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The Washington Post - October 14 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Trump sets Iran pact conditions
BY A NNE G EARAN
AND A BBY P HILLIP
President Trump on Friday officially disavowed the international
nuclear deal with Iran, undermining but not terminating an agreement he called weak and poorly
constructed.
The administration asked Congress to attach new caveats that
could either alter the pact or lead
to its rupture. Sounding frustrated
and angry, Trump also threatened
to unilaterally withdraw from the
seven-nation accord if his concerns are not met.
WHITE HOUSE ASKS CONGRESS FOR CHANGES
President threatens to withdraw from nuclear accord
“We will not continue down the
path whose predictable conclusion is more violence, more terror
and the very real threat of Iran’s
nuclear breakout,” Trump said in
remarks delivered at the White
House.
His decision to withdraw presi-
dential “certification” of the deal
throws its future into doubt by
tying continued U.S. participation
to new requirements for Iran. But
the approach also falls well short
of Trump’s repeated campaign
vow to scrap the deal altogether,
marking the latest collision be-
Sharp words: European leaders criticize Trump’s shift on nuclear deal. A8
tween his “America first” worldview and the realities of global
diplomacy and dealmaking.
The move was immediately met
with opposition Friday from U.S.
allies that are part of the pact and
with skepticism from many U.S.
lawmakers, including some Republicans. Iran, meanwhile, responded with a threat of its own,
vowing in a statement to walk
away if Iranian “rights and interests in the deal are not respected.”
If the amendment is approved
by Congress and Iran fails to meet
the new requirements, the United
IRAN CONTINUED ON A8
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
. $2
Move to halt ACA
subsidies rattles
insurance market
States challenge
administration’s decision
as firms reconsider rates
J ULIET E ILPERIN,
A MY G OLDSTEIN
AND C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
BY
The Trump administration’s
decision to halt payments to insurers that help millions of lowerincome Americans afford coverage under the Affordable Care Act
roiled the law’s insurance marketplaces Friday and sparked an immediate legal challenge from
nearly 20 state attorneys general.
The administration’s move,
which
officials
formalized
through a filing in a federal appeals court, could throw the ACA
sign-up season that begins Nov. 1
into disarray. Some insurers and
state regulators are scrambling to
reconsider rates for next year, and
the uncertainty is sure to make an
already challenging enrollment
period even more so.
Yet it is unclear whether either
the litigation or vehement opposition by a broad swath of the
health-care industry has any
chance of stopping what the president and his top aides portrayed
as integral to their broader effort
to dismantle the 2010 health law.
“ObamaCare is a broken mess,”
Trump tweeted Friday. “Piece by
piece we will now begin the process of giving America the great
HealthCare it deserves!”
Both supporters and critics of
the ACA see the “cost-sharing reduction” payments, which help
offset deductibles and other outof-pocket expenses for roughly
7 million Americans earning up to
250 percent of the federal poverty
level, as crucial for individuals
buying coverage under the law.
Insurers are obligated to provide these discounts for eligible
customers, even if the federal government does not fund the CSRs,
as they’re called; ending the payments is grounds for any company
to back out of its federal contract
to sell health plans for 2018. Their
only other option is to raise premium rates.
In recent months, some state
INSURANCE CONTINUED ON A4
Uncertain effects: Ending subsidies may not hurt poorest the most. A4
As payments end,
battle lines re-form
PHOTOS BY STUART PALLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: The swimming pool where Daniel and Cindy Pomplun took refuge as the Tubbs fire burned through their home.
BELOW: Two melted cars sit where the Pompluns’ garage used to be. For more images, see wapo.st/californiafires.
Out of the flames, into the water
With their only escape route blocked, the Pompluns survived a California wildfire in their pool
BY
W ESLEY L OWERY
Daniel Pomplun jolted awake. It was
1:30 a.m. Tuesday, and he heard the crackling of flames. He noticed the power was out,
and he rose from bed and went to the
window.
They had been fast asleep, and Daniel and
his wife, Cindy, had missed the warnings.
The residents of Santa Rosa, Calif., had been
evacuating for more than three hours already as the rapidly spreading wildfire approached. The red glow through the window
told Daniel it was too late. The fire was here.
“Cindy! Wake up!” Pomplun, 54, shouted,
shaking her. “We’ve got to go!”
They threw on the closest clothing: for
Cindy, a light T-shirt and cargo pants, and for
Daniel, a Minnesota Vikings sweatshirt and
University of Minnesota sweatpants. They
grabbed the car keys and ran to the front
door.
For 17 years, the Pompluns had lived in
this two-story moss-green home in rural
Santa Rosa. There is just one road out of
their neighborhood. After Daniel’s frantic
fingers found the knob of the front door and
pulled it open, he saw the fire had leapt over
the driveway. The only pathway to safety was
blocked by the flames surging toward them.
ESCAPE CONTINUED ON A12
Lifesaver: A California county’s 2 a.m.
fire-evacuation alert sets it apart. A12
Democrats call sudden
cutoff of funds sabotage
and vow to fight
BY M IKE D E B ONIS
AND E D O ’ K EEFE
President Trump’s decision
Thursday to cut off crucial healthcare subsidies has once again
revived the long-running debate
over the Affordable Care Act,
increasing the potential for a
government shutdown in December and making the issue central
in next year’s midterm elections.
The move to end insurer subsidies could propel premiums an
average of 20 percent higher next
year for those who purchase insurance on the individual market,
according to a nonpartisan congressional analysis.
Trump and Republican allies
defended the move as removing a
giveaway for insurance companies, and they blame rising premiums on fundamental flaws in
then-President Barack Obama’s
signature health-care reform law.
But Democrats called it an act of
sabotage against the ACA for
which the GOP will be held responsible at the polls.
The dispute sets the stage for
another wave of political battles
over the nation’s health-care system, as Republican lawmakers
will need to decide whether to
authorize the subsidies through
legislation as well as whether to
once again attempt a broader
repeal of the ACA, popularly
known as Obamacare. Democrats
could also use a Dec. 8 appropriations deadline to threaten a government shutdown if the subsidies are not restored.
The party’s leaders stopped
short of such a threat Friday. But
Democrats warned more broadly
that escalating Republican efforts to undermine the ACA —
which also included an order by
Trump on Thursday loosening
insurance requirements — would
be used against the GOP in the
2018 elections.
“Republicans in the House and
CONGRESS CONTINUED ON A4
DAN STEINBERG | PERSPECTIVE
D.C. is the punchline. The joke isn’t funny anymore.
There’s a joke in the office about
how everyone in the Sports
department takes turns writing
front-page stories about the
narrowest slice of the sports
world: Washington teams having
a chance to do something special
in the playoffs and/or
Washington teams failing to do
something special in the playoffs.
It’s a story we pass around,
nurture to varying degrees and
patch up to fit the latest
circumstances — to the extent the
latest circumstances have
changed. Which isn’t usually that
much.
Anyhow, the joke is now
something like eight years old.
That’s an old joke. Old jokes stop
being funny.
“Are you writing about the
74th time this has happened to a
Washington, D.C., team?” a fan
named Mike Bobys asked me
around 1:30 a.m. Friday, when I
took out my laptop at the Big
Stick and tried to write
something about the Nationals’
season-ending 9-8 loss to the
Chicago Cubs but instead wound
up staring into space.
Another fan named Ryan
Clagett found us in the corner
and sat down. He said what I
knew he would say because it’s
what everyone was saying, which
is why none of this is particularly
worth writing because you’ve
already felt it.
“I want to say disbelief, but, I
mean, I expected it,” he said.
That isn’t the full story,
though, because he also bought
tickets thinking this time might
be different.
“When we were up 4-1, that’s
when I thought, ‘Oh, my God. Oh,
my God. This might be it,’ ” he
STEINBERG CONTINUED ON A9
With the Nats losing in the
NLDS on Thursday, D.C. fans
have watched their teams go 69
seasons without an appearance
in a conference finals.
IN sunday’s post
Inside
Opioid power play How the drug industry defeated the DEA at
the height of the nation’s deadly drug crisis: an investigation
by The Washington Post and “60 Minutes.”
Folk revival A billionaire’s
vision for breathing life back
into Tulsa includes a mecca
for Bob Dylan fans and a
trove of artifacts related to the
legendary artist. Arts & Style
Fall dining guide Food critic
Tom Sietsema’s Top 10
restaurants and 43 of his
other favorites, plus our ideas
for the best cheap eats and
go-to bars. Magazine
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
$132
HERVE MERLIAC/ASSOCIATED PRESS
THE NATION
REAL ESTATE
All shapes and sizes
Toolshed to cool shed
Researchers invent a camouflaged
membrane that can hide like an
octopus and inflate to mimic
everyday objects such as potted
plants or a clump of rocks. A3
Extra space may be as close as the
back yard. No longer a dusty spot
for tools and gardening, sheds can
become outposts of serenity in the
back of a crowded house.
BUSINESS NEWS ............................................. A10
COMICS ............................................................. C5
OPINION PAGES...............................................A13
LOTTERIES.........................................................B3
OBITUARIES.......................................................B4
TELEVISION.......................................................C3
WORLD NEWS....................................................A6
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B6
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 313
1 7 6 5
A2
EZ
I N CA S E Y OU M I S S ED I T
Some reports that you may have missed. Read more at washingtonpost.com.
Kirstjen Nielsen
picked to lead DHS
U.S. men fail to qualify
for soccer World Cup
President Trump announced
Wednesday that he would
nominate Kirstjen Nielsen, a
cybersecurity expert and deputy
White House chief of staff, to be
Homeland Security secretary, a
job left vacant when John F.
Kelly departed to become White
House chief of staff in July.
The U.S. men’s national soccer
team, which had qualified for
soccer’s global spectacle every
four years since last missing out
in 1986, failed to qualify for next
year’s World Cup in Russia by
losing to Trinidad and Tobago on
Tuesday night.
washingtonpost.com/sports
washingtonpost.com/national
U.S. to exit UNESCO
in move backing Israel
The United States will
withdraw from UNESCO at the
end of next year, the State
Department said Thursday, over
what it said is anti-Israel bias at
the U.N.’s educational, science
and cultural organization. The
department said the United
States wants to remain involved
as a nonmember observer state.
washingtonpost.com/world
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Chicago’s soda tax
fizzles after 2 months
About two months after the
country’s largest soda tax went
into effect, lawmakers in Cook
County, Ill., the home of Chicago,
have decided to repeal it. It’s a
major victory for Big Soda,
which spent millions on ad buys
and lobbying in the county, and
the second blow to the soda tax
movement, which suffered a
defeat in Santa Fe, N.M., in May.
washingtonpost.com/business
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
Republican Collins to remain in the Senate
Ending speculation, the
centrist said she won’t
run for Maine’s governor
BY
S EAN S ULLIVAN
Sen. Susan Collins of Maine
announced Friday that she will
not run for governor in 2018,
renewing her commitment to
serve in a sharply polarized Senate where her centrist Republican positions have made her a
key bulwark against much of
President Trump’s agenda.
Ending months of speculation
about her political future, Collins, who does not face reelection
until 2020, opted to stick with
the job she has held for the past
two decades, even as other moderate GOP lawmakers including
Rep. Charlie Dent (Pa.) and Sen.
Bob Corker (Tenn.) are heading
for the exits.
“The best way that I can
contribute to these priorities is
to remain a member of the
United States Senate,” Collins
told a business crowd, capping a
speech in which she described
her role as a bipartisan figure on
such issues as health care and
national security in Washington.
The Maine Republican made
her announcement in the coastal
Maine town of Rockport, at a
Penobscot County Chamber of
Commerce breakfast. Her decision was closely held, leaving
Republican officials to speculate
about her plans in recent days.
Collins read aloud a letter
from a Senate colleague: “The
institution would suffer in your
absence. There are very few who
have the ability to bring about
positive change; you are such a
JOEL PAGE/REUTERS
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) hugs an attendant of a business breakfast in Rockport, Maine. Her
decision to stay in the Senate means she will continue her bipartisan role on issues such as health care.
person.” Her final decision, she
said, came down to “my sense of
where I can do the most for the
people of Maine and for the
nation.”
Collins is seen as the most
middle-of-the-road Republican
in the Senate, willing to buck
Trump and Senate Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.)
when she disagrees with them.
She opposed two different efforts
to dismantle and replace the
Affordable Care Act earlier this
year, citing the negative impact
she believed the plans would
have had on vulnerable Americans, particularly in Maine.
In a Senate where Republicans
hold a slim 52-to-48 majority and
Democrats are broadly united
against much of Trump’s agenda,
Collins’s vote can be pivotal.
During the initial health-care
push, she was one of three Republicans whose “no” votes ended the effort.
Her announcement Friday
served as a reaffirmation of her
desire to continue in that instrumental role, at a time when a
growing number of Republicans
worry about stopping Trump
from making controversial decisions with far-reaching consequences.
Republicans are trying for a
sweeping rewrite of the nation’s
tax laws, and many of them hope
the overhaul effort will wash
away some of the deep anger in
the party after the health-care
failure. Collins is not viewed as a
certain supporter of the tax endeavor.
Collins has come under criticism from Maine Gov. Paul
LePage (R) over her position on
health care. Such hostility could
have complicated her run for
governor.
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
Paul Kane contributed to this report.
Republicans fear backlash in 2018 if tax e≠ort fails
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At Koch brothers’ donor
summit, worried GOP
loyalists sound alarm
BY
S EAN S ULLIVAN
new york — Wealthy conservative donors and influential Republican lawmakers say they increasingly fear a historic backlash at the ballot box next year if
the GOP effort to pass a sweeping
rewrite of the nation’s tax laws
falls short in the coming months.
At a two-day midtown Manhattan summit of the billionaire
industrialist Koch brothers’ powerful donor network, GOP patrons, senators and strategists
spoke in cataclysmic terms about
the price they expect to pay in the
midterm elections if their tax
reform effort does not win passage.
They voiced concerns a demoralized Republican base would
stay home, financiers would stop
writing campaign donation
checks to incumbents and the
congressional majorities the party has built in the House and
Senate could evaporate overnight.
To head that off, the same
Republicans said they are waging
an intense, multi-front effort in
and outside of Congress and the
White House to shepherd the
endeavor to the finish line.
Koch network officials said
they have invested more than
$10 million this year in advocating for the GOP tax plan.
They are sensitive to lingering
intraparty divisions and distractions from President Trump that
could sink their attempt. Those
complications heightened tensions inside the luxe hotel ballrooms where the summit
wrapped up Friday.
“Hugely nervous,” said Chris
Wright, an oil and gas executive
from Colorado, describing the
tone of the conversations he and
other donors were having about
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tax reform. Wright, like most
attendees, argued that passing a
tax bill would give the party a
much-needed boost.
And if they fail?
“I think the Republicans will
pay a heavy price in the midterm
elections,” he said.
Art Pope, a major conservative
donor from North Carolina, put it
this way: “When you have lack of
success, that may depress voter
turnout for Republicans, that
may depress donations for Republicans and conservatives.”
Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) warned
that Republicans could face a
“Watergate-level blowout” in the
midterm elections if they don’t
make major legislative strides on
taxes and health care, invoking
the political scandal that brought
down Richard Nixon’s presidency
and set back the GOP considerably in subsequent elections.
“If tax reform crashes and
burns, if [on] Obamacare, nothing happens, we could face a
bloodbath,” said Cruz, who spoke
in a moderated discussion.
More than 100 top donors
gathered for the Koch network
meeting. The Washington Post
and other news organizations
were invited to cover the gathering, on the condition the donors
present not be named without
their permission.
In a panel discussion focused
on tax reform, Sens. David Perdue (R-Ga.) and Tim Scott
(R-S.C.) warned of dire political
consequences if the endeavor is
not successful.
“Failure is a starting process,
in my opinion, to losing the
House, which will manifest in
2018 if we don’t get this done,”
Scott said. “And frankly, I think it
destabilizes the Senate, we lose
the Senate as well.”
Trump and Republican congressional leaders are aiming to
turn their plan into law in the
next three months. An initial
proposal crafted by the White
House and congressional GOP
leaders aims to cut tax rates for
the wealthy, the middle class and
businesses, as well preserve some
popular deductions.
“I mostly came here today to
assure you, that before this year
is out, with your help in this
room, we’re going to cut taxes
across the board,” Vice President
Pence said in a speech to the Koch
donors Friday afternoon.
Republican leaders are hopeful if they accomplish that, some
of the disappointment in the
party over the failure to dismantle the Affordable Care Act this
year will evaporate. But the GOP
discord that decimated that effort is already threatening to
undermine the tax push.
“I think we can get there, but
I’m very, very concerned about it
right now,” Perdue said. Asked
whether individual senators understand the importance of uniting broadly and avoiding fierce
fights for individual demands in
the tax talks, he replied: “I think
48 United States senators get
that.”
The crowd, well aware there
are 52 Republican senators,
laughed.
The Koch network plans to
spend between $300 million to
$400 million on policy and political campaigns during the 2018
election cycle. Within that budget, they have already invested
eight figures on the tax push.
They are airing television ads,
hosting events and rallying donors to write checks, call lawmakers and pen op-eds in an effort to
ramp up pressure.
“It’s the most significant federal effort we’ve ever undertaken,”
said Tim Phillips, the president of
Americans for Prosperity, a national Koch-backed organization.
They are hoping Trump complements their efforts. As he has
throughout
his
presidency,
Trump has been consumed in
recent weeks by other issues and
fights. One such feud is with Sen.
Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), a retiring
lawmaker who is seen as a key
figure when it comes to tax and
budgetary matters.
“It’s frustrating and annoying
that he does that,” said Wright’s
wife, Liz Wright, speaking of the
president’s tendency to stoke
conflict on social media. She
sought to play down the impact
of the president’s various fights
on the tax effort.
Trump has also reopened a
fierce debate over health care
with executive actions this week
taking aim at the ACA. Those
moves could steal away attention
from taxes and increase the potential for a government shutdown in December.
There are also brewing tensions between Senate Republican
leaders and the rank and file in
the wake of the failed repeal
push. Those could also add
thorns to the tax talks.
In a dig at his own caucus’s
dearth of achievements, Cruz
called the Senate’s confirmation
of Neil M. Gorsuch to the Supreme Court “damn near the only
thing Senate Republicans have
done.” Cruz also argued the Senate leaders should keep the upper
chamber in session for more days
each week.
“It’s the old bulls who don’t
want to stay in session that long,”
Cruz said.
Amid that internal rancor, Republican lawmakers are dealing
with external pressure to finish
their work on tax reform that is
as high as it has been for a
legislative priority this year.
Failure, to many of the people
who helped elect them, would
fundamentally transform their
standing in a way the health-care
stumble did not.
“They risk their activist base
becoming disillusioned. I think a
lot of the donor base would also
be disillusioned. So there’s a great
deal at stake for them,” Phillips
said.
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
politics & the nation
FBI director warns against restricting NSA surveillance
Disputed program has
helped detect potential
terrorist plots
BY
D EVLIN B ARRETT
FBI Director Christopher A.
Wray warned Friday that changing the rules of a soon-to-expire
surveillance program could create new barriers to preventing
terrorist attacks, similar to those
that existed before 2001.
In defending his agency’s
information-sharing
program
with the National Security Agency — which civil liberties groups
have criticized as a threat to
privacy — Wray said his agents
get just a small piece of the NSA’s
intelligence gathering.
“The FBI only receives collection for a very small percentage of
what the NSA does. It’s about
4.3 percent of the targets under
NSA collection. But that 4.3 percent is unbelievably valuable to
our mission,’’ Wray said during an
appearance at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank
in Washington. He did not say
how large that database is.
Wray offered a forceful defense
of the program, which is often
referred to by the law that authorizes it, Section 702 of the Foreign
Intelligence Surveillance Act.
Section 702 is due to expire at the
end of the year, setting up a battle
in Congress over whether it
should be modified to include
additional privacy safeguards
for Americans.
Section 702 authorizes the NSA
to target the electronic communications of foreign citizens outside
the United States for intelligencegathering purposes. In collecting
those calls and emails, some
Americans’ communications also
are intercepted, but officials have
long resisted saying how many.
The FBI is allowed to search the
702 database for national security
purposes by making a query for
things such as an email address
or a name.
Lawmakers on the left and the
right would like to see the law
modified so that the FBI would
need a warrant to review some
query results.
Proposed legislation by the top
Republican and Democrat on the
House Judiciary Committee
would not require a warrant to
query the database, but it would
require one for the FBI to review
any communications returned in
response to a query seeking evidence of a crime. Under the proposed law, the new restriction
would not apply to queries for
counterterrorism, counterproliferation or counterespionage purposes.
The American Civil Liberties
Union and other groups argue
that the proposed bill doesn’t go
far enough — and that a warrant
should be required for all searches of the database.
U.S. officials sometimes refer
to Section 702 as the “crown
jewel’’ of surveillance programs,
saying it has been critical to
detecting nascent terrorist plots,
such as a plan to detonate homemade bombs on the New York
City subways in 2009. It has also
helped the government better understand Russian efforts to inter-
Morphing membrane
can hide like an octopus
Researchers create
camouflaging material
that takes on 3-D shapes
BY
B EN G UARINO
No other animal has mastered
camouflage like the octopus. The
most versatile of these morphing
creatures, the mimic octopus,
contorts its body into a thin
ribbon and adopts the colors of a
venomous sea serpent to scare
away predators. Divers have seen
mimic octopuses masquerade as
lionfish, sea stars, shrimp and
anemones. When peckish, the
octopus takes the form of a lusty
crab. Real crustaceans fooled by
the display end up eaten.
This octopus has inspired materials scientists and engineers at
Cornell University. With the aid
of octopus expert Roger Hanlon
at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass., they
have successfully mimicked the
mimic using sheets of rubber and
mesh.
The researchers created a thin
membrane that contorts into
complex 3-D shapes, they report
in a study published Thursday in
the journal Science. The membranes can inflate in seconds to
the shapes of everyday objects,
such as a potted plant or a cluster
of stones.
Octopuses are covered in muscly bundles called papillae, Hanlon and his colleagues documented in the Journal of Morphology
in 2014. The papillae go slack
when an octopus wants to decrease the drag of water against
its skin, allowing it to speed away
in a hurry. Contractions cause
fleshy nubs to appear, and the
skin bulges. Octopuses can
match the texture of seaweed so
closely in this way that they
become almost invisible.
Itai Cohen, a materials expert
and an author of the new study,
said he was awed by videos of the
shape-shifters. “You are staring
at this coral reef. You have no idea
[an octopus] is there,” he said.
And then: “It changes color. It
changes texture. It appears out of
nowhere.”
Cohen was impressed and inspired. “That is just awesome,” he
recalled thinking. “How the heck
do we do that?”
He and fellow Cornell researcher Robert Shepherd assigned James Pikul the grunt
work of figuring it out. “For a few
decades, scientists and engineers
have been trying to control the
shape of soft, stretchable materials,” said Pikul, a postdoctoral
researcher at the time of this
study and now an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania. But cheaply fabricating
these materials proved difficult.
Success brought together two
concepts: the musculature of the
octopus and the mechanics of
blowing up a balloon. The trick
was to cut concentric rings into a
thin surface of silicone rubber
and mesh. Inflating the rubber
caused the membrane to contort,
following the shape of the cuts.
“The width of the concentric
rings determine how much radial
stretch there is in the membrane,” Pikul said. The wider the
rings, the less stretch it had.
“This stretch is directly related to
the slope of the inflated shape, so
if you know your final shape, you
can calculate the slope and
match the ring patterns to that
slope.”
Programming the laser cuts in
just the right way enabled the
rubber to inflate not only outwardly, like a kickball, but as a
3-D structure with concave regions. It’s a bit like the sculptures
made by twisting together
sausage-shaped balloons. Except
in this case, it’s all one membrane.
To show their membrane in
action, the researchers had it
take the shape of river stones.
During demonstrations of their
work, Shepherd begins with the
inflated
membrane
tucked
among real stones. “Many times
people are surprised that they
weren’t actually rocks,” he said.
The team also picked a succulent with spiral leaves to show
that the membrane can mimic
lifelike shapes. “And succulents
are pretty cool plants,” Pikul said.
Theirs is the latest invention
in the field of soft materials to
borrow ideas from cephalopods.
Researchers at Harvard University announced in August 2016
that they had created the first
autonomous soft robot, patterned after the eight-legged
creatures.
“I have been thinking about
octopuses for a while,” Shepherd
said. In previous research, he and
his colleagues created flexible,
color-changing robots also inspired by octopus skin.
The Army Research Office provided funding for the recent
work. “You could imagine shipping out camouflage sheets,” Cohen said.
“We didn’t go into this with an
application in mind,” Shepherd
said. But he envisions creating
touch mechanisms used in concert with virtual reality. A person
running a finger along a morphing membrane might feel
something like gravel suddenly
switch to a glassy surface — or a
virtual-reality octopus that goes
from nubby to smooth in the
blink of an eye.
ben.guarino@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
FBI Director Christopher A. Wray talks on Friday at the Heritage Foundation about how limiting
Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act could threaten national security.
fere with the 2016 election, officials have said.
In his remarks Friday, Wray
insisted any new limits on Section 702 would be a major setback
for national security.
“Any material change to the
FBI’s use of 702 would severely
inhibit our ability to keep the
American people safe,’’ he said.
In 2008, Congress passed the
law creating Section 702 in response to an outcry over the
disclosure of a warrantless sur-
veillance program begun by the
George W. Bush administration
after the 2001 terrorist attacks.
The law allows the NSA to
target the communications of individuals overseas if they fall into
a number of broad courtapproved categories of foreign
intelligence interest, including
counterterrorism, counterproliferation, cybersecurity and foreign powers.
Last year, the NSA targeted
106,000 foreign citizens. Anyone
those targets corresponded with
also had their communications
picked up. This is called “incidental” collection.
Senior government officials
said that as a legal matter, no
warrant is required to query data
already collected lawfully. At
least three federal district courts
and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which oversees
and approves surveillance involving national security matters,
have agreed with that position.
One appeals court has sidestepped the issue, and a second
has yet to rule.
Wray said many of the concerns about the program stem
from misunderstandings of how
it works.
As an example, he said that if
the FBI received a tip that a
person had been observed taking
what appeared to be surveillance
photos of a bridge in Washington,
an agent would then check the
702 database. Such an inquiry
might tell them if that person had
been in contact with an Islamic
State recruiter and was worthy of
further investigation.
But if the FBI was forced to get
a warrant to review that kind of
information, he said, the agency
might never be able to connect
those dots, because simply photographing a bridge probably
wouldn’t be suspicious enough to
legally justify a warrant.
Except for about 10 terrorism
cases, “Section 702 has not been
used for any traditional criminal
case as evidence in a trial,’’ Wray
said. “So the notion that there are
criminal agents using Section 702
to make garden-variety criminal
cases is just a myth — that’s
not happening.’’
Wray compared proposed limitations on the 702 program to
information-sharing
barriers
that existed inside the government before Sept. 11, 2001.
To put new limits on the
702 program would be “a selfinflicted wound,” Wray said, adding: “I beg the country not to go
there again. . . . For God’s sake,
people, let’s not take a step backwards.’’
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
DIGEST
LOUISIANA
New Orleans officer
slain during patrol
A New Orleans police officer
was fatally shot Friday, ambushed
as he and his patrol team stepped
out of their car to investigate
something suspicious shortly
after midnight. Other officers
returned fire, wounding a suspect
who eventually surrendered to a
SWAT team, police said.
The wounded suspect, a man
about 30 years old, fled into an
apartment, which was
surrounded by a SWAT team.
Police negotiators persuaded him
to give up. The suspect was taken
to a hospital with several gunshot
wounds, Police Superintendent
Michael Harrison said.
The slain officer was Marcus
McNeil, 29, a three-year veteran
survived by a wife and two
children, ages 5 and 2, police
said.
JOHN MINCHILLO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
— Associated Press
A cyclist passes over the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge as a dense fog rolls over the Ohio River.
The structure spans 1,057 feet and connects Cincinnati to Covington, Ky.
ARKANSAS
Appeals court pauses
abortion pill limits
A federal appeals court on
Friday prevented Arkansas from
enforcing restrictions on how the
abortion pill is administered
while Planned Parenthood asks
the nation’s highest court to
review a ruling in favor of the law.
A three-judge panel of the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the
8th Circuit granted a request by
Planned Parenthood Great Plains
to not allow an earlier ruling in
favor of the restrictions to take
effect yet. The restrictions are
part of a 2015 law that requires
doctors who provide the abortion
pill to maintain a contract with
another physician who has
admitting privileges at a hospital
and agrees to handle any
complications.
The organization said it
planned to petition the U.S.
Supreme Court to review the case.
The court did not elaborate on its
reason for the stay in its one-page
order.
The three-judge panel of the
appeals court in July lifted a
preliminary injunction that a
federal judge had issued against
the law. The panel sent the case
back to U.S. District Judge
Kristine Baker and said the judge
should look into the number of
women who would be unduly
burdened by the requirement and
whether it amounts to a “large
fraction” of women seeking the
abortion pill in Arkansas. The
appeals court said last month it
would not reconsider the panel’s
decision.
Planned Parenthood has said
it would no longer be able to
offer the abortion pill at its Little
Rock and Fayetteville, N.C.,
health centers if the law takes
effect.
— Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Seattle police meet
reform needs, DOJ says
Seattle’s police department no
longer regularly violates the
constitutional rights of the city’s
residents and should be found in
initial compliance with its 2012
agreement to change its ways, the
U.S. Justice Department said
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Friday.
If U.S. District Judge James
Robart agrees, it would mark a
significant milestone recognizing
the city’s efforts to overhaul
nearly all aspects of its police
department, including how
officers are trained, how and
when they use force, and how
such episodes are documented
and reviewed.
The Justice Department began
investigating Seattle police
following several questionable
uses of force, including the
unjustified shooting of a Native
American woodcarver after he
crossed the street in front of a
cruiser in 2010. In 2011, DOJ
attorneys said they had found
that officers were too quick to
resort to force, especially in lowlevel situations.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
States, insurers scramble to adjust after Trump’s move
INSURANCE FROM A1
regulators directed ACA insurers
to add a surcharge to their 2018
rates in case the payments would
not be made, but insurers elsewhere may have to absorb the
costs.
On Friday morning, the two
main health insurance industry
trade groups, America’s Health Insurance Plans and the Blue Cross
Blue Shield Association, issued a
rare joint statement calling the
payments “critical” and saying
“there will be real consequences”
to ending them. Consumers’ insurance choices will shrink, costs
will rise and the marketplaces will
become unstable, they warned.
The Congressional Budget Office projected in August that eliminating the payments would increase taxpayer costs by $6 billion
in 2018 and $21 billion in 2020
because federal tax credits for
many Americans covered under
the ACA rise when their premiums increase. The CBO also said
that “5 percent of people live in
areas that would have no insurers” next year if subsidies ended,
but the “slightly higher number of
uninsured” would be temporary.
By 2020, it estimated, the uninsured rate would be “slightly lower” as more Americans took advantage of more generous premium tax credits.
A major fear among insurers is
that the White House’s announcement, combined with other efforts
to undermine the marketplaces,
will scare customers away if they
see rising premiums. Many people
may not understand when signing
up for insurance that although the
premiums may have spiked, the
amount they actually pay may not
be much higher because of those
tax credits — which are available
to people who make as much as
four times the federal poverty level, or up to $97,200 in income for a
family of four in 2017.
“I think it’s unfortunate, because I think it can frighten consumers who may feel there isn’t an
opportunity for them to have affordable health care,” said Diane
Holder, president of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Health Plan.
Other parts of the health-care
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump said the subsidies go “to insurance companies . . . to lift up their stock price.” He added, “That’s not what I’m about.”
industry also voiced sharp alarm
Friday.
The American Medical Association said in a statement that it was
“deeply discouraged by the administration’s decision” and
urged Congress to “accelerate” its
efforts to “reinstate these payments before further damage is
done.”
The move to cut off the subsidies quickly triggered a new
round of litigation: Attorneys general from 18 states and the District
of Columbia challenged it collectively late Friday in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, with a request
for a preliminary injunction to
ensure that federal officials maintain the payments. In part, the
states are concerned about the
potential for rising numbers of
uninsured residents and the impact that could have on healthcare costs.
“It’s long past time that Donald
Trump learns he doesn’t just get to
choose what laws he’ll follow or
Subsidies’ end may not
pinch where you’d think
BY
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
President Trump rocked the
health-care world late Thursday
night by finally following through
on a threat to end billions of dollars in subsidy payments that are
made to insurers to lower deductibles and out-of-pocket costs for
lower-income Americans.
Trump cast his decision as one
that would stop a costly federal
outlay that he has described as an
insurer bailout. “Massive subsidy
payments to their [Democrats’]
pet insurance companies has
stopped,” he tweeted.
The decision triggered sharp
condemnation from major players across the health-care system.
But while the payments to insurance companies do benefit lowerincome Americans, taking these
payments away will have some
counterintuitive effects — and
probably won’t hurt the poorest
the most.
Here’s how they could play out:
1) Taxpayers will pay more
when premiums go up.
When the reimbursements —
worth roughly $10 billion next
year — to health insurers go away,
insurers will still have to offer
plans with lower deductibles and
co-pays to people who make less
than 250 percent of the federal
poverty level — $60,750 for a family of four in 2017.
To make up the difference, insurers will raise premiums. As the
premiums increase, so do the premium tax credits — the federal
subsidies that help people afford
health insurance.
“The premiums are going to go
up, the premium subsidies go up.
They’re just paying out of their
left pocket instead of their right
pocket,” said Dave Windley, a
managing director at Jefferies, an
investment banking firm. “So it’s
really kind of cutting off your nose
to spite your face.”
Tax credits are pegged to income. That means people who
today benefit from cost-sharing
reductions, or CSRs, will get even
bigger tax credits to pay for their
monthly insurance costs once the
CSRs are ended.
“We think the federal government might end up paying more,”
said Chet Burrell, president of
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield.
“We’re already getting word from
other analyses that this could increase federal outflows.”
The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office forecast that
ending cost-sharing reductions
would increase federal deficits by
$194 billion over a decade.
“It is important to note that,
contrary to the desired impact of
reducing insurance premium
costs, defunding of cost-sharing
reductions will cause the federal
government to spend more money through higher funding expenditure” of premium tax credits,
Michael Neidorff, chief executive
of insurer Centene, said in a statement.
2) Lower-income Americans aren’t really the ones at
risk of paying more.
Although the subsidies benefit
lower-income Americans, they
aren’t the ones on the hook if
premiums skyrocket. Because of
how premium tax credits increase, it should largely be a wash
for people who receive credits,
health policy experts said.
People who make between
250 percent and 400 percent of
the federal poverty level could get
more generous tax credits, because those are pegged to the size
of the silver plans, the most popular plans.
“Federal subsidies are not going away and, as a result of this
action, will go up, resulting in
lower-cost options for many consumers,” Greg Bury, a spokesman
for the Midwest insurer Medica,
said in an email.
People who make too much
money to qualify for premium tax
credits will feel the most pain
when premiums increase. But
since many states allowed insurers to increase premiums due to
cost-sharing reduction uncertainty on silver plans sold on their
exchanges, this impact may be
limited.
3) Ripple effects.
The end of subsidies could affect large numbers of Americans
if it pushes insurers to a tipping
point, causing them to reevaluate
whether they should offer plans at
all in the individual market.
On Friday, many insurers said
they were still committed to the
market next year, but some signaled they could reevaluate.
“I think it will create a lot of
uncertainty — and it’s a cumulative uncertainty created not only
by this decision of this administration, but the executive order,
the question of will Congress step
in, what will the agencies do,” said
Nicole Elliott, a partner at the law
firm Holland & Knight.
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
what bills he’ll pay,” California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (D)
told reporters in a conference call.
Many of Trump’s top healthcare advisers — including former
Health and Human Services secretary Tom Price, Domestic Policy
Council Director Andrew Bremberg, and Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma — had privately warned for months that
stopping the payments could disrupt the individual insurance
marketplace and lead to coverage
losses. But others, such as Office of
Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, backed the
move, and several federal lawyers
argued that the administration
lacked the legal authority to continue making the payments.
House GOP leaders have long
contended that the ACA does not
include specific language providing appropriations to cover the
government’s cost, and they sued
HHS when President Barack
Obama was in office. A federal
court agreed that the payments
were illegal, and the case has been
pending before the U.S. Court of
Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.
In their filing to the court Friday, administration officials endorsed the House GOP’s position.
The documents include a Wednesday legal opinion from Attorney
General Jeff Sessions, informing
HHS and the Treasury Department that he believes “the best
interpretation of the law” indicates that money appropriated to
HHS “cannot be used to fund” the
subsidies.
Speaking to reporters on the
South Lawn of the White House
on Friday, Trump said that the
money for CSRs “is going to insurance companies . . . to lift up their
stock price” — although companies must provide the offsets to
eligible individuals even without
any federal reimbursement.
“That’s not what I’m about,” the
president said. “Take a look at who
those insurance companies sup-
port, and I guarantee you it’s not
Donald Trump.”
Separately, Vice President
Pence touted this and other steps
the White House has taken to roll
back the ACA.
“President Trump and I will not
rest, we will not relent, until we
end the Obamacare nightmare
once and for all,” said Pence,
speaking at a gathering of wealthy
donors in New York.
Meanwhile, regulators in several states began recalculating
how much companies could
charge customers for plans in
2018.
Massachusetts is one state that
had asked for two sets of rates: one
with a standard increase and another without the cost-sharing
subsidies in place. The state announced Thursday that it would
use the standard rates, which assumed the subsidies would continue. Several hours later, the
White House announced its decision on the payments.
“The federal government’s an-
nouncement on cost-sharing reductions is disruptive for our
80,000 potentially impacted
members and our insurance market,” Jason Lefferts, a spokesman
for the Massachusetts Health Connector, said in an email.
Chet Burrell, chief executive of
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield,
said his company was in talks with
Maryland officials about how it
would need a 20 percent additional premium increase, given the
cutoff, or would face losing about
$50 million next year.
Some individual consumers
who now receive the subsidies
fear what could lie ahead.
Robin Adler Frieden, a 58-yearold retired bank loan manager in
Santa Clarita, Calif., has diabetes
and congestive heart failure.
While she and her husband think
they can cover a monthly premium that is set to rise from $253 to
more than $600 next year, she
worries that co-pays for her “cocktail” of medications and frequent
doctor visits may skyrocket.
“All that stuff adds up. On the
cost-sharing reduction plan, it’s
reasonable,” she said. “It’s a real
hardship, knowing this is a threat
to our family and our livelihood.”
While White House and HHS
officials said Thursday that Congress can choose to appropriate
the cost-sharing payments if it
wishes, such a proposal would
face fierce resistance from many
Republicans on Capitol Hill.
Wall Street analysts predicted
that insurers would flee the marketplaces in the coming months.
Even more than the direct loss of
federal funding, they said, the fact
that some healthier consumers
may be deterred from signing up
could prompt companies’ exodus.
“We expect health plans still in
the exchanges to have immediate
losses, some of potentially large
magnitude, and a rapid exit of
plans from marketplaces,” Sheryl
Skolnick, a research director at
Mizuho Securities USA, wrote in a
note to investors.
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
Ann E. Marimow, Colby Itkowitz, Sean
Sullivan and Michael Scherer
contributed to this report.
Shutdown a risk in ACA fight on Hill
CONGRESS FROM A1
Senate now own the health-care
system in this country from top to
bottom, and their destructive actions, and the actions of the
president, are going to fall on
their backs,” Senate Minority
Leader Charles E. Schumer
(D-N.Y.) told reporters Friday.
“The American people will know
exactly where to place the blame
when their premiums shoot up
and when millions lose coverage.”
Democratic campaigns immediately seized on Trump’s
move to undermine the ACA,
blasting supporters within hours
with emails asking them to sign
petitions.
“He’s willing to let people die if
it means he can claim a big
political win,” said a message
from the Democratic National
Committee. “Call it craven, call it
heartless and cruel. But don’t let
this moment pass you by.”
But Corry Bliss, the executive
director of the Congressional
Leadership Fund, a super PAC
that plans to spend more than
$100 million over the coming
year to keep the House in GOP
hands, said he expects the issue to
have minimal bearing on the
midterms.
“One party is trying to cut
middle-class taxes, the other party is trying to raise taxes and
increase spending by trillions,”
Bliss said, referring to tax overhaul that Republicans are hoping
to pass. “That is and will be the
most important issue of 2018.”
Bipartisan health talks are underway in the Senate, led by Sens.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and
Patty Murray (D-Wash.), respectively the chairman and ranking
Democrat of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. Those talks could include
a continuation of the subsidy
payments.
Senate aides said Friday that
the talks are continuing and that
a deal between the two could be
within reach. But it is unclear
whether Republicans at large
would accept any deal the pair
might strike — a reality highlighted Friday by remarks that White
House budget director Mick Mulvaney made to Politico, indicating that Trump would not support a “clean Murray-Alexander
bill.”
“The president has said pretty
clearly that he’s willing to talk to
just about anybody about repealing and replacing [Obamacare],”
Mulvaney said. “But if the
CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES
“The American people will know exactly where to place the blame,”
said Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.).
straight-up question is: Is the
president interested in continuing what he sees as corporate
welfare and bailouts for the insurance companies? No.”
Trump’s decision to act on
health care comes two weeks
after the expiry of a key deadline.
Before the deadline, Senate Republicans, using special budget
procedures, could have passed a
health-care bill with 50 senators’
votes plus the vice president’s.
Republicans could add similar
instructions to their next budget,
which is expected to be on the
Senate floor next week, but party
leaders have so far kept the
framework focused on a major
tax overhaul that is at the center
of the GOP agenda.
The White House held off for
months on issuing regulations
addressing health care in hopes
that Congress would pass legislation to replace parts of the ACA.
But after the budget deadline
passed, the administration decided to move forward with the
regulatory efforts.
The subsidies had been a
source of debate inside the White
House, with aides including former Health and Human Services
secretary Tom Price arguing in
favor of continuing the payments
until Congress acts.
But the president, backed by
other aides, including Mulvaney
and Vice President Pence, leaned
against the idea from the beginning, arguing that the payments
only boost private insurance
companies’ profits.
“That money is a subsidy for
insurance companies,” Trump
told reporters outside the White
House on Friday. “Take a look at
their stocks. Look where they are.
They’re going through the roof.”
Ultimately, people familiar
with the discussions said that the
White House hopes to revisit the
repeal-and-replace effort in January or February — after Congress
tackles tax legislation — in an
effort to prevent vulnerable lawmakers from having to run for
reelection without fulfilling a signature promise.
“It’s something they will do on
a short-term basis and then come
back at the larger issue,” said
Grace-Marie Turner, president of
the Galen Institute, a conservative health-policy organization.
“There are a lot of members who
are worried about being primaried, so they need something to
run on.”
Democrats, however, said they
would try to force the subsidy
payments to be paid before then.
Current federal appropriations
expire Dec. 8, and Democrats
could threaten to withhold votes
on any extension unless the issue
is addressed, threatening a government shutdown.
Schumer declined to draw a
hard line when asked whether
Democrats would oppose any
spending bill that did not include
the cost-sharing payments. “I
think we’re going to have a very
good opportunity . . . to get this
done in a bipartisan way, if we
can’t get it done sooner,” he said.
House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi (D-Calif.), in an interview,
made a starker declaration about
the cancellation of the subsidies:
“We have to try to put a stop to
that immediately, these particular pieces of it, because people
will die.”
Democrats can block any
spending bill from passage in the
Senate, where a 60-vote supermajority is needed to pass most
major legislation. In the House,
Democrats have frequently provided the majority of the votes for
bills keeping the government
open — giving them significant
leverage should they choose to
use it.
Key conservatives, meanwhile,
warned that any attempt to continue the subsidies, which were
expected to total about $7 billion
this year, would be met with
fierce resistance.
Rep. Mark Walker (R-N.C.),
chairman of the conservative Republican Study Committee, said
the only way he and other GOP
conservatives could stomach an
extension would be as a bridge to
a new, more conservative healthcare system.
Trump’s move to end the subsidies and make other changes to
health insurance markets by executive action, he said, could create new momentum for the type
of health-care overhaul that Republicans have thus far failed to
move through the Senate.
“This may create enough energy and buzz to say, ‘Okay, we’ve
got to get back to the drawing
board and do something pretty
quick here,’ ” he said.
Passing any significant legislation that advances the Republican health-care agenda is likely to
be impossible under normal Senate rules, which would require at
least eight Democrats and independents to break ranks if all 52
Republicans agree on a health
bill.
Besides the talks between Alexander and Murray, a parallel effort is underway among conservatives to forge a bill that
might include continuing the
subsidy payments, Rep. Mark
Meadows (R-N.C.) said in a Friday
interview, citing talks with Sen.
Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) and other
GOP senators. But any deal,
Meadows said, would have to
include significant changes to expand health-insurance options
beyond what the ACA currently
allows — including some changes
Democrats have fiercely opposed.
mike.debonis@washpost.com
ed.okeefe@washpost.com
Abby Phillip contributed to this
report.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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A6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
The World
Austria’s far right
sees victory in any
election outcome
Campaign has revealed just how far toward
the margins politics in Europe have shifted
BY
G RIFF W ITTE
vienna — For nearly two years —
through the height of the European refugee crisis and beyond —
the far-right Freedom Party dominated opinion polls here with its
message of keeping Austrians
happy by keeping newcomers out.
Then came the youthful new
face of the establishment: Sebastian Kurz, the wunderkind of Austrian politics, with his sweptback
mane of dark brown hair, golden
tongue and boasts of actual success in stopping migrants from
reaching this land of Alpine vistas,
low unemployment and generous
social welfare.
At 30, Kurz took control of the
People’s Party, the fusty centerright party that had long lagged in
the polls. At 31, the foreign minister is likely to become Austria’s
next chancellor following elections here Sunday that Kurz and
his People’s Party are widely expected to win.
Yet the far right will still be able
to claim victory.
Kurz’s face may be fresh, and his
party may be comfortably rooted
in the mainstream. But the hardline ideas behind Kurz’s success
are unmistakably those long advocated by the Freedom Party, which
has seen its once-fringe policies
increasingly imitated at the center
of Austrian politics.
“People always felt shame saying they were for the Freedom
Party, because others would say,
‘You’re a Nazi,’ ” said Stefan
Petzner, a political consultant and
former adviser to the far-right party. “Now the People’s Party has the
same positions. But saying that
you’re for Kurz is sexy. It’s cool.”
The validation of hard-line
rhetoric and policies by the European mainstream reflects just
how far the continent’s politics
have shifted, even as far-right parties fall short of outright electoral
victory. From Hungary to the
Netherlands, anti-immigrant positions and slogans have gone
from the margins to the middle.
Nowhere is that more apparent
than Austria, a country at the
meeting place of Europe’s east and
west, with a starring role in the
2015 refugee crisis.
Here, unlike in other parts of
postwar Europe, far-right politics
have long been a fixture, with the
Freedom Party tracing its lineage
to its founding in the 1950s by a
former SS officer.
The party enjoyed relative suc-
cess long before the current wave
of nationalist politics swept Europe; in 1999, a second-place finish earned the Freedom Party a
position in a coalition government and inspired fellow members of the European Union to
impose sanctions on Austria.
The Freedom Party is again a
strong contender to join the government this year, with an expected second-place finish making it a
likely partner for Kurz.
But no one is talking about
sanctions this time around. And
unlike in past elections, when
mainstream politicians largely
ignored the Freedom Party’s
relentless emphasis on antiimmigrant policies as a balm for
the nation’s ills, this time they are
joining in.
None are doing so with as much
zeal as Kurz, who has placed
get-tough immigration policies at
the center of his campaign.
In one of the campaign’s final
debates this week, Kurz went toeto-toe with the Freedom Party’s
leader — onetime neo-Nazi youth
activist Heinz-Christian Strache
— to prove that he is every bit as
serious as his far-right rival about
closing the central Mediterranean
route for migrants, slashing benefits for new arrivals and curbing
the influence of Islam in Austria.
“Mr. Strache, you’re in the
wrong debate,” Kurz, wearing a
crisp, open-collared white shirt,
interjected at one point when
challenged on his hard-line credentials. “You think you’re sitting
in front of a left-wing politician.”
There’s little chance voters will
make the same mistake.
On the campaign trail, Kurz,
who has been the nation’s foreign
minister since 2013 and would be
the world’s youngest head of government if made chancellor,
draws cheers by touting his role in
the spring 2016 decision to close
Austrian borders to new arrivals.
The move set off a chain reaction
down the Balkan route and
stranded thousands of people fleeing war, persecution and poverty
as they sought to reach destinations farther north and west in
Europe.
The closure was praised by the
nationalist Hungarian leader
Viktor Orban — a point Kurz made
with pride during this week’s debate — but rankled German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who was
pushing for a more orderly end to
the crisis.
Kurz says he will push for simi-
LISI NIESNER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Sebastian Kurz, Austria’s foreign minister and leader of the center-right People’s Party, greets supporters in Vienna. The hard-line ideas
behind his success — his party is widely expected to win Sunday’s election — are unmistakably those long advocated by the Freedom Party.
LEONHARD FOEGER/REUTERS
Posters show Kurz, left, and Chancellor Christian Kern of the
Social Democrats, whose policies have been tough on new arrivals.
“There’s been a
shift. A few years
ago, they would
have talked behind
your backs. But now
people are becoming
more and more
openly racist.”
Miriam Iddrisu, a social worker
who was born in Austria
to an Austrian mother
and Ghanaian father
larly decisive action to shut the
central Mediterranean route,
which is now the primary path for
asylum seekers trying to enter
Europe. He also highlights his
efforts to pass Austria’s burqa ban,
and has vowed to put more money
into the pockets of Austrian citizens by sharply reducing benefits
for newcomers, whether they’re
refugees from Syria or immigrants
from elsewhere in the E.U.
To the Freedom Party, it all
sounds very familiar.
“Mr. Kurz took nearly 100 percent of our program,” said Markus
Tschank, one of the party’s parliamentary candidates in Vienna.
“He just copy-pasted it, and put a
nice smile on it.”
To the ruling Social Democrats,
who have been top dog in a coalition government with Kurz’s party
for the past four years, the foreign
minister’s promises sound “like a
fairy tale,” said Johannes Vetter,
the Social Democrats’ campaign
manager.
“He claims that by solving the
refugee problem, he’ll solve all
your problems,” said Vetter, whose
party is mired in third place amid
a scandal involving deceptive
Facebook pages. “It’s like Donald
Trump saying he’ll solve all problems by building a wall.”
But the center-left Social Democrats have hardly been a beacon
of support for immigrants and
refugees. Many of the party’s policies are similarly tough on new
arrivals, and Vetter said public
opinion in Austria has swung so
far right that it’s not worth trying
to change minds.
“We don’t have a dreamy view of
multiculturalism,” Vetter said.
Especially compared with Germany, attitudes in Austria toward
newcomers have never been terribly friendly. But the refugee crisis hardened opinions as hundreds of thousands of people
made their way through the country — and tens of thousands settled.
Kurz’s allies say his focus on
voters’ concerns over immigration
and integration will blunt the appeal of the populist right by offering a more palatable alternative.
“One of the biggest challenges
for Europe is the present polarization, and the biggest cause of
polarization is when you look
away from a problem and don’t
address it head-on,” said Karl
Mahrer, a People’s Party candidate
in Vienna.
But the anti-immigrant rhetoric also risks feeding the polarization.
On the streets of Vienna’s working-class 10th District, where
women in hijabs push strollers
past kebab stands, some nativeborn Austrians aren’t shy about
expressing their contempt.
“I was born in 1941, and Austria
was absolutely destroyed,” said
Rudolf Wollner, a retired factory
manager. “We had to work for
everything we had. But the people
coming now, they don’t want to
work.”
His 70-year-old wife, Irene, said
she had been counting what she
considered “foreign” faces as she
walked from the subway station.
“There were 15 of them, all with
dark skin,” she said, shaking her
head.
Miriam Iddrisu, 32, was among
the nonwhite faces — though she
was born in Austria, to an Austrian mother and a Ghanaian father.
Attitudes in the country, she
said, were becoming more hostile
as the rhetoric from politicians
turned sharply xenophobic.
“There’s been a shift. A few
years ago, they would have talked
behind your backs. But now people are becoming more and
more openly racist,” said Iddrisu, a
social worker who works with Vienna’s homeless. “The politicians
are blaming foreigners for everything. It’s an easy explanation for
all the problems of Austria.”
griff.witte@washpost.com
Luisa Beck contributed to this report.
DIGEST
that had the Social Democrats
pulling slightly ahead of her
party in Lower Saxony.
The regional vote has held up
coalition talks between Merkel’s
Union bloc and two smaller
parties on forming a new
national government.
BELGIUM
U.K. finance chief
walks back comments
Britain’s finance chief quickly
backed away from comments
that risked inflaming the Brexit
talks Friday, saying he regretted
describing the European Union
as “the enemy” during an earlier
television interview.
Chancellor Philip Hammond
retreated from the potentially
volatile comments moments
after they aired on Sky News,
saying on Twitter that he was
“making the point that we are
united at home. I regret I used a
poor choice of words.”
His comments came hours
after European Commission
President Jean-Claude Juncker
suggested that delays in the talks
were due to Britain’s failure to
meet E.U. demands that it fulfill
all financial commitments it
made as a member of the bloc.
— Associated Press
At least six soldiers killed in
Egypt’s Sinai: Armed militants
killed at least six Egyptian
soldiers at a military post in the
Sinai Peninsula, the army said, in
an attack later claimed by the
Islamic State. Attacks targeting
security forces have been
common since Egypt’s Islamist
president Mohamed Morsi was
ousted in 2013 after mass
protests against his rule. The
army said in a statement Friday
that the six soldiers were killed
when “armed terrorists” attacked
a checkpoint in Arish with
grenades and firearms.
Russia summons U.S. envoy
over missing flags: Russia’s
— Associated Press
NIGERIA
Court convicts 45 in
Boko Haram trials
A Nigerian court has
convicted 45 Boko Haram
members in the largest mass
trial in the Islamist extremist
group’s history.
The closed-door proceedings
have raised concerns among
human rights groups about
whether the trials of more than
1,600 people will be fair.
These were the first results
from the mass trials, which
began early this week at a
military barracks in northern
Nigeria.
The country’s information
BAZ RATNER/REUTERS
foreign ministry said Friday that
it had summoned the U.S.
Embassy charge d’affaires in
Moscow to protest what it said
was the removal of Russian flags
from diplomatic premises that
Russia had to vacate in the
United States, Russia’s RIA news
agency reported.
A gas canister fired by police hits the car of a politician from the National Super Alliance, an opposition party, during a protest in Nairobi.
Earlier this week, opposition leader Raila Odinga dropped out of Kenya’s presidential race, saying “illegalities” were likely in the balloting. That
election, set for Oct. 26, was scheduled to be a redo of an Aug. 8 vote that a court found was marred by irregularities.
Weah maintains lead in Liberia
election: Former international
minister said the 45 people were
sentenced to three to 31 years in
prison. An additional 468 were
released but were ordered to
undergo deradicalization.
soccer star George Weah
maintained an early lead in
Liberia’s election Friday as the
West African nation released a
second round of provisional
results of the vote to succeed
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Africa’s
first female president.
— Associated Press
GERMANY
Merkel predicts close
race in regional vote
German Chancellor Angela
Merkel said she expects a tight
race in Sunday’s regional
election in the northern state of
Lower Saxony.
The state’s center-left coalition
called the early election after it
lost its parliamentary majority
when a Green lawmaker defected
to Merkel’s conservatives in July.
Merkel told a party rally in the
town of Stade on Friday not to
read too much into recent polls
— From news services
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
RE
Iraqi forces demand
that Kurdish troops
leave Kirkuk area
Oil-rich territory seen as
flash point after vote for
independent Kurdistan
BY L OVEDAY M ORRIS
AND M USTAFA S ALIM
baghdad — Iraqi forces have
AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
An oil field south of Hawijah burns Oct. 6 after being set ablaze by Islamic State fighters fleeing a government offensive in Kirkuk
province. The area, home to 10 percent of Iraq’s oil reserves, has long been contested by Kurds and the central government in Baghdad.
TURK
TTUR
URK
UR
U
RK
RKEY
EY
50 MILES
Mahabad
KURDISTAN
SYRI
SYR
YRI
YR
RIA
RIA
RI
REGIONAL
Tal Afar
GOVERNMENT
Mosul
IRA
IRAN
RAN
RAN
Irbil
IRAQ
Tigris
TURKEY
Tehran
Kirkuk
R.
Detail
SYRIA
IRAQ
Tikrit
IRAN
Baghdad
ia
rs
Pe Gu
demanded that Kurdish troops
withdraw from oil fields and military bases around the contested
city of Kirkuk, Kurdish officials
and a senior militia leader said
Friday, leading to a tense standoff
around the city.
Kurdish peshmerga soldiers
rallied to protect Kirkuk on
Thursday night, as Interior Ministry troops and Shiite militias mobilized nearby. Volunteer and retired fighters bolstered the lines.
Several positions were taken over
by Iraqi forces, however, with
Kurdish officers saying they received orders to withdraw.
The Kirkuk area, with about
10 percent of Iraq’s oil reserves,
has long been contested by the
central government in Baghdad
and Kurdish authorities in Irbil,
but the province has become even
more of a flash point since the
Kurdistan region voted in favor of
independence in a referendum
last month.
At the center of the military
conflagration are areas that forces
loyal to Baghdad occupied before
the Islamic State’s advance in 2014
but lost as Iraqi forces collapsed
en masse in northern Iraq.
Kurdistan sees Kirkuk — ethnically and religiously mixed and
home to Kurds, Arabs, Turkmens,
Assyrian Christians, Sunnis and
Shiites — as a historically Kurdish
city where demographics were
shifted by a campaign of “Arabization” under Iraq’s former dictatorial ruler, Saddam Hussein. Baghdad contests that claim.
Relations between Baghdad
and Irbil have deteriorated in recent weeks after the semiautonomous government in the north
defied the vehement opposition of
Baghdad, as well as that of the
United States and Kurdistan’s
neighbors, to hold the independence vote. Baghdad has blocked
international flights to Irbil in
retaliation and has threatened to
take over border crossings.
“I call on our brothers of the
peshmerga to hand over these
areas and not to drag the country
into internal war,” said the militia
commander, Hadi al-Amiri, head
of the Iran-backed Badr Organization. He said Iraq is demanding
that oil fields and military bases
be handed over.
In Baghdad, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi took to Twitter on Friday to dismiss reports
that Iraqi forces were planning to
attack Kurdistan as “fake news”
with a “deplorable agenda.” Other
commanders said Iraqi forces’
movements were related to securing the nearby town of Hawijah,
which was recently recaptured
from Islamic State militants.
But the country’s interior minister, Qasim al-Araji, said that
there was a “process of redeployment” underway that would see
Iraqi forces return to the positions
they held in the area before the
Islamic State’s advance in 2014,
when the Iraqi army collapsed in
huge areas of the country’s north.
Najmaldin Karim, governor of
Kirkuk province, said Baghdad
demanded that the peshmerga retreat from the K-1 military base
and the oil fields run by Iraq’s
North Oil Co. “They gave us an
ultimatum,” he said. “There were
troop movements of Shiite militias. Some of them were disguised
as the federal police; they were
with elements of the army. They
moved toward our vital infrastructure, power plants, gas and
oil fields.”
Kimberly Kagan, president of
the Institute for the Study of War,
said Araji’s statement could be
viewed by Kurdish authorities as a
“statement of intent” designed to
signal allied Shiite militias that
they should proceed with a military buildup to reclaim lands once
held by Iraqi forces. “I think the
Kurds are reading the tea leaves
THE WASHINGTON POST
correctly,” Kagan said.
The fact that the demands were
outlined by militia leaders and the
Interior Ministry — which is run
by the Badr Organization, one of
Iraq’s most powerful militias —
raised questions about the extent
to which they were operating under the control of the central gov-
ernment.
Irsan Shukur, a member of the
local council in Taza, south of
Kirkuk city, said the council mediated between peshmerga, federal
police and Iraqi Emergency Response Division troops when they
moved into the area Thursday
night. Peshmerga commanders
agreed to retreat and left “without
firing any bullets,” he said, with
the Iraqi troops arguing that they
needed to take control to secure
Hawijah, recently recaptured
from the Islamic State.
“Two regiments refused to retreat, and currently we are negotiating with them to retreat,”
Shukur said. “The good thing is
that all the sides agreed that it’s
not necessary to use violence.”
Karim, the governor, denied
that any peshmerga had retreated
but said there had been natural
redeployments because of the
changing security situation.
One peshmerga officer in
southwest Kirkuk said his unit
withdrew Thursday night to another bank of a local river. He said
he had received orders to withdraw but did not know why.
The unit was with the Patriotic
Union of Kurdistan political faction, rather than the ruling Kurdistan Democratic Party. The PUK
has been calling for dialogue with
Baghdad.
“Not all the Kurds are the
same,” said the Badr Organization’s Amiri. “There are those that
are cooperating and those who
are refusing to retreat and want
war.”
Footage shared on social media
by members of the Emergency
Response Division showed fighters pulling down a Kurdish flag
from one peshmerga position
near the city.
Kurdistan’s prime minister,
Nechirvan Barzani, called on the
international community and
Iraq’s top Shiite cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani, to intervene and
support the peshmerga to prevent
the city from becoming “another
Mosul.”
“We are surprised by the position of the Iraqi army,” he said.
“Everyone remembers how the
Iraqi army fled from Kirkuk and
the cities around.”
loveday.morris@washpost.com
mustafa.salim@washpost.com
Aaso Ameen Schwan in Irbil and
Tamer El-Ghobashy in Cairo
contributed to this report.
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A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
Iran deal’s future in doubt after Trump demands changes
IRAN FROM A1
States could impose new sanctions that would effectively break
the deal. Or, if Congress is unwilling, Trump said he could back
away on his own.
“As I have said many times, the
Iran deal was one of the worst and
most one-sided transactions the
United States has ever entered
into,” Trump said, later charging
that Tehran is “not living up to the
spirit of the deal.”
U.S. officials acknowledge that
Iran is meeting its technical obligations but accuse the Islamic republic of using the deal as a shield
for an expansion of “destabilizing”
activities such as the funding and
arming of terrorist groups.
Trump said nothing in support
of the agreement, which is prized
by key U.S. allies and backed, with
caveats, by leading members of his
administration and many Republicans in Congress.
The agreement — known formally as the Joint Comprehensive
Plan of Action — limits Iran’s nuclear activities in exchange for the
lifting of sanctions that were imposed in response to worries that
Tehran was driving quickly
toward a bomb.
European allies lobbied Trump
hard in recent weeks not to scuttle
a pact they claim has worked as
intended to avert the near-term
risk of an Iranian nuclear weapon.
In a joint statement, the leaders of
Britain, France and Germany did
not hide their disappointment.
“We encourage the U.S. Administration and Congress to consider
the implications to the security of
the U.S. and its allies before taking
any steps that might undermine
the JCPoA, such as re-imposing
sanctions on Iran lifted under the
agreement,” the statement said.
The leaders said their countries
would work with the Trump administration to address concerns
over Iran’s ballistic missile program and “regional activities” that
threaten European security. That
is a reference to alleged support
for terrorism and Iran’s support
for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, who helped
negotiate the agreement, called
Trump’s speech “inane” and suggested Trump’s attitude toward
the Shiite-majority nation was
motivated by ties to Sunni Arab
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
“We will not continue down the path whose predictable conclusion is more violence, more terror and the very real threat of Iran’s nuclear
breakout,” President Trump said in announcing that he had decided to withdraw presidential “certification” of the seven-nation accord.
states such as Saudi Arabia and
the United Arab Emirates, and
Shiite-majority but Sunni-ruled
Bahrain.
“Allegations, threats & profanity will never intimidate Iranians,”
Zarif said on Twitter. “Trump will
eventually discover this; as every
predecessor did.”
The 2015 agreement among the
United States, Iran, Britain,
France, Germany, Russia and China set limits on Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of
what had become crippling economic sanctions.
The pact was a signature foreign policy goal of the Obama administration, which considered it
a potential building block for a
better U.S. relationship with Tehran after more than three decades
of enmity.
Critics of the deal say the agreement does not prevent an eventual
Iranian bomb and at best merely
delays that capability.
The pact as negotiated is limit-
ed to Iranian nuclear activity,
which the country claims has always been peaceful. Under the
agreement, Iran was allowed to
keep some uranium-enrichment
capacity.
The deal was not designed to
address many other areas of international concern, including Iran’s
missile programs, its alleged support for terrorism and its human
rights record. All of those are subject to separate international and
U.S. sanctions that are unaffected
by the nuclear agreement.
Trump acted under a U.S. law
that is separate from the deal itself
and that has been a more pressing
irritant to Trump than the underlying agreement. The law requires
the president to endorse the deal
every 90 days with a certification
that Iran is meeting its obligations
and that the deal remains in the
U.S. national interest.
Trump does not think either
condition is true, and he made
clear he has not changed his low
opinion of the deal itself.
Trump’s announcement on Iran
is his latest attempt to unwind
international pacts entered into
by President Barack Obama. Earlier this year he announced that he
was withdrawing the United
States from the Paris climate accord, and he began his administration by ending U.S. participation
in an expansive Pacific Rim trade
deal. He has cast all of those pacts
as bad deals for the United States.
Ben Rhodes, Obama’s deputy
national security adviser, called
Trump’s actions “unnecessary and
arbitrary.”
“If you’re most concerned about
what will happen in 2025, there’s
no need to precipitate a crisis in
October of 2017 around an arbitrary congressional deadline,”
Rhodes said. “There’s plenty of
time to assess how the deal is
working, and make decisions
around what the United States
wants to do.”
Trump recited a 30-year litany
of grievances against the Iranian
regime dating back to the Islamic
revolution in 1979 and the seizing
of hostages at the U.S. Embassy in
Tehran. He called Iran the world’s
leading state sponsor of terrorism,
a threat to Israel and a human
rights violator.
“Given the regime’s murderous
past and present, we should not
take lightly its sinister vision for
the future,” Trump said.
The Trump administration is
now asking Congress to add conditions for U.S. cooperation that
would address Iranian ballistic
missile development as well as
alleged support for terrorist or
extremist groups in Lebanon,
Yemen and elsewhere.
The president also announced
new unilateral sanctions on Iran’s
powerful Revolutionary Guard
Corps related to its alleged activities in support of terrorism.
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
told reporters during a briefing
ahead of the president’s address
that the administration also wants
to address “sunset clauses” in the
deal. Those provisions allow Iran
to resume certain nuclear activities that raise proliferation concerns beginning 10 to 15 years
after the accord took effect in January 2016.
Tillerson called that a “countdown clock to when Iran can have
a nuclear program again.”
Congress now has 60 days to
consider whether to reimpose
sanctions. Congress could buck
the administration’s request and
slap the sanctions back on now,
but some of the leading Iran
hawks in Congress have already
suggested that they are likely to be
on board with the administration’s approach.
House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Edward R. Royce
(R-Calif.) said earlier this week
that rather than scrap the deal, he
wants to “enforce the hell out of it.”
One of the key lawmakers who
will help shape the future of the
deal is Senate Foreign Relations
Committee Chairman Bob Corker
(R-Tenn.), who has been embroiled in a war of words with the
president after raising concerns
about Trump’s stability.
Corker said Friday that the
United States would continue to
“honor” the Iran agreement but
that U.S. sanctions would automatically “snap back” into place if
Iran gets within one year of being
able to achieve a weapon.
The Trump administration has
worked with Corker and Sen. Tom
Cotton (R-Ark.) on legislation that
would set new conditions on U.S.
participation in the deal. Cotton
has said he will not lead a charge to
reimpose sanctions, sending an
important signal to other conservatives.
Many Democrats expressed dismay.
“The effect of what the president has done has really been to
constrain our freedom of action,”
said Rep. Adam B. Schiff (Calif.),
the ranking Democrat on the
House Intelligence Committee.
“Steps we might have taken to
constrain Iran’s malevolent activity will now be viewed through the
prism of the president’s hostility
to the nuclear deal.”
anne.gearan@washpost.com
abby.phillip@washpost.com
Carol Morello and Karoun Demirjian
contributed to this report.
Europeans decry Trump’s Iran shift
Leaders ask president to
consider implications of
breaking nuclear accord
BY
M ICHAEL B IRNBAUM
AND G RIFF W ITTE
brussels — European leaders
pushed back sharply Friday
against President Trump’s decision to strip White House backing from the Iran nuclear deal,
saying the move would weaken
U.S. credibility, drive a wedge
within the Western alliance and
hurt global efforts to address
dangers from Tehran to North
Korea.
They also insisted they would
carry on with an agreement designed to keep Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons, and they
challenged Trump’s authority to
scuttle a deal that is enshrined in
international law via a U.N. resolution.
“The president of the United
States has many powers,” said
European Union foreign policy
chief Federica Mogherini at a
Brussels news conference minutes after Trump announced his
decision at the White House. “Not
this one.”
In contrast to Trump’s portrayal of a broken agreement that
allows Iran to evade sanctions
with only minimal inspections, a
stern-faced Mogherini described
the deal as “robust” and said Iran
is upholding its end of the bargain, with no recorded violations.
“The deal has prevented and
continues to prevent and will
continue to prevent Iran from
developing a nuclear weapon,”
she said.
The deal — a milestone
achievement of coordination
among the Obama administration and European capitals — is
the latest pillar of transatlantic
cooperation to creak as Trump
cancels or tries to renegotiate
agreements that he condemns as
insufficiently favorable to U.S.
interests.
Europe — long Washington’s
most important partner in global
security and diplomacy — was
already reeling from Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris
climate accord, another ambitious international agreement
negotiated under President Barack Obama.
But many European leaders
view any damage to the Iran deal
as far graver for global security,
since it could exacerbate nuclear
crises in the Middle East and the
Korean Peninsula.
To emphasize the depth of
European concern, German
Chancellor Angela Merkel, British Prime Minister Theresa May
and French President Emmanuel
Macron issued a rare joint rebuke
of Trump’s decision Friday evening.
While couched in careful diplomatic language, the statement
left little doubt that the continent’s three most powerful figures see the U.S. move as a
potentially dangerous shift at a
time when they are already anxious about Trump’s bellicose rhetoric toward North Korea.
It urged the White House and
Congress to “consider the implications to the security of the U.S.
and its allies before taking any
steps that might undermine” the
Iran agreement.
The Russian Foreign Ministry
echoed the Western European
leaders, saying in a statement
that Russia plans to uphold
the deal.
“We regret the decision” by
Trump, the ministry said. “Obviously it runs counter to the spirit
and letter” of the agreement.
Trump on Friday did not ask
Congress to reimpose sanctions
on Iran.
But Trump did ask lawmakers
to pass measures that increase
pressure on Iran to curtail its
ballistic missile program and
curb what Washington views as
its widening and destabilizing
role across the Middle East.
Even as he stopped short of
jettisoning the deal, Trump’s demands still damaged American
power by weakening Europe’s
trust in its most important ally,
policymakers said.
“Keeping faith to an agreement
is absolutely fundamental in international diplomacy. And this
is exactly what the president is
putting into question,” said Norbert Röttgen, chairman of the
foreign affairs committee of the
German parliament and a top
Merkel ally.
The pact between Iran and six
world powers — the United
States, Britain, France, Russia,
China and Germany — essentially
limits Tehran’s uranium enrichment in exchange for lifting international sanctions. Iran has repeatedly denied that it seeks nuclear arms, but it insists on retaining the ability to enrich
uranium for use as fuel in nuclear
power and research reactors.
The other parties to the agreement have formed a united front
against the United States, and
there are no significant voices
supporting a renegotiation.
The White House threat to renege on an international commitment made just two years ago
could harm attempts to address
both Iran and North Korea,
which has threatened to strike
the United States with nuclear
weapons, European diplomats
and politicians said.
Not backing the agreement
“would have a disastrous consequence with regard to the Middle
East,” Röttgen said. “Perhaps a
nuclear race would be ignited. It
would drive a real wedge into
international relations between
the U.S. and Europe. And it would
make North Korea even more
complicated because the credibility of the United States would
suffer.”
The nuclear agreement, signed
in 2015 and implemented in January 2016, was the result of years
of painstaking negotiations that
Obama viewed as a core achievement of his eight years in office.
Trump has made undoing
Obama’s legacy a core focus of his
presidency — at the cost, critics
say, of picking apart the entire
post-World War II global order.
European diplomats said that
they shared U.S. concerns about
Iran’s ballistic missile program
and its aggressive behavior in the
Middle East and that they welcomed efforts to change Tehran’s
course. But they said Trump’s decertification of the deal would
harm efforts to address those
additional issues.
“There’s a balance of power
between the moderates and the
hard-liners in Tehran,” a senior
E.U. official said Friday. “We have
an interest in avoiding taking the
steps that would strengthen the
hard-liners.”
michael.birnbaum@washpost.com
griff.witte@washpost.com
Witte reported from Berlin. Erin
Cunningham in Istanbul, James
McAuley in Paris and Karla Adam in
London contributed to this report.
IRANIAN PRESIDENCY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani responds Friday on state television to President Trump’s
announcement that he will not certify to Congress that Iran is complying with the 2015 nuclear deal.
Rouhani fires back over nuclear deal
He says Iran will honor
the pact while other
signatory nations do so
BY
E RIN C UNNINGHAM
istanbul — Iranian President
Hassan Rouhani blasted the
Trump administration Friday for
moving “unilaterally” against the
2015 nuclear deal, denouncing the
new U.S. policy but stopping short
of announcing a withdrawal from
the pact.
“We will continue to stick to the
deal and to cooperate with the
[International Atomic Energy
Agency] within the framework of
international law,” he said, referring to the watchdog tasked with
monitoring Iran’s nuclear program. But if the deal’s other signatories “refuse to abide by their
commitments, Iran will not hesitate” to respond, he said.
Rouhani’s remarks came just
hours after Trump announced his
intention to “decertify” the deal in
a report to Congress. The agreement, which was negotiated under
the
Obama
administration,
curbed Iran’s nuclear activities in
exchange for major sanctions relief.
Trump hopes congressional
leaders will ramp up pressure on
Iran by legislating new restrictions
on some of the deal’s provisions.
Iran, Trump said, is “under the
control of a fanatical regime.”
In his address, which was carried live on state television, Rouhani fired back, saying that the
United States is “more isolated
than ever.”
“The speech tonight showed
that the [nuclear deal] is much
stronger than what this gentleman thought during the presidential campaign,” he said, referring
to Trump. Rouhani, a moderate
leader who has pushed for Iran to
open up to the world, was reelected for a second term in May.
“This is an international, multilateral deal,” Rouhani said of the
agreement, also known as the
Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA. “It is not a document between Iran and the United
States that he can treat the way
that he likes.”
In his policy speech Friday,
Trump referred to Iran as a “dictatorship” with a “long campaign of
bloodshed.”
“The regime remains the
world’s leading state sponsor of
terrorism,” he said, adding that he
would order the Treasury Department to designate Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps a supporter
of terrorism.
The Revolutionary Guard is an
official branch of Iran’s armed
forces, although it commands
proxy forces in the region and
wields vast political and economic
influence. Trump’s move, using an
existing executive order on terrorism financing, falls short of the
Foreign Terrorist Organization
designation used by the State Department, which carries much
harsher sanctions.
Still, the designation could have
far-reaching consequences, both
in Iran and the region. The Revolutionary Guard, which maintains
land, sea and air forces, has threatened U.S. military bases in the
Persian Gulf. Iran’s Foreign Ministry said Friday that designating the
Revolutionary Guard a terrorist
group would provoke an unspecified “crushing” response.
The Revolutionary Guard “is a
powerful force that is popular
among the Iranian people,” Rouhani said. In recent months, Rouhani sought to curb the Revolutionary Guard’s role in a stagnant
economy as part of a bid to woo
further foreign investment.
But now, Rouhani said, Iran is
united in the face of foreign aggression.
“You made us more united than
ever,” he said, addressing the United States. “You can try to separate
the government and the people,
but you cannot sow discord.”
“The Iranian nation is not a
nation that will easily retreat in
the face of a dictator,” he said.
erin.cunningham@washpost.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
SU
Mysterious story of couple rescued in Pakistan is raising new questions
Some wonder if they are
trying to avoid queries
from U.S. intelligence
BY
G REG J AFFE
Pakistani officials have described the mission to free an
American woman, her Canadian
husband and their three children
as a harrowing operation and a
rare bit of positive news in the
troubled relationship between
their country and the United
States.
Pakistani soldiers, acting on
American intelligence, appear to
have opened fire Wednesday at
the tires of a car carrying Caitlan
Coleman, 31, her husband, Joshua
Boyle, 34, and their three children
not long after it crossed the border from Afghanistan into Pakistan’s tribal areas.
A senior Trump administration official, shortly after the family’s release, compared their ordeal to “living in a hole for five
years.”
But, as with so many aspects of
the murky and often confusing
U.S.-Pakistan relationship, the
family’s dramatic rescue has
raised as many questions as it has
answered. On Friday night, Coleman, Boyle and their children
arrived in Toronto after the family, at the husband’s insistence,
had refused to get on a plane for
the United States.
Boyle’s father told the New
York Times that his son did not
want to stop at Bagram air base in
Afghanistan, where Americans
have been accused of abusing
detainees.
In a statement to the Associated Press, Boyle said, “God has
given me and my family unparalleled resilience and determination.”
The family’s refusal to travel to
the United States led some former
U.S. officials to speculate about
the couple’s motives in journeying to Afghanistan five years earlier and suggest that they may be
trying to avoid tough questions
from U.S. intelligence officials.
Other U.S. officials played down
that explanation.
“The administration made
very clear that if they wanted to
come back to the United States
there would be no problems,” said
a U.S. official who is familiar with
the case and was speaking on the
condition of anonymity to discuss
dealings with the family.
Shortly after marrying in 2011,
Coleman and Boyle visited Central America and then headed off
to Russia and Central Asia. Coleman was pregnant with their first
child in 2012 when they decided
to go hiking in Wardak province,
a dangerous region south of Kabul that is dominated by feuding
militant groups.
The couple’s decision to visit
Wardak and Boyle’s unusual personal history set off widespread
speculation inside the U.S. intelligence community about his motives. Before he wed Coleman,
Boyle had married and divorced
the oldest sister of Omar Khadr, a
Canadian who was arrested by
U.S. forces in Afghanistan in 2002
and was alleged to have ties to
al-Qaeda.
The patriarch of the Khadr
family was killed in 2003, along
with al-Qaeda and Taliban members, in a shootout with Pakistani
security forces near the Afghanistan border. Boyle’s associations
with the family led some U.S.
intelligence officials to speculate
that the visit to Afghanistan may
have been part of a larger effort to
link up with Taliban-affiliated
militants.
“I can’t say that [he was ever
al-Qaeda],” said one former U.S.
intelligence official, who spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
discuss sensitive information.
“He was never a fighter on the
battlefield. But my belief is that
he clearly was interested in getting into it.”
After they were taken captive,
Boyle and Coleman appear to
have suffered through a harrowing ordeal. Coleman in a video
released in December 2016 described her captivity as a “Kafkaesque nightmare.”
“Just give the offenders something so they and you can save
face and we can leave the region
permanently,” she said in the video aimed at President Barack
Obama.
The successful rescue also set
off a flurry of questions about
what it might portend for
U.S.-Pakistan relations. “The first
thing to recognize is that this
relationship is as broken as it’s
been since 2011,” when U.S. officials launched a clandestine raid
into Pakistan to kill Osama bin
Laden, said Moeed Yusuf, an associate vice president for the United
States Institute of Peace.
The Trump administration’s
new strategy in Afghanistan has
put a heavy emphasis on military
operations to punish the Taliban
in Afghanistan and has increased
pressure on Pakistan to eliminate
enemy sanctuaries there.
Pakistan would prefer a plan
that prioritizes peace talks with
the Taliban over a militaryfocused effort. In the aftermath of
the successful mission, President
Trump suggested that his tough
rhetoric had helped to bring Islamabad into line. But Yusuf and
other analysts suggested that the
president was misreading Pakistani motives.
“The danger here is that Washington internalizes the message
that tough talk with the Pakistanis is working,” Yusuf said. “I am
overall pessimistic about the relationship. . . . If there is one thing
that underpins everything, it is a
deep mistrust between these two
countries.”
Other analysts who follow
South Asia were slightly more
positive in their assessments and
saw potential for cooperation between the two nations.
“The United States and Pakistan have some key areas of
aligned interests, including on
counterterrorism and counterextremism,” said Daniel Feldman,
who was the special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan
in the Obama administration.
“This demonstrates that there are
opportunities to work together in
both our nations’ interests.”
At the Coleman household in
southeastern Pennsylvania, the
focus wasn’t on geopolitics but on
the return of a long-missing
daughter.
Her family posted a note on
their door referring to the “joyful
news” and asking for privacy “as
we make plans for the future.”
greg.jaffe@washpost.com
Shaiq Hussain in Islamabad and Greg
Miller in Washington contributed to
this report.
Why does it happen? The existential crisis of Washington sports fans.
STEINBERG FROM A1
said. “And then . . . here we go
again. It felt like 2012 all over
again.”
That’s where I’m at. I was dangling from the same yo-yo. When
the Nats beat up on the Cubs in
Game 4 on Wednesday evening,
my very first thought was, “Wow,
they’re setting up Washington
fans for another inconceivable
letdown.” Then I switched to
thinking it just wasn’t possible
for it to happen again and that
momentum and home field and
superior talent and the pity of the
universe would be enough. Except then I thought that optimism was further proof that the
most comical disaster awaited.
And then I wondered how many
times one city can flip tails in a
row.
It was the same thing during
the game. When Nationals starting pitcher Gio Gonzalez was erratic in the first inning, I was convinced the Nats would crater.
When Michael A. Taylor hit a
three-run home run in the second
inning, I thought something had
finally changed. When Max
Scherzer and Matt Wieters did
things in the fifth inning that left
even longtime baseball observers
bewildered, it was same-old
Washington, to the point that a
39-year-old man approached me
talking about the time I had interviewed him after he wore a paper bag on his head to a Redskins
game, and then he poured out his
ever-loving D.C. sports soul right
in front of Shake Shack.
The Nats climbed back in it
with two runs in the sixth to cut
the deficit to 8-6, and I started recording video of dang near every
seventh- and eighth-inning atbat, thinking of what I would type
when I posted the video of fans
celebrating a game-tying home
run. “Bedlam,” I remember considering. “Insanity.” With Cubs
relief pitcher Wade Davis running on bread crumbs and Gatorade vapors, it felt inevitable.
