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The Washington Post – October 20, 2017

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Dodgers rout Cubs, advance to first World Series since 1988. Sports, D1
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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Mostly sunny 76/54 • Tomorrow: Mostly sunny 76/56 B8
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
. $2
Kelly defends
call to widow
PRESIDENT WAS ACCUSED OF INSENSITIVITY
Trump did his best in difficult time, chief of staff says
A NNE G EARAN,
P HILIP R UCKER
AND J OHN W AGNER
BY
FRED DUFOUR/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
For Rohingya, Suu Kyi
a ‘bright light’ no more
BY
M AX B EARAK
kutupalong, bangladesh — His people,
the Rohingya, are stateless, and the evidence of it is etched into his skin.
The Burmese military beat his legs and
feet mercilessly and chased him out of his
native land in the 1990s. In a refugee camp
in Bangladesh, police tortured him for
leading a mass refusal of a policy that forced
the Rohingya back to Burma.
Abdusalam imagined himself the unsung
Gandhi, Mandela or King Jr. of his people.
And while those champions of freedom
inspired him, another was the vessel of his
hopes: Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma’s antiauthoritarian icon. He dreamed she would
bravely face down the military and welcome
the Rohingya back to their homes as
Burmese leader, once a focus
of their hopes, has done little
to defend the minority
Rohingya refugees wait to collect food
at a camp in Bangladesh. More than a
half-million have fled violence in
Buddhist-majority Burma since August.
citizens.
The first part came true. But sitting in a
decrepit shack in the refugee camp in
Bangladesh where he now expects to live
the rest of his days, he had only disappointment for Suu Kyi.
“She’s made a deal with the devil,” he said.
Suu Kyi has been Burma’s de facto leader
since 2016, but she has said nothing to quell
intensifying bouts of violence against the
Rohingya.
Over the past two months, the decadesold cycle of violence between the Muslim
Rohingya and Burma’s Buddhist majority
has reached a bloody apex. More than half a
million Rohingya have sought refuge in
Bangladesh. Thousands more continue to
escape by the day, carrying with them
stories of summary executions, gang rapes
and murdered children. In Bangladesh, they
join hundreds of thousands more like
Abdusalam who fled pogroms in the 1990s
and 2000s.
Many are left to wonder: Were we wrong
BURMA CONTINUED ON A6
White House Chief of Staff John
F. Kelly on Thursday unequivocally defended President Trump’s
calls to the families of four fallen
soldiers, using his credibility as a
retired general who lost a son on
the battlefield to try to help his
boss contain a public relations crisis.
In an extraordinary, emotional
appearance in the White House
briefing room, Kelly described in
painful detail the trauma of losing
service members. He also excoriated a Democratic congresswoman for publicizing her account of
Trump’s call Tuesday with the
widow of one of the four soldiers
killed in an ambush in Niger.
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Chief of Staff John F. Kelly at
the White House on Thursday.
U.S. deaths in Niger: Sen. McCain
demands more information. A8
The former homeland security
secretary said that Trump had
sought his counsel this week
about making those calls and that
he thought the president spoke
KELLY CONTINUED ON A4
Bush denounces
‘bigotry,’ ‘fabrication’
Trump not mentioned,
but ex-president’s speech
is construed as a rebuke
BY
D AVID N AKAMURA
Former president George W.
Bush on Thursday delivered a
rare political speech in which he
warned of threats to American
democracy and a decay of civic
engagement, a message that
was interpreted as a rebuke of
President Trump’s divisive leader-
ship style.
At a New York forum sponsored by his presidential center,
Bush offered a blunt assessment
of a political system corrupted by
“conspiracy theories and outright
fabrication” in which nationalism
has been “distorted into nativism.”
“We’ve seen our discourse degraded by casual cruelty,” Bush
said during a 16-minute address
at “The Spirit of Liberty” event.
“Bullying and prejudice in our
public life sets a national tone and
provides permission for cruelty
and bigotry. The only way to pass
PRESIDENTS CONTINUED ON A9
In Amazon’s boomtown, Gillespie’s former clients may be ethics challenge
lessons for the next one
As lobbyist, candidate got millions
To cities vying to lure the
tech giant: Maybe grab
a coffee with Seattle
BY
J ONATHAN O ’ C ONNELL
seattle — Amazon.com has
driven an economic boom in Seattle, bestowing more than 40,000
jobs upon a city known for Starbucks coffee and Seahawks fandom. Its growth remade a neglected industrial swath north of
downtown into a hub of young
workers and fixed the region,
along with Microsoft before it, as a
premier locale for the Internet
economy outside Silicon Valley.
Seattle is the fastest-growing
big city in the United States, a
company town with construction
cranes busily erecting new apartments for newly arriving tech
workers. Google and Facebook
have joined Amazon in putting
large offices here.
When Amazon made a surprise
announcement last month that it
planned to open a second headquarters with even more jobs, it
set off an unprecedented race
among cities to lure the tech giant
their way. Amazon said it will
need 8 million square feet in a
second region, making it the biggest economic development target in decades, experts say.
But as Seattleites will say, keeping up with the Internet juggernaut
has not always been easy, providing
a word of caution for officials from
AMAZON CONTINUED ON A16
from firms with big interests in Va.
BY
SARA D. DAVIS/GETTY IMAGES
Vice President Pence appears with Ed Gillespie, the Republican gubernatorial nominee
in Virginia, at a rally in Abingdon a few weeks before the Nov. 7 election.
IN THE NEWS
BULENT KILIC/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
U.S. prospects in Syria Government gains
thwart American hopes of a deeper push into
ISIS territory after the victory in Raqqa. A12
White nationalist heckled Protesters
disrupted Richard Spencer’s University of
Florida speech, hoping to drown him out. A3
THE NATION
THE WORLD
Gun deaths are
higher in states where
concealed-carry laws are
looser, a study said. A2
A study found new laws
have led to a decline in
recurring concussions
among teens. A2
An undocumented
teenage immigrant’s
legal fight to have an
abortion in Texas will
move to federal court
Friday. A4
A bipartisan bill to
preserve insurance subsidies under the Affordable Care Act picked up
steam, but Republican
leaders want concessions. A18
Amid an economic
overhaul, Indian merchants find customers
are spending less on
Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights. A10
The Spanish government said it would move
quickly to take control
of Catalonia after the region’s president refused
to end his push for independence. A12
Russian President
Vladimir Putin declined
to say whether he would
seek another six-year
term as president. A13
THE ECONOMY
Facebook, Google and
Twitter may be one step
closer to new regulations about ad transparency. A15
American Express announced the retirement
of chief executive Kenneth Chenault, one of
three African American
CEOs leading companies in the S&P 500. A15
THE REGION
After losing its lead in
the state’s gambling
market, Maryland Live
Casino is building a
$200 million hotel and
event center. B1
A national survey on
children’s health found
that nearly half of D.C.’s
youth have experienced
a traumatic event. B1
Former president Ba-
rack Obama returned to
the campaign trail to
rally for Virginia gubernatorial candidate
Ralph Northam. B1
A Maryland man was
sentenced to 40 years in
prison for fatally striking his infant son and
burying him in the
woods. B4
The District said it
would pump $3 million
into housing and retail
projects in Wards 7
and 8 to help close the
city’s “grocery gap.” B5
OBITUARIES
French cinema star
Danielle Darrieux, 100,
appeared in more than
100 movies in a career
that spanned more than
eight decades. B6
B ETH R EINHARD
As the Republican gubernatorial nominee in
Virginia, Ed Gillespie has vowed to make health
care more affordable and accessible, pledging
at a recent debate to “incentivize greater
competition in the insurance marketplace.”
But as a private consultant, Gillespie
advised Anthem, the nation’s second-largest
insurance company, as it pursued a merger
last year with Cigna, the No. 3 insurer. Virginia insurance regulators said the merger
would raise costs and reduce competition,
and a federal judge cited the same concerns
when she later blocked the deal.
Anthem is among four companies with
extensive interests in Virginia that paid
Gillespie between $50,000 and $250,000 last
year for consulting services. Anthem, AT&T,
GILLESPIE CONTINUED ON A8
Inside
WEEKEND
Break the fast . . .
But not the bank at these
12 great morning spots.
ST YLE
Cooking up relief
D.C. star chefs’ recipe for
Puerto Rico: A fundraising
dinner and 1 million meals
served on the island. C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A15
COMICS........................................C5
OPINION PAGES..........................A19
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS ............................ A10
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 319
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
7 9 6 6
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
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The Houston Astros host the New York Yankees in
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additional mailing office.
Pulitzer Prize-winning
reporting:
Uncovering Trump
Man, 35, pleads guilty
to federal hate crime
Prosecutors on Thursday
secured a relatively rare federal
hate crime conviction punishable
by a tough sentence as a Florida
man pleaded guilty to leaving a
voice mail that threatened to
shoot people at a mosque.
Gerald Sloane Wallace, 35,
admitted at a plea hearing that he
made the threatening phone call
to the Islamic Center of Greater
Miami on Feb. 19, according to
the U.S. attorney’s office in Miami.
He pleaded guilty to one count of
obstructing the free exercise of
religious beliefs, which carries a
20-year maximum prison
sentence, although he could get
half that.
Prosecutors previously said
Wallace admitted leaving similar
threatening messages at other
mosques. The charge was
upgraded to a hate crime from a
lesser offense punishable by up to
five years in prison.
According to court documents,
the message Wallace left at the
mosque used profanity against
Islam, the prophet Muhammad
and the Koran, and also made the
shooting threats.
Wallace’s sentencing is set for
Jan. 17 in Miami before U.S.
District Judge Marcia Cooke.
— Associated Press
In February 2016,
presidential candidate
Donald Trump
promised $6 million in
donations, including
$1 million from his
own pocket, to charities along his
campaign trail. But by the time he
won the New Hampshire
Republican primary, he had
stopped giving away money and
had donated far less than his
pledged amount. Post reporter
David A. Fahrenthold went in
search of the missing money and
found a bigger story than he ever
expected.
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NEW MEXICO
Diocese releases abuse
allegation documents
The Santa Fe Archdiocese has
released hundreds of pages of
court records related to sexual
abuse allegations against clergy
members in response to an order
from a New Mexico judge,
marking the largest disclosure of
such records since alleged victims
began suing the archdiocese
nearly three decades ago.
Church officials said in a
statement issued after
Wednesday’s release that they
hope the disclosure along with
the recent publication of a list of
clergy accused of sexual
misconduct will serve as an
additional step in healing for
survivors, their families and
parishioners.
The documents include letters
ROBERT F. BUKATY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Frozen and salted menhaden sit in a barrel at a lobster bait
warehouse in Portland, Maine, on Thursday. Interstate regulators are
considering changing how they manage menhaden to better account
for its environmental role, with a vote planned in November. The fish
are often used for supplements and bait.
showing church leaders knew of
sexual abuse allegations that had
been leveled against three priests
from the 1960s through the
1980s.
Judge Alan Malott’s order
stems from a request by the
Albuquerque station KOB-TV,
which intervened in several abuse
cases for the purpose of obtaining
the records.
The records paint a picture of a
diocese that repeatedly assigned
priests accused of sexually
abusing children to posts where
they could abuse again, the
Albuquerque Journal reported.
The records include letters and
reports from psychologists to
church leaders that detail
allegations against the three
priests.
Former priests Jason Sigler
and Sabine Griego still live in
New Mexico, while Arthur
Perrault fled the country.
joining terrorists.
Attorneys for Abdella Ahmad
Tounisi of Aurora, Ill., argued at
his sentencing in Chicago that the
23-year-old was motivated not by
extremist ideology but to help
Syrians by fighting Bashar alAssad’s repressive regime. They
asked for a seven-year sentence.
But Judge Samuel DerYeghiayan rejected that. He said
the group that Tounisi sought to
join, Jabhat al-Nusra, was
affiliated with those “who called
for the destruction of the U.S.”
Addressing Tounisi directly, he
told him that “there are no free
passes when it comes to collusion
with terrorists.”
The judge added that he would
have imposed a sentence beyond
the statutory 15-year maximum if
he could have.
— Associated Press
Three dead in shooting
near university campus
ILLINOIS
Man sentenced for
trying to join terrorists
A federal judge on Thursday
gave a maximum 15-year prison
sentence to a suburban Chicago
man convicted of seeking to join
an al-Qaeda-linked group in
Syria, telling him he made the
choice “to become a villain” by
— Associated Press
COLORADO
Three people, including a
Colorado State University
student, were killed and one
person was wounded Thursday in
a pre-dawn shooting outside an
apartment complex about a mile
west of campus, police said. The
shooting suspect was among the
dead.
A motive for the 2 a.m.
shooting in Fort Collins wasn’t
known. University police alerted
students and faculty via text and
email to stay inside after shots
were heard. They sounded the allclear at 4:35 a.m.
A female CSU student was
killed, and her relatives were
notified, university police said.
Her name wasn’t immediately
released by the Larimer County
coroner.
The other three people
involved in the shooting were not
affiliated with CSU, a public
university with more than 33,000
students about 65 miles north of
Denver. City police Sgt. Dean
Cunningham said it appeared
that the shooter was known by
one of the victims and was among
the dead.
— Associated Press
OKLAHOMA
Former reserve deputy
is released from prison
A former Oklahoma reserve
deputy who fatally shot an
unarmed black man in 2015 with
a firearm that he had mistaken
for a stun gun was released from
prison Thursday after serving less
than half of his four-year
sentence.
Former Tulsa County volunteer
deputy Robert Bates, 76, was
released from the North Fork
Correctional Facility in Sayre in
western Oklahoma after serving
497 days, an Oklahoma
Department of Corrections
spokesman said.
Bates was convicted of seconddegree manslaughter in the April
2015 shooting death of Eric
Harris. Bates will serve probation
for the remainder of his sentence.
He was released early because he
earned credits for good behavior,
the spokesman said.
Harris’s family filed a civil
rights lawsuit in January 2016 in
Tulsa, which, among other things,
alleges that Bates was improperly
trained and supervised and that
then-Tulsa County Sheriff Stanley
Glanz turned a “blind eye to these
dangers.”
Glanz resigned after being
indicted by a grand jury. He was
sentenced last year to a one-year
suspended term on misdemeanor
charges stemming from the
indictment.
— Associated Press
Study ties loose concealed-carry laws to higher gun death rates
BY
K ATIE Z EZIMA
States that have more relaxed
criteria for allowing residents to
carry concealed handguns have a
higher rate of gun deaths than
states with stricter requirements,
according to a study released
Thursday.
Researchers at the Boston University School of Public Health
found states that have so-called
“may issue” laws — which give
law enforcement officials wide
discretion to decide who can
receive a concealed-carry permit
— have lower gun death rates
than states that call for little
discretion once basic criteria for
obtaining the permit are met,
also known as “shall issue” laws.
The study found states with
“shall issue” laws had handgun
homicide rates that were
10.6 percent higher than “may
issue” states. Additionally, “shall
issue” states had firearm homicide rates that were 8.6 percent
higher and overall homicide rates
that were 6.5 percent higher than
“may issue” states.
On opposite ends of the spectrum, Louisiana, a shall-issue
state, had a firearm homicide rate
of 9.96 per 100,000 residents in
2015; Hawaii, a may-issue state,
had a firearm homicide rate of
0.75 per 100,000 residents in
2015.
“There is clearly a trend that’s
going on nationally toward more
and more lenient concealed-carry
laws over time, with less and less
discretion for law enforcement,”
said Michael Siegel, a professor at
the Boston University School of
Public Health and the study’s
main author. “Based on the findings of our paper, that suggests it
is putting the public safety at
risk.”
Nine of the states studied had
“may issue” laws, and 37 states
had “shall issue” laws. Four states
had what is known as “permitless
carry” laws, which allow residents to carry weapons out of
sight without a license, but states
with those laws were not included in the analysis.
The “may issue” states had
varying criteria to approve or
deny a concealed carry permit.
California requires its applicants
be of “good moral character” and
have “good cause” for the permit.
Hawaii requires applicants to
have an exceptional case that
shows they fear injury or damage
to their property.
In New Jersey, a person must
demonstrate a justifiable need to
hide a handgun and submit three
references who have known the
applicant for at least three years
and can vouch he or she is “a
person of good moral character
and behavior.”
Siegel said a number of states
changed their laws to the looser
restrictions during the course of
the study, a change that was
taken into account as part of the
analysis. “There has been a really
tremendous trend in weakening
of these laws over time,” he said.
“There was no state that
strengthened.”
The study comes as more states
are completely doing away with
concealed-carry regulations and
Congress is debating whether to
allow state concealed-carry permits to apply across state lines.
More states are allowing peo-
“That suggests it is
putting the public safety
at risk.”
Michael Siegel, the study’s main author
ple to carry concealed handguns
without a permit.
Bills in both the Senate and
House would allow people who
received a concealed-carry permit in their home state to travel
to another state with their gun, so
long as they abide by the laws in
that state. The proposal is known
as “concealed-carry reciprocity.”
The Senate bill is sponsored by
Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.) and the
House bill by Rep. Richard Hudson (R-N.C.)
“Concealed-carry reciprocity
legislation recognizes that Americans’ Second Amendment right
to bear arms doesn’t end at their
states’ borders,” the National Rifle Association Institute for Legislative Action, which supports the
federal legislation, said in a statement posted on the organization’s website. “This legislation
would ensure that states would
have to treat lawful concealed
carriers from other states the
same as lawful in-state concealed
carriers.”
Tim Schmidt, president and
founder of the United States Concealed Carry Association, said he
expects people who live in places
with strict gun laws and high
homicide rates to take issue with
the study.
“The reality is that concealedcarry permit holders are responsible citizens, who have proven
they are willing to comply with
the law, while criminals who
commit murder don’t care what
the laws are in their states because they’re criminals,” he said
in a statement.
At least 12 states allow residents to carry concealed handguns without a permit, something known as “constitutional
carry” or “permitless carry.” Gun
rights advocates see the laws as
the next frontier in Second
Amendment rights, arguing that
the Constitution is all the permission needed to carry handguns
out of sight.
The District’s strict concealedcarry laws were relaxed last
month after a court struck down
its requirement that people demonstrate a “good reason” — such
as fear of violence — why they
want to carry a weapon out of
sight. District Attorney Karl A.
Racine did not appeal the ruling
out of fear that the case would
end up in the U.S. Supreme Court.
katie.zezima@washpost.com
Study links fewer recurrent concussions in young athletes to new state laws
BY
W ILLIAM W AN
As evidence has grown of the
devastating effects of traumatic
brain injuries, people have become increasingly alarmed and
demanded protective measures.
Some of the most tangible results
of that concern are new laws
passed in all 50 states and the
District that address head injuries among young athletes.
A new study, published Thursday in the American Journal of
Public Health, explores how effective those laws have been in
reducing recurring concussions.
The study found that the new
laws have led to a noticeable
nationwide decline in concus-
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sions among teenagers.
The laws, which vary in
strength, were passed between
2009 and 2014. The researchers
burrowed into a set of national
data tracking the number of
concussions, and analyzed numbers for different states before
and after a law went into effect.
Researchers found that immediately after each law passed,
the number of concussions increased, which they attributed to
improved reporting of concussions because of greater awareness and concern generated by
the laws. But about 2.6 years after
each law was passed, the numbers of repeated concussions began to decline, which seems to
indicate the laws are having an
effect.
“We were very happy to see
that,” said Ginger Jingzhen Yang,
a sports injury researcher at
Nationwide Children’s Hospital
and Ohio State University. Yang
and her co-authors used a nationally representative sample of
high schools that included 100
schools each academic year from
2005 to 2015.
The study found that high
school athletes reported an esti-
mated 2.7 million concussion injuries from fall 2005 through
spring 2016. Of these reported
concussions, 89 percent were
new injuries and 11 percent were
recurrent.
The youth sports laws that
have been passed mostly require
educating coaches, trainers, athletes and parents on the effects of
concussions. Most of them also
require athletes to be removed
from play after a concussion and
prevent them from returning until they have been cleared by
medical staff, so that they do not
experience a recurrence, which
can greatly worsen such injuries.
Some of the results published
Thursday echo the findings of
other recent studies. The rate of
concussions among high school
football players, for example, was
higher than for any in other
sports in Yang’s study. Teenage
boys who play football had an
average annual concussion rate
that was more than double that
of boys playing soccer. The researchers also found that the rate
of concussion during a competitive game was five times higher
than in practice.
When football was taken out of
the equation, in sports played by
both boys and girls, the female
athletes experienced much greater rates of concussion than the
males.
“We don’t know if this is
because girls, for some reason,
carry a higher risk for this kind of
head injury or if they are more
likely to report it,” Yang said.
“This is something we all have to
study further.”
A study in March by the American Academy of Orthopaedic
Surgeons similarly found that
female athletes, especially soccer
players, suffer greater rates of
concussions than male equivalents. The authors of that study
theorized that the disparity may
be caused by lack of protective
gear for female athletes and more
competitive, harder play in girls’
soccer, compared with boys’ soccer, or a difference in neck muscle strength.
The new research on concussion comes at a time when school
officials and parents are grappling with how to respond to the
growing evidence of how severely brain injuries can affect athletes. Many parents have begun
to hold their children back from
participating in football, in particular.
In one recent study, researchers found signs of neurodegenerative disease in 99 percent of the
brains donated by families of
former NFL players. Out of 202
brains that belonged to men who
had played football at all levels,
the researchers found chronic
traumatic encephalopathy in
87 percent. Lawmakers have begun discussing federal regulations to protect players.
Despite the rise of state laws in
recent years, enforcement and
widespread data collection continue to be sparse. Yang and
other experts also point out that
the state laws do not prevent the
concussions from occurring in
the first place.
“These laws focus on recurrence and education, which is
important,” she said. “But they
don’t have prevention as part of
the law, and that needs to be
included. We need more strategies for minimizing body and
head contact.”
william.wan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
SU
Politics & the Nation
Spencer
speech
met by
protests
BY J OE H EIM,
A BIGAIL H AUSLOHNER,
L ORI R OZSA
AND S USAN S VRLUGA
gainesville, fla. — Richard
Spencer came to the University of
Florida hoping to spread his white
nationalist ideas, but his speech
was instead quickly drowned out
Thursday by a hailstorm of chants,
shouting and mockery.
At one point, Spencer said, “You
know that what I am saying here
will change the world.” At another
point, he described the audience as
a mob.
People chanted, “Black lives
matter!” and “Go home, Spencer!”
“Are you adults?” Spencer asked.
“It doesn’t look like it.”
Spencer called the crowd
“shrieking and grunting morons.”
They responded by chanting,
“Let’s go, Gators!”
The public university spent an
estimated $600,000 on security for
the event.
More than 500 law enforcement
officers were deployed, a state of
emergency was declared, and
many students avoided classes,
and campus, entirely on Thursday.
With an intense police presence
— snipers were positioned on the
rooftops of nearby buildings, hundreds of uniformed state troopers
stood at attention behind barricades — the protest outside the
speech proved peaceful.
The event was Spencer’s first
public speech on a college campus
since he led torch-bearing followers through the University of Virginia in August, the start of a weekend of clashes between white nationalists and white supremacists
and counterprotesters that turned
deadly in Charlottesville the next
day.
Spencer’s efforts to speak at UF
had been closely watched and bitterly debated — a sign not only of
how raw the tensions over race and
culture remain but also of the intensity of the fight over free speech
on college campuses.
The campus of 52,000 students
was eerily quiet Thursday morning, with a heavy police presence,
barricades and road closures, but
by early afternoon, crowds of protesters had gathered to counter
Spencer’s appearance.
“We have a duty to fight for our
freedom,” a woman in an orange
tank top shouted, leading a group
of marchers who repeated her
words in unison.
There was a brief scuffle when
protesters turned on a man wearing a shirt that was branded with a
swastika, and he was marched out
of the crowd. But, mostly, people
chanted in unison: “Not my town,
not my state, we don’t want your
Nazi hate!”
When an airplane carrying a
banner that read, “Love Conquers
All! Love will prevail!” flew overhead, the crowd erupted in cheers.
Before he spoke inside a heavily
secured performing arts center,
Spencer answered questions at an
often contentious news conference. He said it was “absolutely
right” that the university and state
expected to spend more than
$600,000 on security. “This is the
free-speech issue of our day.”
Asked whether he was a racist,
he said he was not a racist in a
“cartoonish” sense but that, “Yes,
race is real, race matters, and race is
the foundation of identity.”
Eight hundred tickets were
handed out for the event, but the
lower level of the Curtis M. Phillips
Center for the Performing Arts
looked to be only about half-filled
moments before Spencer began his
speech. A theater manager said
there were about 400 people inside, including media. The protest
and chants in the auditorium began as soon as the event began and
continued until Spencer finally
walked offstage 90 minutes later.
People came for many reasons.
“I came here to support Spencer
because after Charlottesville, the
radical left threatened my family
and children because I was seen
and photographed in Charlottesville,” Tyler TenBrink, 29, said. “The
man’s got the brass to say what
nobody else will.”
Crew Kinnard, 58, a nurse from
Gainesville, came to hear what
Spencer had to say “because I want
to know what I’m arguing against.
“I want to know what logic and
what information he might be using,” Kinnard said. “It breaks my
heart that this is happening in the
21st century, but we all have freedom of speech.”
Emmanuel Kizito, a 20-year-old
political science major at UF, sat
near the back of the auditorium
with a group of black students. He
PHOTOS BY EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Protesters chant during Richard Spencer’s speech at the
University of Florida. ABOVE: Spencer speaks to reporters.
To view a photo gallery, go to washingtonpost.com/nation.
said he “came to witness Spencer’s
violent rhetoric and to indict the
University of Florida . . . who emboldened his ideals by allowing
him to speak.”
Asked if he was worried about
violence or if he thought the event
could be dangerous, he replied, “As
a black man, everywhere in America is dangerous for me.”
After Spencer’s speech ended,
the few supporters who did show
up began to trickle out, and the
protesters started shouting.
One man emerged from behind
the police line only to be sprayed in
the face with something, witnesses
said. Police began escorting others.
“Nazi
scum!”
protesters
screamed as one man in a white
polo shirt and a slicked-down side
part emerged from the theater, and
state troopers formed a cordon between him and the protesters and
helped him move down Hull Road.
The crowd followed, chanting and
surrounding them.
In a telephone interview after
the speech, Spencer described the
appearance as “frustrating and exhilarating at the same time.”
“I’m inspired that we persevered
against totally thuggish behavior,”
he said. “Screaming at the top of
your lungs is the same as trying to
bar the door.”
Spencer called his appearance a
“very big win for us and a very big
loss for the University of Florida
and antifa.”
Zachary Bautista, a University of
Florida medical student, said he
views the protest as part of a larger
series of demonstrations related to
hate and injustice across the country. There was the women’s march
against President Trump and racism in Washington. There were the
marches against racial inequality
in Missouri.
Now, it’s Gainesville’s turn, he
said.
“Having the presence of someone like Richard Spencer here is a
call to action for us,” Bautista, 23,
said. “This is our opportunity to let
everyone know we don’t agree with
this. We want everyone to know we
want equality and opportunity and
for everyone to get along.”
Police on Thursday fenced off a
vast parking lot adjacent to the art
complex. Campus police, officers
from the Florida Highway Patrol
and other law enforcement agencies took up positions around the
campus and the designated protest
zone Thursday morning. Spencer
and his opponents praised the law
enforcement response.
All major roads leading to the
event were blocked by dump trucks
or other large vehicles.
Outside the barriers, a sign listed dozens of prohibited items: no
firearms, tasers, fireworks, torches,
masks or chains; no wagons or pull
carts; no pets, no drones, no skateboards or laser pointers.
Police made two arrests. A 28year-old man from Orlando was
arrested for carrying a firearm on
school property. And a 34-year-old
man was charged with resisting
arrest without violence.
Gov. Rick Scott (R) declared a
state of emergency days before the
speech. University officials sent out
cautionary emails about “the
event,” as they called it, urging students to avoid the area and denouncing the “hateful rhetoric” of
the National Policy Institute.
And protesters converged, blitzing social media. A group called No
Nazis at UF urged solidarity on
social media and offered detailed
plans and shuttle rides to get as
close as possible to the closed-off
area.
Mike Ryan Simonovich, 39, a
stay-at-home father from Gainesville, was trying to find tickets to
see Spencer’s speech. His plan was
to attend the event and then walk
out when Spencer started speaking
to “demonstrate my contempt for
his odious views.”
Ryan Simonovich said he acknowledged that Spencer’s right to
speak was protected by the First
Amendment.
“A roomful of angry liberals
shouting at him does more to promote his ideas than people walking
out in contempt does,” he said.
Spencer’s supporters had been
planning, too. On the Daily Stormer, Andrew Anglin advised people
to dress inconspicuously (“if you’ve
got Nazi tattoos, cover them up”),
avoid the designated protest area
(“TRAP ZONE”) and try to get a
ticket to the speech.
Spencer is trying to keep the
momentum going for his movement by appealing to college students, “trying to get young disaffected whites interested in white
nationalism,” as well as getting media attention, said Marilyn Mayo of
the Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism.
joe. heim@washpost.com
abigail.hauslohner@washpost.com
lori.rozsa@washpost.com
susan.svrluga@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
Appeals court takes case
on pregnant immigrant
BY M ARIA S ACCHETTI
AND A NN E . M ARIMOW
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) talks to reporters on his way to vote on amendments to the fiscal 2018 budget resolution. McCain threw his
support behind the budget, ensuring the GOP would have enough votes to pass the measure.
GOP-backed budget clears the Senate
Move paves the way for
Republicans to enact
tax overhaul unilaterally
BY
E LISE V IEBECK
The Senate approved the Republican-backed budget Thursday night, a major step forward
for the GOP effort to enact tax
cuts.
The budget’s passage will allow
the GOP to use a procedural
maneuver to pass tax legislation
through the Senate with 50 or
more votes, removing the need
for support from Democratic senators.
“Tonight, we completed the
first step toward replacing our
broken tax code. . . . We have a
once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to
replace a failing tax code that
holds Americans back with one
that actually works for them,”
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) said following
the 51-to-49 vote.
Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), who
said he believes the budget ought
to reduce the deficit, was the only
Republican to vote against it.
The budget opens the door to
expanding federal deficits by
$1.5 trillion over 10 years.
Tax cuts have become Republicans’ essential policy objective
since the Senate failed to pass
multiple bills to rewrite Obamacare. Approval of the budget is
expected to help shore up ties
between Senate GOP leaders and
President Trump, who is angry at
Republicans’ failure on health
care and bent on Congress ap-
proving a tax-reform package by
the end of the year.
At the same time, by agreeing
to the massive tax cut, Senate
Republicans
have
officially
moved the party far away from its
promised goal of ensuring that
the tax plan would not add to the
deficit. The White House and
House Republicans had vowed
that the tax cuts would be offset
with new revenue from the elimination of certain deductions, but
that is no longer the GOP’s goal.
Instead, they have abandoned
long-standing party orthodoxy of
deficit reduction and are seeking
a political win after months of
frustration on Capitol Hill.
On Thursday night, House and
Senate Republican leaders, with
the White House’s encouragement, were working jointly on
ways to make the Senate version
of the budget more likely to pass
the House, which would expedite
the budget process and allow the
party to pivot more quickly to the
tax bill itself.
“I applaud the Senate for passing a budget,” Speaker Paul D.
Ryan (R-Wis.) said in a statement.
“This action keeps us on track to
enacting historic tax reform that
will mean more jobs, fairer taxes,
and bigger paychecks for American families. We want Americans
to wake up in the new year with a
new tax code, one that is simple
and fair.”
Political pressure is on the GOP
leaders’ side: Republicans cannot
cut taxes without first passing the
budget resolution, giving them a
strong incentive to support it.
Trump had projected confidence about the Senate’s ability to
approve a budget and applauded
the Senate in a statement after
the vote.
“I think we have the votes for
the budget, which will be Phase
One of our massive tax cuts and
reform,” Trump said during a
meeting with Puerto Rican Gov.
Ricardo Roselló. “But I think we’ll
be successful tonight with respect
to the budget. . . . I think we have
the votes. And frankly, I think we
have the votes for the tax cuts,
which will follow fairly shortly
thereafter.”
The vote came after just over
six hours of amendment votes in
which Democrats sought to call
attention to controversial aspects
of the GOP tax plan.
Democrats had planned to focus on four key tax-reform topics
intended to make Republicans
cast politically awkward votes:
tax cuts for the wealthy, tax increases for the middle class, reductions to Medicare and Medicaid spending, and increases to the
budget deficit.
Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.)
proposed an amendment to prevent tax increases on people making less than $250,000 a year. The
measure would have also required the Senate to approve a
tax-reform bill with 60 votes rather than a simple majority. Senate
Budget Committee Chairman
Mike Enzi (R-Wyo.) called this
language a “poison pill,” and the
amendment was defeated 51 to 47.
Not all of the Democratic
amendments were related to the
tax plan, however. Sen. Maria
Cantwell (D-Wash.) offered language aimed at preventing oil
and gas drilling in the Arctic
National Wildlife Refuge. It failed
52 to 48.
Several Republican amendments were adopted with broad
support. Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.)
proposed language to make the
“American tax system simpler
and fairer for all Americans,”
which passed 98 to 0. Sen. Marco
Rubio (R-Fla.) proposed an
amendment in support of increasing the child tax credit,
which passed by voice vote.
Paul, one of the most vocal
GOP critics of the party’s budget,
proposed several measures to
lower the deficit and one designed to make it easier for the
upper chamber to repeal Obamacare. The amendments failed.
The GOP appeared to win
enough votes to pass its budget
Tuesday when Sen. John McCain
(R-Ariz.) threw his support behind the proposal, saying it would
provide a “path forward on tax
reform.” The return of Sen. Thad
Cochran (R-Miss.) from a healthrelated absence added to leaders’
confidence that they have the
votes for passage.
Republicans control 52 of the
Senate’s 100 seats, meaning they
could lose two votes from their
own party and still pass the budget. Without Cochran, Republicans would have been able to lose
only one vote.
The final amendment offered a
moment of levity after a long
night of votes. Sens. David Perdue
(R-Ga.) and Sheldon Whitehouse
(D-R.I.) offered language that
would eliminate future vote-aramas.
The amendment was approved
by unanimous voice vote, with
applause.
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
Damian Paletta, Karoun Demirjian
and Anne Gearan contributed to this
report.
A young undocumented immigrant’s legal battle to end her
pregnancy will move to a federal
appeals court Friday, with lawyers for the Trump administration arguing that the government
is not obligated to facilitate an
abortion for someone in the country illegally.
Government lawyers are seeking to halt a judge’s ruling
Wednesday that ordered officials
to allow the teen, who is being
held in Texas after crossing the
border illegally, to have the abortion this week “without delay.”
She is in her 15th week of
pregnancy. Texas bans most abortions after 20 weeks.
Federal officials say the 17year-old, who entered this country in September, could solve the
problem herself by voluntarily
leaving or finding a sponsor in the
United States to take custody of
her. “The Administration stands
ready to expedite her return to
her home country,” the White
House said in a statement.
But the American Civil Liberties Union, which is representing
the teenager, says she is entitled
to have an abortion, which she
would pay for, under the 1973
Supreme Court ruling in Roe v.
Wade.
They say the teen, who is from
Central America, was abused by
her parents and cannot easily
return home. And although she
has relatives in the United States,
she may not find a sponsor in
time to terminate her pregnancy.
“It is not appropriate to use
abortion as a bargaining chip,”
said Brigitte Amiri, her ACLU
lawyer. “She shouldn’t have to
give up that right.”
It remains unclear whether the
teen could legally obtain an abortion in her home country. The
ACLU has not released her nationality to preserve her privacy.
On Wednesday, U.S. District
Judge Tanya Chutkan in Washington sided with the ACLU and
ordered the government to swiftly allow the teenager, identified in
court papers as Jane Doe, to meet
with a doctor for counseling that
the state requires at least 24
hours before an abortion. The
meeting would clear the way for
the teen to have the procedure
Friday or Saturday, the judge
ruled.
But the Justice Department
appealed, and a three-judge panel
of the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the D.C. Circuit immediately
stayed part of Chutkan’s order.
The panel said the temporary halt
was intended to “give the court
sufficient opportunity to consider
the emergency motion for stay
and should not be construed in
any way as a ruling on the merits
of that motion.”
The judges — Karen LeCraft
Henderson, Brett M. Kavanaugh
and Patricia A. Millett — allowed
the teenager to undergo the statemandated counseling Thursday.
The ACLU said an abortion
provider will be ready to perform
the abortion Friday if the appeals
court rules in the teen’s favor.
The teenager is being held at a
shelter near the Mexican border
that is overseen by the U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services, which is responsible for
undocumented minors caught
crossing the border without family.
She learned she was pregnant
following a medical examination
after she was taken into federal
custody, her lawyer said. Federal
officials denied her request to
terminate the pregnancy on Sept.
27, citing the Trump administration’s policy of “refusing to facilitate abortions.”
Under the administration of
President Barack Obama, the government did not pay for abortions
except in the case of rape, incest
or a threat to the woman’s life. But
officials did not block immigrants
in U.S. custody from having abortions at their own expense.
The ACLU has asked the lower
court judge to extend any protections offered to the 17-year-old to
other unaccompanied, undocumented minors who are pregnant
and in U.S. custody.
If the teenager does not obtain
an abortion this week, her lawyers said, she may have to go to
another health center hundreds
of miles away because of scheduling problems and clinic hours.
Texas law requires that the same
doctor counsel a patient and perform the abortion.
The Supreme Court has ruled
that the government cannot impose an “undue burden” on a
woman’s right to terminate her
pregnancy in the early stages.
In its court filings, the Justice
Department said the U.S. government has a “legitimate interest in
promoting fetal life and childbirth over abortion.”
“HHS does not impose any
‘undue burden’ on her ability to
get an abortion merely by refusing to facilitate it,” the government wrote. “Courts have recognized that the government may
legitimately refuse to facilitate
abortion without violating a
woman’s constitutional rights.”
Attorneys general from nine
states are backing the federal
government, saying in a court
filing that there is no “constitutional right to abortion on demand.”
Texas Attorney General Ken
Paxton wrote that the high court
has never said that abortion
rights extend to undocumented
immigrants without “significant
ties” to the United States.
“The district court’s order effectively creates a right to abortion for anyone on Earth who
entered the United States illegally, no matter how briefly,” the
attorneys general said.
The teen’s lawyers say the government’s position is a clear constitutional violation and that the
teen should be allowed to be
transported for an abortion —
just as the government does for
federal prison inmates seeking
the procedure.
By “preventing her court-appointed representatives from
transporting her to the clinic, the
government
has
effectively
barred her from obtaining an
abortion,” the ACLU said. “This
they may not do.”
maria.sacchetti@washpost.com
ann.marimow@washpost.com
Kelly gives Trump cover in row over what president said to Gold Star widow
KELLY FROM A1
“bravely” and “expressed his condolences in the best way that he
could.”
“If you elect to call a family like
this, it is about the most difficult
thing you can imagine,” Kelly said.
“There’s no perfect way to make
that phone call.”
His voice growing thin, Kelly
expressed regret and apparent indignation that the commander in
chief’s interactions with Gold Star
families had become a subject of
public debate for four straight
days. “I just thought that that
might be sacred,” Kelly lamented.
What Kelly did not acknowledge
was that it was Trump who initiated that public discussion.
Asked by a reporter Monday
why he had been publicly silent
about the Niger ambush for 12
days, Trump claimed to have called
all Gold Star families during his
tenure and immediately politicized the issue by falsely accusing
former president Barack Obama
and other predecessors of doing so
rarely or never. At the time of that
news conference, Trump had yet to
call any relatives of the soldiers
killed in Niger.
The next day, Trump also suggested that reporters should ask
Kelly whether then-President
Obama had called him when his
son, Marine 1st Lt. Robert M. Kelly,
died in Afghanistan seven years
ago.
Kelly, who had gone to great
lengths to avoid injecting his per-
sonal story into political debates,
did not reveal Thursday how he felt
about Trump’s invoking his son. He
confirmed that there had been no
call from Obama but also said he
did not fault the former president
for not making one. In fact, Kelly
said, he had advised Trump not to
call the loved ones of dead soldiers.
“I said to him, ‘Sir, there’s nothing you can do to lighten the burden on these families,’ ” Kelly said.
The 67-year-old retired Marine
Corps general also sought to claim
the moral high ground by deploring the degradation of modern
American society. When he was
growing up, he said, women, religion and the dignity of life were
sacred. Now, he said, they no longer
are.
There was evident irony in Kelly’s making that particular point in
defense of Trump, whose presidential campaign last year was marked
by name-calling, harsh rhetoric
about Muslims, Mexicans and other minorities, and allegations of
sexual misconduct by more than a
dozen women.
The appearance was an attempt
to tamp down a self-created and
ballooning controversy over
Trump’s contacts with the families
of fallen soldiers. The Washington
Post on Wednesday identified at
least a half-dozen Gold Star families who were not called by Trump
as he had claimed and reported
that Trump had promised one
grieving father $25,000 in June but
had never sent a check; the White
House said it was sent this week
after The Post asked about the case.
Kelly specifically addressed
Trump’s call with Myeshia Johnson, the widow of Sgt. La David T.
Johnson, and reserved his harshest
criticism for Rep. Frederica S. Wilson (D-Fla.), a friend of the family’s
who was with Myeshia Johnson
when the president called and who
listened to the conversation on
speakerphone.
Kelly said he was “stunned,” “appalled” and “brokenhearted” to
learn Wednesday morning that
Wilson had criticized Trump’s tone
and choice of words in media interviews. He accused the congresswoman of “selfish” behavior and of
speaking “in the long tradition of
empty barrels making the most
noise.”
But Kelly also appeared to effectively confirm Wilson’s account by
echoing some of the language she
had described — an account that
Trump had called “totally fabricated.”
Kelly said Trump’s message to
Johnson was: “He knew what he
was getting himself into, because
he enlisted. There’s no reason to
enlist. He enlisted. And he was
where he wanted to be, exactly
where he wanted to be, with exactly
the people he wanted to be with
when his life was taken.”
Kelly also said he was shocked
that Wilson had listened in on the
call, although Kelly was among the
staffers who listened in on the president’s line, according to White
House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.
“When I listened to this woman
and what she was saying and what
she was doing on TV, the only thing
I could do to collect my thoughts
was to go and walk among the
finest men and women on this
earth — and you can always find
them, because they’re in Arlington
National Cemetery,” Kelly said,
adding that he spent 90 minutes
walking among the tombstones
there Wednesday collecting his
thoughts.
Wilson told Politico in response
to Kelly’s remarks that Trump’s
chief of staff is “trying to keep his
job. He will say anything. There
were other people who heard what
I heard.”
Johnson’s aunt, who raised him
as her own son after his mother
died when he was young, has
backed up Wilson’s version of
events.
Late Thursday, Trump continued his criticism of Wilson, tweeting: “The Fake News is going crazy
with wacky Congresswoman Wilson(D), who was SECRETLY on a
very personal call, and gave a total
lie on content!”
Surprising reporters Thursday
afternoon, Kelly took the lectern
from Sanders about two minutes
into the daily briefing and spoke
for about 18 minutes. He answered
a few questions before departing,
but only from journalists who said
they knew Gold Star parents.
Kelly, who became the highestranking military official to lose a
child in Iraq or Afghanistan,
watched both his sons follow him
into the Marine Corps. At the time
Robert died, by stepping on a land
mine in southern Afghanistan in
2010, Kelly and his two sons had
participated in a combined 11 combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Kelly noted Thursday that his
surviving son is serving in Iraq. He
has been private about Robert’s
death, even though both his and his
sons’ military service clearly informs his thinking on White House
foreign policy and national security decisions, several White House
officials said.
“In my case, hours after my son
was killed, his friends were calling
us from Afghanistan, telling us
what a great guy he was. Those are
the only phone calls that really
matter,” Kelly said. “If you elect to
call a family like this — and it’s
about the most difficult thing you
could imagine — there’s no perfect
way to make that phone call.”
Kelly began his remarks with a
stark and meticulous explanation
of what happens to fallen military
personnel overseas.
“Their buddies wrap them up in
whatever passes as a shroud, puts
them on a helicopter as a routine
and sends them home,” he said.
Their first stop along the way is
when they’re packed in ice, typically at the airhead, and then they’re
flown to, usually, Europe, where
they’re then packed in ice again
and flown to Dover Air Force Base.”
He also walked through the
process of what happens when “a
casualty officer” visits the home of
a fallen soldier.
“The casualty officer proceeds to
break the heart of a family member
and stays with that family until —
well, for a long, long time,” Kelly
said. “Even after the interment. So
that’s what happens. Who are these
young men and women? They are
the best one percent this country
produces.”
Aside from the controversy over
Trump’s outreach to the families of
the slain soldiers, the administration is facing mounting questions
about the deadly episode itself.
Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain (RAriz.) threatened Thursday to use
subpoena powers if Trump administration officials are not more
forthcoming about the attack.
“There’s a mind-set over there
that they’re a unicameral government,” McCain said, accusing the
Trump administration of intentionally trying to keep Congress in
the dark about the military’s foreign engagements and saying “it
was easier under Obama.”
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis
took issue with media coverage of
the aftermath of the ambush, after
which Johnson was found to be
missing and his body was not recovered for about two days.
“I would just ask you not to
question the actions of the troops
who were caught in the firefight
and question whether they did everything they could to bring everyone out at once,” Mattis said.
anne.gearan@washpost.com
philip.rucker@washpost.com
john.wagner@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
Trump suggests that FBI may have ‘paid for’ dossier alleging ties to Russia
BY A NNE G EARAN
AND D EVLIN B ARRETT
President Trump suggested
Thursday that the FBI may have
had a hand in creating an intelligence dossier that alleged ties
between Russia and Trump’s
presidential campaign.
“Workers of firm involved with
the discredited and Fake Dossier
take the 5th. Who paid for it,
Russia, the FBI or the Dems (or
all)?” Trump wrote on Twitter.
The compendium of information about Trump, much of it
unproven, was produced by a former British intelligence agent last
year, mostly before Trump won
the 2016 election. Officials have
said the FBI has confirmed some
of the information and rejected
other parts, and caution that it
may be impossible to verify or
disprove the rest.
Trump has vigorously denied
allegations in the document that
the Russian government has collected compromising information about him and was engaged
in an active effort to assist his
campaign.
The Washington Post has previously reported that the FBI
agreed in October 2016 to pay the
dossier’s author, Christopher
Steele, for further work that
might help its own investigation
into Russian election activities.
The FBI, as well as the Senate
Intelligence Committee, is investigating Russian interference in
the election and alleged contacts
between Trump’s associates and
the Kremlin.
As the allegations contained in
the dossier began appearing in
news stories and the dossier itself
became the subject of intense
public debate, Steele became a
publicly known figure and the FBI
did not pursue further work from
him, The Post reported in February.
Trump’s Twitter question about
whether the FBI may have “paid
for” the document suggests that
he is asking whether the bureau
had been involved earlier in the
process, although his precise
meaning is unclear.
An FBI spokesman declined to
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump made his suggestion about the dossier in a tweet.
comment.
Republicans, particularly Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E.
Grassley (Iowa), have sought further answers from the FBI about
its relationship with Steele, and
its plan to pay him for information that could incriminate
Trump or his associates.
It is not uncommon for the FBI
to pay sources of information, and
Steele was well known to the FBI.
Previously, Steele had helped the
FBI put together a sprawling global bribery case involving FIFA, the
governing body of world soccer.
When Steele started compiling
the dossier in 2016, he was doing
so for a Washington firm called
Fusion GPS. The firm began re-
searching Trump first for an unidentified GOP donor, and then
later for Democrats.
Republican lawmakers have
been pressing Fusion GPS for
months to identify those who paid
for Steele’s work, but the firm has
refused. Fusion GPS says that it
has promised confidentiality to
its clients and that violating that
obligation would harm its business model.
On Wednesday, a lawyer for
Fusion GPS said the firm’s employees refused to testify in response to a subpoena from the
House Intelligence Committee,
invoking their constitutional
privilege not to do so. The firm’s
founder, Glenn Simpson, had previously given a 10-hour interview
to the Senate Judiciary Committee.
The dossier alleged, among
other things, that associates of
Trump colluded with the Kremlin
on cyberattacks on Democrats.
Trump said Monday that there
was “no collusion” with Russia
and that special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III’s investigation into
Russian election activities should
conclude quickly. Mueller’s probe,
however, is broader than just the
collusion inquest.
Steele began his Trump investigation in June 2016 after working
for another client preparing a
report on Russian efforts to interfere with politics in Europe.
U.S. intelligence had been independently tracking Russian efforts to influence electoral outcomes in Europe.
“Russian regime has been cultivating, supporting and assisting
TRUMP for at least 5 years,” Steele
wrote that June.
Steele’s information was provided by an intermediary to the
FBI and U.S. intelligence officials
after the Democratic National
Convention in July 2016, when
hacked Democratic emails were
first released by WikiLeaks, according to a source familiar with
the events. After the convention,
Steele contacted a friend in the
FBI to personally explain what he
had found.
anne.gearan@washpost.com
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
Rohingya
abandon
faith in
Suu Kyi
BURMA FROM A1
DAMIR SAGOLJ/REUTERS
AHIM RANI/REUTERS
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Rohingya refugees gather after crossing
into Bangladesh from Burma. Aung San Suu Kyi, shown attending
a royal banquet in Brunei this month, spent years under house
arrest, in the process becoming an anti-authoritarian icon who
inspired people in Burma and around the world. Rohingya refugee
Abdusalam, who says Suu Kyi inspired his activism, wipes away a
tear this month at his house in a refugee camp in Bangladesh.
MAX BEARAK/THE WASHINGTON POST
INDIA
CHINA
BANGLA.
Dhaka
BURMA
(MYANMAR)
Detail
Naypyidaw
R
AK
300 MILES
HIN
THAI.
E
to ever have hoped?
Abdusalam, now 62, first
heard of Suu Kyi in 1988, when
he was his village’s headman.
Word spread of a student uprising against the junta, and that
the daughter of Burma’s beloved
founding father was leading a
new political party, the National
League for Democracy, or NLD.
She was daring the military —
which assassinated her father in
1947 and took over the government in 1962 — to call national
elections.
“She was like a bright light,”
said Abdusalam, who like many
Rohingya uses only one name.
He beat a drum. The villagers
assembled. He told them they
must all vote for the NLD. And
when the day finally came, they
did. So did most Rohingya and
most of Burma, which is also
called Myanmar. Suu Kyi’s party
won in a landslide.
What came next was disastrous. Suu Kyi spent 15 of the
following 21 years under house
arrest, unable to see her dying
husband in Britain for fear that
she never would be allowed back.
The military terrorized groups
seen as part of the uprising,
including the Rohingya.
Suu Kyi’s name became synonymous with the struggle for human rights. She was awarded the
Nobel Peace Prize in 1991. Her
reputation as a saint grew, even
though she seldom spoke out
against the military’s mistreatment of minority groups.
In retrospect, it is unlikely that
Suu Kyi ever had much sympathy
for the Rohingya. Francis Wade,
the author of “Myanmar’s Enemy
Within,” said Suu Kyi never addressed the Rohingya in her 1988
speeches that had so stirred
Abdusalam.
“I’ve never found a historic
record of her calling for them to
be made citizens,” said Wade.
Even so, Abdusalam held on to
his NLD membership card as a
talisman through those dark,
scarring years.
“The soldiers would come into
the mosque while we were praying, when we couldn’t run away
without offending God, and kidnap us. Then they made us carry
their supplies as if we were
donkeys. They would make us
cook their pork. They would pour
liquor onto our parents’ graves.
They would come into our village, see a girl they wanted, take
her to her home, tell her family to
leave and rape her right there in
her own house,” he said. “Everything we had could be taken at a
moment’s notice.”
He stood up to reenact a raid
on his village. Spittle flew from
his mouth as he shouted. He
swung his arms wildly as if he
were wielding a machete. His
voice grew hoarse. He lunged
forward, jabbing the phantom
blade before collapsing into a
chair, overcome with grief.
“They killed a baby like that in
front of me,” he said, his face
buried in his lap as he weeped
into his sarong. “We were just
animals to them.”
The Rohingya occupy a
uniquely marginalized spot in
Burma’s ethnic hierarchy. They
are Muslims in a country that is
nearly 90 percent Buddhist.
Indian
Ocean
Rangoon
Cox’s Bazar
BANGLADESH
Bay of
Bengal
Kutupalong
refugee camp
BURMA
10 MILES
THE WASHINGTON POST
They aren’t citizens. While some
Rohingya claim centuries of history in what is now Burma,
many Burmese see them as a
post-colonial stain, brought by
the British from Bengal in the
19th century to work the fields
and left to grow in number
through the 20th. Their distinct
appearance sets them apart, and
their overt religiosity makes
them suspect; the military has
used a feeble Rohingya insurgency to cast all Rohingya as
potential terrorists.
Suu Kyi hasn’t participated in
the demonizing of the Rohingya
that now has become widespread in Burma, but she has
protested the use of the term
“Rohingya.” Spokesmen for her
office prefer the term “Bengali,”
which implies that the Rohingya
are illegal immigrants despite
being born in Burma. In a speech
last week addressing the crisis,
she referred to the Rohingya
obliquely as “those who have
crossed over to Bangladesh.”
The orders to act against the
Rohingya did not originate with
Suu Kyi but with Senior Gen. Min
Aung Hlaing, Burma’s top military official. But she has not
acknowledged atrocities com-
mitted against them, which have
been documented in detail by
journalists and human rights
organizations.
She and the military have
denied allegations that the expulsion or even extermination of
the Rohingya is underway, claiming instead that “cleansing operations” in Rohingya villages are
aimed at rooting out an Islamist
insurgency. The United Nations
has repeatedly described the operations as “ethnic cleansing”
and said that the military’s intent is not just to drive out the
Rohingya but to prevent their
return by incinerating hundreds
of their villages.
Suu Kyi’s diluted response to
the crisis also may reflect her
continued subordination to the
military, which retained a central role in the government even
while making democratic concessions. A quarter of seats in the
parliament are reserved for the
military, as are the Home Affairs,
Foreign Affairs and Defense ministries. The military holds a ma-
jority of seats on the National
Defense and Security Council,
which has the power to dissolve
the government.
That means the military could
step in and replace Suu Kyi if it
felt she was interfering with its
plans. If Suu Kyi expressed public support for the Rohingya, her
standing among most Burmese
could plummet, making her removal easier. Burmese citizenship for the Rohingya is almost
unthinkable in the current political climate.
“The chances are getting slimmer and slimmer — nonexistent
now, probably,” said Wade.
The death of that dream is
crushing for Mohammad Siddiq,
whose father, Mohammad Hussein, was a proud card-carrying,
flag-waving NLD member. He
recalled that his father’s NLD
card even saved their family
from forced repatriation in the
1990s.
“The U.N. stepped in and told
the Bangladeshis that anyone
who was associated with the
NLD was at extra risk of getting
killed if they went back,” said
Siddiq. “Baba even told a judge
here once, ‘When democracy
comes to Burma, then we’ll immediately go back!’ And he
would go find the red NLD flag
he brought with him and show it
to us.”
Hussein died in 2014, living
long enough to lose hope in the
NLD but not to witness the
calamity that has befallen the
Rohingya in the past two
months. Siddiq, now 33, thinks
the Rohingya will be stateless
forever.
“Baba would put us to bed at
night, and lots of times he would
tell us stories about Burma. ‘We
have paddies there,’ he’d say. ‘Just
like the locals here have their
own paddies.’ It makes me cry
just to think about it,” he said.
“Ever since I’ve become a man,
I’ve never tasted a fresh fish like
the one’s he’d tell us about. He
died, too, without tasting it
again.”
max.bearak@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
Gillespie has lobbied for companies with big stakes in Va.
GILLESPIE FROM A1
Bank of America and Microsoft
contract directly with the state
government, do millions of dollars of business in Virginia, and
lobby to influence state laws and
policies. All but Anthem have
hired Gillespie on and off for
more than a decade, dating to his
time as co-founder of one of the
most successful lobbying firms in
Washington.
If he is elected governor,
Gillespie would face decisions in
which the public’s interests may
conflict with the interests of
companies that have paid his
firms millions of dollars collectively for lobbying and consulting services — and that could hire
him again.
“That’s an issue for him to
overcome, and it’s a nonpartisan
concern for both liberals and
conservatives,” said Tom Fitton,
president of Judicial Watch, a
conservative government watchdog group. “The concern is that
politicians are more concerned
about the payout on K Street that
they may get when they leave
office as opposed to the public’s
interest when they are in office.”
Gillespie’s opponent in the
race, Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam,
also has financial ties to several
companies active in the state,
through his stock portfolio. Virginia’s conflict-of-interest laws
generally allow lawmakers and
state officials to act on bills
affecting companies in which
they own stock.
Gillespie, who declined an interview with The Washington
Post, closed his consulting firm,
Ed Gillespie Strategies, shortly
before launching his campaign in
January. The Republican nominee has no current financial
interests in the companies, such
as stock holdings, and he and his
wife would put their personal
investments in a blind trust if
elected, campaign spokesman
David Abrams said.
“As governor, Ed will be an
honest, ethical, principled, hardworking, faithful servant-leader
worthy of Virginia,” Abrams said,
repeating a phrase that Gillespie
and his staff have used repeatedly throughout the campaign.
Abrams noted that Gillespie voluntarily released the
names of the clients he advised
UP
TO
last year. Virginia’s financial disclosure form requires only that
candidates list the types of businesses and the range of compensation. “Ed went above and beyond,” Abrams said.
One year after President
Trump won election, in part by
railing against influence peddlers and vowing to upend the
status quo, Gillespie is trying to
ride the anti-establishment tide
as well as a former Republican
National Committee chairman
can. His campaign biography omits his lobbying work and
tells the up-from-the-bootstraps
story of the son of an Irish
immigrant grocery store owner
who rose to become a top adviser
to President George W. Bush.
When Gillespie was tapped to
serve in the White House in 2007,
his lobbying firm, Quinn
Gillespie & Associates, represented more than 100 clients, including some of the nation’s biggest
companies and trade groups, according to a financial disclosure
form. The firm reported
$17.2 million in revenue from
federal lobbying in 2016, according to public records.
It was paid more than
$3.2 million from 2001 to 2007 by
three of the companies he consulted for last year — AT&T, Bank
of America and Microsoft — according to public records.
Gillespie also consulted for those
companies before his 2014 Senate campaign, according to his
federal candidate disclosure
form.
A gubernatorial bid by a former lobbyist is not without precedent. Virginia’s current governor, Terry McAuliffe (D), was
previously the managing partner
of a law firm with a lobbying
practice, although he did not
personally lobby. Haley Barbour,
a Republican who founded a
major lobbying firm that employed Gillespie early in his lobbying career, served as governor
of Mississippi from 2004 to 2012.
Gillespie, whose reputation as
a Washington insider could be a
liability in this election cycle, has
proposed an ethics and campaign finance platform that includes provisions opposed by
lawmakers in his own party. His
plan would ban personal use of
campaign funds, slow the “revolving door” by prohibiting for-
60% OFF
Virginia governor’s race
This is the second of two stories examining how Virginia’s gubernatorial
candidates could face challenges leading the state because of their
financial dealings with companies that have extensive interests there.
See Thursday’s report at wapo.st/Northamstocks.
BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Ed Gillespie’s campaign biography omits the lobbying work he has
done, which has been interspersed with government jobs.
Ed Gillespie’s two tracks
The Virginia gubernatorial candidate worked for Rep. Dick Armey (R-Tex.) and
did three stints in the George W. Bush administration, working as a lobbyist in
between those jobs and as a consultant after.
Aide to Rep. Armey
PRIVATE
Working as lobbyist/consultant
‘85
‘90
‘95
mer state employees from lobbying their prior agencies for two
years, and require more frequent
disclosures of conflicts of interest.
Critics, however, pointed to
Gillespie’s own experience with
the revolving door — he worked
for Rep. Dick Armey (R-Tex.)
from 1985 to 1996 and did three
stints in the Bush administration, and advised private clients
as a lobbyist or consultant in
between those jobs and after
leaving the White House. Part of
his firm’s pitch was that he could
leverage his relationships with
those in power.
In 2002, Quinn Gillespie posted notable press clippings on its
website, including one that said
Gillespie “advises the White
House, which puts him in a
perfect position to help his clients.” Also cited was this quote
from a Washington Post story: “Ed Gillespie has emerged as a
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one-stop power broker. He advises top White House officials,
works for GOP campaigns, lobbies for major corporations and
opines on political talk shows.”
Gillespie’s private-sector work
has fueled frequent Democratic
attacks since early 2014, when he
first sought to make the leap
from political operative to elected official. Gillespie came close to
unseating Sen. Mark R. Warner
(D-Va.) that year.
“I served eight years in the U.S.
Army, I showed up for this country,” Northam said at a debate
Oct. 10. “You’ve been a K Street
lobbyist in Washington. The only
time you show up is when you get
paid.”
Gillespie didn’t flinch. “I did
show up for my clients, and I was
effective,” he said.
In a reprise of a Warner attack
ad, Northam dubs Gillespie “Enron Ed” in a television spot that
tries to yoke him to the energy
company that went bankrupt in
2001 amid a massive accounting
fraud. Gillespie was among four
lobbyists registered to represent
the company that year, and he cut
ties before the bankruptcy filing. He has said he had no
knowledge of Enron’s accounting
tactics.
Northam has stock holdings of
between $5,001 and $50,000
each in AT&T, Bank of America
and Dominion Energy, all of
which do business in the state,
according to his candidate financial disclosure form. Environ-
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McAuliffe was involved in an
effort to persuade Anthem to
stay. When the company reversed
its decision, he tweeted: “Just got
a call from @AnthemInc. They
are staying in Virginia!” Anthem
said its decision to remain in
parts of the state preserved insurance for up to 70,000 Virginians.
AT&T lobbied on six 2016 bills
in Virginia — legislation related
to cellular use while driving,
telecommunications
towers,
taxes and workplace safety, according to VPAP. In July, Virginia
became the first state to announce participation in a nationwide public safety broadband
network, created by AT&T with
partners, to allow public safety
officials to communicate more
reliably in a crisis.
Last month, McAuliffe attended an event celebrating an underwater data cable built in part by
Microsoft that stretches from
Virginia to Spain. Microsoft also
operates a data center in Mecklenburg County that employs
more than 250 people. The data
center’s latest expansion received
a $500,000 grant from a state
business incentive program,
McAuliffe announced.
Microsoft lobbied on Virginia
bills related to tax breaks and
high school graduation requirements last year, according to
VPAP.
Bank of America also has a
large presence in Virginia, with
about 133 branches. It lobbied on
bills in Richmond last year that
dealt with mortgage applications
and credit unions, records show.
Bank of America was one of the
biggest beneficiaries of the Troubled Asset Relief Program, the
government
bailout
that
Gillespie helped push when he
was in the White House after
previously working as a lobbyist
for the bank.
Given the myriad ways a governor can affect the fortunes of
large companies doing business
in the state, voters should consider Gillespie’s ties with his former
clients, said Eisman of Common
Cause.
“The candidate knows who
helped him get there and helped
him make his fortune,” he
said. “Voters need to ask what
steps the candidate would take to
ensure his decisions in public
office are based on the merits and
not those past relationships.”
beth.reinhard@washpost.com
Andrew Ba Tran and Alice Crites
contributed to this report.
McCain demands briefings on Niger
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UP TO
Stints in Bush White House
GOVT.
mentalists
have
accused
Northam of putting Dominion’s
interests ahead of those of his
constituents. Northam has denied the claim and has pledged to
put his investments in a blind
trust if he is elected.
Gillespie also has faced criticism from a government watchdog group for declining to elaborate on the consulting work he
did in 2016 with two conglomerates, DCI Group and Brunswick
Group. Brunswick works in 14
countries and employs “experts
in every industry,” according to
its website, while DCI claims to
be “widely acknowledged as the
deepest and most sophisticated
political network in the public
affairs industry.” State law does
not require Gillespie to disclose
clients unless they do business in
Virginia.
“What Gillespie has disclosed
only takes you part of the way,
even though it satisfies the law,”
said Dale Eisman, a senior writer
for the government watchdog
group Common Cause who lives
in Springfield, Va. “We still don’t
know everyone whom he might
be beholden to and what their
connections are to Virginia.”
In voluntarily disclosing his
clients from last year, Gillespie
said he advised Anthem and
AT&T on proposed mergers and
helped Microsoft and Bank of
America with “reputation management and communications
strategy.”
All four companies or their top
executives have contributed to
the Gillespie campaign or to a
committee he controls, according
to the Virginia Public Access
Project (VPAP), and they have
ongoing interests in the state.
The governor can directly affect
those vast interests when making
policy, signing legislation and
recruiting businesses to the state.
The proposed $54 billion
merger last year of Anthem, the
state’s largest insurer, and Cigna
would have created the nation’s
largest insurance company. Virginia insurance regulators opposed the merger, citing “the
potential of harm to policyholders as well as the general public.”
Judge Amy Berman Jackson of
the U.S. District Court for the
District of Columbia blocked the
deal in February, saying that “it is
likely to result in higher prices
and that it will have other anticompetitive effects.”
In August, Anthem announced
that it would pull out of the
Affordable Care Act’s exchange in
Virginia amid uncertainty over
the future of such marketplaces
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K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
The Senate’s top Republican on
military matters threatened
Thursday to subpoena the Trump
administration if officials are not
more forthcoming about the Niger
attack that left four American service members dead — just one of the
steps lawmakers are taking to insist that Congress be read in on
military operations before tragedies occur.
Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman John McCain (RAriz.) is pushing the Trump administration to brief key members of
Congress about the existence of
ongoing operations — something
he said the Obama administration
was far better about doing than the
Trump team.
“There’s a mind-set over there
that they’re a unicameral government,” McCain said on Thursday,
accusing the Trump administration of intentionally trying to keep
Congress in the dark about the
military’s foreign engagements
and noting that “it was easier under Obama.”
“We are coequal branches of
government; we should be informed at all times,” he added.
“We’re just not getting the information in the timely fashion that
we need.”
McCain communicated those
frustrations to national security
adviser H.R. McMaster during a
Wednesday afternoon meeting
with Armed Services Committee
members.
While
McMaster
seemed sympathetic to his demands that Congress be better informed, McCain was unconvinced
that that would lead to any policy
changes, noting that “talk is
cheap.”
Tensions between lawmakers
and the Trump administration
about how extensively key lawmakers such as McCain are briefed
on active operations have flared in
recent weeks after four U.S. Special
Forces soldiers died in an ambush
in Niger. Staff Sgt. Bryan Black,
Staff Sgt. Jeremiah W. Johnson,
Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright, and Sgt.
La David Johnson had been in
Niger as part of a counterterrorism
mission to provide advice and
training to local forces and were
not expected to come into contact
with enemy fighters.
Lawmakers on Capitol Hill have
yet to be briefed about the particulars of the attack — a delay that led
McCain to accuse the administration this week of not being upfront
with Congress about the particulars of the ambush. On Thursday,
McCain added that he was prepared to use “everything, everything, everything” at his disposal
to get complete information about
the attack, even if “it may require a
subpoena.”
McMaster, he added, promised
on Wednesday to brief lawmakers
soon.
But the lawmakers’ frustrations
run deeper than simply being underinformed about one attack. McCain and Sen. Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.) said Thursday that before
the news of the ambush, they had
almost no knowledge about what
U.S. Special Forces were doing in
Niger.
“Very little,” McCain said, when
asked whether he knew anything
about the military’s mission there.
He surmised that there were likely
to be other troops deployed in
global operations that the committee had not been made aware of,
“but I don’t know who they are.”
Graham, who also met with McMaster on Wednesday, said that
his knowledge of U. S. forces’ work
in Niger was “not in any great
detail, just in general.”
“I’m all for going after terrorists,” Graham added, “but I want to
know before I read about it in the
paper where our people are and
what they’re doing.”
White House Chief of Staff John
F. Kelly addressed the confusion
surrounding the events in Niger on
Thursday, telling reporters that
“there’s an investigation ongoing.
An investigation doesn’t mean
anything was wrong. An investigation doesn’t mean people’s heads
are going to roll. The fact is they
need to find out what happened
and why it happened.”
But he did not promise to expedite getting information out to the
public, adding: “I’ve read the same
stories you have. I actually know a
lot more than I’m letting on, but
I’m not going to tell you.”
The FBI is assisting in the investigation, a U.S. official said Thursday. The official declined to describe the particular assistance,
first reported by the Wall Street
Journal, but characterized it as
routine and noted that the bureau
has personnel in Africa. The FBI
has assisted in past military investigations, including the killing of
U.S. soldiers in Jordan.
The dispute over disclosure of
operations is just one of the latest
arenas in which McCain has tangled with the Trump administration over its defense policy. He has
accused the Trump team of not
living up to its promises to better
fund the military in its budget
request — a subject that is gripping
Congress as members hash out the
particulars of a budget and an annual defense authorization bill.
McCain has excoriated the administration as being unprepared for
the aftermath of the Islamic State
in the Middle East and as too soft
on Russia after Moscow’s attempts
to challenge Washington on the
world stage and meddle in various
government systems and the 2016
U.S. election.
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
Karen DeYoung, Matt Zapotosky and
Devlin Barrett contributed to this
report.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A9
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Former presidents, current senator add voices to chorus of Trump detractors
PRESIDENTS FROM A1
along civic values is to first live up
to them.”
Bush did not mention Trump
by name, and former aides emphasized that his message echoed
words he has spoken before. But
the fact that a former president
was sounding the alarm about
American values and the United
States’ role in the world at a time
when Trump has unsettled allies
abroad and provoked intense political backlash at home injected
his remarks with greater urgency.
The scene was remarkable in
part because Bush has largely
remained out of the political spotlight since leaving office amid low
popularity in 2009 and had made
a point not to criticize or secondguess his Democratic successor,
Barack Obama. Just hours after
Bush completed his speech,
Obama also made a veiled critique of the Trump era, calling on
Democrats at a New Jersey campaign event to “send a message to
the world that we are rejecting a
politics of division, we are rejecting a politics of fear.”
That Trump’s two most recent
predecessors felt liberated, or
perhaps compelled, to reenter the
political arena in a manner that
offered an implicit criticism of
him is virtually unprecedented in
modern politics, historians said.
Trump has been harshly critical of
both Bush and Obama — calling
each of them the “worst” president at one time or another — and
mercilessly mocked the 43rd
president’s brother Jeb Bush, the
former Florida governor, during
the 2016 Republican primaries.
George W. Bush was taking aim
at Trump’s “roiling of the traditional institutions of the country
and, in particular, demeaning the
office of the president by a kind of
crude or vulgar bashing of opponents,” said Robert Dallek, a presidential historian and author.
“I think this is Bush throwing
down the gauntlet and feeling
that this is a man who has gone
too far,” Dallek said. The discretion former presidents traditionally afforded their successors “is
now sort of fading to the past
because of the belligerence of
Trump.”
It’s not just the former presidents. Two days ago, Sen. John
McCain (R-Ariz.), while receiving
the National Constitution Center’s Liberty Medal, lambasted
“half-baked, spurious nationalism” and suggested that the United States was abandoning its leadership role, an approach the Vietnam War veteran and former prisoner of war called “unpatriotic.”
McCain’s critique prompted
Trump to warn him to “be careful” because he is prepared to
“fight back.”
The common thread among
Bush’s and McCain’s words was a
defense of the post-World War II
liberal order that America helped
build which supported strong security alliances, a defense of human rights and an open economic
system of free trade, said Richard
Fontaine, who served on the National Security Council under
Bush and was a foreign policy
adviser to McCain.
Although Republicans and
Democrats have disagreed over
the means to achieve such objectives, Trump has opened a direct
assault on many of these ideals,
Fontaine said.
“The hallmark of McCain’s and
Bush’s speeches was to try to
re-center us on what have been,
since 1945, these traditional
ends,” said Fontaine, now the
president of the Center for a New
American Security.
Before leaving office, Obama
had said his goal was to remain
out of the political spotlight in
part to afford his successor the
political space to govern, as Bush
had done for him. He cautioned at
the time, however, that he would
speak out if he saw “core values”
at risk.
Since Trump took office,
Obama has spoken out on occasion to defend his legacy against
Trump’s attempts to repeal the
Affordable Care Act, unwind U.S.
participation in the Paris climate
accord and impose new limits on
immigration.
On Thursday, Obama returned
to the campaign trail, stumping
for Democratic gubernatorial
candidates in New Jersey and
Virginia. Though his remarks
were not as dire as Bush’s, Obama
said in New Jersey that “some of
the politics we see now we
thought we put that to bed. That’s
folks looking 50 years back. It’s
the 21st century, not the 19th century.”
He also reminded his audience
that “you can’t take this election
or any election for granted.” Pausing a beat, he added, “I don’t know
if you all noticed that.”
Jennifer Psaki, who worked as
White House communications director under Obama, said the unifying themes between Obama and
Bush are “humanity and empathy
toward the American public.”
The two leaders are not weigh-
ing in on the political news of the
day, she noted, but are instead
“speaking to the conduct, the empathy, the leadership qualities
that the American public needs of
someone in the Oval Office.”
Bush opened his remarks by
speaking in English and Spanish
and noting that refugees from
Afghanistan, China, North Korea
and Venezuela were seated in the
audience. This week, two federal
judges temporarily enjoined
Trump’s travel ban on immigrants
and refugees from several countries.
Bush, who had unsuccessfully
attempted to advance legislation
that featured a path to citizenship
for undocumented immigrants,
later praised the “forgotten dynamism that immigration has always brought to America.”
Bush warned that “bigotry
seems emboldened” in a passage
that evoked the aftermath of the
white supremacist rally in Charlottesville in August, which left a
female counterprotester dead.
Trump had drawn intense criticism
from Democrats and some Republicans for failing to clearly and
promptly denounce the hate
groups and suggesting equivalence
between protesters on both sides.
“Bigotry or white supremacy in
any form is blasphemy against the
American creed,” Bush said in a
line that drew the most applause.
He paused and appeared to grin.
On Twitter, as liberal and moderate pundits praised Bush’s re-
marks, some far-right commentators mocked them by noting that
many had lambasted Bush’s record of lengthy wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan. Bush’s aides had at
times called on the public to rally
around the president in the wake
of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist
attacks and suggested that criticism of Bush was unpatriotic.
Eliot Cohen, who served as a
State Department counselor in
the Bush administration, said
those who consistently attack
Bush’s record as a way to delegitimize anything he says could wind
up helping Trump continue to
sow division by inadvertently validating his tactics.
“Politics are now about discrediting people by ad hominem
attacks, not by argumentation,”
Cohen said. Those who opposed
Bush’s wars have a fair point of
view, he said, but their constant
“demonization does help make it
easier for Trump.”
david.nakamura@washpost.com
for
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
The World
Afghan
army post
decimated
by Taliban
T
he sweets usually fly
off the shelves during
the Hindu festival of
Diwali, but this year,
only a handful of people stopped by. Idle employees
waited around to take orders
while the neatly piled towers of
shimmering confections waited
for customers.
Famed in Delhi’s Chandni
Chowk market, Kanwarji Bhagirathmal is one of many small
businesses in Delhi where sales
have slowed. “This time last
year, there was a rush of people
standing in front of the shop,”
said Rachit Gupta, who runs the
sweets store. “People who were
spending 1,000 rupees [$15] last
year are spending 600-700 now
[$9-$11].”
In the past year, India’s economic performance has fallen
short of expectations. The shock
of major economic changes has
caused panic and confusion,
leaving some small businesses
like Gupta’s with slower sales
than in past years.
“If food is something people
are willing to forgo, then I’m not
sure what’s happening to others,” he said.
The downturn is especially
bitter because of the promises
Prime Minister Narendra Modi
made when he came to power in
2014. Chiding his predecessor Manmohan Singh, an
Oxford-educated
economist
who oversaw the economic liberalization of India in the 1990s,
Modi presented himself as a
financial genius who presided
over the state of Gujarat
throughout years of boom. He
spoke of his own rise from a
streetside tea seller as a personal
economic miracle, promising
jobs for the young and a new
focus on manufacturing to take
on neighboring China.
But Modi’s promises have
gone
unfulfilled.
Growth
slumped to a three-year low
from April to June, just 5.7 percent. Job creation has stagnated,
leaving millions without work.
In November 2016, Modi
made a surprise announcement
declaring 86 percent of India’s
cash defunct, saying the process
of replacing the country’s paper
money, also known as demonetization, would do away with untaxed stacks of “black money.”
Just afterward, the lines outside
Gupta’s shop vanished entirely.
“I didn’t see people coming for
days,” he said.
In July, a new goods-andservices tax was introduced, but
there has been confusion over
its implementation. The tax replaced varied state taxes and
consolidates India’s economy
into a single market for the first
time, and it resulted in a price
increase for items and services.
Gupta, like many traders in
Chandni Chowk, still doesn’t
know how much tax to charge.
He said even his accountant
didn’t know. “If the people at the
top don’t know what’s happening,” he said, “then how will
people lower down the ladder
know what to do?”
“Everything was fine” until
Modi’s
economic
changes
kicked in, said Jayshree Sengupta, a senior fellow at the Observer Research Foundation. She
said demonetization hurt India’s vast informal sector, which
dealt primarily in cash, and was
unmonitored and untaxed by
the government. “Suddenly they
BY
lost cash flow, they had to wind
up micro-businesses and go
back to their villages,” she said.
“They haven’t come back.”
For small and medium firms,
Sengupta said, the tax overhaul
created a huge amount of paperwork. “Many people are not
computer-literate, they don’t
know how to do online filing,”
she said. “People are not selling
in fear of having to do all this
work.”
Sengupta said that Modi’s
weakness was an unwillingness
to take advice from trained
economists. “He doesn’t consult,” she said.
Modi’s government has made
efforts to lessen the negative
effects of his overhaul on small
businesses: A defunct economic
advisory council was reconstituted, and the goods-andservices tax was lowered on
some items including dried
mango and yarn. In a speech in
early October, Modi dismissed
his critics.
“Do you think this is the first
time that GDP growth rate has
hit 5.7 percent?” he asked, addressing an audience from
the Institute of Company Secretaries. “There are some people
who enjoy spreading pessimism.
It helps them sleep better.”
Surjit Bhalla, a part-time
member of Modi’s economic advisory council, said it is too early
to draw conclusions about how
small businesses have weathered Modi’s changes. He said
Modi has commissioned a survey that will contain strong indicators about how companies
have fared, and he said it’s likely
that the effects on employment
and wages in the sector will be
evident next year.
From Gupta’s perspective,
people are not spending because
the economic slump has disturbed them at a spiritual level.
“There has been no mental
peace this past year,” he said.
“People are not calm in their
minds.”
Kanwarji’s, named after Gupta’s great-great-great-grandfa-
TOP: SANJAY KANOJIA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES; ABOVE: VIDHI DOSHI/THE WASHINGTON POST
‘It doesn’t feel like
Diwali this year’
Modi’s economic overhaul has Indians voicing
frustration over a drop in trade at festival time
BY
V IDHI D OSHI IN N EW D ELHI
TOP: A child watches Diwali fireworks in Allahabad. The
Hindu festival of light signifies the triumph of good over evil
and marks the return of the deity Rama to his birthplace.
ABOVE: Kanwarji Bhagirathmal usually draws lots of
customers at Diwali, but this year people are spending less.
ther, Lala Kanwar Sain, has
stood in the same spot since
the mid-19th century. To the
residents of Chandni Chowk, the
establishment is a landmark in
one of the busiest markets in
Delhi. Sweets of all shapes and
sizes, some covered with a thin
silver foil, some studded with
almonds and pistachios, surround Gupta’s staff. Passersby
eye the stacks of sausage-shaped
gulab jamuns soaked in sugar,
Gupta’s specialty, as suppliers
push past them, carrying boxes
of ingredients on their heads.
But as the festive season of
Diwali approaches, Kanwarji’s is
struggling to cope with the drop
in sales. “In the seven years since
I’ve started running this place,
I’ve never had a year so bad,”
Gupta said.
A few doors down, a man who
sells Indian wedding suits says
sales have dropped to below half
of last year’s. Across the street,
an electric lights market is set
up for Diwali, with blinking
multicolored wires strung up for
show. But no one is buying.
“It’s a very confused market,”
said Vatsal Narula, 23, who was
watching over his father’s lights
shop. The new tax regime has
increased the cost of their products. “They’re introducing everything too fast. They hadn’t
even completed one thing properly, and they already started
moving on to the next,” he said.
Sengupta said that India’s
economy is likely to survive the
shocks of the overhaul but that
Modi’s once-shining career is
starting to tarnish. “India never
collapses. Things will move on
and come back to normal in
some time,” she said.
But for the people of Chandni
Chowk this year, the economic
slump will have a marked impact on a festival that is India’s
equivalent of Christmas. “People
are saying it doesn’t feel like
Diwali this year,” Narula said.
“Very few are putting up lights.
They’re spending the bare minimum.”
A NTONIO O LIVO
kabul — Taliban forces nearly
wiped out an entire Afghan army
post late Wednesday, killing 43
soldiers as they stormed a base
with suicide bombers in the
strife-torn southern province of
Kandahar. The group also
launched two attacks elsewhere
that killed 15 people.
In total, 58 security officers
died in the bloody string of
attacks on military facilities, following suicide bomb attacks this
week that killed 74 people in
three provinces.
The attack in Kandahar’s Maiwand district took place Wednesday night when two Humvees
packed with explosives were
driven into an Afghan National
Army base where 60 soldiers
were stationed.
Taliban fighters then assaulted the facility, setting off several
hours of fighting that killed nearly every Afghan soldier there and
wounded nine. The battle ended
with a U.S. airstrike that killed
nine Taliban fighters, NATO officials said.
Dawlat Waziri, a Defense Ministry spokesman, said just two
soldiers remained unharmed on
the base, while six were missing.
Meanwhile, Taliban fighters
killed nine police officers late
Wednesday in the western
province of Farah during attacks
on police posts there and killed
six policemen in an ambush
in the northern province of
Balkh.
Taliban attacks on Afghan military and police compounds have
increased this week after U.S.
officials met in Oman with delegations from Afghanistan, Pakistan and China to discuss the
possibility of restarting peace
negotiations with the insurgent
group.
While the most recent attacks
were not as deadly as an April
assault on a military facility in
Balkh that killed at least 140
soldiers and officers, or the May
bombing in Kabul that killed 91
people, this week’s attacks mark
a sharp upturn in the number of
casualties.
Afghan officials recently
thwarted plans for attacks in
Kabul that would have targeted
military facilities, convoys and
crowded areas, arresting three
people in vehicles carrying explosives.
Taliban fighters have been
turning increasingly to Humvees, the hulking U.S.-made vehicles favored by government forces, as a tool for suicide bombs,
officials said.
The bulky off-road vehicles,
taken from Afghan army bases in
previous attacks, create more
shrapnel when they explode and
make it harder for Afghan guards
to tell whether an approaching
suicide bomber is with the Taliban, government security officials said.
antonio.olivo@washpost.com
vidhi.doshi@washpost.com
Sayed Salahuddin and Sharif Walid
contributed to this report.
DIGEST
PAKISTAN
BRUSSELS
Nawaz Sharif indicted
on corruption charges
E.U. to increase aid to
Italy in migrant crisis
Former prime minister
Nawaz Sharif was indicted
Thursday over allegations of
corruption, the latest setback for
the deposed leader who remains
one of the most popular
politicians in Pakistan.
Sharif, 67, was ousted from
power in July by the country’s
Supreme Court after months of
hearings on the corruption
charges. He and his family are
accused of using offshore
holding companies to buy luxury
properties in London, charges
stemming from the Panama
Papers leaks in 2016.
Sharif, who was not in court,
sent a plea of not guilty. The
indictment also names his
daughter Maryam and her
husband, Muhammad Safdar.
“You tell me if this is justice or
murder of justice,” Sharif said in
London, where he is staying with
his wife while she is treated for
cancer. Sharif is expected to fly
back to Pakistan, where the trial
is set to open next week.
The European Union has
agreed to increase funding to
help Italy keep migrants from
arriving in Europe by crossing
the Mediterranean Sea,
European Council President
Donald Tusk announced
Thursday.
Tusk said that members of the
28-member bloc will provide
“sufficient finances” to Italy and
that the European Commission
will ensure that the money goes
to fighting “illegal migration.”
After struggling for years
with large numbers of migrants
arriving on its shores, Italy
managed to reduce the numbers
in the past few months by
sending naval units to aid
Libya’s coast guard while
making deals with Libyan
militias to prevent migrants
from leaving the country.
Aid workers, however, say a
humanitarian catastrophe is
brewing in Libya as migrants
get trapped there in detention
centers where they are
mistreated.
— Shaiq Hussain
and Antonio Olivo
— Associated Press
age now in charge of Austria,
Ireland, Canada and France.
Ardern’s predecessor resigned
Aug. 1 after an opinion poll put
their center-left Labour Party at
just 24 percent, roughly half of
Prime Minister Bill English’s
ruling National Party. Although
Ardern’s party finished second in
elections, the National Party
failed to secure a majority.
Ardern has electrified
supporters, stirring up what the
media called “Jacinda-mania” as
she pledged to tackle social
issues such as child poverty and
affordable housing.
Plague cases soar in
Madagascar: The United
Nations says that the number of
plague cases in Madagascar has
almost doubled in the past five
days and that medical experts
project the situation will worsen,
with 1,000 cases expected every
month if funds aren’t rapidly
provided. U.N. spokesman
Stéphane Dujarric said only
26 percent of the $9.5 million
needed to combat the outbreak
has been received. U.N. officials
reported 1,032 cases as of
Wednesday. So far, 89 deaths
have been counted.
— Bloomberg News
AHMAD MASOOD/REUTERS
Ushers pose for photos in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square on
Wednesday during the opening of the 19th National Congress of the
Communist Party of China. The gathering runs through Tuesday.
NEW ZEALAND
Ardern to take reins
in generational shift
The 37-year-old daughter of a
New Zealand police officer is set
to become the latest member of a
new generation of leaders to take
power in some of the world’s
most developed countries.
Jacinda Ardern cut a deal to
form a government with two
smaller coalition members on
Thursday, capping a swift rise
since taking the reins of her
struggling political party. She is
set to become the world’s
youngest female leader, drawing
comparisons to leaders of similar
France reaffirms support of
Iran deal: France has reaffirmed
its support for the Iran nuclear
deal following a decision by
President Trump to no longer
back it in its current form.
Foreign Minister Jean-Yves
Le Drian said after a meeting in
Paris with Yukiya Amano, the
head of the International Atomic
Energy Agency, that the deal
“remains valid” despite Trump’s
decision. Amano also met with
President Emmanuel Macron,
who encouraged the IAEA to
ensure strict adherence to the
deal “in all its aspects.”
Venezuelan jurists arrive as
exiles in Chile: A group of
opposition-appointed
Venezuelan judges arrived in
Chile as exiles after more than
two months holed up at the
Chilean ambassador’s residence
in Caracas to avoid arrest in the
crisis-hit country. Chile’s Foreign
Ministry had granted the five
magistrates asylum in August.
They were threatened with jail
by Venezuelan President Nicolás
Maduro after the National
Assembly appointed them in July
to challenge the Supreme Court,
which heavily favors Maduro.
— From news services
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
After Raqqa victory, U.S. finds options in Syria curtailed
BY
K AREN D E Y OUNG
AND L IZ S LY
BULENT KILIC/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A Syrian Democratic Forces soldier in Raqqa, which the SDF recaptured this week from the Islamic
State. Syrian government gains elsewhere could block further advances by the U.S.-backed SDF.
Assad regime
Iraqi government
Armed opposition groups
Kurdish groups
Islamic State
Mt. Sinjar
50 MILES
Raqqa
IRAQ
SYRIA
Eu
ph
Deir al-Zour
es
ability to remain in power would
leave open the door for Islamic
State militants, gone to ground in
the vast desert that spans the
Syria-Iraq border, to regroup.
“That’s what you get when you
make a deal with the Russians,”
said Jennifer Cafarella of the
Washington-based Institute for
the Study of War, which monitors
the fighting in Syria. “What we
see is a push by the regime and its
backers to seize key infrastructure, such as oil and gas fields,
and to position to disrupt U.S.-led
anti-ISIS operations further
down the Euphrates.”
With the remaining Islamic
State strongholds in Syria increasingly likely to fall into
Syrian government hands, the
Trump administration will have
to decide whether the U.S. military remains in Syria to protect
areas that have been captured by
the SDF — which is dominated by
Syrian Kurds of the People’s Protection Units, or YPG.
On Thursday, female YPG
fighters marked the victory in
Raqqa by raising a giant banner
t
ra
Rapid advances by Russianand Iranian-backed government
forces in eastern Syria are
thwarting the U.S. military’s
hopes of pressing deeper into
Islamic State territory after winning the battle for Raqqa.
An expansion of territory held
by forces loyal to President
Bashar al-Assad is also likely to
provide Assad with additional
leverage in political negotiations
over Syria’s future, talks the United Nations hopes to reconvene
next month.
In a statement this week, U.N.
Secretary General António Guterres said the “latest developments” in Syria pointed “to the
urgent need to reinvigorate the
political process.”
The recent government gains
have cut off the approach of the
U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic
Forces to remaining militant
strongholds in the southeastern
part of the country, including the
crucial town of Bukamal near the
Syria-Iraq border.
Aided by Russian airstrikes, in
apparent violation of a deconfliction line along the Euphrates
River that U.S. officials said had
been tentatively agreed on with
Moscow, government forces have
encircled and claimed control of
another location that had been
on the wish list of U.S. military
planners — the town of Mayadeen, where many senior Islamic State leaders are thought to
have been hiding. The militants
put up little resistance, and most
appear to have escaped.
The unexpected militant withdrawal has “thrown for a loop”
U.S. military assumptions that it
could beat overstretched government forces in a race to the key
river strongholds, said Nicholas
Heras, a fellow at the Center for a
New American Security. “Because ISIS has decided not to put
up a tough fight against Assad’s
forces,” Heras said, “it has forced
a change of assumptions about
what the situation will look like
on the ground.”
The advance has also taken
government forces, and supporting Russian strikes, east of the
river and into Syria’s main oil-
producing region of Deir al-Zour
province, once a key source of
Islamic State revenue.
“I’m not going to address
whether or not an agreement or
deconfliction line has been broken,” Army Col. Ryan S. Dillon,
spokesman for counter-Islamic
State military operations, said in
a telephone interview from Baghdad. “That’s why we maintain an
open dialogue” with Russia.
In addition to daily contact
between the two militaries on a
hotline, U.S. and Russian generals have held two face-to-face
meetings in recent weeks, at least
one of them in Jordan, to discuss
the increasing proximity of their
air operations in the Euphrates
River valley, and that of the
separate ground forces they back.
Progress against the Islamic
State in Syria has been measured
since 2016 by towns and cities
seized from militant control
along the Euphrates by the SDF, a
combination of Arab and Syrian
Kurdish fighters, aided by U.S. air
power and advisers. Manbij, near
the Turkish border in the north,
was recaptured in 2016, followed
by Tabqa and now Raqqa.
After Raqqa, the intention was
to proceed downriver through
Mayadeen to Bukamal, where
SDF fighters would link up with
Iraqi government forces trying to
regain control over the Islamic
State-controlled town of Qaim,
just across the border inside Iraq.
A major goal was to block Iran
from securing a land corridor,
through Iraq, between Tehran
and Damascus.
Dillon declined to say whether
the U.S. military’s plans had
changed.
“There are always plans,” Dillon said. “You don’t fight the
plan, you fight the enemy . . .
where they are.” The military, he
said, was not concerned with
“greater policy decisions” over
who fought the militants or who
controlled Syria, as long as it was
not the Islamic State.
“We’re not in a race, we’re not
in the land-grab business. We’re
here to defeat ISIS,” he said,
using an acronym for the Islamic
State.
Others were less sanguine
about the effect of government
gains, predicting that Assad’s
Mayadeen
100 MILES
TURKEY
SYRIA
Detail
Bukamal
IRAN
LEB.
.
Damascus
JORDAN
SAUDI
ARABIA
Baghdad
IRAQ
Source: IHS Jane’s Conflict Monitor as of Oct. 16
of the Kurdish leader Abdullah
Ocalan over the central square
where the Islamic State carried
out most of its grisly executions.
Ocalan, who heads Turkey’s militant Kurdish movement, the
Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or
Qaim
THE WASHINGTON POST
PKK, is serving a prison sentence
in Turkey for terrorism.
The public declaration of fealty to Ocalan by the Syrian Kurds
who led the Raqqa offensive
points to one of the many challenges confronting the Trump
administration as it seeks to
forge a coherent policy for the
post-Islamic State era. Although
the Syrian Kurds have admitted
many Arabs into their ranks, they
have retained overall control of
the SDF coalition’s command and
ideology.
Turkey, which shares a long
border with the autonomous enclave the Kurds have established
in northeastern Syria, is enraged
at the U.S. military’s support for
the SDF, which it considers an
appendage of Ocalan’s terrorist
movement. That leaves the SDF
vulnerable to potential military
action by Turkey to quell its
aspirations for a ministate in
Syria.
Many Syrian Arabs are also
deeply uncomfortable about the
prospect of being governed by
Kurds. Raqqa is an almost wholly
Arab city, and the photographs of
the Ocalan banner that circulated on social media triggered
widespread condemnation by
Arabs on Thursday.
“For us Raqqans, we do not
know whether the SDF taking
over the city and expelling ISIS is
a liberation or an occupation,”
Tareq Sham, a former Raqqa
resident living in Turkey, wrote
on his Facebook page. “The vast
majority of us consider what
happened a switch between two
occupiers.”
Remaining in Syria to protect
its Kurdish allies risks embroiling the United States in possible
future conflicts between Arabs
and Kurds, and between Turkey
and the Kurds.
The Kurds are also vulnerable
to the Syrian government’s declared ambition to reclaim all of
the territory it lost in the war that
began as a political rebellion in
2011. Much of what happens in
Raqqa will depend on the speed
and success of reconstruction
there. U.S. special envoy Brett
McGurk is visiting the Raqqa
area, accompanied by Saudi Arabian Minister for Gulf Affairs
Thamer al-Sabhan, whose government the Trump administration hopes will put up funds for
the effort.
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
liz.sly@washpost.com
Sly reported from Beirut.
Spain threatens to take over Catalonia government as constitutional crisis looms
BY
W ILLIAM B OOTH
barcelona — Spain and the
secessionist leaders in Catalonia
were headed toward an evermore-serious showdown following the central government’s announcement Thursday that it
would move quickly to assert
control of the autonomous region
after its president refused to end
his push for independence.
Facing a deadline imposed by
Spain’s central government to say
whether Catalonia was declaring
independence, the regional president replied Thursday that Ma-
drid should stop threatening Catalonia and instead agree to dialogue to end the impasse.
Catalan President Carles Puigdemont answered Spain’s demand for clarity by sending a
second letter to Prime Minister
Mariano Rajoy, stating that Catalonia’s suspension of its declaration of independence remains in
force — for the moment.
Puigdemont then added a
threat of his own: If Madrid does
not agree to talks and continues
its “repression” of the region, the
Catalan parliament will meet
soon to vote on a formal declara-
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tion of independence.
The Catalan government’s decision to effectively decline to
respond to Madrid’s ultimatum
brings Spain to the brink of a
constitutional crisis.
The central government in Madrid responded that it would
begin the process of implementing Article 155 of Spain’s 1978
constitution, which allows it to
take over the regional government, including its finances and
police. Madrid announced a
meeting of ministers for an “extraordinary” session Saturday
where they would define what
such a takeover would entail and
how to achieve it.
Such a move would be unprecedented in Spain’s four decades
since the end of the Francisco
Franco dictatorship.
People in Catalonia — and
around Spain — braced for what
would come next.
This is uncharted territory.
“Nobody knows what Article
155 means, because no one has
ever invoked it before,” Oriol
Junqueras, the vice president of
the Catalan regional government, told The Washington Post.
Referring to the central government in Madrid, he said, “they
don’t know what they want to do
with this.”
Asked if he could imagine
authorities entering his office
and arresting him, the vice president answered, “The national
police and the [paramilitary]
Guardia Civil have already been
in this building, where they detained 14 public workers and
officers. They’ve jailed leaders of
civil society organizations. So
yes, I can imagine this happening.”
The head of the Ciudadanos
party, Albert Rivera, who favors
implementing Article 155, told
reporters in Madrid that “a European democracy cannot be blackmailed” by the Catalan government.
José Luis Ábalos, a leader of
the Socialists, who serve as the
opposition in the Spanish parliament, told El Pais newspaper that
his party wants the enactment of
Article 155 to be “very, very limited” and to last “the shortest
period of time possible.” But he
said it was necessary to preserve
the rule of law.
Pro-independence activists in
Catalonia went into rushed meetings Thursday to organize mass
demonstrations, distribute instructions for peaceful civil disobedience and plan to surround
EMILIO MORENATTI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Pro-independence protesters in Barcelona hold signs reading “Freedom” in the Catalan language.
government buildings.
There was widespread anxiety
in Barcelona over possible clashes between national police, sent
to enforce a takeover, and proindependence demonstrators.
The chief of Catalonia’s regional police, Josep Lluís Trapero,
already has been questioned by
prosecutors over his alleged failure to protect federal forces sent
into the region. Two other proindependence activists have been
jailed on suspicion of sedition.
Puigdemont called them “political prisoners.”
Rajoy has warned that if Catalonia declares independence, he
will seek permission from the
upper house of the Spanish legislature, where his party has a
majority, to enact Article 155.
Catalonia, a wealthy state in
northeastern Spain that has a
population of 7 million and its
own language and culture, already enjoys substantial control
over its affairs. The regional government holds sway over health
care, education, media and local
police.
If Madrid enacts Article 155,
Rajoy could appoint his own
deputies to steer the regional
government’s ministries. It is unclear what would happen to Puigdemont. He could remain in his
position as regional president
but would be effectively powerless.
This month, Catalonia staged a
chaotic independence referendum marked by widespread civil
disobedience. It was met by a
harsh response in which national
police and Guardia Civil officers
beat voters with rubber batons
and dragged away ballot boxes.
The central government,
backed by the courts, had declared the referendum illegal and
unconstitutional.
Still, many in Catalonia demanded the right to vote and saw
Madrid as callously disregarding
the people’s will. Although many
polling stations were raided by
police, more than 2 million people managed to vote — and
90 percent chose independence.
