russia –69°
Dec 10
Last
Quarter
Dec 18
New
Dec 26
First
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:06 a.m.
2:29 p.m.
6:17 a.m.
3:27 a.m.
4:52 a.m.
8:38 a.m.
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
79/69/pc
77/58/s
59/45/r
87/67/pc
80/52/s
42/38/pc
36/21/pc
57/47/r
84/78/pc
40/28/r
78/70/pc
86/71/s
55/39/s
64/52/s
42/27/s
38/33/sh
36/30/sh
Set
4:47 p.m.
2:08 a.m.
4:15 p.m.
2:39 p.m.
3:24 p.m.
6:08 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
73/46/pc
Amsterdam
43/35/sh
Athens
59/53/s
Auckland
72/60/c
Baghdad
71/47/s
Bangkok
92/77/pc
Beijing
33/18/pc
Berlin
39/31/c
Bogota
70/47/pc
Brussels
41/31/sh
Buenos Aires
79/63/pc
Cairo
72/58/s
Caracas
76/66/pc
Copenhagen
39/30/r
Dakar
87/76/pc
Dublin
41/33/pc
Edinburgh
38/27/sh
Frankfurt
40/28/c
Geneva
40/28/c
Ham., Bermuda 71/65/pc
Helsinki
38/32/sh
Ho Chi Minh City 86/75/c
Tomorrow
74/44/s
41/31/sh
67/62/pc
72/60/sh
72/49/s
91/76/sh
37/17/s
38/29/c
70/50/r
39/29/sh
81/61/s
72/57/pc
75/67/pc
38/31/c
86/75/pc
41/32/pc
37/28/pc
37/29/c
37/28/sh
71/66/pc
35/32/sh
93/74/pc
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
79/69/pc
75/45/pc
56/52/pc
62/47/s
78/57/pc
55/28/s
87/75/pc
82/57/pc
89/76/pc
73/64/pc
59/43/sh
44/30/pc
55/31/sh
90/79/s
72/42/s
39/20/s
25/22/c
92/74/pc
76/59/t
80/52/pc
29/24/c
37/19/pc
43/36/c
39/31/sh
79/64/pc
75/45/pc
63/57/pc
62/47/s
78/59/pc
56/28/s
86/75/pc
81/59/pc
88/77/pc
72/64/c
56/43/s
39/35/pc
52/32/pc
89/79/c
70/40/pc
37/32/c
30/28/c
92/74/pc
75/59/t
79/51/pc
28/20/sf
38/30/r
40/32/c
35/26/sf
79/70/pc
82/57/s
58/41/r
87/67/pc
84/53/s
48/32/r
35/21/s
53/46/c
85/77/pc
34/28/sh
80/71/pc
76/65/r
59/40/s
54/44/r
44/33/r
36/24/sn
34/30/sn
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
brewers lament untapped potential
BREWERIES FROM B1
past several years.
“We have gone from start-ups
to major employers producing
hundreds of thousands of barrels of beer, with a broad fan
base,” he said. “And as they
contemplate expansion to meet
demand they are reluctant to
invest because of the onerous,
arbitrary restrictions.”
Del. Dereck E. Davis (DPrince George’s), chairman of
the House Economic Matters
Committee, said that the limits
have been in place for years and
while the industry is growing,
none of the state’s existing brewers have come close to the
current caps in place. The legislature raised the cap from 500
barrels to 2,000 barrels annually for taprooms.
“If you are giving your child
an allowance of $5 a day and
they are only spending $2.30
but still they are asking for $30
a day, that doesn’t make sense,”
said Davis, whose panel oversees liquor regulation. “They
are asking for more and complaining about something that
they are not even close to
reaching.”
Franchot has been the leading
voice in state government in the
fight for the breweries. This
spring he created a task force,
“Reform on Tap,” to highlight
the industry’s growth. The
group produced a report that
says there were 22 craft breweries in Maryland in 2010, producing nearly 92,000 barrels of
beer. This year 84 craft breweries are projected to produce
247,000 barrels. But the state
still ranks 25th nationally in per
capita beer production, 36th in
the number of breweries and
47th in overall economic impact.
Franchot, a former state lawmaker who is close to Republican Gov. Larry Hogan but has a
strained relationship with Democratic legislative leaders, suggested at the news conference
that resistance to his proposals
in Annapolis could stem from
those tensions.
He and state Sen. Ronald N.
Young (D-Frederick), who sup-
TOP AND BOTTOM LEFT, MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ/THE WASHINGTON POST; BOTTOM RIGHT, LINDA DAVIDSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: An employee at Union Craft Brewing in Baltimore walks near the Union Avenue building’s entrance.
Kevin Atticks of the Brewers Association of Maryland, from left, Gov. Larry Hogan (R) and Comptroller Peter Franchot (D) raise
pints of “Beat Army” lager at Chesapeake Brewing Company in Annapolis. A Union Craft Brewing vat gets a close eye.
ports the effort to change the
laws, encouraged brewers and
their customers to lobby their
legislators.
“This has nothing to do with
me or what the senators think of
me or the Senate president
thinks of Senator Young,” Franchot said. “It has everything to
do with the people, and the
people of Maryland in a very
broad-based way and a very
potent way are going to weigh in
on this and ask the legislature to
do the right thing.”
Davis said the legislature
will “take a look at what the
comptroller has to offer,” adding that while the “comptroller
likes to say he is the chief
alcohol regulator in the state,
the 187 members of the legislature are the chief policymakers
when it comes to alcohol. We’ll
do our job and we’ll let him do
his job.”
Todd Haymore, Virginia’s secretary of commerce and trade,
said
Maryland
breweries
reached out to Virginia officials
earlier this year about the differences in craft-beer rules in the
two states.
Since then, he said, he and
Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) have
had talks with Maryland brewers about the opportunities that
exist in Virginia.
“Am I aware of any Maryland
breweries who have pulled up
stakes and crossed the Potomac
into Virginia? No,” Haymore
said. “But at the same time, am I
aware of Maryland brewers and
entrepreneurs in Virginia in
dialogue per our invitation?
Yes.”
Benesch, whose company has
26 employees and plans to add
100 new jobs over the next seven
to 10 years, said Maryland is
“stuck” with restrictive laws because there had not been many
craft brewers in the state a
decade ago.
Now, he said, there are those
who are willing to make investments but “the government is
sending a very mixed message to
them on whether they want
them to make those investments
or they don’t want them to make
those investments.”
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
KLMNO
Style
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
C
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
MUSIC REVIEW
THEATER REVIEW
CAROLYN HAX
Even the attendees send
their regrets at the launch
of Greta Van Susteren’s
apology app. C2
At St. Vincent’s solo show
at the Anthem, she
performs all of her latest
and best album. C2
Give MetroStage and
Washington Stage Guild
credit for not regifting the
same old same old. C2
She’s his stepmother, but
his wife draws the line at
the kids calling “that
woman” Grandma. C10
CAROLYN VAN HOUTEN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Grace, a volunteer doula, holds the hand of a patient during an abortion procedure at a clinic in Northern Virginia.
Lending a hand
at the end of
a pregnancy
Doulas offer women support during abortions
BY
M ONICA H ESSE
“Do you support reproductive choices of all
shapes and sizes?” the flier had read, posted
online in early April. “Become an abortion
doula.”
More than 50 women had seen the flier on
Facebook or Twitter and responded to the
email address at the bottom, not entirely sure
what an abortion doula was. Twenty-five had
been selected for a weekend-long training at a
Virginia abortion clinic, and now, one Saturday morning in May, they’d arrived to see
whether they were right for the work.
A doula, traditionally, was trained to support a pregnant woman through her delivery,
explained a facilitator from a group called D.C.
Doulas for Choice. Traditional doulas weren’t
medical professionals, but they could hold
hands, offer distraction, supply heating pads.
In a roomful of doctors and nurses focusing on
the delivery of a healthy baby, a doula was
focused solely on the emotional well-being of
the mother.
What we need now is
a Swift kick in the pants
R ON C HARLES
If Gulliver could travel
through time, instead of sailing
around the world, imagine how
familiar the Yahoos of Washington would look to him now. What
would he say about the roaring
Lilliputians and the swollen
Brobdingnagians
stomping
around the capital?
Jonathan Swift, we need you
more than ever.
This week marks the 350th
birthday of the brilliant Irish
writer, born Nov. 30, 1667. That
we know of Swift at all is one of
the sweetest fortunes of literary
history. His father died of syphilis
before Jonathan was born. A wet
nurse whisked him to England
for three years. He depended on
the generosity of an uncle. He
was almost killed by a mail bomb.
But despite those precarious
turns, Swift became a poet, a
priest, a political operator and, of
course, the greatest satirist in the
English language.
The longevity of Swift’s work is
a testament to its potency because no genre fades as quickly:
Satires are the cut flowers of
literature. Time wilts their wit,
fading their bright colors like old
political cartoons that poke fun
at fat cats we no longer recognize.
(Voltaire adored Samuel Butler’s
1663 mock heroic poem “Hudibras,” but try reading it now
without footnotes.)
As contemporary allusions are
worn away by the acid rain of
history, the profound insights of
a great work of satire grow more
prominent. Today, scholars relish
the anti-Whig references in “Gulliver’s Travels,” but the rest of us
can still enjoy its wicked critique
of hubris, vanity and illogic.
George Orwell, himself a genius
at political satire, noted that
Swift “possessed a terrible intensity of vision, capable of picking
out a single hidden truth and
then magnifying it and distorting
it.”
Now, though, the pre-satirized
absurdities of the Trump era call
into question the potency of this
genre. What comic genius can
compete with the news? Most
days, the White House sounds
kookier than tea at the Mad
Hatter’s table. One minute
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C4
DOULAS CONTINUED ON C9
Project Veritas takes its
shot, but its aim is untrue
BOOK WORLD
BY
D.C. Doulas for Choice, a volunteer-based
collective, believed pregnant women needed
equal support if they decided not to become
mothers at all, the facilitator explained. And
so, if the aspiring doulas in this room made it
through training, and apprenticed through a
series of shadow shifts, then this is what they
were signing up for: To be in a surgical room
with a woman through one of the most intimate emotional experiences of her life; to hold
her hand while she has an abortion.
The facilitator asked everyone to share
strengths they could bring to the table, and
hang-ups they’d try to leave at the door. Bringing: openness, empathy and willingness to
learn, said the aspiring doulas. Leaving: nerves,
distraction and preoccupation with their own
busy lives. “Family judgment,” said a doula
named Grace. “My mother has told me she
would disown me if I had an abortion.”
The other women sitting around the table
BENOIT TESSIER/REUTERS
CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK
Rap music finally gets its
due with Grammy nods
BY
C HRIS R ICHARDS
Way back in 2002, the centripetal rap star of the moment, Jay-Z,
told someone at MTV why he’d
been skipping the Grammys since
1999: “I didn’t think they gave the
rightful respect to hip-hop.”
His point was completely valid
back then — and it remained so up
until Tuesday morning when the
Recording Academy announced
that the 47-year-old rap superstar
had been nominated for eight
Grammys, including the show’s
three sparkliest prizes: album,
record and song of the year.
Even better, it didn’t appear to
be a fluke. Rap (and rap-adjacent)
artists feel as dominant on this
year’s Grammy ballot as rap (and
NOTEBOOK CONTINUED ON C3
Jay-Z is up for the album of the year Grammy for “4:44.”
In the right-wing
campaign to
discredit the
truth, every day
brings a new low.
I don’t mean
Margaret
Roy Moore’s
Sullivan
campaign for U.S.
Senate, though
that certainly has
been at the center, lately, of the
broader crusade.
No, I mean the insidious drive
— led, sadly, by President Trump
— to undermine the reality-based
press in America and in so doing
to eat away at the underpinnings
of our democracy: a shared basis
in credible, verifiable facts.
Breitbart News, as that proTrump propaganda machine
calls itself, was part of the
campaign when it sent staffers (I
won’t call them reporters) to
Alabama for the express purpose
of knocking down a Washington
Post story. In it, multiple women
agreed to use their real names
and to be quoted about Moore’s
alleged sexual misconduct or
assault when they were girls.
(Breitbart ended up confirming
The Post’s story but crowed about
its own non-findings anyway.)
Trump was part of the
campaign when he called this
week for a trophy to be given for
“fake news,” disparaging CNN in
particular. And again when he
reportedly cast doubt on the
validity of the infamous “Access
Hollywood” tape in which he
bragged about grabbing women’s
genitals. There is no question as
to the tape’s authenticity.
But the new low came Monday
as Project Veritas — could its
name be any more Orwellian? —
was exposed for its clumsy effort
to lure The Post into publishing a
false story about a woman whose
girlhood affair with Moore led to
an abortion.
This would-be scam won the
race to the bottom — so far —
because, at its black heart, it
mocked the bravery of women
telling their own true, painful
experiences. It tried to make a
brazen lie the reason the women’s
stories would be dismissed.
Happily, The Post’s reporting
was rigorous. And luckily, the
scheme had all the savvy of a
bully who tries to steal your
lunch with the principal
watching.
“Beyond boneheaded,” was the
characterization of Byron York,
SULLIVAN CONTINUED ON C6
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
JACQUELYN MARTIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Andrés buys the first round.
Chef to CFPB
sta≠ers: Let me
buy you a drink
Super-chef José Andrés has
most recently made headlines for
feeding the people of stormravaged Puerto Rico (at last
count, he was rivaling the Red
Cross). Now his latest efforts at
comforting the afflicted are
directed a little closer to home.
The Washington-based
restaurateur on Monday offered a
free drink to staffers of the
Consumer Financial Protection
Bureau, who are in the awkward
position of not knowing who
heads their agency. It’s a messy
situation, but the upshot is that its
acting director, Leandra English,
filed a lawsuit to stop Trump
appointee Mick Mulvaney from
assuming the position. Both on
Monday claimed to be the rightful
director.
Andrés on Monday tweeted an
invitation for staffers to drink
away the weirdness at one of his
10 metro-area eateries: “@CFPB
team members! i know is
confusing. To have two bosses?
Please bring a proof you work
there to any of our DC restaurants
and first drink is on us . . . ”
Andrés, whom President
Trump sued after the chef backed
out of a plan to open a restaurant
in the Trump hotel complex, has
been working on his anti-Trump
Twitter-trolling game for a while.
He’s used the platform to tweak
Trump for his Puerto Rico
response.
Van Susteren
celebrates her
new book —
and her app
I
t might have been one of the biggest
moments in Washington dishing since . . .
well, who knows? Some of the city’s most
interesting characters had gathered
together on a small stage at the Jefferson Hotel
on Monday night to shoot a quick video in
which they were about to confess their darkest
secrets. Consider us riveted — and our recording
device on to capture the moment.
Taking a break from mingling at a book party
for longtime TV host Greta Van Susteren, the
bipartisan group — which included Sen. Amy
Klobuchar (D-Minn.), White House adviser
Kellyanne Conway, top lobbyist Heather
Podesta, media consultant Tammy Haddad,
former George W. Bush White House staffer
Anita McBride and Joe McCain, the brother of
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) — were planning to
test out Van Susteren’s new app, called “Sorry,”
which allows users to send apologies that people
can accept or reject.
On the count of three, the group chanted, en
masse: “I’m sorry!” But wait, for what? Drat,
they were leaving the juicy parts out this time.
Van Susteren, who is promoting the app in
addition to her new book, “Everything You Need
to Know About Social Media Without Having to
Ask a Kid,” says she imagines the app will be
used for both serious and lighthearted pleas for
forgiveness. “This should be fun — it’s not a lot
of hand-wringing,” she said. “I put my pets on
there apologizing for shredding our mail.”
So wait, why an app? Van Susteren, who last
BRUCE V. BOYAJIAN
Greta Van Susteren’s book party doubled as a fete for her new app, “Sorry.”
year abruptly quit her longtime hosting gig on
Fox News and went on to a short-lived show on
MSNBC, says it seemed like the thing to do in
the age of social media — besides, she had some
free time. “When you’re unemployed, you look
for something to do,” she said.
Well, some people take up pottery-making or
hot yoga. But “some people” aren’t Van Susteren,
whose eclectic roster of VIPs who turned out to
celebrate the fruits of her unemployment
included CNN’s Wolf Blitzer; literary agent Bob
Barnett; Navajo Nation president Russell
Begaye (you might have recognized him from
the disastrous photo op at the White House
earlier in the day when President Trump
brought up “Pocahontas”); former White House
spokesman Sean Spicer and his wife, Rebecca
Miller, of the National Beer Wholesalers
Association; GOP lawyer Ben Ginsberg; director
of the National Institutes of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases, Anthony Fauci; Democratic
strategist Hilary Rosen; and Roberta McCain,
the 105-year-old mother of Joe and John.
Conway was among those singing Van
Susteren’s praises. “She’s one of the few women
on TV who covers her shoulders,” she said. “I
like that.” But when we asked what advice from
Van Susteren’s book, which suggests some level
of discretion (and proper spelling!) on social
media, that she might pass on to her famously
Twitter-happy boss, she had less to say: “No
comment.”
Have fun storming the castle. My work here is done. Matter of fact, so is Trump’s.”
— Veteran ranter and raver Keith Olbermann announcing his retirement from political commentary in one final online video. For the past
year Olbermann has hosted “The Resistance” for GQ magazine and on Monday signed off for good. According to the broadcaster’s tea
leaves, President Trump will be impeached in the next 13 months, so Olbermann’s shelf life as the administration’s gadfly has expired.
FREDERICK M. BROWN/GETTY IMAGES
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THEATER REVIEW
Two shows joyfully say
‘humbug’ to tradition
BY
KYLE GUSTAFSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
St. Vincent played her hits for 40 minutes before diving into songs from “Masseduction,” her latest and best album.
MUSIC REVIEW
At the Anthem, a seductive solo set from St. Vincent
BY
C HRIS K ELLY
“All human beings create their
own mythologies,” Annie Clark,
who performs as St. Vincent, explained to Pitchfork earlier this
year, “and I’m in the somewhat
bizarre circumstance of creating
a big mythology that gets shared
with a lot of people.” On Monday
night at the Anthem, Clark played
Edith Hamilton with her self-created mythology, embarking on an
audiovisual tour through her
body of work in three acts.
Instead of having a band open
the show, Clark screened “The
Birthday Party,” a darkly funny
short film she directed as part of
the horror anthology “XX.”
There’s nothing more self-assured than being your own opener, especially when you can soup
up your film’s soundtrack with
THX-ish, blow-your-head-back
sound.
Act 2 was a 40-minute greatesthits compilation. Clark donned a
magenta fembot get-up — fake
fur, latex, thigh-high boots — and
made her way across the stage
and through time. She moved
through her catalogue chronologically, from the melodramatic
“Marry Me” to the raucous romp
“Actor Out of Work” to the brassy
and brash “Digital Witness” before launching into a sped-up
version of her angular dance party “Birth in Reverse.”
After a brief interlude (and a
costume change), the final act
was the main course: a full playthrough of “Masseduction,” her
latest and best album. It pulses
with the ragged electricity of
synth pop and industrial music,
and finds time not just for stadium-size anthems (“Los Ageless”)
and bittersweet ballads (“Happy
Birthday, Johnny”) but for songs
that manage to do both (“New
York”). As her album title suggests, Clark — unlike so many of
her guitar-wielding peers —
doesn’t shy away from the “sex” in
“sex, drugs, and rock-and-roll.” “I
can’t turn off what turns me on,”
she sneers on the title track of an
album heavy with kinky comeons.
Stage names work as synonyms, but that illusion often
breaks down live in concert;
Trent Reznor is Nine Inch Nails,
until he’s backed by half a dozen
people sharing a stage with him.
On Monday, Clark maintained
the illusion. If there was a band
supplementing her backing
tracks, the audience couldn’t see
it. Instead, Clark kept the stage to
herself, in front of a screen of
images cut and pasted from her
videos into GIF-like loops.
The images did more to portray
the essence of St. Vincent than
any backing band could (all apologies to the band). The world of
her music videos is cartoonish yet
hellish: a Pantone playground of
disembodied body parts, plastic
surgery, telephone cakes, supermodels at the apex of objectification. Watching St. Vincent perform in front of St. Vincent is like
being caught between two mirrors, an infinite loop of isolation.
What better way to examine the
mythology that Clark has created?
style@washpost.com
C ELIA W REN
At this time of year, theaters
often default to tried-and-true
stories, which can feel as familiar
as stripes on a candy cane. So it is
mildly satisfying to spot two
seasonal entertainments that not
only steer clear of Scrooge and
guardian angel Clarence, but
also use miscellany as governing
principle. Both MetroStage’s
“Christmas at the Old Bull &
Bush” and Washington Stage
Guild’s “A Child’s Christmas in
Wales and Other Stories” are on
the wheezy side, but each at least
recognizes that variety is the
gingerbread spice of life.
A bantering music-hall entertainment inspired by a legendary
London pub-and-venue, “Christmas at the Old Bull & Bush” ran
at Arena Stage’s Old Vat Room
for some years, starting in 1997.
The show’s writer, Catherine
Flye, directs the MetroStage incarnation, which features carol
singalongs, sketches, World War
I songs, music-hall tunes and
cheerfully creaky jokes (“You’ve
heard of King Lear? I played his
brother: Chandelier”).
The cast standout is the droll
and dulcet-voiced Tracey Stephens, who wears Edwardian
garb and, at one point, a military
helmet, to channel Florrie Forde,
a historical music-hall star. (Michael Sharp designed the costumes and Carl Gudenius, the
tree-bedecked set.) Flye is very
funny in a couple of comic bits,
including a portrait of a harried
Nativity-play supervisor; and
Bob McDonald brings concerthall flair to “The Road to Mandalay.” (McDonald shares his role
with Benjamin Pattison.)
Nailing the role of an impish
Cockney, Albert Coia is particularly hilarious in the song “Me
Little Yo-Yo,” about a marital
crisis triggered by the loss of a
toy. The number is one example
of the show’s abundant, not-verynaughty double entendres.
Other performances are more
workmanlike, and overall, the
holiday ebullience sometimes
seems forced. But at least the
show steers clear of the sentimentality that can be a seasonal
hazard. (A brief Cratchit-family
homage is played for laughs.)
There’s more sentiment in “A
Child’s Christmas in Wales and
Other Stories,” a world-premiere
yuletide tribute adapted and directed by Stage Guild Artistic
Director Bill Largess. On a set
depicting a genteel, seasonally
decorated parlor, actors Laura
Giannarelli (poised and spirited)
and Vincent Clark (passable) interpret poetry and prose by A.A.
Milne, Louisa May Alcott,
Charles Dickens (not “A Christmas Carol”) and Dylan Thomas,
with a few tunes and Christmasthemed historical anecdotes
tossed in for good measure.
Shows from MetroStage
and Washington Stage
Guild recognize that
variety is the
gingerbread spice of life.
The enactment of the title
story is the show’s highlight, on
the strength of Thomas’s writing.
The Alcott verses, with their
references to “Christmas fairies”
and “chanting cherubs,” supply
most of the mawkishness. In
general, the show labors mightily
to generate its festive spirit, but
at least it explores nonstandard
paths for getting to Noel.
style@washpost.com
Christmas at the Old Bull & Bush
written and directed by Catherine
Flye. Music direction, Joseph Walsh;
light design, Alex F. Keen; sound
engineer, William Wacker. With Brian
O’Connor, Peter Boyer and Katherine
Riddle. Two hours. Tickets: $55-$60.
Through Dec. 24 at MetroStage,
1201 N. Royal St., Alexandria. Visit
metrostage.org or call 703-548-9044.
A Child’s Christmas in Wales and
Other Stories adapted and
directed by Bill Largess. Setting, Carl
F. Gudenius and Kelvin Small;
costumes, Rhe’a Roland; lighting,
Marianne Meadows; sound, Frank
DiSalvo Jr. 70 minutes. Tickets $50$60. Through Dec. 17 at the
Undercroft Theatre, 900
Massachusetts Ave. NW. Call 240582-0050 or visit stageguild.org.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
Will Jay-Z’s introspective ‘4:44’ usurp Lamar’s ‘DAMN.’?
NOTEBOOK FROM C1
Best new artist
Album of the year
Record of the year
Song of the year
rap-adjacent) music has felt in
popular culture for, oh, the past
quarter-century.
Does progress this slow still
count as progress? Before you answer, remember that those coveted
golden
gramophones
are
industry-voted awards — which
means that the industry is ultimately voting for its own relevance.
And this year, the Recording
Academy appears to be doing
some course-correction after its
past two gatherings overlooked
black artists making politically
charged art in favor of white artists making sales-floor scorchers.
In 2016, it was Taylor Swift’s
“1989” that bested Kendrick Lamar’s “To Pimp A Butterfly” for
album of the year. In 2017, we
witnessed an instant replay when
Adele’s “25” topped Beyoncé’s
career-defining
“Lemonade.”
Even Adele was baffled by last
year’s Grammy voting bloc: “What
the f--- does [Beyoncé] have to do
to win album of the year?”
Neither Adele nor Swift is eligible for the top hardware at the Jan.
28 ceremony, and their male subordinates — Sam Smith and Ed
Sheeran, respectively — were
snubbed from the top categories
altogether. In fact, this is the first
time in Grammy history that the
album of the year pool is absent of
white men. So this year should be
different. (Unless Lorde’s somewhat-Swiftian
“Melodrama”
snatches album of the year away
from Jay-Z’s introspective “4:44,”
Alessia Cara
Khalid
Lil Uzi Vert
Julia Michaels
SZA
“Awaken, My Love!,”
Childish Gambino
“4:44,” Jay-Z
“DAMN.,” Kendrick Lamar
“Melodrama,” Lorde
“24K Magic,” Bruno Mars
“Redbone,” Childish
Gambino
“Despacito,” Luis Fonsi and
Daddy Yankee featuring
Justin Bieber
“The Story of O.J.,” Jay-Z
“HUMBLE.,” Kendrick
Lamar
“24K Magic,” Bruno Mars
“Despacito,” Ramón Ayala,
Justin Bieber, Jason “Poo
Bear” Boyd, Erika Ender,
Luis Fonsi and Marty James
Garton, songwriters (Luis
Fonsi & Daddy Yankee
featuring Justin Bieber)
“4:44,” Shawn Carter and
Dion Wilson, songwriters
(Jay-Z)
“Issues,” Benny Blanco,
Mikkel Storleer Eriksen, Tor
Erik Hermansen, Julia
Michaels and Justin Drew
Tranter, songwriters (Julia
Michaels)
“1-800-273-8255,” Alessia
Caracciolo, Sir Robert
Bryson Hall II, Arjun Ivatury
and Khalid Robinson,
songwriters (Logic featuring
Alessia Cara and Khalid)
“That’s What I Like,”
Christopher Brody Brown,
James Fauntleroy, Philip
Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray
Charles McCullough II,
Jeremy Reeves, Ray
Romulus and Jonathan Yip,
songwriters (Bruno Mars)
Lamar’s incendiary “DAMN.,”
Bruno Mars’s high-gloss “24K
Magic” and Childish Gambino’s
neo-funky “Awaken My Love!” —
which could very well happen.)
One guy who isn’t sweating any
of this: Drake. According to reports from Billboard, the most
influential rapper of his generation did not submit his chart-topping 2017 album “More Life,” or
any of the songs from it, for Grammy consideration. He seems to be
taking a move from Frank Ocean,
a two-time Grammy winner who
refused to submit his work for
recognition last year, explaining
that the Recording Academy, “just
doesn’t seem to be representing
very well for the people who come
from where I come from.” He sure
sounded a lot like Jay-Z circa 2002.
Does that mean we’ve come full
circle? Sure, the two top contenders for album of the year are rap
albums — but we aren’t out of the
woods just yet. If Jay-Z’s contemplative “4:44” ends up getting
more votes than Lamar’s more intense, more deserving “DAMN.,”
the Recording Academy will be
resorting to another one of its default moves: handing out the
night’s biggest trophy to an artist
many years past their creative
peak. It’s hard to forget Steely
Dan’s big victory in 2001, or Robert
Plant’s in 2008, or Herbie Hancock’s in 2009.
What if Jay-Z is just the new
Steely Dan? That’s the funny thing
about going full-circle. We end up
where we started.
ISTOCK
chris.richards@washpost.com
Koch brothers’ involvement in Time Inc. purchase raises questions, concerns
BY
P AUL F ARHI
Billionaires are no strangers to
the news-media business (one of
them owns this very newspaper)
but the big takeover deal announced on Sunday raised some
eyebrows nonetheless.
It wasn’t the acquirer — Meredith Corp., publisher of such
wholesome lifestyle magazines as
Family Circle and Better Homes
and Gardens — or the acquired,
Time Inc., that generated concern
and speculation. It was the identity of Meredith’s financial partner
in its $2.8 billion purchase of
Time Inc. that made this more
than just another bit of consolidation in the fading magazine industry.
Billionaire
industrialists
Charles and David Koch will supply about $650 million of Des
Moines-based Meredith’s purchase price for Time Inc., making
them part owners of such titles as
Time, People, Fortune and Sports
Illustrated. The brothers own a
vast energy, apparel and agriculture conglomerate called Koch
Industries, the second-largest privately held company in the nation, and this is their first major
investment in a news operation.
The Kochs are also major financial supporters of libertarian
and conservative causes and candidates, raising questions about
their political intentions, if any, in
backing Meredith.
After fueling the rise of the tea
party movement in 2010, the
Kochs have contributed untold
millions of dollars in so-called
dark money to support Republican candidates who oppose efforts to address climate change,
advocate dismantling the Affordable Care Act, oppose unions and
support tax restructuring favorable to wealthy interests.
“This is a passive financial investment,” a Koch spokesman
noted by email Monday, and Meredith said the billionaires will
receive no seats on Meredith’s
board and have no editorial role
in any of its newly acquired magazines. In a statement, it characterized the Kochs’ investment as
strictly financial, saying it underscored “a strong belief in Meredith’s strength as a business operator, its strategies and its ability
to unlock significant value from
the Time acquisition.”
The company additionally
pointed out that the money is
coming through the Kochs’ corporate investment arm, not out of
their pockets personally.
But that didn’t stop some anxious guessing.
Writing in the Nation magazine, former Time editor Charles
Alexander said the magazine’s
long history of award-winning environmental reporting is threatened by the Kochs’ involvement.
“It is perverse and dangerous for
two billionaires with no commitment to factual truth to be permitted to buy a magazine that has
been a voice for reason and use it
to further their narrow business
interests,” he wrote.
He added, “I still have faith that
in the long ideological war over
climate change, the truth will
eventually prevail. The ravages of
global warming will become too
obvious to be denied, even by the
likes of Trump. But by then the
damage to the planet may be
irreversible, and my beloved
Time, once a soldier for truth,
may have fallen casualty to the
forces of greed and deception.”
Such concerns may be “overstated,” said Jeffrey McCall, a
communication professor at DePauw University in Indiana.
If the Kochs really wanted to
push their political agenda
through the media, he said, they
would target outlets other than
magazines. “Time just doesn’t
have the broad sway it once held.”
The company’s other holdings,
such as People, Fortune and
Sports Illustrated, “aren’t major
players in the broader political
sphere,” McCall noted.
Instead, McCall speculates, the
Kochs see an easy entree into
media ownership at a relatively
low cost, at least for them. “If they
are really intent on becoming media moguls, this could be the first,
gentle toe in the water,” he said.
“Then, they could see how they
like it and determine later if they
want to expand their holdings
and influence.”
To be sure, the Kochs haven’t
been passive about their own media coverage in recent years. For
several years, the company maintained a website, KochFacts.com,
that provided rapid responses to
news coverage it deemed negative, often rebutting the stories on
a point-by-point basis (the site
appears to be dormant; it hasn’t
been updated in more than two
years).
Koch Industries has also gone
on the attack. After David Sassoon
of the Pulitzer Prize-winning site
InsideClimate News reported on
the company’s Canadian oil interests in 2012, the company took out
ads on Facebook featuring a photo of the journalist with the headline, “David Sassoon’s Deceptions.” The ad’s copy read, “Activist/owner of InsideClimate News
misleads readers and asserts outright falsehoods about Koch.”
The Koch website on occasion
published personal email exchanges between reporters and
company executives — sometimes to the reporters’ surprise.
The brothers also hired private
investigators to look into the
background of one writer, Jane
Mayer of the New Yorker magazine, who has done groundbreaking work on the Kochs’ network of
political contributions and con-
nections. (Her book “Dark Money,” probed the rising influence of
the Kochs and other ultrawealthy
political donors in America.)
The company took the unusual
step of writing to the American
Society of Magazine Editors to
object after the organization
named one of Mayer’s New Yorker
pieces on the Kochs as a National
Magazine Award finalist in 2011.
“Her article is ideologically
slanted and a prime example of a
disturbing trend in journalism,
where agenda-driven advocacy
masquerades as objective reporting,” wrote Koch attorney Mark V.
Holden in his letter. “Given these
facts, it would be inappropriate
for ASME to give Ms. Mayer’s
article an award in Reporting.”
Mayer didn’t win the award
that year.
Asked about the Kochs’ latest
deal, Mayer was skeptical on
Monday. “The Kochs have assured
the public that they have zero
interest in influencing news coverage through their financial
stake in the Time Inc. deal, but
UNLEASH
IMAGINATION.
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they also have assured the public
in the past that they had nothing
to do with the rise of the tea party,
that they have attached no strings
to the academic programs they
fund, and that they only act out of
selfless altruism rather than selfinterest when they pour money
into politics, all of which have
proven dubious,” she said in an
email.
“Time,” she said, referring to
the famed news magazine, “will
tell.”
paul.farhi@washpost.com
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. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
book world
AU D I OBOOK S
BY
K ATHERINE A . P OWERS
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS
By Agatha Christie
Harper Audio. Unabridged, 6¼ hours
Kenneth Branagh’s narration of
“Murder on the Orient Express” arrives
in tandem with the movie version, which
he directs and stars in as the cerebral
Belgian sleuth
Hercule Poirot.
Here he takes on
the entire
multinational cast,
and the result is a
highly entertaining,
virtuoso
performance of
voice and manner. As befits a novel
written by that most English of mystery
writers, Branagh’s version of a French
(and Belgian) accent is not so much
authentically French as it is the timehonored Monty Python version of
Frenchmen tackling English. His
Americans — among them gabby Mrs.
Hubbard and the sinister Ratchett’s
agreeable private secretary, Hector
MacQueen — are excellent, broadvoweled fun. Branagh, like Christie
herself, goes to town on the Italian
American Antonio Foscarelli and comes
into his glory with the formidable
Princess Dragomiroff, whose autocratic
Russianness is a treat every time she
opens her imperious mouth. (“I think,
Madame,” Poirot observes, “your strength
is in your will, not in your arm.”) It
doesn’t matter if you know the plot.
“Murder on the Orient Express” as
performed by Branagh is more than a
mystery — it is a delicious performance.
THE BOOK OF DUST: LA BELLE SAUVAGE
By Philip Pullman
Listening Library. Unabridged, 13 hours
ALLA DREYVITSER/THE WASHINGTON POST
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
kookier than tea at the Mad Hatter’s
table. One minute Reince Priebus is
groveling, “Mr. President, we thank you
for the opportunity and the blessing that
you’ve given us to serve your agenda.”
The next, Betsy DeVos is suggesting that
schools might need guns to protect
students from grizzly bears.
This is climate change nobody should
believe in, and it’s made us all weirdly
self-conscious about satire. On Facebook, one constantly sees real stories
prefaced with the advisory: “Not from
the Onion!” Otherwise, who would accept headlines about a former ghosthunter considered to be a federal district
court judge, or the Secretary of the
Treasury neglecting to disclose $100
million in personal assets? With the
Grabber-in-Chief constantly stroking
himself, the Oval Office outstrips the
imaginations of even our cleverest writers. This year, both Salman Rushdie and
Harold Jacobson aimed for the heart of
the bloated beast — and missed badly.
W.B. Yeats knew what he was talking
about when he said of Swift, “Imitate
him if you dare.”
Consider the remarkable persistence
of “A Modest Proposal,” published anonymously in 1729. Swift’s ironic phrase is
such a hardy part of our language that it’s
easy to forget how unlikely it is that we’d
still be referring to a 3,000-word political pamphlet almost 300 years later.
Originally titled “A Modest Proposal for
Preventing the Children of Poor People
From Being a Burden to Their Parents or
Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Public,” the essay burns with
rage at a privileged class willing to ignore
and rationalize human suffering. Although the plight of starving Irishmen
may be unimaginable to us today, the
centuries have done nothing to mute
Swift’s savage indignation. He still
Could Swift save
the gullible from
their travails?
sounds as timely as last night’s “Daily
Show.”
If you haven’t read “A Modest Proposal” since high school, look it up again and
be astounded. Speaking in the voice of a
perfectly reasonable bureaucrat, Swift
begins by describing the piteous state of
beggars and their children “all in rags,
and importuning every passenger for an
alms.” In response to this “deplorable
state,” he announces a solution, “having
no other motive than the publick good of
my country, by advancing our trade,
providing for infants, relieving the poor,
and giving some pleasure to the rich”:
Why not harvest these Irish babies?
“A young healthy child well nursed, is,
at a year old, a most delicious nourishing
and wholesome food, whether stewed,
roasted, baked, or boiled.”
Much of Swift’s essay is taken up with
various statistics and logistical explanations, a hellacious spreadsheet of infant
flesh to lay out the case for utilizing
100,000 children nursed to approximately 28 pounds each. In those wellmodulated sentences, Swift washes individuals and their pain away. As John
Stubbs writes in his recent biography,
Swift possessed an “unequalled capacity
to endow a ludicrous line of argument
with an air of steadfast reason.” The
bloody solution of “A Modest Proposal” is
easy to laugh off as a bit of grotesque
The real horror of “A Modest Proposal” remains its
bland, bureaucratic tone — the same sterile
language of accounting that justified American
slavery, the Holocaust or any scheme that slices
human lives into the columns of a ledger.
hyperbole, but the real horror of the
essay remains its bland, bureaucratic
tone — the same sterile language of
accounting that justified American slavery, the Holocaust or any scheme that
slices human lives into the columns of a
ledger.
Even now, our political leaders are
scheming to strip millions of Americans
of health insurance so that the resultant
federal savings can be lavished on the
richest citizens. That may not be a recipe
for roasting babies au gratin, but it
makes a tasty birthday cake.
If politicians haven’t changed their
menu much in 300 years, the rest of us
still face the same risk of indigestion.
Remember that “Gulliver’s Travels” ends
with the intrepid narrator isolated and
disgusted. Orwell assumed that Gulliver
reflected his creator’s morose character
and claimed that Swift suffered from a
“general hatred of humanity” stoked by a
perverse obsession with mankind’s sins
and weaknesses. Stubbs argues that the
image of Swift as a “misanthropic monster” is not entirely fair, but Gulliver’s
fate is instructive, nonetheless.
Now that we’re all strident critics
trading the day’s outrages across Twitter
and the dining room table, how are we to
avoid being sickened by our own bitter
indignation? The bile in a satirist’s mind
must be balanced with hope, or the
whole enterprise is doomed. Surely,
Swift wouldn’t have bothered to poke fun
at cruelty, incompetence and hypocrisy
unless he believed, on some level, that
such scalding exposure could awaken a
better nature.
On his 350th birthday, it’s good to
remember that despair is the satirist’s
temptation and the citizen’s poison.
ron.charles@washpost.com
Ron Charles is the editor of Book World and
host of TotallyHipVideoBookReview.com.
The first time’s never that great: Jane the Virgin writes a book
BY
N ICOLE Y . C HUNG
Jane Gloriana Villanueva can claim
something that most authors can’t. Despite being a fictional character on the
CW’s rom-com “Jane the Virgin,” Villanueva is a published author on the show
and in real life. Her debut historical
romance, “Snow Falling,” was unveiled
in the Nov. 10 episode of “Jane the
Virgin” and then hit actual bookstores
across America.
Life imitates art in this elaborate act
of corporate synergy swirling around the
story of a Latina virgin who works in a
Miami hotel. On the show, viewers saw
Jane pursuing an MFA and writing a
novel called “Snow Falling” in her spare
time. Variety reports that Simon &
Schuster approached its fellow CBS
subsidiary the CW about making Jane’s
book a reality. To pull off that bit of
publishing trompe-l’œil, Simon & Schuster imprint Adams Media renamed itself
Lorden + Gregor, the fictional publishing house that buys Jane’s novel in
Season 3.
The real paperback book sports blurbs
from fictional characters such as Jane’s
biological father, telenovela star Rogelio
De La Vega; Jane’s favorite romance
writer, Angelique Harper; and her faculty adviser, Marlene Donaldson. Even the
book’s ghost writer, Caridad Pineiro, gets
in on the joke, saying, “Jane’s novel is so
much fun I wish I’d written it myself!”
“Snow Falling” essentially moves the
basic plot of “Jane the Virgin” to the early
20th century. But what works well on the
show doesn’t always make a convincing
story line in the book. For instance, while
Jane’s virginity differentiates her in the
SNOW FALLING
By Jane Gloriana
Villanueva
Lorden + Gregor.
240 pp. Paperback,
$15.99
current-day plot, waiting until marriage
was the societal norm in 1902. And a
relationship crossing cultural divides
would have confronted a lot more racism
in the early 1900s than we see in these
pages.
So, fans of the TV show shouldn’t look
for new thrills and plot twists in “Snow
Falling,” but it might be just the thing for
a cold winter’s night between episodes.
Meta as Jane’s novel is, books jumping
out of popular TV shows, movies and
other books are nothing new. “Fantastic
Beasts and Where to Find Them,” “Quidditch Through the Ages” and “The Tales
of Beedle the Bard” all emerged from the
Harry Potter universe. As a marketing
strategy, these products have the advantage of instant name recognition and a
built-in audience. With the ongoing shift
in how people consume books, it will be
interesting to see if more titles mentioned in movies and TV shows come to
sit on actual shelves.
My vote is for “Congratulations, You’re
Dying,” the debut novel by Jimmy ShiveOverly, the British cad on FXX’s romcom “You’re the Worst.”
nicole.chung@washpost.com
Nicole Y. Chung works in Book World at The
Washington Post.
Actor Michael Sheen brings the rich
timbre of his Welsh voice to Philip
Pullman’s “The Book of Dust,” a kind of
prequel to the “His Dark Materials”
trilogy. Free from much of the
cosmological and didactic trappings of
those books, this is
a terrific, suspensefilled adventure
that is nigh
impossible to
switch off. Played
out in an England
existing in a
dimension parallel
to ours, the story
finds Lyra, star of the trilogy, as a baby
pursued by a madman and his hideous
hyena daemon. Lyra’s protectors are 11year-old Malcolm and 15-year-old Alice.
They flee with baby Lyra in La Belle
Sauvage, Malcolm’s cherished canoe,
paddling through a flooded Thames
Valley, a nightmarish waterscape
bobbing with bodies and infested with
rogues, villains, a very bad fairy and a
water giant, slow and sogged of speech.
Sheen’s voice truly contains multitudes,
capturing the nature of each character
with brio and passing from speaker to
speaker with preternatural limberness.
This is an audiobook for everyone over
the age of 8, a splendid achievement of
storytelling and a masterpiece of voice
acting. Beyond that, it ends with the most
welcome of phrases: “To be continued.”
UNCOMMON TYPE: SOME STORIES
By Tom Hanks
Random House Audio. 10 hours
Tom Hanks reads his own debut
collection of 17 stories. They are paeans
to a bygone America, as well as to space
and time travel, newspapers and,
preeminently, to the venerable
typewriter — even though, as one
character notes, “A
man needs a
typewriter these
days like he needs a
timber ax.”
Heartwarming,
often humorous
and, at times, a little
hokey, the stories
grow on you. One concerns a man
repeatedly returning to the 1939 World’s
Fair by time travel to see a woman. In
another, some friends travel around the
moon. Four stories are jeremiads against
the digital age by a hack reporter.
Elsewhere, children figure out what lay
behind their parents’ divorce, and a
newly unattached woman gets a life with
— no surprise — a typewriter. As it
happens, Hanks plays an excellent
manual typewriter himself, putting his
all into the “chonk-a-chonk” of typing,
line-ending ba-dings, carriage-returns
and the sound of paper being whipped
off the platen roller. His genial, regularguy voice maintains the general
narration, as well as the lines of the many
regular-guy characters. He even carries
off a French publicist with éclat, as she
might say herself if she weren’t
addressing the dim-bulb beefcake Rory
Thorpe, the subject of an entertaining
movie-marketing satire, “A Junket in the
City of Light.”
bookworld@washpost.com
Katherine A. Powers reviews audiobooks
each month for The Washington Post.
Literary Calendar
TONIGHT| 7 P.M. Rae Armantrout will be in
conversation with Book World Editor Ron
Charles for the Life of a Poet series, at Hill
Center in the Old Naval Hospital, 921
Pennsylvania Ave. SE. This event is free.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
11/29/17
FLORENT DÉCHARD/CBS
Bruno Mars: 24K Magic Live at the Apollo (CBS at 10) The singer gives
new meaning to “Uptown Funk,” performing his recent hits and other
favorites at Harlem’s famed venue.
Survivor (CBS at 8) Two castaways
are voted out in back-to-back
episodes.
Riverdale (CW at 8) Archie and
Jughead’s friendship is tested
when Penny Peabody, the
Southside Serpent-aligned lawyer,
decides to call in that favor Juggie
owes her.
Star (Fox at 9) Star’s jealousy gets
the best of her in an episode
packed with guest stars, including
CNN’s Don Lemon, who makes a
cameo as himself.
Mythbusters (Science at 9) How
destructive can a water heater be?
That’s the question at the center of
this week’s installment.
Murder Mystery (Investigation
Discovery at 9) The network’s
“American Murder Mystery”
franchise recounts the
disappearance of Laci Peterson
and the investigation that led to her
husband’s conviction for her
murder.
RETURNING
Vikings (History at 9) Season 5.
FINALE
Chance (Hulu streaming) This
psychological thriller, which stars
Hugh Laurie (“House”), ends its
second season.
LATE NIGHT
Conan (TBS at 11) Eric
McCormack, Rob Riggle.
PREMIERE
The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
(Amazon streaming) This dramedy,
from “Gilmore Girls” creator Amy
Sherman-Palladino, follows a young
woman (Rachel Brosnahan) who
tries her hand at a controversial
new career in 1958 Manhattan:
stand-up comedian. Alex Borstein
and Tony Shalhoub also star.
SPECIAL
Christmas in Rockefeller Center
(NBC at 8) Leslie Odom Jr.
(“Hamilton”), Gwen Stefani, Seal
and Jennifer Nettles are among the
performers at the 85th annual
holiday special.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at 11)
Talib Kweli.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) John Boyega,
Kevin Nealon.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Justin
Timberlake, San Juan Mayor
Carmen Yulín Cruz.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) James
Franco, Octavia Spencer, Brooklynn
Prince, BTS.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Armie
Hammer, Juno Temple, Charlie Puth.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) John Oliver,
Rachel Bloom.
— Bethonie Butler
7:00
7:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
8:00
◆ News
◆ Hollywood
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ TMZ
Mod Fam
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
◆ J’pardy!
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆
ET
9.1 WUSA (CBS) Off Script
14.1 WFDC (UNI) Enamorándome
◆
◆
Family
Feud
Family Feud
20.1 WDCA (MNTV)
◆ MotorWeek
22.1 WMPT (PBS) ◆ Business
26.4 WETA (PBS) PBS NewsHour
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
32.1 WHUT (PBS) Tavis Smiley ARTICO
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
66.1 WPXW (ION) Law & Order
Christmas-Rockefeller
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◆ Survivor
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Fox 5 News ◆ Page Six
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France 24 Programming
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10:00
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Mi marido tiene familia
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CABLE CHANNELS
Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage
Storage
Ozzy & Jack’s
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(5:30) The Book of Eli ★★
Movie: GoodFellas ★★★★ (1990)
Movie: Ghostbusters ★★★
AMC
Treehouse Masters
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Treehouse Masters: Branched Out
Animal Cribs
Animal Planet
(6:30) Movie: Coach Carter ★★★ (2005)
Face
50 Central Face Value
50 Central
BET
Housewives/Atl.
