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The Washington Post – October 18 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Sunny 71/47 • Tomorrow: Mostly sunny 73/54 B8
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
. $2
Drug czar pick
bows out amid
criticism of law
MARINO GUIDED BILL THAT WEAKENED DEA
Justice Dept. official ‘very concerned’ about measure
BY J OHN W AGNER,
L ENNY B ERNSTEIN
AND S COTT H IGHAM
BULENT KILIC/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A Syrian Democratic Forces fighter looks out of a building in Raqqa on Monday. The offensive to recapture the city began in June.
U.S.-backed force claims victory in Raqqa
BY
L OUISA L OVELUCK
AND L IZ S LY
Seizure of Islamic State’s onetime capital raises
questions about America’s future role in Syria
beirut — U.S.-backed forces in
Syria claimed Tuesday that they
had full control of the Islamic
State’s onetime capital of Raqqa,
heralding an end to the militants’
presence in their most symbolically important stronghold and
raising new questions about the
United States’ future role in Syria.
Mustafa Abdi, a spokesman for
the Syrian Democratic Forces, or
SDF, said that military operations
had halted and that members of
the joint Kurdish-Arab force were
clearing the city of explosive devices and hunting for sleeper
cells.
The U.S. military said a formal
victory announcement will come
after SDF forces are sure that no
pockets of Islamic State resis-
Sept. 2013
June 2014
Mosul
SYRIA
Sept. 2015
Mosul
Raqqa
tance remain in the city, but the
SDF portrayed the battle for
Raqqa as over.
“There is an air of jubilation in
the city,” Abdi said. “People are
overjoyed that they are finally rid
of this scourge.”
Kurdish and Arab fighters took
to the streets to celebrate the end
Raqqa
Al-Qaeda in Iraq, based
in Raqqa, morphs into
the Islamic State.
Islamic State control
Sources: Institute for the Study of War
and IHS Jane’s Conflict Monitor
Raqqa
Tikrit
Fallujah
Baghdad
Baghdad
Baghdad
Baghdad
The Islamic State
begins its march into
Iraq, first down the
Euphrates River to
Fallujah in March and
then taking Mosul in June.
By mid-2015, the
Islamic State has
expanded to its
maximum extent.
Decision in federal court
sets up further legal war
on Trump’s policy power
BY
Mosul
With Iraqi forces’
operations in
Fallujah and Ramadi,
the influence of the
Islamic State begins
to wane.
Amid Iraqi operations,
Mosul falls in July,
and a joint
Kurdish-Arab force
clears Raqqa in a
four-month operation.
MARINO CONTINUED ON A6
Silence on Niger ambush: Trump
waited 12 days to mention the
killing of four Green Berets. A4
Manufacturing ills: A weakened
sector leads to more abortions and
abuses, a White House file says. A6
Judge largely halts latest
version of travel ban
Oct. 2017
Mosul
Tikrit
Fallujah
Iraqi forces on move: Kurds lose
ground around city of Kirkuk. A15
Raqqa
IRAQ
Baghdad
RAQQA CONTINUED ON A15
Oct. 2016
Mosul
Raqqa
of the battle they have fought for
four months, climbing onto vehicles and parading around the deserted, destroyed city, according
to photographs posted on social
media. One showed the offensive’s commander, Rojda Felat,
waving a large yellow-and-red
SDF flag in Naim Square, where
the Islamic State carried out its
beheadings.
President Trump announced
Tuesday that Rep. Tom Marino
(R-Pa.), his nominee for drug czar,
was withdrawing in the wake of
an investigative report detailing
how he helped pass legislation
weakening the Drug Enforcement
Administration’s ability to go after drug distributors, even as opioid-related deaths continue to
rise.
With Marino’s withdrawal —
announced by the president in a
morning tweet — the administration’s scrutiny of the law intensified. Deputy Attorney General
Rod J. Rosenstein said he was
“very concerned about it” and
planned to review whether the
DEA needs “more tools” to carry
out its mission.
But it was unclear how aggres-
sively Congress will reassess a bill
that was passed last year with no
opposition. A spokesman for Sen.
Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa),
chairman of the Senate Judiciary
Committee, said the panel was
exploring “the idea of holding an
oversight hearing” to learn what
had changed since President Barack Obama signed the bill.
Democratic lawmakers, meanwhile, sought to increase pressure
for action and cheered Marino’s
exit. They argued that his nomination demonstrated a lack of commitment from Trump to addressing the opioid crisis that has
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
A federal judge on Tuesday
largely blocked the Trump administration from implementing
the latest version of the president’s controversial travel ban,
setting up yet another legal showdown on the extent of the executive branch’s powers when it
comes to setting immigration
policy.
The decision from U.S. District
Judge Derrick K. Watson in Hawaii is sure to be appealed, but for
now, it means that the administration cannot restrict the entry
of travelers from six of the eight
countries that officials said were
unable or unwilling to provide
information that the United
States wanted to vet the countries’ citizens.
The latest ban was set to go
fully into effect in the early hours
of Wednesday, barring various
types of travelers from Syria, Libya, Iran, Yemen, Chad, Somalia,
North Korea and Venezuela. Watson’s order stops it, at least temporarily, with respect to all the
countries except North Korea and
Venezuela.
In a 40-page decision granting
TRAVEL BAN CONTINUED ON A10
The ban at home: A Syrian family
in Ohio worries it won’t reunite. A3
Latest health-care effort quickly stalls Despite decision against Uber, London’s rivalry
GOP flak, mixed signals
from Trump on senators’
ACA subsidies proposal
BY S EAN
J ULIET
AND A MY
S ULLIVAN,
E ILPERIN
G OLDSTEIN
Yet another last-ditch effort to
tackle the nation’s health-care
system stalled within hours of its
release by a bipartisan pair of
senators Tuesday, with President
Trump sending mixed signals
and Republicans either declining
to endorse the proposal or outright opposing it.
The week began on Capitol
Hill with a renewed sense of
urgency to craft legislation fol-
lowing Trump’s decision last
week to end key payments to
health insurers that help millions of lower-income Americans
afford coverage but that the president argued were illegal under
the Affordable Care Act.
The compromise offered by
Sens. Lamar Alexander (RTenn.) and Patty Murray (DWash.) on Tuesday proposes authorizing those payments for
two years in exchange for granting states greater flexibility to
regulate health coverage under
the ACA. Those payments help
offset deductibles and other outof-pocket costs for low-income
consumers who obtain insurance through the law; critics of
Trump’s decision said eliminating the subsidies would cause
insurers to back out of marketSENATE CONTINUED ON A7
ACA legislation, again
Last week, President Trump
ended Obamacare payments to
health insurers that help lowerincome Americans afford coverage.
On Tuesday, a bipartisan pair of
senators proposed authorizing
those payments for two years while
giving states more flexibility to
regulate insurance markets.
The bill quickly met trouble, with key
Republicans declining to support it.
Critics say insurers could
withdraw from markets if the
payments aren’t restored.
Abortion fight: The ACLU claims
the U.S. is illegally blocking an
undocumented teen in custody
from getting the procedure. A13
THE NATION
RICHARD DREW/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Campus visit Extraordinary safety measures
are being taken for a speech by white
nationalist Richard Spencer in Florida. A10
BY K ARLA A DAM
AND W ILLIAM B OOTH
IN THE NEWS
No consensus An NFL players meeting with
team owners ended without a resolution on
protests during the national anthem. D9
between traditional, modern transit continues
U.S. prosecutors
charged two Chinese
nationals who sold fentanyl to Americans over
the Internet, the Justice
Department said. A3
A watchdog will oversee a policy that Attorney General Jeff Sessions reinstated to seize
assets from people suspected of crimes. A9
A federal judge ruled
that a Kentucky sheriff’s
deputy who handcuffed
two children violated
their rights. A12
The nation’s opioid epidemic has unleashed a
secondary outbreak: the
rampant spread of
hepatitis C. A12
THE WORLD
The revelations about
Harvey Weinstein’s behavior prompted women across the globe to
share their stories of
sexual assault and harassment. A13
The man poised to
lead the Czech Republic
bears an uncanny similarity to President
Trump. A14
Deadly attacks by the
Taliban on Afghan security units underscored
the militants’ resilience
and reach. A15
THE ECONOMY
After failing to find
EDDIE KEOGH/REUTERS
Black cabs in London, where officials said they would not renew
Uber’s license. The firm was not found “fit and proper” to operate.
financiers, Nordstrom
abandoned its move to
go private for now. A16
THE REGION
A white University of
Maryland student accused of fatally stabbing
a black student visiting
the campus was charged
with a hate crime. B1
Ralph Northam entered the month with a
2-to-1 cash lead over Ed
Gillespie in the Virginia
gubernatorial race, but
polling remains tight. B1
More than 100 police
officers put Howard
University on temporary
lockdown following calls
about a possible shooter
on campus. B1
Manassas will allow a
nonprofit to buy a
mobile-home park
plagued by sewer problems, giving residents a
likely reprieve from
eviction. B4
london — You are a passenger
hailing a ride in a city both historic and hip, a guardian of custom
and a hub of change. You might
not realize it, but your taxi choice
— go with tradition or punch an
app? — puts you right in the
middle of a debate about the
future of work, technology and
who regulates whom.
In London, the ride-sharing
company Uber, employing tens of
thousands of gig-working immigrants in humming Japanese hybrids, finds itself in a high-stakes
brawl with the long-established
cabbie business, whose iconic
black taxis are operated by old-
Inside
FOOD
Falling for flavor
Five ingredients can help
you get the most out of
autumn’s bounty. E1
OBITUARIES
Vincent E. Reed, who
restored stability and
lifted academics as D.C.
schools superintendent,
died at 89. B1
ST YLE
No paradise?
Two histories of a town in
the Dominican Republic
that gave Jews refuge. C1
ST YLE
Michelin’s second
guide offers only a small
portion of Washington’s
eclectic dining scene,
says Washington Post
critic Tom Sietsema. C1
George Saunders was
the second American in
a row to win the Man
Booker Prize, with his
novel “Lincoln in the
Bardo.” C3
UBER CONTINUED ON A11
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A16
COMICS........................................C7
OPINION PAGES ......................... A20
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS.............................A14
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 317
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
8 9 1 7
A2
EZ
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5:08 p.m.
The New York Yankees host the Houston Astros in Game
5 of the American League Championship Series of the
Major League Baseball playoffs. Follow the game at
postsports.com.
7 p.m.
The Washington Wizards host the Philadelphia 76ers at
Capital One Arena. Follow the game at postsports.com.
9 p.m.
Sens. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.)
debate efforts to overhaul the nation’s tax code in a CNN
town hall in Washington. For details, visit washingtonpost.
com/politics.
9:01 p.m.
The Los Angeles Dodgers visit the Chicago Cubs in Game
4 of the National League Championship Series. Follow the
game at postsports.com.
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CO R R ECTI O N S
An Oct. 17 Page One article about
President Trump’s then-nominee
to lead the Office of National Drug
Control Policy and a bill he helped
guide into law curbing the powers
of the Drug Enforcement
Administration incorrectly said
that Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.)
was absent from Congress,
receiving breast cancer treatment,
when the bill was passed.
McCaskill’s staff, which provided
incorrect information, later said
she was present when the bill
passed by unanimous consent.
A chart with an Oct. 15 Page One
article about a bill curbing the Drug
Enforcement Administration’s
powers misstated the lobbying
position of the Pharmaceutical
Research and Manufacturers of
America. The group listed the bill in
disclosing its lobbying expenditures
but took no position on it.
An Oct. 15 Travel article about a
knitting-themed Windjammer
cruise incorrectly described the
two-masted schooner’s plumbing.
The J.&E. Riggin’s system is
modern, not from the 1920s.
The Washington Post is committed to correcting errors that appear in the
newspaper. Those interested in contacting the paper for that purpose can:
Email: corrections@washpost.com.
Call: 202-334-6000, and ask to be connected to the desk involved — National,
Foreign, Metro, Style, Sports, Business or any of the weekly sections. Comments
can be directed to The Post’s reader advocate, who can be reached at 202-3347582 or readers@washpost.com.
I had dinner over
the weekend at
the “soft opening”
of a buzzy new
restaurant, where
a pedigreed chef
Dana
offers an
Milbank
ambitious menu
WASHINGTON at a price of
nearly $40 per
SKETCH
entree.
It was more
soft than opening.
The bartender, asked for a
cocktail, spilled rail liquors into
a glass with abandon.
The duck arrived so bloody it
appeared to have gone from
pond to plate without pausing
before a heat source. The quail
was foul, and the waiter — there
was only one, and he spent most
of his time attending to a solo
diner who appeared to be the
chef ’s wife — did not know
whether they had wines by the
bottle or what they might cost.
The appetizer plates remained
on the table until it was time for
dessert, which we had to skip to
get home by daybreak.
“This,” one of my dining
companions said, “is how John
Kelly must feel every day.”
Precisely. The White House
chief of staff is the maitre d’ at a
restaurant opening gone
horribly wrong. The dishes are
coming out ill-timed and halfbaked, if they come out at all.
The chef clearly has no idea how
to cook, and all he seems to do is
yell — at servers, line cooks,
investors and, particularly,
restaurant reviewers. The chef
has paranoid hypotheses about
other restaurateurs sabotaging
him. The tables are mostly
empty, and the few loyal patrons
are queasy.
Thanks to Sen. Bob Corker (RTenn.), we now have a mental
image of the White House as
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly takes questions during the
daily news briefing at the White House Thursday in Washington.
“adult day-care center” for
President Trump. Gabe Sherman
writes in Vanity Fair that
presidential confidants describe
him as “unstable,” “losing a step”
and “unraveling.” The
Washington Post’s Ashley Parker
and Greg Jaffe find some Trump
aides “spend a significant part of
their time devising ways to rein
in and control the impetuous
president, angling to avoid
outbursts.”
Kelly himself speaks of a
fragile boss: “When we go in to
see him now, rather than onesies
and twosies, we go in and help
him collectively understand
what he needs to understand to
make these vital decisions.”
Maybe he was better off in a
onesie?
The White House as adult daycare center is an attractive
metaphor, though incomplete.
It suggests those managing
the patient are professionals.
Though this is true of Kelly,
many others seem as unbalanced
and inexpert as the patient.
Hence the “soft opening”
metaphor: The kitchen and
TEXAS
Pilot in balloon crash
probably was impaired
The pilot in the deadliest hotair balloon crash in U.S. history
was probably impaired by
Valium, opioids, and cold and
allergy medicine when he
ignored weather warnings and
flew the ride into a power line,
investigators said Tuesday.
In addition to Valium and
oxycodone, there was enough of
the over-the-counter
antihistamine Benadryl in Alfred
“Skip” Nichols’s system to mimic
“the impairing effect of a blood
alcohol level” of a drunk driver,
said Nicholas Webster, a National
Transportation Safety Board
medical officer.
During a meeting in
Washington, the NTSB revealed
its findings about the July 2016
crash near Austin that killed all
16 people aboard. Investigators
scolded the Federal Aviation
Administration for lax
enforcement of the ballooning
industry and recommended that
balloon pilots submit to the same
medical checks as airplane pilots.
Nichols, 49, had at least four
convictions for drunken driving,
although no alcohol was found in
his system after the crash.
Investigators said Nichols was
told during a weather briefing
before the flight that clouds may
be a problem. He brushed off
the warning.
— Associated Press
MICHIGAN
Judge orders Flint to
pick a water source
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OCTOBER 18 , 2017
waitstaff have just discovered
their celebrity chef is barking
mad and doesn’t know how to
cook, but they can’t do anything
about it because they’re having
trouble enough figuring out how
the dishwasher works.
Consider the menu at
Restaurant Trump this week:
The president’s nominee for
drug czar, Rep. Tom Marino (RPa.), has to be returned to the
kitchen after The Post and CBS
News’s “60 Minutes” report he
helped pass legislation making it
harder for the Drug
Enforcement Administration to
act against big drug companies
(which Trump complains are
“getting away with murder”).
Trump was apparently
unaware of this.
The president cooks up an
utter falsehood when he
proclaims “President Obama and
other presidents, most of them,
didn’t make calls” to the families
of fallen U.S. troops. He then
politicizes the death of Kelly’s
son.
The president serves up a
denunciation of some of his
fellow Republicans for “not
getting the job done,” saying they
“should be ashamed of
themselves.” He voices sympathy
for former aide Stephen K.
Bannon’s war on Republicans
such as Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell (Ky.). Trump
then sits down to lunch with
McConnell and emerges saying
the two are “closer than ever”
and he would try to talk Bannon
out of his attacks.
The most worrisome dish
coming from Trump’s kitchen,
though, is his new specialty:
hostage taking.
Trump on Friday said he
would kill the Iran deal — unless
Congress does something to save
it.
Trump threatened to pull the
plug on Obamacare funds,
potentially causing millions to
lose health care — unless, he
said, Congress passes a new
health-care program.
Before that, he said he would
kill the DACA program
protecting immigrant
“dreamers” — unless Congress
enshrines it in law.
In each case, the dare is the
same: Stop me before I kill
again.
Congress struggles these days
even to name post offices.
Only a madman would think
Congress could swallow what
Trump has ordered for them.
As we left the restaurant
Saturday, two women outside
asked how it was. We explained
about the “soft opening.” The
women said they tried the place
a month earlier and were told,
then, too, it was a “soft opening.”
How long can a “soft opening”
continue before it’s a flop? How
long can this White House
continue to serve slop before we
accept that the chef is mad?
Twitter: @Milbank
DIGEST
•
t
•
t
t
. WEDNESDAY,
Trump cooks up a sou≠lé of dysfunction
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
8 a.m.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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H
A judge on Tuesday ordered
officials in Flint to choose a longterm source of drinking water by
next week, saying the city council
is showing a “breathtaking” lack
of leadership.
Gov. Rick Snyder’s
administration sued Flint to
force the council to approve a 30year deal with the Great Lakes
Water Authority, a regional water
agency, which has been serving
the city since a lead disaster was
declared in fall 2015.
Mayor Karen Weaver agrees
with the plan, but the council
hasn’t been convinced and only
recently hired a consultant. A
court-appointed mediator has
been unable to broker a
settlement.
U.S. District Judge David
Lawson expressed frustration
and set a Monday deadline for
Flint to sign up with Great Lakes
Water or come up with another
long-term solution. He didn’t
indicate what would happen if
the deadline is missed.
Flint ran into extraordinary
trouble when managers
appointed by Snyder (R) put the
city on water from the Flint River
in 2014 while a pipeline was
being built to Lake Huron.
The corrosive water wasn’t
properly treated, and lead
leached from old plumbing into
homes of the approximately
100,000 residents.
— Associated Press
BAC TOTRONG/BOWLING GREEN DAILY NEWS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Employees of Michigan-based Horizon Brothers Painting repaint
the Reservoir Hill water tower in Bowling Green, Ky. The tower,
which was built in 1966, stores 1 million gallons of water. Its
repainting is expecting to be finished in December.
MINNESOTA
her as punishment: A 325-pound
Little-used defense for
pipeline protesters
Florida woman is charged with
killing her 9-year-old cousin by
sitting on the child to punish the
girl. Veronica Green Posey, 64,
was arrested and charged with
homicide and cruelty toward a
child, the Pensacola News
Journal reported. The Escambia
County Sheriff’s Office report
identified Posey as the girl’s
cousin. Paramedics and deputies
responded to the family’s
Pensacola home following a 911
call Saturday. The arrest report
said two other adults, Grace Joan
Smith and James Edmund Smith,
are charged with child neglect.
A Minnesota judge took the
unusual step of allowing four
protesters to use a “necessity
defense,” enabling them to
present evidence that the threat
of climate change from Canadian
tar sands crude is so imminent
that they were justified in trying
to shut down two Enbridge
Energy oil pipelines last year.
Emily Johnston and Annette
Klapstein freely acknowledge
that they turned the emergency
shut-off valves on two pipelines
on Oct. 11, 2016, in Clearwater
County in northwestern
Minnesota. It was part of a
coordinated action by Climate
Direct Action activists to shut
down five pipelines that carry tar
sands crude from Canada to
Minnesota, North Dakota,
Montana and Washington state.
A total of 11 activists were
charged.
Johnston and Klapstein, who
are from the Seattle area, said
Tuesday that as far as their legal
team knows, this is the first time
that a judge has allowed a full
necessity defense on a climate
change issue.
Michael Foster of Seattle was
convicted Oct. 6 of targeting the
Keystone pipeline in North
Dakota. The judge in his case
barred him from using a
necessity defense. He faces up to
21 years in prison when he is
sentenced Jan. 18. A defendant
who filmed him was convicted of
conspiracy and faces up to 11
years.
Johnston and Klapstein are
due to go on trial Dec. 11 on felony
charges of criminal damage to
critical public service facilities
and other counts. In an order
Friday, Clearwater County
District Judge Robert Tiffany
said the four defendants must
clear a high legal bar.
— Associated Press
Child dies after woman sits on
Airport security officers fired
over treatment of passenger:
The Chicago Department of
Aviation fired two security
officers who were involved in an
incident in which a passenger
was dragged off a United Airlines
flight after refusing to give up his
seat. Officials say one of those
officers, a sergeant, also was part
of an attempt to cover up some
details of the incident, which
happened in April at Chicago’s
O’Hare International Airport.
Four officers were involved in the
incident involving passenger
David Dao, who had been aboard
a flight to Louisville. The
department suspended the two
other officers.
Woman charged with drowning
her children: Police in
Wilmington, Del., charged a
woman with drowning her infant
son and the baby’s 5-year-old half
brother. Police said Tuesday that
officers found a 3-month-old boy
and a 5-year-old boy drowned in
a bathtub Monday morning. Kula
Pelima, 30, the mother of the
infant, is charged with two
counts of first-degree murder.
Investigators have been in touch
with the father of the boys, who is
being held in Pennsylvania by
immigration officials. Police say
Pelima called police about
8:30 a.m. Monday to say that she
had drowned the children.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Syrian family fears travel ban will ruin hope for reunion
BY
A BIGAIL H AUSLOHNER
columbus, ohio — He was worried about where his son might
be, but he tried not to let it show
as he texted his daughter 5,000
miles away in Istanbul. “This is
not the first time,” he tried to
reassure her after learning that
his son had gone to visit a friend
and had not returned.
Eblal Zakzok also had to reassure himself; his son was probably fine, but the anxiety began
gnawing at his stomach as he sat
safely in the American Midwest.
Zakzok’s two oldest children were
partway through college when
the family fled the war in Syria in
2014 — finding asylum in the
United States — but his oldest boy
and girl, 18 and 21, were left
behind in Turkey.
His son’s asylum application
stalled amid a lengthy vetting
process, and his daughter was too
old at the time her father was
granted asylum to receive the status through him.
Traditionally, U.S. immigration
proceedings have allowed for other routes to reunite a family in
such circumstances. But Zakzok
fears that a reunion might slip out
of reach. If President Trump’s
newest travel ban is enforced, the
Zakzok family might be permanently torn apart. A federal judge
in Hawaii temporarily blocked
much of the latest version of the
ban Tuesday, one day before it was
set to fully take effect.
It has been nine months since
Trump first rolled out policies
that activists and federal judges
branded a “Muslim ban,” whose
aim was to restrict the travel of
people from seven Muslim-majority countries, including the
Zakzoks’ native Syria. In the intervening months, there have been
more than 40 lawsuits, dozens of
court hearings and three official
policy shifts, the most recent of
which imposed an indefinite ban
on the citizens of six majorityMuslim countries, as well as on
North Koreans and some Venezuelan officials.
Trump has said the evolving
measures are necessary to protect
national security and prevent
ANDREW SPEAR FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Eblal Zakzok, an Ohio professor from Syria who is challenging President Trump’s travel ban, has tea with his daughter Rasha and his wife,
Saeeda, at their home Tuesday. Zakzok’s two eldest children are stuck in Turkey, barred from the United States because of their nationality.
would-be terrorists from entering
the United States. In announcing
a proclamation last month,
Trump described his ban as necessary to “protect the security and
interests of the United States and
its people.”
“Making America Safe is my
number one priority,” Trump
wrote last month. “We will not
admit those into our country we
cannot safely vet.”
The lawyers challenging the
policy say it’s the same old discriminatory ban.
“They’ve tried to amend each
version of it, thinking that will
pass legal muster,” said Avideh
Moussavian, a senior policy attorney at the National Immigration
Law Center, noting that the policies all arise from the same
flawed baseline. “All of these are
fruits of the poisonous tree.”
The administration’s policies
have shifted over time: A few
countries have been removed,
others added; the government
eliminated a specified exception
for non-Muslims; and there was a
court battle over who would be
considered to have a “bona fide”
connection to the United States —
refugees, it was determined,
would not, whereas an American’s foreign-born grandmother
would.
The newest policy is sweeping.
Some countries would receive
specific modifications, but the revision would ban almost all Syrians, Iranians, Libyans, Somalis,
Yemenis, Chadians and North Koreans.
Gone are the dramatic scenes
at airports, the swarms of demonstrators and tearful families that
came with the early days of the
ban. Protests have given way to
far less public battles in courtrooms, embassies and consulates
against a shifting web of red tape.
It is difficult to calculate how
many people would be affected,
lawyers say. Considering prior
visa patterns, it would be tens of
thousands. “It’s much easier to
account for someone in an airport
who is stuck or turned away than
for someone who is told to never
show up for a consular appointment at all,” Moussavian said.
Zakzok is one of those with a
pending lawsuit, a case that involves five other plaintiffs, including a Mississippi man whose wife
is separated from her sick child,
an American, who is receiving
medical care in the United States;
a New Yorker whose Syrian wife
and stepdaughter are stranded in
Europe; and a Maryland woman
who wants to bring her aging
father to live with her family.
“There are plaintiffs in our
group who have terminal illnesses, who want to see their relatives
for the last time. There are people
who are trying to start their lives
with their families whose spouses
are overseas — really basic, fundamental things,” said Omar Jadwat, an attorney for the American
Civil Liberties Union, which has
participated in the litigation.
“The whole way that our immigration system works and the arrangements that people have
made for their lives, which take
these laws into account, have,
with the stroke of a pen, been
upended.”
Zakzok, 47, born to farmers in a
rural hamlet of Aleppo, grew up
tending sheep and goats but went
on to earn a PhD from a British
university. His family fled Syria
after regime forces arrested him
one day on his way to work at the
University of Aleppo and held
him captive for two weeks, torturing him.
After Zakzok’s release, he was
invited to the United States to
present an engineering paper. He
requested asylum. Soon his wife
and three youngest children were
able to follow.
Zakzok was able to secure a
teaching position here, at Ohio
State University, with the help of a
fellowship program for exiled
scholars, and his children settled
easily into advanced chemistry
and biology classes at the local
high school.
But the vetting of his oldest son
dragged on for months. And Zakzok had to wait until he had his
green card to apply for an immigrant visa for his daughter, which
he did as soon as he was able.
Then, Trump was elected after
promising on the campaign trail
to stop the resettlement of Syrian
refugees and limit Muslims’ access to the country. Zakzok
thought some restrictions would
be put in place, but, he said, “I
didn’t think there would be a law
to prevent me from bringing my
daughter.”
Zakzok has asked that his children not be identified because he
fears for their safety. He is counting on his lawsuit, Zakzok v.
Trump, to preserve his ability to
bring his children here.
On Monday, a federal judge in
Maryland heard preliminary arguments on his case and three
others, asking probing questions
of the government and its challengers. Civil rights lawyers have
asked U.S. District Judge Theodore D. Chuang to block the ban
from taking effect, arguing that
the policy discriminates against
Muslims.
“I want him to know that we are
like the American people,” Zakzok
said. “We like freedom. We share
the value of humans, Americans,
the free world. We value the safety
of our neighbors, of our society.
He has nothing to fear from us,
from my daughter, my children.”
abigail.hauslohner@washpost.com
Advertisement
U.S. charges 2 in China
in online fentanyl sales
BY M ATT Z APOTOSKY
AND S ARI H ORWITZ
U.S. prosecutors have charged
two Chinese nationals who sold
fentanyl to American customers
over the Internet in a massive
international conspiracy case, the
Justice Department announced
Tuesday.
The case is unique, the department said, because the men are
the first Chinese-based fentanyl
manufacturers and distributors
to be slapped with a label reserved
for those who have control of the
most prolific international drugtrafficking and money-laundering organizations.
Prosecutors identified the men
charged in the case as Xiaobing
Yan, 40, and Jian Zhang, 38.
Yan, the Justice Department alleged, operated websites selling
fentanyl directly to U.S. customers
and also ran at least two chemical
plants in China that were capable
of producing tons of fentanyl and
fentanyl analogues. The department said that Zhang similarly
ran an enterprise that made
fentanyl in at least four labs in
China and that he advertised and
sold fentanyl over the Internet.
At a news conference held to
announce the charges, Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein
said the cases “mark a major milestone in our battle to stop deadly
fentanyl from entering the United
States.” The men were labeled
“consolidated priority organization targets” and are the first Chinese-based manufacturers to be
given the designation.
It is unclear whether they could
ever be brought to the United
States to face charges. Rosenstein
said that China has no extradition
treaty with the United States but
that U.S. authorities would share
the evidence in the case with their
Chinese counterparts and are “optimistic” that the Chinese would
take action.
Rosenstein said he was in China two weeks ago to meet with
China’s minister of public security
about fentanyl and other issues.
“They are, in fact, helping us,
but we need them to do more,” he
said.
Federal authorities have long
warned of the dangers of fentanyl,
a powerful synthetic opioid that
often contributes to overdoses
and is sometimes added to heroin
and cocaine. The substance is so
dangerous, authorities have said,
that it has sickened emergency
responders merely handling the
drug.
Rosenstein said the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
estimated that more than 20,000
Americans were killed by fentanyl
and fentanyl analogues in 2016.
Investigators think nearly all of it
and its components originate in
China, he said.
The cases against Yan and
Zhang originated domestically. In
Yan’s case, Rosenstein said, a 2013
traffic stop in Mississippi helped
uncover a drug ring selling bath
salts, and investigators working
that case identified Yan as a distributor of several illegal drugs.
His illicit work, Rosenstein alleged, spanned at least six years
and included monitoring legislation and law enforcement activities in the United States and China
to try to evade prosecution. Fentanyl’s chemical structure, Rosenstein said, can be modified to create analogues that are inside the
bounds of U.S. and Chinese law.
Federal agents identified more
than 100 distributors of synthetic
opioids in Yan’s network, Rosenstein said.
Investigators were tipped to
Zhang, he said, as they investigated the 2015 death of an 18-year-old
who had overdosed on fentanyl in
North Dakota. Tracing the source
of the substance that killed the
teenager took those working the
case through Oregon, Canada and
eventually to Zhang in China,
Rosenstein said.
Authorities found that Zhang
had shipped thousands of packages of fentanyl and other drugs to
the United States since January
2013, Rosenstein said. Charges
against him included conduct resulting in the deaths of four people from New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota and Oregon in
2014 and 2015, prosecutors said.
Prosecutors said that Zhang
and Yan were charged with conspiracy to distribute drugs and
related counts and that 21 people
have been indicted on drug charges as part of the investigation.
If convicted, Yan would face a
maximum penalty of 20 years in
prison; Zhang would face life in
prison, prosecutors said.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
Cybersecurity: Launch a Career in One
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What’s driving this sharp growth? With the pervasiveness of online communication and commerce in our
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The types of cyber attacks are becoming more sophisticated, more dangerous and harder to prevent.
Today, educational institutions, such as University of Maryland University College (UMUC), are playing
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Unlock Your Career Potential with a Cybersecurity Degree or Certificate at UMUC
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“What sets UMUC apart is our holistic interdisciplinary approach to cybersecurity,” said Emma GarrisonAlexander, DM, vice dean of cybersecurity and information assurance at UMUC. “Our curriculum
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1
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2
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A4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
In Niger deaths, Trump goes an unusual 12 days silent
BY P HILIP R UCKER
AND D AN L AMOTHE
On Oct. 4, the day four U.S.
Special Forces soldiers were
gunned down at the border of
Niger and Mali in the deadliest
combat incident since President
Trump took office, the commander in chief was lighting up Twitter
with attacks on the “fake news”
media.
The next day, when the remains
of the first soldiers reached Dover
Air Force Base in Delaware,
Trump was assailing the “fake
news” and warning the country of
“the calm before the storm.” What
storm, he never did say.
Over that weekend, as the identity of the fourth soldier was disclosed publicly and more details
emerged about the incident,
Trump was golfing and letting it
rip on Twitter about Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), the
NFL, North Korea, Puerto Rico
and, again, alleged media bias.
But a president who revels in
providing color commentary on
the news said nothing about what
happened in Niger for 12 straight
days — until Monday in the Rose
Garden of the White House,
where he was asked by a reporter
to explain his uncharacteristic silence.
In his answer, Trump said in his
defense that he had written personal letters to the soldiers’ family
members, and he then tried to use
the issue to gain a political advantage. Trump leveled false accusations at his predecessors, including former president Barack
Obama, saying they never or rarely called family members of service members who were killed on
their watch, when in fact they
regularly did.
As anger swelled, Trump continued to attempt to bolster his
broader claim Tuesday by invoking the death of Marine 1st Lt.
Robert Kelly, the son of White
House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly
who was killed in 2010 while serving in Afghanistan.
The White House has not explained why Trump took so long
to comment publicly about the
Niger ambush, but officials said
Tuesday that he was regularly
briefed on the incident during
that period. They declined to provide details.
The White House did not receive detailed information from
the Defense Department about
the four dead soldiers until
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump gives a news conference Monday with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.)
in the Rose Garden of the White House, where he for the first time acknowledged four soldiers’ deaths.
Oct. 12, and that information was
not fully verified by the White
House Military Office until Monday, according to a senior White
House official who spoke on the
condition of anonymity to comment on the internal process.
At that point, the official said,
Trump was cleared to reach out to
the four families — both in letters
that were mailed Tuesday and in
personal phone calls to family
members that day.
“He offered condolences on behalf of a grateful nation and assured them their family’s extraordinary sacrifice to the country
will never be forgotten,” White
House press secretary Sarah
Huckabee Sanders said.
In his call with Sgt. La David T.
Johnson’s widow, Myeshia Johnson, Trump told her, “He knew
what was signing up for, but I
guess it hurts anyway,” according
to the account of Rep. Frederica S.
Wilson (D-Fla.), who was riding in
a limousine with Johnson when
the president called and heard the
conversation on speakerphone.
Wilson recalled in an interview
with The Washington Post that
Johnson broke down in tears. “He
made her cry,” Wilson said. The
congresswoman said she wanted
to take the phone and “curse him
out,” but that the Army sergeant
holding the phone would not let
her speak to the president.
The White House neither confirmed nor denied Wilson’s account. “The President’s conversations with the families of American heroes who have made the
ultimate sacrifice are private,” a
White House official said in a
statement.
Leon Panetta, who served as
defense secretary and White
House chief of staff under Democratic presidents, said Trump
should have more quickly conveyed the “deepest regrets of the
country for the families that lost
their loved ones.” He put some of
the responsibility for Trump’s
slow response on his staff.
“Somebody screwed up here,
okay?” Panetta said. “You don’t let
that amount of time pass when
our men and women in uniform
have been killed.”
Trump did not serve in the
military — he sought and received
several draft deferments during
the Vietnam War — and has
drawn pointed criticism in the
past for his comments about military heroes.
As a presidential candidate,
Trump mocked the service of Sen.
John McCain (R-Ariz.), a prisoner
of war in Vietnam, and feuded
with the Gold Star parents of
Army Capt. Humayun Khan, who
was killed in Iraq in 2004.
And on his first full day as
president, Trump used a speech
before the Central Intelligence
Agency’s wall of stars honoring
intelligence officers who died in
service to air his personal grievances, including about the media
coverage of the size of his inaugural crowd.
Steve Schmidt, a Republican
strategist and former adviser to
Bush and McCain, said he was
surprised by Trump’s 12-day silence on the Niger attack.
“There is no issue too small for
him to comment on,” Schmidt
said. “He tweets at all hours of the
morning and night on every conceivable subject. He has time to
insult, to degrade, to demean always. But once again, you see this
moral obtusity in the performance of his duties as commander
in chief.”
Still, the brother of one of the
fallen soldiers, Staff Sgt. Dustin
Wright, 29, said he and his family
have not been bothered by
Trump’s comments.
William Wright said Tuesday
afternoon in an interview that his
parents were expecting a phone
call from the president soon and
that his family would consider it a
“great honor” to speak with him.
If Trump had called earlier,
Wright said, the family would not
have been ready for it.
“It’s not something we’re upset
by, and it’s not something we are
offended by,” Wright said. “This is
a devastating experience to go
through, and we have been
blessed with a lot of support. It’s
our hope that everyone can rally
around the families of the fallen
soldiers.”
Sanders defended Trump’s
Monday comments, saying the
president was not criticizing his
predecessors “but stating a fact”
that presidents sometimes have
called family members, sometimes have sent letters and other
times have met in person.
Inside the West Wing, Trump’s
advisers have been furious with
what they consider unfair criticism of their boss’s comments
leveled by former Obama staffers.
Privately, they have accused the
media of assuming the worst in
Trump — jumping to a conclusion
that he does not respect military
members because he waited so
long to comment on the four
killed Green Berets. One top aide
argued that a “tone and veil of
hate” has defined the coverage.
With the war against terrorism
continuing well into its second
decade, the number of battlefield
deaths has greatly declined, making the loss of four soldiers on a
single day all the more significant.
So far in 2017, about 30 service
members have died, compared
with at least 346 hostile deaths in
all of 2009 and 456 in all of 2010,
which were Obama’s first two
years in office.
Wartime presidents historically have wrestled with how often
they reach out to the bereaved,
which is an important part of
leadership, and how they maintain their own emotional health
by not letting personal grief overwhelm their judgment, said Eliot
A. Cohen, a senior State Department official in the Bush administration.
“If Franklin D. Roosevelt had
personally contacted the family
members of every service member who fell in World War II, he
would have been so overwhelmed
emotionally he could not have
made any decisions,” Cohen said.
This month’s deadly operation
in Niger was unusual and highly
sensitive, and the military has not
yet disclosed many details. It was
something of a surprise that the
Special Forces unit came under
fire — and the remains of one of
the fallen soldiers, Johnson, 25,
were not recovered until two days
afterward.
Marine Lt. Gen. Frank McKenzie, the director of the Pentagon’s
Joint Staff, told reporters Oct. 12
that the ambush marked the first
time in at least six months that the
U.S. military had faced enemy fire
in the region.
McKenzie said the operation
was meant to be an outreach
effort in which the U.S. soldiers
went out alongside local forces; it
was “not designed to be a combat
patrol.” But he defended the support the soldiers had, saying that
there was a “pretty good level of
planning” and that French forces
responded within 30 minutes
with helicopter air support.
The general said the Pentagon
believes there is some connection
to an affiliate of the Islamic State
terrorist group in the attack.
U.S. Africa Command first disclosed late Oct. 4 that U.S. troops
had come under fire in Niger. The
command confirmed the following morning that three U.S. soldiers — Staff Sgts. Bryan C. Black,
35; Jeremiah W. Johnson, 39; and
Wright — were killed.
On Oct. 6, the Pentagon disclosed that U.S. troops also had
recovered the remains of Johnson. The military did not explain
how Johnson was separated from
other U.S. forces in the mission, a
development that rarely occurs in
a military that prides itself on
never leaving service members
behind on the battlefield.
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis
told reporters Oct. 11 that he “completely rejected” any notion that
the rescue effort for the unit was
slow, and he promised that the
military will examine the operation.
“We’re not complacent,” he
said. “We’re going to be better.”
Sanders
twice
extended
thoughts and prayers on behalf of
the administration to the family
members of the dead soldiers — in
her press briefings on Oct. 5 and 6
— but Trump issued no statement
echoing his press secretary.
Bonnie Carroll, who founded
the Tragedy Assistance Program
for Survivors, said she has had
good experiences with several
presidents when it comes to
mourning the loss of fallen service members.
“While there is no one way to
acknowledge the death,” she said
in a statement, “what is important
for the family is that the president
acknowledges the life and service
of their loved one, and expresses
gratitude on behalf of the nation.”
philip.rucker@washpost.com
dan.lamothe@washpost.com
Alex Horton contributed to this report.
Trump undermines Kelly’s privacy efforts Katsas pressed about White House role
For the past seven
years, Gen. John
F. Kelly has gone
out of his way to
keep the death of
ASHLEY
his son free from
PARKER
politics.
He did not talk
about him when — just four days
after his death in southern
Afghanistan — Kelly found
himself commemorating two
other Marines killed in combat,
in a moving speech in St. Louis.
In fact, according to a
Washington Post report, he
specifically asked the officer
introducing him not to mention
his boy, 1st Lt. Robert M. Kelly,
who was killed instantly when he
stepped on a land mine while on
patrol in 2010.
Just last month, Kelly slipped
away from the White House to
attend a Marine Corps
scholarship golf tournament in
his son’s memory, with little
fanfare or attention.
But on Tuesday, Kelly’s boss,
President Trump, thrust his son
into the public and political
glare, invoking the younger Kelly
as part of a continuing attack on
former president Barack Obama.
In an interview with Fox News
radio, Trump singled out Kelly,
his chief of staff, as he attempted
to bolster his false claim a day
earlier that Obama never called
families of fallen U.S. service
members.
“I think I’ve called every
family of someone who’s died,”
the president told the host, Brian
Kilmeade. “As far as other
representatives, I don’t know.
You could ask General Kelly, did
he get a call from Obama?”
The remark, which was almost
immediately derided by
Democrats and Obama allies as
politicizing a tragedy, was
unplanned, said two White
House officials, who said they
were caught off-guard by
Trump’s comments. One said
Kelly may have mentioned some
details surrounding his son’s
death to the president in private
— and the president then
repeated them in public, a
relatively frequent occurrence
with Trump.
The president’s casual
assertion sent both sides
scrambling to recount their own
White
House
Debrief
version of events — underscoring
again that in Trump’s White
House, almost nothing is off
limits and just about anything
can be used to score political
points.
Leon Panetta, former defense
secretary under Obama and
former White House chief of
staff under President Bill
Clinton, said Trump’s comments
were below the dignity of the
office.
“I just think it demeans the
presidency when you use John
Kelly and his son, both of whom
are patriots, to back up his
excuses for whatever happened,”
Panetta said. “I just think it
creates a sense that there is no
sacred ground for this
president.”
A White House official,
speaking on the condition of
anonymity because he was not
authorized to discuss the matter
publicly, said Kelly did not
receive a call from Obama at the
time.
But in May 2011, Obama
hosted a breakfast for Gold Star
families — those who had lost a
family member who was in
uniform — and Kelly and his
wife attended, according to
White House records.
A person familiar with the
event said the couple were
seated at then-first lady Michelle
Obama’s table.
A former Obama White House
official, meanwhile, flatly
rebutted Trump’s initial claim
that Obama never — he later
backpedaled to suggest rarely —
called families of military lost
during his administration.
“President Obama engaged
families of the fallen and
wounded warriors throughout
his presidency through calls,
letters, visits to Section 60 at
Arlington, visits to Walter Reed,
visits to Dover, and regular
meetings with Gold Star families
at the White House and across
the country,” the official said.
Kelly, who became the
highest-ranking military official
to lose a child in Iraq or
Afghanistan, watched both his
sons follow him into the Marine
Corps. When Robert died, Kelly
and his sons had participated in
11 combat tours in Iraq and
Afghanistan combined.
But Kelly has been private
about his son’s death, even
though both his and his sons’
military service clearly informs
his thinking on White House
foreign policy and national
security decisions, which to him
are not merely intellectual
exercises, several White House
officials said.
Kelly has previously resisted
White House efforts to link
children’s deaths with politics
and policy. Earlier this year,
when Trump ordered the
Department of Homeland
Security to establish the VOICE
office — Victims of Immigration
Crime Engagement — Kelly, then
the homeland security secretary,
at the rollout of the office tried to
push back internally against
efforts to highlight “angel”
moms and families whose kids
were killed by undocumented
immigrants, one department
official said. The families were
featured at the event but did not
have a speaking role.
The official said Kelly is very
sensitive to his son’s death being
politicized, and recoils at
attempts to politicize parents
and families in this manner.
Still, Kelly has spoken publicly
about his son before. He
participated in the 2011
Washington Post profile, largely,
he said, to highlight the lives and
challenges of military families.
Even then, however, his
reticence emerged. When first
approached about the story, he
replied in an email: “We are only
one of 5,500 American families
who have suffered the loss of a
child in this war. The death of
my boy simply cannot be made
to seem any more tragic than the
others.”
Since joining Trump’s West
Wing team, Kelly is almost
always at the president’s side for
public appearances. But he was
notably absent Tuesday from a
Rose Garden news conference
with Trump and the Greek prime
minister.
The White House offered no
explanation of why Kelly was not
in attendance.
ashley.parker@washpost.com
Anne Gearan, David Nakamura and
Philip Rucker contributed to this
report.
BY A NN E . M ARIMOW
AND S EAN S ULLIVAN
Senate Democrats on Tuesday
pressed President Trump’s pick
for an appellate court in Washington about his role as a White
House lawyer in a series of legal
controversies and about whether
he could make judicial decisions
independent of the man who
nominated him.
In nine months as a deputy
White House counsel, Gregory G.
Katsas told senators considering
his nomination, he advised the
Trump administration on the
travel ban on residents of certain
majority-Muslim countries, ending protections for young undocumented immigrants and the
Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity.
Katsas, a former high-level Justice Department official and law
clerk to Supreme Court Justice
Clarence Thomas, sought to assure the Senate Judiciary Committee that he would recuse himself from any cases involving his
work as a government lawyer. The
role of a judge, he said, is to “apply
the law neutrally and fairly without regard” to the views of the
president behind a nomination.
The hearing Tuesday came as
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) is intensifying
efforts to install conservative jurists on the federal bench as political pressures mount on the Republican Party to show more concrete achievements after months
of struggling to govern. With no
major legislative accomplishments despite controlling both
chambers of Congress and the
White House, Republican leaders
have begun to worry about a backlash from its base in next year’s
midterms.
If confirmed by the Senate,
Katsas, 53, would join what is
often referred to as the nation’s
second-highest court in part because the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the District of Columbia Circuit
often rules on high-profile political cases involving executive power and government regulations.
In the nearly two-hour hearing,
Katsas acknowledged giving “legal advice on a few discreet questions” arising from special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation into Russia’s meddling in
Gregory G.
Katsas, the
president’s
nominee to serve
on the U.S. Court
of Appeals for
the D.C. Circuit,
has served as a
deputy White
House counsel. If
appointed, it
would be a
political victory
for Senate
Republicans.
ERIC THAYER/REUTERS
the 2016 election. He declined,
when asked by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), to provide any
details because of concerns, he
said, about violating attorney-client confidences.
Republicans, including Sens.
Orrin G. Hatch (Utah) and Ted
Cruz (Tex.), praised Katsas for his
intellect and integrity.
McConnell has faced pressure
from conservative activists to
ramp up his efforts on judicial
nominations. Lately, he has been
advocating against observing a
long-standing Senate tradition of
allowing senators a chance to
block judicial nominees who
would have jurisdiction over their
states. The “blue slips” have become a focal point on Capitol Hill
in recent days.
That process doesn’t exist,
however, for nominees to the D.C.
Circuit like Katsas, a Virginia resident, because the District has no
senators of its own.
It is not typical for a president
to reach into his own White
House Counsel’s Office to fill vacancies on a federal appellate
bench in part because of questions inevitably raised about the
nominee’s legal advice. President
George W. Bush’s nomination of
Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh to the
D.C. Circuit was stalled for three
years in part because of Kavanaugh’s work as a top White
House aide.
When asked Tuesday by Sen.
Christopher A. Coons (D-Del.)
about Trump’s pardon of former
Maricopa County, Ariz., sheriff
Joe Arpaio, Katsas responded, “I
couldn’t publicly criticize my client in order to advance my personal interests today.”
Nan Aron of the Alliance for
Justice, a critic of Trump’s judicial
nominees, said Katsas’s testimony “did nothing to reassure senators or the American people that
as a federal judge he would act as
an independent check on the outof-control schemes of the executive branch.”
Katsas has the support of many
attorneys in Washington’s legal
establishment, including lawyers
who worked with him during his
stint at the Justice Department
during the administration of
George W. Bush.
Carrie Severino, chief counsel
of the Judicial Crisis Network,
called Katsas “seasoned and well
respected” and called for a
“speedy confirmation.”
Katsas has argued more than
75 appeals, three at the Supreme
Court, including in one of the
challenges to the Affordable Care
Act.
A longtime member of the conservative Federalist Society, Katsas would replace another conservative retired judge, Janice
Rogers Brown. He would join a
bench with four judges nominated by President Barack Obama
and three others nominated by
Democratic presidents.
Even though Katsas repeatedly
refused to detail the substance of
his White House legal advice, he
did provide some insight into the
challenge of working for Trump in
the early months.
The president, he said in response to a question from Sen. Al
Franken (D-Minn.), was “extremely high energy, he had made
a series of campaign promises
and he demands results from people who work for him.”
ann.marimow@washpost.com
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. WEDNESDAY,
Conjuring, blasting enemies central to Trump’s strategy
Allies say fights let him
emphasize the populist
promises of his election
BY
Hillary Clinton is not running
for president again in 2020 — she
has said so, her aides know it,
and there is no political rationale
that would argue otherwise. But
for President Trump, facts like
those simply miss the point.
“I was recently asked if
Crooked Hillary Clinton is going
to run in 2020?” Trump declared
in a tweet Monday morning. “My
answer was, ‘I hope so!’ ”
Just like that, Trump had accomplished his morning task,
conjuring and then belittling a
political villain with little more
than taps on a phone. Using a bit
of deadpan humor and his unconventional grammar, Trump’s
tweet formed the next turn in his
us-against-them
story
line,
which employs an endlessly
evolving band of enemies to anchor his presidency.
By the afternoon, his tweet
had become a topic in an impromptu Rose Garden news conference, where he was able to
repeat the performance in person. “Hillary, please run again,”
he called out in a mocking tone.
Most days bring another
round, often at dawn, like plot
points in a 24/7 miniseries. In
just the past few weeks, Trump
has started, without any clear
provocations, fights with football
players who kneel during the
national anthem, department
stores that declare “Happy Holidays” instead of “Merry Christmas,” and late-night television
hosts for their “unfunny and
repetitive material.”
Then there are the individual
targets: Clinton, of course, but also
“Liddle” Sen. Bob Corker (RTenn.), North Korea’s “Little Rocket Man” Kim Jong Un, ESPN
anchor Jemele Hill, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer
(D-N.Y.), and a shifting array of
reporters, newspapers and networks he labels as the “fake news.”
Although the targets often appear tangential, if not contradictory, to his governing priorities,
both the president and his senior
aides see them as central to his
political strategy. In each instance, the combat allows Trump
to underline for his core supporters the populist promise of his
election: to challenge the power
of political elites and those who
have unfairly benefited from
their “politically correct” vision.
It’s a tactic he has employed
for years — defining himself
against a negative space, as a
tough truth teller who opposes
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
Among those scorned by President Trump are Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, ESPN anchor Jemele Hill,
Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) and the media. Aides say Trump struggles when he doesn’t have a foe to rail against.
others. In 1990, he condemned
his New York real estate rival,
Leona Helmsley, as a “truly evil
human being,” and decades later
he spent years nursing a viciously
personal feud with Rosie O’Donnell, a daytime television host,
largely through social media. His
rise to politics was built upon
sometimes shocking denunciations and insults.
Without a fresh foe to rail
against in real time, his political
aides have observed, Trump can
struggle, uncertain of his next
move and unable to frame the
political debate.
“The low points, if there are any,
are often when his opponent is not
clearly defined,” said one senior
White House official, who spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
speak freely about the president.
The official described the days
after the first failure to repeal the
Affordable Care Act in March and
the weeks near the general election in 2016 as particularly trying
times, because Trump was unable
for days to clearly define his enemy.
But when the president is on
track — he calls Twitter “my
voice” — he can script his presidency like a professional wrestling match, where the heel, or
bad guy, is the one who makes the
face, or good guy, shine in the
ring. This, as it happened, is how
he scripted his one appearance in
the professional wrestling ring,
at WrestleMania 23 in 2007.
In what was billed as the
“battle of the billionaires,” his foe
was Vince McMahon, the owner
of WWE, who long ago mastered
the art of playing the clown who
inspired hatred. With McMahon
winning the animosity of the
crowd, Trump’s participation was
limited to a few straight lines and
stoic looks. The sputtering fury of
the loser McMahon — whose
wife, Linda, now leads Trump’s
Small Business Administration
— told the story for him.
Similarly, the outrage of liberals and Trump skeptics — including many in the media — at
Trump’s denunciations often
helps the president with his base
voters and serves to spread the
Trump message further.
Former House speaker Newt
Gingrich, a supporter of the president, says he has come to see the
value of Trump’s strategy, which
can frame public debates to his
advantage. “In the spring, I quit
worrying about his tweets — and
I think some of the stuff he does
is outrageous — but he has a
larger vision of creativity,” Gingrich said. “He intuits how he can
polarize.”
Trump’s approach to finding
and elevating enemies is more
personal and more specific than
that of past presidents. His predecessor, Barack Obama, defined
and elevated political enemies.
But he followed in the tradition
of Theodore Roosevelt, speaking
of abstract wealthy and selfish
economic interests that had conspired with Republicans against
the middle class.
Like the other Democratic
populists of the 20th century,
including Franklin D. Roosevelt
and Harry S. Truman, Obama
rarely named specific people and
largely refrained from launching
personal attacks on the character
of his opponents.
If anything, Trump is harking
back to an earlier tradition, including the populist movement
of the late 19th century. “A villain
was needed, marked with the
unmistakable stigmata of the
villains of melodrama,” the historian Richard Hofstadter wrote in
his 1955 book “The Age of Reform.” “It was not enough to say
that a conspiracy of the money
power against the common people was going on.”
The early populist villains
were the rich, including the
Rothschild banking family and
the nation’s newspapers, which
were portrayed as puppets of the
powerful. Trump has embraced
some but not all of those approaches, says Michael Kazin, a
history professor at Georgetown
University who has written several histories of populism.
“It’s a populism that looks at
the political elite and the media
elite as opposed to the economic
elite,” Kazin said of Trump. “Ob-
viously, more than any president
I can remember, he thrives on
conflict.”
Several of Trump’s closest advisers have taken to echoing their
boss’s tactics. Trump’s eldest son,
Donald Trump Jr., has also made
a hobby of firing off social media
provocations. In just the past
week, he has attempted to quarrel with late-night host Jimmy
Kimmel (over his response to
Hollywood sexual harassment),
the Boy Scouts (for accepting
girls as members) and British
lawmakers (for their response to
acid attacks), among others.
Similarly, Trump senior adviser Kellyanne Conway began attacking Clinton last week after
news broke alleging years of
harassment and sexual abuse by
Harvey Weinstein, the Hollywood producer. Conway focused
on the time it took Clinton to
release a statement on Weinstein, a critique that neatly fit the
news about a Hollywood predator into a conservative political
story line.
When Fox News invited Conway on to talk more about Clinton’s alleged culpability, the
Trump adviser left little doubt
about her underlying motivations.
“I tweet very sparingly yet
strategically,” she said with a
smile. “I’m always amazed how
easily baited some people are.”
michael.scherer@washpost.com
Lawmakers and Trump officials increase scrutiny of drug enforcement law
MARINO FROM A1
gripped the nation.
A Washington Post/“60 Minutes” investigation published
Sunday explained how a targeted
lobbying effort helped bolster legislation, known as the Ensuring
Patient Access and Effective Drug
Enforcement Act, that made it
harder for the DEA to act against
giant drug distributors, some of
which were fined for repeatedly
ignoring warnings from the agency to shut down suspicious sales of
hundreds of millions of pills.
The law makes it virtually impossible for the DEA to freeze
such questionable shipments
from the companies, according to
internal agency and Justice Department documents and an independent assessment by the agency’s chief administrative law
judge in a soon-to-be-published
law review article. That powerful
tool had allowed the DEA to immediately prevent narcotic painkillers from spilling into the black
market.
“As a former prosecutor who
has dedicated my life to aggressive and faithful enforcement of
our laws, I have reached the difficult decision that the best course
of action is to remove the distraction my nomination has created,”
Marino said in a statement Tuesday.
Rep. Judy Chu (D-Calif.), an
original co-sponsor of the bill,
called Tuesday for an investigation into whether the law is harming enforcement and for hearings
to examine whether she was misled about its impact.
Chu, one of only a few Democrats to put her name on the bill,
said then-acting DEA administrator Chuck Rosenberg — who has
declined repeated interview requests — told her in a meeting last
year after the measure became
law that it “did not interfere with
the DEA’s ability to successfully
stop bad actors.”
White House
memo says weak
manufacturing
causes abortion
BY
M ICHAEL S CHERER
BILL CLARK/CQ ROLL CALL
Rep. Tom Marino (R-Pa.) was nominated in September to head the
Office of National Drug Control Policy. To hear lawmakers’
reactions to his withdrawal, visit wapo.st/trumpmarino1017.
A letter sent by Chu on Tuesday
to two House committee chairmen is the first account of Rosenberg’s position on the law.
Chu said in her letter that she
had thought the law “would help
independent and community
pharmacists, most of whom are
small business owners who provide vital services for their communities.”
In another development Tuesday, the nation’s largest drug manufacturing lobby broke ranks with
the distributors and urged the
law’s repeal.
“We need to ensure the Drug
Enforcement
Administration
(DEA) has sufficient controls and
authorities in place to prevent
illicit diversion of controlled substances,” Stephen J. Ubl, president
and CEO of the Pharmaceutical
Research and Manufacturers of
America, said in a statement.
Trump declined Monday to express support for Marino, nominated in September to lead the
Office of National Drug Control
Policy, when asked about him during a news conference.
On Tuesday, the president took
to Twitter to inform the nation of
Marino’s withdrawal, while adding: “Tom is a fine man and a great
Congressman!”
Trump has pledged to declare a
national emergency next week to
address the opioid crisis — a move
he first promised in August, when
he said the epidemic exceeded
anything he had seen involving
drugs in his lifetime.
Marino, 65, represents Pennsylvania’s 10th Congressional District, a solid-red, mostly rural area
that voted overwhelmingly for
Trump last year.
In his statement, Marino said
he looks forward “to remaining in
service to the people of Pennsylvania’s Tenth Congressional District
and continuing my long record of
championing solutions to better
equip law enforcement to combat
drugs.”
Marino’s staff called the Capitol
Police when The Post and “60
Minutes” tried to interview the
congressman at his office last
month. In the past, Marino has
said the DEA was too aggressive
and needed to work more collaboratively with drug companies.
After reports of Marino’s withdrawal Tuesday, Senate Minority
Leader Charles E. Schumer
(D-N.Y.) called Trump’s announcement “the right decision” but said
the nomination “is further evidence that when it comes to the
opioid crisis, the Trump administration talks the talk, but refuses
to walk the walk.”
Sen. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.),
whose state has been hard hit by
the opioid epidemic, and who was
among the first to call for Marino’s
nomination to be withdrawn, said
he welcomed the news.
“We need a drug czar who has
seen these devastating effects and
who is passionate about ending
this opioid epidemic,” Manchin
said in a statement. “I look forward to working with President
Trump to find a drug czar that will
serve West Virginians and our entire country.”
Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.),
who plans to introduce a measure
that would repeal the law weakening the DEA’s authority, said Tuesday that she is trying to find a
larger piece of legislation that
could serve as a vehicle for the
repeal effort.
“There certainly will be a vehicle by the end of the year,” McCaskill said. “We’re going to have several must-pass things at the end of
the year, if we can’t do it before.”
A senior aide to Schumer said
that Democratic leaders were
“still determining the best possible path” for a repeal effort.
Several Republicans who
worked on the legislation have
pushed back against critics of the
law, arguing that it was vetted
with the proper agencies and
there was plenty of time for any
objections to be heard.
“The Obama administration’s
Justice Department and the DEA
both were consulted on and approved of the Ensuring Patient
Access and Effective Drug Enforcement Act before it was unanimously approved by Congress
and signed into law by President
Obama,” the Grassley spokesman
said.
He added, “The committee is
exploring the idea of holding an
oversight hearing to determine
whether the agencies’ positions
have changed and whether changes are needed to the law.”
Marino spent years trying to
move such legislation through
Congress.
The Post and “60 Minutes” reported Sunday that DEA and Justice Department representatives
signed off on the final wording of
the bill that became law after
lengthy negotiations with the
staff of Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (RUtah) — a point Hatch made in a
speech on the Senate floor Monday.
But the DEA officials said the
agency was forced to accept a
compromise it did not want to
avoid language that would have
crippled enforcement even more.
Emails cited in the report supported that position.
The DEA’s chief administrative
law judge, John J. Mulrooney II,
has concluded that the law makes
it all but impossible for the agency
to freeze the shipments of large
drug distributors via an “immediate suspension order.”
“If it had been the intent of
Congress to completely eliminate
the DEA’s ability to ever impose an
immediate suspension on distributors or manufacturers, it would
be difficult to conceive of a more
effective vehicle for achieving that
goal,” Mulrooney wrote in an article to be published in the Marquette Law Review.
The DEA did not respond to
requests for comment Tuesday.
Top Obama administration officials have declined to discuss how
the bill came to pass.
john.wagner@washpost.com
leonard.bernstein@washpost.com
scott.higham@washpost.com
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
D AMIAN P ALETTA
White House officials working
on trade policy were alarmed last
month when a top adviser to President Trump circulated a two-page
document that alleged that a
weakened manufacturing sector
leads to an increase in abortion,
spousal abuse, divorce and infertility, two people familiar with the
matter said.
The documents, which were obtained by The Washington Post,
were prepared and distributed by
Peter Navarro, former director of
the White House Office of Trade
and Manufacturing Policy. They
were presented without any data
or information to back up the assertions and reveal some of the
materials the Trump administration reviewed as officials crafted
trade policy.
Two administration officials
confirmed the authenticity of the
documents, which emerged as the
administration threatens to withdraw from a free-trade agreement
with South Korea and takes a hardline stance against Canada and
Mexico in renegotiating the North
American Free Trade Agreement.
The fourth round of talks
wrapped up Tuesday amid pointed remarks and with few signs of
progress. Negotiators said the
talks would have to be extended
beyond the original deadline and
into 2018.
The administration has repeatedly linked the decline in U.S. manufacturing to NAFTA and other
trade agreements, claiming that
the deals were bad for U.S. workers.
Navarro has urged Trump to
favor bilateral trade agreements
over regional ones such as NAFTA,
and he supported the president’s
decision
to
abandon
the
Trans-Pacific Partnership. His
documents alarmed other White
House officials, who worried that
such unverified information could
end up steering White House policy, the two administration officials said, speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss the
documents, which were not released publicly.
The documents list what Navarro alleges are the problems that
have resulted from a “weakened
manufacturing base.” Some of the
consequences are economic, including “lost jobs,” “depressed
wages” and “closed factories.”
But a separate sheet claims “Socioeconomic Costs” of the decline
of the country’s manufacturing industry, such as “Higher Divorce
Rate,” “Increased Drug/Opioid
Use,” “Rising Mortality Rate” and
“Higher Abortion Rate,” among
many others.
“We don’t comment on purported internal documents,” said a
White House official, who would
only speak on the condition of
anonymity. “The president is
working hard on behalf of the
American people to make sure our
trade agreements are free and fair
and benefit the American worker.”
Navarro, an economist, is part
of a wing of small but influential
White House advisers who assert
that decades of free-trade policies
have decimated the U.S. manufacturing base and allowed other
countries such as China, Mexico
and Canada to take advantage of
the United States. They blame U.S.
reliance on exports for hurting
U.S. manufacturing, something
Trump has promised to reverse.
Two administration officials
gave differing accounts of Navarro’s memo, which was prepared
and shared last month. One described the documents as staff-level, but another said the paperwork
was shared with Cabinet secretaries during internal deliberations.
Trump has called NAFTA the
“worst agreement ever” and has
heard from a cacophony of voices
within the White House on how he
should proceed on his trade
threats.
White House National Economic Council Director Gary
Cohn, worried about what abrupt
changes might mean for the United States and the global economy,
has tried to press Trump to be
cautious. Commerce Secretary
Wilbur Ross has instead focused
much of his attention on dealing
with what he views as trade imbalances between the United States
and China, although some of
those decisions have also been
delayed as the White House has
focused on NAFTA.
Navarro had worked in the
White House Office of Trade and
Manufacturing Policy, a division
created by Trump after the inauguration. But the office was recently folded into the National
Economic Council. Despite losing
his official senior perch within the
administration, Navarro remains
influential and has argued for a
harder line on trade.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
Anne Gearan, Karoun Demirjian, Sari
Horwitz and Ed O’Keefe contributed to
this report.
Steven Mufson contributed to this
report.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
SU
Within hours of release, another health-care measure stalls
SENATE FROM A1
places across the country.
The measure presented congressional Republicans with an
uncomfortable choice between
helping sustain coverage for
many Americans and making
good on a long-standing campaign promise — and paying the
consequences — by allowing the
ACA to falter.
Senate Republican leaders did
not immediately endorse the proposal. Influential House Republicans panned the blueprint, and
Trump offered conflicting reviews. The discord swiftly cast
the plan’s viability into serious
doubt.
In an address at a Heritage
Foundation dinner in Washington on Tuesday, Trump commended “the bipartisan work” of
Alexander and Murray but suggested that a different kind of fix
is needed.
“I continue to believe Congress
must find a solution to the
Obamacare mess instead of providing bailouts to insurance companies,” Trump said.
Earlier in the day, at a joint
news conference with the prime
minister of Greece, Trump
sounded positive notes about the
plan. “Yes, we have been involved, and this is a short-term
deal,” Trump said. He said the
proposal would “get us over this
intermediate hump” and allow
Republicans to later revisit efforts to aggressively undo the
ACA.
In between those two appearances, the president tweeted:
“Any increase in ObamaCare premiums is the fault of the Democrats for giving us a ‘product’ that
never had a chance of working.”
Trump stopped the CSR payments last week, arguing that the
subsidies were illegal because
they were not explicitly authorized under the ACA, and he
instructed Congress to decide
whether to appropriate the funding.
“None of our guys voted for
Obamacare,” Rep. Tom Cole (ROkla.), a close ally of House GOP
leadership, said in an interview.
“They’re not very interested in
sustaining it.”
A leading House conservative
was outright hostile to the new
bipartisan plan. “The GOP
MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES
Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) speaks to a television reporter about the health-care compromise he
and Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) offered Tuesday. Republicans were cool; President Trump was mixed.
should focus on repealing & replacing Obamacare, not trying to
save it. This bailout is unacceptable,” said Rep. Mark Walker
(R-N.C.) in a statement posted on
Twitter. Walker is the chairman
of the influential Republican
Study Committee.
Senate Republican leaders
were less than enthusiastic.
“We haven’t had a chance to
think about the way forward yet,”
said Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) at his
weekly news conference, minutes after Alexander announced
the deal about 20 feet away,
outside a Republican policy luncheon.
Alexander said the deal he
struck with Murray would extend
CSR payments for two years and
provide states “meaningful flexibility” under the ACA, allowing
them to make changes to insurance offerings as long as the
plans had “comparable affordability,” which is a slightly looser
definition than the existing one.
In an interview, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer
(D-N.Y.) said both parties made
concessions to produce a deal
that would “stabilize the Afford-
able Care Act and undo a good
amount of the sabotage that
we’ve seen in recent days.”
“Each side had to give some,
but that’s what this is all about,”
Schumer added.
The framework would also allow insurers to offer catastrophic
insurance plans to consumers
aged 30 and older on ACA exchanges, while maintaining a
single risk pool. It would shorten
the time period for federal review
of state waiver applications, expedite review for states in emergency circumstances and those
with waiver proposals that have
already been approved for other
states, and allow governors to
approve state waiver applications rather than requiring state
legislative approval.
Alexander emphasized that
the legislation would not allow
states to change the essential
benefits insurers are now required to offer individuals and
small businesses under the ACA,
or let insurers discriminate
against consumers with preexisting conditions. “This takes care
of the next two years,” the senator
said, standing off to the side as
other GOP leaders stood before
television cameras talking primarily about tax legislation. “After that we can have a fullfledged debate on where we go
long-term on health care.”
Trump’s decision to halt CSR
payments last Thursday came a
week after he had called
Schumer to ask him to “work
together on a bipartisan solution
to health care,” in the senator’s
words, and had empowered Alexander to negotiate with Murray.
Schumer said that he realizes
Trump may push later on for
repealing the ACA outright, “and
we will fight him tooth and nail.”
But he added, “In the short run,
stability is in his interest, because otherwise its lands at his
doorstep.”
Still, it remains unclear how
Trump will choose to speak about
the bipartisan deal in the coming
weeks and days, and whether
recalcitrant conservatives will
come along.
The first test will come in the
Senate, where lingering hard
feelings from the failed attempts
to repeal and replace the ACA
remain. Senate GOP leaders have
moved on to tax cuts, their next
big legislative undertaking.
After Trump voiced his support for the health-care compromise, Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.),
McConnell’s top lieutenant, was
unwilling to commit to it.
“I think Sen. Alexander’s done
good work. And to me, it really
depends on a few things,” said
Cornyn, wondering aloud whether the proposal is “compatible”
with the GOP’s larger repeal-andreplace goal.
Earlier Tuesday, Sen. Lindsey
O. Graham (R-S.C.), who was
golfing with Trump on Saturday
when the president discussed the
prospect of negotiations on the
phone with Alexander, said that
even if a deal is struck, it may not
be enough of an overhaul to
satisfy core Republican voters.
“That will be his challenge,
how much is enough? I can’t
support the payments until you
get some reform, but I realize
that for the base, it’s going to be
about not keeping Obamacare in
place,” Graham told reporters.
In advance of the deal’s announcement, many Republican
senators were already distancing
themselves from the emerging
plan.
“I don’t know. I’m not sure
what the Senate should do,” said
Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah)
Tuesday morning.
In the House, which passed an
ACA repeal bill, there appeared
to be even less appetite for a bill
that bolsters an element of the
law that they have pilloried for
seven years without more forcefully rolling back other parts of it.
“This is like we have to fix the
Senate’s failure,” said Cole. Using
a football analogy, he blamed
Senate Republicans for fumbling
the ball on the one-yard line.
In the eyes of Cole and other
leading Republicans, the party’s
congressional majorities were
put at risk by the unsuccessful
repeal push. With Trump’s former chief strategist Stephen K.
Bannon already threatening primary challenges against senators
up in 2018, some fear that asking
lawmakers to reinforce the bill
they tried to undo is simply not a
defensible position.
On the other hand, doing nothing is also likely to spur criticism
of the Republicans.
As senators announced their
agreement, a new analysis
emerged Tuesday showing the
large stakes for insurers in the
short term if the cost-sharing
payments are not restored. By
the end of 2017, health plans will
lose more than $1 billion nationwide, according to the analysis by
Avalere Health, a Washingtonbased consulting firm.
Both state and industry officials welcomed the prospect of a
possible deal on the subsidies,
but they also warned that it could
come too late given that the
45-day open enrollment period
for the ACA begins Nov. 1.
The timing — just two weeks
before the start of the fifth enrollment season for ACA coverage —
could mean havoc back in states,
where some insurance regulators
already are reeling from Trump’s
decision to stop funding CSRs.
“It is better for consumers to
have CSRs funded, but the timing
is so short I am concerned,” said
Tennessee Insurance Commissioner Julie Mix McPeak, the
incoming president of the National Association of Insurance
Commissioners. If the deal becomes law, she said, insurers
would be able to lower their rates
in ACA marketplaces, “but I don’t
know that we have time to do
that before open enrollment.”
It appears likely that the vast
majority of Senate Democrats
will back the measure: Murray
received a round of applause
from her colleagues when she
announced the details of the
agreement in their weekly caucus lunch, according to participants, and no one expressed
dissent.
Still, Democrats said that they
wanted to read the details of the
bill. Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.)
said that the idea of expanding
the availability of catastrophic
plans on the ACA market and
making state waivers easier to
obtain “is not insignificant.”
Even if Democrats embrace
the plan in large numbers, Murphy said, Republicans could ultimately block its passage.
“It is not a done deal that this
agreement reached by Senators
Alexander and Murray will ever
become law,” he said.
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
John Wagner contributed to this
report.
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
Trump trails all modern peers in picking science adviser
BY
C HRIS M OONEY
President Trump has taken
longer than any modern president to name a science adviser,
according to an analysis from The
Washington Post, leaving vacant
a post tasked with providing scientific guidance even as his administration has proceeded with
science-related decisions.
The White House science adviser, a prominent position for
every president since the Eisenhower administration, is responsible for giving the president
scientific and technical advice in
“areas of national concern,” according to a 1976 law that codified the role and cited spheres
ranging from national security to
the environment.
More than eight months into
his first term, Trump has not
nominated anyone to the position. Once selected, Trump’s nominee would require Senate confirmation, which could take weeks
or even longer as Congress ad-
dresses a string of other contentious, time-consuming debates.
“I know that the president has
committed to appointing a director, and a shortlist of qualified
candidates have been narrowed
down,” said a White House official, who was not cleared to speak
for attribution, in response to The
Post’s analysis. The official said
that while it lacks a director, the
White House Office of Science
and Technology Policy does have
more than 40 staffers in place,
“including expertise in natural
disasters, energy, nuclear, national security.”
Still, the long-standing vacancy contrasts sharply with Trump’s
predecessors. President-elect Barack Obama nominated John
Holdren, a Harvard physicist and
energy expert, on Dec. 20, 2008 —
a month before taking the oath of
office. Holdren was confirmed by
the Senate on March 19, 2009,
about two months into Obama’s
first term.
Former presidents John F.
Kennedy, Richard Nixon and Bill
Clinton all also named a science
adviser before taking office, with
Nixon being the quickest to pick
his; he named a nominee just
28 days after being elected. President Ronald Reagan waited four
months after his inauguration to
name his adviser. President
George H.W. Bush waited three
months. President Jimmy Carter
took two.
Even the modern president
who previously waited longest to
name a science adviser, George
W. Bush, moved more quickly
than Trump by a significant margin. Bush named physicist John
Marburger for the role in June
2001 and officially submitted
him for confirmation on Sept. 21,
2001.
“There’s little room for doubt
that the Trump administration’s
priorities do not include science
and technology, in sharp contrast
with every president, Republican
or Democrat, since World War II,”
said Neal Lane, a physicist at Rice
University who was Bill Clinton’s
second science adviser. “Not only
had previous presidents chosen
science advisers well before this
point in their first terms, many of
them had already laid out their
strategies for ensuring that the
U.S. remained a leader in science
and technology.”
Despite lacking a science adviser, Trump has moved forward
with a number of controversial,
high-importance decisions that
have prominent scientific components to them.
Indeed, it is notable that
Trump’s speech abandoning the
Paris climate agreement did not
address the fundamental science
of climate change, even though
he was making a decision about
how the United States would deal
with an issue principally scientific in nature. A trusted science
adviser might have changed that.
A number of other Trump decisions — on matters including
responding to hurricanes and
dealing with Iran’s and North
Korea’s nuclear programs — also
have key scientific elements to
them.
Meanwhile, although Congress
probably won’t go along, the
Trump administration has also
proposed radical cuts to federal
science budgets, even in previously protected areas, such as
medical research. Typically a science adviser would also be heavily involved in any such proposals.
The administration is also considering changing or scrapping
an international agreement regarding Iran’s nuclear weapons
program, where questions of
whether Iran is complying with
the agreement hinge on details of
the refinement of radioactive materials and other nuclear machinery. Obama’s energy secretary,
Ernest Moniz, who joined the
administration after serving as a
professor of physics and engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was closely
involved in negotiating the deal.
The role of the president’s sci-
ence adviser was first elevated to
major prominence by President
Dwight D. Eisenhower following
the Soviet launch of Sputnik in
1957. It has gone through many
permutations since.
Despite initially naming an
adviser very early after his first
election, Nixon later moved the
role out of the White House as he
dismantled the White House Office of Science and Technology in
1973, outsourcing its duties to the
National Science Foundation and
National Security Council.
The scientific community
loudly decried the move, and
after watching Nixon flout the
need for in-house scientific expertise, Congress in 1976 moved
to codify the science adviser role.
Congress passed and Ford signed
legislation to formally create the
White House Office of Science
and Technology Policy.
chris.mooney@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
In California, a direct — if costly — resistance to President Trump’s Washington
The
Debrief
sacramento —
Holding a prideof-place spot on
state Sen. Kevin
SCOTT
de León’s office
WILSON
wall is a painting
by a San Francisco
artist. The picture renders in
watercolor a rampant bear, the
state symbol, its hind legs set in a
bed of California poppies.
De León, a Los Angeles
Democrat who runs the
California state Senate, is
perhaps more than any other
politician shaping the character
of the state’s political project,
which he casts unabashedly in
opposition to the administration
in Washington. The words that
run next to the bear underscore
the point.
“California was not part of this
nation when its history began,”
the script reads. “But we are
clearly now the keeper of its
future.”
That ambition was declared a
day after Donald Trump’s
election to the presidency — by
de León and Assembly Speaker
Anthony Rendon, another Los
Angeles-area Democrat. It can be
read now as the founding charter
of the California resistance, a
political ethos that is progressive
in spirit, aggressively ambitious
in approach and often expensive
for those who live in the state,
including those who can least
afford it.
The first legislative session
since Trump’s election concluded
last month and, by all
assessments, was one of the most
productive in years.
Democrats here split the
agenda in two: what would have
been taken on regardless of who
was president, and what was
necessary to take on because of
who is president.
De León said the session’s goal
for the state was to help “make
the California dream affordable”
in a way that celebrates the
state’s cultural diversity and
DAVID PAUL MORRIS/BLOOMBERG NEWS
The U.S., California and POW/MIA flags fly in front of the California Capitol in Sacramento in March. The Democratic-dominated
legislature has been pursuing a progressive agenda starkly different from that being pushed in Republican-controlled Washington.
preserves its crackling economy,
the sixth-largest in the world if
California were a country. But
the message beyond the
legislative record is as
unmistakable as is the man to
whom it is directed: Where
California heads, so should the
nation.
“If John Kasich, Jeb Bush or
many other Republicans had
won the presidency, I as a
Democrat would have been
disappointed, but I would have
moved on,” he said. “This is
uniquely different. Right away
we saw that Donald J. Trump was
a clear and present danger to our
prosperity, to our progressive
values and to our people.”
The mythology of California is
rooted in a libertarian
adventurism that ended in doom
for the Donner Party but has
helped enrich Silicon Valley.
Now, though, the Western brand
of Republican politics once
exemplified by Ronald Reagan
has been flattened by
demographic change and the
unpopularity of the party’s
national standard-bearer. Trump
lost California by nearly
30 points in November and has
yet to visit the state as president.
State Democratic leaders are
largely unrestrained here by the
shrinking opposition. The only
brake on their grandest
ambitions is their own
ideological division, recognizable
as the same fight taking place
within the party nationally.
Here, the argument has
emerged around immigration,
regulation and health care —
that is, questions about just how
expansive and expensive the
agenda should be.
Lawmakers passed measures
that expanded environmental
regulations opposed by
Republicans in Washington,
declared the entire state a
“sanctuary” for the more than
2 million undocumented
immigrants estimated to live
here, and made more
transparent the cost of
pharmaceutical drug prices at a
time when Washington appears
unable to move on health care.
“We have shown that we can
proceed despite Washington,”
said de León, the force behind
the California Values Act, the
“sanctuary state” law that has
been condemned by the Trump
administration. “We know
Washington is not doing it, so we
have to.”
But the costs associated with
some of the legislature’s most
substantial achievements will
fall on California taxpayers in
the years ahead, making the
state with the highest poverty
rate in the country an even more
expensive place to live.
Lawmakers increased the
gasoline tax by 66 percent and
raised other transportationrelated fees. The moves are
expected to generate $52 billion
in the next decade to rebuild the
state’s patchwork of roads and
creaky bridges — the
infrastructure measure,
Democrats here say, that the
Trump administration has
promised and failed to deliver.
To address California’s
highest-in-the-nation housing
costs, lawmakers placed a
$4 billion bond measure on next
year’s ballot and made it easier
to build houses within
neighborhoods.
“There is a lot of talk about
how progressive the session was,
but I feel it was very regressive,”
said state Sen. Patricia Bates, the
chamber’s Republican leader.
“Our low- and middle-income
folks are going to see the cost of
living go way up — and we’re
already there.”
Bates represents a stretch of
coastal southern Orange and
northern San Diego counties
that has traditionally favored the
GOP’s stand on fiscal issues. She
is troubled by the occasional
distraction of Trump’s tweeting
and, like many other California
Republicans, by the implication
of some of his statements on race
and immigration.
But she is skeptical of the
Democratic dominance of
government in California. She
wryly pronounces the
opposition’s “resistance” in an
exaggerated French accent, and
calls much of the agenda
“sloganeering and not much
else.”
Republicans point to a few
measures that will fall hardest
on the poor: The 12-cent-pergallon increase in the gas tax;
higher real estate transaction
fees meant to help finance
affordable housing construction;
and a requirement that a
prevailing wage be paid to
construction workers for
medium-size and large
apartment projects.
That wage stipulation was the
price Democrats paid to labor for
support of the housing package.
But Republicans say it will add
tens of thousands of dollars to
the cost of each project built,
making that housing less
affordable.
Bates said Democratic leaders
excluded her caucus from much
of the legislating this year, except
in the move to extend by a
decade the state’s cap-and-trade
environmental law, which
requires greenhouse-gasproducing businesses to buy
permits for their emissions.
The bill, a priority of the
governor’s, passed with some
Republican votes. That support,
though, cost the Republican
leader in the Assembly his post
after the party rebelled, a sign of
its division over how much to
cooperate with the Democratic
agenda.
The Democrats had
disagreements of their own.
Gov. Jerry Brown (D), who
succeeded Reagan as governor in
the 1970s and returned to office
in 2011, ruled out an early
version of the sanctuary-state
bill because of concerns it raised
among state and federal law
enforcement officials.
Among its provisions, the bill
would have prevented state and
local police agencies from
communicating with federal
immigration officials and from
asking people about their
immigration status. Brown
worried that it would do too
much to protect undocumented
immigrants who commit crimes.
Negotiations produced a
compromise that allows state
and local law enforcement
agents to work with federal
immigration authorities in the
jails, leaving the rest of the
measure largely intact. Brown
signed it into law this month.
The bigger breach came over
the push to create a single-payer
health-insurance program, an
enormously expensive
undertaking that received
support from the powerful
California Nurses Association.
The measure would have paid
the health-care expenses of all
state residents, including
undocumented immigrants.
Cost estimates ran as high as
$400 billion a year — more than
twice the state budget — and the
bill included no way to pay for it.
De León pushed it through the
state Senate, nonetheless.
But Rendon, the Assembly
speaker, would not take it up, to
the enormous frustration of the
state Democratic Party’s left
wing. He called it “woefully
incomplete,” positioning himself
as a pragmatist to de León’s
more aggressive approach.
The idea is not dead,
especially with the national
health-care debate unsettled.
Lawmakers plan to have
hearings this fall on the
feasibility of a single-payer
system, although little is likely to
happen before the 2018 election,
which will bring in a new
governor and Senate leader. De
León is prevented by term limits
from running again; he has
announced that he is challenging
four-term U.S. Sen. Dianne
Feinstein (D) in next year’s
primary.
“The best resistance is for us is
to continue to thrive
economically,” said Kevin Liao,
Rendon’s press secretary. “Yes, at
times, we will fight back, as was
the case with the sanctuary-state
bill. But we were elected as
representatives of California,
and we will continue to take that
seriously.”
scott.wilson@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
RE
Biden, McCain form new alliance against Trumpism Watchdog appointed for
asset forfeiture program
@PKCapitol
philadelphia —
John McCain and
Joe Biden have
PAUL KANE
been on opposite
sides of many crucial national
security debates over the past 30
years.
From Iraq to Afghanistan to
Syria, the Arizona Republican
and the Delaware Democrat
clashed over the scope of the
American military mission and
the efficacy of reaching for
diplomatic resolutions for these
war-torn nations. They
maintained a genuine friendship
through 22 years of service
together in the Senate and then
Biden’s eight years as vice
president. Yet theirs was a fierce,
principled rivalry.
On Monday night, in the
cradle of liberty, those disputes
disappeared as Biden presented
the Liberty Medal to McCain at
the National Constitution
Center, a nonprofit organization
that touts bipartisanship and sits
across the street from
Independence Hall.
Another reality has also
brought them together:
President Trump, whose global
outlook has helped crystallize
just how closely aligned these
two elder statesmen really are.
“We believed in our country,
and in our country’s
indispensability to international
peace and stability and to the
progress of humanity,” McCain
said, growing unusually
emotional at times during his
address.
McCain pivoted into a fullfrontal attack on those who
“refuse the obligations of
international leadership and our
duty to remain ‘the last, best
hope of earth’ for the sake of
some half-baked, spurious
nationalism.” He did not
mention Trump by name, but the
implication was clear, and it
brought a standing ovation from
a crowd that included
Democratic and Republican
members of Congress from the
region.
The event helped illustrate the
rapidly changing ideological
fault lines, under Trump, on
national security.
No longer is the divide
between those who want to
engage the world through brute
force and those pushing for more
diplomacy. Now, McCain and
MATT ROURKE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former vice president Joe Biden, left, presents Sen. John McCain
(R-Ariz.) with an award in Philadelphia on Monday.
Biden are on the same side,
battling the isolationism that
Trump has avowed and that has
been most clearly articulated by
his onetime chief strategist,
Stephen K. Bannon.
In his first nine months in
office, Trump has withdrawn the
United States from a Pacific Rim
trade pact, the Paris climate
accord and a cultural
organization at the United
Nations, while signaling
opposition to the Iran nuclear
deal and new sanctions against
Moscow.
Some of these moves have
found support from Republicans,
including McCain, but overall
they reveal Trump’s broad
intention to live up to his
“America first” presidential
campaign — a repudiation of all
that McCain and Biden have
pressed for 40 years.
McCain spent the first half of
the year crisscrossing the globe,
trying to reassure the country’s
longtime allies, a theme he
repeated Monday in
Philadelphia.
“We will not thrive in a world
where our leadership and ideals
are absent. We wouldn’t deserve
to,” he said.
The speech prompted the
president to issue an immediate
threat: “People have to be careful
because at some point, I fight
back,” Trump said in an
interview Tuesday with WMAL, a
D.C. radio station.
But it’s a different fight now.
McCain has onetime foes
staunchly on his side; Biden used
the most personal terms possible
to describe his respect for the
ailing senator.
“I want to say, John, how
much your example of service
and duty, courage and loyalty,
inspired my Beau,” Biden told
the crowd, speaking of his late
son’s decision to serve in 2008
with his Army National Guard
unit in Iraq. “John, when he
received his cancer diagnosis, he
also found strength in the
courage you’ve demonstrated
throughout your whole life.”
Beau Biden died in 2015 after
losing his battle with
glioblastoma, the same form of
brain cancer with which McCain
was diagnosed in July. It’s a cruel
twist in the senators’ long
friendship, one they shared with
their mutual close friend, the
Democratic senator Edward M.
Kennedy (Mass.), who died in
2009 from the same disease.
McCain wiped away tears as
Biden spoke of his son’s
adoration for the Arizona
senator, a symbolic forging of
their alliance. They will, for now,
set aside their old disputes on
how to engage the world and
instead take up a mutual fight
against those who want to
withdraw from global
leadership.
The bygone battle lines came
from their upbringings and early
decisions as senators. The son
and grandson of Navy admirals,
McCain, 81, was destined for a
life in the military. When he
arrived in the Senate in 1987, the
Vietnam veteran set his sights on
eventually becoming the
chairman of the Senate Armed
Services Committee, overseeing
the Pentagon.
The son of a used-car
salesman, Biden, 74, always
believed that he could talk
anyone into a deal. In the Senate,
his highest honor came as
Foreign Relations Committee
chairman, overseeing the State
Department.
As the Iraq War unraveled in
2006, McCain pushed for a
military answer: a “surge” in
troops to beat back the
insurgency and hold onto
reconquered territory. Biden
argued for a diplomatic solution:
partitioning the nation, trying to
separate the warring clans into
different regions.
At the end of 2009, McCain
backed the generals who wanted
a massive surge of more than
40,000 troops in Afghanistan,
while Biden counseled President
Barack Obama to go with a
lighter footprint and search for a
political settlement in the
divided country. Obama split the
difference.
In December, during a day of
tribute to Biden in the Senate,
McCain made light of their many
disagreements. “In the persistent
triumph of hope over experience,
we both still cling to the
expectation that we can
persuade the other that he is
mistaken. I think, deep down, we
probably know better,” McCain
joked.
The two men set aside those
disputes Monday, and perhaps
for years to come, as they forged
a new partnership to combat
Trump’s inclination to pull back
the U.S. presence on the global
stage. Biden said that the United
States should always be an
“international beacon of liberty,
and a defender of the dignity of
all human beings and the right to
freedom and justice,” quoting
from an old McCain speech to
sum up the new approach — and
his friend’s longtime
commitment to those values.
“That’s what it’s always been
for four decades,” Biden said.
paul.kane@washpost.com
BY
S ARI H ORWITZ
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
is setting up a unit in the Justice
Department to oversee a policy he
reinstated to help state and local
police take cash and property
from people suspected of a crime,
even if they have not been
charged.
Sessions came under fire from
Democratic and Republican lawmakers when he announced the
policy in July because of concerns
about abuse in earlier incarnations of the asset forfeiture program. In a memo Tuesday, Sessions directed Deputy Attorney
General Rod J. Rosenstein to hire
a director to review all aspects of
the department’s policy and take
action if problems arise.
“The asset forfeiture program
has proven to be extremely valuable to law enforcement in our
country, but it has received certain criticisms,” Sessions wrote in
his memo.
Sessions this summer reversed
an action by Attorney General
Eric H. Holder Jr. to stop the
program. Two years ago, Holder
barred state and local police from
using federal law to seize cash
and other property without criminal charges or warrants.
Since 2008, thousands of police agencies across the country
made more than 55,000 seizures
of cash and property worth
$3 billion under the program,
which allowed local and state
police to make seizures and then
share the proceeds with federal
agencies.
The Sessions policy reauthorizes what is called federal “adoption” of assets that state and local
police seize — when the alleged
conduct that led to the seizures
appears to violate federal law.
When Sessions announced the
policy last summer, Rep. Darrell
Issa (R-Calif.) criticized the move,
calling it “a troubling step backward.” Holder said it was “another extremist action,” and the
American Civil Liberties Union
called it “outrageous.”
“It’s nice to see at least some
acknowledgment that civil forfeiture is in need of increased oversight, but the changes really don’t
go far enough and the core problem still remains,” Issa said in a
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statement Tuesday. “Americans
are still going to have their property taken from them, without
due process, at record rates.”
A Washington Post investigation in 2014 found that since the
terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001,
state and local police had seized
almost $2.5 billion from motorists and others without search
warrants or indictments. Police
routinely stopped drivers for minor traffic infractions, pushed
them to agree to searches without
warrants and then seized large
amounts of cash when there was
no evidence the drivers had done
anything wrong, The Post’s series
found.
“Americans are still
going to have their
property taken
from them,
without due process,
at record rates.”
Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.)
There was little oversight on
how the police spent the money,
according to The Post’s investigation. Sometimes they bought luxury vehicles, high-powered firearms and armored cars.
But Rosenstein said that the
Justice Department would ensure there were safeguards to
prevent abuse. He told reporters
in July that police departments
will have to tell property owners
about their rights and the status
of the seizures. Police will also be
required to detail the probable
cause for the seizures, Rosenstein
said.
Rosenstein’s new director will
oversee and manage compliance
of both civil and criminal asset
forfeiture and “promptly review”
complaints from judges, attorneys, defendants or others and
“take appropriate action,” according to Sessions’s memo.
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
Senate Republicans back budget bill, boosting tax-cut bid
BY E LISE V IEBECK
AND D AMIAN P ALETTA
The White House’s push for tax
cuts made crucial progress on
Tuesday as Senate Republicans
rallied behind a budget proposal
the party needs to pass to keep
alive its hopes of enacting sharp
cuts in tax rates this year.
Senate Republican leaders
earned a series of much-needed
victories Tuesday, first with the
return of ailing Sen. Thad Cochran
(R-Miss.) and later with an announcement from Sen. John
McCain (R-Ariz.) that he would
back the budget resolution to help
passage of tax cuts. Senate Republicans are now hopeful they can
agree on a final budget resolution
this week, which is a key procedural step to help them pass a tax-cut
plan this year without relying on
support from Democrats.
“If we get the Republicans we
need, which is virtually every single one of them . . . we will get that
largest tax cut in the history of our
country,” President Trump said
Tuesday in a speech to the Heritage Foundation. “And you will see
things happen like have never
happened before. We will have
employment. We will have jobs.
We will have companies moving
back into our country.”
Even with the breakthroughs
Tuesday, many hurdles remain.
Republicans still have not written
a tax cut plan, identified trillions
of dollars in tax deductions they
plan to eliminate or sorted out
how to ensure that any tax cuts do
not benefit primarily the wealthy.
Still, none of those things would
have mattered if they failed to pass
a budget resolution.
“I support the Senate budget
resolution because it provides a
path forward on tax reform,” McCain said in a statement. “I have
long supported efforts to fix our
burdensome tax system and hope
Congress will produce meaningful
reform that simplifies the tax
code, strengthens America’s middle class and boosts our economy.”
A budget resolution lays out
nonbinding spending priorities,
but it also clears the way for the
Senate to later approve $1.5 trillion in tax cuts over 10 years with
just 50 votes. Republicans control
just 52 votes in the 100-seat Senate, and they would normally need
60 votes to win passage of such
sweeping changes. This is a crucial
step in a closely divided Senate,
where few if any Democrats are
expected to support tax cuts.
Debate began on the measure
midday Tuesday after a party-line
vote to move the process forward.
If Senate Republicans pass the
budget, they will need to reconcile
differences between their measure and a budget resolution that
already passed the House.
Approving the budget would
shore up ties between Senate GOP
leaders and President Trump, who
is angry at Republicans’ failure on
health care and is bent on Congress’s approving a tax-reform
package by the end of the year.
Democrats are trying to stay
unified to block the tax plan, but
they will need GOP defections to
have any success. Numerous Democrats have said the tax plan
would mostly help the wealthiest
Americans, and they have disputed White House assertions that
corporate tax cuts raise wages by
thousands of dollars. They have
also said the tax cuts would add
trillions of dollars to the government’s debt, eventually hurting
economic growth because of increased borrowing costs.
Even though McCain’s support
is expected to help smooth passage of the budget resolution, he
and Trump have been bickering
for weeks, and these tensions are
likely to fester. McCain said late
Tuesday that he remains concerned about what he believes are
inadequate levels of military funding in the budget, but he said that
can be addressed outside the process the Senate plans to vote on this
week.
“It is an absolute requirement
that we adequately fund the men
and women who are serving in the
military. I’ve said it 50 times, I’ll
say it again: Men and women in
uniform are being killed and
wounded because we have refused
to fund them adequately in order
to do their job,” he said.
Asked whether he was close to a
deal to satisfy his demand for
more spending, McCain sounded
optimistic.
“Yeah, sure!” he said. “We’re
having those conversations with
leadership.”
The GOP’s success on the final
budget vote is not assured, although McCain’s yes and Cochran’s presence give the party a
wider margin for error. Republicans control 52 of the Senate’s 100
seats, meaning they can lose two
votes from their own party and
still pass the budget.
The vote midday Tuesday on the
motion to proceed was the first big
test for leaders. It passed 50 to 47,
with three senators absent and all
other Republicans voting yes.
Even Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.),
who opposes the budget in its
current form, voted to begin debate after a talk with Trump.
If the House and Senate pass
matching budget resolutions, focus will then shift to the House
Ways and Means Committee,
where Republican leaders are trying to craft language that would
serve as the first version of the
tax-cut bill. Trump has said he
wants to slash the corporate tax
rate, simplify the tax code and
deliver a tax cut to middle-income
families. But many details of how
this would work need to be resolved. Trump did not provide
more details of the plan in his
speech Tuesday, but he vowed that
the changes would eventually
jump-start economic growth and
raise wages for all Americans.
“We will lift our people from
welfare to work, from dependence
to independence, and from poverty to total, beautiful prosperity,” he
said.
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
damian.paletta@washpost.com
Federal judge mostly blocks Trump’s third try at travel ban
TRAVEL BAN FROM A1
the state of Hawaii’s request for a
temporary restraining order nationwide, Watson wrote that the
latest ban “suffers from precisely
the same maladies as its predecessor.”
Watson also wrote that the
executive order “plainly discriminates based on nationality” in a
way that is opposed to federal law
and “the founding principles of
this Nation.”
The White House said in a
statement that Watson’s “dangerously flawed” order “undercuts
the President’s efforts to keep the
American people safe and enforce minimum security standards for entry into the United
States.”
“These restrictions are vital to
ensuring that foreign nations
comply with the minimum security standards required for the
integrity of our immigration system and the security of our Nation,” the White House statement
said. “We are therefore confident
that the Judiciary will ultimately
uphold the President’s lawful and
necessary action and swiftly restore its vital protections for the
safety of the American people.”
The State Department said
that it instructed embassies and
consulates across the globe to
resume regular processing of visas for people from the six countries but that it would implement
the order for those affected from
Venezuela and North Korea. Justice Department spokesman Ian
Prior said government lawyers
would appeal the judge’s decision
in an “expeditious manner.”