Critics charge that the referendum was hopelessly compromised, not only by riot police and
legal challenges but by low turnout — only 40 percent of eligible
voters cast ballots.
After the Oct. 1 referendum,
Puigdemont signed an independence declaration. But then he
immediately suspended it, saying
Catalonia wanted to negotiate
with the central government,
with help from Europe.
Leaders in Europe condemned
the staging of the referendum
and the police tactics, stressing
that it was an internal matter for
Spain and that they would not
recognize Catalonia as an independent nation and a member of
the European Union.
When Spain’s prime minister
spoke Wednesday at the national
parliament in Madrid, he was
clearly frustrated.
“The only thing I am asking
Mr. Puigdemont is that he act
sensibly, that he act with balance,
that he puts first the interests of
all citizens, of all Spaniards and
all Catalonians,” Rajoy said.
The central government has
given Puigdemont several deadlines to declare whether the Catalan authorities were proclaiming
independence.
On Monday, the first deadline,
Puigdemont wrote a letter to
Rajoy, calling instead for two
months of dialogue and a halt to
what he called Spain’s “repression” of Catalan citizens and
institutions.
Rajoy said in parliament
Wednesday: “It’s simple, and it’s
not that difficult. It’s answering
one question: Have you or have
you not declared the independence of Catalonia? Because you
understand if you have declared
the independence of Catalonia,
the government is obliged, because that is what it says in the
constitution, that it must act in a
certain way.”
Some leaders in Madrid said
that Catalonia should suspend its
declaration of independence and
immediately move toward regional elections.
It is not clear what such elections would solve. It is possible
that pro-independence sentiment has only grown in Catalonia in recent weeks.
william.booth@washpost.com
Raul Gallego Abellan contributed to
this report.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
Putin silent on whether he’ll run again for president Dubious reporting fuels
Iraqi-Kurdish tensions
But in a lengthy address,
he lists the Kremlin’s
grievances with the U.S.
BY
D AVID F ILIPOV
sochi, russia — Russian President Vladimir Putin, the presumed favorite to win a new
six-year term in March, offered a
message of renewal in a marathon address Thursday. But he
failed to deliver the news that
Kremlin watchers have been
waiting for: whether he will seek
reelection.
Addressing a conference on
international policy at a Russian
resort, Putin said that today’s
leaders have a responsibility to
make sure young people’s
lives “will be better, fairer and
safer.”
“Our job is to make those
dreams come true,” Putin told the
Valdai forum of international
policy experts, set in a Sochi spa
hotel perched among the whitetipped pyramids of the Caucasus
Mountains.
Russia’s next president should
ensure that the country becomes
an economically competitive,
modern society with a strong
defense and a stable political
system, Putin said. But he did not
come out and say he should be
that president.
Putin was asked whether the
next Kremlin leader could be a
woman, a day after the announcement by Ksenia Sobchak,
a celebrity television journalist
and the daughter of Putin’s political mentor, that she would run
for president.
“Everything here is possible,”
Putin said.
Putin took questions for more
than two hours, but when the
election was brought up again, he
said with a little smile, “Okay,
time to finish.”
The Russian leader dedicated
a large portion of his speech and
responses to questions to Russia’s grievances against the United States. He asserted that Washington has failed to fulfill the
terms of nuclear and chemical
weapons treaties. He repeated
his long-standing accusation that
U.S. leaders have displayed double standards with their inter-
ALEXANDER ZEMLIANICHENKO/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Instead of helping create a safer world, the U.S. is “trying to return
us to the 1950s,” Russian President Vladimir Putin said in Sochi.
ventions in Iraq and the former
Yugoslavia while slapping Moscow with sanctions over its annexation of Crimea. Instead of
helping create a safer world after
the Cold War, Putin said, the
United States is “trying to return
us to the 1950s.”
Putin also noted the possibility
that U.S. authorities might force
the U.S. branch of Russia’s statefunded RT television channel to
register as a foreign agent. The
Russian news media has reported that the upper house of the
Russian parliament has drawn
up a blacklist of at least five U.S.
media outlets whose activities in
Russia could be restricted in
response.
“As soon as we see any efforts
to limit our mass media, we will
reciprocate immediately,” Putin
said.
Russian Kremlin watchers had
expected Putin to announce his
candidacy Thursday, but the
president’s spokesman, Dmitry
Peskov, told reporters in a conference call that the Russian leader
planned to concentrate on his
current term.
“Putin himself has not yet
aired his intention to run, and
said there is still enough time
before the election campaign,”
Peskov said.
Putin, who enjoys a seemingly
unbeatable 80 percent approval
rating, faces a conundrum as the
leader who has run Russia for
longer than anyone since Soviet
dictator Joseph Stalin.
The Kremlin leader sees a new
term as a chance to solidify his
legacy as a historic figure for
Russia, the one who dragged the
country from the ruins of the
Soviet Union into modernity and
prosperity. He has focused on
establishing Russia’s newly assertive place in the world order,
leading its as-yet successful military campaign to prop up Syrian
President Bashar al-Assad. He
has offered Russia’s support for
established leaders in the Middle
East and Europe as an alternative
to what he calls U.S.-sponsored
regime change.
But Russian voters have shown
signs of fatigue with the current
system: Anti-corruption protests
twice have brought out larger
numbers of protesters across the
country than at any time since
Putin last’s election victory, in
2012.
Russia’s rising voters are of
particular concern. Young people
in high school and college have
flocked to protests inspired by
anti-corruption whistleblower
Alexei Navalny, who has been
disqualified from running by
a felony conviction that he says is
politically motivated.
The Kremlin has been looking
for ways to interest young people
in loyal political movements.
Some see the candidacy of Sobchak as a Kremlin-devised diversion toward that end, although spokesman Peskov curtly
dismissed the suggestion in his
daily briefing with reporters
Thursday.
Putin is part of the problem,
according to political analyst
Tatyana Stanovaya.
“After almost 18 years in power, he sees himself as more accountable to the judgment of
history than to the needs of the
people,” Stanovaya wrote in a recent report for the Carnegie Moscow Center. “This abstract approach to politics means that the
will of the people (and the role of
elections) are further diminished
in Russia and are no longer the
source of his legitimacy.”
It has fallen to the Kremlin
official in charge of domestic
politics, Sergei Kiriyenko, to
drum up interest in the vote.
Kiriyenko reportedly has the task
of topping Putin’s best election
result, in 2004 — 49.5 million yes
votes from 71 percent of the
turnout. In 2012, Putin collected
45.6 million votes, or 64 percent
of the turnout.
Andrei Kolesnikov, a senior
associate at the Carnegie Moscow
Center, recently suggested that
anything more than 60 percent
would be pushing the upper
limits of Putin’s real electoral
rating, even though he rules
unchallenged by a political system almost entirely subordinate
to him.
Candidates such as Sobchak
have no chance of upsetting Putin, but they offer voters a choice
and give the election the look of a
European-style democracy. Communist and ultranationalist candidates also are expected to win a
small percentage of the vote.
Kiriyenko has been involved in
another effort to give the Russian
polity a new face: Putin’s recent
replacement of 11 of the country’s
85 governors with officials widely
described as technocrats with
few ties to the country’s traditional regional elites or security
services. Several of the new appointees graduated from a Kremlin program to produce effective
officials. The RBC news site recently published a video of a
training exercise that showed
one of the new governors jumping into the sea from a 23-foot
cliff along with other members of
the program.
david.filipov@washpost.com
Andrew Roth and Natalya
Abbakumova contributed to this
report from Moscow.
WorldViews
khanaqin, iraq
— Tantalizing bits
of news began to
TAMER
EL-GHOBASHY stream into the
AND LOVEDAY social media feeds
MORRIS
of Kurdish news
organizations late
Wednesday: Kurds angry with an
Iraqi military takeover of their
towns and cities were rising up
and chasing the troops away.
Unsteady cellphone videos of
young men rampaging through
the streets of Kirkuk, a city at the
heart of a political dispute
between the Iraqi central
government and Kurdish
separatists, were being played on
Kurdish television. Twitter users
from Irbil to Baghdad to
Washington offered breathless
commentary that a long-awaited
reckoning had begun.
Hemin Hawrami, a senior
assistant to Kurdish President
Masoud Barzani, then posted a
tweet that indicated the protests
were growing and had erupted in
the town of Khanaqin. “Kurdish
people in Khanaqin upraised
against the Asaib Ahl Al-Haq
militia,” he wrote, referring to an
Iraqi-government-allied Shiite
militia. “Raised massively
Kurdistan flag in the town and
drove the militia out.”
The percolating unrest, given
authority by Hawrami’s tweet,
was seen by many Kurds and
some of their supporters in
Washington as an affirmation of
their prediction that Baghdad’s
sweep into Kurdish-claimed
territory would lead to chaos and
should have been preempted by
the United States.
Except the news wasn’t entirely
true. There had been isolated
incidents in Kirkuk and
Khanaqin, but they died down
quickly.
Wednesday’s episode was the
latest and sharpest example of
how the Kurdish bid for
independence from Iraq has been
strongly colored by a stream of
sensationalized news reports that
have dented the credibility of
normally reliable Kurdish news
organizations. It has also put
Iraqi towns at the heart of an
international debate over
whether Iran outmaneuvered the
Trump administration in Kirkuk,
with each side using news events
of dubious veracity to bolster
their arguments.
Visits to the sites of the
purported uprisings in disputed
Kirkuk and Khanaqin on
Thursday showed little evidence
of a sustained revolt or signs of
tensions boiling over.
In Khanaqin, a Kurdish town
110 miles north of Baghdad, a few
dozen young men paraded in the
main square waving Kurdish flags
and chanting. The demonstration
was small but energetic, ending
with dancing before they all left.
Rudaw, a Kurdish network, said
the protest had turned violent,
but that report could not be
independently confirmed.
The militia Hawrami said had
been chased out had actually
withdrawn on its own, on an
order Wednesday from Iraqi
Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi.
In Kirkuk, the streets were
largely calm Thursday, and the
main market was open. In the
Rahmani neighborhood where
demonstrations were reported
Wednesday evening, shopkeepers
and residents said the incident
was overblown.
Since Iraq’s military moved
into Kirkuk and other disputed
areas Monday, frantic news
reports on Kurdish channels have
fueled sporadic exoduses from
the city. Iraqi authorities have
denied that any abuses of Kurds
by Iraqi troops have taken place
and warned soldiers against
firing their weapons.
Two Kurdish networks, funded
by senior officials with the
Kurdish Democratic Party in Irbil,
have come under criticism for
spreading unverified reports of
abuse and allegedly broadcasting
calls to resist Iraqi troops. On
Wednesday, the Joint Operations
Command in Baghdad and the
Kirkuk provincial council urged
the Iraqi Commission for Media
and Communications to revoke
the broadcast licenses for the two
networks, Rudaw and K24, for
allegedly broadcasting false news.
tamer.el-ghobashy@washpost.com
loveday.morris@washpost.com
Morris reported from Kirkuk. Mustafa
Salim contributed to this report.
Excerpted from washingtonpost
.com/news/worldview
Distinctively
addressed.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
U.S., Israel balk at Palestinian reconciliation, insisting Hamas must disarm
BY
R UTH E GLASH
jerusalem — Less than a week
after rival Palestinian factions
Fatah and Hamas signed a historic reconciliation pact, Israel and
the United States said such a
union could complicate IsraeliPalestinian peace.
In a statement released Thursday, Jason Greenblatt, President
Trump’s special representative
for international negotiations,
said that any Palestinian government must “unambiguously and
explicitly commit” to nonviolence
and recognize Israel.
He said Hamas must disarm if
it wants to play any role in a
future Palestinian government.
Greenblatt’s words follow a
similar tone that the Israeli government took Tuesday in stating
that it would “not conduct diplomatic negotiations with a Palestinian government that relies on
Hamas, a terrorist organization
calling for the destruction of Israel.”
But Palestinian officials, including Hamas in Gaza, said that
Israel and the U.S. envoy are
meddling in internal Palestinian
matters and that the reconciliation process will continue.
“This is blatant interference in
Palestinian affairs because it is
the right of our people to choose
[the Palestinian] government according to their supreme strategic interests,” senior Hamas official Bassem Naim told Agence
France-Presse.
Nabil Abu Rudeineh, a spokesman for Palestinian Authority
President Mahmoud Abbas, said
the reconciliation agreement
must be promoted to end Israel’s
occupation and establish an independent Palestinian state, local
media reported.
For 10 years, the two parts of
the Palestinian territories, the
West Bank and the Gaza Strip,
MOHAMMED SABER/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
A Palestinian boy waves an Egyptian flag after Fatah and Hamas agreed to end a decade-long split following talks mediated by Egypt.
were ruled by mutually antagonistic groups that only recently
agreed to bury their differences.
Palestinians have long believed that it is in Israel’s interest
to keep the two factions divided,
weakening the Palestinians nationally and keeping the status
quo in place.
“The reality is that there are no
peace negotiations going on, and
even if there were, they would not
yield anything positive,” said Diana Buttu, who served as a legal
adviser for the Palestinian negotiating team.
“The Israeli government is
looking for any excuse not to
negotiate,” she said. “They always
say they want to negotiate, but
the facts on the ground are exactly opposite. They refuse to remove settlements and are even
celebrating 50 years of occupation.”
Hillel Frisch, a senior lecturer
at Bar Ilan University near Tel
Aviv, said he was doubtful that
Palestinian reconciliation would
achieve anything anyway.
“I don’t think Israel has to fret.
It will end in a shootout at most,”
he said.
Over the past 10 years, there
have been several abortive attempts at reuniting Hamas and
Fatah, but even after the two
sides agreed to form a unity
government three years ago,
Hamas continued to run Gaza.
This time, though, some Palestinian officials say conditions are
more conducive. Gaza is in the
midst of a humanitarian crisis
that has paralyzed daily life for its
2 million inhabitants. Since
Hamas took control, Israel has
restricted trade and movement,
citing security concerns. The enclave’s crossing with Egypt has
remained closed.
In May, Hamas, which has
faced increasing isolation internationally, as well as growing
hostility from the Fatah-led Palestinian Authority in the West
Bank, introduced a new manifesto moderating its position toward
Israel by distinguishing between
Zionists and Jews.
The group is still designated a
terrorist organization by Israel
and the United States. Its founding charter declares that its goal
is to obliterate Israel.
The stranglehold on Gaza
worsened this summer when the
Palestinian Authority asked Israel to reduce the electricity supply
to the strip, demanding that
Hamas pay its share of the cost.
Gaza inhabitants were left with
just a few hours of power a day.
Losing support locally, Hamas
has said it is ready to hand over
administrative control to the Palestinian Authority. The deadline
for this process is set for February, and Abbas is expected to visit
the Gaza Strip sometime in the
near future.
Ghassan Khatib, a professor of
political science at Birzeit University near the West Bank town of
Ramallah, said that the two factions still need to discuss certain
issues and that for now the reconciliation arrangement serves only
to address the problems in Gaza.
“Mr. Greenblatt’s statement is
completely unnecessary and has
negative consequences because
the Palestinians are not in the
process of forming a government
that is not compatible with its
previous commitments,” he said.
Moshe Maoz, an Israeli professor of Islamic and Middle Eastern
studies at the Hebrew University
of Jerusalem, said the United
States and Israel are overreacting.
“They should look at the positive side of this new arrangement.
In a sense, it carries some promise, as it could be a good chance
for Israel to negotiate with the
entire Palestinian people,” he
said.
ruth.eglash@washpost.com
CIA director distorts spy agencies’ findings on Russian election interference
BY
G REG M ILLER
CIA Director Mike Pompeo declared Thursday that U.S. intelligence agencies determined that
Russia’s interference in the 2016
American presidential election
did not alter the outcome, a statement that distorted spy agency
findings.
“The intelligence community’s
assessment is that the Russian
meddling that took place did not
affect the outcome of the election,”
Pompeo said at a security conference in Washington.
His comment suggested —
falsely — that a report released by
U.S. intelligence agencies in January had ruled out any impact that
could be attributed to a covert
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Russian interference campaign
that involved leaks of tens of thousands of stolen emails, the flooding of social media sites with false
claims and the purchase of ads on
Facebook.
A report compiled by the CIA
and other agencies described that
Russian operation as unprecedented in its scale and concluded
that Moscow’s goals were to undermine public faith in the U.S.
democratic process and help elect
Donald Trump.
But the report reached no conclusions about whether that interference had altered the outcome
— an issue that U.S. intelligence
officials made clear was considered beyond the scope of their
inquiry.
“We did not make an assessment of the impact that Russian
activities had on the outcome of
the 2016 election,” the report said.
U.S. spy agencies are “charged
with monitoring and assessing
the intentions, capabilities, and
actions of foreign actors,” the report said, but do “not analyze U.S.
political processes or U.S. public
opinion.”
Former U.S. intelligence officials voiced concern over
Pompeo’s statement.
“This is another example of
Pompeo politicizing intelligence,”
a former senior U.S. intelligence
official said. Pompeo “is the most
political CIA director since Bill
Casey” during the Reagan administration, the former official said.
“This significantly undermines
the intelligence community’s
credibility.”
The former official and others
spoke on the condition of anonymity, citing the subject’s sensitivity.
A CIA spokesman denied that
Pompeo intended to mislead the
public with his remarks. “The intelligence assessment with regard
to Russian election meddling has
not changed,” said the spokesman,
Ryan Trapani, “and the director
did not intend to suggest that it
had.”
Pompeo’s comment came in response to a question about Russian meddling at the end of a
lengthy public appearance at the
Foundation for Defense of Democracies, a conservative think tank.
Pompeo also criticized former
U.S. intelligence officials for their
television appearances, implying
that they violated their oaths and
potentially contributed to the
leaks of sensitive information.
“There are an awful lot of former CIA talking heads on TV,”
Pompeo said, adding that their
obligation to remain quiet about
their work “far extends beyond
the day you turn in your badge.”
His comment seemed to be
aimed mainly at former senior
intelligence officials in the Obama
administration, including James
R. Clapper Jr., the former director
of national intelligence, who said
in a recent interview that Russia’s
interference had “cast doubt” on
Trump’s win.
“Our intelligence community
assessment did, I think, serve to
cast doubt on the legitimacy of his
victory,” Clapper said in an interview on CNN last month. He added that he worried Trump’s perceived focus on the issue “tran-
scends, unfortunately, the real
concern here, which is Russian
interference in our political process.”
Clapper could not immediately
be reached to comment.
Michael Morell, the former CIA
deputy director who is employed
by CBS News to comment on national security issues, responded
to Pompeo with a post on Twitter.
Pompeo’s caution against leaking
is “wise,” Morell said. “But, to be
clear, critiquing policy is not leaking.”
Democratic Sens. Ron Wyden
(Ore.) and Martin Heinrich
(N.M.), both members of the Senate Intelligence Committee, rebuked Pompeo for his Russia comments. Wyden said in a posting on
Twitter that Pompeo’s views on
Moscow had “shifted with those of
the president.”
Pompeo’s mischaracterization
of the intelligence report was the
latest in a series of statements
from the former Republican congressman that have seemed aimed
at minimizing the significance of
Russian interference in the 2016
election.
The intelligence report released in January noted Russia’s
“longstanding desire to undermine the U.S.-led liberal democratic order” but said the 2016
effort “demonstrated a significant
escalation in directness, level of
activity and scope of effort compared to previous operations.”
U.S. officials have said they
have seen no evidence that Russia
tampered with voting systems on
Election Day.
greg.miller@washpost.com
Khatami barred from leaving home
BY
E RIN C UNNINGHAM
istanbul — Iranian security
forces prevented former president and opposition figure Mohammad Khatami from leaving
his Tehran home late Wednesday,
local media reported. It was the
latest sign that regime hard-liners were seeking to crack down on
the country’s reformists, activists
said.
Two opposition-linked news
sites said security forces arrived
at Khatami’s home in the Iranian
capital to block him from meeting
with political allies, a move that
one outlet referred to as “temporary house arrest.”
Khatami, a widely popular,
pro-reform cleric, served two
terms as president, from 1997 to
2005, but was later banned from
public appearances after supporting anti-government protests
in 2009. An order from a state
prosecutor this month tightened
those restrictions, according to
one of Khatami’s lawyers, imposing measures including a threemonth ban on receiving political
guests.
The government did not publicly confirm the restrictions. But
the incident Wednesday is being
cast as part of a broader conflict
between pro-reform figures, who
have allied with President Hassan
Rouhani, and hard-liners in the
security forces and judiciary.
Those rivalries are likely to be
aggravated as tensions rise between Iran and the Trump administration, which has vowed a
more aggressive U.S. policy
toward Iran, and as Iranian political factions jockey for power.
The Iranian regime “never
misses a chance to utilize American antagonism to its own advantage,” said Suzanne Maloney, a
senior fellow and Iran expert at
the Brookings Institution.
On one side are the moderates
and reformists, who have pushed
for gradual change in the system,
including greater political freedoms and more dialogue with the
West. On the other side are the
hard-line security forces and conservative clerics, who have balked
at diplomacy and suppressed dis-
sent.
President Trump’s speech on
Iran last week, in which he outlined a new, aggressive strategy,
gave Iranian hard-liners “the opportunity to crack down against
any political force that poses even
a notional challenge to the authority and the legitimacy of the
Islamic Republic,” Maloney said.
This month, an Iranian court
sentenced seven reformist lawmakers, including Khatami’s
brother, to a year in prison for
“propaganda against the state.”
Rights activists have also reported that relatives of late president
Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani
were recently banned from traveling abroad.
But the moves against Khatami
— the 74-year-old standard-bearer of Iran’s reform movement —
are likely to raise the stakes further. Khatami remains highly
popular among Iran’s youth and
urban middle class, analysts said.
erin.cunningham@washpost.com
Brian Murphy in Washington
contributed to this report.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
Economy & Business
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Retirement thins ranks of black CEOs
The number of
African American
chief executives
among the largest
JENA
public U.S.
MCGREGOR
companies —
already a tiny group — is shrinking
by one. American Express on
Wednesday announced the
retirement of its longtime CEO,
Kenneth I. Chenault, and when he
leaves the credit card issuer’s
corner office on Feb. 1, only two
black chief executives will remain
at the helm of companies in the
S&P 500 index. That number has
fallen in recent years despite a
steady drumbeat of attention to
the need for more diversity.
One of the two remaining CEOs
in that index of major public
companies is Merck CEO Kenneth
Frazier, who gained recent
attention for being first among a
wave of corporate chiefs to depart
President Trump’s advisory panels
after his remarks in August about
protests in Charlottesville. The
other, according to the Executive
Leadership Council (ELC), an
organization focused on black
leaders, is Arnold W. Donald, chief
executive of Carnival cruise lines.
(The S&P lists counts 503 chief
executives in total because a few
companies have co-CEOs.) The
Fortune 500 list, which ranks
companies by revenue, now will
include just three: Frazier, J.C.
Penney’s Marvin Ellison and Roger
W. Ferguson Jr., who leads the
money manager TIAA.
Just a few years ago, that
number was higher — if still small.
McDonald’s was helmed by Don
Thompson until early 2015, and
Xerox CEO Ursula Burns stepped
down after that company split into
On
Leadership
DANIEL ACKER/BLOOMBERG NEWS
American Express CEO Kenneth Chenault in Chicago in 2015.
two earlier this year. “It's
disappointing,” ELC chief Ron
Parker said in an interview. “When
we have so few and we lose one, we
all feel we are not making progress.”
Chenault, who major American
Express shareholder Warren
Buffett called “the gold standard
for corporate leadership and the
benchmark that I measure others
against,” had a 16-year run atop the
company, navigating the
aftermath of 9/11, the financial
crisis and a recent turnaround
effort. Though the company has
faced hurdles in recent years as
competitors picked off customers,
he is known for expanding the
company’s customer base and
being a mentor to other leaders.
“He was the dean of CEOs,” said
Parker, adding that Chenault had
been the “architect” of his
organization’s CEO Academy for
developing next-generation
African American leaders.
The smaller numbers come at a
time when diversity has been a hotbutton topic, with companies
talking more and more about
adding women to leadership roles
and increasing the number of
minorities and women in
engineering and technology jobs.
But some worry the heavy focus on
those issues — while important —
could be crowding out broader
discussions about the makeup of
the executive suite.
“Teams that are more diverse,
racially, actually make more money
too,” said Lawrence James, a
partner at the leadership
consultancy RHR International.
“The financial arguments are there,
but people aren’t paying attention.”
Parker and James cited several
reasons progress may have slowed,
including systemic problems of
education and inequality, as well as
the relationship-building
challenges that black managers
face in workplaces that are not
inclusive and predominantly
white. “Black culture and white
culture are different,” James said,
and that makes it less appealing for
black executives to engage in afterwork activities where many
relationships are built.
The CEO has also become even
more of the public face of many
companies, expected to manage a
Twitter account and apologize on
CNBC when something goes
wrong. “When you have publicly
traded companies, one of the
things the board wrestles with is,
‘Do we feel comfortable with a
female or a person of color
representing our enterprise?’ ”
Parker said. “I think it was no
different than when our 44th
president was in his role.”
Parker and James also cited
getting more black directors on
corporate boards. Just 5.6 percent
of board seats on Fortune 500
companies were held by black men
and only 2.2 percent by black
women in 2017, according to an
ELC analysis. More minority or
female directors, Parker said,
should propel more of them to help
rising black executives early in their
careers get the wide-ranging
experience they need.
It could also help keep
complacency from setting in when
boards name one or two minority
executives in the top ranks but then
seem to feel they’ve done their job.
Said Parker, “The one-and-done
syndrome is very much alive in
corporate America.”
10-YEAR TREASURY
CURRENCIES
UP $2.50 PER $1,000, 2.32% YIELD $1=112.53 YEN; EURO=$1.185
Bill aims to tame ‘wild
West’ of social media ads
Facebook, Google
and Twitter are
one step closer to
facing new
HAMZA
SHABAN AND regulations that
would place
KAROUN
DEMIRJIAN
transparency
requirements on
a core aspect of their
businesses: advertising.
With support from Sen. John
McCain (R-Ariz.), Democratic
Sens. Amy Klobuchar (Minn.)
and Mark R. Warner (Va.)
unveiled a bill Thursday called
the Honest Ads Act that would
mandate greater disclosure of
political ads that run on large
Internet platforms. The
proposed legislation was crafted
as a response to a Russianfinanced propaganda campaign
that ran on an array of Web
platforms to spread
disinformation and discord
during the 2016 election.
Although the proposed
legislation was expected for
weeks, it remains unclear
whether the bill will attract
Republican support other than
McCain’s, and if tech companies
will object to rules that would
entangle their ad operations.
The
Switch
When it comes to disclosing who
pays for online advertisements,
he continued, “you’ve got to try
to apply the same rules you
would to radio and TV.”
The bill would require digital
platforms with more than
50 million monthly viewers to
create a public database of
political ads purchased by a
person or group who spends
more than $500. The public file
would include the ad, a
description of the targeted
audience, the number of views it
generated, the date and time it
ran, its price and contract
information for the purchaser.
The proposal would create a
reporting system akin to the one
required of television stations by
the Federal Communications
Commission — although it
would go further by requiring
the disclosure of the ads
themselves, not just the amount
spent to run them.
Warner described the
legislation as “common-sense,
light-touch regulation.” And he
said he hopes that tech
companies will work with him
and Klobuchar to ensure its
passage.
“You’ve got to try to apply the same
rules you would to radio and TV.”
Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.)
jena.mcgregor@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/
on-leadership
“Who wouldn’t want to know
if the ad that’s appearing next to
your story was actually paid for
by a foreign power?” Warner
said. “I don’t know what
opposition there would be to
that kind of disclosure.”
During the briefing,
Klobuchar and Warner said
that the content of online ads,
and the people who fund them,
remain unknown to the public
and because of that the
democratic process is
vulnerable to meddling. And
beyond foreign powers
attempting to interfere in U.S.
elections, they emphasized that
outdated laws have failed to
grapple with the evolution of
massive online platforms, and
the way political speech travels
on the Web. The proposed
legislation, they said, would be
a much-needed corrective.
McCain said in an interview
Thursday that his bill is simply
the next frontier in a decadeslong fight to force more
transparency about money in
politics.
“For 25 years, I’ve been
fighting for full disclosure of
what’s going on. This is a logical
step in that direction,” he said.
“There’s no departure from my
past.”
McCain would not say
whether his support might pave
the way for more Republicans to
come on board. But at least one
of McCain’s allies in the Senate
said he is “very interested” in
the proposal. “Social media
advertising had to be regulated.
It’s the wild, wild West,” said
Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.).
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Final boarding call
A United Airlines 747 makes its last landing at Dulles International Airport, with water cannons heralding its arrival.
United is phasing out its 747s, dubbed “Queen of the Skies,” by Nov. 7. The planes have been part of its fleet since 1970.
Riva Sciuto, a spokeswoman
for Google, said in a statement,
“We support efforts to improve
transparency, enhance
disclosures, and reduce foreign
abuse. We're evaluating steps we
can take on our own platforms
and will work closely with
lawmakers, the FEC, and the
industry to explore the best
solutions.”
Facebook’s vice president of
U.S. public policy, Erin Egan,
said in a statement, “We stand
with lawmakers in their effort to
achieve transparency in political
advertising. We have already
announced the steps Facebook
will take on our own and we
look forward to continuing the
conversation with lawmakers as
we work toward a legislative
solution.”
The co-sponsors of the bill
touted the endorsements of
several civil society groups,
including the Campaign Legal
Center, the Sunlight
Foundation, Issue One, the
Brennan Center of Justice,
Common Cause and Public
Citizen. But some are skeptical
that the Honest Ads Act will
gain enough political support,
given the Republicancontrolled Congress and
potential attacks from freespeech advocates and those
who oppose the creation of new
campaign finance regulations.
A companion bill in the
House was introduced
Thursday by Reps. Derek
Kilmer (D-Wash.) and Mike
Coffman (R-Colo.).
hamza.shaban@washpost.com
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
DIGEST
JOBS
Unemployment claims
drop to 441/2-year low
The number of Americans
filing for unemployment benefits
dropped to its lowest level in more
than 441/2 years last week, pointing
to a rebound in job growth after a
hurricane-related decline in
employment last month.
The labor market outlook was
also bolstered by a report
Thursday showing a measure of
factory employment in the MidAtlantic region racing to a record
high in October. The signs of
labor market strength could
cement expectations that the
Federal Reserve will raise
interest rates in December.
Initial claims for state
unemployment benefits fell by
22,000 to a seasonally adjusted
222,000 for the week ended
Oct. 14, the lowest level since
March 1973, the Labor
Department said
Claims are declining as the
effect of Hurricanes Harvey and
Irma washes out of the data. The
hurricanes boosted claims to an
almost three-year high of
298,000 at the start of September.
A Labor Department official
said claims for the Virgin Islands
and Puerto Rico continued to be
affected in the aftermath of
hurricanes Irma and Maria. As a
result, the department was
estimating claims for the islands.
Last week marked the 137th
week in a row that claims were
below the 300,000 threshold,
which is associated with a robust
labor market. That is the longest
such stretch since 1970.
— Reuters
JAPAN
Nissan halts assembly
of vehicles sold in Japan
The Nissan Motor Co. is
suspending domestic production
of vehicles for the Japanese
market for at least two weeks to
address misconduct in the final
inspection procedures that led to
a major recall, the company said
Thursday.
The issue has tarnished
Nissan’s brand at home and, along
with a data falsification scandal at
compatriot Kobe Steel, raised
questions about compliance and
quality control at Japanese
manufacturers.
Japan’s second-largest
automaker said it would stop
production of domestic-market
vehicles at all six of its Japanese
assembly plants to consolidate
inspection lines to comply with
transport ministry requirements.
Nissan produced about 79,300
passenger and commercial
vehicles in Japan in August.
About 27,600 were made for the
Japanese market.
The automaker said uncertified
technicians performed final
checks for domestic-market
models because some inspection
steps had been transferred to
other inspection lines, in violation
of ministry rules.
Checks by uncertified
inspectors continued even after
Nissan said it had boosted control
of its inspection processes when
the issue came to light last month.
The misconduct has forced
Nissan to recall all 1.2 million
passenger cars sold in Japan in
the past three years for
reinspection. The company said
Thursday that about 34,000
additional cars would be
reinspected. Nissan will continue
to produce vehicles for export in
Japan, as the certification process
for final inspections does not
apply to vehicles shipped
overseas.
— Reuters
Caldwell confirmed that the
automaker had reached a
settlement with states.
Swiss drugmaker Novartis
plans to cut 450 U.S. jobs over the
next two years as it gradually
shuts a generics manufacturing
plant in Colorado and
discontinues some products
amid intense price pressures. “To
remain competitive in the U.S.,
Novartis will discontinue or
divest limited growth products in
saturated markets,” a spokesman
said.
GIANLUIGI GUERCIA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Steven Biggs, owner of the Farm Lodge, grades coffee beans from his
plantation in the British territory of St. Helena. The rare green tipped
bourbon arabica coffee cultivar grown on the island in the South
Atlantic is the rarest and one of the most expensive coffees in the
world. St. Helena produces only a few thousand pounds each year.
ALSO IN BUSINESS
General Motors agreed to pay
$120 million to resolve claims
from 49 U.S. states and the
District of Columbia over faulty
ignition switches, state attorneys
general said. The largest U.S.
automaker had previously paid
about $2.5 billion in penalties
and settlements over the faulty
ignition switches, which could
cause engines to stall and prevent
air bags from deploying in
crashes. The defect has been
linked to 124 deaths and 275
injuries. Spokesman David
LG Electronics said it will work
with Qualcomm to research and
develop autonomous driving
technologies. The South Korean
company said it has opened a
research center in Seoul with the
U.S. chipmaker and will open
another one in the city by the end
of 2018. They will focus on
developing fifth-generation
wireless technology, or 5G, seen
as crucial for autonomous
vehicles.
— From news services
COMING TODAY
10 a.m.: Existing-home sales.
10 a.m.: State unemployment
figures.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
Tiberi’s departure from Congress shows a mounting challenge for the GOP
BY
R OBERT C OSTA
Rep. Patrick J. Tiberi (R-Ohio),
a member of the House Ways and
Means Committee, announced
Thursday that he would leave
Congress early next year to enter
the private sector, jolting GOP
leaders as they scramble to pass
legislation to rewrite the U.S. tax
code — one of President Trump’s
signature campaign promises.
Tiberi’s decision underscores
the mounting challenge facing
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.) in retaining veteran Republican lawmakers, many of
whom have grown weary of the
tumult and stumbles that have
come to define the Trump era on
Capitol Hill.
“It is with a humble and
thankful heart that I will not be
seeking reelection,” Tiberi said in
a statement. “While I have not
yet determined a final resignation date, I will be leaving Congress by January 31, 2018.”
Tiberi, 54, said he has accepted an offer to lead the Ohio
Business Roundtable, a business
advocacy group in Columbus.
Tiberi’s decision to leave the
House before the end of his term,
which surprised colleagues and
Ohio Republicans, is another
rupture in the ongoing deliberations among congressional Republicans over tax policy.
As a senior member of the
House’s tax-writing committee,
Tiberi is positioned to exert significant influence over his party’s
tax overhaul, especially since its
specific provisions are largely
Republican accepted
an offer to lead the Ohio
Business Roundtable
unwritten. But his willingness to
leave the House by late January,
perhaps amid an intense GOP
push on taxes, raised questions
about its fate.
“Tax reform was do or die
before Pat’s decision to leave, and
certainly is now,” said former
Minnesota congressman Vin Weber, who is close to Republican
leaders. “His departure isn’t
helpful. He’s a good guy, a
smart guy.”
Others in the GOP orbit said
Tiberi is a major player but not
central to the chances of tax
legislation.
“I actually feel more optimistic today than I did two weeks
ago,” said Heritage Foundation
senior fellow Stephen Moore,
referring to the GOP’s movement
toward passing a budget this
week, which includes instructions for the expected tax legislation.
“It’s going to be a heavy lift, for
sure, when you take on the
swamp creatures. But in the end,
Republicans finally get the consequences of not passing tax
reform would be catastrophic for
the party, and they could be
wiped out in 2018,” Moore said.
The Ohio congressman joins a
growing crowd of leadershipfriendly Republicans who are
JOHN MINCHILLO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rep. Patrick J. Tiberi (R-Ohio) speaks at DynaLab in Reynoldsburg, Ohio, on April 1. Tiberi said on
Thursday that he will resign from his seat to take the helm of a business policy group back home.
leaving Congress. Reps. David
Reichert (R-Wash.), Charlie Dent
(R-Pa.) and David Trott (RMich.), among others, have already announced they will not
seek reelection.
Dent said in an interview that
more mainstream Republicans
may do the same later this year,
driven by their unease with the
chaotic political environment
in Washington.
“Do I think there will be more?
Yes. Am I prepared to say it’ll be
an avalanche? No. But I do think
there will be more retirements,”
Dent said. “Since Trump, we
spend much of our time now just
responding to the tweet of the
day or the latest outrage. It’s
really distracting from accomplishing our legislative agenda.”
Dent added: “Do you really
want to spend next year explaining what’s going on here? I know
I don’t.”
Tiberi was elected to the
House in 2000 after working as a
real estate agent and serving in
Ohio’s state legislature. The New
York Times first reported his
decision to step down.
According to two friends of
Tiberi, who requested anonymity
to speak candidly, the Ohioan
was motivated to leave by his
desire to spend more time with
his wife and four daughters,
make more money, and escape
the daily drama of Congress.
Tiberi has also voiced private
frustrations about his political
future, following a failed bid to
chair the Ways and Means Committee in 2015 and flirtations this
year with a run for statewide
office next year that have not
panned out, even though the
congressman has more than
$6 million in his campaign account, the friends said.
Tiberi’s seat — in Ohio’s 12th
Congressional District — is in
central Ohio and includes suburban communities near Columbus. Seen as reliably Republican,
it was once held by Ohio Gov.
John Kasich (R) and has not been
held by a Democrat in decades.
Many local GOP figures said
Thursday that they would probably seek the party’s nomination.
Meredith Kelly, a spokeswoman for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee,
said Democrats “will be in the
fight” if party leaders decide
“this district gets us closer to that
goal” of retaking the House majority.
During Ohio Republican John
A. Boehner’s tenure as House
speaker, Tiberi was well known
at the Capitol as a trusted friend
and one of his lieutenants. At
times, when members wanted to
get a message to Boehner, they
huddled with Tiberi.
Ryan, too, sees Tiberi as
an ally.
“Patrick J. Tiberi has brought
great decency and relentless passion to this House,” Ryan said in a
statement. “For me, personally,
Pat is a dear friend whose
thoughtfulness I cherish.”
amy.gardner@washpost.com
Amid Seattle’s Amazon boom, housing prices have soared
AMAZON FROM A1
other cities willing to pursue the
company at great expense.
Over the past decade, Amazon
and founder Jeffrey P. Bezos, who
owns The Washington Post, have
added new products and business
units at a breakneck speed and
expected public partners to keep
pace.
In Seattle, that meant rehabbing an area of more than
350 acres at a cost to taxpayers of
hundreds of millions of dollars in
ongoing transportation and infrastructure upgrades expanding
public transit, road networks,
parks and utilities.
It also put new strains on housing. Seattle is one of the most
expensive places in the United
States to live, forcing lowerincome residents to move to faroff suburbs. The city and surrounding King County declared a
state of emergency in 2015 over
homelessness.
Since then, the problem has
worsened. Rents in King County
have more than doubled in the
past 20 years and gone up 65 percent since 2009. Seattle spends
more than $60 million annually
to address homelessness, up from
$39 million four years ago.
“We started seeing apartment
listings that would say, ‘No deposit needed and priority for Amazon, Microsoft and Google employees,’ ” said Rachael Myers, executive director of the Washington Low Income Housing
Alliance, a Seattle-based advocacy
group. She said the area is “in the
midst of the greatest affordablehousing and homelessness crisis
that our state has ever seen.”
How much of Seattle’s evolution is attributable to Amazon is a
matter of debate. In the past decade, millennial workers have
poured into other big cities —
Washington, San Francisco, Boston — exacerbating housing costs
and homelessness there.
But few buildups are so linked
to the prospects of one company.
Amazon has contributed $30 billion to the local economy and as
much as $55 billion more in spinoff benefits. Unemployment in
the Seattle area is 3.7 percent,
below the national rate of 4.4 percent.
Much of that progress is the
result of Amazon’s decision to
open its first headquarters downtown a decade ago. John Schoettler, who oversees real estate for
the online giant, thought it simplest and least expensive to plan
a suburban headquarters campus east of Lake Washington in
Bellevue, Wash., near Microsoft.
Bezos had a different idea. He
wanted to stay in Seattle.
“Jeff said the type of employees
we want to hire and retain will
want to live in an urban environment. They are going to want to
work, live and play in the urban
core,” Schoettler said.
The decision helped usher in a
new era, one in which top employers abandon suburban office
parks for lively, urban neighborhoods integrated into the cities
around them. Only seven Fortune
500 companies had research or
engineering hubs in Seattle in
2010; now 31 do.
DAVID RYDER FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A worker cleans the exterior of one of three glass biospheres that are part of Amazon’s headquarters in Seattle. The online retail
giant has more than 40,000 employees working in 33 buildings in the city, with space totaling 8.1 million square feet.
“Their growth has just been so
positive to lots of other companies, big and small and medium
and in between,” said Jon Scholes,
president and chief executive of
the Downtown Seattle Association, where Schoettler is a board
member.
It’s a boom that has shown little
sign of slowing. Seattle added
57 people a day for a year through
the summer of 2016, according to
census data. How best to accommodate that growth provokes regular debate in Seattle and could
well shape whatever city Amazon
comes to next.
Such details spark little discussion as mayors and governors
from coast to coast have embarked upon a sweepstakes fit for
a reality show, touting their cities
in online videos and dangling
taxpayer-funded subsidies of as
much as $7 billion, even if their
jurisdictions don’t have the workforce or transportation network
Amazon said it requires.
The company set Thursday as
the deadline to receive proposals.
Tucson officials, with an airport
one-tenth as busy as Seattle’s,
mailed the company a 21-foot cactus to get its attention. Stonecrest,
Ga., with a population barely larger than Amazon’s Seattle workforce, offered to de-annex
345 acres of its land and rename it
the “City of Amazon.” Kansas City,
Mo., Mayor Sly James purchased
1,000 items on Amazon and rated
them all five stars.
New York Mayor Bill de Blasio
announced plans to light up several landmarks and venues in orange to show support for his city’s
bid.
“So will all the mayors go to
compete on ‘The Ellen DeGeneres
Show,’ Kelly Ripa or Anderson
Cooper?” asked Greg LeRoy, president of the policy group Good
Jobs First, which regularly warns
that public incentives rarely pay
off. “That’s the spectrum of the
debate right now.”
Before Amazon, ‘a wasteland’
Seattle won its economic beauty contest in 1962, when it hosted
the World’s Fair. To serve the
crowds, the city built acres of
parking and low-slung motels in
an area known as South Lake
Union.
The bet paid few dividends.
Three decades later, the area was
probably best known for a printing plant, struggling motels and a
Hooters restaurant. Only 677 people lived there in 1990.
Then Paul Allen, co-founder of
Microsoft, launched a real estate
firm called Vulcan and bought
60 acres in the area. Vulcan executive Ada Healey recalls the early
skeptics. During a 2002 pitch
meeting, she said, a representative from a prospective company
turned to her and asked: “Why
would I want to move to South
Lake Union? It is a wasteland.”
Bezos, though, saw promise in
the urban locale. He had started
Amazon in his garage in nearby
Bellevue, then opened an early
office in a former military hospital
now called Pacific Tower. Before
long, he was searching for more
space to accommodate his fastgrowing company.
Schoettler initially secured
about 1.7 million square feet in
10 buildings. It was enough, he
thought, to contain the company
through 2016, when it was projected to have 9,300 employees.
Instead, Amazon grew five
times as fast. It now has more than
40,000 employees in 33 Seattle
buildings totaling 8.1 million
square feet. It occupies 19 percent
of the high-end office space in the
city, according to an analysis by
the Seattle Times, as many square
feet as the city’s next 40 biggest
employers combined.
Next year, Amazon will complete its most prominent addition
— three glass biospheres featuring about 40,000 plants, “a
unique environment for employees to come and collaborate and
innovate,” Schoettler said.
Seattle officials have raced to
keep up, approving $480.5 million in improvements over more
than a decade for South Lake
Union. Amazon and Vulcan, in
need of approval to take over city
alleys for its development,
chipped in funding.
A $190.5 million road-realignment
program
included
$31.4 million from property owners led by Vulcan. A new, 1.3-mile
streetcar line cost $56.4 million
and benefited from $5.5 million
from Amazon, including the donation of a fourth car. Now the city
has embarked on a $201.5 million
electrical substation, work that
includes burying electrical wires.
On weekdays, South Lake
Union teems with young workers
sporting Amazon name tags and
eating bananas that the company
offers free to passersby. Many are
walking their dogs — 4,000
employee-owned pups are registered with headquarters access,
helping Seattle earn notoriety recently for having more dogs than
children.
The campus has produced spillover benefits for the city. Amazon’s buildings are home to 34
restaurants, including a culinary
job-training program called FareStart. More than 20 percent of
employees walk to work, and fewer than half drive.
The company’s longtime support for lesbian, gay, bisexual and
transgender rights — including a
$2.5 million donation that Bezos
and his wife, MacKenzie, made in
support of same-sex marriage —
dovetail with the city’s progressive politics. In June, the company
flew a rainbow flag above its headquarters for LGBT Pride Month. It
has more than 40 “GLAmazon”
chapters for LGBT affinity around
the world.
“We could have gone to the
suburbs, and we could have built a
campus, and we would have had
an entry gate where everybody
would come and go so you would
be very inward-looking and very
exclusive,” Schoettler said, “as opposed to being in a very urban
environment where you have to
look outward, so you’re very inclusive, and everyone is your neighbor — and everyone is welcome.”
The housing struggle
Maybe no city could have built
housing fast enough to keep prices from spiraling upward during
Amazon’s growth, but Seattle —
despite nearly leading the nation
in new apartment construction —
hasn’t come close.
On the sidewalks, alongside
rentable neon bikes, people sub-
sist in tents and sleeping bags in
places locals say they did not congregate at 10 years ago — a warning sign for cities nationwide trying to capture a version of Seattle’s
glory.
“We don’t have enough housing
for low-income people especially,
but we also just don’t have enough
housing,” said Myers, a longtime
Seattle housing advocate. “And
Amazon obviously impacts both
of those things.”
Officials at Bellwether Housing, the city’s largest nonprofit
manager of affordable housing, at
2,000 units, report a vacancy rate
of 1 percent. “It’s very rare that
someone moves out, because they
have nowhere else to go,” said
chief executive Susan Boyd.
A state analysis of evictions
found they were driven not by
social problems but by economics.
As Amazon’s boom has continued,
the city approved a rule this year
requiring landlords to accept the
first viable renter who applies —
rather than cherry-picking a tech
worker. The government also adopted an inclusionary zoning policy requiring developers to set
aside some new units at belowmarket rates or pay into a fund to
develop other affordable units.
Myers suggested other jurisdictions pay heed: “If you’re going to
get an Amazon that’s going to
create a ton of high-paying jobs
and a ton of pressure on the housing market, what are the things
you can do before rents really
skyrocket?”
Ask 10 experts where the company will put its next headquarters, and you may get 10 different
answers. The company prides itself on zigging when others zag,
making it more difficult to read
the tea leaves. Still, many in Seattle say the company probably has
a good idea of its options. “I suspect they have a shortlist,” said
Healey, the Vulcan executive.
Landing the second headquarters would be a legacy-defining
achievement for nearly any governor or mayor, but lessons from
Seattle’s Amazon experience have
bidders scrambling to show how
they can meet Amazon’s insistence on speed, low costs, transportation and inclusion — particularly if they didn’t focus on them
ahead of time.
East Coast cities such as Boston, New York and Washington
may need to answer for their own
runaway real estate and housing
prices. Governors, including Republicans Chris Christie of New
Jersey, Scott Walker of Wisconsin
and Larry Hogan of Maryland,
may have to explain why they
canceled major transit projects.
Charlotte and Indianapolis are
bidding, but Amazon may want to
know the effect of state laws there
affecting the rights of gay or transgender employees.
Amy Liu of the Brookings Institution said the Amazon competition will hopefully serve as a
chance for elected leaders to take
the temperature of how prepared
their neighborhoods and infrastructure are to drive growth,
whether from Amazon or elsewhere.
“These are things every city
should be doing anyway,” she said.
jonathan.oconnell@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
23,500
Close
YTD
% Chg
23,163.04
0.0
+17.2
22,000
20,500
19,000
17,500
Nasdaq Composite Index
6800
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6605.07
–0.3
+22.7
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Construction Materials
Diversified Consumer Svcs
Insurance
Life Sciences
Software
Energy Equipment & Svcs
Computers & Peripherals
Tobacco
Airlines
Distributors
0
–6.0%
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
+6.0%
2.82
2.03
1.22
1.16
1.11
–1.67
–2.18
–2.55
–2.59
–5.07
5600
5000
S&P 500 Index
2562.10
0.0
+14.4
2575
2450
2325
2200
2075
O
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
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Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
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YTD
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219.24
91.90
155.98
259.04
131.55
118.20
33.75
46.59
70.89
82.74
23.58
239.99
163.24
160.90
40.09
0.4
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0.0
0.6
0.4
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2.0
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22.8
24.1
34.7
66.4
41.8
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21.7
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10.5
Company
Close
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J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
142.04
98.11
166.50
63.75
77.91
52.69
91.59
36.24
133.17
119.49
203.25
49.21
107.02
86.40
99.01
1.0
0.1
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.7
–1.3
1.1
2.4
0.3
–1.0
1.2
–0.7
0.2
0.8
23.3
13.7
36.8
8.3
25.4
3.7
8.9
11.6
8.8
9.0
27.0
–7.8
37.2
25.0
–5.0
Close
Daily
% Chg
76,283.16
15,818.00
50,009.47
–0.4
0.2
0.1
389.11
5368.29
12,990.10
7523.04
–0.6
–0.3
–0.4
–0.3
5896.13
3931.25
28,159.09
21,448.52
0.1
–0.3
–1.9
0.4
YTD % Chg
–30%
0%
+30%
US $
EU € per
0.8437
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1852
0.0088
1.3162
0.3157
0.8014
0.0532
0.0075
1.1105
0.2662
0.6761
0.0449
148.1090
35.5224
90.1860
5.9914
0.2398
0.6088
0.0405
Japan ¥ per
112.5300
133.3700
Britain £ per
0.7598
0.9005
Gainers
Adobe Systems Inc
Envision Healthcare
NVR Inc
Insteel Industries
MEDNAX Inc
Pool Corp
AR Best
Quorum Health Corp
Danaher Corp
Lannett Co Inc
Acadia Healthcare
Saia Inc
Axcelis Tech
Comty Health Sys
Steel Dynamics
RLI Corp
Webster Financial
East West Bancorp
Innoviva Inc
Umpqua Holdings
0.0068
Brazil R$ per
3.1708
3.7544
0.0281
4.1696
Canada $ per
1.2478
1.4788
0.0110
1.6423
0.3939
Mexico $ per
18.7808
22.2594
0.1670
24.7189
5.9290
Mexico $
2.5383
0.1684
0.0664
15.0500
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 26,561.57
Russell 2000
1502.04
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 527.08
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
10.05
Virtual
shopping
in store at
Walmart?
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
Walmart has spent billions of
dollars buying websites like
Jet.com and ModCloth and is
investing in new technology
as it goes head-to-head with
Amazon.com. Now, Walmart, the
world’s largest retailer, is setting
its sights on virtual reality.
Imagine this, said Katie
Finnegan, who heads Walmart’s
tech incubator: You need a tent
for your next camping trip. If all
goes to plan, you could one day
virtually swoop into your campsite and see any given tent in
action. “You could unzip it, lay
down, look left and right, and say,
‘Oh, this is supposed to be a
two-person tent? It’s kind of
tight,’ ” she said.
And then you could move on to
the next tent — without leaving
your couch.
“There is a lot of technology
we’re excited about,” Finnegan
said, “but virtual reality in particular offers an opportunity to
actually experience products and
items in an immersive way.”
The technology has yet to
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
0.0
–0.2
0.7
–0.2
YTD % Chg
14.1
10.7
17.8
–28.4
catch on with the mainstream, so
such concepts are still in the
gee-whiz stage with no guarantee
of boosting sales. But this summer, the company put out an
open call for technology firms,
venture capitalists and other entrepreneurs to submit their
ideas. A panel of five judges —
including Arianna Huffington,
founder of Thrive Global, and
Marc Lore, head of Walmart’s
U.S. e-commerce operations —
whittled the 200 applicants to
five winners, who spent about
two months at Walmart’s technology incubator, Store No. 8,
coming up with new shoppingcentric applications for virtual
reality.
Walmart has been experimenting with virtual reality to help
train its employees for busy shopping days such as Black Friday. It
is also testing a program that
would allow delivery drivers to
walk into customers’ homes and
deliver groceries straight to their
refrigerators.
Here are the five ideas the
Bentonville, Ark.-based company
says could be making their way
online as early as next year:
3-D
holograms at Bonobos.com, the male clothing site
Walmart acquired this year for
$310 million, that would make it
possible for shoppers to try on
virtual clothing for fit and style.
According to Walmart, the technology would allow customers
“to view how the fabric moves
and get a sense of sizing, allowing
for more realistic shopping previews and reviews.” (The idea was
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.32
0.45
0.79
1.46
2.75
5.33
proposed by 8i, a New Zealandbased maker of virtual-reality
software.)
At ModCloth, the women’s
clothing site Walmart took over
in March, customers may one day
be able to take 3-D photos of
themselves using their smartphones, and use those images to
get an idea of how something
might look on. That way, executives say, shoppers could “experience the realistic feel of an item
before they purchase without
having to physically go in-store.”
(The concept is offered by Fyusion, a San Francisco-based company that develops technology
for processing 3-D scans.)
An “interactive virtual store”
for designer Rebecca Minkoff,
whose items are sold at Walmart.com, would allow customers to sit in on fashion shows and
shop directly from the runway.
The technology, the company
said, would effectively allow it to
create a virtual store-within-astore. (It was developed by Obsess VR, a New York-based technology firm that specializes in
360-degree shopping sites.)
Tired of shopping online
alone? If Walmart gets its way,
you may soon be interacting with
other shoppers and experts as
you pick out items for your virtual cart. Need help picking a pair
of jeans? A virtual fashion assistant may be able to help. Trying to
figure out why your nightstand is
lopsided? An employee could tell
you which screws are loose. (The
concept is from Nurulize, a
Los Angeles-based virtual-reality
3.82%
4.25%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.11%
1.25%
Federal Funds
15-Year fixed mortgage
1.36%
LIBOR 3-Month
1-Year ARM
Trump picks tech lawyer to head FTC
B RIAN F UNG
The White House said Thursday President Trump intends to
nominate Joseph Simons, a longtime expert in competition law,
to head the Federal Trade Commission, America’s top privacy
and consumer protection agency.
The announcement ends
months of speculation over who
might lead the FTC and its efforts
to regulate perceived monopolies
and unfair business practices, at
a time when many policymakers
have raised questions about the
growing consolidation of industries, including retail and media.
One industry that may be
breathing a sigh of relief ?
Silicon Valley.
Simons serves as a co-chair of
the antitrust practice at the law
firm Paul Weiss. His previous
clients include many tech or
tech-related firms, such as MasterCard, Microsoft, Sharp and
Sony. He has also represented
companies in the defense, music,
software, telecom and transpor-
tation industries.
His selection by Trump is
notable in who Simons is not.
Earlier this year, Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes was
widely rumored to be Trump’s
favored candidate for the FTC
job. Reyes, who would have been
a relative newcomer to Washington, had previously called for
reopening a federal antitrust
probe into Google over the company’s practices in the online
search business. Many policy
analysts took that to imply
Trump wanted the FTC to take a
harder line toward Silicon Valley.
Trump’s move this week to
nominate someone else instead
suggests a shift away from that
approach.
A more establishment candidate with decades of experience,
Simons served under George
W. Bush as the director of the
FTC’s competition bureau.
The White House’s decision to
side with a Beltway-insider type
for FTC chair is consistent with
Trump’s appointment of another
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Losers
Benchmark Electr
United Continental
Genuine Parts Co
SuperValu
Sonic Automotive
Control4 Corp
SLM Corp
8x8 Inc
Black Box Corp
NorwegianCruiseLine
HewlttPckrdEntrprse
Era Group Inc
Spectrum Pharma
Sally Beauty
GATX Corp
Synaptics Inc
Dover Corp
LendingTree Inc
Skechers USA
Kaiser Aluminum
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$59.78
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$15.70
$19.00
$27.26
$10.69
$12.25
$3.20
$54.17
$13.86
$9.33
$18.61
$16.87
$61.23
$36.87
$89.50
$228.35
$24.03
$99.97
–12.9
–12.1
–8.5
–8.1
–8.0
–7.6
–6.8
–6.1
–5.9
–5.7
–5.7
–5.5
–5.4
–5.0
–4.7
–4.5
–4.3
–4.2
–4.2
–4.1
longtime expert to head antitrust
enforcement at the Justice Department, Makan Delrahim.
Delrahim is said to be a
straight shooter who is unlikely
to be swayed by Trump’s public
rhetoric on such issues as the
AT&T/Time-Warner acquisition.
Similarly, by siding with Simons over Reyes, the White
House appears to be prioritizing
the mainstream over the unconventional.
Also on Thursday, the White
House said Trump will nominate
Rohit Chopra, a former top official at the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau, to fill a Democratic slot at the FTC.
“The thing to know about Joe
and Rohit is that they both play
well with others, and that’ll be
good for the commission executing its mission,” said Jon Leibowitz, a former FTC chair who is
now a partner at the law firm
Davis Polk.
Both nominations would head
to the Senate for confirmation.
brian.fong@washpost.com
10-year note
Yield: 2.32
2-year note
Yield: 1.53
5-year note
Yield: 1.96
6-month bill
Yield: 1.25
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
3.16%
software developer.)
Electric outlets, stove tops
and door handles can be child
safety hazards. Soon, an online
tool could peek inside your home
and tell you where the biggest
risks are lurking. The site could
also give product recommendations and allow customers to test
items virtually before buying
them. (It is piloted by Specular
Theory, a Venice Beach, Calif.,
company that specializes in immersive content.)
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
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A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Insurers focusing on ACA
enrollment despite disarray
BY
P AIGE W INFIELD
C UNNINGHAM
Health insurers heading into
the 2018 Affordable Care Act
enrollment season say they are
staying laser focused on maximizing sign-ups, even as Republicans remain in disarray and
even denial over the seven-yearold health-care law.
A big funding infusion that
could help lower premiums for
the law, also known as Obamacare, is in flux just 12 days before
enrollment starts. President
Trump sent mixed signals this
week about whether he would
support legislation funding subsidies to help lower-income
Americans get coverage. A compromise measure crafted by Sens.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and
Patty Murray (D-Wash.) was embraced by two dozen Senate Democrats and Republicans on Thursday.
Adding to the array of possible
outcomes, a federal judge could
rule next week that the Trump
administration is required by law
to resume the payments known as
cost-sharing reductions, in a
court challenge filed by 19 states.
The Department of Health and
Human Services cut them off last
week, saying it didn’t have constitutional authority to pay them
without an appropriation from
Congress.
Yet most insurers have already
finalized plan offerings for the
six-week enrollment period starting Nov. 1, when 11 million or so
Americans are expected to shop
on HealthCare.gov and state-run
marketplaces. Insurers are more
immediately worried about consumer confusion stemming from
the debate over halting the CSRs,
especially given the administration’s recent cuts to outreach and
advertising.
“They’re focused on open enrollment and how do we ensure in
this environment, where we’ve
Many have adjusted
for possibility that they
will not receive subsidies
had so much uncertainty, that
consumers know where to get
their plans,” said Kristine Grow,
spokeswoman for America’s
Health Insurance Plans, a trade
association. “That’s kind of job
No. 1 as we’re standing here today.”
Marketplace insurers, struggling over the past several years
with heavy losses, have been
forced to operate in a deeply
uncertain environment even after Republicans abandoned — for
now — their efforts to repeal and
replace the ACA. Republicans are
now polarized over how to approach the health-care law as it
remains standing. Insurers are
still trying to attract customers.
Alexander, chairman of the
Senate Health, Education, Labor
and Pensions Committee, has
been trying to stack up enough
support to pass a bipartisan
measure hammered out with
Murray, the panel’s ranking Democrat. Their agreement would
fund CSRs for two years and
provide more flexibility to states
seeking alternative marketplace
approaches. But Trump appeared
to tout an alternative reality this
week, insisting on multiple occasions that Obamacare no longer
exists.
“It’s dead. It’s gone. It’s no
longer — you shouldn’t even
mention. It’s gone,” Trump said
in the Rose Garden on Monday.
At a White House news conference on Tuesday, Trump called
the ACA “virtually dead” and “in
its final legs.” “There’s no such
thing as Obamacare anymore,”
the president said.
The marketplaces certainly
aren’t dead, as Trump has
claimed. But they’re not as
healthy as in prior years, either.
Almost all the big, publicly traded
insurers have bailed under heavy
losses, leaving the not-for-profit
plans, some of which are the only
available insurance in rural U.S.
counties.
When
the
marketplaces
opened in 2014, 3 out of 4 shoppers had access to at least three
plans, according to data from the
Kaiser Family Foundation. Just
6 percent had only one plan to
choose from. This year, just
58 percent of shoppers had at
least three plans to choose from.
More than 1 in 5 (21 percent) had
only one option.
Trump’s claims that Obamacare has collapsed — coupled
with months of headlines about
dismantling the ACA and the
possibility that the administration would cut off the CSRs —
mean insurers are encountering
even more consumer confusion
than usual about their coverage
options.
“Whenever our members hear
in the media that these things are
going away, their immediate
thought is ‘Oh my gosh, does this
affect me now?’ ” said Melanie
Coons, a spokeswoman for Premera Blue Cross, which participates in Alaska’s and Washington state’s marketplaces.
“So we try to think from that
perspective: What are our members going to do when all they
hear is their subsidies are going
away and their costs are going
up?” Coons said.
Fortunately for Premera, it
had already submitted to regulators a set of premium rates assuming the CSR payments would
be cut off. Insurers have said they
are generally raising premiums
by 15 to 20 percent to account for
the loss of the subsidies, which
compensate them for discounting costs for the lowest-income
marketplace enrollees.
A multi-front assault on compensation
After repeatedly
failing in their
cynical efforts
that would
cut millions
from health
Federal
insurance rolls,
Insider
congressional
Republicans now
JOE
are attacking
DAVIDSON
the Federal
Employees Health
Benefits Program (FEHBP).
With that move andPresident
Trump’s earlier budget plan,
which would slice and dice
federal retirement, Capitol Hill
and the White House have
mounted a multi-front assault
on federal worker
compensation.
If a House budget resolution
becomes law, federal retiree
health insurance premiums
could rise significantly over time
because growth in the
government’s subsidy would be
limited to the increase in
inflation.
“Federal retirees earned their
retiree health benefits through
years of hard work for this
country. Shifting more of the
cost of the premiums onto their
backs now — when they have
already entered retirement —
fails to honor the commitments
and promises made to them in
exchange for their service,” said
Richard Thissen, president of
the National Active and Retired
Federal Employees Association.
Linking the government’s
subsidy to inflation sounds
reasonable, until you realize that
health-care costs rise much
faster than the general inflation
rate.
“As a rough estimate, it would
raise annuitant premiums by
about 2 percent a year more
than they would otherwise rise,”
said Walton Francis, a healthcare economist and lead author
of Checkbook’s annual Guide to
Health Plans for Federal
Employees. “After 10 years, that
would be about a 20 percent
increase in costs to annuitants.”
Jacqueline Simon, policy
director of the American
Federation of Government
Employees, predicted that
FEHBP would be “vastly more
expensive for retirees” under the
House plan.
Currently, the government
pays about 70 percent of federal
health insurance premiums,
while enrollees pay 30 percent.
Under the House plan, that
could flip, Simon said, with
employees and retirees paying
80 percent of their health
insurance costs after 20 years.
“This proposal imposes
substantial financial harm,” she
added.
The retirees know it.
Linda Kurz, 77, who retired
from the Veterans Health
Service after 37 years, said the
House plan “will probably at
least double or triple my
premium for standard
individual coverage. . . . All of us
need insurance because one
never knows what lies ahead. I
hope and pray that I don’t need
more than occasional doctor
visits and the least necessary
medication for a long time.
“It will likely make federal
recruitment more difficult. It is a
shame that federal employees
are repeatedly asked to fund
reduction of the deficit or to
fund the ‘wall’ or tax cuts
including for those who earn
more than enough.”
Joanne Pedersen, who worked
for the Navy Department for
more than 30 years, said she
“was promised health care for
life. It would create a great
hardship should my premiums
increase.”
Federal employees also were
promised a good retirement
program. But Trump’s proposal
would undercut it by increasing
out-of-pocket employee
payments and decreasing
retirement benefits.
The House plan would further
deteriorate federal employee
compensation by, in the words of
the proposal, “basing Federal
employee retirees’ health
benefits on length of service.
This option would reduce
premium subsidies for retirees
who had relatively short Federal
careers.”
With the inflation and lengthof-service provisions, “these two
reforms would bring health
benefits for Federal retirees
more in line with those offered
in the private sector.”
House Republicans think
that’s a good thing.
Yes, federal benefits are better
than many in the private sector.
That comes with Uncle Sam’s
desire to be a model employer.
Instead of seeking better
benefits for all, under the House
plan, Sam wouldn’t be much
better than the bottom feeders.
“Over the past few decades,
the share of large employers
offering retiree health benefits
has dropped fairly dramatically,”
said Tricia Neuman, a senior vice
president of the Kaiser Family
Foundation, a nonpartisan,
nonprofit organization that
analyzes health-care policy.
“With fewer and fewer large
employers offering retiree health
benefits, we’re now seeing a
clear decline in the share of
seniors with retiree health
benefits.”
If they can’t afford to buy
insurance to supplement
Medicare, one possible result of
a decline in retiree health
benefits is a decline in health
care for seniors who need it the
most.
Is that what Sam wants for his
annuitants?
joe.davidson@washpost.com
paige.cunningham@washpost.com
ZACH GIBSON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Sens. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) and Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) say they have a bipartisan group of
two dozen co-sponsors for their plan to preserve Affordable Care Act insurance subsidies.
ACA subsidy plan picks up steam
BY J ULIET E ILPERIN
AND S EAN S ULLIVAN
Democrats pressed Thursday
to advance a bipartisan bill that
would preserve subsidies for lowincome Americans under the
Affordable Care Act amid a new
show of cooperation, even as Republican leaders suggested that
they would need greater concessions before bringing it up for a
vote.
President Trump, meanwhile,
suggested that he was “open” to
authorizing payments to insurers
that help offset out-of-pocket
health costs in the short term —
but had not given up his goal of
repealing the ACA.
Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee
Chairman Lamar Alexander (RTenn.) and ranking Democratic
member Patty Murray (Wash.),
who wrote the new health-care
package, said that there are 12
Republican and 12 Democratic
co-sponsors for their measure. It
would continue the cost-sharing
reduction payments, known as
CSRs, in exchange for giving
states greater latitude to regulate
health coverage.
Many conservative Republicans, including congressional
leaders, have expressed skepticism about passing legislation
that would roll back the ACA in a
meaningful way. Although the
bill does make it easier for states
to obtain federal waivers to
change the way their markets
operate and allows ACA consumers ages 30 and older to buy
catastrophic health plans, it preserves the law’s core mandates.
Speaking on the floor Wednesday, Alexander said those conservatives were ignoring the “chaos” that could ensue if the federal
government did not provide the
cost-sharing reduction payments
that Trump cut off this month.
“What’s conservative about unaffordable premiums?” he asked.
Even as Alexander and Murray
announced their sponsors, a top
Republican argued that the plan
had to undergo changes and win
the clear support of Trump before
it could succeed.
“It takes the president’s support, would be the first thing it
would take,” said Senate Majority
Whip John Cornyn (R-Tex.).
Trump called Alexander twice
Wednesday, the senator said, and
each time encouraged him to
continue working on a deal.
The president told reporters
Thursday that although he prefers providing federal health
funding in a block grant to states,
he is open to a different approach
for a finite period.
“We will probably like a very
short-term solution until we hit
the block grants, until that all
kicks in,” he said. “And if they can
do something like that, I’m open
to it, but I don’t want it to be at
the expense of the people.”
The president has repeatedly
decried the idea of paying money
to insurers, which is the way
cost-sharing payments are distributed.
Sens. Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.) and Bill Cassidy (R-La.),
whose own ACA overhaul bill
faltered late last month, signed
on to the new bill and have been
working with Sen. Ron Johnson
(R-Wis.) to broker a compromise
that would address the concerns
of the White House and House
Republicans.
Murray said she was confident
that Congress would ultimately
pass the measure because Americans are beginning to grasp that
the impasse in Washington has
translated into higher insurance
rates for 2018.
“Here’s what’s really at stake,”
she said. “Patients and families
across the country are looking
ahead to next year, and they are
realizing they are about to pay the
price for the uncertainty and
partisanship we’ve seen — especially from the Trump administration — on health care over the
last nine months.”
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
John Wagner contributed to this
report.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
washington forum
CATHERINE RAMPELL
Kansas’s lesson to Congress
BY
DINAH SYKES
A
mericans want efficient government, responsible spending and
reasonable taxes. This is not difficult. Yet sometimes what seems
so simple becomes complicated when
these concepts are turned into buzzwords and used as weapons for political
gain.
In 2012, Republicans in Kansas enacted a “revolutionary” tax overhaul promised to be a “shot of adrenaline to the
heart of the Kansas economy.” With the
benefit of hindsight, we can say with
certainty this promise was unfulfilled. In
the following five years, Kansas experienced nine rounds of budget cuts, stress
on state agencies and the inability to
effectively provide the core functions of
government for our citizens.
As Republicans in Congress begin
working to modify the federal tax code, I
worry that tax reform done poorly could
lead to similar failure. I hope federal
lawmakers learn from mistakes made at
the state level.
This year, the Kansas legislature —
including many Republicans like me —
voted to partially restore income-tax
rates and to repeal a provision that
allowed independent business owners to
pay almost no state taxes on their income. We also overrode our governor’s
veto, who opposed rolling back the tax
cuts he championed.
Critics of our vote claim that Kansas
didn’t cut spending enough to accompany the tax cuts. In reality, we cut our
budget through across-the-board cuts,
targeted cuts, rescission bills and allotments. Roughly 3,000 state employee
positions were cut, salaries were frozen,
and road projects canceled. We delayed
payments to the state employee retirement system and emptied our savings
accounts. Even as we issued more than
$2 billion in new bonds to float our debt,
Kansas received three credit downgrades, making that debt costlier.
In Kansas, we understand the allure of
tax-cut promises. We want to believe
promises of amazing growth or outcomes. In 2012, traditional budget forecast models accurately predicted the devastating effect the tax breaks would have
on state revenue. Proponents of the plan
used dynamic scoring predicting incredible economic growth and supporting
their own preconceived ideas. Today, we
know which forecasts were correct.
Across the state, citizens may have
been paying less in income taxes, but
those decreases were offset by increases
in sales taxes, property taxes and fees.
These changes alone were not enough to
put the state on the right path. Education
and infrastructure, key investments necessary for strong economic growth, were
treated as the enemy. As we went through
our 2017 legislative session, the “shot of
economic adrenaline” still showed no
signs of materializing. Our state functioned as though the Great Recession
had never ended.
Kansas should serve as a cautionary
tale illustrating the damage done when
the normal order is shortchanged. America’s founders and countless generations
of leaders embedded deliberative procedures into our legislative process for a
reason. But in 2012, the governor’s tax
proposal looked very different from the
package he signed. A dispute between
House and Senate versions should have
gone to conference committee; however,
the House cut short debate and rammed
through a motion to concur with the
Senate instead. I watch now as lawmakers in Congress use similar tactics, and I
worry that backroom dealing and circumvention of process will lead to similar results.
I never anticipated entering public
service. I was content raising my family,
participating in the PTA and operating
my business. However, I saw the impact
that bad tax policy was having on the
state. I felt the results of growing class
sizes and shrinking programs in the
schools my children attended. I witnessed a gradual erosion of the quality of
life that makes Kansas such a great place
to live.
There is a real temptation to let our
frustration turn into anger. In our increasingly polarized world, we see what
happens when we retreat to our ideological trenches. The antidote, it would seem
to me, is listening carefully to those we
disagree with and seeking common
ground as a starting point. (We should
also note that failing to listen to constituents while blindly holding to ideology
can have consequences: About a third of
Kansas legislators became ex-legislators
in 2016.)
As our country looks at the key issues
ahead of us, including tax policy and
health-care reform, we face important
questions: How can we as Americans
work together to improve our tax policy?
How can we work together to provide
core government functions? Answering
those questions requires having civil
conversations, learning from our neighbors and sharing our experiences. We are
better when we can work together to find
compromise.
The writer, a Republican, is a member of the
Kansas State Senate.
Congress didn’t hobble the DEA
BY
O
ORRIN HATCH
ver the weekend, The Post published an article accusing Congress of passing a bill last year
that gutted the Drug Enforcement Administration’s ability to stem
the opioid crisis. The article asserted
that the legislation was spearheaded by
members of Congress in the pocket of the
drug industry, including Rep. Tom Marino (R-Pa.), President Trump’s former
nominee to be director of the Office of
National Drug Control Policy.
The Post missed the mark.
The article paints a misleading picture in which the bill’s sponsors steamrolled a cowed DEA into submission and
then hoodwinked their congressional
colleagues into passing something they
didn’t understand. Nothing could be
further from the truth.
At issue was the DEA’s authority to
issue what’s called an immediate suspension order. This is an order that,
without prior notice, terminates a distributor’s ability to distribute controlled
substances. It’s an extraordinary measure intended to supplement standard
agency procedures in cases of “imminent danger.”
The problem was that the DEA’s statute did not specify what would constitute “imminent danger,” leaving the
agency with broad discretion to cut off
drug supply chains without warning.
Because that action would result in all
users losing access to the distributor’s
drugs, patient advocates and drug manufacturers raised concerns about giving
the DEA such undefined discretion.
And so Marino introduced legislation
to define “imminent danger.” In 2014, the
bill passed the House but stalled in the
Senate after the Justice Department
expressed opposition. In 2015, with the
support of patient advocates and others,
I approached the DEA to negotiate a
compromise.
The DEA, with the Justice Department’s input, proposed requiring the
DEA to show a “substantial likelihood of
an immediate threat” before it could
issue an immediate suspension order.
This key phrase carried through to the
law.
So imagine my surprise on reading
claims that the sponsors wrote the bill to
gut the DEA’s enforcement authority.
Apparently, the sponsors exercised some
sort of mind-control over the DEA and
Justice Department to get them to give
Congress the very language The Post
now claims destroyed the DEA’s ability to
do its job.
The bill was bipartisan. It was the
product of extensive negotiations with
the DEA and the Justice Department.
The agencies could have stopped the bill
but chose not to. And most important,
the bill passed by unanimous consent,
meaning not a single lawmaker objected
to it. Any senator could have stopped the
bill from passing. Any of my colleagues
could have offered an amendment. Not
one did.
Faced with these facts, The Post alleges that the drug industry and its allies
in Congress snookered Congress into
passing the bill. Other than the bill’s
sponsors, the article claims, “few lawmakers knew the true impact the law
would have.” It further claims this unholy alliance prevailed on the Obama administration to sign the bill into law
without understanding what it actually
did.
This must have been the most effective Washington conspiracy since Frank
and Claire Underwood finagled their
way into the White House.
Left unanswered in The Post’s litany
of allegations are these key questions:
Why would the DEA propose language to
Congress that would eviscerate its enforcement authority? Why would the
DEA agree to allow a bill to move
forward that would hobble its ability to
do its job? Why didn’t President Barack
Obama’s own DEA administrator tell
him not to sign the bill? The Post offers
no satisfactory answers.
Perhaps the reason the DEA chose not
to oppose the bill was because it didn’t,
in fact, eviscerate its authority. Contrary
to the claim that “enforcement actions
plummeted” after Obama signed the bill,
the DEA’s own data show that the agency’s use of immediate suspension orders
began declining in 2012, long before
Obama signed the bill into law. The
Post’s attempt to find a cause-and-effect
relationship here simply doesn’t hold up.
The portrait The Post paints of a
sinister plot that fooled Congress, the
DEA, the Justice Department and ultimately Obama himself makes for fascinating reading. The truth is far less sexy.
The bill passed because lawmakers —
concerned about the DEA’s undefined
authority to cut off drug supply chains
without warning — worked with the
DEA and the Justice Department to craft
language the agencies could agree to.
The DEA and the Justice Department
could have stopped the bill at any time,
just as they did in 2014, when the bill
contained different language. They
chose not to.
That’s what really happened. Let’s
leave the conspiracy theories to Netflix.
The writer, a Republican, represents Utah in
the U.S. Senate.
Sometimes,
playing nice is
sharp politics
ASSOCIATED PRESS
President John F. Kennedy makes a nationally televised address on Oct. 22, 1962.
JOE SCARBOROUGH
JFK could help us
prevent nuclear war
F
ifty-five years ago today, President
John F. Kennedy was navigating
the treacherous tides of the Cuban
Missile Crisis. Day Four found the
young president meeting with his joint
chiefs and Defense Secretary Robert McNamara to weigh military options against
Cuba over the deployment of Soviet nuclear weapons there. Kennedy quickly
concluded that any attack against the
Soviet ally would paint the United States
as “trigger happy” in the eyes of our allies
and invite a Russian counterattack, striking West Berlin. JFK warned his national
security team that such an attack “would
leave me with only one alternative, which
is to fire nuclear weapons.” Because a
nuclear response was not acceptable to
Kennedy, military plans to strike Cuba
were shelved.
Five decades later, the United States
again faces a nuclear showdown, but
from another dystopian regime that has
committed crimes against humanity to a
degree that “does not have any parallel in
the contemporary world.” Those abuses,
documented by the United Nations in
2014, targeted North Korean citizens.
But it is now U.S. allies in South Korea
and Japan facing the fallout from Kim
Jong Un’s unstable, Orwellian government.
Like our Asian allies, Americans worry
about escalating tensions between Washington and Pyongyang. Seven in 10 respondents told NBC/SurveyMonkey
pollsters this month that they fear the
country will be embroiled in major war
during Donald Trump’s presidency. A
majority believe that military conflict
will involve North Korea.
Richard Haass, the president of the
Council on Foreign Relations, tells me
that another Korean war is more likely
than most realize. And the chairman of
the Senate Foreign Relations Committee,
Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), has warned that
President Trump’s own erratic behavior
could unwittingly pull the United States
toward World War III. Sadly, the commander in chief’s words and deeds only
confirm the senator’s bleak assessment.
After his military briefing, Kennedy
spent the rest of his day carrying on as if
the Soviets and Americans were not
engaged in nuclear brinkmanship. He
left Washington for a scheduled campaign trip to Ohio and Illinois, stumping
for candidates in the 1962 midterm elections. Kennedy offered no indication of
the nuclear crisis consuming his White
House. That discretion gave administration officials the space they needed to
work furiously behind the scenes to
defuse the most grave military crisis
since the end of World War II.
Trump, by contrast, has responded to
the current nuclear conflict by publicly
threatening to unleash “fire and fury” on
North Korea. The president used his
speech before the United Nations last
month to launch personal attacks
against North Korea’s despotic leader. He
even undercut his own secretary of
state’s attempt at quiet diplomacy, suggesting on Twitter that only a war would
resolve the conflict.
In every instance, Trump’s radical
rhetoric drew a predictably provocative
reaction from a regime that treats its
leader as a godlike figure. Perhaps that is
something Trump’s State Department
might have warned the president about
— if Trump had a functioning State
Department. But, of course, he does not.
On Day Five of the Cuban Missile
Crisis, Kennedy returned to Washington
and feigned sickness so he could spend
the day discreetly discussing options for
ending the standoff. He would not inform the American people of the ongoing
crisis until Oct. 22, 1962, when he told a
television audience that “Our goal is not
the victory of might, but the vindication
of right. Not peace at the expense of
freedom but both peace and freedom. . . .
God willing, that goal will be achieved.”
That is the kind of White House
address U.S. presidents once gave. A
speech of hope, not hyperbole. A speech
that sought peace instead of flirting with
war. A speech seeking solutions instead
of stirring up the anger of an embittered
political base.
But that’s not what we’ve gotten, or
can expect to get, from Trump. What else
would Americans expect from a man
who once asked a foreign policy adviser
why the United States had nuclear weapons if they could not use them against
countries such as North Korea? Those
NBC/SurveyMonkey poll numbers, unfortunately, represent the informed judgment of the people.
Trump voters ignored all the warnings, and most still refuse to entertain
second thoughts. Until they do, the rest
of the world will have to live with the
consequences.
joe.washpost@gmail.com
The history of Iraqi Jews
is in danger
BY
F
JOSEPH SAMUELS
or more than 10 years, the United
States has served as a gracious host
to thousands of Iraqi Jewish artifacts discovered by the U.S. military in Saddam Hussein’s intelligence
headquarters during the Iraq War. The
trove, which includes 2,700 books, Torah
scrolls and prayer books, and thousands of
documents dating to the 1500s, represents
the lost history of a once thriving, two-millennia-old Jewish community in Iraq.
Despite the U.S. government’s valiant
effort to preserve and restore this treasure, the State Department is preparing to
return the artifacts to Iraq in September
2018 in accordance with an agreement
made with the Iraqi government under
the Obama administration.
But these artifacts belong to the IraqiJewish community and their descendants. Returning the trove to Iraq is
tantamount to returning stolen treasure
to a thief. President Trump and the State
Department should do all that they can to
prevent such an injustice.
I was born in 1930 in Taht Al Takia, the
Jewish quarter of the old city of Baghdad.
Baghdad was my home, and Iraq was my
country. But my sense of national identity
was shattered when Muslim mobs looted
and burned Jewish homes and businesses, murdering hundreds of Jewish men,
women and children in the 1941 pogrom
known as the Farhud.
I was 10 years old. There was nowhere
to run, and no country to take us in.
After the failed Arab war against Israel
in 1948, the Jews of Iraq and other Arab
countries faced anti-Semitism and open
hostility. We suffered arrest, torture, public execution and confiscation of property.
The Iraqi-Jewish artifacts are a rare example of what was stolen from more than
850,000 Arab Jews and the historical
Jewish presence that Arab regimes are
attempting to erase. At present, there are
only about 3,000 Jews living in Arab
countries who are continuing our story.
Decades later, the Baath Party, led by
Hussein, looted and confiscated public
and personal items from synagogues,
Jewish schools and community properties. On May 6, 2003, the U.S. Army
uncovered these artifacts hidden in a
flooded basement of the Mukhabarat
(Iraqi secret service) headquarters.
With the approval of Iraq’s provisional
government, the U.S. military rescued the
damaged items and brought them to this
country. The U.S. government has since
spent more than $3 million to restore the
archive, exhibiting it across the country.
The artifacts brought tears to my eyes
when I first visited the collection at the
Nixon Library. It’s almost as if my lost
history in Iraq came back to life.
The hearts of the Iraqi Jewish community are filled with gratitude toward the
heroic teams who rescued and restored
this collection. Thanks to the United
States, we have preserved these pieces of
history for present and future generations.
But Iraq has proven itself an unreliable
custodian, and we fear these historical
treasures could be lost forever. Trump has
the chance to be remembered as the
preserver of our history, just like Moses
who brought the Hebrews from Egypt and
kept their message alive for future generations. I implore the administration, on
behalf of all Jews from Arab lands and our
descendants, to keep our icons of history
from being sent back to those who stole
them from us.
The writer is an Iraqi-born resident of Santa
Monica, Calif.
O
bamacare repeal? Dead.
Tax reform? Dead and demoted
to tax cuts, now also on life support.
Republicans may have unified control
of government, but they seem curiously
incapable of getting major agenda items
through.
Maybe it’s because Republicans have
insisted on cutting out Democrats and
doing things unilaterally. Or at least they
had been until Thursday, when a bipartisan coalition of 24 senators signed onto a
bill to patch up Obamacare. While President Trump and congressional Republican leadership remain skeptical about
working with the enemy, this could be the
start of a turnaround for the GOP.
To be clear, “bipartisan” ideas are not
necessarily “good” ideas. Sometimes a
policy that both parties support turns out
to be a huge mistake.
As a political matter, though, it can be
extremely useful for the majority party to
get buy-in from the other side, for three
reasons.
First, it offers political cover to do
necessary but unpopular things.
If you actually want to reform and
simplify the tax code, you have to close
loopholes benefitting some constituents.
If you want to cut rates without increasing
deficits, you need to find money elsewhere, either through spending cuts or
other tax increases. Which some affected
group is going to be unhappy about.
Likewise, if you want to wring money
out of the health-care system, you likely
have to inflict pain on someone, whether
it’s patients, providers, insurers or drugmakers.
In other words, despite what Trump
may claim, few policy changes are really
win-win. There’s almost always going to
be at least one loser, who will likely be
loud and angry.
And if your party and your party alone
takes ownership of these changes, that
loud and angry loser is going to direct this
rage at you.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) surely knows this. It’s one
reason he refused to work with President
Barack Obama on almost any major policy initiative. That way, whenever bad
things happened, Republicans could
throw up their hands and proclaim: Don’t
blame us!
And in fact Republicans said this all
the time, even over bad stuff unrelated to
any Democratic policy decisions.
Now, surprisingly, McConnell has
boxed in his own party in the exact same
way.
He declared his intention for Republicans to govern solo, both by crafting bills
of major consequence in secret, without
Democratic input, and by attempting to
pass those bills through a process requiring zero Democratic votes.
In so doing, he’s forced Republicans to
take the heat for every controversial decision Congress makes.
No wonder, then, that the party appears to be giving up or watering down
basically every major pay-for in their tax
overhaul. These include the borderadjustment tax (remember that?) and
full elimination of the state and local tax
deduction.
Republicans are similarly stuck with
the blame for everything that goes wrong
in the health-care system. A majority of
Americans already say that Trump and
congressional Republicans are responsible for any problems with Obamacare
moving forward because they’re the ones
in charge, according to a recent Kaiser
Family Foundation poll.
And when the broader economy softens — which it inevitably will — Republicans will again get stuck holding the bag.
Because they hogged the bag.
Second, if Republicans worked with
Democrats to find some middle ground
and pass their initiatives through socalled regular order, the Grand Old Party
wouldn’t be so easily tripped up by hostage takers.
Right now, Republican leadership is
beholden to the craziest members of its
own party. Someone such as Sen. Ted Cruz
(R-Tex.) knows he can make unreasonable
demands because McConnell can’t afford
defections.
And of course giving in to fringe
demands can cost leadership the votes of
more moderate members of their caucus,
a dynamic we saw during the Obamacare
repeal efforts.
Aiming for a bipartisan coalition of the
middle 60 or so votes, instead of requiring
the vote of nearly every Republican,
would avoid giving undue power to any
one legislator (crazy or otherwise).
Finally, if the majority party successfully achieves meaningful support from the
minority, it’s less likely that a major policy
initiative would be undone or sabotaged
when the balance of power shifts.
That’s a lesson the Democrats have of
course learned with Obamacare, which
passed along party lines (despite
Obama’s efforts to woo Republican votes).
Presumably GOP leadership fears that
working with Democrats on an Obamacare fix could leave Republicans vulnerable to being primaried from the right.
But what’s a bigger threat: some criticism
for playing nice today or facing millions of
uninsured Americans a few years from
now?
crampell@washpost.com
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
What a batty idea
EDITORIALS
Strike three
Mr. Trump’s travel ban has been blocked — again. The administration should let it fade away.
O
that the order violated constitutional protections
against religious discrimination. There’s a convincing case that the president’s decision to permanently
limit travel usurps congressional regulations on
immigration. But the Maryland judge’s ruling takes
an aggressive stance in denying the government the
deference typically granted by courts in national
security cases. Despite the administration’s promises that the Department of Homeland Security
crafted the third ban using objective criteria,
Mr. Trump’s campaign-trail promises to implement
a Muslim ban continue to haunt him in court.
The Justice Department has promised to fight
both decisions. It could make its case before either
the circuit courts or the Supreme Court — which just
dismissed a suit against the second version of the
travel ban last week, and will likely do so with
another challenge at the end of October when the
existing ban on refugee admissions expires.
But why appeal? Just what is it that the government is battling so fiercely to defend? As both judges
noted, the administration has failed to provide any
A superpower
for liberty
evidence that nationality has anything to do with the
security threat an individual poses. Analysis by
David Bier of the Cato Institute shows that the list of
countries included in the ban has little to do with the
criteria ostensibly used by DHS to determine where
increased vetting is needed. And the ban may
actually have harmed security efforts by raising
tensions between the United States and Chad, which
withdrew hundreds of troops from the coalition
battling terrorism in West Africa after reportedly
being added to the ban over a lack of passport paper.
The State Department is now working to patch the
relationship.
The policy alienates many while achieving nothing. It is close enough to the promised Muslim ban
that the courts remain hostile to it, but diluted
enough that the president no longer trumpets it as
an achievement. The government might eventually
eke out a victory before the Supreme Court. But at
this point, what is there to salvage except for
Mr. Trump’s pride? The wisest move for the administration would be to let the ban fade away.
TOM TOLES
Mr. Soros should not have
to do it alone.
Popper, “The Open Society and Its Enemies,” written
during the struggle against totalitarianism in World
War II but holding lessons for today. Then as now, a
healthy civil society — the connections of free
citizens to one another through the press, informal
associations, advocacy organizations and otherwise
— is the bane of authoritarianism.
Alas, even the richest foundations cannot fill the
gap left when governments fail to act. This is salient
and urgent now as President Trump turns his back
on decades of U.S. support for democracy and
human rights. Nothing compares to the persuasive
power and overarching influence of the United
States as the exponent of freedom.
As former president George W. Bush said in an
important address on Thursday, “For more than
70 years, the presidents of both parties believed that
American security and prosperity were directly tied
to the success of freedom in the world. And they
knew that the success depended, in large part, on
U.S. leadership.” For all the positive works Mr. Soros
envisions for his billions, it would be doubly good if
the government of the United States were walking in
tandem with him, and it is a tragedy that it is not.
Chicago has a smart tax proposal for ride-hailing services that other cities should consider.
T
areas surveyed in the new study. (The others were
Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and Seattle.)
The California researchers surveyed more than
2,000 people, including ride-hailing users and
nonusers in those cities as well as their suburbs.
They found that the new services are popular with
wealthier and younger urban dwellers, and much
less so with poorer and suburban ones. Moreover,
their data suggested that half or more of all
ride-hailing trips would not have been made at all,
or would have been undertaken by foot, bicycle or
transit, if not for the existence of services such as
Uber or Lyft. That means the car services, rather
than alleviating traffic and the pollution it produces,
may in fact be adding to it — another reason to ask
ride-hailing companies to contribute something to
help finance transit improvements.
Ride-hailing firm officials dispute these findings,
pointing to previous studies that reached different
conclusions; the California survey may not be the
last word. It’s also true that ride-hailing services are
not the only factor that may have drawn riders away
from transit systems. Poor reliability and increasingly frequent breakdowns have certainly contributed to the exodus of subway passengers in the
District, for instance, and low gas prices have also
provided an inducement for luring people back to
cars.
Nonetheless, it would be folly to ignore the
growing evidence undercutting what was once the
common assumption that ride-hailing apps were an
unalloyed boon that would alleviate congestion. If
the extreme ease and relative comfort of services
such as Uber are in fact generating traffic, then they
are a mixed blessing and should be treated accordingly by policymakers.
Mr. Emanuel appears to be acting on that theory,
as well as on the idea that it is equitable to raise
revenue from services such as Uber, which are used
disproportionately by wealthier passengers, for the
benefit of transit, which serves a mass clientele. That
may not be the last word in the debate, but it seems
informed by common sense.
ABCDE
L O CA L O P I N I O N S
The Purple Line funds should be going to Metro instead
Regarding the Oct. 16 editorial “Parochialism
continues to cripple Metro”:
Again, because of an inexplicable love affair with
the Purple Line, the two-track trolley serving only two Maryland
counties, The Post has missed the
obvious solution. The Washington
Metropolitan Area Transit Authority is a vital regional transportation
system; the Purple Line is not. Metro has deficits in both its operating
and capital budgets; the Purple
Line’s contract will cost $5.6 billion,
with nearly $2 billion in grants and loans from the
federal government.
The obvious solution to Metro’s fiscal woes would
have been to find a way to redirect that $2 billion in
Some Virginians are excited
The Oct. 16 front-page article “A case of politics
fatigue has fewer focusing on Va. governor’s race” was
scary, not only because of the lower predicted turnout
but also because of the views of the people interviewed. Because the implied assumption is that the
people interviewed represent the general population,
the Bernie Sanders supporter who voted for President Trump must prove what many assumed:
Mr. Sanders’s voters helped elect Mr. Trump. The
article left out a finding from a Post poll that
Democrats have about a 10 percentage-point advantage — 67 percent to 57 percent — in registered voters
who say they will vote or have voted in Virginia.
Despite this article’s findings, I know a lot of people
who are very excited about the Virginia elections,
from governor down to House of Delegates.
Peter D. Rosenstein, Washington
Regarding the Oct. 17 news article “NFL endorses
criminal justice reform bill as anthem controversy
swirls”:
In 1969, Curt Flood, a three-time All-Star Major
League Baseball player, refused to be traded to the
Philadelphia Phillies from the St. Louis Cardinals. In
Flood v. Kuhn before the Supreme Court, Flood argued
against the reserve clause, which provided an exception to antitrust laws and allowed teams to trade
players without their input. Flood also cited the 13th
Amendment, which bars slavery and involuntary servitude. In 1975, the reserve clause was eliminated, allowing for the free agency that exists today. This is but one
example of a worthy protest by a professional athlete.
National Football League players who recently
protested against abuse of black people by police
should be heard. It is shameful that the Trump
administration is trying to recast the protests as being
anti-American, when such protests are allowed by
our First Amendment, and the players are trying to
make the United States a more perfect union.
Robert Navin, Vienna
Hailing a subsidy for mass transit
HE DISRUPTIVE effects of ride-hailing services are apparently not limited to traditional taxi companies. In a new transportation
study from the University of California at
Davis, researchers confirm what many urban officials already suspected — that bus and rail-system
passengers are also being lured away by the ease and
convenience of Uber and other such services.
That’s a worrying trend at a time when aging
transit infrastructure is in desperate need of upgrades in a growing number of major cities. And it
has prompted the nation’s first proposal, by Chicago
Mayor Rahm Emanuel (D), to impose a fee dedicated
to mass transit on ride-hailing trips.
If approved by the City Council, the fee, which
would reach 20 cents by 2019, would generate
$20 million annually for the Chicago Transit Authority, which is facing enormous upcoming expenses for modernizing bus and subway services. The
revenue is no game changer, but the concept makes
sense and merits consideration in other cities,
including Washington, one of seven metropolitan
It’s rare that you can refer to an idea as “stupid,” but
the proposed increase in the number of parking spaces
at the National Zoo and construction of what would be
the ugliest garage in existence is just such an instance
[“With expected rise in visitors, National Zoo considers
parking garage,” Metro, Oct. 15]. Aesthetics aside,
spending $50 million to increase the number of spaces
by 520 would cost $96,000 per space, and filling those
spaces at $30 per space for 100 days per year —
reflecting a parking-fee increase and the number of
days the zoo is at full capacity — generates $1.56 million, taking 32 years to break even on the garage,
forgoing any maintenance or operating costs. That,
plus the strain on the surrounding neighborhoods,
speaks to an idea that, like pet rocks and platform
soles, should be allowed to remain in the 1970s.
If anything, the zoo should be seeking to use its
funds for creating more exhibits and closing itself to
vehicular traffic, promoting ride hailing, Metro and
other green means of transport.
Greg Boyd, Washington
The protests aren’t anti-American
I
F A person is to be judged by his enemies,
George Soros can feel proud. Autocrats across
Eastern Europe, including his native Hungary,
as well as those from China to Egypt and many
in between, have expressed fear and loathing — and
taken action against — the civil society organizations that Mr. Soros has generously supported for
three decades. Dictators do not like Mr. Soros at all,
so it is good news that he has now contributed
$18 billion of his fortune to his Open Society
Foundations.
The contributions, made in recent years but
disclosed only this week, will make Open Society the
second-largest philanthropic organization in the
United States, behind the Bill and Melinda Gates
Foundation. Mr. Soros has now created a philanthropic superpower for liberal democracy.
And none too soon. The past decade, in particular,
has witnessed a rising tide of illiberalism across the
globe. The Stanford University-Hoover Institution
scholar Larry Diamond calls this the decade of
democratic recession. From Presidents Xi Jinping of
China and Vladimir Putin of Russia to Recep Tayyip
Erdogan of Turkey, Abdel Fatah al-Sissi of Egypt,
Hun Sen of Cambodia, Nicolás Maduro of Venezuela,
Viktor Orban of Hungary and Ilham Aliyev of
Azerbaijan, government leaders have been aggressively rolling back democracy and human rights.
They have used traditional coercion such as imprisoning innocent people for dissent or for expressing
views freely in news and social media. They also have
subverted freedom by staging “elections” that are
rigged; funding news media that are not independent; labeling civil society organizations as “foreign
agents” or spies; blocking access to the Internet; and
other insidious and innovative techniques.
Mr. Soros, who lived in Nazi-occupied Hungary as
a boy, is at the forefront of pushing back against
totalitarianism and authoritarianism, and his new
commitment suggests that his foundations will
sustain this mission for years to come. Mr. Soros was
moved many years ago by the 1945 book by Karl
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
NCE AGAIN, the courts have blocked President Trump’s travel ban from going into
effect. It is hard not to feel a sense of deja vu
as the government promises for the third
time to appeal the rulings halting the latest iteration
of the president’s order, watered down from his
original “Muslim ban” but still equally pointless.