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Watch
Warm-Up
Bravo
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(10:06) Homestead Rescue (11:06) Homestead Rescue
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Raven
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ESPY Speech College Basketball: Michigan at North Carolina (Live)
College Basketball: Duke at Indiana (Live)
SportCtr
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(7:15) College Basketball: Clemson at Ohio State
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(11:15) NFL Live
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Iron Chef America
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Food Network
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Fox News
(6:25) Movie: Four Christmases ★★ (2008) Movie: Home Alone ★★★ (1990)
The 700 Club
Freeform
The Amazing Spider-Man
Movie: Fantastic Four ★ (2015)
Movie: Fantastic Four ★ (2015)
FX
(6:00) Miss Christmas (2017) Movie: A Gift to Remember (2017)
Movie: With Love, Christmas (2017)
Hallmark
Movie: The Christmas Card ★★ (2006)
Home for Christmas Day
Hallmark M&M Movie: Debbie Macomber’s Dashing Through the Snow
Earth Stood VICE
Movie: Kong: Skull Island ★★★ (2017)
REAL Sports Bryant Gumbel Tracey Ull
Rolling Stone
HBO
Property Brothers: Buying
Property Brothers at Home Property Brothers
Hunters
Hunt Intl
Property Brothers
HGTV
Vikings
Vikings
Vikings
(11:03) Vikings
History
Grey’s Anatomy
Little Women: Dallas
Little Women: Dallas
(10:02) Bring It!
(11:02) The Rap Game
Lifetime
ESPNWS
Orioles Classics
Ftbl
Coach K
MASN
Hardball Matthews
All In With Chris Hayes
Rachel Maddow Show
The Last Word
The 11th Hour
MSNBC
Catfish
(7:45) Catfish: The TV Show
(8:55) Catfish: The TV Show Are You the One?
(11:01) Floribama Shore
MTV
Drain the Ocean: WWII
Titanic: 20 Years Later
Save Titanic-Bob Balllard
Titanic: 20 Years Later
Nat’l Geographic Drain the Titanic
Extra
Wizards Overtime (Live)
Wizards
Redskins
NBC SportsNet WA NBA Basketball: Washington Wizards at Philadelphia 76ers (Live)
Thundermans SpongeBob Full House
Full House
Full House
Full House
Fresh Prince Fresh Prince Friends
Friends
Nickelodeon
Friends
Friends
Friends
Friends
Movie: Bad Boys ★★ (1995)
Spike
(5:30) Movie: Gladiator ★★★ (2000)
Movie: Battle: Los Angeles ★★ (2011)
Mad Max
Syfy
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Big Bang
Full Frontal
Conan
TBS
Man-Liberty
Movie: Winchester ’73 ★★★ (1950)
(9:45) Movie: Bend of the River ★★★ (1952)
Far Country
TCM
My 600-Lb. Life
My 600-Lb. Life
My 600-Lb. Life
TLC
(5:00) American Gangster
Movie: Colombiana ★★ (2011)
(10:01) Movie: American Gangster ★★★ (2007)
TNT
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Expedition Unknown
Travel
Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes Inside Jokes
TruTV
M*A*S*H
M*A*S*H
Everybody Loves Raymond Raymond
Raymond
Mom
Mom
King
King
TV Land
Cosby Show Cosby Show Unsung
Unsung
Unsung
Unsung
TV One
Law & Order: SVU
Movie: Faster ★★ (2010)
Mr. Robot
(11:01) Movie: Faster ★★
USA Network
Black Ink Crew: Chicago
Black Ink Crew: Chicago
Black Ink: Chicago
Dinner
Dinner
Black Ink Crew: Chicago
VH1
GE Washington
Govt. Matters Ravens Wir. SportsTalk
ABC News
News at 10pm
Govt. Matters On Your Side
WNC8
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
Cops
WGN
DOCUMENTARY
LEGEND: Bold indicates new or live programs
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
Scott Peterson: An American
Food with freezer burn won’t harm you, but it may not taste very good
Dear Heloise:
Hints from Does “freezer
Heloise
burn” on food
indicate that the
food is no longer fit for human
consumption? Is it actually bad
for you where it could kill you if
you eat it, or does it just lose
some of its flavor?
Joe G. in Florida
Joe G. in Florida: Freezer burn
is a matter of quality, not safety.
Freezer burn is moisture loss,
which can produce white spots
or dark discoloration. In all
likelihood, it won’t make you
sick, but it’s not going to taste
very good. You also might notice
a different texture to the food.
Dear Heloise: I needed only half
of a small zucchini for a stir-fry,
so I started by cutting off the
stem end, then I cut the zucchini
lengthwise until I had four
spears. I sliced across the spears
until I had the zucchini cut into
quarter-size pieces. It was quick
and easy. This also works well for
large carrots and cucumbers.
Rusti S. in Houston
Dear Heloise: I read in your
column about someone who
wrote about heating pizza in a
frying pan. Wow! I would never
have thought of that idea. I take
it out a half-hour before cooking
and heat it on low for about
10 minutes, and it’s always nice
and crispy. There’s no other way
to warm pizza.
Cheryl D., via email
Dear Heloise: The best way to
preserve marshmallows is to put
them into freezer bags and then
into the freezer. They do not
stick together, and they will be
fresh and soft.
Darlene M., New Braunfels, Tex.
Dear Heloise: Want a simple
dessert with a new flavor? Try
coffee ice cream with raspberry
topping, then top that with a
cloud of whipped cream and
maybe a few chocolate sprinkles.
My guests love it, and my
husband, who is an ice-cream
fiend, could eat it six nights a
week!
Marcee M., Tega Cay, S.C.
Dear Heloise: I have a drip
coffee maker, and recently I
found an easy way to clean the
part that holds the coffee basket.
I used a spray bottle, set to
stream, and hit the nooks and
ridges with streams of water. The
grime and coffee residue flowed
down the center hole, where I
had placed a tall glass to catch
the drips. It takes only a minute
to clean this part of the coffee
maker.
Yvonne in Falls Church, Va.
Dear Heloise: My rubber lid-
gripper finally wore out. I looked
in several stores, but couldn’t
find what I wanted. I had some
leftover rubber waffle shelf liner
that I cut into small-to-mediumsize squares and used them to
open those hard-to-open jar lids.
Laura L., San Clemente, Calif.
Heloise’s column appears six days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box
795000, San Antonio, TX 782795000, or email it to
Heloise@Heloise.com.
© 2017, King Features Syndicate
HOLIDAY EVENTS
Handel’s Messiah
Friday, December 1,
7:30 pm
Saturday, December 2,
4 pm
Sunday, December 3,
4 pm
The famous “Hallelujah Chorus” contains 128 separate
“Hallelujahs!” Find your reason to celebrate with Handel’s
Messiah.
Washington National Cathedral
3101 Wisconsin Ave., NW
Washington DC 20016
Enjoy this holiday masterpiece with period Baroque
instruments in the kind of soaring sacred space Handel
would have imagined.
202.537.2228
cathedral.org/messiah
Wed Nov 29 @ 8 PM
Thurs Nov 30 @ 8 PM
“Hilarious! Fearless” (Washington Post) one-man show
inspired by 100 day road trip through American heartland.
Starring the “peerless” (DCMTA) Dan Hoyle.
The Atlas Performing Arts Center
1333 H St NE
202-399-7993, mosaictheater.org
November 29 @ 8 PM
November 30 @ 8 PM
(post-show discussion
with Congressman
Adam Schiff)
December 1 @ 8 PM
December 2 @ 3 & 8 PM
December 3 @ 3 PM
Must Close December 3! Don’t miss this Trump-inspired
satire starring the “brilliant” (DCMTA) John de Lancie
(Star Trek), Brian George (The Orville), Haaz Sleiman
(Nurse Jackie), and local favorites Laura C. Harris &
Kim Schraf. Running in tandem with The Real Americans
& Draw the Circle. “Full of star power and resounding
relevance.” (Broadway World)
Mosaic Theater Company at
The Atlas Performing Arts Center
1333 H St NE
202-399-7993 ext 2
www.mosaictheater.org
$25–$95
Student & group
tickets available.
$20-$50
Valet Parking
available at
1360 H St NE.
$20-$65
Valet Parking
available at 1360 H
St NE! Info about
discussions at
mosaictheater.
org/discussions
THEATRE
Mosaic Theater Presents
The Real
Americans
Vicuna & The
American
Epilogue
Written by
Jon Robin Baitz
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
Yuja Wang plays
Prokofiev /
Rachmaninoff's
Symphonic
Dances
Tomorrow at 7
Friday at 11:30 a.m.
(Coffee Concert)
Saturday at 8
Witness the triumphant return of Yuja Wang as she effortlessly
conquers Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 5—a masterpiece
of her instrument's repertoire. She joins new music director
Gianandrea Noseda in a thematic program that explores the
connections between three composers and their lives abroad.
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
GALA Theatre
3333 14th Street, NW
202-234-7174
www.galatheatre.org
$10-$30
ForeWords, with with Classical WETA'sDeb Lamberton.
Beginning at 6:45 p.m. before the Sat., Dec. 2 performance.
AfterWords
post-concert
discussion
immediately
following the
Thu., Nov. 30
performance.
FILMS EVENTS
Reel Time at
GALA Films from Mexico,
Dominican Republic &
Chile
Wed, Nov 29 at 7 pm
Thurs, Nov 30 at 7 pm
Fri, Dec 1 at 7 pm
Nov 29: Refugio / Refuge & The Salinas Project
Nov 30: El Sitio de los sitios / Site of Sites
Dec 1: La vida immoral de la pareja ideal / Tales of an
Immoral Couple
Sat, Dec 2 at 4 pm, 7 pm
Sun, Dec 3 at 4 pm , 7 pm
Dec 2: Jeffrey 4 pm & Vida de familia / Family Life 7pm
Dec 3: Dos tipos de cuidado /Two Mischievous Guys 4 pm
& Jesus 7pm
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
In Spanish with
English subtitles
16-2898
C6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
MARGARET SULLIVAN
Seeing how the sausage is made — and that the main ingredient is real meat
SULLIVAN FROM C1
chief political correspondent for
the Washington Examiner, aptly
noting that stupidity and
maliciousness are a bad
combination.
A win, then, for reality. But a
troubling question arises: Who
will be believed? Journalists and
many thoughtful citizens may
have been high-fiving Monday.
And for good reason: The Post’s
video of the encounter with the
would-be source was like a
master class in reporting as highwire act.
But Project Veritas quickly
turned this into a fundraising
opportunity for itself, claiming
victory and releasing a video that
purported to show The Post’s bias
against Trump. (It depicted a
Post reporter explaining the
difference between news-side
reporting and editorial-page
opinion, which has been openly
critical of the administration.)
Some, undoubtedly, believed
Project Veritas’s take, cheered
and opened their wallets.
Are we as a nation so deep into
our social-media bubbles and echo
chambers that many have lost
track of what’s real and what’s
fake?
It’s a deeply troubling problem
but hardly a new one.
“If everybody always lies to
you, the consequence is not that
you believe the lies, but rather
that nobody believes anything
any longer,” wrote the Germanborn political theorist Hannah
Arendt many decades ago.
“And with such a people you
can then do what you please.”
That frightening change is
happening in America, and at a
shocking pace. But there are
encouraging signs, too.
One is that the reality-based
press (the phrase I prefer to
mainstream media) has been
forced to be ever more
transparent in how it operates.
No more can we hide behind a
paternalistic idea that “we know
best” or “it’s news when we say it’s
news.”
Far greater journalistic
transparency is required now.
And we’re seeing more of it.
When BuzzFeed made it clear,
as it broke the news about Rep.
John Conyers Jr.’s sexualharassment settlement, that its
information came from the far-
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
The Metropolitan Opera: The
Exterminating Angel ENCORE
1:00-6:30
Coco 3D (PG) 12:00-10:05
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:30- Justice League (PG-13) 2:004:45-7:30-10:30
2:30-4:30-8:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
2:55-5:50-9:10
1:00-3:10-4:10-6:15-7:15-10:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:00
Coco (PG) CC: 1:30-4:30-6:007:00-9:00
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin
Murder on the Orient Express
IMAX Theater
(PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:15-7:15-9:20
601 Independence Avenue SW
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:45 D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:10-4:10(NR) 2:40
7:30-9:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
12:35-4:25-7:00-10:15
Dream Big: Engineering Our
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
World: An IMAX 3D Experi2:10-5:00-7:45-10:20
ence12:25
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:25Missouri (R) CC: 1:25-4:1511:50-2:05
7:10-9:55
Justice League: The IMAX 2D ExJustice League in 3D (PG-13)
perience (PG-13) 4:20-6:35-8:55
CC: 5:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
1:15-4:20-7:20-10:15
Lady Bird (R) 1:00-3:30-7:25-9:50 AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr
8633 Colesville Road
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Missouri
(R) 12:20-2:20-4:40Experience (PG-13) CC: 12:307:05-9:25
3:30-6:30-9:30
Lady Bird (R) 11:20-1:20-3:20Justice League (PG-13) 7:305:20-7:20-9:20
10:30
The King of Comedy (PG) 9:15
Coco (PG) 12:30-3:30
Funny Face (NR) 7:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:20
The Wizard of Oz (1939) (G) 4:45
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
MARYLAND
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
1:00-7:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 4:00
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
(!) 4:40
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1:10-4:10-7:10
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 1:05-5:408:00
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 1:00-4:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 2:20-5:00-7:40
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 12:00-2:405:20-8:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: (!) 1:50-7:30
The Metropolitan Opera: The
Exterminating Angel ENCORE
1:00-6:30
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 7:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) (!) 3:20
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:30-3:15-6:00-8:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:45-6:45
The Star (PG) CC: (!) 1:30-3:45
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 1:00-7:00
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 1:30-4:157:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
2:00-4:30-7:10
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: (!) 1:45-4:30-7:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 12:00-2:50-5:45-8:35
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 4:00
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
12:15-3:15-6:15-7:15-9:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 12:15-1:30-6:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:30-6:15-9:10
Albert Einstein Planetarium - Wonder (PG) CC: 1:00-3:45National Air and Space Museum 6:30-9:30
6th Street and Independence Ave SW Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:15
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR) Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30 CC: 4:30-10:00
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:00- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
1:15-4:15-7:00-9:50
1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
Coco 3D (PG) (!) 3:00-9:00
Angelika Pop-Up
at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
Novitiate (R) 2:20-4:45
My Friend Dahmer (R) 12:002:30-5:00-7:35
Last Flag Flying (R) 12:00-7:20
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 11:30-2:00-4:20-7:00
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Szczescie swiata 8:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:30-2:15-5:00
Lady Bird (R) 11:00-1:15-3:305:45-8:00
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
12:05-12:15-2:25-4:50-7:209:50-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:25-7:35-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:50-2:15-2:404:40-5:00-7:10-9:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
12:15-3:30-7:00-10:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
11:55-2:25-4:55-7:30-10:05
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
The Breadwinner (PG-13) 12:453:00-5:15-7:30-9:45
God's Own Country 1:15-4:157:15-9:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 1:00-4:00-6:307:00-9:15-9:40
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R)
CC: 4:10-9:30
Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:00-2:15-3:154:30-5:30-6:45-7:45-9:00-9:50
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 1:20-4:20-7:20-9:40
The Florida Project (R) CC:
1:10-7:10
AMC Columbia 14
10300 Little Patuxent Pkwy
Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:20-6:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:40-2:50-3:40-6:20-9:40
The Star (PG) CC: 11:40-2:104:50-7:20-9:50
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:30-2:15-2:455:30-8:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:05-1:50-4:407:20-10:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:504:35-7:15-9:55
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
10:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:50-2:20-4:50-7:25-9:50
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: (!) 10:50-1:354:20-7:10-9:55
Howl’s Moving Castle - Studio
Ghibli Fest 2017 (!) 7:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
(!) 9:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 10:50-1:40-4:30-7:20-10:15
The Metropolitan Opera: The
Exterminating Angel ENCORE (!)
1:00-6:30
Lady Bird (R) (!) 11:35-2:15-4:557:30-10:05
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 12:30
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) (!) 1:10-4:107:10-10:00
Justice League (PG-13) (!)
5:00-8:10
Coco (PG) (!) 10:50-1:50
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
11:45-2:35-5:25-6:45-8:15-9:35
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:35-2:35-5:35-7:05-8:35-10:05
The Star (PG) CC: 11:40-3:055:20-7:45-10:00
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 11:50-1:10-2:10Landmark West End Cinema 4:10-5:10-7:10-8:10-10:10
2301 M Street NW
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:35-2:20-5:05Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:007:45-10:25
3:15-5:30-7:45
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:30-12:45Jane 1:10-7:40
2:45-3:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
The Women 1:30-4:30-7:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
The Square (R) CC: 4:15
1:55-4:45-7:20-9:55
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
11:40-1:45-5:30-8:00-10:25
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
11:00-12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00 Missouri (R) CC: (!) 11:45-2:05Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 4:55-7:40-10:20
The Man Who Invented Christ701 Seventh Street Northwest
Justice League (PG-13) 12:00- mas (PG) (!) 11:50-2:25-5:007:35-10:10
3:00-5:45-8:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:30CC: 12:25-3:15-6:05-8:55
4:35-7:45-10:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
The Star (PG) 12:40-2:55-5:10(!) 1:25-4:30-7:25-10:15
7:35-10:00
Coco (PG) 1:00-3:30-4:30-7:00- Lady Bird (R) (!) 11:30-2:00-4:507:15-9:40
7:30-10:45
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 12:10-3:10Murder on the Orient Express
6:10-9:10
(PG-13) 12:00-2:45-5:25-8:05Justice League: The IMAX 2D
10:45
Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:50Wonder (PG) 12:15-3:00-5:354:40-7:30-10:20
8:10-10:45
Coco (PG) (!) 12:40-3:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
AMC Loews
1:00-6:30
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:5011115 Mall Circle
3:15-9:55
Howl's Moving Castle - Studio Justice League (PG-13) CC: (!)
Ghibli Fest 2017 7:00
10:00-4:45-7:45-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
3:45-9:30
11:45-3:00-6:00-9:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
The Star (PG) CC: 9:30-2:00-5:3012:45-3:55-7:15-10:20
6:45-10:45
right media figure Mike
Cernovich, it protected itself and
helped its readers. When The
Post clearly laid out how it got its
original Moore story — that
reporters found and persuaded
women to tell their stories — it
makes its journalism more
bulletproof.
Newspeople used to joke that
readers should never be allowed
to see how the sausage is made.
Now we need to show that messy
process as clearly as possible. Our
very credibility depends on it.
Project Veritas prides itself on
its ability to do just that — to go
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 9:45-10:4512:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:55-2:45-3:458:00-10:30
Wonder (PG) CC: 9:30-12:103:00-6:00-9:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:45-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: (!) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-9:15
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 2:45-6:009:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
12:00-4:05-6:30-9:25
The Star (PG) CC: 11:10-1:554:30-7:00-9:10
Coco (PG) CC: 11:00-12:00-1:001:55-3:00-3:50-4:45-6:40-7:358:45-9:30-10:25
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:05-1:45-4:407:20-10:00
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:403:00-4:20-6:05-7:00-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
11:50-2:20-4:50-7:40-10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:30-2:00-4:35-7:05-9:30
AMC Magic Johnson
The Man Who Invented
Capital Ctr 12
Christmas (PG) CC: 11:00-1:30800 Shoppers Way
6:45-9:20
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 3:15- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
5:15-6:15-9:15
11:00-12:50-4:00-6:55-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Landmark
1:50-4:50-7:45
Bethesda Row Cinema
The Star (PG) CC: 2:45-5:007235 Woodmont Avenue
7:25-9:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Coco (PG) CC: 1:00-4:00-6:0012:55-3:55
7:00-9:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Jigsaw (R) CC: 4:45-9:45
(PG-13) CC: 1:40-4:15-7:20-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:20-4:05-6:45-9:40 Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 1:304:25-7:10-9:50
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:10-3:45Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
6:30-9:10
Missouri (R) CC: 1:00-2:00-4:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
4:50-6:30-7:00-7:30-9:35-10:00
1:05-3:30-6:05-8:30
The Man Who Invented ChristJustice League in 3D (PG-13)
mas (PG) CC: 1:20-3:55-7:15-9:45
CC: 2:15-8:00
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Lady Bird (R) CC: 1:10-1:503:20-4:40-5:40-6:50-7:45-9:001:30-4:30-7:30
9:25-9:55
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 2:20-7:10
Old Greenbelt Theatre
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 3:00-10:00
129 Centerway
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
The Florida Project (R) 2:30Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:155:15-7:45
4:15-7:15
ArcLight Bethesda
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Paragon Kentlands Stadium 10
629 Center Point Way
Justice League (PG-13) 5:00Justice League (PG-13) 8:005:50-7:35-8:30
10:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
The Star (PG) 11:05-2:50-5:254:30-7:15
7:10-9:10
The Star (PG) 4:55-7:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Coco (PG) 5:30-8:15
(PG-13) 11:50-2:40-5:35-7:45Murder on the Orient Express
10:10
(PG-13) 5:10-7:45
Wonder (PG) 11:20-1:45-2:25Wonder (PG) 4:00
4:30-5:15-7:05-8:20-9:15-10:25 A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
5:10-7:30
2:45-10:40
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:45- 5:10-7:25
1:10-4:50-7:40-9:50
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 4:00-7:00
Missouri (R) 11:55-2:30-3:25Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
4:55-6:00-8:05-10:15
3899 Branch Avenue
Justice League (PG-13)
Justice
League (PG-13) 1:4511:25-12:35-2:00-3:00-4:45-5:304:30-7:15-8:40
7:15-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:30- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:154:05-7:00
2:10-5:10-7:50-10:00
Coco (PG) 1:15-4:00-7:00-7:30- Coco (PG) 12:00-2:00-2:50-4:555:45-7:50
9:30-10:25
The Man Who Invented Christ- Wonder (PG) 2:10-4:50-7:30
mas (PG) CC: 11:35-2:15-4:35- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:302:55-5:20-7:40
7:55-9:40
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:45
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
11:15-12:15-1:50-4:40-7:35-10:20 Justice League (PG-13) 2:10Coco 3D (PG) 12:40-3:30-6:30
3:10-5:10-8:10
Lady Bird (R) 11:10-12:30-3:10- Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 2:555:20-7:25-8:10-10:30
6:20-9:20
Coco (PG) 11:00-2:05-5:00
The Star (PG) 2:15-4:30-6:50-9:30
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
Coco (PG) 1:15-4:15-6:00-7:151020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
10:15
Justice League (PG-13) 11:00- Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13)
2:25-5:15-8:00
12:00-2:00-5:00-6:00-8:00-10:50
Wonder (PG) 1:50-4:40-7:35Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
11:10-1:10-2:10-4:10-5:10-7:10- 10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:00
8:10-10:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:50The Star (PG) 12:10-2:40-5:105:20-7:50-10:30
7:25-9:40
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:20-3:30-4:20- Marshall (PG-13) 1:00
My
Friend Dahmer (R) 2:20-5:006:30-7:30-9:30-10:30
7:40-10:25
Wonder (PG) 1:30-4:30-7:20Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
10:10
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:05- 1:10-4:10-7:10-10:10
12:40-1:40-3:40-4:40-6:20-7:40- Howl’s Moving Castle - Studio
Ghibli Fest 2017 7:00
9:05-10:40
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:20
3:00-9:00
The Metropolitan Opera: The
Justice League (PG-13) 1:00Exterminating Angel ENCORE
4:00-7:00-9:50
1:00-6:30
Bow Tie Harbour 9
Coco 3D (PG) 3:00-9:00
2474 Solomons Island Road
Justice League (PG-13) 6:10-9:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Missouri (R) 10:50-1:50-5:00Stadium 20 & IMAX
7:50-10:30
900 Ellsworth Drive
The Man Who Invented
Christmas (PG) 11:00-2:00-4:30- Justice League (PG-13) 12:504:00-6:15-9:20
7:10-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:20Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
4:35-6:55-7:40-10:10-10:45
10:30-1:20-4:20-7:30-10:20
Coco (PG) 12:10-12:40-3:20-3:40Murder on the Orient Express
4:20-6:30-7:30-9:40
(PG-13) 10:30-1:00-3:40-6:40Murder on the Orient Express
9:40
(PG-13) 12:50-3:50-7:00-10:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Wonder (PG) 1:20-4:10-7:152:20-4:40-9:45
10:10
Last Flag Flying (R) 1:10-4:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:456:50-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 3:40-6:25-9:10
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 11:40-7:00
Missouri (R) 1:10-4:15-7:15-10:15
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:30-4:50Howl’s Moving Castle - Studio
7:20-10:10
Ghibli Fest 2017 7:00
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
10:05
Justice League (PG-13) 2:40-8:45 Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 3:45-10:05 1:30-4:35-7:45-10:55
Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital The Metropolitan Opera: The
3D (PG-13) 12:35-6:55
Exterminating Angel ENCORE
The Star (PG) 12:55-3:30-5:5012:55
8:05-10:30
Coco 3D (PG) 1:10-10:30
Coco (PG) 12:00-3:00-4:55-6:00- Justice League: The IMAX 2D
8:00-9:00
Experience (PG-13) 1:45-4:45Murder on the Orient Express (PG- 7:50-11:00
13) 10:55-1:45-4:30-7:25-10:15
Regal Germantown Stadium 14
Wonder (PG) 12:50-4:00-7:30-10:20
20000 Century Boulevard
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 12:40Justice
League (PG-13) 11:003:25-6:10-9:00
12:00-2:00-3:00-5:00-6:00-8:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:209:00-11:00
4:05-7:20-10:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
The Metropolitan Opera: The
11:00-12:30-2:00-3:30-5:00-8:00Exterminating Angel 1:00-6:30
9:45-11:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
The Star (PG) 11:45-5:15-8:3011:30-5:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) 1:10- 10:45
Coco (PG) 11:45-2:15-3:00-4:304:10-7:15-10:25
Coco 3D (PG) 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00 6:15-7:30-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express
Justice League (PG-13) 11:00(PG-13) 1:15-4:00-6:45-9:45
12:10-1:25-2:00-2:40-3:15-4:30Wonder (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:306:20-7:35-8:45-9:25
7:15-10:15
Coco (PG) XD: 10:55-2:00
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:15Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
1:45-4:15-7:15-10:00
11:30-5:45-10:20
Marshall (PG-13) 10:00
Justice League (PG-13) XD:
Justice
League in 3D (PG-13)
5:05-8:10
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14 My Friend Dahmer (R) 12:001591 West Nursery Road
2:45-5:30-8:15-11:00
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Howl’s Moving Castle - Studio
11:20-12:20-1:20-2:10-3:10Ghibli Fest 2017 7:00
4:10-5:00-6:05-6:55-7:45-8:50Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:00-2:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
9:40-10:30
The Metropolitan Opera: The
Exterminating Angel ENCORE
1:00-6:30
Coco 3D (PG) 1:30-10:30
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Stadium 14
6505 America Blvd.
Justice League (PG-13)
12:30-1:00-3:30-4:15-6:30-7:309:30-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:154:15-7:15-10:30
The Star (PG) 12:45-3:15-5:458:15-10:45
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:00-4:00-6:307:00-9:45
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:005:45-9:45
Wonder (PG) 1:00-3:45-6:45-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:154:15-6:45-9:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:004:30-7:15-10:00
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:45-4:307:15-10:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
2:00-5:15-8:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:15-4:15-7:30-10:30
Coco 3D (PG) 3:30-10:15
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Justice League (PG-13) 1:001:15-4:00-5:30-7:00-8:45-10:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:154:20-7:25-10:30
The Star (PG) 1:15-3:40-6:45-9:15
Coco (PG) 12:10-12:30-3:30-6:157:00-9:30
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:30-4:20-7:00-9:50
Wonder (PG) 1:05-4:00-7:1510:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:15-3:00-6:45-9:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:454:10-7:25-10:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:00-3:15-7:30-10:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:20-4:30-7:40-10:40
Coco 3D (PG) 10:10
Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13
199 East Montgomery Ave
Justice League (PG-13) 11:151:00-2:00-5:00-7:15-8:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:004:15-7:45-10:45
The Star (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:007:45-10:15
Coco (PG) 11:30-12:15-2:45-3:306:00-6:45-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Wonder (PG) 1:30-4:15-8:0010:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:452:15-5:15-10:45
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
Howl’s Moving Castle - Studio
Ghibli Fest 2017 7:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
4:00-9:45-10:30
The Metropolitan Opera: The
Exterminating Angel ENCORE
1:00-6:30
Explosion (Yin Bao Zhe) (NR)
12:45-3:30-6:45-9:30
Lady Bird (R) 12:30-3:30-6:159:00
Coco 3D (PG) 9:00
Regal Waugh Chapel
Stadium 12 & IMAX
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Justice League (PG-13) 12:0012:30-3:30-6:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:403:40-6:45-9:50
The Star (PG) 1:00-3:15-5:307:45-10:00
Coco (PG) 12:30-1:15-4:15-6:307:15-10:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:45-4:40-7:30-10:20
Wonder (PG) 1:10-4:00-6:45-9:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:00-2:40-5:20-8:00-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:503:30-6:15-9:20
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
3:00-6:00-9:00-9:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Coco 3D (PG) 3:30-9:30
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 1:00-4:007:00-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:45-3:45-6:30-9:20
Wonder (PG) 1:20-4:15-7:00-9:50
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:102:50-5:20-7:50-10:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 12:20-3:20-6:15-9:00
Howl’s Moving Castle - Studio
Ghibli Fest 2017 7:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
12:00-3:30-6:50-9:40
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:10
The Metropolitan Opera: The
Exterminating Angel ENCORE
1:00-6:30
Lady Bird (R) 12:40-3:10-5:308:00-10:25
Coco 3D (PG) 3:00-9:10
The Star (PG) CC: 11:45-1:406:15-8:40
Coco (PG) CC: 11:50-6:00-7:0010:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:457:25-10:10
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:20-1:002:00-3:45-4:45-6:30-7:30-9:1510:15
Jigsaw (R) CC: 9:40
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
2:00-4:30-7:10-10:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:10-1:40-4:10-6:40-9:10
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) CC: 11:00-1:30-4:106:45-9:20
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 11:00-2:00-5:00-8:00
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14 Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
11:00-1:50-4:40-7:30-10:20
7710 Matapeake Business Dr
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 8:20
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
(!) 11:20-2:10-5:00-6:30-7:50Experience (PG-13) CC: 11:409:20-10:40
2:30-5:30-8:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
10:20-12:20-1:20-3:30-6:50-10:20 12:45-3:45-9:45
The Star (PG) Open Caption; CC: (!) The Star (PG) 4:00
11:00-1:30-4:10-6:40-9:00
Coco (PG) 1:45-4:45
Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:00-12:50Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
3:40
12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Murder on the Orient Express
Coco 3D (PG) 3:00-9:00
(PG-13) CC: (!) 10:30-3:00-6:20- Justice League (PG-13) 1:15-4:15
9:30
Coco (PG) 11:15-5:15
Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 11:10-1:55- Justice League (PG-13) 7:454:35-7:20-10:15
10:45
Jigsaw (R) CC: 2:30-5:10-8:20- Coco (PG) 2:15
11:00
Justice League (PG-13) 6:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
AMC Shirlington 7
10:45-1:45-4:50-7:40-10:30
2772 South Randolph St.
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC: (!)
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 4:00
12:10-2:40-5:30-8:10-10:45
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
1:45-3:30-7:00
(!) 10:10-10:50-1:00-1:40-3:50Coco (PG) CC: (!) 4:30
4:30-7:00-8:00-9:50-10:50
Murder on the Orient Express
Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 9:40
(PG-13) CC: 1:45-4:30-7:15
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:15-4:15-7:15
(!) 11:50-2:50-4:20-5:40-7:10Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
8:30-10:00
Missouri (R) CC: (!) 1:30-4:15Coco (PG) CC: (!) 10:40-11:407:00
1:50-4:40-7:30
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
iPic Pike & Rose
CC: (!) 1:00-7:30
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Lady Bird (R) 1:15-4:45-6:30
Justice League (PG-13) 1:15Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 1:30-6:45
4:30-7:45-11:00
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:007850e Tysons Corner Center
3:15-6:30-10:00
Justice
League (PG-13) CC:
Coco (PG) (!) 12:30-4:00-7:1510:55-12:15-2:20-3:15-6:15-9:05
10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Murder on the Orient Express
10:40-1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
(PG-13) 12:45-3:45-8:00-10:15
The Star (PG) CC: 10:30-1:45Wonder (PG) 12:00-3:00-6:154:15-6:40-9:50
9:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:00- Coco (PG) CC: (!) 12:10-6:10-8:009:15-10:55
5:00-11:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Murder on the Orient Express
Missouri (R) (!) 12:15-3:30-7:00- (PG-13) CC: 10:35-1:25-4:107:25-10:10
10:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) (!) Wonder (PG) CC: 10:20-12:001:05-2:45-4:05-5:30-8:10-9:451:00-4:15-7:30-10:45
Ferrari 312B: Where the Revolu- 10:50
A
Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
tion Begins (!) 7:00
4:00-9:20
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
11:20-2:00-4:30-7:05-9:40
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Missouri (R) CC: (!) 10:50-1:35Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:15- 4:35-7:40-10:30
Howl’s Moving Castle - Studio
4:00-6:45-9:30-10:15
Ghibli Fest 2017 (!) 7:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
1:15-4:10-7:00-9:50
CC: 11:30-5:15
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45 Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
(!) 11:00-1:55-4:55-7:50-10:40
Wonder (PG) CC: 1:30-4:15The Metropolitan Opera: The
6:50-9:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC: Exterminating Angel ENCORE (!)
1:00-6:30
1:20-8:40
Lady Bird (R) 11:35-2:10-5:00Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
7:30-9:55
2:15-3:50-6:20
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Coco 3D (PG) CC: (!) 4:20-7:2010:15
Missouri (R) CC: 1:45-4:30Justice League: The IMAX 2D
7:15-10:00
Experience (PG-13) CC: 10:20Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
1:15-4:15-7:15-10:05
CC: 4:45-7:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: Justice League (PG-13) 8:1511:00
2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15
Coco (PG) (!) 11:05-2:05-5:10; (!)
AMC Hoffman Center 22
10:25-1:20; (!) 3:10
VIRGINIA
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Justice League (PG-13) CC:
10:45-12:15-1:45-3:15-6:15-9:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
11:45-1:15-2:45-4:15-5:45-7:158:45-10:15
The Star (PG) CC: 12:30-2:455:00-7:10-9:30
Coco (PG) CC: 11:45-3:00-5:008:00-9:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 11:15-12:45-2:003:30-4:45-7:30-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
Regal Westview
2:15-9:00
Stadium 16 & IMAX
It (R) CC: 10:15
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Wonder (PG) CC: 11:00-1:454:30-7:15-10:00
Justice League (PG-13) 1:00Jigsaw (R) CC: 10:05
4:00-7:00-10:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) CC:
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
11:45-1:30-3:00-4:30-6:15-8:00- 11:20-2:10-4:45-7:25-9:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
9:30-11:00
11:55-2:35-5:05-7:40-10:10
The Star (PG) 12:00-2:30-5:15Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:25-6:00
7:30-9:45
Coco (PG) 11:00-12:30-2:00-5:00- Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) CC: 10:50-1:50-4:407:15-8:15-11:15
7:20-10:05
Murder on the Orient Express
My Friend Dahmer (R) 10:45AM
(PG-13) 11:15-2:45-6:00-9:15
Howl’s Moving Castle - Studio
Wonder (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:45Ghibli Fest 2017 7:00
7:45-10:45
The Man Who Invented ChristA Bad Moms Christmas (R)
mas (PG) CC: 11:10-1:40-4:2011:45-2:30-5:45-8:30-11:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:30- 6:50-9:25
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
2:45-5:15-8:00-10:30
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, CC: 11:30AM
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC:
Missouri (R) 11:15-2:30-5:3010:45-1:35-4:25-7:20-10:10
8:30-11:15
The Metropolitan Opera: The
The Man Who Invented
Christmas (PG) 11:00-2:00-4:30- Exterminating Angel ENCORE
1:00-6:30
7:15-10:15
Last Flag Flying (R) CC: 11:50Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
3:00-6:05-9:05
12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Lady Bird (R) 11:40-2:05-4:25Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
6:45-9:20
12:30-3:45-6:45-10:15
Coco 3D (PG) CC: 1:00-7:00
Lady Bird (R) 11:30-2:15-5:00Justice League: The IMAX 2D
7:30-10:00
Experience (PG-13) CC: 1:00Coco 3D (PG) 3:45-10:30
4:00-7:00-10:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 11:30-2:30- Justice League (PG-13) 4:55-7:45
The Star (PG) 10:50AM
5:20-8:15-11:15
Coco (PG) 11:00-2:00
UA Snowden Square
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Stadium 14
2:30-5:30-8:30
9161 Commerce Center Dr
Coco (PG) 6:00; 4:00
Justice League (PG-13) 12:50AMC Potomac Mills 18
1:30-3:50-4:30-6:00-7:20-10:002700 Potomac Mills Circle
10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:15- Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 11:05AM
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC:
3:30-6:40-10:30
11:15-1:00-2:15-5:15-7:15-8:30
The Star (PG) 1:15-3:40-8:50
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:00-4:00-6:10- Thor: Ragnarok in Disney Digital
7:10-9:40
3D (PG-13) CC: 4:00-10:30
Bow Tie
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
11940 Market Street
Justice League (PG-13) 12:303:30-6:30-9:20
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:553:55-6:55-9:50
The Star (PG) 12:05-2:30-5:157:35
Coco (PG) 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:50
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:50-4:50-7:50-10:40
Wonder (PG) 1:30-4:30-7:3010:25
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 9:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:005:00-8:00-10:35
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) 1:40-4:40-7:40-10:30
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:20-4:20-7:20-10:20
Justice League (PG-13) 1:104:10-7:10-10:00
Lady Bird (R) 12:00-2:20-5:208:20-10:45
Cinema Arts Theatre
9650 Main St
Justice League (PG-13) CC: 9:4012:10-2:40-5:10-7:50-10:10
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) CC: 9:40-12:00-2:305:00-7:30-9:50
Wonder (PG) CC: 9:50-12:102:25-4:50-7:20-9:40
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
2:20
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:0512:20-4:35-7:00-9:15
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) 9:45-12:05-2:355:05-7:40-9:55
Lady Bird (R) 9:55-12:15-2:254:45-7:10-9:25
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The Star (PG) 11:45-2:25-4:356:50
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 12:20-3:30-7:10
Wonder (PG) 11:30-2:10-4:507:30
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:45
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:502:15-4:45-7:15
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
11:30-2:20-5:05-7:50
Coco 3D (PG) 1:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:153:15-7:40
Justice League (PG-13) 11:401:30-2:30-4:20-5:30-7:20
The Metropolitan Opera: The Exterminating Angel ENCORE 1:00
Coco (PG) 12:00-3:00-4:00-5:006:00-7:00-8:00; 4:00-7:00
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8890 Mathis Ave.
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:403:20-6:00
Justice League (PG-13) 1:304:00-6:30
Coco (PG) 1:05-3:40-6:05
Wonder (PG) 1:25-3:50-6:15
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
6201 Multiplex Drive
Justice League (PG-13) 10:0012:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-6:007:00-8:00-9:00-10:10
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:151:25-4:30-7:35-10:40
The Star (PG) 10:10-12:25-2:404:55-7:20-9:35
Coco (PG) 10:20-1:15-5:10-7:058:05-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 10:50-1:35-4:20-7:3010:15
Wonder (PG) 11:15-1:55-4:357:15-9:55
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
10:05-3:55-6:50
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:152:45-5:15-7:45-10:25
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
11:00-5:00-10:55
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
AMC Worldgate 9
10:40-1:45-4:45-7:50-10:45
13025 Worldgate Drive
Coco 3D (PG) 11:20-2:15-4:10Justice League (PG-13) CC: 1:10- 11:00
Mental Madhilo (NR) 12:45-9:30
4:00-6:50-9:50
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) CC: (!)
Rave Cinemas
12:20-3:30-6:30-9:40
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
The Star (PG) CC: 1:40-4:1011900 Palace Way
6:40-9:00
Justice League (PG-13) 10:00Coco (PG) CC: (!) 1:00-7:00
12:50-2:35-6:40-8:25-9:35-11:20
Murder on the Orient Express
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
(PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:30-7:20-10:05 10:50-11:45-2:05-5:05-6:25-8:10Wonder (PG) CC: (!) 1:50-4:409:40-11:10
7:30-10:10
The Star (PG) 10:15-12:35-2:55Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) CC:
5:15-7:35-10:30
1:15-3:45-6:10-9:05
Coco (PG) 11:20-2:15-4:40-7:30Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
8:05-10:25
CC: 12:10-3:00-6:00-9:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) CC: (PG-13) 10:35-1:30-4:45-7:55(!) 1:20-4:20-7:10-9:55
10:50
Coco 3D (PG) (!) 4:00-10:00
Wonder (PG) 11:00-1:55-4:35Alamo Drafthouse Cinema - 7:25-10:10
One Loudoun
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
20575 East Hampton Plaza
10:30-1:20-3:55-6:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 11:15The Mist (R) 7:00
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 11:40- 1:45-4:30-7:40-10:35
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
3:10-6:25-9:45
Justice League (PG-13) 10:30- XD: 10:05
Lady Bird (R) 10:45-1:35-4:251:40-4:45-8:00-11:10
Coco (PG) 11:20-2:35-6:00-9:25 7:20-10:00
Coco 3D (PG) 10:40-1:40-5:10Murder on the Orient Express
11:00
(PG-13) 12:00-3:00-6:40-9:55Mental Madhilo (NR) 3:10-9:00
10:25
Justice League (PG-13) XD:
Wonder (PG) 11:10-2:05-5:1011:05-2:00-4:55-7:15-7:50-10:45
8:05-11:05
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Coco (PG) XD: 10:05-1:10-4:05
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Missouri (R) 12:40-4:20-7:2011:40-3:45-5:30
10:25
Lady Bird (R) 10:50-1:30-3:45Regal Ballston Common
6:15-8:55
Stadium 12
Angelika Film Ctr Mosaic
2911 District Ave
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Missouri (R) (!) 10:15-11:40-1:002:20-3:45-4:55-6:30-9:15
The Man Who Invented Christmas (PG) (!) 11:15-2:00-4:307:15-9:55
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13) (!)
11:20-2:15-5:05-8:00-10:40
Lady Bird (R) (!) 10:45-1:15-3:256:00-8:30-10:35
Ferrari 312B: Where the Revolution Begins 7:30
Justice League (PG-13) (!) 10:301:15-4:05-7:00-9:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 10:551:55-4:55-7:55-10:55
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) (!) 11:30-2:20-5:00-7:4010:45
671 N. Glebe Road
Justice League (PG-13) 1:104:10-7:10-10:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 2:005:00-8:10
The Star (PG) 1:55-4:20-6:45-9:10
Coco (PG) 1:00-4:00-5:30-7:0010:00
Murder on the Orient Express
(PG-13) 1:40-4:30-7:20-10:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:206:15-9:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:204:05-6:30-9:05
Marshall (PG-13) 4:20-10:15
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:25-4:157:05-9:55
Howl’s Moving Castle - Studio
Ghibli Fest 2017 7:00
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
2:25-5:20-8:20
behind the carefully lit scenes of
media and politics and to show
what’s really happening.
But its perversion of that
mission was on ugly display this
week.
As a nation tries to keep hold
of what’s real, despite a
gaslighting president and his
corrupt media helpers, we need
more of what’s working:
rigorous, careful journalism and
radical transparency.
margaret.sullivan@washpost.com
For more by Margaret Sullivan visit
wapo.st/sullivan
Wednesday, November 29, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Regal Manassas
The Metropolitan Opera: The ExStadium 14 & IMAX
terminating Angel ENCORE 1:00
11380 Bulloch Drive
Lady Bird (R) 2:10-4:55-7:3010:10
Justice League (PG-13) 1:00Coco 3D (PG) 2:30-8:30
4:00-7:00-9:50
Regal Countryside Stadium 20 Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:5045980 Regal Plaza
4:50-7:45-10:40
Justice League (PG-13) 12:00- The Star (PG) 12:50-4:20-6:309:00
2:50-5:50-6:50-8:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:20- Coco (PG) 1:15-2:30-4:15-7:153:35-6:35-9:45
8:30-10:15
The Star (PG) 1:30-3:50-6:25-8:45 Murder on the Orient Express
Coco (PG) 12:00-12:45-3:00-6:00- (PG-13) 1:30-3:20-6:15-9:10
6:45-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:45Murder on the Orient Express
3:10-6:50-10:20
(PG-13) 12:15-3:10-6:20-9:00
Wonder (PG) 1:40-4:40-7:30Tumhari Sulu (NR) 12:10-3:2510:30
6:35-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Ittefaq (NR) 12:50-3:15-5:35-8:00 12:45-5:10-7:40-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:30- Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:454:15-7:15-9:55
4:10-6:45-9:20
My Friend Dahmer (R) 2:15-4:50My Friend Dahmer (R) 12:507:20-10:00
The Man Who Invented Christ- 5:40-8:15-10:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
mas (PG) 12:35-3:20-5:50-8:30
3:00-6:00-8:50
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
12:40-4:00-9:50
2:15-3:40-7:10-10:10
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Coco 3D (PG) 5:30
12:25-3:25-6:55-10:00
Theeran Adhigaram Ondru (NR) Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 2:00-5:003:15-6:35
8:00-10:50
Lady Bird (R) 12:05-2:50-5:207:55
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
Coco 3D (PG) 3:45-9:45
3575 Potomac Avenue
Hey Pillagada (NR) 12:30-3:30Justice League (PG-13)
6:30-9:40
1:00-1:30-4:00-4:30-7:00-7:30Mental Madhilo (NR) 12:20-3:1010:00-10:30
6:00-8:55
Khakee (Telugu) (NR) 12:00-9:45 Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 3:15Balakrishnudu (NR) 12:10-3:10- 6:15-9:15
The Star (PG) 5:20-7:45
6:20-9:30
Coco (PG) 1:35-4:40-7:40-10:30
Verna 12:20-3:35-6:50-10:00
Murder on the Orient Express
Napoleon (Telugu) (NR) 12:00(PG-13) 12:30-1:40-4:35-7:252:40-5:20-8:20
10:25
Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 9:40
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Wonder (PG) 12:50-3:45-6:25Justice League (PG-13) 1:3010:15
4:30-7:30-10:30
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:15- A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:05
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:403:30-6:30-9:45
3:20-6:20-9:00
Coco (PG) 1:00-4:00-7:00
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:25-4:15Murder on the Orient Express
7:05-9:45
(PG-13) 12:45-3:45-6:45-10:15
Howl’s Moving Castle - Studio
Wonder (PG) 1:15-4:15-7:15Ghibli Fest 2017 7:00
10:00
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 2:45- The Man Who Invented
5:30-8:15-11:00
Christmas (PG) 12:30-3:00-5:30Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:10- 8:00-10:30
3:15-6:15-8:45
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, 12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
Missouri (R) 2:00-5:00-8:00Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
10:50
1:10-4:05-7:20-10:20
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
The Metropolitan Opera: The
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Exterminating Angel ENCORE
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:00-6:30
12:30-1:45-4:45-7:45-10:40
Coco 3D (PG) 4:10-10:10
Coco 3D (PG) 9:30
The Star (PG) 12:35-2:55-10:05
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
Coco (PG) 12:35-1:05-3:40-6:404110 West Ox Road
7:10-9:35
Murder on the Orient Express
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
(PG-13) 12:45-2:30-3:40-7:456500 Springfield Town Center
10:05
Justice League (PG-13) 11:30Wonder (PG) 12:40-1:30-3:301:15-4:00-5:30-10:30
4:30-6:30-7:30-9:15-10:15
A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 10:35 Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:004:40-8:00-10:50
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13)
12:00-12:30-3:00-5:15-5:45-8:15- The Star (PG) 11:00-1:20-3:4010:30-10:55
6:20-9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Coco (PG) 11:40-12:40-3:50-6:00Missouri (R) 1:20-4:25-7:10-10:05 7:00-10:10
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:00-3:50- Murder on the Orient Express
6:50-9:40
(PG-13) 11:10-2:00-4:50-7:50Howl’s Moving Castle - Studio 10:40
Ghibli Fest 2017 7:00
Wonder (PG) 11:05-1:40-4:35The Man Who Invented Christ- 7:20-10:05
mas (PG) 1:25-4:20-7:15-9:55
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:10Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
4:10-6:50-9:20
12:30-3:45-7:00-10:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
The Metropolitan Opera: The
Missouri
(R) 12:50-4:05-7:10Exterminating Angel ENCORE
10:00
1:00-6:30
Howl’s Moving Castle - Studio
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX Ghibli Fest 2017 7:00
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) 2:0012:30-2:30-3:30-6:30-8:30-9:30
3:00-5:00-6:00-8:00
Lady Bird (R) 11:50-2:20-5:00Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13)
7:40-10:20
11:45-1:15-2:45-4:15-5:45-7:15- Coco 3D (PG) 2:50-9:10
8:45-10:15
Regal Virginia Gateway
The Star (PG) 1:45-4:00-6:15Stadium 14 & RPX
8:30-10:45
8001 Gateway Promenade Pl
Coco (PG) 12:00-1:30-3:00-4:306:00-7:30-10:30
Justice League (PG-13) 1:15Murder on the Orient Express
4:15-7:15
(PG-13) 1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 1:50Wonder (PG) 12:30-2:15-3:304:50-7:50-10:50
5:00-6:30-7:45-9:30-10:30
The Star (PG) 2:00-4:10-6:45-9:45
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
Coco (PG) 1:00-1:30-4:00-4:3012:15-2:45-5:15-8:00-10:30
7:00-7:30-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 12:45- Murder on the Orient Express
3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
(PG-13) 12:55-3:30-6:00-9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Wonder (PG) 1:40-2:20-4:20-5:00Missouri (R) 12:45-3:30-6:157:10-8:00-9:50-10:40
9:15
The Man Who Invented Christ- A Bad Moms Christmas (R) 1:203:50-6:30-9:30
mas (PG) 1:00-3:45-6:45-9:15
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 2:30Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
5:10-7:40-10:10
12:00-9:00
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing,
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
Missouri (R) 12:50-3:40-6:15-9:15
1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Coco 3D (PG) 9:00
10:15
Justice League: The IMAX 2D
Experience (PG-13) 1:00-4:00- Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
1:05-4:05-7:05-10:05
7:00-10:00
Coco 3D (PG) 10:00
Regal Kingstowne
Justice League (PG-13) 1:45Stadium 16 & RPX
4:45-7:45-10:45
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
Justice League (PG-13) 1:152:15-5:15-8:15
4:15-7:15
Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) 12:15Smithsonian - Airbus
2:15-3:20-5:15-6:45-8:35-10:00
IMAX Theater
Murder on the Orient Express
14390 Air and Space Museum Pkwy
(PG-13) 12:15-3:20-6:35-9:20
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
The Star (PG) 12:35-2:50-5:0011:10-4:00
7:30-9:45
Coco (PG) 1:45-4:00-4:50-7:00- A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
7:45-10:30
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Wonder (PG) 1:00-3:45-7:15Dream Big: Engineering Our
10:15
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
A Bad Moms Christmas (R)
2:20
12:45-3:15-5:40-8:05-10:30
Daddy's Home 2 (PG-13) 1:20- Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
Justice League: The IMAX 2D Ex3:50-6:20-9:05
My Friend Dahmer (R) 1:50-4:25- perience (PG-13) 4:55-7:20-9:45
7:05-9:50
University Mall Theatre
The Man Who Invented Christ10659 Braddock Road
mas (PG) 12:45-3:30-6:15-9:15
The
LEGO
Ninjago Movie (PG)
Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
CC: 12:00-2:15-4:30
10:15
Kingsman:
The Golden Circle (R)
Roman J. Israel, Esq. (PG-13)
CC: 7:30-10:15
1:15-4:15-7:25-10:30
It
(R)
CC:
7:15-9:50
Lady Bird (R) 12:45-3:05-5:30Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:107:45-10:10
2:20-4:20
Coco 3D (PG) 12:40-10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Justice League (PG-13) 1:4512:20-2:35-4:40
4:40-6:05-7:30-10:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 7:00Justice League in 3D (PG-13)
10:10
12:20-3:15-9:00
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C7
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
AJ5
AJ73
83
Q642
EAST
8
Q 10 8 5
K9762
K97
WEST
93
942
Q J 10 5
J853
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
K Q 10 7 6 4 2
K6
A4
A 10
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1
Pass 2 3
Pass 4 6
All Pass
Opening lead — Q
EAST
Pass
Pass
CLASSIC PEANUTS
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
“W
endy is on my case
again,” Cy the Cynic
told me.
