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The Washington Post – October 21, 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Sunny 76/56 • Tomorrow: Partly sunny 76/58 B8
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
Video disproves remarks
on congresswoman, but
White House stands firm
SOLDIERS ACCUSED
OF SEXUAL OFFENSES
D AVID N AKAMURA
Even some assigned to
stop assaults are charged
The White House’s aggressive
effort to discredit a congresswoman from Florida who criticized President Trump over a military condolence call ran into a
new set of problems Friday when
a video emerged showing that the
chief of staff had made false
claims about her.
It marked the fifth day of a
controversy that has raged since
Trump attempted to deflect criticism of his handling of the deaths
of four service members in an
ambush in Niger. The ensuing
debate has focused on attacks
against Rep. Frederica S. Wilson
(D) that have proved to be inaccurate but that the White House has
refused to back away from, with
the latest episode ensnaring Chief
of Staff John F. Kelly, a decorated
retired Marine general.
The escalating political mud
fight has overshadowed the grief
of Myeshia Johnson and the heroism of her dead husband, Sgt. La
David Johnson, who gave his life
for his country.
Trump aides Friday stood by
Kelly’s contention that Wilson
had boasted about her role in
winning funding for a federal
building, even after video of her
remarks emerged and showed
that he was wrong.
In a rare appearance before
reporters a day earlier to defend
Trump’s calls to grieving military
families, Kelly suggested that
Wilson was like “empty barrels
making the most noise” while
recalling her appearance at a 2015
event that he attended to christen
a new FBI complex in Miami.
Wilson has come under heavy
criticism from Trump and his
BY
PHOTOS BY MASON TRINCA FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Wildfires harsh the buzz about pot
BY
K ATIE Z EZIMA
The deadly wildfires that ravaged communities and wineries
in Northern California also severely damaged numerous marijuana farms, just before the state
is expected to fully legalize the
drug, in a disaster that could have
far-reaching implications for a
nascent industry.
At least 34 marijuana farms
suffered extensive damage as the
wildfires tore across wine country
and some of California’s prime
marijuana-growing areas. The
fires could present challenges to
the scheduled Jan. 1 rollout of
legal marijuana sales at the start
of an industry that is expected to
generate billions of dollars in rev-
With a scheduled rollout of legal marijuana
sales approaching, California faces challenges
BY
H EATHER L ONG
President Trump is threatening
to upend decades of consistency at
the Federal Reserve as he prepares
to pick its next leader, narrowing a
list of final candidates to include
people who could take the powerful central bank in a radically different direction.
Trump is considering two fierce
critics of current Fed Chair Janet
L. Yellen for the role — Stanford
University professor John Taylor
and former Fed governor and Republican economic official Kevin
Warsh — both of whom have spent
years attacking the Fed’s approach
to keeping interest rates low in the
hope of stimulating the economy.
If selected, either could move to
raise interest rates faster, which
could rattle markets.
Some Republican lawmakers,
particularly in the House, are lobbying the White House to appoint
Taylor, a longtime hero in GOP
circles, according to three people
familiar with calls and discussions
who were not authorized to speak
FED CONTINUED ON A12
enue.
In many cases, owners have
spent tens of thousands of dollars
to become compliant with state
law to sell the product. But because the federal government
considers marijuana cultivation
and sales a criminal enterprise, it
remains extremely difficult, if not
impossible, for most of the marijuana businesses affected by the
fire to access insurance, mortgages and loans to rebuild. Even a
charitable fund set up to help
marijuana farmers was frozen because a payment processor will
not handle cannabis transactions.
Cannabis businesses also are
not eligible for any type of federal
disaster relief, according to a
MARIJUANA CONTINUED ON A5
TOP: Amy Goodwin removes yellow leaves and checks for damage to the marijuana crop of SPARC, a large medical pot dispensary,
in Glen Ellen, Calif. The plants require a high level of maintenance, and the wildfire stopped SPARC employees from working.
ABOVE: Thousands of glass dispensary containers are left scattered. California is expected to start legal sales Jan. 1.
ASSAULTS CONTINUED ON A5
THOMAS BOSWELL | PERSPECTIVE
Replacing Baker? Not so easy, Nats.
A
fter letting Dusty Baker’s
contract expire Friday, the
Washington Nationals have
a tough job on their hands. Better
big league managers are hard to
find.
Good luck, Nats. You will need
it. You don’t miss your sanity till
the crazy arrives.
Nats General Manager Mike
Rizzo explained Friday, sort of,
why Baker won’t be back — even
though he described Baker as “a
Hall of Fame-type manager” and
someone who represented the
club “with class and dignity at all
times.”
“Regular season wins and division titles,” Rizzo said, “are not
enough. . . . With success comes
expectations. . . . Our goal is a parade down Pennsylvania Avenue.”
I asked Rizzo on his conference
call: If any of a dozen plays or umpires calls or replay decisions had
come out differently last week in
Game 5 against the Cubs and the
Nats had advanced to the National League Championship Series,
would Baker be back as manager?
“I’m sorry. I didn’t quite hear
that question,” Rizzo said. I don’t
doubt him. But it does show how
slender the threads are on which
Late-night legend David
Letterman is developing a
Netflix show and will soon
receive the Mark Twain Prize
for American Humor, but his
focus is on his main gig:
being a dad. Arts & Style
N. Korean test site shows signs
of ‘tired mountain syndrome’
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — Have North Korea’s
nuclear tests become so big that
they have altered the geological
structure of the land? Some analysts now see signs that Mount
Mantap, the 7,200-foot-high peak
under which North Korea detonates its nuclear bombs, is suffering from “tired mountain syndrome.”
The mountain visibly shifted
during the last nuclear test, an
enormous detonation that was recorded as a 6.3-magnitude earthquake in North Korea’s northeast.
Since then, the area, which is not
known for natural seismic activity, has had three more quakes.
“What we are seeing from
North Korea looks like some kind
of stress in the ground,” said Paul
G. Richards, a seismologist at
Columbia University’s LamontDoherty Earth Observatory. “In
that part of the world, there were
stresses in the ground, but the
explosions have shaken them up.”
Chinese scientists already have
warned that further nuclear tests
could cause the mountain to collapse and release the radiation
N. KOREA CONTINUED ON A9
Where the nuclear tests have been conducted
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Since 2006, North Korea has carried out six nuclear tests at the
Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Facility in the northeastern part of the country.
Seismic sensors were able to determine the magnitude of the explosions.
Dusty Baker will not return as Nationals manager even though the
team won 97 games and the National League East this past season.
careers and franchise directions
hang.
I have covered quite a few managers better than Baker at ingame decisions, lineup construction and deciding when to bench
a slumping star in the middle of a
playoff series. However, they are
all in the Hall of Fame.
Perhaps the Nats will find such
a manager for next season, when
they will be stacked with talent,
even before they add any offseason pieces through trades, free
agent signings or internal promotions. Just getting back Adam
Eaton to replace the (presumably)
BOSWELL CONTINUED ON A12
Feb. 2013
May 2009
M5.1
M4.7
Jan. 2016
M5.1
Sept 3. 2017
Oct. 2006
M6.3
M4.3
Sept. 2016
RUSSIA
M5.3
Nuclear
N. KOREA test site
S. KOREA
P u n g g y e - r i N u c l e a r Te s t Fa c i l i t y
Sources: USGS, Google Earth
Entrance
NORTH
Note: Scale varies
in this view
THE WASHINGTON POST
Inside
IN sunday’s post
The four quadrants of D.C.
Photographers provide a
narrative of everyday life in a
city that is shifting under our
feet. Magazine
$176
JESSE DITTMAR FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
C RAIG W HITLOCK
The Army is grappling with a
resurgence of cases in which
troops responsible for preventing
sexual assault have been accused
of rape and related crimes, undercutting the Pentagon’s claims that
it is making progress against sexual violence in the ranks.
In the most recent case, an
Army prosecutor in charge of sexual assault investigations in the
Southwest was charged by the military last month with putting a
knife to the throat of a lawyer he
had been dating and raping her on
two occasions, according to documents obtained by The Washington Post.
Additionally, a sergeant at Fort
Sill, Okla., who was certified as a
sexual assault prevention officer
was convicted at a court-martial in
May of five counts of raping a
preteen girl.
Army officials confirmed to The
Post that eight other soldiers and
civilians trained to deter sex offenses or help victims have been
investigated over the past year in
connection with sexual assault.
The Army would not provide details, saying that many of the investigations are pending.
Other branches of the armed
forces have faced their own embarrassments. The deputy director of the Air Force’s office of sexual assault prevention at the Pentagon resigned last year after the
Air Force inspector general rebuked him for making sexually
inappropriate comments and cre-
KELLY CONTINUED ON A4
A new Fed chair
could upend
more than just
the central bank
. $2
Army
can’t
shake
scandal
Kelly made
false claim
in dispute
over call
BY
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
THE NATION
An ACA complication
Americans with Obamacare could be locked into health-care plans they do
not want because of the Trump administration’s enrollment timeline. A5
BUSINESS NEWS..............................................A11
COMICS ............................................................. C6
OPINION PAGES...............................................A13
LOTTERIES.........................................................B4
OBITUARIES ...................................................... B6
TELEVISION.......................................................C3
WORLD NEWS....................................................A6
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 320
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B4
9 4 7 5
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. SATURDAY,
Senators demand information on drug law limiting the DEA
BY L ENNY B ERNSTEIN
AND S COTT H IGHAM
More than 30 U.S. senators
demanded information Friday on
the 2016 law that stripped the
Drug Enforcement Administration of its most potent weapon
against companies suspected of
spilling hundreds of millions of
addictive painkillers onto the
black market.
Thirty-one Democrats and two
independents noted that the
same law required the DEA and
the Department of Health and
Human Services to compile a
report for Congress on the law’s
impact by April 16. Six months
later, no report has been submitted.
They demanded an immediate
update, saying they “want to ensure the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and other related agencies have all of the tools
necessary to fight this epidemic.”
In a joint investigation, The
Washington Post and “60 Minutes” reported Sunday that a
I N CA S E Y OU M I S S ED I T
Some reports that you may have missed. Read more at washingtonpost.com.
Bergdahl pleads
guilty to desertion
Gun-control group has
new name: Giffords
Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who
vanished in Afghanistan in 2009
and spent five years in brutal
captivity before the United States
recovered him in a controversial
prisoner swap, pleaded guilty to
two crimes in connection with
his disappearance. Bergdahl, now
31, entered guilty pleas to charges
of desertion and misbehavior
before the enemy.
One of the country’s leading
gun-control groups changed its
name Tuesday from Americans
for Responsible Solutions to
simply Giffords, the name of
Gabrielle Giffords, the former
congresswoman who was shot in
2011 and founded the group two
years later after 20 first-graders
were killed in Connecticut.
washingtonpost.com/national
small number of members of Congress, allied with parts of the drug
industry, had pushed through a
law that undermined DEA efforts
against wholesale drug distributors that have allowed pain pills
to get into the hands of users and
dealers.
In the House, that effort was
led by Rep. Tom Marino (R-Pa.),
who overcame years of opposition from the DEA to win passage
of a version of the law that would
have hamstrung the agency even
more severely. The legislation
was slightly altered during negotiations with Sen. Orrin G. Hatch
(R-Utah) before it cleared the
Senate and was signed last year
by President Barack Obama.
Marino was President Trump’s
nominee to become the nation’s
drug czar. He withdrew his name
Tuesday in the wake of the re-
ports. In a statement on his website, he blasted the reports and
accused a former DEA official,
Joseph T. Rannazzisi, of trying to
deflect blame for a failure to stem
the U.S. opioid crisis. For 10 years,
Rannazzisi led the DEA’s crackdown on wholesale opioid distributors.
Hatch said on the floor of the
Senate and wrote in an op-ed in
The Post that he worked with the
DEA and the Justice Department
to craft the final language. Either
department or any senator could
have stopped the bill, he said. But
The Post and “60 Minutes” reported that DEA officials accepted the language only after concluding it was the best deal they
could get.
In Friday’s letter, the senators
wrote that “as members of Congress from states severely affect-
ed by the nation’s addiction epidemic, we are concerned by these
recent news reports and the issues they raise, and we write to
request that you immediately
provide Congress with an update
on the law’s impact on the war
against addiction.” The letter was
addressed to acting HHS secretary Eric Hargan and acting DEA
administrator Robert Patterson.
The effort was led by Sens.
Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.) and Edward
J. Markey (D-Mass.), who represent three states where the opioid
epidemic is severe. About
200,000 people have died of overdoses of prescription opioids
since 2000, and tens of thousands
more have succumbed to heroin
and fentanyl.
Sen. Charles E. Grassley
(R-Iowa) has promised an over-
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
sight hearing soon on the law,
titled the Ensuring Patient Access
and Effective Drug Enforcement
Act of 2016. Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein also promised a review of whether the law
hurts DEA enforcement efforts.
Numerous lawmakers, most of
them Democrats, have called for
repeal or amendment of the law.
The DEA’s chief administrative
law judge, John J. Mulrooney II,
wrote in an upcoming law review
article that because of the law it is
now “all but logically impossible”
for the DEA to suspend a drug
company’s operations if it fails to
report suspicious orders of narcotics. In the draft article for the
Marquette Law Review, Mulrooney wrote that “at a time
when, by all accounts, opioid
abuse, addiction, and deaths were
increasing markedly,” the new
law “imposed a dramatic diminution of the Agency’s authority.”
leonard.bernstein@washpost.com
scott.higham@washpost.com
Appeals court delays undocumented teen’s abortion
Panel tells government
to find a sponsor for
pregnant immigrant
washingtonpost.com/national
Soros puts $18 billion
into his foundations
Kaepernick files claim
alleging collusion
Billionaire financier George
Soros, known for donating to
liberal causes, now commands
one of the most powerful
philanthropies in the country
after having moved $18 billion of
his personal wealth into his Open
Society Foundations.
Quarterback Colin
Kaepernick, who remains
unemployed after a 2016 season
in which he began the movement
of players protesting during the
national anthem, has filed a
grievance that accuses NFL
teams of colluding to keep him
out of the league.
washingtonpost.com/business
washingtonpost.com/sports
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CO R R ECTI O N
An Oct. 18 Style article and
chart about a Washington PostABC News poll on attitudes
about sexual harassment
misstated the dates the poll was
conducted. It was conducted
Oct. 11-15, not Oct. 12-15 or
Oct. 12-16.
The Washington Post is committed to
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newspaper. Those interested in
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part-time dinner party.
BY M ARIA S ACCHETTI
AND A NN E . M ARIMOW
A D.C. appeals court panel has
declined to order the federal government to immediately allow an
abortion for an undocumented
teenager it is detaining, instead
giving the Department of Health
and Human Services 11 days to
find a sponsor to take custody of
the girl.
The court’s 2-1 decision allows
the Trump administration to
maintain its policy of not facilitating abortions for the undocumented minors in its custody. It
also further delays the 17-yearold’s quest to end her pregnancy,
and increases the risk that she will
run out of time to have the procedure.
The teenager, identified in
court papers as Jane Doe, is
15 weeks pregnant. Texas bars
most abortions after 20 weeks.
Lawyers for the teenager said
in court Friday morning that it
would be difficult to find a government-approved sponsor to take
custody of their client, a Central
American immigrant being held
in a special detention facility in
Texas for minors caught entering
the United States illegally.
If the government does not find
a sponsor, such as an adult relative in the United States who can
care for the girl, the case would
revert to a lower court judge who
ruled Wednesday that the government should facilitate an abortion for the teenager “without
delay.”
The government’s appeal of
that ruling led to Friday’s decision. Any subsequent order by the
lower court judge would also be
subject to appeal.
“She’s already suffered weeks of
delays, which the government has
no business doing.” said Jennifer
Dalven, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union, which
represents the girl.
The teen has been seeking an
abortion since late September,
shortly after she was apprehended and learned she was pregnant.
The appellate ruling by judges
Karen LeCraft Henderson and
Brett M. Kavanaugh, both nominated by Republican presidents,
allows the judges to avoid issuing
a hasty decision in a case that
involves complex areas of immigration and abortion law.
Judge Patricia A. Millett issued
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
People protest outside the Department of Health and Human Services about the Trump
administration’s policy to keep detained undocumented immigrant minors from accessing abortions.
a sharply worded dissent to the
decision, calling the majority’s
ruling “wrong” and “unconstitutional.”
“There are no winners in cases
like these. But there sure are losers,” Millett wrote. “Forcing her to
continue an unwanted pregnancy
just in the hopes of finding a
sponsor that has not been found
in the past six weeks sacrifices
J.D.’s constitutional liberty, auton-
policy of “refusing to facilitate”
abortions for undocumented minors, a departure from the Obama
administration, which allowed
them.
The Department of Health and
Human Services, which oversees
undocumented minors taken into
custody near the border, is trying
to “promote child birth and fetal
life,” according to court filings in
the case.
“She’s already suffered weeks of delays, which the
government has no business doing.”
Jennifer Dalven, an ACLU attorney
omy, and personal dignity for no
justifiable governmental reason.”
The panel’s decision noted that
government lawyers acknowledged that the girl, who is in the
United States illegally, “possesses
a constitutional right to obtain an
abortion in the United States.”
ACLU attorney Brigitte Amiri
urged the court not to set aside its
obligation to protect the teen’s
constitutional right just because
she may eventually obtain a sponsor, and said the government is
not acting in the teen’s best interest.
“They are supplanting her decision about what she should do
with her pregnancy,” Amiri said.
The government says it has a
22nd Annual
Ar t &
Craf
t
Festival
After the ruling, the agency’s
Administration for Children and
Families said in a statement: “For
however much time we are given,
the Office of Refugee Resettlement and HHS will protect the
well being of this minor and all
children and their babies in our
facilities, and we will defend human dignity for all in our care.”
Officials have said the 17-yearold could voluntarily return to her
home country and seek an abortion or find a sponsor in the United States.
However, during oral arguments on Friday, the government
acknowledged for the first time
that abortion is illegal in the girl’s
homeland.
Her native country has not
been released by the court to protect her privacy.
“We’re not putting an obstacle
in her path,” Catherine H. Dorsey,
the government lawyer representing HHS in the case, told the
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judges Friday. “We’re declining to
facilitate an abortion.”
Dorsey told the appeals court
that the government had over the
past month identified two potential sponsors — both relatives —
but they had fallen through. The
government performs background checks on potential sponsors, a process that could take
weeks or months.
During oral arguments, the
judges questioned the government's stance, noting that undocumented immigrants in other
types of federal custody — including adults in immigration detention and federal prisons — may
seek elective abortions at their
own expense.
“Even if she has that right, we
don’t have to facilitate it,” Dorsey
said.
Millett also pointed out that
forcing the teenager to return
home might clash with her legal
right to seek asylum in the United
States. The teen has said that her
parents abused her in her native
country.
About 40 people gathered Friday morning in front of the Department of Health and Human
Services to demand “justice for
Jane.”
“The constitutional right to
abortion does not depend on your
immigration
status,”
said
Georgeanne Usova, legislative
counsel for the ACLU.
Usova said the group wasn’t
just fighting for “this young woman, but every woman in government custody.”
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.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
politics & the nation
Thousands of immigrants could lose protected status
BY
N ICK M IROFF
A form of legal immigration
status will expire soon for
300,000 Haitians and Central
Americans residing legally in the
United States, some for nearly
two decades, but the Trump administration has given little indication it plans to renew the benefit.
The immigrants have been allowed to live and work in the
United States under a program
called Temporary Protected Status (TPS) that shields some migrants from deportation if their
nations are stricken by natural
disasters, civil wars or other calamities.
Permission to stay must be periodically renewed by the Department of Homeland Security, and
in the coming weeks, the agency
will decide the fate of about
195,000 Salvadorans, 57,000 Hondurans, 50,000 Haitians and
2,550 Nicaraguans. Once the protections lapse, those immigrants
would be subject to deportation.
Their predicament is not as
well known as the “Dreamers”
who have been allowed to stay
under the Deferred Action for
Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the
program that Trump is canceling.
But an end to TPS protections
could have wide-ranging conse-
quences, especially in cities such
as Los Angeles, Miami, Houston
and Washington, where many of
the beneficiaries and their
U.S.-born children reside.
Democratic lawmakers and advocacy groups are urging the administration to extend the TPS
protections, warning that the humanitarian and economic costs of
expelling so many long-term U.S.
residents would be steep.
Moreover, they say, the countries remain crippled by violence,
disease and poverty, and the
abrupt loss of the cash remittance
payments the immigrants send
from the United States would deal
a heavy blow to those nations’
feeble economies.
DHS officials say the agency’s
acting secretary, Elaine Duke, has
yet to make a decision and continues to consult with the Department of State, which must provide DHS with specific countryby-country information about
whether conditions in those nations have ameliorated.
But administration officials say
the TPS program was never intended to be a way for migrants to
remain indefinitely in the United
States, and they view it as part of a
broader culture of lax immigration enforcement they want to
remedy.
“We are looking at the fact that
temporary protected status
means temporary, and it has not
been temporary for many years,
and we, the U.S. government, have
created a situation where people
have lived in this country a long
time,” DHS spokesman David
Lapan told reporters this week.
“Every time, we give an extension, and then give an extension,
and soon we have people living
here 20-plus years under what
was supposed to be a temporary
program,” Lapan said. “When do
you stop that?”
DHS has until Nov. 6 to announce its plans for the roughly
60,000 Hondurans and Nicaraguans whose benefits will expire
Jan. 5. They were allowed to stay
after Hurricane Mitch killed
10,000 across Central America in
1998, so many have been in the
United States for at least two
decades.
Haitians received a similar reprieve after the 2010 earthquake
that left at least 200,000 dead.
But the roughly 50,000 Haitians
who have TPS protections could
be forced to return if DHS does
not grant an extension in the
coming weeks. The deadline for
that announcement is Nov. 23,
Thanksgiving Day.
In May then-DHS Secretary
John Kelly renewed TPS protections for those Haitians for six
months, far less than the 18month waivers granted by the
Obama administration. In a statement at the time, Kelly called it a
“limited” extension whose purpose was to “allow Haitian TPS
recipients living in the United
States time to attain travel documents and make other necessary
arrangements for their ultimate
departure from the United
States,” and “to provide the Haitian government with the time it
needs to prepare for the future
repatriation of all current TPS
recipients.”
Immigration policy analysts
say DHS could make a similar
six-month, start-packing-yourbags extension for Central Americans, including the nearly
200,000 Salvadorans whose protections expire in March.
Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, which seeks to reduce immigration to the United
States, said the Trump administration’s big test will be what DHS
decides to do with the Haitians,
given Kelly’s characterization of
the previous extension as a “limited” one.
“That will determine whether
it’s more than rhetoric,” Krikorian
said. “That’s when we’ll get a
sense of how committed the
White House is to making sure the
‘temporary’ in Temporary Protected Status is really temporary.”
DHS officials would not say
what instruction, if any, they have
received from the White House,
where officials referred questions
to DHS.
Honduras and El Salvador have
some of the highest homicide
rates in the world, and tens of
thousands of their citizens continue to attempt to come to the
United States illegally each year.
Haiti, the Western Hemisphere’s poorest country, still suffers from cholera introduced by
United Nations troops who were
sent after the earthquake, in addition to food shortages and other
damage from recent hurricanes.
But administration officials say
the return of tens of thousands of
migrants to Haiti and Central
America would benefit those nations, because their citizens will
return with skills, values and investment capital acquired during
their lives in the United States.
This week 20 Democratic senators, led by Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin (Md.) and Sen. Tim Kaine
(Va.) sent a letter to Duke and
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson
urging an extension of the TPS
deadlines. There are about
30,000 TPS beneficiaries living in
the Washington area with their
families, according to immigrant
advocates.
“These individuals are the
most thoroughly vetted people in
the country,” said Tom Jawetz, an
immigration policy analyst at the
left-leaning Center for American
Progress.
He said TPS beneficiaries are
the parents of 190,000 U.S.-citizen children, and the anxiety of
not knowing what will happen to
their parents is inflicting “devastating emotional, social and educational harm.”
But like the DACA debate, the
TPS decision has become a proxy
for a broader argument about
immigration and the enforcement of U.S. laws. The Trump
administration has been signaling it wants to break with its
predecessors and appears to want
to make a statement, said Doris
Meissner, the top immigration official under the Clinton administration,
“The deeper point is they don’t
want people here from other
countries for humanitarian reasons,” said Meissner, now a senior
fellow at the Migration Policy Institute in Washington. “They
don’t see these various elements
of immigration policy as particularly positive for the U.S., or as a
broader expression of our values
and image in the world.”
Man is sentenced in
firebombings: A New York City
Police find weapons during
child-porn raid: Sheriff’s
man who told authorities that he
disliked Muslims, Arabs and
Hindus has been sentenced to 20
years in prison for several
firebombings that damaged two
houses of worship. Queens
District Attorney Richard A.
Brown announced the sentence
Friday. Suraj Poonai Ray Lazier
Lengend pleaded guilty last
month to attempted arson as a
hate crime. Nobody was hurt
during the rampage on New
Year’s Day 2012. A mosque, a
Hindu temple, homes and a deli
were damaged.
deputies conducting a child-porn
raid Wednesday found an arsenal
of guns and explosives, along
with a note promising “bloody
revenge.” Investigators found the
weapons, including an AK-47
assault rifle, a baseball bat with
nails jutting out and 2,300
rounds of ammunition, in the
Dunedin, Fla., home where
Randall Drake, 24, lived with his
parents. Drake was arrested.
Investigators also found aerial
images of two schools and a
water treatment plant in Tampa.
nick.miroff@washpost.com
DIGEST
IMMIGRATION
Justice files notice to
appeal entry ban block
The Justice Department on
Friday filed its formal notice of
appeal to a federal judge’s
decision to block the Trump
administration from enforcing
its latest entry ban.
Department lawyers filed the
notice in federal district court in
Maryland, writing that they
intended to appeal the case to the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th
Circuit. The notice is the first
step in taking the case to a higher
court. The government has yet to
file its arguments.
Two federal judges, one in
Maryland and the other in
Hawaii, have blocked the
administration from enforcing
President Trump’s latest entry
ban, his third attempt at barring
entry to people from certain
countries.
The measure, if allowed to go
into effect, would have banned
various immigrants and travelers
from Syria, Libya, Iran, Yemen,
Chad, Somalia, North Korea and
Venezuela. Now the
MICHAEL DWYER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Members of the Concord Independent Battery, foreground,
prepare to answer the 21-gun salute from the USS Constitution off
Castle Island in Boston on Friday. The newly refurbished ship,
nicknamed Old Ironsides, took its first spin since October 2014 to
celebrate the U.S. Navy’s 242nd birthday and the 220th anniversary of
the iconic vessel’s maiden voyage.
administration can apply the ban
only to North Korea and
Venezuela — which makes it of
little consequence. Very few
people travel to the United States
from North Korea each year, and
the directive bars only certain
government officials from
Venezuela.
The Justice Department has
not yet filed a notice of appeal in
the Hawaii case.
— Matt Zapotosky
ARIZONA
Arpaio’s guilty verdict
will stay, judge rules
not erase the facts of the case.
Arpaio’s attorney immediately
filed a notice of appeal with the
U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th
Circuit.
Arpaio’s conviction stems
from his failure to comply with a
2011 court order halting the
detention of individuals on the
basis of their suspected
immigration status. Arpaio, who
was voted out of office last fall
after a 24-year run, was a vocal
backer of Trump’s presidential
campaign.
Trump issued the pardon
before Arpaio’s sentencing.
— Kyle Swenson
— From news services
A federal judge on Thursday
shot down former sheriff Joe
Arpaio’s bid to sweep his
criminal record clean.
Arpaio, the controversial
former lawman in Arizona’s
Maricopa County, was granted a
pardon by President Trump on
Aug. 25. Arpaio had been found
guilty of criminal contempt of a
federal court order after a fiveday bench trial earlier this year
and faced the possibility of six
months in jail. After the pardon,
Arpaio, 85, petitioned the court
to clear his record and prevent
the ruling from being used in
future litigation.
In her ruling, U.S. District
Judge Susan R. Bolton said the
pardon only freed Arpaio from
possible punishment. In a fourpage order offering a check on
the president’s executive power,
Bolton wrote that a pardon could
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
Some in Houston wary of helping Puerto Rico
BY
J ENNA J OHNSON
houston — Sitting on Mary
Maddox’s back porch, which
flooded with 22 inches of water
when Hurricane Harvey hit nearly two months ago, is a Lady of
the Night plant from Puerto Rico
that a friend gave her. Ever since
Hurricane Maria ravaged the
island, she says, she has paused
at the blooming plant when she
passes it, rubbing a leaf and
saying a prayer for those still
without water or electricity.
Often, the prayer is accompanied by frustration with President Trump, for whom she voted
and who visited this neighborhood after Harvey.
“He really made me mad,”
said Maddox, 70, who accused
Trump of trying to pit those on
the mainland against Puerto
Ricans, even though they’re all
Americans.
“I don’t know,” said her husband, Fred Maddox, 75. “I think
he’s trying.”
He continued: “It’s a problem,
but they need to handle it. It
shouldn’t be up to us, really. I
don’t think so. They’re sitting
back, they’re taking the money,
they’re taking a little under the
table. He’s trying to wake them
up: Do your job. Be responsible.”
The divide in the Maddox
household is one playing out
across the country, as those who
voted for the president debate
how much support the federal
government should give Puerto
Rico, a U.S. territory without a
voting member of Congress that
is not allowed to vote in presidential elections.
Some supporters of the president, like Fred Maddox, agree
with Trump that Puerto Rico’s
infrastructure was frail before
the storm; that the crisis was
worsened by a lack of leadership
there; and that the federal government should limit its involvement in the rebuilding effort, which will likely cost billions of dollars. But others, like
Mary Maddox, are appalled by
how the president talks about
Puerto Rico and say the United
States has a moral obligation to
take care of its citizens.
A survey released last week by
the Kaiser Family Foundation
found that a majority of Americans believe that the federal
government has been too slow
to respond in Puerto Rico and
that the island still isn’t getting
the help it needs. But the results
largely broke along party lines:
While nearly three-quarters of
Democrats said the federal gov-
ernment isn’t doing enough,
almost three-quarters of Republicans said it is.
It has been two months since
Hurricane Harvey hit Texas and
Gulf Coast states, and more than
a month since Hurricane Maria
slammed into Puerto Rico.
On Oct. 3 — two weeks after
the storm — Trump toured a
neighborhood outside San Juan,
Puerto Rico, and has repeatedly
proclaimed, against much evidence, that his administration
had a “tremendous” response to
Maria. He gave his administration a “10” during a White House
appearance with Puerto Rico’s
governor this week. “I think we
did a fantastic job, and we’re
being given credit,” he said.
In fact, conditions remain
dire throughout much of the
island. Nearly 80 percent of
Puerto Ricans still lack electricity, and 30 percent do not have
access to clean drinking water.
Here in the Maddoxes’ neighborhood of Sageglen, by contrast, life is slowly returning to
normal. On Sept. 2, just after the
storm, Trump briefly toured
Sageglen — a middle-class enclave on the southern edge of
Houston — and announced in a
cul-de-sac piled with Sheetrock
debris and trash bags: “These
are people that have done a
fantastic job holding it together.”
There’s still a near-constant
sound of construction in the
neighborhood, which is filled
with ranch-style and modest
two-story homes. But there are
no longer mountains of debris
on the curbs, thanks to the local
municipal utility district, which
shared the cost of removal with
the Federal Emergency Management Agency. There are brandnew cars sitting in several driveways, thanks to car-insurance
companies quickly totaling
flooded vehicles and local dealers offering flood deals.
Those in the neighborhood
without flood insurance were
able to apply for and receive
assistance from FEMA — including the Maddoxes, who recently
had $14,000 in federal money
land in their checking account.
In the nearly two decades that
the Maddoxes have lived in their
ranch house on Sagelink Circle,
they had seen no need for flood
insurance. And, after recently
helping one of their daughters
pay legal fees for a divorce, the
couple’s savings isn’t what it
once was.
“I’m very appreciative to
FEMA. I really, really am,” said
path of hurricanes and into communities with more-reliable infrastructure.
“I object. I object. They should
stay where they are and fix their
own country up,” Hogg responded softly, shaking his head,
wrongly referring to the U.S.
territory as a separate nation.
MICHAEL STRAVATO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
David and Patsy Hogg of Houston, whose home was flooded by
Hurricane Harvey and who were visited by President Trump.
Mary Maddox, who has been
married for more than 50 years
and raised five children. “I was
just so excited when I saw that
they loved us.”
‘They don’t live deprived’
On a recent afternoon on
nearby Sagelink Court, David
Hogg stopped by the driveway of
his neighbor Donna Ramirez,
showing her the latest handful
of screws he had collected from
the cul-de-sac.
Hogg and his wife, Patsy
Hogg, have had flood insurance
for decades after watching water come dangerously close to
flooding the first floor of their
two-story home soon after they
moved to the neighborhood in
the late 1970s. They now pay
about $450 per year.