Mr. Trump’s third travel ban was set to go into
effect on Wednesday, indefinitely limiting entry into
the United States from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen,
Somalia, Chad and North Korea, and denying entry
to certain government officials from Venezuela. On
Tuesday afternoon, a federal judge based in Hawaii
stopped the ban from taking effect, with the exception of the provisions targeting Venezuela and North
Korea. A federal judge in Maryland followed suit on
Wednesday, blocking enforcement of the ban as
applied to travelers with “bona fide” ties to the
United States.
The Hawaii court found that the revised order
likely exceeded the president’s power to enforce
immigration policy, while the Maryland court ruled
. FRIDAY,
federal contribution to Metro. Sadly, the Trump and
Hogan administrations and Montgomery and Prince
George’s counties missed the train. The Purple Line
probably will be built, and Metro’s
many woes will continue ad infinitum.
Metro is the top regional transportation systems, followed closely
by Interstate 270, the American Legion Bridge and the Capital Beltway.
The Purple Line is not even likely to
be close. It is a waste of scarce taxpayer resources — a vanity project.
I hope Metro board Chairman Jack Evans continues to display the red light on the Purple Line. Metro
is too big to fail.
The Purple Line is a
waste of scarce
taxpayer resources.
Frederick H. Graefe, Bethesda
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Regarding the Oct. 16 front-page article “Trump
may have bolstered kneelers’ legal position”:
I am of the age at which most of my friends and I are
Vietnam or Vietnam-era veterans. This, of course, is
one way we differ from the president, who took four
temporary deferments and then got a permanent one
for “medical” reasons relating to his foot. The latter
must have been unique as the sufferer cannot recall
which foot was affected. The bottom line is that we
veterans do not want to hear phony respect for the
military and the flag from this man. He had his
opportunity to prove his respect and did not.
Peter Kaminsky, Rockville
Talk to Congress about the climate
The Oct. 15 editorial “See it, say it: Climate change”
discussed the connection between climate change and
natural disasters, but it didn’t identify an audience for
this discussion. We should “say it” to our members of
Congress who have thus far refused to address the
problem. And we should say it to our friends and
family who consider the economy or terrorism to be
their top voting issue — without realizing how much
climate change will devastate our economy, or how
much more likely they are to die from high temperatures and heat waves than at the hands of a terrorist.
Even if the Environmental Protection Agency abdicates its responsibility to control carbon emissions,
Congress still holds the power to come up with a
bipartisan solution. And Americans must create the
political will for them to do so.
Leila Z. Hadj-Chikh, Baltimore
Not all ‘identity politics’ are equal
In his otherwise excellent Oct. 15 op-ed, “The
sinister agendas of some Trump backers,” which
decried the tribalism into which our nation is
descending, George F. Will perpetuated the false
analogy between progressive identity politics, which
is aimed at getting more seats at the table, and white
nationalist identity politics, which claims there is
room for only one.
Debra Bergoffen, Washington
The economic elephant in the room
In his Oct. 16 op-ed, “Why Ben Bernanke is worried,” Robert J. Samuelson said Mr. Bernanke is
worried about the Federal Reserve’s ability to ward off
an economic crisis with the same tools he used:
flooding the markets with money and lowering interest rates. The worry is being sparked by a stubbornly
sluggish economy, despite low interest rates and low
inflation. Mr. Samuelson mentioned a complex proposal by Mr. Bernanke called “temporary price-level
targeting” that would essentially involve the “Fed
throwing more money at a faltering economy.”
What surprises me is why the elephant in the room
is being overlooked by leading economists: lending
constraints being imposed on small to medium-size
banks. What good is it to lower the rates and yet
make it near impossible to lend? The money is not
flowing to where it is needed most. As any smallbusiness owner who has lately tried to secure a loan
will tell you, the present state of banking regulations
is clearly a case of the pendulum swinging too far to
the other side, and it needs to be addressed.
Irfan K. Ali, Herndon
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
A21
K
EUGENE ROBINSON
MICHAEL GERSON
Trump’s
mindless
cruelty
True
education
involves risk
O
T
ne person who obviously didn’t
know “what he was signing up
for” is President Trump. Others
include Trump voters who believed they were electing a decent
human being to be commander in chief.
What Trump reportedly said to the
grief-stricken widow of Sgt. La David T.
Johnson, who gave his life for his
country, is not some kind of minor
miscue or media-fueled distraction. It
speaks to the core issue of Trump’s
character and demonstrates, as clearly
as any incident to date, his unfitness for
the office he holds — and dishonors.
Johnson and three other U.S. soldiers
— Staff Sgt. Jeremiah “J.W.” Johnson,
Staff Sgt. Bryan C. Black and Staff
Sgt. Dustin M. Wright — were killed
Oct. 4 in Niger, apparently ambushed by
Islamic State-affiliated militants. Exactly what happened is unclear, and Congress should be as dogged in investigating these deaths as it was in probing
Benghazi.
For 12 days, Trump said nothing, not
even a tweet, about the four Americans
killed in action, and had no contact with
the loved ones they had left behind.
Pressed by reporters to explain his
silence, Trump reacted by slandering
his predecessors, especially President
Barack Obama, falsely claiming that
they, too, neglected to console the
families of the fallen.
Trump then placed a phone call to
Myeshia Johnson, La David Johnson’s
widow. The truism “better late than
never” is not always true.
Offering succor to the families
of service members killed
in the line of duty is one
of the most solemn exercises
a president must undertake.
According to two people who overheard the call, Trump told Johnson that
her husband “knew what he was signing
up for” although his death must still be
painful. One witness who confirms
these were Trump’s words is the woman
who raised Johnson as a son, Cowanda
Jones-Johnson. The other is Rep. Frederica S. Wilson (D-Fla.), who was with
the family when Trump called. Wilson
was so dumbfounded and angry that
she quickly called Trump out publicly
for what he had said.
Trump tweeted a denial and said he
had “proof,” but of course produced
none. The president has shown himself
to be such a liar that it’s impossible to
take his word over almost anyone else’s.
Wilson was furious because instead
of lessening Myeshia Johnson’s grief,
Trump had deepened it. Surely that was
not his intent. But mindless cruelty is
still cruel.
Offering succor to the families of
service members killed in the line of
duty is one of the most solemn exercises
a president must undertake. It is a task
requiring, above all, a sense of humility.
“In the hope that it may be no intrusion
upon the sacredness of your sorrow, I
have ventured to address you this
tribute to the memory of . . . your brave
and early fallen child,” Abraham Lincoln wrote to the parents of a deceased
Union soldier.
Unlike true leaders, however, Trump
seems to associate humility with weakness. When confronted with an error,
big or small, he never just says, “I’m
sorry, I made a mistake, I apologize,”
and leaves it at that. He always seeks to
deflect responsibility. Somebody else is
really at fault. Others who came before
him have done worse. Bad people in the
media are treating him unfairly.
Trump is a weak, narcissistic man in a
job that requires strength and empathy.
I’m not sure that empathy is a concept
he even understands. He acts as if he
believes that feeling someone else’s pain
is strictly for losers, not winners.
None of this is a surprise. We learned
a lot about Trump during the campaign
when he attacked the Khan family, who
lost a son in Iraq, for having the
temerity to criticize him politically. We
have a president who believes that
making the ultimate sacrifice for the
nation is less important than supporting or opposing Trump.
The Post reported Wednesday that
earlier this year, Trump phoned the
father of Army Sgt. Dillon Baldridge,
who was killed June 10 in Afghanistan.
In the course of the conversation,
Trump offered to send the father a
personal check for $25,000 — but did
not follow through. The check was
finally sent this week only after The Post
asked about it.
Sadly, that’s typical Trump. He makes
a grand promise, which allows him to
feel big and generous — which is the
whole point. Even in interactions with
Gold Star families, it’s all about him.
Later, having played the role of Trump
the Munificent, he forgets about it and
goes in search of the next opportunity to
shore up his fragile ego.
No one should expect him to grow in
office. He’s 71. At that age, either you
have compassion, self-knowledge and a
conscience, or you don’t.
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
ERIK DE CASTRO/REUTERS
Syrian Democratic Forces fighters ride atop a military vehicle in Raqqa, Syria, on Tuesday.
DAVID IGNATIUS
The rubble in Raqqa
L
ooking at photographs of the
ruined, desolate streets of what
was once the Islamic State’s
capital of Raqqa is a reminder
of the overwhelming, pitilessly effective military power of the United
States.
Perhaps it’s a tribute to the inevitable nature of American force, once
it’s engaged, that the fall of Raqqa in
Syria this week provoked so little
public discussion. Commentators focused on whether President Trump
had dissed the parents of America’s
fallen warriors, but they barely
seemed to notice that our military has
achieved a goal that three years ago
seemed distant and uncertain.
The heaps of rubble in Raqqa that
once housed terrorists and torturers
convey a bedrock lesson, as valid now
as in 1945: It’s a mistake to provoke
the United States. It may take the
country a while to respond to a threat,
but once the machine of U.S. power is
engaged, it’s relentless — so long as
the political will exists to sustain it.
The Raqqa campaign is a reminder,
too, of something we rarely see in
these divisive days — the continuity of
U.S. commitments from the Obama
administration to Trump. Truly, it was
a shared enterprise. Trump deserves
credit for accelerating the campaign
against the Islamic State and giving
commanders more authority. But the
basic strategy — and the will to resist
the jihadists in the first place — was
President Barack Obama’s.
A secure and confident Trump
would invite Obama to the White
House to meet with commanders and
troops returning from the battle. That
would remind the world that the
United States can keep its word across
administrations. Trump, still anxious
about his authority, seems incapable
of such generosity.
Thinking back to the beginning of
this campaign is to recall how fragile
it seemed at first. The Islamic State
exploded in the summer of 2014,
overrunning Mosul and racing like a
firestorm across the Sunni regions of
Syria and Iraq. The lines of defense
buckled. The Kurdish capital of Irbil
was in danger; so was Baghdad.
As a condition of U.S. military
involvement, Obama demanded a
new government in Baghdad that
would be less pro-Shiite sectarian and
better able to win Sunni trust. He was
right, and he got what he wanted in
the replacement of Nouri al-Maliki as
prime minister with Haider al-Abadi,
who has had a steadier hand than
Iraq-watchers initially predicted.
When Obama announced his goal to
“degrade and ultimately destroy” the
Islamic State, it sounded like an obtuse
and conditional war aim. And it didn’t
help that nobody agreed on a name for
this enemy, variously called “ISIS,”
“ISIL” and “Daesh.” The United States
was hardly enthusiastic for the war
after long, frustrating battles against
Islamist insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan. But Obama pushed ahead.
The campaign got off to a slow
start. Tribes in Iraq’s Euphrates Valley
pleaded for U.S. aid that was initially
slow to arrive. The Iraqi military was a
mess until the U.S.-trained CounterTerrorism Service began to display
real combat power. But gradually,
mostly invisibly, the battle turned:
U.S. air power killed tens of thousands
of recruits to the caliphate, obliterating anyone who raised a digital signal.
The U.S. military said little about this
harsh campaign, but Syrian and Iraqi
fighters saw it, and people go with a
winner.
Watching this battle unfold during
multiple visits to Iraq and Syria, I saw
two factors that changed the tide.
First, the United States found committed allies. The toughest fighters
initially were Kurdish, the KDP and
PUK peshmerga militias in Iraq, and
the YPG in Syria. They stood their
ground and fought — and died. (This
Kurdish loyalty is worth remembering now, in their time of trouble.) The
anti-Islamic State alliance broadened
as the Iraqi military got stronger, and
the YPG recruited Sunnis into an
expanded coalition dubbed the Syrian
Democratic Forces.
Victory came from marrying these
committed fighters to America’s devastating firepower. The United States
could dial in strikes from an array of
platforms — drones, fixed-wing aircraft, advanced artillery. The ruin of
Raqqa makes it look like we just
pounded everything, and the United
States should make a self-critical accounting of civilian loss of life. Honesty about the war’s human cost, and
U.S. responsibility for mistakes made
in the fog of battle, is the best bridge to
the future.
The problem with this campaign
from the beginning was that our
military dominance was patched on
top of political quicksand. That’s still
true. Obama never had a clear political strategy for creating a reformed,
post-Islamic State Syria and Iraq;
neither does Trump. Our military is
supremely effective in its sphere, but
the enduring problems of governance,
it cannot solve.
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
Racist patients often leave doctors at a loss
BY
“I
D OROTHY R . N OVICK
don’t want some spic doctor, I
want the other lady!” The patient was 6 years old. He leaned
back on the chest of his father,
who nodded silently and then agreed:
“He would feel more comfortable.” My
colleague, a physician-in-training who is
from Colombia, stepped out and I took
over.
Patients refuse care based on healthcare providers’ ethnicity and religion so
often that this phenomenon has been
dubbed “medicine’s open secret.” A new
poll shows that a majority of health-care
professionals say they have faced prejudice from patients. In 2013, a nurse in
Flint, Mich., sued a pediatric intensive
care unit after it granted a request from a
father to enter “no African American
nurses” on his infant’s care plan. Damon
Tweedy, an African American psychiatrist, describes similar experiences in
bruising detail throughout his memoir,
“Black Man in a White Coat.” And when
Esther Choo, an Asian American emergency department physician, tweeted last
month that white nationalists refused
her care, she set off a Twitter storm of
health-care providers responding with
similar stories.
Patients have the right to choose their
own health-care providers. But two challenging questions emerge when a patient
refuses care based on a provider’s religion
or ethnicity.
First, how do we balance the patient’s
right to determine his or her care with
the provider’s obligation to treat? Kimani Paul-Emile, professor of law and
biomedical ethics at Fordham University,
coauthored a practice guideline in the
New England Journal of Medicine on this
issue, recommending that if a patient is
either medically unstable or has impaired cognition, the assigned professional is obliged to provide care. However, if the patient is medically stable and
has decision-making capacity, the provider should attempt to negotiate, inform the patient that harmful speech is
not allowed, offer transfer to a different
facility and if all else fails, accommodate
the request. This guideline and others
ensure that we provide appropriate medical care to all patients regardless of their
biases.
Second, how should we as health-care
providers productively discuss the harmful effects of prejudice with our patients?
Many of us deal with racism the way we
have been trained to deal with politics in
the exam room, which is not at all. We
wear stickers declaring “I voted today,”
but never for which candidate. In November, I cared for a 10-year-old who was
fighting in school over the results of the
presidential election. I treated his
scrapes and redirected the discussion to
nonviolent strategies for anger management. We understand that engaging in
political discourse can distract from medical treatment and sour the relationships
we work so hard to build.
However, by extrapolating this tenet to
expressions of racial hatred, we miss a
crucial opportunity for therapeutic intervention. When I treat racist patients but
fail to adequately address the effect of
their words and actions on my colleagues,
I not only avoid teachable moments; I
condone hate.
Pediatricians are in a unique position
to address harmful behaviors in children.
We approach these behaviors the same
way we approach strep throat — overtly,
with empathy, and based on all available
evidence. We teach timeout for toddlers
who bite and we role-play conflict resolution for school-age children who fight.
When a long-term patient of mine was
cruel to a smaller girl in her class, I
accessed the American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendations for assessing
and treating bullying. We strive to help
our young patients become fulfilled, nonviolent members of their communities.
But when it comes to racial intolerance, we are often at a loss. We have no
training in the complexities of discussing
racism in the exam room, no evidencebased guidelines or practical tools at our
disposal. In my seven years of training
and 14 years of continuing medical education, I have never encountered a teaching module on addressing racial intolerance in my patients. As Lachelle Dawn
Weeks, chair of Harvard Medical School’s
Social Justice Committee, states: “Medical education has fallen short in modeling the dialogue between health care
providers and patients about patientheld biases.” As a result, we remain silent.
We take an oath when we graduate
medical school to care for all patients
equally. Our oath prevents us from rejecting a patient based on his or her value
system. But our oath does not compel us
to look the other way.
As a profession, we must learn to
address racism as well as we address
other harmful behaviors. We must teach
ourselves and our trainees how to establish an open, empathic dialogue when we
encounter racial intolerance in real-time.
We must not omit racism from the myriad
of societal ills we address as we fulfill our
oath to provide treatment to all.
Dorothy R. Novick is a pediatrician in
Philadelphia.
he desire to protect young people from offensive ideas and
words is an understandable instinct. In the context of bullying,
it is a requirement. In the context of
great literature, it is nearly always mistaken.
The distinction between the language
of the schoolyard and the language of
Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird” has
somehow been lost on the Biloxi, Miss.,
school board, which recently decided to
remove the book from the eighth-grade
curriculum. “There is some language in
the book that makes people uncomfortable,” explained Kenny Holloway, the
vice president of the board.
The purpose of Lee’s classic, of course,
is to make people uncomfortable with
racial prejudice. To do so, it reflects the
language employed by bigots in the
segregated South, including the n-word.
Given a desire to present the repulsive
reality of racism, it could hardly do
otherwise.
But are the eighth-graders talking and
giggling in the back row ready to handle
that reality? Some, surely, are not. How,
then, are children adequately prepared?
For generations of students, an essential
part of that preparation has been the
reading of “To Kill a Mockingbird,”
which is an education in empathy.
The book may be narrated by a white
child, but its whole purpose is to place
the reader in the shoes of an unjustly
accused black man — to provoke anger at
a legal system that betrays him and
disgust with a social system that dehumanizes him. One child, Dill, nearly
vomits in reaction to the sick parody of
justice he sees in the courtroom. We are
intended to feel the same nausea.
Some of the best literature
for children and
young adults encourages
moral reflection on the
cruel reality
created by adults.
The themes of the book — social
stratification, the sexual subtext of racism, the institutionalization of injustice
— are suited to adults. But Lee attempted
to capture and encourage the pre-cynical
outrage of children toward the horrors
of the adult world. This is exactly what
we would hope an educated eighthgrader would feel.
Some of the best literature for children and young adults encourages moral
reflection on the cruel reality created by
adults. Read “Sadako and the Thousand
Paper Cranes,” as I did with my son. It is
the story of a 12-year-old Japanese girl
who develops leukemia as a result of the
atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. In
order to be granted a wish, she resolves
to fold 1,000 origami cranes, reaching
644 before she is too sick to continue.
Her friends and family finish the task,
and the cranes are buried with her.
Is it uncomfortable to consider that
the United States took actions resulting
in the irradiation of Japanese children? Is
it hard to explain to a child? It should be.
Or consider the fine graphic novel
“American Born Chinese,” in which Danny, the Americanized, suburban child of
Chinese immigrants, is embarrassed by
the yearly arrival of his cousin Chin-Kee,
who embodies every destructive Asian
stereotype. In the book, Chin-Kee turns
out to be the Monkey King, a deity who
encourages Danny to embrace his true
identity.
Was the exaggerated presentation of
Asian stereotypes in the book uncomfortable for my biracial child? I should
hope so. But it was placed within a moral
story that rejects exclusion and encourages the acceptance of ethnic identity.
Cutting out the offensive parts would
have left the story powerless.
Our society has developed a deep
confusion about the meaning of education. For some — both the advocates of
safe spaces and the banners of books —
the goal is the preservation of purity.
They want to protect students and educational institutions from defilement by
words and ideas they find offensive. It is
more of a tendency than an ideology. The
same pursuit of purity can motivate
offended conservatives or offended liberals. “To Kill a Mockingbird” has been
targeted, at various times, by both.
But education must mean more than
avoidance of offense. One purpose is
surely to take the horrible, offensive
things that populate reality and put
them in a moral context — to train our
emotional and intellectual reactions to
uncomfortable human failings. The
greatest stories confront the worst of
human nature with the best of the
human spirit. We diminish their power
by lowering the stakes.
This means that true education always involves risk — particularly the risk
of giving offense. But students are not
defiled by the existence of terrible words
and ideas. They are defiled by the acceptance or normalization of those words
and ideas. Which is precisely what “To
Kill a Mockingbird” — and all true
education — sets out to prevent.
michaelgerson@washpost.com
A22
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THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
KLMNO
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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
High today at
approx. 4 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
57 69 76 65°
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WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
MARYLAND
THE DISTRICT
OBITUARIES
A father will serve 40 years
for punching his infant
son to death and burying
him in a shallow grave. B4
The city awards $3 million
to mixed-use projects in
Wards 7 and 8 to help
close the “grocery gap.” B5
Actress Danielle Darrieux,
luminous beauty of French
cinema, appeared in more
than 100 films. B6
Obama returns to campaign trail to rally for Northam in Virginia
Democrats use former
president’s appearance
as way to energize voters
AND
BY FENIT NIRAPPIL
GREGORY S. SCHNEIDER
richmond — Former president
Barack Obama returned to the
campaign trail on Thursday to
deliver a catharsis to a raucous
crowd of thousands despondent
B
SU
over the presidency of Donald
Trump. And he sought to channel
their frustrations into electing
Democrat Ralph Northam in Virginia’s high-stakes gubernatorial
election that is just three weeks
away.
Obama never named his successor or Northam’s Republican
opponent, Ed Gillespie, once in a
34-minute speech. But he seemed
to be referring to both men as he
lamented how politics have
turned “nasty.”
“We’ve got folks who are deliberately trying to make folks an-
gry, to demonize people who have
different ideas, to get the base all
riled up because it provides a
short-term tactical advantage,”
Obama told the 7,500 people
gathered in the Greater Richmond Convention Center. “So the
question for you tonight for the
next 19 days: Do you want a
politics of division and distraction, or do you believe in a better
kind of politics?”
He praised Northam, a former
Army doctor, pediatric neurologist and current lieutenant governor, as the kind of leader the
country needs.
“At a time so many of us are
cynical about government and
public service, to have someone
step up who you can trust and
just wants to do right by the
people of Virginia, that’s worth
something,” said Obama, who in
2008 became the first Democrat
to carry Virginia in a presidential
race in 44 years.
Northam is locked in a tight
contest with Gillespie, a longtime
GOP operative and former chairman of the Republican National
Committee.
Obama’s presence seemed to
animate Northam, a normally
low-key, genteel man who was
visibly emotional and at his most
energized since he launched his
campaign two years ago.
“Unfortunately, my opponent
Ed Gillespie is cut from the same
cloth that Donald Trump is,” said
Northam in his booming Eastern
Shore drawl. “He is nothing more
than a Washington lobbyist who
has now become Donald Trump’s
chief lobbyist. We cannot let that
happen in the commonwealth of
OBAMA CONTINUED ON B3
Gunfire
victim
feared
worker
NO ACTION TAKEN ON
ABUSIVE BEHAVIOR
Sheriff: Suspect gathered
colleagues before shooting
R ACHEL W EINER,
P AUL D UGGAN
AND E LLIE S ILVERMAN
BY
Jose Hidalgo Romero, one of
five people who were shot
Wednesday in a Maryland workplace attack allegedly carried out
by a fellow employee, had complained to his boss about abusive
behavior by the co-worker long
before the shooting, but no action
was taken because the suspect
was deemed to be “a good worker,” according to Romero’s brother.
“He knew something was going to happen,” Noel Orellana
said of Romero, one of three
employees killed in the shooting
at Advanced Granite Solutions, a
countertop company in Edgewood, Md., about 40 miles northeast of Baltimore.
In an interview Thursday, Orellana said that Romero, 34, had
been looking for a new job for
several weeks because he was
afraid of the co-worker, identified
by authorities as Radee Labeeb
Prince, 37, who was arrested
Wednesday after a day-long manhunt.
SHOOTING CONTINUED ON B2
LUZ LAZO/THE WASHINGTON POST
A flagging casino rebuilds its brand
In bid to regain ground lost to MGM National Harbor, Maryland Live to open $200 million hotel and event center
BY
L UZ L AZO
The 17-story flagship hotel at
Maryland Live Casino won’t
open until the spring, but officials are betting that the
350,000-square-foot
addition
will deliver the winning card it
needs to reclaim the lead in the
state’s crowded gambling market.
Monthly revenue for the casino in Anne Arundel County has
dropped an average of 17.7 percent since MGM National Harbor opened in December — drawing gamblers from the Washington area and elsewhere to its Las
Vegas-style resort along the Potomac River in southern Prince
George’s County.
Officials say the hotel and
event center under construction
CORDISH COS.
in the sprawling Arundel Mills
complex will make the casino
more competitive with its rivals,
particularly
MGM,
which
opened with a 24-story hotel and
a concert hall that has lured
visitors with big-name acts.
“We have to work harder at
what we do,” said Rob Norton,
president of Cordish Global
Gaming Group and Live Casinos.
“When we open the hotel and
event center, I expect that we will
be able to compete differently
and maybe a little bit more
effectively.”
As part of its ongoing transformation, the company also is
rebranding itself: Maryland Live
is now Live Casino & Hotel.
State and county officials say
they, too, have high hopes that
CASINO CONTINUED ON B2
TOP: A crane guides the placement of the final steel beam for Maryland Live’s new hotel during a topping-off ceremony Tuesday in Hanover.
ABOVE: The casino’s new 17-story hotel and event center is seen in a rendering. The hotel will be the tallest building in Anne Arundel County.
Man pleads
guilty to
fatal 2015
stabbing
Motive unclear for brutal
Fourth of July attack on
crowded Metro train
BY
K EITH L . A LEXANDER
The two men, strangers to each
other, were waiting at the Rhode
Island Metro station as a train
pulled up the afternoon of July 4,
2015.
Jasper Spires, then 19, had just
dropped out of his first year in
college. Kevin Sutherland, 24, an
American University graduate on
his way to meet friends, brushed
past him to step into the train’s
car.
Spires, who carried a knife,
followed Sutherland onto the
train. With one hand, he grabbed
Sutherland’s cellphone. With the
other, he began stabbing and
cutting.
Within
moments,
Sutherland was dying on the
floor as other horrified passengers watched. Spires kicked
SPIRES CONTINUED ON B2
Nearly half of D.C.’s children experience trauma, survey finds
Rates in Va., Md. trail;
advocates hope to use data
to guide policy changes
BY
MICHAEL ALISON CHANDLER
In the District, 47 percent of
children and teens have experienced a traumatic event, such as
the death or incarceration of a
parent, witnessing or being a
victim of violence, or living with
someone who has been suicidal
or who has a drug or alcohol
problem, according to new federal data. In Maryland and in
Virginia, the rate was 41 percent.
The findings come from stateby-state survey data released
Thursday from the 2016 National
Survey of Children’s Health,
which aims to take a first-ever
real-time look at the rate of
children affected by adverse
childhood experiences, or ACEs.
Such experiences can have serious long-term impacts on a
child’s health and well-being,
studies show, including increased risk for smoking, alcoholism, depression and heart disease.
Public health advocates hope
this data, which is expected to be
collected annually, will undergird a wide range of policy changes to prevent such adversity and
to help children heal.
“These numbers tell a story
about what is happening nationally to children. They have implications for schools and families
and communities and health
care,” said Martha Davis, senior
program officer for the Robert
Wood Johnson Foundation,
which is promoting policies that
can counteract childhood adversity, such as paid family leave and
home visiting programs that give
parents time and resources to
support their children.
Nationally, more than 46 percent of youth in the United States
have had at least one adverse
experience. The survey showed
Minnesota had the lowest rate at
38 percent, and Arkansas had the
highest rate at 56 percent.
The 10 states with the highest
rates of childhood adversity were
all in the South or Western part of
the United States. The federal
government first included questions about ACEs in the
2011/2012 survey. Since then, the
sample size changed, and the
numbers released Wednesday
will become a baseline.
About 1 in 5 — 22 percent — of
children nationwide have had
two or more adverse experiences,
compared with 15 percent in
Maryland, 19 percent in Virginia
and 22 percent in the District.
REPORT CONTINUED ON B5
Kevin
Sutherland
Jasper Spires
Petula
Dvorak
She is away. Her column will resume
when she returns.
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
Man pleads guilty to murder charge
SPIRES FROM B1
CORDISH COS.
A rendering shows the lobby of Maryland Live Casino’s $200 million hotel, set to open in the spring.
The 310-room hotel will include an event center, restaurants, meeting spaces and a day spa.
Casino’s image is under construction
CASINO FROM B1
the 310-room hotel, day spa and
1,500-seat concert venue will
draw more visitors — and money — to the casino and the
mammoth Arundel Mills outlet
mall next door. More than
10 million people visit the casino annually, according to state
estimates.
“This hotel allows Maryland
Live to expand its base, to
attract tourists from outside the
greater Washington and Baltimore areas,” said Benjamin Wu,
Maryland’s deputy secretary of
commerce. “It is good for the
state. It is building on our
tourism records.”
Anne Arundel officials say
they think the project is so
critical to the success of the
casino that the County Council
is considering giving Cordish
Cos. a multimillion-dollar tax
break on the hotel and conference center.
The casino has contributed
more than $100 million to the
county in taxes on gambling
revenue alone since it opened
five years ago, said David S.
Cordish, chairman of the
Cordish Cos. The money is distributed across the county, including to nonprofit groups.
Under the tax break proposal,
backed by County Executive Steven R. Schuh (R), Cordish Cos.
would pay the county $1 a year
for 30 years in lieu of property
taxes. In exchange, the county
would get access to the conference center for events, officials
said.
The tax deal would cost the
county about $700,000 a year
for the next 30 years, or about
$21 million over the life of the
deal, Schuh said Tuesday at a
topping-off ceremony for the
project.
The legislation would allow a
maximum tax break of $1.2 million a year, or a total of $36 million.
Construction plans include a
1,500-seat event center, but if
the tax break is approved, the
facility would be expanded to
accommodate a convention cen-
ter with 4,000 seats, company
officials said.
If the county were to build a
convention center, Schuh said, it
probably would cost more than
$60 million.
Schuh called the deal an “opportunity for taxpayers,” saying
the county would benefit from
the facility — the largest such
structure in Anne Arundel. Not
only would it attract conventioneers, he said, but it also
would provide “a much needed
in-county location for milestone
events like high school and
community college graduations.”
Residents often must travel to
Baltimore or Prince George’s for
such events.
“No longer would those parents have to travel all over
creation to see their children
cross the stage in a cap and
gown,” he said. “The facilities
we are topping off this morning
will house that convention center.”
After five years in operation,
Live remains the largest of the
state’s six casinos, with nearly
4,000 slot machines and
190 gambling tables. MGM operates 3,087 slot machines and
168 tables, according to a Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency report. However,
MGM became the biggest revenue generator in January, its
first full month of operations. It
also pushed the state’s gambling
revenue to new heights.
Total monthly revenue from
all six casinos rose an average of
38.6 percent after MGM began
operations, according to the
state lottery and gaming agency’s year-to-year comparisons.
The industry, which contributes
a portion of its profits to the
state’s Education Trust Fund, set
a record in March, generating
$141.2 million in revenue. Last
month, gambling revenue totaled $134.5 million — of which
about $1.3 million went to the
state’s general fund and
$32.9 million to the Education
Trust Fund.
The monthly gross revenue
for Live, however, dropped below $50 million for the first time
in at least a year in December —
coinciding with MGM’s opening
— and has continued to fall
below that of the state’s newest
casino. Last month, Live generated $46.96 million from both
slot machines and table games,
a decrease of nearly $7 million
— or 13 percent — compared
with September 2016. MGM
generated $49.36 million, according to the state lottery and
gaming agency.
Officials expected the state’s
other casinos to take a hit when
MGM opened; Live also was
expected to be hardest hit because of its proximity. Live officials said last year that they
considered MGM “another good
competitor” but were counting
on the customer loyalty the
company had built in its five
years of operations.
It wasn’t enough.
The $200 million hotel and
event center, slated to open in
early 2018, promises more entertainment and dining options.
It will give the casino a total of
560 hotel rooms, including a
250-room hotel about a mile
from the casino that Cordish
Cos. purchased last year.
Live plans to reward its most
loyal customers with free accommodations. About 1 million
customers are members of the
casino’s rewards program.
“This is part of how you fight
back,” Cordish said.
With the introduction of Live
hotels, Cordish Cos. is expanding its brand, known across the
country for its entertainment
districts and casinos. The Maryland Live hotels will be the first
of what the company envisions
as a chain in the United States
and internationally, Cordish
said. The company has built
other hotels in the United
States, including the Hard Rock
casino hotels in Tampa and
Hollywood, Fla.
“Let’s see what happens,”
Cordish said. “We are here for
the long haul. My family has
been here for over 100 years. We
are not going anywhere. We will
keep adding [amenities], and
may the best man win.”
Sutherland before trying to rob
another passenger and then running off.
A D.C. prosecutor recounted
the details of the attack in court
Thursday as Spires pleaded guilty
to first-degree murder while
armed.
Sutherland’s parents said the
plea brought them some relief
but no answers for why Spires
attacked,
inflicting
nearly
30 wounds.
“He ended our son’s life and
ended his own life too, and we
just don’t know why. What happened?” Sutherland’s father,
Douglas, said outside D.C. Superior Court. Sutherland added that
Spires seemed like “a bright kid.”
His wife, Theresa, interjected.
“But he still has his life,” she said.
“Kevin does not.”
The Sutherlands agreed that if
Spires had gotten to know their
son, the two might have found
things in common and even become friends.
“Everyone loved Kevin. He just
had that type of personality
where everyone just loved him,”
Douglas Sutherland said.
The plea came after more than
two years of court hearings and
mental evaluations. It was an
emotional hearing as about 40 or
so of Sutherland’s college friends
joined Theresa and Douglas
Sutherland in court. They wore
Sutherland’s photo on buttons on
their lapels. Some wiped away
tears.
Prosecutors and defense attorneys have considered whether
robbery was the motive, or if drug
use or mental illness contributed
to the attack, but they never
arrived at a clear answer. Spires
threw Sutherland’s cellphone
down after the stabbing and did
not take anything else from the
dying man. He was suspected of
being high on synthetic drugs,
but there was no evidence of
drugs in his blood when he was
arrested two days later. Psychiatrists at St. Elizabeths Hospital,
who repeatedly examined Spires
after his arrest, determined that
although Spires did suffer from a
mental illness, it was not so
severe that it would have led to
such a violent attack.
As part of the plea agreement,
District prosecutors and Spires’s
public defenders agreed to a prison sentence of between 30 to
35 years. If Spires had gone to
trial and had been convicted, he
would have faced a maximum
sentence of life without parole.
Spires is scheduled to be sentenced on Jan. 12.
Kevin Sutherland, like others
on the train, was headed to meet
friends for a Fourth of July outing
that day. Three months before his
death, Sutherland had started
working for a Web-based political
fundraising group that linked
members of Congress with their
constituents. The Connecticut
native was an only child.
Spires, who had been living in
and out of his parent’s Northwest
Washington home, had attended
Louisburg College, a private twoyear Methodist school in North
Carolina. He left in 2015, but it
was not clear why.
Spires was arrested two days
after the killing and was charged
with first-degree murder. Since
then, he has been in custody
between D.C. jail and St. Elizabeths, the District’s psychiatric
facility. At one of Spires’s early
court hearings, he smiled, interrupted the judge and seemed
confused about why he had been
arrested. A judge suggested that a
mental evaluation would be appropriate.
Spires has undergone numerous psychiatric evaluations by
doctors at St. Elizabeths, who
determined that he suffered from
a mental illness.
At one point, Spires’s attorney
alerted the judge that they
planned to argue their client was
not guilty by reason of insanity,
but they ultimately did not pursue that defense.
In May, psychiatrists concluded that Spires’s illness was not so
severe that it should have prevented him from conforming his
behavior. They also determined
Spires was competent to assist in
his own defense.
After the hearing, Spires’s attorneys and family declined to
comment.
At the Thursday hearing,
Spires appeared well-spoken, coherent and conversational as
Judge Judith Bartnoff questioned
him to determine if he understood what he was pleading to
and his legal options.
“How are you, Mr. Spires?”
Bartnoff asked. “Good. How are
you?” Spires responded. Then
Bartnoff asked if he was on any
medication and, if so, did the
medication help him think more
clearly. Spires laughed and said,
“Yes.”
Spires, standing next to his
attorneys, then explained to the
judge that if he had pursued an
insanity defense, prosecutors
would have had to prove that he
killed Sutherland, and then there
would be hearings about Spires’s
mental illness.
Bartnoff seemed impressed
with his understanding. “You really do understand this,” she said.
Spires smiled.
“This is a very difficult and
unfortunate circumstance, but I
appreciate that Mr. Spires knows
what he is facing and he is taking
responsibility for it and we won’t
have a trial,” Bartnoff said.
After the hearing, Spires’s attorneys and family declined to
comment.
Spires will remain at St. Elizabeths until his sentencing.
keith.alexander@washpost.com
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Central casting
Fishermen at Jones Point Park on the Potomac are seen from the Woodrow Wilson Memorial
Bridge in Alexandria. The park has two piers where anglers can catch catfish, rock bass and
American eels. It also features a canoe launch for recreational users to paddle on the river.
luz.lazo@washpost.com
Investigators were aware of complaints about suspect’s behavior and anger
SHOOTING FROM B1
After the Maryland shooting,
Prince allegedly drove 50 miles to
Wilmington, Del., where he lived,
and shot a sixth person, also an
acquaintance, in the head and
body. That victim survived the
attack, which occurred at a usedcar dealership.
Orellana quoted his brother as
saying that Prince would punch
people in the back and start fights
at Advanced Granite and that
employees met with an owner of
the company to complain about
the problem. According to Orellana, Romero said that the owner’s
response was, “Leave him alone
— he’s a good worker.”
Ron Cherry, a lawyer for Advanced Granite, which employs
about 35 people, declined to comment on Orellana’s allegations,
citing the continuing police investigation into the circumstances that led to the violence.
Two wounded employees who
survived the shooting remained
hospitalized Thursday in critical
condition.
“Words cannot express our
shock and sadness,” Cherry said.
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“We are a small business, and we
know each of these victims intimately.”
In a Wilmington courtroom
Thursday, Prince pleaded not
guilty to four charges related to
the shooting in that city, including attempted murder. His bail
was set at $2.1 million. He has not
yet appeared in court in Maryland, where the Harford County
sheriff said he has been charged
with murder.
Meanwhile on Thursday, new
details emerged about the terror
that unfolded inside Advanced
Granite when about 10 employees, gathered in a semicircle
around Prince, suddenly came
under close-range gunfire, authorities said.
In an interview, Harford Sheriff Jeffrey R. Gahler said surveillance video shows Prince shortly
before 9 a.m., standing in the
company’s workshop with about
10 of the 29 people who were
working that day.
Prince called the employees to
gather around him, Gahler said.
“The suspect does bring the
victims together, and as they
come close, he pulls out the hand-
gun and begins shooting,” the
sheriff said.
One of the dead was Romero,
who has a wife and two children
in El Salvador, according to his
brother. The family is trying to
arrange to ship his body there.
“He was a very humble guy,”
Orellana said. “Our hearts are
broken.”
Authorities identified the other slain employees as Enis Mrvoljak, 48, of Dundalk, Md., and
Bayarsaukhan Tudev, 53, whose
last known address was in Virginia.
Gahler said investigators are
aware of complaints about Prince
at Advanced Granite, where he
had worked for about four
months, and at past jobs. “There
were some concerns about some
of his behavior, and at other
workplaces some assaults had
taken place,” the sheriff said.
“There seems to be a history with
this individual of workplace violence.”
In February, for example, the
owner of another countertop
company in Harford County filed
a court petition, asking a judge to
order Prince to stay away from
him.
“I fired him for punching another employee on the face,” the
owner said in his petition, which
was denied for lack of evidence.
He wrote that Prince — “a big guy
and very aggressive on me” — had
harassed him several times after
being fired. “He did not hurt me
physically,” the owner wrote, “but
I do not want to wait ’till he will.”
More details also surfaced
Thursday about the Wilmington
attack, with court documents describing a violent encounter between Prince and the victim early
last year.
Family members identified the
victim as Jason Baul, 35, who
owns Baul’s Auto Sales, where the
shooting occurred. In January
2016, Baul reported that Prince
had assaulted him in a robbery
attempt at the home of an acquaintance, according to a court
affidavit filed by a police officer.
“Radee grabbed him and started
punching him,” the officer wrote,
and “kept reaching into his waistband,” as if he had a gun.
Prince was charged with assault and other crimes, but the
case was thrown out, according to
court records. Prince later filed a
lawsuit against Baul over the incident, and the civil case remains
unresolved in a Delaware court.
“Our family has been friends
with their family since I can
remember, since we were walking,” said Robert Baul, 37, of Atlanta, a brother of Jason Baul’s,
speaking of Prince. “We grew up
together.”
Employees of Advanced Granite, which is temporarily closed,
gathered outside the building
early Thursday afternoon, hugging one another on the sidewalk.
Stefanie Shedy, 30, an accountant who left the company more
than a year ago, said she still felt
close to her former co-workers.
She stopped by to leave flowers at
a small memorial site in the parking lot.
“They’re like a tightknit family,
this company,” Shedy said. “I can’t
understand why anyone would
want to hurt them.” She said the
owners are “very good to their
employees,” including helping
them with financial and housing
issues.
She knew four of the victims,
all longtime employees, and said
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they were “very fun and carefree,
always smiling.” She said she did
not know Prince.
An intensive search for Prince
on Wednesday, involving numerous police officers in the Mid-Atlantic region as well as federal
agents, ended at 7:05 p.m. in
Newark, Del., where Prince was
arrested, Wilmington Police
Chief Robert Tracy said.
After a day of media coverage,
with photos of Prince appearing
on numerous websites and TV
stations, tipsters called authorities in the early evening to report
seeing the suspect and his vehicle, a 2008 GMC Acadia, in a
Newark neighborhood about 20
miles southwest of Wilmington.
Two federal agents arrested him
there after a foot chase, during
which Prince tossed away a .380caliber handgun, authorities said.
The weapon was being tested
to determine whether it was used
in the shootings.
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
paul.duggan@washpost.com
ellie.silverman@washpost.com
Lynh Bui and Dan Morse contributed
to this report.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
THE DISTRICT
Two millennial men running to unseat Bonds, 72, in Democratic primary
Goodwin and Lowery
say they will bring fresh
perspectives to council
BY
R ACHEL C HASON
Two millennials promising to
bring fresh ideas and new perspectives to the D.C. Council are
vying to unseat incumbent council member Anita Bonds (D-At
Large) in the Democratic primary
June 19.
Marcus Goodwin, a 28-yearold acquisitions associate at the
real estate development company Four Points, and Jeremiah
Lowery, a 31-year-old organizer at
the Chesapeake Climate Action
Network, said separately that
they have the “utmost respect”
for Bonds, a 72-year-old activist
and veteran D.C. politician who
has served on the council since
2012.
“I have the utmost respect for
Ms. Bonds, but the stakes are too
high, and the council needs new
ideas, passion and energy that I
can best provide,” said Goodwin,
who grew up in Columbia
Heights.
Bonds, who has said her lowkey philosophy makes her unique
on the council, fended off three
challengers in the 2014 Democratic primary who claimed they
would be more energetic and
effective. The current chair of the
committee on housing and community development, Bonds said
her priorities include advocating
for the rights of tenants and
providing resources for homeless
families and the elderly.
“I am running for reelection to
build upon my record of addressing the housing affordability crisis that D.C. is currently facing,”
Bonds said in a statement. “That
is, to preserve as many units as
possible, not to lose any more
public housing units and to upgrade them, and to increase the
stock of affordable units citywide.”
Goodwin, who graduated from
the University of Pennsylvania
and received his master’s degree
in design studies, real estate and
critical conservation from Harvard University, also is focusing
JEREMIAH AT LARGE 2018
LAVAN E. ANDERSON
Jeremiah Lowery, 31, works as
a climate justice organizer.
Marcus Goodwin, 28, works for
a real estate development firm.
on affordability.
He would like to see the council create mechanisms to help
more District renters to become
owners. Goodwin said the owner
of his barbershop, Wanda’s on
7th, has rented her building in
Shaw for 50 years.
“No one should have to do
that,” said Goodwin, who bought
a home in Ward 4 last year.
“There are ideas that aren’t being
considered, and I want to be
thoughtful about how we can
manage the change the city is
seeing.”
The fifth of eight children,
Goodwin went to D.C. public
schools before attending St. Albans, an elite private school in
Northwest Washington, in the
seventh grade.
As an Eagle Scout in high
school, Goodwin met the late
former council member Jim
Graham, who he said inspired
him “to understand how positive
and influential public service can
be.”
Lowery, who lives in Petworth
and graduated from the University of Maryland in 2008, also
wants to focus on helping residents stay afloat financially in a
city where a booming economy is
leaving many long-term residents
behind.
He said his top priority on the
council would be expanding access to high-quality child care in
the District, which MarketWatch
ranked as the country’s most
expensive city for child care in
2015.
Lowery’s mother was in the
District’s foster-care system
growing up and experienced
homelessness, Lowery said, and
his father worked as a security
guard and was unable to afford
child care for Lowery and his two
brothers when they were young.
Lowery said his experiences
informed his understanding
about the need for quality child
care, and he formed the Universal
Childcare Now — D.C. Coalition
in 2015 to interview parents
across the city and push the
District to expand funding for
child care. He said he wants to see
the city, which provides universal
free pre-K for 3- and 4-year-olds,
also focus on providing care for
infants and toddlers.
“Everyone knows how much of
a problem this is,” Lowery said. “I
go out canvassing about the issue,
and parents tell me, ‘I already
know.’ ”
He said that his two brothers
sold drugs because of a lack of
employment opportunities and
that they have been in and out of
prison.
“I’m running because there are
a lot of residents in the District
going through what my family
went through, and I want to
create the change that can help
them,” he said.
rachel.chason@washpost.com
Democrats hope to energize voters with Obama appearance at rally for Northam
OBAMA FROM B1
Virginia. All of us need to stand
up on Election Day. We cannot
accept this is the new normal.”
Obama’s appearance in Richmond came hours after he also
campaigned for Democratic gubernatorial nominee Phil Murphy in New Jersey — the only
other state electing a new governor this year.
The Virginia race is broadly
seen as a hint of what’s to come in
next year’s midterm elections. A
Democratic defeat in a purple
state that voted for Hillary Clinton last year would be a devastating blow to a party hoping to
convert anger toward Trump into
electoral success.
Richmond is part of the “urban
crescent” that stretches from the
D.C. suburbs to Hampton Roads,
a densely populated slice of the
state where Democrats have successfully driven up margins to
win statewide elections since
2009.
The city also has a significant
African American population, a
key Democratic constituency —
and a large portion of the
7,500 people gathered at the
Obama-Northam rally were
black. Black voters make up nearly a fifth of the state’s electorate
and are crucial to Democratic
success on Election Day.
Obama’s appearance comes
the same week as intraparty tensions among the Democrats
threatened to alienate black voters.
Northam’s campaign paid for
the production and distribution
of 1,000 palm cards that included
photos of him and Attorney General Mark R. Herring (D) but not
their ticket mate, Justin Fairfax,
who is running for lieutenant
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former president Barack Obama talks to the crowd with Virginia gubernatorial nominee Ralph
Northam (D) at a rally in Richmond on Thursday. Democrats hope the support of Obama, who in 2008
was the first Democratic presidential contender in 44 years to carry Virginia, will invigorate voters.
governor and hopes to become
the first African American elected statewide in more than
25 years. The omission was requested by a union distributing
those palm cards that did not
endorse Fairfax.
While the fliers in question
were a sliver of all campaign
literature, the perceived snub
made its rounds on social media,
and several black activists touted
it as an example of Democrats
taking the African American vote
for granted. Fairfax called out the
Northam campaign for what he
called a “mistake” and urged the
party to renew its focus on engaging black voters.
Enter the nation’s first African
American president.
Obama made frequent references to Fairfax, bolstering his
bid for lieutenant governor.
“He didn’t grow up with much,
but with scholarships, a hardworking mom, he went to college
and law school and chose public
service to make sure other striving young kids could have the
same opportunities,” Obama
said.
Though he was speaking to
Virginia voters on Thursday,
Obama seemed to be addressing
the whole country as he offered
an optimistic vision for politics
and a defense of the fundamental
decency of the American people.
The question before voters,
Obama said, is “at a time when
our politics just seem so divided
and so angry and so nasty, it’s
whether we can recapture that
spirit, whether we support and
embrace somebody who wants to
bring people together.”
“Yes we can,” he said, repeating
his 2008 campaign slogan and
triggering the crowd to chant the
phrase in response. “We can
LOTTERIES
L O CA L D I G ES T
Results from Oct. 19
THE DISTRICT
Man fatally stabbed
in Northeast D.C.
A 44-year-old man was
fatally stabbed inside a
residence Wednesday night in
Northeast Washington’s
Edgewood neighborhood,
according to D.C. police.
The victim was identified as
Kevin Cross of Northeast.
Police said they were called
to the second-floor residence
in the 2300 block of Lincoln
Road NE about 11:15 p.m. The
address is for the Glenwood
Apartments.
Police said they found Cross
suffering from several stab
wounds. He was taken to a
hospital, where he died. A
police report said the victim
was unable to provide a
description of the attacker
before he was taken to the
hospital.
— Peter Hermann
MARYL AND
Two die in crash
in Potomac area
Two people were killed in a
crash late Wednesday in the
Potomac area of Montgomery
County, authorities said.
At about 11:40 p.m., officers
responded to Democracy
Boulevard at Gainsborough
Road for the report of a crash,
Montgomery County Police
said. They found a 2011 Audi
S4 that had been eastbound,
ran off the road and struck a
tree, killing the driver and
passenger, the statement said.
The driver was identified as
30-year-old Kent Matthew
Brooks of Potomac, and the
passenger was identified as
33-year-old Kathleen Michelle
French of Potomac, police
said.
The cause of the crash is
still under investigation, and
police asked anyone with
information about it to
contact them at 240-773-6620.
— Justin Wm. Moyer
VIRGINIA
Woman is stabbed
to death in Alexandria
A 55-year-old Alexandria
woman was found stabbed to
death Wednesday in a home in
the city, and investigators
arrested a 55-year-old man
and charged him with murder,
Alexandria police officials
said.
Officers found June Seay after
police were called to check on
her welfare at the home in the
200 block of N. Howard Street
about 6:40 p.m., officials said in
a statement. Authorities
pronounced her dead at the
scene.
Police said a 55-year-old man,
whom they did not identify, was
charged in the killing.
Investigators said they knew
each other, but police did not
release information about their
relationship or a motive for the
killing.
— Clarence Williams
Driver flees scene
of fatal crash
Police were seeking a driver
that fled the scene of a fatal
crash in Virginia on Thursday.
At about 6 a.m., officers
responded to Pebble Run Place
and Overland Drive in
Loudoun County, where the
driver of a Jeep Wrangler lost
control of his vehicle for
unknown reasons, Loudoun
police said in a statement.
The Jeep rolled several
times, and the driver, whose
name was not released
pending notification of
relatives, died at the scene, the
statement said.
The Jeep and another
vehicle were seen traveling at
high speed just before the
crash, according to the
statement. The other vehicle
was dark in color and might
have been a Honda or a
Toyota, police said.
The driver of that vehicle
fled the scene.
Police asked anyone with
information about the crash to
contact them at 703-777-1021.
— Justin Wm. Moyer
do that.”
“President Obama spoke to my
heart,” said Dorothy Ware, a 66year-old retiree in Chesterfield
County outside of Richmond.
“We want a united United States,
not the crap that’s going on now.
That’s what we’ll get with this
man right now,” holding up a
Northam sign.
Dionne Jennings, 48, said
Obama’s speech impressed upon
her the urgency of a race that
seemed low-key to her until now.
“This is going to inspire people
to be more active,” said Jennings,
of Prince Edward County in central Virginia. “The way society is
going right now, we need some
help. Everything he said made
that point. We’re going to continue that work.”
Ruth Twiggs of Richmond
waited in line with two friends
and acknowledged that energy
levels in the Northam campaign
may have been low through
the summer.
“I think people were exhausted
from last year,” she said.
“I think part of it is
[Northam’s] personality,” added
her friend Anne Barriault, 65,
also of Richmond. “He’s low-key,
which is okay.”
“It’s a relief — sane and lowkey,” Twiggs said. “This is good.”
The final weeks of the Virginia
election have seen their share of
party all-stars.
On Saturday, the current and
former vice presidents joined the
campaign fray. Former vice president Joe Biden (D) appeared at an
economic
roundtable
with
Northam to praise his workforce
development plan. Hours later,
Vice President Pence (R) rallied a
crowd of about 600 for Gillespie
in deep-red Abingdon in southwest Virginia.
Another former president,
George W. Bush, on Monday
headlined a pair of Virginia fundraisers for Gillespie, who served
as his White House counsel and
chairman of the Republican National Committee. Hillary Clinton helped Northam fundraise in
New York earlier this month.
It’s unclear whether Trump
will appear with Gillespie in a
state where he’s deeply unpopular.
Gillespie has struggled to find
the right footing regarding
Trump. He needs to excite Trump
voters in southwest and Southside Virginia without alienating
moderates and independents
who are necessary to beat
Northam.
Trump
endorsed
Gillespie in a tweet two weeks
ago, but Gillespie did not mention it until pressed by reporters
the following day and has not
included it on his campaign materials.
But since September, Gillespie
has been embracing issues that
resonate with Trump voters, airing ads that defend Confederate
statues and tie MS-13 gang violence to illegal immigration.
At Thursday’s rally, Obama
called Gillespie’s ads as “cynical
as they get.”
“What he’s really trying to
deliver is fear,” Obama said. “If
you scare enough voters, you
might score just enough votes to
win an election. That’s what
makes this . . . damaging to our
democracy.”
fenit.nirappil@washpost.com
gregory.schneider@washpost.com
Enjoy the Breeze
in Your New
Screen Room
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Wed.):
Lucky Numbers (Thu.):
DC-4 (Wed.):
DC-4 (Thu.):
DC-5 (Wed.):
DC-5 (Thu.):
3-3-8
9-5-9-6
4-9-2-7-3
9-1-2
9-3-2
8-5-1-1
2-5-2-7
7-0-7-8-9
7-1-1-6-1
ancing
Easy fin
s.
$149/mo
MARYLAND
Mid-Day Pick 3:
Mid-Day Pick 4:
Night/Pick 3 (Wed.):
Pick 3 (Thu.):
Pick 4 (Wed.):
Pick 4 (Thu.):
Multi-Match:
Match 5 (Wed.):
Match 5 (Thu.):
5 Card Cash:
9-7-0
5-7-8-1
5-5-4
2-5-8
8-8-2-9
4-2-0-4
4-13-17-20-25-39
1-9-12-18-21 *28
1-15-17-18-22 *20
QS-QC-6D-10D-4D
VIRGINIA
Day/Pick-3:
4-5-9
Pick-4:
7-0-6-3
Cash-5:
2-5-9-17-32
Night/Pick-3 (Wed.):
1-5-8
Pick-3 (Thu.):
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
MARYLAND
Two teens, allegedly members of MS-13, are charged with murdering man
BY
D AN M ORSE
Two alleged MS-13 gang
members — ages 17 and 18 —
were ordered held without
bond Thursday amid allegations they stabbed a man more
than 80 times and left him
dead in a creek just north of
Washington.
“This is a gangland-style
murder,” Montgomery County
prosecutor Teresa Casafranca
said in court. She said the
victim — Cristopher Alfredo
Funes Guerra, 20 — was lured
to his death last month.
The arrests in the case come
as Montgomery County and
other jurisdictions in the
Washington area have faced a
spate of homicides linked to
MS-13, a notorious gang that
began in Los Angeles and operates with deep connections to
members in El Salvador.
In Montgomery County, a
relatively safe jurisdiction of
1 million people, gangs have
been responsible for 20 slayings in the past two years —
and half of those have been at
the hands of MS-13, according
to State’s Attorney John McCarthy. “The numbers are shocking,” he said this week in
announcing efforts by his office
to work with schools and police
to combat violence associated
with gangs.
MS-13 is not a problem
countywide, McCarthy said,
but is actively recruiting in
specific neighborhoods and
schools in and around Gaithersburg, Wheaton and Silver
Spring. Gang members are using extreme violence to intimidate residents and trying to
expand extortion efforts, McCarthy said.
In the latest case, David
Lagunes-Bolanos, 17, of Silver
Spring, and Jesus Ponce Flores,
18, of Takoma Park, were
charged Wednesday with conspiracy to commit first-degree
murder and first-degree murder. Lagunes-Bolanos was
charged as an adult. Authori-
ties did not outline a possible
motive.
In court Thursday, assistant
public defender Christopher
Duffner
questioned
the
strength of the cases, saying
that police affidavits against
the defendants were vague and
relied on unnamed witnesses.
“The evidence is weak,” he
said. “There are no real facts
alleged at this point.”
According to the case against
the suspects, they appear to be
part of a wave of recent immigrants caught up in MS-13
violence.
Lagunes-Bolanos
“self-admitted to detectives in this case
that he entered into the coun-
try illegally,” Casafranca said in
court.
Records for Flores also indicate he entered the country
illegally. He is appealing an
order of deportation that is
part of an immigration case,
Casafranca said.
On Sept. 6, a hiker in Long
Branch Stream Valley Park
came across a body in a creek.
Detectives identified the dead
man as Guerra, who had been
reported missing by his family
three days earlier.
Detectives spoke with a relative of the victim, who said that
Guerra left his residence at
8 on the night of Sept. 2, saying
he was going to meet a friend.
He couldn’t be reached later on
his cellphone.
In court papers, police alleged the friend was LagunesBolanos. They questioned him
about his recent interactions
with Guerra, and “LagunesBolanos changed his story multiple times,” detectives asserted
in court papers.
The detectives also spoke with
two witnesses who said they had
heard Lagunes-Bolanos and
Flores bragging about stabbing
the victim. In addition, a third
person told detectives he believed Flores was responsible
for the homicide, according to
police accounts.
dan.morse@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Man who killed infant son, buried him in woods receives 40 years in prison
Antoine Petty was given
maximum sentence after
repeatedly striking child
BY
L YNH B UI
Tiny skeletal fingers poking
through the dirt and a scattering
of other thin bones.
That was all that was left of
2-month-old Antoine Flemons
when police unearthed his body
from the shallow grave his parents dug for the boy, who lived a
short life ended by a beating.
Images of the baby’s remains
flashed on a screen in Prince
George’s County Circuit Court on
Thursday when the child’s father,
Antoine Petty, 33, was sentenced
to 40 years in prison for his son’s
killing.
In graphic detail, prosecutors
described his numerous encounters with Child Protective Services over the past decade — a
series of reported black eyes,
broken ribs and malnourished
children.
They also described how Petty,
frustrated with his crying child
last year, dangled the infant by
the arm and repeatedly struck
him before handing the baby to
his mother to feed. When the
baby continued to cry, Petty dealt
another round of blows, quieting
the child forever.
“ ‘You’re spoiling this child,’ ”
Petty allegedly told his wife after
punching the baby “over and over
again,” Assistant State’s Attorney
Artemis Moutsatsos said during
Thursday’s sentencing hearing.
Petty, who suffers from bipolar
disorder and other mental-health
issues, apologized to his family
and wife for his actions, saying he
panicked when he should have
called 911. Petty described the
child’s death as an “accident.”
“I never had no intentions of
killing my son,” Petty told the
judge.
Prince George’s County Judge
Michael Pearson issued Petty the
maximum sentence for the
charge of child abuse resulting in
death. Pearson said that in his
19 years as a prosecutor, defense
attorney and judge, he had never
encountered such a horrific case.
“I don’t think there’s any case
that has disturbed me to the core
“I don’t think there’s any case that has disturbed
me to the core as much as this one.”
Prince George’s County Judge Michael Pearson, who has been
a prosecutor, defense attorney and judge for 19 years
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY POLICE DEPARTMENT
After he was killed, 2-monthold Antoine Flemons was left in
a car for 24 hours, then buried
in a shallow grave in the woods.
as much as this one,” Pearson
said.
Antoine Flemons was killed
Sept. 21, 2016, after the child
became unresponsive from his
father’s assault.
Petty and his wife tried to
administer CPR when the baby
struggled to breathe, said Douglas R. Irminger, Petty’s public
defender.
“When they realized the child
had died, they panicked,”
Irminger said.
Petty and his wife then kept
the child in their car — a black
hearse — overnight, prosecutors
said. They slept, went to work
and ran errands over the course
of 24 hours before taking the
infant to the back of Parkdale
High School and burying him in
the woods.
Relatives said they hadn’t seen
the baby and reported concerns
to Child Protective Services on
Sept. 22, 2016, and again four
days later, prosecutors said. The
Pettys told their family the child
was with other relatives to explain why their son wasn’t always
with them, police have said.
The child’s remains were finally unearthed after he had been
buried a month when detectives
tracked down the parents, who
led them to his burial site, prosecutors said.
Geneice Petty, the child’s mother, pleaded guilty to one count of
involuntary manslaughter and is
set to be sentenced in December.
Petty’s sister, who had reported
concerns about her nephew’s
whereabouts to Child Protective
Services, said her brother received a sentence that was too
harsh.
“The judge ignored the fact
that he had a mental illness,”
Sharnell Campbell said. “If my
brother got the help he needed,
we wouldn’t be here today.”
Prosecutors cited a long list of
encounters that Petty had with
Child Protective Services dating
from at least 2007. Petty is the
father of nine.
He was accused of carving a
three-inch cross into his 5-yearold daughter’s arm, malnourishing his 11-month-old, pushing a
5-year-old down stairs, giving a
10-year-old a black eye, and forcing one of his daughters to watch
him and a girlfriend have sex,
prosecutors said.
In one case, his 11-month-old
child was taken to a hospital with
rib fractures, injuries doctors declared weren’t accidental, Moutsatsos said.
None of those complaints resulted in criminal charges,
Irminger said. Prosecutors said
the complaints weren’t reported
to police.
“Nobody came to the defense
of this baby, not his family, not
the government, not his parents,”
Prince George’s County State’s
Attorney Angela Alsobrooks said.
“He was literally a defenseless
baby.”
lynh.bui@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Panel urges removal of Baltimore’s chief judge
Has been accused of not
being respectful in court
BY
The Magazine
The quadrants
Photography
from Northwest,
Northeast,
Southwest
and Southeast
captures
everyday life in
a Washington
that is shifting
under our feet.
Arts & Style
The last legend of late-night: Even as he gears
up for his Netflix show, David Letterman focuses on
his main gig: being Harry’s dad.
Business
The race to save coffee: America’s favorite
beverage is under attack from climate change and
other woes. Science may offer a solution.
A state panel on judicial discipline has recommended that Baltimore’s chief judge be removed
from his position and not be
permitted to serve as a judge in
any jurisdiction in the state —
the “strongest possible sanction”
— according to a decision posted
Wednesday.
The Commission on Judicial
Disabilities, which held a multiday hearing on allegations
against Chief Judge Alfred
Nance, found unanimously that
he had committed “sanctionable
conduct” and referred its recommendations to the Court of Appeals, which has final say.
“In the commission’s view, the
imposition of a public reprimand or suspension is not commensurate with the serious violation of misconduct in office
committed by Judge Nance and
does not reassure the public that
Judge Nance will be deterred
from engaging in similar behavior in the future,” the commission wrote. “The commission
concludes that the gravity of the
AMY DAVIS/BALTIMORE SUN
Judge Alfred Nance, the chief
judge of Baltimore City Circuit
Court, is said to have made
“undignified” comments.
“lack of proof,” the commission
wrote.
State laws require judges to
maintain fairness and decorum
and conduct themselves in a
manner that promotes confidence in the courts.
Prosecutors played hours of
courtroom video from Nance’s
cases during last month’s hearing. They described a pattern of
behavior by the judge that they
said belittled those in his courtroom.
The charges were based on his
courtroom encounters with Assistant Public Defender Deborah
Levi, whom prosecutors said
Nance dismissively referred to as
“lady,” “mother hen” and “child.”
They said Nance once told Levi
to “shut up” and threatened to
throw her in jail. She filed a
complaint against Nance with
the commission.
In 2001, he received a public
reprimand after female prosecutors complained that he had an
explosive temper and commented on their appearance. The
commission found he had demeaned women in court and in
chambers and been “rude” and
“hostile” to attorneys in a medical malpractice case.
Nance served as a public defender and private attorney before joining the bench in 1998.
He is less than one year from his
70th birthday, the age at which
judges are required to retire.
Judges can continue to hear
cases after mandatory retirement, but the judicial panel recommended that he not be able to
serve as a senior judge.
— Baltimore Sun
MARYLAND
Sports
‘Fatberg’ clog removed from Baltimore sewer
Travel
Clearing the unsavory
stuff is estimated to have
cost as much as $60,000
Soccer at RFK: Washington’s stadium wasn’t built
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Oklahoma City also maintains its strongest traditions
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JUSTIN FENTON
code violations require the imposition of the strongest possible
sanction.”
Nance, 69, was accused of
having “persistently disrespectful and unprofessional” interactions with a public defender.
This is at least the third time the
Commission on Judicial Disabilities has publicly moved to discipline Nance.
Nance’s attorney, William
Brennan Jr., could not be
reached for comment late
Wednesday.
During a hearing last month,
Brennan said the judge was simply “old school,” a no-nonsense
but fair judge. He warned that
disciplining Nance would set a
dangerous precedent.
But prosecutor Carol Crawford told the panel: “A judge is
not a king, not a queen, not a god.
It’s preposterous that because a
judge is from a certain generation or viewpoint it somehow
excuses their conduct.”
The panel found that Nance
made comments that were “undignified, condescending, and
unprofessional” in two cases. It
also said his “facial expressions,
tone of voice and body language”
were “gratuitous, insensitive, inflammatory and relentless.”
Charges stemming from two
other cases were dismissed for
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BY JUSTIN WM. MOYER
A 20-foot “fatberg” of congealed
grease, flushable wipes and other
unsavory stuff was removed Monday from a sewer pipe in Baltimore
City.
The massive clog in a two-footwide pipe under Lanvale Street
between Charles Street and Maryland Avenue was detected after
recent sewage overflows.
Removing it was no easy task,
said Jeffrey Raymond, a spokesman
for the Baltimore City Department
of Public Works. The job, estimated
to have cost as much as $60,000,
demanded water jets, a scraper and
a vacuum truck to suck out the
fatberg and surrounding debris. A
bypass line also had to be constructed to preserve a “clean working
environment,” Raymond said.
“Think about a can of lard — and
multiply it,” he said.
Officials lay blame for the blockage on a culprit familiar to civil
engineers: flushable wipes. Onehundred-year-old sewer systems
built in an age of “nonexistent environmentalism,” Raymond said, are
not equipped to handle wipes
sometimes marketed as disposable
that some say are anything but.
“Turns out Baltimore has its own
fatberg in its sewer systems — a
congealed lump of fat, along with
wet wipes and other items that do
not break down in sewer systems,”
the Department of Public Works
explained on YouTube, where a
ghostly video of the fatberg was
posted. “Safeguard Baltimore’s
sewer system by canning the grease
and trashing the wipes.”
Though the District has not encountered a high-profile fatberg
like Baltimore’s or London’s 250yard, 130-ton beast, the City Council has jousted with some in Congress who wish to do away with
anti-wipe regulation.
“Since Congress has the ultimate
say over what goes on in Washington, D.C., it’s possible we would
[support] an appropriations measure that makes D.C. think twice
about banning a product that’s
helpful — flushable wipes,” Rep.
Andy Harris (R-Md.) said this year.
Harris offered but later withdrew
an amendment that would have
blocked the city from using its
funds to enforce a law that prohibits disposable wipes in the D.C.
sewer system.
Dallas-based wipes manufacturer Kimberly-Clark has sued the
District over its law regulating
when such wipes can be labeled
“flushable,” alleging that the D.C.
law is unconstitutional because it
tries to regulate businesses beyond
the city.
As the battle over wipes goes on,
one thing seems settled: the term
“fatberg.”
“It’s sort of the name that’s been
adopted worldwide,” Raymond
said.
justin.moyer@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
VIRGINIA
THE DISTRICT
Jury sides with insurer in 2015 mansion blaze
City awards $3 million
to projects aimed at
closing ‘grocery gap’
Investigators called fire
intentional; for years,
owner tried to sell home
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
Two years ago, Susan Rattner’s
11,000-square-foot multimilliondollar mansion in Great Falls, Va.,
burned down in the middle of the
night.
Rattner’s insurance company
accused her of either starting the
fire or knowing who did. On
Wednesday, a jury sided with
Chubb National Insurance Co.,
issuing a ruling that will cost
Rattner hundreds of thousands of
dollars.
“She told people she loved her
house,” Jeffrey O’Hara, an attorney for Chubb, told jurors. “She
couldn’t stand this house.”
It was Rattner who initially
sued Chubb Insurance for more
than $10 million, the total coverage available under her policy.
Chubb countersued for $945,000,
a figure that included the insurance payment to Rattner as well
as the cost of the company’s investigation. This week, the jury
awarded the company that full
amount.
The fire began just after midnight on Nov. 15, 2015. It took
several hours to bring it under
control, officials from the Fairfax
County Fire Department said at
the time, and one firefighter was
injured and briefly hospitalized.
Investigators ruled that the
blaze was intentional, although it
was unclear how it was started.
Rattner had tried to sell the
house for several years before it
burned down, repeatedly lowering the price but keeping it above
$3 million. Days after the fire, she
was scheduled to sell the property
at an “unreserved” auction, in
which there is no minimum price
and a property goes to the highest
bidder.
Patricia Murphy, a real estate
agent who worked with Rattner,
testified that the homeowner said
she would rather burn the house
down than sell it for only $1 million.
After the fire, Rattner asked
Murphy to delete an email in
which she had written that the
house would sell for $1 million
“over my dead body,” calling it
“pretty damaging,” according to
court filings.
Rattner had moved many of
her belongings into storage before the fire. She testified that she
was merely decluttering her
home for the sale and her
planned move to a condominium,
but the insurance company argued that she was protecting her
valuables from going up in
flames.
While Chubb pointed to cellphone records suggesting that
Rattner had traveled from her
Delaware beach home back to
Great Falls the night of the fire, an
expert for her legal team testified
that such data is unreliable.
A sophisticated home security
system had a wire removed, according to testimony, that prevented it from working.
After the fire, Rattner asked
her employees not to tell insurance agents about the storage
units filled with items she had
removed from the house, according to testimony.
Rattner was not in dire financial straits, her attorneys said. A
retired obstetrician and gynecologist, she had a net worth of
about $4.6 million at the time of
the fire and was receiving
$468,000 a year in disability payments. Her brother also provided
her with money to deal with her
multiple sclerosis.
She had been in Great Falls for
a quarter-century, she told fire
investigators. Now that her two
children were grown, she wanted
to move to a smaller place in a
more walkable area, but she said
she had no need to sell a house
she had spent much of her life
customizing.
Rattner’s attorney, Mark Wasserman, suggested that Chubb
was relying far too much on infor-
mation — that he said might not
have been accurate — from Rattner’s home security and fire systems.
“Chubb is just searching for
some excuse to avoid paying,” he
told the jury in closing arguments.
In the days leading up to the
fire, there had been repeated gas
leaks at the house.
Rattner walked into court
shakily and leaning on a cane.
Attorneys for Chubb accused of
her of grossly exaggerating her
physical problems, noting that
she had gone on a seven-hour
bike ride four days before the trial
and traveled to several countries
last year.
“There’s no question she had
the physical ability to move
through that house,” O’Hara said
in his closing argument. He
pointed out that at one point
during the trial, she dropped her
cane and “lurched forward” to
pick it up, implying that she did
not truly need it.
Rattner shook her head vigorously as O’Hara spoke, and she
left the courtroom in tears.
The vacant land where her
house once stood sold for
$700,000 in March, according to
real estate records.
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
Justin Jouvenal contributed to this
report.
MARYLAND
Counselor at Md. high school charged with
sex o≠enses with women he met on Tinder
Colin S. Black has worked
at Albert Einstein High in
Montgomery County
BY
“These charges are deeply troubling. This type of behavior does not reflect the
principles of MCPS or our community, and it will not be tolerated.”
Principal James G. Fernandez
D ONNA S T. G EORGE
AND D AN M ORSE
A counselor at a Maryland
high school was arrested
Thursday on sex offense and
assault charges after allegedly
forcing himself on adult women
during two incidents, each involving acquaintances he met
on the social media app Tinder.
Police said the counselor,
Colin S. Black, 33, who has
worked at Albert Einstein High
School in Kensington, had consensual sex with the women
and then forced them to perform sex acts they did not want
to do.
School Principal James G.
Fernandez sent a letter to
school families Thursday, informing them of the arrest and
noting that the charges did not
involve students or minors, or
happen on school property. He
said student safety remains a
top priority.
“These charges are deeply
troubling,” he wrote. “This type
of behavior does not reflect the
principles of MCPS or our community, and it will not be
tolerated,” a reference to Montgomery County Public Schools.
In court papers, detectives
alleged that one woman went to
Black’s Rockville apartment
March 24 and that the two had
intercourse. Afterward, Black
allegedly ignored the woman’s
pleas as she repeatedly told him
to stop other sex acts, according to documents filed in court.
Police said other allegations
also have come to light about an
alleged assault from December
2016.
In that incident, a woman
who met Black through Tinder
said that the two had intercourse and that he forced her
into acts afterward that she
refused, according to court documents. The woman told police
she wanted to leave but was “in
a state of shock.”
The woman said that she
suggested ordering food and
that Black ordered Thai food.
As they waited for the delivery,
he forced her to perform a sex
act as she repeatedly shouted
“no,” police said in the documents.
The woman said she thought
of running out of the apartment
but was frightened. Later, she
said, Black led her to a bedroom, where she kept checking
to see if he had fallen asleep but
eventually dozed off herself and
was awakened by him on top of
her. He allegedly forced himself
on her again.
The woman told police she
waited until he was asleep,
found her clothes scattered
around the apartment and
drove home.
“Im so sorry you were in pain
baby,” Black texted her later,
the documents state. “Too
much sex. I apologize for not
noticing sooner.”
She replied: “I told you a lot
and said no many times . . . you
didn’t seem to care at all.”
Black allegedly offered another apology, saying he was
“drunk and oblivious.”
He also texted: “I don’t recall
you saying no. I recall you
saying it hurts.”
Black’s career with the Montgomery County school system
started in 2009 and includes
stints as a counselor, coach and
substitute teacher. He was
charged with two counts of
second-degree sexual offense
and one count of second-degree
assault.
It was not clear Thursday
whether Black has a lawyer, and
no one could be reached at the
phone number for him listed in
court documents.
donna.stgeorge@washpost.com
dan.morse@washpost.com
Only three grocery stores
serve Wards 7 and 8,
a total of 150,000 people
BY
R ACHEL C HASON
The District says it will pump
$3 million into housing and retail projects in Wards 7 and 8 to
help close the city’s long-standing “grocery gap.”
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D)
this week awarded $2.1 million to
the Jair Lynch group, which is
redeveloping the shopping center at Pennsylvania and Branch
avenues SE near the Maryland
border, and $880,000 to the
South Capitol Affordable Housing project located at Atlantic
and South Capitol streets SW.
It is the most recent effort by
the mayor and D.C. Council
member Vincent C. Gray (DWard 7), a potential challenger to
Bowser in 2018, to bring grocery
stores to Wards 7 and 8, which
have three supermarkets between them.
“Everybody wants the same
things no matter where they are
living in the city,” said Brian
Kenner, the deputy mayor for
planning and economic development.
Even as the District’s economy
has boomed and grocery stores in
gentrifying neighborhoods have
proliferated, the dearth of grocery stores in its poorest wards
has remained consistent. A study
found that nearly 70 percent of
the city’s supermarkets in 2016
were concentrated in its wealthiest, predominantly white neighborhoods. The remainder were in
majority-black wards with lower
incomes. In Wards 7 and 8, there
are 50,000 people for every grocery store.
Gray, who participated in a
two-mile walk over the weekend
to highlight the grocery deficit
east of the Anacostia, and Bowser
have developed strategies to address the issue, although not
always in concert.
Kenner’s office specified that
the $3 million Bowser awarded
as part of the Neighborhood
Prosperity Fund was an initiative
that originated in the mayor’s
office.
Bowser said the fund will provide “an opportunity for us to
infuse economic support into
areas that need it most.”
“Through these grants, we are
being strategic about investing in
projects that will improve the
quality of life for residents — in
this case, by bringing new jobs,
services, and grocery options to
the residents of Wards 7 and 8,”
said Bowser, who created a new
Cabinet post to focus on development in the city’s poorest areas
after she took office in 2015.
Gray, who served a single term
as mayor before Bowser defeated
Survey: In U.S., adversity
highest among black kids
REPORT FROM B1
Across the country, the prevalence of adversity is higher for
children who are African American or Hispanic. Roughly 40 percent of white children have had at
least one adverse experience,
compared with 51 percent of
Hispanic children and nearly
64 percent of black children.
The disparity is particularly
stark in the District, where just
16 percent of white children had
at least one, compared with
55 percent of nonwhite children.
ACE science
The term “adverse childhood
experiences” — or ACEs — was
popularized following a landmark 1998 study by Kaiser Permanente and the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
that showed the prevalence of
childhood adversity and its overwhelming correlation with poor
health outcomes.
In the past two decades, major
advances in brain science and
biology have helped explain the
connection: Excessive and prolonged stress changes the hormonal balance in the developing
brain and body, causing longterm damage.
A parallel body of research
now shows the brain is plastic,
and certain interventions can
buffer stress and help reverse the
deleterious affects of heavy doses
of stress in childhood.
This body of “ACE science” is
already influencing policies and
practices in a wide range of
professions and government
agencies, with a push for more
professionals and organizations
that work with children and
teens to be “trauma-informed” or
“trauma-sensitive.”
In pediatrics, a growing number of doctors are collecting children’s social histories along with
their medical histories, and they
are seeking to treat root problems, not just symptoms, by offering referrals to social services.
In public education, more
teachers are viewing academic or
behavioral issues through a trauma lens, to see if there is a root
problem that is causing children
to withdraw or to act out.
Similarly, juvenile courts are
also looking at ways to divert
more youths from probation and
incarceration.
In Fairfax County, the juvenile
court screens all new children
and teens who are placed on
probation and has found about
85 percent have at least one ACE,
said Chrissy Cunningham, a prevention coordination specialist
for the county.
The county has also trained
more than 1,000 people through
a 90-minute “trauma Awareness
101” training.
It has an active “trauma informed community network”
that includes government and
non-government professionals
who want to promote trauma-in-
him in the Democratic primary
in 2014, introduced legislation in
March to provide funds for retail
and grocery stores in Wards 7 and
8 and conducted a surprise inspection of the Safeway in the
East River Park Shopping Center
in Northeast this summer. He
declined to comment on Bowser’s
announcement.
Previous attempts by the city
to attract supermarkets east of
the river — over the course of
multiple administrations — have
failed. Efforts to bring two Walmart stores to the area ultimately
fizzled, and a local organic grocery market closed its store on
Pennsylvania Avenue SE in 2012,
unable to make a profit during its
two years in the neighborhood
despite a $900,000 grant from
the District.
Kenner said the pilot program
is intended to fill a “gap in
funding” that Bowser’s office
identified in mixed-use development projects in areas where
unemployment is 10 percent or
higher.
“We have devoted a lot of
resources to affordable housing,”
Kenner said. “But what we were
seeing was there was still a gap
on the retail side. We want to
begin to fill that gap, and eventually to drive unemployment
down.”
Jair Lynch, who changed the
name of the strip on Pennsylvania Avenue SE from the Penn
Branch shopping center to the
Shops at Penn Hill when he
bought it in 2016, acknowledged
that attracting a grocer to the
space is not easy. But he said the
spot has appeal because of the
disposable income of both nearby residents and commuters,
who pass the site on a busy
thoroughfare.
To attract commuters without
changing “the character of the
neighborhood” means building
convenient parking, which the
$2 million grant will go toward,
Lynch said.
Planet Fitness signed a 15-year
lease in the shopping center,
which is estimated to create 400
construction jobs and 200 permanent retail jobs, according to
Bowser’s news release.
“As residents of Ward 7, we
want a quality grocery store,”
said Ayanna Smith, a business
owner who lives in the Penn
Branch neighborhood.
Smith, a mother of two, said
the grant is a “step in the right
direction.”
The grant will support the
build-out for Good Food Markets
in the South Capitol Affordable
Housing project, which is under
construction and will include 195
units of affordable housing and
5,500 square feet of commercial
space. Good Food Market will
partner with a community group
in Ward 8 to bring fresh food and
job opportunities to the Bellevue
neighborhood, city officials said.
rachel.chason@washpost.com
search shows can help children.
Children whose parents report
“always” having positive communication with their children’s
health-care provider were more
than 1.5 times more likely to have
family routines and habits that
can protect against ACEs, such as
eating family meals together,
reading to children, limiting
screen time and not using tobacco at home.
Christina Bethell, director of
the Child and Adolescent Health
Measurement Initiative at Johns
Hopkins University that is analyzing the data, said she hopes
the new survey will spark conversations in communities across
the country about how to reverse
the impacts of childhood stress.
“Children are incredibly resilient. We can buffer their stress,
and we can help them,” she said.
“We are the medicine.”
KEVIN CLARK/THE WASHINGTON POST
The disparity is particularly stark in the District, where 16 percent of white children had at least one
adverse experience, compared with 55 percent of nonwhite children. ABOVE: A mourner places
flowers where Trey Joiner was shot and killed in 2009 as U.S. Park Police tried to arrest him.
formed care for children.
‘Master training’
Statewide there are nine such
networks, meeting for the first
time in Richmond this year.
Next month in Maryland, a
nonprofit is sponsoring a twoday “master training” with Robert Anda, the doctor who was the
co-principal investigator for the
original childhood ACE study.
It is inviting leaders from state
agencies that work with children
and families, and other professionals who work with or advocate for children.
In the District, the public
schools are increasingly promoting trauma sensitive principles in
training and approaches to
school discipline, and research
about ACEs is informing reforms
being developed for the juvenile
court system, said Wendy Ellis,
project director for a Building
Community Resilience initiative
at George Washington University
who said she has consulted with
the attorney general’s office.
Positive communication
In addition to information
about ACEs, the new federal
survey includes information
about protective factors that re-
Survey questions
The complete list of ACE questions that were asked to parents
in the survey include: whether it
is often/very often hard to get by
on income; whether a parent/
guardian is divorced or separated; whether a parent/guardian
has died; whether a parent/
guardian served time in jail;
whether the child saw or heard
violence in the home; whether the
child was a victim of violence or
witnessed violence in the neighborhood; whether the child lived
with anyone mentally ill, suicidal, or depressed; whether the child
lived with anyone with an alcohol or drug problem; and whether
the child was often treated or
judged unfairly due to race or
ethnicity.
michael.chandler@washpost.com
B6
EZ
IN MEMORIAM
BOWMAN
DANIELLE DARRIEUX, 100
French film star’s career
spanned eight decades
DEATH NOTICE
BLINKHORN
GREENE
NANCY E. GREENE
DWIGHT RANDOLPH BOWMAN
10/20/1943 ~ 1/16/2013
I continue to be enveloped in your love.
Happy Birthday!
Love, Your Wife for Life, Gwen
LITTMAN
SHARONDA CACHO LITTMAN
October 20, 2017
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE /GETTY IMAGES
2 Loved
2 Be
4 Gotten
Love your Mother
Geneve (Edwina) Hete-Littman
Happy Birthday Al
French actress Danielle
Darrieux appeared in more
than 100 movies in addition to
her work in TV and theater.
make her portrayal of the tragic
young Baroness one of the hauntingly charming performances of the
year.”
After a brief sojourn in Hollywood — she co-starred with Douglas Fairbanks Jr. in the screwball
comedy “The Rage of Paris” (1938)
— Ms. Darrieux resumed her career
in Europe. (In California, she had
complained openly of the lax shooting schedule that amounted to “sitting around” for $4,000 a week.)
She was also France’s highestpaid movie star of the era, but her
personal life grew complicated. Her
first marriage, to writer-director
and former Olympic swimmer
Henri Decoin, ended in divorce.
In 1940, she became the companion of Dominican playboy and diplomat Porfirio Rubirosa. When he
was held prisoner by the invading
Germans in a hotel at Bad Nauheim,
Ms. Darrieux traveled to Berlin reputedly to charm high-ranking officials of the Nazi regime into freeing
Rubirosa so they could marry (they
did, in 1942).
Her visit to the German capital
drew the attention of the French
Resistance as did her work with
Continentale, a Franco-German
movie production company founded by Nazi propagandist Joseph
Goebbels. Rumors spread that she
was a Nazi sympathizer. She and
Rubirosa were once shot at while
driving in the streets of Paris,
prompting them to move far outside the city limits for the next few
years.
After the war, Ms. Darrieux spent
an exhausting period working to
clear her name as a collaborator. She
then joined her husband on his new
diplomatic assignment in Rome.
The marriage soured because of
what Rubirosa once called his “deviations from strict conjugal orthodoxy”; he soon ran off with tobacco
heiress Doris Duke.
“One woman is not enough for
him,” Ms. Darrieux quipped at the
time. “A man like him needs a harem.”
Ms. Darrieux’s third marriage, to
author Georges Mitsinkidès, lasted
from 1948 until his death in 1991.
Besides Jenvrin, a complete list of
survivors was not immediately
available. She had a son from her
third marriage.
In addition to the work for
Ophuls in the 1950s, Ms. Darrieux
continued a wildly diverse career. In
the Georges Feydeau farce “Occupetoi d’Amélie!” (made in 1949 and
released in the United States as “Oh,
Amelia”), she played an enticing
and teasing free spirit who is pursued by many suitors.
She played a deceitful countess in
the acclaimed spy thriller “Five Fingers” (1952) opposite James Mason
and starred in a French version of
“Lady Chatterley’s Lover” (1955),
based on the D.H. Lawrence novel.
Ms. Darrieux appeared in dramas about the Resistance, including
“Le coup de grâce” (1965) as the wife
of a collaborator played by Michel
Piccoli and “En haut des marches”
(“The Top of the Stairs,” 1983) as a
woman who seeks to avenge her
husband’s wartime death.
Starting in the 1960s, Ms. Darrieux was closely linked to another
icon of French cinema, Catherine
Deneuve. She played Deneuve’s
mother in many films, including the
musical extravaganzas “The Young
Girls of Rochefort” (1967) and “8
Women” (2002), the last of which
featured a mostly all-female cast
that included Isabelle Huppert, Emmanuelle Béart and Fanny Ardant.
Ms. Darrieux remained active onscreen through recent years, drawing favorable reviews as the voice of
the resilient Iranian grandmother
in the 2007 animated feature
“Persepolis,” set before and after the
Islamic revolution.
In interviews, Ms. Darrieux revealed that she was an instinctive
performer who shunned rehearsals
and did not like to talk about process.
“That’s why they gave me my first
role, at 14: because I didn’t know
anything,” she told the French newspaper Le Figaro. “I don’t put myself
‘in the skin’ of my characters. I read
the thing, I know if I like it or not.”
tara.bahrampour@washpost.com
Of Alexandria, VA passed peacefully at his
home on October 18, 2017. He was born
to the late Earl and Gladys Bowers of Elizabethton, TN.
At the age of nine he moved to the DC area,
and then later to Alexandria. Vearl worked
at Safeway after school until the age of
16, when he joined the U.S. Navy- serving
in WWII on the LST Ship # 1066. Upon
returning home from the war, he started
working back as Safeway as a Butcher, and
then later becoming the Manager of the
meat department; retiring in 1978. Vearl
was a member of the Masonic Lodge #219,
the Mt. Vernon Tall Cedar Lodge, and the
Antique Automobile Club. He was loved
and will be greatly missed by his family and
friends.
Vearl is predeceased by his brother; Herbert
(AG) Bowers; and his first wife, Edythe Bowers. He is survived by his wife of 24 years,
Shirley Lindsay Bowers; three daughters,
Linda Tippins (Smokey); Cheryl Shepard;
and Brenda Anci (Fred); son, Thomas Lindsay (Margaret); honorary son, Charles Shepard (Tammy); four grandsons, Chris Tippins
(Jessica); Eric Tippins; Daniel Shepard; and
David Shepard; a great-grandson, Jackson
Tippins.
Visitation will be held on Monday, October
23, 2017 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8
p.m. at Everly Wheatley Funeral Home,
1500 West Braddock Road, Alexandria, VA
22302. Funeral services will follow on
Tuesday at 11 a.m. at Everly Wheatley
with interment immediately following at
Mt. Comfort Cemetery. Please view and
sign the family guestbook at:
www.everlywheatley.com
In lieu of flowers memorial contributions
may be made to Capital Caring Hospice,
https://www.capitalcaring.org. Vearl’s family wishes to express their appreciation to
Capital Caring Hospice and their staff for
the compassionate care provided during
Vearl’s final days.
BUCK
DEATH NOTICE
ADELMAN
EILEEN PALMER ADELMAN
Eileen "Nana" Palmer Adelman died peacefully
with her family by her side on October 14,
2017. Eileen was born in Swindon, England on
July 3, 1942 to the late John and Patricia Palmer.
Preceded in death by her loving husband,
Theodore Adelman and brother, John Palmer.
Survived by her children Bridgette, Sherrie,
Anthony, Marla, Robyn, Julie, Diane, Brian,
many grandchildren, nieces, nephews and
friends. Services will be Saturday, October
21 at Advent Funeral Home - Lanham, MD,
Viewing from 9 to 10 a.m., service at 10 a.m.
Interment will follow at 12:30 p.m. at George
Washington Cemetery, Adelphi, MD. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests donations to the
Hospice of the Chesapeake.
PERLMETER
Mrs. Nancy E. Greene, District of Columbia
resident. She transitioned on Friday, October
13, 2017. Funeral services will be held on
Friday, October 20, 2017 at John Rhines Funeral, 3015 12th St, Washington, DC at 10 a.m. The
funeral home phone number is 202.529.4300.
AMES
LENA AMES
Lena Ames of Falls Church VA passed
away on October 13, 2017. She was
retired from the Arlington County Department of Human Services. She is survived
by a host of relatives and friends. A
memorial service will be held on Saturday,
October 21 at 4 p.m. at the Unitarian
Universalist Church of Arlington, 4444
Arlington Blvd., Arlington, VA.
Arrangements are by Ames Funeral Home,
Manassas, VA, 703-368-2814.
Paul Bryan Belanga, 80, of Alexandria, died
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 after a threemonth struggle with pancreatic cancer. Paul
passed away while listening to prayer and
surrounded by his wife of 43 years, Solveig
(Balleby), and his three children, Natalie, Sean,
and Kevin.
Paul was born the youngest of four on October
22, 1936 in Creswell, NC. Growing up on a farm
in rural North Carolina, Paul proved capable of
greater things. He excelled as a student and
athlete and eventually realized his dream of
attending the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, from which he graduated in 1959.
He went on to a distinguished career in public
service and retired from both the Overseas
Private Investment Corporation and the Food
and Agriculture Organization of the United
Nations. Always curious and adventurous,
Paul traveled extensively with his wife, Solveig,
and for a time worked in Rome, Italy.
Paul was a giving person who volunteered
in many capacities once he retired. He was
an active member of Saint George’s Episcopal
Church where he served on the Outreach
Committee and supported the HOST Program
to help feed the homeless. Paul spent many
hours working with Samaritan Ministries and
visiting with the elderly and infirm. He served
as President of the Association of Former
International Civil Servants for over a decade.
Paul was an ardent Democrat who contributed
his time to various campaigns and the smooth
functioning of the electoral process. An avid
conversationalist with a sincere interest in the
ideas and perspectives of others, he especially
loved talking politics and world affairs. Paul
enjoyed all things Tar Heels, Redskins, and
Nationals. Paul was also a proud amateur
genealogist and enjoyed continuing his sister
Evelyn's efforts to trace the Belanga lineage.
Paul is survived by his wife, Solveig; sister,
Norma; three children, Natalie, Sean, and
Kevin; daughters-in law, Alisha and Yumi; and
11 grandchildren, Jehane, Gabrielle, Tyler, Jeremy, Christine, Sophia, Dominic, Sonya, Evelyn,
Maeve and Alessia. He was preceded in death
by two sisters, Evelyn Sindelar and Frances
Mitchell.
On Monday, October 9, 2017, in Annandale,
VA, after a year-long battle with head and
neck cancer. Born in Colon, Panama, Eugene is
survived by his wife of 24 years, Nancy Pearse
Lee, his daughter, Amanda G. Lee, his sister
Ellen Lee-Allen (Jordan) and his father, Paw
Hong Lee of New York, New York.
A funeral service will be held in celebration of
his life on Monday, October 23, 2017 at Vienna
Presbyterian Church, 124 Park St. NE, Vienna,
VA at 2:30 p.m. Donations may be made
in Eug’s name to the Hera Ovarian Cancer
Foundation or the American Cancer Society.
Online condolences may be made at:
www.adventfuneral.com
CHINN
The officers and members of Local
#10 International Union of Elevator Constructors are hereby notified of the passing of Honorary
Brother Joseph Le on October 13,
2017. Officers and members may
call at the Collins Funeral Home,
500 University Blvd., Silver Spring, MD from 2 to
4 and 7 to 9 p.m., Sunday, October 22. Services
will be held on Monday, October 23, 11 a.m. at
St. John the Evangelist Church, 10103 Georgia
Ave., Silver Spring, MD. Interment Gate of
Heaven Cemetery, 13801 Georgia Ave., Silver
Spring, MD.
Fraternally,
The Business Office
LEWIS
To be seen in the
Funeral Services
Directory, please call
paid Death Notices
at 202-334-4122.
PIZZA
JEAN MARIE PIZZA (Age 85)
On Monday, October 16, 2017 of Cheverly,
MD, formerly of Salisbury, MD. Beloved wife
of the late Lawrence "Hank" Pizza; loving
mother of Lawrence, Jr. (Irene), Timothy
(Robbin), Gary (Kathy), Jeannie Pizza, Anita
(Richard) Walburn, and Elizabeth Ann
Wincek; cherished grandmother of Christina, Stephanie, Kelly, Timothy, Jr. (Carolyn),
Tanner, Karly Pizza, Angela (John) Shipp,
Jennifer (Jesse) Smith, Russell (Krista)
Ziebell, Richard (Logan), Justin Walburn,
Amber, Madison and Hayley Wincek; and
great-grandmother of seven. Friends may
call at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, 3107
63rd Place, Cheverly, MD on Friday, October
20 from 1 to 4 and 6 to 9 p.m., where a Mass
will be offered on Saturday, October 21 at
9:30 a.m. Interment Meadowridge Memorial Park. Memorial contributions may be
made in her name to the Alzheimer's Association, National Capital Area, 3701 Pender
Drive, Suite 400, Fairfax, VA 22030 or to
the American Heart Association, 4217 Park
Place Court, Glen Allen, VA 23066.
www.gaschs.com
ROBERTS
JOYCE CYNTHIA ROBERTS (Age 60)
CAROLYN JEAN DAVIS LEWIS
On Wednesday, October 4, 2017 of Cheverly,
MD. Beloved wife of Vincent R. Lewis. Visitation
will be held on Saturday, October 21, 2017 at
12:30 p.m., at Fort Lincoln Funeral Home, 3401
Bladensburg Road, Brentwood, MD., until time
of funeral service at 1:30 p.m. Interment
private.
McREYNOLDS
LINDA LOUISE McREYNOLDS (Saddler)
Linda Louise McReynolds (Saddler), 70, passed
away peacefully in her home, in Colmar Manor,
MD, on October 13, 2017. She is survived by
her husband of 48 years, Joseph McReynolds;
her sons, David and Michael (Angela) stepson,
William (Alice); and her three grandchildren
David, Michael, and Danielle. She is also survived by her siblings Phyllis Geis (Carl), Loraine
Clapp (George), Jerry Saddler and Roberta
Davis, originally from Springfield, OH.
Her life will be celebrated on Wednesday,
October 25, 2017 from 10 to 11 a.m., at
Chambers Funeral Home, 5801 Cleveland Ave,
Riverdale, MD 20737. Interment following at
Fort Lincoln Cemetery at noon. Reception to
follow at Colmar Manor Community Center.
Of Washington, DC entered eternal rest on
October 3, 2017. Survived by her loving son,
Warren Dickson, mother, Peggy Roberts, brother, Tracy Roberts (Debra), nephews, David and
Maat, niece, Mena, and a host of other relatives
and friends. Preceded in death by her father,
Lewis Roberts. Viewing to be held Saturday,
October 21, at 10 a.m. at Marshall-March
Funeral Home, 4308 Suitland Rd, Suitland, MD,
followed by a memorial service at 11 a.m. Interment to follow at Heritage Memorial Cemetery,
Waldorf, MD.
ROBINSON
OTIS ROBINSON, SR
Entered into eternal rest on Friday,
October 13, 2017. Beloved husband of Marion Robinson. Also
survived by son, Otis Robinson,
Jr.; granddaughter, Marion Olivia
Robinson; a host of other relatives
and friends. He was predeceased
by four brothers, Fletcher, James Sr., Vance
and Odell Robinson; four sisters, Carrie Mae
Minson, Samella Edwards, Lounell Jones and
Ruth V. Holmes (Lee). Friends may visit with the
family on Saturday, October 21 from 10 a.m.
until time of service, 11 a.m. at New Covenant
Baptist Church, 1301 W St., SE, Washington,
DC. Interment Lincoln Memorial Cemetery. Services by HODGES & EDWARDS.
SCHOENE
JANET LUCILLE CHINN
On Monday, October 16, 2017. The beloved
wife of 58 years of Richard Chinn; mother of
Michael Chinn of Columbia, MD and Kevin
Chinn of Baltimore, MD and grandmother
of Christopher Chinn of Shady Side, MD. A
memorial service will be held on Monday,
October 23 at 12 p.m. at Riva Trace Baptist
Church, 475 W. Central Ave., Davidsonville,
MD. Inurnment will be private. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contributions may be
made to the Alzheimer's Assn., 1850 York
Rd., Ste. D, Timonium, MD 21093. Condolences may be made online at:
www.KalasFuneralHomes.com
CORNELL
DAVID H. CORNELL (Age 69)
It is with regret that we notify the
members of Steamfitters Local
#602 of the death of Brother David
Cornell. Services held by family.
Notice #1636.
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
DUDLEY
TOWANA L. DUDLEY
On September 1, 2017 Family and friends are
invited to attend a celebration of the life of
Towana Dudley on Saturday, October 21 at 2
p.m. until 6 p.m. at 1410 Missouri Ave N.W.
Washington D.C. 20011
GOFUS
MOULD
CATHERINE BUTLER MOULD
“Kitty” (Age 90)
Of McLean, VA passed away on October 17,
2017. She was born in Washington, D.C. and
was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, and
homemaker. She was dedicated to her faith
and was highly active for decades at St. John’s
Catholic Church.