“Weren’t you going to ask
her out?”
“She’s playing hard to
get,” Cy said. “She’s also
playing hard to endure. She
accused me of not crediting
her with any ‘card sense.’ I
said men are naturally better
at card games, and that went
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
over like a pregnant pole
vaulter.”
Cy and Wendy, my club’s
feminist, are constant foes.
Wendy had played at six
spades. She took the ace of
diamonds, cashed the king of
trumps, took the top hearts
and ruffed a heart. When the
queen didn’t fall, Wendy led
a trump to dummy, ruffed the
last heart and exited with a
diamond.
LIO
“I put up the 10 to save my
partner from an end play,”
Cy said, “and led a club,
but Wendy played low from
dummy and made the slam.
I said she’d made a lucky
guess, and the argument
began.”
Wendy’s “guess” in clubs
was logical. If Cy had the
king, he would let East win
the diamond to lead a club.
So Wendy could place East
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
with the king and had to
hope Cy had the jack.
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
AJ5AJ73
83Q642
Your partner opens one
diamond, you respond one
heart and he bids one spade.
What do you say?
ANSWER: You have a close
decision whether to insist
BLONDIE
on game or invite. Part of
the answer depends on your
partner’s standards for an
opening bid. If he is apt to
open light, shapely hands,
settle for an invitation: Jump
to 2NT. If partner’s opening bids are sound, you can
risk 3NT. Don’t bother to bid
clubs.
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C8
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | NOVEMBER 29
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year you go with
the flow, as you are
aware of what the
appropriate choice
is for you. A tendency to stir
the pot could disappear as
summer appears on the
horizon. If you are single,
you have no shortage of
opportunities to change
that status. Take your time
getting to know someone
before you commit. If you are
attached, you might want
more downtime than in the
past. Try to understand your
sensitivities and not project
them onto your sweetie. Aries
knows how to have a good
time.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You express your ability to
tackle problems today. You
also demonstrate how fiery a
leader you can be. Pressure
builds around a personal
matter. You might be forced to
detach in order to understand
the other party’s position.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Deal with others directly. You
might not feel comfortable
with a new friend’s attitude.
Work-related issues seem to
arise from out of nowhere. You
could have difficulty coming to
a conclusion once you see the
variables involved.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Relate to others directly, and
they will appreciate how you
WEINGARTENS & CLARK personalize your conversations
and thoughts. You are likely
to gain a unique perspective
of a partner or loved one. You
might want to mull over your
thoughts for a while.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You have the ability to move
forward and handle a problem
more easily than many around
you. Tap into your ability to
see beyond the here and now.
Follow your gut, and you can’t
go wrong. Don’t let anyone rain
on your parade.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You might find that others are
stuck on their position and will
fight to have their way. If you
detach and understand where
they are coming from, you will
have a much easier time. Be
willing to rethink your view as
well.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You might want to look the
other way or defer to others
because of a problem that is
affecting you. A new friend
could be unusually verbal,
to the point that he or she
becomes demanding and
pushy.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You could find a loved one
quite demanding. Maintain a
sense of humor when speaking
to this person. You might not
be as sure of yourself as you
would like. Understanding
helps, but refuse to fight with
someone who is sure that he
or she knows better.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You might be feistier than you
have been in a while. Should
someone who is part of your
personal life create a problem
for you in your professional
life, you could be unusually
sarcastic, irritated and angry.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You can’t seem to contain
your playful, adventurous
personality. Some of your
friends love your spirited
mood; however, you’ll want
to contain yourself at work.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You often feel a bit off at this
time of year. Stay centered,
if possible, and do not
internalize others’ issues. Be
smart and stay out of control
games. You are changing, and
others might not know how to
respond to you.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Take the initiative and make
the first move. Don’t hesitate
to ask for what you want. It
is clear that others are not
as confident as you are. Your
leadership makes all the
difference in the outcome.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You might wonder what has
been going on with you lately.
Be a little indulgent, and you
are likely to have a lot of fun.
Keep any receipts and tags,
as you might need to make
some returns.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C9
RE
Lending a hand to women getting abortions
DOULAS FROM C1
winced. Grace shrugged a little, as
if to say, What are you going to do?
The night before this training,
she’d been worrying that her parents might ask about her weekend
plans, but here she was, anyway.
The women the doulas helped
would be strangers, the facilitators explained. The doulas would
know them only by their first
names. After they left, the doulas
would never see them again.
Outside the clinic, abortion
was vast and abstract. Inside,
abortion was a five-minute procedure happening to actual people. To be an abortion doula
meant being a part of the prochoice movement at its most
granular, most personal, where
philosophical debates fell away.
On the first day of training, a
doctor had come in, a chic, funny
woman who walked through the
mechanics of the procedure, passing around medical instruments:
a tenaculum, metal dilators. On
the second day, they went over a
list of neutral phrases and topics
for if they found themselves not
knowing what else to say: “It is
almost finished.” “You’re so
strong.” “Are you watching anything good on TV?” Ask what
patients were planning to have
for dinner — they wouldn’t have
eaten since the night before. Talk
about their kids. Patients who
already had kids loved talking
about their kids.
“It feels a little vague,” worried
a woman named Lila as they went
over how to explain their roles to
patients. “I’m circling around,
like, ‘I’m here for you,’ but am I
communicating what that would
really, actually look like for me to
be in the room?”
The final activity was role-play;
the trainers had written scenarios
on index cards. “Grace, are you
comfortable going first?” a facilitator named Lindsey asked, selecting a card for the young woman who had said she needed to
leave behind family judgment.
Another trainer lay back in a
chair meant to mimic a surgical
table. “I’m freaked out,” the pretend patient told Grace. “The protesters outside are making me nervous — are they here every day?”
“They’re here some days,” improvised Grace, who, like other
women in this story, is not being
identified by her full name, because of the sensitivity of the
topic. “Some days they’re not.
What about them is making you
nervous?”
“Will I have to walk past them
on my way out?”
“If you’re worried about getting
to your car,” Grace said, “we’ll
make sure you don’t have to go
out alone.”
After the final exercise, one of
the trainers asked everyone to
make a circle and close their eyes.
“If something is making you nervous — if you are feeling like being
an abortion doula is not the right
fit, then take a step forward now.”
A few people shifted their
weight and one started to raise
her hand. But in the end, they all
stayed in place, and they were all
still in.
A
month later, a couple of days
before her first shadow
shift, Grace went to a coffee
shop to meet Tahira, the experienced doula she’d been assigned
to shadow.
“Do you have any questions?”
Tahira asked. “Nervous about
anything?”
Tahira had been volunteering
with D.C. Doulas for Choice for
several years, she told Grace, long
enough to know that she was
supposed to offer just two fingers
for patients to squeeze instead of
a hand, but also long enough to
know when to bend that rule.
“Sometimes, what they need is
just to hear that what they’re
feeling is normal,” Tahira said.
“And it probably is.”
Some women might cry, and
that was normal. Some women
might feel only relief, and that
was normal. Some might feel
guilty about their relief. Feel
drowsy after anesthesia. Feel
woozy, in the patient lounge,
while they sat with the other
women who had just come out of
their own procedures. Have
cramps. Laugh. Want to talk
about nothing but the final season of “Veep.” Normal, normal,
normal.
“Sometimes women come who
don’t believe in abortion,” Tahira
told Grace. Women who felt it was
immoral. But then these same
women ended up at the clinic, and
them coming there, despite what
they thought they believed, was a
normal thing that Tahira saw all
the time.
Grace’s first introduction to
abortion, at least that she could
remember, was at a Christian retreat. Someone had talked to the
girls about how their virginity
should be saved, as a gift. Someone else showed pictures of dismembered fetuses and said women who had abortions always re-
gretted them. Life was beautiful,
life was sacred.
When she grew up, she became
a birth doula. She sat in rooms
with women in labor, leading
them through breathing exercises, hours on end, exhausted and
exhilarated, watching as new life
came into the world.
Earlier this spring when she’d
learned she was pregnant, the
timing wasn’t good, but it wasn’t
horrible. She had a job and a
boyfriend with whom she hoped
she might have children one day.
They talked about it a lot, and she
thought about it a lot while she
visited her family in their conservative state, wondering whether her mother noticed that she
seemed more tired than usual.
If you ever have an abortion I’ll
disown you, her mother had said,
but then Grace’s second introduction to abortion was the clinic
where she and her boyfriend had
decided, after weeks of conversation, to make an appointment.
She put her feet in the stirrups,
and she took long breaths as she
looked up at the ceiling.
When it was over, her primary
“Not great,” said the woman,
curling her hands into the sleeves
of her sweatshirt.
T
wenty minutes earlier, Grace
had turned off the “find my
friends” app on her phone,
so her parents wouldn’t see her
pull into an abortion clinic. She
parked in the garage of an office
park where protesters outside
carried signs reading “Everyone
deserves a birthday.”
Now she was wearing turquoise scrubs and sitting in a
carpeted room that had a Bible on
the table and a small fountain
plugged into the wall.
“You’ll sleep just for a few minutes, but it will feel like you slept
for hours,” Tahira told the patient,
answering a question about anesthesia. The anesthesia wasn’t required, but a lot of women who
came here requested it. “You’ll
wake up, and you’ll have something to eat in the patients’
lounge. We’ll be with you the
whole time.”
“Could I ask you a question?
I’m bad with needles. When I
wake up, will the needle from the
Five minutes: “I’m so f---ed up
about this,” the patient said, rubbing her eye with her fist. “That’s
okay, that’s normal,” Tahira said.
“I’m so f---ed up,” said the patient
again.
“Grace is going to be the official
hand-holder,” Tahira said to the
next woman, deciding her trainee
seemed confident enough to take
the lead.
“How early did you have to get
up to come here?” Grace asked the
patient, knowing some women
traveled hundreds of miles. The
woman had gotten up at 5 a.m.,
she said, but she was used to it —
her daughter was an early riser.
“Every kid I meet is obsessed
with tablets,” Grace said. “Any
shows she’s watching?”
“Scoot down,” the nurse said to
the patient. “These straps are to
help keep your legs from moving.”
Down the hall in the patient
lounge, women whose abortions
were completed sat in a row of
recliners eating crackers and
juice. They wanted to know
whether someone could go out
and tell their husbands that it was
over. Whether they would be able
I
t was nearing the end of summer and most of the trainee
doulas had been through at
least one of their shadow shifts.
Not all of them, though. Two had
decided the program wasn’t a
good fit. Another had accepted a
job in California, and some hadn’t
been asked to continue with the
collective — trainers didn’t feel
they had the right temperaments.
The collective’s leadership decided they would be happy with a
dozen committed doulas to come
out of the May training.
The ones who remained were
nurses and nonprofit workers,
students and yoga teachers, most
of them in their 20s or 30s and all
of them banking on the fact that
five minutes with a stranger was
volunteer work that could make a
difference in an issue that went to
the moral core of America.
And meanwhile, the House of
Representatives scheduled a vote
on a nationwide 20-week abortion ban.
And meanwhile, in nearby
Maryland, one of the only clinics
in the country to provide thirdtrimester abortions was closing
“If someone getting an abortion calls it a baby, it’s a baby. If she calls it a fetus, it’s a fetus.”
Grace, one of the volunteers with D.C. Doulas for Choice
emotion wasn’t grief, she said, but
assurance that she’d made the
right decision. The clinic had
been compassionate, her friends
had been supportive, and when it
was over she started to think
about women who had to go
through it alone. The spectrum of
reproductive health was so wide,
and filled with so much wonder
and pain.
She found herself googling
“abortion doula,” a concept she
was only vaguely familiar with.
D.C. Doulas for Choice came up,
and they had just posted a flier,
and they were accepting applicants.
“We’re going to come up with a
mission statement,” Lindsey, the
facilitator, had said at training. A
sentence-long definition of what
this class of doulas wanted to
represent.
“Nonjudgmental,”
someone
called out, and Lindsey wrote it
on the whiteboard. “Client-centric,” suggested another. Lindsey
wrote down everything, adding
semicolons, transforming the
suggestions into an unwieldy sentence. “Anything else?” she asked.
From the back of the room,
Grace half-raised her hand.
“A doula is water,” she said.
“Explain that?”
“Taking the shape of whatever
role is needed,” Grace explained.
“Like water.”
From the whiteboard, Lindsey
nodded. “If someone getting an
abortion calls it a baby, it’s a baby,”
Lindsey said. “If she calls it a
fetus, it’s a fetus. If she doesn’t say
anything, don’t talk about it.”
She turned and wrote on the
whiteboard: “A doula is water.”
A
n abortion was a five-minute
medical procedure, and an
abortion was a query into
the literal meaning of life. It was
the reason some people voted for
presidents, it was a small collection of cells. Every possible thing
that could be said about abortion
had been said, but a lot had been
said speculatively, because people
with experience were too afraid to
talk about it out loud. Abortion
was a secret. Abortion was almost
always a secret.
“How are you feeling?” Tahira
asked the first patient of the day
as Grace sat next to her, observing, on the morning of her first
shadow shift.
PHOTOS BY EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Lila, top right, a volunteer doula, supports a patient who is
about to have an abortion at a clinic in Northern Virginia.
anesthesia still be in my arm?” the
woman wanted to know.
The woman didn’t offer why
she was having an abortion. She
didn’t say anything about her
pregnancy. Tahira had explained
to the patient that doulas were
free, voluntary, and there to offer
comfort. The patient had responded, “I could really use that
right now,” and that was the only
thing about her they knew.
A little while later, Tahira and
Grace stood in the surgery room
with the patient, a doctor, a nurse,
an anesthesiologist. “Take a big
breath, look at me,” Tahira told
the patient as the nurse adjusted
her feet and told her to scoot
down on the table. The patient
looked up at Tahira with big eyes.
“Deep breaths, we’re going to do
deep breaths,” Tahira said as the
anesthesiologist injected the sedative. “I know this is scary, but you
are tough.”
They had been in the room
with her for almost exactly five
minutes. The sound of the doctor’s medical vacuum was about
as loud as a Dustbuster. There was
blood in a tube; the doctor
worked fast. Tahira and Grace
stood with the woman in the
baggy sweatshirt, while in the
waiting room, there were six more
patients to go.
Five minutes with the second
patient: Talking about whether
there was anything good on Netflix.
Five minutes with the third:
Talking about workout regimens,
whether it was better to go to the
gym every day or let muscles rest.
to go pick up their kids and play
laser tag later. Whether the other
women thought God would forgive them. Why they had tears
running down their faces when
they didn’t feel sad.
“Because there’s a lot going on
in there,” Tahira said, finding a
tissue. “You’re feeling a lot of
things right now.”
Grace held one woman’s hand,
listening as she talked about her
upcoming wedding. “You’re getting married?” a different patient
asked. “That’s nice.”
“It was just the worst timing,”
the bride said as she gestured to
her stomach.
“I know it was,” the other woman said. “I believe you.”
One woman sat in her armchair
and sobbed, and when a clinic
worker told her the hard part was
over now, she said she wasn’t sure
whether that was true.
She was scared that the hard
part hadn’t happened yet, she
said. That the hard part would be
when her family reacted and she
was left alone with her decision.
As the women left, one by one,
they carefully folded their blankets. They tossed their paper cups
into a waste can and said, “Thank
you, thank you.”
“You can stay as long as you
want,” Grace said to the woman
who didn’t know whether the
hard part was over. It was a little
after noon. She had seen seven
abortions in less than four hours.
“It’s okay to cry. That’s normal.
You never know how you’re going
to feel.”
down. The owner, rattled and exhausted by protests, had made the
decision to shutter. He accepted
an offer on the property from the
highest bidder, which turned out
to be an antiabortion group called
Maryland Coalition for Life that
ran a crisis pregnancy center
across the street. They would now
be occupying the clinic’s space.
Nationwide, abortions were
down, which some conservatives
saw as a moral victory and some
liberals saw as a sex-education
victory. Even the Virginia clinic
where the doulas primarily volunteered now saw a dozen patients
on a busy Saturday instead of the
20 or 30 it once had.
And meanwhile, Grace got a
new client for her birth doula practice, a pregnant woman who was
new to the area and who didn’t
know many other people. Grace
went to her house, and they talked
and got to know each other, and
they planned for the woman to call
Grace when she went into labor.
Back in the training, the group
had done an exercise where a
trainer read out loud statements
related to abortion, and the aspiring doulas had to move around
the room based on how strongly
they agreed or disagreed: Abortion should be legal in the first
trimester. In the second. The third.
Thirteen years old is too young to
have an abortion. Thirteen years
old is too young to be a mother.
Nobody would be judged for
their answers, a trainer said. The
purpose was internal, to make
participants aware of their own
biases and hard lines, because in
the clinic they would have to learn
to leave biases behind. About half
of the participants moved from
one end of the room to the other,
strongly agreeing or disagreeing.
Grace often stayed more toward
the middle.
That was what being prochoice looked like to her at the
end of the day — the quiet questions a client would ask herself
before she decided which kind of
doula, birth or abortion, she
needed.
If I had an abortion I would be
ending a life, one question read.
“Death can exist without it being murder,” a doula replied, explaining how she could agree
with the “life ending” statement
but still believe in abortion. “I can
love animals and still eat meat. I
can do this kind of work because
of these gray areas.”
I
n late August, Grace went out to
dinner with Lila, a fellow
trainee whom she’d met back
in May at the training weekend,
the woman who had worried
about whether she was explaining the role of a doula correctly.
“There were some people that
really wanted me in the room and
knew that right off the bat,” Lila
said as they waited for their food
and discussed their apprenticeships. “They didn’t even have any
questions before they said yes.
And then there were others where
I was trying to respect their space,
because I wasn’t sure if they wanted me around. But then later in
the patient room . . .”
“They would open up?” Grace
guessed.
“Almost like they would break
open.”
Lila, in her shifts, had tried to
dig through her brain for the
Spanish word for “cramps,” which
she thought she must have
learned in a post-college job in
Honduras. Two of her patients did
not speak English.
Lila, in her shifts, had talked
with patients about food, so much
about food: pretzels, Saltines,
biryani, lasagna, the big feast that
a patient was planning to have to
celebrate the end of Ramadan.
She had listened to her trainer
doula, Shelby, when Shelby told
her to keep an eye on a woman in a
sports jersey who had seemed
particularly stoic. It was often the
patients who thought they would
be fine who ended up breaking
into tears, Shelby said.
The woman had started to cry
as soon as she came out of the
exam room. Lila sat next to her
and stroked her arm.
“She kept repeating, ‘I didn’t
want to have to do that,’ ” Lila told
Grace now. “But I didn’t know her
story at all — if she was just
coming off of anesthesia, or what
it was that made her want to say
this to a stranger who was holding
her hand.”
“That’s what I’ve found hard
about this,” Grace said. “Wondering about people like that. When
they leave, what happens to
them?”
“When she left, she wasn’t
pregnant anymore,” Lila said, reminding Grace of something they
had talked about in training.
Their clients had come to the
clinic for one reason. If they left
and they were no longer pregnant, then they had found what
they were looking for.
T
he pregnant woman who had
asked for Grace to serve as a
birth doula called just before dawn on a weekday morning.
Labor was being induced; she was
heading to the hospital. It turned
out that what she needed most
was someone to be with her toddler while she delivered the baby.
Grace spent the day going on
walks, making craft projects, and
nearly 24 hours later, the mother
called to say that she had delivered a tiny, perfect newborn.
Life was beautiful, life was sacred, and it could turn out in so
many ways.
The world outside marched on.
The House voted to support the
20-week abortion ban that Republicans had proposed.
A GOP congressman ended up
resigning, after news came out
that he had supported the ban
while privately encouraging his
mistress to have an abortion.
On a Friday morning in early
fall, Grace drove to the Virginia
clinic. By herself this time — she
had completed her training and
she would be the only doula on call.
“Did you hear about what happened in Alexandria?” one of the
clinic workers asked, just after
Grace checked in. The day before,
the worker explained, an Alexandria abortion clinic had been
overtaken by a group of protesters
who came into the lobby and
refused to leave. “One of them was
a priest,” the worker said. Five of
them had been arrested.
Grace changed into her scrubs.
The changing room was really just
a repurposed closet, and she stood
inside it, gathering herself for a
minute, next to boxes and plastic
storage bins, before walking back
out into the waiting room. Four
women sat, flipping through magazines or staring at the floor.
A few minutes later, Grace sat in
the small room with the Bible and
the fountain, across from a woman
whose long hair was neatly curled
but who shrunk into the chair with
her arms crossed over her chest.
“Has anyone talked to you
about the doula program here?”
she asked the woman, who shook
her head no. Grace explained
what it was.
“Does that sound like something you would be interested
in?” she asked. The woman nodded her head yes.
“Okay,” Grace said. “Then I’ll be
with you when you go in. I’ll be
with you the whole time.”
monica.hesse@washpost.com
C10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
KIDSPOST.COM
TODAY
The history of the ornament dates to the late
1500s. Glassmakers in the small German town of
Lauscha are credited with creating the first
ornaments.
Archaeologists in Peru hope
to save cultural sites called
huacas from disappearing
because of building projects.
Our warm weather won’t last
forever, so let’s enjoy being
outdoors without a heavy coat.
ILLUSTRATION BY BRIELLE CROWELL, 9, BURKE
STEPS
1
Select two colored pieces of construction paper that aren’t too dark to be
drawn on. Cut each in half widthwise.
Fold two pieces in half widthwise, then
top to bottom, making a rectangle. When
opened, each paper will have four equal
sections.
It’s easy to
get the hang
of these tree
ornaments
2
Color the eight rectangular sections
with crayons or markers. The more
you fill each space, the better.
Adult’s help: No
Hands-on time:
3
Cut the rectangles apart with scissors, then cut each rectangle lengthwise into four
strips. You will have 32 pieces when done.
4
Flip the strips over and decorate the
blank sides with glitter glue. Allow
them to dry for 24 hours.
5
When dry, roll each strip in on itself,
securing it in place with a small piece
of Scotch tape. Roll half with your drawing on the outside and the others with the
glitter facing out.
11/2 hours
Total time:
Two days
6
Once your paper beads are done, gently pull off the top of the ornament
ball and pop them inside. (If the beads
are a little big, a gentle squeeze helps.)
When finished, the ornament should be
more than half full. Fill it a little more
with the pompoms and a few bells. Don’t
fill the ball completely; otherwise, you
won’t be able to make the bells jingle. Put
the ornament top back on and tie a ribbon around it.
Want an ornament with a wider opening? Try a plastic Mason jar ornament.
After unscrewing the lid, you can easily
put in larger bead loops.
SUPPLIES
Construction paper
Crayons and markers
Scissors
Glitter glue
Scotch tape
Hollow plastic ornament ball
or Mason jar ornament
½-inch or smaller tinsel pompoms
½-inch jingle bells
Thin ribbon
PHOTOS BY KRIS CORONADO
BY
K RIS C ORONADO
C
otton-ball snowman? Glittery pine cones? Been there, done that. Take your
holiday creativity to the next level by stuffing a hollow ornament ball with
one-of-a-kind paper beads made by you. ¶ You may already have most of what
you need for this project. The rest can be found at a craft store. ¶ Take your
time. The more effort and imagination you pour into making this ornament, the more
dazzling it will be. When finished, give it to a loved one or proudly hang it on a tree.
ACROSS
1 Schooner
features
6 Frosty coating
10 Shine
15 Advil
competitor
16 __ of March
17 EVE’s
companion, in a
2008 Pixar film
18 *Is unsuitable
21 “__ ideas?”
22 “Back to the
Future” vehicle
23 Wild place
24 Rays or Jays
26 RAM part
27 First light
28 Egyptian snake
30 Wide shoe spec
32 *Literary character with an
evil alter ego
38 Anti-cruelty org.
39 “Hold up!”
40 Radiate
42 Twangy-voiced
43 Breakfast order
44 BFFs
46 Gets a
glimpse of
48 Most innocent
49 Canonized Mlle.
50 *Threshold
55 Bus depot: abbr.
56 Corrida
opponent
58 Paddock sound
59 Hank’s job on
“Breaking Bad,”
briefly
60 Modern-day
Persian
62 Tiny annoyance
63 Former One
Direction singer
Zayn __
64 Frequent
presidential
candidate
Ralph
65 Fairy tale
baddie
66 In reserve
67 Skim (over)
68 *See 42-Down
69 Knight’s horse
DOWN
1 Angry with
2 Without
assistance
3 “Later!”
By Claire Muscat and David Steinberg
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
kidspost@washpost.com
Wife’s war on ‘Grandma’ confounds
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
4 Family room
sets
5 Final email step
6 Search quickly
through
7 Figure of
speech
8 Way around
D.C.
9 Perfume
compound
10 No Doubt lead
singer Stefani
11 Chocolate dog
12 “My Fair Lady”
heroine
13 Let happen
14 Fruit that’s
still a fruit
when two of
its letters are
switched
19 What sirens
may do
20 Actress Salma
25 Chinese liquor
brand
27 San Diego
suburb
29 Climbed
31 The Eiffel Tower,
aptly?
32 Western outlaw
33 Be indebted to
11/29/17
34 Cleaning cloth
35 Irish dance
36 “Close Encounters” beings
37 Hides one’s
true self
38 Idyllic
41 Take for a first
drive
42 With 68-Across,
each successive one of a
45
47
48
51
set graphically
depicted by this
puzzle’s circles
Arranged like
the 68-Acrosses
in the answers
to starred clues
are designed
to be
Farm mom
Tissue layer
“What a
nightmare!”
52 Fab Four
drummer
53 [Don’t touch
my bone!]
54 Info a spy
might gather
57 Dollar bills
59 Condé __
61 Recipient of
much Apr. mail
63 More, in Madrid
TUESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Dear Carolyn:
Both of my
parents are
deceased, and my
father remarried
after my mother
Carolyn
passed. I have not
Hax
always had a great
relationship with
my stepmother,
but it has grown to one of mutual
respect and understanding. She
has since remarried, but my
siblings and I include her in
family decisions and functions.
My issue is that my wife does
not want “that woman” to be
called Grandma by our two
children, who are both still
under 2. I want to be able to
respect my spouse’s wishes and
have asked for a reason, but have
not gotten any real response
beyond “She’s not your mother”
and “We don’t want to equate her
with my parents.”
She’s not my mother, and I
don’t want to equate her with my
in-laws — she is always going to
be farther away and less involved
— but my reasoning is: 1) It
would really hurt her to be told
we won’t call her that, and 2) IT’S
JUST A FREAKIN’ NAME!!! (I
try to be more reasoned with my
wife.)
My wife apparently feels
strongly about this, but so far I
have put my foot down. My wife
says I am choosing my
stepmother over her. I feel that
can’t be it, there has to be some
reason, but don’t get anything
beyond the “She’s not your
mother” argument. Help.
— Anonymous
Anonymous: Either your wife
can’t stand your stepmother and
this is just where she’s massing
her troops, or there’s a whole lot
of snarled and matted Stuff
behind your wife’s fixation on a
title.
That choosing-yourstepmother-over-her charge she
lobbed at you is not only
emotional blackmail, it’s also
batnuts enough to suggest the
latter — that there’s some history
to your wife’s Grandma fixation.
Still, simple dislike could
certainly suffice, if it’s intense
enough; presumably you have
enough context to piece together
the source.
It’s actually easy to dodge the
name issue, though, verging on
ridiculously so; countless
beloved grandmas are called
something other than Grandma.
My little universe alone has
hosted Nanna, Nanny, Nonie,
Mema, Mimi, May-May, Yia-Yia,
Grandbum and a Grammy/
Gramma or few. No Grandmas.
Toddler mispronunciations,
meanwhile, are a cottage
industry when it comes to
producing family nicknames.
So figure something out.
And in doing so, save your
energy for whatever the bigger
issue is behind your wife’s
startling contempt. One way to
pry it out is by agreeing with
your wife: “You’re right. She’s not
my mother.”
And then don’t lobby against
your wife (or for your
stepmother, even) so much as
you lobby — kindly — for love
and inclusion: “But she matters
to me,” or “She’s the only parent
I’ve got left.”
And/or: “I see her as another
person in the world to love our
kids. I don’t understand how that
hurts them, or you, or your folks.”
And: “Love isn’t a zero-sum
game. Making room for my
stepmother doesn’t displace your
parents.”
And: “Whenever you’re ready
to talk about why you feel so
strongly about this, I’m ready to
listen.”
I am, too, by the way — so if
your wife ever does come up with
a real explanation, feel free to
throw some details at your nosy
local advice columnist.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
HOCKEY
PRO BASKETBALL
PRO FOOTBALL
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Braden Holtby’s thirst to improve has the
Caps goalie working on head trajectory. D3
LeBron James is ejected for first time,
but Cleveland still wins ninth straight. D3
Ben McAdoo benches Eli Manning, all but
completing the wreck of the Giants. D5
Georgetown cupcake: Hoyas keep
running past also-rans, rout Maine. D7
Shake-up before it shakes out
In penultimate CFP rankings, Clemson ascends to top spot followed by Auburn, Oklahoma and Wisconsin
It’s Porter
in clutch,
completing
comeback
WIZARDS 92,
TIMBERWOLVES 89
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
minneapolis — The Washing-
BRYNN ANDERSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Coach Nick Saban and Alabama fell out of the top four of the College Football Playoff rankings for the first time in three years following Saturday’s loss to Auburn.
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
As Clemson leapt from No. 3 to No. 1, the
expected turbulence hit the top of the College
Football Playoff rankings released Tuesday evening, the bulk of it blowing in from the state of
Alabama. Auburn’s 26-14 mastery of Alabama
on Saturday at Auburn caused the Tigers to
vault from No. 6 to No. 2, while the Crimson
Tide plunged from No. 1 to No. 5.
Not only did it mark Alabama’s first absence
from the coveted top four since Nov. 11, 2014,
but it positioned Auburn (10-2) above five
teams with fewer losses. Eye test-wise, Auburn’s two thumping victories over teams
ranked No. 1 at the time — Georgia on Nov. 11
and Alabama — clearly impressed the 13 sets of
eyes on the committee, which ranked teams for
the fifth and penultimate time this season.
The final rankings, replete with the four
teams that will play off Jan. 1 in the Rose Bowl
in Pasadena, Calif., and the Sugar Bowl in New
Orleans, will appear at midday Sunday.
Behind Auburn sit No. 3 Oklahoma (11-1) and
No. 4 Wisconsin (12-0), both up a notch, then
No. 5 Alabama (11-1), No. 6 Georgia (11-1) and
No. 7 Miami (10-1), which fell from No. 2 after its
jarring 24-14 upset loss at Pitt (5-7).
It marked the first entry into the top four for
Wisconsin, which started out at No. 9 on Oct. 28
before inching upward, budging past some
Turning the Tide
Alabama fell four spots in the College Football
Playoff rankings after its loss to Auburn on Saturday.
LAST WEEK
THIS WEEK
1. Alabama (11-0)
1. Clemson (11-1)
2. Miami (10-0)
2. Auburn (10-2)
3. Clemson (10-1)
3. Oklahoma (11-1)
4. Oklahoma (10-1)
4. Wisconsin (12-0)
5. Wisconsin (11-0)
5. Alabama (11-1)
RANKINGS CONTINUED ON D6
For some CFP hopefuls, playing field was tilted long before kickoff
When the college football
season began, the Central
Florida Knights had 12 games
on their schedule and no votes
in either the Associated Press
or coaches’ poll. So even as they
Barry
endured preseason practices
Svrluga
and prepared for what was a
potentially exciting year, the
most honest among the Knights had to know:
Before a snap was taken, they had zero chance
at appearing in the College Football Playoff,
the championship format for their level of
play.
Now, UCF has one more game on its
schedule. It could beat Memphis in Saturday’s
American Athletic Conference championship
game 82-0, thus finishing an unbeaten season,
and there’s no path in. To half the teams that
play college football at its highest level — the
65 that aren’t in a so-called “Power Five”
conference — the doors aren’t just shut;
they’re locked, deadbolted.
“All you can do is beat the teams that are on
your schedule,” UCF Coach Scott Frost told
reporters Saturday, after the Knights closed
their regular season with what, for them,
amounted to a nail-biter: a 49-42 victory over
South Florida. “. . . We’re not going to talk too
much about who we’ve beat and how
dominant we are.”
Put aside the most pressing issue
surrounding Frost’s program — which is
Frost’s future there — and forget that
Hurricane Irma cost the Knights what might
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D6
ton Wizards, entering a grueling
stretch of their schedule without
their four-time all-star point
guard, played a few cards Tuesday
night they weren’t accustomed to
— and the result was a stirring
92-89 win over the Minnesota
Timberwolves.
In their first victory since John
Wall was shut down for about two
weeks with left knee inflammation, the Wizards overcame a
double-digit deficit by turning to
their defense, their bench and,
more than anything, the most
understated member of the
team’s big three — Otto Porter Jr.
Porter had a game-high 22
points, including the Wizards’
final two field goals — a game-tying play at the rim off a nice pass
from Mike Scott and a 22-foot
jumper to put the Wizards ahead
with 25 seconds remaining.
Washington (11-9) snapped a
two-game losing streak at a key
time with the Philadelphia 76ers
visiting Capital One Arena on
Wednesday night for the second
game of a back-to-back set for the
Wizards.
Though Bradley Beal hit the
free throw in the closing moments to produce the final margin, he played almost 35 minutes
as the team’s sole facilitator. Beal
collected six assists, but his stint
as lead guard affected his own
offense as he faced clogged lanes
and defenders loading up on
pick-and-roll plays.
“They didn’t want me to get
anything going,” said Beal, who
finished with eight points on
2-for-11 shooting. “I wasn’t necessarily scoring and I’m okay with
that because someone else is. Our
team is going to score one way or
another.”
And as Beal struggled to score,
Porter filled the offensive gaps.
One day after Beal implored
Porter to become a more vocal
alpha male in Wall’s absence, Beal
shared a story from Tuesday’s
game in which Porter requested
more looks in the fourth quarter
in the post against a smaller
Timberwolves guard. With 25
seconds remaining, the Wizards
needed a basket and ran a play for
Porter. His one-dribble pull-up
jumper produced the decisive
points of an impressive road win.
“One of our best players is out,”
Porter said. “The whole team has
to step up and do more.”
Washington held Minnesota to
41.2 percent shooting and kept
the Timberwolves (12-9) under 90
points for the first time this season.
“It was the defense we needed
to win the game,” Coach Scott
Brooks said. “We just kept hanging in there, making key plays,
winning basketball plays for one
another. A lot of guys played well.
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D3
Wizards at 76ers
Today, 7 p.m., NBCSW, NBATV
Is Cousins gone? It’s more
than just follow the money.
The best thing
about the
Washington
Redskins the past
three seasons has
been Kirk
Thomas
Cousins. Not just
Boswell
his emergence as
one of the top
dozen quarterbacks in the NFL,
but his dignity while playing for
a franchise that has stripped the
dignity of almost every visible
employee of the Dan Snyder era.
On Saturday night, leaving a
movie, a friend who’s a longtime
fan of the team remarked how
much he has enjoyed Cousins’s
play, his leadership and his
personality.
“Then enjoy his last five
games in Washington,” I said.
“You think he’s going to
leave?” my friend asked.
“He’s long gone,” I replied.
That’s read-the-tea-leaves
movie-chitchat talk, the kind of
speculation that followers of this
team have constantly. But
sometimes what you really
believe, and in your sportswriter
bones just know is true, bubbles
up and unexpectedly comes out
of your mouth. I’d be shocked
(but pleased) if Cousins is back
in 2018 and flabbergasted if he
signs a long-term deal that
BOSWELL CONTINUED ON D5
Redskins will wear their heart on their feet against Cowboys
BY
MASTER TESFATSION/WASHINGTON POST
“Whatever I can do to help bring attention, cool,” said Redskins
defensive lineman Ziggy Hood, whose oldest son has autism.
M ASTER T ESFATSION
Ziggy Hood isn’t flashy on the
field. He wears generic black-andwhite cleats and gloves for every
game and burgundy arm sleeves
to cover up the logo on his wrist
straps so he won’t get fined.
“Just give me my standard-issue [gear], and let me just rock
and roll,” said the Washington
Redskins defensive lineman.
On Thursday night, he might
have the freshest cleats on the
field when the Redskins face the
Dallas Cowboys. The nine-year
veteran is one of many Redskins
players participating in “My
Cause, My Cleats,” a league initiative in Week 13 that allows players
to promote and raise awareness
for a charity of their choice with
custom cleats.
Hood elected to bring awareness to autism, a cause that’s
personal to his family. Hood’s
oldest son, Josiah, has the condition. Hood’s cleats will be designed with puzzle pieces, the
primary symbol for autism, with
his 7-year-old son’s name written
on the toe box.
“We’re not only dealing with it
as a family but as a village for the
entire DMV area,” said Hood, who
also held an event on Halloween
to raise money for kids with autism in the Washington area. “But
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D5
Redskins at Cowboys
Tomorrow, 8:25 p.m., NBC, NFLN
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
EARLY LEAD
Rodgers
is close to
practicing,
but will he?
BY
FSU kicker
said he was
attacked at
frat house
D.C. SPORTS BOG
C INDY B OREN
BY
Early Sunday evening, before
the crowd filled the seats at Pittsburgh’s Heinz Field, Aaron Rodgers walked out, as has been his
habit since breaking his collarbone. This time, he had a purpose:
Instead of playfully tossing a football, he fired one, showing off just
how well he is progressing six
Sundays after breaking the collarbone above his throwing arm.
Rodgers reportedly threw
about 40 passes, the longest covering around 50 yards, over a display
that lasted 10 to 15 minutes. It was
especially significant because the
two-time MVP is eligible to return
to practice Saturday and will be
eligible to play in a game for the
first time Dec. 17, provided his
collarbone heals and the Packers
remain in the running for a playoff
berth. Whether Rodgers will actually practice Saturday is another
matter, and one that Coach Mike
McCarthy hesitated to address.
“We’ll see,” he said Monday.
“There’s a protocol. There’s targets
we’re trying to hit each and every
week. I think they’re working [on
it], and it’s segmented. The A-No. 1
priority is to get him healthy.”
Rodgers had surgery Oct. 19
and was placed on IR, which
meant he must sit out eight weeks,
the next day. Since then, there has
been what McCarthy called a
“step-by-step process” for his recovery. “There’s a plan laid out for
Aaron, just like the other guys on
IR,” McCarthy said. “He’s knocking it out of the park.”
As for the other component to a
Rodgers return, the team remains
in the mix for a wild-card berth
with a 5-6 record but would most
likely have to run the table to
qualify for postseason play. The
Packers play the Buccaneers on
Sunday at Lambeau Field, then
the Browns in Cleveland, the Panthers in Charlotte (when Rodgers
would conceivably be eligible to
return), the Vikings at Lambeau
and the Lions in Detroit.
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Robert Griffin III helped the Redskins close the 2012 season on a seven-game win streak to secure the NFC East title.
History shows all hope is not lost
BY
S COTT A LLEN
The Redskins just might have the
rest of the NFC teams battling for a
playoff spot right where they want
them — looking down at Washington in
the conference standings.
The Redskins (5-6) enter Thursday’s
game at Dallas in 11th place in the NFC
postseason pecking order. With no
chance of winning the NFC East, the
Redskins’ only path to the playoffs is via
one of the two wild-card berths. While
Washington almost certainly has to win
its remaining five games and get some
help for that to happen, the Redskins
have been in this predicament before.
They’ve made a habit of December
playoff pushes — and 10-loss seasons —
this century.
Each of the four times Washington
has made the playoffs since 2005, the
team won at least four consecutive
games to end the season. The Redskins
were 5-6 entering Week 13 in each of
those years (2005, 2007, 2012 and 2015).
The past three times the Redskins
entered Week 13 with a winning record
— which they’ve done only three times
since 2000, including last season —
they missed the playoffs.
The 2017 schedule sets up favorably
for another improbable playoff run.
The Redskins’ remaining opponents
are a combined 20-35, worse than the
record of the opponents they faced
during their winning streaks to close
the 2005, 2007, 2012 and 2015 seasons.
On the other hand, the Redskins need a
lot more help in the form of the teams
ahead of them in the playoff race losing
than they did when they won the NFC
East in 2015.
Here’s a closer look at the seasonending winning streaks that led to the
past four playoff appearances.
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“The American public
is fed up with the
disrespect the NFL is
paying to our Country,
our Flag and our
National Anthem. Weak
and out of control!”
2015
Low point: 5-7
Finished: 9-7, won NFC East
Record of opponents during 4-0
streak: 21-33
PRESIDENT TRUMP
on Twitter on Tuesday, referring
to continued player protests during
the national anthem. (via Early Lead)
In Week 13, the Redskins missed a
Tiger Woods said he is on the
“other side” of too many years
relying on pain medication to
cope with his back surgeries,
which led to his arrest on a DUI
charge six months ago that he
attributed to a bad mix of
prescription drugs.
“I’m loving life now,” he said
Tuesday.
Woods is making yet another
return to competition this week
at the Hero World Challenge, an
18-man event with no cut at
Albany Golf Club in Nassau,
Bahamas. It’s his first
tournament in 10 months and
his first time competing since
fusion surgery in April, the
fourth operation on his back.
Early indications are that
Woods is in a much better spot
than when he returned a year
ago in the Bahamas. According
to those who played with him in
recent weeks, his swing looks
faster and more fluid and he
appears to be happy and healthy.
The tournament starts
Thursday. It will be the first time
since Feb. 3 in Dubai that Woods
has to count every shot.
2012
Low point: 3-6
Finished: 10-6, won NFC East
Record of opponents during 7-0
streak: 41-43
The Redskins’ 17-16 win over the
Giants in Week 13 was their third of
seven consecutive wins to end the
regular season in Robert Griffin III’s
rookie year. A 21-13 loss to the one-win
Carolina Panthers at FedEx Field in
Week 9 dropped Washington to 3-6 and
gave Coach Mike Shanahan a lot to
think about before the bye week.
“When you lose a game like that, now
you’re playing to see who, obviously, is
going to be on your football team for
years to come,” Shanahan said. “Now
we get a chance to evaluate players and
see where we’re at. Obviously we’re not
out of it statistically. But now we find
out what type of character we’ve got
and how guys keep on fighting through
the rest of the season.”
“Being 3-6 really [stinks] because,
right now, we’re on the outside looking
in,” linebacker Lorenzo Alexander said.
“I’m not thinking about next year.
That’s an offseason thing for me. But
you know it’s hard when you see
yourself in that type of position and
your head coach is saying those types of
things. It’s disappointing.”
2007
Low point: 5-7
Finished: 9-7, wild card
Record of opponents during 4-0
streak: 35-19
The Redskins fell to 5-7 with a loss to
the Bills at home in their first game
following the death of Sean Taylor. At
that point, three teams were tied at 6-6
for the NFC’s second wild card, and four
teams in addition to the Redskins were
in the mix at 5-7. Todd Collins replaced
injured starter Jason Campbell at
quarterback in the second quarter of
the Redskins’ next game, a 24-16 win
over the Bears, and led Washington to
wins over the Giants, Vikings and
Cowboys over the final three weeks.
2005
Low point: 5-6
Finished: 10-6, wild card
Record of opponents during 5-0
streak: 33-32
“For me personally, this is about as
tough a stretch as I have been through,”
Coach Joe Gibbs said after the Redskins
dropped to 5-6 following an overtime
loss to the Chargers at FedEx Field.
Washington’s 3-0 start was a distant
memory, and with seven NFC teams at
7-4 or better, including the Cowboys
and Giants, the team’s playoff hopes
were fleeting.
The Redskins bounced back with five
straight wins, including over NFC East
foes in three consecutive weeks for the
first time since 1992. Taylor returned a
fumble for a touchdown to seal the
Redskins’ playoff-clinching, 31-20 win
at Philadelphia in Week 17.
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
TELEVISION AND RADIO
NBA
7 p.m.
‘Loving life’: Woods
making another return
golden opportunity to take control of a
weak NFC East, falling to 5-7 with a
19-16 loss to the Cowboys on “Monday
Night Football.” The setback dropped
Washington into a three-way tie with
the Eagles and Giants for the division
lead, but the Redskins rebounded to
close the season with four consecutive
wins. Washington clinched its first NFC
East title since 2012 with a 38-24 win at
Philadelphia the day after Christmas.
Shanahan later clarified that he
wasn’t giving up on the season and
acknowledged he didn’t give “the
perfect quote.” The Redskins were
perfect over the next two months and
clinched the division in Week 17 with a
28-18 win over the Cowboys at home.
On Nov. 26, 2016, Florida State’s
Ricky Aguayo missed two of his
three field goal attempts against
Florida. The Seminoles easily defeated their in-state rival, 31-13,
but less than a week later, a bloodied Aguayo told Tallahassee police
he had been jumped in front of a
Florida State fraternity house because of the missed kicks.
“He said they were giving him a
hard time about missed field goals
during the Florida game,” the officers wrote in their report, obtained by the Tallahassee Democrat. “He said he was rushed by
several of the members of the
fraternity . . . and was punched in
the face.”
The Florida State fraternity in
question, Pi Kappa Phi, was shut
down this month by its national
chapter after a pledge named Andrew Coffey died at an off-campus
party Nov. 3. Authorities have yet
to determine a cause of Coffey’s
death, though they believe alcohol was involved. The Democrat
obtained the Aguayo police report
as part of a public-records request
related to the fraternity.