Opponents of the ban, though,
hailed the judge’s ruling. Hawaii
Attorney General Douglas Chin
said, “Today is another victory for
the rule of law. We stand ready to
defend it.”
Omar Jadwat, who directs the
ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project and was involved in a separate
challenge to the ban in federal
court in Maryland, said, “We’re
glad, but not surprised, that President Trump’s illegal and unconstitutional Muslim ban has been
MARK RALSTON/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
People in Los Angeles march in a rally Sunday to protest President Trump’s latest attempt to restrict travel into the United States from
several majority-Muslim countries. A federal judge in Hawaii blocked the implementation of the ban regarding the mostly Muslim nations.
blocked once again.”
Trump was blocked by courts
from imposing his last two versions of the travel ban, but the
ultimate question of whether he
ever had the authority to implement such a measure remains
somewhat murky.
The Supreme Court had been
scheduled to hear arguments on
his second travel ban, inked in
March, which barred the entry of
citizens from six majority-Muslim countries and refugees from
everywhere. But a key portion of
that ban expired and Trump issued his latest ban before the
hearing.
That prompted the justices to
remove oral arguments from the
calendar. They later dismissed
one of the challenges to the
March version of the ban.
Federal appeals courts had
ruled against the Trump administration on the last measure, and
Watson relied in part on the
precedent from one of those cases
in the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the 9th Circuit. The Supreme
Court, though, had vacated the
precedent from the other ruling
that went against the administration in the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the 4th Circuit.
The state of Hawaii and others
who sued over the March travel
ban asked judges to block the new
one in federal courts in Hawaii,
Washington state and Maryland.
They argued that Trump had
exceeded his legal authority to set
immigration policy and that the
latest measure — like the last two
— fulfilled his unconstitutional
campaign promise to implement
a Muslim ban.
Hawaii asked a judge to block
the ban with respect to all the
majority-Muslim countries; the
state’s lawyers did not challenge
the measures imposed against
Venezuela and North Korea.
Watson did not address whether the ban was constitutional;
rather, he limited his analysis to
whether Trump had exceeded the
authority Congress has given the
president to impose restrictions
on those wanting to enter the
United States. Of particular concern, he said, were that officials
seemed to treat someone’s nationality as an indicator of the
threat the person poses — without providing evidence of a connection between the two.
Legal analysts had said challengers of the latest travel ban
would face an uphill battle, particularly because the measure
was put into effect after an extensive process in which the United
States negotiated with other
countries for information.
Such a process, legal analysts
said, presumably would help the
government defeat arguments
that the president had not made
the appropriate findings to justify
his order. The list of countries
affected also was changed to include two countries that are not
majority Muslim — Venezuela
and North Korea — potentially
helping the government argue
that the measure was not meant
to discriminate against Muslims.
Challengers to the ban, however, sought to link the new directive to its predecessors, and they
asserted that even the additions
were mainly symbolic.
The directive imposed more
complete bans on some countries
than on others.
For Syria and North Korea, the
president’s proclamation blocked
immigrants wanting to relocate
to the United States and nonimmigrants wishing to visit in some
capacity. For Iran, the proclamation blocked both immigrants
and nonimmigrants, although it
exempted students and those
participating in a cultural exchange.
The proclamation blocked people from Chad, Libya and Yemen
from coming to the United States
as immigrants or on business or
tourist visas, and it blocked people from Somalia from coming as
immigrants. The proclamation
named Venezuela, but it only
blocked certain government officials.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
Carol Morello contributed to this
report.
With white nationalist visiting a campus, Florida prepares as if for disaster
BY L ORI R OZSA
AND S USAN S VRLUGA
They asked the governor to
declare a state of emergency, an
action usually reserved for approaching hurricanes. They prepared to suspend bus routes and
seal off roads and parking lots.
They expanded mental-health
counseling on campus. And they
offered to excuse students and
employees who do not want to go
to class or work on Thursday.
When the University of Florida, under the threat of a lawsuit,
agreed to allow white nationalist
Richard Spencer to speak on campus, school officials did not wait
to see what would happen.
Distilling lessons from events
in Charlottesville and Berkeley,
Calif., the UF president and political leaders from the surrounding
Gainesville community began
taking extraordinary steps to try
to ensure that the Spencer speech
scheduled for Thursday will be as
much of a nonevent as possible.
Spencer will be corralled into a
corner of the 2,000-acre campus,
21/2 miles away from the center of
the university and most of its
classrooms.
Nearby buildings, including
two museums and a student recreation center, will be closed.
Access to the Phillips Center
for the Performing Arts, where
Spencer is slated to speak, will be
limited; no vehicles or bicycles
will be allowed. If people — including counterprotesters —
want to get to the speech, they
will have to walk a significant
distance.
“Bring a good pair of walking
shoes and wear sunscreen,” Alachua County Sheriff Sadie Darnell advised.
Darnell on Monday asked Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) to declare a
state of emergency in anticipation of Spencer’s speech. Scott
agreed, giving local law enforcement the ability to be more “flexible” in dealing with anticipated
protests and counterprotests.
Even the local jail planned to
shut down: The Alachua County
sheriff announced that visitation
and criminal registrations would
be suspended Thursday and Friday.
“It’s just in case we have an
influx, if things don’t go as we
hope they do and people commit
crimes and acts of violence,” said
Sgt. Chris Sims, a spokesman for
the sheriff ’s office. “Should the
need arise and arrests have to be
made, we want to have the proper
personnel and transportation at
our detention facility.”
Darnell said she wants to buy
more radios so the law enforcement agencies that have been
called to help, including the FBI,
DAVID J. PHILLIP/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Richard Spencer, whose movement mixes white nationalism,
racism and populism, speaks at Texas A&M University in 2016.
the National Guard and the university police, will be on the same
communications system.
“We’ve had the luxury of time
to prepare,” Darnell said. “The
challenge is that we don’t know
what we may be facing.”
University officials have tried
hard to forestall violence between
protesters and counterprotesters
by urging students to simply ignore Spencer.
“By shunning him and his followers, we will block his attempt
for further visibility,” UF President W. Kent Fuchs said in a
statement to the university’s
52,000 students.
That did not prevent a group of
about 30 students from demonstrating in front of Fuchs’s office
Monday, demanding that he resign for allowing Spencer to
speak on campus.
Fuchs originally denied Spencer’s request but relented after a
local civil rights attorney threatened a lawsuit.
“If you are like me, I expect you
are surprised and even shocked to
learn that UF is required by law to
allow Mr. Spencer to speak his
racist views on our campus,”
Fuchs said.
The university sponsored lectures and discussions last week
about the First Amendment. The
flagship university created a website with answers to common
questions. Police have worked
with local groups that feel vulnerable to increase security.
“The best resolution would be
if this person and this organization decided not to come, and
maybe changed their message
from hate to love,” said Rabbi Berl
Goldman of the Lubavitch-Chabad Jewish Student and Community Center.
Barring that, Goldman said,
“we’re very in touch with law
enforcement.”
The preparation is in contrast
to what the University of Virginia
and the city of Charlottesville did
in the run-up to Spencer’s rally in
August.
Gainesville Mayor Lauren Poe
said the city, UF and Alachua
County law enforcement officers
had conference calls with U-Va.
officers to get advice. They sent
five officers to California last
month to observe the planned
“Free Speech Week” event at the
University of California at Berkeley that fizzled out before it even
started.
“We learned about how some of
these groups are looking to incite
violence, how they build up to it
and increase their numbers so
that people that are there to
peacefully protest kind of get
swept up. Hopefully, we can avoid
that happening,” Poe said.
Gainesville and UF are also
trying to preempt violence by
showcasing unity and tolerance.
More than a dozen religious and
community leaders held a public
rally Monday night in downtown
Gainesville to show “a message of
love.”
“I do believe that we’re going to
be an example for how a community can rise up and directly confront hatred and racism and bigotry with a positive, anti-racist
message,” Poe said.
For his part, Spencer said the
preparations, especially the state
of emergency declaration, “are
going overboard.”
He said that if violence occurs,
it will not come from his supporters. Instead, the police should be
wary of the people protesting his
visit, Spencer said.
“We don’t want any of our
people to be the one to throw the
first punch,” Spencer said. “We
don’t want them to do anything to
harm our movement.”
Spencer said he expects that
antifascist protesters — known
widely as “antifa” — will try to
goad his followers.
“But we can’t stoop down to
their level,” he said.
susan.svrluga@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
RE
Despite London’s ban, many see Uber as the inevitable future
UBER FROM A1
school drivers who’ve spent years
committing to memory every
street in the city.
Last month, the London transit
authority dropped a bombshell. It
was not going to renew Uber’s
5-year-old license, it said, because
the Silicon Valley corporation was
not a “fit and proper” company to
run a taxi service. The authorities
revealed few specifics but said
Uber had failed to report serious
criminal offenses allegedly committed by its drivers. They also
said Uber was not conducting
rigorous background and medical
checks on its operators.
Commuters were stunned.
More than 3.5 million people
here have downloaded the app,
making it one of the biggest ridehailing markets in the world.
There are 40,000 Uber drivers
cruising around London. They
are allowed to keep driving for
now, pending an appeal the company filed Friday. Almost 900,000
people have signed an online petition against the ban.
The Uber fight in London not
only pits new ways against old, it
also reveals modern-day ruptures
in the labor market — such as,
what is the value of a worker who
knows things versus a worker
who knows how to look up things
online?
There is also this: In multicultural London, Uber drivers are far
more likely to be named Ali or
Muhammad, while black-cab
drivers tend to be an Ollie or a
Brian. And the fight is playing out
in a city where much of the white
working class finds itself challenged by the forces of globalism,
mass immigration and galloping
technological change, all hot-button topics since Britain voted to
leave the European Union.
After they were alerted that
their license to operate would be
yanked, Uber’s libertarian-minded executives accused London of
going Luddite — hostile to cutting-edge technology. The company claimed that officials had
“caved in to a small number of
people who want to restrict consumer choice.”
The accusations didn’t go
down well. London’s mayor, Sadiq
Khan, a child of immigrants and a
rising star in the Labour Party,
said that tech companies such as
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A woman holds a smartphone showing the Uber app. The clash in London between taxis and Uber is stark because it so clearly pits a
bespoke experience — the East London driver as tour guide with volumes of opinions — against techie upstarts.
Uber were indeed welcome but
needed “to play by the rules.”
Many cities around the world
have seen tussles among taxi and
Uber drivers. But the clash in
London is stark because it so
clearly pits a bespoke experience
— the boxy black cab, straight out
of central casting, the East London driver as tour guide with
volumes of opinions — against
techie upstarts.
A new arrival from Libya or
Bangladesh with a work visa can
start driving for Uber within
weeks of landing in London, assisted by GPS navigation systems,
their cellphone screens guiding
them with Google Maps and the
Israeli-designed Waze.
Meanwhile, the London cabbie
often spends two or three or four
years studying for “the Knowledge,” a mind-maze battery of
exams that involve memorizing
more than 25,000 streets, mews
and passageways and 20,000
landmarks.
Uber is relatively cheap — and
popular, especially among the
young. Black cabs can be pricey,
and to hail one, you sometimes
have to look away from your
phone and wave your arm.
An Uber to Heathrow or Gatwick airports might cost $50. A
black cab can charge twice that, a
round-trip ride costing as much
as a discount plane ticket to
Spain.
After the Uber ban was announced, cabbie John McDonnell
felt that his protests against the
ride-hail app had finally paid off.
“They weren’t going to push us
around,” said the 51-year-old driver, who has attended numerous
anti-Uber demonstrations, standing on the hood of his car and
waving a Union Jack flag.
To him, Transport for London’s
decision meant that London’s
cabbies had won — and shoved a
Silicon Valley giant back on its
heels.
“We’ve been here for 350 years,
and this American company
comes in and decides to take
over? That’s not on,” McDonnell
said, referring to the days when
London taxis were horse-drawn
carriages.
He thinks that taxi drivers
should be professionals, as he is,
and that Britain’s immigration
policy should favor migrants with
special knowledge. “We will have
the skilled people. We don’t want
the unskilled,” he said.
The ease with which Uber drivers can get up and running irks
many cabbies.
“I’m like a doctor, and they are
like a cleaner compared to us,”
said Tony Bensalem, 58, a black-
cab driver who was driving along
the Mall, a tree-lined road that
links Buckingham Palace to Trafalgar Square. “Someone comes
from Italy, France, wherever, they
have no job, and then they have
Uber. I think it’s wrong, 100 percent.”
Harsha Prabath Kumara, a 33year-old Uber driver originally
from Sri Lanka, said he doesn’t
understand the allegation that
Uber’s service is unsafe. “You can
see the driver’s name, the driver’s
license details, you can see the
driver’s rating and feedback others have given, you can see what
kind of person he is. If you don’t
like it, you can reject it straight
away,” he said.
Dara Khosrowshahi, Uber’s
new chief executive, issued a conciliatory statement from San
Francisco admitting the company
“got things wrong.” He would
fight the London ban, he said,
“with the knowledge that we must
also change.”
Khosrowshahi flew to London
to meet with regulators face to
face. Jo Bertram, Uber’s top U.K.
executive, resigned. Uber, it
seemed, was trying to turn a page
after a scandal-ridden year that
exposed a toxic corporate culture
and growth-at-all-costs approach.
It’s unclear whether the road
ahead for Uber in London is long
or short. But many of the drivers
interviewed for this article —
both Uber and black cab — think
the ride-hailing service will remain in some capacity.
“Uber is not going anywhere,”
said Clifford Weeks, 58, a jovial
black-cab driver wearing a jean
jacket and black cap who drove
from Trafalgar Square to the Royal Festival Hall without pausing
to look at a Google map or a
device.
“That doesn’t matter,” he said
of the Knowledge exams. “People
just want to get from A to B.” And
Uber, he acknowledged, is generally cheap.
Weeks recalled the day his own
daughter said she was an Uber
rider. “One day, she said, ‘Dad, I
use an Uber cab.’ You can imagine
that should be heresy in my
house, but people love it.”
One day, out of curiosity, he
watched his daughter and her
friend use the app and was
floored to see a car roll up 50 seconds after they had punched in
the postal code.
“Am I sour? No, not really. It’s
just how it goes,” he said, shrugging. “If they say Uber will no
longer be on the streets on London, I’d be very surprised. I’d eat
my hat.”
If Uber is forced out of London
— as it has been in other cities
around the world — many expect
something else will fill the vacuum.
“This is technology. This is the
future,” said Ovidiu Vilcea, a 29year-old Uber driver from Romania, nodding at the smartphone
affixed to his windshield.
He drove past London’s Natural History Museum, famous for
its dinosaur collection. Looking
in his rearview mirror, he said: “If
it’s not Uber, it’s going to be
another company soon.”
karla.adam@washpost.com
william.booth@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
Judge rules in favor of 2 children handcuffed at Ky. schools
BY
M ORIAH B ALINGIT
A Kentucky sheriff ’s deputy
who handcuffed an 8-year-old
boy and 9-year-old girl at school
violated the children’s constitutional rights, a federal judge
ruled, labeling the move “excessive force” and an unnecessary
reaction to their misbehavior.
The American Civil Liberties
Union, which filed the lawsuit on
the children’s behalf, said last
week’s ruling vindicates its position that schools should not use
police officers to deal with misbehaving students, particularly
children with disabilities. The
children who were handcuffed
had been diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, a condition that made it
difficult for them to focus and
follow instructions.
“This judge drew a line in the
sand and said this conduct is
unconstitutional, and we think
that this is helpful in our efforts
to advocate against the criminalization of children,” said Claudia
Center, a senior staff attorney
with the ACLU. “It’s a terrible
policy from our view, particularly
in elementary schools.”
Neither the sheriff ’s office nor
the county attorney’s office in
Kenton County returned calls for
comment. The sheriff ’s deputy
named in the case, Kevin Sumner,
could not be reached for comment.
School police officers have
been scrutinized in recent years
for the role they have played in
enforcing order. School police
officers say they help keep
schools safe, but critics say that
some use brutal tactics to deal
with discipline matters, criminalizing routine misbehavior.
Special-education students are
more likely than other youngsters to be restrained in school,
including with handcuffs. According to federal data, school
personnel or police officers mechanically restrained nearly
6,000 students in the 2013-2014
school year, the latest year for
which such data is available.
Nearly 33 percent of them were
special-education students, even
though that group represented
only 14 percent of student enrollment that school year.
According to court documents,
staff members at two elementary
schools in Kenton County summoned Sumner to deal with the
children after they misbehaved
and hit teachers, encounters that
ended with Sumner cuffing the
children above their elbows and
cinching the cuffs so tight it hurt
them.
Sumner handcuffed the girl on
two separate occasions in fall
2014 and the boy once in the
same period, despite a school
policy prohibiting school staff
members from handcuffing students. Sumner’s supervisor testified that the sheriff ’s deputy acted in accordance with his training and that the policy did not
apply to law enforcement in
schools.
According to court documents,
school personnel summoned the
sheriff ’s deputy after the boy,
identified as S.R. in the lawsuit,
had disrupted class, run away
from the principal and kicked a
special-education teacher. School
staff members videotaped the
encounter between Sumner and
the boy, who was 4 feet tall and 54
pounds.
“You don’t get to swing at me
like that,” Sumner told the boy as
he placed the ring of the cuffs on
the boy’s skinny biceps. He
cinched the chain between the
cuffs tighter, forcing the boy’s
arms together behind his back.
“You can do what we ask you to
do, or suffer the consequences.”
“Ow! That hurts!” the boy
yelled. He continued to cry and
squirm in the chair, kicking his
feet.
U.S. District Judge William O.
Bertelsman wrote in his ruling
that although the boy had swung
at the deputy, his actions “can
hardly be considered a serious
physical threat from an unarmed,
54-pound 8-year-old child.”
Bertelsman ruled that Kenton
County could be held liable for
the deputy’s conduct. The lawsuit
is set to proceed to trial, where a
jury will determine damages. The
judge rejected the claim that the
children had been targeted or
treated differently because of
their disability, pointing out that
their parents had not told school
staff members about their diagnoses.
The Kentucky lawsuit also
spurred a Justice Department
investigation of the Kenton
County School District, which in
January agreed to new policies to
ensure discipline practices do not
discriminate against children
with disabilities, according to the
ACLU.
moriah.balingit@washpost.com
Opioid abuse drives hepatitis C crisis
New liver disease cases
have nearly tripled over
past several years
BY
K ATIE Z EZIMA
charleston, w.va. — The na-
tion’s opioid epidemic has unleashed a secondary outbreak: the
rampant spread of hepatitis C.
New cases of the liver disease
have nearly tripled nationwide in
just a few years, driven largely by
the use of needles among drug
users in their 20s and 30s, spawning a new generation of hepatitis C patients. Because a treatment that cures the disease costs
tens of thousands of dollars, is
limited by insurance and Medicaid, and is mostly unavailable to
people who are still using illicit
drugs, there probably will be financial and public health ramifications for decades to come.
Here in West Virginia, which
has the nation’s highest rates of
overdose deaths and new hepatitis C and hepatitis B infections,
public-health officials are attempting to identify as many new
hepatitis carriers as possible —
and are girding for decades of
repercussions.
“If we don’t cure a significant
number of the people who are
injecting, in 20 years from now,
the hospitals in this part of the
world will be flooded with these
people with end-stage liver disease, which has no cure,” said
Judith Feinberg, a professor of
behavioral medicine and psychiatry at the West Virginia University
School of Medicine. “I can see it
coming at me like the headlights
of a train. Just coming, coming,
coming, and I’m thinking,
‘Doesn’t anybody want to jump
out of the way?’”
The number of new confirmed
hepatitis C cases nationwide rose
from 853 in 2010 to 2,436 in 2015,
according to the Centers for Disease Control — a 15-year high. But
tens of thousands more are believed to have contracted the disease without knowing it.
According to the CDC, 34,000
people were estimated to have
contracted hepatitis C in 2015, a
number public health officials believe is low. In Massachusetts, officials estimate 300,000 people
have the disease — and just half
have received a formal diagnosis.
Testing for the disease is not widespread, and because it’s possible
to not display any symptoms, hepatitis C often goes undetected for
decades until manifesting in severe, life-threatening liver disease.
“It’s the unidentified that scare
me,” said Rahul Gupta, West Virginia’s health commissioner.
“What I’m afraid of is that there
are people out there not in the
medical health care system and
they’re spreading the disease.”
Across the nation, health providers are seeing a cascade of
public-health consequences unleashed by the opioid epidemic
beyond the significant rise of
overdoses: increases in hepatitis
B; sexually transmitted diseases
including syphilis and gonorrhea;
elevated rates of endocarditis, an
infection of the heart seen in people who inject drugs; higher rates
of emergency room visits for abscesses; and hospitalizations for
soft-tissue infections — some that
become so severe they require
amputations.
Some places are seeing small
increases in HIV, and there is a
PHILIP SCOTT ANDREWS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A patient’s saliva is screened for HIV on Sept. 28 in the rural town of Spencer, W.Va. Hepatitis C is about
10 times more contagious than HIV and can be contracted at any point during the injection process.
widespread fear that an outbreak
like the one in Austin, Ind., where
nearly 200 drug users contracted
the disease in 2014 and 2015 because of sharing needles, could
happen again.
Part of the solution, public
health officials believe, is what
happened in the wake of Austin:
opening syringe exchanges so users can access clean needles. Long
controversial, syringe exchanges
are becoming more broadly accepted in the wake of the opioid
epidemic. In Kentucky, 20 have
opened since the state legislature
approved them in 2015. In North
Carolina, at least 25 have opened
since they were legalized last year.
Hepatitis C was once associated
with baby boomers — who contracted the disease before the nation’s blood supply was screened
for it starting in the early 1990s —
and with urban drug users. About
3.5 million people nationwide
have hepatitis C, three-quarters of
them baby boomers. Nearly
20,000 people died of the disease
in 2015, the majority of them over
the age of 55.
Now, new carriers tend to be
young people who use intravenous drugs. Health providers in
an array of locations, from rural
Tennessee to suburban Boston to
Baltimore, are reporting increases in hepatitis C diagnoses.
In West Virginia, the number of
new hepatitis C cases is nine times
the national average, and Medicaid costs for treating the disease
amounted to more than $27 million from 2014 to 2016.
Gupta said West Virginia is seeing major increases in syphilis
and gonorrhea cases, which he
believes are due to drug use.
“You can have direct consequences of needle injection . . .
and consequences of impaired
judgment,” Gupta said.
West Virginia has aggressively
tried to track hepatitis B and C
cases, expanding testing at the
state’s syringe exchanges, jails
and prisons. Gupta said one reason the number of hepatitis cases
here is so high is probably due to
the fact that the state is aggressively seeking them out.
Thousands of people each year
stream into West Virginia Health
Right’s free clinic for clean needles, medication and, staffers
hope, a hepatitis C test.
About half of the clinic’s clients
have hepatitis C, chief executive
Angie Settle said, discovered
through a rapid-results test the
clinic offers. The clinic, which
sends mobile dental units around
the state to offer free dental care,
has started sending staff along to
test people for hepatitis C.
William Turley was high when
he let his friend plunge her used
heroin-filled needle into a vein
running through his left hand.
When they sobered up, she told
him she had hepatitis C. He got
tested here, and it came back
positive. He was in such disbelief
he asked for a second test, which
confirmed the result.
“I never thought that I would
catch it,” said Turley, 49. Very few
drug users talk about the disease,
he said. “You hear about AIDS.
You never hear about hepatitis C.”
Turley said he is focused on
getting sober so he can be cured.
West Virginia Health Right is one
of the few places that gives patients the drugs that will help
without cost — but treatment
does come with conditions.
Drug companies require patients to be sober to access the
medication, Settle said. And many
states, including West Virginia,
require Medicaid patients to have
an advanced form of the disease
and be sober before approving
treatment. A six-month course of
the drugs used to cure hepatitis C
can cost upward of $100,000.
“A lot of the state Medicaid
treatment restricts access,” said
Laura Fanucchi, an assistant professor at University of Kentucky
HealthCare. “A lot of physicians
don’t think that’s the best approach because it limits access to
the most vulnerable populations.”
Hepatitis C is particularly worrisome because it is 10 times more
contagious than HIV. While HIV
can be spread by sharing needles,
hepatitis C can be contracted at
any point during the injection
process, including by using a drug
cooker or tourniquet that has another person’s blood on it, said
Shruti Mehta, deputy chair of the
department of epidemiology at
the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg
School of Public Health. The disease also is spread through sexual
contact, though the rate of transmission is not as high as blood-toblood contact.
Mehta said hepatitis C rates
also are spiking among inner-city
drug users. She studies a cohort of
about 5,000 injection drug users,
and about 60 percent of them
have contracted hepatitis C.
“It’s a disease of long-term consequences that people don’t understand,” she said.
Officials are increasingly concerned that some of those consequences could manifest themselves for decades. The prevalence
of hepatitis C among women who
gave birth from 2009 to 2014 increased 89 percent, according to a
study by Vanderbilt University
and the Tennessee Department of
Health. West Virginia has the
highest rate of births to infected
mothers, with 22.6 per 1,000 live
births. The disease can be passed
to an infant during birth, and
about 6 percent of babies born to
infected mothers contract the disease.
Soon after finding out she was
pregnant, Sarah Farrugia went to
the doctor, who drew blood and
diagnosed her with the disease.
Farrugia, 27, of Maine, had injected heroin for about five years.
She stopped using drugs after
meeting the man who is now her
husband and got pregnant a few
months later. She was shocked
but not surprised because of her
past drug use. She was glad to
know that there is a cure.
“But of course there’s the other
layer of it: What does this mean
for my child?” she asked.
Farrugia gave birth to a healthy
baby boy and nursed him for a
year, even though doctors warned
the baby had a small chance of
contracting the disease through
breast milk.
Farrugia planned to start the
drugs used to cure hepatitis C
when she was done nursing her
son, but she became pregnant
again. Her son tested negative for
hepatitis C. She will have her
daughter, who will turn 1 in December, tested when she is
18 months old. Farrugia wants to
start the drug regimen when she
is done nursing, noting that her
viral load is low and that she feels
good about her prognosis.
She believes that drug use
needs to be less stigmatized and
that people need to start talking
more about hepatitis.
“When I would be worried
about using someone else’s needles, it was because I didn’t want
to contract HIV or AIDS,” she said.
“I didn’t think about other
things.”
katie.zezima@washpost.com
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
California wildfires
hit area already in
a housing crunch
Thousands left homeless
in region where homes
are hard to come by
BY
L ISA B ONOS
santa rosa, calif. — For the
five years that Horacio Hernandez and Laura Gomez rented a
two-bedroom home in this city’s
Coffey Park neighborhood, they’d
felt reassured by the fact that
there was a fire hydrant on their
corner and a fire station less than
a mile away.
When they left their home
early Monday with the rest of the
neighborhood amid high winds
and smoke swirling through the
air, they thought it was just a
precautionary evacuation. On
their way out the door, they
grabbed their rental agreement
and not much else.
Like most of the homes in the
neighborhood, theirs is now reduced to debris.
Coffey Park was once a tightknit and tightly packed portrait
of the American Dream. It offered more-affordable housing in
a county where the average home
sells for $625,000 and a city
where rents hover around $2,000
for a two-bedroom. For Hernandez and Gomez, it was the perfect
spot for a couple who couldn’t yet
afford to buy a home; they had
room to barbecue and host larger
family celebrations, for $1,575 a
month in rent.
Now the neighborhood resembles a war zone. Burned-out cars
sit in driveways. Tubs and fireplaces are overturned, bathed in
sooty roof tiles and fallen drywall
— the ashes of everyday life. The
people who once lived here are
trying to figure out what’s next.
Hernandez and Gomez are
temporarily staying in an overstuffed house about a mile away
— Gomez’s mother’s home. It
now has 10 people in it. The
couple share a room with one
twin bed where Gomez sleeps
wrapped in Red Cross blankets.
Her husband sleeps on the floor.
The room is crowded with boxes
of essentials they’ve collected
from nearby shelters: toiletries,
clothing, towels.
Gomez, a 31-year-old nonprofit
worker, wants to stay at her
mother’s place for a month or
two or three to save up more of a
cushion before they rent somewhere new. But Hernandez, a
39-year-old plumber, is eager to
move somewhere more lasting.
“We are going to stay” in Santa
Rosa, Hernandez said. “We are
going to try to find a place to
live.”
Over 10 days, the Northern
California wildfires have consumed more than 200,000 acres
— an area larger than the five
boroughs of New York City combined. Many of the displaced are
staying with relatives, with
friends or in shelters. Soon they
will be looking for longer-term
housing. But where will they go?
Santa Rosa was experiencing a
housing crunch before the fires
blasted through. Vacancy rates
were low, and local officials had
been trying to fill some of the
demand by allowing more “granny” units — small homes built in
the back yards of larger houses.
On top of that, a natural disaster has suddenly left thousands
of people homeless. Santa Rosa
Mayor Chris Coursey said the
fires have destroyed 5 percent of
the city’s housing stock and plenty more beyond the borders.
Coursey said he does not know
how quickly the city will be able
to rebuild, an effort that will
depend heavily on federal and
state funding. Firefighters are
still battling the blazes. Debris
will need to be removed. Plans
will need to be drawn up. Permits
and funding will need to be
secured. Builders will need time
to build.
In the meantime, the Federal
Emergency Management Agency
is asking that everyone who has
been displaced by the fires register with the agency so that it can
determine how much housing
assistance is needed.
“The first option is to locate a
place that’s close to where they
lived before. That’s essential, but
it’s not always possible,” Victor
Inge, a FEMA spokesman, said
Saturday outside an assistance
center in downtown Santa Rosa.
County officials said it is unclear how long the shelters across
the North Bay area will remain
open. But Shirlee Zane, a member of the Sonoma County Board
of Supervisors, said they will
exist “for as long as this crisis
occurs, and they’re going to need
to stay open beyond that until we
can house everybody.”
Zane, whose district includes
areas that were affected by the
fires, wants to speed up the
building process to get displaced
residents situated as quickly as
possible.
“We’re going to need a really
comprehensive strategy about
not only getting people into transitional housing or temporary
housing,” she said in an interview, “but then how are we going
to build that permanent housing
that’s also going to meet the
needs of those people in the
middle-class neighborhoods that
lost their homes and our most
vulnerable population, which
continues to grow, which is people over the age of 65.”
Long before the fires, the nonprofit Petaluma People Services
Center had been placing seniors
in shared homes so that they are
not living alone. In the past week,
Executive Director Elece Hempel
said the nonprofit has received
700 calls from people — some
from as far away as Houston —
offering temporary housing to
those who are staying in shelters.
“People are saying: ‘You can stay
for two days, or you can stay for a
year,’ ” Hempel said. She estimated that about 100 people had
been placed.
Many displaced residents are
not entertaining plans to leave
the area soon. One of the first
things Tony Cohen did after evacuating his home in Mark West
Meadows, just north of Santa
Rosa’s city limits, was buy a tent.
His home, which he bought for
more than $1 million 12 years
ago, is gone. But as soon as he is
able to get back on the property,
he intends to live there, even if he
has to sleep in a $3,000 Tuff Shed
from Home Depot and shower at
a friend’s place nearby.
“I love that spot,” Cohen said of
his property, which is surrounded by hiking trails. “I just want to
reestablish it as my home as soon
as I can, even without a building.”
Joshua Damron, 35, who grew
“The first option is to
locate a place that’s
close to where they lived
before. That’s essential,
but it’s not always
possible.”
Victor Inge, a FEMA spokesman
up in western Sonoma County,
had long dreamed of living in
Coffey Park, which he called “the
nice, normal-people part of
town.” Damron had thought he
would never be able to own a
house in California. But when the
economy tanked, he and his wife,
Abby, had been saving up, and
they bought a three-bedroom
home on Mocha Lane for
$375,000 in 2014. Since then,
home prices in the neighborhood
had reached half a million.
“It’s really safe. It’s a great
place to raise a family,” Abby
Damron said Thursday while sitting at a picnic table in the park
where the couple’s three sons
play once or twice a day. The park
is still verdant and cheery, while
their house across the street has
been reduced to ash and debris.
The family of five is staying
with Joshua’s parents about a
mile west of Coffey Park. They
plan to come back once they are
able. In the meantime, his sons
miss the family rituals that took
place at the house, namely tinkering with their dad in the
garage. Daniel, 5, recently asked
when they were going to play in
the garage again. Joshua didn’t
know how to answer.
“When do we get to do those
things our family did together?”
Joshua wondered, adding that
some of their family rituals can
take place anywhere. “We can
still do our stories around the
dinner table, and we can still
read books around the dinner
table. We can still go for walks
and do our family Bible time
together. We can create stability
in those areas.”
It will be a while before their
family walks familiar terrain,
though. “We have to rebuild here.
We have to help our neighbors
rebuild here,” Joshua said, adding that he didn’t know how long
it would take to rebuild a neighborhood where about 150 to 200
homes were lost.
“It was a cool neighborhood,”
he said. “It is going to be a cool
neighborhood.”
lisa.bonos@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
SU
Undocumented, pregnant and at center of abortion fight
Teen in U.S. custody is
illegally blocked from
procedure, ACLU argues
AND
BY M ARIA
S ANDHYA
S ACCHETTI
S OMASHEKHAR
The American Civil Liberties
Union is accusing the Trump administration of illegally blocking a
17-year-old Central American immigrant from having an abortion
and will urge a federal judge in
Washington on Wednesday to
clear the way for her and other
young immigrants to terminate
their pregnancies.
Known as “Jane Doe” in federal
court, the teenager is one of thousands of unaccompanied minors
who have crossed the border illegally. She is being held in South
Texas and has permission from a
state judge to have an abortion,
but she says federal officials refuse
to transport her to a clinic.
“It’s unprecedented, it’s unconstitutional, and it’s also unconscionable,” said Brigitte Amiri, a
senior ACLU staff lawyer and attorney for the girl, who filed suit
through her court-appointed
guardian. “Blocking access to
abortion for unaccompanied minors is downright cruel.”
The ACLU alleges that federal
employees in Texas went as far as
to visit the girl to talk her out of the
procedure and took her to a Christian “crisis pregnancy center,”
where she allegedly received an
ultrasound against her will.
Lawyers are seeking an emergency restraining order preventing the government from interfering with the girl’s plan to undergo
an abortion and a preliminary injunction to protect others in her
situation.
The Department of Health and
Human Services, which is responsible for caring for detained unaccompanied minors, said this week
that “there is no constitutional
right” for an immigrant minor to
get an elective abortion while in
federal custody. Officials said they
are required to care for immigrant
children and teens through the
program, including an “unborn
baby.”
On Tuesday, an HHS official
said Scott Lloyd, who directs the
agency’s Office of Refugee Resettlement, had personally intervened to try to persuade unaccompanied minor girls not to have
abortions. The official, who was
authorized to comment only as an
unnamed spokesman, declined to
say whether those girls were
blocked from getting the procedure or to comment on Jane
Doe’s case.
Lloyd’s office contracts with
shelters to house unaccompanied
minors until they can be reunited
with family members.
“When there’s a child in the
program who is pregnant, he has
been reaching out to her and trying to help as much as possible
with life-affirming options,” the
spokesman said. “He by law has
custody of these children, and just
like a foster parent, he knows that
that’s a lot of responsibility and he
is going to make choices that he
thinks are best for both the mother and the child.”
The spokesman said the Office
of Refugee Resettlement is reviewing its medical policy for the minors, with plans to “clarify” issues
related to abortion in the next few
weeks. Court records show that on
March 30, Lloyd said in an email
that federally funded shelters
“should not be supporting abortion services pre or post-release;
only pregnancy services and lifeaffirming options counseling.”
There are about 5,000 unaccompanied minors in the office’s
custody.
Jane Doe’s case has drawn the
attention of immigration hardliners and antiabortion groups, as
well as abortion rights advocates.
In a brief supporting HHS, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton
(R) said it would be breaking new
ground to declare that undocumented immigrants with “no substantial ties” to the United States
have a constitutional right to
“abortion on demand.”
Siding with the ACLU would
“effectively announce that anyone
on Earth has any number of constitutional rights simply by being
apprehended at the United States
border,” he wrote.
The ACLU argues that the
Trump administration’s position
violates Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court ruling that grants
women the right to an abortion. In
addition to blocking abortions,
lawyers say, the administration is
also illegally forcing unaccompanied minors to tell their parents or
sponsors about their pregnancies
or to visit antiabortion crisis pregnancy centers.
A federal magistrate judge in
California agreed with the ACLU
when lawyers tried to add the girl
to a related case there. The judge
declined, because the girl is in
Texas, but said she would have
ruled in their favor.
“The government may not want
to facilitate abortion, but it cannot
block it,” U.S. Magistrate Judge
Laurel Beeler ruled on Oct. 11.
The teenager is more than 14
weeks pregnant. Texas law bars
terminating pregnancies after 20
weeks. The House recently passed
similar legislation that President
Trump endorsed, though it is unlikely to pass the Senate.
Robert Carey, director of the
Office of Refugee Resettlement
under President Barack Obama
from 2015 until Trump took office,
said it would be unusual for a
person in his position to personally approach a minor in his custody.
“I would not have seen that as
appropriate,” Carey said. “I was
involved in weighing in on policy
decisions but would not have intervened in individual cases like
this.”
During his tenure, the office
was forbidden to pay for abortions, except in cases of rape, incest or a threat to the woman’s life,
Carey said. The office did, however, pick up the cost of taking girls
to abortion clinics as a matter of
policy. Carey said some pregnant
minors may have suffered sexual
abuse in their home country or
during the trek north to cross the
border.
Adult federal detainees also
have access to abortions, according to federal court records.
Two members of Congress
wrote to acting HHS secretary
Eric Hargan this week about the
case. “It is troubling to consider
that this Administration is imposing its ideological agenda on girls,”
wrote Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Tex.)
and Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.).
“To force a girl to carry an unwanted pregnancy to term against her
expressed will . . . is wrong and
unlawful.”
maria.sacchetti@washpost.com
sandhya.somashekhar@
washpost.com
‘#MeToo’ revelations go
global after Weinstein fall
BY
K ARLA A DAM
london — The wave of revelations and revulsion over Harvey
Weinstein has gone global.
As A-list actresses level claims
of sexual misconduct at the nowdisgraced Hollywood mogul, ordinary women everywhere engaged
in a collective outpouring of their
stories of assaults and sexual harassment, inspired by an online
campaign made famous by Alyssa
Milano.
And, as the #MeToo ranks
swelled, there is also a sense of
bitterness about how sexism remains rooted in many parts of the
world — including places seen as
progressive regarding women’s
rights.
“This has been part of our world
— women’s world — since time
immemorial,” said the British actress Emma Thompson when
asked by the BBC about the Weinstein scandal.
Indeed, the statistics compiled
by the Stop Street Harassment
campaign in the United States
make for sober reading.
The group highlights a 2014
study by YouGov that ranked the
safety of transit systems for women in 16 cities around the world.
Bogota was the most unsafe city in
the survey, while Mexico City was
the worst for verbal and physical
harassment, with 64 percent of
women respondents saying they
had been groped or harassed on
public transit.
Within hours of Milano’s #MeToo call, the hashtag was trending
worldwide, with accounts pouring
in from Calgary to Cairo and from
Paris to Perth. The two-word
hashtag has been tweeted more
than half a million times and has
been featured in over 12 million
posts on Facebook. On Arab social
media sites, women jumped into
the conversation using the
hashtag #AnaKaman, the Arabic
translation of “me too.”
A 63-year-old Australian woman tweeted that harassment was
present “all through my early
working life in the 70s & 80s”
while working at the Department
of Defense in Sydney.
“Looking back it was horrendous,” she wrote.
A parish priest in rural England
tweeted where she faced harassment: “Paris when I was 16 heading to visit my pen friend. Norfolk
when I was 22 being expected to
‘earn’ some bar work. Others I
can't say.”
“In Calgary traveling with a client on business . . . In Vancouver
applying for one job, working at
another . . . Amazingly #JustHowItWas #MeToo,” tweeted a Canadian author with her list.
A self-described German-Finnish world traveler tweeted: “And
then there was that old man who
placed his sweaty hands on me in
an overfilled metro in Rome acting
as if it’s not him.”
“Tailors in Pakistan who always
need to measure your chest and
hips at least 7 times,” wrote a press
officer in Lahore. “You always
know when the hand lingers too
long.”
Even in countries considered to
be progressive, women were sharing stories of abuse. “5 years ago at
Copenhagen Airport I was sexu-
ally assaulted by a security guard,”
tweeted a British comedian and
actress.
In France — where President
Emmanuel Macron said he would
revoke Weinstein’s Légion d’Honneur award — a separate but similar campaign took root with thousands taking to social media with
the hashtag #balancetonporc, or
“squeal on your pig.”
Sandra Muller, a French journalist, kicked off the #balancetonporc campaign when she encouraged people to name and shame
those responsible for sexual harassment. She named her own former boss, whom she said commented on her breasts and told her
that she was “my type of woman.”
Stories began flooding in, like
that of a Paris-based radio journalist who tweeted that an editor of a
major radio station once grabbed
her by the throat and told her she
would have sex with him “whether
you want it or not.” She said she
filed a complaint but that nothing
happened.
On Monday, Marlène Schiappa,
France’s gender equality minister,
said legislators will debate proposals for cracking down on sexual
violence and harassment, including issuing fines for “wolf whistling” and other sexually tinged
comments on the street.
This isn’t the first time that
women — and some men — have
turned to social media en masse to
highlight examples of harassment
and abuse.
Five years ago, Laura Bates, a
British writer and campaigner,
founded #Everydaysexism, an online project that catalogues everyday, street-level sexism.
She said in an interview that the
recent campaigns following the
Weinstein allegations highlight
how “enormously widespread” the
problem is and how too often
women are ignored or silenced.
“Women are often told that the
problem doesn’t exist, sexism is
the thing of the past, we’re equal
now, those things only happened
in the 70s, you must be overreacting, you got the wrong end of the
stick, he probably meant it as a
compliment, you just need to
smile, darling,” she said.
Many of the patterns seen in
articles that have emerged in recent days — stories of abuse at
home, in the workplace, at schools,
in public spaces — are not new,
Bates said. But she said that more
women are speaking out.
“I don’t think we’ve seen great
strides in the last five years with
the problem shifting. What we are
seeing is thanks to the incredible
courage of women and girls all
over the world speaking out about
their experiences is the increased
tendencies for survivors to be able
to talk about what’s happened to
them,” she said.
She added that she hoped the
outpouring of grief and frustration will help shift the conversation from “this point, where we are
constantly trying to raise awareness that the problem even exists”
to the next phase, “where we are
having a debate about how to fix
it.”
karla.adam@washpost.com
Heba Habib in Stockholm contributed
to this report.
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A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
The World
T
he man poised to lead
the Czech Republic following elections this
week is a polarizing billionaire who vows to drain the
swamp of this capital city’s politics, run his country like a
business and keep out Muslim
immigrants.
He casts himself as the
straight-talking voice of the
common man and derives support from the country’s forgotten communities. He makes a
sport of attacking the European
Union and says NATO’s mission
is outdated. He pledges to put
his own nation’s interests above
all else but is dogged by investigations into alleged shady dealings that threaten to cripple his
political career.
Andrej Babis is so similar to
the U.S. president in profile and
outlook that he feels compelled
to offer at least one key distinction.
“I was never bankrupt,” the
63-year-old says mischievously
in an interview at his featureless
office park on the outskirts of
this gloriously gargoyle-andspire-pierced city.
There are other differences,
too. But the overall picture is
clear: Europe, a land where
President Trump is widely reviled, could soon have a man
who bears an uncanny resemblance leading a nation at the
continent’s heart.
“People here may not like
Trump,” said Jiri Pehe, the director of New York University’s
Prague campus. “But they like
Trumpian politics as performed
by Mr. Babis.”
Babis won’t be alone, either. If
elections on Friday and Saturday vault him to the prime
minister’s office, as polls suggest
they probably will, he could
plant a flag farther west for a
strongman vision of government that is testing young democracies to the east — and in
the process straining European
unity.
“He’s no democrat,” said Pehe,
a former adviser to Vaclav Havel,
the Czech anti-communist dissident turned president. “The
danger here is that the Czech
Republic could slide to the European periphery, along with Hungary and Poland.”
Austria, too, is shifting in that
direction, after an election Sunday that put in line for chancellor a 31-year-old conservative
who has mimicked many of the
policies of the far-right Freedom
Party — and is expected to make
the Euroskeptic party his partner in government.
The Czech Republic’s own
turn toward the east is, in many
respects, surprising. Of the nations that emerged from behind
the Iron Curtain nearly three
decades ago, the Czech Republic
has fared the best by numerous
measures. With a strong manufacturing base, it has the lowest
unemployment rate in the E.U., a
DAVID W CERNY/REUTERS
Czech politics take Trumpian turn
budget surplus and life satisfaction ratings that would be the
envy of the Italians or the Spanish.
Unlike Poland, it didn’t suffer
a mass exodus of its young
workers. Unlike Hungary, it
didn’t have hundreds of thousands of asylum seekers crossing
its territory at the height of the
2015 refugee crisis.
But the Czech Republic does
have persistently low wages,
along with a political class that
is notoriously beset by corruption. It also has older residents
who yearn for the simpler days
of their communist youth, when
the all-powerful state protected
them.
The combination has made
the nation of 10 million fertile
ground for populism. And Babis,
the country’s second-wealthiest
man, has seized the opportunity.
The businessman, who initially earned his wealth under stillmysterious circumstances during the first years after communism’s collapse, makes an unlikely champion of the little guy.
Born in modern-day Slovakia
as the son of a diplomat, he
spent part of his youth in Switzerland and speaks fluent German, French and English. As an
adult, he lived for years in
Country at center of Europe is
poised to elect a man whose pitch
mirrors the U.S. president’s
BY
G RIFF W ITTE
Morocco. His vast business empire includes agricultural and
chemical
firms,
Michelinstarred restaurants and a significant portion of the Czech national media.
He was a political novice
when, in 2012, he founded his
own party, Action of Dissatisfied
Citizens, which is known by its
Czech acronym ANO, meaning
“yes.”
The party, running on a probusiness and anti-politicalestablishment
platform,
stunned the nation a year later
when it took second place in
parliamentary elections. Babis
became finance minister in a
coalition
government
and
served until May, when he was
forced out amid a swirl of accu-
IN PRAGUE
sations over alleged tax evasion
and other improprieties — all of
which he denies.
But the ouster didn’t weaken
him. If anything, it may have
bolstered his carefully cultivated reputation as a political outsider whom the insiders will do
anything to ruin.
“People are saying that I’m a
danger to democracy in this
country, which of course is ridiculous,” he said, his gray suit
neatly pressed, his gray hair and
beard trimmed tight. “I’m a
danger to this corrupt system.”
It’s a message that he repeats
relentlessly on the trail, where
he signs copies of his slickly
produced campaign book and
gives out his cellphone number
to people who say they could use
Andrej Babis, leader of the Czech ANO party and candidate for
prime minister, is often compared to President Trump.
his help battling the turgid
Czech bureaucracy.
“He’s a normal guy,” said Zdena Krskova, a 69-year-old who
was shopping for dinner one day
at an open-air market in a
working-class neighborhood of
north Prague. “Plus, he has
enough money, so he doesn’t
need to steal from the people.”
Babis’s support is concentrated outside Prague, in smaller
cities and towns that haven’t
shared the same bump in prosperity as the country’s touristthronged capital. It also comes
from older voters who are looking to the billionaire to cut
through the messy logistics of
democratic politics and use a
firm hand to restore a simpler,
bygone time, said Daniel
Prokop, head of political polling
for the research firm Median.
“His voters are authoritarianoriented,” Prokop said. “If you
ask whether it’s better to have a
strong leader or democratic
decision-making, his people say
strong leader.”
And there’s a reason they
gravitate to Babis.
“He’s used to getting his way,”
said Jan Machacek, who runs a
think tank funded by Babis’s
firms. “Compromise is not in his
genes.”
Machacek, who was a dissident during communist times,
said the billionaire’s political
rise reflects widespread disappointment among Czech voters
who had high hopes for a democratic system they thought could
solve the nation’s ills. Instead, he
said, they got weak parties and
corrupt politicians.
The consequence of such disillusionment, he said, “could be
a lot worse than Mr. Babis.”
Unlike Trump, Machacek
said, Babis is no showboat. He is
a demanding businessman but
doesn’t deliberately sow chaos.
Yet Babis has shown a willingness to pick fights with powerful
European leaders, particularly
on the issue of refugees.
In the interview, Babis
mocked programs under which
E.U. members are supposed to
share the burden of taking in
asylum seekers, disparaged the
notion of a “multicultural society” and, referring to the German chancellor, blamed the
2015 refugee crisis on “the stupidity of Madame Merkel.”
Such comments could mean
more trouble for the E.U., which
is grappling with how to handle
populist governments in Hungary and Poland. In both countries, the leaders are well practiced at demonizing migrants
and flouting the will of Brussels
for domestic gain.
Babis seems to be employing a
similar approach — at least
during the campaign.
“He’s operating with fear. Promoting danger — the E.U. and
migrants,” said Ivan Gabal, an
independent member of Parliament who is aligned with the
center-right Christian Democrats. “That’s the whole strategy.”
In the Czech Republic —
where anti-E.U. and antimigrant sentiments both run
high — it seems to be a winning
one. But it’s not unusual here,
and Babis came to it relatively
late.
Even if Babis’s party comes
out on top this week, he will
need to find coalition partners.
He will also have to contend
with multiple investigations
into his business practices. And
he will need to work with Europe.
All of which suggests that, like
Trump, Babis may shift course
on some of his campaign promises once he confronts the reality
of governing. And unlike Trump,
Gabal said, Babis is capable of
admitting when he’s wrong.
“When you put data in front of
him and say, ‘You’re not right.
The situation is different,’ he’ll
look at it. And accept it,” said
Gabal, whose party has been in
coalition with Babis’s — and may
be once again post-election.
“He’s not stupid.”
griff.witte@washpost.com
Katerina Santurova contributed to
this report.
DIGEST
BRITAIN
MI5 chief sounds alarm
on pace of terror threat
Britain’s domestic intelligence
chief warned during a rare public
speech Tuesday that the terrorist
threat the country faces has
accelerated at an alarming pace
and is worse now than at any time
in his 34-year career.
MI5 Director General Andrew
Parker said his agency is
constantly expanding and
upgrading its capability but
cannot realistically prevent all
attacks targeting civilians.
“We are contending with an
intense U.K. terrorist threat from
Islamist extremists,” Parker said
in London. “That threat is
multidimensional, evolving
rapidly and operating at a scale
and pace we’ve not seen before.”
He noted a “dramatic upshift”
in the threat this year, with
attacks in London and
Manchester that killed 36 people
combined.
“Twenty attacks in the U.K.
have been foiled over the past
four years,” Parker said. “Many
more will have been prevented by
the early interventions we and
the police make. There have been
a record number of terrorismrelated arrests: 379 in the year to
June.”
Parker said MI5 has more than
500 live investigations involving
about 3,000 people known to be
involved in extremist activities.
More than 20,000 people have
been scrutinized for possible
terror ties, he said, and there are
undoubtedly “violent extremists”
who have escaped detection.
Parker called on technology
firms to work with the
government on preventing their
social-media platforms from
being used by extremists for
communications that cannot be
monitored.
substantially over.
According to a military
spokesman, 20 to 30 militants are
left in Marawi, including six to
eight foreign fighters.
Marawi, a center of Islamic
faith in the predominantly
Roman Catholic nation, has been
devastated by the siege laid by the
Islamic State-allied militants,
who overran the city on May 23.
The occupation of the city and
the involvement of foreign
fighters set off alarms in
Southeast Asia and the West.
Analysts said parts of the
southern Philippines were at risk
of becoming a new base for the
Islamic State as it lost territory in
Iraq and Syria.
— Associated Press
ISRAEL
Talks ruled out unless
Hamas is sidelined
Israel said Tuesday that it
would not conduct negotiations
with a Palestinian government
that includes a role for the
militant group Hamas, laying
down a significant potential
roadblock to already complicated
Palestinian reconciliation efforts.
Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu’s office said there
would be no talks with the
Palestinians unless Hamas agrees
to a series of conditions it is
unlikely to accept, including
recognizing Israel and agreeing
to disarm.
The announcement came as
Palestinian Authority President
Mahmoud Abbas’s Fatah
government is in talks with
Hamas over ending a 10-year
split.
Under Egyptian auspices,
the Palestinian factions
announced a preliminary
agreement last week and have
formed committees to sort out
unresolved issues.
Hamas seized control of the
Gaza Strip from Abbas’s forces in
2007, leaving the Palestinians
divided between two
governments. Previous
reconciliation attempts have
failed.
Netanyahu’s stance matched
past demands placed on Hamas
by Israel and the international
community — that it renounce
violence and recognize Israel’s
right to exist.
But Tuesday’s statement added
— Associated Press
Liberian runoff vote on Nov. 7:
IVAN DAMANIK/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
An Indonesian villager takes a picture of Mount Sinabung as it spews thick smoke as seen from Tiga
Pancur village in Karo, North Sumatra. The volcano roared back to life in 2010 for the first time in 400
years. After another period of inactivity, it erupted again in 2013 and has remained highly active since.
some new conditions, including
that Abbas’s government
continue a crackdown on Hamas
militants in the West Bank and
that Hamas return the remains of
two Israeli soldiers and release
two Israeli civilians thought to be
held in Gaza.
Ahmad Majdalani, an aide to
Abbas, said Hamas would not be
part of the new government and
would be included only if it
accepts the pursuit of a peace
agreement with Israel.
— Associated Press
PHILIPPINES
Troops make final push
in battle for Marawi
Gunfire rang out sporadically
and explosions thudded as
Philippine troops fought Tuesday
to regain control of the last
pocket of Marawi controlled by
Islamist militants, with President
Rodrigo Duterte declaring the
southern city liberated from
“terrorist influence.”
The military, boosted by the
deaths of two key militant leaders
the day before, hoped to swiftly
defeat the dwindling band of
fighters trapped in an area it says
is about five acres.
Duterte visited the city on
Tuesday and announced its
liberation. “Ladies and
gentlemen, I hereby declare
Marawi City liberated from the
terrorist influence,” he said.
Gen. Eduardo Año, the military
chief, said the threat from the
militants, who have occupied
parts of the city for five months, is
Election authorities said Liberia’s
presidential runoff will take place
Nov. 7. A National Elections
Commission official said former
international soccer star George
Weah will face Vice President
Joseph Boakai in the second
round. Neither of the men got the
more than 50 percent of the vote
needed for an outright win in the
Oct. 10 election. Weah got about
39 percent; Boakai got 29 percent.
U.N. halves rations in Central
African Republic: A U.N.
humanitarian official said
aid workers have had to cut
rations in half in the Central
African Republic because of
underfunding. Najat Rochdi
said operations have been
suspended entirely in some
remote areas because aid could
be delivered there only by air, and
that had become too expensive.
The country has suffered waves
of communal violence since
2013.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
BY A NTONIO O LIVO
AND S AYED S ALAHUDDIN
kabul — A string of Taliban
attacks on Afghan security units
killed more than 70 people, officials said Tuesday, in another
show of force by the militants
amid a renewed effort seeking
possible peace talks.
The attacks, which began late
Monday and ranked among the
deadliest of the year, underscored the Taliban’s resilience
and ability to strike heavily
protected sites such as military
bases.
They also raised questions
about any potential Taliban commitment to open dialogue with
the Afghan government and its
allies after 16 years of conflict.
In Oman, U.S. officials met
with delegations from China,
Pakistan and Afghanistan to try
to revive peace talks with the
Taliban. Previous attempts to
open talks with the organization
have stalled, most recently last
year after Taliban leader Akhtar
Mohammad Mansour was killed
in a U.S. drone strike.
On Tuesday, Taliban forces
stormed a police compound
south of Kabul, killing 41 people,
including a local police chief, in a
gun battle that lasted hours, officials said.
The commando-style raid in
Gardez in Paktia province, about
80 miles from Kabul, also injured
about 100 people when two car
bombs exploded outside the
compound, which serves as a
command center for local police
and a main training site for
police recruits.
Taliban fighters then stormed
the site, taking over towers and
firing indiscriminately, causing
casualties among police and civilians who happened to be there on
government business, officials
said.
An Interior Ministry spokesman, Najib Danesh, said local
police chief Toryalai Abadani was
among those killed.
Earlier, a similar attack in
neighboring Ghazni province
killed 25 government security
officers and five civilians. A suicide bomber drove a vehicle into
a government compound, after
which gunmen entered the site.
At least 48 people were also
wounded, Gen. Murad Ali Murad,
a deputy interior minister, told
reporters.
Murad said a total of 74 people
were killed in the spate of Taliban
violence that included smaller
attacks.
Pakistan — which recently won
some favor from the Trump administration after the rescue of
American Caitlan Coleman and
her family, held by the Talibanlinked Haqqani network for five
years — quickly condemned the
attack in Gardez.
Officials in Pakistan are seeking to ease strained relations
with Afghanistan, partly in
hopes of gaining a better seat in
discussions over economic investments in the region that
include a stronger U.S. presence,
increased trade with India and a
nearly $1 trillion Chinese “Silk
Road” initiative that, using land
and sea routes, would connect
China’s commercial markets to
Central Asia, the Middle East
and Europe.
“Pakistan reiterates its unequivocal condemnation of terrorism in all forms and manifestations and reaffirms its commitment for continued efforts and
cooperation for eliminating this
menace,” the country’s Foreign
Ministry said in a statement.
The attacks followed several
attempted suicide bombings in
Kabul during recent weeks.
The Afghan intelligence agency said Tuesday that it recently
thwarted a Taliban plot to attack
several spots in the city, including
military facilities, army convoys
and crowded areas.
The agency arrested two men
Monday who were traveling in a
car full of explosives. Over the
weekend, a driver of a truck
carrying three tons of explosives
was also arrested.
Taliban fighters and other militants, including Islamic State
extremists, have struck bases
used by security forces in the
past.
In April, Taliban insurgents
dressed in army uniforms surged
into an army facility in the northern Balkh province, killing dozens of soldiers.
Also in Paktia province, the
United States carried out a drone
strike Monday, killing 20 “extremists” in the Jaji Maidan district, a NATO spokesman said
Tuesday.
antonio.olivo@washpost.com
Shaiq Hussein in Islamabad
contributed to this report.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Iraqi forces shrink Kurdish-held territories
BY L OVEDAY M ORRIS,
T AMER E L- G HOBASHY
AND A ASO A MEEN S HWAN
baghdad — Iraqi forces seized
several northern towns from
Kurdish fighters Tuesday, as the
federal government in Baghdad
expanded its swift campaign to
reassert authority in areas that
have been disputed for nearly two
decades.
The campaign, which began
over the weekend with Iraqi forces moving to control the oil-rich
city of Kirkuk, has grown to include areas Kurds claimed after
the U.S. invasion in 2003. The
operation
has
significantly
shrunk Kurdish-controlled territory and raised doubts about the
future of the region’s political
leadership, which has long agitated for independence.
In his first public comments
since the loss of Kirkuk, the president of Iraqi Kurdistan, Masoud
Barzani, urged Kurds to remain
united and suggested that his political rivals were to blame for the
crisis. He has come under intense
pressure since moving ahead with
a bid for independence that appears to have backfired.
Baghdad’s push into the contested territories comes after a
Kurdish referendum on inde-
pendence last month that was
opposed by the central government, the region’s neighbors and
the United States. The dispute
has undermined the U.S. goal of a
coordinated military campaign
against the Islamic State militant
group that would translate into
political cooperation between the
two key American allies.
Last year to the day, Kurdish
and Iraqi forces launched a battle
to reclaim Mosul from the Islamic
State after a historic agreement to
fight in tandem. That military
cooperation has been replaced in
recent days by the threat of the
two sides turning their guns on
each other — though Tuesday’s
push by Iraqi forces appeared to
avoid armed conflict as Kurdish
fighters pulled back of their own
accord.
Barzani said the withdrawal of
the Kurdish peshmerga forces on
Tuesday from disputed territories, which he blamed on a “unilateral decision” by some of his
political rivals, meant that negotiations with Baghdad over troop
distribution in the region would
now be based on where Kurdish
forces were stationed before the
Mosul operation began last year.
Many of the areas ceded on
Tuesday had been in Kurdish
hands long before that battle
Sinjar on Tuesday for the first
time since 2003, residents said.
Sheikh Khalaf Bahri, a Yazidi
religious leader, said the situation
was calm, although residents
were staying indoors.
“It’s too early for them to know
if they are safe,” he said. “We hope
that this will be resolved soon,
and we hope that the Yazidi people will not be subject to any
attacks.”
Elias Sinjari, a resident, said
the peshmerga forces withdrew
in the night, except for those
originally from the town. They
were replaced by a Baghdadbacked Yazidi militia known as
the Lalish Force.
“I don’t care who holds our city,
whether it’s peshmerga or Iraqis.
What we care about is living in
peace and to be protected,” he
said by phone. “Everybody claims
they care about Sinjar when, in
fact, no one did anything for
Sinjar. We are just a card they use
when they need and then can
throw away.”
Since retaking Sinjar two years
ago, Barzani has tried to assert
control over a wide swath of
territory bordering the Kurdish
region and stamp out the influence of Baghdad and rival Kurdish groups.
While many Yazidis consider
was launched.
According to officials in the
towns of Sinjar, Makhmur,
Bashiqa and Rabia and in the
Mosul dam area, peshmerga forces with the ruling party of the
Kurdistan Regional Government
withdrew from their posts as Iraqi
forces approached. A spokesman
for the peshmerga did not respond to requests for comment.
Militia forces affiliated with
the Iraqi government seized control of Sinjar, near the border
with Syria, early Tuesday.
A force of local Yazidis, part of
Iraq’s popular mobilization
movement of militias, took control of the town, residents and
fighters said. A few hours later,
Baghdad-allied Shiite militia
forces entered, they added.
Iraqi forces also announced on
Tuesday the retaking of the oil
fields of Bai Hassan and Avana
near Kirkuk, potentially depriving the Kurdish region of its main
source of revenue. Baghdad has
accused the Kurds of illegally
exporting oil.
In a triumphant news conference two years ago after Kurdish
forces took Sinjar from Islamic
State militants, Barzani vowed
that no flag other than the Kurdish one would fly over the town.
But the Iraqi flag went up in
themselves ethnically Kurdish,
not all do. Some accuse Barzani,
whose peshmerga fighters guarded the area before the Islamic
State’s conquest, of abandoning
them in 2014.
When the peshmerga withdrew, the Islamic State slaughtered thousands of Yazidi men
and captured thousands of Yazidi
women to hold as sex slaves.
Many Sinjar residents view the
arrival of the new forces, particularly Shiite militias from a different part of the country, as an
uncomfortable reminder of that
trauma.
“Unfortunately, again, the forces that were expected to protect
the Yazidis left the Yazidis alone
without firing a single bullet,”
said Haider Shesho, a local Yazidi
commander.
He said Yazidi leaders were
trying to negotiate for the forces
from outside the region to leave
the Town Center. “We have no
problem with the Yazidi force,” he
said. “We would like international intervention. The Yazidis have
suffered a lot.”
loveday.morris@washpost.com
tamer.el-ghobashy@washpost.com
Shwan reported from Irbil, Iraq.
Mustafa Salim contributed to this
report.
ERIK DE CASTRO/REUTERS
Syrian Democratic Forces fighters ride atop military vehicles as they celebrate what they say is victory in Raqqa. For photos and video, go to wapo.st/raqqafall.
In Raqqa, ‘an air of jubilation’ as U.S.-backed force claims city
RAQQA FROM A1
By the time the battle was over,
Raqqa had lost all strategic significance to the group that once had
used the city to showcase its brutality and plot attacks against the
West. The fall of the Iraqi city of
Mosul in July and the loss of large
areas of territory in eastern Syria
to Syrian government forces leave
the militants in control of only
one sizable stretch of territory,
spanning the Iraqi-Syrian border.
But the capture of Raqqa by the
SDF, backed by U.S. airstrikes and
American advisers on the ground,
nonetheless marks a milestone in
the U.S.-led war against the Islamic State. In a briefing to reporters
in Washington, a U.S. military
spokesman, Col. Ryan Dillon,
called it “momentous.” He said
that the Islamic State has now lost
87 percent of the territory it once
controlled and that 6,500 fighters
remain, out of tens of thousands
at the peak of the group’s prowess.
The victory also intensifies
growing questions about what
comes next. The remaining Islamic State strongholds in Syria lie to
the south in the province of Deir
al-Zour, where the Syrian government and its Iranian-backed and
Russian allies are making fast
progress. The U.S. military will
leave it up to the SDF to decide
whether it wants to continue to
advance into the area, Dillon said.
Perhaps more importantly, the
Trump administration has not yet
indicated whether it is prepared
to stay on in northeastern Syria to
provide protection for the fledgling ministate being forged by
Syria’s Kurds. The experience
over the past two days of the
Kurds in neighboring Iraq may
embolden the Syrian government
to challenge the Syrian Kurdish
enclave once the Islamic State is
vanquished, just as the Iraqi gov-
ernment has moved to dislodge
Kurdish forces from the oil-rich
city of Kirkuk and other areas
they controlled.
Syrian government officials
have spoken on several occasions
about their determination to regain control over all of the territory they lost to the rebellion
against President Bashar alAssad, including the area controlled by the Kurds.
“What would be disastrous for
Syrian Kurds is a rapid U.S. drawdown in Syria. It would take away
their major foreign patron,” said
Nicholas A. Heras of the Center
for a New American Security.
A civilian council comprising
Arabs and Kurds is waiting in the
wings to take over governance of
Raqqa, under the auspices of the
Kurdish-led administration running northeastern Syria. But the
international community has not
committed funds for reconstruction of the devastated city, and the
absence of a clear U.S. policy for
northeastern Syria risks undermining the gains, cautioned Hassan Hassan of the Washingtonbased Tahrir Institute.
“No one trusts the Americans,
not even the Kurds,” he said. “To
defeat extremism after destroying areas through the necessity of
war, you have to deal with the
consequences, not just drop
bombs and leave because you
have an aversion to war.”
The offensive to capture the
city began in June, with the SDF
advancing on the ground as
U.S.-led coalition airstrikes pummeled the militants. As was the
case in Mosul, victory over the
militants has come at a tremendous price. Much of the city now
lies in ruins, its residents scattered in displacement camps
across the country.
At least 1,000 civilians are said
to have died, according to esti-
mates by monitoring groups,
most of them in the relentless
airstrikes. More than 270,000
people fled their homes during
the battle, according to the United
Nations, and many will find they
do not have homes to go back to.
Besieged and severely weakened, dozens of militants had
launched a final stand from inside Raqqa’s main hospital and
stadium. But the end of the battle
was hastened by a controversial
deal brokered by local officials
under which local fighters were
offered the chance to escape prosecution, if they had not committed crimes, by surrendering to the
SDF. Dillon said 350 fighters had
surrendered in recent days, including some foreign fighters.
They are being screened by the
SDF to figure out whether they
had participated in killings, he
said.
Raqqa was the first provincial
capital to fully fall from government control when it was cap-
tured in March 2013 by moderate
and extremist groups including
the al-Qaeda-linked Jabhat alNusra, then operating as the Syrian wing of the Iraqi-based Islamic State.
louisa.loveluck@washpost.com
liz.sly@washpost.com
Heba Habib in Stockholm, Zakaria
Zakaria and Erin Cunningham in
Istanbul, and Alex Horton in
Washington contributed to this
report.
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OCTOBER 18 , 2017
Economy & Business
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States, insurers seek
higher health premiums
despite deal on subsidies
Moves reflect doubt that
Congress will pass plan
to save ACA payments
BY
CHRISTOPHER DILTS/BLOOMBERG NEWS
A woman walks past a Nordstrom in Chicago. Nordstrom family owners announced this summer that they would seek financing to buy out
the remainder of the department store. That plan has since been set aside, but officials said that efforts will resume after the holidays.
Nordstrom shelves going private
In tough period for retail,
longtime success story
fails to find financiers
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
Nordstrom, for years, has been
a bright spot in an industry roiled
by mounting bankruptcies and
store closures.
But, it seems, not even the 116year-old retail darling is immune
from worries in the broader industry. After failing to find financiers, company executives announced this week that they were
calling off efforts to go private —
at least for now.
Seattle-based Nordstrom said
it “intends to continue its efforts . . . after the conclusion of
the holiday season.”
Shares of the company’s stock
tumbled more than 5 percent following the announcement Monday — to the lowest point in more
than a year — before recovering
about half that Tuesday. Other
department store stocks also took
a hit, including Dillard’s (down
about 3 percent) and Macy’s
(down 2 percent).
“Investors are finally starting
to understand the risks associated
with this sector,” said Howard
Davidowitz, chairman of retail
consulting and investment banking firm Davidowitz & Associates.
“They’re realizing that financing
another loony private-equity deal
with billions in debt is a terrible
idea.”
Toys R Us, the Limited and
David’s Bridal are among more
than a dozen high-profile privateequity-backed retailers to file for
bankruptcy this year, raising
questions about the long-term impact of debt-heavy arrangements.
Members of the Nordstrom
family — who together own
31 percent of the company — announced this summer that they
were looking to buy the remain-
“Investors are finally
starting to understand.”
Howard Davidowitz, on industry risk
der of the company and take it
private. The news sent Nordstrom’s stock soaring 17 percent.
But in the months since, the
family was reported to have faced
challenges in financing a takeover
of the $7 billion company, with
lenders demanding interest rates
as high as 12 percent, according to
the New York Post.
For Nordstrom, analysts said
the motivations for going private
are twofold. First, a sale would
allow members of the fourth-generation Nordstrom family to cash
out if they were interested. Secondly, it would free the retailer
from Wall Street’s expectations
for short-term financial results.
The company has roughly 350
stores around the country and is
run by family members, including
company co-presidents Blake,
Pete and Erik Nordstrom.
“Not having to worry about
quarterly earnings means you can
take some chances and make
changes without being in the public eye,” Davidowitz said. “But at
the same time, taking on billions
of dollars of debt at a time like this
— well, that could very well put
Nordstrom at risk.”
The focus now, analysts say,
will be on Nordstrom’s performance in the crucial coming
months.
“In the short term, this means
one thing: They have to have a
successful holiday season,” said
Mark Cohen, director of retail
studies at Columbia Business
School and former chief executive
of Sears Canada. “That’s crucial if
their going-private strategy is going to come off the shelf again.”
More than 300 retailers have
filed for bankruptcy this year as
brick-and-mortar chains struggle
to keep up with Americans’
changing shopping habits. Traditional department stores have
fared particularly badly amid increasing competition from online
retailers such as Amazon, which
this year is on track to surpass
Macy’s as the country’s largest
seller of clothing. (Jeffrey P. Bezos,
the founder and chief executive of
Amazon, also owns The Washington Post.)
Nordstrom, founded in 1901 as
a shoe store, has fared better than
many of its competitors by building up its online and off-price
businesses. It was one of the first
major retailers to offer free shipping and returns on all online
orders, and it has been aggressive
in expanding its discount Nordstrom Rack website, which last
quarter posted a 27 percent increase in sales.
And, analysts said, the chain
hasn’t been afraid to experiment
with new approaches: This
month, for example, Nordstrom
opened its first merchandise-free
store, staffed with stylists, tailors,
manicurists and bartenders (customers would be directed to buy
outfits and accessories they like
from the company’s website). The
company also owns flash-sale site
HauteLook and online styling
company Trunk Club.
“So far, Nordstrom has been
successful in almost everything
they’ve done,” Davidowitz said,
“but there’s no guarantee that will
continue when you pile on the
debt.”
He pointed to Neiman Marcus
— another upscale department
store chain that was on the upswing before being acquired by a
private-equity firm in 2013 — as a
cautionary tale. Earlier this year,
the Dallas-based retailer said it
was considering putting itself up
for sale after more than a decade
of attempting to pay down its
debt. The company, which owes
nearly $5 billion, has since called
off plans for a sale.
“That was another company
that could do no wrong,” Davidowitz said. “But look at it now.”
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
C AROLYN Y . J OHNSON
States and insurance companies scrambled to raise premiums
for insurance plans sold on the
Affordable Care Act exchanges —
even as Senate leaders reached a
deal on Tuesday that would fund
the subsidies in the short term.
The subsidies, called cost-sharing reductions — or CSRs — are
federal payments to insurers that
are used to offset deductibles and
other out-of-pocket health costs
for lower-income Americans.
The White House announced it
was ending the subsidy payments
late last week. The bipartisan deal
reached on Tuesday would fund
those marketplaces for two years.
But insurers — which are still obligated to sell the plans even if the
subsidy payments end — continued preparations to make up the
difference by requesting higher
premiums for next year amid uncertainty about whether the deal
would pass.
In many states, insurance companies had already priced in a
possible end of CSRs to their rate
requests, anticipating President
Trump’s move. In others, regulators explicitly asked companies to
assume the payments would be
made — or gave little direction,
leaving some insurance companies pushing for higher rates at the
last minute.
North Dakota insurance commissioner Jon Godfread announced that insurers would not
be allowed to refile for higher
rates. He said he made the decision to protect people who do not
receive a second type of subsidy —
premium tax credits that defray
the cost of their health insurance.
“This is an issue that is between
insurance carriers and the federal
government, and while I understand the strain you are under in
participating in this marketplace,
it is my duty to look out for those
consumers who have had to absorb multiple rounds of increases
to their health insurance premiums without receiving any assistance from the federal government,” Godfread said in a statement.
One North Dakota insurer,
Medica, decided in September not
to remain on the exchange. Another, Blue Cross Blue Shield of
North Dakota, said it would still
sell health plans on the marketplace, despite the fact its rates
were approved based on the assumption the cost-sharing subsidies would be paid.
“We expect that premiums may
increase in 2019 as a result of these
activities, however the full impact
will not be known until we understand our 2018 membership and
their utilization of health care services,” Andrea Dinneen, a spokeswoman for Blue Cross Blue Shield
of North Dakota, said in a statement.
Rhode Island had approved
rates based on the assumption the
federal payments would continue.
The insurance commission is now
working through an elaborate
procedure to raise the original
rates.
“It’s not as easy as pressing a
button,” said Cory King, the Rhode
Island insurance commissioner’s
principal policy associate. For
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode
Island, the insurers with more
customers, the change will push
the premium increase for “silver”
tier plans from about 12 percent to
about 30 percent.
Montana Health Co-Op, which
had filed for an average 4 percent
increase, requested to raise the
premium for silver plans by another 24 percent. PacificSource
Health Plans, which had filed for
an average 7.4 percent increase on
its Montana plans, requested another 11.3 percent premium increase for its silver plans.
“My department was advised by
both companies just months ago,
that with or without CSR payments, they would be able to honor the rates they provided to us
and the public. Today, by their
actions, they inform me that was
not true,” Montana securities and
insurance commissioner Matt
Rosendale said in a statement.
Insurers have expressed varying degrees of frustration with the
process.
Ken Provencher, president of
the regional insurer PacificSource
Health Plans, said that in the three
states where his company sells
plans on the exchange, the regulators all asked for slightly different
assumptions regarding whether
the payments would be made.
“The great ironic thing is that we
actually struggled in the individual
market in the first three years of the
ACA and constantly refined our
strategy. In 2017, we've actually
seen some stability,” Provencher
said. “We feel like we're in a reasonably comfortable place to offer coverage to the market.”
In Oregon, officials instructed
insurers that participate on the
exchange to file for a 7.1 percent
increase for all silver plans, on top
of the already-approved 2018 rates
to compensate for the loss of CSRs.
“We've been preparing for this
type of action since the day the
administration hinted it might
happen,” said Jake Sunderland, a
spokesman for Oregon's Department of Consumer and Business
Services. “We'd already done the
math and had a pretty good idea of
what increase would be necessary
to compensate for the missing
funding.”
Other states were still working
toward a solution.
In Washington, rates will increase between 9 percent and
27 percent without the payments,
according to spokesman Steve Valandra.
carolyn.johnson@washpost.com
Amy Goldstein contributed to this
story.
DIGEST
HEALTH INSURERS
UnitedHealth expects
earnings to grow
UnitedHealth Group, the
largest U.S. health insurer, said
earnings will grow 13 to
16 percent in 2018 as medical
costs remain low, and it expects
to benefit from new insurance
products backed by President
Trump.
UnitedHealth, the industry
bellwether, is the first health
insurer to report profits, and its
third-quarter net earnings rose
26.3 percent, beating analysts’
expectations.
UnitedHealth sold Affordable
Care Act individual plans in
about two dozen states before
booking financial losses and then
mostly pulling out of the market
this year.
UnitedHealth’s new chief
executive, Dave Wichmann, sees
opportunities in the plans
outlined by Trump.
Those plans envision the
creation of more associations
that will allow people to band
together to buy cheaper, less
regulated health plans and
extend the duration of benefitlight short-term plans to one year
from three months.
Wichmann said the company
would work with the
administration on the new
products it had outlined and that
it already has 300,000 customers
in association health plans.
Wichmann said the 2018
outlook takes into account the
reinstatement of the Affordable
Care Act’s 3 percent tax on health
insurance, putting the cost at
about 75 cents in earnings-pershare growth. The tax was
suspended in 2017 and will be
back in effect because
Republicans failed to repeal the
Affordable Care Act.
— Reuters
CONSUMER GOODS
J&J raises forecast due
to cancer drugs sales
Johnson & Johnson posted
better than expected thirdquarter earnings, raising its fullyear forecast due to growth from
new cancer drugs and highmargin treatments picked up in
its $30 billion acquisition of
Actelion Pharmaceuticals earlier
this year.
Sales at J&J’s pharmaceuticals
segment rose 15.4 percent to
$9.7 billion in the third quarter.
Around half of that growth came
from the Actelion deal.
Higher demand for J&J’s
blood-cancer drugs, Darzalex and
Imbruvica, and Actelion’s rare
diseases treatments are expected
to boost earnings going forward.
J&J said adjusted earnings,
excluding one-time items, rose
13 percent to $1.90 per share.
Analysts on average were
expecting an adjusted profit of
$1.80 per share.
Sales at J&J’s consumer
products segment, which makes
Band-Aids, Neutrogena products
and Tylenol, rose 2.9 percent to
$3.4 billion. The company’s net
earnings fell to $3.76 billion, or
$1.37 per share, in the quarter
from $4.27 billion, or $1.53 per
share, a year earlier. The firm
said it was hurt by amortization
and deal-related expenses.
J&J expects revenue of
$76.1 billion to $76.5 billion for
the year.
— Reuters
BANKS
Two investment banks
report earnings gains
Wall Street rivals Goldman
NAVESH CHITRAKAR/REUTERS
A woman picks marigold flowers before selling them at a market for
revelers to use for the Tihar festival, also called Diwali, the Hindu
festival of lights, in Kathmandu, Nepal. Marigolds are used to make
garlands and offer prayers during the five-day celebration, which
signifies the victory of light over darkness and good over evil.
kept a lid on expenses relative to
revenue.
Goldman’s bond trading
results were under particular
scrutiny from investors, since the
fifth-largest U.S. bank is more
reliant on trading than
competitors and does not have a
significant retail operation to
offset recent declines.
Goldman’s 26 percent fall in
third-quarter bond trading was
within the 16 percent to
27 percent declines that the Wall
Street rivals had reported but far
less than the 40 percent drop
some analysts had been
expecting. Overall, the bank
reported a 3 percent profit
decline that beat Wall Street
estimates.
In the third quarter, Morgan
Stanley’s wealth management
business reported record revenue
and a pretax profit margin of
26.5 percent.
— Reuters
Sachs Group and Morgan Stanley
topped analyst expectations on
Tuesday, reporting third-quarter
earnings gains from a range of
products and services despite an
industry-wide decline in bond
trading.
Goldman’s private equity
investments helped fuel its
earnings beat, while Morgan
Stanley’s wealth management
unit delivered record revenue
and profit margins.
Both reported higher
investment banking revenue
than the period a year ago and
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Commerce
Department releases housing
starts for September.
Earnings: American Express,
United Continental
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
Don’t let anxiety over a student loan
make you an easy target for scammers
If you’re in the
market to buy a
home, you might
hear a real estate
professional say
it’s all about
Michelle
“location,
Singletary location,
location.”
THE COLOR
Those in the
OF MONEY
business of deceit
also look for the
best location — but not
necessarily a physical place. For
scammers, it’s all about where
they’ll get the most money
victimizing people. And one of
the hottest places to be right
now involves student loans,
which are at an all-time high of
$1.4 trillion.
Lots of folks are struggling to
handle education debt. Even
those who are managing their
loan payments want out — and
fast.
Last week, the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau
released its annual Student Loan
Ombudsman Report. The
consumer watchdog agency said
it has handled 20,600 federal
and private student loan
complaints from September
2016 through August 2017.
During the same period, the
bureau handled about 2,300
debt-collection complaints about
private and federal student
loans.
The CFPB says it has been able
to return $750 million since 2011
to borrowers harmed by
dishonest practices and loanservicing failures.
Borrowers complained about
overly aggressive — and, in some
cases, illegal — debt-collection
practices. For example, a
borrower’s Social Security check
can be attached to offset a
federal student loan but not a
private loan. Nevertheless, some
debt collectors trying to collect
on private loans make that
threat.
If you’ve got a loan issue, the
CFPB may be able to help. You
can submit a complaint online at
consumerfinance.gov.
Last week, I was happy to see
that the Federal Trade
Commission has partnered with
11 states and the District to
combat deceptive student debtrelief scams. The crackdown is
called “Operation Game of
Loans.”
As a fan of the “Game of
Thrones” books and HBO series,
I think the campaign
enforcement title is spot-on.
Throughout the series, the
characters in this fantasyland
dread the looming cold, harsh
season, which requires
preparation and vigilance.
“Winter is coming for debtrelief scams that prey on hardworking Americans struggling to
pay back their student loans,”
said Maureen K. Ohlhausen,
acting chairman of the FTC.
The agency highlighted
actions it has taken against a few
companies recently. In one case,
a Florida-based business, which
falsely claimed it was affiliated
with the Department of
Education (DOE), allegedly
bilked borrowers out of at least
$11 million by promising to
forgive their loans, lower
payments and reduce interest
rates. Another company
allegedly took more than
$20 million from consumers by
charging illegal upfront fees of
up to $1,000.
Under the Telemarketing
Sales Rule, companies offering
debt-relief services cannot
charge upfront fees. It’s illegal to
collect money from customers
before the company has been
able to settle or reduce their
debts.
I get it. The debt is
overwhelming for many
borrowers, and that makes them
susceptible to debt-relief scams.
The CFPB says more than
1.2 million borrowers defaulted
in 2016.
One person I was working
with through my church
financial ministry panicked
about the amount of student
loans she’s carrying. She agreed
to pay a debt-relief company
$1,600. When I found out about
it, I asked to see her contract.
I was incredulous. Basically,
all the company was going to do
was explore the federal
repayment programs. Her
contract literally said they would
do this by “using publicly
available information” found on
the student aid website run by
the Education Department.
Then it promised to “secure
documentation on behalf of the
client to apply for the available
program or programs through
the DOE” and “maintain the
client’s file throughout the
duration of the DOE repayment
obligation.” In other words, they
would do nothing but send her
some forms they downloaded
online and keep a useless file
open.
There were many red flags in
the contract, including asking
that the woman provide her
Federal Student Aid
Identification (FSA ID), which is
the username and password
used to log on to DOE websites.
You should not give this
information to anyone.
Thankfully, the woman told me
about the contract in time for
her to back out of the
arrangement.
While there are legitimate
companies that offer services to
help you navigate repayment
options, why pay for something
that you can do for yourself —
free — if you’re already in debt?
If you’ve got a federal loan and
need guidance, go to
StudentAid.gov/repay — the
same place the debt-relief
companies go — for free
information about repayment
and forgiveness programs. Check
out ftc.gov for tips on how to
spot a student loan debt-relief
scam.
If you’ve got a loan issue, the
CFPB may be able to help. You
can submit a complaint online at
consumerfinance.gov.
This coming winter, scammers
will be on the prowl for new
victims as a new borrowers
begin their student loan
payments, after having had a sixmonth grace period following
their spring graduations from
college.
If you’ve got student loans,
don’t let your desperation for
relief lure you into falling for a
scam.
Readers may write to Michelle
Singletary at The Washington Post,
1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C.
20071 or
singletarym@washpost.com.
Personal responses may not be
possible, and comments or
questions may be used in a future
column, with the writer’s name,
unless otherwise requested. To read
previous Color of Money columns, go
to wapo.st/michelle-singletary.
Financier Soros shifts $18 billion
into his Open Society Foundations
BY
T HOMAS H EATH
Billionaire financier George Soros, known for donating to liberal
causes, now commands one of the
most powerful philanthropies in
the United States after having
moved $18 billion of his personal
wealth into his Open Society
Foundations.
The philanthropy, launched in
1979 with scholarships to black
South Africans under apartheid,
supports efforts to promote justice and equality around the globe.
The latest contribution vaults the
charity into one of the biggest in
the United States, behind those
such as the Bill and Melinda Gates
Foundation, founded by the
Microsoft billionaires.
“This is huge news, because he
grants in a more political fashion
that almost all of his peers,” said
Eileen Heisman, chief executive of
the National Philanthropic Trust,
which sponsors donor-advised
funds. “This is just going to put
more dollars behind it.”
Soros ranks 20th on Forbes
Magazine’s list of the 400 wealthiest Americans, with a net worth of
$23 billion. The 87-year-old hedge
fund manager was born in Hungary but fled the communist country
and put himself through the London School of Economics while
waiting tables and working as a
railway porter.
Through a spokesman, Soros
declined to comment.
The Open Society Foundations
network has given away $14 billion since 1984.
“We have no plans to change
our spending,” said Laura Silber,
the foundation’s head of communications. “We plan to continue to
focus on building open societies.
That means advancing human
rights, advancing justice and democratic practices.”
People close to the Soros foundation, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they
were not authorized to comment
publicly, said that for years, Soros
has been migrating his billions in
personal wealth from his investment vehicle, Soros Fund Management, to the foundation.
“It’s not like he wrote a check
for $18 billion and went over and
deposited it in the foundation,”
said one source. “This has been a
years-long process.”
The news of the $18 billion gift
was reported earlier in the Wall
Street Journal.
Soros began Soros Fund Management in 1969 and became one
of the world’s most successful investors, known for speculating on
currencies. He is best known for
short selling the British pound in
1992, which earned him the name
“The Man Who Broke the Bank of
England.”
In 2011, Soros Fund Management converted its investment
NO
WANT TO SELL IT
FOR TOP DOLLAR?
fund into a family office that handles Soros’s money and that of his
foundation.
Soros is known for his long
support of progressive causes and
U.S. Democratic candidates, making him a frequent target of political conservatives. He was a strident critic of then-President
George W. Bush and made personal donations to several nonprofit
groups that opposed Donald
Trump. He was an early supporter
of Barack Obama and gave millions to Hillary Clinton’s 2016
presidential campaign.
The Open Society Foundations
has offices in New York, London,
Budapest and Brussels. The foundation now works in more than
140 countries, has a staff of 1,500
and commands a $940 million
budget.
The largest share of its money
— 28 percent — goes toward democratic practices and human
rights. Twenty-three regional and
national foundations run by local
boards help determine how Open
Society’s grants are distributed.
“He is an immigrant who came
from a place where communication and having a dialogue wasn’t
welcome,” Heisman said. “He
lived under communism and under Nazi occupation. Living in an
open society is important to him,
and his grant-making has followed that path for years.”
thomas.heath@washpost.com
NO
HELLO!
A NATION RESPONDS
Wednesday, October 18
Streamed live from 9:00 - 10:30 a.m.
The Washington Post will bring together
lawmakers, industry leaders and journalists
to discuss how the nation is responding to
America’s opioid epidemic. Speakers will discuss
how the skyrocketing number of cases of opioid
abuse — and opioid-related deaths — reflects
a complex set of circumstances and regulatory
challenges that cross boundaries between
government and the medical industry, and have
consequences that reach far beyond those
sectors.
“Addiction in America: A Nation Responds” is
the latest program from Washington Post Live,
the newsroom’s live journalism platform.
To watch the live stream or
see the full list of speakers:
wapo.st/wpaddiction
Lenny Bernstein
STILL LOVING YOUR HOUSE?
YES
ADDICTION IN AMERICA
Health and
Medicine Reporter,
The Washington Post
Sen. Joe Manchin III
(D-W.Va.)
Sen. Maggie Hassan
(D-N.H.)
Sen. Rob Portman
(R-Ohio)
Roger Krone
Chairman and
Chief Executive Officer,
Leidos
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A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Abrasive negotiations
over NAFTA lead to a
three-nation standoff
BY S TEVEN M UFSON
AND D AMIAN P ALETTA
President Trump has tried to
bring his abrasive dealmaking
style to the North American Free
Trade Agreement negotiations,
but the fourth round of talks ended Tuesday without any sign that
Canada and Mexico were planning to knuckle under to U.S. demands.
Ministers from both nations
said that the U.S. proposals unveiled over the past week went
well beyond their countries’ own
red lines, though they agreed to
remain at the negotiating table
and extend talks through the end
of March 2018.
In a reflection of Trump’s
stance, U.S. Trade Representative
Robert E. Lighthizer exchanged
sharp words with his Canadian
and Mexican counterparts at a
briefing Tuesday afternoon, saying he was “disappointed” that
they were “reluctant to give up
unfair advantages.” He asserted
that “trade deficits do matter and
we intend to reduce them.”
The negotiators’ rhetoric
comes as the White House appears to be leaning toward its
more strident voices on trade.
While Lighthizer has taken the
lead, Peter Navarro, a top White
House trade adviser who lost his
senior perch within the administration, remains influential. Last
month, he circulated two documents that he created, stating
without any supporting facts or
data that a weakened manufac-
turing base could lead to a host of
socioeconomic problems, including “higher abortion rate” and
“increased spousal abuse.”
During the past week of negotiations, Lighthizer has introduced
several particularly controversial
proposals. They included a sunset
clause that would require the renewal of the agreement every five
years; rules of origin that would
tighten U.S. requirements for domestic content, especially for automobiles, to qualify for zero-tariff treatment; and an end to the
transnational courts that settle
international business disputes.
He also laid out limits on U.S.
procurement from companies in
Canada and Mexico while demanding greater access for U.S.
companies seeking to sell goods
and services to those governments. Canada’s foreign affairs
minister, Chrystia Freeland, said
that the proposal left Canada and
Mexico combined with less access
to the U.S. procurement process
than Bahrain.
Although NAFTA was designed
23 years ago to encourage investment and the freer flow of goods
between the three countries, “continuing to design a national manufacturing policy largely dependent on exports to the United States
for balance cannot long continue,”
Lighthizer said. He added that “it
is unreasonable to expect that the
United States will continue to encourage and guarantee U.S. companies to invest in Mexico and
Canada primarily for export to the
United States.”
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
U.S. Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer, left, has taken a
lead role in North American Free Trade Agreement talks.
Freeland said that Canada does
not consider bilateral trade balances to be the most important
indicators in trade talks, but she
noted that the United States has
only a slight, $8 billion trade deficit in goods and services with
Canada and that, in manufactured goods alone, the United
States has a $36 billion surplus
with Canada.
Though Trump has called NAFTA the “worst agreement ever,” he
has heard from a cacophony of
voices within the White House on
how he should proceed on his
trade threats.
White House National Economic Council Director Gary
Cohn has tried to press Trump to
be cautious, worried about what
abrupt changes might mean for
the United States and the global
economy. Commerce Secretary
Wilbur Ross has focused much of
his attention on dealing with what
he views as trade imbalances between the United States and China, although some of those decisions have also been delayed as
the White House has focused on
“We have seen no indication
that our partners are willing to
make any changes that will result
in a rebalancing and a reduction
in these huge trade deficits,” Lighthizer said. “Now I understand
that, after many years of one-sided benefits, their companies have
become reliant on special preferences and not just comparative
advantage.”
Freeland said that an agreement “cannot be achieved with a
winner-take-all mind-set.” She
said that what negotiators had
seen over the past few days was “a
series of unconventional proposals” that “make our work much
more challenging.”
Freeland countered that U.S.
proposals to increase U.S. national content in goods given favored
treatment within NAFTA “would
severely disrupt supply chains”
and “put in jeopardy tens of thousands of jobs.”
She said that U.S. proposals
“would turn back the clock on
openness and predictability” and
“in some cases run counter to
World Trade Organization rules.”
. WEDNESDAY,
NAFTA.
Lighthizer has emerged in recent weeks as one of the most
strident voices within the White
House, pushing back on foreign
ministers and business groups
that have urged caution.
Congressional
Republican
leaders have expressed opposition to the hard-line stance the
White House has taken in the
NAFTA talks, urging it to move
much more slowly. And many
business groups have also pushed
back, saying that the Trump administration’s threats to withdraw from NAFTA could throw
the economy — particularly exports — into turmoil. Congress
would probably have to vote on
major changes to NAFTA as part
of a new ratification, but the
White House has mostly rejected
congressional warnings so far.
“With Mexico running up to a
presidential election in the middle of next year, to ask their president to do things to help the United States at the expense of Mexico
is a non-starter in negotiating
terms,” said C. Fred Bergsten, senior fellow at the Peterson Institute
for International Economics.
In Mexico, politicians reacted
angrily to the U.S. stance. Dolores
Padierna, a leftist senator who
serves on a congressional committee that tracks the NAFTA
talks, said of President Trump:
“This New York magnate has a
sick hatred of Mexico; his words
and proposals are like poison
snakes.”
She said that Mexico’s secretary
of economy, Ildefonso Guajardo
Villarreal, should leave the talks.
At the news conference Tuesday, Guajardo said that “in order
for the efforts of Mexico, the United States and Canada to be fruitful, we must understand that we
all have limits.” He added “despite
our current differences, we must
ensure that the decisions we make
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
today do not come back and haunt
us tomorrow.”
Matthew Kronby, a former Canadian trade negotiator who
worked on Canada’s recent freetrade agreement with the European Union, suggested that the
hard-line U.S. tactics were not
meant to get an agreement.
“My question is whether the
objective is to put forward proposals that Canada and Mexico and
even the U.S. Congress wouldn’t
be able to accept and use that as a
pretext to start the process of
withdrawal. That may be the administration’s endgame,” he said.
The break in NAFTA negotiations Tuesday coincided with an
announcement by Canadian jet
maker Bombardier that it would
partner with European aircraft
manufacturer Airbus. The deal
might give Bombardier an avenue
to circumvent the punitive 219
percent tariffs that the Commerce
Department slapped on the company on Sept. 26.
It also puts Airbus in a stronger
position to compete with Boeing,
which had filed the trade complaint against Bombardier.
The Bombardier case also
shows how difficult it is to draw
bright national borders around
products. For the company’s
CS100 jets, it orders fuselage parts
made in Shenyang, China. The
jet’s wings are made in Belfast,
where their assembly sustains a
few thousand jobs. The landing
gear comes from German and
French suppliers. The engine,
which has a competitive advantage in fuel efficiency, is made by
Connecticut-based Pratt & Whitney.
steven.mufson@washpost.com
damian.paletta@washpost.com
Aaron Gregg in Washington, Gabriela
Martinez and David Agren in Mexico
City, and Alan Freeman in Ottawa
contributed to this report.
Senior Trump aide is among candidates to lead Heritage Foundation
R OBERT C OSTA,
A SHLEY P ARKER
AND J OHN W AGNER
BY
The Heritage Foundation has
narrowed its search for a new
president to a shortlist of finalists, a group that includes Todd
Ricketts, a co-owner of the Chicago Cubs, and Marc Short, a senior
Trump White House official, according to three people familiar
with the discussions.
In addition to Ricketts and
Short, Heritage’s board of trustees also has expressed interest in
Lisa B. Nelson, the chief executive
of the American Legislative Exchange Council, and David Trulio,
a vice president at Lockheed Martin, said the people, who spoke on
the condition of anonymity to
discuss private deliberations.
The conservative think tank’s
trustees, however, remain torn
over their decision. Kay Coles
James — a Heritage board member who served as the director of
the Office of Personnel Management under President George W.
Bush and is close to Heritage
founder Edwin J. Feulner — has
been mentioned by several associates as someone who could fill the
position in a temporary capacity
if the board cannot settle on a
candidate.
The group’s clout in Washington was underscored by President
Trump’s appearance Tuesday
night at a gathering of its President’s Club at a Washington hotel.
The top job at the influential
conservative outpost has been
open since May, when Jim
DeMint, the Republican firebrand and former South Carolina
senator, was pushed out, although Fuelner has been serving
as the interim president. The
search process is in flux, and it is
not clear whether the leading candidates have been formally contacted by the Heritage board — or
whether they would accept the
position.
For Ricketts — a longtime GOP
activist whose father, Joe, is the
founder of TD Ameritrade and
whose brother Pete Ricketts (R) is
the governor of Nebraska — the
posting would offer him and his
family even greater influence in
helping to shape the direction of
the Republican Party and the conservative movement.
Trump selected Todd Ricketts
to serve as deputy commerce secretary, but in April he withdrew
his nomination from consideration, citing an inability to untangle his financial holdings to the
satisfaction of the Office of Government Ethics.