Ramirez and her husband
also said they thought that they
had flood insurance on their
home, which they bought a year
ago, only to learn weeks after
the storm that they did not.
To Ramirez, the role of the
government is to broadly coordinate relief efforts and ensure
that insurance companies are
fulfilling their obligations to
policyholders, but that people
should take personal responsibility for their property or look
to churches or charities for
assistance.
“Do other people think that
other people should pay for me
to fix my house? Because it’s not
their fault that I flooded,” said
Ramirez, taking a break from
sorting through soggy research
documents in her garage.
Ramirez, who describes herself as a “throw-the-dice-type
voter,” said she reluctantly voted
for Trump in November — although her support deepened
after meeting Trump in her
cul-de-sac about a month ago.
“In person, he’s totally different than on TV, and he gave us
just such a feeling of confidence,
like we weren’t forgotten about,”
said Ramirez, who has one
grown daughter. “He talked directly at a lot of people in the
crowd, and his word for me was:
‘Don’t lose hope, you’re going to
be all right.’ ”
Ramirez worries that when
the government makes money
easily available after a natural
disaster, there’s an opportunity
for corruption and a chance that
some people will take more than
they need. And she thinks that
media coverage of the crisis in
Puerto Rico has lacked context,
especially in reporting that
nearly all of the island is still
without electricity.
“Guess what? There’s a big
chunk of the population that
lives without electricity all the
time,” Ramirez said, saying she
was sharing the experiences of a
friend who has family on the
island.
Hogg, 76, nodded his head in
agreement: “They never had it.
Never had it.”
“They don’t live deprived, because it’s a beautiful environment,” she continued. “The
weather is nice, the climate is
good most of the time, so it’s
different from here. . . . It works
there because of the climate. It
wouldn’t work here.”
About 96 percent of Puerto
Rico’s electricity customers had
service before Maria made landfall, according to federal data;
many of the rest had no power
because of Hurricane Irma two
weeks earlier.
Ramirez said the government
should encourage those living in
the hardest-hit areas to move to
the mainland, out of the direct
‘No mercy’
Later in the day, as Hogg and
his wife sat in their garage
workshop, they again debated
where the government’s role
starts and ends. Patsy Hogg said
she’s trying to figure out where,
exactly, she stands. She’s worried
about the ever-growing national
debt, but she can’t stand to see
people suffer.
Both are longtime Republicans, although lately they consider themselves first and foremost “Trumpsters.” Patsy Hogg
described meeting the president
and his wife, who gave her a hug,
as a blessing from God.
“We love Trump,” she said. “We
voted for him. We pray for him
every day.”
The couple agrees that the
president needs to be more careful with what he says on Twitter,
especially when it comes to Puerto Rico.
But David Hogg, a retired
electrical engineer who once
worked at NASA, also said that
Puerto Ricans’ “lack of responsibility is not an emergency on my
part.” The same goes for Texans
without flood insurance, he said.
His wife frowned, stared at
him and asked: “So you have no
mercy?”
“Uh-uh. No mercy,” he said.
“They should do what I do:
Spend the money, get insurance.”
Patsy Hogg said one of their
friends at their Baptist church, a
retired single woman, didn’t
have flood insurance when her
two-story townhouse flooded
and that FEMA quickly provided
her with some money.
“I was glad that they did that.
That made me feel good,” Patsy
Hogg said. “She’s certainly not
destitute, but I’m just really glad
that they did that. If that’s my tax
dollars at work, I’m okay with
that.”
She then came to her husband’s defense: “And he’s not
really as hardhearted as he
sounds. He was very glad when
he learned that they had given
her money.”
jenna.johnson@washpost.com
Emily Guskin contributed to this
report.
White House stands by Kelly’s incorrect claims about lawmaker
KELLY FROM A1
supporters for publicly accusing
the president of being insensitive
in a phone call to Johnson two
weeks ago, after her husband died
in the line of duty.
But video of Wilson’s nine-
minute speech at the 2015 event,
posted by the Sun-Sentinel of Fort
Lauderdale, shows that she spoke
solely about her efforts to get the
building named after two fallen
FBI agents, praised the agents for
their service and thanked colleagues in Congress from both
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parties.
Instead of backing down,
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders piled on
Friday and said Kelly was justified in accusing the lawmaker of
grandstanding, despite erring on
the facts. “As we say in the South:
all hat, no cattle,” Sanders said of
Wilson, an African American who
is known for wearing brightly
colored cowboy hats.
Sanders also attempted to shift
the debate away from Kelly’s inaccuracies to instead focus on his
personal integrity.
“If you want to get into a debate
with a four-star Marine general, I
think that that’s something highly inappropriate,” she said.
In an interview with Fox Business Network taped Friday,
Trump accused Wilson of debasing Kelly by suggesting that the
chief of staff had defended the
president at Trump’s insistence,
in order to keep his job.
“When she made that statement, I thought it was sickening,
actually,” Trump said. He added
that Kelly is “doing an incredible
job” and said the general, who
had listened in on his call with
Johnson, was “offended” that Wilson would make it public.
“Actually, he said to me: ‘Sir,
this is not acceptable. This is
really not,’ ” the president said.
“Look, I’ve called many people.
And I would think that every one
of them appreciated it. I was very
surprised to see this, to be honest
with you.”
Critics said the episode reflects
Trump’s continued efforts to
avoid scrutiny of his conduct in
office by casting blame elsewhere.
The president waited 12 days to
comment on the soldiers’ deaths
before being asked about his silence at a Rose Garden news
conference Monday. In defending
himself, Trump erroneously accused former presidents of failing
to call military families whose
loved ones were killed in action.
Trump later defended his claim
by publicly disclosing that President Barack Obama had not
called Kelly after his son, Robert,
was killed in Afghanistan.
Trump reportedly did not inform Kelly, who has resisted ef-
forts to politicize his son’s death,
that he would make that information public. Kelly and his wife
attended a 2011 event at the White
House in honor of Gold Star families and were seated at first lady
Michelle Obama’s table.
“It made me sad,” said Amy
Siskind, a former Wall Street executive who runs a women’s empowerment group and compiles a
running public list of the erosion
of democratic norms in the
Trump era. Kelly is “a good man,”
Siskind said. “He takes a job [as
chief of staff ] to prevent World
War III, but then he lets Trump
use his son, unbeknown to him, to
make a political point about
Obama. And then he went out and
defended him.”
Siskind added that Kelly,
brought into the White House to
help rein in his boss’s worst impulses, had compromised himself
in trying to stick up for Trump.
“Kelly created a big asterisk
next to his name,” she said. “But
how many in the Trump regime
have done that?”
Wilson, a longtime family
friend who helped mentor La
David Johnson in a local program, said she listened to Trump’s
conversation via speakerphone
while in a car with Johnson’s
widow and aunt. The congresswoman told reporters late Tuesday that Trump had told Myeshia
Johnson her husband “must have
known what he signed up for.” She
later said that Trump did not refer
to La David Johnson by name and
that the conversation left the widow crying and shaken.
Trump lashed out on Twitter
the next morning, calling Wilson’s account “totally fabricated”
and stating that he had “proof.”
Trump’s subsequent revelation
that Obama had not called Kelly
after his son’s death led to Kelly’s
appearance in the briefing room
Thursday.
In the Fox interview, Trump
insisted that he did speak La
David Johnson’s name in his conversation with his widow.
At the White House, Sanders
accused reporters of fanning the
flames of a sensational story. “It
should have ended yesterday after General Kelly’s comments,”
she said. “But it didn’t. . . . It’s still
the bulk of the coverage on most
every TV you turn on and most
every newspaper that you open
up today.”
She did not mention that
Trump had tweeted again about
the issue late Thursday, nearly
eight hours after Kelly’s briefing
room appearance.
“The Fake News is going crazy
with wacky Congresswoman Wilson (D), who was SECRETLY on a
very personal call, and gave a total
lie on content!” Trump wrote.
In his defense of Trump on
Thursday, Kelly accused Wilson
of “selfish behavior.” And he asserted that Wilson, at the 2015
FBI building dedication in Miami, had “talked about how she
was instrumental in getting the
funding for that building, and
how she took care of her constituents because she got the money,
and she just called up President
Obama, and on that phone call, he
gave the money, the $20 million.”
Wilson denied making such
remarks. The Sun-Sentinel video
shows that she recounted how
she went into “attack mode” to
ensure that Congress and Obama
expedited a bill to name the building after the two fallen FBI agents
in about four weeks.
When initially told that such
legislation could take as long as a
year, Wilson recalled, “I said, excuse my French, ‘Aw, hell no, we’re
going to get this done.’ ” She
spread credit, offering praise for
then-House Speaker John A.
Boehner (R-Ohio). She also
praised the two agents, Benjamin
Grogan and Jerry Dove, who were
killed in a shootout with bank
robbers in 1986 in Miami.
Peter Feaver, a Duke University
political science professor who
served as a special adviser at the
National Security Council in the
George W. Bush administration,
said Trump had erred by engaging in the political fight in the
first place.
“Every politically savvy person
would have said, ‘You can’t criticize Gold Star families and have
anything good come out — so just
don’t bother,’ ” Feaver said. “If
they criticize you, just take it.”
david.nakamura@washpost.com
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
Ex-energy
regulators
criticize
Perry plan
BY
S TEVEN M UFSON
Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s
bid to change regulations to
help coal and nuclear power
plants has run into unusually
blunt opposition from a group
of former regulators from both
parties.
Eight former members of the
Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission — including five
former chairmen — have filed a
letter with the commission opposing Perry’s proposal to give
coal and nuclear plants credit
for resilience so that they would
have a better chance of beating
solar, wind and natural gas
competitors.
The former commissioners
said that Perry was seeking to
reverse a quarter-century of
FERC reforms and that many of
the coal plants he aims to help
have no advantage when it
comes to reliability.
“His focus is clearly coal, and
there are a lot of dirty coal
plants that are not competitive
in today’s energy markets,” Elizabeth Moler, a former FERC
chairwoman, former deputy energy secretary and former Exelon executive, said in an interview. “To me he’s effectively
proposing to subsidize them
and put a tax on consumers in
doing so. It’s a tax in different
clothing. It’s going to cost customers more money to run dirty
old coal plants.”
Early this month, Perry proposed to FERC that credit be
given to power plants that have
90-day fuel supplies on site so
that they could operate during
an emergency, such as extreme
weather or a disaster.
FERC is an independent
agency, however, and some
members have indicated that
the commission will make its
own decision. Even one of President Trump’s nominees has
stressed FERC’s independence.
Robert F. Powelson, who was
confirmed in August, said in a
speech at the National Press
Club on Monday that “the moment we put our thumbs on the
scale is the moment we bastardize the process.”
The former commissioners’
letter to FERC said that Perry’s
proposal “would be a significant
step backward from the Commission’s long and bipartisan
evolution to transparent, open,
competitive wholesale markets”
and that it “would instead disrupt decades of substantial investment made in the modern
electric power system, raise
costs for customers, and do so
in a manner directly counter to
the Commission’s long experience.”
The group wrote that “subsidizing resources so they do not
retire would fundamentally distort markets. The subsidized
resources would inevitably
drive out the unsubsidized resources, and the subsidies
would inevitably raise prices to
customers.”
It said that “investor confidence would evaporate and
markets would tend to collapse.
This loss of faith in markets
would thereby undermine reliability.”
Pat Wood III, who was chairman of FERC under President
George W. Bush, said reliability
has more to do with transmission and distribution than with
the type of fuel used.
Wood serves as chairman of
the board of Dynegy, which has
about a dozen coal plants, and
as a director of SunPower. He
said that when Illinois recently
gave subsidies to nuclear plants
in the state, Dynegy had to shut
down some units.
“We’re getting shoved aside,”
he said. “Subsidizing one resource ends up shutting down
another one.”
The group’s letter acknowledged that there are federal tax
subsidies for every kind of fuel,
but it said that “one step the
Commission has never taken is
to create or authorize on its own
the kind of subsidy proposed
here.”
Sen. Ron Wyden (Ore.), the
ranking Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee, said
FERC should shelve the Perry
proposal.
“Arbitrarily propping up a
dying industry goes against
what the GOP has long claimed
is its goal — an all-of-the-above
energy strategy,” Wyden said in
a statement. “This rule clearly
picks winners and losers in
energy resources.”
steven.mufson@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/energy-environment
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
RE
Changes to ACA enrollment could lock millions into unwanted health plans
BY
A MY G OLDSTEIN
Millions of Americans with insurance through the Affordable
Care Act could find themselves
locked into health plans they do
not want for the coming year
because of the Trump administration’s schedule for the enrollment
season that starts in less than two
weeks.
The complication arises when
people who already have health
plans under the law are automatically re-enrolled in the same plan.
In the past, a few million consumers each year have been autoenrolled and then were sent government notices encouraging
them to check whether they could
find better or more affordable
coverage.
This time, according to a federal document obtained by The
Washington Post, the automatic
enrollment will take place after it
is too late to make any changes.
Auto-enrollment will occur immediately after the last day of the
ACA sign-up season, which the
Trump administration has shortened, leaving the vast majority of
such consumers stranded without
any way to switch to a plan they
might prefer.
That inability is particularly
problematic at the moment,
health policy specialists say, because political turmoil surrounding the sprawling health-care law
has contributed to spikes in 2018
insurance rates that might catch
customers by surprise, as well as
widespread public confusion
about this fifth year’s enrollment
season.
The administration’s unannounced decision about the nuances of auto-enrollment is part
of a pattern in which President
Trump’s antipathy for the ACA —
he erroneously terms its insurances exchanges “dead” — has
filtered into a series of actions and
inactions that could suppress the
number of Americans who receive
coverage through the marketplaces for 2018.
The sign-up period is to run
from Nov. 1 to Dec. 15 — half the
duration of the past three years.
Last month, federal health officials announced that they were
slashing by 90 percent the money
devoted to outreach and advertising aimed at uninsured Americans eligible for ACA coverage
and people already covered who
need to sign up again. At the same
time, funding for enrollment
helpers, known as navigators, has
been curtailed by about 40 percent.
Last week, Trump took two dramatic steps that are likely to weaken the ACA marketplaces further.
He ended billions of dollars in
reimbursements to marketplace
insurers for discounts the law requires them to provide to lowerincome customers for deductibles
and other out-of-pocket expenses.
And the president signed an executive order that, over time, is
likely to make it easier for individuals and small businesses to buy
relatively inexpensive health
plans that can circumvent consumer protections and medical
benefits required under the law.
How the renewal of current
customers in ACA marketplaces
will be handled is one of several
crucial questions about aspects of
the imminent enrollment period
that have remained murky as
Nov. 1 approaches.
According to the document,
“Consumer Timelines,” from the
Health and Human Services Department’s Centers for Medicare
and Medicaid Services, the agency
overseeing ACA marketplaces,
the automatic re-enrollment will
take place starting Dec. 16, the day
after the enrollment season ends.
That is the same date as the past
three years, but before, when the
sign-up period lasted until Jan. 31,
consumers had time to go into
HealthCare.gov, the website for
the federal insurance exchange on
which most states rely, and either
shop for a more affordable plan or
drop their coverage.
Asked about the timing, CMS
officials on Friday did not specifically confirm the auto-enrollment
date but issued a statement that
said: “Similar to Medicare’s openenrollment period, if you miss the
deadline to enroll in a plan of your
choice, you will not be able to
make any changes to your plan
until the next coverage year” except for a small number of people
eligible for a special enrollment
period because of moves, marriages, new babies or other life
changes. The statement said that
auto-enrollment will happen this
year and that “we encourage all
consumers to shop and pick a
plan that best suits their healthcare needs.”
It remains unclear whether
consumers will be notified of
when the automatic enrollment
will take place — or that they will
be unable to make changes afterward. A page on the HealthCare.gov website, containing information on how to keep or
change a health plan, says that
current ACA customers will re-
California
pot farms
manage
the damage
MARIJUANA FROM A1
spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
“It’s the darkness right before
the dawn of legal, regulated cannabis in California,” said Hezekiah Allen, executive director of the
California Growers Association,
who cautioned that the full extent
of the damage remains unknown.
“These businesses are in a really
vulnerable position, and this really came at about the worst time it
could have. It means we’re on our
own.”
The fires burned swaths of
Mendocino County, which is part
of what is known as California’s
“Emerald Triangle,” the nation’s
epicenter of marijuana growing.
It also devastated Sonoma County, which is best known for wine
but has seen an increase in cannabis farming. The fires killed at
least 42 people and damaged
thousands of buildings, according to the California Department
of Forestry and Fire Protection.
Some marijuana farms were
completely destroyed, and many
others are believed to have been
heavily damaged by fire, smoke
and ash. Structures used to store
dried marijuana burned, as did
greenhouses and irrigation lines.
Many marijuana cultivators live
on their farms, and some homes
burned to the ground.
Erich Pearson, co-owner of
SPARC, a large medical cannabis
dispensary with two locations in
San Francisco and others north of
the city, saw his crops in Glen
Ellen, Calif., about 50 miles north
of San Francisco, engulfed by
flames after awakening to the
smell of smoke. The first thing he
saw after getting close to the farm
was a metal-roofed barn on fire. It
was filled with marijuana harvested to sell on the legal market.
“We lost everything we har-
MASON TRINCA FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Inside a wildfire-damaged SPARC barn in Glen Ellen, Calif., bunches of drying marijuana still hang from the rafters.
vested to date, and had significant
damage to what’s left,” he said.
There is concern that what has
been destroyed, as well as the
damage from smoke, ash and lack
of water for crops that did survive,
could seriously impact the supply
for customers when marijuana is
legal for sale. The fire has compounded existing problems with
the initial start of sales because of
a regulatory mess: Many municipalities and the state have not
released draft regulations for how
businesses must comply with the
new law. Businesses in some places, including San Francisco, are
not likely to be able to open Jan. 1.
“Now, we might be facing a
much smaller harvest than we
were anticipating, which could
potentially drive the price up,”
said Josh Drayton, deputy director of the California Cannabis
Industry Association. “It’s going
to touch every different piece of
the industry, and we can’t get
ahead of this yet. We still don’t
know how much has survived,
how much has been lost.”
Chiah Rodriques, chief executive of Mendocino Generations, a
marijuana collective in Mendocino County, said that most of the
40 farms she works with were
only about 25 to 50 percent harvested when the fires broke out
earlier this month. About a quarter of the farms were affected by
either fire or smoke, she said, and
just 10 of the 40 have the local
permit necessary to become compliant with the state, though all
are working toward them. None
of them have crop insurance, she
said.
Rodriques said that the fires
could lead to less usable marijua-
na on the market come January.
The one saving grace might be to
repurpose affected plants and use
them for oil and other tinctures
that can be sold at dispensaries.
The oils are far less lucrative than
the flowers, the part of the plant
that is consumed — and this year
was expected to be a bumper crop.
“You’re looking at the difference between $800 to $1,500 a
pound to now getting $100; it’s a
huge blow,” she said, especially
when farmers have spent so much
money trying to become compliant with laws.
“These people put everything
they had into paying for this fee
and this tax and this permit and
this lawyer, one thing after the
next, and to have this happen
right when it’s finally harvest is
huge,” she said.
Pearson carefully selected the
seeds and genetic strains for the
cannabis he planted in February
on part of 400 acres he shares
with 11 other farmers. He is now
starting from scratch: finding
new seeds and securing greenhouse space to grow the new
plants. He had submitted all of his
permits to become legal under the
county and state’s new regulations.
“The hopes of what we could do
are still the hopes of what we’re
going to do,” Pearson said. “It’s
just going to be a little harder to
get there.”
Ashley Oldham, owner of Frost
Flower Farms in Redwood Valley,
Calif., did something very out of
character: She left her cellphone
at a friend’s house the day the fire
reached her. A neighbor pounded
on her door in the middle of the
night as flames surrounded her
More training fails to stop Army sexual misconduct allegations
ASSAULTS FROM A1
ating “an intimidating and offensive working environment,” according to a confidential report
obtained by The Post under the
Freedom of Information Act.
Air Force staff members complained that the senior executive,
Jay Aanrud, made sexist remarks
about tight pants and Hooters
models, and said it is women’s
work to shop and eat bonbons,
according to the report. Aanrud, a
former pilot whose call sign was
“Hoser,” told investigators that he
was joking and that his remarks
were misconstrued.
Despite the investigation, the
Air Force rehired Aanrud last
month to work at the Pentagon as a
technical specialist on aviation issues. An Air Force spokeswoman
said he doesn’t supervise anyone in
his new job. Aanrud declined to
comment.
For the armed forces, the cases
are a painful reminder of similar
scandals in 2013.
That year, the Air Force’s chief
sexual assault prevention officer at
the Pentagon was accused of groping a woman outside a bar; he was
later acquitted by a civilian jury but
reprimanded by the military. An
Army sergeant in charge of helping
sexual assault victims at Fort
Hood, Tex., was convicted of pandering for pimping female soldiers.
In addition, each of the military
services was tainted by reports of
young women being assaulted by
uniformed recruiters.
With angry lawmakers in Congress demanding a crackdown,
then-Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered the armed forces in
May 2013 to retrain and rescreen
tens of thousands of military
recruiters and sexual assault prevention officers.
Despite the measures, incidents
kept happening. Five months after
Hagel’s order, a soldier attending a
sexual assault prevention conference in Orlando was accused of
getting drunk and raping a woman
he met at his hotel. The Army investigated but did not file charges
because the woman declined to
cooperate.
Since then, the military has invested millions of additional dollars in sexual assault awareness
programs. Training is mandatory
for everyone in uniform. Top brass
have promised to redouble their
efforts to punish offenders and
protect victims.
“We’ve been putting extraordinary resources into this area,” said
Rep. Mike Coffman (R-Colo.),
chairman of the House Armed Services subcommittee for military
personnel. “Of all the issues we
have on my committee, we have
spent more time on sexual assault
than any other issue.”
Coffman said military leaders
have come a long way in address-
ing the problem but added that
more needs to be done. He said
Army leaders have briefed him
about the sexual assault prevention officers who have been accused of sexual assault and said
they are reviewing how people are
selected for those posts.
“We always need to look at the
screening and look where the
screening failed,” Coffman said in
an interview. But in comparison
with past scandals, he said, “the
Army has gotten the message an
awful lot quicker.”
Last year, the Defense Department received 6,172 reports of sexual assault in the ranks — a new
high and almost twice as many as
were reported in 2010. Pentagon
officials have called the increase a
sign that more victims are willing
to come forward and trust the military to help them.
To tackle the problem, the Army
employs 650 full-time sexual assault response coordinators and
victim advocates, plus 2,200 others
who work part time.
In the past year, eight of them
have been accused of sexual
assault, triggering criminal investigations by a combination of military and civilian authorities, said
William J. Sharp, an Army spokesman at the Pentagon.
Officials from the Navy, the Marines and the Air Force told The
Post that none of their personnel
involved in sexual assault preven-
tion have been investigated for sex
crimes over the past year.
Lt. Col. Jennifer R. Johnson, an
Army spokeswoman, said the service adopted new standards in 2013
for screening sexual assault prevention personnel, drill instructors, recruiters and others who
hold positions of “significant
trust.”
She said that the standards are
more stringent than the Defense
Department requires, but that the
Army has decided to review them
again “to determine if any changes
are required.”
“As Army professionals, we expect everyone on our team to live
and demonstrate the Army values
every day,” Johnson said in an
email. “Every allegation of sexual
assault, from an unwanted touch
over the clothing to a forcible rape,
is investigated. . . . The Army
strives to hold all offenders accountable for their actions no matter their position or rank.”
Few personnel get more screening than the Army’s special-victim
prosecutors, a team of 23 lawyers
who oversee sex crime and domestic violence cases across the country. The job is considered an elite
position within the Judge Advocate General’s Corps, and those
who hold it are handpicked by the
Army’s top uniformed lawyer.
The program was thrown into
turmoil in 2014 when its supervisor
was placed under investigation for
allegedly groping a female lawyer
— at a sexual assault prevention
conference.
The supervisor, Lt. Col. Jay
Morse, acknowledged having an
intimate encounter with the woman but denied touching her without consent. Army officials ultimately decided that they lacked
evidence to press criminal charges,
but Morse was reprimanded for
misconduct. He retired soon after.
The Army has since been rattled
by another case involving a specialvictim prosecutor.
In August 2016, a lawyer who
worked for the Army walked into
the Comanche County Courthouse
in Lawton, Okla., to seek a protective order against a man she had
been dating: Capt. Scott Hockenberry, who handled cases at Fort
Sill and other posts in the region.
The woman alleged in court papers that their relationship had
turned violent and that Hockenberry had raped her three times
over the previous month. She also
alleged that he had placed a knife
against her throat during one of
the assaults and injured her jaw on
another occasion, according to her
protective-order application.
“They started dating, but it got
out of control,” said Robert Don
Gifford, an attorney for the woman.
Hockenberry disputed the allegations and has filed a defamation
claim against the woman in state
ceive two notices before Nov. 1 —
one from the federal marketplace
and the other from their insurer.
It does not say what information
those notices will contain.
Asked to clarify, CMS officials
did not provide details and pointed to an August news release that
said the $10 million remaining for
outreach efforts, down from
$100 million last year, would focus on telling consumers about
“the new dates of the open-enrollment period through digital media, email, and text messages.”
Consumer advocates and
health policy experts, told of the
auto-enrollment timing, were
critical.
“It was never a good idea to
auto-enroll. The advice has always been to come back and
shop,” said Karen Pollitz, a senior
fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation. But before, consumers
could later choose different coverage. “Now that’s it. The curtain
falls.”
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
home, saving the lives of Oldham
and her 4-year-old daughter.
Oldham’s house was destroyed,
but her greenhouse stayed intact,
in part because she hiked through
what looked like a “post-apocalyptic disaster zone” to check on
her property after the fire passed.
She said that emergency officials
initially did not allow marijuana
farmers to check on their crops, as
is allowed for farmers of other
agricultural products.
When she arrived at the farm,
she used a neighbor’s hose to wet
down a large oak tree that was
ablaze, saving her greenhouse.
Oldham has been okayed for a
legal permit in Mendocino County, spending “a lot of money” to
come fully into compliance. She
estimates that she lost about
25 percent of her crop to wind
damage, and much of it looks
burned.
She and other cannabis farmers must have their crops extensively tested under California’s
new regulations, and most people
don’t know what impact smoke or
burn damage will have.
“We’ve never experienced this,
and I don’t know what to expect,”
she said. She said that she will not
be able to recoup the full value of
her house through insurance because she grows marijuana.
“We’re totally legal,” she said of
her farm. “But we’re still being
treated unfairly.”
Susan Schindler, a grower in
Potter Valley, Calif., said she has
spent at least $20,000 on consultants, attorneys and fees trying to
come into compliance for legal
sales in January. She evacuated
her home and has been at a San
Francisco hotel since the fires.
Her master grower told her the
plants are “very crisp.”
Half of the crop was destroyed
earlier this year due to russet
mites, and now she thinks much
of the other half will be lost to fire.
Some was harvested, and she’s
hoping that it will allow her to
break even.
Schindler calls marijuana a
“holy plant” that she’s farmed for
years, selling to medical dispensaries.
“I’m not going to give up,” she
said, “but it’s going to take a lot of
money out of my bank account
this year.”
katie.zezima@washpost.com
court in Oklahoma, documents
show.
The Army reassigned him to the
Military District of Washington
and conducted a lengthy criminal
investigation.
Last month, it charged Hockenberry with sexually assaulting the
woman on two occasions, placing a
knife against her throat and striking her in the face, according to
military charging documents obtained by The Post. A preliminary
hearing is scheduled later this
month.
“We categorically deny all of the
allegations made by this accuser.
Period. Full stop,” said Will Helixon, an attorney representing Hockenberry.
The Post’s policy is not to identify victims of sexual assault or abuse
in most cases.
It is unclear why the Army waited a year to file charges. Lawyers
for both sides say the case has
attracted notice at the Pentagon,
given the nature of Hockenberry’s
job. “This has received extra scrutiny,” Gifford said.
Another recent case that has received high-level attention surfaced in August at Fort Benning,
Ga., a boot-camp hub for the Army.
The Army suspended several
drill instructors after female recruits reported being sexually assaulted. A criminal investigation is
pending. The Army has released
few details, although it has since
relieved a Fort Benning battalion
commander because of “a loss of
confidence in his ability” to lead.
craig.whitlock@washpost.com
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
The World
Stability may be enough for Japan to reelect Abe
If polls are right, the nationalistic prime minister and his party will almost certainly stay in power for another four years
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
tokyo — Spare a thought for
Japanese voters as they go to the
polls in a snap parliamentary
election Sunday. The economy is
ticking along respectably, the
stock market is at a 20-year high,
the country enjoys full employment, Japanese companies are
making good profits and there are
no divisive problems involving
race and almost no issues surrounding immigration.
It is, as Daniel Sneider of Stanford University puts it, a “Seinfeld
election.” An election about nothing.
But this election offers one
important thing for voters at
home and governments abroad:
stability. Shinzo Abe’s ruling Liberal Democratic Party, which has
been in power for five years, will
almost certainly secure control of
the House of Representatives for
another four-year term.
That is noteworthy in a country that went through six prime
ministers in six years — until Abe
returned to power at the end of
2012 — and in a world where
other advanced nations are dealing with the effects of electoral
surprises.
“Britain is in a negative spiral
after making a major mistake
with Brexit, and obviously there’s
the sad story of the U.S.,” said
Michael Fullilove, executive director of the Lowy Institute in
Sydney. Australia, for its part, is
on its fourth prime minister in
five years.
“There has been so much dysfunction in politics and churn in
leadership, and there has been a
tendency among Western countries to look inward rather than
taking an outward-looking, more
muscular view,” Fullilove said.
“Japan under Abe is an exception
to both those trends.”
Abe, who is 63, called the snap
election 14 months before it was
due, ostensibly to seek a new
mandate to be tough on North
Korea and channel a planned
consumption-tax increase into
social spending rather than retiring debt.
But most analysts say he is
being opportunistic, trying to exploit a sudden rebound in the
polls — Kim Jong Un’s missile
launches over Japan helped boost
the hawkish Abe’s numbers —
and a vacuum in the opposition
after months of lingering scandal.
If his party retains a two-thirds
majority in the powerful lower
house, the nationalistic Abe is
likely to press ahead with plans to
revise the postwar pacifist constitution and strengthen Japan’s
military.
After a surprise challenge from
Tokyo governor Yuriko Koike
quickly fizzled, Abe’s ruling coalition is poised to win more than
300 of the 465 seats in the lower
house, according to forecasts
from the Jiji Press news agency. It
must take 310 seats to retain the
supermajority needed to amend
the constitution.
But the anticipated support for
the government belies the decidedly tepid feelings about the
prime minister himself. A poll by
the Asahi Shimbun published
Wednesday night found that
51 percent of respondents do not
Iraqi forces
capture
last district
in Kirkuk
BY T AMER E L- G HOBASHY
AND M USTAFA S ALIM
baghdad — Iraqi and Kurdish
PHOTOS BY KAZUHIRO NOGI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks in Tokyo ahead of Sunday’s vote — which he called 14 months before it was due, ostensibly to seek a new
mandate to be tough on North Korea and deliver social spending. Many analysts say he is trying to exploit a sudden rebound in the polls.
want Abe to remain as prime
minister.
“Japanese voters are rewarding
Abe for providing continuity and
stability, even if they don’t like
him,” said Sneider, an East Asia
specialist currently based in Tokyo. “They might not greet him
enthusiastically, and they might
worry about his nationalism, but
they’re not interested in trading
that for uncertainty.”
This is partly because the
memories of political upheaval
remain so fresh in Japan.
When Junichiro Koizumi retired in 2006 after five years as
prime minister, as required by
LDP rules, Abe succeeded him.
But he lasted only one year, quitting suddenly after a huge defeat
in an upper house election and
two scandals in his cabinet.
Then, within the next five years
came two conservative prime
ministers and three from the
Democratic Party of Japan, during a rare but difficult period in
government that coincided with
the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.
Repeated cabinet reshuffles
meant some ministers were
changed even more frequently.
Abe got a second chance when
he was returned to the premiership at the end of 2012. The LDP
changed its rules earlier this year
to allow him to serve a third
consecutive three-year term. If he
stays until 2021, he will become
Japan’s longest-serving prime
minister.
But Alison Evans, a Japan specialist at IHS Markit, the consulting firm, says Japan’s recent stability is more a function of the
party than the person. Except for
two short periods, the LDP has
been in government since 1955.
“The LDP will continue to
People listen to Abe speak. If his Liberal Democratic Party retains
a two-thirds majority in the lower house, Abe is likely to push plans
to revise the pacifist constitution and strengthen the military.
dominate, but prime ministers
will come and go,” Evans said.
“Japan is a democracy, but culturally and structurally, there has
been no move towards pluralism.”