Florida State also has suspended all Greek activity indefinitely
in the wake of Coffey’s death.
The Aguayo incident took place
at about 3 a.m. Dec. 2, 2016, according to the report. Aguayo told
police that he was walking past
the fraternity house when people
on the front porch began yelling
at him about the missed kicks in
the Florida game. Here’s how the
Democrat’s Karl Etters described
it:
“Witnesses who were driving
by during the fight said they had
to stop because the ruckus spilled
into the street. As they drove by
during the scuffle, Aguayo was
thrown into the witnesses’ vehicle, they told police. The two men
then tried to help break up the
fight. . . . A member of the fraternity told investigators he heard
about the fight and went outside.
He said he was hit in the face four
times in the fracas. The fraternity
member was intoxicated, TPD
wrote in its report, and his injuries were not consistent with being punched, according to court
documents.”
Police said they found “a moderate amount of blood” on
Aguayo’s face and shirt and that
his injuries “were consistent with
being punched in the face.”
No charges were filed and no
one involved requested medical
attention. Aguayo, then a freshman, made both field goal attempts and 3 of 4 extra points in
Florida State’s next game, a 33-32
win over Michigan in the Orange
Bowl on Dec. 30. This season, the
younger brother of former Florida
State all-American Roberto
Aguayo has made 15 of 18 field
goal attempts and all 33 extrapoint attempts.
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
D I G ES T
GOLF
A December winning streak
secured each of the Redskins’
past four trips to the playoffs
M ATT B ONESTEEL
“I’m just looking forward to
getting through these four
rounds and having an
understanding — a better
understanding — of where I’m
at,” he said.
COLLEGES
Arkansas will use two firms to
search for its athletic director
and football coach.
The school announced the
hiring of firms Korn Ferry and
DHK International two weeks
after Chancellor Joseph
Steinmetz fired athletic director
Jeff Long and less than a week
after interim athletic director
Julie Cromer Peoples fired
football coach Bret Bielema. . . .
New Florida football Coach
Dan Mullen dismissed defensive
coordinator Randy Shannon
and five other assistants,
according to a person who spoke
to the Associated Press on the
condition of anonymity because
the Gators had not announced
the moves.
Mullen also hired longtime
assistants Billy Gonzales and
John Hevesy. . . .
Miami Coach Mark Richt was
named the ACC’s coach of the
year, and Boston College running
back A.J. Dillon was named the
conference’s top rookie.
10:30 p.m.
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Washington at Philadelphia » NBA TV, NBC Sports Washington,
WFED (1500 AM)
Golden State at Los Angeles Lakers » NBA TV
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Tampa Bay at Boston » NBC Sports Network
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
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9 p.m.
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9:30 p.m.
Auburn at Dayton » CBS Sports Network
Penn at Villanova » Fox Sports 2
Rider at Providence » MASN2
Clemson at Ohio State » ESPN2
Penn State at North Carolina State » ESPNU
Michigan at North Carolina » ESPN
Chicago State at Marquette » Fox Sports 2
Belmont at TCU » MASN2
Miami at Minnesota » ESPN2
Boston College at Nebraska » ESPNU
Duke at Indiana » ESPN
BASEBALL
Right-hander Doug Fister
signed a $4 million deal with the
Texas Rangers, becoming the
first free agent to finalize a big
league contract and the first to
switch teams. . . .
A Massachusetts appeals court
dismissed a wrongful-death
lawsuit filed in 2012 by the
widow of former pitcher Mark
Fidrych, who died at 54 in 2009
after his clothing became
tangled in a spinning piece of a
dump truck he was working on.
Ann Pantazis sued the makers of
the truck and the spinning
component, arguing they did not
provide sufficient warnings.
OLYMPICS
Diary entries from Grigory
Rodchenkov, the key
whistleblower in the Russian
doping scandal, recount several
meetings with powerful
government officials and are
expected to be used as further
evidence when the International
Olympic Committee decides
Russia’s fate for the 2018 Games.
The New York Times obtained
entries from the diary kept by
Rodchenkov, the former head of
the Moscow anti-doping lab who
is living in the United States
under federal protection.
Included in the diary were
details of discussions and
6 p.m.
8 p.m.
8 p.m.
Notre Dame at Michigan » Big Ten Network
Florida State at Iowa » Big Ten Network
Middle Tennessee at Mississippi » SEC Network
GOLF
8 p.m.
1:30 a.m.
(Thurs.)
PGA Tour of Australasia: Australian PGA, first round » Golf Channel
European Tour: Mauritius Open, first round » Golf Channel
SOCCER
1:25 p.m.
3 p.m.
3:25 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
Copa del Rey: Murcia at Barcelona »beIN Sports
Premier League: Southampton at Manchester City » NBC Sports Network
Ligue 1: Troyes at Paris Saint-Germain » beIN Sports
MLS playoffs, Eastern Conference championship, second leg: Columbus
at Toronto » Fox Sports 1
meetings with Vitaly Mutko,
who was the country’s sports
minister at the time and is now
deputy prime minister.
SOCCER
Ashley Young’s first-half
double and Jesse Lingard’s 60meter solo goal helped
Manchester United win at
Watford, 4-2, to keep in sight of
English Premier League leader
Manchester City. . . .
The U.S. women’s national
team will play Denmark on
Jan. 21 in San Diego in
preparation for World Cup
qualifying later in the year.
OBITUARIES
NASCAR Hall of Famer Bud
Moore, a World War II veteran
awarded five Purple Hearts and
two Bronze Stars, has died at 92.
Moore, who lived in
Spartanburg, S.C., won the
NASCAR title in 1957 as crew
chief for Buck Baker and car
owner titles in 1962 and 1963
with Joe Weatherly. . . .
Former Syracuse tailback
Walter Reyes, second all-time
on the school’s rushing list, died
at 36, according to the Trumbull
County Coroner’s office in Ohio.
Reyes died Sunday night after
complaining of stomach pain for
several days. A coroner’s report is
expected in eight to 10 weeks.
AUTO RACING
The Borg-Warner Trophy that
honors the Indianapolis 500
winner left the United States for
the first time in its 82 years to
celebrate Takuma Sato’s victory
in Japan.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Holtby not afraid to lead with his head
Trajectory technique
is Caps goalie’s way
to gain an edge
BY
NHL ROUNDUP
New York’s dominance
on home ice continues
ISLANDERS 5,
CANUCKS 2
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
A popular vacation destination,
Kelowna, B.C., is on the eastern
shore of Okanagan Lake with a
waterfront downtown that’s also
surrounded by parks, mountains
and vineyards. It was where
Washington Capitals goaltender
Braden Holtby and new goaltending coach Scott Murray took a
summer bonding trip of sorts,
three days to get to know each
other better in one of the most
idyllic cities in Canada.
“It was good to get a plan in
place for what we wanted to accomplish this year, and then also
get something to work on . . . and
kind have one aspect that we’re
going to work on through the
year,” Holtby said.
That one aspect would be the
focus of Murray’s goaltending
teaching, a style called “head trajectory” that was developed by
British Columbia-based Lyle
Mast, who consults with several
goalies and coaches in the NHL.
The simplest way to describe head
trajectory is tracking a puck with
the head rather than just with the
eyes. While in Kelowna, Holtby
and Murray met with Mast to
learn more about head trajectory
and, as Holtby put it, “to see if
there was any tools we could add.”
Murray is the fifth goaltending
coach Holtby has had in his sevenyear tenure with the Capitals, and
each has his own philosophies
about the position. The transition
from Mitch Korn to Murray was
relatively seamless; Murray had
started working with Washington’s goalies last season when he
was still the assistant goaltending
coach and primarily responsible
for the organization’s minor
league netminders.
But through those changes,
Holtby has had to balance keeping
an open mind to new ideas and
concepts while sticking to a foundation that has made him a Vezina
Trophy winner and one of the
league’s best and most consistent
goaltenders the past three years.
“You pick and choose what
works for you,” Holtby said. “Obviously, everyone at this level has
something that makes them successful that they bring to the table.
A goaltending coach is like a
teacher, and if you’re going to
broaden your horizons and broaden your game as much as you can,
D3
M2
A SSOCIATED P RESS
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Braden Holtby, left, has balanced new ideas and concepts with his Vezina Trophy-winning foundation.
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
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Tomorrow
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vs. Columbus Blue Jackets
Saturday
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Monday
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you want to get different teachers.
You want to go to different classes
and that kind of thing, learn everything about the position.
“And then you take all of that
information and find what works
for you. If you have one ideology
in mind, you’re not going to adapt
to the changes in the game. Teams
figure you out and your tendencies, so you’ve got to keep evolving.”
Holtby and Korn took a similar
trip together the summer before
they first started their partnership in the 2014-15 season. That
excursion featured some vision
training with an optometrist in
Minneapolis, and it was Korn,
now the Capitals’ director of goaltending, who suggested Holtby
and Murray go to Kelowna together to start building their relationship and also explore the headtrajectory concept with Mast.
“Obviously, when you enter a
partnership, the biggest thing is
trust and believing in each other
as people, so I think it was really
important,” Murray said. “As
much as I’ve gotten a chance to
talk to him and know him a little
bit, to get to know him really well
as a person in a scenario where we
had no choice but to get to know
each other and hang out, it was
awesome.”
It also served as the starting
point for adding some elements of
head trajectory into Holtby’s
game. Minnesota Wild goaltender
Devan Dubnyk, who has worked
with Mast for the past three summers, offered a demonstration of
the technique in a hallway of Capital One Arena when the Wild was
in town earlier this month. The
key goal is increased efficiency.
“If you think about going from
your right to your left and the pass
comes, you think being fast is
moving and then pushing over,”
Dubnyk said. That could require
four separate actions to accomplish. But, Dubnyk explained, if he
moves his head while tracking the
puck, “you just stay there and then
as the puck crosses, if you’re
watching it and then you just
watch it as it gets there, you just
push and you’re eliminating an
extra motion.”
Basically, it’s leading with the
head and having the body follow.
Holes close more easily because
the upper body is always behind
the puck and facing the puck,
which then allows the lower body
to come in behind the puck better.
“Imagine if the eyes were stuck
in the middle of your sockets,”
Dubnyk said, “and the only way
you’d be able to follow or watch
things around would be how
you’d look.”
Said Holtby: “It’s mainly just to
give yourself a little more time to
react. Some of it makes sense.”
That one motion saved could be
the split second that differentiates a goal and a save. With a less
experienced blue line in front of
him this season, Holtby is seeing
roughly 4.75 more shots per game
compared with last year. It’s the
first time he has been peppered
with more than 30 shots per game
since Barry Trotz became coach.
But in the company of goalies who
have played at least 800 minutes
this season, Holtby is fifth in evenstrength save percentage (.925)
and high-danger save percentage
(.842), maintaining his top form
even as his teammates have occasionally struggled in front of him.
If a headfirst approach can give
Holtby even the slightest edge,
he’s open to it.
“He’s open because he knows
how to bring new techniques into
his game and new information
into his head without being consumed by it,” Murray said. “Him
learning and trying new concepts
is not something that bothers
him. It helps him because of the
way he internalizes it and manages that information and those
techniques and brings it into that
whole package that he stays true
to.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
Calvin de Haan and Jordan
Eberle scored goals one minute
apart in the first period to spark
the New York Islanders to a 5-2
win over the Vancouver Canucks
on Tuesday night.
Eberle now has goals in three
straight games and recorded his
400th NHL point as New York
improved to 15-7-2 overall and 80-2 at Barclays Center. The Islanders are the only team in the league
to not have lost a game in regulation on home ice this season.
Andrew Ladd, Anders Lee and
John Tavares also scored goals for
New York.
Thomas Vanek and Bo Horvat
scored for the Canucks, who have
lost three straight.
SHARKS 3, FLYERS 1: Joe
Thornton scored the go-ahead
goal late in the first period, and
visiting San Jose extended Philadelphia’s losing streak to nine.
Chris Tierney and Marc-Edouard Vlasic also scored for the
Sharks.
Claude Giroux scored 48 seconds into the game for the Flyers.
PANTHERS 5, RANGERS 4:
Denis Malgin scored with 1:09 left,
and Florida recovered after giving
up two three-goal leads to beat
host New York.
Jonathan Huberdeau had a goal
and an assist, and Aleksander
Barkov, Jamie McGinn and Micheal Haley also scored for Florida.
Chris Kreider had two goals and
an assist, Pavel Buchnevich added
a goal and two assists, and J.T.
Miller also scored for the Rangers,
whose eight-game home winning
streak ended. David Desharnais
had three assists to help New York
tie it after trailing 3-0 and 4-1.
KINGS
4, RED WINGS 1:
Dustin Brown and Anze Kopitar
scored 2:10 apart late in the second period to put Los Angeles
ahead, and the Kings went on for a
victory in Detroit.
Kopitar scored again in the
third period and Adrian Kempe
also scored for the Kings.
Mike Green had the only goal
for Detroit.
LIGHTNING
2, SABRES 0:
Andrei Vasilevskiy made 34 saves
in his second shutout this season,
and Tampa Bay ended a two-game
skid with a victory in Buffalo.
Defenseman Dan Girardi and
Mikhail Sergachev had goals for
the Lightning. Tampa Bay is off to
the best start in franchise history
(17-5-2) but had lost consecutive
games for the first time.
BLUE JACKETS 3, HURRICANES 2 (SO): Cam Atkinson
and Artemi Panarin scored in the
shootout to give host Columbus a
win over Carolina.
Zach Werenski had a goal and
an assist, and Josh Anderson also
scored for the Blue Jackets.
Joonas Korpisalo, starting in
place of Sergei Bobrovsky, made
29 saves in regulation and overtime and stopped two more shots
in the shootout for Columbus.
Noah Hanifan scored in the
first period for Carolina, and
Brock McGinn tied it midway
through the third.
PREDATORS 3, BLACKHAWKS 2: Pekka Rinne made 37
saves, and Nashville held off visiting Chicago to earn its 10th win in
its past 12 games.
Filip Forsberg, Austin Watson
and Roman Josi scored for the
Predators.
Tommy Wingels and Lance
Bouma scored for the Blackhawks,
who had won two in a row.
MAPLE LEAFS 4, FLAMES
1: Roman Polak, Nikita Zaitsev,
Nazem Kadri and Leo Komarov
each scored once for Toronto in a
victory in Calgary.
The Maple Leafs improved to
4-1-0 against fellow Canadian
teams this season. Four of their
next five games are also against
Canadian opponents.
Michael Stone had the only goal
for the Flames.
OILERS
3, COYOTES 2
(OT): Ryan Nugent-Hopkins
scored in the final minute of overtime to give host Edmonton a win
over Arizona.
Zack Kassian and Matthew
Benning also scored for the Oilers,
who have won consecutive games
for the second time this season.
Christian Fischer and Oliver
Ekman-Larsson scored for Arizona.
Penguins place Murray on IR
The
Pittsburgh
Penguins
placed goaltender Matt Murray on
injured reserve Tuesday with a
lower-body injury.
Coach Mike Sullivan called
Murray “week-to-week” after the
23-year-old left Monday night’s
5-4 overtime win over Philadelphia in the second period following a collision with Flyers forward
Jakub Voracek.
Porter
Cavs win ninth straight shows up
despite James’s ejection in clutch
CAVALIERS 108,
for Wizards
HEAT 97
NBA ROUNDUP
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Kevin Love scored 32 of his 38
points in the first half, LeBron
James was ejected for the first
time in his career and the Cleveland Cavaliers extended their longest winning streak since 2015 to
nine games by downing the Miami
Heat, 108-97, Tuesday night at
home.
Love had his way with every
defender Miami put on him, finishing 10 of 16 from the field and 14
of 17 on free throws. He scored 22
in the first quarter, and the Cavs
opened a 27-point lead before halftime.
James added 21 points before
he was slapped with two technical
fouls by referee Kane Fitzgerald
and was tossed with 1:59 left in the
third quarter and the Cavs leading
by 23. It was the first time James
was thrown out in 1,299 career
games.
“On that particular play I got
fouled all the way up the court,
from the time that I stripped him
[James Johnson] all the way until I
got to the rim, and so that’s what
it’s about,” James said. “I said what
I had to say and I moved on, but he
[Fitzgerald] thought that I should
get two of them, so it is . . . we got
the win and that’s most important.”
Dwyane Wade added 17 points
for Cleveland, which has shaken
off a slow start and is again playing
like the team to beat in the Eastern
Conference.
Dion Waiters scored 21 and
Bam Adebayo had 19 for the Heat,
which had won three in a row.
SUNS 104, BULLS 99: Devin
Booker scored 33 points as Phoenix
held off Chicago on the road.
Booker looked just fine after sitting out a game because of inflammation in his right big toe, nailing
five three-pointers and grabbing
nine rebounds.
T.J. Warren scored 25 for Phoenix, and Alex Len tied a career high
with 18 rebounds. The Suns dominated on the glass, 57-41, while
snapping a three-game losing
streak. The rebuilding Bulls are a
league-worst 3-16 after dropping
their sixth straight.
Justin Holiday made six threepointers on his way to 25 points for
Chicago. Kris Dunn added 24
points, hitting all four from long
range, and eight assists.
Phoenix came out on top after
Chicago cut a 15-point fourth-quarter lead to three in the final minute.
Griffin out up to eight weeks
Blake Griffin has a sprained left
knee and could miss up to eight
weeks, sidelining another key
player for the injury-riddled Los
Angeles Clippers.
The team said Tuesday that an
MRI exam revealed a medial collateral ligament sprain, but there
is no other structural damage to
the knee.
Griffin got hurt late in Monday
night’s 120-115 win over the Los
Angeles Lakers. He had 26 points
and 11 rebounds in the Clippers’
third straight victory.
He was going for a loose ball in
the paint with teammate Austin
Rivers and Lakers rookie Lonzo
Ball. It appeared Rivers fell on
Griffin, whose knee got twisted as
he landed on his back. Griffin got
up but soon left the game.
It’s the latest setback for the
Clippers, who are 8-11 and in second in the Pacific Division.
They are already missing guard
Patrick Beverley, who is out for the
season after right knee surgery
last week. He was acquired after
all-star guard Chris Paul left for
Houston. Forward Danilo Gallinari and guard Milos Teodosic are
hurt, too.
The team didn’t practice Tuesday and hosts Utah on Thursday.
Griffin didn’t speak to reporters
after Monday’s win and left the
locker room looking grim.
WIZARDS FROM D1
It’s a great team win.”
Since learning that knee issues
would keep Wall out for at least
two weeks, Brooks has shared a
message of improvement. The
team must become a better version of itself while Wall sits, and
against the Timberwolves, the
bench played one of its best
games.
Every member of the Wizards’
second unit finished with a plus/
minus of 12 points or more and
obliterated Minnesota’s bench
for a 49-11 scoring advantage.
Conversely, the starters produced negative plus/minus numbers, and no one other than
Porter reached double figures in
scoring.
“The bench all came in and did
their job,” Brooks said. “They
basically gave us the win tonight.”
Each role player played to his
strengths. Kelly Oubre Jr. took on
defensive assignments against
the Timberwolves’ top perimeter
player, Jimmy Butler, while still
scoring 16 points on 7-for-14
shooting. Jodie Meeks made his
first three three-pointers and finished with a 4-for-6 line from
beyond the arc for 12 points.
Scott, who has floated in and out
of the rotation, had an efficient
night of 12 points, five rebounds
and two assists, including the one
that led to Porter’s game-tying
bucket.
“Every night we know the
starters won’t quote-unquote
have it,” Meeks said. “We wanted
to come in and give some energy
and fortunately we were able to
help turn it around.”
In the fourth quarter, Brooks
trusted his gut in playing five role
players. Three starters — Markieff Morris, Marcin Gortat and
Tim Frazier, who has replaced
BRACE HEMMELGARN/USA TODAY SPORTS
Wizards forward Otto Porter Jr. makes the game-winning shot over Minnesota’s Karl-Anthony Towns.
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
at Philadelphia 76ers
Today
7 NBCSW, NBA TV
vs. Detroit Pistons
Friday
7 NBCSW
at Utah Jazz
Monday
9 NBCSW Plus
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
Wall in the lineup — did not leave
the bench as the second unit put
in the heavy lifting. More than
any other player, Ian Mahinmi
justified Brooks’s faith in his
bench.
Mahinmi, who has struggled to
contribute offensively, played
stout defense against Karl-Antho-
ny Towns and added a bit of
playmaking.
Though Towns finished with
20 points on 9-for-19 shooting,
Mahinmi played him tough late
in the game — obstructing shots
and stealing a pass that eventually led to a loose ball and Tyus
Jones hitting a three-pointer to
give Minnesota an 87-83 lead with
4:13 to play.
Washington lost that possession, but Mahinmi showed up
big on the other end in fighting
over Towns for offensive rebounds. Mahinmi’s work under
the offensive glass saved a late
possession, and on the reset he
threw a pass back to the arc
where Scott waited and made a
three-pointer that tied the game
at 87 with 2:48 left.
“It feels good to win on the
road,” Mahinmi said, “and it feels
good to get a good chunk of
minutes in the fourth quarter.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Wizards 92, Timberwolves 89
Washington ........................ 23 20 25 24 — 92
Minnesota .......................... 30 21 20 18 — 89
WASHINGTON
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
Morris
20:39
1-6 0-0 1-4 1 3
2
Porter Jr.
32:05 8-18 2-2 0-8 0 1 22
Gortat
20:04
4-8 1-2 2-7 1 1
9
Beal
34:21 2-11 4-6 0-2 6 1
8
Frazier
15:34
1-2 0-1 0-1 3 1
2
Oubre Jr.
31:27 7-14 2-4 0-4 2 3 16
Mahinmi
26:29
1-4 0-0 5-8 1 4
2
Satoransky
21:35
3-6 0-0 1-5 6 0
7
Scott
20:26
5-8 1-2 0-5 2 0 12
Meeks
17:18
4-6 0-0 0-0 0 2 12
TOTALS
240 36-83 10-17 9-44 22 16 92
Percentages: FG .434, FT .588. 3-Point Goals: 10-28, .357
(Meeks 4-6, Porter Jr. 4-8, Satoransky 1-2, Scott 1-4,
Beal 0-1, Morris 0-3, Oubre Jr. 0-4). Team Rebounds: 9.
Team Turnovers: 7 (4 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Mahinmi 2,
Beal, Oubre Jr.). Turnovers: 7 (Morris 3, Beal, Oubre Jr.,
Porter Jr., Scott). Steals: 5 (Oubre Jr. 2, Scott 2,
Satoransky). Technical Fouls: None.
MINNESOTA
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
Gibson
41:06 8-13 0-2 3-11 1 2 16
Wiggins
37:26 5-15 2-3 0-2 4 2 13
Towns
39:48 9-19 0-0 3-17 0 4 20
Butler
38:28 5-17 4-4 5-7 9 1 17
Jones
39:49
4-9 2-3 0-4 7 3 12
Crawford
16:03
4-8 0-0 1-1 1 0 10
Dieng
15:06
0-2 1-2 0-5 2 3
1
Brooks
8:11
0-1 0-0 1-1 2 1
0
Muhammad
4:03
0-1 0-0 0-1 0 1
0
Teague
0:00
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0
0
TOTALS
240 35-85 9-14 13-49 26 17 89
Percentages: FG .412, FT .643. 3-Point Goals: 10-30, .333
(Butler 3-9, Crawford 2-4, Towns 2-5, Jones 2-6, Wiggins
1-5, Dieng 0-1). Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 10
(15 PTS). Blocked Shots: 1 (Wiggins). Turnovers: 10
(Towns 4, Crawford 2, Butler, Gibson, Muhammad,
Wiggins). Steals: 3 (Butler, Jones, Towns). Technical
Fouls: None.
A: 13,442 (19,356).
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
nfl rewind
NFC East
AFC East
DALLAS (5-6)
PHILADELPHIA (10-1)
BUFFALO (6-5)
NEW ENGLAND (9-2)
September
10: N.Y. Giants, 19-3
17: at Denver, 17-42
25: at Arizona, 28-17
October
1: L.A. Rams, 30-35
8: Green Bay, 31-35
15: Bye
22: at San Fran., 40-10
29: at Washington, 33-19
November
5: Kansas City, 28-17
12: at Atlanta, 7-27
19: Philadelphia, 9-37
23: L.A. Chargers, 6-28
30: Washington
December
10: at N.Y. Giants
17: at Oakland
24: Seattle
31: at Philadelphia
September
10: at Washington, 30-17
17: at Kansas City, 20-27
24: N.Y. Giants, 27-24
October
1: at L.A. Chargers, 26-24
8: Arizona, 34-7
12: at Carolina, 28-23
23: Washington, 34-24
29: San Fran., 33-10
November
5: Denver, 51-23
12: Bye
19: at Dallas, 37-9
26: Chicago, 31-3
December
3: at Seattle
10: at L.A. Rams
17: at N.Y. Giants
25: Oakland
31: Dallas
September
10: N.Y. Jets, 21-12
17: at Carolina, 3-9
24: Denver, 26-16
October
1: at Atlanta, 23-17
8: at Cincinnati, 16-20
15: Bye
22: Tampa Bay, 30-27
29: Oakland, 34-14
November
2: at N.Y. Jets, 21-34
12: New Orleans, 10-47
19: at L.A. Chargers, 24-54
26: at Kansas City, 16-10
December
3: New England
10: Indianapolis
17: Miami
24: at New England
31: at Miami
September
7: Kansas City, 27-42
17: at N. Orleans, 36-20
24: Houston, 36-33
October
1: Carolina, 30-33
5: at Tampa Bay, 19-14
15: at N.Y. Jets, 24-17
22: Atlanta, 23-7
29: L.A. Chargers, 21-13
November
5: Bye
12: at Denver, 41-16
19: at Oakland, 33-8
26: Miami, 35-17
December
3: at Buffalo
11: at Miami
17: at Pittsburgh
24: Buffalo
31: N.Y. Jets
NEW YORK (2-9)
WASHINGTON (5-6)
MIAMI (4-7)
NEW YORK (4-7)
September
10: at Dallas, 3-19
18: Detroit, 10-24
24: at Philadelphia, 24-27
October
1: at Tampa Bay, 23-25
8: L.A. Chargers, 22-27
15: at Denver, 23-10
22: Seattle, 7-24
29: Bye
November
5: L.A. Rams, 17-51
12: at San Fran., 21-31
19: Kansas City, 12-9
23: at Washington, 10-20
December
3: at Oakland
10: Dallas
17: Philadelphia
24: at Arizona
31: Washington
September
10: Philadelphia, 17-30
17: at L.A. Rams, 27-20
24: Oakland, 27-10
October
2: at Kansas City, 20-29
8: Bye
15: San Fran., 26-24
23: at Philadelphia, 24-34
29: Dallas, 19-33
November
5: at Seattle, 17-14
12: Minnesota, 30-38
19: at N. Orleans, 31-34
23: N.Y. Giants, 20-10
30: at Dallas
December
10: at L.A. Chargers
17: Arizona
24: Denver
31: at N.Y. Giants
September
10: Tampa Bay, ppd.
17: at L.A. Chargers, 1917
24: at N.Y. Jets, 6-20
October
1: New Orleans, 0-20
8: Tennessee, 16-10
15: at Atlanta, 20-17
22: N.Y. Jets, 31-28
26: at Baltimore, 0-40
November
5: Oakland, 24-27
13: at Carolina, 21-45
19: Tampa Bay, 20-30
26: at New England, 17-35
December
3: Denver
11: New England
17: at Buffalo
24: at Kansas City
31: Buffalo
September
10: at Buffalo, 12-21
17: at Oakland, 20-45
24: Miami, 20-6
October
1: Jacksonville, 23-20
8: at Cleveland, 17-14
15: New England, 17-24
22: at Miami, 28-31
29: Atlanta, 20-25
November
2: Buffalo, 34-21
12: at Tampa Bay, 10-15
19: Bye
26: Carolina, 27-35
December
3: Kansas City
10: at Denver
17: at New Orleans
24: L.A. Chargers
31: at New England
MICHAEL PEREZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Second-year quarterback Carson Wentz and the surging Eagles have won their past three games by 28 points apiece.
NFC North
CHICAGO (3-8)
GREEN BAY (5-6)
September
10: Atlanta, 17-23
17: at Tampa Bay, 7-29
24: Pittsburgh, 23-17
28: at Green Bay, 14-35
October
9: Minnesota, 17-20
15: at Baltimore, 27-24
22: Carolina, 17-3
29: at New Orleans, 12-20
November
5: Bye
12: Green Bay, 16-23
19: Detroit, 24-27
26: at Philadelphia, 3-31
December
3: San Fran.
10: at Cincinnati
16: at Detroit
24: Cleveland
31: at Minnesota
September
10: Seattle, 17-9
17: at Atlanta, 23-34
24: Cincinnati, 27-24
28: Chicago, 35-14
October
8: at Dallas, 35-31
15: at Minnesota, 10-23
22: New Orleans, 17-26
29: Bye
November
6: Detroit, 17-30
12: at Chicago, 23-16
19: Baltimore, 0-23
26: at Pittsburgh, 28-31
December
3: Tampa Bay
10: at Cleveland
17: at Carolina
23: Minnesota
31: at Detroit
DETROIT (6-5)
MINNESOTA (9-2)
September
10: Arizona, 35-23
18: at N.Y. Giants, 24-10
24: Atlanta, 26-30
October
1: at Minnesota, 14-7
8: Carolina, 24-27
15: at New Orleans, 38-52
22: Bye
29: Pittsburgh, 15-20
November
6: at Green Bay, 30-17
12: Cleveland, 38-24
19: at Chicago, 27-24
23: Minnesota, 23-30
December
3: at Baltimore
10: at Tampa Bay
16: Chicago
24: at Cincinnati
31: Green Bay
September
11: New Orleans, 29-19
17: at Pittsburgh, 9-26
24: Tampa Bay, 34-17
October
1: Detroit, 7-14
9: at Chicago, 20-17
15: Green Bay, 23-10
22: Baltimore, 24-16
29: at Cleveland, 33-16
November
5: Bye
12: at Washington, 38-30
19: L.A. Rams, 24-7
23: at Detroit, 30-23
December
3: at Atlanta
10: at Carolina
17: Cincinnati
23: at Green Bay
31: Chicago
NFC South
ATLANTA (7-4)
NEW ORLEANS (8-3)
September
10: at Chicago, 23-17
17: Green Bay, 34-23
24: at Detroit, 30-26
October
1: Buffalo, 17-23
8: Bye
15: Miami, 17-20
22: at New England, 7-23
29: at N.Y. Jets, 25-20
November
5: at Carolina, 17-20
12: Dallas, 27-7
20: at Seattle, 34-31
26: Tampa Bay, 34-20
December
3: Minnesota
7: New Orleans
18: at Tampa Bay
24: at New Orleans
31: Carolina
September
11: at Minnesota, 19-29
17: New England, 20-36
24: at Carolina, 34-13
October
1: at Miami, 20-0
8: Bye
15: Detroit, 52-38
22: at Green Bay, 26-17
29: Chicago, 20-12
November
5: Tampa Bay, 30-10
12: at Buffalo, 47-10
19: Washington, 34-31
26: at L.A. Rams, 20-26
December
3: Carolina
7: at Atlanta
17: N.Y. Jets
24: Atlanta
31: at Tampa Bay
CAROLINA (8-3)
TAMPA BAY (4-7)
September
10: at San Fran., 23-3
17: Buffalo, 9-3
24: New Orleans, 13-34
October
1: at New England, 33-30
8: at Detroit, 27-24
12: Philadelphia, 23-28
22: at Chicago, 3-17
29: at Tampa Bay, 17-3
November
5: Atlanta, 20-17
13: Miami, 45-21
19: Bye
26: at N.Y. Jets, 35-27
December
3: at New Orleans
10: Minnesota
17: Green Bay
24: Tampa Bay
31: at Atlanta
September
10: at Miami, ppd.
17: Chicago, 29-7
24: at Minnesota, 17-34
October
1: N.Y. Giants, 25-23
5: New England, 14-19
15: at Arizona, 33-38
22: at Buffalo, 27-30
29: Carolina, 3-17
November
5: at New Orleans, 10-30
12: N.Y. Jets, 15-10
19: at Miami, 30-20
26: at Atlanta, 20-34
December
3: at Green Bay
10: Detroit
18: Atlanta
24: at Carolina
31: New Orleans
NFC West
ARIZONA (5-6)
September
10: at Detroit, 23-35
17: at Indianapolis, 16-13
25: Dallas, 17-28
October
1: San Fran., 18-15
8: at Philadelphia, 7-34
15: Tampa Bay, 38-33
22: at L.A. Rams, 0-33
29: Bye
November
5: at San Fran., 20-10
9: Seattle, 16-22
19: at Houston, 21-31
26: Jacksonville, 27-24
December
3: L.A. Rams
10: Tennessee
17: at Washington
24: N.Y. Giants
31: at Seattle
LOS ANGELES (8-3)
September
10: Indianapolis, 46-9
17: Washington, 20-27
21: at San Fran., 41-39
October
1: at Dallas, 35-30
8: Seattle, 10-16
15: at Jacksonville, 27-17
22: Arizona, 33-0
29: Bye
November
5: at N.Y. Giants, 51-17
12: Houston, 33-7
19: at Minnesota, 7-24
26: New Orleans, 26-20
December
3: at Arizona
10: Philadelphia
17: at Seattle
24: at Tennessee
31: San Fran.
SAN FRANCISCO
(1-10)
September
10: Carolina, 3-23
17: at Seattle, 9-12
21: L.A. Rams, 39-41
October
1: at Arizona, 15-18
8: at Indianapolis, 23-26
15: at Washington, 24-26
22: Dallas, 10-40
29: at Philadelphia, 10-33
November
5: Arizona, 10-20
12: N.Y. Giants, 31-21
19: Bye
26: Seattle, 13-24
December
3: at Chicago
10: at Houston
17: Tennessee
24: Jacksonville
31: at L.A. Rams
SEATTLE (7-4)
September
10: at Green Bay, 9-17
17: San Fran., 12-9
24: at Tennessee, 27-33
October
1: Indianapolis, 46-18
8: at L.A. Rams, 16-10
15: Bye
22: at N.Y. Giants, 24-7
29: Houston, 41-38
November
5: Washington, 14-17
9: at Arizona, 22-16
20: Atlanta, 31-34
26: at San Fran., 24-13
December
3: Philadelphia
10: at Jacksonville
17: L.A. Rams
24: at Dallas
31: Arizona
AFC North
NFL power rankings
Each week, national NFL writer Mark Maske provides his ranking and commentary on all 32 teams. Dive deeper daily on
washingtonpost.com/sports.
1. Eagles, 10-1 PREVIOUS: 1
The Eagles’ last three wins have come by 28 points each. Will
their lack of experience in close games come back to plague
them?
17. Redskins, 5-6 PREVIOUS: 19
Keeping this depleted team around .500 has been an
accomplishment for Coach Jay Gruden. Talk of the playoffs isn’t
realistic; this isn’t the AFC wild-card race, after all.
2. Patriots, 9-2 PREVIOUS: 2
Sunday’s win over the Dolphins was routine, and the Patriots are
in a very good groove. They play their next three games on the
road, including Week 15’s anticipated clash with Pittsburgh.
18. Raiders, 5-6 PREVIOUS: 20
The Raiders haven’t really gotten better. The Chiefs sinking at
the top of the AFC West has merely helped Oakland get back into
the playoff race by default.
3. Steelers, 9-2 PREVIOUS: 4
While Coach Mike Tomlin was talking up the upcoming
showdown with New England, the Steelers nearly slipped up at
home against the Aaron Rodgers-less Packers.
19. Bills, 6-5 PREVIOUS: 24
Isn’t it about time for Coach Sean McDermott to make another
quarterback switch from Tyrod Taylor back to Nathan Peterman?
Just kidding.
4. Vikings, 9-2 PREVIOUS: 5
Case Keenum keeps playing well and is maintaining his hold on
the starting quarterback job. There remains no reason for Coach
Mike Zimmer to make a switch to Teddy Bridgewater yet.
20. Cardinals, 5-6 PREVIOUS: 25
Blaine Gabbert or Drew Stanton? How can a single NFL roster be
blessed with such a wealth of quarterback talent? Seriously,
though, the backups haven’t looked terrible.
5. Rams, 8-3 PREVIOUS: 8
The Rams recovered from a loss to the Vikings to beat the Saints
in impressive fashion, reinforcing the idea that they belong in the
conversation about which team is the NFC’s best.
21. Buccaneers, 4-7 PREVIOUS: 15
The magic of Ryan Fitzpatrick has worn off, and Jameis Winston
may return this week. Winston is set to resume throwing during
Wednesday’s practice and may play this weekend.
6. Panthers, 8-3 PREVIOUS: 7
The Panthers keep finding ways to win. But if they’re going to be
a legitimate contender for NFC supremacy, they need QB Cam
Newton to be more consistent as a passer.
22. Texans, 4-7 PREVIOUS: 17
Don’t ever forget that the Texans thought that Savage, and not
Deshaun Watson, was the best option as their Week 1 starter at
quarterback.
7. Saints, 8-3 PREVIOUS: 3
There’s no time to lament the loss to the Rams with an NFC
South showdown against Carolina coming up this week.
23. Jets, 4-7 PREVIOUS: 21
Is it too late to go back to tanking the season? The Jets have
played far better than expected but are far from a playoff berth.
8. Falcons, 7-4 PREVIOUS: 9
The Falcons have regrouped with three straight wins. They are
clearly the league’s best third-place team, which just might be
enough to get them into the playoffs.
24. Cowboys, 5-6 PREVIOUS: 22
Dak Prescott hasn’t been very good in the absence of suspended
RB Ezekiel Elliott. If Prescott wants to be considered a true
franchise quarterback, he must rise to the occasion.
9. Seahawks, 7-4 PREVIOUS: 13
The once-fearsome secondary is decimated and there’s little
reason to believe that the Seahawks remain a major threat.
25. Packers, 5-6 PREVIOUS: 23
Coach Mike McCarthy’s faith in Brett Hundley was rewarded with
a much improved performance against the Steelers.
10. Ravens, 6-5 PREVIOUS: 11
The passing game remained unsightly Monday night. But the
Ravens had the benefit of facing Tom Savage and the Texans
and got the win they needed to stay in the AFC wild-card race.
26. Colts, 3-8 PREVIOUS: 26
It’s difficult to find a more irrelevant team in the league right
now. At least the Browns are so bad that they’re interesting. The
Colts fall squarely in the nothing-to-see-here category.
11. Chargers, 5-6 PREVIOUS: 16
Being the second-best NFL team in L.A. is not such a bad thing at
the moment. The Chargers are playing well.
27. Bears, 3-8 PREVIOUS: 27
There reportedly was the stench of rotting fish Monday at Halas
Hall, supposedly from a bad batch of sushi. Insert your own joke.
12. Titans, 7-4 PREVIOUS: 12
The Titans have pulled back even with the Jaguars. Everything
appears to be setting up for the AFC South title to be on the line
when these teams meet in Nashville in Week 17.
28. Dolphins, 4-7 PREVIOUS: 29
The play of Jay Cutler and Matt Moore this season has done
wonders for the long-term job security of Ryan Tannehill for next
year and beyond.
13. Jaguars, 7-4 PREVIOUS: 6
It has been a breakthrough season for the Jaguars, and they still
could very well end up in the playoffs. But a game against the
Cardinals is one that you have to win.
29. Giants, 2-9 PREVIOUS: 28
The offense is about as nonthreatening as it gets right now. The
effort level of Giants players this season isn’t the only indictment
of Ben McAdoo’s coaching.
14. Bengals, 5-6 PREVIOUS: 18
With two straight wins, the Bengals continue to reassemble their
once-broken season.
30. Broncos, 3-8 PREVIOUS: 30
It is a near certainty now that Denver will be among the teams
searching for a quarterback this coming offseason.
15. Lions, 6-5 PREVIOUS: 10
The status of QB Matthew Stafford’s ankle, injured during last
week’s loss to the Vikings, will be the main issue this week.
31. 49ers, 1-10 PREVIOUS: 31
It’s Jimmy Garoppolo time. The 49ers can only hope that he
seizes the starting quarterback job for good.
16. Chiefs, 6-5 PREVIOUS: 14
The Chiefs’ season is crumbling. And a drastic move, like going
to QB Patrick Mahomes, could be the only thing that can save it.
32. Browns, 0-11 PREVIOUS: 32
The only reason for optimism is the return of Josh Gordon. Yikes.
NFC Statistics
Rush
142.1
147.5
117.5
124.5
116.8
102.9
104.4
81.1
78.3
134.8
129.2
72.8
99.9
100.4
91.3
120.4
Pass
267.3
234.0
261.5
251.3
256.5
260.2
251.7
264.5
255.6
198.7
204.0
256.8
221.8
208.3
204.6
167.1
DEFENSE
Yards
Carolina .............................. 288.3
Minnesota .......................... 290.4
Philadelphia ....................... 291.6
Seattle ............................... 311.7
Atlanta ............................... 321.8
Chicago .............................. 328.2
Arizona .............................. 332.8
New Orleans ...................... 334.7
L.A. Rams ........................... 336.0
Washington ....................... 346.0
Dallas ................................. 348.3
Green Bay .......................... 351.2
Detroit ............................... 359.4
San Francisco ..................... 374.2
N.Y. Giants ......................... 389.9
Tampa Bay ......................... 395.5
Rush
83.2
75.5
65.1
98.4
113.9
112.4
100.4
112.9
123.3
111.8
112.5
107.1
116.2
129.5
131.7
110.9
Pass
205.1
214.9
226.5
213.4
207.9
215.8
232.5
221.8
212.7
234.2
235.7
244.1
243.2
244.6
258.2
284.6
PASSING
ATT-CMP
Brees, NOR .............. 373/266
Wentz, PHL ............. 354/213
A. Rodgers, GBY ...... 193/128
Cousins, WAS ......... 376/249
Goff, LA ................... 361/223
Stafford, DET .......... 395/247
M. Ryan, ATL ........... 361/244
Keenum, MIN .......... 330/218
R. Wilson, SEA ........ 411/256
Prescott, DAL .......... 347/221
Winston, TAM ......... 259/159
PCT
71.3
60.2
66.3
66.2
61.8
62.5
67.6
66.1
62.3
63.7
61.4
YDS TD INT RATE
3029 16 5 104.1
2657 28 5 104.0
1385 13 3 103.2
3038 19 6 101.1
2964 18 5 98.6
3010 21 6 97.3
2884 16 8 97.2
2476 14 5 96.2
3029 23 8 95.2
2318 16 9 87.6
1920 10 6 87.3
RECEIVING
NO YDS AVG
Ju. Jones, ATL ....................... 66 1039 15.7
Thielen, MIN .......................... 70 1005 14.4
Mic. Thomas, NOR ................ 70 805 11.5
Fitzgerald, ARI ...................... 72 780 10.8
M. Jones, DET ....................... 44 731 16.6
R. Woods, LA ......................... 47 703 15.0
D. Adams, GBY ...................... 55 702 12.8
Mi. Evans, TAM ..................... 51 702 13.8
Tate, DET ............................... 63 698 11.1
Baldwin, SEA ......................... 58 698 12.0
LG TD
53 3
65 3
33 2
37 4
43 8
94 4
55 7
41 4
45 3
54 4
RUSHING
NO YDS AVG
Gurley, LA ............................ 204 865 4.2
J. Howard, CHI ..................... 199 847 4.3
Ingram, NOR ........................ 166 837 5.0
E. Elliott, DAL ...................... 191 783 4.1
Blount, PHL ......................... 137 658 4.8
Hyde, SNF ............................ 157 639 4.1
Kamara, NOR ......................... 77 546 7.1
T. Coleman, ATL .................. 122 539 4.4
LG TD
36 8
53 5
51 8
30 7
68 2
61 4
74 5
52 5
Rush
114.2
104.1
112.6
93.2
154.3
122.8
91.0
115.2
108.0
102.3
107.4
116.5
95.3
79.2
116.8
75.6
Pass
297.0
262.9
246.0
263.9
194.8
222.9
237.5
207.5
211.7
212.3
202.8
182.5
201.3
206.6
164.3
198.6
DEFENSE
Yards
Jacksonville ....................... 281.8
Denver ................................ 289.1
Pittsburgh .......................... 289.4
Baltimore ........................... 305.7
Cleveland ........................... 318.0
Tennessee .......................... 323.5
Cincinnati ........................... 330.5
L.A. Chargers ..................... 339.5
Houston ............................. 340.2
N.Y. Jets ............................ 342.5
Miami ................................. 346.3
Oakland .............................. 353.6
Buffalo ............................... 354.9
Kansas City ........................ 372.5
Indianapolis ....................... 375.8
New England ...................... 385.5
Rush
113.1
87.2
96.0
115.8
97.2
89.2
126.6
133.5
96.3
120.4
117.7
108.8
114.0
126.9
109.5
115.1
Pass
168.7
201.9
193.4
189.9
220.8
234.3
203.8
206.0
243.9
222.2
228.5
244.8
240.9
245.6
266.3
270.4
PASSING
ATT-CMP
Brady, NE ................ 408/279
Al. Smith, KC ........... 369/254
D. Watson, HOU ...... 204/126
McCown, NYJ .......... 349/235
Rivers, LAC .............. 388/241
Dalton, CIN .............. 324/201
Ty. Taylor, BUF ........ 308/197
D. Carr, OAK ............ 343/222
Roethlisberger, PIT . 396/250
Brissett, IND ........... 323/196
Cutler, MIA .............. 271/175
PCT
68.4
68.8
61.8
67.3
62.1
62.0
64.0
64.7
63.1
60.7
64.6
September
10: Pittsburgh, 18-21
17: at Baltimore, 10-24
24: at Indianapolis, 28-31
October
1: Cincinnati, 7-31
8: N.Y. Jets, 14-17
15: at Houston, 17-33
22: Tennessee, 9-12
29: Minnesota, 16-33
November
5: Bye
12: at Detroit, 24-38
19: Jacksonville, 7-19
26: at Cincinnati, 16-30
December
3: at L.A. Chargers
10: Green Bay
17: Baltimore
24: at Chicago
31: at Pittsburgh
CINCINNATI (5-6)
PITTSBURGH (9-2)
September
10: Baltimore, 0-20
14: Houston, 9-13
24: at Green Bay, 24-27
October
1: at Cleveland, 31-7
8: Buffalo, 20-16
15: Bye
22: at Pittsburgh, 14-29
29: Indianapolis, 24-23
November
5: at Jacksonville, 7-23
12: at Tennessee, 20-24
19: at Denver, 20-17
26: Cleveland, 30-16
December
4: Pittsburgh
10: Chicago
17: at Minnesota
24: Detroit
31: at Baltimore
September
10: at Cleveland, 21-18
17: Minnesota, 26-9
24: at Chicago, 17-23
October
1: at Baltimore, 26-9
8: Jacksonville, 9-30
15: at Kansas City, 19-13
22: Cincinnati, 29-14
29: at Detroit, 20-15
November
5: Bye
12: at Indianapolis, 20-17
16: Tennessee, 40-17
26: Green Bay, 31-28
December
4: at Cincinnati
10: Baltimore
17: New England
25: at Houston
31: Cleveland
HOUSTON (4-7)
JACKSONVILLE (7-4)
September
10: Jacksonville, 7-29
14: at Cincinnati, 13-9
24: at N. England, 33-36
October
1: Tennessee, 57-14
8: Kansas City, 34-42
15: Cleveland, 33-17
22: Bye
29: at Seattle, 38-41
November
5: Indianapolis, 14-20
12: at L.A. Rams, 7-33
19: Arizona, 31-21
27: at Baltimore, 16-23
December
3: at Tennessee
10: San Fran.
17: at Jacksonville
25: Pittsburgh
31: at Indianapolis
September
10: at Houston, 29-7
17: Tennessee, 16-37
24: Baltimore, 44-7
October
1: at N.Y. Jets, 20-23
8: at Pittsburgh, 30-9
15: L.A. Rams, 17-27
22: at Indianapolis, 27-0
29: Bye
November
5: Cincinnati, 23-7
12: L.A. Chargers, 20-17
19: at Cleveland, 19-7
26: at Arizona, 24-27
December
3: Indianapolis
10: Seattle
17: Houston
24: at San Fran.