She was preceded in death by her husband,
John Calvin Mould. Surviving are seven children, John C. Mould and wife, Carmel, Richard
J. Mould and wife, Kimberly, Andrew Mould,
Father Christopher J. Mould, Kevin M. Mould
and wife, Colby Stanton, Daniel T. Mould, and
Patricia Cuskelly; eight grandchildren, Caitlin,
Cristen, Jacob, Braden, Eric, Kara, Sean, and
Kevin; sister, Barbara Joan Leitch; brother,
Harvey Butler; numerous nieces, nephews, and
cousins.
Visitation will be held from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on
Sunday, October 22, 2017 at Murphy Funeral
Home in Falls Church, VA.
A Funeral Mass will be conducted at 11 a.m. on
Monday, October 23, 2017 at St. John’s Catholic
Church in McLean with Father Christopher J.
Mould officiating. Burial will be at National
Memorial Park in Falls Church, VA.
LESTER PHILIP SCHOENE, JR.
After a happy and busy life, adding value to
everything he touched, Lester P. Schoene, Jr.
died October 17, 2017 in his Fairfax, VA home.
Born June 15, 1934, he was an engineer and
manager for some three decades with IBM,
then earned his M.S. degree at the George
Mason University School for Conflict Analysis
and Resolution, where he also served on the
advisory board. Finally, he served the last
dozen years in various roles as an ADR advisor
and was appointed the Reservist Ombuds for
FEMA. A lifelong leader and volunteer, he
served in a number of roles for Burgundy Farm
Country Day School, and was active in the
Rotary Club. He is survived by his wife, Mary
Branch Grove; sister, Molly Mercker; three
children, Lavinia, Karl, and Philip; and two
grandchildren, Adam and Mary.
For information regarding the November 3
memorial service, or for donations in lieu of
flowers, please go to adventfuneral.com. Interment is private.
GIANTELLI
Manhattan College, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering in
1998. In 1999, Joseph and his wife moved
to Maryland. For the past 10 years, he was
a reactor systems engineer at the Nuclear
Regulatory Commission.
Joseph is survived by his beloved wife, Adelaide, and his children whom he adored,
Andrew, Matthew and Alexa. He was a
hands-on dad and kid at heart. He was
an active member of Boy Scouts, avid fisherman, and enjoyed to putter with 3-d printing.
Joseph was cherished son of Raymond and
Joan Giantelli; loving brother of Raymond
Giantelli, Mary Ostrander, Antonetta James,
and Patricia Righetti. Joseph is also survived
by his in-laws Raffaele and Marcella Mella
and many loving nieces and nephews, as
well as many family and friends.
A funeral service will be held at Saint George’s
Episcopal Church, 915 North Oakland Street
Arlington, VA 22203 on Saturday, October 21
at 9 a.m. Jefferson Funeral Chapel will be
handling all arrangements. Donations in Paul’s
memory can be made to the UN Refugee
Agency (www.unrefugees.org).
When the
need arises,
let families
find you in the
Funeral Services
Directory.
Died peacefully on October 15, 2017 at
Casey House Hospice with his wife and
daughter by his side.
Alan is survived by his loving wife of 47
years, Carol Glasgow Perlmeter of Barnesville, MD; his devoted daughter Jessica
Perlmeter Cochrane and her husband
Anthony Cochrane of Maplewood, NJ; his
cherished grandchildren Callum Alan Hugh
Cochrane and Rosamund Carol Margaret
Cochrane and his son-in-law Ernesto Capello of St. Paul, MN. His beloved daughter
Rachel Ann Perlmeter preceded him in
death.
Alan is also survived by his loving mother
Lillian Perlmeter of Eugene, OR and his
siblings; Eileen Perlmeter (Patrick Cassidy),
Stuart Perlmeter (Anne Todd) and Barbara
Douglas (Paul Douglas). Alan’s father, Jack
G. Perlmeter, preceded him in death.
Alan was a Television Engineer at WETA TV
for over 30 years and a proud member of
IBEW. Alan worked on many productions
at WETA including The PBS NewsHour, MacNeil/Lehrer Report, Washington Week, A
Capitol Fourth Celebrations, National
Memorial Concerts, In Performance at The
White House and The Lawmakers.
The family will be holding a private memorial service.
Memorial contributions can be made in
the name of A
‘ lan B. Perlmeter’ to: Montgomery Hospice - Casey House 1355 Piccard Drive, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20850
www.montgomeryhospice.org/donatesupport/donate-now.
LE
CARTER
Died peacefully in Plano, Texas on October 12,
2017. She was born on Christmas Day, 1928 in
Washington, DC. She was preceded in death by
her husband, Billy Edward Carter, her parents,
John J. and Margaret Keliher O’Leary and one
brother, John J. O’Leary.
Mary Ann grew up in Washington, DC and had a
great love for her hometown including the fact
that she was the first granddaughter of former
Fire Chief, James “Pop” Keliher. This did not
prevent her from living and teaching around
the world including in Sumpter, South Carolina,
Ft. Worth, Texas, Wiesbaden Germany and
Zweibrucken American High School also in
Germany. She retired to Ingram, Texas where
she lived for 23 years.
Mary Ann was grateful for the many blessings
that life had given her and is survived by her
daughters, Wanda Wirbs and Karen Furry and
husband, Randy Furry, grandson, Rodney Furry
and wife Natalie, grandson Scott Wirbs and
wife, Tonya, brother Daniel O’Leary and wife,
Peggy, nine great-grandchildren and a slew
of nieces, nephews, cousins and her beloved
students.
There will be no services at this time. Burial will
be at a later date when she will be buried with
her husband at Arlington National Cemetery.
ALAN BARRY PERLMETER
(Age 69)
JOSEPH LE
of Gaithersburg, MD, passed
away on October 15, 2017.
Beloved wife of the late Daniel
R. Buck, Sr.; devoted mother
of Daniel R. Buck, Jr. (Victoria), Stephen
C. Buck, and Allison B. Cord; cherished
grandmother of Christina Cord, Evan Cord,
Derek Cord (Emily), Bennett Cord, and
Emma Buck. Viewing to be held Monday,
October 23, from 9:30 until time of service
at 10 a.m. at St. John Neumann Catholic
Church, 9000 Warfield Rd., Gaithersburg,
MD. Interment to follow at Ft. Lincoln
Cemetery. For full obituary, please visit
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
BELANGA
PAUL BRYAN BELANGA
LEE
EUGENE C. LEE
“Eug” (Age 55)
JEAN R. BUCK (Age 89)
MARY ANN CARTER
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
DEATH NOTICE
BOWERS
VEARL HAGAN BOWERS
(Age 91)
. FRIDAY,
DEATH NOTICE
JOSEPH P. BLINKHORN (Age 70)
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother
Joseph Blinkhorn. Services held by
family. Notice #1637.
Daniel W. Loveless, FST
BY TARA BAHRAMPOUR
Danielle Darrieux, a luminous
beauty of French cinema whose portrayals of wistful ingenues, romantic temptresses and tragic adulteresses spanned more than eight decades, died Oct. 17 at her home in
Bois-le-Roi, France. She was 100.
Her companion, Jacques Jenvrin, confirmed the death to Agence
France-Presse but did not provide
the cause.
Ms. Darrieux’s poise, languid
glamour and fine singing voice catapulted her to stardom as a teenager
in the early 1930s and kept her there
for decades, whether in melodramas, frisky comedies or light musicals. She appeared in more than 100
films in addition to her work in
television and theater.
Her career was seriously threatened immediately after World War
II, when she faced accusations of
collaboration with the wartime Vichy regime and the German government. But she managed to clear her
name, and her career continued unimpeded through the years.
If her prewar movies emphasized
her sparkle and charm, the postwar
years elicited some of her most riveting dramatic performances.
Much of her critical legacy rests on
three celebrated films she made
with director Max Ophuls: “La
Ronde” (1950), “Le Plaisir” (1952)
and “The Earrings of Madame de . . .
” (1953).
They are love stories, droll, anguished and highly theatrical in
their plotting and swirling camera
movements. In “La Ronde,” she was
the understanding paramour of a
young man facing sudden impotence. She was a prostitute in “Le
Plaisir,” based on stories by Guy de
Maupassant, and in “Earrings” she
played an aristocratic officer’s bored
wife whose life is upended when she
finds passion outside her marriage.
“These are extraordinary pieces
of filmmaking,” Los Angeles Times
film critic Kenneth Turan said in a
2012 interview for this obituary. “If
you love film as visual medium,
these are some of the masterpieces,
and Darrieux was one of Ophuls’s
muses. ‘Earrings’ is a quintessentially romantic film but a very artificial story, and it takes a really great
actress to take this artificial character — an artificial character in an
artificial art — to make it real and
moving and subtle. She is quite a
presence.”
Ms. Darrieux brought a tender
and restrained sympathy to what
she regarded as her most delicately
calibrated performance: the married woman who falls in love with
an opportunistic young man (Gerard Philipe) in “Le rouge et le noir”
(“The Red and the Black,” 1954),
based on the Stendhal novel set in
post-Napoleonic France.
In addition to her movie roles,
Ms. Darrieux worked in television
and theater. In 1970, she replaced
Katharine Hepburn on Broadway
as the indomitable Gallic entrepreneur Coco Chanel in the musical
“Coco.”
The change was greeted warmly
by critics. As Mel Gussow dryly noted in his New York Times review,
“She is French, and she can sing.”
More than that, he wrote, she imbued the role with the hallmarks of
a Darrieux performance: beauty,
charm, flirtatiousness and vulnerability.
The film historian David Shipman noted those qualities when he
wrote, “It is always an unpleasant
surprise to all young men when they
first go to France that all Frenchwomen are not like Danielle Darrieux.”
Danielle Yvonne Marie Antoinette Darrieux was born May 1, 1917,
in Bordeaux, the daughter of an eye
doctor and Algerian concert singer.
Her father died within a few years,
and her family, now in Paris, struggled on her mother’s income from
giving music lessons.
She entered film work in 1931
after answering an open-casting
call for “Le Bal,” an adaptation of an
Irène Némirovsky novella. She won
the role of a headstrong adolescent
who takes revenge on her socialclimbing mother. She appeared in
20 films over the next five years.
She excelled in light fare such as
“Battement de coeur” (“Beating
Heart,” 1940) as a student in pickpocket school and appeared convincingly in period dramas such as
“Port-Arthur” (1936), set during the
Russo-Japanese War. She also
played unconventional roles, including a willful young bride who
consummates an affair with her
middle-aged husband’s son in “Mademoiselle ma mère” (1938).
Ms. Darrieux made her deepest
early impression on audiences in
“Mayerling” (1936) as the doomed
lover of an Austrian crown prince
played by Charles Boyer, who would
later play her husband in “The Earrings of Madame de . . . ”
Writing of “Mayerling,” New York
Times film critic Frank S. Nugent
wrote that Ms. Darrieux “has a cameo-like perfection of feature and a
limpid serenity of manner which
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
NANCY BURGESS GOFUS
(Age 63)
Passed away peacefully on Tuesday, October
17, 2017 after a short battle with an aggressive
cancer. Born on November 24, 1953 in Waycross, GA, she was the daughter of J.J. (Jack)
and Mary Mercer Burgess.
Nancy was an executive with a number of
companies within the telecommunications and
internet domain industries for over 35 years.
She was an active member of Trinity Presbyterian Church, Herndon, VA and was also
deeply involved with a number of non-profit
organizations. A proud graduate of the College
of William and Mary, Class of 1975, she was the
outgoing Chair of the College of William and
Mary Foundation Board. She had previously
served as chair of the Volunteers of America
National Board and was currently serving on
the board of the Volunteers of America –
Chesapeake.
She is survived by her husband, Joe, her
children, J. Matthew Gofus (Kate) and Kathryn
Scholfield (Tyler) and two grandchildren, Margaret and Jack Gofus. She is also survived
by her mother, Mary Mercer Burgess and her
brother, J. Michael Burgess.
The family will receive friends on Sunday.
October 22, 5 to 7 p.m. at Adams-Green
Funeral Home, Herndon. A funeral service of
Witness to the Resurrection will be held on
Monday, October 23, 11 a.m. at Trinity Presbyterian Church, Herndon. In lieu of flowers,
please consider a donation to the College
of William and Mary or Trinity Presbyterian
Church, Herndon. Details of funeral arrangements can be found at:
www.adamsgreen.com
JOSEPH M. GIANTELLI (Age 52)
On Sunday, October 15, 2017 Joseph Giantelli
of Rockville, MD passed peacefully. Joseph
was born on July 20, 1965 in Mount Vernon,
New York. As a young man, he participated
in Boy Scouts and achieved Eagle Scout
in 1983. He attended Mount Vernon High
School continued his education at Westchester Community College graduating with an
associates degree in electronic technologies.
In 1989, he met the love of his life, Adelaide
Giantelli (nee Mella) and they were happily
married for nearly 25 years. Being a lifelong
learner, Joseph continued his education at
The family will receive friends at
PUMPHREY’S COLONIAL FUNERAL HOME,
300 W. Montgomery Ave., Rockville, MD on
Sunday, October 22 from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9
p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be offered
at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 520 Veirs Mill
Rd., Rockville, MD on Monday, October 23,
2017 at 10:30 a.m. Interment private. In lieu
of flowers, donations in memory of Joseph
Giantelli may be made to the National Capital
Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America go
to https://www.ncacbsa.org/support-scouting/. Please view and sign online family
guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
POST YOUR
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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
SHOWERS
STONE
ERNEST LEROY SHOWERS "Roy"
Of Springfield, VA, passed away suddenly on
July 4, 2014. Roy was raised in Linden, VA in
Fauquier County. He graduated from James
Madison University in 1976 and was employed
by VISA, Inc. retiring as a manager. Roy
loved traveling and exploring new places. Roy
is survived by his loving wife Linda “Lynn”
Showers. He was the son-in-law to Mary
Figard, brother-in-law to D’Ann (Steve) Atkinson, Reginald (Debby) Figard and Janet (Sam)
Brutcher, uncle to Tara and Kelly Figard, and
nephew of Dorothy Shiflett. Roy is also survived by a host of cousins. He was preceded
in death by his father William Showers, Sr.,
brother William “Jack” Showers, Jr., and grandmother Ruth Showers. His father-in-law, Ross
Figard, passed away in February 2015. Interment will take place on October 21, 2017 at 11
a.m. at Leeds Cemetery, Markham, VA.
WARNER A. STONE "Dino" (Age 69)
Of Chesapeake Beach, MD. Passed away
October 7, 2017.
Religious service scheduled for Saturday,
October 21, 2017, 1 p.m. at St. Anthony's
Catholic Church, North Beach, MD.
Celebration of Life scheduled for Sunday,
October 22, 2017, 1 to 4 p.m. at American
Legion #206, Chesapeake Beach, MD.
Our Hearts are Broken. Your family and
friends.
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
WYNN
BROWN
JOHNSON
On October 7, 2017. He is survived by his
loving wife, Clarice P. Wynn; a daughter, Rev.
Shermaine Wynn Mounoubai; son-in-law,
Madnodje; two grandchildren, Koyta and Kadja
Visitation Saturday, October 21, 2017 from 10
a.m. until hour of service at 11 a.m. at St.
Mary's Baptist Church, 8008 Eastern Ave., NW.
Services by DL MCLAUGHLIN FUNERAL HOME.
To place a notice, call:
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800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
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JOHN P. BROWN "Jack"
Jack Brown of Washington, D.C. died peacefully on his 92nd birthday, October 14, 2017
surrounded by his family. He is survived by
his devoted son, John Patrick (Anita) Brown,
Jr.; loving daughter, Anne Sims (Michael)
Loftus; favorite granddaughter, Madeleine
Lee Brown; and brother, Thomas J. (Joan)
Browne. He was pre-deceased by his loving
wife of 44 years, Caroline Hopkins Brown.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at
Annunciation Catholic Church, 3810 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.,
at 9:45 A.M. on Friday, October 20. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be made in
his name to the Sibley Memorial Hospital
Foundation, 3255 Loughboro Road, N.W.,
Washington, DC 20016.
IN MEMORIAM
COHEN
WILSON
Immediately after high school, she was
employed by an insurance company, and later
by National Association of Security Dealers
until her retirement in 1994.
A funeral service will be held on Saturday,
October 21, 2017, 2 p.m. at Westminster
Presbyterian Church, 2701 Cameron Mills
Rd, Alexandria, VA 22302.
Mary enjoyed cooking and had a hobby of
collecting cookbooks, particularly those from
churches and other organizations.
She was an active member and officer of the
Takoma Chapter No. 12 Order of The Eastern
Star, District of Columbia. She grew up in, and
was a lifetime member, of the Mt Vernon Place
United Methodist Church in DC, where she
attended and participated regularly.
Mary and Bob made many annual trips to
Council Grove visiting family over the years. In
2014, they made their home in Council Grove.
She is survived by her loving husband of the
home, nieces, nephews and cousins.
Visitation will be Monday, October 23, 6 to
7 p.m., followed by the funeral on Tuesday,
October 24, 2017 at 11 a.m., both being held
at the Zeiner Funeral Home in Council Grove.
SOUTHCOMB
MICHAEL B. SOUTHCOMB (Age 75)
It is with regret that we notify
the members of Steamfitters
Local #602 of the death of Brother
Michael Southcomb. A Celebration of Life Service will be held
in the near future. Please check
www.steamfitters-602.org
for
details. Notice #1634.
Daniel W. Loveless, F.S.T.
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Mary grew up on Capitol Hill in Washington,
attended Stewart Junior High School and graduated from Eastern High School, where she
enjoyed participating in school activities. She
helped organize many of the class of 1941
reunions, and was a member of the Eastern
High School 50+ Club, where she was the class
representative for the Class of ’41.
Robert is survived by his loving wife of 65
years, Betsy Graves Smith; two daughters,
Mary Louise Bondel and Sarah Catherine
Byrd (Steven); granddaughters, Catherine
Anne Earman (Joshua), Rebecca Suzanne
Byrd Musser (Robert), Elise Catherine Bondel, and Laura Meredith Bondel; four greatgranddaughters and four great-grandsons;
a brother, William F Smith, III (Juanita) and
many loving extended family members and
friends.
In lieu of flowers, those wishing to make
a donation in his memory may send it
to Fisher House Foundation, 111 Rockville
Pike, Suite 420, Rockville MD 20850.
MONDAY-SATURDAY
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ANDREW H. JOHNSON
On Saturday, October 7, 2017, Andrew H Johnson departed this life, his daughter, Crystal
Johnson and family at his side. Attended Holy
Trinity Grade School, Gonzaga College High
School in Washington, DC. Master’s Degree
in Information Technology at the University of
Maryland. Memorial October 25, 11 a.m. at
Grace Community Church 8200 Old Columbia
Road, Fulton, MD 20759. Remembrance 3 p.m.,
Adelphi Mills 8402 Riggs Road, Adelphi, MD
20783. Burial: George Washington Cemetery,
Adelphi, MD
CLIPPER
MARY SHIVERS WILSON (Age 94)
Passed away October 17, 2017, at the Morris
County Hospital. She was born November 13,
1922, to Thomas J. and Reva W. Shivers in
Washington, DC. She married Robert R. Wilson,
Jr., on December 18, 1965 in DC. They have
been married 52 wonderful years.
ROBERT LEE SMITH
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
GEORGE F. WYNN (Age 98)
J. RANDOLPH UMSTEAD
Robert Lee Smith, age 90, of Alexandria,
VA, died on October 17, 2017. He was
born to the late William Francis and Helen
Loretta (Licht) Smith in Portsmouth, Ohio.
He is also predeceased by his son-in-law
Carl John Bondel. Robert was a longtime
resident of Northern Virginia.
DEATH NOTICE
UMSTEAD
James Randolph Umstead II (Randy), 48, of
Washington, DC., passed away on October 17,
2017. Randy is survived by beloved wife, Lucille
Coen; son, Cory Umstead; daughter, BlankaJeanne Umstead; mother, Jeanne M. Umstead;
brother, Michael S. Umstead; sisters, Vivienne
Gray and Merion Wright; five step children and
13 beautiful grandchildren. A funeral service
will be held at 1 p.m. on Sunday, October 22,
2017 in the First Seventh Day Adventist Church
at 810 Shepherd Street NW, Washington, DC.
www.moorefuneralhomepa.com
SMITH
B7
RE
Notices with photos begin at 3"
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ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque.
In loving and dedicated memory of
DANA LOVETT COHEN
May 21, 1944 - October 24, 1993
You are always in our thoughts,
with everyday guided by the indelible foundation you created supporting your family during your life.
Our bonded family dedication to
each other is our way of saying
Thank You.
Your loving family
Ron, Alan, Craig, Sue-Ann,
Your Grandchildren:
Daniele, Amanda, Derick,
Morgan, Dayna,
Chase and Ryan
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
ROSA D. THOMAS
JOSEPH DANIEL CLIPPER
Of Washington, DC, went home to be with the
Lord on Wednesday, October 4, 2017. Joseph,
son of the late Viola E. Clipper and Rev. Herman
S. Clipper, was born in Montgomery County,
MD on December 3, 1937 and is survived by
one daughter, Juana Clipper; two sisters, Rev.
Dr. Blanche Clipper Hudson and Mrs. Shirley
Gaither. A Memorial Service will be held on
Saturday, October 21, 2017 at Unity Church of
Washington, 1225 R Street, NW, Washington,
DC at 11 a.m. Repast immediately following.
Entered into eternal rest on
Wednesday, October 11, 2017.
She leaves to cherish her memory,
one daughter, Sharon D.; one
granddaughter, Kia Hutchison;
one great-granddaughter, Kiyarah.
She is preceded in death by her
loving husband, Pastor William Thomas, Jr. and
son, William Thomas, III. Family will receive
friends on Friday, October 20, viewing 6 to 9
p.m. at Antioch Baptist Church 13025 Old Marlboro Pike, Upper Marlboro, MD. Services will be
held on Saturday, October 21, viewing, 9 a.m.
until time of service, 11 a.m. at St. Paul Baptist
Church, 6419 Marlboro Pike, District Heights,
MD. Interment Harmony Memorial Park.
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HEDRICK
WILSON
OWENS
Memorial contributions may be made to the
Mt Vernon Place United Methodist Church, and
may be sent in care of Zeiner Funeral Home,
PO Box 273, Council Grove, KS 66846.
Condolences may be left at:
www.zeinerfuneralhomes.com
WINNEFELD
JONATHAN J. WINNEFELD (Age 19)
Born in San Diego, CA, Jonathan passed in
Denver, CO on September 7, 2017 after a
long and honorable battle with addiction. A
graduate of Washington-Lee High School in
Arlington, VA, where he was a member of
the varsity baseball team. Achieved his Emergency Medical Technical qualification in New
Haven, CT and was a freshman at the University
of Denver. Jon was loved by everyone who
knew him. He is survived by his loving parents
James and Mary, and his brother James, III.
Funeral service will be held at Fort Myer
Memorial Chapel, 101 McNair Rd, Fort Myer,
VA 22211 on Friday, November 17 at 9 a.m.,
followed by interment at Arlington National
Cemetery, 1 Memorial Drive, Arlington, VA
22211 at 11 a.m. A celebration of his life will be
held after graveside. Memorial contributions
may be made to www.taps.org/winnefeld
Please view and sign the family guestbook at
www.everlywheatley.com
IN MEMORIAM
MICHAEL KEITH HEDRICK
Cdr., U.S. Navy (Ret.)
TAUCHIOUS and VIOLA OWENS
Happy Anniversary!
You were together in life for over 70 years,
You are forever together in eternity.
We love and miss you so much!
Janice, Brenda, Sharon, Jesse,
Leslie, and Michele
DEATH NOTICE
In 1992, he left NIH to become an information
technologist at the Department of Interior’s
Bureau of Land Management. He remained
at BLM until his retirement in 2007, except
for a two-year period – 2002 to 2004 – at
the Office of Personnel Management helping
to develop a new central personnel system
for the federal government. After retiring
he became a consultant, spending most of
2008 in Gambia working to demonstrate
how technology can address the needs of a
developing nation.
Jones! Marion's special friends, the Johnstons and Robert Mallett, agreed that "No
one wears red like Marion Jones!" As a young
woman, Mrs. Jones studied the fine art of
millinery, and she wanted to travel to Paris
to study fashion design; even then, she was
striving for greatness without even realizing
it.
Mrs. Jones was born in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Pittsburgh, one of eight
offspring of parents Grace and Frank Whitlock. Mrs. Jones was born on Good Friday
and once told her male classmates at her
college alma mater, "I was born on Good
Friday, and I am innately good, so don't try to
lead me astray!" Mrs. Jones excelled in her
early studies before matriculating to Virginia
State College (now Virginia State University),
where she was an honor student, and one
of the most popular coeds at the Petersburg
institution. While attending Virginia State
College, her chosen curricula included courses in the fields of social work, French, the
art of fencing, and when she was crowned
"Miss Virginia State," it was the same year
that the college football team won the CIAA
championship title. Although Morgan State
College was favored to win, one of the
two young men responsible for the upset
victory was the Trojan hero, Marion's brother,
"Kenny" Whitlock. While attending Virginia
State College, Mrs. Jones pledged into the
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority on November
1, 1938; the Alpha Epsilon Chapter. She
also attended the University of Pittsburgh.
Marion moved to Washington, DC, where she
met and married her handsome and popular
soulmate, Washingtonian Clifton W. Jones,
who tragically passed from this earth only six
months after their wedding. Marion was four
months pregnant with her daughter at the
time of his demise and she never remarried.
Mrs. Jones was a successful real estate
broker, a pioneer as a woman and minority,
helping to break the proverbial "glass ceiling"
in her profession. Her offices were located
in the coveted Shoreham Building, located
on 15th & H Streets NW, then known as the
"Little Wall Street." She handled exclusive
properties and represented VIPs in the marketplace. Her style and grace was accentuated by her reputation as the "Bronze Coco
Chanel." Her business attire always included
the donning of an exquisite tailored suit with
matching hat and gloves - all reflecting her
individual style, personality, and panache.
Oscar de la Renta, the award winning designer who dressed Jacqueline Kennedy, also
dressed one Marion Jones! How interesting
that Oscar passed away exactly one year
after Marion's departure. They must be sharing designing ideas up there in the Heavenly
realm! The fabulous hats worn my Mrs.
Jones were mostly designed by the award
winning designer, Frank Olive, whom she
met. He gave her a hat pin as a special gift.
Mr. Olive created for the designer houses
of Oscar de la Renta and Pauline Trigere.
Mrs. Jones wore her dresses too. Mr. Olive
designed for celebrities and the theater, for
performers like Carol Burnett, Diana Ross,
and Peggy Lee, and business professional
Marion Jones! Pauline Trigere, a Parisian
designer, was the first name designer to use
an African-American model for her designs,
and she held firm when one major store in
Memphis threatened to pull their business.
Mrs. Trigere dressed Bette Davis, Wallis Simpson, Marion's friend Lena Horne, and Marion
Mrs. Jones was a beautiful woman of dignity,
born with class, who saw the beauty and
humanity in others. She had personal acclaim
and professional success, but her real joy
was her daughter, Cliftine.
Mom, what sacrifices you made for me, how
wonderful a Mother God gave me. You dwell
in my heart-house, and you always will. The
memory of your helping hand will buoy me
with hope. Our Tunisian friend, Aisha, once
commented, that when she saw us together,
she saw two people, but one soul. The Lord
will dry my tear-stained cheeks, someday.
I miss you and I love you. I feel that your
abiding love will never leave me. You are
always in my thoughts, my heart, my spirit,
and my soul; until we meet again, dear
Mother, beyond the sunset, o glad reunion,
for eternity.
Your Loving Daughter, Cliftine
"Those who sow in tears shall reap in joy."
Psalm 126:5
"O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where
is thy victory?"
1 Corinthians 15:55
"This is the day the Lord has made; let us
rejoice and be glad in it."
Psalm 118:24
CLARK CHAMBLISS COLLINS
On Thursday, October 12, 2017, Clark Chambliss Collins passed away at his home in the
Leisure World community in Rossmoor, MD.
He was 68.
Clark was born in Baltimore on January 20,
1949, the son of Edward Rhodes Collins and
Annie R. Collins. He and his three younger
siblings grew up on Good Hope Road in
the then-rural Colesville area of Montgomery
County. Clark graduated from Springbrook
High School and attended Montgomery Community College and the University of Maryland, obtaining the background in math and
science that led him to become a pioneer in
information technology.
He began his long federal government career
in 1976 as a computer specialist at the
U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. In 1982 he moved to the National
Clark loved going out to hear music, especially jazz and old-school funk. He played
golf and followed baseball with the joy of a
true fan. He spent many happy hours on and
around the Chesapeake Bay – and always
knew which waterside restaurants had the
freshest fish and the biggest crabs.
Clark is survived by his sisters, Kirsten Collins
and Avis Collins Robinson; his brother,
Edward R. Collins Jr.; his daughters, Kristen
Collins Sheriff and Tara Michele Collins; his
grandson, Maksym; his nieces, Marie Statler,
Danae Cotton and Angelique Byrd; and his
nephews, Vincent Campbell Jr., Russell
Campbell, Aaron Robinson, Lowell Robinson
and Edward R. Collins III.
Clark donated his remains to science. A
memorial service will be held October 30
at 11 a.m. at St. John the Baptist Catholic
Church in Silver Spring, MD. In lieu of flowers,
the family requests donations to Johns Hopkins University Hospital.
DEATH NOTICE
RYAN
IN. Jane’s brother, Barrett Gleixner, introduced Tom and Jane during their sophomore
year, and they were married a year after
graduation in 1962.
Institutes of Health, where he spent the next
10 years. At NIH, working in the Office of
the Director, Clark played an instrumental
role in bringing the nation’s premier medical
research institution into the information age.
JONES
In Loving Memory
MARION WHITLOCK JONES
March 29, 1918 - October 20, 2013
TRACYE P. WILSON
Tracye Payne Wilson passed peacefully on
Thursday, October 12, 2017. Family will receive
friends on Saturday, October 21, visitation 10
a.m., service 11 a.m., Mt. Sinai Baptist Church,
1615 3rd St. NW, Washington, DC 20001.
COLLINS
IN MEMORIAM
Mrs. Jones had her fifteen minutes of fame
when, in 1964, on a vacation with her parents
and her daughter in Miami Beach, Florida,
she was invited to Gulfstream Race Track,
and, on a two dollar wager, won the Twin
Double, $81,181.80, which at the time was
the single largest payoff in flat-horse racing
history. Countless articles and interviews
followed, along with an appearance on the
nationally televised program, "To Tell the
Truth." Mrs. Jones was a founding member of
the influential Pittsburghers of Washington,
an association dedicated to providing scholarship funds for students from the Pittsburgh
area attending colleges in Washington, DC.
The first scholarship recipient suggested by
Mrs. Jones was the now successful attorney,
Billy Martin, a hometown Sewickleyite; his
mother and Mrs. Jones were childhood
friends. Attorney Martin, on several occasions, has publically credited and thanked
Mrs. Jones for playing a significant role in
his collegiate beginnings and therefore in his
professional achievements in the national
legal arena. Mrs. Jones contributed greatly
to her beloved Asbury United Methodist
Church, and she regularly attended St John's
Church (long known as "The Church of the
Presidents") for its weekday noon services.
Mrs. Jones, also affectionately known as
"The General" by many of her friends, had
an indefatigable spirit. She has often been
described as a "great lady," a "delightful
lady," and an "amazing person." Her friends
describe her as a giving, inspirational and
courageous woman. She has meant so much
to so many, and is loved and missed by family
and friends, near and far. The community is
grateful for the wisdom, service and experience that she gained through the years that
she then imparted to others. Her legacy can
be found in the many people and families
that were able to own their homes as a result
of her efforts. Many lives have been touched
and changed because of the friendship and
love of Mrs. Jones. She is remembered with
great love by those who were captivated not
only by her intelligence, sharp wit and humor,
but also by the sentimental softness resting
always within her eyes. As one of her young
admirers once said, "Mrs. Jones, seeing you
smile was a day maker." Today we remember
and celebrate her rich life and reflect on a life
well lived.
Passed away peacefully on Sunday, October
15, 2017 (age 67) with his family by his side,
after a long battle with dementia. He joins his
parents, Gordon and Thelma; brother, David;
and sister, Robin in eternal and peaceful rest.
Mike is survived by his beloved bride Denise;
children, Michael (Nicole), Lauren (Chris), and
Matthew (Andrea); sisters, Erin and Tricia; and
grandchildren, Jacquelyn and Michael. Interment and services to be scheduled at Arlington
National Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements by Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home
www.fairfaxmemorialfuneralhome.com
THOMAS DAVID RYAN "Tom"
Rear Admiral USN (Retired)
Rear Admiral Thomas “Tom” David Ryan
(USN, retired) died peacefully in Summerville,
South Carolina, on November 13, 2016 at the
age of 77.
Tom is survived by his wife, Jane Ann Ryan
(Gleixner) of Summerville, SC; his five children Thomas, Jr. (Ellen-Sue), Timothy (Lynn),
Jennifer Long (Larry), Jeanette Murphy
(Mark), and Joanne Stallman (Bob); and his
sixteen grandchildren Elizabeth and Andrew
Ryan; Timothy, Grace and Jack Ryan; Rebecca, Nicholas and Barrett Long; Ryan, Flannery, Cormac, Finnian, and Onora Murphy;
and Jane, Annmarie, and Molly Stallman. He
is preceded in death by his sister Diane and
brothers Patrick, Daniel, and Gerald of Buffalo, NY.
Tom was born on July 4, 1939 in Buffalo,
New York, to Thomas Leo Ryan and Virginia
Marguerita Ryan (Stoffel). He earned his
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering
from the University of Notre Dame in 1961,
and his Master’s Degree in Nuclear Engineering in 1964 and his Doctorate in Nuclear
Engineering in 1974 from the University of
Michigan. Tom’s college sweetheart, Jane,
attended Saint Mary’s College, South Bend,
Upon graduation and commissioning in the
Navy, Tom immediately reported to the
destroyer USS Barry (DD933) homeported at
Newport, RI. The highlight of his first tour was
participation in the blockade of Cuba during
the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. Following
his initial sea duty and marriage to Jane,
the couple moved to Ann Arbor, Michigan
for his graduate work at the University of
Michigan as a Navy Burke Scholar. His Navy
career in the submarine force spanned 34
years and included command of the USS
Batfish (SSN681), Submarine Development
Squadron Twelve, and as the Gulf War commander of Submarine Group Eight in Naples,
Italy. He retired in 1995 from his final tour
as the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation. Tom earned the highest peacetime
military award, the Defense Distinguished
Service Medal.
Following retirement, he worked as General
Manager for Commonwealth Edison in
Downers Grove, Illinois before accepting a
position as Director for the Nuclear Energy
Institute in Washington, DC. He finished his
civilian career as a Senior Consultant for
Cortana Corporation in Falls Church, VA
where he was responsible for helping the
US Navy obtain the latest technology in
undersea warfare. Tom was known for his
leadership and dedication to all who worked
for him.
The family would like to thank the caregivers
and staff at The Village at Summerville for
their dedication in caring for Tom in his final
year of life.
The celebration of Tom’s life will occur on
October 23, 2017 at 12:45 pm at the Old
Post Chapel on Joint Base Myer-Henderson
Hall, followed by his interment at Arlington
National Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Alzheimer’s Association.
https://alz.org/donate.asp.
ROBERTS-SHORTER
Gretchen, the family genealogist, discovered
the early 1900s diary of Roy Plummer, her
uncle’s uncle, which detailed his experiences
as a soldier serving in the U.S. Army in
France during World War I. She donated the
diary to the National Museum of African
American History and Culture where curators described it as a very rare find. Gretchen
was active in the efforts to re-establish the
celebration of DC’s Emancipation Day, and
she published an online database of the
3,100 enslaved District residents who were
emancipated on April 16, 1862.
Gretchen’s commitment to the community
was further evidenced by her service on
the Washington, DC Board of Directors of
Reading is Fundamental (RIF) and on the
Board of Directors of Wings for Joy in Montgomery County.
GRETCHEN ROBERTS-SHORTER
Passed away unexpectedly on the morning
of October 6, 2017. A native Washingtonian
and the oldest child of Aneita and Bertrand
Roberts, Gretchen earned a B.A. degree in
art from Howard University and an M.Ed.
degree in special education from George
Washington University. For more than 30
years, she was a highly dedicated and committed art and special education teacher in
the DC Public Schools, serving at Seaton and
Thompson Elementary Schools and Sharpe
Health School. For several years Gretchen
served as a monitor and administrator,
assessing the efficacy of educational programs for special needs students.
Gretchen was also an entrepreneur, a gifted
artist and a writer. As a young adult, she
bought, repaired, and sold Volkswagens.
Later she and her husband Gary acquired
rental properties that Gretchen actively managed. She was an award-winning photographer who specialized in outdoor scenes
and still lifes. She was also a prize-winning,
published author. In 2004, the Washington
Writers’ Publishing House selected her novel
Can’t Remember Playing, the story of a
mixed-race slave who fought in the Revolutionary War, as the winner of their fiction
writing competition.
But of all of her interests and passions, what
was most important to Gretchen was being
the wife of Gary and the mother of Kimani.
She married Gary Shorter on August 12, 1978
and enjoyed 39 years with the “love of her
life.” Their son Kimani Shorter, born in 1980,
was Gretchen’s proudest accomplishment.
She approached motherhood with much
dedication and relished every milestone in
Kimani’s life.
Sadly, Gretchen was predeceased by her only
sibling, Sonya. Left to mourn and cherish her
memory are her devoted husband, Gary;
her loving son, Kimani; her aunt, Phyllis
Fauntleroy; her first cousins, Robert (Robin)
Harlan, Phylicia Fauntleroy Bowman,
Stephanye Fauntleroy, Jacqueline (Jiffy)
Fauntleroy Barber, John Fauntleroy, Robert
Plummer, Jr. and Fred Fauntleroy; her sistersand brothers-in-law, James Simpkins, Kumea
Shorter-Gooden and Winston Gooden, and
Wendy and Robert Edwards; and many other
family members, friends and colleagues.
Services will be held on October 21 at 11 a.m.
(with a viewing at 10 a.m.) at Northeastern
Presbyterian Church, 2112 Varnum St., N.E.,
Washington, DC 20018. In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that donations be made to
the Equal Justice Initiative, 122 Commerce
Street, Montgomery, Alabama 36104; or go
to eji.org.
REMEMBER
YOUR LOVED ONES
December 17, 2017
TheWashington Post Magazine will publish
an Annual Commemorative Section.
Plan to be a part of this annual tradition!
RATES
$11.10 per Line
$150 B&W Photo
$200 Color Photo
DEADLINE
5 p.m.
Friday, November 17, 2017
For more information, please call:
202-334-4122 or 1-800-627-1150, ext. 4-4122
E-mail:
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B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Sunny and lovely
Just when you think it can’t get any
better, today will have more
stunningly sunny conditions and
comfortable readings. Highs should
make at least the mid-70s, and the
upper 70s are possible. Mix in low humidity, a
slight breeze and blue skies, and it’s another day
to be savored. Tonight will be clear and calm with
temperatures near 70. Lows end the night in the
mid-40s to mid-50s depending on how far from
the warmer city environs you are.
Today
Mostly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Saturday
Mostly sunny
Sunday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Monday
Mostly cloudy
Tuesday
Rain
Wednesday
Partly sunny
76° 54
76° 56
77° 60
76° 64
72° 53
64° 48
FEELS*: 76°
FEELS: 77°
FEELS: 78°
FEELS: 75°
FEELS: 69°
FEELS: 64°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
P: 5%
P: 5%
P: 25%
P: 75%
P: 25%
WIND: NW 6–12 mph
W: SE 4–8 mph
W: S 6–12 mph
W: SSW 7–14 mph
W: SSE 8–16 mph
W: S 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
72/47
Hagerstown
74/49
M
Normal
Philadelphia
74/53
Record high
Record low
Norfolk
75/56
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Dulles
BWI
72° 2:33 p.m.
49° 6:00 a.m.
67°/49°
88° 1938
30° 1880
73° 4:00 p.m.
37° 6:37 a.m.
67°/43°
87° 2016
25° 1976
73° 2:19 p.m.
40° 6:06 a.m.
66°/44°
87° 2016
29° 2015
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +6.1° yr. to date: +3.1°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 69°
Virginia Beach
74/55
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 68°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
72/58
OCEAN: 70°
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Moderate
Normal
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
0.83"
2.09"
31.91"
32.21"
0.00"
1.48"
1.98"
36.23"
33.90"
0.00"
1.42"
2.07"
33.61"
33.95"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
4 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly sunny, warm for October. High
62–67. Wind northwest 4–8 mph. Tonight, clear, cool. Low
39–51. Wind west 2–4 mph. Saturday, partly sunny, mild.
High 63–67. Wind southeast 3–6 mph. Sunday, partly
sunny. High 60–64.
Atlantic beaches: Today, mostly sunny, warm. High 71–75.
Wind northwest 6–12 mph. Tonight, mostly clear, mild. Low
51–57. Wind northwest 4–8 mph. Saturday, mostly sunny,
warm. High 71–75. Wind northeast 4–8 mph. Sunday, partly
sunny. High 72–76.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly sunny, warm.
Wind northwest 5–10 knots. Waves a foot or less. • Lower Potomac
and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly sunny, warm. Wind northwest
5–10 knots. Waves a foot or less on the Potomac, 1–2 feet on the
Chesapeake. Visibility good.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little
Falls will be about 2.8 feet, holding about steady Saturday. Flood
stage at Little Falls is 10 feet.
Ocean City
W
Reagan
OCEAN: 67°
Richmond
76/50
Annapolis
FORECAST
Ocean City
72/50
Lexington
77/49
Washington
ACTUAL
Cape May
71/51
Annapolis
73/51
Charlottesville
79/50
Today’s tides
Tu
High
Low
Weather map features for noon today.
Baltimore
75/47
Dover
73/50
Washington
76/54
RECORD
°
Su
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
3:53 a.m.
9:08 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
9:25 p.m.
12:12 a.m.
6:03 a.m.
12:14 p.m.
6:46 p.m.
2:14 a.m.
8:24 a.m.
2:46 p.m.
8:43 p.m.
Norfolk
4:12 a.m.
10:32 a.m.
4:46 p.m.
10:50 p.m.
Point Lookout
2:02 a.m.
8:12 a.m.
2:41 p.m.
9:21 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: El Centro, CA 97°
Low: Bodie State Park, CA 11°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
68/43/s
76/49/s
29/22/s
79/56/pc
85/70/t
75/47/s
68/40/pc
79/58/pc
78/45/s
54/35/r
69/52/s
67/50/s
65/46/s
81/56/s
76/48/s
80/49/s
73/34/pc
76/58/s
75/51/s
74/52/s
80/69/pc
79/38/s
Tomorrow
74/46/s
65/40/s
31/25/sn
78/60/pc
89/65/pc
76/49/s
56/43/s
80/65/pc
59/32/pc
49/44/r
73/55/s
73/55/pc
71/51/pc
82/63/pc
81/51/pc
80/52/pc
51/37/pc
77/62/pc
75/55/pc
77/58/pc
88/60/pc
57/36/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
75/61/s
73/53/s
87/64/s
21/7/c
77/57/s
70/46/s
87/74/pc
80/70/t
76/54/s
83/63/pc
83/67/pc
76/63/s
79/54/c
78/61/pc
75/59/pc
77/54/s
80/61/pc
89/79/pc
75/58/s
76/60/s
78/52/s
83/73/pc
72/55/s
75/56/s
70/47/t
74/57/pc
81/51/s
22/10/pc
64/38/pc
77/47/s
87/74/pc
88/70/pc
75/60/pc
83/68/pc
85/68/pc
72/47/t
74/55/s
81/63/pc
82/62/s
78/60/pc
80/67/pc
87/79/t
74/61/pc
69/45/t
80/61/pc
84/73/c
76/58/s
75/57/s
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
77/66/s
78/64/s
86/70/pc
74/53/s
88/61/s
71/47/s
66/42/s
55/45/r
71/49/s
78/51/s
52/33/c
76/50/s
68/44/c
79/60/s
87/77/s
63/38/c
73/61/sh
64/51/pc
87/78/s
54/45/r
53/36/c
66/44/s
89/74/pc
77/64/s
78/47/t
69/41/t
87/73/sh
77/56/s
86/61/s
75/53/pc
69/46/s
60/54/r
77/50/s
78/53/pc
64/38/pc
77/52/s
71/45/pc
79/62/pc
86/77/s
57/43/s
77/61/pc
67/53/s
87/77/s
55/51/r
45/43/r
75/51/pc
90/74/pc
74/44/t
World
High: Fitzroy Crossing, Australia 112°
Low: Eureka, Canada –24°
Oct 27
First
Quarter
Nov 4
Full
Nov 10
Last
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Nov 18
New
Rise
7:23 a.m.
7:58 a.m.
5:44 a.m.
5:00 a.m.
7:46 a.m.
11:57 a.m.
Set
6:22 p.m.
7:16 p.m.
5:39 p.m.
5:16 p.m.
6:38 p.m.
9:29 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
73/48/pc
Amsterdam
59/52/sh
Athens
77/62/pc
Auckland
63/56/c
Baghdad
91/60/s
Bangkok
91/79/t
Beijing
68/50/s
Berlin
66/48/pc
Bogota
69/51/r
Brussels
59/50/sh
Buenos Aires
74/53/pc
Cairo
85/66/s
Caracas
77/68/pc
Copenhagen
57/51/sh
Dakar
90/80/s
Dublin
54/50/r
Edinburgh
59/49/c
Frankfurt
62/45/sh
Geneva
64/49/sh
Ham., Bermuda 79/73/pc
Helsinki
44/30/pc
Ho Chi Minh City 90/75/t
Tomorrow
74/49/c
62/51/r
78/61/pc
62/56/c
90/58/s
92/77/t
64/47/c
58/50/pc
67/50/r
63/48/sh
65/45/s
83/65/s
77/69/t
56/49/r
90/80/s
55/44/r
56/47/r
64/45/sh
68/44/pc
78/72/s
41/28/pc
88/75/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
84/70/s
93/61/s
71/56/pc
78/59/s
84/57/pc
75/42/s
85/79/t
82/77/r
86/76/pc
68/60/pc
72/61/sh
58/54/pc
72/57/s
89/80/pc
76/52/pc
63/46/s
43/32/c
90/79/pc
79/59/sh
96/69/pc
44/42/sh
63/43/s
62/53/pc
62/48/pc
83/68/pc
93/62/s
71/58/pc
75/57/s
79/55/t
76/40/s
88/80/pc
85/73/r
87/76/pc
70/62/pc
70/53/pc
59/48/pc
73/48/t
87/78/pc
78/52/pc
69/48/pc
38/26/r
88/78/s
80/58/pc
95/69/pc
45/41/r
71/47/pc
63/48/sh
60/51/pc
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
85/71/s
95/67/s
73/51/pc
86/70/pc
68/45/pc
69/41/pc
71/49/s
72/59/s
92/80/pc
49/38/c
69/58/r
77/71/r
73/52/s
63/61/r
69/50/s
62/46/pc
61/50/pc
91/74/pc
97/67/s
74/57/s
85/71/pc
82/52/s
68/40/s
72/48/s
72/57/pc
90/79/c
49/38/pc
66/57/pc
75/68/r
73/52/s
67/63/r
72/51/pc
63/48/pc
60/46/sh
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
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KLMNO
Style
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST . GOINGOUTGUIDE.COM
MOVIE REVIEWS IN WEEKEND
Only the Brave A timely drama shows how fighting fires is not only a heroic act, but also an art.
26
C
SU
. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2017
Wake-up calls
The 12 breakfast spots that
will break your “snooze” habit
— but not the bank.
PAGE 17
Breathe A biopic of a man who coped with polio in a quite British way: Move on, and rise above it. 27
Faces Places A famous director and a street artist take a road trip in France, beautifying spaces.
In Hollywood and D.C., a history of hiding abuse
The worlds of film and politics have long protected the men in power roles
BY
M ARC F ISHER
Hollywood and politics have always been as famous for sex scandals as they are for winning hearts
and inspiring dreams.
More than in most businesses,
in Hollywood and in politics, personal attraction matters. Charisma and sex appeal play a role in
people’s decisions to buy movie
tickets and cast ballots. Entertainment and elective office are also
industries where a relative few
hold great power, giving those who
toil for them strong incentives to
protect their images.
As more women detail aggressive sexual behavior by Harvey
Weinstein, who was for many
years one of the most powerful
men in the movie business, Hollywood is being singled out, as politics has been, as a field in which
sexual harassment and assault are
especially rampant. But from the
retail business to college campuses, harassment is a commonplace
in the lives of many Americans.
What may be distinctive about the
worlds of Hollywood and politics
is the level of hypocrisy involved
when fields that are so dependent
on their public images turn out to
be protecting bad behavior in
their own ranks.
“There’s a universal issue of
males in power, whether in academia or business or anywhere,”
said Burton Peretti, a historian of
the connections between the film
industry and politics, who is a
dean at Northern Virginia Community College. “But both Hollywood and politics had an expectation for decades that the media
would not report on indiscretions,
and both industries have leaders
who are treated like they can do no
POWER CONTINUED ON C4
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
“Hollywood has an amazing asymmetry in power between the
producers and the actor,” says author Edward Jay Epstein.
28
Middleburg Film Festival:
Nice respite from scandal
Harvey Weinstein
will not be a
presence,
symbolically or
otherwise, at this
year’s Middleburg
Ann
Film Festival.
Hornaday
No Weinstein
films will be
shown at this year’s edition of
Middleburg, which got underway
Thursday with the opening-night
film “Darkest Hour.” In fact,
Middleburg, which in a short
time has earned respect on the
festival circuit for its relaxed,
elegant vibe, sharp programming
and subtle star power, offers a
gentle rebuke and aspirational
example in contrast to the nasty
and brutish values Weinstein has
come to personify in recent
weeks. “It’s one of the nicest film
festivals I’ve ever been to,” noted
producer Cassian Elwes in a
recent telephone conversation.
“Sheila Johnson obviously loves
cinema. And she’s a voice for
women, which is so important
right now for so many reasons
that are obvious.”
Johnson, a co-founder of the
Black Entertainment Television
and a former board member of
the Sundance Institute, had long
wanted to bring a film festival to
Virginia’s Middleburg, where she
makes her home.
When she completed the 340acre Salamander Resort and Spa
in 2013, she finally had a hub, and
a place for visiting filmmakers
and cine-tourists to stay. In less
than six months, Johnson,
executive director Susan Koch
and programming director
Connie White had booked the arthouse hit “Nebraska” as the
festival’s opening-night film, with
HORNADAY CONTINUED ON C2
PHOTOS BY ESSDRAS M SUAREZ FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Patrons at Pineapple and Pearls watch as Patrick O’Connell, center, of the Inn at Little Washington finishes a dish. Below, one of the courses, bass Veronique, is constructed.
In D.C., culinary stars align to aid Puerto Rico
BY
R OXANNE R OBERTS
Dain Oswald and Eileen Cavanagh
hovered over their computers last week,
hoping to snag two of 57 seats for dinner
at Pineapple and Pearls. But not just any
dinner: This was a nine-course meal
prepared by the three chefs the Michelin
Guide has declared the best in Washington.
Patrick O’Connell of the Inn at Little
Washington, José Andrés of Minibar, and
Aaron Silverman of Pineapple and Pearls
— each awarded two stars in Michelin’s
annual guide to Washington’s best restaurants — teamed up Wednesday for a
one-night-only culinary extravaganza.
The dinner, a benefit for Puerto Rico
hurricane relief, sold out in seconds. To
their surprise and delight, Oswald and
Cavanagh landed one of the coveted
$595-per-person reservations.
“This is what we do for fun,” said
Oswald. “We love to eat out. That’s our
thing.”
“We’ve been here before, and we love
this place,” said his wife. “And we were
worried about the aid that Puerto Rico
wasn’t getting. So we thought this would
be a great way to contribute to that.”
And the combination of chefs was
irresistible, said Oswald: “Tonight, this is
a six-star restaurant.”
On the island, Andrés’s
team has prepared more
than 1 million meals
BY
Which meant foie gras, caviar, bison
tartare, lamb carpaccio, Parmesan egg
with white truffle, wagyu steak and more.
Plus wines, sherry and Dom Pérignon
champagne.
With the kitchen open to the small
dining room, guests could see more than
T IM C ARMAN
a dozen chefs (yes, a real-life too many
cooks in the kitchen) working together,
doing that complicated waltz of any
professional kitchen.
“There’s a wonderful vibe in the room,”
said O’Connell, a perfectionist who vacil-
A week ago, President Trump issued a warning on Twitter: He could not keep the Federal
Emergency Management Agency, the military
and other first responders in Puerto Rico forever, he wrote. His tweet was quickly viewed by
some as a threat that the government might
abandon its own territory before the island
could recover from the devastating blow delivered by Hurricane Maria in mid-September.
On Tuesday, chef and restaurateur José Andrés said his nonprofit, World Central Kitchen,
and the hundreds who have volunteered to
help it, would keep feeding Puerto Ricans until
the locals could again take care of themselves,
which could take awhile. According to FEMA,
only 14 percent of the island has electricity, and
many areas still have no drinking water or
access to fresh food.
“When we establish contact with a community, we maintain that contact,” Andrés said
during a phone interview from San Juan.
“When we go to a place, we take care of that
place until we feel it has the right conditions to
sustain itself. That’s what a relief organization
should be.”
Andrés landed in Puerto Rico on Sept. 25 and
immediately started working with chef José
DINNER CONTINUED ON C3
ANDRÉS CONTINUED ON C3
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Freeman circulates 3 branches of government
Freeman and
Powell
SURREAL ESTATE
Grey Gardens
has a buyer, but
the Edies’ stuff
can still be yours
Try to keep this one straight: Morgan Freeman
recently played the chief justice of the United
States on “Madam Secretary,” a CBS show about a
fictional secretary of state, and now the actor —
who has also played a fictional president, House
speaker, senator and even God — is taking on the
role of Colin Powell, a (duh) real-life former
secretary of state.
Whew. Freeman has been cast in the titular role
in the upcoming movie “Powell” from director
Reginald Hudlin, who is just off the Thurgood
Marshall biopic “Marshall,” per the Hollywood
Reporter.
The Hollywood Reporter says that “Powell” will
focus on the then-secretary of state’s famous
address to the U.N. Security Council in which he
asserted that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein had
weapons of mass destruction, a momentous claim
that turned out to be based on faulty information
— and one Powell would later admit was a “blot”
on his record.
We have to acknowledge that the casting of the
gravelly voiced actor as the four-star general and
first African American to serve as the nation’s top
diplomat is a more logical casting choice than
Tyler Perry. (The “Madea” star will take on the role
of Powell in a movie about Richard B. Cheney,
which stars Christian Bale as the powerful veep.)
HEY, ISN’T THAT . . .?
White House communicators Hope Hicks and
Sarah Huckabee Sanders having a long after-
Hicks and
Huckabee
Sanders
work powwow close to the office?
On Wednesday evening, Hicks, the White
House communications director, and Huckabee
Sanders, the White House press secretary, were
spotted at Woodward Table just a few blocks from
1600 Penn. The powerful pair were joined by two
unidentified male guests, says our spy. Everyone
was dressed in Washington work wear — dark
suits and sheaths — so we assume it was a
business dinner. The group stayed for nearly
three hours, we’re told.
The party of four headed to a semiprivate room
near the back of the restaurant so Hicks, who
generally keeps a low profile, and Huckabee
Sanders, who’s been spoofed on “Saturday Night
Live,” weren’t recognized by the other diners as
the White House crew noshed on burgers, fried
chicken and mac and cheese.
PHOTOS FROM THE CORCORAN REAL ESTATE GROUP
An exterior shot and a living area of Grey Gardens, which practically had a
co-starring role — in a less glamorous state — in a 1975 documentary.
After more than eight months on the market,
Grey Gardens — the Hamptons estate made
famous in a 1975 documentary about its
eccentric inhabitants, known as Big Edie and
Little Edie — has a buyer.
Author and noted Washington hostess Sally
Quinn, the widow of legendary Washington
Post executive editor Ben Bradlee and the
owner of the historical home, said the deal will
close in the next few weeks. Quinn wouldn’t
disclose the buyer or the price (the listing price
was a smidgen under $20 million, and it was
reduced by $2 million in April), telling us only
that she’s “happy” with the contract and that
the new owner “really understands the house”
and plans to preserve it.
People still have a chance to snap up some of
the home’s history: Quinn will be holding an
estate sale to clear the home of its furnishings,
including the pieces she discovered in the attic
when she bought the place that had belonged
to the Edies, who were the aunt and cousin of
Jackie Bouvier Kennedy, in 1979.
Edith Bouvier Beale and her daughter,
Edith Beale, have become cult figures since the
documentary “Grey Gardens” captured their
reclusive lives at the then-decrepit mansion,
where they lived, sporting fur coats and
headscarves, among feral cats and raccoons.
The documentary was turned into a feature
film starring Jessica Lange and Drew
Barrymore and eventually adapted into a
musical.
My goal is to be better informed, raise my voice, and participate in a more meaningful way.
— Comedian Chelsea Handler, explaining on Twitter why she’s leaving her Netflix talk show to focus on political activism.
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
ANN HORNADAY
Middleburg Film Festival’s amiable qualities help draw big ‘gets,’ audiences
HORNADAY FROM C1
star Bruce Dern in attendance.
There might have been backstage
logistical hiccups getting talent to
dinners and events on time, but
viewers were treated to a buzzy
slate of films that included “Philomena” and “The Butler,” with
director Lee Daniels on hand at
the screening (Johnson was an
executive producer of the film).
From the beginning, Johnson
and her team intended Middleburg to be a stop along the “road to
the Oscars,” so that the local filmgoers and weekend tourists could
get early glimpses of the kinds of
smart, attractively produced, occasionally provocative films that
become awards front-runners.
True to that aim, the festival has
booked an impressive number of
movies that became serious contenders and winners, including
“The Imitation Game,” “Spotlight,”
“Carol,” “Manchester by the Sea”
and “Moonlight.”
Meg Ryan brought her directo-
rial debut “Ithaca” to Middleburg.
“Twilight” director and outspoken
Hollywood feminist Catherine
Hardwicke conducted a lively conversation at the nearby Boxwood
Winery. Bo Derek and Beverly
Johnson are regulars. In 2016,
Emma Stone presented the musical “La La Land” in a packed Salamander ballroom, where Motion
Picture Academy president Cheryl
Boone Isaacs watched from the
back. Forty-four Oscar nominations accrued to last year’s slate —
which, with 25 films, represents a
startling rate of return.
“We’re always saying, ‘Can we
top what we did last year?’ ” Johnson said over lunch recently. “And
think that we have. I think it’s just
as strong.”
This weekend, Middleburg will
once again bring some of the
strongest films of the year to play
over a meticulously curated weekend: Director Dee Rees will appear
with her new film “Mudbound.”
Greta Gerwig will present her solo
directorial debut “Lady Bird.” Grif-
fin Dunne will present “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” a
documentary he made about his
aunt. Such festival-circuit talkers
as “I, Tonya,” “Last Flag Flying”
and “Three Billboards Outside
Ebbing, Missouri” will make local
debuts. Venerable writer-director
James Ivory will hold court in the
Salamander’s wood-paneled library.
In the festival world, these are
big “gets” — all the more notable
for the fact that they’re all flocking
to a town of about 800 people, in
the middle of horse country, with
no proper movie theater to speak
of.
Middleburg’s success rests on
the crucial fact that Johnson, Koch
and White understand that every
great festival must cater to two
populations above all else: artists
and audiences.
Koch, a documentary filmmaker herself, notes that beyond such
market-driven festivals as Sundance, Cannes and Toronto, the
deciding factor in filmmakers
choosing to come to one small
festival rather than another comes
down to one simple question: Are
they treated well? Johnson, well
schooled in the arts of wining,
dining and making guests feel at
home, provides a safe space for the
talent. For their part, the writers,
directors, actors and producers
who come to Middleburg appreciate rubbing shoulders with the
political figures they’re likely to
encounter, whether it’s Sen. Tim
Kaine (D-Va.) or former attorney
general Eric Holder. Koch recalls a
director telling her Middleburg is
his favorite festival. “I asked him
why, and he said, ‘Because you
have the most interesting and intelligent people.’ ”
But perhaps Middleburg’s most
meaningful achievement is how it
has identified, understood and
connected to its audience, which
extends from the locals — who
were initially skeptical of how a
film festival would affect their
town’s traffic patterns and atmosphere — to day-trippers from sub-
urban Virginia and Washington
and even annual regulars from
Los Angeles, New York, Chicago
and Boston. (Johnson is expecting
about 4,000 visitors this year.)
Since the beginning, Johnson
says, she’s taken pains to make
sure that Middleburg’s program
fits the tastes and sensibilities of
her neighbors, even while it brings
the wider world into a community
that could easily fall prey to insularity. She wants the festival to
push the envelope, but carefully. “I
don’t want to offend anybody in
the community,” she says. “I want
to get them from the inside out.”
That said, Middleburg doesn’t
always play it safe: “Jackie,” a
sometimes jarring portrait of Jacqueline Kennedy in the aftermath
of her husband’s murder, was enthusiastically embraced by last
year’s audience, which included
Lynda Bird Johnson Robb. This
year’s program includes “A Fantastic Woman,” starring the transgender actress Daniela Vega, who will
be at the screening. And Johnson
has made a point of putting women front and center as filmmakers,
participants and on her own team,
which is entirely female, save for
the technical staff hired every year
to help with audio and projection.
The fact that Middleburg has
emerged as a woman-led festival is
something of a coincidence, as is
the fact that this year no films
from the Weinstein Company will
be on the slate. But its organically
inclusive sensibility helps to make
Middleburg feel vibrant and forward-looking at a time when such
vision is sorely needed. As Johnson looks ahead, she sees careful
growth,
between-the-festivals
programming and a dedicated
theatrical space in Middleburg’s
future. For now, though, the festival feels like it’s precisely where we
need it to be.
ann.hornaday@washpost.com
The Middleburg Film Festival runs
through Sunday. Individual tickets to
some screenings are still available.
Visit www.middleburgfilm.org.
Husband needs to speak up about sister’s unrelenting attacks on his wife
husband’s sister
hasn’t liked me
since the day we
met. I’m not sure
entirely why — if
Carolyn
there’s a reason,
Hax
neither my
mother-in-law nor
husband will
admit to knowing it. I can only
guess it’s jealousy that her brother
got married first, our rushed
engagement (I was pregnant), or
that I’m not “fancy.” Me: jeans and
dive bars. Her: designer dresses
and elite schools. Not that there’s
anything wrong with that, we are
just very different!
Over the past four years I
dismissed her insults and
judgments and nose-wrinkling as
her being immature, I’ve
extended olive branches that were
never returned, and now, finally,
after her last round of texting my
husband about what a bad person
I am, I’m just done with her. I’ve
never wronged her. I’ve never said
anything bad about her.
She won’t stop though. I could
go into detail about the crazy stuff
she has done and said but it
would take too long.
The problem is my mother-inlaw keeps inviting her to do things
with us and I say I don’t want her
there and I look like the bad guy. I
just want to stay out of my sisterin-law’s way and protect myself
and my sanity at this point. My
husband has explained this, I have
explained this, to no avail.
My mother-in-law sees me as
breaking up her family.
Now my mother-in-law has
announced she is hosting
Thanksgiving. I don’t want to sit at
a table again with this woman who
has been nothing but cruel to me.
I’m sick to my stomach for weeks
leading up to it, and angry and sad
afterward. I don’t want to spend
the holiday alone. But I also feel for
my husband and mother-in-law
who want to be together. At the
same time, I’m getting increasingly
angry at my mother-in-law for her
insensitivity to how much it hurt
to join her family and be treated
like this by her daughter. Help?
— Sick to My Stomach
Sick to My Stomach: Your sister-
in-law has obviously gone too far,
which means your husband just as
obviously hasn’t gone far enough.
Some personalities just clash.
Not much you can do about it
within families except be civil
and, as you say, stay out of each
other’s way.
When your sister-in-law
resorted to insults, “crazy stuff”
and rage-texting your husband,
she took her hostility public and
crossed an important line.
Because of that it is, was and
has been all along incumbent on
your husband to put a stop to it.
Overt insult?: “Do not talk about
my wife like that.” Crazies/nosewrinkles?: “Please take your
contempt somewhere else.” Nasty
texts, four years (right?) into your
relationship?: “If you force me to
choose between you and [wife],
I’m choosing her.”
Zero tolerance, in other words,
and unflinching consequences.
“Mom, we won’t be at a
Thanksgiving that includes
[sister]. I’m sad it has come to
this, but I won’t stand for her
open hostility to [wife].”
I’m mostly advising your
husband, which I generally won’t
do because you’re the one who
asked. But I’ve done it here to
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Hi, Carolyn: My
spell out exactly what you need to
ask for, can justifiably insist on
and should pre-think
consequences for not getting. Not
so you can break up his family —
but so there’s no mistaking who
did.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A $595 meal for a worthy cause
DINNER FROM C1
lated between excited and nervous most of the night. “We
should do more of these, but
they’re stressful because so much
can go wrong even with the best
of intentions on all parts. You just
never know what you’re walking
into. It’s not improv because you
know what you’re serving, but
you don’t know what to expect.”
The only one missing was Andrés, who has spent most of the
past month in Puerto Rico feeding
the victims of Hurricane Maria.
As of this week, his World
Central Kitchen has prepared and
delivered a million meals, with no
end in sight.
Most of his planning for this
dinner, conceived before the hurricane hit, came during day trips
home or via cellphone from the
island.
“He started something big in
Puerto Rico, so he’s got to be
there,” explained Joshua Hermias, head chef at Andrés’s Minibar. “Every time he was here, we
went over the menu to make sure
we’re portraying his vision.”
Taking it all in: Silverman, who
opened Pineapple and Pearls just
18 months ago.
“I grew up reading about these
guys in magazines,” he said, referring to O’Connell and Andrés.
“They’re institutions. They literally set the stage decades ago for
us to do what we do today.”
Given the demands of elite
restaurants, a night off is rare for
any executive chef — so the trio of
two-star teams working together
in a restaurant was a first for
Washington.
Anyone who happened to book
a reservation at Pineapple and
Pearls before the dinner was announced could keep it if they
were willing to pay the higher fee
(about twice the normal prix fixe
rate) to benefit Andrés’s charity.
Most, like Jennifer Epperson
and JB Kelly, jumped at the
chance. “I think it’s a worthy
cause,” Kelly said. “And why
would we miss this? It was like a
gift.”
The three restaurants divided
the menu roughly into thirds,
coordinating to create a seamless
menu and ensure tiny plate after
plate of perfection.
But Washington is not yet perfect, according to Michelin. Tues-
day’s announcement, just the second year Michelin has ranked
local restaurants, once again gave
two stars to Minibar, the Inn at
Little Washington and Pineapple
and Pearls, and added two restaurants (Komi and Métier) to last
year’s list of one-star picks. That
didn’t sit well with many food
aficionados, who thought the
French company had shortchanged and overlooked some of
the capital’s best offerings.
“We don’t pretend to have truth
with a capital T,” said Michael
Ellis, international director of the
Michelin Guide. “We have a point
of view. You can agree with it or
not agree with it. The fact that
people are passionate about the
list means that there’s a thriving
food culture here. I would be
more worried if we launched a
guide and no one cared.”
The Michelin tire company
started publishing the guide in
1900, and it quickly became the
standard for how great European
restaurants were judged. But it
didn’t come to the United States
until 2005 and to Washington
until last year.
As much as chefs obsess about
stars, Ellis (an American living in
France) says the guide was always
designed first and foremost for
discerning travelers. Now in 28
countries, Michelin’s inspectors
visit restaurants anonymously,
pay like any other customer and
have exacting standards.
“Michelin stars are tough —
ACROSS
1 Kind of rain or
rock
5 Affect profoundly
8 Often-converted
residence
12 Like the “funny
bone” nerve
14 Poet Silverstein
15 Declare firmly
16 Early sustenance
for Bruce Wayne?
18 Country where
Quechua is
spoken
19 Great Plains
native
20 Pluto quintet
21 Gets on the
wrong train, say
22 Handing a St.
Louis team an
embarrassing
loss?
26 Mother with
a Nobel prize
27 Fight in the
backwoods
28 Vacation fill-in:
abbr.
29 Message often
included in its
response
32 Central Dallas?
33 Tribal VIP’s
family?
37 Elastic wood
40 Sister magazine
of Jet
41 God with a
quiver
45 Where the groom
may walk down
the aisle
47 Soi-__:
self-styled
49 Easy out in
rodent baseball?
53 Components of
56-Across
54 Quartet member
55 Org. with
Jungians
56 Malt creations
57 Went all out on
stage ... or a hint
to the four other
longest puzzle
answers
59 Ticket booth
sight
60 Protected,
in a way
61 Sister of Thalia
62 Hardy heroine
Andrés’s team overcame obstacles
really, really tough — to get,”
Silverman said. “We’re just a year
and a half in. We’re excited to
work toward three, but right now,
to get two stars is mind-blowing
for us.”
“A Frenchman was once asked
the difference between a two- and
three-star restaurant,” O’Connell
said. “He said, ‘Very little. At a
two-star restaurant, you expect
the food to be absolutely sublime
— but if there was a tiny piece of
sand in an oyster, you wouldn’t
think too much about it. In a
three-star restaurant, if there was
a piece of sand in your oyster, it
would be unthinkable and unforgivable.’ ”
There was no sand in the
oysters Wednesday night. The
three-hour meal ended with an
almond cake with caviar, followed
by pesto ice cream, followed by an
itty-bitty ice cream cone.
Then waiters delivered a porcelain chicken to each table, from
which every guest pulled a golden
egg. They cracked the chocolate
shell to find a smaller egg, which
held a tiny Lego chef. One lucky
guest at each of the two seatings
found the Lego chef — and a
small certificate for a free dinner
at Minibar.
“I got the golden ticket —
literally!” said Oswald, who floated happily into the night. “We’re
never going to have a meal like
this again. We’re never going to
have a night like this again.”
roxanne.roberts@washpost.com
ESSDRAS M SUAREZ FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Plates of mizu manju (uni in Iberico broth) were part of the dinner
at Pineapple and Pearls to benefit Puerto Rico.
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
C3
SU
By Jeffrey Wechsler
ANDRÉS FROM C1
Enrique, whose eponymous San
Juan restaurant was already preparing batches of sancocho — a
Puerto Rican beef stew — for hungry residents. In their first couple
of days together, the chefs produced enough food to feed 1,000,
then 2,000 people. Within a week
of Andrés’s appearance on the island, their numbers skyrocketed
to 25,000 meals per day, now including sandwiches and paella.
Nearly a month after Maria,
Andrés, World Central Kitchen
and volunteers reached a milestone in their #chefsforpuertorico
campaign: As of Tuesday, they had
prepared and delivered 1 million
meals to residents. As a point of
comparison, the American Red
Cross has delivered 150,000 MREs
(meals ready to eat), 302,000 meal
boxes, and 1.4 million pounds of
canned goods, rice, beans, crackers, fruit, vegetables and other
shelf-stable foods, said Elizabeth
Penniman, vice president of communications for the organization.
She estimated that those supplies
equate to 1.6 million meals
“served” in Puerto Rico after Hurricanes Irma and Maria.
FEMA has provided more than
14 million meals and 11 million
liters of water in all 78 municipalities in Puerto Rico, said spokesman Dan Stoneking. That number
includes meals provided by state,
local and volunteer organizations,
such as World Central Kitchen,
which FEMA has helped fund.
How Andrés and crew have
pulled off this feat is a story that’s
difficult to piece together on a
cellphone call to Puerto Rico,
where service remains spotty and
the chef remains too swamped to
walk a reporter through all the
complex logistics of feeding an
island with little gas, electricity or
transportation. The chef said it
started with Enrique’s restaurant
and has expanded to 15 kitchens,
including the Coliseo de Puerto
Rico in San Juan, where the majority of the meals are prepared. Between 450 and 500 volunteers are
involved daily.
In fact, after Andrés navigated
Houston’s flooded streets to help
feed the city following Hurricane
Harvey, he learned an important
lesson about relief operations: You
need a facility with a large capacity
kitchen to prepare meals on a massive scale; otherwise, you’ll never
quiet a city’s hunger pains following a disaster. In Houston, Andrés
worked at the downtown convention center. But in Puerto Rico, he
initially couldn’t get access to the
coliseum.
“First, I wanted to come to the
coliseo, where I am right now,
because I was looking for the biggest kitchen, and they told me, ‘No
way, José,’ ” Andrés recalled, now
laughing at the story. A week later,
however, Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo
Rosselló and first lady Beatriz
Areizaga helped the chef secure
access to the coliseum, where
cooks now prepare more than
60,000 meals a day.
Assistance has come from a variety of sources, Andrés said. Donors, large and small, have contributed millions of dollars to
World Central Kitchen. Goya
Foods loaned the nonprofit its helicopter to fly food into remote
JOE RAEDLE/WORLD CENTRAL KITCHEN
Chef José Andrés and his nonprofit, World Central Kitchen, have
prepared and delivered 1 million meals to residents.
regions in the mountains. (The
helicopter also helped crews locate a working kitchen, which is
now one of the 15 spots for meal
preparation.) Even the Department of Homeland Security has
assisted with food distribution,
Andrés said, after the agency
helped the chef find a missing
person.
“I became friends with them,” he
said of Homeland Security personnel. “We saw that they were going
to the very hard-hit areas and that
they were going with their cars
halfway empty. They said we could
bring food, so we began giving
them food. They began taking
thousands of sandwiches.”
FEMA initially provided money
to World Central Kitchen to prepare 20,000 meals. But when the
agency tried to negotiate a second
contract to prepare another
20,000 meals, Andrés balked. The
chef wanted money for 120,000
meals, which exceeded FEMA’s authority to grant without putting
the contract out to bid, an agency
spokesman said. Regardless,
FEMA said it was still looking at
another contract with the nonprofit to fund the organization’s
meals program.
Andrés expressed his frustration to a Time magazine reporter.
“FEMA used me as a puppet to
show that they were doing something,” Andrés said about the original contract.
Several days later, Andrés dialed
down his rhetoric, if not his desire
to see more from his government.
The native Spaniard became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 2013.
“You know me, nobody holds
me back. But at the same time, you
have to be strategic,” Andrés said.
He understands that FEMA employees have to abide by the rules
and the thresholds established by
people higher up in the agency.
But he would still like to see more
flexibility from the agency, particular during times of crisis.
“Bureaucracy needs to give
them the tools to move quick and
fast to take care of people,” he said.
“If bureaucracy doesn’t allow
them to move quick and fast, it’s a
problem.”
Andrés is not just talking the
talk, either. Since he arrived in
Puerto Rico, he has put much of
his life on hold in Washington,
where he oversees ThinkFoodGroup, a company with more than
a dozen restaurants, a catering
division and a food truck. Andrés
was in Puerto Rico, in fact, when
he heard the news that Minibar,
the chef’s gastronomic funhouse
in Penn Quarter, maintained its
two Michelin stars.
In the four weeks since Maria
pummeled the island, Andrés has
been home only three or four days,
he said. He returned once after
becoming dehydrated.
“The reality here is very hard to
escape. My question is, if we don’t
do it, who’s going to do it?” Andrés
said about feeding Puerto Ricans.
“Fresh food is hard to come by . . .
Sometimes the only fresh food
people are eating is fruit we are
bringing. The only hot meal they
are eating is the lukewarm meal
we are bringing.”
Andrés hopes that World Central Kitchen is demonstrating
what kind of results a nonprofit
with a “private-sector mentality”
can achieve. He suspects that, in
years to come, others will be examining “our successes and failures
and how we did it.”
“How we were able to go from
100 meals to a million meals,” he
added. The secret, Andrés noted,
was the chef community, the many
volunteers who picked up a knife
and got to it. A chef’s disposition,
Andrés said, is to know how to
adapt to crisis.
“We are survivors,” he said. “We
never wanted to be here for so long
. . . but circumstances invited us to
be part of it.”
Then Andrés remembered a favorite quote from literature, taken
from a John Steinbeck novel:
“Where there’s a fight so hungry people can eat, I will be there,” he said.
Andrés remembered the quote
almost verbatim. It’s a line from
Tom Joad, the central character in
Steinbeck’s Depression-era novel,
“The Grapes of Wrath.” Joad is the
one who experiences a major
transformation over the course of
the story. He, as CliffsNotes reminds us, undergoes a “moral
journey from self to community,
from ‘I’ to ‘we.’ ”
tim.carman@washpost.com
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C4
EZ
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THE WASHINGTON POST
KK
BY
A NNE M IDGETTE
Who are the most important
living composers? Philip Glass
and Steve Reich are often lumped
together in people’s minds as the
Hertz and Avis of “minimalism,”
the maverick musical style that
emerged in the 1970s whose hallmark was repeating patterns of
notes. But where Glass is a wildly
prolific jack-of-all-trades, writing
everything from film scores to piano etudes, Reich has a kind of
monkish single-mindedness, pursuing his ideas with tenacious focus, so that throughout his oeuvre
there is a clear through line leading from one piece to another.
Reich is 81 now, and Wednesday
the Library of Congress opened its
season with a sensational concert
of his music by Ensemble Signal,
co-produced by Washington Performing Arts and featuring the
East Coast premiere of a work
commissioned by a consortium
that included both institutions, a
piece called “Runner” (2016).
The first striking thing about
the concert was that Reich was
there. The evening opened with
him and the ensemble’s conductor, Brad Lubman, taking the stage
for a performance of his seminal
1972 piece “Clapping Music,” written for two pairs of hands. Reich
looks the same as ever — slightly
more bowlegged, and slightly
grayer, but no less austere, sporting his signature baseball cap and
offering, without fanfare, a workmanlike performance of a piece
that was written to cut down on
equipment. Clapping into microphones, the two performers spin
out the same rhythms in slightly
different ways, moving in and out
of sync with each other — a device
that remained a Reich signature
for the next four-plus decades.
The next striking thing was that
all of the other music on the program was so new. The oldest piece,
apart from “Clapping Music,” was
the Double Sextet, which had its
premiere in 2008 in Richmond
and for which Reich was awarded
the Pulitzer Prize in 2009. Also on
the program, in addition to “Runner,” were the Quartet from 2013
(for two pianos and two marimbas, cornerstones of Reich’s vocabulary); “Pulse,” from 2015; and, as
an encore, the final movement of
“Radio Rewrite,” Reich’s take on
Radiohead (Et tu, Reich?), which
had its premiere in 2013. Rather
than a career retrospective, the
evening was a celebration of an
active composer who appears to
be exploring his more melodic,
more richly instrumentally textured side — a “late style” that at
least since the Double Sextet has
been coming steadily into focus.
Ensemble Signal has been focusing on Reich recently, with two
first-rate recordings of some of his
major works, including his 1976
“Music for 18 Musicians,” arguably
his most influential. For younger
players, Reich’s music is part of the
canon now, which means they approach it like any other music —
and play it, arguably, more musically, with more beauty, than earlier performers who focused mainly
on its newness. This approach
only underlined Reich’s intensifying concerns with the textural intricacy and melodiousness of
acoustic instruments. The opening measures of “Pulse,” indeed,
evoked the flavor of Copland’s “Appalachian Spring.”
And while Reich has said he is
not much interested in writing
again for orchestra, the program
showed him making much of a
large chamber ensemble — especially because this ensemble plays
the Double Sextet not as six instrumentalists playing with a recording of themselves, as it was performed at the 2008 premiere, but
with 12 live players. “Runner,” the
night’s biggest work, is scored for
19 musicians, making for a crowded stage, with two of each instrument except the lone double bass.
Reich’s scores tend to be borne on
the kind of propulsive rhythms
manifest in “Clapping Music,” and
pianists David Friend and Oliver
Hagen were nearly lifted from
their seats by the intensity of their
insistent beats, but the composer
keeps holding up pieces of melody
in other instruments, as if to invoke a sense of wonder at their
ability to be beautiful. Reich is an
old master in today’s music world,
and this newest work showed
again that he fully deserves the
title.
anne.midgette@washpost.com
The program will be performed at
Carnegie Hall on Nov. 2.
Enter for your chance to
Win 4 tickets to the Opening Night
performance of
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Saturday, November 18
6 Winners!
TV HIGHLIGHTS
DOCUMENTARIES
RETURNING
Great Performances: She Loves Me (WETA
and MPT at 9) Laura Benanti and Zachary
Levi play a pair of feuding perfumery clerks
who don’t realize they’re romantic pen pals in
Roundabout Theatre Company’s rendition of
this 1963 musical.
The Day I Met El Chapo (Netflix streaming)
Mexican actress Kate del Castillo, who secretly
met with notorious drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo”
Guzmán in 2016, tells her side of the story in this
three-part docu-series.
Haters Back Off! (Netflix streaming) Season 2.
PREMIERE
Superstition (Syfy at 10) Mario Van Peebles
helms this supernatural drama.
PLUS! Save 20% on $25 tickets
Valid for performances November 18 - December 3.
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nor combined with other offers.
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S1117 2x10.5
Tracey Ullman’s Show (HBO at 11) Season 2.
LATE NIGHT
One of Us (Netflix streaming) This film, from “Jesus
Camp” directors Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady,
chronicles the journey of three New Yorkers who
have decided to leave ultra-Orthodox Judaism.
Bill Maher (HBO at 10) Janice Min, Daryl Davis,
James Carville, Erick Erickson, Margaret Hoover.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Woody Harrelson, Tony
Bennett.
— Bethonie Butler
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
10/20/17
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Weinstein scandal is ‘tipping point,’ professor says
POWER FROM C1
Fall in love with your favorite characters
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OCTOBER 20 , 2017
Television
MUSIC REVIEW
Ensemble Signal proves Steve Reich,
the new old master, hasn’t slowed
. FRIDAY,
wrong because they wield so much
power.”
Some expect that new revelations about sexual misdeeds, as
well as continuing shifts in who
gains power in major U.S. institutions, will lead to lasting change.
“This is a tipping point,” said
Eddie Glaude Jr., a professor of
religion and African American
studies at Princeton, who has written about pragmatism and power
in American public life. “With
more and more women saying
that this kind of behavior is not
acceptable, and you will be held to
account, we are seeing from the
likes of Weinstein, Cosby and
Trump a last gasp of an old understanding of who we were.”
Glaude said that both Hollywood
and politics “have experienced radical change in recent years,” as women and racial and sexual minorities
gain a foothold on power. With that
shift comes new light on those who
have abused their power, making it
harder for them to continue their
abuses.
But others argue that especially
in institutions where power still
resides in a relative handful of powerful men, the incentive remains to
keep protecting abusers.
In Hollywood and in politics —
but also in fields such as college
sports, where people stayed quiet
about reports that a Penn State
football coach had molested boys,
or in medicine, where University of
Southern California officials said
nothing publicly after learning that
the dean of their medical school led
a secret life of drug abuse and partying — people at various levels had a
vested interest in protecting powerful miscreants.
Sexual misbehavior becomes
public in other fields as well —
prominent recent examples have
been revealed at Silicon Valley
companies and on college campuses. But some argue that scandals in Hollywood and politics
blow up particularly spectacularly
because of the public nature of
those fields.
“If we were told that the head of
Wachovia Bank was doing this, it
wouldn’t get nearly the same attention,” said Joe Pichirallo, a
longtime movie producer who
teaches at New York University’s
Tisch School of the Arts.
In any field, Pichirallo said, successful leaders can come to believe
that they can do whatever they
want. In Hollywood, it’s easier to
actually get away with misdeeds:
“If you wanted to disagree with
Harvey on the cut of a film, he
would swat you away like a fly and
you’d be done,” he said. “People
have become more sensitive in the
last few years to the need to root
out this kind of abusive behavior,
but still, when you’re in a place
where your job can go away with a
flick of a finger, you often have to
make decisions like ‘Do I take care
of my family and advance my career, or do I tell a reporter that my
boss is a scoundrel?’ ”
Once called out in public, some
powerful figures have maintained
that their abusive behavior was
merely a product of a time when
sexism was rarely called out.
“I came of age in the ’60s and
’70s, when all the rules about behavior and workplaces were different,” Weinstein said in a semiapologetic statement after the
New York Times reported on allegations against him. “That was the
culture then.”
Last year, when Trump was confronted with the “Access Hollywood” recording of his own account of grabbing women’s genitals, he dismissed his comments as
“locker room talk,” the kind of
rough banter that provoked little
protest when he was young.
Through the first decades of the
sexual revolution, when Victorianera reticence about sex fell away,
some Americans felt a sense of liberation. But others concluded that
the new freedoms also gave wide
berth to abusers, whether at fancy
prep schools, in the Catholic
Church, on college campuses or in
workplaces of all sorts.
In the past few decades, however, activists have raised awareness
of sexual harassment, promoting a
new set of expectations and tight-
er legal and social regulation
around issues of consent and victims’ rights.
Still, in some fields, the rules
don’t seem to have changed quite
as clearly.
“In Hollywood, they haven’t really had incentives to change,” said
Emilie Raymond, a historian at
Virginia Commonwealth University whose work has focused on
the intersection between the movie industry and politics. “It’s one of
the most male-dominated industries in the United States, and it’s
one of the only fields where it’s
perfectly okay to discriminate —
when you’re casting a movie, you
can say ‘I need
someone fatter,’
or ‘I need a
white person.’ ”
But even beyond that quirk
of the business,
what
distinguishes Hollywood and gives
Weinstein
abusers freer
rein than they might find in other
lines of work is the extraordinary
power granted to the people in
charge. “It’s an industry where it’s
easy to exploit your power because
of the desperation for work,” Raymond said.
Similarly, in politics, young people entering the field are often so
eager to get started that they will
work without pay.
In both lines of work, once people get inside they are determined
to stay there, which leads to a willingness to hide unacceptable behaviors from the people in charge.
“In both fields, there’s a tremendous effort to maintain the illusion
that everything’s squeaky clean,
and to hide anything sexual, especially,” Epstein said. “Both institutions protect themselves with layers of public relations people who
create illusions.”
Secrecy is a passion in both
industries. In Hollywood, many
workers must sign nondisclosure
agreements before they can commence work on any project. In
Washington, an intricate system
of classification and persistent
threats of punishment for leaks
pervade many areas of government and campaigns.
Although standards have shifted and the news media have grown
more aggressive about reporting
scandals, the tolerance for misbehavior remains markedly different
from other sectors of society.
In Hollywood, “they think
they’re ahead of the times and
more progressive than much of
the country, but at least on this
issue, they’re really behind the
times,” Raymond said. She noted
that when then-Fox News executive Roger Ailes and the network’s
popular then-TV talk host Bill
O’Reilly were accused of sexual
harassment, “the company shut
down that behavior very quickly.
But in Hollywood, Roman Polanski still gets a standing ovation at
the
Oscars
and
Arnold
Schwarzenegger still had a great
public image even after the revelations about his secret son.” The
actor and former California governor fathered a child with a longtime member of his household
staff. Polanski, who won an Oscar
for best director in 2003, pleaded
guilty in 1977 to unlawful sexual
intercourse with a 13-year-old.
Now, with the drumbeat of revelations accelerating, will those in
power be scared straight? Skeptics
argue that the men who’ve been
exposed as serial harassers were
relatively easy targets because
they were, like Bill Cosby or Ailes,
in the twilight of their careers; or,
like Weinstein, no longer nearly as
powerful as they’d once been.
But others see evidence of lasting, structural change as the
makeup and mores of the American population shift.
“In moments of profound transition, there are always head
winds,” Glaude said. “Power seeks
relentlessly to secure its position.
So the fact that there are Weinsteins and Trumps and Cosbys
ought not to surprise us. Powerful
men will still exercise their power,
but other people aren’t taking it
anymore. The United States is
changing.”
marc.fisher@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
EZ
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
RE
PICKLES
C5
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH (D)
A 10 9 4
10 9 4
KQJ4
Q7
EAST
762
53
9763
9642
WEST
K53
AK762
85
A83
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
QJ8
QJ8
A 10 2
K J 10 5
The bidding:
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
1
Pass 2 NT
3 NT
All Pass
Opening lead — Choose it
WEST
Pass
M
illard Pringle played at
my club yesterday. He is
a quiet little man who tends
to get lost in the maze of
defensive “rules.”
“Look what he did to me
in the penny game,” Cy the
Cynic fumed. “I was South,
Millard was West. Against
my 3NT he led the TWO of
hearts.”
“Was that his idea of a
fourth-best lead?” I asked.
“Who knows?” Cy growled.
“Maybe he had a heart
mixed in with his diamonds.
When I won, I thought it was
safe to force out the ace
of clubs for nine tricks. But
Millard took the ace and ran
the hearts for down one.”
“If he leads the six of
hearts,” I remarked, “you’ll
play him for a five-card suit.
You’ll finesse in spades and
win four spades, a heart and
four diamonds.”
“The man’s a fruitcake,”
Cy grumbled.
In fact, Millard’s lead was
astute. Since Millard has 14
points, he knows East has
none and will play no part in
the defense. So Millard has
no reason to lead an honest
fourth-best heart. A deceptive lead may induce declarer
to misjudge.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
K53AK762
85A83
You open one heart, your
partner bids one spade, you
raise to two spades and he
tries three clubs. What do
you say?
ANSWER: Partner’s three
clubs is, as far as you know,
a try for game. You have
maximum, useful values but
no ideal call. You can’t jump
to four spades or raise to
four clubs with three-card
support. Bid three hearts.
You hope to place the contract after you hear partner
bid once more.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
C6
EZ
MUTTS
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
PATRICK McDONNELL
ZITS
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | OCTOBER 20
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year you open up
to many possibilities.
Avoid making a
financial commitment,
even with more funds coming
in. Evaluate the long-term
implications as well. If you
are single, you’ll meet people
with ease, but you can get
possessive very quickly. You
could form a relationship
in the next 12 months that
becomes a lifelong bond. If
you are attached, the two of
you enjoy each other to no
end. Be careful of flickering
jealousy. Scorpio can give
you powerful feedback about
investments.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Opportunities come through a
partner or loved one. You feel
as if someone is offering you
a gift. You have a lot to share,
which reflects in the lengthy
conversations you could have.
Others ask for feedback from
you.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
After recent events, you might
decide to defer to others. You
might not want to proceed in
the direction a situation might
be heading. A key person
shares a plethora of thoughts,
which helps you make a
decision.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
This workweek might have
been tiring, but you are not
done. Follow through on a
WEINGARTENS & CLARK creative question that came
up during the week. Your
imagination and intellect often
wander away from the facts
at hand.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Your ingenuity carries you
through several offers, all of
which you would like to take.
Somehow, even if you make
a decision, the doors to other
opportunities will stay open for
a while.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Stay centered, even with
impending news that could
be exciting. Some of you will
be looking at changes in your
domestic life. For some people,
it could be a new home. You
have had a dream or vision.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Your words have impact, and
others respond to you as a
result. Your positive attitude
attracts new friends and
possibilities. Check out a
purchase before making it.
This item will improve your dayto-day life.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Be aware of the day-to-day
costs you might be incurring,
as well as the costs you
could incur this weekend.
Conversations about this issue
could be fruitful. To your relief,
you see more options and
flexibility than you thought
possible.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Feel free to let others know
where you are coming
from. Optimistic responses
easily could punctuate a
conversation that you start up.
You feel as if you can share
more with this group of people.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Slow down and do some
assessing before you take the
next step. These periods of
reflection help you affirm that
you are heading in the right
direction. This habit could
save you many unnecessary
hassles.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
Your sense of direction carries
you through a problem. You
turn an issue into a positive
experience, delighting those
around you. Others will open
up once they relax. You might
be surprised but pleased with
what you hear.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Others decide they want
you to take the lead. Don’t
hesitate. Isn’t this role the
one you wanted? You might
have an admirer around work
or in some other community
venture that you are not
aware of.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
News comes from a distance
that could light up your day.
You might be planning a trip
with this person before you
know it. Both of you work on
the same deep, emotional
plane.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
KLMNO
SPORTS
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
D
M2
D.C. SPORTS BOG
HOCKEY
PRO FOOTBALL
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Hey, remember that time Queen
Elizabeth II and Prince Philip watched
Maryland upset North Carolina in
football at Byrd Stadium? D2
In a move to get goals from someone
besides No. 8, Capitals shake up their
bottom-six forwards, moving Tom Wilson
up and Andre Burakovsky down. D3
The Raiders rally to stun the Chiefs, 3130, in a wild finish that included three
end zone penalties in the final moments
and a pair of untimed downs. D4
At Big Ten media day, the FBI corruption
case and the fall of Rick Pitino cast a
large shadow, especially for Minnesota’s
Richard Pitino, Rick’s son. D6
Dodgers
finally
return
to Series
DODGERS 11,
CUBS 1
Kershaw, Hernandez give
L.A. 1st pennant since ’88
BY
B ARRY S VRLUGA
chicago — When this last hap-
PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
DREAMS
an d doub t
For Annandale senior Nicolle Uria, college plans
are on hold amid uncertainty surrounding DACA
BY
J ESSE D OUGHERTY
Nicolle Uria, above left, joined her Annandale volleyball teammates for
the national anthem before a recent match. With her DACA status set to
expire next year, she is uncertain she will be able to attend college here.
T
he red brake lights on the cars ahead all lit up, the
rush-hour traffic slowly rolled to a halt, and Nicolle
Uria, tightly gripping a Gatorade water bottle in one
hand and her iPhone in the other, just needed someone,
anyone, to answer her call.
“Come on, pick up, pick up,” Nicolle whispered to herself in
the passenger’s seat, phone pressed against her ear.
It went to voice mail. She punched in another number.
“Pick up, pick up,” she said a little louder, and again no one
did.
On this drizzly October evening, Nicolle found herself as
she so often has since Sept. 5: stuck between two worlds as a
high school student and volleyball player, and as a dreamer.
The 17-year-old was coming from a meeting in Arlington with
the Dream Project, an organization that helps students with
various immigration statuses apply to college. She was
heading to Annandale High in Fairfax County, where she is a
senior and had a volleyball match at 7:15 p.m. And for a
moment, it all felt hectic and out of her control.
URIA CONTINUED ON D6
pened, Clayton Kershaw was seven months old, so he has no
firsthand memory of what transpired then. But when you wear
the uniform of the Los Angeles
Dodgers, history follows you,
even as you pursue it yourself. So
the ghosts of the 1988 Dodgers —
Kirk Gibson and Orel Hershiser
and the rest — stalked Kershaw.
Yes, there were Robinson and
Koufax and the Hall of Famers
whose images flicker from even
further back. But the 1988 Dodgers, those were the guys the
40-somthings in Hollywood grew
up rooting for. Those were the
guys Kershaw had to try to replace.
“A lot of us weren’t around in
’88,” Dodgers General Manager
Farhan Zaidi said. “But that
doesn’t stop people from reminding us. . . . We’re well aware of the
date.”
On Thursday night at Wrigley
Field, Kershaw took the long,
gun-slinging stride of a Texan —
the Texan he is — and kicked
open that saloon door, finally,
and established a new date: 2017.
In a position he had never been
before — with both the ball and a
chance to pitch the Dodgers into
the World Series — Kershaw delivered the backbone of an 11-1
lambasting of the poor Chicago
Cubs, who got the ace lefty at his
best, who got the Dodgers at their
best, who were flat rolled over
with help from three home runs
from utility man Enrique Hernandez.
“Each and every game,” said
Andrew Friedman, the team’s
president of baseball operations,
“has had a different hero.”
The glee in the Dodgers’ celebration showed how little they
cared who it was Thursday or
who it might be next week. As
long as it’s someone. The Dodgers’ victory finished off the National League Championship Series in five games, dethroned the
defending champions, reinforced
NLCS CONTINUED ON D5
Yankees at Astros
Game 6: Today, 8 p.m., FS1
Yankees lead series, 3-2
All things big, small: Aaron Judge,
Jose Altuve show good things can
come in packages of all sizes. D5
For Goodell, fair process seems Redskins still seek ‘havoc’
Your moment of playo≠ Zen:
optional, and that’s a problem even without Allen up front No bad losses, only good wins
Roger Goodell
always makes the
same mistake: He
prizes his own
authority over
fairness to others.
Sally
This is a
Jenkins
psychological
flaw, not a legal
principle, and the NFL ought to
quit defending it in court.
The pattern is well
established: The commissioner
commits needless small acts of
despotism that wind up causing
federal litigation sieges and
harm the league’s integrity
rather than sustain it.
What would it have taken to
give the Dallas Cowboys’ Ezekiel
Elliott a fair hearing against
accusations of domestic
violence? Not much. Just
something shy of a total
Orwellian mind-screw. Instead,
the case has become a typical
morass, a perfect example of the
rigged process over which
Goodell presides. Judge Paul A.
Crotty of the Southern District of
New York not only delayed
Elliott’s six-game suspension
Tuesday evening but did so with
a sharply worded ruling that
found “significant issues
implicating the fundamental
fairness of the arbitration
JENKINS CONTINUED ON D4
BY
R ICK M AESE
It all starts up front. Whatever
happens in the secondary, to the
opponent’s ground game, whatever the opposing quarterback
hopes to do — the key to the Washington Redskins stopping any of it
has been the pressure generated
by the team’s upgraded defensive
line, a unit that was instantly and
severely downgraded following
Jonathan Allen’s foot injury Sunday.
“It’s a big loss. I’m not going to
be up here and fake it and say it’s
not,” cornerback Josh Norman
said. “It’s a big loss for us because
he’s one of our driving forces in the
middle. He creates havoc in the
middle when he’s on the field.”
With Allen on crutches and just
hours removed from surgery, his
teammates began preparations
Thursday for their biggest contest
to date: a Monday night showdown at the Philadelphia Eagles
that carries significant implications for the NFC East title.
The coaches will do their best to
shuffle the pieces, but losing Allen
causes a ripple effect that touches
the other defensive position
groups.
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D4
Redskins at Eagles
Monday, 8:30 p.m., ESPN
On
Football
CHUCK
CULPEPPER
If a bad loss falls in
the forest, does a
committee in a
sterile meeting
room at a gaudy
hotel in North
Texas hear it?