Abe is taking advantage of this,
though. Even his critics concede
that he has learned from his first
disastrous stint as prime minister
and proved himself to be a political survivor.
Under his “Abenomics” stimulus policies, the Japanese economy has grown for six quarters in a
row after two decades of recession and stagnation, now ticking
along at 2.5 percent annual
growth. Even if ordinary Japanese say they don’t feel the improvement, at least the numbers
are heading in the right direction.
Allies and other like-minded
governments would welcome
“They might not greet him enthusiastically,
and they might worry about his nationalism,
but they’re not interested in trading that
for uncertainty.”
Stanford University’s Daniel Sneider,
an East Asia specialist based in Tokyo
Abe’s continuing in office. Just
having a prime minister who lasts
more than a year has injected
some certainty and stability into
political and trading relationships with other countries, said
one diplomat from the region.
It is especially important for
the relationship with the United
States, Japan’s main ally.
“There were multiple moments over recent years when
American officials said, ‘Why
bother building a relationship
when he or she isn’t going to be
there in a few months?’ ” said
Brad Glosserman, an American
who is a visiting professor at
Tama University in Tokyo. “It’s
hard to exaggerate the value of
having this relationship.”
One relationship that is serving Japan well is the bond that
Abe has formed with President
Trump.
On the campaign trail, Trump
had repeatedly lashed out at Japan, espousing a 1980s view of
their trading relationship and repeatedly saying that Japan
should be paying for its own
defense. But Abe made determined efforts to get on the right
side of Trump, being the first
foreign leader to visit him after
his election victory and holding a
chummy summit with him at
Mar-a-Lago just a few weeks after
Trump’s inauguration. The two
regularly talk on the phone about
North Korea, and Trump arrives
in Japan on Nov. 5 to begin an
Asian tour.
That Trump has not acted
against Japan’s interests — with
the exception of withdrawing
from the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal — is a testament to
Abe’s influence, analysts say.
anna.fifield@washpost.com
forces exchanged heavy fire Friday
as Iraqi troops backed by allied
militias captured the remaining
district of the disputed Kirkuk
province.
The two sides, close military
partners during the fight against
the Islamic State, turned their
weapons on each other early Friday, marking the heaviest clashes
since Iraq’s military began a campaign last week to reclaim areas it
lost in 2014.
Kurdish peshmerga forces initially had withdrawn from large
swaths of the province as the Iraqi
military marched on Kirkuk city.
On Friday, groups of peshmerga
fighters held firm and attempted
to halt the Iraqi advance with
rockets and mortars, Iraqi and
peshmerga commanders said.
By late afternoon, the peshmerga forces retreated, and troops
from Iraq’s counterterrorism service, army and federal police, as
well as members of a powerful
Iran-backed Shiite militia, entered and took control of Altun
Kupri, a small town about 25 miles
northwest of Kirkuk city. They
also took over the main checkpoint on the road to the Kurdish
capital of Irbil, the Iraqi military
said in a statement.
The assault capped a swift campaign by Baghdad to impose its
authority over areas that had been
taken over by the semiautonomous Kurdish regional government in 2014 as the Iraqi army
collapsed in the face of an Islamic
State onslaught. Iraqi forces have
now taken control of the oil fields
in Kirkuk province that had been a
major source of revenue for the
Kurdish government, along with
areas where the majority of the
population is Kurdish, leading to
fears of mass displacement.
In Washington, State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said the United States is concerned by the clashes in northern
Iraq. She asked the Iraqi federal
government to limit the movement of forces in disputed areas to
promote calm.
“We are monitoring the situation closely, and call on all parties
to cease all violence and provocative movements, and to coordinate their activities to restore
calm,” Nauert said in a statement.
The Trump administration has
encouraged Baghdad and the
Kurdish government to hold talks.
The moves came on the heels of
a Kurdish referendum on independence last month that was vigorously opposed by Iraq’s central
government, along with the
United States, the European
Union, the United Nations, Turkey
and Iran. The vote was held not
only in Kurdish areas but also in
Kirkuk and other disputed territory, roiling the Iraqi government,
Turkey and Iran, which all moved
to isolate the Kurdish region.
tamer.el-ghobashy@washpost.com
Anne Gearan in Washington
contributed to this report.
DIGEST
CUBA
U.S. links 2 more cases
to mysterious attacks
Injuries have been confirmed
to two more State Department
personnel stationed in Havana,
bringing to 24 the number of
verified cases linked to
mysterious and unexplained
attacks on U.S. Embassy staff
in Cuba.
State Department
spokeswoman Heather Nauert
said Friday that the new medical
assessments involved incidents
that happened earlier this year.
“They do not reflect new
attacks,” she said, noting that the
most recent medically confirmed
case happened in late August.
Nauert acknowledged also
that the number of victims may
grow.
“Our personnel are receiving
comprehensive medical
evaluations and care,” Nauert
said. “We can’t rule out
additional new cases as medical
professionals continue to
evaluate members of the
embassy community.”
The State Department has
said Americans who worked at
the embassy were targeted for
attacks that began late last year
and continued at least until late
this summer. The victims include
diplomats, intelligence officers
and their spouses.
deadly bombing in the capital,
Mogadishu. The United States is
expected to play a supporting
role in the new offensive, a
Somali military official said.
Al-Shabab has been blamed but
has not commented on the
bombing. The Information
Ministry says 56 were people still
missing from Saturday’s truck
bombing, in which 358 people
were killed. An additional 228
people were wounded.
— Carol Morello
AFGHANISTAN
Dozens are killed in
2 mosque bombings
Dozens of worshipers were
killed Friday when suicide
bombers struck two mosques in
an escalation of violence in
Afghanistan this week that has
left at least 150 people dead.
A suicide bomber detonated
explosives inside a Shiite mosque
on the southwestern fringe of
the capital, killing 39 people —
among them women and
children — on a day reserved in
Afghanistan for prayer and
reflection. In addition, 45 people
were wounded in the attack,
which took place during evening
prayers inside the Imam Zaman
Mosque in the city’s Dasht-eBarchi neighborhood.
In central Ghowr province,
a suicide bomber attacked
worshipers in a Sunni mosque,
where a former Taliban
commander who was inside was
Lebanese court sentences
2 assassins in absentia: A court
DAVID MOIR/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
A woman takes shelter under an umbrella as she walks in the
rain in downtown Sydney. Rain fell across the city and much of New
South Wales on Friday after one of the driest Septembers on record.
Meanwhile, the state of Queensland, to the north, was struggling
with flooding after receiving heavy rains over the past week.
apparently the target, a local
official said.
Twenty people, including the
former Taliban commander, died
in the afternoon attack, local
officials said.
— Antonio Olivo
and Sayed Salahuddin
Somalia to declare ‘state of war’
against al-Shabab: Somalia’s
President Mohamed Abdullahi
Mohamed is expected to
announce a “state of war”
Saturday against the al-Shabab
extremist group, which has been
blamed for the last weekend’s
in Lebanon has sentenced in
absentia two Lebanese citizens
to death over the 1982
assassination of President-elect
Bashir Gemayel. According to
judicial officials, Habib Tanious
Shartouni and Nabil Faraj alAlam, both members of the proSyrian Syrian Social Nationalist
Party, were sentenced to death.
Gemayel was killed along with
23 supporters in a powerful
explosion at the right-wing
Christian Phalange Party
headquarters in east Beirut on
Sept. 14, 1982, barely two weeks
before he was due to take office.
The blast came at the height of
the country’s 15-year civil war
and Israel’s invasion of Lebanon.
At least 16 police officers
reportedly killed in Egypt: At
least sixteen Egyptian police
officers were killed in a shootout
during a raid on a suspected
militant hideout in Egypt’s
Western desert, two security
sources said. The sources said
authorities were following a lead
to an apartment thought to
house eight suspected members
of Hasm, a group that has
claimed several attacks around
Cairo targeting judges and
policemen since last year.
WHO names Mugabe a
‘goodwill ambassador’:
Zimbabwe’s President Robert
Mugabe is being named a
“goodwill ambassador” by the
World Health Organization.
WHO Director General Tedros
Adhanom told a conference in
Uruguay this week that Mugabe
could use the role “to influence
his peers in his region.” A WHO
spokeswoman confirmed the
comments Friday. Two dozen
groups released a statement
slamming the appointment,
saying they were “shocked and
deeply concerned” and citing
Mugabe’s “long track record of
human rights violations.”
— From news services
.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
THE WASHINGTON POST
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
The influential Catalan activists jailed in Spain
With a tweet or text, the two can put 100,000 people on the street. Now they’re charged with sedition.
BY
W ILLIAM B OOTH
barcelona — Jordi Sánchez
and Jordi Cuixart are not wellknown names in Europe, or even
in Spain. But the two wield extraordinary influence in the tense
drama now unfolding in restive
Catalonia. Because in a few short
hours, through their organizations and networks, with a tweet
or a text, the activist duo can put
100,000 people on the street.
It was this remarkable ability
to stage some of the largest
peaceful demonstrations in Europe — and the power of their
message promoting a democratic
and independent Catalonia —
that steered the two toward an
almost inevitable collision with
the central government in Madrid.
Sánchez and Cuixart, who both
espouse nonviolence, are now
sitting in jail cells at the Soto del
Real prison in Madrid, held in
preventive detention, without
bail, on charges of sedition
against the state, which carries a
maximum sentence of 15 years.
They were arrested Monday as
part of a government crackdown
that seeks to stifle the secessionist movement in Catalonia.
Spain’s prime minister, Mariano Rajoy, has called the independence movement and its leaders reckless, even dangerous, rebels. Their chaotic independence
referendum earlier this month
was deemed illegal by Rajoy and
constitutional judges. Riot police
were ordered to stop it, producing wild scenes — beamed
around the world — of officers
whipping citizens with rubber
batons and dragging them away
from ballot boxes.
The Spanish news media outside Catalonia has generally
viewed the pair as skilled troublemakers, misguided at best, but
worthy of respect because of their
clout.
Cuixart, 42, is a dashing figure
who favors black leather jackets.
A high school dropout, he is a
self-made man who founded a
successful business that exports
packaging machinery. He leads
the Catalan group Omnium Cultural, which backed the independence referendum.
Sánchez, 53, looks like the
rumpled university professor he
is. He teaches at the University of
EMILIO MORENATTI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Protesters in Catalonia, one holding a pro-independence flag,
gather outside the Barcelona offices of Spain’s central government
after the court decision to jail Jordi Sánchez and Jordi Cuixart.
Barcelona and is president of
the Catalan National Assembly,
which is not an elected body but a
pro-independence group that
boasts about 80,000 members.
Sánchez is seen as especially
effective. He is “a professional
agitator, a gladiator who doesn’t
rest,” Spain’s El Mundo newspaper said. “He has been insisting
on Catalan independence for
three years, from the political
arena and from the streets, which
is the place he feels most at
home.”
Compared with Sánchez and
Cuixart, regional politicians in
Catalonia are amateurs at the art
and science of mass mobilizations, according to the Spanish
news media.
The two — alongside unions,
student groups and an alphabet
soup of Catalan political parties
and civic organizations — have
been instrumental in producing
vast crowds of demonstrators,
who have turned out by the
hundreds of thousands with flags
and banners, chanting “The
streets are ours!” and “Let us
vote!”
Their wives told The Washington Post that they had not been
allowed to visit their husbands in
prison but that they had spoken
with them by telephone.
The two men are housed in
separate wings of the prison, so
their communication with each
other is limited. One of their
associates joked that Sánchez
and Cuixart are allowed to see
each other in the prison chapel,
“so they have become more devout.”
Their wives say that the two
men remain strong but that sedition is a serious charge at such a
highly politicized moment. They
worry that their husbands are
being held hostage.
Catalonia’s regional president,
Carles Puigdemont, who is pushing for independence, calls the
two “political prisoners.”
He said their incarceration “is
the shame of Europe.”
“The lawyers cannot say how
long, but they tell me, get ready,
this could take time,” said Susanna Barreda Cortiella, the wife of
Jordi Sánchez.
“They went after them first,
because it’s easier to arrest two
civil society leaders than to jail
elected officials or the chief of
police,” Barreda said.
The showdown in Catalonia
edged toward constitutional crisis this week, following the central government’s announcement
Thursday that it would move
quickly to assert control of the
autonomous region after its president refused to end his push for
independence.
Rajoy, the prime minister, will
convene an emergency cabinet
meeting Saturday to begin the
unprecedented process of invoking Article 155 of Spain’s 1978
constitution, which would allow
Madrid to seize control of the
autonomous government in Catalonia, including its finances, public media and police.
The sedition charges against
the two men arise from a Sept. 20
demonstration outside the Barcelona offices of the regional vice
president and the Economic Ministry. Members of Spain’s Civil
Guard police entered the building, arrested 14 employees and
minor officials, and seized documents that authorities say were
to be used to stage the illegal
referendum.
A demonstration quickly grew
to many thousands and lasted for
hours.
“So now my husband is in jail,
and I feel sad for him,” said Txell
Bonet, Cuixart’s wife.
“You might think my situation
and my daily life is difficult,” said
Bonet, the mother of a 6-monthold. “But I don’t feel that. I feel
when they arrest Jordi, the government is attacking everybody.
This is an injustice we are all
suffering.”
The arrest of the two secessionists may give Spain a black eye in
Europe, but so far the European
leadership has backed Madrid,
decrying the police violence but
also insisting that the referendum was illegal and remains an
internal affair.
Pro-independence activists,
overall, seem anxious about what
happens next. But they think they
will ultimately prevail.
“We have a big problem. Spain
has a huge problem,” Oriol Junqueras, vice president of the Catalan regional government, told
The Post. He said the arrest of the
two activists only stokes anger
and bolsters the case for independence.
“Of course, they are political
prisoners,” he said. “They’ve been
jailed because of their acts in
front of this very building where
we are sitting, where they told the
people to go home in peace.”
Junqueras said the two have
been scrupulous and relentless in
their message of nonviolence.
“At the end, officials like me
don’t matter so much,” he said.
“What matters is what the people
want. The people here will
decide.”
william.booth@washpost.com
Raul Gallego Abellan contributed to
this report.
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
U.S. counterterrorism efforts
to grow in Africa, Mattis says
BY
K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
The military is shifting its counterterrorism strategy to focus
more on Africa, put decision-making authority in the hands of commanders in the field, and expand
the ability to use lethal force
against suspected terrorists, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told
two senior members of the Senate
Armed Services Committee on Friday.
Sen. Lindsey O. Graham
(R-S.C.) told reporters that Mattis
outlined the new rules of engagement during back-to-back briefings for Graham and Sen. John
McCain (R-Ariz.), chairman of the
panel. Graham added that he supported Mattis’s plans, and that the
secretary had pledged to work
more closely with lawmakers to
keep them informed about expanding operations and newly
identified threats for Congress to
exercise oversight authority.
“The war is morphing,” Graham
said. “You’re going to see more
actions in Africa, not less; you’re
going to see more aggression by
the United States toward our enemies, not less; you’re going to
have decisions being made not in
the White House but out in the
field.”
Graham said that other changes to the Pentagon’s counterterrorism policy would include the
adoption of a “status-based targeting” system for suspected terrorists, meaning troops will be able to
use lethal force against a suspected member of a terrorist organization even if that person does not
pose an immediate threat.
He said Mattis had informed
them that the military would also
be changing how it decides when
to use ground troops and when
troops should be deployed in more
of an advisory role.
The changes come as lawmakers have pressed the White House
and Pentagon for details about
what led to the Oct. 4 ambush in
Niger in which four U.S. Special
Forces soldiers were killed.
Graham indicated that lawmakers
are determined to learn what led
to the soldiers’ deaths and whether they could have been prevented.
The ambush occurred near Niger’s border with Mali, where alQaeda’s North Africa branch has
been battling both the government and a French-led coalition
seeking to flush them from desert
hideouts. Of specific concern is
whether U.S. intelligence assets in
the region failed to detect the existence of a threat to American personnel in the region.
Graham said it’s too early to
know for certain.
“In war you fail, you make mistakes and the whole goal is to learn
from your mistakes and not repeat
them,” he said. “The one thing I
don’t want to do is jump to conclusions.”
McCain threatened Thursday
to use a subpoena if necessary to
compel information from the
Trump administration. Mattis appeared on Capitol Hill a day after
McCain’s warning. After meeting
with McCain for about 15 minutes,
Mattis told reporters that military
investigators would provide him
with information about the Niger
attack “as soon as they can,” but he
would not commit to a specific
timeline about when more information would be available.
As chairman of the Senate committee with primary oversight
over the military, McCain argued,
he must be better informed of such
operations ahead of time.
But it remained unclear what
kind of “operation” the slain soldiers were involved in. “The U.S.
military does not have an active,
direct combat mission in Niger,”
AFRICOM said in a statement Friday. It said about 800 military
personnel there provide support
to the U.S. Embassy in Niamey, the
capital; and to support construction at what it called a “temporary,
expeditionary contingency” being
built at Agadez, in the middle of
the country. The Washington Post
reported in 2014 that the United
States had received permission
from the Niger government to
construct a drone base near Agadez.
AFRICOM, the command said
in the statement, provides “training and security assistance to the
Nigerien Armed Forces, including
support for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance to facilitate their efforts to target violent
extremist organizations.” Security
operations, it said, “are executed
almost exclusively” by partnered
security forces.
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
Karen DeYoung contributed to this
report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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A9
RE
U.S.-led coalition declares ISIS forces vanquished and battle for Raqqa over
BY
L OUISA L OVELUCK
beirut — The U.S.-led coalition
said Friday that the capture of the
Islamic State’s onetime Syrian
capital of Raqqa marked a turning point in the fight against the
extremist group, effectively declaring an end to the military
operation there.
A U.S.-backed force known as
the Syrian Democratic Forces, or
SDF, has been clearing the final
pockets of resistance in the city
since proclaiming victory over the
Islamic State on Tuesday.
“Daesh’s loss of Mosul and now
Raqqah are turning points for
the terrorist organization whose
leaders grow ever more distant
from a dwindling number of terrorist adherents,” the coalition
said in a statement, using an Arabic acronym for the Islamic State.
Three years after seizing a
swath of land the size of Belgium
across Syria and Iraq, the Islamic
State is clinging to only one siz-
BULENT KILIC/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Kurdish members of the Syrian Democratic Forces ride in a truck
past damaged buildings in Raqqa. The SDF has been clearing final
pockets of resistance in the city since declaring victory on Tuesday.
able stretch of territory spanning
the border between the two countries.
The battle for Raqqa began in
June, with the SDF advancing on
foot as U.S.-led coalition airstrikes
pummeled Islamic State positions from above.
Much of the city now lies in
ruins. The water supply and electricity grid have been shattered. According to monitoring
groups, more than 1,000 civilians
were killed in the fight.
The SDF used a news conference Friday to call on the international community to commit
funds to support an incoming
civilian council.
“We call upon all countries and
peace-loving forces and all humanitarian organizations to participate in rebuilding the city and
villages around it and help in
removing the scars of war that
were inflicted by the Islamic
State,” said Talal Sillo, a spokesman and senior SDF commander.
The full cost of reconstructing
Raqqa city remains unknown and
international donor funding is
publicly earmarked only for
short-term projects.
More than 270,000 people had
fled the city since June. Many are
camped across a network of poorly supplied displacement camps
with little hope of being able to
return home anytime soon.
The coalition used its victory
statement to push back at criticisms that the civilian cost had
been too high and that the ground
operation was led by a mainly
Kurdish force.
“They fought tenaciously and
with courage against an unprincipled enemy, taking great care to
move the population trapped by
Daesh away from the battle area
and minimize civilian casualties,”
said Brig. Gen. Jonathan Braga,
the coalition’s director of operations. He described the SDF as
an “ethnically diverse force” led
by “local elements.”
Although the SDF features a
substantial number of Arab fighters, its operational structure is
dominated by Kurdish militias
linked to the Kurdistan Workers’
Party, or PKK, which is designated
as a terrorist organization in
neighboring Turkey.
The fighting force celebrated
victory Thursday with a news conference in a central square once
used by the Islamic State to show-
case beheadings. Behind the gathered fighters was a banner of Abdullah Ocalan, a divisive Kurdish
nationalist leader who has been
jailed as a terrorist in Turkey.
The image heightened fears
among some Arab former residents that their city could now be
dominated by a force toward
whom they harbor deep suspicions and resentments.
“Where is the ‘Arab ingredient’
that the SDF spoke so much
about,” Khalaf Al-Malla, an activist now living in northern Syria,
wrote on his Facebook page, describing Ocalan as the city’s new
“caliph.”
“Why don’t they represent
them as a partner in victory? It
seems they just sent them to die in
the fight against ISIS.”
Sillo said 655 local and international SDF fighters had lost their
lives during the four-month battle
for Raqqa. “Our victory is one
against terrorism,” he said.
louisa.loveluck@washpost.com
Impact of N. Korean nuclear tests recalls Soviet ‘tired mountain syndrome’
N. KOREA FROM A1
from the blast.
North Korea has conducted six
nuclear tests since 2006, all of
them in tunnels burrowed deep
under Mount Mantap at a site
known as the Punggye-ri Nuclear
Test Facility. Intelligence analysts
and experts alike use satellite imagery to keep close track of movement at the three entrances to the
tunnels for signals that a test
might be coming.
After the latest nuclear test, on
Sept. 3, Kim Jong Un’s regime
claimed that it had set off a hydrogen bomb and that it had been a
“perfect success.”
The regime is known for brazen
exaggeration, but analysts and
many government officials said
the size of the earthquake that the
test generated suggested that
North Korea had detonated a
thermonuclear device at least 17
times the size of the U.S. bomb
dropped on Hiroshima in 1945.
It registered as an artificial 6.3magnitude earthquake, so big
that it shook houses in northeastern China. Eight minutes later,
there was a 4.1-magnitude earthquake that appeared to be a tunnel collapsing at the site.
Images captured by Airbus, a
space technology company that
makes Earth-observation satellites, showed the mountain literally moving during the test. An
85-acre area on the peak of Mount
Mantap visibly subsided during
the explosion, an indication of
both the size of the blast and the
weakness of the mountain.
Since that day, there have been
three much smaller quakes at the
site, in the 2- to 3-magnitude
range, each of them prompting
fears that North Korea had conducted another nuclear test that
perhaps had gone wrong. But they
all turned out to be natural.
That has analysts Frank V. Pabian and Jack Liu wondering if
Mount Mantap is suffering from
“tired mountain syndrome,” a diagnosis previously applied to the
Soviet Union’s atomic test sites.
“The underground detonation
of nuclear explosions considerably alters the properties of the
rock mass,” Vitaly V. Adushkin
and William Leith wrote in a re-
port on the Soviet tests for the U.S.
Geological Survey in 2001. This
leads to fracturing and rocks
breaking, as well as changes along
tectonic faults.
Earthquakes also occurred at
the United States’ nuclear test site
“We call it ‘taking the
roof off.’ If the mountain
collapses and the hole is
exposed, it will let out
many bad things.”
Wang Naiyan, Chinese researcher,
on the danger of another
nuclear test at Mount Mantap
in Nevada after detonations there.
“The experience we had from
the Nevada test site and decades
of monitoring the Soviet Union’s
major test sites in Kazakhstan
showed that after a very large
nuclear explosion, several other
significant things can happen,”
said Richards, the seismologist.
These include cavities collapsing
hours or even months later, he
said.
Pabian and Liu said that the
North Korean test site also
seemed to be suffering.
“Based on the severity of the
initial blast, the post-test tremors,
and the extent of observable surface disturbances, we have to assume that there must have been
substantial damage to the existing tunnel network under Mount
Mantap,” they wrote in a report
for the specialist North Korea
website 38 North.
But the degradation of the
mountain does not necessarily
mean that it would be abandoned
as a test site — just as the United
States did not abandon the Nevada test site after earthquakes
there, they said. Instead, the United States kept using the site until a
nuclear test moratorium took effect in 1992.
For that reason, analysts will
continue to keep a close eye on the
Punggye-ri site to see if North
Korea starts excavating there
again — a sign of possible prepa-
rations for another test.
The previous tests took place
through the north portal to the
underground tunnels, but even if
those tunnels had collapsed,
North Korea’s nuclear scientists
might still use tunnel complexes
linked to the south and west portals, said Pabian and Liu.
Chinese scientists have warned
that another test under the mountain could lead to an environmental disaster. If the whole mountain
caved in on itself, radiation could
escape and drift across the region,
said Wang Naiyan, former chairman of the China Nuclear Society
and a senior researcher on China’s
nuclear weapons program.
“We call it ‘taking the roof off.’ If
the mountain collapses and the
hole is exposed, it will let out
many bad things,” Wang told the
South China Morning Post last
month.
The recent seismic events have
triggered another environmental
concern, at least on the Internet:
that the nuclear tests might trigger the eruption of Mount Paektu,
an active volcano straddling the
border between North Korea and
China more than 80 miles away.
The mountain has not experienced a major eruption for centuries, and its last small rumble
was in 1903.
But this scenario, experts say, is
a stretch.
Volcanic eruptions happen
when molten rock flows into the
magma chamber under the surface, said Colin Wilson, professor
of volcanology at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand.
If an earthquake occurs when
the magma is hot and, as Wilson
puts it, “ready to roll,” it could
trigger an eruption. But if the
molten rock is not activated, then
even a large earthquake won’t
cause a volcanic eruption.
He cited the Tohoku earthquake in 2011, which had a magnitude of 9 but did not cause any of
Japan’s many volcanoes to blow
their tops.
“There’s no point in kicking a
dead horse,” Wilson said. “If the
horse is up and ready, and you give
it a slap on the bum, it will take off.
But if it’s dead, even if you slap it,
it’s not going anywhere.”
anna.fifield@washpost.com
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A10
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
LETTER FROM PARIS
A NEW LINE
WITH
ROBIN GIVHAN
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Washington Post fashion critic Robin Givhan interviews
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French Muslims recall repression of
1961, and ask how much has changed
BY
J AMES M C A ULEY
It ranks among the bloodiest
acts of state repression against
peaceful protesters in modern
European history, but few remember the horror.
On Oct. 17, 1961, in the final
months of the Algerian war,
thousands of pro-independence
Algerian demonstrators marched
through the graceful boulevards
of the French capital. They were
pushing for an end to a seemingly
endless conflict and for a halt to
the ghettoization that so many
faced in metropolitan France.
Neither was to be: French
security forces quickly descended
on the crowds in a murderous
rampage, even throwing bodies
into the River Seine when they
had finished their work. Some
historians estimate that police
killed as many as 200 people. No
one can say for sure.
This year is not a special anniversary of the “Paris massacre.”
But for some, especially in
France’s predominantly Arab and
Muslim communities, it is. The
Algerian protesters killed in 1961
were ultimately attacked under
an antecedent of the law that
French President Emmanuel
Macron has now, with certain
revisions, made permanent: the
“state of emergency.” For Arabs
and Muslims in France, this law is
a painful reminder of an even
more painful past.
Macron and his administration
have billed these emergency powers, which allow administrative
authorities to search and detain
terrorism suspects without warrants, as the surest means of stopping the wave of terrorist violence
that has claimed more than 230
lives in this country since the beginning of 2015. The measures
have been in place since the day
after the November 2015 attacks
in Paris. Two weeks ago, the
French Parliament’s lower house
voted, by an overwhelming
majority, to extend many of the
provisions indefinitely.
But France’s state of emergency
has a clear history that is fundamentally entwined with the
nation’s colonial past and especially with the nightmare of that
October night in 1961.
In 1955, during the early stages
of the Algerian war, the French
government passed a law that
would enable authorities to curb
revolutionary insurrection. In a
territory that ultimately grew to
encompass all of metropolitan
France, authorities could prevent
suspected Algerian revolutionaries from congregating in public
and exchanging ideas. By early
October 1961, the emergency
powers included a special nighttime curfew imposed only on
Algerian workers, all of whom
were French citizens at the time.
It was partly this discrimination
that so many gathered to protest
on the night of Oct. 17.
Strictly speaking, there was no
“direct link” between the law and
the attack on the Algerian protesters, said Sylvie Thénault, a
prominent French historian of
Algerian independence who has
written on the state of emergency.
That was the doing of Paris’s
police chief, Maurice Papon, the
same man who, during World
War II, had overseen the deportations of some 1,600 Bordeaux
Jews to their deaths in Nazi concentration camps. He would rise
to be a government minister in
the late 1970s, but was convicted
of crimes against humanity in
1998.
“There was a racist, discriminatory element to the law, but it
had other dimensions to it as well,
such as thwarting political opponents,” Thénault said. “On an extremely general level, however,
you can say that the state of emergency did play a part in the exceptional measures that were used to
single out and isolate Algerians.”
For Yasser Louati, a prominent
French civil liberties activist, the
history speaks for itself, and the
current French government, by
passing a version of this same law,
has ultimately sent a clear message to the country’s sizable Arab
and Muslim populations. As he
put it: “It means their lives don’t
mean much.”
“This was the police killing —
murdering — more civilians than
in any country in the Western
world since the Second World
War, and that’s true to this day,”
said Arun Kapil, a scholar of
French colonial history who
teaches at the Catholic University
of Paris. “And this happened in a
Western democracy.”
“What’s the difference between
then and the situation today?”
Louati asked. “No, we don’t have
people being killed in the streets
anymore, but we do have thousands of raids being carried out
without warrants, because people
have been reported by their
neighbors or their colleagues.”
Many Muslims perceive
France’s war on terrorism as a
crackdown on Muslims by another name. Statistics show some
truth behind that perception.
Since November 2015, French
police have conducted approximately 4,000 home raids and
have placed roughly 400 people
under house arrest, according to
statistics collected by Amnesty
International. According to data
compiled by the Collective
Against Islamophobia in France
(CCIF), an organization devoted
to combating discrimination,
about 25 percent of those house
arrests have involved Muslims.
That community is believed to
account for no more than 10 percent of the total population.
During the French presidential
election in the spring, some in
France’s Arab and Muslim communities saw a champion in
Macron, who advocated — in a
contest that largely hinged on
immigration — principles of tolerance and cohesion. While his
opponent, the far-right Marine
Le Pen, railed against “radical
Islam,” Macron went so far as to
proclaim his country’s colonial
past “a crime against humanity.”
But the new president’s image
is no longer quite that of a savior
among those in France’s largest
minority group, Louati said. Although his predecessor, François
Hollande, shattered decades of
government silence in 2012 by
calling the Paris massacre a
“bloody repression,” Macron has
said nothing, even as he champions his new security bill.
For Louati and others, the
silence is deafening: “The fact
that he doesn’t have the political
spine to move beyond this law
means that we will have to carry
this burden into the future.”
james.mcauley@washpost.com
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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
SU
Economy & Business
DOW 23,328.63
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Hollywood assistants
urged to reveal abuse
Industry shifts in wake
of Weinstein accusations
BY
SPENCER PLATT/GETTY IMAGES
A trader wears a hat on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday recognizing the market milestone. The Dow is up 27 percent
in the past year and 250 percent since it bottomed out in March 2009, making it the second-longest bull market in U.S. history.
Investors giddy as Dow tops 23,000
Nine years after the financial crisis, it has become fashionable again to participate in the stock market
When the Dow
topped 23,000 for
the first time
HEATHER
Tuesday, Adam
LONG
Cooper was
sitting in class at
Howard University grinning.
Cooper, a junior, had his Schwab
trading app open, watching the
market climb and his personal
wealth grow.
The U.S. stock market is
soaring, as President Trump
likes to point out on Twitter. The
Dow is up 27 percent in the past
year and 250 percent since it
bottomed out in March 2009
during the financial crisis. We’re
in the midst of the secondlongest bull market in U.S.
history.
“It is cool again to invest,” said
Cooper, who bought his first
stock at age 18 with money he
saved from an Outback
Steakhouse job. Today he has
about $10,000 in the market,
thanks to a combination of
investment gains and putting
more money in over the years.
He’s now 25.
On Main Street, it has become
fashionable again to talk about
stocks. Cooper’s wardrobe even
pays homage to investing. He
ditched his sports team hats in
favor of a navy cap with the
Bloomberg logo on it, a gift from
the company that makes the
popular trading and market data
terminals. Friends regularly ask
him for stock tips.
Cooper, who drives for Lyft in
between classes to make extra
Wonkblog
cash to invest, isn’t alone in
putting a lot of his money in the
market. Fifty-two percent of
Americans have at least some
money in stocks, according to
data released in September from
the Federal Reserve. That’s the
highest percentage since the
financial crisis, a sign that
Americans who felt burned
during 2008-09 downturn have
returned.
Some worry that stock market
euphoria is gripping the country.
They point out that the Dow
topped 23,000 the same week
that Wall Street marked the 30th
anniversary of the 1987 crash.
Black Monday — October 19,
1987 — was the worst day ever
for stocks. The Dow shed
22.6 percent, a reminder of how
quickly wealth can be wiped out.
Those looking for reason to
worry don’t have to search far.