31: at Tennessee
INDIANAPOLIS (3-8)
TENNESSEE (7-4)
September
10: at L.A. Rams, 9-46
17: Arizona, 13-16
24: Cleveland, 31-28
October
1: at Seattle, 18-46
8: San Fran., 26-23
16: at Tennessee, 22-36
22: Jacksonville, 0-27
29: at Cincinnati, 23-24
November
5: at Houston, 20-14
12: Pittsburgh, 17-20
19: Bye
26: Tennessee, 16-20
December
3: at Jacksonville
10: at Buffalo
14: Denver
23: at Baltimore
31: Houston
September
10: Oakland, 16-26
17: at Jacksonville, 37-16
24: Seattle, 33-27
October
1: at Houston, 14-57
8: at Miami, 10-16
16: Indianapolis, 36-22
22: at Cleveland, 12-9
29: Bye
November
5: Baltimore, 23-20
12: Cincinnati, 24-20
16: at Pittsburgh, 17-40
26: at Indianapolis, 20-16
December
3: Houston
10: at Arizona
17: at San Fran.
24: L.A. Rams
31: Jacksonville
AFC West
mark.maske@washpost.com
OFFENSE
Yards
New England ...................... 411.2
Pittsburgh .......................... 367.0
Kansas City ........................ 358.6
L.A. Chargers ..................... 357.1
Jacksonville ....................... 349.1
Houston ............................. 345.7
Oakland .............................. 328.5
Tennessee .......................... 322.7
Denver ................................ 319.7
N.Y. Jets ............................ 314.5
Cleveland ........................... 310.2
Buffalo ............................... 299.0
Indianapolis ....................... 296.5
Miami ................................. 285.8
Baltimore ........................... 281.1
Cincinnati ........................... 274.3
CLEVELAND (0-11)
September
10: at Cincinnati, 20-0
17: Cleveland, 24-10
24: at Jacksonville, 7-44
October
1: Pittsburgh, 9-26
8: at Oakland, 30-17
15: Chicago, 24-27
22: at Minnesota, 16-24
26: Miami, 40-0
November
5: at Tennessee, 20-23
12: Bye
19: at Green Bay, 23-0
27: Houston, 23-16
December
3: Detroit
10: at Pittsburgh
17: at Cleveland
23: Indianapolis
31: Cincinnati
AFC South
AFC Statistics
OFFENSE
Yards
New Orleans ...................... 409.4
Philadelphia ....................... 381.5
L.A. Rams ........................... 379.0
Minnesota .......................... 375.7
Atlanta ............................... 373.4
Seattle ............................... 363.1
Washington ....................... 356.1
Tampa Bay ......................... 345.5
Detroit ............................... 333.9
Dallas ................................. 333.5
Carolina .............................. 333.2
Arizona .............................. 329.6
San Francisco ..................... 321.7
Green Bay .......................... 308.6
N.Y. Giants ......................... 295.9
Chicago .............................. 287.5
BALTIMORE (6-5)
YDS TD INT RATE
3374 26 3 111.7
2873 19 4 104.5
1699 19 8 103.0
2549 17 8 95.3
2948 20 7 95.2
2372 18 8 92.5
2025 12 3 91.7
2444 16 8 91.5
2948 20 12 89.9
2368 9 5 86.0
1602 13 9 82.7
RECEIVING
NO YDS AVG
A. Brown, PIT ........................ 80 1195 14.9
D. Hopkins, HOU .................... 69 1004 14.6
K. Allen, LAC ......................... 67 927 13.8
Cooks, NE .............................. 51 869 17.0
A. Green, CIN ......................... 53 809 15.3
Kelce, KC ................................ 62 777 12.5
T. Hilton, IND ........................ 38 740 19.5
T. Hill, KC ............................... 54 726 13.4
R. Anderson, NYJ .................. 41 714 17.4
Gronkowski, NE ..................... 46 702 15.3
LG TD
51 8
72 9
50 4
64 5
77 6
44 5
80 3
75 4
69 7
53 7
RUSHING
Bell, PIT ...............................
K. Hunt, KC ..........................
Fournette, JAC ....................
McCoy, BUF .........................
Gordon, LAC ........................
L. Miller, HOU ......................
A. Collins, BAL .....................
C.. Anderson, DEN ...............
LG TD
27 5
69 4
90 6
48 4
87 5
21 3
50 2
40 2
NO YDS AVG
252 981 3.9
184 890 4.8
187 765 4.1
192 758 3.9
188 698 3.7
179 655 3.7
129 630 4.9
144 585 4.1
DENVER (3-8)
LOS ANGELES (5-6)
September
11: L.A. Chargers, 24-21
17: Dallas, 42-17
24: at Buffalo, 16-26
October
1: Oakland, 16-10
8: Bye
15: N.Y. Giants, 10-23
22: at L.A. Chargers, 0-21
30: at Kansas City, 19-29
November
5: at Philadelphia, 23-51
12: New England, 16-41
19: Cincinnati, 17-20
26: at Oakland, 14-21
December
3: at Miami
10: N.Y. Jets
14: at Indianapolis
24: at Washington
31: Kansas City
September
11: at Denver, 21-24
17: Miami, 17-19
24: Kansas City, 10-24
October
1: Philadelphia, 24-26
8: at N.Y. Giants, 27-22
15: at Oakland, 17-16
22: Denver, 21-0
29: at N. England, 13-21
November
5: Bye
12: at Jacksonville, 17-20
19: Buffalo, 54-24
23: at Dallas, 28-6
December
3: Cleveland
10: Washington
16: at Kansas City
24: at N.Y. Jets
31: Oakland
KANSAS CITY (6-5)
OAKLAND (5-6)
September
7: at New England, 42-27
17: Philadelphia, 27-20
24: at L.A. Chargers, 2410
October
2: Washington, 29-20
8: at Houston, 42-34
15: Pittsburgh, 13-19
19: at Oakland, 30-31
30: Denver, 29-19
November
5: at Dallas, 17-28
12: Bye
19: at N.Y. Giants, 9-12
26: Buffalo, 10-16
December
3: at N.Y. Jets
10: Oakland
16: L.A. Chargers
24: Miami
31: at Denver
September
10: at Tennessee, 26-16
17: N.Y. Jets, 45-20
24: at Washington, 10-27
October
1: at Denver, 10-16
8: Baltimore, 17-30
15: L.A. Chargers, 16-17
19: Kansas City, 31-30
29: at Buffalo, 14-34
November
5: at Miami, 27-24
12: Bye
19: New England, 8-33
26: Denver, 21-14
December
3: N.Y. Giants
10: at Kansas City
17: Dallas
25: at Philadelphia
31: at L.A. Chargers
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
SU
professional football
Manning is benched, and McAdoo’s destruction of the Giants is almost complete
Ben McAdoo
won’t be
remembered for
MARK MASKE much as an NFL
head coach. His
calamitous second
season with the New York Giants
is winding down, and he is giving
the franchise’s patient owners
little choice but to oust him at
season’s end. But he will be
remembered for one thing: He is
the coach who sat Eli Manning.
McAdoo’s stunning
announcement Tuesday that
Geno Smith, not Manning, will
start at quarterback Sunday at
Oakland brought a prosperous
Giants era to an unofficial close.
The Giants won two Super Bowls
with Tom Coughlin as their coach
and Manning as their
quarterback, twice upsetting the
New England Patriots in
memorable fashion, to close the
2007 and 2011 seasons.
But McAdoo replaced
Coughlin as the team’s coach
before last season, and now he
has ended Manning’s streak at
210 consecutive regular season
starts.
“I have a lot of confidence in
Eli as a player, as a quarterback,”
McAdoo said at a news
conference Tuesday. “But at this
point, it’s my responsibility for
the organization to make sure we
take a look at Geno and at some
point take a look at Davis [Webb,
a rookie third-string
quarterback] and give them the
opportunity to show what they
can do heading into next year.”
McAdoo said he pondered the
move after the Giants’ feeble 2010 defeat Thanksgiving night to
the Washington Redskins at
On the
NFL
PATRICK SEMANSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Giants quarterback Eli Manning has been benched in favor of Geno Smith after 210 consecutive starts.
FedEx Field. The defense scored
the Giants’ only touchdown in
that loss, which dropped their
record to 2-9. McAdoo spoke to
Manning on Monday and again
early Tuesday, and Manning
declined McAdoo’s offer to keep
the starting streak going by
having Manning play the first
half and having Smith take over
for the second half.
“Our number one job is to still
win football games,” McAdoo
said. “But it’s my responsibility to
make sure we have a complete
evaluation of the roster top to
bottom, especially at the
quarterback position, moving on
to next season.”
In truth, this isn’t about
evaluation. Smith almost
certainly is not the Giants’
successor to Manning. It’s
unlikely that Webb, a third-round
draft choice this year, is either.
Manning’s successor probably
will come via next year’s draft, in
which the Giants should have a
lofty first-round pick, based on
this season’s ugly results.
This was about, in effect,
cutting the franchise’s emotional
ties to Manning sooner rather
than later, and about beginning
what now appears almost certain
to be an offseason housecleaning.
It is difficult to envision McAdoo
or the coach who follows him
turning back to Manning.
Manning, as he spoke to
reporters Tuesday, was asked
whether he believes he has played
his final game for the Giants.
“I don’t know,” he said. “I don’t
know. I’ll take it one week at a
time.”
He was obviously emotional as
he said, “It’s hard. It’s been a hard
day to handle this. But I’ll hang in
there and figure it out.”
Manning was asked if this was
his toughest day with the
franchise that obtained him in a
draft-day trade with the Chargers
in 2004 orchestrated by
Manning, his family and agent
Tom Condon to keep him from
playing in San Diego.
“It’s up there,” Manning said.
Those from in and around the
league jumped to Manning’s
defense.
“Eli Manning has been totally
disrespected by the Giants,”
former Redskins linebacker
London Fletcher, another NFL
iron man, wrote on Twitter.
Former Giants offensive tackle
David Diehl wrote on Twitter that
he was “absolutely speechless”
and questioned whether “this [is]
what you do to a man who has
[led] this team for 210 straight
games[.]”
But some saw it coming.
Former Redskins quarterback
Joe Theismann said earlier this
month that the end for Manning
with the Giants was in sight.
“The Giants under Eli won two
Super Bowls because of the way
Eli played during the playoffs,”
Theismann said then. “Those
were teams that were not
dominant teams, by any stretch.
He deserves all the credit in the
world for those two Super Bowls.
But this has been going on for a
while. It doesn’t just start in one
year. I do think we’re seeing the
end for him in New York with the
Giants. I really do.”
McAdoo said he spoke to
Giants General Manager Jerry
Reese and the team’s ownership
and that everyone was “on the
same page” with the move.
McAdoo said the benching of
Manning “has nothing to do with
my future.”
For McAdoo, that coaching
future with the Giants could be
short-lived. McAdoo guided the
Giants to the playoffs last season
as a rookie head coach. But the
team has fallen apart this season.
The effort level of McAdoo’s
players during games has been
questioned. He has suspended
two players for violating team
rules. The team appears in
disarray on McAdoo’s watch. Now
things have deteriorated to the
point that Manning has been
benched.
Giants co-owners John Mara
and Steve Tisch are known for
Redskins will wear custom cleats Thursday to promote charities
REDSKINS FROM D1
not only just that but for the
entire world. It’s one of the things
that don’t get talked about much.
You got diabetes. You got breast
cancer. You’ve got homeless, underprivileged children. But whatever I can do to help bring attention, cool. I did my job.”
Hood didn’t participate in “My
Cause, My Cleats” last year in his
first season with the Redskins,
the first time the league allowed
players to break a strict dress
code for a good cause, but he feels
comfortable now as a defensive
leader in his second season to
participate in the initiative.
Quarterback Kirk Cousins did
participate last year and plans to
promote the same charity, International Justice Mission, at AT&T
Stadium on Thursday in a primetime game. The nonprofit aims to
protect “the poor from violence in
the developing world.” It’s an
organization Cousins has promoted often over the last three
seasons, and he intends to wear
cleats with its slogan, “Until all
are free.”
“In America, it is hard to understand a culture of impunity,
MASTER TESFATSION/THE WASHINGTON POST
Redskins tight end Vernon Davis will wear shoes Thursday night
promoting the National Center for Children and Families.
where literally you call 911 and
you say someone is invading my
home and is stealing and there is
nobody to come and get you, to
protect you, to fight for you,”
Cousins said. “There are countries and cultures and places
where that is the case. And so IJM
goes into those places and works
with local government authorities and brings justice and brings
justice to impunity. That is something that [wife] Julie and I have
a heart for, and we want to raise
awareness for it. . . . What they
need is funding. They need peo-
ple to support them and their
work, so we do that passionately
and we want to raise awareness
and help other people to do the
same.”
Cornerback Josh Norman and
inside linebacker Zach Brown
will promote helping inner-city
children
through
different
causes. Norman will wear cleats
that feature his charity, Starz24,
which intends to “provide enrichment to children through community events and youth programs.” Brown will support Inner
City Visions.
“A lot of people don’t support
the inner-city kids,” Brown said.
“So this year, I’m going to give
back for Christmas and take some
kids shopping because a lot of
them don’t have nothing. I came
from where I didn’t have nothing,
where you’ve got two pairs of
shoes — school shoes and play
shoes. You had to make do. So, for
me, to give back makes me feel
better.”
Outside linebacker Ryan Kerrigan will promote his organization, the Blitz for the Better Foundation, which works with schools
in the greater D.C. area to raise
awareness and help children suf-
fering from chronic illnesses.
Long snapper Ryan Sundberg
will team with the Redskins Charitable Foundation for the “Loads
of Love” initiative to help provide
washers and dryers to local
schools.
“We found out one of the major
reasons kids weren’t going to
school is because they didn’t have
clean clothes,” Sundberg said. “So
we decided to put some washers
and dryers in elementary schools
around here and try to get kids to
go to school.”
Safety Deshazor Everett will
wear white cleats with a pink
ribbon to symbolize breast cancer
in honor of his late grandmother.
Everett has a ribbon tattooed on
his arm in her honor.
“It showed me not to quit,”
Everett said. “It got me through
my first year of college [at Texas
A&M] because I almost quit football, honestly. Doing conditioning is different than it is in high
school, and I was like, ‘Man, I
don’t know if I’m built for this.’ I
looked at her name on my arm,
and I was like, ‘If she can fight, I
can fight.’ It’s really what got me
through.”
master.tesfatsion@washpost.com
THOMAS BOSWELL
Enjoy Cousins’s final games in D.C. This is about more than money.
BOSWELL FROM D1
prevents him leaving after 2018.
In the past week, Cousins has
made three public comments
that tip off his true state of
mind. Last year his famous
“How do you like me now?”
scream (as he rubbed the
general manager’s head)
foreshadowed the true state of
non-negotiations between the
proud Cousins and his he’s-notall-that-good bosses. We’re there
again. Cousins’s recent
comments have “Goodbye”
under every word.
Except for his post-victory
yells (“You like that!?”), Cousins
has been a brilliant
noncommittal NFL diplomat at
his own personal PR. It’s like
subliminal advertising. Cousins
says all the right things about
wanting to play and win in D.C.
for eternity, and you see a
beautiful painting of a sunset.
But if you shine infrared light on
it, you see there is a message
written under the paint in blood:
“I’ve Been Kidnapped in the Dan
Snyder Clown Car. Get Me Out of
Here!”
Last Friday, Cousins ripped
the condition of FedEx Field. He
added caveats. But here’s the
crux of it.
“It probably doesn’t look like a
professional NFL field should,”
Cousins said. “I watched last
year’s game at the end of the
season, and had forgotten how
many times running backs,
receivers . . . slipped . . . If you
think the field is rough now on
Thanksgiving, we’ve got two
more home games in mid-to-late
December, and that’s probably
going to be a bigger challenge.”
“So, it is what it is,” he added.
“I don’t know why it is that way
or what causes it. I’ve kind of
learned to just accept it and
understand it as a part of the
deal . . . even going back to the
playoff game my rookie year [in
2012] . . . There’s too many times
[when] it can be the difference
in a win or a loss.”
Would playing half your
games on that field make you
want to sign a long-term
contract?
In the same interview on 106.7
FM, Cousins responded to a
national NFL story that said,
according to sources, the
Redskins had decided not to use
the $28.8 million transition tag
on him in 2018. Instead, the
team would “evaluate his play”
over this season’s final six games
to see if Cousins “was worth” a
third (and final) franchise tag
for $34.5 million and, if so,
would use that as a starting
point in hopes of working out a
long-term deal.
Cousins could’ve shrugged off
the story as speculation because
it had no comment from the
team. Instead, he answered as if
the premise was correct: “If you
still need five more games, or
five-plus, to make a decision, so
be it,” he said. “But I’d like to
think that I’ve played a lot of
football here.”
You mean like 43 straight
starts over three seasons with a
99.7 quarterback rating, 73
touchdown passes to 29
interceptions, plus a dozen
rushing touchdowns? In those
three years, here are the
quarterbacks who are almost
exactly like him, statistically, but
usually not quite as good:
Matthew Stafford, Russell
Wilson, Drew Brees, Matt Ryan,
Alex Smith and Andy Dalton.
Who’s clearly much better in
that time? Tom Brady.
Then, in a Post story Monday,
Cousins talked about his desire
to end his career someday, many
years from now, “on my terms.”
He gave a fine analysis of the
difficulty, but profound
satisfaction, in “going out on
top,” even if “only one percent of
one percent” of pro athletes ever
actually leave their sport that
way. Then he practically took out
an ad for a long-term deal
(somewhere) by explaining why
so many current quarterbacks
were still playing so well deep
into their 30s.
Over and over, he said “on my
terms.” Since the day he was
drafted by the Redskins, nothing
has ever been on Cousins’s
“terms.” He always has been the
one who was kept on the bench
or doubted by the team or lowballed or kept in D.C. with backto-back “tags,” instead of a long-
term deal — a first in NFL
history for a quarterback.
Now Cousins has them over a
barrel. He loves it. As the first
NFL player to trust his own
ability enough to play on backto-back tags in a violent sport,
he’s just weeks away from having
maximum leverage on judgment
day. Of course, the team hates
this. It’s utterly against the NFL’s
players-are-cattle ethos.
Cousins undoubtedly loves his
teammates and respects his
offensive-guru head coach. But
how much? Is there any price —
even full market value, which
probably would make him the
highest-paid player in NFL
history (until the next big
quarterback deal comes along)
— at which Cousins would stay
in Snyder World?
It’s probably too late to repair
this relationship. But the
Redskins darn well better try. It’s
all on them, no matter how
much they try to make it seem
like it’s all on Cousins.
Why? This all goes back to the
Snyder-Mike Shanahan feud. It
has never disappeared. That
venom returns, perhaps
subconsciously, every time a
Cousins contract comes up. This
season, Shanahan twisted the
knife again on a national NFL
show. Snyder wanted to bet the
farm on Robert Griffin III in the
2012 draft, while Shanahan had
his doubts and, being a genius
(and don’t you forget it),
grabbed Cousins in the fourth
round as an insurance policy.
Snyder loathes being wrong,
and even more, he despises
being called out. History says he
usually prefers to stay wrong.
Bruce Allen enables him with
“Yeses.”
The NFL is a blood-oath world
of deep allegiances. In the
league, Cousins will always be
seen as a Shanny guy who owes
him big-time for the prescient
confidence he showed. Cousins
also owes Shanahan’s son Kyle,
then-offensive coordinator in
Washington, for teaching him
the NFL game and pouring all
that time into the diligent
Cousins as if he were a future
star, not a backup.
The Redskins see Cousins and
think of Shanahan smirking
with vindication on both Kirk
and RGIII. That’s bigger than
any foam finger. Cousins sees the
team’s top two bosses and
remembers how they treated
people in the RGIII days, all the
backstabbing while showing no
faith in him.
Cousins may have been gone,
long gone, years ago. Now, after
he has proved himself, proved
himself again and finally proved
himself a third time this season
with a decimated offense around
him, it’s finally playing out.
Say it ain’t so. But it sure looks
like it is.
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
For more by Thomas Boswell, visit
washingtonpost.com/boswell.
their patience. But would anyone
be patient enough to bring back
McAdoo for another season?
“Listen, I haven’t coached well
enough,” McAdoo said Tuesday.
“Our offense hasn’t played well
enough. Our defense hasn’t
played well enough, and our
special teams haven’t played well
enough. All those reasons are
why I’m standing here right now.
They’re all part of it.”
When McAdoo took over for
Coughlin, he spoke of it being an
evolution, not a revolution.
Instead, it has been a ruination.
This day was coming . . .
eventually. It came for Manning’s
brother Peyton in Indianapolis. It
even will come for Tom Brady in
New England. It comes for all
NFL players, even the greatest
quarterbacks. But the
deterioration of the Giants under
McAdoo hastened it and made it
far less dignified than it could
have been.
The overhaul of the Giants has
begun. They could have a new
GM, new coach and new
quarterback in place by Opening
Day next season. More major
changes probably are in store.
But nothing yet to come will be
more significant than what
happened Tuesday.
“I think a lot of Hall of Fame
quarterbacks who have done a lot
for a lot of teams haven’t been
able to choose the way that they
get to move on,” McAdoo said.
“And I’m not saying that we’re
moving on. But at some point in
time, you have to make hard,
tough decisions for the best for
the franchise. That’s what I have
to do here.”
mark.maske@washpost.com
R E D S K I NS NOTE S
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
Williams a game-time
decision vs. Cowboys
The Washington Redskins will
wait until Thursday night to
determine Trent Williams’s
status against the Dallas
Cowboys, but his limited
participation in practice Tuesday
was a promising sign.
The veteran left tackle took
part in individual drills for the
first time since the team was
preparing to face the New
Orleans Saints in Week 11.
Williams, who is playing through
a knee injury that will require
surgery, did not play in last
Thursday’s win over the New
York Giants. But despite chronic
soreness, the lineman insisted in
an interview with The Post on
Monday that he doesn’t have any
intention of shutting it down —
even if Washington is eliminated
from playoff contention.
Williams’s limited status was
the only change to the Redskins’
injury report. Tight end Jordan
Reed (hamstring), defensive
lineman Terrell McClain (toe),
safety Montae Nicholson
(concussion) and center Chase
Roullier (hand) did not practice.
Coach Jay Gruden called
McClain’s injury “an issue” but
said he didn’t know whether the
toe is fractured. “We just don’t
know the severity as far as how
long,” he said. “These big guys
who have these toe injuries —
there is a lot of weight that he
has got to put on there. All the
planting and moving around
side to side, it’s a little bit
difficult. So we will see what he
can tolerate.”
As for Reed, Gruden didn’t
have much of an update. “Your
guess is as good as mine,” he said
of the tight end, who has missed
five games. “But obviously there
is an issue there, otherwise I
would like to think he would be
further along now. But we just
have got to get him healthy.”
— Kimberley A. Martin
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Left tackle Trent Williams, who
did not play against the Giants,
was limited in practice Tuesday.
D6
EZ
NFL NOTES
49ers say
Garoppolo
will start
vs. Bears
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The San Francisco 49ers will
start Jimmy Garoppolo at quarterback this week.
The 49ers said Coach Kyle
Shanahan met with his quarterbacks Tuesday to tell them Garoppolo will make his first start for
San Francisco (1-10) this weekend
at Chicago (3-8).
The 49ers acquired Garoppolo
on Oct. 31 from New England for
a 2018 second-round pick to be
the franchise’s long-term quarterback.
After taking time to learn the
new offense, Garoppolo made his
San Francisco debut in Sunday’s
24-13 loss to Seattle after starter
C.J. Beathard left with injuries to
his hip and knee with just over a
minute left.
Garoppolo completed both
passes, including a 10-yard touchdown pass to Louis Murphy.
Fighting suspensions reduced
Oakland wide receiver Michael
Crabtree and Denver cornerback
Aqib Talib had their two-game
suspensions reduced to one game
after appeal hearings.
Derrick Brooks heard Crabtree’s case and James Thrash
heard Talib’s appeal, and both
decided to reduce the two-game
bans issued Monday by NFL Vice
President of Football Operations
Jon Runyan.
The fight during Oakland’s 2114 win on Sunday was a continuation of a dispute that started last
season when Talib ripped Crabtree’s chain off during the season
finale. Crabtree missed the first
game between the teams this year
but didn’t wait long to seek revenge.
Crabtree punched Denver cornerback Chris Harris Jr. while
blocking him on the first play of
Oakland’s second drive. He then
aggressively blocked Talib on a
running play and drove him to
the ground on the Broncos’ sideline on the following play, starting the brawl.
COWBOYS: Running back
Darren McFadden announced his
retirement two days after his
release by Dallas.
McFadden posted on Twitter
that he made the decision “not
with sadness or without further
opportunity, but with a couple of
days to reflect on how I feel and
where I am at this stage in life.”
The 30-year-old McFadden,
who was in his 10th season, was
an afterthought for the Cowboys
even after 2016 NFL rushing leader Ezekiel Elliott started his sixgame suspension over alleged domestic violence.
McFadden was the fourth overall pick by Oakland in 2008 out of
Arkansas. He finished with 5,421
yards rushing and 28 touchdowns. He had two 1,000-yard
seasons, including 2015 when he
led the Cowboys in his first season with them and finished
fourth in the NFL with 1,089
yards.
TEXANS: Quarterback Tom
Savage committed three turnovers in Houston’s 23-16 loss to
the Baltimore Ravens on Monday
night, but Coach Bill O’Brien said
he is not considering a change at
the position “right now.”
“We’re going to sit down and
watch the tape, and we’ll see if we
can get it corrected,” he said. “It
has to get corrected, because if
not we’re going to have to go in a
different direction.”
T.J. Yates is the only other
quarterback on the active roster.
Rookie starter Deshaun Watson
is out for the season with a knee
injury.
DOLPHINS: Miami placed
defensive end William Hayes on
injured reserve because of a back
injury.
Hayes, a 10-year veteran,
played in 10 games off the bench
this season. He made 19 tackles
and was the Dolphins’ most effective run-stopping end.
Miami acquired Hayes in
March in a trade with the Los
Angeles Rams that also involved
low draft picks.
BEARS: Chicago waived
wide receiver Tre McBride.
Claimed off waivers on Sept. 3,
McBride appeared in eight games
for Chicago and had eight catches
for 144 yards. He had 92 yards
receiving in a loss at New Orleans
on Oct. 29.
GIANTS: New York signed
defensive backs Brandon Dixon
and Darryl Morris.
Dixon, who played 14 games
with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
in 2014, was signed off the Giants’
practice squad.
Morris, who has played for the
49ers, Texans and Colts, was released by Indianapolis on Oct. 3.
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
United’s home schedule won’t entirely be played at Audi Field
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
D.C. United will move into a
new stadium next season, but because of MLS’s concerns about
scheduling complications and
competitive advantage late in the
year, the club will have to play
between two and four home
matches at alternative locations
before Audi Field opens, The
Washington Post has learned.
The 20,000-capacity venue in
Southwest D.C. is slated to open on
time in late June, almost four
months into the season. United
had hoped to play all 17 home
games there by front-loading the
schedule with away matches and
squeezing the entire home slate
into the last four months of the
league calendar.
But with MLS balking at that
plan, United is preparing to play
multiple early-season home
games elsewhere, such as Annapolis, Baltimore or Richmond. Depending on how many matches
are involved, United could play all
of them at one location or spread
them out.
The most likely number of offsite home games is three, according to two people familiar with the
situation who did not want to go
on the record because the matter
Annapolis, Baltimore
and Richmond are in mix
to host two to four games
is unresolved. United officials did
not want to comment specifically
about the schedule. MLS deferred
questions to the team.
Navy-Marine Corps Memorial
Stadium (34,000 seats, 30 miles
east of Washington) would seem
to make the most sense. “We have
had discussions about a game or
two, but nothing has been finalized,” Navy spokesman Scott
Strasemeier said.
Richmond’s City Stadium,
home to United’s second-division
affiliate, holds about 22,000 spectators (9,000 are used for Kickers
matches), and, unlike the Annapolis venue, it has a natural-grass
playing surface. However, the 110mile distance on heavily traveled
Interstate 95 would probably dissuade many season-ticket holders
from attending.
Baltimore has two primary venues, both problematic: Oriole Park
at Camden Yards has a baseball
configuration and possible scheduling conflicts with the Orioles,
while the 71,000-seat capacity at
M&T Bank Stadium, an NFL venue, is too large for United’s purposes.
One person said United is unlikely to consider FedEx Field, Nationals Park or RFK Stadium, the
club’s antiquated home for 22 seasons. The University of Maryland’s
facilities — Maryland Stadium
(54,000 seats and artificial turf )
and Ludwig Field (8,000 and no
locker rooms) — are well-situated
but imperfect, and the Maryland
SoccerPlex in Montgomery County (5,200 seats) is too small.
MLS is aiming to unveil all of its
2018 home openers before Christmas and the complete schedule in
mid-January. Last winter, those
announcements came Dec. 21 and
Jan. 12, respectively.
In the past, MLS has accommodated teams moving into new or
renovated stadiums deep into the
season: In 2011, Sporting Kansas
City played 10 consecutive away
matches — a league record — before christening Livestrong Sporting Park (now Children’s Mercy
Park) on June 9. In 2016, Toronto
FC played eight in a row on the
road while BMO Field underwent
expansion; it reopened May 7.
United’s schedule will probably
end up looking like the Philadel-
phia Union’s in 2010. With PPL
Park (now Talen Energy Stadium)
under construction, the expansion team played twice at Lincoln
Financial Field (home to the NFL’s
Eagles) amid eight away games
before debuting at the new venue
in Chester, Pa., on June 27.
Without playing any home
games at alternative locations,
United would probably have 12
road matches before opening Audi
Field. Complicating the schedule
next year is the possibility of MLS
taking its usual break during the
group stage of the World Cup, set
for June 14-28. Since the U.S. national team failed to qualify, the
league could end up shortening
that break.
MLS sees logistical problems in
scheduling a full home schedule
between late June and late October, the people said, and is also
wary of allowing United to play
almost every league match down
the stretch at home. The counterargument is that United’s heavy
road schedule early in the year
would offset any advantage late in
the season.
United has apparently found
enough open dates for 17 home
games in four months, identifying
weekends and several weeknights
when the Nationals are away.
Since the stadiums are three
blocks apart, they will rarely, if
ever, play on the same day because
of parking and other transportation conflicts.
With United playing at alternative sites, the team would not
charge season-ticket holders if
they did not want to attend those
matches, United spokeswoman
Lindsay Simpson said. They
would have first priority to purchase seats to those games.
“We’re committed to remaining
fan-focused throughout the transition leading to Audi Field,” she
said. “We won’t know the schedule
until probably early January.
When we have more information,
we’ll share it with our fans.”
There is also the possibility of
season-ticket holders applying
their seats toward a proposed
four-team tournament at Audi
Field, a summer event featuring
United and clubs from Europe,
Latin America and perhaps Asia.
If MLS isn’t going to fill available
dates at Audi Field with regular
season matches, one person said,
United would fill them with a tournament and try to reclaim revenue
lost by having to play regular season matches in the alternative
venues.
steven.goff@washpost.com
BARRY SVRLUGA
There is no
path to title
for a team
such as UCF
SVRLUGA FROM D1
have been their best win, a game
against Georgia Tech that was
canceled.
The salient points are these:
Central Florida, which won its 11
regular season games by an
average of nearly 26 points, could
have won those games by 36 or 46
points, and it would not have had
a shot. Central Florida, which led
the nation in scoring at 48.3
points per game, could have
scored 68.3 points per game, and
it would not have had a shot.
And, most important: This isn’t
about Central Florida in 2017, or
even about, say, Western
Michigan in 2016. It’s about the
Mid-American Conference team
that goes unbeaten in 2018, and
the Mountain West team that
follows a year later.
They have no shot.
That there are injustices in
college football is, of course, not
news, and it’s possible we will be
hearing from some of the nation’s
most prominent programs —
Alabama or Southern Cal or Notre
Dame or all of the above — about
how they were jobbed this year,
depending on the outcomes of the
conference championship games
over the coming weekend.
But the schools that actually
are getting jobbed as winter
begins are those that don’t have a
chance before the season starts.
Go back to what would seem
like a trivial point: Central
Florida received zero votes in
either the preseason AP poll of
writers or the preseason coaches’
poll. Neither poll determines
which four teams ultimately gain
entry to the College Football
Playoff, because that’s up to a
committee. Yet those polls
provide a baseline, one that can’t
be reestablished during a season,
even as sands begin to shift.
JOHN RAOUX/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Central Florida has gone 11-0 and has averaged a nation-leading 48.3 points a game but has no shot to make the College Football Playoff.
Take the team UCF beat in its
regular season finale, South
Florida. The Bulls were coming off
an 11-2 season that concluded with
a victory over South Carolina in
the (ahem) Birmingham Bowl. The
Bulls were coming off a season that
propelled then-head coach Willie
Taggart to the top job at Oregon.
The Bulls were coming off a season
in which they finished ranked 19th
in the nation by the AP.
And so, with former Texas
coach Charlie Strong taking over
for Taggart, the Bulls appeared
ready to roll. They were rewarded
for their previous season with the
No. 19 ranking in the preseason
AP poll.
Why does this matter? Because
if that had been UCF ranked 19th
in the preseason, maybe — maybe
— the Knights might have risen in
the AP poll higher than their
current 12th. And that might have
— might have — pushed them
closer to the edges of the top four
in the final CFP rankings.
A year ago, Western Michigan
was in that same situation: zero
votes in the preseason, 13 straight
wins including the MAC title
game, a ranking of 12th by the AP
after that finish — and yet just
15th in the College Football
Playoff rankings.
This is silly, of course, because
how a team is ranked in the
preseason is at worst completely
arbitrary and at best an educated
guess. Either way, it should have
absolutely no impact on whether
a team is a contender for the
playoff — or even have an impact
on the quality of bowl it can go to.
(Want to argue that writers or
coaches actually know what’s
going on in August? Florida State
began the season ranked third in
both polls. The Seminoles must
beat Louisiana-Monroe to pull
back to 6-6 for the season and —
get this — be eligible to play in the
Walk-On’s Independence Bowl.
Merry Christmas from
Shreveport!)
(I’m not going to use this space,
either, to argue for an expanded
version of the College Football
Playoff, either. I mean, I’m not
going to point out that the
Football Championship
Subdivision already has an
expanded playoff or that fitting
eight teams in would be easier
than cutting melted butter with
an ax. That’s not the point here.
Much.)
An issue: scheduling. No, the
Knights don’t really have a
signature nonconference victory,
even though they crushed
Maryland, 38-10, in College Park.
But trying to schedule a
meaningful nonconference win
must happen four or five — or
more — years beforehand, when
college football schedules are
formed. It’s not the Knights’ fault
that the Terrapins (sorry, Terps
fans) stunk this year, nor is it the
Knights’ fault that their Georgia
Tech game was wiped out, nor was
it Western Michigan’s fault that it
beat two Big Ten teams last year —
Northwestern and Illinois — that
combined to go a mediocre 10-15.
Still, Wisconsin won’t be
penalized for its schedule, even
though its nonconference foes
were Utah State, Florida Atlantic
and BYU. Forget how many years
out those deals were made. That’s
not even trying — yet the Badgers
will make the playoff if they beat
Ohio State on Saturday.
Now, this isn’t saying that
Central Florida is better than
Wisconsin. But it is saying we’ll
never know.
This is just the fourth year of the
College Football Playoff, so there’s
not much history yet. We know,
however, that a team can gain a
berth in the national semifinals
even if it can’t earn a spot in its
own conference championship
game, as Ohio State did last year
(and Alabama will argue this year).
We’re about to learn that a two-loss
team can gain entry, provided 10-2
Auburn beats Georgia in the SEC
title game (and, perhaps, if Ohio
State thumps Wisconsin in the Big
Ten title game).
We know with some certainty,
though, that when the season
begins, precisely half of the teams
that play college football at its
highest level have no chance of
competing for their sport’s
highest prize. Which brings up a
question: Do they really play the
sport at its highest level?
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
Clemson, Auburn are 1-2, Alabama falls to No. 5 in CFP rankings
RANKINGS FROM D1
College Football Playoff rankings
RELEASED TUESDAY
losing teams while being overtaken by some winning teams, all
while hauling the hard weight of
its tepid schedule. In a system that
prizes challenging wins, Wisconsin’s nine Power Five victims include only one ranked team
(No. 21 Northwestern). Those
nine are a combined 50-58 as the
schedule offered no opportunity
against anybody in the Big Ten
East Division top three (Ohio
State, Penn State, Michigan
State). Clemson’s Power Five victims are 67-39, with Auburn’s at
54-30 and Oklahoma’s at 57-51.
Four teams with vague (at best)
playoff hopes rested just beyond
the top seven: No. 8 Ohio State
(10-2), No. 9 Penn State (10-2),
No. 10 Southern California (10-2)
and No. 11 TCU (10-2). All except
Penn State get a chance to burnish
their CVs this weekend, with Ohio
State playing Wisconsin for the
Big Ten title, Southern California
playing Stanford for the Pacific-12
championship and TCU playing
Oklahoma for the Big 12 title.
Record
1. Clemson......................................................................11-1
2. Auburn........................................................................10-2
3. Oklahoma ...................................................................11-1
4. Wisconsin...................................................................12-0
5. Alabama .....................................................................11-1
6. Georgia .......................................................................11-1
7. Miami .........................................................................10-1
8. Ohio St........................................................................10-2
9. Penn St.......................................................................10-2
10. Southern Cal ............................................................10-2
11. TCU ...........................................................................10-2
12. Stanford .....................................................................9-3
13. Washington .............................................................10-2
14. UCF ...........................................................................11-0
15. Notre Dame................................................................9-3
16. Michigan St................................................................9-3
17. LSU .............................................................................9-3
18. Washington St...........................................................9-3
19. Oklahoma St. .............................................................9-3
20. Memphis ..................................................................10-1
21. Northwestern ............................................................9-3
22. Virginia Tech ..............................................................9-3
23. Mississippi St. ...........................................................8-4
24. N.C. State...................................................................8-4
25. Fresno St....................................................................9-3
The College Football Playoff Selection Committee will
announce the final rankings Sunday at noon. The playoff
semifinals will match the No. 1 seed vs. the No. 4 seed, and
No. 2 will face No. 3. The semifinals will be hosted at the
Rose Bowl and Sugar Bowl on Jan. 1, 2018. The championship game will be played on Jan. 8, 2018 in Atlanta.
Kirby Hocutt, the chairman of a
committee that includes five men
from coaching and five from athletic directing, said the margin
between No. 5 Alabama and No. 8
Ohio State remains small, raising
the possibility of a royal argument
between those two fan bases,
should chaos butt in.
Stanford (9-3) held down No. 12,
just ahead of Washington (10-2),
which Stanford defeated Nov. 10.
With the Pac-12 widely presumed
the only Power Five conference
without a viable chance at the fourteam playoff, its three teams in spaces Nos. 10, 12 and 13 still outpaced
No. 14 Central Florida, the top team
from the second-tier Group of Five.
The Knights’ much-lauded 49-42
win over South Florida pushed UCF
to 11-0 but pushed it only a notch up
the charts, but it does find the privilege of a ranked opponent for its
American Athletic Conference
championship game, and that will
be No. 20 Memphis (10-1), which it
throttled, 40-13, on Sept. 30.
Notre Dame (9-3) saw its 38-20
loss at Stanford dock it from No. 8
to No. 15.
Among the top 11, four heavy
occasions this weekend will help
sort out matters, or not so much.
Clemson will play Miami in the
Atlantic Coast Conference championship game in Charlotte, Auburn will play Georgia in the
Southeastern Conference cham-
pionship game in Atlanta, plus the
bouts of Oklahoma and TCU, and
Wisconsin and Ohio State.
With Alabama just outside the
top four, Clemson’s streak of 17
consecutive rankings within the
top four became the nation’s longest run. (The committee does not
issue postseason rankings.)
Clemson spent the entire 2015
season at No. 1 in all six rankings
and has not departed the top four
since. The No. 1 Tigers (Clemson)
and the No. 2 Tigers (Auburn)
played each other long ago Sept. 9,
with the former Tigers hogging 11
sacks and winning, 14-6. Auburn
Coach Gus Malzahn stressed Saturday that he meant no disrespect
to Clemson, but his Auburn team
differs utterly from that Auburn
team from early September.
While both sets of Tigers play
this weekend, Alabama will rest
and hope for unrest from above.
In so doing, the Crimson Tide
will know that only one team so far
in the four-season-old playoff era,
Ohio State in 2016, has reached the
playoff without reaching a conference championship game. Ala-
bama did get a wee boost from the
bottom of the rankings, when one
of its semi-anonymous September
victims, Fresno State (9-3),
nudged in at No. 25, having reassembled itself mightily after starting off 1-2 with losses at Alabama
(by 41-10) and Washington (by 4816). Fresno State’s presence gave
Alabama, whose stash of wins is
less shiny than those of Clemson,
Auburn, Oklahoma and even Ohio
State, three wins over ranked
teams, counting No. 17 LSU (9-3)
and No. 23 Mississippi State (8-4).
At the top, Clemson caused itself to lose a ranked victim because it blasted No. 24 South Carolina 34-10 on Saturday and shooed
that rival from the rankings, but it
gained one when a previous Clemson victim, North Carolina State
(8-4), replaced South Carolina at
No. 24. Another Clemson victim,
Virginia Tech (9-3), went from
No. 25 to No. 22, meaning Clemson has beaten teams ranked
Nos. 2, 22 and 24, plus four more
Power Five teams with winning
records.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
college basketball
Hoyas scarcely break
Boilermakers hand No. 17 Cardinals their first loss a sweat in rout of Maine
NATIONAL ROUNDUP
Darral Willis had 14 points and
12 rebounds for the Shockers,
while Rashard Kelly had 12 points
and 10 rebounds. Alante Fenner
led Savannah State with 18 points.
PURDUE 66,
LOUISVILLE 57
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Vince Edwards scored 15
points, and Carsen Edwards and
Dakota Mathias spurred a late run
Tuesday night to send Purdue past
No. 17 Louisville, 66-57, in the
ACC/Big Ten Challenge in West
Lafayette, Ind.
The Boilermakers (6-2) beat
their second straight ranked opponent — and won for the first
time since their 41-week streak in
the top 25 ended. Edwards and
Mathias both finished with 13
points.
Louisville (4-1) was led by V.J.
King with 17 points and Deng Adel
with 13. It’s the second time in
eight years the Cardinals have lost
their first road game of the season.
The difference Tuesday was
Purdue’s size advantage and
Coach Matt Painter’s willingness
to let 7-foot-2 center Isaac Haas
play most of the final 15 minutes
with three fouls.
Painter made the move with the
Boilermakers down 33-27. Over
the next 2:05, Haas drew five fouls
and sent two of the Cardinals’
starters to the bench with four
fouls. When the 16-3 run ended,
the Boilermakers led, 43-36, with
9:12 to go.
KANSAS
96, TOLEDO 58:
Devonte Graham scored a careerhigh 35 points, Malik Newman
added 17 and the second-ranked
Jayhawks ran roughshod over the
Rockets in Lawrence, Kan., to extend their best start in seven years.
Svi Mykhailiuk hit five threepointers and added 15 points for
Kansas (6-0), which built a 59-30
XAVIER
76, BAYLOR 63:
J.P. Macura scored 15 of his 19
points in the first half in Cincinnati, and the No. 21 Musketeers sent
the No. 16 Bears to their first loss
of the season.
Xavier (6-1) recovered from its
first loss — against Arizona State
— by controlling the boards and
putting together decisive runs in
each half. It never trailed after an
opening 21-8 spurt.
Kaiser Gates also had 19 points
for the Musketeers, including a
three-pointer that blunted the
Bears’ final comeback attempt.
Xavier has won 34 straight nonconference home games, with the
last loss 56-55 to Wofford on
Dec. 22, 2012.
MICHAEL CONROY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Guard Dakota Mathias, shooting over Louisville forward Deng
Adel in the second half, scored 13 points in Purdue’s win Tuesday.
lead by halftime and pushed the
advantage to more than 50 points
before coasting down the stretch.
The Jayhawks were 12 of 20
from beyond the arc and shot 59
percent from the field, though
emptying the bench early kept
them from hitting the 100-point
mark for the third consecutive
game.
They also forced 20 turnovers
by a Toledo team that had committed 25 total over its previous three
games.
WICHITA STATE 112, SAVANNAH STATE 66: Samajae
Haynes-Jones scored a seasonhigh 31 points to lead the No. 8
Shockers (5-1) in Wichita.
Jones, a junior college transfer,
scored 30 points in his first five
games combined.
Five other Wichita State players
scored in double figures against
the fast-paced Tigers (2-6). Leading scorer Landry Shamet did not
play in the second half after re-injuring his right ankle.
No. 1 U-Conn. women cruise
Kia Nurse scored 27 points, hitting all eight of her three-point
attempts, and Gabby Williams
added 18 points in her homecoming to help No. 1 Connecticut (6-0)
beat host Nevada, 88-57, in Reno.
It was a season high for Williams, who was playing her first
game at Nevada’s Lawlor Events
Center since she led her high
school team to a state title in 2012.
Her father, Matt, and sister, Kayla,
both played basketball at Nevada
UCLA 68, UC RIVERSIDE
48: Monique Billings had 14
points and 12 rebounds to lift the
seventh-ranked Bruins (6-1) in Los
Angeles.
OREGON
87, HAMPTON
45: Oti Gildon had career highs of
20 points and 12 rebounds to help
the No. 10 Ducks (6-1) roll in Eugene, Ore.
New-look Cavs still prefer to play slow
Unforgiving defense,
deliberate pace helped
U-Va. smother Wisconsin
BY
G ENE W ANG
charlottesville — The Vir-
ginia men’s basketball team is in
the early stages of transition, but
through seven games, its identity
remains intact.
The defense was unforgiving
and the pace was deliberate as the
Cavaliers improved to 7-0 by stifling Wisconsin, 49-37, on Monday night in the ACC/Big Ten
Challenge at John Paul Jones Arena.
The Cavaliers limited the Badgers to 31.3 percent shooting, including 3 for 20 (15.0 percent) on
three-pointers, and without a
point for 71/2 minutes of the second
half. So locked in was Virginia
that it held the Badgers to less
than half of their season scoring
average. Wisconsin also committed 14 turnovers and labored to
get the ball inside to forward
Ethan Happ. With Cavaliers center Jack Salt defending him for
the majority of the game, the
third-team all-American finished
with 14 points.
There also was a predictable
lack of scoring, heightened by the
matchup against the similarly
grinding Badgers. And the Cavaliers, oddly, attempted no free
throws, making them just the
third college team in the past five
seasons to win while doing that,
according to ESPN Stats & Info.
But consistency and diversified
scoring have vaulted the Cavaliers
into the Associated Press top 25
for the first time this season at
No. 18, and they helped quiet
concerns about the loss of several
important contributors from last
season.
“We’ve seen a lot of guys shine
on different nights, so I think that
says a lot,” said guard Kyle Guy,
Virginia’s leading scorer at 16.0
points per game. “If I’m having an
off shooting night, someone else
can go get a bucket. I think we
have a lot of people who can score,
and when we find our identity, it’ll
start being a little smoother.”
Virginia was carried against
Wisconsin by Guy (17 points) and
fellow guard Devon Hall (16), the
players on whom Coach Tony Bennett figures to lean most offensively following the graduation of
top scorer London Perrantes and
the exit of three transfers, including guard Marial Shayok. No other Cavaliers player scored more
than four points Monday.
“Offensively, it’s been different
guys at different times,” Bennett
said. “We’re not going to reinvent
the wheel, but [we’re] trying to get
great shots for the right guys.
GEORGETOWN 76,
MAINE 55
BY
G ENE W ANG
Patrick Ewing made clear during his introductory news conference as Georgetown men’s basketball coach in early April he
would be avoiding blue bloods
this season in a favor of less taxing
opponents.
The thinking, he said, was to
compile confidence-building victories for the youthful Hoyas rather than face a more robust schedule potentially dotted with losses.
A visit from Maine on Tuesday
night fell in line with that blueprint, allowing Georgetown to
forge a comfortable lead soon
after tip-off on the way to a 76-55
triumph at Capital One Arena.
The Hoyas improved to 5-0,
with their first true test more
than two weeks away when they
play visiting Syracuse. Still, Ewing revealed he found plenty of
shortcomings within the performance against shorthanded
Maine, which dropped to 1-6 after
being picked to finish last in the
America East by conference
coaches.
“I was disappointed in our effort tonight,” Ewing said. “We’ve
been playing very well, but tonight we took a step backward.
Nothing against Maine. They’re
an outstanding ballclub. They’re
very well-coached, but we just
didn’t do all the things that we
were doing well.”
Georgetown nonetheless led
for all but 1:40 and got a seasonhigh 18 points from Kaleb Johnson, a junior swingman. Hoyas
junior center Jessie Govan added
16 points on 7-for-12 shooting
with eight rebounds.