Then the rally came up one run
short, and I immediately lapsed
into that comfortably exaggerated self-pity, flinging out all those
numbers of futility and the
echoes of the past and the sad
photos of hollow-eyed fans staring at the wrong team celebrating. Everything about it was so,
so familiar. Even thinking it was
familiar was familiar; I did a full
lap inside Verizon Center after
the latest Game 7 loss in May,
thinking how familiar that felt,
and now I was remembering the
familiarity of familiarity.
“It’s okay; it’s okay,” one of the
last fans to leave the lower bowl
told one of the biggest Nats fans I
know a few minutes after 1, when
the ushers started asking us to
leave.
“No, it’s not,” he replied. “The
same old [stuff ] every time. Literally, it’s the same exact [stuff ].”
Which is the crazy part because the specifics were not in
any way the same. This was gobbledygook none of us had ever
seen before: catcher interference,
runs scoring on strikeouts, inning-ending outs via replayed
pickoff moves, a veteran outfielder just whiffing completely on a
line drive, 43 other things that
made the game one of a kind.
It was one of the most unforgettable playoff games any
drugged-out Strat-O-Matic player
ever could invent — did Strat-OMatic have catcher interference?
— but it also slid seamlessly into a
20-year legacy of similar Washington losses. It was unique, and
it was part of a stupefyingly consistent whole. It stood by itself,
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
The rally cap didn’t work
against Chicago.
Washington lost in five
games to the Cubs and failed
to advance out of the
National League Division
Series for the fourth time in
six years. Washington teams
have lost the past 12 games
in which a win would have
allowed them to advance to
the conference finals.
“I thought, ‘Oh, my
God. . . . This
might be it.’ And
then . . . here we
go again. It felt
like 2012 all over
again.”
Nationals fan Ryan Clagett
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
and it blended in. You expected it,
and you didn’t, and then you did,
and then you didn’t, and when it
happened, you sort of did, even if
you still couldn’t believe it.
It’s terribly sad within that
narrowest slice of the sports
world, in which you just want to
see a Washington team succeed
and just want to stop repeating
the dumbest of all numbers. Sixty-nine straight seasons without
a conference final appearance in
football, basketball, baseball or
hockey, easily the longest such
streak in the country. Twelve
times that such an appearance
was just one win away; a record
of 0-12 in those games. A record
of 3-13 in the past 16 home playoff
games with a chance to advance.
None of that makes sense, and
it’s why people started sending
me the sort of notes you shouldn’t
send journalists after midnight.
Luis: “Why . . . Why does this
happen. Why do I even email you
at 1 am???? . . . God what an awful
loss. I hate baseball.”
Andrew: “I would argue that
these sports teams have failed
this population, and have violated their civic duty in doing so.”
Nick: “Why does this happen
always and why do I care so
much?”
And so on. I don’t begrudge
anyone who feels that way. This
has been a really unbelievable
stretch: so much regular season
success, so much tantalizing
postseason promise, so many
endings in that sickening silence.
But coming back for more isn’t
much sillier than caring about
any of this in the first place. That
doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be furious over weird umpiring or
strange managerial choices or
mental mistakes or D.C. sports
trolls or jinxy bloggers or exorbitant prices or familiar feelings or
sickening silence. The thing
about sports, though, is that even
when you know your team is going to lose, you also sort of wonder whether your team might
win. Even when it’s probably stupid to wonder that. Even after 69
straight seasons.
When I was being all similarly
melodramatic after the Nats lost
to the Cardinals in 2012, my
friend Rudy texted me way after
midnight to say, “Pretty sure I’m
as mad as anyone, but I’m okay.
We’ll live.”
This time he wrote to me at
2:55 a.m. Like every single other
thing that happened over the
past 24 hours, it felt familiar. Hey,
at least D.C. has a trademark.
“I’ll say it again five years later:
We’ll live,” he wrote. “Really wish
fans didn’t beat themselves up so
much when our teams lose. People feel stupid and get mad at
themselves; then they get mad at
everyone else, too. Why? It’s just
entertainment. Enjoy the show,
even if it doesn’t have a happy
ending.”
And so even in that somber bar
at 2 in the morning, when I was
talking to poor Mike Bobys, I
asked him what he wanted to
read next.
“Not this,” he said. “I want to
read about the Caps. It’s just always on to the next team.”
Sure enough. And I guess it’s
my turn to write the front-page
story.
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
For more by Dan Steinberg, visit
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog.
A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
Economy & Business
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Wells Fargo sees
profits tumble in
wake of scandal
Darkening skies
Ohio extends its ban
on company; criticism
continues on Hill
BY
TOMOHIRO OHSUMI/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Sea gulls fly as a man fishes near a Kobe Steel plant in Kobe, Japan. A scandal involving faked quality data that has
roiled the company has expanded to its core business after the company admitted “inappropriate actions” related
to steel wire produced outside Japan. The revelations triggered a fresh collapse in the company’s shares.
Social Security checks to rise 2%
The increase for 2018 is the largest in years — and many squeezed recipients say they need it badly
BY
H EATHER L ONG
Social Security checks are going up 2 percent in 2018, the U.S.
government announced Friday.
It’s the first substantial raise in
years.
More than 66 million Americans receive Social Security payments. Most recipients are seniors over age 65, but payments
also go to the severely disabled
and orphans. The average check
is currently $1,377 a month,
meaning next year’s increase will
raise the typical monthly payment by $27.
For Sandy Lacoss of Woodstock, Vt., the bump can’t come
soon enough.
“We need more money to live
on,” said Lacoss, a 71-year-old
retired cleaner. “My rent goes up
every year. I really can’t afford it.”
Social Security checks rose
0.3 percent in 2017. In 2016, the
checks didn’t go up at all, leaving
many seniors saying they were
struggling to keep up on their
bills. There hasn’t been an increase greater than 2 percent
since 2011.
The raise is a cost-of-living
adjustment (COLA) that’s meant
to keep up with the higher costs of
everything from rent to medica-
CURRENCIES
$1=111.86 YEN; EURO=$1.182
tions. But many seniors think the
government’s calculations are
flawed.
“If you polled seniors, 10 out of
10 would say the COLA is not
keeping up with their costs,” said
Gary Koenig, vice president of
financial security at AARP.
But others say the COLA formula, which has been used since
1975, is fair.
“Seniors are not getting slighted,” said Charles Blahous, who
served as the public trustee for
Social Security and Medicare
from 2010 through 2015 and is
now a researcher at the Mercatus
Center.
The COLA isn’t meant to be a
merit increase, Blahous said. He
points out that years where there
has been no increase in the COLA
were actually good for seniors
because those were years when
prices weren’t rising (or even fell),
yet seniors didn’t get their checks
reduced.
The 2018 rise is larger than in
past years partly because Hurricanes Harvey and Irma caused a
jump in gas and other prices in
September.
The Social Security Administration bases the COLA on a
measure of inflation called
CPI-W, a statistic that captures
“If you polled seniors,
10 out of 10 would say
the COLA is not keeping
up with their costs.”
Gary Koenig, a vice president at AARP
how fast costs are rising for workers. But most seniors are retirees.
Health care is often their biggest
expense, and it’s one of the
fastest-rising costs in America.
Medicare Part B premiums are
expected to rise in 2018, eating up
much of the Social Security increase for some seniors.
Lacoss has rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. She gets dizzy
sometimes, and she broke her
arm a few years ago in a fall. Her
doctor suggested that she get
Lifeline, a medical alert system,
but she asked him how she was
supposed to pay for it.
“I wish I could go to work, but
the doctors won’t let me,” Lacoss
said. She lives off about $900 a
month — $691 a month from
Social Security and $207 from a
pension from an old job — putting
her just below the poverty line of
$12,060 a year for one person.
Social Security is a financial
lifeline for many. The monthly
payments lifted more than
26 million Americans out of poverty last year, according to the
Census Bureau, making it the
most effect anti-poverty program
the government has.
“The income older Americans
get from Social Security is critical
in keeping them out of poverty,”
Koenig said. About half of older
Americans rely on Social Security
for 50 percent or more of their
income, AARP found.
President Trump vowed during
his campaign not to cut Social
Security benefits.
Lacoss has already been informed that her rent is going up
in December. With no children or
spouse, she is on her own to make
her meager budget work. She
exhausted her savings paying for
medical bills and car repairs in
recent years. She’s thankful for a
local food bank that helps her out
with groceries.
Her only splurge is her cat,
Sassy Girl.
“She’s my buddy and I’m her
buddy,” said Lacoss. “I’ll go without before she will have to go
without.”
heather.long@washpost.com
R ENAE M ERLE
Wells Fargo’s slump is deepening in the wake of its year-long
sales scandal.
The bank reported disappointing profits Friday, bucking the
trend set by its biggest competitors. The state of Ohio decided
this week to extend a ban on
working with the bank, and lawmakers are questioning whether
Wells Fargo has paid a big enough
price for its misdeeds.
Wells Fargo was dethroned as
the world’s most valuable bank
after the scandal hit, but now it’s
slipping further behind. Its profits fell nearly 19 percent to
$4.57 billion during the third
quarter, compared with $5.64 billion during the same period last
year, the company said Friday.
Revenue fell 2 percent to
$21.9 billion.
And Wall Street isn’t happy:
The company’s stock price tumbled in early trading Friday,
though it recovered some losses
to close down 2.75 percent to
$53.69 a share. It’s now down
more than 2.7 percent so far this
year. While not a significant loss,
it is striking when compared with
the bank’s competitors. JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America’s
stock prices are up 12 percent and
17 percent, respectively, during
the same period, and both reported profits and revenue this week
that beat analysts’ expectations.
“We are waiting for the quarter
that Wells shows stronger momentum across the business, and
this was not the quarter,” Brian
Kleinhanzl, with investment
banking and security brokerage
firm Keefe, Bruyette & Woods,
said in a research note.
Referring to the disappointing
earnings report, Wells Fargo chief
executive Timothy J. Sloan said
the bank is making progress in
key areas but acknowledged its
continuing struggles. “Over the
past year we have made fundamental changes to transform
Wells Fargo as part of our effort to
rebuild trust and build a better
bank,” Sloan said in a statement.
Part of what weighed down the
bank during the third quarter
dated back to the Great Recession
era. Wells Fargo set aside $1 billion to settle an investigation into
its pre-crisis mortgage lending
practices. Still, many of its problems stem from its admission last
year that it had opened millions
of sham accounts that customers
didn’t ask for. Some customers
were wrongly charged with overdraft and other fees that harmed
their credit scores. The bank
faced an immediate backlash on
Capitol Hill, forcing longtime
chief executive John Stumpf to
resign and some senior executives to give up millions of dollars
in bonuses.
Wells Fargo’s community banking division, where the sales scandal originated, remains a trouble
spot. Profits in the unit, which
generates 60 percent of Wells
Fargo’s profit, fell 31 percent to
$2.23 billion during the quarter,
compared with $3.2 billion during the same period last year.
“We believe the consumer
bank will be a drag on performance well into 2018 from prior
aggressive sales tactics,” Kenneth
Leon, equity analyst at CFRA
“We are waiting for the
quarter that Wells
shows stronger
momentum across the
business, and this was
not the quarter.”
Brian Kleinhanzl of investment
banking firm Keefe, Bruyette & Woods
Research, said in a research note
Friday.
Meanwhile, Wells Fargo is
struggling to satisfy its critics. It
drew more backlash after it revealed recently that the creation
of fake accounts had gone on far
longer than the bank had first
acknowledged. Now Wells Fargo
says employees created up to
3.5 million fake accounts, rather
than the 2 million it reported
earlier. The bank also said that for
six years about 570,000 customers were charged for auto insurance they didn’t need, driving
some to default on their loans and
see their cars repossessed.
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (DMass.), a longtime critic of Wall
Street, is calling for the company’s entire board of directors to be
removed, and other Democrats
on Capitol Hill have questioned
whether its banking charter
should be reviewed. Warren told
Sloan, the bank’s chief executive,
during a tense hearing last month
that he should be fired.
Wells Fargo is also facing a
similar struggle as it tries to prove
to cities and states where it operates that it has reformed itself.
Ohio, which stopped work with
the bank last year, announced
this week that it would extend its
ban for at least another six
months. “This bank has not yet
regained the public’s confidence,”
Gov. John Kasich (R) said in a
statement. “Wells Fargo still has
work to do.”
The bank, which has repeatedly apologized for its offenses, said
in a statement that it was “disappointed in the governor’s decision.”
renae.merle@washpost.com
DIGEST
FEDERAL CONTRACTS
IRS suspends its
contract with Equifax
The IRS suspended a
$7.25 million contract with the
credit reporting company
Equifax on Friday after members
of Congress complained that the
tax agency had awarded a no-bid
contract to a company that
recently suffered a massive data
beach.
The IRS had contracted with
Equifax to validate the identities
of taxpayers communicating
with the agency on the phone or
through its website. The IRS said
in a statement that it had
suspended the contract as “a
precautionary step” while it
reviews Equifax’s security
systems.
“There is still no indication of
any compromise of the limited
IRS data shared under the
contract,” the agency said.
Equifax revealed in September
that hackers had obtained the
personal information of more
than 145 million people.
While the contract is
suspended, taxpayers will not be
able to create new accounts in
the IRS’s Secure Access program,
which lets taxpayers securely use
certain IRS services online.
— Associated Press
July-September operating profit
nearly tripled over a year earlier
to a record.
August. Auto sales jumped
3.6 percent, the most since
March 2015. Gasoline sales
climbed 5.8 percent, probably
reflecting price spikes after
Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.
Even excluding the volatile
auto and gas categories, sales
rose a solid 0.5 percent, up
from a 0.1 percent gain in
August.
— Associated Press
CORPORATIONS
Samsung chairman
to step down in March
The chairman of Samsung’s
board of directors — the public
face of the company after its
de facto chief was jailed on
corruption charges — said Friday
that he will resign next year.
“As we are confronted with
unprecedented crisis . . . I believe
that time has now come for the
company to start anew, with a
new spirit and young leadership
to better respond to challenges
arising in the rapidly changing
IT industry,” Kwon Oh-hyun, 65,
said in a letter to employees.
Kwon will resign as head of
Samsung’s semiconductor and
components business. His term
on the board expires in March,
Samsung said in a statement.
Samsung vice chairman Lee
Jae-yong, 49, was convicted of
corruption and sentenced to five
years in prison in August, along
with four former Samsung
executives.
Also Friday, Samsung said its
AUTO INDUSTRY
Ford to offer repairs
on Explorer SUVs
Ford said Friday that it will
offer free repairs to North
American owners of more than
1.4 million Explorer sport-utility
vehicles to help ensure that
carbon monoxide and other
exhaust gases cannot get into the
cabins. The move comes after
federal regulators decided in
July to upgrade an investigation.
Several police agencies have
raised concerns about deadly
carbon monoxide gas entering
the cabins of Ford Explorers that
had been adapted for law
enforcement use. Regulators said
they are aware of more than
2,700 complaints for exhaust
odors as well as reports of three
crashes and 41 injuries that may
be linked to carbon monoxide
exposure among police and
civilian Explorer vehicles for the
model years 2011 to 2017.
Ford said that its investigation
has not found levels of the gas
BMW is recalling more than
RAMINDER PAL SINGH/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Stubble is set on fire Friday in a paddy field on the outskirts of
Amritsar, India, despite a pollution-control ban on the practice.
Farmers in the states of Punjab and Haryana are still burning paddy
stubble before they plant fresh crops. Pollution in places including
New Delhi has been linked to the burning of stubble.
“that exceed what people are
exposed to every day” but that it
is acting to respond to customer
concerns. It said dealers will
begin making repairs Nov. 1.
— Associated Press
ALSO IN BUSINESS
Americans increased their
spending at retailers last month
by the most in 2½ years, with the
upturn driven by strong auto
sales as residents of hurricaneravaged areas replaced destroyed
cars. The Commerce Department
reported Friday that retail sales
rose 1.6 percent in September,
after slipping 0.1 percent in
85,000 SUVs in the United States
because a mat that detects the
presence of a front-seat
passenger can fail, meaning the
front passenger air bag might
not inflate in a crash. The recall
covers the X3 from 2006 through
2010. BMW said in government
documents that the mat can
wear and develop cracks that can
interrupt electrical signals. That
can cause the front air bag to
switch off.
Facebook has launched a service
that allows its American users to
order food for carryout or
delivery through its app or
website. Facebook said Friday
that it has partnered with
restaurants including Chipotle,
Five Guys and Papa John’s.
— From news reports
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Steadily citing stock market
puts Trump at risk for regret
their friend.”
Getting the stock market up
has proven to be far easier in
recent years than increasing
wages. Just ask former president
Barack Obama. The Dow surged
almost 150 percent during
Obama’s tenure. Wage growth,
meanwhile, hovered around a
disappointing 2 percent a year.
The other risk for Trump is
that, after years of climbing, the
market could fall unexpectedly. A
large decline in the stock market
is hard to dismiss as “fake news.”
“We think equity valuations
are pretty full now,” says Andreas
Utermann, chief executive of
Allianz Global Investors.
Many wealthy investors are
taking some of their money out
of the markets and keeping it in
cash, in anticipation of a
downturn ahead, he notes.
It’s almost impossible to
predict when markets will fall, of
course. But Trump’s intense
focus on the market could easily
backfire if there is a sell-off.
Or it could lead him to make
choices to try to prop up Wall
Street, a slippery slope.
“By obsessing over the
markets, he could create an
impression that the markets
have an undue influence on his
policies,” Valliere says. “It colors
his thinking on everything.”
Trump has many big decisions
coming that could affect the
market. The signature part of
“Trumponomics” is tax reform.
Trump and Republicans in
Congress have to decide if an
ambitious package of tax cuts
being negotiated on Capitol Hill
should help corporations and the
wealthy (the same people
benefiting from the current stock
market run) or help the middle
class and working poor (the
people who have little to no
money in the market and are
generally skeptical about
Wall Street, especially after the
2008 financial crisis).
The stock market may go up
more if big businesses get tax
breaks, but that isn’t necessarily
a boon for Main Street.
The president’s other looming
choice is whom to appoint the
next head of the Federal Reserve,
America’s central bank, which
plays a huge role in steering the
economy.
According to news reports,
there are many diverse
candidates, including Fed chair
Janet L. Yellen, and Fed governor
Jerome “Jay” Powell, National
Economic Council chief Gary
Cohn and more traditional
President Trump
seems to have
another
HEATHER
obsession: the
LONG
stock market. He
mentions it
almost daily now,
touting how the
Dow Jones industrial average —
a popular U.S. stock market
indicator — is up 25 percent
since Election Day.
It’s almost as if, in Trump’s
mind, the stock market is his
report card. At a time when the
polls give him about a 40 percent
approval rating, he seems to view
the market as giving him a
standing ovation.
“It would be really nice if the
Fake News Media would report
the virtually unprecedented
stock market growth since the
election,” Trump tweeted
Wednesday. It’s a much different
tone than a year ago, when
Trump warned America to
beware of a “big fat bubble” in
stocks.
Trump’s right the market has
soared since the election. The
Dow is up about 25 percent and
the S&P 500 is up about
20 percent. Those are big
increases, but they aren’t
“unprecedented.” Bloomberg
News ran the numbers
comparing Trump’s S&P 500
market bump to that of past
presidents.
The result? Trump isn’t the
best; he’s the seventh best.
There’s a much deeper issue
than that: By constantly citing
the stock market, Trump risks
confusing Wall Street with Main
Street. When wealthy investors
profit, it doesn’t mean average
folks do too.
Only about half of America
has any money at all in the stock
market, according to the Federal
Reserve, which does a
comprehensive survey of
everyone who has money in
brokerage accounts, mutual
funds, 401(k) plans, pensions,
etc.
Most people with incomes
below about $50,000 don’t have
money in stocks. They benefit
little, if at all, from the market
surge.
“When Trump’s base sees him
be a cheerleader for Wall Street,
it’s a negative for Trump,” argues
Greg Valliere, chief global
strategist at Horizon
Investments, who writes a daily
political note. “His base in
Youngstown, Ohio, or
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania — they
don’t feel the stock market is
Wonkblog
A11
SU
Collins’s advocacy for biotech firm
is problematic, ethics watchdog says
Republican economists Kevin
Warsh and John Taylor.
All are well respected, but Wall
Street might feel more
comfortable with some than
others.
“The markets like continuing
and familiarity. That would be a
vote for Janet Yellen first and Jay
Powell second,” says Seth
Carpenter, chief economist at
UBS.
Yellen and Powell have helped
shape the policies in recent years
that have boosted the stock
market to record highs.
Any change to the current
policy would be a “sharp and
substantial disruption” to
markets, Carpenter says.
It’s not clear any of the
candidates would want to dive in
and start making major changes,
but Warsh and Taylor have been
the most critical of some current
Fed moves. They are seen as
likely to raise interest rates faster
than Yellen or Powell, a move
that could spook markets.
There’s been a lot of talk about
which candidate is closest to
Trump or which one would be
likely to scale back bank
regulations the most. If Trump’s
overarching concern is the
markets, Yellen or Powell may be
likely to move to the top of the
list.
“Frankly, from Trump’s own
economic personal interests,
Janet Yellen would be a good
choice. She’s done a good job of
steering the economy, which is
good for him,” says Joseph
Gagnon, a senior fellow at the
Peterson Institute for
International Economics and
former economist at the Fed.
For Trump, it seems the
market is only becoming more
important as the first year of his
presidency continues.
On Wednesday night, in a
highly unusual statement, he
told Fox News’s interviewer Sean
Hannity the stock market rise is
helping bring down the nation’s
$20 trillion debt.
In reality, the debt is rising,
and there’s little connection
between the stock market and
government debt.
“We’re very, very happy with
what’s happening on Wall
Street,” Trump told Hannity.
Two questions remain: How
far will he go to ensure the bull
market keeps going? And will
Main Street like the result?
N.Y. congressman
could be vulnerable
to criminal charges
M IKE D E B ONIS
BY
A House ethics watchdog has
found “substantial reason to believe” that Rep. Chris Collins violated federal law and congressional rules by meeting with government researchers in his official capacity to benefit a biotech
company he is invested in, and by
sharing private information to
drum up investments in that
company.
The New York Republican was
an early backer of Innate Immunotherapeutics, an Australian
firm that was developing a new
therapy for multiple sclerosis,
and recruited investors that included family, his congressional
staff and House colleagues — including Tom Price, who later
served as Department of Health
and Human Services secretary.
A high-stakes trial of Innate
Immuno’s drug failed earlier this
year, and its chief executive said
in August that the firm is likely to
shutter. But the Office of Congressional Ethics started probing in
March whether Collins overstepped bounds in his advocacy
for the firm and corroborated
some allegations in July.
The report’s findings could
leave Collins, an early supporter
of President Trump’s presidential
campaign, vulnerable to ethics
sanctions or even criminal prosecution based on allegations of
insider trading.
The report was published
Thursday by the House Ethics
Committee pursuant to House
rules requiring its public release.
The panel is reviewing whether
Collins has violated the chamber’s rules of conduct but has yet
to make any determination and
declined to make any comment
Thursday.
Collins’s attorneys have denied
the allegations of wrongdoing in
the report. “Rep. Collins has done
nothing improper, and his cooperation and candor during the
OCE review process confirm he
has nothing to hide,” they wrote
in an Aug. 14 letter released
Thursday by the Ethics Committee. “There is nothing in the record to suggest, let alone support,
the conclusion that Rep. Collins
violated House rules, standards
of conduct or federal law.”
Collins himself dismissed the
heather.long@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/wonkblog
findings to reporters Thursday,
calling the investigation a “witch
hunt” prompted by a Democratic
lawmaker’s complaint. He noted
that the central allegation from
Rep. Louise M. Slaughter (D-N.Y.)
— that he supported a bill, the
21st Century Cures Act, that could
have benefited Innate Immuno —
was not supported by investigators.
Slaughter said Thursday that
the report showed Collins “put
his obsession to enrich himself
before the people he swore to
represent. It is a disgrace to Congress and to his constituents, who
deserve better.”
Said Collins, “She’s a despicable human being . . . You don’t
go after another member with
fabricated allegations like she
did.”
Collins’s ties to Innate Immuno
have been under public scrutiny
since January, when Price was
found to have purchased a significant stake in the company amid
his nomination as HHS secretary.
Collins remains the largest shareholder in Innate Immuno, according to a listing on the firm’s
website.
Price did not cooperate with
the OCE probe, according to the
report.
The OCE did not corroborate
an allegation that drove much of
the media coverage of Collins’s
ties to Innate Immuno — that he
acted improperly in recruiting
friends and colleagues, including
Price, to participate in a special
discounted “private placement”
stock sale.
But it did find other new instances of potential wrongdoing
— notably, a Nov. 18, 2013, visit to
the National Institutes of Health,
where Collins and a House staffer
met with a key researcher into
multiple sclerosis. In that meeting, Collins is alleged to have
asked with help in designing Innate Immuno’s drug trial.
The meeting came after Collins, in a July 2013 hearing of the
House Committee on Science,
Space, & Technology, mentioned
Innate Immuno’s drug to a top
NIH official without disclosing
his stake in the company. The
official then invited Collins for a
visit.
In interviews with OCE, Collins “stated that he went to NIH as
a private citizen and that his visit
had no relation to any official
duties” but also described it as
akin to a “high school field trip,”
the report said. Asked why he
brought a legislative staffer along
to the meeting, he responded, “I
don’t go anywhere alone.”
An unnamed NIH employee
told investigators that Collins
represented himself as being connected with Innate Immuno and
said the firm was in need of “some
help with the design of the next
Phase 2 trial and he asked me
whether I would be willing to
help them and I said yes.” He did
not, the employee said, discuss
any constituents affected or any
legislation involving multiple
sclerosis.
The report also found that Collins on several occasions gave
potential investors details on Innate’s drug trials that were not
available in the company’s public
filings. That, investigators found,
could implicate federal insidertrading laws and the Stock Act —
a 2012 law that makes clear members of Congress are covered by
those existing laws.
Rep. Chris Collins “put
his obsession to enrich
himself before the
people he swore to
represent. It is a
disgrace to Congress.”
Rep. Louise M. Slaughter (D-N.Y.),
who lodged an ethics complaint
against the New York Republican
“Given Innate’s intention to
partner with, or become acquired
by, a large pharmaceutical company, updates on patient enrollment, the eventual completion of
enrollment, and specific communications with pharmaceutical
companies were likely important
facts for investors making a decision about whether to purchase
or sell Innate stock,” the report
said.
Collins said Thursday that the
NIH meeting was cleared in advance by the House Ethics Committee: “They said, ‘As long as
there’s no nonpublic information
discussed’ — and there certainly
wasn’t — ‘sure, you can go on a
tour anywhere you want.’ ” There
is no mention of any official clearance for the meeting in the OCE
report.
The discussion of Innate Immuno’s trial, he added, “was an
afterthought at the end of a tour. I
clearly understand the optics, but
there was nothing done that was
wrong.”
mike.debonis@washpost.com
THE MARKETS
Data and graphics by
U.S. Stock Market Performance
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Dow Jones Industrial Average
22,900
Close
1 Year
% Chg
22,871.72 +0.4
+26.4
22,860
22,820
22,780
22,740
Nasdaq Composite Index
6620
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Weekly
% Chg
6605.80
+0.2
+26.7
Weekly
% Chg
Industry Group
Tobacco
Health Care Technology
Water Utilities
Multiline Retail
Metals & Mining
Textiles & Apparel
Industrial Conglomerates
Media
Health Care Providers
Diversified Telecomm
–5%
0%
+5%
3.1
2.9
2.8
2.7
2.7
–2.3
–2.5
–3.4
–3.6
–4.6
6580
6560
2553.17
S&P 500 Index
+0.2
+19.7
2558
2554
2550
2546
2542
Mon.
Tue.
Wed.
Thur.
Fri.
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Weekly
% Chg
76,989.79
15,807.17
49,977.00
1.2
0.5
–0.6
391.42
5351.74
12,991.87
7535.44
0.5
–0.2
0.3
0.2
5814.15
3921.00
28,476.43
21,155.18
1 Year % Chg
–30%
0%
+30%
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
% Chg
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
217.72
92.86
156.99
260.74
130.71
119.16
33.47
46.18
71.43
82.41
22.98
238.53
164.47
147.10
39.67
0.6
1.4
1.1
0.8
3.0
1.8
–0.8
1.5
0.3
0.9
–5.8
–3.0
–0.8
0.4
0.1
28.1
53.7
34.2
95.5
50.3
18.2
10.9
10.6
35.0
–4.8
–20.1
42.5
30.2
–4.3
7.3
Company
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
136.43
95.86
165.37
63.39
77.49
50.98
93.04
36.34
126.67
118.72
192.52
47.86
108.66
86.62
97.38
2.4
–1.1
3.6
–1.8
2.0
–2.7
0.8
0.8
1.3
0.4
–2.8
–1.9
1.8
9.6
–2.7
15.4
41.5
43.3
1.4
36.1
–2.0
5.4
10.9
10.1
18.9
43.5
–4.8
32.7
27.0
6.9
US $
1.8
2.2
0.1
2.2
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1824
0.0089
1.3296
0.3175
0.8012
0.0528
0.0076
1.1245
0.2685
0.6776
0.0447
148.7340
35.5218
89.6290
5.9085
0.2388
0.6026
0.0397
EU € per
0.8457
Japan ¥ per
111.8600
132.2700
Britain £ per
0.7521
0.8893
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.1491
3.7238
0.0281
4.1872
Canada $ per
1.2481
1.4757
0.0111
1.6595
0.3963
Mexico $ per
18.9322
22.3862
0.1690
25.1715
6.0120
Mexico $
2.5232
0.1663
0.0659
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 26,485.98
Russell 2000
1502.66
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 528.25
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
9.61
1 Year % Chg
20.1
23.6
35.0
–42.4
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$1.5155
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–3.6
+3.7
+2.9
+3.1
–0.9
week
$500
$1000
year
$1500
–3.2
3.5
0.4
–0.9
4.2
3.4
2.2
3.9
3.8
Company
CASI Pharma
Celsion Corp
Altimmune Inc
Spherix Inc
CEL-SCI Corp
HostHotels& Resorts
Freddie Mac
Fannie Mae
Tegna Inc
Intrexon Corp
Vanda Pharma
GSE Systems Inc
US Silica Holdings
Discovery Comm
K2M Group Holdings
Rexahn Pharma
Close
Weekly
% Chg
$2.72
$4.15
$2.50
$1.60
$1.83
$19.51
$3.17
$3.24
$12.64
$17.99
$16.25
$3.36
$28.36
$19.24
$19.02
$2.17
44.7
23.9
10.1
8.1
7.0
6.4
5.7
5.4
–5.7
–6.2
–6.3
–6.7
–7.4
–10.1
–12.7
–20.2
week
$100
$1000
year
$1900
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Consumer Rates
Weekly % Chg
0.1
–0.5
0.9
–0.4
+3.4
+0.8
+4.4
+2.3
+4.8
Close
15.1701
Interest Rates
Other Measures
$3.1335
$3.5275
$51.45
$1,304.60
$3.00
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
Cross Currency Rates
US $ per
Weekly
% Chg
Local Gainers and Losers
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6600
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.32
0.45
0.76
1.46
2.77
5.34
4.25%
3.82%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.25%
Federal Funds
3.05%
1.36%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.24%
10-year note
Yield: 2.27
2-year note
Yield: 1.49
5-year note
Yield: 1.90
6-month bill
Yield: 1.24
15-Year fixed mortgage
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
In the lone Calif. county that sent a fire alert Las Vegas police amend
to residents’ cellphones, no reported deaths shooting timeline again
BY MARK BERMAN
Lake County’s call was
sent out just after 2 a.m.
AND
BY AARON C. DAVIS
SANDHYA SOMASHEKHAR
As wind-fanned flames raced
across several counties in Northern California, only one activated
the government’s most potent
public notification system — a
blast that overrides the volume
controls on cellphones, turning
them into the equivalent of
squawking alarms.
The simultaneous wake-up call
for many of Lake County’s 64,000
residents came shortly after 2 a.m.
Monday, after county emergency
officials decided to order a mandatory evacuation because of the inferno known as the Sulphur fire.
“We decided it was the right
course,” Lt. Corey Paulich, spokesman for the Lake County Sheriff’s
Office, said of the alert. “We felt
that our residents were in imminent danger.”
In neighboring Sonoma County,
however, officials decided not to
send an alert because of concern
that it might cause panic and clog
roadways, potentially blocking
rescue workers or even leaving
thousands exposed to shifting,
wind-driven fires.
The fires did not treat the nine
affected counties equally, and the
destruction in population centers
was worse in Sonoma than anywhere else. But all 36 confirmed
fire-related fatalities were in Sonoma and three other counties that
did not send wireless alerts. No
deaths have been reported in Lake
County.
Five years after it was launched
by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the use of the
nation’s alert system remains uneven. And despite a campaign by
FEMA to encourage local governments to participate, most U.S.
counties could not order an alert
today if they faced an emergency.
More than 65 percent of the nation’s 3,500 counties do not have
agreements in place with FEMA to
send alerts through the Wireless
Emergency Alert system, as it is
known, the agency said.
The alerts are sent to all phones
in the targeted area, often accompanied by a vibration and a unique
sound that FEMA says is “designed
to get your attention.” The majority of alerts sent over the system
STUART PALLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A firefighter carries a bundle of radios Friday morning in the
staging area at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds in California.
since 2012 — more than 25,000 —
have been related to flash floods,
tornadoes and other weather
events, FEMA records show.
There have been missteps. Authorities were criticized in Southern California in June when an
alert was erroneously sent to a
wide swath of Riverside County,
which has a population of more
than 2 million, directing residents
to “evacuate now” because of a
wildfire. Officials took to social
media to stress that the evacuation
was only for a small area of the
county.
But a trade group for wireless
carriers credits the alerts with
helping to save lives during extreme weather events and other
emergencies, including a tornado
in Connecticut and child abductions in many states.
Of the four counties in Northern California where residents
were killed in fires this week, two
— Sonoma and Mendocino — had
agreements in place with FEMA
that enabled them to send alerts.
Yuba and Napa counties did not,
according to federal records.
That left Napa residents like
Emily Cocks with no warning before fire appeared in view of her
home. Cocks said that her husband woke up around 12:45 a.m.
Monday after he heard branches
hitting their bedroom window
from high winds in the Atlas Peak
area. Looking outside, the couple
saw fire on the ridge above them.
They packed their cats, some
clothing and Cocks’s grandmother’s jewelry, then left for her parents’ home 100 miles to the south.
Before they arrived, on a news
report, Cocks’s father spotted the
home in Atlas Peak engulfed in
flames.
Of the lack of an alert, she said,
“In hindsight, it would have been
nice.”
Molly Rattigan, Napa’s deputy
county executive officer, said the
county has long opted to do evacuations in person. “We’re a small
community and going out to people in person, and helping them,
that’s been what’s worked well for
us,” she said.
Napa used its Nixle service
Monday night, a system that allows for a kind of reverse 911
calling and emergency text messaging to those who sign up voluntarily. Two people in the county
died Monday; two more deaths
were confirmed Friday. Before the
fire, 20,000 people in the county of
about 140,000 had signed up for
the service, she said. Since Monday, the number has grown to
135,000.
Officials in Yuba County defended the decision not to rely on
the alerts system. Cell service is
spotty in the rural area, said Russ
Brown, a spokesman for the county’s office of emergency services.
Instead, Yuba used a reverse 911
system dubbed CodeRED, along
with old-fashioned bullhorns and
sirens, to wake people, Brown said.
Brown dismissed the idea that a
wireless alert would have prevented the four deaths from this week’s
fires in the county, saying that
cellphone towers were among the
first structures overwhelmed by
flames.
Emergency officials in Sonoma
County, where fires incinerated
whole neighborhoods in the city of
Santa Rosa, said at a news conference Wednesday that the dwindling number of landlines added
to the challenge of reaching people
through reverse 911 calls.
Sheriff Rob Giordano urged
Sonoma County residents to sign
up for its voluntary system of
emergency alerts — which, like
Napa, Sonoma used to spread
evacuation orders. As of earlier
this summer, only 10,000 of the
county’s 500,000 residents had
signed up.
On Thursday, Sonoma County
emergency officials offered a different explanation. They said they
had consciously decided not to use
the FEMA-backed wireless technology for fear of causing mass
panic and “because the warning is
not targeted,” said Jennifer Larocque, a county spokeswoman.
But WEA notifications can and
have been targeted to smaller geographic areas, FEMA said Friday.
The agency pointed to the wireless alert issued Monday at the
request of Lake County officials.
That alert went to a six-mile-wide
swath of residents in and around
the city of Clear Lake, according to
a map provided by FEMA.
Among those who received the
warning was Josy Range, who noticed a vague smell of smoke when
she woke up unexpectedly around
2 a.m. Almost immediately, Range
said, her cellphone erupted with
messages, including one that was
delivered with a sharp ring unlike
an ordinary text message. “It sort
of sounded like a siren,” she recalled.
The message read: “Mandatory
evacuations for Sulpher Fire. Elem
Colony & N. Clearlake Shelter
@ Twin Pine,” according to FEMA.
Range heeded the warning. She
got dressed, grabbed her medications and her three dogs, and
climbed in her car. She soon hit a
roadblock set up by the fire department, where other neighbors had
gathered to gaze at the glowing
spectacle that had materialized,
seemingly within minutes, on the
ridge above her home.
“I looked back at my house and I
could see a row of flames on the
hillside above it,” recalled Range,
65, who at that point pulled out her
cellphone once more. “I said, I
guess I should take a picture of
this.”
aaron.davis@washpost.com
sandhya.somashekhar
@washpost.com
Lisa Bonos contributed to this report.
Las Vegas police said Friday
that the gunman who opened fire
on a country music festival did not
shoot a security guard six minutes
before that rampage, contradicting a timeline they had offered
earlier this week.
The change marked the latest
shift in the official narrative of
what happened before and during
the massacre on Oct. 1. Authorities
said the gunman, Stephen Paddock, fired from his high-rise suite
in the Mandalay Bay Resort and
Casino, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds more before killing
himself.
Joseph Lombardo, the Las Vegas sheriff, also said Friday that
the number of injuries related to
the massacre had increased, to
546. Of that number, he said,
45 were still hospitalized, some in
critical condition.
Investigators remain unable to
determine a motivation for the
rampage and why Paddock, a 64year-old avid gambler, shuttled
23 guns and other equipment into
his room before opening fire. The
FBI said Friday they had “made
significant progress,” tracking
thousands of leads and conducting hundreds of interviews.
But for much of this week, new
questions surrounding the shooting have centered on the law
enforcement response and the
timeline, which had been changed
multiple times and challenged by
MGM Resorts International, the
Mandalay Bay’s owner. The timeline and the law enforcement response have been thrown into
question as police and the hotel
offered different accounts of precisely what happened the night of
the massacre.
Lombardo said he was “offended” at the criticisms he was taking
and lamented the amount of time
his investigators with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD) had to dedicate to
sifting through the timeline.
“There is no conspiracy between the FBI, between LVMPD
and the MGM,” Lombardo said at a
news briefing, during which he
partially read from prepared statements and took no questions. “Nobody is attempting to hide anything in reference to this investigation. The dynamics and the size of
this investigation requires us to go
through voluminous amounts of
information in order to draw an
accurate picture.”
The latest timeline offered Friday still left key questions unan-
Couple took
refuge in
pool during
Calif. blaze
ESCAPE FROM A1
The choice had been made for
them.
“We’re going to stay here as long
as possible,” Daniel instructed
Cindy, recalling a television show
he’d watched about wildfires that
had suggested it would be safer to
be inside at the height of the
flames rather than out on foot
among them. “And then we’ll run.”
If the house caught fire and
there was nowhere to turn, he
thought to himself, they could
make a dash to the swimming
pool, where maybe they could wait
out the blaze.
Authorities in Northern California are still assessing the damage from the most devastating,
and deadliest, spate of wildfires to
strike the state in modern history.
With at least 17 blazes still burning
as of Friday, officials say thousands of people remain displaced
and at least 36 have been confirmed dead.
More than 220,000 acres of
land have been scorched in the
past week, and the fires have encroached upon — and in some
cases leveled — residential areas,
forcing people to leave behind
houses full of their belongings.
Search parties have begun sifting
through the ashes of felled homes,
looking for the bodies of those
who couldn’t escape.
“We all have suffered a trauma
here,” Santa Rosa Mayor Chris
Coursey told reporters Friday.
“And we’re going to be a long time
in recovering from this incident.”
Into the water
Before the Pompluns could
leave, they needed to find their
cats.
Sishi, their 10-year-old calico,
was lounging in the sunroom, but
they couldn’t find Tabitha, their
mackerel tabby. They ran toward
the back of the house, looking out
STUART PALLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The swimming pool where the Pompluns waited out the Tubbs fire in Santa Rosa. Before leaving their neighborhood the next day, they laid
out stones to read “WALK OUT” to indicate to rescuers that they had survived the fire and had left.
at the shed where the cats often
slept. It was engulfed in flames.
For the next half-hour, Daniel
and Cindy stood in the window of
the sunroom and watched as
their neighborhood ignited and
charred. Soon, their garage caught
fire, thrusting smoke into the
house through the second-floor
crawl space.
It was pitch black except for
the approaching red-and-orange
glow. The sunroom had filled with
smoke, with just a foot or so of air
left. It was about 2 a.m. It was past
time to go.
Daniel carried their passports,
a bottle of water and a pair of
kitchen towels. Cindy clutched the
cat tight against her chest. They
slid open the sunroom door and
began to run.
To the left, they could see flames
on the roof. To the right, red dots
speckling the far-off hills seemed
to be leaping closer. The cat shed
was a pile of ash. Sishi wriggled
her way from Cindy’s arm, leaping
to the ground and disappearing
into the darkness.
The grass beneath their feet was
crispy and black. The air was chilly
and smoky.
They reached the edge of the
swimming pool. They stuck one
foot after the other into the cold
water. Once they were shoulderdeep, they draped wet towels over
their heads.
The flames danced across the
roof and rolled down the sides of
their home.
Then came the popping, as the
fire reached the 100 rounds of
shotgun and rifle ammunition in
one of the upstairs bedrooms. The
oak tree just to the north of the
pool became a bouquet of fire.
Then the pine tree to the west did
too. Both trees loomed overhead,
the flames licking the darkness.
They stayed as far away from
the burning home as they could,
but they didn’t want to wander
deeper into the pool than where
they could stand.
After about 30 minutes in the
water — the height of the fire
around them — the back wall of
the house was fully engulfed in
flames, pounding their faces with
cruel, raw heat. Their heads were
burning, faces blistering. Their
bodies shivered, shaking uncontrollably beneath the cold water.
During the worst moments,
they completely submerged under
the cold water, holding their
breath for as long as they could,
bobbing up for air.
They discussed the things they
were losing, watching as room af-
ter room of their five-bedroom
home burned. The reality of what
couldn’t be recovered — the photographs, the mementos from college, the souvenirs from family
vacations — settled in. But for
most of their time in the water, the
adrenaline robbed them of any
focus other than staying alive.
The house collapsed, and the
fire moved on. Their melted and
sagging cars sat where the garage
had been. A single surviving squirrel ventured down from an untouched tree branch and approached what remained of the
Pompluns’ home before retreating. Maybe, Daniel suggested to
Cindy, it was time they came out of
hiding, too.
As the songs of a few returning
birds marked the sunrise, the shivering Pompluns slowly emerged
from the water. The concrete path
swered, including when police
were first notified that there was a
gunman firing from the hotel’s
32nd floor.
In the wake of mass casualty
attacks, information relayed publicly often evolves and changes as
authorities sift through large
numbers of conflicting reports.
But the accounts released publicly
in Las Vegas have been remarkably
fluid more than a week after the
attack, with police and hotel officials offering significant — and at
times conflicting — revisions to
previous explanations of what
happened.
The confusion began Monday,
when police said that the gunman
fired at a hotel security guard,
Jesus Campos, six minutes before
the mass shooting began, not during the massacre, as they had said
previously. Lombardo also said
police had hunted for the source of
the gunfire and that officers responding to the gunman’s floor
were unaware that a guard was
shot until they arrived there, at
which point the shooting rampage
had ended.
MGM Resorts pushed back on
this account, first saying Tuesday
that there were unspecified inaccuracies and then, on Thursday,
releasing a statement directly contradicting parts of what the police
had said.
Lombardo had said Monday
that Campos, the guard, was shot
at 9:59 p.m. and that the mass
shooting began at 10:05 p.m. This
six-minute gap left uncertain
whether there was any lag in
alerting police to the source of the
gunfire during critical moments.
Police said officers arrived on the
32nd floor at 10:17 p.m., two minutes after Paddock had stopped
firing.
MGM, though, said it was “confident” that the 9:59 p.m. time was
inaccurate and “was derived from
a Mandalay Bay report manually
created after the fact without the
benefit of information we now
have.” The company also disputed
the suggestion of a lag, saying the
shooting rampage began within a
minute of Campos reporting his
injury on the 32nd floor.
On Friday, Lombardo effectively
agreed with the company’s statement. Lombardo said that, upon
investigation, police learned that
Campos first encountered a barricaded door on the 32nd floor at
9:59 p.m. Paddock then fired on
Campos “in close proximity to”
10:05 p.m., when the mass shooting began, Lombardo continued.
mark.berman@washpost.com
was still warm, the ruins around
them smoldering. They lay down
together and embraced for
warmth as their clothes hung
from the metal frame of what was
once a poolside table.
Occasionally a helicopter or
plane would fly overhead, so Daniel arranged stones on the patio to
send a message: “NEED EVAC.”
Cindy went searching for Sishi,
finding her snuggled beneath a
juniper bush. She came out to
cuddle for a few moments before
sneaking back under the bush,
refusing to budge.
Daniel decided it was time to
start walking, but they both needed to find shoes. As he surveyed
the neighborhood, he spotted a
single house that seemed untouched. The back screen door
was open, so they let themselves
in. They found two pairs of flipflops that fit, and a hat to cover
Cindy’s head from the sun. They
took a few pieces of paper, and a
pen, and shoved a couple of bottles
of water into a brown paper bag.
Daniel left a note on the floor,
apologizing for what he’d taken
and promising it would be returned. Around noon they started
walking, changing the message in
stones outside their home to:
“WALK OUT.”
A white pickup truck drove
past, as a group made their way
back into the neighborhood to
check on friends who lived nearby.
About a mile farther up the road
they found a sheriff’s deputy.
“Come on,” the deputy shouted
out to them. “I’ll get you to the
shelter.”
Daniel’s employer — where he
works as a software engineer —
helped them find temporary housing and got them a borrowed car
so they could go to the bank and
get new credit cards and the eye
doctor to each be fitted for new
glasses. The insurance claims have
been filed for their home and cars.
The Pompluns began discussing what comes next: Do they stay
and rebuild? Do they move elsewhere? They don’t know.
They say they think their cat
Tabitha didn’t make it, probably
succumbing to the fire in the shed.
But they have called animal control, hoping that Sishi is still out
there, nestled beneath the juniper
bush.
wesley.lowery@washpost.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
Free For All
Newsworthy
research
A loss for local reporting
In her Oct. 2 Style column, “A bit of good news for
local reporting,” Margaret Sullivan detailed how
local reporting is disappearing from newspapers
and “faced with extinction.”
So it was most ironic that on that same day, I read
a small Editor’s Note on Page 2 of the Oct. 1
“Loudoun Extra” stating that it would be the
section’s final edition and that readers should look
for local news and information on The Post’s website
from here on out.
Not all print subscribers wish to transition to
digital subscriptions. I hope more sections of The
Post’s print edition do not go the same route.
Timothy J. Schott, Leesburg
This review was missing something
I read Chris Kelly’s Oct. 3 music review, “Solange
puts fannies in seats, and gets them out” [Style], with
a sad resignation, after being seduced by a photo
caption that mentioned “the Sun Ra Arkestra.”
There was no mention of any actual music by the
Sun Ra Arkestra in this review of a Kennedy Center
concert.
As a longtime follower of the Arkestra, from their
early days in Chicago, I wondered how they were
doing after Sun Ra’s death in 1993. Has their music
changed? Well, the review called them “the stardusted Sun Ra Arkestra” and referred to “the Arkestra’s
Afrofuturistic sojourn.” But that was it. Those quotes
are all the reviewer had to say about the opening set.
Why? I assume it’s because the reviewer had too
little knowledge of jazz to say any more. Equally, the
writer had very little to say about Solange’s music.
Most of the review was a list of the songs she
performed, characterized by the nature of the songs’
lyrics. I would have preferred a review that discussed
the difference between an eight-bar popular song
and the 12-bar blues, an allusion to hooks or a
mention of music.
Ted White, Falls Church
DANIEL LIN/DAILY NEWS-RECORD VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
James Madison quarterback Bryan Schor breaks
away from Norfolk State during a Sept. 16 game.
The Post’s JMU fumble
As of Oct. 3, James Madison University’s football
team had the NCAA’s longest active Division I
football winning streak, at 17 games. (The nextclosest was Clemson University with 11.)
Yet Post readers would not know this, given the
short shrift the paper routinely gives the only local
university with a recent football national championship, the 2017 Football Championship Subdivision.
Moreover, JMU’s current football team is considered
by several analysts to be the best in Virginia.
The Post is missing a big story here, and its
readers deserve better.
John Edgell, Washington
Terrible imagery
Regarding Marc A. Thiessen’s Oct. 4 op-ed, “Who’s
playing politics now?”:
Thiessen, reflexively opposing restrictions on firearms in the wake of the Las Vegas massacre, complained that Democrats were politicizing the event by
questioning the proliferation of and increasingly easy
access to guns. He hypothesized that “heads would
have exploded” if those on the right responded by
“injecting politics into this tragedy” (as if the demand
for silence on the subject were not itself political). His
choice of phrase was more than just vulgar. If he had
been in a Las Vegas trauma unit he would, indeed,
have seen exploded skulls and splattered brain tissue.
His callousness is typical of the people who demonstrate an idolatrous reverence for guns at the expense
of the public.
Brendan Martin, Arlington
ETHAN MILLER/GETTY IMAGES
A fan makes his feelings known during the University of Nevada at Las Vegas football game on Oct. 7.
The real story — and people — of Las Vegas
As a Las Vegas resident, and a human, I was disgusted by
the Oct. 6 Style article “A place of vast resort” about my city.
We are the same people who reside in every city. We work,
we have families, we are intelligent.
Our first responders put their lives on the line for
everyone, no matter who they were or where they were
from. Regardless of creed or color, we bleed for all who were
devastated by this tragedy. The article showed little concern
for the people who call Las Vegas home.
Constance Kuhlman, Las Vegas
We are not
born killers
Courtland Milloy, in his Oct. 4 Metro
column, “A tragic reminder of capacity
for killing,” quoted a statement by a
participant in the Ken Burns and Lynn
Novick documentary on the Vietnam
War. Karl Marlantes, who served in the
Marine Corps in that war, said, “We’re a
very aggressive species. It is in us. People
talk a lot about how well the military
turns kids into killing machines. I always
argue that it’s just finishing school.”
Marlantes’s statement is contradicted
by the evidence presented in a book
published in 1996, “On Killing: The
Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in
War and Society.” The author, Dave
Grossman, was at the time a lieutenant
colonel in the Army, a psychologist and a
former Army Ranger and paratrooper.
Most of us do not want to kill
our brothers and sisters.
Grossman was committed to helping
the U.S. military become more effective
in fighting wars. He revealed that the
Army has to train its members to kill
because most people do not want to kill
other human beings. He cited a study
conducted by the Army after World
War II that discovered that in combat
only 15 to 20 percent of soldiers fired
their weapons and an even smaller
percentage fired to kill. The Army then
changed its combat training to desensitize soldiers to the humanity of the
enemy. The new training was effective,
and as a result, 55 percent of the infantrymen in the Korean War fired their
weapons, and 90 to 95 percent fired
them in Vietnam.
Marlantes’s statement may reflect this
training. But I think that most of us do
not want to kill our sisters and brothers,
even if our nation has designated them
as enemies. We must be trained to do it.
Robert Macfarlane, Fairfax
ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Marines march in Da Nang, South Vietnam, on March 15, 1965.
Hard truths about the Vietnam War
“Myth No. 1” in the Oct. 1 “Five Myths: The Vietnam War”
by Lan Cao [Outlook] contained its own myth: that the
AK-47 rifle used by the Viet Cong was equivalent to the M16
rifle used by American troops. The M16 rifle was vastly
problematic, often rendered inoperable because of jamming, resulting in deaths and casualties of American
soldiers.
The Viet Cong stripped our fallen of clothing and
whatever else they could but left the M16s. American troops
took AK-47s from fallen Viet Cong and asked their parents
to ship rifles from home to them in theater. AK-47s worked
just fine.
Don’t take my word for it. Review “The M16 Controversies: Military Organizations and Weapons Acquisition,” James Fallows’s 1981 “National Defense,” or the
transcript of the “Hearings before the Special Subcommittee on the M-16 Rifle Program of the Committee on
Armed Services, House of Representatives, Ninetieth
Congress, First Session.”
Fallows wrote, “The M16 rifle . . . was converted from
an uncannily reliable weapon into one that betrayed its
users not by an enemy plot, but by the small-minded
machinations of a development bureaucracy that was
damned if it was going to let a privately developed,
unconventional weapon compete with the products of its
own system.”
Our American military members are heroes. Unfortunately, in Vietnam, they were also victims.
Mark Werfel, Annandale
The “Five Myths” about Vietnam essay claimed that
the proposition that American soldiers in Vietnam were
mostly draftees is a myth. After 1965, few of the combat
troops were “volunteers” in any true sense of the word. The
Feb. 12, 1970, New York Times reported that 50 percent of
the soldiers killed in Vietnam between June 1965 and June
1969 were draftees. Of those who were not drafted, many
enlisted because they knew they would be drafted at some
point. During my basic training in June 1969, there was
virtually no indoctrination as to why the Vietnam War was
worth winning or discussion of how it would be won.
The war continued because of domestic political reasons,
not because legions of young Americans were willing to die
to keep South Vietnam non-communist. If the latter were
the case, the United States would not have pulled its troops
out between 1969 and 1973. While I would have been on the
government side if I were Vietnamese, few Americans
believed that the South Vietnamese could win the war
without our troops.
Arthur J. Amchan, McLean
Lan Cao wrote, “Between 1964 and 1973, volunteers
outnumbered enlisted troops by nearly four to one.”
The term “enlisted” refers to non-officers in the U.S.
military, and, during those years, encompassed draftees
and those who voluntarily enlisted. The author should have
written, “volunteers outnumbered draftees in enlisted
ranks.”
Michael K. Bohn, Alexandria
The first female
NBA owner
More to the jets story
The Post has provided extensive coverage of the
use of government and charter aircraft by Interior
Secretary Ryan Zinke and then-Health and Human
Services Secretary Tom Price, among other Trump
administration officials [“Price to pay part of costs
of flights,” front page, Sept. 29].
Lest readers think this is a new practice, or one
limited to a few officials, it’s worth recalling that
then-Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch was using a
government aircraft when she and former president Bill Clinton had their meeting on the tarmac at
an Arizona airport. And TV news helicopters
showed former FBI director James B. Comey
climbing aboard an executive jet in Los Angeles
after he was dismissed by President Trump.
It would be helpful to readers if The Post
provided context to its continuing coverage of this
subject by comparing travel practices of the current
and former administrations.
Peter A. Harrigan, Rehoboth Beach, Del.
One more mistake
An Oct. 1 grammar mistake was especially egregious because it appeared on the op-ed page over
Ruth Marcus’s column: “One fewer hostage in the
Senate.” The adjective “few” means “not many but
more than one,” and “fewer” is the comparative form
— so “fewer” cannot be used to modify the singular
noun “hostage.” A correct version of the headline
might have been “One less hostage in the Senate.”
Alas, copy editors seem to have become few and
fewer.
Elliot Wilner, Bethesda
I was delighted to see prominent
coverage of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine awarded to American
researchers who have made vast contributions to research surrounding
circadian rhythms [“3 Americans win
Nobel for discovery of genes linked to
circadian rhythms,” news, Oct. 3].
I’ve built upon their work in my
own research about meal timing and
meal frequency, with a focus on further understanding how the human
body’s biological clock responds to
caloric intake and insulin function.
Outside of helping people understand
sleep disorders, these researchers laid
the scientific foundation to help others analyze environmental stimuli
that may influence weight gain, insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunction, which can lead to potential
solutions to help treat and reduce the
risk of obesity, Type 2 diabetes and
heart disease. Their contributions
will continue to shape the field of
public health for years to come.
I applaud the prominent placement of articles on this topic and
other scientific discoveries.
Hana Kahleova, Washington
The writer is director of clinical
research for the Physicians
Committee for Responsible Medicine.
JENNIFER CLASEN/AMAZON PRIME VIDEO
The extended Pfefferman family on the television show “Transparent.”
Stereotypes are never funny
In his Critic’s Notebook review of two TV shows —
“Transparent” and “9JKL” — Hank Stuever seemed to
have no malicious intent. Yet the Jewish stereotypes
he depicted — and apparently considered accurate —
are harmful [“The Jewish experience, in two frames,”
Style, Oct. 2].
Stuever wrote that he learned about being Jewish
from television, the Old Testament and “Fiddler on the
Roof.” Does that really qualify him to make generalizations about Jews? The Jewish people have a long, varied
and remarkably accomplished history despite frequent
persecution. Hollywood’s shallow and stereotypeladen depictions don’t begin to tell the story.
Stuever wondered why the first episode of “9JKL”
didn’t identify the central family as Jewish — even
though it obviously was, because it fit Hollywood’s
ugly Jewish stereotypes. I’ve known hundreds of
Jewish individuals and families. I’ve never met one
who fits these dreadful stereotypes.
Networks and studios should reject any show centered on vicious stereotypes — Jewish or otherwise.
This pertains even if a show’s creator is Jewish.
Even if intended as comedy, ugly stereotypes contribute to the dangerous bigotry emerging in our
country and around the world. Critics have a responsibility to call out producers who traffic in such stereotypes.
Debra L. Feuer, Bethesda
The Oct. 4 Business article “Joining the D.C.
team(s)” noted that Laurene Powell Jobs “is buying a
significant stake in Monumental Sports & Entertainment, a sprawling $2.5 billion complex that
includes the NBA Wizards, NHL Capitals and Capital One Arena.” But it did not mention the first
woman to become an owner in the National Basketball Association: Irene Pollin. The article said Abe
“Pollin died in 2009. Pollin’s widow, Irene, became
the owner until [Ted] Leonsis and his partners
bought the rest of the Wizards and the sports arena a
year later.” Having been an owner since July 14, 1968,
I had one of the most wonderful experiences a
person could have, as my husband’s only business
partner. Articles that don’t provide readers basic
information do readers a major disservice.
Irene Pollin, Bethesda
The writer is former owner of the Washington
Wizards, Capitals, Mystics, Capital Centre
and Verizon Center.
BILL KOSTROUN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Irene Pollin and Ted Leonsis attend the NBA
draft lottery on May 18, 2010, in Secaucus, N.J.
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
A crucial vaccination link
EDITORIALS
Mr. Trump’s dangerous folly
Contradicting many of his advisers, the president puts the Iran nuclear agreement in a perilous limbo.
I
than a year away from being able to produce a
nuclear device, according to U.S. intelligence estimates, to having a fraction of the necessary
materiel, and that under close international monitoring. The president’s contention that Iran is guilty
of “multiple violations of the agreement” is belied
by eight reports of the International Atomic Energy
Agency as well as statements by his secretaries of
state and defense and the chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff.
Mr. Trump’s advisers persuaded him not to
withdraw from the accord directly, but instead to
send the matter to Congress, which must vote within
60 days on whether to restore U.S. sanctions on Iran.
But the president set a trap by vowing to terminate
the deal if Congress did not impose new requirements on Iran, including an end to the sunset
provisions. Any U.S. attempt to unilaterally revise
the accord is doomed; it will be rejected not just by
Iran but also by the other parties to the deal,
including Russia, China and the European Union.
Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), the chairman of the
Foreign Relations Committee, says he will introduce
amendments meant to satisfy Mr. Trump; he told us
that “we have no intention of passing a piece of
legislation that violates” the accord. But Democrats,
including some who were critical of the original Iran
deal, are understandably dubious. Sen. Benjamin L.
Cardin (Md.), the senior Democrat on the committee, vowed “not [to] buy into the false premise that it
is Congress’s role to legislate solutions to problems
of [Mr. Trump’s] own making.”
Mr. Trump promised additional action to address
the non-nuclear threats posed by Iran, including its
interventions in Iraq and Syria. The administration
is justified in imposing sanctions on Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps. But it appears to have no clear
plan to address Iran’s military entrenchment in
Syria, which is threatening to touch off a new
conflict with Israel. Rather than tackling those
urgent challenges, Mr. Trump prefers to renounce
the legacy of his political nemesis Barack Obama
and thereby reopen the one front where Tehran is
currently contained. North Korea will take note:
The United States cannot be trusted to stick to any
nuclear accord.
Congress must
salvage the census
The 2020 count is over budget, but it
is also essential to good governance.
O
VER THE next few years, the government
will determine how much political representation and federal money your state
gets. That crucial process is off to a lousy
start.
Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told a House
panel Thursday that the 2020 Census will cost an
additional $3.3 billion, a 27 percent funding hike
from earlier estimates. The 2020 count was supposed to be different, leveraging satellite imagery to
create a database of U.S. addresses, relying on
online rather than mail-in responses, and using
troves of data that private companies have collected
to fill in gaps. These and other money-saving
innovations were supposed to keep total costs about
flat since the last big count, in 2010.
But it has not worked out that way. These changes
required some upfront investment, and Congress
has refused to appropriate the necessary cash,
underfunding the Census Bureau year after year
while the bureau should have been preparing. It has
had to cancel a variety of important tests of its new
systems, along with end-to-end field tests that had
been planned for next year. Without the testing, the
bureau will have to rely more on older, more
expensive counting methods.
This penny-wise, pound-foolish approach means
that, with hardly any time left before the counting
must commence, Mr. Ross must go to Congress
begging for money to cover the inevitable cost
overruns. The current projection is that the 2020
Census will cost $15.6 billion, when the bureau
previously figured it could keep costs at about
$12 billion with a few smart changes. That may have
been unrealistic, but anything close to that level
would have been a real accomplishment. Population
growth and inflation both push up costs between
counts, as does the fact that fewer and fewer people
are responding to the first wave of mailed census
forms, which in turn requires more census workers
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross speaks on Capitol Hill on Thursday about the 2020 Census.
to knock on doors in order to ensure an accurate
count.
At stake is more than just a fascinating report on
American demography. Congressional seats and
electoral college votes are apportioned to the states
according to the decennial census numbers. The
federal government depends on the figures to
distribute more than half a trillion dollars. Businesses of all sorts rely on solid federal population
data to decide what to produce and where to sell.
Historically, the census has undercounted poor and
minority communities. Without better procedures,
federal officials may do so again, potentially shortchanging Americans who deserve to be considered.
Accurately counting every American is a responsibility so critical that the Constitution itself explicitly
obliges the federal government to do so.
Congress must attempt to salvage the foundering
2020 count. It should not feel bound to meet only
Mr. Ross’s suggested funding levels but rather to
determine whether they should be exceeded. Some
in Congress have already concluded as much.
Moreover, lawmakers must examine what is happening at vital-statistics organizations across the
government. Politico published Wednesday a damning report showing that agencies that collect
information on U.S. businesses, employment, wages
and a variety of other things are struggling because
of congressional shortsightedness.
Neither Congress nor the executive branch can
wisely govern the country without knowing what it
looks like.
A far-right incumbent’s outlook is small-minded to the point of dysfunction.
W
based on birth gender rather than identity; and has
been a crusader against abortion as well as birth
control.
In 2010, he managed to create a furor even
among his own party’s leadership by suggesting
that God exacts vengeance on women who abort
their fetuses by ensuring that their subsequent
pregnancies will produce disabled children.
“There’s a special punishment Christians would
suggest,” he said, conflating contempt for women
who seek abortions with disdain for those with
disabilities.
During the current race, he has refused to debate
Ms. Roem, asserting high-mindedly that no fair
exchange of views is possible because her supporters have insulted him by referring to him as “Bigot
Bob.” But is that an inaccurate characterization of
an official who opposed the judicial nomination of a
respected gay prosecutor and proposed legislation
to ban gays from serving in the Virginia National
Guard? He justified the latter stance under the
following rationale: “It’s a distraction when I’m on
the battlefield and have to concentrate on the
enemy 600 yards away and I’m worried about this
guy who’s got eyes on me.”
Predictably, Mr. Marshall has tried to cast doubt
on the legitimacy of Ms. Roem’s gender identity,
insisting on using male pronouns to refer to her.
Conservative groups backing him have unleashed
incendiary robo-calls suggesting that girls’ sports
teams would be infiltrated by boys under policies
favored by Ms. Roem and charging that she would
pursue a radical agenda.
In fact, Ms. Roem, a former journalist with a
wonky streak, has largely focused her campaign on
proposals to ease traffic congestion along Prince
William County’s Route 28 corridor, an area of
vulnerability for Mr. Marshall, who opposed the
state’s bipartisan landmark transportation funding
package in 2013.
While the attacks on Ms. Roem focus largely on
her identity, Mr. Marshall’s shortcomings involve
the intolerance of his ideas. In an era of rising
extremism, Mr. Marshall remains a standard-bearer
of zealotry whose aversion to pragmatism promotes
legislative dysfunction.
ABCDE
LOCAL OPINIONS
Maryland’s school-calendar squeeze leaves out students’ needs
Regarding the Oct. 10 Metro article “Schools in
Md. feel calendar squeeze”:
As a teacher, I make every instructional decision
based on the needs of my students. I ask myself, “Is
this good for kids?” Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s
(R) calendar mandate, based on economic interests
rather than student learning, has put Montgomery
County Public Schools in the difficult position of
deciding which important things must be let go in
order to meet the start and end dates he has
imposed. Why are decisions about schools being
made without regard to what’s best for student
learning?
The governor’s dismissive comments about professional time reveal his ignorance about what
teachers do and what students need, but the MCPS
Board of Education must do all it can for the
The Oct. 9 news article “Failure to vaccinate is
likely culprit of U.S. measles outbreaks, study
says” brought notice to the growing problem of
unvaccinated people and the U.S. measles outbreaks. The study eliminated other possibilities,
as statistics have shown a drop in outside cases of
the disease coming into the United States and
there is little to no evidence that the vaccine is
losing its effectiveness.
Forgoing vaccinations is a serious problem, but it
cannot be fixed by eliminating only religious and
philosophical exemptions for children entering
public schools in California, Mississippi and West
Virginia. Vaccination protests have grown larger as
false accounts have spread like wildfire via social
media. The country is still missing vital education
and accurate communication on vaccines. Many
opponents of vaccinations are stuck on old ideas
that have been disproved, such as that vaccines
cause autism. Doctors should be fully informed so
they can teach their patients. Education and
accurate communication can help fix the declining
number of vaccinations in some communities in
the United States that have led to outbreaks of
dangerous diseases.
Rachel Gerber, Pittsburgh
The rural vote matters
Regarding the Oct. 9 Metro article “Rural Va.
Democrats complain party is ignoring them”:
In statewide elections, Virginia’s Democrats
cannot afford to ignore rural Democrats. While
Democrats in rural districts may not be successful
in winning Virginia House or Senate seats, rural
Democrats must be motivated to come out and
vote. Their votes will elect statewide candidates.
In 2016, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton won Virginia by 212,000 votes. In 53 of
Virginia’s most Republican-leaning and rural counties and cities, Republican presidential nominee
Donald Trump got 69 percent of the vote to
Ms. Clinton’s 26 percent. However, Ms. Clinton’s
26 percent in those locations represented
215,000 votes — enough for her to win Virginia. Democrats need to court all voters throughout the commonwealth.
Louis Modliszewski, Warrenton
Toxic air is a quiet scourge
The real extremist in Virginia politics
HAT WOULD otherwise be a smallstakes race for a low-profile electoral
office — the Manassas-area 13th District
seat in Virginia’s House of Delegates —
has taken on national dimensions and attracted
national cash largely because the Democratic
challenger, 32-year-old Danica Roem, would become the state’s first openly transgender elected
official. That’s given the 13-term Republican incumbent, Del. Robert G. Marshall, an opening to portray
her as an extremist. In fact, as Mr. Marshall has
shown repeatedly during his 25 years in office, he is
the extremist in the race.
Mr. Marshall, 73, wields a scholarly affect to
distract voters from his long-standing legislative
priorities, which include a laundry list of hard-right
conservative causes that has prompted lawmakers
of both parties in Richmond to refer to him as
“Sideshow Bob.” A relentless culture warrior,
Mr. Marshall was a bitter opponent of same-sex
marriage; has championed a legislative push to
enact a Virginia version of North Carolina’s notorious bathroom bill, restricting public restrooms
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
N AN act of political vanity and geopolitical
folly, President Trump has made one of the most
serious national security challenges facing the
United States, that of Iran, considerably worse.
His announcement Friday that he would report to
Congress that the Islamic republic is not meeting
the terms of the 2015 multinational accord limiting
its nuclear program flouted the reports of international inspectors, the unanimous counsel of his
national security team and the appeals of key U.S.
allies. His threat to terminate the agreement if
Congress and America’s allies do not meet his
demands for revisions could easily lead to Iran’s
resumption of a race toward nuclear weapons — a
dangerous course that the deal brokered by the
Obama administration succeeded in arresting.
The nuclear accord is flawed, including sunset
provisions that remove restrictions on Iranian
nuclear activities beginning eight years from now.
But Mr. Trump’s hyperbolic claim that the deal is
“one of the worst and most one-sided transactions
the United States has ever entered into” is belied by
the fact that the regime has gone from being less
. SATURDAY,
students and families its members are privileged to
serve. Most high school teachers see about 150 students per day. Our students need meticulously
planned, dynamic lessons that use a variety of
strategies. They need timely feedback so that they
can improve. Students need attention and support.
Early-release days, delayed openings and days at the
end of each grading period provide time for high
school English teachers such as me to assess student
learning, analyze data and adjust instruction based
on student performance. Student instructional prep
time is essential to student learning.
I urge the MCPS Board of Education and
stakeholders to work with teachers to build a
calendar that prioritizes student learning by protecting instructional prep time.
Leah Wilson, Rockville
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News pages:
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Editorial Page Editor
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Associate Editorial Page Editor
Vice Presidents:
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Regarding the Oct. 10 news article “EPA chief tells
coal miners he will repeal Obama-era power plant
rule”:
It is sad to witness the flensing of the Environmental Protection Agency, once a proud, innovative
and effective agency that protected the environment
and worked to assure human health.
We used to suffer badly in southern Ontario from
toxic air originating from coal-fired power plants in
the Midwest. In 2005, Ontario had 19 smog advisories, one eight days long. An Ontario Medical
Association study estimated that the pollution
caused about 2,000 premature deaths annually as
well as more than 100,000 cases of respiratory
distress.
When the EPA regulations respecting coal-fire
emissions came into effect, air quality improved so
much that most years now there is not a single smog
advisory. We can also be grateful that the EPA’s
example provided a standard that we could cite to
compel our own coal-fired plant to close down.
Unlike deaths from environmental disasters such
as forest fires and hurricanes, toxic-air deaths
are forlorn statistical events, unrecognized and
unmourned.
How long until the scourge of deadly air
once again rolls across the border — after exacting
an even more tragic toll in America first?
Greg Michalenko, Waterloo, Ontario
A destructive paradox
The Oct. 8 Outlook feature “Five Myths: Gun
violence” was correct to point out that mental illness
is not the source of gun violence except for the high
death rate when guns are used in suicide. The
4 percent of violence attributed to the mentally ill is
actually an exaggeration in that people with mental
illness may use guns for violence for the same
reasons as non-mentally ill persons.
The stigmatizing attention to gun violence by the
mentally ill comes from two sources. Occasional
bizarre circumstances suggest mental illness and
are newsworthy in contrast with the almost daily
mass violence in the United States. The second
source is a campaign of misinformation from elected
officials and the pro-gun lobby that supports them. A
destructive paradox is to blame mental illness for
the gun violence while forbidding health agencies
from supporting research and even attempts to
exclude discussion of guns from the doctor-patient
relationship.
William T. Carpenter, Columbia
The writer is a professor of psychiatry and
pharmacology at the University of Maryland
School of Medicine.
The vice president’s real bosses
The Oct. 10 front-page article “Trump lashes out
at allies, putting agenda at risk” described how few
GOP leaders have publicly sided with either President Trump or Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) during
their recent Twitter feud. According to the report,
“the most vocal Trump defender was the one under
the president’s employ, Vice President Pence.” I take
exception to this characterization of Mr. Pence’s
position. He was put in office by the electoral
college based on the votes of the people in the
November 2016 election. Not only is the vice
president not in Mr. Trump’s employ, but he also is
about the only administration official whom
Mr. Trump can’t fire.
You might think this would make Mr. Pence feel
freer to speak honestly about the president’s obvious
deficits, but you would be wrong.
Douglas M. Pollock, Oakton
C OR R E C TI ON
The Oct. 12 editorial “The wastrels in the Trump
Cabinet” incorrectly reported the result of Treasury
Secretary Steven Mnuchin’s request for a
government jet for his honeymoon. His request was
withdrawn.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
COLBERT I. KING
EZ
A15
RE
One Weird
Trick? Not for
harassment.
DRAWING BOARD
I liked carrying a
gun way too much
G
uns are more than news stories in the Brightwood neighborhood of Northwest Washington, where my home is located. They are a
deadly fact of life.
Around 12:30 Wednesday morning, a neighbor took
to our email discussion group to ask about a helicopter
that had been circling above Missouri and Georgia
avenues NW for 30 minutes. “What’s going on?” he
asked.
The answer came later in the morning from the D.C.
police. A fatal shooting had occurred in the 6200 block
of Eighth Street NW.
“At approximately 11:58 pm, members of the Fourth
District responded to the listed location for the report
of a shooting,” the news release said. “Upon arrival,
officers located three adult male victims suffering from
gunshot wounds. DC Fire and EMS responded to the
scene and transported all of the victims to local
hospitals. Two of the victims succumbed to their
injuries and were pronounced dead. A third victim
sustained non-life threatening injuries.” The first
decedent has been identified as 22-year-old Sefjuan
Jones, of Nashville, N.C. The second has been identified
as 25-year-old Renard Marsh of Northwest.
The shooting scene is in a residential area two blocks
east of George Avenue. I live three blocks west of the
avenue. Two of the victims were found in the house, the
third outside. Police don’t know where the shooting
took place, but they are on the lookout for a black BMW
witnessed leaving the scene.
The good news: We’ve had only nine assaults,
including shootings, in Brightwood this year. That’s
down from 16 last year, according to The Post.
The bad news is that Tuesday brought Brightwood’s
homicide total to three this year. A year ago at this time,
we had none.
But guns we have.
The other night, neighbors behind my house in
16th Street Heights were awakened by gunshots. Shells
on the street, but no bodies, were found the next
morning.
We have guns.
This is no knock on the police in the Fourth District.
They are out and about. They respond quickly. They
make arrests. But they can’t be everywhere — not like
guns and the shooters who use them.
It deserves noting that overall crime — robberies,
assaults with deadly weapons, homicides — is down in
the city, according to Kevin Donahue, D.C. deputy
mayor for public safety.
But the reductions are uneven. Eastern sections of
the city rack up the big numbers. West of Rock Creek
Park, relatively speaking, is a demilitarized zone.
But it is the specter of violence — fear that danger
could be lurking around the corner — that sets
neighborhoods, and neighbors, apart.
I guess some things in life, crime included, may just
come with the territory.
Which gets us back to guns.
Why so many?
The answer, some may think, lies with the federal
appeals court ruling last month that gutted the city’s
gun control laws. Now residents, after years of D.C.
opposition, will be able to get permits to carry guns in
public if they get criminal background checks, two
hours of range training and a 16-hour safety course.
I won’t be one of those trying to get a concealedcarry license.
Not that I am irrevocably opposed to gun ownership.
Records of the D.C. police will show that I am a
registered gun owner — have been for years.
Got my license when I returned to the District after
living in Maryland, where I acquired my .22-caliber
semiautomatic rifle. Renewed the license last year
after being fingerprinted and undergoing an FBI
background check.
I know my way around guns, having fired an M1 rifle
in Army training. I also am familiar with pistols.
During my years as a special agent with the State
Department in the ’60s, I was qualified in the use of a
.38-caliber pistol and a .357 magnum. These were the
weapons issued when I was assigned to protect visiting
foreign heads of state.
And that is the reason I will not seek a concealedcarry pistol license.
While my own weapon is trigger-locked with the key
out of reach, I don’t particularly like myself when I
have a gun on my hip.
Recalling my experience years ago when I was
pressed into service to help protect a foreign leader
attending a U.N. General Assembly session and making
an official visit to Washington, I back off the idea of
carrying a lethal weapon.
I liked the experience way too much.
I loved the weight of the weapon on my hip, the
glances I got from the people on the streets, in the
hotels and at receptions who noticed the gun when my
jacket slid open.
I liked too much the feeling of empowerment, and
the what? — the itchiness to show off, to be seen taking
on possible threats. Just spoiling for a challenge.
Back then, the lure of coming off macho was in my
head.
It could be with me now.
I’ll take my chances without a weapon. The District
has enough guns without adding another.
Lots of guns.
BY
C HRISTINE E MBA
I
BY LUCKOVICH FOR THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION
BY R. MCKEE FOR THE AUGUSTA CHRONICLE
BY MORIN FOR THE MIAMI HERALD
BY WALT HANDELSMAN FOR THE NEW ORLEANS ADVOCATE
kingc@washpost.com
t was an open secret in Hollywood, and
it’s all too public now. This month’s
reporting by the New York Times and
the New Yorker has seared the alleged
misdeeds of movie producer Harvey Weinstein into the national consciousness.
Actually, “misdeeds” is too genteel a
word to describe the ghastly allegations of
rape, sexual harassment and sexual assault
levied against Weinstein by women from
all walks of Hollywood, including some of
the most successful women in the movie
business. The stream of outrages shows no
sign of letting up. Each day since the story
broke, more women have come forward
with accounts of abuse or close escape at
Weinstein’s hands.
The revelations are horrible. The allegations are painful to read, and the evidence
is nauseating to listen to. And having
waded through a flood of similar scandals
in our recent past — Cosby, Ailes, O’Reilly,
among others — we’re desperate for a path
out.
Perhaps the disgust and fatigue help
explain the rush to identify the one rule
that can end it all for good. If we can just
find the right charm to ward off sexual
impropriety, some seem to think, we’ll
never have to face this discomfort again.
Too bad it’s not that easy.
As a response to this particular scandal,
some have proposed blanket applications
of what has been referred to as the “Mike
Pence Rule,” after the vice president’s stated policy against eating alone with a
woman who isn’t his wife or attending an
event featuring alcohol without her.
“THINK,” tweeted former Trump adviser
Sebastian Gorka on Tuesday night. “If
Weinstein had obeyed @VP Pence’s rules
for meeting with the opposite sex, none of
these poor women would ever have been
abused.” Others go in for variations on this
One Weird Trick to prevent sexual assault:
We need a more formal office culture,
suggests Business Insider columnist Josh
Barro. We need checks on how men and
women interact professionally, says New
York Times columnist Ross Douthat.
It’s not that these suggestions have nothing to recommend them. Drawing clear
lines around professional interactions
might make sexual misconduct easier to
spot, for instance, or make it harder for an
aggressor to create an obviously coercive
situation.
But they also aren’t enough. Rules about
how many people should be present at a
mixed-sex meeting might stymie the opportunist harasser, but they won’t be
enough to stop determined predators — of
which there are many. And overbroad
guidelines on where men can interact with
women, and how much, close off opportunities for women and make it easier to
blame them when things still — inevitably
— go wrong.
Sexual predation is a much bigger, more
complicated and more systemic problem
than can ever be solved by instituting one
good guideline. Despite how comforting it
would be to say we’ve found a quick fix, we
can’t just flip the switch, breathe a sigh of
relief and look away. To create real societal
change, we’ll need to keep our eyes trained
on instances where we’ve failed, even
though we would prefer not to. Rather than
just setting up new rules and hoping they’ll
take care of the situation for us, we’ll have
to change the ways we think and live.
What does that look like? It might start
with viewing women as people. We might
move away from rhetoric suggesting we
remember to value their experience only
when they are our (or somebody else’s)
daughters, sisters or wives. It would continue with teaching bystanders, especially
men, to speak up when they see other men
behaving badly, and to resist giving any
leeway to the bad but brilliant to share in
their power. It also means listening to
women when they share their experiences
— and even seeking them out, rather than
discounting them or asking why they didn’t
come forward earlier. And in the long term,
it means teaching our sons, especially, how
to treat others as equals.
These aren’t novel solutions; they’re an
ongoing grind. But the truth is, no quick fix
will ever be enough. The work will be
never-ending. But it has to be done.
Christine Emba is a Post opinions writer and
editor.
ALEXANDRA PETRI
The good news about Bob Corker’s comments? Everyone in the Senate agrees!
Sen. Bob Corker (R-Lame Duck, Tenn.) recently
gave an explosive 25-minute interview to the New
York Times describing the president as being
someone in need of constant supervision who is
liable to get us into World War III. Great. He said,
among other things: “Look, except for a few people,
the vast majority of our caucus understands what
we’re dealing with here . . . of course they understand the volatility that we’re dealing with and the
tremendous amount of work that it takes by people
around him to keep him in the middle of the road.”
A rough summary of his comments follows.
T
he president? Oh, no, he’s totally unfit. I am
terrified for this country. Everyone in the
Senate agrees. That is why we have, so far,
not really said or done anything to contradict his agenda (except by a margin of one or two
harrowing votes after receiving approximately
1,850,000 irate phone calls apiece).
But you have to understand: We are all constantly terrified. We all should be terrified. It’s even
worse than you realize. Picture what you think it is,
and then light it on fire and toss rusty nails and
loose plague rats everywhere.
Listen, this is a living nightmare. The president
no longer speaks in complete sentences, if he ever
did. The last time we visited together, he was
gnawing on what appeared to be a severed human
leg. You know that painting of Saturn devouring his
children? That’s his bedtime ritual.