Ricketts’s father helped finance Future45, a super PAC that
spent lavishly for Trump in the
final weeks of the presidential
campaign, giving the group at
least $1 million through the end
of September, Federal Election
Commission filings show. Joe
Ricketts and his wife, Marlene,
also contributed nearly $344,000
to support Trump’s campaign and
the Republican Party.
Short, the director of legislative affairs at the White House,
has strong conservative credentials, previously leading Freedom
Partners, the political operation
for billionaire brothers Charles
and David Koch, and before that
working for Vice President Pence
when Pence was a rising star on
the right during his days in the
U.S. House.
It is unclear whether Short has
expressed interest in the job, and
he has not met with the Heritage
board. But if selected — and if he
were to accept — he would represent yet another high-profile departure from Trump’s administration, which has already faced
steady turnover and shake-ups.
Nelson, Ricketts, Short and
Trulio did not respond to requests
for comment, and a spokeswoman for Heritage also declined to
weigh in on the specific finalists.
“The Heritage Foundation
Board of Trustees continues to
search for a new president who
demonstrates an unwavering
commitment to continuing Heritage’s legacy of rigorous research
and fighting for the conservative
principles at our core,” Heritage
spokeswoman Sarah Mills said in
an email statement.
robert.costa@washpost.com
ashley.parker@washpost.com
john.wagner@washpost.com
Matea Gold contributed to this report.
THE MARKETS
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Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
23,000
Close
YTD
% Chg
22,997.44
+0.2
+16.4
21,250
19,500
17,750
Nasdaq Composite Index
6800
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6623.66
0.0
+23.0
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Trading Co's & Distr
Health Care Providers
Pharmaceuticals
Biotechnology
Electric Utilities
Building Products
Capital Markets
Power Prodct & Enrgy Trdr
Personal Products
Diversified Consumer Svcs
0
–4.0%
+4.0%
3.38
2.76
1.37
1.32
0.83
–0.95
–1.01
–1.54
–1.72
–1.93
5600
5000
S&P 500 Index
2559.36
+0.1
+14.3
2575
2450
2325
2200
2075
O
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
76,201.25
15,816.90
50,100.74
–0.9
0.1
0.8
390.44
5361.37
12,995.06
7516.17
–0.2
0.0
–0.1
–0.1
5889.61
3913.07
28,697.49
21,336.12
0.7
0.0
0.0
0.4
YTD % Chg
–40%
0%
+40%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
217.75
91.69
160.47
258.62
130.54
120.22
33.60
46.52
70.88
82.96
23.19
236.09
163.35
146.54
39.79
–0.4
–0.3
0.4
–0.4
–0.7
0.1
0.2
–0.2
–0.1
0.2
–0.7
–2.6
–0.5
–0.2
0.1
21.9
23.8
38.6
66.1
40.8
2.1
11.2
12.2
23.9
–8.1
–26.6
–1.4
21.8
–11.7
9.7
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
140.79
97.62
165.40
63.22
77.59
52.00
92.80
36.20
128.65
119.36
203.89
48.40
107.54
85.98
98.36
3.4
–0.2
0.2
–0.2
–0.1
1.2
–0.4
0.6
–0.1
0.3
5.5
0.6
–0.7
0.3
0.2
22.2
13.1
35.9
7.4
24.9
2.3
10.4
11.5
5.1
8.9
27.4
–9.3
37.8
24.4
–5.6
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
0.8498
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1767
0.0089
1.3187
0.3167
0.7984
0.0533
0.0076
1.1208
0.2688
0.6785
0.0453
147.9820
35.5336
89.5930
5.9805
0.2402
0.6054
0.0404
Japan ¥ per
112.2100
132.0400
Britain £ per
0.7584
0.8922
0.0068
Brazil R$ per
3.1605
3.7197
0.0281
4.1642
Canada $ per
1.2525
1.4737
0.0111
1.6517
0.3967
Mexico $ per
18.7637
22.0796
0.1670
24.7422
5.9390
Mexico $
2.5212
0.1682
0.0668
14.9770
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 26,530.34
Russell 2000
1497.50
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 523.40
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
10.31
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
0.0
–0.3
–0.7
4.0
YTD % Chg
14.0
10.3
17.0
–26.6
$3.1955
$3.5000
$51.88
$1,286.20
$2.96
–1.3
–0.1
0.0
–1.3
+0.5
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded (Ticker)
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
% Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.5275
$17.04
$9.8475
$0.1403
$4.3475
+0.3
–1.9
–0.6
–1.1
–0.4
day
$800
month
$1200
$1000
0.1
–1.3
–0.2
0.5
–0.6
–0.2
–1.6
1.9
–2.4
Gainers
Cloud Peak Energy
WW Grainger
Comty Health Sys
PG&E Corp
UnitedHealth Group
Tenet Healthcare
Sonic Corp
MSC Indstr Direct
Ulta Beauty Inc
Momenta
Brinker Intl
Buffalo Wild Wings
BJ's Restaurants
Navient Corp
Barnes & Noble Edu
Depomed Inc
Quality Systems
Spectrum Pharma
WellCare Hlth Plans
Bill Barrett Corp
Daily
Close % Chg
$4.33
$205.42
$6.43
$57.44
$203.89
$13.60
$26.00
$78.93
$202.28
$14.20
$32.35
$106.50
$31.00
$12.20
$6.48
$5.25
$16.07
$14.46
$174.03
$4.36
16.4
12.6
9.0
7.5
5.5
5.3
4.8
4.4
4.4
4.4
4.3
4.1
4.0
4.0
3.8
3.8
3.7
3.7
3.6
3.6
Losers
Badger Meter Inc
OraSure Tech
RoadrunnerTrans Sys
Briggs & Stratton
Repligen Corp
Scientific Games
Coty Inc
Atlas Air Worldwide
Xylem Inc
Era Group Inc
Synchronoss
Mosaic Co
CenturyLink Inc
VASCO
Kopin Corp
Energizer Holdings
Time Inc
McDermott
Liquidity Services
Unit Corp
Daily
Close % Chg
$44.60
$18.89
$8.49
$22.98
$36.23
$42.75
$16.00
$61.95
$63.23
$10.01
$13.19
$21.06
$19.02
$11.90
$3.77
$46.19
$12.25
$6.58
$5.80
$19.00
–12.2
–9.9
–6.5
–6.0
–5.2
–5.0
–4.9
–4.3
–4.1
–3.9
–3.9
–3.8
–3.7
–3.6
–3.6
–3.5
–3.5
–3.4
–3.3
–3.3
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6200
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.32
0.45
0.78
1.46
2.75
5.35
4.25%
3.77%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
1.25%
Federal Funds
3.03%
1.35%
LIBOR 3-Month
10-year note
Yield: 2.30
2-year note
Yield: 1.55
5-year note
Yield: 1.96
6-month bill
Yield: 1.25
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.12%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Rhetoric is weakening
New name for gun-control group: Giffords
credibility of Trump’s
part of effort
threats against N. Korea Rebranding
to gather momentum
The
Daily 202
palo alto,
calif. —
President Trump’s
bellicose rhetoric
toward North
Korea is making it
harder to marshal domestic
support for a potential U.S.
intervention.
This is a widespread concern
among fellows at the Hoover
Institution, a right-leaning think
tank on the campus of Stanford
University.
Trump has tweeted that
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
is “wasting his time” by trying to
negotiate with Pyongyang,
suggesting that only military
force can curb Kim Jong Un.
Kori Schake, a defense policy
expert at the Hoover Institution
who worked at the Pentagon, the
State Department and the
National Security Council for
parts of both Bush
administrations, says it is
important to open a direct
dialogue with Pyongyang.
“Negotiations are useful
intelligence tools. I have
enormous confidence in
American intelligence agencies
to find out interesting stuff in
negotiations,” she said. “But the
main reason I favor negotiations
is that we may actually have to
go to war on the Korean
Peninsula. If we do, my mom is
not going to be able to get to a
place of supporting that unless
she thinks her government has
done everything possible to
avert it. I don’t see how any
American administration ever
gets to war without negotiations
because of the importance of
carrying the American public
along — most especially if it is a
war of choice.”
California is thousands of
miles closer to Asia than
Washington, so the problems of
the Pacific Rim have always felt
closer on the West Coast, but the
hard truth that the Bay Area
could soon be within range of a
North Korean intercontinental
ballistic missile adds a sense of
urgency to the discussion.
The Defense Intelligence
Agency concluded this summer
that North Korea has
successfully produced a
miniaturized nuclear warhead
that can fit inside its missiles,
crossing a key threshold, and
estimated that the country’s
atomic arsenal now includes up
to 60 nukes.
I spent two days here for a
roundtable with a group of
journalists who cover foreign
policy and national security.
JAMES
HOHMANN
“I don’t see how
any American
administration ever
gets to war without
negotiations because of
the importance of
carrying the American
public along.”
Kori Schake, defense policy expert
at the Hoover Institution
North Korea preoccupied nearly
every conversation.
Schake said the North
Koreans are behaving rationally
by racing ahead with their
program in the face of Trump’s
threats. She is “serenely
unrepentant” about joining
other conservatives in speaking
out against Trump during the
2016 campaign.
“If I was the North Koreans, I
would be doing the exact same
thing that they’re doing,” Schake
said. “The administration is
being sloppy in the precision of
their language about this, and
the precision of their language
about this matters enormously.”
Trump has not watched his
words carefully. After the
president gave Kim the
nickname “Rocket Man” and
imposed a new round of
sanctions, the 33-year-old
dictator called Trump “a
mentally deranged U.S. dotard.”
Posing for a group photo with
military brass recently, Trump
told reporters: “You guys know
what this represents? Maybe it’s
the calm before the storm.”
Asked to clarify, Trump said,
“You’ll find out.”
Stanford political science
professor Amy Zegart, a senior
Hoover fellow, has been
conducting research on what
makes threats most effective.
She surveyed 259 senior foreign
military officers and asked each
to rank the seven most
important factors in making a
threat credible. She was shocked
to discover that domestic
political support for military
action beat out such factors as
the size of a country’s military
and its willingness to risk mass
casualties by a pretty wide
margin.
“If we bring that back home to
the current administration, the
implications are that the more
fractured your populace is, the
less popular your administration
is and the less public support
you have for military action, the
less credible your threat will be,”
Zegart said. “Whether it’s a
drone or a battalion, that’s a
generalizable ranking of
credibility. . . . This is a big
change in how we think about
warfare.”
By that standard alone,
Trump’s threats must not be
terribly credible. Recent polls
underscore Trump’s domestic
challenges vis-à-vis North Korea.
A Washington Post-ABC News
survey conducted late last
month showed that 7 in 10
Americans agree that North
Korea poses a “serious threat” to
the United States, but there is
little appetite for intervention:
23 percent say the United States
should strike North Korea first;
67 percent say there should be
U.S. military action only if North
Korea attacks the United States
or its allies.
An Associated Press-NORC
poll released last Wednesday
found that just 8 percent of
Americans say Trump’s war of
words with Kim is making the
North Korea situation better.
Not only do 65 percent of
Americans think Trump’s
comments have made the
situation worse, but 45 percent
also think the president has
made it “MUCH worse.” Six in 10
independents and even 4 in 10
Republicans say Trump’s
comments have made matters
worse.
A Quinnipiac University poll
published Thursday found that
57 percent of Americans lack
confidence in Trump’s ability to
handle the situation. Two-thirds
of those surveyed say the United
States should negotiate with
North Korea, while the other
third say negotiations are a
waste of time. A 54 percent
majority thinks the situation can
be resolved diplomatically, while
29 percent expect that the
United States will need to use
military force.
Michael Auslin, a former
history professor at Yale
University who came to Hoover
from the American Enterprise
Institute, says American leaders
must do much more to explain to
the electorate why our security
guarantee for South Korea is so
important to maintain global
security.
“If we as the foreign policy
community writ large make the
assumption that it’s self-evident
that we have to continue
protecting South Korea’s
$1.3 trillion economy against a
North Korean nuke, we may well
find ourselves faced with a
political backlash from the
hinterlands,” he said. “North
Korea is not the Soviet Union.
Pyongyang is not Moscow. We do
not face a politically existential
threat to the United States from
North Korea.”
Auslin expects a
demonstration shot from Kim —
potentially with a mushroom
cloud over the Pacific Ocean —
and he fears an accidental
launch.
But he also says the United
States must end the
“denuclearization fantasy” and
accept that the regime will be a
member of the nuclear club.
“In post-Iraq America, I
cannot see that preventive war is
a politically palatable solution,”
said Auslin, whose new book is
titled “The End of the Asian
Century.” “I cannot believe that
any administration would be
able to go to war over nuclear
tests and ICBM tests. . . . I don’t
think we’re going to war. I don’t
think we can negotiate away
these weapons. It may be heresy
to say so, but I believe we are
faced with learning to live in a
North Korean nuclear world.
With learning to love the North
Korean nuke.”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
after Las Vegas attack
BY
S ARI H ORWITZ
One of the country’s leading
gun-control groups changed its
name Tuesday from Americans for
Responsible Solutions to Giffords,
the name of the former Arizona
congresswoman who was shot in
the head in 2011 and founded the
group two years later after 20 Connecticut first-graders were killed.
Gun-control advocates said the
name change is part of a larger
effort to reframe the gun debate in
the wake of the recent mass shooting in Las Vegas. By focusing on
former Democratic congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords as a symbol
of “courage,” they are hoping to
draw in more people to fight for
stronger firearms laws.
“It will be a long, hard haul, but
I’m optimistic,” Giffords said in an
interview with her husband, Mark
Kelly, from their home in Tucson.
“It is about the courage of single
individuals, but also the courage
of members of Congress and state
legislators to stand up to the gun
lobby and focus on this like they
never have before,” said Kelly, a
former astronaut and co-founder
of the group. “If we don’t have the
courage to talk about this . . . we’re
going to have another Sandy Hook
Elementary School shooting, another shooting like we saw in Vegas.”
Kelly traveled to Las Vegas last
week and met with the families of
two women with injuries similar
to those suffered by his wife.
“These two young women have
serious traumatic brain injuries
and a long road ahead of them,”
Kelly said. “And I’ve been there
before. Their lives have been completely changed forever. They are
going through something very
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, who survived a shooting in 2011, was joined by other
Democrats on the steps of the Capitol early this month as she called for new gun safety legislation.
similar to what Gabby and I went
through. I wanted to let them
know to count on me if they need
any advice. It’s a sad, sad situation.”
After every mass shooting, guncontrol groups have urged lawmakers to pass stronger background checks and tighten other
gun laws. Gun rights advocates
resist, nothing happens in Congress and the same pattern repeats
itself after the next event.
Kelly and Giffords, both gun
owners, said that cycle can be broken, if only incrementally at first.
They pointed out that after the Las
Vegas shooting, members of Congress, including Republicans,
called for legislation to restrict or
prohibit “bump stocks.” Stephen
Paddock, firing from the 32nd
floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel,
had used bump stocks to accelerate the gunfire from his rifles,
killing 58 people and injuring
more than 500 attending a music
festival on the Strip below.
“To me, that is counter to the
argument that a lot of them make
all the time,” Kelly said. “Their
argument often is, ‘Legislation
doesn’t matter because criminals
do not follow the law.’ They at least
left the door open for Congress to
act on regulating a device that
turns a semiautomatic weapon
into a fully automatic weapon.”
Four days after the shooting,
the National Rifle Association unexpectedly joined the effort, releasing a statement saying, “The
NRA believes that devices designed to allow semiautomatic rifles to function like fully automatic rifles should be subject to additional regulations.”
The bump-stock issue, however, is already at a standstill. House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) and
many other House Republicans
last week backed away from congressional action to ban the devices, saying the Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
(ATF) should regulate or ban
bump stocks by decree.
But, in a letter to Congress, current and former ATF agents said it
is Congress that should take action. They said that under the law,
attaching the device to a gun “does
not make it a machine gun,” so
ATF cannot regulate it.
Kelly and Giffords have an uphill battle. The NRA spent more
than $30 million supporting Donald Trump’s presidential campaign. In recent months, the
Trump administration has been
easing gun regulations. It blocked,
for example, the Social Security
Administration from reporting
mentally impaired recipients to a
national background-check database, reversing an Obama administration action.
The NRA declined to comment
on the rebranding of the Giffords
group.
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
For Zinke backer, growing fears about Interior chief
The
Energy
202
DINO
GRANDONI
Land Tawney
really only started
to worry
after President
Trump’s
election once he
heard the name
Cathy McMorris
Rodgers.
McMorris Rodgers — a House
Republican who represents
Washington state’s rural,
easternmost district — has
advocated selling off some lands
owned by the federal
government. In 2011, she cosponsored a bill that would have
sold off more than 3 million acres
in the West.
So when Tawney heard that
the president-elect was
considering her as secretary of
the Interior Department, which
oversees more than 400 million
acres of public lands, the
sportsman from Montana sprang
into action. Tawney is president
and chief executive of
Backcountry Hunters & Anglers
(BHA), which bills itself as being
the “sportsmen’s voice” for
public-lands issues. The
organization pushes for hunters
and anglers to have better access
to public lands — and for public
lands to stay in federal control.
Tawney thought he had an
answer to his worries: then-Rep.
Ryan Zinke (Mont.), whom he
met even before his current job
and regarded as a reasonable
Republican on public-lands
issues.
Zinke had separated himself
from McMorris Rodgers and
some other Republicans who, in
Tawney’s view, wished to
“liquidate” publicly held lands by
either transferring them to the
care of industry-friendly states or
directly selling them to private
owners. So Tawney pressed a
BHA member who happened to
have the president-elect’s ear —
Donald Trump Jr. — to get his
father to consider Zinke for the
position, instead.
“We made it known to the new
administration that we thought
that [Zinke] was somebody from
the West who understood
Western politics and understood
the importance of public lands,”
Tawney said. Based in part on the
suggestion from his son, who like
Tawney is an avid hunter, Trump
in December chose Zinke to run
Interior.
“You wouldn’t know he’s a
congressman,” Tawney told The
Washington Post at the time,
praising the pick. “He really
prides himself on being a
Theodore Roosevelt Republican,
and he lives that a little bit more
than other people.”
Now, almost a year later, after
getting profiled in Men’s Journal,
the Hill and elsewhere as a
Democrat with a modicum of
sway in Trump’s administration,
Tawney said in a recent interview
with the Energy 202 that there is
a “growing murmur” among BHA
members who worry that
Washington politics is rubbing
off on Zinke.
Starting this summer, BHA has
issued increasingly distressed
news releases on the turn the
department’s agenda has taken
under Zinke.
After Interior announced it
will revisit a sage grouse
management deal struck under
President Barack Obama, BHA
said “Western landscapes will be
poorer as a result.”
After Zinke claimed
offhandedly that a third of
Interior’s staff members were
disloyal to Trump, Tawney wrote
he “never once has questioned
the patriotism of our public land
managers.”
But what truly rattled Tawney
was Interior’s approach to
national monuments.
The Trump administration has
undertaken a review of parcels of
federal lands designated under
the 1906 Antiquities Act as
worthy of special protection from
use by industry. Like presidents
before him, Obama used the
century-old law to create
national monuments. But
Republicans have accused him of
abusing that executive power and
ignoring state interests by doing
so more than two-dozen times.
Tawney’s organization
commended Zinke for amending
management plans for existing
monuments to ensure access for
hunting and fishing. But Tawney
was disillusioned when the
Interior secretary made moves
toward shrinking the size of
several of the monuments.
“That’s the thing that was most
troubling,” Tawney said. “The
way we’ve been looking at it is
that an attack on one is an attack
of them all,” he said. “I think the
monuments review is not
necessarily something that Zinke
pushed himself.”
Nevertheless, BHA in August
launched its toughest rebuke to
Zinke yet with a TV ad campaign
titled “What Happened to Ryan
Zinke?”
“He said he’d fight to protect
our public lands,” intones the
ads. “Wanted to be like Theodore
Roosevelt. But since his
Washington promotion, he’s put
our public lands at risk.”
Tawney is from a Democratic
family; his father once led
Montana’s Democratic Party.
Zinke, Tawney said, “was the pick
of the litter. I want to make that
clear. He was the best choice
from what we had in front of us.”
Tawney still has kind words for
Zinke, calling him “a proven
leader.” Tawney, who often travels
to Washington to lobby, said he
has spoken to Zinke since he took
office (although he hasn’t spoken
to Donald Trump Jr. since
January). As to the question of
whether he still regards him as
an ally, Tawney split the
difference.
“What we’ve always done is
we’ve applauded [Zinke] for the
things that we think he’s doing
that are beneficial to hunters and
anglers,” he said, “then we’ve
held him accountable on the
other end of that.”
dino.grandoni@washpost.com
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
The fun of guns
EDITORIALS
A second term for Ms. Yellen
The Fed chair’s record of competence should earn her reappointment by Mr. Trump.
P
The Fed has cautiously but steadily raised interest
rates and recently announced the gradual unwinding
of the asset purchasing program it undertook during
the Great Recession. Ms. Yellen has also encouraged
and defended the central bank’s moves to require
new safeguards at financial institutions. Despite new
regulations and tightening monetary policies, the
economy appears to be chugging along.
Many of the alternatives to Ms. Yellen appear to be
too inflexible. Stanford University economist John
Taylor has the brains for the Fed’s top job, but he is
also notable for developing a formula for pegging
interest rates, suggesting he would be too mechanical in his judgments and too austere in interest-rate
setting. Other options lack Ms. Yellen’s combination
of deep understanding of monetary policy and political deftness. Kevin Warsh, a former Fed governor,
began his campaign to be a GOP Fed nominee years
ago, launching strong criticisms at the central bank’s
quantitative-easing policies. His criticisms have
proved wrong; quantitative easing helped cushion
the Great Recession’s blow and bolstered the subsequent recovery. Gary Cohn, a senior Trump economic
Crushed hopes
in Venezuela
adviser, has no monetary-policy experience, and his
performance developing a tax-reform framework for
the Trump administration does not recommend him.
Jerome Powell, a current Fed governor and reportedly Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin’s preferred
candidate, is more attractive than the other alternatives. A lawyer, he lacks Ms. Yellen’s formal training in
economics, but he has substantial central-bank experience. In public appearances he has expressed a
sensible amount of concern with preserving economic growth. He has also called for a balanced
approach to regulating financial institutions.
What closes the case for Ms. Yellen is tradition. At a
time when other executive appointments that should
be insulated from politics, such as judicial picks, are
being steadily politicized, it is crucial that the Federal
Reserve’s independence be preserved. The national
— and world — economy depends on allowing the Fed
to make sometimes tough, unpopular decisions.
With the economy improving but not roaring, the Fed
will face some hard choices over the coming months.
Reappointing Ms. Yellen would send a reassuring
message of continuity.
TOM TOLES
Election results suggest another
avenue for change has closed.
H
OPES THAT Venezuela could emerge from
its catastrophic political and economic collapse by democratic means suffered a
crushing and perhaps terminal blow on
Sunday. Having abolished the National Assembly,
crushed street demonstrations, jailed nearly 500 opposition activists and all but wiped out independent
media, the government of Nicolás Maduro staged
elections for provincial governors. Polls showed the
opposition, which reluctantly agreed to participate,
would win up to two-thirds of the races — which was
logical, since only about a fifth of Venezuelans still
say they support the government. Yet the results
announced by pro-regime election authorities were
nearly the opposite: Seventeen of 23 governorships
were awarded to Mr. Maduro’s party, which was said
to have collected 54 percent of the vote.
Stunned opposition leaders were unable to immediately point to tangible evidence of fraud in the
vote count, though some of the results beggared
belief: In the province covering greater Caracas, a
longtime opposition stronghold, polls showed its
candidate ahead by nine points, but the official count
had him losing by six. Still, the pre-rigging of the
election was clear enough. Among other measures,
election authorities abruptly moved the polling
places of more than half a million voters in antigovernment neighborhoods to regime-friendly areas
and printed ballots including multiple opposition
candidates, including those who had been defeated
in primary voting.
The electoral travesty was quickly denounced by
the State Department, while the secretary general of
the Organization of American States, Luis Almagro,
said, “The results of an election in a country with no
guarantees for the effective exercise of democracy
cannot be recognized.” But the damage has been
done. Mr. Maduro and his shrinking circle of international supporters, centered in Cuba and Russia, are
claiming that his regime has proven it has a democratic mandate. In reality, it has all but shut down
peaceful avenues for rescuing the country.
That Venezuela needs help is beyond question. In
addition to the regime’s violent repression of dissent,
the country is paralyzed by shortages of food and
medicine so severe that most of its citizens say they
have lost weight, and hundreds of thousands have
taken refuge in other countries. The inflation and
murder rates are probably the highest in the world.
Mr. Maduro and his clique, including senior military
leaders, have set new standards for Latin American
corruption, pocketing millions in graft and bribes
and trafficking cocaine to the United States.
The Trump administration has rightly broken
with a long history of U.S. passivity. Most of the
regime’s elite are banned from visiting the United
States, and tough financial sanctions could eventually force a default on its huge foreign debts. But with
military intervention not a workable or politically
acceptable option, U.S. options are limited. Drastic
measures, such as an embargo on oil imports from
Venezuela, would only inflict even more misery on
its 31 million people.
Mr. Maduro has been a spectacular failure at
governing, but under the tutelage of his Cuban
overseers he has succeeded in closing off almost all
avenues for change. The best of those was a free and
fair democratic election. Sunday’s result suggests
that such a vote is no longer possible.
Vincent Reed, former superintendent of D.C. Public Schools, enriched the lives of children around the city.
W
an illustrious life that included a Golden Gloves
boxing championship, being the first black principal
of the city’s largely white Woodrow Wilson High
School and serving as assistant secretary of education in the Reagan administration.
But it was Mr. Reed’s five years leading the city
schools that brought him national renown and
respect. He took over at a time of tumult and after a
succession of failed superintendents. He brought
stability to a system that had been incapable of paying
its teachers on time and getting books into classrooms. Most significantly, he insisted that schools get
back to the fundamentals of teaching children. His
reforms — an emphasis on math and reading, an end
to social promotion, measuring students’ progress,
remedial help for struggling students — paid off with
an increase (the first in a decade) in student test
scores in 1979 and then again the following year.
Mr. Reed’s tenure was regrettably cut short by the
small-minded politics of an elected school board that
wanted to advance adult, not student, interests.
Unwilling to put someone’s brother-in-law in a job or
steer school supplies to a favored contractor,
Mr. Reed got tired of being undermined and resigned,
prompting an outcry from the public that recognized,
as we wrote at the time, how devastating his departure would be. Indeed, it is hard not to wonder how
things would have been different if Mr. Reed had
been allowed to operate with the freedom that
eventually came with mayoral control over schools.
Nonetheless, Mr. Reed leaves a rich legacy. It’s in
the lives of students he touched directly like Ms. Cohen; the students he never met but who benefited
from his creation, Benjamin Banneker Academic
High School; and educators helped by the support
and guidance he provided from his position at The
Post. “I get so upset,” he once said, “when we tell our
kids they can’t learn because they come from meager
circumstances.” His life and career proved what
could be accomplished.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Addressing diversity in schools doesn’t require a lack of rigor
The Oct. 15 editorial “In Virginia, a retreat from
rigor” described political cowardice. That Lt. Gov.
Ralph Northam (D), who is running for governor, is
hiding behind diversity of the student body to avoid
tackling the problem of our children’s education is
outrageous. The editorial said, “Particularly concerning was Mr. Northam’s view that because
children are diverse, ‘coming from different backgrounds and different regions,’ he’s ‘not sure that
it’s fair’ to give them all the same test; they
shouldn’t be penalized, he said, for the environment they come from.”
The diversity faced in our public schools includes
language and economic background. How individuals learn is another type of diversity found in our
classrooms. The simple answer is a track system in
Regarding Colbert I. King’s Oct. 14 op-ed, “I liked
carrying a gun way too much”:
I recently heard a co-worker say her husband
admitted he wanted an AK-47 because he liked the
idea of having one of the very best assault rifles, that
it would be like owning a Porsche and that firing it
would be so great. An intern who worked with my
daughter expressed surprise that she had never been
to a firing range and said she should go, that firing a
gun is so much fun. Another colleague also talked
about the joys of going to a firing range and owning
an arsenal of weapons. None of these people was
talking about gun ownership for self-defense purposes. Instead, it was about “fun.” Why should the
public’s safety be at the mercy of this mind-set?
Mr. King was right.
Martha Sewall, Baltimore
Honest voices are what we need
Regarding Michael Gerson’s Oct. 13 op-ed, “It’s
time for Republican vertebrates”:
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), surveying
the damage from internecine warfare that threatens
to break apart his party, urged President Trump and
his current enemy, Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), to
address their differences, suggesting that “these two
gentlemen . . . sit down and just talk through their
issues.”
One stumbling block for Mr. Ryan is that a gentleman does not boast of engaging in sexual assault, does
not denigrate women for their physical appearance,
does not malign those with disabilities or illnesses
and does not publicly refer to someone he disagrees
with as a “son of a b----.”
The second stumbling block is that the president
does not give an inch. The only way that the two men’s
“issues” could be resolved would be if Mr. Corker were
to capitulate, apologize and tell the world what a great
man Mr. Trump is. Blind loyalty is demanded to
remain in the president’s good graces.
Mr. Corker is not seeking reelection and is likely to
be a truth teller for the remainder of his term. Those
who care about our country and who want it to have a
future need for him to be an honest, independent and
honorable voice. Patching up the spat, which was
initiated by the president, as usual, is not in the
interest of the nation.
Oren Spiegler, Upper Saint Clair, Pa.
The truth about ACA subsidies
Farewell to a local icon
HEN VINCENT E. REED retired as vice
president of communications for
The Post, we received a letter from
someone who had been a student at
Woodrow Wilson High School when Mr. Reed was its
principal. “He was the most caring, involved, handson principal one could ever imagine having,” wrote
Helaine Cohen, relating how Mr. Reed insisted she
go to college and helped her get in. “Giving me faith
in myself and guidance for my future” were her
words. There is no better testimonial to describe
how Mr. Reed enriched the lives of children in this
city during trying times.
Mr. Reed, who died Tuesday at the age of 89,
served as superintendent of public schools from 1975
to 1980, a time of hope, optimism and achievement
for the city’s long-troubled public schools. One of
17 children raised by a father who was an insurance
salesman and drove a laundry truck and a mother
who was “a fanatic about education,” Mr. Reed had
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
RESIDENT TRUMP appears close to deciding
who will be the world’s most powerful economic official, the leader of the Federal Reserve, for the next four years. He should pick
the person who already has a proven track record of
competence and care in the conduct of the nation’s
monetary policy: current Fed Chair Janet L. Yellen.
Mr. Trump is reportedly meeting with Ms. Yellen
on Thursday, and he may announce his decision
shortly after that. Under normal circumstances, she
would be the obvious pick. Though President Barack
Obama tapped her, reappointing Fed chairs has
become a laudable, decades-long, bipartisan tradition. This would not matter if Ms. Yellen had done a
poor job. But she has performed well.
Reputed to be a “dove” — that is, willing to keep
interest rates low to encourage growth and employment, at the risk of stoking inflation and asset
bubbles — when she assumed the Fed’s reins, Ms. Yellen maintained the loose money policies she inherited from recession-era Chair Ben Bernanke. But as
employment and wage figures have improved, she
has behaved more hawkishly than many doves prefer.
. WEDNESDAY,
which those who require a slower, measured
approach are not overwhelmed and turned off but,
having been taught at a speed appropriate to their
learning level, have the opportunity to move up to
the next level. However, our culture has demeaned
that system as negatively affecting students’ selfesteem. Apparently, it is better that the students
struggle by being in a class in which the pace is one
that makes them feel stupid and hate school.
As the editorial said, “Mr. Northam’s comments
are part of an unfortunate trend in Virginia to pull
back from rigor in assessments and accountability.”
It is sickening to see the damage done by considering self-esteem first. Unfortunately, the results
show that the approach has failed students.
Joan Salemi, West Springfield
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The Oct. 14 front-page headline “Move to halt ACA
subsidies rattles insurance market” described the
payments President Trump ended as being part of
the Affordable Care Act. That accepts the disputed
premise that the ACA provides for those payments to insurance companies. A federal court ruled
that the ACA does not fund those payments, that
continued payment of those subsidies is unlawful
and unconstitutional, and that the payments must
stop.
Second, while on the surface it may appear those
payments to insurers “help millions of lowerincome Americans afford coverage,” that is inaccurate. Eliminating the payments to insurers neither
reduces the coverage the ACA promises lowerincome Americans nor increases the amount lowerincome Americans must pay for that coverage. The
effect will be to increase how much high-income
earners pay for ACA coverage and perhaps to
increase federal spending, as described in the
accompanying news article, “Subsidies’ end may not
pinch where you’d think.”
Michael F. Cannon, Washington
The writer is director of health policy studies
for the Cato Institute.
Dishonorable behavior
Pardon my cynicism, but the recent extravaganza
of the politics/news/entertainment industry over the
machinations of a Hollywood executive is both boring and nauseating. The so-called casting couch has
been the subject of open gossip since before the
addition of sound to movies. The continuously broadcast outrage by media, actors and politicians reads
like a Hollywood-style script. The drama, plot twists
and dialogue all appear as spontaneous reactions to
something just revealed. In truth, many of these
people knew all along what was occurring. They
tolerated it because that is how their business is done.
“Don’t rock the boat” is the watchword.
The Clinton-Cosby-Trump-Weinstein sagas were
alleged and tolerated for decades. Such abusive actions are not acceptable and are in direct conflict with
the norms of morality. Until mainstream, marginalized and striving people speak out and publicly object
to individuals who believe that they are not subject to
the rules of civilized behavior, the predators will
continue to prevail. The #MeToo campaign is a wonderful step forward to bring this scourge to an end.
David G. Jarrett, Derwood
So Harvey Weinstein is apparently being held
publicly accountable for his aberrant sexual activity
in a culture that generally admires such activity,
providing you do not go over the line. However, no
one at the University of North Carolina is being held
accountable by the NCAA or the public for what
appears to be aberrant course-passing, qualifying
students to play sports [“NCAA opts to pass on
punishment for North Carolina in academic scandal,”
Sports, Oct. 14].
Rather than protesting innocence, maybe the honorable thing is to admit wrongdoing and resign. Honor and truth and personal responsibility, however,
seem to have little to do with all this. UNC claims its
2005 basketball championship was fair and honorable.
When we consider being finally held accountable
for our actions, we think we will know God’s take on
aberrant sex, but we think he will give a pass on
cheating in basketball.
Mike Thompson, Hollywood, Md.
Communal communion
Regarding the Oct. 14 Religion article “Fashion
pick leaves girl on sidelines of First Communion”:
Events such as First Communion and graduation
ceremonies serve primarily to recognize the efforts
of the group as a whole, not as a collection of
individuals.
It’s much the same reason you don’t see one
member of an athletic team, marching band or
choir dressing differently from the rest of the group.
Michael Wolff, Falls Church
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A21
RE
DAVID IGNATIUS
KATHLEEN PARKER
Chaos, risk, golf: An
international guide to Trump
Finding my
#MeToo
outrage
A
s President Trump prepares
to head to Asia next month
for his most important overseas trip yet, foreign intelligence services are undoubtedly trying
to assemble personality profiles to
explain this unconventional, risktaking, domineering president to the
leaders he will meet.
How will they describe Trump?
Probably not with the same hyperbole
we sometimes use in our daily news
commentary. Foreign governments
aren’t as easily shocked or offended as
American journalists. They’re used to
bullying autocrats. They watch
Trump’s nonstop circus act, probably
with frequent dismay, but they must
make policy decisions rather than
value judgments.
When people worry he’s
near the edge of the cliff,
he thinks it’s fear talking.
Trump has been president for almost nine months now. If foreign
analysts have been doing their reporting, they should discern some basic
parameters of his presidency. They’re
not Americans; they don’t have to
evaluate Trump’s fitness to be president, or whether he has violated the
Constitution. They must deal with the
reality that he was elected, that he
probably has more than three more
years left in office, and that foreign
governments misread him at their
peril.
What should well-informed foreign
analysts say in their assessments of
Trump? Here are some notes to get
them started:
Trump likes creating chaos. It’s
not an accident, or a problem of poor
staff work, or an itchy Twitter finger.
The man likes disruption and the
occasional humiliation of others. He
thinks it puts adversaries off balance
and opens space for negotiation. An
example is a column in Sunday’s Post
by Dan Balz, headlined “Trump overloads circuits in governing by disruption.” It discussed Trump’s “destructive” actions in decertifying the Iran
nuclear deal and defunding Obamacare.
Not exactly a positive article, by the
usual standards. But an insider says
the White House loved it. That’s the
image Trump wants to present. His
bullying tweets are what Secretary of
State Rex “Fully Intact” Tillerson
called “action-forcing events” on
CBS’s “Face the Nation.”
Trump has high tolerance for
risk, especially when operating with
partners. That extends to the risk of
nuclear conflict. Trump believes that,
as one insider puts it, “If you want to
win, you have to be prepared to lose.”
Trump hears the angst about his
brinkmanship, but he’s happy for the
leverage it gives him. When people
worry he’s too near the edge of the
cliff, he thinks this is fear talking —
because you never know how close
you really are.
Trump has a different calculus
about nuclear weapons than any recent president. He thinks that past
presidents have been so scared about
the danger of nuclear war that, as one
insider puts it, “people play their
hands into unwinnable positions.”
Trump’s propensity for risk is presumably checked by three generals who
advise him and who know the face of
war. But it’s Trump’s finger that’s on
the button.
Trump doesn’t always go for broke.
After his bankruptcies, he mostly
franchised his name rather than putting his own money on the line. Golf
explains Trump, too. With a difficult
lie, does he try to bend the ball around
a tree? Or does he play it safe and lay
up? Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.),
a recent golf partner, tells me it
depends. If Trump is playing one on
one, he’s fairly careful, letting his
competitors make mistakes and beat
themselves. But if it’s match play,
when Trump has a partner and can
afford a bad shot, he goes for it.
Cautionary note to China: In the
North Korea crisis, Trump thinks he’s
in match play.
For Trump, everything is personal. He’s a vain man who loves to be
flattered. Early stroking pays dividends. His best relationships are
probably with the Saudis, the Chinese
and the Japanese. All three relationships have featured personal visits, a
show of rapport — and were set up
early by Jared Kushner, who is still the
custodian of Trump’s personal account in foreign policy.
The China relationship is especially
important for Trump. He campaigned
on a tough anti-Beijing line, but he
has come to see President Xi Jinping
as a kindred spirit: a fellow “big guy,”
a populist autocrat, a risk taker who
keeps confounding his rivals.
The bottom line is that Trump
hungers for success and wants the
credit for it. His Asian hosts are
thinking now how to deliver goodies
on trade — measures that Trump can
tout as reducing the trade deficit and
opening market access.
As an American, I find Trump’s
approach to the presidency divisive
and potentially dangerous. But that’s
not what foreign governments worry
about. They seek to understand
Trump and bend him toward their
interests.
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
A blueprint for loss
BY
T
H UGH H EWITT
he United States courts, the
third branch of government
laid out in the Constitution,
maintains a website that
tracks vacancies among its 890 authorized judgeships. That site is continually updated, but for conservative
supporters of President Trump most
concerned with the judiciary — and
they are legion — its scorecard doesn’t
change often enough.
I’ve written before that judicial
nominations and confirmations are
the key metric of success for the Trump
“base” and that the greatest impediment to the president’s nominees is
the so-called blue slip. But if the
Senate’s “old guard” among the GOP
needed anything more than the desire
to see originalism return or to vindicate voters’ will to prod it to end, once
and for all, the anti-constitutional use
of the blue slip, former White House
chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon has
given them that push.
When Bannon declared war on the
GOP’s Senate majority Saturday at the
Values Voter Summit, he was serving
notice upon not just Republican incumbents up for reelection in 2018
but every Republican senator enamored of the privileges of the majority
that their indifference to party would
rob some of their friends of their jobs
and every member of the caucus of
power.
“We have some of the most qualified people,” Trump declared in the
White House Rose Garden on Monday, with Senate Majority Leader
Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) at his side.
“They’re waiting forever on line,” he
continued. “It shouldn’t happen that
way. It’s not right; it’s not fair.”
It is not remotely just or even close
to “fair” to those nominees; nor is it
“fair” for critics of the Senate GOP to
lump McConnell in with the obstructionists. It was McConnell, after all,
who saved the Supreme Court from a
liberal majority through the refusal to
hold any hearings for any nominee.
McConnell didn’t throw in with
Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine), John
McCain (R-Ariz.), Lisa Murkowski (RAlaska) and Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who at
different junctures “saved” Obamacare. All sophistry and talking points
aside, Obamacare is alive today because the Freedom Caucus in the
House and these four senators destroyed first Obamacare repeal’s momentum and then its chances at
50 votes in the Senate.
Bannon has a case to make against
those legislators. But he is going to
make it instead against establishment
D.C., and there’s a good chance he will
bring the house (and the House and
Senate) down around him in doing so
— and with it every foreseeable future
Supreme Court nominee. While McConnell is doing what he can to avoid
this, other Republicans have failed to
act like a party and free the GOP from
the paralysis that has kept it from key
goals, most importantly the effort to
maintain even the semblance of originalism in the courts.
More
than
anyone
else,
Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa),
chair of the Judiciary Committee and
the key defender of the blue slips,
methodically frustrates the one offering that establishment D.C. can make
to the conservatives in the countryside. The best GOP leader of the
Senate of my lifetime is now watching
his old colleague toss the long-sought
majority on the political pyre because
of a love of a tradition that is not even
within the formal rules of the Senate.
It is simply inexplicable that any
federal-court vacancies could be left
unfilled a year from Trump’s inauguration. But that’s where we are headed,
and proponents of the Bannon-fueled
rejectionism of GOP incumbents will
rightly listen to no explanation for this
feebleness. Because there isn’t any. If
Senate Republicans don’t want the
majority, they are doing everything
exactly right. If they do like their
positions of authority, then burn the
blue slips and stay in session until
every judicial nominee has a hearing
and a vote. This isn’t complicated. Only
the Beltway’s barons can make it so,
and they will learn a very tough lesson
in 13 months if they insist on business
their way, and not the way of the
framers.
Hugh Hewitt, a Post contributing
columnist, hosts a nationally syndicated
radio show and is author of “The Fourth
Way: The Conservative Playbook for a
Lasting GOP Majority.”
D
come up for renewal every eight years. And NBC
has licenses for the so-called ownedand-operated stations in several large cities —
including Washington, New York and Los Angeles.
FCC commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel told
CNN’s Brian Stelter over the weekend: “History
won’t be kind to silence.” Rosenworcel, who
was first nominated by President Barack
Obama and later by Trump, said, “I think it’s
important for all the commissioners to make
clear that they support the First Amendment.”
And so Pai, who was designated as FCC
chairman by Trump in January, has checked
that box. Still, longtime FCC watcher Andrew
Jay Schwartzman wasn’t satisfied. “Commissioner Pai’s statement is a profile in cowardice,”
said Schwartzman in a statement of his own.
“Unlike his predecessors, who have forthrightly stood up to Presidential interference, he
continues to equivocate. He needs to say that
President Trump has no right to interfere in the
FCC’s licensing process and he will ignore the
President’s pressure.”
What’s eerie is that the president of the
United States is the guy who forced the FCC
chairman to “reiterate” his commitment to the
First Amendment. In a Sept. 15 address, Pai
identified collegiate intolerance as a threat to
freedom of expression: “Fewer today seem to be
willing to defend to the death others’ right to say
things with which they might disagree. The
situation on many college campuses is especially distressing. The cases are legion. . . . The
common thread is the belief, shared by too
many, that those with views perceived as unpopular or offensive should be silenced.”
That “common thread” weaves straight
through the Oval Office.
epending upon one’s distance
from all things Twitter, recent
revelations of sexual harassment in Hollywood are either
the tipping point we’ve been waiting
for — or just another shark attack until
the next one.
If you’re former Fox News anchor
Gretchen Carlson, whose book, “Be
Fierce,” was released just as Harvey
Weinstein was falling from grace,
we’re in the midst of a Malcolm
Gladwell sequel.
And Carlson, who also is a former
Miss America, is the female version of
David, who ultimately brought down
Goliath — Fox News creator and chief
executive Roger Ailes — with a sexual
harassment lawsuit that resulted in a
$20 million settlement. She also
opened the floodgates with her witness and testament, prompting
strangers to stop her on the street. In
the past few days, thousands of other
women have taken to social media to
post their own experiences of sexual
harassment using the hashtag #MeToo.
“Every woman has a story,” says
Carlson.
If you’re a skeptical sort, on the
other hand, you may lean toward the
shark-attack line of thinking. This,
too, shall pass softly into history, in
other words, because inevitably something else will come along to demand
our attention. Given the plethora of
horrors, from the Las Vegas slaughter
to the California fires, how does one
sustain the necessary intensity to effect the sort of systemic cultural
change that Carlson and others hope
for?
The skeptics would have a valid
point were it not for at least one
statistically significant factor and one
whale of a difference from all previous
uprisings.
If true, as Carlson says, that every
woman has a story, then, statistically,
sexual harassment in the workplace is
a plague, a disaster and a psychological assault weapon. Given that women
constitute half the world’s population
— and that successful women mean
successful families and societies —
then any word or action that undermines their ability to conduct life
without fear of sex-based exploitation
or retribution should be considered an
epidemic of opioid proportions.
Coincidentally, President Trump,
whose campaign recently was subpoenaed for records related to multiple
sexual-harassment allegations, is slated next week to declare the opioid
crisis a national emergency.
The big-fish difference, meanwhile,
is the president. The man who famously boasted of grabbing women by
their nethers sparked the Women’s
March last January with his many
crude,
misogynistic
comments.
Trump’s lawyers have requested that
they be allowed to postpone responding to the subpoena until his presidency ends, but feminist attorney Gloria
Allred, who is representing some of
the accusers, doesn’t appear to harbor
patience in her armory of legal tactics.
To be continued.
When I interviewed Carlson recently, I confessed that I had always been a
“guy-girl,” raised by my father in a
male-centric environment and, as a
professional skeptic, had often assumed that most “victims” of sexual
harassment were either not tough
enough, lacked a sense of humor or
were stupid about guy-tude.
It turns out I was also, according to
Carlson, part of the problem. (You
learn something new every day.) Next I
told her that I had never been sexually
harassed, then proceeded to relate at
least two incidents in my adult working life that were textbook sexual
harassment. I simply hadn’t recognized them as such.
Indeed, I did what most women do.
I shrugged them off and stashed the
experiences so deeply in my psyche’s
Junk folder that I forgot about them —
until now. #MeToo.
Cases such as Carlson’s — Ailes kept
pushing her for sex so that she would
“be good and better” — were more
clear-cut than mine. One incident was
hands-on, but the other, a series of
episodes in the early 1990s, was environmental. Strippers were brought in
to our intimate public-relations office
to perform for executives’ birthday
parties. I was told I could stay home
those days, which I did, but then the
CEO would call a meeting and show a
video of the striptease on a large
screen while my boss and a half-dozen
male colleagues laughed.
It wasn’t fun or funny.
Sexual harassment doesn’t always
mean a sexual advance, as Carlson
pointed out. It’s about power through
sexual intimidation. Surely, women
have a right to live and work without
this predatory threat. If enough fathers care about their daughters’ future success; if enough brothers care
about their sisters’ safety; if enough
women care enough about each other,
#MeToo — or #BeFierce — won’t be just
another hashtag.
And as long as Trump is considered
one of the greatest offenders by so
many women, this moment won’t likely be just another bad day at the beach.
— Erik Wemple
kathleenparker@washpost.com
EVAN VUCCI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Trump takes reporters’ questions during a news conference with Senate
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) at the White House on Monday.
DAVID VON DREHLE
Is the president
a patriot?
I
wanted this column to be about something other than the man in the White
House. To look away now and then is a
healthy discipline.
But President Trump’s impulsive attack
on his predecessors, blurted during a joint
news conference with Senate Majority
Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), has
raised again a question that has haunted
me since his inaugural address. Is Trump
patriotic?
In case you missed it, the president was
asked why he had been quiet for nearly
two weeks about the deaths of four American soldiers in Niger on Oct. 4. Trump
could have answered in a number of ways:
by noting the danger of speaking ahead of
all the facts; by citing the need for care
with details of a covert operation. Instead,
he hemmed and hawed about letters he
had written to the families of the dead
soldiers (but not yet sent), before adding
that he might call the families, too, if he
has time.
Shifting to the attack, as he often does
when he feels threatened, Trump accused
his predecessors of failing to appreciate
fully the toll of their decisions on the men
and women they command.
“If you look at President Obama and
other presidents, most of them didn’t
make calls, a lot of them didn’t make calls.
I like to call when it’s appropriate, when I
think I am able to do it. They have made
the ultimate sacrifice,” Trump said.
Put aside the casual insincerity of this
calumny, which had him backpedaling the
moment it left his mouth. He tried to take
back “most” and substitute “a lot.” And
don’t expect him to call every family —
only those that are “appropriate,” and only
when he thinks he is “able to do it.” (At that
point he had called none of the four
families.)
What struck me was Trump’s contempt
for his predecessors. With scarcely a
thought, he attacked not their policies, but
their characters, accusing them of being
casual about the deaths of American soldiers.
In their eye-opening book “The Presidents Club,” my friends Nancy Gibbs and
Michael Duffy documented the deep and
complex empathy fostered among sitting
presidents and their predecessors. Only
they can understand the weighty experience of the office, and this makes even
bitter political rivals into “fellow travelers
in the parallel universe where past, present, and future blur, where the terrain of
regret looks very different and where there
is hardly ever such a thing as a perfect
outcome.”
However, the newest club member appears incapable of empathy. Thus, he can
malign not just the decisions but also the
decency of previous presidents. And not as
a matter of principle — merely on impulse,
a whim.
Patriotism doesn’t require us to praise
what is not praiseworthy. Like any other
American, Trump is free to criticize as he
sees fit. But when an elected leader disparages, without cause, the good faith of other
elected leaders, he is tearing the country
down. What sort of nation, after all, would
elect them?
I might be reading too much into a
passing remark, except that Trump has
been at this business from the beginning.
His campaign was a tirade against “stupid” leaders who never managed to accomplish things that he would deliver on Day
One. (We’re still waiting.) The transition
was filled with talk of incompetent intelligence agencies. His inaugural address told
the world that America’s bipartisan foreign policy of the previous 75 years was
only a craven and deliberate theft of the
nation’s wealth by its own leaders, to be
“redistributed all across the world.”
No one could hear and heed that speech
without thinking less of the United States.
For this was not some buck-chasing talkshow host tossing veiled charges of treason. This was the new president.
I don’t think we’ve ever been led by a
person with such a low opinion of America. And I’m hardly the only person to
notice. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), whose
military service Trump denigrated during
his campaign, had this to say on Monday:
“To fear the world we have organized and
led for three-quarters of a century, to
abandon the ideals we have advanced
around the globe, to refuse the obligations
of international leadership and our duty to
remain ‘the last best hope of Earth’ for the
sake of some half-baked, spurious nationalism” — to be Trump, in other words — is
“unpatriotic.”
The president insists that football players show respect for the national anthem,
yet he has no respect for the good faith of
those who served before him. He complains that critics are unfair to him even as
he unfairly maligns his predecessors. At
71, Trump is experiencing public service
for the very first time. We can but hope
that the value of it will eventually dawn on
him.
david.vondrehle@washpost.com
ERIK WEMPLE
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/blogs/erik-wemple
The FCC chairman defends
the First Amendment
Ajit Pai offered what sounded like a mission
statement.
At an event Tuesday morning at George
Mason University, the Federal Communications Commission chairman was asked about
the latest affronts by President Trump to the
First Amendment. After NBC News published
a report that Trump favored boosting the U.S.
nuclear stockpile, he tweeted some threats at
the network:
“Fake @NBCNews made up a story that I
wanted a ‘tenfold’ increase in our U.S. nuclear
arsenal. Pure fiction, made up to demean. NBC
= CNN!”
“With all of the Fake News coming out of
NBC and the Networks, at what point is it
appropriate to challenge their License? Bad for
country!”
“Network news has become so partisan,
distorted and fake that licenses must be challenged and, if appropriate, revoked. Not fair to
public!”
Asked about his reaction, Pai said, “I will
reiterate what I have said for many years at the
FCC, up to and including last month. . . . I
believe in the First Amendment. The FCC
under my leadership will stand for the First
Amendment. And under the law, the FCC does
not have the authority to revoke a license of a
broadcast station based on the content of a
particular newscast.”
It’s more elementary than that, of course. As
has been pointed out, neither Trump nor the
FCC can revoke a “license” for the “NBC” network. Such a license doesn’t exist. However,
NBC-affiliate broadcasters have licenses that
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THE WASHINGTON POST
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
KLMNO
METRO
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
High today at
approx. 4 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
49 63 71 60°
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Precip: 0%
Wind: SW
4-8 mph
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WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
VIRGINIA
OBITUARIES
Fifty years ago, a young
D.C. musician was “shoved
into” filling in for an ill
Jimi Hendrix bandmate. B3
Manassas approves the
sale of a mobile-home
park where residents were
threatened with eviction. B4
Daphne Caruana Galizia
was targeted in a series of
attacks for her reporting
on Maltese politics. B6
Stabbing
at U-Md.
charged as
hate crime
Champing at autumn’s bit
DIGITAL TRAIL FOUND,
PROSECUTOR SAYS
White student is accused
of killing black visitor
BY
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
L YNH B UI
A white University of Maryland
student accused of fatally stabbing a black student who was
visiting the campus has been
charged with a hate crime after
authorities reviewed his phone
and social media activity, prosecutors said.
A Prince George’s County
grand jury on Tuesday handed up
the hate-crime charge against
Sean Urbanski, who already faced
a murder count in the May slaying of Richard Collins III.
Urbanski stabbed Collins while
he was visiting friends at U-Md.
in a “totally unprovoked” attack,
police said. Collins had been attending Bowie State University
and was days away from graduation when he was slain.
Prince George’s County State’s
Attorney Angela Alsobrooks declined to say exactly what evidence of an alleged racial motive
was found. But she said federal
and local law enforcement officials have been sifting through
Urbanski’s phone and other digital devices, as well as his social
media activity, and uncovered
“lots of digital evidence.” She said
Collins’s killing was “unjustified
and premeditated.”
The evidence led investigators
URBANSKI CONTINUED ON B4
Horses frolic in late-afternoon sun in a pasture along Route 27 near Damascus, Md. The early week’s crisp,
clear weather is expected to last the next several days as fall finally sets in around Washington. Forecast, B8
Northam sustains lead
in funds over Gillespie
Democrat entered month
with 2-to-1 edge in cash
BY
F ENIT N IRAPPIL
Virginia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ralph Northam
maintained his commanding financial lead over Republican Ed
Gillespie through September, new
campaign finance filings show.
Northam, the lieutenant governor, ended the month with
$5.7 million on hand after raising
$7.2 million in September, according to data compiled Tuesday by
the nonpartisan Virginia Public
Access Project.
Republican contender Ed
Gillespie had $2.5 million as of
Sept. 30 after raising $4.4 million.
The combined fundraising
hauls include millions in “in-kind
support” — spending to support
the campaigns on voter outreach
and other matters — that is not
direct cash contributions.
With three weeks to go, the
finances of the gubernatorial contest are still fluid. Virginia does
not cap how much individuals and
organizations can donate, and
millions typically pour into the
contest in the final weeks.
Libertarian candidate Cliff
Hyra is continuing to run a lowVIRGINIA CONTINUED ON B4
Shooting scare locks down Howard
No gunman found after
search by 100 officers
P ETER H ERMANN,
S ARAH L ARIMER
AND K EITH L . A LEXANDER
BY
Calls about a possible active
shooter at Howard University on
Tuesday that drew a large police
response came after a student’s
ex-boyfriend repeatedly threatened her and warned her about
being on campus, according to
law enforcement officials and
court documents.
Police found no gun and no
shooter and said they were looking into the alleged threats. Several officials said the man had
been rejected for the university’s
medical program and barred
from the Northwest Washington
campus two weeks ago. They believe the calls about a shooter
were made by people concerned
about the young woman’s safety
and fueled by false rumors.
The ex-girlfriend had obtained
a temporary protection order
against the man and said in her
court petition that he told her,
“Do not go to campus” and “there
are those that will see you hurt
more than words.” She wrote that
he warned her that “going to
police is unacceptable” and that
he knew she had an exam Tuesday
and that he would be there. Police
said the young man was not in
custody but was being investigated.
The shooting scare came dur-
ing the run-up to Howard’s homecoming celebration this weekend
and the anticipated visit by thousands of graduates and others for
activities at the historically black
college founded in 1867.
D.C. police reacted swiftly to
the emergency calls, sending
more than 100 officers, many
armed with semiautomatic rifles.
They searched three campus
buildings, closed streets and put
the campus under lockdown for
two hours. Classes were canceled
for the day.
“We have found no evidence
that supports there was a shooting on our campus,” Howard’s
interim police chief, Alonzo F. Joy
Jr., told reporters after the allclear was given. He warned of
“some serious repercussions if we
HOWARD CONTINUED ON B4
VINCENT E. REED 1928-2017
Superintendent restored ‘stability and hope’ to D.C. schools
BY
E MILY L ANGER
Vincent E. Reed, the former
D.C. Public Schools superintendent who gained national renown
in the 1970s when he led the
long-troubled district through a
period of administrative stability
and student achievement, died
Oct. 17 at his home in Washington. He was 89.
A niece, Ella Redmond, confirmed his death. He had chronic
obstructive pulmonary disease,
congestive heart failure and other
ailments.
Mr. Reed retired in 1998 as The
Washington Post’s vice president
for communications, a position
he held for 16 years. Before joining The Post, his stint as assistant
secretary of education made him
one of the highest-ranking African Americans in the Reagan
administration.
A former Golden Gloves boxing champion, all-American football tackle and Army officer, Mr.
Reed joined the D.C. school system in 1956 and ascended the
ranks from shop teacher to administrator.
He was the first black principal
of the largely white Wilson High
School in Northwest Washington
before being named by the D.C.
school board to the district’s top
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Vincent E. Reed, then D.C.
schools superintendent, at a
school board meeting in
November 1978. He clashed
often with board members.
job in 1975. He stepped down in
1980 after rancorous disputes
with the elected board members,
but he maintained a reputation as
one of the most popular superintendents in D.C. history.
One of his signature victories
— although it was not achieved
until after his superintendency —
was the creation of Benjamin
Banneker Academic High School,
a selective magnet school in
Northwest for high-achieving
students.
“Vince Reed was one of the real
heroes of Washington, D.C.,” said
Donald E. Graham, former publisher of The Post. “A lot of people
thought he was the best school
superintendent the city ever had.
He was a man of perfect integrity,
REED CONTINUED ON B5
Teen’s last
minutes
detailed
in court
Three MS-13 associates
plead guilty to charges
in slaying of Md. girl
BY
J USTIN J OUVENAL
One MS-13 member clicked a
cigar cutter open and closed with
a metallic ring, while another
told the 15-year-old they would
cut her fingers off, the prosecutor said. Another gang member
asked where the gasoline was so
they could burn the girl up.
Ten members and associates
of MS-13 lured Damaris A. Reyes
Rivas to a Springfield park in
January because they wanted
revenge. They blamed the Gaithersburg teen for the death of
their clique’s leader, Christian
Sosa Rivas, whose body had been
dumped in the Potomac about a
week earlier.
Venus Romero Iraheta, 17, who
was Sosa Rivas’s girlfriend, told
Damaris her fate would be the
same.
“Venus told her she was going
to die that day as Christian did —
in the cold,” Fairfax County Deputy Commonwealth’s Attorney
Katherine Stott said in a Fairfax
County courtroom Tuesday.
Damaris was forced to strip off
her shirt and shoes and stand in
the snow in frigid weather.
Stott then recounted the ruthless slaying of Damaris, whose
DAMARIS CONTINUED ON B3
Courtland
Milloy
He is away. His
column will resume
when he returns.
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
MARYLAND
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
VIRGINIA
County executive hopefuls debate in Montgomery Sheri≠ can fire deputy
who opposed his
reelection, judge rules
BY
R ACHEL S IEGEL
Four candidates seeking the
Democratic nomination for county executive of Montgomery
County squared off in a debate
Monday, touching on local issues
including traffic congestion, a
minimum-wage increase and the
influence of developer money in
county races.
The forum, hosted by the Sentinel Newspapers, attracted few audience members but fueled two
hours of questioning among
Montgomery County Council
President Roger Berliner (D-Potomac-Bethesda), at-large council
members Marc Elrich and George
L. Leventhal and the race’s newest
candidate, state Del. C. William
Frick (D-Montgomery).
As candidates made their cases
for how they would lead Maryland’s largest jurisdiction, Frick
sought to position himself as a
lifelong resident whose time in
state rather than local government could give him a fresh perspective on how to bring about a
“new generation of leadership in
Montgomery County.”
By contrast, the three termlimited County Council members
said their years of experience in
local politics laid the groundwork
to address issues including public
safety and the needs of the county’s senior population.
“It’s hard to believe these are
the people who are going to solve
the situation when they’ve been
there for more than a decade,”
Frick said. “Nothing is changing.
Talk is cheap.”
Berliner responded, “I think
talk is cheap from someone who
hasn’t done this work.”
Elrich noted that if term limits
had been enacted at the state
level, where Frick has served in
the House of Delegates since
2007, Frick would eventually be
unseated too.
More than eight months ahead
of the Democratic primary, the
forum did not include two Democrats who are expected to run for
county executive but have yet to
file for candidacy.
Potomac businessman David
Blair is expected to announce his
campaign later this month, and
former Rockville mayor Rose
Krasnow is expected to make her
decision in coming weeks.
Robin Ficker, the only Republican who has filed to run for county
executive, was not invited to participate in the forum but was
present in the sparse audience.
Ficker, a longtime activist who
led last year’s successful campaign to institute term limits on
the County Council, told The Post
that the debate lacked “robust”
discussion because it included
only Democrats.
But there were some issues on
which the candidates split, including the county’s publicfinancing system, in place for the
first time this election cycle, and
whether to take campaign contributions from developers. Elrich
and Leventhal are participating
in the public-financing program
while Frick and Berliner are not.
Frick said he is frustrated by the
idea of using taxpayer money to
provide matching funds for politi-
BY
PHOTOS BY SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
FROM TOP: Del. C. William
Frick and his wife, Bethany;
Montgomery County Council
President Roger Berliner;
council member George L.
Leventhal; and council member
Marc Elrich. The four men seek
the Democratic nomination for
county executive.
cal candidates. Berliner said he
supports the public-financing
program as a means of “leveling
the playing field” but believes the
system’s limits on donations
would leave him at a disadvantage, since he is running countywide for the first time — unlike
Elrich and Leventhal — and will
need more resources to reach voters and build name recognition.
In response to a question from
the moderator, Berliner said he
does accept developer money but
added that doing so “has never
compromised how I have gone
about my business.”
Elrich said he has never accepted developer money. Leventhal
said he would accept such funds
up to the $150 threshold allowed
by the public-financing system.
Candidates also addressed
gang violence in Montgomery
County, two weeks after the council allocated additional funds to
try to combat the issue. Emphasizing the need to address the
public-safety concerns and the
social issues at the root of what
draws youths to gangs, candidates agreed that they would be
open to taking extra measures —
such as designating more funding
to county police — if elected county executive.
“We are committed to a comprehensive approach,” Berliner
said. “Just know we are not
throwing money at this issue.”
The candidates also spoke
along similar lines when reflecting on the successes of Montgomery County and their pride as local
residents and public servants.
“We have a great story to tell,
and we need to do a better job of
telling it,” Leventhal said.
rachel.siegel@washpost.com
T OM J ACKMAN
A homicide detective in a Virginia sheriff’s department is a
“policymaker,” a federal judge has
ruled, so the detective can be fired
for opposing the sheriff’s reelection.
The decision not to rehire Mark
F. McCaffrey, a police officer and
sheriff’s deputy for 30 years, was
made by Loudoun County Sheriff
Michael L. Chapman (R), and it
threatened to upend the highprofile murder trial of Braulio
Castillo in 2016, as Chapman had
suddenly ousted the lead detective.
Defense attorneys wondered
whether some misconduct by McCaffrey affected the case and
prompted the sheriff to remove
him on the eve of trial. No, Chapman acknowledged to the lawyers
in the case. He refused to reappoint McCaffrey last year because
he supported Eric Noble, Chapman’s opponent in the 2015 Republican primary, and the reason
was “not a work performance issue,” according to a prosecutor’s
memo in the case.
The Loudoun prosecutor’s office temporarily hired McCaffrey
to work on the murder trial, which
resulted in Castillo’s conviction
for killing his wife and staging it
to look like a suicide. In July,
McCaffrey sued Chapman and
Loudoun County alleging retaliation and a violation of his First
Amendment right to free speech.
Chapman responded in an affidavit that as an elected officer, “I
have a right to not swear in any
deputies or other sworn personnel at the beginning of my term.”
He also noted, “I perceived Mr.
McCaffrey’s conduct as a threat to
my ability to lead and manage”
the Loudoun sheriff’s office. He
said that McCaffrey had voiced
complaints about Chapman to
other deputies and to the Police
Benevolent Association, which
did not endorse Chapman in 2015.
U.S. District Judge Anthony J.
Trenga sided completely with
Chapman and dismissed the case
Thursday. McCaffrey’s attorney,
Robert J. Cynkar, already has appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the 4th Circuit.
Trenga cited a previous
4th Circuit ruling to decide that
McCaffrey’s firing was justified.
“The law in this circuit is clear,”
Trenga said, “that sheriffs in Virginia have the right to lawfully
terminate their deputies for political affiliation reasons.” The logic
behind this is that a sheriff is
elected by the public, that the
sheriff “owes a duty to the electorate” to ensure that his policies are
implemented and that “deputy
sheriffs play a special role in the
sheriff’s policies and goals.”
Therefore, “the office of a deputy sheriff in Virginia is partisan,”
Trenga wrote, and “the First
Amendment’s protection against
retaliatory termination does not
require ‘that a sheriff must attempt to implement his policies
and perform his duties through
deputies who have expressed
clear opposition to him,’ ” referring to the 1997 ruling.
But the test of whether a deputy
is a partisan is only one step in the
analysis, Trenga said. Next the
court has to determine whether
the person who was fired has the
responsibilities of a “policymaker
. . . whose function is such that
party affiliation is an equally appropriate requirement.” Trenga
concluded that “McCaffrey’s role
as deputy sheriff was that of a
‘policymaker.’ ”
Trenga
cited
McCaffrey’s
20 years of experience with another department and then
10 years in Loudoun to observe
that he “was by no means a junior
deputy.” Also, the judge noted that
“McCaffrey had the discretion to
contact directly the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office and the
Medical Examiner’s Office and to
request the resources of those
offices in support of the [Loudoun
County Sheriff’s Office]’s law enforcement mission. . . . A deputy
with McCaffrey’s alleged experience, seniority and responsibilities within a sheriff’s office is a
policymaker.”
As a policymaker, McCaffrey
was an “exception to the general
rule against partisan terminations of public employees,” Trenga
ruled.
The judge granted Chapman’s
motion to dismiss the case, less
than three months after it was
filed. “It says something,” Chapman said Monday, “when the
judge rules on a case that quickly.
It further validates the constitutional authority of sheriffs
throughout the commonwealth of
Virginia.”
The sheriff declined to explore
the issue of who qualified as a
policymaker in his department,
but he said that “it impacts morale
when somebody actively opposes
you within the department.” He
noted that sheriffs appoint their
entire force of deputies every four
years and may decline to reappoint anyone, and that only five
deputies were not reappointed in
2016, three of them eligible for
retirement. McCaffrey was not.
Cynkar, McCaffrey’s attorney,
said he was surprised by the ruling. “We felt that the district court
got the law fundamentally
wrong,” he said. Cynkar noted
that Loudoun has the largest sheriff’s office in Virginia, with more
than 600 sworn deputies, and that
“the sheriff’s orders create a very
defined structure” of the sheriff,
two chief deputies and five majors
at the top of the organization.
“They are the only people that
make policy,” Cynkar said, “which
is done by written guidance down
to the commanders. We feel that
the judge missed that this isn’t
Mayberry — they have structured
it quite clearly as to where policy
is made.”
McCaffrey held the rank of detective. He declined to comment.
tom.jackman@washpost.com
VIRGINIA
Biden endorses Roem, four others in nationally watched statehouse races
BY P ATRICIA S ULLIVAN
AND F ENIT N IRAPPIL
Former vice president Joe
Biden has waded into one of the
most watched statehouse races in
the country, endorsing a Prince
William County Democrat who is
trying to oust a longtime incumbent and become the first openly
transgender individual elected in
Virginia.
Biden, who has called transgender rights the “civil rights
issue of our time,” issued a statement Monday in support of Danica Roem and four other Democrats running for the House of
Delegates in November, part of a
push by the state party to end or
weaken the Republican Party’s
16-year dominance in the chamber.
The statement emailed to Virginia’s Democratic Party cited
Roem’s focus on transportation,
including ways to improve
THE DAILY QUIZ
From what country is Werewolf
Cabernet Sauvignon?
(Hint: The wine is one of Dave McIntyre’s
picks of the week in today’s Food section.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click on
“Quizzes” to enter the correct response.
traffic-clogged Route 28.
“As someone who spent decades riding the train to work, I’m
proud today to endorse Danica
Roem’s historic candidacy, because I know her emphasis on
improving transportation infrastructure is critical to improving
the quality of life for thousands of
Virginians,” Biden said.
“I know she’d make people of
her lifelong home of Prince William County proud by working to
improve their commutes and
strengthen the middle class while
serving them with compassion in
Richmond and Manassas.”
Roem, who is in a heated battle
with Del. Robert G. Marshall (R),
declared herself “humbled” by
Biden’s endorsement.
“I have made transportation
policy my top priority,” she said.
“This helps us entirely.”
Biden campaigned in Northern Virginia last weekend for
gubernatorial candidate Ralph
Northam (D), currently the
state’s lieutenant governor. He
also endorsed four other Democratic state House candidates:
first-term incumbent Del. John J.
Bell of Chantilly, a 26-year Air
Force veteran who faces Republican challenger Subba Kolla; Jennifer Carroll Foy, who is running
against Republican Michael David Makee for the open House
District 2 seat in Prince William
County; David Reid of Ashburn,
who is challenging Del. Thomas
A. “Tag” Greason (R) for the
House District 32 seat; and Elizabeth Guzman, who is challenging
Del. L. Scott Lingamfelter (R) in
House District 31.
Biden called Bell “a proven
leader . . . [who] has a track
record of getting things done
across the aisle and advocating
for his constituents.”
Republicans have a 66-to-34
majority in the House, and all 100
seats are on the ballot Nov. 7.
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Democrat Danica Roem is
trying to become Virginia’s first
openly transgender individual
elected to office. Former vice
president Joe Biden said he is
backing Roem’s “historic
candidacy.”
According to the latest campaign finance filings, Democratic
House of Delegates incumbents,
challengers and leadership PACs
raised $5.7 million through September, while Republicans raised
$3.6 million.
But Republicans are sitting on
an enormous treasury, built up
over years: They had $8.4 million
in accounts heading into October, according to an analysis of
the latest data by the Virginia
Public Access Project, while
Democratic House candidates
had $5.1 million.
Roem, who has raised nearly
$500,000 in 2017, lost her cashon-hand edge to Marshall in September after spending more than
$200,000, including on two ads.
She ended the month with
$78,000 available.
Marshall, who had raised
about $50,000 through August,
picked up his fundraising pace in
September, taking in $82,103,
including a $20,000 check from
the chairman of a group that
opposes transgender rights. He
ended the month with $173,000
available.
patricia.sullivan@washpost.com
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
2017 PostPoints Scavenger Hunt
Benjamin Booker is coming to town.
This frenzied guitar player sure gets around.
He’s known for his blues, boogie and soul
And his new album; he’s on a roll.
Who will open for Benjamin Booker on Monday, October 23 at 9:30 Club?
(Hint: See 930.com for the answer.)
Enjoy a merry wintertime play
A joyful classic, come what may
At Adventure Theatre in just a few weeks.
Treat the kids; come take a peek.
Who will direct Frosty the Snowman November 17-December 31
at Adventure Theatre-MTC?
(Hint: See AdventureTheatre-MTC.org for the answer.)
EARN 5 POINTS AND A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES. Answer our Scavenger Hunt questions, then go to washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click “Quizzes” to enter your responses.
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NF407 6x.5
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
50 years ago, a D.C. musician was in the hot seat, playing drums for Hendrix
You’ve heard the
adage: The show
must go on. And
so, when Mitch
Mitchell, Jimi
Hendrix’s
John
drummer, was
Kelly's
struck with acute
Washington appendicitis on
Aug. 10, 1967,
before an
afternoon gig at the District’s
Ambassador Theatre, someone
would have to pick up the sticks.
That someone was Bill Havu,
a 20-year-old college dropout
who played in the psychedelic
D.C. band the Natty Bumpo.
“I was kind of shoved into it,”
Bill told me over the phone from
Denver, where he runs an art
gallery.
Bill wasn’t the only drummer
in the Natty Bumpo. He and
bandmate Marty Baum would
trade back and forth during
gigs.
“He’d play drums when I
played bass. He’d play guitar
when I played drums,” Bill said.
“We sort of had this quick back
and forth. When Hendrix asked
us, ‘You want to play drums?’
Marty said, ‘You go ahead.’ ”
Their band was the opening
act during Hendrix’s five-day
run at the Ambassador, which
for six glorious months hosted
concerts at 18th Street and
Columbia Road NW. The
theater’s 50th anniversary is
being marked with a free
afternoon get-together on
Oct. 28 at the Songbyrd in
Adams Morgan. (Visit
SongbyrdDC.com for
information.)
The Hendrix shows have
L O C A L D IG ES T
THE DISTRICT
attained mythical status. The
guitarist had taken London by
storm but hadn’t yet released an
album in the States. Over the
course of the week, more and
more people went to see him,
including members of the Who
after the band’s gig at DAR
Constitution Hall. Hendrix even
set a guitar on fire one night,
reportedly the last time he ever
did that in public.
Thursday was to include a
free afternoon performance of
three or four songs for kids in
the neighborhood. That’s the
one Bill was tapped to play
when the manic Mitchell got
sick.
(Or “sick.” Bill suspects that
the English drummer just didn’t
want to play such a low-stakes
show. Mitchell showed up for
the evening gig.)
As a drummer myself, I had
many questions for Bill, starting
with: Whose drum kit did he
play? Mitchell’s or his own?
“I was offered his,” Bill said. “I
said no, basically out of hubris,
but also because I was more
familiar with my set.”
That was a “nice set of black
oyster pearl Ludwigs just like
Ringo Starr’s. He was my hero.”
Said Bill: “In retrospect, I’ve
always thought I should have
used [Mitchell’s] drums. His
drums were tuned and sounded
quite different from mine. Jimi
and Noel [bassist Noel Redding]
were more used to that sound
and totally unfamiliar with
mine.”
Bill had first heard Hendrix’s
songs only the night before. Now
he would be playing them with
their creator, the man many
COURTESY OF BILL HAVU
ABOVE: For five nights in the summer of 1967, Bill Havu, far right,
and the Natty Bumpo opened for Jimi Hendrix at the Ambassador
Theatre in Adams Morgan. His bandmates were, from left, Charles
Smith, Marty Baum and Cam Bruce (in a mask). RIGHT: Today,
Havu, 70, runs an art gallery in Denver.
would soon consider the best
guitarist in rock and roll.
“I didn’t know the songs. I
didn’t know where the breaks
were,” Bill said. “I laid down a
pretty heavy beat and kept it
there.
“What I didn’t realize was
that even though there was a
monitor right next to the drum
set” — that’s a speaker that’s
supposed to let musicians hear
one another — “it was so
overpoweringly loud that I
couldn’t hear Noel that well. He
kept coming over and nudging
me and saying, ‘Speed up, speed
up.’
“It was hard to take it all in,
because of the volume. It was
about twice our volume. I felt as
though I had to play louder. The
drums were mic’d, so I think I
overpowered it a little bit, just
because I was hearing this wall
of sound behind me.”
That sounds like an aural
metaphor for the tumultuous
A Kentucky man dressed as the
Pokémon character Pikachu
jumped a concrete barrier outside
the White House on Tuesday
morning and was quickly taken
into custody, according to the
Secret Service and a police report.
During the incident, D.C.
police said the person — dressed
as the short, chubby yellow
cartoon — dropped a backpack
near the southern fence along
E Street NW. Police and fire
departments were called to the
scene; police and the Secret
Service said the backpack
contained nothing hazardous.
Curtis Combs, 36, of Somerset,
Ky., was charged with unlawful
entry.
The incident occurred about
9:45 a.m. along E Street, near the
Ellipse. The Secret Service said
Combs was near an outer
perimeter fence when he jumped
the barrier. He stated to police he
was unarmed and started
climbing the fence, the police
report says. The fence is marked
by a sign: “Restricted Area Do Not
Enter.”
Authorities did not describe a
motive.
— Peter Hermann
MARYLAND
U-Md. shooting is
drug-related, police say
A shooting outside the
University of Maryland at College
Park on Saturday stemmed from
a drug sale, according to Prince
George’s County police.
Authorities said Tuesday they
charged Jenare Marriott, 26, of no
fixed address, with attempted
murder, robbery and assault in
connection with the nonfatal
shooting.
The shooting occurred about
8:20 p.m. on Saturday in the 7500
block of Rhode Island Avenue
about a block away from the
campus, police said. Police
responding to the report of a
shooting found one man shot and
another injured. Both are
university students, police said.
killing, along with that of Sosa
Rivas and the abduction of another teen, has led to the arrests
of 18 young people and highlighted the resurgence of MS-13, the
region’s largest and most violent
gang.
Damaris’s killers were remorseless, capturing her final
minutes in gruesome cellphone
videos.
The chilling recitation came as
three associates of MS-13 pleaded guilty to charges in Fairfax
related to Damaris’s killing, the
first convictions in a case that
grabbed headlines locally and
nationally.
Cindy Blanco Hernandez, 19,
of Reston, and Aldair J. Miranda
Carcamo, 18, and Emerson
Fugon Lopez, 17, both of Springfield, entered pleas to abduction
and, in two cases, gang participation, as part of deals with prosecutors. They face up to 20 or
30 years in prison when they are
sentenced May 11.
Attorneys for all three defendants said in court that their
clients did not directly participate in Damaris’s slaying or did
not know of the plans to kill her.
Court records show all are
slated to be witnesses in the
upcoming trials of three other
defendants charged directly in
Damaris’s killing. All 10 defendants in the case are young —
between 15 and 21.
Stott said the plot to kill
Damaris began Jan. 8 when Jose
Castillo Rivas, who is charged
with murder in the case, picked
up Damaris and drove her to
Springfield’s Lake Accotink Park.
Damaris thought she was going
to smoke marijuana, but the
other MS-13 members and associates were waiting for her.
Rivas, Iraheta — also charged
with murder — and other male
members of the gang allegedly
took Damaris into the woods
and began interrogating her
about Sosa Rivas’s killing.
Damaris was questioned about a
rival MS-13 leader who was
thought to have orchestrated
Sosa Rivas’s slaying. Stott said
Damaris offered to deliver him
— Lynh Bui
Results from Oct. 17
Man dies in crash;
tried to pass truck
DISTRICT
— Dana Hedgpeth
SHARON MERIASH
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/johnkelly.
FAMILY PHOTO
Prosecutors say Gaithersburg 15-year-old Damaris A. Reyes Rivas
was killed by members and associates of the MS-13 gang.
FAIRFAX COUNTY POLICE DEPARTMENT PHOTOS
MS-13 associates Aldair J. Miranda Carcamo, 18, of Springfield and
Cindy Blanco Hernandez, 19, of Reston pleaded guilty to abduction
charges related to Damaris Reyes Rivas’s January slaying.
members brought Pine Sol to
clean their machetes and that
the killing was approved by leaders of the transnational gang in
El Salvador. Eight people have
been charged in that case.
After Damaris’s interrogation
in the Springfield park, the
group drove her to a location
nearby, Stott said. Damaris was
again taken into the woods. Stott
said all 10 of the MS-13 members
and associates attacked Damaris
by punching and kicking her and
hitting her with sticks.
Iraheta, who is charged as an
adult, then confronted Damaris
a final time, Uribe testified at the
earlier hearing. Iraheta cut a
dollar-sign tattoo, which Sosa
Rivas had given her, off Damaris’s hand.
Iraheta then listed her full
name so Damaris would know
the name of her killer, Uribe
testified.
“[Venus] told the victim she
would never forgive her and
would see her in hell,” Uribe told
a judge.
Then,
Iraheta
allegedly
plunged a knife into the teen
13 times.
She is scheduled to stand trial
on a murder charge in January.
Two other MS-13 members
jabbed a sharpened stick into
Damaris’s neck, Stott said. The
attack, which was filmed on
cellphones, showed Damaris
bleeding amid dead leaves in the
woods, according to a search
warrant filed in the case.
Authorities allege that Jose
Torres Cerrato, 17, another MS13 associate charged with murder, hoped to send the video
back to MS-13 leaders in El
Salvador as proof of his willingness to do the bidding of the
gang. Damaris’s killing was also
“greenlighted” by gang leaders
there, and Cerrato was promoted after Damaris’s killing, authorities said.
Stott said some members of
MS-13 returned to the location
where Damaris was killed later
that night. They dragged her
body beneath a Beltway overpass, placing her facedown in a
puddle. They stacked railroad
ties on her body.
Damaris’s slaying was discovered after investigators in
Prince William County found
the videos of her killing while
probing Sosa Rivas’s death.
Damaris’s mother told The
Washington Post this year that
her daughter went missing in
mid-December and had come
under the sway of MS-13. Maria
Reyes said she had brought
Damaris to the United States
from her native El Salvador in
the hopes of escaping such gang
violence.
The other trials in the case
are scheduled for later this year
and early next year.
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
to the gang members.
At an earlier hearing in the
case, FBI special agent Fernando
Uribe testified that Damaris acknowledged that she’d had a
sexual relationship with Sosa
Rivas.
Sosa Rivas was slain around
New Year’s Eve in a Dumfries,
Va., park after being lured there
by an ex-girlfriend, according to
a federal indictment in the case
that does not name the former
girlfriend. Sosa Rivas was
stabbed and beaten with machetes, rocks and tree branches before his body was sunk in the
Potomac River, according to the
indictment.
Federal prosecutors said gang
L O T T ER IES
VIRGINIA
Authorities have identified a
man who died in a crash when his
vehicle struck another car headon as he tried to pass a tractortrailer along a road in Loudoun
County.
The incident unfolded just
before 5 a.m. Friday on Route 9,
about a mile west of Route 611,
outside Hillsboro.
The driver of a Kia, Kevin R.
Bell, 60, of Inwood, W.Va., died at
the scene, according to police. He
was wearing a seat belt.
The driver of a Dodge Charger
was taken to a hospital with
serious injuries.
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
MS-13 members threatened to cut o≠ teen’s fingers, prosecutors say
DAMARIS FROM B1
Man in costume jumps
White House barrier
Sixties. So tell me, Bill, what was
Washington like in those days?
“It was really difficult to put
everything in perspective,” said
Bill, 70. “You were just caught up
in the wave. You couldn’t really
take your time and pause,
because there would be an
assassination, then there would
be a riot, then another
assassination. Then there’d be
the news of the war, videos of
the bombing on the television.
Then Jimi Hendrix, then the
Who. It was so much highoctane stuff for your brain and
your soul to get a handle on, all
you could do was just try to keep
your head above water.
“In retrospect, I still look at it
as a jumble. One moment I was
in a suit and tie going to the
College of the South, the next
moment I was onstage with Jimi
Hendrix.”
And you know what? It went
okay. Bill may not have been as
flashy as Mitchell, but he said he
didn’t embarrass himself. The
Ambassador was demolished in
1969. Mitchell died in 2008.
Bill has never seen a photo
from that afternoon, though he
thinks there must be one out
there somewhere. He does carry
one reminder.
“I remember going to hit the
crash cymbal,” Bill said. “I hit
my finger on the edge of my
cymbal and cut it wide open. I
was bleeding while I was
playing. Blood was flying. I still
have the scar.”
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Mon.):
Lucky Numbers (Tue.):
DC-4 (Mon.):
DC-4 (Tue.):
DC-5 (Mon.):
DC-5 (Tue.):
Match 5 (Tue.):
5 Card Cash:
1-0-1
9-0-5-4
6-2-9-4-8
1-1-9
1-9-5
7-2-7-1
2-7-4-6
6-1-1-0-4
4-5-4-3-9
11-13-26-31-33 *37
10C-2D-10H-AD-6H
VIRGINIA
Day/Pick-3:
Pick-4:
Cash-5 (Tue.):
Night/Pick-3 (Mon.):
Pick-3 (Tue.):
Pick-4 (Mon.):
Pick-4 (Tue.):
Cash-5 (Mon.):
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5-1-2
7-1-0-0
5-13-17-18-27
9-8-9
4-0-7
0-4-0-8
5-1-7-9
4-16-20-22-25
2-3-4-28-34
301-637-2870
703-382-8505
MARYLAND
Day/Pick 3:
3-6-4
Pick 4:
1-3-7-4
Night/Pick 3 (Mon.):
1-7-3
Pick 3 (Tue.):
3-5-1
Pick 4 (Mon.):
4-3-9-8
Pick 4 (Tue.):
7-5-8-4
Multi-Match (Mon.):
5-17-23-29-36-39
Match 5 (Mon.):
5-16-23-32-38 *27
MULTI-STATE GAMES
Cash 4 Life:
3-11-32-49-55 ¶4
Mega Millions:
31-45-49-56-70 **11
Megaplier:
5x
Lucky for Life:
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*Bonus Ball
**Mega Ball
‡Lucky Ball
¶Cash Ball
For late drawings and out-of-area results,
check washingtonpost.com/lottery
The green pages.
Did you know? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
B4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
2-hour lockdown, cancellation of classes at Howard
Mobile-home residents
follow calls about a possible shooter on campus
get reprieve in Manassas
VIRGINIA
HOWARD FROM B1
identify” a person responsible for
the incident, but he declined to
discuss specifics.
Students interviewed said
there had been rumors about a
disturbance on campus Tuesday.
Danea Rutherford, 19, said she
and her friends did not take it
seriously because Howard officials had not warned of any
threats. They were in a classroom
in a campus building when they
saw police cars.
“It was scary,” she said. “We
kept on hearing the dogs, we kept
on seeing police running.”
Rutherford said she saw police
long before she received an alert
from the university.
While she and others barricaded the classroom door, someone
was trying to get inside the room,
said Rutherford, a sophomore at
Howard. They didn’t immediately
realize it was a Howard official.
“We were on the phone with
our parents, and everyone just
stopped and looked at the door,”
she said. “I couldn’t move. I was
like, ‘We get shot today, I don’t
know what to say.’ ”
The incident began to unfold
shortly before noon at the university, which is off Georgia and
Michigan avenues. Joy said the
first call to campus police reported a shooting at the College of
Medicine building near the 2400
block of Sixth Street NW. Campus
officers reported that they did not
hear any gunshots but began to
search the floors.
At 12:02 p.m., another call —
this one anonymous — reporting
a shooting at Howard’s administrative building came in to the
District’s 911 center, the Office of
Unified Communication. Officials said it was the first of five
separate 911 calls reporting a
shooting.
Howard University’s student
newspaper, the Hilltop, posted an
image of the school’s alerts on
Twitter. According to the tweet, at
12:42 p.m., a message went out
reading: “ALERT!! There is a report of an ARMED person
throughout the campus shelter in
BY
BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
D.C. police near Howard University after reports of a possible shooter on campus Tuesday. D.C. police
reacted swiftly to several calls, sending more than 100 officers, many armed with semiautomatic rifles.
They searched three campus buildings and put the campus under lockdown but found no danger.
“We have found no
evidence that supports
there was a shooting on
our campus.”
Alonzo F. Joy Jr., interim police chief
at Howard University
place while police investigate.”
Asked if police notified students quickly enough, the university’s president, Wayne A.I. Frederick, said, “I think that we were
doing the best we could with the
limited information we had.”
Officials said they had not determined the genesis of the calls.
Two law enforcement officials
said some or all may have come
from the ex-girlfriend’s worried
friends or relatives, and they are
exploring whether allegations
about a shooting circulated on
social media before the calls to
police were made.
The officials said all the calls
were from people who believed a
shooting had occurred. The officials said D.C. police did not know
about the prior threats before
they responded.
Police searched the medicine
building and an attached annex,
the administrative building, and
a third office. The alert was lifted
at 2:05 p.m.
The ex-girlfriend had filed for
the protective order in D.C. Superior Court on Friday. She detailed
several days of alleged abuse,
along with threatening emails.
She wrote that among those
threatened were her cat and relatives, and she said her former
boyfriend told her he had secretly
installed cameras in her campus
residence.
The woman said in the petition
that she saw the man on campus
Sept. 29 and “felt uncomfortable.”
peter.hermann@washpost.com
sarah.larimer@washpost.com
keith.alexander@washpost.com
Dana Hedgpeth contributed to this
report.
Northam’s lead in funds hasn’t translated to polls
VIRGINIA FROM B1
budget campaign, records show,
with $4,000 heading into October
after raising $9,000.
Despite Northam’s enormous
financial advantage, polls show
the race is still tight.
A weekly tracking poll released
Tuesday by the Wason Center for
Public Policy at Christopher Newport University found Northam
with a four-point lead — within
the survey’s margin of error. That
compares with a slightly statistically significant seven-point lead
from last week.
Monmouth University released
a poll Tuesday that found
Northam and Gillespie virtually
tied while consolidating their support in favorable regions.
Northam led in vote-rich Northern Virginia by 32 points, while
Gillespie led in rural western Virginia by 33 points.
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Quinnipiac University and
Washington Post/Schar School
polls that showed Northam with a
double-digit lead in the last
month were outliers.
In September, Northam collected donations of under $100 from
nearly 7,000 people while
Gillespie pulled equivalent donations from 2,700 people.
Northam’s top donor in September was the Democratic Governors Association, which gave $1
million. Reports also show a previously announced $450,000 donation from Everytown, a gun-control group bankrolled by former
New York City mayor Michael
Bloomberg.
Unions were also big givers: A
group allied with Laborers’ International Union of North America
donated $300,000, the United
Food and Commercial Workers
poured in $225,000, and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers gave $100,000. Novelist John Grisham, who lives in
Charlottesville, also pitched in
$100,000.
Northam also drew six-figure
in-kind support from NextGen
America, billionaire environmentalist Tom Steyer’s group, and the
political arms of the Virginia
League of Conservation Voters
and Planned Parenthood Virginia.
All three have previously announced they would spend millions on field and digital operations supporting Northam.
Gillespie raked in $2 million
from the Republican Governors
Association, which previously
gave $3 million. He also picked up
$100,000 checks from the former
head of Advance Auto Parts, Roanoke’s Nicholas Taubman; Houston Texans owner Robert McNair;
tobacco giant Altria; and home
builder Dwight Schar.
Through August, Gillespie’s
election-year fundraising haul
was the lowest of any major-party
gubernatorial nominee since
2001. That surprised many observers, who expected his deep
connections to the Republican donor class as the former head of the
Republican National Committee
and as a corporate consultant to
result in a flood of donations.
Republicans attributed the
fundraising lag to a variety of reasons, including donors who were
tuned out after the presidential
contest and an unfavorable political climate for the GOP in Virginia.
Gillespie picked up the pace in
September, bringing his total election-year haul to $13 million.
That’s more than the Democratic
winners in 2001 and 2005 raised
by the same point in the campaign, according to an inflationadjusted analysis by the Virginia
Public Access Project.
But Northam raised about
$20 million this year, although
that is well short of Gov. Terry
McAuliffe (D)’s record-shattering
$26 million haul at the same
point. McAuliffe cannot seek consecutive terms under the state
constitution.
Gillespie
played
down
Northam’s financial advantage on
Tuesday, telling reporters that he
had enough money to get his message out to voters
Both gubernatorial candidates
also brought in party all-stars to
help raise money in October. Hillary Clinton headlined a Northam
fundraiser in New York on Oct. 4,
and former president George W.
Bush headlined two Virginia
fundraisers Monday for Gillespie.
In the down-ballot races, Attorney General Mark R. Herring (D)
A weekly tracking poll
released Tuesday by the
Wason Center for Public
Policy at Christopher
Newport University
found Northam with a
four-point lead.
went head to head with his Republican challenger John Adams in
September: Each raised about
$1.6 million and spent more than
$1.9 million. But Herring had
$2.5 million in campaign accounts
as of Sept. 30, 10 times the size of
Adams’s remaining war chest.
The Republican Attorneys General Association has since helped
refill Adams’s coffers, pouring in
$1.6 million in October.
Democratic lieutenant governor nominee Justin Fairfax in September raised $600,000, twice as
much as his Republican rival, Jill
Holtzman Vogel. He ended the
month with $568,000 on hand to
Vogel’s $168,000.
Vogel, a state senator from Fauquier County, has been able to
count on her father, megadonor
William B. Holtzman, for help in
the final stretch of earlier campaigns. He gave $250,000 in the
final weeks of her heated primary
contest.
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
P ATRICIA S ULLIVAN
Residents of a Manassas
mobile-home park who had been
threatened with eviction will
very likely be able to stay in their
homes after the city agreed to
allow a local nonprofit agency to
buy the property.
The Manassas City Council
voted unanimously Monday
night to enable Catholics for
Housing, a Northern Virginia
nonprofit group, to purchase the
East End mobile-home park for
$1.4 million.
The site had been declared a
health hazard by the city after
years of unrepaired sewer leaks.
About 18 months ago, the city
signed an agreement to buy the
property, provided the 300 tenants on the 57 lots were evicted
so that the sewer pipes could be
removed.
The vote Monday night means
that instead, Catholics for Housing can become the landlord for
the families, most of whom are
Latino immigrants.
Under the terms of the sale,
which was not yet completed, the
nonprofit group would assume
responsibility for fixing the sewer system, at an estimated cost of
$1.5 million; keep monthly lot
fees at $650 for almost all the
residents for at least five years;
fix the park’s crumbling roads;
and plow them after snowstorms.
“We are doing this for the
express purpose of sustaining
these homes for the residents of
East End,” said Catholics for
Housing Executive Director Karen DeVito. “We’re going to make
this happen, and it’s going to
work.”
Timothy Cope, the attorney for
the current property owner, the
Helen Loretta Clarke Trust, did
not respond to calls seeking
comment.
DeVito said that the organization expects to complete the
purchase in early November after submitting construction
drawings and bonds to the city.
Once the sewer lines are fixed,
she said, they will be incorporated into the city’s public sewer
system, which means the city will
repair and maintain the lines in
the future.
Catholics for Housing is preparing new, multiyear leases for
the tenants, DeVito said.
The city had an April 2016
contract with the Helen Loretta
Clarke Trust to buy the property
for $1.8 million. Residents were
told in August 2016 that they had
until February 2017 to leave.
Tenants said they could not
afford to move their trailers to
another park or find other housing in the expensive Washington
area.
“We are all poor. . . . The cost of
living is too high,” Selfo Sosa, a
construction worker who has
lived at East End since 2012, said
last spring.
On the advice of a pro bono
attorney, residents began withholding about $170,000 in
monthly lot fees, part of a court
case to try to force the landowner
to fix the sewer lines. That money will now go toward repairing
the lines, officials said.
“This is huge, this is great, and
it was accomplished without a
lawsuit,” said Victor M. Glasberg,
the Alexandria lawyer who
threatened to sue on behalf of
the tenants. “In the end, everyone did what they should have
done from the beginning.”
The pipes flooded raw sewage
after rainstorms, leaving a strong
odor, biting insects and ruined
floors in the modest homes. That
attracted the attention of city
officials around 2008. They say
they spent six years trying to get
the property owner to fix the
pipes.
Pope said the trust could not
afford the repair.
The porous lines allowed up to
200,000 gallons of rainwater a
day to drain toward the Upper
Occoquan water treatment
plant, eating up capacity that
officials say soon will be needed
for new commercial and residential development.
Several would-be rescuers appeared and disappeared in 2016
and early 2017 before Catholics
for Housing came forward.
The organization is a small
nonprofit that manages 18 other
rental properties in Arlington,
Fairfax and Fredericksburg and
co-owns its original property in
Vienna.
patricia.sullivan@washpost.com
Social media activity is
crux of hate-crime charge
URBANSKI FROM B1
to conclude that “Lieutenant Collins was murdered because of his
race,” Alsobrooks said.
Collins’s slaying sparked national outcry after police announced that they were investigating Urbanski’s connection to a
Facebook page called Alt-Reich:
Nation. University of Maryland
Police Chief David B. Mitchell has
said that the content from the
page was full of racist and inflammatory material.
Prosecutors at the time said
they would move cautiously, waiting for law enforcement officials
to more fully review Collins’s digital activity before deciding
whether to pursue the case as a
hate crime.
Collins and two friends were at
a bus stop on the U-Md. campus
in College Park on May 20 when
Urbanski approached them at
around 3 a.m., police said.
Urbanski told Collins, “Step left,
step left if you know what’s best
for you,” according to police
charging papers. Collins refused
to move, police said. That’s when
Urbanski pulled a knife and
stabbed Collins, police said.
Urbanski ran from the scene
but was quickly found nearby
with a folding knife in his pocket,
police said.
The entire incident was caught
on video, prosecutors said.
Urbanski, 22, of Severna Park,
is scheduled to go to trial in
January.
Urbanski’s lawyer William C.