The Hoyas, who shot 46 percent and went 22 of 29 from the
foul line, held a double-digit advantage through the majority of
the lightly attended game that
included sparse student turnout.
The closest Maine got in the second half was 48-38 with 13:12 to
play, but Govan made a layup, and
Marcus Derrickson followed with
two free throws.
Georgetown did encounter a
bit of a scare early in the second
half when starting guard Jonathan Mulmore (10 points, five
assists) fell hard clutching his left
knee. The senior walked slowly to
the bench with what was described as a lower leg contusion
but re-entered several minutes
later to help the Hoyas pull away.
The Black Bears, missing three
starters, were representative of
the type of opponent Georgetown
has been dispatching with ease
this season. Maine has not won
more than eight games in any of
the previous four seasons or finished above .500 since 2009-10.
The Hoyas have yet to play an
opponent with a winning record.
Their first five opponents were a
combined 9-25 entering Tuesday
night, and two of those teams had
managed but a single victory.
Underscoring Ewing’s preference of facing more manageable
opposition was withdrawing
from this past weekend’s PK80
tournament in Portland, Ore., featuring Duke, North Carolina and
Michigan State. Georgetown had
been scheduled to play the Spartans in the first round.
Thus the Hoyas, according to
several metrics the NCAA uses in
part to determine a school’s
NCAA tournament profile, rank
among the lowest in the country
in strength of schedule.
KenPom.com, for instance, has
the Hoyas 348th out of 351 programs in that category. Georgetown’s strength of schedule is No.
349 in the Sagarin ratings.
Not that Ewing is necessarily
seeking an immediate return to
the NCAA tournament for the
Hoyas, who have missed the
sport’s showcase event in three of
the past four seasons. Georgetown finished 14-18 last season,
leading to the dismissal of John
Thompson III under whom the
Hoyas routinely played demanding nonconference games.
Among the most promising
holdovers from the Thompson III
era is Govan, the Hoyas’ thirdleading scorer last season. Govan
indicated he would relish the opportunity to learn under Ewing,
the most decorated player in
Georgetown history and a member of the Naismith Basketball
Hall of Fame.
Govan was among five Georgetown players to score in double
figures against Maine, which
missed all 10 of its three-point
attempts in the first half. The
Hoyas weren’t much better in
that time, making just 1 of 6 from
beyond the arc, but they capitalized on a considerable length advantage to get shots regularly
within several feet of the basket.
“It shows our unselfishness as
a team,” Johnson said of the balanced scoring, “It’s good to have
five different players in double
figures, to be able to spread the
wealth around.”
Georgetown used an 11-0 run
early in the first half to open a 13-2
lead, and another burst featuring
consecutive layups from Derrickson shortly before intermission
expanded the margin to 29-14.
The junior forward from Bowie
finished with 12 points on 3-for-4
shooting.
“I’ve just got to hype myself up
every game because I know if I
don’t take these games serious,
then how am I going to take a
game against like Villanova or
Seton Hall serious?” Govan said.
“I’ve got to come out every game
with the same mentality, just try
to dominate, and that’s the message Coach Ewing has been trying
to get to me this year.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
AREA ROUNDUP
Hokies race to a 6-1 start
by overpowering Hawkeyes
VIRGINIA TECH 79,
IOWA 55
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kyle Guy, Virginia’s leading scorer at 16.0 points per game, had 17 in Monday’s victory over Wisconsin.
Sprinkle in some interior touches
for different people and just play
the best way we can. We just talk
about getting a quality shot.”
The Cavaliers came into Monday night shooting nearly 51 percent, which ranked fourth in the
ACC. Even though Virginia shot a
season-low 38.3 percent against
Wisconsin, Guy’s emergence as
one of the team’s most polished
scorers has provided the Cavaliers
with a leading candidate for a
go-to player in tight situations,
the role Perrantes embraced last
season.
Guy was particularly effective
in the first half, repeatedly beating Wisconsin defenders off the
dribble, including twice getting
deep into the lane and finishing
gracefully. He made 7 of 11 twopoint field goal attempts to offset
errant shooting from beyond the
arc (1 of 6).
“I’ve always tried to be that way,
especially in high school in my
younger years, but definitely last
year I was a little more one-dimensional,” Guy said, referring to
attempting 103 three-pointers in
2016-17 compared to 102 two-
point shots. “That was just something — all you guys know; I’ve
said it a thousand times — I just
tried to work on this summer, and
I think it’s starting to show.”
Guy’s performance followed a
season-low five points on 2-for-8
shooting in Friday’s 70-55 win
against Rhode Island in the final
of the NIT Season Tip-Off at New
York’s Barclays Center, site of this
season’s ACC tournament. In the
three games before that, Guy had
made 23 of 46 field goal attempts,
including scoring a career-high
29 points to spark a 76-67 victory
at Virginia Commonwealth on
Nov. 17.
The Cavaliers, in keeping with
another Bennett hallmark, have
played at the slowest pace in Division I so far, according to estimates of possessions per 40 minutes by advanced statistical website KenPom.com. But they have
shown that not every winning
score needs to be in the 50s or
higher, with Bennett indicating
Virginia is at its best offensively
when attacking instead of settling
for jumpers. Getting to the rim
also presumably will begin send-
ing the Cavaliers to the free throw
line more often.
Virginia entered Monday’s
game making 81.4 percent of its
foul shots, seventh nationally, but
had attempted just 102, ranked
277th. After Monday, none of its
players was averaging more than
three free throw attempts per
game.
But Hall has been on an offensive upswing lately, posting his
second straight game in double
figures after combining for 17
points in his three previous
games. The redshirt senior shot
just 5 for 17 over that stretch but
since has made 12 of 19 field goal
attempts.
Against Wisconsin, he made
7 of 10 shots, frequently going to
the rim aggressively. He’s averaging 11.9 points this season, the
best of his college career.
“I think we’re still in the midst
of trying to forge our identity as a
team,” Hall said. “It’s early in the
season, and so we are still trying
to make sure everybody’s on the
same page in terms of knowing
what type of team we are.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
Ahmed Hill scored 18 points to
lift Virginia Tech to a 79-55 victory
over Iowa on Tuesday night in
Blacksburg, Va.
Hill hit 6 of 13 shots, including
three three-pointers, for the
Hokies (6-1), who blew open a tied
game at halftime with a big run
early in the second half. P.J. Horne
added 16 points for Virginia Tech,
and Justin Bibbs had 14.
A combination of Virginia
Tech’s stingy defense and the
Hawkeyes’ icy shooting led to
Iowa’s demise on this evening. The
Hokies broke things open with a
20-1 run early in the second half,
with Bibbs scoring nine of Virginia Tech’s points in the run.
Iowa (4-3), which lost for the
third time in four games, made its
first basket of the second half — a
jumper by Tyler Cook with 19:11
remaining — but then missed 17
consecutive shots. During a span
of more than eight minutes, the
Hawkeyes scored just one point,
which came on a free throw by
Cook with 12:52 remaining.
After shooting 51.7 percent in
the first half (15 of 29), Iowa made
just seven field goals in the final 20
minutes. The Hawkeyes’ 33.3 percent shooting (22 of 66) was their
worst of the season.
Cook paced the Hawkeyes with
16 points.
The Hawkeyes came into the
game hoping that the return of
co-captain Nicholas Baer would
provide a spark, but Baer, a 6foot-7 forward who missed the
first six games because of a broken
bone in his left pinky finger,
scored five points and made just 2
of 9 from the floor.
The Hokies, who came into the
game leading the nation in scoring
at 102 points per game, got another fantastic performance from
their bench. Virginia Tech’s bench
came into the game averaging 26.7
points, and the reserves combined
to score 31 against the Hawkeyes.
VCU 85, APPALACHIAN ST.
72: Justin Tillman scored 21
points, and Jonathan Williams
added 18 for the Rams in Richmond.
Khris Lane added 17 for the
Rams (4-3), who led 46-45 at halftime and opened the second half
on a 19-9 run. That gave them a
65-54 lead with 11:44 to play, and
they did not let the Mountaineers
closer than nine after that.
Ronshad Shabazz led Appalachian State with 19 points.
Howard women earn first win
Howard got a game-high 19
points from sophomore guard
Sarah Edmond, along with five
assists and five steals, in a 68-65
victory over Fairleigh Dickinson at
Burr Gymnasium.
The Bison, who also got 10
points and eight rebounds from
freshman Tariah Johnson, improved to 1-5.
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
scoreboard
FO O T B A LL
B A S K ET B A L L
HOCKEY
NFL
NBA
NCAA men
NHL
Kings 4, Red Wings 1
NFC
EASTERN CONFERENCE
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
LOS ANGELES .......................... 0
DETROIT .................................. 1
EAST
W
Philadelphia ................ 10
Dallas ............................ 5
Washington .................. 5
N.Y. Giants .................... 2
L
1
6
6
9
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.909
.455
.455
.182
PF
351
248
258
172
PA
191
270
276
267
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ................. 8
Carolina ......................... 8
Atlanta .......................... 7
Tampa Bay .................... 4
L
3
3
4
7
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.727
.727
.636
.364
PF
322
248
265
223
PA
222
207
230
262
NORTH
W
Minnesota ..................... 9
Detroit .......................... 6
Green Bay ..................... 5
Chicago ......................... 3
L
2
5
6
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.818
.545
.455
.273
PF
271
294
232
177
PA
195
264
261
252
WEST
W L
L.A. Rams ...................... 8 3
Seattle .......................... 7 4
Arizona ......................... 5 6
San Francisco ................ 1 10
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.727
.636
.455
.091
PF
329
266
203
187
PA
206
212
278
284
AFC
EAST
W
New England ................. 9
Buffalo .......................... 6
N.Y. Jets ....................... 4
Miami ............................ 4
L
2
5
7
7
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.818
.545
.364
.364
PF
325
224
228
174
PA
220
260
257
289
SOUTH
W
Tennessee ..................... 7
Jacksonville .................. 7
Houston ........................ 4
Indianapolis .................. 3
L
4
4
7
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.636
.636
.364
.273
PF
242
269
283
195
PA
269
168
285
300
NORTH
W L
Pittsburgh ..................... 9 2
Baltimore ...................... 6 5
Cincinnati ...................... 5 6
Cleveland ...................... 0 11
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.818
.545
.455
.000
PF
258
236
199
166
PA
193
187
215
289
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 6
L.A. Chargers ................ 5
Oakland ......................... 5
Denver ........................... 3
L
5
6
6
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.545
.455
.455
.273
PF
272
249
225
197
PA
236
202
261
280
WEEK 12
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
at Washington 20, N.Y. Giants 10
Minnesota 30, at Detroit 23
L.A. Chargers 28, at Dallas 6
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
at Atlanta 34, Tampa Bay 20
Cincinnati 30, at Cleveland 16
Tennessee 20, at Indianapolis 16
Buffalo 16, at Kansas City 10
at Philadelphia 31, Chicago 3
at New England 35, Miami 17
Carolina 35, at N.Y. Jets 27
Seattle 24, at San Francisco 13
at Oakland 21, Denver 14
at L.A. Rams 26, New Orleans 20
at Arizona 27, Jacksonville 24
at Pittsburgh 31, Green Bay 28
MONDAY’S RESULT
at Baltimore 23, Houston 16
WEEK 13
THURSDAY’S GAME
Washington at Dallas (-1), 8:25
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Detroit at Baltimore (-3), 1
Tampa Bay (OFF) at Green Bay, 1
Minnesota at Atlanta (-3), 1
San Francisco at Chicago (-31/2), 1
Denver (-1) at Miami, 1
Indianapolis at Jacksonville (-91/2), 1
Houston at Tennessee (-61/2), 1
Kansas City (-3) at N.Y. Jets, 1
New England (-8) at Buffalo, 1
Cleveland at L.A. Chargers (-131/2), 4:05
Carolina at New Orleans (-4), 4:25
L.A. Rams (-7) at Arizona, 4:25
N.Y. Giants at Oakland (-7), 4:25
Philadelphia (-6) at Seattle, 8:30
MONDAY’S GAME
Pittsburgh (-51/2) at Cincinnati, 8:30
ATLANTIC
W
Boston........................................18
Toronto ......................................12
Philadelphia ...............................11
New York ...................................10
Brooklyn.......................................7
L
4
7
8
10
13
Pct
.818
.632
.579
.500
.350
GB
—
41/2
51/2
7
10
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington ...............................11
Miami.........................................10
Charlotte......................................8
Orlando ........................................8
Atlanta.........................................4
L
9
10
11
13
16
Pct
.550
.500
.421
.381
.200
GB
—
1
21/2
31/2
7
CENTRAL
W
Detroit .......................................13
Cleveland ...................................14
Indiana .......................................12
x-Milwaukee ................................9
Chicago ........................................3
L
6
7
9
9
16
Pct
.684
.667
.571
.500
.158
GB
—
—
2
31/2
10
L
4
7
9
12
16
Pct
.800
.650
.550
.368
.238
GB
—
3
5
81/2
111/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .....................................16
San Antonio ...............................13
New Orleans ..............................11
Memphis ......................................7
Dallas ...........................................5
NORTHWEST
W
Portland .....................................13
x-Denver ....................................11
Minnesota..................................12
x-Utah ..........................................9
Oklahoma City .............................8
PACIFIC
W
Golden State..............................15
L.A. Clippers.................................8
L.A. Lakers ...................................8
Phoenix ........................................8
x-Sacramento ..............................6
FRIDAY‘S GAME
FAR WEST
Pac-12 championship: Stanford (9-3) vs. Southern Cal
(10-2) at Santa Clara, Calif., 8
SATURDAY‘S GAMES
SOUTH
U-Mass. (4-7) at FIU (7-4), Noon
Louisiana-Monroe (4-7) at Florida St. (5-6), Noon
AAC championship: Memphis (10-1) at UCF (11-0), Noon
CUSA championship: North Texas (9-3) at FAU (9-3), Noon
Georgia Southern (2-9) at Coastal Carolina (2-9), 1
Idaho (3-8) at Georgia St. (6-4), 2
Louisiana-Lafayette (5-6) at Appalachian St. (7-4), 2:30
SEC championship: Georgia (11-1) vs. Auburn (10-2) at
Atlanta, 4
ACC championship: Clemson (11-1) vs. Miami (10-1) at
Charlotte, 8
MIDWEST
MAC championship: Toledo (10-2) vs. Akron (7-5) at
Detroit, Noon
Big Ten championship: Ohio St. (10-2) vs. Wisconsin
(12-0) at Indianapolis, 8
SOUTHWWEST
Big 12 championship: TCU (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (11-1) at
Arlington, Tex., 12:30
Troy (9-2) at Arkansas St. (7-3), 3
SWAC championship: Alcorn St. (7-4) vs. Grambling St.
(10-1) at Houston, 4:30
FAR WEST
South Alabama (4-7) at New Mexico St. (5-6), 4
MWC championship: Boise St. (9-3) at Fresno St. (9-3), 7:45
FCS PLAYOFFS
Kennesaw St. (11-1) at Jacksonville St. (10-1), 2
Stony Brook (10-2) at James Madison (11-0), 2
Furman (8-4) at Wofford (9-2), 2
N. Iowa (8-4) at S. Dakota St. (9-2), 3
New Hampshire (8-4) at Cent. Arkansas (10-1), 3
South Dakota (8-4) at Sam Houston St. (10-1), 3
San Diego (10-2) at N. Dakota St. (10-1), 3:30
Weber St. (10-2) at S. Utah (9-2), 8
SATURDAY, DEC. 9
L
6
11
12
14
14
Pct
.619
.579
.571
.450
.421
Pct
.714
.421
.400
.364
.300
GB
—
1
1
31/2
4
GB
—
6
61/2
71/2
1/
82
x-Late game
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Cleveland 113, at Philadelphia 91
at Indiana 121, Orlando 109
Detroit 118, at Boston 108
Portland 103, at New York 91
at Houston 117, Brooklyn 103
at San Antonio 115, Dallas 108
at L.A. Clippers 120, L.A. Lakers 115
Sacramento 110, at Golden State 106
Washington 92, at Minnesota 89
at Cleveland 108, Miami 97
Phoenix 104, at Chicago 99
Denver at Utah, Late
Milwaukee at Sacramento, Late
Quarterfinals
Stony Brook-James Madison winner vs. Weber St.-S.
Utah winner
Kennesaw St.-Jacksonville St. winner vs. South DakotaSam Houston St. winner
N. Iowa-South Dakota St. winner vs. New HampshireCent. Arkansas winner
Furman-Wofford winner vs. San Diego-North Dakota St.
winner
Cleveland at Atlanta, 7:30
Philadelphia at Boston, 7:30
Chicago at Denver, 9
Milwaukee at Portland, 10
Utah at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
Virginia Tech 79, Iowa 55
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Iowa (4-3)
Cook 6-10 4-6 16, Garza 2-6 0-2 4, Wagner 1-3 0-0 2,
Bohannon 4-12 0-0 12, Moss 1-6 0-0 2, Baer 2-9 0-0 5,
Pemsl 2-8 2-2 6, Nunge 2-4 0-0 4, Kriener 0-1 0-0 0,
Ellingson 0-2 0-0 0, Dailey 2-5 0-0 4. 22-66 Totals 6-10 55.
Detroit at Washington, 7
Golden State at Orlando, 7
Indiana at Toronto, 7:30
Charlotte at Miami, 8
Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 8
Sacramento at Chicago, 8
San Antonio at Memphis, 8
New Orleans at Utah, 9
Virginia Tech (6-1)
Blackshear 2-3 3-4 7, Alexander-Walker 1-4 2-2 5,
Robinson 2-8 0-0 4, Hill 6-13 3-5 18, Bibbs 4-13 4-4 14,
Horne 6-7 4-6 16, Fullard 0-0 0-0 0, Bede 0-0 0-0 0,
Wilson 1-1 1-2 3, Jackson 0-0 0-0 0, Ammerman 0-1 0-0
0, Clarke 3-8 5-5 12. Totals 25-58 22-28 79.
Cavaliers 108, Heat 97
25
40
25
18
23 — 97
15 — 108
MIAMI: Richardson 6-9 0-0 15, Winslow 2-10 0-0 5,
Whiteside 5-10 1-3 11, Dragic 1-5 5-8 7, Waiters 8-19 2-3
21, J.Johnson 6-11 0-1 14, Haslem 0-0 0-0 0, Adebayo 7-7
5-5 19, Olynyk 2-3 0-0 5, Walton Jr. 0-1 0-0 0, T.Johnson
0-5 0-0 0, Ellington 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 37-84 13-20 97.
CLEVELAND: James 10-16 0-1 21, Crowder 0-2 0-0 0,
Love 10-16 14-17 38, Calderon 0-0 1-2 1, Smith 5-13 0-1
12, Holland 0-1 0-0 0, Green 2-4 2-2 6, Osman 0-0 0-0 0,
Frye 1-4 0-0 2, Zizic 0-1 0-0 0, Korver 4-8 0-0 11, Wade
8-16 0-0 17. Totals 40-81 17-23 108.
Three-point Goals: Miami 10-31 (Richardson 3-5, Waiters 3-11, J.Johnson 2-3, Olynyk 1-1, Winslow 1-2, Dragic
0-2, T.Johnson 0-3, Ellington 0-4), Cleveland 11-33 (Love
4-8, Korver 3-7, Smith 2-9, Wade 1-2, James 1-3,
Crowder 0-1, Green 0-1, Frye 0-2). Fouled Out: None.
Rebounds: Miami 42 (Whiteside 14), Cleveland 45
(James 12). Assists: Miami 24 (Waiters 7), Cleveland 21
(James 6). Total Fouls: Miami 19, Cleveland 17. Technicals: James. Ejected: James. A: 20,562 (20,562).
Suns 104, Bulls 99
18
14
27
27
31 — 104
29 — 99
PHOENIX: Warren 10-20 4-4 25, Bender 0-2 0-0 0,
Chandler 0-0 1-2 1, Ulis 5-9 3-5 14, Booker 10-23 8-10 33,
Jackson 0-3 0-0 0, Chriss 2-5 0-0 4, Len 6-10 1-2 13,
James 2-8 0-0 5, Daniels 3-7 0-0 9. Totals 38-87 17-23
104.
CHICAGO: Valentine 2-7 0-0 5, Markkanen 4-15 1-2 12,
Lopez 4-15 2-2 10, Dunn 10-16 0-0 24, Holiday 9-15 1-2
25, Zipser 0-5 0-0 0, Portis 3-5 2-2 9, Felicio 1-1 0-0 2,
Grant 3-7 0-0 6, Blakeney 2-8 1-2 6. Totals 38-94 7-10 99.
Three-point Goals: Phoenix 11-30 (Booker 5-9, Daniels
3-6, Ulis 1-1, Warren 1-5, James 1-5, Chriss 0-1, Jackson
0-1, Bender 0-2), Chicago 16-40 (Holiday 6-9, Dunn 4-5,
Markkanen 3-11, Portis 1-2, Blakeney 1-3, Valentine 1-5,
Grant 0-1, Zipser 0-4). Fouled Out: Holiday. Rebounds:
Phoenix 57 (Len 18), Chicago 41 (Lopez 7). Assists:
Phoenix 24 (James 7), Chicago 26 (Dunn 8). Total Fouls:
Phoenix 12, Chicago 20. A: 18,324 (20,917).
T RA NSA C T I ONS
MLB
Texas Rangers: Agreed to terms with RHP Doug Fister
on a one-year contract.
Colorado Rockies: Named Warren Schaeffer manager of
Hartford (EL).
NBA
Los Angeles Lakers: Recalled C Thomas Bryant from
South Bay (NBAGL).
NFL
NFL: Reduced the two-game suspensions of Oakland WR
Michael Crabtree and Denver CB Aqib Talib to one game
on appeal.
NFL: RB Darren McFadden announced his retirement.
Arizona Cardinals: Released S Harlan Miller and OL
Vinston Painter. Signed LB Gabe Martin from New
Orleans practice squad.
Chicago Bears: Waived WR Tre McBride.
Green Bay Packers: Released LB Derrick Mathews and
OT Francis Kallon from the practice squad.
Miami Dolphins: Placed DE William Hayes on injured
reserve.
New England Patriots: Signed OL Jason King. Signed LB
Nicholas Grigsby from Baltimore’s practice squad.
New York Giants: Signed DB Darryl Morris. Signed DB
Brandon Dixon from the practice squad and DB Jeremiah
McKinnon to the practice squad.
Tennessee Titans: Released WR C.J. Beard from the
practice squad. Signed WR Darius Jennings to the
practice squad.
ARENA FOOTBALL LEAGUE
AFL: Announced the Cleveland Gladiators will suspend
play for the 2018 and 2019 season due to a construction
project on Quicken Loans Arena.
Albany AFL: Named Les Moss assistant head coach.
NHL
NHL: Fined Chicago RW Patrick Kane $5,000 for slashing
and Minnesota D Matt Dumba $5,000 for unsportsmanlike conduct.
Arizona Coyotes: Assigned D Jakob Chychrun to Tucson
(AHL).
Colorado Avalanche: Reassigned D Chris Bigras and
Andrei Mironov to San Antonio (AHL). Recalled D
Duncan Siemens from San Antonio.
Los Angeles Kings: Placed F Andy Andreoff on injured
reserve retroactive to Saturday.
Pittsburgh Penguins: Placed G Matt Murray on injured
reserve. Recalled G Sean Maguire from Wheeling (ECHL)
to Wilkes-Barre/Scranton (AHL).
COLLEGES
Iowa State: Agreed to terms with football coach Matt
Campbell on a six-year contract.
Clippers 120, Lakers 115
Late Monday
L.A. LAKERS ....................... 32
L.A. CLIPPERS .................... 34
Georgetown (5-0)
Pickett 0-5 1-2 1, Derrickson 3-4 6-6 12, Govan 7-12 1-2
16, Mulmore 3-4 4-4 10, Johnson 5-10 7-8 18, Muresan
0-0 0-0 0, Sodom 0-1 0-0 0, Blair 4-8 1-2 11, Mosely 0-4
1-2 1, Dickerson 3-5 1-3 7, Hines 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 25-54
22-29 76.
Halftime: VCU 46-45. Three-point goals: Appalachian St.
6-25 (Forrest 3-9, Holley 1-2, Shabazz 1-6, O.Williams
1-6, Cottrell 0-1, T.Johnson 0-1), VCU 10-20 (J.Williams
4-6, Jenkins 3-3, Tillman 2-2, Mobley 1-1, Maye 0-1,
Jackson 0-2, Lane 0-2, Simms 0-3). Fouled out: None.
Rebounds: Appalachian St. 37 (Kinney 7), VCU 30 (Lane,
Tillman 6). Assists: Appalachian St. 12 (Kinney 4), VCU
18 (J.Williams 7). Total fouls: Appalachian St. 24, VCU
20. A: 7,637 (7,637).
EAST
Army (8-3) vs. Navy (6-5) at Philadelphia, 3
FCS PLAYOFFS
Maine (1-6)
Stojiljkovic 0-3 0-0 0, Fleming 3-11 0-0 6, Calixte 6-9 4-4
17, Araujo 0-1 0-0 0, Evans 0-3 0-0 0, Antoms 1-3 0-0 2,
Melmed 0-2 0-0 0, Ashley 3-5 1-2 8, Bryant 0-1 0-0 0,
Lowndes 3-7 0-2 6, Er 5-12 2-2 13, Majstorovic 1-3 0-0 3.
22-60 Totals 7-10 55.
VCU (4-3)
Lane 7-11 3-3 17, Tillman 6-9 7-12 21, J.Williams 4-11
6-6 18, Jackson 2-5 0-0 4, Jenkins 5-8 0-0 13, Santos-Silva 2-3 0-2 4, Mobley 1-1 0-0 3, Djonkam 0-0 0-0 0, Maye
0-4 0-2 0, Simms 2-7 1-1 5. Totals 29-59 17-26 85.
THURSDAY’S GAMES
PHOENIX ............................ 28
CHICAGO ............................ 29
Georgetown 76, Maine 55
Appalachian St. (4-4)
Kinney 4-7 0-1 8, T.Johnson 2-6 2-3 6, I.Johnson 5-5 0-1
10, Shabazz 7-17 4-6 19, Forrest 4-12 1-3 12, Holley 1-2
2-2 5, Cottrell 1-2 0-0 2, Wilson 1-2 1-2 3, O.Williams 3-8
0-0 7. 28-61 Totals 10-18 72.
Washington at Philadelphia, 7
Oklahoma City at Orlando, 7
Phoenix at Detroit, 7
Charlotte at Toronto, 7:30
Miami at New York, 7:30
Indiana at Houston, 8
Minnesota at New Orleans, 8
Brooklyn at Dallas, 8:30
Memphis at San Antonio, 8:30
Golden State at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
30
26
27
27
26 — 115
33 — 120
L.A. LAKERS: Ingram 6-10 5-9 17, Nance Jr. 4-7 1-1 9,
Lopez 2-8 1-2 5, Ball 1-7 0-0 3, Caldwell-Pope 12-28 0-0
29, Brewer 2-4 0-0 4, Kuzma 5-7 2-2 15, Randle 2-5 7-10
11, Bogut 0-0 0-0 0, Clarkson 8-12 0-0 17, Hart 2-3 0-0 5.
Totals 44-91 16-24 115.
L.A. CLIPPERS: W.Johnson 2-7 0-0 4, Griffin 9-21 5-6 26,
Jordan 3-4 3-3 9, Rivers 7-16 4-5 19, L.Williams 12-21
14-14 42, Dekker 2-4 2-2 6, Harrell 0-2 0-0 0, Reed 0-0 0-0
0, Evans 2-5 0-0 4, C.Williams 3-4 0-0 7, Thornwell 1-1
0-0 3. Totals 41-85 28-30 120.
Three-point Goals: L.A. Lakers 11-30 (Caldwell-Pope
5-11, Kuzma 3-5, Clarkson 1-1, Hart 1-1, Ball 1-6, Brewer
0-1, Ingram 0-1, Lopez 0-2, Randle 0-2), L.A. Clippers
10-28 (L.Williams 4-8, Griffin 3-6, Thornwell 1-1, C.Williams 1-2, Rivers 1-6, Evans 0-1, Dekker 0-2, W.Johnson
0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 43
(Clarkson, Nance Jr. 8), L.A. Clippers 44 (Griffin 11).
Assists: L.A. Lakers 23 (Ball 7), L.A. Clippers 19 (Rivers,
Griffin 6). Total Fouls: L.A. Lakers 29, L.A. Clippers 22. A:
18,086 (19,060).
Halftime: 38-38. Three-point goals: Iowa 5-20 (Bohannon 4-8, Baer 1-5, Nunge 0-1, Ellingson 0-2, Dailey 0-2,
Moss 0-2), Virginia Tech 7-23 (Hill 3-9, Bibbs 2-7,
Alexander-Walker 1-2, Clarke 1-3, Robinson 0-1, Blackshear 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Iowa 43 (Pemsl
14), Virginia Tech 39 (Blackshear 10). Assists: Iowa 11
(Pemsl 6), Virginia Tech 15 (Robinson 6). Total fouls:
Iowa 20, Virginia Tech 13. Technical fouls: Iowa coach
Fran McCaffery. A: 7,101 (10,052).
NCAA women
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
Bloomsburg 58, Chestnut Hill 53
Castleton 68, Johnson St. 14
Lafayette 59, Cornell 58
Lincoln (Pa.) 93, Wilmington (Del.) 80
Old Westbury 114, Sarah Lawrence 28
Quinnipiac 72, Dayton 66
William Smith 69, St. John Fisher 66
SOUTH
Florida 69, Jacksonville 59
Howard 68, Fairleigh Dickinson 65
Jackson St. 77, Spring Hill 50
Liberty 68, Limestone 38
Ohio 69, E. Kentucky 57
Radford 56, UNC-Greensboro 53
South Alabama 59, Alabama St. 44
Southern Miss. 71, Northwestern St. 59
Wofford 96, Bob Jones 54
MIDWEST
Akron 69, Winthrop 43
Alverno 52, Mount Mary 29
Aquinas 75, Cornerstone 62
Bowling Green 90, Valparaiso 77
Carroll (Wis.) 70, Edgewood 57
Cleveland St. 77, E. Illinois 69
Crown (Minn.) 83, Trinity Bible 66
Indiana St. 84, Missouri St. 51
Lakeland 65, Lawrence 53
Marquette 92, Loyola of Chicago 30
Mary 90, Yellowstone Christian 56
Mayville St. 82, Minn.-Morris 72
Wis.-Superior 78, Hamline 58
SOUTHWEST
Cent. Arkansas 106, Crowley’s Ridge 23
Houston 72, Texas St. 67
Stephen F. Austin 97, Central Baptist 34
Texas A&M 98, Prairie View 70
UALR 68, Oklahoma 56
FAR WEST
Cal Poly 77, CS Monterey Bay 44
Long Beach St. 80, Arizona 72
Loyola Marymount 84, CS Dominguez Hills 52
Oregon 87, Hampton 45
U-Conn. 88, Nevada 57
Utah Valley 72, Dixie St. 63
30
27
27 — 110
24 — 106
SACRAMENTO: Temple 4-7 4-5 14, Labissiere 4-7 1-1 9,
Randolph 4-11 3-4 11, Fox 3-7 0-0 6, Hill 6-10 0-0 16,
Cauley-Stein 8-9 3-4 19, Koufos 0-2 0-0 0, Mason 5-10
2-2 14, Hield 2-5 0-0 5, Bogdanovic 4-7 4-5 12, Carter 2-4
0-0 4. Totals 42-79 17-21 110.
GOLDEN STATE: Casspi 4-7 0-0 9, Green 4-15 2-4 14,
Pachulia 1-4 1-2 3, McCaw 5-8 4-4 16, Thompson 7-20 2-2
21, Young 3-6 0-0 8, Bell 2-2 0-0 4, Looney 0-0 0-0 0, West
4-6 0-0 8, McGee 1-1 0-0 2, Livingston 5-6 0-0 10,
Iguodala 4-5 1-2 11. Totals 40-80 10-14 106.
Three-point Goals: Sacramento 9-17 (Hill 4-5, Mason
2-2, Temple 2-4, Hield 1-2, Carter 0-1, Randolph 0-1,
Bogdanovic 0-2), Golden State 16-37 (Thompson 5-12,
Green 4-11, Iguodala 2-3, Young 2-5, McCaw 2-5, Casspi
1-1). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Sacramento 36
(Cauley-Stein 8), Golden State 36 (West 7). Assists:
Sacramento 27 (Cauley-Stein 6), Golden State 31 (Green
8). Total Fouls: Sacramento 15, Golden State 15. A:
19,596 (19,596).
NBA LEADERS
Entering Tuesday’s games
SCORING
G
HARDEN, HOU ..................... 20
ANTETOKOUNMPO, MIL ..... 17
JAMES, CLE ......................... 20
PORZINGIS, NYK ................. 18
CURRY, GOL ......................... 19
DAVIS, NOR ......................... 19
LILLARD, POR ...................... 21
COUSINS, NOR .................... 20
DURANT, GOL ...................... 16
BEAL, WAS .......................... 19
FG
192
192
222
169
154
177
168
175
144
163
FT PTS. AVG.
159 633 31.6
110 502 29.5
86 571 28.6
111 486 27.0
119 494 26.0
126 494 26.0
151 540 25.7
115 510 25.5
66 395 24.7
89 459 24.2
GF
72
89
78
74
74
82
68
70
GA
60
76
74
75
90
77
70
78
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 17
Toronto ......................... 16
Detroit .......................... 10
Boston ........................... 10
Montreal ....................... 10
Ottawa ............................ 8
Florida ........................... 10
Buffalo ............................ 6
L
5
9
10
8
12
8
12
15
OL PTS.
2
36
1
33
5
25
4
24
3
23
6
22
2
22
4
16
GF
88
92
70
60
60
67
72
55
GA
62
78
74
66
81
74
83
85
W
17
15
15
12
12
11
11
L
6
6
6
9
10
10
9
OL PTS.
1
35
3
33
3
33
3
27
1
25
3
25
2
24
GF
84
76
80
76
67
72
73
GA
63
68
64
63
69
74
71
PACIFIC
W
x-Vegas ......................... 15
Los Angeles .................. 14
San Jose ........................ 13
Calgary .......................... 13
Vancouver ..................... 11
Anaheim ....................... 10
Edmonton ..................... 10
Arizona ........................... 6
L
6
8
8
10
10
10
13
17
OL PTS.
1
31
3
31
2
28
1
27
4
26
4
24
2
22
4
16
GF
81
73
61
70
68
65
67
66
GA
66
57
51
76
73
73
81
98
3
1
Scoring: 1, Philadelphia, Giroux 11 (Voracek, MacDonald), 0:48. 2, San Jose, Tierney 6 (Burns, Dillon), 10:29. 3,
San Jose, Thornton 4 (Couture, Pavelski), 18:42 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Los Angeles, Brown 10 (Kopitar, Folin), 17:43.
3, Los Angeles, Kopitar 11 (Martinez, Doughty), 19:53
(pp).
SECOND PERIOD
THIRD PERIOD
SHOTS ON GOAL
Scoring: 4, Los Angeles, Kempe 8 (Fantenberg, Gaborik),
0:58. 5, Los Angeles, Kopitar 12 (Muzzin, Doughty),
12:17.
SAN JOSE .............................. 12
17
5 — 34
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 8
10
5 — 23
Power-play opportunities: San Jose 1 of 5; Philadelphia 0
of 2. Goalies: San Jose, Dell 3-3-1 (23 shots-22 saves).
Philadelphia, Neuvirth 2-5-1 (34-31). A: 18,935 (19,543).
T: 2:21.
SHOTS ON GOAL
LOS ANGELES ........................ 14
13
9 — 36
DETROIT ................................ 11
9
4 — 24
Power-play opportunities: Los Angeles 1 of 4; Detroit 0
of 3. Goalies: Los Angeles, Quick 11-8-1 (24 shots-23
saves). Detroit, Howard 8-7-4 (36-32). A: 19,515
(20,000). T: 2:25.
Islanders 5, Canucks 2
VANCOUVER ........................... 1
N.Y. ISLANDERS ...................... 3
Scoring: 4, San Jose, Vlasic 2 (Braun, Couture), 16:04.
Predators 3, Blackhawks 2
CHICAGO .................................. 1
NASHVILLE .............................. 1
0
1
1 —
1 —
2
3
FIRST PERIOD
1
1
0 —
1 —
2
5
Scoring: 1, Nashville, F.Forsberg 12 (Arvidsson, Johansen), 3:16. 2, Chicago, Wingels 2 (Sharp, DeBrincat), 5:10.
SECOND PERIOD
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Islanders, Ladd 6 (Tavares, Pelech), 5:23
(sh). 2, Vancouver, Vanek 6 (Gagner, Eriksson), 6:25
(pp). 3, N.Y. Islanders, de Haan 1 (Quine, Ho-Sang),
16:42. 4, N.Y. Islanders, Eberle 10 (Boychuk, Barzal),
17:42.
Scoring: 3, Nashville, Watson 3 (Bitetto, Irwin), 3:48.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Nashville, Josi 6 (Turris), 2:32 (pp). 5,
Chicago, Bouma 2 (Hayden, Rutta), 9:38.
SHOTS ON GOAL
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 5, N.Y. Islanders, Lee 13, 3:46. 6, Vancouver,
Horvat 10 (Tanev), 6:33 (sh).
THIRD PERIOD
SHOTS ON GOAL
VANCOUVER ........................... 8
6
11 — 25
N.Y. ISLANDERS .................... 12
13
11 — 36
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 1 of 2; N.Y. Islanders 0 of 3. Goalies: Vancouver, Nilsson 5-2-1 (36
shots-31 saves). N.Y. Islanders, Halak 7-5-0 (25-23). A:
11,194 (15,795). T: 2:26.
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
CHICAGO ................................ 14
11
14 — 39
NASHVILLE .............................. 7
13
11 — 31
Power-play opportunities: Chicago 0 of 3; Nashville 1 of
4. Goalies: Chicago, A.Forsberg 1-2-2 (31 shots-28
saves). Nashville, Rinne 14-3-2 (39-37). A: 17,187
(17,113). T: 2:43.
Maple Leafs 4, Flames 1
TORONTO ................................ 1
CALGARY ................................. 0
1
0
2 —
1 —
4
1
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Toronto, Polak 1, 18:36.
Tampa Bay 2, at Buffalo 0
at N.Y. Islanders 5, Vancouver 2
at Columbus 3, Carolina 2 (SO)
Florida 5, at N.Y. Rangers 4
San Jose 3, at Philadelphia 1
Los Angeles 4, at Detroit 1
at Nashville 3, Chicago 2
Toronto 4, at Calgary 1
at Edmonton 3, Arizona 2 (OT)
Dallas at Vegas, Late
SECOND PERIOD
Panthers 5, Rangers 4
FLORIDA .................................. 3
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 0
1
3
1 —
1 —
5
4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Florida, Barkov 8 (Huberdeau, Yandle), 5:50
(pp). 2, Florida, McGinn 4 (Bjugstad), 9:35. 3, Florida,
Haley 1 (Sceviour, Yandle), 16:47.
SECOND PERIOD
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Ottawa at Montreal, 7:30
Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:30
Anaheim at St. Louis, 9
Winnipeg at Colorado, 9:30
THURSDAY’S GAMES
Los Angeles at Washington, 7
Montreal at Detroit, 7:30
Vancouver at Nashville, 8
Vegas at Minnesota, 8
Dallas at Chicago, 8:30
Toronto at Edmonton, 9
Arizona at Calgary, 9
CAROLINA ......................... 1
COLUMBUS ........................ 1
0 —
0 —
2
0
1
0
0 — 2
0 — 3
Scoring: 1, Arizona, Fischer 7 (Domi, Dvorak), 6:22. 2,
Edmonton, Kassian 1 (Letestu), 16:30.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Edmonton, Benning 3 (Lucic, Russell), 14:25.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 5, Edmonton, Nugent-Hopkins 9 (Benning), 4:20.
SHOTS ON GOAL
Scoring: 3, Columbus, Werenski 7 (Milano, Wennberg),
3:47.
Scoring: 4, Carolina, McGinn 6 (Jooris, Pesce), 10:09.
TAMPA BAY ............................ 9
10
7 — 26
BUFFALO ............................... 10
11
13 — 34
Power-play opportunities: Tampa Bay 1 of 3; Buffalo 0 of
3. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 16-3-1 (34 shots-34
saves). Buffalo, Lehner 5-11-2 (26-24). A: 17,569
(19,070). T: 2:29.
0 — 2
1 — 3
Scoring: 1, Columbus, Anderson 9 (Werenski, Dubois),
1:10. 2, Carolina, Hanifin 4 (Skinner, Ryan), 7:41.
THIRD PERIOD
SHOTS ON GOAL
0
1
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Tampa Bay, Sergachev 6 (Palat, Johnson),
16:29 (pp).
Scoring: 2, Tampa Bay, Girardi 1 (Kucherov, Namestnikov), 12:08.
1
0
FIRST PERIOD
THIRD PERIOD
0
1
FIRST PERIOD
SECOND PERIOD
ARIZONA ........................... 1
EDMONTON ....................... 1
Scoring: 3, Arizona, Ekman-Larsson 6 (Keller, Domi),
19:11 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
1
0
SHOTS ON GOAL
Oilers 3, Coyotes 2 (OT)
Blue Jackets 3,
Hurricanes 2 (OT)
Lightning 2, Sabres 0
Scoring: 3, Toronto, Kadri 12 (Nylander), 1:54. 4, Calgary,
Stone 2 (Bennett, Brouwer), 5:29. 5, Toronto, Komarov
3, 19:59.
Scoring: 8, N.Y. Rangers, Kreider 10 (Buchnevich, Desharnais), 13:28. 9, Florida, Malgin 1 (Pysyk, Huberdeau), 18:51.
FLORIDA .................................. 6
12
9 — 27
N.Y. RANGERS ....................... 13
16
8 — 37
Power-play opportunities: Florida 1 of 2; N.Y. Rangers 0
of 3. Goalies: Florida, Reimer 4-6-1 (37 shots-33 saves).
N.Y. Rangers, Pavelec 1-4-0 (21-19), Lundqvist 12-6-2
(6-3). A: 17,376 (18,006). T: 2:35.
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Anaheim at Columbus, 7
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 7
Ottawa at N.Y. Islanders, 7
San Jose at Florida, 7:30
Vegas at Winnipeg, 8
Los Angeles at St. Louis, 8
New Jersey at Colorado, 9
THIRD PERIOD
THIRD PERIOD
SHOTS ON GOAL
FRIDAY’S GAMES
Scoring: 2, Toronto, Zaitsev 4 (Hyman, Matthews),
12:36.
TORONTO .............................. 12
11
7 — 30
CALGARY ................................. 9
6
5 — 20
Power-play opportunities: Toronto 0 of 2; Calgary 0 of 3.
Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 14-7-1 (20 shots-19 saves).
Calgary, Smith 11-8-1 (29-26). A: 19,289 (19,289). T:
2:33.
Scoring: 4, N.Y. Rangers, Miller 4 (Zuccarello, Skjei), 4:04.
5, Florida, Huberdeau 8 (Weegar, Matheson), 8:36. 6, N.Y.
Rangers, Buchnevich 9 (Kreider, Desharnais), 9:26. 7, N.Y.
Rangers, Kreider 9 (Desharnais, Buchnevich), 11:16.
VIRGINIA
Centreville 50, West Potomac 47
Fairfax 50, Annandale 40
Hayfield 84, Edison 79
Herndon 70, Lee 53
Oakton 63, McLean 47
Robinson 54, Langley 48
Rock Ridge 45, Riverside 42
South Lakes 69, Marshall 63
Wakefield 57, W.T. Woodson 46
PRIVATE
Grace Brethren 59, Hebrew Academy 44
St. Anne's-Belfield 82, Flint Hill 76
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
VIRGINIA
Centreville 53, West Potomac 34
Chantilly 46, South County 34
Fairfax 70, Annandale 27
Herndon 65, Lee 19
Lake Braddock 39, Westfield 32
Langley 43, Robinson 39
Loudoun County 55, Battlefield 47
Marshall 55, South Lakes 40
Mount Vernon 48, Jefferson 23
Oakton 49, McLean 33
Wakefield 45, W.T. Woodson 32
Yorktown 58, Stuart 39
PRIVATE
Episcopal 64, Christ Chapel Academy 30
Field 39, Washington Christian 33
Flint Hill 59, St. Anne's-Belfield 49
George Mason 41, National Cathedral 34
Georgetown Day 41, Sandy Spring 35
Grace Brethren 42, Hebrew Academy 41
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 69, Oakcrest 21
B OY S ' B A S K E T B A L L
GRACE BRETHREN 59, HEBREW ACADEMY 44
Nevada (3-3)
Cephas 1-5 0-0 2, Zeller 7-12 3-3 17, Bergman 3-6 2-2 10,
Moe 2-10 0-0 5, Tobey 0-1 0-0 0, Briggs 3-11 0-0 6, Dearth
0-0 0-0 0, King 5-11 0-2 15, Redmon 1-4 0-0 2, 22-60
Totals 5-7 57.
U-CONN. ............................. 31 22 18 17
—88
NEVADA ............................. 12 14 18 13
—57
Three-point goals: U-Conn. 10-18 (Collier 0-3, Stevens
0-2, Dangerfield 1-4, Nurse 8-8, Irwin 1-1), Nevada 8-15
(Bergman 2-5, Moe 1-4, King 5-6). Assists: U-Conn. 25
(Collier 5), Nevada 18 (Moe 4). Fouled out: None.
Rebounds: U-Conn. 34 (Stevens 14), Nevada 29 (Cephas
6). Total fouls: U-Conn. 15, Nevada 14. A: 7,815.
GB (0-0) Bourke 9, McKelvin 5, Miller 4, McClure 3 Totals
6 3-10 59.
H (2-1) Fogel 5, Kosowsky 2, Levieddin 18, Glashofer 11,
Ely 3, Snow 2 Totals 14 4-8 44.
Halftime: Grace Brethren, (27-24).
Three-point goals: H 4 (Fogel 1, Beletskiy 1, Glashofer 1,
Ely 1); GB 2 (McClure 1, Bourke 1)
NONLEAGUE
SHOOTOUT
Carolina 0 (Aho NG, Teravainen NG), Columbus 2
(Atkinson G, Panarin G).
SHOTS ON GOAL
CAROLINA ....................... 12
7
10
2 — 31
COLUMBUS ...................... 11
13
9
5 — 38
Power-play opportunities: Carolina 0 of 1; Columbus 0 of
1. Goalies: Carolina, Darling 7-6-5 (38 shots-36 saves).
Columbus, Korpisalo 2-3-0 (31-29). A: 13,947 (18,500).
T: 2:30.
ARIZONA ........................... 7
11
9
4 — 31
EDMONTON ....................... 6
11
9
1 — 27
Power-play opportunities: Arizona 1 of 2; Edmonton 0 of
3. Goalies: Arizona, Wedgewood 2-3-2 (27 shots-24
saves). Edmonton, Talbot 10-10-1 (31-29). A: 18,347
(18,641). T: 2:45.
BAS E BALL
MLB CALENDAR
Nov. 27-30: Major League Baseball Players Association
executive board meeting, Irving, Texas.
Dec. 1_ Last day to offer 2018 contracts to unsigned
players on 40-man rosters.
Dec. 10: Hall of Fame Modern Baseball committee vote
announced, Lake Buena Vista, Fla.
Dec. 11-14: Winter meetings, Lake Buena Vista, Fla.
SB (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 82.
FH (0-1) Wahab 26, Moore 12, Turner 10, Taylor 9,
Jioklow 6, Herlihy 6, Ellison 3, Stern 2, Jones 2 Totals 27
13-22 76.
Halftime: St. Anne's-Belfield, (38-33).
Three-point goals: FH 3 (Taylor 1, Herlihy 2).
SOUTH LAKES 69, MARSHALL 63
The top 25 teams in the USA Today women’s college
basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Monday, points based on 25 points for a
first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote
and previous ranking:
M (0-0) Robinson 14, Deaver 14, Schlaffer 12, de Walque
12, Lampman 5, Gamble 4, Wilcox 2 Totals 20 14-23 63.
SL (1-0) Savage 19, Aghayere 16, Powers 10, Johnson 6,
Saunders 5, Krukowski 3, Rowe 3, Bower 3, Adams 2,
Kurtu 2 Totals 19 19-30 69.
Halftime: Marshall, (32-24).