Chief of Staff John F. Kelly is very faint and weak
because he doesn’t know what would happen if he
ever slept when the president was awake. He is
squatting on top of a giant throne of empty Red
Bulls hissing at anyone who approaches, and he is
still the sanest man in the building. I don’t know
how much longer he can stay awake, or what will
happen when he shuts his eyes.
The last time I visited the White House, they had
put those little plastic things in all the sockets, and
when I casually went to plug in my cellphone, three
different aides screamed at me not to touch
anything because of “what happened last time.” I
don’t know what happened last time. After looking
into an aide’s haunted eyes, I don’t think I ever
want to know. I think the only thing that lets me
sleep at night is that I have not seen what he has
seen.
That is why I have voted with President Trump
more than 80 percent of the time.
Look, everyone in the Senate agrees. We all know
how bad it is. Whole subcommittees have gone in
on time-share bunkers together. World War III is a
real possibility. Fortunately, the contractors who
will supply weapons for World War III are in one of
my colleagues’ home state, and the individuals
whose charred, bleeding hands will supply arrows
and stones for World War IV are in all of our states.
So there’s a slim upside there, I guess. But we know
by what a pathetically thin thread the country is
hanging. We all know.
The Senate halls are full of screaming all the time
because we are so afraid, so so afraid. We scream
from morning until night until our throats are raw.
We scream from the moment we arrive in the
Capitol until the second someone turns on a camera
so that we can make a statement offering the
president our public support.
But the strain is unbearable. We can’t live like
this. I am just saying what we long have thought.
Everyone agrees with me, which you can tell from
almost zero of their public actions and onthe-record statements, but trust me, we all have our
eyes open to the full horror of it all.
It’s like being in Caligula’s court, except Caligula’s court had nice sculptures and sometimes you
got to hang out with a horse. It’s like being trapped
in a Tudor novel. I can’t read “Wolf Hall”; my hands
just start shaking and shaking.
This is not normal. This is not okay. And I am
doing what it takes: giving an interview to a media
outlet stating my concerns! And uh, no, that’s, that’s
sort of it, but that’s doing something, I feel. It’s still
more than anyone else has done.
For too long, this has been an open secret that no
one does anything about, but now it will just be an
open — thing that no one does anything about.
That’s progress, I think.
Alexandra Petri writes the ComPost blog at
washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost.
A16
EZ
‘Ravages of cord-cutting’
put a damper on AT&T’s
expansion into TV industry
AT&T’s push to
acquire DirecTV
in 2015 looked like
brilliance at first.
BRIAN FUNG
Having already
captured most of
the low-hanging fruit in the
telephone and wireless markets,
AT&T’s expansion into the
television industry promised
The
Switch
much more room for growth. By
offering DirecTV directly to
consumers, AT&T might gain
customers, hang on to old ones
and take advantage of viewing
data for advertising purposes.
But almost from the
beginning, the deal’s potential
seemed limited by the growing
number of consumers who have
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
been abandoning traditional
television services. With more
Americans embracing online
alternatives, AT&T may have
inherited in DirecTV — and its 20
million subscribers — a brewing
long-term headache that can be
solved only by either preventing
or compensating for the effects of
cord-cutting.
It seems that problem may be
more acute than we thought.
This week AT&T told
regulators that it expects to
finish the quarter with about
90,000 fewer TV subscribers
than it began with. AT&T blamed
a number of issues, including
hurricane damage, rising credit
standards and competition. The
report also shows that AT&T lost
more traditional TV customers
than it gained back through its
online video app, DirecTV Now.
And analysts are suggesting
that’s evidence that cord-cutting
is the main culprit.
“DirecTV, like all of its cable
peers, is suffering from the
ravages of cord-cutting,” industry
analyst Craig Moffett said in a
research note this week. Moffett
added that although nobody
expected AT&T’s pay-TV
numbers to look good, hardly
anyone could have predicted
they would look “this bad.”
The outlook doesn’t appear
much healthier for the rest of the
television industry. Over the past
year, cable and satellite firms
have collectively lost nearly
3 million customers, according to
estimates by market analysts at
SNL Kagan and New Street
Research.
For AT&T, the decline in
traditional DirecTV customers
puts more pressure on the
company to shore up its online
products — especially if the
traditional product continues to
falter.
That’s where the company’s
proposed acquisition of Time
Warner may come in. With
control of franchises such as
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. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
Warner Bros. and CNN, AT&T
could seek new ways of making
money that boost its fortunes in
video. That deal is still awaiting
approval by the Justice
Department.
AT&T declined to comment,
but last week chief executive
Randall Stephenson told Vanity
Fair that the company hopes to
“change the economics” of
television with the deal, driving
prices down so that it can “get
customers who’ve opted out [of
pay TV] back into the ecosystem.”
brian.fung@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.
com/news/the-switch
KLMNO
METRO
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
High today at
approx. 4 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
63 72 79 72°
°
°
°
District bill
would end
penalties for
sex workers
79°
Precip: 55%
Wind: NE
4-8 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
RELIGION
MARYLAND
OBITUARIES
A Catholic school barred a
9-year-old from her First
Communion because she
planned to wear a suit. B2
Montgomery County will
not pay a Pennsylvania
company for a flawed
minimum-wage study. B3
Bunny Sigler helped
create the soulful “sound
of Philadelphia” in the
1970s. B4
A young couple is killed. A man is indicted, but remains free.
Caught in the middle are grieving families battling the rules of extradition.
Council’s Grosso pushes
decriminalization as way
‘out of the shadows’
BY
Teenager died near
her Fairfax mosque
BY
SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
No justice in a global tug of war
The former college soccer player was
gunned down in his own home, shell casings
scattered around his body, police said. His
girlfriend’s body was found a couple of miles
away, slumped against a tree with a bullet
through her head.
Authorities are confident they know who
carried out the double slaying in Northern
Virginia late last year. A witness places an
aspiring rapper at the scenes of the killings. A
Fairfax grand jury indicted him on murder
charges. Detectives know where he lives.
Yet, nearly 10 months later, Yohannes Nessibu remains a free man. He was spotted
BY J USTIN
J OUVENAL
Sileshi Dinke,
54, the father of
Kedest Simeneh,
in his
Springfield, Va.,
home with his
youngest child,
Christina
Simeneh, 12.
strolling down a street in recent months. On
Twitter, he still promotes a mix tape that
features him rapping about shooting a woman.
Nessibu, 23, is out of reach because he
boarded a flight to his native Ethiopia, just
before police closed in on him, the victims’
families say. The families say he’s now the
subject of an international tug of war: The
United States wants him returned to stand
trial, but Ethiopia refuses because it bars the
extradition of its own citizens.
Nessibu’s case is among dozens in which
citizens of foreign countries have allegedly
NESSIBU CONTINUED ON B6
BILL CONTINUED ON B4
J USTIN W M. M OYER
baltimore — Label 56, a white-
power record label run out of a
southwest Baltimore townhouse,
is not welcoming to outsiders.
Off Interstate 95 in Morrell
Park, a poor, mostly white quarter
of majority-black Baltimore, the
home is guarded by three pit bulls
that sit peacefully in the living
room but howl when a stranger
approaches.
In the wake of August’s attacks
in Charlottesville, where a white
nationalist allegedly drove into a
crowd of counterprotesters, killing a 32-year-old woman and injuring many others, some record
labels deemed racist were temporarily shut down or otherwise
shamed. One label on Long Island
was kicked off PayPal. One in New
Jersey was shut down after it was
J USTIN J OUVENAL
A hearing in the high-profile
slaying of a Fairfax County girl
killed near her mosque was temporarily suspended Friday after
her father yelled at the defendant
and her mother hurled a shoe at
him across the courtroom.
The loud outburst occurred as
the preliminary hearing for 22year-old Darwin Martinez Torres
was set to begin before a courtroom packed with roughly 250
supporters of the victim, 17-yearold Nabra Hassanen.
“You killed my daughter!” Mohmoud Hassanen yelled across the
courtroom at Torres and then
lunged in the direction of the
defendant, who was about 30 feet
away.
As sheriff’s deputies and family
members rushed to restrain him,
Sawsan Gazzar, the victim’s mother, rose and yelled “I kill you!” She
then threw a shoe toward Torres
that missed him.
Sheriff’s deputies rushed both
the judge and defendant out of the
courtroom and forcefully removed Mohmoud Hassanen, as
Nabra’s supporters hurled insults
at the deputies and Torres.
Fairfax County Juvenile and
Domestic Relations Court Judge
Kimberly J. Daniel ordered the
courtroom cleared.
When the hearing resumed an
hour later with only attorneys, the
defendant and Nabra’s family
members present, Torres waived
the preliminary hearing on his
murder charge. The case now goes
before a Fairfax County grand
jury, which will decide whether to
indict Torres.
The chaotic scene in the courtroom showed that the grief that
followed Nabra’s brutal slaying in
June is still raw, particularly
among members of the local Muslim community. The killing drew
national attention, and vigils were
held for her in locations across the
country.
Nabra was walking to her
mosque when she was abducted
and slain. Her family and some
supporters say she was targeted
because she was Muslim, but Fairfax County prosecutor Raymond
F. Morrogh said after the hearing
that investigators have turned up
no evidence of a hate crime.
“It really sent a shock wave
through the Muslim community,”
Maura Yasin, a supporter of the
SLAYING CONTINUED ON B3
Md. record label persists
in its white-power spin
BY
Murder
hearing
briefly
halted
OUTBURST BY
VICTIM’S PARENTS
R ACHEL C HASON
Most of the times Laya Monarez sold sex in the District, she
said things went smoothly: She
got money to pay her rent, and
her customers got what they
wanted.
It is the times that turned
violent, though, that stick with
Monarez, 35, who is now a LGBT
activist and artist.
Once, a man in the District
picked her up in his car and
refused to pay her. When she
tried to leave the car, he stabbed
her. When she jumped out of the
car, he tried to run her over. She
escaped but didn’t report the
attack to police, fearing they
would arrest her for prostitution.
A new bill to decriminalize sex
work in the District would make
sex workers — many of whom are
victims of violent crimes — more
comfortable reporting those
crimes to police, said Monarez.
The bill, introduced by D.C.
Council members David Grosso
(I-At Large) and Robert C. White
Jr. (D-At Large), would make the
District the only U.S. jurisdiction
to decriminalize prostitution
outside some areas in Nevada,
where legal brothels exist.
Activists say the bill would also
make it easier for sex workers to
find other jobs and housing because they would not have prostitution-related arrests on their
records.
“This is about protecting the
human rights of our residents,”
said Grosso, a progressive council member who also led the push
to decriminalize marijuana in the
District. “Arresting our way
through this has never worked.”
Monarez, who grew up in Fairfax County, said that if sex work is
decriminalized, workers will also
feel more comfortable reporting
minors and other victims of trafficking to police.
“When the women build trust
with the police, they keep your
neighborhood safe, because
there are eyes watching,” Monarez said. “They know the neighborhoods.”
Coercing people to engage in
sex work against their will would
remain illegal, as would any prostitution involving minors. The
bill, introduced last week, is supported by the Sex Worker Advocates Coalition, a broad group
that includes HIPS (formerly
known as Helping Individual
Prostitutes Survive), WhitmanWalker Health and the American
Civil Liberties Union of D.C.
But not all advocates support
B
SU
outed by the Philadelphia Inquirer. A Minneapolis lawyer who ran
a neo-Nazi label was fired from his
law firm.
But Label 56, run by Clemie
Richard Haught Jr., is still in business in this city about 35 miles
from the nation’s capital. It’s the
only white-power label in the
Washington region on the Southern Poverty Law Center’s list of
active hate groups, and it continues to thrive in an environment
where others have faced obstacles.
The label surfaced in mainstream media in 2012, when a
guitarist for a band that released
songs with Haught killed six people at a Sikh temple near Milwaukee. The label surfaced again this
year when a Maryland Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post learned it was
renting its hall to white supremaLABEL 56 CONTINUED ON B2
Fall break at college:
Mandatory or elective?
BY
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Ahead of the Halloween crush
Mason Reynolds, 3, shows he’s stronger than he looks by lifting a
pumpkin Friday at Butler’s Orchard in Germantown, Md. He and
his mother, Erin Quinn, were loading a wheelbarrow. The orchard
offers pick-your-own produce options.
S ARAH L ARIMER
American University students
were on their fall break Friday, a
bit of rest that arrived after midterm exams. Students at George
Washington University got their
own autumnal respite this week
on Monday and Tuesday.
The Student Association at
George Washington loves the
school’s fall break, said Peak Sen
Chua, the organization’s president.
“During fall break, students
have the opportunity to relax, go
home, or pursue hobbies or pastimes they otherwise wouldn’t be
able to do without a four-day weekend — it really allows students to
breathe after almost two months
of classes,” he said in an email.
For college graduates of a certain age, fall break must sound like
some higher education mirage.
And, to be sure, it’s not universal
(leading confederations of universities and colleges don’t keep track
of how many schools bestow the
break). The University of Maryland, a public institution, doesn’t
get one, for example.
“There’s a big difference in
flexibility, as it relates to public
and private institutions,” said Katie Lawson, a U-Md. spokeswoman. “And public institutions have
strict policies that stipulate how
many academic days we have in a
specific calendar year.”
Scheduling out an academic
year is a complex process — so
maybe we can avoid a deep dive
into that right now. Instead, let’s
consider whether fall breaks are
an example of coddled college
students, unprepared for the professional life, or life in general.
FALL BREAK CONTINUED ON B4
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
RELIGION
Fashion pick leaves girl on sidelines of First Communion
BY
J ULIE Z AUZMER
Cady Mansell has always had a
strong sense of fashion. At 9 years
old, she likes trying on makeup
and painting her nails. She likes
shopping trips to Chicago with
her fashion-conscious mother.
And ever since she asked for her
first bow tie during one of those
trips to the mall, when she was
just 4 years old, Cady has had a
thing for snazzy suits.
When it came time for her First
Communion, a major event for
Cady, she naturally started thinking early about what she wanted
to wear on the big day. She settled
on a brand-new all-white suit.
“It kind of sparkles in the
sunlight,” she enthused when she
tried it on.
But then word got out at her
Catholic school about her
planned attire. School officials
told Cady’s parents that she
couldn’t celebrate First Communion with the rest of her class
unless she wore a skirt or a dress.
When the Mansells dug in their
heels, insisting that their daughter should wear the outfit she had
picked out for her special day, the
argument escalated quickly — to
the point that the Mansells pulled
their daughters out of the school
and the church altogether.
“It made me sad and mad,”
Cady said. “We should all be
equal and wear what we would
like.”
At the school, St. John the
Evangelist in St. John, Ind., an
official, who asked The Washington Post not to publish her name
because she didn’t make the decision to ban Cady’s suit, said the
school couldn’t bend its dress
code to suit Cady’s style.
“We have a dress code in place
for our school. We consistently
enforce that,” she said. “Oftentimes, you’ll get somebody who
wants to wear sneakers instead of
dress shoes, or a purple shirt
Catholic school’s apparel rules dashed 9-year-old’s
dream of wearing a sparkling white suit
FAMILY PHOTO
Cady Mansell, 9, models the suit she wanted to wear for her First Communion. Officials at
her Catholic school in Indiana rejected it because they said it violated the dress code.
instead of a white shirt.”
The dress code prescribes dark
slacks and a white shirt for the
boys at the school, and a white
dress or skirt for the girls. A girl
would not be allowed to wear an
outfit that fits the boys’ dress
code, the official said, although
she couldn’t provide a reason,
other than that it is against the
dress code.
“Most people have dress codes
at work. They have dress codes
for other things. They’re in place
for a reason: So that there’s a
consistent, uniformly enforced
dress code,” she said.
The Rev. Sammie Maletta, the
priest at St. John the Evangelist,
told the family that a deacon at
the church could administer
Cady’s First Communion privately but that she couldn’t attend the
ceremony with the rest of her
classmates unless she wore a
dress or skirt. Cady was upset by
that, because she wanted to sit
with her friends. Maletta declined to comment for this article, according to a school official.
“We couldn’t go to the real
Communion Mass,” said Cady’s
mother, Chris Mansell. “We
would have to wait until all the
kids left the building, then come
in like a secret. No picture, no
anything, like we were ashamed
of her. I said, ‘That’s not an
option.’ ”
Cady’s mother, who worked at
the school as a teacher’s aide,
discussed the dress code with the
principal. Her husband took
Cady to the rehearsal for the
ceremony. There, Chris said, Mal-
etta pulled Cady’s father aside.
In Chris’s telling, Maletta said:
“You’re raising your daughter
wrong. You’re setting bad examples for her. She doesn’t have the
brain development and maturity
to decide if she wants to wear a
suit. It’s your job as a parent to
say, ‘You’re not wearing a suit.
You’re wearing a dress.’ If you
won’t do this, you’re raising your
daughter wrong.”
Mansell responded by saying
that if that was how Maletta saw
it, the family would leave the
parish, which was central to their
lives. It meant pulling their
daughters out of the school and
Chris quitting her job there. They
went through with it.
“He already said I was raising
my daughter wrong and we’re
bad parents. At that point, I don’t
want to be in an organization like
that,” Chris said.
Chris said that all this has
nothing to do with Cady’s gender
identity or sexuality — her 9-yearold girl definitely identifies as a
girl.
Cady does have short hair right
now, for excellent reason: She has
twice grown her hair long and
then cut it to donate to Locks of
Love, which makes wigs for people who lose their hair to disease.
Her father has shaved his head
several years in a row as a fundraiser for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, which raises money for
childhood cancer research.
This year, Cady asked, “Can I
shave my head for St. Baldrick’s? I
want to see if I can make more
money than Daddy ever did.” And
she did it — she said she raised
$6,000, the most of anyone at the
event, and after she shaved her
head, they gave her a medal
almost as big as her face.
Her hair is still growing back;
she wears it plain at school, but at
home, she sometimes plays
around with styles like a mohawk. Ask her about her fashion
sense and you’ll get a list not just
of clothing but of all her many
favorites: “I like ‘Star Wars’ stuff.
I like cartwheels. I like drones. I
like math. I like to color.”
Cady said she’s enjoying the
new Catholic school that her
parents enrolled her in a few days
after they left St. John the Evangelist at the end of September.
But the kids at her new school
already celebrated their First
Communion at the end of third
grade, instead of at the beginning
of fourth grade, like Cady was
supposed to do at St. John the
Evangelist, so Chris (who will also
need to find a new job) is looking
for a church where Cady can
finally take her First Communion.
That matters a lot to Chris,
who said she tried attending a
nondenominational church for
about a year but returned to
Catholicism specifically because
of her deep connection to Communion.
“I just felt really called to go
back because of the sacrament. I
prayed on it a lot. I always wanted
my girls to make the sacrament in
the Catholic Church,” she said.
“The Eucharist is just something
so special. I think when you’re a
cradle Catholic, it’s different. It’s
in your blood. It’s in your roots. I
just wanted my daughters to be
able to experience that.”
Until that day comes, Cady is
getting ready — she practiced
Communion at home with orange soda instead of wine. Her
mom posted a photograph of her
in her suit in the Facebook group
Pantsuit Nation, a group of feminists who supported famous
pantsuit-wearer Hillary Clinton.
Cady liked hearing some of the
responses on Facebook.
“I really love it,” she said,
“because then I’m not the only
one that thinks girls should wear
suits.”
julie.zauzmer@washpost.com
MARYLAND
School choir’s rendition of ‘Rise Up’ resonates with a troubled nation
BY
K ELYN S OONG
Nothing seemed out of the ordinary for 11-year-old Kai Young as
he arrived for a morning choir
rehearsal at Cardinal Shehan
School in Baltimore late last
month.
He mingled with friends, suppressed any nerves he had about
singing his solo and let out a voice
that would eventually be heard by
millions — although he had no
idea of that at the time. Kai was
simply singing because that’s
what he loves to do.
Over the course of just a few
weeks, Kai and his school’s choir
have appeared on television stations, courted countless media requests and gone viral for their
uplifting performance of “Rise
Up,” by the singer and songwriter
Andra Day.
And it all started when Kenyatta Hardison, the choir’s director,
decided to record her students’
progress on a Facebook Live video
for the kids’ parents.
“I thought I was just singing,
and when she took that video I
thought it was just going to be a
simple video,” Kai said recently.
“But it really wasn’t.”
Practice that morning was only
the second time Kai and nearly 30
of his classmates in the choir had
met up this school year. They were
rehearsing “Rise Up” for an upcoming gala.
As her kids got ready to sing,
Hardison took out her phone and
began recording live on Facebook,
figuring parents would tune in to
watch their children.
Her prediction was slightly off.
Since the video was posted on
Hardison’s personal Facebook account, the nine-minute clip had
amassed nearly 3.5 million views
as of Friday morning. The video
quickly spread and was eventually
picked up by ChoirBuzz, a choralfocused Facebook group, whose
video of the Cardinal Shehan
School Choir has been viewed
more than 5.3 million times.
The powerful lyrics and the
children’s voices have resonated
deeply with viewers, bringing
some to tears. Several commenters shared stories of personal
struggles and how the video has
inspired them.
“This touched my heart so
much! Keep reaching kids
through music!!” a Facebook user
who said she was diagnosed with
breast cancer last month wrote in
one of the most liked comments
on the ChoirBuzz video.
Viewers from around the world
have reached out to the school,
Hardison said, and many have expressed how the kids’ talents and
innocence have given them hope
during a time when it feels like
tragedies dominate the news.
“With what’s going on in the
world, it’s refreshing,” Hardison
said when asked to explain the
video’s power. “I even said to my
kids, ‘Whoa, this is a different type
of movement.’ . . . I just told them
God is using you and your gift.”
Kai’s father, Deron Young,
echoed Hardison’s thoughts and
pointed to the song’s poignant but
straightforward refrain: “I’ll rise
up / I’ll rise up unafraid / I’ll rise
up / And I’ll do it a thousand times
again.”
“This song, it resonates so much
because of the times we’re in right
now,” he said. “There’s a lot of pain
going on. . . . When you have a
group of kids, innocent kids, singing ‘Rise Up,’ the message is mindboggling, how such a simple
phrase can impact so many people. . . . The kids are trying to show
us there’s another way than what
we’re experiencing. As a parent,
I’m just full of joy that my son is a
part of this.”
The attention has stunned the
members of the small Catholic,
predominantly African American
pre-K to eighth-grade school, and
Hardison is hoping the video can
dispel negative images of the city
that some may have.
“When you think Baltimore
City, people talk about ‘The Wire’,
they talk about the deaths,
the killings, and people, they’re
After Charlottesville, some
white-power record labels
went away. Not this one.
LABEL 56 FROM B1
cists connected to Haught.
While some labels were silenced, at Label 56, the music
plays on.
Devin Burghart, vice president
of the Institute for Research and
Education on Human Rights, a
Seattle-based nonprofit organization that fights white nationalism,
said it is hard to gauge the size of
the white power music business.
Such groups operate in the shadows, and some are linked to gang
activity.
But Label 56, which keeps a low
profile and shuns media attention, is poised to get stronger,
Burghart said.
He said the music label has
maintained connections with
white power crews that operate in
the area, such as the Maryland
Skinheads, without making a formal affiliation with them. Label 56
also has shied away from conflicts
with these groups that could be
damaging to its business while
maintaining a satisfied customer
base that existed long before violence in Charlottesville, Burghart
said.
“The organization’s catalog
continues to expand,” he said in an
email. “They become one of the
bigger players. They’re sponsoring shows. They’re building international ties, as well as ties to lots
of local white power skinhead
groups. They’re targeting antifa.”
Haught declined to comment
on his label, saying in a Facebook
message: “Don’t take it personally,
we don’t do any media requests.”
Public records show Haught
has run Label 56 since 2005. Today, the label serves as a distributor of music and clothing, some of
it right-wing, some of it explicitly
racist.
The label’s offerings include
Confederate flags and “Rock
Against Communism” patches, a
recording of a speech by William
Pierce — the white supremacist
author of “The Turner Diaries” —
and music by Bound for Glory,
perhaps the best-known of the
active white-power bands, as well
as by other artists who embrace
anti-Semitism.
Label 56 also hosts a blog on its
website that offers takes on the
news. A recent post lamented that
“pro-European” musicians were
TRADITIONALIST WORKER PARTY
Jason Augustus — his stage name — says he is a “national socialist.”
being censored online, while another took on the National Football League for its criticism of
President Trump.
The record label’s Facebook
page and Twitter feed remain active, often taking up racially
charged causes. After the Charlottesville attack, one blog post
blamed antifa — an anti-fascist
protest movement — and Charlottesville’s mayor for the violence.
“The message has been distorted by the mass media, essentially
calling everyone in attendance a
Nazi,” the Aug. 14 post read.
“While nearly all of the participants were indeed Caucasian,
there should be no argument that
they should have the same respect
as any another group that has a
focus on Identity Politics. Unfortunately, the age of political correctness and social justice says
that it’s wrong to have an identity
that isn’t minority or immigrant.”
Intermittently, Label 56 also
hosts an Internet radio show that
promotes its releases and music
by like-minded artists. One of
those musicians on the label is
scared of the city,” said Hardison, a
44-year-old Baltimore native.
“When we said Baltimore, people
were like shocked, ‘Baltimore?’ I
said, ‘Yep, right here in Baltimore.’
“We have kids with heart, kids
with capacity, kids who care,” she
said. “There’s talent all around
Baltimore. There are some bright
kids here that get overlooked because of some others who make
wrong choices.”
Cardinal Shehan serves mostly
low- and middle-class students,
according to Hardison, who is in
her 23rd year at the school.
While only about 30 kids performed “Rise Up,” the school has a
96-member choir with varying
levels of talent and experience.
Some, including Kai, have sung
most of their lives. When Kai, who
lives in Ellicott City, was 3, he
would belt out Jackson 5 songs
into a turkey baster while pretending to be Michael Jackson.
“Anything from the Jackson 5
really inspired me to sing,” he said,
“and for this song [‘Rise Up’] to
have inspired hope and happiness, it just makes me happy.”
The four soloists in the video, in
order of appearance, are Kai (sixth
grade), John Paige (sixth grade),
Bryana Hardison (the choir director’s daughter, fourth-grade) and
Carlyse Blackwell (fifth grade).
Bryana and Carlyse had never performed a solo before the video.
In its caption, Hardison wrote
that the performance was “Not
perfect but Imperfectly perfect.”
Hardison has been inundated
with requests for more performances, but she said there are no
plans for anything beyond rehearsals right now. But fans can
expect more Facebook Live videos
(the choir practices weekly on
Wednesdays) and an understanding from her students that the
world is now watching.
“Just going to keep on spreading,” Hardison said. “There’s nothing else we can do. Just keep on
spreading. Just let God have his
way.”
Jason Augustus, who spoke on the
condition that his stage name be
used for fear of retaliation over his
views.
Augustus, 32, of Paoli, Ind., has
a studio at his trailer, recording all
instruments on his records himself. He also says he is a “national
socialist.”
“We are rapidly becoming a despised minority,” he said of white
people in a telephone interview.
“It’s cool to hate white people
these days.”
Augustus grew up in the Ridgewood neighborhood of Queens, a
“very Puerto Rican area,” he said.
“As a kid, I just got my [butt]
kicked constantly.”
He played in “the only national
socialist band in New York City”
and performed at “Hammerfest,”
an annual neo-Nazi festival. He
eventually started a solo project:
14 Sacred Words. The name alludes to a well-known white supremacist slogan: “We must secure the existence of our people
and a future for white children.”
After being contacted by Label
56 last year, Augustus started releasing music with Haught. Despite the business relationship,
Augustus said he has not met
Haught.
“I’m guessing these people actually have on-the-books jobs —
they don’t want to lose them,” he
said. “They want to hold on to
whatever anonymity they can. . . .
They don’t just want to leave their
entire life behind and yell about
Jews all day.”
Though organized at a distance, Augustus’s release on Label
56 showcases the connection between domestic labels and whitesupremacist labels that operate in
Europe, where the white-power
scene is bigger but can run afoul of
speech laws.
“America is the only country
that still has next-to-zero restrictions on freedom of speech,” said
the host of a recent Label 56 podcast. “Throughout Europe, however, it doesn’t exist.”
Augustus, who was banned
from iTunes and Amazon, has
struggled with such laws. The lyrics to his song “The Devil Wears
Our Face” include a Holocaust
reference: “The answer is right
behind the six-pointed star/6 million lies deafen us to who we are.”
While Label 56 released an uncensored version of the song in the
United States, the European version, released by the German label
One People One Struggle, removed the word “six” to make the
reference to death camps less obvious. (One People One Struggle
declined to comment.)
Burghart said groups promoting white-nationalist music are
“burrowing online” as they are
pushed offline, but that doesn’t
mean they’re doomed. They face
no criminal or civil sanctions, he
said, and there is an audience,
however marginal, for their products.
“Hate is their business,” he said,
“and business is good.”
kelyn.soong@washpost.com
justin.moyer@washpost.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
MARYLAND
Montgomery will not pay Pa. company for flawed minimum-wage study
BY
R ACHEL S IEGEL
Montgomery County and a
consulting firm it hired have mutually agreed that the county will
not pay for a $149,000 flawed
study that overestimated the
number of jobs lost if the minimum wage was raised to $15 an
hour.
The county has declined to pay
an invoice sent by the Philadelphia-based firm PFM, said Patrick Lacefield, a spokesman for
County Executive Isiah Leggett
(D). The decision was first reported by Bethesda Beat on Wednesday.
“Basically because of the flaws,
[the study] was not a useful product for us,” Lacefield said. “This is
a better way for us to proceed.”
A spokesman for PFM said that
the error was made by a subcontractor and that the firm had
agreed to waive its fee.
Leggett commissioned the
study this year after vetoing a bill
that would have made Montgomery County the first jurisdiction
in Maryland to require a $15
minimum wage by 2020. Businesses with fewer than 26 employees would have had until
2022 to comply. Five of the County Council’s nine members voted
LOCA L D I G ES T
THE DISTRICT
VIRGINIA
Man sentenced
for armed robbery
GOP group contributes
heavily to AG race
A District man was sentenced
to 41/2 years in prison Thursday
after robbing a man of his SUV
in Northeast Washington on
June 27, federal prosecutors said.
Marcquise Smith, 27, took the
SUV within six weeks after
release from a five-year sentence
for armed robbery in the
District, according to the U.S.
attorney’s office.
The Republican Attorneys
General Association, which has
been pouring money into the
campaign of the GOP challenger
for Virginia’s attorney general’s
race, upped the ante Wednesday
with a $900,000 contribution.
That brings the group’s total
donations to John Adams to
$2.75 million.
The Democratic Attorneys
General Association has given
incumbent Mark R. Herring
$1.7 million so far, although
Herring has raised nearly
$2.8 million more, for a total of
about $4.5 million.
The Republican group
signaled earlier this year it would
break a long-standing practice of
not spending money on races
where there is an incumbent, in
the only attorney general’s race
in the nation this fall.
— Shira Stein
Silver Spring man
fatally shot in NE
A Silver Spring man was
fatally shot Thursday in
Northeast, D.C. police said.
Donnell Lewis Byrd, 30, was
shot in the 200 block of 54th
Street NE, they said.
— Dana Hedgpeth
and Clarence Williams
— Patricia Sullivan
THE REGION
Import ban a
boon to U.S.
salamanders
BY
M ARTIN W EIL
An import moratorium imposed last year to protect America’s salamanders from the scourge
of possible disease seems to be
working, according to a Smithsonian Institution report.
A study published Friday by the
Smithsonian’s Conservation Biology Institute cited a 98.4 percent
cut in imports of 201 salamander
species that could be carrying a
newly discovered fungal disease
that is deadly to salamanders.
Based on the report, it appears
that the ban may be in time to
shield the United States’ ecologically significant salamanders
from the pathogen, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal).
The disease it causes has proved
pernicious elsewhere.
Absence of the ailment among
U.S. pet salamanders was demonstrated, according to the scientists, by a mail-in survey.
Sampling kits were sent to salamander owners. Skin swabs from
639 salamanders showed none
with evidence of the disease, the
scientists said. Salamanders are
particularly abundant in the eastern United States. The country has
190 native species.
martin.weil@washpost.com
L O TTER I ES
Results from Oct. 13
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Thu.):
Lucky Numbers (Fri.):
DC-4 (Thu.):
DC-4 (Fri.):
DC-5 (Thu.):
DC-5 (Fri.):
1-4-0
2-9-7-8
4-2-6-1-5
4-4-3
3-2-3
9-1-6-4
9-8-2-2
6-6-4-2-4
1-1-2-5-0
Day/Pick 3:
3-5-8
Pick 4:
1-2-8-0
Night/Pick 3 (Thu.):
5-8-7
Pick 3 (Fri.):
4-3-9
Pick 4 (Thu.):
5-9-9-0
Pick 4 (Fri.):
3-6-3-1
Multi-Match (Thu.):
5-9-11-26-38-39
Match 5 (Thu.):
10-13-19-22-27 *9
Match 5 (Fri.):
15-21-27-34-36 *22
5 Card Cash:
8D-9S-JH-JS-QC
VIRGINIA
6-2-7
9-3-8-7
6-7-8-19-21
6-6-2
8-3-3
1-4-2-5
7-9-9-7
11-14-18-21-26
2-8-17-21-28
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
12-33-41-45-60 ¶2
Mega Millions:
2-7-18-26-31 **12
Megaplier:
2x
Lucky for Life:
5-19-27-35-43 ‡10
*Bonus Ball
**Mega Ball
¶Cash Ball
‡Lucky Ball
For late drawings and out-of-area results,
check washingtonpost.com/lottery
month in which he proposed
further changes to the bill. He
asked council members to expand the definition of small businesses to include those with 50 or
fewer employees — covering
96 percent of businesses and
50 percent of county employees,
according to Leggett’s office. Leggett also suggested giving large
businesses until 2022 to comply,
and small employers and nonprofit organizations until 2024.
Acting in line with Leggett’s
recommendations, the council’s
Health and Human Services
Committee voted Monday to extend the bill’s timeline and rede-
fine small businesses.
Council member George L.
Leventhal (D-At Large), who
chairs the three-member committee and supported the original
legislation, was the only committee member to vote against the
changes. At Monday’s committee
meeting, Leventhal posed a question for Leggett’s office: Would
Montgomery get its money back
from the consulting firm for the
flawed study?
“I don’t think we got our money’s worth,” Leventhal told The
Washington Post. “I don’t think
the county got a good product.”
Lacefield said the county and
Grand jury
will decide
on indictment
in teen’s death
SLAYING FROM B1
victim, said outside the courthouse after the hearing. “I didn’t
want my 16-year-old going out at
night. We felt a target was on the
back of the Muslim community.”
Many of Nabra’s supporters
wore white T-shirts that read “Justice for Nabra” and carried signs
outside the courtroom that featured images of her in a hijab. In
chants, they demanded justice.
Morrogh said that additional
charges could be filed against Torres and that he has not ruled out a
capital case.
The incident began when
Nabra, of Reston, and a group of
up to 15 teens were returning to
the All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) mosque in Sterling
after eating a meal at McDonald’s
around 3:40 a.m. on June 18 during the holy month of Ramadan,
police said. Pre-dawn meals are a
popular way for young people to
celebrate Ramadan at the
mosque.
As the group walked down
Dranesville Road, Torres approached in a red Pontiac and got
MATTHEW BARAKAT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nabra Hassanen’s supporters rally Friday outside the Fairfax
County Courthouse during a hearing for Darwin Martinez Torres.
into a verbal altercation with a
teen on a bike, police said. Torres
then drove his car over the curb
and across a grassy area, chasing
the teens.
Torres, a construction worker,
caught up with the group a short
time later in a parking lot, police
said. They said he got out of his car
and chased the teens with a baseball bat, allegedly hitting Nabra.
The teens scattered, and one
looked back and saw Torres standing over Nabra as she lay on the
ground, according to a search
warrant recently unsealed in the
case. None of the teens saw the
South Lakes High School student
again.
Fairfax County police said Tor-
res then put Nabra in his car and
took her to Loudoun County,
where he assaulted her again,
killed her and dumped her body in
a pond adjacent to the apartment
complex where he lived in Sterling.
Torres returned to the scene
where Nabra was abducted, and
his car was spotted by one of the
teens in the group, according to
the search warrant.
When a police officer approached the Pontiac and asked
Torres to get out, he was not wearing shoes or a shirt, detectives
wrote in the search warrant.
The officers also discovered
blood on the passenger-side door
and back seat. Torres was taken
Self-Revelation Church
of Absolute Monism
Golden Lotus Temple Yoga Philosophy
Swami Premananda of India, Founder
“THY CELESTIAL PURITY”
Church and Sunday School Services, 11 AM
WWW.SELFREVELATIONCHURCH.ORG
301-229-3871, 4748 Western Ave., Bethesda, MD
BAPTIST
MT. PLEASANT BAPTIST
215 R.I. Ave., N.W., Wash., D.C. 202-332-5748
Office Hours: M-F 8:30-5 pm
Rev. Terry D. Streeter, Pastor
October 15, 2017
7:45 am Joyful Thoughts about God
Psalm 18:46
10:45 am
4:00 pm
An Angry Confused City
Acts 19:28-31
Pastor to Pilgrim Rest Baptist
Visit our website at www.MPBCDC.org
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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rachel.siegel@washpost.com
into custody around 5:15 a.m.,
police said.
He later admitted his role in
Nabra’s killing and led police to
her body, according to the search
warrant. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has placed a
detainer on Torres, meaning they
are interested in possible future
deportation proceedings. He is a
native of El Salvador.
Torres’s background of violence
also has been a focus of the investigation.
A woman in Loudoun County
reported Torres had punched,
choked and sexually assaulted her
a week before Nabra’s killing, according to two people familiar
with her account. But the woman
declined to pursue charges.
Detectives with the Loudoun
County Sheriff’s Office also filed a
search warrant that was recently
unsealed that sought Torres’s high
school records for clues to why he
might have targeted Nabra.
The search warrant states Torres had violent incidents while at
Park View and Potomac Falls high
schools in Loudoun. A relative of
Torres said he had a 4-year-old
child.
Mohmoud Hassanen and his
wife did not discuss the courtroom outburst after the hearing,
but the father said the family has
endured a nightmare.
“I don’t want this to happen to
anybody,” he said. “I love my
daughter very much.”
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
Trump’s ACA move echoes in gubernatorial race
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
Health care, already an issue
that Virginia voters have ranked
high in the state’s competitive race
for governor, came roaring to the
front burner Friday after President Trump announced that he
would continue to dismantle
Obamacare by ending federal subsidies to insurers.
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ralph Northam, in a statement, called the move to halt federal payments that help insurers
cover low-income people “unconscionable as it is putting lives at
risk,” and he challenged his Republican rival, Ed Gillespie, to join
him in calling on Trump to reverse
course.
Gillespie did not comment on
Trump’s actions. Instead, he highlighted his own plans to reduce
health-care costs in Virginia.
The Trump administration informed a federal court Friday that
it would not make the “cost-sharing reduction payments,” expected to total $7 billion, to insurers
because the money was not formally appropriated by Congress.
The move comes after Congress
failed several times to pass legislation overhauling the Affordable
Care Act.
Insurers depend on the costsharing payments authorized under the law to offset deductibles
and other out-of-pocket costs for
about 7 million people. Analysts
expect companies to raise premiums or pull out of individual marketplaces as a result of Trump’s
action.
The precise impact on Virginia
is unclear. In 2016, about 242,000
Virginians bought insurance
plans that were subsidized
through the federal program, according to the state attorney general’s office.
Plans that will be sold in Virginia’s ACA markets starting Nov.
1 already include a surcharge for
the payments’ suspension, which
Trump had threatened for
months.
The insurer Anthem in August
cited uncertainty surrounding
cost-sharing subsidies in its decision to pull out of Virginia’s ACA
marketplace, although it reversed
course the next month. Anthem
did not immediately respond Friday to a request for comment on
its plans.
In a statement, Virginia Gov.
Terry McAuliffe (D), who cannot
seek consecutive terms under the
state constitution, said Trump’s
actions risk “a full blown public
health crisis across our country.”
While Virginia had already
planned for the subsidy cuts for
2018, McAuliffe’s spokesman said
insurers in future years could raise
prices further or pull out entirely.
“Because of the way the Trump
administration has handled this
whole thing, there were already
significant rate increases, these
companies baking in and preparing for the worst,” Brian Coy said.
“They are going to set rates again,
and we have every expectation
that rates will go up again.”
Northam, a pediatric neurologist and McAuliffe’s lieutenant
governor, has sought to channel
voter anxiety about the federal
health-care debate.
“For too long, Republican leaders have allowed President Trump
to play politics with people’s lives,”
Northam said in his statement.
RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRECTORY
ABSOLUTE MONISM
PFM had been talking for “a
period of time” about mistakes in
the initial study. But Leventhal
publicly asking about payment
pushed Leggett’s office to respond this week, Lacefield said.
The firm presented the county
with revisions to the first draft,
but the county has chosen not to
move forward with a new study,
Lacefield said.
“When we looked at the revisions we thought there was still a
lack of clarity,” Lacefield said. “If
there’s still this lack of clarity, we
don’t need to work further on
this.”
VIRGINIA
BY
MARYLAND
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5 (Fri.):
Night/Pick-3 (Thu.):
Pick-3 (Fri.):
Pick-4 (Thu.):
Pick-4 (Fri.):
Cash-5 (Thu.):
Cash-5 (Fri.):
for the bill — one short of the six
needed to override Leggett’s veto.
The study, released in August,
initially predicted that 47,000
jobs would be lost by 2022 if a $15
minimum wage was required.
But later that month, the research
group admitted to “a computation error” that overestimated the
number of lost jobs.
Over the summer, council
member Marc Elrich (D-At
Large) introduced a revised bill
that would grant small businesses, nonprofit organizations
and adult day-care providers until 2022 to adopt the increase.
Leggett issued a memo last
BAPTIST
Shiloh
Shiloh Baptist Church
9th & P Streets, N.W.
Wallace Charles Smith
Senior Minister
Sunday, October 15, 2017
Disabilities Observance
7:45 AM
Reverend Wallace Charles Smith
Preaching
9:30 AM
Church School Classes for All Ages
10:55 AM
Reverend Ronald K. Austin
Pastor of Spirit of Peace Baptist Church
Capitol Heights, Maryland
Preaching
Interpreting Service for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing
#ShilohDC
www.shilohbaptist.org
BAPTIST
Nineteenth Street
4606 16th Street, NW
Church School 8:45 a.m.
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Rev. Darryl D. Roberts, Ph.D., preaching
Be sure to visit www.everyblessing.org
METAPHYSICAL
DIVINE SCIENCE CHURCH
OF THE HEALING CHRIST
2025 35th St. NW, Washington, DC 20007
202/333-7630 or Dial for Meditation 202/338-1240
Sunday, Oct. 15 - 11:00 am divinescience.org
BEFORE CHRIST COMES
Rev. D. Gatewood
Metaphysical Book Store, Tues.-Thur., 10 am-3 pm
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
ALL SOULS CHURCH, UNITARIAN
October 15 9:30 AM & 11:15 AM (ASL interpretation @ 11:15) n
"The Shared World"
Rev. Dr. Robert M. Hardies
16th & Harvard NW; 202.332.5266; all-souls.org
PRESBYTERIAN
4101 NEBRASKA
AVE NW
Tenleytown Metro
Plenty of Parking
202.537.0800
ROMAN CATHOLIC
“. . . It is time for leaders on both
sides of the aisle to put a stop to the
uncertainty and work on stabilizing and building on the Affordable
Care Act’s progress.”
Gillespie, a longtime GOP operative and the party’s 2014 U.S.
Senate nominee, declined to
weigh in on Trump’s move to end
the payments when asked Friday
on WAMU’s “Kojo Nnamdi Show”
and later through a spokesman.
He said Virginia should increase
competition in the insurance market by forming a regional compact
allowing plans to be sold across
state lines. His spokesman, David
Abrams, said that Virginia “can’t
rely on Washington, D.C., to solve
our problems.”
Attorney General Mark Herring, a Democrat running for reelection, said Friday that Virginia
will join several other jurisdictions, including Maryland, California and the District of Columbia, that are suing the Trump administration over the end of the
subsidies.
Virginians will go to the polls
Nov. 7.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
ROMAN CATHOLIC
Basilica of the National Shrine
of the Immaculate Conception
Reverend Monsignor Walter R. Rossi, Rector
14 October 2017
Diocese of Arlington Pilgrimage
1:30 Mass - Great Upper Church
Most Reverend Michael F. Burbidge
Bishop of Arlington
Celebrant & Homilist
_____________
15 October 2017
Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Masses 5:15 (Vigil)
7:30 , 9 , 10:30 12 (Choir)
1:30 (Spanish) & 4:30 Confessions 10 - 12 ,
12:30 - 1:30 (Spanish) & 2 - 4 _____________
“Slowing Down”
Dr. David Renwick
Sunday Worship:
9 A.M. | 10:50 A.M. | 11 A.M.
Sunday School:
9:30 A.M.
BROADCAST LIVE AT:
www.nationalpres.org
Daily Masses 7 , 7:30 , 8 , 8:30 , 12:10 & 5:15 Daily Confessions 7:45 - 8:15 , 10 - 12 3:30 - 6 400 Michigan Avenue Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia
202-526-8300 www.nationalshrine.com Brookland-CUA Metro
Free Parking Bookstore Gift Shop Cafeteria Guided Tours
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
DEATH NOTICE
Prostitution bill faces opposition on council
BILL FROM B1
Grosso’s approach.
Tina Frundt, a victim of sex
trafficking who now runs a program that helps young people
escape their traffickers, said decriminalizing sex work will make
it easier for pimps to open brothels without fearing intervention
from police.
“It is a criminal enterprise, and
by decriminalizing it, we are
making it easier for bad people to
commit crimes,” said Frundt,
whose pimp broke her arm with a
baseball bat when she was a
teenager.
She said too few people realize
the scale of sex trafficking in the
District and its suburbs. This
year, Frundt has received about
eight to 10 referrals a week about
possible victims of trafficking
from sources including police,
parents and the foster-care system.
“If it’s decriminalized, how are
they going to differentiate between the good guys and the bad
guys?” she said. “How is this
going to be regulated?”
Unlike in the Netherlands,
where prostitution is legal and
regulated, sex work would be
decriminalized but not legalized,
meaning that it would not “bring
with it a burdensome regulatory
scheme that would criminalize
Fall break is
the power nap
the academic
year deserves
those who do not comply,” Grosso’s office said.
Sex workers also generally prefer decriminalization because
they would not have to pay for
licensing and other costs of regulation, Monarez said on “The
Kojo Nnamdi Show.”
The bill would create a task
force to study the effects of decriminalization and make any
is illegal in many countries in
Northern Europe — because it
still means that sex workers are
operating in “the shadows.”
“We have to get it out of the
shadows and to change the way
we talk about it,” Grosso said.
But D.C. Council Chairman
Phil Mendelson opposes the bill,
which is also likely to face resistance from the GOP-controlled
“When the women build trust with the police,
they keep your neighborhood safe,
because there are eyes watching.”
Laya Monarez, former sex worker-turned-activist
additional
recommendations,
which could include regulations
for health and safety developed
in consultation with those affected, Grosso’s office said.
Americans are split on whether they believe prostitution between consenting adults should
be legalized, with 49 percent saying it should be and 44 percent
saying it should remain illegal,
according to a 2016 survey by
WGBH’s Point Taken/Marist College.
Grosso said the District did not
opt for the “Nordic model” —
selling sex is legal but buying sex
House Committee on Oversight
and Government Reform, which
has legislative jurisdiction over
the District
“We have amended the current
law over the years to recognize
that sex workers are often the
victims of trafficking,” Mendelson said in a statement. “Moreover, the penalties for first-time
offenders are minor. But there is
a great deal of collateral crime
associated with prostitution, and
it often presents a public nuisance. Accordingly, the District
should not legalize this activity.”
Council member Jack Evans
(D-Ward 2), who has focused on
strategies to combat prostitution
since taking office in 1991, said he
worried that decriminalization
would turn the nation’s capital
into “a mecca for prostitution.”
Much of the street prostitution
is concentrated downtown,
where residents’ complaints pick
up every summer, said Kevin
Deeley, an advisory neighborhood commissioner for the Logan Circle neighborhood.
The complaints typically come
from residents heading to work
or walking their dogs early in the
morning, when they see sex
workers still on the streets, Deeley said.
Deeley’s district includes the
corner of 12th Street and Massachusetts Avenue NW, where police have repeatedly arrested
prostitutes and their customers
over the years. But those sting
operations are only temporarily
successful at curbing sex work,
Deeley said.
“New approaches are certainly
warranted,” he said. “I’m not sure
if this is the right one. But I think
fresh ideas and not being resigned, not thinking the problem
is endemic, is helpful.”
The number of sex workers on
the streets in the District has
decreased in recent years, due to
a combination of police enforcement and sex workers using the
Internet to advertise.
Cyndee Clay, executive director of HIPS, said the organization’s mobile outreach van, which
provides safe-sex material and
syringe exchanges, served upward of 100 people a night during
the 1990s. Today, she said, the van
serves between 30 and 50 sex
workers a night.
The number of prostitutionrelated arrests in recent years
have also decreased, from 714 in
2015 to 216 in 2016, according to
data from the police department.
In 2016, 158 of the arrests were
for sexual solicitation and 37
were for prostitution, according
to police data.
Sgt. Jacob Lipscomb, a member of the human-trafficking
unit, said that police target buyers and sellers for arrest but that
because there are more buyers,
more of them tend to be arrested.
Lipscomb said sex workers
should feel comfortable going to
the police if they have been victims of a crime, regardless of
whether sex work is decriminalized.
“It doesn’t matter if you’re a
prostitute or if you’re not a prostitute — if a crime has been
committed, then we will investigate it,” Lipscomb said, adding he
had no opinion on decriminalization.
rachel.chason@washpost.com
obituaries
BUNNY SIGLER, 76
Singer helped create ‘sound of Philadelphia’
F ROM
FALL BREAK FROM B1
Doug McKenna said if college
students need a champion on this
issue, he’ll be there for them.
“I’m an advocate for students. I
really believe in higher education.
I believe what we’re doing is
positive for the community and
for these individuals who are here
studying,” said McKenna, registrar at American University. “So, I
will defend students’ right to have
a fall break, which seems like a
crazy thing to say.”
If they want, AU students can
remain in their dorm rooms during the break. At most campuses
with a fall vacation, the break
lasts a day or two, although students at the University of Notre
Dame embark on a week-long
respite starting Sunday.
McKenna says of the four institutions where he’s worked, three
have scheduled fall breaks.
“A college student’s job right
now is to be a college student,” he
said. “And within the university
that the student selects to attend,
and if they’re fortunate enough to
attend a university that gives a
fall break, why is that a problem
for anyone?”
McKenna pointed out that
members of the workforce observe federal holidays. Students
pay tuition he said, and they are
engaged in their education.
“This is the culture that students are in, right now, they’re
students in college, and it’s totally
appropriate that after spending
half of the semester studying diligently and then taking exams,
they get a little break,” he said.
McKenna called fall breaks a
time to recharge.
“It’s more of a release valve
than an actual break, I would say,”
he said.
On spring break, students are
gone for a longer stretch of time,
he said. Some use that period for
service projects. Some go to South
Beach. “But that’s fine, too,” he
said. “Now’s the time.”
When they’re on fall break,
many students go home, McKenna
said, or get out of town and relax.
“It’s like a power nap versus an
overnight rest, is [how I would
compare] fall break to spring
break,” he said.
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/grade-point
NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Bunny Sigler, a singer, songwriter and producer who helped
create the soulful “sound of Philadelphia” in the 1970s, died Oct. 6
at his home near Philadelphia. He
was 76.
His lawyer, Lloyd Zane Remick,
said the cause was a heart attack.
Mr. Sigler worked with producers and songwriters Kenny
Gamble and Leon Huff in developing a genre that blended soul,
funk and big-band styles, and
cemented the city in the country’s
musical landscape with its lush
horn ensembles and smooth vocals.
Gamble said Mr. Sigler was one
of the most talented songwriters
and producers he ever worked
with, and “more importantly, he
was like family to us.”
As a performer, Mr. Sigler was
known for such hits as the 1967
single “Let the Good Times Roll &
Feel So Good.” In a 2008 interview
with NPR, Gamble said he, Huff
and Mr. Sigler also performed
background vocals on songs such
as “If You Don’t Know Me by
Now,” recorded in 1972 by Harold
Melvin & the Blue Notes.
Mr. Sigler’s career spanned
decades and saw collaborations
with acts as varied as Jay-Z and
Patti LaBelle.
Mr. Sigler “spent his life using
his talents to bring love and joy to
BLACKER
EDWIN S. BLACKER
Edwin S. Blacker passed on October 6,
2017 in St Petersburg, FL at the age of
80. He was born in Petersburg, Virginia,
the son of Samuel and Dora (Kaplan). After
graduating from the Richmond Professional
Institute, he began his career with the
National Park Service as the manager for
Wolf Trap and Ford’s Theater, followed by
directing the Bat Sheva Dance Company
of Israel. He then joined the staff of the
Kennedy Center where he managed the
Terrace and Eisenhower Theaters, as well
as representing his union. He was active in
the local gay communities of Washington
and St. Petersburg, a founding member of
Bet Mishpachah Synagogue and a volunteer
at the Whitman Walker Clinic. He retired in
2002, and moved to St. Petersburg. He
is survived by his husband of 20 years,
Ervin (Charlie) Cerveny and loving family
and friends. Donations in his memory can
be made to the Metro Community Center
Senior Programs at https://www.metrotampabay.org/product/elder-programs/.
Information regarding his memorial service
can be obtained by contacting:
Blackermem@aol.com
CALLAGHAN
DONALD E. CALLAGHAN (Age 89)
Died peacefully with his two daughters
at his side on Monday, May 15, 2017 in
Williamsburg, VA. Born in Lawrence, MA
on November 10, 1927, he was the third
child of Eugene F. Callaghan and Kathryn A.
Barrett.
His life revolved around service to his
family, his church, his community and his
country. After graduating from high school
in 1945, he headed to Massachusettes
Institute of Technology (MIT) before being
drafted into the United States Army. What
began as a year of Army service, led to
a 24-year career in the Medical Service
Corps of the US Air Force. Don earned
degrees from The Ohio State University,
and Washington University in St. Louis,
MO. Don married Maureen Lennon, an Air
Force nurse, in 1953, while they were
both stationed in TX. Don retired from the
Air Force in 1970 as a Lt Colonel, and
the family moved to Fort Washington, MD,
where he embarked on a career in hospital
administration, consulting and as a small
business owner. Don and Maureen retired
to Whiting, NJ in 1995 and enjoyed the
vibrant community until Maureen died in
2010. Don moved to Williamsburg, VA in
2015 to be close to his two daughters.
Don was predeceased by his wife of 57
years, Maureen, as well as brothers, Eugene
F. Callaghan II and John W. Callaghan. Don
is survived by daughters, Maureen Sadler
(Gary), Williamsburg, VA and Kittie Abell
(Rob), Charlottesville, VA; five grandchildren, Joseph Sadler (Shannon), Victoria,
TX, Michael Sadler (Erica), Little Rock, AR,
Kathleen Abell Edwards (Brandon), Charlottesville, VA, Mary Sadler, Chattanooga,
TN and Thomas Abell, Charlottesville, VA;
three great-grandsons; sister, Marion E.
Callaghan, Silver Spring, MD; and dozens of
nieces, nephews and cousins.
A Funeral Mass will be said on Monday,
October 16, 2017 at 8:45 a.m. in the Fort
Meyer Chapel. Burial at Arlington National
Cemetery, with Full Military Honors, will
immediately follow. Online condolences
may be shared at:
www.bucktroutfuneralhome.net
CAVANAUGH
MATT SLOCUM/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bunny Sigler, who helped develop a genre that blended soul, funk and big band, performs at a
Philadelphia Phillies playoff game in 2009.
others and for that we are all
grateful,” LaBelle tweeted upon
his death.
Walter Sigler was born in Philadelphia on March 27, 1941. “They
called me Bunny right off because
I was born two days before Easter,” Mr. Sigler said on his website.
At times, he also said the name
arose because he was born with a
fully formed front tooth.
Mr. Sigler sang in church
choirs as a boy and eventually
developed an emotional performance style, falling to his knees and
crying while singing ballads at
local restaurants and nightclubs.
Remick said Mr. Sigler worked
until shortly before his death,
posting songs and music videos
on his YouTube channel as recently as August even as health issues
kept him hospitalized for long
stretches of time.
Survivors include his wife,
Martha, and two children.
newsobits@washpost.com
ELEANOR ANN CAVANAUGH
Of Washington, DC on Saturday,
October 7, 2017. Loving mother of
Michael P. Bruckwick (Annemarie)
Grandmother of
Colin, Emma,
Patrick and Frank Bruckwick.
Friends may call at DeVol Funeral Home 2222
Wisconsin Ave., NW, Washington, DC. (Complimentary Valet Parking) on Monday, October 16,
2017 from 6 to 8 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial
will be offered on Tuesday, October 17, 2017
at 10:30 a.m. at Holy Trinity Catholic Church
36th and O St, NW, Washington, DC. Interment
at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made in her name to
the American Cancer Society. please sign the
guestbook at:
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
OF NOTE
Obituaries of residents from the
District, Maryland and Northern
Virginia.
Francis Rockie Fera,
school administrator
Francis Rockie Fera, 76, who
spent 32 years overseeing and
opening new schools in Loudoun
County and retired in 2001 as
principal of Harper Park Middle
School, died Sept. 7 at his home
in Leesburg, Va. The cause was
bile duct cancer, said his wife,
Peggy Fera.
Mr. Fera, who was known by
his middle name, was born in the
District and lived in Northern
Virginia most of his life. He
taught high school math before
starting his career in Loudoun
County in 1969. He opened three
schools and helped organize the
school system and its curriculum
as the county changed. In 1989,
he received The Washington
Post’s distinguished educational
leadership award for his work as
principal at J.L. Simpson Middle
School. He was also principal at
Sugarland Elementary, Guilford
Elementary and Farmwell Station Middle School. He was a
vestry member at St. James’
Episcopal Church in Leesburg.
Mary Lou Lamphere,
volunteer, teacher
Mary Lou Lamphere, 91, a
substitute teacher in Montgomery County, Md., in the late
1960s, and a volunteer with the
Campfire Girls and Walter Reed
Army Medical Center, died
Aug. 22 at a hospital in Gaithersburg, Md. The cause was pneumonia, said a daughter, Jo Ann
Berry.
Ms. Lamphere, a resident of
Bethesda, Md., was born Mary
Lou Hinckley in Rutland City,
Vt., and moved to the Washington area in 1957. She worked an
antiques store in Bethesda in the
1970s. She did needlework and
gardening.
Danya Pelzman,
interior designer
Danya Pelzman, 86, a Washington interior designer who had
done flower arrangements for
the Gerald R. Ford White House,
Vice President Walter Mondale
and others, died Aug. 16 at a
hospital in Bethesda, Md. The
cause was cardiac arrest, said a
daughter, Helen Pelzman.
Mrs. Pelzman, a Bethesda resident, was born Danya Plaw in
Vilkaviskis, Lithuania. She immigrated to Kingston, Ontario, in
1937 and settled in the Washington area in 1967. From 1974 to
1979, she was director of interior
design for Bloomingdale’s department store in the Tysons
Corner region of Fairfax County
and then until 1986, she was vice
president of design at Farr-Jewett & Associates, a D.C.-based
development company. She then
ran her own interior design business until 2010.
David Sadd,
Arab American advocate
David Sadd, 74, the co-founder
of the American Task Force for
Lebanon and a president of the
National Association of ArabAmericans from 1980 to 1988,
died Sept. 16 at his home in
Montgomery Village, Md. The
cause was progressive supranuclear palsy, said a daughter, Theresa Robinson.
Mr. Sadd was born in Akron,
Ohio, and moved to the Washington area in 1969. In 1988, he
started his own international
business management consulting firm, the David Sadd Co. He
formerly served on the boards of
American Near East Refugee Aid
and the Army and Navy Club.
Sylvia Robinson,
community activist
Sylvia Robinson, 56, a community activist who founded the
Emergence Community Arts Col-
lective and worked to influence
redevelopment efforts along
Georgia Avenue NW in the District, died Sept. 18 at a hospital in
Washington. The cause was complications from breast cancer,
said her partner, Jabari Zakiya.
Ms. Robinson, a Washington
native, was a computer analyst
from the early 1980s to the late
1990s. She opened the arts collective in 2006 and was its
executive director until her
death. She was active in the
Georgia Avenue Community Development Task Force, seeking to
have residents’ wishes reflected
in redevelopment projects. She
also helped found other community organizations, including the
Pleasant Plains Civic Association
and the Diverse City Fund, which
offers grants to social justice
organizations.
— From staff reports
C O R R E C TI ONS
The Oct. 8 obituary of CIA wife
and memoirist Bina Cady Kiyonaga incorrectly referred to the
highly decorated military unit in
which her husband, Joseph Y.
Kiyonaga, served during World
War II. It was the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, not the
42nd Regimental Combat Team.
The Oct. 12 obituary of jazz
musician Grady Tate incorrectly
referred to Modern Drummer
magazine as Modern Drumming.
DEATH NOTICE
CHAPMAN
JANE BROOKS (Frazier) CHAPMAN
Joined her husband James A Chapman Sr.
in eternal rest on October 7, 2017. She is
survived by her three adult children, James
Chapman Jr., Cathy Chapman-Tannehill and
William Chapman. She was the loved Grandmother of Carrie Tannehill-Kolyer, Meghan
Chapman, and Kathleen Chapman. and her
great-grandchildren, Cameron Tannehill, and
Cole Kolyer.
Jane was born in 1924 in Washington DC,
and started her adult working life as a phone
operator. Married in June of 1947 and then in
July of 1947 moved to Falls Church, VA. She
lived a full life as a wife and mother. Jane was
active in her church, and community. Jane was
a proud member of the Order of the Eastern
Star. In her later years she worked for Fairfax
County in the voter registration office. Jane
was a percipient in the compilation of the
Providence Perspective, an oral history of the
Providence District within Fairfax County.
In keeping with her wishes there will be
a private family only burial at the National
Memorial Park where her ashes will be
interred.
FAIRFAX
HELEN DAILEY FAIRFAX (Age 101)
Died October 7, 2017 at Goodwin House,
Alexandria, VA. She was the wife of the late
Douglas Davis Fairfax and a former resident
of College Park, MD and Washington, VA. She
is survived by her devoted children, Douglas
D., Jr (Sonona) and Nancy Canova (Robert);
several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
A memorial service will be held at Goodwin
House Chapel on Sunday, October 22, 2017 at
2:30 p.m., followed by a reception. Donations
may be made to Goodwin House Foundation:
Hospice Program or Nursing Education, 4800
Fillmore Ave, Alexandria, VA 22311. Burial will
be at a later date in Union Cemetery, Leesburg,
VA.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
FUTROVSKY
CHARLES J. FUTROVSKY
On Wednesday, October 11,
2017, CHARLES J. FUTROVSKY
of Silver Spring, MD. Beloved
husband of nearly 62 years
of Frances Seigel Futrovsky.
Devoted and cherished father
of Mark (Robyn) Futrovsky, Susan (Larry)
Davis, Beth Cornfield and Julie (Chris) Mottler. Dear brother of Hilda (the late Arnold)
Springer and the late Donald Futrovsky,
Kitty Strauss and Richard Futrovsky. Loving
brother-in-law of Morton Seigel, Ethel
(Mike) Pustilnik and the late Lorraine
Kuritzky. Adored and extremely proud
"Pop" of Erin (Jason), Scott, Cori, Steven
(Courtney), Mitchell, Drew, Liza, Marley,
Vittoria and Alex. Tickled pink great-grandfather of Avery. His family overflowed his
life with nachas. Funeral services will be
held on Sunday, October 15, 2017, 12
noon at Shaare Tefila Congregation, 16620
Georgia Ave., Olney, MD 20832. Interment
following at Judean Memorial Gardens,
Olney, MD. After the interment, the family
will receive relatives and friends at Shaare
Tefila Congregation until 5 p.m. Shiva
minyan will be held Sunday evening at
7:30 p.m. at the Community Room at 3200
N. Leisure World Blvd. Shiva will continue
through Wednesday evening at the home
of Mark and Robyn Futrovsky with minyans
at 7:30 p.m. Memorial contributions may
be made to Shaare Tefila Congregation.
Arrangements entrusted to TORCHINSKY
HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202-541-1001.
ANTHONY S. GALLUCIO
Of McLean, Virginia, passed peacefully October
8, 2017 surrounded by family. Born in Wilmington, Delaware, to Samuel A. Gallucio and
Margaret Talarico Gallucio, Tony attended
Wilmington High School and was a veteran
of the Korean War, serving in the U.S. Army.
He attended the University of Delaware and
Georgetown University School of Law. Beloved
father, he is survived by Charles and Emma
Gallucio of Washington, DC, Darcy Gallucio of
McLean, VA, Thomas Gallucio of Reston, VA,
and Henry Gallucio of Washington, DC. He was
predeceased by his wife of 30 years, Dorothy
R. Gallucio, in 1989; by his dear companion,
Catherine C. Baker; and by his good friend,
Lucy Bruck. Funeral services will be held at
St. Luke’s Catholic Church in McLean, Virginia,
at 11 a.m. on October 20, 2017. A reception
will follow at St. Luke's. In lieu of flowers, the
family kindly requests donations to the Breast
Cancer Research Foundation.
JOHNSON
CURTIS J. JOHNSON
On Sunday, October 8, 2017 in Bowie, MD
Curtis Jerrod Johnson lost his battle with stomach cancer. He was an active duty member of
the United States Airforce and assigned to the
16th intelligence squadron at Ft. Meade MD.
He is survived by his wife, Kwanza Johnson and
his children, Mobian Jerrod Johnson, Tiyanna
Monet Johnson, CurNijhe Jerrod Johnson, Ania
Nevaeh Johnson and Kaiden Jerrod Johnson.
He is also survived by his mother, Jessie Fae
Barkley; father, Winfred Johnson; stepmother,
Tammy Johnson; along with seven siblings; and
a host of aunts; uncles and cousins. The funeral
service will be held at JB Jenkins Funeral
Home on October 20, 2017. Visitation from
9:30 a.m. until 10:30 a.m. service will begin
at 10:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers please send
donations to Debbie Dream Foundation for
stomach Cancer research. Interment Maryland
Veterans Cemetery, 2:30 p.m. Cheltenham,
MD.
B5
RE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
LEVY
QUICK
FINE
KLEIN
WOODRING
PHILIP G. LEVY
LYTLE H. QUICK (Age 96)
Philip passed away suddenly and unexpectedly
Thursday morning, October 12, 2017 on his
way to New York City. A native of Washington, DC, he was a “lifer” at Sidwell Friends
School and graduate of the University of Wisconsin. Philip is best known as the founder and
owner of Bridge Street Books in Georgetown,
referred to by George Will as “a small island
of individuality” and by others as “the intellectual’s bookstore.” He was a very active board
member of The Play Company (New York) and
the University of Wisconsin’s Department of
History.
Philip was predeceased by his parents, Samuel
and Gertrude Levy, and his brother, David. He
leaves behind his loving brother, Richard and
wife, Lorraine Gallard; sister-in-law, Seena; his
devoted nephew and nieces, Benjamin, Karena
and Sarabinh; six grand-nephews and nieces,
close cousins and dear friends as well as the
dedicated staff of Bridge Street books.
Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m., Monday, October 16 at the Washington Hebrew
Congregation.
A gathering celebrating Philip's life will be held
in New York City at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests that
contributions in Philip's memory may be made
to The Play Company, New York or the University of Wisconsin Foundation, directed to the
Department of History.
LINOWES
ADA H. LINOWES
GALLUCIO
EZ
On Wednesday, October 11,
2017, ADA H. LINOWES of
Chevy Chase, MD. Beloved
wife of 59 years of the late
R. Robert Linowes, devoted
mother of Robin (John)
Thomas, Julie (Dr. David
Roth) Linowes, Lisa Linowes Yates and
Michael (Elissa) Linowes. Dear sister of
Irma Bierman and the late Irving (surviving, Ethel) Hamburger. She is also survived
by ten grandchildren. Ada was a native
Washingtonian. A local philanthropist, she
and her husband supported and were
affiliated with many cultural and fine arts,
including the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the
Phillips Gallery, the Greater Washington
Community Foundation and the Shakespeare Theatre Company. She earned her
Bachelor of Arts from George Washington
University and a Master of Fine Arts from
the Corcoran School of Design. She produced paintings, drawings, collages, silk
screening and sculpture. Her artwork
appeared in many local exhibitions. Funeral services will be held on Monday, October 16, 2017, 11:00 AM at Judean Memorial Gardens Chapel, Olney, MD. Interment
following. Memorial contributions may be
made to the Alzheimer's Association.
Shiva will be observed Monday through
Wednesday evening at the late residence.
Arrangements entrusted to TORCHINSKY
HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202-541-1001.
MATARRESE
ANTONY MATARRESE
"Tony"
Passed away on Monday, October 9, 2017
at his home in the retirement community
of Westminster at Lake Ridge, Virginia. An
accomplished musician, he was born in New
Jersey and performed in the New York area as
a young man. He played percussion, accordion
and piano. He joined the U. S. Marine Band
and performed at the White House during the
tenure of presidents, Dwight Eisenhower, John
F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon.
John F. Kennedy appointed Matarrese as the
official White House pianist. Matarrese retired
from the Marine Band after 20 years of service,
then performed in the greater Metropolitan
Washington, DC area. Matarrese is survived
by his sister, Jean Hacker and brother, George
Matarrese. A gathering in remembrance of
Matarrese will be held at Westminster at Lake
Ridge.
MONTGOMERY
ANNA G. MONTGOMERY
Born August 11, 1924, passed away on October
12, 2017 at Anne Arundel Medical Center.
Preceded in death by her husband, Robert in
1990. Survived by her daughter, Clare Blau
(Roger); son, Dean Montgomery (Judy) and
grandsons, Robert and Thomas Montgomery.
A Graveside service will be held at 1 p.m. on
Sunday, October 15 at Parklawn Memorial Gardens, 12800 Viers Mill Rd., Rockville, MD 20853.
In lieu of flowers, donations are welcome to
Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church of Bethesda, 8011 Old Georgetown Rd., Bethesda, MD
20814. Online condolences can be made at:
www.hardestyfuneralhome.com
Of Washington, DC died October 10, 2017.
Dear husband of 71 years of the late Thelma
Quick; mother of the late Yvonne Neal, Darlene
Duckett and Lytle H. Quick, Jr. He is also
lovingly survived by brother, Brooks Quick; 10
grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; four
great-great-grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends. Visitation will be held on
Wednesday, October 18 from 10 a.m. until time
of service at 11 a.m. at Marshall-March Funeral
Home of DC, 4217 9th St., NW, Washington, DC
20011. Interment Maryland National Memorial
Park .
RICE
BETH PHILLIPS FINE
ROBERT JOSEPH RICE "Bob"
On October 7, 2017 of College Park MD
at the age of 94. Beloved husband of the
late Regina Geraldine "Geri" Rice; cherished
father of Robert J. Rice, Michael A. Rice Sr.,
Mary A. Scribner, Regina L. Terry, John G.
Rice, Lynn M. Marion and Patricia A. Rice;
"Grandpa Hook" to 15; (two preceded in
death) and great-grandfather to 13. Friends
may call at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church,
4902 Berwyn Road, College Park, MD on
Monday, October 16 from 9:30 a.m. until
mass time at 10:30 a.m. Interment Fort
Lincoln Cemetery.
www.gaschs.com
RITTER
CHARLES WILLIS RITTER
Of Washington, DC, age 77, on September 26,
2017 after a long battle with Parkinson’s. Born
on February 18, 1940 in Baltimore, Maryland to
the late Mary (nee Claiborne) and Roy Ritter.
Willis graduated from the McDonogh School,
Cornell University and the University of Virginia
School of Law, where he made Law Review,
before embarking on a pioneering and highly
successful career in the practice of municipal
bond law. Beloved husband and best friend
to Anne (nee Miller) for 34 wonderful years.
Exceptionally proud father to Andrew (Lee
Anne), David (Julie), and Ben (Cara). Devoted
and doting grandfather to Todd, Patrick, Vivian,
Robbie, Sam, Olivia Sordo, and Angelo. Loving
brother to Mimi O’Neill and Lucy Skeen. Dear
friend to too many to count and a mentor to
many. An avid golfer, raconteur extraordinaire,
and long-suffering Redskins fan. His generous
philanthropy and devotion to education has
provided opportunity to scores of young people. His wit and wisdom will be sorely missed.
There will be a memorial service for family and
friends and St. Columba's Episcopal Church at
4201 Albemarle St NW, Washington, DC 20016
on November 1, at 11 a.m.
On Wednesday, October 11, 2017,
Beth passed away two weeks shy
of her 65th birthday in Washington, DC. She had courageously
fought a five-year battle with multiple myeloma, an incurable blood
cancer. Beth was the beloved wife of Michael;
mother of Suzanne; sister of Mark L. Phillips
(Anne); sister-in-law of Adrienne Hyman
(Howard) and David Fine; and aunt of Matthew
Hymansmith (Amanda), Julie Hyman Moore
(Brad Moore) and Jamison Hyman. Beth was
a lover of reading, science fiction, classic
movies, traveling, historic architecture, walking and cultivating friendships with a diverse
group of people. Beth graduated from Walter
Johnson High School in Bethesda, MD and
received a Bachelors Degree at the University
of Pennsylvania. After a job as a social worker
in Philadelphia, PA, Beth relocated to the
Washington area and worked at the National
Academy of Sciences before beginning a
career at the US Department of Education.
She devoted more than 30 years as a program
specialist to the areas of library programs,
Native Americans and schools of higher education. Funeral services will be held on Sunday, October 15, 2017 at 2 p.m. at the chapel of
Judean Memorial Gardens, 16225 Batchelors
Forest Road, Olney, MD, with burial to follow
at the adjacent cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
contributions may be made to the Multiple
Myeloma Research Foundation, Norwalk, CT,
or the Center for Science in the Public Interest,
Washington, DC. Arrangements entrusted to
TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202541-1001.
LOUIS L. WOODRING (Age 87)
MARILYN KLEIN
Of Northwest Washington, DC, a transportation
and architecture expert who worked for the
Council of Environmental Quality and the Federal Railroad Administration, passed away
Thursday, October 12, 2017 at the age of 89.
Mrs. Klein, known as Mickey to her friends, was
active in arts and education after retiring from
the government, and taught for many years
at what is now the Osher Lifelong Learning
Institute. She also was an involved member of
the Cosmos Club, and coordinated many of the
Club's social and political events.
Mrs. Klein was co-author of "Clues to American
Architecture," which sold more than 60,000
copies. Her husband, Norman Klein, an architect, died in 1975.
The family honors her boundless energy, creativity, and strength of character that she
provided that will guide them all in the future.
She is survived by three children, Stephen,
Debbie and Laura; four grandchildren and one
great-grandchild. Services will be at Temple
Sinai on Sunday, October 15, at 3 p.m., with a
reception immediately following at The Towers
Community Room, 4201 Cathedral Ave., NW.
On Wednesday, September 27, 2017, Louis L.
“Lou” Woodring died, following a very full, rich
life. Lou was born on July 13, 1930 to Helen
and Joseph Blair Woodring in Reynoldsville,
PA. He served in the Air Force then moved
to the Washington, DC area, where he had
a successful career as a salesman and food
broker. In 1982, he purchased Quality Engraving & Design in Kensington, MD, a business
he grew to great success. He retired in 1997.
Lou was past President of the Silver Spring
Jaycees and White Oak Rotary; past Commander of American Legion Cissel Saxon Post 41;
past Commodore of Rotary Yacht Squadron of
the Chesapeake Bay; and a Mason.
He is survived by his wife of nearly 61 years,
Martha McGee Woodring; daughter, Melissa
Rosenberg; son-in-law, Jim Rosenberg; grandchildren, Sam and Hannah Rosenberg; sister,
Janet Shobert; and several nieces and
nephews. He was predeceased by his parents;
brothers, Bill, Jack and Joe; and grandson, Joey.
A gathering of family and friends will be held
on Saturday, October 14, 2017 at Hines Rinaldi
Funeral Home in Silver Spring, MD, with visitation at 10 a.m., until time of service at 11 a.m.
Burial to follow at Union Cemetery. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be made to Joe’s
Movement Emporium, 3309 Bunker Hill Rd., Mt.
Rainier, MD 20712 (www.joesmovement.org).
Please sign and view the family guestbook:
www.hinesrinaldifuneralhome.com
CEMETERY LOTS
MOUNT COMFORT CEMETERY, ALEXANDRIA
Lot for sale. $2,000.
For more info please call 724-643-8884
HARRIS
SMITH
LUCILLE BOWSER SMITH
On October 10, 2017. Survived by many loving
children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held on
Friday, November 3, 2017 at 3 p.m. at the
Guild Chapel at Asbury Methodist Village in
Gaithersburg, Maryland. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to Hughes United Methodist Church, 10700 Georgia
Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20902.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
DEATH NOTICE
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
KUEHNER
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
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EMAIL:
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TIMMS
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
ROBERT W. TIMMS
Entered into eternal rest on Thursday,
October 12, 2017. He is survived by his
brother, Ronald Timms (Sherry); two nieces,
Lisa Timms Bowne (Jim) an Lori Timms
Agostino (Lenny); three grand-nieces and
nephews, Ashley, Christopher and Maxwell
Bowne; two great friends, Margaret
Sharkey and Kari Baumann; and a host
of other relatives and friends. Funeral and
burial services are private.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
DEATH NOTICE
CARR
MILDRED HARPER HARRIS "Millie"
Millie passed away peacefully on Monday,
October 2, 2017 at the Washington Hospital
Center. She is survived by her son, Charles;
three granddaughters, Adrienne, Quran
and Mecca; three great-grandchildren, Brian,
Da Yana and Claudia; two great-great-grandchildren; three sisters, four brothers-in-law;
two sisters-in-law and a host of nieces,
nephews, other relatives and friends. Family
will receive friends on Tuesday, October 17
from 12:30 p.m. until time of service 1:30
p.m. at FORT LINCOLN FUNERAL HOME, 3401
Bladensburg Rd,. Brentwood, MD. Interment
Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.fort-lincoln.com
CURRENT 2017 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
Black & White
1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
Rev. Msgr. RALPH J. KUEHNER
(Age 93)
Beloved priest of the Archdiocese of Washington, died on Thursday, October 12, 2017. For
more than 20 years, Father Kuehner served
at Saint Francis of Assisi Church in Derwood,
MD. He is survived by his brother, Edward; as
well as many nieces, nephews and cousins.
Relatives and friends may call at St. Francis
of Assisi Church, 6701 Muncaster Mill Road,
Derwood, MD on Sunday, October 15 from
3 to 7 p.m. with Vigil Mass at 7:30 p.m.
Mass of Christian Burial at St. Francis of
Assisi Church celebrated on Monday, October
16, at 10:30 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven
Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be
made to SOME, 71 O St., NW, Washington,
DC 20001 or at www.some.org.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
Color
3" - $502
4" - $545
5" - $680
-----SUNDAY
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3" - $535
4" - $621
5" - $770
COOPER
architecture in Winchester, then moved to
Washington, eventually becoming a partner
in the firm of Walton, Madden & Cooper.
He got the attention of his bride-to-be,
Shirley Sutliff, on their first date when he
sketched one of his projects on a napkin
-- upside-down, so she could see it right
across the table, and with his left hand. Six
months later they were married.
CLARKE THOMAS COOPER, JR.
Died peacefully on Friday, October 6, 2017.
He was born in 1929 to Clarke T. and
Katherine Montague Cooper in Winchester,
Virginia. He attended Handley High School
and Augusta Military Academy, and studied
architecture at Carnegie Institute of Technology.
As a lieutenant in the Army he was made
chief of the design team for the 130th
Engineer Aviation Brigade in Japan. Years
later he still never would tell his children
what he had worked on as he had never
heard whether the project had been declassified.
After leaving the Army he began practicing
He designed apartment buildings, hotels and
schools all around the DC area. Later his
career took an unexpected ecclesiastical
turn as he got involved in a number of
long-term church projects, including a major
renovation of the National City Christian
Church, the master plan for the campus
of the Virginia Theological Seminary and a
new building for Lynn House Nursing Facility.
Among other offices he was president of
the DC chapter of the American Institute of
Architects, vice president of the Metropolitan Club, trustee of the College of Preachers
at Washington Cathedral and a member of
the vestry at St. Paul's Church in Alexandria.
He designed just one project for himself:
a house for his family near Bath, Maine.
He loved it dearly and contrived to spend
as much time there as he decently could.
He is survived by his wife, Shirley; their
children, Clarke, Robert and Katherine (Hoffman), and four grandchildren. A funeral service will be held at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 228 S. Pitt St., Alexandria, Virginia at
2 p.m., Thursday, October 19.
SMITH
Jay Lloyd Smith returned to Virginia and
began work in the elevator trade in 1947,
continuing in the trade for 43 years. He
began at Otis Elevator, then National Elevator, Consolidated Elevator and then moving
to Westinghouse where he later headed up
the Washington Metro subway system.
He served as Treasurer for the International
Elevator Constructors Union Local #10,
Washington. D.C. Chapter for 26 years. He
also held several terms as Business Agent
and was very active in union affairs.
Jay Lloyd Smith married Sibyl Mary Warthen
Smith in 1949. They bought a house in
Kensington, Maryland where they lived until
moving to Rockville, Maryland. Jay and Sibyl
had three daughters. He and Sibyl moved to
Arlington, VA in 2012.
JAY LLOYD SMITH
February 18, 1925 - October 9, 2017
Born on February 18, 1925 in Washington,
DC to Ella Mae Lloyd Smith and Jay Stanley
Smith, Jay Lloyd Smith died on October 9,
2017 in Arlington, VA. He lived to the age
of 92 years. Beloved husband to his wife of
64 years, the late Sibyl Mary Warthen Smith.
Mr. Smith is survived by his brother, James
Warren Smith, and three daughters, Kathryn
Lee Smith, Laura Jaye Smith, and Barbara
Smith Ficarrotta. Also surviving are one sonin-law, Thomas Ficarrotta; three grandchildren, Michael Franklin, Liana Papaleo and
Justin Franklin; two granddaughters-in-law,
and three great-grandchildren. Mr. Smith
also had two nieces, and a nephew, as well
as three grand-nieces and nephews.