Brennan did not return a call
requesting comment, but at a
court hearing earlier this year,
Brennan said that drugs and alcohol may have played a role in the
case.
Urbanski is in jail and being
held without bond.
Alsobrooks said that her office
plans to seek the maximum sentence of life in prison without
parole if Urbanski is convicted of
murder. The charge of “a hate
crime resulting in death” carries a
maximum sentence of 20 years in
prison.
“It is our great hope that we
will bring peace and healing to
the family in the case,” Alsobrooks said.
Collins, 23, had been commis-
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POLICE DEPARTMENT
Sean Urbanski allegedly
stabbed visiting student
Richard Collins III in May on
the University of Maryland’s
College Park campus.
sioned into the U.S. Army as a
second lieutenant and was set to
graduate from Bowie State University just days before he was
killed. His family declined to
comment Tuesday.
Alsobrooks said that Collins’s
family continues to grieve.
“I don’t know that there is
anything that can ever be done to
really completely heal a wound
like this,” Alsobrooks said. “They
lost their son three days shy of his
graduation. I don’t know if there
is any way to make whole the
family in this case.”
The incident further heightened racial tensions at U-Md.,
which had reported several racebased incidents throughout the
campus in previous months. The
university launched new initiatives aimed at reviewing and improving how it investigates them.
Recently, a man was charged in
connection with swastika graffiti
found on a garbage can on campus. And campus police last week
said that they were investigating
three incidents of hate-related
graffiti found in a restroom stall.
“The Collins family remains in
our thoughts, following their
tragic loss last May,” the university said in a statement on Tuesday. “This is especially true today
as the prosecution of this senseless crime moves through the
criminal justice system.”
lynh.bui@washpost.com
Keith L. Alexander contributed to this
report.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
THE REGION
Maryland leads group
suing DeVos on rules
for vocational programs
BY
D ANIELLE D OUGLASG ABRIEL
Maryland’s attorney general is
leading a coalition of state prosecutors that on Tuesday sued
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos
over the suspension of Obamaera regulations governing careertraining programs.
The rule, known as gainful
employment, threatens to withhold student aid from vocational
programs that have graduates
who consistently end up with
more debt than they can repay. It
took nearly five years to implement the regulation, as for-profit
colleges petitioned the courts to
prevent what they regard as an
attack on their sector. Those
schools, critics say, have found an
ally in DeVos, who has halted
enforcement of the rule as her
department prepares to entirely
rewrite it.
“It’s outrageous for the department to say they’re going to allow
these predatory institutions to
continue to take advantage of
people who are vulnerable, people with very few resources,”
Maryland Attorney General Brian E. Frosh said in an interview
Tuesday.
A program is considered to
lead to “gainful employment” if
the annual loan payment of a
typical graduate does not exceed
20 percent of their discretionary
income or 8 percent of their total
earnings. Exceeding those debtto-earnings rates means possible
expulsion from the federal student aid program. Eight hundred
of the 8,700 programs reviewed
by education officials at the end
of last year failed to meet the
thresholds. Ninety-eight percent
of those programs are offered by
for-profit colleges, while the remaining 2 percent are at private
nonprofit schools, such as Harvard University.
As the rule is written, the
government is supposed to cut off
federal student aid to any program that fails twice in a threeyear period or teeters on the line
for failure for four consecutive
years. Failing programs are supposed to notify students that they
are at risk of losing access to
federal loans and grants. But that
hasn’t happened.
Since March, the department
has given schools more time to
appeal the agency’s review of
their debt-to-earnings data, comply with disclosure requirements
and create a list of students who
have completed their programs
as outlined in the rule. Prosecutors say each of those steps has
undermined the regulation’s aim
of holding schools accountable
DOUG KAPUSTIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Maryland Attorney General Brian E. Frosh and other state attorneys general are seeking injunctive
relief, which could force the department to immediately implement the gainful employment rule.
“This is just the latest in
a string of frivolous
lawsuits filed by
Democratic attorneys
general.”
Liz Hill, an Education Department
spokeswoman
for saddling students with hefty
debt but without the skills needed to repay the money. The continued delays and refusal to enforce aspects of the rule violate
federal law, according to the complaint.
“This is just the latest in a
string of frivolous lawsuits filed
by Democratic attorneys general
who are only seeking to score
quick political points,” Liz Hill, a
spokeswoman for the Education
Department, said in an email.
“While this administration, and
Secretary DeVos in particular,
continue work to replace this
broken rule with one that actually protects students, these legal
stunts do nothing more than
divert time and resources away
from that effort.”
DeVos has derided the employment regulation as being overly
burdensome and in need of an
overhaul.
“Gainful employment regulations have been repeatedly challenged by educational institutions and overturned by the
courts, underscoring the need for
a regulatory reset,” DeVos said
when she announced plans to
rewrite the rule in June. “Once
fully implemented, the current
rules would unfairly and arbitrarily limit students’ ability to
pursue certain types of higher
education and career-training
programs.”
The department officials have
said delaying elements of the rule
was necessary in light of a federal
lawsuit brought by an association
of for-profit cosmetology schools
seeking exemption. The organization claimed that the debt-to-income calculation in the rule
wrongly excluded the tips hairdressers often earn as a part of
their overall pay. In June, a federal judge ordered that cosmetology schools in the association be
given more flexibility in appealing the earnings data. Although
the judge said the ruling was
meant to avoid “upending ” the
entire regulation, the department
applied the rationale to all
schools.
“It was a very narrow exception, and the court made very
clear that it didn’t relate to the
larger rule,” Frosh said. “You’ve
got three court decisions upholding the rule and the department
is still saying ‘We don’t think it’s
right, so we’re not going to implement it.’ ”
Frosh and the other state attorneys general are seeking injunctive relief, which if granted would
force the department to immediately implement the rule. He said
there has been a steady increase
in consumer complaints against
for-profit colleges in Maryland
and that authorities have a responsibility to hold bad actors in
the sector accountable.
Democratic attorneys general
have been waging fights in the
courts to get the Trump administration to uphold a series of
regulations to protect students
from
predatory
for-profit
schools.
danielle.douglas@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Projected budget shortfall drops from $740 million to $250 million
BY
O VETTA W IGGINS
The budget shortfall for the
next fiscal year in Maryland is not
as large as originally projected,
the chief legislative analyst told a
joint panel of state lawmakers on
Tuesday.
Warren G. Deschenaux, executive director of the Department of
Legislative Services, said the anticipated budget gap of about
$740 million has been reduced to
$250 million.
He said bond premiums, overestimates in health-care costs for
state workers, a reduction in the
Medicaid caseload and recent
budget cuts made by the Board of
Public Works accounted for the
lower projection.
“The outlook is better than I
expected it to be,” Deschenaux
said.
To cover the smaller shortfall,
he suggested that the General
Assembly consider “freezing everything at current levels” except
for mandated spending such as
K-12 education and reimbursements for care providers who
work with the disabled.
While the news was rosier than
in previous years, analysts noted
that the forecast did not include
the devastating impact that federal changes to health care or the
tax code could have on state revenue.
And analysts suggested that
the state continue to look closely
at the continued fall in sales-tax
revenue, largely a result of consumers relying more on online
commerce as well as the effect of
an aging population that has different spending patterns.
For fiscal 2019, the lion’s share
of the change in the budget gap
comes from the state’s getting
more than expected in bond premiums, Deschenaux said.
Del. Maggie L. McIntosh (DBaltimore City), chair of the
House Appropriations Committee, asked whether the expected
bond premiums should be included in the fiscal outlook. But Deschenaux said the projection, like
estimated revenue from sales taxes, is always a part of the forecast.
A move by Gov. Larry Hogan (R)
to cut spending from the state’s
current budget freed up $61 million to plug the shortfall, De-
schenaux said.
Last month, the Board of Public Works approved the $61 million budget cut, which included
reducing health department
spending by $22 million, eliminating 30 positions at public
higher education institutions to
save $8 million and cutting more
than $8 million from the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
obituaries
D.C. schools chief
restored optimism
REED FROM B1
and he was willing to do anything
where kids were concerned.”
Mr. Reed “brought this sense of
stability and hope, and people
had great confidence,” said Mary
Levy, a longtime monitor of the
school district through the group
Parents United for the D.C. Public
Schools. “It was a big contrast
with what had gone before, with
all the tumult.”
Mr. Reed assumed the superintendency at a delicate moment
for the city and for the district. In
the 12 years before his tenure, the
district had gone through eight
superintendents. His predecessor, Barbara A. Sizemore, had left
amid charged battles over race
and class in the school system.
Mr. Reed was credited with
making swift administrative and
practical changes that improved
the delivery of school supplies,
ended inflated spending and
eliminated morale-sapping payroll mistakes. Just over a year into
his tenure, The Post wrote a frontpage story about the sense of
optimism that had arrived in the
long-beleaguered district.
Among teachers and administrators, he cultivated a reputation
for watchfulness. He would occasionally swing by downtown department stores such as Woodward & Lothrop, spot school employees shopping and invite them
to go back to the office.
He said the tactic worked. “I
haven’t seen anybody out shopping recently,” he told The Post in
1977, “except at lunch hour.”
In the classroom, he eschewed
pedagogical trends to instead focus on basic skills such as math
and reading.
“What do you call innovation?”
he told The Post in 1977. “If the
kids can read and write, that’s an
innovation, because that’s different than what we have now. . . .
What we need are students who
can live in this country and move
through this life and make a
contribution.”
To improve academic performance and end social promotions,
he introduced a competency-
saying, “and that means he has to
get out on his own. He’ll be
leaving tomorrow.”
The next morning, Mr. Reed
woke up and found his belongings packed in a cardboard suitcase. He opted to stay home and
remain in school.
Mr.
Reed
received
a
physical-education degree in 1952
from what is now West Virginia
State University and began his career there as a football coach. He
was an Army veteran of the Korean
War.
After settling in Washington,
he received a master’s degree in
educational administration from
Howard University in 1965.
based curriculum under which
students were required to learn
particular fundamental skills to
move on to the next grade. Those
who failed were given special
remedial instruction.
The system seemed to work: In
1979, test scores rose for the first
time in a decade, and the following year they rose again.
Clashes and criticism
His tenure was not without
controversy. He weathered a 23day teacher strike in 1979 and lost
700 teachers because of citywide
austerity measures. Some school
board members and other critics
faulted him for being slow to
enforce a “back to basics” curriculum program and argued that his
popularity stemmed from personal charisma rather than from
results.
Mr. Reed argued that he could
not reverse the years of insufficient education that older students had received and that the
ultimate proof of his success
would be the performance of
younger students who entered
the system while he was superintendent.
He sharply criticized board
members’ demands that he provide jobs for their acquaintances
and said the board had displayed
an uncooperative approach
toward his staff members. He and
the board clashed over the creation of a model college-preparatory high school for the district, an
initiative he strongly supported.
Proposals for the school were
defeated twice. Its detractors on
the board feared that a selective
school would be too elitist or
would cater disproportionately to
white students.
In December 1980, Mr. Reed
announced that he would resign.
The Post editorial board wrote
that the city had “an emergency
on its hands” and argued for Mr.
Reed to be given an extended
contract that would protect him
from looming changes to retiree
benefits. He received an outpouring of requests that he stay, including from then-Mayor Marion
Barry.
MARGARET THOMAS/THE WASHINGTON POST
From left, D.C. Schools Superintendent Vincent E. Reed, Council member Dave Clark, Mayor
Marion Barry in July 1980, with silk roses that were sold to help finance a trip to the Rose Bowl
Parade for the Cardozo Marching Band. Mr. Reed was later a vice president at The Post.
“The agony of what I’ve been
through is something I can’t explain,” Mr. Reed said of his decision to leave the school system.
“It’s something I can’t stand anymore.”
The month after his resignation, the school board voted to
create what became Benjamin
Banneker High. Two decades later, Post columnist William Raspberry wrote that the institution
was “an important source of pride
for both the school system and
the city.”
Vincent Emory Reed was born
March 1, 1928, in St. Louis and
was the 14th of 17 children. His
father was an insurance salesman
and drove a laundry truck. His
mother was “a fanatic about education,” Mr. Reed told The Post.
When he was 14, he announced
over dinner that he was going to
quit school and become a fighter.
“He’s quitting school, so he’s
grown,” he recalled his mother
“He was a man of perfect integrity, and he was willing
to do anything where kids were concerned.”
Donald E. Graham, former publisher of The Washington Post
Dedicated to education
In March 1981, President Ronald Reagan named Mr. Reed assistant secretary for elementary and
secondary education. He served
in that position, overseeing matters including federal funding for
schools, until joining The Post in
1982. As head of communications, he was the newspaper’s
chief liaison with the public on
matters other than news and editorial questions, and its chief
spokesman on business issues.
His responsibilities included
the company’s educational and
charitable programs, which were
greatly expanded under his stewardship. Among them were the
Agnes Meyer awards, which are
given
to
outstanding
Washington-area teachers, and a
program through which high
school students earn college
scholarships by making the honor roll.
For years, Mr. Reed hosted an
informal monthly meeting of
area school superintendents at
The Post.
Survivors include his wife of 65
years, Frances Bullitt Reed, a former elementary school reading
specialist, of Washington; two
brothers; and a sister.
Mr. Reed once reflected on his
upbringing and how it informed
his philosophy.
“We were poor, but we made it,”
he told The Post. “We had to do
without some things sometimes,
but we made it. That’s why I get so
upset when we tell our kids they
can’t learn because they come
from meager circumstances.”
emily.langer@washpost.com
J.Y. Smith, a former obituaries editor
of The Washington Post who died in
2006, contributed to this report.
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
obituaries
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
BEVERLY
GIANTELLI
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
DEATH NOTICE
JOHNSON
WILLIAM DOUGLAS JOHNSON
DAPHNE CARUANA GALIZIA, 53
JUNE FRANCES BEVERLY
June 5, 1934 – October 18, 2011
Remembering You!
GALLAGHER
JOSEPH M. GIANTELLI (Age 52)
On Sunday, October 15, 2017 of Rockville, MD.
Beloved husband of the Adelaide Giantelli for
24 years. Dear Father of Andrew Raffaele,
Matthew Raymond, and Alexa Michelle
Giantelli; cherished son of Raymond and Joan
Giantelli; loving brother of Raymond Giantelli,
Mary Ostrander, Antonetta James, and Patricia
Righetti. Mr. Giantelli is also survived by many
other loving nieces and nephews, as well as
many loving friends.
The family will receive friends at Pumphrey’s
Colonial Funeral Home, 300 W. Montgomery
Ave., Rockville, MD on Sunday, October 22
from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. A Mass of
Christian Burial will be offered at St. Mary’s
Catholic Church, 520 Veirs Mill Rd., Rockville,
MD on Monday, October 23, 2017 at 10:30 a.m.
Interment private.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made in Joseph’s memory to the Boy Scouts
of America at www.scouting.org. Please view
and sign online family guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
HARDISON
PATRICK KEVIN GALLAGHER
July 6, 1990 - October 18, 2015
MASON
DAVID ALLEN MASON
October 16, 1981 - July 31, 2001
The love is felt even when the being is gone.
You can still hear the words at the end of the
song. Love is the only thing that is eternal, and
David is eternally loved. Our memories are a
constant reminder of how much we loved you,
and how much you loved us. We will always
miss you and love you. Memories of David
we will pass on to those we love and touch,
carrying you through the ages. Eternally ours,
for our hearts are eternally yours.
Happy 36th Birthday
Love, Mom, Dad, Zach, and all the
Family and Friends
BY
H ARRISON S MITH
The first attack came in 1995,
when Daphne Caruana Galizia’s
front door was doused with fuel
and set ablaze. She told her three
children that the fire had simply
been caused by candles, left outside for too long. Privately, she
believed that she was targeted for
retaliation. Her collie was killed
soon after, left in front of her
home with a slit throat.
A reform-minded political columnist, Mrs. Caruana Galizia had
written an editorial for the Sunday Times of Malta, her country’s
largest newspaper, calling for the
commander of Malta’s armed
forces to resign because his children had been linked to drug
trafficking.
Fearing for her family’s safety,
she took her own children out of
school and for several weeks
stayed away from her home in
Bidnija, a small town in the hills
of one of Europe’s smallest countries.
Nothing more came of the story. But in 2006, shortly after she
published an article critical of
neo-Nazi groups in Malta, a stack
of tires was arranged behind her
house and set on fire. “My brother
happened to be coming home at
night and noticed the fire,” her
son, Matthew Caruana Galizia,
said in a phone interview. “If he
hadn’t noticed, we probably
would have been burned alive.”
Mrs. Caruana Galizia, who
faced what her family described
as an escalating series of retaliatory attacks for her independent
reporting on Maltese politics,
died Oct. 16 after her Peugeot 108
exploded near her home in Bidnija. She was 53.
Malta police are investigating
the case with assistance from the
FBI, as requested by Malta’s
prime minister, Joseph Muscat. If
Mrs. Caruana Galizia is found to
have been targeted, she will be the
28th journalist killed for her work
this year, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists.
Mrs. Caruana Galizia was in
some ways an unassuming muckraker. Though she established
herself early in her career as a
scorching political commentator,
since 2004 she had run Taste &
Flair, a lifestyle magazine published by the Malta Independent
newspaper.
Writing and editing the magazine’s stories, mainly about Mal-
tese cuisine, was her day job. In
her free time, she posted articles
to a blog called Running Commentary, a website that made her
Malta’s most prominent investigative reporter and, as Politico
wrote in one recent profile, “a
one-woman WikiLeaks.”
On some days, the site drew
more than 400,000 readers, a
figure that dwarfed the audience
of Malta’s main newspapers and
nearly equaled the country’s population. Her posts ranged from
commentary on the country’s
“19th-century” treatment of
women to more salacious items,
including a report that a Maltese
government minister was seen in
a German brothel. The minister
denied the story and in February
received a warrant to freeze Mrs.
Caruana Galizia’s bank accounts.
Her recent work was fueled by
the Panama Papers, a 2016 leak of
more than 11 million documents
that linked government officials
around the world to secretive
offshore shell companies. Mrs.
Caruana Galizia’s work occurred
independently of the Pulitzer
Prize-winning investigative effort
led by the Washington-based International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), in
partnership with the German
newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung
and more than 100 other media
organizations. (Her son Matthew
is a software developer and data
journalist with ICIJ.)
In blog posts based on documents from the Panama Papers,
she tied Muscat’s government —
including his wife, chief of staff
and energy minister — to several
shell companies. She alleged that
officials had been receiving illicit
payments funneled by the government of Azerbaijan, a former
Soviet satellite state.
Officials denied the charges,
and Mrs. Caruana Galizia soon
faced a deluge of libel threats and
suits. In addition, her bull terrier
was poisoned and nearly killed
earlier this year, Matthew Caruana Galizia said, and one of her
younger sons, a Maltese diplomat, was recalled from his post in
New Delhi without explanation.
Before her death, Matthew said,
his mother had planned to sue the
government, arguing that the diplomatic ouster was intended as
retaliation for her reporting.
“Everyone knows Caruana Galizia was a harsh critic of mine,
both politically and personally,
but nobody can justify this barbaric act in any way,” Muscat said
after Mrs. Caruana Galizia’s
death.
Malta’s government had been
in a state of near-disarray since
Mrs. Caruana Galizia began publishing her allegations, with Muscat holding snap elections in June
in an attempt to solidify his fouryear hold on power. Shortly before the election, Ken Mifsud
Bonnici, an adviser to the European Commission, wrote that
Malta was facing “a veritable collapse of the rule of law.”
In a Facebook post Tuesday,
Matthew Caruana Galizia wrote
that his mother “was assassinated
because she stood between the
rule of law and those who sought
to violate it, like many strong
journalists.” He blamed the “incompetence and negligence” of
the police and government for her
death.
“This is what happens when
the institutions of the state are
incapacitated,” he continued:
“The last person left standing is
often a journalist. Which makes
her the first person left dead.”
Daphne Anne Vella was born in
the resort town of Sliema on Aug.
26, 1964. Her father owned a
business that imported and installed elevators, and her mother
was a homemaker. She married
Peter Caruana Galizia in 1985.
Mrs. Caruana Galizia joined
the Times of Malta two years later,
working as a reporter and then a
columnist before moving to the
Malta Independent as an associate editor in 1992. As a columnist,
she developed a flair for fiery,
opinionated writing that carried
over to her blog.
In 1997, she received a bachelor’s degree in archaeology from
the University of Malta.
In addition to her husband,
survivors include their three sons
and her mother and father.
Mrs. Caruana Galizia’s last
post, published a half-hour before
her death, described her increasing frustration over a lack of accountability for government corruption. In a court hearing that
morning, the prime minister’s
chief of staff, Keith Schembri, said
he had not been able to respond to
accusations of corruption because of a “medical condition.”
“There are crooks everywhere
you look now,” she wrote. “The
situation is desperate.”
harrison.smith@washpost.com
Daphne Caruana Galizia “was assassinated because she stood
between the rule of law and those who sought to violate it.”
Matthew Caruana Galizia, her son, in a Facebook post
After living a full and happy life, went to
be with the Lord on Sunday, October 15,
2017. She is survived by her husband of
75 years, Dr. W. Barker Hardison, and two
sons, William B. Hardison, Jr. (Carolyn) of
Richmond, VA, and Richard E. Hardison
of Raleigh, NC. She is also survived by
four grandchildren: Jonathan Hardison and
Matthew Hardison both of Richmond, Drew
(Ashley) Hardison of Apex, NC, and Susan
(Ryan) Thomsen of Raleigh, NC. Her four
great-grandchildren are Graham and Charlotte Anne Hardison, and Will and John
Thomsen.
She was born, Lois Mae Fielden on August
2, 1917 in Knoxville, TN. Lois was a pastor’s
wife for over 50 years and taught Latin and
English in Arlington County public schools
for nearly 20 years. She graduated from
Carson Newman College and received her
Master’s degree from The W.O. Carver
School of Missions and Religious Education
in Louisville, Kentucky. Her entire adult
life she and her husband supported home
missionary work with families in the
Appalachian region of East Tennessee.
KETTER
ANN MARIE KETTER (née Dusterhoff)
On Monday, October 16, 2017,
Ann Marie Ketter of Olney, MD.
Beloved wife of Douglas Ketter
and daughter of Frances D. and
Charles P. Dusterhoff. She is also
survived by siblings, Paul J. Dusterhoff and Alice D. King. Visitation
will be held on Saturday, October
20, 2017 at St. Peter's Catholic Church, 2900
Olney Sandy Spring Rd., Olney, MD at 11
a.m., followed by Mass of Christian Burial
at 12 noon. Interment to follow at Gate of
Heaven Cemetery, Silver Spring, MD. In lieu
of flowers, contributions may be made to
St. Peter Building Fund, 2900 Olney Sandy
Spring Rd., Olney, MD 20832 or the charity
of your choice. Arrangements by Cole Funeral
Services, Rockville, MD.
www.colefuneral.com
KIDWELL
WILBUR ROSS KIDWELL, JR.
Passed away peacefully at his home October
11, 2017. He was predeceased by his wife of
58 years, Billie Ruth Kidwell. He is survived
by his twin daughters, Polly Kidwell and Patty
Christenson; five grandchildren, Cory Cardenas, Jake and Amber Christenson, Ashley Hall
and Brooke Hall II. Additionally by two great
grandchildren and one on the way.
Wilbur will be laid to rest next to his beloved
wife on Friday, October 20, 2017 at 11 a.m.
at National Memorial Park, 7482 Lee Highway,
Falls Church, Virginia 22042.
KIME
A Memorial Service will be conducted on
Thursday, October 19, 2017 at 1 p.m. by
the Rev. Jim Bell in the Village Church
on the campus of Greenspring Retirement
Community. A graveside service for the
family will precede the memorial service at
National Memorial Park in Falls Church. In
lieu of flowers, gifts may be made in her
honor to a charity of your choice.
DARRIN ZAMMIT LUPI/REUTERS
Maltese investigative journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia poses outside the Libyan Embassy in Valletta
in 2011. She died Oct. 16 after her Peugeot 108 exploded near her home in Bidnija.
Reform-minded columnist in
Malta faced deluge of threats
LOIS MAE HARDISON (Age 100)
Doug Johnson, one of the nation's leadingand most frequently quoted-experts on
banking cybersecurity, died October 12,
2017 of pancreatic cancer. "There was no
one who more effectively or effortlessly
helped the public understand how banks
keep customers' money safe," said Rob
Nichols, President and CEO of the American
Bankers Association, where Doug was
Senior Vice President of Payments and
Cybersecurity. Before his 18 years at ABA,
Doug was Assistant Director of Florida's
Division of Banking. He is survived and
greatly missed by his wife, Lisa; daughter,
Nikki; sisters, Pat Sellergren and Claudia
Johnson; nephew, Ross Loomis; nieces,
Anne Loomis Thompson, Katie, Margaret,
and Jordan Sellergren; and cousin, Carol
Loman. Friends are invited to celebrate
Doug's life at the George P. Kalas Funeral
Home, 2973 Solomons Island Rd., Edgewater, MD on Friday, October 20, 2017 from
10:30 a.m., until his service begins at 11
a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requests
that contributions may be made in Doug's
name to Maryland's Chesapeake Cats and
Dogs or Compass Regional Hospice. An
online guestbook is available at:
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
HARTEKER
DEATH NOTICE
ADELMAN
STEVE FRANCIS KIME
Capt., U.S. Navy (Ret.)
EILEEN PALMER ADELMAN
Eileen "Nana" Palmer Adelman died peacefully
with her family by her side on October 14,
2017. Eileen was born in Swindon, England on
July 3, 1942 to the late John and Patricia Palmer.
Preceded in death by her loving husband,
Theodore Adelman and brother, John Palmer.
Survived by her children Bridgette, Sherrie,
Anthony, Marla, Robyn, Julie, Diane, Brian,
many grandchildren, nieces, nephews and
friends. Services will be Saturday, October
21 at Advent Funeral Home - Lanham, MD,
Viewing from 9 to 10 a.m., service at 10 a.m.
Interment will follow at 12:30 p.m. at George
Washington Cemetery, Adelphi, MD. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests donations to the
Hospice of the Chesapeake.
ALEXANDER
PATRICK ALEXANDER, SR.
The members of the DC Fire Fighters Association, Local 36 and the
Retired Firefighters of Washington regret to announce the death
of retired Brother PATRICK
ALEXANDER, SR., age 103 whom
was the oldest member of the
RFA on Tuesday, August 15, 2017. Brother
ALEXANDER was appointed to the Department
on May 1, 1938 to Truck 13 and retired on
January 1, 1968 as Deputy Fire Chief/Adm.
Division. His funeral and interment have
already taken place.
BECKLEY
ELAINE M. BECKLEY
On Saturday, October 14, 2017,
Elaine M. Beckley, 75, of Bethesda, MD. Beloved wife of the
late Joseph M. Beckley; loving
mother of Mike Beckley (Leigh), Jim Beckley
(Carey) and Marguerite Campbell (Rob);
grandmother of Colin, Lucy, James, Emma,
Teddy, Fritz and Josephine; sister of Bob
Suttle, Roberta Kring and Chris Hankla.
She was preceded in death by her sisters,
Louise LeBorne and Pauline Elcenko.
Memorial Mass will be held at St. Raphael
Catholic Church, 1513 Dunster Road,
Rockville, MD on Thursday, October 19,
2017 at 10:30 a.m. Inurnment will be held at
a later date at Arlington National Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions
may be made in her name to Cure CP,
www.CureCP.org or to Haven of Lake and
Sumter Counties, www.HavenLakeSumter.
org. Please sign the family guestbook at:
www.DeVolFuneral.com
BING-CURRY
JUANITA BING-CURRY
On Sunday, October 8, 2017, Juanita Bing-Curry
passed away at the age of 93 in her home
in Indianapolis, IN. She leaves to cherish her
memory, three children, Dorothy, David and
Brenda; 10 grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren, six great-great-grandchildren, one sister, Mable Simmons; two sisters-in-law, Fannie
Bing and Iona Bing; a host of nieces, nephews,
extended family and devoted friends. Preceded
in death by son, Haskel. Homegoing ServIce
will be held Friday, October 20 at New Mt. Olive
Baptist Church, 710 - 58th St., NE, Washington,
DC 20019, viewing from 10 a.m. until time of
service at 11 a.m. Online condolences can be
submitted at:
www.jbjfh.com
CRAIG
CECELIA CRAIG
Sisters of Ladies Auxiliary #213 are
hereby notified to assemble at
10:20 a.m., for prayer followed by
Mass of Christian burial at Our Lady
of Perpetual Help, 1600 Morris
Road, SE, on Thursday, October 19.
Kelly S. Tucker, President
Kayla Tucker, Rec. Secretary
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
Passed away at his home in Clifton, VA on
October 9, 2017, with his wife of 55 years,
Wilma Mae Snook Kime, by his side. Capt.
Kime was born on December 3, 1940, in
New Albany, IN, the son of Lila Mae and
Martin Anthony Kime. He attended New
Albany High School and studied at the
University of Louisville, earning his bachelor’s degree in international studies in 1962.
LINDA HARTEKER
Teacher, writer, and editor, died on October
9, 2017 at age 76. She had a varied career.
She taught French, wrote proposals for several
organizations, wrote and edited elementary
school textbooks, served as Director of Public
Information for a pharmacy association, and
edited papers for submission to medical journals.
She was a voracious reader. She amassed a
library of 2500 volumes including histories,
biographies and novels. After retiring she did
volunteer work at the US Botanic Garden and
she provided volunteer tutoring to adults at a
language learning center and to children at a
neighborhood school.
Ms Harteker is survived by her husband, Joel,
her brother, Paul Rukenbrod, her sister-inlaw, Margaret Rukenbrod, and a niece and
nephews.
Funeral services will take place at the Mount
Vernon United Methodist Church, 2006 Belle
View Blvd., Alexandria, VA 22307 on Friday,
October 20, 2017 at 10:30 a.m. In lieu of
flowers, please make contributions to Children’s Hospital Foundation, 111 Michigan Ave.,
NW, Washington, DC 20010.
HUBBARD
LESLIE ANNE HUBBARD
(née Wrightson)
Passed away peacefully on Saturday, October 14, 2017 in Fredericksburg, VA. Leslie
was the spouse of 18 years to Dennis
M. Hubbard of Wheaton, MD. She was
preceded in death by her mother, Harriet
Dise Wrightson; father, Frank Powell
Wrightson, and brother, Alan Michael
Wrightson.
Leslie worked in food services facilities
design and recently moved from Gaithersburg, MD to Lake Anna, VA.
She is survived by her brother, Steven
Powell Wrightson (TJ Wrightson); sister
Mary Teresa "Terri" Wrightson (Susan
Johnson); and nieces and nephews: Carla
Hubbard, Paula Hubbard, Katie Wrightson, Jenna Hubbard, and Mark Wrightson
(Denise Wrightson).
Leslie always enjoyed socializing with her
many friends and family. She especially
enjoyed her time vacationing at Lake
Temagami in Northern Ontario, Canada,
as well as boating in Lake Anna with her
dear friends and family.
Services for Leslie will be held at a later
date yet to be determined. In lieu of
flowers, donations may be directed to
Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center in
Fredericksburg, VA or Montgomery Hospice of Montgomery County, Maryland.
Following graduation, Capt. Kime was commissioned in the U.S. Navy and entered the
submarine service, where he spent several
years on diesel boats before transitioning to
naval intelligence. He earned masters and
doctorate degrees from Harvard University
and served as naval attaché to the Soviet
Union from 1983 to 1985. He also served
as deputy director, Navy Politico-Military
Policy and Current Plans at the Pentagon.
He was an instructor at the National War
College, Georgetown University and American University. At his last duty station,
he was director, the Division of U.S. and
International Studies, the U.S. Naval Academy.
Following military retirement, Capt. Kime
was appointed president of Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges. He also was
named vice president of the American
Association of State Colleges and Universities.
Awards include the Department of Defense
Legion of Merit and the Medal for Distinguished Public Service. He was a member
of the New Albany High School and International Adult and Continuing Education
Halls of Fame. He represented Virginia on
the Southern Region Education Board and
chaired the Department of Veterans Affairs
Educational Advisory Committee.
In addition to his wife, Capt. Kime is survived by four children, Barrett Lee Kime,
Lauren Kime Cacela, Carl Martin Kime and
Stephanie Kime Schroeder, their spouses
and nine grandchildren. He also is survived
by a sister, Mary Anne Brown.
Capt. Kime will be interred at Arlington
National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Pat Tillman Foundation Tillman Scholars Program.
pattillmanfoundation.org/donate/.
LEWIS
GEORGE H. LEWIS
Peacefully transitioned on Sunday, October
8, 2017, at his residence. He is survived by
his loving wife, Carlease Lewis; three sons,
George T. Lewis, Donald Williams (Karen) and
Glenn Early; two daughters, Cassandra Bethea
and Paulette Early; three sisters, Patricia Kitt
(Carl), Brenda Johnson and Velva Johnson;
one brother, Carl Johnson (Phyllis). He is also
survived by grandchildren, nieces, nephews,
other relatives and friends. Family will receive
friends on Friday, October 20, 2017 from 10
a.m., until service at 11 a.m., at Greater Harvest
Baptist Church, 3231 Sherman Avenue, NW,
Washington, DC. Interment Glenwood Cemetery, Washington, DC.
www.marshallmarchfh.com
POSTON
RAYMOND L. POSTON, JR.
Raymond L. Poston Jr., prominent lawyer,
real estate developer and longtime Washingtonian died on October 10, 2017 of natural
causes. He was 96. Born in Wiehle, Virginia
(now Reston) in 1920, Mr. Poston grew up
in very modest circumstances and endured
the Great Depression. After graduating from
Herndon High School, he obtained a secretarial degree from Strayer Business College
and ended up working in the Pentagon. In
1943, he enlisted in the US Navy where by
war’s end he rose to the rank of Lieutenant.
He remained in the Naval Reserves for 30
years and ended his service with the rank of
Commander. After World War II, through the
GI bill, he obtained his college degree and
then his law degree from George Washington
University. He opened his own law practice
where he initially specialized in representing
military personnel in a variety of civil matters.
While his law practice thrived, he found his
true professional calling in the real estate
world. He had a special knack for identifying
under-valued commercial and residential
properties, renovating and modernizing
them to attract tenants and ultimately selling
them.
In 1960, his life changed when a woman
named Gretchen Householder answered his
ad seeking secretarial help. Within months,
he informed Ms. Householder that he could
no longer employ her, because he wanted to
marry her. They wed on December 30, 1960,
had four children and remained married until
Mrs. Poston’s death in 1992. Mrs. Poston
became social secretary to the White House
in the Carter administration, leading Mr.
Poston to marvel at the arc of his life from its
modest beginning to attending White House
functions.
Besides his family, he loved baseball and
tennis. He could recall in vivid detail attending his first Washington Senators game with
his father in 1934 and seeing Hank Greenberg
hit a homerun. He took up tennis in the 1950s
and played for years at the Washington
Hilton tennis club on Connecticut Avenue. In
1974 he purchased a property on Fessenden
Street NW and built a clay court in the back.
He then formed a club with fellow tennis
enthusiasts. Mr Poston played regularly until
he was 88.
He is survived by his four children, Jeffrey
(Cathy) of Bethesda Md, Carol Crisco of
Jacksonville Florida, Ramsey of Washington
DC, Katharene Snavely (Geoff) of Annapolis
Maryland and seven loving grandchildren,
William Poston, Gretchen Poston, Jack Poston, Alexandra Snavely, Ella Snavely, Max
Crisco and Ava Poston. In lieu of flowers,
the family requests that donations be made
in Mr. Poston’s name to the Washington
Nationals Youth Baseball Academy or the
Chesapeake Bay Foundation.
A memorial service will be held at St. Ann’s
Roman Catholic Church on Friday, October
27, 2017. Visitation at 9:30 a.m. Mass at 10
a.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
McARTOR
RUDDEN
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
TATE
HODGKINS
LYNN
THOMPSON
On Tuesday, October 17, 2017,
of Silver Spring, MD. Beloved husband of Jean Tate; father of Allen
Tate, Jr. (Theresa), Gail Erickson
(Ken), David Tate (Stephanie
Everett), Vivian Czajkowski (John),
Janice Zephir (David) and Keith
Tate (Karen). Also survived by 13 grandchildren, 15 great grandchildren, and one greatgreat grandchild. Relatives and friends may call
at Chapel at Riderwood Village, 3110 Gracefield
Road, Silver Spring, MD, on Friday, October 20,
from 12 to 1 p.m.; where the Funeral Service
will follow at 1 p.m. Interment Glen Haven
Memorial Park. Memorial contributions may
be made to Riderwood Benevolent Care Fund,
3110 Gracefield Road, Silver Spring, MD 20904.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
Died at Brookshire Nursing Home in Hillsborough, NC on Friday, October 13, 2017.
Jean was predeceased by her parents and
husband of 69 years, Robert C. McArtor.
Survivors are her children, Susan Bellinger
(Dwight) and Curt McArtor (Natalie); granddaughters, Samantha Bellinger-Cocuzza (Carl)
and Gwen Bellinger; and sister, Joyce Norton;
Visitation, 4 to 8 p.m., on Friday, October
20, service, 11 a.m., on Saturday, October
21 at Everly-Wheatley Funeral Home, 1500
W. Braddock Rd., Alexandria, VA. Interment
following at Mt. Comfort Cemetery. Memorials
may be made to Hospice or the charity of your
choice.
PENNESTRI
ELIZABETH ANN WILLIAMS PENNESTRI
PIZZA
ALLEN B. RUDDEN
Passed away on September 21, 2017. Born in
Washington, DC and moved to Largo, Florida
from Olney, Maryland in 1989. Honorably discharged from the Army in 1959. Worked 30
plus years in DC, Maryland and Virginia areas
as a buyer and general manager in the furniture
and bedding industry. Served six years on the
board of directors for the Palm Hill Country
Club Association. An avid tennis player and
loved sports. Survived by brother, Larry Rudden
of Columbia, MD; sister, Sharon Kaufman of
Brookeville, MD; daughter, Karen Wilkins of
Clovis, CA; stepdaughters, Luanne Owen of
Herndon, VA, and Terri Rothwell of Falls
Church, VA; six grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. Private graveside service. Donations may be made to Suncoast Hospice, 5771
Roosevelt Blvd., Clearwater, FL 32760.
STEPHEN W. F. HODGKINS
(Age 61)
TOMASSONI
Passed away on Tuesday, September 26,
2017 at Doctors Hospital at Renaissance
in Edinburg, Texas. Stephen was born in
Rockville Centre, New York on March 9,
1956, to Claire and Wendell Hodgkins. He
grew up in Kensington, Maryland, graduated from St. John’s College High School
in 1974, and received a bachelor’s degree
from the University of Maryland. At an early
age, Stephen’s desire was to work in the
oil and gas industry. To that end, in 1986,
Stephen enrolled in the University of Texas
and received his Masters of Science in
Geology. He worked as a Landman in Texas
for almost 30 years.
He is survived by his parents, two sisters,
Yvonne and Lisa (Richard); a brother, Gerald
(Marissa); three nephews and two nieces;
many other relatives and friends.
JEAN MARIE PIZZA (Age 85)
On Monday, October 16, 2017 of Cheverly,
MD, formerly of Salisbury, MD. Beloved wife
of the late Lawrence "Hank" Pizza; loving
mother of Lawrence, Jr. (Irene), Timothy
(Robbin), Gary (Kathy), Jeannie Pizza, Anita
(Richard) Walburn, and Elizabeth Ann
Wincek; cherished grandmother of Christina, Stephanie, Kelly, Timothy, Jr. (Carolyn),
Tanner, Karly Pizza, Angela (John) Shipp,
Jennifer (Jesse) Smith, Russell (Krista)
Ziebell, Richard (Logan), Justin Walburn,
Amber, Madison and Hayley Wincek; and
great-grandmother of seven. Friends may
call at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, 3107
63rd Place, Cheverly, MD on Friday, October
20 from 1 to 4 and 6 to 9 p.m., where a Mass
will be offered on Saturday, October 21 at
9:30 a.m. Interment Meadowridge Memorial Park. Memorial contributions may be
made in her name to the Alzheimer's Association, National Capital Area, 3701 Pender
Drive, Suite 400, Fairfax, VA 22030 or to
the American Heart Association, 4217 Park
Place Court, Glen Allen, VA 23066.
www.gaschs.com
ROACH
BERNARD ROACH
The Washington DC Boxing Hall of
Fame members regret the passing of
inductee Bernard Roach.
Ken Sprouse, President
Bobby Magruder, Treasurer
RUTT
MARYANN (Meyers) RUTT (Age 88)
Peacefully on October 11, 2017 in Luray, VA.
She was married to the late Herbert P. Rutt. Surviving by sons, James Patrick (Celia) Rutt, John
(Tina) Rutt and Robert Paul (Terri) Rutt; three
sisters, three grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Service were private.
STONE
FLORENCE RUTH CHADDER STONE
(Age 100)
Formerly of Takoma Park, MD. Died on
Wednesday, October 11, 2017. Born in
Peabody, MA, to British parents, John and
Edith Chadder. She was predeceased by
her husband, Francis. Florence is survived
by her children, David, Richard and Susan
(Robert); and grandchildren, Kelley (Jenn)
and Leo Spada. Memorial services will
be held on Wednesday, October 25 at
11 a.m., at the Guild Chapel at Asbury
Methodist Village, 211 Russell Avenue,
Gaithersburg, MD. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to
Silver Spring United Methodist Women,
8900 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring, MD
20910.
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
McCHESNEY
Fred had a distinguished professional life
which began with the practice of law at a
large firm in Washington, DC. He went on to
serve as the Associate Director for Policy and
Evaluation at the Federal Trade Commission
during the Reagan administration. The bulk
of his substantial career, spanning 35 years,
was as a professor of both law and economics at numerous universities, including
Northwestern where he was the James B.
Haddad Chair from 1999 to 2011, Cornell
from 1997 to 1999, Emory from 1983 to
1997, and, most recently, the University of
Miami School of Law where he was the de
la Cruz-Mentschikoff Endowed Chair in Law
and Economics.
FRED SANDERSON McCHESNEY
(Age 68)
On Thursday, October
12, 2017 Fred Sanderson McChesney died
peacefully with family at
his side, in Washington,
DC. Beloved husband of
the late Sheila Elaine McChesney; loving
father of Madeleine Claire (Eduardo Patricio
Wisbrun), Mary Elizabeth (“Lizzy”), Robert
William, IV (Kristina Igorevna) and James
Edward; and grandfather of Thomas Daniel
and Nicolas Matthew Wisbrun.
Fred was born in Washington, DC, on November 19, 1948, the son of Robert William
McChesney, Jr. and the late Louise Sanderson
McChesney, and was raised in Montgomery
County, Maryland. He attended Our Lady
of Lourdes School in Bethesda, MD and
Holy Redeemer School in Kensington, MD
graduated from Our Lady of Good Counsel
High School in 1966 and the College of the
Holy Cross in 1970. Fred went on to earn his
J.D. from the University of Miami in 1978 and
his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of
Virginia in 1982.
Fred was the eldest of seven children and
was adored by his surviving siblings, Robert
William, III, S.J., Michael Joseph, William David
(Annie), Kathleen Marie (Brian Alpert), Marie
Louise (“Weed”) Forte (Greg) and Mary Woodchek (Eric). He was loved and admired by his
13 nieces and nephews.
A master storyteller, Fred drew from vast
life experiences to provide his material. He
was a world traveler with an ever-curious
intellect, a voracious reader, an avid baseball
fan, a music lover with encyclopedic knowledge of music of the 1950's and 1960's.
(His daughter Lizzy, a professional musician
known as Lissy Trullie, cites early memories
of spending hours listening to the “oldies”
with her dad as a source of inspiration). He
entertained, amused and delighted his family
at their frequent gatherings. He was a giant
personality and filled every room he entered.
Fred had a gregarious nature and was cherished by his many friends and colleagues.
His educational and professional endeavors
took him around the country and abroad. He
had a special love for France and was fluent
in French and German. Fred made lifelong,
loyal friends everywhere he went.
ELBA IRIS CACHO TOMASSONI
February 5, 1944 - October 11, 2017
She is survived by her husband, Carlos
Tomassoni; daughters, Marlys Tomassoni
Nylund, Ingrid Tomassoni and Lizanne
Tomassoni Heatherly; and four grandchildren.
Fred is perhaps best known for his groundbreaking work in the field of public choice
economics. Public choice economics, recognized with a Nobel Prize in economics
for one of its founders in 1986, argues that
political actors behave according to private
incentives instead of the public good. Fred
extended the literature in his 1997 Harvard
Press book, Money for Nothing: Politicians,
Rent Extraction and Political Extortion, arguing that politicians receive contributions and
other rewards not only for acting, but also for
threatening to act, and then not executing
on those threats. Hence the title of the
book. In the 1995 University of Chicago
Press Book, Causes and Consequences of
Antitrust: The Public Choice Perspective,
which Professor McChesney both edited and
contributed to, he used public-choice theory
to critique claims that antitrust laws serve
the public good and are thus vulnerable to
special interest groups like other laws.
He also wrote extensively on the importance
of providing rights to property, noting that
the failure to provide such rights historically
to Native Americans has been a significant
cause of their economic plight. His 2003
Princeton University press book, Property
Rights: Cooperation, Conflict and Law, is
an important contribution to property rights
literature.
Professor McChesney was noted for his
excellent teaching, received multiple awards
for his excellence in the classroom, and was
a mentor to many students during his long
academic career.
Visitation will be held Friday, November 10
from 4 to 7:30 p.m., at Holy Redeemer
Catholic Church, 9705 Summit Avenue, Kensington, MD 20895. There will be a Mass of
Christian Burial at Holy Redeemer Church on
Saturday November 11 at 10 a.m. Burial
arrangements are private.
Sadly, Gretchen was predeceased by her only
sibling, Sonya. Left to mourn and cherish her
memory are her devoted husband, Gary;
her loving son, Kimani; her aunt, Phyllis
Fauntleroy; her first cousins, Robert (Robin)
Harlan, Phylicia Fauntleroy Bowman,
Stephanye Fauntleroy, Jacqueline (Jiffy)
Fauntleroy Barber, John Fauntleroy, Robert
Plummer, Jr. and Fred Fauntleroy; her sistersand brothers-in-law, James Simpkins, Kumea
Shorter-Gooden and Winston Gooden, and
Wendy and Robert Edwards; and many other
family members, friends and colleagues.
Services will be held on October 21 at 11 a.m.
(with a viewing at 10 a.m.) at Northeastern
Presbyterian Church, 2112 Varnum St., N.E.,
Washington, DC 20018. In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that donations be made to
the Equal Justice Initiative, 122 Commerce
Street, Montgomery, Alabama 36104; or go
to eji.org.
WIYGUL
MANNING
JONES
TONELSON
SUE WIYGUL
NATHAN TONELSON (Age 82)
Of Potomac, MD on Tuesday,
October 17, 2017. Beloved
husband of the late Marilyn;
devoted father of Jed (Laura),
David (Mary) and Felice (Jim)
Weber; cherished grandfather
Danny,
of
Elise,
Matthew, Stephen, Ethan,
Jason; and loving brother of Helene Burte.
Funeral services Thursday October 19, 2017
at 12 p.m., at Temple Beth Ami, Rockville,
MD, with interment to follow at Garden of
Remembrance, Clarksburg, MD. The family
will be sitting Shiva at the home of Felice
and Jim Weber on Thursday, October 19,
2017 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Donations in his
memory can be made to the Alzheimer's
Association.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
DEATH NOTICE
BEULAH M. MANNING
NORRIS E. JONES, SR.
Entered into eternal rest on Monday, October
9, 2017. He is survived by his wife, Elvira
Lopez; three daughters, Tawanda Jones, Roxie
Jefferson and Nicole Pennington; son, Norris
E. Jones Jr.; 12 grandchildren; seven greatgrandchildren and a host of other relatives and
friends. Mr. Jones will lie in state at Pilgrim AME
Church, 612 17th St. NE. on Friday, October 20
from 10 a.m. until service 11 a.m. Interment
Harmony memorial Park.
www.stewartfuneralhome.com
Passed on October 12, 2017. Funeral services
will be held on Saturday, October 21 at United
House of Prayer For All People, wake, 9 a.m.;
followed by service, 10 a.m. Interment to follow
Lincoln Cemetery, Suitland, MD. Inquiries
directed to Howell Funeral Home, 10220 Guildford Rd., Jessup, MD 20794, 301-604-0101
Much loved matriarch of our family and our
business, Wiygul Automotive Clinic, passed
away Sunday, October 15, 2017. She is survived by her sons, Oscar and Bill; daughter,
Elizabeth McLaughlin, along with their families
of 10 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. She is preceded in death by her beloved
husband, Oscar Sr., and her eldest daughter,
Suzanne Crawley.
A celebration of life will be held at 7 p.m., on
Wednesday, October 18, at Fairfax Memorial
Funeral Home, 9902 Braddock Rd. Fairfax, VA
22032. In lieu of flowers, the Wiygul family
suggest memorial contributions be made to
ALIVE! ALexandrians InVolved Ecumenically!
www.fmfh.com
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JOHN C. NEAL
ELAINE ANN AHERN (Age 70)
Of Manassas, VA, passed away peacefully, with
her family at her side, on Friday, October 13,
2017, at Walter Reed National Military Medical
Center. She is survived by her loving husband,
Michael F. Ahern, COL USA (Ret.); sons, Sean D.
Ahern (Jennifer) and Kevin C. Ahern (Alison); six
grandchildren, Christopher, Michael, Jonathan,
Daniel, Eden and Levi; mother, Ann R. Jack; and
one sister, Rosann Vitti. She was preceded in
death by her father, Frank Jack; and brother,
Robert Jack. Elaine was born and raised in
Cleveland, OH. A devoted mother and Army
wife, Elaine raised her family in numerous
locations in the United States and overseas. An
inveterate volunteer, she also worked with the
Army Community Service. After her sons were
grown, she worked for 15 years as receptionist
for Interstate Van Lines in Springfield, VA.
During retirement, Elaine was an active member and instructor of the Lifelong Learning
Institute of Manassas, VA. The family will
receive friends at Pierce Funeral Home and
Cremation Services, 9609 Center Street, Manassas, VA on Friday, October 20, 2017 from
7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be
celebrated on Saturday, October 21, 2017 at
10:30 a.m., at Sacred Heart Catholic Church,
12975 Purcell Road, Manassas, VA 20112.
Interment at a later date in Arlington National
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers the family suggest
that memorial contributions be made to
Catholic Charities of the Arlington Diocese(http://ccda.net).
Dr. CHRISTOPHER SUN FOOK LOW
Departed this life on Friday, June 3, 2017.
He is survived by his wife, Patricia Ann
Gowland; his sister, Susan Low Mihelick; his
sister-in-law, Beth Richardson, one niece
and one nephew and four great nieces and
nephews.
He was a resident of Alexandria for 26
years. During that period he was a Patent
Examiner and later a Supervisory Patent
Examiner. After his retirement in 2010,
he applied for and received a Registered
Patent Agent license. He frequently helped
other Patent Examiners formulate responses to issues that were raised. He truly
enjoyed the challenge of the patent
process. Christopher was also active in
his Condominium Association and Mount
Vernon Counsel of Citizens’ Associations.
There will be a memorial service for Christopher at 1 p.m. on Friday, October 20, 2017 at
Goodwin House Bailey’s Crossroads, 3440
S. Jefferson St., Falls Church, VA. Dr. Low’s
remains will be interned at the Hawaiian
Memorial Park, Kaneohe, HI in 2018, after
services in Honolulu. No flowers please, In
lieu of them, please donate to the Christopher Low Endowed Scholarship Fund for
Natural Sciences at the University of Hawaii
Foundation, 2444 Dole St, Bachman Hall
105, Honolulu, HI 96822.
WICKLINE
Please view and sign the family's online
guestbook at
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
But of all of her interests and passions, what
was most important to Gretchen was being
the wife of Gary and the mother of Kimani.
She married Gary Shorter on August 12, 1978
and enjoyed 39 years with the “love of her
life.” Their son Kimani Shorter, born in 1980,
was Gretchen’s proudest accomplishment.
She approached motherhood with much
dedication and relished every milestone in
Kimani’s life.
SAMUEL NATHANIEL THOMPSON
(Age 69)
Passed away suddenly on October 15, 2017.
Brother of Fay Frances and Veronica (Rose);
father of Leslie and Tressa; three grandsons
Dexter, William and Sean. Also survived by
loving aunts, Doris Roberson, Ann Stith (Pompey) and Valeria Thompson; cousins and
friends. On Friday, October 20, 2017, friends
may visit with the family, 10 a.m. until service
time at 11 a.m. at Shiloh Baptist Church,
9th and P Sts., NW, Washington, DC. Rev.
Dr. Wallace Charles Smith, Pastor. Interment
Maryland National Memorial Park, Laurel, MD.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made
to the current relief efforts underway in
Puerto Rico via Save the Children Relief
Fund.
In lieu in flowers, donations may be made
to the University of Miami School of Law in
memory of Fred S. McChesney, 1311 Miller
Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146.
Gretchen’s commitment to the community
was further evidenced by her service on
the Washington, DC Board of Directors of
Reading is Fundamental (RIF) and on the
Board of Directors of Wings for Joy in Montgomery County.
Gretchen was also an entrepreneur, a gifted
artist and a writer. As a young adult, she
bought, repaired, and sold Volkswagens.
Later she and her husband Gary acquired
rental properties that Gretchen actively managed. She was an award-winning photographer who specialized in outdoor scenes
and still lifes. She was also a prize-winning,
published author. In 2004, the Washington
Writers’ Publishing House selected her novel
Can’t Remember Playing, the story of a
mixed-race slave who fought in the Revolutionary War, as the winner of their fiction
writing competition.
KUNIKO TOBARI LYNN
Passed away peacefully, surrounded by her
family, on April 18, 2017, at Arlington’s Virginia
Hospital Center.
Born February 27, 1934, Kuniko grew up in
Tokyo, Japan, the daughter of Masatane and
Shigeo Tobari. She met her husband, the late
James C. Lynn, in Tokyo and they were married
in 1958. They lived primarily between Tokyo
and Fairfax, VA for 20 years, before settling in
Fairfax in 1978 and then Arlington, VA in 2004.
Kuniko worked at Garfinckel’s and Michael
Round in Springfield, VA, in the 80’s and 90’s.
She had many hobbies, including Ikebana,
French embroidery, ballroom dancing, Japanese and Hawaiian dancing, making handmade
purses and pillows and taking care of her
flowers and garden. She was also a proud
member of the Tokyo Wives Club in Washington, DC.
Kuniko is survived by her two sons, Peter R.
Lynn and James A. Lynn, both of Arlington,
VA; as well as her sister, Yasuko Hatano, and
brother, Hirohike Tobari, of Japan.
A memorial service will take place at 3 p.m., on
Wednesday, October 18 at the Old Post Chapel,
Ft Myer, VA, followed by interment at the
Columbarium at Arlington National Cemetery.
Professor McChesney’s primary teaching
and scholarly interests were in the fields
of antitrust, corporations, and law and economics, about which he wrote over one
hundred books, articles, monographs, and
other scholarly works published by leading
academic presses and journals.
Gretchen, the family genealogist, discovered
the early 1900s diary of Roy Plummer, her
uncle’s uncle, which detailed his experiences
as a soldier serving in the U.S. Army in
France during World War I. She donated the
diary to the National Museum of African
American History and Culture where curators described it as a very rare find. Gretchen
was active in the efforts to re-establish the
celebration of DC’s Emancipation Day, and
she published an online database of the
3,100 enslaved District residents who were
emancipated on April 16, 1862.
Passed away unexpectedly on the morning
of October 6, 2017. A native Washingtonian
and the oldest child of Aneita and Bertrand
Roberts, Gretchen earned a B.A. degree in
art from Howard University and an M.Ed.
degree in special education from George
Washington University. For more than 30
years, she was a highly dedicated and committed art and special education teacher in
the DC Public Schools, serving at Seaton and
Thompson Elementary Schools and Sharpe
Health School. For several years Gretchen
served as a monitor and administrator,
assessing the efficacy of educational programs for special needs students.
A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at Holy
Redeemer Catholic Church, 9705 Summit
Avenue, Kensington, Maryland on October
21, 2017 at 2 p.m. Interment will be at
Ledgelawn Cemetery in Bar Harbor, Maine,
at a later date.
Services will be held at Fairfax Memorial
Funeral Home, 9902 Braddock Rd., Fairfax,
VA 22032 on Friday, October 20, 2017 from
5 to 8 p.m.
ROBERTS-SHORTER
GRETCHEN ROBERTS-SHORTER
B7
RE
ALLEN WESLEY TATE, SR. (Age 89)
JEAN DAVIS McARTOR (Age 88)
On Sunday October 15, 2017, Betty, of Adelphi,
MD passed away at Friends House in Sandy
Springs, MD. Betty will join her dearly departed
husband, Dominick, as well as her two wonderful sons, Steven and James who were both
taken early. Visiting will be at the Roy W.
Barber Funeral Home, 21525 Laytonsville Rd.,
Laytonsville, MD, 20882, on Thursday October
the 19 from 10 to 11 a.m., with the funeral
service to follow. A gathering will follow at
niece Liz's home. A graveside service will be on
Friday, October 20, at 11 a.m. at Fort Lincoln
Cemetery, 3401 Bladensburg Rd, Brentwood,
MD 20722.
EZ
LEE E. WICKLINE (Age 91)
Educator
Dr. Lee Edwin Wickline of Bowie, MD, died
on Tuesday, October 3, 2017 of congestive
heart failure at Hospice of the Chesapeake’s
Mandrin House in Harwood, MD. Born on
July 17, 1926 in Assurance, WV, he was the
eldest child of Walden Emmett Wickline and
Anna May (Miller) Wickline. A graduate of
Greenville High School, he enlisted in the
United States Navy during World War II at age
17, serving in part on the aircraft carrier USS
Princeton, CV-37.
The G.I. bill made it possible for Lee to
enroll at Berea College in Kentucky where he
graduated in 1949. While at Berea he met
and married Carolyn Ethel (Clifford) Wickline,
his beloved wife of 69 years. He received his
teacher’s certification from Concord College
in Athens, WV, in 1950 and spent the next
several years teaching high school science,
mathematics and physics at Tallulah Falls
School in Georgia, and Brookhaven High
School in Mississippi. He earned his master’s
degree at West Virginia University in 1954
before returning home to teach at Union
High School in Monroe County, WV, and
then Allentown High School in Pennsylvania
in 1958. He received his doctorate degree
at Penn State University in 1964 and was
awarded a fellowship to attend the Woodrow
Wilson School of Public and International
Affairs in 1969.
Prompted by the Soviet Union’s launch of
Sputnik, President Dwight D. Eisenhower
signed the National Defense Education Act
in 1958, which provided federal funding of
higher education to promote and improve
the teaching of science, mathematics, and
foreign languages. As part of this nationwide
initiative, Dr. Wickline worked as a state
science specialist for the West Virginia
Department of Education in Charleston and
then the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare in Washington, DC. Among
his many achievements at HEW was the
creation of the National Diffusion Network in
1974, which he directed for 16 years. The
NDN developed a system for schools to learn
about exemplary and innovative education
programs that were federally funded and
enabled schools to add them to their curriculum. In 1975 he served as Director of the
Office of Education Refugee Assistance Task
Force establishing education programs for
Cambodian and Vietnamese war refugees.
Accepting an invitation from the Soviet
government, Lee and his wife visited
Moscow in the summer of 1989 to discuss
education programs to benefit Russian
school children. After more than 30 years
of service at HEW and the U.S. Department
of Education, he retired in 1992 to Talbot
County on Maryland’s Eastern Shore until
returning to Bowie, MD in October 2016.
Lee was a lifelong student, avid reader, and
storyteller whose hobbies included 65 years
as an amateur radio operator and a Morse
code, electronics and radio theory instructor.
He was also an accomplished and competitive sailor, racing up and down the Chesapeake Bay in his Santana 21 and later a
Catalina 27, “Cool Breeze.” He served as
commodore of the Maryland Capital Yacht
Club in 1989.
In addition to his wife, Carolyn, Lee is survived by his two sons, John Wickline of
Dunkirk, MD and James Wickline (Jennifer,
née Elderkin) of Maungatapere, New
Zealand; three grandchildren, Hunter, Kate
and Sage; brother, Wade Wickline (Glenna);
and sisters, Edna Mikesell and Roxie Wickline. Among his many special friends are
Ce Harrison-Wickline, Shoby Maranto and a
host of cousins, nieces and nephews. He was
predeceased by his sister, Anna Harris.
A memorial service will be held at a future
date to be announced. The family suggests
that memorial donations be made to Berea
College - Lee E. Wickline Scholarship, Berea
College Alumni Relations, CPO 2203, Berea,
KY 40404 (www.berea.edu/give).
When the need arises, let families find you in
the Funeral Services Directory.
To be seen in the Funeral Services Directory,
please call paid Death Notices at 202-334-4122.
Peacefully transitioned while in home hospice
on Sunday October 8, 2017. He leaves his wife
of 70 years, Eddie Lee Neal; three daughters,
Gwen Ann Chase, Sherry Randolph and Carolyn
Wilson; and one son, John. His son, Gregory
preceded him in death.
Viewing will be held at 10 a.m., followed by
funeral service at 11 a.m. on Thursday, October
19 at From the Heart Church Ministries, 4949
Allentown Road, Suitland, MD 20746.
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TARA BOYLE ROCHE
Of Silver Spring, MD on Sunday,
October 15, 2017. Beloved wife
of Thomas E. Roche; mother of
Thomas M. Roche, Tierney K.
Roche, Tristan C. Roche and Timothy J. Roche; daughter of Agnes
Boyle and the late Patrick Boyle;
sister of Gavin P. Boyle, Kelleen B.
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B8
EZ
. WEDNESDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
The Weather
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Frosty morning, then beautiful
Coming off a frosty start in spots,
this one looks rather beautiful. It’s a
classic “Nice Day” around here with
temperatures rising to near 70 as
skies remain mostly clear. A light
wind turns to come out of the south with time.
Tonight, calm winds make evening readings in
the 60s pleasant. Clear skies offer good
stargazing for those away from the city glare.
Lows range through the 40s.
Today
Sunny
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Thursday
Mostly sunny
Friday
Mostly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Saturday
Mostly sunny
Sunday
Partly sunny
Monday
Rain possible
71° 47
73° 54
75° 51
75° 55
76° 59
77° 62
FEELS*: 72°
FEELS: 74°
FEELS: 75°
FEELS: 77°
FEELS: 76°
FEELS: 74°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
P: 0%
P: 0%
P: 5%
P: 10%
P: 30%
WIND: SW 4–8 mph
W: SSW 6–12 mph
W: NW 6–12 mph
W: ESE 4–8 mph
W: S 7–14 mph
W: S 8–16 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
70/42
Hagerstown
70/42
Sa
Normal
Philadelphia
71/51
Record high
Record low
Norfolk
68/51
Th
F
Sa
Su
Virginia Beach
68/54
Dominant cause: Particulates
F
63° 2:42 p.m.
38° 6:11 a.m.
66°/45°
90° 1938
33° 1982
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
Normal
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
0.83"
1.87"
31.91"
31.99"
0.00"
1.48"
1.78"
36.23"
33.70"
0.00"
1.42"
1.86"
33.61"
33.74"
Moon Phases
Solar system
4 out of 11+
Atlantic beaches: Today, sunny. High 65–69. Wind
northeast 4–8 mph. Tonight, clear. Low 46–51. Wind
southwest 3–6 mph. Thursday, mostly sunny. High 70–74.
Wind south–southwest 4–8 mph. Friday, sunny. High 71–75.
Wind northwest 6–12 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, sunny. Wind southwest 4–8
knots. Waves a foot or less. Visibility unrestricted. • Lower Potomac
and Chesapeake Bay: Today, sunny. Wind west 4–8 knots. Waves
a foot or less on the lower Potomac, 1–2 feet on the Chesapeake.
Visibility good.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls will be
around 3.0 feet, falling to 2.9 feet Thursday. Flood stage at Little
Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
2:16 a.m.
7:37 a.m.
2:36 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
4:46 a.m.
10:58 a.m.
5:19 p.m.
11:24 p.m.
12:57 a.m.
7:02 a.m.
1:21 p.m.
7:22 p.m.
2:52 a.m.
9:10 a.m.
3:20 p.m.
9:31 p.m.
12:41 a.m.
7:09 a.m.
1:13 p.m.
7:42 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
World
High: Kanyemba, Zimbabwe 111°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –41°
Yesterday's National
High: Palm Springs, CA 99°
Low: Lake George, CO 14°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
70/44/s
78/52/pc
37/27/s
70/49/s
82/56/s
70/44/s
68/50/pc
74/50/s
62/36/pc
73/48/pc
69/53/s
67/52/s
68/51/s
75/57/s
74/44/s
70/42/s
74/39/s
70/51/s
69/47/s
72/50/s
83/58/s
76/43/s
Tomorrow
72/47/s
75/52/pc
35/20/s
74/50/s
82/65/pc
72/49/s
76/51/s
77/50/s
76/44/s
74/44/pc
71/55/s
67/47/s
72/48/pc
81/56/s
74/46/s
75/45/s
74/46/s
71/51/s
72/49/s
72/49/s
83/64/pc
75/48/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
74/46/s
68/50/s
86/63/pc
31/12/sn
65/37/pc
72/46/s
87/77/pc
83/62/s
70/50/s
79/48/s
79/65/pc
73/49/s
84/61/s
77/49/s
86/64/s
72/50/s
76/52/s
86/75/pc
69/50/s
70/42/s
74/46/s
80/63/s
72/55/s
68/51/s
74/56/s
71/45/s
87/61/pc
24/8/pc
70/53/s
74/48/s
86/76/pc
85/65/pc
72/51/s
81/53/s
81/67/pc
77/57/s
88/62/s
81/51/s
78/63/pc
75/50/s
79/54/s
89/78/t
68/52/s
70/55/s
76/45/s
83/68/s
72/55/s
74/56/s
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
78/53/s
76/44/pc
82/70/pc
71/51/s
96/70/pc
68/45/s
68/47/s
64/52/r
72/49/s
69/45/s
79/44/pc
68/41/s
82/51/pc
74/54/s
87/79/sh
71/47/s
79/66/s
68/54/pc
86/78/t
60/51/r
55/48/r
70/47/s
86/72/pc
77/50/s
79/60/pc
77/56/s
85/71/pc
73/54/s
96/68/s
70/49/s
71/48/s
57/46/r
72/52/s
75/47/s
68/44/pc
73/48/s
69/51/c
78/54/s
88/78/s
76/51/s
75/66/pc
66/55/c
88/79/s
57/46/r
52/41/sh
72/46/s
89/73/pc
79/58/pc
Oct 19
New
Oct 27
First
Quarter
Nov 4
Full
Nov 10
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Today
Addis Ababa
75/53/pc
Amsterdam
65/53/pc
Athens
79/60/pc
Auckland
63/48/pc
Baghdad
89/57/s
Bangkok
86/75/t
Beijing
58/48/c
Berlin
67/49/pc
Bogota
70/47/pc
Brussels
69/52/pc
Buenos Aires
79/54/t
Cairo
87/68/s
Caracas
78/68/pc
Copenhagen
58/50/pc
Dakar
89/81/s
Dublin
55/52/sh
Edinburgh
54/49/sh
Frankfurt
66/46/pc
Geneva
67/47/pc
Ham., Bermuda 80/75/r
Helsinki
50/35/c
Ho Chi Minh City 85/75/t
Tomorrow
72/53/pc
68/55/sh
77/59/s
63/56/s
89/58/s
89/77/pc
66/49/pc
65/50/pc
69/48/pc
70/55/sh
68/52/s
87/68/s
78/68/pc
56/52/r
91/80/s
57/48/r
60/49/sh
67/50/pc
69/49/sh
80/75/r
47/32/pc
89/75/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
86/72/pc
94/63/s
74/58/s
79/60/s
79/51/s
81/44/s
90/80/pc
89/79/t
86/77/c
68/60/pc
68/61/t
64/53/sh
61/45/t
89/76/t
74/54/pc
64/48/s
56/38/pc
91/78/pc
81/59/t
94/70/s
52/34/c
66/48/s
68/55/c
60/45/pc
86/73/c
93/64/s
72/57/s
81/59/s
86/55/pc
77/41/s
88/78/pc
85/78/t
85/76/t
68/60/pc
71/64/sh
64/52/r
67/49/sh
88/79/pc
74/55/pc
69/45/c
47/35/pc
92/78/pc
79/61/t
95/71/s
48/39/c
68/41/pc
69/55/sh
64/44/pc
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
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72/51/s
89/70/pc
72/46/s
73/41/pc
65/48/c
71/60/c
92/80/pc
51/35/c
74/64/pc
80/75/r
68/50/s
63/54/pc
69/50/s
69/46/pc
69/51/pc
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95/65/s
72/53/pc
88/71/pc
80/50/pc
71/40/s
71/48/pc
70/61/c
90/78/c
48/34/c
78/66/s
78/73/sh
69/52/s
61/58/r
69/43/pc
66/46/s
65/49/s
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
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quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
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5:58 a.m.
5:40 a.m.
5:01 a.m.
7:52 a.m.
12:04 p.m.
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WORLD
Now’s the time to
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g
Th
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
63° 3:26 p.m.
36° 6:30 a.m.
68°/43°
84° 2016
31° 1981
Normal
Total this year
UV: Moderate
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly sunny, warmer. High 56–60.
Wind southeast 3–6 mph. Tonight, clear. Low 33–42. Wind
light, variable. Thursday, mostly sunny. High 61–65. Wind
west 4–8 mph. Friday, sunny. High 61–65. Wind west–
southwest 4–8 mph.
g
W
64° 2:51 p.m.
46° 6:09 a.m.
68°/50°
86° 1938
33° 1893
Total this month
Air Quality: Good
Low
Low
Low
High
g
Tu
BWI
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 67°
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
g
M
Dulles
OCEAN: 69°
Pollen: Low
Point Lookout
W
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +6.7° yr. to date: +3.1°
OCEAN: 71°
Norfolk
Tu
Precipitation
Kitty Hawk
67/60
Ocean City
M
Reagan
OCEAN: 65°
Richmond
68/41
Annapolis
FORECAST
Ocean City
66/48
Lexington
69/39
Washington
ACTUAL
Cape May
66/50
Annapolis
68/46
Charlottesville
71/39
Today’s tides
Su
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Baltimore
70/44
Dover
70/45
Washington
71/47
RECORD
°
F
REGION
AVERAGE
LUXURY
SHINGLES
KLMNO
Style
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
RE
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
BOOK WORLD
CAROLYN HAX
KIDSPOST
A new book reveals the
secrets of the vice
president’s residence,
(dog) skeletons and all. C2
In Roddy Doyle’s “Smile,”
it’s a world, not a frown,
that’s turned upside down
by a molester. C3
They provide housing
and child care. Now the
son-in-law says they’re
“far too involved.” C9
The story behind the
Alaska state flag
and the 13-year-old
who designed it. C10
C
An early
glimpse at
Weinstein’s
mind-set
As credible
allegations
emerged over the
past few weeks of
Hollywood mogul
Harvey
Margaret
Weinstein’s sexual
Sullivan
assaults, some
observers
marveled to learn that it had
been going on since the early
1980s.
Weinstein, now 65, was only
30 then. How on earth could this
have been happening for so
long?
Well, make room, if you can
stomach it, for “Denny the
Hustler,” a character in a 1971
nightlife column in the
University of Buffalo student
newspaper, the Spectrum.
The column (“Patchworks”)
was written by Weinstein and
Corky Burger, his longtime
business partner in promoting
concerts and art-house films. It
featured a fictional character
who carefully sized up attractive
women in the bars of Buffalo
and made aggressive moves on
them.
“ ‘Denny the Hustler’ did not
take no for an answer,” said a
Feb. 22, 1971, article. (Weinstein’s
19th birthday would come the
next month.)
It went on: “His whole
approach employs a psychology
of command, or in layman’s
terms — ‘Look, baby, I’m
probably the best-looking and
most exciting person you’ll ever
want to meet — and if you refuse
to dance with me, I’ll probably
crack this bottle of Schmidts
over your skull.’ ”
And this: “Raw energy. Power.
She cannot refuse. Another
success for Denny the Hustler,
who underneath all is one of the
SULLIVAN CONTINUED ON C9
Changing views on harassment
A Washington Post-ABC poll finds
more Americans think harassment
is a “serious problem.” C9
HANS DEUTSCH/AMERICAN JEWISH JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE
A paradoxical paradise
T
A Caribbean island offered refuge for Jews fleeing
Nazi Germany, but was it an idyllic new home?
BY
E MILY C ODIK IN
SOSUA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
CRITIC’S NOTEBOOK
Michelin stars
feel like they
are light-years
from reality
BY
T OM S IETSEMA
Tuesday’s release of the second
Michelin Guide for Washington
prompts the question, at least for
those of us who love to eat in the
nation’s capital: Are the famously
anonymous inspectors dining in
the same market we are?
The list of starred restaurants
increased by only two this year
(yawn), for a total of 14. New to
the club: Komi, the ode to modern
Greek cooking from Johnny Monis in Dupont Circle, and Métier,
the fine-dining lair by Eric Ziebold near the convention center.
The restaurants, both helmed by
James Beard Award-winning
chefs, received one star, defined
by Michelin as “high-quality
cooking, worth a detour.”
Like last year, no local establishment garnered the French
guide’s highest honor of three
stars, which translates to “exceptional cuisine, worth a special
journey.”
As before, only three places
received two stars: Minibar by
José Andrés, Pineapple and
Pearls, and the Inn at Little Washington — the only venue outside
the city proper — were toasted for
their “excellent cuisine,” also
“worth a detour.”
And, in a sorry repeat of 2016,
some of the crown jewels in the
city were overlooked, starwise.
The head-scratching omissions
include Rasika in Penn Quarter,
NOTEBOOK CONTINUED ON C4
EMILY CODIK/THE WASHINGTON POST
The beach in Sosua, Dominican Republic, at top in the 1940s and
above in July. Washington Post reporter Emily Codik, whose family
was among the Jews who fled to the remote coastal town, found
that the memories of the settlers who grew up on the island are at
odds with some historical documents.
he night before Kristallnacht — the infamous
date in November 1938 when synagogues
burned across Germany and the Nazis arrested
tens of thousands of Jews — my father’s family
escaped from Berlin and fled to one of the few
places in the world willing to take in Jewish refugees.
They settled in Sosua, a remote beach town on the
northern coast of the Dominican Republic, whose dictator, Rafael Trujillo, had offered Jews safety for a promise
to develop the land.
This is the story I heard countless times. “It was
paradise,” my 89-year-old Aunt Hella would say, weaving
my family’s heritage into a little-known part of Holocaust
history.
But the story never entirely made sense.
As it was told to me, a small Caribbean country saved
my family at a time when more powerful nations such as
the United States and Britain refused to do the same. In
return, the Jews transformed a jungle coastline into a
peaceful settlement with a hospital and a school. My
grandfather, a salesman by trade, became the village
baker. Hundreds of others — accountants, nurses, tailors
— learned to ride horses and clear roads.
The story always ended the same way, and with little
explanation. Sosua had been ruined, I was told, its streets
overrun by prostitutes and foreigners. The town had
become a destination for sex tourism. My family moved
away, like so many others, and never returned.
My father lives in Santo Domingo, where I was raised,
and his parents and two sisters ended up in Miami.
People often act surprised when I tell them that I’m
SOSUA CONTINUED ON C6
ART REVIEW
After a makeover, Freer to be itself
BY
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Visitors to the renovated Freer Gallery will be able to relax in the
loggia areas of the courtyard, which are outfitted with WiFi.
P HILIP K ENNICOTT
The Freer Gallery of Art was
the Smithsonian’s first museum
devoted just to art, and it remains
among the most modest and
handsome buildings on the Mall.
Opened in 1923, it was a perfect
addition to the growing reorganization of the capital’s monumental core, a light-colored stone
building that recalled Renaissance architecture. The Detroit
industrialist who created the museum, Charles Lang Freer, said his
goal was to display work with
“the power to broaden aesthetic
culture and the grace to elevate
the human mind.”
After more than a year and a
half of renovation work, the Freer
reopened to the public over the
weekend, along with a raft of new
exhibitions at its partner institution, the subterranean Sackler
Gallery to which it is connected
by an underground tunnel. With
the director of the Freer/Sackler,
Julian Raby, set to retire early
next year, this project serves as a
summation of his tenure: sensible, accessible and stylish in a
low-key way.
The old Freer galleries are
looking handsome. New case
work and more thematic display
of material make the classical
galleries clustered around the
Freer’s central courtyard feel both
elegant and fresh. Historic images of these rooms show display
cases pushed up against the
walls. Now they are spread
throughout the rooms, and glowing with light. Each room takes
up a basic theme, or subject,
including Chinese jade, body image in Indian art and cultural
exchange between Islam and the
East. The galleries have been
ART REVIEW CONTINUED ON C2
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
“Of the United States?
Nah.”
— NBA great LeBron James,
with a casual response to a GQ
magazine writer’s question
about whether he’d ever want to
be president.
NICK WASS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chelsea Clinton goes
toe-to-toe with outlet
Snappy tweeter Chelsea Clinton — former
first daughter and heir apparent to the
Clinton legacy — covers a lot of ground on her
social-media timeline. She’s shared photos of
sad spinach pancakes and defended Sean
Spicer (yep), but there’s one topic she’s not
interested in at the moment: her mom’s toe.
Some background:
Former secretary of state
Hillary Clinton apparently
fell and broke her toe while
running down a flight of
stairs with a cup of coffee.
She’s on a book tour.
Things happen. Clinton
even showed up to a TV
Clinton
appearance with a boot on
her wounded right foot.
But the injury understandably delayed some
of her appearances. Her daughter Chelsea
doesn’t think this is newsworthy.
Responding to a Fox News Channel tweet
about her mother’s “derailed” book tour, the
younger Clinton offered up her candid
thoughts.
“Some perspective: Not worried about my
mom’s broken toe. I am worried about people
in Puerto Rico not having clean water, food or
power,” the vice chair of the Clinton
Foundation tweeted.
Clinton has been growing less shy about
offering rapid and cheeky responses to the
news since her mother’s presidential loss last
year.
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Vice presidents since Walter Mondale have lived at this house, which its residents say is more livable than the White House.
Veep background: Book reveals the residence’s secrets
D
espite its second-banana
status, the residence of the
vice president, a Queen Annestyle home on the grounds of the
Naval Observatory in Northwest
Washington, has seen its share of
drama and good times. It’s not as
old as the White House, of course —
the vice president didn’t have an
official home until 1975 — but
there’s still plenty of history there,
as chronicled in the new book
“Number One Observatory Circle,”
by Charles Denyer.
A few tidbits from the photoheavy coffee-table tome:
There are bodies buried
there . . . of pets, anyway. The
Mondales’ blind collie, Bonnie, and
Dave, the Cheneys’ Labrador, died
during their respective families’
tenures, and the deceased pups
were buried on the grounds.
And a conspiracy theory
surrounds it. So here’s a weird
“coincidence”: Satellite images of
the residence taken while Richard
B. Cheney was in office looked
“scrambled and quite blurry.” But
when he left and Joe Biden began
his tenure, the images “strangely
became much clearer,” the book
notes, leading some to conclude
that Cheney had somehow exercised
control over them. “Mere
coincidence, surely, but it only
added to the drama and mystique of
the Cheney vice presidency,” Denyer
writes. Surely.
Some guy named “Petro”
lives there. Even though Navy
stewards cook for the residents, the
Quayles and their three children
would occasionally order delivery
pizza. But the Veep couldn’t just use
his own name and have the pizza
dropped off on his doorstep, so the
family used the last name of Secret
Service agent Joe Petro and would
have the pie delivered to the guard
shack. Years later, Petro tells
Denyer, he ran into former vice
president Dan Quayle, who told him
that the family still used his name
as an alias when ordering pizza.
The Bushes served cheap
booze. The Bushes (H.W. and
family) entertained a ton (900
parties in their first five years
alone!), and while they always put
on a good spread, they didn’t go topshelf when it came to the hooch.
They ordered from Ace Beverage,
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
“preferring medium-priced alcohol,
never the expensive range — but
always a request for Stolichnaya
‘Stoli’ vodka.”
People prefer it to the White
House. Of course, nearly every VP
longs for that top job — but not
because of the home that comes
with it. Several of its residents have
said that they far prefer the home at
the Naval Observatory, which is
relatively secluded and surrounded
by private grounds, to the more
public White House, which is
constantly surrounded by tourists.
“It’s been said that both Biden and
[Obama] wholeheartedly agree that
as far as living arrangements go, the
vice president’s residence is ‘way
better than the White House,’ ”
Denyer writes.
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Renovated Freer Gallery reflects (and reflects on) its founder’s quirky vision
ART REVIEW FROM C1
painted different colors to reflect
the diverse range of Freer’s collecting interests. The American
rooms, full of paintings by Whistler and his contemporaries, are
now a kind of light purple or thin
eggplant color.
New works are on view (including a moody and abstract “red
cow” by Albert Pinkham Ryder),
and old works, including the beloved “Peacock Room,” are still
there (now featuring objects, including ceramics, likely to have
graced the room when it was
installed in Freer’s Detroit mansion). There is also better signage
and new wall text, sometimes
with a lighter and even cheeky
sense of humor.
But perhaps the most salient
change is how the Freer confronts
the problem of Freer, which for
modern visitors includes the curious range of his collection, from
ancient Egyptian statues to Cambodian temple sculpture, plus all
those watery American impressionist images by Whistler. The
general aesthetic sensibility of
Freer — for whom an interest in
Asian art grew out of his passion
for American painting — is now a
historical curiosity, and a bit confusing to audiences who expect
more consistency, categorical
clarity and chronological continuity in a museum.
So, the curators have done the
only thing they could do, short of
suppress and deny the problem.
They confront it head on, with
small exhibitions devoted to
Freer, an extended timeline that
charts the growth of this early
exercise in American museumbuilding, and a video wall (which
wasn’t working when this critic
visited) that is meant to gather
together the museum’s aesthetic
diversity into a meaningful
whole.
The biggest problem, of course,
is the question of beauty, whether
it is a category that crosses cultural lines, if it can encompass both
objects made for daily use on one
continent and those made for
spiritual practice on another.
And, even more problematic,
whether all of this can be gathered together, and then repurposed as a national civic institution meant to “broaden aesthetic
culture” and “elevate the human
mind.”
The Freer/Sackler isn’t new to
confronting this problem, and for
years the institution has mounted
compelling exhibitions that sidestep Freer’s broad-minded but
culturally determined aestheticism by keeping a tight focus on a
single subject, or explore the fash-
ionable idea of “connection” or
“exchange,” which avoids the idea
of universal standards of beauty
in favor of practical, material
interactions between cultures.
Among the new exhibitions
that opened, “Encountering the
Buddha” shows the museum staff
grappling successfully with these
core challenges. The exhibition
covers some 2,000 years of cultural and religious history, spread
across a vast and diverse expanse
of the globe, with myriad local
and regional permutations and
syncretic evolutions. For those
who are deeply familiar with the
history and religious practice of
Buddhism, this may seem a rather elementary introduction. But
better than many exhibits at the
museum in the past, “Encountering the Buddha” makes an almost
infinitely complicated subject
manageable to a literate, engaged
audience.
Four Buddha heads, from a
range of cultures and spanning
more than 1,500 years, open the
exhibition, allowing for general
comment on the depiction of the
enlightened teacher. But these
are all heads severed from larger
statues, and the curators use that
fact to insist on an essential idea:
“Broken Buddhas like these have
no religious use in Buddhist communities. In museums, however,
fragments are considered art, appreciated for their beauty and
historical importance.”
Another display includes a
4th-century bodhisattva sculpture from what is now Afghanistan to explore the sometimes-astonishing breadth of cultural exchange during the age. The
sculpted head has thick, wavy
hair and sensual lips, and recalls
ancient Greek images. Centuries
after Alexander the Great’s attempts to push his empire east,
this style remained in currency,
informing depictions of bodhisattvas — those who aspire to Buddhahood and seek to bring this
enlightenment to others.
The exhibition also features
video of religious practice at the
Great Stupas, giant domed temples in Sri Lanka, and a room that
recalls a Tibetan Buddhist shrine,
with dozens of objects arrayed in
a dizzying display of color and
texture, metalwork, tapestry, furniture and painted materials. A
touch screen outside the temple
space explains much of what is on
view.
One wonders what Freer might
make of all of this. He’d probably
find it a tad unpoetical, and even
jarring, and perhaps he’d balk at
the juxtaposition of an elegantly
made bronze Buddha from Thailand or Cambodia, crowned and
regal, with a small figure of a
rather sad and tattered bodhisattva from the 7th century. Neither
conforms to the usual expectations of how these figures would
be represented, and from a purely
visual point of view, they aren’t
happy in proximity. But the point
is deftly made: The Buddhist tradition is so rich and manifold that
for every rule there is an almost
inevitable exception.
If that is the only axiom
gleaned from a visit to this exhibition, then the visit wasn’t in
waste. But audiences will probably come away with a lot more,
and perhaps a more firm and
navigable mental map of the Buddhist world. The exhibition, like
other installations at the refurbished Freer, give one both a
sense of the world and permission to find it more than a little
confusing. That’s a good first step
for further exploration.
philip.kennicott@washpost.com
The Freer and Sackler Galleries
For more information about visiting
the reopened Freer/Sackler galleries,
visit freersackler.si.edu.
STANLEY J. STANISKI
A scene from the video “The Texture of Practice: Sri Lanka’s Great Stupa,” part of the Freer’s “Encountering the Buddha” exhibition.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
book world
Behind his
half-empty
glass lies
a trauma
BY
SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY
BY
A
usma Zehanat Khan’s latest, The
Bloodprint (Harper Voyager), pits
an order of women devoted to the
written word against a patriarchal
religion dominating the world. Arian is
one of the Companions of Hira, formed
to combat the one-eyed preacher and his
empire, the Talisman. The Taliban, I
mean the Talisman, has twisted local
legends and religion to persuade society
to turn on its women — banning them
from riding horses, reading and writing,
or showing their heads. If a woman
disobeys or is unsupervised by a man in
public, she is enslaved. The Talisman has
also destroyed books and banned
reading and writing, but our heroine
Arian is an “oralist” who recites what is
remembered from religious texts — to
magical ends. She is sent by the
secretive and manipulative leader of the
Companions to recover one such sacred
text, the Bloodprint, to liberate her
people. That’s a lot to follow, for sure,
but the book is nuanced in showing the
value of history and religion and the
damage willful ignorance can inflict.
And if it’s plot twists you’re after, “The
Bloodprint” has plenty of them — and
an exciting cliffhanger, too.
R ON C HARLES
We’ve got a couple of months to go, but
it’s safe to say that Roddy Doyle’s “Smile”
is the most bitterly ironic title of 2017.
Ha, ha, ha, indeed.
Doyle, who won the Booker Prize in
1993 for his portrayal of young Paddy
Clarke, is the Irish master of crumpled
hope — and no country provides stiffer
competition in that category.
His new novel offers a deceptively
languid plot laced with menace. Paced
more like a short story than a novel,
“Smile” creates contradictory feelings of
poignant stagnation and accelerating
descent.
The narrator, 54-year-old Victor
Forde, speaks with a kind of plaintive
congeniality that immediately scratches
your sympathies. “I stayed up at the bar a
few times,” he begins, “but I didn’t want
the barman thinking that I needed someone to talk to.”
Oh, Victor. You so need someone to
talk to.
But at the moment, we readers appear
to be Victor’s only friends. His marriage
to a beloved TV personality has collapsed. He has no contact with his son.
He’s living alone, unemployed, forcing
himself to go out each night and run
through the motions of having a favorite
local pub.
“I can’t have looked that bad — that
lonely, or sad. Or neglected,” he says,
which only confirms that he looks exactly
that bad — that lonely, and sad. And
neglected.
This is a performance few writers
could carry off: a novel constructed
entirely from bar stool chatter and scraps
of memory. But you can’t turn away. It’s
like watching a building collapse in slow
motion.
Victor just wants a collection of guys
he can drink with and swap cracks about
football — anything to avoid being asked,
“What are you up to these days?” But the
only man who takes an interest in him is
an offish fellow named Fitzgerald. They
were schoolmates some 40 years ago,
though Victor can’t remember him, and
he definitely doesn’t like him. Still, the
encounter sets him off on a cycle of
reminiscence that draws the novel into
Victor’s past.
Doyle has perfected a narrative technique that’s elliptical without feeling coy.
Victor’s stories arrive between beers, in
the natural tide of pub talk. His memories of falling in love, of discovering sex,
bounce off the page with that ebullient
joy that Doyle can somehow create in the
fog of despair. We learn just enough
about Victor’s early success as a music
critic to grasp what he lost, what glittery
promise he never fulfilled. For a time, he
enjoyed a reputation for glib provocation
— radio shows depended on him to fill
out the hour — but the big Irish novel
that he was long-rumored to be working
on never appeared. Victor and his infinitely patient wife maintained the fantasy of his productivity until there was
nothing left but cobwebs of disappointment and shame. Now, he laughs off
those years of writer’s block with a joke
T
ALLA DREYVITSER/THE WASHINGTON POST/IMAGE SOURCE: ISTOCK
about “The Shining,” but it’s an empty
gesture, a comic reflex with no mirth.
The cause of his failure, his long
exhalation of potential, becomes the
undertow of Victor’s confession, provoked for reasons he doesn’t entirely
understand by Fitzgerald’s persistent
questions about their school days.
Doyle draws adolescence with such
crisp empathy and humor that Victor’s
memories feel as real as photos of your
own childhood. His Catholic schooling
under the brothers is charged with excitement and the possibility of violence.
“I was often terrified and I laughed so
much I went blind,” he says. There’s the
threat of being struck by one of the
teachers or mocked by a fellow student
for some imperceptible difference. “The
wrong word, the wrong shirt, the wrong
band,” he notes, “could destroy you.”
When a French teacher says, “Victor
Forde, I can never resist your smile,”
Victor knows immediately, “I was
doomed.”
In a recent interview in Dublin, Doyle
revealed that he drew this incident from
SMILE
By Roddy Doyle
Viking. 224 pp. $25
real life. “It was a dreadful experience,”
he said, “this strange man at the front of
the classroom flirting — I suppose —
with me. It left me wondering what was
wrong with my smile.”
The horror remains, but decades of
tough journalism and brave memoirs
have drained much of the surprise from
tales of child molestation. No one picks
up a new novel involving Catholic education without bracing for the inevitable
arrival of some reptilian pedophile. That
expectation is even stronger in Doyle’s
native country. “The story of institutional abuse has become almost expected in
Ireland,” he said.
But still Doyle was determined to
write a novel that shocked.
The usual technique for inspiring that
reaction is to carve deeper into a new
limb of explicitness, as Gabriel Tallent
does in this year’s best-selling “My Absolute Darling.” But Doyle pushes his novel
into a strange place. The lone scene of
abuse in “Smile” is chilling but brief,
even mild. Years later, when Victor
speaks of that experience publicly, he
practically laughs it off and acknowledges that other students suffered much
worse.
But as the novel reaches its crescendo,
Doyle shatters the natural structure of
his narrative and manages to disorient
us despite our weary confidence that we
know the dimensions of the molestation
tale. It’s a daring move, an attempt to
trace the penumbra of abuse across a
shattered psyche. For one horrible moment, we get a sense of the victim’s
unspeakable confusion, the terror that
diverts a life and wrecks a mind.
M ADDIE C RUM
Everything you think you know about
ghosts — they’re translucent, they appear
in flashes, they speak in moans — is
mistaken. At least that’s what the amateur sleuth in David Wong’s new novel
believes, and he wants to set the record
straight.
Our collective, ghost-related mythology arose, Wong writes, from Victorianera portraits, which, due to long exposure times, featured blurred subjects.
Real ghosts, on the other hand, just look
like you and me. They lurk inside humanoid forms. “And no,” Wong says, “they
can’t be photographed.”
It’s the sort of cheeky factoid that
features heavily on the comedy site
Cracked.com, where Wong — pen name
of Jason Pargin — is an executive editor.
And it’s the sort of observation that fans
of his previous books, “John Dies at the
End” and “This Book Is Full of Spiders,”
have lauded.
In “What the Hell Did I Just Read,” the
narrator, Dave, along with his best friend
and kindhearted girlfriend, take it upon
themselves to fend off an onslaught of
paranormal happenings in their home
town in the “Bermuda Triangle of the
Midwest.” Their latest exploit begins
with a lost child: Maggie, a small, elfish
blonde, “the type of missing kid the news
media actually notices.” When she turns
up the next day, the case is far from
closed. Nearly a dozen more kids vanish,
leading Dave and his friends on a wild
trip that takes them inside corrupt government agencies, a motel run by a
libertarian biker gang and to a lake that’s
George Saunders becomes second
American to win Man Booker Prize
BY
R ON C HARLES
George Saunders won the 2017 Man
Booker Prize, becoming the second
American in a row to win the coveted
British literary award. His winning novel, “Lincoln in the Bardo,” describes the
night President Lincoln visited his son’s
body in a Washington graveyard.
The prize, worth approximately
$66,000, guarantees increased sales
around the world, although “Lincoln in
the Bardo” was already a bestseller in the
United States.
Baroness Lola Young, chair of the Man
Booker Prize, made the announcement at
a ceremony Tuesday evening in London.
“The form and style of this utterly original novel reveals a witty, intelligent, and
deeply moving narrative,” she said.
Distinct from the satires Saunders has
published in the New Yorker and else-
WHAT THE HELL
DID I JUST READ
By David Wong
St. Martin’s. 375 pp.
$26.99
become a breeding ground for shapeshifting, memory-altering monsters.
At its best, “What the Hell Did I Just
Read” is reminiscent of Douglas Adams’s
work, stuffed with layers of absurd pastiche. Overwrought professors explain
the taxonomy of monsters; Dave shoots
said monsters using a T-shirt cannon
loaded with knockoff Shrouds of Turin.
But the brisk story is too often stalled by
crass bits. Dave and his girlfriend live
where, “Lincoln in the Bardo” is an
extended national ghost story, a funny
and piteous tale about the death of
Lincoln’s 11-year-old son, Willie, in 1862.
The book’s structure is strikingly unusual. It’s composed largely of brief quotations from letters, diaries, newspaper
articles, personal testimonies and later
scholars, each one meticulously attributed. We hear from people who worked for
the president, his friends, colleagues and
enemies, 19th-century biographers and
more recent ones such as Doris Kearns
Goodwin. Saunders has said he came to
see his role as a novelist expanding to
include the role of “curator.”
This form, though, is not the novel’s
hough it’s title has a familiar ring,
The Tiger’s Daughter (Tor) by K.
Arsenault Rivera turns many of
the standard conventions of fantasy on
their heads. At the center of the novel is
O-Shizuka, the princess of the wealthy
Hokkaran Empire, and Barsalayaa
Shefali, a warrior-princess of the
nomadic Qorin Tribe. Their births come
at the beginning of a creeping darkness
plaguing villages and turning people
into roaming demons. The story
chronicles the girls’ lives as they grow
into teenagers and learn the history of
their peoples’ alliance and how to
control their budding powers. The
narrative, however, isn’t driven by a
quest or a big evil to defeat. It’s a love
letter, written to O-Shizuka, lavishly
chronicling how two women fall in love.
It takes some suspension of belief — the
letter is written in the second person, as
if O-Shizuka wasn’t present at any of the
events — but the love story is important,
thoughtfully rendered and palpably felt.
bookworld@washpost.com
Ron Charles is the editor of Book World.
Think ‘The Sixth Sense’ but with a sick sense of humor
BY
E VERDEEN M ASON
above a sex shop; erotic toys and porn
stars are the subjects of hackneyed,
recurring gags.
Wong also uses the story’s setting as an
opportunity to explore issues related to
class anxiety. “I’ve always wondered
what it would be like to live in a town that
was actually growing,” Dave muses, likening his struggle with depression to his
city’s stagnation. But the novel’s breakneck pace doesn’t allow the author, his
characters or the reader to sit with this
question for long. Instead, we’re off
again, battling a giant praying mantis
with a chain saw.
bookworld@washpost.com
Maddie Crum is a writer and editor in New
York. Her work has appeared in Vulture,
Literary Hub and the Los Angeles Review of
Books.
only radical element. Stirred into the mix
of what Saunders calls “historical nuggets” are the voices of ghosts trapped in
Georgetown’s Oak Hill Cemetery, where
Willie is laid to rest.
Last year’s Booker Prize went to “The
Sellout,” by American writer Paul Beatty.
This year, when half the finalists were
U.S. citizens, there was renewed concern
that the British award was being taken
over by Americans.