There’s a potential war with
North Korea and ongoing drama
in Washington. But stepping
aside from politics, the market
has tended to drop when just
about everyone thinks the good
times will never end. Some think
we’re hitting “peak giddiness”
now. Consider these stats:
63 percent of Americans
believe the stock market will be
higher a year from now. The
University of Michigan has
asked that question every year
since 2002. This is the highest
level ever recorded by the survey.
60 percent of market experts
are bullish and 15 percent are
bearish, according to a weekly
poll Investors Intelligence
conducts of more than 100
independent investment
newsletters. Historically, when
more than 60 percent get
bullish, it has been a warning
sign.
The P/E ratio, a gauge of how
expensive the market is, has
topped 21 for the Dow. That’s
high by historical standards. The
average P/E ratio since World
War II is a bit more than 18. It
was 20 heading into the 1987
crash.
Federal Reserve Chair Janet L.
Yellen, who generally tries to
avoid commenting on the
market, said Sunday that stocks
looked “elevated” with prices at
“high levels in historical terms.”
It’s not just stocks. The
Economist’s cover earlier this
month proclaimed, “The bull
market in everything.” We’re
seeing just about every asset
class rise lately: stocks,
commodities, land, even bitcoin.
It’s usually a sign investors are
getting overly hyped and aren’t
separating out the best
investment opportunities from
the “meh” ones.
But there’s a strong case to be
made that we’re all spending too
much time worrying about the
next market drop. It took only
two years for the Dow to regain
all its losses from the 1987 crash.
The best thing for most people
to do is stay invested, a “buy and
hold” mentality.
Staying in stocks has always
paid off, even if it was dicey for a
while. Stock investors made
money over every 15-year period
since World War II, according to
Howard Silverblatt, a senior
analyst at S&P Dow Jones
Indices who ran the numbers for
every 15-year period from 1945
to 2015. Over many 15-year time
spans, investors more than
doubled their money.
Fidelity Investments ran a
similar analysis. Since 1926,
investors with 85 percent in
stocks and 15 percent in bonds
averaged 9.6 percent a year
return. Even more important,
Fidelity looked at what returns
would look like if someone
missed the days when the
market shot up the most. If
someone invested $10,000 in
1980 and kept it in the market
through August 2017, they would
have more than $615,000. If they
missed only the five best market
days, they would have just under
$400,000.
We all spend so much time
worried about market crashes.
The bigger problem most people
have is they pull their money out
at the wrong time and miss out
on the gains.
“It’s very important for our
generation to invest,” Cooper
said. “It looks like we'll have a
lot more debt than past
generations. We have to start
talking to each other more about
how to be smart with money.”
heather.long@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/wonkblog
D ANIELLE P AQUETTE
There is no rule book for Hollywood assistants. They make reservations, plan birthday parties,
schedule surgeries — tasks vary
by employer. But practically everyone signs a confidentiality
agreement.
Now, industry leaders are urging these gatekeepers to shatter
the culture of silence and come
forward if they endure or witness
sexual harassment, even if they’re
bound by a nondisclosure agreement.
The calls for increased transparency follow reports by the
New York Times and New Yorker
alleging many years and incidents of harassment and sexual
abuse by Harvey Weinstein. The
stories have rocked the entertainment business and raised questions about how much the movie
producer’s assistants knew about
the abuse.
Since the Weinstein stories
surfaced, ICM Partners, one of
the world’s largest talent agencies, and other firms have told
staffers to speak up if a boss
harasses them or others. A veteran assistant is counseling newcomers on how to handle sexual
harassment. New York state lawmakers, meanwhile, are pushing
for legislation that would outlaw
any contract that would have the
effect of concealing claims of harassment or discrimination.
The days of executives prizing
discretion over safety need to be
over, said Rachel Zaslansky Sheer,
co-founder of the Grapevine
Agency, a staffing firm to the
stars.
“If anything feels off, don’t do
it,” Sheer said she tells job candidates. “Say something. It’s not
worth it. Nothing is worth it.”
ICM Partners, one of Hollywood’s big-four agencies, recently
called an all-staff meeting, at
which Chris Silbermann, the
firm’s managing partner, denounced Weinstein’s behavior
and told workers to report abuse
they see on the job to human
resources or the firm’s legal team.
“He assured the staff that every
partner’s door is open to discuss
this matter or any other if people
needed to talk,” ICM spokesman
Brad Turell said.
Assistants, however, don’t often feel empowered to ask questions or say no, even if they
suspect that their employer could
be hurting others.
“You are not in a position
where you have any remote sort
of leverage, and you are extremely
replaceable,” said the assistant of
a popular showrunner in Los
Angeles, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of his
nondisclosure agreement and
fear of retaliation. “There are very
few things that are worth speaking up about, because when and if
you decide to do that, it’s over.”
However, Debra Katz, a civil
rights and employment lawyer in
Washington, said that the industry’s customary nondisclosure
agreements cannot block someone from filing a complaint to the
Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission. She added that assistants alleged to have enabled
sexual harassment or abuse could
face legal exposure.
“This whole notion of an assistant delivering someone to a hotel room and clearly knowing
what it was about — there’s a good
argument that the individual aided and abetted the sexual assault,” Katz said. “If they were
taking women to Weinstein under what they knew were false
pretenses, and if they understood
that there were likely unwanted
sexual advances, that’s aiding and
abetting.”
Some lawmakers are pushing
to give workers more legal protection to raise concerns.
Two New York state senators
introduced a bill last year that
would throw out any contract
that prohibits workers from reporting misconduct. (The move
came after former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson accused
executive Roger Ailes of sexual
harassment.)
“The Weinstein matter shows
that when the boss commits sexual harassment, it’s not just overlooked but enabled,” said state
Sen. Brad Hoylman (D), one of the
measure’s co-sponsors.
About 632,000 executive assistants work in the United States,
according to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics. Fewer than 4 percent
are employed by an artist, entertainer or athlete, government
data shows.
Bonnie Low-Kramen, cofounder of New York Celebrity
Assistants, a networking organization, spoke to a crowd of aspiring assistants in Dallas about how
to handle sexual harassers.
The topic, she said, exploded
into her conversations after the
Weinstein story broke.
“What is it we are willing to
tolerate and not tolerate?” she
said she asks young people who
want a foot in Hollywood’s door.
Low-Kramen, who worked as
actress Olympia Dukakis’s assistant for 25 years, advises assistants to tell their bosses or someone they trust when something
makes them uncomfortable.
“Nine times out of 10, they’re
not going to lose their jobs,” she
said. “We have to shine a light, or
we’ll never break these patterns.”
A number of Weinstein’s accusers have raised uncomfortable
questions about the role played
by his assistants. In describing an
alleged assault that took place in
1997 in Cannes, France, model
Zoe Brock said Weinstein’s assistant had said that a group of
friends would be meeting in the
producer’s hotel room. “I had
been played by not just one predator, but all of his accomplices,”
she said on Australia’s “60 Minutes.”
The assistant later apologized, Brock wrote in a Medium
post. “ ‘I’m so sorry,’ he said,”
according to Brock’s account. “ ‘I
want you to know that of all the
girls he does this to you are the
one I really felt bad about.’ ”
danielle.paquette@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
wonkblog
DIGEST
FEDERAL BUDGET
U.S. closes year with
$666 billion deficit
The federal budget deficit
rose to $666 billion in the justcompleted fiscal year, a spike
that comes as Republicans are
moving to draft a tax code
rewrite that promises to add up
to $1.5 trillion to the national
debt over the coming decade.
The sobering deficit numbers,
released Friday by the Treasury
Department and the White
House budget office, followed
Senate passage Thursday night
of a 10-year budget plan that
shelves GOP concerns on
deficits and debt in favor of a
tax overhaul.
Friday’s budget figures
represent an $80 billion jump
over last year’s $585 billion
deficit, which itself exceeded the
previous year’s $438 billion.
The administration said the
sour deficit report shows a need
to pass the tax overhaul
measure.
“These numbers should serve
as a smoke alarm for
Washington, a reminder that we
need to grow our economy again
and get our fiscal house in
order,” White House budget
director Mick Mulvaney said.
“We can do that through smart
spending restraint, tax reform
and cutting red tape.”
The White House in July
revised its short-term deficit
outlook significantly to warn of
worsening deficits. Since then,
an active hurricane season has
prompted the government to
spend billions in disaster relief.
— Associated Press
MANUFACTURING
GE reports heavy
3rd-quarter losses
General Electric drastically
cut expectations for the full year
on Friday after third-quarter
profit fell more sharply than
expected on large restructuring
charges.
In a conference call, new
chief executive John Flannery
called the results unacceptable.
“It’s also clear from our current
results that we need to make
some major changes with
urgency and a depth of
purpose.” Flannery said Friday.
During the quarter, profit fell
9 percent to $1.84 billion, or
21 cents per share. Adjusted
earnings came to 29 cents per
share, far from the per-share
earnings of 49 cents Wall Street
had expected, according to
Zacks Investment Research.
Revenue jumped 14 percent
to $33.5 billion, exceeding the
$31.92 billion analysts had
expected. Sales in the power
unit, GE’s biggest source of
revenue, fell 4 percent. Sales
and earnings in the
transportation division were off
by double-digit percentages.
The company has cut
$1 billion in industrial costs this
year. It plans more than
$2 billion in cuts next year,
double the original target, to go
with at least $20 billion in
divestments over the next year
or two, Flannery said.
The company cut its full-year
outlook to between $1.05 and
last month as the Houston
housing market quickly
recovered from Hurricane
Harvey. Still, a shortage of
available homes is thwarting
many would-be buyers and
limiting sales. The National
Association of Realtors says
existing-home sales increased
0.7 percent to a seasonally
adjusted annual rate of
5.39 million. That’s the first
increase after three months of
declines. The median home
price rose to $245,100, up
4.2 percent from a year ago.
Wells Fargo confirmed Friday
ANTONIO LACERDA/EUROPEAN PRESS PHOTO AGENCY-EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Thousand of people rush to enter Guanabara supermarket during
the super sale in Rio de Janeiro on Friday. The Brazilian supermarket
has an annual sale that creates mayhem as shoppers take advantage
of sales of up to 60 percent off, which is similar to the popular
discounts of Black Friday that are found in the United States.
$1.10 per share, down from a
previous per-share outlook of
$1.60 to 1.70 and the
$1.54 per share analysts had
been looking for, according to a
poll by FactSet.
— Associated Press
ALSO IN BUSINESS
U.S. home sales rose slightly
three high-level foreign
exchange executives and a
currency trader have left the
bank but would not say if they
were fired. The bank, which has
been through several
investigations after a scandal
over millions of fake accounts
and another over auto insurance
practices, has paid millions in
fines and settlements, and
investigations at the state and
federal level are still pending.
— From news services
A12
EZ
. SATURDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
THOMAS BOSWELL
Good night to Baker, and good luck to the Nationals finding a better manager
be out of work soon. There are
none, except perhaps John Farrell,
who inherited a Red Sox team
built by Theo Epstein and previously managed by Terry Francona
and took it to the 2013 World Series title in his first year in Boston.
In 2014, Brad Ausmus was
hailed as an ultimate managerial
candidate, an eloquent but tough
Dartmouth graduate who was up
to speed on the new analytics but
played 1,971 games in the majors
as a catcher. How could he fail?
This year, the Detroit Tigers fired
him. The X-factor nobody spotted:
He lost more than he won. Maybe
that was his apprenticeship, like
Joe Torre’s miserable early years.
When the Nats look at veteran
candidates, they all will fall under
the long shadow of Baker, who
ranks 14th in career victories and
has a career winning percentage
of .532. That is an interesting
neighborhood, the .530s. It includes Joe Maddon, Tony La Russa, Whitey Herzog, Torre and
Francona.
Here are some distinguished
managers below .530: Tom Lasorda (.526), Buck Showalter (.518),
Lou Piniella (.517), Farrell (.517)
and three-time World Series win-
ner Bruce Bochy, who’s a bit under
.500.
Now for Rizzo’s second challenge: Find a rookie manager who
can walk into a clubhouse with
personalities and résumés as big
as those of Bryce Harper, Max
Scherzer, Stephen Strasburg, Daniel Murphy, Ryan Zimmerman,
Anthony Rendon, Gio Gonzalez
and Matt Wieters and immediately command respect while
maintaining the upbeat, constructive clubhouse atmosphere.
Find a rookie manager — and
there are only two kinds, veterans
and rookies — who will have his
tough decisions not only obeyed
but swallowed by the entire team
without indigestion, including in
October.
Maybe Bud Black could do all
those things.
Rimshot.
After all, the former pitcher,
still only 60, just took the Colorado Rockies from 75-87 in 2016 to
87-75 and a playoff spot in his first
season at the helm.
Black illustrates what may be
Rizzo’s final challenge: The Nationals’ principal owners, the
Lerner family, consistently have
shied from paying market price
for any manager. All came inexpensively because they were out of
favor or past age 65, such as Davey
Johnson and Baker, or rookies
who craved a chance, such as
Manny Acta and Williams.
Two years ago, the Nats were
down to Black and Baker as their
primary candidates. Then things
went sideways. The Nats, in
Black’s view, lowballed him with
what, in the Nats’ view, was merely a first offer. Ted Lerner didn’t
love Black’s desire to discuss salary at their first meeting rather
than stick to the wonders of managing his Nats. Poor chemistry.
Within 24 hours, Baker had the
job.
In my experience, the person
you call in for the first job interview is probably your first choice.
And the guy you call within hours
to smooth out a sticky situation —
as the Nats did with Baker — is
probably your satisfactory fallback.
Maybe Baker, 68, wasn’t quite a
Hall of Fame manager. Though he
was great at managing people and
clubhouses, perhaps he was just a
solid, conventional manager within games who thought showing
confidence in his mainstays was
more important than making analytically brilliant or intuitive
moves.
But consider this: Almost everyone in MLB agreed that if he
had won a World Series either last
season or this one, he would have
been a lock for Cooperstown. Anyone who fits that description must
be pretty darn good.
Perhaps the Nats will find a
wonderful manager who will lead
them to parades and still be a
shining star a decade from now.
Or maybe they will get lucky like
the Orioles did when Joe Altobelli
won the 1983 World Series after
replacing the retired Earl Weaver,
who couldn’t get them over the
finish line.
Baker was not such a good
manager that he couldn’t be fired.
It’s happened three times before.
But he was a marvelous, multifaceted person who brought smiles,
empathy, strength of character
and laughter everywhere he went.
Within days of his taking the job,
all thoughts of Jonathan Papelbon
choking Harper in the dugout at
the end of the 2015 season evaporated, though they both still were
in the same clubhouse. No problem. Dusty was there, too.
In his last game with the Nats,
Baker and Maddon, the certified
genius, faced similar problems:
starting pitchers who had to be
hooked early. Maddon burned
through his bullpen, using five relievers to get just eight outs. Then
he prayed his closer, Wade Davis,
could get more outs and throw
more pitches than he had in any
save in his life. Baker spaced out
five pitchers from his bullpen to
get 15 outs and had his closer,
Doolittle, ready for normal duty: a
scoreless ninth inning.
In the game that ended the
Nats’ season and probably cost
Baker his job, Baker may have
won the biggest element in the
managing battle. That’s irony.
Whenever I looked up some aspect of Baker’s overflowing life,
his full name often caught my eye:
Johnnie B. “Dusty” Baker. I often
thought, “Can’t we upgrade that B
to a B-plus?”
Finding a manager better than
Johnnie B-plus “Dusty” Baker
probably can be done. But good
luck trying.
Trump under pressure to put conservative atop Fed
seat with Randal K. Quarles.
Powell has emerged as a strong
candidate, meeting many of the
qualities that would seem to align
with Trump’s preferences. Powell
would probably keep in place
many of Yellen’s monetary policies, but he is a Republican and
former partner of the private equity firm the Carlyle Group who
shares Trump’s views on pulling
back regulations. Cohn, a former
Goldman Sachs executive, is also
seen as someone who would provide continuity but with a lighter
touch on regulation.
The decision will rank among
the most important of Trump’s
presidency — the Fed chair wields
tremendous power over the domestic and global economy. The
Fed operates independently of the
White House, but the president
gets to nominate Fed governors,
including the chair, when there
are openings. The Senate approves the president’s nominees.
A Fed chair who aggressively
hiked interest rates would complicate Trump’s goals of a stronger
economy and thriving market by
the time he is up for reelection.
“This is a president who loves
low interest rates and happy markets, so this decision should be
easy: Yellen, a no-brainer,” said
Greg Valliere, a strategist with Horizon Investments. “But he also
hates regulations and must realize
that Dodd-Frank reforms are going nowhere in the Senate, which
means the Fed will have to lead the
fight to kill regulations.”
Cohn was seen as the ideal
choice for Trump for much of the
summer, but he angered Trump
when he criticized the president’s
remarks after the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville.
Taylor, who worked in the
George H.W. Bush administration,
says quantitative easing — or QE,
the injection of money into the
economy by the Fed — was a mistake. He says the Fed should act
almost like a computer, raising or
lowering interest rates when clear,
transparent metrics are hit in the
job market and inflation. His
framework for setting interest
rates has been dubbed the “Taylor
Rule.” If it were in place now,
interest rates would probably be
higher than the current range of 1
to 1.25 percent.
But some argue that Taylor and
Warsh would not disrupt the Fed’s
slow and steady path of raising
interest rates and unwinding QE.
Once people get on the Fed board,
they have a tendency to soften
their views and not operate independently of the White House. All
of the Fed’s key decisions are made
by a committee of 12 people.
“You’re the Fed chair, but you’re
not the dictator,” said Michel, of
the Heritage Foundation.
BOSWELL FROM A1
departing Jayson Werth (.226) will
be a major upgrade. But I
wouldn’t be able to find that hypothetical manager for 2018, even
with a blank checkbook.
Nats fans often say, “In Rizzo we
trust.” How on earth did the GM
create a decent bullpen at the
trade deadline? Not one pundit,
local or national, mentioned Sean
Doolittle, Ryan Madson or Brandon Kintzler as possibilities for
the Nats. Rizzo got them all.
In decision-making, there is
only one hole in Rizzo’s socks. He
had a chance to hire a manager after 2013 and decided that Matt
Williams was an excellent choice,
saying publicly and privately that
Williams was going to be “a great
manager.” Williams lacked only
one skill: communicating with humans. By his second season, Williams was avoiding his own clubhouse in the afternoon so he could
find shoulders on other floors of
Nationals Park to commiserate on.
That was a miss.
Here are Rizzo’s challenges.
First, find a veteran manager with
a track record anywhere close to
Baker’s who is available or likely to
pick for the top post. “They’re both
very talented people,” Trump told
Fox Business in an interview.
The White House, which has
confirmed the list of five finalists,
says Trump aims to announce a
nominee before he leaves for Asia
on Nov. 3.
The decision could have wide
ramifications for the economy —
and politics. Changes in Fed policy
can affect growth and markets,
sometimes in unpredictable ways.
The selection of a Fed chair also
comes in the midst of debates on
Capitol Hill over an overhaul of
the tax code. Alan Greenspan famously broke with the Fed’s tradition of staying out of politics to
endorse George W. Bush’s tax cuts
in 2001, lending his imprimatur to
the effort.
Yellen’s tenure, like that of her
predecessor, Ben Bernanke, has
been marked by unprecedented
efforts to fight unemployment and
stimulate economic growth in the
aftermath of the 2008-2009 recession. Yellen continued a trend of
holding interest rates at historic
lows for nearly a decade and even
employed
never-before-used
monetary maneuvers in an effort
to accelerate the recovery.
Warsh and Taylor argue that
Yellen has gone too far in pushing
for economic stimulus, saying she
FED FROM A1
publicly. Vice President Pence also
likes Taylor, according to several
White House officials not authorized to speak publicly. On Friday,
the Wall Street Journal editorial
page endorsed choosing Taylor or
Warsh.
But Trump is also contemplating keeping Yellen, with whom he
met this week. Unemployment
has fallen to a 16-year low during
her tenure. Top White House economic adviser Gary Cohn and current Fed governor Jerome Powell,
a Republican, are also on the president’s shortlist for the job.
Many on Wall Street argue that
what is needed most right now at
the Fed are continuity and low
rates. Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin, a former Goldman
Sachs executive, is pushing Powell
as an option that would allow
Trump to keep the Fed on a steady
and familiar course without reappointing Yellen, a Democrat, according to several people close to
Mnuchin who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they
were not authorized to discuss the
internal deliberations.
Trump said Friday that “it is in
my thinking” to appoint both Powell and Taylor to the Fed, although
he did not say which one he would
has left the United States vulnerable to the type of out-of-control
inflation it faced in the 1970s and
early 1980s. If Trump tapped either for the job, the new chair
would probably push the Fed to
raise interest rates much more
quickly to limit the risk of inflation, a move that could startle
markets and potentially slow the
economy.
Appointing one of them would
be a long break with tradition, as
sitting Fed chairs have been reappointed by presidents of opposing
parties ever since Ronald Reagan
did so with Paul Volcker, a Jimmy
Carter appointee.
“She’s done a magnificent job,”
said Allen Sinai, president of Decision Economics and a longtime
adviser to both political parties.
“The main problem is she is not a
loyal Republican. Janet is a liberal
Democrat. She doesn’t hide this.”
Many in the GOP say the Fed is
playing too big of a role in the
economy, especially considering
Yellen and Bernanke took the
Fed’s assets from $900 billion to
$4.5 trillion today.
“I would want someone who is
explicit about ditching the framework they are operating under
now,” said Norbert Michel, director of the Center for Data Analysis
at the conservative Heritage Foun-
dation.
Trump’s views on the central
bank have swung wildly in the
past year and a half. On the campaign trail he slammed Yellen, accusing her of keeping rates artificially low “because she’s obviously
political and doing what Obama
wants her to do.” Now that Trump
is in the White House, he says he
“like[s] a low-interest-rate policy”
and “respects” Yellen.
What complicates the decision
for Trump is that he wants the next
Fed chair to do more than craft
monetary policy; he wants that
person to lead the charge on rolling back regulations on banks,
including the Dodd-Frank Wall
Street Reform Act put in place
after the crisis. Yellen has repeatedly stated that she thinks banks
are much safer today because of
regulations, although she has expressed openness to making
tweaks to Dodd-Frank, especially
for smaller bankers.
Trump has an unusually large
opportunity to shape the Fed. In
addition to picking the chair, he
gets to fill four openings out of
seven Fed governor seats. If he
does not reappoint Yellen and she
steps down, Trump would then get
to make five appointments, an unprecedented number in a short
period. He has already filled one
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
For more by Thomas Boswell, visit
washingtonpost.com/boswell.
heather.long@washpost.com
Damian Paletta contributed to this
report.
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
U.S. Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
23,330
Close
1 Year
% Chg
23,328.63 +2.0
+28.4
23,220
23,110
23,000
22,890
Nasdaq Composite Index
6640
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Weekly
% Chg
6629.05
+0.4
+26.5
Weekly
% Chg
Industry Group
Health Care Providers
Trading Co's & Distr
Construction Materials
Textiles & Apparel
Commercial Banks
Airlines
Personal Products
Distributors
Energy Equipment & Svcs
Household Products
–6%
0%
+6%
5.6
5.5
5.1
3.7
3.0
–2.4
–3.2
–4.1
–4.5
–4.8
6600
6580
6560
2575.21
S&P 500 Index
+0.9
+20.3
2578
2572
2566
2560
2554
2548
Mon.
Tue.
Wed.
Thur.
Fri.
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Weekly
% Chg
76,390.52
15,857.22
49,970.83
–0.8
0.3
0.0
390.13
5372.38
12,991.28
7523.23
–0.3
0.4
0.0
–0.2
5906.99
3926.85
28,487.24
21,457.64
1 Year % Chg
–25%
0%
+25%
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
% Chg
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
221.32
92.09
156.25
264.75
131.36
118.64
34.25
46.38
71.18
83.11
23.83
244.73
163.43
162.07
40.43
1.7
–0.8
–0.5
1.5
0.5
–0.4
2.3
0.4
–0.3
0.8
3.7
2.6
–0.6
10.2
1.9
30.3
37.9
33.5
94.9
51.6
16.5
13.6
10.6
32.3
–4.7
–18.0
40.2
29.4
7.0
14.1
Company
Close
Weekly
% Chg
1 Year
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
142.40
99.51
166.30
63.88
78.81
53.06
88.25
36.42
133.32
120.93
207.49
49.53
107.55
87.44
99.40
4.4
3.8
0.6
0.8
1.7
4.1
–5.1
0.2
5.2
1.9
7.8
3.5
–1.0
0.9
2.1
24.0
45.8
50.4
3.2
37.7
2.3
3.9
11.9
21.7
21.8
43.0
0.8
30.4
27.2
8.0
US $
1.6
0.1
0.0
1.4
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1777
0.0088
1.3189
0.3130
0.7923
0.0526
0.0075
1.1199
0.2659
0.6727
0.0447
149.6540
35.5291
89.9000
5.9787
0.2374
0.6007
0.0400
2.5300
0.1682
EU € per
0.8491
Japan ¥ per
113.4700
133.6300
Britain £ per
0.7583
0.8929
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.1938
3.7612
0.0281
4.2118
Canada $ per
1.2622
1.4864
0.0111
1.6646
0.3951
Mexico $ per
18.9787
22.3522
0.1670
25.0307
5.9440
Mexico $
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 26,697.94
Russell 2000
1509.25
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 530.82
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
9.97
1 Year % Chg
20.6
23.7
34.8
–27.5
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Weekly
(Ticker) % Chg
Weekly
% Chg
$1.5520
$17.08
$9.8925
$0.1400
$4.2600
+2.4
–1.9
–1.1
–2.8
–3.1
week
$500
$1000
year
$1500
–1.0
1.0
–1.5
–1.6
0.0
2.3
–1.5
–2.1
–1.8
0.0665
Company
NVR Inc
Altimmune Inc
Primus
Discovery Comm
Neuralstem Inc
Capital One Fin
K2M Group Holdings
Danaher Corp
Intelsat SA
Spherix Inc
LaSalle Hotel Prop
Novavax Inc
Urban One Inc
Celsion Corp
CASI Pharma
Rexahn Pharma
Close
Weekly
% Chg
$3223.25
$2.66
$5.43
$20.29
$1.42
$89.67
$19.98
$90.79
$6.40
$1.49
$28.52
$1.05
$1.86
$3.76
$2.37
$1.85
9.6
6.4
6.3
5.5
5.2
5.0
5.0
4.5
–6.4
–6.9
–7.2
–7.9
–9.3
–9.4
–12.9
–14.7
week
$0
$1000
year
$2400
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Consumer Rates
Weekly % Chg
0.8
0.4
0.5
3.7
+1.0
–2.3
0.0
–1.8
–2.8
Close
15.0380
Interest Rates
Other Measures
$3.1655
$3.4450
$51.47
$1,280.50
$2.92
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
Cross Currency Rates
US $ per
Weekly
% Chg
Local Gainers and Losers
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6620
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.32
0.45
0.79
1.46
2.75
5.33
4.25%
Bank Prime
1.25%
Federal Funds
1.36%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.81%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.10%
10-year note
Yield: 2.38
2-year note
Yield: 1.57
5-year note
Yield: 2.02
6-month bill
Yield: 1.26
15-Year fixed mortgage
3.24%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
RE
Free For All
Context makes
the tweet
even worse
Left behind by ‘Going Out’
I am irritated that The Post has eliminated the
“Going Out Guide” from the Thursday Local Living
section. I don’t need to see pages of home-decorating
ideas or home sales. I don’t know what activities are
available without the “Going Out Guide.” Friday’s
Weekend section has some listings, but not as many
as Local Living ran.
I was already mad that the “Events Calendar” was
removed from the Saturday Religion page. Churches
have concerts that are not necessarily sacred in
nature because their acoustics are spectacular.
These were great public services that The Post
eliminated.
Sheila B. Sheats, Burke
JAMES LAWLER DUGGAN/REUTERS
GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at the
Values Voter Summit in Washington on Oct. 13.
More to the Moore story
Regarding the Oct. 12 front-page article “Charity
privately paid Roy Moore”:
The charity in question, Foundation for Moral
Law, didn’t pay former Alabama chief justice Roy
Moore “privately”; it paid him secretly, and it is
alleged to have intentionally tried to hide its actions
while Moore publicly denied these payments.
The charity was audited on suspicion of violating
Internal Revenue Service regulations for nonprofit
organizations. The headline seemed to minimize the
corruption. Democracy dies in darkness; The Post
shouldn’t help it hide in the shadows.
John Darrin, Frederick
Outrage can’t be partisan
Regarding Christine Emba’s Oct. 14 op-ed, “One
Weird Trick? Not for harassment.”:
Perhaps the reason that sexual harassment and
assault aren’t taken as seriously as Emba thinks they
should be is that liberals ignore such activities by
men who espouse pro-woman attitudes. Emba cited
a “flood of similar scandals in our recent past” but
mentioned only “Cosby, Ailes and O’Reilly”
— referring to Bill Cosby, Roger Ailes and Bill
O’Reilly, one controversial black man and
two
conservative
white men.
In discussing sexual
improprieties, Emba
failed to name former
congressman Anthony
Weiner (D-N.Y.), who
MARK LENNIHAN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
pleaded guilty to
charges related to Anthony Weiner
sending sexual material to a minor and former president Bill Clinton (D),
who was accused of sexual harassment or assault by
several women. The Weiner case has been in the
news recently. Clinton’s activities are certainly
recent enough.
Emba’s naming of only Ailes, O’Reilly and Cosby is prima facie proof of fake, preening moral
outrage.
Joseph E. Stolz Jr., Washington Grove
Another electric option
I enjoyed the Oct. 12 Economy & Business article
“2017 marks the rise of the all-electric vehicle.” It
seemed odd, though, that there was no mention of
the Chevrolet Bolt.
The Bolt, which is similar in specs and pricing to
the Tesla Model 3, has been available to consumers
for some time. My wife and I were waiting for just
such a combination of capability and price in an
electric vehicle, and we bought a Bolt a few months
ago and haven’t been disappointed.
Perhaps it lacks the Tesla mystique, but it is a
well-made, fun-to-drive car that lives up to its
promise. All the attention still seems to be on the
Tesla, which is not yet widely available to the masses.
(For the record, I have no stake in Chevrolet other
than as a customer.)
Zolt Levay, Columbia
RAMON ESPINOSA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
What perseverance looks like
I was stunned by the Oct. 12 front-page photograph by
the Associated Press’s Ramon Espinosa of residents of the
San Lorenzo neighborhood of Morovis, Puerto Rico,
carrying supplies that had been delivered by helicopter
after Hurricane Maria [“Puerto Rico’s misery drags on”].
The color palette, the curve of the road, the shapes of the
trees, the forbidding tone of the sky and the subject matter
— every individual trying to persevere — were terrific and
quite reminiscent of Thomas Hart Benton murals.
Mary M. Miller, Washington
The Oct. 8 front-page article “President,
with tweet, dives into Virginia race” covered President Trump’s endorsement of
Republican Ed Gillespie in the Virginia
governor’s race in a tweet that falsely
accused Democrat Ralph Northam of
“fighting for the violent MS-13.” Trump’s
tweet was repeated in the article’s second
paragraph.
Not until the 31st paragraph were readers provided context in which they learned
that a “misleading” Gillespie ad sparked
Trump’s accusation. Repeated analysis has
shown that very few readers make it that
far into an article, and, substantively, the
article’s structure thus failed to inform
readers of critical context. And, nowhere
did the article make clear that Trump’s
tweet went from “misleading” to potentially libelous material.
The article focused on a political analysis of Trump’s potential impact in the
election. That’s horse-race journalism.
Fact check after fact check has made
clear that Trump’s statements and tweets
are often divorced from reality. The headline on this article should have read:
“Trump joined Gillespie in lying about
Northam,” because it is true (backed by
facts) and interesting and new. To treat
Trump’s distortions as legitimate, without
making clear the falsehoods they contained, is to normalize the abnormal. The
Post owes its readers and American democracy better.
Adam Siegel, McLean
Of culture wars and
making arrangements
The Oct. 11 news article “Trump scores win in
culture war as NFL asks players to stand for
anthem” and George F. Will’s Oct. 15 op-ed, “The
sinister agendas of some Trump backers” described
Vice President Pence’s visit to a football game as
“preplanned.”
Pray tell me, what is the difference between
“planning” and “preplanning”? Doesn’t planning
mean arranging something in advance? Has anything ever been “post-planned”?
Carole S. Appel, Alexandria
PHOTOS BY NATHANIEL KOCH
Scenes from Peirce Mill in Northwest Washington. Jeanne Minor, upper right, works inside the mill.
Pondering Peirce Mill’s history
MICHAEL CONROY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vice President Pence and his wife, Karen, stand
for the national anthem before an Indianapolis
Colts game Oct. 8 in Indianapolis.