Jay Lloyd Smith lived the early part of his life
in rural McLean, VA, working various farming
jobs after school as a child. He attended
Western High School in Washington, DC until
he was drafted into the army in 1942. He
served as both combat engineer and demolitions expert entering the European continent
via Normandy Beach. Near the end of the
European conflict he was sent to the Pacific
Theater. He served a total of 41 months and
was awarded several combat medals for his
service.
Following his service to his country, Jay Smith
worked for 14 months for the National Forest
Service.
Mr. Smith was active in his service to other
people in many capacities. He was always
the neighbor who helped out, the person
others turned to when they needed something.
Mr. Smith was an avid Civil War buff and was
well-read on the subject. He had a collection
of books and essays on the Civil War and
could quote both statistics and the overall
events of every aspect of the Civil War. He
frequently visited famous battle sites.
He also had an interest in country western
music and especially enjoyed the fiddle.
Jay Lloyd Smith saw a lot in his 92 years and
helped a lot of people. He will be sorely
missed by his family and friends and was
loved and respected by all who knew him.
Funeral services will be held at the
Lewinsville Presbyterian Church, 1724 Chain
Bridge Road, McLean, Virginia on October
19, 2017. A memorial visitation will be held
from 10 to 11 a.m.; after which a memorial
service will be held at 11 a.m. Burial will
follow in the church cemetery.
Flowers may be sent to the funeral home or
donations may be made in memoriam of Jay
Lloyd Smith to the Veterans of Foreign Wars
(www.vfw.org) or the American Bible Society
(www.JSmith.americanbible.org).
DEATH NOTICE
6"+ for ALL color notices
$160 each additional inch wkday
$186 each additional inch Sunday
JAMES
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
Col. JOHN M. CARR, JR. (Age 89)
U.S. Army (Ret.)
Of Fairfax County, VA passed away on May
18, 2017 in Winchester, VA.
Col. Carr was born in 1928 in Philadelphia,
PA, the son of the late Catherine and John
M. Carr, Sr. After graduating high school,
joined the U.S. Army and began his military
career of 32 years. While in the service he
completed both a Bachelor’s and Master’s
Degree.
His loving wife of 62 years, Lois H. Carr,
whom he married on February 16, 1952
at Fort Knox, KY, preceded him in death
on August 9, 2014. Lois was devoted to
John, his career, and raising their family.
After their retirement John and Lois loved
spending time at their beach house with
their family, friends, and “the dogs”.
Survived by their son, John M. Carr, III
of PA, daughters, Donna C. Tambor and
husband, Steve of VA, Susan C. O’Donnell
of WV; grandchildren, Ashley M. Tambor, J.
Travis O’Donnell, Kristin L. McWhorter and
husband, Taylor, Erin K. O’Donnell, Colin
A. O’Donnell; and great-grandsons, Mac C.
and Lennox K. McWhorter. Also survived by
his brother, James T. Carr and wife, Geri of
NJ and their families. In addition to family,
John and Lois are survived by their beloved
Boxer, Shelby, 13½ years old.
A funeral service will be conducted at 9 a.m.
on Monday, October 16, 2017 at Arlington
National Cemetery. Guests received at
Administration Building at 8:15 a.m.
Memorial contributions may be made to
Alzheimer’s Association National Capital
Chapter, 11240 Waples Mill Road, Fairfax,
VA 22030.
Please view full obituary and John’s military
career at:
www.ompsfuneralhome.com
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MORIN MacPHEE
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque.
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
PLEASE NOTE:
Notices must be placed via phone, fax or
email. Photos must be emailed. You can
no longer place notices, drop off photos
and make payment in person.
Payment must be made via phone with
debit/credit card.
WILLIAM CHESTER JAMES "Bill"
Passed away on Saturday, September 30, 2017 at The Washington Hospital Center with his
family and friends by his side.
He was the beloved husband of
the late Alice M James. He is
survived by brothers, Louis, John,
George (Regina), and Harry (Dorothy); sisterin-law, Delores Butler Cole; one son, William C
James “Billy” (Bridgett); grandchildren, William
Jr. “Binky”, Costello, Anthony, Darnese, and
Denise; a host of other relatives, neighbors
and friends. The family will receive friends on
October 16, 2017 from 9 a.m. until 12 noon.
Funeral Services will be held at Holy ComforterSt Cyprian Catholic Church, 1357 East Capitol
St. SE, Washington DC 20003. Interment Harmony Memorial Cemetery. Services by POPE.
REMEMBER
YOUR LOVED ONES
MARIE MORIN MacPHEE (Age 89)
Marie Morin MacPhee of Hilton Head, SC,
formerly of Springfield, VA, passed away on
October 7, 2017. She was predeceased by her
husband of 59 years, Frederick C. Morin, Jr.,
longtime past Chairman of the Fairfax County
Water Authority. She was also predeceased
by her second husband, Daniel J. MacPhee of
Hilton Head, SC.
Marie was born in Boston, MA on December
16, 1927. She lived in Springfield for over 50
years where she worked for the March of
Dimes Virginia Chapter from 1963 to 1987.
Marie was a communicant of Saint Lawrence
Catholic Church in Alexandria.
Marie and Fred had three children. Surviving
are Frederick C. Morin III (Tracy), Cynthia Morin
Pack (Ronald) and Michele Morin Leake (John
Patrick). She is survived by 10 grandchildren
and 12 great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be held Sunday, October 15, from
2 to 5 p.m. at Demaine Funeral Home, 5308
Backlick Road, Springfield, VA 22151. A graveside service will be held Monday, October 16,
at 12 noon at the Fairfax Memorial Park, 9900
Braddock Road, Fairfax, VA 22032. Additional
information may be found at:
www.demainefunerals.com
RICE
December 17, 2017
Dot and Mike had seven daughters in 10
years. They lost one, Kathryn Sue, to cystic
fibrosis, but raised six to be capable women
and mothers. They survive her: Deborah Kelly
of Silver Spring, Maryland, Judith Meyer of
Auburn, Maine, Karen Chirgwin of Williston,
Vermont, Janet Rice of Woodstock, Georgia,
Theresa Sanderson of Newington, Connecticut, and Constance Brown of Southport,
North Carolina. Dot also has 13 surviving
grandchildren and a new great-grandson,
known in the family as “Mr. Baby.”
TheWashington Post Magazine will publish
an Annual Commemorative Section.
Plan to be a part of this annual tradition!
RATES
$11.10 per Line
$150 B&W Photo
$200 Color Photo
DEADLINE
5 p.m.
Friday, November 17, 2017
For more information, please call:
202-334-4122 or 1-800-627-1150, ext. 4-4122
E-mail:
deathnotices@washpost.com
DEATH NOTICE
DOROTHY JONES RICE
The large and generous heart of Dorothy
Jones Rice finally failed her on October 10,
2017, at her home in Southport, North Carolina.
She had devoted all of her 79 years to
the happiness and welfare of her friends,
family, and others she encountered. Born
and raised in Washington, DC, she attended
Holy Cross Academy. She served a few years
in the office of Allen Dulles, the first Director
of the CIA, before marrying Michael Rice
in 1959 and beginning her true vocation,
motherhood. They recently celebrated their
58th wedding anniversary.
Dot’s maternal instincts were too strong
to be denied when her child-rearing years
ended. The entry into the household of a
Golden Retriever gave her an outlet for those
instincts, and soon the house had a litter of
puppies that provided the start of a career
of raising and showing a champion line of
Golden Retrievers. That went on for 35 years,
yielding a house full of ribbons and trophies,
and many happy families who took her dogs.
Dot was known throughout New England and
eastern Canada for the quality of her golden
retrievers. She served a term as president
of the Connecticut River Valley Kennel Club.
Friends may call at Our Lady of Victory
Church, 4835 MacArthur Blvd, Washington,
DC, on Monday, October 16 from 11 a.m. until
time of Mass of Christian Burial at 11:30 a.m.
Interment will immediately follow at Gate of
Heaven Cemetery, Silver Spring, MD.
Please view and sign the family’s online
guest book at: www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
A possible break in the clouds
The sun should try to break through,
with fog and drizzle ending in the
morning. Temperatures near 70 to 75
degrees are likely, with possible
afternoon sunshine. The evening
should bring showers and drizzle, with overnight
lows in the mid-60s to near 70 degrees.
Today
Rain
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Mostly sunny
Monday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Tuesday
Sunny
Wednesday
Sunny
Thursday
Partly sunny
79° 65
85° 59
66° 46
65° 47
71° 51
74° 53
FEELS*: 80°
FEELS: 86°
FEELS: 66°
FEELS: 67°
FEELS: 73°
FEELS: 76°
CHNCE PRECIP: 55%
P: 20%
P: 10%
P: 0%
P: 5%
P: 10%
WIND: NE 4–8 mph
W: SSW 8–16 mph
W: N 8–16 mph
W: NNE 6–12 mph
W: SSW 6–12 mph
W: SSW 4–8 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
78/61
Hagerstown
77/60
Philadelphia
75/64
FORECAST
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
66° 1:00 p.m.
60° 4:00 a.m.
69°/52°
89° 1954
31° 1906
64° 4:00 p.m.
58° 2:00 a.m.
69°/45°
84° 1989
30° 2012
64° 4:00 p.m.
59° 2:00 a.m.
68°/46°
89° 1954
32° 2006
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +7.5° yr. to date: +3.1°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 74°
Ocean City
76/66
OCEAN: 68°
Lexington
80/59
Richmond
79/61
Norfolk
77/66
Virginia Beach
77/67
Past 24 hours
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Normal
OCEAN: 71°
Kitty Hawk
76/68
OCEAN: 74°
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
High
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
Trace
0.73"
1.43"
31.81"
31.55"
0.00"
1.40"
1.37"
36.15"
33.29"
0.01"
1.31"
1.45"
33.50"
33.33"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
2 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, decreasing clouds, warmer. High 66–
70. Wind southwest 4–8 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy. Low
51–57. Winds southwest 3–6 mph. Sunday, mostly sunny,
warm. High 69–73. Winds west–southwest 6–12 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, cloudy, a shower. High 75–79.
Wind east 4–8 mph. Tonight, mainly cloudy, mild. Low
63–67. Wind south 6–12 mph. Sunday, partly sunny, breezy,
very warm, humid. High 78–85. Wind southwest 8–16 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly cloudy, drizzle,
damp, patchy fog. Wind east 4–8 knots. Waves a foot. • Lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, cloudy, drizzle, a shower. Wind
northeast at 6–12 knots. Waves 1–2 feet on the Chesapeake Bay,
1 foot on the Potomac.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls
will be around 3.2 feet, rising to 3.1 feet on Sunday. Flood stage at
Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
3:44 a.m.
11:09 a.m.
4:27 p.m.
11:24 p.m.
Annapolis
1:20 a.m.
7:48 a.m.
1:29 p.m.
7:34 p.m.
10:28 p.m.
Ocean City
3:25 a.m.
9:33 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
Norfolk
5:36 a.m.
11:39 a.m.
6:07 p.m.
none
4:14 a.m.
9:25 a.m.
3:37 p.m.
10:07 p.m.
Point Lookout
ACTUAL
Cape May
75/67
Annapolis
75/66
Charlottesville
82/59
Today’s tides
Tu
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Weather map features for noon today.
Baltimore
77/60
Dover
76/63
Washington
79/65
RECORD
°
M
REGION
AVERAGE
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
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A fight for
extradition
in double
murder case
NESSIBU FROM B1
citizens of foreign countries have
allegedly committed crimes in
the United States, and then
sought refuge in their homelands. The United States will extradite its nationals, but a number of countries, including Brazil,
Germany and China refuse to
turn over their citizens to face
charges abroad, even in murder
cases.
The State Department declined to comment on Nessibu’s
case, but it has previously said
such policies are one of the largest stumbling blocks in cases
involving international extradition. It has long pushed for countries to drop the bans.
Caught in the middle are grieving families such as those of
Henok Yohannes and Kedest Simeneh, both 22, of Fairfax County.
With the criminal proceedings
frozen, the families are in an
agonizing limbo.
“We just want justice,” said
Kedest’s father, Sileshi Dinke, 54.
Dinke said his family has been
in direct talks with the Ethiopian
Embassy in recent days about
possible solutions and he is cautiously optimistic something
might be worked out. The embassy did not respond to requests for
comment.
The families of the victims
agreed to speak about the killings
in the hopes that publicity will
help bring about a resolution. At
the very least, they want to make
Nessibu’s life in the Ethiopian
capital of Addis Ababa less comfortable.
Nessibu did not respond to a
request for comment through
email and social media, his family
THE DAILY QUIZ
The cover story of the Real Estate
section highlights the growing
popularity of luxury sheds. According
to the story, how much has business at
Modern-Shed grown annually the past
six years?
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110+
World
High: Mecca, Saudi Arabia 110°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –32°
Yesterday's National
High: Lake Charles, LA 95°
Low: Bodie State Park, CA 0°
SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
couldn’t be reached, and no attorney is listed for him in court
records.
An alleged killer at the door
Christina Simeneh, 12, began
the story of her sister’s killing in a
quiet voice: “I was the last person
to see her.”
Still wearing her crossing
guard belt after arriving home
from elementary school on a recent afternoon, Christina described how Kedest walked
through the door of the family’s
Springfield home shortly before
7 p.m. on Dec. 22. She was with
three people. One was the man
who would allegedly end her life.
Kedest Simeneh, top in photo,
and above left, and Henok
Yohannes, above right, were
fatally shot in December.
Yohannes Nessibu, who flew to
his native Ethiopia the day
Simeneh’s body was found, has
been indicted, but the case has
ground to a halt because
Ethiopia will not extradite him.
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
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Set
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excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
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Ho Chi Minh City 87/76/t
Nothing seemed amiss. Her
sister briefly popped into a bathroom or bedroom to get something and called her boyfriend,
Henok Yohannes. Christina chatted with the men.
Then, Kedest headed back out
into the night.
The encounter was so ordinary
it might have been forgotten, if
Christina had seen her sister
again.
At the time, Kedest was working in health care and had attended Northern Virginia Community
College. Her family said she did
not appear to be in any kind of
trouble.
Instead, they remember a
young woman who was quick to
give hugs, and funny and generous. They recalled that Kedest
once came across a homeless
woman and her kids begging one
day and took the family out to eat
at Panda Express.
After leaving home on Dec. 22,
Kedest’s family said, she and the
men headed to Henok’s house.
According to a search warrant
filed in the case, Kedest posted a
video on social media, showing
the car ride.
The brief video shows the
group laughing and joking. There
were no signs of what was to
come.
When the group arrived at
Henok’s home on Blarney Stone
Court in Burke, Nessibu and Kedest went inside while the other
men waited in the car, Kedest’s
family said one or more of the
other men told detectives.
Waiting inside was Henok,
who had been a soccer star at
West Springfield High School,
before winning a sports scholarship to attend Virginia’s University of Mary Washington in 2012,
his family said.
Henok dropped out his sophomore year to make more money
and took jobs with a moving
company and a restaurant, the
family said. He eventually wanted
to open his own business. They
said Henok and Kedest had a
budding relationship.
“He was humble, loving, full of
life and had a big smile,” said his
sister, Elsabeth Yohannes.
Tomorrow
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Islamabad
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Jerusalem
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Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
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Ottawa
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Prague
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A second search warrant filed
by Fairfax County police said a
family member told detectives
that Henok had a history of dealing drugs, mostly marijuana.
Family members said in an interview that detectives told them
that the meeting on the evening
of Dec. 22 was arranged so Nessibu could purchase drugs from
Henok.
But the deal went awry somehow. Henok’s family said he was
shot in the neck and head as he
lay on the floor in the home. The
second search warrant said police
found a backpack that contained
what they believed was marijuana and a scale at the scene.
Kedest’s family said Nessibu
ushered her out of the house,
according to witness accounts
given to police. Nessibu then
allegedly forced the men with
him to drive to a residential
neighborhood a little more than
two miles away in Burke.
It was there that Kedest’s family said police told them she was
shot execution-style in the back
yard of a home on Cordwood
Court about 8 p.m. A neighbor
found her body the next morning.
A stalled push for justice
Kedest’s family said detectives
told them that Nessibu paid
about $3,000 in cash for a oneway plane ticket from Dulles International Airport to Addis Ababa, leaving the same day Kedest’s
body was found.
Detectives had begun piecing
together evidence they believed
would link Nessibu to the killings, but they were just a step
behind.
The first search warrant states
that one of the men who was in
the car with Nessibu and Kedest
told detectives on Dec. 29 that
Nessibu killed Henok and was
seen holding the murder weapon
in the area where Kedest’s body
was found.
By March, prosecutors felt they
had enough evidence to pursue
charges. A Fairfax County grand
jury indicted Nessibu for murder
and a weapons charge in both
killings. Prosecutors began efforts to have Nessibu returned to
2017 PostPoints Scavenger Hunt
Catch Kate Hamill’s Vanity Fair
At Shakespeare Theatre if you dare.
This wicked play is a must-see.
Better yet, admission’s free.
When is Vanity Fair, the ReDiscovery Reading Series season opener,
at Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington, DC?
Holy cow, God is back.
He’s divine and a crackerjack.
At Signature Theatre for six weeks
An Act of God is tongue in cheek.
What beloved DC actor plays the part of God in An Act of God
at Signature Theatre?
(Hint: See ShakespeareTheatre.org for the answer.)
(Hint: See SigTheatre.org for the answer.)
EARN 5 POINTS AND A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES. Answer our Scavenger Hunt questions, then go to washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click “Quizzes” to enter your responses.
83/76/sh
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Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
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64/51/sh
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
the United States.
In a typical extradition, prosecutors work with the Justice and
State departments to formally
request a suspect’s return to the
United States. The United States
maintains extradition treaties
with more than 100 countries
that govern the process, which
can take months or even years.
The families said prosecutors
hit a roadblock in Nessibu’s case,
because the United States does
not have an extradition treaty
with Ethiopia and the country
bars the extradition of its citizens.
The families said Ethiopian officials offered to try Nessibu in that
country’s courts, but the families
balked saying they doubt it would
be a fair trial.
Similar issues with extradition
have played a role in other highprofile cases. In 1997, Samuel
Sheinbein, then 17, and a friend
killed and dismembered a fellow
high school student in Montgomery County, Md.
Sheinbein fled to Israel, where
he claimed Israeli citizenship.
The United States sought Sheinbein’s extradition, but the Israeli
courts blocked it, saying the nation’s law at the time banned the
extradition of its citizens. The
move caused an international
row and eventually led Israel to
change its law.
“There has been in the past,
not just in Ethiopia, but in other
countries resistance to turning
over natives,” said Joshua Dratel,
an attorney who specializes in
extradition cases.
That battle is one the Simeneh
and Yohannes families plan to
keep fighting.
The killings occurred as the
families were preparing for the
holidays. Kedest’s family recalled
having to remove her unopened
presents from beneath the Christmas tree. Without an end to their
ordeal in sight, the wounds remain as raw as they did that day.
“We are devastated,” said Elsabeth. “We need justice for Kedest
and Henok.”
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
Jennifer Jenkins contributed to this
report.
KLMNO
Style
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
.
SECTION C
EZ
RE
PHOTOS BY KYLE GUSTAFSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Onstage, Foo Fighters are no pretenders
The heavyweight rock-and-roll band opens the new Anthem venue at D.C.’s Southwest Waterfront on a raucous note
BY
C HRIS K ELLY
flexible stage presentation that can put the cap as
low as 2,500. On opening night it was set up for
maximum capacity and the scale was a bit staggering upon entry. But with its layer-cake balconies and
massive general admission pit (gently graded to
ensure great sight regardless of height), the Anthem
shares the spirit of the 9:30, bringing concertgoers
within arm’s reach of stadium-size acts.
For the Northern Virginia-raised Grohl, the show
was yet another homecoming, as he reminisced
about eating jumbo crabs on the waterfront, listening to DC101 and WHFS, and visiting the old 9:30
Club, in its original F Street NW location. “I grew up
in this city, I grew up down in Springfield,” he
explained. “Now, I get to come back home and play
rock-and-roll for all you people, and I like it.”
Foo Fighters are one of the last pure rock-and-roll
bands that can easily fill a venue of this size, a
distinction Grohl doesn’t take lightly. “You know
what I get asked every day? ‘Is rock-and-roll dead?’ ”
he mused, as he turned the bridge of “The Pretender”
into a Chuck Berry riff. “Do you think rock-and-roll is
dead? Do you love rock-and-roll? I love rock-and-roll.”
If the 9:30 Club feels like a warehouse turned into
a rock club, then the Anthem feels like an airplane
hangar that mutated into one. And when it was time
to officially open the venue — the centerpiece of the
redeveloped Wharf on Washington’s Southwest Waterfront, owned and operated by the team behind
D.C.’s world-renowned 9:30 — the Anthem called in
the only band with the local roots and international
fame that could pull it off: Foo Fighters.
After a Wednesday “warm up” gig as part of the
Anthem’s soft opening, the band returned on Thursday night, ready to rock, officially. “It’s gonna be a
long night,” frontman Dave Grohl warned the crowd
before kicking off the band’s 21/2-hour set. “We gotta
break this s--- in.” That’s exactly what Grohl and
friends did, treating the Anthem like a new leather
jacket: turning something that glimmers with newness and making it feel as cozy as a childhood home.
Making the mammoth, multimillion-dollar venue
feel intimate was no small feat. The brand-new venue
can hold five times as many concertgoers as the 9:30,
maxing out at a capacity of 6,000 but also with a
FOO FIGHTERS CONTINUED ON C4
Northern Virginia-raised Dave Grohl and his band,
Foo Fighters, perform during the opening concert
at the Anthem in Southwest Washington.
Hunker down,
‘father of
daughters’
BY
At Kennedy
Center, sound
renovation
J ESSICA C ONTRERA
The world was waiting for Matt Damon
to address the scandal that had enveloped
Harvey Weinstein, the Hollywood mogul
who had helped launch his career, and the
A-lister chose his words carefully.
“As the father of four daughters,” Damon said in an interview this week, “this
is the kind of sexual predation that keeps
me up at night.”
It may have sounded familiar — and
not just because there have been a lot of
sexual harassers to denounce lately.
“As the father of three daughters,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
pronounced a year ago, as the then-Republican nominee for president was exposed on tapes bragging about groping
women, “I strongly believe that Trump
needs to apologize directly to women and
girls everywhere.”
“As the father of three daughters,” said
Fox News commentator Geraldo Rivera a
few months earlier, after his company’s
CEO, Roger Ailes, was accused by multiple women of sexual harassment, “I urge
all who have been offended to reach out.”
Every catastrophe has its own cliches.
We hunker down against a hurricane. We
refuse to let the terrorists win. We offer
thoughts and prayers. But even words
that are well-intentioned can, after a few
FATHERS CONTINUED ON C2
BY
what it takes to appeal to a mainstream audience —
you know, getting “white famous.”
For instance, Mooney has a chance at a big project
that would help propel his star beyond the comedy
club circuit — but he’s asked to play a woman to get
laughs.
Although loosely based on the experiences of
executive producer Jamie Foxx, Floyd is somewhat
Music wants to be democratic; and the
Kennedy Center wants to be all things to
all people, while signaling a nod to
grandeur. Its new Terrace Theater, unveiled this week after a 16-month renovation, manages to carry out this confusing mandate. Where once there was a
dizzying descent along sharply raked
stairs toward a narrow proscenium,
there is now a feeling of spaciousness,
with gleaming walls, undulating wood
(mimicking the sound waves they reflect), wider aisles and curving balconies
swelling from the side walls.
“We’re 98 percent done,” said Deborah
Rutter, the Kennedy Center’s president,
standing in the lobby before the first
Fortas Chamber concert in its new home,
on Thursday night. How is the new
space, with its flexibility — a proscenium
that can be set up and removed with
ease, acoustical curtains behind the
paneling that can be drawn to absorb
more sound for amplified performances
— going to affect programming? “It
hasn’t yet,” said Rutter; this season’s
events were planned while the hall was
under construction. “But it will.”
The prime mandate was “acoustics,”
says Leora Mirvish, the architect who
supervised the Eisenhower Theater ren-
TELEVISION CONTINUED ON C3
MIDGETTE CONTINUED ON C2
MICHAEL DESMOND/SHOWTIME
Jay Pharoah as a comedian struggling with which lines he’s willing to cross to be “White Famous.”
New Jay Pharoah series ‘White Famous’ shows
the perils of being black and funny in Hollywood
BY
E LAHE I ZADI
To wear the dress, or to not wear the dress?
It’s a question black male comedic actors have
grappled with publicly and privately for generations,
and one that Floyd Mooney immediately faces in
Showtime’s “White Famous.” The comedy series,
which premieres Sunday, follows a popular black
stand-up comic, played by Jay Pharoah, confronting
A NNE M IDGETTE
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
SCOTT SUCHMAN
The Terrace Theater at the Kennedy Center has undulating wood on the walls to reflect sound waves.
Seating still steep at revised Terrace
MIDGETTE FROM C1
ovation in 2008 and now the new
Terrace. Whatever its wider uses
— the opening weekend featured
rap and comedy performances —
its main function remains acoustic music. Jenny Bilfield, president and chief executive of Washington Performing Arts, a frequent renter of the hall, finds
that the new Terrace “feels more
intimate, elegant, flexible, and
has better sightlines and amenities for visitors.” That steep descent or ascent to one’s seat,
though, is still a factor. “We’re
trying not to be the first casualty
in the new Terrace Theater,”
quipped one woman helping an
unsteady man navigate the stairs.
Concert halls are reopening all
over the place. This weekend, the
Freer and Sackler Galleries of the
Smithsonian are reopening after
an extensive renovation. Its new
theater has undergone less a
reconfiguration than a facelift,
with new carpeting and upholstery, A/V technology, and theatrical lighting. Like the Terrace,
the theater is multipurpose; Mi-
chael Wilpers, the museums’ performing arts programmer, says
there are no more than 20 live
performances there a year.
The Terrace, by contrast, is one
of the main small theaters in the
city — and the Fortas series broke
it in lovingly and at considerable
length. Patrons got a jolt at the
start with two trumpet fanfares
(executed with aplomb and agility by Brandon Eubank and Amy
McCabe) that demonstrated the
hall can be almost too live. The
program, called “2-4-6-8,” was
designed to show the hall in
different configurations of instruments, from four-handed piano — Joseph Kalichstein and
Lisa Emenheiser in enthusiastic
Slavonic Dances by Dvorak — to
the Mendelssohn Octet, with the
Emerson and Dover Quartets
representing the old and new
guards of American chamber
music. But the groupings weren’t
really varied enough — no winds,
no voices — to put the hall fully
through its paces, though they
added up to almost three hours of
energetic music.
In general, the space seems
And if you weren’t fathers of
daughters, it wouldn’t be so bad?
FATHERS FROM C1
too many repetitions, begin to
draw ire: Lawmakers who, in the
wake of mass shootings, are quick
to offer those “thoughts and
prayers” via Twitter and Facebook
have lately faced a backlash from
some who say they’d rather see
legislative action instead.
“When social media gives the
opportunity for us all to express
similar feelings in similar ways,
people start to think that they are
hollow,” said Peter Smudde, an
Illinois State University professor
of communications.
The sentiment of wanting to
pray may be genuine, Smudde
said, but the strong backlash to
the phrase has made it not only a
cliche, but a taboo. “As a father of
daughters” seems headed for the
same fate — and Damon quickly
felt the blowback.
“Keep in mind that women are
not only ‘wives’ and ‘daughters’
but also, in fact, people,” one Twitter user snipped on Wednesday, in
a tweet that got 14,000 likes.
“Men only humanize women
when things affect women in their
lives,” said another.
For his critics, it wasn’t that
Damon mentioned his kids. But
because he denounced sexual violence and mentioned that he was
a father in the same breath, it
more warm and vivid, with a
clarity — and good sightlines —
from every corner of the room. It
was easy to zero in on the details,
from the ping of a broken E string
from the Dover’s violinist Joel
Link in the Brahms G Minor
Piano Quartet and the various
bobbles of the Emerson’s waning
violinist Eugene Drucker, sounding a little sour in some romantic
passages from Schoenberg’s
“Verklärte Nacht.” None of this
mitigated the goodwill in the
room, or the impression that the
new Terrace Theater remains the
Kennedy Center’s most pleasant.
anne.midgette@washpost.com
Washington Performing Arts and the
Fortas concerts will jointly present
the Sphinx Virtuosi at the Terrace
Theater on Sunday afternoon. The
Freer and Sackler Galleries are
celebrating their reopening with a
festival of Asian food and cultures on
Saturday and Sunday, including popup performances by members of the
Silk Road ensemble; there will be
one in the new auditorium on
Sunday morning.
seemed to them he was denouncing sexual violence merely because he is a father.
“You don’t need a daughter to
feel guilty about working with a
man who preys on young women,”
wrote Hunter Harris for New York
magazine. “You just need a conscience.”
Mark Macias, a public-relations
adviser who works in crisis management, puts it this way: Would
you condemn racism with the preface, “As a person with a black
friend . . .”?
“I am sure there are a lot of
people who never spoke out
[against Weinstein] and they
might feel a little guilty, and this is
their way of appeasing their conscience,” Macias said. “But you
shouldn’t have to bring up proof
that you can relate.”
Perhaps
Damon’s
words
ACROSS
1 Floors
11 Beliefs
15 Offer a
libation (for)
16 Polar explorer’s
concern
17 President
leaving office,
perhaps
18 Commercial
name abbr.
19 Redden, say
20 William Tell
Monument city
22 Venus is in it:
abbr.
23 “S” on an
invitation
24 Vehicle-sharing
company
26 “Born on the
Bayou” band,
briefly
27 __ bar
30 It’s tuned
an octave
higher than
a cello
31 1988 noir
remake
32 Unconcealed
enmity
34 Samoa or
Caramel
deLite
36 Certain
baron
37 King’s value,
at times
38 Gather
39 Sch. period
40 Backwoods
preposition
41 Combined
43 King or
queen
44 Chinese
military gp.
45 Grew
49 Pipe in a song
52 Pen name that
sounds like a
drink
54 Cry at the
craps table
56 U.S. dept.
with a bolt
on its seal
57 Experience
for Marty McFly
58 Classroom
fixture
59 Unable to
continue
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
By Jim Quinlan
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
DOWN
1 Did
2 Pioneer in
portable music
3 Arrogant
manner,
slangily
4 Top medalla
5 “You peeked!”
6 Totally
7 Heaven-__
8 Helped make
a bed
9 Mark’s
replacement
10 Premium
movie channel
that dropped
its “!” in 2005
11 “Portlandia”
airer
12 Pot without
speed
13 Serious
transgression,
in Catholicism
14 Split
21 Coppers
23 Burned
with steam
25 Led
26 Sometime
substitute for
bread crumbs
wouldn’t have gotten so much
attention if they hadn’t been said
so many times before. In the past
few years, the cycle of powerful
men being accused of sexual assault and abuse has played on
repeat. Bill Cosby, Bill O’Reilly,
Roger Ailes: an awful sense of deja
vu sets in. In each case, the men
were alleged to have used their
influence to take advantage of —
and then silence — women they
encountered professionally.
The scandal that most brought
out the daughter-mentioning was
the disclosure of the “Access Hollywood” tape, in which future
President Trump bagged about
grabbing women’s genitals.
“Such vile degradations demean our wives and daughters
and corrupt America’s face to the
world,” Mitt Romney said.
“As the grandfather of two pre-
10/14/17
34 Barely
caught
35 Molelike
mammal
40 Hat for
Indiana
Jones
42 Decrees
43 2017 Dolly
portrayer on
Broadway
46 “Finish the job!”
27 Some
sweaters
28 Get by
29 Venerated
symbol
31 Martha Kent
portrayer
in recent
Superman
films
32 Barracks VIP
33 Betamax player
47 “Handsome,
clever, and
rich” Austen
character
48 Food or water
49 Finally give
50 Tournament
format
51 Likely to skid
53 Get to
55 Enhance,
as a résumé
FRIDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
cious girls,” said Jeb Bush, “I find
that no apology can excuse away
Donald Trump’s reprehensible
comments degrading women.”
Then-Rep. Jason Chaffetz (RUtah) made the reference even
more vivid, saying he could not
look his 15-year-old daughter in
the eye and “endorse this person,”
meaning Trump. Nineteen days
later, though, he tweeted that
while he wouldn’t endorse
Trump, he would be voting for
him.
Politics and intentions aside,
research has shown that having a
daughter can, in fact, change how
a man treats other women. Studies have found that men with
daughters are less attached to traditional gender roles; male CEOs
with firstborn daughters pay their
employees more; male judges
with daughters are more likely to
rule in favor of female plaintiffs in
cases involving employment discrimination; and male venture
capital managers with daughters
hire more female partners.
All of these steps toward equality can be achieved, of course,
without producing any offspring.
Take, for consideration, the advice of writer Anne Victoria
Clarke, who in a post for Medium
this week, promised one easy trick
for men to make sure they are
“treating women like people.” Just
behave toward them like you
would toward Dwayne “The
Rock” Johnson.
“Simply,” Clarke suggested, “offer them the same respect, admiration, and healthy dose of fear
you’d offer anyone who could
completely destroy you should
you deserve it.”
jessica.contrera@washpost.com
B FEATURED LISTING B
$35
Baroque Brüder
Sat., Oct. 14, 5 p.m.
A program of gorgeous choral works by Telemann, Bach,
Bruhns and Graupner. Guest soloists include
Grace Srinivasan, soprano; Barbara Hollinshead,
mezzo-soprano;Joseph Dietrich, tenor; and Steve Combs,
bass.
St. John’s Episcopal Church,
Norwod Parish
6701 Wisconsin Ave
Chevy Chase, MD
www.cantate.org
Ages
18-35
$20
Tickets available at
cantate.org
Under 17
FREE
CHILDREN'S THEATRE
GALita
Oct 16-20 at 10:30 am
Oct 14 & 21 at 3 pm
In this enchanting Spanish fairy tale, a brave young girl
helps her prince defeat evil and accomplish the impossible.
October 14, 2017
7:30p.m.
Join The thirteen in a concert of works from the Jewish
Dispora, the African American experience, and works
relevant to our shared society.
Tchaikovsky’s
Eugene Onegin
Saturday October 14
at 7:30 p.m.
Tchaikovsky’s romantic opera, in costume and sung in
Russian with English supertitles.
www.belcantanti.com
Orange is the
New Barack
Fridays & Saturdays
at 7:30pm
No Show on Oct. 13 & 14
A musical, political satire.
We put the MOCK in Democracy!
Info: 202.312.1555
www.capsteps.com
Blancaflor
The Girl Wizard
GALA Theatre
3333 14th Street, NW
202-234-7174
www.galatheatre.org
$10-$12
Bilingual
St. Columba's Church
4201 Albemarle St. NW
Washington, DC 20016
www.thethirteenchoir.org
$30 at the
door
$25 in
advance
Tenleytown metro!
Ample street
parking!
Concord-St. Andrews
United Methodist Church
5910 Goldsboro Road
Bethesda, MD (240) 230-7372
Gen. $40
Senior $35
Students
w/ID $15
MUSIC - CHORAL
On the Migration
of Souls
OPERA
Tickets online and
at the door
COMEDY
Ronald Reagan Building
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Tix available at ticketmaster.com
202.397.SEAT
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
$36
Discounts available
for groups of 10 or
more.
Call 202-312-1427
16-2898
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
An honest answer
to a question
about happiness
10/14/17
Hi, Carolyn:
Carolyn
Hax
In General: Be honest with
yourself about who you are — the
good and bad in balance. You’ll
make better decisions about
everything. And you’ll be more
mindful of having one set of
standards by which you judge
both yourself and others, which
in turn will make you more openminded, less judgmental and all
around on better terms with your
surroundings. For further
reading, Google “fundamental
attribution error.”
Dear Carolyn: I’m getting
married very soon, and my future
in-laws are all in the wedding. For
various reasons, the primary one
being that there are some cultural
differences and they do things
differently than I do, they have all
preemptively refused to do the
few things I’ve asked them to do:
be at a certain place at a certain
time wearing venue-appropriate
clothing.
I talked this over with my
fiance and told him I accept that
they want to be themselves and
do things their own way, and that
I’m okay with it. He got very upset
about the fact that they aren’t
respecting my wishes and
intervened on my behalf. I think
this involved a yelling fight with
at least one relative, though I
wasn’t there.
I now sense that the future inlaws are all upset with me. They
think I sicced my fiance on them,
which I didn’t, and I’m not sure
how to proceed from here! How
do I do damage control that
doesn’t undermine my fiance, who
was just trying to support me?
— Weddingy Fluff ’n’ Stuff
Weddingy Fluff ’n’ Stuff: There
comes a point when trying to fix
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Adapted from a recent online discussion.
Based on all the
questions you see,
is there any one
nugget of advice
you would give to
EVERYONE to be more happy
and to find their own inner
solutions to problems?
— In General
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NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
something starts to make it
worse, and your fiance
unfortunately reached that point
when he challenged his family.
I suggest you say nothing
further about this, in your
defense or your fiance’s or
anything else. Instead, be nothing
but warm and welcoming to his
family hereafter, and consider
tweaking or outright eliminating
items on the wedding agenda that
expose these cultural differences.
I don’t know if this last one is
even possible, but have a look. It’s
hard to think of a specific
wedding event that’s worth
having if the place/timing/clothes
are going to present such a
problem. (Please feel free to
correct me on this, anyone, if you
have a specific example that says
otherwise.)
At least, this is true of the
specific wedding issue. Your
fiance might have also been trying
to fix something with his family in
a larger sense — marrying
someone outside their/his culture
could even be part of that.
If true, the outcome of this part
of the story probably won’t be
known for some time. It’s also
something I suggest you leave to
him to navigate, although it
would be appropriate and even
useful to prompt him to talk/
think about the possibility that
this wedding issue is just a proxy
for a bigger battle he’s trying to
fight with them. It’s possible he
himself hasn’t entirely seen it for
what it is.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
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Jay Pharoah’s prime-time shift
TELEVISION FROM C1
mirrored by Pharoah, too. “I felt
like I connected with Floyd
Mooney immediately,” the standup comic and “Saturday Night
Live” veteran said in an interview.
Hailing from Chesapeake, Va.,
Pharoah, who turns 30 Saturday,
has been performing since he was
a teenager and toured with comics such as Charlie Murphy before
joining SNL in 2010.
“I felt like we were on similar
paths — of course his career is a
little bit different — but our stories are synonymous,” Pharoah
said of the character he plays.
“Being hot on the underground
and trying to cross over into the
industry, and then Floyd trying to
keep his moral code.”
“White Famous” was co-created by Tom Kapinos, the man behind Showtime’s big hit “Californication.” He said he was drawn to
the show in part because of the
subject matter and “the sense that
for a black comedian, the concept
of ‘selling out’ is just much more
vivid” than for a white comic.
While at first hesitating over
whether to try to help develop the
series — “I don’t know if I’m the
guy for this,” Kapinos recalled —
he changed his mind after meeting with Foxx. “It was hilarious.
We had an hour-and-a-half meeting and it was like a one-man
show,” Kapinos said.
Pharoah met Foxx when the
comedic veteran hosted SNL in
2012. “We connected immediately. He told me,” then Pharoah
broke into a spot-on Foxx impersonation, “I think you’re talented,
I think you’re talented, man. You
know, I want to work with you, I
want to work with you.”
Foxx would later explain that
while Floyd Mooney “is like almost every comedian who’s trying to cross over,” Pharoah recalled, some of the character is
also based on specific people besides Foxx, like Eddie Murphy,
who would confide in and seek
advice from his former wife, Nicole Mitchell Murphy.
In the show, Mooney also is
co-parenting with his ex-girlfriend and love of his life, Sadie
(Cleopatra Coleman). “I think I
subconsciously borrowed from
‘Californication’ with the family
dynamic,” Kapinos said. “Beyond
a comedian wanting to be successful, he has a woman he loves
and he has a kid with her, and it’s
about trying to balance all that.”
(In fact, “White Famous” is set in
the same fictionalized Los Angeles, with some minor characters
from “Californication” popping
up, such as Stu Beggs, played by
Stephen Tobolowsky. “If you’re a
fan, it’s just a fun little nod,”
Kapinos said.)
There are other striking parallels with Pharoah’s own experience, he said, such as Mooney’s
best friend (Jacob Ming-Trent),
who helps his character keep “his
moral code and his values,” Pharaoh said. “I really do have that in
my life.”
He doesn’t want to divulge
some of the specific story lines
Mooney encounters during the
show’s run, but said, “The topics
that we do touch on are so talkedabout behind closed doors. These
things happen all the time, but,
like, there’s not a spotlight on any
of them.”
“I don’t know if I can give you
any specifics. I mean, I’ve had a
lot of experiences with weird folks
in the industry — I’m not going
put out celebrity names, but there
are some weird people in Hollywood,” Pharoah said.
In the first set of episodes, we
see Mooney endure bizarre meetings with producers, and he gets
caught up in a controversy after
one producer’s racially charged
encounter with him goes viral.
And expect to see a few impersonations, but not too many; Pharoah
has a strong impression game,
from Denzel Washington to Jay-Z.
Most notably, he played President
Obama on SNL, where he had a
six-season stint that ended a year
ago.
In an April interview with Hot
97, Pharoah talked about how
SNL puts “people into boxes” and
being asked to wear a dress on the
show and saying no. Now, when
asked how his SNL experiences,
good or bad, have impacted him,
he responded, “Well, I’m not
speaking in the negativity because, first of all, that’s my family.”
“But I mean, SNL was a launchpad. It was a starting point,” he
continued. “That place was comedy boot camp and once you get
out of there, you’re ready for anything.”
Even though shooting multiple
takes and not performing in front
of a live audience differs from
SNL, “the training that I did have
from before kind of reinforced
and empowered me to get things
done quicker,” Pharoah said. “I
like one takes, those are cool, but
the fact that you can do it again —
it just gives you a chance to put
variety out. You give them different variations of the line.”
Mooney faces pressure from
his agent and others in the industry to do whatever it takes to get
“white famous.” In real life,
Pharoah said he’s managed to
avoid compromising his values in
pursuit of recognition. He credits
his “good home base,” which includes his sister, who serves as his
manager, and his parents and
family, who are still a big part of
his life.
“I still go to my grandma’s
house and eat with her when I get
down there, you know, the things
that I always did before, I still do,
and I think that’s kept me grounded,” he said. “I think my view will
always be the same: You don’t
have to compromise yourself to
get where you want to go, especially with so many avenues and
so much access that the world has
right now.”
MD (301) 841-6897
elahe.izadi@washpost.com
White Famous (30 minutes)
premieres with two episodes Sunday
at 10 p.m. on Showtime.
“EXTRAORDINARY.”
-Pete Hammond, DEADLINE
LIAM NEESON
DIANE LANE
MARK FELT
THE MAN WHO BROUGHT DOWN THE WHITE HOUSE
BASED ON THE
BOOKS BY
Washington, DC
LANDMARK’S
E STREET CINEMA
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ARCLIGHT
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MARK FELT JOHN O’CONNOR
PETER LANDESMAN
WRITTEN AND
AND
DIRECTED BY
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BETHESDA ROW CINEMA
(301) 652-7273
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C4
EZ
Set spans Foo Fighters’ career
FOO FIGHTERS FROM C1
The members of Foo Fighters play like
they are singlehandedly responsible for
keeping the heart of rock beating. Grohl
led the way with his Pantene mane and
Paul Stanley ad-libs, knocking out riffs
while screeching and yeowing his way
through the Foo Fighters catalogue.
(“You know I like to scream a little bit”
was the night’s biggest understatement.)
That catalogue is now nine albums
and 22 years deep, and the band played a
song for every year of its existence,
bracketing the set with one of its earliest
singles (“I’ll Stick Around”) and its best
one (“Everlong”). In between, there were
old favorites (“Big Me,” “My Hero”), monster hits (“All My Life,” “Best of You”), and
a handful from the band’s new album,
“Concrete and Gold.”
The songs released during this decade
suffer from terminal proficiency: They
rock, sure, but after hearing a few, they
start to sound the same, or the same as
classic rock radio, with some Beatles here
and some Thin Lizzy there. (And some
Rolling Stones, too: The band covered
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
“Bitch” with 9:30 Club and Anthem owner Seth Hurwitz on drums.)
For the past decade, as Grohl has
turned into a rock-and-roll statesman,
he has become obsessed with keeping
the genre alive. Meanwhile, his lyrics
have become more fixated on mortality,
from the “I never wanna die” pleadings
of “Walk” to the totality of “These Days.”
On the latter, he sings, “One of these
days your heart will stop and play its
final beat, but it’s all right.” Perhaps that
acceptance of his own mortality puts the
death of rock-and-roll in perspective:
Despite the band’s best efforts, rockand-roll might die . . . and that’s all
right, too.
DISTRICT
Brave (PG) 2:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
10:30AM
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
10:35-1:25-4:20-7:20-10:15
American Made (R) CC: 10:45-1:304:15-7:10-10:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 1:20-4:30-7:45-9:50
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
10:40-12:05-2:40-4:25-7:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 5:15
It (R) CC: 1:15-9:30
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:15-2:004:45-7:30-10:20
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
11:20-1:55-4:35-7:15-11:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
11:25-12:30-3:00-4:30-5:30-7:008:00-9:30-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:004:00-7:00-10:00
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) CC: 12:00-3:457:30-11:15
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: 12:00-2:35-5:157:55-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:00-2:456:30-10:10
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
11:30-7:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
3:10-10:40
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
Zauberflote (NR) 12:55
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 11:20-2:00-4:40-7:20-10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
11:10-1:50-4:30-7:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 9:40
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:30-2:305:10-7:50-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:35-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:25
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:40-1:304:20-7:10-9:55
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: (!) 11:40-2:20-5:007:40-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: (!)
5:00-8:30
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air & Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
One World, One Sky: Big Bird's
Adventure (NR) Please Call
Angelika
Pop-Up at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 11:45-2:15-4:40-7:00-9:20
Wind River (R) CC: 11:20-9:30
So B. It (PG-13) 11:15-3:15-5:10-9:15
LoveLive! Sunshine!! Aqours 2nd
LoveLive! Happy Party Train Tour
11:00AM
The Pathological Optimist 1:30-7:30
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 11:152:00-4:45-7:30
Avalon Family: Imagination Stage
Song Circle (NR) 10:00AM
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:00-3:155:30-8:00
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
American Made (R) CC: 12:15-2:455:10-7:35-10:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:10
It (R) CC: 11:00-1:40-4:25-7:10-9:50
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:15-12:001:45-3:15-7:15-8:00-9:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:003:30-4:45-7:00-10:15-10:30
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird
Hamilton CC: 10:30-1:00-4:007:00-10:00
Goodbye Christopher Robin CC:
10:45-12:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-9:0010:00
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13)
CC: 10:15-12:45-3:45-6:45
Human Flow (PG-13) CC: 10:151:30-4:45-8:15
Halloween (1978) (R) 11:59
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
10:35-1:05-4:05-7:05-9:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
10:20-1:10-4:10-7:10-9:40
The Florida Project (R) CC: 10:251:15-3:15-4:15-6:30-7:15-9:15-9:50
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
(R) 11:59
The Room (R) 11:59
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
Dolores (NR) 11:30-4:30-9:50
The Big Sick (R) CC: 11:00-1:304:15-7:30-9:55
Bending the Arc 11:45-2:15-4:457:15-9:45
The King's Choice (Kongens nei)
(NR) 1:40-7:00
Medal of Honor Theater NMMC
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:0012:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
Regal Gallery Place
Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street NW
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
Zauberflote (NR) 12:55
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
12:00-2:35-5:10-7:45-10:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
1:00-4:25-7:30-10:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:45-3:15-5:45-8:15-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-7:00
It (R) 7:15-10:10
The Foreigner (R) 12:00-5:258:05-10:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:152:45-5:15-8:00-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:10-5:008:00-10:50
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
3:35-10:25
The Foreigner (R) 2:40
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
1:00-3:45-6:30-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
6:00-9:45
It (R) CC: 10:15-4:30-7:30-10:30
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 10:451:30-4:30-7:30-10:15
IMAX Theater
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
601 Independence Avenue SW
10:30-1:15-4:15-6:30-7:00-9:30
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00-1:452:40
4:45-7:45-9:00-10:45
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
11:00-2:30
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
Dream Big: Engineering Our World: My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
10:00AM
An IMAX 3D Experience 12:25
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
AMC Magic Johnson
Capital Center 12
Experience (R) 5:45-8:55
800 Shoppers Way
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-2:05-5:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
12:50-3:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 11:15-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:35
AFI Silver Theatre
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Cultural Center
CC: 10:00-1:05-4:10-7:10-10:25
8633 Colesville Road
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
Criss Cross (1949) (NR) 5:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 11:30- 10:40-1:10-3:40-6:20-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 10:152:00-4:30-7:05-9:35
12:30-4:00-7:30-11:00
Kansas City Confidential (1952)
It (R) CC: 10:00-4:10-9:00
(NR) 2:45
Blade
Runner 2049 (R) CC: 9:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:10The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:45-2:302:30-4:50-7:10-9:30
5:15-8:00-10:45
The Asphalt Jungle (NR) 7:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 5:45
The Killing (1956) (NR) 9:45
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 10:10-12:45AMC Academy 8
3:35-6:15
6198 Greenbelt Road
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 10:20-4:30-7:05
CC: 11:30-2:45-6:00-9:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
American Made (R) CC: 2:00-4:45- 10:30-1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30-9:457:40-10:25
10:30-11:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:45-1:3011:45-3:15-5:15-7:00-9:45
4:15-7:00-9:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
11:15-1:45-4:15-6:45
Experience (R) CC: 11:30-3:00It (R) CC: (!) 11:00-2:00-5:00-10:00 6:30-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: (!) My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:30-8:45
10:00AM
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
Brawl in Cell Block 99 1:15-7:15
(!) 11:00-12:10-2:30-5:00-7:30Brave (PG) 2:00
10:30-11:00
ArcLight Bethesda
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
7101 Democracy Boulevard
(!) 11:05-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
It (R) (!) 8:00
10:40-1:00-4:45-7:10-10:20
AMC Center Park 8
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 12:004001 Powder Mill Rd.
2:55-4:40-7:40-9:55
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) American Made (R) 11:40-1:55CC: 12:00-3:15-6:25-9:30
5:15-7:35-10:55
It (R) CC: 11:00-5:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:00-1:45- 11:20-1:50-4:55-7:55-10:40
4:30-7:30-10:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:30-1:05-3:25-4:35-7:00
11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 9:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 2:00 It (R) 4:25-10:35
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) The Foreigner (R) 11:30-2:40-5:00CC: 12:40-3:20-6:00-9:00
8:10-10:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:2512:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:10
2:05-4:30-7:05-9:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:15- Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:502:50-6:30-8:30-10:05
12:45-2:00-5:10-8:00-9:40
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:00- Marshall (PG-13) 11:45-2:20-3:155:00-7:45-10:30
5:05-7:45-9:30
AMC Columbia 14
The Florida Project (R) 10:50-11:5510300 Little Patuxent Parkway
2:25-5:35-7:25-8:20-9:35-10:50
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
2:30-5:55
Zauberflote (NR) (!) 12:55
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:00-1:254:50-8:15
11:30-2:05-4:35
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: (!) 11:20-2:00-4:50-7:40-10:25 10:15-2:10-5:50-7:30-10:05
American Made (R) CC: 11:25-2:10- Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13)
5:00-7:45-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) CC: 12:35-3:00
Professor Marston & the Wonder
CC: 11:50-3:00-6:30-9:50
Women (R) CC: 11:35-2:15-5:40Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 9:30
7:20-9:50
It (R) CC: 11:40-2:50-6:10-9:20
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:25-3:507:15-10:25
(!) 11:05-1:45-4:30-7:05-9:40
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: (!) 7:15
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
11:00-1:40-4:20-6:55-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:30Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!) 7:00-10:30
10:50-1:05-3:25-5:10-7:35-10:05
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00-1:50- 10:30-1:00-3:50
4:40-7:30-10:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D 12:10-3:20-6:40-9:50
Experience (R) (!) 11:15-2:45Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:006:15-10:00
11:00-1:30-2:30-6:00-9:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder It (R) 6:30-9:40
Women (R) (!) 10:50-1:25-4:25The Foreigner (R) 10:50-1:40-4:307:20-10:10
7:20-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) (!) 11:45Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:303:15-7:00-10:30
2:00-4:40-6:50-7:40-9:20-10:10
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 5:45
Bow Tie Harbour 9
The Foreigner (R) (!) 10:50-1:302474 Solomons Island Road
4:20-7:10-10:05
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
11:20-2:00-4:40-7:20-10:10
(R) (!) 10:00
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 1:404:20-7:10-10:00
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
American Made (R) 11:30-2:20The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: 5:10-7:50-10:40
11:30-2:05-4:40
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 10:30-12:50-3:10-5:30-8:00-10:20
CC: (!) 11:40-2:20-5:00-7:40-10:20
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 10:40Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
1:20-4:00-6:50-9:40
1:10-4:10-8:30
(PG-13) 11:10-2:10-5:00American Made (R) CC: 11:25-2:10- Marshall
7:40-10:30
5:00-7:45-10:35
Professor
& the Wonder
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Women (R)Marston
10:20-1:00-3:40CC: 11:50-3:15-6:30-9:40
7:00-9:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
(!) 11:40-2:15-4:50-7:25-10:00
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
11:15-1:55-5:45-8:10-9:20
11:15-4:20-9:40
It (R) CC: 7:10-10:15
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 7:00
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 3:40-9:10 Zauberflote (NR) 12:55
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D The LEGO Ninjago Movie 3D (PG)
Experience (R) CC: (!) 12:00-3:30- 1:50-7:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
7:00-10:30
11:15-2:20-5:15-8:10-11:00
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 12:05
American Made (R) 11:40-2:35Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: (!)
5:30-8:30
11:35-2:10-4:45-7:20-9:55
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 12:10-3:20- Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:30-2:45-6:00-9:15
6:40-9:50
Flatliners (PG-13) 1:00-3:45-10:15
Judwaa 2 (NR) 2:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:25-3:55Marshall (PG-13) (!) 11:15-1:255:10-8:55
4:20-7:15-10:05
Professor Marston & the Wonder It (R) 12:45-4:00-7:10-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:20Women (R) CC: 2:05-4:50-7:3010:10
3:00-5:40-8:20-11:00
Last Night(!) 11:20AM
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 11:10-2:35Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) (!) 4:35 5:35-8:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:25-5:10The Foreigner (R) (!) 1:45-4:556:25-8:55-10:10; 3:55
7:35-10:20
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) (!)
12:10-7:40
11:25-1:50-3:10-4:25-5:35-6:508:00-9:15-10:25
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:35-2:20-5:05-7:50-10:35
Blood Money 1:15-6:45
The Foreigner (R) 10:55-1:50-4:50The Rocky Horror Picture Show
7:45-10:45
(R) 10:00
Brave (PG) (!) 2:00-6:00
Marshall (PG-13) 11:00-2:00-5:008:00-11:00
AMC Loews
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
12:10-7:40
11115 Mall Circle
Happy Death Day (PG-13) XD:
Brave (PG) (!) 2:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: 11:00-1:50-4:30-7:15-9:55
Hoyt's West Nursery
11:30-1:30-4:00
Cinema 14
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
1591 West Nursery Road
CC: 10:15-12:30-3:30-6:15-9:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
CC: 11:45-3:15-6:45-10:00
1:55-4:20-6:45
MARYLAND
KYLE GUSTAFSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 1:45-4:40-7:15-9:50
American Made (R) CC: 1:354:15-10:05
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 1:00-4:05-7:10-10:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
1:20-4:00-6:30-9:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 1:002:00-3:00-4:30-6:30-8:00-10:00
It (R) CC: 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:3011:30
The Foreigner (R) CC: 1:40-4:257:05-9:50-11:45
American Assassin (R) CC: 1:153:50-6:35-9:10
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: 1:003:20-5:40-8:00-9:20-10:20-11:40
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:25-4:106:55-9:40
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: 1:50-4:45-7:20-9:55
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13) CC:
1:00-5:30-7:55-10:25-11:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:45-3:00-6:30-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:30-3:157:00-8:15-10:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:15-12:00-12:45-3:00-3:15
It (R) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
Flatliners (PG-13) 6:00-8:45
The Foreigner (R) 11:00-1:45-4:457:30-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:452:30-5:00-6:30-8:00-9:30-10:45
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 11:15-1:45-4:30-7:1510:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:452:00-4:30-5:45-9:30
Mahanubhavudu (NR) 5:15-8:30
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 10:50-1:10-4:30-7:40-10:50
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
12:40
Zauberflote (NR) 12:55
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
11:30-2:05-4:35-7:05-9:40
12:20-3:10-6:00
American Made (R) CC: 11:20-2:15The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 5:00-7:50-10:40
12:50-3:50-6:45-9:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 1:45American Made (R) 12:45-3:405:20-9:00
6:45-9:30
It (R) CC: 1:00-4:00-7:10-10:20
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 3:15- Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: (!) 7:00
6:15-9:15
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 11:20Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 4:20-10:15
12:40-4:00-7:15-10:25
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:50-2:40My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
5:30-8:10-10:50
11:15-12:30-3:30-6:15
American Assassin (R) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:152:10-7:20
11:45-3:20-6:30-7:00-10:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Regal Hyattsville Royale
It (R) 1:00-4:30-7:45-10:45
10:50-1:25-4:00-6:45-9:20
Stadium 14
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:50Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
6505 America Blvd.
11:45-12:45-2:15-3:15-4:40-5:40The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 1:00- 3:00-6:00-8:45
The Foreigner (R) 12:10-5:157:15-8:15-9:45-10:45
3:45-6:45-9:30
8:00-10:50
Blade
Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:00- Experience (R) CC: 10:45-2:201:30-4:15-7:00-10:00
Landmark
2:40-5:20-8:15-9:00-10:40
6:00-9:40
American Made (R) 12:00-2:45Bethesda Row Cinema
Judwaa 2 (NR) 8:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:005:30-8:15-11:00
7235 Woodmont Avenue
4:45-7:30-10:15
Marshall (PG-13) 12:40-4:10Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 7:30-10:20
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 8:30
12:15-4:00-7:15-10:30
Down The White House (PG-13)
Blade
Runner
2049
3D
(R)
1:50A
Question of Faith (PG) CC: 3:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: 10:50-1:30-4:40-7:15-10:05
2:50-5:30-9:15-10:00
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
12:00-12:30-3:15-6:00
Goodbye Christopher Robin CC:
11:40-4:50-10:00
Xscape Theatres
10:00-10:40-1:10-2:00-3:50-4:30- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:15-3:45Professor Marston & the Wonder
Brandywine 14
5:00-7:30-8:45
6:40-7:30-9:30-10:00
Women (R) CC: 10:45-1:20-4:007710 Matapeake Business Drive
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 10:00- It (R) 1:15-4:30-7:45-10:50
6:35-9:20
The
LEGO
Ninjago
Movie
(PG)
CC:
Flatliners
(PG-13)
1:30-7:30
12:50-3:40-6:50-9:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:45-3:2010:50-1:40
The Foreigner (R) 1:00-4:00Lucky CC: 10:40-1:15-3:30-8:007:00-10:40
The
Mountain
Between
Us
(PG-13)
7:00-9:45
10:05
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:45- CC: (!) 10:40-1:10-1:50-4:30-6:20- 10:50AM
7:20-10:00
Selected) 10:30-1:40-4:20-7:20-9:50 3:15-5:45-8:30-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:10- Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Brave (PG) (!) 2:00-6:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
CC: 1:00-4:40-7:50-11:00
AMC Shirlington 7
2:35-6:15-10:00-11:05
10:10-1:00-4:10-7:00-9:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
2772 South Randolph St.
Marshall (PG-13) 12:45-4:00Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
10:00-12:35-3:20-6:10-8:50
7:15-10:15
The
Mountain
Between Us (PG-13)
10:20-1:20-4:00-5:30-7:10-9:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
CC: (!) 11:00-1:40-4:15-7:00-10:00
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
Old Greenbelt Theatre
11:50-3:30-7:00-10:30
4:30-10:30
Battle
of
the
Sexes
(PG-13) CC:
129 Centerway
11:15-2:00-4:50-7:40-10:25
Professor Marston & the Wonder It (R) CC: 11:10-2:10-5:10-8:10Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 8:00
Women (R) 12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30 11:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
Utopia Film Festival (NR) 11:00AM
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 7:00
10:00-4:00-10:00
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
The Foreigner (R) Open Caption; CC: Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: (!)
Paragon Kentlands
14716 Baltimore Avenue
10:15-11:30-2:20-4:10-5:00-6:50- 11:15-2:00-4:45-7:15-9:45
Stadium 10
The
LEGO
Ninjago
Movie
(PG)
7:40-9:40-10:20
629 Center Point Way
The Florida Project (R) (!) 11:0012:25-3:00-5:30-8:10
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 10:05-12:50- 12:15-1:45-3:15-4:30-6:15-7:30The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 3:40-10:10
9:15-10:15
12:40-2:55-5:10-7:25-9:40
12:45-3:35-6:30-9:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!) Professor Marston & the Wonder
American Made (R) 11:55-2:20American Made (R) 12:50-3:4511:40-3:00-4:40-5:30-7:10-8:00Women
(R) CC: (!) 10:30-1:30-4:304:50-7:20-9:50
6:45-9:45
9:50-10:50
7:30-10:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:10Blade
Runner
2049 3D (R) CC: (!)
12:25-2:40-4:55-7:10-9:25
12:15-3:30-6:45-10:15
6:30-9:20
1:00-7:00
Dunkirk (PG-13) 12:35-2:55-5:15- My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
A Question of Faith (PG) CC:
7:35-9:55
AMC Tysons Corner 16
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:45-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:20-1:40- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30-4:15- 11:20-2:00
7850e Tysons Corner Center
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13) CC:
3:40-5:00-7:00-8:20-10:20
Brave (PG) CC: 2:00
5:00-8:15
10:30-3:50-9:00
It (R) 1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00
The
Metropolitan
Opera: Die
It (R) 12:30-3:50-7:00-10:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:50- Flatliners (PG-13) 10:40
Zauberflote (NR) (!) 12:55
11:00-2:30-6:00-9:30
3:00-5:10-7:20-9:30
The
LEGO
Ninjago
Movie (PG) CC:
The Foreigner (R) 12:50-4:30Marshall (PG-13) Open Caption; CC:
Home Again (PG-13) 3:05-7:40
11:20-2:05-4:40
7:30-10:30
10:20-1:20-4:20-7:30-10:40
Wind River (R) 12:40-5:15-9:50
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:00iPic Pike & Rose
Professor Marston & the Wonder 1:15-3:45-7:15-9:15-10:45
CC: (!) 10:40-1:20-4:20-7:10-10:00
11830 Grand Park Avenue
Women (R) 12:15-2:40-5:05Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:007:30-9:55
The
LEGO
Ninjago Movie (PG) (!)
5:15
2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
American Made (R) CC: (!) 11:30Marshall (PG-13) 1:00-4:00-7:00- 12:30-3:30
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 2:20-5:15-8:00-10:45
10:00
3899 Branch Avenue
(!) 1:00-4:30-8:00-11:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 1:15Regal Rockville Center
American Made (R) (!) 11:30-2:45- CC: 12:15-3:25-6:40-9:50
3:55-6:20-8:45
Stadium 13
6:15-9:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
199
East
Montgomery
Avenue
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) (!) (!) 10:55-1:25-4:10-6:45-9:15
12:45-3:50-6:50-9:50
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
11:45-3:15-7:00-10:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:30- Zauberflote (NR) 12:55-12:56
Blade Runner 2049 (R) (!) 11:0010:00-1:45-5:20-8:50-12:20
7:00-10:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
3:00-6:45-11:00
It (R) CC: 8:05-11:10
It (R) 12:15-3:20-6:15-9:15
11:00-1:30-4:00-6:30-10:15
It (R) 6:30-10:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) (!) 7:00
The Foreigner (R) 11:30-2:10-4:50- The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) The Foreigner (R) (!) 12:00-3:30Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: (!)
7:30-10:10
11:15-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
7:15-10:15
11:35-2:10-5:05-7:40-10:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30- American Made (R) 12:00-2:45Happy Death Day (PG-13) (!) 1:30- The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 10:502:55-5:30-7:55-10:20
5:30-8:15-11:00
4:45-7:45-10:30
1:30-4:15-7:25-9:45-12:25
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Marshall (PG-13) (!) 12:45-4:15Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 10:10
12:15-3:30-10:00
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
7:30-10:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
My
Little
Pony:
The
Movie
(PG)
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
10:25-12:00-1:00-2:30-3:30-4:5510:30-11:30-12:30-2:00-4:30-7:00
Zauberflote (NR) 12:55
5:55-7:20-8:30-9:55-10:55-11:55
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:45-3:15The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Marshall
(PG-13) CC: (!) 10:45-1:35AMC
Courthouse
Plaza
8
6:15-7:00-10:30
12:10-2:45-5:20-8:00
4:25-7:15-10:05-12:20
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) It (R) 12:30-3:45-7:15-10:30
Blade
Runner
2049: The IMAX 2D
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
The Foreigner (R) 7:15
1:25-4:30-7:40-10:25
Experience (R) (!) 11:05-2:45Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:30- 10:45-2:15-5:00
American Made (R) 7:50-10:30
6:35-10:15
The
Mountain
Between
Us
(PG-13)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 2:00-4:45-7:30-9:30-11:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: (!)
CC: 11:00-1:15-4:45-7:30-10:10
Marshall (PG-13) 6:45
12:05-3:20-6:30-9:50
10:30-4:45-8:20-11:50
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 4:15My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Professor Marston & the Wonder
11:00-1:30-4:15-7:10-10:00
7:45-9:00-9:45
12:40-1:55-4:30-7:05
American Made (R) CC: 11:10-1:45- Women (R) CC: (!) 10:35-1:15-4:00Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:45- City Of Rock (NR) 10:15
6:50-9:25-12:00
The Foreigner (R) 11:00-1:45-4:30- 4:30-7:20-10:20
7:30-8:45
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Blade Runner 2049 (R) (!) 12:107:15-10:00
It (R) 1:05-4:10-7:20-10:20
4:05-7:35-11:20
CC: 10:45-1:50-4:10-7:15-10:00
The Foreigner (R) 1:00-4:05-7:10- Marshall (PG-13) 11:15-2:00-4:45- My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: Brave (PG) (!) 6:01AM
7:30-10:45
10:05
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) (!)
11:10-1:40-4:00-6:45-9:20
Regal Waugh Chapel
10:00AM
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 7:40-10:10
Stadium 12 & IMAX
3:00-5:40-8:10-10:00-10:45
AMC Worldgate 9
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Marshall (PG-13) 12:50-4:0013025 Worldgate Drive
10:50-1:15-3:30-5:45-8:00-10:20
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
7:00-10:10
Marshall
(PG-13)
CC:
11:15-2:00Brave
(PG)
6:00
Professor Marston & the Wonder 12:10-2:00-4:35-7:00
4:45-7:30-10:15
The
Mountain
Between Us (PG-13)
Women (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15 The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 12:55-3:35-6:15-9:05
AMC
Hoffman
Center
22
12:40-3:45-6:45-9:35
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:15American
Made
(R) CC: 1:25-4:10206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
5:00-10:30
6:50-9:30
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
A Question of Faith (PG) 1:10-3:50- 12:20-3:25-6:30-9:45
Kingsman:
The
Golden
Circle (R)
(R) 10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
6:40-9:30
CC: 12:10-3:20-6:40-9:50
Brave (PG) 2:00
12:15-2:45-5:20-7:50
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
My
Little
Pony:
The
Movie
(PG) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:40-4:25- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:303:40-6:50-9:40
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
4:15-8:15
6:15-9:50-10:20
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Blade
Runner
2049
(R)
CC:
(!)
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
It (R) 1:00-4:10-7:20-10:25
Stadium 20 & IMAX
11:25-12:00-2:45-7:00-10:30
The Foreigner (R) 1:10-4:05-7:20- Zauberflote (NR) 12:55
900 Ellsworth Drive
It
(R)
CC:
9:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
10:05
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 11:3011:10-2:00-4:40-7:20
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
Zauberflote (NR) 12:55
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 2:05-4:50-7:35-10:20
2D Experience (R) 12:00-3:35Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 3:10- 7:10-10:50
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
CC: 10:45-1:40-4:30-7:10-9:50
6:30-9:35
American Assassin (R) 1:45-4:45- American Made (R) CC: 11:25-2:15- 12:40-3:00-5:20-7:45-10:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 7:40-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:15-4:055:00-7:40-10:25
7:15-10:00
1:00-4:20-7:15-10:10
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30- Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:40-3:50-6:40-9:40
2:55-5:45-8:15-10:45
11:35-2:10
Marshall (PG-13) 1:20-4:15-7:30- Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) (!) 3:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 10:15
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema CC: 12:15-3:40-7:00-10:15
11:40-2:55-6:45-10:10
One Loudoun
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:50- It (R) CC: 11:45-3:15-6:30-9:45
Dunkirk (PG-13) 6:15-9:05
20575 East Hampton Plaza
8:00-9:25
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:45The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
10:30-1:05-3:40-6:20-9:05
Regal
Westview
6:00-7:30-9:45-11:10
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 12:45-3:25 10:00AM
Stadium 16 & IMAX
It (R) 1:45-5:00-8:15-11:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:45- My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
5243 Buckeystown Pike
The Foreigner (R) 11:30-2:10-4:5510:00AM
1:15-5:00-9:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
7:45-10:35
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 12:40
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
1:00-4:00-6:45
Flatliners (PG-13) 12:25-4:10Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
10:50-1:35-4:10-6:45-9:20
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
7:00-10:20
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:30-2:15- 10:05-1:25-4:00-7:20-10:45
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 3:05
It (R) 2:30-6:45-10:25
5:00-7:45-10:30
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 11:30- Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 9:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) American Assassin (R) CC: 10:40 Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:20-3:104:45-8:30
7:00-11:00
Happy
Death
Day
(PG-13)
CC:
12:45-4:15-7:30-11:00
mother! (R) 12:15
11:15-12:30-1:45-3:00-4:15-5:30- The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Marshall (PG-13) 12:40-4:1011:35-3:20-6:20-9:35
7:00-7:30-8:15-9:30-10:00-10:45
11:45-1:15-3:00-6:15
7:00-10:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45- American Made (R) 11:10-2:10American Made (R) 12:30-3:30The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
5:20-8:20-11:15
4:30-6:25-7:15-9:15-10:15
6:15-9:15
12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:45- Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 10:25 5:45-7:30-11:15
12:50-3:40-6:00-9:05
Experience (R) CC: 11:00-2:30American Made (R) 1:15-4:356:15-10:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:20It (R) 1:30-4:45-8:00-11:15
7:30-11:30
4:15-10:05
Flatliners (PG-13) 4:00-7:00-10:00 'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
10:45-4:45
The Foreigner (R) 10:10-1:05-4:45Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:151:15-4:00-6:45
8:00-10:55
Professor
Marston
&
the
Wonder
3:15-6:30-9:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:45- The Foreigner (R) 11:30-2:30-5:15- Women (R) CC: 11:20-1:00-3:45- Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:006:30-9:15
5:30-8:00-9:30-10:45
2:45-5:40-8:40-11:20
8:15-11:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 2:15
An American Werewolf in London
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
3:30-7:30
(R)
7:40
Regal Germantown
2D Experience (R) 11:30-3:15American Satan (R) 11:00-1:45Stadium 14
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
7:00-10:45
4:30-7:15-10:00
20000 Century Boulevard
2911 District Ave
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:45Last Night 10:30-10:00
2:15-5:00-7:45-9:00-10:15
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
Only
the
Brave
(PG-13)
7:00
Zauberflote (NR) 12:55
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 2:004:30-7:10-9:50
AMC Potomac Mills 18
4:45-8:30-9:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
American Made (R) CC: 12:45-3:102700 Potomac Mills Circle
11:00-1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Marshall (PG-13) 12:30-3:455:40-8:15-10:40
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 7:15-10:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
4:45-7:45-10:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder 10:45-2:00-4:15-6:45-9:15
CC: 10:00-1:30-4:20-7:35-10:40
Women (R) 1:15-4:30-7:15-10:00 The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
American Made (R) 11:00-1:4511:45-3:15-7:00-10:30
A Question of Faith (PG) 1:00
CC: 11:40-2:20-5:00-7:45-10:25
4:30-7:15-10:15
VIRGINIA
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
At the Anthem,
which booked
Foo Fighters for
its opening
concert, the floor
has a gentle slope
to provide better
sightlines.
style@washpost.com
MOVIE DIRECTORY
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
. SATURDAY,
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:15-2:00-4:40-7:15-9:30
Goodbye Christopher Robin (!)
10:05-12:35-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:25
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13)
CC: (!) 11:20AM
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: (!) 10:15-12:503:20-5:45-8:10-10:35
LoveLive! Sunshine!! Aqours 2nd
LoveLive! Happy Party Train Tour
11:00AM
The Florida Project (R) CC: (!)
11:00-1:45-4:45-7:30-10:15
Saturday, October 14, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
American Made (R) 12:35-3:456:40-9:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:40-3:00-6:30-9:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:30-3:054:45-7:00-10:00
It (R) 12:30-4:00-7:20-10:20
Flatliners (PG-13) 5:30-8:10-10:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:552:35-5:10-7:45-10:30
The Foreigner (R) 11:30-2:15-5:158:00-10:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:002:45-5:00-7:30-10:35
Marshall (PG-13) 12:45-4:157:15-10:15
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:008:30-9:15
11940 Market Street
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:30- Regal Countryside Stadium 20
7:00-10:30
45980 Regal Plaza
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 1:30-4:00
10:10-1:10-4:10
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 1:35The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 4:20-7:05-9:45
10:50-1:50-4:50-7:50-10:55
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 11:10- 1:20-4:35-7:15-10:00
2:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:45-8:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) American Made (R) 12:40-3:2511:50-3:00-6:10-9:50
6:15-9:10
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
10:15-12:50-3:50-6:30-9:20
12:15-3:30-6:45-10:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:00-2:30- It (R) 12:30-3:35-6:35-9:50
6:00-9:30
American Assassin (R) 6:10-8:55
It (R) 6:40-10:00
Arjun Reddy (NR) 1:05-4:45-8:15
The Foreigner (R) 10:40-1:40-4:40- Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:257:40-10:50
2:45-5:30-8:05-10:25
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 10:30Bareilly Ki Barfi (NR) 1:45-5:001:30-4:30-7:30-10:40
7:40-10:20
Marshall (PG-13) 10:20-1:20-4:20- Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 12:15-3:107:20-10:10
6:05-9:20
Professor Marston & the Wonder Chef (Hindi) (NR) 12:05-2:55Women (R) 10:00-1:00-4:00-6:50- 5:50-9:15
10:20
Judwaa 2 (NR) 12:00-3:00-6:009:30
Cinema Arts Theatre
Jai Lava Kusa (NR) 12:00-3:159650 Main St
6:30-9:55
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
The Stray (PG) 12:50-3:05-5:15-7:30
9:40-12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:50
American Made (R) CC: 9:45-12:05- Spyder (Tamil) (NR) 12:35-3:457:00-10:10
2:35-5:05-7:40-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 9:45- Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
4:30-9:40
1:00-4:15-7:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 9:50- Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 12:10-2:50-5:45-9:00
12:10-2:30-4:55-7:20-9:35
Lucky CC: 10:00-12:00-2:00-4:00- Mahanubhavudu (NR) 12:20-3:206:20-9:25
6:00-8:00-9:50
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Punjab Nahi Jaungi 1:00-4:157:20-10:15
Down The White House (PG-13)
CC: 9:55-12:15-2:25-4:45-7:10-9:20 Bailaras (NR) 1:15-4:05-6:50-9:35
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
11:25-1:50-4:20-6:50-9:20
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
11:20-2:05-4:40-7:20-10:00
American Made (R) 12:20-3:007:35-10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:10-3:15-7:15-10:25
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:50-2:20-4:55-7:25-9:55
The Foreigner (R) 11:35-2:15-5:057:50-10:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:452:40-7:10-9:50
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:303:10-5:30-7:00-8:00-9:30-10:40
Marshall (PG-13) 11:30-2:10-4:507:30-10:10
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 11:55-2:25-5:00-7:4510:20
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
Zauberflote (NR) 12:55
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:307:05-10:30; 12:00-3:30-7:05-10:30
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8890 Mathis Ave.
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
12:00-2:15-4:30-6:40-8:45
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
11:30-1:35
American Made (R) 12:00-2:154:25-6:40-8:55
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:004:15-7:30
It (R) 3:30-6:05-8:40
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
6201 Multiplex Drive
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
11:25-1:55-4:25-6:55-9:25
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
11:00-1:40-4:35-7:15-10:10
American Made (R) 10:45-1:304:15-7:10-9:55
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
10:00-1:10-4:20-7:30-10:40
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
10:10-12:40-3:10-4:10-6:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:3012:00-3:30-5:30-7:00-10:30
It (R) 10:25-1:45-4:50-7:55-11:00
The Foreigner (R) 11:45-2:25-5:057:45-10:25
Judwaa 2 (NR) 10:05-1:05-7:2510:30
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
2:00-9:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 10:0012:25-2:50-5:15-7:40-9:10-10:05
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 10:40-1:204:00-5:40-8:20-11:00
Rave Cinemas
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
11900 Palace Way
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
10:55-1:40-4:25-7:20-10:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 11:001:50-4:40-7:35-10:25
American Made (R) 11:30-2:154:55-7:50-10:35
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:30-3:55-7:05-10:15
It (R) 11:15-2:45-6:30-9:30
Flatliners (PG-13) 11:05-2:00-4:357:10-9:45
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
11:10-4:45-10:20
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:402:25-5:00-7:40-10:10
American Assassin (R) 2:10-7:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:152:50-5:30-8:05-10:45
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 12:20-3:156:20-9:25
Marshall (PG-13) 11:35-2:20-5:057:55-10:40
It (R) XD: 12:40-4:15-7:25-10:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 11:20-2:05-4:50-7:3010:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) XD:
11:25-1:55-4:30-7:15-9:50
Regal Ballston Common
Stadium 12
671 N. Glebe Road
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
Zauberflote (NR) 12:55
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 11:45-2:004:30-6:45
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
12:15-3:30-6:15-9:00
Judwaa 2 (NR) 3:15-6:20-9:30
American Assassin (R) 10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:003:30-7:00-9:35
Marshall (PG-13) 12:40-3:356:30-9:50
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 12:25-3:00-6:35-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:452:30-9:35-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:102:45-5:30-8:05-10:40
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:45-3:10-6:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
1:30-4:30-7:15-10:00
American Made (R) 2:00-4:507:40-10:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:15-4:456:45-8:15-10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:40-3:45-6:50-10:10
It (R) 1:10-4:10-7:10-10:20
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:30-1:40-4:20-7:00
The Foreigner (R) 1:50-5:00-7:4510:30
American Assassin (R) 12:50-3:306:30-9:10
Flatliners (PG-13) 9:00
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
2D Experience (R) 12:30-4:007:30-11:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:003:20-5:50-8:30-9:40-10:50
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 2:30-5:20-8:00-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 2:153:15-6:00-9:30
Regal Potomac Yard
Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
Zauberflote (NR) 12:55
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 1:003:40-6:25-9:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
1:05-3:55-6:45-9:35
American Made (R) 2:00-4:457:25-10:10
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:05-3:25-6:40-10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:30-1:40-4:20-7:00
Regal Dulles Town Center 10 Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:3512:25-12:55-4:05-4:35-6:55-7:4521100 Dulles Town Circle
8:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
It (R) 12:45-4:00-7:10-10:25
11:45-2:20
The
Foreigner (R) 11:30-2:20-5:10The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
8:00-10:50-11:30
12:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
American Assassin (R) 12:50-3:45American Made (R) 1:30-4:306:30-9:20
7:45-10:40
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:402:10-4:55-7:40-9:40-10:30-11:30
12:30-3:15-6:30-9:45
Marshall (PG-13) 12:15-1:25-4:15My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
7:15-10:15-11:25
12:45-3:45-6:15-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:30- Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 3:156:15-9:55-10:45
7:00-10:00
True to the Game (R) 3:10-6:00-8:45
It (R) 1:15-3:00-6:00-9:15
'Til
Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
The Foreigner (R) 11:45-2:30-5:1511:30-2:15-5:05-7:55-10:55
8:00-10:45
Regal
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:50Springfield Town Center 12
2:15-4:45-7:30-10:30
6500 Springfield Town Center
Marshall (PG-13) 1:00-4:15-7:15The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
10:15
12:40-3:20-6:40
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
5:00-8:30
Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:55
American Made (R) 11:10-2:004110 West Ox Road
4:50-7:50-10:45
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Zauberflote (NR) 12:55
12:10-3:30-7:00-10:50
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:10-3:45
1:00-3:50-6:30-9:20
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:3012:35-3:50-6:45-10:50
12:00-3:40-6:50-7:20-11:00
American Made (R) 7:05-9:50
It (R) 12:50-4:00-7:10-10:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
The Foreigner (R) 11:40-2:5012:30-3:55-7:25-10:40
6:10-9:10
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Flatliners (PG-13) 11:00-6:20-10:00
12:05-2:40-5:15-7:50-10:25
Happy
Death Day (PG-13) 11:20Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:15-3:302:20-5:10-8:00-10:40
7:15-9:30
Marshall
(PG-13) 11:50-3:00The Foreigner (R) 1:25-4:30-7:356:00-9:00
10:30
Blade
Runner
2049 3D (R) 3:10Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:109:30-10:30
2:40-5:45-8:15-10:45
The
Mountain
Between Us (PG-13)
Marshall (PG-13) 12:00-2:50-5:102:00
8:00-10:50
Regal
Virginia
Gateway
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
Stadium 14 & RPX
6:30-10:15
8001
Gateway
Promenade
Place
The Outlaws (Crime City) (beomjoi-do-si) (NR) 12:40-3:40-6:55-9:55 The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
10:45-1:15-3:45-8:00
Regal Fox
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Stadium 16 & IMAX
11:00-1:30-4:10-7:20-10:10
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 1:30-3:45- American Made (R) 10:35-1:103:50-6:30-9:20
6:00-8:15-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
11:40-3:10-6:15-9:30
12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:00-1:45-4:15-6:45
12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-7:00
American Made (R) 1:30-4:15My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
7:00-9:45
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 10:30AM
It (R) 11:50-4:20-7:30-10:45
12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
The Foreigner (R) 11:10-2:30-5:10My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
7:40-10:20
11:45-1:15-4:00-6:45
Flatliners (PG-13) 11:20-2:45It (R) 1:00-4:15-7:30-10:45
7:00-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30-2:00Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:304:10-5:40-7:45-8:30-9:15
2:45-5:15-7:45-9:15-10:15
Flatliners (PG-13) 12:15-3:00Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
7:15-10:30
The Foreigner (R) 11:45-2:30-5:15- 3:30-10:30
Home Again (PG-13) 1:40-4:058:00-10:45
American Assassin (R) 3:45-9:30 6:40-9:50
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30- Marshall (PG-13) 10:50-1:50-4:307:15-10:00
3:00-5:30-8:00-9:15-10:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
Women
(R) 11:15-2:00-5:00-8:152D Experience (R) 11:45-3:2010:50
7:00-10:40
Blade
Runner
2049 (R) 12:30-4:00Wind River (R) 1:00-6:30
6:00-9:00-9:45
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
Smithsonian - Airbus
1:15-4:50
IMAX Theater
Professor Marston & the Wonder
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
Women (R) 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
10:15
11:10AM
Regal Kingstowne
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Stadium 16 & RPX
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
12:00-4:15-6:50
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) An IMAX 3D Experience 2:20
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
1:25-4:05-6:45-10:05
Experience (R) 4:00-7:30-10:30
American Made (R) 1:30-5:20Journey to Space 3D (NR) 12:00
8:00-10:35
University Mall Theatre
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
10659 Braddock Road
12:45-3:50-7:15-10:20
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:2012:15-1:10-3:45-6:15
2:35-4:35
It (R) 1:40-4:40-7:45-10:45
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:00Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00-4:45- 1:45-3:30-5:15
6:00-8:30
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 7:30-9:45
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:30-7:30- Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
10:15
CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:40-12:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:30The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
3:20-6:05-9:00
7:15-9:50-12:00
Flatliners (PG-13) 12:55-4:00The Rocky Horror Picture Show
7:00-10:05
(R) 12:00AM
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C5
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH
10 7 3
Q7
942
A K 10 7 3
WEST
KJ92
10 5 4 2
K65
64
EAST
Q64
J98
Q 10 8 3
Q85
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
A85
AK63
AJ7
J92
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1 NT
Pass
3 NT
Opening lead — 2
EAST
All Pass
“S
imple Saturday” colCLASSIC PEANUTS
umns are meant to
help aspiring players improve
technique and develop logical
thinking.