The Booker contest was closed to
Americans until 2013, when the eligibility rules were expanded to include writers
beyond Commonwealth, Irish and Zimbabwean citizens.
bookworld@washpost.com
A
kata Warrior (Viking) is Nnedi
Okorafor’s sequel to her awardwinning novel “Akata Witch,” and
it is longer and better than its
predecessor. Here, budding soccer star
and sorceress-in-training Sunny Nwazue
is two years into her juju training at
Leopard Knocks, a city in Nigeria for the
magic wielders. Sunny, American-born
but growing up in Nigeria, is still
learning about her heritage as a leopard
person, as well as her ongoing battle
against the evil spirit Ekwensu. In the
meantime, Sunny starts to grapple with
her own inner darkness and is forced to
reflect on what being a Leopard person
does to her family. As always, Okorafor
effortlessly blends in critiques and
observations of modern culture,
reflecting on police brutality; the casual,
familial misogyny in even the most
modern households; and the cultural
misunderstanding that can put Africans
and African Americans at odds. This
book, although written for young adults,
is sophisticated in parsing out these
adult issues, and it is a salve for grownups who may see themselves reflected in
these very real, funny kids.
bookworld@washpost.com
Everdeen Mason reviews science fiction
and fantasy every month for The Washington
Post.
Literary Calendar
7 p.m. Amy Tan will discuss her life and
memoir, “Where the Past Begins,” at Sixth
& I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW.
$18-$45. sixthandi.org.
C4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
Television
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SPECIAL
CMT Artists of the Year 2017
(CMT at 8) Little Big Town, Andra
Day, Common and Lee Ann
Womack perform at this live
ceremony, which honors country
music’s biggest stars. This year’s
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the deadly mass shooting in Las
Vegas.
RETURNING
Property Brothers (HGTV at 9)
Season 11.
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LATE NIGHT
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— Bethonie Butler
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High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
D.C. gets all jacked up
for another Michelin flat
NOTEBOOK FROM C1
still the finest modern Indian
restaurant of my acquaintance in
the United States; Rasika West
End, its flashier near-equal across
town; Bad Saint in Columbia
Heights, the Filipino exemplar
showered with accolades from
critics around the country; and
Himitsu, the contemporary Japanese outpost in Petworth beloved
as much for its drinks and hospitality as for its Kobe steak with
white kimchi and buttery
furikake-sprinkled rice.
The new edition of the guide,
which also addresses budgetfriendly establishments with a
Bib Gourmand designation, is as
pancake-thin as the District’s inaugural publication, with 108 entries.
“By definition, Year 2 is not
going to have the same coverage
as Year 1,” Michael Ellis, international director for the Michelin
Guides, told The Washington Post
on Tuesday. To the taste arbiter’s
credit, inspectors visit candidate
restaurants multiple times. To its
shame, Michelin has barely
scratched the surface of Washington’s dynamic restaurant scene.
Because? “We did not have the
resources to go beyond the areas
we covered last year,” says Ellis.
“We only have so many boots on
the ground in terms of the inspection team” — which sounds a bit
like a theater critic walking out of
a play at intermission or a football
beat writer leaving a game at
halftime. They’re missing the full
show.
Komi and Métier were both
awarded four stars, my highest
rating, in The Post’s 2017 fall
dining guide, and are justly deserving of their fresh recognition.
Komi’s luscious and epic Mediterranean tasting menu is presented
in a recently made-over dining
room; the sophisticated yet
whimsical script at Métier has
included duck foie gras whose
grill marks are matched by
stripes of brioche crumbs, and a
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Komi (shown here before its recent interior makeover) received a Michelin star this year.
dessert delivered atop a Parisian
street sign.
The restaurants stalled at two
Michelin stars rank as some of the
country’s most imaginative and
influential. There’s no better
avant-garde kitchen than the
spectacle known as Minibar, and
few standard-bearers of fine dining as delicious and innovative as
Pineapple and Pearls. As for the
Inn at Little Washington, poised
to celebrate its 40th anniversary
next year, what more could the
detail-conscious chef-owner Patrick O’Connell and company do to
impress diners? My No. 1 favorite
dining destination this year already hangs a chandelier in its
chicken coop and offers with
breakfast a jam-and-jelly menu.
Meanwhile, Plume in the Jefferson Hotel remains a curious
holdover from last year’s Michelin star-rated restaurants in
Washington. The dining room is
among the city’s most posh, and
while the food has improved of
late, it is an inconsistent experience for which you hope someone
else is paying.
In a lame move, Michelin,
which has published guides in
America for a dozen years, now
gives restaurants that are not
distinguished with a star or a Bib
Gourmand a pat on the back just
for appearing on its list. The
plate-shaped symbol is called
“L’Assiette Michelin” and covers
72 eateries. Nobody wins when
everybody wins, at least in this
contest.
Asked by The Post to address
the sighs heard around town
when chefs with stars in their
eyes received word about their
status, Ellis — who calls the overall dining scene in Washington
“phenomenal” — says, “I don’t
think it’s necessarily a good idea
for them to get hung up on stars.”
Especially from strangers.
My one-word review of Michelin’s half-baked take on the
scene I cover: boring.
tom.sietsema@washpost.com
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This wildly popular interactive comedy whodunit keeps
the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the suspects
and catch the killer. New clues and up to the minute
improvisation deliver “the most fun I ever had at the
Kennedy Center.” (Arch Campbell ABC News)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Come as your
favorite Shear
Madness character
on Sat 10/28 @ 9
& get 25% off.
Use Code 270942.
DANCE
Mariinsky Ballet:
“La Bayadère”
Tonight -Saturday at 7:30
Saturday & Sunday at 1:30
Replete with forbidden love, shocking betrayal, and a
spectral voyage to the afterlife, this enchanting journey
to a fabled past radiates with colorful characters, vibrant
sets and costumes, and virtuosic moments. Petipa created
La Bayadère for the Mariinsky more than 140 years ago,
and this dazzling ballet continues to be "theirs" well into
the 21st century. Casting available at kennedy-center.org
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
"An unbroken line of
arabesques that
stops the heart with
its grace"
—The Telegraph
(London)
SPECIAL EVENTS
Great Falls Studios
Art Tour 2017
Celebrating Art Since 2003
Friday October 20 to
Sunday October 22
10am to 5pm
Take a self-guided driving tour of art studios in lovely Great
Falls, VA. Meet 50 artists in 25 studios. Demonstrations.
Hands-on activities. Family-friendly.
Great Falls, VA
Map available on-line and at Great
Falls Library, 9830 Georgetown Pike.
GreatFallsStudios.com/studiotour
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
Free
25 artist studios
open to the public.
16-2898
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C5
RE
Old friends have dinner, but one person doesn’t stop talking long enough to eat
Miss
Manners
Dear Miss
Manners: I have
dinner with a
small group of
longtime friends
who come
together once or
twice a year to
touch base. One
person in the
group tends to dominate the
conversation with greatly
detailed storytelling of mishaps
and adventures of family
members and friends.
I believe I speak for the others
in the group as well — as I
recognize the glaze in their eyes
and the curious questions
ceasing — that we’d all like a
JUDITH
MARTIN,
NICHOLAS
MARTIN AND
JACOBINA
MARTIN
chance to contribute and catch
up. For example, I want to hear
about everyone’s newest
grandchild, latest hobby or how
they’re coping with an aging
parent, but it’s hard to get past
this one long-winded person.
Can you suggest a delicate way to
redirect the conversation
without being rude?
Even when a dinner party
includes a relatively small
number of guests, etiquette
allows — even expects — many
multiple, simultaneous
conversations among different
groupings. It is natural that at
some point in the evening,
attention may focus on a single
speaker, but not for more than a
few minutes.
When your lecturer begins,
feel free to start a separate
conversation with your next
neighbor. If your guests follow
your lead, only one or two people
need be bored at a time, and this
duty can be quietly rotated as
you move from pre-dinner
drinks, to the table, to afterdinner coffee.
Dear Miss Manners: My son is
engaged, and I am over the
moon. I have more friends who
want to throw a party to
celebrate their engagement than
invitations allotted to the
wedding. I have hosted parties
for many of their children in the
past, and I know they want to do
the same for me.
What should I do? Do I let
them throw a party even though
they will not be invited to the
wedding, or do I politely decline?
How many of these offers were
you planning on accepting? Miss
Manners agrees that anyone
hosting a party should be invited
to the wedding, but she assumes
that at least one of the
prospective hosts is already on
the invitation list. Everyone else
can be thanked but told that a
party is already scheduled.
Dear Miss Manners: Our family
received a save-the-date card in
the mail for an upcoming bar
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
Brave (PG) 2:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
CC: 12:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) CC: 2:10-5:00-7:45-10:30
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
3:30-10:30
American Made (R) CC: 1:20-4:157:10-9:55
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:25
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: 1:00-3:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 3:00
It (R) CC: 10:30
The Foreigner (R) CC: 1:50-4:407:30-10:15
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:153:50-6:30-10:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
1:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:05-10:05
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:10-4:107:00-9:50
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
2D Experience (R) CC: 12:304:15-8:00
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: 1:45-4:30-7:109:45
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
10:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:305:15-9:00
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 7:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
3:10
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) CC: 2:00-4:40-7:20
The Metropolitan Opera: Die Zauberflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: 1:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!) 4:25
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 2:305:10-7:50
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:35-3:00-5:30-8:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:304:20-7:10
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: (!) 12:30-3:055:40-8:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
(!) 7:55
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
Angelika Pop-Up at Union Market
550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) CC: 11:45-2:15-4:40-7:00
Wind River (R) CC: 11:20AM
So B. It (PG-13) 12:00-3:155:15-7:15
The Pathological Optimist 1:303:30-5:30-7:30
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
2:00-4:45
Dalida (NR) 8:00
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:00-3:155:30-8:00
Landmark Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
American Made (R) CC: 12:152:45-5:10-7:35-10:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 1:30-4:30-7:15-10:00
It (R) CC: 1:40-4:25-7:10-9:50
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:00-1:003:15-7:00-7:30-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:003:30-4:15-7:00-10:00-10:15
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird
Hamilton CC: 1:00-4:00-7:00-9:30
Goodbye Christopher Robin CC:
12:30-1:30-4:30-7:30-9:45
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13)
CC: 12:45-3:45
Human Flow (PG-13) CC: 1:304:45-8:15
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
1:05-4:05-7:05-9:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
1:10-4:10-9:35
The Florida Project (R) CC: 1:153:15-4:15-6:30-7:15-9:00-9:40
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
Singin' in the Rain (1952) (NR)
1:30-4:30-7:30
Dolores (NR) 4:30
Bending the Arc 2:15-7:15
The King's Choice (Kongens nei)
(NR) 1:40-7:00
The Big Sick (R) 4:15
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:0012:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street Northwest
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) 12:00-2:35-5:10-10:50
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
2:30-7:45-10:40
The Metropolitan Opera: Die Zauberflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:00-5:45-8:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-7:00
It (R) 4:20-10:10
The Foreigner (R) 12:00-2:40-5:258:05-10:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:152:45-4:20-8:05-10:35
The Princess Bride 30th Anniversary (1987) presented by TCM
(NR) 2:00-7:00
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-5:15-7:159:30-10:45
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
3:35-10:25
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
IMAX Theater
6:00-9:30
601 Independence Avenue SW
It (R) CC: 10:15-4:30-7:30-10:30
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
2:40
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
Dream Big: Engineering Our
World: An IMAX 3D Experience
12:25
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R)
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-2:05-5:15
MARYLAND
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Center
8633 Colesville Road
Rififi (Du rififi chez les hommes)
(NR) 9:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 11:302:00-4:30-7:05-9:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:102:30-4:50-7:10-8:00-9:30
The Killing (1956) (NR) 6:30
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) (!) 1:30-4:10-6:50
American Made (R) CC: (!) 2:004:45-8:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 1:00-4:00-7:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: (!) 2:30-5:00-7:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
3:00-6:30-7:30
It (R) CC: (!) 1:00-4:00-7:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
1:15-3:30-6:00-8:30
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: (!)
1:00-4:30
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) CC: 1:00-3:35-6:10-8:45
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 12:30-3:50-6:50-10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: 12:30-3:15-6:00-8:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 2:30
It (R) CC: 6:00
The Foreigner (R) CC: 1:30-4:106:55-9:35
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:007:00-9:45
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:304:00-7:30
AMC Columbia 14
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
11:30-2:05-4:35
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: (!) 11:20-2:00-4:50-7:30-10:10
American Made (R) CC: 10:501:30-4:10-9:55
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 11:50-3:00-6:30-9:50
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
Zauberflote ENCORE (NR) (!)
1:00-6:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: (!) 11:05-1:45-4:30-7:05-9:40
It (R) CC: 11:00-9:45
New Mexico Backcountry Discovery Route (NR) (!) 7:00
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: (!) 9:50
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
11:00-1:40-4:20-7:10-9:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:10-1:40-4:10-6:40-9:10
The Princess Bride 30th Anniversary (1987) presented by TCM
(NR) 2:00-7:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:001:50-4:40-7:30-10:10
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) (!) 11:15-2:456:15-10:00
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) (!) 10:50-1:25-4:257:20-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) (!) 12:204:10-8:10
The Foreigner (R) (!) 10:50-1:304:20-7:10-10:05
mitzvah. Our families’ children
attend school together, and our
family was very excited to be
included.
The save-the-date card
remains posted in our kitchen,
but no invitation was received.
The party is now only two weeks
away. No calls have been received
from the family or their party
planner asking if we plan to
attend for their final count. What
to do?
Having been asked to save the
date, it is only reasonable of you
to assume that an invitation
would be forthcoming. Miss
Manners would not want you to
be accused of not responding to
an invitation that was mailed but
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14 The Metropolitan Opera: Die Zau- Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 2:001591 West Nursery Road
berflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30 4:45-8:30-9:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 10:451:55-4:20-6:45
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:15
The Mountain Between Us (PGHappy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!) 13) CC: 1:45-4:40-7:15-9:50
10:30-1:15-4:15-6:30-7:00-9:45
American Made (R) CC: 2:05-4:45Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:007:25-10:05
1:45-4:45-7:45-9:00-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
CC: 1:00-4:05-7:10-10:15
11:00-2:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
AMC Magic Johnson Capital Center 12 CC: 1:20-4:00-6:30-9:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 1:00800 Shoppers Way
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: 2:00-3:00-4:30-6:30-8:00-10:00
It (R) CC: 1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
1:00-3:20
The Foreigner (R) CC: 1:40-4:25The Mountain Between Us (PG- 7:05-9:50
13) CC: 1:40-4:25-7:10-9:40
American Assassin (R) CC: 1:15Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 3:50-6:35-9:10
CC: 12:30-3:30-6:25-9:35
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:00-3:20-5:40-8:00-9:20-10:20
CC: 1:15-3:45-6:30-9:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:25-4:10Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:30- 6:55-9:40
4:00-7:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder
It (R) CC: 5:25
Women (R) CC: 1:50-4:45-7:20The Foreigner (R) CC: 2:00-4:45- 9:55
7:15-9:45
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
1:00-5:30-7:55-10:25
5:40-9:15
Landmark Bethesda Row Cinema
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 2:307235 Woodmont Avenue
5:15-8:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
1:00-3:15-5:30-7:45-9:30-10:00
Down The White House (PG-13)
CC: 1:30-4:40-7:15-10:05
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
4:25-7:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:50Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:15- 3:40-6:50-9:10
7:00-9:45
Goodbye Christopher Robin CC:
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D 1:10-2:00-3:50-4:30-6:40-7:309:30-10:00
Experience (R) CC: 2:45-6:1510:00
Lucky CC: 1:15-3:30-8:00-10:05
Brawl in Cell Block 99 2:15-8:30 The Meyerowitz Stories (New and
Selected)1:40-4:20-7:20-9:50
Brave (PG) 2:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
ArcLight Bethesda
1:00-4:10-7:00-9:45
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:20The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
4:00-5:30-7:10-9:40
11:00-1:20-4:45-7:10-9:45
Old Greenbelt Theatre
The Mountain Between Us (PG129 Centerway
13) 11:20-2:10-5:50-7:30-10:05
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 12:00- Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 3:005:30-8:00
2:55-4:40-7:40-10:05
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Paragon Kentlands Stadium 10
11:15-1:50-4:55-7:55-10:15
629 Center Point Way
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
11:05-1:15-3:25-4:35-7:00
5:10-7:25
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 9:15
American Made (R) 4:50-7:20
It (R) 4:25-10:10
Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
The Foreigner (R) 11:30-2:40-5:00- My
4:55-7:10
8:10-10:30
(PG-13) 5:15-7:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:25- Dunkirk
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 4:302:05-4:30-7:05-9:20
The Princess Bride 30th Anniver- 5:30-7:50
It (R) 4:20-7:10
sary (1987) presented by TCM
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
(NR) 2:00-7:00
Marshall (PG-13) 11:45-2:20-5:05- 5:10-7:20
Home Again (PG-13) 7:40
7:45-9:30
The Florida Project (R) 11:10-2:25- Wind River (R) 5:15
Professor Marston & the Wonder
5:35-7:25-8:20-9:30
Women (R) 5:05-7:30
American Made (R) 11:40-1:55Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
5:15-7:30-10:35
3899 Branch Avenue
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:254:50-8:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:50- 12:00-2:25-5:00-7:30
2:00-3:00-5:10-8:00-9:40
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought 12:45-3:50-7:00
Down The White House (PG-13) Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00CC: 12:40-3:30
4:30-8:00
Professor Marston & the Wonder It (R) 2:15-5:15-8:15
Women (R) CC: 11:35-2:15-4:15- The Foreigner (R) 12:30-3:105:40-7:20-9:50
5:55-8:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:30Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:0512:25-3:50-7:15
2:50-5:50-8:50
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:307:00-10:20
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
1:00-3:50
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:10-3:20-6:40-9:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:0011:30-2:30-3:00-6:00-9:30
It (R) 6:30-9:40
The Foreigner (R) 11:10-1:50-4:307:20-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:202:00-4:40-6:50-7:40-9:20-10:10
Bow Tie Harbour 9
2474 Solomons Island Road
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) 11:20-2:00-4:40-7:20-10:10
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 10:504:20-10:00
American Made (R) 11:30-2:20AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 5:10-7:50-10:40
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Brave (PG) CC: 2:00-6:00
10:30-12:50-3:10-5:30-8:00-10:20
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 10:4011:30-2:05-4:40
1:20-4:00-6:50-9:40
The Mountain Between Us (PG- The Princess Bride 30th Anniver13) CC: 2:20-5:00-7:40-10:20
sary (1987) presented by TCM
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC: (NR) 2:00-7:00
1:10-4:10-7:05-10:00
Marshall (PG-13) 11:10-2:10-5:00American Made (R) CC: 2:10-5:00- 7:40-10:30
7:45-10:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Women (R) 10:20-1:00-3:40CC: 11:50-3:15-6:30-9:40
7:00-9:30
It (R) CC: 7:10-10:15
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
CC: 11:40-2:15-4:50-7:25-10:00
The
LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 1:5511:20-4:20-9:40
5:45-8:10-9:20
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:05 The LEGO Ninjago Movie 3D (PG)
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 1:45-4:55- 1:50-7:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG7:35-10:20
13) 11:05-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:15
Judwaa 2 (NR) 8:30
American Made (R) 11:40-2:35Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
5:30-8:30
11:35-2:10-4:45-7:20-9:55
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!) Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:45-12:45-1:50-3:10-4:25-5:35- 11:30-2:45-6:00-9:15
The Metropolitan Opera: Die Zau6:50-8:00-9:15-10:25
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) (!) 12:10- berflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
3:20-6:40-9:50
11:35-2:20-5:05-7:50-10:35
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:35Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:25-3:551:25-4:20-7:15-10:05
5:10-8:55
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
It (R) 12:45-4:00-7:10-10:15
Experience (R) CC: 12:00-3:30The Foreigner (R) 10:55-1:50-4:507:00-10:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder 7:45-10:40
Flatliners (PG-13) 10:45
Women (R) CC: (!) 2:05-4:50Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:207:30-10:10
3:00-5:40-8:20
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
The Princess Bride 30th Anniver4:35
sary (1987) presented by TCM
Last Night11:30AM
(NR) 2:00-7:00
The Foreigner (R) (!) 3:40-9:10
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 11:10-2:35Blood Money(!) 1:15-6:45
5:35-8:40
AMC Loews St. Charles Town Ctr. 9 Marshall (PG-13) 11:00-2:0011115 Mall Circle
5:00-8:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
Brave (PG) (!) 2:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: 12:10-7:40
11:30-1:30-4:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:25The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 5:10-8:55
CC: 10:15-12:30-3:30-6:15-9:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) XD:
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 11:00-1:50-4:30-7:15-9:55
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
CC: 11:45-3:15-6:45-10:00
12:10-7:40
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: 10:00-1:00-3:45-6:30-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:55
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
4:00-6:00-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:15-7:008:15-10:45
It (R) 12:15-3:15-6:15-9:15
The Foreigner (R) 1:45-4:457:30-10:30
Flatliners (PG-13) 12:30-3:15-8:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:002:30-5:00-8:00-10:45
The Princess Bride 30th Anniversary (1987) presented by TCM
(NR) 2:00-7:00
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:452:00-4:30-5:45-9:30
Mersal (NR) 12:00-3:30-7:00-10:45
Regal Hyattsville Royale Stadium 14
6505 America Blvd.
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
1:00-3:45-6:45-9:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) 1:30-4:15-7:00-10:00
American Made (R) 1:00-3:456:30-9:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:30-3:15-6:00-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00-4:054:45-7:50-8:30
It (R) 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:20
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:157:15-10:00
Flatliners (PG-13) 1:30-7:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:153:45-6:15-9:00
Marshall (PG-13) 12:45-4:007:15-10:15
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 12:30-3:30-6:30-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:301:35-5:15-9:00
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
4:30-10:30
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
14716 Baltimore Avenue
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:25-3:00-5:30-8:10
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) 12:45-3:35-6:30-9:30
American Made (R) 12:50-3:456:45-9:45
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:15-3:30-6:45-10:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:10-2:40-5:10-7:45-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30-4:155:00-8:15
It (R) 12:30-3:50-7:00-10:05
Flatliners (PG-13) 10:40
The Foreigner (R) 12:50-4:307:30-10:30
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:001:15-3:45-7:15-9:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:002:30-5:15-8:00-10:35
Marshall (PG-13) 1:00-4:00-7:0010:00
Regal Rockville Center Stadium 13
199 East Montgomery Avenue
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
1:00-4:00-6:30-10:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) 1:45-4:30-7:45-10:30
American Made (R) 2:00-5:008:00-10:45
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
15200 Major Lansdale Boulevard
12:30-3:30-6:45-10:00
The Metropolitan Opera: Die ZauThe LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
berflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30
2:45-5:20-8:00-10:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG- My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:45-4:15-7:00-9:30
13) 1:25-4:30-7:40-10:25
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:15-7:00American Made (R) 1:20-4:359:45-10:30
7:50-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) It (R) 12:45-3:45-7:15-10:30
The Foreigner (R) 1:45-4:303:20-6:30-9:50
The Metropolitan Opera: Die Zau- 7:15-10:00
berflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30 Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:004:45-7:30-11:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
The Princess Bride 30th Anniver2:55-5:30-8:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:45-7:30 sary (1987) presented by TCM
(NR) 2:00-7:00
It (R) 10:20
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:45-7:30The Foreigner (R) 1:30-4:2010:45
7:10-10:05
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:30Happy Death Day (PG-13) 2:004:00-7:30-9:00
4:40-7:10-9:45
The Princess Bride 30th Anniver- City Of Rock (NR) 10:15
sary (1987) presented by TCM
Regal Waugh Chapel
(NR) 2:00-7:00
Stadium 12 & IMAX
Marshall (PG-13) 1:10-4:00-7:001419 South Main Chapel Way
10:10
The
LEGO
Ninjago Movie (PG)
Professor Marston & the Wonder 12:10-2:00-4:35-7:00
Women (R) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15 The Mountain Between Us (PGBlade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:15- 13) 12:40-3:45-6:45-9:35
5:00-8:45
The Golden Circle (R)
A Question of Faith (PG) 1:10-3:50- Kingsman:
12:20-3:25-6:30-9:45
6:40-9:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Regal Cinemas Majestic
12:15-2:45-5:15-7:50
Stadium 20 & IMAX
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:40-4:25900 Ellsworth Drive
6:15-9:50-10:20
It (R) 1:00-4:10-7:20-10:25
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
The Foreigner (R) 1:10-4:0512:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG- 7:20-10:05
American Assassin (R) 1:45-4:4513) 1:00-4:20-7:15-10:10
7:40-10:30
American Made (R) 1:15-4:357:30-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
12:30-3:45-7:35-11:00
Marshall (PG-13) 1:20-4:15-7:30The Metropolitan Opera: Die Zau- 10:15
berflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30 Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
2D Experience (R) 12:00-3:35My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
7:10-10:50
1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:50Dunkirk (PG-13) 10:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:45- 8:00-9:25
5:45-7:20-10:00-11:00
Regal Westview Stadium 16 & IMAX
It (R) 1:05-4:20-7:35-10:50
5243 Buckeystown Pike
The Foreigner (R) 12:00-2:40-5:25- The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
8:15-11:00
1:00-4:00-6:45
Flatliners (PG-13) 1:35-4:25The Mountain Between Us (PG7:15-10:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:15- 13) 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 9:30
3:15-5:40-8:10-10:55
The Princess Bride 30th Anniver- Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:45-4:15-7:30-11:00
sary (1987) presented by TCM
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
(NR) 2:00-7:00
11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Marshall (PG-13) 12:40-4:10American Made (R) 12:30-3:307:00-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 12:35- 6:15-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:454:45-8:30
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 11:00 5:45-7:30-11:15
It (R) 1:30-4:45-8:00-11:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:35
Flatliners (PG-13) 1:15-4:00Regal Germantown Stadium 14 7:00-10:00
20000 Century Boulevard
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:153:15-6:30-9:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
The Foreigner (R) 11:30-2:30-5:15The Mountain Between Us (PG- 8:15-11:00
13) 10:30
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
2D Experience (R) 11:30-3:15American Made (R) 1:45-4:307:00-10:45
10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:4512:00-3:15-6:30-10:00
2:15-5:00-7:45-10:15
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: 11:20-1:00-3:456:30-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
3:30
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13) 9:55
American Satan (R) 11:05-1:45UA Snowden Square Stadium 14 4:30-7:15-10:00
Last
Night11:20-4:25
9161 Commerce Center Drive
Swing Away (PG) 3:00-5:30-8:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
AMC Potomac Mills 18
12:25-3:10-6:00-8:30
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
The Mountain Between Us (PGThe LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
13) 1:00-3:50-6:45-9:30
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 9:10 11:25-2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
American Made (R) 12:50-3:45CC: 11:40-2:20-5:00-7:45-10:25
6:30-9:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
12:40
12:45-4:00-7:15-10:25
The Metropolitan Opera: Die Zau- My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
berflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30 CC: 11:30-2:05-4:35-7:05-9:40
American Made (R) CC: 11:20My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
2:15-5:00-7:50-10:30
12:30-3:30-6:15-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:00Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:101:45-2:45-5:20-6:20-9:00-10:00
12:40-3:40-7:10-7:45-10:40
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
It (R) 1:20-4:30-7:30-10:30
CC: 12:00-3:15-6:30-9:40
The Foreigner (R) 12:10-3:20It (R) CC: 1:00-4:00-7:10-10:20
6:15-10:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:15- The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:50-2:405:30-8:10-10:50
3:00-6:00-8:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:20- American Assassin (R) CC:
11:20-9:40
2:45-5:10-7:40-10:10
The Princess Bride 30th Anniver- Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 11:204:20-10:00
sary (1987) presented by TCM
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
(NR) 2:00-7:00
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:15-7:20- 11:10-1:45-4:20-7:00-9:35
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
10:15
12:45-3:15-5:40-8:15-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
4:10-9:45
2D Experience (R) CC: 12:15Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14 4:00-7:40
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
The Princess Bride 30th AnniverThe LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: sary (1987) presented by TCM
10:50-1:40
(NR) (!) 2:00-7:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG- Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:0013) CC: (!) 10:40-1:10-1:50-4:30- 4:45-7:30-10:15
6:20-7:20-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 8:45
CC: 1:00-4:40-7:50-11:00
A Question of Faith (PG) CC: 3:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13) 4:25
CC: 10:00-12:35-3:20-6:10-8:50
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
Women (R) CC: 1:20-4:00-6:3511:50-3:30-7:00-10:30
9:20
It (R) CC: 11:10-2:10-5:10-8:10Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:4511:10
2:15-4:40-7:15-9:45
The Foreigner (R) Open Caption; Brave (PG) (!) 2:00-6:00
CC: 10:15-11:30-2:20-4:10-5:00AMC Shirlington 7
6:50-7:40-9:40-10:20
2772 South Randolph St.
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 10:10The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
12:50-3:40-6:40-10:10
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!) CC: (!) 1:40-4:15-7:00-10:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
11:40-3:00-4:40-5:30-7:10-8:002:00-4:50-7:40-10:25
9:50-10:50
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:20-3:10- Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
4:00-10:00
6:30-9:20
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: (!)
A Question of Faith (PG) CC:
2:00-4:45-7:15-9:45
11:20-2:00
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13) CC: The Florida Project (R) (!) 1:453:15-4:30-6:15-7:30-9:15-10:15
10:30-3:50-9:00
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
Women (R) CC: (!) 1:30-4:3011:00-2:30-6:00-9:30
7:30-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) Open Caption;
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: (!)
CC: 10:20-1:20-4:20-7:30-10:40
1:00-7:00
Marshall (PG-13) 12:30-3:457:15-10:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 1:15-4:30-7:15-10:00
A Question of Faith (PG) 1:00
iPic Pike & Rose
11830 Grand Park Avenue
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) (!)
12:30-3:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) (!) 1:00-4:30-8:00-11:15
American Made (R) (!) 11:30-2:456:15-9:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
(!) 11:45-3:15-7:00-10:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) (!) 11:003:00-6:45-11:00
It (R) 10:40
The Foreigner (R) (!) 12:00-3:307:15-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) (!) 1:304:45-7:45-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) (!) 12:45-4:157:45-10:50
AMC Tysons Corner 16
7850e Tysons Corner Center
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
11:20-1:50
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 10:40-1:40-4:20-7:10-10:15
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
4:30
American Made (R) CC: 12:104:15-8:15-9:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 12:15-3:25-6:40-10:00
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
Zauberflote ENCORE (NR) (!)
1:00-6:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: 10:55-1:25-4:10-6:45-9:15
New Mexico Backcountry Discovery Route (NR) (!) 7:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 10:253:00-9:35
It (R) CC: 1:10-7:45-10:50
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 10:502150 Clarendon Blvd.
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: 1:30-4:15-6:55-9:40
Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 4:40-10:10
1:15-4:45
The Mountain Between Us (PG- Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
10:25-10:50
13) CC: 1:15-4:45-7:30-10:10
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC: Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
10:25-12:05-1:00-2:30-3:30-4:551:30-4:15-7:10-10:00
American Made (R) CC: 1:45-4:30- 5:55-7:20-8:30-9:45-10:55
The Princess Bride 30th Anniver7:20-10:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) sary (1987) presented by TCM
(NR) (!) 2:00-7:00
CC: 1:30-3:45-7:15-10:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:45My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:35-4:25-7:15-10:05
CC: 2:15-4:00-6:45-9:20
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 7:40-10:10 Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
2D Experience (R) 11:05-2:45Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
6:20-9:55
1:15-3:30-5:45-8:00-10:20
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:00- Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: (!) 10:35-1:15-4:006:45-9:30
7:25-9:50
AMC Hoffman Center 22
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
10:30-4:35
Brave (PG) 2:00
Brave (PG) (!) 2:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:404:15-8:15
7:15-10:55
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
AMC Worldgate 9
2:00-4:40-7:20
13025 Worldgate Drive
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Brave (PG) (!) 2:00
CC: 11:05-1:40-4:20-7:10-9:50
The Mountain Between Us (PGAmerican Made (R) CC: 11:2513) CC: 12:55-3:35-6:15-9:05
2:15-6:45-9:25
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC: American Made (R) CC: 1:25-4:106:50-9:30
12:40-3:50-10:10
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 12:10-3:20-6:40-9:50
CC: 12:15-3:40-7:00-9:40
Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
The Metropolitan Opera: Die Zau- My
berflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30 CC: 1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Blade
Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:00My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
3:30-7:00-10:30
CC: 1:05-3:40-6:20-9:05
It
(R)
CC:
7:55
It (R) CC: 11:45-3:15-6:30-9:45
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 2:05-4:50New Mexico Backcountry Discov- 7:35-10:10
ery Route (NR) 7:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
12:40-3:00-5:20-7:45-10:20
11:45-7:30
(PG-13) CC: (!) 1:15-4:05Flatliners (PG-13) CC: 11:10-10:00 Marshall
7:15-10:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Blade
Runner
2049 3D (R) CC:
11:00-1:35-4:10-6:45-9:20
4:25
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:30-2:15Alamo
Drafthouse
Cinema 5:00-7:45-10:30
One Loudoun
American Assassin (R) CC:
20575 East Hampton Plaza
12:20-10:25
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
11:15-12:30-1:45-3:00-4:15-5:30- 11:50-2:55
7:00-8:00-9:30-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
The Princess Bride 30th Anniver- 12:40-3:55-7:20-10:40
It (R) 6:30-10:25
sary (1987) presented by TCM
(NR) (!) 2:00-7:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:15Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:45- 3:15-10:00
4:30-7:15-10:15
The Mountain Between Us (PGBlade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D 13) 12:15-3:25-6:20-9:35
Experience (R) CC: 11:00-2:30American Made (R) 11:25-2:206:15-9:45
5:20-8:20-11:15
VIRGINIA
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:30-3:30-6:00-9:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:004:15-8:00
The Foreigner (R) 11:05-2:005:45-9:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:153:05-4:55-8:40-11:20
Evil Dead 2 (R) 7:00
Bloodsport (R) 7:40
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
2911 District Ave
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
1:50-4:30-7:10-9:50
American Made (R) CC: 12:303:05-5:40-8:15-10:40
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 10:10-1:15-4:20-7:35-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
11:45-3:15-7:00-10:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:15-2:00-4:40-7:15-9:30
Goodbye Christopher Robin CC: (!)
10:05-12:35-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:25
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13)
CC: (!) 10:00-11:20
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: (!) 10:15-12:503:20-5:45-8:10-10:35
The Florida Project (R) CC: (!)
11:30-2:15-4:45-7:30-10:15
not delivered, nor for your hosts
to feel regret that you missed the
event because of a mistake on
their part — either failing to mail
an intended invitation or
assuming that the “save the date’’
was all that was required.
You should therefore inquire
directly. If the omission was not
innocent — for example, an
attempt to solicit gifts without
an invitation — you will find out
soon enough.
New Miss Manners columns are
posted Monday through Saturday on
washingtonpost.com/advice. You can
send questions to Miss Manners at
her website, missmanners.com.
© 2017, by Judith Martin
Wednesday, October 18, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
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Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 2:054:25-7:30-10:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 2:305:00-7:30-10:15
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Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
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It (R) 12:30-3:35-6:35-9:50
American Assassin (R) 6:10-9:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:252:45-5:30-8:05
Bareilly Ki Barfi (NR) 1:45-5:007:40
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 12:15-3:106:05-9:20
Bow Tie
Reston Town Center 11 & BTX Chef (Hindi) (NR) 2:55-5:50-9:15
Judwaa 2 (NR) 3:00-6:00-9:30
11940 Market Street
Raja The Great (NR) 12:45-3:40The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 4:10 6:35-9:40
The Mountain Between Us (PG- Jai Lava Kusa (NR) 3:15-6:30-9:55
13) 1:50-4:50-7:50-10:35
The Stray (PG) 12:50-3:05-5:15Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 12:10- 7:30
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Runner 2049 3D (R)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Blade
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My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Women (R) 12:30-3:10-6:05-9:00
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Mahanubhavudu (NR) 12:20-3:20Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:306:20-9:25
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Punjab
Nahi Jaungi4:00-7:05-10:00
It (R) 10:00
Bailaras (NR) 1:15-4:05-6:50-9:35
The Foreigner (R) 1:40-4:40Mersal
(NR) 12:30-3:50-7:10
7:40-10:25
Regal Dulles Town Center 10
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:3021100 Dulles Town Circle
4:30-7:30-10:15
The Princess Bride 30th Anniver- The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
sary (1987) presented by TCM
11:45-2:20
(NR) 2:00-7:00
The Mountain Between Us (PGMarshall (PG-13) 1:20-4:20-7:20- 13) 12:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
10:10
American Made (R) 1:30-4:30Professor Marston & the Wonder 7:45-10:40
Women (R) 1:00-4:00-6:50-10:20 Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
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7:00-10:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
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Cinema Arts Theatre
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:309650 Main St
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC: 7:00-10:00
It (R) 1:15-3:00-6:00-9:15
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12:05-2:35-5:05-7:40-10:00
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1:00-4:15-7:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 9:50- Marshall (PG-13) 1:00-4:15-7:1510:15
12:10-2:30-4:55-7:20-9:35
Lucky CC: 10:00-12:00-2:00-4:00- Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
5:00-8:30
6:00-8:00-9:50
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Regal Fairfax Towne Center 10
Down The White House (PG-13)
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CC: 9:55-12:15-2:25-4:45-7:10-9:20 The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 4:20
The
Mountain
Between Us (PGCobb Village 12 Leesburg
13) 12:35-3:50-6:45-10:50
1600 Village Market Boulevard
American
Made
(R) 10:50
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:25-1:50-4:20-6:50
12:30-3:55-7:25-10:40
The Mountain Between Us (PGThe Metropolitan Opera: Die Zau13) 11:20-2:05-4:40-7:20
berflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30
American Made (R) 12:20-3:00My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
7:35
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 12:05-2:40-5:15-7:50-10:25
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:15-3:3012:10-3:15-7:15
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My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
The Foreigner (R) 1:25-4:3011:50-2:20-4:55-7:25
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:45- 7:35-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:102:40-7:10
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30- 2:40-5:45-8:15-10:45
The Princess Bride 30th Anniver3:10-5:30-8:00
sary (1987) presented by TCM
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Professor Marston & the Wonder Marshall (PG-13) 12:00-2:50-5:108:00-10:50
Women (R) 11:55-2:25-5:00-7:45
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 10:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00The Outlaws (Crime City)
3:30-7:05
(beom-joi-do-si) (NR) 12:40-3:40The Foreigner (R) 11:35-2:156:55-9:55
5:05-7:50
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX
Zauberflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Tokyo Ghoul (Tokyo Guru) (2017) Despicable Me 3 (PG) 1:30-3:45(NR) 7:30
6:00-8:15-10:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
3:30-7:05
12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
The Mountain Between Us (PGManassas 4 Cinemas
13) 12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
8890 Mathis Ave.
The Mountain Between Us (PG- American Made (R) 1:30-4:157:00-9:45
13) 2:15-4:30-6:40
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 1:35 Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
American Made (R) 2:15-4:25-6:40 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:0012:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
4:15-7:30
It (R) 1:00-4:15-7:30-10:45
It (R) 3:30-6:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30-2:00Rave Cinemas Centreville 12 4:10-5:40-7:45-8:30-9:15
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5:45-8:30
11:25-1:55-4:25-6:55-9:25
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13) 11:00-1:40-4:35-7:15-10:10
American Assassin (R) 3:45-9:30
American Made (R) 10:45-1:30Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:304:15-7:10-9:55
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Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
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It (R) 10:25-1:45-4:50-7:55-11:00 Professor Marston & the Wonder
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Happy Death Day (PG-13) 10:00- Regal Kingstowne Stadium 16 & RPX
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5910 Kingstowne Towne Center
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 10:40-1:20The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
4:00-5:40-8:20-11:00
12:15-4:15-6:50
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American Made (R) 1:30-5:05Regal Ballston Common Stadium 12 7:45-10:20
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My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
The Mountain Between Us (PG- 12:30-1:10-3:45-6:15
13) 1:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
It (R) 1:15-4:15-7:20-10:20
American Made (R) 1:00-3:45Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00-4:456:40-9:30
6:15-8:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:306:20-9:45
7:30-10:15
The Metropolitan Opera: Die
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:30Zauberflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00
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Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:05-4:45- Flatliners (PG-13) 12:55-4:006:40-9:55
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It (R) 1:05-4:00-10:15
Judwaa 2 (NR) 3:15-6:20-9:30
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Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
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It (R) 1:10-4:10-7:10-10:20
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:30-1:40-4:20-7:00-9:40
The Foreigner (R) 1:50-5:007:45-10:30
American Assassin (R) 12:503:30-6:30-9:10
Flatliners (PG-13) 9:00
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX
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Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:003:20-5:50-8:30-10:50
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 2:30-5:20-8:00-10:40
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Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
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American Made (R) 1:40-4:457:35-10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
1:00-4:10-7:20-10:30
The Metropolitan Opera: Die Zauberflote ENCORE (NR) 1:00-6:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:15-4:30-7:30-10:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:302:00-4:00-4:30-5:30-7:30-9:009:55-10:30
It (R) 1:00-4:05-7:10-10:25
The Foreigner (R) 1:30-4:207:05-10:00
American Assassin (R) 1:00-3:456:30-9:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 2:104:55-7:40-10:20
The Princess Bride 30th Anniversary (1987) presented by TCM
(NR) 2:00-7:00
Marshall (PG-13) 1:25-4:15-7:1510:10
Walk With Me (NR) 7:30
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 1:007:00-9:40
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13)
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Regal Springfield Town Center 12
6500 Springfield Town Center
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American Made (R) 11:10-2:004:50-7:50-10:45
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:10-3:30-7:00-10:50
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:00-3:50-6:30-9:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:3012:00-3:40-6:50-7:10-10:45
It (R) 12:50-4:00-7:10-10:20
The Foreigner (R) 11:40-2:506:10-9:10
Flatliners (PG-13) 11:00-2:406:20-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:202:20-5:10-8:00-10:40
Marshall (PG-13) 11:50-3:006:00-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 3:1010:00-10:30
Regal Virginia Gateway
Stadium 14 & RPX
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
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12:50-3:45-6:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG13) 1:30-4:10-7:20-10:10
American Made (R) 1:10-3:506:30-9:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
12:10-3:10-6:10-9:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-7:00
It (R) 1:20-4:20-7:30-10:45
The Foreigner (R) 11:50-2:30-5:107:40-10:20
Flatliners (PG-13) 12:40-3:208:00-10:40
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:152:45-5:15-7:45-10:15
Home Again (PG-13) 12:45-3:156:40-9:50
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:30-7:1510:00
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 12:20-3:00-5:308:15-10:50
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
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Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30-4:006:00-9:00-9:45
Smithsonian - Airbus IMAX Theater
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
11:10-4:00
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
Dream Big: Engineering Our
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2:20
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) 6:00-8:55
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
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University Mall Theatre
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Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 7:30-9:45
Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
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The Hitman's Bodyguard (R) CC:
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N329 6x.75B
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Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:152:45-5:30-8:05-10:30
C6
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
K
. WEDNESDAY,
Looking
for true
past of
Sosua
SOSUA FROM C1
Jewish and Dominican, and I’ve
yet to meet anyone who knows
about Sosua. “Never forget,” people say about the Holocaust. But
this part of Jewish history has
been almost entirely lost, and the
story I’d been told seemed incomplete.
I thought I knew the beginning
and the end. In July, I left for
Sosua to find out the rest. It
quickly became clear why so
many chose to forget.
T
he first thing I wanted to see
was the beach. I remembered seeing photos of my
father’s family along the shore.
My father warned me to stay
away. The beach, he said, had
become a site for prostitution and
crime.
Could it really be that dangerous? I remembered going there as
a child, but I hadn’t been back to
the town in more than a decade. I
asked Ivonne Strauss de Milz, a
family friend and a descendant of
refugees who lives in Sosua, to
take me there. “Is that the purse
you’re taking?” she asked, then
instructed me to zip it shut.
The shore was strewn with umbrellas and beach chairs scattered
in front of hundreds of shacks
selling cigars, souvenirs and Dominican aphrodisiacs. It didn’t
look that unsafe. But around the
beach, several people later told
me, tourists can find any type of
sex they might want: straight, gay,
sex with transgender people —
even illegal sex with minors.
Prostitution has long been a
part of Dominican culture, but
nowhere does it feel more entrenched than in Sosua. The sex
trade took off there in the 1980s
and ’90s, after a nearby airport
opened and foreign tourists
flooded the town. Over the next
few decades, the hotel industry
boomed, and Dominican women
headed for Sosua hoping to find
more profitable work. As prostitution increased, the town got a
reputation as a major sex-tourism
destination. Today, on the main
drag of Calle Pedro Clisante, dozens of prostitutes line the sidewalk in front of the busy open-air
restaurants and bars filled with
foreign men.
“Sosua has a before and after,”
said Alexandra Lister, a program
manager with CEPROSH, a
health organization based in
Puerto Plata, who has worked
with sex workers in the region
since the 1990s. “And the ‘after’
isn’t pretty.”
As we drove away, Ivonne
pointed out one hotel. It was a
three-story building, painted
lime green and white, where she
said my grandparents’ house had
once stood.
A man named Joe Benjamin
had lived next door. He understood why Sosua had changed. He
was the one I was going to see
next.
oe’s family arrived in Sosua in
1947, part of the last refugee
group selected by the Dominican Republic Settlement Association, an organization founded by the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee (JDC) in
New York, which sought safety for
Jews. In 1938, Trujillo had offered
to take in up to 100,000 refugees.
In turn, the association funded
and populated Sosua, but the outbreak of World War II and a 1941
Nazi ban on Jewish emigration
meant that only about 4,000 visas
were ever issued.
The association gave farmers
like Joe’s father a mule, a horse, 10
cows and 75 acres of land. In the
early days, urban transplants
wearing wide straw hats rode
horse-drawn wagons from one
plot to the next. Joe told me that
his father, once a furniture maker,
got up at 4:30 every morning to
milk his cows.
On weekends, a projector
would light up at the theater in
town for a matinee movie. Joe and
his sister would make the
two-kilometer walk back to the
family farm in the dark. He never
told his parents where he was
going. Nobody feared anything
then.
For decades, Joe, now 76, was
an executive with a successful
dairy and meat cooperative
founded by Sosua’s Jews. Today,
he lives in a spacious house on the
outskirts of town, in a plush development behind a guarded security gate. He told me how he’d
slept with his windows open as a
kid. He remembered the town
library, the cafe, the nights when
everyone gathered around a record player to listen to opera.
But I had heard those stories
J
AMERICAN JEWISH JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE
tration for permission any time
they wanted to leave Sosua, and
the nearest major town was hours
away by horseback or about an
hour by car, making romance between Dominicans and Jews difficult. These conditions helped
spawn cases of adultery in the
small community, constantly witnessed and whispered about.
“You never knew in the morning when you woke up which
young man had slept with a married woman,” Kohn said.
But it wasn’t only single men
sleeping with married women.
The settlers gossiped about both
husbands and wives engaging in
affairs, Joe Benjamin told me, and
the Columbia University analysis
mentioned a “sexual turpitude”
that had resulted in cases of syphilis.
It made me think of a short
passage in “Dominican Haven:
The Jewish Refugee Settlement in
Sosua,” one of the few books published about the town, that now
made a lot more sense. In the
255-page book, a few paragraphs,
easily overlooked, mentioned
these dalliances: In 1942, doctors
“warned men to stay away from
bordellos and unknown women
and, assuming their advice would
be ignored, to use condoms.”
The bordellos in question were
in Charamicos, a poor neighborhood on the south end of the
beach. The refugees had populated El Batey on the north end, and
those looking for sex would discreetly venture south. Today’s sex
industry is completely different,
employing women from across
the Dominican Republic and Haiti, who take spins around town
and on the beach looking for
clients.
“Everything is just much more
visible,” said Denise Brennan, a
Georgetown University professor
who wrote the book “What’s Love
Got to Do With It?” about Sosua’s
sex industry.
Still, it was the Jews — not the
tourists blamed for Sosua’s demise — who first visited prostitutes. But that part of the story
had been conveniently lost in the
retelling.
W
EMILY CODIK/THE WASHINGTON POST
HANS DEUTSCH/AMERICAN JEWISH JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Jewish refugees at the beach in Sosua, Dominican Republic, circa 1940; children celebrate Purim in the
1940s in Sosua’s school, which still operates today (Hella Blum, left, the aunt of Washington Post writer Emily Codik, taught first
grade); a hotel has replaced the Codiks’ house in the town where only a few descendants of the Jewish refugees remain.
before. I wondered if that was all
he knew.
“What else is important for me
to know?” I asked.
There are things you won’t find
in the history books, he said.
Then he made a reference to a
best-selling book I had never
read, about a fictional small town
where sex, gossip and scandal
hide behind the pretense of paradise.
“Sosua,” he said, “was a small
Peyton Place.”
I didn’t understand. What did a
racy novel have to do with my
family’s past?
T
he few published works about
Sosua read like history text-
books. But there were other
texts and documents that I had
never seen, and I knew where to
find them.
Next door to the town synagogue is a small Jewish museum.
Inside, I found a damaged photo
of my Aunt Margot’s wedding.
Documents on display showed
the stains of age. A map of Sosua
had lost one of its adhesive letters
and now read only “Sosu.” A
group of descendants, including
Ivonne and Joe, had planned to
raise funds for a renovation, but
the efforts have yet to get off the
ground.
The museum archives were in a
tiny air-conditioned room in the
back. Dozens of boxes sat on industrial steel shelves. It was overwhelming. There was so much
history here, none of it known to
me. I started pulling crinkled
sheets out of folders, searching
for clues.
I found a file for my Uncle Max,
my Aunt Hella’s husband.
Stashed inside, a form detailed
my aunt’s journey from Germany
to the Dominican Republic. I had
to read it twice. What it said went
against every story I had been
told about my family’s escape
from the Nazis.
They didn’t flee Berlin the
night before Kristallnacht. They’d
left a month earlier — Oct. 12,
1938 — and arrived in the Dominican Republic in November. A
separate list of settlers revealed
that the family arrived in Sosua in
stages, starting in 1947, much later than I’d thought.
Leaving on the eve of Kristallnacht had always been a key part
of our story, a hurried exit from
Berlin at just the right moment,
before Nazi mobs stormed Jewish
neighborhoods, killing at least 91
Jews, and anti-Semitism took a
more violent and radical turn. So
was their time in Sosua, but the
reality was that they didn’t arrive
there until after the war.
I had never asked about the
timeline. Instead, I pictured them
abandoning an apartment in Berlin and finding refuge in a rustic
home in Sosua. It was a reminder
of how stories, consciously or not,
can be romanticized as we retell
them, even to ourselves.
I started digging deeper into
the archives, looking for anything
that could provide a hint about
what Joe had told me. Fraying
papers, many stashed haphazardly in folders and boxes, detailed
transcripts of meetings, vital records, academic papers and memos sent from Sosua to the settlement association in New York.
On one shelf, I saw a narrow
light-blue box labeled “exit interviews.” I pulled it onto the table.
Inside were several testimonials
from refugees, all men, who had
abandoned Sosua and were apparently questioned by the settlement association about why
they’d left.
“I could not stay [sic] the sun,”
said a 29-year-old Austrian.
“I had nothing to do there,” said
a 27-year-old Romanian.
“The agricultural work was too
hard for me,” said a 34-year-old
Pole.
Then there were two others,
Tibor Meister, a 24-year-old Hungarian textile technician, and
Louis Lajos Klein, a 28-year-old
Czech mechanic, who cited tensions in Sosua that left them both
feeling panicked.
Meister said he was threatened
by a group of German Jews in the
dormitory.
“I have been attacked by some
twelve men while sleeping in my
bed,” Klein said. “That is why I
preferred to leave Sosua of fear
they might repeat it or kill me.”
Until then, I’d heard that people left Sosua in search of better
work or education. No one had
ever mentioned violence. Could it
have been true?
The JDC doesn’t have a record
of the incident, but in “Tropical
Zion: General Trujillo, FDR and
the Jews of Sosua,” historian Allen
Wells says the settlement association asked 45 troublemakers to
leave Sosua for Ciudad Trujillo in
1942. Meister and Klein could
have been part of that group.
Among other files, I found an
analysis written by former settler
Ann Bandler for Columbia University in 1956. She suggested that
Sosua’s administration had demonstrated an “impractical idealism” and blamed it for much of
what had gone wrong. With proper planning and management,
these middle-class, white-collar
Europeans could have built the
new life they had been promised.
Instead, the early settlers had felt
“dispirited and pessimistic” from
the start.
“They came to Sosua unprepared, unexperienced, unselected,” the document said. “It is not
sufficient to benevolently take
these people away from their past
sufferings and only deposit them
in an undeveloped area.”
A parade of experts, Bandler
wrote, had made plans for Sosua,
advising the refugees to plant
bananas, raise livestock or grow
tomatoes; that last effort resulted
in such a failure that a large
surplus of tomatoes spoiled and
FAMILY PHOTO
Clockwise from top left: Bruno Codik, Irma Codik, Manfred
Codik, Hella Blum and Margot Labi shortly after the family
arrived in the Dominican Republic from Germany.
was thrown into the sea.
The land they had been instructed to develop turned out to
be better suited for pasture than
farming, and the Jews ended up
finding success in a dairy and
meat operation that — ironically
— sold pork.
But the administration’s unkept promises and poor directions bred resentment, Bandler
wrote, until antagonism toward it
became the main bond among the
settlers.
The JDC acknowledges that Sosua’s refugees faced considerable
challenges. “The context under
which these efforts occurred was
totally unprecedented: a war raging, the Holocaust in full force
and many countries closing their
doors to Jews,” Linda Levi, director of the JDC archives, later
wrote me in an email.
Still, with every page I read, the
story that Sosua had been some
sort of paradise, the story I had
always been told, started to come
apart.
ocuments in the archives revealed tensions I had never
heard about, between Austrians and Germans, between
those who lived in town and those
on farms, and those who wanted
to improve the community and
those who wanted to abandon it
and immigrate to the United
States.
It wasn’t unusual for the Jews
to fight among themselves. People screamed at one another at
community meetings. Divisions
emerged over who would be the
boss and how to address the
town’s problems.
One main reason Sosua fell
apart, several refugees said in
interviews, was simple. It wasn’t
only the backbreaking agricultural work, the infighting, the culture shock or the desire to find a
better life in the States.
“There were very, very few
girls,” refugee Ruth Kohn, 90, now
living in Springfield, Va., told me.
Single men had trouble finding
marriageable partners in Sosua.
In 1942, according to the JDC,
among a population of 472 were
158 single men and 38 single
women.
The settlement association had
looked for young men with an
agricultural background who
could develop the land. Trujillo
also sought out men, hoping that
the wave of immigrants from Europe would intermarry with Dominicans and “whiten” his nation’s people.
Settlers had to ask the adminis-
D
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
hen I got back from Sosua,
I called my Aunt Hella
and told her that the archives told a different story about
our family’s journey. She said that
the night before Kristallnacht
must have been when they arrived in the Dominican Republic,
not when they left Berlin.
She told me that the first few
years in the country were hard —
my grandparents struggled to
learn Spanish and earn money.
Records the JDC sent me revealed
more details: In Santo Domingo,
then called Ciudad Trujillo, my
grandfather tried selling tableware, peddling kitchen coal,
working as a carpenter and serving as a messenger. But despite
working hard, he said he still
couldn’t make a living.
Maybe that’s why he decided to
move to Sosua. My Aunt Hella was
the first to go, after marrying my
Uncle Max, one of Sosua’s early
settlers, at 19. The rest followed
her. Hella and Max stayed in Sosua only a few years. My grandparents lived there through the
late 1950s, while my Aunt Margot
and Uncle Vittorio remained until the 1960s.
It was hard getting used to life
in Sosua, Aunt Hella said, but she
refused to believe the story about
the attack in the barracks. That
must have happened before she
got there, she said. She never saw
any violence like that.
I asked her about the affairs.
“Yes, people would trade partners,” she said. “That was a mess.”
Why don’t people talk about
those things? I told her that I’d
gone to Sosua to find out what
had happened. I left thinking that
idealism has always been a part of
the town, woven even into the
stories we tell.
There were challenges in Sosua, she said, but everyone could
live however they wanted, far
from the Nazis and without fear
of persecution.
“They were free,” she said.
That was what mattered, of
course. Sosua’s legacy is that it
saved so many lives. It’s easier to
hide the story’s difficult aspects in
a dusty box in a locked room, and
it’s more comfortable to remember the town as a perfect haven.
But the stories we tell ourselves
become history, and the full version of what happened in Sosua is
being lost. The town has become
so foreign to those who left that
some have vowed never to return.
My Aunt Hella told me about
one of the last times she visited,
with Vittorio, more than a decade
ago. She stood in the middle of the
town, stunned at how things had
changed, and turned to her brother-in-law.
“Let’s forget about this,” she
said.
emily.codik@washpost.com
This story was supported by a grant
from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis
Reporting.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C7
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
N-S VULNERABLE
NORTH (D)
KQ4
A
10 7 6 3
Q J 10 7 6
EAST
AJ8
752
AJ94
842
WEST
10 7 6 3
984
K852
K9
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
952
K Q J 10 6 3
Q
A53
The bidding:
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
1
Pass 1 1 NT
Pass 4 Opening lead — 2
WEST
Pass
All Pass
“I
read your columns,”
Unlucky Louie told me
in the club lounge. “You’re
always on my case for playing
too fast.”
“Rightly so,” Rose
remarked. She says that
hasty play is Louie’s nemesis.
“There are plenty of times
when the right play needs no
thought,” Louie sniffed.
To make his case for
haste, Louie produced
today’s deal. He had been
East, defending against four
hearts.
“My partner led the deuce
of diamonds,” Louie said,
“and when I took the ace,
declarer dropped the queen
— a likely singleton. What
would you lead next?”
“I see your point,” I said.
“East must hope West has
a club honor or, less likely,
a trump trick. The defense
also needs two spade tricks
— quickly, before South can
discard on the clubs. So East
must lead the eight at Trick
Two, hoping South has three
low spades.”
“It took me a split second
to find that shift,” Louie said.
“South went down.”
Louie defended well. Still,
playing without thinking is a
bad habit to cultivate.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
KQ4A
10 7 6 3 Q J 10 7 6
You open one club, and
your partner responds one
heart. What do you say?
ANSWER: No second bid is
ideal, but partner’s response
in a new suit is forcing, so
you must bid something.
A rebid of two clubs would
suggest a six-card suit but
would be the choice of some
experts. A bid of two diamonds would be a strengthshowing “reverse.” I would
try 1NT, promising (if not
quite delivering) a minimum
balanced hand.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C8
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | OCTOBER 18
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year your
attractiveness,
spontaneity
and unusual
resourcefulness make you a
star wherever you are. You
might have a difficult moment
or two, but you’ll sail right
through hassles. If you are
single, you might need to push
away all of your admirers.
Your popularity soars so high
that one of them might think
you are a rock star. If you
are attached, the two of you
could see the benefits of your
upbeat attitude, as long as you
don’t become too me-oriented.
A fellow Libra gives you great
advice!
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Someone close to you
suddenly becomes unusually
friendly and buoyant. You
might be watchful of what
comes down the path next.
This person’s feelings stem
from authenticity; they feel
more relaxed than normal.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Be willing to do more than
your fair share, whether at
the office or participating in a
routine event. Communication
opens up many unanticipated
doors. Someone at a distance
does their best to waylay your
plans!
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Your imagination might be
cherished by several of your
WEINGARTENS & CLARK close associates. This trait
not only helps you eliminate
unresolvable problems,
but also allows you to put
the cherry on top of fun
happenings.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Your domestic life often is a
high priority. Right now, your
optimism and abundant caring
liven up an issue around
your home. You will get past
someone’s resistance, no
matter how difficult or stoic
this person might be.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You speak your mind with
clarity and kindness. Right
now, you have a strong yet
caring edge to your words,
whether talking about
plans, feelings or making an
appointment.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You will feel indulged and/or
cared about. As a result, you’ll
spread those same feelings
to others. Buy a gift for no
reason other than to express
your feelings. A budding love
interest could become a bit
contrary.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Don’t hesitate to ask for what
you desire. Your alwayspresent charm soars, making
it difficult to say no to you. Be
careful about what you ask for,
as you are likely to receive just
that. Make sure that a leak is
not more than just a leak.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
You might want to take a
back seat and watch what
is happening. The smart
move might be to say less,
avoid making judgments and
observe. A person you meet
today could be very significant
and lucky for you. The bond
could have a secretive tone.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Your frivolous and fun
personality comes out with a
friend or a group of associates.
Someone might attempt to
rain on your parade, and will, if
you let them.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You stay on top of work and
other responsibilities with a
great deal of grace and caring.
Opportunities seem to come
toward you, which might be a
direct result of your attitude.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Keep reaching out for a special
person you care about who
is not readily available. Once
you finally make contact,
you’ll feel rewarded and as if
the connection was worth the
effort.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
One-on-one relating draws a
strong response from a friend.
You feel as if you can make
a difference by opening up
to this person and accepting
some of what they have to
offer. You don’t need to lose
some of your skepticism.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Harassment concerns
on the rise, poll finds
BY C AITLIN
AND E MILY
G IBSON
G USKIN
A solid majority of Americans
now say that sexual harassment
in the workplace is a “serious
problem” in the United States,
according to a new Washington
Post-ABC News poll — marking a
significant increase that has coincided with a period when several
high-profile harassment and assault scandals have unfolded.
In a 2011 Post-ABC poll, 47 percent of Americans said they felt
that sexual harassment in the
workplace was a serious problem. That number has now risen
to 64 percent. Nearly two-thirds
of Americans say men who sexually harass female co-workers
usually get away with it.
The new poll was conducted in
the days after a sexual abuse
controversy surrounding Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein made national headlines.
More than 20 women — including Oscar winners such as Angelina Jolie and Gwyneth Paltrow as
well as little-known aspiring actresses and low-level assistants —
shared their accounts following
investigative reports by the New
York Times and the New Yorker.
But recent years have also seen
similar allegations effectively
end the careers of comedian Bill
Cosby, Fox News chief executive
Roger Ailes and Fox anchor Bill
O’Reilly. Several women also accused then-candidate Donald
Trump of unwanted groping last
year.
The Post-ABC survey shows
that plenty of women identify
with the accusers in these cases.
One-third of women say that they
have experienced sexual advances from a male co-worker or a
man who had influence over
their job, and one-third of that
group of women say the male
co-workers’ behavior constituted
sexual abuse.
The trend shows little sign of
fading with younger generations,
EZ
C9
RE
Sharp increase in Americans who say sexual harassment
of women in the workplace is “serious problem”
Q: Do you think sexual harassment of women in the workplace is a
problem in this country or not? If you do: Is that a serious problem, or
not serious? (Percent saying “serious problem”)
64%
with 41 percent of employed
women under age 40 saying
they’ve received unwanted sexual
advances from male co-workers,
compared with 25 percent of
employed women ages 40 and
older.
About 8 in 10 women who
experienced unwanted advances
involving work considered it sexual harassment, while more than
3 in 10 considered it sexual abuse.
When asked about unwanted
sexual advances they deemed
inappropriate either inside or
outside their workplace, the
number leaps to a 54 percent
majority of women who say it’s
happened to them, the poll
shows.
The level of workplace harassment found in the poll is roughly
in line with numbers reported in
previous studies, according to
Fatima Goss Graves, president
and chief executive of the National Women’s Law Center, a Washington-based advocacy group.
She noted that certain fields —
such as construction, policing
and the restaurant industry —
have typically shown higher
rates.
The Post-ABC poll found that
42 percent of women who had
experienced harassment say they
had reported such incidents to
supervisors. Still, nearly 6 in 10,
or 58 percent of the women, said
they didn’t notify anyone in a
supervisory position.
“There’s a range of reasons
why people don’t report. One big
one is that retaliation often accompanies harassment,” Goss
Graves said. “People who come
forward risk isolation and shaming, and they risk short- or longterm damage to their careers.”
The steep rise in the number of
Americans concerned about the
issue is fueled particularly by
younger adults and women with
college degrees, the survey
shows. The share of female college graduates saying sexual harassment is a serious problem
60
47%
40
20
0
2011
2017
Source: Oct. 12-15 Post-ABC News poll with error margin of 3.5 points among 1,260 U.S. adults.
THE WASHINGTON POST
grew from 47 percent in 2011 to
76 percent in the latest survey.
Social media has added a dimension to the public discussion
of harassment. In April, after it
was revealed that Fox had
reached settlements with several
female employees who said
O’Reilly had harassed them, a
#droporeilly campaign emerged
on Twitter. After a leaked tape
captured Trump seemingly bragging about sexually assaulting
women, other women who had
endured abuse shared their own
stories on social media, tagged
their posts with #notokay.
On Sunday, actress Alyssa
Milano took to Twitter to encourage women who have been sexually harassed or assaulted to
identify themselves with just two
words: “Me too.” Within hours,
hundreds of thousands of social
media users had done just that.
Goss Graves said campaigns
like these “have raised tremendous awareness around notions
of consent, around harassment,
around being an effective bystander.” She added, “there has
been a renewed understanding of
the way in which harassment
takes place.”
But the Post-ABC poll shows
that most don’t hold much hope
that victims will find justice. A
65 percent majority of Americans, and more than three-quarters of women, say men typically
get away with sexually harassing
women in the workplace. And
among women who say they’ve
experienced unwelcome sexual
advances on the job, a whopping
94 percent say men usually avoid
facing any consequences for their
actions.
Of the women who have faced
harassment or abuse at work,
52 percent say they were left
feeling humiliated. A larger
64 percent said they were intimidated, and 31 percent said they
felt ashamed. But the strongest
majority — 83 percent — said
their experiences made them angry.
Concern about sexual harassment is yet another issue where
partisans are growing further
apart. While 79 percent of Democrats and 66 percent of independents say harassment is a serious
problem — both rising more than
20 percentage points in the past
six years — this number falls to
42 percent among Republicans,
little changed over that same
period.
The Post-ABC poll was conducted Oct. 12-16 among a random national sample of 1,260
adults reached on both conventional and cellular phones. The
survey included an oversample of
women resulting in 740 interviews, with the final sample
weighted to the share of men and
women in the U.S. adult population. The results from the full
survey have a margin of sampling
error of plus or minus 3.5 points
for the full sample and four
points among women.
caitlin.gibson@washpost.com
emily. guskin@washpost.com
Scott Clement contributed to this
report.
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Harvey Weinstein, right, with director Tony Maylam and Brad
Grey in 1980 on the set of “The Burning.” In 1971, Weinstein
crafted a misogynistic character in his college newspaper.
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MARGARET SULLIVAN
Was ‘Denny’ foreboding
alleged actions of Weinstein?
SULLIVAN FROM C1
most ethical people you’ll ever
want to know.”
Like a junior (and far less
appealing) version of Chicago
columnist Mike Royko’s alter
ego, Slats Grobnik, Denny the
Hustler was the kind of guy you
might encounter in local
watering holes.
“Go to a couple of ’em and
who knows, maybe you’ll get to
meet and greet Denny the
Hustler, Patchworks’ Man on the
Town, in person.”
Pure fantasy? Certainly in one
sense. Clumsy satire? Maybe.
But in some way, perhaps, a
glimpse of Weinstein’s predatory
DNA.
Corky Burger told me in an
email that his role in the early
partnership with Weinstein was
to sell ads. “I never did any of the
writing,” Burger said. After
reading the column, he added:
“Definitely, I didn’t write one
word of this.” (Living in Buffalo,
where he does part-time
consulting to raise money for
charities, he described himself as
“still in shock, appalled and
saddened” but not ready to say
anything more about Weinstein.)
The tale of Denny the Hustler
reminds us that one of the
easiest ways to hide is in plain
sight.
The column’s jokey tone —
violence against women is ever
so funny, right? — might recall
Bill Cosby’s onstage bits about
drugging women with the
supposed aphrodisiac Spanish
fly. (Like this one in 1969: “Go to
a party, see five girls standing
alone: ‘Boy if I had a whole jug of
Spanish fly, I’d light that corner
up over there.’ ”) Decades later,
dozens of accusers said Cosby
drugged women to molest them.
It might remind you of the
just-for-laughs bragging of
Donald Trump to Billy Bush on
the famous “Access Hollywood”
video about how easy it is to
grope women “when you’re a
star.” Afterward, multiple
women came forward to accuse
him of predatory behavior
toward them.
It might remind you of Seth
McFarlane’s much-quoted 2013
quip to the Oscar nominees for
supporting actress:
“Congratulations, you five ladies
no longer have to pretend to be
attracted to Harvey Weinstein.”
Is it ever really entertaining to
joke about drugging or groping
women, or cracking a beer bottle
over a woman’s head because she
refuses your advances? No, not
even in 1971.
It’s hard to know what the
psychological underpinnings
might be in all these cases, but at
the very least Weinstein’s
character provides a disturbing
window into his psyche and his
view of women.
Denny the Hustler’s story isn’t
literature by any stretch of the
imagination. Quite the opposite.
But as what might be considered
the juvenilia of a predator, it
nevertheless had something
important to say.
Too bad nobody was listening.
margaret.sullivan@washpost.com
For more by Margaret Sullivan, visit
wapo.st/sullivan.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
The oldest continuously used national flag in the
world is the Danish flag. The people of Denmark
have had the same red-and-white flag since 1625 —
that’s 392 years ago!
Plenty of sunshine and a little bit
warmer than Tuesday. In other
words, a totally delightful day.
Find more stories about
history and science on our
website, along with photos,
quizzes and events.
ILLUSTRATION BY CHARLOTTE CHAPMAN, 7, RESTON
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
DAVID LOH/REUTERS
Big-brained cetaceans, such as the
sperm whale, show sophisticated
behaviors, including babysitting.
Some types of whale
are killer smart
AK CHILD AND FAMILY
MADELINE MCGRAW/SEWARD LIBRARY & MUSEUM
Boy was proud to make a flag for his state
BY
A NN C AMERON S IEGAL
A drawing contest became a lifechanger for 13-year-old Benny Benson.
The year was 1927. The Alaska
American
Legion
sponsored
a
design-the-Alaska-flag contest for children in the seventh through 12th grades.
Alaska wasn’t even a state yet — it was a
territory — but some people thought that
having an official flag was a good first
step toward gaining statehood.
Of 142 entries submitted from territory schools, Benny’s design was chosen
because of its simplicity: eight gold-colored stars on a bright blue background.
Seven stars form the Big Dipper, part of
the Ursa Major constellation. The large
eighth star in the upper-right corner
represents the North Star.
Benny’s written description of his
design stated: “The blue field is for the
Alaska Sky and the forget-me-not, an
Alaskan flower. The North Star is for the
future of Alaska, the most northerly in
the union. The Dipper is for the Great
Bear — symbolizing strength.”
Benny’s prize was a gold watch with
his flag emblem engraved on the back.
1
4
10
14
15
16
17
19
20
21
22
25
28
31
32
33
34
37
41
42
43
44
45
46
52
53
54
57
58
63
64
65
66
67
68
ACROSS
Back (out)
Go by
Peak in Thessaly
Can. neighbor
City on the
Liffey
Performs like
Kanye
Eastern
seaboard,
facetiously
Frantically
Out in the open
Open in the
garden
Narrow opening
Unlikely to run
Insinuate
Kitchen gadgets
brand
Sneak attack
Dryly amusing
“More info
later”: abbr.
Increase security twofold ...
and what 17-,
25-, 46- and
58-Across
literally do
Radical ’60s gp.
Besides
Scramble, as a
secret message
Tile container in
Scrabble
Write, as music
Secret overseas
cash stash site
Japanese noodle
Leg bone
Midwestern city
associated with
steaks
Additionally
What Aladdin
craved and Jasmine wanted to
escape, in the
Disney film
Abbr. on a city
limits sign
What’s for
dinner
Speed (up)
Piece of glass
Radical in aspirin and vinegar
Spot on a
peacock’s tail
DOWN
1 Taylor Swift’s
“__ Song”
kidspost@washpost.com
Learn more
AK CHILD AND FAMILY
CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: Benny
Benson, age 13, after designing the
flag that still represents Alaska. The
group home where he lived at the time.
A stone memorial that depicts the flag.
“Alaska’s Flag,” the official state song,
incorporates Benny Benson’s description
of the flag he designed. Listen to the song
at wapo.st/AlaskaStateSong.
For more about the song’s history, visit
wapo.st/AlaskaSongHistory.
— Reuters
By Robin Stears
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
He also received $1,000, equal to about
$14,000 today.
In a TV interview years later, Benny
recalled the moment his name was
announced as the winner. “I darn near
fell out of my seat!” With a hearty laugh,
he added, “And school closed for the rest
of the day.”
It was a nice change from the sadness
of Benny’s early childhood. When he was
3, his family lost its house in a fire and his
mother died of pneumonia (pronounced
nuh-MO-nyuh). Because his father was
unable to care for him or his younger
brother, the boys lived in a group home
for children until they graduated from
high school. Benny later used his contest
award money to further his education —
learning to repair diesel engines and
eventually becoming an airplane mechanic in Kodiak, Alaska.
In 1959, 32 years after Benny won the
contest, Alaska became our 49th state,
and his flag has waved proudly ever
since.
Benson died in 1972, but he is still
remembered fondly throughout Alaska.
The Kodiak airport is named for him, as
are several roads and a school. A stone
memorial to the teen stands in the coastal
town of Seward, where he lived in 1927.
Denis McCarville, head of AK Child
and Family of Anchorage, said that each
year, on July 9, Alaska Flag Day, Benny is
remembered with pride, song and the
retelling of his story. “It is said, as a boy
when people would come to see the
‘famous’ designer of the Alaska flag, he
would usually find a way to be out in the
woods far away from the attention.”
“As a grown man,” McCarville added,
“Benny became used to the attention,
while remaining humble. A friend of his
once said that Benny was probably grand
marshal of more parades in Alaska than
anyone of his time.”
In a 1971 television interview, Benson,
then 57, said, “I think the biggest thing
that ever happened was when they flew
the Alaska flag to the moon with other
state flags” on the Apollo 11 mission in
1969. “I think that was quite a deal.”
Whales and dolphins — both members of the cetacean family — are
among the brainiest beings. Scientists have now identified differences
among them that are tied to relative
brain size.
A study of 90 cetacean species
published Monday found that those
with larger brains exhibit more complex social structures and behaviors,
with the killer whale and the sperm
whale leading the way.
Dolphins and whales “are extremely playful; they learn from each other,
have complex communication,” said
biologist Susanne Shultz of the University of Manchester in Britain.
Researchers created a database of
brain size, social structures and cultural behaviors across cetacean species. The group of species with the
largest brain relative to body size
were large dolphins, such as the killer
whale and the pilot whale, Shultz
said. Killer whales’ food preferences
are one of their complex behaviors.
Other big-brained cetaceans also
show sophisticated behaviors. Mother sperm whales, for example, organize babysitting duties to protect
their young while they hunt for food.
Some of the largest cetaceans —
including the blue whale — were on
the low end of relative brain size.
A son-in-law’s pocket of resistance
Hi, Carolyn: Our
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
2 Trident-shaped
letter
3 “You’re it!”
game
4 1999 Ron
Howard
satire
5 Journalist
Clare Boothe __
6 Multiple
choice choices
7 “Republic”
philosopher
8 Family gal
9 M.D. treating
canals
10 Postgrad tests
11 South Pacific
island nation
12 “Blazing
Saddles,”
for one
13 “Shoot!”
18 Après-ski
amenities
21 Dude
22 Herring prized
for its roe
23 Long rides?
24 Preparing to
flower
26 Handed-down
tales
27 Gas in a tank
29 Syst. with
hand signals
30 What a
treater
picks up
33 “Says __?”
34 Touch-related
35 In __ daylight
36 Supplement
38 Garment
worn in HBO’s
“Rome”
10/18/17
39
40
44
46
47
108-card game
Not hidden
Merit badge org.
Expensive
“My Ántonia”
novelist Cather
48 “Hedda Gabler”
playwright
49 It won’t hold
water
50 Nick of “Hotel
Rwanda”
51 Chain with a
Smart Sense
store brand
55 __-deucey
56 Scoundrel
58 Stew vegetable
59 Mandela’s org.
60 15-Across
locale: abbr.
61 2000s “SNL”
notable Tina
62 Wrapping time
TUESDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
son-in-law
recently lodged a
complaint that
our daughter
shared: that we
Carolyn
are “far too
Hax
involved” in their
personal business.
It makes him
uncomfortable to know his wife
talks to her parents about much
of their lives.
We understand and would
happily step back but are not
sure how to accomplish that
considering they live rent-free in
a home we own — this
arrangement was supposed to
last a year but has stretched to
three — and receive free child
care from us two days a week. We
are not choosing to be so
intimately involved in their daily
lives, but do not see how it’s
avoidable when they are so
reliant on us.
They are not in a position to
buy a home yet, and it would be
wasteful for them to start renting
just to have more independence
from us. No one wants to end the
babysitting arrangement,
although this is largely what’s
leading to our son-in-law’s
discomfort. Also, I am not sure
our daughter was supposed to
share her husband’s comment.
We are feeling awkward,
underappreciated and a little bit
hurt. What should we do?
— Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.: You could
step back to admire how
beautifully your daughter just
made his point, by oversharing
his concern about oversharing.
That would require a level of
detachment, though, that I
suspect you haven’t achieved.
For one thing, you cite a
financial arrangement as a
defense for an emotional one,
and it doesn’t work that way. Ask
anyone rearing aloof teenagers:
They can depend on you utterly
and break bread with you daily
and keep you thoroughly,
exquisitely shut out of their inner
emotional lives, if they so choose.
Being enmeshed on one front
doesn’t guarantee it on others.
Nor does being in control on
the financial front entitle you to
control on another.
There is intimacy in child care,
granted, especially since kids are
so gleefully unfiltered when it
comes to dishing on their
parents. But you can still opt not
to close that circuit, easily: 1.
Don’t circulate what your
daughter shares with you; 2.
Don’t circulate what the kids
burble to you, unless it’s utterly
superficial or utterly serious; 3.
Don’t give them unsolicited
advice, rearrange their
cupboards, correct their
parenting techniques. If asked
for advice, answer only
minimally, leaving room for
follow-up questions.
You can start applying these
best practices on this very topic,
since the oversharing issue isn’t
about you, it’s strictly between
husband and wife. Say so when
your daughter brings it up:
“We’ll be mindful not to butt in,
starting now: You two need to
work it out on your own.”
I’ll flag one thing that I hope
doesn’t sabotage this advice.
Abusers often isolate partners by
demanding “privacy” —
eavesdropping on calls, say, and
trying to clamp down on what’s
shared. I don’t necessarily
suspect it here but must be
thorough.
Please see how your opinion
has jumped into their finances,
too, and withdraw it; whether
you think renting is “wasteful” is
irrelevant. Maybe rent money
would be extremely well spent
toward their health and
independence as adults, spouses
and parents.
And maybe charging them
rent, which you then save for
them, would help set them free?
Just one idea toward a larger
point: Hereafter, contribute only
toward making yourselves
obsolete. It’s a parent’s most
precious gift.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
KLMNO
SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
BY
D AVE S HEININ
new york — There was a time,
around the turn of this century,
when the New York Yankees were
winning championships with
such regularity and winning postseason series in such outrageous
ways, it seemed they might never
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
M2
D
L.A. takes commanding lead Injury to Hayward shatters
by silencing Chicago again
Boston’s season in opener
New York storms back late,
ties Houston at two games
YANKEES 6,
ASTROS 4
.
lose one again. This phenomenon
peaked during the 2001 American
League Division Series, when
they trailed the Oakland A’s two
games to none but won three
straight games on three straight
days on two different coasts to
take the series.
Until they were officially vanquished — a finality that would
come, of course, at the end of that
postseason, with a loss to Arizona
in the World Series to end their
ALCS CONTINUED ON D3
DODGERS 6,
CUBS 1
BY
B ARRY S VRLUGA
chicago — Wrigley Field can be
a madhouse, for sure. The past
few Octobers, the streets that
surround it — Addison and
Clark, Waveland and Sheffield —
have filled with diehards in the
hours before and after these
postseason games, joy all
around. The stands, they can
shake. What can reasonably be
described as a frenzy, complete
with sing-alongs and city-wide
hugs, ensues.
But for all the mayhem, this
old yard can get quiet, too. Think
preschool at naptime, a chapel at
confession, an abandoned house
after dark. In those stretches
when the hometown Cubbies are
NLCS CONTINUED ON D3
Game 4: Dodgers at Cubs Today, 9 p.m., TBS
Game 5: Astros at Yankees Today, 5 p.m., FS1
CAVALIERS 102,
CELTICS 99
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
cleveland — Tuesday night’s
game between the Cleveland
Cavaliers and Boston Celtics was
one of the most anticipated basketball nights of the entire year.
It marked both the return of
Kyrie Irving to face the team he
asked to be traded away from
earlier this summer and the
beginning of the 2017-18 NBA
season.
Less than halfway into the
first quarter, none of that mattered anymore.
Gordon Hayward, the all-star
forward making his Celtics debut after signing with Boston as
a free agent this summer, fell
awkwardly after colliding with
LeBron James while going for an
alley-oop pass and crashed to the
floor, his left foot pointing in the
wrong direction after dislocating
his ankle and fracturing his left
tibia — an injury that could be
heard on TNT’s live television
HAYWARD CONTINUED ON D4
PHOTO BY KATHERINE FREY, PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CHE GRAHAM
Sound familiar?
The future is now.
Wall and the Wizards
give advance notice
Team hopes continuity will help it take next step, break Washington’s so-called curse
BY
Jerry
Brewer
C ANDACE B UCKNER
T
he morning the sun rose over a still-unbroken Washington sports curse, John Wall stretched
out on a courtside seat inside Madison Square Garden, pondering another season-ending loss
by the Washington Nationals. ¶ His Washington Wizards teammates were buzzing through
the end of their morning shoot-around, the charter bus purring outside ready to take on Manhattan. But Wall, devoted to his adopted home town more than the average NBA superstar, was engrossed in a conversation about a sport he barely knows. He had forgone the New York nightlife to
watch the winner-take-all Game 5 of the National League Division Series, from Gio Gonzalez’s first
pitch to Bryce Harper’s final strike. The morning after a wild 9-8 Nationals home loss to the Chicago
Cubs, Wall was using the pronoun “we” to express his disappointment. ¶ “I really don’t know the runs of
baseball, but it didn’t end as well as we wanted it to,” Wall said, less than 13 hours after Harper struck
out to end the game and the Nationals’ best World Series chance in years.
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D7
A year ago, the Washington
Wizards were just getting past
the name-tag stage of their
relationship. As the season
began, they had a new coach
and nine new players. They
had playoff hopes, but they
were more concerned with
saying Ian Mahinmi’s name
correctly.
On Tuesday afternoon, the eve of a 2017-18
campaign brimming with glorious possibility,
there was no feeling-out, no wondering how
to handle situations, no doubt about how
hopeful and urgent this season should be.
There was no easing into a long journey. The
Wizards talked about specific things such as
rebounding and defensive rotations, and it
wasn’t in an obligatory manner, either. They
were making certain that a clear objective —
win 50 games or more, advance to the
conference finals or beyond — wouldn’t be
inhibited by fine details.
For the Wizards, next season is here, finally.
Tomorrow is no longer a future concept.
They’re not a young and developing team in
need of a new coach’s voice anymore. They’re
a team with three players on maximum
76ers at Wizards, today, 7 p.m., NBC Sports Washington, ESPN
BREWER CONTINUED ON D6
HOCKEY
PRO BASKETBALL
PRO FOOTBALL
The Capitals’ defense tightens up
against high-scoring Toronto but the
offense struggles in a 2-0 loss at
Capital One Arena. D4
Our NBA season preview continues
with a look at rookie Markelle Fultz,
who comes along at a vital moment
in the 76ers’ “process.” D5
A federal court granted a temporary
restraining order to put Cowboys
running back Ezekiel Elliott’s sixgame suspension back on hold. D9
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D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
EARLY LEAD
Eagles fans
ask league
to keep ref
from team
BY
Canadian
curler has
a brush
with airline
EARLY LEAD
M ATT B ONESTEEL
The Philadelphia Eagles are 5-1
and coming off a pretty big win
over the Carolina Panthers, so
their fans should be pretty happy,
no? Actually no, they’re not happy.
Specifically, their ire is being
directed at referee Pete Morelli,
whose officiating crew flagged the
Eagles 10 times for 126 yards
against the Panthers while calling
only one penalty for one yard
against Carolina. It was a discrepancy of historic proportions.
Because of that and other recent Eagles games officiated by
Morelli, a fan named Will
Philbrick has started a Change.org
petition asking NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell to keep Morelli
away from Eagles games. It had
nearly 65,000 online signatures by
Tuesday evening.
“NFL Referee Pete Morelli has a
clear and statistically obvious bias
against the Philadelphia Eagles,”
Philbrick writes. “Over the last
four games that he has officiated
that the Eagles were playing in,
the Eagles were flagged a total of
40 times for 396 yards, while the
Eagles opponent in those games
were flagged a mere 8 times for 74
yards.”
Morelli’s work has come under
fire before. After a string of officiating gaffes in the 2015 season, his
crew was not selected to work the
postseason and then was broken
up after the season, a signal by the
NFL that it was not enamored
with Morelli’s officiating team.
With a new squad, Morelli was
back in the playoffs last year, however, officiating the AFC secondround game between the Patriots
and the Texans.
Since becoming an NFL referee
in 2003, Morelli has led the officiating crew in 15 games involving
the Eagles (three of them playoff
games). Philadelphia has gone 8-7
in those games, including 2-1 in
the postseason. However, the Eagles are 2-6 in their past eight
games with Morelli as referee.
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“This man in the Oval
Office is a soulless
coward who thinks
that he can only
become large by
belittling others.”
GREGG POPOVICH,
Spurs coach, in response to President
Trump’s false claim that former
president Barack Obama and other
commanders in chief “didn’t make
calls” to families of fallen soldiers.
BY
CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“We understand her reaction,” Burke Magnus, an ESPN executive, said of Sam Ponder taking issue with Barstool Sports.
Ponder slams her new colleagues
BY
C INDY B OREN
On the day before ESPN’s new latenight sports show featuring the guys
from Barstool Sports was to debut, one
of the network’s NFL hosts seemed less
than pleased with the idea.
The “Barstool Van Talk” show, which
debuted Tuesday night on ESPN2,
features Dan Katz and PFT Commenter
and promises to be, um, freewheeling.
Sam Ponder, in her first year hosting
“Sunday NFL Countdown,” has a
history with the website and knows full
well how the site’s misogyny-as-hobby
take on life can feel to a woman. She
was flashing back to a time three years
ago when the NFL was dealing with its
domestic violence crisis stemming
from the release of the Ray Rice video.
Back then, Ponder was making a name
for herself on ESPN’s college football
Saturdays and her husband, Christian,
was in his final season as a quarterback
for the Minnesota Vikings.
Ponder kicked off the dust-up
Monday with a tweet in which she
offered a sarcastic greeting to Katz,
who appears on the show and is known
as @BarstoolBigCat on Twitter.
“Welcome to the ESPN family
BarstoolBigCat (& welcome to all ur
minions who will respond to this so
kindly).”
She included images of something
that she said Katz had written — here’s
a cleaned-up version:
“Editor’s note — I know Feits
[Barstool blogger Feitelberg] blogged
this already. But I wrote it up too
because I’m fired the [expletive] up.
[Expletive] SAM PONDER THAT
BIBLE THUMPING FREAK . . . this
dumb. Seriously you sound like a KO
Barstool freak, not a chick that has a
job where the #1 requirement is you
[turn men on]. So give it a rest with
your righteous indignation. Your entire
career and livelihood is based on
appealing to guys like me and blogs like
ours. Bottomline [sic] is guys thinking
chicks are hot is natural. It’s
She and ESPN’s hosts from
Barstool Sports have spat
over perceived misogyny
Darwinism. It’s never gonna change.
But that doesn’t mean we don’t respect
women and think it’s okay to hit a
woman. I have no idea what’s so
confusing about that. Go [expletive]
yourself.”
Katz was not involved, but Feitelberg
and Barstool founder Dave Portnoy
were.
As she expected, Ponder heard all
about it on Twitter and clarified with a
tweet. “I was wrong in thinking
@BarstoolBigCat wrote that article &
called me a slut repeatedly. He just
continuously laughed along. It was the
PRESIDENT of @barstoolsports who
said these things. Happy to clarify.”
Portnoy’s response?
“Everybody out here getting mad,
committing libel,” he tweeted. “I’m very
happy that Barstool for the most part is
a family. Poke fun, make fun, row
together. Maybe that’s part of our
success?”
In
July
2014,
Feitelberg
screengrabbed a Ponder tweet
(“Blogs/websites that constantly
disrespect women & objectify their
bodies, then take a strong stand on the
Ray Rice issue really confuse me.”) and
wrote:
“Hmmmm kind of a strange take
here. The woman who was hired to
stand on the sidelines, because she’s
attractive, and report a stone’s throw
away from girls who were hired to
dance in their underwear, because
they’re attractive, is against blogs
saying women are attractive. Quite the
stance. Guess I have to start approving
chicks getting beaten now. Hey what do
you want me to do? It’s out of my
hands. I like pretty girls wearing little
clothes and I think it’s funny that
women are not great drivers. Only
logical that I should stand and applaud
anytime one takes an uppercut
deathblow.”
ESPN has been under intense
scrutiny over its social media policy of
late,
following
the
two-week
suspension of Jemele Hill, one of
ESPN’s biggest stars, who suggested
that NFL fans could boycott the Dallas
Cowboys advertisers because of team
owner Jerry Jones’s stance on players
standing for the national anthem.
In another high-profile case of ESPN
policing its own on social media, the
company
suspended
columnist/
podcast host/then-Grantland editorin-chief Bill Simmons from Twitter in
in 2013 after he criticized an exchange
on the ESPN show “First Take” between
host Skip Bayless and Seahawks
cornerback Richard Sherman.
Now another has called out a show
that will appear on one of its networks
and drew ESPN’s support as well as a
reminder that it would be watching
“Barstool Van Talk” closely.
“The comments about Sam Ponder
were offensive and inappropriate, and
we understand her reaction,” Burke
Magnus, the executive vice president
for programming and scheduling, said
in an email to The Washington Post.
“She is a valued colleague and doing a
great job for us. As stated previously,
we do not control the content of
Barstool Sports. We are doing a show
with Big Cat and PFT, and we do have
final say on the content of that show.”
Ponder herself wasn’t backing down
Monday night.
“Don’t feel sorry for me,” she
tweeted. “I have a voice & even though
it can be scary to use it sometimes (as
all my DMs right now confirm) if those
of us who have a platform don’t use
ours, those without one may not use
theirs either.”
cindy.boren@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
earlylead
Pitino sues Adidas
over recruit dealings
Former Louisville basketball
coach Rick Pitino is suing Adidas
and says the sportswear maker
“outrageously conspired” to
funnel money to the family of a
Cardinals recruit without his
knowledge.
Pitino’s lawsuit filed Tuesday
comes a day after Louisville’s
Athletic Association fired him for
cause after acknowledging the
program’s involvement in a
national federal bribery
investigation of college
basketball. Ten people, including
an Adidas executive, were
arrested in the probe, but Pitino is
not named in the federal
complaint.
Hours after his firing Monday,
Adidas terminated its personal
services agreement with Pitino.
The former coach’s lawsuit
states that Adidas’s activities
made it appear he was aware of
the practices and notes, “That
could not be further from the
truth.” Pitino’s suit seeks a jury
trial along with compensatory
and punitive damages.
Adidas said in an email to the
Associated Press that Pitino’s suit
Canadian-born curler Erin
McInrue Savage understands her
sport isn’t the most popular of
athletic endeavors in the United
States. But she doesn’t think she
should have to make the case that
curling is a sport at all.
Yet that’s what Savage, a researcher on aging, said she was
forced to do this month when an
American Airlines employee at
Phoenix’s Sky Harbor International Airport allegedly balked at
allowing her to check her curling
broom as sporting equipment.
“[The agent] said curling isn’t
a sport,” McInrue Savage, 34, said
Saturday, a day after documenting her exchange in a post that
went viral on Facebook. “I told
her it’s in the Olympics.”
McInrue Savage said the interaction began after the agent
initially refused to allow her to
check her equipment bag for $25,
the standard fee for an excess
sports equipment bag that her
curling teammates were charged
on the way out. (McInrue Savage,
who resides in Oakland, Calif.,
said she flew to Phoenix on a
different airline.)
“[The agent] said it wasn’t an
‘elite’ sport like golf,” McInrue
Savage recalled, noting that even
after giving the customer service
agent a history lesson about
curling’s origins, as well as offering to demonstrate how the
brooms worked by unpacking
them, the agent only relented
slightly.
McInrue Savage said the agent
tried to charge her the oversize
sports equipment fee of $150,
citing rules about standard
sports equipment luggage size
that limit items to 62 linear
inches and 50 pounds. Curling
brooms, which cost around $150,
are typically 48 inches long and
eight inches wide and often
weigh less than a pound.
McInrue Savage said the bag in
which she kept her brooms and
some other equipment was longer than 62 inches, but she was
able to get it under the limit by
removing the extra equipment
and duct taping the edges of the
bag. McInrue Savage said after
about an eight-minute exchange,
the agent finally agreed to allow
her to pay the $25 standard
sports baggage fee, but not without resistance. McInrue Savage
said the agent ended their exchange by telling her, “I hope you
never fly American Airlines
again.”
American Airlines is disputing
McInrue Savage’s account. The
post, which identified the agent
by name, also included a picture
of the agent’s badge, which led
Facebook to delete the post because it violated its “anti-bullying” policy. By then, however, the
post had already been shared
hundreds of times.
marissa.payne@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
TELEVISION AND RADIO
MLB PLAYOFFS
DIG ES T
COLLEGES
M ARISSA P AYNE
“is clearly a reaction to his
termination yesterday and is
without merit.” . . .
The Connecticut and
Providence basketball teams will
play an exhibition game next
Wednesday night to benefit the
Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund.
The schools said the NCAA
granted a waiver to allow the
extra exhibition game, provided
the proceeds are donated to
hurricane relief.
The game will be played at the
Mohegan Sun arena in
Uncasville, the home court of the
WNBA’s Connecticut Sun. . . .
Notre Dame quarterback
Brandon Wimbush is
“100 percent” healthy for the
team’s showdown Saturday night
against visiting Southern
California, Fighting Irish Coach
Brian Kelly said.
Wimbush sat out Notre Dame’s
last game, a victory at North
Carolina on Oct. 7, with a right
foot injury. The Irish were off last
week. . . .
SOCCER
Cristiano Ronaldo got the best
of Harry Kane in the duel
between two of Europe’s most
prolific forwards, but Kane’s
Tottenham celebrated after
taking a 1-1 draw from host Real
Madrid in the Champions
League.
Tottenham proved tough to
crack against the defending
champions and held on for the
draw that kept both clubs at the
top of Group H and in good
position to advance to the
knockout round.
The English club scored first
with an own-goal by Raphael
Varane as the Madrid defender
tried to clear a cross.
Ronaldo equalized for Madrid
by converting a penalty kick just
before halftime after Toni Kroos
was fouled. . . .
Elsewhere in the Champions
League, Liverpool racked up its
biggest ever away win in Europe,
ending its run of seven group
matches by crushing Maribor, 7-0,
in Slovenia. Mohamed Salah and
Roberto Firmino each scored
two goals.
And to cap a good night for
English sides, host Manchester
City defeated Napoli, 2-1. . . .
The United States will play
England on Saturday in Goa,
India, in the quarterfinals of the
Under-17 World Cup.
England advanced by defeating
Japan, 5-3, on penalty kicks after
a 0-0 tie. The United States
routed Paraguay, 5-0, in the
second round Monday.
MISC.
Top-ranked Rafael Nadal
withdrew from next week’s Swiss
Indoors, ceding the top seed to
seven-time champion Roger
Federer.
Nadal said he’s taking medical
advice to protect “over-stressing
of the [right] knee.”
He said the injury affected him
last week in Shanghai, where he
lost in the final to Federer. . . .
Maria Sharapova was beaten
by Magdalena Rybarikova, 7-6
(7-3), 6-4, in the first round of the
Kremlin Cup in Moscow, ending
her bid for a second title in two
weeks.
Sharapova, who won the
Tianjin Open on Sunday in China,
brought her usual power but
lacked accuracy with some wild
swings on key points. . . .
Former top 50 player Rebecca
Marino will come out of
retirement after more than 41/2
years and enter a pair of
tournaments.
Tennis Canada announced that
Marino, 26, will appear in events
at Saguenay and Toronto. Marino
left professional tennis in
February 2013 and said she had
been dealing with depression. . . .
Members of Congress asked
the nation’s governing body for
amateur football to detail its
5 p.m.
9 p.m.
ALCS, Game 5: Houston at New York Yankees » Fox Sports 1, WTEM (980 AM)
NLCS, Game 4: Los Angeles Dodgers at Chicago Cubs » TBS, WTEM (980 AM)
NBA
7 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, ESPN, WFED (1500 AM)
Minnesota at San Antonio » ESPN
NHL
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis » NBC Sports Network
Montreal at Los Angeles » NBC Sports Network
GOLF
10 p.m.
PGA Tour: The CJ Cup, first round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
6 a.m.
ATP: Stockholm Open, early-round play » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
FIFA U-17 World Cup: Ghana vs. Niger » Fox Sports 2
FIFA U-17 World Cup: Brazil vs. Honduras »Fox Sports 2
UEFA Champions League: Olympiacos FC at Barcelona » Fox Sports 2
NASL: Edmonton at Jacksonville » beIN Sports
efforts to make the game safer for
children.
Last week, Democrats on the
Energy and Commerce
Committee held a forum with
experts on brain injuries who said
tackle football poses serious risks,
especially for kids.
Committee Democrats sent a
letter to USA Football seeking
details on how it evaluates the
safety of its tackle football
programs for kids. USA Football
recently launched a pilot program
called Rookie Tackle for younger
kids, which uses smaller teams
and fields and rules that are
intended to reduce contact. . . .