Presumably it does, but to say it
should matter much to the
committee’s 13 men is to succumb
to the kind of 20th-century
thinking the College Football
Playoff selection committee was
birthed to discard.
As the first three committees
(2014-16) taught us serially
through their rankings and their
puffs of smoke rising from the
vicinity of Dallas-Fort Worth
International Airport, it’s less
about who beat you than about
whom you beat. For one thing, the
committee habitually enlists
former coaches — five this year —
and while coaches have a long
history of preposterous
haughtiness with their pretense
that American football knowledge
is paramount to existence, they do
know the unforgiving struggle of
wringing wins from a hard land.
Coaches remind us after each
loss that in college football the
players are absurdly young, which
is just one way to explain how
LSU could beat Florida and
Auburn after losing to Troy and
ON FOOTBALL CONTINUED ON D7
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
EARLY LEAD
EARLY LEAD
Cheers for
Eminem,
jeers for
Kid Rock
BY
No penalty
for musher
of drugged
sled dogs
D.C. SPORTS BOG
M ATT B ONESTEEL
For the first time since 1978, the
Pistons’ regular home venue is
inside the Detroit city limits. They
opened Little Caesars Arena on
Wednesday night for their first
game of the season in front of a bit
of a sparse crowd.
Those who showed up to see
the Pistons beat the Hornets were
welcomed by Detroit favorite son
Eminem, who had a courtside
seat and tried to hype up the
crowd after the players were introduced.
“Detroit, welcome them back
for the first time in over 40 years
to our city, to my city, to your city!
Make some noise for the Detroit
Pistons. Let’s go!” he said over the
public-address system after the
players were introduced.
Kid Rock, another Michiganbred entertainer, also was in attendance. He wasn’t so warmly
welcomed.
“A few moments later, the videoboard showed Kid Rock, who
was sitting courtside, and who got
booed where Eminem got
cheered,” Shawn Windsor of the
Free Press reported.
The two recording artists have
staked out positions on the opposite side of the political spectrum.
At the BET awards last week,
Eminem unleashed a blistering
attack on President Trump in a
four-minute freestyle called “The
Storm,” attacking the president
for his criticism of NFL players’
protests during the national anthem and his neglect of other
issues facing the country. Kid
Rock, meanwhile, has voiced his
support for Trump and is weighing a run against Michigan Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow next
year.
“I thought just having Eminem
up there was great as a Detroit
guy,” Pistons Coach Stan Van Gundy said afterward. “I thought it
was great of [Pistons owner Tom
Gores] — and if [NBA Commissioner] Adam Silver was involved
— to think about that. I think
without making any statement,
they were able to make a statement by involving Eminem in it.”
matt.bonesteel@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
QUOTABLE
“If they do not sign
him, they’re crazy.
They’re absolutely
crazy. He deserves a
long-term contract.”
BOOMER ESIASON,
former NFL quarterback and current
analyst, commenting on the Redskins
and Kirk Cousins on Showtime’s
“Inside the NFL.” (via Early Lead)
BY
COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
Queen Elizabeth II and Maryland Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin examined the ceremonial coin before a game in 1957.
A ‘wonderful, wonderful’ event
BY
S COTT A LLEN
No matter how impressive the guest
list is for Maryland’s homecoming
game against Indiana on Oct. 28, it
probably won’t compare to the
distinguished company in attendance
for the Terrapins’ game against North
Carolina 60 years ago Thursday.
On Oct. 19, 1957, Queen Elizabeth II
and Prince Philip watched Maryland
upset the No. 14 Tar Heels, 21-7, at Byrd
Stadium from a specially erected box
on the visitor’s side of the field. The
game fell during the queen’s first visit
to the United States as a monarch, a
six-day trip that began with a stop in
Virginia for the 350th anniversary
celebration of the founding of
Jamestown. During her time in D.C.,
the queen attended a state dinner at the
White House and visited Washington
National Cathedral, Children’s Hospital
and the National Gallery of Art. While
planning her visit, she specifically
requested the chance to see her first
American football game.
“We are very excited that she is
coming to College Park,” Maryland
Coach Tommy Mont said after the
announcement was made in August of
that year. “We will show her the best we
possibly can. We got pretty badly licked
by North Carolina last year, but it won’t
happen this year.”
Maryland lost, 34-6, to the Tar Heels
and ex-Terps coach Jim Tatum in
Chapel Hill in 1956. North Carolina
arrived in College Park in 1957 with a
3-1 record. Maryland officials were
determined to keep the “Queen’s Game”
as typical as possible to give their royal
visitors an authentic experience. “We
want the game to go on much as usual,”
Albin Kuhn, assistant to the president,
told The Washington Post. During the
week leading up the game, Maryland
co-captains Gene Alderton and Jack
Healy practiced their pregame
presentation to the queen. Alderton got
a new front tooth for the occasion,
replacing one that had been knocked
Sixty years ago, England’s
queen watched Maryland
upset ranked North Carolina
out as a result of a head-on collision
earlier in the season. Decorative flags
and red, white, black and gold bunting
ringed the playing field.
The queen’s party arrived via
motorcade. She was showered with
gifts, including a gold brooch shaped
like a Terrapin and set with rubies and
diamonds and a covered urn of Steuben
glass. Maryland’s players gave her an
autographed football, and North
Carolina presented her a medallion
with her likeness after it was used for
the coin toss. Maryland’s cheerleaders
offered mums.
A sellout crowd of 43,000 attended
the game. The Post reported that
“Western Union tripled its facilities in
the press box” and newspaper, radio,
TV and motion picture representatives
from London, India, Pakistan, New
Zealand and Australia were among the
480 accredited members of the press.
The queen’s special security force was
more than 300 strong, including
special agents from the Maryland State
Police, Secret Service, National
Detective Agency and Scotland Yard.
Students displayed cards with the
queen’s initials, while the Maryland
and North Carolina marching bands
played “Rule, Britannia” during the
halftime show. As for the game,
Maryland running back Ted Kershner’s
81-yard touchdown run in the fourth
quarter broke a 7-7 tie. The celebration
was subdued when the game ended on
an incomplete pass. “Instead of pouring
onto the field to storm the goal posts,
the fans obeyed a request made earlier
over the loudspeaker to remain in their
seats until The Queen had departed,”
The Post’s Dave Brady wrote. Mont’s
players carried him to the queen’s box
after the win.
“Wonderful, wonderful,” the queen
said.
“Very wonderful,” Prince Philip said,
shaking Mont’s hand.
Here’s how Edward T. Folliard
described the game in The Post:
“For the better part of three hours
yesterday, Queen Elizabeth II had the
unusual experience of not being stared
at — and this in spite of the fact that she
was part of a crowd of 43,000. She and
Prince Philip went to College Park, Md.,
five miles outside of Washington, to see
an exciting football game between the
University of Maryland and the
University of North Carolina. The great
throng cheered the royal couple on
their arrival, bands serenaded them,
and drum majorettes strutted for them.
There also was cheering and staring
during the intermission, and at the end.
But for most of the time the eyes of the
43,000 fans were on the gridiron where
Maryland’s Terrapins defeated North
Carolina’s Tar Heels, 21 to 7. This meant
that the ‘Queen’s Game,’ as it will always
be known at College Park, was a major
upset, North Carolina having been a 7point favorite before the kick-off. But if
this was a surprise, it was a mild one
compared to something that happened
after the game.”
Oh, right. After the game, Queen
Elizabeth and Prince Philip paid a
surprise visit to a Giant supermarket in
West Hyattsville on their way back to
the White House. Via The Post:
“The royal limousine drew up before
the Giant Food Store and, to the
complete amazement of hundreds of
weekend shoppers, the Queen and her
Prince consort got out and walked into
the store. Housewives and other
shoppers inside the store looked up in
astonishment as they found the Queen
and Prince Philip peering into their
shopping carts.”
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
M ARISSA P AYNE
Doping in athletics has been a
problem for decades, but usually
it’s limited to human competition. This month, however, the
Iditarod Trail Committee confirmed in a pair of statements that
for the first time in its storied
history, the annual Alaskan dog
sled race that travels nearly
1,000 miles from Anchorage to
Nome wasn’t run cleanly.
Several dogs from a single
musher’s team tested positive for
the drug tramadol, a Class IV opioid pain reliever that’s available
only by prescription in pill, liquid,
suppository and other forms. It’s
unclear how the dogs ingested the
medication or even whether the
musher, whom the statement
does not name, intentionally administered the drug to the dogs.
“In consultation with legal
counsel, the ITC Board of Directors determined that the ITC
would likely not be able to prove
intent,” the committee said in a
statement, confirming the musher will go unpunished and remain
eligible to compete in the race
next year.
The musher, who identified
him- or herself only as Musher X,
penned a seven-paragraph letter
to the other competitors explaining what happened. The letter,
obtained by the Alaska Dispatch
News on Thursday, was distributed to the mushers by Wade Marrs,
the president of the Iditarod Officials Finishers Club.
In the letter, Musher X denies
allegations that he or she administered the drugs to the dogs and
“repeatedly offered to submit to a
polygraph and complied fully
with all requests.”
The letter also stated the drug
was “likely given after the team
finished the race” based on what
Musher X says were the levels of
the drug found in the dogs’ system.
“Accordingly, Musher X was determined unlikely to have administered a drug to their own dogs,”
the letter continued. “Musher X
was led to believe that the Head
Veterinarian and Race Marshall
suspected either an accident or
possibly foul play in the Nome dog
lot or food bags. They assured
Musher X the issue was over, no
further action was necessary, and
that measures were being taken to
increase security of the food
drops, checkpoints, and the Nome
dog yard.”
The Iditarod Trail Committee’s
statement, however, gives a somewhat more flexible timeline regarding when the dogs may have
ingested the drugs. While it didn’t
rule out the possibility of postrace administration, it left open
the possibility that it may have
been given during the race, as
well, based on test results of urine
obtained from the dogs six hours
after they finished the race.
marissa.payne@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/earlylead
DIGEST
SOCCER
Morgan, Ertz, Rapinoe
lead U.S. past S. Korea
Alex Morgan scored in a
fourth straight game as the
U.S. women beat South Korea, 3-1,
in New Orleans.
Julie Ertz scored for the fourth
time in five games for the
Americans, and Megan Rapinoe
added her 34th international goal
and her 42nd assist. . . .
Olivier Giroud scored late in
the second half to help visiting
Arsenal maintain its perfect
Europa League campaign with a
1-0 win over 10-man Red Star
Belgrade in Serbia. . . .
In college action, Veronica
Latsko scored her third straight
game-winner as the 12th-ranked
Virginia women’s team beat host
Syracuse, 3-1, in New York. . . .
The Georgetown women beat
Marquette, 3-0, at Shaw Field to
clinch home-field advantage in
the Big East tournament.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Riley Ferguson threw a 21yard touchdown pass with 1:28
left and Patrick Taylor rushed for
four scores as No. 25 Memphis
overcame a 17-point deficit to beat
Houston, 42-38, on the road.
Ferguson was 33 for 53 for 471
yards and found Sean Dykes to
cap an eight-play, 80-yard drive
that took 1:49 and give Memphis
its only lead.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Vanderbilt Coach Stephanie
White said it is a “slap in the face”
to South Carolina that the
Gamecocks still are waiting for an
invitation to the White House as
the reigning women’s national
champions.
Texas A&M Coach Gary Blair
took it a step further, suggesting
that President Trump call South
Carolina Coach Dawn Staley
personally and ask her to visit.
White and Blair spoke during
SEC media day in Nashville.
The office of U.S. Ambassador
to the United Nations Nikki
Haley said recently that an invite
would be coming later. Haley, the
former South Carolina governor,
is friends with Staley. . . .
Louisville men’s interim coach
David Padgett hired Greg Paulus
as an assistant.
Paulus played at Duke from
2006 to 2009 before switching to
football and becoming Syracuse’s
quarterback as a graduate
transfer. He was an Ohio State
assistant for the past four seasons
and previously worked at Navy.
TELEVISION AND RADIO
MLB PLAYOFFS
8 p.m.
GOLF
6 a.m.
ALCS Game 6: New York Yankees at Houston » Fox Sports 1, WTEM (980 AM)
9:30 a.m.
NBA
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
Detroit at Washington » NBC Sports Washington, WFED (1500 AM)
Cleveland at Milwaukee » ESPN
Golden State at New Orleans » ESPN
NHL
7:30 p.m.
AUTO RACING
Washington at Detroit » NBC Sports Washington Plus, WJFK (106.7 FM)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
10:15 p.m.
Western Kentucky at Old Dominion » CBS Sports Network
Marshall at Middle Tennessee State » ESPN2
Princeton at Harvard » NBC Sports Network
Air Force at Nevada » CBS Sports Network
Colorado State at New Mexico » ESPN2
SOCCER
2:40 p.m.
2:55 p.m.
11 a.m.
12:45 p.m.
5 p.m.
11 p.m.
7 p.m.
BASEBALL
The Detroit Tigers are in talks
to hire Ron Gardenhire as
manager, a person with
knowledge of the discussions
said. The person spoke on the
condition of anonymity because
no announcement was made.
Gardenhire was the bench
coach this season for the Arizona
Diamondbacks. He led the
Minnesota Twins from 2002 to
2014 and was American League
manager of the year in 2010.
GOLF
Tournament host Sergio
Garcia shot a 5-under-par 66 to
grab a share of the lead in the
European Tour’s Andalucia
Valderrama Masters in
Sotogrande, Spain.
Kentucky Blue/White Game » SEC Network
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
Northwestern at Michigan » Big Ten Network
COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
6 p.m.
8 p.m.
ATP: Stockholm Open, quarterfinals » Tennis Channel
WTA: Kremlin Cup, quarterfinals » beIN Sports
ATP: Stockholm Open, quarterfinals » Tennis Channel
Formula One: U.S. Grand Prix, practice » NBC Sports Network
NASCAR Cup: Hollywood Casino 400, practice » NBC Sports Network
NASCAR Xfinity Series: Kansas Lottery 300, practice » NBC Sports Network
FIM MotoGP: Australia, qualifying » beIN Sports
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
4 p.m.
French Ligue 1: St. Etienne vs. Montpellier » beIN Sports
English Premier League: West Ham vs. Brighton » NBC Sports Network
TENNIS
6 a.m.
8 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
10 p.m.
European Tour: Andalucia Valderrama Masters, second round »
Golf Channel
European Tour: Andalucia Valderrama Masters, second round »
Golf Channel
Champions Tour: Dominion Charity Classic, first round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour: CJ Cup at Nine Bridges, third round » Golf Channel
Rutgers at Indiana » Big Ten Network
Penn State at Purdue » Big Ten Network
MIXED MARTIAL ARTS
9 p.m.
Bellator MMA » Spike TV
TENNIS
Top-seeded Pablo Carreno
Busta was knocked out of the
Kremlin Cup in the second round
by Daniil Medvedev, 6-3, 6-3, in
Moscow. The Russian broke
Carreno Busta twice in each set.
Second-seeded Albert RamosVinolas lost his second-round
match in surprising style, beaten,
4-6, 7-5, 6-2, by 107th-ranked
Alexander Bublik. Earlier, Daria
Kasatkina booked a place in the
semifinals of the women’s draw,
beating Aliaksandra Sasnovich,
6-4, 6-3.
AUTO RACING
Formula One driver Fernando
Alonso extended his contract
with McLaren to the 2018 season.
— From news services
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
M2
Seeking balance, Caps shake up lines
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
A theme for the Washington
Capitals entering last season was
developing more secondary scoring, and the team became the
picture of balance with production throughout the lineup as it
finished third in the NHL with
261 goals. But Washington needed to replace top-six forwards
Marcus Johansson and Justin
Williams this season, and its lineup has become top-heavy, with
almost all of the scoring coming
from just three players.
Of the 22 goals Washington has
scored through seven games, 17
have come from Alex Ovechkin
(nine), Nicklas Backstrom (five)
and T.J. Oshie (three). The Capitals’ bottom-six forwards have
managed just two goals. That
kind of imbalance is not what
Barry Trotz is looking for, so with
his team coming off Tuesday’s 2-0
home loss to the Toronto Maple
Leafs, the coach shuffled his lines
before Friday’s game at Detroit.
An assistant coach suggested
moving power forward Tom Wilson into the top six, and with
sniper Andre Burakovsky struggling to hit the net — he’s still
without a goal — Trotz had them
switch spots. Wilson will play on
the left side with Backstrom and
Oshie, while Burakovsky will be
on the right with third-line center
Lars Eller and Brett Connolly.
The hope is that chemistry
among Burakovsky, Eller and
Connolly — the Capitals’ third
line most of last season — returns
quickly to spark Burakovsky’s
production and bring balance to a
team on a two-game losing streak.
“We need some scoring
throughout our lineup — not just
the power play and the five-onfive from our top two lines,” Trotz
said.
After Williams moved on in
free agency and Johansson was
traded because of salary-cap constraints, the Capitals were counting on Burakovsky to take on a
bigger role. The 22-year-old start-
C A P I TA L S ’ N E X T T H R E E
at Detroit Red Wings
Today
7:30 NBCSW Plus
vs. Florida Panthers
Tomorrow
7:30 NBCSN,
NBCSW
10 NBCSW
Radio: WJFK (106.7 FM);
WFED (1500 AM)
CHRIS SZAGOLA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
After three games on the Capitals’ third line, Tom Wilson is moving
up to play left wing with Nicklas Backstrom and T.J. Oshie.
ed the season on Washington’s
top line, but most of his shot
attempts have been blocked or
missed the net entirely. Burakovsky acknowledged he’s taking too
long to shoot, so perhaps a move
back to the right side, his off side,
will make for a quicker release.
In the past two seasons, Burakovsky endured goal droughts of
25-plus games in the first half of
the season, and there’s some concern that if this seven-game dry
spell doesn’t end soon, it could
stretch into a long slump.
“It’s been a couple games now
without a goal, and it’s not acceptable,” Burakovsky said. “The most
important thing is that we win
the games, but obviously I need to
get going and producing, too. I’ve
been playing with two of the best
guys in the league, and nothing
really happened.”
While Burakovsky’s preference
is to play his off side, Wilson
almost exclusively has played
right wing in the NHL. When
Trotz approached him about playing on the left side with Backstrom and Oshie, Wilson jokingly
told him, “I’ll play upside down or
I’ll play goalie if I play with those
guys.”
Wilson has appeared in just
three games after being suspended for the first four, and like with
Burakovsky, the Capitals are expecting him to score more this
year. Trotz set the goal at double
digits before the season; he had
seven goals last season.
“It’s just that our room right
now maybe needs a little bit of a
different look, with the lines mixing up a little bit and getting a
spark,” Wilson said. “Nicky and
Osh, they’re such good players, so
if I just keep my game simple and
read off them and just get open,
they’re going to make things happen.”
Fourth-line center Jay Beagle
said the bottom-six offense has
been slow to come because chemistry with linemates takes time
and Washington is still incorporating new faces into the forward
corps. Beagle has played with
four different wingers through
the first seven games, with Alex
Chiasson, Nathan Walker and Tyler Graovac rotating in and out of
the lineup. On Thursday, Trotz
said Graovac is “week-to-week”
with an upper-body injury, and
practice rushes indicated Chiasson will play against the Red
Wings, with Walker expected to
be scratched.
“There’s no excuses ever, but
sometimes it takes a while,” Beagle said when asked about the
lack of scoring. “It’s nothing that’s
alarming. You just have to make
sure that you keep getting the
chances, and I think we are getting chances. It’s just a matter of
burying them. . . . Sometimes the
reads are a little off. It’s still
taking a little bit to get to know
each other.”
Before Washington’s game
against Toronto, it appeared that
defense was the Capitals’ most
pressing issue after they allowed
eight goals in a loss at Philadelphia. That aspect of Washington’s
play improved against the Maple
Leafs’ high-scoring lineup, but
after the game, goaltender
Braden Holtby said the Capitals
remain a work in progress.
“We’d be kidding ourselves if
we’re not going to have some
growing pains along the way,”
Holtby said.
Addressing the team’s secondary scoring seems to be the next
project.
“Against Toronto, we played
pretty well defensively, and we
had chances offensively; they just
didn’t go in,” Wilson said. “If we
play like that every night, there’s
guys in this room that can score.
We know that, so goals are going
to come.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
Oubre might spend time with the Wizards’ starters
With injuries to Morris,
Smith, versatile forward
fills in capably in opener
BY
Cory Schneider allowed four
goals on 24 shots before leaving
with a lower-body injury; Keith
Kinkaid started the third period
and stopped nine shots.
ISLANDERS 4,
RANGERS 3 (SO)
LIGHTNING
2,
BLUE
JACKETS 0: Mikhail Sergachev
John Tavares scored in the
shootout to lift the New York
Islanders over the host New York
Rangers, 4-3, on Thursday night
for their eighth win in the past
nine games against their struggling crosstown rivals.
Anders Lee, Brock Nelson and
Mathew Barzal scored in regulation, and Jaroslav Halak stopped
38 shots to help the Islanders
recover after blowing a two-goal
lead in the third.
David Desharnais, Mats Zuccarello and Kevin Hayes scored, and
Henrik Lundqvist finished with
35 saves for the Rangers, who lost
their fifth straight (0-3-2) to fall to
1-5-2. It’s their fewest points after
eight games since they were 1-6-1
to start the 1959-60 season.
BRUINS 6, CANUCKS 3: Patrice Bergeron had a goal and
three assists in his season debut,
moving up to seventh on host
Boston’s career scoring list.
Anders Bjork scored twice,
Brad Marchand had a goal and
two assists, and David Pastrnak
added a goal and an assist for the
Bruins. Anton Khudobin made
26 saves while starting in place of
Tuukka Rask, who is out indefinitely with a concussion he suffered in practice Wednesday.
DEVILS 5, SENATORS 4
(OT): John Moore scored 1:20
into overtime as New Jersey used
three unanswered goals to beat
host Ottawa.
Top draft pick Nico Hischier
scored twice for New Jersey, the
first goals of his NHL career. Kyle
Palmieri and Marcus Johansson
also scored for the Devils, who
improved to 6-1-0. Taylor Hall
chipped in four assists.
Russell Westbrook had a tripledouble, and the Oklahoma City
Thunder beat the visiting New
York Knicks, 105-84, on Thursday
night in their first regular season
game with all-star additions Paul
George and Carmelo Anthony.
Westbrook, the NBA MVP last
season when he averaged a tripledouble, had 21 points, 16 assists
and 10 rebounds.
George, acquired from the Indiana Pacers, led the Thunder
with 28 points. Anthony, who was
traded from the Knicks right before training camp, had 22 points
against his former team. Kristaps
Porzingis had 31 points and 12 rebounds for New York.
RAPTORS
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Detroit Pistons
Today
7 NBCSW
at Denver Nuggets
Monday
9 NBCSW
at Los Angeles Lakers
Wednesday 10:30 NBCSW, ESPN
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
mixed well within a starting five
that already has primary offensive weapons. Following the
game, Gortat alluded to Oubre’s
willingness to fit into the unit,
which means he would have to
accept a supporting role at times.
“Kelly’s Kelly. Sometimes he’s
a hothead. We love what he do.
He’s just got to understand: With
the starters, you got to play a
little bit of a different way than
the second unit. But he’s doing a
tremendous job,” Gortat said.
“We love what he’s doing, and
[his] right hand improved. He
already had like four layups this
year — in a practice!”
As the only rotational wing
player who has a season under
Brooks, Oubre has more freedom
when playing with the second
unit. However, until the Wizards
return to full strength with their
frontcourt, the starters may need
to make room for Oubre.
“It is a blessing because it
always did not used to be like
that,” Oubre said. “I have definitely worked for that, and I am
going to continue to work to be
the best player that I can be to
pretty much not have any boundaries on me.
“I just want to be the player
that makes the right decisions,
not the forced ones, so I am just
definitely growing and getting
better over time.”
Morris takes part in practice
On Thursday, Morris showed
more improvement after his abdominal surgery by practicing
with teammates.
As a team, the Wizards did not
go through contact, allowing
Morris to make another small
step in his recovery. Morris underwent the surgery Sept. 22 and
was expected to miss six to eight
weeks from that time.
“He looked good,” Brooks said
of Morris’s practice. “He’s getting
better day by day. I don’t know
when he’s going to come back,
but I know he’s going to come
back soon to [regular] practice.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Bath & Shower Remodels
PREDATORS
1, FLYERS 0:
Pekka Rinne stopped 28 shots,
Colton Sissons scored, and visiting Nashville beat Philadelphia.
Sissons got his second goal of
the season early in the third,
giving the defending Western
Conference champions their
fourth win in five games.
OILERS 2, BLACKHAWKS
1 (OT): Mark Letestu scored on a
power play with 15.8 seconds left
in overtime for visiting Edmonton.
Letestu beat Anton Forsberg
on the short side with a one-time
shot from the left circle. Connor
McDavid had two assists, including setting up Patrick Maroon
with a sensational spinning move
and pinpoint backhand pass for a
first-period goal.
Patrick Kane scored Chicago’s
lone goal, then took the overtime
penalty that led to Letestu’s goal.
BLUES
4, AVALANCHE 3:
Jaden Schwartz and Vince Dunn
scored 52 seconds apart in the
second for St. Louis in Denver.
Paul added a goal and an assist
to give him 601 points.
HURRICANES 2, FLAMES
1: Justin Williams had the win-
ning goal early in the third period
for visiting Carolina.
Jeff Skinner opened the scoring in the second period for the
Hurricanes. Sean Monahan tallied for Calgary with less than
four minutes left.
OKC’s Westbrook posts
triple-double in opener
A SSOCIATED P RESS
“He played great,” Washington Coach Scott Brooks said of Kelly Oubre Jr. against Philadelphia.
scored his first two NHL goals,
and Andrei Vasilevskiy made
43 saves for his fifth career shutout for Tampa Bay in Columbus.
Nikita Kucherov assisted on
both goals to push his NHL-leading point total to 14.
NBA ROUNDUP
THUNDER 105,
KNICKS 84
C ANDACE B UCKNER
During the Washington Wizards’ season opener, Kelly Oubre
Jr. filled in with the starters after
Jason Smith left the game because of a sprained right shoulder, and he might remain with
the group Friday night when the
Wizards face the Detroit Pistons.
“There’s definitely a possibility. It’s really not making that
decision on last night. He played
great,” Coach Scott Brooks said of
possibly starting Oubre, who
sparked the top unit with his
three-point shooting and defense
in the 120-115 win over the Philadelphia 76ers. “I’m going to make
that decision [Friday] on how it
could help us win the next game.
. . . Kelly definitely has a chance
to start.”
On Wednesday night, Smith,
the 7-footer who replaced Markieff Morris in the starting lineup,
suffered his injury on one of the
first defensive plays of the game
while attempting to stop Joel
Embiid at the rim. The next day,
Smith’s MRI exam revealed no
structural damage, but he
missed practice to receive treatment. Though Smith’s injury limits the Wizards’ depth at the
power forward position, the 6foot-7 Oubre offers a tempting
alternative to play and stay
small.
During the opener, the four
regular starters plus Oubre
played 17 minutes as a unit and
showed balance on both ends of
the court. Though 6-11 Marcin
Gortat was the only legitimately
big player, this unit collected
18 rebounds and three blocks,
according to NBA.com. On the
offensive end, the shooting was
inaccurate (14 for 32 for
43.8 percent), but in this 17-minute stint, players drew 15 fouls
and attempted 22 of the team’s
38 total free throws.
Oubre factored significantly
into the unit’s success by grabbing eight rebounds, including a
perfectly timed putback slam in
the fourth quarter.
“I look at rebounding as a stat
that Kelly can really be consistent with,” Brooks said. “He has
the size, the strength, the length,
athleticism and the toughness to
get in there and get the rebounds. I think you should be
able to see [eight] every night.”
Beyond Oubre’s play around
the rim, he led the team by
making 3 of 6 three-point attempts. Also, Oubre’s 10 shots
Rangers’ slide continues
with loss to N.Y. rivals
A SSOCIATED P RESS
at Vancouver Canucks
Thursday
NHL ROUNDUP
117, BULLS 101:
Jonas Valanciunas had 23 points
and 15 rebounds, C.J. Miles
scored 22 points in his Toronto
debut, and the host Raptors won
the season opener for both teams.
Robin Lopez scored 18 points
for Chicago, which trailed 58-37
at halftime.
Nets’ Lin is out for season
Brooklyn Nets guard Jeremy
Lin is expected to miss the rest of
the season because of a ruptured
patella tendon of the right knee.
Lin, 29, was hurt midway
through the fourth quarter of the
Nets’ 140-131 loss at Indiana on
Wednesday in their opener. He
landed hard behind the baseline
after a drive to the basket and was
in tears as he clutched at his knee.
WARRIORS: Forward Draymond Green has no structural
damage in his injured left knee
but is still doubtful to play in
Golden State’s next game.
Green was hurt late in the third
quarter of Tuesday’s seasonopening, 122-121 loss to Houston.
MAVERICKS: The brother
of Dallas guard Devin Harris was
fatally injured in an early morning crash on a Dallas expressway.
A Dallas police statement says
38-year-old Bruce Harris died
Thursday afternoon of injuries
from the 1:40 a.m. Thursday
crash in North Dallas. Harris and
another man were in a disabled
vehicle when it was slammed
from behind and set on fire by a
car with two 23-year-old men.
Harris died hours later at Presbyterian Hospital.
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D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
professional Football
R ED S KI NS NO TES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
Norman and Breeland
‘limited’ in practice
The Washington Redskins’
banged-up secondary was well
represented when the squad
launched into practice in earnest
Thursday for Monday night’s
game at the Philadelphia Eagles.
But it’s unclear who will be
available for the all-important
rematch with their division rival.
Starting cornerbacks Josh
Norman and Bashaud Breeland
suited up with their teammates
for the initial phase of practice at
Redskins Park, but Norman, who
fractured a rib in the Oct. 2 loss at
Kansas City, didn’t do one-on-one
drills. Breeland, who had to be
helped off the field after injuring
his left knee in Sunday’s victory
over San Francisco, tried
defending wide receiver Jamison
Crowder on one route but eased
up and jogged along behind after
coaches yelled at him to stop.
Coach Jay Gruden classified
both as “limited” following the
two-hour practice, along with
safety Deshazor Everett
(hamstring).
Also making an appearance
was veteran safety DeAngelo Hall,
33, who had been on the team’s
physically unable to perform list
to start the season after his 2016
campaign ended when he tore an
anterior cruciate ligament in
Week 3. Under NFL rules, Hall
has 21 days to practice before the
team must decide whether to
keep him on injured reserve or
put him on the 53-man roster.
“He looked good today,”
Gruden said of Hall, a former
cornerback who the coach said
would remain at safety if he
returns. “A little rusty, but I think
he’s got a chance.”
Monday’s game has major
implications for the NFC East
race. The Eagles (5-1) hold a
commanding lead, with the
Redskins (3-2) in second. If they
can split with the Eagles, who
beat them, 30-17, in the season
opener, the Redskins would
remain in contention for the
division title.
“They’re 5-1, and we’re 3-2. Just
do the math,” Gruden said. “If you
look at 3-3 and 6-1 and we’ve lost
to them twice, that’s a big
difference. [If we are] 4-2 and [the
Eagles are] 5-2, we’re right there
in the thick of things as far as the
NFC East is concerned.”
Led by second-year
quarterback Carson Wentz, the
Eagles’ offense ranks among the
NFL’s top 10 in every major
statistical category — including
first in third-down percentage
and time of possession, third in
yards per game and ninth in
passing yards per game.
Norman said his limited return
Thursday “felt fine” but gave no
indication whether he would play
Monday.
“In some movements, I can feel
[pain]; in some movements, I
didn’t,” Norman said. “It’s a pain
tolerance, so obviously that has a
lot to do with it and just how you
turn and work your body. I know
how to play, so I’m trying to be
cautious in that area.”
With Norman out and Breeland
sidelined in the third quarter, the
Redskins got impressive play last
week from backup Quinton
Dunbar, who started alongside
Breeland; third-year cornerback
Kendall Fuller, who shifted from
the slot to outside on some plays
and nearly stepped in at safety;
and rookie Fabian Moreau.
— Liz Clarke
NFL ROUNDUP
Carr, Oakland rally
for thrilling victory
RAIDERS 31,
CHIEFS 30
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Derek Carr threw a two-yard
touchdown pass to Michael Crabtree on the final play after the
game was extended by two
straight defensive holding calls,
and the Oakland Raiders snapped
a four-game losing streak with a
31-30 victory over the visiting
Kansas City Chiefs on Thursday
night.
With the Raiders’ season on the
line after the recent slump, Carr
led an 85-yard touchdown drive
in the final 2:25 to give Oakland
(3-4) a thrilling comeback win in a
game it trailed by nine points
heading into the fourth quarter.
Carr finished 29 for 52 for
417 yards and three touchdowns,
with Amari Cooper catching
11 passes for 210 yards and two of
the scores.
Alex Smith threw for 342 yards
and three touchdowns, but it
wasn’t enough for the Chiefs (5-2).
They lost consecutive games for
the first time since Oct. 11-18, 2015,
and their 12-game winning streak
in the AFC West was snapped.
The Raiders had an apparent
go-ahead touchdown pass to Jared Cook with 18 seconds left that
was overturned when replay
ruled he was down at the 1. An
offensive pass interference on Michael Crabtree wiped out another
touchdown on the next play.
But holding calls on Ron Parker
and Eric Murray set the stage for
the final play. Carr hit Crabtree in
the front corner of the end zone to
tie it at 30. Giorgio Tavecchio won
it with the extra point, setting off a
celebration on a wild night that
included Oakland running back
Marshawn Lynch getting ejected
in the second quarter for shoving
an official.
Newton doesn’t talk to media
Quarterback Cam Newton declined to speak to reporters for the
second consecutive day.
Panthers spokesman Steven
Drummond said the former
league MVP gave no explanation
as to why he wouldn’t participate
in his weekly news conference
ahead of Sunday’s game against
Chicago. Drummond was seen
speaking to Newton at his locker
for several minutes during the
team’s open locker room session.
NFL players are subject to fines
for not talking to the media.
Newton’s decision comes two
weeks after he apologized for
comments he said were “extremely degrading and disrespectful to
women.” Jourdan Rodrigue, the
female reporter from the Charlotte Observer whom Newton’s
sexist comments were directed at,
returned to work this week after
taking time off.
When reporters entered the
Panthers’ locker room Thursday,
Newton had the volume so high
on a sound system playing music
that it made it difficult for other
players to conduct interviews. He
turned the music off after about 15
minutes.
When asked about Newton’s
decision to not speak to reporters,
Coach Ron Rivera said, “I thought
he had a press conference today
but apparently not.”
Also Thursday, three-time allpro middle linebacker Luke Kuechly missed his third straight day
of practice with a concussion
while wide receiver Kelvin Benjamin missed a second consecutive
day of practice with inflammation
in his left knee.
BUCCANEERS: Jameis Winston said his injured right shoulder is “getting better every single
day,” but the Tampa Bay quarterback still isn’t throwing in practice.
“We made a decision to hold
him another day from throwing.
He did everything else,” Coach
Dirk Koetter said. “I fully expect
that Jameis takes all the snaps”
Friday.
JAGUARS: Running back
Leonard Fournette said his ankle
feels good and he “most definitely” will be healthy enough to play
Sunday at Indianapolis.
Fournette missed a second consecutive practice because of a
sprained right ankle.
JETS: Running back Bilal
Powell is expected to play at Miami on Sunday after practicing
fully for the first time since straining a calf muscle nearly two weeks
ago. Powell was hurt early in New
York’s win at Cleveland on Oct. 8
and hadn’t fully participated in
practice since then.
VIKINGS: Quarterback Teddy Bridgewater said he “definitely” believes he will play this season after returning to practice for
the first time in almost 14 months.
Bridgewater was cleared to rejoin the team Wednesday on the
field where he dislocated his left
knee and tore multiple ligaments
in a non-contact drill less than
two weeks before the 2016 season
began. The 24-year-old quarterback said his knee was feeling fine
the day after his first practice,
though he wasn’t taking any hits.
FALCONS: Atlanta signed
defensive tackle Ahtyba Rubin, a
former starter with Cleveland and
Seattle. Rubin, 31, was cut by
Denver on Tuesday.
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Redskins’ Jonathan Allen pursued the Raiders’ Derek Carr last month. Before his injury Sunday, Allen had given the pass rush a boost.
Allen’s injury shakes up the Redskins on defense
REDSKINS FROM D1
The Redskins placed the rookie
defensive lineman on injured reserve following surgery to repair a
Lisfranc injury in his left foot, but
coaches aren’t yet ruling him out
for the season. Allen suffered a
clean break in his midfoot, a person familiar with the situation
said, and could miss just eight
weeks as a result. In the best-case
scenario, Allen could return in
Week 15 against the Arizona Cardinals.
“We got better news after the
surgery that it wouldn’t be as
lengthy as some of these surgeries
typically are,” Coach Jay Gruden
said Thursday. “So that’s good. But
we still have to rehab it. He is a big
man, and sometimes bigger guys
take a little bit longer, but we will
wait and see.”
While they wait, the coaches
will hope somebody can slide in
and take Allen’s spot — particularly on passing downs, where the
rookie out of Alabama was so effective lining up opposite Matt
Ioannidis. The top candidate appears to be Anthony Lanier II, the
second-year lineman out of Alabama A&M.
Though Lanier played in four
games last season, he hasn’t been
active this season. The stakes will
be high: He would be facing an
Eagles offense ranked sixth in the
league in points per game and
third in yards. Philadelphia also
has the best third-down percentage in the NFL.
“He has all the ability in the
world,” defensive lineman Ziggy
Hood said of Lanier. “He’s capable
of doing the same job, if not better.”
Redskins coaches spent extra
time working with Lanier during
individual drills early in practice.
He’s expected to see action in passing situations and in the team’s
nickel package, helping Ioannidis
put pressure on Philadelphia
quarterback Carson Wentz.
“With a young guy like Ant, you
have to spend time with him,”
defensive lineman Stacy McGee
said. “You have to get his mind
right and make sure him and Matt
are meshing well when they’re on
the field together.”
Chemistry between defensive
linemen can be important, as Allen and Ioannidis showed consistently in the Redskins’ first five
games. With the two of them playing together and wreaking havoc,
the Redskins were able to rely on
more four-man pass rushes and
allow their linebackers to help in
coverage.
Washington has blitzed only on
30 percent of its defensive downs
this year — down slightly from
34 percent a season ago — but its
big bodies up front have been able
to keep opposing quarterbacks on
their toes.
Pro Football Focus tracks “pressure percentage” — taking into
account sacks, hits and hurries of
the quarterback — and Allen was
rated the team’s second-best defensive lineman, applying quantifiable pressure on 13 of 80 passrush snaps. Among the Redskins’
starters, only Ioannidis graded
higher.
The Redskins believe they have
a bit of insurance in case Lanier
isn’t quite ready for a high-impact
role.
They signed A.J. Francis, the
third-year lineman out of Maryland, to the practice squad and
then promoted him to the 53-man
roster. He spent some time with
the Redskins last season and was
also in training camp this year.
“Francis provides us some
depth as far as the interior, as far
as nose guard is concerned,”
Gruden said. “I don’t know which
combination we will use come
Monday, but it is good to get A.J.
back here.”
Defensive line coach Jim Tomsula likes to rotate his guys up
front, based on scheme, down and
need. That means players get reps,
they get rest, they don’t suffer as
much wear and tear on their bodies and they can slide into different spots along the line. Without
Allen, the Redskins could rely
more on McGee, Hood or Terrell
McClain in passing situations.
“This room is full of a bunch of
guys who aren’t selfish, that’s willing to put egos aside, play different
positions they normally don’t
play,” Hood said, “whether that’s
me playing nose, Terrell playing
four-technique and [McGee] playing four-technique. You got guys
doing that and willing to fight for
the guy next to you.”
If Lanier is limited or Francis
isn’t ready to go, coaches say they
will have options. It won’t be the
same as having Allen in there, but
it could represent their best
chance Monday.
“We’ve all been prepared the
same way,” McGee said. “We got
our different abilities, so maybe
we don’t do what he did, but we
can still get the job done.”
rick.maese@washpost.com
Master Tesfatsion contributed to this
report.
SALLY JENKINS
NFL is in a terrible legal cycle, all because of Goodell
JENKINS FROM D1
proceeding.”
The NFL’s courtroom dramas
all have the same thing in
common, whether the case is
Elliott’s or Tom Brady’s:
Questions of guilt or innocence
become totally obscured by the
league’s attempt to tilt the case.
“This has been a persistent
and consistent theme in the
NFL’s scorched-earth tactics
against its players” in
disciplinary hearings, sports
attorney Daniel Wallach said. “It
continually trips over itself when
it doesn’t need to. It is snatching
defeat from the jaws of victory
with ham-handed litigation
tactics.”
Crotty’s ruling is one more
addition to a rising pile of legal
rebukes to Goodell over his
abuse of power. In September,
Judge Amos Mazzant of the
Eastern District of Texas laid
into Goodell and his handpicked
rubber-stamp arbitrator Harold
Henderson for turning “a blind
eye” to basic facts and fairness in
Elliott’s case. Next up will be
Judge Katherine Polk Failla, who
will hear more arguments on
whether to enforce Elliott’s
suspension by Oct. 30 — and this
time the NFL may well find that
it has exhausted its favorite ploy.
The NFL’s legal strategy on
Goodell’s behalf is always the
same: It counts heavily on the
deep reluctance of judges to
interfere in arbitration under
labor law. League lawyer Dan
Nash argues that because NFL
players granted Goodell broad
disciplinary powers in Article 46
of the collective bargaining
agreement, they surrendered the
right to any judicial
intervention. But Crotty
disagreed. “That is quite wrong,”
he ruled.
BRENDAN MCDERMID/REUTERS
The NFL’s collective bargaining agreement gives Commissioner
Roger Goodell broad powers to make disciplinary decisions.
Can Goodell go too far? Is
there no way to check him? This
is an important question, not
just for the NFL but for all
employees and, frankly, all
judges. Arbitration can be
overturned only on very narrow
grounds: if the bench finds
misconduct or “fundamental
unfairness.”
In Deflategate, Brady’s lawyers
argued long and hard that he
was treated unfairly, and district
court Judge Richard Berman
agreed, finding “several
significant legal deficiencies” in
Goodell’s six-game suspension.
But Brady then lost at the
appellate level when a threejudge panel found Brady’s
contention was “hypertechnical”
and not potent enough.
Elliott appears to have a much
stronger case. His argument is in
no way hypertechnical; it’s raw
and blunt. The league denied
Elliott basic access to the
testimony against him by his
accuser. It also hid the fact that
league investigator Kia Roberts
declined to recommend
suspension because she found
the accuser not credible.
According to Judge Crotty’s
ruling, Elliott was “deprived of
opportunities to explore
pertinent and material
evidence.”
What’s so baffling about these
unfair tactics is that they don’t
strengthen the NFL’s
disciplinary authority. They
actually weaken it and open the
league to a whale of a legal
challenge.
“What the league should be
doing is ensuring that the
players and the union have
access to the same documents
and witnesses and materials,”
Wallach said. “If a level playing
field is ensured from an
evidentiary standpoint, then
rulings from Goodell are less
vulnerable.”
The NFL has fallen into a
terrible legal cycle because of
one man’s personal exigencies.
Goodell needed a public
relations stand on a domestic
violence case to make up for
earlier botchings, just as he
needed Deflategate to even the
score with owners who thought
he had botched Spygate. So
Elliott inherited the cycle of
unfairness, and it has become all
but impossible to tell whether
he’s guilty or innocent, and now
both sides probably will end up
bringing in their heavy legal
hitters, Paul Clement for the NFL
and Ted Olson for the players’
union, to file spiraling appeals as
they did in Deflategate.
NFL owners should have
reined in Goodell long ago.
Instead they let him wander on
to this shaky legal ground, and
now a judge may do their reining
for them. If Goodell can behave
this way, then what’s to prevent
other heads of corporate entities
from railroading their
employees? Your work cubicle
could be next.
Goodell’s conduct has eroded
basic faith in arbitration, and it
seems inevitable that a court will
restore it. The arbitration system
was written to declutter the
courts and settle labor disputes
more efficiently. It wasn’t written
to strip American employees of
basic citizenship rights and turn
them into residents of some
abstract legal Siberia. This was
the point that Olson made on
Brady’s behalf during the New
England quarterback’s federal
appeal, and in Elliott’s case, it
looks like a winner. As Olson
said, Goodell’s arbitration
standards “are damaging and
unfair . . . to collective
bargaining agreements
everywhere.”
sally.jenkins@washpost.com
For more by Sally Jenkins, visit
washingtonpost.com/jenkins.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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M2
The long and the short of it: Altuve and Judge take baseball to new heights
BY
D AVE S HEININ
new york — Every once in a
while, the planets align, giant
Jupiter and tiny Mercury, and we
get the two best players in the
American League Championship
Series at the same vector, in the
same camera shot, near the same
base, and we are left to remind
ourselves, for the millionth time,
baseball is a wondrous game. Aaron Judge, the New York Yankees’
rookie right fielder, will reach
down — way down — and pat Jose
Altuve, the Houston Astros’ second baseman, on the back, as he
did Wednesday after an RBI double in the third inning, and the
game will go on. But the wonder
remains.
It is a wonder Judge and Altuve
even play the same sport, let alone
that they are two of its greatest
practitioners — the leading candidates for AL MVP this season
and the engines of their respective teams’ offenses in the ALCS, a
series the Yankees lead, three
games to two, entering Friday
night’s Game 6 at Houston’s Minute Maid Park.
Judge, 25, is a 6-foot-7, 280pound mountain of muscle, the
likes of which the sport has never
seen, an NFL tight end in Yankees
pinstripes, a slugger who set a
rookie record this season with
52 home runs, including the longest and the hardest hit of the
year. He is a primary reason the
Yankees stand one win from the
World Series, having gone 4 for 9
with two homers, two doubles
and six RBI and contributing a
couple of dazzling defensive plays
as the Yankees swept Games 3, 4
and 5 at Yankee Stadium this
week.
Altuve, meanwhile, is listed at
5-6, 165 pounds but acknowledges he is actually 5-5. A 27-year-old
Venezuelan, he is a wizard with
both the bat and the glove and a
speeding blur on the bases, a
three-time AL batting champ, the
first player in history to lead his
league in hits outright four
straight seasons. He hit three
homers in Game 1 of the division
series against Boston — joining a
short list, which includes Babe
Ruth and Albert Pujols, of players
who have done that in a postseason game — and almost singlehandedly willed the Astros to victories over the Yankees in Games 1
and 2 in Houston, scoring the
go-ahead runs in each with daring base running and robbing the
Yankees of hits in the field.
“I don’t really care how tall he
is. It’s his ability that speaks for
itself,” Astros Manager A.J. Hinch
said of Altuve. “He’s the most
consistent player in the league, in
a league that has elite performers
anywhere . . . Five-six, 6-6, 100
pounds, 200 pounds, 300 pounds
— it’s more about what he does,
not about the package it comes
from.”
But if Judge and Altuve are the
focal points of their respective
lineups, the ones you never want
to see at the plate at the biggest
moments, they are also the largest black holes, sucking in their
JUSTIN LANE/EPA-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Aaron Judge of the Yankees and
the Astros’ Jose Altuve are the
favorites in the AL MVP race.
teams’ entire production, when
they disappear. In the Yankees’
two losses in Houston, Judge
went 1 for 7 with three strikeouts,
leaving his postseason batting average to that point at .129 (4 for
31) with 19 strikeouts. In the Astros’ three losses in the Bronx,
Altuve was 0 for 10 and scored
just one run.
Yankees Manager Joe Girardi
suggested Altuve and Judge, as
outliers by virtue of their respec-
tive sizes, can be victims of strikezone biases on the part of umpires, with umpires calling strikes
on Judge that are actually below
his strike zone and on Altuve on
pitches that are actually high.
Some advanced metrics back up
that claim, with Judge, according
to ESPN, ranking third in low
strikes “framed against” — low
balls that are called strikes.
“It’s part of what’s going to
happen to him because he’s so
tall,” Girardi said. “I think there
are some pitches that were called
on him during the series that
haven’t necessarily been strikes.
There’s a big difference between 1
and 1 [count] and 2 and 0 [or] 2
and 1. There’s a big difference in
the way it changes an at-bat. . . . If
you’re an umpire that sees
500 pitches a week, in your mind
you’re going to have an idea of
what’s a strike and not a strike.
And the rare bodies are the Altuves and the Judges. So a lot of
times they might get more or
[fewer] strikes called on them
because [their strike zones are]
different.”
To reach their current status,
both Judge and Altuve had to
overcome plenty of built-in biases
within the sport about their respective body types. Position
players of Judge’s size rarely last
in the majors, their strike zones
too big, their swings too long.
Players of Altuve’s size rarely
make it to the big leagues, with
5-5 Freddie Patek, who retired in
1981, being the last.
When Altuve was 16, the Astros
rejected him at a tryout because
of his size, but Altuve’s father
begged the team to give his son a
second tryout, and the Astros
eventually signed him for just
$15,000. And despite hitting .327
with an .867 on-base-plus-slugging percentage in the minors,
none of the leading prospectranking websites named him
among the top 100 prospects in
the game. Even as he became one
of baseball’s best hitters, Altuve
has had to deal with inherent
doubts, puzzled looks, whispered
jabs and even outright jokes
about his size.
“I’ve had to battle for every
single hit,” he once told
ESPN.com. “As soon as I cross the
white line, I feel the same size as
everyone else.”
As for Judge, despite his prodigious power and huge numbers at
Fresno State, nearly every team in
baseball passed over him until the
Yankees took him with the 32nd
pick of the 2013 draft — and even
the Yankees passed over him
once, taking a third baseman with
the 26th pick. He debuted in the
majors last September, with 42
strikeouts in 84 at-bats, and as
recently as March, he was still
competing for a spot on the Yankees’ Opening Day roster.
“There were a lot of unknowns,” Judge said of the spring
training roster battle. “There was
talk of, ‘You’re going back to Triple-A,’ ‘You’re not going to be the
starting right fielder,’ or, ‘Are we
going to platoon you and some
other outfielders?’ I knew what I
Dodgers
capture
the NL
pennant
NLCS FROM D1
Los Angeles as the best team in
baseball over the entirety of the
season — and won the Dodgers
their first pennant since Kershaw
was in diapers. He has three Cy
Young Awards. None mean what
Thursday meant to him.
“It means everything,” Kershaw said in a delirious Dodgers
celebration room, his hair soaked
with beer and champagne. “It’s
why you play this game. All the
other stuff, all the individual stuff
is great, and I’ll look back on it
when I retire.
“But people don’t remember
that stuff. People remember people that win the World Series.
This is a really special moment
for me, and hopefully with four
more wins, it’s even more special.”
Because Kershaw has been the
centerpiece of this generation of
Dodgers, because he is the constant in their run of five straight
division titles, he should take the
longest, deepest breath, smile the
widest grin and exhale most thoroughly. His six-inning, three-hit,
one-run performance might not
have been his most dominant.
But it will forever show that when
an ace was needed, an ace
showed up. He pushed these
modern-day Dodgers through a
barrier they had never felled
before.
“No one — no one — that I’ve
ever met works harder behind
the scenes than Clayton does,”
said third baseman Justin Turner,
named the MVP of the series.
But this dismantling of the
Cubs, it came from all angles and
involved almost all the Dodgers,
JOHN STARKS/DAILY HERALD/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Enrique Hernandez, center, got to celebrate like this three times Thursday. This was his third-inning grand slam, one of his three homers.
who had 11 hits and nine runs by
the fourth inning. Hernandez,
one of several Dodgers who can
play — and play effectively — all
over the field, belted home runs
on each of the first two pitches he
saw, the second a third-inning
grand slam that broke the game
open — en route to seven RBI.
And the Dodgers showed the
complete nature of their roster by
rolling out their bullpen, suddenly the most trustworthy in the
game. Converted starter Kenta
Maeda, right-hander Brandon
Morrow and untouchable closer
Kenley Jansen worked the last
three frames without incident.
Over the five games, the Cubs
never scored a run against Los
Angeles relievers, against whom
they went — get this — 4 for 50
(.080).
So this was, in fact, total domination. The Dodgers’ 104-win
season was marred by a bizarre
stretch in which they lost
16 times in 17 games straddling
August and September. But they
blew away Arizona in the division
series, a sweep in which there
was never any doubt. And against
the Cubs, they were relentless in
absolutely suffocating what is
normally among the game’s most
dangerous lineups. Chicago’s hit
was capable of. I wanted to go out
and prove it. . . . The ups and
downs, that’s baseball life. That’s
what I live for, play for. To a
certain extent I enjoy failure. It’s
part of the game.”
There is a mutual admiration
between Judge and Altuve, born
of the understanding that despite
their obvious gifts, neither can do
what the other does. They spoke
at length at the All-Star Game in
July and have connected again in
fleeting moments during the
ALCS. They almost certainly will
finish 1-2 in MVP voting when
results are announced in November.
“He hits the ball way farther
than anybody in the big leagues,”
Altuve said. “He did everything to
win the MVP in the regular season. But what I like the most
about him is how humble he is. . . .
If he wins the MVP, I think that it
couldn’t happen to a better guy,
because he works really hard and
I like the way he plays.”
Altuve might beat out Judge for
the MVP award. He has a slight
edge in wins above replacement,
as calculated by baseball-reference.com, and had a more consistent season than Judge, who endured a much-examined twomonth slump in the second half.
But when he gets around Judge,
Altuve is just like the rest of us,
gazing on in wonder at what the
big man can do on a baseball field.
“Maybe in another life,” Altuve
said, “I want to be Aaron Judge
and hit all those homers.”
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
totals, game by game: four, three,
eight, five and four. Kris Bryant
and Anthony Rizzo, the Cubs’
best two hitters, went 5 for 37
(.135) in the series. The Dodgers
have thus outscored their playoff
opponents 48-19.
“We were the best team all year
long,” Manager Dave Roberts
said. “These guys over there —
they believed.”
That belief began right here at
Wrigley, where last fall, Kershaw
was thumped in the sixth game of
the NLCS — seven hits and five
runs in five innings — and the
Dodgers had to endure the Cubs’
pennant-winning
celebration.
Worse, when spring arrived, it
was the Dodgers who opened the
season at Wrigley. A quirk, to be
sure, but they had to watch the
Cubs receive their World Series
rings.
That day, Friedman worked his
way through the clubhouse, curious as to how players would take
in that scene. Some chose to
watch from the dugout. Some just
stayed in the clubhouse.
“But the common theme was,”
Friedman said, “how much they
wanted for our home opener next
year — for the visiting team to
experience the same thing.”
Now they have a chance. The
Dodgers will host Game 1 of the
World Series on Tuesday at Dodger Stadium regardless of their
opponent, be it the New York
Yankees or the Houston Astros.
And it’s highly likely that the
starting pitcher that night will be
none other than Kershaw, who
needed only 89 pitches in Game 5
and will be on his regular four
days’ rest.
In the din Thursday night, that
seemed like more than four days
away.
“This is what we work so hard
for,” Kershaw said. “You got to
celebrate hard. To be able to get to
the World Series, that’s the second-best thing you can do.”
The best is to win it, of course.
That’s what the 1988 team did.
That’s what Gibson and Hershiser, Jackie Robinson and Sandy
Koufax, Steve Garvey and Tommy
Lasorda — that’s what they all
did. Now the ghosts have company. The Dodgers are back in the
World Series.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
Sticking around for senior year at Virginia is paying o≠ for Kiser, Blanding
BY
G ENE W ANG
Shortly after the Virginia football team was embarrassed, 5210, by archrival Virginia Tech to
close last season with a 2-10
record, Cavaliers linebacker Micah Kiser began considering
whether he wanted to come back
for his final year of eligibility.
Entering the NFL draft certainly was an option for the ACC’s
leader in tackles, especially given
Virginia’s futility over most of the
past dozen seasons and what at
the time appeared dim prospects
for a turnaround.
“Last year with that Virginia
Tech game, that was a really sour
feeling in the mouth, kind of like,
‘Wow, can I really go through
something like this again?’ ” Kiser said. “That was kind of like the
worst feeling I ever had in my life,
and I was like, ‘Is it really worth
another season feeling like
that?’ ”
He decided it was. Kiser —
along with senior safety Quin
Blanding, a fellow first-team allACC selection — had too much
invested in the program to depart
without having given Coach
Bronco Mendenhall’s blueprint
for prosperity one more season to
unfold under their leadership.
“They had plenty of reason not
to come back — a new coach and a
2-10 season on top of very little
winning football,” said Mendenhall, adding he didn’t lobby either
player much. “But it matters a lot
to me that they trusted me and
gave the opportunity and were
willing to kind of give me a
second chance, that they saw
enough that this could be better
and thought it was going to be
better.”
Behind Kiser and Blanding,
the Cavaliers (5-1, 2-0 ACC) are
18th in major college football in
total defense after finishing last
season 79th. A victory in Saturday’s game against Boston College (3-4, 1-3) at Scott Stadium
would secure a bowl berth for
Virginia for just the second time
since 2008.
Kiser, meanwhile, ranks first in
the ACC again this season in
tackles per game (14.4), and Blanding is second (10.2).
Known for stout defenses
throughout 11 years as coach of
Brigham Young, Mendenhall began orchestrating the revival in
Charlottesville by simplifying the
playbook, allowing the defense to
focus on swarming to the football
rather than absorbing terminology.
Last weekend, Virginia limited
North Carolina to 257 total yards
in a 20-14 win on the road. Two
weeks ago, the Cavaliers permitted 255 total yards to visiting
Duke in a 28-21 victory. It’s the
first time since 2012 that Virginia
has held consecutive Football
Bowl Subdivision opponents to
fewer than 300 yards of total
offense.
But it hasn’t been only defensive modifications that elevated
Mendenhall into contention for
ACC coach of the year after preseason voting among media
members tabbed Virginia to finish last in the Coastal Division.
The Cavaliers are second in the
Coastal, a half-game behind unbeaten Miami, with their next
two games against opponents
who are a combined 1-6 in the
ACC.
The poise of quarterback Kurt
Benkert, according to coaches
and teammates, has enabled Virginia to win games it may not
have last season. The graduate
transfer’s 15 touchdown passes
are second in the conference, one
behind reigning Heisman Trophy
winner Lamar Jackson of Louisville. Benkert’s three interceptions are the second fewest in the
ACC among players with at least
200 passing attempts.
“I think it’s just confidence,”
said Benkert, who’s on pace to
become the first player in school
history to pass for at least
3,000 yards and 30 touchdowns
in one season. “More of, ‘We know
that we can do this,’ instead of,
‘We hope we can do this,’ and I
think that’s the biggest deal.”
Fully healthy after recovering
from a torn anterior cruciate ligament two years ago, Benkert
pointed to last season’s game
against the Cardinals as a lightbulb moment helping to trigger
Virginia’s offensive upswing.
Even though the Cavaliers lost,
32-25, the offense began to grow
more comfortable operating at
the deliberate pace that’s now
paying dividends.
Virginia opened last season at
a quicker clip under offensive
coordinator Robert Anae, who
was an assistant at Texas Tech for
Mike Leach and at Arizona for
Rich Rodriguez, both of whom
deployed high-octane attacks.
The Cavaliers, however, were
unable to produce extended
drives, thus not allowing the defense adequate rest. The defense
has had plenty of time to catch its
breath on the sideline in most
games this season.
“We had been used to going
fast just every single play,” Benkert said. “It’s different. It’s a little
bit harder to get into a rhythm,
but it also really helps our defense
a lot. If we are clicking when we’re
going slower, then it just keeps
them off the field so much longer,
so you have your pros and cons
with it, but it’s been working for
us.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
D6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
Family matters cast a large shadow for Minnesota’s Pitino
BY
R OMAN S TUBBS
new york — If Minnesota Coach
Richard Pitino was dreading
Thursday’s Big Ten basketball
media day at Madison Square
Garden, he didn’t show it. He
arrived at the podium with coffee
in hand and a smirk on his face.
He didn’t look the least bit concerned about answering questions about his father, Rick Pitino,
the disgraced Hall of Fame coach
who was officially fired by Louisville on Monday in the wake of an
FBI investigation that has rocked
college basketball.
But Richard Pitino, 35, was still
wrestling with how difficult the
past few weeks have been for his
family. The first five questions he
answered were about the promising season ahead in Minneapolis
— with four starters returning
from a team that went 24-10 and
made the NCAA tournament last
season, the Gophers are legiti-
mate Big Ten contenders — but he
couldn’t escape the inevitable
probing of his emotions.
“It’s been really hard,” he said.
“You just want for him, more than
anything . . . you see your dad, you
want him to be happy. You want
him to be healthy.”
That the league’s annual opening event was in New York for the
first time felt strange, but it was a
fitting backdrop on a morning
when the conference’s coaches
had to confront uncomfortable
questions about the state of their
sport. The Big Ten has not been
contacted by the FBI in the recruiting scandal, Commissioner
Jim Delany said, and none of the
league’s programs have been ensnared in the investigation.
But there were reminders all
morning. There was Archie Miller, the first-year coach at Indiana, whose brother, Arizona
Coach Sean Miller, has come under fire after one of his assistants
was arrested in the probe. Also
making his debut was Illinois
Coach Brad Underwood, whose
former school, Oklahoma State,
had an assistant coach arrested.
There was Iowa Coach Fran
McCaffery, who told reporters
earlier this week that he has
turned in programs for violations, and Michigan State Coach
Tom Izzo, who urged everyone
not to paint college basketball
with a wide brush.
“There’s going to be 10 percent
problems in every profession,
whether it be coaching, whether
it be in business, whether it be
writers,” Izzo said. “I guess you
could go to policemen to priests,
nowadays to everybody, there’s a
10 percent.”
Delany did his best to change
the subject in tipping off the
event. He announced that the
league would expand from an
18-game conference schedule to
20 next season, with teams play-
ing seven opponents twice and six
others once.
But the cloud hanging over the
sport remained at the forefront.
Richard Pitino, who served two
stints as an assistant at Louisville
under his father, said he has used
his team’s preseason preparation
as a reprieve.
“It’s tough when it unfolds in
the public. When things like this
happen, it brings you closer together,” he said. “You learn who
your friends are. You learn who is
really there for you when you
need them. We’re a strong family,
and he’s a strong person, so he’ll
get through it.”
Pitino wasn’t the only one doing some soul searching in the
wake of the Louisville scandal
this week; the fallout has touched
every corner of the league. On the
late September day when charges
were levied against assistant
coaches from four schools, Maryland Coach Mark Turgeon said he
called Jim Haney, executive director of the National Association of
Basketball Coaches, to make suggestions on potential changes for
the game.
“It’s an ugly time for [college
basketball]. I do think the majority of the coaches are not involved
in that. . . . I was surprised that
the FBI was involved,” Turgeon
said.
“I knew eventually stuff was
going to start coming out like
that,” said Michigan State sophomore Miles Bridges, who was
voted preseason player of the
year. “I didn’t know it was going
to be that big for the FBI to get
into it.”
Delany said he was not
shocked when the investigation
surfaced. He cited “at least nine
intersections between college
basketball and the FBI in my life,”
most of which were gambling
investigations.
Pitino didn’t seem worried that
Uncertain
DACA fate
leaves Uria
on edge
‘Thought she was American'
It was a cold Friday in February
2016, and Nicolle’s parents, Ivan
Uria and Giovanna Portugal,
were acting strange when she got
home from school.
“Why don’t you go upstairs to
your room?” Nicolle remembers
her mother saying. “We need to
talk.”
Nicolle’s first thought was that
she might be adopted. But she
looked so much like her two older
sisters, that couldn’t be true.
All three of them, as far as she
knew, were born in the United
States. Nicolle’s first memory was
of her whole family eating ice
cream at the Leesburg Outlets in
Virginia. Her father was holding a
camcorder, and she and her sisters, still learning English, were
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
remembers one friend answering.
“I have a friend who is an
immigrant and undocumented,”
Nicolle remembers telling her,
and she left it at that.
“I was really afraid last year,”
Nicolle said later. “I didn’t want to
be out there with my identity
because of a lot of the things
Trump was saying. Now I don’t
mind, because it helps people
understand better.”
Once Aleman finished speaking, Nicolle waited to see him
one-on-one. She wanted to ask
about James Madison’s academic
programs. She wanted to know
whether there was a Hispanic
presence on campus. She loved
hearing about colleges and all the
majors, clubs and classes that
make knowledge seem limitless.
“What is your status?” Aleman
asked her after they had been
talking for a bit.
“I have DACA,” she said.
“Can you get it renewed?” he
replied and assured her he was
not asking for admissions purposes.
“No,” Nicolle said before catching herself. “Well, maybe. I don’t
know yet.”
They spoke for a few more
minutes, and then Nicolle hurried out of the door.
URIA FROM D1
Sept. 5 was the day President
Trump rescinded the Deferred
Action for Childhood Arrivals
(DACA) program, which was created in 2012 for undocumented
immigrants who came to the
United States as children, a group
known as “dreamers.” Nicolle
came from Bolivia when she was
just a year old and received DACA
status in September 2016. That
gave her a Social Security number, working papers and, more
than anything, opportunity.
Then Trump discontinued
DACA last month and Nicolle,
with about 690,000 other dreamers, was thrown into a state of
confusion. She was not eligible to
reapply for DACA at the Oct. 5
deadline. If a fractured Congress
doesn’t reach an immigration
deal in the near future, her DACA
status will expire next September
and she will become undocumented. If that happens, Nicolle
will be subject to deportation and
not able to legally drive or work. A
handful of colleges have programs for undocumented students, but she would not be eligible for in-state tuition without
DACA, and her options would be
slim.
Her plan was to apply to
schools abroad, shoot for Virginia
Commonwealth University if that
didn’t work out, try out for the
volleyball team, major in journalism or business and one day head
a media company. But the DACA
decision turned that future, once
brimming with goals, into a waiting game stuffed with questions,
ones only Congress can answer
and that make her wonder whether she has a future here at all.
“It’s like you’re sailing in a
beautiful ocean and then you
crash and it’s raining a lot,”
Nicolle said earlier that October
day, sitting in the half-lit living
room of the only home she has
ever known. “And you’re stuck,
and you don’t know where to go,
which way to swim. It’s dark, and
you can’t see. That’s how I feel
right now with DACA maybe ending.”
At this moment, however, Nicolle was just worried about getting to her volleyball match in
time. Finally, on her third try,
Annandale’s team manager answered her call, and Nicolle sat up
in her seat.
“Is the JV still playing? . . .
Uh-huh. . . . Okay. . . . How many
sets left?” she asked. “Tell everyone I will be there on time.”
Nicolle went to hang up before
reaching the phone back to her
ear.
“Hey,” she said firmly, making
sure he was still on the line. “I
promise I’ll be there on time.”
his name would be tied to the
probe, even though his namesake’s already is. He already has
had a wild year. Entering last
season, he was on the hot seat
before improving Minnesota’s
record by 16 wins and being honored as Big Ten coach of the year.
He began this preseason with
unbridled optimism: He’s expected to have a top-five team in the
league and has traction for the
future with the school investing
$166 million into new facilities
for its athletic programs. But with
his father and mentor out of a job,
the tenor of the upcoming season
has changed considerably in the
past month.
“It’s going to be different that
he’s not coaching. It’s been 30some years, right? That’s going to
be different,” Pitino said. “It’s
been weird. I’m there for him. I
love him. I wouldn’t trade him for
anyone else in the world.”
PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Nicolle Uria, left, walked with her brother-in-law, Alan Olmos, and sister Lizzett Uria after an Annandale volleyball match.
ABOVE PHOTOS: Nicolle gets her strongest support amid the uncertainty from her parents, Giovanna Portugal and Ivan Uria.
laughing and saying their names
for him in between bites.
“All she ever knew was America, and she thought she was
American,” Portugal said. “She
loved her country. It was her
country.”
But as she got older, Nicolle
noticed her family was different
from others. When she was 10,
her grandparents, who used to
live in their basement and took
care of Nicolle when she was
little, went back to Bolivia because, as her mother told her,
“they missed home.” When there
were parent lunches at school,
her sisters came instead. Her
mother was busy working three
jobs as a house cleaner, babysitter
and receptionist. Her father was a
cashier at a gas station near their
house. They were always saving
up to make car payments, pay
rent and put Nicolle’s older sisters through college.
When Nicolle asked to go to
France for an eighth-grade field
trip, her mother said she couldn’t
because they didn’t have the money. When she hassled her parents
to take her to get her learner’s
permit, they said they were too
busy at work. But the whole truth
was that if Nicolle left the country, she would not be able to get
back in. She was not allowed to
drive, even as all her friends were
learning. The family legally immigrated 16 years ago because
Ivan and Giovanna had work visas. But the visas eventually expired, and the family stayed anyway. Ivan and Giovanna were now
applying for green cards, and her
sisters were doing the same, and
Nicolle wanted to get her learner’s permit but . . .
“You’re undocumented,” her
“It’s like you’re sailing in a beautiful ocean and
then you crash. . . . And you’re stuck, and you
don’t know where to go, which way to swim.
It’s dark, and you can’t see. That’s how I feel.”
Nicolle Uria
parents told her in her room, and
she immediately started to cry.
Before Nicolle could start asking questions, they handed her a
folder full of transcripts and paperwork and old tests she had
aced. They told her there were
forms for her to sign. There was a
way for life to go on as it always
had. There was hope.
On the front of the red folder,
written in black Sharpie, were
four letters: DACA.
‘You don’t know their story’
Before Nicolle rushed to her
volleyball match that October
day, she sat on the edge of an
Arlington classroom, binder on
her lap, No. 2 pencil ready to
scratch notes onto paper.
“Right now, all the high school
students I work with are afraid,”
Carlos Aleman, a James Madison
professor and guest speaker at
this Dream Project meeting, said
to the room. “Afraid of what’s
going to happen. Afraid of DACA
ending.”
Nicolle stopped writing and
nodded her head in agreement.
She looked across the room at
Lizzett Uria, her older sister and
the Dream Project’s executive director, and the two locked eyes for
a few long moments. Then Nicolle
dropped her head and kept recording what Aleman said.
She never felt fear before
Sept. 5, a day she spent in Washington taking photos for a friend’s
magazine project. She was not
near her phone or a television as
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
stood in front of an American flag
and said, “I’m here today to announce that the program known
as DACA, that was effectuated
under the Obama administration, is being rescinded.” Her
mother immediately texted Nicolle, asking where she was, who
she was with and when she would
be home.
When Nicolle walked through
the door that evening, Portugal
told her what happened. Her parents and sisters all have temporary green cards, putting them on
track for permanent residence,
and now Nicolle was the only one
with an uncertain future. Nicolle
focused on the six-month period
Trump left for negotiations on
DACA. They had to come up with
something, she thought. She set
up notifications for the president’s tweets so she would be
alerted every time he posted. For
more than a month now, as
Trump has tweeted about the
NFL and North Korea and hurricane relief, Nicolle has stared
through her cracked iPhone
screen, looking for the word
“DACA,” hoping her fate becomes
clearer.
“But you shouldn’t be afraid,”
Aleman continued as more than a
dozen students, a handful with
DACA, quietly listened. “You’ve
already done the hard part.”
The hard part for Nicolle has
been trying to stand out and
blend in at the same time.
She always had been active in
school and the community, but
having DACA made her want to
do even more. She stars as an
outside hitter on the Annandale
volleyball team in the fall, does
gymnastics in the winter and
runs track in the spring. She may
try lacrosse for the first time this
year. She does community service
with the Key Club, collecting
change for those affected by Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane
Irma. She is president of the
school’s Hispanic Leadership
Club, a member of Future Business Leaders of America and entertainment editor for the school
newspaper. She is a Girl Scouts
ambassador and has been part of
a troop since kindergarten.
But she still felt like she was
hiding. In the first months of
Trump’s presidency, Nicolle
heard some of her friends adopting opinions they saw on the
news. They called immigrants
criminals. They said those who
crossed the border are a part of
gangs. They said they should
leave.
“You don’t know their story,”
Nicolle would suggest.
“Well, how do you know?” she
‘She still has hope’
Nicolle walked quickly toward
the school entrance just before
7 p.m., hugging friends and waving to parents as she went.
“Hey Nicolle!” said a dad working the ticket table right outside
the gym. “Why are you so late?”
“Uh . . . ” Nicolle took a long
pause as she opened the door
behind her. “I had a school thing.”
Her team was already warming
up, and she took just three minutes to change into her uniform
and twist her hair into a tight
braid. As much as she likes the
Dream Project, where she can
discuss her immigration status
without fear of being judged, she
also enjoys the normality of playing sports. Physically, volleyball
gives her a chance to spike winners and celebrate with teammates between points. Emotionally, it gives her a break.
Few people inside the small
gym knew about Nicolle’s uncertain future. There is still time for
DACA to be saved, and Nicolle
will track the headlines as the
deadline inches closer. She still
could go to college, with or without DACA, if she is accepted to a
program for undocumented students that is affordable for her
family. And if Nicolle does need to
go back to Bolivia, Portugal will
go with her.
“It’s supposed to be her senior
year of high school, such a fun
and exciting time,” her sister
Lizzett said. “But she is the only
one in the family who doesn’t
have a stable status right now. She
doesn’t know anything about Bolivia. It’s sad for us, but she remains so positive. She still has
hope.”
On nights like this, with her
family watching from the bleachers and the referee’s whistle echoing off the brick walls, there was
something settling for Nicolle
about working toward a clear
objective, tracking the ball as it
sailed back and forth over the net,
doing everything she could to
keep it from hitting the floor.
Annandale lost to Hayfield in
straight sets, and after the teams
shook hands, Nicolle slowly
walked over to Lizzett.
“Don’t hug me,” Nicolle said,
laughing. “I’m so sweaty.”
“Tough one,” Lizzett said, hugging her anyway.
“Yeah, but it’s okay,” Nicolle
answered. “There’s always the
next one.”
Soon the crowd filtered into
the night and Nicolle, Lizzett and
Lizzett’s
husband
walked
through a misty rain and to the
car. It had been a long day, and it
was time for Nicolle to go home.
jesse.dougherty@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
SU
HIGH SCHOOLS
TOP 20
S C HE D U LE
TODAY
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Dunbar at H.D. Woodson, 6
Eastern at Ballou, 6
Kingsman Academy at Fairmont Heights, 7
Phelps at Coolidge, 6
Richard Wright at Cesar Chavez, 6:30
Theodore Roosevelt at Bell, 6
1. Wise (7-0)
Next: Today vs. Eleanor Roosevelt
(6-1), 7 p.m.
2. Gonzaga (7-1)
Next: Oct. 27 at Good Counsel (5-2),
7 p.m.
MARYLAND
Arundel at Chesapeake, 6:30
Blair at Clarksburg, 6:30
Blake at Rockville, 7
Broadneck at Meade, 6:30
Chopticon at Huntingtown, 7
Churchill at Seneca Valley, 6:30
Damascus at Walter Johnson, 7
Douglass at Gwynn Park, 6:30
Einstein at Northwood, 6:30
Eleanor Roosevelt at Wise, 7
Glen Burnie at Old Mill, 6:30
Great Mills at St. Charles, 7
Hammond at Howard, 7:30
Kennedy at Gaithersburg, 6:30
La Plata at Calvert, 7
Largo at Northwestern, 7
Laurel at High Point, 7
Leonardtown at North Point, 7
Magruder at Springbrook, 6:30
Mount Hebron at Long Reach, 7
North County at Annapolis, 6:30
Northern at McDonough, 7
Northwest at Whitman, 6:30
Oakland Mills at Glenelg, 7
Paint Branch at Sherwood, 7
Poolesville at Watkins Mill, 7
Quince Orchard at Wheaton, 6:30
River Hill at Reservoir, 7
Severna Park at Northeast, 6:30
Southern at South River, 6:30
Thomas Stone at Lackey, 7
Westlake at Patuxent, 7
Whitman at Northwest, 6:30
Wilde Lake at Marriotts Ridge, 7
Wootton at Walkersville, 6:30
3. Damascus (7-0)
Next: Today at Walter Johnson
(2-5), 7 p.m.
4. St. John’s (4-2)
Next: Saturday vs. DeMatha (4-3),
1 p.m.
5. Stone Bridge (7-0)
Next: Today at Tuscarora (6-1),
7 p.m.
6. Westfield (7-0)
Next: Today at Centreville (6-1),
7 p.m.
7. Centreville (6-1)
Next: Today vs. Westfield (7-0),
7 p.m.
8. Good Counsel (5-2)
Next: Today vs. Carroll (3-4), 7 p.m.
9. Spalding (4-2)
Next: Today vs. St. Frances (7-0),
7 p.m.
10. North Point (7-0)
Next: Today vs. Leonardtown (0-7),
7 p.m.
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
11. C.H. Flowers (7-0)
Next: Saturday vs. Suitland (7-0),
2 p.m.
Simple throws with logical reads have helped Westfield quarterback Noah Kim thrive ahead of Friday’s game against No. 7 Centreville.
FOOTBALL NOTES
12. Madison (6-2)
Next: Oct. 27 vs. Oakton (1-6),
7 p.m.
13. South Lakes (6-1)
Next: Today vs. McLean (0-7), 7 p.m.
14. DeMatha (4-3)
Next: Saturday at St. John’s (4-2),
1 p.m.
15. Freedom-Woodbridge (7-0)
Next: Today at Potomac (2-4),
7 p.m.
16. Friendship Collegiate (4-3)
Next: Saturday vs. Fort Hill (7-0),
1 p.m.
17. H.D. Woodson (5-2)
Next: Today vs. Dunbar (2-5), 6 p.m.
18. Bullis (6-0)
Next: Saturday at Episcopal (3-2),
2 p.m.
19. Quince Orchard (6-1)
Next: Today at Wheaton (2-5),
6:30 p.m.
20. Broad Run (7-0)
Next: Today vs. Freedom-South
Riding (1-6), 7 p.m.
More online
For game summaries, video recaps
and photo galleries for matchups
throughout the region, visit the
High School Sports section at
washingtonpost.com.
For video highlights of the
weekend’s top plays, along with
score updates and links to The
Post’s latest high school sports
content, follow us on Twitter
@WashPostHS.
To learn how to submit scores and
stats to appear in the newspaper
and online, email us at
hss@washpost.com.
Westfield looks for simple solutions
F ROM
STAFF REPORTS
Coaches always have struggled
to find a balance between what is
simple enough for their offense
to run effectively yet complicated
enough to keep defenses on their
toes. A lot has to do with personnel and balance, but a good
portion is stuff that coaches
know just plain works.
For the No. 6 Westfield Bulldogs and sophomore quarterback Noah Kim, it’s a really basic
recipe. They run the ball behind
a big offensive line — they’re
averaging 131 rushing yards per
game — and give Kim simple
throws with logical reads.
That’s not an offense with
training wheels for a young quarterback, Coach Kyle Simmons
said. It’s foolproof Football 101.
“I think for any high school
quarterback, if you give them too
much to look at, you’re asking for
trouble,” he said.
Instead, Westfield (7-0) uses
basic pro-style formations players have grown up with and basic
blocking schemes and route
combinations, then mixes and
matches the two. Simmons can
take a certain inside run play and
call it with three receivers on the
field or two tight ends.
He can call the same downfield passing play in a heavy
formation or a more spread-out
look. This is one of the main ways
offensive coaches can keep game
plans simple enough to strip out
bells and whistles but complex
enough that defenses don’t know
what’s coming.
“We can run the ball, and we
can throw the ball, and we can
get in multiple formations,” Simmons said. And the Bulldogs can
run almost all of their plays out
of any of those formations.
Heading into Friday’s game
against No. 7 Centreville, Simmons already has cut down on
the number of plays he wants his
offense to have ready. He rather
would do the basic things —
running the football and protecting the passer — really well than
install exotic packages that his
team might not execute every
time.
— Jacob Bogage
Blake seeks history
During Blake’s offseason
workouts, about 60 players attended almost every session.
Some also ran track or practiced
with teammates away from the
group setting.
They wanted to be stronger,
faster and more unified to erase
the stigma of four consecutive
losing seasons.
The commitment has worked,
and Blake (6-1) is preparing for
Friday’s game at Rockville with
extra incentive.
The Bengals are one win from
tying a school record for victories, set in 2011. While the team
won’t talk about the occasion
this week, the players are eager
to chase history.
“I know the boys and I know
people outside are really excited,
and our fans have been really
supportive,” Coach DeShawn Anderson said. “I know they’re
aware of their success.”
Blake, which has a combined
17-35 record the past five seasons, endured a season-opening
loss to No. 3 Damascus. But the
squad has since won six straight,
scoring at least 31 points four
times.
In that stretch, running back
Isaac Smith has emerged. The
senior has 1,002 total yards,
including 346 yards and five
touchdowns the past two weeks.
Smith will look to build on
that and power Blake’s milestone
pursuit against the winless
Rams.
— Callie Caplan
Suitland’s big chance
It has been a few years since
Suitland played in a game like
this. Mired in mediocrity since
2014, the Rams have emerged as
one of the biggest surprises in
the region, boasting an undefeated record through seven games.
They will have the chance to
answer their doubters Saturday
at No. 11 C.H. Flowers (7-0), a
Prince George’s County defensive
juggernaut intent on padding its
own résumé with the playoffs
looming. It’s the biggest challenge to date for Suitland, even if
Coach Ed Shields is downplaying
its significance.
“I don’t know about it being a
big moment for the program,”
Shields said.
The Rams have only one win
over a team with a winning
record — Douglass. So, yes, Suitland has something to prove.
The Rams have built their
success on the legs of senior
running back Antwan Squire,
who leads the area with
1,384 rushing yards and is fourth
with 14 touchdowns.
The 5-foot-9 Squire added
about 15 pounds of muscle before
the season, Shields said, making
him a more physical runner. His
vision is much improved, too, a
combination that’s proved unsolvable for opposing defensive
coordinators.
It’s the type of challenge the
vaunted Jaguars defense relishes.
— Joshua Needelman
Stallions’ stretch run
After spending the first half of
their season trying to prove they
can compete with the best teams
in Northern Virginia, the South
County Stallions turn their attention to a more direct challenge:
winning the Patriot District.
The Stallions (3-4) spent September and early October facing
the likes of Westfield, Centreville
and Madison. Last week, they
took down West Springfield, currently the leader in the Patriot
District, 35-7. This week, they get
Robinson, which sits one spot
ahead of them in the district
rankings.
“These are district games now,
which means we have to throw it
all out onto the field,” Coach
Gerry Pannoni said. “But we’ve
been through weeks of playofflike games already. We’re used to
a big game environment.”
Pannoni said he doesn’t mind
the structure of this year’s schedule — strong area teams early,
important district games later. It
has prepared his team for the
challenge of winning out against
West Springfield, Robinson and
Lake Braddock.
“If you feel like you have a
good
program,
competing
against the best can only make
you better,” Pannoni said. “If you
don’t have a good program,
you’re just being fed to the
wolves. Luckily, I feel like we
have a good program, so we’re
ready now for these late games.”
VIRGINIA
Annandale at Mount Vernon, 7
Brentsville at Culpeper, 7
Champe at Rock Ridge, 7
Dominion at Loudoun County, 7
Falls Church at Wakefield, 7
Forest Park at Gar-Field, 7
Freedom-South Riding at Broad Run, 7
Freedom-Woodbridge at Potomac, 7
Hayfield at West Potomac, 7
Herndon at Yorktown, 7
Hylton at Battlefield, 7
Jefferson at Stuart, 7
Lake Braddock at Fairfax, 7
Loudoun Valley at Riverside, 7
Marshall at Lee, 7
McLean at South Lakes, 7
Oakton at Chantilly, 7
Osbourn at Patriot, 7
Potomac Falls at Briar Woods, 7
Robinson at South County, 7
Stone Bridge at Tuscarora, 7
Stonewall Jackson at Osbourn Park, 7:30
Warren County at Manassas Park, 7
Washington-Lee at Langley, 7
West Springfield at W.T. Woodson, 7
Westfield at Centreville, 7
Woodbridge at Colgan, 7
Woodgrove at Heritage, 7
PRIVATE
Carroll at Good Counsel, 7
John Carroll at Severn School, 4
National Collegiate at Capitol Christian, 7
Norfolk Academy at John Paul the Great, 6
Pallotti at Archbishop Curley, 7
Potomac School at Paul VI, 2:30
Sidwell Friends at Maret, 4
St. Frances at Spalding, 7
St. Joseph at Avalon, 7
St. Paul’s at St. Mary’s-Annapolis, 7
SATURDAY
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Anacostia at Wilson, 2
Cardozo at McKinley, 2
Fort Hill at Friendship Collegiate, 1
Model at KIPP, 2:30
Paul Public Charter at Imhotep Public Charter, 1
MARYLAND
DuVal at Oxon Hill, 2
Friendly at Bladensburg, 2
Parkdale at Central, 2
Potomac at Bowie, 2
Suitland at C.H. Flowers, 2
Surrattsville at Crossland, 2
VIRGINIA
Edison at T.C. Williams, 1
Hampton Roads Academy at NVK, 3
PRIVATE
Bullis at Episcopal, 2
DeMatha at St. John’s, 1
Flint Hill at Saint James, 7
Georgetown Prep at Landon, 1
Mount Carmel (Md.)
at Annapolis Area Christian, 7
National Christian at St. Michael, 2
O’Connell at Trinity Episcopal, 2
St. Albans at St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes, 2
St. Christopher’s at Bishop Ireton, 7
St. Mary’s Ryken at McNamara, 1
— Michael Errigo
ON FOOTBALL
In the College Football Playo≠ era, there are no dreadful losses, only superior wins
ON FOOTBALL FROM D1
how Troy could beat LSU and then
lose to South Alabama, which lost
at home to Idaho, taking into
account the emotions involved in
the natural Idaho-South Alabama
conference rivalry.
Just last weekend, then-No. 2
Clemson had a “bad loss” at
Syracuse, then-No. 5 Washington
had a “bad loss” at Arizona State
and then-No. 8 Washington State
had a “bad loss” at California. In
the Associated Press rankings,
Clemson fell five spots,
Washington seven spots and
Washington State seven spots, a
discrepancy owing to Clemson’s
image as a defending national
champion and the state of
Washington’s positioning in the
Pacific Time Zone, long a scourge
in a nation of Eastern myopia.
Before last weekend, Clemson
had been playing some of the
highest-brow football you could
ever wish to see, Washington had
been metronomic in its all-threephases excellence, and
Washington State had just
finished flexing its hangover
resistance when it upset Southern
California and then traveled to
Oregon and romped. Syracuse
was a 3-3 team that had lost to
plucky Middle Tennessee,
Arizona State was a 2-3 team
whose defense had shown the
basic consistency of air in
allowing 30 or more points in
every game this season, and
California was a 3-3 team that lost
its first three Pacific-12
Conference games by a combined
113-51.
Syracuse won, 27-24.
Arizona State won, 13-7, and
held Washington to 230 total
yards that should have been
officially deducted to half that for
how wretched the Huskies
looked.
California won, inconceivably,
37-3.
Because these things are
impossible to digest, some fans
probably felt alarm, but it’s
doubtful that alarm reached the
meeting room. For one thing, the
committee hasn’t started meeting
yet and won’t issue its first
findings until Oct. 31. For another,
the committees have seen some
bad losses before, and they have
known what to do with those:
ADRIAN KRAUS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Coach Dabo Swinney and defending national champion Clemson
remain in the playoff hunt despite an astonishing loss at Syracuse.
place them within something
called, half-hilariously, a “body of
work.” Clemson, in particular,
already has a stirring collection of
good wins (Auburn, at Louisville,
at Virginia Tech), with chances for
more.
In 2014, Ohio State reached the
playoff at No. 4 despite having
lost at home to a team, Virginia
Tech, that stood 6-6 at the time of
the final rankings. In 2015,
Michigan State and Oklahoma
reached the playoff at Nos. 3 and 4
despite having lost, either on the
road or at a neutral site, to teams
that stood 5-7 at the time of the
final rankings. All three of those
qualifiers had enough mustard
elsewhere in the schedule to
forgive the “bad loss” — decisively
so with Michigan State and
Oklahoma and barely so with
Ohio State.
So far, after three previous
seasons and 12 spots bestowed
from that room in Texas, only that
2014 Ohio State berth loosed all
that much of a big squabble.
Using tiny margins, the
committee, on its final night of
deliberations in a preposterous
land, inched the No. 6 Buckeyes
above Baylor and TCU and into
No. 4. The legit argument came
down to Baylor (11-1) or Ohio
State (12-1), whose quality rout in
Indianapolis over a 10-2
Wisconsin team in the Big Ten
championship game edged out
Baylor’s quality win at home over
a 9-2 Kansas State team. Further,
Ohio State’s 3-1 nonconference
record with wins at Navy (7-5) and
over Cincinnati (9-3) inched past
Baylor’s 3-0 nonconference
record with wins over SMU (1-11),
Northwestern State of the third
tier (6-6) and Buffalo (5-6).
In the mild 2016 argument
between Ohio State (11-1) and
Penn State (11-2), with Penn State
holding both a Big Ten title and a
win over Ohio State, the largest
determining factor might have
been Ohio State’s roaring win at
Oklahoma.
It’s the wins, bud.
Of course, it’s not a real playoff
until it’s senseless, and this
playoff concept has made a little
too much sense so far, all told.
Real playoffs make no sense, so
that the country spends months
producing playoff seedings and
then weeks (or days)
delegitimizing them, which is
how we had six months
determining that the Cleveland
Indians were 102-60 while the
New York Yankees were 91-71, but
based on fleeting autumn
moments, it’s the Yankees we’re
still watching. Maybe the College
Football Playoff won’t find that
treasured senselessness until it
expands to eight teams.
Still, last weekend heightened
a prospect often mulled: that of a
two-loss playoff qualifier. We’re
down to eight unbeaten teams in
the Football Bowl Subdivision,
just six from the top tier. If a first
two-loss team will break the
mold, it will figure to do so by
outweighing any bad loss with a
small smorgasbord of good wins.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20 , 2017
scoreboard
FOOTBA LL
BASEBALL
BASKETBALL
HOCKEY
NFL
Raiders 31, Chiefs 30
MLB postseason
NBA
NHL
NFC
CHIEFS ................................... 10
RAIDERS ................................ 14
CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
EASTERN CONFERENCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Best of 7
ATLANTIC
W
Toronto ........................................1
New York .....................................0
Philadelphia .................................0
Brooklyn.......................................0
Boston..........................................0
L
Pct
0 1.000
1 .000
1 .000
1 .000
2 .000
GB
—
1
1
1
11/2
SOUTHEAST
W
Orlando ........................................1
Washington .................................1
Atlanta.........................................1
Charlotte......................................0
Miami...........................................0
L
Pct
0 1.000
0 1.000
0 1.000
1 .000
1 .000
GB
—
—
—
1
1
CENTRAL
W
Detroit .........................................1
Indiana .........................................1
Milwaukee ...................................1
Cleveland .....................................1
Chicago ........................................0
L
0
0
0
0
1
Pct
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
.000
GB
—
—
—
—
1
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .......................................2
Memphis ......................................1
San Antonio .................................1
Dallas ...........................................0
New Orleans ................................0
L
Pct
0 1.000
0 1.000
0 1.000
1 .000
1 .000
GB
—
NORTHWEST
W
Utah .............................................1
Portland .......................................1
Oklahoma City .............................1
Minnesota....................................0
Denver..........................................0
L
Pct
0 1.000
0 1.000
0 1.000
1 .000
1 .000
GB
—
—
—
1
1
PACIFIC
W
x- L.A. Clippers ............................0
x- L.A. Lakers...............................0
Golden State................................0
Sacramento .................................0
Phoenix ........................................0
L
0
0
1
1
1
GB
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 5
Washington .................. 3
Dallas ............................ 2
N.Y. Giants .................... 1
L
1
2
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.600
.400
.167
PF
165
117
125
105
PA
122
113
132
132
SOUTH
W
Carolina ......................... 4
New Orleans ................. 3
Atlanta .......................... 3
Tampa Bay .................... 2
L
2
2
2
3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.600
.600
.400
PF
128
145
121
118
PA
122
116
109
121
NORTH
W
Minnesota ..................... 4
Green Bay ..................... 4
Detroit .......................... 3
Chicago ......................... 2
L
2
2
3
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.667
.500
.333
PF
122
147
161
105
PA
103
135
149
148
WEST
W
L.A. Rams ...................... 4
Seattle .......................... 3
Arizona ......................... 3
San Francisco ................ 0
L
2
2
3
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.600
.500
.000
PF
179
110
119
113
PA
138
87
158
146
AFC
EAST
W
New England ................. 4
Buffalo .......................... 3
Miami ............................ 3
N.Y. Jets ....................... 3
L
2
2
2
3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.600
.600
.500
PF
172
89
61
109
PA
159
74
84
130
SOUTH
W
Tennessee ..................... 3
Jacksonville .................. 3
Houston ........................ 3
Indianapolis .................. 2
L
3
3
3
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.500
.500
.500
.333
PF
146
156
177
119
PA
164
110
147
195
NORTH
W
Pittsburgh ..................... 4
Baltimore ...................... 3
Cincinnati ...................... 2
Cleveland ...................... 0
L
2
3
3
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.500
.400
.000
PF
118
114
84
94
PA
102
124
83
157
WEST
W
x-Kansas City ................ 5
Denver ........................... 3
L.A. Chargers ................ 2
x-Oakland ...................... 2
L
1
2
4
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.600
.333
.333
PF
177
108
116
124
PA
130
97
131
126
x-late game
10
0
10
7
0 — 30
10 — 31
FIRST QUARTER
Kansas City: FG Butker 53, 10:14.
Oakland: Cooper 38 pass from Carr (Tavecchio kick),
8:11.
Kansas City: Kelce 10 pass from A.Smith (Butker kick),
4:17.
Oakland: Cooper 45 pass from Carr (Tavecchio kick),
:40.
SECOND QUARTER
Kansas City: Hill 64 pass from A.Smith (Butker kick),
8:51.
Kansas City: FG Butker 39, 1:06.
THIRD QUARTER
Oakland: Washington 4 run (Tavecchio kick), 10:45.
Kansas City: A.Wilson 63 pass from A.Smith (Butker
kick), 7:08.
Kansas City: FG Butker 37, :47.
FOURTH QUARTER
Oakland: FG Tavecchio 26, 11:53.
Oakland: Crabtree 2 pass from Carr (Tavecchio kick),
:00.
Attendance: 55,090.
CHIEFS
First Downs .......................................... 19
Total Net Yards ................................... 425
Rushes-Yards ................................. 23-94
Passing ................................................ 331
Punt Returns ..................................... 2-13
Kickoff Returns ................................. 2-37
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 25-36-0
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 1-0
Penalties-Yards .............................. 8-108
Time Of Possession ......................... 30:36
RAIDERS
32
505
21-88
417
1-0
1-19
29-52-0
0-0
10-97
29:24
RUSHING
Kansas City: K.Hunt 18-87, Hill 2-7, A.Smith 1-0, Spiller
2-0.
Oakland: Washington 9-33, Richard 9-31, Carr 1-15,
Lynch 2-9.
PASSING
Kansas City: A.Smith 25-36-0-342.
Oakland: Carr 29-52-0-417.
RECEIVING
Kansas City: Hill 6-125, Robinson 5-69, Kelce 4-33,
K.Hunt 4-30, D.Harris 2-16, A.Wilson 1-63, Travis 1-3,
Thomas 1-2, A.Hunt 1-1.
Oakland: Cooper 11-210, J.Cook 6-107, Richard 4-45,
Crabtree 3-24, Washington 3-7, Roberts 1-15.
THURSDAY’S RESULT
Kansas City at Oakland, Late
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Tampa Bay at Buffalo (-31/2), 1
New Orleans (-4) at Green Bay, 1
Baltimore at Minnesota (-6), 1
Tennessee (-51/2) at Cleveland, 1
N.Y. Jets at Miami (-3), 1
Jacksonville (-3) at Indianapolis, 1
Arizona vs L.A. Rams (-3) at London, UK, 1
Carolina (-3) at Chicago, 1
Dallas (-6) at San Francisco, 4:05
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh (-5), 4:25
Seattle(-4) at N.Y. Giants, 4:25
Denver at L.A. Chargers (PK), 4:25
Atlanta at New England (-3), 8:30
BYE: Detroit, Houston
NCAA
THURSDAY
No. 25 Memphis 42, houston 38
SATURDAY
No. 1 Alabama vs. Tennessee, 3:30
No. 2 Penn State vs. No. 19 Michigan, 7:30
No. 4 TCU vs. Kansas, 8
No. 5 Wisconsin vs. Maryland, Noon
No. 8 Miami vs. Syracuse, 3:30
No. 9 Oklahoma at Kansas State, 4
No. 10 Oklahoma State at Texas, Noon
No. 11 Southern Cal at No. 13 Notre Dame, 7:30
No. 14 Virginia Tech vs. North Carolina, 3:30
No. 15 Washington State vs. Colorado, 10:45
No. 16 South Florida at Tulane, 7
No. 18 Michigan State vs. Indiana, 3:30
No. 20 UCF at Navy, 3:30
No. 21 Auburn at Arkansas, 7:30
No. 23 West Virginia at Baylor, 8
No. 24 LSU at Mississippi, 7:15
MONDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Philadelphia (-5), 8:30
THURSDAY’S GAME
Miami at Baltimore, 8:25
AMERICAN LEAGUE
NEW YORK 3, HOUSTON 2
Friday, Oct. 13: Houston 2, New York 1
Saturday, Oct. 14: Houston 2, New York 1
Monday, Oct. 16: New York 8, Houston 1
Tuesday, Oct. 17: New York 6, Houston 4
Wednesday, Oct. 18: New York 5, Houston 0
Friday, Oct. 20: New York (Severino 14-6) at Houston
(Verlander 15-8), 8:08 (FS1)
x-Saturday, Oct. 21: New York at Houston, 8:08 (FS1)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
LOS ANGELES 4, CHICAGO 1
Saturday, Oct. 14: Los Angeles 5, Chicago 2
Sunday, Oct. 15: Los Angeles 4, Chicago 1
Tuesday, Oct. 17: Los Angeles 6, Chicago 1
Wednesday, Oct. 18: Chicago 3, Los Angeles 2
Thursday, Oct. 19: Los Angeles 11 at Chicago 1
x-Saturday, Oct. 21: Chicago at Los Angeles, 4:08or 8:08
x-Sunday, Oct. 22: Chicago at Los Angeles, 7:38 (TBS)
Dodgers 11, Cubs 1
L.A.