Three-point goals: SL 4 (Johnson 1, Saunders 1, Savage
1, Bower 1); M 3 (Robinson 1, Schlaffer 1, de Walque 1)
PVS
1
6
3
4
7
2
4
8
9
10
11
13
14
12
15
17
16
19
18
22
25
—
20
—
—
Others receiving votes: DePaul 44, N.C. State 33, Iowa
31, Green Bay 31, Oklahoma 27, California 24, Michigan
State 14, Georgia Tech 13, Middle Tennessee 12, Miami
8, Kansas State 3, Texas-Arlington 3, Arizona State 2,
Georgia 2, New Mexico 2, Southern Cal 2, Florida Gulf
Coast 1, Indiana 1, South Dakota State 1.
ROBINSON 54, LANGLEY 48
FLINT HILL 59, ST. ANNE'S-BELFIELD 49
L (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 48.
R (1-0) Schnizer 11, Delgado 10, Elkin 9, Rowson 4,
Winchell 2 Totals 9 9-16 54.
Halftime: Langley, (27-23).
Three-point goals: R 3 (Delgado 2, Schnizer 1).
SB (0-1)Totals 0 0-0 49.
FH (1-0) Lamont 16, Jordan 15, Wiley 9, Miller 8, Rice 4,
Rice 3, Giuliani 2, Boyce 2 Totals 15 20-31 59.
Halftime: Flint Hill, (0-0).
Three-point goals: FH 3 (Rice 1, Lamont 2).
FAIRFAX 50, ANNANDALE 40
EPISCOPAL 64, CHRIST CHAPEL ACADEMY 30
F (1-0) Peters 14, Ackerman 14, Abtew 12, Napper 3,
Mbangue 2, Vannavong 2 Totals 12 8-12 50.
A (0-0) Abdalla 9, Anderson 6, Casquino 6, Aburish 5,
Lotongo 4, McKiver 4, Gomez 4 Totals 10 6-12 40.
Halftime: Fairfax, (27-17).
Three-point goals: A 4 (Lotongo 1, Casquino 2, Abdalla
1); F 5 (Abtew 3, Ackerman 2)
CC (0-0) Luck 24, Wiley 6 Totals 7 4-8 30.
E (1-0) Shepherd 28, Weger 14, Goree 10, Giblin 2, Gerow
2, Singletary 2, Phillips 2, Wood 2 Totals 18 10-16 64.
Halftime: Episcopal, (46-16).
Three-point goals: E 6 (Goree 2, Shepherd 3, Weger 1);
CC 4 (Luck 4)
ROCK RIDGE 45, RIVERSIDE 42
M (0-0) Moskowitz 12, Auza 8, Dufrane 6, Hedrick 4,
Buday 2, Jones 1 Totals 7 7-13 33.
O (0-0) Coleman 15, Mori 10, Vietmeyer 10, Perine 8,
Kaloi 4, Meshanko 2 Totals 12 16-23 49.
Halftime: Oakton, (19-8).
Three-point goals: O 3 (Coleman 3); M 4 (Moskowitz 4)
HAYFIELD 84, EDISON 79
CENTREVILLE 53, WEST POTOMAC 34
E (0-1) Hester 22, Washington 22, Clawson 13, Williams
12, Broady 6, Yattara 2, Wigglesworth 2 Totals 29 12-25
79.
H (0-0) Cobbs 21, Jones 20, Peterson 13, Bailey 11,
Joiner 9, Robinson 4, Richardson 3, Hutchinson 2, Traylor
1 Totals 20 20-28 84.
Halftime: Hayfield, (44-43).
Three-point goals: H 8 (Cobbs 1, Jones 3, Bailey 3,
Richardson 1); E 3 (Clawson 1, Hester 1, Broady 1)
C (1-0) Garrett 20, Squirewell 7, Sanders 6, Martin 5,
Doyle 4, Hall 4, Naderi 3, Squirewell 2, Hott 2 Totals 13
18-26 53.
WP (0-1) Eby 12, Terwilliger 6, Essex 6, Mackey 3, Ellis 2,
Terwilliger 2, Tawiah-Otoo 2, Mackie 1 Totals 9 13-27 34.
Halftime: Centreville, (28-11).
Three-point goals: WP 1 (Terwilliger 1); C 3 (Sanders 1,
Squirewell 1, Naderi 1)
WAKEFIELD 57, W.T. WOODSON 46
W (1-0) Cooper 18, Warner 15, Hatcher 7, Horsford 6,
Ugtakhbayar 3, Lipford 2 Totals 13 16-18 57.
WTW (0-1) Spurlock 21, Gambold 10, Urbach 5, Hennessey 4, Walker 2, Mains 2, Lee 2 Totals 12 10-13 46.
Halftime: W.T. Woodson, (24-15).
Three-point goals: WTW 4 (Urbach 1, Spurlock 2,
Gambold 1); W 3 (Horsford 1, Warner 1, Ugtakhbayar 1)
OAKTON 63, MCLEAN 47
O (1-0) Johnson 13, Johnson-Parrotte 10, Johnson 10,
Campo 8, Jaquette 8, Digby 7, Smith 5, Kaloi 2 Totals 20
11-14 63.
M (0-1) Stout 13, Senft 12, Aka 8, Leggett 6, Prock 6,
Legg 2 Totals 14 10-14 47.
Halftime: Oakton, (26-23).
Three-point goals: M 3 (Senft 2, Stout 1); O 4 (Johnson 1,
Johnson 1, Smith 1, Digby 1)
CENTREVILLE 50, WEST POTOMAC 47
WP (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 47.
C (0-0) Douglas 27, O'Shea 6, Murray 4, Porter 4, Skule 4,
Douglas 2, Shanton 1 Totals 15 12-29 50.
Halftime: West Potomac, (26-25).
Three-point goals: C 2 (Douglas 2).
MARSHALL 55, SOUTH LAKES 40
SL (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 40.
M (0-0) Ford 20, Trivisonno 11, Dirkse 8, Trivisonno 5,
Soule 4, Grill 3, Donnellan 2, South 2 Totals 19 11-18 55.
Halftime: Marshall, (23-20).
Three-point goals: M 2 (Trivisonno 2).
LOUDOUN COUNTY 55, BATTLEFIELD 47
TOP 20
B (0-0) Jenk 14, Kanti 11, Jagels 8, Turnbull 6, Beasley 3,
Dutton 3, Walsh 2 Totals 9 8-11 47.
LC (1-0) Villaflor 23, Harden 15, Ng 14, Allen 3 Totals 10
20-31 55.
Halftime: Loudoun County, (29-25).
Three-point goals: LC 5 (Ng 2, Allen 1, Harden 1, Villaflor
1); B 7 (Beasley 1, Kanti 1, Jagels 2, Jenk 2, Dutton 1)
NO. 19 HERNDON 65, LEE 19
LAKE BRADDOCK 39, WESTFIELD 32
H (0-0) Kimble 10, Brunson 10, Pearson 8, Anane 8,
Newman 7, Montalban 5, Johnson 4, Owen 4, Boulware
4, Koch 3, Hinders 2 Totals 20 13-13 65.
L (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 19.
Halftime: Herndon, (34-12).
Three-point goals: H 4 (Koch 1, Montalban 1, Kimble 1,
Newman 1).
W (0-0) McNamara 10, Wardak 5, Mackmin 5, Toliver 4,
Yoham 4, Logan 4 Totals 12 5-12 32.
LB (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 39.
Halftime: Lake Braddock, (18-15).
Three-point goals: W 1 (Wardak 1)
GI R L S ' B A S K E TBALL
PVAC
GRACE BRETHREN 42, HEBREW ACADEMY 41
GB (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 42.
H (1-2) Fleisher 4 Totals 2 0-0 41.
Halftime: Hebrew Academy, (17-17).
Three-point goals:
FIELD 39, WASHINGTON CHRISTIAN 33
F (0-0) Blackman 13, Rauch 10, Shaw 7, Morgan 3,
Mengistu-Gunn 2, Sandground 2, Bennett 2 Totals 12
9-21 39.
WC (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 33.
Halftime: Field, (23-10).
Three-point goals: F 2 (Rauch 2)
HERNDON 70, LEE 53
L (0-1) Lynch 10, Hunt 10, Samuels 7, Magpayo 6, Spears
6, Sulieman 4, Whitaker 4, Wickliffe 4, Khan 2 Totals 17
7-16 53.
H (1-0) Varone 16, Myers 12, Cole 10, Lewis 8,
Rehnstrom 7, Snead 7, Castagno 4, Sweeney 4, Hart 2
Totals 15 22-35 70.
Halftime: Herndon, (30-21).
Three-point goals: H 6 (Cole 2, Rehnstrom 1, Myers 2,
Lewis 1); L 4 (Spears 1, Hunt 2, Samuels 1)
OAKTON 49, MCLEAN 33
RR (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 45.
R (1-1) Odom 13, Weeren 5, Jackson 11, Khan 4, Berrett 3
Totals 12 12-20 42.
Halftime: Rock Ridge, (25-22).
Three-point goals: R 2 (Weeren 1, Jackson 1).
ST. ANNE'S-BELFIELD 82, FLINT HILL 76
USA TODAY COACHES POLL
PTS
800
730
713
704
674
659
612
580
544
493
471
426
406
364
335
303
282
220
190
162
161
101
82
74
60
0 —
0 —
Scoring: 1, Detroit, Green 2 (Nielsen, Helm), 14:12.
Florida 3, at New Jersey 2
at Pittsburgh 5, Philadelphia 4 (OT)
at Montreal 3, Columbus 1
at Winnipeg 7, Minnesota 2
at Chicago 7, Anaheim 3
U-Conn. (6-0)
Collier 5-11 2-2 12, Stevens 8-11 1-4 17, Williams 8-13
2-3 18, Dangerfield 4-9 0-0 9, Nurse 9-10 1-1 27, Irwin 2-2
0-0 5, Bent 0-0 0-0 0, Coombs 0-0 0-0 0, Walker 0-1 0-0 0,
36-57 Totals 6-10 88.
RECORD
5-0
6-0
6-0
5-0
6-0
6-1
5-1
7-1
5-1
5-1
6-0
6-0
6-0
4-3
5-2
5-1
6-1
5-1
3-2
4-1
4-1
6-0
2-2
5-0
6-0
1
0
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 7, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares 16 (Lee, Pelech), 13:35.
TAMPA BAY ............................ 1
BUFFALO ................................. 0
SAN JOSE ................................ 2
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 1
FIRST PERIOD
MONDAY’S RESULTS
PVAC
U-Conn. (32)
Notre Dame
Mississippi State
Texas
Louisville
South Carolina
UCLA
Ohio State
Baylor
Oregon
Florida State
West Virginia
Tennessee
Stanford
Maryland
Duke
South Florida
Missouri
Oregon State
Michigan
Texas A&M
Kentucky
Marquette
Villanova
Syracuse
4
1
x-Late game
No. 1 U-Conn. 88, Nevada 57
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
2 —
0 —
HI GH S C HOOLS
Late Monday
26
28
OL PTS.
1
33
2
32
4
32
1
29
3
29
2
28
5
25
7
23
BOYS' BASKETBALL
Kings 110, Warriors 106
SACRAMENTO ................... 27
GOLDEN STATE .................. 27
L
8
7
6
10
10
10
8
10
CENTRAL
St. Louis ........................
Nashville .......................
Winnipeg ......................
Chicago .........................
x-Dallas .........................
Minnesota .....................
Colorado ........................
VCU 85, Appalachian St. 72
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
METROPOLITAN
W
Columbus ...................... 16
N.Y. Islanders ............... 15
New Jersey ................... 14
Washington .................. 14
Pittsburgh ..................... 13
N.Y. Rangers ................. 13
Carolina ......................... 10
Philadelphia .................... 8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Halftime: Georgetown 40-24. Three-point goals: Maine
4-23 (Calixte 1-2, Ashley 1-2, Majstorovic 1-2, Er 1-6,
Bryant 0-1, Araujo 0-1, Melmed 0-2, Evans 0-2, Fleming
0-2, Lowndes 0-3), Georgetown 4-18 (Blair 2-5, Govan
1-2, Johnson 1-3, Mosely 0-1, Dickerson 0-1, Derrickson
0-1, Hines 0-1, Pickett 0-4). Fouled out: Er. Rebounds:
Maine 32 (Er 6), Georgetown 30 (Govan 8). Assists:
Maine 8 (Fleming 2), Georgetown 13 (Mulmore 5). Total
fouls: Maine 20, Georgetown 15.
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
MIAMI ................................ 24
CLEVELAND ....................... 35
NCAA
L
8
8
9
11
11
EAST
Dartmouth 64, Loyola (Md.) 63
Florida St. 78, Rutgers 73
Georgetown 76, Maine 55
Pittsburgh 71, High Point 63
Rhode Island 86, Brown 62
SOUTH
Georgia Tech 52, Northwestern 51
S. Dakota St. 99, Mississippi 97, OT
Tennessee St. 67, Fisk 53
VCU 85, Appalachian St. 72
VMI 76, Charleston Southern 68
Vanderbilt 74, Radford 62
Virginia Tech 79, Iowa 55
Wake Forest 80, Illinois 73
MIDWEST
Akron 75, Chattanooga 70
Ball St. 81, Oakland City 57
Kansas 96, Toledo 58
Missouri St. 77, Colorado St. 67
Purdue 66, Louisville 57
Valparaiso 72, Utah St. 65
W. Michigan 65, Saint Louis 51
Wichita St. 112, Savannah St. 66
Xavier 76, Baylor 63
SOUTHWEST
SMU 95, Rio Grande 64
Tulsa 100, UTSA 96
FAR WEST
Boise St. 87, Loyola of Chicago 53
Hawaii 87, Adams State 77
Washington 85, Kennesaw St. 71
Sharks 3, Flyers 1
2
0
NONLEAGUE
LANGLEY 43, ROBINSON 39
R (0-1) Krug 11, Edwards 8, Hugney 8, Leigh 6, Gressett
4, McBride 2 Totals 5 11-17 39.
L (0-0) Azad 14, Shively 13, Callaghan 10, Jepsen 4,
Mufti 2 Totals 10 8-14 43.
Halftime: Langley, (20-14).
Three-point goals: L 5 (Callaghan 2, Shively 3); R 6
(Hugney 2, Krug 3, Edwards 1)
MOUNT VERNON 48, JEFFERSON 23
MV (0-0) Bordley 25, Anderson 10, Solomon 8, Larkins 3,
Floyd 2 Totals 11 2-5 48.
J (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 23.
Halftime: Mount Vernon, (19-11).
Three-point goals: MV 8 (Solomon 2, Bordley 5, Larkins
1)
WAKEFIELD 45, W.T. WOODSON 32
WTW (0-0) Shurberg 15, Pesansky 8, Noca 6, Henry 2,
Wilson 1 Totals 5 7-20 32.
W (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 45.
Halftime: W.T. Woodson, (18-15).
Three-point goals: WTW 5 (Shurberg 3, Noca 2)
GEORGE MASON 41, NATIONAL CATHEDRAL 34
NCS (0-0)Totals 0 0-0 34.
GM (0-0) Hirsch 24, Bloomgarden 6, Short 6 Totals 9
14-18 41.
Halftime: George Mason, (21-11).
Three-point goals: GM 3 (Bloomgarden 2, Dodge 1).
GEORGETOWN DAY 41, SANDY SPRING 35
SS (0-0) Brown 16, Clouse 6, Fenton 5, Broadway 4,
Clouse 2, Malow 2 Totals 9 8-13 35.
GD (0-1) Griffith 14, Perelman 9, Asher 4, Zinn 4,
Bergreen 4, Forman 4 Totals 15 6-11 41.
Halftime: Georgetown Day, (23-11).
Three-point goals: GD 1 (Perelman 1); SS 3 (Brown 3)
BOXI NG
FIGHT SCHEDULE
SATURDAY
At Madison Square Garden, New York (HBO), Miguel
Cotto vs. Sadam Ali, 12, for Cotto’s WBO World junior
middleweight title; Rey Vargas vs. Oscar Negrete, 12s,
for Vargas’ WBC junior featherweight title.
FAIRFAX 70, ANNANDALE 27
DEC. 8
At Hialeah Park Racing & Casino, Hialeah, Fla. (FS1),
Jean Pascal vs. Ahmed Elbiali, 10, light heavyweights;
Chad Dawson vs. Edwin Rodriguez, 10, light heavyweights.
F (0-0) McNaughton 24, George 21, Kilts 9, Stanford 6,
Heslep 4, Napper-Braxton 4, Moore 2 Totals 25 2-2 70.
A (0-0) Irvin 16, Elkherbi 4, Reams 3, Yungner 2, Hatch 2
Totals 5 8-17 27.
Halftime: Fairfax, (47-10).
Three-point goals: A 3 (Reams 1, Irvin 2); F 6 (McNaughton 4, George 1, Kilts 1)
DEC. 9
At Mandalay Bay Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas (HBO),
Orlando Salido vs. Miguel Roman, 10, junior lightweights; Tevin Farmer vs. Kenichi Ogawa, 12, for vacant
IBF junior lightweight title; Francisco Vargas vs. Stephen Smith, 10, junior lightweights; Jaime Munguia vs.
Steven Martinez, 10, junior middleweights.
EFGHI
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Grounds/Maintenance Specialist Temporary, full-time 2/12/201812/12/2018. 50 jobs w/ Ed's Plant
World, Inc., Brandywine, MD &
job sites in Anne Arundel(MD),
Baltimore(MD),
Calvert(MD),
Charles(MD), Montgomery(MD),
Prince George's(MD) & FairfaVA)
cty/cntys. Use hand/power tools/
equip. Work w/out close supervision to lay sod, trim, plant, water,
fertilize, dig, rake, haul debris;
assist w/install mortarless masonry wall/walk units. Must exercise
indep judgmt; may demonstrate
tasks to other employees. Nonsupervisory. 3 mos landscape exp
req'd. Lift/carry 50 lbs, when nec.
Random, post-accident & upon
suspicion drug test req'd. 40 hr/wk
6:00 AM-2:30 PM M-F. Sat/Sun
work req'd, when nec. Wage no
less than $14.70/hr (OT varies @
$22.05/hr). Raise/bonus at emplr
discretion. Transport (incl. meals
&, as nec, lodging) to place of
employ provided or paid to wkrs
residing outside normal commute
distance by completion of 50%
of job period. Return transport
provided or paid to same wkrs
if wkr completes job period or
is dismissed early. Wkrs are guaranteed offer of 3/4 of work hrs
each 12-wk period. Tools, supplies, equip, & uniform provided
at no cost. Emplr may assist to
secure wkr-pd lodging at reasonable cost if needed. Emplr provides incidental transport btw job
sites. Interview req'd. Ed's Plant
World is EEO employer. Fax
resume to (301) 372-1721 or apply
at: Prince George's One-Stop
Career Ctr., 1801 McCormick
Drive, 1st Floor, Largo, MD
20774,
(301)
618-8400.
JO#758226.
L JOBS
Landscape Laborer - Temporary,
full-time 2/12/2018-11/24/2018.
36 jobs w/ Toll Landscape, LLC
- VA, Ashburn, VA & job sites
in Prince George's(MD), Fairfax,
Loudoun & Prince William(VA)
cty/cntys. Use hand/power tools/
equip. Lay sod, mow, trim, plant,
water, fertilize, dig, rake, assist w/
install of mortarless masonry wall
units. Entry lvl; req's suprvsn. No
exp req'd/will train. Must lift/carry
50 lbs, when nec. Emplyr paid
pre-emplymnt drug test req'd/new
hires. Bground checks req'd/contract requiremts. 40 hr/wk 7:00
AM-3:30 PM M-F. Sat. work req'd
when nec. Wage no less than
$14.70/hr
(OT
varies
@
$22.05/hr). Raise/bonus at emplr
discretion. Transport (incl. meals
&, as nec, lodging) to place of
employ provided or paid to wkrs
residing outside normal commute
distance by completion of 50%
of job period. Return transport
provided or paid to same wkrs
if wkr completes job period or
is dismissed early. Wkrs are guaranteed offer of 3/4 of work hrs
each 12-wk period. Tools, supplies, equip, & uniform & daily
trans. to/from wksite from central
loc provided at no cost. Potential
deduct for advances, reasonable
cost of lodging, replacemnt uniform pieces &/or vol. health insurance may apply. Emplr may assist
to secure wkr-paid lodging if needed. Emplr provides incidental
transport btw job sites. Interview
req'd. Fax resume to (571) 2918876 or apply at: VEC-Prince William, 13370 Minnieville Road,
Woodbridge, VA 22192, (703)
897-0407. JO#1211646.
Landscape Laborer - Temporary,
full-time
2/15/1812/15/18. 16 jobs w/ Kane
Landscapes, Inc., Sterling, VA
& job sites in Frederick, Montgomery, Arlington, Fairfax,
Fauquier, Loudoun & Prince
William
cntys.
Use
hand/power tools/equip. Lay
sod, mow, trim, plant, water,
fertilize, dig, rake; install mortarless masonry wall units.
Entry level/req’s suprvsn. No
exp. req. will train. Lift/carry
50 lbs, when nec.40 hr/wk
6:45 AM-3:45 PM M-F, Sat
req'd, when nec. Wage is no
less than $14.70/hr (OT varies
@ $22.05/hr). Raise/bonus at
emplr
discretion.Transport
(incl. meals &, as nec, lodging)
to place of employ provided
or paid to wkrs residing outside normal commute distance by completion of 50% of
job period. Return transport
provided or paid to same wkrs
if wkr completes job period
or is dismissed early. Wkrs
are guaranteed offer of 3/4 of
work hrs each 12-wk period.
Tools, supplies, equip, & uniform provided at no cost.
Potential deduct for advances
may apply. Emplr provides
incidental transport btw job
sites. Interview req'd. Fax
resume to (571) 375-0447 or
apply at: VEC Alexandria,
5520 Cherokee Ave., Alexandria, VA 22312, (703) 8131300. JO#1206086
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Aviation, Boats, RVs
Motorcycles Directory
TRAVELMASTER 1997 - 29' class c
motorhome. V10 Ford, 73k miles,
island queen, split bath, generator/AC, VA inspct. $10, 750
703-340-4737
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
820
1-800-753-POST
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 6011
Emerson St #504, Bladensburg, MD
20710, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 7th day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 7th
day of December, 2017.
Housing Opportunities Commission’s Net Assets (in millions of dollars)
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142571
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
WILLIE S BAILEY
IDA M LUMPKIN A/K/A
IDA M BAILEY
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-35870
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 155
Potomac Passage, UNIT 622, Oxon
Hill, MD 20745, and reported in the
above entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 6th day
of December, 2017 next; provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
15th Street, Washington, DC, MD
in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 6th
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $340,480.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142569
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ESTATE OF GILBERT E SAUNDERS
C/O MARK SAUNDERS
(SUCCESSOR) PER REP
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-12467
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 3513
Mullin Ln, Bowie, MD 20715, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 7th day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $302,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142572
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
JOHN N TAYLOR
MARION S TAYLOR
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF15-09178
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 6618
Horseshoe Rd, Clinton, MD 20735,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 6th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 6th day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $496,789.23.
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142566
1-800-753-POST
Liabilities:
Current Liabilities (Including Current
Portion of Long-Term Debt and Bonds
Payable)
Noncurrent Liabilities:
Bonds Payable
Other Liabilities
Total Liabilities
Restricted for:
Debt Service
Customer Deposits and Other
Closing Cost Assistance Program
Unrestricted
Total Net Position
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Change (%)
$423.5
384.5
314.6
1,122.6
$(37.3)
20.7
(6.2)
(22.8)
-8.8%
5.4%
-2.0%
-2.0%
17.8
16.3
1.5
9.2%
170.0
176.1
(6.1)
-3.5%
469.8
227.4
867.2
508.5
229.3
913.9
(38.7)
(1.9)
(46.7)
-7.6%
-0.8%
-5.1%
2.7
4.6
(1.9)
-41.0%
(12.0)
(19.3)
7.3
-37.8%
80.7
1.6
3.8
173.5
77.8
2.8
3.4
155.7
2.92
(1.2)
0.4
17.8
3.7%
-41.8%
13.1%
11.4%
$247.6
$220.4
$27.2
12.4%
Deferred Outflows of Resources
Net Position
Net Investment in Capital Assets
Change ($)
2016
$386.2
405.2
308.4
1,099.8
Deferred Outflows of Resources
Bids & Proposals
2017
Operating Revenues
Dwelling Rental
Intergovernmental Grants
Investment Income
Unrealized Gains (Losses) on
Investments
Interest on Mortgages and
Construction Loans Receivable
Management Fees and Other Income
Total Operating Revenues
2016
$68.0
118.5
3.8
(3.6)
Change ($)
$68.3
116.0
3.5
3.4
$(0.3)
2.5
0.3
(7.0)
Change (%)
-0.5%
2.1%
9.1%
-204.7%
11.1
12.1
(1.0)
-8.2%
12.8
210.6
10.2
213.5
2.6
-2.9
25.5%
-1.3%
Operating Expenses
Housing Assistance Payments
Administration
Maintenance
Depreciation and Amortization
Utilities
Fringe Benefits
Pension Expense
Interest Expense
Other expenses
Total Operating Expenses
95.5
39.4
17.0
14.3
4.9
9.8
1.5
21.9
11.6
216.0
91.4
35.6
17.4
13.9
5.4
10.4
0.8
22.3
9.9
207.1
4.1
3.8
(0.4)
0.4
(0.5)
(0.6)
0.7
(0.4)
1.7
8.9
4.5%
10.8%
-2.5%
2.7%
-9.0%
-6.1%
86.9%
-1.6%
17.4%
4.3%
Operating Income
-183.4%
(5.3)
6.4
(11.7)
Nonoperating Revenues, Net
32.3
28.8
3.5
12.1%
Income Before Contributions
27.0
35.2
(8.2)
-23.4%
Capital Contributions
Change in Net Position
0.3
$27.2
3.4
38.6
(3.1)
(11.4)
-92.4%
-29.5%
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
JOSEPH JENKINS, JR A/K/A JOSEPH
JENKINS JR
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-43765
NOTICE
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ABESS NASRALLA
ALBERTA M NASRALLA
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF16-43764
NOTICE
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ANTHONY H PHIPPS
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-03325
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 5204
Church Road, Bowie, MD 20720,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 6th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 6th day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $357,200.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142568
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 13002
Bay Hill Drive, Beltsville, MD 20705,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 6th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 6th day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $763,703.73.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142567
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 6th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 16308
Baden Westwood Road, Brandywine, MD 20613, and reported in
the above entitled cause, will be
finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
6th day of December, 2017 next;
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post,
1150 15th Street, Washington, DC,
MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 6th
day of December, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $218,450.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142565
852
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
John E. Driscoll, III, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
vs.
DENETTA M JAMES
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
vs.
BERNARD HERMAN JAMES
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
Darrell A. Holtz
Defendant
No . C-02-CV-17-001720
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Tuesday, November 14, 2017, that the
sale of the property in the proceedings mentioned, made and reported by Robert A. Jones, Substitute
Trustee
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 14th day
of December 2017 next, provided
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive
weeks on or before the 14th day
of December 2017 next. The report
states the amount of sale of the
property at 9 LEEWARD COURT,
ANNAPOLIS, MD 21403 to be
$231,374.00
Robert P Duckworth
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Anne Arundel County, MD
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14812
NOTICE
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-14108
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 7209
Cross Street, UNIT 7209, District
Heights, MD 20747, and reported
in the above entitled cause, will
be finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
7th day of December, 2017 next;
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in THE WASHINGTON
POST, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
three successive weeks before the
7th day of December, 2017.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 7th
day of November, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Philip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 7314
15th Pl, Takoma Park, MD 20912,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 7th day of December,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150 15th Street,
Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S once a
week for three successive weeks
before the 7th day of December,
2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $123,378.20.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $270,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142575
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
12142574
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
Edward L. Vasquez
Defendants
No . C-02-CV-16-003480
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Tuesday, November 7, 2017, that the sale
of the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported by
Robert A. Jones, Substitute Trustee
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 7th day
of December 2017 next, provided
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive
weeks on or before the 7th day
of December 2017 next. The report
states the amount of sale of the
property at 510 Imperial Square,
Odenton,
MD. 21113 to be
$149,000.00
Robert P Duckworth
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Anne Arundel County, MD
12142781
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
12144186
John E. Driscoll, III, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Nov 15, 22, 29, 2017
SF
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1-800-753-POST
Nov 22, 29, Dec 6, 2017
SF
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Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
FREE UNDER $250
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
825
Bids & Proposals
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
EMBASSY OF INDIA
WASHINGTON DC
****
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP)
The Embassy of India invites proposals from competent
and qualified Architects/Architectural firms for providing
Professional Services for Architectural, Engineering, and
Project Management for the Comprehensive Renovations
of Exteriors of the Embassy’s property located at 1438 U
Street NW, Washington DC 20008, U.S.A.
2.
Embassy’s
website
https://www.indianembassy.org/pages.php?id=33 and Central Procurement Portal (CPP) at https://eprocure.gov.in/cppp/ may also be
referred to for complete details, scope of work, and conditions of eligibility.
3. The bids should be submitted in three sealed envelopes
{Envelope A “Earnest Money Deposit” through a cheque
for US$1,000.00 in favour of ‘Embassy of India’, Envelope
B “Technical Bid Documents”, and Envelope C “Financial
Bid Documents”}. Three envelopes containing “A”, “B” &
“C” shall be duly superscribed with above titles and put
in another sealed envelope superscribed with the title
“Proposal for Providing Professional Services for Architectural, Engineering, and Project Management for the
Comprehensive Renovations of Exteriors of the Embassy’s
property located at 1438 U Street NW, Washington DC
20008.”
Last date for receipt of bids is December 21, 2017 at
1500 hours
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
Housing Opportunities Commission’s Changes in Net Assets (in millions of dollars)
1-800-753-POST
SF
2017
Assets:
Current and Other Assets
Capital Assets
Mortgage and Construction Loans
Receivable
Total Assets
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
1-800-753-POST
825
Official Notices
The 2017 Audited Financial Statements for the Housing Opportunities Commission are now available. They can be
found at www.hocmc.org under Newsroom/Publications, or you may pick up a copy at the main office located at
10400 Detrick Avenue, Kensington, MD 20895. A summary is provided below.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $62,665.00.
Wake up to
home delivery.
820
Official Notices
NOTICE
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ADRIANE MINCEY
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-11050
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Clerk of the Circuit Court
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A
CLASSIFIED
D9
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13705 Modrad Way, Unit 33
Silver Spring, MD 20904
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
SAMIHA MUHAMMAD, dated May 22, 2008 and recorded
in Liber 35771, folio 520 among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.414026V; Tax ID
No.05-02771718 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $22,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 559161)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. COHEN,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
Axelson, Williamowsky, Bender & Fishman, P.C.
ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT LAW
1401 Rockville Pike, Suite 650. Rockville, MD 20852
TELEPHONE (301) 738-7657. TELECOPIER (301) 424-0124
SUBSTITUTE, Trustee's sale
of valuable Improved real estate Improved by premises
known as
20113 Cider Barrel Drive, Unit #21,Germantown, MD 20876-2708
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
from GIFTY MARION ASMAH-DICKERSON, dated December 21, 2006
and recorded in Liber 33968 at Folio 072 among the land records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, Maryland, upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse
door, 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, Maryland on Thursday, December
14, 2017 at 9:30 a.m. all that property described in said Deed of Trust as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED as Condominium Unit No. 21, as shown on
Condominium Phasing Plat-Phasing Plan, Orchard Run Condominium, Phase
4, recorded among the Land Records of Montgomery County, Maryland as
Plat Nos. 9404, 9405 and 9406.
The improvements thereon being known as 20113 Cider Barrel Drive.
Said property is improved by A Dwelling and Is SOLD IN "AS IS CONDITION"
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $22,000.00 in the form of cash, certified
check, or in any other form suitable to the substitute Trustees in their
sole discretion, shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest at 3.625%
per annum from the date of
sale to the date of payment will be paid within ten days after the final
ratification of the sale.
Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by
purchaser.
Front Foot Benefit charges are to be adjusted for the current year to
date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Title examination,
conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer taxes and all other costs
incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the
essence for the purchaser, otherwise the property will be resold at the
risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The purchaser agrees to pay the
Substitute Trustees fees plus all costs incurred if the Substitute Trustee
have filed the appropriate pleadings with the Court to resell the property.
Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the court in
connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the
Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order
by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the
purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by purchaser at the
time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser
3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly
agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not
required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement
the deposit shall be forfeited to the Substitute Trustee and all expenses of
this sale (including attorney fees or full commission on the gross sales price
of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit.
In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to
any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property
regardless of any improvements made to the real property.
In the Event this property is sold and for any reason the sale is not ratified
the liability of the Substitute Trustees shall be limited to a refund of the
deposit. Upon refund of the deposit the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees either at law or in equity.
JEREMY K. FISHMAN,
SAMUEL D. WILLIAMOWSKY, and ERICA T. DAVIS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES,
by virtue of instrument recorded among the land records of MONTGOMERY County, Maryland.
Brenda DiMarco, Auctioneer
14804 Main Street
Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
Phone#: 301-627-1002
Auctioneer's Number #A00116
November 21, December 6, 13, 2017
12142640
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
12609 Hill Creek Lane
Potomac, MD 20854
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
LEONARD JAIGOBIN AND RAJDULARI S. JAIGOBIN, dated
January 10, 2007 and recorded in Liber 33742, folio 652
among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD,
default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed
as Case No.434197V; Tax ID No.06-03432402 ) the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $50,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
12142534 transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 577380)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
ARE YOUR
TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054F 2x3
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
12144713
D10
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3210 N. Leisure World Blvd., Unit 311
Silver Spring, MD 20906
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
MARILYNN P. FAUST, dated October 9, 2012 and recorded
in Liber 45255, folio 224 among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.435309V; Tax ID
No.13-0334446 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $20,900.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 578279)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
12144281
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11800 Old Georgetown Road #1533
North Bethesda, MD 20852
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
GABRIEL ROMERO, dated October 25, 2010 and recorded
in Liber 40423, folio 322 among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.416868V; Tax ID
No.04-03546840 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at the MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $39,700.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 568449)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
ERIN M. AUGUST,
HUGH J. GREEN,
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
611 Whetstone Glen Street
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from STELLA
BROWN, dated June 23, 2006 and recorded in Liber 32900,
folio 263 among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case
docketed as Case No.433940V; Tax ID No.09-03547285 ) the
Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850, on
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $21,000.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
PURCHASER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT THE PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO AN IRS RIGHT OF REDEMPTION. Balance of the
purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for MONTGOMERY
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 556271)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
BRIAN THOMAS,
KHALID D. WALKER,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12140008
ARE YOUR TENANTS
MOVING OUT?
CLASSIFIED
202-334-7007
e-mail:
legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x2
850
EZ
Montgomery County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
864 College Parkway, Unit 101,
Rockville, MD 20850
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to DENNIS F. HARDIMAN, Trustee(s),
dated December 20, 2012, and recorded among the Land
Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
45986, folio 209, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED FEBRUARY 1, 2013 IN LIBER 45986, FOLIO
209.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (54906)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
LEGAL
NOTICES
www.hwestauctions.com
To place your
legal notice in the
Classified section:
Call:
Montgomery County
NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
12140003
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
www.hwestauctions.com
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142413
KNOWN AS
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
9240 Three Oaks Drive
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
Silver Spring, MD 20901
SUITE 100
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
Deed of Trust to RECON TRUST COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
October 19, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35001, folio
594, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
KNOWN AS
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
23723 CLARKSMEAD DRIVE
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
CLARKSBURG, MD 20871
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
certain Deed of Trust to LAWYERS TITLE SERVICES, INC. , Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
Trustee(s), dated December 27, 2006, and recorded among the THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
33592, folio 200, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 1:30 PM
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon
situated
in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned as follows:
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-THREE (33) IN BLOCK LETTERED
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 "C" IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION SEVEN (7),
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
SLIGO PARK HILLS" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 90 AT PLAT 9730
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 1:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
as follows:
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiLOT 26 IN BLOCK "O" AS SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED, tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate"LOTS 29 THROUGH 53 AND PARCEL A & D, BLOCK 'F', LOTS rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
9 THROUGH 24 AND PARCEL A, BLOCK 'O', CLARKSBURG merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
TOWN CENTER" AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED PLAT other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
22228
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
without either express or implied warranty or representation, subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi- assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, of the purchase price with interest at 5% per annum from the
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $ 20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY association dues and assessments that may become due after
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
the purchase price with interest at 6.375% per annum from taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
association dues and assessments that may become due after said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting Trustee's File No. (30944)
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
www.hwestauctions.com
Trustee's File No. (55486)
NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
12140001
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
12142537 NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
LEGAL NOTICES
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Montgomery County
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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2017
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
LAW OFFICES
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
Shulman, Rogers, Gandal, Pordy & Ecker, P.A.
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
12505 Park Potomac Avenue, 6th Floor
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
Potomac, MD 20854
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
(301) 230-5241
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
File No. 113852.00460
KNOWN AS
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
11813 HEARTWOOD DRIVE
of
Beltsville, MD 20705
Two Valuable Fee Simple Properties
located in Montgomery County, Maryland,
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
known as
certain Deed of Trust to WAYNE LEE, Trustee(s), dated January
TAX ID NO. 05-00272438
12, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
TAX ID NO. 05-03552453
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 22330, folio 649, the
(collectively the “Property”)
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
and Security Agreement (the “Deed of Trust”) from Elderhome duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
Land, L.L.C., and Burtonsville Crossing, LLC, to Ryan Riel and occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
Laurence E. Bensignor, Trustees, bearing the date of June 14, party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
2013, recorded in Book 47084, at Page 013 among the Land offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
Records of Montgomery County, Maryland, and at the request COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
of the party secured thereby, default having occurred in the MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
terms and conditions thereof, the Substitute Trustees having
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
been substituted for the Trustees named in said Deed of Trust, ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
County, at 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, MD on December described as follows:
15, 2017 at 3:00 p.m., some or all of the Property described in
LOT NUMBERED TWO (2) IN BLOCK NUMBERED TWO 92)
said Deed of Trust.
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT OF CORRECTION,
All these Fee-Simple lots of ground and the improve- PLAT TWO, BELTSVILLE HEIGHTS" AS PER PLAT THEREOF
ments, if any, thereon identified as Tax ID No. 05- RECORDED IN THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S
00272438 and 05-03552453 and more fully described in COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK VJ164 AT PLAT 57.
the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
Each lot will be offered separately, bids reserved, and then without either express or implied warranty or representation,
offered in the aggregate and will be sold in the manner producing including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
the greater amount of proceeds.
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiTERMS OF SALE
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateThe bid which yields the highest price for the Property will rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
be accepted by the Substitute Trustees. Notwithstanding the merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
foregoing, the Substitute Trustees absolutely reserve the right other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
to postpone the sale and/or cancel the sale at any time until and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
the auctioneer announces that the Property is "sold" and the which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
deposit in the required amount and form is received by the subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
Substitute Trustees. A deposit in the amount of $150,000.00 record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
will be required at the time of sale if the Property is sold in assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
the aggregate. Deposits in the amount of $75,000.00 will be TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $32,000.00 payable in certified
required for each parcel in the event the Property is sold in check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
individual parcels. Such deposit(s) must be by cashier's check time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
or certified check or such other form as the Substitute Trustees’ ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
may determine in their sole discretion. The Noteholder secured COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 6.2% on
by the Deed of Trust (or any related party) shall be exempted unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
by the Substitute Trustees from submitting any bidding deposit. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
The Substitute Trustees will, as a condition of the sale, require post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
all potential bidders, except the Noteholder, to show their party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
deposit before any bidding begins. The retained deposit of the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
successful purchaser shall be applied, without interest, to the the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
successful purchaser's credit at settlement, provided, however, purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
that in the event the successful purchaser fails to consummate resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
the purchase in accordance with the terms of sale as herein All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
provided, such deposit, will be forfeited. The terms of sale including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
must be complied with and settlement consummated thereon adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
within 30 days from date of final ratification of the sale by the transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland unless extended shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
at the sole discretion of the Substitute Trustees. There will and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
event settlement is delayed for any reason. TIME IS OF THE any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
ESSENCE. The balance of the purchase price over and above Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
the retained deposit, with interest thereon at a rate of 8% from take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
the date of sale through the date of receipt of the balance of or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
the purchase price, will be due at settlement in cash or certified deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
funds; and if not so paid, the Substitute Trustees reserve the the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
right to retain the deposit and resell the Property at the risk and provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
cost of the defaulting purchaser, after such advertisement and this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
on such terms as the Substitute Trustees may deem proper, and shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
to avail themselves and the Noteholder of any legal or equitable The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
rights against the defaulting purchaser.
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
The Property is sold subject to the lawful rights, if any, of into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
parties in possession, if such rights have priority over the Deed is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
of Trust, and to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions, interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
easements, rights of way, encumbrances, liens, agreements and announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06819)
limitations of record having priority over the Deed of Trust. The Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
Property will be sold “WHERE IS” and in “AS IS” condition
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
without any warranty as to condition, express or implied, and
Gene Jung,
without any representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the
Substitute Trustees
information furnished to prospective bidders by the Substitute
Trustees or any other party and without any other representations
or warranty of any nature. Without limiting the generality of
the foregoing, the Property will be sold without representation
or warranty as to (i) title to the Property, (ii) the nature,
condition, structural integrity, or fitness for a particular use of
www.hwestauctions.com
any improvements, fixtures or personal property included within NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER
6, 13, 2017
12145177
the Property, (iii) the environmental condition of the Property
or the compliance of the Property with federal, state and local
laws and regulations concerning the presence or disposal of
hazardous substances, (iv) compliance of the Property with
the Americans with Disabilities Act or any similar law, or (v)
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
compliance of the Property with any zoning laws or ordinances
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
and any and all applicable safety codes, and acceptance of the
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
Deed to the Property by the successful purchaser shall constitute
a waiver of any claims against the Substitute Trustees or the
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
Noteholder concerning any of the foregoing matters. Purchaser
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
KNOWN AS
Property.
3323 Pumphrey Drive
Conveyance shall be by Trustee’s Deed, without covenant or
District Heights, MD 20747
warranty, express or implied, specifically including marketability
or insurability (hazard or title), unless otherwise required by Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
statute, court rule or the Deed of Trust. The risk of loss or damage Deed of Trust to FRIEDMAN & MAC FAYDEN PA, Trustee(s),
by fire or other casualty to the Property from and after the dated July 20, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records
date of sale will be upon the successful purchaser. Adjustment of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26199,
of all taxes, ground rents, public charges, assessments, sewer, folio 644, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
water, drainage and other public improvements will be made as of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
of the date of sale and are to be assumed and paid thereafter by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
by the successful purchaser, whether assessments have been default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
levied or not. Any condominium fees, homeowners association request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
dues, assessments or capital contributions, if any, payable with Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
respect to the Property shall be assumed after the date of sale GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
by the successful purchaser. All costs incident to the settlement ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
and conveyancing including, without limitation, examination
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
of title, conveyancing, all recordation taxes and charges, all ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
transfer taxes and charges, title insurance premiums, notary thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
fees, settlement fees and all other costs incident to settlement described as follows:
shall be at the cost of the successful purchaser. In the event
the Substitute Trustees are unable for any reason to convey LOT NUMBERED THREE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-SIX (376),
title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be to IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "OLE LONGFIELD", PRINCE
request and receive a return of the deposit. Upon return of the GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, AS PER PLAT THEREOF
deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect and the purchaser RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK BB 6 AT FOLIO 54, ONE OF
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. THE LAND RECORDS OF SAID PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
This advertisement, as amended or supplemented by any oral MARYLAND.
announcements during the conduct of the sale, constitutes the The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
entire terms upon which the Property shall be offered for sale.
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
Stephen A. Metz and Benjamin P. Smith
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiSubstitute Trustees
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
www.hwestauctions.com
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
12141924 record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $9,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
Membership is rewarding.
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-08792)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
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www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
12145170
OPQRS
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29 20 7
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
13009 BELLE MEADE TRACE
BOWIE, MD 20720
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Mary
Akisanya and Sunday Akisanya dated January 31, 2005 and recorded in
Liber 21509, folio 123 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 12, 2017 AT 10:44 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-3530672.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $66,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 22230.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
12141677
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
2407 BERMONDSEY DR.
BOWIE, MD 20721
DECEMBER 12, 2017 AT 10:46 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-0771386.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $89,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 39275.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 22, Nov 29 & Dec 6
12143086
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
P
D11
C
G
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
13004 MARQUETTE LA.
BOWIE, MD 20715
413 CLOVIS AVE.
CAPITOL HEIGHTS, MD 20743
7418 PARKWOOD ST.
HYATTSVILLE, MD 20784
6306 BROOKE JANE DR.
CLINTON, MD 20735
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Mathew
Keel, Jr. dated September 8, 2006 and recorded in Liber 26361, folio 537
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Gregorio
Ceja a/k/a Gregorio G. Ceja dated November 27, 2006 and recorded in
Liber 26693, folio 706 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:51 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Bruce
Edwards Phillips and Pamerly G. Phillips dated April 20, 2004 and recorded
in Liber 23078, folio 123 among the Land Records of Prince George's
County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub.
Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's
County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance,
located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:55 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-0188094.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $21,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 57789.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-0916031.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $15,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66555.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #14-1612472.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66497.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 22, Nov 29 & Dec 6
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $28,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 58800.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12141160
12142641
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Yvonne M.
Davis dated January 9, 2007 and recorded in Liber 27337, folio 205 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 10:56 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-0013755.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $60,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65442.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:48 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #18-2055507.
12144723
12140457
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 10:55 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-3581170.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $32,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67705.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
12141389
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6223 Gothic Lane
Bowie, MD 20720
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to WILLIAM A. MARKWAT, Trustee(s), dated
December 30, 2004, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 21615,
folio 076, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-SIX (36) IN BLOCK LETTERED "A" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT TWO, HIGHBRIDGE", AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT NLP 142 AT
PLAT 99, BEING IN THE 14TH ELECTION DISTRICT.
Said property is subject to a 120 day IRS Right of Redemption.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $29,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.875%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-15560)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Jason L. Hamlin,
Glen H. Tschirgi, Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6600 Queens Chapel Road
Hyattsville, MD 20782
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to DAVID G. SWEIDERK AND ROBERT
BYSTROWSKI, Trustee(s), dated July 22, 2005, and recorded
among the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND in Liber 22718, folio 603, the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 1, BLOCK 23, AS
SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED "SECTION 6-B, UNIVERSITY
PARK," AS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF THE
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK
6, PAGE 55.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.25% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-10152)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis
Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Burnett
Dockery dated August 23, 2007 and recorded in Liber 29151, folio 292
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:52 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #13-3237468.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $29,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65175.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12140460
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
12144128 NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-0868901.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 58742.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
3540 EDWARDS ST.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20774
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Dorothy
McClendon, Fred D. Brown, as Remainderman and Harold T. McClendon,
as Remainderman dated April 26, 2007 and recorded in Liber 27738, folio
294 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main
St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.),
on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:50 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #20-2233906.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $34,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68846.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12140479
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8477 GREENBELT RD., UNIT #T2
GREENBELT, MD 20770
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Patrice
A. Mathews dated August 26, 2005 and recorded in Liber 23284, folio 703
among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St.,
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:54 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD
and described as Unit Numbered 8477-T2 Greenbelt Road of plan of
condominium entitled "Chelsea Wood Condominium" and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #21-2303881.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to b
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Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
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10333 HALTON TERR.
LANHAM, MD 20706
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Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Angelina
Ogu and Longinus Ogu dated January 12, 2007 and recorded in Liber
26878, folio 636 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
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DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:49 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #20-2283182.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $84,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 47595.
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12141792
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Rolando V.