A “hold-up play” — refusing a trick you can win —
may help to break up your
opponents’ communication.
Against today’s 3NT, West
leads the deuce of spades.
If declarer takes the ace,
the defense can cash three
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
spades if they regain the
lead. But if South holds up
and wins the third spade,
West’s fourth spade is not
readily cashable.
Hold-up plays come with
caveats. Don’t hold up if a
shift will pose a greater risk.
South actually ducked the
first spade, and East found
the shift to the 10 of diamonds (an “honor-trapping”
LIO
play): jack, king. On the next
diamond, he covered dummy’s nine. South took his ace
and lost a club finesse, and
East cashed two diamonds.
Down one.
West’s deuce of spades
showed a four-card holding,
so South must take the ace
immediately and finesse in
clubs. He has nine winners,
and the defense gets only
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
three spades and a club.
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
K J 9 2 10 5 4 2
K6564
The dealer, at your left,
opens one club. Your partner
doubles. The next player bids
one diamond. What do you
say?
ANSWER: This is a case of
looking ahead. You have the
values to act. Indeed, if the
opponents bid more, you can
compete at least to the two
level. Bid one spade. You can
try two hearts later if necessary and play there or at two
spades as partner prefers.
He may have four-card support for only one major suit.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C6
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | OCTOBER 14
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year you impress
others with your
ability to draw them
in. You are unusually
social and full of fun as well.
You might enjoy enormous
popularity, which makes it
easier to pursue some of
your long-term goals. If you
are single, you might have
difficulty deciding exactly
whom you want to date. Relax,
and just be yourself. If you are
attached, the two of you often
can be found out and about
enjoying each other. You’ll
want to join some mutual
friends for more social outings.
Leo makes you smile.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You might note a gentleness
that emanates from a loved
one. You add extra pizazz to
your interactions with this
person. News from a distance
could cause you to gain a
fresh perspective, which you
might find difficult to embrace
on some level.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You’ll make an effort to make
a loved one feel nurtured.
Do your best to indulge this
person with his or her favorite
activities and interests. You
are likely to achieve your goal
by dedicating this day to this
person.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Reach out to a neighbor or
relative with whom you might
WEINGARTENS & CLARK need to spend some time.
Understand that this person
could be distancing him- or
herself. The good news is that
this behavior will be changing
soon.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Be aware of a tendency
to sometimes become
overindulgent or too focused
on a loved one. Right now,
this person might want to
return that same favor. You
need some time for yourself,
whether it’s just to catch up
on sleep or take care of some
bills.
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You might feel more confident
about a personal matter
than you realize. You also
might enjoy hosting a gettogether at your home. Make
it spontaneous, with a theme.
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Your words often trigger ideas.
You could find yourself in an
exchange that is both thoughtprovocative and rewarding.
Make plans to visit with a
friend for a late lunch.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Be aware of the impact that
a recent conversation has
had on a friend. This person
appreciates how you always
seem ready to play devil’s
advocate. Even though your
exchange could be intense,
you are likely to have a great
time.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You are nothing if not intense.
Wherever you go, you exude
confidence, intensity and
curiosity. Others notice you
and are drawn to you. You
might feel tight financially, but
you will find a way around the
issue.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Don’t become upset if you
don’t get your way. Go along
with the moment, and have
confidence that you are
valued. You might be working
your way out of a difficult
period.
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You want someone else
to share more of him- or
herself. Asking this person
questions might feel intrusive,
so listen well instead, as it
could encourage him or her
to reveal more.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You like being in the limelight.
Check in on an older relative
or friend who often feels better
when he or she sees you. This
person might seem off right
now. You can’t force a mood
change.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
You might want to complete a
project. You might decide to
include a friend in what you
are doing. A relative or friend
could be difficult. Consider
what it would be like to walk in
this person’s shoes before you
make any judgments.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
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SPORTS
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
Game 5 of the NLDS required 4 hours 37 minutes to play and 369 pitches to record 54 outs. It had more than a few what-if moments.
First inning
Gio Gonzalez’s wild pitch
allows Jon Jay to move from
second to third. Jay scores
on Anthony Rizzo’s
groundball to second. In the
bottom of the inning, Bryce
Harper is up with one out
and Trea Turner on third.
Turner is thrown out at home
on Harper’s grounder to
second on a drawn-in infield.
End of inning: 44.6%
79.7%
Top fifth
Max Scherzer retires Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo —
the Cubs’ two best hitters — to start the inning and
has Willson Contreras down 0-2. Contreras singles.
Scherzer then has Ben Zobrist in a 1-2 hole before
Zobrist bloops a single. Addison Russell’s two-run
double makes it 5-4 before the madness of a passed
ball third strike, throwing error on Matt Wieters, a little
catcher interference and a hit batsman. “Nothing in
my head was getting sideways,” Scherzer said of the
inning. Trust us, Max, it was definitely sideways.
End of half-inning: 18.9%
Cubs 7, Nats 4
Cubs 1, Nats 0
Bottom eighth
Davis walks his first two
hitters before Adam Lind hits
into a double play. Taylor
singles, cutting deficit to one.
Jose Lobaton singles to put
runners on the corners, then
inexplicably gets picked off
first by Contreras, an out that
comes after replay review.
End of inning: 16.4%
Bottom sixth
Daniel Murphy’s double trims Nats’ deficit to
8-6 with runners at second and third. Joe
Maddon intentionally walks Anthony Rendon
to get to Wieters. Dusty Baker opts not to
pinch-hit. Wieters hits flyball to right on first
pitch. Baker removes Wieters in the top of
the seventh anyway in a double-switch.
End of inning: 18.3%
Cubs 8, Nats 6
Cubs 9, Nats 8
1st inning
44.6%
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
9th
SOURCE: FANGRAPHS
Bottom second
After Michael A. Taylor’s three-run
homer puts the Nats up 4-1, they
had runners on first and second
with two outs for Ryan Zimmerman.
There is an opportunity to blow the
game open. Instead, Zimmerman
strikes out on three pitches.
End of inning:79.7%
Graph represents
Nationals’ win probability.
18.3%
18.9%
16.4%
13.5%
Nats 4, Cubs 1
9.6%
Top sixth
Brandon Kintzler retires the first
two hitters, then misses on a
borderline 3-2 sinker to Zobrist.
Russell follows with the laser to left
that Werth loses in the lights.
End of inning: 9.6%
Cubs 8, Nats 4
Bottom ninth
Harper strikes out
swinging to end it.
It’s 12:45 a.m.
End of inning: 0%
Bottom seventh
With two on and two outs, Maddon turns to
closer Wade Davis for what would be a sevenout save. Zimmerman is his first hitter, and in
perhaps the game’s most crucial at-bat, he
sees four pitches, all strikes. He fouls off one
0-2 pitch but misses a cutter for strike three.
End of inning: 13.5%
0%
Cubs 9, Nats 8
Cubs 9, Nats 7
Where it went wrong
BY
B ARRY S VRLUGA
After Jon Jay led off the game with a double,
Washington lefty Gio Gonzalez uncorked his
third pitch of the night — a curveball on which
he couldn’t get a grip. The ball sailed to the
backstop, and Jay easily advanced to third.
What’s the adage? In a tight game, a team must
score runners who reach third with less than
two outs. Though Gonzalez struck out Kris
Bryant, Anthony Rizzo managed to do what a
professional hitter should do in that instance:
get a grounder to second, enough to score Jay
and provide the Cubs a 1-0 lead.
The Nats, though, had the chance to return
serve in almost the same manner in the
bottom of the first. With Trea Turner at third
and one out, Bryce Harper had a chance to
match Rizzo: score a runner from third with
less than two outs.
There were two differences: Cubs Manager
We are told and trained to think about
what’s next. What happened Thursday night
can’t be changed by Friday morning, so learn
from it and move on. What’s important isn’t
how it went down. What’s important is how it
impacts the future.
And yet here we are, with so much cud to
chew. With what transpired Thursday night
and into Friday morning at Nationals Park —
the insanity of the Washington Nationals’ 9-8
loss to the Chicago Cubs — it might be
instructive to go back and review how many
different herbs and spices went into this stew.
The questions about the future — whether
Manager Dusty Baker remains here, what
tweaks to the roster are forthcoming, whether
the Cubs can beat the Dodgers for the National
League pennant — can wait. Let’s exhale and
review.
“Not really totally sure what happened,”
said veteran outfielder Jayson Werth, who
probably played his last game as a National.
“That was one of the craziest games I’ve ever
been a part of.”
So wander through the craziness. Here are
the key instances, large and small, that might
have turned the game — and extended the
season — for the Nationals.
NATIONALS CONTINUED ON D6
D.C.’s painful postseason ritual
Dominate the regular season, lose in the
playoffs, rinse, repeat. Steinberg, A1
For Werth, the end of the tour
Jayson Werth’s past seven years had their share
of highs and lows, just like Game 5. D7
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
First inning: Gio’s wild pitch, Bryant’s
hold
Arena resigns as U.S. coach
after Cup qualifying failure
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
The fallout from the U.S. failure to qualify for the 2018 World
Cup hit Friday with Bruce Arena
resigning as head coach and executive Sunil Gulati saying the
organization would take a “deep
dive” into what ails the men’s
program.
Under fire for his role as president of the U.S. Soccer Federation, Gulati said he would not
step down from a position he has
held since 2006 and that he has
yet to decide whether to seek a
fourth term in February.
American soccer is reeling after a 2-1 defeat at Trinidad and
Tobago on Tuesday ended a
streak of seven consecutive appearances in the sport’s quadrennial championship. A regional
power for 25 years, the U.S. squad
finished fifth in CONCACAF’s six-
nation group for three places in
next summer’s tournament in
Russia.
Arena, in his second tour with
the national team, announced his
resignation Friday morning, one
day after telling The Washington
Post that he would “do whatever
is right” in terms of his immediate future with the program.
“No excuses,” Arena said in a
statement issued Friday by the
USSF. “We didn’t get the job
done, and I accept responsibility.”
The federation plans to name
an interim coach in seven to
10 days to oversee one or two
friendlies next month, Gulati
said. The search for a permanent
replacement is likely to last several months, he suggested.
Tab Ramos, a former U.S. national team star who coaches the
under-20 team and serves as
ARENA CONTINUED ON D5
Ryan Zimmerman had two great chances to boost the
Nationals’ hopes in Game 5 but struck out both times.
Astros get the jump in ALCS
Dallas Keuchel pitches seven scoreless innings
as Houston holds off Yankees in opener, 2-1. D8
Following pregame scare,
Orange stunner: No. 2 Tigers’
Backstrom helps Caps to win title hopes take hit with upset
CAPITALS 5,
DEVILS 2
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
newark — In a mix-up that was
ultimately fitting for the Friday
the 13th date, right after the
Washington Capitals hit the ice
for warmups at Prudential Center,
a puck appeared to strike center
Nicklas Backstrom. He hurriedly
returned to the locker room and
did not come back to the ice for
the rest of the pregame skate.
“I just don’t like warmups, so I
decided to rest and get my legs
fresh instead,” Backstrom deadpanned after the game. “No, I got
hit by a puck. I don’t know. Maybe
that was a wake-up call. Who
knows?”
Confusion with the off-ice offi-
cials initially had Backstrom listed as a scratch for the game, but
he was indeed in the lineup and
on the bench with his teammates
for puck drop against the New
Jersey Devils. Over the next 60
minutes, he was impossible to
miss, putting on a passing clinic
in the Capitals’ 5-2 win as he
recorded three primary assists
and then added an insurance goal
in the third period.
That was the good news for
Washington, which snapped its
two-game losing streak with its
best performance to date. The bad
news was that, while the injury
bug seemed to spare Backstrom, it
might have bitten top defenseman Matt Niskanen, who didn’t
return after going to the locker
CAPITALS CONTINUED ON D5
Capitals at Flyers
Today, 7 p.m., NBCSW
SYRACUSE 27,
CLEMSON 24
BY
J OHN K EKIS
Associated Press
syracuse, n.y. — Eric Dungey
threw for 278 yards and three
touchdowns, Cole Murphy kicked
a tiebreaking field goal in the
fourth quarter, and Syracuse
stunned No. 2 Clemson, 27-24, on
Friday night to put a damper on
the Tigers’ chances to repeat as
national champions.
Clemson (6-1, 4-1 ACC) had won
12 consecutive road games, the
longest streak in Clemson history
and tied for the second longest
active streak in the nation. Clemson also had won 11 consecutive
games overall, the longest active
winning streak in the nation, and
12 straight away from home
against ACC teams. Clemson lost
its last road game of 2014 at Georgia Tech.
“We had opportunities. We
didn’t take advantage of opportunities,” Clemson Coach Dabo
Swinney said. “They did. This is
SYRACUSE CONTINUED ON D2
COLLEGE FOOTBALL SATURDAY
Northwestern at
Maryland, 3:30
ESPN2
Virginia at North
Carolina, 3:30
NBCSW
25 Navy at
Memphis, 3:45
ESPNU
Utah
at 13 USC, 8
ABC
UNC walks: Tar Heels avoid major NCAA penalties in academic scandal. D5
D2
EZ
D I G ES T
TENNIS
As Federer awaits,
del Potro nurses wrist
Juan Martin del Potro’s
bruised left wrist was placed in a
splint after a nasty fall while
winning his quarterfinal at the
Shanghai Masters on Friday.
Del Potro is due to play Roger
Federer in the semifinals
Saturday. The other semifinal
features top-ranked Rafael Nadal
against Marin Cilic.
Del Potro tumbled on the court
at 2-2 in the third set against
Viktor Troicki and tried to break
the fall with his left hand. Del
Potro, who has had surgery on
both wrists, conferred with a
trainer and shook his wrist.
Del Potro ended up breaking
Troicki’s serve in that fifth game
and prevailed, 4-6, 6-1, 6-4.
“I don’t know how my wrist is
after I fell down,” del Potro said.
“. . . I’m going to the hospital to
see what the MRI says and what
the doctor says. Then I will take a
decision for tomorrow. I would
like to play and be 100 percent.”
Jorge Viale, his agent, tweeted
that tests revealed a “wrist
contusion” but “more serious
problems were ruled out.” . . .
The highest ranked player left
in the Hong Kong Open,
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, beat
Naomi Osaka, 6-3, 6-3, in the
quarterfinals.
Osaka ousted Venus Williams
but couldn’t match 21st-ranked
Pavlyuchenkova from the
baseline and served nine double
faults. Pavlyuchenkova next faces
Wang Qiang, who beat Sam
Stosur, 7-5, 6-2.
GOLF
Pat Perez led by one stroke
halfway through the CIMB
Classic after carding a 7-underpar 65 around a four-hour delay
for rain in Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia.
Fellow American Xander
Schauffele was on Perez’s tail
after a long-range eagle on the
third hole set up his 5-under 67.
Defending champion Justin
Thomas had another poor round
by his high standards, a 71. A
three-peat at TPC Kuala Lumpur,
where he clinched his maiden
U.S. PGA Tour title in 2015, seems
a tall order. . . .
Angel Yin shot a 7-under 65
and took a two-stroke lead after
the second round of the LPGA
Tour’s KEB Hana Bank
Championship in Incheon, South
Korea. . . .
Jerry Smith, David McKenzie
and Gibby Gilbert III shared the
first-round lead at 5-under 67 in
the PGA Tour Champions’ SAS
Championship in Cary, N.C. . . .
Marcus Fraser carded the
lowest round of his European
Tour career, a 62, to take a share
of the lead at the midway point of
the Italian Open in Monza. . . .
Matt Parziale won the U.S.
Mid-Amateur Championship in
Atlanta to earn spots in next
year’s U.S. Open and Masters.
PRO BASKETBALL
Bill Laimbeer will be the new
coach and general manager of the
San Antonio Stars when the team
is sold and relocated, according to
a person with knowledge of the
deal. The person spoke to the
Associated Press on condition of
anonymity because there has no
official announcement. . . .
The Cleveland Cavaliers are
trading Richard Jefferson and
Kay Felder to save money.
Cleveland has agreed to send
Jefferson, Felder, two secondround draft picks and $3 million
to the Atlanta Hawks in a move
that will allow the Eastern
Conference champions to avoid
paying $12 million in luxury tax
penalties, a person familiar with
the deal told the Associated Press.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
North Carolina State said the
NCAA has ruled freshman guard
Braxton Beverly ineligible to
play this season.
Coach Kevin Keatts said the
school will appeal the decision
“and hopefully it yields a different
result.”
Beverly signed with Ohio State
and attended classes there but
received a release after Thad
Matta’s ouster as head coach. He
signed with N.C. State in August.
Beverly said in a statement
issued by the school that he’s
“devastated” and called it
“incredibly unfair.” . . .
Bitter rivals Kansas and
Missouri agreed to play an
exhibition game Oct. 22 in Kansas
City, Mo., to raise money for
hurricane relief efforts. The
NCAA granted a waiver for the
game, with the goal to raise more
than $1 million.
SOCCER
A villa valued at 7 million euros
($8.3 million) on an Italian island
was how a Qatari television
executive bribed a top FIFA
official, according to police.
Italian police said they seized
the luxury property in Sardinia
they assert Nasser al-Khelaifi,
who is also president of Paris
Saint-Germain, made available to
former FIFA secretary general
Jerome Valcke.
Details were revealed one day
after Swiss federal prosecutors
oversaw evidence-gathering raids
in four European countries for a
widening investigation of FIFA
and the 2018-2022 World Cup
bidding contests won by Russia
and Qatar. . . .
Brazilian star Kaka has
announced he will not re-sign
with Orlando City after three
seasons with the MLS club. Kaka,
35, said that he will play his final
game with the team Sunday when
it hosts the Columbus Crew at
Orlando City Stadium. . . .
In Germany, Cologne’s
seemingly cursed start to the
Bundesliga continued when video
assistance denied the side a late
penalty and then host Stuttgart
scored in the fourth minute of
injury time for a 2-1 win. . . .
In Spain, Espanyol was held to
a 0-0 draw at home in Barcelona
by Levante after it wasted several
scoring chances. . . .
The third-ranked Maryland
men’s team got a hat trick from
Eryk Williamson and edged host
Wisconsin, 5-4, in Madison to
remain unbeaten and give Coach
Sasho Cirovski his 400th win. . . .
The ninth-ranked Georgetown
men earned a 2-0 road victory
over Villanova in Chester, Pa. . . .
North Carolina State battled
the No. 10 Virginia men to a 0-0
draw in Raleigh, N.C.
MISC.
Erin Hamlin, Tucker West
and the doubles team of Matt
Mortensen and Jayson
Terdiman got their Olympic
seasons off to winning starts in
Whistler, B.C. They all prevailed
in USA Luge’s first seeding race of
the season. . . .
Codie Bascue drove to a
victory, and Justin Olsen and
Evan Weinstock broke a fiveyear-old start record to highlight
the first day of the USA Bobsled
National Team Trials in Lake
Placid, N.Y.
— From news services
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
ALCS, Game 2: New York Yankees at Houston » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
NLCS, Game 1: Chicago Cubs at Los Angeles Dodgers » TBS, WTEM (980 AM)
NHL
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia » NBC Sports Washington, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Toronto at Montreal » NHL Network
COLLEGE FOOTBALL, SEE PAGE D3
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
7:30 a.m.
7:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
12:15 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
FIFA U-17 World Cup: France vs. Honduras » Fox Sports 1
FIFA U-17 World Cup: Japan vs. New Caledonia » Fox Sports 2
English Premier League: Manchester United at Liverpool »
NBC Sports Network
German Bundesliga: Freiburg at Bayern Munich » Fox Sports 2
Spanish La Liga: Real Madrid at Getafe » beIN Sports
English Premier League: Bournemouth at Tottenham » CNBC
English Premier League: Chelsea at Crystal Palace » NBC Sports Network
Italian Serie A: Lazio at Juventus » beIN Sports
German Bundesliga: Leipzig at Borussia Dortmund » Fox Sports 2
English Premier League: Arsenal at Watford » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
Spanish La Liga: Barcelona at Atletico Madrid » beIN Sports
NWSL championship: North Carolina vs. Portland » Lifetime
GOLF
6:30 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
11 p.m.
European Tour: Italian Open, third round » Golf Channel
Champions Tour: SAS Championship, second round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour: CIMB Classic, final round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
6 a.m.
ATP: Shanghai Masters, doubles semifinal » Tennis Channel
AUTO RACING
1 p.m.
4 p.m.
NASCAR Truck Series: Fred’s 250 » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
NASCAR Cup Series: Alabama 500, qualifying » NBC Sports Network
BOXING
7:30 p.m.
Premier Boxing Champions: Leo Santa Cruz vs. Chris Avalos; Abner Mares
vs. Andres Gutierrez » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
COLLEGE HOCKEY
6 p.m.
Denver at Notre Dame » NBC Sports Network
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
Terps eye bowl bid, but slate is tough
BY
R OMAN S TUBBS
Maryland football is halfway to
clinching bowl eligibility. That
statement, five games into the second year of a rebuilding project
under Coach DJ Durkin, is striking given modest outside preseason expectations against a
tough schedule and even more so
once the games began and the
team’s perpetual instability at
quarterback kicked in again.
The pleasant surprise — a record of 3-2 overall, 1-1 in the Big Ten
— could have fans gazing ahead at
the schedule for opportunities to
clinch a postseason appearance.
They will find the path gets no less
daunting. If upcoming games
against the Big Ten’s elite play out
even remotely like the Terrapins’
62-14 loss at Ohio State last week,
then reaching six wins probably
will hinge on key matchups
against teams with comparable
rosters.
The first pivotal chance is Saturday against Northwestern (2-3,
0-2), which opened as a slight favorite in College Park earlier this
week but is reeling after consecutive losses to begin conference play.
“We definitely need to win this
game. I wouldn’t say our approach
is any different from any other
game, just off the simple fact that
we approach every game like we’re
going to win it,” Maryland senior
safety Josh Woods said. “But we
definitely understand that this is a
must-win game if you’re talking
about postseason hopes and
things like that.”
Maryland has navigated the nation’s second-toughest opening
stretch in terms of opponents’
winning percentage, behind Florida State; the Terrapins’ five opponents are 13-3 combined. Two of
their wins have been on the road
as double-digit underdogs.
Now the Terps are facing what is
projected to be the most difficult
schedule in the country over the
final seven weeks of the season,
with four of those games coming
against teams currently ranked in
the Associated Press top 25. Maryland’s current opponent winning
percentage over its entire schedule
is .720, the highest in the country
ahead of Iowa (.685), Florida State
(.681), Notre Dame (.679), Indiana
JAMIE SABAU/GETTY IMAGES
Facing Ohio State last week was rough for Maryland, but the remaining games do not get much easier.
(.667) and Georgia Tech (.667).
While last week’s loss to Ohio
State was a reality check on the
lengths Maryland must travel to
make up ground against the blue
bloods in the Big Ten, in the grand
scheme the loss will have little
effect on whether Maryland can
attain bowl eligibility.
According to ESPN’s Football
Power Index, which measures a
team’s true strength on a net
points scale, Maryland is favored
in just one remaining game —
against Rutgers at Yankee Stadium on Nov. 4. It has a 44 percent
or better chance against two other
remaining foes, Northwestern
and Indiana, but it has far less
favorable odds to beat any of the
ranked teams left on the schedule:
No. 3 Penn State (7.3), No. 7 Wisconsin (5.1 percent), No. 17 Michigan (25.6) and No. 21 Michigan
State (27.4).
“We don’t change our goals or
who we are or what we want to do
based on . . . I mean, we lost a game
[against Ohio State]. It’s not the
end of the world. Nobody is hanging their heads,” Woods said. “We
have a lot of football left to be
played. Who knows what’s going
to happen.”
Already the season has defied
predictions. Maryland was a threetouchdown underdog for its season opener at then-No. 23 Texas
and won, 51-41, for its first victory
over a ranked team in seven years.
It was a two-touchdown underdog
in a 31-24 victory at Minnesota in
the Big Ten opener, when thirdstring sophomore Max Bortenschlager became the team’s third
quarterback to win a game this
season after Tyrrell Pigrome and
Kasim Hill both suffered seasonending knee injuries in September.
But Bortenschlager couldn’t escape the program’s tortured tradition of quarterback injuries last
week against the Buckeyes. He
was knocked out of the game after
taking a late hit to the head at the
end of a scramble.
Bortenschlager practiced this
week and is considered a gametime decision, Maryland Coach DJ
Durkin said Thursday. And if he
can’t play, fourth-stringer Caleb
Henderson will become the fourth
Maryland quarterback to start in
the first six games.
“His role is critically important
no matter what Max’s health is,
obviously as a guy playing in the
game or one play away from playing in the game,” Durkin said of
Henderson. “Certainly we know
better than anyone as things have
gone, when you’re one play away,
that’s close to getting on the field.”
Durkin drew parallels between
his team and Northwestern earlier
this week; the Wildcats, who were
considered a contender to win the
Big Ten West during the preseason, have watched expectations fade, most recently with last
week’s 31-7 loss to Penn State at
home. Both teams have similar
statistical production: Northwestern ranks ninth in the Big Ten in
total offense (377.2 yards per
game) and 11th in total defense
(383.6); Maryland ranks 12th
(339.0) and 13th (420.6) in those
categories.
And the Wildcats need to win
four of their last seven games to
secure a postseason berth, although their strength of schedule
doesn’t compare to Maryland’s
down the stretch; according to
ESPN’s FPI, the Wildcats will be
favored in six of their final seven
games, including this weekend in
College Park.
“Northwestern is a good team,
whether they’ve had struggles or
not,” Maryland senior defensive
end Chandler Burkett said. “You
have to be ready for anybody.”
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
Bryant goes down with injury as No. 2 Clemson falls
SYRACUSE FROM D1
going to hurt, but you move forward.”
The Orange (4-3, 2-1) is 3-6
against the previous year’s national champion; it also beat Penn
State in 1987 and Michigan in
1998.
Clemson won the title last year
despite a loss to Pittsburgh. That
was not lost on the Tigers.
“Every goal is there for this
team,” Swinney said. “We’ve got to
get better from this, have the type
of season we want to have.”
The Tigers took a big blow
when quarterback Kelly Bryant
suffered an apparent concussion
in the final minute of the first half.
He was knocked down hard by
defensive tackle Chris Slayton and
lay on the turf for a couple of
minutes before being helped to
the locker room. Slowed after
spraining his left ankle last week
against Wake Forest, Bryant
passed for 116 yards and ran for
minus-8 yards.
Clemson has a bye week to heal
and correct its mistakes.
“I’m sure they’ll still have an
opportunity to play for the national championship,” Syracuse Coach
Dino Babers said. “They’re a national
championship
team.
They’re going to be fine.”
Bryant, who watched the second half from the sideline, entered the game averaging
277 yards of total offense but noticeably favored an injured ankle
as Syracuse gained a surprising
17-14 halftime lead.
Zerrick Cooper replaced Bryant
to start the second half and guided
the Tigers to a tying field goal.
The Tigers tried a trick play
with time winding down, but Will
Spiers threw an incompletion on a
fake punt.
Dungey hit Dontae Strickland
for a 23-yard score to open the
game and also hit Ervin Philips for
66 yards in the first quarter and
Steve Ishmael for 30 in the third to
break a 17-17 tie.
Syracuse used big plays to stun
the Tigers, hitting six of 20 yards
or more as the Orange outgained
Clemson 440-317. And the Orange
defense limited the Tigers to
2 for 11 on third down, none more
critical than Cooper’s overthrow
on third down before the fake.
The Orange responded quickly
as the Carrier Dome crowd rocked
the building with raucous cheers
of “Let’s Go Orange!” Dungey
raced 45 yards down the left side
and hit Ishmael on the next play
for a 30-yard scoring pass.
Not to be outdone, the Tigers
scored in 56 seconds on Travis
Etienne’s 52-yard run to tie it at 24.
The Orange defense took a page
out of Clemson’s playbook. The
Tigers were among just three
teams in the nation averaging at
least 230 yards rushing and
230 yards passing (Ohio State and
Oregon are the others). The Tigers
managed just 39 yards rushing in
the first half and 113 total.
“They came ready to play,”
Clemson defensive end Clelin Ferrell said. “They came out, they saw
blood, they saw they had a definite
chance to win the game, and we
just didn’t capitalize on the opportunities we had to make a comeback.”
The Tigers scored in just 67 seconds on their first possession,
with Tavien Feaster capping a
three-play drive with a 37-yard
run untouched up the middle of
the Orange defense. But the Orange defense rose to the occasion
from that point on.
Wizards’ McCullough shows promise in limited role
BY
TELEVISION AND RADIO
MLB PLAYOFFS
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
C ANDACE B UCKNER
new york — In February, when
the Washington Wizards made a
trade-deadline deal with the
Brooklyn Nets to get Bojan Bogdanovic, the team surrendered its
2017 first-round draft pick. At the
time, the thinking within the Wizards’ front office was that the trade
also helped the team land a prospect with the talent of a lottery
pick.
Chris McCullough, a native of
the Bronx who was packaged in
the trade with Brooklyn, has displayed that kind of potential since
he declared for the NBA draft after
an injury-shortened freshman
season at Syracuse.
His 7-foot-31/2 wingspan seems
to exaggerate his already lanky
6-11 frame.
“Whenever I come home,” McCullough said, “somebody always
says, ‘Damn! You’ve grown another inch.’ ”
McCullough was grounded in
January 2015 after he tore the
anterior cruciate ligament in his
right knee, but he now says he
jumps higher than ever. On top of
that, McCullough is only 22 years
old. As he enters his first full season in Washington and third overall in the NBA, McCullough will be
the 2017 draft pick the Wizards
never had, even if he remains
somewhat of an enigma.
In his return home Friday night,
McCullough played 13 minutes,
scored five points and grabbed
three rebounds in the Wizards’
110-103 win over the New York
Knicks.
With John Wall sitting out the
preseason finale, Bradley Beal led
the Wizards with 24 points in
29 minutes. Kelly Oubre Jr. played
his best offensive game of the exhibition season, making 9 of 13 shots
for 21 points. Also, Tomas Satoransky played the backup point guard
role with confidence, slamming
down a putback dunk in the second quarter, then finding the
range on his jump shot the rest of
the game (5 for 6 overall) for
10 points.
McCullough checked into the
game for the first time with 1:15
remaining in the third quarter
and flashed his burgeoning game
throughout the fourth. With 7:37
to play, McCullough created his
own shot off the dribble, falling
down but making a tough shot off
the backboard. On the Wizards’
next possession, McCullough
pulled up for a 28-footer.
Despite scattered moments of
preseason promise — McCullough
has received a “DNP” in two games
— Wizards Coach Scott Brooks
admits it will be even more difficult to find regular season minutes for him.
“It’s a catch-22,” Coach Scott
Brooks said. “He hasn’t had much
experience, but it’s tough to get
him experience, so he’s going to
have to keep battling [during]
spots on the practice floor where
he stands out.”
McCullough remains defined
by his potential, and his abbreviated basketball résumé reveals his
physical gifts: rebounding, dunking and running the floor. But
McCullough has focused on becoming a better ball-screener and
pick-and-pop player. He wants to
show his improvement this season, and McCullough had a chance
to do so while playing the entire
fourth quarter Friday at Madison
Square Garden. The extended play
afforded McCullough another
chance to help erase a criticism
that has followed him for years:
his work ethic.
“I heard that all my life, just
playing with a motor and effort,”
said McCullough, who is in the
final guaranteed year of his contract. “Coming up in high school,
things were a little easy for me
because I was better than everybody else. But now it’s my third
year. I get it now. You’ve got to go
hard on every play. You’ve got to
sprint the floor. That’s how I’m
going to get easy layups, easy
dunks, stuff like that. Get a lot of
rebounds, so that’s what I’m going
to do.”
When McCullough became the
first New York-born and raised
player drafted by the Brooklyn
Nets, he was still rehabbing from
his ACL injury. He made his NBA
debut 53 games into his rookie
season, and then-interim head
coach Tony Brown, now a Wizards
assistant, started him in the final
four games. However, McCullough spent his second year
shuttling between the bench and
the minors. The plan didn’t exactly inspire a 20-year-old who was
new to being a professional.
Although McCullough became
an NBA Development League allstar for the Long Island Nets,
shortly thereafter the parent team
sent him to the Wizards.
The Nets “did not feel like he
committed himself the way they
would have liked all the time,” said
Stephen Pina, McCullough’s agent
through ASM Sports, who also
said that playing near McCullough’s home town didn’t help
his development.
“Expectations and pressures
that come along with being from
New York can play a lot to a young
kid’s psyche,” Pina said. But
“Washington looked at it essentially as they got a first-round draft
pick who was still young. . . . I
think it gave Chris a fresh new
start.”
Even if McCullough does not
get much game experience, he
views his third year as a second
chance.
“It’s a mind-set thing,” McCullough said. “I know what
coaches want. I know what coaches expect out of me. I know what I
can do, so I’m just going to go out
there rebound and run the floor.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
college football
In Baylor’s ruins, Rhule right at home
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
waco, tex. — To the cheerless
KEVIN JAIRAJ/USA TODAY SPORTS
With Jalen Reagor, left, and Kenny Hill, sixth-ranked TCU is a rare
team to be favored when playing a road game against Kansas State.
TOD A Y ’ S TV G A M ES
EARLY SHIFT
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
No. 6 TCU at Kansas State » Fox Sports 1
No. 17 Michigan at Indiana » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
No. 24 Texas Tech at West Virginia » ESPNU
South Carolina at Tennessee » ESPN
Florida State at Duke » ESPN2
BYU at Mississippi State » SEC Network
Kansas at Iowa State » MASN2
Rutgers at Illinois » Big Ten Network
North Carolina State at Pittsburgh » NBC Sports Washington
Connecticut at Temple » ESPNews
Eastern Michigan at Army » CBS Sports Network
Go ahead and bet against Kansas State as a home underdog. Over the
previous four seasons, Bill Snyder’s team has gone 6-1 against the spread
when the visiting team is favored, and now the Wildcats are six-point
underdogs to TCU in the Little Apple. The Horned Frogs are unbeaten but
have given up at least 24 points in each of their last three games against
teams (SMU, Oklahoma State and West Virginia) that rank in the top 13
nationally in terms of yards per game. Kansas State isn’t nearly as potent,
as it leads only Baylor in Big 12 total offense. . . . While we’re on the subject
of gambling, the boys in the desert have set the over-under total for the
Texas Tech-West Virginia game at 76, second only to UCLA-Arizona this
weekend. The Red Raiders, ranked for the first time since 2013, actually had
more rushing yards (313) than passing yards (290) in last week’s demolition
of Kansas, just the second time they’ve done that in a game since 2000.
SWING SHIFT
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:45
4
Northwestern at Maryland » ESPN2
Virginia at North Carolina » NBC Sports Washington
Villanova at James Madison » MASN
Purdue at No. 7 Wisconsin » Big Ten Network
No. 10 Auburn at LSU » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
Georgia Tech at No. 11 Miami » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
No. 12 Oklahoma vs. Texas in Dallas » ESPN
Baylor at No. 14 Oklahoma State » Fox Sports 1
Vanderbilt at Mississippi » SEC Network
Akron at Western Michigan » CBS Sports Network
No. 25 Navy at Memphis » ESPNU
Houston at Tulsa » ESPNews
This year’s Red River Rivalry between Oklahoma and Texas lost a little bit
of its luster last weekend when the Sooners were upset by Iowa State. Still,
it’ll be interesting to see how first-year coaches Lincoln Riley and Tom
Herman handle the pressure of the rivalry at the Cotton Bowl. It’s the first
time both teams will meet with new coaches since 1947. Herman beat
Oklahoma last year while coaching Houston, and Riley will hope to avoid
becoming the first Sooners coach since 1999 (Bob Stoops’s first season) to
lose consecutive regular season games. . . . Mark Richt is 14-2 all-time as an
NCAA head coach against Georgia Tech, with all but one of those games
coming while he was in charge at Georgia. Seven of the nine wins have come
with Paul Johnson on the Yellow Jackets’ sideline, but things could be a little
trickier on Saturday: The Hurricanes will face Georgia Tech without
running back Mark Walton, who’s out for the season with an ankle injury.
The Yellow Jackets also are averaging nearly 400 rushing yards per game
and are a blown fourth-quarter lead against Tennessee away from being
undefeated.
NIGHT SHIFT
7
7
7:15
7:30
7:30
7:30
8
8
10:15
10:30
10:45
11
East Carolina at No. 22 Central Florida » CBS Sports Network
Texas A&M at Florida » ESPN2
Arkansas at No. 1 Alabama » ESPN
Missouri at No. 4 Georgia » SEC Network
No. 9 Ohio State at Nebraska » Fox Sports 1
Cincinnati at No. 18 South Florida » ESPNU
Utah at No. 13 Southern Cal » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
No. 21 Michigan State at Minnesota » Big Ten Network
Nevada at Colorado State » ESPN2
Boise State at No. 19 San Diego State » CBS Sports Network
No. 5 Washington at Arizona State » ESPN
Oregon at No. 23 Stanford » Fox Sports 1
One of these days this season — maybe? — we are going to get a prime-time
Saturday lineup that’s filled with great-on-paper games. This is not that
Saturday. Utah-Southern California might be the best of the bunch. The
Trojans have forced 15 turnovers this season, the Utes 14 (though they
didn’t force any in last weekend’s loss to Stanford, snapping their streak of
19 straight games with a takeaway). USC forced three of them in last week’s
win over floundering Oregon State, and quarterback Sam Darnold brushed
off his early-season struggles with 316 passing yards and three touchdown
passes. Still, he’s thrown at least one interception in every game this
season. . . . Stay up late to catch Boise State-San Diego State if only to
watch Aztecs running back Rashaad Penny, who leads the nation in allpurpose yards and is second in rushing yards one season after another San
Diego State running back, Donnel Pumphrey, was tops nationally in that
category.
— Matt Bonesteel
Other area games
Georgetown (1-4)
at Lehigh (1-5), 12:30
Gallaudet (1-4)
at Alfred State (0-5), 1
Savannah State (0-5)
at Morgan State (0-5), 1
VMI (0-6) at Furman (3-3), 1
Bowie State (6-0)
at Virginia State (5-0), 2
Howard (2-3)
at Delaware State (0-5), 2
Hampton (3-2)
at Norfolk State (2-3), 2
Old Dominion (2-3)
at Marshall (4-1), 2:30
Virginia (4-1)
at North Carolina (1-5), 3:30
William & Mary (2-3)
at Delaware (3-2), 3:30
Richmond (3-2) at Towson (2-3), 4
Kennesaw State (4-1)
at Liberty (3-2), 6
question about just who in the
world took over the Baylor football program, it’s this outstanding
conversationalist with a 2-10 season writhing four years in his
past. On the matter of who guides
Baylor after its sprawling scandal
and wretched exodus of 2016, it’s
a 42-year-old man who can recollect a meaningless game that had
lasting meaning. About who oversees Baylor at 0-5 heading into
Oklahoma State, it’s a man who
can handle it because he grasps
one of the great human truths.
Sometimes in life, people wind
up grateful for times that seemed
only lousy.
Matt Rhule has completed his
move from Temple, where he
went 2-10 in 2013 before rising, to
Baylor, which went 32-7 from 2013
to 2015 before sinking. The sexual-assault epidemic from that era
hovers on, as it should given its
importance, and figures to keep
regenerating, as it did Sept. 22,
when a court filing relative to a
lawsuit revealed another grotesquerie, that departed interim
president David Garland had referred in an email to women “who
may seem willingly to make themselves victims.”
The failed figures of the past —
including football coach Art
Briles, athletic director Ian McCaw and university president
Kenneth Starr — have exited. Now
the mere football of it has gone to
Rhule, who grew up largely on
Roosevelt Island in the East River
between Manhattan and Queens
and who revels in a childhood
rich in friends both from rentcontrol housing like his and from
families of diplomats, from Kenya, Ethiopia and elsewhere. This
adorer of the rich tapestry of one
Manhattan (the one in New York)
just lost Sept. 30 in another Manhattan (the one in Kansas) to
reach that 0-5, with a game Saturday at 14th-ranked Oklahoma
State, followed by West Virginia
and Texas.
He can handle it.
Two-and-10 helps.
A meaningless game in Memphis helps more.
In life, that meaningless game
with lasting meaning can sit
tucked and buried four years into
the past where almost nobody
sees it and almost nobody has any
reason to look. Just noting the
particulars might turn you forlorn: Late November. A 1-10 team
playing a 3-7 team. A stadium
seating 61,000. A crowd announced at 25,671 sprinkled
about. If by chance you remember
Temple 41, Memphis 21, at Memphis on Nov. 30, 2013, the chances
are that you are either a Temple
fan, a close relative of a Temple
player or some kind of savant.
“It’s funny, it’s in my house, I
used to have it in my office; it’s a
picture of me, in the huddle, talking to the team before we took the
field,” Rhule said from the livingroom couch of his office at Baylor.
“And my son’s right next to me” —
he was 8 then — “and it was just
such a great moment. I remember
my son went, ‘Dad, there’s a tiger
outside.’ I was like, ‘I know. Memphis Tigers. You’ve seen mascots
before.’ He was like, ‘Dad, I do not
want to leave the locker room.
There’s a tiger outside.’ Literally,
you walk out, and there’s this big
cage, and there’s a tiger outside.
“It was like: us, them, a couple
of their fans and the tiger.”
Three memories prevail from
that 2013 season, his first at Temple, before he pulled off the Galileo feat of getting the Owls — the
Temple Owls! — to 10 wins in 2015
(with ESPN’s “College GameDay”
coming to Philadelphia for the
Notre Dame game) and 10 more in
2016 (with an American Athletic
Conference title).
One memory is set in Idaho,
where a 26-24 loss left Temple 0-4,
and where Rhule prepared for
“the angry-coach speech,” but
then, on the way into the locker
room, saw both his son and one of
his players looking dejected. So he
said, as he remembers: “This will
all pass, and all this work is not for
naught. You’re just accumulating
it, and it will eventually pay off.”
Another happened in his office
in Philadelphia, where the phone
rang one day and it happened to
be Dick Vermeil, a man who won
both a Rose Bowl and a Super
Bowl and whose voice suddenly
was there saying, “Trust your gut,
and do what you think is right.”
“So that’s why I never panicked,” Rhule said last week. “After that year, people said, ‘Are you
going to fire coaches?’ I said, ‘No,
I’m just not going to panic.’ ”
The third came in Memphis,
after which the coach of a team
that had just gone from 1-10 to
2-10 said that barren day, “It’s
unbelievably satisfying.” The rising coach on the other end, Justin
Fuente, nowadays at Virginia
ORLIN WAGNER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Baylor’s Matt Rhule sees 0-5 as an opportunity to coach and teach. “This is when the players need it.”
Tech, said, “Matt and his staff did
a great job of keeping those kids
committed.”
“So I always look back, and as
coaches at Temple we would always say we felt like we did our
best coaching job the first year,”
Rhule said in late September. “You
know, we took a team that lost to
Fordham” — and lost to a Fiesta
Bowl-winning Central Florida
with particular agony, in the closing seconds, by 39-36 — “and we
always felt like we did our best
teaching and coaching that year.
“So as we go through this now,
my challenge to our staff [which
includes two former players from
that Memphis game] is to make
sure we do our best teaching and
coaching right now, because this
is when the players need it. This is
when the players need to be
brought along, and they need to
be mentored and coached and
helped through this. So our staff is
trying to embrace these moments. When you’re going
through hard times is where you
build relationships. You build a
foundation for a program, where,
‘Hey, this is what we stand for.’ ”
He says all of this, of course, as a
former walk-on. He finished high
school in 1994 in State College, Pa.
He tried to play at Penn State. He
flunked the first physical with a
bum shoulder. He rehabbed that
and helped the equipment managers. He kept calling or visiting
Joe Paterno’s office, begging or
pleading. His uncommon persistence landed him on the scout
team, then on the team, even after
a nadir before his junior year
when Penn State did not include
him among 105 players. (Then
somebody got hurt.)
“I’m not perfect, but I try to
make sure I give everyone an opportunity,” he said. “And, also, I
think the biggest thing is that we
just try to find value in guys, even
if it’s just their toughness and their
dependability. And I think if you
have enough guys like that, then I
think your team can become a
tough, dependable team, because
teams are not built with stars.
Teams are built with, you know,
the glue guys, and then the stars,
you know, take you over the top.”
So with a Baylor program that
hemorrhaged players last year in
the wake of scandal — one of
them, quarterback Jarrett Stidham, now leading the nation’s
10th-ranked team at Auburn —
and now includes 78 freshmen
and sophomores among 116 roster players, through loss after
loss, Rhule finishes games and
goes home. He conks out almost
involuntarily for two or three
hours. He wakes, usually around 3
a.m., and he evaluates everything.
When Baylor fought hard Sept.
23 and nabbed a second-half lead
against Oklahoma, stunning anyone who was looking, he thought
about everything from the insufficient tackling to the booming
postgame crowd noise. Sometimes, at more reasonable hours,
he welcomes the input of his wife,
Julie, who noticed earlier this
year he didn’t look quite himself
while coaching.
Still, he doesn’t resonate suffering. He’s a guy who once went 2-10
and won a game nobody saw at
Memphis.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
WA S H I N G T O N R E D S K I N S V S . S A N F R A N C I S C O 4 9 E R S
OCTOBER 15
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1:00 PM
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. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
professional Football
REDSKINS NOTES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
For Sunday, Williams
is game-time decision
Washington Redskins left tackle
Trent Williams will be a gametime decision Sunday against the
San Francisco 49ers. Williams
was listed as questionable Friday
after suffering a left meniscus
injury in Week 4 against the
Kansas City Chiefs. He didn’t
practice all week, but Redskins
Coach Jay Gruden knows better
than to rule Williams out.
“Have you seen Trent play?”
Gruden said. “I have the trust
and confidence that if Trent says
he can go, he’ll be fine. He’s
played enough football here. He
knows our system. He’s very
smart and obviously very
athletic. At the end of the day, it’s
sore. . . . If he feels like he can
give it a valiant effort, I believe
he’ll be effective.”
Instead of participating in
individual drills, Williams
rehabbed off to the side at the
start of practices this week. He
said the knee still hurts even
after the bye week. When asked
about the likelihood of playing,
Williams said, “We’ll see. We’ll
see what it feels like on Sunday
and the next 48 hours.”
Williams missed just four plays
against the Chiefs after suffering
the injury. He has played through
some difficult injuries over the
years, which gives the Redskins
confidence that he’s capable of
starting even without a week of
practice. Gruden said that
Williams is so athletic that even
NFL NOTES
San Francisco releases
former all-pro Bowman
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
San Francisco cut ties with one
of the few remaining links to its
last run of success when it released linebacker NaVorro Bowman on Friday.
General Manager John Lynch
said the team looked into possible
trade partners and came close to
completing one. But when that
fell through, the team granted
Bowman’s request and released
him to give him the opportunity to
pick his new team.
Bowman, a former All-Met
from Suitland High, originally
joined the 49ers as a third-round
pick in 2010 and quickly formed
one of the league’s best linebacking duos with Patrick Willis. The
two were key to San Francisco’s
run of three straight trips to the
NFC title game and one Super
Bowl appearance. The only players remaining in San Francisco
who played in that Super Bowl
following the 2012 season are left
tackle Joe Staley, center Daniel
Kilgore and tight end Garrett
Celek.
Bowman earned first team allpro honors four times in his career, achieving it from 2011-13 and
then again in 2015 after coming
back from a devastating knee injury. Bowman then tore his Achilles’ tendon early last season and
missed most of the year before
coming back again this year.
PANTHERS: Carolina star
linebacker Luke Kuechly is back
in the concussion protocol. And
that could leave a big hole at the
heart of the Panthers’ defense.
Kuechly left the Panthers’ 28-23
loss to the Philadelphia Eagles in
the first half Thursday night after
taking a hit near the left side of his
neck. He walked to the sideline
and later jogged to the tunnel but
didn’t return to the field with his
teammates at the start of the third
quarter before being ruled out.
“All I can tell you is he’s in the
protocol,” Panthers Coach Ron Rivera said, adding: “I don’t know
anything other than that.”
VIKINGS: Minnesota will be
shorthanded on offense heading
into an important home game
against the rival Green Bay Packers on Sunday.
Quarterback Sam Bradford,
wide receiver Stefon Diggs and
left guard Nick Easton were all
ruled out by Coach Mike Zimmer
after not practicing during the
week.
PACKERS: Safety Morgan
Burnett will miss Sunday’s game
against Minnesota with a hamstring injury, and Green Bay
might be down another starter in
the secondary in cornerback Kevin King.
Burnett was ruled out, and
King was listed as doubtful.
TITANS: Wide receiver
Rishard Matthews says he made a
bad decision on Twitter to threaten to quit football if the NFL
institutes a new rule mandating
players stand for the national anthem.
Asked if he stands by that initial statement, Matthews said
“not right now.”
GIANTS: After losing three
wide receivers to season-ending
injuries last weekend, winless
New York will be without five
more starters for Sunday night’s
game against the Broncos.
Defensive end Olivier Vernon
will miss a second straight game
with a sprained ankle. Center
Weston Richburg (concussion)
and running back Paul Perkins
(ribs) also will be out, along with
defensive captain Jonathan Casillas (neck) and wide receiver Sterling Shepard (sprained ankle).
TEXANS: Houston safety
Marcus Gilchrist has been fined
$24,309 by the NFL for his helmet-to-helmet hit on Chiefs tight
end Travis Kelce last Sunday
night.
Game to remain in Oakland
The NFL tentatively plans to
keep Sunday’s Raiders-Chargers
game in Oakland.
Wildfires raging in Northern
California led to consideration of
the game being relocated, based
on concerns about air quality.
But the Raiders issued a written statement that said: “Sunday’s
game against the Chargers remains scheduled for 1:25 p.m.
[PT] at the Oakland-Alameda
County Coliseum. We will continue to monitor air quality conditions in the Bay Area and will
update the public with any changes via our social media channels.”
A league official confirmed the
plan to keep the game in Oakland,
while adding that “if conditions
are unsafe, we would alter plans.”
— Mark Maske
10/28/17
JAYNE KAMIN-ONCEA/USA TODAY SPORTS
Trent Williams has rehabbed off to the side instead of participating
in individual drills this week because of a left meniscus injury.
at less than 100 percent, he still
would be better than a lot of
tackles in the NFL.
“I’ve been in some tough
situations,” Williams said of
playing through injuries. “It’s a
little easier when something
happens in the game and you’ve
kind of got some adrenaline
pumping. When you’ve got to
suffer through something for a
few weeks, it’s a little different.
I’ve got the same mentality that
I’ve always had. I’m still going to
try to go out there and be there
for my teammates.”
The Redskins have ruled out
cornerback Josh Norman (rib
fracture) and offensive tackle Ty
Nsekhe (core muscle). Running
back Rob Kelley (ankle) and
safety Deshazor Everett
(hamstring) are both listed as
doubtful.
Kelley didn’t participate all
week during practice. He
suffered the ankle sprain against
Kansas City, a game in which he
played through a rib injury.
Gruden said Wednesday that
Kelley would be a long shot to
play against San Francisco.
Disliking proposal
A proposal by former Lions
linebacker DeAndre Levy to a
congressional forum that the
NFL should eliminate fullcontact practices was met with
skepticism at Redskins Park.
“It’s football. If you don’t want
the thumping, you might as well
call it flag football. Pull out the
flags and let’s do that,” veteran
tight end Vernon Davis said.
— Master Tesfatsion
and Rick Maese
With Norman out, Dunbar raring to go
BY
R ICK M AESE
In offseason workouts, in
training camp and in daily walkthroughs, cornerback Josh Norman was plenty familiar with
that voice. Quinton Dunbar, perpetually situated a rung or two
down the depth chart, always
was eager for reps, always was
ready to jump on the field.
“Even in practice, he been
asking me, ‘You need somebody?
You need somebody?’ I’m like,
‘Yeah, man, go out there,’ ” Norman said.
Now Norman is sidelined with
a rib injury, and it’s Dunbar’s
turn. The third-year player, who
has lined up on the defensive
side of the ball for all of
26 months, faces the tall task of
replacing one of the top cornerbacks in the league. Norman
won’t play Sunday and could
miss four weeks. Until Norman is
healthy enough to play, though,
Dunbar will try to make the most
of his chance.
“Dunbar’s been biting at the
bit for the last year,” Norman
said. “I’m excited to see it. I know
there’s no trouble once he get in
there, and when he plays, you’ll
see: He lives for those moments.
He lives for this moment, the
time he has right now.”
Until the Redskins’ Week 4
loss at Kansas City, most of
Dunbar’s action this season came
on special teams. He totaled
10 defensive snaps in the first
three games combined, according to Football Outsiders. But
after Norman went down late in
the first half against the Chiefs,
the 25-year old Dunbar answered
the call and played 37 defensive
snaps. The University of Florida
product was targeted five times
and allowed three catches for
only 14 yards, according to Pro
Football Focus, which said his
coverage grade of 81.9 was the
highest of anyone in the game.
Redskins Coach Jay Gruden is
hoping for a similar performance
Sunday against San Francisco.
Gruden called Dunbar a “unique
person” earlier this week before
cracking a smile.
“I don’t think he’s really smart
enough to know the magnitude
of the situation he’s in,” Gruden
joked. “He just goes out and
plays. He just loves playing football. He loves to compete. Man,
he thinks he can cover anybody,
anytime, anywhere. And that’s a
great mentality to have as a
corner, and that’s the way he
feels.”
Getting elevated to the first
team is not exactly foreign to
Dunbar. In Week 3 a year ago,
four Redskins starters suffered
injuries against the Giants, including cornerbacks Bashaud
Breeland and Dashaun Phillips.
Dunbar got the start the next two
weeks, and Gruden said he liked
what he saw, even if Dunbar got
off to a rocky start.
Early against New York, Dunbar mistakenly touched a live
ball on a punt, which the Giants
then recovered and turned into
seven points. But he later caught
a 31-yard pass from punter Tress
Way, which set up a Redskins
field goal. And then on the
Giants’ ensuing drive, Dunbar
made a one-handed interception
that kept the highlight reels
spinning. The Redskins won, 2927.
This time around Dunbar is
looking to show he can be more
than just a fill-in off the bench.
He is still new to the position. He
was a wide receiver in high
school and college. He signed
with Washington as an undrafted free agent in 2015, and coaches moved him to cornerback
during his first training camp.
By now, there’s no identity
crisis. He feels comfortable at
corner, comfortable in the position meetings and is eager to
carve out his own niche. He
won’t play just like Norman on
Sunday — he will press more
and rely on his strength and
speed.
“I feel like I’m a DB,” he said,
“like I’m a solid DB. And if I go
out there and do what I’m supposed to do, trust my technique
and trust my teammates, everything will work out.”
He again spent the offseason
training with a defensive backs
coach near his Miami home, and
at Redskins Park he has been
working diligently with Washington’s new secondary coaches,
Torrian Gray and assistant James
Rowe.
“Each year I feel like I get
better,” Dunbar said, “better at
learning the defense, different
things to be a great DB.”
The difference this season,
coaches agree, is that Dunbar is
no longer relying solely on athleticism, but he’s picking up the
nuances of the position.
“I’ve seen him grow leaps and
bounds from a mental standpoint,” Gray said. “. . . He’s got the
athletic ability, all those things.
But once you understand your
position and you understand
what the offense is doing, the
game really starts to slow down
for you.”
The Redskins’ coaches like
Dunbar’s length — he’s listed as
6-foot-2, 197 pounds — as well as
his speed and athleticism.
Gruden is hopeful a few more
game reps will show what the
young defensive back is really
capable of as the season wears
on.
“I’m excited to see him play on
a longer basis, see what he can do
because he can bump and run,”
Gruden said. “He’s got long arms
and he can run, see how he does
out in space. But we’re excited to
see him.”
rick.maese@washpost.com
Even on bye week, Cowboys a hub for controversy
BY
M ARK M ASKE
It’s probably a good thing for
both the Dallas Cowboys and the
NFL that the Cowboys don’t have
a game this weekend, courtesy of
their bye week. Some clarity is
needed on multiple issues before
the Cowboys take the field again.
By the time the Cowboys play
Oct. 22 at San Francisco, NFL
owners will have had their meeting next Tuesday and Wednesday
in New York to make a plan for
dealing with the raging controversy over players’ protests during the national anthem.
Meanwhile, the next steps in
the legal tussle between the NFL
and the NFL Players Association
over the on-again, off-again, nowon-again six-game suspension of
Cowboys running back Ezekiel
Elliott may have at least begun to
play out. As things now stand, the
Cowboys won’t have Elliott in the
lineup when they resume play.
But Elliott’s legal representatives
have another chance to try to get
the suspension placed on hold.
The NFL’s plan for dealing with
the anthem controversy could
come with the cooperation of the
NFLPA; the union’s executive director, DeMaurice Smith, and
players are scheduled to attend
next week’s meeting. It could involve the league supporting players’ activism. Or it could include
owners requiring players to stand
for the national anthem.
Meanwhile, other teams and
their players will have to figure
out how to handle the situation at
this weekend’s games. For the
Miami Dolphins, who play Sunday at Atlanta, that probably
means continuing the policy put
in place last weekend, when players were required to stand for the
anthem if they were on the sideline but also were given the option
to remain inside the locker room
or in the tunnel leading to the
field. For other teams, it will mean
players making individual decisions, and that likely will result in
some players kneeling in protest.
Cowboys players won’t have to
face owner Jerry Jones’s stand-orelse proclamation, at least not yet.
But the Cowboys’ situation seems
more unsettled than that of any
other team. Jones said after his
team’s home loss to the Green Bay
Packers last Sunday night that the
Cowboys would bench any player
who protests during the anthem
and thereby, in Jones’s view, is
disrespectful to the American
flag. Jones became the first owner
to take such a forceful stand
against the protests.
Jones’s comments came less
than two weeks after he took a
knee alongside Cowboys players
and coaches — in the wake of
President Trump’s initial remarks
condemning the players’ protests— before the anthem at a
Monday night game at Arizona.
Jones and the Cowboys then
stood and returned to their sideline, and remained standing for
the anthem.
But that solidarity with the
players seemed lost by the time
Jones spoke last Sunday night.
Jones said the Cowboys would
refuse to play before they would
allow players to, in his words,
disrespect the flag.
Cowboys players clearly were
upset, and Jones met with his
players Wednesday. According to
a report by ESPN, Jones sought to
ease the players’ concerns by telling them that he’d made his public comments, which came after
Vice President Pence walked out
of a 49ers-Colts game Sunday in
Indianapolis and cited the protests, to take public scrutiny off
his players and put the focus entirely on him.
Whether that explanation satisfies Cowboys players remains to
be seen. The outcome of the owners’ meeting next week will go a
long way toward determining
how things go from here for the
Cowboys and other teams. Will
the owners’ plan calm players or
anger them? Will players emerge
feeling like their input was taken
into consideration and incorporated into the anthem plan?
For the Cowboys, there are byeweek issues everywhere they
turn.
Elliott’s suspension was reinstated Thursday by the New Orleans-based U.S. Court of Appeals
for the Fifth Circuit. A three-judge
panel ruled, by a 2-1 margin, that
the district court in Texas that
granted an injunction to the NFLPA and Elliott, keeping Elliott’s
suspension on hold, did not have
proper jurisdiction. The NFLPA
filed its case in the Texas federal
court before Elliott’s appeal before NFL-appointed arbitrator
Harold Henderson was resolved.
The union had assumed — correctly, as it turned out — that
Henderson would uphold the suspension imposed by NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, and it
was attempting to win the race to
court to get the venue of its choosing. The NFL subsequently filed a
case in New York in a bid to affirm
Henderson’s ruling. Now the
union’s gambit has failed, and the
case in New York could become
the active case. The problem for
the union in New York is that the
case involving Tom Brady’s fourgame Deflategate suspension
played out there, and the appeals
court’s decision reinstating Brady’s suspension and reinforcing
Goodell’s authority in player discipline applies there as a precedent.
So while the appeals court in
New Orleans did not rule on the
merits of whether Elliott deserves
an injunction — and, in fact, left
open the possibility that he might
deserve one based on the assertion that the appeals process before Henderson was unfair — the
venue matters. The union and
Elliott’s lawyers were sifting
through their options Thursday.
Those options include appealing
the ruling of the three-judge panel to the entire appeals court in
New Orleans; seeking an injunction or temporary restraining order in New York; or refiling the
case in the district court in Texas,
although it might be difficult to
make that the active case with the
New York case already filed.
Elliott could be shelved just as
the Cowboys seemed to be getting
their running game going, given
his productive game against the
Packers. Things become far more
difficult for the Cowboys if they
indeed lose Elliott and must patch
together their run game with Darren McFadden and Alfred Morris.
The Cowboys began the season
with seemingly realistic Super
Bowl aspirations but have a record of 2-3.
“It’s a new season,” Cowboys
tight end Jason Witten said as the
locker room emptied around him
Sunday, with Elliott being among
the final players to leave. “This
team understands year to year
you’ve got to adjust to a new
season. There’s a lot that you can
build on. Certainly a foundation
was laid last year. But it’s a new
year. We’ve got to reestablish it.”
It’s still relatively early in the
season and there is plenty of football to be played. But for the
Cowboys, it could become too late
relatively quickly if they don’t get
things moving in a more positive
direction.
mark.maske@washpost.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
M2
Four points for Backstrom in road win Panarin, Jones boost
NHL ROUNDUP
Columbus to a victory
CAPITALS FROM D1
room in the second period. The
team announced that Niskanen
suffered an upper-body injury
that will be reevaluated Saturday
before Washington’s game at the
Philadelphia Flyers.
Niskanen went to the bench in
apparent pain after New Jersey
forward Jimmy Hayes slashed his
stick. He took off his left glove
before retreating to the locker
room before the second intermission.
By that point, the Capitals had
built a 3-1 lead. In the first period,
Backstrom fed T.J. Oshie in the
slot before he snapped it over New
Jersey goaltender Cory Schneider.
Then, on a power play eight minutes into the second period, Backstrom held onto the puck near the
left half-wall, waiting for the perfect opportunity to slide it over to
Alex Ovechkin’s office in the left
faceoff circle.
From there, Ovechkin scored
his ninth goal, making these first
five games his hottest start to a
season in his 13-year career. Entering Friday’s game, Ovechkin
had scored more goals than seven
NHL teams. He’s now just the
fourth player in the NHL’s expansion era (since 1967-68) to score
nine goals in his team’s first five
games.
“The way he’s able to create
space for himself, to jump in
holes, and his release is second to
none,” Oshie said of Ovechkin.
“Am I surprised on O’s production? I don’t think so. Am I impressed? Very.”
Less than three minutes after
Taylor Hall’s power-play goal cut
Washington’s lead to one, a deflection in front by Jakub Vrana put
the Capitals up by two again. The
Capitals then poured it on in the
third period: After Kyle Palmieri
brought New Jersey back within a
goal in the period’s first minute,
Backstrom assisted on Oshie’s
second power-play goal of the
game, then later redirected a shot
in front for a goal of his own as
Washington pulled away.
“This was the way we want to
play,” goaltender Braden Holtby
said.
Friday’s game marked a reunion of the Capitals and forward
Marcus Johansson, whom the
team traded to New Jersey over
the summer for two draft picks.
Johansson played in the Capitals’
top-six forward corps last season,
and his offseason departure coupled with that of fellow top-six
forward Justin Williams left
Washington with 48 goals to replace.
BLUE JACKETS 3,
RANGERS 1
A SSOCIATED P RESS
JULIO CORTEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nicklas Backstrom (19) celebrates with his teammates after scoring the game’s final goal Friday.
Capitals 5, Devils 2
WASHINGTON .................... 1
NEW JERSEY ....................... 0
2
1
2 — 5
1 — 2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Washington, Oshie 4 (Backstrom), 14:49.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Washington, Ovechkin 9 (Backstrom,
Carlson), 8:01 (pp). 3, New Jersey, Hall 1 (Butcher,
Palmieri), 16:28 (pp). 4, Washington, Vrana 1
(Smith-Pelly, Kuznetsov), 19:00.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, New Jersey, Palmieri 1 (Moore, Severson), 0:53. 6, Washington, Oshie 5 (Backstrom,
Kuznetsov), 5:26 (pp). 7, Washington, Backstrom 2
(Ovechkin, Oshie), 7:02 (pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
WASHINGTON .................... 8
12
8 — 28
NEW JERSEY ....................... 8
9
6 — 23
Power-play opportunities: Washington 2 of 4 Goalies: Washington, Holtby 3-1-0 (23 shots-21 saves).
New Jersey, Schneider 3-1-0 (28-23). A: 13,458
(16,514). T: 2:35.
While Williams signed with the
Carolina Hurricanes in free agency, Johansson was a salary-cap
casualty that few expected after
he scored a career-high 24 goals
with the Capitals last season.
Washington awarded Oshie and
fellow forward Evgeny Kuznetsov
expensive long-term deals, seemingly choosing to keep them over
Johansson.
Oshie’s deal, an eight-year,
$46 million contract, was closely
scrutinized because Oshie will be
38 when it runs out. The
$5.75 million salary-cap hit was
earned after he scored a careerhigh 33 goals last season, but
there was some doubt that he
would continue to shoot a leaguehigh 24 percent this season.
Through four games, Oshie was
shooting 33.3 percent with three
goals, and he improved on those
numbers against the Devils with
two goals on three shots.
Johansson and the Devils were
rolling entering the matchup,
having won their first three
games. But Friday night, the Capitals’ star players announced their
presence after an offseason that
revolved around who left. Five
goals in the first five games is the
best start Oshie has had to a
season in his career. Ovechkin,
Backstrom and Kuznetsov are
tied for the league lead in points
with 10.
“The whole team was playing
good tonight,” Backstrom said.
“We had better structure, and we
kept it together. We played better
defensively. When we play quick,
it’s hard for other teams to create
chances, so I think the whole team
played better tonight.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
Artemi Panarin and Seth Jones
scored to rally the host Columbus
Blue Jackets to a 3-1 win over the
New York Rangers on Friday.
Zach Werenski had two assists,
and Lukas Sedlak added an empty-net goal for Columbus.
Panarin, acquired from Chicago during the offseason, got his
first goal with the Blue Jackets.
He snaked through the defense
and beat goaltender Henrik
Lundqvist between the pads 7:25
into the third period for a 2-1 lead.
He’s tied for the team lead with
four points.
Sergei Bobrovsky had 37 saves
for Columbus, and Lundqvist
stopped 40 shots.
Kevin Hayes scored for New
York with 5:25 left in the first
period. Hayes intercepted Jones’s
drop pass and charged on a
breakaway, beating Bobrovsky on
his glove side.
Jones made amends with 46
seconds left in the second by
snapping a shot from the left wall
that hit the Rangers’ Mika Zibanejad in the shin. Lundqvist
was caught lunging the other way,
and the deflected shot bounced in
off the post to make it 1-1.
The Blue Jackets opened the
third period with an 11-0 shot
advantage in the first six minutes
but couldn’t solve Lundqvist until
Panarin broke the tie.
Columbus had a goal waved off
29 seconds into the game because
Matt Calvert backed into Lundqvist in the crease. Calvert had
redirected a shot by David Savard.
Blue Jackets defenseman Gabriel Carlsson was injured and
left the game in the third period.
SENATORS
6, FLAMES 0:
Kyle Turris had three assists, and
Craig Anderson made 25 saves as
visiting Ottawa cruised to a win.
Cody Ceci scored in the first
period, Derick Brassard tallied in
the second, and Mike Hoffman,
Mark Stone, Ryan Dzingel and
Chris Wideman found the net in
the third for Ottawa.
AVALANCHE
3, DUCKS 1:
Tyson Barrie had the go-ahead
goal late in the third period as
host Colorado handled Anaheim.
Wild’s Coyle out 6 to 8 weeks
Minnesota forward Charlie
Coyle will be sidelined six to eight
weeks after breaking his right leg
Thursday in Chicago.
Forwards Nino Niederreiter
and Marcus Foligno also were
injured in Minnesota’s 5-2 victory.
The Wild said Niederreiter is out
for at least three weeks with a left
high ankle sprain, and Foligno
will be out for at least a week with
a broken facial bone.
The Wild said it would recall at
least three players from its AHL
squad, the Iowa Wild, before its
home opener Saturday against
Columbus.
CANADIENS: A person with
knowledge of the situation said
Montreal defenseman Mark Streit will not report to the minors
after clearing waivers and will
spend the next few days weighing
his options.
The person spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity because talks have been
private.
The Canadiens assigned the
39-year-old to the AHL’s Laval
Rocket after none of the other 30
NHL teams put in a claim for the
Swiss defender.
Streit played just two games
since rejoining Montreal, averaging 14 minutes and registering a
minus-2 rating.
PAUL VERNON/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Blue Jackets defenseman Seth Jones, left, scored against
defenseman Nick Holden’s Rangers in the second period Friday.
NCAA opts to pass on punishment for North Carolina in academic scandal
BY W ILL H OBSON
AND M ATT B ONESTEEL
of the NCAA panel that heard the
case. “But the panel couldn’t conclude violations. That’s reality.”
North Carolina had faced penalties in multiple sports — including men’s and women’s basketball, as well as football — that
could have included postseason
bans and the vacating of two
men’s basketball championships
won during the time span the
deficient classes were offered. Instead, the only penalty the NCAA
handed down at the conclusion of
a 31/2-year investigation was a
“show-cause” order for former African and Afro-American studies
department
chair
Julius
Nyang’oro, an essentially meaningless penalty that will make it
more difficult for the retired professor to obtain a job in college
athletics.
The saga dates from 2011, when
the (Raleigh, N.C.) News & Observer published the first in what
became a series of stories about
the irregular courses, which were
nominally taught by Nyang’oro
but often simply required one
paper actually graded by Deborah
Crowder, a manager in the African and Afro-American studies
department.
In 2013, a grand jury indicted
Nyang’oro on a fraud charge
stemming from the classes, a
charge that prosecutors later
dropped. In 2014, a universitycommissioned investigation by
Kenneth L. Wainstein — a former
general counsel at the FBI and
partner at the law firm Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft — found
that at least 3,100 students had
taken the “paper classes” from
1993 to 2011.
Of those students, Wainstein
found, nearly half were athletes,
with football, men’s basketball
and women’s basketball the
teams most represented. Former
star football player Julius Peppers
took several of the courses, and
Rashad McCants — a star from
the Tar Heels’ 2005 NCAA men’s
basketball championship team —
has said he took several bogus
classes and that tutors directed
him to the courses and wrote
papers for him. This was all well
known in the athletic department, McCants claimed. Coach
Roy Williams and other players
from the 2005 team disputed McCants’s allegations.
Wainstein concluded that the
classes were part of a “shadow
curriculum”
developed
by
Nyang’oro and Crowder to help
struggling North Carolina students, particularly athletes, and
that university academic counselors steered athletes into these
classes.
Wainstein did not find evidence that top North Carolina
athletics or university officials
were aware of the classes.
North Carolina initially accepted the Wainstein report’s findings, the NCAA noted, as its accreditation agency was examining the situation. When the NCAA
decided the situation potentially
merited penalties for North Carolina athletics, however, university
officials “pivoted dramatically”
and “disavowed” the report, the
NCAA noted.
Sankey said the NCAA intends
to forward its ruling to the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools Commission on Colleges,
North Carolina’s accrediting
body, which in 2015 took the rare
step of placing the school on probation over the no-show classes.
In a news conference in Chapel
Hill on Friday afternoon, North
Carolina officials welcomed the
NCAA’s decision, which affirmed
what university leaders have been
saying for years when speaking in
public about the “paper courses”
— since the classes were offered to
all students, they didn’t fall under
the purview of NCAA jurisdiction.
“We had some things that occurred that we haven’t been
proud of,” Athletic Director Bubba Cunningham said. “Sometimes the behavior that you’re not
proud of just doesn’t quite fit into
a bylaw or a rule . . . and that’s
what we’ve been talking about for
five years. We’re not proud of the
behavior, but we didn’t think it fit
into a bylaw.”
North Carolina officials disagreed with the NCAA’s criticism
of the school’s changing positions
on the Wainstein report, claiming
they have never disagreed with
the facts Wainstein uncovered —
just his conclusions about the role
of athletics and the motivations of
those involved.
While UNC athletic officials
have said they had no knowledge
of the courses and did not participate in steering players to them,
the Wainstein report noted that
North Carolina’s football staff
seemed especially concerned
when Crowder retired in 2009.
Athletics academics counselors
and football coaches held a meeting in which a PowerPoint presentation explained the importance
of the classes in keeping football
players academically eligible.
“We put them in classes that
met degree requirements in
which . . . they didn’t go to class
. . . they didn’t have to take notes,
have to stay awake . . . they didn’t
have to meet with professors . . .
they didn’t have to pay attention
or necessarily engage with the
material,” the presentation said.
“THESE NO LONGER EXIST.”
On campus, Friday’s ruling was
a welcome conclusion to a scandal that created distractions for
the university and its sports
teams for six years. The Tar Heels
basketball teams were scheduled
to hold their version of Midnight
Madness on Friday night, kicking
off their new seasons.
A banner celebrating last season’s men’s basketball national
championship was set to be
raised to the rafters at Smith
Center. It will join the 2005 and
2009 banners which, after Friday’s ruling, are there to stay.
Arena resigns, Gulati stays at U.S. soccer
enter the race.
Gulati, who sits on the powerful FIFA Council at soccer’s international governing body, ran unopposed in his first three elections.
Gulati said he won’t resign
“because of everything where the
sport is now and the role I played
in it and the role I think I can play
going forward if I choose to run.
The sport is in a very different
place than it was 10 years ago or
30 years ago when I first got
involved.”
Gulati also said continuity is
necessary as the USSF works
with Mexico and Canada on a
shared bid to host the 2026 World
Cup. The formal bid is due in
March, with North America heavily favored to defeat Morocco
when FIFA votes in June.
Many critics, however, say
broad changes are necessary in
the wake of not just the failed
World Cup campaign but the
direction of the USSF at large.
“There are real problems systemically, and they need to be
improved,” Gans said. “There are
real leadership and judgment
problems, and they need to be
improved.”
The defeat in Trinidad and
Tobago “was a shock and a horror, and to say that I was surprised, of course I was,” he continued. “On the other hand,
there’s an aspect that wasn’t a
surprise because there have been
real problems.”
The federation will take a closer look at how to improve everything from youth development to
the performance of senior national teams, Gulati said. He said
he was open to outside help, as
well.
“We looked over the last several years at a lot of different
models around the world and
tried to adapt some of them to the
unique circumstances of the
United States,” he said. “That will
continue, and we’ll try to get
some outside expertise to look at
what we’re doing, so we’re not
doing things in an insular way.
Maybe we’re not on track in some
areas and we’ll make adjustments.”
Whatever happens, it will be
without Arena in the primary
men’s job.
“I believe in the American
player and the American coach,
and with our combined efforts
the future remains bright,” he
said. “I don’t know what the
future holds for me, but I can say
this from the bottom of my heart:
From the high of reaching the
quarterfinal of the 2002 World
Cup to the low of a few days ago, I
have appreciated every minute of
being a part of this program.”
One of the worst academic
scandals in the history of college
sports ended with a whimper Friday, with the NCAA ruling it will
not punish the University of
North Carolina’s athletics department for deficient “paper courses” taken by thousands of students, many of them athletes,
over nearly two decades.
In a decision released Friday
morning, the NCAA’s Committee
on Infractions concluded that, because the lenient classes in the
school’s African and Afro-American studies department — which
never met, rarely involved university faculty and often provided
passing grades in exchange for
one short paper graded by a university secretary — were also taken by regular students, NCAA
investigators could not prove the
classes constituted an unfair benefit for North Carolina athletes.
“It’s important to understand
that the panel is in no way supporting what happened. What
happened was troubling,” said
Southeastern Conference Commissioner Greg Sankey, a member
ARENA FROM D1
youth technical director, would
seem to be a prime candidate for
the short-term role.
The federation is likely to expand its search internationally
for the long-term hire. From
MLS, Sporting Kansas City’s Peter Vermes is highly regarded.
Arena, a Hall of Fame coach
who guided the squad to the 2002
World Cup quarterfinals, was
summoned last winter to rescue a
2018 qualifying campaign that
had gone awry under Jurgen
Klinsmann. He restored stability,
steering the team back into contention, but couldn’t finish the
job.
The Americans needed only a
draw in the last match to secure
passage but fell behind by two
goals in the first half to the worst
team in the group and lost.
Mexico, Costa Rica and Panama clinched the automatic
berths, and coupled with the
other results in the region, the
United States also missed out on
a playoff slot against Australia.
“When I took the job last
November, I knew there was a
great challenge ahead, probably
more than most people could
appreciate,” Arena said.
The United States had been
among seven countries to participate in every World Cup since
1990.
“This certainly is a major setback for the program, and questions rightly should be asked
about how we can improve,” said
Arena, 66, who won five NCAA
titles at the University of Virginia, two MLS Cup trophies with
D.C. United and three league
crowns with the Los Angeles
Galaxy.
“No doubt, this process already has started and will continue so that U.S. Soccer can progress.”
In a conference call with reporters after Arena’s announcement, Gulati said he would not
step down.
He also said he would decide in
a few weeks whether to seek
reelection.
Steve Gans, a Boston attorney
with a long history in soccer, and
Paul Lapointe, a coach and administrator from western Massachusetts, said they plan to
will.hobson@washpost.com
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
steven.goff@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
baseball
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Nationals Manager Dusty Baker takes the ball from Sammy Solis after he gave up two hits in the seventh inning of Game 5. The Cubs held on for a 9-8 win.
Nationals’ Game 5 loss was filled with what-ifs
NATIONALS FROM D1
Joe Maddon pulled his infield in, and
Bryant, the third baseman, played close
to the bag, shortening Turner’s lead.
When Harper hit his grounder to second,
Turner ran on contact. But Bryant’s hold
meant Turner had farther to run, and
Cubs second baseman Javier Baez
gunned him down at the plate. Cubs 1,
Nats 0.
Bottom of the second: Zimmerman’s
chance, Part I
After Michael A. Taylor’s three-run
homer put the Nats up 4-1, they had
runners on first and second with two outs
for Ryan Zimmerman, in the cleanup
spot. Nationals Park buzzed, and a threerun lead felt promising. But what if it
became 5-1, or 6-1, or — gulp — 7-1? Facing
shaky Cubs starter Kyle Hendricks, Zimmerman struck out on three pitches. Nats
4, Cubs 1.
Top of the fifth: Scherzer in command
This is the frame that will be dissected
by scientists from future generations.
“Bizarro world,” Maddon called it. But
put aside the oddities — a passed ball on
Nats catcher Matt Wieters following
what would have been an inning-ending
strikeout, Wieters’s regrettable decision
to throw the ball at all (it ended up in the
outfield), a catcher interference and a hit
batsman with the bases loaded.
“I’m sure I’ve been in some crazy stuff
before,” pitcher Max Scherzer said. “But
nothing like that.”
Concentrate, instead, on the normal
beginning to the inning.
Scherzer, pitching in relief, retired Bryant and Rizzo — the Cubs’ two best hitters
— on six pitches. He then went up 0-2 on
Willson Contreras, the cleanup man.
Cubs officials, watching from the stands,
were quietly preparing to watch Scherzer
throw three or four monster innings.
On his ninth pitch, Scherzer got Contreras to hit a grounder to the left of
Turner, the shortstop, who had been
playing deep in the hole. Turner fielded it
— but couldn’t make the throw in time to
get Contreras. No big deal. Scherzer went
to work on pinch hitter Ben Zobrist, got
up 1-2 — but couldn’t put Zobrist away.
Zobrist fouled off one 2-2 pitch and then
floated the next one over Turner’s head
and just short of Werth, the left fielder.
Addison Russell’s two-run double immediately followed, and then the game
went completely haywire. But none of
that happens if Scherzer could have put
away Contreras or Zobrist. Cubs 7, Nats 4.