Four-time Tour de France
champion Chris Froome capped
his season by winning the Velo
d’Or award as the best rider of
2017. . . .
A foundation that runs venues
from the 2002 Winter Olympics
in the Salt Lake City area needs
$39 million over the next decade
for infrastructure improvements
that would put the city in position
to make a bid for a future
Olympics in 2026 or 2030,
according to a new Utah state
audit made public.
— From news services
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
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baseball
Darvish shuts down Cubs as Dodgers take 3-0 NLCS lead
NLCS FROM D1
trailing and hope seems lost, the
frenzy is replaced by an uneasy
murmur, if that.
Which is exactly where we are in
this National League Championship Series. Tuesday night, the Chicago Cubs lost their third straight
game to the Los Angeles Dodgers,
this one 6-1. They will play for their
season Wednesday night back at
the Friendly Confines. Manage a
win, and return again Thursday to
try again.
But at this point, that quiet that
falls over Wrigley in those nervous
moments when the opponent surges ahead, or when the home team’s
offense falls flat — which it has this
entire series — seem to portend the
end of the season. The 2016 Cubs
won the World Series, and they will
never again buy a beer in this town.
But the 2017 Cubs appear ready to
exit, and meekly. The Dodgers —
with versatility throughout their
lineup and a bullpen that, at this
point, appears dominant — are a
better team, a better team now one
win from their first World Series
since 1988.
The Cubs’ offense, which has
scored four runs in the three games
of the series, was certainly the leading cause of those silent stretches
Tuesday. But there were other issues — the solo homers right-hander Kyle Hendricks allowed to Andre
Ethier (who had one previous atbat this postseason) and Chris Taylor, errors from third baseman Kris
Bryant and reserve outfielder Ian
Happ, a dropped third strike that
scored a run.
Still, if there was one moment
when the series seemed to close for
the Cubs, when “Wait till next year”
became the operative phrase —
again — in Wrigleyville, it had to be
in the top of the sixth, a frame that
started with Bryant’s error and included a walk from reliever Carl
Edwards Jr. to load the bases. After
Edwards recorded the second out,
Dodgers Manager Dave Roberts
made his first — and only — curious
move of the series: He allowed his
starter, Yu Darvish, to hit with two
outs and the bases loaded in a game
the Dodgers led just 3-1.
This was strange on a few levels.
Neither of the Dodgers’ previous
two starters, the godly Clayton Kershaw and the competent Rich Hill,
threw a pitch in the sixth inning of
their outings. Roberts had Curtis
Granderson, a veteran left-handed
hitter, on deck to pinch-hit. Yet
when the second out was recorded,
he pulled Granderson back and
sent up Darvish anyway.
And then, of all things, Edwards
couldn’t throw a strike. After
CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chris Taylor helped Los Angeles pull away from Chicago with a fifth-inning RBI triple. Taylor also homered Tuesday in the leadoff spot.
Darvish squared to fake a bunt on
the first pitch, catcher Willson Contreras went to talk to him. After the
second pitch began with the same
approach from Darvish and the
same result from Edwards, pitching coach Chris Bosio visited the
mound. No matter. Edwards
missed with his next two pitches,
and Darvish — who had drawn one
walk in his 131 major league plate
appearances — became the first
pitcher to draw a bases-loaded
walk during the postseason in 40
years.
That pushed the Dodgers’ lead to
4-1, and when Darvish got the next
four outs — turning the game over
to Los Angeles’s infallible bullpen
— Roberts’s chicanery had somehow worked out.
Even before all that, Cubs Manager Joe Maddon had to do something with his lineup just to show
he was trying to keep the Cubs’
season alive. In seven postseason
games entering Tuesday, the Cubs
were hitting .162. They had gone 0
for 24 against the Dodgers’ bullpen.
Their two most important offen-
JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES
Cubs players and coaches were dejected in the dugout — Chicago has scored just four runs in the NLCS.
Yankees storm back late, win Game 4 to even ALCS
ALCS FROM D1
streak of three straight titles —
you had no choice but to assume
the Yankees, until proven otherwise, would always win.
A baseball generation later, the
2017 Yankees — the “Baby Bombers,” as they are known — have
shown themselves to have the
same irrepressible quality to them
as their immortalized forebears.
Even when the situation is most
grim, if they have another game,
another inning or another swing
of the bat, these Yankees believe
they have a chance.
The latest proof came Tuesday
at Yankee Stadium in an improbable 6-4 come-from-behind victory
over the Houston Astros in Game
4 of the American League Championship Series, when the Yankees
erased a four-run deficit in a twoinning burst late in the game to
steal a win and even this best-ofseven series at two games apiece.
Game 5 will be Wednesday, with
New York’s Masahiro Tanaka facing Houston’s Dallas Keuchel.
“It’s like, ‘Okay, time to go to
work,’ ” said Aaron Judge, the Yankees’ rookie slugger and one of the
heroes of Game 4, of the team’s
mentality when trailing. “Sometimes I think we like playing with
our backs against the wall. It’s
kind of crazy.”
On Tuesday, the Yankees dug
themselves a 4-0 hole by the
game’s late stages — with the Astros getting three of those runs on
Yuli Gurriel’s bases-clearing double in the sixth — but took advantage of Houston’s most glaring
shortcoming, a bullpen perilously
thin in trustworthy arms, as well
as an uncharacteristic defensive
lapse by Houston’s infield, to construct a stirring comeback.
At the climax of the Yankees’
rally — when Judge doubled off
Astros closer Ken Giles to tie the
game, then designated hitter Gary
Sanchez doubled again two batters
later off Giles to give the Yankees
the lead — a delirious crowd of
48,804 had the new Yankee Stadium, which opened in 2009, quak-
AL BELLO/GETTY IMAGES
New York’s Aaron Judge celebrates his game-tying double in the
eighth Tuesday night. An inning earlier, he blasted a solo home run.
ing and pulsating in the same suffocating way the old building did
during the 1996-2001 glory days.
“I see things that I haven’t seen
in a while,” said Yankees Manager
Joe Girardi, a catcher on three of
those Yankees championship
teams. “And it reminds me a lot of
when I was playing here. . . . I just
feel like the fans are back.”
The margin between winning
and losing through the first 31/2
games of the ALCS had felt narrow, fleeting and fluky — a nifty bit
of base running here, a botched
outfield relay there, an awkward
hack that produced the Yankee
Stadiumest of Yankee Stadium
home runs. Even the Astros’ 4-0
lead was aided by a pair of errors
by Yankees second baseman Starlin Castro on balls hit directly to
him.
But in the eighth inning of
Game 4, the Yankees brought
down the hammer in a way that
felt definitive and emphatic, and
not the slightest bit fluky or fleeting. It was an inning in which they
applied relentless pressure to the
Astros, and the Astros, themselves
used to being the relentless ones,
fell apart.
“We got punched in the mouth
tonight,” Astros third baseman
Alex Bregman said. “But we’re going to fight back.”
The Yankees put the tying runs
in scoring position with nobody
out in the eighth when the Astros
failed to accept a gifted out the
Yankees attempted to hand them.
After pinch hitter Chase Headley
lined a ball into left-center off
Astros right-hander Joe Musgrove, sending Todd Frazier from
first base around to third, Headley
slipped between first and second
base, and the Astros appeared to
have him hung up.
But instead of the throw going
to second base — which at best
could have resulted in a quick
throw to first to nail the retreating
Headley, and at worst would have
held Headley to a single — second
baseman Jose Altuve called for
shortstop Carlos Correa, the cut-
off man, to throw to first, behind
Headley. To make matters worse,
when Headley changed directions
and charged toward second, Altuve took the throw from first
baseman Gurriel but failed to position himself in front of the bag.
Headley dove in, barely safe,
ahead of Altuve’s tag.
“Good base running on his
part,” Correa said of Headley.
“They got lucky. . . . We didn’t drop
the ball. We didn’t throw the ball
away. He just beat the throw. It
wasn’t a mistake there. It was just
— I guess he did better than we
did.”
But regardless of fault, the Astros now found themselves in a
bad way. The stadium walls were
closing in on them. There were
now runners on second and third
with nobody out, and Judge —
whose homer off Astros starter
Lance McCullers an inning earlier
had put the Yankees on the board
and knocked McCullers from the
game — was on deck.
“That was a big play,” Astros
Manager A.J. Hinch said of the
Headley at-bat, “because it set up a
ton of pressure on us for the rest of
the inning, with guys all over the
place.”
Hinch summoned his last line
of defense, his closer Giles, for
what would have to be a six-out
tightrope-walk of a save. He recorded only one of those outs before the save, the lead and — soon
enough — the victory were gone.
After Brett Gardner’s RBI
groundout made it 4-3, Judge
pounced on a 2-2 slider, bashing it
against the wall in left and tying
the game. Two batters later, Sanchez put the Yankees ahead.
All that was left was a perfect
ninth inning from Yankees closer
Aroldis Chapman, well-rested
thanks to Monday’s lopsided victory in Game 3, and the Baby
Bombers, babies no longer, had a
signature moment to celebrate at
Yankee Stadium — where they are
now 5-0 this postseason, with at
least one more game, and perhaps
as many as four, still to go.
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
sive players, Bryant and first baseman Anthony Rizzo, were 1 for 14 in
the series. Javier Baez, a wizard at
second base, was 0 for 19 with eight
strikeouts in the postseason.
So Maddon inserted left-handed
slugger Kyle Schwarber into the
second hole, dropping Bryant and
Rizzo to third and fourth, respectively. He benched Baez in favor of
switch-hitting Ben Zobrist, who he
played at second and hit first.
“My perspective or perception is
that we need to hit a couple balls
hard in a row — successful hits —
and then move on from there and
see what happens,” Maddon said.
“We just haven’t been able to do
that. And it’s not just the Dodgers
series, quite frankly. Winning three
out of five against Washington, we
didn’t beat them up either, offensively.”
The hard hits — successful hits
— started in the first for the Cubs.
Schwarber absolutely pulverized
the first offering he saw from
Darvish into the seats in left-center,
and Wrigley leapt to life. Bryant
and Contreras both smacked hard
singles that inning. But when
Darvish struck out Jon Jay, he had
escaped the frame without further
damage.
And from there, the Cubs continued their funk. With the specter of
the Dodgers’ bullpen looming,
Darvish sprinkled three harmless
singles and a walk over the remainder of his outing. The only time the
Cubs put two men on in the same
inning — the fourth — Maddon
elected to have Hendricks hit for
himself with two outs and men on
first and second. Hendricks struck
out.
Thus, Wrigley had its quiet
spells, unmistakable around here.
Last fall, there was so much tension
and angst in this ballpark — when
108 years of frustration were replaced by a championship that will
never be forgotten — that the lulls
made sense. Now they’re back
again, even if the angst is gone.
They came Tuesday night because
the Cubs didn’t hit, because they
walked the pitcher with the bases
loaded, because they started kicking the ball around.
But they came, too, because the
Dodgers are displaying that they
are a superior team. They were
better during the regular season,
104 wins to 92. They have been
better over the first three games of
this series, by the cumulative score
of 15-4. And if the Dodgers can
inflict one more quiet night on the
Cubs, they’ll be back in the World
Series for the first time in 29 years,
and Wrigley will fall silent all winter.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
K
Capitals tripped up by lack of balance
Bulls’ Mirotic is injured
in fight with teammate
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
As goaltender Braden Holtby
scrambled in the crease with the
puck among his pads, Toronto forward Connor Brown gave it one
whack and then another, nudging it
through Holtby’s legs for a goal.
Entering Tuesday night’s game, the
Washington Capitals likely would
have been pleased that a high-powered Maple Leafs offense managed
just one goal on Holtby.
Washington’s recent defensive
struggles have drawn much of the
attention, but it was the offense that
stalled against Toronto. The Capitals were shut out in a 2-0 loss, with
the second goal going into an empty
net in the last minute of the game.
The team took one step forward
defensively and one step back offensively as it continues to search
for the right balance of both.
“They scored on their chance,”
Coach Barry Trotz said. “We just
need to score on ours.”
The last time these two teams
played each other was in April in a
first-round playoff series that
Washington won. At the time, the
Maple Leafs were announcing
themselves as future contenders
while the Capitals were holding
their position as the more seasoned
and structured group. But Tuesday’s game was something of an
early-season measuring stick for
both squads.
Judging by this matchup, the
Maple Leafs appear to have established more of an identity than this
version of the Capitals, who are still
very much a work in progress with
five new faces in the lineup. This is
the first time the Maple Leafs have
ever blanked the Capitals in Washington.
“We’d be kidding ourselves if
we’re not going to have some growing pains along the way,” Holtby
said. “It’s just how we handle them
and what we do with them. How do
we fight through them and get better? Because we know we have the
capability in this locker room. It
doesn’t take one week or two weeks
to build a team chemistry and a
team identity. It takes a while. As
long as we’re working at it and have
full commitment, it’ll come sooner
rather than later.”
Toronto entered the game scoring more than five goals per game,
the most in the NHL, while Washington averaged 3.67 goals per
game and centers Nicklas Backstrom and Evgeny Kuznetsov were
tied for the league lead in points
with 11.
But what was expected to be a
high-flying, high-scoring matchup
was the opposite after 40 minutes.
Neither team had scored, and both
recorded only 17 shots on goal
AND STAFF REPORTS
PHOTOS BY TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Connor Brown’s third-period goal, above, helped lift Toronto to its first shutout victory in Washington.
Maple Leafs 2, Capitals 0
TORONTO ................................ 0
WASHINGTON ......................... 0
0
0
2 —
0 —
2
0
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: None. Penalties: Marleau, TOR, (tripping),
18:50.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: None. Penalties: Kadri, TOR, (closing hand on
the puck), 14:11; Walker, WSH, (holding), 16:48.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Toronto, Brown 2 (Rielly), 5:53. 2, Toronto,
Kadri 3 (Rielly, Hyman), 19:38. Penalties: Ovechkin,
WSH, (high sticking), 1:08; Bozak, TOR, (slashing), 2:05.
SHOTS ON GOAL
TORONTO ................................ 7
10
13 — 30
WASHINGTON ......................... 7
10
13 — 30
Power-play opportunities: Toronto 0 of 2; Washington 0
of 3. Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 5-1-0 (30 shots-30
saves). Washington, Holtby 3-2-0 (29-28). A: 18,506
(18,277). T: 2:24.
C A P I TA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
Winger T.J. Oshie and the Capitals held the NHL’s highest-scoring
team in check in the teams’ first meeting since last year’s playoffs.
through two periods as players on
both sides fumbled scoring
chances.
“I think these teams now both
respect each other a lot,” Capitals
forward Tom Wilson said. “Both
teams have a lot of firepower in the
top six, and you know what, both
teams have kind of seen what the
other can do. Maybe there was a bit
of a feeling-out period and respecting kind of on the defensive side of
the puck.”
For Washington, holding the
Maple Leafs scoreless through two
periods felt like a win in itself. The
Capitals entered this matchup depleted with top defenseman Matt
Niskanen out for a second straight
game with a hand injury. The Capitals had been struggling defensively even with Niskanen in the lineup,
allowing the sixth-most shots
against through five games. But in
the team’s first game without Niskanen on Saturday against the Philadelphia Flyers, an inexperienced
defense that includes two rookies
allowed eight goals in regulation
for the first time since 2006 in an
8-2 loss.
In addition to putting its depleted defense up against the highestscoring team in the league, Washington was without its checkingline center because Lars Eller was
too sick to play. Tyler Graovac centered the third line in place of Eller,
but after Graovac played just five
shifts and 2:41 in the first period, he
suffered an upper-body injury that
ruled him out for the rest of the
game. After the game, Trotz said he
wasn’t sure of the extent of Graovac’s injury yet, just that “he’s going
to miss a little bit of time here.”
Washington had just one practice day to correct the issues that led
to the humiliating loss in Philadelphia. Perhaps with this blue-line
personnel, the Capitals couldn’t afford to be the freewheeling offensive team of the past few years and
needed to adopt a more conservative approach. As Trotz said Monday, “If you want to trade chances
against the Toronto Maple Leafs, I
know who’s winning that.”
The demoralizing part about
Tuesday’s loss was that Washington
at Detroit Red Wings
Friday
7:30 NBCSW Plus
Saturday
7:30 NBCSW
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Sidney Crosby scored the tying
goal with less than a minute remaining in regulation, Evgeni
Malkin put in the winner 58 seconds into overtime and the Pittsburgh Penguins beat the struggling New York Rangers, 5-4, on
Tuesday night at Madison Square
Garden.
of the third period.
Desharnais, Pavel Buchnevich
and J.T. Miller scored in a span of
2:30 as the Rangers got three
straight goals early in the second
to take a 3-2 lead.
Crosby scored with 56 seconds
left in the third period when he
put a puck between Lundqvist’s
pads. It was Crosby’s fifth consecutive game at Madison Square Garden with a goal.
DEVILS 5, LIGHTNING 4
(SO): Kyle Palmieri scored the
lone goal in a shootout as New
Jersey held off Tampa Bay in New-
— Tim Bontemps
Jefferson joins Nuggets
Richard Jefferson, 37, will join
the Denver Nuggets on a one-year
deal, a person with knowledge of
the negotiations confirmed to the
Associated Press. ESPN first reported the deal, which it said is
worth $2.3 million.
Hayward’s injury makes
Celtics’ loss excruciating
at Vancouver Canucks
Oct. 26
10:00 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM);
WFED (1500 AM)
HAYWARD FROM D1
did well to avoid trading chances
with the Maple Leafs, and the Capitals just didn’t capitalize on their
own.
Maple Leafs goaltender Frederik
Andersen finished with 30 saves to
earn the shutout.
“I thought defensively we were
obviously better than in Philly, but
we’re going to need to score some
goals,” forward Brett Connolly said.
“I think it’s a step in the right direction defensively, but we weren’t
scoring tonight. That’s how it
works. You’ve got to bring both elements to the game to win, and we
didn’t do that tonight.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
Crosby, Malkin help Pittsburgh keep N.Y. reeling
Patric Hornqvist, Phil Kessel
and ex-Ranger Carl Hagelin also
scored for the two-time defending
Stanley Cup champions, who
handed New York (1-5-1) its fourth
straight loss.
Rangers captain Ryan McDonagh turned the puck over in overtime and Kessel set up Malkin for
the game-winner. Just before that,
the Rangers iced the puck, leading
to a faceoff in their zone.
Michael Grabner put New York
ahead 4-3 when he and David Desharnais completed a nifty giveand-go at the eight-minute mark
What already was set to be a
long season for the Chicago Bulls
suddenly got significantly worse
Tuesday.
Nikola Mirotic, arguably Chicago’s best player, suffered multiple
broken bones in his face and a
concussion after being punched
by teammate Bobby Portis in an
altercation during practice. Mirotic will require surgery and will
likely miss an extended period of
time.
“Chicago Bulls forwards Bobby
Portis and Nikola Mirotic had a
physical altercation during today’s practice,” the team said in a
statement released Tuesday evening. “As a result of the incident,
Mirotic suffered a concussion and
maxillary fractures. Surgery is
likely required. Miroti is out indefinitely.
“The Bulls are evaluating disciplinary action. An update will be
provided when applicable.”
After trading star forward Jimmy Butler to the Minnesota Timberwolves in a draft night deal in
June to move from being a borderline playoff team in the Eastern
Conference into a full-scale rebuild, the Bulls enter this season
expected to be among the worst
teams in the NBA. And that was
before losing Mirotic, who averaged 10.6 points and 5.5 rebounds
last season.
The question now is not only
when will Mirotic return, but
when — or whether — Portis will
play for the Bulls again.
Portis, 22, was Chicago’s firstround pick (22nd overall) in the
2015 draft and was expected to be
a key part of the Bulls’ frontcourt
rotation this season. So was Mirotic, who was slated to begin the
season as the team’s starting power forward.
Now, in the wake of Tuesday’s
incident, both look like they could
be out of the picture for quite some
time. In their wake, the most logical option to soak up those minutes — and a starting spot — would
be Lauri Markkanen, the 20-yearold forward the Bulls took seventh
overall in June’s draft. That pick
was the centerpiece of the Butler
trade in June, which also brought
back guards Zach LaVine and Kris
Dunn.
Both of those players will also
start the season on the sidelines —
LaVine is recovering from a torn
anterior cruciate ligament he suffered last season, while Dunn suffered an open dislocation of his
left index finger earlier this month
and will be out for a couple of
weeks.
The combination of injuries to
Mirotic, LaVine and Cameron
Payne — out for several weeks
after undergoing surgery for a broken bone in his foot — would allow
the Bulls the option of applying for
a long-term injury exception to
give them an extra body to help fill
out their roster.
vs. Florida Panthers
NHL ROUNDUP
PENGUINS 5,
RANGERS 4 (OT)
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
NBA NOTES
MAPLE LEAFS 2,
CAPITALS 0
BY
. WEDNESDAY,
ark. Drew Stafford scored twice in
regulation as the Devils improved
to 5-1-0.
Palmieri and Brian Gibbons
each had a goal in the first period,
and Cory Schneider made 33
saves. Tampa Bay had its fourgame winning streak snapped.
Nikita Kucherov scored his
eighth in seven games for the
Lightning. He has scored at least
once in every game this season,
and the 24-year-old right wing became the sixth player in modern
NHL history to score at least one
goal in the first seven games of a
season.
FLYERS 5, PANTHERS 1:
Sean Couturier, Shayne Gostisbehere, Claude Giroux and Dale
Weise all scored in the second
period to lead Philadelphia past
visiting Florida.
The Flyers followed an 8-2 win
against Washington with another
dominant offensive effort, capped
by the four-goal second.
Michal Neuvirth made the lead
stand with 40 saves in his first win.
STARS
3,
COYOTES
1:
Radek Faksa, Dan Hamhuis and
Alexander Radulov scored their
first goals of the season, and host
Dallas beat Arizona (0-5-1), the
only NHL team without a victory.
CANUCKS 3, SENATORS 0:
Brock Boeser and Alexander Burmistrov had a goal and an assist
each for Vancouver in Ottawa.
PREDATORS
4,
AVALANCHE 1: Viktor Arvidsson and
Roman Josi each had a goal and an
assist as host Nashville won for the
third time in four games.
BLUE JACKETS 5, JETS 2:
In Winnipeg, Jack Johnson’s goal
13:54 into the second period was
the eventual winner as Columbus
extended its win streak to four.
HURRICANES 5, OILERS
3: Teuvo Teravainen had a pair of
goals and Jordan Staal a goal and
three assists to help visiting Carolina hand Edmonton its fourth
straight loss.
broadcast.
In an instant, an arena that
had been full of frenetic energy
was shocked into a sudden silence, while players on both
teams reacted in horror. And at
the same time, a team that entered the season projected to be
among the NBA’s elite now finds
itself staring at a far different
reality than it was expecting.
Boston eventually fought back
from an 18-point deficit to lose,
102-99, but the result was largely
irrelevant. Hayward’s injury, and
the impact it had on both the
Celtics and the rest of the Eastern
Conference, pushed all other story lines to the rear.
“This stuff is so fragile,” Golden
State Warriors Coach Steve Kerr
said some 2,000 miles away as he
was preparing for his own game
against the Houston Rockets. All
it took was one attempted alleyoop pass for everything Boston
had hoped to see during this
season get wiped away in the
blink of an eye.
Teams spend months, if not
years, preparing meticulously to
go into the offseason looking for
specific ways to improve their
teams and then do their best to
execute those plans.
Boston did exactly that this
summer, not only convincing
Hayward to leave the Utah Jazz to
rejoin Celtics Coach Brad Stevens
— his college coach at Butler —
but pulling off one of the most
stunning trades in recent years to
land Irving. By pairing the two of
them with Al Horford, the Celtics
felt like they had a chance to give
James his biggest challenge yet
during his seven-plus years of
Eastern Conference dominance,
while at the same time setting
themselves up to be a contender
for years to come.
Now all of that has been
thrown into the air. It’s still unclear when Hayward is going to
be back, but anyone who witnessed the injury here at Quicken
Loans Arena on Tuesday night
was under no illusions that such a
recovery would be a speedy one.
“You hurt for him,” Stevens
said. “He’s put in a lot of great
work, and I thought he had his
most comfortable week, as far as
feeling like he was going to play
really well. Now hopefully we get
a full recovery.
“It’s a tough deal, but I guess
that’s part of it, the risk of injury. I
really feel for him.”
Boston sacrificed quality depth
to acquire Irving and Hayward,
making Jae Crowder part of the
package that went to Cleveland in
exchange for Irving and shipping
Avery Bradley to Detroit for Marcus Morris, allowing the Celtics to
clear just enough salary cap space
to sign Hayward.
Those were moves any team
would do to land players of Irving
and Hayward’s caliber. But they
GREGORY SHAMUS/GETTY IMAGES
LeBron James shares an
embrace with Kyrie Irving after
the Cavaliers edged the Celtics.
forced Boston to sacrifice a good
portion of the depth that made it
successful last season in exchange for being able to rely on
truly top-end talent.
The problem is that with one of
those top-end talents now gone,
the burden has grown on the
team’s inexperienced depth pieces to pick up the slack in Hayward’s absence.
“We have to,” Stevens told
TNT’s broadcast at halftime,
when asked how his team would
cope with Hayward’s injury. “It’s
on all of us to fill our roles more
effectively because, well, we have
to.”
Hayward’s injury also blows
open the top of the Eastern Conference, where many had presumed the Celtics would be positioned alongside the Cavaliers
this season. One of the teams that
is best positioned to fight for a top
two seed alongside Cleveland is
the Washington Wizards.
There already wasn’t much of a
gap between Boston and Washington even before Hayward’s injury. After it? One could argue the
Wizards are the clear favorites to
secure home court until at least
the Eastern Conference finals —
and, with it, yet another chance to
end
Washington’s
20-year
drought without a conference
final appearance in any of the
four major professional sports.
None of that was on the minds
of anyone here at Quicken Loans
Arena on Tuesday night, though.
Instead, it was the image of Hayward on the ground, his left leg
bent at the knee and his foot
pointing in the wrong direction.
“It was very difficult,” Cavaliers
Coach Tyronn Lue said. “Even
though he was from the opposing
team, we’re still a fraternity, and
we’re still brothers. You never
want to see anyone get injured or
go down like that.”
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
KLMNO
nba preview
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2017
.
PAGE D5
JESSE D. GARRABRANT/NBAE/GETTY IMAGES
L O W - P R E S S U R E S I T U AT I O N
Deep and talented 76ers don’t need Markelle Fultz to be a franchise savior like many other No. 1 picks
BY
J ESSE D OUGHERTY
M
arkelle Fultz’s professional career will begin just a short drive from Prince George’s County, where he
grew from a small kid into a 6-foot-4 bigger kid, where doubt, both perceived and palpable, seemed to always follow him, and where his dream of one day being an NBA player — scratch that: an NBA star —
was first hatched. ¶ Fultz, the player cut from DeMatha Catholic’s varsity team as a sophomore, late to
show up on the radar of top college recruiters and then ridiculed for leading the University of Washington to just nine wins as a freshman last season, is debuting as the league’s most recent No. 1 pick. Thing is, he’s being
treated as anything but. ¶ The 19-year-old guard will, in all likelihood, be coming off the bench when his Philadelphia
76ers tip off with the Washington Wizards at Capital One Arena on Wednesday night. In a preseason survey of NBA general managers, Fultz did not receive a single vote to win rookie of the year. Lonzo Ball, the player picked one spot behind Fultz
who has a talkative father you may have heard of, received 19. Ben Simmons, who was selected first overall by the 76ers in
2016 and is also debuting after missing all of last season with a foot injury, received seven.
FULTZ CONTINUED ON D6
Wizards’ roster A look at who’s who entering the 2017-18 season. D7
Continuity counts East’s contenders face varying degrees of turnover. D7
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
nba preview
FULTZ FROM D5
Now Fultz, who was sidelined
by an ankle injury during summer league play and bothered by
lingering shoulder and knee soreness in recent weeks, starts his
career as a sort of sidekick to
Simmons and center Joel Embiid.
It is an odd position for a first
overall pick, especially one whose
team traded up for him and is
playing in a town that so rarely
offers a grace period to athletes of
any distinction. It may also turn
out to be a favorable position.
“At this point, it’s almost as if
they have three No. 1 picks in one
year and you are seeing them at
the same time,” said Mike Sielski,
a sports columnist at the Philadelphia Inquirer. “It’s Simmons,
it’s to a degree Embiid, and then
Fultz is kind of almost third in
that regard. That’s how people
around here are looking at it, and
that will give Markelle some time
to grow.”
The expectations for Fultz,
however tempered heading into
the season, are emblematic of
where the 76ers are as a franchise.
In 2013, when Sam Hinkie was
the team’s general manager and
the basketball world was being
told to “Trust The Process,” Michael Carter-Williams and Nerlens Noel were drafted directly
into leading roles. Noel, still recovering from a torn anterior
cruciate ligament, was unable to
fulfill his while missing his entire
rookie season. Carter-Williams
was handed the keys to the 76ers’
offense and immediately became
a round-the-clock ballhandler
who took 15.1 shots per game.
Carter-Williams was named
rookie of the year, but he struggled to shoot and take care of the
ball, the former a requirement for
the modern point guard and the
latter a fundamental necessity.
The 76ers won just 19 games —
good for tanking, later bad for
Hinkie’s job security — and the
only reason to watch the team
was to check on its future pieces.
It quickly became easy for those
future pieces to disappoint.
“Noel and Carter-Williams
came in like they were supposed
to be franchise saviors, whereas
most players drafted sixth and
11th, you don’t look at them that
way,” said the Athletic’s Derek
Bodner, who has covered the
76ers for various outlets for four
years. “But since they were the
first pieces acquired during that
rebuild, it changed things.
Whereas Markelle is probably the
last real high draft pick the team
will have and therefore won’t
have that burden.”
So while most No. 1 picks join
barren rosters begging for a centerpiece, Fultz joins Embiid, Simmons, second-year forward Dario
Saric, veteran sharpshooter J.J.
Redick, Robert Covington and his
floor-scraping arms, and journeyman guard Jerryd Bayless, who is
expected to start in the backcourt
alongside Simmons and Redick
on Wednesday.
That is a team that, if Embiid
stays even relatively healthy,
could contend for a playoff spot
after winning a total 75 games in
Brett Brown’s first four seasons as
head coach. And while Fultz is
the most recent addition to the
franchise’s core, Simmons and
Embiid each carry high levels of
intrigue into this season.
FULTZ IS JUST
O N E PA R T O F
THE PROCESS
Simmons, a 6-10, rim-stalking
point forward, already has more
Showtime documentaries made
about him (one) than NBA minutes played (zero). He is slotted to
be the team’s primary ballhandler, and his highlight reel of
no-look passes, all from college at
Louisiana State or games that
didn’t count, present him as a
skilled facilitator for any player,
let alone one his size. The 7-foot
Embiid was drafted third overall
in 2014 but has played just 31
games, all last season. He averaged 20.2 points and 7.8 rebounds and shot 36.7 percent
from three in those games, and
his dunks and step-back jumpers
plastered him all over social media. His own jocular tweets have
helped with that, too.
Then mix in two solid floor
spacers in Redick and Covington,
veterans such as Bayless and
Amir Johnson, and backcourt
depth, and it all makes for a
favorable situation for a teenager.
“With Fultz coming in, it’s like,
well, the team should be pretty
good, a lot better than it’s ever
been,” Sielski said. “So whatever
they get from Fultz should be
gravy at this point.”
That is not to say that Fultz
won’t face challenges as a rookie.
JESSE D. GARRABRANT/NBAE/GETTY IMAGES
Rookie guard Markelle Fultz will begin the
year coming off the bench for Philadelphia,
which opens tonight at Washington.
Some have come already. He has
been mocked for his shooting and
free throw form during the preseason, and he has linked those
struggles to shoulder soreness.
He often played as a pick-and-roll
ballhandler in college but will
have to adjust to being an offguard when on the court with
Simmons. Even if he isn’t expected to carry a heavy load from the
start, Philadelphia fans will still
question General Manager Bryan
Colangelo’s decision to trade up
two picks when Fultz’s first dry
spell comes. And in an 82-game
season, it will come.
But he will also be able to wade
into the NBA spotlight as an
off-the-bench scorer, surrounded
by young, talented players on a
team that is done rebuilding but
still permitted growing pains.
“He has a very good situation
for himself,” said Stu Jackson, a
Turner Sports NBA analyst who is
also a former coach and executive. “There’s an opportunity here
for him to get playing time but
not also have to necessarily be the
franchise player, and it’s an opportunity for him to develop on a
more realistic timetable.”
On Monday morning, Philadelphia’s sports fans likely turned
their car radio dials to 94.1 WIP-
FM while driving to work. The
day before, Brown indicated that
Fultz would not start in the
opener because he “hasn’t played
much basketball in the preseason.” In many cities, it would
be irrational for radio hosts to dig
into a 19-year-old player, who had
yet to lace up for a regular season
game, for being eased into action
by a coach.
In Philadelphia, it is odd that it
didn’t happen.
For four hours, stretching from
6 a.m. to 10 a.m., fill-in host Al
Morganti facilitated a conversation that centered on the 5-1
Eagles and shifted, for brief moments, to the high-scoring Flyers
and out-of-season Phillies. Carson Wentz looks like the real deal,
they said. How about the Flyers’
8-2 win over the Capitals on
Saturday, they asked. The Phillies
are still looking for a manager,
they pointed out.
“And we didn’t even get to the
Sixers; we’ll have to do that
tomorrow,” Morganti said toward
the end of the show, and it
seemed like the moment he’d
bring the Fultz decision into play.
“I mean,” he continued. “Did
you see Joel Embiid play the
other night?”
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
JERRY BREWER
Time for excuses is past for the Wizards, and so the future is now in Washington
BREWER FROM D1
contracts and the league’s fifthhighest payroll. After advancing
to the second round of the
playoffs in three of the past four
seasons, after leading late in the
third quarter of Game 7 last year
in Boston, the Wizards have
reached the prime of this era.
They haven’t built the best team
in the NBA, or even the Eastern
Conference, but they’re a
legitimate, well-tested contender.
And for the next four or five
years, they’re on the clock to do
something special.
“We have the recipe,” Coach
Scott Brooks said. “We’re a
talented team. We’ve got the skillset. We’ve got players that play
hard, and they care for one
another, so hopefully that
continues throughout the
season.”
Fittingly, the season begins
Wednesday night against the
rising Philadelphia 76ers, who
are in the beginning stages of a
process similar to the one the
Wizards began seven years ago
after drafting John Wall No. 1
overall. Perhaps Washington will
look briefly at young, athletic and
unencumbered Philadelphia and
remember what it used to be.
Most likely, however, the Wizards
will be too focused on
maximizing a situation they’ve
waited a long time to have.
Last season, they broke
through several barriers — their
own problems and historic
burdens — to recover from a 2-8
start and post a 49-33 mark, the
franchise’s best record in 38
years. They’ve done all the
difficult stuff, finding two
reliable stars in Wall and Bradley
Beal, adding a complementary
No. 3 guy with star talent in Otto
Porter Jr., making deals for good
role players such as Markieff
Morris and Marcin Gortat, and
cobbling together a better bench.
But while a high level of
competitiveness is almost
guaranteed, excellence is another
issue.
In pursuit of greatness, the
Wizards have to master little
details, which can became a big
problem. Instead of mass
revision, they have to get one or
two percent better in several
areas. That will be their test. They
consider good to be insufficient.
“To have that consistency is
going to be interesting to see
because we’re the team that has
the target on our back this year,”
forward Jason Smith said. “We’re
a good team, and we proved that
last year, and we have to go out
there and play like that this year.
Start the year off on a good note,
rather than a bad note like we did
last year. It should be fun,
though. We’re ready. I think we’re
ready. We always can get better
and shore up a few things on the
defensive end, but I think,
overall, we’re looking good.”
The preseason left one major
impression about the Wizards.
They’re still bitter about losing
that Game 7 in Boston, and they
used the disappointment as
motivation to enter this season in
great physical condition and with
an intense focus on taking the socalled next step. In sports, scar
tissue spurs development. The
Wizards can turn old pain into
something useful.
However, it’s unlikely that they
can rely on pain to get them
through the entire season. It
serves as a great boost to start the
year, and if the Wizards return to
the playoffs, it could propel them
to advance deeper. But what they
need most is to prove that they
have an innate will to win.
Incentives are always nice, but
the Wizards have to want to win
because they burn to win. They
can’t settle for being a good
offensive team that plays
marginal defense. They can’t
expect their big men to do all the
rebounding while the perimeter
players get out and run the floor.
They can’t take random games off
because, like last season, a slim
margin of four games could
separate the East No. 1 seed from
the fourth seed.
Beal says his primary goal is to
become a better rebounder this
season. Brooks takes it another
step. He wants Wall, Beal and all
the perimeter players to help the
team improve from ranking in
the bottom third of the NBA in
most every team rebounding
category. This is an urgent need
with Morris, their starting power
forward, injured.
“I think both our guards are
going to have to get better,”
Brooks said. “I think they both
can average over five a game.
John and Brad, I think they
should get 5.5 to 6.5, even seven
some nights. And if they do that,
we’re a better defensive team.
We’re not bad at making the team
miss the first shot. We get in
trouble when we give up too
many offensive rebounds,
putbacks and kick-out threes.
Those are costly ones, and we
have to have our guards get in
there and battle because it’s not a
big man thing. It’s a team thing.
And we have to get better as a
team rebounding.”
When asked about the
defense’s improvement thus far,
Brooks offers a familiar refrain:
“We have to get better.” The
Wizards finished 20th in
defensive efficiency last season. If
they could rise to 12th, they could
win 55 games and be the
conference’s top playoff seed. But
they’ve never done anything the
easy way. Was it because of youth
and roster shuffling? Was it
talent? Or are the Wizards a team
terminally addicted to living on
the edge?
This season will provide
stronger answers, and they won’t
be accompanied by excuses. This
is a developed team. There’s still
some growing left, but the
Wizards won’t have a lot of
patience.
Waiting for tomorrow can be
frustrating. It’s also comforting.
But the Wizards no longer have
the luxury of disregarding time.
This is their time. They must
make good use of it.
jerry.brewer@washpost.com
For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
washingtonpost.com/brewer.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
SU
NBA preview
Wizards’ roster is mostly unchanged from last year. They view that as a positive.
WIZARDS FROM D1
The local baseball team has not
advanced past the NLDS despite
making it four times in the last six
seasons. Wall, set to begin his
eighth NBA season, can empathize.
“It’s like you get there but you
never get over the hump, you
know what I mean? So that’s the
frustrating part,” Wall said, relating it to his Wizards teams. “I’ve
been through that. We’ve been to
the second round three times, so
that’s my motivation to get over
that hump. I definitely want to
break that.”
For the Wizards, the opportunity to break through begins with
their season opener at home
Wednesday night against the
Philadelphia 76ers.
Making a leap this year
The Wizards have nurtured
three maximum contract players
who represent the heart of what
could be the franchise’s best team
in decades — and with a payroll at
$123 million, its most expensive.
Wall, Bradley Beal and Otto Porter
Jr. are entering their fifth year
together. Add in stalwarts Marcin
Gortat and Markieff Morris, as
well as Coach Scott Brooks starting his second year with the team,
and the Wizards’ continuity is a
distinct strength in an inconstant
Eastern Conference.
“We’re cool with everybody. Everybody gets along,” Beal said
about the team’s bond. “There’s
no drama. There’s no issues or
anything like that. So that just
carries right onto the floor. We
love each other off the floor. We
love each other on the floor.”
The Wizards may be all grown
up, but the question remains how
much they can continue to evolve.
The young core has banged
against the second-round ceiling.
Partially because it was limited
financially in free agency after
matching Porter’s max offer sheet,
Washington has added nothing
substantial that would realistically propel it past the conference
darlings, the Cleveland Cavaliers
and Boston Celtics.
But stability doesn’t have to
lead to stasis. Wall believes there
is room to grow, specifically, for
this core to snap the city’s socalled curse and advance to the
conference finals. If so, they
would be the first of Washington’s
four major sports teams to reach a
conference final or championship
series since 1998.
“We can still get better, and as
individuals, I’ve still got a lot left
in my game,” Wall said. “I feel like
me getting to the point when I’m
finally healthy is going to be even
more bigger. Same with [Beal].
When he started being more
healthy, it was a totally different
team.
“We showed glimpses,” Wall
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Marcin Gortat is one of five returning starters for the Wizards, who won 49 games last season.
Wizards’ 2017-18 roster
NO.
POS.
PLAYER
YEARS
PRIOR TO NBA
HT
WT
PPG
RPG
APG
FG%
1
F
Chris McCullough
2
Syracuse
6-9
215
2.3
1.2
0.1
50.0
2
G
John Wall
7
Kentucky
6-4
210
23.1
4.2
10.7
45.1
3
G
Bradley Beal
5
Florida
6-5
207
23.1
3.1
3.5
48.2
4
F
*Mike Young
R
Pittsburgh
6-9
235
---
---
---
---
5
F
Markieff Morris**
6
Kansas
6-10
245
14.0
6.5
1.7
45.7
7
F
*Devin Robinson
R
Florida
6-8
200
---
---
---
---
8
G
Tim Frazier
3
Penn State
6-1
170
7.1
2.7
5.2
40.3
9
G-F
Sheldon Mac**
1
Miami
6-6
200
3.0
1.1
0.5
40.0
12
F
Kelly Oubre Jr.
2
Kansas
6-7
205
6.3
3.3
0.6
42.1
13
C
Marcin Gortat
10
Poland
6-11
240
10.8
10.4
1.5
57.9
14
F-C
Jason Smith
9
Colorado State
7-0
240
5.7
3.5
0.5
52.9
20
G
Jodie Meeks
8
Kentucky
6-4
210
9.1
2.1
1.3
40.2
21
G-F
Carrick Felix
1
Arizona State
6-6
203
---
---
---
---
22
F
Otto Porter Jr.
4
Georgetown
6-8
198
13.4
6.4
1.5
51.6
28
C
Ian Mahinmi
9
France
6-11
262
5.6
4.8
0.6
58.6
30
F
Mike Scott
5
Virginia
6-8
237
2.5
2.1
0.9
28.8
31
G-F
Tomas Satoransky
1
Czech Republic
6-7
210
2.7
1.5
1.6
41.5
* — on two-way contract ** — injured
Note: All stats from 2016-17 season
continued. “Now that we’re taking care of our bodies more, being
a lot better, the game has opened
up even more for us now. Last
year, everybody said it was a career year [for me], but I think I’m
going to have an even more crazy
career year than last year.”
Chemistry set
Continuity can look like this:
Wall on the fast break, his eyes
fixed on the rim but his mind on
the favorite spots of his targets.
“When John drives, he knows
that either me or Brad is in the
corner,” Porter said. “You just have
to play with each other over a long
period of time to get that type of
connection or type of chemistry.”
An Oct. 8 exhibition, only the
second game in which the four
healthy starters had played in the
preseason while Morris recovers
from sports hernia surgery, illustrated the damage this team can
do. The starting unit spent less
than eight minutes building a
38-point first quarter against the
Cavaliers.
“If we play together, I mean, we
will destroy anybody,” said Gortat,
the big man who sets screens at
just the right angle for his teammates. “Our chemistry is just too
good right now. . . . We understand each other. There’s nothing
we’ve got to talk about. Completely nothing.”
This unspoken connection extends off the court. When they go
to Benihana, Wall knows Beal will
clean his plate of shrimp. Wall is
also keenly aware of Porter’s easygoing personality, which made it
unnecessary for the teammates to
talk it out this summer after Wall
declared his intent to recruit allstar Paul George, who happens to
play Porter’s position.
“I got a bigger picture in mind. I
don’t take things personal,” Porter
said. “It’s hard to get me upset
about anything or talk about anything. Everything rolls off my
shoulders.”
Outsiders see this harmony
and place the Wizards as high as a
top-three team in the East. But
with Wall at 27 and Beal only 24,
some envision maturation past
the third seed.
“Obviously Boston and Cleveland are the presumed favorites,
but I think there’s no reason to
believe [the Wizards] can’t be in
that mix,” said a longtime Eastern
Conference scout who asked to
remain anonymous because he
wasn’t given permission to speak
publicly. “They’re moving into
their primes.”
Dennis Scott has become a believer. Scott, the Maryland native
who played 10 years in the league
and now works as an “NBA on
TNT” reporter and NBA TV analyst, boldly predicted the Wizards
will be the East representative in
the NBA Finals — if Wall has an
MVP-worthy season. Scott even
backed up Beal’s statement from
May that the Cavaliers didn’t
want to face Washington in the
playoffs.
“No question about it. It’s a
nightmare matchup [for Cleveland],” Scott said. “When Bradley
Beal and John Wall are healthy,
they are a nightmare matchup.
“I love Derrick Rose, I’m still a
big fan of his and hope he can turn
his career around and get back,
but I don’t think Derrick Rose
wants some of John Wall right
now,” Scott said of the Cavaliers’
new point guard. “Love Isaiah . . .
[but] Isaiah Thomas don’t want
John Wall right now. LeBron
doesn’t want to guard John Wall
right now.”
Carry that weight
The starting five may have
transformed into a “nightmare
matchup” for teams, but last year
the Wizards’ depth was a horror
show.
Washington’s bench was so unstable — six role players who
signed with the Wizards last season are no longer with the team —
that in the most important game
of the year, Brooks wouldn’t dare
remove his starters from the floor.
During Game 7 of the Eastern
Conference semifinals against the
Celtics, Wall played the entire
second half and wore out, making
just 2 of 13 shots (8 of 23 overall) in
the 115-105 loss.
“I didn’t expect to play 24
straight minutes. That’s who
coach wanted. Whatever he put
me through, I’m down with it. I
make no excuses when I get be-
tween the lines,” Wall said. “I
made all those shots the first
three quarters, it’s just — like the
Celtics said, in the fourth quarter,
fatigue kicked in. I’m fine with
that because I went out swinging.
I went out the way I played the
whole playoffs, just giving myself
a chance.”
As the front office tried to revamp the bench with budget veterans Tim Frazier, Jodie Meeks
and Mike Scott, Wall spent the
summer preparing himself to carry another heavy load. For Washington to continue growing, Wall
believes he must soar into the
MVP conversation.
Tucked away in his iPhone’s
“Notes” app, for his eyes only, Wall
keeps a list of every slight he finds
on social media. They are fuel for
him. After the Wizards fell in
Game 7, he read: “John Wall
couldn’t do this. John Wall
couldn’t get over this hump.” He
filed it away, then tapped out a
reminder to himself: “I gave it
everything I had. Get in the best
shape possible.”
After Game 7, Wall rested for
one week before signing up for
spin class and boxing lessons. He
drilled with basketball skills
trainer Rob McClanaghan. The
day after the news conference
celebrating his four-year, $170
million contract extension, Wall
was back working out at the Wizards’ practice facility. When he
finally took a break in the Bahamas later in the summer, he still
rode his bicycle around paradise.
For the first time in many years,
Wall experienced the benefits of
good health last season, leading to
his “career year.”
“I fell in love with working out,”
Wall said. “In the past, I loved
working out but I couldn’t because it would take me two hours
to prepare for a workout [due to
treatment for injuries]. So if I
wanted to come back to the gym
and work out at 8, I had to go there
at 6 to prepare myself. Now it’s
like a 10-15 minute stretch, you
just do a routine and get my work
in.”
Wall has dubbed this his
“#Wolfseason” — potentially the
best chance in his career to advance past the second round. After the Nationals’ ouster, Wall
came across a graphic on social
media highlighting Washington’s
sports futility. His image was included on the ignominious Mount
Rushmore, alongside Harper,
Kirk Cousins and Alex Ovechkin,
the four current leaders of the
local franchises.
Wall clicked “like” — his way of
announcing his intention of shattering the city’s curse and the
Wizards’ second-round ceiling.
“It’s just more pressure on me,
which I love,” Wall said. “It’s just
more motivation for me. I’m fine
with that. I want to break it.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
How much does continuity matter for NBA teams?
It depends on where the continuity is found on a roster. If a team just makes a few tweaks to the bench, it might be able to find some early rhythm. But if there was upheaval in the starting lineup, it might
take a bit for that team to jell. ¶ This summer, the Wizards underwent only minor upgrades to the roster — mostly tinkering with the rotation’s seventh- through ninth-man spots. The starting unit will remain
the same, point guard to center. ¶ That’s not the case for two teams predicted to again finish ahead of Washington in the East this season, the Cavaliers and the Celtics. Both teams will have players who
weren’t on last season’s roster accounting for 60 percent of their starting lineups. The Celtics actually have only one returning starter, Al Horford. While not new to the team, second-year swingman Jaylen
Brown will shift into the starting unit. The team that finished just in front of the Wizards last season, the Raptors, swapped a piece in its starting five (C.J. Miles in; DeMarre Carroll out).
Here are the depth chart projections for three of the East’s top teams. Note: Bold indicates new player; “replacing” does not necessarily mean in that specific role.
WIZARDS
CAVALIERS
CELTICS
bring back
bring back
bring back only
73%
47%
33%
of last season’s 49-33 team
of last year’s 51-31 team
of last year’s 53-29 team
Wizards starters
Wizards bench
Cavaliers starters
Cavaliers bench
Celtics starters
Celtics bench
John Wall
Bradley Beal
Otto Porter Jr.
Markieff Morris
Marcin Gortat
Kelly Oubre Jr.
Jodie Meeks
(replacing Bojan Bogdanovic)
Ian Mahinmi
Tim Frazier
(replacing Brandon Jennings)
Mike Scott
(replacing Daniel Ochefu)
Jason Smith
Tomas Satoransky
Chris McCullough
Sheldon Mac
Carrick Felix (replacing Trey
Burke/Marcus Thornton)
Derrick Rose
(replacing Kyrie Irving)
Dwyane Wade
(replacing Deron Williams)
LeBron James
Jae Crowder
(replacing Richard Jefferson)
Kevin Love
Isaiah Thomas
(replacing Kay Felder)
J.R. Smith
Tristan Thompson
Iman Shumpert
Kyle Korver
Channing Frye
Jeff Green
(replacing Derrick Williams)
Jose Calderon
(replacing James Jones)
Cedi Osman
(replacing Dahntay Jones)
Ante Zizic (replacing Walter
Tavares)
Kyrie Irving
(replacing Isaiah Thomas)
Jaylen Brown
*Gordon Hayward
(replacing Avery Bradley)
Marcus Morris
(replacing Jae Crowder)
Al Horford
Marcus Smart
Jayson Tatum
(replacing Kelly Olynyk)
Kadeem Allen
Terry Rozier
Guerschon Yabusele
(replacing Jonas Jerebko)
Shane Larkin
(replacing Gerald Green)
Semi Ojeleye (replacing
Demetrius Jackson)
Abdel Nader
(replacing James Young)
Daniel Theis
(replacing Jordan Mickey)
Aron Baynes (replacing Amir
Johnson/Tyler Zeller)
*-Injured Tuesday
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
nfl rewind
NFC East
AFC East
DALLAS (2-3)
PHILADELPHIA (5-1)
BUFFALO (3-2)
NEW ENGLAND (4-2)
September
10: N.Y. Giants, 19-3
17: at Denver, 17-42
25: at Arizona, 28-17
October
1: L.A. Rams, 30-35
8: Green Bay, 31-35
15: Bye
22: at San Fran.
29: at Washington
November
5: Kansas City
12: at Atlanta
19: Philadelphia
23: L.A. Chargers
30: Washington
December
10: at N.Y. Giants
17: at Oakland
24: Seattle
31: at Philadelphia
September
10: at Washington, 30-17
17: at Kansas City, 20-27
24: N.Y. Giants, 27-24
October
1: at L.A. Chargers, 26-24
8: Arizona, 34-7
12: at Carolina, 28-23
23: Washington
29: San Fran.
November
5: Denver
12: Bye
19: at Dallas
26: Chicago
December
3: at Seattle
10: at L.A. Rams
17: at N.Y. Giants
25: Oakland
31: Dallas
September
10: N.Y. Jets, 21-12
17: at Carolina, 3-9
24: Denver, 26-16
October
1: at Atlanta, 23-17
8: at Cincinnati, 16-20
15: Bye
22: Tampa Bay
29: Oakland
November
2: at N.Y. Jets
12: New Orleans
19: at L.A. Chargers
26: at Kansas City
December
3: New England
10: Indianapolis
17: Miami
24: at New England
31: at Miami
September
7: Kansas City, 27-42
17: at New Orleans, 36-20
24: Houston, 36-33
October
1: Carolina, 30-33
5: at Tampa Bay, 19-14
15: at N.Y. Jets, 24-17
22: Atlanta
29: L.A. Chargers
November
5: Bye
12: at Denver
19: at Oakland
26: Miami
December
3: at Buffalo
11: at Miami
17: at Pittsburgh
24: Buffalo
31: N.Y. Jets
NEW YORK (1-5)
WASHINGTON (3-2)
MIAMI (3-2)
NEW YORK (3-3)
September
10: at Dallas, 3-19
18: Detroit, 10-24
24: at Philadelphia, 24-27
October
1: at Tampa Bay, 23-25
8: L.A. Chargers, 22-27
15: at Denver, 23-10
22: Seattle
29: Bye
November
5: L.A. Rams
12: at San Fran.
19: Kansas City
23: at Washington
December
3: at Oakland
10: Dallas
17: Philadelphia
24: at Arizona
31: Washington
September
10: Philadelphia, 17-30
17: at L.A. Rams, 27-20
24: Oakland, 27-10
October
2: at Kansas City, 20-29
8: Bye
15: San Fran., 26-24
23: at Philadelphia
29: Dallas
November
5: at Seattle
12: Minnesota
19: at New Orleans
23: N.Y. Giants
30: at Dallas
December
10: at L.A. Chargers
17: Arizona
24: Denver
31: at N.Y. Giants
September
17: at L.A. Chargers, 19-17
24: at N.Y. Jets, 6-20
October
1: New Orleans, 0-20
8: Tennessee, 16-10
15: at Atlanta, 20-17
22: N.Y. Jets
26: at Baltimore
November
5: Oakland
13: at Carolina
19: Tampa Bay
26: at New England
December
3: Denver
11: New England
17: at Buffalo
24: at Kansas City
31: Buffalo
September
10: at Buffalo, 12-21
17: at Oakland, 20-45
24: Miami, 20-6
October
1: Jacksonville, 23-20 (OT)
8: at Cleveland, 17-14
15: New England, 17-24
22: at Miami
29: Atlanta
November
2: Buffalo
12: at Tampa Bay
19: Bye
26: Carolina
December
3: Kansas City
10: at Denver
17: at New Orleans
24: L.A. Chargers
31: at New England
BOB LEVERONE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carson Wentz and the Eagles have soared into the top spot after a 28-23 road victory over the Panthers on Thursday night.
NFC North
CHICAGO (2-4)
GREEN BAY (4-2)
September
10: Atlanta, 17-23
17: at Tampa Bay, 7-29
24: Pittsburgh, 23-17 (OT)
28: at Green Bay, 14-35
October
9: Minnesota, 17-20
15: at Baltimore, 27-24 (OT)
22: Carolina
29: at New Orleans
November
5: Bye
12: Green Bay
19: Detroit
26: at Philadelphia
December
3: San Fran.
10: at Cincinnati
16: at Detroit
24: Cleveland
31: at Minnesota
September
10: Seattle, 17-9
17: at Atlanta, 23-34
24: Cincinnati, 27-24 (OT)
28: Chicago, 35-14
October
8: at Dallas, 35-31
15: at Minnesota, 10-23
22: New Orleans
29: Bye
November
6: Detroit
12: at Chicago
19: Baltimore
26: at Pittsburgh
December
3: Tampa Bay
10: at Cleveland
17: at Carolina
23: Minnesota
31: at Detroit
DETROIT (3-3)
MINNESOTA (4-2)
September
10: Arizona, 35-23
18: at N.Y. Giants, 24-10
24: Atlanta, 26-30
October
1: at Minnesota, 14-7
8: Carolina, 24-27
15: at New Orleans, 38-52
22: Bye
29: Pittsburgh
November
6: at Green Bay
12: Cleveland
19: at Chicago
23: Minnesota
December
3: at Baltimore
10: at Tampa Bay
16: Chicago
24: at Cincinnati
31: Green Bay
September
11: New Orleans, 29-19
17: at Pittsburgh, 9-26
24: Tampa Bay, 34-17
October
1: Detroit, 7-14
9: at Chicago, 20-17
15: Green Bay, 23-10
22: Baltimore
29: at Cleveland
November
5: Bye
12: at Washington
19: L.A. Rams
23: at Detroit
December
3: at Atlanta
10: at Carolina
17: Cincinnati
23: at Green Bay
31: Chicago
NFC South
ATLANTA (3-2)
NEW ORLEANS (3-2)
September
10: at Chicago, 23-17
17: Green Bay, 34-23
24: at Detroit, 30-26
October
1: Buffalo, 17-23
8: Bye
15: Miami, 17-20
22: at New England
29: at N.Y. Jets
November
5: at Carolina
12: Dallas
20: at Seattle
26: Tampa Bay
December
3: Minnesota
7: New Orleans
18: at Tampa Bay
24: at New Orleans
31: Carolina
September
11: at Minnesota, 19-29
17: New England, 20-36
24: at Carolina, 34-13
October
1: at Miami, 20-0
8: Bye
15: Detroit, 52-38
22: at Green Bay
29: Chicago
November
5: Tampa Bay
12: at Buffalo
19: Washington
26: at L.A. Rams
December
3: Carolina
7: at Atlanta
17: N.Y. Jets
24: Atlanta
31: at Tampa Bay
CAROLINA (4-2)
TAMPA BAY (2-3)
September
10: at San Fran., 23-3
17: Buffalo, 9-3
24: New Orleans, 13-34
October
1: at New England, 33-30
8: at Detroit, 27-24
12: Philadelphia, 23-28
22: at Chicago
29: at Tampa Bay
November
5: Atlanta
13: Miami
19: Bye
26: at N.Y. Jets
December
3: at New Orleans
10: Minnesota
17: Green Bay
24: Tampa Bay
31: at Atlanta
September
17: Chicago, 29-7
24: at Minnesota, 17-34
October
1: N.Y. Giants, 25-23
5: New England, 14-19
15: at Arizona, 33-38
22: at Buffalo
29: Carolina
November
5: at New Orleans
12: N.Y. Jets
19: at Miami
26: at Atlanta
December
3: at Green Bay
10: Detroit
18: Atlanta
24: at Carolina
31: New Orleans
NFC West
ARIZONA (3-3)
SAN FRANCISCO (0-6)
September
10: at Detroit, 23-35
17: at Indianapolis,
16-13 (OT)
25: Dallas, 17-28
October
1: San Fran., 18-15 (OT)
8: at Philadelphia, 7-34
15: Tampa Bay, 38-33
22: at L.A. Rams
29: Bye
November
5: at San Fran.
9: Seattle
19: at Houston
26: Jacksonville
December
3: L.A. Rams
10: Tennessee
17: at Washington
24: N.Y. Giants
31: at Seattle
September
10: Carolina, 3-23
17: at Seattle, 9-12
21: L.A. Rams, 39-41
October
1: at Arizona, 15-18 (OT)
8: at Indianapolis,
23-26 (OT)
15: at Washington, 24-26
22: Dallas
29: at Philadelphia
November
5: Arizona
12: N.Y. Giants
19: Bye
26: Seattle
December
3: at Chicago
10: at Houston
17: Tennessee
24: Jacksonville
31: at L.A. Rams
LOS ANGELES (4-2)
SEATTLE (3-2)
September
10: Indianapolis, 46-9
17: Washington, 20-27
21: at San Fran., 41-39
October
1: at Dallas, 35-30
8: Seattle, 10-16
15: at Jacksonville, 27-17
22: Arizona
29: Bye
November
5: at N.Y. Giants
12: Houston
19: at Minnesota
26: New Orleans
December
3: at Arizona
10: Philadelphia
17: at Seattle
24: at Tennessee
31: San Fran.
September
10: at Green Bay, 9-17
17: San Fran., 12-9
24: at Tennessee, 27-33
October
1: Indianapolis, 46-18
8: at L.A. Rams, 16-10
15: Bye
22: at N.Y. Giants
29: Houston
November
5: Washington
9: at Arizona
20: Atlanta
26: at San Fran.
December
3: Philadelphia
10: at Jacksonville
17: L.A. Rams
24: at Dallas
31: Arizona
AFC North
NFL power rankings
Each week, national NFL writer Mark Maske provides his ranking and commentary on all 32 teams. Dive deeper daily on
washingtonpost.com/sports.
1. Eagles, 5-1 PREVIOUS: 3
Will the Eagles be the NFL’s best team at season’s end?
Probably not. But they are making progress and have earned the
top spot after an impressive triumph Thursday night at Carolina.
17. Jaguars, 3-3 PREVIOUS: 12
Are the Jaguars philosophically opposed to a two-game winning
streak? They have alternated wins and losses so far this season
and have looked completely different from week to week.
2. Patriots, 4-2 PREVIOUS: 6
The Patriots beat the Jets to move into first place in the AFC
East. But it was a far-from-convincing victory, and it signals that
there’s at least a chance this division will remain competitive.
18. Dolphins, 3-2 PREVIOUS: 22
Just when it seems like the appropriate time to give up on Jay
Cutler and go with Matt Moore at quarterback, something
happens like the improbable comeback in Atlanta.
3. Steelers, 4-2 PREVIOUS: 14
So, QB Ben Roethlisberger isn’t done after all. The Steelers
followed their dismal showing against the Jaguars by handing
the Chiefs their first loss of the season.
19. Falcons, 3-2 PREVIOUS: 8
The Falcons melted down and turned a big lead into a deflating
loss against the Dolphins, and now Atlanta has to travel to
New England for a Super Bowl rematch.
4. Chiefs, 5-1 PREVIOUS: 1
The Chiefs simply cannot beat the Steelers. Accept that and
move on. They remain among the NFL’s very best teams.
20. Lions, 3-3 PREVIOUS: 9
The Lions are coming unglued, and that mammoth contract
handed out to QB Matthew Stafford doesn’t look quite as good.
5. Seahawks, 3-2 PREVIOUS: 7
The Seahawks return from their bye week to play an interesting
game against the Giants on Sunday in the Meadowlands. If they
take the game lightly, it could cost them.
21. Cardinals, 3-3 PREVIOUS: 28
Adrian Peterson does have something left, after all. That was
evident right away in his first game for the Cardinals after never
being on display in New Orleans before he was traded.
6. Rams, 4-2 PREVIOUS: 10
The Rams are a first-place team after six games and still way
ahead of any realistic rebuilding schedule under first-year Coach
Sean McVay after the triumph over the Jaguars.
22. Bears, 2-4 PREVIOUS: 29
The Bears got their first win with Mitchell Trubisky at
quarterback in his second NFL start. They did it by not relying on
him too heavily to be the focal point of the offense.
7. Vikings, 4-2 PREVIOUS: 16
The hit by Anthony Barr that might have ended Aaron Rodgers’s
season wasn’t dirty and it wasn’t illegal. But could it have been
avoided? Perhaps.
23. Ravens, 3-3 PREVIOUS: 11
Maybe it’s time to accept that this is simply a mediocre team
that isn’t likely to develop into anything more formidable than
that.
24. Cowboys, 2-3 PREVIOUS: 24
The Cowboys return from their bye for a busy week in which a lot
of the attention will be paid to off-the-field issues. They will also
have to play a football game against the 49ers.
9. Broncos, 3-2 PREVIOUS: 4
The Giants were going to win a game eventually. But if the
Broncos aspire to be one of the NFL’s top teams, that loss simply
cannot happen on their home field in a prime-time game.
25. Tiants, 3-3 PREVIOUS: 26
Marcus Mariota had a productive night throwing the ball Monday,
especially in the second half, and the Titans finally found a way to
beat the Colts after losing to them 11 straight times.
10. Redskins 3-2 PREVIOUS: 17
It was more interesting than it needed to be against the 49ers.
But the Redskins have beaten McVay and Kyle Shanahan.
26. Chargers, 2-4 PREVIOUS: 27
Two straight wins have things looking better. What could be
next? A few Chargers fans in L.A.? Let’s not get carried away.
11. Texans, 3-3 PREVIOUS: 20
The once-superb defense has been decimated by injuries, so the
offense will have to lead the way for the Texans to contend.
27. Buccaneers, 2-3 PREVIOUS: 19
The defense made both Adrian Peterson and Carson Palmer look
rejuvenated for the Cardinals.
12. Saints, 3-2 PREVIOUS: 23
The defense has found a way to contribute — by generating
turnovers and scoring touchdowns — and the big win over the
Lions means that the Saints can dream about the playoff chase.
28. Giants, 1-5 PREVIOUS: 30
Of course, with Odell Beckham Jr. done for the season and the
Giants practically out of wide receivers, that’s when the offense
springs to life and the team gets into the win column.
13. Bengals, 2-3 PREVIOUS: 13
No one needs to worry about Coach Marvin Lewis’s job security
or QB Andy Dalton’s worthiness to be the starter, at least for now.
29. Raiders, 2-4 PREVIOUS: 25
Even QB Derek Carr’s quick return from his back injury could not
stop the Raiders’ downward spiral. This could get very ugly.
14. Bills, 3-2 PREVIOUS: 15
The Bills had a week off to try to digest their pre-bye loss to the
Bengals. They return to face the Buccaneers at an opportune
time, with QB Jameis Winston hampered by a shoulder injury.
30. Colts, 2-4 PREVIOUS: 21
Jacoby Brissett hasn’t been terrible while filling in at
quarterback. But he isn’t making anyone forget that the Colts
really, really need Andrew Luck.
15. Jets, 3-3 PREVIOUS: 18
The Jets might not have won if Austin Seferian-Jenkins’s fumble
was ruled differently. But they would have had a chance.
31. 49ers, 0-6 PREVIOUS: 31
The Niners lost another game Sunday. But they might have
found an interesting quarterback prospect in C.J. Beathard.
16. Packers, 4-2 PREVIOUS: 2
It’s difficult to imagine the Packers being a factor in the NFC’s
Super Bowl chase with the untested Brett Hundley under center.
32. Browns, 0-6 PREVIOUS: 32
Is there a lower ranking available?
Rush
132.5
82.4
120.6
122.8
113.8
116.0
124.0
117.2
69.8
109.2
95.5
94.8
88.3
89.5
136.0
84.0
Pass
250.7
299.6
257.8
251.4
258.4
243.8
232.2
238.8
286.2
228.4
228.0
226.5
230.0
226.8
170.8
214.0
DEFENSE
Yards
Carolina .............................. 280.0
Minnesota .......................... 295.5
Chicago .............................. 302.7
Atlanta ............................... 312.4
Washington ....................... 316.0
Green Bay .......................... 326.2
Seattle ............................... 330.0
Detroit ............................... 338.5
Philadelphia ....................... 339.2
Dallas ................................. 339.8
Arizona .............................. 340.7
L.A. Rams ........................... 350.2
New Orleans ...................... 369.2
N.Y. Giants ......................... 371.8
San Francisco ..................... 375.2
Tampa Bay ......................... 403.4
Rush
83.3
78.7
104.3
102.0
88.0
119.8
127.2
94.3
65.7
118.0
90.3
139.5
100.8
123.5
112.8
101.8
Pass
196.7
216.8
198.3
210.4
228.0
206.3
202.8
244.2
273.5
221.8
250.3
210.7
268.4
248.3
262.3
301.6
PASSING
ATT-CMP
Cousins, WAS ......... 158/105
Brees, NOR .............. 183/126
A. Rodgers, GBY ...... 193/128
Wentz, PHL ............. 207/126
Goff, LA ................... 185/111
Keenum, MIN .......... 159/102
Prescott, DAL .......... 179/112
Winston, TAM ........... 164/99
R. Wilson, SEA ........ 178/111
Manning, NYG ......... 221/148
PCT YDS TD INT RATE
66.5 1,334 9 2 106.4
68.9 1,321 10 2 103.2
66.3 1,385 13 3 103.2
60.9 1,584 13 3 99.6
60.0 1,484 8 3 93.2
64.2 1,134 5 1 93.1
62.6 1,192 11 4 93.1
60.4 1,259 7 3 91.0
62.4 1,222 8 3 90.6
67.0 1,466 9 5 89.7
mark.maske@washpost.com
RECEIVING
NO YDS AVG
Thielen, MIN .......................... 38 489 12.9
Fitzgerald, ARI ...................... 42 465 11.1
Garcon, SNF ........................... 33 434 13.2
Ertz, PHL ............................... 34 405 11.9
S. Diggs, MIN ........................ 23 395 17.2
Mi. Evans, TAM ..................... 27 371 13.7
Benjamin, CAR ...................... 26 371 14.3
Ju. Jones, ATL ....................... 25 367 14.7
Tate, DET ............................... 36 363 10.1
C. Thompson, WAS ............... 18 340 18.9
LG TD
45 0
37 3
59 0
53 4
59 4
41 3
43 1
34 0
45 2
74 2
RUSHING
NO YDS AVG
Gurley, LA ............................ 123 521 4.2
J. Howard, CHI ..................... 118 495 4.2
E. Elliott, DAL ...................... 105 393 3.7
Blount, PHL ........................... 70 390 5.6
Hyde, SNF .............................. 86 360 4.2
Cook, MIN .............................. 74 354 4.8
D. Freeman, ATL ................... 79 353 4.5
Abdullah, DET ....................... 90 342 3.8
Ingram, NOR .......................... 67 284 4.2
LG TD
29 4
53 4
30 2
68 1
61 4
33 2
44 5
34 1
51 2
OFFENSE
Yards
New England ...................... 412.0
Kansas City ........................ 387.0
Denver ................................ 355.4
Pittsburgh .......................... 349.7
L.A. Chargers ..................... 345.2
Houston ............................. 343.8
Tennessee .......................... 336.0
Jacksonville ....................... 335.5
N.Y. Jets ............................ 318.7
Cincinnati ........................... 311.0
Cleveland ........................... 308.3
Indianapolis ....................... 301.2
Baltimore ........................... 289.2
Oakland .............................. 278.3
Buffalo ............................... 271.6
Miami ................................. 242.8
Rush
102.2
134.8
123.6
107.3
79.0
137.7
132.0
165.8
105.2
84.0
96.7
97.5
129.5
93.7
106.6
87.4
Pass
309.8
252.2
231.8
242.3
266.2
206.2
204.0
169.7
213.5
227.0
211.7
203.7
159.7
184.7
165.0
155.4
DEFENSE
Yards
Denver ................................ 261.8
Cincinnati ........................... 262.8
Pittsburgh .......................... 272.0
Houston ............................. 310.5
Cleveland ........................... 310.7
Jacksonville ....................... 311.7
Miami ................................. 315.4
Buffalo ............................... 322.4
Baltimore ........................... 330.8
Tennessee .......................... 337.0
L.A. Chargers ..................... 338.5
Oakland .............................. 349.8
N.Y. Jets ............................ 358.0
Kansas City ........................ 378.2
Indianapolis ....................... 410.0
New England ...................... 440.7
Rush
70.2
103.2
118.5
107.2
84.3
145.7
80.4
87.6
141.3
105.8
152.5
117.2
138.8
130.7
114.2
115.8
Pass
191.6
159.6
153.5
203.3
226.3
166.0
235.0
234.8
189.5
231.2
186.0
232.7
219.2
247.5
295.8
324.8
PASSING
Al. Smith, KC .................
Brady, NE .......................
D. Watson, HOU ............
D. Carr, OAK ..................
Ty. Taylor, BUF ..............
McCown, NYJ ................
Rivers, LAC ....................
Dalton, CIN ....................
Mariota, TEN .................
Siemian, DEN ................
PCT
72.9
65.7
61.5
68.3
62.5
70.1
61.3
65.4
62.7
61.4
September
10: Pittsburgh, 18-21
17: at Baltimore, 10-24
24: at Indianapolis, 28-31
October
1: Cincinnati, 7-31
8: N.Y. Jets, 14-17
15: at Houston, 17-33
22: Tennessee
29: Minnesota
November
5: Bye
12: at Detroit
19: Jacksonville
26: at Cincinnati
December
3: at L.A. Chargers
10: Green Bay
17: Baltimore
24: at Chicago
31: at Pittsburgh
CINCINNATI (2-3)
PITTSBURGH (4-2)
September
10: Baltimore, 0-20
14: Houston, 9-13
24: at Green Bay,
24-27 (OT)
October
1: at Cleveland, 31-7
8: Buffalo, 20-16
15: Bye
22: at Pittsburgh
29: Indianapolis
November
5: at Jacksonville
12: at Tennessee
19: at Denver
26: Cleveland
December
4: Pittsburgh
10: Chicago
17: at Minnesota
24: Detroit
31: at Baltimore
September
10: at Cleveland, 21-18
17: Minnesota, 26-9
24: at Chicago, 17-23 (OT)
October
1: at Baltimore, 26-9
8: Jacksonville, 9-30
15: at Kansas City, 19-13
22: Cincinnati
29: at Detroit
November
5: Bye
12: at Indianapolis
16: Tennessee
26: Green Bay
December
4: at Cincinnati
10: Baltimore
17: New England
25: at Houston
31: Cleveland
HOUSTON (3-3)
JACKSONVILLE (3-3)
September
10: Jacksonville, 7-29
14: at Cincinnati, 13-9
24: at New England, 33-36
October
1: Tennessee, 57-14
8: Kansas City, 34-42
15: Cleveland, 33-17
22: Bye
29: at Seattle
November
5: Indianapolis
12: at L.A. Rams
19: Arizona
27: at Baltimore
December
3: at Tennessee
10: San Fran.
17: at Jacksonville
25: Pittsburgh
31: at Indianapolis
September
10: at Houston, 29-7
17: Tennessee, 16-37
24: Baltimore, 44-7
October
1: at N.Y. Jets, 20-23 (OT)
8: at Pittsburgh, 30-9
15: L.A. Rams, 17-27
22: at Indianapolis
29: Bye
November
5: Cincinnati
12: L.A. Chargers
19: at Cleveland
26: at Arizona
December
3: Indianapolis
10: Seattle
17: Houston
24: at San Fran.
31: at Tennessee
INDIANAPOLIS (2-4)
TENNESSEE (3-3)
September
10: at L.A. Rams, 9-46
17: Arizona, 13-16 (OT)
24: Cleveland, 31-28
October
1: at Seattle, 18-46
8: San Fran., 26-23 (OT)
16: at Tennessee, 22-36
22: Jacksonville
29: at Cincinnati
November
5: at Houston
12: Pittsburgh
19: Bye
26: Tennessee
December
3: at Jacksonville
10: at Buffalo
14: Denver
23: at Baltimore
31: Houston
September
10: Oakland, 16-26
17: at Jacksonville, 37-16
24: Seattle, 33-27
October
1: at Houston, 14-57
8: at Miami, 10-16
16: Indianapolis, 36-22
22: at Cleveland
29: Bye
November
5: Baltimore
12: Cincinnati
16: at Pittsburgh
26: at Indianapolis
December
3: Houston
10: at Arizona
17: at San Fran.
24: L.A. Rams
31: Jacksonville
AFC West
AFC statistics
OFFENSE
Yards
Philadelphia ....................... 383.2
Tampa Bay ......................... 382.0
Atlanta ............................... 378.4
Washington ....................... 374.2
New Orleans ...................... 372.2
L.A. Rams ........................... 359.8
Dallas ................................. 356.2
Minnesota .......................... 356.0
Arizona .............................. 356.0
Seattle ............................... 337.6
Carolina .............................. 323.5
San Francisco ..................... 321.3
Green Bay .......................... 318.3
N.Y. Giants ......................... 316.3
Chicago .............................. 306.8
Detroit ............................... 298.0
CLEVELAND (0-6)
September
10: at Cincinnati, 20-0
17: Cleveland, 24-10
24: at Jacksonville, 7-44
October
1: Pittsburgh, 9-26
8: at Oakland, 30-17
15: Chicago, 24-27 (OT)
22: at Minnesota
26: Miami
November
5: at Tennessee
12: Bye
19: at Green Bay
27: Houston
December
3: Detroit
10: at Pittsburgh
17: at Cleveland
23: Indianapolis
31: Cincinnati
AFC South
8. Panthers, 4-2 PREVIOUS: 5
Well, Cam Newton had been playing like an MVP again before
the clunker in Thursday night’s home loss to the Eagles. But
that’s going to happen sometimes.
NFC statistics
BALTIMORE (3-3)
YDS
1,637
1,959
1,297
924
910
1,374
1,633
1,220
1,098
1,264
TD INT RATE
12
0 119.2
13
2 106.9
15
5 101.1
8
4 93.9
6
2 90.6
7
6 89.2
10
5 88.2
7
6 87.5
4
4 84.2
8
6 84.1
RECEIVING
NO YDS AVG
A. Brown, PIT ........................ 48 700 14.6
A. Green, CIN ......................... 32 504 15.8
T. Hilton, IND ........................ 25 485 19.4
Cooks, NE .............................. 24 472 19.7
K. Allen, LAC ......................... 33 446 13.5
Gronkowski, NE ..................... 26 401 15.4
Kelce, KC ................................ 33 390 11.8
T. Hill, KC ............................... 30 390 13.0
D. Hopkins, HOU .................... 37 382 10.3
Dem. Thomas, DEN ............... 28 380 13.6
LG TD
51 2
77 3
63 1
54 2
50 1
53 4
44 2
75 2
34 6
40 0
RUSHING
NO YDS AVG
K. Hunt, KC .......................... 106 630 5.9
Fournette, JAC .................... 130 596 4.6
Bell, PIT ............................... 134 550 4.1
Ajayi, MIA ........................... 102 391 3.8
L. Miller, HOU ........................ 98 372 3.8
Gordon, LAC .......................... 99 356 3.6
C.. Anderson, DEN ................. 82 347 4.2
A. Collins, BAL ....................... 52 335 6.4
D. Henry, TEN ........................ 62 318 5.1
LG TD
69 4
90 6
27 4
20 0
19 1
21 3
40 1
50 0
72 2
DENVER (3-2)
LOS ANGELES (2-4)
September
11: L.A. Chargers, 24-21
17: Dallas, 42-17
24: at Buffalo, 16-26
October
1: Oakland, 16-10
8: Bye
15: N.Y. Giants, 10-23
22: at L.A. Chargers
30: at Kansas City
November
5: at Philadelphia
12: New England
19: Cincinnati
26: at Oakland
December
3: at Miami
10: N.Y. Jets
14: at Indianapolis
24: at Washington
31: Kansas City
September
11: at Denver, 21-24
17: Miami, 17-19
24: Kansas City, 10-24
October
1: Philadelphia, 24-26
8: at N.Y. Giants, 27-22
15: at Oakland, 17-16
22: Denver
29: at New England
November
5: Bye
12: at Jacksonville
19: Buffalo
23: at Dallas
December
3: Cleveland
10: Washington
16: at Kansas City
24: at N.Y. Jets
31: Oakland
KANSAS CITY (5-1)
OAKLAND (2-4)
September
7: at New England, 42-27
17: Philadelphia, 27-20
24: at L.A. Chargers, 24-10
October
2: Washington, 29-20
8: at Houston, 42-34
15: Pittsburgh, 13-19
19: at Oakland
30: Denver
November
5: at Dallas
12: Bye
19: at N.Y. Giants
26: Buffalo
December
3: at N.Y. Jets
10: Oakland
16: L.A. Chargers
24: Miami
31: at Denver
September
10: at Tennessee, 26-16
17: N.Y. Jets, 45-20
24: at Washington, 10-27
October
1: at Denver, 10-16
8: Baltimore, 17-30
15: L.A. Chargers, 16-17
19: Kansas City
29: at Buffalo
November
5: at Miami
12: Bye
19: New England
26: Denver
December
3: N.Y. Giants
10: at Kansas City
17: Dallas
25: at Philadelphia
31: at L.A. Chargers
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D9
M2
professional football
At NFL meeting, no order for players to stand for anthem
BY
M ARK M ASKE
new york — NFL owners
emerged from a series of meetings
Tuesday, including an approximately four-hour gathering with
players at the league’s offices,
without a requirement that players must stand for the national
anthem before games.
Several owners said they do not
expect that to change Wednesday
when the owners conclude their
two-day meeting in New York.
They said the owners are more
focused on conversations regarding league support of players’
community activism than on enacting any anthem-related rule
change that would be designed to
alleviate the intense criticism by
President Trump and some fans of
players’ protests.
“It’s not about counting votes”
for such a rule change, New York
Giants co-owner Steve Tisch said.
“It’s really about acknowledging
that this dialogue started today
hopefully will have real impact.
Any relationship, the foundation
has to be based on trust. And I
think this is sort of the first brick
in that foundation and hopefully
it will create a very strong foundation based on trust, communication, openness and understanding.”
Owners met for about three
hours at a Manhattan hotel following the earlier session with
players at the NFL’s Park Avenue
headquarters. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said the league
did not seek or receive a commitment from players to stand for the
anthem.
“We did not ask for that,” Good-
RICHARD DREW/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“It’s going to be an individual choice,” Indianapolis safety Darius
Butler said of the anthem protest issue discussed at the meetings.
ell said. “We spent today talking
about the issues that players have
been trying to bring attention to,
about issues in our community. . . .
I think we all agree there’s nothing
more important than trying to
give back in our communities and
make our communities better.
That was the entire focus.”
Jed York, the chief executive
officer of the San Francisco 49ers,
said the league cannot overreact
to criticism by Trump and others
of players’ protests.
“We need to be above it,” York
said. “We need to be above petty
attacks from anybody because racial and socio-economic inequality has existed in this country for
too long. We need to get the focus
on that and we need to make sure
that we make progress there. . . .
You’ve got to block out the noise
and you have to go do your job.
And that’s what we need to focus
on. Are people going to slip? Is
somebody going to say something
or tweet something? Probably. But
we can’t let that detract from the
overall goal of progressing these
issues and making sure that we
are a unified front with the players.”
Earlier Tuesday, players said
protests during the anthem would
remain an individual choice made
by players.
“I think that’s up to each individual,” said the Philadelphia Eagles’ Malcolm Jenkins, one of the
players who attended the meeting
at the NFL’s offices. Jenkins added
later: “Actually very little of the
meeting was about the actual anthem. We were really more talking
about solutions and how we get
the results that we want to get.”
The Indianapolis Colts’ Darius
Butler, another player who participated in the meeting, said:
“That’s going to come down to the
individual. It’s going to be an individual choice.”
This is the owners’ regularly
scheduled fall meeting, with the
anthem issues and the players’
protests having been pushed to
the forefront because of the raging
national debate over them fueled
by Trump. Some owners appear to
be hoping that the spirit of cooperation on players’ community activism could prompt players to
voluntarily stand for the anthem.
“I think they [owners] wanted
to get a better understanding as to
what it is that we are looking for as
players and how they could come
along and support our voices,”
Jenkins said as he stood outside
the league’s headquarters, surrounded by other players, early
Tuesday afternoon. “And I think
we’ll continue to work that out
and what that looks like. You can
only accomplish so much in [one]
meeting. But it was good to finally
meet face to face, have that real
dialogue, get some understanding
as to where we all stand and then
move on from that.”
Goodell wrote to teams last
week that the NFL believes players should stand for the anthem.
But NFL officials said going into
this meeting that the league had
no formal plan or proposal requiring players to stand for the anthem to put before the owners.
One owner, the Dallas Cowboys’ Jerry Jones, has said he
would bench any player on his
team who protests during the anthem. Jones attended the owners’
meeting Tuesday but was not pre-
sent for the earlier meeting with
players.
York said the owners should
resist forcing players to stand for
the anthem even if there are economic repercussions for the
league and teams.
“I think that our country is
more important than a slight economic impact,” York said. “And I
think if we can come together and
we can work together in this front,
you’re going to bypass any economic downturn that you can possibly see because this issue is more
important than economics. For
the NFL to come out strongly today and have that partnership
with our players and start that
partnership, I think it shows that.
Honestly this is one of the proudest days that I’ve ever felt being a
part of the National Football
League.”
After the morning meeting, the
league and players’ union issued a
joint statement that said: “Today
owners and players had a productive meeting focused on how we
can work together to promote
positive social change and address inequality in our communities. NFL executives and owners
joined NFLPA executives and
player leaders to review and discuss plans to utilize our platform
to promote equality and effectuate positive change. We agreed
that these are common issues and
pledged to meet again to continue
this work together.
“As we said last week, everyone
who is part of our NFL community
has a tremendous respect for our
country, our flag, our anthem and
our military. In the best American
tradition, we are coming together
Cowboys’ Elliott granted another legal reprieve on suspension
Running back will be
eligible to play Sunday
against the 49ers
BY
M ARK M ASKE
new york — The on-again,
off-again suspension of Dallas
Cowboys running back Ezekiel
Elliott by the NFL is off again, at
least for now.
A federal judge in New York
granted a request Tuesday by the
NFL Players Association for a
temporary restraining order that
puts Elliott’s six-game suspension by the league under its
personal conduct policy back on
hold.
The latest development in the
legal tussle between the league
and players’ union over Elliott’s
suspension presumably keeps Elliott eligible to play in the Cowboys’ game Sunday at San Francisco and potentially in their Oct.
29 game against the Washington
Redskins at FedEx Field.
The NFL and NFLPA remained at odds in court even
while players met Tuesday morning with owners at the league’s
offices in Manhattan to discuss
issues related to the players’
protests during the national anthem. Players and owners described those conversations as
productive, and owners emerged
from a full day of meetings
without requiring players to
stand for the anthem. But in the
Elliott case, the league and union
remained on opposite sides.
The temporary restraining order was granted by U.S. District
Judge Paul A. Crotty. It will
remain in effect until Oct. 30 or
until the presiding judge in the
case, Katherine Polk Failla, rules
on the NFLPA’s request for a
preliminary injunction.
The NFL had declared Elliott’s
suspension to be in effect beginning this week after convincing a
RON JENKINS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ezekiel Elliott’s six-game suspension by the league under its personal conduct policy is back on hold.
federal appeals court in New
Orleans to last week lift the
preliminary injunction that had
been granted to the NFLPA by a
federal judge in Texas.
The courtroom maneuvering
has kept Elliott in the Cowboys’
lineup despite the suspension by
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and the decision by league-appointed arbitrator Harold Hen-
derson to uphold Goodell’s suspension.
The league determined after a
lengthy investigation that Elliott,
in its view, was guilty of committing violence against his former
girlfriend in a series of incidents
last year in Ohio. Authorities in
Columbus did not charge Elliott
with a crime. The suspension
was upheld by Henderson, the
former league labor executive
assigned by Goodell to hear and
resolve Elliott’s appeal.
The NFLPA filed its legal challenge in Texas and was granted a
preliminary injunction by U.S.
District Judge Amos L. Mazzant
III. Mazzant ruled that Elliott did
not receive a fair hearing before
Henderson, in large part because
Goodell and Elliott’s accuser did
not testify.
The suspension was reinstated
when the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the 5th Circuit granted the
NFL’s request for a stay of the
injunction. A three-judge panel
of that court ruled, in a 2-1
decision, that the district court
in Texas did not have jurisdiction
because the NFLPA filed its case
there before Henderson issued
his ruling in the appeal. The
NFLPA pointed out that the appeals court did not rule on the
merits of the case. It asked the
full appeals court for a re-hearing and sought to have Mazzant
keep the injunction in place until
Elliott’s appeal had been resolved.
Meanwhile, the venue shifted
to the Southern District of New
York, where the league had filed
a lawsuit seeking to have Henderson’s decision on Elliott’s appeal affirmed.
The additional problem that
the NFLPA faces in New York is
the precedent in place there from
the legal fight over Tom Brady’s
Deflategate suspension. The case
played out there and the NFLPA
initially was able to have Brady’s
suspension overturned at the
district court level, keeping him
eligible to play for the New
England Patriots’ entire 2015
season. But Brady served the
suspension by sitting out the first
four games of last season after
the NFL prevailed on appeal, a
decision that seemed to reinforce
Goodell’s authority in player disciplinary matters.
The Cowboys are coming off
their bye week and take a disappointing 2-3 record into their
game Sunday against the winless
49ers. Elliott has had an inconsistent season after leading the
NFL in rushing last season as a
rookie. But he’s coming off a very
good performance in the Cowboys’ most recent game, as he ran
for 116 yards in a 35-31 defeat to
the Green Bay Packers in Arlington, Tex., on Oct. 8.
mark.maske@washpost.com
THE INSIDER
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
Hopkins goes on IR;
Redskins sign Rose
The Washington Redskins
designated place kicker Dustin
Hopkins on short-term injured
reserve and signed place kicker
Nick Rose on Tuesday, according
to two people with knowledge of
the situation.
Redskins Coach Jay Gruden
said after Sunday’s 26-24 win
over the San Francisco 49ers that
Hopkins was dealing with a right
hip rotator muscle strain. He
underwent an MRI exam and was
initially considered “week-to-
week.” Now Hopkins will be out
for at least eight weeks and won’t
be eligible to return until
Week 14, when the Redskins face
the Los Angeles Chargers.
Hopkins will be eligible to
resume practicing in six weeks if
he is able.
Hopkins, who was acquired in
Week 2 of the 2015 season, has
been fairly reliable since he
replaced Kai Forbath as the
team’s place kicker. He has made
84 percent of his field goal tries
and 94.6 percent of his extrapoint attempts in 36 games with
the Redskins. Through five
games this season, he is 9 for 11
on field goals, with both of his
misses on tries of 50 yards or
longer. Hopkins also is 12 of 13
on extra points. His only miss
occurred against the 49ers, but
he went 2 for 2 on field goal
attempts Sunday.
Washington worked out four
place kickers Tuesday, according
to a person with knowledge of
the situation. They opted to sign
Rose, a 2016 undrafted free agent
out of Texas. The 23-year-old has
spent the past two training
camps with the Atlanta Falcons
and 49ers, but Rose has yet to
appear in an NFL game.
During the preseason with the
49ers, Rose made 3 of 4 field goal
attempts, with his only miss on a
53-yard try, and went 4 for 5 on
extra points. Rose also logged
three touchbacks on six kickoffs.
During his final season at
Texas in 2015, Rose made 13 of
his 17 field goal attempts and 38
of his 39 extra-point tries. He
recorded touchbacks on
74.6 percent of his kickoffs as
opponents returned just 12, the
fewest in the nation that season.
More snaps for Doctson
Josh Doctson needs more snaps.
The second-year wide receiver
has served a limited role through
five games, including in Sunday’s
win over San Francisco, in which
he participated in just 19 of
Washington’s 74 offensive snaps.
That means Doctson, the
team’s 2016 first-round draft
pick, was on the field for just
more than 25 percent of the
team’s offensive snaps. And
during Monday’s news
conference, Gruden addressed
the deficiency, saying the
coaching staff will look at getting
Doctson more playing time
moving forward.
“We are going to actively
expand [his role], without a
doubt,” Gruden said. “He didn’t
get as many reps as I would like.”
Doctson, 24, once again
flashed his potential in a reserve
role Sunday. He scored his
second career touchdown during
the opening drive on an 11-yard
reception, his only catch in the
game. Two of Doctson’s four
catches this season have resulted
in touchdowns.
— Master Tesfatsion
to find common ground and commit to the hard work required for
positive change.”
Former 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who started the
players’ protest movement last
season and now has filed a grievance accusing NFL teams of colluding against him, did not attend
the meeting Tuesday morning but
was invited, according to Jenkins.
“He was invited, actually,” Jenkins said. “He was invited.”
Kaepernick’s legal representatives issued a statement saying
that players wanted Kaepernick
present but Kaepernick was not
invited by the league.
A group of players, including
Jenkins, has lobbied Goodell for
league support of players’ community activism. The league on
Monday publicly endorsed bipartisan legislation proposed on Capitol Hill addressing criminal sentencing reform.
“There are a lot of things discussed about how we could move
forward,” Jenkins said. “We’re not
ready to roll any of that out because it’s all talk right now. We’ll
continue to work through that —
what we want as players, what the
league can do with obviously their
platform. We’re the greatest sport
in this country. We have the
unique ability to bring people together from all walks of life
whether it’s in our locker rooms or
it’s in our stands. And I think we
see that responsibility as players
and the league to do that with our
country. And it starts with having
some tough conversations and
moving forward, and I think that’s
what we started today.”
mark.maske@washpost.com
NFL NOTES
Giants end
suspension
of veteran
cornerback
Rodgers-Cromartie
left team’s facility
before practice last week
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The New York Giants ended
their suspension of veteran cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie for insubordination.
Team officials announced Tuesday that Rodgers-Cromartie was
reinstated to the active roster after
missing the team’s game against
Denver on Sunday night.
The team says Rodgers-Cromartie met with Coach Ben McAdoo on Tuesday morning, then
was taken off of the reserve/suspended by club list.
The 31-year-old veteran was
suspended for leaving the team
facility before practice last week.
He also left the bench and then
returned in the second half of the
Giants’ loss to the Chargers, a
move that prompted McAdoo to
make Rodgers-Cromartie inactive
for the Broncos game.
PACKERS: Green Bay signed
rookie quarterback Jerod Evans to
the practice squad. The 6-foot-3,
232-pound Evans was signed as an
undrafted rookie by Philadelphia
out of Virginia Tech on May 12 but
was placed on injured reserve four
days later and released.
JAGUARS: Jacksonville parted ways with kicker Jason Myers,
waiving him two days after he
hooked two 54-yard field goals in a
loss to the Los Angeles Rams.
The Jaguars replaced Myers
with free agent Josh Lambo, who
spent two seasons with the thenSan Diego Chargers. The Chargers
cut him in September.
LIONS: Punter Sam Martin
was removed from the reserve/
non-football injury list and practiced for the first time this season.
Martin, a fifth-round draft pick
in 2013, has the four highest net
punting averages in club history.
BILLS: Buffalo signed wide
receiver Deonte Thompson, who
has five-plus seasons of NFL experience and had 11 catches for 125
yards and a touchdown with Chicago before being released by the
Bears last week. The Bills opened a
roster spot by releasing running
back Joe Banyard.
49ERS: San Francisco signed
defensive linemen Leger Douzable and Tony McDaniel to oneyear deals. To make room, the
49ers placed defensive lineman
Arik Armstead on injured reserve
with a broken hand and released
tight end Logan Paulsen.
D10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
COLLEGE SOCCER
ALL-MET SPORTS
In an era of specialization, Good Counsel’s Chapman stands apart Hoyas stun
No. 3 Terps
on late goal,
end streak
BY
M IA O ’ N EILL
After helping Good Counsel’s
girls’ soccer team to a crucial win
over conference rival Paul VI last
month, junior forward Chloe
Chapman was all about perspective.
“Now I’ve got to go do homework,” Chapman said matter-offactly, tossing a backpack over
her shoulder.
Just about an hour before, it
was her goal that opened the
scoring in a 2-1 victory against
the reigning WCAC champions.
Darting between two defenders
to collect a pass from teammate
Jameese Joseph, Chapman cut
around the Panthers’ goalkeeper
and coolly finished from a tight
angle.
It was a remarkable goal by
most standards, but for Chapman, it was routine — the kind of
result that her schedule and athletic ambition demand.
Besides being Good Counsel’s
leading scorer and an all-state
selection in soccer for the past
two seasons, Chapman has been
attracting the attention of some
of the country’s top college basketball programs since middle
school. A point guard, Chapman
is ranked among the best 60
basketball players in the nation
in ESPN’s HoopGurlz recruiting
list for the Class of 2019.
Now she’s hoping to become
what in today’s world of sport
specialization is exceedingly
rare: a two-sport athlete at a
top-level Division I university.
“It’s different, because you
don’t hear about a lot of dualsport athletes in college for D-I
schools,” said Chapman, who has
participated in trials with USA
Basketball youth national teams
and hopes one day to play in the
WNBA. “But this is something I
want to do.”
She is well on her way. Already,
18 schools have made offers for
Chapman to play both sports,
including leading ACC, Big Ten,
Southeastern Conference and Pacific-12 programs — a testament
to her skill in two very demanding sports.
Multisport female athletes at
this level aren’t unheard of. Jennifer Hamson, a center for the
WNBA’s Indiana Fever, played
basketball and volleyball at BYU,
while National Women’s Soccer
League players Elizabeth Eddy
and Julie King, in addition to
playing soccer in college, played
lacrosse and basketball, respectively.
But such cases are highly unusual because of the pressure
placed on today’s college athletes,
according to women’s basketball
recruiting expert Dan Olson, who
is the director of HoopGurlz and
the Collegiate Girls Basketball
Report. Olson said he has seen
college athletes play two sports,
but not often at top-tier programs. And even in those rarest
cases, few play both sports for
four years.
“There’s more demand put on
student-athletes now than ever
before,” Olson said.
Good Counsel girls’ basketball
Coach Tom Splaine, who has seen
THE TOP 10
THE TOP 10
Boys’ soccer
Girls’ soccer
Leonardtown beat Great Mills, 7-0, in ‘The Battle for the
Boot.' The schools are located 10 miles apart in Southern
Maryland and play each year for a trophy shaped like a
soccer cleat that the winner keeps until the following
year's game. . . . With a goal and two assists in a 3-0 win
over Old Mill on Thursday, Meade junior forward Silas
Baker has nine goals and seven assists this season. . . .