I have fond memories of biking and picnicking
near Peirce Mill in Rock Creek Park as a child, so I
enjoyed reading the Oct. 8 Washington Post
Magazine Street Smart article “In Rock Creek
Park, history is good grist,” about how Quaker
Isaac Peirce created a large milling business using
the water of Rock Creek as a power source.
I was surprised, however, to read that the
business “was supported by slave labor,” as it was
my understanding that Quakers were leaders in
the abolition movement.
In fact, according to the website the Abolition
Project, “The abolition campaign in Britain was
started by the Society of Friends, known as
the Quakers. Quakers believe that all people are
created equal in the eyes of God. . . . By
1761, Quakers had come to view abolition as a
Christian duty and all Quakers, on both sides of
the Atlantic, were barred from owning slaves.”
I would like to know more about the circumstances under which Peirce relied on slave labor,
as the Quaker religion prohibited its members
from owning slaves at the time.
Rachel A. Bernhardt, Silver Spring
Surrounded by pet peeves
I again have encountered one of my grammatical
pet peeves in a Post article. In this case, in the Oct.
13 front-page article “Exhausted crews battle a
‘once-in-a-career fire,’ ” about the tragic fires in
California’s wine country. The article described
Woodley Place as “a line of modest houses surrounded on three sides by wooded hills.”
If something is surrounded, it would be encircled. To be surrounded on three sides is a
contradiction in terms, unless, of course, the parcel
is triangular, and in that case it becomes repetitive.
The proper description would be to say that it was
bordered on three sides.
I have encountered this error multiple times
within the pages of The Post, including in an Aug.
26 Real Estate feature, “The view from the front
porch? A national park,” in which a house was
described as “surrounded on three sides by national
park land.” Previous misuse included describing a
Potomac River peninsula as surrounded by water
on three sides. Although I might get perverse pleasure each time I discover this error, I would prefer
that The Post not fuel my obsession.
Dan Edelstein, Silver Spring
TOMOHIRO OHSUMI/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Birds fly near a man as he fishes in front of a
Kobe Steel plant in Kobe, Japan, on Oct. 13.
Not everything is political
The birds were the least of it
The birds depicted in the Oct. 14 Economy &
Business photograph “Darkening skies” are pigeons, not sea gulls.
The error in the caption, while amusing, is of
little significance compared to the grievous scandal
of a trusted company deliberately falsifying data on
its products, as Kobe Steel is accused of doing,
which the photo caption noted. Someone at Kobe is
a true birdbrain for thinking he could get away with
cheating. No offense to birds intended.
Robert Davis, Silver Spring
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Intelligence analysts at the U.S. Army cryptanalysis service headquarters in Arlington in 1944.
Remembering Ann Caracristi and the ‘code girls’
It’s unfathomable that “The hidden figures of
WWII code-breaking,” Elaine Showalter’s Oct. 8 Book
World review of Liza Mundy’s book “Code Girls,” only
once mentioned Ann Caracristi by name, and then
only to attribute to her an inane quote [Outlook].
Caracristi went from “code girl” to a career of
renown at the National Security Agency. She rose to
become deputy director, the highest civilian position
in the agency. She died last year at 94.
George F. Steeg, Potomac Falls
I greatly enjoyed the Oct. 9 Style article “The life of
the party, with calculated cool,” about a Renoir
exhibit at the Phillips Collection built around “Luncheon of the Boating Party,” one of my all-time
favorites. However, the article misidentified one of
the other paintings in the exhibit. While “Danse a la
Campaign” might be appropriate in Washington,
where politics makes strange dance partners, the
real name of the piece is “Danse à la Campagne”
(“Dance in the Country”), much more appropriate to
Renoir and the actual subject matter of the painting.
Clare Feinson, Washington
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Focus the census on essential data
EDITORIALS
The Senate chooses fiscal irresponsibility
A GOP-backed plan that would generate $1.5 trillion in new debt forsakes reform for tax breaks.
T
economy. Lowering corporate rates would make
the United States a more attractive place to do
business. Ending tax breaks would fight tax
gaming by the wealthy and cut unneeded government interference in private decisions about
where to invest money. The result would be a fairer
and more efficient tax code, without adding a
penny to the debt. Republicans and Democrats
should be able to agree on such a policy.
But as the plan has developed, Republicans
have balked at doing the hard stuff — that is,
raising revenue. Instead of clipping their ambitions to reduce tax rates so that it continued to line
up with their willingness to offset them, Republicans have steadily gravitated toward simply not
paying for them. The Senate on Thursday put a
number on its fiscal recklessness, giving itself
permission to leave $1.5 trillion in tax cuts
unpaid-for.
Republicans respond that the way these numbers have to be officially counted makes them look
worse than reality. The reasoning is complex, but
the bottom line is simple: They want to use a
budgeting gimmick that previous congresses have
properly declined to exploit. The tax plan’s backers
also argue that the cut will spur economic growth,
which will eventually return more money to the
Treasury than traditional budget calculations
would suggest. The myth that tax cuts pay for
themselves has been debunked by both economic
theory and practical experience. While some
“dynamic” effects are possible, they are hard to
predict and certainly not as large as tax-cut
enthusiasts claim.
There is still time for reason to prevail. Before
the Senate voted for fiscal irresponsibility, the
House passed a budget plan calling for revenueneutral tax reform. This concept must be revived
as the action turns to congressional committees,
which will fill in the crucial details — which taxes
will be cut, by how much, with which offsets. At
the end of this process, the chambers must vote
again on the whole package. The senators who
surrendered to fiscal cowardice on Thursday will
have one last chance to prove themselves responsible.
Starting over
in South Sudan
It is time for Washington
to move beyond Mr. Kiir.
T
HE FACT that the humanitarian disaster in
South Sudan is man-made offers little consolation to the victims, but suggests that it
might be reversed. This was once a fertile
and oil-rich land; it is now convulsed by violence and
hunger. Some 4 million people, a third of the
population, are displaced internally or refugees
abroad. Responsibility for this catastrophe rests on
the shoulders of two men who led South Sudan to
independence in 2011 and then squandered their
legacy on war and enriching themselves.
In a recent interview with The Post, one of them,
President Salva Kiir, was defiant. He did not accept
any blame for the ruinous conflict with his rival and
former first vice president, Riek Machar. Wearing
the cowboy hat he received as a gift from President
George W. Bush, Mr. Kiir declared, “I did not do
anything that can make me regret.” Asked whether
his troops have made any mistakes, he responded,
“I don’t remember.” He deflected a question about
the role of his soldiers in violence by claiming that
their uniforms were being stolen by Mr. Machar’s
men. Then he went on a rant about shootings in the
United States.
Mr. Kiir is now in the driver’s seat. Mr. Machar is
in South Africa, although the remnants of his army
still fight. The core problem for all those who have
ambitions to save South Sudan is how to help its
suffering people while forcing Mr. Kiir out of the
way. For years, efforts have been made to get
Mr. Kiir to agree to a sustainable peace, hold
accountable those responsible for war crimes and
build a functioning state. Talk doesn’t work. Sanctions seem to bother him little. Peace agreements
and various cease-fire arrangements have been
reached and tossed away like tissue paper. An arms
embargo failed to get off the ground in the
U.N. Security Council.
On a recent visit, the U.S. Agency for International Development administrator, Mark Green, found
Mr. Kiir in denial, disputing every concern he
raised. Mr. Green announced that the U.S. administration would be carrying out a policy review, and
President Trump asked U.S. Ambassador to the
MARIAH QUESADA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Women and children in Terekeka, South Sudan, on Oct. 4.
United Nations Nikki Haley to visit Mr. Kiir this
month. In remarks at the Security Council in
September, she declared that “this is the last
chance” at salvaging a peace for South Sudan.
As warring groups splinter, it may be hard to ever
put South Sudan back together. But the Trump
administration does have a chance at a fresh start.
Ms. Haley might consider reaching out to a younger
in memory of two FBI agents who had been killed in
the line of duty. He claimed Ms. Wilson used the
occasion to take unseemly credit for securing federal
funding for the building. “We were stunned,” he said,
“stunned that she had done it. Even for someone that
is that empty a barrel, we were stunned.”
But, as a video by the Florida Sun Sentinel of
Ms. Wilson’s remarks that day shows, Mr. Kelly got it
all wrong. She did not say she got money for the
building. She was generous and graceful in sharing
credit for how legislation naming the building was
fast-tracked. And she spent most of her nine-minute
speech praising the FBI agents killed in a gunfight
generation of more technocratic leaders who are
fed up with the failures of their elders. The
administration should also press Egypt, Uganda
and Ukraine to stop the flow of arms to South
Sudan. The United States cannot forsake a people
caught in the grip of misery; it must begin to look
beyond the men who made this awful mess,
including Mr. Kiir.
with drug dealers: “Today it is our patriotic duty to
lift up Special Agent Benjamin Grogan and Special
Agent Jerry Dove from the streets of South Florida
and place their names and pictures high, where the
world will know that we are proud of their sacrifice,
sacrifice for our nation.”
It is unfortunate that the sacrifice of brave people
such as these two agents or the four soldiers killed in
Niger can get overwhelmed by the petty namecalling of politics. That is a point Mr. Kelly was trying
to make Thursday, and that he undercut with his
misrepresentation of Ms. Wilson. He needs to set the
record straight.
ABCDE
LOCAL OPINIONS
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
Decriminalizing sex work would help bring victims out of the shadows
At first blush, it is easy to assume that decriminalizing prostitution will embolden sex traffickers and
increase victimization. People such as Tina Frundt
and Nicholas Kristof assert as much. However, the
reality is that decriminalizing sex work, as proposed
recently by D.C. Council members David Grosso
(I-At Large) and Robert C. White Jr. (D-At Large),
will reduce sex trafficking.
Research I conducted for my book on human
trafficking shows that decriminalization of sex work
is an evidenced-based approach to combating sex
trafficking. While there is research to suggest that
legalization does create a protective veneer that
would facilitate the impunity of sex traffickers,
decriminalization is a different approach entirely.
Decriminalizing sex work does not make prostitu-
Va. is improving schools
The Oct. 15 editorial “In Virginia, a retreat from
rigor” conflated the modernizing of state-mandated
tests and accountability reform with the lowering of
Virginia’s academic standards. This couldn’t be
further from the truth.
Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) has worked with educators and policymakers in a bipartisan way to
strengthen Virginia’s education system by shifting
from “testing for testing’s sake” to truly evaluating
the progress students and schools are making. Those
actions are not a reduction of standards but, rather, a
reaction to a testing system that failed to foster the
skills our students truly need. Recognizing its
shortcomings, policymakers worked to replace some
standardized tests with more sophisticated exams
that require students to think critically and communicate clearly, rather than simply regurgitate facts.
When established, the standards and their corresponding tests provided new levels of equity, consistency and accountability. More than 20 years later,
we can hold teachers and students accountable for
more than scores on tests that demonstrate neither
growth nor true ability. It is misleading to claim to
care about education accountability as a great
equalizer for minority students, but then rail against
a proposal that, for the first time would hold schools
accountable for the atrocious achievement gaps for
students of color. The editorial filled in the wrong
bubble when it implied that the bipartisan leaders
who are working on education reform in Virginia are
reducing standards rather than making schools
work better for students and our economy.
Dietra Trent, Richmond
The writer is Virginia’s secretary of education.
President Trump stated that he would not certify
the 2015 Iran nuclear deal because Iran was “not
living up to the spirit of the deal” [“Trump
sets Iran pact conditions,” front page, Oct. 14]. This
was contrary to Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s
recognition that Iran is in “technical compliance,” as
well as the International Atomic Energy Agency’s
recognition that Iran is in compliance.
Conservatives tend to support textualist jurisprudence, essentially arguing that one must adhere
strictly to the text and not the intention or “spirit” of
the law when interpreting a legal text. It is particularly interesting to see the Trump administration, whose
only success to date has been the appointment of Neil
M. Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, dismiss the nuclear deal because the Islamic republic is “not living
up to the spirit of the deal.”
Armin Tadayon, Chantilly
The chief of staff was trying to make a point about politicizing soldiers’ deaths, but he got his facts wrong.
W
The Oct. 14 editorial “Congress must salvage the
census” justified higher funding for the Census
Bureau so that an accurate count of the U.S. population is ensured. Ironically, the editorial came out the
same day my family received a “past due notice” from
the Census Bureau saying we had not submitted our
“2016 Annual Survey of Entrepreneurs.”
The “mandatory” survey is 27 pages long and
includes questions such as on “the reason to own the
business”: Was it “flexible hours”? These 27 pages of
questions have nothing to do with apportioning
congressional seats or reversing the historical undercounting of poor and minority communities.
Those who support increased funding for the
Census Bureau should consider the difference between essential activities to count the population and
inessential activities that census bureaucrats think
are of interest, as well as how our government has
made “mandatory” what should be optional.
Jonathan D. Berman, North Bethesda
Parsing Iran’s nuclear compliance
Mr. Kelly owes the congresswoman an apology
HITE HOUSE Chief of Staff John F. Kelly
owes Rep. Frederica S. Wilson (D-Fla.) an
apology. That is the only conclusion that
can be drawn after watching a video of
the representative’s remarks at the dedication of an
FBI building in Miramar, Fla., in 2015.
Mr. Kelly took to the lectern in the White House
briefing room Thursday to defend President Trump’s
handling of a condolence call to a widow of one of
the soldiers killed in Niger and to attack Ms. Wilson
as selfish and politically motivated for her criticism.
To bolster that characterization, he offered up his
remembrance of the dedication of the FBI building
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
HE SENATE late Thursday narrowly approved a budget plan that could cost the
nation dearly. The goal is a massive tax cut
with uncertain benefits for most Americans, in an economy that does not require the sort
of short-term jolt that deficit-financed tax cuts are
good for. The price tag is $1.5 trillion in new debt
over 10 years.
The bad news is that several Republicans who
previously expressed deep concern about the
country’s shaky finances voted for the budget
outline, clearing the way for this foolish plan. The
good news is that they still have a chance to show
that they are not irresponsible hypocrites. Thursday’s vote was just the first step in a long process of
hashing out exactly what the tax cut would look
like — and, therefore, how damaging it would be.
This policy push began with a much better idea:
real tax reform. Congress would cut tax rates —
particularly for corporations, which face a relatively high nominal rate — but would recoup the
revenue by closing tax loopholes and ending big
tax breaks. Both sides of this plan would help the
. SATURDAY,
tion legal; it just empowers victims to come forward
without fear of erroneous criminalization.
I’ve gone to “the track” in the District, where
women are sold for sex on the street. In speaking
with these women, I’ve learned that some of them
are pimped and have been nearly drowned, hit, shot
or stabbed. Many never alerted the authorities of the
abuse, for fear of punishment. Far too often, victims
of sex trafficking who muster the courage to call the
police are erroneously arrested themselves, instead
of their abusers.
It is clear that any anti-trafficking advocate who
opposes this legislation is misguided, as decriminalizing sex work will undoubtedly bring sextrafficking victims out of the shadows.
Kimberly Mehlman-Orozco, Montclair, Va.
News pages:
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Managing Editor
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Cut off harassment at the roots
Regarding Alyssa Rosenberg’s Oct. 17 op-ed, “Why
I thought twice before saying #MeToo”:
I echo Ms. Rosenberg’s sentiments. It is utterly
heartbreaking to scroll through my social-media
feeds and discover countless women who have
experienced such inexcusable, despicable behavior.
Reading firsthand accounts has forced me to relive
my own dreadful encounter — a memory I desperately fight to repress.
As Ms. Rosenberg stated, these “consciousnessraising” moments such as #MeToo are not enough.
The problem lies in our culture. Our country refuses
to acknowledge the stereotypes and behaviors that
perpetuate this endless cycle of sexual harassment
and violence. For one, it starts early. As an undergraduate, I worked in a psychology lab that studied the
topic. You would not believe the number of middle
school girls who found it acceptable for boys to “rate”
their body parts and send dirty pictures via texts. In
fact, our findings showed that as early as elementary
school, children feel that they must abide by certain
rules to be a “real” boy or girl.
Raising awareness is necessary. But we must also
push for a rigorous change in our education system,
where these behaviors and mind-sets initially take
shape.
Naomi Charalambakis, Louisville, Ky.
Econ 101
Regarding the Oct. 15 Business article “Nobel
winner Thaler infused real behavior into economics”:
Behavioral economics does not explain the myriad ways other economic agents (businesses, investors, workers and other drivers of capitalist economies) are rational, which is explained by current
economic doctrine. These agents conform to the
mathematical models, which are nothing but a
formalization of the underlying theory to make it
amenable to empirical testing. (I don’t see anybody
attacking Albert Einstein’s theories for being too
mathematical). Indeed, that is the way all science
works.
Economic orthodoxy also explains an important
and ubiquitous real-world phenomenon that cannot
be explained by behavioral economics: downwardsloping demand curves.
Also, I wish The Post would stop attacking former
Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan for not
addressing the spiking housing prices and mortgage
policies that caused the Great Recession. There is
nothing about housing prices in the Fed’s dual
mandate; the bad mortgage policies, which were the
main underlying cause of the recession, were implemented during the Clinton and George W. Bush
administrations.
Salvatore Lazzari, Germantown
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
A15
K
ALEXANDRA PETRI
Men of the world: You are not the weather
S
moke is not weather. Let me tell you why I have
said this. Weather is something you can do
very little to prevent; you can only prepare for
it and warn people about it and buy protective
gear. Smoke happens when someone decides to light
a fire.
I am sick of having to treat smoke as though it is
weather.
I am sick of having to bear witness about sexual
harassment.
I am sick of being warned, or not warned, about
interacting with certain people, as casually — Molly
Ringwald’s words, not mine — as talking about the
weather.
“Bring an umbrella. There is a man spitting on you
from a great height and it is easier to treat it as
though it is raining,” we are told.
“If you have lunch with him, know that he likes to
set up a giant pit filled with stakes that you will have
to step around.”
“He is a thundercloud. He is quicksand. He is a
deep bog.”
For the last time, men are not the weather. You are
not the weather.
Yes, I mean you. Maybe you are one of the good
COLBERT I. KING
ones, but I mean you. If I say “not everyone,” you will
think, “Oh, not me,” and you will be wrong. So I mean
you.
You thought you were being nice, maybe. That any
attention from you was flattering, maybe. That I
would see it as a compliment, maybe. I have forgiven
you, maybe. Or I am embarrassed for you, or I never
knew what your name was. But make no mistake:
Nothing about this was inevitable. This was not
weather. You are not the weather, and your buddy is
not the weather.
This has to stop. Instead of saying, “You cannot
smoke in here,” we are telling every woman, “There is
going to be smoke in the restaurant, so encase
yourself entirely in protective sheeting.” Instead of
saying, “Do not go around lighting people on fire,” we
are telling women, “Don’t be flammable.” But you
can’t be human and not be flammable. This is not like
walking down a dark alley and getting mugged,
because for that to be true you have to have the
option of not walking down the dark alley.
If someone were standing on a corner throwing
mud at passersby, we would not say to the passersby,
“Well, my aunt didn’t get any mud thrown at her, and
she never wore nail polish, so try that.” Do you want
to hear a story? One of the things I was wearing when
somebody tried to do something I did not want them
to do was a Jabba the Hutt suit. Don’t talk to people
about what they were wearing. A, Hutts are asexual,
and B, no. It is not what you are wearing.
I have the same stories as everyone else, but not as
awful. Stories that could have been much worse.
They end with a shrug and “I was lucky.” We all have a
story. And if we do not have a story, we have a theory.
We become convinced that we are carrying some sort
of charm, that it is the four-leaf clover we did wear or
the short dress we didn’t. But of course luck is not like
that.
I am sick of having to suffer so a man can grow.
What is this, every Hollywood movie ever made? I am
tired of having to confess to someone else’s crimes. I
am tired of showing up at the banquet dripping
blood like Banquo’s ghost. This should be your ghost,
not mine. I am not the one who should be ashamed
that you have done these things. I am not here to
make you see the error of your ways. I am here to get
through my life every day without inhaling thick
lungfuls of smoke.
Because that’s what this is. This is like getting
people who have gotten cancer from secondhand
I don’t
care about
‘Merry Christmas’
BY
P
kingc@washpost.com
Alexandra Petri writes the ComPost blog at
washingtonpost.com/blogs/compost.
Confessions
of a fake-news
reader
DRAWING BOARD
resident Trump went before a Values Voter
Summit audience here in Washington last
week and declared, “We’re saying ‘Merry
Christmas’ again.”
There is no warrant in law that directs Americans to say “Merry Christmas,” “Happy Holidays” or
anything at all. How we greet one another during
the holiday season, Mr. President, is our business.
Americans have a right to do as we please.
As if we don’t already have enough trouble
across the length and breadth of the land with
Trump’s forays into cultural wars, the last thing the
United States needs is combat over use of the words
“Merry Christmas.” But here we are.
Telling a revved-up Values Voter audience that
he is “stopping cold the attacks on Judeo-Christian
values,” Trump suggested to the crowd, which
already thinks a “war on Christianity” is being
waged, that invoking “Merry Christmas” is a way of
fighting back.
He set it up this way: “You know,” he exclaimed,
“we’re getting near that beautiful Christmas season
that people don’t talk about anymore.” (Laughter
from the audience.) “They don’t use the word
‘Christmas,’ because it’s not politically correct. You
go to department stores, and they’ll say, ‘Happy
New Year,’ and they’ll say other things. And it will
be red, they’ll have it painted, but they don’t say it.
Well, guess what?” he asked.
For Trump and those who see this as an issue,
wishing fellow Americans a “Merry Christmas”
clearly is a way to thumb their noses at America’s
left and to strike a blow for Christianity.
Speaking only for myself, I fully expect to
celebrate Christmas even if I never hear a “Merry
Christmas,” because nothing in my faith tradition
teaches that the celebration of Christmas depends
upon the salutations I receive on the street, in the
newsroom and at the grocery store.
Candidate Trump pledged at Liberty University
in Virginia in January 2016, “If I’m president, you
will see ‘Merry Christmas’ in department stores,
believe me, believe me.” Well, believe me, my
Christmas observance does not depend upon a
department store’s season’s greetings whether
secular, sacred or if they even obliquely allude to
Christmas.
Besides, “Merry Christmas” as a seasonal salute
is nowhere to be found in the Holy Bible, was never
used by the early Christians and probably dates, at
the earliest, to the 16th century.
It has become a tradition of a religious nature
that is observed during a national holiday. But it
now competes with “Happy Holidays” and other
secular greetings because some people have come
to realize that not everyone they meet is Christian.
“Politically correct,” as Trump calls it? Or respect
for the sensibilities of others?
What makes this whole dust-up over “Merry
Christmas” so off-putting is the cynically manufactured nature of Trump’s advocacy. He’s doing
nothing but pandering to a religiously conservative
base, which he plays for adulation and smothered
laughs.
Regardless of the greetings we encounter, the
King household intends to observe the Advent
season with time carved out for reflection and
preparation for Christmas. The help of “Merry
Christmas” proponents is neither needed nor
wanted.
If the utterance “Happy Holidays” can ruin your
celebration of the birth of Jesus, you may wish to
set aside a little time for serious examination of
your beliefs. And if hearing fewer expressions of
“Merry Christmas” is causing some Christians to
fall by the wayside, then their faith, indeed, rests on
shaky ground.
I don’t believe that is the case.
Christianity, Christmas trees, chimney stockings
and gift-giving aren’t going anywhere. Neither are
the classics: “It’s a Wonderful Life,” Irving Berlin’s
“White Christmas,” Judy Garland’s “Have Yourself a
Merry Little Christmas” and Nat King Cole’s “The
Christmas Song.” Oh, they might have to share
space with Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas Is You,” but fear not, that secular, leftist
element that scares the life out of the religious
right can’t take those things, including “Merry
Christmas,” out of the season.
For one simple reason, and this goes for
Judaism, Islam and all the other great spiritual
traditions, as well: Religion doesn’t depend upon
secular society to keep going.
Something else is at work, and it’s deeper and
more enduring than a holiday greeting.
It is beyond the reach of public discourse and
can withstand anything secularism can throw its
way.
Believers may wish to say it in unison: “Faith.”
It’s not to be played with, Mr. Trump. “Merry
Christmas” cannot and should not be used as a
wedge or crass political tool.
smoke to come testify together as a way of solving the
problem.
So let’s try something new: You don’t stop smoking
because it kills other people, until those people are
your family. You stop smoking because it makes your
breath foul and your hair brittle and it will kill you,
eventually.
If you don’t know that this is killing you, I should
not have to tell you. It is in your interest to be a good
person, not because of some abstract concept of sin
but because you are poisoning yourself. You like the
smoke, but you are choking on it.
This world does not have an existence independent of the people who live in it. Remember that. If you
stopped believing things had to be this way, even for a
second, it would stop. It is only this way because
somebody laughs at the joke. It is only this way
because the man on TV got away with it. It is only this
way because we keep telling ourselves this is weather.
Everything in our lives does not have to smell like
smoke. We could get rid of it. But we have to want to.
You have to want to.
T IA G RAVES F ISHER
O
BY HORSEY FOR THE LOS ANGELES TIMES
BY SACK FOR THE STAR TRIBUNE
BY MIKE SMITH FOR THE LAS VEGAS SUN
BY SHENEMAN
n Nov. 8, I posted a photograph of
myself on Facebook, captioned “67th
vote cast at Wyoming Town Hall,” my
“I voted” sticker barely visible. I got
15 likes. From the quiet of my remote home,
Facebook provided me with trusted, reliable
social connectivity. Or so I thought.
Over the past few weeks, I have learned how
rural Wisconsin swing voters — voters like me
— were microtargeted by Russian bots via
Facebook advertising. Could I have been one
of the victims? If so, how did some troll
halfway around the world in St. Petersburg
track me down?
Often, nothing more than random twists of
fate explain how the innocent fall prey to
criminal wrongdoing. Could that damn raccoon that tried to break into my house that
spring have landed me in the bull’s-eye of a
Russian operative?
My husband wasn’t home the night of this
attempted break-in, which I caught on camera. Our dog Ginger, old, deaf and arthritic,
was no longer a reliable guard. A few nights
later, a raccoon got into my 86-year-old
mother’s house, just a few minutes’ walk
through the woods from mine. It left paw
prints on her freezer and food wrappers across
her kitchen floor. My mother slept through the
feast.
That afternoon — worried about further
incursions and the potential for rabies exposure — I drove to a gun store in Richland
Center and bought a semiautomatic .22caliber rifle. In just a matter of days, I went
from raccoon photographer to registered gun
owner.
On June 7, I posted the photo of that rascal
raccoon with the caption, “Caught red handed
trying to break in.” I got 13 likes. Some months
later, I got a fundraising call on my unlisted
landline from a pro-gun group — had my
name gotten on some database of gun owners?
— conducting a political survey on the Second
Amendment. Then, sometime that fall, I started getting the bad “news” about Hillary
Clinton.
I recall reading online “news” reports that
she was in terrible health. She allegedly had
secret brain surgery by some doctor who later
mysteriously died. That’s what the story said.
Another touted a “whistle blower” who disclosed that Clinton had Parkinson’s disease.
Another “news” report alleged she hid a
colostomy bag underneath the long tunics she
regularly wore on the campaign trail. Meanwhile, Donald Trump was all over it, bringing
up Clinton’s health with regularity. I wondered why CNN and other outlets weren’t
reporting these stories. After hunting around,
I was able to determine that the stories were
false, of course, but they nonetheless served as
a reminder of Clinton’s bout with pneumonia
and that she nearly collapsed getting into a car
at an event. The false stories reminded me of
the true ones.
Today, now that the election fog has lifted, I
vaguely recall reading other nefarious
“news.” (Regrettably, I now find it necessary
to use quotation marks around this word.)
Though I clearly remember these “news”
stories, I can’t really attest to their source or
where I saw them. I can’t remember which I
saw on my Facebook feed — which I increasingly relied on for my “news” — and which I
saw elsewhere.
If I had been more attentive, would I have
been more discerning? During the 2016 campaign, I considered myself a sophisticated
media consumer. I had my smart, analytic
brain in full gear and my TV remote ready to
mute the political commercials, taking note of
whether a PAC or candidate’s campaign paid
the bill. But on Facebook, my emotional brain
was engaged. I read about my family’s and
friends’ lives; I celebrated births and mourned
deaths; I took those silly quizzes and hit the
“like” button when the mood struck — all the
while apparently scrolling entirely clueless
through Russian efforts to influence my vote.
In 2015, after decades of living in Los
Angeles County, I moved home to rural Wisconsin. Despite my career, first as a prosecutor
and later as a judge, I had never owned a
firearm. By mid-2016, living in wooded seclusion, up a half-mile gravel driveway with the
nearest town of over 1,400 some three miles
away, I figured it was time to protect myself.
The only risks on my radar were raccoon
burglars, not microtargeting Russian bots and
Facebook. Godspeed, Mr. Mueller.
The writer lives in Iowa County, Wis.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
Three men charged in shooting after white nationalist’s speech in Florida
BY S USAN S VRLUGA
AND L ORI R OZSA
gainesville, fla. — Three men
were charged with attempted
homicide after they argued with a
group of people protesting a white
nationalist’s speech and a shot was
fired at the protesters, police said
Friday.
About 90 minutes after Richard
Spencer’s speech Thursday at the
University of Florida, a silver Jeep
pulled up to six to eight protesters
near a bus stop and the occupants
confronted them, according to the
Gainesville Police Department.
The men, whom police identified as white nationalists, threatened the group, making Nazi salutes and shouting chants about
Hitler, police said. One protester
hit the Jeep with a baton, and the
vehicle pulled over.
Tyler Tenbrink, 28, of Richmond, Tex., jumped out with a
gun, police said. Colton Fears, 28,
and William Fears, 30, of Pasadena, Tex., encouraged Tenbrink to
shoot, according to the Alachua
County sheriff’s arrest report, yelling, “I’m going to f------ kill you,”
“Kill them,” and “Shoot them.”
Tenbrink fired a single shot that
missed the protesters, police said,
and hit a nearby building.
The men fled in the Jeep, but
one of the people who had been
targeted got the license plate
number and reported it to police.
An off-duty sheriff ’s deputy
found the Jeep. The men were
arrested about 20 miles north of
Gainesville.
Gainesville police confirmed
Friday the arrests were related to
Spencer’s event.
Spencer’s speech was repeatedly
disrupted by people shouting at
him, but protests outside remained
largely peaceful, despite tensions
between his supporters and counterprotesters. Tenbrink had come to
Gainesville for the speech.
“I came here to support Spencer because after Charlottesville,
the radical left threatened my
family and children because I was
seen and photographed in Charlottesville,” Tenbrink told The
Washington Post on Thursday, referring to the Unite the Right rally
in August that ended in violence.
“The man’s got the brass to say
what nobody else will.”
On Thursday, Tenbrink told
The Post inside Spencer’s event
that he had come from Houston
for the speech, and that all he
cares about are the 14 words, a
reference to a white-supremacist
slogan: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future
for white children.”
At least two of the three who
were arrested have demonstrated
connections to extremist groups,
police said.
Tenbrink, Colton Fears and
William Fears were charged with
attempted homicide and were in
the Alachua County Jail on Friday.
Tenbrink faces additional charges
for possession of a firearm by a
felon. Tenbrink admitted he was
the shooter, according to the arrest report.
Spencer did not respond to requests for comment.
susan.svrluga@washpost.com
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KLMNO
METRO
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
High today at
approx. 3 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
56 70 75 66°
°
°
°
76°
Precip: 0%
Wind: E
4-8 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
RELIGION
THE REGION
OBITUARIES
Sarah Huckabee Sanders,
the president’s public face,
is a fitting symbol for fellow
religious conservatives. B3
Rolling road closures will
take place most of the day
for Sunday’s Marine Corps
Marathon. MAP, B2
Helen DeVos, mother-in-law
of Education Secretary
Betsy DeVos, was a noted
Michigan philanthropist. B6
Study shows body cameras make no di≠erence
BY
CAROLYN KASTER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
D.C. Police Chief Peter
Newsham said study results
were “not what we anticipated.”
Final charge
dropped in
high-profile
Md. rape case
Girl had claimed she
was attacked at school
by immigrant teens
BY
P ETER H ERMANN
D.C. police officers wearing
body cameras reported using force
about as often as colleagues who
didn’t have them, and citizen complaints against the two groups
were about even, according to a
new study that bucks early expectations about the effect of the devices.
When the cameras started to
appear in police departments in
2014, experts predicted behavior
on both sides of the badge would
improve under the watchful eye of
the lens. But the look by the Dis-
trict’s in-house research branch
suggests otherwise — a finding
that could shift the debate on one
argument used to put the cameras
in virtually every big-city police
department nationwide.
D.C. Police Chief Peter Newsham said the results surprised department leaders and were “not
what we anticipated.” He said it
appears in many police interactions, “cameras didn’t make a difference.”