Top of the sixth: Zobrist’s take,
Layne’s call
Brandon Kintzler came on in relief of
Scherzer and retired the first two hitters
he faced. Zobrist was next, and he worked
the count full. Kintzler went with his best
pitch, a sinker. It came in right at Zobrist’s knees. He didn’t swing. Homeplate umpire Jerry Layne didn’t move.
MLB.com’s GameCast technology shows
the pitch caught the bottom of the strike
zone. Layne called it a ball, and Zobrist
walked. Russell scalded Kintzler’s next
pitch to left, a ball Werth lost in the lights
— turning the final out of the inning into
a run-scoring double. Cubs 8, Nats 4.
Bottom of the sixth: Baker’s decision
After Daniel Murphy’s double drove in
two runs and cut the deficit to 8-6,
Maddon decided to intentionally walk
Anthony Rendon to load the bases —
putting the lead runner on base. Wieters
was the next hitter. He was, at that
moment, 2 for 13 in the series — with one
of those hits a bunt against the shift
earlier Thursday evening. Over his final
36 games of the regular season, Wieters
hit .168.
And yet, with lefty Mike Montgomery
on the mound, Baker declined to turn to
veteran Howie Kendrick, his top righthanded-hitting pinch-hit option. Wieters
swung at the first pitch. That he put good
wood on it — driving it to right — doesn’t
justify the decision-making process. Jason Heyward gobbled up Wieters’s ball,
ending the inning. Then, in the course of
making a pitching change in the top of
the seventh, Baker removed Wieters anyway, exacerbating the problem.
Kendrick never got off the bench.
Bottom
seventh:
chance, Part II
Zimmerman’s
With the Cubs up 9-6, we must remember that Harper came up with the bases
loaded — representing the go-ahead run.
Harper roped a ball to center — likely a
double had the Cubs been playing at
regular depth, but a sacrifice fly with
Chicago, appropriately, playing deep, a
“no-doubles” defense.
Still, that brought up Zimmerman
with two outs. Maddon turned to Wade
Davis, his closer. Davis hadn’t recorded
more than five outs in an outing this
season.
“I was prepared to use Wade for six,”
Maddon said. “But what’s the difference
between six and seven outs, right?”
Here, he would be asked to get seven to
finish the game. The first was Zimmerman. A single would have made it a
one-run game, a double could have tied it.
A homer would have put the Nats ahead.
Zimmerman took one strike, fouled off
two more — and then swung through a
cut fastball. Strikeout. Threat over. Cubs
9, Nats 7.
Bottom eighth: Lind’s swing, Lobaton’s stray
When Davis walked the first two Nats
of the eighth, Washington — again — had
the go-ahead run at the plate. This time, it
was in the person of pinch hitter Adam
Lind. This was the perfect spot for Lind,
who hit .356 with four homers as a pinch
hitter during the year. Davis, clearly, was
tiring.
And what did Lind do? He swung at
Davis’s first pitch — the aggressive style
that had helped him during the year,
disastrous in this moment. The result
was the worst possible: a double-play
grounder.
Taylor followed with a hard single up
the middle to cut the lead to 9-8, and
when Jose Lobaton, Wieters’s replacement, unexpectedly singled, the tying run
was again in scoring position, the goahead run on base as well.
But with Turner at the plate, Cubs
catcher Contreras noticed Lobaton straying a bit far from first. “They cannot fall
asleep on me,” Contreras said. On the
third pitch to Turner, Contreras threw to
Rizzo, the first baseman. Though Lobaton beat the throw back safely, Rizzo kept
the tag on him as he bounced up — just
long enough, as Lobaton’s foot came off
the bag by about an inch.
After a replay challenge, Lobaton, the
potential winning run, was ruled out.
Davis had retired only one of the five Nats
hitters in the frame. Instead of continuing to sweat, he got a chance to collect
himself. Cubs 9, Nats 8.
Bottom of the ninth: Harper’s last
stand
The Nats had the top of the order up.
Their best player would bat in the final
inning. Tying the game — shoot, winning
the game — wasn’t unrealistic.
But Turner (short flyball) and Werth
(strikeout) went meekly. Still, that
brought up Harper — who already had a
single, double and sacrifice fly to his
credit — as the tying run. “Bryce was just
starting to swing the bat,” Baker said.
Davis, though, was starting to find
another gear. With the count 1-1, he fired
a 95 mph fastball — and Harper fouled it
off. Harper then took two high fastballs.
What else would baseball want? Two
outs, bottom of the ninth, down by a run,
Bryce Harper at the plate.
“That’s what you live for,” Harper said.
But on Thursday night, the Nats died —
again. Davis came down and in with a cut
fastball — off the plate, actually, perhaps
ball four. Harper swung and missed. And
with that, he ended 4 hours 37 minutes of
riveting mayhem, albeit in the most painful way possible for Washington — so far.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
NATIONALS NOTES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
For Baker, uncertain
future begins now
Dusty Baker made his way
through the Nationals’
clubhouse in the wee hours
Friday morning, through the
familiar dejection of another
abrupt ending to another
promising playoff run, to bid
farewell to his players. He got to
Matt Albers, and they hugged.
“Hell of a year,” Baker told the
relief pitcher, whose career as a
National began as a spring
training invitee and ended with a
perfect fourth inning in
Washington’s Game 5 loss to the
Cubs.
In many ways, it was a hell of a
year for Baker, too. The
Nationals overcame a series of
significant injuries to win 97
games and claim their second
straight National League East
title under his watch. He moved
into 14th on the managerial
career wins list. Twelve of the 13
ahead of him are in the Hall of
Fame. There’s a chance he’ll
become the first African
American inducted as a manager
one day.
But the Nationals also fell one
win shy of the National League
Championship Series again, and
Baker now has lost 10
consecutive games with a chance
to advance in the postseason. A
World Series title still eludes him
after 22 seasons as manager.
Whether he’ll get a 23rd chance
remains uncertain because
Baker isn’t under contract for
next season.
Throughout this season, Baker
repeated he wants to return for
2018, and Nationals officials
repeated they want him to do so.
But the club also postponed
contract extension talks until
after the season, leaving open the
possibility that a foul finish
could change the outlook. Could
the communication mess
surrounding Stephen Strasburg’s
status for Game 4 and
Thursday’s excruciating Game 5
loss have flipped Baker’s
fortunes?
Baker is revered in the
Nationals’ clubhouse for his
ability to communicate and
relate with his players. He was
the second choice to replace Matt
Williams two years ago, but he
was exactly who the Nationals
needed to succeed the uptight
Williams. He loosened the
clubhouse. Players enjoy playing
for him. After Thursday’s loss, a
few players were asked if they
wanted Baker back in 2018. The
answers ranged from nocomment to ringing
endorsement.
“That decision is made from
up top,” right fielder Bryce
Harper said. “I don’t want to
comment on that, really.”
“I would love to have him
back,” Nationals shortstop Trea
Turner said. “We won 95 games
last year, 97 this year. Fun to be
around. But that is not my job.”
“I think Dusty’s obviously
great,” first baseman Ryan
Zimmerman said. “The whole
coaching staff. Those guys
worked their butt off to get us
ready. They do such a good job of
making sure that they relate to
us. Ask us everything, not just
baseball-wise. That’s a great
group of guys in there. They’re as
much deserving of all the success
we have as we are. They probably
work harder than us, to be
honest with you. So it’s a
pleasure to be with that staff. I
think everyone in this room will
love to have all of them back.”
Baker will turn 69 years old
next June. Unless a team hires an
older manager — which seems
unlikely — Baker will be the
oldest manager in baseball next
season if he returns, now that the
Mets have fired Terry Collins.
The Nationals are poised to
make another run at a World
Series next year — Harper’s final
season before hitting free agency
— with most of their team intact.
Will Baker lead them?
— Jorge Castillo
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Nationals left fielder Jayson Werth scampered home on a wild pitch in the sixth inning of Game 5 of the NLDS on Thursday night. In possibly his last game with the team, Werth was 2 for 4 with two walks.
GIVING IT ALL HE WAS WERTH
After seven seasons and much more than his share of heartbreak, veteran outfielder says, ‘I’m proud to call myself a National’
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
Jayson Werth “couldn’t go
there” yet, not quite so soon, not a
half-hour after his Washington
Nationals’ season ended in another loss that redefined the term
gut-wrenching — in part because,
by this time, he and the other
longtime Nationals have so few
guts left to wrench.
He couldn’t say whether his
failure to reach the main goal he
set for his time with the franchise
— a World Series that was laughable when he arrived before the
2011 season but transformed into
a serious consideration — would
define his time as a National.
Perspective takes time. He hadn’t
had enough of that yet.
He had seen the Nationals’
hopes eviscerated before but not
like this. Every other time, there
was next year. But the 38-yearold, after seven years with the
Nationals, is not under contract
for the 2018 season. As he leaned
against a clubhouse wall at Nationals Park early Friday morning, pants stained with dirt, knee
clearly paining him — the loss
paining him more — Werth
looked like a man defeated.
“This one — I’m not really sure
what happened,” he said. “. . . This
is tough. This stings a little bit.”
The Nationals have plenty of
more cost-efficient outfielders
than Werth moving forward. Perhaps they will sign him as a
veteran bench piece. More likely,
he will find a home elsewhere.
The end came swiftly, and it
included a flyball he lost in the
lights that left him looking like a
goat, then a strikeout in what will
probably be his last Nationals
at-bat. Some fans booed him before that last at-bat.
“I can probably count on one
hand how many balls I’ve had go
in the lights on me in seven years,”
Werth said. “For that to happen
tonight . . .”
The numbers will never tell
Werth’s tale. They are not franchise-altering.
He did not make an all-star
team. His 109 home runs in his
seven Nationals seasons were
75th most in baseball. During his
time in Washington, Werth accumulated 13 wins above replacement (WAR), an advanced statistic that summarizes a player’s
contributions to his team, as calculated by FanGraphs.com. That
ranked him 107th in the majors
over the period, less than catcher
Matt Wieters accumulated in the
same span (14.4). Werth’s .788
on-base plus slugging percentage
(OPS) ranked 55th among hitters
with at least 3,000 plate appearances in the past seven years.
He was not a star, not the kind
of guy who gets a deal worth
$126 million these days — and
especially not the kind of guy who
got one in 2010.
But the fact of the matter,
indisputable despite the number
of people who dispute it these
days, is that numbers do not tell
his story. Numbers do not explain
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Werth, who won the World Series with Philadelphia in 2008, joined the Nationals in 2011 but could not help the team advance
past the NLDS. In his 808 regular season games with Washington, he hit .263 with 109 home runs, 450 runs and 393 RBI.
why Dusty Baker, managing for
his team’s season Thursday night,
chose a guy with one hit in the
whole series to play left field and
bat second. Werth’s playoff history and importance to the
psyche of this team inspired that.
Numbers did not foretell the
two-hit, two-walk game Werth
compiled when the statistics said
he shouldn’t have even started
Game 5. That something extra
explains that. And only the unforgiving baseball fates explain why
Werth not only missed out on the
October joy he wanted but why
October saw fit to steal the light
from his eyes like that again.
“You’d love to see things happen perfectly at the end. Unfortunately, that’s not always the way it
happens,” Ryan Zimmerman said.
“I don’t think that should take
anything away from what he’s
done for a lot of people here. It’s
been a fun ride with him.”
Asked what he would do in the
hours after the game, Werth said
he would have a couple of Bard’s
beers, then maybe go watch the
whole thing again. He said he
hardly remembers any of the
postseason games he has played.
They are the most freeing moments of his career, Werth has
said. But in all but one year of his
career, those most free moments
eventually transformed into
draining ones.
“Seriously, I’m still trying to
wrap my head around this one,”
Werth said. “I just keep thinking
of different stuff that was happening that was off the wall. I’ll
probably go watch the whole
game back, relive it, torture myself.”
Games like Thursday’s test the
soul, which longs for explanation
and struggles to move forward
without it. There will be no explanation, no reason one wily veteran can go out on top but a guy
like Werth — who transformed
the ethos of the Nationals franchise from top to bottom — is left
with nothing but near-miss memories, as if he didn’t do enough.
But in prodding the organization
to grow up to the point that
missing the playoffs is unacceptable and 100-loss seasons are
unthinkable, Werth did plenty.
“I’m proud of what we’ve accomplished here, obviously. This
place has come a long way in
seven years. No regrets. We gave it
all we had. I know I gave everything I had,” Werth said. “I’m
proud to call myself a National.
Before I came here, I don’t know if
anybody would’ve said that. Even
so, this one’s tough to take. We
had opportunities, and you just
still think, ‘Man, you can’t believe
it’s over.’ ”
Werth’s “proud to call myself a
National” statement echoed Ian
Desmond’s sentiment at the end
of 2015 and defines the transformation Werth prodded along, understood best by those who have
been with the Nationals since the
beginning. When he signed with
Washington, it was laughable.
Now big-name free agents sign on
every year. When he signed, the
Nationals lost every regular season. Now, winning division titles
is not enough.
Werth oversaw the first step of
the evolution. Perhaps the next
step must be shepherded by
someone else.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
Keuchel keeps New York’s bats quiet
ASTROS 2,
YANKEES 1
BY
D AVE S HEININ
houston — By virtue of its
having an odd number of innings
and no clock to speak of, baseball
does not lend itself, either mathematically or aesthetically, to division into halves the way other
team sports do. But this month,
subtly and organically, the game
has cleaved itself into two distinct
parts. With starting pitchers getting less leeway to go deep into
games, and bullpens growing in
importance and workload, postseason baseball has become a
game of two halves: the starter
half and the bullpen half. And
only one of them lends itself to
scoring.
No team understands the dichotomy as fully as the Houston
Astros, and no opponent provides
as stark a lesson in its significance
as the New York Yankees, with
their bullpen full of rocket arms.
On Friday night, in Game 1 of the
American League Championship
Series, the Astros dominated the
game’s first half, as they have
done all season, then ran out the
clock, such as it were, for a 2-1
victory.
Game 2 is Saturday, with new
Astros ace Justin Verlander facing the Yankees’ Luis Severino.
On a night when lefty Dallas
Keuchel became the first Astros
pitcher in this postseason to last
beyond the sixth inning — delivering seven scoreless innings,
striking out 10 and boosting his
credentials as the premier Yankee-slayer of his era — the Astros
took the lead with a pair of
fourth-inning runs and made
sure the Yankees’ diabolical bullpen never got a say in the outcome.
The Astros’ bullpen carried the
slim lead home for the final two
innings, with closer Ken Giles
surviving a towering homer in the
ninth by Yankees first baseman
Greg Bird to earn a five-out save.
The Astros outscored opponents by at least 38 runs in each of
the first four innings this season,
accounting for 82 percent of their
run differential of plus-196, and
they have scored first in all five of
their games this postseason. You
don’t want to be behind when the
parade of fire-breathing relievers
begins, and these days it begins
earlier than ever.
Entering Friday night’s game,
relievers had accounted for more
innings pitched (1712/3) than starters (1651/3) this postseason — a
trend that, were it to continue
through the end of the World
Series, would mark a first for
baseball’s playoffs, and perhaps a
shift from which there will be no
going back.
The Yankees, whose bullpen
features five of the top 12 relievers
in baseball by strikeout rate, present the biggest second-half challenge in baseball, expertly constructed for the purpose of extinguishing rallies and hope and
locking down leads in the second
half of games. But they can’t lock
down a lead if they never get one,
and the Astros, by winning the
first half, made sure of it.
The Astros won the first half
Friday night largely through the
bat, glove and feet of second
baseman Jose Altuve, who came
to the plate each time to a chant of
“M-V-P! M-V-P” and answered
three times with singles, boosting
his batting average this postseason to .579.
If you’ve wondered how a player listed at 5-foot-6 can be a
leading candidate for most valuable player in a sport that doesn’t
involve thoroughbreds or parallel
bars, consider the way Altuve
altered the course of the game in
the fourth inning. First, in the top
half, he made a diving play at
second base to rob Didi Gregorius
of a base hit.
Then, in the bottom half, he
beat out an infield single, stole
second on cannon-armed Yankees catcher Gary Sanchez and
scored the game’s first run when
Carlos Correa lined a hanging
slider into left field for an RBI
single. The Astros tacked on a
second run when Yuli Gurriel
singled home Correa two batters
later.
It was the fifth time in five
games this postseason the Astros
scored first.
Friday night’s Game 1 felt
something like a throwback to the
old days — which is to say, 2014 or
so — when aces regularly pitched
deep into the second half of
games, even in October. By the
time the first reliever of the game,
Yankees right-hander Chad
Green, climbed the mound, it was
the seventh-inning stretch and
the crowd of 43,116 was beginning its nightly singalong to
“Deep in the Heart of Texas.”
This series offers a delicious
contrast of histories, atmospheres and even heights — as
evidenced whenever the two leading candidates for MVP, Houston’s Altuve and New York’s 6foot-7 slugger Aaron Judge, stand
next to each other.
The Yankees, of course, have
won 27 World Series titles, including five in the past quarter-century. The Astros, born as
the Houston Colt .45’s in 1962,
have won none and have only
played in one, losing to the Chicago White Sox in 2005.
You could get a sense of the
difference between the franchises
as the players lined up, caps removed, along the baselines following the pregame introductions for the national anthem.
Along the first base line, the
Astros, in their Friday-alternate
orange jerseys, sported mullets,
mohawks, full beards and thick
stubble. Along the third base line,
the Yankees, in their classic road
grays with no names on the back,
were all buzz cuts and smooth
chins.
And then Keuchel took the
mound, with a beard that could
house a couple of small farm
animals.
Minute Maid Park’s retractable
roof was mercifully closed, protecting the proceedings and the
sellout crowd from the swelter
residing just outside, where it was
86 degrees at first pitch. It also
left the deafening roar, which
went up with each big pitch.
While watering the field before
the game, the grounds crew spent
an inordinate amount of time and
water on the area in front of home
plate, leaving it a shade of dark
chocolate that contrasted with
the mochas and caramels of the
surrounding dirt. This was by
design — Keuchel is the most
prolific groundball pitcher in
baseball, and the muddy patch in
front of the plate was there to
slow down grounders off the Yan-
BASEBALL NOTES
Dodgers are well-rested for their rematch with Cubs
A SSOCIATED P RESS
When the Chicago Cubs began
their National League Division
Series clincher in Washington on
Thursday night, the Los Angeles
Dodgers watched it on their
stadium video boards during an
upbeat team workout in Chavez
Ravine.
By the time Wade Davis got the
final out in Chicago’s 277-minute
victory, the Dodgers were long
gone home. They all could have
been fast asleep by the time the
Cubs’ plane left Washington on
its 10-hour delayed trip across
the country, only arriving mid-
morning Friday.
Whether the rested, hungry
Dodgers can use these advantages in any meaningful way against
the possibly bedraggled defending World Series champions will
be decided when they get together this weekend to play for the
NL pennant again.
“The Cubs are the defending
world champs, so there’s a lot to
be said for having been there and
done that,” Los Angeles Manager
Dave Roberts said. “It’s virtually
the same group.”
The Cubs and Dodgers are
back for a rematch of last season’s NL Championship Series
when Los Angeles ace Clayton
Kershaw takes the mound for
Game 1 on Saturday night, but
these well-loved powerhouses’
circumstances are somewhat reversed.
After the Cubs finished far
ahead of the Dodgers in the
regular season standings last
year to earn home-field advantage, Los Angeles won 18 more
games than the Cubs this year.
Chicago had to sweat through a
marathon series against the Nationals to reach the NLCS — the
same route taken by the Dodgers
in 2016.
And after four straight failures
to win the pennant with highpriced NL West championship
teams, the Dodgers have the
confidence of a 104-win campaign heading into a chance to
get back at the Cubs, who eliminated them in six games last
October.
Chicago’s charter flight didn’t
leave the Washington area until
4 a.m. Eastern time, and it was
diverted to Albuquerque because
of a medical issue with a family
member of an unnamed player.
The flight had to take on a new
crew during its stop.
Los Angeles rolled into the
NLCS with a sweep of Arizona,
RONALD MARTINEZ/GETTY IMAGES
The Astros’ Dallas Keuchel continues his mastery of the Yankees
with a 10-strikeout performance over seven scoreless innings.
kees’ bats.
But on Friday night, Keuchel’s
chief weapon was the strikeout,
with his 10 whiffs representing a
season high. In his career, regular
and postseason combined, he is
now 6-2 with a 1.09 ERA against
the Yankees, with 62 strikeouts
and only eight walks in 572/3 innings.
Keuchel ran into his only real
jam in the fifth, a first-and-second, nobody-out crisis, which he
escaped with a couple of clutch
pitches and one defensive gem.
With two outs, Judge lined a
single to left, but left fielder Mar-
win Gonzalez — a super-utility
man who made at least 14 starts
this season at five different positions — gathered it in and fired a
strike home, measured at 97 mph
by Statcast, to nail Bird, the slowest member of the Yankees’ lineup, at the plate.
Out beyond Gonzalez’s spot in
left field, the Yankees’ relievers
peered out of their bullpen
through plexiglass windows. It
was nearly halftime of Game 1,
and they were waiting, armed
and ready, as they would be all
night, for a lead that never came.
while the Cubs were stretched to
the limit by the Nationals. Chicago Manager Joe Maddon used
seven pitchers in Game 5 of the
NLDS, but the Cubs hope they
have the pitching depth to get
through the weekend. . . .
As the Dodgers head into
Game 1 of the NLCS, the Los
Angeles City Council has honored former manager Tommy
Lasorda with a celebration of his
recent 90th birthday.
Council members praised Lasorda during Friday’s meeting
and presented him a certificate
of appreciation.
Lasorda said he feels like he
was born in Los Angeles and
thinks of himself as a real Angeleno.
He closed by saying, “Thank
you for the honor and may God
bless each and every one of you
— and if the Dodgers don’t win
this time I think I’m going to kill
myself!”
The chamber erupted in
laughter and applause.
BREWERS:
Milwaukee
plans to extend the protective
netting on the field level at Miller
Park. The netting will now run to
the outer edge of each dugout.
The Brewers’ plans are in line
with other clubs that will expand
netting for the 2018 season after
a young girl was injured by a foul
ball at Yankee Stadium. The line
drive off the bat of Yankees
slugger Todd Frazier last month
hit the girl in the face, sending
her to the hospital.
The Brewers first extended the
netting after the 2015 season to
the inside edge of each dugout,
which currently meets Major
League Baseball standards.
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
HIGH SCHOOL SCOREBOARD
FOOTBALL
BOYS' SOCCER
DISTRICT
Ballou 13, Wilson 7
Bell 54, Coolidge 0
H.D. Woodson 32, Eastern 0
Theodore Roosevelt 29, Cardozo 0
MARYLAND
Arundel 42, Annapolis 22
Atholton 21, Mount Hebron 7
Blair 26, Springbrook 0
Blake 105, Churchill 19
Broadneck 42, South River 7
C.H. Flowers 14, Friendly 12
Chopticon 19, Lackey 14
Clarksburg 49, Wheaton 21
Damascus 42, Watkins Mill 18
Glen Burnie 34, North County 12
Gwynn Park 27, Northwestern 7
Howard 41, Caravel Academy (Del.) 0
Huntingtown 21, Great Mills 9
Linganore 48, Kennedy 0
Long Reach 27, Marriotts Ridge 6
Meade 26, Severna Park 16
North Point 35, St. Charles 0
Northeast 40, Southern 13
Northern 42, Leonardtown 6
Northwest 49, Richard Montgomery 24
Old Mill 34, Chesapeake 14
Paint Branch 53, Gaithersburg 14
Patuxent 21, Calvert 19
Quince Orchard 47, Einstein 0
Rockville 28, Magruder 8
Seneca Valley 20, Poolesville 14
Sherwood 62, Northwood 8
Suitland 55, Largo 7
Thomas Stone 31, La Plata 7
Westlake 41, McDonough 12
Whitman 27, Walter Johnson 7
Wise 58, Oxon Hill 14
Wootton 44, Bethesda-Chevy Chase 0
VIRGINIA
Battlefield 35, Osbourn Park 7
Brentsville 7, William Monroe 6
Broad Run 44, Parkdale 6
Champe 39, Briar Woods 0
Colgan 56, Gar-Field 12
Falls Church 49, Edison 19
Freedom-Woodbridge 41, Woodbridge 14
Heritage 28, Riverside 7
Hylton 57, Potomac (Va.) 3
Jefferson 19, NVK 7
Lake Braddock 29, W.T. Woodson 5
Lee 34, Wakefield 14
Loudoun County 63, Park View 12
Loudoun Valley 49, Jefferson 6
Madison 49, Chantilly 7
Marshall 49, George Mason 8
Mount Vernon 28, Stuart 14
Patriot 21, Forest Park 10
Robinson 31, Fairfax 7
Skyline 37, Manassas Park 12
South County 35, West Springfield 7
South Lakes 44, Washington-Lee 0
Stone Bridge 48, Rock Ridge 7
Stonewall Jackson 18, Osbourn 13
Tuscarora 48, Freedom-South Riding 26
West Potomac 46, Annandale 7
Westfield 34, Oakton 14
Woodgrove 28, Dominion 12
Yorktown 31, Langley 20
PRIVATE
Collegiate 42, O'Connell 7
Georgetown Prep 45, St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 7
Good Counsel 20, DeMatha 14 (trueOT)
John Carroll 10, Pallotti 7
John Paul the Great 19, Concordia Prep 8
Maryland School for the Deaf 46, Kingsman Academy 6
St. Mary's Ryken 21, Avalon 6
St. Mary's-Annapolis 49, Archbishop Curley 0
MARYLAND
Atholton 1, River Hill 0
Sherwood 3, Quince Orchard 0
PRIVATE
Georgetown Day 1, Washington International 0
Gonzaga 3, St. Mary's Ryken 1
Good Counsel 1, Bishop Ireton 0
Potomac School 2, The Heights 1
Riverdale Baptist 4, Lanham Christian 4
St. Albans 2, Episcopal 1
VOLLEYBALL
PRIVATE
Annapolis Area Christian def. St. Mary's-Annapolis
(21-11, 25-21, 25-15)
Georgetown Day def. Bullis (25-8, 25-14, 25-18)
Maret def. Holton-Arms (25-22, 25-22, 25-15)
St. Mary's Ryken def. St. John's (25-16, 25-16, 27-25)
FIELD HOCKEY
MARYLAND
Whitman 11, Kennedy 0
VIRGINIA
T.C. Williams 5, Hayfield 0
T.C. Williams 4, West Potomac 0
Westfield 11, O'Connell 0
PRIVATE
Spalding 4, St. Mary's-Annapolis 2
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 3, Episcopal 2
RUSHING LEADERS: S: Squire 22-268, McCants 8-97,
Sloan 3-38, Perry 3-19, Wooden 2-16.
RECEIVING LEADERS: S: Henry 3-56, Young 1-18, Gates
2-12, Rheams 1-11, Williams 1-11, Wooden 2-9.
C: Motuba Samy 4 run ( Morse kick )
C: Perkins 13 run ( Morse kick )
C: Perkins 13 run ( Morse kick )
C: Perkins 6 run ( Williams kick )
W: Cameron 87 kickoff return ( Kipkirui kick )
C: Williams 2 pass from ( Perkins pass from )
C: Wilder 87 kickoff return ( Morse kick )
C: Perkins 15 run ( Morse kick )
W: Kipkirui 33 ( Kipkirui kick )
WHITMAN 27, WALTER JOHNSON 7
Walter Johnson (2-5, 0-4) . 0
Whitman (1-6, 1-2) ............ 6
DAMASCUS 42, WATKINS MILL 18
Watkins Mill (3-2, 2-1) ...... 0 0 12
Damascus (7-0, 4-0) .......... 13 29 0
GIRLS' SOCCER
MARYLAND
Calvert 2, Leonardtown 1
Meade 0, Old Mill 0
PRIVATE
Good Counsel 3, Bishop Ireton 0
Maret 1, Sandy Spring 0
Potomac School 2, Georgetown Visitation 1
St. John's 5, McNamara 1
St. John's Catholic Prep 5, McNamara 1
6
0
—
—
18
42
D: Dickens 28 pass from Furgeson ( Baires kick )
D: Wentzlaff 36 pass from Furgeson ( kick failed )
D: Wentzlaff 68 run ( Dickens run )
D: Dickens 14 run ( Baires kick )
D: Smith 12 pass from Furgeson ( Baires kick )
D: Beall 9 run ( Baires kick )
WM: 1 run ( run failed )
WM: 8 pass from ( pass failed )
WM: 9 run ( run failed )
Gaithersburg (0-7, 0-2) .....
Paint Branch (6-1, 3-0) ......
DISTRICT
BALLOU 13, WILSON 7
PB: Douglas Jr. 1 run ( PRYZGOCKI kick )
PB: Agbodzah 28 pass from Douglas Jr. ( kick failed )
PB: Anumbga 8 run ( kick failed )
G: Woodward 6 run ( McClintock kick )
PB: DOKU 7 run ( pass failed )
PB: DOKU 45 run ( DOKU run )
PB: PAGE 1 run ( kick failed )
G: DeCarlo 76 pass from Woodward ( McClintock kick )
PB: Douglas Jr. 16 run ( PRYZGOCKI kick )
PB: FERGUSON 15 run ( PRYZGOCKI kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: PB: DOKU 17-154, PAGE 13-94,
Douglas Jr. 7-74, FERGUSON 5-40, REIGLE 1-11, RAMEY
2-9, Anumbga 1-8.
PASSING LEADERS: PB: Douglas Jr. 4-10-1-80.
RECEIVING LEADERS: PB: Agbodzah 2-55, Anumbga
1-16.
Wilson (3-4, 1-0) ............... 0
Ballou (4-3, 0-0) ................. 7
0
0
7
6
0
0
—
—
7
13
H.D. WOODSON 32, EASTERN 0
H.D. Woodson (5-2, 0-0) .... 0
Eastern (3-4, 0-0) .............. 0
26
0
0
0
6
0
—
—
32
0
H: Dixon 74 interception return ( kick failed )
H: Salahuddin 38 run ( Winston kick )
H: Wright 16 run ( kick failed )
H: Robinson 23 run ( Winston kick )
H: Tucker 15 fumble return ( kick failed )
RUSHING LEADERS: H: Salahuddin 10-155, Robinson
6-36, Wright 4-10, Mcduffie 1-7, Grinage 1-3.
PASSING LEADERS: H: Robinson 5-9-0-76.
RECEIVING LEADERS: H: Harris 2-45, Mcduffie 1-11,
Bost 2-9.
MARYLAND
ARUNDEL 42, ANNAPOLIS 22
Annapolis (2-4, 1-3) ........... 8
Arundel (4-2, 1-1) .............. 7
0 14
21 14
0
0
—
—
22
42
RUSHING LEADERS: A: White 18-27, Womack 7-10. A:
Hunter 13-178, Sedgwick 8-19, Baker 1-7.
PASSING LEADERS: A: Sedgwick 11-15-133.
RECEIVING LEADERS: A: Womack 1-46. A: Kidwell 3-40.
BLAKE 105, CHURCHILL 19
Blake (6-1, 3-1) ..................
Churchill (3-4, 2-2) .............
—
—
105
19
B: Smith 9 run ( Simms run )
B: Thomas 3 run ( kick failed )
B: Gardner III 5 pass from Kingrea ( Gardner III pass from
Simms )
C: 53 pass from ( run failed )
B: Smith 22 run ( HAMILTON run )
C: 12 run ( run failed )
C: 1 run ( kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: B: Smith 19-241, Thomas 18-70,
Simms 2-25.
PASSING LEADERS: B: Simms 4-5-72, Kingrea 2-7-58.
RECEIVING LEADERS: B: Gardner III 3-105, HERNANDEZ
1-53.
BROADNECK 42, SOUTH RIVER 7
South River (4-3, 4-3) ........ 0
Broadneck (7-0, 6-0) .......... 14
7
7
0
14
0
7
—
—
7
42
RUSHING LEADERS: B: Carcamo 16-104, Watson 7-78,
Woods Jr. 1-8.
PASSING LEADERS: B: Davis 19-24-0-301.
CLARKSBURG 49, WHEATON 21
Clarksburg (3-4, 1-1) ......... 7
Wheaton (2-5, 0-0) ............ 0
C: Perkins 5 run ( Morse kick )
W: Djieya 6 run ( Kipkirui kick )
14 14 14
7 7 7
—
—
49
21
QUINCE ORCHARD 47, EINSTEIN 0
Einstein (4-3, 1-1) ............. 0 0
Quince Orchard (6-1, 0-0) .. 27 13
0
0
0
7
—
—
0
47
QO: Green 8 blocked punt return ( Steinwandel kick )
QO: Cooper 3 run ( Steinwandel kick )
QO: Derwin 18 run ( Steinwandel kick )
QO: Derwin 63 pass from Bonner ( kick failed )
QO: Hodges 6 pass from Bonner ( Steinwandel kick )
QO: McGonagle 56 pass from Bonner ( kick failed )
QO: Wasikye 18 run ( Steinwandel kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: QO: Wasikye 6-56, Mayoni 10-54,
Cooper 4-41, Derwin 1-18, Wade 2-8, Titus 3-4.
PASSING LEADERS: QO: Bonner 8-9-225.
RECEIVING LEADERS: QO: Derwin 1-63, McGonagle
2-63, Payne 2-54, Hodges 2-31, Cooper 1-14.
ROCKVILLE 28, MAGRUDER 8
Rockville (0-7, 0-3) ............
Magruder (3-4, 1-3) ...........
—
—
28
8
M: Baxter 1 run ( Juarez kick )
M: Baxter 1 run ( Juarez kick )
M: Barclay 1 run ( Juarez kick )
M: David 2 run ( Juarez kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: M: David 12-117, Baxter 7-30,
Barclay 3-13, Claggett 5-7, White 2-6.
RECEIVING LEADERS: M: Baxter 1-38, Douglas 2-37,
David 1-22, White 1-18.
SHERWOOD 62, NORTHWOOD 8
Northwood (0-7, 0-2) ......... 0 8
Sherwood (6-1, 2-0) ........... 27 21
0
7
0
7
—
—
8
62
S: West 25 fumble return ( kick failed )
S: Trice 2 run ( Salgado kick )
S: Hunt 14 pass from Mbony ( Salgado kick )
S: Mbony 45 run ( Salgado kick )
S: Dumas 16 pass from Mbony ( Salgado kick )
S: Sherarrd 25 blocked punt return ( Salgado kick )
NW: Joseph 2 run ( Sanjong pass from Boyer )
S: Webb 25 pass from Murphy ( Salgado kick )
S: Clyatt 2 pass from Murphy ( Salgado kick )
S: Trice 2 run ( Salgado kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: S: Commeau 7-71, Trice 7-52,
Mbony 1-45.
PASSING LEADERS: S: Mbony 13-18-0-208.
RECEIVING LEADERS: S: Hobbs 3-78, Webb 2-52, Hunt
4-52, Dumas 2-37, Allen 2-30, Clyatt 2-25.
SUITLAND 55, LARGO 7
Suitland (7-0, 2-0) ............. 0
Largo (2-4, 1-0) .................. 0
13 28 14
7 0 0
—
—
0
13
—
—
7
27
W: Carone 10 run ( kick failed )
W: Kim 1 run ( Merenstein run )
WJ: Barnes 6 pass from Diomande ( Cortes kick )
W: Carone 61 run ( Bobbitt kick )
W: Carone 31 run ( kick failed )
RUSHING LEADERS: WJ: Diomande 14-112, Griffin
18-44, Barnes 2-5, Stroud 1-3, Van Kirk 1-1. W: Carone
19-171, Roegge 5-70, Roegge 2-26, Kim 12-23, Gutierrez
1-6, Kelly 1-5.
PASSING LEADERS: WJ: Diomande 6-7-0-42. W: Kelly
3-5-0-35.
RECEIVING LEADERS: WJ: Barnes 3-20, Griffin 1-12,
Carter 1-7, Williams 1-3. W: Roegge 1-19, Vipulis 2-16.
Oxon Hill (4-3, 2-1) ............ 0 6 8
Wise (7-0, 4-0) ................... 24 13 14
14
53
FOOTBALL
B: Winslow 11 pass from Buchanan ( Jackson kick )
B: Gater 31 pass from Buchanan ( kick failed )
W: Reed 1 run ( Gudiel kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: B: Buchanan 10-60, Jackson 10-50,
Johnson 3-12, Ruffin 3-9, Gater 2-2.
PASSING LEADERS: B: Buchanan 10-17-1-152.
RECEIVING LEADERS: B: Gater 4-70, Milligan 2-54,
Johnson 1-13, Winslow 1-11, Ruffin 2-4.
7
0
WISE 58, OXON HILL 14
PAINT BRANCH 53, GAITHERSBURG 14
—
—
0
8
55
7
0
7
—
—
14
58
RUSHING LEADERS: OH: Ingram 8-57, George 1-9,
Harvey 1-9, Waid 3-6, Watson 4-5, Dawkins 3-1. W:
Oliver 12-114, Medley 7-105, Williams 3-48, Morsell 2-9,
Bell 1-8, Farooq 1-6, Foxx 1-3.
PASSING LEADERS: OH: Ingram 8-19-1-73. W: Williams
12-18-189.
RECEIVING LEADERS: OH: George 3-37, Banks 1-32,
Brame 1-5, Watson 1-1. W: Lytton, Jr. 2-54, Farooq 2-45,
Morsell 1-33, Oliver 2-23, Brooks 2-22, Hazel 2-12.
VIRGINIA
FALLS CHURCH 49, EDISON 19
Falls Church (5-3, 1-0) ....... 0
Edison (3-4, 2-2) ................ 0
28
6
7
7
14
6
—
—
49
19
FC: Marshall 10 run ( Argueta kick )
E: Blake 57 run ( kick failed )
FC: Marshall 14 run ( Argueta kick )
FC: Saia 8 run ( Argueta kick )
FC: Saia 5 run ( Argueta kick )
E: Abu-Jamous 44 run ( Kinfe kick )
FC: Marshall 22 run ( Argueta kick )
FC: Marshall 23 run ( Argueta kick )
FC: Troy 12 run ( Argueta kick )
E: Brown 5 run ( pass failed )
RUSHING LEADERS: FC: Marshall 23-207. E: Blake
18-125, Abu-Jamous 4-72.
RECEIVING LEADERS: E: Abu-Jamous 5-86, Alliata 4-47,
Kohistany 1-39.
HERITAGE 28, RIVERSIDE 7
Riverside (3-5, 0-4) ............ 0
Heritage (6-2, 3-1) ............. 7
0
7
0
7
7
7
—
—
7
28
H: Maisus 12 pass from Johnson ( Henriquez kick )
H: Johnson 6 run ( Henriquez kick )
H: Johnson 74 run ( Henriquez kick )
H: Maisus 14 pass from Johnson ( Henriquez kick )
R: Selman 5 pass from Jackson ( Stone kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: R: Bryant 18-41, Haggler 2-15. H:
Johnson 9-144, Calderon 18-64, Moss 2-4.
PASSING LEADERS: H: Johnson 10-20-172.
RECEIVING LEADERS: R: Selman 6-45, Speroni 1-10,
DeVault 1-7, Weeren 1-2. H: Wooten 2-100, Maisus 5-56,
Holland 2-9, Calderon 1-7.
LEE 34, WAKEFIELD 14
Lee (3-5, 2-1) ..................... 0
Wakefield (2-5, 0-1) .......... 7
0
0
20 14
7 0
—
—
34
14
W: Lee 11 run ( Pinto kick )
L: Spears pass from Noory ( pass failed )
W: Isler 8 run ( Pinto kick )
L: Mulatu 15 run ( Mulatu run )
L: Mulatu 50 run ( run failed )
L: Hadj 5 run ( run failed )
L: Mulatu 24 run ( Samuel pass from Noory )
RUSHING LEADERS: L: Mulatu 25-233, Noory 4-5. W:
Lee 18-108, Poythress 4-18.
PASSING LEADERS: L: Noory 7-21-89. W: Poythress
7-17-2-59.
RECEIVING LEADERS: L: Samuel 7-63, Menefee 1-19,
Mulatu 1-7. W: Calfee 2-20, Baron 1-19, Clark 1-5.
LOUDOUN COUNTY 63, PARK VIEW 12
Loudoun County (5-2, 3-0) . 21 35
Park View (0-7, 0-4) .......... 0 6
7
6
0
0
—
—
63
12
RUSHING LEADERS: LC: Harris 5-59, Barts 4-26.
PASSING LEADERS: LC: Barts 9-15-176, Wilson 2-2-11.
RECEIVING LEADERS: LC: Baah 4-71, Beal 2-60, Berard
1-22, Corbett 1-15.
MADISON 49, CHANTILLY 7
Chantilly (0-7, 0-1) ............ 0 7
Madison (6-2, 1-1) ............. 22 27
0
0
0
0
—
—
7
49
RUSHING LEADERS: C: Imperato 11-35, Sparks 5-5.
PASSING LEADERS: C: Bae 3-8-31.
RECEIVING LEADERS: C: Kelly 1-20, Johnson 2-7.
MARSHALL 49, GEORGE MASON 8
George Mason (5-2, 0-0) ... 0 8
Marshall (6-1, 2-0) ............. 15 14
0
6
0
14
—
—
8
49
M: Margiotta 36 run ( Chang kick )
M: Margiotta 31 run ( Nininger pass from Margiotta )
M: Gonzales-Pinto 5 run ( Chang kick )
GM: Creed 1 run ( Roou run )
M: Margiotta 60 run ( Chang kick )
M: Platter 3 run ( kick failed )
M: Allen 13 run ( Chang kick )
M: Burke 14 run ( Chang kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: M: Margiotta 14-237, GonzalesPinto 9-49, Nininger 5-38, Allen 2-13, Platter 2-11.
SOUTH LAKES 44, WASHINGTON-LEE 0
South Lakes (6-1, 2-0) ....... 14 23
Washington-Lee (1-6, 1-1) 0 0
7
0
0
0
—
—
44
0
SL: Mensah 43 run ( Madden kick )
SL: Hagengimana 8 pass from Miles ( Madden kick )
SL: Alston 20 pass from Miles ( Madden kick )
SL: Seneca safety, penalty in end zone
SL: Mensah 2 run ( Madden kick )
SL: Miles 1 run ( Madden kick )
SL: White 7 interception return ( Madden kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: SL: Mensah 10-81, Miles 8-69,
Alston 3-41.
PASSING LEADERS: SL: Miles 4-8-47, Shapiro 4-4-0-25.
RECEIVING LEADERS: SL: Alston 2-39, Seneca 3-23,
Hagengimana 1-8.
WEST POTOMAC 46, ANNANDALE 7
Annandale (3-4, 0-1) ......... 0
West Potomac (4-3, 1-1) ... 0
0 7
27 13
0
6
—
—
7
46
WP: Etheredge 40 pass from Jones ( Heyde kick )
WP: Webb 46 pass from Jones ( Heyde kick )
WP: Cleveland 7 run ( Heyde kick )
WP: Cleveland 5 run ( Heyde kick )
WP: Cleveland 69 run ( Heyde kick )
WP: Jones 4 run ( kick failed )
A: McCrossin 18 pass from Gill ( Cruz kick )
WP: Mayo 25 run
RUSHING LEADERS: A: Rush 27-142, Elhag 1-2, Adams
1-1.
RECEIVING LEADERS: A: McCrossin 3-22, Carter 2-21,
Ibrahim 1-7.
WESTFIELD 34, OAKTON 14
Westfield (7-0, 2-0) ........... 0
Oakton (1-6, 0-2) ............... 0
21
0
7
0
6
14
—
—
34
14
W: Kim 1 run ( Nugent kick )
W: Woodley 15 pass from Kim ( Nugent kick )
W: Kiley 45 pass from Kim ( Nugent kick )
W: Morin 43 pass from Kim ( Nugent kick )
W: Woodley 6 pass from Kim ( kick failed )
O: Corgnati 64 pass from Campo ( Applegate kick )
O: Kamal 8 pass from Campo ( Applegate kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: W: Kim 6-18, McClintock 9-15,
Pickett 9-15, Goodman 3-4, Kiley 3-4.
PASSING LEADERS: W: Kim 11-17-0-238.
RECEIVING LEADERS: W: Morin 2-50, Goodman 1-30,
Kiley 1-30, Woodley 2-21, Pickett 1-10.
WOODGROVE 28, DOMINION 12
Dominion (4-3, 2-1) ........... 6
Woodgrove (5-2, 3-0) ........ 7
6
7
0
0
0
14
—
—
YORKTOWN 31, LANGLEY 20
L: Vasiliadis 1 run ( kick )
Y: Wall 22 run ( Luncher kick )
Y: Luncher 8 run ( Luncher kick )
21
7
0
0
10
13
—
—
PRIVATE
GEORGETOWN PREP 45,
ST. STEPHEN'S/ST. AGNES 7
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes (1-5, 0-2) ...... 0 0 0 7 — 7
Georgetown Prep (5-1, 1-0) ................ 24 14 7 0 — 45
GP: Hampton 4 run ( Horrigan kick )
GP: Hagy 46 run ( Horrigan kick )
GP: Coleman safety, ball carrier tackled in end zone
GP: Black 58 kickoff return ( Cave pass from Ridgway )
GP: Hampton 5 run ( Horrigan kick )
GP: Smith 31 pass from Ridgway ( Horrigan kick )
GP: Davin 2 run ( Howley kick )
SSSA: Thompson 12 pass from Lyons ( Fisher kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: SSSA: Lyons 7-35, Sobers 3-7. GP:
Hagy 1-49, Hampton 5-35, Steplight 8-34, Black 8-25,
Davin 2-15.
PASSING LEADERS: SSSA: Lyons 8-16-74. GP: Ridgway
3-4-83.
RECEIVING LEADERS: SSSA: Baker 3-45, Thompson
6-39. GP: Smith 1-31.
GOOD COUNSEL 20, DEMATHA 14 (OT)
Good Counsel (5-2, 1-1) ..... 7
DeMatha (4-3, 0-2) ............ 0
0
7
0
7
7
0
6
0
— 20
— 14
GC: Snell 1 run ( kick )
D: Washington 3 run ( kick )
D: Hellams 52 pass from Najarian ( kick )
GC: Wilkerson 44 pass from Snell ( kick )
GC: Palmer 5 run
RUSHING LEADERS: GC: Palmer 15-49.
PASSING LEADERS: GC: Snell 9-13-150.
More online
For game summaries, video recaps
and photo galleries from matchups
throughout the region, visit the
High School Sports section at
washingtonpost.com.
For video highlights of the
weekend’s top plays, along with
score updates and links to the
Post’s latest high school sports
content, follow us on Twitter
@washposths.
To learn how to submit scores and
stats to appear in the newspaper
and online, email us at
hss@washpost.com.
12
28
D: Richardson 17 pass from Jarman ( kick failed )
W: Johnson 56 pass from Burton ( Larsen kick )
W: Piland 1 run ( Larsen kick )
D: Richardson 27 pass from Jarman ( run failed )
W: Castellano 41 pass from Burton ( Larsen kick )
W: Burton 1 run ( Larsen kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: D: Wertz 8-30. W: Johnson 21-99,
Lewis 7-65, Piland 9-24.
PASSING LEADERS: D: Jarman 9-14-157. W: Burton
10-14-171.
RECEIVING LEADERS: D: Richardson 3-58, Pierre 3-56.
W: Castellano 4-63, Johnson 1-56, Badillo 4-22.
Yorktown (6-1, 2-0) ........... 0
Langley (0-7, 0-0) .............. 0
Y: Patterson 8 pass from Porter ( Luncher kick )
L: Norris 1 run ( kick )
Y: Patterson 59 pass from Porter ( Luncher kick )
L: Vasiliadis run ( kick failed )
Y: Luncher 28 field goal
RUSHING LEADERS: Y: Wall 4-65, Luncher 14-46. L: Keys
25-116, Vasiliadis 21-64.
PASSING LEADERS: Y: Porter 5-12-1-104.
RECEIVING LEADERS: Y: Patterson 3-111. L: Vasiliadis
3-50, Vasiliadis 4-44.
31
20
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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D9
M2
high schools
WCAC
Palmer, Falcons show they’re ready for the ‘big time’ in victory over Stags
GOOD COUNSEL 20,
DEMATHA 14 (OT)
Late touchdown pass
precedes winning run
BY
D AN R OTH
Latrele Palmer tore through a
pair of tacklers and into the end
zone, spiked the ball and ripped
off his helmet before a growing
mob of teammates caught up to
him.
It was a good way for No. 13
Good Counsel to finish a 20-14
overtime win over No. 5 DeMatha
on Friday.
After tying the game with a
minute to play on a 44-yard touchdown pass from Kamerun Snell to
Sy’Veon Wilkerson, the Falcons
stuffed DeMatha on its opening
overtime possession before Palmer sealed the win.
“Big-time players make bigtime plays,” Good Counsel Coach
Andy Stefanelli told his players
after the game. “I think you’re big
time now.”
With no particular player star-
ring, several made pivotal plays
for Good Counsel (5-2 overall, 1-1
WCAC) on Friday in Hyattsville.
Linebacker Jalen Green batted
down a pass on fourth and six with
a little more than two minutes
remaining in the fourth quarter,
when a DeMatha first down would
have essentially ended the game.
“I just knew I had to be the one
to make the play,” said Green, who
added a pair of key sacks late. “I
wanted to put the team on my
shoulders and make that play.”
Wilkerson, a sophomore running back with limited playing
time so far this season, reeled in
the game-tying touchdown from
Snell, whose confidence never wavered despite numerous fumbles
and poor passing conditions in a
steady mist.
“It was man-to-man with a running back and a linebacker,” Snell
said. “I knew that my running
back could outrun him so I just
gave him a chance.”
“That’s what got us going,”
Green said of the pass. “That’s
what won us this game.”
And then there was Palmer,
sprung by his offensive line, who
broke free for the winning touchdown, despite everybody in the
stadium knowing a run was coming.
“Unbelievable,” Palmer, still
panting from the exhilaration,
said. “We actually beat these guys
this time.”
Taking advantage of a muffed
punt after their opening drive
went three and out, the Falcons
scored on a one-yard run by Snell
and led 7-0 after the first quarter.
DeMatha (4-3, 0-2) quickly answered with a three-yard touchdown run by Detrick Washington
early in the second quarter.
The Stags seized the momentum on a spectacular catch and
run by Demarcco Hellams, who
carved his way through defenders
for a 52-yard touchdown in the
third quarter.
After losing a fumble to the
Falcons, the Stags forced a Good
Counsel turnover on a first and
goal from the 1-yard line early in
the fourth quarter.
Good Counsel was able to respond, and DeMatha dropped its
second straight game.
“It got ugly, it got sticky, we kept
coming back,” Stefanelli told his
players. “That’s what Good Counsel does.”
dan.roth@washpost.com
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY
Pumas validate No. 1 ranking with rout of Clippers
WISE 58,
OXON HILL 14
BY
K YLE M ELNICK
Wise football Coach DaLawn
Parrish’s phone hardly stopped
ringing this week. Former assistant coaches, relatives and local
media members called Parrish to
congratulate him on Wise being
ranked No. 1 by The Washington
Post.
While Wise has been ranked in
the top five for 99 consecutive
weeks, Parrish said his squad has
never been ranked No. 1 since the
program began in 2006.
Despite the unusual praise,
Parrish and his team’s approach
didn’t change in a 58-14 win over
Oxon Hill on Friday night. Having won 35 consecutive games,
including two 4A state championships, Wise has received each
opponent’s best effort the past
three years, regardless of its
ranking. So the Pumas brought
the same intensity.
“The pressure of being No. 1
doesn’t mean nothing to us,”
Parrish said. “We only look at the
end result . . . because that’s
really what counts.”
Wise’s dominance begins on
offense. The Pumas (7-0) are
averaging 49.9 points and put
together perhaps their most impressive performance in a 75-0
win over Bowie last weekend.
The Pumas lost quarterback
Jabari Laws, the 2016 All-Met
Offensive Player of the Year, from
last year’s team, but Quinton
Williams has had no issues replacing him. With his 6-foot-4,
185-pound frame, the Good
Counsel transfer expands Wise’s
possibilities through the air. He
completed 12 of 18 passes for
189 yards and four touchdowns
Friday against the Clippers.
Senior running back John
Oliver had a rushing and receiving touchdown Friday before
scoring on an 80-yard kickoff
return right after Oxon Hill
(4-3) cut the deficit to 23 in the
third quarter.
“Nobody can really see me in
the pistol behind [Williams],”
Oliver said. “With my quickness
and how he moves with his wide
turns, I’m just on to the races.”
Wise’s lone challenge this season came in a 15-13 win over
Calvert Hall on Sept. 8. Parrish
said the Cardinals used coverages his team had never seen. Wise
added plays to attack those
schemes, and it has since outscored opponents 277-14.
But to laud Wise’s offense too
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Wise running back John Oliver (2), breaking free in the first half Friday night against Oxon Hill, scored on a run, a reception and a kickoff return.
heavily would take away attention from its commanding defense. The Pumas’ 4-2-5 formation takes advantage of their
athleticism, and Parrish said the
depth at each defensive position
is as good as on any team he has
coached.
Oxon Hill, which started dualthreat quarterback Jy’ir Ingram
in place of DaJuan Rollins
(bruised collarbone), gained just
160 total yards, but it gained
momentum at the start of the
second half by getting the ball
to wide receiver Daniel George, a
Penn State commit.
Oliver destroyed the Clippers’
energy with his kickoff return
touchdown.
The Pumas face perhaps their
toughest challenge next week at
Eleanor Roosevelt, which has
outscored its past three opponents 139-6.
“It’s always been one game at a
time for us,” Parrish said. “We put
all our focus on Oxon Hill this
week. We’re going to put all our
focus on Eleanor Roosevelt next
week.”
kyle.melnick@washpost.com
Wise wide receiver Isaiah Hazel (1) celebrates with teammates after his touchdown reception against Oxon Hill.
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
Felton’s skill is on full display as Eagles trounce Vikings in clash of unbeatens
FREEDOM-WOOD. 41,
WOODBRIDGE 14
Eagles improve to 7-0
behind QB’s five TDs
BY
C ALLIE C APLAN
One of Prince William County’s leaders had to falter in Friday
night’s showdown of undefeated
teams.
Freedom-Woodbridge entered
the game with the top scoring
offense, averaging more than 56
points per game. Woodbridge,
meanwhile, had held opponents
to less than seven points per
game.
Freedom-Woodbridge quarterback A.J. Felton, however,
didn’t let the question linger long
in his team’s 41-14 victory. The
senior used his explosive speed
and savvy instincts in the Eagles’
option offense to pick apart the
Vikings and keep his squad in the
lead for a top playoff seed.
“At the end of the day, we’ve
got people that can make plays,”
Freedom-Woodbridge
Coach
Darryl Overton said. “We’re averaging almost 60 points a game,
so even on bad games, we showed
the expectation is that we’re
going to score.”
It’s Felton’s second year in the
Eagles’ system, and Overton has
noticed his maturation throughout the season. He’s more settled
in the pocket, makes quicker
decisions and can direct the
no-huddle offense with ease.
Those improvements were on
display in front of his home
crowd Friday.
He opened the first quarter
with touchdown runs of 58 and
63 yards, putting the Vikings
(6-1) on their heels less than
halfway through the quarter.
But as the Eagles (7-0) became
more reliant on their run game,
Woodbridge brought extra pressure in the box and stymied
momentum.
“They was stacking the box
because I guess they were scared
of me and [running back Tyquan
Brown] or whatever,” Felton said.
After Overton adjusted his offense at halftime to include more
downfield passing, the Vikings
then had to fear Felton’s arm, too.
He had a 47-yard touchdown
connection with wide receiver
Eric Surratt to start the fourth
quarter en route to finishing
with five touchdowns. It was
Felton’s second straight fivescore game after the Eagles
trounced Forest Park, 49-13, last
week.
“He’s just a dynamic player,
and I think he’s getting overlooked,” Overton said of his quarterback, who also had a secondquarter interception while playing cornerback. “He’s instinctive,
and now he’s trusting what’s
happening in front of him. This is
his second year. He knows what’s
happening in front of him so he
can anticipate each play a little
faster.”
Felton completed six of 18
passes for 135 yards and one
touchdown, but his most extensive damage came on the ground
with 10 rushes for 191 yards and
four touchdowns.
Midway through the fourth
quarter, he dropped back for a
pass on third down but pulled
the ball down, snaked along the
sideline and left the Vikings
defenders lunging to the ground
as he scampered 46 yards into
the end zone.
“You’ve got to have speed because speed kills,” Felton said.
“So I mean, I just trained in the
offseason, got faster, and now my
speed kills.”
callie.caplan@washpost.com
D10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14 , 2017
scoreboard
FOOTBA LL
B A S E B AL L
ALCS GAME 1
NFL
NCAA
MLB postseason
NLDS GAME 5
HOW THEY SCORED
NFC
THURSDAY’S RESULT
WILD CARD
Cubs 9, Nationals 8
SOUTH
at Louisiana-Lafayette 24, Texas St. 7
Tuesday, Oct. 3: at New York Yankees 8, Minnesota 4
Wednesday, Oct. 4: at Arizona 11, Colorado 8
Late Thursday
DIVISION SERIES
CHICAGO
AB
Jay lf-cf..........................4
Davis p ...........................0
Bryant 3b .......................5
Rizzo 1b .........................5
Contreras c.....................3
Almora cf .......................1
Zobrist ph-lf...................2
Russell ss.......................4
Heyward rf.....................4
Baez 2b ..........................5
Hendricks p ....................2
La Stella ph ....................0
Duensing p .....................0
Strop p ...........................0
Montgomery p ...............0
Schwarber ph.................1
Edwards p ......................0
Quintana p .....................0
Martin cf ........................1
TOTALS
37
R
1
0
1
0
2
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
9
WASHINGTON
AB
Turner ss........................6
Werth lf .........................4
Harper rf ........................4
Zimmerman 1b ..............4
Murphy 2b......................3
Rendon 3b ......................3
Wieters c .......................4
Madson p .......................0
Lind ph ...........................1
Doolittle p ......................0
Taylor cf .........................4
Gonzalez p .....................1
Albers p..........................0
Robles ph .......................1
Scherzer p ......................0
Kintzler p .......................0
Difo ph ...........................1
Solis p ............................0
Lobaton c .......................2
TOTALS
38
R H
0 2
1 2
1 2
0 0
2 2
1 1
1 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 1
8 14
CUBS FIRST
Jon Jay doubles. On Gio Gonzalez’s wild pitch, Jon Jay
to third. Kris Bryant strikes out swinging. Anthony Rizzo grounds out, Jon Jay scores. Willson Contreras
walks. Albert Almora singles. Willson Contreras to
third. Addison Russell walks. Albert Almora to second.
Jason Heyward grounds out.
Cubs 1, Nationals 0
NATIONALS SECOND
Daniel Murphy homers. Anthony Rendon singles. Matt
Wieters singles. Anthony Rendon to second. Michael
Taylor homers, Matt Wieters scores, Anthony Rendon
scores. Gio Gonzalez strikes out swinging. Trea Turner
strikes out swinging. Jayson Werth doubles. Bryce
Harper is intentionally walked. Ryan Zimmerman
strikes out swinging.
Nationals 4, Cubs 1
CUBS THIRD
Kris Bryant doubles. Anthony Rizzo called out on
strikes. Willson Contreras walks. Albert Almora walks.
Willson Contreras to second. Kris Bryant to third. Addison Russell grounds out, Albert Almora to second, Willson Contreras to third, Kris Bryant scores. On Gio Gonzalez’s wild pitch, Willson Contreras scores. Jason Heyward strikes out swinging.
Nationals 4, Cubs 3
CUBS FIFTH
Kris Bryant grounds out. Anthony Rizzo flies out. Willson Contreras singles. Ben Zobrist pinch-hitting for Albert Almora. Ben Zobrist singles. Willson Contreras to
second. Addison Russell doubles, Ben Zobrist scores,
Willson Contreras scores. Jason Heyward is intentionally walked. On Matt Wieters’s passed ball, Jason Heyward to third, Addison Russell scores. Javier Baez
reaches on third strike, advances to second, Jason Heyward to third, Addison Russell scores. Throwing error
by Matt Wieters. Tommy La Stella pinch-hitting for
Kyle Hendricks. Interference error by Matt Wieters. Jon
Jay hit by pitch, Tommy La Stella to second, Javier
Baez to third, Jason Heyward scores. Kris Bryant pops
out.
Cubs 7, Nationals 4
CUBS SIXTH
Anthony Rizzo grounds out. Willson Contreras grounds
out. Ben Zobrist walks. Addison Russell doubles, Ben
Zobrist scores. Jason Heyward flies out.
Cubs 8, Nationals 4
NATIONALS SIXTH
Wilmer Difo pinch-hitting for Brandon Kintzler. Wilmer
Difo grounds out. Trea Turner grounds out. Jayson
Werth walks. Bryce Harper doubles. Jayson Werth to
third. On Mike Montgomery’s wild pitch, Bryce Harper
to third, Jayson Werth scores. Ryan Zimmerman walks,
Bryce Harper to third, Jayson Werth scores. Daniel
Murphy doubles, Ryan Zimmerman to third, Bryce
Harper scores. Anthony Rendon is intentionally walked.
Matt Wieters flies out.
Cubs 8, Nationals 6
CUBS SEVENTH
Javier Baez grounds out. Kyle Schwarber pinch-hitting
for Mike Montgomery. Kyle Schwarber singles. Jon Jay
singles. Kyle Schwarber to third. Kris Bryant reaches on
a fielder’s choice, Jon Jay out at second, Kyle Schwarber scores. Anthony Rizzo grounds out.
Cubs 9, Nationals 6
NATIONALS SEVENTH
Michael Taylor walks. Jose Lobaton flies out. Trea Turner singles. Michael Taylor to second. Jayson Werth
walks. Trea Turner to second. Michael Taylor to third.
Bryce Harper out on a sacrifice fly, Michael Taylor
scores. Ryan Zimmerman strikes out swinging.
Cubs 9, Nationals 7
NATIONALS EIGHTH
Daniel Murphy walks. Anthony Rendon walks. Daniel
Murphy to second. Adam Lind pinch-hitting for Ryan
Madson. Adam Lind grounds out. Anthony Rendon out
at second. Daniel Murphy to third. Michael Taylor singles, Daniel Murphy scores. Jose Lobaton singles. Michael Taylor to second. With Trea Turner batting, Jose
Lobaton picked off.
Cubs 9, Nationals 8
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 5
Washington .................. 2
Dallas ............................ 2
N.Y. Giants .................... 0
L
1
2
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.500
.400
.000
PF
165
91
125
82
PA
122
89
132
122
SOUTH
W
Atlanta .......................... 3
Carolina ......................... 4
New Orleans ................. 2
Tampa Bay .................... 2
L
1
2
2
2
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.667
.500
.500
PF
104
128
93
85
PA
89
122
78
83
NORTH
W
Green Bay ..................... 4
Detroit .......................... 3
Minnesota ..................... 3
Chicago ......................... 1
L
1
2
2
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.600
.600
.200
PF
137
123
99
78
PA
112
97
93
124
WEST
W
Seattle .......................... 3
L.A. Rams ...................... 3
Arizona ......................... 2
San Francisco ................ 0
L
2
2
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.600
.600
.400
.000
PF
110
152
81
89
PA
87
121
125
120
EAST
W
Buffalo .......................... 3
N.Y. Jets ....................... 3
New England ................. 3
Miami ............................ 2
L
2
2
2
2
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.600
.600
.600
.500
PF
89
92
148
41
PA
74
106
142
67
SOUTH
W
Jacksonville .................. 3
Houston ........................ 2
Tennessee ..................... 2
Indianapolis .................. 2
L
2
3
3
3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.600
.400
.400
.400
PF
139
144
110
97
PA
83
130
142
159
NORTH
W
Pittsburgh ..................... 3
Baltimore ...................... 3
Cincinnati ...................... 2
Cleveland ...................... 0
L
2
2
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.600
.600
.400
.000
PF
99
90
84
77
PA
89
97
83
124
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 5
Denver ........................... 3
Oakland ......................... 2
L.A. Chargers ................ 1
L
0
1
3
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
1.000
.750
.400
.200
PF
164
98
108
99
PA
111
74
109
115
AFC
WEEK 6
THURSDAY’S RESULT
Philadelphia 28, at Carolina 23
SUNDAY’S GAMES
San Francisco at Washington (-101/2), 1
Chicago at Baltimore (-61/2), 1
Green Bay (-3) at Minnesota, 1
Cleveland at Houston (-91/2), 1
Detroit at New Orleans (-4), 1
Miami at Atlanta (-13), 1
New England (-9) at N.Y. Jets, 1
Tampa Bay (-11/2) at Arizona, 4:05
L.A. Rams at Jacksonville (-21/2), 4:05
L.A. Chargers at Oakland (-3), 4:25
Pittsburgh at Kansas City (-4), 4:25
N.Y. Giants at Denver (-111/2), 8:30
BYE: Buffalo, Dallas, Seattle, Cincinnati
MONDAY’S GAME
Indianapolis at Tennessee (OFF), 8:30
WEEK 7
THURSDAY’S GAME
Kansas City at Oakland, 8:25
SUNDAY, OCT. 22
Baltimore at Minnesota, 1
Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 1
New Orleans at Green Bay, 1
Tennessee at Cleveland, 1
N.Y. Jets at Miami, 1
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 1
Arizona vs L.A. Rams at London, UK, 1
Carolina at Chicago, 1
Dallas at San Francisco, 4:05
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 4:25
Seattle at N.Y. Giants, 4:25
Denver at L.A. Chargers, 4:25
Atlanta at New England, 8:30
BYE: Detroit, Houston
MONDAY, OCT. 23
Washington at Philadelphia, 8:30
Week 6 injury report
SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS AT WASHINGTON REDSKINS
49ers: OUT: RB Kyle Juszczyk (back). QUESTIONABLE: S
Adrian Colbert (hamstring), LB Reuben Foster (ankle), S
Eric Reid (knee), LB Dekoda Watson (groin), CB Ahkello
Witherspoon (concussion). Redskins: OUT: CB Josh
Norman (rib), T Ty Nsekhe (core muscle). DOUBTFUL: S
Deshazor Everett (hamstring), RB Rob Kelley (ankle).
QUESTIONABLE: T Trent Williams (knee).
HICAGO BEARS AT BALTIMORE RAVENS
Bears: OUT: LB John Timu (knee, ankle), WR Markus
Wheaton (groin). QUESTIONABLE: C Hroniss Grasu
(hand), DT Nick Kwiatkoski (chest). Ravens: OUT: C
Matt Skura (knee), RB Terrance West (calf). DOUBTFUL:
DT Brandon Williams (foot), LB Tim Williams (thigh).
QUESTIONABLE: DT Carl Davis (thigh), CB Jaylen Hill
(thigh), S Anthony Levine (thigh), WR Jeremy Maclin
(shoulder), WR Breshad Perriman (knee), CB Jimmy
Smith (achilles), TE Maxx Williams (ankle).
CLEVELAND BROWNS AT HOUSTON TEXANS
Browns: DOUBTFUL: LB James Burgess (knee).. QUESTIONABLE: WR Kenny Britt (knee, groin), T Shon
Coleman (knee), C J.C. Tretter (knee). Texans: OUT: LB
Ben Heeney (knee), CB Kevin Johnson (knee), S Corey
Moore (concussion), RB Jordan Todman (calf). QUESTIONABLE: C Greg Mancz (knee), LB Benardrick McKinney (hip).
DETROIT LIONS AT NEW ORLEANS SAINTS
Lions: OUT: LB Paul Worrilow (knee). QUESTIONABLE:
DE Ezekiel Ansah (knee), WR Kenny Golladay (hamstring), G T.J. Lang (back), QB Matthew Stafford
(ankle), T Rick Wagner (shoulder), RB Dwayne Washington (quadricep). Saints: QUESTIONABLE: T Terron
Armstead (shoulder), G Andrus Peat (hip), WR Willie
Snead (hamstring).
GREEN BAY PACKERS AT MINNESOTA VIKINGS
Packers: OUT: S Morgan Burnett (hamstring), LB Joe
Thomas (ankle). DOUBTFUL: LB Ahmad Brooks (back),
CB Kevin King (concussion). QUESTIONABLE: T David
Bakhtiari (hamstring), T Bryan Bulaga (ankle), CB Davon
House (quadricep), RB Ty Montgomery (ribs). Vikings:
OUT: QB Sam Bradford (knee), WR Stefon Diggs (groin),
G Nick Easton (calf). QUESTIONABLE: S Andrew Sendejo (groin).
FRIDAY‘S RESULTS
Best of five
EAST
at Syracuse 27, Clemson 24
FAR WEST
Washington St. at California, Late
SATURDAY‘S GAMES
EAST
E. Michigan (2-3) at Army (4-2), Noon
Fordham (1-5) at Colgate (2-4), Noon
Lafayette (2-4) at Harvard (2-2), Noon
NC State (5-1) at Pittsburgh (2-4), Noon
U-Conn. (1-4) at Temple (3-3), Noon
Texas Tech (4-1) at West Virginia (3-2), Noon
Princeton (3-1) at Brown (2-2), 12:30
Georgetown (1-4) at Lehigh (1-5), 12:30
St. Francis (Pa.) (3-2) at Bryant (2-3), 1
Dartmouth (4-0) at Sacred Heart (2-3), 1
Holy Cross (2-4) at Yale (3-1), 1
Penn (2-2) at Columbia (4-0), 1:30
Bucknell (2-3) at Cornell (1-3), 1:30
N. Illinois (3-2) at Buffalo (3-3), 3:30
William & Mary (2-3) at Delaware (3-2), 3:30
Rhode Island (2-3) at Maine (1-3), 3:30
Richmond (3-2) at Towson (2-3), 4
Duquesne (4-1) at Robert Morris (2-3), 6
New Hampshire (4-1) at Stony Brook (4-2), 6
SOUTH
Florida St. (1-3) at Duke (4-2), Noon
BYU (1-5) at Mississippi St. (3-2), Noon
Charleston Southern (2-3) at Presbyterian (3-3), Noon
South Carolina (4-2) at Tennessee (3-2), Noon
Boston College (2-4) at Louisville (4-2), 12:20
VMI (0-6) at Furman (3-3), 1
Savannah St. (0-5) at Morgan St. (0-5), 1
Davidson (2-3) at Stetson (1-5), 1
Howard (2-3) at Delaware St. (0-5), 2
Gardner-Webb (1-4) at NC Central (4-1), 2
Hampton (3-2) at Norfolk St. (2-3), 2
Old Dominion (2-3) at Marshall (4-1), 2:30
Prairie View (2-3) at Alcorn St. (4-2), 3
NC A&T (6-0) at Florida A&M (2-4), 3
Villanova (4-2) at James Madison (5-0), 3:30
Auburn (5-1) at LSU (4-2), 3:30
Northwestern (2-3) at Maryland (3-2), 3:30
Chattanooga (1-5) at Mercer (3-3), 3:30
Georgia Tech (3-1) at Miami (4-0), 3:30
Vanderbilt (3-3) at Mississippi (2-3), 3:30
Virginia (4-1) at North Carolina (1-5), 3:30
ETSU (3-3) at W. Carolina (4-2), 3:30
Navy (5-0) at Memphis (4-1), 3:45
E. Kentucky (1-4) at Jacksonville St. (4-1), 4
Charlotte (0-6) at W. Kentucky (3-2), 4:30
Georgia St. (2-2) at Louisiana-Monroe (3-2), 5
New Mexico St. (2-4) at Georgia Southern (0-4), 6
Kennesaw St. (4-1) at Liberty (3-2), 6
Wofford (5-0) at The Citadel (3-2), 6
Middle Tennessee (3-3) at UAB (3-2), 6:30
Tulane (3-2) at FIU (3-2), 7
Texas A&M (4-2) at Florida (3-2), 7
UTEP (0-6) at Southern Miss. (3-2), 7
East Carolina (1-5) at UCF (4-0), 7
Arkansas (2-3) at Alabama (6-0), 7:15
Missouri (1-4) at Georgia (6-0), 7:30
Cincinnati (2-4) at South Florida (5-0), 7:30
MIDWEST
Jacksonville (4-1) at Butler (3-3), Noon
Rutgers (1-4) at Illinois (2-3), Noon
Michigan (4-1) at Indiana (3-2), Noon
Kansas (1-4) at Iowa St. (3-2), Noon
TCU (5-0) at Kansas St. (3-2), Noon
Campbell (4-2) at Dayton (2-4), 1
Tennessee Tech (0-6) at SE Missouri (1-4), 2
Marist (3-3) at Valparaiso (2-4), 2
N. Iowa (2-3) at S. Dakota St. (4-1), 3
Illinois St. (4-1) at S. Illinois (2-3), 3
Indiana St. (0-5) at South Dakota (5-0), 3
Ohio (4-2) at Bowling Green (1-5), 3:30
Toledo (4-1) at Cent. Michigan (2-4), 3:30
Miami (Ohio) (2-4) at Kent St. (1-5), 3:30
Akron (3-3) at W. Michigan (4-2), 3:30
Purdue (3-2) at Wisconsin (5-0), 3:30
N. Dakota St. (5-0) at Youngstown St. (3-2), 7
Ohio St. (5-1) at Nebraska (3-3), 7:30
Michigan St. (4-1) at Minnesota (3-2), 8
SOUTHWEST
Alabama St. (0-5) at Texas Southern (0-5), 3
Baylor (0-5) at Oklahoma St. (4-1), 3:30
Oklahoma (4-1) vs. Texas (3-2) at Dallas, 3:30
Houston (4-1) at Tulsa (1-5), 4
UTSA (3-1) at North Texas (3-2), 6:30
Coastal Carolina (1-4) at Arkansas St. (2-2), 7
Stephen F. Austin (2-4) at Cent. Arkansas (4-1), 7
Northwestern St. (1-4) at Sam Houston St. (4-1), 7
FAR WEST
UNLV (2-3) at Air Force (1-4), 2
North Dakota (2-4) at Montana (4-2), 3
Colorado (3-3) at Oregon St. (1-5), 4
Montana St. (2-3) at E. Washington (4-2), 4:05
Wyoming (3-2) at Utah St. (3-3), 4:30
Appalachian St. (3-2) at Idaho (2-3), 5
N. Arizona (3-2) at Portland St. (0-5), 5
Morehead St. (2-4) at San Diego (3-2), 5
Utah (4-1) at Southern Cal (5-1), 8
S. Utah (3-2) at Weber St. (4-1), 8
UCLA (3-2) at Arizona (3-2), 9
Idaho St. (3-3) at Sacramento St. (2-3), 9
New Mexico (3-2) at Fresno St. (3-2), 10
Nevada (1-5) at Colorado St. (4-2), 10:15
Boise St. (3-2) at San Diego St. (6-0), 10:30
Washington (6-0) at Arizona St. (2-3), 10:45
Oregon (4-2) at Stanford (4-2), 11
San Jose St. (1-6) at Hawaii (2-4), 11:59
Syracuse 27, No. 2 Clemson 24
CLEMSON ................................. 7
SYRACUSE ............................. 14
7
3
10
7
0 — 24
3 — 27
SYR: D.Strickland 23 pass from Dungey (Murphy kick),
11:44 first.
CLE: Feaster 37 run (Al.Spence kick), 10:37 first.
SYR: Philips 66 pass from Dungey (Murphy kick), 5:13
first.
CLE: Muse 63 fumble return (Al.Spence kick), 8:31
second.
SYR: FG Murphy 21, 3:49 second.
CLE: FG Al.Spence 30, 8:27 third.
SYR: Ishmael 30 pass from Dungey (Murphy kick), 7:12
third.
CLE: Etienne 52 run (Al.Spence kick), 6:16 third.
SYR: FG Murphy 30, 9:41 fourth.
CLEMSON
First Downs ..................................... 16
Rushes-Yards ........................... 25-113
Passing .......................................... 204
Comp-Att-Int .......................... 22-32-0
Return Yards .................................... 53
Punts-Avg. ................................. 5-41.8
Fumbles-Lost .................................. 1-0
Penalties-Yards ........................ 10-104
Time Of Possession .................... 25:08
SYRACUSE
28
50-162
278
20-33-0
82
5-36.8
2-1
13-115
34:52
LOS ANGELES CHARGERS AT OAKLAND RAIDERS
Chargers: QUESTIONABLE: T Joe Barksdale (foot), LB
Jatavis Brown (ankle), RB Branden Oliver (hamstring),
WR Mike Williams (back). Raiders: OUT: CB Gareon
Conley (shin), CB Antonio Hamilton (knee), LB Marquel
Lee (ankle), RB Jamize Olawale (concussion). QUESTIONABLE: CB David Amerson (shoulder), LB Cory
James (knee), RB DeAndre Washington (hamstring).
RUSHING
LOS ANGELES RAMS AT JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS
Rams: DOUBTFUL: CB Troy Hill (shoulder). QUESTIONABLE: LB Mark Barron (knee), S Lamarcus Joyner
(hamstring). Jaguars: OUT: C Brandon Linder (illness).
QUESTIONABLE: WR Arrelious Benn (groin), G Patrick
Omameh (hip).
Clemson: K.Bryant 12-17-0-116, Cooper 10-14-0-88,
Spiers 0-1-0-0. Syracuse: Devin Butler 0-1-0-0, Dungey
20-32-0-278.
MIAMI DOLPHINS AT ATLANTA FALCONS
Dolphins: DOUBTFUL: WR DeVante Parker (ankle).
QUESTIONABLE: CB Xavien Howard (shoulder), CB
Byron Maxwell (foot). Falcons: OUT: LB Jermaine Grace
(hamstring), WR Mohamed Sanu (hamstring), DE Courtney Upshaw (ankle, knee). QUESTIONABLE: K Matt
Bryant (back).
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS AT NEW YORK JETS
Patriots: OUT: CB Eric Rowe (groin). QUESTIONABLE:
RB Rex Burkhead (ribs). Jets: QUESTIONABLE: RB Bilal
Powell (calf), DE Muhammad Wilkerson (shoulder, toe).
PITTSBURGH STEELERS AT KANSAS CITY CHIEFS
Steelers: QUESTIONABLE: G Ramon Foster (back).
Chiefs: OUT: WR Chris Conley (achilles), G Laurent
Duvernay-Tardif (knee), C Mitch Morse (foot), S Steven
Terrell (concussion).
TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS AT ARIZONA CARDINALS
Buccaneers: OUT: LB Kwon Alexander (hamstring), S
Josh Robinson (concussion), DE Ryan Russell (shoulder), S Keith Tandy (hip). QUESTIONABLE: DE Robert
Ayers (back), LB Lavonte David (ankle), C Ali Marpet
(illness), S T.J. Ward (hip). Cardinals: OUT: DT Olsen
Pierre (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: LB Karlos Dansby (hamstring), DT Robert Nkemdiche (calf), DT Corey Peters
(knee), CB Patrick Peterson (quadricep), T Jared Veldheer (knee).
NEW YORK GIANTS AT DENVER BRONCOS
Giants: OUT: LB Jonathan Casillas (neck), DE Romeo
Okwara (knee), RB Paul Perkins (ribs), C Weston
Richburg (concussion), WR Sterling Shepard (ankle), DE
Olivier Vernon (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: S Landon Collins (ankle). Broncos: OUT: WR Cody Latimer (knee), QB
Paxton Lynch (right shoulder).
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS AT TENNESSEE TITANS
Colts: DNP: RB Frank Gore (not injury related), QB
Andrew Luck (right shoulder), G Jack Mewhort (not
injury related), LB Anthony Walker (hamstring). LIMITED: WR Kamar Aiken (hip). FULL: QB Jacoby Brissett
(left wrist), TE Jack Doyle (concussion, neck), CB Nate
Hairston (quadricep), RB Matt Jones (knee), WR Chester Rogers (hamstring), CB Quincy Wilson (knee).
Titans: DNP: S Johnathan Cyprien (hamstring), WR
Corey Davis (hamstring). LIMITED:LB Daren Bates
(knee), QB Marcus Mariota (hamstring).FULL: T Taylor
Lewan (knee).
B O X ING
FIGHT SCHEDULE
SATURDAY
At StubHub Center, Carson, Calif. (FOX), Leo Santa Cruz
vs. Chris Avalos, 12, for Santa Cruz’s WBA Super
featherweight title; Abner Mares vs. Andres Gutierrez,
12, for Mares’ WBA World featherweight title; Eddie
Ramirez vs. Antonio DeMarco, 10, junior welterweights.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
CUBS ELIMINATED NATIONALS, 3-2
Game 1: Chicago 3, at Washington 0
Game 2: at Washington 6, Chicago 3
Game 3: at Chicago 2, Washington 1
Game 4: Washington 5, at Chicago 0
Game 5: Chicago 9, at Washington 8
DODGERS ELIMINATED DIAMONDBACKS, 3-0
Game 1: at Los Angeles 9, Arizona 5
Game 2: at Los Angeles 8, Arizona 5
Game 3: Los Angeles 3, at Arizona, 1
AMERICAN LEAGUE
ASTROS ELIMINATED RED SOX, 3-1
Game 1: at Houston 8, Boston 2
Game 2: at Houston 8, Boston 2
Game 3: at Boston 10, Houston 3
Game 4: Houston 5, at Boston 4
YANKEES ELIMINATED INDIANS, 3-2
Game 1: at Cleveland 4, New York 0
Game 2: at Cleveland 9, New York 8, 13 innings
Game 3: at New York 1, Cleveland 0
Game 4: at New York 7, Cleveland 3
Game 5: New York 5, at Cleveland 2
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
Best of seven
AMERICAN LEAGUE
ASTROS LEAD YANKEES, 1-0
Game 1: at Houston 2, New York 1
Game 2: Saturday, Oct. 14: New York (Severino 14-6) at
Houston (Verlander 15-8), 4:08 (Fox)
Game 3: Monday, Oct. 16: Houston at New York
(Sabathia 14-5), 8:08 (FS1)
Game 4: Tuesday, Oct. 17: Houston at New York (Gray
10-12), TBA (Fox or FS1)
x-Game 5: Wednesday, Oct. 18: Houston at New York,
TBA (Fox or FS1)
x-Game 6: Friday, Oct. 20: New York at Houston, TBA
(Fox or FS1)
x-Game 7: Saturday, Oct. 21: New York at Houston, TBA
(Fox or FS1)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
LOS ANGELES VS. CHICAGO
Game 1: Saturday, Oct. 14: Chicago at Los Angeles
(Kershaw 18-4), 8:08 (TBS)
Game 2: Sunday, Oct. 15: Chicago at Los Angeles, 7:38
(TBS)
Game 3: Tuesday, Oct. 17: Los Angeles at Chicago, TBA
(TBS)
Game 4: Wednesday, Oct. 18: Los Angeles at Chicago,
TBA (TBS)
x-Game 5: Thursday, Oct. 19: Los Angeles at Chicago,
TBA (TBS)
x-Game 6: Saturday, Oct. 21: Chicago at Los Angeles,
TBA (TBS)
x-Game 7: Sunday, Oct. 22: Chicago at Los Angeles, TBA
(TBS)
WORLD SERIES
Best of seven; All Games Televised by Fox
Game 1: Tuesday, Oct. 24
Game 2: Wednesday, Oct. 25
Game 3: Friday, Oct. 27
Game 4: Saturday, Oct. 28
x-Game 5: Sunday, Oct. 29
x-Game 6: Tuesday, Oct. 31
x-Game 7: Wednesday, Nov. 1
In the Fall One-Day Member-Guest Matt Bravo, Madison Smith, David Allen and Kenton Quick won the first
flight. Mike Crisci, Nathan Guilmain, David Faber & Alex Martin won the second flight.