After a scoreless draw with Quince Orchard, Whitman
bounced back with a pair of 4-0 wins over Richard
Montgomery and then-No. 9 Damascus. . . . Wilson
stayed undefeated with a 10-0 win over Banneker and a
4-0 win over School Without Walls. . . . With five losses
in a brutal nonconference schedule, DeMatha has one
local loss to Landon and is in first place in the WCAC at
4-0-1.
St. John's earned away wins at Holy Cross and McNamara to stay perfect in the WCAC. . . . Bethesda-Chevy
Chase suffered a surprising 1-0 loss at Wootton. . . . Fifi
Iluyomade's goal and assist helped lift Spalding to a
comeback victory over Notre Dame Prep. . . . Whitman
came from behind to claim a decisive 5-1 win over
Damascus. . . . Broadneck handily beat Northeast, 7-0,
and Glen Burnie, 13-2. . . . Northern also enjoyed a week
of blowout wins, steamrolling Chopticon and Patuxent.
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
Severna Park
Leonardtown
Meade
Whitman
Landon
Churchill
Wilson
DeMatha
River Hill
The Heights
Record
11-0-1
10-1
11-1
9-1-2
10-1-2
9-2
10-0-1
6-6-2
10-1-2
12-2
many of his players go on to
compete in college during his
14-year tenure, agrees that Division I hopefuls have to work
harder than ever — especially if
they’re trying to play two sports
— but he believes Chapman is a
remarkable case, both for her
skill and her composure.
“She’s fortunate in that she’s
talented enough that she’s able to
balance both sports,” Splaine
said, adding that in addition to
her athletic gifts, Chapman possesses a mental maturity that
allows her to transition easily
between seasons while also keeping up with schoolwork.
Chapman, too, says she has the
skill and the discipline necessary
to succeed at the next level in
both basketball and soccer. And
although basketball remains her
first love, she insists she is com-
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Team
St. John's
Bethesda-Chevy Chase
Spalding
Whitman
Broadneck
Northern
Potomac School
Paul VI
River Hill
South River
Record
11-1
10-1
8-0-2
11-1
9-1-1
9-1
9-1-1
8-2-1
9-2-1
9-2
mitted to both sports.
“It’s not like I’m a basketball
player that plays soccer,” she said.
“I’m a basketball player and a
soccer player. They’re both my
focus.”
The experience of Erik Chapman, Chloe’s father and a former
basketball and football player in
high school before playing quarterback at Virginia Tech, has been
helpful as Chloe navigates the
tricky maze of college recruiting.
“The good thing is I’ve had
experience,” said Erik, who’s on
the coaching staff of Chloe’s AAU
basketball showcase team, the
Maryland Lady Terps. “When
they’re recruiting you, you want
someone who’s going to look out
for you during the highs and the
lows.”
At first, Chloe didn’t consider
playing both sports in college.
Having quit travel soccer in
eighth grade to make time for
basketball showcases, she knew
little about the soccer recruiting
process. (Soccer recruiting, like
basketball, happens mainly at
club showcase events rather than
high school games.)
But things changed in 2015,
when Erik sent a video of Chloe’s
varsity soccer highlights to several schools that were recruiting
her for basketball.
The response was enthusiastic.
Basketball coaches who had long
had an eye on Chloe were calling
up their soccer coaches, urging
them to watch the clips.
“They were like, ‘Who’s this
girl?’ ” recalled Erik Chapman.
“They didn’t see her on the soccer
showcases, because she’s playing
basketball showcases.”
Chloe has narrowed her search
to about 12 schools, all of which
would have her playing both
sports. She plans to make a decision in the spring.
Meanwhile, she is focused on
her remaining time at Good
Counsel, where she is hoping to
capture a second WCAC title in
soccer and a first in basketball.
In college, maintaining such
balance will likely be more difficult, especially because Chloe’s
ultimate goal is to pursue basketball, her first love, professionally.
But many of those closest to her,
including Splaine and Good
Counsel soccer Coach Jim Bruno,
believe she has what it takes.
“A lot of people are like, ‘You’re
probably going to choose when
you go to college, right?’ ” Chapman said. “And I’m like, ‘No, I’m
trying to do both.’ ”
mia.oneill@washpost.com
No one knows when Luck will return. It should be next season.
Divining the
status of Andrew
Luck has become
a parlor game, a
ADAM
season-long
KILGORE
attempt at
reading tea leaves
and interpreting signals.
Indianapolis Colts fans and beat
writers have been forced to
become an army of heartland
Kremlinologists. Conflicting
information abounds. Concrete
information is sparse. And so it
counts as significant when ESPN
analyst Matt Hasselbeck, Luck’s
close friend and former backup,
declared during the “Monday
Night Football” pregame show
that “he’s not close right now.”
The question has hovered over
the Colts’ season: When will Luck
come back? He watched from the
sideline Monday night in
Nashville, wearing a Colts cap
and a “Property of Colts” T-shirt
as Indianapolis lost, 36-22, to the
Tennessee Titans. Luck
underwent surgery to repair a
torn labrum in his right throwing
shoulder in January, and ever
since the Colts have been either
stingy or unreliable in hinting
when he would return.
As the Colts’ latest loss wore
on, another question continued
to gain, if not surpass, that one:
What would even be the point?
A healthy Luck would give the
Colts the best chance to contend.
That ship has already sailed. The
2-4 Colts are only a game out of
first place in the AFC South, but
any sign that they’re a playoff
team is a mirage. They have been
outscored by 76 points, the worst
margin in the NFL. Their defense
got embarrassed in the second
half Monday night. They are, as
expected, not good.
Something is clearly screwy
with Luck’s rehab. Colts owner
On
the NFL
MARK ZALESKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
With the Colts struggling at 2-4, letting Andrew Luck’s shoulder injury heal seems like the prudent move.
Jim Irsay is not exactly a reliable
narrator, but over the past two
years, he has said Luck wouldn’t
need surgery and that he would
return for the start of this season.
Nobody with the Colts has
provided anything resembling a
timetable about Luck, who
returned to practice Oct. 4.
Whatever it is, Luck’s future can
only be made more secure by
letting his labrum heal and not
playing behind a subpar
offensive line on a team doomed
to miss the playoffs for a third
straight season.
“Maybe I’m old, but I’m trying
Transform
Your Home
to do the timeline, it’s just hard to
figure out,” Hasselbeck told the
Indianapolis Star’s Zak Keefer
last week. “He had surgery in
January. What’s going on? I saw
the film [of Luck throwing light
passes during practice last
week]. That’s not real. That’s not
him. Yeah, you’re out there on the
field, but that’s not you. I’m just
surprised it’s mid-October and
he’s not out there.”
Luck remains sidelined
midway through the 2017 season,
in the big picture, because the
Colts have badly mismanaged his
injury and could be in the middle
Ceramic Tile
Wood Look
Porcelain Tile
Natural Stone
Carpet
Hardwood Flooring
With High
Quality Flooring
of botching the greatest gift a
franchise can receive. Luck’s
situation has reached such an
odd place, it’s worth looking back
over how the Colts got here.
The Colts benefited from the
biggest stroke of fortune a
franchise can get. The one year
everything fell apart and they
landed the first pick, a no-doubt
potential franchise quarterback
was available. They took
advantage by winning 11 games
in each of Luck’s first three
seasons. When he took them to
the AFC championship game
after the 2014 season, it seemed
like another step in a Super Bowl
progression. Luck was not only
the future of the Colts, but the
future of the NFL.
Luck first hurt his shoulder in
the third week of the 2015 season.
He missed two games and
returned, playing until a
lacerated kidney knocked him
out for the final seven games of
what became a lost season for the
Colts. Luck had done enough,
though, to sign the richest
contract in NFL history that
offseason.
In Week 2 of 2016, Luck
reinjured his shoulder making a
tackle on an interception return.
At the time, Irsay vowed Luck
wouldn’t need surgery. The Colts
either misdiagnosed the injury,
misunderstood the severity or
needlessly lied to the public and
cast uncertainty over the entire
franchise.
Evidence suggests they
botched the diagnosis and/or
plan for treatment, because the
Colts continued to play Luck
behind a horrendous offensive
line, even as they slipped out of
playoff contention before the
final week of the season. Luck
still threw for 4,240 yards and 31
touchdowns, completing a
career-high 63.5 percent of his
attempts.
When Irsay announced that
Luck would need surgery, he
insisted Luck would be ready to
start the first game of this
season. Again, either the Colts
botched the medical assessment
of their franchise quarterback or
their owner lied to no end other
than casting unnecessary
pressure on Luck and eventual
doubt on the franchise’s
quarterback position.
Luck didn’t say it explicitly,
but his words suggest he believes
the Colts blew the diagnosis. In
his first comments after the
surgery, Luck told reporters that
he decided to have the surgery.
Rehab — the plan the Colts had
laid out and publicly espoused —
no longer worked, in his mind.
Luck might be practicing now,
but he remains too good for their
roster, so much so it would be
pointless playing him the rest of
the season. He should heal fully.
The Colts could develop Jacoby
Brissett, who has been
promising, either to showcase
him for a trade or as a reliable
backup for Luck next year.
Without Luck, they’re certain to
fall into another high draft pick.
It’s not clear when Luck will be
ready. But if the Colts want to
salvage a situation they have
botched, they’ll make sure he
doesn’t play all season.
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
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total flooring
purchase
Climb aboard the home delivery train
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S TEVEN G OFF
With time melting away at
Ludwig Field on Tuesday night,
Maryland’s unbeaten men’s soccer team committed players forward in a late effort to crack open
a scoreless affair and avoid overtime.
Georgetown repelled the forceful effort, then turned the match
in its favor by stinging the thirdranked Terrapins with a swift
counterattack.
From one end to the other, an
upset took hold.
Jacob Montes applied the finishing touches, scoring his first
career goal in the 88th minute
and lifting the No. 13 Hoyas to a
1-0 upset in College Park. The
outcome ended Maryland’s regular season unbeaten streak over
two-plus seasons at 30.
“It’s a big result based on where
this team was 12 months ago,”
Hoyas Coach Brian Wiese said of
a program that stumbled through
the 2016 season and missed the
NCAA tournament for the first
time in five years.
The match seemed to be flowing Maryland’s way after two major second-half threats, including
Eryk Williamson’s wicked shot off
the crossbar.
But with the extra period looming, the Hoyas cleared the ball
from danger. Montes, a freshman
from the Portland Timbers youth
academy, made an inside run
between two defenders and
latched on to Christopher Lema’s
pass before driving a right-footed
shot under charging goalkeeper
Dayne St. Clair.
“We were on the counter,” Montes said. “I saw Lema pick up the
ball. I know his quality in passing,
so I made my run through. I got a
lucky bounce to me.”
Maryland Coach Sasho Cirovski was disappointed in the way
his team conceded the counterattack and defended Georgetown’s
threat.
“We were really pushing at the
end for the goal, and you always
fear getting caught on the counter, and they caught us that one
time,” he said. “Maybe we showed
a little naivete the way we dealt
with it.”
The Terrapins (10-1-3) suffered
their first regular season setback
since falling at Ohio State on
Oct. 31, 2015.
Cirovski said he thought his
team needed to lose ahead of the
postseason to perhaps avoid the
fate of last year’s unbeaten team,
which didn’t handle adversity in
the NCAA tournament and lost in
the second round to Providence.
“You hate to lose anytime, but
in many ways this is what the
doctor ordered,” he said. “We
need to get a little bit of an edge
back and maybe exhale a little bit
and stop dealing with this undefeated baloney.
“I’m not a good loser, but we’re
going to learn from this and move
forward.”
The Hoyas (10-2-1) improved to
3-1-1 in their past five meetings
with Maryland after losing the
first 28 times.
“Maryland is such a good team.
They are such a fun team,” Wiese
said. “You scout them, and it’s fun
to watch their games. And then
you realize you have to play them
and deal with these good players.”
The Hoyas dealt with them just
fine most of the cool night, conceding few quality opportunities
and creating some of their own.
They were the better side for a
long stretch of the second half
before Maryland took charge, albeit without breaking the tie.
The Terrapins played without
their starting outside defenders,
George Campbell (red-card suspension) and Chase Gasper
(groin injury). Georgetown leading scorer Achara (six goals in
seven appearances) remained out
with an ankle injury.
The Hoyas will close the regular season with three of four
matches at home, starting Saturday against Seton Hall, while
Maryland will finish with three
home games, beginning Friday
against Coastal Carolina.
RADFORD
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MHIC #125450 • DC #67004413 • VA #2705 108835A • WVA #036832
BY
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EstiMAtEs
GEORGETOWN 1,
MARYLAND 0
SF
1, VIRGINIA 0:
In Charlottesville, Sivert Daehlie
scored in the 61st minute as the
Highlanders (8-4-2) upset the
10th-ranked Cavaliers (9-2-3).
It was Radford’s first victory in
the series after 11 defeats and one
draw. Virginia, which had been
enjoying a six-game unbeaten
run, had won 25 of its previous 26
home matches.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D11
M2
scoreboard
FOOTBA LL
Titans 36, Colts 22
NFL
NFC
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 5
Washington .................. 3
Dallas ............................ 2
N.Y. Giants .................... 1
SOUTH
W
Carolina ......................... 4
New Orleans ................. 3
Atlanta .......................... 3
Tampa Bay .................... 2
BASEBALL
Late Monday
L
1
2
3
5
L
2
2
2
3
T
0
0
0
0
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.600
.400
.167
PCT.
.667
.600
.600
.400
PF
165
117
125
105
PF
128
145
121
118
PA
122
113
132
132
PA
122
116
109
121
NORTH
W
Minnesota ..................... 4
Green Bay ..................... 4
Detroit .......................... 3
Chicago ......................... 2
L
2
2
3
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.667
.500
.333
PF
122
147
161
105
PA
103
135
149
148
WEST
W
L.A. Rams ...................... 4
Seattle .......................... 3
Arizona ......................... 3
San Francisco ................ 0
L
2
2
3
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.600
.500
.000
PF
179
110
119
113
PA
138
87
158
146
AFC
EAST
W
New England ................. 4
Buffalo .......................... 3
Miami ............................ 3
N.Y. Jets ....................... 3
L
2
2
2
3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.600
.600
.500
PF
172
89
61
109
PA
159
74
84
130
SOUTH
W
Tennessee ..................... 3
Jacksonville .................. 3
Houston ........................ 3
Indianapolis .................. 2
L
3
3
3
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.500
.500
.500
.333
PF
146
156
177
119
PA
164
110
147
195
NORTH
W
Pittsburgh ..................... 4
Baltimore ...................... 3
Cincinnati ...................... 2
Cleveland ...................... 0
L
2
3
3
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.500
.400
.000
PF
118
114
84
94
PA
102
124
83
157
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 5
Denver ........................... 3
L.A. Chargers ................ 2
Oakland ......................... 2
L
1
2
4
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.600
.333
.333
PF
177
108
116
124
PA
130
97
131
126
WEEK 6
THURSDAY’S RESULT
Philadelphia 28, AT Carolina 23
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
at Washington 26, San Francisco 24
Chicago 27, at Baltimore 24, OT
Miami 20, at Atlanta 17
at Houston 33, Cleveland 17
New England 24, at N.Y. Jets 17
Minnesota 23, at Green Bay 10
at New Orleans 52, Detroit 38
L.A. Rams 27, at Jacksonville 17
at Arizona 38, Tampa Bay 33
L.A. Chargers 17, at Oakland 16
Pittsburgh 19, at Kansas City 13
N.Y. Giants 23, at Denver 10
BYE: Buffalo, Dallas, Seattle, Cincinnati
MONDAY’S RESULT
at Tennessee 36, Indianapolis 22
WEEK 7
THURSDAY’S GAME
Kansas City (-3) at Oakland, 8:25
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Baltimore at Minnesota (-51/2), 1
Tampa Bay at Buffalo (OFF), 1
New Orleans (-6) at Green Bay, 1
Tennessee (-51/2) at Cleveland, 1
N.Y. Jets at Miami (-3), 1
Jacksonville (-3) at Indianapolis, 1
Arizona vs L.A. Rams (-31/2) in London, 1
Carolina (-3) at Chicago, 1
Dallas (-51/2) at San Francisco, 4:05
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh (-51/2), 4:25
Seattle (-5) at N.Y. Giants, 4:25
Denver at L.A. Chargers (-2), 4:25
Atlanta at New England (-3), 8:30
BYE: Detroit, Houston
MONDAY’S GAME
Washington at Philadelphia (-41/2), 8:30
NCAA
THURSDAY‘S GAMES
SOUTHWEST
Louisiana-Lafayette (3-3) at Arkansas St. (3-2), 7:30
Memphis (5-1) at Houston (4-2), 8
FRIDAY‘S GAMES
EAST
Princeton (4-1) at Harvard (3-2), 7:30
SOUTH
W. Kentucky (4-2) at Old Dominion (2-4), 6
Marshall (5-1) at Middle Tennessee (3-4), 7
FAR WEST
Air Force (2-4) at Nevada (1-6), 9:30
Colorado St. (5-2) at New Mexico (3-3), 10:15
SATURDAY‘S GAMES
EAST
Temple (3-4) at Army (5-2), Noon
Bryant (2-4) at CCSU (4-3), Noon
St. Francis (Pa.) (4-2) at Duquesne (5-1), Noon
Elon (5-1) at Rhode Island (2-4), Noon
Sacred Heart (2-4) at Robert Morris (2-4), Noon
Purdue (3-3) at Rutgers (2-4), Noon
Tulsa (2-5) at U-Conn. (2-4), Noon
Colgate (3-4) at Holy Cross (2-5), 12:05
Columbia (5-0) at Dartmouth (5-0), 12:30
Drake (3-3) at Marist (3-4), 1
Liberty (3-3) at Monmouth (N.J.) (5-1), 1
Yale (4-1) at Penn (2-3), 1
Fordham (1-6) at Georgetown (1-5), 2
Towson (2-4) at New Hampshire (4-2), 2
Brown (2-3) at Cornell (1-4), 3
Maine (2-3) at Albany (N.Y.) (3-3), 3:30
Richmond (4-2) at Delaware (4-2), 3:30
Bucknell (3-3) at Lafayette (2-5), 3:30
UCF (5-0) at Navy (5-1), 3:30
Georgia Southern (0-5) at U-Mass. (0-6), 3:30
Michigan (5-1) at Penn St. (6-0), 7:30
SOUTH
Louisville (4-3) at Florida St. (2-3), Noon
San Diego (4-2) at Jacksonville (4-2), Noon
Pittsburgh (2-5) at Duke (4-3), 12:20
Boston College (3-4) at Virginia (5-1), 12:30
Dayton (2-5) at Davidson (2-4), 1
Morgan St. (1-5) at Howard (3-3), 1
Stetson (2-5) at Morehead St. (2-5), 1
Bethune-Cookman (3-3) at N.C. A&T (7-0), 1
Mercer (4-3) at Furman (4-3), 1:30
W. Carolina (5-2) at VMI (0-7), 1:30
Samford (4-2) at Wofford (6-0), 1:30
The Citadel (3-3) at Chattanooga (1-6), 2
SC State (2-4) at Delaware St. (0-6), 2
Troy (4-2) at Georgia St. (3-2), 2
Florida A&M (2-5) at Hampton (4-2), 2
Norfolk St. (2-4) at N.C. Central (5-1), 2
UT Martin (3-3) at E. Kentucky (1-5), 3
Alcorn St. (5-2) at Grambling St. (5-1), 3
Va. Lynchburg (0-0) at MVSU (1-5), 3
Tennessee (3-3) at Alabama (7-0), 3:30
Coastal Carolina (1-5) at Appalachian St. (4-2), 3:30
Syracuse (4-3) at Miami (5-0), 3:30
North Carolina (1-6) at Virginia Tech (5-1), 3:30
James Madison (6-0) at William & Mary (2-4), 3:30
Kentucky (5-1) at Mississippi St. (4-2), 4
SE Missouri (2-4) at Austin Peay (4-3), 5
North Texas (4-2) at FAU (3-3), 5
Louisiana-Monroe (3-3) at South Alabama (2-4), 5
Savannah St. (0-6) at Charleston Southern (3-3), 6
UAB (4-2) at Charlotte (0-7), 6:30
BYU (1-6) at East Carolina (1-6), 7
Southern U. (3-3) at Jackson St. (0-6), 7
Southern Miss. (4-2) at Louisiana Tech (3-3), 7
Incarnate Word (1-5) at McNeese St. (5-1), 7
Cent. Arkansas (5-1) at Northwestern St. (1-5), 7
South Florida (6-0) at Tulane (3-3), 7
LSU (5-2) at Mississippi (3-3), 7:15
Wake Forest (4-2) at Georgia Tech (3-2), 7:30
MIDWEST
Maryland (3-3) at Wisconsin (6-0), Noon
Idaho (2-4) at Missouri (1-5), Noon
Iowa (4-2) at Northwestern (3-3), Noon
Akron (4-3) at Toledo (5-1), Noon
Campbell (5-2) at Butler (4-3), 1
Sacramento St. (3-3) at North Dakota (2-5), 1:30
N. Illinois (4-2) at Bowling Green (1-6), 2
W. Michigan (4-3) at E. Michigan (2-4), 2
Youngstown St. (3-3) at N. Iowa (3-3), 2
Kent St. (2-5) at Ohio (5-2), 2
Buffalo (3-4) at Miami (Ohio) (2-5), 2:30
Cent. Michigan (2-5) at Ball St. (2-4), 3
Jacksonville St. (5-1) at E. Illinois (5-2), 3
South Dakota (6-0) at Illinois St. (4-2), 3
S. Illinois (3-3) at Indiana St. (0-6), 3
S. Dakota St. (4-2) at Missouri St. (1-5), 3
Indiana (3-3) at Michigan St. (5-1), 3:30
Illinois (2-4) at Minnesota (3-3), 3:30
W. Illinois (5-1) at N. Dakota St. (6-0), 3:30
SMU (4-2) at Cincinnati (2-5), 4
Oklahoma (5-1) at Kansas St. (3-3), 4
Southern Cal (6-1) at Notre Dame (5-1), 7:30
SOUTHWEST
Oklahoma St. (5-1) at Texas (3-3), Noon
Iowa St. (4-2) at Texas Tech (4-2), Noon
Lamar (1-5) at Sam Houston St. (5-1), 4
Rice (1-5) at UTSA (3-2), 7
Auburn (5-2) at Arkansas (2-4), 7:30
West Virginia (4-2) at Baylor (0-6), 8
Kansas (1-5) at TCU (6-0), 8
FAR WEST
Montana St. (2-4) at N. Colorado (2-3), 2:30
Arizona St. (3-3) at Utah (4-2), 3:30
Oregon (4-3) at UCLA (3-3), 4
Portland St. (0-6) at Idaho St. (3-4), 4:30
Utah St. (3-4) at UNLV (2-4), 6
UC Davis (3-3) at N. Arizona (4-2), 7
E. Washington (5-2) at S. Utah (4-2), 7:05
Arizona (4-2) at California (4-3), 8
Weber St. (4-2) at Cal Poly (0-6), 9:05
Wyoming (4-2) at Boise St. (4-2), 10:15
Fresno St. (4-2) at San Diego St. (6-1), 10:30
Colorado (4-3) at Washington St. (6-1), 10:45
COLTS ...................................... 3
TITANS ..................................... 6
10
3
6
6
3 — 22
21 — 36
FIRST QUARTER
Tennessee: FG Succop 48, 11:15.
Indianapolis: FG Vinatieri 36, 6:45.
Tennessee: FG Succop 32, :47.
SECOND QUARTER
Indianapolis: Doyle 8 pass from Brissett (Vinatieri
kick), 10:54.
Tennessee: FG Succop 40, 4:10.
Indianapolis: FG Vinatieri 25, :14.
THIRD QUARTER
Indianapolis: Simon 26 interception return (kick failed),
13:50.
Tennessee: FG Succop 48, 9:43.
Tennessee: FG Succop 23, 4:35.
FOURTH QUARTER
Tennessee: Murray 3 run (Succop kick), 10:01.
Indianapolis: FG Vinatieri 52, 7:27.
Tennessee: Taylor 53 pass from Mariota (Succop kick),
5:29.
Tennessee: Henry 72 run (Succop kick), :47.
Attendance: 63,888.
COLTS
First Downs .......................................... 18
Total Net Yards ................................... 297
Rushes-Yards ................................. 20-85
Passing ................................................ 212
Punt Returns ....................................... 0-0
Kickoff Returns ............................... 5-157
Interceptions Ret. ............................. 1-26
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 21-37-0
Sacked-Yards Lost .............................. 0-0
Punts .............................................. 3-53.3
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 1-1
Penalties-Yards ................................ 5-51
Time Of Possession ......................... 24:07
TITANS
25
473
34-168
305
2-15
2-46
0-0
23-32-1
1-1
1-44.0
0-0
4-45
35:53
RUSHING
Indianapolis: Gore 10-49, Mack 2-18, Brissett 5-15,
Turbin 3-3.
Tennessee: Henry 19-131, Murray 12-40, Mariota 2-0,
D.Walker 1-(minus 3).
PASSING
Indianapolis: Brissett 21-37-0-212.
Tennessee: Mariota 23-32-1-306.
RECEIVING
Indianapolis: Doyle 7-50, Moncrief 5-67, Turbin 4-37,
Aiken 2-21, Gore 2-18, Hilton 1-19.
Tennessee: Decker 7-88, Matthews 4-69, Murray 4-47,
D.Walker 4-17, Taylor 2-61, Henry 1-14, J.Smith 1-10.
MISSED FIELD GOALS
None.
TEN N I S
ATP/WTA
KREMLIN CUP
At Olympic Stadium; In Moscow
Purse: Men: $745,940 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
MEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, def. Konstantin Kravchuk,
Russia, 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (7-3); Damir Dzumhur (6), BosniaHerzegovina, def. Thomas Fabbiano, Italy, 6-3, 0-6, 6-2;
Rogerio Dutra Silva, Brazil, def. Evgeny Donskoy, Russia,
6-3, 7-5; Andreas Seppi, Italy, def. Jiri Vesely, Czech
Republic, 6-3, 4-1 retired; Laslo Djere, Serbia, def. Paolo
Lorenzi (7), Italy, 4-6, 7-6 (11-9), 6-4; Ricardas Berankis,
Lithuania, def. Dusan Lajovic, Serbia, 6-3, 7-6 (7-2); Filip
Krajinovic, Serbia, def. Andrey Rublev (5), Russia, 7-5,
7-6 (8-6).
WOMEN’S SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Vera Lapko, Belarus, def. Maryna Zanevska, Belgium,
6-2, 6-3; Julia Goerges (7), Germany, def. Polina Monova,
Russia, 6-0, 6-3; Natalia Vikhlyantseva, Russia, def. Kaia
Kanepi, Estonia, 6-3, 6-2; Magdalena Rybarikova (8),
Slovakia, def. Maria Sharapova, Russia, 7-6 (7-3), 6-4;
Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, def. Elena Rybakina,
Russia, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3; Daria Kasatkina, Russia, def.
Anastasia Pavlychenkova (5), Russia, 7-6 (7-2), 6-1;
Daria Gavrilova (6), Australia, def. Kristyna Pliskova,
Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-7 (7-5), 6-1.
MEN’S DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
Mikhail Elgin and Daniil Medvedev, Russia, def. Alexander Bublik and Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 6-2, 6-4;
Juan Sebastian Cabal, Colombia, and Denys Molchanov
(3), Ukraine, def. Aslan Karatsev and Richard Muzaev,
Russia, 7-6 (7-4), 6-1.
WOMEN’S DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
Monique Adamczak, Australia, and Renata Voracova (3),
Czech Republic, def. Bernarda Pera and CoCo
Vandeweghe, United States, 1-6, 6-1, 10-5; Timea
Babos, Hungary, and Andrea Hlavackova (1), Czech
Republic, def. Alize Cornet and Kristina Mladenovic,
France, 6-7 (9-7), 7-6 (7-5), 10-8; Barbora Krejcikova and
Katerina Siniakova (3), Czech Republic, def. Yulia
Putintseva, Kazakhstan, and Maryna Zanevska, Belgium, 6-1, 6-0; Nicole Melichar, United States, and Anna
Smith, Britain, def. Irina-Camelia Begu and Raluca Olaru
(4), Romania, 3-6, 6-4, 10-6; Vera Lapko, Belarus, and
Anastasia Potapova, Russia, def. Alla Kudryavtseva,
Russia, and Alicja Rosolska, Poland, 6-2, 6-4; Olga
Savchuk, Ukraine, and Katarina Srebotnik (2), Slovenia,
def. Lyudmyla Kichenok, Ukraine, and Arina Rodionova,
Australia, 6-2, 3-6, 10-7.
ATP
BASKETBALL
MLB postseason
NBA
NHL
WILD CARD
EASTERN CONFERENCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Tuesday, Oct. 3: at New York Yankees 8, Minnesota 4
Wednesday, Oct. 4: at Arizona 11, Colorado 8
DIVISION SERIES
Best of five
NATIONAL LEAGUE
CUBS ELIMINATED NATIONALS, 3-2
Game 1: Chicago 3, at Washington 0
Game 2: at Washington 6, Chicago 3
Game 3: at Chicago 2, Washington 1
Game 4: Washington 5, at Chicago 0
Game 5: Chicago 9, at Washington 8
DODGERS ELIMINATED DIAMONDBACKS, 3-0
Game 1: at Los Angeles 9, Arizona 5
Game 2: at Los Angeles 8, Arizona 5
Game 3: Los Angeles 3, at Arizona, 1
AMERICAN LEAGUE
ASTROS ELIMINATED RED SOX, 3-1
Game 1: at Houston 8, Boston 2
Game 2: at Houston 8, Boston 2
Game 3: at Boston 10, Houston 3
Game 4: Houston 5, at Boston 4
YANKEES ELIMINATED INDIANS, 3-2
Game 1: at Cleveland 4, New York 0
Game 2: at Cleveland 9, New York 8, 13 innings
Game 3: at New York 1, Cleveland 0
Game 4: at New York 7, Cleveland 3
Game 5: New York 5, at Cleveland 2
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Alessandro Giannessi, Italy,
6-0, 7-5; Yuichi Sugita (7), Japan, def. Denis Istomin,
Uzbekistan, 1-6, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4); Fabio Fognini (6), Italy,
def. Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, 7-5, 6-1; Chung Hyeon, South
Korea, def. Marton Fucsovics, Hungary, 6-3, 6-2; Fernando Verdasco (8), Spain, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands,
6-3, 6-1; Elias Ymer, Sweden, def. Leonardo Mayer,
Argentina, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5; Jurgen Zopp, Estonia, def. Lukas
Lacko, Slovakia, 6-4, 6-7 (7-1), 6-2; Marcos Baghdatis,
Cyprus, def. Norbert Gombos, Slovakia, 6-3, 6-4.
DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
Jack Sock, United States, and Nenad Zimonjic (3),
Serbia, def. Leander Paes and Purav Raja, India, 3-6, 7-6
(7-3), 10-8; Simone Bolelli and Fabio Fognini, Italy, def.
Jeremy Chardy, France, and Robert Lindstedt, Sweden,
6-3, 6-1.
EUROPEAN OPEN
At Lotto Arena; In Antwerp, Belgium
Purse: $696,300 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Joao Sousa, Portugal, def. Benoit Paire (7), France, 6-4,
6-7 (7-2), 7-5; Henri Laaksonen, Switzerland, def.
Alexandr Dolgopolov (8), Ukraine, 6-2, 7-6 (7-5); Frances
Tiafoe, United States, def. Florian Mayer, Germany, 6-3,
6-4; Stefanos Tsitsipas, Greece, def. Pablo Cuevas (6),
Uruguay, 6-1, 6-4; Ernesto Escobedo, United States, def.
Denis Shapovalov, Canada, 7-6 (7-5), 6-4; Kenny de
Schepper, France, def. Aldin Setkic, Bosnia-Herzegovina, 6-2, 6-1; David Ferrer (5), Spain, def. Stefano
Travaglia, Italy, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (7-3).
DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
Scott Lipsky, United States, and Divij Sharan, India, def.
Steve Darcis and Arthur De Greef, Belgium, 7-5, 4-6,
10-8; Raven Klaasen, South Africa, and Rajeev Ram (3),
United States, def. Florian Mayer and Cedrik-Marcel
Stebe, Germany, 7-5, 6-1; Wesley Koolhof, Netherlands,
and Artem Sitak, New Zealand, def. Ken and Neal
Skupski, Britain, 6-4, 4-6, 10-8; Ivan Dodig, Croatia, and
Marcel Granollers (2), Spain, def. Nick Kyrgios and Matt
Reid, Australia, 4-6, 6-1, 10-7.
WTA
LUXEMBOURG OPEN
At CK Sportcenter Kockelsheuer; In Luxembourg
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Kiki Bertens (2), Netherlands, def. Denisa Allertova,
Czech Republic, 6-4, 7-5; Heather Watson, Britain, def.
Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 6-2, 6-1; Johanna Larsson,
Sweden, def. Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, 2-6, 6-2, 6-3;
Alison Van Uytvanck, Belgium, def. Ajla Tomljanovic,
Croatia, 6-2, 6-4; Evgeniya Rodina, Russia, def. Jana
Fett, Croatia, 7-5, 6-3; Naomi Broady, Britain, def.
Tatjana Maria (6), Germany, 6-2, 6-2; Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Monica Niculescu, Romania, 7-5, 6-3;
Andrea Petkovic, Germany, def. Petra Martic, Croatia,
6-1, 3-6, 7-6 (7-5); Sabine Lisicki, Germany, def. Mihaela
Buzarnescu, Romania, 7-6 (7-3), 7-6 (7-4); Monica Puig,
Puerto Rico, def. Angelique Kerber (1), Germany, 6-3,
6-4.
DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
Viktorija Golubic, Switzerland, and Darija Jurak (4),
Croatia, def. Lara Arruabarrena and Sara Sorribes
Tormo, Spain, walkover; Veronica Cepede Royg, Paraguay, and Beatriz Haddad Maia, Brazil, def. Alexandra
Cadantu, Romania, and Prarthana Thombare, India, 7-5,
6-1.
LOCAL GOLF
LAKEWOOD
Thomas Hilley defeated Daniel Odenheimer on the
second sudden death playoff hole to win the men’s
member championship.
MOUNT VERNON
n the MVCC LGA 18/9 Cross Country Scramble, the
winning team was Sue Genuario, Debbie Sheridan, Elin
Bohn and Cindy Skiles with a score of 37.
ATLANTIC
W
Brooklyn.......................................0
New York .....................................0
Philadelphia .................................0
Toronto ........................................0
Boston..........................................0
L
0
0
0
0
1
Pct
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
GB
SOUTHEAST
W
Atlanta.........................................0
Charlotte......................................0
Miami...........................................0
Orlando ........................................0
Washington .................................0
L
0
0
0
0
0
Pct
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
GB
—
—
—
—
—
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland .....................................1
Chicago ........................................0
Detroit .........................................0
Indiana .........................................0
Milwaukee ...................................0
L
Pct
0 1.000
0 .000
0 .000
0 .000
0 .000
GB
—
SOUTHWEST
W
Dallas ...........................................0
x-Houston ....................................0
Memphis ......................................0
New Orleans ................................0
San Antonio .................................0
L
0
0
0
0
0
Pct
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
GB
—
—
—
—
—
NORTHWEST
W
Denver..........................................0
Minnesota....................................0
Oklahoma City .............................0
Portland .......................................0
Utah .............................................0
L
0
0
0
0
0
Pct
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
GB
—
—
—
—
—
PACIFIC
W
x-Golden State.............................0
L.A. Clippers.................................0
L.A. Lakers ...................................0
Phoenix ........................................0
Sacramento .................................0
L
0
0
0
0
0
Pct
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
GB
—
—
—
—
—
—
1/
2
1/
2
1/
2
1/
2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
Best of seven
AMERICAN LEAGUE
ASTROS AND YANKEES TIED, 2-2
Game 1: at Houston 2, New York 1
Game 2: at Houston 2, New York 1
Game 3: at New York 8, Houston 1
Game 4: at New York 6, Houston 4
Game 5: Wednesday’s game: Houston (Keuchel 12-9) at
New York (Tanaka 13-12), 5:08 (FS1)
Game 6: Friday: New York (Severino 14-6) at Houston
(Verlander 15-8), 8:08 (FS1)
x-Game 7: Saturday: New York at Houston, 8:08 (FS1)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
DODGERS LEAD CUBS, 3-0
Game 1: at Los Angeles 5, Chicago 2
Game 2: at Los Angeles 4, Chicago 1
Game 3: Los Angeles 6, at Chicago 1
Game 4: Wednesday’s game: Los Angeles (Wood 16-3)
at Chicago (Arrieta (14-10), 9:08 (TBS)
x-Game 5: Thursday: Los Angeles (Kershaw 18-4) at
Chicago, 8:08 (TBS)
x-Game 6: Saturday: Chicago at Los Angeles, 4:08 or 8:08
(TBS)
x-Game 7: Sunday: Chicago at Los Angeles, 7:38 (TBS)
WORLD SERIES
Best of seven; All Games Televised by Fox
Game 1: Tuesday, Oct. 24
Game 2: Wednesday, Oct. 25
Game 3: Friday, Oct. 27
Game 4: Saturday, Oct. 28
x-Game 5: Sunday, Oct. 29
x-Game 6: Tuesday, Oct. 31
x-Game 7: Wednesday, Nov. 1
Yankees 6, Astros 4
HOUSTON
AB
Springer cf......................3
Reddick rf .......................3
Altuve 2b........................2
Correa ss ........................4
Gurriel 1b .......................4
Bregman 3b ....................4
Beltran dh ......................3
Gattis ph-dh ...................1
Gonzalez lf .....................3
McCann c ........................2
TOTALS
29
R
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
4
H
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
3
BI BB SO AVG
0 1 0 .071
0 0 0 .000
0 2 1 .357
0 0 2 .267
3 0 2 .231
0 0 1 .154
0 0 2 .111
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .083
0 0 1 .000
3 3 9
—
NEW YORK
AB
Gardner lf .......................4
Judge rf ..........................3
Gregorius ss ...................4
Sanchez dh-c ..................3
Bird 1b ............................1
Castro 2b ........................3
Hicks cf...........................4
Frazier 3b .......................4
Romine c.........................2
Headley ph .....................1
Ellsbury pr ......................0
TOTALS
29
R
0
2
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
6
H
0
2
2
1
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
8
BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 .143
2 1 1 .308
0 0 0 .250
3 0 0 .071
0 3 1 .273
0 1 0 .214
0 0 0 .133
0 0 1 .333
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .286
0 0 0 .000
6 5 3
—
HOUSTON ...................000
NEW YORK .................000
003 100 —
000 24X —
4
6
3
8
0
3
E: Castro 2 (2), Romine (1). LOB: Houston 3, New York
5. 2B: Gurriel (2), Beltran (1), Gonzalez (1), Judge (1),
Sanchez (1). 3B: Gregorius (1). HR: Judge (2), off McCullers.
HOUSTON
IP
H R ER BB SO ERA
McCullers .........................6 2 1 1 2 3 1.50
Devenski .......................0.1 1 1 1 1 0 13.5
Musgrove......................0.2 2 2 2 0 0 27.0
Giles ..............................0.1 3 2 2 1 0 13.5
Gregerson .....................0.2 0 0 0 1 0 0.00
NEW YORK
IP
Gray..................................5
Robertson ........................1
Green ...............................2
Chapman ..........................1
H
1
1
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
2 1 2 4 1.80
1 1 1 1 3.00
1 0 0 2 0.00
0 0 0 2 6.75
WP: Green (1-0); LP: Giles (0-1); S: Chapman (1). Gray
pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. McCullers pitched to 1
batter in the 7th. Musgrove pitched to 2 batters in the
8th. Inherited runners-scored: Musgrove 1-0, Giles 2-1,
Gregerson 2-0. HBP: Gray (McCann). WP: Gray. T: 3:37.
A: 48,804 (49,642).
NLCS GAME 3
Dodgers 6, Cubs 1
L.A.
AB
Farmer ph.......................0
Taylor ss-cf ....................5
Bellinger 1b ....................5
Turner 3b........................3
Puig rf.............................5
Ethier lf ..........................4
Hernandez cf-lf ..............1
Utley 2b ..........................3
Forsythe ph-2b...............0
Barnes c..........................3
Pederson cf ....................3
Culberson ph-ss .............1
Darvish p ........................2
TOTALS
35
R
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
6
H
0
2
0
0
2
2
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
9
BI BB SO AVG
1 0 0 .000
2 0 1 .333
0 0 1 .250
0 2 0 .273
0 0 1 .400
1 0 1 .500
0 0 0 .200
0 0 1 .000
0 1 0 .200
0 1 0 .111
0 0 1 .333
0 0 1 .333
1 1 1 .000
5 5 8
—
CHICAGO
AB
Zobrist 2b-rf...................4
Schwarber lf...................3
Bryant 3b........................4
Rizzo 1b..........................4
Contreras c .....................3
Avila c.............................1
Jay cf ..............................3
Almora ph.......................1
Russell ss .......................4
Heyward rf .....................1
Baez ph-2b .....................1
La Stella ph ....................1
Hendricks p ....................2
Happ cf ...........................2
TOTALS
34
R
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H
0
1
2
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
8
BI BB SO AVG
0 0 1 .000
1 1 0 .167
0 0 0 .250
0 0 2 .100
0 0 1 .182
0 0 0 1.00
0 0 1 .100
0 0 0 .250
0 0 1 .200
0 1 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
0 0 1 .000
0 0 2 .000
0 0 2 .000
1 2 11
—
L.A...............................011
CHICAGO.....................100
011
000
020 —
000 —
6
1
9
8
0
2
E: Bryant (1), Happ (1). LOB: Los Angeles 8, Chicago 8.
2B: Pederson (1), Almora (1). 3B: Taylor (1). HR: Ethier
(1), off Hendricks; Taylor (2), off Hendricks; Schwarber
(1), off Darvish.
L.A.
IP
H R ER BB SO ERA
Darvish..........................6.1 6 1 1 1 7 1.42
Watson .........................0.2 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Morrow ............................1 0 0 0 1 1 0.00
Stripling ...........................0 2 0 0 0 0 0.00
Jansen..............................1 0 0 0 0 2 0.00
CHICAGO
IP
Hendricks.........................5
Edwards ...........................1
Strop ................................1
Montgomery .................0.1
Rondon..........................1.2
H
6
0
0
1
2
R ER BB SO ERA
4 3 1 5 5.40
0 0 2 1 0.00
0 0 1 0 0.00
2 1 1 1 20.2
0 0 0 1 4.50
WP: Darvish (1-0); LP: Hendricks (0-1). Hendricks
pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Stripling pitched to 2
batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Jansen
2-0, Edwards 2-1, Rondon 1-0. WP: Montgomery. PB:
Contreras (1). T: 3:39. A: 41,871 (41,072).
Today's NLCS game
DODGERS AT CUBS, 9:00
W-L
ERA
16-3
2.72
18-7
14-10
3.53
16-15
Wood (L)
Arrieta (R)
TEAM
Today's ALCS game
W-L
ERA
14-5
2.90
TEAM
18-7
Tanaka (R)
13-12
4.74
17-15
MLB calendar
Oct. 24: World Series starts.
November TBA: Deadline for teams to make qualifying
offers to their eligible former players who became free
agents, fifth day after World Series.
November TBA: Deadline for free agents to accept
qualifying offers, 15th day after World Series.
Nov. 13-16: General managers’ meetings, Orlando, Fla.
L
1
1
2
2
3
1
3
5
OL PTS.
0
10
0
10
1
9
0
8
1
7
1
5
1
5
1
3
GF
21
26
25
26
23
12
15
17
GA
13
17
29
16
24
11
18
26
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay ...................... 5
Toronto ........................... 5
Detroit ............................ 4
Ottawa ............................ 3
Boston ............................. 2
Florida ............................. 2
x-Montreal ...................... 1
x-Buffalo ......................... 1
L
1
1
2
1
3
3
3
4
OL PTS.
1
11
0
10
0
8
2
8
0
4
0
4
1
3
1
3
GF
27
28
20
20
14
17
8
14
GA
23
19
15
13
18
20
17
23
CENTRAL
W
Chicago ........................... 4
St. Louis .......................... 4
Colorado .......................... 4
Nashville ......................... 3
Dallas .............................. 3
Winnipeg ........................ 3
Minnesota ....................... 1
L
1
2
3
2
3
3
1
OL PTS.
1
9
0
8
0
8
1
7
0
6
0
6
2
4
GF
25
18
20
18
14
18
15
GA
13
16
17
17
14
23
16
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................... 4
x-Vegas ........................... 4
Calgary ............................ 4
Vancouver ....................... 2
Anaheim ......................... 2
x-San Jose ...................... 1
Edmonton ....................... 1
Arizona ........................... 0
L
0
1
2
2
3
3
4
5
OL PTS.
1
9
0
8
0
8
1
5
1
5
0
2
0
2
1
1
GF
16
15
17
12
12
8
11
12
GA
9
11
17
14
17
14
19
25
WESTERN CONFERENCE
x-Late game
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Philadelphia at Washington, 7
Brooklyn at Indiana, 7
Charlotte at Detroit, 7
Miami at Orlando, 7
Milwaukee at Boston, 7:30
New Orleans at Memphis, 8
Atlanta at Dallas, 8:30
Denver at Utah, 9
Minnesota at San Antonio, 9:30
Houston at Sacramento, 10
Portland at Phoenix, 10
Boston ................................ 19
Cleveland ............................ 29
BOSTON
Hayward
Tatum
Horford
Brown
Irving
Smart
Rozier
Baynes
Ojeleye
Larkin
TOTALS
28 — 99
30 — 102
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
5:15
1-2 0-0 0-1 0 1
2
36:32 5-11 3-3 4-10 3 4 14
32:05
2-7 5-7 0-7 5 2
9
39:37 11-23 1-2 1-6 0 5 25
39:21 8-17 2-2 2-4 10 4 22
35:03 5-16 2-3 0-9 3 2 12
19:32
2-6 4-4 0-3 2 0
9
19:07
2-2 2-4 2-5 1 5
6
8:39
0-2 0-0 0-0 0 1
0
4:49
0-1 0-0 0-1 0 0
0
240 36-87 19-25 9-46 24 24 99
Percentages: FG .414, FT .760. 3-Point Goals: 8-32, .250
(Irving 4-9, Brown 2-9, Tatum 1-2, Rozier 1-3, Hayward
0-1, Larkin 0-1, Ojeleye 0-1, Horford 0-2, Smart 0-4).
Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 10 (11 PTS).
Blocked Shots: 4 (Smart 2, Baynes, Horford). Turnovers:
10 (Brown 3, Baynes 2, Irving 2, Smart 2, Tatum). Steals:
11 (Brown 3, Irving 3, Rozier 3, Smart 2). Technical Fouls:
coach Celtics (Defensive three second), 10:32 first
CLEVELAND
Crowder
James
Love
Rose
Wade
Smith
Thompson
Green
Shumpert
Korver
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
34:44 3-10 4-4 1-5 2 2 11
41:12 12-19 4-4 1-16 9 3 29
28:24
4-9 6-7 3-11 0 2 15
31:15 5-14 3-4 1-4 2 2 14
28:30 3-10 2-2 1-1 3 1
8
21:55
4-7 1-1 0-4 1 4 10
19:36
2-3 1-3 1-6 2 3
5
14:14
3-8 0-0 0-0 0 3
6
12:51
2-3 0-0 1-2 0 3
4
7:19
0-0 0-0 0-0 0 2
0
240 38-83 21-25 9-49 19 25 102
Percentages: FG .458, FT .840. 3-Point Goals: 5-22, .227
(Rose 1-3, Smith 1-3, Love 1-4, Crowder 1-5, James 1-5,
Green 0-1, Wade 0-1). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 17 (24 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (James 2, Wade).
Turnovers: 17 (James 4, Wade 4, Love 2, Rose 2,
Thompson 2, Crowder, Green, Shumpert). Steals: 3
(Crowder 2, Shumpert). Technical Fouls: coach Cavaliers
(Defensive three second), 9:23 second
2017-18 WASHINGTON WIZARDS SCHEDULE
Oct. 18 Philadelphia, 7
Oct. 20 Detroit, 7
Oct. 23 at Denver, 9
Oct. 25 at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
Oct. 27 at Golden State, 10:30
Oct. 29 at Sacramento, 6
Nov. 1 Phoenix, 7
Nov. 3 Cleveland, 7
Nov. 5 at Toronto, 6
Nov. 7 Dallas, 7
Nov. 9 L.A. Lakers, 7
Nov. 11 Atlanta, 7
Nov. 13 Sacramento, 7
Nov. 15 at Miami, 7:30
Nov. 17 Miami, 7
Nov. 19 at Toronto, 3:30
Nov. 20 at Milwaukee, 8
Nov. 22 at Charlotte, 7
Nov. 25 Portland, 7
Nov. 28 at Minnesota, 8
Nov. 29 at Philadelphia, 7
Dec. 1 Detroit, 7
Dec. 4 at Utah, 9
Dec. 5 at Portland, 10
Dec. 7 at Phoenix, 9
Dec. 9 at L.A. Clippers, 3:30
Dec. 12 at Brooklyn, 7:30
Dec. 13 Memphis, 7
Dec. 15 L.A. Clippers, 7
Dec. 17 Cleveland, 6
Dec. 19 New Orleans, 7
Dec. 22 at Brooklyn, 7:30
Dec. 23 Orlando, 7
Dec. 25 at Boston, 5:30
Dec. 27 at Atlanta, 7:30
Dec. 29 Houston, 7
Dec. 31 Chicago, 3:30
Jan. 3 New York, 7
Jan. 5 at Memphis, 9:30
Jan. 6 Milwaukee, 8
Jan. 10 Utah, 7
Jan. 12 Orlando, 7
Jan. 13 Brooklyn, 7
Jan. 15 Milwaukee, 2
Jan. 17 at Charlotte, 7
Jan. 19 at Detroit, 8
Jan. 22 at Dallas, 8:30
Jan. 25 at Oklahoma City, 8
Jan. 27 at Atlanta, 7:30
Jan. 30 Oklahoma City, 7
Feb. 1 Toronto, 7
Feb. 3 at Orlando, 7
Feb. 5 at Indiana, 7
Feb. 6 at Philadelphia, 8
Feb. 8 Boston, 8
Feb. 10 at Chicago, 8
Feb. 14 at New York, 7:30
Feb. 22 at Cleveland, 8
Feb. 23 Charlotte, 7
Feb. 25 Philadelphia, 8
Feb. 27 at Milwaukee, 8
Feb. 28 Golden State, 8
March 2 Toronto, 8
March 4 Indiana, 6
March 6 Miami, 7
March 9 at New Orleans, 8
March 10 at Miami, 7:30
March 13 Minnesota, 7
March 14 at Boston, 8
March 17 Indiana, 7
March 21 at San Antonio, 9:30
March 23 Denver, 7
March 25 New York, 6
March 27 San Antonio, 7
March 29 at Detroit, 7
March 31 Charlotte, 3
April 1 at Chicago, 3:30
April 3 at Houston, 8
April 5 at Cleveland, 8
April 6 Atlanta, 7
April 10 Boston, 8
April 11 at Orlando, 8
AUTO RACING
SHOTS ON GOAL
COLORADO .............................. 8
6
7 — 21
NASHVILLE .............................. 7
14
13 — 34
Power-play opportunities: Colorado 1 of 6; Nashville 1 of
5. Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov 3-2-0 (34 shots-30
saves). Nashville, Rinne 3-1-1 (21-20). A: 17,113
(17,113). T: 2:28.
ARIZONA ................................. 0
DALLAS .................................... 1
1
1
0 —
1 —
1
3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Dallas, Faksa 1 (Janmark), 5:17.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Dallas, Hamhuis 1 (Faksa, Pitlick), 10:48. 3,
Arizona, Demers 1 (Domi, Duclair), 14:40.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Dallas, Radulov 1 (Seguin, Hamhuis), 19:08.
SHOTS ON GOAL
ARIZONA ................................. 6
7
15 — 28
DALLAS .................................. 12
13
9 — 34
Power-play opportunities: Arizona 0 of 2; Dallas 0 of 1.
Goalies: Arizona, Hill 0-1-0 (33 shots-31 saves). Dallas,
Bishop 3-1-0 (28-27). A: 16,007 (18,532). T: 2:27.
0
1
2 —
2 —
5
3
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Edmonton, Letestu 1 (McDavid, Yamamoto),
17:11 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Carolina, Staal 1, 4:03 (sh). 6, Edmonton,
Strome 1 (Jokinen, Russell), 5:03 (pp). 7, Edmonton,
Lucic 1 (Strome, Nugent-Hopkins), 8:06. 8, Carolina,
Slavin 1 (Staal, Williams), 10:36.
SHOTS ON GOAL
CAROLINA ............................... 8
7
6 — 21
EDMONTON ........................... 15
21
15 — 51
Power-play opportunities: Carolina 2 of 5; Edmonton 2 of
7. Goalies: Carolina, Ward 1-0-0 (51 shots-48 saves).
Edmonton, Brossoit 0-1-0 (21-16). A: 18,347 (18,641). T:
2:27.
Tampa Bay at Columbus, 7
Vancouver at Boston, 7
N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Nashville at Philadelphia, 7
New Jersey at Ottawa, 7:30
Edmonton at Chicago, 8:30
St. Louis at Colorado, 9
Carolina at Calgary, 9
Dallas at Arizona, 10
S OC C E R
MLS
Penguins 5, Rangers 4 (OT)
PITTSBURGH ..................... 2
N.Y. RANGERS ................... 0
1
3
1
1
1 — 5
0 — 4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Pittsburgh, Kessel 2 (Cole, Malkin), 0:43. 2,
Pittsburgh, Hagelin 1 (Maatta), 13:30.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, N.Y. Rangers, Desharnais 1 (Miller, Shattenkirk), 6:02. 4, N.Y. Rangers, Buchnevich 1 (Zuccarello,
Zibanejad), 7:32 (pp). 5, N.Y. Rangers, Miller 2 (McDonagh, DeAngelo), 8:32 (pp). 6, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 3
(Kessel, Malkin), 18:01 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 7, N.Y. Rangers, Grabner 1 (Miller, Desharnais),
8:00. 8, Pittsburgh, Crosby 4 (Malkin, Hornqvist), 19:04.
OVERTIME
Scoring: 9, Pittsburgh, Malkin 2 (Kessel), 0:58.
SHOTS ON GOAL
PITTSBURGH ................... 12
11
9
1 — 33
N.Y. RANGERS ................. 10
8
14 — 32
Power-play opportunities: Pittsburgh 1 of 3; N.Y. Rangers 2 of 6. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 4-0-1 (32
shots-28 saves). N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 1-3-1 (33-28).
A: 18,006 (18,006). T: 2:36.
Flyers 5, Panthers 1
FLORIDA .................................. 0
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 0
0
4
1 —
1 —
1
5
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Philadelphia, Couturier 4 (Giroux, Voracek),
1:05. 2, Philadelphia, Gostisbehere 1 (Hagg, Simmonds),
7:35. 3, Philadelphia, Giroux 4 (Filppula, Gostisbehere),
13:22 (pp). 4, Philadelphia, Weise 1 (Patrick, Konecny),
16:16.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Florida, McGinn 1 (Bjugstad, Vrbata), 16:10
(pp). 6, Philadelphia, Filppula 4, 18:23.
SHOTS ON GOAL
FLORIDA ................................ 15
12
14 — 41
PHILADELPHIA ...................... 11
15
13 — 39
Power-play opportunities: Florida 1 of 6; Philadelphia 1
of 4. Goalies: Florida, Luongo 1-2-0 (38 shots-34 saves).
Philadelphia, Neuvirth 1-1-0 (41-40). A: 19,145 (19,543).
T: 2:33.
EASTERN
W
Toronto FC .....................20
New York City FC ...........16
Chicago ..........................16
Atlanta United FC ..........15
Columbus .......................16
New York .......................13
New England ..................12
Philadelphia ...................10
Montreal ........................11
Orlando City ...................10
D.C. United .......................9
L
5
9
10
9
12
12
15
14
16
14
19
T PTS
8
68
8
56
7
55
9
54
5
53
8
47
6
42
9
39
6
39
9
39
5
32
GF
72
54
61
68
51
51
50
44
50
38
30
GA
35
41
44
38
47
46
59
46
55
52
58
WESTERN
W
Vancouver ......................15
Seattle ...........................13
Portland .........................14
Sporting KC ....................12
Houston .........................12
San Jose .........................12
Dallas .............................10
Real Salt Lake ................12
Minnesota United ..........10
Colorado ...........................9
Los Angeles .....................8
L
11
9
11
8
10
14
10
15
17
18
17
T PTS
7
52
11
50
8
50
13
49
11
47
7
43
13
43
6
42
6
36
6
33
8
32
GF
49
49
58
39
54
36
43
47
45
31
44
GA
47
39
49
27
45
58
47
54
67
48
62
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
at Portland 4, D.C. United 0
Atlanta United FC 0, at New York 0, tie
at Chicago 3, Philadelphia 2
Columbus 1, at Orlando City 0
at New England 2, New York City FC 1
at Toronto FC 1, Montreal 0
at Colorado 1, Real Salt Lake 0
Houston 0, at Sporting KC 0, tie
at Los Angeles 3, Minnesota United 0
San Jose 1, at Vancouver 1, tie
at Seattle 4, Dallas 0
SUNDAY’S MATCHES
New York at D.C. United, 4
Chicago at Houston, 4
Colorado at Seattle, 4
Columbus at New York City FC, 4
Los Angeles at Dallas, 4
Minnesota United at San Jose, 4
New England at Montreal, 4
Orlando City at Philadelphia, 4
Sporting KC at Real Salt Lake, 4
Toronto FC at Atlanta United FC, 4
Vancouver at Portland, 4
NWSL playoffs
SEMIFINALS
Canucks 3, Senators 0
VANCOUVER ........................... 1
OTTAWA .................................. 0
1
0
1 —
0 —
3
0
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Vancouver, Boeser 2 (Burmistrov, Del Zotto),
15:29 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Vancouver, Burmistrov 1 (Boeser, Baertschi),
16:29.
SATURDAY, OCT. 7
at Portland 4, Orlando 1
SUNDAY, OCT. 8
at North Carolina 1, Chicago 0
CHAMPIONSHIP
In Orlando
SATURDAY’S RESULT
Portland 1, North Carolina 0
THIRD PERIOD
H I GH S C HOOLS
Scoring: 3, Vancouver, Vanek 2, 15:12.
SHOTS ON GOAL
VANCOUVER ........................... 4
12
8 — 24
OTTAWA ................................ 17
7
8 — 32
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 1 of 2; Ottawa 0 of
3. Goalies: Vancouver, Nilsson 1-0-0 (32 shots-32
saves). Ottawa, Anderson 2-1-2 (24-21). A: 13,430
(18,572). T: 2:34.
Devils 5, Lightning 4 (OT)
TAMPA BAY ...................... 2
NEW JERSEY ..................... 3
2
0
0
1
0 — 4
0 — 5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, New Jersey, Stafford 2 (Butcher, Hischier),
2:45. 2, Tampa Bay, Namestnikov 3 (Kucherov, Stamkos), 7:33. 3, Tampa Bay, Palat 3 (Johnson, Sergachev),
12:21 (pp). 4, New Jersey, Palmieri 2 (Hall, Henrique),
16:19 (pp). 5, New Jersey, Gibbons 3 (Santini, Wood),
19:08.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 8 (Stamkos, Sergachev), 14:02. 7, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 2 (Gourde),
17:23.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 8, New Jersey, Stafford 3 (Hischier, Severson),
15:54 (pp).
SHOOTOUT
Tampa Bay 0 (Point NG, Kucherov NG, Callahan NG),
New Jersey 1 (Stafford NG, Hall NG, Palmieri G).
SHOTS ON GOAL
TAMPA BAY .................... 11
11
13
2 — 37
NEW JERSEY ................... 15
9
8
2 — 34
Power-play opportunities: Tampa Bay 1 of 5; New Jersey
2 of 4. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Budaj 0-0-1 (34 shots-30
saves). New Jersey, Schneider 4-1-0 (37-33). A: 13,176
(16,514). T: 2:44.
Blue Jackets 5, Jets 2
COLUMBUS .............................. 0
WINNIPEG ............................... 0
4
1
1 —
1 —
5
2
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Columbus, Atkinson 3 (Panarin, Wennberg),
0:36. 2, Columbus, Foligno 1, 10:50. 3, Winnipeg, Connor
1 (Wheeler, Scheifele), 12:30. 4, Columbus, Johnson 1
(Anderson, Dubinsky), 13:54. 5, Columbus, Sedlak 2,
18:11.
NASCAR Cup
THIRD PERIOD
POINTS LEADERS
Scoring: 6, Columbus, Werenski 3 (Calvert, Jones),
12:15. 7, Winnipeg, Armia 1 (Byfuglien), 18:23 (sh).
Through Sunday
1. Martin Truex Jr. ................................................ 3120
2. Brad Keselowski ............................................... 3101
3. Kyle Larson ....................................................... 3096
4. Kevin Harvick .................................................... 3089
5. Denny Hamlin ................................................... 3088
6. Chase Elliott ..................................................... 3087
7. Ryan Blaney ...................................................... 3076
8. Jimmie Johnson ................................................ 3074
Scoring: 5, Nashville, Watson 1 (Emelin), 4:08.
Scoring: 1, Carolina, Teravainen 1 (Slavin, Williams),
0:20. 2, Carolina, Teravainen 2 (Faulk, Staal), 4:53 (pp).
3, Carolina, Lindholm 1 (Faulk, Staal), 18:40 (pp).
THURSDAY’S GAMES
33
18
THIRD PERIOD
FIRST PERIOD
Detroit at Toronto, 7:30
Chicago at St. Louis, 8
Montreal at Los Angeles, 10:30
19
25
Scoring: 1, Colorado, MacKinnon 1 (Rantanen, Barrie),
4:09 (pp). 2, Nashville, Arvidsson 3 (Emelin, Forsberg),
7:07. 3, Nashville, Josi 1 (Forsberg, Arvidsson), 13:30
(pp). 4, Nashville, Sissons 1 (Josi, Smith), 19:15.
CAROLINA ............................... 3
EDMONTON ............................. 0
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Cavaliers 102, Celtics 99
1
4
Hurricanes 5, Oilers 3
Toronto 2, at Washington 0
at Philadelphia 5, Florida 1
Pittsburgh 5, at N.Y. Rangers 4 (OT)
Vancouver 3, at Ottawa 0
at New Jersey 5, Tampa Bay 4 (SO)
Columbus 5, at Winnipeg 2
at Nashville 4, Colorado 1
at Dallas 3, Arizona 1
Carolina 5, at Edmonton 3
Buffalo at Vegas, Late
Montreal at San Jose, Late
at Cleveland 102, Boston 99
Houston at Golden State, Late
0 —
1 —
MONDAY’S RESULT
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
TUESDAY’S RESULTS
1
3
SECOND PERIOD
Stars 3, Coyotes 1
No games scheduled.
ASTROS AT YANKEES, 5:00
Keuchel (L)
COLORADO .............................. 0
NASHVILLE .............................. 0
METROPOLITAN
W
Columbus ........................ 5
New Jersey ..................... 5
Pittsburgh ....................... 4
Philadelphia .................... 4
Washington .................... 3
Carolina ........................... 2
N.Y. Islanders ................. 2
N.Y. Rangers ................... 1
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Chicago at Toronto, 7:30
New York at Oklahoma City, 8
L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
ALCS GAME 4
Predators 4, Avalanche 1
Tampa Bay 3, at Detroit 2
x-Late game
THURSDAY’S GAMES
STOCKHOLM OPEN
At Kungliga Tennishallen; In Stockholm
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Purse: $696,300 (WT250)
H OC K E Y
GIRLS' TENNIS
PRIVATE
Episcopal 6, Bullis 1
Flint Hill 9, Paul VI 0
Holton-Arms 7, Georgetown Visitation 0
VOLLEYBALL
MARYLAND
Long Reach def. Atholton (25-19, 25-18, 25-9, 25-7)
Marriotts Ridge def. Oakland Mills (25-15, 25-14, 25-10)
Reservoir def. Hammond (25-15, 25-15, 26-24)
VIRGINIA
Chantilly def. Oakton (25-21, 26-28, 25-21, 15-25, 17-12)
Colgan def. Gar-Field (25-17, 25-12, 25-14)
Langley def. Yorktown (25-10, 25-23, 25-21)
PRIVATE
Episcopal def. St. Andrew's (25-15, 25-21, 25-10)
Flint Hill def. Paul VI (25-14, 25-12, 22-25, 25-17)
Georgetown Day def. Holton-Arms (25-21, 23-25, 25-21,
22-25, 16-14)
Holy Cross def. St. Mary's Ryken (25-23, 25-17, 25-11)
FIELD HOCKEY
MARYLAND
River Hill 4, Howard 0
VIRGINIA
George Mason 2, Brookewood 0
T.C. Williams 6, Annandale 0
Westfield 5, Oakton 0
VIRGINIA 6A
Fairfax 1, Lake Braddock 0
PRIVATE
Holy Cross 1, Sidwell Friends 0
Potomac School 2, National Cathedral 1
St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 5, Flint Hill 0
Stone Ridge 2, Episcopal 0
BOYS' SOCCER
MARYLAND
Churchill 3, Blair 1
PRIVATE
Gonzaga 1, DeMatha 0
Good Counsel 3, McNamara 1
Landon 3, Georgetown Prep 2
O'Connell 1, St. Mary's Ryken 0
Sidwell Friends 6, Saint James 1
St. Albans 3, St. Stephen's/St. Agnes 1
St. Andrew's 2, Flint Hill 1
GIRLS' SOCCER
MARYLAND
Calvert 7, Patuxent 1
Northern 2, Leonardtown 0
PRIVATE
Good Counsel 2, McNamara 0
National Cathedral 0, Flint Hill 0
Potomac School 3, Stone Ridge 0
Sandy Spring 8, McLean 0
Severn School 7, Baltimore Friends 0
Spalding 5, Mercy (Balt.) 1
SHOTS ON GOAL
COLUMBUS ............................ 11
16
12 — 39
WINNIPEG ............................... 8
11
7 — 26
Power-play opportunities: Columbus 0 of 3; Winnipeg 0
of 1. Goalies: Columbus, Korpisalo 1-1-0 (26 shots-24
saves). Winnipeg, Mason 0-3-0 (39-34). A: 15,321
(15,294). T: 2:21.
TR ANS AC TI ONS
NFL
New York Giants: Waived/injured CB Michael Hunter.
Reinstated CB Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie from the
reserve/suspended list.
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
washingtonpost.com/
realestate
apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
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820
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Official Notices
Official Notices
Notice is hereby given that the Community Development Administration (the “Administration”), a unit of the
Division of Development Finance of the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development,
will conduct a public hearing at 12:00 pm, on Friday, November 3, 2017 at the Maryland Department of
Housing and Community Development, 7800 Harkins Road, Lanham, Maryland 20706 in Room 364. The
public hearing will concern the plan of financing, including the loans funded from the proceeds of private
activity bonds issued by the Administration and/or the State of Maryland (the “State”) acting through its
Board of Public Works, for financing the acquisition, construction, renovation, rehabilitation or other costs
of the multifamily residential rental housing projects listed below (the “Projects”) in an amount not to
exceed the maximum aggregate amount of private activity bond obligations to be issued for such Projects
as set forth below (or refunding of any obligation by other obligations in amounts up to such maximum
aggregate principal amount.) Additional information relating to the bonds to be issued and each Project is
available by writing Diane Melton at the above address or calling 301-429-7710.
Prospective Location
Number
Units in
Project
Name
of Project
Initial
Owner or
principal
user
Maximum
Aggregate
Amount of
Obligations
to be
Issued
$16,000,000
Shalom
Square
50
6200, 6220, 6240, 6260, and 6280 Foreland Garth, Columbia, MD 21045 –
Howard County
Heritage
Housing
Partners
Corp.
Village at
Lakeview
223
810, 811, 820, 821 & 831, Fishermans
Lane and 1831, 1841, 1851, 1861, 1871,
1881, 1910, 1911, 1921, 1930, 1931,
1940, 1941 & 1951, Edgewater Dr., Edgewood, MD 21040 – Harford County
Edgewood GP, $28,000,000
LLC
Friends
House
80
17340 Quaker Lane, Sandy Spring, MD
20860 - Montgomery County
Homes for
America, Inc.
Riverfront
Townhomes
126
2900-2934 (even), 3000-3050 (even),
3001-3017 (odd) Southland Ave., 200-210
(even), 201-205 (odd), 301-313 (odd)
Seagull Ave., 200-216, 300-314, & 316
Bridgeview Rd., 201-223 (odd), 301-307
(odd) Cherry Hill Rd., and 3000-3014
(even) Seamon Ave.,
Baltimore, MD 21225 – Baltimore City
$18,000,000
Landex
Development,
LLC
Hillside Park
Apartments
94
4900-4908 (even), 4901-4905 (odd)
Stafford St., 401-405 (odd) Long Island
Ave., 4900-4904 (even), 4901-4909 (odd)
Parkton Ct., 400 & 402 South Wickham
Rd., Baltimore, MD 21229 – Baltimore City
$13,000,000
Landex
Development,
LLC
Greenmount
and Chase
60
Two apartment buildings to be constructed in place of existing structures located
on lots in Ward 10, Section 3, bound by E.
Chase St. to the south, Greenmount Ave.
to the west, E. Biddle St. to the north, and
Homewood Ave. to the east, Baltimore,
MD 21202 – Baltimore City
TRF Development Partners, Inc.
Prospect
Place
85
3 Hill St., Mt. Airy, MD 21771 – Frederick
County
$24,000,000
Foundation
Development
Group, LLC
Autos Wanted
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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING ISSUANCE OF BONDS OR OTHER
OBLIGATIONS TO FINANCE
RESIDENTIAL RENTAL HOUSING PROJECTS
VOLVO
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or call 202-334-6200
Official Notices
CHRYSLER
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leather seats, 133k mi, black on
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850
851
Montgomery County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
NSOUGAN A. AMEH
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. 420230V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 12th
day of OCTOBER, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 13025
Brahms Terrace, Silver Spring, MD
20904 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 13th day of NOVEMBER, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper
of general circulation published in
said County before the 13th day
of NOVEMBER, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$280,700.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136600
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
ESTATE OF BARBARA J. DOXIE
RIKKI DRYKERMAN,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. 431938V
NOTICE
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needed to deliver
The Washington Post
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DC, MD and VA area.
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income opportunity!
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required.
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(Please press “0”
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Notice is hereby given this 11th
day of OCTOBER, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 3501
Forest Edge Drive Apt. 1F, Silver
Spring, MD 20906 will be ratified
and confirmed unless cause to
the contrary thereof be shown on
or before the 13th day of NOVEMBER, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper
of general circulation published in
said County before the 13th day
of NOVEMBER, 2017.
Official Notices
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Aviation, Boats, RVs
Motorcycles Directory
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$173,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136585
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
TOYIN MBANAJA
AMBROSE A AKINRINMADE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAE13-12277
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 11th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 3705
Pogonia Court Unit 4C, Hyattsville,
MD 20784, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 13th day of November, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 13th day of
November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$116,328.79.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136588
12136592
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
$16,000,000
v.
ESTATE OF JOHN M. MORTON
KIM MORTON PRADD,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
KIM MORTON PRADD
Defendant(s)
v.
LEKISHIA STEWART
DAVID STEWART
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. 420017V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 6th
day of OCTOBER, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 1240
Kathryn Road, Silver Spring, MD
20904 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 6th day of NOVEMBER, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive weeks in some newspaper
of general circulation published in
said County before the 6th day of
NOVEMBER, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$297,000.00.
12136598
Notice is hereby given this 6th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County,
Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 6711 Seat
Pleasant Drive, Capitol Heights, MD
20743 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 6th day of November,
2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 6th day of
November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$212,275.62.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136583
How about some
home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
MELISSA R. RICHARDSON
ERICA A. RICHARDSON
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF15-25552
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 5th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 7014
East Forest Road, Hyattsville, MD
20785 will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 6th day of November,
2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 6th day of
November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$129,500.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136582
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
DERRICK C DEFREITAS
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-10999
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 3rd
day of October, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Thomas J. Gartner,
Phillip S. Shriver, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 1903
Beecham Ct, Bowie, MD 20721, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 3rd day of November ,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
three successive weeks before the
3rd day of November, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $283,981.35.
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136927
Civil Action No. CAEF17-09957
NOTICE
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
851
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017
HARLEY 2001 SPORTSTER 883 12k miles, good condition, runs
good, silver, vance & hines pipe
$2800 OBO 703-304-4513
Notice is hereby given this 11th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 12416
Parker Lane, Clinton, MD 20735,
will be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 13th
day of November, 2017, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be published
at least once a week in each of
three successive weeks in some
newspaper of general circulation
published in said County before
the 13th day of November, 2017.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
Motorcycles
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
SHIRLEY M. BELCHER
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF13-37691
NOTICE
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$74,480.00.
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017
ABC LICENSE: Liberty Barbeque, LLC
trading as Liberty Barbecue, 370
West Broad Street Falls Church,
(Fairfax County), Virginia 22046.
The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT
OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) for a Wine and Beer
on Premises license to sell wine,
beer & mixed beverages on and
off premises with keg permit. Brian
Normile, Managing Member NOTE:
Objections to the issuance of this
license must be submitted to ABC no
later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first of two required
newspaper legal notices. Objections
should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.
$13,000,000
All interested parties are invited to submit written comments or present oral comments at the public
hearing regarding the issuance of bonds, notes, or other obligations of the Administration and/or the
State for the Projects being financed. Written comments or notice of intent to present oral comments
should be received by the Administration on or before, November 2, 2017 and should be submitted
to Diane Melton, Housing Development Programs, 7800 Harkins Road, Lanham, Maryland 20706 or
diane.melton@maryland.gov. Oral comments will be limited to presentations of no more than five (5)
minutes per person.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MARYLAND
Call Mrs. Tompkins
at 240-432-1914
69
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C
CLASSIFIED
D12
SF
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
ESTATE OF SYLVESTER FOSTER
THOMAS J. KOKOLIS,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Defendant(s)
Civil Action No. CAEF17-11722
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 11th
day of October 2017, by the Circuit
Court for Prince George's County, Maryland, that the sale of the
property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 11006
Trafton Court, Upper Marlboro, MD
20774, will be ratified and confirmed unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 13th day of November, 2017, provided a copy of this
NOTICE be published at least once
a week in each of three successive
weeks in some newspaper of general circulation published in said
County before the 13th day of
November, 2017.
850
Montgomery County
850
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
Montgomery County
LAW OFFICES
Shulman, Rogers, Gandal, Pordy & Ecker, P.A.
12505 Park Potomac Avenue, 6th Floor
Potomac, MD 20854
(301) 230-5241
File No. 113852.00460
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
of
Two Valuable Fee Simple Properties
located in Montgomery County, Maryland,
known as
TAX ID NO. 05-00272438
TAX ID NO. 05-03552453
(collectively the “Property”)
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust
and Security Agreement (the “Deed of Trust”) from Elderhome
Land, L.L.C., and Burtonsville Crossing, LLC, to Ryan Riel and
Laurence E. Bensignor, Trustees, bearing the date of June 14,
2013, recorded in Book 47084, at Page 013 among the Land
Records of Montgomery County, Maryland, and at the request
of the party secured thereby, default having occurred in the
terms and conditions thereof, the Substitute Trustees having
been substituted for the Trustees named in said Deed of Trust,
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Montgomery
County, at 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, MD on October 27,
2017 at 3:00 p.m., some or all of the Property described in said
Deed of Trust.
All these Fee-Simple lots of ground and the improvements, if
any, thereon identified as Tax ID No. 05-00272438 and 0503552453 and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of
Trust.
Each lot will be offered separately, bids reserved, and then
offered in the aggregate and will be sold in the manner producing
the greater amount of proceeds.
TERMS OF SALE
The bid which yields the highest price for the Property will
be accepted by the Substitute Trustees. Notwithstanding the
foregoing, the Substitute Trustees absolutely reserve the right
to postpone the sale and/or cancel the sale at any time until
the auctioneer announces that the Property is "sold" and the
deposit in the required amount and form is received by the
Substitute Trustees. A deposit in the amount of $150,000.00
will be required at the time of sale if the Property is sold in
the aggregate. Deposits in the amount of $75,000.00 will be
required for each parcel in the event the Property is sold in
individual parcels. Such deposit(s) must be by cashier's check
or certified check or such other form as the Substitute Trustees’
may determine in their sole discretion. The Noteholder secured
by the Deed of Trust (or any related party) shall be exempted
by the Substitute Trustees from submitting any bidding deposit.
The Substitute Trustees will, as a condition of the sale, require
all potential bidders, except the Noteholder, to show their
deposit before any bidding begins. The retained deposit of the
successful purchaser shall be applied, without interest, to the
successful purchaser's credit at settlement, provided, however,
that in the event the successful purchaser fails to consummate
the purchase in accordance with the terms of sale as herein
provided, such deposit, will be forfeited. The terms of sale
must be complied with and settlement consummated thereon
within 30 days from date of final ratification of the sale by the
Circuit Court for Montgomery County, Maryland unless extended
at the sole discretion of the Substitute Trustees. There will
be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the
event settlement is delayed for any reason. TIME IS OF THE
ESSENCE. The balance of the purchase price over and above
the retained deposit, with interest thereon at a rate of 8% from
the date of sale through the date of receipt of the balance of
the purchase price, will be due at settlement in cash or certified
funds; and if not so paid, the Substitute Trustees reserve the
right to retain the deposit and resell the Property at the risk and
cost of the defaulting purchaser, after such advertisement and
on such terms as the Substitute Trustees may deem proper, and
to avail themselves and the Noteholder of any legal or equitable
rights against the defaulting purchaser.
The Property is sold subject to the lawful rights, if any, of
parties in possession, if such rights have priority over the Deed
of Trust, and to any and all covenants, conditions, restrictions,
easements, rights of way, encumbrances, liens, agreements and
limitations of record having priority over the Deed of Trust. The
Property will be sold “WHERE IS” and in “AS IS” condition
without any warranty as to condition, express or implied, and
without any representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the
information furnished to prospective bidders by the Substitute
Trustees or any other party and without any other representations
or warranty of any nature. Without limiting the generality of
the foregoing, the Property will be sold without representation
or warranty as to (i) title to the Property, (ii) the nature,
condition, structural integrity, or fitness for a particular use of
any improvements, fixtures or personal property included within
the Property, (iii) the environmental condition of the Property
or the compliance of the Property with federal, state and local
laws and regulations concerning the presence or disposal of
hazardous substances, (iv) compliance of the Property with
the Americans with Disabilities Act or any similar law, or (v)
compliance of the Property with any zoning laws or ordinances
and any and all applicable safety codes, and acceptance of the
Deed to the Property by the successful purchaser shall constitute
a waiver of any claims against the Substitute Trustees or the
Noteholder concerning any of the foregoing matters. Purchaser
shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
Property.
Conveyance shall be by Trustee’s Deed, without covenant or
warranty, express or implied, specifically including marketability
or insurability (hazard or title), unless otherwise required by
statute, court rule or the Deed of Trust. The risk of loss or damage
by fire or other casualty to the Property from and after the
date of sale will be upon the successful purchaser. Adjustment
of all taxes, ground rents, public charges, assessments, sewer,
water, drainage and other public improvements will be made as
of the date of sale and are to be assumed and paid thereafter
by the successful purchaser, whether assessments have been
levied or not. Any condominium fees, homeowners association
dues, assessments or capital contributions, if any, payable with
respect to the Property shall be assumed after the date of sale
by the successful purchaser. All costs incident to the settlement
and conveyancing including, without limitation, examination
of title, conveyancing, all recordation taxes and charges, all
transfer taxes and charges, title insurance premiums, notary
fees, settlement fees and all other costs incident to settlement
shall be at the cost of the successful purchaser. In the event
the Substitute Trustees are unable for any reason to convey
title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be to
request and receive a return of the deposit. Upon return of the
deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
This advertisement, as amended or supplemented by any oral
announcements during the conduct of the sale, constitutes the
entire terms upon which the Property shall be offered for sale.
Sara A. Michaloski and Benjamin P. Smith,
Substitute Trustees
851
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
FREE UNDER $250
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
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Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
4003 ESTEVEZ CT.
BOWIE, MD 20716
OCTOBER 31, 2017 AT 10:54 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-3117819.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65991.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12133335
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
913 HIGHVIEW DR.
CAPITOL HEIGHTS, MD 20743
851
Prince Georges County
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Denise
D. Fuller and George A. Fuller, Jr. dated March 26, 2004 and recorded in
Liber 19276, folio 339 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
OCTOBER 24, 2017 AT 10:38 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-0064626.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $15,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65091.
The property will be sold subject to a 120 day right of redemption by the
Internal Revenue Service.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 4, Oct 11 & Oct 18
12132531
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Linda
D. Burney f/k/a Linda Bonds Burney and Karen B. Gibson dated February
22, 2014 and recorded in Liber 35780, folio 99 among the Land Records
of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court
for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772
(Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
OCTOBER 31, 2017 AT 10:54 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #18-2077428.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68242.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 11, Oct 18 & Oct 25
Prince Georges County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
3404 CHERRY HILL CT.
BELTSVILLE, MD 20705
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Brenda A.
Larke dated June 1, 2007 and recorded in Liber 28345, folio 208 among
the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro,
MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.), on
Oct 11, Oct 18 & Oct 25
851
12133573
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
14201 DAWN WHISTLE WAY
BOWIE, MD 20721
12903 TRUMBULL DR.
UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from
Portia Maillard-Laws a/k/a Portia Maillard dated November 18, 2005 and
recorded in Liber 24055, folio 636 among the Land Records of Prince
George's County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince
George's County, 14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing
entrance, located on Main St.), on
OCTOBER 31, 2017 AT 10:55 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #15-1752377.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $23,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67688.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 11, Oct 18 & Oct 25
12133011
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Fairview
Manor, LLC dated November 9, 2011 and recorded in Liber 33137, folio
551 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main
St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main St.),
on
NOVEMBER 7, 2017 AT 10:55 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings
and improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and
described as follows: Lot 22, Block B, as shown on "Plat 5 Collingbrook",
said Plat recorded among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
Maryland at Plat Book REP 197 at Plat No. 92. Tax ID #07-3560323.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $49,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
1409 ARAGONA BLVD.
FORT WASHINGTON, MD 20744
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Alphonzo
W. Johns and Eloise K. Johns dated February 1, 2008 and recorded in
Liber 29841, folio 28 among the Land Records of Prince George's County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County,
14735 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located
on Main St.), on
NOVEMBER 7, 2017 AT 10:54 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #05-0269886.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $65,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale to be
$285,000.00.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 68301.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 55530.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Oct 18, 25, Nov 1, 2017 12136589
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 18, Oct 25 & Nov 1
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 11, 18, 25, 2017
12131409
12136025
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
Oct 18, Oct 25 & Nov 1
12134290
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
855
Anne Arundel County
855
Charles County
Charles County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
7208 KENT TOWN DR.
HYATTSVILLE, MD 20785
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Carlos
Adalberto Yanez dated March 29, 2007 and recorded in Liber 29820, folio
278 among the Land Records of Prince George's County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Prince George's County, 14735 Main
St., Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 (Duval Wing entrance, located on Main
St.), on
OCTOBER 24, 2017 AT 10:39 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from John
H. Painter, Jr. a/k/a John Harold Painter, Jr. dated February 10, 2005 and
recorded in Liber 15984, folio 631 among the Land Records of Anne
Arundel County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof,
the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne
Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD
21401, on
OCTOBER 24, 2017 AT 9:29 AM
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Timothy A.
Cross and Christine D. Cross dated August 1, 2008 and recorded in Liber
6680, folio 549 among the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at
public auction at the Circuit Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La
Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be held in the breezeway between the Circuit
Court and the District Court), on
NOVEMBER 7, 2017 AT 1:07 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Prince George's County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #13-1551886.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $30,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Prince George's County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 37831.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-205-12075758.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-127789.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $19,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 64206.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 67025.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Oct 4, Oct 11 & Oct 18
12131475
12136169
Oct 4, Oct 11 & Oct 18
852
12131478
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1501 ROBINSON RD.
SHADY SIDE, MD 20764
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Donald
A. Tyner dated May 7, 2009 and recorded in Liber 21076, folio 406 among
the Land Records of Anne Arundel County, MD, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the
Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County, at the Court House Door, 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
NOVEMBER 7, 2017 AT 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #07-156-00589700.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $33,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 65490.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Oct 18, Oct 25 & Nov 1
852
12131717
Anne Arundel County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY,
Robert E. Frazier, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Samuel Chung, et al
Defendant
No . C-02-CV-16-000078
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Tuesday, October 3, 2017, that the sale
of the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported
by, Thomas W. Hodge, Substitute
Trustee
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 2nd day
of November 2017 next, provided
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks on or before the 2nd
day of November 2017 next. The
report states the amount of sale
of the property at 2645 DIDELPHIS
DRIVE, ODENTON, MD 21113, to be
$296,000.00
Robert P Duckworth
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Anne Arundel County, MD
Oct 11, 18, 25, 2017
12135533
Calvert County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CALVERT COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Robert E. Frazier, et al.
Substitute Trustees,
Plaintiffs,
V.
Patti Evans
Defendant(s)
CASE NO. 04C17000070
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this 26th
day of September, 2017, that the
sale of the property in this case,
11546 Senora Lane, Lusby, Maryland, 20657, reported by Robert E.
Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, and Scott
Robinson, Substitute Trustees, be
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 26th day of October,
2017, provided a copy of this
Notice be inserted in The Washington Post, a newspaper published
in Calvert County, Maryland, once
in each of three (3) successive
weeks on or before the 26th day
of October, 2017.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $171,000.00.
Kathy P. Smith
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Calvert County, MD
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 Viking Drive, Suite 203
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 213-2959
Oct 6, 13, 20, 2017 12134347
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
John E. Driscoll, III, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Versus
Herbert W. Shockey
Virginia L. Shockey
Defendants
No . C-02-CV-17-001396
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this Tuesday, October 3, 2017, that the sale
of the property in the proceedings
mentioned, made and reported by
Robert A. Jones, Substitute Trustee
BE RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 2nd day
of November 2017 next, provided
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in some newspaper published in
Anne Arundel County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive
weeks on or before the 2nd day
of November 2017 next. The report
states the amount of sale of the
property at 1641 MIDLAND ROAD,
EDGEWATER, MD 21037,
to be
$96,000.00
Robert P Duckworth
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Anne Arundel County, MD
Oct 11, 18, 25, 2017
853
12135537
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Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
8287 SEBRING CT.
SEVERN, MD 21144
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Andrew
Loren Fecher and Karina Fecher dated November 8, 2013 and recorded in
Liber 26864, folio 491 among the Land Records of Anne Arundel County,
MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees
will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County,
at the Court House Door, 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, MD 21401, on
OCTOBER 24, 2017 AT 9:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Anne Arundel County, MD and more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #04-929-90003428.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of
the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification
of sale by the Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County. Interest to be
paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received
in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of
interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 58232.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
LICENSE NOS. A000004, A000176, A000177, A000234, A000297,A000338,
A000394, A000424, A000429, A000445, A000465
Oct 4, Oct 11 & Oct 18
855
12128417
Charles County
855
Charles County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Eric L.
Donnell dated April 17, 2013 and recorded in Liber 8303, folio 427 among
the Land Records of Charles County, MD, default having occurred under
the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit
Court for Charles County, 200 Charles St., La Plata, MD 20646, (Sale will be
held in the breezeway between the Circuit Court and the District Court), on
OCTOBER 31, 2017 AT 1:08 PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Charles County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #06-086497.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Charles County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 66781.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 11, Oct 18 & Oct 25
12134287
LEGAL NOTICES
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
Membership is rewarding.
856
Frederick County
856
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and
improvements thereon situated in Howard County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #16-086568.
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $35,000 by cash or certified check. Balance
of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Howard County. Interest
to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to
the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are
received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement
of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement
or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be
obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE
FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including
agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private
charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent,
to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.
Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be
assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all
documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be
borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or
damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to
be announced at the time of sale.
If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the
purchaser's sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of
the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement,
the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all
expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the
above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of
this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross
sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited
deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the
risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of
any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without
reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser
shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus
results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser
and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured
party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection
with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.
Trustees' file number 41901.
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 18, Oct 25 & Nov 1
873
Prince William County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
12735 Crossman Creek Way,
Bristow, VA 20136
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
June 28, 2006, and recorded at Instrument Number 200607050100102 and
a Loan Modification recorded on November 15, 2012 at Instrument Number
201211150110216, in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, VA, securing a loan which was originally $622,000.00. The
appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer
for sale at public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince
William County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
November 3, 2017 at 1:00 PM
Jeffrey Patrick McEvoy, P.C.,
8 W. Third Street
Frederick Maryland 21701
301-694-2752
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE
OFFICE AND RESIDENTIAL BUILDING
IN DOWNTOWN FREDERICK
135 W. PATRICK STREET
FREDERICK, MARYLAND 21701
(Case No.: 10-C-17-001208 in the Circuit Court for Frederick County)
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Indemnity Deed of Trust
from Patrick Parking, LLC, dated June 9, 2006 recorded in Liber 6063,
folio 152 among the Land Records of Frederick County, MD (collectively
referred to as “Deed of Trust”), default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Substitute Trustee will sell at public auction at the Circuit
Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 West Patrick
Street, Frederick, Maryland, on
OCTOBER 20, 2017 AT 10:30 AM
ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND situated in Frederick County,
Maryland, Tax ID No. 02-082586 and more fully described in the aforesaid
Deed of Trust.
The property is believed to be improved by a building that contains two
office units and one residential unit.
The property and improvements, if any, will be sold in an “AS IS”
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, existing building and/or
environmental violations, agreements of record affecting the same, if any,
and with no warranty either expressed or implied as to the description of
the condition of the property or improvements.
The property will be sold subject to any violation notices and subject
to all conditions, restrictions, covenants, encumbrances, right of ways,
agreements and other matters of record affecting the same, if any. The
property will be sold subject to existing leases, if any.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $40,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s
check or money order, at the time of sale will be required of all purchasers
other than the holder of the Note secured by the Deed of Trust, or an
affiliate. The deposit must be increased to 10% of the purchase price
within 2 business days at the office of the Substitute Trustee. The Balance
of the purchase price is to be paid in immediately available funds, within
ten (10) business days after the final ratification of sale by the Circuit
Court for Frederick County. If payment of the balance does not take place
within ten (10) business days after ratification, the deposit will be forfeited
and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting
purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus
proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property. In the event
the property is purchased by someone other than the note holder or an
affiliate, interest shall be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate
of 7.750% per annum from date of sale to the date funds are received in
the office of the Substitute Trustee. In the event the settlement is delayed
for any reason and the property is purchased by someone other than the
note holder or an affiliate, there shall be no abatement of interest caused
by the delay. Taxes, water, sewer, ground rent, condominium fees, and/or
homeowners association dues, if applicable, to be adjusted to the date of
sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. All other public charges
and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or
metropolitan district charges, if any, are to be adjusted for the current
year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all
documentary stamps, recordation taxes and transfer taxes shall be borne
by the purchaser.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS" condition and without any recourse,
representations or warranties, either express or implied, as to its nature,
condition or description. Neither the Substitute Trustee, the secured party,
the note holder nor any other party makes any warranty or representation
of any kind or nature regarding the physical condition of, the description
of, or title to the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall
assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale.
If the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey the property as described
above, by reason of any defect in the title or otherwise, the purchaser's
sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to the refund of the
aforementioned deposit. Upon refund of the deposit to purchaser, the
sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no
further claims against the Substitute Trustee or the secured party. The
conveyance of the property by the Substitute Trustee to the purchaser
at settlement shall be by Trustee’s Deed without covenant or warranty.
The Memorandum of Purchase between the Substitute Trustee, as seller,
and the purchaser (the "Memorandum of Purchase") shall include, by
reference, all the terms and conditions contained herein, specifically
including, but not limited to, the following provisions: "Purchaser agrees
and represents that the purchaser is purchasing the property subject
to all matters known and unknown, in "AS IS, WHERE IS" condition.
In executing and delivering the Memorandum of Purchase, purchaser
recognizes purchaser has not relied upon nor been induced by any
statements or representations of any person, including the Trustee, the
secured party, the Deed of Trust holder or an affiliate or their respective
servicers, heirs, personal and legal representatives, agents, employees,
successors and assigns (collectively, "Released Parties"), in respect of
the condition of the property, including the environmental condition to
the property, unless such representations or statements are specifically
set forth in the Memorandum of Purchase. Purchaser has not relied on
anything in the foreclosure advertisement, but rather has relied solely
on such investigations, examinations or inspections of the property as
purchaser has made. Purchaser waives and releases the Released Parties
from any and all claims the purchaser or its successors and assigns
may have now or in the future may have relating to the condition of
the property. Purchaser acknowledges and agrees that this provision
was a negotiated part of the Memorandum of Purchase and serves
as an essential component of consideration for the same. The parties
specifically acknowledge and agree that this clause bars all claims by
purchaser against Released Parties, arising from the condition of or
releases from the property pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental
Response, Compensations and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, and
all other actions pursuant to federal, state or local laws, ordinances
or regulations for any environmental condition of or releases from the
property. Further, purchaser agrees to indemnify Trustee for any liability
they may have to any third party for an environmental condition of the
property. Notwithstanding the parties' intent that this clause bars all
such claims, should a court of competent jurisdiction deem otherwise,
purchaser agrees that the presence of this clause should serve as
the overwhelming, primary factor in any equitable apportionment of
response costs under applicable federal, state or local laws, ordinances,
or regulations."
Note: The information contained herein was obtained from sources
deemed to be reliable, but is offered for information purposes only. The
Auctioneer, the Substitute Trustee, the Deed of Trust note holder and
the secured party do not make any representations or warranties with
respect to the accuracy of the information contained herein. Prospective
purchasers are urged to make their own inspection.
Andrew F. Murphy, Substitute Trustee
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
OCT. 4, 11 & 18, 2017
Prince William County
12135310
873
12133025
IS YOUR CAR
HOLDING UP?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054E 2x2
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 41,
CROSSMAN CREEK, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and
recorded in Instrument No. 200303110044512, among the Land Records
of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
October 11, 18, 2017
12134035
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
11220 Stagestone Way, Unit 11 - 8,
Manassas, VA 20109
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
March 6, 2015, and recorded at Instrument Number 201503110018213
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $193,431.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
November 17, 2017 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of The
following described property, situate, lying and being in Prince William
County, Virginia to wit:
Condominium Unit 11-8, Jackson’s Ridge Condominium, A Condominium,
and the limited common elements appurtenant thereto; established by
Condominium Instruments recorded on August 22, 1989 in Deed Book
1680 at Page 727, and any and all subsequent amendments thereto,
among the land records of Prince William County, Virginia, and as more
fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
October 18, 25, 2017
856
Frederick County
usc 94242
CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FREDERICK COUNTY
Sandra K. Dalton
Clerk of the Circuit Court
100 West Patrick Street
Courthouse
Frederick, Maryland 21701
(301) 600-1976
Case Number: 10-C-16-000598FC
Lender License Number: N/A
Keith M. Yacko
vs.
Leslie Irwin
Margaret Adjaye
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby issued by the
Circuit Court of Frederick County
this 29th day of September 2017,
that the sale made and recorded
by Robert E. Frazier, et al., for the
sale of the property described in
these proceedings
2507 Carrington Way
Frederick, Maryland 21702
be ratified and confirmed thirty
(30) days from the date of this
notice, unless cause to the contrary be shown, provided a copy
of this Notice be inserted in some
newspaper published in this County, once of each (3) successive
weeks.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $253,000.00.
Sandra K. Dalton
Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Frederick County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 Viking Drive, Suite 203
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 2132959
Oct 11, 18, 25, 2017
12135693
12130944
856
Prince William County
873
D13
Prince William County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
8236 Stoddard Drive,
Manassas, VA 20110
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Olumide
Ashiru-Balogun dated November 12, 2009 and recorded in Liber 12179,
folio 359 among the Land Records of Howard County, MD, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public
auction, AUCTION SALE TO BE HELD AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING,
9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD 21045, on
NOVEMBER 6, 2017 AT 9:30 AM
Frederick County
The purchaser is responsible for, and the property is sold subject to,
any environmental matter or condition, whether latent or observable,
if any, that may exist at or affect or relate to the property and to any
governmental requirements affecting the same.