The chief said the recordings
have been a valuable tool, providing a precise record of tense and
difficult encounters, including po-
DEVICE FALLS SHORT
OF EXPECTATIONS
D.C. police surprised;
finding could shift debate
lice shootings.
The District says the study of its
$5.1 million program is among the
more comprehensive looks at
whether police-worn cameras affect behavior by officers and the
people they encounter.
Police body cameras became
seen as a key tool for reform after
growing concern over the deaths
in several cities of people in police
custody. Public officials quickly
heeded calls to infuse new levels of
public accountability and transparency into everyday police
work.
Though some police departments were reluctant, most contended the videos would most often exonerate officers facing allegations of misconduct, provide the
public with a unique perspective
of officers’ work and be an invaluable tool for training. D.C. police,
and the labor union, embraced the
the day they tried to
levitate the pentagon
POLICE CONTINUED ON B6
Musk gets
conditional
approval to
bore tunnel
Travel from District to
NYC in about 30 minutes
could be on the horizon
D AN M ORSE
BY
Maryland prosecutors have
dropped child pornography
charges against Rockville teenager Henry Sanchez Milian, quietly ending a case that erupted onto
the national stage when Sanchez
Milian and a friend — who each
entered the country illegally last
year — were accused of raping a
classmate in a school bathroom.
“I am grateful to God,” Sanchez
Milian’s stepmother, Lorena Hernandez, said outside of court Friday. “Now there is light at the end
of the tunnel.”
With the dismissed charges,
Sanchez Milian no longer faces
any counts from incidents that
unfolded on March 16, when a
14-year-old student at Rockville
High School told school officials
and detectives she had been
forced into a bathroom stall, held
down and attacked.
Sanchez Milian, 18 at the time,
and Jose Montano, 17 at the time,
were charged by Montgomery
County police with rape and sex
offense counts, punishable by life
BERNIE BOSTON/THE WASHINGTON STAR
CASE CONTINUED ON B5
Bahai faith
to mark 200th
birthday of
visionary leader
BY
program.
The D.C. research looked at a
period when the police force was
rolling out its body-camera program — and some officers had the
cameras while others were still
waiting.
Researchers found slightly
more officers with cameras reported using force than those without.
More people filed complaints
against officers wearing cameras
than without. The research team
said the differences were statistically insignificant, making the influence of the cameras a wash.
J ULIE Z AUZMER
The Bahai faith is one of the
youngest world religions — on
Sunday, it will celebrate the birthday of its messenger, Baha’u’llah,
who was born just 200 years ago.
But to the kids bouncing off the
purple-painted
walls
on
14th Street, that’s ancient history.
“My name is Baha’u’llah Junior!” Menkem Sium calls out jokingly. “My dad is 200 years old!”
Baha’u’llah, who was born in
Tehran in 1817, might not recognize the religion based on his
teachings today, in its vibrant
form in the District. Fourteen
youth groups teach crafts, games
and vocabulary to about 120 teenagers, including the enthusiastic
Sium. About 190 younger children
participate in 20 Bahai children’s
classes. All over the city, Bahai
devotees and other curious adults
gather in private homes and in a
stately 16th Street NW worship
center, every night of the week, for
35 regular study circles and 45
devotional meetings.
On Sunday, local followers of
the faith will congregate for an
extravaganza of artistic performances in English and Spanish —
and plenty of food — to celebrate
the 200th birthday of the visionary leader behind it all. Their celebration will focus on racial unity,
BAHAI CONTINUED ON B6
Fifty years ago, antiwar protesters converged here
with a purpose. (By the way, it didn’t leave the ground.)
They’d demonstrated
before, thousands of antiwar
protesters
singing and waving
KATIE
banners and burning draft
METTLER
cards on the Mall.
Now the organizers for the
National Mobilization Committee to End the
War in Vietnam wanted to go further —
much further. On Oct. 21, 1967, they
announced, antiwar protesters would march
en masse past the Lincoln Memorial, across
the Memorial Bridge, all the way to the front
steps of the Pentagon.
And then they would try to levitate it.
And storm it.
And bring the military-industrial complex
to its knees.
“We will dye the Potomac red, burn the
cherry trees, panhandle embassies, attack
with water pistols, marbles, bubble gum
wrappers, bazookas, girls will run naked and
p--- on the Pentagon walls, sorcerers,
swamis, witches, voodoo, warlocks, medicine
men and speed freaks will hurl their magic
at the faded brown walls,” promised Abbie
Hoffman, one of the organizers and a cofounder of the Youth International Party
(Yippies). “We shall raise the flag of
Retropolis
RETROPOLIS CONTINUED ON B5
BOB BURCHETTE/THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: A protester fills the barrels of military policemen’s rifles with flowers on Oct. 21, 1967, as they block the
crowd from approaching the Pentagon. ABOVE: Police carry off one of the protesters. The march by the National
Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam became a defining moment of the antiwar movement.
M ICHAEL L ARIS
Maryland’s Department of
Transportation has given conditional approval to the construction of a tunnel from Baltimore to
Washington, giving a boost — or
hype, depending on the viewpoint — to entrepreneur Elon
Musk’s plan to build a superhigh-speed transportation system.
The agency said Musk’s the
Boring Company can dig miles of
tunnel under state roads to be
used for the privately financed
Hyperloop.
The decision was soon followed by a tweet from Gov. Larry
Hogan (R), who videotaped a
message backing the budding
tunnel builder’s plans to bring
“rapid electric transportation to
MD — connecting Baltimore City
to D.C.”
Transportation experts and engineers were left weighing what
one U.S. official termed the “visionary/charlatan ratio” when it
comes to Musk and his latest
grand plan. Is it the beginning of
something brilliant — or brilliant
marketing hype?
The project will start near Fort
Meade, in Anne Arundel County,
said Hogan spokesman Doug
Mayer. About 10 miles of tunnel
will be under the state-owned
portion of Interstate 295, the
Baltimore-Washington Parkway,
he said.
“It’s called a utility permit.
That’s all they need to do the
digging,” Mayer said. “It’s a private company, privately financed.
The costs to the state will be
extremely limited, if anything at
all. The state has been working
with them for multiple months
on the permit process.”
The idea of digging a long
tunnel — it’s roughly 35 miles
from Penn Station to Union Station, though the actual route
hasn’t been revealed — is not
far-fetched, said Mike Mooney, a
tunneling professor at the Colorado School of Mines.
“This is not outside the realm.
It’s
conceivable,
certainly,”
Mooney said.
“Is it a big project? Sure,” he
added. But that’s by U.S. standards, where five miles is considered the high end. “It’s not a big
project globally.”
Technology has dramatically
improved tunneling, and in vast
Chinese cities, or in Qatar’s capital Doha, subways, road tunnels
and other projects might hit 50 or
even 100 miles of digging within a
five-year span, Mooney said.
Tunnel boring machines can
cut through the earth, sometimes
just tens of feet below the surface,
leaving cement supports behind
and causing no damage to the
roads or buildings above, he added.
So Washington-area commutHYPERLOOP CONTINUED ON B6
Marine Corps Marathon
Marathon route
17
NORTH CAPITOL ST.
5TH ST.
DELA
WAR
E AV
E.
1ST ST.
9TH ST.
10TH ST.
6TH ST.
INDEPENDENCE AVE.
L’ENFANT
PLAZA
15
FEDERAL
CENTER SW
W
AS
H.
C ST.
AV
E.
D ST.
CAP.
SOUTH
E ST.
395
M
AI
NE
East
Potomac
Park
Ohio Drive
6:30 a.m.
to noon
G ST.
AV
E.
695
ST.
BEAT THEI BRIDGE
Runners must keep
at least a 14-minuteper-mile pace to
WATERFRONT
reach the bridge
N ST.
before it opens to
traffic at 1:15 p.m.
O ST.
SOUTH CAPITOL ST.
20
M ST.
Nationals
Park
P ST.
Q ST.
14
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PENTAGON
.
HAY
ES
0
150
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.
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6:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
0
100
0
50
CRYSTAL
CITY
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Sources: Marine Corps Marathon, WMATA
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
MILES
Reagan
23
13
National
Airport
Hains
Point
Joint Base
1
23RD ST.
Anacostia-
NATIONAL
AIRPORT
Bolling
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Union
Station
U.S.
Capitol
19
4TH ST.
14TH ST.
SMITHSONIAN
D ST.
Capitol area
6:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
JEFFERSON
DR.
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4 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
C ST.
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18
7TH ST.
17TH ST.
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12TH ST.
16TH ST.
15TH ST.
18TH ST.
19TH ST.
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110
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7
8
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
METRO
Water station
.
AVE
N.
CON
Racers will start the 42nd Marine Corps Marathon at
7:45 a.m. Sunday. Rolling road closures will be in effect
along the 26.2-mile course from 3:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
MA
CAR
THU
R
. SATURDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
3RD ST.
EZ
4TH ST.
B2
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
RE
RELIGION
An evangelical in the briefing room
As she defends Trump
and ignites debates,
Sanders draws on faith
BY
M ICHELLE B OORSTEIN
This is the world as seen
through the eyes of White House
press secretary Sarah Huckabee
Sanders:
As a girl, she watched her father, Southern Baptist pastor
turned GOP governor Mike Huckabee, sidelined when he entered
politics. Arkansas Democrats literally nailed his office door shut.
In the years after, she saw conservative Christians — like her
family, like most everyone she
knew — ridiculed in American
pop culture.
As a young woman, she moved
to Washington to work for the
government and noticed right
away, she says, that people in the
capital care more about your job
than who you are. “Certainly not
like where I’m from,” she says.
Sanders described this perpetualinterloper experience from her
other world: an elegant, wellappointed office at the White
House, where reporters from outlets such as the New York Times
and CNN metaphorically prostrate themselves at her door day in
and day out, and from where she
can receive guidance on the phone
every day from her father, long a
political darling of conservative
Christians and now a TV celebrity
worth millions.
As the public face of the president, Sanders is a fitting symbol
for her fellow religious conservatives, who are both insider and
outsider, powerful and powerless.
Religious conservatives “aren’t
outsiders in this White House, but
generally speaking they are,” the
35-year-old said in a recent interview in her West Wing office.
Sanders’s podium persona is all
business, even a bit short at times.
She so often says that she doesn’t
know the answer to a question or
will have to get back to the questioner that it has become a critics’
meme. “Saturday Night Live”
spoofed her in its recent season
opener, with faux Sanders telling
President Trump that her success
lies in the fact that “I’m nononsense, but I’m all nonsense.”
One on one, however, she
comes across as relaxed and open,
even when she’s on offense.
“If someone says something
about another faith, particularly
liberals come to their defense in a
raging motion, but if someone attacks a Christian, it’s perfectly
fine. At some point we became a
culture that said that was okay.”
For many conservative Christians, defending their faith is now
tied tightly to defending Trump.
For Sanders, that meant becoming
a headline herself the day before
this interview, after she told reporters during a briefing that an
ESPN host who had called Trump
a “white supremacist” should be
fired. The comment about Jemele
Hill set off a firestorm.
To prepare for that briefing,
Sanders that day opened her
leather-bound daily devotional, as
she always does before heading
out to the lectern. In her office, she
read to herself: “Come to me and
rest. Give your mind a rest from its
habitual judging.”
Facing judgment is part of being Sanders, perhaps the most visible evangelical in U.S. political
life (aside from Mike Pence, but
Sanders is on the news every day).
But unlike her father, Sanders never intended to be the face of anything; until a few months ago, she
was known as a talented behindthe-scenes political organizer.
Since she assumed the press
secretary job in July, Sanders has
triggered discussions about,
among other things, the place of
religious conservative women in
politics and whether her presence
helps or hurts the evangelical witness.
Rick Tyler, a conservative Christian strategist who served as a
spokesman for Newt Gingrich and
Ted Cruz, is one of several leading
GOP operatives who worry about
the White House’s approach to
evangelicals. He thinks the muchcovered Trump evangelical advisory board — the only faith group
with regular access these days to
the White House — is made up
mostly of outliers, people with no
real constituencies who can’t
move votes.
“In terms of political power,
[Christian conservatives] don’t
have any. I think Sarah gets that,”
said Tyler, long an outspoken
Trump critic. “The ethical challenges of her job are amazing. . . .
The consistent falsehoods, lies
[from Trump] are unbelievable.”
Evangelicals have been deeply
divided in recent months over issues including Trump’s threat to
deport hundreds of thousands of
undocumented youth and his
comments that there were “two
sides” to a deadly white-supremacist rally in Charlottesville.
Although some say the Trump-
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evangelical alliance harms Christianity, it’s common to hear other
conservative Christians say that
God put Trump in White House
for some reason.
Brian Kaylor, a Baptist pastor
with a PhD in political communications who has written several
books about religion and politics,
thinks that Sanders holds this
view of a divine plan and that it
gives her confidence at the lectern.
“When you have to stand up
there and defend whatever he’s
done, it’s more than you are defending a politician or even a president; you are defending God’s
chosen leader for this time,” Kaylor said.
Although she identifies as a
Southern Baptist — the biggest
and among the most conservative
U.S. affiliations — the past few
churches Sanders has attended
are more mainstream evangelical.
Her husband is a Catholic, and
their three children were baptized
as infants, a rite mandatory for
Catholics and some other Christians but long considered a deviation to traditional Southern Baptists, who believe that baptism
should be reserved for people who
have decided for themselves to
accept Christ.
In a compromise, Sanders and
her husband, Bryan Sanders, go to
evangelical and Catholic churches
every Sunday.
For many religious conservatives, Sanders is a source of enormous pride. The fact that someone
with her background represents
the president every day has huge
symbolic weight, whether or not
she has influence — and despite
that, she often seems to learn of
his controversial tweets at the
same time the public does.
David Brody, chief political correspondent for the Christian network CBN, said that when Sanders
appears on the network’s proTrump talk show, “the social media director said he has never seen
so many emoji hearts. . . . She’s
feisty but in a bless-your-heart
sort of way.”
Brody said his viewers were
wowed by a briefing over the summer, when Sanders was asked
whether Trump brought low the
office of the president by tweeting
a crack about television host Mika
Brzezinski, whom he called “low
I.Q. Crazy” and whom he said he
saw “bleeding badly from a facelift.”
“Are you going to tell your kids
this behavior is okay?” a reporter
asked.
“As a person of faith, I think we
all have one perfect role model.
And when I’m asked that question, I point to God. I point to my
faith. And that’s where I always
tell my kids to look.”
Brody raved.
“I don’t remember that coming
from Republicans, Democrats —
that’s pretty bold in the context of
a White House briefing,” he said.
Some religious conservatives
say one of Sanders’s best attributes
is that she isn’t Sean Spicer. They
want someone at the lectern who
can defend Trump without becoming the story.
Sanders has a leg up, perhaps,
as politics is the family business.
While Mike Huckabee began
his political career literally locked
out, he eventually became a popular leader in Arkansas, known as a
compassionate conservative willing to work across partisan barriers to solve problems.
He later won the Iowa Republican presidential caucuses in 2008
and went on to host a longrunning, popular show on Fox
News Channel.
Huckabee said that his daughter, the youngest of three children,
was always drawn to politics and
that as a teenager she sorted
through voter and polling data in
the living room.
Rick Caldwell, a longtime family friend, said Sanders’s parents
demanded that their children get
involved. “Her dad always said,
‘Everyone wants to eat off a clean
plate, but not everyone is willing
to wash the dishes,’ ” Caldwell
said.
After college, Sanders moved to
Washington, where she worked in
legislative affairs for the George
W. Bush administration’s Education Department. At the time, she
thought she’d never leave.
“I had no intentions of going
back,” she said. But she did, in
2006, to help her father start a PAC
in Little Rock. Sanders was considered an especially gifted young
organizer and was given important jobs not only on her father’s
campaign but with other national
campaigns, including that of Sen.
John Boozman (R-Ark.) and Tim
Pawlenty’s run for president in
2011.
Multiple people who worked on
campaigns with Sanders praised
her ability to juggle a lot at once
(including
on
understaffed
teams), her high energy, her
thoughtful management of grassroots organizing and her political
instincts on what makes a candidate appealing. Few could recall
her policy priorities or views.
The love-hate relationship with
Washington is a core part of con-
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
With her Southern Baptist roots and open professions of faith,
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders inspires
admiration among many religious conservatives.
servative evangelicals’ view of politics. There has been, in Sanders’s
lifetime in particular, a feeling
among these Americans that politicians have broken promises to
them. They fear being used or not
being dealt with genuinely.
This attitude may have brought
Sanders and her father to Trump
early — in the first part of 2016,
long before most well-known conservative Christian leaders.
In an interview, Huckabee said
Trump’s perceived lack of pretense drew his daughter in. “She
can deal with the authenticity of
people who are not like her. One
thing she’d not be comfortable
with [is] someone who pretends to
be a faith person but isn’t.”
Trump, he said, is authentic, a
highly prized characteristic.
Asked by the New York Times
earlier this fall what drew her to
Trump, Sanders was quick to answer: “I thought he could win.”
She said she thought Trump’s
appeal to conservative Christians
was pretty basic: the appointment
of Neil M. Gorsuch to the Supreme
Court and efforts on abortion and
religious freedom for conservatives.
“Some things are black and
white, and some aren’t. Some are
simple right-and-wrong questions of morality. Tax reform isn’t
necessarily a question of morality.
For me, the life issue is a question
of morality. Those aren’t the same
for me,” she said in her office.
When she was appointed, many
antiabortion leaders from big
groups such as the Susan B. Anthony List and Concerned Women
for America celebrated — even as
evangelicals in the heartland
might have raised eyebrows about
a mother of young children taking
such a high-powered job.
Dianne Bystrom, director of a
center on women and politics at
Iowa State University, said GOP
RELIGIOUS SERVICES DIRECTORY
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ROMAN CATHOLIC
women have started embracing
motherhood in politics in the past
couple of years.
“It used to be no one campaigned on being a mom, because
if you were a mom, why aren’t you
taking care of your kids? But [in
the past few years] being a mom is
being turned into an advantage.”
It looks more nuanced to
Anthea Butler, a religious-studies
professor at the University of
Pennsylvania who writes about
women and Christianity. To Butler, Sanders is “the classical evangelical woman,” someone who has
worked for men “and knows how
she is supposed to behave as a
support to men in power. . . . I’m
not saying you should discount
her for what she has done, but if
you look at her life, she has been at
the seat of political evangelical
power for a long time. She knows
what’s up.”
It’s true that Sanders, despite
her self-described outsider status,
has been in an elite position of
influence for much of her life. But
never in one that comes with a
West Wing office. The question is:
When the Trump years are over,
what will she do? What effect will
all of this have on her career?
Right now she is not focusing
that far ahead. Instead, she said in
her office, what she wants most is
to be a good role model for her
kids. “It’s amazing how much
things change when you realize
people are really closely watching
what you’re doing and following
every move you make,” she said. “I
want to make sure I’m teaching
them the right thing.
“It encourages you to be a better
person,” she said of her children.
And what does she think about
the fact that her children are
watching her serve Trump?
Sanders smiled.
“Here I am.”
michelle.boorstein@washpost.com
ROMAN CATHOLIC
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
THE DISTRICT
Consulting firm running United Medical Center ousts hospital CEO
Firing follows objection
to contract extension
BY
C OLBY I TKOWITZ
The consulting firm charged
with turning around the troubled
United Medical Center has told
District officials it will replace
the hospital’s chief executive.
The move comes on the heels
of six council members filing a
resolution disapproving of the
proposed $4.2 million contract
for Veritas of Washington LLC to
continue its hospital management next year.
In a letter sent to the city’s
Department of Health Care Finance this week, Veritas Presi-
dent Chrystie Boucrée said the
company would launch a national search for a new CEO, “pending approval of the option year of
the Veritas contract.”
The removal of current CEO
Luis Hernandez is effective immediately, she wrote, and she has
asked the UMC Board to appoint
David Boucrée, her cousin, as
interim chief executive.
The news was first reported by
the
Washington
Business
Journal.
Vincent C. Gray, the council’s
health committee chair, called
the CEO dismissal “a Band-Aid
approach.”
“The systemic problems go
beyond Veritas’s operational capacity,” he said in a statement.
Veritas, a company led by campaign donors to D.C. Mayor Muri-
Md. man arrested
in fatal shooting
D.C. police on Friday arrested
a Maryland man in the Oct. 8
fatal shooting of the brother of a
Virginia Tech football player.
Authorities said they charged
Michael Leonard Jones, 21, of
Bladensburg, Md., with firstdegree murder while armed.
No motive was disclosed in
the shooting of Omar Earl
Rogers, 25. He was found shot
in a car behind a bar about 4
a.m. in the 2200 block of Martin
Luther King Jr. Avenue SE.
News reports said he had
performed as a singer at the
restaurant that night. A younger
brother, Sean Savoy, is a Hokies
wide receiver.
— Peter Herman
Teenager wounded in
afternoon shooting
A 16-year-old was shot and
wounded Friday afternoon near
Third and T streets NE, D.C.
police said.
It appeared that he was hit in
the buttocks and back and was
conscious and breathing when
taken to a hospital, they said.
The shooting was reported
about 4 p.m. The site is about
two blocks from McKinley Tech
High School.
— Martin Weil
MARYL AND
Arrest made in killing
of college student
man in the four-year-old death
of a student at the University of
Maryland at Eastern Shore.
Davonta M. Braxton, 25, of
Baltimore, was arrested Friday
and charged with seconddegree murder, manslaughter
and other assault-related
charges in connection with the
fatal stabbing of Edmond St.
Clair, 21, the Maryland state
police said.
St. Clair was a student at the
university when he was fatally
stabbed on Feb. 16, 2013, after
an argument, police said. They
said Braxton had been a
student at the university
intermittently.
— Dana Hedgpeth
VIRGINIA
Student shot,wounded
at Virginia State U.
A student at Virginia State
University was shot and
wounded at the campus in
Petersburg late Thursday night,
authorities said.
Chesterfield County police
said they thought the shooting
was an isolated incident.
Last Saturday night, police
locked down the campus after a
shooting during homecoming
weekend. The victim in that
incident was described as not a
student.
University President Makola
M. Abdullah said Friday that
steps being taken included an
added police presence,
additional lighting and security
cameras, use of plainclothes
officers and collaborative
patrols with the county police.
MARYLAND
BY
M ARTIN W EIL
This is a world of change. Night
follows day, winter succeeds summer, and on Thursday in one of
the starker breaks with longestablished patterns, the number
of thefts from autos in one Maryland county dropped to only two.
The unusually low number was
reported in Prince George’s County, where police have made a vigorous effort this year to stop what
they call a preventable but disappointingly common crime.
They have urged car owners to
take precautions such as locking
doors and removing valuables.
But through early October, the
number of thefts totaled 4,113, for
an average of about 15 thefts per
day. On one day, 24 were reported.
One three-day total amounted to
62. Little suggested how few
would be reported Thursday.
No obvious explanation was
available, other than random
fluctuation. One day of only two
thefts hardly seems to suggest the
tide had turned.
On the other hand, said Cpl.
Harry Bond, a county police
spokesman, if the next day’s figure was again so low, that might
just mean something.
martin.weil@washpost.com
THE DAILY QUIZ
The cover story of the Real Estate
section highlights homes selling for
$3 million in the Washington area and
around the nation. What characteristic
of owners of high-end properties has
changed over the years, according to
agents?
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click on
“Quizzes” to enter the correct response.
newborn from contracting HIV
and to properly treat a woman
with potentially fatal blood-pressure problems.
In July, a 70-year-old patient
died but his family wasn’t notified for a week, and his family
said hospital officials lost track of
the body for several days.
A Washington Post review of
public records in September
found Veritas failed to meet several city standards for managing
the hospital, including delivering
only $1.07 million of the $9 million in extra revenue its executives promised to generate.
Gray’s committee has scheduled a public roundtable session
for Oct. 30 to hear from hospital
and Veritas employees to determine whether to renew the
contract.
“UMC looks forward to the
upcoming Councilmember Gray
hearing and the opportunity to
share with the City Council the
initiatives that Veritas has undertaken to improve patient quality
and safety,” Chrystie Boucrée said
in her email.
In his statement, Gray said: “I
have a singular goal with the
operations of the UMC which is
to preserve lives and improve
patient safety. I filed a Disapproval Resolution on this Veritas
contract because of their consistently poor performance. The
removal of their CEO is only an
attempt to retain their $4.2 million contract. I have yet to see a
plan that sets forth a strategic
direction on how Veritas will
turnaround UMC operations.”
colby.itkowitz@washpost.com
WSSC sues chemical firms alleging price-fixing
BY
K ATHERINE S HAVER
Maryland’s largest water utility
filed a lawsuit in federal court
Thursday against eight chemical
companies and five executives, alleging that they conspired to inflate the price of a water treatment
chemical over more than 14 years.
The price-fixing and bid-rigging
scheme, the complaint alleges,
caused Washington Suburban
Sanitary Commission (WSSC) to
overpay by “many millions” for
aluminum sulfate.
WSSC supplies drinking water
and treats sewage for nearly 2 million people in Montgomery and
Prince George’s counties.
The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt, is the
latest civil action in what federal
prosecutors have alleged has been
a years-long conspiracy among
chemical companies to drive up
prices for aluminum sulfate,
known as alum, by eliminating
competition. Utilities use alum,
which dissolves solids, to purify
drinking water and treat sewage.
Nationwide, 68 similar civil
claims have been filed against the
companies and some of their top
executives by water utilities, cities
and private entities trying to recoup lost money, WSSC said.
WSSC is seeking more than
$5 million in compensation and
punitive damages, according to
the complaint. The utility spent
about $9 million on alum between
1997 and 2016, the utility said.
“This lawsuit is about protecting the investment our customers
made in safe, clean water,” WSSC
General Manager Carla A. Reid
said. “The suppliers named in this
suit conspired to deprive us of a
competitive price for this essential
product, and we will hold them
accountable.”
The companies named in the suit
include Ontario-based Chemtrade
Chemicals,
Pennsylvania-based
Geo Specialty Chemicals, Georgiabased C&S Chemicals, Georgiabased RGM Chemical, Atlantabased
Kemira
Chemicals,
Louisiana-based Southern Ionics,
and Baltimore-based Usalco and
Delta Chemical. The complaint
also names General Chemical, as
well as affiliates and subsidiaries
for all the companies.
The conspiracy lasted from
1997 to 2011, WSSC alleges, but
long-term contracts caused the
utility to lose money into 2016.
WSSC said the companies’ executives discussed their bids, agreed
to “stay away” from each others’
customers, and submitted intentionally high “throwaway” bids to
direct contracts to one another.
Because of the alleged bid-rigging, WSSC’s price for alum nearly
quadrupled between 2000 and
2010, from $82 per ton to $314 per
ton, according to the lawsuit.
Rohit Bhardwaj, chief financial
officer for Chemtrade, said the
allegations in the lawsuit precede
2014, when Chemtrade bought
General Chemical. He said he
couldn’t comment on the lawsuit,
but he said General Chemical had
been granted amnesty in the Justice Department’s criminal investigation into the allegations.
A lawyer for Kemira declined to
comment, saying the company
had not seen the suit.
Officials for the other companies named in the lawsuit did not
return calls late Thursday.
Ballard Spahr, a Philadelphiabased law firm that filed similar
lawsuits for Baltimore and Richmond in May, will represent
WSSC.
The lawsuit probably will be
transferred for pretrial proceedings to the federal court in Newark, where dozens of similar lawsuits are being coordinated, WSSC
said. However, any trial in WSSC’s
case would be held in Greenbelt.
katherine.shaver@washpost.com
— Clarence Williams
and Martin Weil
Authorities have charged a
Thefts from
cars oddly
drop to two
ing.
Hernandez’s contract expired
on Sept. 30, 2017, but he will
remain with the company “to
oversee other areas of the Veritas
portfolio,” Chrystie Boucrée said
in an emailed statement. Hernandez lives in Florida but had
been flying to the District for the
CEO job and staying at an apartment in National Harbor with
the city covering his travel and
rent, expense reports showed. It’s
unclear whether his new role will
continue that arrangement.
Under management by Veritas, the hospital has had a number of high-profile incidents.
District regulators closed the
hospital’s obstetrics wing in
August, citing dangerous medical
errors. Those included failures to
take basic steps to prevent a
MARYLAND
LOCA L D I G ES T
THE DISTRICT
el E. Bowser (D), was brought on
in April 2016 to stabilize the
Southeast hospital. But despite
already collecting millions from
the city, it has failed to show
measurable improvements.
Gray and other council members have grown increasingly
critical of Veritas’s handling of
UMC, the District’s only public
hospital and the only full-service
one east of the Anacostia River.
The hospital has long been
plagued with financial and quality issues. Hernandez’s ouster will
mean UMC will be searching for
its fourth CEO in about two years.
Boucrée, the pending interim
CEO, has described his professional background as being in
information technology — including work with health insurance companies — and outsourc-
PHOTOS BY RICKY CARIOTI/THE WASHINGTON POST
L O TTER I ES
At a debate in Leesburg on Friday, Attorney General Mark R. Herring (D), left, and challenger John Adams (R) argued passionately over
same-sex marriage, the Affordable Care Act, abortion, the opioid crisis in Virginia and other issues.
Results from Oct. 20
VIRGINIA
DISTRICT
Mid-Day Lucky Numbers:
Mid-Day DC-4:
Mid-Day DC-5:
Lucky Numbers (Thu.):
Lucky Numbers (Fri.):
DC-4 (Thu.):
DC-4 (Fri.):
DC-5 (Thu.):
DC-5 (Fri.):
6-7-8
6-6-5-4
0-2-9-0-1
9-3-2
1-5-8
2-5-2-7
2-8-1-5
7-1-1-6-1
0-0-4-7-1
MARYLAND
Day/Pick 3:
Pick 4:
Night/Pick 3 (Thu.):
Pick 3 (Fri.):
Pick 4 (Thu.):
Pick 4 (Fri.):
Multi-Match (Thu.):
Match 5 (Thu.):
Match 5 (Fri.):
5 Card Cash:
6-3-7
0-6-5-0
2-5-8
4-4-9
4-2-0-4
6-8-1-7
4-13-17-20-25-39
1-15-17-18-22 *20
7-13-29-32-34 *1
4C-9C-KS-4H-5D
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Herring, Adams spar in race for attorney general
BY
P ATRICIA S ULLIVAN
The two candidates in Virginia’s attorney general race
pulled no punches in a robust
debate in Leesburg on Friday
morning, staking out positions
that were nearly diametrically opposed to each other in their last
meeting before the Nov. 7 election.
Attorney General Mark R. Herring (D) defended his record as an
aggressive challenger of attacks
on health care and warned that
challenger John Adams (R) is “fixated on conservative social issues” and seeks to “become the
lawyer for the Republican caucus
in Richmond.”
Adams said Herring is the one
who is fixated on social issues,
calling Herring’s 2014 decision to
join a lawsuit seeking to overturn
Virginia’s ban on same-sex marriage “unconscionable . . . indefensible.” Adams argued that Herring “believes in centralized,
government-run health care,”
while he believes in private insurance operating in the free market.
Herring told the 150 people at
the Loudoun Chamber of
Commerce-sponsored event that
during his first term in office,
under the leadership of Gov. Terry
McAuliffe (D), life was good in the
commonwealth: Unemployment
dropped from 5.4 percent to
3.8 percent, 215,000 new jobs
were created and $18.5 billion of
new capital was invested in Virginia.
Those achievements were possible in part, Herring said, because the Democrats made sure
the world knew people of all races, religions and gender identities
are welcome in the state.
Adams accused Herring of inserting politics into the attorney
general’s office and of distorting
his record on birth control.
“He says I want to roll back
women’s access to birth control.
That is insane,” said Adams, arguing that his pro bono legal work
for a religious order, the Little
Sisters of the Poor, and a business,
Hobby Lobby, that didn’t want to
be forced to provide contraceptive services under the Affordable
Care Act was about religious liberty. “Guess what? We won. It was
unconstitutional. That’s what I
fought for. I am not running to roll
back anybody’s rights,” he said.
The race, which has attracted
far less public attention than Virginia’s closely watched gubernatorial contest, is the only attorney
general election on the ballot in
the country this November.
Both parties’ associations of at-
torneys general have been pouring money into their candidates’
campaign
funds,
including
$775,000 that the Republican Attorneys General Association added Thursday to Adams’s coffers,
bringing its total investment in
the race to more than $3.5 million. The Democratic Attorneys
General group, Herring’s top donor, has given him $1.75 million.
Herring, a Democrat from
Leesburg, is aggressively challenging Trump administration
policies: suing over the constitutionality of President Trump’s
first immigration ban; joining
with other attorneys general in a
lawsuit over Trump’s decision to
end federal subsidies to health
insurers; and opposing the administration’s move to end contraception coverage required by
the ACA.
The incumbent on Friday cited
his work to eliminate the state’s
backlog of 3,000 untested rape
kits, cracking down on gangs and
gun violence, leading an awardwinning Medicaid fraud unit and
prosecuting child predators.