COLUMBIA
Gil Digioia won the Christian Heurich Left Handers
Championship with a low net of 69. Mike McCarthy
won low gross with a 74.
NATIONAL GC TANTALLON
Al Green and Randy Brack won the overall Hustle with
Joe Mullins and Jack Sullivan winning the front and
Rich Barbour and Ralph Harms winning the back. Mike
Suranno won closest to the pin.
TR A N S A C TI O N S
MLB
Philadelphia Phillies: Named Larry Bowa senior adviser
to the general manager.
NBA
Atlanta Hawks: Requested waivers on F Tyler Cavanaugh, G Quinn Cook and F Jeremy Evans.
Golden State Warriors: Waived C Trevor Thompson.
Indiana Pacers: Exercised the fourth-year option on C
Myles Turner and third-year option on F Domantas
Sabonis.
Phoenix Suns: Signed F Tidjan Keita.
NFL
NFL: Fined Houston S Marcus Gilchrist $24,309 and
Carolina OT Matt Kalil, Minnesota DT Jaleel Johnson,
Philadelphia DE Brandon Graham and Dallas LB Anthony
Hitchens $9,115 for their actions during last week’s
games.
San Francisco 49ers: Released LB NaVorro Bowman.
NHL
Anaheim Ducks: Assigned LW Giovanni Fiore to San
Diego (AHL) and G Angus Redmond from San Diego to
Utah (ECHL). Recalled LW Nicolas Kerdiles from San
Diego.
Chicago Blackhawks: Assigned D Luc Snuggerud to
Rockford (AHL) and G Collin Delia from Rockford to Indy
(ECHL).
St. Louis Blues: Assigned F Conner Bleackley from
Chicago (AHL) to Tulsa (ECHL).
100
110
— 9 9 0
— 8 14 2
WASHINGTON
IP
Gonzalez ......................3
Albers ..........................1
Scherzer ......................1
Kintzler ........................1
Solis ..........................0.1
Madson .....................1.2
Doolittle.......................1
H
3
0
3
1
2
0
0
R ER BB SO NP ERA
3 3 4 5 67 6.75
0 0 0 0 16 0.00
4 2 1 1 28 3.68
1 1 1 0 23 5.40
1 1 0 0 12 9.00
0 0 0 1 19 2.25
0 0 0 2 13 0.00
SOCCER
ATLANTIC
W
Boston..........................................4
Brooklyn.......................................3
Toronto ........................................3
Philadelphia .................................2
New York .....................................0
L
Pct
0 1.000
1 .750
2 .600
3 .400
5 .000
GB
—
1
11/2
21/2
1/
42
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington .................................4
Orlando ........................................3
Miami...........................................3
Atlanta.........................................2
Charlotte......................................2
L
1
3
3
3
3
Pct
.800
.500
.500
.400
.400
GB
—
11/2
11/2
2
2
CENTRAL
W
Indiana .........................................3
Chicago ........................................3
Detroit .........................................2
Milwaukee ...................................1
Cleveland .....................................1
L
1
3
3
3
4
Pct
.750
.500
.400
.250
.200
GB
—
1
11/2
2
21/2
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .......................................4
Dallas ...........................................4
San Antonio .................................3
Memphis ......................................3
New Orleans ................................1
L
1
2
2
2
3
Pct
.800
.667
.600
.600
.250
GB
—
NORTHWEST
W
Utah .............................................5
x-Portland....................................4
Oklahoma City .............................3
Minnesota....................................2
Denver..........................................3
L
Pct
0 1.000
1 .800
1 .750
1 .667
2 .600
GB
—
1
11/2
2
2
PACIFIC
W
x-L.A. Clippers .............................2
x-Golden State.............................1
x-Phoenix.....................................1
x-L.A. Lakers................................1
x-Sacramento ..............................1
L
2
2
3
4
4
GB
—
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Pct
.500
.333
.250
.200
.200
1/
2
1
1
21/2
1/
2
1
11/2
11/2
TE N NI S
MLS
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
Dallas 108, at Atlanta 94
at L.A. Clippers 104, Sacramento 87
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
Washington 110, at New York 103
at Charlotte 111, Dallas 96
Cleveland 113, at Orlando 106
Toronto 125, at Chicago 104
at Memphis 142, New Orleans 101
San Antonio 106, at Houston 97
at Milwaukee 107, Detroit 103
Philadelphia 119, Miami 95
Brisbane Bullets at Phoenix, Late
Haifa Maccabi at Portland, Late
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, Late
Sacramento at Golden State, Late
EASTERN
W
Toronto FC .....................19
New York City FC ...........16
Atlanta United FC ..........15
Chicago ..........................15
Columbus .......................15
New York .......................13
Philadelphia ...................10
Montreal ........................11
New England ..................11
Orlando City ...................10
D.C. United .......................9
L
5
8
9
10
12
12
13
15
15
13
18
T PTS
8
65
8
56
8
53
7
52
5
50
7
46
9
39
6
39
6
39
9
39
5
32
GF
71
53
68
58
50
51
42
50
48
38
30
GA
35
39
38
42
47
46
43
54
58
51
54
WESTERN
W
Vancouver ......................15
Sporting KC ....................12
Seattle ...........................12
Portland .........................13
Houston .........................12
Dallas .............................10
Real Salt Lake ................12
San Jose .........................12
Minnesota United ..........10
Colorado ...........................8
Los Angeles .....................7
L
11
8
9
11
10
9
14
14
16
18
17
T PTS
6
51
12
48
11
47
8
47
10
46
13
43
6
42
6
42
6
36
6
30
8
29
GF
48
39
45
54
54
43
47
35
45
30
41
GA
46
27
39
49
45
43
53
57
64
48
62
SINGLES— QUARTERFINALS
Marin Cilic (4), Croatia, def. Albert Ramos-Vinolas,
Spain, 6-3, 6-4; Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Grigor
Dimitrov (6), Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-7 (7-4), 6-3; Juan Martin
del Potro (16), Argentina, def. Viktor Troicki, Serbia, 4-6,
6-1, 6-4; Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Richard
Gasquet, France, 7-5, 6-4.
DOUBLES — QUARTERFINALS
Henri Kontinen, Finland, and John Peers (1), Australia,
def. Ivan Dodig, Croaita, and Marcel Granollers (5),
Spain, 3-6, 6-3, 10-8; Jamie Murray, Britain, and Bruno
Soares (4), Brazil, def. Raven Klaasen, South Africa, and
Rajeev Ram (6), United States, 6-1, 7-6 (8-6); Jean-Julien Rojer, Netherlands, and Horia Tecau (3), Romania,
def. Oliver Marach, Austria, and Mate Pavic (7), Croatia,
7-6 (8-6), 6-4; Lukasz Kubot, Poland, and Marcelo Melo
(2), Brazil, def. Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico, and Julio
Peralta, Chile, 7-6 (7-1), 6-4.
At Tianjin Tuanbo International Tennis Centre
In Tianjin, China
Purse: $426,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES — QUARTERFINALS
Aryna Sabalenka, Belarus, def. Zhu Lin, China, 6-3, 6-4;
Maria Sharapova, Russia, def. Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, 6-3, 6-1; Sara Errani, Italy, def. Christina
McHale, United States, 5-7, 7-6 (7-2), 6-1; Peng Shuai
(3), China, def. Sara Sorribes Tormo, Spain, 6-0, 6-1.
DOUBLES — SEMIFINALS
Dalila Jakupovic, Slovenia, and Nina Stojanovic (3),
Serbia, def. Guo Hanyu and Ye Qiu Yu, China, 6-0, 4-6,
10-4.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22
HONG KONG OPEN
At Victoria Park Tennis Stadium; In Hong Kong
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES — QUARTERFINALS
Jennifer Brady, United States, def. Nicole Gibbs, United
States, 7-5, 6-4; Daria Gavrilova (7), Australia, def.
Lizette Cabrera, Australia, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4; Wang Qiang,
China, def. Sam Stosur, Australia, 7-5, 6-2; Anastasia
Pavlyuchenkova (6), Russia, def. Naomi Osaka, Japan,
6-3, 6-3.
SATURDAY’S RESULT
at Portland 4, Orlando 1
SUNDAY’S RESULT
at North Carolina 1, Chicago 0
CIMB CLASSIC
At TPC Kuala Lumpur; In Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Purse: $7 million
Yardage: 7,005; Par: 72
Wizards 110, Knicks 103
30
30
27
25
27 — 110
22 — 103
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
22:19 5-10 1-2 5-8 3 1 11
22:59 7-14 0-0 1-5 1 0 17
25:49
0-1 0-2 0-3 2 4
0
28:33 7-13 8-8 0-4 4 2 24
25:49
3-5 1-2 0-4 4 3
8
23:51 9-13 2-4 0-4 0 5 21
22:11
5-6 0-0 2-3 5 1 10
19:46
1-3 0-0 1-3 2 2
2
13:15
2-3 0-0 0-3 0 1
5
12:00
1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1
3
10:42
0-3 2-2 0-1 1 0
2
10:21
1-5 3-4 1-2 1 0
6
2:25
0-0 1-2 0-0 0 0
1
240 41-78 18-26 10-41 23 20 110
Percentages: FG .526, FT .692. 3-Point Goals: 10-31, .323
(Smith 3-8, Beal 2-6, Felix 1-2, Frazier 1-2, McCullough
1-2, Scott 1-3, Oubre Jr. 1-4, Meeks 0-2, Porter Jr. 0-2).
Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 21 (28 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 3 (Gortat, Mahinmi, Oubre Jr.). Turnovers: 21 (Beal 4, Frazier 4, Gortat 4, Satoransky 4,
Oubre Jr. 2, Scott 2, Mahinmi). Steals: 8 (Mahinmi 2,
Beal, Frazier, McCullough, Oubre Jr., Porter Jr., Satoransky). Technical Fouls: Oubre Jr., 10:03 second.
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
21:50 4-11 2-2 2-3 0 4 10
24:05
0-4 1-1 0-4 2 0
1
22:56
6-8 3-4 3-7 2 1 15
29:44 9-15 1-1 0-3 2 2 23
22:51
1-6 1-2 0-0 3 0
3
23:41 8-12 1-2 0-2 1 2 21
19:30
1-5 0-0 0-1 5 3
3
16:33
2-2 1-2 2-7 0 3
5
15:16
1-2 1-2 1-2 1 3
3
13:50
1-2 2-2 0-2 0 2
5
9:45
1-4 1-2 0-1 1 1
3
9:37
1-3 2-2 0-0 1 0
4
6:50
2-7 0-0 0-0 0 1
5
3:32
1-2 0-0 0-0 0 1
2
240 38-83 16-22 8-32 18 23 103
Percentages: FG .458, FT .727. 3-Point Goals: 11-27, .407
(McDermott 4-6, Hardaway Jr. 4-8, Baker 1-1, Thomas
1-1, Kuzminskas 1-4, Kornet 0-1, Lee 0-1, Sessions 0-1,
Beasley 0-2, Dotson 0-2). Team Rebounds: 12. Team
Turnovers: 15 (19 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Hardaway Jr.,
Hernangomez, Kanter, O’Quinn). Turnovers: 15 (Beasley
2, Hernangomez 2, Jack 2, Kanter 2, O’Quinn 2, Baker,
Dotson, Hardaway Jr., McDermott, Sessions). Steals: 11
(Baker 2, Dotson 2, Beasley, Hardaway Jr., Kanter,
Kornet, McDermott, O’Quinn, Thomas). Technical Fouls:
Beasley, 3:02 second
A: 16,461 (19,812).
SECOND ROUND
Pat Perez ............................................ 66 65
Xander Schauffele .............................. 65 67
Sung Kang .......................................... 67 68
Cameron Smith .................................. 64 71
Thomas Pieters .................................. 68 67
Keegan Bradley .................................. 65 71
Rafa Cabrera Bello ............................. 67 70
Hideki Matsuyama ............................. 70 68
Kyle Stanley ....................................... 71 67
Michael Kim ....................................... 68 70
Lucas Glover ....................................... 71 67
Adam Hadwin ..................................... 71 67
Brendan Steele ................................... 67 71
Danny Lee ........................................... 73 65
Harold Varner III ................................. 72 67
Branden Grace .................................... 72 67
Jazz Janewattananond ...................... 70 69
Kevin Na ............................................. 66 73
Scott Brown ....................................... 70 69
Poom Saksansin ................................. 65 74
Wesley Bryan ..................................... 71 68
Gary Woodland ................................... 66 73
Ollie Schniederjans ............................ 72 68
Luke List ............................................. 70 70
David Lipsky ....................................... 69 71
Davis Love III ...................................... 67 73
Paul Casey .......................................... 77 63
C.T. Pan ............................................... 70 70
Jamie Lovemark ................................. 70 70
Stewart Cink ...................................... 72 68
Anirban Lahiri .................................... 67 73
Camilo Villegas .................................. 72 68
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
131 -13
132 -12
135 -9
135 -9
135 -9
136 -8
137 -7
138 -6
138 -6
138 -6
138 -6
138 -6
138 -6
138 -6
139 -5
139 -5
139 -5
139 -5
139 -5
139 -5
139 -5
139 -5
140 -4
140 -4
140 -4
140 -4
140 -4
140 -4
140 -4
140 -4
140 -4
140 -4
LPGA Tour
KEP HANABANK CHAMPIONSHIP
At Sky 72 Golf Club (Ocean Course)
In Incheon, South Korea
Purse: $2 million; Yardage: 6,316; Par: 72
SECOND ROUND
Angel Yin ...........................................
In Gee Chun ........................................
Jin Young Ko ......................................
Sung Hyun Park .................................
Seon Woo Bae ...................................
Ji-Hyun Kim .......................................
Marina Alex .......................................
Cristie Kerr ........................................
Lizette Salas ......................................
Chella Choi .........................................
Min-Sun Kim ......................................
Minjee Lee .........................................
Brooke M. Henderson ........................
Lexi Thompson ..................................
68 65
70 65
68 67
66 69
69 67
68 68
67 69
67 69
67 69
67 70
66 71
66 71
71 67
69 69
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
133 -11
135 -9
135 -9
135 -9
136 -8
136 -8
136 -8
136 -8
136 -8
137 -7
137 -7
137 -7
138 -6
138 -6
BI BB SO AVG
0 1 2 .333
0 1 1 .333
0 1 3 .000
0 0 0
--0 0 2 .000
0 0 1 .250
0 0 2 .000
1 0 2 .500
0 0 0 .000
0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 .000
1 3 14
—
HOUSTON
AB
Springer cf......................3
Reddick rf .......................4
Altuve 2b........................4
Correa ss ........................4
Gonzalez lf .....................3
Gurriel 1b .......................3
Beltran dh ......................3
Bregman 3b ....................3
McCann c ........................3
TOTALS
30
R
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
H
0
0
3
1
0
1
0
1
0
6
BI BB SO AVG
0 1 2 .000
0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 .750
1 0 1 .250
0 0 0 .000
1 0 0 .333
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .333
0 0 1 .000
2 1 5
—
NEW YORK .................000
HOUSTON ...................000
000 001 —
200 00X —
1
2
5
6
0
1
E: Altuve (1). LOB: New York 7, Houston 5. HR: Bird (1),
off Giles.
NEW YORK
IP
H R ER BB SO ERA
Tanaka .............................6 4 2 2 1 3 3.00
Green ...............................2 2 0 0 0 2 0.00
HOUSTON
IP
Keuchel ............................7
Devenski .......................0.1
Giles ..............................1.2
H
4
0
1
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 10 0.00
0 0 1 0 0.00
1 1 1 4 5.40
WP: Keuchel (1-0); LP: Tanaka (0-1); S: Giles (1). Inherited runners-scored: Giles 1-0. WP: Tanaka, Giles. T:
3:20. A: 43,116 (42,060).
H OC K E Y
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
METROPOLITAN
W
Washington .................... 3
Columbus ........................ 3
New Jersey ..................... 3
Pittsburgh ....................... 2
Philadelphia .................... 2
Carolina ........................... 1
N.Y. Islanders ................. 1
N.Y. Rangers ................... 1
L
1
1
1
2
2
0
2
4
OL PTS.
1
7
0
6
0
6
1
5
0
4
1
3
1
3
0
2
GF
21
11
18
16
13
6
10
11
GA
14
7
11
22
13
6
14
18
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay ...................... 3
Toronto ........................... 3
x-Detroit ......................... 3
Florida ............................. 2
x-Ottawa ......................... 1
Boston ............................. 1
Montreal ......................... 1
Buffalo ............................ 0
L
1
1
1
1
0
2
3
3
OL PTS.
0
6
0
6
0
6
0
4
2
4
0
2
0
2
1
1
GF
18
22
12
13
8
7
5
9
GA
15
16
9
11
9
13
13
18
CENTRAL
W
St. Louis .......................... 4
Chicago ........................... 3
x-Colorado ....................... 3
Winnipeg ........................ 2
Nashville ......................... 2
Minnesota ....................... 1
Dallas .............................. 1
L
1
1
1
2
2
1
3
OL PTS.
0
8
1
7
0
6
0
4
0
4
1
3
0
2
GF
17
23
15
14
13
11
8
GA
14
12
9
17
14
11
12
PACIFIC
W
x-Vegas ........................... 3
x-Calgary ......................... 3
Los Angeles .................... 2
x-Anaheim ...................... 2
Vancouver ....................... 1
San Jose .......................... 1
Edmonton ....................... 1
Arizona ........................... 0
L
0
1
0
1
1
2
2
3
OL PTS.
0
6
0
6
1
5
1
5
1
3
0
2
0
2
1
1
GF
9
12
9
10
7
7
7
9
GA
4
9
5
11
9
11
8
16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
x-Late game
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
at Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 4
at Florida 5, St. Louis 2
at Nashville 4, Dallas 1
Minnesota 5, at Chicago 2
Winnipeg 4, at Vancouver 2
Detroit 4, at Arizona 2
at San Jose 3, Buffalo 2
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
Washington 5, at New Jersey 2
at Columbus 3, N.Y. Rangers 1
Anaheim at Colorado, Late
Ottawa at Calgary, Late
Detroit at Vegas, Late
Washington at Philadelphia, 7
Florida at Pittsburgh, 7
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 7
Carolina at Winnipeg, 7
Toronto at Montreal, 7
New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Colorado at Dallas, 8
Columbus at Minnesota, 8
Nashville at Chicago, 8:30
Boston at Arizona, 9
Calgary at Vancouver, 10
Ottawa at Edmonton, 10
N.Y. Islanders at San Jose, 10:30
Buffalo at Los Angeles, 10:30
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Boston at Vegas, 7
Buffalo at Anaheim, 9
N.Y. Islanders at Los Angeles, 10:30
MONDAY’S GAMES
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 7:30
Blue Jackets 3, Rangers 1
N.Y. RANGERS ......................... 1
COLUMBUS .............................. 0
0
1
0 —
2 —
1
3
DOUBLES — SEMIFINALS
Chan Hao-ching and Yung-jan (1), Taiwan, def. Eri
Hozumi and Miyu Kato (4), Japan, 6-1, 6-7 (7-5), 10-2.
Scoring: 2, Columbus, Jones 1 (Wennberg, Werenski),
19:14.
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Rangers, Hayes 1, 14:35.
SECOND PERIOD
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Columbus, Panarin 1 (Jones, Werenski), 7:25.
4, Columbus, Sedlak 1 (Murray), 19:54.
SHOTS ON GOAL
At Tips Arena Linz; In Linz, Austria
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
PGA Tour
H
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
5
FIRST PERIOD
GENERALI LADIES LINZ
GOLF
R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
DOUBLES — QUARTERFINALS
Monique Adamczak, Australia, and Chang Kai-chen,
Taiwan, def. Desirae Krawczyk, United States, and
Giuliana Olmos, Mexico, 6-4, 4-6, 10-3.
CHAMPIONSHIP
SATURDAY’S MATCH
Portland vs. North Carolina, 4:30
NEW YORK
AB
Gardner lf .......................3
Judge rf ..........................3
Sanchez c .......................3
Romine c.........................0
Gregorius ss ...................4
Castro 2b ........................4
Hicks cf...........................4
Bird 1b ............................4
Holliday dh .....................3
Ellsbury ph-dh ................1
Frazier 3b .......................3
TOTALS
32
SATURDAY’S GAMES
WTA
D.C. United at Portland, 7:30
Atlanta United FC at New York, 5
Columbus at Orlando City, 5
Montreal at Toronto FC, 5
New York City FC at New England, 5
Philadelphia at Chicago, 5
Dallas at Seattle, 7:30
Houston at Sporting KC, 7:30
Minnesota United at Los Angeles, 7:30
Real Salt Lake at Colorado, 7:30
San Jose at Vancouver, 7:30
SEMIFINALS
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Boston at Cleveland, 8
Houston at Golden State, 10:30
NEW YORK
Beasley
Lee
Kanter
Hardaway Jr.
Sessions
McDermott
Baker
O'Quinn
Hernangomez
Thomas
Dotson
Jack
Kuzminskas
Kornet
TOTALS
At Qizhong Tennis Center; In Shanghai
Purse: $6.52 million (Masters 1000)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
TIANJIN OPEN
REGULAR SEASON
WASHINGTON
Porter Jr.
Smith
Gortat
Beal
Frazier
Oubre Jr.
Satoransky
Mahinmi
McCullough
Felix
Meeks
Scott
Young
TOTALS
SHANGHAI MASTERS
SUNDAY’S MATCHES
NWSL playoffs
SUNDAY’S GAMES
No games scheduled.
Washington ........................ 26
New York ............................ 26
ATP
New York at D.C. United, 4
Chicago at Houston, 4
Colorado at Seattle, 4
Columbus at New York City FC, 4
Los Angeles at Dallas, 4
Minnesota United at San Jose, 4
New England at Montreal, 4
Orlando City at Philadelphia, 4
Sporting KC at Real Salt Lake, 4
Toronto FC at Atlanta United FC, 4
Vancouver at Portland, 4
x-Late game
MONDAY’S GAMES
No games scheduled.
ARMY NAVY
041
002
AVG
.143
.167
.211
.150
.211
.176
.143
--.667
--.333
.000
--.000
.000
--.000
--.500
—
EASTERN CONFERENCE
PASSING
LOCAL GOLF
BI BB SO
0 0 2
0 2 1
1 1 1
0 1 3
2 2 1
0 2 0
0 0 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
4 1 1
0 0 1
0 0 0
0 0 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
7 9 12
WP: Duensing, (1-0); LP: Scherzer, (0-1); S: Davis, (3).
Edwards pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scored: Strop 1-0, Montgomery 1-1,
Quintana 1-1, Davis 2-0, Madson 2-1. HBP: Scherzer
(Jay). WP: Gonzalez 2, Montgomery. PB: Wieters (1).
T: 4:37. A: 43,849 (41,418).
BASKETBALL
SATURDAY’S GAMES
No games scheduled.
Clemson: Cain 7-55, H.Renfrow 5-64, McCloud 4-23,
Richard 3-41, Rodgers 1-13, Overton 1-6, Thompson 1-2.
Syracuse: Ishmael 6-73, Philips 4-94, Pierce 4-66,
D.Strickland 2-20, Devin Butler 2-10, Custis 1-15,
Perkins 1-0.
BI BB SO AVG
1 0 1 .273
0 0 0
--1 0 1 .200
1 0 1 .200
0 2 0 .214
0 1 0 .333
0 1 0 .235
4 1 1 .222
0 1 2 .167
0 0 2 .000
0 0 1 .000
0 0 0
--0 0 0
--0 0 0
--0 0 0
--0 0 0 .200
0 0 0
--0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
7 6 9
—
E: Wieters 2 (2). LOB: Chicago 9, Washington 13. 2B:
Jay (2), Bryant (2), Russell 2 (2), Werth (1), Harper (1),
Murphy (1). HR: Murphy (1), off Hendricks; Taylor (2),
off Hendricks. RBI: Jay (1), Bryant (2), Rizzo (6), Russell 4 (4), Harper (3), Murphy 2 (2), Taylor 4 (8). SB:
Turner (1). SF: Harper.
DP: Chicago 1 (Baez, Russell, Rizzo).
CHICAGO
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Hendricks.....................4 9 4 4 1 7 81 3.27
Duensing ..................0.2 0 0 0 1 1 19 0.00
Strop ............................1 0 1 1 1 1 16 2.70
Montgomery.............0.1 2 1 1 2 0 14 27.0
Edwards.......................0 0 1 1 1 0
5 23.1
Quintana ..................0.2 1 0 0 1 0 12 0.00
Davis ........................2.1 2 1 1 2 3 44 4.15
NBA preseason
Clemson: Etienne 5-68, Feaster 7-57, Choice 3-12,
Rodgers 1-(minus 6), K.Bryant 4-(minus 8), Cooper
5-(minus 10). Syracuse: D.Strickland 19-78, Dungey
21-61, Neal 3-23, Perkins 2-7, Philips 1-4, Mahoney
1-(minus 2), (Team) 3-(minus 9).
RECEIVING
CHICAGO....................... 102
WASHINGTON.............. 040
H
2
0
1
0
1
1
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
9
Astros 2, Yankees 1
SINGLES — QUARTERFINALS
Mihaela Buzarnescu, Romania, def. Belinda Bencic,
Switzerland, 6-4, 5-7, 7-6 (7-4); Viktorija Golubic,
Switzerland, def. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-3, 6-1;
Barbora Strycova (2), Czech Republic, def. Tatjana Maria
(7), Germany, 6-1, 6-3; Magdalena Rybarikova (1),
Slovakia, def. Sorana Cirstea (5), Romania, 5-7, 6-2, 6-1.
DOUBLES — QUARTERFINALS
Natalia Dzalamidze, Russia, and Xenia Knoll, Switzerland, def. Nadiia Kichenok, Ukraine, and Anastasia
Rodionova (4), Australia, 6-3, 6-2.
N.Y. RANGERS ....................... 11
18
9 — 38
COLUMBUS ............................ 13
12
18 — 43
Power-play opportunities: N.Y. Rangers 0 of 4; Columbus
0 of 3. Goalies: N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 1-3-0 (42
shots-40 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 3-0-0 (38-37). A:
15,342 (18,500). T: 2:28.
Wild 5, Blackhawks 2
Late Thursday
MINNESOTA ............................ 0
CHICAGO .................................. 0
AU TO R AC I NG
1
0
4 —
2 —
5
2
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Minnesota, Staal 2 (Coyle), 19:25.
NASCAR Cup
THIRD PERIOD
SCHEDULE-WINNERS
Scoring: 2, Chicago, Hartman 2 (Kero, Kane), 8:21. 3,
Minnesota, Stewart 3 (Zucker), 10:32. 4, Minnesota,
Zucker 2 (Reilly, Cullen), 12:29 (pp). 5, Minnesota,
Stewart 4 (Spurgeon, Ennis), 15:56. 6, Minnesota, Koivu
2 (Quincey, Eriksson Ek), 17:59. 7, Chicago, Toews 3
(Forsling, Hartman), 19:04 (pp).
Feb. 19: x-Advance Auto Parts Clash (Joey Logano)
Feb. 23: x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 1 (Chase Elliott)
Feb. 23: x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 2 (Denny Hamlin)
Feb. 26: Daytona 500 (Kurt Busch)
March 5: Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500 (Brad Keselowski)
March 12: Kobalt 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
March 19: Camping World 500 (Ryan Newman)
March 26: Auto Club 400 (Kyle Larson)
April 2: STP 500 (Brad Keselowski)
April 9: O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
April 24: Food City 500 (Jimmie Johnson)
April 30: Toyota Owners 400 (Joey Logano)
May 7: GEICO 500 (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
May 13: Go Bowling 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
May 20: x-Monster Energy Open (Daniel Suarez)
May 20: x-Monster Energy NASCAR All-Star Race (Kyle
Busch)
May 28: Coca-Cola 600 (Austin Dillon)
June 4: AAA 400 Drive for Autism (Jimmie Johnson)
June 11: Pocono 400 (Ryan Blaney)
June 18: FireKeepers Casino 400 (Kyle Larson)
June 25: Toyota/Save Mart 350 (Kevin Harvick)
July 1: Coke Zero 400 (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
July 8: Quaker State 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
July 16: New Hampshire 301 (Denny Hamlin)
July 23: Brickyard 400 (Kasey Kahne)
July 30: Overton’s 400 (Kyle Busch)
Aug. 6: I Love New York 355 at The Glen (Martin Truex
Jr.)
Aug. 13: Pure Michigan 400 (Kyle Larson)
Aug. 19: Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race (Kyle Busch)
Sept. 3: Bojangles’ Southern 500 (Denny Hamlin)
Sept. 9: Federated Auto Parts 400 (Kyle Larson)
Sept. 17: Tales of the Turtles 400 (Martin Truex Jr.)
Sept. 24: ISM Connect 300 (Kyle Busch)
Oct. 1: Apache Warrior 400 (Kyle Busch)
Oct. 8: Bank of America 500 (Martin Truex Jr.)
Oct. 15: Alabama 500, Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 22: Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan.
Oct. 29: Old Dominion 500, Martinsville, Va.
Nov. 5: AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas
Nov. 12: Can-Am 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 19: Ford Ecoboost 400, Homestead, Fla.
x-non-points race
SHOTS ON GOAL
MINNESOTA ............................ 8
9
17 — 34
CHICAGO .................................. 6
16
16 — 38
Power-play opportunities: Minnesota 1 of 4; Chicago 0 of
5. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 1-1-0 (38 shots-36
saves). Chicago, Crawford 3-1-0 (32-29). A: 21,386
(19,717). T: 2:33.
Jets 4, Canucks 2
Late Thursday
WINNIPEG ............................... 1
VANCOUVER ........................... 1
2
0
1 —
1 —
4
2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Vancouver, D.Sedin 1 (Boeser, Vanek), 7:25
(pp). 2, Winnipeg, Morrissey 1 (Little, Trouba), 9:04.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Winnipeg, Laine 2 (Little, Kulikov), 15:31. 4,
Winnipeg, Myers 1 (Copp), 18:44 (sh).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Vancouver, C.Tanev 2 (Gagner), 12:43. 6,
Winnipeg, Ehlers 4, 19:55.
SHOTS ON GOAL
WINNIPEG ............................... 9
6
5 — 20
VANCOUVER ........................... 8
12
12 — 32
Power-play opportunities: Winnipeg 0 of 2; Vancouver 1
of 5. Goalies: Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 2-0-0 (32 shots-30
saves). Vancouver, Markstrom 1-1-1 (19-16). A: 15,589
(18,910). T: 2:31.
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
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apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
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washingtonpost.com/pets
Student Desk & Chair—$55 24x42
top with drawers, v/good cond.
roller chair, 301-345-1693
Collectibles
AURORA SLOT CARS Wanted—$100 &
up, cars/sets. + Atlas, AFX, Tyco,
Cox, Revell, AMT. 703-960-3594
Clothing, Shoes
& Accessories
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
255
Virgin Hair Bundles—97.00 GRAND
OPENING for Hair over Heels virgin
hair. www.shophairoverheels.com
Heavy Duty Electric Motors—$70,
Hyattsville, MD, 301-322-6449Two,
NEW 1/2 hp, used 1/6 hp.
Women's Thigh high Boots—$125,
Hyattsville, MD, 301-322-6449NEW,
black suede size 11
John Deere Gator 825i ( 2013 )
2013 John Deere Gator 825i, 4X4,
420 hours. Asking $3645.
Call or text : (804) 293-5595
275
Firewood
FIREWOOD SALES, seasoned Oak,
$350/full cord. Delivered. NOVA.
Robert 703-424-4064 or 703-855-4691
Crafts & Hobbies
260
Furniture
BUNKBED—$185 Solid Dark Wood,
W/mattress, vgood cond. deliv for
$20 in DC area, 301-345-1693
WALDORF, MD- Liv room furn & more!
exc cond. Leather/fabric set. $1K ea
set OBO. Mercedes 2005 Benz E320
98K mi. $8,799 OBO 202-553-7522
Aquarium—$225, wheaton, MD, 240- 265
671-4352
Home & Garden
350
Merchandise Wanted
Mount Rainer(20712) - 28 homes,
toys clothes, furn, household items
and more! 10/14 7AM-3PM
3202 Sheperd St (336)473-8525
Musical Instruments
Electric Organ— Beautiful Wood case
organ. Needs repair. $200, 703-4766460. Herndon, VA
291
Garage Sales, MD
CITY WIDE YARD SALE!
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266
Will Come to you!
280
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them 240
away. Call 571-830-5871
Clothing, Shoes
& Accessories
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
BRICK—$249 550 New 10 Hole Bldg
Size, less or more if need (apprx
1500) .45 each, 301-345-1693
Yard Sale—5 Sa-Sun 8-1, Oct 14-15,
kids & wmn Cls,11004 Burywood Ln,
Reston, VA 20194.
ROCKVILLE - Sat 10/14, 9am-4pm.
4415 Judith Street. Furniture,
knick-knacks, China, etc
355
Sporting Goods
& Services
Garage Sales, VA
Burke—Special Treasures Sale! Sat
GOLF CLUB SET—$45 Set of clubs
with Spalding Bag, wood drivers,
also have golf shoes,301-345-1693
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$195
Great cardio workout, easy fold up;
Exc Cond, $800 new, 571-606-0319
POOL TABLE/PING PONG TABLE $600. New cond. King size bed /
wall unit, dresser w/mirror. $1200
without dresser, $1400 w dresser
Call 301-651-1553 or 301-505-3717
10/14, Good Shepherd Church, 9350
Braddock Rd, 9-2. Toys, housewares,
furniture, books, sports & more!
Falls Church—Clothes Galore
7138 Noland Rd, Falls Church, VA,
10/14, 8 am-2 pm, 703-876-6209
Electronics
Estate Sales
Antiques & Auctions
205
205
Antiques
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
Antiques
KENSINGTON
ANTIQUE ROW
Antiques & Specialty Shops
Antique & Vintage Furniture.
Lighting, Jewelry, Art, Linens,
China, Silver, Mirrors, Books...
Multi-Dealer Mall B Stay 4 Lunch
Home delivery
is convenient.
KensingtonAntiqueRow.com
1-800-753-POST
SF
E. Howard Ave., Kensington,
MD N. on Conn., R. on Howard,
2 mi. N of Beltway (I-495)
Free Parking!
www.FOURSALES.com
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
Need a Quality Sale? 703-256-8300
Weightlifting Equipment—$200 Fair$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
275
Merchandise Wanted
FREON WANTED—Old R-12 collecting
dust? We buy cylinders & cans of
R-12! EPA Certified. (312) 291-9169
www.RefrigerantFinders.com
fax, VA, 703-203-1618 text e-mail
address for list and pictures
345
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS - Huge MultiFamily Yard/Bake Sale at 3526 Mass.
Ave. NW. Sat. 10/14, 10-2pm. Furniture, Linens, Household, Toys, Books
and more. GREAT DEALS! Everything
must go. RAIN OR SHINE.
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
350
Radio tubes—WANTED ham radios
huge speakers tube hif amps 202
527 9501, vcvdc@msn.com
RECORDS - I pay cash for
50s, 60s, & 70s .
Categories: Jazz, Soul, R&R, R&B.
Call 703-865-6050.
Garage Sales, D.C.
Garage Sales, MD
BETHESDA- 8107 Thoreau Dr. Sat
10/14, 7:30a-11:30a, Multi-Family,
PEO yard sale, all proceeds for
Women's education.
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
360
610
Estate Sales
SW DC - 1308 4th st. Sat.-Sun.
10/14, 15, 9am-5pm.Furn., artwork
, china, silver, antique dolls.
416
Tickets, Wanted
REDSKINS, WIZARDS, CAPS
Season Tickets Wanted.
Buying all locations. Top $ paid.
Please call 1-800-786-8425
601
Alexandria, VA- 7300 Park Terrace Dr.
Fri-Sun, 10-3. Full house sale.
www.caringtransitionsnova.com
for pics and details.
CENTREVILLE, VA- 60 yrs accm., art
deco, "waterfall" BR set, depression glass, crystal, wrought iron
outdoor furn., BR furn., solid cherry DR set, antique jewelry, vintage
kit., lawn tools, vint. clothing, vint.
linens, much, much more! Fri Oct.
13th by appt only,
Call 703-209-7312 or 757-5618112, Sat Oct 14th, 8am-4pm,
1336 Sleek Woodruff Ln.
KENSINGTON, MD (20895) - 10001
Crestwood Rd. Fri-Sat 10/13-10/14
10AM-3PM. Antiques, sterling, silver
artwork and rugs. 301-593-5433
FREE UNDER $250
Dogs for Sale
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES
11 weeks, Red Tri and black bi, S/W.
registrable, $700-$750
Call Jim 540-371-6939
Belgian Malinois Puppies - 9 weeks,
AKC, family, home protection, world
shenkin lines, vaccinated, $1500
571-643-2107
BOSTON TERRIER PUPPIESAKC reg., 3 Males, S&W, 15
weeks, parents on prem. $550
each. Call 240-346-7818
Dobes, Yorkies & more—PUPPY SALE
304-904-6289,Cash,CC,EasyFinance
wvpuppy.com 59 East Rd Martinsburg,WV.exit16E.AcrossFromBigLots
Lost
ENGLISH BULLDOGS, M's, AKC,
Fat, Sassy, Lots of Wrinkles, S
& W, Health Guaranteed, Family
Raised, $1800+, Call or Text For
More Info. rdy 10/14 240-925-1545
CAT- Lost 1 yr ago- Burke/Fairfax
area. Female, 3 yrs old, Silver/grey
marble Tabby. Believe she's in
someone's home. 703-627-5651
602
ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES- Cute,
cuddly & wrinkly, ready now, call
for price. S&W, vet checked
Call 814-793-2008
Found
FAIRFAX CO. ANIMAL SERVICES
AM STAFF F BLK/W
FFX CO
CHIHUA MIX, SH F TN
FFX CO
ALASK HUSK MIX M BLK/W FFX CO
PUG MIX M BRDL
FFX CO
BOXER MIX M BRDL/W
FFX CO
CHIHUA MIX, LH M BLK/W
FFX CO
PLOTT HOUND MIX M BRDL FFX CO
DSH MIX U BR
FFX CO
DSH MIX (M & F) BR/GRAY
FFX CO
CONURE U GR/RED
FFX CO
FOR MORE INFO CALL (703) 830-1100
HOWARD CO. ANIMAL CONTROL
If you have lost an animal in the
Howard County/
Washington Metro area:
CALL 410-313-2780
GERMAN SHEPHERD WORKING
LINE PUPPIES- 6 F's, blk & sable,
ready 10/16. vt chkd, UTD shts,
hlth guar., $1,800. World class
ped., AKC reg. 301-956-4635
Havanese,Morkies,more—Best Prices
304-904-6289,Cash,CC, EasyFinance
wvpuppy.com 59 EastRd MartinsburgWV exit16E AcrossFrom Big Lots
610
Dogs for Sale
LAB PUPPIES - AKC, FC champion
line, yellow & choc females,
shots,dewormed. Vet checked, POP.
crate trained $600+ 540-582-5769
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
LAB PUPS- AKC, Yellow Females,
Ready 10/20. Deposit. S&W, health
guar. Convenient to I 95 VA.
$750. Call 804-994-3171
620
MORKIES (MALTESE & YORKIE)- 9wks,
M & F, very tiny, shots, wormed,
fluffy love, paper trained, $300-$400
Call 240-743-9300
POMSKY PUPS( HUSKY/POMERANIAN) raised with love & care, $750,
OBO, (must sell due to owner's
health) 12 weeks Call 804-457-2139
after 8 pm
Poodle, Standard - AKC—M/F, 4 mths.
Vet. Cert., current shots wormed.
Champion pedigree. Family raised.
House trained. $850 727-742-8759
ShiChon—Teddybear Puppies- DC's
Fav family puppy. 5year Health
Warr/Vet ck, Local In home breeder
,raised with TLC. 9/10wks $750&850
703-577-1069
www.DCDogFinders.com
Shih Tzu/Bichon—Adorable Shichon
Teddybears! Raise with TLC
703-577-1069 $750 9wks Vet check
www.DCDogFinders.com
Yorkie—$1100, 8 weeks ready to go.
4 boy litter, shots, tails/dew claws
docked. CKC. Lovely little teddy
bears. Parents here. 304-620-8390.
JACK RUSSELL PUPS - Smooth,
Broken & rough NKC reg $800. S/W.
Ready now. Donna 301-751-0892
djackrussells@gmail.com
Yorkshire Terrier—$1200, Female, 8
months, vaccines UTD, registered,
comes w/everything, 301-467-1921
C
Cats
Persian—Registered. 2 males,
9 weeks old. Very friendly! Home
raised. Litter boxed trained.
$600, 703-232-3778
Adopt Cats
4Paws—Adopt fr 20+ cat/
kitten $v Sun 1-4 Sterling
Petco www.fourpaws.org
571-434-6562 CFC34517
LAB RET/GOLDEN RET CROSS& AKC
GOLDEN PUPS & ADULTS
8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543 640
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
SHIH TZU POODLE MIX PUPS & TOY
POODLE PUPS- Shots, wormed, mother & father on premises. Mix 11 wks
old. Toys ready 10/14. 540-406-0740
MONTGOMERY CO. ANIMAL SHELTER
If you have lost an animal in the
Washington Metro area: Please call
the Montgomery Co. Animal Shelter
at 240-773-5960 or online for found
animals at www.mchumane.org
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
622
Vienna, VA
Fri & Sat 10-3.
288 Windover Ave
The first of 2 great sales.
See estatesales.net
Encore Estate Sales 703-922-6260
Stratford Landing—Community
Yard Sale Londonderry & Camden,
Alexandria, VA, 10/14, 8am-12pm
www.stratfordlanding.org/aboutslca
Virginia Beach—2405 Strawflower
Ct, 23453. 10/12/2017. 1999 WinAluminum Extension Ladder (20 ft.)—
nebago Minnie Winnie 619-981-7635
$65, Burke, VA, 703-978-2723
SCUBAGEAR Large—$249
Wetsuit,Fins,Gloves,Boots,Mask/Snrkl, 360
Wght belt/wghts, 301-345-1693
Men's White Pants— $15, Hyattsville, Therapy Lamp—$39.99 NatureBright FIREWOOD—$240, fairfax, VA, 703297-6936 1 cord of seasoned hardMD, 301-322-6449NEW, Izod 36 x
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $39.99,
2858 N SEMINOLE TRL, MADISON, VA
wood
firewood.
Free
delivery
32 with tags.
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
LIVE ESTATE AUCTION SAT 9:30AM
Two Car Seats—39 Generic infant
$39 Graco child car seat,$49($79
See Web 4 Details.
both)Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
245
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
Suede Purses—$30, Hyattsville, MD,
301-322-6449NEW, twoBlack and
Red with straps.
237
COCA COLA COOLER STORE DISPLAY—65 inches tall coke bottle,
$49, Burke, VA, 703-455-8306
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
Birds & Other Animals
Canaries — Young singing canaries,
Buy a male $60 , get female FREE!
Mr.Domingo - 703-992-8468
C
JOBS
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
Great part-time
income opportunity!
Transportation
required.
To apply, go to
deliverthepost.com
or call
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(Please press “0”
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JOBS
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers
are needed to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Olney, Silver Spring
& Rockville, MD
Call Don Money at
301-674-0010
Wake up
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ATV
Our readers like to know the terrain of the fascinating
place they inhabit. The Washington Post Magazine is
their vehicle. Stories on destinations, people, and
windows on the local past get them thinking and get
them going. To great restaurants, too.
Meet the readers.
N2569 6x10.5
229
Appliances
KIRBY Generation Vacuum Cleaner—$135 Excel'nt Cond, HEPA filtration, Cost $1300. 571-606-0319
229
EZ
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
electric oven. GE four burner. Good
condition—$75.00, silver spring,
MD, 301-384-1855
225
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
the local expert
on local jobs
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
208
CLASSIFIED
D11
Cars
OPQRS
D12
BMW 2014 535i Individual- 17k mi.,
immaculate, warranty. Exclusive
Azurite blk w/Amaro Merino lthr,
nav., htd frnt/rear sts, power trunk,
$33,500. Mark 301-908-0045
CHEVROLET
CHEVROLET
2016
SONIC
LT
7K MILES**IMMACULATE
$9,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
CHEVROLET 2016 CRUZE LIMITED
IMMACULATE
$10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Chevrolet 2014 Camaro SS - $24,900
18,450 mi, garaged, blck, 6.2L V8, 6
SPD auto w/ tap shift & remote start.
Fully loaded. (571)-286-6161
CHEVROLET
2013
SONIC
LS
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$6,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
CHRYSLER
CHRYSLER 2015 200 LIMITED
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
CHRYSLER 2004 SEBRING CONV
80K MILES**IMMACULATE $4,395
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD
HONDA
HONDA
HONDA 2015 ACCORD SPORT
IMMACULATE
ONLY
$15,888
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HONDA
2010
INSIGHT
EX
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$6,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD
2014
FOCUS
SE
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$8,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2014 FUSION ENERGI- Fully
equip., 21k mi., exc. cond.,
$17,500 Call 703-759-5883 or
email dhall47@verizon.net
HONDA 2014 ACCORD SEDAN EX-L
Clean Carfax, 1 owner. Must see!
Landmark Honda
877-300-4382
HONDA 2014 CIVIC LX
1 owner, clean carfax. Must see!
Fairfax Honda
877-687-6563
HONDA 2015 CIVIC LX
1 owner, clean carfax. Must see!
Fairfax Honda
877-687-6563
VOLVO 2017 V60 PREMIER
Station wagon, like new. Call!
Fairfax Volvo/VW
877-687-6563
FORD
2013
FIESTA
SE
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$6,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
RosenthalAuto.com
FORD 2011 EDGE LIMITED 4X4
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HONDA
2013
CR-Z
MGER
SPECIAL
ONLY
$9,999
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
69
'08 370 Rinker - 1 owner, Low Hrs
Exc. Cond. Lift Slip kept, Outdrives & Boat bottom looks nearly
New. Lift Slip Opt'l. at South River
Marina, Edgewater 540-270-5403
HONDA 2014 CIVIC LX
Clean Carfax, 1 owner. Must see!
Landmark Honda
877-300-4382
FORD
2013
FOCUS
SE
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$7,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Ford 1955 Custom Line 2dr, no motor, $550 OBO
240-435-1094
Motorcycles
HARLEY 2001 SPORTSTER 883 12k miles, good condition, runs
good, silver, vance & hines pipe
$2800 OBO 703-304-4513
JAGUAR
INFINITI
INFINITI
2008
G37
CPE
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$12,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
INFINITI 2008 G35 X SDN AWD
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$8,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Wake up
to home delivery.
JAGUAR 2009 XK 2DR CONV
Clean Carfax, low miles. Call!
Jaguar Tysons
888-600-4487
NISSAN
Antiques & Classics
Bob Rosenthal's
Classic Car
Collection!
"I have been collecting cars for 70
years and it is now time to sell my
current collection for someone
else to enjoy!"
-Bob Rosenthal
RANGE ROVER 2014 SUPERCHRGD
Navigation, wood/lthr steering
wheel, soft close doors. Call!
Land Rover Chantilly 888-900-6946
NISSAN
2016
VERSA
1.6SV
IMMACULATE
ONLY
$9,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
All cars are in
excellent condition!
JAGUAR 2015 XF I4 PREMIUM
Nav, pwr sunroof & more. Call!
Jaguar Chantilly
888-900-6946
PONTIAC
RosenthalAuto.com
JAGUAR 2000 S Type- Seafrost.
Good condition. 60,000 miles
$18,000 703-758-1331
PONTIAC
2008
G6
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$4,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
SATURN
SATURN
2009
AURA
XE
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$6,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
TOYOTA
SF
MERCEDES
2008
C300
GARAGE
KEPT
ONLY
$10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
TOYOTA
2014
PRIUS
C
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
TOYOTA
2010
COROLLA
LE
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$7,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
1408
NISSAN
2016
SENTRA
SV
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
RANGE ROVER 2013 EVOQUE
Pure Premium 4WD, lthr. Must see!
Land Rover Tysons 888-600-4487
MERCEDES-BENZ
1-800-753-POST
MERCEDES-BENZ
MERCEDES-BENZ 2004 E500 4MATICAWD, 74,600 mi, silver ext, black
lthr, heat vent seats, Nav, sunroof,
Bose w/ 6CD, great snow driver,
Michelins, good cond, all records.
$7,200. DC, Call Zu 202-255-4370
HYUNDAI
HYUNDAI
2016
ELANTRA
SE
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$9,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HYUNDAI
2011
SONATA
SE
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$9,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD
2014
FUSION
SE
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Aviation, Boats, RVs
Motorcycles Directory
Power Boats
HONDA
2014
CIVIC
LX
SUPER
NICE
ONLY
$10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD
2015
FUSION
SE
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$11,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
CHRYSLER 2004 CONCORDE - automatic, 115k mi, MD Inspc, all power,
leathr int, AM/FM/CD, very good
condition $2,300 OBO 240-347-5362
1408
Antiques & Classics
WANTED VINTAGE SPORTS CARS &
CLASSICS, Especially Mercedes,
Porsche, Jaguar, Old Hot Rods and
Race Cars. Prefer Unrestored Car.
Call Bob 703-966-0122
1475
Commercial &
Specialized Vehicles
Ford 1934 Woody
$85,000
WHEEL CHAIR ACCESIBLE VANS
32 in stock. Starting at $7,000.
VA Dealer #12069.
1-800-420-6470
ASK FOR STEVE.
Ford 1936 Woody
$90,000
1480
Ford 1939 Woody
$75,000
Mercury 1941 Woody
$95,000
Ford 1946 Woody
$95,000
Ford 1947 Woody
$50,000
Mercury 1948 Woody
$95,000
Packard 1949 Station
$55,000
Plymouth 1950 Woody
$50,000
Please call (703)509-3600
for more information!
Trucks
DODGE 1990 150 POWER RAM - Blck,
approx 134,000 miles, 2nd owner,
tool chest incl, newly painted, excellent condition $7,000 202-832-1237
e-mail:
legalnotices@washpost.com
1490
Sports Utility Vehicles
FORD 2014 ESCAPE S FWD
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$11,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN 2012 ROGUE S FWD
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2013 EDGE LIMITED 4WD
LOADED
ONLY
$13,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN
2010
ROGUE
SE
IMMACULATE
ONLY
$8,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2012 ESCAPE LIMITED 4X4
LOW
MILES
IMMACULATE
ONLY
$10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2005 EDDIE BAUER
EXPLORER- 127k mi., excellent
condition, $5000 or best offer,
Call 301-908-8188
TOYOTA 1999 TACOMA Pre Runner
truck, Green, Driven daily, 295,000
miles, very good condition $3,000.
Call 703-580-6012
GMC
2005
YUKON
DENALI
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$8,999
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
1485
Vans
Chevrolet 2005 Uplander - White, 6 HONDA
2006
CR-V
EX
passenger, automatic, 50K miles, MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$7,995
Md. Inspected, Very good condition. Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
$4,100 call 240-876-0494
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
JEEP 2016 COMPASS SPORT FWD
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$12,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
SF
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
From dramas and musicals to standup and ballet, discover great ways to
save money, win tickets and have fun
at the theater.
Membership is rewarding.
202-334-7007
Sports Utility Vehicles
GMC
2008
ENVOY
SLT
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$8,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your
legal notice in the
Classified section:
Call:
1490
Chevrolet 1966 Impala - Convertible FORD 2015 ESCAPE S FWD JEEP 2016 COMPASS LATITUDE
327 engine, AC, White with Black SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$12,995 SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$12,995
Original Top, good condition, 1 Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422 Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
owner, $18,000 call (301) 733-2670
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you to the best
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C3748 6x10.5
10
SPONSORED BY CARS.COM
FORD
2016
FIESTA
SE
IMMACULATE
ONLY
$9,999
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD
2015
FOCUS
SE
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$9,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
S2930 6x2
BMW
EZ
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THE WASHINGTON POST . SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2017
Real Estate
DOUGLAS HILL FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Once a toolshed, but now a cool shed
Extra space may be as close as the back yard. 18
NEW GR AYSON MODEL
GR AND OPENING THIS WEEKEND
E XQU ISI T E S I NGL E -FA M I LY H OM ES I N T H E H E A RT OF B ET H ESDA
F ROM $1.35M | 301.978.3618 | L I V E A T B ET H ESDA M E W S W P.COM
5345 C A M BER L E Y A V EN U E , B ET H ESDA , MD 20814
Prices, terms, specifications and availability are subject to change without notice. See a Sales Manager for complete details.
MHBR # 3552
2
EZ
DC, Maryland & Virginia
trust McEnearney Associates
McEnearney.com
OPEN SUN 10/15, 1-4
RESTON, VA
Spectacular 5,000+ SF home. Soaring ceilings,
sparkling water views. 5 BR, 4 BA, 2-car garage at
cul-de-sac’s end. 1486 Waterfront Rd | $1,448,500
Pat Buck 703.395.9625
OPEN SUN 10/15, 2-4
OCTOBER 14, 2017
ALEXANDRIA, VA
Secluded mid-century modern on two acres with
over 4,000 SF of finished area. 2-car garage
converted to studio. 1335 N Pegram St | $1,350,000
Paul Anderson 703.408.0676
OPEN SUN 10/15, 2-4
OPEN SUN 10/15, 2-4
ARLINGTON, VA
Spacious 1925, renovated, craftsman bungalow.
Family room opens to deck overlooking gorgeous
garden. 131 N Edgewood Street | $1,250,000
Anne Martone 703.717.6344
ARLINGTON, VA
OLD TOWN ALEXANDRIA, VA
KENSINGTON, MD
DC/WESLEY HEIGHTS
WOODBRIDGE, VA
DC/CLEVELAND PARK
ALEXANDRIA, VA
3,700+ SF of living space with 4 BR, 3.5 BA on
3 levels. Open floor plan, gleaming hardwoods,
large family room and kitchen. | $499,000
David Rainey 703.286.1333
2-BR, 1-BA bungalow in the heart of Del Ray.
Renovated kitchen with family room addition and
finished loft. 109 E Custis Avenue | $679,900
Jen Walker 703.675.1566
Meticulously maintained & beautifully updated
throughout, 4 BR, 2.5 BA, 2-car garage, gorgeous
back yard, great location! | $985,000
Kathy Byars 240.372.9708
Gorgeous & spacious 1-BR condo. Beautiful views
from private balcony. Delightful neighborhood shops, grocery, restaurants and more. | $379,000
Rina Kunk 202.489.9011
Vibrant Columbia Pike Corridor! 1-BR condo with
gorgeous kitchen & updated bath. Outdoor pool
& BBQ/picnic area. 3701 5th St S #505 | $195,000
Cindy Clemmer 703.966.0403
Terrific 2-bedroom + den with balcony at The
Foxhall, spacious floor plan, updated kitchen,
parking, storage. | $850,000
Katherine Martin 202.494.7373
Turn-key, light-filled, two-level end unit with 2 BR,
1.5 BA. Convenient location near bus routes, 395,
Mark Center, and Old Town. | $319,500
Joan Bready 703.220.7803
OPEN SUN 10/15, 2-4
OLD TOWN
ALEXANDRIA
Yates Gardens –
Quintessential Old
Town townhouse, SE
quadrant, 3 finished
levels, 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, lush tiered
garden, parking at
the door. 718 S Royal
Street | $829,000
Noel Kaupinen 703.200.1165
OPEN SUN 10/15, 2-4
ALEXANDRIA, VA
Impeccable all-brick home with NEW kitchen,
luxurious master BR, 5 BR, 3.5 BA, Juliet balcony.
In-law/au pair suite. 3643 Trinity Dr | $1,040,000
Waldi Crawford 703.629.5655
OPEN SUN 10/15, 2-4
ALEXANDRIA, VA
Renovated split-level on 2/3 acre. 4 BR, 3.5 BA, 3
fireplaces, bright sunroom, gourmet kitchen, great
room and rec room. 7213 Marine Dr | $899,000
Mary Ellen Rotondo 703.472.5454
OPEN SUN 10/15, 2-4
ALEXANDRIA, VA
Elegant home in Canal Way. Hardwood floors,
new kitchen, living room with elegant fireplace
and French doors to private patio. | $999,900
Sheila Molina 703.725.1056
. SATURDAY,
OPEN SUN 10/15, 2-4
ALEXANDRIA, VA
Heart of Del Ray charming Bungalow with 4
BR, 3 BA, finished basement and an extremely
walkable location. 8 W Uhler Avenue | $875,000
Sue & Allison Goodhart 703.362.3221
THE WASHINGTON POST
there when it counts
ALEXANDRIA, VA
Experience excellence and custom craftsmanship,
unmatched detail. 5 bedrooms, 5.5 baths. 0.50acre gorgeous lot. Swim year-round. | $2,595,000
Kristin Mango 571.276.0798
FALLS CHURCH, VA
Charm & sunlight fill this immaculate 3-BR, 2.5BA Tudor/Cape. Eat-in kitchen. Large living room
with fireplace. Big back porch. | $629,000
Robin Cale 703.598.4662
McLEAN, VA
Chesterbrook Woods. 1/2-acre cul-de-sac. Main
level BR & BA. Hardwoods. 6 BR, 4 BA. Master
suite with spacious sunroom. | $1,295,000
Renneye Pike 703.798.4089
POTOMAC, MD
Spacious 4 level home in outstanding condition, 4
BR, 2.5 BA, over 3000 sq ft of living space, large
lot, great location! | $625,000
Katherine Martin 202.494.7373
UNCOVER the Splendor of Southeast Living
Bringing a touch of luxury east of the river, offering expansive
OLD TOWN
ALEXANDRIA
Fabulous indoor/
outdoor living with
chef’s kitchen &
family room with
fireplace opening to
landscaped patio. 3
BR, 3.5 BA. Spa-like
master suite, sunny
roof deck & 2 parking
spaces. | $1,015,000
MaryAshley Rhule 860.214.7474
Serving the Washington, DC Metro Area since 1980.
DC-MD-VA 877.624.9322
ALEXANDRIA
Island Creek/
Kingstowne – Pristine
3-level, 3-BR, 2.5-BA
townhome. Garage,
deck, walk-out lower
level. Country kitchen
with island. Updated,
and fresh. Close to
shopping and major
transportation. |
$464,950
Peter Blann 703.201.7656
residences perfectly situated in an unbeatable location. Just minutes
from the Navy Yard, Eastern Market, and Capitol Hill there are no
shortages of things to DO!
2 Beds & 2.5 Baths starting at low $300’s
3 Beds & 2.5 Baths starting at high $300’s
3 Beds w/Den & 2.5 Baths starting at high $400’s
Exclusive Sales by Kirby Mitchell | 202.903.2200
themitchellgroup@mcenearney.com | woodcrestvillas.com
Buying New
3
EZ
Parklands
Townhouses o≠er luxe features at a low price
BY
D EBORAH K . D IETSCH
For Rick and Jennifer Rademacher, what
distinguishes the new Parklands townhouses from similar developments in Montgomery County with high-end features is the
base price tag: $569,900.
“We had been looking for a new house,
from Rockville to Germantown,” says Jennifer. “There’s a lot that came with this house,
and the price point was hugely attractive to
us.”
Long & Foster real estate agent Mike
Aubrey, who has sold six townhouses in the
Gaithersburg development so far, agrees.
“It’s impossible to get a house loaded up
with features for this asking price in Montgomery County,” says Aubrey, who has appeared on the HGTV shows “Power Broker,”
“Get It Sold” and “Real Estate Intervention.”
The 15-residence development by Craftmark Homes is next to the previously completed portion of Parklands and the Watkins
Mill community near the Metropolitan
Grove MARC station.
Standard features include Shaker-style
kitchen cabinets, stainless-steel appliances,
engineered hardwood flooring, quartz
countertops and a security system. Chrome
Delta faucets come with the kitchen and
bathrooms, and ceilings reach nine feet on
all levels. Coated glass in the windows to
prevent heat loss, high-efficiency water
heaters, heat-flow-resistant insulation in
walls and LED lighting are part of the
package to help homeowners save energy.
ready for immediate move-in, and three
more are scheduled to deliver in November
and December.
Schools: Brown Station Elementary,
Lakelands Park Middle and Quince Orchard
High.
To see more photos of Parklands, go to
washingtonpost.com/realestate.
Transportation: Nearby are Interstate
270 and the Metropolitan Grove MARC
station, which is connected to a Ride On bus
route and a future bus rapid transit line.
realestate@washpost.com
OCTOBER 14, 2017
Parks and amenities: Seneca Creek State
Park is nearby. The Parklands and Watkins
Mill community has its own tot lots, clubhouse, pool, exercise room and tennis court.
Shopping: Close to Parklands are Sam’s
Club, Costco and several shopping centers.
A grocery store and retail are planned for
the Watkins Mill Town Center, which is
within walking distance.
. SATURDAY,
bathroom and a utility room. At the rear of
this level is a rec room with windows and a
door leading to the back yard. This large
space can be converted into another bedroom or a home office. The Rademachers
use it as a second living-family room where
they can watch TV.
Design options at an added cost include
hexagonal and herringbone-patterned tile
instead of the standard subway tile for the
kitchen backsplash; a gas fireplace in the
living-family room; and a deck off the back
of the second floor. With these features and
an end-unit location, the home price can
reach into the $600,000s.
One townhouse, priced at $573,640, is
PARKLANDS
266 Caulfield Lane, Gaithersburg
Townhouses start at $569,900 and rise to
more than $600,000 for an end unit.
Builder: Craftmark Homes
Features: The three-story townhouses have
an open-plan layout on the second floor, with
the kitchen separating the living and dining
spaces. Two bedrooms and a hall bathroom
are at the front of the third level, and a
master suite with three closets occupies the
rear. The lowest level next to the garage
features a large room that can be used as
another bedroom, recreation space, a TV
lounge or a home office, with access to the
back yard.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 3/3
Square footage: 2,638
View model: Saturday and Sunday, 1 to
3 p.m. or by appointment
Contact: Mike Aubrey at 301-873-9807
or mike@mikeaubrey.com
THE WASHINGTON POST
Bay windows, roof gables: The
Rademachers were among the first to buy in
Parklands and moved in during July.
They bought an end unit for almost
$600,000 and chose the option of a full
bathroom on the ground level. “The open
plan and kitchen island are favorite features,” says Rick, 49, an accountant. “We like
to cook and eat, and we often have dinner at
the island.”
The Rademachers say they appreciate the
size of their townhouse. At 2,638 square
feet, “it feels like a single-family home,” says
Jennifer, 48, who works for a recruitment
firm.
“Another attractive feature for us was the
fact that the townhouses are 24 feet wide as
opposed to the 16-feet or 20-feet options we
saw in the other communities we visited,”
says Rick.
On the exterior, the three-story townhouses are clad in stone at the base and
brick on the upper two stories. Some have
bay windows and roof gables. From the
canopy-sheltered entrance, a staircase leads
to the completely open second floor. The
kitchen, with its 14-foot-long island, is
placed in the middle to separate the dining
area at the front from the living-family room
at the back. The adaptable level allows the
dining and living spaces to be flipped or
serve different uses altogether.
On the top floor, two bedrooms and a hall
bathroom are situated at the front, a laundry room is positioned in the middle, and a
master suite with three closets occupies the
rear.
Behind the two-car garage on the ground
floor is a mudroom, space for an optional
PHOTOS BY BENJAMIN C TANKERSLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: The 2,638-square-foot Parklands townhouses feel “like a single-family home,” says Jennifer Rademacher, a recent buyer.
BELOW: The kitchens come with a 14-foot-long island, Shaker-style cabinets, stainless-steel appliances and quartz countertops.
4
EZ
Move In Now
And Save
Thousands
Before
NOV
Now You See It.
Now It’s Home.
2017
15
VISIT TODAY AND TOUR YOUR NEW HOME.
BEFORE IT DISAPPEARS.
TIMBER LAKE
Final Opportunities — Only 2 Homes Remain!
Single Family Homes from the upper 1.4M’s
THE WASHINGTON POST
• Minutes from endless shopping, dining and
entertainment in Fairfax
For more information, Contact New Home Specialists
Amy Dooling and Dawn Martin.
(301) 273-7525 | NewHomes@whihomes.com
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
• Gorgeous wooded lots on a serene cul-de-sac
• Access to highly regarded Fairfax County schools
Choose Your Move-In-Ready Home
WinchesterHomes.com/TimberWP
11548 Northview Trail, Oakton, VA 22124 | Open daily from 11am to 6pm
Winchester Homes, Inc., A Member of the TRI Pointe Group. | 2015 BUILDER OF THE YEAR1 AND 2014 DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR 2. | Copyright ©2017 Winchester Homes Inc. All rights reserved.
The prices of our homes, included features, plans, specifications, promotions/incentives, neighborhood build-out and available locations are subject to change without notice. Stated dimensions, square footage and acreage are approximate and should not be used as a representation of any home’s or homesite’s precise or actual size, location or orientation. There is no guarantee that any particular homesite or home
will be available. No information or material herein is to be construed to be an offer or solicitation for sale. Not all features and options are available in all homes. Unless otherwise expressly stated, homes do not come with hardscape, landscape, or other decorator items. Community maps, illustrations, plans and/or amenities reflect our current vision and are subject to change without notice. Maps not to scale. Some
amenities may not yet be constructed. Builder reserves the right to change the size, design, configuration and location of amenities not yet constructed and does not warrant the suitability thereof for any use or for any person. There is no guarantee that any particular homesite, home or common area will offer a view or that any particular view will be preserved. Views may also be altered by subsequent development,
construction, and landscaping growth. Any photographs or renderings used herein reflect artists’ conceptions and are for illustrative purposes only. Photographs or renderings of people do not depict or indicate any preference regarding race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, handicap/physical disability, familial status, or national origin. A link to a third party website does not imply endorsement of that site nor any
ability to control that site’s privacy practices. Marketing promotions/incentives, if any, are subject to conditions or restrictions and are subject to change without notice. No warranty or guarantee is made regarding any particular area public school/school district or that any particular public school/school district will service any given community. Schools/school districts may change over time. Builder does not warrant
the suitability of any trail for any use or for any person. You must visit a Company New Home Gallery to purchase a home. Please consult a New Home Advisor for specific price and other information for each community. Please see the actual purchase agreement for additional information, disclosures, and disclaimers relating to any home, homesite and/or the features thereof. A Broker/Agent must register their client
in person on client’s first visit at each community for a Broker/Agent to receive a commission or referral fee, if available. Our name and the logos contained herein are registered trademarks of TRI Pointe Group, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries. Winchester is a registered trademark and is used with permission. © 2017 Winchester Homes Inc., a member of the TRI Pointe Group. All rights reserved. 1 BUILDER Magazine named
TRI Pointe Group the Builder of the Year in 2015. The Builder of the Year Award is BUILDER’S highest yearly honor. 2 Builder and Developer Magazine, a national homebuilding publication, named TRI Pointe the Developer of the Year in 2014.
5
EZ
New Homes and New Communities
MD
www.CalAtlanticHomes.com
MD
3,340 sq. ft.
2 BD/2.5BA
$1,940,000
Located in Anne Arundel County,
Harmans Ridge is an enclave of
luxurious single-family homes
with access to MD-100 and I-95
for commutes to employment
centers such as the NSA and
Fort Meade and 2.4 miles from
shopping and entertainment
at Arundel Mills. Visit today and
tour our Quick Move-In homes
and take advantage of our
Anniversary Sales Event!
This beautiful transitional home is
open, airy, with an incredible flow
of space. It has neutral tones with
a touch of quartz that really pops.
With seating for ten in the dining
room, and a space off the kitchen
for casual gatherings, it’s ideal for
entertaining. An extraordinary
owner’s suite and amazing
amenities, all waiting for you.
quarrysprings.com
6407 Summersweet Drive
Clinton, MD 20735
LAFAYETTE - Unit #154, 8101 River Rd
Bethesda, MD 20817
Quarry Springs
2,520 - 3,734 sq. ft.
4-5 Beds/2.5-4.5 Baths
From the upper $300s
4,630 sq. ft.
3BD/3.5BA
$4,090,000
The Vineyards features new
spacious single-family homes
with stunning architectural
features and interior finishes
designed for the way today’s
families live in a convenient
location accessible to shopping,
restaurants, Joint Base Andrews,
recreation and commuter
routes. Visit our model home
today and take advantage of
our Anniversary Sales Event!
Grand in size, stunning in design, and
with multiple spacious terraces, the
outdoor living is something special.
The family room is both beautiful and
functional, and you’ll lounge in the
sun room, flooded with light. Quarry’s
largest home is truly something to
take in.
quarrysprings.com
443-883-1762
GEORGETOWN - Unit #121, 8101 River Rd
Bethesda, MD 20817
301-683-5106
MD Enclave at Spa
1 Enclave Court
Annapolis, Maryland 21403
3,400 sq. ft.
3BD/3BA
$2,190,000
Up to 2,798 sq. ft.
3BR/2.5BA
Townhomes from the mid $400s
This stunning, spacious home
has simple, clean lines and a
magnificent modern feel. The
chef’s kitchen opens up to the
bright, airy family room, making
it a perfect place to entertain.
Breathtaking bedroom suites, spalike bathrooms, and over 600 sq. ft.
of terraces overlooking resort-like
grounds.
Enclave at Spa is your invitation
to an exceptional Annapolis
lifestyle. Close to the water and
historic downtown, these 3-story
townhomes feature 2-car garages
and spacious, open floor plans.
Breathe the Chesapeake air from
your optional rear deck or unwind
in your serene owner’s suite.
khov.com/EnclaveatSpa
301-683-6366
OCTOBER 14, 2017
301-683-5106
MD
301-683-5106
. SATURDAY,
quarrysprings.com
ADAMS - Unit # 143, 8101 River Rd
Bethesda, MD 20817
Quarry Springs
THE WASHINGTON POST
Quarry Springs
MD
2,310 - 2,933 sq. ft.
3-4 Beds / 2.5-4 Baths
From the upper $400’s
410-691-0295
The Vineyards
CalAtlanticHomes.com
MD
1606 Hekla Lane
Hanover, MD 21076
Harmans Ridge
6
EZ
Where We Live
Stone Ridge
Nice place
to be, once
you’re out
of the car
Loudoun neighborhood’s
residents say amenities make
the congestion endurable
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
L ESTER D AVIS
side of Loudoun County, Stone Ridge is a
3,700-home community that offers residents easy access to a variety of amenities,
including an amphitheater, miles of trails,
ball courts and a popular weekend farmers market next to the StoneSprings
Hospital Center, said Gina Tufano, an
agent with Pearson Smith Realty.
Tufano said that the area has exploded
with development in the past couple of
years, leaving residents with many retail
options. A number of recent infrastructure improvements are also helping to
ease the traffic burden, she said.
“Route 50 used to be a mess, but they
recently widened it and there are more
interchanges, which has greatly improved
traffic,” she said. “The people came before
the infrastructure was ready.”
Besides, the fact that Stone Ridge has
some of the lowest homeowners association fees — under $100 a month on
average — leads to increased spending
power for potential buyers, Tufano said.
Jill Parker, who moved four years ago
from Gainesville in Prince William County
to a 2,400-square-foot, four-bedroom,
three-bathroom house on Green Mountain Terrace, said that relocating to Stone
Ridge shaved time off her husband’s
commute to the District.
“I could see how some people might not
like the amount of traffic, but we were
about 15 miles further south, so we’re
happy,” said Parker, with a smile.
If Parker was smiling after her husband’s commutes were shortened about
30 minutes, Derek Torrance, who has lived
in Stone Ridge for 10 years, was downright
giddy about his time saved behind the
wheel.
He moved to Stone Ridge from Front
Royal and reduced a commute that
clocked in at an hour to less than 10
minutes.
“My life is so much nicer,” said Torrance,
who lives in a 1,550-square-foot, two-bedroom, two-bathroom condominium on
Cathedral Valley Square.
Living there: The neighborhood is
bordered to the north by Lee Jackson
Memorial Highway, to the south by Braddock Road, to the west by Lobo Drive and
to the east by Gum Spring Road.
In the past 12 months, 65 properties
Md.
Va.
Arcola
Dulles
Detail Airport
50
LE E
J AC
KS
ON
ME
MO
RIA
LH
Village
Center
D.C.
WY
STONE
RIDGE
BR
AD
DO
CK
RD
GUM SPRING RD
Plenty to do: Wrapped in the country-
PHOTOS BY JUSTIN T. GELLERSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
“There’s some stress associated with driving in and around Stone Ridge, but once you’re here it’s pretty relaxing, and traffic isn’t bad
on the weekends,” says Simeon Bush, a father of three. Highly rated public schools “definitely motivated me to move here,” he says.
B O DR
The fact that Alexis Moreno is not
looking to flee his “overcrowded” neighborhood of Stone Ridge in Loudoun
County, Va., is proof that this place, with
routine traffic congestion that tests the
resolve of the most battle-hardened of
steering-wheel-grippers, is well worth the
headache, he said.
“It’s a pretty cool place to live, with
great schools, and there are always exciting community events happening,” said
Moreno, who moved 12 years ago to a
3,500-square-foot, four-bedroom, fourbathroom single-family house on Mineral
Springs Circle in Stone Ridge.
“The place has just gotten so crowded
over the years. It can be a nightmare to get
to an entry or exit point,” he said.
Still, added Moreno, the upside of living
in Stone Ridge far exceeds any burdens
that result from an uptick in traffic.
Simeon Bush, who moved six years ago
to a 5,400-square-foot, five-bedroom,
four-bathroom Colonial on Olivine Place,
said that while Stone Ridge experiences its
fair share of traffic congestion, it’s nothing
like “the hustle and bustle of the D.C.
area.”
“There’s some stress associated with
driving in and around Stone Ridge, but
once you’re here it’s pretty relaxing, and
traffic isn’t bad on the weekends.”
Bush, who has three children, said he
also loved the fact that Stone Ridge
includes highly rated public schools,
which “definitely motivated me to move
here.”
LO
OCTOBER 14, 2017
BY
1/4 MILE
Source: maps4news.com/here
THE WASHINGTON POST
have sold in Stone Ridge, ranging from a
1,105-square-foot, two-bedroom, twobathroom condominium for $245,000 to a
6,275-square-foot, six-bedroom, six-bathroom traditional-style house for $810,000,
said Tufano of Pearson Smith Realty.
There are 22 homes for sale in Stone
Ridge, ranging from a 2,205-square-foot,
three-bedroom, three-bathroom condo To see more photos of Stone Ridge, go to
washingtonpost.com/realestate.
The community’s amenities include an
amphitheater, miles of trails, ball courts
and a popular weekend farmers market.
minium for $358,990 to a 5,218-squarefoot six-bedroom, five-bathroom traditional-style house for $744,000, Tufano
said.
Schools: Arcola Elementary, Mercer
Middle and John Champe High.
Transit: Stone Ridge is serviced by the
Dulles South commuter bus system and is
about 16 miles from the Wiehle-Reston
East Station on Metro’s Silver Line. The
community is also served by a network of
commuter buses operated by Loudoun
County Transit.
Crime: Since January, there have been
36 reports of theft, 15 assaults and one
vehicle theft in the area that includes
Stone Ridge, according to the Loudoun
County Sheriff ’s Office.
realestate@washpost.com
7
EZ
ColdwellBankerHomes.com
#1 Real Estate Brand Online* | Properties Marketed on up to 900 Websites | 110-Year Legacy
Washington, D.C. | 5/5.1 | $1,500,000
4609 Foxhall Crescent Northwest
Approximately 4,200 sq. ft. on 3 levels. Generous main
floor with 2 story foyer. 3 bedrooms with en suite baths on
2nd level. Walk-out lower level, flagstone patio, 2-car garage.
Washington, D.C. | 3/3.1 | $1,200,000
1405 5th Street Northwest
Spacious, light-filled home in Shaw. Large kitchen with
stainless steel appliances. Over-sized bay windows. Upper
level with 2 master suites, powder room.
Washington, D.C. | 5/3 | $1,149,000
4801 Brandywine Street Northwest
Located in AU Park, this classic home sits on a corner
lot. Den/office. Wood-burning fireplace, hardwood floors
throughout. In-law suite with partial kitchen, private entrance.
Bethesda, Maryland | 3/4.1 | $995,000
5618 Wood Way
Sumner Colonial on cul-de-sac. Renovated with quality
features. Gourmet kitchen, updated baths, floor-to-ceiling
Pella sliding doors. Finished lower level has Au Pair suite.
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 202.333.6100
Search DC10074609 on CBHomes.com
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 202.333.6100
Search DC10064154 on CBHomes.com
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 202.387.6180
Search DC10068083 on CBHomes.com
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 202.333.6100
Search MC10003781 on CBHomes.com
Open House
Extravaganza
This Weekend
Davidsonville, Maryland | 5/4.2 | $975,000
1100 Thomas Swann Lane
7,299 sq. ft. home on 3 acres. Renovated kitchen open to 2-story
great room, main-level owners suite, lower level rec room, gym,
theater. Easy D.C. commute. Blue Ribbon Public Schools.
To view open houses in your area,
visit ColdwellBankerHomes.com
Washington, D.C. | 3/2 | $949,500
529 7th Street Northeast
Classic porch-front Italianate facade Victorian. Separate living
and dining rooms. kitchen has additional family room. Large
backyard, possible off-street parking. Quiet street.
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 202.547.3525
Search DC10068245 on CBHomes.com
Mary Beth Paganelli 410.263.8686/Direct: 410.980.5812
Search AA10007601 on CBHomes.com
Clifton, Virginia | 4/4.1 | $924,000
7425 Dunquin Court
Well-maintained home on 5+ acres, near downtown Clifton.
Allows horses. Hardwood floors, open floor plan. Master suite
has sitting area, deck, his/her walk-in closets, vanities.
Annapolis, Maryland | 4/2.1 | $889,900
1303 Beachview Road
Custom-built contemporary in Fishing Creek Farms. Chef’s
kitchen with granite counter island. Bamboo floors. Master
suite retreat. Sun IPE deck, Zen garden. Winter water views.
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 202.333.6100
Search DC10068998 on CBHomes.com
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 202.547.3525
Search DC10070299 on CBHomes.com
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 703.938.5600
Search FX10066184 on CBHomes.com
Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 410.263.8686
Search A10070952 on CBHomes.com
C O N TAC T T H E AG E N T O R O F F I C E TO S C H E D U L E A N A PP O I N T M E N T TO TO U R O N E O F T H E F E AT U R E D P R O PE R T I E S .
*comScore, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 2016. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker United, REALTORS® are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company. The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but
not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. ©2017 Coldwell Banker Real Estate
LLC. All rights reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell
Banker Real Estate LLC.
150400BRK-4/17
Administered by American Home Shield
OCTOBER 14, 2017
Alexandria 703.518.8300 | Annapolis Church 410.263.8686 | Annapolis Plaza 410.224.2200 | Arlington Regional 703.524.2100
Bethesda Downtown 301.718.0010 | Capitol Hill 202.547.3525 | Dupont/Logan Circle 202.387.6180 | Fairfax 703.691.1400
Georgetown 202.333.6100 | Leesburg 703.771.8888 | North Potomac/Rockville 301.921.1040 | Potomac 301.983.0200
Prince William Parkway 703.763.1950 | Reston Town Center 703.471.7220 | Vienna 703.938.5600
. SATURDAY,
Washington, D.C. | 3/2 | $925,000
1811 Ontario Place Northwest, #3
Duplex condo with open layout. Light-filled aerie, multiple
exposures overlooking lush tree-lined streets. Storage and a
$282 condo fee. Convenient to Rock Creek Park and the Zoo.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Washington, D.C. | 3/3.1 | $929,000
3415 14th Street Northwest, #PH-4
Luxury Condo. Gourmet kitchen with high-end stainless steel
appliances and stone-enclosed island. Wet bar, wine chiller.
Front & rear roof deck, balcony. Video intercom.
8
EZ
Market Analysis
Mortgage fraud is on the increase, so it’s wise to get defensive
Fraud in connection with
home mortgages is on the
rise, ranging from little
white lies about the
intended use of the
property all the way up to
The
much more sophisticated
Nation's
schemes.
Housing
What, you ask, does this
have
to do with me? Maybe
KENNETH R.
more than you think,
HARNEY
especially if you end up on
the wrong end of it and
have no clue about what’s going on.
Overall fraud risk in the home mortgage
field is up by 16.9 percent in the most
recent 12-month period tracked by data
analytics firm CoreLogic. And of all types
of application fraud, the risk of what is
called “occupancy” misinformation —
where “applicants deliberately
misrepresent their intended use” of the
property — is rising the fastest. This
includes cases in which borrowers lie
about whether they intend to live in a
house or rent it out. (Applicants who
promise to live in the property generally
qualify for lower interest rates and down
payments; investors in rental homes get
charged more.)
Application fraud was found in 1 of
every 122 mortgage applications during
the first two quarters of 2017, according to
Bridget Berg, CoreLogic’s senior director of
fraud solutions strategy. During the same
period in 2016, 1 of every 143 loan
applications had signs of fraud. Among the
varied types of fraud tracked by Berg’s
company were misrepresentations on the
sources of down-payment money as well as
on income amounts and employment;
undisclosed debts; and games played with
appraisals.