AB R H
Taylor cf .........................4 2 2
Turner 3b........................5 1 1
Bellinger 1b ....................5 2 3
Puig rf.............................5 3 2
Forsythe 2b ....................5 0 1
Hernandez lf...................4 3 3
Barnes c..........................5 0 1
Culberson ss...................5 0 3
Kershaw p ......................3 0 0
Farmer ph.......................1 0 0
Pederson ph ...................1 0 0
TOTALS
43 11 16
BI BB SO AVG
0 1 0 .316
1 0 2 .333
1 0 2 .318
0 0 0 .389
2 0 1 .200
7 1 0 .444
0 0 1 .133
0 0 1 .455
0 0 1 .000
0 0 0 .000
0 0 1 .200
11 2 9
—
CHICAGO
AB
Almora cf........................4
Schwarber lf...................3
Bryant 3b........................4
Rizzo 1b..........................4
Contreras c.....................4
Russell ss .......................3
Baez 2b...........................3
Zobrist rf........................3
Martin ph .......................1
La Stella ph ....................1
Happ 2b ..........................1
TOTALS
31
R
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
BI BB SO AVG
0 0 2 .188
0 1 2 .167
1 0 0 .200
0 0 0 .059
0 0 1 .222
0 0 0 .125
0 0 3 .167
0 0 2 .000
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .250
1 1 10
—
L.A...............................115
CHICAGO.....................000
200
100
H
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
4
002 — 11 16
000 — 1 4
0
0
LOB: Los Angeles 7, Chicago 4. 2B: Taylor (1), Bellinger
(2), Forsythe (1). 3B: Culberson (1). HR: Hernandez (1),
off Quintana; Hernandez (2), off Rondon; Hernandez
(3), off Montgomery; Bryant (1), off Kershaw.
L.A.
IP
H R ER BB SO ERA
Kershaw...........................6 3 1 1 1 5 2.45
Maeda ..............................1 0 0 0 0 2 0.00
Morrow ............................1 1 0 0 0 3 0.00
Jansen..............................1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
CHICAGO
IP
Quintana ..........................2
Rondon.............................1
Lackey ..............................2
Duensing..........................2
Montgomery ....................2
H
6
2
3
0
5
R ER BB SO ERA
6 6 1 1 10.2
1 1 0 2 6.00
2 2 0 2 9.82
0 0 1 2 2.25
2 2 0 2 13.5
WP: Kershaw (1-0); LP: Quintana (0-1). Quintana
pitched to 4 batters in the 3rd. Inherited runnersscored: Rondon 3-3. WP: Lackey 2. T: 3:06. A: 42,735
(41,072).
MONDAY, OCT. 30
Denver at Kansas City, 8:30
T RA NSA C T I ONS
No. 25 Memphis 42,
Houston 38
HIGH SCHOOLS
0
10
21
14
21 — 42
7 — 38
HOU: Birden 1 run (Novikoff kick), 3:29 first.
HOU: Catalon 4 run (Novikoff kick), 9:55 second.
HOU: FG Novikoff 30, :17 second.
MEM: P.Taylor 2 run (Patterson kick), 11:42 third.
HOU: Catalon 1 run (Novikoff kick), 6:14 third.
MEM: Pollard 93 kickoff return (Patterson kick), 5:57
third.
HOU: Catalon 1 run (Novikoff kick), 6:14 third.
MEM: P.Taylor 9 run (Patterson kick), :30 third.
MEM: P.Taylor 1 run (Patterson kick), 11:04 fourth.
HOU: Dunbar 8 pass from Postma (Novikoff kick), 6:44
fourth.
MEM: P.Taylor 5 run (Patterson kick), 5:14 fourth.
MEM: Dykes 21 pass from Ferguson (Patterson kick),
1:28 fourth.
Atlanta Falcons: Signed DT Ahtyba Rubin. Waived DL
Taniela Tupou.
San Francisco 49Ers: Signed TE Logan Paulsen to a
one-year contract. Released CB Leon Hall.
Washington Redskins: Placed DL Jonathan Allen injured
reserve. Signed DL A.J. Francis and DL Ondre Pipkins to
the practice squad.
MEMPHIS
First Downs ..................................... 28
Rushes-Yards ............................. 23-30
Passing .......................................... 471
Comp-Att-Int .......................... 33-53-1
Return Yards .................................. 195
Punts-Avg. ................................. 7-31.0
Fumbles-Lost .................................. 1-1
Penalties-Yards ............................ 2-10
Time Of Possession .................... 22:25
CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE
RUSHING
Cfl: Fined Winnipeg OL Matthias Goossen an undisclosed amount for an unnecessary hit to a vulnerable
player (Micah Awe) in the game against the BC Lions.
Memphis: P.Taylor 14-39, Henderson 4-(minus 1),
(Team) 1-(minus 2), Ferguson 4-(minus 6). Houston:
Birden 21-106, Catalon 22-65, Postma 8-49, King 3-19.
NFL
NHL
Nhl: Fined St. Louis F Vladimir Sobotka $5,000 for
high-sticking Chicago F Patrick Sharp during and Oct. 18
game in St. Louis.
Carolina Hurricanes: Activated D Trevor van Riemsdyk
from injured reserve.
Colorado Avalanche: Reassigned D Andrei Mironov to
San Antonio (AHL).
Los Angeles Kings: Signed D Derek Forbort to a two-year
contract and F Brooks Laich to a one-year contract.
HOUSTON
26
54-239
315
29-41-1
57
6-41.5
2-2
7-72
37:35
GIRLS’ FALL TENNIS
PRIVATE
Episcopal 7, St. Andrew’s 0
Flint Hill 5, Bullis 2
Potomac School 7, St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes 0
VOLLEYBALL
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
School Without Walls def. H.D. Woodson (25-7, 25-21,
0-0)
VIRGINIA
Fairfax def. Lake Braddock (25-22, 25-17, 25-21)
Langley def. McLean (25-21, 21-25, 25-15, 25-19)
Oakton def. Centreville (28-26, 25-16, 25-14)
W.T. Woodson def. West Springfield (25-21, 14-25,
25-20, 18-25, 15-5)
Woodgrove def. Riverside (25-22, 25-15, 25-12)
PRIVATE
Holy Cross def. Good Counsel (25-17, 20-25, 25-20,
21-25, 15-9)
Stone Ridge def. Holy Child (1-0, 1-0, 1-0)
FIELD HOCKEY
MARYLAND
Good Counsel 4, Winters Mill 1
VIRGINIA
Fairfax 1, W.T. Woodson 0
Westfield 2, Madison 0
PRIVATE
Episcopal 3, Holy Child 0
National Cathedral 2, Bullis 1
Potomac School 3, Holton-Arms 1
St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes 7, Sidwell Friends 0
PASSING
BOYS’ FALL SOCCER
Memphis: Ferguson 33-53-1-471. Houston: King 0-1-0-0,
Postma 29-40-1-315.
MARYLAND
High Point 0, Bowie 0
Huntingtown 4, Patuxent 1
Meade 6, Broadneck 4
Severna Park 1, Old Mill 0
Sherwood 1, Damascus 0
PRIVATE
Maret 4, Sidwell Friends 1
RECEIVING
Memphis: A.Miller 10-178, Pollard 9-91, Mayhue 5-63,
P.Taylor 3-21, Dykes 2-41, Magnifico 2-29, K.Jones 1-28,
Coxie 1-20. Houston: Bonner 8-121, King 7-51, Dunbar
7-43, Leday 3-21, Catalon 2-28, Lark 1-38, Birden 1-13.
GIRLS’ FALL SOCCER
LOCA L G OL F
BOWIE
FAIRFAX
Hal Curtis, Sirlester Griffin, Andy Reininger and Chris
Photangtham won Wednesday’s BSGA Closing Day with
a 124. Larry Crum, John Snow and Richard Dutton were
closest to the pin. Don Dalzell defeated Larry Blum in the
Senior Men’s Club Championship in 19 holes.
Frank Endmondson, Mike Fabio and Fred Vogel won the
Retired Men Closing Day event with a 121.
BRYCE RESORT
MOUNT VERNON
Steve Koons and Lou Haley won the Retired Men’s
2-Man Team Championship with a 57.
Nick Semuta, Barry Thomas and Oscar Rodriguez won
the Best Ball Tourament.
11/2
11/2
—
—
—
x-late game
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Wilson 13, Banneker 0
MARYLAND
Calvert 4, Great Mills 1
Urbana 2, Spalding 1
PRIVATE
Georgetown Day 2, Sandy Spring 0
Good Counsel 2, Elizabeth Seton 0
Rockbridge 9, Riverdale Baptist 0
FOOTBALL
MARYLAND
Richard Montgomery 42, Bethesda-Chevy Chase 0
MLS
METROPOLITAN
W
New Jersey ..................... 6
Columbus ........................ 5
Pittsburgh ....................... 4
Philadelphia .................... 4
Carolina ........................... 3
Washington .................... 3
N.Y. Islanders ................. 3
N.Y. Rangers ................... 1
L
1
2
2
3
1
3
3
5
OL PTS.
0
12
0
10
1
9
0
8
1
7
1
7
1
7
2
4
GF
31
21
25
26
14
23
19
20
GA
21
15
29
17
12
24
21
30
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay ...................... 6
Toronto ........................... 6
Ottawa ............................ 3
Detroit ............................ 4
Boston ............................. 3
Florida ............................. 2
Buffalo ............................ 1
Montreal ......................... 1
L
1
1
1
3
3
3
4
5
OL PTS.
1
13
0
12
3
9
0
8
0
6
0
4
2
4
1
3
GF
29
34
24
23
20
17
18
11
GA
23
22
18
21
21
20
28
27
CENTRAL
W
St. Louis .......................... 6
Chicago ........................... 4
Nashville ......................... 4
Colorado .......................... 4
x-Dallas ........................... 3
Winnipeg ........................ 3
Minnesota ....................... 1
L
2
2
2
4
3
3
1
OL PTS.
0
12
2
10
1
9
0
8
0
6
0
6
2
4
GF
27
28
19
23
14
18
15
GA
21
20
17
21
14
23
16
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................... 5
Vegas .............................. 5
Calgary ............................ 4
Anaheim ......................... 2
Vancouver ....................... 2
San Jose .......................... 2
Edmonton ....................... 2
x-Arizona ........................ 0
L
0
1
3
3
3
3
4
5
OL PTS.
1
11
0
10
0
8
1
5
1
5
0
4
0
4
1
1
GF
21
20
18
12
15
13
13
12
GA
10
15
19
17
20
16
20
25
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Toronto 117, Chicago 101
Oklahoma City 105, New York 84
L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, Late
Vancouver at Buffalo, 7
San Jose at New Jersey, 7
Pittsburgh at Florida, 7:30
Washington at Detroit, 7:30
Minnesota at Winnipeg, 8
Montreal at Anaheim, 10
WESTERN
W
Vancouver ......................15
Seattle ...........................13
Portland .........................14
Sporting KC ....................12
Houston .........................12
San Jose .........................12
Dallas .............................10
Real Salt Lake ................12
Minnesota United ..........10
Colorado ...........................9
Los Angeles .....................8
L
11
9
11
8
10
14
10
15
17
18
17
T PTS
7
52
11
50
8
50
13
49
11
47
7
43
13
43
6
42
6
36
6
33
8
32
GF
49
49
58
39
54
36
43
47
45
31
44
GA
47
39
49
27
45
58
47
54
67
48
62
SUNDAY’S MATCHES
Chicago at Houston, 4
Colorado at Seattle, 4
Columbus at New York City FC, 4
Los Angeles at Dallas, 4
Minnesota United at San Jose, 4
New England at Montreal, 4
New York at D.C. United, 4
Orlando City at Philadelphia, 4
Sporting KC at Real Salt Lake, 4
Toronto FC at Atlanta United FC, 4
Vancouver at Portland, 4
TE NNI S
At Olympic Stadium in Moscow
Purse: Men: $745,940 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
MEN’S SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Daniil Medvedev, Russia, def. Pablo Carreno Busta (1),
Spain, 6-3, 6-3; Mirza Basic, Bosnia-Herzegovina, def.
Lazlo Djere, Serbia, 6-1, 6-1; Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, def. Filip Krajinovic, Serbia, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4; Alexander
Bublik, Kazakhstan, def. Albert Ramos-Vinolas, Spain,
4-7, 7-5, 6-2.
WOMEN’S SINGLES — QUARTERFINALS
Daria Kasatkina, Russia, def. Aliaksandra Sasnovich,
Belarus, 6-4, 6-3; Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, def.
Vera Lapko, Belarus, 6-3, 4-6, 7-5; Julia Goerges (7),
Germany, def. Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, 6-3, 6-4; Natalia
Vikhlyantseva, Russia, def. Alize Cornet, France, 4-6,
7-5, 6-3.
MEN’S DOUBLES — QUARTERFINALS
Evgeny Donskoy and Andrey Kuznetsov, Russia, def.
Rogerio Dutra Silva, Brazil, and Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, 6-4,
6-1; Damir Dzumhur, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Antonio
Sancic, Croatia, def. Hans Podlipnik-Castillo, Chile, and A
Vasilevski, Belarus, 6-4, 7-6 (7-4); Juan Sebastian Cabal,
Colombia, and Denys Molchanov (3), Ukraine, def.
Mikhail Elgin and Daniil Medvedev, Russia, 6-4, 6-1.
Islanders 4, Rangers 3 (OT)
N.Y. ISLANDERS ................ 2
N.Y. RANGERS ................... 1
1
0
0
2
0 — 4
0 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, N.Y. Islanders, Lee 3 (Eberle, Pulock), 2:40
(pp). 2, N.Y. Rangers, Desharnais 2 (Shattenkirk, Staal),
5:02. 3, N.Y. Islanders, Nelson 4 (Ladd), 6:06.
WOMEN’S DOUBLES — SEMIFINALS
Nicole Melichar, United States, and Anna Smith, Britain,
def. Nadiia Kichenok, Ukraine, and Anastasia Rodionova,
Australia, 6-4, 6-1; Timea Babos, Hungary, and Andrea
Hlavackova (1), Czech Republic, def. Barbora Krejcikova
and Katerina Siniakova (3), Czech Republic, 4-6, 6-2,
10-8.
SECOND PERIOD
27
26
37 — 101
33 — 117
Scoring: 4, N.Y. Islanders, Barzal 1 (Bailey, de Haan),
1:15.
CHICAGO: Zipser 3-6 1-2 7, Markkanen 5-12 5-6 17,
Lopez 7-15 4-4 18, Grant 3-9 1-1 7, Holiday 5-16 1-1 15,
Felicio 2-2 0-0 4, Felder 2-9 2-2 6, Arcidiacono 0-2 0-0 0,
Blakeney 1-1 0-0 3, Pondexter 4-6 0-0 8, Nwaba 1-1 2-3 4,
Valentine 4-10 0-0 12. Totals 37-89 16-19 101.
THIRD PERIOD
TORONTO: Powell 5-11 2-2 15, Ibaka 3-8 0-0 8, Valanciunas 9-17 5-6 23, Lowry 4-7 3-3 12, DeRozan 2-9 7-8 11,
Anunoby 3-6 2-2 9, Miles 7-12 2-2 22, McKinnie 0-0 0-0 0,
Siakam 0-0 0-0 0, Poeltl 1-2 0-0 2, Wright 4-6 5-5 13,
VanVleet 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 39-83 26-28 117.
N.Y. Islanders 2 (Eberle G, Tavares G), N.Y. Rangers 1 (,
Zuccarello G, Zibanejad NG, Desharnais NG).
Three-point Goals: Chicago 11-33 (Valentine 4-7, Holiday 4-12, Markkanen 2-6, Blakeney 1-1, Felder 0-1,
Pondexter 0-1, Zipser 0-1, Lopez 0-1, Grant 0-1, Arcidiacono 0-2), Toronto 13-29 (Miles 6-9, Powell 3-6, Ibaka
2-4, Lowry 1-3, Anunoby 1-3, Wright 0-1, Valanciunas
0-1, VanVleet 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Chicago
39 (Markkanen, Lopez 8), Toronto 49 (Valanciunas 15).
Assists: Chicago 22 (Grant 7), Toronto 26 (Lowry 9).
Total Fouls: Chicago 23, Toronto 19. Technicals: Valanciunas. A: 19,800 (19,800).
SHOOTOUT
SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
SHOTS ON GOAL
N.Y. ISLANDERS .............. 13
10
13
2 — 38
N.Y. RANGERS ................. 12
12
13
4 — 41
Power-play opportunities: N.Y. Islanders 1 of 3; N.Y.
Rangers 0 of 1. Goalies: N.Y. Islanders, Halak 2-2-0 (41
shots-38 saves). N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 1-3-2 (38-35).
A: 18,006 (18,006). T: 2:47.
Predators 1, Flyers 0
NASHVILLE .............................. 0
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 0
0
0
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Nashville, Sissons 2 (Fiala), 3:49.
The top 25 teams in the USA Today preseason 2017-18
men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, final 2016-17 records, points based on 25
points for a first-place vote through one point for a
25th-place vote and previous ranking:
SHOTS ON GOAL
PTS
774
747
723
678
654
623
549
543
515
458
396
383
349
305
303
295
284
275
242
208
167
152
139
107
82
PVS
13
NR
4
5
7
8
10
21
1
11
NR
NR
22
20
NR
14
18
9
2
NR
15
NR
NR
12
NR
Others receiving votes: Texas A&M 76, Virginia 57,
Butler 43, Missouri 35, TCU 32, Rhode Island 31,
Providence 21, Wisconsin 21, Maryland 20, Oakland 19,
Oklahoma 19, Michigan 13, Texas 13, Oregon 12, Virginia
Tech 12, Creighton 6, Southern Methodist 6, Georgia 3,
Georgia Tech 3, Arkansas 2, Harvard 2, Florida State 1,
Nevada 1, South Carolina 1.
EUROPEAN OPEN
At Lotto Arena in Antwerp, Belgium
Purse: $696,300 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
PRESEASON COACHES POLL
RECORD
28-9
20-15
31-5
32-6
32-5
32-4
27-9
31-5
33-7
28-9
26-10
21-12
30-6
26-10
24-10
25-9
24-14
31-5
37-2
24-12
27-8
29-5
21-12
27-8
19-15
ATP
Scoring: 5, N.Y. Rangers, Zuccarello 2 (Smith), 3:29. 6,
N.Y. Rangers, Hayes 2 (Fast, McDonagh), 14:06.
NCAA
Duke (20)
Michigan State (9)
Kansas
Kentucky
Arizona (2)
Villanova
Florida (1)
Wichita State
North Carolina
West Virginia
Southern California
Miami (Fla.)
Cincinnati
Notre Dame
Minnesota
Louisville
Xavier
UCLA
Gonzaga
Northwestern
Purdue
Saint Mary's
Seton Hall
Baylor
Alabama
GA
35
41
44
38
47
46
59
46
55
52
58
KREMLIN CUP
FRIDAY’S GAMES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
GF
72
54
61
68
51
51
50
44
50
38
30
ATP/WTA
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
14
33
T PTS
8
68
8
56
7
55
9
54
5
53
8
47
6
42
9
39
6
39
9
39
5
32
Toronto 6, Detroit 3
St. Louis 5, Chicago 2
Los Angeles 5, Montreal 1
Tampa Bay 2, Columbus 0
Boston 6, Vancouver 3
N.Y. Islanders 4, N.Y. Rangers 3 (SO)
Nashville 1, Philadelphia 0
New Jersey 5, Ottawa 4 (OT)
Edmonton 2, Chicago 1 (OT)
St. Louis 4, Colorado 3
Carolina 2, Calgary 1
Dallas at Arizona, Late
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7
Boston at Philadelphia, 7
Cleveland at Milwaukee, 7
Detroit at Washington, 7
Portland at Indiana, 7
Orlando at Brooklyn, 7:30
Utah at Minnesota, 8
Sacramento at Dallas, 8:30
Golden State at New Orleans, 9:30
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 10
L
5
9
10
9
12
12
15
14
16
14
19
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
THURSDAY’S GAMES
FRIDAY’S GAMES
EASTERN
W
Toronto FC .....................20
New York City FC ...........16
Chicago ..........................16
Atlanta United FC ..........15
Columbus .......................16
New York .......................13
New England ..................12
Philadelphia ...................10
Montreal ........................11
Orlando City ...................10
D.C. United .......................9
x- late game
Detroit 102, Charlotte 90
Indiana 140, Brooklyn 131
Orlando 116, Miami 109
Washington 120, Philadelphia 115
Milwaukee 108, Boston 100
Memphis 103, New Orleans 91
Atlanta 117, Dallas 111
Utah 106, Denver 96
San Antonio 107, Minnesota 99
Houston 105, Sacramento 100
Portland 124, Phoenix 76
CHICAGO ............................ 23
TORONTO ........................... 25
MEMPHIS ................................. 0
HOUSTON ................................ 7
Pct
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
1/
2
1/
2
Raptors 117, Bulls 101
SUNDAY, OCT. 29
Minnesota vs Cleveland at London, UK, 9:30 a.m.
San Francisco at Philadelphia, 1
Oakland at Buffalo, 1
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 1
Carolina at Tampa Bay, 1
Chicago at New Orleans, 1
Atlanta at N.Y. Jets, 1
L.A. Chargers at New England, 1
Houston at Seattle, 4:05
Dallas at Washington, 4:25
Pittsburgh at Detroit, 8:30
BYE: L.A. Rams, Arizona, N.Y. Giants, Jacksonville,
Tennessee, Green Bay
WESTERN CONFERENCE
S OC C E R
1 —
0 —
1
0
Stefanos Tsitsipas, Greece, def. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, 7-6
(7-4), 5-6 retired; Diego Schwartzman (4), Argentina,
def. Ernesto Escobedo, United States, 6-3, 7-6 (7-5);
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (2), France, def. Kenny de Schepper,
France, 6-4, 6-3; David Goffin (1), Belgium, def. Frances
Tiafoe, United States, 7-6 (7-1), 6-2; David Ferrer (5),
Spain, def. Steve Darcis, Belgium, 7-5, 5-7, 6-3.
DOUBLES — QUARTERFINALS
Scott Lipsky, United States, and Divij Sharan, India, def.
Raven Klaasen, South Africa, and Rajeev Ram (3),
United States, 6-4, 4-6, 10-8; Ivan Dodig, Croatia, and
Marcel Granollers (2), Spain, def. Ben Mclachlan, Japan,
and Andres Molteni, Argentina, 6-2, 6-7 (7-4), 10-7;
Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico, and Julio Peralta, Chile, def.
Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, 1-6, 7-6 (10-8),
10-7.
STOCKHOLM OPEN
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Purse: $696,300 (WT250)
NASHVILLE .............................. 7
9
8 — 24
PHILADELPHIA ........................ 6
10
12 — 28
Power-play opportunities: Nashville 0 of 2; Philadelphia
0 of 5. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 4-1-1 (28 shots-28
saves). Philadelphia, Neuvirth 1-2-0 (24-23). A: 19,396
(19,543). T: 2:22.
SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Yuichi Sugita (7), Japan, def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus,
6-3, 3-6, 6-2; Kevin Anderson (2), South Africa, def.
Chung Hyeon, South Korea, 6-3, 6-2; Mischa Zverev (5),
Germany, def. Viktor Troicki, Serbia, 6-2, 6-3; Grigor
Dimitrov (1), Bulgaria, def. Jerzy Janowicz, Poland, 7-5,
7-6 (7-5); Juan Martin del Potro (4), Argentina, def.
Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany, 6-2, 7-6 (8-6).
Bruins 6, Canucks 3
VANCOUVER ........................... 1
BOSTON ................................... 4
2
1
0 —
1 —
3
6
WTA
FIRST PERIOD
LUXEMBORG OPEN
Scoring: 1, Vancouver, Dorsett 2 (Tanev, Del Zotto),
2:58. 2, Boston, Bjork 2 (Bergeron, Marchand), 3:29. 3,
Boston, Pastrnak 4, 9:03 (pp). 4, Boston, Bjork 3
(McAvoy, Krejci), 9:26 (pp). 5, Boston, Krejci 1
(Bergeron, Agostino), 10:40 (pp).
At CK Sportcenter Kockelsheuer in Luxembourg
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES — QUARTERFINALS
Scoring: 6, Boston, Marchand 4 (Bergeron, Bjork), 10:05.
7, Vancouver, Vanek 3 (Gagner, Del Zotto), 16:06 (pp). 8,
Vancouver, Horvat 3 (Baertschi, Boeser), 16:40.
Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-1, 6-2; Carina Witthoeft, Germany, def. Kiki
Bertens (3), Netherlands, 6-1, 6-2; Monica Puig, Puerto
Rico, def. Naomi Broady, Britain, 6-0, 5-7, 6-1; Elise
Mertens (5), Belgium, def. Heather Watson, Britain, 6-4,
6-4.
THIRD PERIOD
DOUBLES — QUARTERFINALS
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 9, Boston, Bergeron 1 (Marchand, Pastrnak),
11:53 (pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
VANCOUVER ........................... 8
9
12 — 29
BOSTON ................................. 18
7
10 — 35
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 1 of 6; Boston 4 of
8. Goalies: Vancouver, Markstrom 1-2-1 (18 shots-16
saves), Nilsson 1-1-0 (17-13). Boston, Khudobin 2-0-0
(29-26). A: 17,565 (17,565). T: 2:41.
Lesley Kerkhove, Netherlands, and Lidziya Marozava,
Belarus, def. Natela Dzalamidze, Russia, and Xenia
Knoll, Switzerland, 4-6, 6-2, 10-7; Anna-Lena Friedsam
and Antonia Lottner, Germany, def. Mihaela Buzarnescu, Romania, and Oksana Kalashnikova, Georgia, 6-3,
6-4; Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, and Kirsten Flipkens,
Belgium, def. Viktorija Golubic, Switzerland, and Darija
Jurak (4), Croatia, 6-2, 6-3; Varvara Lepchenko, United
States, and Fanny Stollar, Hungary, def. Veronica
Cepede Royg, Paraguay, and Beatriz Haddad Maia,
Brazil, 6-3, 3-6, 12-10.
WEEKEND ON THE AIR
TOMORROW
NHL
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
12:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
4 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:15 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
10:15 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
10:45 p.m.
Maryland at Wisconsin » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45), WTEM (980 AM)
Iowa at Northwestern » ESPN2
Louisville at Florida State » ESPN
Pittsburgh at Duke » WDCA (Ch. 20)
Oklahoma State at Texas » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
Morgan State at Howard » NewsChannel 8
Iowa State at Texas Tech » Fox Sports 1
Tulsa at Connecticut » ESPNU
Temple at Army » CBS Sports Network
Purdue at Rutgers » Big Ten Network
Idaho at Missouri » SEC Network
Boston College at Virginia » NBC Sports Washington
Central Florida at Navy » CBS Sports Network, WFED (1500 AM)
North Carolina at Virginia Tech » ESPN2, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Illinois at Minnesota » Big Ten Network
Syracuse at Miami » ESPN
Indiana at Michigan State » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
Tennessee at Alabama » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
Arizona State at Utah » Fox Sports 1
Kentucky at Mississippi State » SEC Network
SMU at Cincinnati » ESPNU
Oklahoma at Kansas State » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
Alabama Birmingham at Charlotte » beIN Sports
South Florida at Tulane » ESPN2
BYU at East Carolina » CBS Sports Network
LSU at Mississippi » ESPN
Michigan at Penn State » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
Auburn at Arkansas » SEC Network
Wake Forest at Georgia Tech » ESPNU
Southern California at Notre Dame » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
Kansas at TCU » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
Wyoming at Boise State » ESPN2
Fresno State at San Diego State » CBS Sports Network
Colorado at Washington State » ESPN
MLB PLAYOFFS
8 p.m.
ALCS Game 7: New York Yankees at Houston (if necessary) » Fox Sports 1,
WTEM (980 AM)
NBA
8 p.m.
Golden State at Memphis » NBA TV
SOCCER
Florida vs. Washington » NBC Sports Network, NBC Sports Washington,
WJFK (106.7 FM)
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
12:20 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
English Premier League: Chelsea vs. Watford » NBC Sports Network
German Bundesliga: Eintracht Frankfurt vs. Borussia Dortmund » Fox Sports 1
English Premier League: Huddersfield vs. Manchester United »
NBC Sports Network
English Premier League: Manchester City vs. Burnley » CNBC
Spanish La Liga: Valencia vs. Sevilla » beIN Sports
English Premier League: Southampton vs. West Brom » WRC (Ch. 4),
WBAL (Ch. 11)
Spanish La Liga: FC Barcelona vs. Malaga CF » beIN Sports
North American Soccer League: Carolina vs. San Francisco » beIN Sports
WTA Kremlin Cup, final » beIN Sports
ATP Stockholm Open, semifinals » Tennis Channel
European Tour: Andalucia Valderrama Masters, third round » Golf Channel
Champions Tour: Dominion Charity Classic, second round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour: CJ Cup at Nine Bridges, final round » Golf Channel
AUTO RACING
11 a.m.
Noon
1:30 p.m.
3 p.m.
4 p.m.
NASCAR Cup: Hollywood Casino 500 practice » NBC Sports Washington
NASCAR Xfinity Series: Kansas Lottery 300, qualifying » NBC Sports Network
NASCAR Cup: Hollywood Casino 500, practice » NBC Sports Network
NASCAR Xfinity Series: Kansas Lottery 300 » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
Formula One: U.S. Grand Prix, qualifying » NBC Sports Network
COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
8:30 p.m.
Wisconsin at Minnesota » Big Ten Network
SUNDAY
NFL
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4 p.m.
4:20 p.m.
8:20 p.m.
TENNIS
5 a.m.
7 a.m.
7:30 a.m.
WTA Finals, round robin » beIN Sports
ATP Stockholm Open, singles and doubles finals » Tennis Channel
WTA Finals, round robin » beIN Sports
7:30 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
European Tour: Andalucia Valderrama Masters, final round » Golf Channel
Champions Tour: Dominion Charity Classic, final round » Golf Channel
AUTO RACING
GOLF
8 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
10 p.m.
German Bundesliga: Cologne vs. Werder Bremen » Fox Sports 1
English Premier League: Everton vs. Arsenal » NBC Sports Network
German Bundesliga: Freiburg vs. Hertha Berlin » Fox Sports 1
Spanish La Liga: Celta Vigo vs. Atlético Madrid » beIN Sports
English Premier League: Tottenham vs. Liverpool » NBC Sports Network
Women’s friendly: United States vs. South Korea » ESPN
Spanish La Liga: Real Madrid vs. Eibar » beIN Sports
MLS: New York at D.C. United » NewsChannel 8, WJFK (106.7 FM)
GOLF
TENNIS
6 a.m.
7 a.m.
7:20 a.m.
8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
10 a.m.
10:55 a.m.
2 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
4 p.m.
Baltimore at Minnesota » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13), WIYY (97.9 FM)
New Orleans at Green Bay » WJFK (106.7 FM)
Tampa Bay at Buffalo » WTEM (980 AM)
Dallas at San Francisco » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45), WTEM (980 AM)
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
Atlanta at New England » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11), WJFK (106.7 FM)
3 p.m.
3 p.m.
NASCAR Cup: Hollywood Casino 400 » NBC Sports Network
Formula One: U.S. Grand Prix » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
WOMEN’S COLLEGE SOCCER
5 p.m.
6 p.m.
Mississippi at Mississippi State » SEC Network
LSU at Auburn » ESPNU
COLLEGE FIELD HOCKEY
1 p.m.
Maryland at Rutgers » Big Ten Network
COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
4 p.m.
Mississippi State at Arkansas » SEC Network
Michigan at Ohio State » ESPNU
South Carolina at Alabama » SEC Network
Texas at Oklahoma » ESPN2
WOMEN’S HOCKEY
2 p.m.
Canada vs. United States » NHL Network
CFL
1 p.m.
Hamilton at Montreal » ESPN2
RUNNING
8 a.m.
Marine Corps Marathon » NBC Sports Washington
EFGHI
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
washingtonpost.com/
realestate
apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
washingtonpost.com/pets
825
Bids & Proposals
Sagres Construction, bidding as a general contractor on District
of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (DC WASA) Invitation to
Bid: #170120 - Small Diameter Water Main Replacement 12b2
is looking for quotes from qualified MBE, WBE, and DBE certified
Subcontractors located in DC, MD, and VA. Subcontracting and
Supplier opportunities are available in the following areas:
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
Erosion Control Contractors
Material Supply
Aggregate Supply
Asphalt/ Milling and Paving
Utility Contractors
Site Concrete Contractors
Portable Toilet Suppliers
Trucking
Labor
Traffic Control
Scope of Work
H Approximately 1.5 miles of water mains and associated valves and
appurtenances.
H Copper water services 2 inch and smaller in public and private
space.
H Curb stop /curb stop box, meter box and penetration through
building wall and connection to first fitting inside the building
including installation of a shut-off valve and pressure reducing
valve.
H Permanent pavement and surface restoration.
All interested businesses should note the scope of works that pertain
to their subcontractor / supplier areas of specialty and contact Ms.
Shaina Webb for access to plans/specifications. The Bid Date for this
project is November 15th , 2017. Please submit your quotes to
Shaina Webb at Sagres Construction Corporation no later than COB
November 13th, 2017.
Phone: (703) 924-7220 ext. (107) Fax: (703) 924-5145 Email:
Shaina@sagresconstruction.com
205
Antiques
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
208
Appliances
KIRBY Generation Vacuum Cleaner—$135 Excel'nt Cond, HEPA filtration, Cost $1300. 571-606-0319
210
Art
ETCHING PRESS- Like new, bed
36.25"X52" Rock, MD. $4,999. You
pick up/deliver. 321 GR. Ratio
diam wheel 5 FT steel.
240-778-4979
225
Collectibles
AURORA SLOT CARS Wanted—$100 &
up, cars/sets. +Atlas, AFX, Tyco,
Cox, Monogram. 703-960-3594
CHRISTMAS VILLAGE—$100 MAKE
OFFER. 4 LARGE CERAMIC HOUSES. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
MOTOROLA RADIO—$25 VINTAGE IN
CABINET.
DOES NOT WORK.
$25, Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
TEDDY BEAR TEA SET—$50 VINTAGE
MINIATURE PORCELAIN. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
237
Firewood
FIREWOOD SALES, seasoned Oak,
$350/full cord. Delivered. NOVA.
Robert 703-424-4064 or 703-855-4691
245
Electronics
355
Garage Sales, VA
Barkley/Armistead Park—
COMMUNITY YARD SALE in one
location! Mainstone Dr & Lee HWY,
Fairfax, 10/21/2017, 9AM-12PM,
703-280-5050 Sponsored by
Ann & Randy Real Estate
FAIRFAX- 11333 Edenderry. 1 mile W
of RT 123 (GMU), off Braddock Rd.
Large sale inc antiques from closed
Michigan Lake House, tools, clocks,
fishing, collectibles, furn, household
items & a multitude of other old &
new items. Fri 10/20 & Sat 10/21, 8-4
FAIRFAX- Brecon Ridge Woods
Community Garage Sale. Homes on
Bentonbrook, Edenderry, Tydfil.
Directions: 1 mile W of RT 123 (GMU).
Fri 10/20 & Sat 10/21, 8am-4pm.
Newington—Raceway Farms community Yard Sale and treasure
trove,Telegraph Rd at Blanche Dr.,
VA, Kingstowne, 10/21/2017,
8AM - 1PM, Rain date 10/22
Reston—Unique items from all over
the world - all priced to go. Come
on out!
See you on Saturday,
21 October. 11797 Great Owl Circle,
Reston, VA, 0/21/2017, 08:30hrs.
Sleepy Hollow Woods—Community Yard Sale, Columbia Pk & Moss
Dr or Sleepy Hollow Rd & Fern Ln,
Annandale, VA, 10/21/2017,
8am - 1pm. Rain date: 10/28/2017
Vienna—Everything Must Go! 1412
Wynhurst Lane, 10/20-10/22, 9a-4p.
Art, antique furniture & collectibles,
women's clothing, handyman tools,
silk flower arrangements, holiday
collectibles & decorations. 10-speed
bicycles, new golf clubs/shoes,
cameras, 32-foot HD ladder, household items. Cash Only, Please.
Therapy Lamp—39.99 NatureBright 358
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $39.99,
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
ANNANDALE, VA -3916 Malcolm Ct.
10/21 9AM- 3PM. Tools, Tool boxes,
255
Yard Equipment, Cars & Furniture.
Moving Sale
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
DEWALT
RECIPROCATING
SAW
(SAWZALL)—$50 CASE/INST BOOK.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
FISKARS
TREE
TRIMMER/PRUNER—$30
LIKE NEW.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
GLASS BLOCKS—$30
14 GLASS
BLOCKS. EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Krebs
electric
airless
sprayer—100.00 never used still
in box . Call 410-302-8075.
260
Furniture
Bar counter reception counter—
$200, Springfield, VA, 202-5493395
Dining Room Table, Chairs—$249.99
LEESBURG,
VA,
703-771-1799
44x68" w/3 12" extns. "Madeira"
DINING TABLE- henkel harris, queen
anne #2209, exquisite double
pedestal table, mahogany, W48 L66
H30. Extends to 114" with four
12"leaves. $1095 404-915-9209
Homelegance Prenzo King Bed Headboard—$249.00 Unopened box.
Paid $550.00. Can't use.
265
Home & Garden
Aluminum Extension Ladder (20 ft.) —
$65, Burke, VA, 703-978-2723
CUTLERY SET—$20 KUCHESTOLZ 6
PC SET W/CUTTING BOARD. NEW..
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
DISHES—$60 CUNNINGHAMPICKETT
SPRINGVIOLET. 6 PLATES/1 PLATTER. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Firewood—$225, Northern VA, 703397-6936 1 cord of oak firewood.
Free delivery
FIREWOOD—$240, fairfax, VA, 703297-6936 1 cord of seasoned hardwood firewood. Free delivery
McLean—1122 Litton Ln, 10/21
&10/22, 9am-5pm,Furniture, home
goods, toys, bikes, tools & more.
Silver
Spring—1617 Gamewell
Road, Silver Spring, MD, 10/21/2017,
9:00AM, Furn, Hummel, Sterling,
Hunting, Tractor, African, Jewelry
360
Estate Sales
3871 N 30TH ST, ARLINGTON, VA
GREAT ARLINGTON ESTATE SALE!
DIR: Military Rd, 30th St N.
Fri/Sat 9-3; Sun 9-1.
See Web 4 Details.
www.FOURSALES.com
Need a Quality Sale?
703-256-8300
or call 202-334-6200
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
840
18255 Glen Oak Way
Leesburg, Va. 20176
"Rivercreek"
Sat, Sun & Mon 10 - 3
www.emeraldestatesales.com
703-582-1135
Alexandria
Fri -Sun, 10am-4pm
WELLS ESTATE SALES
OCTOBER 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 10, 2017
Jewelry & Watches
NECKLACES
HANDCRAFTED—$10
UP. VARIETY
STYLES/COLORS.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
275
Merchandise Wanted
Dogs for Sale
280
Musical Instruments
BONTEMPI ORGAN—$50
CHILDS
SMALL BATTERY OP KBRD. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
JUNIOR ZITHER—$25 CHILDS EARLY
60s HARBERT ITALIANA. ORIG. BOX.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
291
Sporting Goods
& Services
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$195
Great cardio workout, Folds to fit in
car, EXC, $800 new, 571-606-0319
Two Car Seats—39.99 Generic infant
or 49.99 Graco child car seat(79.99
both) Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
295
Toys
TOMY TODDLIN TRAIN—$50 OLD.
RIDE ON. TOOTS. EXCELL COND.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
350
Garage Sales, MD
Bowie—2400 Kegwood LN, 10/21,
Public Sale Notices
PUPS- Adorable, Blue merle, $380,
black tri, $340 cash. First shots,
dewormed, 8 weeks. 301-797-5645
Belgian Malinois Puppies - 9 weeks,
AKC, family, home protection, world
shenkin lines, vaccinated, $1500
571-643-2107
Cavachon Shih-chon—Sale. 304-9046289, Cash, CC, Easy Finance
wvpuppy.com 59 East Rd Martinsburg,WV,exit16E.AcrossFromBigLots
CHOCOLATE LAB PUPPIES - 9 weeks,
AKC, lovable healthy puppies, shots
and wormed, health cert. $575
610-857-1932
Doberman, Cavachons & more—SALE
304-904-6289,Cash,CC,Easy Finance
wvpuppy.com 59 EastRd Martinsburg WV exit16E AcrossFromBigLots
DOBERMAN PUPPIES - AKC, big
boned, family raised, great temperament, parents on premises. 8 weeks
old. $600-$800. Call 240-674-2844
ENGLISH BULLDOGS, M's, AKC,
Fat, Sassy, Lots of Wrinkles, S
& W, Health Guaranteed, Family
Raised, $1800+, Call or Text For
More Info. rdy 10/14 240-925-1545
FRENCH BULLDOG PUPPIES- Male,
brindle & white, $2500, 8 weeks,
S&W, AKC reg.
Call Danny 540-645-2992
GERMAN SHEPHERD WORKING
LINE PUPPIES- 6 F's, blk & sable,
ready 10/16. vt chkd, UTD shts,
hlth guar., $1,800. World class
ped., AKC reg. 301-956-4635
7-12pm, 17"tire/rims, coach bags,
leather couch, tools, clothes & more
Glen Echo—Thru out Glen Echo, MD
Sat. 10/21/2017, 9 am - 2 pm,
Rain: Town Hall, Harvard Ave.
Official Notices
Lost
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266
Will Come to you!
12138191
820
opens the doors to a great treasure 610
trove of quality antiques & collectibles, Cornices from The Carlisle Maltese Yorkies & more—SALE. 304- ABC LICENSE: NODD LLC trading
house, ironworks, beautiful antique 904-6289, Cash, CC, Easy Finance as SideBar, 24 South King Street
furn., china incl. Meissen, Minton, wvpuppy.com 59 East Rd Martins- Leesburg (Loudoun County) Virginia
& Dresden, & Johnson Brothers burgWV exit16E AcrossFrom Big Lots 20175. The above establishment is
(Friendly Village) antique oriental
applying to the VIRGINIA DEPARTMiniature Schnauzers —Purebred
rugs, piano, books. This is a fabulous
MENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE
Puppies - Please visit us at
sale, don't miss! Quaker Land to JanCONTROL (ABC) for a Wine & Beer
taylorstoyschnauzers.com
neys Ln, to Taylor Run Pkwy EAST,
on & off Premises/Mixed Beverage
Or call: 540-937-4332
left to 315 Lamond Pl
on Premises license to sell or manSee website estatesales.net.
SHIH TZU POODLE MIX PUPS & TOY ufacture alcoholic beverages. Nils
703-536-7816.
POODLE PUPS- Shots, wormed, moth- Schnibbe, Member NOTE: Objections to the issuance of this license
er
&
father
on
premises.
Mix
11
wks
601
old. Toys ready 10/14. 540-406-0740 must be submitted to ABC no later
than 30 days from the publishing
Boston Terrier—$1,000 reward, Male,
Yorkie — 4 Males, shots, CKC,
date of the first of two required
8 yrs old, white and brindle, approx cuddly teddy bears, 9 weeks old,
newspaper legal notices. Objections
19 lbs, goes by Vinnie. Got lost in
$1100, 304-620-8390
should be registered at www.abc.virHyattsville, near Magruder Park, on
ginia.gov or 800-552-3200.
YORKIES - 8 weeks, adorable
Oct 9. He is a companion dog,
females, registered, 1st shots,
beloved and needed. Please return
835
dewormed, paper trained,
him to us. 787-249-6998.
$550. 301-423-0643
Dogs for Sale
269
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
2619 DOUGLAS ROAD, S.E., UNIT 303
WASHINGTON, DC 20020
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of the
District of Columbia recorded on May 2, 2003, as Instrument
Number 2003052845, and in accordance Judgment filed on
August 23, 2016 in case 2015 CA 005911 R(RP) and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within the office
of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335 WISCONSIN
AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC 20015-2034 on,
NOVEMBER 21, 2017 at 3:30 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
2619 DOUGLAS ROAD, S.E., UNIT 303, WASHINGTON, DC
20020, PART OF LOT 149, IN SQUARE 5871
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (5.875%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 27800
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian 610
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
820
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD MINI MIX
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
TIGER STAINLESS STEEL THERMAL AIR
POT—$25 3.0 LITER HOT/COLD.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
840
Trustees Sale - DC
LAB PUPS- AKC, Yellow Females,
Ready 10/20. Deposit. S&W, health
guar. Convenient to I 95 VA.
$750. Call 804-994-3171
LAB RET/GOLDEN RET CROSS& AKC
GOLDEN PUPS & ADULTS
POTOMAC- Moving Sale Sun. 10908
Balantre, 10/22, 10a-5pm, 301-602- 8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
3864. BR sets, Dining table, sectional on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
Pool table, Gym, HH.
Official Notices
ABC LICENSE: TB Merrifield LLC trading as Ted's Bulletin Merrifield, 2911
District Ave #160, Fairfax (Fairfax
County), Virginia 22031-2281. The
above establishment is applying to
the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL
(ABC) for a Wine and Beer/Mixed
Beverage On Premises Restaurant
license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Troy Vallier CFO.
NOTE: Objections to the issuance of
this license must be submitted to
ABC no later than 30 days from the
publishing date of the first of two
required newspaper legal notices.
Objections should be registered at
www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-5523200.
ABC LICENSE: TB Reston LLC trading as Ted's Bulletin Reston, 11948
Market St, Reston (Fairfax County), Virginia 20190-5614. The above
establishment is applying to the
VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC)
for a Wine and Beer/Mixed Beverage On Premises Restaurant license
to sell or manufacture alcoholic
beverages. Troy Vallier CFO. NOTE:
Objections to the issuance of this
license must be submitted to ABC no
later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first of two required
newspaper legal notices. Objections
should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.
ABC LICENSE: Northside FC, LLC
trading as Northside Falls Church,
205 Park Ave Falls Church, Virginia
22046. The above establishment is
applying to the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE
CONTROL (ABC) for a Wine and Beer
on Premises license to sell Wine
& Beer On & Off Premises w/keg
& Mixed Beverage. Brian Normile,
Managing Member NOTE: Objections to the issuance of this license
must be submitted to ABC no later
than 30 days from the publishing
date of the first of two required
newspaper legal notices. Objections
should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
IN ORDER TO ENFORCE ITS LIEN
FOR UNPAID RENT, AMERICAN
SELF STORAGE WILL SELL AT A
PUBLIC AUCTION ON Thursday
10 / 26 /17 AT 12:00PM NOON,
FOR CASH, THE CONTENTS OF
THE FOLLOWING UNITS/SPACES
007 - A. Duvall
039 - S.G Riley IV
084 - T.L Watkins
129 - M. Everett
407- J. Bowles
662- R. Derrick
Sale to be held at
American Self Storage
4551 Eisenhower Ave
Alexandria, VA 22304
(703)-823-2300
10/26/2017 at 12:00pm
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up
to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
840
Trustees Sale - DC
Trustees Sale - DC
840
Trustees Sale - DC
UNIT OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION SALE OF VALUABLE CONDOMINIUM
UNIT CONTAINED WITHIN PREMISES at 2004 11th Street, S.E.,
Unit 132, WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-4053. Pursuant to District of
Columbia Condominium Act of 1976, Section 313 and under the
power of sale contained in the Declaration recorded on October
30, 2000 as Instrument Number 2000100525 and Bylaws of
the Condominium recorded on October 30, 2000 as Instrument
Number 2000100526, and as amended, and in accordance
with Public Law 90-566 and D.C. Code Section 42-1903.13, as
amended, notice filed September 22, 2017, and at the request
of the Attorney for the Unit Owners’ Association, we shall sell
at public auction on Thursday the 26th day of October 2017,
at 11:34 AM, within the office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers,
5301 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20005.
Unit 132 of the Lincoln Condominium designated on the Records
of the Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment and
taxation purposes as Lot 2089 in Square 304.
Terms of sale: Sold Subject to the provisions, restrictions,
easements and conditions as set forth in the Declaration of
Condominium, the By-laws relating thereto, and any and all
amendments thereto existing deed(s) of trust and real estate
taxes, as applicable; the purchase price above said trust(s) to
be paid in cash. Also sold subject to any other prior liens,
encumbrances and municipal assessments, if any, as applicable,
further particulars of which may be announced at time of sale.
A deposit of $2,500.00 will be required at time of sale, such
deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such other form
as the attorney for the Owners’ Association may require in her
sole discretion. All conveyancing, recording, recordation tax,
transfer tax, etc. at purchaser’s cost. All adjustments made as
of date of sale. The balance of the purchase price, together
with interest at the rate of 10% per annum from date of sale
to date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, must
be paid in cash or by cashier’s or certified check and all other
terms to be complied with within 30 days, otherwise deposit
is forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and sold at
the discretion of the Owners’ Association and at the risk and
cost of the defaulting purchaser. Association shall convey a
deed pursuant to D. C. Code Section 42-1903.13 (c) (1) and (3) as
amended, and make no further representations or warranties as
to title. The Association reserves the right in its sole discretion
to rescind the sale at any time until conveyance of the deed. In
the event of failure on the part of the Association to convey such
deed, the purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of deposit.
Anthony R. Champ, Esq.
Attorney for Owner’s Association
Kass Legal Group, PLLC
Washington Post
Oct. 16, 20, 25, 2017
12136412
UNIT OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION SALE OF VALUABLE CONDOMINIUM
UNIT CONTAINED WITHIN PREMISES at 2004 11th Street, S.E.,
Unit 330, WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001-4053. Pursuant to District of
Columbia Condominium Act of 1976, Section 313 and under the
power of sale contained in the Declaration recorded on October
30, 2000 as Instrument Number 2000100525 and Bylaws of
the Condominium recorded on October 30, 2000 as Instrument
Number 2000100526, and as amended, and in accordance
with Public Law 90-566 and D.C. Code Section 42-1903.13, as
amended, notice filed September 22, 2017, and at the request
of the Attorney for the Unit Owners’ Association, we shall sell
at public auction on Thursday the 26th day of October 2017,
at 11:32 AM, within the office of Alex Cooper Auctioneers,
5301 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20005.
Unit 330 of the Lincoln Condominium designated on the Records
of the Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment and
taxation purposes as Lot 2126 in Square 304.
Terms of sale: Sold Subject to the provisions, restrictions,
easements and conditions as set forth in the Declaration of
Condominium, the By-laws relating thereto, and any and all
amendments thereto existing deed(s) of trust and real estate
taxes, as applicable; the purchase price above said trust(s) to
be paid in cash. Also sold subject to any other prior liens,
encumbrances and municipal assessments, if any, as applicable,
further particulars of which may be announced at time of sale.
A deposit of $5,000.00 will be required at time of sale, such
deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such other form
as the attorney for the Owners’ Association may require in her
sole discretion. All conveyancing, recording, recordation tax,
transfer tax, etc. at purchaser’s cost. All adjustments made as
of date of sale. The balance of the purchase price, together
with interest at the rate of 10% per annum from date of sale
to date of receipt of the balance of the purchase price, must
be paid in cash or by cashier’s or certified check and all other
terms to be complied with within 30 days, otherwise deposit
is forfeited and the property may be re-advertised and sold at
the discretion of the Owners’ Association and at the risk and
cost of the defaulting purchaser. Association shall convey a
deed pursuant to D. C. Code Section 42-1903.13 (c) (1) and (3) as
amended, and make no further representations or warranties as
to title. The Association reserves the right in its sole discretion
to rescind the sale at any time until conveyance of the deed. In
the event of failure on the part of the Association to convey such
deed, the purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of deposit.
Anthony R. Champ, Esq.
Attorney for Owner’s Association
Kass Legal Group, PLLC
Washington Post
Oct. 16, 20, 25, 2017
12136411
850
850
Montgomery County
OCTOBER 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 10, 2017
12138190
Montgomery County
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
Montgomery County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
5576 BURNSIDE DRIVE, APARTMENT 2
Rockville, MD 20853
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to SUELLEN WOHLFARTH, Trustee(s), dated
January 19, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29212, folio
450, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS CONDOMINIUM UNIT
NO. TWO (2) IN BUILDING NO. 5576 IN "NORTH CREEK
PLACE CONDOMINIUM", ROCKVILLE, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND, AND THE PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE
COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO, PURSUANT
TO THE DECLARATION RECORDED IN LIBER 6580 AT FOLIO
248, RE-RECORDED IN LIBER 6581 AT FOLIO 1, AND ANY
AND ALL SUBSEQUENT AMENDMENTS THERETO RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND AND THE PLAT RECORDED IN CONDOMINIUM
PLAT BOOK 36, PLAT NO. 3742, ET SEQ., AND ANY AND ALL
SUBSEQUENT AMENDMENTS THERETO RECORDED AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $12,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.125%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-07006)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Laura D. Harris, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
SF
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LEGAL NOTICES
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850
Montgomery County
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850
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
463 STERNWHEELER COURT
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to SMART CHOICE SETTLEMENTS OF MD LLC,
Trustee(s), dated January 2, 2007, and recorded among the
Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
34360, folio 579, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED TWENTY-EIGHT (28), IN BLOCK LETTERED "A, " IN A SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT 1, AUDUBON SQUARE" AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 108 AT PLAT
12512 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING
KNOWN AS 463 STERNWHEELER COURT, GAITHERSBURG,
MARYLAND 20877.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $32,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
www.hwestauctions.com
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
12133142
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.5% on 850
Montgomery County 850 Montgomery County
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
FOR THE COUNTY OF
FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY
MONTGOMERY, MARYLAND
MARYLAND
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the Trustee(s)
Substitute Trustees
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of Plaintiff(s)
Plaintiffs
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the vs.
v.
SYLVIA JUAREZ A/K/A
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
SYLVIA U. JUAREZ
ANNICE Y WALKER
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. Defendant(s)
Defendant(s)
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, Mortgagor(s)
Civil Action No. 419267V
CIVIL NO. 411256V
NOTICE
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given this 16th
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
IS HEREBY GIVEN THIS
day of OCTOBER, 2017, by the Cirtransfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement NOTICE
12th day of October, 2017 by the
cuit Court for Montgomery Counshall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF ty, Maryland, that the sale of the
Maryland, and by
property mentioned in these proand/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be MONTGOMERY,
the authority thereof, that the sale
ceedings and described as 15113
by Kristine D. Brown, WilDonna Drive, Silver Spring, MD
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for made
liam M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto,
will be ratified and conany reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the Real 20905
firmed unless cause to the condesignated as 704 Mapletrary thereof be shown on or
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to Property
wood Avenue, Takoma Park, MD
before the 15th day of NOVEMtake place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law 20912, and reported in the above BER, 2017, provided a copy of this
cause, will be finally ratiNOTICE be published at least once
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned entitled
fied and confirmed, unless cause
a week in each of three succesdeposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against to the contrary thereof be shown sive weeks in some newspaper
or before the 13th day of
of general circulation published in
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These on
November , 2017, next; provided
said County before the 15th day
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, a copy of this order be inserted of NOVEMBER, 2017.
THE WASHINGTON POST, 1150
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser in
The Report of Sale states the
15th Street, Washington DC, MD
of the sale to be
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. published in said COUNTY OF amount
$362,570.16.
once a week for
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the MONTGOMERY
three successive weeks before
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered the 13th day of November, 2017.
Montgomery County, Maryland
report states the amount of
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale The
the sale to be $351,000.00
Oct 20, 27, Nov 3, 2017 12137357
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Montgomery County, Maryland
You, too, could have
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-04416)
Oct 20, 27, Nov 3, 2017 12137352
home delivery.
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Jason L. Hamlin, Glen H.
If
only
you
had
home
delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Tschirgi, Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
SF
1-800-753-POST SF
Substitute Trustees
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know.
How about some
home delivery?
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
FREE UNDER $250
ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.
5301 WISCONSIN AVE. NW, #750
WASH., DC 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
Samuel I. White, P.C.
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE,
SUITE 100
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
VALUABLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING KNOWN AS:
44 GALVESTON PLACE, SW, UNIT A
WASHINGTON, DC 20032
By virtue of Deed of Trust recorded in the land records of
the District of Columbia recorded on December 6, 1995, as
Instrument Number 9500073370, and in accordance Judgment
filed on June 30, 2017 in case 2015 CA 002489 R(RP) and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustees will offer to sell at public auction, within
the office of HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS, INC., 5335
WISCONSIN AVENUE, NW, SUITE 440, WASHINGTON, DC
20015-2034 on,
NOVEMBER 21, 2017 at 3:30 PM
the land and premises situated in the District of Columbia and
more particularly described in the above referenced Deed of
Trust and as of the date hereof designated on the Records of the
Assessor of the District of Columbia for assessment purposes as:
44 GALVESTON PLACE, SW, UNIT A, WASHINGTON, DC 20032,
PART OF LOT 18, IN SQUARE 6239S
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, the ability of the purchaser
to obtain title insurance or other similar matters, and subject
to easements, agreements and restrictions of record which
affect the same, if any. The property will be sold subject to
any assessments including assessment pursuant to D.C. Code
Section 42-1903.13.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 cash or certified
funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance of the
purchase price with interest on the unpaid purchase money at
the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note (6.75%
per annum) from the date of sale to the date funds are received
by the Trustees, payable in cash or certified funds within TEN
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. There will be
no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event
additional funds are tendered before settlement. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date
of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All other
public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such
amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges,
ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale are
to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation
including but not limited to title examination, conveyancing, city
revenue stamps, transfer taxes, title insurance, and all other
costs incident to settlement are to be paid by the purchaser.
Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the
property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
date of sale. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. If the
Purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, Purchaser
agrees that the property will be resold and the entire deposit
retained by the Substitute Trustees as liquidated damages for all
losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall
have no further liability. The purchaser agrees to accept service
by first class mail and certified mail addressed to the address
provided by said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of
Sale for all correspondence including any Motion or Show Cause
Order incident to this sale. The defaulted purchaser shall not be
entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even
if such surplus results from improvements to the property by
said defaulted purchaser. The sale is subject to post-sale audit
of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including but
not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered
into and repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan
prior to sale. In any such event or if the sale is not ratified, the
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit without interest.
Trustee’s File No. 24109
JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III ET AL,
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
ALEX COOPER AUCTIONEERS, INC.
5301 WISCONSIN AVE. NW, #750
WASH., DC 202-364-0306
WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
S0833-1 6x2
Bids & Proposals
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
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For Jobs advertisements, go to
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or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
825
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2017
12133195
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x1
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
CLASSIFIED
D9
D10
850
Montgomery County
OPQRS
850
Montgomery County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
TRUSTEE'S SALE
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
1601 Rollins Ave, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
premises known as 1601 Rollins Ave, Capitol Heights, MD
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
KNOWN AS
of Trust, dated January 12, 2007, and recorded in Liber 27142
at Page 425 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
3950 BEL PRE ROAD, APARTMENT 8
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $168,750.00.
Silver Spring, MD 20906
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
Deed of Trust to LARRY F. PRATT, Trustee(s), dated April 20, COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
2006, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 32275, folio 048, the holder Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on November 7, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument not limited to:
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of Tax ID# 18-2085959
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
affect same, if any.
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 10:00AM
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
as follows:
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND AS on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN A DEED RECORDED AT will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
DEED BOOK 31238, PAGE 001 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND.
association dues and assessments that may become due after
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
without either express or implied warranty or representation, Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold Trustee's File No. 17-266068.
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $17,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 6.375%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
www.hwestauctions.com
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
12135924
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the OCTOBER 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 2017
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
TRUSTEE'S SALE
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
5703 66th Avenue, Riverdale, MD 20737
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be premises known as 5703 66th Avenue, Riverdale, MD 20737.
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement Trust, dated March 17, 2009, and recorded in Liber 30571 at
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium Page 317 among the land records of the County of Prince
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be George's, in the original principal amount of $125,681.00.
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on November 7, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These not limited to:
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, Tax ID# 19-2136216
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale affect same, if any.
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06774)
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
Substitute Trustees
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
www.hwestauctions.com
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
12131750 property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-257776.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
15000 SPRING MEADOWS DRIVE
Darnestown, MD 20874
www.hwestauctions.com
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain OCTOBER 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 2017
12135919
Deed of Trust to VICKI L. PARRY, Trustee(s), dated October 3,
2005, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 30943, folio 528, the holder
TRUSTEE'S SALE
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
9206 IVANHOE RD, Fort Washington, MD 20744
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of premises known as 9206 IVANHOE RD, Fort Washington, MD
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee 20744. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY of Trust, dated March 26, 2008, and recorded in Liber 30008 at
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, Page 001 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $220,000.00.
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 10:00AM
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
as follows:
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on November 7, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-EIGHT (38) IN BLOCK LETTERED all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
"C" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SPRING MEADOWS", not limited to:
AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND Tax ID# 12-1262989
RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNT, MARYLAND IN PLAT Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
BOOK 100 AT PLAT NO. 11189.
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
without either express or implied warranty or representation, affect same, if any.
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of association dues and assessments that may become due after
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $71,500.00 payable in certified taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.125% purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the Trustee's File No. 14-242857.
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
www.hwestauctions.com
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be OCTOBER 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 2017
12134860
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-22715)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Jason L. Hamlin, Glen H. Tschirgi,
Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
12134829
S0833-2 6x3
Easy Pay
851
Prince Georges County
851
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2017
EZ
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
15406 Bennetts Run Court, Brandywine, MD 20613
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 15406 Bennetts Run Court, Brandywine,
MD 20613. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated April 14, 2011, and recorded in
Liber 32622 at Page 590 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $218,321.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on November
7, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 11-3242252
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266495.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
368 Possum Court, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 368 Possum Court, Capitol Heights, MD
20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated October 30, 2009, and recorded in Liber 31131
at Page 247 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $235,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on November 7, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 18-2088003
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-263528.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
15803 DEER CREEK CT., LAUREL, MD 20707
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 15803 DEER CREEK CT., LAUREL, MD
20707. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated February 23, 2006, and recorded in Liber 25460
at Page 194 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $209,600.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on November 7, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 10-1092485
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-243128.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 2017
12134857 OCTOBER 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 2017
12134846 OCTOBER 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 2017
12134639
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5827 Shoshone Drive, Forest Heights, MD 20745
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5827 Shoshone Drive, Forest Heights,
MD 20745. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated July 13, 2013, and recorded in
Liber 35016 at Page 536 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $183,662.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on November
7, 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 12-1308378
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-260053.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6403 Auth Rd, Suitland, MD 20746
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6403 Auth Rd, Suitland, MD 20746. By
virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated June 2, 2012, and recorded in Liber 34009 at Page
275 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $180,600.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on November 7, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-0481754
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-267934.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12426 Ronald Beall Drive, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12426 Ronald Beall Drive, Upper Marlboro,
MD 20774. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated December 11, 2006, and recorded
in Liber 26949 at Page 302 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $211,022.92. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24,
2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-0195305
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-264360.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 2017
12134856 OCTOBER 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 2017
12134830 OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133318
TRUSTEE'S SALE
10706 Brookland Rd, Glenn Dale, MD 20769
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 10706 Brookland Rd, Glenn Dale, MD
20769. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated July 16, 2007, and recorded in Liber 29143 at
Page 727 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $272,250.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on November 7, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 14-2922078
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-248821.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
8605 SHEEHAN DRIVE, BRANDYWINE, MD 20613
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 8605 SHEEHAN DRIVE, BRANDYWINE, MD
20613. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated July 24, 2009, and recorded in Liber 30915 at
Page 53 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $367,324.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on November 7, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 11-3060779
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-256975.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12238 Goldstone Ct, Waldorf, MD 20601
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12238 Goldstone Ct, Waldorf, MD 20601.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust dated November 25, 2013, and recorded in Liber 08442
at Page 0164 among the land records of the COUNTY OF
CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $357,717.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between
Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on October 24, 2017
at 12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-337783
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-245093. LOAN TYPE= VA
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 2017
12134848 OCTOBER 20, 27, NOVEMBER 3, 2017
12134654 OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133307
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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2017
851
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7314 15Th Pl, Takoma Park, MD 20912
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7314 15Th Pl, Takoma Park, MD 20912.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated July 6, 2007, and recorded in Liber 29044 at
Page 389 among the land records of the County of Prince
George's, in the original principal amount of $544,185.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 17-1850114
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266270.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5616 Coolidge St, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5616 Coolidge St, Capitol Heights, MD
20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated November 20, 2009, and recorded
in Liber 31397 at Page 457 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $199,267.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24,
2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 18-2022960
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266342.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7209 Cross Street, UNIT 7209,
District Heights, MD 20747
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7209 Cross Street, UNIT 7209, District
Heights, MD 20747. By virtue of the power and authority
contained in a Deed of Trust, dated May 2, 2006, and recorded
in Liber 26239 at Page 601 among the land records of
the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $86,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24,
2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-0439760
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
of the purchase price with interest at 8.499% per annum from
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266208.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
3513 Mullin Ln, Bowie, MD 20715
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 3513 Mullin Ln, Bowie, MD 20715. By
virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated June 15, 2006, and recorded in Liber 25606 at Page
641 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $495,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 14-1677848
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-265642.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
852
Anne Arundel County
852
D11
Anne Arundel County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
8577 Pioneer Drive Unit 21B, Severn, MD 21144
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 8577 Pioneer Drive Unit 21B, Severn, MD
21144. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated May 17, 2013, and recorded in Liber 26190 at
Page 0288 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $173,400.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 04-912-06609601
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-262108.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
12131483 OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131479
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4009 Vine St, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 4009 Vine St, Capitol Heights, MD 20743.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated July 16, 2007, and recorded in Liber 28436 at
Page 028 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $399,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-0529586
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266655.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5910 CLEVELAND AVE, Riverdale, MD 20737
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5910 CLEVELAND AVE, Riverdale, MD
20737. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated January 17, 2006, and recorded in Liber 30108
at Page 377 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $160,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 19-2138279
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-250997.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
12130925
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5204 Church Road, Bowie, MD 20720
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5204 Church Road, Bowie, MD 20720.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated August 30, 2010, and recorded in Liber 32462 at
Page 335 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $374,950.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-3701216
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-260795.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
12133306 OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131421
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6927 Lamont Dr, Lanham, MD 20706
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6927 Lamont Dr, Lanham, MD 20706. By
virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated November 4, 2005, and recorded in Liber 25657 at
Page 663 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $213,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 21-2357234
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-264259.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133178
www.hwestauctions.com
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6450 FOREST RD, Cheverly, MD 20785
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6450 FOREST RD, Cheverly, MD 20785.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated June 29, 2007, and recorded in Liber 28322 at
Page 061 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $360,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-0086405
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 7.85% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-243243.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
12131411
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6011 Emerson St #504, Bladensburg, MD 20710
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6011 Emerson St #504, Bladensburg, MD
20710. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated April 21, 2009, and recorded in Liber 31581 at
Page 597 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $118,437.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-0183475
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-265389.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
851
12129273
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Shannon Menapace
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Melvin H. Flora, Jr.
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF14-05650
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Naimah Tucker and
Roger Felli
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-12495
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 11th day of October 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
14601 Wern Way, Laurel, Maryland
20707, made and reported by
James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Brian Thomas, Hugh J. Green,
Shannon Menapace and Christine
M. Drexel, Substitute Trustees, be
RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 13th day of November, 2017, provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post once in each of three (3)
successive weeks before the 13th
day of November, 2017.
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 11th day of October 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
11405 Hennessey Drive, Beltsville,
Maryland 20705, made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, and Shannon Menapace,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 13th day of November,
2017, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 13th day of
November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $263,340.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $517,500.00.
Oct 20, 27, Nov 3, 2017 12136923
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
Oct 20, 27, Nov 3, 2017 12136913
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Erin M. Cohen
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Elizabeth Nwogu and
Alexius Nwanwa
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF15-25810
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 11th day of October 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
2510 Nicol Circle, Bowie, Maryland
20721 made and reported by
James E. Clarke, Renee Dyson,
Brian Thomas, Erin M. Cohen, Hugh
J. Green, and Patrick M. A. Decker,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 13th day of November,
2017, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 13th day of
November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $330,000.00
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Oct 20, 27, Nov 3,2017 12136904
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Erin M. August
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
The Estate of
Roberto Antonio Zaldana
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF16-25741
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 11th day of October 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
6111 Osborn Road, Hyattsville,
Maryland 20785, made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M.
August, Hugh J. Green and Patrick
M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 13th day of
November, 2017, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 13th day of November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $189,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Oct 20, 27, Nov 3, 2017 12136920
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Estate of Walter R. Tabor
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-15688
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 11th day of October 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
10203 Marlboro Pike, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, made and
reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon
Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 13th day of
November, 2017, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 13th day of November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $265,517.17.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Oct 20, 27, Nov 3, 2017 12136921
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Lee V. Brown, Individually and as
Surviving Tenant by the Entirety of
Francis J. Brown
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF16-38362
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 11th day of October 2017, that
the foreclosure sale of the property described in the deed of trust
docketed herein and located at
1100 Oakdale Drive, Hyattsville,
Maryland 20782, made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, and Patrick
M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 13th day of
November, 2017, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 13th day of November, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $212,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Oct 20, 27, Nov 3, 2017 12136914
How about some
home delivery?
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SF
TRUSTEE'S SALE
230 Sweet Pine Dr #23, Laurel, MD 20724
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 230 Sweet Pine Dr #23, Laurel, MD 20724.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated October 22, 2013, and recorded in Liber 26802
at Page 055 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $200,969.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 04-566-90039349
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-265765.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133177
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1016 MURDOCH CT, Crofton, MD 21114
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1016 MURDOCH CT, Crofton, MD 21114.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated March 25, 2006, and recorded in Liber 17663 at
Page 752 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $178,500.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-213-90069774
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 7.75% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-239977.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
12131495 OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
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www.hwestauctions.com
12131414 OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12130927
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A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133314
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Anne Arundel County
OPQRS
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852
Anne Arundel County
Anne Arundel County
852
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Anne Arundel County
Anne Arundel County
852
EZ
Anne Arundel County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
TRUSTEE'S SALE
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
1443 Chatham Ct Unit 53YB, Crofton, MD 21114
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
premises known as 1443 Chatham Ct Unit 53YB, Crofton,
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
MD 21114. By virtue of the power and authority contained
KNOWN AS
in a Deed of Trust, dated November 17, 2014, and recorded
in Liber 27821 at Page 183 among the land records of the
1545 FALLING BROOK COURT
COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount
ODENTON, MD 21113
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain of $235,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
Deed of Trust to DAVID SILVERMAN, Trustee(s), dated October undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
28, 2009, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church
ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 21721, folio 355, Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM,
MODIFIED SEPTEMBER 1, 2011 IN LIBER 23942, FOLIO all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
0292 the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of not limited to:
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by Tax ID# 02-208-90005646
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE ANNE affect same, if any.
ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
OCTOBER 24, 2017 at 10:00 AM
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. SIXTY-SIX (66), will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT FIVE OF SIX, by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
SEVEN OAKS, PARCEL 6B, PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT", association dues and assessments that may become due after
WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK 244, Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
FOLIO 19.
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
without either express or implied warranty or representation, property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi- are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, Trustee's File No. 16-259580.
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $29,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
www.hwestauctions.com
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of ANNE ARUNDEL A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
12134334
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.0% on OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
TRUSTEE'S SALE
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
1826 Chesapeake Road, Pasadena, MD 21122
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be premises known as 1826 Chesapeake Road, Pasadena, MD
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. 21122. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, of Trust, dated June 7, 2012, and recorded in Liber 24795
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be at Page 0249 among the land records of the County of Anne
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and Arundel, in the original principal amount of $487,500.00.
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to Tax ID# 03-385-07182000
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, affect same, if any.
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-07738)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M. association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
Gene Jung,
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
Substitute Trustees
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131461
www.hwestauctions.com
Trustee's File No. 16-259829.
A181,
A316,
A311,
A182,
A183,
A425,
A426,
A461,
A463
TRUSTEE'S SALE
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12126601
201 Bowie Street, Annapolis, MD 21401
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 201 Bowie Street, Annapolis, MD 21401.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
TRUSTEE'S SALE
dated September 9, 2013, and recorded in Liber 26683 at Page
033 among the land records of the County of Anne Arundel,
8602 BLACK ROCK HARBOUR, Pasadena, MD 21122
in the original principal amount of $309,294.00. Upon default Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for premises known as 8602 BLACK ROCK HARBOUR, Pasadena,
www.hwestauctions.com
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF MD 21122. By virtue of the power and authority contained A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on in a Deed of Trust, dated August 24, 2010, and recorded in OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12125870
October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in Liber 22612 at Page 0155 among the land records of the 855
855
Charles
County
Charles
County
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount
Tax ID# 06-000-90215231
of $276,540.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
TRUSTEE'S SALE
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church
6604 Captain Johns Ct, Bryans Road, MD 20616
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
affect same, if any.
not limited to:
premises known as 6604 Captain Johns Ct, Bryans Road, MD
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
20616. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The Tax ID# 03-244-90024778
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and Deed of Trust, dated April 19, 2006, and recorded in Liber
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, 05803 at Page 0641 among the land records of the COUNTY
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may OF CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $164,500.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments affect same, if any.
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between
association dues and assessments that may become due after balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on October 24, 2017
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within at 12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments including but not limited to:
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments Tax ID# 07-053967
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting association dues and assessments that may become due after conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. affect same, if any.
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
Trustee's File No. 17-266320.
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
Trustee's File No. 17-265589.
association dues and assessments that may become due after
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
Manassas,
Virginia
20109
(410)
769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131482
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
www.hwestauctions.com
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know. A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463 Trustee's File No. 17-266067.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
12131494
(And your subscription up-to-date.) OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
1214 Waugh Chapel Road
Gambrills, MD 21054
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
certain Deed of Trust to MARK H. FRIEDMAN AND KENNETH
J. MACFADYEN, Trustee(s), dated December 21, 2004, and
recorded among the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY,
MARYLAND in Liber 15789, folio 0304, the holder of the
indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
21401 ON,
OCTOBER 24, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND AS
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN A DEED RECORDED AT
DEED BOOK 8578, PAGE 464 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
ANNE ARUNDEL, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $13,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06583)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
855
Charles County
855
Charles County
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
857
is convenient.
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
12129394
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
Howard County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8729 HAYSHED LANE APARTMENT 31
Columbia, MD 21045
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to FIRST MERIT SETTLEMENT, Trustee(s), dated
September 8, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of
HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 09487, folio 588, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX
ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 12:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS UNIT NUMBER 31
IN BUILDING 3, WING A, LOCATED AT 8729 HAYSHED
LANE, LONGREACH HOUSE CONDOMINIUM, HORIZONTAL
PROPERTY REGIME, AS SAID UNIT AND SAID CONDOMINIUM ARE ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO MASTER DEED
AND BY-LAWS DATED JANUARY 26,1973 AND RECORDED
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF HOWARD COUNTY IN LIBER
CMP NO. 623, FOLIO 461, ET SEQ., AND THE AMENDED
MASTER DEED AND BY-LAWS DATED AUGUST 27, 1973
AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF HOWARD
COUNTY IN LIBER CMP NO. 657, FOLIO 635, ET SEQ.,AND
THE REVISED AMENDED MASTER DEED DATED OCTOBER
18, 1973 AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS
OF HOWARD COUNTY IN LIBER CMP NO. 657, FOLIO
550, AND PURSUANT TO THE PLANS OF THE BUILDING
AND UNITS SHOWN BY THE PLATS OF THE CONDOMINIUM
PROJECT DESCRIBED IN THE AFORESAID MASTER DEED
AND THE AFORESAID AMENDED MASTER DEED AND REVISED
AMENDED MASTER DEED AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF HOWARD COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK NO. 24,
FOLIOS 37 THROUGH 44 INCLUSIVE AND PLAT BOOK NO. 25,
FOLIOS 94 THROUGH 106 INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NO.
26, FOLIO 20. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN
www.hwestauctions.com
LIBER 3319 FOLIO 211, AMONG THE SAID LAND RECORDS.
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131422 The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
857
857
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
Howard County
Howard County
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $9,000.00 payable in certified
KNOWN AS
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
7944 PETTIGREW STREET
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
Elkridge, MD 21075
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY,
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on unpaid
Deed of Trust to LYNDE SELDON, Trustee(s), dated May 27, purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
2015, and recorded among the Land Records of HOWARD secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 16270, folio 525, the holder deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE public charges and private charges or assessments, including
LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 12:00PM
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
follows:
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 108, IN unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT OF RE-SUBDIVISION any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
BLUE STREAM LOTS 1-125, OPEN SPACE LOTS 126 & 127 be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
AND BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL J-1, A RE-SUBDIVISION purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
OF BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL J-2 "BLUE STREAM", PLATS Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
21737-21738, BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL K, "BLUE survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
STREAM", PLATS 21558-21564, AND EASEMENTS ON PAR- void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
CEL J-1, "BLUE STREAM", PLATS 21737-21738", AS PER claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postPLATS THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT NOS. MDR 21981, cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
MDR 21984 AND MDR 21986. THE IMPROVEMENTS THERE- to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
ON BEING KNOWN AS NO.: 7944 PETTIGREW STREET.
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
without either express or implied warranty or representation, No. (17-07804)
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiOliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateGene Jung,
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
Substitute Trustees
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
www.hwestauctions.com
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
12133198
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $37,500.00 payable in certified 856
856
Frederick County
Frederick County
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
ucs101590
ucs261434
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CIRCUIT COURT FOR
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY,
FREDERICK COUNTY
FREDERICK COUNTY
Sandra K. Dalton
Sandra K. Dalton
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.875% on unpaid
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Clerk of the Circuit Court
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
100 West Patrick Street
100 West Patrick Street
Courthouse
Courthouse
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
Frederick, MD 21701
Frederick, MD 21701
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
(301) 600-1976
(301) 600-1976
Case Number:10-C-16-002198FC
Case Number:10-C-16-000303FC
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
Lender License Number: 399801
Lender License Number:N/A
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
James E Clarke
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's James E Clarke
VS.
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at VS.
Farzan Fanaiyan
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other Deborah R Roberts
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE OF SALE
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
Notice is hereby issued by the
is hereby issued by the
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to Circuit Court for Frederick County Notice
Circuit Court for Frederick County
this 6th day of October 2017, that
this 6th day of October 2017, that
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes the
sale made and recorded by
the sale made and recorded by
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by James E. Clarke et al., for the sale James E. Clarke et al., for the sale
the property described in these
of the property described in these
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner of
proceedings
proceedings
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
3045 Flint Hill Road
1851 Millstream Drive
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
Adamstown, MD 21710
Frederick, MD 21702
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are be ratified and confirmed thiry (30) be ratified and confirmed thiry (30)
from the date of this Notice,
days from the date of this Notice,
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for days
unless cause to the contrary be
unless cause to the contrary be
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall shown, provided a copy of this shown, provided a copy of this
be inserted in some NewsNotice be inserted in some Newsbe limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The Notice
paper published in this County,
paper published in this County,
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute once in each of three (3) succes- once in each of three (3) successive weeks.
sive weeks.
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
The report states the amount of
The report states the amount of
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be the sale to be $205,200.00.
the sale to be $313,944.70.
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
Sandra K. Dalton
Sandra K. Dalton
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Clerk of the Circuit Court
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postof Frederick County
of Frederick County
sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to Oct 20, 27,Nov 3,2017 12137350 Oct 20, 27,Nov 3,2017 12136951
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
You, too, could have
Wake up to
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
home delivery.
home delivery.
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
No. (17-05601)
SF
SF
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
You, too, could have
Gene Jung,
home delivery.
Home delivery
Substitute Trustees
1-800-753-POST
www.hwestauctions.com
WP 2x1
S0833-1 6x2
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
To place your legal notice in
the Classified section:
Call: 202-334-7007
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2017
Howard County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
17172 Russell Dr, Cobb Island, MD 20625
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 17172 Russell Dr, Cobb Island, MD 20625.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated January 29, 2007, and recorded in Liber 6196 at Page
736 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES, in
the original principal amount of $340,000.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF
CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit
& District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on October 24, 2017 at 12:00
PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including
but not limited to:
Tax ID# 05-027292
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-261003.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
LEGAL NOTICES
ENROLL TODAY
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or call 202-334-6100.
857
12131485
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
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S0833-2 10x3
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2017
857
Howard County
857
OPQRS
EZ
872
Howard County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
15125 SAPLING RIDGE DRIVE
Dayton, MD 21036
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAND AMERICA LAWYERS TITLE, Trustee(s),
dated November 3, 2006, and recorded among the Land
Records of HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 10384,
folio 676, MODIFIED: JUNE 12, 2012 IN LIBER 14249, FOLIO
264 the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE HOWARD
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY
BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 12:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS PRESERVATION PARCEL
A AS SHOWN ON A PLATS ENTITLED "HIGH FOREST ESTATES,
LOTS 1 THROUGH 50, BUILDABLE PRESERVATION PARCEL
A, NON-BUILDABLE PRESERVATION PARCEL B, SHEETS 2 OF
5 AND 3 OF 5" SAID PLATS BEING RECORDED AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND AS PLAT
NOS. 13959 AND 13960.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $93,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY,
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on unpaid
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
public charges and private charges or assessments, including
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
No. (17-02480)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Laura D. Harris, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
871
City of Alexandria
12134827
871
City of Alexandria
Pursuant to Virginia Code § 55-79.84, and by virtue of a Deed of
Appointment of Trustee dated August 17, 2017 and recorded on August
23, 2017 among the land records of the City of Alexandria, Virginia as
Instrument No. 170012852, the Unit Owners Association for Reynolds
Prospect, a Condominium, a/k/a Reynolds Prospect Condominium Unit
Owners Association (the “Association”), by its appointed Trustee, Mazin I.
Elias will offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder on: October
31, 2017 at 3:00 p.m., at the main outside entrance to the Courthouse
for the Circuit Court for the City of Alexandria, Virginia, 520 King Street,
Alexandria, Virginia 22314, the real property and improvements, along
with any limited common elements appurtenant thereto with the street
address of 240 S. Reynolds St. #111, Alexandria, Virginia 22304 and legally
described as:
Condominium Unit No. 111, REYNOLD’S PROSPECT, a Condominium, and
the Limited Common Elements appurtenant thereto, established by Condominium Instruments recorded on June 17, 1988, in Deed Book 1244, at
page 1978, and any and all amendments thereto whether now existing
or hereafter recorded, among the land records of the City of Alexandria,
Virginia. (collectively the “Property”)
The sale is being conducted in order to satisfy the liens securing
unpaid assessments, less any payments made, if any, as perfected by
the Association recording of the Memorandum of Lien among the land
records of the City of Alexandria, Virginia on March 24, 2017 as Instrument
No. 170004380 (“Lien(s)”).
The Property will be sold in “AS IS” condition and without any warranty
either expressed or implied, as to any aspect or condition of the property,
including, but not limited to the conditions, restrictions, rights of ways,
easements, reservations, community association instruments, any other
instruments and/or amendments thereto and subject to all liens, existing
housing and zoning code violations, filed or unfiled mechanic’s and/or
materialmen’s liens, if any, and all matters of record taking priority over
the Association’s Lien, including, but not limited to, any Deed of Trust. The
sale is further subject to all provisions, restrictions, easements, covenants,
and conditions as contained in the aforementioned Association’s original,
if applicable, amended, instruments, Declaration, and Bylaws and or any
other governing instrument.
The successful bidder at the foreclosure sale shall assume all risk of loss
and shall be responsible for any damage to the Property immediately upon
the conclusion of bidding on the date of sale. A nonrefundable deposit in
the amount of ten percent (10%) of the sale price to be paid by certified or
cashier’s check will be required of the successful bidder at the time and
place of the sale. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Association reserves
the right to waive the requirements of the deposit. The successful bidder
shall be required to sign a Memorandum of Sale at the conclusion of the
bidding incorporating all terms of sale. Settlement in full must be made
within thirty (30) days from the date of the sale, time being of the essence.
In the event the purchaser fails to settle in full as required and within
the required time period, the aforementioned deposit shall be forfeited
by purchaser and will be retained by Trustee, the purchaser’s contract
rights shall also be forfeited, and the Property may be resold at the risk,
cost and expense of the purchaser with the deposit applied to the costs
and expenses of sale, including trustees' fees. At settlement the deposit
retained by Trustee, without interest, shall be applied to the purchase
price and the balance shall be paid in cash or its equivalent. All costs
of the conveyance, which shall be by special warranty deed, examination
of title, state and local recordation taxes, grantor taxes, recording and
clerk's fees, notary fees, settlement fees, including preparation of deed,
etc., to be at the cost of the purchaser. Taxes, water, rent and all
other municipal charges and assessments payable and including, but not
limited to, sanitary and/or city charges, if any, shall be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale and assumed therein by the purchaser.
Trustee shall not have a duty to deliver possession of the Property to the
successful bidder. Interest to be paid by the purchaser at a rate of ten
percent (10%) per annum from the date of the sale to the date of the
settlement. The Association, if a bidder, shall not be required to post the
deposit or pay interest.
If Trustee is unable for any reason, in his sole discretion, to convey title
to the Property, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy at law
or in equity shall be the return of its deposit, without interest, and upon
the return of the deposit the sale shall be void and of no effect. To the
extent permitted by the applicable law, Trustee reserves the right, in his
sole discretion, to (1) announce additional terms at the time of sale, (2)
waive or modify the requirement with respect to the bidder's deposit,
(3) accept or reject any or all bids, (4) extend the time to receive bids,
(5) withdraw the Property from the sale at any time, and (6) postpone
settlement following sale for a reasonable period of time as determined
by Trustee. The information contained herein was obtained by sources
deemed to be reliable, but is offered for information purposes only. The
Association cannot make any representations or warranties with respect
to the accuracy of this information.
Inquiries should be directed to counsel for the Association, Joseph J.
Shannon, Esq., Rees Broome, PC, 1900 Gallows Road, Suite 700, Vienna,
Virginia 22182, (703) 790-1911.
12135021
LEGAL NOTICES
e-mail: legalnotices@washpost.com
872
873
Fairfax County
D13
Prince William County
876
876
Loudoun County
878
Loudoun County
Stafford County
878
Stafford County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
4104 MAPLE ST,
FAIRFAX, VA 22030
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
4314 CUB RUN ROAD,
CHANTILLY, VA 20151
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
1589 Wood Duck Court
Woodbridge, VA 22192
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
PIN: 129-35-2211-000
Tax Map #: 106//17////127/
NOTICE OF TRUSTEES' SALE
134 KEATING CIRCLE
STAFFORD, VA 22554
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $212,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
November 2, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 18891,
Page 0965, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on November 22, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 58 3 39 91 303
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $312,262.35, with an annual
interest rate of 8.790000% dated
April 14, 2007, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 19268, Page 0570,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on November 15,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 57 1 23 060
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $450,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.640000% dated
May 8, 2007, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 19328, Page 0137,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on November 22,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0334-02-0056
Pursuant to Virginia Code § 55-516, and by virtue of a Deed of
Appointment of Trustee dated October 24, 2016 and recorded on
November 16, 2016 in the Land Records of Loudoun County, Virginia
as Instrument No. 201611160077801, South Village Homeowners Association (“Association”), by its appointed Trustee, Mazin I. Elias will offer for
sale at public auction to the highest bidder on October 31, 2017 at 11:00
a.m., at the main entrance to the Courthouse for the Circuit Court of
Loudoun County, Virginia, 18 E. Market St., Leesburg, Virginia 20176, the
real property improvements, along with any limited common elements
appurtenant thereto, located at the street address of 43010 Matties
Terrace, South Riding, Virginia 20152, legally described as:
In execution of a Credit Line Deed of Trust dated June 28, 2005, in
the original amount of $55,950.00, recorded as Instrument Number
LR050024033 in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of Stafford County,
Virginia, the undersigned Trustees, any of whom may act, will on October
31, 2017, at 10:00 a.m., by the front main entrance to the Stafford County
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia 22554, offer for
sale at public auction to the highest bidder the following property with
improvements thereon:
LOT 50, SECTION ONE (1), TAMARLANE, AS THE SAME IS DULY
DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN PB41 PAGES 298-302.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-260536.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-269650.
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$428,300.00, dated May 6, 2003,
recorded among the land records
of the Circuit Court for Prince William County on May 8, 2003, as
Instrument
Number
200305080083288, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on November
10, 2017 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Lot 30, Section 3, DAWSON LANDING, as the
same appears duly dedicated, platted and recorded in Deed Book
2468 at Page 1, among the Land
Records of Prince William County,
Virginia. Tax ID: 8390-58-8085.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 13, 20, 2017
12135196
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 20, 27, 2017
12136404
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6191 FREDS OAK RD,
FAIRFAX STATION, VA 22039
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5743 WALCOTT AVENUE,
FAIRFAX, VA 22030
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $937,500.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.000000% dated
December 20, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 18084,
Page 1541, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on November 15, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0773 12 0058A
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$700,000.00, with an annual interest rate of 2.000000% dated October 18, 2005, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 17873, Page 1804,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on November 22,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0664 05 0046
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-265522.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 20, 27, 2017
12137341
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
4603 GRAMLEE CIRCLE,
FAIRFAX, VA 22032
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $508,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
September 6, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 18749,
Page 1626, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on November 15, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0691 04 0088
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-256499.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 13, 20, 2017
12135154
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-266461.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 13, 20, 2017
12135787
873
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
301 SURVEYORS COURT SW,
VIENNA, VA 22180
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5832 COLFAX AVENUE,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22311
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $671,533.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.750000% dated
April 6, 2012, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX as Deed Book 22237, Page
1518, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction all that
property located in the COUNTY
OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse
steps at the front of the Circuit
Court building for the County of
Fairfax located at 4110 Chain
Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on
November 15, 2017 at 2:30 PM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 061-4-34-0036
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-269039.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 13, 20, 2017
12129714
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $711,492.46, with an annual
interest rate of 4.500000% dated
April 25, 2006, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 18410, Page 1040,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on November 22,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 038-4-42-0049A
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-261965.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 20, 27, 2017
12136401
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6924 DUKE DR,
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22307
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $440,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
January 13, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 19068,
Page 0824, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on November 22, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0492 15 0012
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-261467.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 20, 27, 2017
12137362
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-253986.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 20, 27, 2017
12136405
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $318,600.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
December 21, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Instrument
Number 2007002523.012, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on November 22,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0931 23100010
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-264197.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 20, 27, 2017
12136403
Prince William County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
8609 Braxted Lane
Manassas, VA 20110
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$64,999.00, dated November 29,
1999, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on December 1, 1999, as Instrument Number
34606, in Deed Book 2828, at Page
0224, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction, at the main
entrance of the courthouse for
the Circuit Court of Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Ave, Manassas,
VA on November 10, 2017 at 9:00
AM, the property described in said
deed of trust, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
UNIT NO. 226, GEORGIAN HAMLET,
A CONDOMINIUM, established by a
Declaration duly recorded in Deed
Book 1316, at page 1811, as
amended in Deed Book 1326 at
page 666, as amended in Deed
Book 1338 at page 810 as amended in Deed Book 1344 at page 120,
as amended in Deed Book 1350 at
page 96, as amended in Deed Book
1355 at page 1431, as amended
in Deed Book 1359 at page 1542,
as amended in Deed Book 1361 at
page 1541, as amended in Deed
Book 1364 at page 1856, as
amended in Deed Book 1365 at
page 1603, as amended in Deed
Book 1369 at page 229, as amended in Deed Book 1391 at page
1344, as amended in Deed Book
1396 at page 1678, as amended
in Deed Book 1406 at page 1383,
as amended in Deed Book 1412 at
page 2006, as amended in Deed
Book 1421 at page 765, as amended in Deed Book 1424 at page
307 and as amended in Deed Book
1432 at page 761, among the land
records of Prince William County,
Virginia, together with the exclusive right to the use of the Limited
Common Elements appurtenant to
said Unit as set forth in said Declaration and an undivided interest
in the Common Elements of GEORGIAN HAMLET, a Condominium, as
provided in said Declaration.. Tax
ID: 22179.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $6,400.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: FHA (Trustee # 579637)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
The Vendor Auction.com will be
used in conjunction with this sale
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $13,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
Loan Type: Conv/Conv (Trustee #
569981)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0467
10/ 20/2017 10/27/2017 12137384
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
16101 HAWKWATCH COURT,
WOODBRIDGE, VA 22191
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $462,933.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.250000% dated
March 29, 2011, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM as Deed Instrument
Number 201103310026792, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on December 19, 2017
at 4:00 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 8290-34-7655
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
15-251501.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 20, Nov 20, 27 2017 12137367
876
Loudoun County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
38591 STEVENS RD,
LOVETTSVILLE, VA 20180
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $719,200.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
January 26, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 20070130-0008064, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
November 15, 2017 at 9:30 AM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 403-36-4023-000
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-254412.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 13, 20, 2017
Lot 127, SOUTH VILLAGE, Section 2, as the same is duly dedicated, platted
and recorded as Instrument #200311240154898 and as shown on Plat
recorded as Instrument #200311240154899, among the Land Records of
Loudoun County, Virginia ( “Property”).
The sale of the Property is being conducted in order to satisfy the
liens securing unpaid assessments, less any payments made, if any, as
perfected by the memoranda of liens recorded in the Land Records of
Loudoun County, Virginia on (i) April 11, 2014 as Instrument No. 201404110018158; and (ii) March 14, 2016 as Instrument No. 20160314-0014120
(“Lien(s)”).
The Property will be sold in “AS IS” condition and without any warranty
either expressed or implied, as to any aspect or condition of the property,
including, but not limited to the conditions, restrictions, rights of ways,
easements, reservations, community association instruments, any other
instruments and/or amendments thereto and subject to all liens, existing
housing and zoning code violations, filed or unfiled mechanic’s and/or
materialmen’s liens, if any, and all matters of record taking priority over the
Association’s Lien(s), including, but not limited to, any Deed of Trust. The
sale is further subject to all provisions, restrictions, easements, covenants,
and conditions as contained in the aforementioned Association’s original,
if applicable, amended, instruments, Declaration, and Bylaws and or any
other governing instrument.
The successful bidder at the foreclosure sale shall assume all risk of loss
and shall be responsible for any damage to the Property immediately upon
the conclusion of bidding on the date of sale. A nonrefundable deposit in
the amount of ten percent (10%) of the sale price to be paid by certified or
cashier’s check will be required of the successful bidder at the time and
place of the sale. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Association reserves
the right to waive the requirements of the deposit. The successful bidder
shall be required to sign a Memorandum of Sale at the conclusion of the
bidding incorporating all terms of sale. Settlement in full must be made
within thirty (30) days from the date of the sale, time being of the essence.
In the event the purchaser fails to settle in full as required and within
the required time period, the aforementioned deposit shall be forfeited
by purchaser and will be retained by Trustee, the purchaser’s contract
rights shall also be forfeited, and the Property may be resold at the risk,
cost and expense of the purchaser with the deposit applied to the costs
and expenses of sale, including trustees' fees. At settlement the deposit
retained by Trustee, without interest, shall be applied to the purchase
price and the balance shall be paid in cash or its equivalent. All costs
of the conveyance, which shall be by special warranty deed, examination
of title, state and local recordation taxes, grantor taxes, recording and
clerk's fees, notary fees, settlement fees, including preparation of deed,
etc., to be at the cost of the purchaser. Taxes, water, rent and all
other municipal charges and assessments payable and including, but not
limited to, sanitary and/or city charges, if any, shall be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale and assumed therein by the purchaser.
Trustee shall not have a duty to deliver possession of the Property to the
successful bidder. Interest to be paid by the purchaser at a rate of ten
percent (10%) per annum from the date of the sale to the date of the
settlement. The Association, if a bidder, shall not be required to post the
deposit or pay interest.
If Trustee is unable for any reason, in his sole discretion, to convey title
to the Property, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy at law
or in equity shall be the return of its deposit, without interest, and upon
the return of the deposit the sale shall be void and of no effect. To the
extent permitted by the applicable law, Trustee reserves the right, in his
sole discretion, to (1) announce additional terms at the time of sale, (2)
waive or modify the requirement with respect to the bidder's deposit,
(3) accept or reject any or all bids, (4) extend the time to receive bids,
(5) withdraw the Property from the sale at any time, and (6) postpone
settlement following sale for a reasonable period of time as determined
by Trustee. The information contained herein was obtained by sources
deemed to be reliable, but is offered for information purposes only. The
Association cannot make any representations or warranties with respect
to the accuracy of this information.
Inquiries should be directed to counsel for the Association, Joseph
Shannon, Esq., Rees Broome, PC, 1900 Gallows Road, Suite 700, Vienna,
Virginia 22182, (703) 790-1911.
Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27, 2017
876
12135019
877
Loudoun County
2004 Mill Garden Drive,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $514,414.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.750000% dated
August 10, 2009, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 200908120055392, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
November 22, 2017 at 9:30 AM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 111471269000
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-268325.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 20, 27, 2017
12133323
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
12135155
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery
is convenient.
SF
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE SALE
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
18390 RENEE COURT,
LEESBURG, VA 20176
SF
10/6, 10/13, 10/20/2017 12131178
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Towne #: 5000.0321
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$162,011.00, dated March 5, 2013
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of the Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in Document No. 130005146 and modified in Document No. 150002292,
default having occurred in the
payment of the Note thereby
secured and at the request of
the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at
the entrance to the Spotsylvania
County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, on
November 7, 2017 at 12:00 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as:
Lot 82, Section 2, Mill Garden, with
improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (50686)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Oct 13, 20, 2017
12135955
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6646 KIRKLEY AVE,
MCLEAN, VA 22101
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $520,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 6.625000% dated
September 25, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 18785,
Page 1620, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on November 22, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0402 09 0059
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THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
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TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-246926.
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PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 20, 27, 2017
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Parcel Number 30-GG-1-50
This sale is subject to the restrictions, rights of way, conditions, easements, and mechanic's liens, if any, whether of record or not of record, to
the extent any of the foregoing apply and take priority over the lien of the
Deed of Trust. This sale further is subject to a Deed of Trust recorded as
Instrument Number LR050024032 in the original amount of $298,500.00.