Adams — a politically conservative Richmond attorney and
former federal prosecutor, clerk
to U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Clarence Thomas and associate
White House attorney under Pres-
2017 PostPoints Scavenger Hunt
Holy cow, The Smoking Popes
Sing of love and dashing hopes
With power chords and energy
At Black Cat in northwest DC.
Who will open for the punk rock band The Smoking Popes on
Tuesday, October 24 at Black Cat?
Need a night out; want to break out in song?
Head to Bobby McKey’s; you can’t go wrong.
Shout out your favorites; they’ll play them all.
Come with your friends and have a ball.
Who is the Entertainment Director at Bobby McKey’s Dueling
Piano Bar in National Harbor?
(Hint: See BlackCatDC.com for the answer.)
(Hint: See BobbyMcKeys.com for the answer.)
EARN 5 POINTS AND A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES. Answer our Scavenger Hunt questions, then go to washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click “Quizzes” to enter your responses.
ident George W. Bush — charges
that Herring should stick to the
job of advising the General Assembly and defending state laws.
Regulatory overreach is “one of
the biggest problems in this country,” he said.
Adams said his personal beliefs
— he opposes abortion and samesex marriage and supports gun
rights — would not influence his
decisions as attorney general.
While he would offer legal advice
to the General Assembly, he says,
he would defend the state’s positions in court whether he agrees
or not.
Adams sought to prove Herring
has failed in the job, attacking his
work on the opioid drug crisis by
noting that deaths have risen in
the past four years. He faulted
Herring for giving pay raises to
some lawyers in his office instead
of spending the money for other
needs.
“John wants you to think where
he stands on issues isn’t relevant
to the job. Nothing could be further from the truth,” Herring said.
“Issues of choice, health care, gun
safety, the fundamental rights of
all Virginians will most certainly
cross the desk of the next attorney
general. It matters immensely
where we stand on these issues.”
patricia.sullivan@washpost.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
THE DISTRICT
Gray pushes a new name for the area east of the Anacostia River: ‘East End’
BY
P ERRY S TEIN
D.C. Council member Vincent
C. Gray (D-Ward 7) almost stumbled at a recent city event. As he
discussed the results of a study
highlighting inequalities in the
city, he seemed nearly to say
“east of the river” — a moniker
given to the city’s neighborhoods
that lie east of the Anacostia
River.
Then he backtracked, saying
he no longer uses that term.
Instead, he refers to the area as
the “East End.”
“I don’t say ‘east of the river’
anymore,” Gray said at the event.
“When you say ‘east of the river,’
people unfortunately think of
‘the other side of the tracks.’ We
have a West End, and now we
have an East End.”
The former mayor noted in an
interview that people already
were saying “east of the river”
when he started working in the
city decades ago. He said he
began using the more concise
“East End” about a year ago.
While Gray said there is nothing inherently offensive or factually wrong with “east of the
river,” he said it has become
shorthand for the poverty and
crime that some associate with
that swath of the city in Wards 7
and 8.
“When you think of the West
End, that is associated with a
very positive, somewhat affluent
area of the city,” Gray said, referring to the small, upscale neighborhood in the western part of
the city north of Foggy Bottom. “I
think ‘East End’ starts to create
an environment that people will
start thinking of the east part of
the city.”
Rebranding neighborhoods in
the District is nothing new, particularly in this fast-paced era of
urban growth. In the past
20 years, neighborhood names
such as NoMa, Hill East and
Capitol
Riverfront
have
emerged, with some catching on
better than others. Even Penn
Quarter, now an established
neighborhood name, came from
revitalization efforts. Developers
are pushing “North Shaw” to
market new development to prospective tenants in the booming
area around Eighth and V streets
NW.
WAMU’s “The Kojo Nnamdi
Show” recently explored the idea
of neighborhood rebranding efforts and tried to determine
whom “East End” was meant to
appeal to: Is it to make the area
sound more appealing to people
who don’t live there, or is it to
empower those who do live
there?
Nikki Peele, an activist and
blogger who writes about
Ward 8, said on the show that
efforts in the past to call the area
“River East” were about the residents who lived there.
“I think what we were doing
was hoping to take back our
community on our terms and
start a conversation about what
it’s like to live and work and love
Ward 7 and Ward 8,” she said.
But at a time when residents
in Wards 7 and 8 are increasingly
concerned about the effects of
gentrification in their neighborhoods, a new name such as “East
End” could be co-opted by developers looking to lure new residents.
“If he’s just trying to change
the name so other people feel
more comfortable moving there,
then I don’t know if it’s going to
do anything,” said Kymone Freeman, an activist who runs We Act
Radio in Ward 8.
Freeman, who grew up in
Ward 8 and now lives in Ward 5,
said he doesn’t mind the “East
End” name, so long as local
officials also address persistent
inequities in the two wards compared with the rest of the city.
Residents in Wards 7 and 8 have
the highest poverty rates, highest
unemployment rates and lowest
graduation rates in the city.
“I think the issues that he is
addressing are necessary — the
stigmas and that east of the river
has long been neglected,” Freeman said. “If you are simply
trying to remove the stigma
without removing the stain, it’s
just lipstick on a pig.”
Malcolm Williams, president
of the Anacostia Business Improvement District, wrote in an
email that he is “indifferent” to
the new nickname.
Gray said that he does not
know if “East End” will catch on
and that he has no plans to
propose legislation that would
put city funds toward an official
branding effort.
“We’ll just see how people go
on with using it at this point,” he
said.
perry.stein@washpost.com
People cross the intersection
of Martin Luther King Jr.
Avenue SE and Good Hope
Road. “When you say ‘east of
the river,’ people . . . think of
‘the other side of the tracks,’ ”
Vincent C. Gray said of his use
of a different name for the area.
JAHI CHIKWENDIU/THE WASHINGTON POST
Teens could
still face
deportation
CASE FROM B1
HENRY BURROUGHS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
A pressing wall of antiwar protesters — and a line of armed military policemen — at the Pentagon on Oct. 21, 1967.
RETROPOLIS
In 1967,
a turning point
in the antiwar
movement
RETROPOLIS FROM B1
nothingness over the Pentagon
and a mighty cheer of liberation
will echo through the land.”
As many as 100,000 people,
mostly young, mostly white,
flooded the capital for the
demonstration, anticipating an
injection of counterculture flair
into the antiwar movement. An
estimated 35,000 to 50,000
demonstrators descended on the
Pentagon. And by dawn the next
day, nearly 700 had been
arrested for various acts of civil
disobedience, including trying
to get inside the building.
It was an early test of that
fall’s new motto, “from protest
to resistance,” and a concrete
shift in the “tone and tactics of
the antiwar movement,”
according to Maurice Isserman,
a history professor at Hamilton
College who attended the
Pentagon march as a 16-year-old
high school student.
Now, on the 50th anniversary
of that pivotal weekend,
Isserman and more than
100 others plan to demonstrate
once again in Washington as
part of a two-day retrospective
event organized by the Vietnam
Peace Commemoration
Committee (VPCC).
“This is not an attempt to
repeat what happened in 1967,”
said Terry Provance, a VPCC
staffer who helped organize the
weekend’s festivities.
“Though you never know,” he
joked. “If somebody acts on their
own, they act on their own.”
That was the mind-set
50 years ago, too, as the
mobilization committee worked
with different factions within
the antiwar movement to plan
the Pentagon march.
Some groups were only
comfortable demonstrating at
the Mall. Others supported
putting the pressure on military
officials, rather than picketing
the White House or marching to
Capitol Hill. And still others
were made quite nervous by the
radical rhetoric of Hoffman and
his Yippies co-founder Jerry
Rubin, who were primarily
responsible for the threats to
levitate the Pentagon and turn
the Potomac River red.
A few months before the
demonstration, Hoffman and
Rubin held a news conference to
detail their plans of an
“exorcism to cast out evil spirits”
by the “flower power
contingent.” They had incense
and a “psychedelic bomb,” which
looked like a bowling ball,
according to Jonah Raskin’s
book “For the Hell of It: The Life
and Times of Abbie Hoffman.”
On Oct. 21, demonstrators
began filling the Mall
midmorning. Speakers included
writer Norman Mailer, poet
Robert Lowell, pediatrician
Benjamin Spock and Clive
Jenkins of the British Labour
Party, whose remarks were
interrupted when a member of
the American Nazi Party tried to
punch him at the podium.
By late afternoon, the
momentum had shifted toward
the Pentagon. Throngs of people
marched south, bottlenecking as
they crossed the bridge and
slowing to a shuffle, Isserman
recalled.
All around the Pentagon,
military police, federal marshals
and thousands of Army troops
with rifles and riot gear were
stationed in place, according to
the Justice Department, ready to
defend the nation’s wartime
command center against the
demonstrators coming to storm
it. From their perimeter
positions on the ground and
perches on the roof, the officers
watched as the protesters inched
closer and closer, spilling into
the Pentagon’s parking lot and
toward its entrance.
They readied their weapons,
though some officers said years
later that the guns weren’t
loaded.
“It was a great deal of
uncertainty,” Isserman said. “You
kind of didn’t know which way it
was going to go.”
Isserman had no intention of
getting arrested; he had
promised his parents he
wouldn’t. But then a section of
fencing gave way on the
perimeter, and suddenly people
were pouring through by the
thousands, pushing closer to the
Pentagon entrance. Isserman
was in the middle of it.
Most of the crowd was quickly
cordoned off, not allowed to
move forward or backward.
More than a dozen others broke
the line, though, making it just
inside the Pentagon doors before
being carted out by officials.
Defense Secretary Robert
McNamara watched the chaos
from the safety of his office. He
would later say that he had
turned against the war himself
by 1967.
The Potomac never ran red,
no cherry trees burned and the
Pentagon did not leave the
ground. The hippies and yippies
who wanted to levitate the
3.7 million-square-foot building
couldn’t fully encircle it as
planned — though the exorcism
was more about theatrics than
anything else.
As the sun set, the crowd
began to shrink. But there were
confrontations into the evening,
with brawls and bloodied heads
and tear gas lobbed into the
crowd. The steps of the
Pentagon were streaked red.
By dawn the next day, only a
few protesters remained,
huddled together, having
burned their signs to keep
warm.
At that point, nearly 20,000
Americans had been killed in
Vietnam, and the war would
claim 38,000 more lives before
the United States finally
withdrew in 1975. But the march
on the Pentagon became a
defining moment of the antiwar
movement, immortalized in
Mailer’s Pulitzer Prize-winning
book “The Armies of the Night.”
“It was really hard for the
antiwar movement to
understand its own progress,”
Isserman said. “In a way, we had
more influence than we possibly
could have known staring up at
the Pentagon.”
katie.mettler@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/
retropolis
in prison. Montano was charged
as an adult.
In the two months that followed, however, prosecutors studied high school surveillance video,
reviewed phone records, spoke to
the girl and others, and concluded
the original claims could not be
corroborated. Defense attorneys
had been telling prosecutors for
weeks that the sex acts had been
consensual.
In May, prosecutors dropped
the rape case but filed charges
against the suspects related to
possession of child pornography.
According to their new case,
before March 16, Montano had
engaged in lewd text exchanges
with the 14-year-old, and she sent
him images of herself unclothed.
Montano then forwarded the
images to Sanchez Milian, prosecutors said.
Defense attorneys did not deny
that sequence of events, but they
blasted prosecutors for what they
said was a stretch of child pornography laws designed to go after
adults. Montano’s attorneys resolved his pornography case in
juvenile court when he admitted
to possessing one of the images.
But Sanchez Milian — who had
stayed in the adult court system —
was facing trial on child pornography charges at the end of October.
His defense attorneys had dug in
for a fight, establishing in hearings that they had the legal right to
call the girl to the witness stand for
questioning about whether the
images in the texts were of her.
Prosecutors, who had contended they could make their case
without her testimony, said Friday
that having her testify would
needlessly traumatize a teenage
girl who has suffered mentalhealth issues. Having her called as
a witness also would go against
the wishes of the girl’s family, prosecutors said in court.
“The parent of the victim expressed significant concerns that
participation at trial would be detrimental to the physical and mental well-being of the child,” Assistant State’s Attorney Mary Herdman said in court, reading from a
document she submitted as part of
the record dropping the child pornography case. Herdman said
prosecutors wanted “to protect
this vulnerable child from further
harm in this matter.”
Sanchez Milian, a native of Guatemala, and Montano, from El Salvador, were stopped at the U.S.
border last year, detained, and
then allowed to continue on to
relatives in Montgomery County,
where they enrolled at Rockville
High at the ninth-grade level.
Though the Maryland criminal
cases have come to an end, Sanchez Milian and Montano face
possible deportation.
After court Friday, Sanchez Milian was taken back to the Montgomery County jail, according to
his attorneys. He is being held
there, for a limited time, because
immigration agents had earlier
lodged a detainer against him, according to jail officials.
David Moyse, one of Sanchez
Milian’s attorneys, said he expected officials to start the deportation
process. But Sanchez Milian has a
strong case for staying in the United States and attempting to seek
legal status, Moyse said.
“Henry had never been in any
trouble prior to these allegations,”
he said. “He’s got no criminal convictions or connections to gangs.
He doesn’t even have a speeding
ticket.”
Montano’s attorneys also are
trying to keep him in the country.
Attorney Jose Canto said that immigration officials have launched
a removal case against his client.
Canto is seeking asylum protection for Montano, in part because
some media coverage of the rape
allegations indicated Montano
may have been a member of the
MS-13 gang. Montano never belonged to MS-13, Canto said, but
the label could put him in danger
from rival gangs, or MS-13, if he
were deported to El Salvador.
“Jose just wants to go to school
and take advantage of the opportunities this country offers,” Canto
said. “Unfortunately, he and Henry became the faces of the illegal
immigration debate in this country.”
dan.morse@washpost.com
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
IN MEMORIAM
Some still Bahai faith’s focus on equality still resonates today
skeptical
over Musk’s
Hyperloop
BAHAI FROM B1
HYPERLOOP FROM B1
ers could soon be inching along in
traffic as Musk’s cheekily named
the Boring Company inches below at 100 or 150 feet a day, or
potentially faster if Musk’s promised technical upgrades to the
digging process materialize
“The knock on tunneling is it’s
expensive. It’s more expensive
than surface transportation. So
anything that can be done to
bring innovation to drive costs
down is a good thing,” Mooney
said.
But big questions remain on
costs — to build the project and to
use the system, which would work
by shooting pods in vacuumsealed tubes at high speeds.
Jose Gomez-Ibanez, a professor of Urban Planning at the
Harvard Kennedy School, said he
counts himself in the skeptical
camp, but he does not count out
Musk, who has succeeded against
long odds in the past.
“I can’t understand why going
that fast is going to be easier in
the tube than through the air,”
Gomez-Ibanez says. “There’s a
reason why trains have lost out to
planes over longer distances, and
that’s in part because it’s hard to
maintain a really high quality
right of way,” in this case an
airtight vacuum tunnel.
“You’ve got to respect this guy,
because he’s really got a record
for making things that other people were skeptical about happening,” Gomez-Ibanez said of Musk,
the electric car pioneer and rocket builder. But the “reality of so
much infrastructure” will provide
a major hurdle for the Hyperloop,
he said.
That could translate to costs
that may be “prohibitive to the
general public,” said Kevin
Chang, an assistant professor and
transportation engineer at the
University of Idaho.
And as with any mode of transportation, safety issues need to be
thought through, Chang said. “If
there’s an unforeseen crash that
occurs along the corridor, how do
you mitigate the loss of life?” he
said.
Still, as an engineer, he’s excited by the prospect — and the
freedom it could give people to
live where they want.
Musk said this summer on
Twitter that he had “verbal govt
approval” to build a pod-andtube transportation system, and
one of his super-high-speed podand-tube transportation systems,
known as a Hyperloop, could
make the trip from New York to
Washington in 29 minutes.
“I might consider
working on one end of
the route, and living on
the other end.”
Kevin Chang, assistant professor and
engineer at the University of Idaho
“I might consider working on
one end of the route, and living on
the other end,” Chang said.
Musk also announced this
summer that he had completed
the first segment of his first tunnel, in Los Angeles. Another firm,
Hyperloop One, is also pressing
hard on the idea.
But last week’s announcement
left more questions than answers.
Maryland officials did not immediately have information on
what is involved in the conditional approval or whether any environmental reviews are necessary
for the project. Mayer referred
questions on the construction
timeline, costs and sources of
funds to the Boring Company,
which declined to answer them,
relying instead on a short statement released by the state.
“The Boring Company would
like to thank Maryland, Washington, D.C., and the White House
Office of American Innovation for
their support,” the company said.
In March, President Trump appointed his son-in-law, senior adviser Jared Kushner, to lead the
office.
A White House spokesman
said the innovation office served
as “a guide to the process and
helped convene meetings and
calls when appropriate” to advance the broader Hyperloop
project.
As for the District, a spokesman for the District Department
of Transportation, Terry Owens,
said: “We have had conversations
with the Musk people. . . . We’re
trying to better understand the
concept as it’s been developed so
far.”
michael.laris@washpost.com
one of Baha’u’llah’s foremost
goals, which remains elusive and
just as relevant today.
Baha’u’llah was born two years
before a man who eventually came
to call himself the Bab. The Bab
announced in 1844, at age 25, that
he had come to proclaim the arrival of the next great messenger, a
man who would follow in the tradition of earlier religious messengers — Jesus, Muhammad, Buddha, Krishna and so on. Hundreds
of people became followers of the
Bab before he was executed for his
beliefs in 1850.
Thirteen
years
later,
Baha’u’llah revealed himself: He
was the messenger whom the Bab
had promised. He, too, was imprisoned and harassed for much
of the next 40 years while he wrote
the works that became the basis of
the Bahai faith. The religion places a heavy emphasis on equality,
and Baha’u’llah’s writings taught
about harmony among men and
women, people of all races, science
and religion, and all forms of faith.
Today, gorgeous Bahai temples
stand on every continent but Antarctica, as architectural icons in
places from Cambodia to Uganda
to the suburbs of Chicago. Bahai
communities — some of whom are
still persecuted in the Middle East
but many still thrive in tolerant
nations — gather for worship in
almost every country. And here in
Columbia Heights, a raucous
group of teens is learning to pray.
“Oh Lord,” Anais Basora, 11,
reads aloud. “Confer thy bounty
. . .”
Navid Shahidinejad, the leader
of this Bahai youth group meeting
at the Rita Bright Community
Center, prods Basora, “Do you
know what ‘bounty’ means?”
Basora isn’t Bahai. Most of the
teenagers in the “junior youth empowerment” groups run by Bahai
believers in the District are not
members of the faith, based on the
Researcher
advises
police units
‘recalibrate’
POLICE FROM B1
Police agencies “should not expect dramatic reductions in the
use of force complaints, or other
large-scale shifts in police behavior solely from the deployment of
this technology,” concluded David
Yokum, who directs The Lab @DC,
which conducted the study with
assistance from outside universities.
In an interview, Yokum added,
“So if you are a police department
thinking that this technology on
its own is going to be something to
cause big shifts on those two dynamics, this would be a cause to
recalibrate your expectations.”
Newsham, the chief, said the
biggest benefit of cameras has been
having a clear record in controversial incidents, such as a Dec. 25,
2016, fatal police shooting of a man
during a domestic dispute. Relatives argued police shot an unarmed man; the body-camera video showed the man with “a rather
large butcher’s knife,” Newsham
said. “In today’s environment in
policing, having legitimacy is
JULIE ZAUZMER/THE WASHINGTON POST
Michael Velasquez, 17, left, and youth group leader Navid
Shahidinejad help Anais Basora, 11, memorize a Bahai prayer in
the District on Thursday. The youths also do service projects.
Bahai tenet of treating people of
all religions equally.
“When I look at the revelation
of Baha’u’llah and its purpose to
unify mankind, I find that this
revelation is for everybody, and all
are welcome to participate,” said
Maryam Esmaeili, a leader in
D.C.’s Bahai community. She runs
her own youth group using the
same Bahai curriculum at a second location in Columbia Heights,
and has also helped out in Shahidinejad’s group as well. “Universal
participation is absolutely necessary to build a better world. It’s not
in the hands of only Bahai.”
Esmaeili and Shahidinejad said
the intent of opening these youth
groups to nonbelievers isn’t to
convert the teenagers; after all,
their faith preaches that all religions are equal. That being said,
they encourage children and parents who are interested in Bahai
practices to learn more outside of
the youth group. The Bahai focus
on racial equality is often what
interests parents, who sometimes
start learning the prayers with
their children and check out
events at the 16th Street center.
The religion is too small for the
Pew Research Center or other polling groups to have gathered much
data on it, but the Bahai International Community says there are
more than 5 million adherents
worldwide and about 1,000 in
D.C., with additional communities
in the Maryland and Virginia suburbs. On Sunday, the community
will host its major celebration of
the Baha’u’llah’s 200th birthday at
Woodrow Wilson High School.
Abdul Hill, the athletics manager at the Rita Bright Community
Center, said he likes having the
Bahai youth group there because
it introduces the children to another culture and that education
on how to pray helps them deepen
their own faith, whatever their
religion might be. “A lot of them
don’t go to church,” Hill said.
“Something like this is very big for
them — just having that structure
as a human being on Earth.”
On Thursday night, after the
teenagers practice memorizing a
prayer
drawn
from
the
Baha’u’llah’s writings and play an
energetic name game, they sit in a
circle to think up ideas for their
something we have to have.”
Sgt. Matthew Mahl, chairman
of the D.C. police labor union, said
he too expected a bigger impact
from the cameras.
“I honestly thought that complaints would have come down,”
he said. “We’re spending all this
money to realize that everything is
the same. Maybe that’s a good
thing, that we’ve been doing
things right from the beginning.”
The union leader said officers
appear to have adjusted to the
cameras. “It really has been business as usual,” he said.
Many departments, including
the District, publicly release footage of some police-involved shootings and other encounters, though
policy differs from agency to agency. Authorities in Las Vegas released video of officers streaming
into the crowd as a gunman fired
into a concert earlier this month,
killing 58 people and injuring hundreds.
Officers also have been caught
in compromising and embarrassing positions, such as in Baltimore
where officers targeted in a corruption investigation implicated
themselves on camera.
There have been incidents
where critical interactions were
not recorded because officers
failed to turn on their cameras.
In one incident in the District,
an officer did not turn on his camera before he fatally shot an unarmed motorcyclist in a case that
has angered the victim’s family
and friends. The D.C. police union
says it will push for a new device
that turns on body cameras when
an officer removes a gun from the
holster.
The 21/2-year study of 2,224
D.C. officers — 1,035 without cameras, 1,189 with cameras — started
in June 2015, when cameras were
distributed in limited numbers in
an initial rollout, and it continued
as more officers were phased in to
the program. The department
reached full deployment of
2,600 cameras in December 2016.
Researchers found 880 officers
with cameras reported using force
during an encounter over a sevenmonth period. The number
dropped to 807 for officers without
cameras. Citizens filed 337 complaints against officers wearing
cameras and 280 against officers
not wearing cameras.
Yokum said the outcomes of internal investigations of those complaints were roughly equivalent to
past years.
Michael G. Tobin, director of the
D.C. Office of Police Complaints, a
civilian review board that supplied researchers with some of
their data, said while the cameras
have made it far easier to reach
conclusive results, the videos have
“not had a direct effect yet on our
findings.”
He said preliminary data shows
roughly the same number of complaints were dismissed in fiscal 2017 for a variety of reasons
involving officers wearing and not
wearing body cameras.
Unlike the report’s researchers,
Tobin’s investigators — who examine allegations of improper use of
next service project, a core part of
the Bahai curriculum.
The kids have decided that they
want to visit children with cancer.
Shahidinejad mostly lets them
think through their ideas on their
own.
“I know that they like the Jell-O
and the pudding,” Sium, 13, says.
One teen suggests that they could
bring video games to the patients,
and Basora suggests bringing teddy bears. “I’ve got a bunch,” she
says, then she thinks better of it.
“No, I’m not giving them.”
One of the adults suggests writing cards, and Basora says, “No,
that’s for the vegetarians.” There’s
a rare moment of silence. All the
kids stare at her for a moment and
then figure out what she meant:
veterans. Good-natured giggles
ripple around the circle.
This process is central to the
curriculum, which focuses on social justice. “The revelation of
Baha’u’llah, which talks about the
oneness of mankind, is so grand in
itself,” Esmaeili said. “That is
where this idea of unity becomes
more possible: just being able to
support youth and middle-schoolers in developing an understanding of their twofold moral purpose, that they have qualities that
can be used to serve others.”
Esmaeili, who grew up in a Bahai home in El Salvador, said she
often meets people who are surprised to learn about the Bahai
community running so many programs for people of all ages in the
District and in many other American cities. One of the first assignments in the adult study circles is
to visit a friend and share a prayer
with him or her, she said.
“Sometimes, that sounds very
odd, in a city like D.C., that people
are actually doing this,” she said.
But the kids in the youth group
don’t seem to find it odd at all.
julie.zauzmer@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/acts-of-faith
force and other issues — have
watched many hours of body-camera videos. Tobin said in volatile,
emotional situations, “it’s reasonable that people react the same
whether they are on camera or
not.” But, he said, “in routine encounters, when people know the
camera is active, I believe we see
people acting differently — more
professionally, more formally.”
Michael D. White, a professor in
the School of Criminology and
Criminal Justice at Arizona State
University, said early expectations
about body-worn cameras relied
largely on the study of a single,
small West Coast police department that at the time was among a
handful of agencies with the program. The study correlated a drop
in complaints and uses of force to
the cameras.
That department, White said,
had many problems, and the camera program was among the reforms that could account for the
declines. He said additional data
as more departments add cameras
is more in line with what the District found.
Yokum, the D.C. researcher, said
the study does not suggest the
camera program is a bust, but he
said chiefs should not expect
wholesale drops in complaints or
in officers using force.
“There are other potential benefits from the program,” the researcher said, “such as how the
video footage is used in the courts,
how it’s used to train officers, and
the public perception of trust.”
peter.hermann@washpost.com
FORD
EUGENE FORD
Greatly missed and much loved
DEATH NOTICE
AMES
LENA AMES
Lena Ames of Falls Church VA passed
away on October 13, 2017. She was
retired from the Arlington County Department of Human Services. She is survived
by a host of relatives and friends. A
memorial service will be held on Saturday,
October 21 at 4 p.m. at the Unitarian
Universalist Church of Arlington, 4444
Arlington Blvd., Arlington, VA.
Arrangements are by Ames Funeral Home,
Manassas, VA, 703-368-2814.
BELANGA
PAUL BRYAN BELANGA
Paul Bryan Belanga, 80, of Alexandria, died
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 after a threemonth struggle with pancreatic cancer. Paul
passed away while listening to prayer and
surrounded by his wife of 43 years, Solveig
(Balleby), and his three children, Natalie, Sean,
and Kevin.
Paul was born the youngest of four on October
22, 1936 in Creswell, NC. Growing up on a farm
in rural North Carolina, Paul proved capable of
greater things. He excelled as a student and
athlete and eventually realized his dream of
attending the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, from which he graduated in 1959.
He went on to a distinguished career in public
service and retired from both the Overseas
Private Investment Corporation and the Food
and Agriculture Organization of the United
Nations. Always curious and adventurous,
Paul traveled extensively with his wife, Solveig,
and for a time worked in Rome, Italy.
Paul was a giving person who volunteered
in many capacities once he retired. He was
an active member of Saint George’s Episcopal
Church where he served on the Outreach
Committee and supported the HOST Program
to help feed the homeless. Paul spent many
hours working with Samaritan Ministries and
visiting with the elderly and infirm. He served
as President of the Association of Former
International Civil Servants for over a decade.
Paul was an ardent Democrat who contributed
his time to various campaigns and the smooth
functioning of the electoral process. An avid
conversationalist with a sincere interest in the
ideas and perspectives of others, he especially
loved talking politics and world affairs. Paul
enjoyed all things Tar Heels, Redskins, and
Nationals. Paul was also a proud amateur
genealogist and enjoyed continuing his sister
Evelyn's efforts to trace the Belanga lineage.
Paul is survived by his wife, Solveig; sister,
Norma; three children, Natalie, Sean, and
Kevin; daughters-in law, Alisha and Yumi; and
11 grandchildren, Jehane, Gabrielle, Tyler, Jeremy, Christine, Sophia, Dominic, Sonya, Evelyn,
Maeve and Alessia. He was preceded in death
by two sisters, Evelyn Sindelar and Frances
Mitchell.
A funeral service will be held at Saint George’s
Episcopal Church, 915 North Oakland Street
Arlington, VA 22203 on Saturday, October 21
at 9 a.m. Jefferson Funeral Chapel will be
handling all arrangements. Donations in Paul’s
memory can be made to the UN Refugee
Agency (www.unrefugees.org).
BROOKE
JOELLE MECHALY BROOKE
On Thursday, October 19, 2017,
JOELLE MECHALY BROOKE of
Davidsonville, MD. Beloved
wife of Donald E. Brooke. Loving mother of Bianca (Jay)
Rupert, Jonathan (Jen) and
Matthew (Mindy Ehrenfried) Brooke. Devoted daughter of Simone and David Mechaly.
Dear sister of Batsheva and Orly Mechaly.
Cherished grandmother of Kai, Finley and
Jax Rupert, Isabella, Colby, Ethan and Maia
Brooke. Graveside funeral services were
held on Friday, October 20, 2017, Mt.
Lebanon Cemetery, Adelphi, MD. Shiva will
observed at Magen David Sephardic Congregation, 11215 Woodglen Drive, North
Bethesda, MD 20852 on Sunday at 8 a.m.
and 7 p.m. and Monday through Thursday
at 6:50 a.m. and 7 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the Hospice of the
Chesapeake or to Magen David Sephardic
Congregation. Arrangements entrusted to
TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL HOME,
202-541-1001.
BUCK
JEAN R. BUCK (Age 89)
of Gaithersburg, MD, passed
away on October 15, 2017.
Beloved wife of the late Daniel
R. Buck, Sr.; devoted mother
of Daniel R. Buck, Jr. (Victoria), Stephen
C. Buck, and Allison B. Cord; cherished
grandmother of Christina Cord, Evan Cord,
Derek Cord (Emily), Bennett Cord, and
Emma Buck. Viewing to be held Monday,
October 23, from 9:30 until time of service
at 10 a.m. at St. John Neumann Catholic
Church, 9000 Warfield Rd., Gaithersburg,
MD. Interment to follow at Ft. Lincoln
Cemetery. For full obituary, please visit
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
DUDLEY
TOWANA L. DUDLEY
On September 1, 2017 Family and friends are
invited to attend a celebration of the life of
Towana Dudley on Saturday, October 21 at 2
p.m. until 6 p.m. at 1410 Missouri Ave N.W.
Washington D.C. 20011
obituaries
FINCH
HELEN DEVOS, 90
KENNETH FINCH
Benefactor gave to Christian, children’s charities
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Helen DeVos, a philanthropist
from western Michigan known
for her support of children’s
health, Christian education and
the arts, died Oct. 18 in Ada
Township, Mich. She was 90.
The cause was complications
from a stroke following a recent
diagnosis of myeloid leukemia,
her family said.
Mrs. DeVos was married to
Richard DeVos, who co-founded
direct-sales company Amway and
owns the Orlando Magic, and she
was the mother-in-law of U.S.
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.
Helen Van Wesep was born in
Grand Rapids, Mich., on Feb. 24,
1927, and her parents were schoolteachers. She attended Calvin College in Grand Rapids and worked
briefly as a substitute teacher before marrying in 1953. She volunteered her time and leadership to
an array of causes, including Christian churches and ministries.
Mrs. DeVos and her husband,
who started the Richard and Helen DeVos Foundation, supported
Grand Rapids Christian schools,
including the Richard and Helen
DeVos Center for Arts and Worship at Grand Rapids Christian
High School, and numerous colleges and universities. The DeVos
family also is known for its political donations, including to Republican presidential candidates.
Mrs. DeVos was a prominent
supporter of the Grand Rapids
Symphony and was a board member and officer from 1971 to 1990.
She and her husband provided
the funding to help the Grand
Rapids Symphony make its first
commercial recording of works
commissioned by the symphony.
She had four children, one of
whom, Richard DeVos Jr., ran for
governor of Michigan in 2006 but
was defeated by the incumbent,
Jennifer Granholm (D). Richard
Jr. married Betsy Prince, who
serves as President Trump’s education secretary.
newsobits@washpost.com
PHELAN M. EBENHACK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Helen DeVos with her husband, Richard DeVos, at an Orlando
Magic game against the Chicago Bulls on March 8.
Kenneth Finch, 87, of Arlington, Virginia,
died October 5, 2017, at ManorCare of
Arlington. He was born on April 7, 1930 to
William Kenneth Finch and Agnes McDonald Finch and was the oldest of their four
children. Ken grew up in St. Louis and
graduated from St. Louis University High
School in 1948 and St. Louis University in
1952.