Lee dated February 8, 2007 and recorded in Liber 27487, folio 377 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 10:53 AM
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12139286
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
12144146 NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13 2017
12138329
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
9406 BRANDYWINE RD.
CLINTON, MD 20735
7403 HAWTHORNE ST.
HYATTSVILLE, MD 20785
13201 WRIGHT PL.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20774
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Otis
R. L. Lindsey a/k/a Otis L. Lindsey dated May 5, 2015 and recorded in
Liber 37040, folio 468 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
9602 LINWOOD AVENUE
Lanham, MD 20706
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to SUSAN M. PESNER, Trustee(s), dated May
31, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25681, folio 620, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOTS NUMBERED TWO HUNDRED SIXTY (260) AND TWO
HUNDRED SIXTY-ONE (261), IN BLOCK NUMBERED EIGHTEEN (18), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SHERMAN
PARK", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN
PLAT BOOK JWB 5, AT PLAT 642, AND RE-RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK A, AT PLAT 103, BEING IN THE 20TH ELECTION
DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.625%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-17617)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13 2017
851
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Joemade
Scott-Carter a/k/a Joemade P. Scott-Carter dated April 17, 2015 and
recorded in Liber 36988, folio 91 among the Land Records of Prince
George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince
George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing
entrance, located on Main St.), on
DECEMBER 12, 2017 AT 10:43 AM
13008 BLAIRMORE ST.
BELTSVILLE, MD 20705
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Marsha
E. Jackson and Frederick T. Jackson dated May 23, 2007 and recorded in
Liber 28972, folio 496 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
851
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 22, Nov 29 & Dec 6
851
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12140884
Wake up
to home
delivery
Home
delivery
is
convenient
1 800 753 POST
1 800 753 POST
D12
851
Prince Georges County
OPQRS
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
4913 HEATH STREET
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to REALTY TITLE SERVICES INC, Trustee(s),
dated June 24, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records
of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 36154,
folio 313, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed
of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees,
by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED THREE
(3) AND FOUR (4) IN BLOCK SEVENTY-TWO (72) IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "GREATER CAPITOL HEIGHTS",
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN LIBER
B.D.S. NO. 1 FOLIO 63, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $21,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.875%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-14306)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Jason L. Hamlin, Glen H.
Tschirgi, Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
12138135
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2420 59TH PLACE
Hyattsville, MD 20785
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DONALD W. COURTNEY, Trustee(s), dated
February 11, 2011, and recorded among the Land Records of
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 32457, folio
456, MODIFIED: AUGUST 7, 2015 IN LIBER 38060, FOLIO
126 the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED NINE (9), IN BLOCK NUMBERED FORTYSEVEN(47), IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SECTION 8,
CHEVERLY", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND,
IN PLAT BOOK BB 10, AT PLAT 16; BEING IN THE 2ND
ELECTION DISTRICT OF SAID COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $14,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.875%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-22568)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Melissa Alcocer, Jeana McMurray, Louis
Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1406 SAYBROOKE CT.
PASADENA, MD 21122
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1496 MARA VISTA CT., UNIT #112
CROFTON, MD 21114
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Chuck
Rollins and Heather Rollins dated June 20, 2006 and recorded in Liber
17981, folio 406 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the
Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 9:29 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Alice M.
De Seve dated March 13, 2006 and recorded in Liber 17637, folio 1 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #03-792-90109783.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $83,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 61898.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and
described as Unit 112XC, in Building B, as set forth in "Declaration
Establishing a Plan for condominium Ownership of Crofton Mews Condominium No. 1" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Tax ID #02-208-90005863.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $12,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
12143965
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1828 WOODS RD.
ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Wayne
S. Simmons dated March 30, 2007 and recorded in Liber 18947, folio 438
among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House
Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 9:28 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-145-90099365.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $100,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 58896.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
12144726
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68086.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12141159
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1501 ROBINSON RD.
SHADY SIDE, MD 20764
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Donald
A. Tyner dated May 7, 2009 and recorded in Liber 21076, folio 406 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-156-00589700.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $33,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65490.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
12140887
748 MILLHOUSE DRIVE
GLEN BURNIE, MD 21060
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust, dated August 26, 2015, and recorded among
the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND
in Liber 28783, folio 291, RE-RECORDED ON JUNE 15,
2016 IN LIBER 29700 AND FOLIO 371, the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401 ON,
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST
RECORDED SEPTEMBER 8, 2015 IN LIBER 28783, FOLIO
291.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (46621)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
529 Bay Dale Court
Arnold, MD 21012
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to BRYAN D. LESLIE, Trustee(s), dated August
7, 2015, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28710, folio 438, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401 ON,
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
UNIT 20, BUILDING 2, PHASE 3, PLAT NUMBER 1, SECTION 2,
AS SHOWN ON A PLAT ENTITLED, BAY HILLS TOWNHOUSES,
OAKMONT, SECTION 2, PLAT 1, AND RECORDED IN THE LAND
RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, IN PLAT BOOK E22,
FOLIO 13.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 3.99% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (54773)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
EZ
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
657 CADBURY DRIVE
ODENTON, MD 21113
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to LESLIE J. KEIDEL, Trustee(s), dated
May 21, 2013, and recorded among the Land Records of
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 26281, folio
0386, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE ANNE
ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH
CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 10:00 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT 22A, BLOCK L, AS SHOWN UPON THE PLAT OF MAPLE
RIDGE, SECTION NO. 3, AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, IN PLAT BOOK 32,
FOLIO 68.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 4% per annum from the
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. (45429)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
12140984
853
Calvert County
853
Calvert County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
377 Rachaels Way
Prince Frederick, MD 20678
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MARK H. FRIEDMAN AND KENNETH J. MAC
FADYEN, Trustee(s), dated March 1, 2005, and recorded among
the Land Records of CALVERT COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
02759, folio 332, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE
CALVERT COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 175 MAIN ST,
PRINCE FREDERICK, MD 20678 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CALVERT COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-NINE (39), IN THE SUBDIVISION
KNOWN AS "FINAL PLAT, PLAT THREE, SYMPHONY WOODS",
AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF CALVERT COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK
ABE 4, AT PLAT 68; BEING IN THE 2ND ELECTION DISTRICT
OF SAID COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $14,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CALVERT COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 8.3% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (15-12246)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
853
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2017
853
Calvert County
Calvert County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
241 LAUREL DR.
LUSBY, MD 20657
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Ethel M.
Long and Laronda Willett dated April 25, 2008 and recorded in Liber 3163,
folio 450 among the Land Records of Calvert County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction at the Circuit Court for Calvert County, at the Court House Door,
175 Main St., Prince Frederick, MD 20678, on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 3:30 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Calvert County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-055461.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $39,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Calvert County. Interest to
be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the
Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 53184.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12141678
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11730 MILL BRIDGE RD.
LUSBY, MD 20657
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Sylvester
R. Phillips and Theo Phillips dated November 11, 2009 and recorded in
Liber 3428, folio 221 among the Land Records of Calvert County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Calvert County, at the Court
House Door, 175 Main St., Prince Frederick, MD 20678, on
DECEMBER 5, 2017 AT 3:31 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Calvert County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-020625.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $28,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Calvert County. Interest to
be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the
Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64808.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 15, Nov 22 & Nov 29
12141679
855
Charles County
855
Charles County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6750 Barney Drive
Hughesville, MD 20637
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to GEORGE MANTAKOS, Trustee(s), dated March
27, 2012, and recorded among the Land Records of CHARLES
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 07770, folio 0049, MODIFIED:
NOVEMBER 1, 2015 IN LIBER 09158, FOLIO 0004 the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE
BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA
PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 1:30PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-SEVEN (27), AS SHOWN ON A PLAT
ENTITLED PLAT 3, BLOCK "B", SECTION TWO, "BENEDICT
PLANTATION", DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
FOR CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK DGB 46 AT
FOLIO 292.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.75% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (16-12638)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
Erin M. August, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
12145226
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
12142095 NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
12142050
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
12138123
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
12144736
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2017
855
Charles County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
11529 TIMBERBROOK DR.
WALDORF, MD 20601
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Quinton
McNeil dated November 18, 2015 and recorded in Liber 9216, folio 455
among the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale
will be held in the breezeway between the Circuit Court and the District
Court), on
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 1:04 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-086616.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $26,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68611.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
12144729
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
10500 LYNNEWOOD CT.
WALDORF, MD 20603
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from William R.
Hogans, IV and Joy Amos-Hogans dated September 19, 2005 and recorded
in Liber 5458, folio 569 among the Land Records of Charles County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles
St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway between the
Circuit Court and the District Court), on
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 1:03 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-232418.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $54,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 54375.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
12144727
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
16224 AND 16195 WILKERSON PL.
BRANDYWINE, MD 20613
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from James
R. Wilkerson and Christine J. Wilkerson dated May 4, 2004 and recorded
in Liber 4725, folio 24 among the Land Records of Charles County, MD,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will
sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles
St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway between the
Circuit Court and the District Court), on
DECEMBER 19, 2017 AT 1:05 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #09-011994 and Tax ID
#09-000968.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $31,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64872.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
OPQRS
EZ
Charles County
12144730
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855
Charles County
855
Charles County
856
Frederick County
856
D13
856
Frederick County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
LEESBURG, VA 20175
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
703-777-7101
KNOWN AS
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
3272 GREEN COVE PLACE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Waldorf, MD 20601
509 Postoak Road
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Frederick, MD 21703
Deed of Trust to THOMAS DORE, Trustee(s), dated August 31,
2015, and recorded among the Land Records of CHARLES Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from MARY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 09087, folio 0340, the holder A. PERE AND WILFRED M. PERE, dated October 17, 2008 and
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having recorded in Liber 7105, folio 0082 among the Land Records of
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having (Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.10C17001906; Tax ID
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the No.02-089971 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W.
offer for sale at public auction at THE CHARLES COUNTY PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 200 CHARLES STREET ( IN THE
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 1:15 PM
BREEZEWAY BETWEEN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS ), LA ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
PLATA, MD 20646 ON,
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
DECEMBER 15, 2017 at 1:30PM
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
thereon situated in CHARLES COUNTY, MD and described as conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
follows:
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
LOT 61 AS SHOWN AND SET OUT ON A PLAT ENTITLED Terms of Sale: A deposit $19,000.00 will be required at the
"RECORD PLATS 1 THROUGH 5 ADAMS CROSSING PHASE B time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY
SECTION 1," AS PER PLATS THEREOF RECORDED AMONG CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance
THE LAND RECORDS OF CHARLES COUNTY, MARYLAND IN of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of
PLAT BOOK 58 AT PLATS 575 THROUGH 579. BEING PART final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK
OF THE SAME PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN DEED RECORDED COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the
AMONG THE AFORESAID LAND RECORDS IN LIBER 8843 purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
FOLIO 251.
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
without either express or implied warranty or representation, first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi- of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $30,000.00 payable in certified for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of CHARLES COUNTY, execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.75% on unpaid prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
public charges and private charges or assessments, including thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason, deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 578413)
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
JAMES E. CLARKE,
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
RENEE DYSON,
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
HUGH J. GREEN,
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
SHANNON MENAPACE,
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
BRIAN THOMAS,
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postSUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-09833)
www.hwestauctions.com
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
12142405
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and NOVEMBER 15, 22, 28 2017
Gene Jung,
ORLANS PC
Substitute Trustees
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3755 Maplecrest Drive
www.hwestauctions.com
Knoxville, MD 21758
NOVEMBER 29, DECEMBER 6, 13, 2017
12138121
Under
a
power
of
sale
contained in a Deed of Trust from BONNIE
856
856
Frederick County
Frederick County
J. TEAGUE AND GARY A. TEAGUE, dated March 13, 2009 and
recorded in Liber 7443, folio 0216 among the Land Records of
FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder
(Foreclosure Case docketed as Case No.10C16002833; Tax ID
No.12-297203 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
ORLANS PC
at the FREDERICK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W.
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, MD 21701, on
LEESBURG, VA 20175
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 1:15 PM
703-777-7101
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
7106 Oberlin Circle
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
Frederick, MD 21703
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
TIMOTHY MICHAEL MESZAROS AND MEGAN R. SHULZ,
dated May 7, 2010 and recorded in Liber 7869, folio 0301 Terms of Sale: A deposit $29,000.00 will be required at the
among the Land Records of FREDERICK COUNTY, MD, default time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure Case docketed as BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Case No.10C14003292; Tax ID No.28-572603 ) the Sub. PURCHASER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT THE PROPERTY IS SUBTrustees will sell at public auction at the FREDERICK COUNTY JECT TO AN IRS RIGHT OF REDEMPTION. Balance of the
COURTHOUSE, located at 100 W. PATRICK ST, FREDERICK, purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK COUNTY.
MD 21701, on
Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the purchaser
DECEMBER 4, 2017 at 1:15 PM
defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property shall
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. The purchaser
thereon situated in FREDERICK COUNTY, MD and more fully waives personal service and accepts service by first class mail
and certified mail addressed to the address provided by said
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property.In
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be
Terms of Sale: A deposit $21,500.00 will be required at the entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, including, but
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR BY not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus which may arise
CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Balance therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for FREDERICK date of sale to the date funds are received by the Substitute
COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser. If the Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event
purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or any
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense. time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed for
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes a
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale, and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect, deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps, is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 572814)
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
JAMES E. CLARKE,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
RENEE DYSON,
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
HUGH J. GREEN,
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
PATRICK M. A. DECKER,
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
www.hwestauctions.com
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity, NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
12142407
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 548055)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
BRIAN THOMAS,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
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NOVEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2017
S2931 2x5
12142412
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S0833-1 6x2
855
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
GREENSPOONMARDER, P.A.
10015 OLD COLUMBIA ROAD, SUITE B-215
COLUMBIA, MD 21046
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
11808 PINE TREE COURT
MONROVIA, MD 21770
DECEMBER 8, 2017 AT 1:00 PM
By virtue of a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
SHAWN M. LYLES AND FRANCES A. LYLES, dated JANUARY
17, 2006, and recorded in the Land Records of Frederick
County, Maryland, at Liber 5861, Folio 731, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustee will sell
at public auction, at the front of the Frederick County courthouse
located at 100 W. Patrick Street, Frederick, MD. All that FEE
SIMPLE lot of ground and the improvements thereon, situated in
Frederick County and being more fully described in the aforesaid
Deed of Trust.
ALL THAT PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE, LYING
AND BEING IN FREDERICK COUNTY, STATE OF MARYLAND,
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS TO WIT: BEGINNING FOR THE
SAME AT THE REAR NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 6, NEW
MARKET VIEW, A PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
4, PLAT NO. 49, THENCE WITH THE NORTH SIDE OF LOT 6; 1.
N 60 DEGREES 48’ 07” W -310.36 FEET TO A POINT ON PINE
TREE COURT, THENCE WITH SAID COURT; 2. 45.00 FEET ON
THE ARC OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF
115.51 FEET, CHORD N 45 DEGREES 25’ 50” W-44.72 FEET,
THENCE LEAVING SAID COURT AND RUNNING WITH LIBER
1076 AT FOLIO 415 THE TWO FOLLOWING COURSES AND
DISTANCES; 3. N 61 DEGREES 39’ 16” E - 727.66 FEET,
THENCE; 4. S 50 DEGREES 49’ 18” E - 72.00 FEET, THENCE;
5. S 39 DEGREES 10’ 42” W - 622.80 FEET TO THE PLACE OF
BEGINNING, CONTAINING 3.10 ACRES OF LAND.
THE PROPERTY IS BEING SOLD SUBJECT TO A 120 DAY
RIGHT OF REDEMPTION BY THE IRS.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the loan
and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered into by
the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale is void
and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without interest.
Purchaser must obtain possession and assumes risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of the auction forward.
The property will be sold in an “as is” condition, without express
or implied warranty as to the nature and description of the
improvements as contained herein, and subject to conditions
restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, but
omitting any covenant or restriction based on race, color,
religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, if any,
and with no warranty of any kind.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,000.00 by cash, certified
check or cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser, if
other than the note holder, at time and place of sale, balance
in immediately available funds upon final ratification of sale
by the Circuit Court for Frederick County, Maryland, interest to
be paid at the rate of 12.5% on unpaid purchase money from
date of sale to date of settlement. The secured party herein, if
a bidder, shall not be required to post a deposit. Third party
purchaser (excluding the secured party) will be required to
complete full settlement of the purchase of the property within
TWENTY (20) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification of the sale
by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser’s deposit shall be
forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense
of the defaulting purchaser. All other public charges and private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground
rent, taxes, if any, to be adjusted to date of sale. Cost of
all documentary stamps and transfer taxes and all other costs
incident to the settlement shall be borne by the purchaser. If
applicable, condominium and/or homeowner association dues
and assessments due pursuant to Md. Real Property Article
11-110 and those that may become due after the time of
sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. Purchaser must
obtain possession and assumes the risk of loss or damage to
the property from the date of sale forward. If the sale is
rescinded or not ratified for any reason, including post sale
lender audit, or the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey good
and marketable title, or a resale is to take place for any reason,
the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to a
refund of the aforementioned deposit. The purchaser waives all
rights and claims against the Substitute Trustee whether known
or unknown. These provisions shall survive settlement. Upon
refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect,
and the purchaser shall have no further claim against Substitute
Trustee. The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of
the loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser’s deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, may be
announced at the time and date of sale. (File #41145.0066 /
10C16001949)
Erin M. Shaffer,
Substitute Trustee
www.hwestauctions.com
NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
857
Howard County
857
Howard County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
10205 WINCOPIN CIR., UNIT #304
COLUMBIA, MD 21044
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Lucie M.
Lynch dated June 11, 2005 and recorded in Liber 9327, folio 518 among
the Land Records of Howard County, MD, default having occurred under
the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction, AUCTION
SALE TO BE HELD AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
COLUMBIA, MD 21045, on
DECEMBER 18, 2017 AT 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and described as
Unit 304, in the Condominium regime known as "Lakeside at Town Centre
Condominium" and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
Tax ID #15-138041.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $31,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67077.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Nov 29, Dec 6 & Dec 13
12143967
ORLANS PC
1602 VILLAGE MARKET BLVD. SE, SUITE 310
LEESBURG, VA 20175
703-777-7101
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
7204 Old Friendship Way
Elkridge, MD 21075
Under a power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from
SENITHEA R. HILLIARD, dated January 25, 2008 and recorded
in Liber 11148, folio 646 among the Land Records of HOWARD
COUNTY, MD, default having occurred thereunder (Foreclosure
Case docketed as Case No.13C16110069; Tax ID No.01298763 ) the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction
at THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD,
COLUMBIA, MD. 21045, on
DECEMBER 11, 2017 at 11:15 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and more fully
described in above referenced Deed of Trust.
The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to
conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the
same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit $26,800.00 will be required at the
time of sale, such deposit to be in CERTIFIED CHECK OR
BY CASHIER'S CHECK, CASH WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within
ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for
HOWARD COUNTY. Time is of the essence as to the purchaser.
If the purchaser defaults, the deposit shall be forfeited and the
property shall be resold at the purchaser's risk and expense.
The purchaser waives personal service and accepts service by
first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum
of Sale for any Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this
sale including a Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of
the Property.In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive any benefit from the resale,
including, but not limited to, additional proceeds or surplus
which may arise therefrom. Interest to be paid on the unpaid
purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note
from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the
Substitute Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in
the event additional funds are tendered at the time of sale or
any time prior to settlement or if the settlement is delayed
for any reason. In the event that the Secured Party executes
a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the
above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allows the borrower(s) to
execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan,
prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee's prior
knowledge, this Contract shall be null and void and of no effect,
and the Purchaser's sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit
12142086 without interest. Purchaser shall pay for documentary stamps,
transfer taxes and settlement expenses. Taxes, ground rent,
water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association
dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual
basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if
applicable, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed
thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser
assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date
of sale forward. If the Substitute Trustee(s) are unable to convey
insurable title for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in
law or equity shall be limited to a refund of the aforementioned
deposit without interest. In the event the sale is not ratified
for any reason, the Purchaser's sole remedy, at law or equity,
is the return of the deposit without interest. (File # 568764)
JAMES E. CLARKE,
RENEE DYSON,
HUGH J. GREEN,
SHANNON MENAPACE,
KHALID D. WALKER,
BRIAN THOMAS,
CHRISTINE M. DREXEL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
COULD YOU
USE SOME
EXTRA CASH?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
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NOVEMBER 22, 29, DECEMBER 6, 2017
12144274
C054B 2x3
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872
Fairfax County
872
873
Fairfax County
Prince William County
873
Prince William County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6141 B Essex House Square
Alexandria, VA 22310
12306 Colby Drive, Woodbridge, Virginia
Pursuant to Virginia Code § 55-79.84 and in execution of Liens for
Condominium Assessments held by Essex House Condominium Unit
Owners Association, Inc. recorded amongst the land records of Fairfax
County, Virginia at Instrument No.’s 2014021457.001, 2015003872.001 and
2016019419.001, the undersigned appointed Trustee will offer for sale at
public auction at the main entrance to the Courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Fairfax County, Virginia, 4110 Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22030,
on December 13, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. the property described in said liens,
with the street address of 6141 B Essex House Square, Alexandria, Virginia
22310 and briefly described as Condominium Unit No. 6141B, Phase 5,
Essex House Condominium and as further described in the Deed recorded
amongst the land records of Fairfax County, Virginia at Instrument No.
2002020706.017. Tax Map# 0911 13056141B.
Default having been made in the terms of a certain Deed of Trust
dated May 1, 2017, and recorded May 3, 2017, in the original principal
amount of $205,000.00 and recorded in the Clerk’s office of the Prince
William County Circuit Court as Instrument numbered 201705030033337,
the undersigned Trustee will sell at public auction on November 30,
2017 at 10:00 a.m., in front of the building housing the Prince William
County Circuit Court, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, Virginia, the property
designated as:
Lot 94, Section 6A, LAKE RIDGE, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted
and recorded in Deed Book 522 at page 140, among the land records of
Prince William County, Virginia.
TERMS OF SALE:ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $7,000.00 or 10% of the
sale price, whichever is lower, will be required in the form of a certified
or cashier’s check. Cash will not be accepted as a deposit. Settlement
within fifteen (15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee may forfeit deposit.
Additional terms to be announced at sale. This is a communication from
a debt collector. This notice is an attempt to collect on a debt and any
information obtained will be used for that purpose.
Trustee: Joseph J. Shannon and Juan R. Cardenas, c/o Rees Broome, PC,
1900 Gallows Rd, Suite 700, Tysons Corner, VA 22182. 703-790-1911
jshannon@reesbroome.com
Sale is subject to all prior liens, easements, restrictions, covenants and
conditions, if any, which would be disclosed by an accurate survey or
inspection of the premises. TERMS: CASH. A deposit of $20,000.00 or
10% of the sale price, whichever is lower, is required of the successful
bidder at the time of sale. Settlement is to be made within 21 days.
The successful bidder will be required to execute a Memorandum of
Trustee’s Sale, which is available for review at the place of sale or in
advance upon request made to the Trustee, outlining additional terms of
sale and settlement. AVENUE PROJECTS, LLC, 801 North Pitt Street, Suite
120, Alexandria, VA 22314. (703) 348-0099 avenueprojectsva@gmail.com
November 27, 28, 29, 30, Decenber 1, 2017
12144194
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
6224 Les Dorson Lane
Alexandria, VA 22315
Pursuant to Virginia Code § 55-516 and in execution of certain Memoranda
of Lien for Unpaid Assessments held by Kingstowne Residential Owners
Corporation, recorded amongst the land records of Fairfax County,
Virginia at Instrument Nos. 2017023106 and 2015037699, the undersigned
appointed Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the main entrance
to the Courthouse for the Circuit Court of Fairfax County, Virginia, 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22030, on December 13, 2017 at 9:10
a.m. the property described in said liens, with the street address of 6224
Les Dorson Lane, Alexandria, Virginia 22315 and briefly described as Lot
20, Section 19, Kingstowne, Founders Ridge and as further described in
the Deed recorded amongst the land records of Fairfax County, Virginia at
Instrument No. 2005006590.003. Tax Map# 0913-19-0020.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $15,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is lower, will be required in the form of a
certified or cashier’s check, made payable to Rees Broome, PC. Cash will
not be accepted as a deposit. Settlement within fifteen (15) days of sale,
otherwise Trustee may forfeit deposit. Additional terms to be announced
at sale. This is a communication from a debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and any information obtained will be used for
that purpose.
Trustee: Joseph J. Shannon and Kathleen N. Machado, c/o Rees Broome,
PC, 1900 Gallows Rd, Suite 700, Tysons Corner, VA 22182. 703-790-1911
kmacahdo@reesbroome.com
November 27, 28, 29, 30, Decenber 1, 2017
873
Fairfax County
Prince William County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6653 DUNWICH WAY,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22315
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
15838 Fourmile Creek Court
Haymarket, VA 20169
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $500,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
October 21, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17897,
Page 1813, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on December 13, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 91-2-14-27
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$345,950.00, dated May 8, 2015,
recorded among the land records
of the Circuit Court for Prince William County on May 11, 2015,
as
Instrument
Number
201505110036264, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on December
15, 2017 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Lot Sixty (60),
Section
Twenty-Seven
(27),
''Dominion Valley Country Club'',
as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and recorded as
Instrument No. 200409270163842
and as shown on plat attached
thereto and recorded as Instrument No. 200409270163843,
among the land records of Prince
William County, Virginia. Tax ID:
7298-28-4781.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-269185.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Nov 29, Dec 6, 2017
12143457
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2107 SILENTREE DR,
VIENNA, VA 22182
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $250,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.150000% dated
May 31, 2007, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX as Deed Book 19419, Page
1400, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction all that
property located in the COUNTY
OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse
steps at the front of the Circuit
Court building for the County of
Fairfax located at 4110 Chain
Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on
January 3, 2018 at 2:30 PM, the
property with improvements to
wit:
Tax Map No. 0391270004
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-270679.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Nov 29, Dec 6, 2017
12145389
11/29/2017, 12/06/2017 12145353
You, too, could have
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12144100
Prince William County
SF
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home delivery.
SF
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
6609 HOT SPRING LANE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $162,500.00, dated October 13,
2005, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on October
20, 2005, as Instrument Number
200510200181318, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on December
22, 2017 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Condominium Unit No. 6-57, SOMERSET AT
WESTRIDGE, a Condominium, and
the limited common elements
appurtenant thereto, established
by Condominium Instruments
recorded September 16, 1988, in
Deed Book 1599 at Page 931,
among the land records of Prince
William County, Virginia. Tax ID:
8193-63-8038.01.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 18, 2015, in
the original principal amount of
$251,853.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 150009846 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Spotsylvania County,
9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia on January 11,
2018, at 4:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND, TOGETHER WITH
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE
COUNTY OF SPOTSYLVANIA, COMMONWEALTH
OF
VIRGINIA,
DESCRIBED AS LOT ONE HUNDRED
ELEVEN (111), THE GLEN, SECTION
9D, SALEM FIELDS, AS THE SAME
APPEARS DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK 1886 AT PAGE 303 (PLAT
FILE 8, PAGES 87-89) AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3227291.
Nov. 29, Dec. 6, 13, 2017 12142374
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $10,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: Conv/FHLMC (Trustee #
580383)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0593
11/22/2017, 11/29/2017 12144634
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
9430 Lanae Lane
Manassas Park, VA 20111
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$139,481.00, dated November 19,
1999, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on November 22, 1999, as Instrument Number 32764, in Deed Book 2823,
at Page 1659, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction,
at the main entrance of the courthouse for the Circuit Court of
Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on December
15, 2017 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: LOT 291, SECTION SEVEN (7), BELMONT STATION, AS THE SAME APPEARS DULY
DEDICATED,
PLATTED
AND
RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 2556
AT PAGE 1767, AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF PRINCE WILLIAM
COUNTY, VIRGINIA. Tax ID: 30-2291.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $10,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of THE
FOLLOWING DESCRIBED REAL PROPERTY SITUATE IN THE CITY OF BLUEMONT, COUNTY OF CLARKE, AND COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, TO WIT:
LOTS 9, 10 AND 11, BLOCK 4, UNIT 1, AS SHOWN ON PLAT DATED MARCH
5, 1952 RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF CLARKE COUNTY IN DEED BOOK 41, PAGE 506 TAX ID#: 17A2-10-10;
17A2-10-11, and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
12143325
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
8629 Liberia Avenue,
Manassas, VA 20110
878
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated July
26, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200608030114926 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County, VA, securing
a loan which was originally $345,600.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction
at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
December 13, 2017 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of LOT ONE
HUNDRED EIGHT-EIGHT (188), DEER PARK, AS THE SAME APPEARS DULY
DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED IN INSTRUMENT NO. 635 AT PAGE
968, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
November 22, 29, 2017
877
12142022
877
Spotsylvania County
Spotsylvania County
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In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 29, 2014,
in the original principal amount
of $255,280.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. 140013490 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Stafford County, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on
January 25, 2018 , at 2:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: UNIT 1277,
PHASE 12, THE VILLAGE AT WOODSTREAM
CONDOMINIUM,
IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THE DECLARATION CREATING SAID CONDOMINIUM DULY RECORDED AS INSRTUMENT NO. LR140007705, AND
ANY AND ALL SUBSEQUENT
AMENDMENTS THERETO, WITH
PLAT RECORDED IN INSTRUMENT
NO. PM140000087, AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF STAFFORD
COUNTY, VIRGINIA. SUBJECT TO
THE NOTICE OF DECREE AFFECTING CERTAIN PROPERTY FOR
WATER AND SEWER CHARGES AS
RECORDED IN INSTRUMENT NO.
110013539.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3154301.
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1-800-753-POST
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1-800-753-POST SF
SF
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TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (53835)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
11-27, 28,29,30,12-1
12144903
November 22, 29, December 6, 2017
MARYLAND
12140048
610
Roommates
Dogs for Sale
LAUREL 2 rooms available, $600-$675
share bath & kit. All util. paid.
240-396-7926 or 240-593-0281
OLNEY- Shr condo. Great loc. Nr
shopping & bus. Clean. Quiet. No
smoking, no pets. Small rm w/ wlkin closet, 2 windows, W/D. $600.
Nr MedStar. Leave voice msg. Dep
osit
required.
240-351-5150
Silver Spring- Furn, W/D, internet/
cable. N/S. Kitch, near trans. Safe.
$300 bi-wkly. Sam 240-286-5451
French Bulldogs - 9 weeks, AKC,
brndle, 1 F, Reduced! $2,000
301-252-9213 or visit:
www.windsoroakfarm.com
SPRINGDALE -2 rooms for rent,
master bdrm w prvt BA $650. 2nd
room w shrd BA, $550. F pref
336-708-5657, okay to text
German Shepherd—Beautiful Black
& Red pups from European Import
parents. AKC, hip/health guarantee
2 litters just born 804-895-3388
www.VomBrandonHaus.com
TEMPLE HILLS-Rooms. $600-$625
GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPPIES
NICE home. Utilities incl. No smokAKC, both parents on site, shots &
ing.
1
person.
301-848-0418
vet checked. Will be ready Dec 4.
Wheaton— $725, Shared SFH, 1 BR,
$1000. Call 540-820-0967
Cable Wifi, AC, util incl, nr pub trans,
furn avail, 301-503-1753. Avail Now
VIRGINIA
Roommates
Woodbridge— $590, 1 bedrm, 1 ba,
1857 cedar cove, 703-597-3525,
Balc, AC, Heat Lady to share
Out-of-Town
Real Estate
DELAWARE
New Move-In Ready Homes!
Low Taxes! Close to Beaches,
Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes
from low $100’s. No HOA Fees.
Brochures Available.
1-866-629-0770 or
www.coolbranch.com
225
Collectibles
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
255
IMPORTED GERMAN SHEPARDSready now. black and tan, champ
blood lines, european papers, 1 M, 1
F, med coats $2500 ea703-953-8404
Morkie—1 Female $800, 3 Males
$700 ea. 8 wks old on 11/23. Wonderful Hypoallergenic indoor lap
dogs. Call Jon @ 831-682-1254.
Purebred Pups—Multiple Breeds.
$700-$1500, m/f, 2-12 weeks old,
now 4 xmas or deposits, white
huskies, panda german shepards,
mini pinschers, poodles, doodles
(lab, goldens & border) some akc,
dewormed, 1st shot. 240-626-9749
Yorkie Labs Huskys & more — Big
Puppy Sale 304-904-6289, Cash, CC,
Easy Finance, wvpuppy.com
59 East Rd Martinsburg WV, exit16E
Yorkshire Terriers— Female & Male,
9 weeks old, Health guarantee, registered, playful and lovable, parents
on premises. $1,350. 540-631-1415
622
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
Adopt Cats
4Pawss—Adopt fr 30+ cat/
kitten $v Sat 1-5 Fairfax
Petco www.fourpaws.org
703-352-3300 CFC#34517
GIANT COMMERICAL LEAF
VACCUM- 18 hp, used
1 season, $2500 OBO.
Call 703-863-1139 Juan
640
Birds & Other Animals
Machine Shop Equip:Delta lathe $950
K-T horiz. mill $1200, B-S surface AFRICAN PARROT MALE GREY, with
grinder $750,Wells cut-off saw $300, cage, 15 years olds, reasonable price
Shadowgraph, $50. 410-212-4393 negotiable, 202-396-4233
260
You, too, could have
home delivery.
Furniture
1-800-753-POST
Kimball office furniture;
Presidential series, high quality.
Desk, side arm - 6 16” W drawers.
Bookshelf hutch 80” L rests on
desk/side arm.
File cabinet w/ 3 drawers, 16” W
Two credenzas; one with armoire
Price $2,600; phone 703-582-9624
265
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home & Garden
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
280
Home delivery
is convenient.
Musical Instruments
Piano-Baldwin Acoustical—Great
Shape. Recently tuned. $1000,
Glenn Dale, MD, 301-467-1786
LANHAM- 3 BR, newly painted, car610
pet & closet doors, $1450/mo. + sec.,
301-980-4374
Bichon Poo Puppies — Shots,
MARYLAND
wormed, vet checked. Cream and
black with highlights. Hypoallergenic. Home raised with loving
attention. $650. (540) 222-6555
ANDREWS AFB Area- Nice furn room,
int. & cbl, kit privs. w/w. $550/mo
+ $50 sec dep. Call 301-395-6738
1-800-753-POST
Dogs for Sale
BOWIE TOWN CENTER - BR in
townhouse with shared bath.
$550 utils not incl. 757-343-4190
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
Orange County
Pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage
Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart
B, and the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, I
will conduct a COMMISSIONER’S SALE of 104 Colonial Court, Locust Grove,
VA. In execution of a certain deed of trust by William J. McAuliffe and Eileen
M. McAuliffe dated March 14, 2005, recorded in the County of Orange,
Virginia, as Instrument No. 050002745, and the Assignment recorded in
the Circuit Court of Orange County, Virginia in favor of the Secretary of
Housing and Urban Development recorded January 25, 2013 as Instrument
No. 130000799, default having occurred in the payment of the Note
thereby secured and at the request of the holder, the undersigned
Foreclosure Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction in the front
of the building housing the Circuit Court of Orange County, VA located at
110 North Madison Road, Suite 300, Orange, VA on December 13, 2017 at
1:00 P.M., the property described in said deed of trust, located at the above
address, with improvements thereon and more particularly described as
follows: Lot 306, Sec 5, Lake of the Woods, Tax Map # 012A0000503060,
for which a further description is attached to the deed of trust in this
case. TERMS OF SALE: Neither the FORECLOSURE COMMISSIONER nor the
holder of the note secured by the deed of trust will deliver possession
of the property to the successful bidder. The purchaser at the sale will
be required to pay all closing costs. Real estate taxes, water/sewer fees
and other public charges will be prorated as of the date of sale. The risk
of loss or damage to the property passes to the purchaser immediately
upon the conclusion of the sale. Terms: A bidder's deposit of ten percent
(10%) of the sale price in the form of certified funds payable to the
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and must be present at
the time of sale. Foreclosure Commissioner shall have no duty to obtain
possession for purchaser. The property and the improvements thereon
will be sold "AS IS" and without representation or warranties of any kind.
The sale is subject to all liens, encumbrances, conditions, easements and
restrictions, if any, superior to the mentioned deed of trust and lawfully
affecting the property. Sale is subject to post-sale confirmation that the
borrower did not file for protection under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior
to the sale, as well as to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination
of whether the borrower(s) reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.
In any such event, the sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser's
sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the Purchaser's
deposit without interest. Additional terms to be announced at the sale.
HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant. Anderson Law,
Foreclosure Commissioner, 2492 N. Landing Rd, Ste 104, Virginia Beach,
VA 23456, 757-301-3636 Tel, 757-301-3640 Fax. Add to run November 22,
2017, November 29, 2017, and December 6, 2017.
SF
Roommates
1-800-753-POST
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Parcel 2: Containing 1.864 acres,
as shown on plat of survey recorded with deed in Deed Book 180,
page 122, with improvements
thereon.
881
Orange County
Houses
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
1536 Courthouse Road,
Stafford, VA 22554
Stafford County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $148,400.00, dated November
10, 2006 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No. LR060037564 and modified
in
Document
No.
LR070025805, default having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse
Road, Stafford, on December 19,
2017 at 11:00 AM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Parcel 1: Containing 2.728 acres,
as shown on plat of survey recorded with deed in Deed Book 56,
Page 229, and;
MD H PR. GEORGE'S CO.
SF
SF
Stafford County
TRUSTEE SALE
SF
SF
SF
878
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
109 WOODSTREAM CIRCLE,
STAFFORD, VA 22556.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
12142637
Nov 29, Dec 20, 27, 2017 12145538
1-800-753-POST
11/29/2017, 12/06/2017 12145352
1-800-753-POST
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
November 22, 29, 2017
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
881
Clarke County
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 118,
Section 2, West Gate of Lomond, as the same appears duly dedicated,
platted and recorded in Deed Book 95 at Page 369, among the Land
Records of Prince William County, City of Manassas, VA, and as more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
874
Clarke County
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
November 25, 2006, and recorded in Deed Book 471, Page 487 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Clarke County, VA, securing a loan
which was originally $189,000.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE,
Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at main
entrance of the Circuit Court for Clarke County located at 102 N. Church
Street Berryville, VA 22611-0189 on:
December 14, 2017 at 11:00 AM
How about some
home delivery?
Wake up
to home
delivery.
874
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
dated November 22, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number
200612120172688 in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $240,000.00. The
appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer
for sale at public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
December 13, 2017 at 1:00 PM
November 22, 29, 2017
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2017
EZ
Prince William County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
111 Honeysuckle Lane,
Bluemont, VA 20135
SF
Towne #: 5000.0605
1-800-753-POST
873
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
8151 Claremont Street,
Manassas, VA 20110
1-800-753-POST
Loan Type: Conv/Conv (Trustee #
553636)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
877
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
4175 Churchman Way
Woodbridge, VA 22192
SF
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $12,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: FHA/GNMA (Trustee #
569336)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0606
November 21, 27, 29, 2017
873
Prince William County
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
FORT WASHINGTON - Rooms with
pvt BA. Kitn. Vets welcome. 5 min
to Nat'l Harbor. Inc cable/internet.
Starts @ $850. Call 301-292-6147
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
From dramas and musicals to stand-up and
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KLMNO
Food
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
TOM SIETSEMA
BRING IT!
Bindaas in Foggy Bottom
trumps its Cleveland Park
sibling, from a design
perspective. E2
If you dread the cookie
swap, here’s the recipe for
you. E8
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/FOOD
MG VA PG EE
E
MORE AT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RECIPES
Sausage and Sweet Potato Pie E3
Arctic Char, Broccolini and Edamame
With Soy-Ginger Sauce E3
Roasted Winter Vegetable and Burrata
Salad E3
Shortbread Jam Bars E8
Chat At noon: live.washingtonpost.com
Italian Onion Soup ONLINE
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
D.C.’s bread
scene, enriched
Seylou Bakery & Mill promises to be
a game-changer; Jonathan Bethony is
called ‘the Steve Jobs’ of his profession
BY
J ANE B LACK
Special to The Washington Post
Horse bread. The name is not exactly appetizing. Its
ingredient list might not make your mouth water, either:
Each loaf includes field peas, sorghum, millet, mustard seed
and camelina, an oil seed similar to flax.
And yet, it is delicious. Were it not for the peas, which you
can see in every slice, you would never know this wasn’t just
whole-wheat bread. Even calling it “whole grain” wouldn’t
do it justice. It has a wonderfully chewy crust and an
extraordinary, deep flavor — a mix of earthiness from the
grains and tang from its sourdough leavener.
Baker Jonathan Bethony dreamed up this particular loaf
because it incorporates what Heinz Thomet, an organic
farmer in Maryland, grows to keep his land healthy and
primed to produce more traditional wheat. (The name
“horse bread” is inspired by history, Bethony says, as this is
SEYLOU CONTINUED ON E6
Jonathan Bethony and his wife, Jessica Azeez, are opening Seylou Bakery & Mill in Shaw
this week. Here, he transfers loaves of bread from a huge and unusual wood-fired oven.
A delicious tide is turning for white chocolate
BY
S IMRAN S ETHI
Special to The Washington Post
For years, connoisseurs dismissed white chocolate — a confection made with cocoa butter,
milk solids and sugar, but with
none of the cocoa solids that give
darker chocolate its recognizable
flavor and color. “White chocolate
or white lie?” one online video
asks. The host opens with: “If you
love white chocolate, I hate to
break it to you: You’re not eating
chocolate.”
Besides the absence of cocoa
solids, the reputation stems from
the fact that white chocolate
products often contain such additives as palm oil and other fillers,
plus an excess of sweeteners. But
a growing number of specialty
chocolate companies are now giv-
ing the same attention to white
chocolate as dark or milk chocolate, and trying to highlight the
ways it can showcase flavor.
A cocoa bean is made up of
roughly equal parts cocoa butter
and cacao nibs. Cocoa butter is
what gives chocolate its rich
mouthfeel, and the nibs hold
most of the distinctive smell and
taste. Absent of nibs, “white chocolate is basically just sweet fat,”
says Clay Gordon, creator of the
Chocolate Life website, “with a
melt that is unencumbered by the
nonfat cocoa solids, or cocoa
powder.” For a chocolate to be
Dirty secrets about
foods labeled ‘clean’
BY
T AMAR H ASPEL
Special to The Washington Post
CHOCOLATE CONTINUED ON E4
RECIPES
Roasted Parsnip White
Chocolate Soup E8 White
Chocolate Unicorn Bark E8
UNEARTHED
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
FROM LEFT: Castronovo, Askinosie Chocolate, Fruition Chocolate
and Charm School Chocolate chocolate bars and coated pistachios.
What happens when you take
the artificial colors, flavors and
preservatives out of Pillsbury
slice-and-bake chocolate chip
cookies?
You have a revolt on your
hands, that’s what. From the
moderate, “definitely not a huge
fan of the new recipe” to the
immoderate, “Horrible
ugghhhh I’m sooooooo
disappointed,” the reviews on
Pillsbury’s website gave new
meaning to “cookie pan.”
Read through them, though,
and you’ll find another thread.
Consumers weren’t objecting
just to flavor (or texture, or how
the cookies baked up, or the
number of chocolate chips); they
were objecting to the idea that
Pillsbury wanted to make the
cookies more healthful.
“People do NOT bake Pillsbury
cookies because they’re ‘natural’
or ‘healthy’ or ‘good for us’ or
environmentally sound or any of
the other nonsense that’s being
shoved down our throats in the
name of . . . what? . . .
‘gastronomical correctness?’ ”
said commenter LadyMidnight.
UNEARTHED CONTINUED ON E6
E2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
NOVEMBER 29 , 2017
PHOTOS BY DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
LEFT: Kheema pao, at Bindaas in Foggy Bottom, features a toasted bun to top with minced lamb full of pureed Thai chiles — and a cooling vegetable mix. RIGHT: With seating for 100, the latest outpost can
serve more than twice as many diners as the first Cleveland Park location. This also brings more wall space for art and an exhibition kitchen, as well as a larger menu that includes sandwiches and curries.
At Bindaas, solid Indian street food gets a bigger lane
Rasika West End restaurants.
In a glance around Bindaas, it
looks as though half the World
Bank, among the eatery’s
neighbors, has begun taking
lunch and dinner here. The
tables invariably find at least one
order of pao (buns) on them. A
toasted roll in the company of
minced lamb, shot through with
pureed Thai chiles, suggests a
sloppy Joe by way of Mumbai.
(Chopped tomato, cucumber and
onion on the plate have a cooling
effect on the heat.) I prefer buns
to the tame “roadside” sandwich
built with twice-fried chicken
and flanked with “gunpowder”
fries that may only hint of
firepower.
The tables are small. Order a
few dishes at a time to prevent
overcrowding or the forfeiture of
The delicious
advantage the
freshly minted
Bindaas in Foggy
FIRST BITE
Bottom has over
the Indian streetfood purveyor of the same name
in Cleveland Park is made
obvious the moment you step
inside: The 100-seat spinoff, a
gratifying successor to Johnny
Rockets, is more than double the
size of the original.
The sweep translates to a
menu that goes beyond what’s
playing in Cleveland Park to
include sandwiches and curries;
more wall space for art; and an
exhibition kitchen. “The chefs
are on show!” says the leader of
the pack, Vikram Sunderam,
whose other responsibilities
include the popular Rasika and
Tom
Sietsema
a remaining bite on a plate. The
meatless draws include a crisp,
saucer-size steamed rice cake
(uttapam) spread with minced,
roasted butternut squash and a
dollop of wicked cilantrococonut chutney, as well as a
pleasing curry cast with carrots,
peas and caramelized onion,
plus hits of mace and cardamom.
The saucy curry tops a bowl of
sunny yellow basmati rice.
Bindaas uses a pizza oven
rather than a traditional Indian
tandoor to make its pillowy
naan. The hot pocket, with a
light application of spinach and
cottage cheese inside, is a deal of
a meal — and a nice swab — for
$4.
From a design perspective, the
baby Bindaas trumps its sibling.
Basket lights made from cane
dress up the ceiling; mirrored
columns come with the bonus of
coat hooks; and nods to overseas
include colorful prints of graffiti
and clocks of the sort you see in
Indian train stations. The
crowds I’ve encountered, day
and night, make a strong case
for reservations. Solo diners
might consider the shelf-style
seating near the host stand.
Carryovers from the original
Bindaas include a salmon kebab
draped with a creamy sauce of
coconut milk and curry leaf, and
the sheer, bite-size puffs filled
with near-liquid avocado, yogurt
and tamarind chutney, called
golgappa. Typical of the chaat
dispensed from food stalls and
carts abroad, the delicate snack
comes with a playful warning:
“Eat them in one bite,” owner
Ashok Bajaj says when he spots
an order on your table.
tom.sietsema@washpost.com
2000 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202516-4326. bindaasdc.com. Snacks,
sandwiches and small plates, $2.50
to $15.
One of the meatless draws at
Foggy Bottom’s Bindaas
includes butternut squash
uttapam, a crisp, saucer-size
steamed rice cake spread with
minced, roasted butternut
squash and a dollop of cilantrococonut chutney.
More bars are booting corporate beer from their taps and doubling down on craft
At some point
over the next few
weeks, kegs of
FRITZ HAHN
Founders will kick
at Pizzeria
Paradiso, and bottles of Wicked
Weed will run out of stock. And
when they do, Paradiso’s four
Washington-area locations —
Georgetown, Dupont Circle,
Alexandria and Hyattsville — will
never sell another drop.
Last month, Pizzeria Paradiso
decided to sell only beer made by
breweries that meet the Brewers
Association’s definition of craft:
“small, independent and
traditional,” joining a growing
number of beer bars across the
country that no longer sell beers
by previously independent
breweries that have been
acquired by worldwide
conglomerates, including
Lagunitas, Ballast Point and
Devils Backbone, which are now
owned by Heineken,
Constellation Brands and
Anheuser-Busch InBev,
respectively.
“It’s a business decision,” says
Pizzeria Paradiso beer director
Drew McCormick. “In the
broadest sense, it comes from the
broadest Paradiso ethos:
Purchasing food from local
farmers, purchasing through
local distributors, and trying to
support small, local,
independent vendors when we
can.”
While the pizzeria has never
carried Miller Lite or Michelob
Ultra, it has continued to sell
beers by Wicked Weed and other
acquired breweries. But,
McCormick says, the questions of
independence and ownership are
“becoming murky and confusing,
even on our side of things,” so she
and owner Ruth Gresser made
the decision to go for a clean
break.
“I didn’t enjoy cutting any of
Beer
them,” McCormick says. “Each
one, we carried for a particular
reason, and it filled a particular
spot on the menu for us. I’ve been
having conversations with reps
from those breweries. It’s not
about the liquid — it’s about the
business side.”
That “business side” has been
the catalyst for other beer bars to
sever ties with big beer. The
Happy Raven in Lincoln, Neb.,
voted as its state’s best craft beer
bar on CraftBeer.com, stopped
carrying AB InBev and
MillerCoors products in June.
“Our decision was based on
the fact that I believe AB is trying
to take over the market, and that
hurts the local craft breweries
that I serve every day,” says
owner Matt Myers. “It’s more of a
moral stance than anything.”
If customers on their way to a
Nebraska Cornhuskers game
asks for a Budweiser or Coors
Light, bartenders try to steer
Sale Ends 12-5-17
Look for additional promotional discounts
@Magrudersofdc.com
5626 Connecticut Ave., N.W.
MON–THU: 9AM–8PM • FRI–SAT: 9AM–9PM • SUNDAY: 10AM–6PM
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