Deposit of $2,500.00 by cashier's check shall be required to qualify as a
bidder prior to the sale, except from the Noteholder.
The deposit, without interest, is applied to the purchase price at settlement. Settlement will be held on or before fifteen (15) days after sale;
time being of the essence. Upon purchaser's default, the deposit shall
be forfeited and the Property shall be resold at the risk and costs of the
defaulting purchaser.
The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by bank or cashier’s
check or wire transfer. Settlement shall be at the offices of the Substitute
Trustees or other mutually agreed location. The Property and any
improvements thereon shall be sold in "as is" condition without any
warranties. The successful bidder shall assume all loss or damage to
the Property from and after the strike down of the final bid at the sale.
Purchaser shall be responsible for all costs of the conveyance, which shall
be by special warranty including, but not limited to, the preparation of
the deed, the grantor's tax, and the congestion relief fee. In addition,
at settlement, the successful bidder shall pay all past due and current
assessments, sewer or water charges, and real estate taxes, and any
penalties and interest due on any of the foregoing, with respect to the
Property prorated to and including the date of the foreclosure sale.
The purchaser shall be responsible for all assessments, sewer or water
charges, and real estate taxes due from and after the sale date. The sale is
subject to such additional terms as the Substitute Trustees may announce
at the time of sale. The purchaser will be required to sign a Memorandum
of Sale incorporating all the terms of the sale.
William H. Casterline, Jr.
Jeremy B. Root
James R. Meizanis
For Information contact:
William H. Casterline, Jr.
BLANKINGSHIP & KEITH, PC
4020 University Drive #300
Fairfax, Virginia 22030
(703) 691-1235
October 13, 20, 2017
877
Spotsylvania County
12135793
C
JOBS
TRUSTEE SALE
2815 O'Connor Court,
Fredericksburg, VA 22408
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $70,300.00, dated May 26, 2006
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of the Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in Document No. 200600019760, default
having occurred in the payment
of the Note thereby secured and
at the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, on November 14,
2017 at 12:00 PM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 120, Section 2, Pelhams Crossing, with improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (57228
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Oct 16,17,18,19,20,2017 12136446
881
Orange County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
18320 BEECHNUT DRIVE,
ORANGE, VA 22960
In execution of a certain Deed
of Trust dated July 8, 2005, in
the original principal amount of
$232,500.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Orange County, Virginia as Instrument No. 050007716 . The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
for sale at public auction in the
front of the Circuit Court building
for Orange County, 109 W. Main
Street, Orange, Virginia on November 16, 2017, at 10:00 AM, the
property described in said Deed
of Trust, located at the above
address, and more particularly
described as follows: ALL THAT
CERTAIN TRACT OR PARCEL LYING
AND SITUATE IN TAYLOR MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT OF ORANGE COUNTY, VIRGINIA, CONTAINING 12.301
ACRES, DESIGNATED AS LOT C OF
BEECH TREE ESTATES, ON A PLAT
OF SURVEY BY HERNDON AND
GRYMES, C.L.S., DATED SEPTEMBER 24, 1990, REVISED DECEMBER
4, 1992 AND RECORDED IN THE
CLERK‘S OFFICE OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE COUNTY OF
ORANGE, VIRGINIA IN DEED BOOK
493, PAGE 660.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3205931.
Oct 20, 27, 2017
12137390
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Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3991 LYNDHURST DR UNIT #303,
FAIRFAX, VA 22031
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
2604 ROSWELL COURT,
FALLS CHURCH, VA 22043
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
Map-Block-Lot Number: 058.01-0B-2.111
Account No. 50560100
Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27, 2017
872
Fairfax County
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THE WASHINGTON POST . GOINGOUTGUIDE.COM
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
Wake-up calls
The 12 breakfast spots that
will break your “snooze” habit
— but not the bank.
PAGE 17
GORAN KOSANOVIC FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
DINING
$20 DINER
MOVIES
These are heady times to be a
D.C. restaurant-goer. Behold:
Tom Sietsema’s Top 10 list. 6
If you doubt a seafood burger
can taste meaty, swim up to
FishScale for waves of flavor. 8
A real-life crew of firefighters
gets their rightful recognition in
the drama “Only the Brave.” 26
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
EZ
2
11/4/17
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Noteworthy events this week
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Nightlife
10 bars hold an
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Sample the
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Exhibits
16
Music
Homosuperior;
Aminé; the
Bobs; Queens
of the Stone
Age. 5
Movies
“Breathe” tells
the life story of
an advocate of
the disabled.
27
MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
Hundreds dance at Howard University’s Yardfest, one of the District’s greatest musical traditions, last year.
Howard Homecoming International Yardfest
The Notorious B.I.G., Jay-Z and Drake are among the superstars who have taken the stage in the past at Yardfest, the
centerpiece of Howard University’s Homecoming celebrations that draws crowds of students, alumni and local hip-hop fans to
a free day-long concert on the main quad. Performers are usually kept secret in advance; last year’s headliners included
Common, Lil Uzi Vert and Faith Evans.
When: Friday from noon to 6 p.m. Where: 2400 Sixth St. NW. howard.edu. Admission: Free.
Stage
The
international
adoption
experience gets
the immersivetheater
treatment. 20
The Most Very
Specialest Evening
with Tig Notaro
and Friends
The highlight of the National Gallery of Art’s fall season is an exhibition
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be on view, including paintings by Gerard ter Borch, Gerrit Dou, Pieter
de Hooch, Gabriel Metsu, Frans van Mieris, Caspar Netscher and Jan
Steen.
When: Sunday through Jan. 21.
Where: National Gallery of Art, Sixth Street and Constitution Avenue
NW. nga.gov.
Admission: Free.
When: Thursday at 8 p.m.
Where: The Lincoln Theatre,
1215 U St. NW. bentzenball.com.
Tickets: $35.
Kids Euro Festival
The European Union’s annual Kids Euro Festival offers two weeks of
free cultural events for the whole family at venues across the city,
including the National Gallery of Art, public libraries and embassies.
There are story times, featuring books from and about the E.U. for
younger ones, and movie screenings, dance performances, science
experiments and painting workshops for older children.
Where: 1333 19th St. NW.
shopmadeindc.com.
Where: Locations vary. euintheus.org.
Admission: Free.
— Fritz Hahn, Philip Kennicott
and Holley Simmons
OCTOBER 20, 2017
Time is running out to score
the last tickets to Tig Notaro.
When: Grand opening Friday
through Sunday.
When: Saturday through Nov. 5.
Admission: Free.
CHRIS WILCHA/SHOWTIME
You don’t have to be from
Washington to appreciate Shop
Made in D.C., a hybrid storecafe devoted to locally made
products, food and booze.
Browse jewelry, clothing and
home goods crafted by D.C.
residents, including shirts and
hats from District of Clothing
and stationery and bags from
Printed Wild. The Neighborhood
Restaurant Group (owners of
Red Apron Butcher and
ChurchKey) is curating the food
and drink offerings, which will
include Tibetan dumplings from
Dorjee Momo, tacos from
Tortilladora and Bullfrog
Bagels, as well as beer and
cider. RSVP for the opening
weekend festivities to receive a
Made in D.C. tote.
. FRIDAY,
On the cover
Hot cakes from
Florida Avenue
Grill, which
serves up
slightly more
petite stacks.
Shop Made in D.C.
THE WASHINGTON POST
“One Mississippi” star Tig
Notaro is again the curator of
Brightest Young Things’ annual
Bentzen Ball comedy festival,
which sprawls across the District
for four days. Although a number
of the featured events are
already sold out, tickets remain
for the festival’s opening
extravaganza, which features
stand-up by Notaro, onetime
D.C. resident Seaton Smith and
special guests.
‘Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting:
Inspiration and Rivalry’
4
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Plan Ahead
Noteworthy events over the next two weeks
Nov. 3-12 XIII Fuego Flamenco Festival
Masters of flamenco dance descend on D.C. for Gala Hispanic Theatre’s
13th Annual Flamenco Festival, a 10-day celebration that includes the
U.S. premiere of “Binomio,” a new flamenco piece choreographed by
Spanish director Francisco Hidalgo, and a new work from Edwin Aparicio,
American flamenco star and the festival’s curator. The festival also
includes Flamenco en Familia, a free interactive dance demo for children
on Nov. 11 at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
GALA Hispanic Theatre, 3333 14th St. NW. galatheatre.org. $30-$60.
Nov. 5 The producer Flying Lotus in 3-D
A pair of Flying Lotus-branded 3-D glasses are included with every ticket
for the L.A.-based experimental electronic music producer’s fall tour. Put
them on, and experience his meandering mix of hip-hop, jazz and
electronica as a soundtrack to the show’s holographic 3-D imagery and
lighting effects. You might wish every concert passed out these glasses
after this.
7 p.m. Echostage, 2135 Queens Chapel Rd. NE. echostage.com. $43.45.
Nov. 7 ‘Crazy For You’
JOSHUA WHITE/HAUSER & WIRTH
Part of “Pickett’s Charge (The Thunderous Cannonade),” which deals with the legacy of the Civil War.
The exhibition will go on view on an entire floor at the Hirshhorn at the beginning of next month.
The irresistible Gershwin classics such as “I’ve Got Rhythm,” “Someone
to Watch Over Me,” “Embraceable You” and “Nice Work If You Can Get It”
featured in “Crazy For You” should have theatergoers skipping out of
Signature Theatre — or tap-dancing, if they’re inspired by the show’s
playful numbers from Tony-nominated choreographer Denis Jones. The
feel-good musical-comedy runs through Jan. 14, which means there’s
plenty of time to see this star-crossed love story between a spirited
postmistress and the banker assigned to foreclose on her small town’s
theater.
Through Jan. 14. Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington.
sigtheatre.org. $22-$113.
Nov. 8 ‘Mark Bradford: Pickett’s Charge’
In November, the entire third level of the Hirshhorn will be taken over by “Pickett’s Charge,” a massive, new 360degree panoramic commission from artist Mark Bradford. In eight abstract pieces — each more than 45 feet
long — Bradford grapples with the Civil War’s legacy and the complexities of American history. “Pickett’s Charge”
is inspired by Paul Philippoteaux’s historical cyclorama depicting the final charge of the Battle of Gettysburg, and
elements of the original 1883 painting are layered into Bradford’s collages.
Through Nov. 12, 2018. Hirshhorn Museum, Independence Avenue and Seventh Street SW. hirshhorn.si.edu. Free.
Photo courtesy of SHAPESHIFT Theatrical
— Adele Chapin
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
NEXT WEEK!
Presented by SHAPESHIFT Theatrical
from Minneapolis, MN
Fifteen accomplished young dancers tell powerful, personal
stories of a summer of friendships in the ensemble’s trademark
style of interwoven vignettes, combining styles of Hip Hop dance
with the lyricism of contemporary movement.
October 27–29 | Family Theater
AGE 9+
WORLD-CLASS SHOW JUMPING
ENTERTAINING EXHIBITIONS
FUN FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
TICKETS START AT $20 FOR SELECTED NIGHTS
KIDS 12 & UNDER FREE FOR DAYTIME SESSIONS
DISCOUNTS FOR GROUPS, MILITARY, STUDENT AND SENIORS
Oct. 28 at 1:30 p.m. is a sensory-friendly performance.
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM
FOR MORE INFO, GO TO WIHS.ORG
TICKETS ON SALE NOW! KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
Tickets also available at the Box Office. Groups call (202) 416-8400.
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries, call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
Bank of America is the Presenting Sponsor
of Peformances for Young Audiences.
Funding for Access and Accommodation Programs at the Kennedy Center
is provided by the U.S. Department of Education.
Additional support for Grey Skies Blue
is provided by A. James & Alice B. Clark Foundation;
The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation;
Paul M. Angell Family Foundation;
and the U.S. Department of Education.
Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by
David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program.
Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible
through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts
and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.
Home delivery makes good sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Music
Aminé
Show: Thursday at the Howard
Theatre. Doors open at 7 p.m. 202803-2899. thehowardtheatre.com.
$25-$98.
Amid all the rock stars and
Black Beatles of hip-hop, Aminé is
perhaps rap’s biggest pop fanatic.
You can hear the signs all over
“Good for You,” a debut album that
finds the Portland rapper flexing
and finessing old and new flames
with clever wordplay, a playful
energy and beats so bright you
might need shades.
Beyond the lyrical nods to
“SpongeBob SquarePants” and
such classicist couplets as “Phone
drier than Mojave /Daddy diabetic, so he eat his pancakes with
agave,” the best parts of Aminé’s
5
EZ
music are his addictive hooks.
Many share the melodies of pop
punk, as on “Wedding Crashers:”
“This is dedicated to my ex lovers
/Hope that you hear this, never
find another,” he sings, adding
with a sneer, “Hope you play this at
your wedding /Yeah, the one I
won’t attend.”
That one is more Warped Tour
than Rock the Bells, but Aminé
really proves his pop bona fides on
“Spice Girl.” “I had to get ‘Spice
Girl’ approved by every Spice Girl,”
he tweeted in July. “Really didn’t
think theyd let me release it but
they are the GOATS.” In the land of
endless Biggie-or-Tupac and JayZ-or-Nas debates, only rap’s mostdedicated pop star would call the
Spice Girls the greatest of all time.
— Chris Kelly
FARRAH SKEIKY
Homosuperior, a Washington hardcore and self-described “queercore” punk band, at a show at
DC9. “We’re here to tell everyone, ‘No, be yourself,’ ” says Donna Slash, the band’s founder.
why stop being
loud now?
Homosuperior
Show: With Heavy Breathing, Die
Nerven and Hand Grenade Job on
Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Dupont
Underground.
dupontunderground.org. $5-$10.
A
Queens of the Stone
Age
Over its 35-year career, the
Bobs have pushed the envelope of
what all-vocal music can sound
like. Formed in an era when other
vocal quartets were singing classic barbershop tags, the Bobs
defined their sound as a “band
without instruments,” wrote original songs and turned cover versions upside-down: The group
adapted the Doors’ “Light My
Fire” into a madrigal and put a
distortion pedal on its voices to
mimic the sound of a guitar solo.
After 31/2 decades, the quartet is
hanging up its pitch pipe as a
group so that its members —
Matthew “Bob” Stull, Dan “Bob”
Schumacher, Richard “Bob”
Greene and Angie “Bob” Doctor —
can focus on solo projects.
The Bobs are leaving behind a
legacy of recorded music. The
group’s 16 albums include a large
number of original compositions,
which is unusual in a medium
typically devoted to covers. And
when the Bobs do take on another
composer’s work, they do so with
their own spin. The group’s most
memorable cover might be a
piano-accompanied version of
Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” in
which their voices turn into a
wordless orchestra. Using voices
to adapt a song without lyrics is
just one of the ways the Bobs have
been ahead of their time, and the
a cappella world is better for their
vocal and creative contributions.
— Catherine P. Lewis
features a particularly playful
bass line and falsetto refrain,
while “Domesticated Animals”
melds dissonant guitar riffs into a
chorus that begs for a singalong.
When the band takes take the
stage at the newly minted Anthem, expect faithful renditions
of songs from across its catalogue
punctuated by Homme’s banter.
— Christopher Kompanek
Queens of the Stone Age at the
Anthem promises to be a
blazing, bouncing, metal-rock
singalong.
KYLE GUSTAFSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
OCTOBER 20, 2017
Born out of the demise of stoner-rock pioneers Kyuss, Queens of
the Stone Age fuses the thud of
heavy metal with the levity of pop
to create an utterly listenable
blend of blazing guitar hooks and
melodies.
The album cover of the band’s
newest release, “Villains,” fea-
— Chris Richards
Show: Saturday at 8 p.m. at the
Barns at Wolf Trap. 877-965-3872.
wolftrap.org. $30-$35.
. FRIDAY,
Show: Friday at 8 p.m. at the
Anthem. 202-265-0930.
theanthemdc.com. Show is sold out.
tures a demon’s hands covering
the face of a man in a leather
jacket. He’s wearing a cross, and
his blue eyes pierce through the
demon’s hands, which happen to
be flashing a peace sign as they
attempt blindness. The duality
depicted encapsulates the push
and pull that gives Josh Homme
and Co. such a dynamic sound,
which seems to constantly be
reconciling with itself. The album’s nine tracks, produced by
pop maven Mark Ronson, are
bouncy as any that QOTSA has
ever made. “The Evil Has Landed”
or’s ferocious style of punk feels
like necessary noise in Washington, especially considering reports that the president recently
made a joke about how his vice
president “wants to hang” gay
people.
“Things suck right now, especially with this new administration,” Slash says. “People are
trying to push queers back into
the closet, trying to get people to
assimilate. There’s all of this
backlash against trans people
and gender-fluid people. We’re
here to tell everyone, ‘No, be
yourself. . . . There’s no way we
can go back to the way things
were.’ ”
The Bobs
THE WASHINGTON POST
fter hosting drag nights
across the District for
years, Donna Slash
wanted to start something loud — something “fast,
angry and desperate-sounding”
that would give the singer an
opportunity to dress as bombastically as Divine, or Wendy O.
Williams, or Miss Guy of the
Toilet Boys — “cult figures of the
’70s, ’80s and ’90s that I had
pictures of that I had to hide
from my parents growing up,”
says Slash (who goes by Josh
Vogelsong during the daylight
hours). “I loved Marilyn Manson
back then, too. So all of that
scary, nightmarish stuff — but
with sparkles.”
So Slash acquired some dazzling new attire and formed
Homosuperior, a self-described
“queercore” punk group that
currently features drummer Kit
Wagner, bassist K.C. Oden and a
new guitarist, Farrah Skeiky (a
noted punk photographer who
occasionally takes pictures for
The Washington Post).Now,
nearly three years into the
band’s existence, Homosuperi-
JOHN CORNICELLO/WOLF TRAP
The Bobs, who over 16 albums changed the world of a cappella
music for the better, is hanging up their pitch pipe.
6
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Dining
Tom Sietsema’s 10 favorite restaurants right now
BY
H OLLEY S IMMONS
For the past few months, Washington Post food critic Tom Sietsema has been hard at work assessing the region’s best restaurants
for his Fall Dining Guide, published in The Post Magazine. The
area has seen a boom in innovative Asian restaurants, Sietsema
said, but the year’s most notable
developments have been in highend dining.
“The region’s more formal places
are all cooking as if they’re chasing
after Michelin stars — and some
are,” Sietsema said. “Our high-end
places tend to be as fun as they are
delicious. The lofty level of cooking
and the absence of pretension are
truly impressive.”
Here are his top 10 favorites of
the season, chosen in part for
their service, ambiance or both.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
10. Sfoglina
You can count on one hand the
number of ingredients in most
pastas at Sfoglina, and the noodles are made fresh in a room
adjoining the dining area. At his
Van Ness restaurant, chef Fabio
Trabocchi eschews the more opulent tendencies of Fiola and Fiola
Mare for simple, pared-down
preparations of classic Italian
dishes. The results are so striking
that you might be tempted to take
a snapshot before devouring
them. 4445 Connecticut Ave. NW.
9. The Salt Line
Waterside views? Check. Justcaught seafood? Check. Nautical
decor? Check. The only thing
missing at the Salt Line is the
sound of seagull squawks. From
chef Kyle Bailey, formerly of Birch
& Barley, comes this casual destination-dining spot with such
menu hits as seafood charcuterie,
rockfish crudo and Nashville hot
soft-shell crab. Landlubbers will
appreciate the New England
Smash burger, which Sietsema
found to be one of the best in
town. 79 Potomac Ave. SE.
8. ChiKo
Everything
about
ChiKo
screams casual — except the
food’s quality. The counter-service restaurant on Barracks Row serves Korean and Chinese dishes finessed by chefs Scott
Drewno (formerly of the Source
from Wolfgang Puck) and Danny
Lee (of Korean favorite Mandu).
The menu is packed with such
lovingly made dishes as furikake
butter rice topped with brisket
and a lamb stir-fry so excellent,
Sietsema offers to buy you dinner
if you can find a finer one. 423
Eighth St. SE.
PHOTOS BY DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
CLOCKWISE, FROM LEFT: Patrick O’Connell, the chef-proprietor of the Inn at Little Washington, has tea on the grounds; squid ink and
paprika cannelloni curl at Sfoglina; a plate including soya chicken, barbecued pork (char siu) and crispy pork belly at Tiger Fork.
7. Tiger Fork
Hidden within Blagden Alley,
Tiger Fork is a Chinese restaurant
so vibrant and aromatic you’d
think you stepped into a Hong
Kong night market. The open
kitchen is helmed by Irvin van
Oordt, an alum of the Source and
Rogue 24, which happens to be
the building’s previous tenant.
Don’t miss the barbecue plate
piled with pork belly, pork shoulder and soya chicken. Behind 922
N St. NW in Blagden Alley.
6. Bad Saint
Pray to the line gods that you’re
one of 24 lucky diners to land a
seat in Bad Saint. The small, noreservations Filipino restaurant
in Columbia Heights can be a
challenge to get into, but chef Tom
Cunanan’s dishes inspired by family recipes are worth the wait —
and the national acclaim. Vegetar-
ians will appreciate the shredded
banana hearts and coconut milk
with long peppers, cane vinegar
and ginger. 3226 11th St. NW.
5. Métier
No detail is overlooked at Métier, chef Eric Ziebold’s sleek restaurant beneath Kinship. The
chef takes flavor risks that pay off:
banana and sea urchin strike a
pleasant chord; tomatoes and
pink peppercorns bring a dessert
to life; and avocado toast gets
even better with dashi jelly. If
you’re in the mood for a gourmet
meal with top-notch service (and
low decibels), Métier is the way to
go. 1015 Seventh St. NW.
4. Minibar
José Andrés’s culinary playground serves one dazzling dish
after another, including edible
Parmesan spoons meant for
scooping up basil foam and bal-
samic vinegar “caviar.” Unlike
many gastronomic spectacles,
Andrés’s actually taste good,
which is part of the reason Sietsema says it’s worth dropping the
$275 per person for this stellar
prix-fixe meal. 855 E St. NW.
prepay model. Plating is playful,
including an “afternoon tea” portion that includes elevated finger
foods like a foie gras canele and
sorrel and roe tuile. The menufree meal keeps you guessing. 715
Eighth St. SE.
3. Himitsu
What Himitsu lacks in size it
makes up for in flavor. The shoe
box of a restaurant in Petworth
serves jewel-like cuts of raw fish
as well as cooked winners like
fried red drum in green curry. It
can be difficult to choose from
chef Kevin Tien’s dishes, so don’t
hesitate to tell your server how
hungry you are and follow the
chef’s whims. 828 Upshur St. NW.
1. Inn at Little Washington
Dining at the Inn at Little
Washington is a journey, and not
just because it’s a 90-minute drive
outside of the District. Servers at
Patrick O’Connell’s combination
restaurant-hotel put on a transportive show with such dishes as
lamb carpaccio with Caesar salad
ice cream; foie gras custard; and a
chocolate sphere served with a
tiny golden hammer for accessing
the ice cream inside. At nearly 40
years old, this spot’s looking better than ever. 309 Middle St.,
Washington, Va.
2. Pineapple and Pearls
This thrill-inducing restaurant
from Rose’s Luxury chef Aaron
Silverman flips the dining experience on its head, beginning with a
holley.simmons@washpost.com
Ask Tom
Excerpts from Post Food Critic
Tom Sietsema’s online discussion
7
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TONIGHT!
FRI, OCT 20
THU,
OCT
LARA
ST.12JOHN, VIOLIN
Q: Is it that Michelin is stuck in
have a special-occasion lunch for
two? Unfortunately, dinner is not
an option.
A: The first place that comes to
mind is Sfoglina, the lovely
“pasta shop” from chef Fabio
Trabocchi and No. 10 on my fall
list of favorite restaurants (see
Page 6). I’m also enamored of
Rasika West End, where (if you
ask in advance) you can enjoy
modern Indian food in a
carriage-shaped booth next to
the picture window.
CHAMBER MUSIC AT THE BARNS
SON LITTLE
ALA.NI
WED, OCT 25
GENERAL ADMISSION
JOHN LODGE
OF THE MOODY BLUES
an act of God
“ [TOM]
STORY IS
EXCELLENT
– THE WASHINGTON POST
“A
THE 10,000 LIGHT YEARS TOUR
THU, OCT 26
SACHAL ENSEMBLE
TRULY WITTY,
URBANE COMEDY
FRI, OCT 27
“ AN IRREVERENT COMEDY “ SUBLIMELY SATIRICAL AND
UNSPEAKABLY FUNNY
– BROADWAY WORLD
NOW THROUGH NOVEMBER 26
– THEATREBLOOM
SigTheatre.org | 703 820 9771
MAGGIE ROSE
SCOTT KURT
SAT, OCT 28
– DCMETROTHEATERARTS
“
Q: Any suggestions for a place to
MATT HERSKOWITZ, PIANO
MOUNTAIN
FOUNDER’S DAY HEART
GENERAL ADMISSION
“
the past, where white tablecloths
and fusty service (e.g., Plume)
count for more than brilliant
food (e.g., Rasika)?
A: I think Michelin retains a
dated European sensibility that’s
at odds with the way so many
Americans are dining these days.
Even in some of our more formal
restaurants, we expect to have
fun, for instance.
“
many others’ about Michelin’s
decision not to award any D.C.
restaurants (or the Inn at Little
Washington) three stars this
year. The consensus seems to be
that Michelin is hung up on
certain European formalities and
traditions that simply don’t
translate to many American
restaurants. This seems a
reasonable hypothesis, but
Michelin explicitly states
ambiance and service are not a
factor when awarding stars. This
means they are either lying or
truly believe D.C. food is inferior
to other major dining
destinations. What do you think?
A: One of my biggest beefs with
the Michelin Guide for
Washington, released earlier this
week, is explained by a lack of
support, both financial and
human. Michael Ellis, the
international director for the
publication, told The
Washington Post, “We did not
have the resources to go beyond
the areas we covered last year,”
when the D.C. list made its debut.
“We only have so many boots on
the ground in terms of the
inspection team.”
But to your question: Michelin
does seem to favor fancier spots
that accept reservations (see:
Plume, a curious inclusion) over
places with crazy-good cooking
that don’t (e.g., Little Serow and
Bad Saint).
“
Q: I’ve read your opinion and
BERNHOFT
WED, NOV 1
GENERAL ADMISSION
AND MANY MORE!
1 6 3 5 T R A P R D, V I E N N A , VA 2 2 1 8 2
You, too, could have home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
ASK TOM CONTINUED ON 10
SF
“CLASSIC AMERICAN THEATER AT ITS FINEST.”
“TERRIFIC SONGS ... SASSY DANCING.”
— Washington Post
“A MOVING AND GORGEOUS TESTIMONIAL.”
NOW PLAYING
BEGINS OCTOBER 27
BEGINS NOVEMBER 10
BY ARTHUR MILLER
DIRECTED BY SEEMA SUEKO
BOOK BY GEORGE ABBOTT AND RICHARD BISSELL
MUSIC AND LYRICS BY RICHARD ADLER AND JERRY ROSS
BASED ON THE NOVEL 7½ CENTS BY RICHARD BISSELL
DIRECTED BY ALAN PAUL | CHOREOGRAPHED BY PARKER ESSE
MUSIC DIRECTION BY JAMES CUNNINGHAM
BY CHRISTINA HAM
DIRECTED BY TIMOTHY DOUGLAS
Photo of Hal Linden by Tony Powell.
Photo of Tim Rogan and Britney Coleman by Tony Powell.
THE PRICE
— Broadway World
THE PAJAMA
GAME
NINA SIMONE:
FOUR WOMEN
— Star Tribune
FEATURING
EMMY AND TONY
WINNER HAL LINDEN
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
ORDER TODAY!
202-488-3300
ARENASTAGE.ORG
8
EZ
$20 Diner
DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
In Shaw, burgers fresh from the docks
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
BY
T
T IM C ARMAN
he first time Henry Brandon Williams prepared a
fish burger, he did it for
love, not money. About a
decade ago, his mother decided to
adopt a pescatarian diet, and Williams wanted to make sure she
had something to eat at a family
cookout. So he chopped fish fillets
in a food processor, pressed the
flesh into patties and grilled them
up.
“The carnivores, they just
jumped on” the burgers, Williams
recalled. “She almost didn’t get
one.”
I can relate. In early October, I
visited FishScale, the sleek new
Shaw-area shop that Williams
opened this summer, and the
place had already been picked
clean for the night, which is not as
unusual as it sounds. At present,
Williams has only about 120 patties available per day, each made
with sustainable, wild-caught
FishScale casts a rod toward the future using
only craft-conscious, sustainable seafood
fish or shellfish, some with names
you rarely see on seafood menus
around Washington.
But Williams had a backup
option ready to slap on the grill, a
fish from Hawaii called monchong. The first time he pronounced the name, I thought he
had sneezed. I must have looked
confused because Williams
quickly added that the fish also
goes by the handle pomfret.
Kristal Williams, the chef’s sister
and the general manager at FishScale, suggested that monchong’s
flesh tastes sweet and buttery.
Sustainable fish with sweet
and buttery flesh? You can call it
dumpfish for all I care. I was
immediately baited by the concept, before taking a single bite.
Williams has learned a few
things about seafood burgers and
cooking in the years since he
dazzled the family with his grill
improv. He graduated from
L’Academie de Cuisine in GaithDINER CONTINUED ON 9
If you go
FISHSCALE
637 Florida Ave. NW. No phone.
wearefishscale.com.
Hours: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. MondayWednesday; 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Thursday-Saturday.
Nearest Metro: Shaw-Howard
University, with a 0.2-mile walk to
the restaurant.
Prices: $3.50 to $17.95 for sides
and sandwiches.
TOP: A grey triggerfish burger
at FishScale, Henry Brandon
Williams’s fast-casual eatery
whose minimalist aesthetic
extends to its fare, which lets
the patties, not the garnishes,
shine. LEFT: His pescatarian
mother, Mary, shown, was
Williams’s inspiration.
9
EZ
PHOTOS BY DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
DINER FROM 8
OCTOBER 20, 2017
tim.carman@washpost.com
. FRIDAY,
been fished almost to oblivion.
With every choice it makes, FishScale wants to ensure that you —
and countless generations after
you — can all enjoy the fruits of
the sea.
As such, FishScale is a casual
seafood spot that smells like the
future: craft-conscious, affordable, sustainable.
Each fish burger sports tire
tracks across its surface, courtesy
of a wood-burning grill that imparts a delicate smokiness to the
patty. Williams has refined his
burger-forming technique: He no
longer uses a food processor. Instead, he removes the bloodlines
that often run down the center of
the fish and then grinds the fillets, as if he were preparing a
hamburger patty. Williams adds
no filler to the ground fish but
does fold in a secret ingredient to
help bind the flesh.
The technique makes for a surprisingly meaty fish burger, so
different from the standard fried
THE WASHINGTON POST
ersburg in 2010. He spent a year
working at BlackSalt, the seafood
lover’s destination in the Palisades, featuring a sit-down restaurant and one of the finest fish
markets in the District. He also
workshopped his FishScale concept for a year with a stand at the
FreshFarm Market by the White
House.
He scouted a number of neighborhoods before settling on Florida Avenue NW for his bricks-andmortar debut. Carved out of a
narrow retail space — once an
appliance store and a hair salon
in the dark days before Washington became a wonky midway of
restaurants — FishScale comes
off
as
a
stripped-down
fast-casual. It’s like a dockside
fish house that’s been transported
to the big city. The menu is a
series of wood planks affixed to
the wall, each identifying the
burgers and sides available that
day. You may have to ask about
the price of some items.
Unless you’re a marine biologist, you’ll also have to ask about
the specimens that Williams
sources from ProFish, the Washington seafood supplier committed to sustainability. Since opening in August, FishScale has
served up burgers formed from
triggerfish, sheepshead, wahoo,
amberjack, monchong, pompano
and other species that haven’t
FishScale owner Henry
Brandon Williams
working his magic on the
wood-burning grill, which
not only churns out
surprisingly meatlike fish
burgers, but a grilled
romaine salad, drizzled
with kefir-crème fraîche
dressing and topped with
granola.
fillet tucked inside a toasted bun.
FishScale’s toothsome patties are
served naked between two halves
of a luxurious olive oil bun from
Panorama Bakery. Don’t waste
your time hunting for tartar
sauce. There isn’t any. The condiments are limited to house-made
ones, including grilled onions,
pesto, cucumber-and-tomato relish, dinosaur kale kimchi, sunflower-yogurt coleslaw and a
sambal hot sauce, some of which
you can mix and match.
Even when garnished, though,
the fish burgers are not exactly
dressed for the opera ball. Williams is a minimalist, preferring
to apply his condiments sparingly
so that they don’t jam up the
flavors of the fish. Even potential
Bigfoot garnishes, such as the
kimchi or the sambal, tread lightly across these patties.
As a result, the pompano burger, paired with kimchi, goes down
clean, cool and briny, an ocean
breeze off the Florida coast. The
burger built with sheepshead —
the black-and-white striped “convict fish” with the Gary Busey
chompers — has an almost shellfish-like sweetness, which can be
softly embellished with the cucumber-and-tomato relish. And
while I didn’t find the Hawaiian
monchong particularly buttery, I
did find it sweet and firm enough
to stand up to that freaky sambal.
But if you’re looking for something buttery, go with the blue
crab burger, a golden puck of
succulent lump meat from Cambridge, Md. The flesh is so fresh
and pristine, you’d swear Williams had pulled the crabs from
the Chesapeake earlier that day.
The best part of this crustacean
patty? I detected a hint of tomalley, that blue-crab gland with the
headstrong flavor. Perhaps my
palate fooled me, but that burger
had a depth and richness that no
mere crab cake could touch.
Once you order a burger at
FishScale, your sides are limited
to Jackson’s Honest chips or one
of two seasonal dishes. In September, Williams sold grilled
corn brushed with a pickled plum
sauce, which added a touch of
acid to those sweet summer kernels. Alas, the corn is gone, but
the grilled romaine remains. The
half-head comes drizzled with a
kefir-crème fraîche dressing, tart
and creamy, topped with sun gold
tomatoes and granola. It’s both
awesome and off-putting, depending on what ingredients
wind up on the end of your fork.
The salad offers a side benefit
as well. For demanding customers, Williams will take the dressing and slather it on a bun. After
all, he’s already asking diners to
forgo their favorite fish when they
walk in the door at FishScale. He’s
wise enough not to deprive them
of something approximating tartar sauce, too.
Ask Tom
10
EZ
Pink Martini
with China Forbes
ASK TOM FROM 7
featuring special guest Ari Shapiro
Q: I moved away from D.C. a
while back but will be visiting in
a couple weeks and was hoping
you had a suggestion for a Friday
night small group dinner. It
needs to be vegetarian friendly
and preferably not too spendy. I
only have one night to eat in the
city. Where should I go? Bonus
points if it isn’t a place I have to
stand outside for hours to get
into.
A: You don’t say how long ago
you moved away from one of the
best dining scenes in the country,
or if you want to try something
new (to you), so I’ll offer an “old”
suggestion — Zaytinya in Penn
Quarter for Middle Eastern small
plates — and a new one: Espita
Mezcaleria in Shaw for modern
Mexican fare, including some
exciting meatless tacos from chef
Robert Aikens.
NEXT WEEK!
Emil de Cou, conductor | October 26–28, 2017 | Concert Hall
TICKETS ON SALE NOW! KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
Tickets also available at the Box Office. Groups call (202) 416-8400.
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries, call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
David and Alice Rubenstein
are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO.
Excerpts from Post Food Critic
Tom Sietsema’s online discussion
AARP is the Presenting Sponsor
of the NSO Pops Season.
“Mad Men–era SEX APPEAL...
an absolutely stellar cast.”
Q: A friend and I are looking for
someplace new for lunch this
–Broadway World
Saturday. We’ve done Michel
Richard’s Central, Wolfgang
Puck’s restaurant and the like,
and I’d like to show her
something new. She’ll be staying
near the Capitol, although we
don’t necessarily need to stay in
the area (or near a Metro line)
since I’ll be driving down to visit.
Any ideas for a fun new place for
two foodies who will eat just
about anything?
A: If you want to stay on the Hill,
check out Joselito for Spanish
food in a gracious environment;
if you don’t mind another
location, head to the Navy Yard
for seafood with a view at the
Salt Line, another restaurant on
my Top 10 list at the moment.
Q: Do you think Little Serow
deserves a star? I know I’m
biased, because it’s still my
favorite meal in the city, but I
certainly do.
A: Ab-so-lute-ly. Little Serow is
one of the best Thai expressions
on the East Coast.
Q: Looking for a
recommendation to take my
boyfriend’s 95-year-old
grandmother in December. She
has not been to D.C. since she
was a child, and I’d love to take
her somewhere very special, but
it needs to have an approachable
menu and be wheelchairaccessible. Help, please!
A: Give 701 in Penn Quarter a
call to verify wheelchair
accessibility. It has some nice
views from its windows and a
modern American menu to
satisfy both conservative and
more adventurous palates.
Q: I have been searching for
years for a lovely, crisp eggplant
parm. Where can I find it?
A: All together now: All-Purpose
Pizzeria!
Tom Sietsema hosts a Q&A
on Wednesdays at 11 a.m. at
live.washingtonpost.com.
HANDMADE
HEAVEN
“DAZZLINGLY WITTY…
a tantalizing unsolved mystery.”
–The Washington Post
“DELICIOUS FUN.”
–DC Metro Theater Arts
By Tom
ns
Bur
the
LOV E R
the
OCTOBER 20, 2017
Collection
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
by Harold Pinter
directed by Michael Kahn
250+
AMERICAN
ARTISTS
LIVE!
•Exciting Demos
•Tasty Treats
•Shopping Fun
•Kids’ Entertainment
Photo of Lisa Dwan and Patrick Kennedy by Carol Rosegg.
ORDER TODAY!
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MUST CLOSE OCTOBER 29
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Restaurant Partner: Asia Nine
OCT 20, 21, 22, 2017
Montgomery Co. Fairgrounds
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Admission: $8 online; $10 at the door
Admission good all 3 days
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Fri. & Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-5
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SF
11
Nightlife
D.C. bars compete
to beautify Totino’s
pizza; patrons win
BY
F RITZ H AHN
October is National Pizza
Month, but the Pabst Brewing
Company wants you to forget “contemporary, elevated pizza parlors”
and artisan margherita pies. Instead, they’re looking back to those
college days when you didn’t need
anything more than a frozen pizza
and a six-pack of PBR.
Through the end of October,
Pabst is hosting the “District of
Pabst Pizza Crush,” a pizzamaking contest between 10
neighborhood bars. They’re buying each bar a countertop Hamilton Beach pizza oven and, on a
designated night, supplying them
with 10 frozen Totino’s cheese
pizzas. That’s where the competition comes in: Each bar will receive $20 to spend on toppings of
their choice, which must be added to the Totino’s before the pizzas are served to customers.
Last week, the Pug, an H Street
NE bar that doesn’t have an actual
kitchen, hosted the first beer-andpizza night. Bar owner Tony
Tomelden, whose father was half
Filipino and half Irish, used his
$20 on longaniza sausage from the
Filipino Global Market in Oxon
Hill. The meat added a sweet-andspicy flavor to the industrial tomato sauce and molten cheese.
Technically, you can’t order the
pizza. Instead, local Pabst rep
Shane Dwyer walked around the
Pug a few times an hour with a
plate of cooked, sliced pizza and
Email:
goingoutguide
@washpost.com Telephone: 202334-6808 Get listed: Our listings
include events in the following
categories: pop music, classical
music, museums, theater, dance,
comedy and film. We accept events
in the District; Montgomery, Prince
George’s, Calvert, Charles and St.
Mary’s counties in Maryland; and
the area including Arlington,
Fairfax, Loudoun and Prince
William counties and the city of
Alexandria in Virginia. If you’d like
your event to be considered, please
submit the event name,
description, date, time, location
and price at events.washpost.com.
Listings are subject to space
restrictions. We cannot
acknowledge every submission. Advertising: Ron Ulrich,
ronald.ulrich@washpost.com, 202334-5289
Matthew McGovern at his bar,
the Dew Drop Inn. The
Brookland tavern’s turn in the
District of Pabst Pizza Crush, a
contest in which neighborhood
bars put their own spin on
frozen pizza and then give it
away to diners, is Wednesday.
offered pieces to customers drinking PBR cans and tallboys. In between, there were giveaways of
PBR swag, including Halloween
koozies.
Dwyer expects the rest of the
events to work the same way: Buy a
PBR, and you’ll get a free taste of
some of the bar’s special pizza.
“Taste” is the operative word here:
You probably won’t eat your fill,
depending on the size of the crowd.
Still, it’s free — and it’s a good
excuse for some low-key hang time
with friends at a neighborhood bar.
Upcoming events at Ivy and
Coney (Tuesday), Dew Drop Inn
(Wednesday), the Looking Glass
Lounge (Thursday) and the Good
Silver (Oct. 31). See the @pbr_dc
Twitter account for a full calendar and additional details.
fritz.hahn@washpost.com
EZ
THE BLUE HOUR
A Far Cry
Luciana Souza, vocalist
WOR
PREM LD
IERE!
SAT, NOV 4, 8pm • SIXTH & I
Featuring music by Pulitzer Prizewinner Caroline Shaw, My Brightest
Diamond’s Shara Nova, and more
TICKETS: (202) 785-9727
WashingtonPerformingArts.org
FRITZ HAHN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Jason Moran, Artistic Director for Jazz
National Symphony Orchestra
Family Concert
Halloween
Spooktacular
Creep into the Concert Hall for costumed classics at this frightfully fun concert
featuring ghoulishly attired musicians. Arrive early for trick-or-treating and a special
Haunted Hall Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo.”
Oct. 29 at 2 p.m. is a sensory-friendly performance.
CARRIE MAE WEEMS
GRACE NOTES:
REFLECTIONS FOR NOW
TICKETS ON SALE NOW! KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
OCTOBER 20 AT 8 P.M.
EISENHOWER THEATER
October 29 at 2 and 4 p.m. | Concert Hall
AGE 5+
Tickets also available at the Box Office. Groups call (202) 416-8400.
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries, call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
David and Alice Rubenstein are the
Presenting Underwriters of the NSO.
Additional support for the NSO Family Concerts is provided by
is provided by A. James & Alice B. Clark Foundation; Macy’s;
The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; an endowment from the
Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; the U.S. Department of Education;
and the Women’s Committee for the National Symphony Orchestra.
Bank of America is the Presenting Sponsor
of Peformances for Young Audiences.
Funding for Access and Accommodation Programs at the Kennedy Center
is provided by the U.S. Department of Education.
A PART OF JFKC: A CENTENNIAL
CELEBRATION OF JOHN F. KENNEDY
Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by
David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program.
WGL is the proud sponsor
of the NSO Family Concerts.
Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible
through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts
and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.
NEA JAZZ MASTER
RON CARTER TRIO
OCTOBER 27 AT 7 & 9 P.M.
TERRACE THEATER
WE EKEND
Tickets also available at the Box Office.
Groups (202) 416-8400
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries,
call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540
Support for Jazz at the Kennedy Center is
generously provided by C. Michael Kojaian.
Support for JFKC: A Centennial Celebration of John F. Kennedy
is provided by Ambassador Elizabeth Frawley Bagley, Chevron,
the Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation, Northern Trust, and Target.
OCTOBER 20, 2017
TICKETS ON SALE NOW!
(202) 467-4600
KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG
. FRIDAY,
NOVEMBER 6 AT 7 & 9 P.M.
THEATER LAB
THE WASHINGTON POST
DJANGO FESTIVAL
ALL-STARS FEATURING
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12
PG
P O P M U SIC
Prices listed where available
FRIDAY
21 SAVAGE Echostage. echostage.com. 10
p.m. $48.40. BLACK MASALA, THE
SOUTHERN BELLES AND THUNDER BODY
Gypsy Sally’s. gypsysallys.com. 8:30 p.m.
$15. CHEIKH NDOYE & FRIENDS
Montpelier Arts Center. arts.pgparks.com. 8
p.m. $25. CHRIS LAKE, DOMBRESKY AND
ALEX ELJAIEK U Street Music Hall.
ustreetmusichall.com. 10 p.m. $10. COMBO
CHIMBITA AND LOS GAITEROS DE
SANGUASHINGTON Atlas Performing Arts
Center. atlasarts.org. 8 p.m. $25-$32.
ELENA & LOS FULANOS Tropicalia. bit.ly/
2xKuzUe. 8 p.m. $15-$18. GOLDLINK The
Fillmore. fillmoresilverspring.com. 11:30 p.m.
$25. GRANT-LEE PHILLIPS, LAURA
TSAGGARIS Pearl Street Warehouse.
pearlstreetwarehouse.com. 8:30 p.m. $20. JJ
GREY & MOFRO, THE COMMONHEART
9:30 Club. 930.com. 7 p.m. $29. LILA
DOWNS Music Center at Strathmore.
strathmore.org. 8 p.m. $38-$78. LLOYD
COLE Birchmere. birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m.
$25. NAJEE Blues Alley. bluesalley.com. 8
p.m. Through Sunday. $55-$60. NATALIE
PRASS, WILDHONEY AND DEN-MATE
Black Cat. blackcatdc.com. 8 p.m. $10-$12.
OH HE DEAD, SOLDIERS OF SUBURBIA
AND MALPRACTICE Rock & Roll Hotel.
rockandrollhoteldc.com. 9 p.m. $15. QUEENS
OF THE STONE AGE, ROYAL BLOOD The
Anthem. theanthemdc.com. 8 p.m. $49.50$75. Sold out. THE CLARKS, SCOTT KURT
AND MEMPHIS 59 State Theatre.
thestatetheatre.com. 7 p.m. $18-$21. THE
FAB FAUX: THE BEATLES 1966-1967 The
Hamilton. thehamiltondc.com. 8 p.m. $44$93.50. THE FLESHTONES U Street Music
Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m. $25. THE
SOCIAL ANIMALS, CROOKS AND CROWS
DC9. dcnine.com. 7 p.m. $12. WAYNE
LINSEY, ALANA LYNNE, SUNWHOA LOVE
AND LYNNE FLOODMONT Bethesda Blues
& Jazz Supper Club. bethesdabluesjazz.com.
8 p.m. $40.
SATURDAY
BARRULE Calvert Marine Museum.
calvertmarinemuseum.com. 7 p.m. $25.
BLACK PISTOL FIRE, BLACK FOOT
GYPSIES U Street Music Hall.
ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m. $15.
CLAPTONE, MARTIN MIGUEL U Street
Music Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. 10:30 p.m.
$15-$20. COLIN HAY, CHRIS TRAPPER
Financing
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October is Domestic Violence
Awareness Month
Debbi Morgan
The Monkey on My Back
Complete Bathroom Remodeling
Go on a journey through a legacy of abuse
spanning three generations of women
through the eyes of this award winning
actress and star Debbi Morgan.
Ready To
Remodel?
S AT U R D AY
Lincoln Theatre. thelincolndc.com. 8 p.m.
$45-$59.50. DIZZY GILLESPIE
CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION The Kennedy
Center. kennedy-center.org. 8 p.m. $19-$59.
FRED HERSCH Atlas Performing Arts
Center. atlasarts.org. 8 p.m. $31.50-$40.
HEATWAVE Publick Playhouse.
arts.pgparks.com. 8 p.m. $30-$35.
HENNYPALOOZA Echostage.
echostage.com. 5 p.m. $60. JULIE FOWLIS
BlackRock Center for the Arts.
blackrockcenter.org. 8 p.m. $29-$43.
MARIJA TEMO Bossa Bistro. bit.ly/2gfcPFr. 8
p.m. $14-$17. MEEK MILL, MONEYBAGG
YO Echostage. echostage.com. 10 p.m.
$48.40. MOON HOOCH, MARCO
1. Coffee
2. Paper
3. Bills
S U N D AY
10 21 2017 10 22 2017
@ 8PM @ 2PM
Superior Service | Years of Experience
TICKETS: $35/PERSON
$30 for students & seniors
visit arts.pgparks.com
Fall
Special!
@ the B-Side theater
Fine & Performing Arts Center
Bowie State University
14000 Jericho Park Road Bowie, MD
FREE 8 Jet
Body Massager
or $1,000 OFF
$10 of each ticket will be donated to the
Family Crisis Center.
ENROLL IN EASY PAY TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
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Democracy Dies in Darkness
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THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
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13
BENEVENTO 9:30 Club. 930.com. 10:30
p.m. $20. PICKWICK, THE ELWINS DC9.
dcnine.com. 7 p.m. $15. REACHING FOR
THE MOON: THE UNSUNG IRVING BERLIN
1st Stage. 1ststagetysons.org. 8 p.m. $25.
REGGAE FEST WITH ALKALINE The
Howard Theatre. thehowardtheatre.com. 11
p.m. $25. STEAL YOUR PEACH, SQUARING
THE CIRCLE AND BLACK MUDDY RIVER
BAND Gypsy Sally’s. gypsysallys.com. 8:30
p.m. $15. THE BOBS The Barns at Wolf Trap.
wolftrap.org. 8 p.m. $30-$35. THE FAB
FAUX: THE BEATLES 1969-1970 The
Hamilton. thehamiltondc.com. 8 p.m. $44$93.50. WOMEN IN CONCERT State
Theatre. thestatetheatre.com. 9 p.m. $27$45. ZEDD, GREY AND LOPHIILE The
Anthem. theanthemdc.com. 8 p.m. $41-$76.
SUNDAY
AL STEWART Birchmere. birchmere.com.
7:30 p.m. $39.50-$79.50. A TRIBUTE TO
THE MUSIC OF STEPHANIE MILLS, CHAKA
KHAN AND ARETHA FRANKLIN Bethesda
Blues & Jazz Supper Club.
bethesdabluesjazz.com. 7 p.m. $30. BLACK
KIDS, SURF ROCK IS DEAD DC9.
dcnine.com. 9 p.m. $15. LECRAE, AHA
GAZELLE AND 1K PHEW The Fillmore.
fillmoresilverspring.com. 7 p.m. $26.95.
LEVON MIKAELIAN’S ARMENIAN JAZZ
TRIO Bossa Bistro. bossadc.com. 7 p.m. $10.
LIL KIM The Howard Theatre.
thehowardtheatre.com. 7 p.m. $50. MARTIN
SEXTON TRIO, REBECCA HAVILAND AND
WHISKEY HEART The Hamilton.
thehamiltondc.com. 7:30 p.m. $27.75$49.75. NOBUNTU Montgomery College
Cultural Arts Center.
mcblogs.montgomerycollege.edu/cac. 2 p.m.
$10-$35. SHADY RILL Historic St. Mary’s
City, Visitor Center Auditorium. bit.ly/
2kSB6pL. 3 p.m. $15. THE GIBSON
PG
BROTHERS Amp by Strathmore.
ampbystrathmore.com. 8 p.m. $30-$40.
MONDAY
BENJAMIN BOOKER, SHE KEEPS BEES
9:30 Club. 930.com. 7 p.m. $20. COVEY,
SHINJI Black Cat. blackcatdc.com. 7:30 p.m.
$10. JACQUI NAYLOR QUARTET Blues
TOWN CONTINUED ON 14
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Taste…
. FRIDAY,
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FREE Parking
$8/Adult, $1/Child (6-12)
14
On the Town
PG
TOWN FROM 13
Alley. bluesalley.com. 8 p.m. $22. THE WAR
ON DRUGS, THE BUILDING The Anthem.
theanthemdc.com. 8 p.m. $41-$56. TV GIRL
AND BROTHERTIGER Comet Ping Pong.
cometpingpong.com. 9 p.m. $12.
TUESDAY
BEACH FOSSILS, SNAIL MAIL AND
RAENER 9:30 Club. 930.com. 10 p.m. $20.
BRIAN MCKNIGHT Birchmere.
birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m. Through
Wednesday. $89.50. FLORIST, KEEPER
AND LURAY DC9. dcnine.com. 8 p.m. $12$14. GURF MORLIX Hill Country.
hillcountrywdc.com. 8:30 p.m. $17-$20.
MOURNING [A] BLKSTAR Bossa Bistro.
bit.ly/2kT0Brb. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. NOAH
GUNDERSEN, SILVER TORCHES 9:30
Club. 930.com. 6 p.m. $20. THE SMOKING
POPES, CHRIS FARREN Black Cat.
blackcatdc.com. 7:30 p.m. $17-$20. WENDY
HICKS Blues Alley. bluesalley.com. 8 p.m.
$20. YUMI ZOUMA U Street Music Hall.
ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m. $15.
WEDNESDAY
So handy.
So reliable.
Home delivery.
ARUN RAMAMURTHY, KARAVIKA Bossa
Bistro. bossadc.com. 9 p.m. $5. BJ JANSEN,
COMMON GROUND, DELFEAYO
MARSALIS AND DUANE EUBANKS
Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club.
bethesdabluesjazz.com. 8 p.m. $40.
GIRAFFAGE, SWEATER BEATS AND
WINGTIP U Street Music Hall.
1-800-753-POST
COURTESY OF WOLF TRAP
R&B singer-songwriter Son Little will perform at the Barns at Wolf
Trap on Wednesday at 8 p.m. along with Ala.Ni.
ustreetmusichall.com. 10 p.m. $20. JAZZY
BLU Blues Alley. bluesalley.com. 8 p.m. $22.
KRIS DELMHORST, JEFFREY FOUCAULT
Gypsy Sally’s. gypsysallys.com. 8 p.m. $18.
PHIL LESH, THE TERRAPIN FAMILY BAND,
NICKI BLUHM, ROBERT RANDOLPH,
PRESERVATION HAL JAZZ BAND The
Anthem. theanthemdc.com. 6 p.m. $75-
SF
The 2017
is ON!
$125. SLAID CLEAVES Hill Country.
hillcountrywdc.com. 7 p.m. $17-$28. SON
LITTLE, ALA.NI The Barns at Wolf Trap.
wolftrap.org. 8 p.m. $20. THE EFFECTS,
SUPER SILVER HAZE AND LIGHT BEAMS
Black Cat. blackcatdc.com. 7:30 p.m. $10.
THURSDAY
AMINÉ, TOWKIO The Howard Theatre.
thehowardtheatre.com. 8 p.m. $25-$98.
ANDERS OSBORNE, JACKIE GREENE AND
CRIS JACOBS Birchmere. birchmere.com.
7:30 p.m. $35. BRAD LINDE ENSEMBLE
Atlas Performing Arts Center. atlasarts.org. 7
p.m. $25-$28. CISSA PAZ AND FRIENDS
Bossa Bistro. bossadc.com. 9:30 p.m.
Through Oct. 27. $10. JANE MONHEIT Blues
Alley. bluesalley.com. 8 p.m. $40-$45. JOHN
LODGE The Barns at Wolf Trap. wolftrap.org.
8 p.m. $60-$75. LAWRENCE ROTHMAN,
WESTON SMITH DC9. dcnine.com. 9 p.m.
$12. LOUIS THE CHILD, OPIA AND WIN &
WOO 9:30 Club. 930.com. 7 p.m. $30. MAX,
ROZES U Street Music Hall.
ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m. $10-$12. NORA
JANE STRUTHERS, THE PARTY LINE AND
BY & BY Gypsy Sally’s. gypsysallys.com. 8
p.m. $12-$14. PINK MARTINI, CHINA
FORBES The Kennedy Center. kennedycenter.org. 7 p.m. Through Oct. 28. $24-$89.
SARA CURTIN, THE NORTH COUNTRY AND
PNMA Black Cat. blackcatdc.com. 7:30 p.m.
$15.
K
CLAS S ICAL
Prices listed where available
FRIDAY
OCTOBER 20, 2017
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9:30 Club • Adventure Theatre-MTC • Arena Stage • Belfort Furniture • Bethesda Blues and Jazz Supper Club • The Birchmere • Black Cat
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S0991 4x7
CAPPELLA PRATENSIS: MISSA
LUTHERANA In celebration of the 500th
anniversary of the symbolic start of the
Reformation, the group performs works
associated with the Protestant movement
by Adam Rener, Heinrich Isaac and Johann
Walter. Clarice Smith Performing Arts
Center, University of Maryland, Route 193
and Stadium Drive, College Park.
theclarice.umd.edu/events/2017/cappellapratensis. 8 p.m. $10-$25.
FRIDAY MORNING MUSIC CLUB: CALVARY
BAPTIST CHURCH CONCERT SERIES The
group performs Greig’s Selected Norwegian
Folk Songs, Op. 66 with Jeffery Beaudry,
piano, and Schumann’s Quartet in A with
David Brown and Sheyna Burt on violins,
Caroline Brethaueron viola, and David Pearl
on cello. Calvary Baptist Church, 755 Eighth
St. NW. fmmc.org/event/calvary-baptistchurch-concert-series-59. Noon. Free.
LARA ST. JOHN AND MATT HERSKOWITZ:
CHAMBER MUSIC AT THE BARNS St. John,
artistic adviser, and Herskowitz, pianist,
present a program of chamber works, as
well as St. John’s recent album, “Shiksa.”
The Barns at Wolf Trap, 1635 Trap Rd.,
Vienna. wolftrap.org/tickets/calendar/
performance/1718barns/1020show17.aspx.
7:30 p.m. $45.
QUARTET UNCORKED! The Arlington
Philharmonic’s Quartet in Residence and
Bistro 360 join for a happy hour concert
combining music and wine. (Admission
includes wine). Bennett Park Art Atrium,
1601 Clarendon Blvd., Arlington.
arlingtonphilharmonic.org. 6 p.m. $15.
SHINING BROW Miriam Khalil, Sidney
Outlaw, Rebecca Ringle and Robert Baker
star in an UrbanArias production exploring
the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. Featuring the
On the Town
Inscape Chamber Orchestra. Atlas
Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE.
urbanarias.org. 8 p.m. Through Oct. 21. $39$42.
ST. LOUIS CONCERT SERIES: ALTMAN
AND ADELSBERGER Ben Altman, guitarist,
and Heather Adelsberger, pianist, perform
works by Manuel Ponce, Joaquín Rodrigo,
Bach, Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco and Luigi
Boccherini. Adelsberger also performs on
the harpsichord. St. Louis Church, 12500
Clarksville Pike, Clarksville.
stlconcertseries.org/ben-altman-and-heatheradelsberger. 7:30 p.m. Free.
SATURDAY
ALEXANDRIA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
British conductor James E. Ross
conducts Brahms’s Symphony No. 3 and
other works. Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert
Hall and Arts Center, 4915 East Campus Dr.,
Alexandria. nvcc.edu/schlesingercenter. 8
p.m. Through Sunday. $20.
BALTIMORE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Jun
Märkl conducts, featuring Saint-Saëns’s
“Danse Macabre” and Strauss’s “Don
Quixote.” Pianist Jonathan Biss performs
Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 21 in C. Music
Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman
Lane, North Bethesda. strathmore.org. 8
p.m. Through Nov. 18. $30-$85.
FAIRFAX SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Christopher Zimmerman conducts the
orchestra on Rachmaninoff’s Piano
Concerto No. 2, and Shostakovich’s
Symphony No. 5. George Mason University
Center for the Arts, 4373 Mason Pond Dr.,
Fairfax. cfa.gmu.edu. 8 p.m. Through Feb. 3.
$15-$65.
STEVEN HONIGBERG & FRIENDS: A
SCHUBERTIADE The National Symphony
Orchestra’s cellist, with violinists, Karen
Johnson and Lily Honigberg, violist, Daniel
Foster and pianist, Adam Golka, performs
Schubert’s Piano Trio No. 2 in E-flat and
String Quartet No. 14 in D Minor (“Death
and the Maiden”). Dumbarton Concerts,
3133 Dumbarton St. NW.
dumbartonconcerts.org. 6 p.m. $39-$42.
SUNDAY
MASTERWORKS OF FIVE CENTURIES
2017-2018 SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES The
Smithsonian Chamber Players
perform Brahms’s Sonata in E Minor for
Cello and Piano (1862-1865), and Piano
Quartet in G Minor (1861). National Museum
of American History, 14th Street and
Constitution Avenue NW.
smithsonianassociates.org. 6:30 p.m. $25$35. Preconcert lecture at 6:30 p.m.,
concert: 7:30 p.m.
PHILHARMONIC CONCERT The orchestra
performs a work by local Virginia composer
Ben Roundtree, and violinist Leonid
Sushansky performs Tchaikovsky’s Violin
Concerto. The Church of the Epiphany, 1317
G St. NW. epiphanydc.org. 3 p.m. $20.
SETH PARKER WOODS The cellist performs
solo works including “Khse Buon” (1980) by
Chinary Ung, and Bach’s Suite No. 2 in D
Minor. The Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St.
NW. phillipscollection.org. 4 p.m. $20-$40.
Advance reservations are recommended;
tickets can be reserved online until 12 hours
before each concert.
Serenade in D. Dumbarton House, 2715 Q
St. NW. fmmc.org/event/dumbarton-concertseries-16. 12 p.m. Free.
FRIDAY MORNING MUSIC CLUB:
GOODWIN HOUSE CONCERT SERIES The
group performs works by Schumann,
featuring Yuki Nishio, soprano, and Gillian
Cookson, piano, as well as selected works
EZ
NAZIONALE DI SANTA CECILIA WITH
MARTHA ARGERICH 2016 Kennedy Center
Honoree, Argerich, performs with the Italian
orchestra conducted by Antonio Pappano.
The Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW.
kennedy-center.org. 8 p.m. $45-$135.
ORCHESTRA DELL’ACCADEMIA
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FRIDAY MORNING MUSIC CLUB:
DUMBARTON HOUSE CONCERT SERIES
The group performs Galliard’s “How Sweet
the Warbling Linnet Sings” from “Pan and
Syrinx”; Handel’s “Hush, Ye Pretty Warbling
Quire” from “Acis and Galatea,” as well as
“Nel dolce dell’oblio,” and Beethoven’s
Alcina
WEDNESDAY
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TUESDAY
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE ENCHANTRESS
BECOMES THE ENCHANTED?
by other composers. Goodwin House, 4800
Fillmore Ave., Alexandria. fmmc.org/event/
goodwin-house-concert-series-5. 7:30 p.m.
Free.
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. FRIDAY,
November 4–19 | Eisenhower Theater
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EZ
On Exhibit
M USE U M S
OPENINGS
“BOTANICAL BEAUTIES: FLOWERING
PLANTS ON STAMPS” An exhibition that
highlights the variety of flowering plants
commemorated on U.S. postage stamps
during the past 50 years. It includes some
30 pieces of artwork used to produce at
least 28 flora stamps. Opening Friday.
National Postal Museum, 2 Massachusetts
Ave. NE. postalmuseum.si.edu/exhibits/
upcoming/index.html.
“FRONT ROOM: NJIDEKA AKUNYILI
CROSBY” The Los-Angeles based Nigerian
artist debuts six paintings taken from her
experience of moving from Nigeria to the
United States. Opening Wednesday.
Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum
Dr., Baltimore. artbma.org/exhibitions/frontroom-njideka-akunyili-crosby.
“MURDER IS HER HOBBY: FRANCES
GLESSNER LEE AND THE NUTSHELL
STUDIES OF UNEXPLAINED DEATH” An
exhibition of Lee’s detailed miniature crime
scenes. The dollhouse-size dioramas were
created in the first half of the 20th century
and are still used in forensic training today.
Opening Friday. Renwick Gallery, 17th Street
and Pennsylvania Avenue NW.
americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2017/
nutshells.
“RICK ARALUCE: THE FINAL STOP” A largescale installation of an abandoned subway
platform created by Araluce, an artist and
scenic designer based in Seattle. Opening
Friday. Renwick Gallery, 17th Street and
Pennsylvania Avenue NW.
americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2017/
araluce/.
“VERMEER AND THE MASTERS OF GENRE
PAINTING: INSPIRATION AND RIVALRY”
An exhibition of about 75 works by Vermeer
and his fellow painters of the Dutch Golden
Age, including Gerard ter Borch, Gerrit Dou,
Pieter de Hooch, Gabriel Metsu, Frans van
Mieris, Caspar Netscher and Jan Steen.
Opening Sunday. National Gallery of Art,
West Building, Sixth Street and Constitution
Avenue NW. nga.gov/content/ngaweb/
exhibitions/2017/vermeer-and-the-masters-ofgenre-painting.html.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
ONGOING
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM AT THE
KATZEN ARTS CENTER “I AM: An East-West
Arts Initiative Organized by CARAVAN,”
through Sunday. An exhibition that
showcases the insights and experiences of
Middle Eastern women on social, cultural
and religious issues. “Twist — Layer — Pour:
Site-Specific Installations by Three
Washington Artists,” through Sunday. An
exhibition of works by artists Sondra N.
Arkin, Joan Belmar and Mary Early,
composed of steel wire, synthetic papers
and beeswax. “Barjeel Art Foundation
Collection, United Arab Emirates,” through
Dec. 17. An exhibition of works that illustrate
an array of technologies of conflict and that
explore mechanisms of power. 4400
Massachusetts Ave. NW. american.edu/cas/
museum.
ANACOSTIA COMMUNITY MUSEUM
“Gateways/Portales,” through Jan. 7.
Through the gateways of social justice,
community access and public festivals, this
exhibition explores the experiences of Latino
migrants and immigrants in Washington,
Baltimore, Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham,
N.C. 1901 Fort Pl. SE. anacostia.si.edu.
ARTHUR M. SACKLER GALLERY “Turquoise
Mountain: Artists Transforming
Afghanistan,” through Oct. 29. Artisans from
the Murad Khani district of Old Kabul
demonstrate their work and share their
experiences. “Encountering the Buddha: Art
and Practice Across Asia,” through Oct. 1,
2020. An exhibition of Buddhist art from
India, China, Afghanistan, Pakistan,
Cambodia, Thailand, Indonesia and Japan.
1050 Independence Ave. SW. asia.si.edu.
ART MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAS “Human
Landscapes,” through Nov. 26. An exhibition
of contemporary Argentine art. 201 18th St.
NW. museum.oas.org.
DUMBARTON OAKS MUSEUM “Ancient
Bronzes in the Dumbarton Oaks
Collections,” through March 31. An
exhibition of bronze objects — ranging from
prehistoric Chinese, Egyptian, Greco-Roman
and Byzantine to the 15th-century Inca
Empire — that highlights the craft of bronze
metallurgy and the use and meaning of
ancient works in bronze. 1703 32nd St. NW.
doaks.org/visit/museum/exhibitions/womenin-art-1850-1910.
FOLGER SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY
“Painting Shakespeare,” through Feb. 11. An
exhibition of the Folger’s collection of
Shakespeare and Shakespeare-related art
SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM/GIFT OF JOHN GELLATLY
A gypsum plaster rendering from China of two celestial beings is one of the pieces on display in
“Encountering the Buddha: Art and Practice Across Asia” at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.
and memorabilia, including oil sketches,
posters, scrapbooks, programs, prints,
figurines, photographs and paintings. A
highlight is Henry Fuseli’s Gothic
masterpiece “Macbeth Consulting the Vision
of the Armed Head,” painted for the Irish
Shakespeare Gallery in Dublin in 1793 and
still in its original frame. 201 East Capitol St.
SE. folger.edu.
GEORG“The Box Project: Uncommon
Threads,” through Jan. 29. An exhibition of
three-dimensional artworks that fit inside a
standard box. 701 21st St. NW.
museum.gwu.edu/collectors-vision.
HILLWOOD ESTATE, MUSEUM AND
GARDENS “Spectacular Gems and Jewelry
From the Merriweather Post Collection,”
through Jan. 7. An exhibition of more than 50
pieces of jewelry that once belonged to
Marjorie Merriweather Post, including pieces
she commissioned from Cartier, Van Cleef &
Arpels, Harry Winston and Verdura. 4155
Linnean Ave. NW. hillwoodmuseum.org/
Spectacular-Gems-and-Jewelry.
HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE
GARDEN “Ai Weiwei: Trace at Hirshhorn,”
through Jan. 1. An installation that portrays
activists, advocates of free speech and
prisoners of conscience in 176 portraits
composed of thousands of Lego blocks. The
work centers on the artist’s personal
experience in 2011, in which he was
detained by the Chinese government and
kept under surveillance for 81 days and then
prohibited from traveling abroad for four
years. “Ilya and Emilia Kabakov: The Utopian
Projects,” through March 4. An exhibition
that features more than 20 maquettes and
whimsical models, including architectural
structures, allegorical narratives and
commissioned outdoor works. The Russian
artist couple has been working
collaboratively for nearly 30 years, creating
installation-based works. Seventh Street and
Independence Avenue SW. hirshhorn.si.edu.
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS “Echoes of the
Great War: American Experiences of World
War I,” through Jan. 1, 2019. The exhibition
depicts the U.S. involvement in and
experience of the Great War. Independence
Ave. SE. loc.gov.
NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM
“Artist Soldiers,” through Nov. 11, 2018. An
exhibition that examines the work of
professional artists who were recruited by
the U.S. Army and were considered the first
true combat artists, along with the artwork of
soldiers, including Jeff Gusky’s photos of
stone carvings made in underground
shelters, that provide a unique perspective
on the First World War. Sixth Street and
Independence Avenue SW.
airandspace.si.edu.
NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM
“Investigating Where We Live: District of
Culture,” through Jan. 15. Local teens
planned and designed an exhibition based
on interviews with artists and creatives; their
photographs of art, music and food in D.C.’s
historic neighborhoods and their own
communities; and written reflections on how
the arts and culture influence a city’s
residents. 401 F St. NW. nbm.org.
NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WEST
BUILDING “Fragonard: The Fantasy Figures,”
through Dec. 3. An exhibition that presents
scientific research into the mysterious series
of brightly colored portraits of lavishly
costumed individuals relating to 14 of
Fragonard’s known paintings. “Bosch to
Bloemaert: Early Netherlandish Drawings,”
through Jan. 7. An exhibition of 100 drawings
by Netherlandish artists born before 1585
from the collection of the Museum Boijmans
Van Beuningen. Highlights include 15thcentury studies from the circle of Rogier van
der Weyden, two sheets by Hieronymus
Bosch, six drawings by Pieter Bruegel the
Elder and a selection of works by Abraham
Bloemaert. Sixth Street and Constitution
Avenue NW. nga.gov.
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MUSEUM “Wild:
Michael Nichols,” through Jan. 12. An
exhibition of images of wildlife and wild
places through the eyes of photographer
and former National Geographic magazine
editor at large for photography Michael
“Nick” Nichols. 17th and M streets NW.
nationalgeographic.org/dc/exhibitions/wildnichols.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN
AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE “More
Than a Picture: Selections from the
Photography Collection,” through Jan. 1. An
exhibition of more than 150 photographs
and related objects that demonstrates the
slavery era, Jim Crow, Black Lives Matter and
other key historical and cultural events that
illuminate African American life. 14th Street
and Constitution Avenue NW. nmaahc.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN
ART“Healing Arts,” through Jan. 1, 2020. An
exhibition of paintings and sculptures from
the permanent collection that attempt to
counter physical, social and spiritual
problems including global issues such as the
HIV/AIDS crisis. 950 Independence Ave. SW.
africa.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN
HISTORY “Ceramics from the U.S./Mexico
Borderlands,” through May 4. The museum’s
“American Stories” exhibition adds artifacts
related to different Latino traditions
celebrating life and death, including a
miniature ofrenda to honor deceased loved
ones. 14th Street and Constitution Avenue
NW. americanhistory.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL
HISTORY “Objects of Wonder,” through Jan.
1, 2019. The exhibition includes the “Blue
Flame,” one of the world’s largest and finest
pieces of gem-quality lapis lazuli; Martha,
the last known passenger pigeon; the
Pinniped fossil, a fossil of one of the earliest
members of the group of animals that
includes seals, sea lions and walruses; and
the 1875 Tsimshian House Front, one of the
best examples of Native Alaskan design
artwork. “Narwhal: Revealing an Arctic
Legend,” through Jan. 1, 2019. An exhibition
on the research and collaboration by Inuit
and scientists on the narwhal reveals the
latest in scientific knowledge on the animal
and illuminates the interconnectedness
between people and ecosystems. 10th
Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
naturalhistory.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN
INDIAN “Nation to Nation: Treaties Between
the United States and American Indian
Nations,” through April 1, 2020. An
exhibition exploring the relationship
between Native American nations and the
United States. “Our Universes: Traditional
Knowledge Shapes Our World,” through April
30, 2019. The exhibition focuses on
indigenous cosmologies, worldviews and
philosophies related to the creation and
order of the universe and the spiritual
relationship between humankind and the
natural world. Fourth Street and
Independence Avenue SW. nmai.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE
ARTS “Equilibrium: Fanny Sanín,” through
Oct. 29. An exhibition that looks at the
process of Colombian artist Fanny Sanín,
known for her works that feature cleanedged geometric forms. Four to 18
preliminary drawings precede each finished
work of large-scale painting on canvas.
“Magnetic Fields: Expanding American
Abstraction, 1960s to Today,” through Jan.
21. An exhibition that explores historical and
formal dialogue on abstraction among black
women artists, featuring works by more than
20 women, including Mavis Pusey, Shinique
Smith, Alma Woodsey Thomas and Chakaia
Booker. 1250 New York Ave. NW. nmwa.org.
NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY
“Antebellum Portraits by Mathew Brady,”
through June 3. An exhibition that traces
Brady’s career through portrait ambrotypes,
daguerreotypes and salted-paper prints, and
also includes contemporary engravings and
advertising broadsides Brady used to
market his portrait business. Though Brady
is known best as a Civil War–era
photographer, he became an acclaimed
portrait photographer before the war. “One
Life: Sylvia Plath,” through May 20. An
exhibition of personal letters, family
photographs, objects and her own artwork
from the archives at Smith College and the
University of Indiana’s Lilly Library that
shows the writer and poet’s struggle to
understand herself and to navigate the
social pressures placed on young women of
the time. Eighth and F streets NW. npg.si.edu.
NATIONAL POSTAL MUSEUM “My Fellow
Soldiers: Letters from World War I,” through
Nov. 29. An exhibition of personal
correspondence written on the front lines
and home front that shows the history of
America’s involvement in World War I. 2
Massachusetts Ave. NE.
postalmuseum.si.edu.
NEWSEUM “Creating Camelot: The Kennedy
Photography of Jacques Lowe,” through Jan.
7. To mark the 100th anniversary of the birth
of President John F. Kennedy, an exhibition
of more than 70 intimate and iconic images
of Kennedy, first lady Jacqueline Kennedy
and their children, Caroline and John, taken
by Kennedy’s personal photographer,
Jacques Lowe. 555 Pennsylvania Ave. NW.
newseum.org.
RENWICK GALLERY “Murder Is Her Hobby:
Frances Glessner Lee and the Nutshell
Studies of Unexplained Death,” through Jan.
28. An exhibition of Lee’s detailed miniature
crime scenes. The dollhouse-size dioramas
were created in the first half of the 20th
century and are still used in forensic training.
17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW.
americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2017/
parallax.
SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM
“Lumia: Thomas Wilfred and the Art of Light,”
through Jan. 7. An exhibition of light
compositions that display changing colored
forms against a black background, similar to
the aurora borealis. Eighth and F streets NW.
americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2017/
lumia.
THE KENNEDY CENTER “Mark Twain Prize
for American Humor Exhibit: The Art of
Robert Risko,” through Oct. 27. A showcase
of work by the celebrated caricaturist, who
has created the art for the Kennedy Center
Mark Twain prize since 2002. 2700 F St. NW.
kennedy-center.org.
THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION “Renoir and
Friends: Luncheon of the Boating Party,”
through Jan. 7. An exhibition that focuses on
the painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir and
the diverse circle of friends who inspired it.
The exhibition will display 40 more works —
paintings, drawings, pastels, watercolors
and photographs from public and private
collections around the world — that reveal
the story of “Luncheon of the Boating Party.”
1600 21st St. NW. phillipscollection.org.
VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS “Hear
My Voice: Native American Art of the Past
and Present,” through Nov. 26. An exhibition
of 56 works that illustrate the ways in which
native art speaks of a shared knowledge and
history yet shows an incredible level of
diversity. It serves as an exploration of
conversations between Native American
artists and their art across the continent, 35
indigenous cultures and the centuries. 200
N. Boulevard, Richmond. vmfa.museum.
WOODROW WILSON HOUSE “The Ghost
Fleet of Mallows Bay,” through Feb. 28. This
exhibition tells the history of the “Ghost
Fleet” in the Potomac River’s Mallows Bay.
The largest shipwreck fleet in the Western
Hemisphere is a legacy of World War I: In
April 1917, President Woodrow Wilson
approved an order for 1,000 transport
vessels for the war effort. The fighting ended
before any of the ships were put into service,
and hundreds were scrapped in the bay.
2340 S St. NW. woodrowwilsonhouse.org.
From the cover
17
EZ
Sound the alarm:
Best breakfasts
BY THE
G OING O UT G UIDE STAFF
Y
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
OCTOBER 20, 2017
The Seraphim pour-over
brewing system at Slipstream, a
restaurant and coffee shop on
14th Street slinging high-end
java and the best rice breakfast
bowl in the city.
. FRIDAY,
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
THE WASHINGTON POST
ou can’t swing a
champagne flute in
this town without
hitting a decent brunch
spot. But a good breakfast
joint? That’s a swing and a
miss.
Finding a great morning
meal can feel impossible,
and too often we’re left settling for a $15 plate of mediocre bacon and eggs. Perhaps it’s our void of New
York-style bodegas and delis, or our excess of ritzy restaurants. Or maybe it’s just
one of those things the city
will eventually improve, as
it has with coffee and dessert.
Discouraged but not defeated, we resolved to find
the best breakfast spots in
the area, the casual kind
that locals crave, not those
frequented by tourists at
fancy hotels. The first meal
of the day can be a treat — if
you know where to go.
18
EZ
From the cover
The Royal
Stomping Ground
This LeDroit Park cafe has an old-timey vibe, thanks to the beer tap made from an antique fire extinguisher and
the hand-cranked metal ice shaver used to make adult snow cones. The breakfast menu includes house-made
biscuits with preserves and fermented chile butter, bagels, croissants and such specialty dishes as lox tartine
($11), served on toasted sourdough with caraway crème fraîche, and arepas rancheras ($12), made with an overeasy egg, melty cheese, black beans and fresh red salsa. For something sweet, Counter Culture coffee pairs well
with the ultra-buttery guava-and-cheese pastry ($5).
— Gabe Hiatt
501 Florida Ave. NW. 202-332-7777. theroyaldc.com. Breakfast served weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to noon and on
weekends from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Nestled inside a tall brown
farmhouse in Del Ray,
Stomping Ground is a casual,
cozy neighborhood favorite.
Get in line for coffee from
Swing’s — the 101-year-old
roaster down the street — and
the sophisticated Southern
fare. Breakfast includes an
American take on chilaquiles
($10), with red and green
salsas and a poached egg, and
soft buttermilk biscuits served
as sandwiches or with spicy
sausage gravy ($7). The fried
chicken biscuit ordered in the
Not So Classic style ($9)
benefits from the bird’s
crunchy crust, which holds up
nicely to the za’atar, honey, hot
sauce and benne seed tahini.
— Gabe Hiatt
2309 Mt. Vernon Ave.,
Alexandria. 703-567-6616.
stompdelray.com. Breakfast
served Tuesday to Sunday from
7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Closed Monday.
Slipstream
Come nighttime, this sleek 14th
Street cafe morphs into a bar with
craft cocktails and light bites. During
the day, it slings coffee and the area’s
best — and very on-trend — rice
bowl. The breakfast bowl ($7.50)
looks like it just got off a plane from
Los Angeles, artfully arranged with
short-grain rice, greens, radish
slices, a poached egg and, for a
surcharge, avocado. The cafe’s also
home to another trendy breakfast
dish: fancy toast. Get it topped with
smoked salmon, harissa hummus
with chickpea salad and grapefruit,
or — our favorite — avocado with
goat cheese mousse ($6.50).
— Holley Simmons
Two locations: 1333 14th St. NW.
202-450-2216; 82 I St. SE. 202-5605095. slipstreamdc.com. Breakfast
served 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays
and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekends.
The Not So Classic Fried Chicken Bis
The breakfast bowl with
brown rice, greens and a
poached egg at Slipstream.
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2017
Mark’s Kitchen
BILL O'LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Mark Furstenberg in his lauded Bread Furst, on Connecticut Avenue.
Bread Furst
Mark Furstenberg’s bakery, widely considered the best in the city, can be
uncomfortably crowded on weekends, but it’s a much different place on
weekdays, when you can grab a snack on the way to work or linger at a
sidewalk table with a cappuccino. Past the piles of glowing golden
croissants and tempting pain au chocolat, grab the breakfast banh mi
sandwich ($5), a weekday special consisting of a fresh baguette filled with
a mushroom-and-onion frittata, pickled carrots and daikon. On weekends,
don’t miss the frittata or the true-to-its-name messy egg.
— Fritz Hahn
4434 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-966-1300. breadfurst.com. Pastries served
until they run out; breakfast specialties served until 11 a.m.
Takoma Park is home to Mark’s,
a diner from owner Mark Choe
that offers an encyclopedic
breakfast menu influenced by
neighborhood hippies, healthconscious Seventh-day
Adventists and Korean flavors.
Ask nicely, and the waitstaff
might let you order off the
lunch menu early. Go for the
extra spicy kimchi combination
fried rice ($11.95), which comes
with seaweed, an over-easy egg
and your choice of bulgogi
steak, chicken teriyaki or tofu.
Wash it down with a drink from
the long list of juice blends
($4.25-$5.75); think strawberrykiwi and celery-apple-carrot.
The earthy mung bean
pancakes packed with spinach
and cabbage are available in a
starter size ($3.45) or as a plate
($7.95) and come with soy sauce
instead of syrup. The organic
buckwheat variety are even
cheaper ($6.25, and for $1 more,
you can pick an atypical filling
such as mangoes, chestnuts and
sweet potatoes).
— Gabe Hiatt
7006 Carroll Ave., Takoma Park.
301-270-1884. markskitchen.com.
Breakfast served weekdays from
9 a.m. to noon and on weekends
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The gooey goodness that is the New Yorker breakfast combo at Smoked
Smoked and Stacked
Pastrami isn’t just a lunchtime affair at Smoked and Stacked, the unpreten
New Yorker ($8), a breakfast sandwich with pastrami, Comte cheese, swee
cannot be contained within its soft milk-bread bun — as soon as you pick
on a slow day, because you might need a nap to recover. (And if you want s
the basic bacon, egg and cheese.)
1239 Ninth St. NW. 202-465-4822. smokedandstacked.com. Breakfast serv
19
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Little Red Fox
DOUG KAPUSTIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
cuit at Stomping Ground.
Competition for seating can be
thick at the tiny market between
Tenleytown and Chevy Chase.
The place is heavy with the
smell of bacon, a natural add-on
for the breakfast burrito ($8.50),
packed with scrambled eggs,
black beans, potatoes and a side
of house-made Thai chili hot
sauce, or one of three ciabatta
sandwiches ($6.50), filled with
eggs and such additions as
Gorgonzola spread. The black
pepper maple latte ($4.25) is the
perfect match for the
exceptional slice of gingerbread
chess pie ($4.50), which imparts
a forceful spice into the darkbrown custard filling.
— Gabe Hiatt
5035 Connecticut Ave. NW.
202-248-6346.
littleredfoxdc.com. Breakfast
served weekdays from 7:30 to
11 a.m. and on weekends from
7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed
Monday.
BONNIE JO MOUNT/THE WASHINGTON POST
Will Fillmore, waiting for lunch at Florida Avenue Grill, says he has come there for “40 years or more.”
Florida Avenue Grill
This seven-decade-old local favorite has a counter and a handful of tables, but what it lacks in size it more than
makes up for in comfort food. The main attraction is Miss Bertha’s Breakfast Special ($11.95), a combination of
fluffy hot cakes or French toast, with eggs, breakfast meat (bacon, sausage or scrapple) and a choice of home fries,
grits or apples, which taste like pie filling. Be prepared: Breakfast dishes, including the bacon and French toast,
are cooked in a heavenly amount of butter.
— Savannah Stephens
1100 Florida Ave. NW. 202-265-1586. floridaavenuegrill.com. Breakfast served all day.
Mason Dixie Biscuit Co.
Wicked Waffle
Filled with good vibes, cool tunes
and the occasional aloof-yetcharming employee, this ivycovered spot remains a
photogenic mainstay. In the
mornings, choose from a small
menu of customizable and wellexecuted basics, such as the
breakfast burrito with eggs,
potatoes and cheddar ($8.50), the
generous bowl of granola with
Trickling Springs yogurt ($6), or
the breakfast sandwich with eggs,
caramelized onions and arugula
on toasted house-made bread or
a Bullfrog bagel ($7). The coffee,
from Ceremony in Annapolis,
provides an ideal buzz.
— Kara Elder
1700 First St. NW. 202-6439222. bigbearcafe-dc.com.
Breakfast served weekdays
from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. and
weekends from 7:30 a.m. to 4
p.m.
The fluffy, flaky and buttery
biscuits at Mason Dixie are
worth the trek to this drivethrough kitchenette. Add
chicken that’s been
marinated for 24 hours and
fried to a golden brown, and
you’ve got all the makings of a
great morning. Also available:
egg, cheese, sausage, bacon
and ham on a biscuit, plus a
sausage gravy bowl ($7.27)
with white gravy, a fried egg
and a biscuit. Spring for the
fresh-made jam, which costs
extra but can be smeared on
leftover bits for a salty-sweet
finish.
— Holley Simmons
2301 Bladensburg Rd. NE.
202-849-3518.
masondixiebiscuits.com.
Breakfast served all day on
weekends and from 7 to 11
a.m. on weekdays.
The row of waffle irons in the front
window clue you to this downtown
restaurant’s gimmick: Every dish is
served atop a freshly made Belgianstyle waffle or packed between two.
The premise would be worth an
eye-roll if the waffles weren’t so
good — airy inside, firm outside
and crispy around the edges. The
satisfying waffle sandwich filled
with eggs, bacon and cheese ($5.75)
has a feeling of fast food novelty
about it. The one covered in rich
Nutella hazelnut spread and
powdered sugar ($6.45) will bring
back memories of European
vacations, especially if you add
bananas.
— Fritz Hahn
Two locations: 1712 I St. NW. 202944-2700; 7101 Democracy Blvd.,
Bethesda. 301-469-0006.
wickedwaffle.com. Waffles with
eggs served until 11 a.m. D.C.
location closed Sunday.
Best Buns
ntious sandwich joint from “Top Chef” alum Marjorie Meek-Bradley. The
et-and-spicy pepper jelly and an egg, is a glorious, squishy mess that
it up, you’re guaranteed to have yolk running down your fingers. Try one
something smaller, go for the cured-salmon-and-avocado sandwich, or
The breakfast sandwiches at this cheery Shirlington staple harness the best elements of a classic grilled cheese. The
Willing-No-Ham ($5.25) is the standout on an abbreviated menu of sandwiches and oatmeal that complements the
fresh-baked breads, croissants, muffins, danishes and scones on display. Buttery, warm Texas toast frames a
perfectly fried egg (it still runs!) topped with crispy bacon and gooey American cheese. With more than a dozen
types of bread baked daily — poblano cheddar, anyone? — this is a breakfast option worth getting up early for.
— Matt Brooks
4010 Campbell Ave., Arlington. 703-578-1500. greatamericanrestaurants.com/bestbuns. Breakfast sandwiches
served daily until 11 a.m.
ved daily until 11 a.m.
— Maura Judkis
goingoutguide@washpost.com
. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2017
DEB LINDSEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
d and Stacked.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Big Bear Cafe
20
EZ
On Stage
STEPHEN SPOTSWOOD
Scenery in “Hello, My Name Is . . .,” which looks at the stark range
of home life experienced by three fictional Korean children.
Set in
a house,
questions
of home
In a piece of her own, a theatrical designer draws
on her experience as an international adoptee
BY
G EOFFREY H IMES
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
W
hen the Washington
playwriting collective
the Welders invited
Deb Sivigny to be their
resident designer, she was hesitant to accept.
“I already have a lot of designer
opportunities,” Sivigny explains.
“So I asked, ‘What if I create a
piece?’ To my surprise, they said
yes. . . . They argue that designers
are storytellers as much as those
who use words.”
That new immersive piece,
“Hello, My Name Is . . .,” opens at
Rhizome D.C. this weekend. And
although Sivigny created the dialogue as well as the design, the
latter sets the tone for the former.
“Hello, My Name Is . . . ” moves
the audience from room to room
in a large house where each space
presents a different environment.
The show, semi-autobiographical
for Sivigny, deals with Korean
adoptees adapting to their American homes.
“There’s this concept that
when you walk through a doorway,” Sivigny says, “you forget the
world you left behind and enter
another world, another life. And
if you make that journey physically yourself, it means that much
more.”
Sivigny was adopted at 5
months old from South Korea by
a Taiwanese mother and a European American father in Durham,
Conn., part of a tidal wave of
200,000 Korean children adopted by American parents between
1970 and 1990. Sivigny’s parents
encouraged her to assimilate, and
as a grade-schooler, she was glad
to do so. As a teenager, however,
she started wrestling with questions of identity.
“Many adoptees never get over
that feeling of being abandoned
and rejected,” Sivigny says. “In my
play’s early scenes, the adoptees
don’t speak, and that reflects the
reality” when they first arrive. “In
the second half, when they’re
teenagers and older, they have a
lot to say.”
The three Korean children in
the play represent three different
slices from the spectrum of the
adoptee experience, and, Sivigny
says, there’s a bit of her in each of
DANIEL COREY
them. June, who arrived at age 6,
came with more memories. Like
the author, she’s a bibliophile who
reads copiously about her homeland. “But when she finally gets to
Korea,” Sivigny says, “it’s not
quite what she expected.” The
playwright had the same reaction
when she finally visited South
Korea as a 37-year-old in 2015.
The character Dana is adopted
into a home of wealth and privilege; her bedroom is a young girl’s
fantasia of a shopping trip to the
mall, and she assimilates more
easily than the others. Bryan, by
contrast, is adopted into an unhappy lower-middle-class family,
and he sleeps in a room that
resembles a YMCA hostel more
than a teenager’s bedroom. As a
If you go
HELLO, MY NAME IS . . .
Rhizome D.C., 6950 Maple St. NW.
Call 202-630-3781 or visit
thewelders.org.
Dates: Friday-Nov. 12.
Tickets: $40.
Costume and scenic designer
Deb Sivigny was able to try her
hand at a new stage role —
playwright — with her play
“Hello, My Name Is . . .” The
production is immersive: The
audience walks through a large
house to learn the story.
result, he’s angry all the time, and
when he’s busted for pot, he discovers that he’s never been legally
adopted and is subject to deportation to a country he’s never
known.
“I was naturalized at age 2,”
Sivigny says, “which is what parents are supposed to do. But
sometimes it doesn’t happen, and
the kids aren’t U.S. citizens. Bryan
represents those who fall through
the cracks. In some ways there’s
not a lot of difference between
adoptees and immigrants who
come at a young age, especially if
the latter were separated from
their parents. So a lot of adoptees
do identify with the Dream Act
kids.”
goingoutguide@washpost.com
On Stage
21
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ALSO P L AYING
Prices are for the entire run of the
show; individual shows may vary.
OPENINGS
DRUMMING WITH DISHES An interactive,
musical performance about a child and her
imaginary friend. Atlas Performing Arts
Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993.
atlasarts.org. Opening Wednesday at
10 a.m. $12.
BURNING DOORS Pussy Riot’s Maria
Alyokhina makes her stage debut with a
story about persecuted artists. Clarice
Smith Performing Arts Center, University of
Maryland, Route 193 and Stadium Drive,
College Park. 301-405-2787.
theclarice.umd.edu. Opening Thursday at
8 p.m. $10-$25.
CARRIE MAE WEEMS: GRACE NOTES:
REFLECTIONS FOR NOW A multimedia
performance that explores escalating
racial tensions in the United States. The
Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW. 202-4674600. kennedy-center.org. Opening Friday at
8 p.m. $19-$59.
DESDE EL ANDAMIO/FROM THE
SCAFFOLD A Spanish play about a man
suspended on the scaffold of a high
building with observations about his own
life. Casa de la Luna, 4020 Georgia Avenue
NW. 202-882-6227. teatrodelaluna.org.
Opening Friday at 8 p.m. $20-$25.
INTO THE WOODS JR. The fairy tale
musical from Stephen Sondheim and
James Lapine gets a retelling that’s fit for a
younger audience. Arts Barn, 311 Kent
Square Rd., Gaithersburg. 301-258-6394.
gaithersburgmd.gov. Opening Friday at
7:30 p.m. $12-$15.
NEIL SIMON’S LOST IN YONKERS Two
young brothers are forced to come to terms
with a stern grandmother. Congregation
Har Shalom, 11510 Falls Rd., Potomac.
301-299-7087. peacemountaintheatre.com.
Opening Thursday at 8 p.m. $22-$24.
SECOND CHANCES The play follows the
lives of eight characters in the theme of
addressing domestic violence. Anacostia
Arts Center, 1231 Good Hope Rd. SE. 202631-6291. anacostiaartscenter.com.
Opening Thursday at 7 p.m. $25.
STRANGE TALES III: DRIVE-IN DOUBLE
FEATURE Plays that take cues from
traditional horror and drive-in movies.
Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 Seventh St.
SE. 202-547-6839. chaw.org. Opening
Friday at 8 p.m. $15.
THE BOOK OF MORMON The comedy
musical from the creators of “South Park”
about an odd pair of Mormon missionaries.
The Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW. 202467-4600. kennedy-center.org. Opening
Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. $59-$199.
THE GONDOLIERS Gilbert and Sullivan’s
hit about class distinctions through
Venetian gondoliers. George Mason
University Center for the Arts, 4373 Mason
Pond Dr., Fairfax. 703-993-8888.
cfa.gmu.edu. Opening Thursday at 8 p.m.
DAN NORMAN/GUTHRIE THEATER
Steve Hendrickson, Jacqueline Correa, Dan Domingues and Sally Wingert star in “Native Gardens,” a Karen Zacarías play about a
neighborly rivalry, at Arena Stage through Sunday. Tickets are $56-$111.
ONGOING
TERESA WOOD
Cody Nickell and Shirine Babb portray the title characters in
Folger Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s “Antony and
Cleopatra,” through Nov. 19. Tickets are $35-$79.
ROBERT POST’S COMEDY THEATRE FOR
KIDS A one-man variety show. The
Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW. 202-4674600. kennedy-center.org. Saturday at
2 p.m. $20.
THE BENTZEN BALL OPENING NIGHT The
opening night of the comedy festival
curated by Tig Notaro. Lincoln Theatre,
1215 U St. NW. 202-888-0050.
thelincolndc.com. Thursday at 6:30 p.m.
$35.
THE SECOND CITY’S WHEN LIFE GIVES
YOU CLEMENS A tribute to American writer
Mark Twain. The Kennedy Center, 2700 F
St. NW. 202-467-4600. kennedy-center.org.
Friday at 7 p.m. Through Oct. 19. $39-$49.
DANCE
DANCE, CHAMPAGNE & CHOCOLATE
WITH GIN Gin Dance Company celebrates
its seventh season with an evening of new
works. Ballet NOVA Center for Dance, 3443
Carlin Springs Rd., Falls Church. 703-7783008. balletnova.org. Saturday at 7:30 p.m.
FEED THE HUNGRY CHILDREN IN
SIERRA LEONE Shu-Chen, artistic director
of Gin Dance Company, performs with
musicians and vocalists for a benefit for
children in Sierra Leone. The Church of
Annunciation, 3810 Massachusetts Ave.
NW. Sunday at 5 p.m.
LA BAYADÈRE The Mariinsky Ballet
presents La Bayadère, choreographed for
them by Marius Petipa more than 140
years ago. The Kennedy Center, 2700 F St.
NW. 202-467-4600. kennedy-center.org.
Friday at 7:30 p.m. Through Sunday. $39$150.
SUKHISHVILI GEORGIAN NATIONAL
DANCE COMPANY Fifty costumed
performers of the Sukhishvili Georgian
National Dance company come to the
stage for an evening of traditional dance.
George Washington University’s Lisner
Auditorium, 730 21st St. NW. 202-9946800. lisner.gwu.edu. Friday at 7:30 p.m.
$50-$125.
THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW The
Manassas Ballet Theatre presents the
Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Hylton Performing
Arts Center, 10960 George Mason Cir.,
Manassas. 703-993-7759.
manassasballet.org. Friday at 7:30 p.m.
Through Sunday. $35.
OCTOBER 20, 2017
2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Rd., Olney. 301924-3400. olneytheatre.org. Through
Sunday. $37-$84.
KEN LUDWIG’S MOON OVER BUFFALO
The Providence Players kick off their 20th
anniversary season with this fast-paced
comedy. James Lee Community Center,
2855 Annandale Rd. Falls Church.
providenceplayers.org. Through Saturday.
$17-$20.
LOVE AND INFORMATION The D.C.
premiere of British playwright Caryl
Churchill’s play on modern communication.
Forum Theatre, 8641 Colesville Rd., Silver
Spring. 301-588-8279. forum-theatre.org.
Through Saturday. $18-$38.
NATIVE GARDENS A play from Karen
Zacarías about a neighborly rivalry
between two couples. Arena Stage, 1101
Sixth St. SW. 202-488-3300.
arenastage.org. Through Sunday. $56-$111.
OUR TOWN An adaptation of Thornton
Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning drama with
Japanese Bunraku-style puppets. Olney
Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring
Rd., Olney. 301-924-3400. olneytheatre.org.
Through Nov. 12. $49-$74.
COMEDY
. FRIDAY,
inspired by the French mathematician and
physicist Emilie du Châtelet. Gunston Arts
Center Theater II, 2700 S. Lang St.,
Arlington. Through Nov. 12.
GOD OF CARNAGE The story of a
playground altercation between 11-year-old
boys that brings together two sets of
Brooklyn parents. Dorothy Betts Marvin
Theatre, 800 21st St. NW. 202-994-8072.
theatredance.columbian.gwu.edu. Through
Sunday. $10-$20.
HOW I BECAME A PIRATE A children’s play
based on the book by Melinda Long.
Adventure Theatre MTC, 7300 MacArthur
Blvd., Glen Echo. 3016342270.
adventuretheatre-mtc.org. Through Sunday.
$19.50.