Other companies that monitor
mortgage fraud confirm that fraud has
increased and may be headed in
worrisome directions. Mark Fleming, chief
economist for First American Financial,
says the recent massive hack of personal
data at credit bureau Equifax, where files
on 145.5 million consumers were accessed,
could open the door to far more sinister
forms of application fraud.
In an interview, Fleming told me that
given the unprecedented range and depth
of the information stolen in the Equifax
breach, “the risk of identity-based fraud
and misrepresentation is certainly
elevated. To the extent that more people
have their information out there,” the
greater the danger, he said.
That risk may be increased further by
the apparently slow-moving pace of many
American consumers to protect
themselves from mortgage and credit-card
fraud by freezing or locking down their
files at the three major credit bureaus —
Experian, Equifax and TransUnion — as
well at the fourth, smaller bureau, Innovis.
According to an estimate by one expert,
Avivah Litan of Gartner Research, only
about 2 to 3 percent of consumers have
freezes on their credit files, and only
around 5 percent ultimately may be jolted
into doing so following the Equifax heist.
According to a report by Bloomberg News,
Credit Sesame, which operates a popular
online credit-scoring and monitoring
service, found that as of Sept. 25, less than
According to an estimate by
one expert . . . only about 2 to
3 percent of consumers have
freezes on their credit files.
half of 1 percent of 4.5 million TransUnion
credit profiles had a freeze on their reports.
Why is this troubling from a mortgagefraud perspective? And what’s the
relevance for me as a homeowner or
buyer?
With the extraordinarily detailed and
sensitive information that hackers and
their customers may now possess on
millions of Americans — Social Security
numbers, driver’s licenses, credit card
numbers, home addresses and more —
they may be able to create fake identities
that are credible enough to fool banks and
other lenders into granting home equity
lines of credit and other mortgages in their
names, making off with thousands of
dollars in the process.
Consider the arrest last fall in New
Jersey of a team of alleged identity thieves
following an investigation by federal
agencies. The scammers allegedly used
stolen and fictitious personal identities
they created to persuade lenders to
approve three home equity lines of credit
(HELOCs) and four mortgages. The total
reported take: nearly $1 million. Although
most major lenders have software
packages designed to spot signs of identity
fraud, cases like this keep popping up and
may become more frequent with the
availability of so much detailed
information from Equifax files floating
around on dark websites, now or in the
months and years ahead.
What does this all mean for you? At the
very least, be aware that any form of
mortgage fraud — including falsehoods
about intended occupancy — may
constitute bank fraud, which is a federal
crime. And get defensive if you haven’t
already done so: Freeze your credit reports
at all the credit bureaus. Identity thieves
should find it much more difficult to take
out a new loan in your name if your credit
files are locked down.
Ken Harney’s email address is
kenharney@earthlink.net.
FINAL BUILDER CLOSEOUT!
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
SAVE UP TO $15,000 THIS WEEKEND!*
New & Nautical 3-level Garage Townhome
Condominiums Featuring 3-4 BR’s & 2.5-3.5 BA’s,
Designer Kitchen with Eat-in Island and Family
Room with a Fireplace. Located off I-95 within
walking distance of the VRE Park & Ride and the
Waterfront of Historic Occoquan.
Limited Availability
Hurry For Best Selection!
12804 Lotte Drive, Woodbridge, Virginia 22192
Model Open Fri. - Tues., 11am - 5pm
703.929.3319
BasheerAndEdgemoore.com
*Receive up to $15,000 to be used towards options or allowable closing costs. Offer is valid on qualifying homes only. This is a limited
time offer, subject to change and may be withdrawn at the discretion of Basheer & Edgemoore without prior notice and may not be
used in conjunction with any other discount. Prices subject to change without notice. Certain restrictions apply.
For more details, see Sales Manager. 10/2017.
9
EZ
Home. Made.
FALL FESTIVALOF SAVINGS
UP TO IN UPGRADES ON US*
ADDITIONAL SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE ON MOVE-IN READY HOMES
Fall means spending quality time with your favorite people. Whether you’re watching the game, sharing
a slice of pumpkin pie, or just kicking back on the sofa, we want to help you find the perfect house for seasonal
gatherings. Hurry and save up to on upgrades for your dream kitchen or a home entertainment package.
VanMetreHomes.com/Fall-Festival
THE WASHINGTON POST
LET OUR FAMILY BUILD A HOME FOR YOURS
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
*Available only for new contracts wrien and accepted at Van Metre Homes communities between October and November . A maximum of toward a kitchen upgrade
or home entertainment package for single-family homes, townhomes or a multi-family home purchased, notwithstanding the number of purchasers for a specific new home. Purchasers shall not
be entitled to any rebate, refund or other consideration in the event that the full value of the credit is not used. Other terms and conditions may apply. Maximum credit varies by community.
Visit VanMetreHomes.com/Fall-Festival or see a Sales Manager for details.
10
EZ
Anniversary
Purchase a new home on a contract signed between
September 1, 2017 and October 15th, 2017 and receive:
Up to $
25,000*
in Design Center Options
on To-Be-Built Homes
AND
Our Anniversary. Your Celebration.
Bring the celebration home and select from a fabulous selection of
move-in-ready homes with special offers. With luxurious features
and neighborhoods with spectacular amenities, you are sure to find
your dream home perfect for celebrating.
EXTENDED
T H R U O C T O B E R 1 5 TH
Up to $
10,000**
Towards Closing Costs on To-Be-Built
and Quick Move-in Homes
when financing with our affiliate lender CalAtlantic
Mortgage, and using our affiliate title company
CalAtlantic Title in Virginia or CalAtlantic Title of
Maryland, Inc. as your closing agent/title insurer
Visit a CalAtlantic Homes community today to find your dream home.
Maryland
ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY
Admirals Ridge
Quick Move-in Homes
Available
(443) 924-6767
Luxury townhomes from
the mid $400s in Arnold
Chapel Creek Village
Quick Move-in Homes
Available
(443) 545 6639
Luxury townhomes from
the upper $400s in
Gambrills
Harmans Preserve
Quick Move-in
Homes Available
(410) 609-6631
Townhomes from the
upper $300s in Hanover
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
Harmans Ridge
Wooded Homesites
(410) 691-0295
Single-family homes
from the upper $400s
in Hanover
Holly Ridge
Four Community Parks
(410) 768-1725
Single-family homes
from the low $400s and
townhomes from the low
$300s in Glen Burnie
FREDERICK COUNTY
Kaplan’s Preserve
Dulaney View
First-Floor Owner’s
Suite Available
(410) 969-7462
Single-family homes
from the upper $400s
in Severn
Final Opportunity
(410) 453-6181
Luxury single-family
homes from the upper
$800s in Timonium
Eastchurch
Hunt Valley Overlook
at Sparks
Jefferson Place
North Shore Forest
Luxury Living with
Over 2,100 Sq Ft
(410) 609-6629
Townhomes from
the upper $200s
in Glen Burnie
Luxury Living with
Over 2,400 Sq Ft
(410) 584-1061
Luxury townhomes from
the mid $400s in Sparks
Red Oak Crossing
Open on Weekends
(443) 219-4433
Luxury single-family
homes from the low $600s
in Parkville
Final Opportunity
(410) 969-7407
Townhomes from
the upper $200s
in Glen Burnie
Loch Raven Vista
Shannon’s Glen
Marriott’s Choice
Villas
Quick Move-in Homes
Available
(443) 228-5068
Townhomes from the
low $300s in Jessup
Now Selling
(202) 528-4599
Garage villas from the
upper $200s
in Randallstown
Willow Creek
Ravenhurst Glen
Final Opportunity
(410) 969-7462
Single-family homes from
the low $600s in Severn
Grand Opening
(610) 715-5144
Townhomes from the low
$200s in Middle River
New Homesites Released
(301) 825-9195
Single-family homes from
the low $400s in Frederick
New Homesites Released
(301) 682-2382
Townhomes with one- and
two-car garages from the
mid $200s in Frederick
Landsdale
New Homesites Released
(301) 882-4751
Single-family homes
from the upper $400s
in Monrovia
Villages of Urbana
Coming Soon
Luxury townhomes
with detached, two-car
garages in Urbana
MONTGOMERY COUNTY
Crown
Final Opportunity
(301) 977-4057
Innovative townhomes
from the upper $500s
in Gaithersburg
BALTIMORE COUNTY
Cromwell Ridge
Quick Move-in Homes
Available
(410) 665-2084
Luxury single-family
homes from the upper
$400s in Parkville
Laytonsville Grove
Coming This Winter
Luxury single-family
homes in Laytonsville
Norbeck Crossing
Final Opportunity
(301) 774-2727
Luxury elevator residences
from the upper $200s
in Silver Spring
PRINCE GEORGE’S
COUNTY
Brick Yard Station
LOUDOUN COUNTY
Ashburn Overlook
Coming Soon
Luxury Townhomes in
Ashburn near the W & OD
Trail and Potomac River
Belmont Run
Grand Opening
(703) 470-8349
Townhomes in Ashburn
from the $500s
New Homesites Released
(301) 210-2785
Urban and traditional
townhomes from the low $300s
AND
Two-car garage
townhomes from the
upper $300s
Glenbury Estates
Parkside at Westphalia
Three New Home
Designs Available
(703) 327-6515
Luxury single-family
homes from the upper
$500s in Aldie
New Homesites Released
SF: (301) 420-0168
TH: (301) 568-2512
Single-family homes from
the low $400s and onecar garage townhomes
from the low $300s in
Upper Marlboro
The Vineyards
Grand Opening
(443) 883-1762
Single-family homes from
the upper $300s
in Clinton
Springdale Estates
Learn more at CalAtlanticHomes.com/DCHomes
Virginia
Coming Soon
Spacious townhomes in
Upper Marlboro
Opening Soon
(703) 587-4165
Luxury estate homes
on spacious homesites
from the low $900s
in Centreville
Rosedale
SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY
Breckenridge Farms
Grand Opening
(540) 848-3942
Single-family homes from
the low $400s
in Spotsylvania
Estates at Kingswood
Quick Move-in
Home Available
(540) 710-6029
Single-family homes
from the upper $300s
in Fredericksburg
Available only when you close on a home in any Maryland or Virginia community pursuant to a contract you sign on or between September 1, 2017, and October 15th, 2017. *Seller provided Design
Center credits for to-be-built homes may be applied to available upgrades and options at Seller’s Design Center. Availability of items may vary by community. Offer does not have any cash value.
**Receipt of closing cost credit for to-be-built homes or quick move-in homes is subject to limits and is contingent upon buyer closing a loan with our affiliated lender, CalAtlantic Mortgage or,
where permitted by seller, another seller preferred lender, and obtaining title insurance and closing services from our affiliated title agent, CalAtlantic Title in VA, or our affiliate CalAtlantic Title of
Maryland, Inc. in MD. The offer to pay closing costs does not include payment of prepaid taxes, property or mortgage insurance, or mortgage installments. Pre-payments of HOA assessments are
typically subject to lender limits. The combined value of seller incentives, credits and other seller contributions may exceed lender limits established for the loan program for which buyer qualifies.
Buyer should ask his or her lender about the impact of such limits. Prices, plans and terms are effective on the date of publication and subject to change without notice. Depictions of homes or
other features are artist conceptions. Hardscape, landscape and other items shown may be decorator suggestions that are not included in the purchase price and availability may vary. This ad
contains general information about new home communities in Maryland and Virginia and it is not an offer or the solicitation of an offer for the purchase of a new home. This information is not
directed to residents of any other state that requires registration or permit issuance prior to the publication of such information. CalAtlantic Mortgage, Inc., NMLS# 203897 is a licensed Maryland
Mortgage Lender #20537; offices #20539 in Columbia, MD; #20538 in Chantilly, VA; 22183 in Charlotte, NC and #06-20680 in Scottsdale, AZ. CalAtlantic Mortgage, Inc., NMLS ID# 203897 (www.
nmlsconsumeraccess.org) is a Virginia Licensed Lender and Broker #MC-5716 in Scottsdale, AZ and branch licenses in Chantilly, VA, Charlotte, NC and Scottsdale, AZ. MHBR #128 CAMA067
11
EZ
New Homes and New Communities
MD Kensington Overlook
khov.com/KensingtonOverlook
MD
Kensington Overlook is a
close-knit community of just 25
impressive townhomes. When
you live here, you’ll be less than
a mile from Westfield Wheaton
mall and Wheaton Metro. These
3-story townhomes are filled with
modern style and offer you an
easy, walkable lifestyle.
Spacious single-family homes
designed for the way today’s
homeowners live with stunning
architectural features and
interior finishes! Enjoy living in
a community surrounded by
breathtaking views of Sugarloaf
Mountain with amenities,
including a pool, community
center, tot lots and trails.
Don’t miss our Anniversary
Sales Event extended through
October 15th!
www.CalAtlanticHomes.com 301-882-4751
Brownstones
MD The
at Chevy Chase Lake
3605 Chevy Chase Lake Drive
Chevy Chase, MD 20815
1,873-2,392 sq. ft.
3-4 bed/2.5-3.5 bath
Low $300’s
2,927 – 3,134 sq. ft.
Up to 5BR/4.5BA
From $1.5 Million
Landsdale combines luxury
homes with rural serenity
and suburban convenience,
just minutes from Downtown
Frederick. Amenities include a
pool, clubhouse, tennis courts,
volleyball court, playing field,
amphitheater and playgrounds.
Come take a peek at our TWO
exciting Townhome models today!
Tour the new Avalon model
today! These GALA award
winning, new elevator
townhomes offer modern
luxuries and maintenance-free
living in the heart of Chevy
Chase, just moments from DC
and Bethesda.
AVALON MODEL OPENS TODAY
Details at EYA.com/Avalon
MHBR #7634
301-966-3375
EYA.com/Avalon
4601 Tinder Box Circle
Monrovia, MD 21170
MD
301-658-2535
Balk Hill Village
2115 St. Joseph’s Drive
Mitchellville, MD
Our luxury townhomes live like
a single family home with 3 to 5
bedrooms, 2.5 to 4.5 baths,
up to 2700+ sf, main-level
entrances, open floorplans,
backyards, optional attics with
rooftop terraces, full-sized
basements, and more. We have
a townhome to fit every lifestyle
and these are a must see!
Don’t miss out on the final
opportunity at Balk Hill Village!
Only five homes remain at
this sought-after townhome
community, perfectly located
in Mitchellville, just 1 mile from
shopping and dining at Woodmore
Towne Centre. Amenities include
a community center & gardens,
parks, tot lot and trails.
khov.com/balkhillvillage
301-683-6464
OCTOBER 14, 2017
2,215 Sq. Ft.
3BR/3BA
Townhomes from the upper $300s
. SATURDAY,
1,550 - 2,800+ sq ft
up to 5BR/4.5BA
from $309,990
THE WASHINGTON POST
ryanhomes.com/landsdaletowns 301-882-4773
11015 Tinder Box Way
Monrovia, MD 21770
2,792-3,377 sq. ft.
Up to 6BR/5.5BA
From $489,990
4388 Shamrock Dr.
Monrovia MD. 21770
MD Landsdale (Townhomes)
MD Landsdale
1,933 sq. ft.
3BR/2.5BA
Townhomes from the mid $400s
301-683-6462
Landsdale
WinchesterHomes.com
1166 Findley Road
Kensington, MD 20895
12
EZ
New Homes and New Communities
MD
Grosvenor Heights
5315 Merriam Street
Bethesda, MD 20814
MD
285 Kepler Drive
Gaithersburg, MD
Crown
2,523-3,433 sq. ft.
Up to 4BR/3.5BA
From $1.1 Million
2,533 sq. ft.
3BD/4BA
$766,665
The new Everett model opens
today! Join us between 1–2PM
and meet acclaimed interior
designer, Erica Burns. You’ll want
to tour all of our distinctive
model homes, situated in a
wooded oasis, just moments
from downtown Bethesda.
The Chagall includes three
bedrooms, three full and two half
baths. Upscale interior finishes
include hardwood flooring
throughout the main level,
hardwood staircases, stainless
steel gas appliances, and beautiful
granite countertops. The fourth
level is just for fun! Centered by
an oversized loft and flanked by
both front and rear terraces. Walk
to Downtown Crown for shopping,
dining and entertainment.
EVERETT MODEL OPENS TODAY
Details at EYA.com/NewModel
MHBR #7084
EYA.com/NewModel
MD
mihomes.com
301-683-5510
Montgomery Row
6602 Eames Way
Bethesda, MD 20817
VA
703-334-3397
11548 Northview Trail
Oakton, VA 22124
Timber Lake
1,686 – 2,650 sq. ft.
Up to 5BR/4.5BA
From the $700s
8,000 sq. ft.
4BR/5.5BA
$1,799,900
Conveniently located in Bethesda,
these modern new townhomes
offer it all: GALA award winning
design with expansive living space,
gourmet kitchens, and private
rooftop terraces. Situated just steps
from Montgomery Mall and the
Shops at Wildwood, and moments
to your favorite Bethesda Row
destinations. For limited time, enjoy
special savings.
With 8,000 sq. ft. of upgraded
luxury, the Randall II (Homesite 2)
at Timber Lake is all you’ve
dreamed of. From the 3-car
garage to the perfect blend of
formal and casual, open spaces,
this home is built to fit your
lifestyle. One look at the vast
owner’s suite and you’ll be feeling
right at home.
Save BIG on Move-In-Ready Homes
MHBR #7472
MD
THE WASHINGTON POST
WinchesterHomes.com
301-945-7274
Scotland Heights
2075 Bagpipe Lane
Waldorf, MD
VA
301-273-7525
22270 Foggy Ridge Terrace
Ashburn, VA 20148
Belmont Run
4,252 sq. ft.
4BD/4.5BA
$519,990
Overlooking the great room on one end,
and the formal dining room at the other, this
kitchen is an entertainers dream! Double
wall ovens, designer cooktop, large granite
island and ample prep space make cooking
for the largest party a cinch. Elegant 42”
cabinets with light granite, stainless steel
appliances, and hardwood floors make
the kitchen as beautiful as it is functional.
A library with bay window, formal dining
room, great room, and mud room complete
the main level. The basement has been
finished with a 9’ceilings, a recreation room,
wet bar with refrigerator, media room, and
full bathroom.
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
EYA.com/Post
mihomes.com
301-720-9929
2,280 to 3,108 sq. ft.
3-4 Beds/2.5-3.5 Baths
From the low $500s
Belmont Run features luxury
townhomes with over 2,280
square feet on 80 homesites at
the intersection of Croson Lane
and Belmont Ridge Road in
Ashburn. Visit our model home
today and take advantage of
our Anniversary Sales Event!
CalAtlanticHomes.com
703-470-8349
13
EZ
LIVE IN THE
TWO RIVERS
INTRODUCING T WO RIVERS FOR EVERYONE!
L O V E T W O R I V E R S . C O M | 410.220.6810
OCTOBER 14, 2017
CLASSIC GROUP | NVHOMES | RYAN HOMES | STANLEY MARTIN HOMES | WINCHESTER HOMES
. SATURDAY,
NEW HOMES FOR ACTIVE ADULTS FROM THE UPPER $300s
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES FOR ALL AGES FROM THE MID $600s
THE WASHINGTON POST
Two Rivers is two extraordinary lifestyles in one unprecedented new home community
at the center of it all in Anne Arundel County. Discover single-family homes
for all ages and a variety of single level living home styles for active adults.
14
EZ
House of the Week
An Alexandria home with a few histories
BY
K ATHY O RTON
The plaque adorning the house
in Old Town Alexandria proclaims
“George
Johnston’s
Home.” It was placed there in
1964 after a campaign to move
the plaque from its original site at
the corner of Prince and Lee
streets.
Research shows that Johnston
lived at 224 S. Lee St. and had his
law office down the street. Back in
1932, when the Alexandria Chamber of Commerce undertook a
campaign to mark historical sites
and buildings throughout the
city, the two sites were confused.
As was the date of Johnston’s
death, which on the plaque is
listed as 1765, but was a year later.
Johnston was a prominent attorney who shared an office with
George Washington in Manassas
when the future president
worked as a surveyor. The two
men also served together in the
Virginia House of Burgesses. His
son, George Johnston Jr., was an
aide-de-camp to Washington during the Revolutionary War.
Over the years, many stories
HOMEVISIT
Many stories have been associated with the Georgian brick house,
known as “George Johnston’s Home,” in Alexandria, Va.
have been associated with the
Georgian brick house. Some say it
was in the home’s library where
Johnston drafted the denunciation of the Stamp Act that Patrick
Henry delivered. (The original
draft was reportedly found in one
of Johnston’s law books.) They
also claim the mantel in the li-
brary was a gift from Washington.
But in 1996, when the home
was selected for the Alexandria
Decorator Show House, a historian probed deeper into its history. T. Michael Miller of the
Office of Historic Alexandria
found that many of the house’s
architectural details dated to a
period later than Johnston’s life.
He confirmed his findings with
Denys Peter Myers, an architectural historian with the National
Park Service.
Miller didn’t dispute that Johnston had lived at that address but
as he wrote in his report “subsequent actions have done much to
confuse the general public about
the true historicity of the dwelling.”
Miller wrote the flounder section of the house was most likely
constructed by Thomas Preston
around 1800 and the front section
built circa 1802 by Daniel Douglass, who probably destroyed the
Johnston house to build the new
section.
He noted the mantels in the
drawing rooms and the reeded
chair rails in the dining room
appear to be Colonial Revival
additions. The Federal period
mantel in the library was probably installed in 1946, when naval
officer John Opie lived in the
home.
Regardless of the home’s
provenance, it retains its historical character even as it has
224 S. LEE ST.,
ALEXANDRIA, VA.
$4,995,000
Features: Known as “George
Johnston’s Home,” the Georgian
brick house strings its rooms
together like cars on a train. On the
main floor, the double parlor is
followed by the dining room,
kitchen and family room. U-shaped
gardens surround the house. An
18th-century smokehouse provides
additional storage on the property.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 6/5
Approximate square-footage:
5,259
Lot size: 0.19 acre
Agent: Eileen McGrath,
Washington Fine Properties
For more photos of this home
and other houses for sale in the
area, go to washingtonpost.com/
wherewelive.
been updated for today’s living.
The six-bedroom, five-bathroom,
5,259-square-foot house is listed
at $4,995,000.
kathy.orton@washpost.com
BETTER HOMES.
BETTER LIVING.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
FIND YOUR DREAM HOME IN CLARKSBURG VILLAGE
MARYLAND’S BEST-SELLING COMMUNITY!*
These beautiful Craftmark Homes are just the start of the grandeur
of living at Clarksburg Village. Commuting convenience is key in this
area, and living here you’ll be right next to I-270 and close to I-370. By
living in the same community as Clarksburg Village Center, and near
hot shopping spots like the new Clarksburg Premium Outlets, you don’t
even have to leave your neighborhood to experience fantastic dining &
shopping. The community also has bountiful amenities, including two
swimming pools, a clubhouse, multipurpose ballfields & more.
Clarksburg Village • Clarksburg, MD
Neo-traditional single family homes from the upper $500s
Single family homes from the $700s
• Up to 6 BR & 6½ BA • 2,928+ sq. ft. • 2-car garages
• Gourmet kitchens • Hand-finished hardwood floors
• Ceramic tile in bathrooms • 4th level bonus suites
• Elaborate detailing throughout
22001 Winding Woods Way, Clarksburg, MD 20871
CraftmarkHomes.com/ClarksburgVillage-sf
(301) 540-3830
Open Daily, 11 am – 6 pm. • Brokers Welcome.**
*Based on cumulative sales, 1/1/15-12/31/15.
**Must register and comply with policy terms.
MHBR #451.
15
EZ
Two Grand Openings.
Two Locations.
One Tough Decision.
SAT U R DAY, O CTO B E R 14, N O O N – 4 P M
Introducing the Everett model home
Tour the Avalon today and discover why The Brownstones earned
a 2017 GALA award for design. These new elevator townhomes
offer elegant luxury and maintenance-free living in the heart of
Chevy Chase, just moments from DC and Bethesda.
Visit today and meet acclaimed interior designer, Erica Burns,
available 1–2PM. You’ll want to tour all four of our distinctive
model homes, situated in a wooded oasis and just moments
from downtown Bethesda.
New Townhomes from $1.1M
For directions or details visit EYA.com/NewModel
3605 Chevy Chase Lake Drive, Chevy Chase, MD 20815
5315 Merriam Street, Bethesda, MD 20814
and follow signs to the Everett model
OCTOBER 14, 2017
EYA MARKETING LLC MHBR #7634, #7084
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE. RENDERINGS FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY.
. SATURDAY,
New Elevator Townhomes from $1.5M
For directions or details visit EYA.com/Avalon
THE WASHINGTON POST
The new Avalon model home opens
16
EZ
Town Square
Real Estate News & Notes
Bloomingdale
rowhouse lists
for just under
$1.5 million
in Upper Marlboro, Md., Ryan
Homes is building townhouses
District Design &
Development (D3) recently
completed renovations on a
Victorian-style rowhouse at 24 T
St. NW in the District’s
Bloomingdale neighborhood,
transforming the property into a
4,000-square-foot, threebedroom house with a twobedroom rental unit on the
basement level.
D3, owned by managing
partners Brian Abramson and
Yvette Freeman, specializes in
residential renovations and
property restorations.
Abramson is a thirdgeneration real estate developer
from the family that owns Tower
Cos., and Freeman also owns
Foundry home furnishings, a
former U Street store relocated
to the Old Lucketts Store in
Leesburg, Va.
The $1.495 million property
on T Street includes Italian tiles,
an open kitchen with Carrera
HOMEVISIT
The renovated Victorian rowhouse at 24 T St. NW includes 12-foothigh ceilings, two master bedrooms and two balconies.
marble counters, white-and-gray
European kitchen cabinets, 12foot-high ceilings in the two
master bedrooms, two balconies,
a patio and a rooftop deck with
views of the monuments.
The first master suite has a
free-standing tub, a stand-alone
shower and two skylights, while
the second master bathroom has
two rain showerheads and a
custom-designed glass
enclosure.
The house includes two offstreet parking spaces.
For more information, visit
www.24TStreet.com or contact
Joe Freeman, a Coldwell
Banker Residential Brokerage
agent, at 202-256-5453.
Affordable House
of the Week:
Upper Marlboro townhouse
At Westphalia Town Center
priced from the $310,000s to the
$380,000s.
The new development will
eventually include hundreds of
townhouses and apartments, as
well as a hotel, shops,
restaurants and an office
building all within walking
distance.
Community plans include a
dog park and an amphitheater
for outdoor concerts.
Westphalia Town Center is
about six miles from the District,
two miles from the Beltway and
five miles from the Branch
Avenue Metro station.
Three models are available for
buyers, each with an open floor
plan, granite counters, stainlesssteel appliances, a tankless water
heater and energy-efficient
features.
An advantage of newly built
houses is that buyers usually
don’t need to budget much for
repairs for a few years and their
utility bills tend to be lower than
they are for older homes.
The Ryan Homes townhouses
have 1,553 to 2,427 square feet
with two to five bedrooms, three
to five bathrooms, a one- or twocar garage and a deck. Some
include a rooftop terrace.
For more information, call the
Ryan Homes sales office at 301736-1080, visit the model homes
at 5550 Mellwood Rd. in Upper
Marlboro or go to www.
ryanhomes.com/find-yourhome/our-communities/
maryland/upper-marlboro/
westphalia-town-center.
— Michele Lerner
To pass on a tip or item, contact us at
realestate@washpost.com and put
“Town Square” in the subject line.
RE AL ESTATE
Real Estate Editor:
V. Dion Haynes,
dion.haynes@washpost.com
Art Director:
Dwuan June
Advertising Manager:
Howard J.S. Bomstein,
howard.bomstein@washpost.com
To contact us:
realestate@washpost.com
Mail:
The Washington Post, Real Estate
Section
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C.
20071
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
B E S P O K E L I V I N G AWA I T S I N A R E V I TA L I Z E D I C O N I C S E T T I N G
TWO- TO FOUR-BEDROOM RESIDENCES | PRICED FROM $2M+
NOW SELLING BY APPOINTMENT : 202.751.2900 | WARDMANTOWERLIVINGDC.COM
17
EZ
New Homes and New Communities
VA
WinchesterHomes.com
VA
2748 Stream Vista Court
Oakton, VA 22124
Timber Lake
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1609 Village Market Blvd, Suite 110
Leesburg, VA 20175
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1,614 - 2,488 sq. ft.
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From $400,000s
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vanmetrehomes.com
40635 Hazel Place
Aldie, VA 20105
Tanglewood
VA
VA
703-764-5463
10915 Olive View Dr
Spotsylvania, VA 22553
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3,573 - 4,505 sq. ft.
5-8BR/3-6.5BA
from $600s
4,057 sq. ft.
4BR/3.5BA
$651,716
Now selling all new exterior
elevations with unique modern
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community of Fortunes Landing. On-site
amenities include Residential Community Center
& Sport Court, Paved Exercise Trails, Public
Waterfront Park, and more. Come home to peace
and tranquility while having the convenience of
I-95, downtown Fredericksburg & Central Park
only minutes away.
*Image shown is of similar home and is for illustrative
purposes only. Prices, financing, and other offers subject to
change without notice.
vanmetrehomes.com
Downtown Brambleton
42369 Chapel Gate Terrace
Brambleton, VA 20148
VA
540-786-0817
12301 Barley Woods Avenue
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Barley Woods
2,787 - 3,122 sq. ft.
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From $500,000s
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vanmetrehomes.com
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. SATURDAY,
All new model now open!! These
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great parks, coffee shops, the movies,
or the neighborhood gym. Then come
home to your private rooftop terrace,
or your relaxing view of the lake.
HARD HAT MODEL TOUR EVENT
BOUTIQUE 55+ COMMUNITY
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THE WASHINGTON POST
VA
fortuneslandingva.com
703-327-7830
18
EZ
Cover Story
A space
solution
may be in
a chic shed
Sleek retreats for work and
creativity evolve from old,
dusty storage spaces
BY
R OXANA P OPESCU
About six years ago, Chelsea Hadley left her
job as a fundraiser for the Los Angeles
County Museum of Art and started running
a small arts foundation
from her house.
In theory, the idea was
a no-brainer — she had
two school-age children;
her husband, the film
scorer and hip-hop musician Justin Reinhardt, already worked from
home; and the flexibility was seductive.
Practically, she discovered one hitch: Her
house, in a canyon in Los Angeles, was not
designed for that kind of lifestyle.
“We live in a 1950s midcentury modern
post-and-beam house, which is, like, very
L.A.-feeling, but it’s one big, open space,”
Hadley said. “So we realized really quickly
that with him working at home and me
working at home and having two young
kids, I was never going to get any work done
and neither was he.”
Adding a room would have blasted
through their budget and changed their
home’s footprint, but they did have an
8,360-square-foot lot and a back yard —
littered with outgrown toys — that needed
updating. The answer to everything was a
$60,000 luxury shed by kitHAUS, a prefab
maker that has created sleek spaces for
clients including comic actress Amy Poehler.
Backyard sheds long ago morphed from
dusty storage shacks or scroungy domains
of gardeners and grandpas to swoonable
spaces that let people fulfill needs and fantasies for a fraction of what it would cost to
trade up or remodel.
They are the heart of the yard and sometimes the home, serving as offices, meditation rooms, writing nooks, bars, saunas,
guest suites or crafting cottages, and sometimes a combination of the above.
Deep down, the appeal of the backyard
shed, and the many ways the space has been
interpreted, can be explained by that primordial need for intimate, secluded snugness, said Debra Prinzing, author of “Stylish
Sheds and Elegant Hideaways.”
“It goes back to our visceral memories of
having a little secret place,” Prinzing said.
When she used to ask people about their
dream sheds, the answers “were all over the
WILLIAM WRIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY
A journalist in Santa Cruz, Calif., turned a modest potting shed into a miniature
newsroom of less than 100 square feet. It keeps her close to home but separate.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
FALL
HOME
GUIDE
WILLIAM WRIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY
The owners of this dining pavilion in the San Francisco area drew on their Nordic
heritage to re-create a green roof with grasses friendly to the region.
WILLIAM WRIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY
This breezy hideaway near a stream in the woods of Washington’s Whatcom County
utilizes recycled window panels from an old sunroom.
19
EZ
DOUGLAS HILL FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Chelsea Hadley had this shed built when she decided to start working from home. She has two children, and her husband is a
musician who works from home. “We realized really quickly that I was never going to get any work done and neither was he.”
SHEDS CONTINUED ON T20
OCTOBER 14, 2017
A Seattle-area cabinetmaker built this conservatory using
salvaged windows and doors. She uses it for birdwatching.
. SATURDAY,
WILLIAM WRIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY
ents — it’s those that live in
“tight but wealthy” urban areas
such as downtown San Francisco and Seattle.
Jeremy Nova, a co-founder of
Studio Shed, outside Boulder,
Colo., said there’s a key advantage to building small: The
structure might not need to be
permitted, depending on local
building codes. “We’ve done installations in very small back
yards,” Nova said. One yard in
San Francisco was so tiny the
builders had to carry panels in
through the house.
Studio Shed has averaged
year-over-year growth of almost
50 percent since inception in
2008, Nova said. His sheds are
most popular in California,
where “you have a lot more acceptance of integrating indoor
and outdoor living spaces, and
part of that is the climate.” He
and other shed builders have
clients across the United States.
The backyard shed as retreat
is far from a North American
concept — they’ve been a fixture
in Great Britain for decades and
they’re the crux of a social movement in Australia.
While they come in many
styles and prices, from mass
produced or customizable units
in the low four figures to architect-designed showpieces, highend sheds tend to use durable
and ecologically responsible
THE WASHINGTON POST
map in terms of architecture.”
But they all evoked the “excitement you had as a child, putting
a blanket over a card table and
climbing underneath. You had
your own little space. I think
that’s what everyone is going
for.”
Perhaps nothing consecrates
the status of sheds more than a
reality TV show on the topic.
“He Shed She Shed” on FYI.TV
pits pairs of amateur shed designers with competing visions.
The popularity of the units is
evidenced in the growth of shed
companies. Business at Modern-Shed has increased 20 percent per year for the past six
years, said Tim Vack, general
manager of the Seattle-based
firm. A mix of factors is driving
demand: Awful traffic and the
rise of flex policies means more
people are choosing to work
from home. That’s especially
true in the Pacific Northwest
and in California, where jobs in
design, tech or entertainment
are common.
Construction and real estate
costs mean it’s hard to move or
remodel, he added. An unfinished Modern-Shed typically
starts at $18,500 to $25,000 (not
including delivery or installation). He estimated that a room
addition would cost four to
eight times that.
People with 3,000-squarefoot villas aren’t his typical cli-
20
EZ
Seeking a little sanity in the backyard shed
SHEDS FROM T19
materials, and they have bespoke details
that help them match the main house, such
as custom paint or curated lighting. Adding
a bathroom or kitchen can send costs up, in
part because of permits.
Tom Sandonato, who co-founded
kitHAUS in 2004, said coveted upgrades
blend inside and outside: outdoor kitchens
or showers, hardwood floors that transition
into decks, open air passages connecting
enclosed spaces. His business has grown
about 5 percent yearly in the past two years,
he said.
Eric Enns, owner of Modern Spaces and
Sheds, based in Northern California, is
working on another concept that merges
indoors and outdoors: a treehouse shed in
Santa Cruz. Enns said people — including
himself — are increasingly wanting multipurpose sheds.
“I have four kids, two dogs and a cat, and I
can’t get anything done in my house. It’s not
even an option,” he said. “I have mine set up
with a little Ikea desk back there, [and] we
have a loft with a bed.” His kids use it for
sleepovers. He uses it for work.
Clients of the real estate start-up Cover
are also asking for hybrid spaces: a pool
house/guesthouse, a sound editing room by
day and a lounge after hours, said its cofounder, Alexis Rivas.
The company, whose investors include
General Catalyst, is trying something new:
clients answer 50 to 100 questions online,
and an algorithm designs their space. Cover
find private, walled in spaces in which they
can have some quiet time and feel like
they’re in a comfortable, almost isolated
space to get work done and close out the
world around them,” he said. “People are
looking for walls now.”
Nova said his clients are expressing the
same sentiment: “We found in talking to our
customers that so many people’s homes are
no longer a sanctuary,” he said.
Katharine Harer, a poet and English professor, spent years trying to create such a
sanctuary. First she bought a weekend cabin
in Gualala, a coastal outcrop in Northern
California where ocean meets redwoods.
She worked at the dining table but felt she
needed something more “intimate.” In July
she had an 8- by 10-foot writing shed installed. She describes it as “monastic.” It has
big windows and insulated maple walls.
Outside, all she sees is green. It cost around
$16,000.
Harer always found ways to be productive: “I’ve worked on back porches, in corners of rooms.” But with a dedicated space,
she immediately focused better. “Now, I
have the dream.”
Jim Doti, a professor of economics at
Chapman University in Orange, Calif., and,
until last year, the university’s president,
also finds that walking some 40 feet from
his house, in a semirural part of Orange
County, to his shed spurs his creativity. “It
does something with your mind,” Doti said
in his shed as chickens roamed outside on a
recent afternoon. “It allows you, you know,
to get in sync with whatever you’re going to
trims costs by automating manufacturing
and design. Its units cost $55,000 to
$400,000, including permits and installation, Rivas said.
Another innovator is Austin-based Sett
Studio, which started selling flat-pack DIY
kits in August. They start at $6,800, not
including tax and shipping. “Hopefully,
that’s the next thing,” said Danielle Hritsko,
an administrative assistant there.
These days versatility rules, Sandonato
agreed. He built Hadley’s studio, a roughly
190-square-foot rectangle with ipe floors
and exterior walls and glass doors on two
sides that sits in the corner of their frondfilled garden, in 2012. Since then it has
morphed into a space that fulfills several of
the family’s needs. Houseguests sleep there.
When they have parties, they slide open the
doors and let people mosey between the
yard and the studio. Their daughter, 14, is
lobbying for the shed to become a hangout
zone when friends come over.
Hadley works exclusively from the studio, and she steals minutes to marvel at
hummingbirds in her garden.
“I 100 percent believe that it did change
my life,” she said. It gave her a separate space
to focus, uninterrupted and inspired — especially valuable for a work-from-home parent, she said.
There’s something about modern houses
that has made people turn to backyard
sheds for comfort, said Mitchell Parker, an
editor and writer at Houzz.
“These open floor plans are so popular
these days, but people are struggling to now
OCTOBER 14, 2017
. SATURDAY,
realestate@washpost.com
To see more photos of luxury sheds, go to
washingtonpost.com/realestate.
20 AREA
LOCATOR
MAPS
1,200
COMMUNIT Y
LISTINGS
SHOPPING FOR A
NEW HOME?
THE WASHINGTON POST
be doing that’s different from what you do
over there.”
He uses his 12- by 14-foot studio for one
purpose: turning wood bowls. It’s his private oasis, where he can withdraw and spin
hunks of heavy olive and lustrous ambrosia
maple into svelte bowls he gives to friends or
donates to charity auctions.
Doti thought of carving out room in the
garage, but his wife worried his hobby
would send sawdust all over her Porsche. So
a shed it was.
In a sense, it’s a throwback to the classic
toolshed: filled with drills, a lathe and a
workbench. But it has upgrades, including
an air filtration system and customizations,
down to the window geometry, exterior
colors and the sconces he handpicked to
match his house. In all, the space, by Studio
Shed, cost around $30,000.
When “Stylish Sheds and Elegant Hideaways” author Prinzing lived in Thousand
Oaks, Calif., her homeowner’s association
forbade sheds. Pool cabanas were allowed —
but she didn’t have a pool. “The irony of it
all,” she joked.
She recently moved to near Seattle, and she
has plans for a “half-shed, half-greenhouse”
where she’ll write and start seedlings.
She may call the space the Seed House. “I
just don’t know yet,” she said, and stated one
of her cardinal rules of shed ownership:
“You have to name it.”
Don’t make the biggest
purchase of your life without
seeing all the choices.
PLANNED AND
ACTIVE ADULT
COMMUNITIES
New Homes Guide magazine is the
only complete directory to every new
single-family, townhome, condominium,
planned community and active adult
community in the Mid-Atlantic Region.
INFORMATIVE
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BUILDERS
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EASTERN SHORE
21
EZ
Life Happens At Landsdale
Four Miles East of Urbana on Rte. 80
9 DECORATED MODELS NOW OPEN
New Sections Now Selling with Delivery Options to Match Your Time Frame
With more than 170 families living at Landsdale, it’s no wonder, it has become Frederick’s fastest selling new home community.
At Landsdale you will discover stunning views to delight your senses, a world-class amenity park that is ready for you to enjoy,
and a variety of homes to fit your lifestyle. But the biggest benefit of all – the value.
3 Townhome Models | 6 Single-Family Home Models | One-Level Living Available | 6,000 Sq. Ft. Community Clubhouse
8-Lane Olympic-Size Pool | Zero-Entry Leisure Pool | Tennis Courts | Tot Lots | Walking/Biking Trails | Top-Ranked Schools
Single-Family Homes from the $420’s
Townhomes from the low $300’s
Single-Family Homes from the $480’s
Phone: (301) 200-1703 | LandsdaleFrederick.com/Fall2017
*Prices, offers, availability and features subject to change without notice. See individual Sales and Marketing Representatives for details. MHBR No. 128, MHBR No. 57, MHBR No. 56.
OCTOBER 14, 2017
Directions: From I-270, take Exit 26 for Maryland 80 toward Urbana/Buckeystown. Turn left onto MD-80E. Continue straight through traffic circle to stay on Md-80E and follow
for 4 miles. Turn left onto Ed McClain Rd. To visit Winchester Homes turn left at the 1st community entrance on Landsdale Blvd. To visit CalAtlantic Homes & Ryan Homes use
the 2nd community entrance at Monrovia Blvd.
. SATURDAY,
Single-Family Homes from the mid $400’s
Townhomes from the low $300’s
THE WASHINGTON POST
Cash In On Fall Savings For A Limited Time Only!*
22
EZ
DIY
What’s causing this leaky door? He’ll have the answer in a flashing.
Dear Tim: I’ve got a sliding
patio door on the back of my
home. There’s a moisture
problem directly under the
TIM CARTER
door in the basement. I plan
to seal between the bottom
aluminum threshold and the concrete curb
and caulk the gap between the side trim
and my brick. I know I need to install a
concrete overlay to get my patio to drain. Is
that all I have to do? — Doug T., Windsor,
Ontario
Ask the
Builder
or the bird.
In the case of your door, water can get
behind the concrete curb under the
threshold. While there might be a hidden
flashing behind the curb, how is it possible
for the water to get back out on top of the
patio and drain away from the house? The
concrete curb is acting like a dam.
My advice is to carefully remove the
aluminum trim that’s covering the wood
trim that surrounds the sliding patio door.
Then remove any wood trim around the
door. You need to determine if the top and
sides of the door have proper flashing.
As drastic as it sounds, you also need to
remove the simple curb that’s under the
door threshold. While this may seem like a
difficult task, I’m quite sure it’s only going
to take an hour or less using a four-pound
hammer or even less time if you rent an
electric demolition hammer from a tool
rental business. Be sure to tape thin sheets
of plywood over the glass to protect the
door from flying pieces of concrete.
Once you’ve exposed the top, sides and
bottom of the door, you can assess what
needs to be done to make the door
waterproof. I’m hoping that you discover
the builder or carpenter installed a proper
flashing pan under the entire door
threshold. That’s the first step that should
have been taken before the door was lifted
into the rough opening.
If there’s no flashing pan under the door,
I’m afraid that you need to remove the
entire door from the opening and start the
installation process over from scratch.
There are preformed plastic flashing pans
that you can use under the door, or you can
create one with thin sheets of lead or
modern rubberized-asphalt-based flashing
tape. There are countless videos online that
show you how to install these flashings
under a door or window.
The ultimate goal is to create
overlapping layers of flashing material so
that any water that gets behind the door
trim from above the door or along the sides
is captured and redirected back out to the
front face of the house below the threshold.
Years ago, builders used soldered sheet
copper or tin-coated steel. Good flashing is
critical in homes that are framed with
wood. It’s unacceptable for any water to
gain access to the wood framing behind
brick, siding or stucco. The technology to
achieve this goal has been known for
hundreds of years, but unfortunately, many
modern builders don’t study old structures
to see how the master builders of old kept
houses dry.
Need an answer? All of Tim’s past columns are
archived free at www.AsktheBuilder.com. You can
also watch hundreds of videos, download Quick
Start Guides and more.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
You’re suffering like many other
homeowners. Not a week goes by that I
don’t get a request for help from one of my
newsletter subscribers or a visitor to my
AsktheBuilder.com website. When I look at
the photos homeowners send me, as you
did, it’s clear that many builders,
remodelers and carpenters are clueless
about flashing exterior doors.
I regret to inform you that your plan of
attack may not solve the problem. What’s
more, caulk is not a permanent solution, no
matter what the warranty on the label
states. I’m beginning to think that caulk
manufacturers are using warranties more
as a marketing gimmick than as a factual
representation about how long the product
will actually perform without failure.
Your photos show that you’ve got a brick
exterior with raked mortar joints. This
method of dressing the mortar creates a
small shelf on top of each horizontal row of
brick, and it’s the least waterproof mortar
joint. The most weather-resistant mortar
joint is one that’s been created with a
convex rounded tool. When the bricklayer
uses the tool on the soft mortar, the
resulting shape is a slightly concave mortar
joint where the edges of the mortar touch
the outer edges of the brick.
Water flowing down the wall during an
intense, wind-driven rainstorm is
automatically forced down the wall by the
concave joints. With your raked joint,
water can collect to a slight degree on the
small shelf. If a brick or two or three has a
backward tilt, the water can begin to seep
behind the brick.
Your photos also scream at me that your
builder or the carpenter didn’t put a proper
flashing under the door threshold. This
flashing is designed to shed water to the
outside of the concrete step beneath the
door threshold.
Think for a moment how overlapping
shingles work on a roof or lap wood siding
works on the exterior wall of a house. Each
successive shingle or piece of siding
overlaps the one below. This is no different
from the way feathers work on a bird.
Gravity pulls the water over each shingle,
piece of siding or feather, and the water
never can get into the core of the building
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23
EZ
INSTANTLY
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You Don’t Have to Wait Long for Lasting Value.
Quick Move-In Homes Are Ready Now Across Maryland.
Find Your New Home and Save Big
Before October 31.*
THE WASHINGTON POST
K. Hovnanian® Homes has been making dreams come true for our
homeowners for more than 50 years. It’s why you can step inside a
Quick Move-In Home and swear that it was created specifically for
your family. We listen to our buyers, and we build homes designed
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khov.com/MDQuick
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OCTOBER 14, 2017
*Incentives available on new contracts on quick move-in homes purchased October 31, 2017, and settled by November 15, 2017, and are not retroactive. Offers may
vary by home, homesite and community. We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation.
Seller contribution limits apply and may affect maximum financing. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no
barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin. Prices, terms, features, incentives and savings subject to
change without notice. See a Sales Consultant for details. K. Hovnanian® American Mortgage, LLC, 3601 Quantum Boulevard, Boynton Beach, FL 33426.
NMLS #3259 (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org). Licensed by the Maryland Commissioner of Financial Regulation. MHBR #3149, 7865, 7757, 7730, 6943.
©2017 K. Hovnanian® Companies, LLC.
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. SATURDAY,
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THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
24
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Sept. 15th
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Oct. 15th
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Since 1976
25
EZ
New Homes and New Communities
VA
mihomes.com
VA
The Hillcrest II offers main level living
at its best. First floor owner’s suite
occupies its own wing. The kitchen is
a chef’s dream with loads of cabinet
space, a corner sink with windows,
walk in pantry and generous
granite center island, stainless steel
appliances, and double wall oven.
Hardwood floors in the main living
areas. This home includes the upper
loft with a bedroom and full bath
makes it the perfect place for guests!
Join the Movement and Live
Happier™. Trilogy® at Lake
Frederick is a stunning 55+ Resort
Community in the Beautiful
Shenandoah Valley! This home
comes complete with a landscape
package and upgraded flooring.
Sales and Construction: Shea
Homes Limited Partnership
(#2705152813).
TrilogyLife.com/LakeFrederick
VA
800-685-6494
Trilogy® at Lake Frederick
156 Towhee
Lake Frederick, VA 22630
4,600 sq. ft.
4BD/3.5BA
From $477,900
2,270 Sq. Ft.
2.5 Bedrooms/3 Baths/2 Car Garage
$545,990
Bridgewater Model-3 br 2.5 baml living. Open floor plan. Master
br features large walk-in closet &
luxury bath. Bedrooms 2&3 share
a dual vanity & sep. room for tub/
shower & water closet. Flexible
floor plan offering many options
for finished LL, third car garage
bay & more!
Join the Movement and Live
Happier™. Trilogy® at Lake
Frederick is a stunning 55+ Resort
Community in the Beautiful
Shenandoah Valley! This home
comes complete with a stainless
steel appliance package and
upgraded flooring. Sales and
Construction: Shea Homes Limited
Partnership (#2705152813).
540-395-6535
TrilogyLife.com/LakeFrederick
10918 Cobble Run
Spotsylvania VA 22551
VA
800-685-6494
11600 Robin Woods Circle
Spotsylvania VA 22551
Fawn Lake
2,605 sq. ft.
3BD/2.5BA
Starting at $550,000
2,444 -3,504 sq. ft.
3 BD/2BA
From the mid $300s
Inviting home plans offer
spacious kitchens that open to
family room. Modern, efficient
mudrooms offer convenience
and storage solutions. First floor
master suites in most models,
all on full unfinished basements.
Land in the Fairway and partner
with us to create a home with
your custom touches.
Fawn Lake Signature BuilderNow building in the Orchard Hill
neighborhood. Callie III Floorplan
w/Main Level Living. Loft optional
starting at $399,000. Beautiful
home w/ many extras. Lexington
model on slab starting at
$351,000. Custom homes outside
Orchard Hill start at $400,000 on
your lot or $500,000 on our lot.
540-972-3778
OCTOBER 14, 2017
www.mendlesonhomes.com
. SATURDAY,
540-672-7910
103 Phoebe Court
Lake Frederick, VA 22630
THE WASHINGTON POST
FCH1.com
Trilogy® at Lake Frederick
1,783 Sq. Ft
3 Bedrooms/2 Baths/2 Car Garage
$368,990
12006 Fawn Lake Parkway
Spotsylvania VA 22551
Fawn Lake
VA
2,999 sq. ft.
3BD/3BA
$449,990
540-736-6107
Fawn Lake
www.atlanticbuilders.com
VA
11426 Osprey Trail
Spotsylvania, VA
Fawn Lake
26
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New Homes and New Communities
VA
Trilogy® at Lake Frederick
Easy Pay
128 Towhee
Lake Frederick, VA 22630
2,270 Sq. Ft.
2 Bedrooms/2.5 Baths/2 Car Garage
$533,900
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Join the Movement and Live
Happier™. Trilogy® at Lake
Frederick is a stunning 55+ Resort
Community in the Beautiful
Shenandoah Valley! This home
comes complete with stainless
steel appliances, and upgraded
flooring & light package. Sales and
Construction: Shea Homes Limited
Partnership (#2705152813).
takes the stress out of your news.
Democracy Dies in Darkness
TrilogyLife.com/LakeFrederick
800-685-6494
ENROLL IN EASY PAY TODAY Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy or call 202-334-6100.
Real Estate Guide
Herndon
Herndon
McLean
McLean
Haymarket, VA
FREE ELEVATOR? YOURS FOR A LIMITED TIME.
JUNCTION
SQUARE
$329,230
OPEN HOUSE SAT. 10/14 & SUN. 10/15, 11 AM-6 PM!
Brand new 2 BR, 2 BA condominium in
Regency at Dominion Valley-Greenbrier Collection.
OPEN HOUSE TODAY FROM NOON-4PM
COME HOME TO THE SIGNET.
Discover a lifestyle of ease and elegance
Tour our stunning model home & learn how you can have your
unlike anything else in McLean.
• Fun-filled active-adult (55+) gated community
• Spacious kitchen w/upgraded cabinets & granite countertops
• Master suite w/sitting area, walk-in closet & expanded shower
• 1,482 sq.ft. of luxury living in home backing to trees
• Hardwood floors in living room, kitchen & foyer
• 1-car oversized garage & so much more!
5300 Merchants View Square
Haymarket, VA 20169
own private elevator included on a new home for FREE!*
Furnished Model Open By Appointment
HOMES PRICED FROM THE MID $600s
703-754-3399 - TollBrothers.com
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
1 Bedrooms w/ Den from the $800s | 2 Bedrooms from $1.2M
703.982.6774 | www.LiveHerndonVA.com
2 Bedrooms w/ Den from $1.5M | 3 Bedrooms from $1.8M
www.TheSignetVA.com
711 MONROE ST. | HERNDON, VA 20170
* Disclaimer: Subject to change without notice. Valid on contracts written on or before October 15th. See sales manager for full details.
ARE YOUR TENANTS MOVING OUT?
YES
NEED TO RENT THE PLACE OUT?
NO
WELL, KEEP US IN MIND
IT’S ANOTHER YEAR
OF CLARINET PRACTICE
YES
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
2.1 million readers, renters included • 202.334.6200 • washingtonpost.com/classified • Open 24/7
Or place your ad in Express, our daily commuter read, and reach 536,000 readers.
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
C054F 5x2.75
27
EZ
LIVE HAPPIER.
TM
Open House Event this Weekend!
Real Trilogy® Members sharing stories about their funniest grandkid stories.
Trilogy® is more than a place to live. It’s knowing you’re in the right place, at the
right time, with the right people. And for many of our members, they wonder why
they ever put off making the move. Try something unexpected. Know your neighbors.
Experience a true sense of community. Be part of something bigger. Once you’re
here, you’ll understand why everyone is asking, “Why didn’t I do this sooner?”
OCT 14 & 15 | OPEN HOUSE EVENT
1-4 pm
Sales and Construction: Shea Homes Limited Partnership (#2705152813). Homes at Trilogy at Lake Frederick are intended for occupancy by at least one person 55 years or older, with certain exceptions for younger persons
as provided by law and the governing covenants, conditions and restrictions. This is not an offer of real estate for sale, or a solicitation of an offer to buy, to residents of any state or province in which registration and other
legal requirements have not been fulfilled. Trademarks are property of their respective owners. Equal Housing Opportunity.
OCTOBER 14, 2017
Lake Frederick, VA | Low $300s + | TrilogyLife.com/LakeFrederick
. SATURDAY,
55+ TRILOGY® AT LAKE FREDERICK
THE WASHINGTON POST
CALL 855.321.9528
28
EZ
Mortgage Rates
Strong economic
growth pushes
up 30-year and
15-year figures
BY
K ATHY O RTON
After a month of incremental
increases, fixed mortgage rates
took their biggest leap since this
summer.
According to the latest data
released Thursday by Freddie
1200 current homeowners trust
McEnearney Property Management
with their homes.
703.537.3340 | McEnearneyPM.com
Sales – Rentals – Tenant Representation
703.683.2700 | McEnearneyCommercial.com
HOMESTYLES
S TA R T I N G
IN THE MID
$ 300s
Mac, the 30-year fixed-rate average climbed to 3.91 percent with
an average 0.5 point. (Points are
fees paid to a lender equal to 1
percent of the loan amount.) It
was 3.85 percent a week ago and
3.47 percent a year ago. The 30year average, which hasn’t been
this high since August, had its
biggest one-week increase since
July.
The 15-year fixed-rate average
jumped to 3.21 percent with an
average 0.5 point. It was 3.15
percent a week ago and 2.76 percent a year ago. The 15-year average hasn’t been this high since
July. The five-year adjustable rate
average fell to 3.16 percent with
an average 0.4 point. It was 3.18
percent a week ago and 2.82
percent a year ago.
“Data released last week, on
balance, suggested continued
strong economic growth,” said
Joel Kan, a Mortgage Bankers
Association economist. “In combination with hawkish comments
from some Fed officials, this
pushed rates up.”
Bankrate.com, which puts out
a weekly mortgage rate trend
index, found that nearly twothirds of the experts it surveyed
say rates will remain relatively
stable in the coming week. Michael Becker, branch manager of
Sierra Pacific Mortgage, is one
who expects rates to hold steady.
“Despite a weak headline number in the employment report last
week, mortgage rates moved
higher as markets focused in the
larger than expected increase in
average hourly earnings,” Becker
said. “The Fed is focused on wages as they believe that increases in
income will lead to increases in
overall inflation. The market is
now pricing in an 80 percent
chance that the Fed will hike rates
at their December meeting. But
for the coming week there is not a
lot of economic data being released, so I think rates will hold at
their current levels for now.”
Meanwhile, as rates were rising, mortgage applications retreated last week, according to
the latest data from the Mortgage
Bankers Association. The market
composite index — a measure of
total loan application volume —
decreased 2.1 percent. The refinance index fell 4 percent, while
the purchase index slipped 0.1
percent.
The refinance share of mortgage activity accounted for 49
percent of all applications.
“Refinance activity declined
overall, as conventional refinance
applications decreased 7 percent,
only partially offset by a 10 per-
Weekly averages for popular
mortgage types
5%
3.91
4
30-YEAR FIXED
3.21
15-YEAR FIXED
3.16
5-YEAR ARM
2
1
0
’16
’17
Source: Freddie Mac
THE WASHINGTON POST
cent increase in government refinance applications,” Kan said.
The MBA also released its
mortgage credit availability index
(MCAI) this week, which showed
credit availability increased in
September. The MCAI rose 0.7
percent to 181.4 last month. A
decline in the MCAI indicates
that lending standards are tightening, while an increase signals
they are loosening.
kathy.orton@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
where-we-live
E ASTON V ILLAGE
ON
THE
TRED
AVON
RIVER
L o c a t e d o n M a r y l a n d ’s E a s t e r n s h o re , E a s to n V i l l a g e o f fe r s s m a l l - to w n c h a r m a n d a v i b ra n t , c o a s t a l
l i fe s t y l e fe a t u r i n g a c l u b h o u s e , p o o l , f i t n e s s c e n t e r, s i x a c re p a r k a n d 5 0 a c re s o f p re s e r ve d w e t l a n d s .
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
Chesapeake Charm. Eastern Shore Escape. Over a Mile of Shoreline.
THE WASHINGTON POST
3
2 8 3 7 4 V I L L A G E L A K E W A Y, E A S T O N , M D 2 1 6 0 1
E A S T O N V I L L A G E @ U R B A N PA C E . C O M
E A S T O N V I L L A G E M D. C O M
29
EZ
Signature Builders
Atlantic Builders
Coleman Homes
Fairway Custom Homes
Custom Homes • Quick Delivery Homes
Fredericksburg Custom Homes
J Hall Homes
M/I Homes
Lakefront & Wooded Home Sites • Buy Now, Build Later
THE WASHINGTON POST
Simply Home
Warner Custom Homes
Fawn Lake Real Estate Company is a seller’s broker and represents a number of signature builders, private property owners’ interests and the Community
Development Company’s properties. Fawn Lake Real Estate Company is by law obligated to deal with any interested party, professionally, honestly and
with integrity, providing full disclosure. Appointments are encouraged and appreciated.
OCTOBER 14, 2017
fawnlakevirginia.com | 540.972.0400
. SATURDAY,
Mendleson Development
30
EZ
Condo Advice
Condo insurance,
similar to rental
coverage, is vital
for unit owners
Dear Benny: My daughter rents
an apartment and pays for
renter’s insurance. Is there
something similar for
condominium owners that
covers the loss of personal
belongings and the inside of the
unit in case of fire, theft, etc.? I
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Office: 301.770.0760
was told I need something that
covers the electrical and
structural systems, but that
doesn’t seem right to me. Why
should my insurance policy have
to pay for something that goes
wrong in the common elements?
—Josephine
Josephine: Yes, the insurance
coverage for condominiums that
is similar to rental coverage is
called an HO-6 policy. Every
condominium owner in the
United States should have this
insurance coverage.
In fact, in some jurisdictions
— including Maryland and the
District — it is mandatory for
condo owners to have an HO-6
policy. Strict liability applies in
those two jurisdictions; that
means that if a problem occurs
in your unit — such as a pipe
that serves only your unit bursts
— regardless of fault you have to
pay the association’s deductible.
Why? Because in many older
buildings that were converted
from rental to condo, things
happen, and each time the
association has to make a claim
against the master insurance
policy, the association has to pay
the deductible; this typically
ranges from $5,000 to $20,000.
So if you have to pay $5,000 to
the association,
your HO-6 will
pay $4,500 and
you will be out of
BENNY L.
pocket only $500.
KASS
It make sense
because it saves the association
from having to shell out dollars
after dollars as the building
starts to fall apart.
Housing
Counsel
Dear Benny: I am on the
board of a 16-unit condominium
association. We have two
courtyards with eight units each
and have been here since it was
built. One of the homeowners
states all the windows in his unit
need replacing.
He contacted the developer
several years ago, and they sent
him new windows. He did not
install them.
He’s asking the association to
pay more than $5,000 to have
some windows replaced. I don’t
believe we are liable for the
problems he is dealing with as a
homeowner.
— Selena
Selena: I am confused. If the
developer sent him windows,
why is he now asking the
association to pay to install
them? You have to review your
legal documents: In some,
windows are common elements
and in others they are part of the
unit.
If they are part of the unit,
then the responsibility to install
is on the unit owner — however,
he will need to get permission
from your board.
On the other hand, if they are
common elements, the board
would have the obligation to
install. However, that does not
mean the board has to do that; it
can exercise its “business
judgment” and decide: “We don’t
need new windows, it would be
an unnecessary expense and if
we do it for one unit we would
have to do it for all.”
There is a lesson to be learned
from this question: Quite often,
answers will be found in the
legal documents of your
condominium association. I
firmly believe that every unit
owner should read these legal
documents carefully at least
once and board members should
read at least once a year.
realestate@washpost.com
Benny L. Kass is a Washington and
Maryland lawyer. This column is not
legal advice and should not be acted
upon without obtaining legal
counsel. Send questions to
blkass@kasslegalgroup.com.
REFINED HOMES.
THE ULTIMATE LOCATION.
Potomac Overlook Brownstones
at National Harbor
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
Imagine a short commute home to unwind in a
gorgeous home with fine detailing, a spacious interior
& exquisite architecture. Relax on your rooftop terrace
with breathtaking views overlooking the Potomac
River. Endless dining, recreation & entertainment
opportunities are just 1 block away at National
Harbor, including the new MGM Casino. This can be
your life if you live at Potomac Overlook Brownstones.
Potomac Overlook Brownstones
Townhomes from the low $600s
NEW SECTION JUST RELEASED!
O N LY 1 B L O C K WA L K T O S H O P S &
R E S TA U R A N T S AT N AT I O N A L H A R B O R !
Prices, features, and incentives are subject to change
without notice. Images for illustrative purposes only.
See a Sales Manager for details.
•
•
•
•
Up to 4 BR & 4.5 BA • Rooftop terrace
Fine detailing, spacious interiors & exquisite architecture
Quick access to the heart of D.C. & Old Town Alexandria
Enjoy walking, jogging, biking paths & trails along the
Potomac River waterfront
• The National Harbor boasts a marina, 2 public piers,
shopping, dining & entertainment
500 Rampart Way, National Harbor, MD 20745
Open Daily 10 am – 5 pm
(202) 570-6003 • YourIntegrityHomes.com/PotomacOverlook
31
Real Estate Guide
Dupont Circle - NW
ATTENTION ADVERTISERS:
Dupont Circle - NW
All advertisements for the sale or rental of dwelling units published in The Washington Post are subject
to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or
discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or
intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.' State law forbids, discrimination,
based on factors in addition to those protected under Federal law.
Bethesda
Bethesda
TAKE IN THE CITY
VIEWS WITH A
HARDHAT TOUR.
The Washington Post will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal
opportunity basis.
Capitol Hill
EZ
Capitol Hill
Visit our Sales Gallery today and learn more about this
new collection of condominiums, nestled atop
the Canopy Hotel by Hilton, with exclusive owners
access to all hotel amenities.
NOW SELLING FROM THE MID $300s
CONDOMINIUMS THAT ALLOW YOU TO OWN THE ULTIMATE LUXURY: TIME.
301.747.3124
LIVE930ROSE.COM
Sales Gallery Open Daily
11572 Old Georgetown Rd., N. Bethesda, MD 20852
Northwest - Other
Northwest - Other
0pen Ho use Th i s Su nday From 1-3pm
PREVIEW PHASE II & INQUIRE ABOUT
O U R P R E-R E L E A S E S P E C I A L S
N E W D I S T I N C T I V E LY M O D E R N T O W N H O M E S O N C A P I T O L H I L L
Immediate Move-In | PRICED FROM $1.29M
4 1 8 1 3 TH S T R E E T S E , W D C 2 0 0 0 3
W W W. B U C H A N A N PA R K H O M E S . C O M | 2 0 2 . 4 3 1 . 1 2 7 2
Capitol Hill
Capitol Hill
418 13th St. SE, WDC
Open House SUN, 1-3 PM
New 3 Bed + Den Townhome
$1.289 million
New construction luxury townhome on Capitol
Hill. 3 bedroom + Den, 4.5 baths, gourmet kitchen,
private garage, private roof deck. Central location.
Contact sales agent for showing.
David Klimas, Vice President, 202-431-1272
Prince George's Co
MD
HYATTSVILLE/NR DC LINE
WEST END LIVING
$ 285,000
Sales by McWilliams Ballard
Capitol Hill
$15,000
1 bedrm, 1 ba, 202-270-3282, 219 14th st NE
Fncd Yrd, Built in 1913.
Sales center open daily: 11am to 5pm
Wesley Heights
All brick corner detached rambler/capecod,
2-3 BRs, 2 FBAs, finished basement, deck, &
2 car off street parking
Ekuban Realty
301-642-3232
301.909.8846 | THEL AURENMD.COM
4901 HAMPDEN LN., BETHESDA, MD 20814
Open Sat 1-4pm
A HIGHER STYLE.
A Stunning Sight to See.
Bethesda
BETH/Grosvenor Heights
Visit us this weekend and learn more about our exclusive
model pricing. Discover the luxurious lifestyle that awaits
you in the heart of Bethesda .
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S A L E S BY M AY H O O D C O M PA N Y
Anne Arundel CO.
MD
Villas at Severna Park
$740K to $3.2M | 202.293.2501
TOUR OUR FEATURED TWO BEDROOM + DEN
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VOLUMETRIC FLOORPLANS
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You, too, could have
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1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
U N R I VA L E D LO C AT I O N
Be introduced to this bespoke
collection of eight two-level townhome
condominiums in the center of it all.
Schedule a Hard Hat Tour and Choose Your View
Bethesda’s Tallest Condominium Residences from the $700’s
S TA RT YOU R D I SCOV ERY: 11PA R K N W.COM
ChevalOnFairmont.com | 301.476.1637
Prices, financing and offers subject to change without
notice. Please see a sales representative for details.
SF
Sales by
OCTOBER 14, 2017
2 NEW HOMES W/ELEVATOR
ONLY 2 LEFT! Homes by Sandy Spring Builders
within walking distance to METRO! Standard
feats incl Thermador appliances, party deck
off main level, 5BR, 5 1/2 BAS, oversized 2 car
gar w/add'l 2 car covered parking. This loaded
model has nice extras but standard home is
amazing! 10K CLOSING CREDIT TO BUYERS
FOR SETTLEMENT BY 12/31/17. 10101 Fleming
Ave.
www.BannerTeam.com
Wendy Banner/BannerTeam 301-365-9090
L&F
301-907-7600
LUXURIOUS FINISHES
. SATURDAY,
703 Lynngate Rd
Only $499,900!
Stunning 5BR/ 3 1/2BA, 2 car garage Contemp;
open floor plan! Gourmet kitchen; SS appliances, granite counters, breakfast bar & morning room! Lots of light & windows! Hardwood
floors! Screened porch & stone patio. Gas FP
fam room. New carpet. No more mowing,
weeding, mulching nor snow removal! Only 15
mins to DT! Water access too!
Monique Ligthart, Coldwell Banker
443-995-3942(c) / 410-263-8686(o)
THE WASHINGTON POST
Wesley Heights
$1,939,000
GREAT NEW PRICE! 2923 45th St NW
Charming home, Prime location.
Delightful
Wesley Heights home with 4 large bedrooms,
a top floor guest room/office, 3 full and 2 half
bathrooms. Features include high ceilings, a
large and sun-filled eat-in kitchen and breakfast
area with 10.5 foot ceiling, a stunning center
island and top of the line appliances; updated
bathrooms, and a cozy paneled library with 10
foot ceiling. Complete with a 7,700+ foot level
fenced lot, beautiful views and sought after
location. Open 2-4pm
Benjamin Tessler
202-494-3111
202-362-1300
Luxury condo building near Georgetown, with
floor-to-ceiling windows, rich amenities and 24-hour
concierge. Landscaped rooftop and Nobu, the
world-famous restaurant.
32
Real Estate Guide
EZ
Bethesda
Bethesda
Alexandria City
Alexandria City
GRAND OPENING
VA Real Estate
Auctions
VA Real Estate
Auctions
PUBLIC AUCTION
Valuable Commercial Lot - Prime Location
in Dahlgren, VA 22485
Rt. 301 (James Madison Parkway) and
Commerce Drive, Dahlgren, VA 22485
HISTORIC, YET MODERN IN THE HEART OF OLD TOWN.
October 24, 2017 @ 1:00 PM
Model Open House Tomorrow | 1pm-4pm
Join Us for Food, Wine and Exclusive Tours
Experience the perfect pairing of elegance and contemporary
living that is Brightleaf. Homes offer refined finishes, private
elevators, backyards, two-car garages with lofts.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19 | 5PM-7PM
Move-In Today | Priced From $2.85M
Two-Bedroom Residences from $599K
Two-Bedroom + Den Residences from $999K
LiveStonehall.com | 301.747.3899
Prices, financing and offers subject
to change without notice. Please see
a sales representative for details.
Sales by
Property is believed to be 1.40+/- Acres, unimproved single parcel.
Zoned C-2, General Trade
Prime Commercial location with direct frontage on Route 301.
Large lot in high growth area with huge potential.
Do not miss this opportunity! ~ Investors welcome! ~ No Buyer’s Premium!
703.688.3694
LIVEBRIGHTLEAFCOOPER.COM
TERMS: A deposit of $50,000.00 will be required at time of sale by certified funds or cashier’s check.
Settlement is to occur within Thirty (30) days from date of sale or
sooner, time is of the essence, with the balance to be paid at settlement. Additional terms may be announced at time of sale.
Broker Participation Welcome. Property sold As-Is, Where-Is.
517 N. ST. ASAPH STREET
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22314
For complete terms & conditions visit:
www.atlanticauctions.com or contact Jack Levi at (410)803-4161.
Va. Lic. # 2905000893
Prince George's Co
MD
Prince George's Co
MD
Alexandria
Alexandria
Waterfront, Sale
Seashore Sales
Terrific 2.5 Acre Topsail
Waterfront Getaway!
Calvert County
Waterfront
13385 Joy Rd, Lusby
CITY LIFE. SUBURBAN EASE.
TOWNS AT SOUTH ALEX
Coming Soon From the $700s
2-car garages | Roof terraces & lofts | 4 levels
Minutes to Metro | Easy access to GW Parkway & Capital Beltway
Close to Old Town shops, restaurants & more
Private shoreline saltwater estate.
Huge intracoastal waterway views!
250 ft on beautiful New Topsail Creek.
SACRIFICE $40,000.
202-545-6621
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
(571) 349-8806 | BY APPOINTMENT
Home delivery
is convenient.
*Prices and details subject to change without notice.
Waterfront, Sale
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
Springfield
Springfield
$400,000
7-DAY ONLINE AUCTION
EBIDLOCAL.com
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Open Thursday - Monday
11AM - 5PM
13888 Victory Lane
Dowell, MD 20629
or by appointment
410-326-3330 Center
301-862-2169 Office
thaffer@classicgroupmd.com
www.harboursatsolomons.com
SF
Fairfax County
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
Harbours at Solomons Island
Waterside Living
Nestled in the quaint historic town
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33
Market Trends
EZ
What’s ahead for home buyers in Northern Virginia
BY
M ICHELE L ERNER
FALL
HOME
GUIDE
amenities with good commuting
options to Fort Belvoir and Quantico.”
Fulton says single-family
homes at Embrey Mill are priced
in the $300,000s. In addition,
there are affordable townhouses
and single-family homes under
development at Summerfield in
Fredericksburg
by
Beazer
Homes, priced from the
mid-$200,000s for the townhouses and the low-$300,000s
for the single-family homes.
Nearby at Rappahannock Land-
ing, Ryan Homes and Lennar are
building townhouses priced in
the $200,000s.
In Manassas, Stanley Martin
Homes is building townhouses
and townhouse-style condos at
the Landing at Cannon Branch,
which will be part of a mixed-use
development that includes a
brewpub. Prices have yet to be
determined for the community,
where sales will begin later this
year.
At Potomac Shores in Prince
William County, Brookfield
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Fast-selling homes
Whether sales will slow in the
fall remains to be seen, but during the first nine months of 2017,
homes in Northern Virginia have
been selling quickly and at higher
New construction
Newly built homes typically
cost more than resale properties
in every part of the country. In
Northern Virginia, high costs for
land and labor make construction even more expensive.
“If you’re looking for affordable housing, Stafford County is
about the only place in Northern
Virginia with more affordable
prices,” says Dan Fulton, senior
vice president of John Burns Real
Estate Consulting in Reston.
“Embrey Mill is one of the most
interesting developments there,
a planned community with lots of
GREG HOLDEN OF GRIN AND BEAR IT
A 2,544-square-foot, three-bedroom end-unit townhouse at
13773 Ulysses St. in Woodbridge, Va., is listed for $485,000.
Homes, NV Homes, Ryan Homes
and Pulte Homes are building
townhouses priced from the upper $300,000s to the low
$400,000s and single-family
homes priced from the upper
$400,000s to the $600,000s. The
planned community adjacent to
the Potomac River features numerous amenities, including a
golf course, pools, parks and a
future VRE station.
In Loudoun County, high-end
townhouses by the Knutson Companies are nearly sold out at
Crescent Place in Leesburg, purchased by empty-nesters and others who want to live in a walkable
community, says Chris Masters,
executive vice president of
McWilliams | Ballard in Washington. Similar townhouses are under construction at Brambleton,
priced in the $600,000s and located within walking distance of
Brambleton Town Center.
In Herndon, Stanley Martin
Homes is building condos across
the Dulles Toll Road from the
future Herndon Metro station.
Pricing has yet to be determined
for these two-level townhousestyle condos, which will include
roof terraces on the upper units.
In Alexandria, EYA will begin
selling townhouses and condos at
Robinson Landing on the Potomac.
THE WASHINGTON POST
The
beforethe-schoolyear-starts
buyers
have
settled
into
their homes in
Northern Virginia, so house
hunters looking this fall may
have less competition for the
limited available inventory of
properties on the market.
Buyers in the Northern Virginia suburbs, like buyers in other areas, are slowing down a little
this fall and opting to wait for the
right place at the right price in
some neighborhoods. In the most
popular locations, though, the
sales pace is still fast.
“Buyers in the DMV [District,
Maryland and Virginia] are really
savvy and ready to buy,” says Nela
Richardson, chief economist of
Redfin brokerage in Washington.
“There’s no learning curve required. But, especially in the fall,
they’ve got plenty of time to wait
for the right house.”
Richardson says many buyers
in the Northern Virginia suburbs
have close ties to the federal
government either as employees
or contractors and are more likely to delay purchases if they are
concerned about the consequences of politics and any potential shrinking of the government.
“The most affluent buyers,
though, who are looking at a
higher price point, are more globally focused and are more jaded,
so their decisions are less impacted by government policy,” says
Richardson.
The close-in suburbs in Virginia have markets similar to the
District, says Richardson, and
sellers are seeing a little less
buyer traffic than anticipated
this fall.
“Even though it’s still clearly a
seller’s market, buyers are demanding more,” says Richardson.
“They’re expecting more inventory to become available in the
future and are less likely to compete with multiple offers above
the list price.”
Richardson says Northern Virginia buyers will agree to pay the
list price, but Redfin agents say
they are hearing more often that
buyers then want the sellers to fix
every small item found on a home
inspection report.
prices than in 2016, according to
Jonathan Hill, vice president of
customer engagement for multiple listing service Bright MLS
(formerly MRIS) in Rockville.
Bright’s statistics show that
the average number of days a
property stays on the market
declined by 17.7 percent year-todate at the end of September.
“The majority of homes sold
within one to 10 days,” says Hill.
“In fact, the number of homes
that sold within 10 days is 10
times the number of homes that
sold in any other time frame.”
Not only are homes selling
quickly, they are also selling for
more money this year. Sale prices
rose 4.4 percent during the first
nine months of 2017 compared to
the first nine months of 2016,
says Hill. The number of homes
sold also rose by 4.1 percent
during that period.
The price range with the most
listings of single-family (detached) homes in Northern Virginia is $600,000 to $800,000.
For townhouses, buyers will find
the highest number of listings
priced between $300,000 and
$400,000; for condos, the highest number of listings is between
$200,000 and $300,000.
“The lack of inventory continues to be a problem in Northern
Virginia, which had just a 2.5month supply of homes in September,” says Hill. “A balanced
market typically has a five- to
six-month supply of homes.”
Hill says that prices were up
year-over-year in September everywhere in Northern Virginia
except in Fairfax County where
sale prices remained unchanged
from last year’s level of $460,000.
“The housing market is just
tired, especially in high-priced
neighborhoods,” says Hill. “One
exception to that is Fairfax City,
where prices rose by 24 percent
to $541,500 in September. But in
that area we’re only looking at 38
sales. Since it’s such a small
market, so that’s kind of an outlier.”
34
EZ
Buying and Selling
Rent-back agreement lets a seller buy some extra time
BY
S USAN S TRAIGHT
FALL
HOME
GUIDE
Andrea McDaniel was
selling her condo in Annandale, Va., when
she received a
very attractive
cash offer with
a very short time until closing.
Though she had expected to have
more time to find a new home,
the offer was too good to refuse.
“When you have a cash offer in
hand you never want to turn that
down,” she said. Her agent proposed a rent-back. The buyer, an
investor who was planning to rent
the condo out anyway, readily accepted.
“The rent-back agreement let
me stay in my home and gave me
peace of mind to find a place,”
McDaniel said.
While it may make the seller
uncomfortable to suddenly be in
the position of renter, sometimes
it’s a necessary step to achieve a
goal, such as moving into a dream
home as opposed to the one available at the closing date.
flexible with their dates have an
advantage over inflexible parties.
“When it looked like it was four
more days after settlement [before the seller could move out] my
client said that was fine,” said
Denise Greene, an agent with
D.C.-based DCRE Residential.
“She wasn’t really in a hurry. If
there’s a huge extension of time,
you’d have to consider a rentback.”
Whether it’s a formal rent-back
agreement or a four-day grace
period, “make it really clear” in
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THE WASHINGTON POST
NASTCO/GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
Sometimes rent-backs are necessary for sellers to achieve a goal,
such as moving into a dream home.
IN
OCTOBER 14, 2017
What the contract says
The rent-back contract, or
“Seller’s Post-Settlement Occupancy Agreement,” that is found
on www.virginiamls.com is a
one-page form that lists such in-
formation as the rent amount,
security deposit, move date and
responsibility of the seller to
maintain the home. As for insurance, it leaves that up to the seller
and buyer, saying only that they
“are advised to consult with an
insurance agent regarding coverage.”
McDaniel was advised to obtain renters insurance. “I canceled my homeowners policy the
day we went to settlement,” she
said. The price of the homeowners insurance vs. her renters
insurance was “fairly comparable,” she added.
As for the rent amount, buyers
typically either charge the local
market rate or the actual amount
they will be paying to live in the
property, including mortgage
principal, interest, taxes and insurance.
After selling her condo in December, McDaniel rented it back
from the buyer for about 40 days
at a daily rate that she said was
roughly equivalent to her mortgage payment plus condo fee. She
paid the full rent at the closing but
was able to get some of it back by
moving out before the 40 days
was over.
“We included a clause that as
long as I gave about a week’s
notice [the buyer] would repay
the difference,” she said.
Buyers and sellers who can be
writing, said Sharon Jarrott, partner with Washington-based Capital Properties.
“If everyone agrees to a few
days extra, simply put it in email,”
Jarrott said. “I feel better when
there’s a piece of paper. If anything should happen to me or
anyone, there needs to be an
email.” It can be a two-sentence
email — a record that everybody
has agreed to certain terms, such
as no security deposit required
and keys to be turned over on a
certain day.
Alert the lender
As a broker, Jarrott said that
this paper trail is crucial. “The
broker has obligations to comply
with the law even when everyone
is agreeable,” she said. And things
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occasionally happen; for example, a seller or buyer could have a
sudden medical crisis or even die.
Without the proper paperwork,
that could leave the transaction in
limbo.
At the end of a rent-back period
when the seller moves out, the
buyer can withhold part of the
security deposit if damage occurs
after closing. Think: pets, kids,
moving furniture. The seller has
to maintain the home in the state
it was in at settlement.
The buyer, in turn, must be
reasonable. The security deposit
is not for repairing items that
were never at issue in the sales
process — such as replacing light
fixtures that are out of style but
still working.
In terms of timing, rent-backs
should be seen as a short-term
solution. If the parties engage in a
rent-back longer than a certain
number of days, the lender may
consider it an investment property and adjust the terms of the
loan. Lenders charge higher interest rates for loans for investment
properties than principal residences.
Lenders are on the lookout for
loan fraud in the form of investors
purchasing a home at a principal
home rate and then never actually
living there. The buyer should
discuss the terms carefully with a
lender before entering into the
agreement.
Another consideration is the
timing of the rent payment. Wrapping the rent into the closing and
delivering it as a single payment
can minimize stress for all parties.
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35
EZ
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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EZ
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THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 14, 2017
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THE WASHINGTON POST
.
OCTOBER 14, 2017
Real Estate section inside
FALL
HOME
GUIDE
WHERE WE LIVE: STONE RIDGE
HARNEY
COVER STORY
Quality of life in this Loudoun
community outweighs the traffic
frustrations, residents say. 6
Mortgage fraud — even
by consumers — is
rising. 8
Luxury sheds add high
style to living spaces. 18
3.91
Mortgage rates rise. 28
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