11509 TIMBERBROOK DR.
WALDORF, MD 20601
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 18, Oct 25 & Nov 1
873
Howard County
7172 TALISMAN LA.
COLUMBIA, MD 21045
328 WOODSIDE PL.
WALDORF, MD 20601
WP 2x1
Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
857
Howard County
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
1603 CROFTON PKWY.
CROFTON, MD 21114
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE
OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY
857
Frederick County
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LEGAL NOTICES
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 97,
Section 2, Sumner Lake, as the same appears duly dedicated, platted and
recorded as Instrument No. 200101290009408 among the Land Records
of Prince William County, Virginia., and as more fully described in the
aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
October 18, 25, 2017
12136918
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
2850 Bowes Lane,
Woodbridge, VA 22193
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated May
27, 2005, and recorded at Instrument Number 200505310087496 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County, VA, securing
a loan which was originally $223,900.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction
at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
November 3, 2017 at 1:00 PM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of Lot 101,
Dale City, Section T-15, Gideon Square, as the same is duly dedicated,
platted and recorded in Deed Book 1384, Folio 1167, among the Land
Records of Prince William Country, Virginia, and as more fully described in
the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
October 11, 18 , 2017
875
Fauquier County
12134603
875
Fauquier County
NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE SALE
7115 McHenry Court,
Remington, VA 22734
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
October 28, 2005, and recorded in Deed Book 1187, Page 2408 in the
Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Fauquier County, VA, securing a loan
which was originally $289,580.00. The appointed SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE,
Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at public auction at front
steps of the Circuit Court, 29 Ashby Street, Warrenton, VA 20186 on:
November 7, 2017 at 10:00 AM
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All that
certain lot, piece or parcel of land, with all improvements thereon and
all appurtenances thereto belonging, located and being in the County of
Fauquier, Commonwealth of Virginia, and being designated as follows:
Lot 62, Phase 1, RIVERTON, as the same is duly dedicated, platted and
recorded in Deed Book 1157, page 88, among the land records of Fauquier
County, Virginia, and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
October 18, 25, 2017
12135552
TRUSTEE'S SALE
OF
VALUABLE REAL ESTATE
11545 Bristersburg Road, Catlett, VA 20119
In execution of a deed of trust dated August 1, 2006 and recorded in
Deed Book 1230, at Page 1105, in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of
Fauquier County, Virginia, default having been made in the terms of the
loan secured thereby, and having been requested to do so by the holder
of the note evidencing said indebtedness, the undersigned substitute
trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Fauquier
County Circuit Courthouse, 40 Culpeper Street, Warrenton, Virginia, on
Friday, October 20, 2017, at 11:00 o’clock a.m. the following real estate with
improvements thereon, Tax ID No. 7838-59-0101-000:
Beginning at a point on the easterly side of Virginia Route 616 at
the southwesterly corner of said premises and the northwesterly
corner of land now or formerly of Edwards, then N 28 degrees 31’
11” E 276.61 feet along a line on the easterly side of Virginia Route
616, to a point; then E 60 degrees 11’ 09” E 788.31 feet along Lot
2 on said plat to a point; then S 20 degrees 48’ 51” W 274.55 feet
along said lot 2 to a point; then N 69 degrees 23’ 41” W 272.43
feet along land now or formerly of Shelton to a point; thence
N 69 degrees 02’ 14” W 552.98 feet partially along land of said
Shelton and of said Edwards to the point and place of beginning,
containing 5.0923 acres, more or less and shown on Lot 1 on a
plat entitled “Plat of Boundary Survey, Lots 1 and 2, Nita N. Hughes
Property, Cedar Run Magisterial District, Fauquier County, Virginia,
recorded with deed at Deed Book 406 at Page 339.
This conveyance will be made subject to conditions, restrictions, rightsof-way, easements, conservation easements, reservations, and financing
statements contained in deeds and other land records forming the chain
of title to this property, subject to any potential filed or unfiled mechanic's
liens and any other matters of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust
being executed. Real estate taxes for 2017 shall be adjusted to the date of
sale.
To the extent permissible by law, all bidders, including the successful
bidder, waive and release the Trustee, the Noteholder, and their respective
agents, successors and assigns from any and all claims such bidder or
his successors and assigns may have now or in the future relating to the
environmental condition of the Property.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH, all costs of the conveyance, which shall be by
special warranty, examination of title, preparation of deed and grantor's
tax thereon, etc., will be at the cost of the purchaser. A deposit of
the lesser of $5,000.00 or ten percent (10%) of the successful bid (cash,
cashier's or certified check) may be required of successful bidder at the
time of sale, and settlement in full shall be made within thirty (30) days
from the date of sale at 31 Winchester Street, Warrenton, Virginia, time
being of the essence. THE PROPERTY AND THE IMPROVEMENTS TO THE
PROPERTY, IF ANY, SHALL BE CONVEYED WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY
KIND IN "AS IS, WHERE IS" CONDITION, WITH ANY AND ALL FAULTS AND
DEFECTS.
THE REAL PROPERTY SHALL BE CONVEYED SUBJECT TO ALL TENANCIES
AND TENANTS IN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY, IF ANY. IT SHALL BE THE
RESPONSIBILITY OF THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER TO OBTAIN POSSESSION OF
THE PROPERTY.
Real estate taxes for 2017 shall be adjusted to the date of sale. In
addition, at settlement the successful bidder shall pay all past due and
current assessments, sewer or water charges, and real estate taxes, and
any penalties and interest due on any of the foregoing with respect to
the property, prorated to and including the date of the foreclosure sale.
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
October 25, 2005, and recorded at Instrument Number 200510270187027
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Prince William County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $412,000.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, VA 20110 on:
November 17, 2017 at 1:00 PM
The Trustee reserves the right: (i) to waive the deposit requirement; (ii)
to extend the period of time within which the purchaser is to make full
settlement; (iii) to withdraw the property from sale at any time prior to
the termination of the bidding; (iv) to keep the bidding open for any length
of time; (v) to reject all bids; and (vi) to postpone or set over the date of
sale. In the event the Trustee deems it best for any reason at the time of
sale to postpone or continue this sale from time to time, such notices of
postponement or setting over will be in a manner deemed reasonable by
the Trustee.
WALKER JONES, PC,
Substitute Trustee
Contact: Michael T. Brown
31 Winchester Street
Warrenton, Virginia 20186
(540) 347-9223
September 27, October 4, October 11, October 18, 2017
12131498
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S2930 10x3
851
WP 2x1
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2017
OPQRS
877
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
10285 Westwood Court
Manassas, VA 20110
877
Spotsylvania County
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $11,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: FHA/GNMA (Trustee #
549120)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
The Vendor Auction.com will be
used in conjunction with this sale
Towne #: 5000.0409
Loudoun County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
10 HAMPTON RD,
ROUND HILL, VA 20141
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $290,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.850000% dated
November 14, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 20061130-0099215, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
November 15, 2017 at 9:30 AM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 584397154001
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-266502.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 18, 25, 2017
12136029
Home
delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
improved real property, with an abbreviated legal description of All that
certain lot, parcel or tract of land with all rights and privileges thereto
appurtenant and with all improvements thereon, situate, lying and being
in Lee Hill Magisterial District, Spotsylvania County, Virginia, containing
1.4346 acres, more or less, designated as Tax Map # 37-A-109 and more
particularly described and shown on a plat of survey by Merestone Land
Surveying, PLLC, dated April 4, 2006, entitled “Boundary Line Adjustment,
The Property of John M. or Jennifer Abbott, TM#37(A)110 and the Property
of Charles M. or Olivia C. Hamlet TM#37(A)109,” a copy of which is
attached to the Deed of John and Jennifer Abbot recorded as Instrument#
200600020126 among the Land Records of Spotsylvania County, Virginia,
and as more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
TERMS OF SALE: The property will be sold “AS IS,” WITHOUT REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND AND SUBJECT TO conditions,
restrictions, reservations, easements, rights of way, and all other matters
of record taking priority over the Deed of Trust to be announced at the time
of sale. A deposit of $20,000.00, or 10% of the sale price, whichever is
lower, in cash or cashier’s check payable to the SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE will
be required at the time of sale. The balance of the purchase price, with
interest at the rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of
sale to the date said funds are received in the office of the SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE, will be due within fifteen (15) days of sale. In the event of default
by the successful bidder, the entire deposit shall be forfeited and applied
to the costs and expenses of sale and Substitute Trustee's fee. All other
public charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, whether
incurred prior to or after the sale, and all other costs incident to settlement
to be paid by the purchaser. In the event taxes, any other public charges
have been advanced, a credit will be due to the seller, to be adjusted
from the date of sale at the time of settlement. Purchaser agrees to pay
the seller's attorneys at settlement, a fee of $445.00 for review of the
settlement documents.
Additional terms will be announced at the time of sale and the successful
bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Substitute Trustees
a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of bidding.
Rosenberg & Associates, LLC
(Attorney for the Secured Party)
4340 East West Highway, Suite 600
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-907-8000
www.rosenberg-assoc.com
877
12136916
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
877
Spotsylvania County
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
9803 KENMORE COURT,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22408
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
2032 MT OLIVE ROAD,
BEAVERDAM, VA 23015
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated March 20, 2003,
in the original principal amount
of $175,200.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 200300012158 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on November 16, 2017 , at 4:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: THE LAND
REFERRED TO IN THIS COMMITMENT IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL
OF LAND SITUATE, LYING AND
BEING IN LEE MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, AND KNOWN AS LOT 74,
SECTION TWO, POPLAR FOREST AT
LEE‘S HILL, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED ON THAT CERTAIN
RECORD, "PLAT OF SUBDIVISION,
SECTION TWO, POPLAR FOREST AT
LEE‘S HILL," LEE HILL MAGISTERIAL
DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY,
VIRGINIA, MADE BY SULLIVAN,
DONAHOE AND INGALLS, DATED
JULY 2, 1992, AND RECORDED IN
THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN PLAT FILE 3
AT PAGES 741 THROUGH 743. FOR
INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY:
9803 KENMORE COURT, FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22408
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 6, 2004,
in the original principal amount
of $118,755.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. LR 200400031504
. The undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on November 16, 2017, at 4:00 PM, the property described in said Deed of
Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND
WITH ALL
BUILDINGS AND
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON AND
ALL RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES
APPURTENANT THERETO, SITUATE,
LYING AND BEING IN BERKELEY
MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA, ON THE
NORTHERLY SIDE OF STATE ROUTE
658, CONTAINING 2.3164 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS, KNOWN AS PARCEL A, AS SHOWN ON PLAT
RECORDED IN PLAT FILE 6, PAGE
721, IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE OF
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3209151.
Oct 18, 25, 2017
12136849
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
If only you had home delivery.
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2815 O'Connor Court,
Fredericksburg, VA 22408
Spotsylvania County
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust dated
September 27, 2007, and recorded at Instrument Number 200700027974
in the Clerk’s Office for the Circuit Court for Spotsylvania County,
VA, securing a loan which was originally $80,000.00. The appointed
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE, Commonwealth Trustees, LLC will offer for sale at
public auction at the front steps of the Circuit Court for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, Virginia 22553 on:
November 6, 2017 at 11:30 AM
October 18, 25, 2017
10/11/2017, 11/18/2017 12135194
SF
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3151571
Oct 11, 18, 2017
12130756
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
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SF
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $70,300.00, dated May 26, 2006
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of the Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in Document No. 200600019760, default
having occurred in the payment
of the Note thereby secured and
at the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, on November 14,
2017 at 12:00 PM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 120, Section 2, Pelhams Crossing, with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (57228
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Oct 16,17,18,19,20,2017 12136446
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
10710 PEACH TREE DRIVE,
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22407
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated November 16, 2004,
in the original principal amount
of $128,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 200400047410 .
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on November 16, 2017 , at 4:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN TRACT OF REAL ESTATE
SITUATED IN CHANCELLOR MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA AND BEING LOT
264, SECTION TWO, RAINTREE
SUBDIVISION, AS SHOWN AND
DESCRIBED ON A PLAT OF SUBDIVISION DATED AUGUST, 1993, BY
REID, BAGBY & CALDWELL, P. C.,
WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED IN THE
OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT OF SPOTSYLVANIA
COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN PLAT FILE 4,
AT PAGE 371.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-37652-1.
Oct 11, 18, 2017
12134844
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
877
879
Spotsylvania County
Culpeper County
EZ
879
Culpeper County
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated August 31, 2004,
in the original principal amount
of $223,900.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Spotsylvania County, Virginia as
Instrument No. LR200400035448.
The
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction in the front of the Circuit
Court building for Spotsylvania
County, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, Virginia on November 16, 2017 , at 4:00 PM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: LOT 41,
GLENVIEW, SECTION 8, SALEM
FIELDS, AS THE SAME APPEARS
DULY DEDICATED, PLATTED AND
RECORDED
AT
INSTRUMENT#200200038889,
AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3218301.
Oct 11, 18, 2017
12134843
Culpeper County
Trustee's Sale
788 Virginia Avenue,
Culpeper, Virginia 22701
(Tax Map No.: 40-U-2-151)
Default having been made in the
terms of a certain Deed of Trust
dated February 25, 2008, in the
original principal amount of
$235,762.00 and recorded in the
Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court
of the County of Culpeper, Virginia
as Instrument No. 080001340, the
undersigned Substitute Trustees
will sell at public auction on October 27, 2017, at 10:30 am, in front of
the building housing the Culpeper
County Circuit Court, At the old
courthouse steps located at the
corner of W. Davis and N. West
Streets , Culpeper, VA 22701, the
property designated as Lot 151,
Lakeview of Culpeper, as the same
appears duly dedicated, platted
and recorded as Instrument No.
020006557, at page 29 and in plat
book 7, at pages 480-487, among
the land records of Culpeper County, Virginia. Sale is subject to all
prior liens, easements, restrictions, covenants, and conditions,
if any, of record, or other matters
which would be disclosed by an
accurate survey or inspection of
the premises.
TERMS: CASH. A deposit of
$23,500.00 or 10% of the sale
price, whichever is lower, will be
required of the successful bidder
at time of sale. Prior to the sale,
interested bidders will be required
to register with and must present
a bid deposit which may be held
during the sale by the trustee.
The bid deposit must be certified
funds and/or cash, but no more
than $9,900.00 of cash will be
accepted. The successful bidder’s
deposit will be retained at the sale
and applied to the sale price. If
held by the trustee, all other bid
deposits will be returned to the
unsuccessful bidders. Settlement
is to be made within 15 days. The
successful bidder will be responsible for obtaining possession of the
property, and for all costs and fees
related to recording the Trustee’s
Deed, including the grantors tax.
The successful bidder will be
required to execute a Memorandum of Trustee's Sale, available for
review on the Foreclosure Sales
page of www.glasserlaw.com, outlining additional terms of sale and
settlement. A Trustee’s Deed will
be prepared by Trustee’s attorney
at high bidder’s expense. This is
a communication from a debt collector.
Glasser and Glasser, P.L.C. on behalf
of Atlantic Trustee Services, L.L.C.,
REO Solutions, LLC, Substitute
Trustees, Crown Center Building,
Suite 600, 580 East Main Street,
Norfolk, VA 23510, File No. 20712511, Tel: (757) 321-6465, between
10:00 a.m. & 12:00 noon only.
Oct. 11, 18, 2017
Notice of Substitute Trustee’s and Secured Party’s Sale
The State Theatre
305-311 S. Main Street
Culpeper, Virginia 22701
Tax Parcel No. 41A2-1-C1-2
In execution of a Deed of Trust from State Theatre Owner, LLC, a Virginia
limited liability company (the “Borrower”), dated July 30, 2012, recorded
July 31, 2012, in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court of Culpeper County,
Virginia (the “Clerk’s Office”) as Instrument No. 120004537 (the “Deed of
Trust”), the undersigned Substitute Trustee and agent for the Secured
Party (the “Trustee”), at the direction of the Noteholder , will offer for
sale at public auction at the front entrance of the Culpeper County Circuit
Court located at 135 W. Cameron Street, Culpeper, Virginia 22701, on
October 20, 2017, at 11:00 a.m. (the “Date of Sale”), the property (as
defined in the Deed of Trust) consisting of a theatre and all other rights,
easements and appurtenances benefiting and\or burdening the theatre
property (collectively, the “Real Estate”), and together with all of the
Trustee’s right, title and interest, in and to, all items of tangible and
intangible property described in the Deed of Trust, including, without
limitation, machinery, equipment, furniture, furnishings, goods, building
supplies and materials of the Borrower used on or in connection with
the Real Estate and described as “Collateral” under Financing Statements
perfecting the Noteholder’s interest as the secured party therein filed
with the Virginia State Corporation Commission and the Clerk’s Office
on August 10 and August 14, 2017, as File Number 17081056287 and
as Instrument No. 170017302 respectively (collectively, the “Equipment”).
The Real Estate and the Equipment are hereinafter referred to collectively
as the “Property.”
Terms: ALL CASH except that, subject to the requirements of Section 5559.4 of the Code of Virginia, 1950, as amended, the holder of the note
secured by the Deed of Trust (the “Noteholder”) shall be entitled to apply
any of the debt secured by the Deed of Trust as a credit to the successful
bid for the Property (the “Sales Price”). To participate in the bidding,
a bidder’s deposit in the amount of $250,000.00 (the “Deposit”) will be
required at the Date of Sale in cash or by certified or cashier’s check
payable to the Trustee (or to the bidder and endorsed to the Trustee). To
the extent the deposit exceeds 10% of the final bid, the Trustee will refund
the difference pending closing. The Noteholder shall not be required to
provide a Deposit. The balance of the Sales Price shall be paid in cash,
wired funds or by certified or cashier’s check, at settlement, to be held
no later than twenty-one (21) days after the Date of Sale at the office of
the Trustee (the “Date of Settlement”), TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE. To
those who provide a Deposit to the Trustee but are not the successful
bidder, the Trustee will return the Deposits promptly after completion of
the bidding.
The Trustee reserves the unilateral right, at any time, to: (i) waive or reduce
the Deposit requirement as to any bidder; (ii) withdraw the Property from
sale at any time before the termination of the bidding; (iii) keep the bidding
open for any length of time (which the Trustee intends to do as the Trustee
determines the highest sales price); (iv) reject any and all bids; (v) require
any and all bidders to substantiate their ability to produce the required
Deposit and provide substantial proof of the ability to pay the balance of
the high bid before either allowing them to bid or accepting their bid; (vi)
extend the time to knock down a bid while the successful bidder obtains
the required Deposit; and (vii) extend the Date of Settlement.
If the successful bidder fails to complete settlement on the Date of
Settlement as required, its Deposit shall be delivered to, and retained by,
the Noteholder and applied, in part, to the costs of the foreclosure sale
(including the Trustee’s fees and expenses and fees of the Noteholder’s
counsel), and the Property shall be resold at the risk and expense of the
defaulting bidder. Such retention of the Deposit shall not limit any rights
or remedies of the Trustee or the Noteholder with respect to such default
by the successful bidder. All closing costs, other than preparation of the
deed and the grantor’s tax (which shall be paid out of the proceeds of
sale), shall be borne by the successful bidder. Real estate taxes shall be
prorated to the Date of Sale and the successful bidder will be obligated
to add to its successful bid amount on the Date of Settlement any real
estate taxes paid for the period after the Date of Settlement. Income and
expenses of the Property shall not be prorated.
The Real Estate shall be conveyed by special warranty deed and the
Equipment shall be conveyed by bill of sale, without warranty. All of
the Property shall be sold “as is,” “where is” without representation
or warranty of any kind (except as described in the deed) including,
without limitation, zoning, structural integrity, physical condition, extent
of construction, construction materials, workmanship, habitability, environmental condition, fitness for a particular purpose or merchantability of
all or any part of the Property, and any information a survey or inspection
of the Property would disclose, and subject to, if any, conditions,
restrictions, right-of-ways, easements, reservations, agreements, liens
and other conditions and matters of record taking priority over the lien
of the Deed of Trust. The risk of loss or damage to the Property by
condemnation, fire or other casualty shall be borne by the successful
bidder from the moment the Trustee accepts the successful bidder’s final
bid. Delivery of physical possession of the Property will not be performed
by the Trustee but will be the responsibility of the successful bidder. The
Real Estate will be conveyed expressly subject to that certain Real Estate
Master Lease dated May 30, 2013 between State Theatre Owner, LLC, as
Master Landlord and State Theater Master Tenant, LLC, as Master Tenant.
No representations are made by the Trustee regarding the status of this
Master Lease.
No representation or warranty is made as to the accuracy of the square
footages, the existence or condition of the building or structure on the
Real Estate or any other Real Estate amenities.
The successful bidder will be required to execute a Memorandum of Sale
and Deposit Receipt (the “Memo of Sale”) concerning the purchase of
the Property, a copy of which will be made available upon request to
the information contact person below or immediately before announcing
the sale of the Property on the Date of Sale. The Substitute Trustee
was substituted by Deed of Appointment of Substitute Trustee dated July
31, 2017, and recorded in the Clerk’s Office before the Date of Sale.
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated June 11, 2008, in
the original principal amount of
$220,607.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Orange County, Virginia as Instrument No. 080004843 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Orange County, 109 W. Main
Street, Orange, Virginia on November 16, 2017, at 10:00 AM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND,
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN GORDON
MAGISTERIAL
DISTRICT,
ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, DESIGNATED AS LOT 193R, SECTION
NINE, WILDERNESS SHORES SUBDIVISION, ON PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT
OF SUBDIVISION WILDERNESS
SHORES SECTION NINE GORDON
MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT ORANGE
CO., VA", MADE BY WEBB AND
ASSOCIATES, DATED SEPTEMBER
29, 2006 AND RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, IN PLAT CABINET M, SLOTS
71 THROUGH 78.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-1947031.
Oct 11, 18, 2017
12131190
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Roommates
PETWORTH 1 Furn rm, free cable/
int., nr Petw. Sta. $575/mo. all
utils incl. Shirley 202-723-1742
MARYLAND
Roommates
ADELPHI - Basement room for rent.
Furnished. Quiet neighborhood.
1 person. Call 301-887-1788
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2017
275
MARYLAND
Merchandise Wanted
Roommates
HYATTSVILLE - Room for rent in SFH,
N/S. $550 + sec dep + shrd util.
240-481-4212
or
301-779-2426
$550 dep. NS/NP. $550/mo utilities
included. 301-736-3217 after 4pm
HYATTSVILLE - 1 furnished BR $600
or negotiable. Avail now. utilities incl
and free cable. Quiet. 240-476-9245
Paul S. Bliley, Jr.
Substitute Trustee
Williams Mullen, P.C.
200 South 10th Street
Richmond, Virginia 23218
(804) 420-6448
LANHAM- 1BR in house $700.
Bsmt $850. All util incl. 7304
Galileo Way. Call 240-997-3826
LANHAM - room for rent. $700,
utilities included. Near train. Quiet
& clean. Call 240-667-2599
LAUREL-Rooms for rent, w-w carpet,
W/D, D/W, great loc, $585 or $650
(1/2BA incl). utils incl. 240-475-4072
OLNEY, MD - 2 blocks away from
Montgomery General Hospital
1 spac.room, private bath/pvt pkng
$750. All util incl Avail now . Near
trans. 240-602-3131
OXON HILL /TEMPLE HILLS-Rooms.
$600 - $675. NICE home. Utilities incl.
No smoking. 1 person. 301-848-0418
SF
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1-800-753-POST SF
FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE
FRIES?"
KLMNO
202.334.6200
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Open 24/7
355
Garage Sales, VA
Barkley/Armistead Park—
COMMUNITY YARD SALE in one
location! Mainstone Dr & Lee HWY,
Fairfax, 10/21/2017, 9AM-12PM,
703-280-5050 Sponsored by
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Vienna—Everything Must Go! 1412
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Art, antique furniture & collectibles,
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Instrument
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Food
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2017
.
SECTION E
The flavors we fall back on
Cooking with autumnal produce means getting the final breath of the summer’s harvest
PHOTOS BY GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
BY
J ULIA T URSHEN
There’s a poem I love called “September Tomatoes,” by the Massachusettsbased poet Karina Borowicz. In it, she evokes the feeling and details of the
season change, like the fruit flies that erupt from tomato plants and the compost
that cooks build from what remains of summer. It closes beautifully: “My greatgrandmother sang with the girls of her village / as they pulled the flax. Songs so
old / and so tied to the season that the very sound / seemed to turn the weather.”
Borowicz captures in her poem what I try to capture in my kitchen this time
of year: the palpable shift from one time of year into another. Cooking with
autumnal produce means getting the final breath of the summer’s harvest while
also inviting all that comes with cooler weather. It means juicy grapes and
crunchy apples, tough-skinned squash and pumpkins and tender heads of
cauliflower and, my favorite, tall stalks thick as branches dotted with Brussels
sprouts. Fall cooking comes with small trades (like the charcoal grill for the
stove-top and flip-flops for shoes with socks). While we’re not quite yet to
dinner by the fireplace, we’re on our way.
RECIPES
Crunchy Brussels Sprouts With Mustard E6 Shredded
Sprouts Slaw With Gorgonzola + Hazelnuts E6 Roasted
Brussels Sprout Leaves With Pecorino E6 Sheet Pan
Sausage Dinner With Roasted Grapes + Broccoli Rabe E6
Concord Grape Shrub E6 Butternut Squash, Parmesan +
Thyme Fritters E7 Creamy Squash Soup With Pimenton
E7 Butternut Squash with Saffron E7 Roasted Cauliflower
With Butter + Hot Sauce E7 Shredded Green Apple Salad
With Fish Sauce + Cilantro E7 Sauteed Apples With Brown
Butter and Sage E7
FALL CONTINUED ON E6
Michelin’s cheap shot: List of supposedly low-cost restaurants in D.C. tries but fails to get it right
BY
T IM C ARMAN
There’s no reason to sugarcoat this, so
I won’t: The Michelin Guide has a
cheap-eats problem.
The famous French dining guide —
once the arbiter of taste for many chefs
and the public — doesn’t officially label
the food “cheap” at the restaurants on its
annual Bib Gourmand list, but the word
is implied louder than a jackhammer at
dawn. For a restaurant to qualify for the
list, Michelin’s anonymous inspectors
must be able to order two courses and a
glass of wine, or dessert, for $40 or less,
excluding tax and tip.
Where to start with this mess? How
about here: Spending $40 for a meal is
not cheap. Not for me, and probably not
for 95 percent of Washington (which is
why, as the $20 Diner in the Weekend
section, I aim to keep the meals in the
$20 range, though admittedly without
alcohol).
It’s cheap only by the tortured standards of a guide that clings to an Old
European notion of fine dining, with
white tablecloths, impeccably dressed
servers and sommeliers who dangle
silver-plated tastevins around their
necks.
Of the 22 restaurants placed on the
Bib Gourmand list for Washington’s 2018
Michelin Guide, only two serve what I
would consider cheap eats: CherCher, a
terrific Ethiopian spot on Ninth Street
NW, and 2 Amys, where you can still get a
beer and a charred-and-chewy Neapolitan pizza for under $20.
Even some chefs who oversee Bib
restaurants in Washington don’t lump
their menus into the cheap-eats category. They’ll say their food is “affordable”
or “competitively priced.” But they, like
most diners with any sense of perspective, will reserve the cheap-eats tag for
places that truly aim for a lower price
point, such as a fried chicken joint or
strip-center taqueria.
“Hey, I’m married. I got two kids,” said
Rob Rubba, the chef behind the Bibdesignated Hazel in Shaw. “Hazel would
not be a cheap night out, I can guarantee
you that. That would be going out for us.”
“Going out” as in: Going out for a nice
meal.
Michael Friedman, the chef and partner behind Red Hen, has a different
definition of cheap eats than the one that
Michelin has applied to his Bib Gourmand restaurant in Bloomingdale.
“Going to my favorite taco shop for $2
lengua tacos. That, to me, is cheap eats,”
Friedman said. “A great slice of pizza for
$3. Those are, for me, the guidelines for
quote-unquote ‘cheap eats.’ I would say
that in the world of Michelin, obviously
you’re dealing on another level altogether.”
Michelin is still relatively new to the
universe of American dining. The tire
MICHELIN CONTINUED ON E4
OCTOBER 20 - 22
Pumpkins + Cider
MIX &
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TOM SIETSEMA
Calle Cinco is a striking popup for Spanish small plates.E8
DAVE MCINTYRE
People, not vines, suffer in
Northern California’s fires.E3
WEEKNIGHT VEGETARIAN
A simple soup that shows off
roasted garlic’s versatility.E2
E2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
Roasted garlic lends depth of flavor to a simple soup
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
Cauliflower and Roasted Garlic Soup
4 servings (makes about 5 cups)
Adapted from “Little Bird Goodness,” by Megan May (Penguin, 2017).
Does everyone
know about the
glorious versatility
of roasted garlic? I
hope so. But just
in case you don’t,
Joe Yonan the next time
you’ve got your
WEEKNIGHT
VEGETARIAN
oven going for at
least the better
part of an hour,
roast some and you’ll see. Just
take a whole head of garlic, cut it
in half horizontally, so you get
through all the cloves, drizzle
each half with olive oil, wrap each
in foil, and roast for 45 minutes
or so. Let it cool slightly, and then
squeeze out the cloves.
Slather some on toast while it’s
still warm, sprinkle with salt, and
devour. Save the rest to whisk
into vinaigrette, puree into
hummus or other bean dips, add
to marinades, stews, soups. There
are as many uses as there are
cooks.
Roasted garlic adds depth of
flavor to the most basic recipes.
Take a simple cauliflower soup
like the one I spied in “Little Bird
Goodness” by Megan May
(Penguin Books, 2017). You
simmer cauliflower florets in
vegetable broth until they’re
tender, then blend the affair with
cashews (for plant-based
creaminess) and, yes, a whole
Ingredients
1 head garlic
2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive
oil
4 cups Scrappy Vegetable
Broth or store-bought, no-saltadded vegetable broth
1 large head cauliflower, cut
into small florets (8 cups)
3/4 cup raw cashews
1/2 teaspoon sea salt, or more
as needed
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground
black pepper, or more as
needed
1/4 cup Blanched Basil Oil, for
garnish (optional)
Fresh pea shoots, for garnish
(optional)
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
head’s worth of roasted garlic.
What would have surely been
pale, bland and boring turns into
something with an almost
mysterious backdrop of nutty
sweetness.
As we head into soup season,
it’s a trick to remember. If you’re
like me, you’ll appreciate the idea
so much that you’ll want to make
one important amendment to the
advice I gave at the top of this
column. Don’t roast a whole head
of garlic. Roast two, at least.
joe.yonan@washpost.com
You can kick off
sweet potato
season at your
house with this
stir-fry, and if you
hadn’t thought of
Bonnie S. using them that
Benwick
way before, you
have company.
DINNER IN
I endorse!
25 MINUTES
Here, they take on
the savory flavors
of the quick sauce; cut and cook
them as directed — a little shy of
fully tender and with edges for
crisping — and you’ll get the
benefit of their natural
sweetness as well.
There’s not much to prep in
this recipe, but I would suggest
taking a few minutes to first
shred fresh cabbage as an
accompaniment. It adds a
welcome crunch and keeps this
meal in low-carb territory.
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Stir-Fried Sweet Potato and Pork
2 to 3 servings
Serve with thinly sliced green or Napa cabbage.
Adapted from “Sweet Potatoes: Roasted, Loaded, Fried and Made
Into Pie,” by Mary-Frances Heck (Clarkson Potter, 2017).
Ingredients
2 or 3 large cloves garlic
2-inch piece fresh ginger root
3 scallions
1 pound sweet potato
1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine or
dry sherry
1 tablespoon low-sodium soy
sauce or tamari
1 teaspoon Worcestershire
sauce
1/2 teaspoon sugar
6 ounces ground pork
1 tablespoon canola or
grapeseed oil
Pinch crushed red pepper
flakes
bonnie.benwick@washpost.com
Bonnie S. Benwick tested this
recipe. Questions? Email her:
food@washpost.com. Have a quick
dinner recipe that works for you?
Send it along, too.
Find other quick meals with The
Post’s Recipe Finder:
washingtonpost.com/recipes
Steps
Mince enough of the garlic to
yield 1 tablespoon. Peel and
mince the ginger to yield 1 tablespoon. Separate the scallion
whites and greens; chop each.
Peel the sweet potato, and either grate it in a food processor
(cut into chunks first), cut it
into matchsticks or use a spiralizer.
Whisk together the wine or dry
FO O D
To contact us: Email:
food@washpost.com Telephone:
202-334-7575 Mail: The
Washington Post, Food, 1301 K St.
NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
sherry, the soy sauce or tamari,
the Worcestershire sauce and
sugar in a medium bowl. Add
the pork and stir with a fork to
incorporate.
Heat a wok or large, wellseasoned cast-iron skillet over
high heat. Drizzle in the oil so
that it coats the sides of the wok.
Working quickly, add the garlic,
ginger and scallion whites; stirfry for 5 seconds, then add the
pork mixture and crushed red
pepper flakes. Stir-fry for 3 to 4
minutes, until the pork is
cooked through.
Add the sweet potato; stir-fry
for about 6 minutes and try to
create some crisped edges on it,
if possible. Some of the sweet
potato pieces will still be somewhat firm. Remove from the
heat.
Divide among individual bowls.
Garnish each portion with the
scallion greens. Serve hot.
Nutrition | Per serving: 350 calories, 13 g
protein, 35 g carbohydrates, 17 g fat, 5 g
saturated fat, 40 mg cholesterol, 360 mg
sodium, 5 g dietary fiber, 8 g sugar
Sale Ends 10-24-17
Polenta and grits
are not exactly the
same. But they are
close cousins,
both made from
medium- to
Ellie
coarsely ground
Krieger
corn that cooks
into a creamy,
NOURISH
satisfying bed for
a saucy entree.
One of the pairings for the
cornmeal porridge is as iconic as
“milk and cookies” and “peanut
butter and jelly” — namely,
shrimp and grits. Once I get that
duo on my mind, I can’t seem to
think of anything else. This time,
while dreaming of a dinner of
comforting cornmeal topped
with shrimp in a creamy baconflecked sauce, I started imagining
it through a Mediterranean lens.
Approaching the flavors and
textures from that direction —
with olive oil, tomatoes and
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2 ounces chopped/diced
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11/4 pounds large, peeled and
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1 tablespoon olive oil
1 medium onion, diced (1 cup)
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11/2 teaspoons chopped fresh
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1/4 teaspoon freshly ground
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Pinch crushed red pepper
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11/2 to 2 teaspoons cornstarch
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1 cup water (may substitute fish
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1/2 cup whole milk
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shellfish so well. Then the shrimp
are cooked nearly through, and
transferred to a plate. The sauce,
made in the same skillet, starts
with onion, garlic and thyme and
is finished with a sprinkle of
cornstarch, a can of tomatoes,
water (or fish stock) and whole
milk.
After simmering a bit, the
mixture thickens into a lightly
creamy tomato sauce, and the
shrimp and pancetta are
returned to heat through and
finish cooking. Served over the
fragrant, smooth polenta, it
makes for an Italian-style
shrimp-and-grits dish that hits
the spot.
food@washpost.com
Krieger is a registered dietitian,
nutritionist and author who hosts
public television’s “Ellie’s Real Good
Food.” She blogs and offers a weekly
newsletter at www.elliekrieger.com.
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Steps
Cook the polenta according to
the package directions, using
1/ teaspoon of the salt in the
4
cooking water. Once that’s done,
stir in the butter until it has
melted, and cover to keep the
polenta warm as you prepare
the shrimp. (The yield is about
4 cups.) Bring about a cup of
water to a boil in a kettle to add
to the polenta later, as needed.
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herbs instead of cheese and
cream — lends itself naturally to
a more healthful yet still
profoundly satisfying dinner. It’s
easy to make as well.
First, you cook the polenta in a
pot according to the package
directions. A quick version can be
done in just a few minutes, while
regular polenta can take about 40
minutes to cook. Then it is
treated to a light touch of butter
and kept covered, off the heat,
while the shrimp is prepared.
The polenta will thicken as it sits
but it will quickly become creamy
and smooth again with some hot
water stirred in just before
serving.
The shrimp and sauce that
gets ladled over it is an easy, onepan situation. It starts with a bit
of diced pancetta (Italian bacon)
— just enough to imbue the dish
with that craveable, smoky-pork
essence that complements
Cab. • Chard. • Merlot
Genetin Pouilly Fume
17.99
Colline St. Jean Vacqueyras... 17.99
Jean Reverdy Sancerre ........... 16.99
Villa Medoro Montepulciano 14.99
Borsao Tres Picos Garnacha..... 14.99
Grand Veneur “Champauvins”.... 13.99
Chateau Desclau Bordeaux 12.99
Campo Viejo Reserva................ 9.99
Banfi Chianti Classico .................. 9.49
Nobilo Sauvignon Blanc
8.99
Segries Cotes Du Rhone ............. 8.99
Bernier Chardonnay
8.99
Trivento Malbec Reserve............. 6.99
Casillero del Diablo.................. 6.99
Scotch
~ 1.75 Spirits ~
13.99
~ Global Values ~
Dewar’s 12 Yr
1.75
LTR
Recipe tested by Joe Yonan; email
questions to food@washpost.com
From registered nutritionist
and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.
B&G Reserves
Red Blend
Bourgogne Rouge
Cabernet • Chardonnay
Up To $36 Mail In Rebate
Rhiannon
Ecard
Clos Du Bois
LA CREMA
Nutrition | Per serving: 240 calories, 9 g
protein, 26 g carbohydrates, 14 g fat, 0 g
saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 370 mg
sodium, 5 g dietary fiber, 10 g sugar
4 to 5 servings, Healthy
Customer App
reciation
Tastings: Fri 4-7
Sat 11-2 & 3-6
202-686-5271
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Alex. Valley Cab. 15.99
R. River P. Noir 14.99
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Charlotte’s Home S.B. 10.99
Polenta and Shrimp
With Creamy Tomato
Sauce
Look for additional promotional discounts
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7.49
Polenta in a supporting role for shrimp
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A sweet,
seasonal
take on a
stir-fry
750
ML
Steps
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
Discard the loose outer layers
of papery peel from the head of
garlic, then cut it in half horizontally and drizzle each half
with the oil. Wrap each half in a
small piece of aluminum foil,
place on a small baking sheet
and roast (middle rack) until
the cloves are very tender and
caramel-colored, 40 to 50 minutes. Unwrap and let cool, then
pick or squeeze out each roasted clove and discard the skins.
Combine the broth and the
cauliflower in a large saucepan
over medium-high heat. Once
the liquid comes to a boil,
reduce the heat to mediumlow, so it’s barely bubbling.
Cook until you can easily mash
the cauliflower against the side
of the pot with a wooden
spoon. Remove from the heat,
then add the roasted garlic
cloves and 1/2 cup of the cashews. Chop the remaining
1/ cup of cashews and reserve
4
for the garnish.
Use an immersion (stick)
blender to puree the soup until
smooth. It will be fairly thick.
(Alternatively, you can puree
the soup in batches in a blender, being careful to not fill it
more than halfway to avoid
splatters.)
Wipe out the saucepan, and
return the pureed soup to it,
over medium-low heat. Stir in
the salt and pepper; cook until
the flavors meld, about 15 minutes. Taste, and adjust the seasoning, as needed.
To serve, divide the soup
among individual bowls. Top
each portion with the chopped
cashews, a drizzle of the basil
oil and pea shoots, if using.
Scatter the pancetta in a large
nonstick skillet over medium
heat; cook for about 2 minutes,
or until browned and crisped.
Add the shrimp and cook for 2
to 3 minutes, until it has just
turned pink on the outside but
is not quite cooked through.
Transfer the shrimp and pancetta to a plate.
Heat the oil in the same pan
(medium heat). Once the oil
shimmers, add the onion and
cook for 3 minutes, stirring,
until translucent, then stir in
the garlic, thyme, the remaining
1/ teaspoon salt, the black pep4
per and crushed red pepper
flakes; cook for 30 seconds.
Sprinkle the cornstarch (as
needed) over the onion mixture
and stir until incorporated. Add
the tomatoes with their juices,
the water and milk. Increase the
heat to medium-high; cook for
about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally, to form a slightly thickened sauce.
Return the shrimp and pancetta
to the pan; cook for about a
minute, or until warmed
through and the shrimp is
cooked through.
If the polenta has thickened/
firmed up too much in the interim, stir in the reserved boiling
water, a few tablespoons at a
time, to make it smooth and soft
again. Divide among individual
plates and top each portion
with the shrimp mixture. Serve
warm.
Nutrition | Per serving (based on 5): 350
calories, 29 g protein, 35 g carbohydrates,
10 g fat, 4 g saturated fat, 200 mg
cholesterol, 470 mg sodium, 3 g dietary
fiber, 5 g sugar
Recipe tested by Johnna French; email
questions to food@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E3
EE
RECOMMENDATIONS
Exceptional
Very Good
Excellent
As the weather turns cool and
night falls early, we prepare to
exorcise our demons by dressing
in scary costumes and gorging on
cheap candy. Why not enjoy some
scary good wines, too? Here are
four appropriate for Halloween.
— D.M.
GREAT VALUE
Bodegas Tobia “Daimon” 2015
Rioja, Spain, $16
This devilish blend of garnacha
(the Spanish name for grenache)
and tempranillo is savory and rich
with dark fruit flavors and a
haunting finish that won’t leave
you alone. Alcohol by volume:
14.5 percent.
Distributed by DMV: Available in the District
at Paul’s of Chevy Chase, Yes! Organic
Market (various locations). Available in
Maryland at 5 O’clock Wines & Spirits in
Owings Mills; Beers & Cheers in
Germantown; Dunkirk Wine & Spirits;
Franklin Liquors in Ijamsville; Franklin’s
Restaurant, Brewery and General Store
and Yes! Organic Market in Hyattsville; the
Italian Market in Annapolis; Liquor Pump in
Parkville; Old Farm Liquors in Frederick;
Parkway Deli & Restaurant in Silver Spring;
Pine Liquors in Fort Washington; the
Winery in Chester; Wine Source in
Baltimore; Town Center Market in Riverdale
Park.
JOHN G. MABANGLO/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
The entrance sign to Nicholson Ranch vineyards, which was heavily damaged by fires in Sonoma,
Calif., is charred. “The fire may kill the current foliage but rarely the vine itself,” one viticulturist said.
People, not vines, suffer in California
As I write this,
less than 48 hours
after the first
alarms sounded
of wildfires in
California wine
Wine
country, it is
impossible to
DAVE
estimate the
MCINTYRE
impact of this
catastrophe. Fires
are still spreading, people are
still fleeing their homes and
desperately trying to protect
their families, pets and
livelihoods. When the flames
subside, we may have a clearer
picture of the devastation to
cities, neighborhoods, vineyards
and wineries. And it could be
jaw-droppingly bad.
If you’ve ever visited Napa or
Sonoma counties, you know
someone affected by this
disaster. Maybe you have friends
or family there, or a favorite
winery you visit and order wine
from every time you’re in the
area. Perhaps you remember
that cheerful woman who
poured you a taste at Signorello
winery in Napa’s Stags Leap
District or at Paradise Ridge
Winery near Santa Rosa, where
you lingered to watch the sun
set into the Pacific in the
distance. Perhaps that waiter
who so enthusiastically
explained the daily specials and
the wonderful zinfandel
available by the glass at Willi’s
Wine Bar. Signorello, Paradise
Ridge and Willi’s are gone, as
are many more of our favorite
places to stay, visit or taste.
On the second morning — last
Tuesday — I heard a report on
NPR by a KQED reporter who
visited the Atlas Peak area of
Napa County, where the first
fires broke out late on the
evening of Oct. 8. She spoke of
million-dollar homes consumed,
“Bentleys burned to their metal
frames,” and an infinity pool
“cracked by the intense heat of
the flames.” I shouted at my
radio: What about the winery
workers who live in the valley, or
the migrant laborers who came
north for the harvest? A mobile
home retirement community in
Santa Rosa was destroyed, as
were several stores and fast-food
restaurants. The charred hulks
of cars in the news photos were
Corollas and Civics, not
Bentleys. At those hotels that
burned down, the Hilton and
the Fountaingrove Inn — rich
people didn’t stay or work there.
This is a calamity for everyone,
not just the wealthy.
And fate was its usual fickle
self, leaving people to wonder
why they were spared when
their neighbors were decimated.
Adam Lee, winemaker at Siduri
winery, in an industrial park in
Santa Rosa just west of U.S.
Route 101, walked past
devastated blocks of his
neighbors’ businesses and found
his winery intact. Less than two
miles away, my cousin’s house
remained unscathed, while more
than 40 homes in her
development were burned to the
ground.
Residents rallied through
social media, posting news of
fires, road closures and shelters
opening for people and animals.
I — and many others out of
harm’s way — followed these
updates raptly, trying to sort fact
from rumor to glean news of
friends and favorite wineries.
My friend and fellow wine
writer Elaine Chukan Brown
fired off a volley of updates
about wind direction and
evacuation routes with a
journalist’s sense for reporting
facts over rumor. Because of her,
I knew exactly where I could
have taken my dogs or horses if I
needed to. Reporting these
developments was a coping
mechanism perhaps, as she
calmly evacuated her own family
and pets from their home east of
Sonoma late Monday when the
fires turned in their direction.
Through it all, Brown never
lost her sense of humor. “The
people we were going to go sky
diving with later this week had
to evacuate but did not lose
their home. Yay,” she posted on
Facebook. “Even so, we will not
be going sky diving this week.”
Early last Wednesday, as the
fires continued to spread, she
wrote: “There are times when
prayers make sense because it is
all you have. Pray.”
This was supposed to be a
column about the effects of the
fires on the wine industry in
Napa and Sonoma. And, well, it
is, because the effects will be
mainly on the people, not the
wineries burned, damaged or
spared, the grapes tainted or
scorched.
Harvest was well underway,
with only the latest-ripening
grape varieties still hanging on
the vines. These would be
mostly cabernet sauvignon and
zinfandel, so those wines from
2017 might be the most severely
affected, especially in areas
where the fires hit hardest.
(Zinfandel lovers can take
comfort that Sonoma’s Dry
Creek Valley, a prime zin region,
was not hit.)
Wineries that burned down
lost not only the 2017 wines, but
also the 2015 and 2016 vintages
of reds aging in barrels or
bottles but not yet released.
Even wineries that were spared
may see their wines affected by
smoke. Extended power outages
may also affect wines in the
cellar as they rise in
temperature. And future
vintages could be affected —
destroyed vineyards may take
several years to recover.
Vines may be more resilient
that we expect, however. Daniel
Roberts, a viticulturist based in
Sonoma County, has helped
restore four vineyards damaged
by fire in the past. “It’s hard to
kill vines,” he says. “The fire may
kill the current foliage but rarely
the vine itself.” Moisture within
the trunk of the vine helps it
stay alive even through the
stress of a fire. “You may lose a
year or two of crop, but the vines
recover,” Roberts says.
Perhaps that’s a metaphor for
the people of Napa and Sonoma.
After all, this is a story about
them.
Sinister Hand 2015/2016
Yakima Valley, Wash., $30
This Rhone-style blend of
grenache, syrah, mourvedre and
cinsault grabs your attention with
flavors of Bing cherries, black
olives and tea, then holds on
through a gripping finish. I tasted
food@washpost.com
McIntyre blogs at dmwineline.com.
On Twitter: @dmwine.
Werewolf Cabernet Sauvignon
2016
Distributed by Roanoke Valley in the
District and Virginia, by Country Vintner in
Maryland: Available in the District at Batch
13, MacArthur Beverages, Pearson’s.
Available in Maryland at Montgomery
County Liquor & Wine (Darnestown,
Kensington, Muddy Branch); on the list at
Flamant in Annapolis, Rye Street Tavern in
Baltimore. Available in Virginia at Arrowine
and Cheese in Arlington, Daily Planet in
Alexandria, Dominion Wine and Beer in
Falls Church.
Transylvania, Romania, $11
This bright, juicy cabernet is ideal
for Halloween parties, if only for
the label. (There is a pinot noir
and a chardonnay as well.) But it
could transform a meal as well;
pair it with a bloody steak and a
full moon. ABV: 13 percent.
Banshee Pinot Noir 2015
Sonoma County, Calif., $26
The Banshee screams Sonoma
pinot with its dark cherry fruit
flavors. ABV: 13.6 percent.
Distributed by Elite: Available in the District
at Central Liquors, Cork Market, Wagshal’s
Deli, Watergate Vintners & Spirits; on the
list at BlackSalt, Double Eagle Steak
House, RPM Italian. On the list in Maryland
at Pure Wine Cafe in Ellicott City. Available
in Virginia at Arrowine and Cheese and
Bistro 360 in Arlington, the Bottle Stop in
Occoquan, the Caboose Market & Cafe in
Ashland, Cheesetique and Streets Market
and Cafe in Alexandria, Libbie Market and
Richmond Wine Station in Richmond,
Norm’s Beer & Wine in Vienna, Vino Market
Distributed by DMV: Available in the District
at Paul’s of Chevy Chase. Available in
Maryland at Cranberry Liquors in
Westminster, Dulaney Wines & Spirits in
Towson, Eastport Liquors in Annapolis, Hair
o’ the Dog in Easton, Laurel Beer, Wine &
Spirits in Laurel, Liquor Pump in Parkville,
Rita’s World of Wine, Beer & Spirits and
Sisters in Berlin, Village Pump Liquors in
College Park.
Availability information is based on
distributor records. Wines might not
be in stock at every listed store and
might be sold at additional stores.
Prices are approximate. Check
Winesearcher.com to verify
availability, or ask a favorite wine
store to order through a distributor.
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9.99 lb.
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ROBYN BECK/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
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Heat from wildfires in Santa Rosa, Calif., damaged grape vines,
and wines aging in barrels or bottles could be affected as well.
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
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Martell VSOP .........................................29.99
Martell Blue Swift..................................39.99
Remy Martin VSOP..............................35.99
Remy Martin 1738 ..............................49.99
Liqueur Sale
Baileys Irish Cream ................................24.99
Cointreau ..............................................34.99
Disaronno Amaretto.............................24.99
Domaine Canton • B&B .................31.99
Frangelico • St. Germain...............27.99
Grand Marnier • Drambuie ..........31.99
Kahlua ....................................................17.99
3, 4 & 5 Liter Sale
Almaden All Types................... 5 LTR .......15.99
Black Box Reb $5=12.99 ............ 3 LTR .......17.99
Carlo Rossi ............................. 4 LTR .......13.99
Franzia All Types ...................... 5 LTR .......15.99
4339 Connecticut Ave. NW ★ Adjacent to Van Ness Metro Stop
202-966-4400 | Wineline: 202-966-0445
calvertwoodley.com | wine@calvertwoodley.com
Hours: M-F 10-8:30 • Sat 9:30-8:30 • Sunday 10:30-5:00
Sale Thru Sunday 10/22/17
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Craft Beer Sale
Almanac Vanilla Cherry Dogpatch...375Ml..... 9.99
Charm City Raspberry Coconut Mead...4pk Cans ...10.99
Goose Island Festbier • Summertime Kolsch ...6pk ..... 8.99
Hardywood The Great Return IPA (16oz)...4pk Cans ...10.99
Left Coast Voodoo Stout ...................22oz ..... 5.99
Old Ox Hoppy Place IPA • Black Ox...6pk Cans... 10.99
Oliver Staring at the Sun ..............6pk Cans ..... 9.99
Ommegang Fruition .................6pk... 11.99
Oskar Blues Dale's Pale Ale • Canundrum....12pk Cans ...17.99
Perennial Owen .........................750Ml ...14.99
Schlafly Hop Toddy .....................750Ml ...11.99
Starr Hill Northern Lights • Grateful Pale Ale ..6pk ..... 9.99
Tastings: Thurs 4-7pm: Brewery Ommegang,
Sat 12-3pm: Almanac, 3-6pm: Old Ox Brewery
Case Beer Sale
- 12 OZ. CANS Natural Light.......................... 18pk ......... 9.99
Busch Reg • Light ................... 30pk .......14.99
Bud Reg • Light • Miller Lite............. 15.99
Yuengling Reg • Light • Coors Light...15.99
Natural Light ......................... 30pk .......15.99
Stella Artois .................................. 27.99
12 OZ. BOTTLES
Yuengling Lager • Miller Lite ...........20.99
Beck’s Regular ........................................24.99
Heineken Reg • Amstel ....................25.99
Bass Ale • St. Pauli Girl Reg • Michelob Ultra ...25.99
Redhook Long Hammer IPA • ESB ........25.99
Dos Equis Amber• Lager • Corona Extra • Light .... 26.99
Hoegaarden • Spaten • Leffe Blonde • Brown ...27.99
Goose Island • Stella Artois ........27.99
Newcastle • Peroni • Urquell......29.99
Modelo Especial • Negra .......................30.99
Devils Backbone Lager • IPA • Blue Moon ... 31.99
1.5 Liter Magnum Sale
Beringer Founders'...........................12.99
Cavit..................................................... 9.88
Citra .......................................................... 8.99
Concha y Toro ....................................... 7.49
Corbett Canyon ................................... 7.49
Fetzer......................................................10.99
Folonari ................................................... 9.99
La Vieille Ferme .................................10.99
Lindeman’s Bins ................................... 8.49
Mondavi Reb 6 Bot $10 .............................. 9.49
Stone Cellars ......................................... 8.99
Vendange.......................................... 5.99
Walnut Crest ......................................... 7.49
Yellow Tail Rebate up to $18 ...................... 8.99
Champagne & Sparkling Sale
Henri Abele Brut • Brut Rosé ...............29.99
Laurent Perrier Brut ...........................35.99
Moët Imperial • Roederer Brut..........39.99
Piper Heidsieck Brut ..........................37.99
Taittinger Brut ......................................38.99
Veuve Clicquot Brut ...........................45.99
Chandon Brut • Rosé • Blanc de Noirs...17.99
Domaine Carneros Brut ...................26.99
Gloria Ferrer Brut • Blanc de Noirs.....15.99
Corte Giona Prosecco Extra Dry............. 9.99
Valdo Prosecco Brut Rebate Up to $15 Reb ...10.99
Valdo Oro Puro Prosecco Brut.................16.99
Zardetto Prosecco .................................10.99
E4
MG
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
Michelin’s Bib Gourmands list overlooks D.C.’s true great-bargain restaurants
MICHELIN FROM E1
company only started publishing
dining guides in the United
States in 2005, when it rolled out
a little red book for New York
City. In the past dozen years,
Michelin has already stopped
publishing guides in Los Angeles
and Las Vegas, ostensibly because the Great Recession put the
brakes on such profligate spending, though Jonathan Gold, the
Pulitzer Prize-winning critic for
the Los Angeles Times, suggested
another theory to The Washington Post last year:
“In their two editions here, the
Michelin ratings seemed uniquely ill-suited to evaluating Los
Angeles restaurants, which tend
to aspire to different things than
the restaurants in Paris. Some of
our most imaginative chefs use
the same farmers market ingredients, top-rank seafood and sustainably raised meat as the expense account restaurants but
put their creations on tortillas
instead of fine china and serve it
from the backs of trucks. Others
serve brilliant-tasting menus in
barely converted mini-mall pizzerias, in the back of convenience
stores or in untranslated Chinese.”
Gold, I think, gets to the heart
of the issue about Michelin in
America: Our dining culture is
more relaxed, more multicultural
and informal, and that trend has
only accelerated as Gen Xers and
millennials have taken over local
restaurant scenes once run by
baby boomers who still had a Rat
Pack-era mentality about fine
dining, one so Frenchified it
smelled of butter and black truffles.
In its first D.C. guide, Michelin
seemed to make some accommodations to the American style of
dining (while also awarding stars
to air-pinky palaces, such as
Plume). Rose’s Luxury, chef Aaron Silverman’s Barracks Row restaurant with the mismatched
plateware and the quirky, personalized wait staff, earned a
star.
So did Tail Up Goat in Adams
DAYNA SMITH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
At 2 Amys pizzeria in Northwest Washington, visitors can order a beer and a Neapolitan pizza for
under $20. The restaurant made the Bib Gourmand list for Washington’s 2018 Michelin Guide.
RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
To stay under the $40 limit of the Bib Gourmands at pasta house
Sfoglina, you wouldn’t actually be able to order pasta.
Morgan, a modern Greek restaurant with tables sans linens and
chairs that look like they were
swiped from study hall.
But Michelin has made few, if
any, accommodations with its
Bib Gourmands, which seems
less a cheap-eats category than a
minor-league system for those
polished restaurants that haven’t
quite made the jump to the Bigs.
Worse, most — and I do mean
most — of the 22 Bib Gourmand
restaurants on this year’s list
would be compromised if a diner
were forced to cobble together
4/$5.00
$14.88
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6oz
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Premium
Hearts of Palm
14oz
$1.69
Marinated
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Leaves
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23oz
$7.99
17.6oz
ImportedfromHolland
8Ct
4.4oz
$3.99
10Ct
Pts
Couscous and
Rice Pilafs
1L
STONEFIRE
Naan
Flatbreads $1.99
BIGELOW
2/$5.00
Clementines
3LbBag................ $5.49 Ea
Cranberries
12Oz.....................$1.99 Ea
RomeApples................ 99¢ Lb
Pineapples...............$1.99 Ea
AnjouPears............. $1.39 Lb
$2.49
Not at White Flint
Sale Dates 10-18 thru 10-31-2017
MiniSeedlees
Cucumber6Pk...... $2.29 Ea
RedorYellowPeppers... $1.59 Lb
GreenBeans................. 89¢ Lb
Tomatoes................. $1.09 Lb
BabyRedPotatoes
3Lb........................ $2.59 Ea
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4/$5.00
12oz
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ALL WINES 750 ML
UNLESS NOTED
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Chamisal Unoaked Chard.............$9.99
7 Moons ..........................................$7.99
Chat. St. Michelle PG,SB,Chard....$8.99
Estancia Chard...............................$8.99
Cab & PN......................................$10.99
Black Box 3.0L BoxAsstTypes....$14.99
Mulderbosch Rose &
Chenin Blanc $8.99 SB.............$11.99
Toad Hollow Unoaked Chard.......$9.99
Latour Ardeche Chard.................$7.99
Pouilly Fuisse ............................$16.99
Marsannay .................................$19.99
Ferrari Carano ReserveChard....$27.99
Sierra Nevada & New Belgium,
Sam Adams 6 Pack $9.99 Case..................$34.99
Stella, Heineken & Heineken Light 12Pack....$17.99
Stella, Corona, Corona Light,
Heineken & Amstel Loose Case..................$27.99
Yuengling suitcase Can $17.99 Bottles....$20.99
Beck’s 16oz Can Case...........................................$21.99
*Certain 6 Pack/Case do not apply*
5100 WISCONSIN AVE., NW
4/$5.00
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Imported
TreatSizePacks
9.5oz
Bud, Bud Light, Miller Lite, 24 Pack Cans
Coors Light, MGD, Rolling
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Rock, & Michelob Ultra
$1.99
DC WINE & BEER SPECIALS
DC BEER SPECIALS
Eggenberg, Goose Island, Leffe & Hoegaarden
6 Pack $8.99 Case............................................$29.99
Kronenbourg 1664, Carlsberg, Carlsberg
Elephant, Pilsner Urquell, Peroni, Redhook
6 Pack $8.99 Case............................................$29.99
Hofbrau, Paulaner, Starr Hill, Bold Rock Ciders,
Jacks Ciders, 6 Pack $9.99 Case................$34.99
21st Amendment, Founders, SweetWater
15 Pack Can...........................................................$17.99
Dinkel Acker Pils/Oktoberfest, Bitburger German
Pils, Kostritzer Schwarzbier, Benedictiner Helles
16oz Can Case $27.99 4 Pack...........................$6.99
Kirin Ichiban, Sapporo 12 Pack.....................$11.99
4/$5.00
HARIBO
Gold Bears
25% Off
PRODUCE SPECIALS
AssortedTypes|8.8oz
17.6oz
$14.88
3/$5.00
14oz
Italian Tomatoes – Organic Balsamic
Crushed or Diced
Vinegar
Caseof 12 1L
AssortedVarieties
5/7 Ct Artichoke
Hearts
$7.99
Quincy...........................................$12.99
Ravenswood “Vintners Blend”
Asst Types.......................................$6.99
Casillero del Diablo AsstTypes...$6.99
A by Acacia Chard.........................$6.99
Dona Paula Estate Malbec...........$8.99
Josh Chard & SB...............................$9.99
Charles Smith VelvetDevilMerlot....$8.99
Ruffino PG.......................................$5.99
Decoy Cab $14.99 Merlot.......$13.99
Gnarly Head Zinf .........................$7.99
Bolla PG & PN 1.5L..........................$8.99
Mezzacorona PG...........................$6.99
Dead Bo L Red Blend.....................$5.99
Castle Rock Calif. PN.....................$6.99
Caceres Red.................................$10.99
White & Rose $7.99 Reserve...$15.99
RHONE WINE SALE
Kermit Lynch CDRR......................$9.99
Cosme CDR...................................$10.99
Cosme Gigondas..........................$25.99
Janasse CDR Res.........................$13.99
Ferraton CDRR................................$7.99
Berthet Rayne CDRR...................$9.99
CNP...............................................$29.99
Delas CDRR & Viognier...................$8.99
Guigal CDRR.................................$11.99
NEW ZEALAND SAUVIGNON BLANC SALE
Matua ..............................................$8.99 Monkey Bay ..................................$5.99
Mohua ..........................................$10.99 Brancott..........................................$7.99
Kim Crawford............................$10.99 Cloudy Bay .................................$19.99
Nobilo ..............................................$8.99 Kono ..............................................$10.99
Icon...............................................$12.99 Starborough..................................$8.99
Drylands ......................................$11.99 Villa Maria ....................................$9.99
CHAMPAGNE & SPARKLING SALE
Veuve Clicquot ..........................$45.99 Roederer Estate..........................$18.99
Moet Imperial..............................$39.99 Montelliana Prosecco.................$8.99
GH Mumm
Ruffino & Mionetto Prosecco...$9.99
Cordon Rouge...............................$33.99 Lamarca Prosecco.......................$11.99
Perrier Jouet .............................$37.99 Biutiful Asst Types........................$9.99
Trouillard ....................................$23.99 Cristalino Brut & Segura Viudas...$6.99
Laurent Perrier.........................$35.99 Campo Viejo Brut.........................$7.99
RODMAN’S FOOD &
DRUG STORE
What’s a good coffee
grinder for a tiny space?
Wednesdays at noon, we field
questions about all things food
for
one
hour
at
live.
washingtonpost.com. Here are
edited excerpts from that chat.
Recipes whose names are capitalized can be found in our Recipe
Finder at washingtonpost.com/
recipes.
Q: What is your favorite small
coffee grinder? I have a tiny
apartment kitchen with no counter space.
A: I recently bought the Hario
Mini Mill hand grinder. It’s slim,
easy to use, and it produces
uniform coffee grounds, which is
what you want. (When some
grounds are large and some
small, you get an uneven extraction.) Best of all, it’s only about
$30, much cheaper than an electric burr grinder.
— Tim Carman
Q: I have three spaghetti
squash; can you suggest some
off-the-cuff creative ideas for
how to use this beyond subbing it
as “noodles” with pesto or tomato sauce?
A: Maybe use the “noodles” in
Chat. St. Michelle
Indian Wells Cab & Merlot..........$13.99
Antinori Bianco $9.99 Rosso...$15.99
Apothic Red....................................$8.99
Chapoutier Belleruche CDR..........$9.99
Perrin Red, White, Rose..................$7.99
Villages $9.99 CNP.................$32.99
Brunel CDR...................................$10.99
Coudoulet de Beaucastel .....$22.99
Grand Veneur............................$11.99
Thomas CNP................................$19.99
Alain Jaume
Vacqueyras...................................$19.99
“Like” us on
• WHEATON, MD
4301 RANDOLPH RD (AT VEIRS MILL RD)
PHONE 301.946.3100
tim.carman@washpost.com
Tea
Assorted
Types
20Ct
CENTO
1L
Natural
Ice Cream
Fabulous Flavors The Leading Name
Witch Hazel
All
$3.99
Water
NEAR EAST Spring
ImportedFromFrance
$5.99
$2.99
Assorted
Types
10oz
the property outright, so no rent
to pay, no [community area
maintenance] charges, which relieve an enormous burden. They
are also multigenerational in
terms of who works there: Dad
on the floor, Mom in the kitchen,
kids helping out, and not to
overly fantasize about other people’s lives in the restaurant business, but they have a pretty good
life and don’t seem to be driven
by ideas of owning a minirestaurant empire. . . . In much of
our country, those types of places
have become chain restaurants.”
TWINING’S
Hummus
“Robusto” Extra
Virgin Olive Oil
VOLVIC
GIFFORD’S
OF MAINE
32oz
(WisconsinAveOnly)
LANTANA
$2.99 2/$5.00 $2.99
8oz
Non-DairyExcluded
$4.99
For Keurig
Brewing Systems
2/$3.00
99¢
Ice Cream
2/$5.00
PEET’S K-CUPS
Holland Rusks
$6.99
AssortedTypes|18-20Ct
Jumbo Stroopwafels
$1.79
$1.99
7oz
2/$4.00
DAELMAN’S
Panko
Breadcrumbs
Extra Virgin Olive Oil
Mild & Buttery, Rich &
Robust, or Everyday
Teas
10oz
Extra Fine Green
Flageolets
14.1oz
$3.99
Authentic Indian
“Heat & Eat” Entrees
$4.99
5oz
10.5oz
KITCHENS OF INDIA
$2.99
Crisp Toasts Parchment
Wrapped
& Crème
Cheese
Filled Wafers AssortedTypes
Italian Toast
Sherry Wine Vinegar
“Le Puy” Lentils
17.6oz
17oz
$2.99
25.4oz
BAUDUCCO CABOT
Bruschetta
DON BRUNO
French Dried
Green Lentils
CALIFORNIA
OLIVE RANCH
500Ml
5oz
San Remo Pesto
$2.19
Fancy
Nonpareille
Capers
16oz
220G
$2.99
Pre-cut
Hearts of Palm
14oz
AssortedTypes
$40 threshold benefit? Mostly
Michelin, which can honor deserving restaurants in a category
that’s not becoming to most of
them.
Chef Peter Pastan, the mastermind behind 2 Amys, has been to
a few Bib Gourmand restaurants
in Italy, and he’s noticed a difference between the Bibs in the Old
World vs. those in the New World.
He offered these thoughts about
Italian Bibs via email:
“Of the few I’d been to, they are
family places in every possible
way. I assume the family owns
BELLINO BEN & JERRY’S
Gourmet Flavored
Pumpkin Seeds
French Olives –
two courses with a glass of wine
(or dessert) for $40.
For starters, you wouldn’t have
the budget to enjoy a pasta at
Sfoglina, Fabio and Maria Trabocchi’s restaurant in Van Ness.
Need I remind you Sfoglina is a
pasta house?
At Doi Moi, you’d probably
have to skip the entrees.
At Jaleo, you’d be forced to
stop eating after two or three
small plates, no matter how hungry you still were.
And so on.
So whom does this arbitrary
G�
EVIAN
F
,
W, Natural Spring
B
Water
M
1L
~~~~
O
E Caseof 12
D�!
DISCOUNT GOURMET
Marinated
Artichoke Hearts
Baan Thai is one of Washington’s true bargain restaurants, a place
that puts a premium on technique, ingredients and authentic flavor.
Yet there are such family-run
places in Washington. They’re
just harder to find. They’re
tucked into strip centers or lonely corridors, sometimes run by
folks who speak English as a
second language and who struggle from month to month, because they are paying rents and
other fees.
These are the true bargain
restaurants in Washington, the
real Bib Gourmands.
They are spots that place a
premium on cooking techniques,
good ingredients and authentic
flavors, regardless of what kind
of atmosphere they provide for
diners or what kind of surly
server sidles up to the table.
Restaurants like Baan Thai on
14th Street NW, El Sol Restaurante & Tequileria on 11th Street NW,
Federalist Pig in Adams Morgan,
Mi Cuba Cafe in Columbia
Heights and many more. (There
are tons more in the D.C. suburbs, of course, but Michelin
remains firmly rooted in the
District at this point.)
The tire company, in other
words, needs to see cheap eats
through the eyes of the average
American, not from under the
nose of a Michelin inspector who
clearly values pampering as
much as a well-prepared meal.
FREE PARKING
AT ALL LOCATIONS
SALE DATES
10/18/17 THRU 10/31/17
• WHITE FLINT PLAZA
IMAGES SHOWN ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION
Follow Us 5148 NICHOLSON LA. N. KENSINGTON, MD PURPOSES ONLY. ACTUAL PRODUCTS
MAY DIFFER - NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR
@rodmansdc
TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
PHONE 301.881.6253
a fritter or latke? Something like
the Summer Squash Fritters
With Buttermilk Dressing or
Zucchini-Potato Latkes.
— Kara Elder
Q: I am cooking a pot of
Rancho Gordo cranberry beans
in the slow cooker right now.
What would you do with them
when they are ready?
A: Ah, these are the best. If
you’ve never had them before, I’d
say eat some of them with just a
glug of olive oil and salt, with lots
of the bean liquid for broth. Then
drain some (save the liquid!) and
make tacos with some of your
favorite other ingredients: thinly
sliced cabbage for crunch, maybe
some potatoes, cilantro if you
like it, salsa. Then turn some into
soup, just pureeing with more of
that broth and seasoning how
you like, and topping with fried
tortilla strips, chunks of avocado,
maybe feta. Then finish the rest
by pureeing it thicker into a bean
dip, with caramelized onions,
roasted garlic, smoked paprika.
That should do it. A zillion other
options, of course, too.
MARYLAND
WINE & BEER
SPECIALS
BLOCKBUSTERS
— Joe Yonan
WINES ARE 750ML UNLESS NOTED
WINE & CHEESE TASTING EVERY
SATURDAY 1- 4 PM AT ALL STORES
SALES DATES 10-18 THRU 10-31-2017
NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
BEER SALE
Peter Vella 5.0L Box Delicious Red & Blush.......... $12.99 Miller Lite & MGD
Chalis & Burg............................................... $14.99
30 Pack ................ $24.99
Kendall Jackson Chard...................................... $11.99 Coors Light
Apothic Red & White...........................................$9.59
18 Pack Can .......... $14.99
Sutter Home White Zinf & Moscato.......................$5.55 Budweiser Reg & Light
30 Pack ................ $24.99
AMERICAN WINE SALE
CK Mondavi 1.5L Asst Types ................................$9.99 Michelob Reg, Light, Ultra
12 Pack Bottle ....... $12.99
Fetzer Chard, Cab, Merlot....................................$6.99
BV Coastal Chard, Cab, Merlot .............................$7.99 Heineken Reg & Light, Amstel
12 Pack Bottle ....... $14.99
Mirassou Chard, Cab, Merlot, PN .........................$8.99
Chat. St. Michelle Chard................ $8.99 Cab .... $11.99 Stella Artois 12 Pack
Bottle.................... $16.49
Sterling “Vintners Collection” Chard................ $10.99
Cab & Merlot............................................ $11.99 Corona Extra & Light
18 Pack Bottle ....... $21.59
FRENCH WINE SALE
Tecate Reg & Light
La Vieille Ferme Red, White, Rose ........................$8.59
12 Pack Can .......... $10.99
Charles Thomas CDR Red & White.........................$8.99 Dos Equis Amber, Special Lager
Vaugelas Corbieres ............................................$9.99
12 Pack Bottle ....... $12.99
Dom. Bellevue Touraine SB & Rose ..................... $11.59 Woodchuck Cider Asst Types
Jadot Beaujolais Villages.... $10.99 Macon Villages .... $11.99
6 Pack Bottle ...........$7.99
SOUTH AMERICAN WINE SALE
CRAFT BEER 6PK & 12PK SALE
Cousino Macul Chard, Cab, Merlot........................$7.99 Sam Adams Asst Types
Alamos Chard & Malbec......................................$8.49
12 Pack Bottle ....... $15.99
Coliman Malbec .................................................$6.99 Flying Dog Bloodline,
Gascon Malbec ................................................ $10.99 The Truth, Raging IPA
Concha y Toro 1.5L Asst Types..............................$7.99
6 Pack Bottle ...........$9.49
Goose Island Asst Types
Our Maryland Locations
6 Pack Bottle ...........$8.49
• 4301 Randolph Rd, Wheaton MD, 301-946-3100 Shiner Asst Types
• 5148 Nicholson Ln, Kensington MD, 301-881-6253 6 Pack Bottle ...........$6.99
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MG
E5
EE
YOUR HAUNTING HEADQUARTERS
Apothic Red
California. 750ml
$7.97
7 97
Witching Hour Red
Blend
19 Crimes Red Blend
Australia. 750ml
$7.99
7 99
California. 750ml
$7.99
7 99
Kendall Jackson
Vintner’s Reserve
Chardonnay
California 750ml
California.
$9.97
Melodramatic
Darkness Red Blend
Kim Crawford
Sauvignon Blanc
California. 750ml
New Zealand. 750ml
$9.99
9 99
Radius Red Blend
Hob Nob Red Blend
Washington. 750ml
France. 750ml
$10.99
10 99
$10.97
10 97
$10.99
10 99
Over 3,000 Spirits
Mr. Stacks Pumpkin
Spice
750ml
$8.99
Veil Pumpkin Vodka
Espolon Silver
750ml
750ml
$11.99
Tito’s Handmade
Vodka
$23.49
1.75L
$28.99
Tanqueray Gin
Jack Daniel’s Black
Crystal Head Vodka
1.75L
1.75L
750ml
$31.99
$37.99
Johnnie Walker Black
1.75L
$44.99
$59.99
Over 2,500 Beers
12-11.2oz btls
$9.99
$10.99
WINER
RY DIR
REC
CT® WIN
NE SAV
VINGS COUP
PON | Valid 10/18/2017 - 10/25/2017
SAVE 10%
SAVE 15%
Ballast Point
Pumpkin Down
6-12oz btls
$10.99
ONLINE CODE 5408
Stella Artois
12-11.2oz btls
$13.99
Corona Extra,
Corona Light
24-12oz loose btls
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E6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
Go beyond the pumpkin spice with these 5 fall ingredients
FALL FROM E1
My favorite fall recipes straddle
this sense of in-between:
Apples: My take includes warm
wedges cooked in brown butter that
can veer savory with sage or sweet
with brown sugar. You can serve the
savory ones alongside roast chicken
or pork chops, or on toast that you’ve
slathered with goat cheese or ricotta.
The sweet ones can be offered in the
morning to make usual oatmeal less
usual, or for dessert over ice cream.
But for days when fall doesn’t quite
feel like fall, you can do the cold,
crunchy apple salad with fish sauce
and cilantro, a nod to Southeast Asian
green mango salad. A fall fruit that
can be dressed in warm weather
clothing, an apple is a versatile thing.
Use crisp, firm apples for all these
preparations.
Butternut squash, or any winter
squash for that matter, offers similar
versatility. You can grate the flesh and
mix it with Parmesan, thyme, a bit of
flour and egg, and fry the mixture
into irresistible fritters that are perfect to serve with cocktails at your
next dinner party. You can even tuck
the fritters into warm flatbread that
you’ve spread with yogurt and top
with some cucumbers and salad
greens for a delightful vegetarian
sandwich. While it’s delicious made
crisp, squash is also wonderful rendered soft. Try it in a simple, creamy
soup spiked with pimenton (smoked
Spanish paprika) or pureed into a
mash with a bit of saffron. Serve the
mash as a side dish for nearly anything, including — but not limited to
— braised lamb, roasted salmon or
chicken thighs.
Brussels sprouts can also take on
so many forms and lend themselves
well to strong flavors. One of my
favorite techniques includes mustard
in three forms: mustard seeds that
add crunch and pop (these are optional, but do try them if you can find
them); Dijon mustard, creamy but
sharp; and grainy mustard, sort of a
cross between the first two. Combined, they transform plain roasted
sprouts into a side dish with an
incredible depth of flavor. Serve with
bratwurst or roast pork loin. Or peel
the leaves off each sprout, roast
quickly and top with salty pecorino
cheese and bright lemon juice. These
are incredibly good and can be served
on their own as a snack (like kale
chips, but better) or as a side dish. You
could even toss them with cooked
pasta and call it a day. Or you can skip
cooking altogether. Just combine
thinly sliced raw sprouts with crumbled Gorgonzola and chopped, toasted hazelnuts for a rich, satisfying and
unexpected salad.
Cauliflower, with its sturdy florets
(and, incidentally, now available in a
range of colors), can also stand up to
big flavors. I like to roast a whole head
broken into pieces until they’re
browned and crisp at the edges and
toss with butter and hot sauce, like
chicken wings sans the chicken. Or
roast and drizzle with a simple cheddar cheese sauce (like nachos sans the
chips). Both of these remind us that
vegetables can be just as satisfying as
anything else. And don’t forget the
leaves that hug your cauliflower. If
you buy a cauliflower as fresh as
possible (at your local farmers market, for example), chances are the
leaves that protect the cauliflower
will be bright green and crisp and
entirely edible. Do not discard them.
Instead, roughly chop them and saute
them with olive oil, minced garlic and
a pinch of dried red chile flakes as you
would any other green. Serve as a side
dish, mix with pasta or any cooked
grain, or turn them into a frittata.
Grapes, while available all year, hit
their peak in the fall. Besides just
eating them out of hand, try cooking
with them. I like to throw them on a
sheet pan with bitter broccoli rabe
and fennel-scented Italian sausages
and roast the whole tray. The grapes
get soft and concentrated, almost like
cherry tomatoes. Or make a shrub,
the delicious and versatile vinegarbased fruit syrup. You can mix it with
sparkling water for an alternative to
soda or mix with gin and serve over
crushed ice. To make it, all you need is
a jar and a little patience. Just crush
grapes with sugar and let them sit for
a day before straining the mixture
and adding an equal part apple cider
vinegar. The shrub can sit in your
fridge for up to a month. It’s a great
thing to bring to someone’s house if
you’re invited for dinner. And the
easiest way to make grapes last
longer? Throw them in your freezer
and pull them out whenever you want
a healthy, refreshing snack. They’re
my go-to, especially when I’m writing.
In fact, I’m eating some right now.
From my kitchen to yours, fall.
food@washpost.com
Turshen is a writer, recipe developer and
author of the best-selling “Small
Victories” and the more recent “Feed the
Resistance” (Chronicle Books, 2017). She
and her family live in Upstate New York.
She will join our online chat with readers
on Wednesday at noon at
live.washingtonpost.com.
PHOTOS BY GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Crunchy Brussels Sprouts
With Mustard
Shredded Sprouts Slaw
With Gorgonzola + Hazelnuts
Roasted Brussels Sprout Leaves
With Pecorino
4 servings, Healthy
4 servings
4 servings, Healthy
Because the sprouts are dressed when they are
fresh from oven-roasting, the dressing clings to
them in a luxurious way.
All recipes from cookbook author Julia Turshen.
Keep this in mind as an easy/last-minute
holiday side dish.
MAKE AHEAD: The Brussels sprouts can be
prepped (without dressing) and refrigerated in a
zip-top bag for several days in advance.
With a final squeeze of lemon juice over them,
these leaves are irresistible.
Ingredients
1 pound Brussels sprouts
Extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher or coarse sea salt
1 or 2 ounces pecorino Romano cheese, freshly
and finely grated, for serving
Lemon wedges, for serving
Ingredients
1 pound Brussels sprouts (ends trimmed), each
cut in half
6 tablespoons olive oil
Kosher salt
1 teaspoon black mustard seed (optional)
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon coarse-grain/whole-grain
mustard
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
Steps
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Place the Brussels sprouts on a baking sheet.
Drizzle with 3 tablespoons of the oil and then
sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and all the
mustard seed, if using. Use your clean hands to
mix everything together. Roast (middle rack)
for about 35 minutes, stirring now and then,
until the sprouts have softened and browned.
Meanwhile, whisk together the prepared mustards, vinegar and the remaining 3 tablespoons
of oil in a large bowl to form an emulsified
dressing. Taste and season lightly with salt.
Transfer the warm sprouts to the bowl and toss
to incorporate. Serve warm or at room temperature.
Ingredients
1 pound Brussels sprouts, ends trimmed
Extra-virgin olive oil
Fresh lemon juice
Kosher or sea salt
Gorgonzola cheese, crumbled
Toasted, chopped hazelnuts (see NOTE)
Steps
Thinly slice the Brussels sprouts, placing them
in a mixing bowl as you work. Drizzle with equal
parts oil and lemon juice (to taste). Use your
clean hands to scrunch them, so the Brussels
sprouts soften a bit. Season lightly with salt.
Serve at room temperature, topped with crumbled cheese and the chopped, toasted hazelnuts.
NOTE: Toast the hazelnuts in a small, dry skillet
over medium-low heat for several minutes,
until fragrant and lightly browned. Cool before
using.
Nutrition | Per serving (using 2 tablespoons oil and lemon juice;
1/ teaspoon kosher salt; 2 ounces cheese, and 1/ cup chopped
4
4
hazelnuts): 210 calories, 8 g protein, 12 g carbohydrates, 16 g
fat, 4 g saturated fat, 15 mg cholesterol, 180 mg sodium, 5 g
dietary fiber, 3 g sugar
Steps
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Peel the leaves off each sprout, which is tedious
but meditative, placing them on a rimmed
baking sheet as you work.
Drizzle with oil and season lightly with the salt,
then use your clean hands to toss until evenly
coated. Roast (middle rack) for about 20 minutes, stirring once or twice, until the leaves
become crunchy.
Top with the cheese (to taste). Serve right away,
squeezing the lemon wedges over them while
the leaves are still warm.
Nutrition | Per serving (using 1 1/2 tablespoons oil,
teaspoon kosher salt and 1 ounce pecorino Romano): 130
calories, 7 g protein, 10 g carbohydrates, 8 g fat, 2 g saturated
fat, 5 mg cholesterol, 270 mg sodium, 4 g dietary fiber, 2 g sugar
1/
2
Recipe tested by Bonnie S. Benwick; email questions to
food@washpost.com
Recipe tested by Helen Horton; email questions to
food@washpost.com
Nutrition | Per serving (using 1/2 teaspoon salt): 240 calories, 4 g
protein, 11 g carbohydrates, 21 g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 0 mg
cholesterol, 230 mg sodium, 4 g dietary fiber, 3 g sugar
Recipe tested by Mary Pat Flaherty; email questions to
food@washpost.com
Sheet Pan Sausage Dinner
With Roasted Grapes + Broccoli Rabe
4 servings
Sweet grapes, bitter broccoli rabe and fennel-y sausage come together in
this easy, one-pan dinner.
Ingredients
1 pound broccoli rabe, tough ends trimmed, coarsely chopped
1 pound seedless red grapes, stemmed
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
8 fresh Italian sausages, preferably with fennel seed
Steps
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
Spread the broccoli rabe and grapes on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with
the oil and sprinkle with the salt, then use your clean hands to toss and coat
evenly; make sure they are arranged in a single layer. Arrange the sausages
on top, with plenty of room between them.
Roast (middle rack) for about 30 minutes, turning the sausages over and
giving the broccoli rabe and grapes a stir halfway through, until the broccoli
rabe is tender, the grapes are nearly jammy and the sausages are cooked
through and browned.
Serve hot, straight from the pan.
Nutrition | Per serving: 330 calories, 29 g protein, 29 g carbohydrates, 13 g fat, 5 g saturated fat, 45
mg cholesterol, 1,010 mg sodium, 1 g dietary fiber, 19 g sugar
Recipe tested by Bonnie S. Benwick; email questions to food@washpost.com
Concord Grape Shrub
5 to 10 servings (makes 2 1/2 cups)
Drink this straight up, stirred into cocktails or with seltzer water.
MAKE AHEAD: The grape and sugar mixture needs to refrigerate for 1 day,
and the shrub needs to cure in the refrigerator for a day before serving. Once
completed, it can be refrigerated for up to 1 month.
From cookbook author Julia Turshen.
Ingredients
3 cups Concord grapes, stemmed and rinsed
1/2 cup sugar
11/2 cups apple cider vinegar
Steps
Combine the grapes and sugar in a large, clean jar. Use a wooden spoon to
gently muddle the mixture. Seal the jar and refrigerate for 24 hours.
Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh strainer, into a separate large, clean
jar, pressing down firmly to extract all the juice you can from the grapes.
Discard the solids. Seal and refrigerate for 1 day.
Add the vinegar, stirring to incorporate. The shrub is ready to use, although
it will mellow, and perhaps be more drinkable straight up, if you let it sit in
the refrigerator for a few hours.
Ingredients are too variable for a meaningful analysis.
Recipe tested by Kara Elder; email questions to food@washpost.com
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E7
EE
Roasted Cauliflower
With Butter + Hot Sauce
4 servings
Butternut Squash, Parmesan +
Thyme Fritters
Creamy Squash Soup
With Pimenton
4 servings (makes about 20 pieces)
4 servings (makes 5
Tender and unexpected, these fritters are
perfect to serve with cocktails at your next dinner
party.
It has become easy to find butternut squash
that are just the right size for this recipe. A bit of
Spanish smoked paprika elevates the soup and
enriches its color.
A small pour of heavy cream or a spoonful of
sour cream on each portion would not be unwelcome.
Ingredients
1/2 cup flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed
2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme leaves
1 pound butternut squash, peeled, seeded and
coarsely grated
1/4 cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
cheese
1 large egg, beaten
1/4 cup milk
About 1/2 cup vegetable oil, for frying
Steps
Whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt
and thyme in a mixing bowl. Add the grated
squash, cheese, egg and milk, stirring until
incorporated.
Line a baking sheet with paper towels, then seat
a wire rack over it.
Heat 1/4 cup of oil in a large, heavy nonstick
skillet over medium-high heat. Once the oil
shimmers, drop tablespoonfuls of the batter
into the skillet, without crowding them, and use
the back of the spoon to press each mound into
a flat pancake.
Cook the fritters until the undersides are
browned, 1 to 2 minutes, then carefully turn
them and cook until the second sides are nicely
browned, another minute or two. Transfer the
fritters to the rack to drain, sprinkling each one
with a little salt.
Fry the remaining fritter mixture in batches,
adding more oil to the pan, as needed.
Serve right away.
Ingredients are too variable for a meaningful analysis.
Recipe tested by Bonnie S. Benwick; email questions to
food@washpost.com
1/2
Butternut Squash With Saffron
4 servings
to 6 cups), Healthy
Ingredients
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 to 2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 teaspoons Spanish smoked paprika
(pimenton; sweet or hot), plus more for
optional garnish
4 cups no-salt-added chicken broth
One 11/2-pound butternut squash, peeled,
seeded and diced
Steps
Heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat.
Once the oil shimmers, stir in the onion; cook
for about 5 minutes or until softened, then add
the garlic, 1 teaspoon of the salt and the paprika.
Cook for a minute, then add the broth and
squash.
Once the liquid starts to bubble, cook, uncovered, for about 20 minutes or until the squash is
tender.
Remove the center knob of the blender lid, so
steam can escape. Working in batches, puree
the soup mixture until smooth, holding a paper
towel over the lid opening to avoid splash-ups.
Taste and add some or all the remaining salt, as
needed.
Serve hot, with a sprinkle of paprika, if desired.
This makes an excellent side dish for just about
anything.
MAKE AHEAD: The prepared squash can be
refrigerated for up to 3 days.
Ingredients
Large pinch saffron threads
2 tablespoons boiling water
1 pound peeled butternut squash, cut into
chunks
1/4 cup heavy cream
Kosher or sea salt
Steps
Place the saffron in a small bowl and pour the
water over it. Let steep for at least 5 minutes.
Place the chunks of squash in a steamer basket;
cover and steam over several inches of boiling
water in a saucepan (medium-high heat), until
they are tender.
Transfer to a food processor; add the saffron
and its water and the heavy cream; pulse to
form a puree. (Alternatively, you can use a
potato masher to break down the tender squash
in a mixing bowl with the saffron mixture and
heavy cream, for a coarser texture.)
Season lightly with salt and serve warm.
Nutrition | Per serving (using 1/2 teaspoon salt): 80 calories, 1 g
protein, 8 g carbohydrates, 6 g fat, 4 g saturated fat, 20 mg
cholesterol, 150 mg sodium, 1 g dietary fiber, 2 g sugar
Recipe tested by Lynn O’Brien; email questions to
food@washpost.com
Nutrition | Per serving: 140 calories, 3 g protein, 16 g
carbohydrates, 7 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 350
mg sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 6 g sugar
Recipe tested by Lynn O’Brien; email questions to
food@washpost.com
Shredded Green Apple Salad
With Fish Sauce + Cilantro
4 servings (makes a generous 3 cups)
This is crunchy, bright and surprisingly complex in flavor.
Serve with grilled pork, fish or chicken, or atop a bowl of rice with a fried or
poached egg. It makes a nice accompaniment to the Butternut Squash,
Parmesan + Thyme Fritters, too (see related recipe).
Sauteed Apples With Brown Butter and Sage
4 servings
Deeply savory and a bit sweet, these apples are best served with roast
chicken, pork chops or tenderloin, or on toast that you’ve slathered with
either goat cheese or ricotta cheese.
For a sweeter take on this dish, see the VARIATION, below.
Ingredients
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
1 pound apples, cored and cut into thin wedges
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1 tablespoon minced fresh sage
Ingredients
2 tablespoons fish sauce
2 tablespoons unseasoned rice vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar
4 tart green apples, such as Granny Smith, peeled
1 small shallot, minced
Large handful cilantro leaves and tender stems, chopped
Steps
Whisk together the fish sauce, vinegar and sugar in a mixing bowl.
Grate the apples on the large-holed side of a box grater over that bowl;
discard the cores.
Add the shallot and cilantro, tossing lightly to incorporate and coat with the
dressing. Serve right away.
Nutrition | Per serving: 50 calories, 0 g protein, 13 g carbohydrates, 0 g fat, 0 g saturated fat, 0 mg
cholesterol, 600 mg sodium, 1 g dietary fiber, 10 g sugar
Recipe tested by Jessica Weissman; email questions to food@washpost.com
Steps
Melt the butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Cook
further, for about 2 minutes, until it turns light brown.
Add the sliced apples, then scatter the salt and sage over them. Cook for
about 8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the butter is dark brown and
the apples are softened, reducing the heat to medium, as needed, to keep the
fruit from scorching.
Serve right away.
VARIATION: To make Sauteed Apples With Brown Butter, Ginger and
Brown Sugar, swap out the sage for a tablespoon of minced fresh ginger
root, and add 3 tablespoons light brown sugar and a shake of ground
cinnamon. Serve warm, over vanilla ice cream or on top of oatmeal.
Nutrition | Per serving: 160 calories, 0 g protein, 16 g carbohydrates, 12 g fat, 7 g saturated fat, 30 mg
cholesterol, 140 mg sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 12 g sugar
Recipe tested by Monica Norton; email questions to food@washpost.com
This cauliflower offers a similar
appeal to Buffalo chicken wings. When
it’s crisp and hot, the cauliflower gets
tossed with butter and hot sauce. You
could serve this drizzled with blue
cheese dressing.
For a cheesy sauce idea as well as a
use for the vegetable’s leaves, see the
VARIATIONS, below.
Ingredients
1 large head (about 21/2 pounds)
cauliflower, cut into bite-size florets
(about 8 cups)
3 tablespoons olive oil
Kosher salt
3 tablespoons unsalted butter,
melted
1 tablespoon of your favorite hot
sauce, or more as needed
Large handful coarsely chopped
fresh cilantro or chives, for serving
(optional)
Steps
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
Spread the cauliflower florets on a
rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with
the oil and sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon
of the salt. Use your hands to toss
them until evenly coated. Roast
(middle rack) for about 35 minutes,
stirring now and then, until the
cauliflower is softened and browned.
Whisk together the butter and hot
sauce in a large bowl. Add the hot
cauliflower to the bowl and toss to
coat. Taste and season with more salt
and/or hot sauce.
Transfer to a serving platter, sprinkle
with the cilantro or chives, if using,
and serve right away.
VARIATIONS: To make Roasted
Cauliflower With Cheddar Sauce,
omit the butter and hot sauce step in
the directions above. Combine 1 tablespoon unsalted butter and 1 tablespoon flour in a small saucepan over
medium heat, whisking until light
brown. Slowly whisk in 1/2 cup whole
milk; cook for about 1 minute, until
thickened. Add 2 large handfuls of
coarsely grated mild cheddar cheese
(because mild cheese will be creamier than sharp). Taste and season with
salt and/or pepper and hot sauce;
whisk in more milk, a tablespoon at a
time, as needed to create a more
pourable sauce. Drizzle the sauce
over the just-roasted florets and
serve hot.
To make Sauteed Cauliflower Leaves
With Garlic, look for heads of cauliflower at the farmers market that
have bright green, crisp leaves hugging the exterior. Coarsely chop
them and add to a large skillet with
olive oil, minced garlic and a pinch of
crushed red pepper flakes (all to
taste). Cook for about 5 minutes over
medium heat, until just wilted. Season lightly with salt and sprinkle
with fresh lemon juice (to taste).
Nutrition | Per serving: 220 calories, 4 g protein, 10
g carbohydrates, 20 g fat, 7 g saturated fat, 25 mg
cholesterol, 230 mg sodium, 4 g dietary fiber, 4 g
sugar
Recipe tested by Nilar Andrea Chit Tun; email
questions to food@washpost.com
E8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 18 , 2017
The piquillo peppers — among the festive tapas on the menu at
Calle Cinco — are stuffed with goat cheese, drizzled with spiced
honey, and garnished with pine nuts and minced parsley.
Relaxed and striking,
Calle Cinco adds spice
to the D.C. tapas scene
The missing
ingredient at the
late Conosci in
Mount Vernon
FIRST BITE
Triangle: a full
kitchen.
Conceived as an intimate
crudo bar, the jewel in the crown
of Washington restaurants by
the Boston-based Michael
Schlow lacked a grill, a fryer and
space to accommodate both an
a la carte list and a tasting
menu. When Schlow convened
his team to come up with a
replacement for the space,
which adjoined his Italian spot,
Alta Strada, the idea that got the
most votes was a tapas bar.
Kudos to Schlow, who hopes
to find a bigger roost for
Conosci, for leaving the interior
untouched. The original gold
walls, leafy chandeliers and
dark-blue banquettes remain,
making “C5,” as the staff calls
the pop-up, the city’s most
glamorous backdrop for Spanish
small plates.
With the help of some heat, in
the form of new equipment, and
some recipes from Spanish
enthusiast George Rodrigues,
formerly the chef at Tico on 14th
Street NW, Calle Cinco began
serving sherry, fried calamari
and churros in September.
Tom
Sietsema
The newly relaxed idea finds
Rodrigues, 36, occasionally
leaving his post behind the
counter to drop off a plate. One
of the most striking dishes
features piquillo peppers. Served
two per order and drizzled with
spiced honey, the crimson
vegetables are garnished with
crackling pine nuts and minced
parsley. Once the flesh of the
peppers is cut, tangy goat cheese
makes an appearance: The
combination makes an ideal
salad.
My initial grazing expedition
proved a mixed bag, mostly due
to timid seasoning. Calle Cinco’s
beef-and-lamb meatballs
reminded me more of my
Minnesota mom’s meatloaf than
anything I’ve knocked back in
San Sebastian, and tortilla
Espanola was spongy. “Good if
you were in an airport lounge,” a
companion whispered of the
small plates, and I nodded.
Time helps. A return visit,
which found me strolling into a
cloud of garlic and included
dessert, had me comparing C5
favorably to Jaleo, the city’s
standard-bearer for Spanish.
Piping-hot papas bravas, lashed
with creamy aioli, didn’t last
through much of a cooling-down
period. And the reason the
PHOTOS BY DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ABOVE: George Rodrigues
prepares piquillo peppers and
other assorted tapas in the
kitchen at Calle Cinco in Mount
Vernon Triangle.
LEFT: A lineup of small-plate
offerings at the bar. The pop-up
restaurant is in the space
formerly occupied by Conosci.
menu refers to the chef ’s
seafood salad as “famous” turns
out to be supple poached shrimp
and squid on a pool of biting
gazpacho — pure joy spurred by
rings of pickled Fresno chiles.
Slender, sugar-dusted churros
from pastry chef Alex Levin are
lovely on their own, crazymaking after a dunk in satiny
dark chocolate sauce. In a nod to
Spain’s affection for gin and
tonics, Levin offers a gin-andtonic sorbet that goes down like
snow kissed with lime. Even the
servers’ black T-shirts made me
smile: “You had me at
boquerones,” read one.
Now’s the time to
GET YOUR ROOF
READY FOR WINTER!
No one knows how long Calle
Cinco will stick around. Schlow
says replacement possibilities
include a Japanese sushi bar and
a Northeastern seafood spot. But
as of now, the temporary tapas
destination is revving up its
happy hour (4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
daily) by serving grilled hamand-cheese sandwiches known
as “bikinis” and a challenge:
Whoever can manage a spill-free
drink of cava from a traditional
porron (long-spouted glass
pitcher) held an arm’s length
away gets a gratis tapa.
Game on, amigos!
tom.sietsema@washpost.com
465 K St. NW. 202-629-4662.
callecincodc.com. Tapas, $6 to $15.
ARCHITECTURAL
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Roofi
LIMITED TIME ONLY
Roof issues can become much worse when you add
snow, ice and the constant freezing and thawing of
winter! Call the experts at Long Roofing!
g
g
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50 Year Full Replacement Value Warranty
Select ShingleMaster Earned by
Only 1% of the Nation’s Roofers
Traditional Asphalt Shingles,
Architectural, Designer & Luxury
Styles, and Flat Roofing
Many Colors & Options
free
OFF
OFF
Total Roof
Replacement
Total Roof
Replacement
gutters
+ guards!
with Roofing Purchase
Expires 12/1/17. Valid initial visit only. Min. purchase required.
Cannot be combined with other offers.
DESIGNER
PREMIUM
SHINGLES
844-427-LONG
LongRoofing.com
We build Trust and Peace of Mind
into every Long Roof
DESIGNER
SLATE
FREE ESTIMATES
“Very professional company! Well worth the money for top quality
materials and a 50 year warranty! Best service ever!” – Joyce N.
A TRUSTED NAME SINCE 1945
ASPHALT
SHAKES
Licensed, Bonded, Insured
MHIC 51346, VA 2705048183A, DC 67006785, PA 115431
LUXURY
SHINGLES
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