I'LL GET YOU BACK AGAIN Sarah
Gancher’s musical comedy about a standup comedian who joins her father’s rock
band. Round House Theatre, 4545 EastWest Hwy., Bethesda. 240-644-1100.
roundhousetheatre.org. Through Oct. 29.
$36-$65.
IN THE HEIGHTS Lin-Manuel Miranda’s
Tony Award-winning show about
Washington Heights. Olney Theatre Center,
29. $21.75-$25.
WIDOWERS’ HOUSES George Bernard
Shaw’s comedy examines the ethics of
making money. Washington Stage Guild at
the Undercroft Theatre, 900
Massachusetts Ave., NW. 240 582-0050.
Stageguild.org. Through Sunday. $50-$60.
THE WASHINGTON POST
AN ACT OF GOD The D.C. premiere of
“Daily Show” alum David Javerbaum’s
comedy. Signature Theatre, 4200
Campbell Ave., Arlington. 703-820-9771.
signature-theatre.org. Through Nov. 26.
ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA Shirine Babb
and Cody Nickell headline the
Shakespearean play. Folger Theatre, 201
East Capitol St. SE. 202-544-7077.
folger.edu. Through Nov. 19. $35-$79.
ARE YOU NOW, OR HAVE YOU EVER
BEEN . . . A dramatization of poet Langston
Hughes’s struggle to compose a poem on
the eve of his appearance in front of
Sen. Joseph McCarthy’s Permanent
Subcommittee on Investigations on UnAmerican Activities. MetroStage, 1201 N.
Royal St., Alexandria. 800-494-8497.
metrostage.org. Through Nov. 5. $55-$60.
ASSASSINS A dark musical revue about
nine misfits who have killed or tried to kill
American presidents. NextStop Theatre
Company, 269 Sunset Park Dr., Herndon.
866-811-4111. Through Nov. 12.
BLANCAFLOR, THE WIZARD GIRL A
bilingual fairy tale about a prince who
enlists the help of a brave and beautiful
maiden. GALA Hispanic Theatre, 3333 14th
St. NW. 202-234-7174. en.galatheatre.org.
Through Saturday. $10-$12.
DEATH OF A SALESMAN Actor Craig
Wallace stars as Willy Loman in this
production of Arthur Miller’s Pulitzer Prizewinning play. Best for ages 13 and older.
Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. 202-3474833. fords.org. Through Sunday. $17-$64.
EMILIE: LA MARQUISE DU CHÂTELET
DEFENDS HER LIFE TONIGHT A play
RHINOCEROS A commentary on human
nature through a story about rhinoceroses.
Howard Community College, 10901 Little
Patuxent Pkwy., Columbia. 410-772-4800.
Through Sunday. $5-$10.
SOTTO VOCE A love story inspired by
Jewish passengers on the ill-fated ocean
liner SS St. Louis, who fled Nazi Germany
only to be denied entry in Cuba and the
United States. Theater J, 1529 16th St. NW.
202-777-3210. edcjcc.org. Through Oct. 29.
$15-$69.
THE ADVENTURES OF PETER PAN An
aerobatic production of J.M. Barrie’s novel.
Synetic Theater, 1800 S. Bell St., Arlington.
866-811-4111. synetictheater.org. Through
Nov. 19. $15-$55.
THE EFFECT A love story between two
volunteers in a clinical trial to test a new
antidepressant. Studio Theatre, 1501 14th
St. NW. 202-332-3300. studiotheatre.org.
Through Oct. 29. $20-$55.
THE LOVER AND THE COLLECTION A
double bill of comedic one-act plays by
Harold Pinter. Lansburgh Theatre, 450
Seventh St. NW. 202-547-1122.
shakespearetheatre.org. Through Oct. 29.
THE MISTRESS CYCLE The production
tells the story of five women, including
Anais Nin, and Lulu White. Creative
Cauldron, 410 S. Maple Ave. Falls Church.
703-436-9948. creativecauldron.org.
Through Oct. 29. $20-$30.
THE PRICE Arthur Miller’s play about a
police sergeant who returns to Manhattan
to sell his parents’ estate. Arena Stage,
1101 Sixth St. SW. 202-488-3300.
arenastage.org. Through Nov. 12. $81-$111.
THE SMARTEST GIRL IN THE WORLD Two
siblings work together to compete in a local
TV competition. Best for children age 6 and
older. Imagination Stage, 4908 Auburn
Ave., Bethesda. 301-280-1660.
imaginationstage.org. Through Oct. 29.
THE WILD PARTY Queenie and Burrs try to
one-up each other in throwing great parties
in this jazz musical with a score by Andrew
Lippa. Clarice Smith Performing Arts
Center, University of Maryland, Route 193
and Stadium Drive, College Park. 301-4052787. theclarice.umd.edu. Through Nov. 11.
$10-$25.
THE WILD PARTY A musical based on
Joseph Moncure March’s poem about a
wild and decadent 1920s soiree. Source
Theatre, 1835 14th St. NW. 202-204-7800.
constellationtheatre.org. Through Oct. 29.
$15-$25.
VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND
SPIKE A movie star throws her sisters’
lives into chaos when she shows up with at
their Pennsylvania home with a young
boyfriend. The Highwood Theatre, 914
Silver Spring Ave, Silver Spring. 301-5870697. thehighwoodtheatre.org. Through Oct.
22
EZ
B FEATURED LISTING B
The Washington Chorus:
Bernstein &
Belshazzar
Wednesday,
November 8, 8:00 pm
The Washington Chorus is going to
blow the roof off the Kennedy Center
with two choral powerhouses: William
Walton’s epic Belshazzar’s Feast, and
Leonard Bernstein’s Chichester Psalms.
TWC’s new Artistic Director Christopher
Bell makes his DC debut with this
season-opening concert.
Concert Hall, John F.
Kennedy Center for the
Performing Arts
202.342.6221
$72-18
Call
202.342.6221
or visit
TWChorus.org
for tickets and
more
information
$12-60
Ticket sales
now open!
Family friendly!
HOLIDAY EVENTS
A Quebec
Christmas
Revels
Dec 9-17, 2017
matinee & evening
shows
Join our cast of over 100, ages 8-85!
Journey into the magic of the Quebec
winter holidays and enjoy traditional
tunes, toe-tapping dances, footstomping instrumentals, a spirited story
with a flying canoe, sing-along carols and
more. Welcome Yule!
GW Lisner Auditorium
730 21st Street NW
Washington, DC 20052
www.revelsdc.org
THEATRE
Folger Theatre presents
Antony and
Cleopatra
Now on stage
through Nov. 19
Are You Now or Have
You Ever Been…
By Carlyle Brown
Thru Nov 5
Wed, Th & Fri at 8,
Sat 3 & 8, Sun 3 & 7
Dreamgirls
August 31November 12
Follow the rise and fall of “The Dreams”,
an all-female, black singing group who
learn the reality of show “business”.
Studio Theatre
presents
Now playing!
A sexy and provocative play about the
chemistry of love, directed by Studio’s
Artistic Director David Muse.
The Effect
By Lucy Prebble
OCTOBER 20, 2017
Studio Theatre
1501 14th Street NW
Washington, DC 20005
202.332.3300,
studiotheatre.org
Talk Backs
Discount tix w/playwright
if you call Fri 8pm &
theatre
Sat 3 & 8pm
Call for
tickets and
info
$20-$55
$30 adults
$15
students,
staff,
seniors,
groups
Tickets
888-945-2468
cfa.gmu.edu
1 actor—5 characters—5 cosmic
views—5 individual crises that get solved
or don’t
Directed by Aly B. Ettman
Featuring Nora Achrati
Melton Rehearsal Hall
Woolly Mammoth Theatre
Company
641 D St., N.W.
Washington, DC 20004
$25
Universe
Players2.org
202-355-6330
Sat., Oct. 28, 1 p.m.
DuffleBag Theatre’s performance of
“Peter Pan” will whisk you off to
Neverland with only the set, props and
costumes they brought in their trunk. If
the actors aren’t enough to tell the story,
some of the audience members might
even get cast in the show!
The Alden
This performance is
being held at
The Old Firehouse,
1440 Chain Bridge Rd.,
McLean, Va. 22101
703-790-0123 /TTY: 711
www.aldentheatre.org
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This wildly popular interactive comedy
whodunit keeps the audiences laughing
as they try to outwit the suspects and
catch the killer. New clues and up to the
minute improvisation deliver “the most
fun I ever had at the Kennedy Center.”
(Arch Campbell, ABC News)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Sotto Voce
Through October 29
“Elegant production” (Wash Post) of
Pulitzer Prize-winner Nilo Cruz’s
passionate and lyrical romantic drama
Theater J
1529 16th St., NW
Theaterj.org, 202-777-3210
A production of Mason’s
College of Visual and
Performing Arts
. FRIDAY,
“An astonishingly rich and rewarding
play, as intelligent as it is deeply felt.”
—Daily Telegraph (UK)
MetroStage
1201 N. Royal St. Alex. VA
703-548-9044
www.metrostage.org
Toby’s Dinner Theatre
of Columbia
410.730.8311
Tobysdinnertheatre.com
Tix starting
Visit
at $35
folger.edu/
theatre
Discounts for a listing
available - of related
visit
events
website
Center for the Arts
Concert Hall
George Mason University
4373 Mason Pond Dr.
Fairfax, VA 22030
cfa.gmu.edu
The Gondoliers
THE WASHINGTON POST
Tues-Sat @ 7:30pm
Sat & Sun @ 2:30pm
Folger Theatre
201 East Capitol St., SE, DC
202.544.7077
www.folger.edu/theatre
Mason students shine in one of Gilbert
& Sullivan’s most sparkling and
tuneful operas! The trials of governing
and romance in fictional Barataria get
sorted out in Gilbert’s witty satire of
snobbery and class distinctions set to
Sullivan’s delightful score.
Gilbert & Sullivan’s
The
Edge . . .
Mark Antony, at the peak of his
political power, is ensconced in Egypt
at the side of the irresistible Cleopatra.
Shakespeare’s epic tale of politics and
power is sweepingly staged in the
Folger’s intimate theater, converted to
the round. With Cody Nickell and Shirine
Babb in the title roles.
“Naylor digs into the heart, mind and
soul of the poet (Langston Hughes) with
incredible strength and clarity.”
DCmetrotheaterarts.com
The Edge of the Universe
Players 2 present
Mystery School
Oct. 26-Oct. 28, 2017
at 8pm
Oct. 28 also at 2pm
Oct. 29 at 4pm
Oct. 28 to Nov. 19
Sats. 8:00, Suns. 7:00
by Paul Selig
DuffleBag
Theatre:
“Peter Pan”
Shear Madness
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
Tickets:
$15
$10 MCC
tax district
residents
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
$39-$69
Free,
onsite parking
Come as your
favorite Shear
Madness
character on
Sat 10/28 @ 9
& get 25% off.
Use Code
270942.
Senior and
under-35
discounts
16-2898
23
PG
THEATRE
Final Weekend!
Skeleton Crew
Must Close This Sunday
October 22!
by Dominique Morisseau
directed by
Patricia McGregor
Check website for
complete schedule.
Vanya and Sonia
and Masha and
Spike
Written by
Christopher Durant
Directed by
Howard Vincent Kurtz
DC’s Hottest Musical!
The Wild Party
Wed - Sat @ 8pm;
Sun @ 3pm
Oct 21 - Nov 11, 2017
Must Close Oct. 29.
7-8 shows/week.
As rumors spread through one of the last
auto-stamping plants in Detroit, a
tight-knit family of workers face what
they’re willing to sacrifice to survive.
Skeleton Crew is an important work by an
important writer that excavates the lives
of working class people in America today.
Studio Theatre
1501 14th Street NW
Washington, DC 20005
202.332.3300,
studiotheatre.org
Winner of the 2013 Tony Award for Best
Play, this story follows middle-aged
siblings Vanya and Sonia. Hilarity ensues
as this kooky clan works out their
differences.
Little Theatre of Alexandria
600 Wolfe Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
www.thelittletheatre.com
A smoldering seductress and a vaudeville
clown invite you over for drinking,
dancing and a sizzling score of jazz, rock
& gospel.
Constellation at Source
1835 14th St. NW
202.204.7741
ConstellationTheatre.org
Tickets
available
online and
at the box
office
Tickets:
$19-22
“A deeply
moral and
deeply
American
play.”
—The New
York Times
For
information
and tickets,
see website:
www.
thelittle
theatre.com
“A Musical
Tickets
Powerhouse”
start at $25 – City Paper
CHILDREN'S THEATRE
GALita
Blancaflor
The Girl Wizard
In this Spanish fairy tale, a brave young
girl helps her prince defeat evil and
accomplish the impossible.
Sat, Oct 21 at 3 pm
GALA Theatre
3333 14th Street, NW
202-234-7174
www.galatheatre.org
$10-$12
Bilingual
MUSIC - CONCERTS
This Sunday!
Sun, October 22
3:00 p.m.
Dynamic vocal ensemble, The U.S. Army
Voices, will join forces with The U.S. Army
Blues and guest vocalist, Tish Oney for a
program of exciting vocal jazz. Selections
include Birdland, Desafinado, and The
Best is Yet to Come. Live web broadcast.
Valid photo ID for 18+
Brucker Hall
400 McNair Rd
Fort Myer in
Arlington, VA
Valid ID 18+
usarmyband.com
facebook.com/usarmyband
youtube.com/usarmyband
Chamber Music
Series
Sunday, Oct. 22
at 2 p.m.
Chamber ensembles from “The
President’s Own” will perform
Beethoven’s Sextet for Two Horns and
String Quartet in E-flat; Andriessen’s
Percosse; Gabaye’s Sonatine for Flute
and Bassoon; Popper’s Requiem; and
Bartók’s Contrasts.
Chamber Players
Series
Thurs, Oct 26, 7:30 p.m.
Army Blues and
Army Voices
Special Guest:
Tish Oney
Deranged with
Downrange Rock
Orchestra
Free
Organ Concert
and
Hymn Sing
Petite Messe
Solennelle
FREE,
no tickets
required
Free parking in
garage at 7th
& K Sts, SE;
Please allow
extra time for
ID checks at
the gate.
Join us for an Evening of Music for Jazz
Combo featuring members of the Airmen
of Note.
Lyceum
201 S. Washington Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
All perf.
FREE, no
tickets
required
www.usaf
band.af.mil
Next week!
Thursday and Saturday
Oct 26 and 28
7:30 p.m.
We are setting the stage to rock the
house at Brucker Hall. Join us for a
full-scale rock show production featuring
The U.S. Army Band Downrange in a
fun family-friendly pop/rock show with a
Halloween feel. Costumes are
encouraged! Saturday show will be live
web broadcast. Valid photo ID for 18+
Brucker Hall
400 McNair Rd
Fort Myer in
Arlington, VA
Valid ID 18+
usarmyband.com
facebook.com/usarmyband
youtube.com/usarmyband
Free!
No tickets
required.
Live web
broadcast.
Visit
usarmy
band.com
for full
schedule.
Saturday, October 21,
4:00 pm
In celebration of the 500th Anniversary
of the Reformation, Dr. Chad Winterfeldt
of Gustavus Adolphus College (MN) will
present a program of Bach and other
music composed for the Lutheran
church, including favorite hymns that the
audience will be invited to sing.
Holy Trinity Lutheran
Church
3022 Woodlawn Avenue
Falls Church, VA 22042
www.holytrinityfalls
church.org
A 100% of all donations will be forwarded
to Catholic Charities U.S.A. to benefit
victims of the recent hurricanes.
Annunciation Catholic
Church
3810 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20016
(one block west of Wisconsin
Avenue)
Info: 202-441-7678
Sunday, October 22nd
5:00 P.M.
Sunday, October 22,
4 pm
Please vist the web site for a full list of
performers
www.annunciationdc.org/roth-concert
Maestro David B. Lang conducts
Rossini’s final work for chorus, soloists,
two pianos and harmonium. Featured
artists include Soprano Jacqueline Leary
Warsaw, host of EWTN’s “In Concert.”
Treat yourself to the scope and beauty of
this extraordinary work.
St. Luke Catholic Church
7001 Georgetown Pike
McLean, VA 22101
www.RestonChorale.org
Freewill
Offering
Reception will
follow. Easy
parking in
church lots.
Free will
Donations
requested
A reception
will follow.
There is ample
free parking
and the church
has an
entrance
ramp.
$20-$30
Seniors &
Adults
Free:
Youth &
Military
Tickets online
and at the
door
Free parking
OCTOBER 20, 2017
Gioachino Rossini’s
John Philip Sousa Band
Hall, Marine Barracks
Annex, 7th & K Sts, SE
Washington, DC
202-433-4011
Live streaming at:
www.marineband.marines.mil
. FRIDAY,
Gala Benefit
Concert for
Hurricane Relief
Visit
usarmy
band.com
for full
schedule.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Pop/rock Halloween
Free!
No tickets
required.
Live web
broadcast.
24
PG
MUSIC - CONCERTS
John E. Marlow
Guitar Series,
Richard Miller
Leonard Bernstein
at 100
Domingo-Cafritz
Young Artists
Orchestra
dell’Accademia
Nazionale di
Santa Cecilia
(Rome) with
Martha Argerich
National
Philharmonic
Chamber Players
at Potter Violins
Songs Celestial
2017 marks the 55th anniversary of the
start of the bossa nova craze in the
US. Fall in love again with the spirit of
Jobim and Gilberto, with duos and song.
Guests: João Figueirôa (guitar) and
Débora Watts (voice)
Change Of Venue
Cultural Arts Center,
Montgomery College
7995 Georgia Avenue
Silver Spring
Takoma Park, MD 20910
Sunday, October 22
at 5 pm
A centennial celebration by the Young
Artists from the Washington National
Opera includes works from Bernstein’s
“West Side Story”, “Candide” and “Mass”
which premiered at the opening of the
Kennedy Center.
St John’s Episcopal Church
Georgetown Parish
3240 O St. NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-338-1796
www.stjohnsgeorgetown.org
Wednesday,
October 25 at 8:00 PM
Founded in 1908, the lauded Rome-based
orchestra brings to Washington the works
for which it is best known—the Italian opera
and concert repertoire—and a rare
concerto performance by piano legend
(and 2016 Kennedy Center Honoree)
Martha Argerich. Conducted by Music
Director Sir Antonio Pappano.
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Sun., Oct. 29 at 3pm
Hugo Wolf
Italian Serenade (1887)
Gabriela Lena Frank
Leyendas –
An Andean Walkabout (2001)
Hamza El Din
Escalay ( Water Wheel)
(1971)
Antonin Dvorák
String Quartet no. 12
“American”
Potter Violins
John Kendall Recital Hall,
7711 Eastern Ave
Takoma Park, MD
To purchase, visit: http://
classicalmusicconcert. org/
event/national-philharmonicchamber-players-3/
Sunday,
October 29, 2017
at 4:00 PM
Thomas Beveridge conducts and
organist Paul Skevington accompanies
the Chorale in works by Schubert,
Bernstein, Rachmaninov, Faure, and
Vaughan Williams, including a premiere
performance of Maestro Beveridge's
"Song of Celestial Love" (Vedantic Hymn
on text by Sri Ramakrishna).
Saturday, October 21,
8:00pm
Pre-concert Lecture
7:00pm
St. Luke Catholic Church
7001 Georgetown Pike
McLean, VA 22101
www.newdominion.org
202-244-7191
Adult
$35-45
Student
(1/2 price)
Under 18
Free
w/paying
Adult
$30
www.marlow
guitar.org
301.799.4028
Reception
follows in
Blake Hall
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
Co-presented
by Washington
Performing
Arts and
the Kennedy
Center.
Price: $20
Colin Sorgi &
Sara
Matayoshi,
violin
Julius Wirth,
viola
Lori Barnet,
cello
$35 Adult
$30
Seniors
(62+)
$15 youth
(Ages 525)
Free Parking
$15-50
Group and
student
disc. avail.
For more
information,
visit
citychoir.org or
call (571) 2068525
MUSIC - CHORAL
The City Choir of
Washington
Barber Adagio for
Strings and
Bruckner Mass in
F minor
National Lutheran Choir
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
"Holy Spirit Mass"
The Schola
Cantorum of the
London Oratory
Sunday, November 5,
4:30 PM
Barber’s achingly beautiful Adago for
Strings has become “the nation’s funeral
music.” The City Choir also presents the
first performance of Bruckner’s Mass in
F minor in DC in fifty years—a fitting
opening to Mo. Shafer’s 50th anniversary
season.
Sunday, October 22nd
7pm
Join the National Lutheran Choir for the
world premiere of a major choralinstrumental work. Holy Spirit Mass,
by Norwegian composer Kim André
Arnesen, commemorates the 500th
Anniversary of the Reformation, and
welcomes all to celebrate shared joy in
faith.
The Schola Cantorum of the London
Oratory School Concert. A benefit
featuring the works of Montiverdi,Tallis,
Purcell, Britten, La Rocca, Holst & others.
Tickets available only at the door.
Cash or check.
Sunday October 28
7:00 pm
National Presbyterian
Church
4101 Nebraska Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20016
Free parking available.
Basilica of the
National Shrine of the
Immaculate Conception
400 Michigan Ave NE
Washington DC 20017
RSVP
requested:
Free
http://bit.ly/
HSMTixDC
NLCA.com
Saint Thomas Apostle
Church
2665 Woodley Road, NW
Washington, DC 20008
(1 block form the Woodley
Park Zoo/Adams Morgan
Metro Station) 202-234-1488
$25
www.stthomas
apostledc.org
$25, $15
Free Parking
MUSIC - JAZZ
Levon Mikaelian
Saturday, October 28
8 p.m.
Pianist, composer and singer Levon
Mikaelian performs new music from his
highly-anticipated CD release, Untainted.
Arts Barn
311 Kent Square Rd.
www.Gaithersburgmd.gov
301-258-6394
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
Eclipse Chamber
Orchestra
Sunday, October 22
at 4PM
Mozart: Marriage of Figaro Overture
Haydn: Trumpet Concerto with Steven
Hendrickson
Beethoven: Symphony No. 2
St. Patrick’s Episcopal
4700 Whitehaven Parkway
Washington, DC 20007
www.eclpiseco.org
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
$30
Suggested Reception
Donation to follow
16-2898
25
PG
CABARET
Songs From His World:
Jacques Brel
French with English titles
9 Performances only!
November 4–19, 2017
A cabaret of top 20th century hits! Join
Fleta Hylton and Byron Jones as they
sing favorites such as Ne me quitte pas,
Amsterdam, Marieke & More.
Source Theatre
1835 14th St N, WDC
inseries.org 202-204-7763
GA $43
SE $40
Stu. $20
Reserve
cabaret tables:
202-204-7763
$36
Discounts available for groups
of 10+. Call:
202-312-1427
COMEDY
Fridays & Saturdays
at 7:30pm
Orange is the
New Barack
A musical, political satire.
We put the MOCK in Democracy!
www.capsteps.com | Info: 202.312.1555
Ronald Reagan Building
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Tix available at 202.397.SEAT
ticketmaster.com
DANCE
Fuego
Flamencio XIII
International Festival
Mariinsky Ballet:
“La Bayadère”
Casting available at
kennedy-center.org
Nov 3-5
Fri & Sat at 8 pm
Sun at 2 pm
Flamenco Extranjero
Flamenco Aparicio Dance Co.
Nov 3 – 5
Nov 9-12
Thurs-Sat at 8 pm
Sun at 2 pm
Binomio
Francisco Hidalgo & Co. (Madrid)
Nov 9 - 12
Tonight at 7:30
Tomorrow at 1:30 & 7:30
Sunday at 1:30
Replete with forbidden love, shocking
betrayal, and a spectral voyage to the
afterlife, this enchanting journey to a fabled
past radiates with colorful characters,
vibrant sets and costumes, and virtuosic
moments. Petipa created La Bayadère for
the Mariinsky more than 140 years ago, and
this dazzling ballet continues to be "theirs".
GALA Theatre
3333 14th Street, NW
202-234-7174
www.galatheatre.org
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
$35-$45
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
"An unbroken
line of
arabesques
that stops the
heart with its
grace"—The
Telegraph
(London)
FESTIVALS
Kids Euro Festival
One or more events
take place daily.
Saturday October 21–
Sunday November 5.
View complete
schedule at
kidseurofestival.org
A Celebration of European arts and culture
for kids! Free events creating imagination,
joy, and friendship presented to you by the
28 European Union countries.
Held at Venues Throughout
the Washington Area.
For complete list of events,
and venues, schedule visit
kidseurofestival.org
All events
are free
AUDITIONS
Anne Of Green
Gables:The Musical Adults (ages 25-75):
Written by Don Harron &
Norman Campbell
Directed by
Michael J. Baker
Sat 10/20 @ 1pm;
Sun 10/22 @ 7pm
17 F (several ages); 10 M (several ages)
See website for complete descriptions.
Please sign up on website for audition
time. Please bring current headshot
(if you have one), resume, and accurate
conflict list.
Little Theatre of Alexandria
600 Wolfe Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
NA
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
thelittle
theatre.com
16-2898
WE HEAR YOU
GOT RID OF
NO
WHAT IF YOU
GOT RID OF
12 MONTHS
12 YEARS
WORTH OF STUFF AND SOLD
IT FOR DECENT CASH
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
. FRIDAY,
YES
THE WASHINGTON POST
HAVE YOU ACCOMPLISHED
ANYTHING LATELY?
C054C 5x4.5
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
OCTOBER 20, 2017
2.1 million readers, bargain hunters included • 202.334.6200 • washingtonpost.com/classified • Open 24/7
Or place your ad in Express, our daily commuter read, and reach 536,000 readers.
26
EZ
Movies
Only the Brave SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT
Tough fighters — with a tender side, too
The drama is a retelling of a real-life tragedy, but it’s
still full of joy — and breathtaking action, and awe
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
BY
A
S TEPHANIE M ERRY
s if on cue, “Only the
Brave” — a deeply moving drama about firefighters — arrives in
theaters, just as the catastrophic
wildfires in Northern California
seem to be winding down.
Directed by Joseph Kosinski,
from a screenplay by Ken Nolan
and Eric Warren Singer, the film
is based on a GQ story about the
Granite Mountain Hotshots, an
elite crew of firefighters who experienced a harrowing tragedy in
Yarnell, Ariz., in 2013. If that
event doesn’t ring a bell, I won’t
reveal precisely what happened.
Although it seems only fair to
warn audiences that the outcome
isn’t a happy one.
Still, there’s plenty of joy in this
story, which starts out like an
underdog sports movie. The firefighting crew in Prescott, Ariz.,
led by the brooding, rugged Eric
Marsh (Josh Brolin), is immensely capable. But because they haven’t yet been certified for toptier “hotshot” status, they’re rele-
gated to mopping up the remnants of fires that other, more
specialized teams have attacked
at the front lines.
Eric is a strategic genius when
it comes to fire-suppression tactics that look, to the untrained
eye, like random destruction. He
even personalizes blazes, referring to one as a “b----” and asking,
of another far-off conflagration,
“What are you up to?” Although
Eric figures out the answer to that
rhetorical question, he has no
authority to put his plan into
motion. When a snobby, dismissive hotshot team takes over and
bungles the operation, the collateral damage is a whole town.
Much of “Only the Brave” focuses on the Prescott crew’s quest
for elite status as emotionally
significant subplots bubble up
around the edges. These include
Eric’s sweet but strained relationship with his wife (Jennifer Connelly), a veterinarian who hates
playing second fiddle to whatever
fire happens to be burning nearby, and the story of Brendan
(Miles Teller), a recruit who is
Eric (Josh Brolin, shown
with Jennifer Connelly)
supervises the
“hotshots,” the name for
a corps of firefighters
specialized in
strategically choking off
blazes, in “Only the
Brave.”
struggling to put aside his past as
a drug user and petty criminal
after his ex-girlfriend gives birth
to their daughter.
There’s also breathtaking action, of course, broken up by
amusing dialogue as the guys rib
one another or dissect their romantic conquests. The acting ensemble has a believable, brotherly
chemistry, especially Teller and
Taylor Kitsch, playing a troublemaker who initially teases Brendan brutally before the two warm
up to each other.
Shot by Oscar-winning cin-
ematographer Claudio Miranda,
the film captures the stunning
and terrible beauty of fire. In one
mesmerizing scene, Eric reminisces about an awful inferno in
which a bear came running out of
the forest — completely engulfed
in flames. That haunting image
becomes an important metaphor
as the story progresses.
Continuing his recent trend of
playing kindly, drawling cowboys,
Jeff Bridges shows up as the fire
chief, a role in which he gets to
flex some serious acting muscle.
Connelly, likewise, provides an
emotional reminder of just how
talented she is, losing it in one
memorable scene — and inviting
the audience to follow suit.
For all the action and emotion,
“Only the Brave” is also surprisingly informative for anyone unacquainted with the art of fighting fire, delving not just into
methodology but also rivalries
between those who battle wildfires and those who put out burning buildings. It also shows how
comfortable these men are in
extremely dangerous situations.
This is a job for real heroes. The
reminder of their sacrifice could
not come at a more opportune
time.
stephanie.merry@washpost.com
PG-13. At area theaters. Contains
deadly fires, some sexual
references, strong language and
drug use. 134 minutes.
Movies
27
EZ
Ratings guide
Breathe Masterpiece
Very good
Okay
Poor
Also reviewed
Faces Places
A filmmaker and a
street artist hit the
road, making art. 28
Dina
A documentary tells
the story of an
autistic couple. 28
Plus
Common Sense
Media 31
DAVID BLOOMER/BLEECKER STREET | PARTICIPANT MEDIA
A man and wife face polio, undaunted
Son’s dutiful biopic of
disability-rights advocate
could have delved deeper
BY
A LAN Z ILBERMAN
Andrew Garfield, foreground,
portrays the late Robin
Cavendish — the father of
“Breathe’s” producer — with,
from left, actors Hugh
Bonneville, Claire Foy, Harry
Marcus and Tom Hollander.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
PG-13. At area theaters. Contains sexual situations and bloody medical imagery. 117 minutes.
Wonderstruck is
based on a book
about the
connection between
two children in
different time
periods.
The Killing of a
Sacred Deer is a
drama about a
surgeon and a
mysterious boy.
Jigsaw is a spinoff
of the “Saw” horror
franchise.
Jane is a
documentary
portrait of
primatologist Jane
Goodall.
The Paris Opera
looks behind the
scenes at a French
theater.
Chavela profiles
singer Chavela
Vargas.
OCTOBER 20, 2017
their scenes alone together feel
perfunctory. More often, there are
others in the room: Teddy or Diana’s twin brothers, played by Tom
Hollander. At times, viewers may
feel like a third wheel — watching
a couple who clearly had a more
fascinating relationship than the
one we see.
After decades of living with polio, Robin undergoes a series of
medical crises, leading him to
make a draconian health decision.
To its credit, “Breathe” avoids histrionics in favor of understatement, re-creating the bittersweet
emotions that Robin’s family
members must have felt.
All the same, “Breathe” relies
too heavily on Jonathan’s memories without ever really getting
inside Robin’s head — an unbalanced approach that no amount of
acting can compensate for. If its
subject were around to see this
film, would he appreciate the tender care that his son obviously
took in making it? Or might he be
annoyed to have so little attention
paid to what he himself was thinking?
Miles Teller plays a
veteran with PTSD in
Thank You for Your
Service.
. FRIDAY,
nary man in a difficult situation.
Famous for such motion-capture
roles as Gollum in “The Lord of the
Rings” and Caesar the chimpanzee in the “Planet of the Apes”
franchises, Serkis, in his first time
behind the camera, is a natural,
filming his actors with affection,
an overabundance of light and a
command of tone.
Yet too much of “Breathe” relies
on the predictable tropes of the
biopic. Scenes in which Robin and
Diana are told that they cannot do
something — whether by doctors
or relatives — are followed, in
short order, by scenes of them
persevering in just that activity.
(The film glosses over the question
of how they arrived at such affluence). Once Robin has achieved an
unprecedented level of independence, he turns his attention
toward helping others in his condition. He makes for a convincing
communicator, with a witty, informal speaking style that earns applause at every major milestone.
The film’s emotional core is the
Cavendishes’ marriage. Best
known for her portrayal of Queen
Elizabeth in the series “The
Crown,” the actress is similarly
taciturn here, delivering a performance that is convincing, in a
role that doesn’t demand much of
her except as it relates to Robin.
The question of how the couple
make do in the bedroom is answered, tastefully, yet many of
George Clooney
directs Suburbicon,
from a script by Joel
and Ethan Coen.
THE WASHINGTON POST
“Breathe” is meant, no doubt, as
a sincere homage to the late disability advocate Robin Cavendish,
who died, after living with polio
for 36 years, in 1994. Commissioned by his son, producer Jonathan Cavendish — who plays a
minor role in the film — and directed by Jonathan Cavendish’s
business partner, actor Andy Serkis, the movie has the tone of a
eulogy delivered by a dutiful son:
affectionate, complimentary and
maudlin. The story by screenwriter William Nicholson (“Everest”)
jumps from one major episode in
Robin’s life to another, but with
none of those episodes delving
into his interior life, “Breathe” remains a superficial tear-jerker.
The tale begins in the late
1950s, with Andrew Garfield playing Robin as an athletic, dashing
adventurer. Robin woos Diana
(Claire Foy), and after they marry,
they fly to Kenya on business. But
after Diana announces her pregnancy, tragedy strikes, as her 28year-old husband collapses, becomes paralyzed and can only
breathe with the assistance of a
mechanical ventilator. Upon returning to England, Robin grows
depressed, yearning for death, but
Diana will have none of it. Ignoring the warnings of his doctor,
Robin — with Diana’s help —
leaves the confines of the hospital.
From this point forward,
“Breathe” follows Robin as he
pushes for more and more freedom, ultimately designing — with
the help of his inventor friend
Teddy (Hugh Bonneville) — a line
of mechanical chairs for the severely disabled.
When the movie sticks to the
matter-of-fact — the difficulties of
using an iron lung, for instance —
it can be downright harrowing.
One scene shows the young Jonathan unplugging the machine,
without his mother’s knowledge,
as his father feebly gasps for
breath. As an actor, Garfield accomplishes a great deal with limited mobility, conveying — with his
eyes alone — both resignation at
his circumstance and frustration
that he cannot do more.
Another standout sequence features Robin on vacation in the
Spanish countryside: After the
mechanical ventilator breaks,
members of his family take turns
squeezing a breathing apparatus
that is little more than an airbagand-hose. Such vignettes avoid
portraying Robin as a hero, instead showing him to be an ordi-
Opening next
week
28
EZ
Movies
Faces Places Hey, ordinary folks: You ought to be in pictures
BY
A NN H ORNADAY
Just when your feelings about
film culture and human nature
couldn’t get any grimmer, along
comes a film like “Faces Places” to
restore your faith in both.
A collaborative project between the legendary director Agnès Varda (best known for her
influential French New Wave film
“Cleo From 5 to 7” and, later, the
tough, uncompromising “Vagabond”) and the French street
artist JR, this documentary takes
the shape of a road trip infused
with equal parts whimsy, artistic
experimentation and awe-inspiring monumentality. The film
opens with Varda, 89, meeting up
with JR, an anonymous photographer whose habit of superimposing massive images of faces
and eyes on such public surfaces
as walls, streets and rooftops has
made him a star on a par with
Banksy. They discover a mutual
fascination with people and their
environments and embark on a
tour de France in JR’s customized
van — complete with large-format camera and printer — to see
what they can see.
What Varda and JR discover —
and what “Faces and Places” celebrates with such brio and
bracing humor — are the farms,
factories and shipping docks
where everyday people make
their living and create their lives.
COHEN MEDIA GROUP
Artist JR, left, and director Agnès Varda, known as the mother of the French New Wave, hit the road for a bright, tender documentary.
Inviting these citizens into their
project, they paste their enormous portraits onto houses,
trains, barns, town squares and,
in one memorable instance, an
abandoned German pillbox, creating homages to shared history
and human connection that are
intimate and epic. While Varda
and JR ply their trade as visual
troubadours, they contemplate
their own ideas of what constitutes artistic vision, with Varda’s
eyesight compromised by age and
disease, and JR’s obscured behind
the dark sunglasses he wears like
a self-protective totem.
Harking back to Varda’s most
definitive work — including the
feminism of “Cleo,” the restlessness of “Vagabond” and the creative energies of her 2000 documentary “The Gleaners and I” —
“Faces Places” often plays like a
particularly poignant summa of
her extraordinary and underrec-
ognized career. That tone is captured in the film’s most wrenching passage, when an encounter
with a figure from her New Wave
past is hijacked by what looks
suspiciously like a fit of male ego,
insecurity and reflexive competitiveness. Varda doesn’t hide her
heartbreak, but the moment soon
gives way to a small but moving
victory. She’s the one who has
survived, and who has continued
to push herself creatively in ways
that are bold, risky and utterly of
a piece with the past of the
medium she loves and has come
to embody. “Faces Places” is a film
of sheer joy, its exuberance surpassed only by its tenderness and
purity of purpose.
ann.hornaday@washpost.com
PG. At Landmark’s Bethesda Row
Cinema. Contains brief nude
images. In French with subtitles. 90
minutes.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
Dina She allowed cameras,
and love, into her life
BY
A NN H ORNADAY
Meet Dina Buno, a lively, tartly
good-natured middle-aged woman with a tousled bob that Meg
Ryan would envy, a devoted fiance
named Scott and a disposition of
uncommon candor and selfawareness.
Dina also happens to be autistic. And as the indomitable title
character of Antonio Santini and
Dan Sickles’s intimate documentary, she offers an irresistible subject: Funny and forthright, she
allows the filmmakers into her
apartment and daily life in suburban Philadelphia with startling
aplomb. Although her position on
the neurotypical spectrum might
partly account for Dina’s appealing lack of guile, she’s anything
but childlike or naive, especially
when it comes to preparing for her
wedding.
For viewers familiar with last
year’s “Life, Animated,” Dina
might recall that film’s similarly
resilient protagonist, Owen Suskind, who like Dina could be seen
forging a functional and independent life as well as meaningful,
emotionally risky romantic relationships. But unlike Owen, who
found a path toward socialization
through Disney cartoons, Dina
gets a kick out of watching “Keeping Up With the Kardashians” and
“Sex in the City,” which might explain why she’s so disarmingly
honest with Scott — who has
Asperger’s syndrome — about
their differing ideas about sex.
Focusing on the sometimes
SUNDANCE INSTITUTE/THE ORCHARD
fraught weeks leading up to their
wedding, “Dina” judiciously addresses the events of Dina’s past
that led her to this moment, intercutting those revelations with
scenes of Dina coping with her
own emotional and cognitive diffi-
Scott Levin and Dina Bruno, a
couple who are both on the
autism spectrum. In a new
documentary, Bruno stars in
the story of her life, zooming in
on the weeks before her
wedding.
culties, as well as obstacles faced
by Scott, who is preparing to leave
his parents’ home for the first
time.
There are moments in “Dina”
that invite viewers to wonder
DINA CONTINUED ON 29
Movies
29
EZ
For Ahkeem Story of teen is hard to watch but important to tell
BY
C HRISTOPHER K OMPANEK
The story told in “For Ahkeem,”
a stark documentary portrait of a
troubled teenager struggling to
redirect her life, unfolds in the
months before and after the 2014
police killing of Michael Brown in
Ferguson, Mo. Set in an insular
and run-down pocket of nearby
St. Louis, the film watches its
subjects as they watch TV news
reports about the shooting, and
its subsequent protests, with a
combined sense of grief and resignation.
That backdrop is just a blip in a
series of bad news for the film’s
subjects: 17-year-old Daje Shelton
and her boyfriend, Antonio. As
the film opens, Daje has gotten in
trouble for fighting: A judge orders her to attend a school he has
set up to keep minors out of jail.
But while she’s excited about the
prospect of graduating and going
to college, those things remain
abstract for her, never quite snapping into focus despite — or perhaps because of — Daje’s keen
awareness of the obstacles that lie
in front of her and the systemic
oppression that surrounds her.
In a subtly heartbreaking moment, Daje walks home with
friends, alternately singing and
humming the theme from “Dawson’s Creek” — which includes the
line “I don’t want to wait for our
lives to be over.” Antonio — who
first catches Daje’s eye while pass-
LAST RESORT DOC/TRANSIENT PICTURES
Daje Shelton, the St. Louis high-schooler at the center of “For Ahkeem.” With a title referring to her
son, the documentary follows Daje’s hopes of graduation and college and the setbacks they encounter.
ing through the school’s metal
detector with swagger — sees
boundless potential in her, while
predicting that his own life will be
short.
With a couple of exceptions,
filmmakers Landon Van Soest
and Jeremy S. Levine shoot in a
cinéma-vérité style, including
several close-ups that call attention to their proximity to the
film’s subjects and voice-over narration by Daje — a technique
more commonly seen in fiction
than nonfiction — that acts as a
kind of audio diary, lending the
film a bleak, poetic beauty. (The
title “For Ahkeem” refers to Daje’s
child.)
Yet the film raises some ethical
questions.
DALE ROBINETTE/PARAMOUNT PICTURES/PURE FLIX ENTERTAINMENT
To their credit, Santini, Sickles
and their cinematographer, Adam
Uhl, build discretion into their
movie, frequently filming Dina
and Steve from a distance, giving
them dignity in the form of space
and environmental context.
Equally on point is the film’s pastel color palette, which lends the
images an air of both over-lighted
naturalism and soothing gentleness. Even if approached with
more than a few misgivings,
“Dina” is valuable if only to offer
viewers an honest, touching, ultimately optimistic portrait of people embracing intimacy and honesty the best way they know how.
Those struggles have always been
the stuff of the best cinematic love
stories. This might not be a conventional or familiar example of
the genre, but it’s utterly universal.
ann.hornaday@washpost.com
Unrated. At Landmark’s E Street
Cinema. Contains some thematic
material concerning sexuality and
violence. 103 minutes.
OCTOBER 20, 2017
After a homeless drifter (Djimon Hounsou) appears to a woman (Renée Zellweger) in a dream, she
encourages her estranged husband (Greg Kinnear) to befriend the man to save their struggling
marriage in “Same Kind of Different as Me.” This movie did not screen for critics. PG-13. At area theaters.
Contains strong language, some violence and some mature thematic material. 119 minutes.
whether Santini and Sickles aren’t
veering into voyeurism, such as
when Dina presents Scott with a
copy of “The Joy of Sex” and proceeds to have a conversation about
masturbation and other matters.
Would we be watching this if it
weren’t for the fact that Dina and
Scott are on the spectrum? Is there
something condescending in
packaging their lives as entertainment? (Watch and be amazed as
Dina and Scott discuss the 2016
election!) What are the issues of
transparency and consent when
filmmakers are crossing so many
sensitive boundaries with intellectually challenged subjects?
But the film also encourages
viewers to check their own assumptions: Why, for example,
wouldn’t people as observant and
highly functional as Dina and
Scott have the ability to consent?
Aren’t portraits like these necessary to illuminate lives that are too
often marginalized and misunderstood?
Unrated. At the Angelika Pop-Up at
Union Market. Contains mature
thematic material and coarse
language. 90 minutes.
. FRIDAY,
DINA FROM 28
goingoutguide@washpost.com
THE WASHINGTON POST
Also Opening
The events it depicts with such
intimacy, which include Daje’s
pregnancy and Antonio’s arrest
(while a passenger in a car that
turns out to be stolen) occur with
frustrating predictability, reinforcing destructive stereotypes.
Could not the filmmakers, both
savvy Emmy winners, have posted Antonio’s $500 bond, connected him with a service for legal aid,
or at least warned him against
pleading guilty to a felony, which
would — even without jail time —
affect his employment prospects?
One school of thought holds
that nonfiction filmmakers
should never interfere in their
subject’s lives, but perhaps that
rule should be reexamined. In a
powerful subsequent scene, Antonio is rejected from a training
program that would have helped
him get a construction job, because he’s now a felon. The story
that is told here, with such heartbreaking clarity, is an important
one, but it is hard to watch.
The vicious-cycle narrative is
familiar, but “For Ahkeem” comes
uncomfortably close at times to
crossing the line between shining
a light on a problem and exploiting one, despite the filmmakers’
good intentions.
30
EZ
Movies
ALSO P L AYING
Also Opening
Star ratings are from Post reviews;
go to goingoutguide.com/movies for
the full-length reviews. Movies not
reviewed by The Post are marked
“NR.” For showtimes, see the
Movie Directory.
AMERICAN ASSASSIN
Dylan O’Brien stars a baby-faced
CIA operative in this lumbering
thriller based onVince Flynn books.
(R, 111 minutes, contains strong
violence throughout, some torture,
crude language and brief nudity. At
area theaters.)
AMERICAN MADE
The fact-based comedy tells the
story of 1980s drug-runner Barry
Seal. (R, 115 minutes, contains
strong language, sex, nudity and
some violence. At area theaters.)
BATTLE OF THE SEXES
Timely comedy looks back at a
match when tennis star Billie Jean
King struck a blow for feminism.
(PG-13, 121 minutes, contains
some sexual material and partial
nudity. At area theaters.)
THE BIG SICK
Kumail Nanjiani stars in this
winning rom-com inspired by his
courtship with his wife (and cowriter), Emily V. Gordon. (R, 119
minutes, contains obscenity,
including sexual references. At
Landmark’s West End Cinema.)
BLADE RUNNER 2049
Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford costar in the follow-up to Ridley Scott’s
1982 sci-fi masterwork. (Rating,
160 minutes, contains violence,
some sexuality, nudity and crude
language. At area theaters.)
DESPICABLE ME 3
Tyler Perry, right, returns in the role of the beloved, blunt-spoken grandmother Madea in the horror-comedy sequel “Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween.” This movie did not screen for critics. PG-13. At area theaters. Contains sexual references, drug content, coarse language and some
horror images. 101 minutes.
animated franchise work is starting
to feel stale. (PG, 91 minutes,
contains some mild rude humor
and action. At area theaters.)
and some coarse language. At
Paragon Kentlands Stadium 10
and University Mall Theatre.)
Christopher Nolan tells a rousing
story of the Battle of Dunkirk in
1940. (PG-13, 107 minutes,
contains scenes of intense warfare
nongraphic childbirth scene,
emotional upsets and school
bullying. At area theaters.)
GOODBYE
THE FLORIDA PROJECT
DUNKIRK
references and some drug
material. At area theaters.)
In the seedy shadows of Disney
World, a child tries to make a magic
kingdom. (R, 115 minutes,
contains profanity throughout,
disturbing behavior, sexual
CHRISTOPHER ROBIN
Domhnall Gleeson plays the writer
of “Winnie-the-Pooh,” A.A. Milne, as
a shellshocked war veteran. (PG,
101 minutes, contains disturbing
battlefield flashbacks, a
HAPPY DEATH DAY
A college girl gets killed, again and
again, in a “Groundhog Day”-esque
slasher film. (PG-13, 96 minutes,
contains sexual situations, strong
MOVIES CONTINUED ON 32
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
The familiar formula that made this
CHIP BERGMAN/LIONSGATE
CLAIRE FOLGER/ANNAPURNA PICTURES
ABOVE: Luke Evans on the set of “Professor Marston
and the Wonder Women,” the absorbing true story
about the origin of the comic-book superhero.
UNIVERSAL PICTURES
LEFT: Jessica Rothe as a murdered teen in the not
particularly heart-pounding “Happy Death Day.”
31
Movies
“DINA CAPTIVATES!
A FASCINATING LOVE STORY.”
EZ
- Alonso Duralde, THE WRAP
Common Sense Media
Breathe
“IT’S LEAD GIVES THE
BEST PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR
IN THE STORY OF HER LIFE.”
What parents need to know
- Eric Kohn, INDIEWIRE
(PG-13)
Age 12+
Feel-good romance tackles
serious themes, disability rights.
“Breathe” — Andy Serkis’s
directorial debut — is based on
the true story of Robin
Cavendish (Andrew Garfield),
who became paralyzed after
contracting polio in the late
1950s. Some blood is spilled as
part of his medical condition
(enough to upset young/
particularly sensitive kids), a
married couple cuddles (and, it’s
implied, gets up to some
intimate touching), there are a
couple of swear words, and
adults drink in social situations.
But overall this is an uplifting,
feel-good, true story of someone
with severe disabilities who not
only survives but perseveres and
thrives with the help of his
empathetic friends and
courageous wife (Claire Foy). It
does bring up the topic of
assisted suicide, taking a stance
that not all viewers will agree
with. (117 minutes)
“A DARING, AFFECTING FILM.
IT’S IMPOSSIBLE NOT
TO CARE DEEPLY.”
- Tim Grierson, SCREEN DAILY
A real-life romantic comedy
EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT
DAVID BLOOMER/BLEECKER STREET AND PARTICIPANT MEDIA
Andrew Garfield and Claire Foy star as Robin and Diana Cavendish
in “Breathe,” an uplifting true story about someone with polio.
also some drinking, a brief
moment of nonsexual male
partial nudity (bare bottoms),
and a romantic (but not graphic)
bathtub scene. Josh Brolin and
Miles Teller co-star. (134
minutes)
Gaga: Five Foot Two
(TV-
MA)
STREAMING
Age 15+
An accessible star comes to life;
language, partial nudity.
“Gaga: Five Foot Two” is a
documentary about superstar
Lady Gaga (real name: Stefani
Germanotta) as she prepares for
the release of her 2016 album
“Joanne” and her halftime
appearance at 2017’s Super Bowl
in Houston. Centered more on
the intense work and emotional
and physical ups and downs the
singer-dancer-songwriter
experiences than on
performances, the film is a
personal one. Still, there’s lots of
music, along with well-shot
sequences that showcase Lady
Gaga’s talent, outsize personality
and commitment to her art.
Audiences are treated to a look at
her strong connections to family,
collaborators and fans. There’s
plenty of swearing, mostly “f---”
and “s---.” Gaga wears skimpy
clothes (including thongs), has
The Mayor
(TV-PG)
STREAMING
Age 12+
Rapper runs for mayor as a joke
— and wins — in fun comedy.
“The Mayor” is a familyfriendly sitcom starring Brandon
Micheal Hall (“Search Party”) as
a 27-year-old aspiring hip-hop
artist who finds himself the
unlikely mayor of his town. He
lives with his mom, a postal
carrier who references having
had him at age 16 and who’s a
hard-working, positive presence
in his life. Language is mild, and
the show offers positive
messages about civic
engagement, teamwork and
leadership — as well as plenty of
laughs. (weekly 22-minute
episodes)
On ABC broadcast. Also available via
Hulu and abc.go.com.
“AN ANIMATED
MASTERPIECE.
I have never seen anything
like it before.”
-PETE HAMMOND, DEADLINE
“A MIRACULOUS
TRIBUTE...”
-JOE McGOVERN, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY
WASHINGTON, DC
AVALON THEATRE
5612 Connecticut Ave NW
(202) 966-6000
BETHESDA, MD
ARCLIGHT BETHESDA
7101 Democracy Blvd
(240) 762-4000
FAIRFAX, VA
CINEMA ARTS THEATRES
9650 Main St
(703) 978-6991
LOVINGVINCENT.COM
WINNER
CANNES
FILM FESTIVAL
GOLDEN EYE PRIZE
“
★★★★”
WINNER
PEOPLE’S CHOICE
(DOCUMENTARY)
TORONTO
FILM FESTIVAL
“★★★★ SHEER PERFECTION.”
“UNFORGETTABLE.”
“EXQUISITE.”
COHEN MEDIA GROUP
A FILM BY
AGNES VARDA AND JR
BETHESDA ROW CINEMA 235 WOODMONT AVENUE, BETHESDA 301-652-7273
So handy. So reliable.
Home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
OCTOBER 20, 2017
Common Sense
Media helps
families make smart media choices.
Go to commonsensemedia.org for
age-based and educational ratings
and reviews for movies, games, apps,
TV shows, websites and books.
-A.O. SCOTT, THE NEW YORK TIMES
. FRIDAY,
NETFLIX
“Gaga: Five Foot Two” is a documentary about singer-dancersongwriter Stefani Germanotta — otherwise known as Lady Gaga.
sexy moves and appears topless
in a few scenes. She smokes
cigarettes throughout the film.
There are occasional references
to past recreational drug use and
to medication still prescribed for
pain from an ongoing injury.
Overall, Lady Gaga holds little
back about the challenges she
faces as a music icon and as a
maturing woman. Of course,
she’s aware of the camera’s
presence and what that means,
but she seems intent on letting
her fans and others in on what
it’s really like to be her. Gaga fans
run the age gamut and include
the very young, but this movie is
for mature folks only. (100
minutes)
Via Netflix streaming.
STARTS TODAY
“HYPNOTIC AND BEGUILING...”
THE WASHINGTON POST
Only the Brave (PG-13)
Age 13+
Language, firefighting peril in
true-story of heroism.
“Only the Brave” is an intense
but uneven drama about the
real-life Granite Mountain
Hotshots, a team of elite
firefighters from Arizona who
faced a deadly wildfire in June
2013, demonstrating courage,
perseverance and teamwork in
the process. The main concern
for younger viewers is the peril
of the fast-moving fires, but
although there are deaths,
they’re not shown. There’s a
snake bite and a couple of fights.
Characters swear fairly
frequently (including “s---,” “a--”
and more) and talk roughly but
non-graphically about sex; they
also rip into one another for fun.
Drug use is a plot element —
characters work hard to
overcome addiction, and drug
use is clearly frowned upon —
and what looks like crack is
smoked in one scene. There’s
a film by Dan&Antonio
Dina.film
32
EZ
Movies
Also Opening
some violence, sexual material and
smoking. At area theaters.)
MOVIES FROM 30
language and graphic violence. At
area theaters.)
HUMAN FLOW
This documentary by artist Ai
Weiwei is designed to arouse
outrage and sorrow, and it
succeeds. (PG-13, 145 minutes,
contains disturbing images and
themes. At ArcLight Bethesda and
Landmark’s E Street Cinema.)
IT
The Stephen King adaptation
features an entity that doesn’t just
feed on fear, but curates it. (R, 135
minutes, contains bloody violence,
horror and strong language. At area
theaters.)
KINGSMAN: THE
GOLDEN CIRCLE
Taron Egerton is back in sequel to
2015 film — along with a couple of
seemingly deceased characters.
(R, 141 minutes, contains copious
violence, drug use, strong language
throughout and some sexual
situations. At area theaters.)
LEAP!
Elle Fanning voices an 11-year-old
Parisian orphan who dreams of
dancing. (PG, 89 minutes,
contains some impolite humor and
action. At University Mall Theatre.)
LUCKY
Prolific character actor Dean
Stanton, who died in September,
plays a cranky old loner. (Unrated,
88 minutes, contains strong
language. At Cinema Arts Theatre
and Landmark’s West End Cinema.)
MARK FELT: THE MAN
WHO BROUGHT DOWN THE
WHITE HOUSE
This story of Deep Throat is an
absorbing alternative to the 1976
thriller’s, presenting the
informant’s psychological and
emotional motives. (PG-13, 103
minutes, contains some obscenity.
At area theaters.)
MARSHALL
We see Thurgood Marshall as a
justice-obsessed NAACP lawyer, not
the giant he would become. (PG13, 118 minutes, contains strong
language, violence, sexual
situations and rape. At area
theaters.)
THE MOUNTAIN
BETWEEN US
Kate Winslet and Idris Elba suffer
and smolder in this thriller that’s
part survival drama, part romance.
(PG-13, 112 minutes, contains
sexuality, peril, injury images and
brief obscenity. At area theaters.)
THE LEGO NINJAGO
JACK ENGLISH/UNIVERSAL PICTURES
In “The Snowman,” Michael Fassbender plays a detective investigating a series of grisly murders in
which the killer seems to be taunting him. This movie did not screen in time for review in Weekend. R. At area
theaters. Contains graphic images, violence, some coarse language, sexuality and brief nudity. 119 minutes.
THE ANONYMOUS WHISTLEBLOWER
WHIS
WHO RISKED
EVERYT
EVERYTHING
IN THE NAME OF JUSTICE
“EXTRAORDINARY.”
-Pete Hammond, DEADLINE
OCTOBER 20, 2017
“AS TIMELY AS IT GETS.”
-Joshua Rothkopf, TIME OUT NEW YORK
LIAM NEESON
MARK FELT
LOVING VINCENT
The ambitious film, set up as an
probe into the artist’s death, is a
technical spectacle, but at times it
drags. (PG-13, 94 minutes,
contains discussions of suicide,
“MASTERFUL.
SHOWS US THE UNDENIABLE
POWER OF CINEMA.”
– HuffPost
“INTIMATE & TOUCHING.”
– The Playlist
“A REMARKABLE
EXPERIENCE.”
– The Knockturnal
“COMPELLING.”
– IndieWire
THE MAN WHO BROUGHT DOWN THE WHITE HOUSE
. FRIDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
DIANE LANE
MOVIE
Third Lego movie lacks the popcultural touchstones of the first two
animated films. (PG, 101 minutes,
contains mild action and rude
humor. At area theaters.)
MY LITTLE PONY: THE
MOVIE
The animated adventure expands
on the “Friendship Is Magic” TV
series. (PG, 99 minutes, contains
a few tempestlike sequences and
brief moments of sadness, but
most of the action is mild and
sparkly. At area theaters.)
PROFESSOR MARSTON
AND THE WONDER WOMEN
Rebecca Hall delivers a prickly tour
de force as one of the real-life
women who inspired a comic book
icon. (R, 108 minutes, contains
strong sexual content, including
brief graphic images, and
obscenity. At area theaters.)
SPIDER-MAN:
HOMECOMING
Tom Holland’s 15-year-old
webslinger is torn between
attending the school dance and
saving the world from evil in this
refreshing reboot of a familiar
superhero story. (PG-13, 133
DC’s only nonprofit film center
EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT
STARTS TODAY
BASED ON THE
BOOKS BY
MARK FELT AND JOHN O’CONNOR
WRITTEN AND
DIRECTED BY
PETER LANDESMAN
Alexandria
Washington, DC ANGELIKA Washington, DC
Alexandria REGAL
POP-UP AT UNION MARKET LANDMARK’S WEST END CINEMA AMC HOFFMAN CENTER 22 POTOMAC YARD STADIUM 16
(202) 534-1907
amctheatres.com
(571) 512-3313
(703) 739-4040
WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM
Fredericksburg
Sterling
REGAL FREDERICKSBURG 15 REGAL COUNTRYSIDE STADIUM 20
(844) 462-7342
(844) 462-7342 #394
VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.MARKFELTMOVIE.COM
ANGELIKA POP-UP
550 Penn Street NE, Washington, DC
(571) 512-3311 • angelikafilmcenter.com
Q&As with DIRECTOR JEREMY S. LEVINE TOMORROW
after the 7:15 show, and intro to the 9:15 show,
SUNDAY after the 1:15 show. WEDNESDAY PANEL
DISCUSSION with DIRECTOR LANDON VAN SOEST and
ALLIANCE FOR EXCELLENT EDUCATION after the 7:15 show.
"AN IMAGINATIVE WORK OF ART IN ITSELF" -
Fri–Thu: 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 8:00 (no 8pm Thu)
FROM THE DIRECTORS OF LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE
OF
BATTLE THE
SEXES
Fri–Thu: 11:15AM, 2:00, 4:45, 7:30
(no 11:15am Sat or Sun; no 7:30pm Wed)
reel israel dc presents:
OUR FATHER 8pm Wed 10/25
5612 Connecticut Ave NW • (202) 966-6000
tickets online: www.theavalon.org
Movies
minutes, contains sci-fi action
violence, some strong language
and brief suggestive comments. At
University Mall Theatre.)
Also Opening
TAKE EVERY WAVE: THE
LIFE OF LAIRD HAMILTON
This documentary about a big-wave
surfer only skims along the surface.
(Unrated, 118 minutes, contains
strong language. At Landmark’s E
Street Cinema.)
VICTORIA AND ABDUL
For the most part, the drama
starring Judi Dench and Ali Fazal
plays like broadly clownish comedy.
(PG-13, 112 minutes, contains
strong language and mature
thematic material. At area
theaters.)
WIND RIVER
Taylor Sheridan’s directorial debut
is set amid the poverty and
foreshortened prospects of a
Native American community. (R,
107 minutes, contains strong
violence, a rape, disturbing images
and obscenity. At Angelika Pop-Up
at Union Market.)
REP ER TO R Y
APOLLO 13 Friday at 2 p.m. Free.
National Archives, 700
Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-3575000. archives.gov.
A WOMAN’S FACE Sunday at
4 p.m. Free. Hill Center at the Old
Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania
Ave. SE. 202-549-4172.
hillcenterdc.org.
DOUBLE EXPOSURE FILM
FESTIVAL Through Sunday. $15$250. National Portrait Gallery,
Eighth and F streets NW. 202-6331000. doubleexposurefestival.com/
wash2017-films.
DRAGONFLY EYES Saturday at 7
p.m. Freer Gallery of Art, 1050
Independence Ave SW. asia.si.edu.
BEN ROTHSTEIN/WARNER BROS. PICTURES
Abbie Cornish and Andy Garcia star, with Gerard Butler (not shown), in “Geostorm,” a disaster thriller
about a climate catastrophe caused by a malfunctioning system of weather-control satellites. This movie
did not screen for critics. PG-13. At area theaters. Contains destruction, action and violence. 109 minutes.
FAMILY FUN MOVIE NIGHTS
Through Dec. 15. Free. Stacy C.
Sherwood Center, 3740 Old Lee
Hwy. Fairfax. fairfaxva.gov/home.
FORREST GUMP Friday at 7 p.m.
Free. National Archives, 700
Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-3575000. archives.gov.
HOCUS POCUS Friday at 7:30 p.m.
Free. Adventure Links at Hemlock
Overlook Regional Park, 13220
Yates Ford Rd., Clifton. 571-2813556. bit.ly/2zaLMCy.
JOAN FONTAINE CENTENNIAL
Sunday. Through Nov. 22. AFI Silver
Theatre, 8633 Colesville Rd., Silver
Spring. 301-495-6700. afi.com/
silver.
LUTHER THE REFORMER: 500YEAR LEGACY Through Nov. 16.
Free. Goethe-Institut, 1990 K St
NW, Suite 3. 202-847-4700.
33
EZ
goethe.de/washington.
MIDDLEBURG FILM FESTIVAL
Through Sunday. $10-$15. Various
locations around Middleburg.
middleburgfilm.org.
NOIR CITY DC 2017 Through Oct.
26. AFI Silver Theatre, 8633
Colesville Rd., Silver Spring. 301495-6700. afi.com/silver.
OIL AND WATER Tuesday at 7 p.m.
$15. Atlas Performing Arts Center,
1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993.
atlasarts.org.
PHANTOM OF THE OPERA
Saturday at 7 a.m. Free. Calvary
United Methodist Church, 2315 S.
Grant St Arlington. (703) 892-5185.
bit.ly/2xHMECj.
THE BLUE MAX Friday at 7 p.m.
Free. National Air and Space
Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy
Center, 14390 Air and Space
Museum Parkway, Chantilly.
20151. 703-572-4118.
airandspace.si.edu.
WASHINGTON JEWISH FILM
FESTIVAL Through Dec. 5. $13.50$28.13. Edlavitch DCJCC, 1529
16th St. NW. 202-518-9400.
wjff.org.
THE MOST INSPIRING
MOVIE OF THE YEAR.
“
Award-worthy, brilliant
performances by both
Andrew Garfield and Claire Foy.”
“CELEBRATES THE
TRIUMPH OF THE
HUMAN SPIRIT.”
“A SWOON-WORTHY
ROMANCE.”
THE WASHINGTON POST
“TERRIFICALLY ENTERTAINING.”
SHAWN EDWARDS, FOXTV
“Judi Dench Is A Royal
Pleasure. A Fun Time
At The Movies.”
PETER TRAVERS
“Judi Dench Is Dazzling.”
GOOD HOUSEKEEPING
. FRIDAY,
© 2017 FOCUS FEATURES LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
NOW PLAYING IN THEATERS EVERYWHERE
CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATER LOCATIONS AND SHOWTIMES
NOW PLAYING
CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATER LOCATIONS AND SHOWTIMES
OCTOBER 20, 2017
VictoriaAndAbdulFilm.com
34
EZ
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:00-1:15-3:30-4:45-7:00- 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:30-10:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
12:20-2:40-5:00-7:30-9:55 CC: (!) 11:45-2:15-4:45-6:00Landmark E Street Cinema 7:15-8:30-9:45-11:00
AMC Loews Georgetown 14 10:15-10:30
Geostorm (PG-13) CC:
3111 K Street N.W.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 20, 2017
Geostorm (PG-13) CC:
11:30-2:15-7:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
5:00-10:30
The Mountain Between Us
(PG-13) CC: 4:00
Same Kind of Different as
Me (PG-13) CC: 10:40-1:304:45-7:40-10:30
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
CC: 10:40-1:55-4:45-7:0510:00
American Made (R) CC:
10:45-1:35-5:05-7:50-10:35
Kingsman: The Golden
Circle (R) CC: 1:35-7:4010:50
The Snowman (R) CC:
11:10-1:00-2:45-4:30-7:3010:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
CC: 5:15
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC:
10:50AM
The Foreigner (R) CC:
10:45-2:00-4:45-7:35-10:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
CC: 10:35-12:20-2:40-4:205:40-7:00-8:15-9:30-10:45
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:301:20-4:10-7:10-10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) CC:
12:10-2:45-5:20-8:00-10:45
Professor Marston & the
Wonder Women (R) CC:
12:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
CC: 1:30-9:00
Only the Brave (PG-13)
12:40-3:50-7:00-10:10
Blade Runner 2049: The
IMAX 2D Experience (R) CC:
12:00-3:40-7:20-11:00
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
555 11th St NW
Dina 1:20-4:20-7:20-9:40
Take Every Wave: The
Life of Laird Hamilton CC:
1:00-9:15
Human Flow (PG-13) CC:
1:30-4:40-8:00
Goodbye Christopher Robin
CC: 1:30-4:30-7:30-9:55
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
CC: 1:10-4:10-7:10-9:40
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
CC: 1:05-4:05-7:05-9:35
Breathe (PG-13) CC: 1:004:00-7:00-9:50
The Florida Project (R) CC:
1:15-3:30-4:15-6:30-7:1510:00
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
The Big Sick (R) CC:
2:00-7:00
Bending the Arc 4:40-9:40
Lucky CC: 2:30-5:00-7:309:50
Mark Felt: The Man Who
Brought Down The White
House (PG-13) CC: 2:154:45-7:15-9:45
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
We, the Marines (NR)
10:00-11:00-12:00-1:002:00-3:00-4:00
Regal Gallery Place
Stadium 14
701 Seventh St Northwest
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:204:20-7:30-10:00
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:002:50-5:35-8:20-11:00
AMC Mazza Gallerie
Same Kind of Different as
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Me (PG-13) 1:10-4:05-6:55Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!)
7:00-9:55
2:10-4:50-10:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) (!) 7:40 12:10-3:50-11:10
The Mountain Between Us The Foreigner (R) 12:10(PG-13) CC: 1:50-4:302:55-5:40-8:25-11:10
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
7:10-9:50
12:15-2:45-5:35-8:15-10:45
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!)
Marshall (PG-13) 12:402:30-5:10-7:50-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 3:35-10:20
CC: (!) 3:05-5:30-8:00-10:25 Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:00-2:30-5:10-7:50-9:30
1:55-4:40-7:30-10:15
Professor Marston & the
Smithsonian - Lockheed
Wonder Women (R) CC: (!)
Martin IMAX Theater
1:00-3:30
601 Independence Avenue SW
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D
CC: 6:30
(NR) 2:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
A Beautiful Planet 3D
2:50-10:00
(G) 4:20
Albert Einstein Planetarium - Aircraft Carrier: Guardians
National Air and Space Museum of the Sea 3D (NR) 11:006th St and Independence Ave SW 1:15-3:30
To Space and Back 11:00AM Dream Big: Engineering Our
Dark Universe Space Show World: An IMAX 3D Experi(NR) 11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30- ence 12:25
Blade Runner 2049: The
3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) IMAX 2D Experience (R)
9:55
12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00Journey to Space 3D (NR)
4:00-5:00
10:25-11:50-2:05-5:15
One World, One Sky: Big
Bird's Adventure (NR)
10:30AM
The Foreigner (R) CC:
11:45-2:30-3:45-6:30-9:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
CC: 10:15-1:00-5:15-8:0010:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:002:00-5:00-7:45-10:30
AMC Center Park 8
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
Geostorm (PG-13) CC:
CC: (!) 10:45-11:30-1:301:55-7:30
2:15-4:00-4:45-6:45-7:30Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 11:15- 9:30-10:15
4:20-10:15
AMC Magic Johnson
The Mountain Between Us
Capital Ctr 12
(PG-13) CC: 11:15-5:00
800 Shoppers Way
Kingsman: The Golden
Same Kind of Different as
Circle (R) CC: 1:50-10:20
Me (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:00The Snowman (R) CC:
6:45-9:30
12:00-2:45-6:00-9:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC:
The Foreigner (R) CC:
11:10-1:50-4:40-7:20-10:00 2:00-5:00-8:00-11:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
CC: 11:55-2:15-4:35-7:15- Madea Halloween (PG-13)
1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
9:45
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:55ArcLight Bethesda
3:00-6:05-9:00
7101 Democracy Blvd
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13) Geostorm (PG-13) 11:30CC: (!) 11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00- 2:35-5:05-7:35-9:25
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
7:45-9:45
(PG) 12:50-4:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
The Mountain Between Us
11:00-2:30-6:00-9:30
(PG-13) 12:30
AMC Columbia 14
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
10300 Little Patuxent Pkwy
12:05-3:05-7:00
Kingsman: The Golden
Geostorm (PG-13) CC:
Circle (R) 4:55-10:25
1:20-6:40
My Little Pony: The Movie
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
(PG) 3:10-6:00
4:00-9:20
The Foreigner (R) 11:50The LEGO Ninjago Movie
2:10-5:20-7:50-10:45
(PG) CC: 10:50-1:20
The Mountain Between Us Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
(PG-13) CC: (!) 11:20-3:40- 10:25-1:00-4:20-7:05-9:50
Marshall (PG-13) 11:404:30-7:10-9:50
2:05-4:45-7:20-9:35
American Made (R) CC:
11:05-1:55-4:35-7:20-10:10 American Made (R)
3:20-7:10
Kingsman: The Golden
Geostorm (PG-13) 10:15Circle (R) CC: 12:30-6:45
My Little Pony: The Movie 10:55
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
(PG) CC: (!) 10:50AM
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:40-4:05-7:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
11:15-2:45-6:15-9:55
11:55-2:25-5:50-8:05-10:30The Snowman (R) CC: (!)
11:00-1:45-4:35-7:20-10:15 11:00
It (R) CC: 3:50-6:55-10:05 The Snowman (R) 11:45Only the Brave (PG-13) (!) 2:50-5:30-8:00-10:40
Professor Marston & the
11:30-2:50-6:10-9:30
Wonder Women (R) CC:
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
4:35
CC: 10:55-1:35-4:15-6:55
Happy Death Day (PG-13) Blade Runner 2049 (R)
11:15-9:55
CC: (!) 10:55-1:30-4:10Breathe (PG-13) CC: 10:556:35-9:20
1:30-2:30-5:10-7:40-10:10
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:05-1:50-4:40-7:25-10:20 The Florida Project (R)
11:25-2:45-5:40-7:55-10:20
Geostorm: An IMAX 3D
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Experience (PG-13) (!)
11:35-2:20-5:00-7:40-10:20 Madea Halloween (PG-13)
11:35-2:40-5:35-8:15-10:15
Professor Marston & the
Wonder Women (R) (!) 2:00 Loving Vincent (PG-13)
The Foreigner (R) (!) 11:15- 10:30-12:45-2:20-5:00-7:158:25-9:30-10:35
2:05-4:50-7:35-10:20
Human Flow (PG-13) 10:00Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13) 11:00-2:00-3:00-4:30-7:2511:10-1:40-4:20-7:00-9:40 8:10-9:40
The Rocky Horror Picture
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
Show (R) (!) 10:00
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
The Florida Project (R)
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
11:20-2:00-4:50-7:30-10:10 CC: 1:00-1:50-4:10-7:007:40-9:35-10:05
Cinemark
Goodbye Christopher Robin
Egyptian 24 and XD
CC: 1:40-4:30-7:30-9:55
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:505:30-8:25
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
2:40-11:10
The Mountain Between Us
(PG-13) 12:00-3:00-5:458:30-11:15
The Snowman (R) 10:551:45-4:35-7:30-10:25
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
1:25-9:00
The Foreigner (R) 1:00-4:007:00-10:00
Only the Brave (PG-13)
12:40-3:50-7:20-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
10:55-12:15-1:50-2:50-4:305:40-7:10-8:20-9:50-10:45
Golmaal Again (NR)
2:40-9:40
Secret Superstar (NR)
11:10-6:10
Raja The Great (NR) 3:1010:40
Marshall (PG-13) 11:052:00-4:55-7:45-10:50
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
12:35-3:15-5:55-8:35-11:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D
(R) 5:10
Mersal (NR) 11:15-6:45
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:505:30-8:25
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
2:40-11:10
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
(PG) 10:55-1:35
Kingsman: The Golden
Circle (R) 11:15-2:306:00-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
1:25-9:00
It (R) 4:10-7:25-10:55
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) XD:
11:30-2:10-4:50-7:30-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 3D
(R) 5:10
Hoyt's West Nursery
Cinema 14
1591 West Nursery Rd
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 1:103:50-6:25-9:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
(PG) CC: 2:00
The Mountain Between Us
(PG-13) CC: 1:25-4:006:35-9:10
Same Kind of Different as
Me (PG-13) CC: 1:05-4:006:45-9:30
Kingsman: The Golden
Circle (R) CC: 1:00-4:057:10-10:15
The Snowman (R) CC: 2:104:55-7:40-10:25-11:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
2:30-6:05-9:35
It (R) CC: 1:15-4:15-7:15AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 The LEGO Ninjago Movie
10:15
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
(PG) 11:10AM
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!)
1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
11:00-2:40-6:10-9:40
11:45-2:25-7:45
The Foreigner (R) CC: 1:40Only the Brave (PG-13)
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) (!)
4:25-7:05-9:50-11:35
10:20-1:20-4:20-7:20-10:20
5:05-10:25
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
Same Kind of Different as The Foreigner (R) 10:10CC: 1:00-3:20-5:40-8:001:00-3:50-7:00-10:00
Me (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:3510:20-11:40
Happy Death Day (PG-13) Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:254:25-7:15-10:05
AFI Silver Theatre
10:40-1:30-4:00-7:10-9:50 4:10-6:55-9:40
The Snowman (R) CC: (!)
Cultural Ctr
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
1:40-4:30-7:20-10:10
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Ma8633 Colesville Road
Madea Halloween (PG-13) dea Halloween (PG-13) CC:
Breathe (PG-13) (!) 10:00
1:40-4:10-6:40-9:30
The Taking of Pelham 1,2,3 Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
1:20-2:20-3:45-5:00-6:30(1974) (NR) 7:30
Madea Halloween (PG-13) Kingsman: The Golden
7:30-9:00-10:00-11:30
Circle (R) 12:30-3:40-6:50- Professor Marston & the
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:30-3:00-5:3010:10
2:00-4:30-7:05-9:30
8:00-10:30
Wonder Women (R) CC:
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
Breathe (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:50
Madea Halloween (PG-13) 'Til Death Do Us Part (PG1:00-3:20-5:40-8:00
12:45-3:50; (!) 6:55
12:00-2:30-5:10-7:50-10:30
The
Rocky
Horror
Picture
13) CC: 4:25-6:50-9:15
AMC Academy 8
Show (R) 10:00
Bow Tie Harbour 9
6198 Greenbelt Road
Landmark
MARYLAND
Angelika Pop-Up
at Union Market
550 Penn St NE - Unit E
Wind River (R) CC: 12:002:30-5:00-7:30-9:40
Mark Felt: The Man Who
Brought Down The White
House (PG-13) CC: 11:452:15-4:40-7:00-9:20
For Ahkeem 11:15-1:153:15-5:15-7:15-9:15
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
11:15-2:00-4:45-7:30
Loving Vincent (PG-13)
12:15-2:45-5:15-8:00
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V St, NW
American Made (R) CC:
12:15-2:45-5:10-7:35-10:00
It (R) CC: 1:40-4:25-7:109:50
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:303:15-7:15-8:00-9:45
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:15-4:40-7:25
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) (!)
2:00-10:10
The Mountain Between Us
(PG-13) 11:25-3:25
My Little Pony: The Movie
(PG) CC: 11:05-1:35-4:10
It (R) CC: 7:00-10:00
The Snowman (R) CC: (!)
11:30-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
11:30-3:00-6:30-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
CC: (!) 12:30-2:05-4:257:05-9:30
AMC Loews
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
11115 Mall Circle
2474 Solomons Island Road
Geostorm (PG-13) 10:501:30-4:10-7:00-9:50
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!)
The Mountain Between Us
1:30-7:00
(PG-13) 11:00-1:40-4:30
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) (!)
It (R) 7:20-10:20
10:30-4:15-9:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
The Mountain Between Us 10:40-1:20-4:00-6:40-9:10
(PG-13) CC: 10:15-4:30-7:15 American Made (R) 2:20Kingsman: The Golden
5:10-7:50-10:40
Circle (R) CC: 1:15-10:00
The Snowman (R) 10:30Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 1:10-3:50-6:50-9:30
2:15-6:00
Marshall (PG-13) 11:10The Snowman (R) CC: (!)
2:10-5:00-7:40-10:30
10:00-12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00 Professor Marston & the
It (R) CC: 11:15-9:30
Wonder Women (R) 11:30AM
Bethesda Row Cinema
7235 Woodmont Ave
Faces, Places (Visages,
villages) (PG) 1:20-3:305:40-7:50-10:00
Mark Felt: The Man Who
Brought Down The White
House (PG-13) CC: 1:454:00-6:40-10:05
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
12:50-3:40-6:50-9:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
CC: 1:30-4:20-4:50-7:109:50
Breathe (PG-13) CC: 1:103:50-7:20-9:50
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
5:30-8:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
11:45-12:40-2:25-3:20-5:056:00-7:45-8:40-10:25-11:20
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
(PG) 12:00-2:30
Regal Germantown
Stadium 14
20000 Century Blvd
Friday, October 20, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
12:00-1:30-2:35-4:15-5:157:00-8:00-9:45-10:45
Regal Rockville Ctr
Stadium 13
199 East Montgomery Ave
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:152:00-7:45
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:15Paragon Kentlands
(PG) 11:15-1:45-4:30-7:15
2:00-7:30
Stadium 10
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
629 Center Point Way
5:00-10:30
(PG) 12:45-3:30
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:25The Mountain Between Us
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
2:50-5:15-7:40-10:05
(PG-13) 11:30-9:30
4:45-10:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
American Made (R) 8:15(PG) 12:40-2:55-5:10-7:25- The Mountain Between Us 11:00
(PG-13) 4:30-10:45
9:40
Kingsman: The Golden
American Made (R) 11:55- Same Kind of Different as Circle (R) 2:45-6:15
Me (PG-13) 12:15-3:152:20-4:50-7:20-9:50
Same Kind of Different as
My Little Pony: The Movie 6:30-9:30
Me (PG-13) 11:30-2:15(PG) 12:25-2:40-4:55-7:10- American Made (R)
5:00-7:45-10:45
6:45-9:45
9:25
My Little Pony: The Movie My Little Pony: The Movie
The Snowman (R) 11:55(PG) 12:00-2:45-5:30
(PG) 1:15-4:00
2:25-4:55-7:30-10:05
It (R) 12:30-3:00-6:30-9:45
Kingsman: The Golden
Dunkirk (PG-13) 12:25The Snowman (R) 11:30Circle (R) 1:15-7:15
2:45-7:35
2:30-5:15-8:00-11:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
The Foreigner (R) 11:1512:30-4:15-8:15
12:20-3:40-7:00-10:20
It (R) 1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00 It (R) 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30 2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
The Snowman (R) 12:00Only the Brave (PG-13)
11:45-3:15-7:00-10:30
3:00-5:45-8:45
1:20-4:10-7:00-9:50
Only the Brave (PG-13)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) The Foreigner (R) 12:3012:00-3:30-7:00-10:00
12:50-3:00-5:10-7:20-9:30 3:30-6:30-9:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
Only the Brave (PG-13)
Professor Marston &
11:45-2:15-4:45-7:15-10:00
12:15-3:45-7:00-10:15
the Wonder Women (R)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) Marshall (PG-13) 12:155:10-9:55
3:45-6:45-9:30
Regal Bowie Stadium 14 11:45-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:45 Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Golmaal Again (NR) 1:3015200 Major Lansdale Blvd
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
5:15-9:00
11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-9:45Geostorm (PG-13) 1:00-7:10 Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
Madea Halloween (PG-13) 10:45
(PG) 12:30-3:25
Regal Waugh Chapel
11:30-2:15-5:15-6:15-8:00Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
Stadium 12 & IMAX
9:00-10:30
4:05-10:20
1419 South Main Chapel Way
Mersal (NR) 1:00-4:45-8:30
The Mountain Between Us
Regal Hyattsville Royale Geostorm (PG-13) 12:10(PG-13) 1:25-7:50
2:55-8:20
Stadium 14
American Made (R) 6:55The LEGO Ninjago Movie
6505 America Blvd.
10:00
Kingsman: The Golden
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:30-6:15 (PG) 12:30-4:10
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
Circle (R) 4:15-10:35
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
5:35-11:00
Same Kind of Different as 12:45-9:00
The Mountain Between Us
Me (PG-13) 12:50-4:10The LEGO Ninjago Movie
7:20-10:15
(PG) 12:45-3:20-6:15-9:15 (PG-13) 10:45
My Little Pony: The Movie The Mountain Between Us Kingsman: The Golden
Circle (R) 7:10
(PG) 1:10-3:50
(PG-13) 1:00-6:30
My Little Pony: The Movie
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
American Made (R)
(PG) 1:40-4:25
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
3:45-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
It (R) 6:10-9:15
Kingsman: The Golden
12:40-3:10-7:10-10:00
The Snowman (R) 1:15Circle (R) 7:00-10:15
It (R) 6:45-9:50
4:25-7:40-10:25
My Little Pony: The Movie The Snowman (R) 1:10The Foreigner (R) 12:40(PG) 1:30-4:15
4:40-8:00-10:50
3:45-6:30-9:40
Same Kind of Different as The Foreigner (R) 1:00-3:45Only the Brave (PG-13)
Me (PG-13) 1:30-4:45-7:45- 7:00-10:25
12:10-3:15-6:20-9:30
10:35
Happy Death Day (PG-13) Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:00- Only the Brave (PG-13)
12:45-4:00-7:30-10:30
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:10
6:00-9:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
Marshall (PG-13) 12:20It (R) 1:00-4:05-7:30-10:45 12:20-2:45-5:20-8:10-10:40
3:40-6:50-9:50
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:00- Marshall (PG-13) 12:15Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
6:45-9:45
3:20-6:15-9:15
Madea Halloween (PG-13) The Snowman (R) 1:45Geostorm: An IMAX 3D
12:00-1:20-2:40-4:00-5:20- 4:30-7:15-10:00
Experience (PG-13) 1:306:40-8:00-9:20-10:40
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 4:15-7:00-9:45
A Question of Faith (PG)
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:15-10:45 Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
12:25-3:00-5:30-8:10-10:45 Only the Brave (PG-13)
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
Regal Cinemas Majestic 1:15-4:45-7:50-11:00
12:00-1:20-2:35-3:55-5:10Stadium 20 & IMAX
Marshall (PG-13) 2:00-5:00- 6:30-7:45-9:05-10:20
900 Ellsworth Dr
8:00-10:50
Regal Westview
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:25Stadium 16 & IMAX
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
6:10-8:50
5243 Buckeystown Pike
12:30-1:45-3:00-4:30-5:45Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
7:00-8:30-9:45-11:00
12:35-11:30
(PG) 12:00-2:45
The Mountain Between Us
Regal Laurel Towne
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:45(PG-13) 3:55-9:55
Centre 12
7:00
Same Kind of Different as
14716 Baltimore Ave
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
Me (PG-13) 1:25-4:15-7:15The
LEGO
Ninjago
Movie
4:00-10:00
10:15
(PG)
12:30-3:15
The Mountain Between Us
American Made (R) 5:50Geostorm (PG-13) 12:45(PG-13) 8:30-11:15
11:30
3:45-7:10
Kingsman: The Golden
Kingsman: The Golden
Geostorm
3D
(PG-13)
10:00
Circle (R) 1:00-4:30-8:00Circle (R) 12:05-6:45
The
Mountain
Between
Us
11:15
It (R) 5:00-8:15-11:30
(PG-13)
12:15-3:00-5:35My Little Pony: The Movie
My Little Pony: The Movie
8:15-10:55
(PG) 11:45-2:30-5:15
(PG) 12:10-2:55
American Made (R) 6:45
Same Kind of Different as
The Snowman (R) 11:45Kingsman: The Golden
Me (PG-13) 12:45-4:152:40-5:35-8:30-11:25
Circle (R) 6:15-9:35
7:30-11:00
The Foreigner (R) 12:50My
Little
Pony:
The
Movie
American Made (R) 12:003:40-6:20-11:30
(PG)
1:00-3:40
3:00-6:00-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
Blade
Runner
2049
(R)
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
11:55-3:45-7:25-11:00
12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
11:45-3:30-7:15-11:00
Only the Brave (PG-13)
It (R) 9:30
It (R) 12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
11:35-2:45-5:55-9:15
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) The Snowman (R) 1:0012:30-3:15-6:15-9:15
12:15-2:50-5:25-8:00-9:00- 4:00-7:30-10:30
The
Foreigner
(R)
1:15-4:30The Snowman (R) 12:3010:30
7:20-10:20
3:45-7:15-10:15
The Foreigner (R) 8:40
The Foreigner (R) 1:00-4:45Marshall (PG-13) 1:10-4:00- Only the Brave (PG-13)
12:40-3:50-7:15-10:25
8:15-11:15
7:00-10:00
Golmaal Again (NR) 11:30- Happy Death Day (PG-13) Only the Brave (PG-13)
12:10-2:30-5:00-7:45-10:15 12:15-3:45-7:00-10:45
3:10-6:50-10:35
Marshall (PG-13) 12:20Happy Death Day (PG-13)
Secret Superstar (NR)
11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
12:25-3:50-7:20-10:40
3:10-6:30-9:15
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:157:30-10:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
11:30-2:15-5:00-6:30-7:459:30-10:30
Geostorm: An IMAX 3D
Experience (PG-13) 11:302:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
UA Snowden Square
Stadium 14
9161 Commerce Ctr Dr
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:302:10-7:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
(PG) 12:20-3:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
4:50-10:10
The Mountain Between Us
(PG-13) 3:10-9:50
American Made (R)
6:15-9:15
Same Kind of Different as
Me (PG-13) 12:30-3:406:30-9:30
Kingsman: The Golden
Circle (R) 11:45-6:30
My Little Pony: The Movie
(PG) 12:50-3:30-6:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
11:50-3:20-7:00-10:30
It (R) 8:45
The Snowman (R) 11:402:20-5:00-7:45-10:40
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
12:10-3:00-6:00-9:00
Only the Brave (PG-13)
12:30-4:00-7:15-10:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
12:15-2:45-5:30-8:15-10:45
The Foreigner (R) 1:00-4:157:15-10:00
Golmaal Again (NR) 11:302:50-6:15-9:45
Marshall (PG-13) 12:403:50-6:45-9:40
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
12:00-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:50
VIRGINIA
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Geostorm (PG-13) CC:
7:00-10:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
(PG) CC: 2:30-5:00
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
2:00-4:30
The Mountain Between Us
(PG-13) CC: 1:15
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
CC: 7:30-10:20
American Made (R) CC:
1:30-3:50-7:15-10:00
Kingsman: The Golden
Circle (R) CC: 4:10-6:309:45
Same Kind of Different as
Me (PG-13) CC: 1:50-4:457:30-10:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
CC: 1:15-3:30-5:45-8:0010:20
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:154:00-6:45-9:50
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC:
1:15-4:15-7:15-9:30
AMC Hoffman Ctr 22
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
Geostorm (PG-13) CC:
11:45-5:00-10:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
2:30-7:30
Same Kind of Different as
Me (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:003:45-6:30-9:15
The Snowman (R) CC:
10:45-1:30-4:30-7:15-10:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC:
11:30-1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) CC:
11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
The Rocky Horror Picture
Show (R) 10:00
AMC Potomac Mills 18
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Xscape Theatres
Geostorm (PG-13) CC:
Brandywine 14
11:40-4:55-10:10
7710 Matapeake Business Dr
Geostorm (PG-13) CC:
(!) 11:10-2:30-5:20-8:1011:10
The Mountain Between Us
(PG-13) CC: (!) 10:15-1:104:20-7:20-8:50
Same Kind of Different
as Me (PG-13) CC: 11:203:30-6:30-10:15
Kingsman: The Golden
Circle (R) CC: 9:50
The Snowman (R) CC:
(!) 10:40-1:40-4:40-7:3010:40
It (R) CC: 10:50-1:50-4:507:50-9:40-11:00
Only the Brave (PG-13)
CC: (!) 10:10-11:30-3:107:10-10:20
The Foreigner (R) Open
Caption; CC: 10:30-1:304:10-6:50-9:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
CC: (!) 10:00-12:30-3:005:30-8:00-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC:
11:40-2:50-6:00-9:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
CC: (!) 10:20-11:50-12:502:40-3:20-5:10-5:50-7:408:20-10:10-10:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
(!) 10:45-2:20-6:10-10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
CC: (!) 11:00-1:20-2:003:50-4:30-6:20-7:00-11:30
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
2:20-7:35
Same Kind of Different as
Me (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:302:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
The Snowman (R) CC:
11:45-2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC:
12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) CC:
11:50-2:30-5:10-7:45-10:20
AMC Shirlington 7
2772 South Randolph St.
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
CC: 10:30-1:15-4:15-7:1510:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
10:00-4:00-10:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
CC: 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:3010:30
Breathe (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
The Florida Project (R) (!)
11:15-2:00-4:45-7:30-10:15
Goodbye Christopher Robin
(!) 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:4510:15
Professor Marston & the
Wonder Women (R) CC: (!)
10:45-1:45-4:15-7:00-9:45
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
CC: 1:00-7:00
AMC Tysons Corner 16
7850e Tysons Corner Ctr
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!)
11:15-2:10-7:30
iPic Pike & Rose
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) (!)
11830 Grand Park Ave
4:55-10:15
Geostorm (PG-13) (!) 12:45- The Snowman (R) CC: (!)
10:45-1:45-4:40-7:45-10:45
4:15-7:30-10:45
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Kingsman: The Golden
Circle (R) 11:00-2:30-6:30- Madea Halloween (PG-13)
CC: (!) 11:00-1:30-4:00-7:0510:00
The Snowman (R) (!) 12:00- 9:45-12:15
3:30-7:00-10:15
AMC Worldgate 9
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
13025 Worldgate Dr
11:00-2:45-6:45-11:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC:
The Foreigner (R) (!) 12:30- (!) 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
4:00-7:15-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) (!) Alamo Drafthouse Cinema One Loudoun
2:00-5:00-8:00-11:30
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Marshall (PG-13) (!) 11:303:00-6:15-9:30
My Little Pony: The Movie
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
(PG) 10:05AM
Madea Halloween (PG-13) Geostorm (PG-13) 11:202:15-4:40-8:00-11:00
(!) 1:15-4:30-7:45-11:15
Movies
35
EZ
What Washington is watching on DVD
UNIVERSAL PICTURES
1. The Mummy, top
2. Baby Driver
3. Wonder Woman
4. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead
Men Tell No Tales
5. Transformers: The Last Knight
SOURCE: Redbox,
for the week ended Oct. 15.
New on DVD
Girls Trip, right
Lady Macbeth
Landline
The Midwife
Spider-Man: Homecoming
Step
MICHELE K. SHORT/UNIVERSAL PICTURES
MOVIE DIRECTORY
Kingsman: The Golden
Circle (R) 11:50-3:15-6:4010:05
It (R) 2:45-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
11:00-3:10-7:00-11:00
American Made (R)
11:35-6:00
The Snowman (R) 10:351:00-5:00-8:20-11:25
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
2:35-10:20
The Foreigner (R) 11:503:00-6:20-9:25
Only the Brave (PG-13)
11:10-1:40-4:00-7:20-10:40
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
11:20-2:00-5:20-6:20-9:0011:40
Dracula (1931) (NR) 7:40
Angelika Film Ctr Mosaic
2911 District Ave
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:204:50-8:30
Same Kind of Different as
Me (PG-13) 12:35-3:256:15-9:30
American Made (R)
5:00-7:50
Kingsman: The Golden
Circle (R) 6:35-9:45
It (R) 1:05-4:15-7:30-10:30
My Little Pony: The Movie
(PG) 12:40-2:30
The Snowman (R) 12:403:20-6:00-9:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
12:55-3:15-5:45-8:15-10:35
Bareilly Ki Barfi (NR) 1:354:55-7:35-10:15
Golmaal Again (NR) 3:306:50-10:25
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 1:004:05-7:05-10:20
Chef (Hindi) (NR) 1:154:30-7:20
Judwaa 2 (NR) 1:25-4:357:45
Jai Lava Kusa (NR) 3:106:30-10:05
The Stray (PG) 1:45-4:20
Professor Marston & the
Wonder Women (R) 10:10
Mahanubhavudu (NR) 1:304:45-8:05
Raja The Great (NR) 12:303:35-6:45-9:55
Breathe (PG-13) 12:30-3:106:05-9:15
Mark Felt: The Man Who
Brought Down The White
House (PG-13) 1:10-3:506:20-9:20
Mersal (NR) 12:35-3:55-7:25
Secret Superstar (NR)
12:45-4:00-7:00-10:00
The Foreigner (R) 11:451:30-4:15-7:30-10:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
11:50-2:30-5:30-8:00-10:40
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:006:45-10:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13)
12:15-2:45-5:15-6:00-7:458:30-10:15-11:00
The Snowman (R) 1:304:30-7:30-10:15
The Foreigner (R) 12:002:45-5:45-8:30-11:15
American Assassin (R)
10:00
Only the Brave (PG-13)
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10 Professor Marston &
the Wonder Women (R)
4110 West Ox Road
8:15-11:00
American Made (R) 10:25 Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
Same Kind of Different as 1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Me (PG-13) 12:30-3:30Breathe (PG-13) 1:00-3:456:30-9:25
6:30-9:15
My Little Pony: The Movie Geostorm: An IMAX 3D
(PG) 12:00-2:35-5:15-7:50 Experience (PG-13) 1:45Blade Runner 2049 (R)
4:45-7:30-10:15
12:15-3:25-7:00-9:30
Regal Kingstowne
The Snowman (R) 12:05Stadium 16 & RPX
2:50-5:10-8:00-10:45
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
The Foreigner (R) 12:35The LEGO Ninjago Movie
3:50-6:45-10:35
(PG) 1:40-4:15
Only the Brave (PG-13)
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:3012:50-3:55-7:10-10:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 4:10-6:45-9:30
12:10-2:40-5:35-8:10-10:40 The Mountain Between Us
Marshall (PG-13) 1:30-4:30- (PG-13) 3:30-10:05
American Made (R)
7:40-10:30
6:40-9:20
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
Madea Halloween (PG-13) Kingsman: The Golden
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00 Circle (R) 12:30-6:55
The Fortress (nam-han-san- My Little Pony: The Movie
(PG) 12:00-3:10-4:05
seong) (NR) 12:40-4:00It (R) 6:00-9:15
7:20-10:30
Same Kind of Different as
Regal Fox
Me (PG-13) 12:25-4:25Stadium 16 & IMAX
6:35-10:30
22875 Brambleton Plaza
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 12:45- 12:45-6:30-9:05
3:15-5:30-7:45
The Foreigner (R) 1:25-4:45Geostorm (PG-13) 3:157:30-10:45
6:00-9:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13)
Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10 The LEGO Ninjago Movie
1:00-3:40-6:10-9:00
21100 Dulles Town Circle
(PG) 12:15-2:45-5:45
The Snowman (R) 1:15Geostorm (PG-13) 1:00-7:15 Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:30 4:00-7:00-9:45
The Mountain Between Us Only the Brave (PG-13)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
(PG-13) 10:20
1:10-4:30-7:45-10:15
(PG) 1:45-3:45
American Made (R) 12:15- Marshall (PG-13) 12:20Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
3:00-6:15-9:00
3:05-6:05-10:00
4:30-10:00
Golmaal Again (NR) 12:55The Mountain Between Us Kingsman: The Golden
Circle (R) 12:15-3:30-6:45- 3:15-7:10-9:35
(PG-13) 5:00-10:50
10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A
American Made (R)
My Little Pony: The Movie Madea Halloween (PG-13)
2:15-8:00
(PG) 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:45 12:15-2:45-5:15-7:50-10:20
Kingsman: The Golden
Same Kind of Different as Happy Death Day (PG-13)
Circle (R) 6:30-9:45
My Little Pony: The Movie Me (PG-13) 1:15-4:15-7:15- 12:40-1:45-3:00-4:40-5:307:15-8:15-9:40-10:45
10:15
(PG) 12:30-3:00
It (R) 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30 Geostorm (PG-13) 2:30-8:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:00Blade Runner 2049 (R)
12:00-3:30-7:00-9:30
5:20-10:35
It (R) 12:10-3:15-6:15-9:15 12:00-3:30-7:00-10:30
Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
11380 Bulloch Drive
It (R) 1:00-4:15-7:25-10:40
The Snowman (R) 11:452:35-5:25-8:15-11:05
The Foreigner (R) 12:55The LEGO Ninjago Movie
4:35-7:15-10:05
(PG) 12:45-4:45
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:15-7:30 Only the Brave (PG-13)
1:10-4:10-7:30-10:55
Geostorm 3D (PG-13)
American Assassin (R) 8:55
4:20-10:10
The Mountain Between Us Happy Death Day (PG-13)
12:30-3:05-5:40-8:10-10:50
(PG-13) 2:30-8:00
Same Kind of Different as Marshall (PG-13) 12:403:35-6:30-9:25
Me (PG-13) 12:15-3:00Mark Felt: The Man Who
6:15-9:10
Brought Down The White
American Made (R) 5:20House (PG-13) 11:35-2:2510:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:10- 5:0