He served in the US Naval Reserve while
in high school and was commissioned as
a Second Lieutenant in the US Air Force
Reserve upon graduation from St. Louis
University in 1952. Ken had a varied career
in several Air Force assignments. He was an
instructor at Mountain Home AFB in Idaho,
he attended a psychological warfare course
at the Georgetown University School of
Foreign Service in 1952, and he flew from
Billy Mitchell Field in Milwaukee in F-89
Scorpion aircraft as flight Intel officer. He
completed his Air Force service as a reserve
officer with USAF-JAG affiliation and retired
in 1971 at the rank of Major.
Ken was a graduate of Marquette University
Law School and Georgetown University
Graduate Law School. After practicing law
in Milwaukee, WI, he worked at the Federal
Communications Commission for over
twenty years. From late 1950s to 1960s he
worked on issues related to space law and
was chairman of the Space Subcommittee
of the International Law Committee of the
Federal Bar Association.
Ken was passionate about his Irish heritage.
He was a devout Catholic and very proud
of his Jesuit education. He was a master
carpenter and he loved the theater and
movies. He crewed and did production
work on many Hexagon Musical Theater
productions in Washington, DC.
Ken is survived by his sister, Suzanne
DeBlaze of St. Louis, and several nieces and
a nephew. His twin younger brothers, Basil
and Barton, predeceased him. A funeral
Mass will be celebrated on Friday, October
27 at 1:30 p.m. at St Anthony of Padua
Catholic Church, 3305 Glen Carlyn Road,
Falls Church, VA. Inurnment will be at
Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, DC at a later date.
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
BERUL
WYMAN
HELLER
ROBERTS
JOYCE CYNTHIA ROBERTS (Age 60)
On October 3, 2017. Beloved wife of the late Dr.
Stanley Heller, mother of the late Alan Heller.
Survived by son, Dov (Chana), six grandchildren
and 21 great-grandchildren. Burial was held.
Memorial contributions to Aish Los Angeles,
1417 S. Doheny Dr. Los Angeles, CA 90035.
Of Washington, DC entered eternal rest on
October 3, 2017. Survived by her loving son,
Warren Dickson, mother, Peggy Roberts, brother, Tracy Roberts (Debra), nephews, David and
Maat, niece, Mena, and a host of other relatives
and friends. Preceded in death by her father,
Lewis Roberts. Viewing to be held Saturday,
October 21, at 10 a.m. at Marshall-March
Funeral Home, 4308 Suitland Rd, Suitland, MD,
followed by a memorial service at 11 a.m. Interment to follow at Heritage Memorial Cemetery,
Waldorf, MD.
B7
RE
DEATH NOTICE
JANE SEGAL HELLER, (Age 95)
McCREE
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
JOHNSON
Prior to joining the Commission, Marlene had
been Chairperson of the District of Columbia Alcoholic Beverage Control Board for 12
years where she presided over quasi-judicial
Board proceedings.
Earlier, she was appointed by the late Mayor
Marion Barry as the first operating executive
and supervisory hearing officer of the D.C.
Office of Employee Appeals. In 2005, Marlene
was appointed General Counsel of the Washington Convention Center Authority, now
known as Events DC, a post where she
remained until her death. During her tenure
there, she was instrumental in the development of the Washington, D.C. Marriott
Marquis Hotel, the new Entertainment and
Sports Arena and other significant capital
development projects undertaken by the
Authority.
SCHOENE
LAWRENCE H. BERUL
ROBERT LEE McCREE
On Saturday, October 7, 2017, God in His
Sovereignty, called Robert Lee McCree into
Eternal Life. He is survived by his wife, Veronica Elaine McCree; children, Valerie, Darnell,
Sharyn, Carol, Angela, Joseph Ronald and Cassandra; sisters, JoAnn and Barbara; brother,
Richard; grandchildren; great-grandchildren; a
host of other relatives and friends. Family will
receive friends on Tuesday, October 24 from 10
a.m. until time of service, 11 a.m. at From the
Heart Church Ministries, 5055 Allentown Rd.,
Suitland, MD. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.fort-lincoln.com
McREYNOLDS
LINDA LOUISE McREYNOLDS (Saddler)
Linda Louise McReynolds (Saddler), 70, passed
away peacefully in her home, in Colmar Manor,
MD, on October 13, 2017. She is survived by
her husband of 48 years, Joseph McReynolds;
her sons, David and Michael (Angela) stepson,
William (Alice); and her three grandchildren
David, Michael, and Danielle. She is also survived by her siblings Phyllis Geis (Carl), Loraine
Clapp (George), Jerry Saddler and Roberta
Davis, originally from Springfield, OH.
Her life will be celebrated on Wednesday,
October 25, 2017 from 10 to 11 a.m., at
Chambers Funeral Home, 5801 Cleveland Ave,
Riverdale, MD 20737. Interment following at
Fort Lincoln Cemetery at noon. Reception to
follow at Colmar Manor Community Center.
LESTER PHILIP SCHOENE, JR.
After a happy and busy life, adding value to
everything he touched, Lester P. Schoene, Jr.
died October 17, 2017 in his Fairfax, VA home.
Born June 15, 1934, he was an engineer and
manager for some three decades with IBM,
then earned his M.S. degree at the George
Mason University School for Conflict Analysis
and Resolution, where he also served on the
advisory board. Finally, he served the last
dozen years in various roles as an ADR advisor
and was appointed the Reservist Ombuds for
FEMA. A lifelong leader and volunteer, he
served in a number of roles for Burgundy Farm
Country Day School, and was active in the
Rotary Club. He is survived by his wife, Mary
Branch Grove; sister, Molly Mercker; three
children, Lavinia, Karl, and Philip; and two
grandchildren, Adam and Mary.
On Thursday, October 19,
2017 of Boca Raton, FL and
Ocean City, MD (previously of
Potomac, MD and Cherry Hill,
NJ).
Beloved Husband of Annette
(Felber) Berul, devoted father
of Charles (Marcie) Berul and Lisa (James)
Denburg, loving brother of Shirley Kline
and the late Wolfie Berul. Also survived by
his five grandchildren, Andrew, Stephen,
Jared Berul, Alison and Jolie Denburg and
many adoring family and friends. Larry was
born in Camden, NJ and received B.S. Engineering from Drexel, J.D. Law degree from
George Washington University, and MBA
from Columbia University. He was an avid
musician, golfer, world traveler, beach/ski
bum and family man.
Graveside Services will be held Sunday,
October 22, 2017 at 2 p.m. at B'nai Israel
Congregation Cemetery in Oxon Hill, MD.
Family will be observing Shiva on Sunday
at 6 p.m. and Monday at 7 p.m. at the
residence of Marcie and Charlie Berul in
Bethesda, MD. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to the American Heart Association or Jewish Federation.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
CEMETERY LOTS
GABOR
NAT MEM PK - Falls Ch., 2 plots, sect FF, nr.
Lord's Supper. Value $7200; asking $4500 ea or
both for $8000. Gd. Investment. 703-356-8853
For information regarding the November 3
memorial service, or for donations in lieu of
flowers, please go to adventfuneral.com. Interment is private.
HELEN WANT MILLER (Age 87)
She began her career as a young attorney
in the corporate legal department at IBM.
After a brief tenure at IBM, she returned
home to D.C. and began a long, successful
career as public servant working for the
District of Columbia in various executive
government capacities for over 30 years,
with great distinction.
Between 1977 and 1979, Marlene was legal
counsel to the Committee on Finance and
Revenue of the Council of the District of
Columbia. From 1995 to 1999, she served
as Chairman of the city’s Public Service
Commission, the regulatory oversight agency
for utility and telecommunication companies.
Robert Gabor passed away peacefully at
his home in Friendship Heights, Maryland on
October 16, 2017. He is survived by his daughter Vivian, her husband Jim Grossfeld, and their
daughter Elise of Bethesda, Maryland, and his
son Andrew, his wife Kimbell, and their children
Laura and Ted of Wheaton, Illinois.
FRANK DARE SLINGLAND
Frank Dare Slingland, 89, of Lusby, MD and
most recently, Raleigh, NC, passed away
peacefully on Thursday, October 12, 2017.
Frank is succeeded by his wife of 61 years,
Betty, his three children, Ginger Merkle
(Rick) Raleigh, NC, Charles (Kathy) Lusby,
MD, and Susan (Wayne Middlesteadt)
Boone, NC. He is also survived by three
grandchildren, Jennifer Filosa (Gerard),
Scott Slingland (Ashley Ledford) and Patrick
Merkle, and one great-grandchild.
Frank was director of Emmy-winning NBC
Huntley-Brinkley Report. Later he directed
the NBC Nightly News. He “moonlighted”
directing ACC Basketball when it was produced by C.D. Chesley. Frank’s expertise in
directing was sought for unique opportunities to do presidential debates, Olympics,
and national conventions.
He earned his retirement where he enjoyed
gardening and fishing and persevered at
golf.
Condolences may be sent to the family
via the Brown-Wynne Funeral website at
www.BrownWynneMillbrook.com.
A Memorial Mass will be held on November
4th at 12N in St. Mary of the Angels
Chapel at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic
Church, 11401 Leesville Road, Raleigh.
Memorial donations may be made to the
American Diabetes Association.
STONE
After the war, Mr. Gabor played a vital role in
the struggle to stop Soviet-backed communists
from seizing control of the Hungarian government. In late 1947, the newly-empowered
communists sought his arrest, but he eluded
capture by escaping the country. Months later
a trial was held in Budapest where he was tried
in absentia and sentenced to death by hanging,
on charges of conspiracy and espionage.
He arrived in the U.S. in 1950 with his wife
Elizabeth. Robert soon joined the research
department of the Free Europe Committee. He
later managed an international news feature
service and founded Peace with Freedom, a
non-profit organization dedicated to helping
newly independent African nations overcome
the legacy of colonialism. In 1986, he and
his wife moved to Washington where Robert
worked at the AFL-CIO as a specialist in Eastern
European affairs.
With the collapse of the communist government, after 40 years of exile, Robert returned to
Hungary where he received a hero’s welcome
and medals of honor for his work against the
Nazis and communists. In 1998, he authored
the book Genuine Social Democracy: Struggles
against Fascism and Communism in Hungary,
1944-1948.
A memorial service will be held at a future date
in the Washington area.
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MARY MILLER LAWRENCE "Polly"
Mary M. "Polly" Lawrence of Chevy Chase,
MD passed away peacefully Monday, October 9, 2017 from post-surgical complications.
Beloved wife of 61 years to Samuel A.
Lawrence, devoted mother of Susan, Sam
and Mary, and grandmother of Thomas and
Neville, Polly leaves a legacy of caring, support and giving.
Polly was born November 5, 1933, the night
her father was elected Mayor of Louisville,
KY. She was the youngest of four daughters
(the “Miller Girls”) and a proud bearer of her
Kentucky heritage. She was known for her
ready smile, enthusiasm for life and sunny
personality.
The Miller family relocated to Washington
in 1939 where Polly attended Horace Mann,
Sidwell Friends and the Madeira Schools.
She received her undergraduate degree from
Vassar College and later a MEd from Syracuse University. She taught hundreds of
children during her fifteen years as a teacher
and special education specialist for those
with reading disabilities. Polly later served as
Executive Secretary for the Wallace Genetic
Foundation where her work was instrumental to the foundation’s mission for the
advancement of sustainable agriculture.
In retirement, Polly devoted her life to family,
friends and many causes important to her.
She served on the Chevy Chase Village
Board of Managers and the boards of the
Casey Tree and Accokeek Foundations.
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MICHAEL KEITH HEDRICK
Cdr., U.S. Navy (Ret.)
Service will be held on Saturday, October
21 at 1 p.m. at Pisgah Baptist Church
in Rice, VA. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to the Pisgah
Baptist Church music program at 202 Pisgah Church Rd, Rice, VA 23966. Shorter
Funeral Home is serving the family.
Passed away peacefully on Sunday, October
15, 2017 (age 67) with his family by his side,
after a long battle with dementia. He joins his
parents, Gordon and Thelma; brother, David;
and sister, Robin in eternal and peaceful rest.
Mike is survived by his beloved bride Denise;
children, Michael (Nicole), Lauren (Chris), and
Matthew (Andrea); sisters, Erin and Tricia; and
grandchildren, Jacquelyn and Michael. Interment and services to be scheduled at Arlington
National Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements by Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home
www.fairfaxmemorialfuneralhome.com
REMEMBER
YOUR LOVED ONES
December 17, 2017
MASSEY
TheWashington Post Magazine will publish
an Annual Commemorative Section.
JEROME LOUIS MASSEY
Lt. Colonel USAR (Ret.)
Plan to be a part of this annual tradition!
Jerome Louis Massey, of Fairfax
Virginia, died on Tuesday October 17, 2017 at Fair Oaks Hospital in Oakton Virginia. He was
95. He was born on July 27 1922
in Norfolk Virginia. He fought in
World War II as an engineer and firefighter. In
1945 he married Bernice Siegel, and together
they had four children.
He was a man of great accomplishment,
some of his notable accomplishments while
in the USAR include:
He completed Command and General Staff
College and many other Department of
Defense schools.
He invented a way to allow doctors and
nurses into operating theatres while keeping
others out by putting a special plate in their
shoes. This technology was used in various
military hospitals.
He participated in the design and testing of
the military combat boots and the design
of shoes worn on aircraft carriers. He also
participated in designing shoes worn by
women of the armed forces.
He was awarded the Meritorious service
metal as a Major for breaking up a black
market theft ring at a military reservation.
His life was at risk in this challenging affair.
He was an entrepreneur in the retail shoe
industry. Massey's Johnston & Murphy Shop
became a world-renowned men's' retail
shoe store.
He and his wife were charter members of
Congregation Olam Tikvah.
Surviving children are Ruth Leichter (Harry
Leichter) of Grand Forks North Dakota, Hedy
Osmunson (Ozzy Osmuson) of Virginia Beach
Virginia, Harriet Van De Riet (Jack Van De
Reit) of Herndon Virginia and Mark Massey
(Kathy Kleiman) of Falls Church Virginia, as
well as eight grandchildren and 13 greatgrandchildren
Memorial donations may be made to Congregation Olam Tikvah in Fairfax Virginia, where
funeral services were held.
Polly cherished memories of her summers
at the Miller family home on Cape Cod
and at the Lawrence cottage in Southwest
Harbor, Maine with its long traditions and
spectacular views of the waters and mountains of Acadia National Park. She was
dedicated to ensuring that the property
would continue to provide the gathering
place for her extended family for generations
to come, as it has for generations past. Polly
simply loved being active with family and
friends, be it tennis , mountain hikes, picnics
on offshore islands, or sailing the ocean’s
tides.
Polly treasured her friendships and possessed an exceedingly positive outlook
throughout her lifetime, readily expressing
gratitude for so many of life’s experiences
whether a blossom in her garden, a hummingbird paying a visit, or being with her
beloved husband. Polly’s Can-Do spirit carried her through her short hospital stay as
she bravely faced heart surgery and life’s
next great adventure.
Polly is survived by her husband, Sam of
Chevy Chase, MD; her immediate family
Susan and Eric Carlson of Kirkland, WA, Sam
and Kate Lawrence of Brooklyn, NY, and
Mary, John, Thomas and Neville Caulfield of
Durham, NH; a large extended family and
countless friends. Thank you, Polly, for all
that you have given us during your sojourn
here on earth. Peace be with you.
A service of remembrance and thanksgiving
will be held in the Bethlehem Chapel of the
National Cathedral, Friday, November 17 at
3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts
may be made to the National Cathedral or
to Compassion & Choices, an organization
dedicated to easing life’s final days by recognizing everyone’s desires to die at a time and
place of their choice.
IN. Jane’s brother, Barrett Gleixner, introduced Tom and Jane during their sophomore
year, and they were married a year after
graduation in 1962.
PLEASE NOTE:
PERLMETER
Mabel is survived by her daughter Nancy
Taylor Bubes and husband Alan and their
children Nathan, Elizabeth, and Andrew of
Washington, DC; son Doug Taylor (Danette)
and children Chris, Ruthanne, and Rachel;
and son Billy Taylor (Denise) and children
Steven and Jennifer of Fredericksburg, VA.
In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made
to the Marlene Johnson Memorial Scholarship Fund for Homeless Students c/o Community Partnership for the Prevention of
Homelessness 801 Pennsylvania Ave S.E.
Suite 360 WDC 20003.
RYAN
LEGACY.COM
Included in all death notices
Optional for In Memoriams
ALAN BARRY PERLMETER
(Age 69)
MABEL WEAVER TAYLOR
A memorial service for Ms. Johnson will be
held on November 3, 2017, at 11 am in
the Bethlehem Chapel of the Washington
National Cathedral, followed by a reception
at the Washington Convention Center at 1
pm.
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
DEATH NOTICE
Mabel Weaver Taylor, of Fredericksburg, VA,
passed away peacefully in Farmville, VA on
Sunday, October 15, 2017, at the age of 91.
She is preceded in death by her husband
of 58 years Douglas Clyde Taylor. Her life
was an example of devotion, which was
demonstrated through her music in church
and her unconditional love for family.
For those who knew Marlene and shared
friendship, the indelible memories and the
love in our hearts are eternal.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
TAYLOR
Died peacefully on October 15, 2017 at
Casey House Hospice with his wife and
daughter by his side.
Alan is survived by his loving wife of 47
years, Carol Glasgow Perlmeter of Barnesville, MD; his devoted daughter Jessica
Perlmeter Cochrane and her husband
Anthony Cochrane of Maplewood, NJ; his
cherished grandchildren Callum Alan Hugh
Cochrane and Rosamund Carol Margaret
Cochrane and his son-in-law Ernesto Capello of St. Paul, MN. His beloved daughter
Rachel Ann Perlmeter preceded him in
death.
Alan is also survived by his loving mother
Lillian Perlmeter of Eugene, OR and his
siblings; Eileen Perlmeter (Patrick Cassidy),
Stuart Perlmeter (Anne Todd) and Barbara
Douglas (Paul Douglas). Alan’s father, Jack
G. Perlmeter, preceded him in death.
Alan was a Television Engineer at WETA TV
for over 30 years and a proud member of
IBEW. Alan worked on many productions
at WETA including The PBS NewsHour, MacNeil/Lehrer Report, Washington Week, A
Capitol Fourth Celebrations, National
Memorial Concerts, In Performance at The
White House and The Lawmakers.
The family will be holding a private memorial service.
Memorial contributions can be made in
the name of A
‘ lan B. Perlmeter’ to: Montgomery Hospice - Casey House 1355 Piccard Drive, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20850
www.montgomeryhospice.org/donatesupport/donate-now.
Marlene was preceded in death by her parents and her younger sister, Denise. She
leaves to mourn her two adult Godchildren,
Ayanna and Jua Mitchell, both of whom
reside in Chicago, and an extended family of
friends and colleagues.
Polly was a gifted athlete, playing competitive tennis throughout her life and greatly
enjoying rounds of golf in her later years.
Her adventurous spirit led to frequent travels
abroad and to many of our national parks and
historic sites. She was an avid reader with a
love for biographies of individuals who have
made a positive impact on society.
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
Born in Budapest, Hungary in October 1919, Mr.
Gabor became active in politics at a young age
and dedicated his life to the struggle for social
justice. At risk of his own life, during Germany’s
occupation of Hungary, Robert helped operate
a clandestine radio station. His efforts included
procuring false papers for many Jewish families.
WARNER A. STONE "Dino" (Age 69)
Of Chesapeake Beach, MD. Passed away
October 7, 2017.
Religious service scheduled for Saturday,
October 21, 2017, 1 p.m. at St. Anthony's
Catholic Church, North Beach, MD.
Celebration of Life scheduled for Sunday,
October 22, 2017, 1 to 4 p.m. at American
Legion #206, Chesapeake Beach, MD.
Our Hearts are Broken. Your family and
friends.
Marlene was warmly admired for her brilliance, tenacity, sharp wit, compassion and
unstinting loyalty. And she was very fond of
tasty gourmet cuisine, pleasurable Caribbean
holidays, fabulous shoes and a succession of
beloved pet dogs.
She was a garden docent at The Hillwood
Estate for fifteen years and a member of
the Chevy Chase Village Parks Committee
and the Chevy Chase Garden Club for over
twenty years.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
JOHN ANTHONY MEANA
Of Fairfax County, VA, died on Friday, October
20, 2017 at her home. Beloved wife of Stanley
G. Miller; mother of Sidney Miller Kaplan (Paul)
and Betsy Miller Royals (Terry); and grandmother of Meghan Royals, Amy Pernick (Andrew),
David Kaplan and Emily Karl (Matt). She is
also survived by her great-grandson, Matthew
Pernick. Funeral services will be held at Money
and King Funeral, 171 West Maple Avenue,
Vienna, VA, on Sunday, October 22, at 11:30
a.m. Interment King David Memorial Gardens.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to Saint Jude Children's Hospital,
501 Saint Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.
Online condolences and fond memories may
be offered to the family at:
www.moneyandking.com
Marlene was a proud, life-long Washingtonian. She graduated from high school at
National Cathedral School, and earned her
B.A. degree from Boston University and her
JD degree from The University of Chicago
School of Law, in the graduating class of
1972.
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
MEANA
MILLER
LORRAINE JOHNSON
(1947 – 2017)
Marlene Lorraine Johnson was born in the
District of Columbia on June 22, 1947, to
parents Lucille and Julien Johnson. She died
peacefully on September 24, 2017 while in
hospice care after a brief hospitalization.
LAWRENCE
SLINGLAND
ROBERT GABOR (Age 98)
Of Kill Devil Hills, NC, passed away on
Tuesday, October 10, 2017. Born in Annandale, VA, John was the son of the late Jack
and Geraldine Meana. Besides his parents,
John was predeceased by his brother, Gary
Meana.
He is survived by his wife, Carolyn “Carrie”
Meana; step-daughter, Nikole Keaton
(Jeromy); two brothers, Mark Meana and
Richard Meana (Alice); nephew, Michael
Meana (Megan); niece, Kristin Martin (Brendan); and many good friends.
The Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated at Holy Redeemer Church in Kitty
Hawk, NC on October 27, 2017 at 4 p.m.
PATRICIA HOWLAND WYMAN
On October 9, 2017, at home in Chevy
Chase, MD. Lifelong volunteer and wife
of Foreign Service Officer, the late Parker
D. Wyman. She is survived by her loving
children, Cheryl, Robert and Candace
Wyman and Joy McGugan; grandchildren,
Philip C. and Penelope Mause, John and
Merrily McGugan, Sean and Marie Allen,
and Teela Wyman; great-grandaughter, Evelyn Allen; sons-in law, Vincent J. McGugan,
Philip J. Mause and Greg DeCicco; granddaughter-in-law, Denise Allen; sister, Nancy
Washburne; and brother, John R. Howland,
Jr. A memorial service will be held at All
Saints Episcopal Church, 3 Chevy Chase
Circle, Chevy Chase, MD, at 12 noon on
Monday, November 13. Interment will
be private. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made in Patricia
Wyman’s name to Stratford Hall, 483 Great
House Road, Stratford, VA 22558 or to The
Colonial Dames of America- Chapter III, c/o
Ms. M. Whitmore, 17613 Princess Anne
Drive, Olney, MD 20832.
THOMAS DAVID RYAN "Tom"
Rear Admiral USN (Retired)
Rear Admiral Thomas “Tom” David Ryan
(USN, retired) died peacefully in Summerville,
South Carolina, on November 13, 2016 at the
age of 77.
Tom is survived by his wife, Jane Ann Ryan
(Gleixner) of Summerville, SC; his five children Thomas, Jr. (Ellen-Sue), Timothy (Lynn),
Jennifer Long (Larry), Jeanette Murphy
(Mark), and Joanne Stallman (Bob); and his
sixteen grandchildren Elizabeth and Andrew
Ryan; Timothy, Grace and Jack Ryan; Rebecca, Nicholas and Barrett Long; Ryan, Flannery, Cormac, Finnian, and Onora Murphy;
and Jane, Annmarie, and Molly Stallman. He
is preceded in death by his sister Diane and
brothers Patrick, Daniel, and Gerald of Buffalo, NY.
Tom was born on July 4, 1939 in Buffalo,
New York, to Thomas Leo Ryan and Virginia
Marguerita Ryan (Stoffel). He earned his
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering
from the University of Notre Dame in 1961,
and his Master’s Degree in Nuclear Engineering in 1964 and his Doctorate in Nuclear
Engineering in 1974 from the University of
Michigan. Tom’s college sweetheart, Jane,
attended Saint Mary’s College, South Bend,
Upon graduation and commissioning in the
Navy, Tom immediately reported to the
destroyer USS Barry (DD933) homeported at
Newport, RI. The highlight of his first tour was
participation in the blockade of Cuba during
the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. Following
his initial sea duty and marriage to Jane,
the couple moved to Ann Arbor, Michigan
for his graduate work at the University of
Michigan as a Navy Burke Scholar. His Navy
career in the submarine force spanned 34
years and included command of the USS
Batfish (SSN681), Submarine Development
Squadron Twelve, and as the Gulf War commander of Submarine Group Eight in Naples,
Italy. He retired in 1995 from his final tour
as the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation. Tom earned the highest peacetime
military award, the Defense Distinguished
Service Medal.
Following retirement, he worked as General
Manager for Commonwealth Edison in
Downers Grove, Illinois before accepting a
position as Director for the Nuclear Energy
Institute in Washington, DC. He finished his
civilian career as a Senior Consultant for
Cortana Corporation in Falls Church, VA
where he was responsible for helping the
US Navy obtain the latest technology in
undersea warfare. Tom was known for his
leadership and dedication to all who worked
for him.
The family would like to thank the caregivers
and staff at The Village at Summerville for
their dedication in caring for Tom in his final
year of life.
The celebration of Tom’s life will occur on
October 23, 2017 at 12:45 pm at the Old
Post Chapel on Joint Base Myer-Henderson
Hall, followed by his interment at Arlington
National Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Alzheimer’s Association.
https://alz.org/donate.asp.
RATES
$11.10 per Line
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DEADLINE
5 p.m.
Friday, November 17, 2017
For more information, please call:
202-334-4122 or 1-800-627-1150, ext. 4-4122
E-mail:
deathnotices@washpost.com
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
B8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Once again, sunny and glorious
Today will be about the same as
Friday — glorious — but on the best
day of the weekend! Any clouds are
fleeting as highs rise to the mid-70s,
with some upper 70s intermixed.
Winds are light out of the south. Tonight, it
remains pleasant, while the slightest touch of
mugginess slowly creeps up slightly nearer dawn.
Low temperatures downtown may settle in the
mid-50s, with some upper 40s outside of the
Beltway.
Today
Sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Sunday
Partly sunny
Monday
Partly sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Tuesday
Rain
Wednesday
Partly sunny
Thursday
Partly sunny
76° 56
76° 58
77° 65
72° 52
63° 47
61° 47
FEELS*: 78°
FEELS: 77°
FEELS: 76°
FEELS: 69°
FEELS: 62°
FEELS: 59°
CHNCE PRECIP: 0%
P: 5%
P: 5%
P: 75%
P: 20%
P: 10%
WIND: E 4–8 mph
W: S 4–8 mph
W: S 7–14 mph
W: S 10–20 mph
W: NW 7–14 mph
W: NW 8–16 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Tu
W
High
Weather map features for noon today.
Low
Harrisburg
75/49
Hagerstown
75/52
Normal
Record high
Philadelphia
77/54
Record low
Baltimore
75/49
Dover
73/52
Washington
76/56
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
77° 3:11 p.m.
55° 3:00 a.m.
67°/49°
86° 1969
31° 1972
76° 2:16 p.m.
44° 5:58 a.m.
67°/42°
83° 2016
20° 1972
76° 3:00 p.m.
50° 1:00 a.m.
66°/44°
87° 1969
28° 1992
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +6.2° yr. to date: +3.1°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 70°
OCEAN: 64°
Richmond
76/51
Virginia Beach
73/57
Norfolk
74/57
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 67°
Total this month
Normal
Kitty Hawk
72/59
Total this year
OCEAN: 70°
Normal
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Moderate
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Moderate
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.00"
0.83"
2.19"
31.91"
32.31"
0.00"
1.48"
2.08"
36.23"
34.00"
0.00"
1.42"
2.17"
33.61"
34.05"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
4 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, partly sunny, mild. High 63–67. Wind
southeast 5–10 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy. Low 42–51.
Wind calm. Sunday, partly sunny, nice. High 62–66. Wind
south 8–16 mph. Monday, mostly cloudy. High 59–63. Wind
south 10–20 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, mostly sunny, warm. High 71–75.
Wind northeast 4–8 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy. Low
53–57. Wind southeast 4–8 mph. Sunday, partly sunny.
High 72–76. Wind southeast 6–12 mph. Monday, partly
sunny, warm. High 73–77.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly sunny, warm.
Wind east 5–10 knots. Waves a foot or less. • Lower Potomac and
Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly sunny. Wind east 5–10 knots. Waves
a foot or less on the Potomac, 1–2 feet on the Chesapeake. Visibility
good.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls will be about 2.8
feet, holding about steady Sunday. Flood stage at Little Falls is 10
feet.
Annapolis
FORECAST
Ocean City
71/56
Lexington
76/50
Washington
ACTUAL
Cape May
71/54
Annapolis
73/55
Charlottesville
78/51
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
M
REGION
AVERAGE
(High tides in Bold)
4:37 a.m.
9:51 a.m.
4:38 p.m.
10:04 p.m.
12:57 a.m.
6:39 a.m.
12:51 p.m.
7:27 p.m.
Ocean City
2:51 a.m.
9:05 a.m.
3:27 p.m.
9:24 p.m.
Norfolk
4:50 a.m.
11:11 a.m.
5:27 p.m.
11:28 p.m.
Point Lookout
2:41 a.m.
8:41 a.m.
3:22 p.m.
10:08 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Edinburg, TX 92°
Low: Boulder, WY 16°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Today
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
74/45/s
64/38/s
30/23/c
78/59/pc
89/64/pc
75/49/s
56/42/s
80/63/pc
58/32/pc
48/43/r
73/55/s
73/54/pc
71/52/s
81/63/pc
81/52/pc
79/52/pc
52/34/pc
77/63/pc
75/54/pc
77/57/pc
89/60/pc
56/35/pc
Tomorrow
75/51/pc
69/45/s
34/28/c
77/65/c
79/48/r
74/53/pc
68/47/pc
80/68/pc
69/44/c
61/42/pc
72/57/s
77/59/pc
73/53/pc
82/66/sh
82/56/pc
79/60/pc
65/46/pc
69/49/r
77/58/pc
79/60/pc
75/52/pc
72/47/s
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
74/48/t
74/56/pc
80/50/s
19/7/pc
66/40/pc
78/46/s
87/73/pc
86/70/pc
76/59/pc
85/69/pc
84/70/pc
73/49/t
74/56/s
80/67/pc
82/64/s
78/59/pc
81/68/pc
87/79/pc
73/62/pc
70/47/t
80/59/pc
85/74/c
75/58/s
74/57/s
67/45/s
76/59/pc
76/49/s
21/9/c
66/47/pc
76/53/s
88/74/pc
80/53/r
74/58/c
79/59/r
86/72/c
68/42/s
83/61/s
72/53/r
94/67/s
79/62/pc
74/59/r
89/79/pc
68/48/r
64/47/s
81/62/pc
82/67/t
73/60/pc
76/61/pc
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
78/50/t
72/43/t
86/72/pc
77/54/s
85/61/s
76/52/pc
67/46/s
60/55/r
76/50/s
78/52/pc
66/38/pc
76/51/s
71/46/pc
79/64/pc
87/77/s
57/42/s
77/61/pc
68/52/s
88/76/s
56/51/r
44/43/r
75/49/s
90/75/pc
76/46/t
70/45/s
70/46/s
86/72/pc
74/59/pc
91/64/s
77/55/pc
66/48/pc
64/48/r
75/55/s
79/57/pc
72/40/s
77/55/pc
77/50/s
67/52/r
86/77/s
69/46/pc
85/64/s
74/54/s
87/77/s
60/48/sh
59/40/r
75/55/pc
90/76/pc
70/45/s
World
High: Fitzroy Crossing, Australia 112°
Low: Eureka, Canada –20°
Oct 27
First
Quarter
Nov 4
Full
Nov 10
Last
Quarter
Nov 18
New
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:24 a.m.
8:57 a.m.
5:46 a.m.
4:59 a.m.
7:43 a.m.
11:53 a.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Tomorrow
Addis Ababa
75/49/pc
Amsterdam
61/50/r
Athens
78/61/pc
Auckland
62/58/c
Baghdad
90/60/s
Bangkok
91/79/t
Beijing
65/45/pc
Berlin
58/50/pc
Bogota
68/51/r
Brussels
62/47/sh
Buenos Aires
67/43/pc
Cairo
82/65/s
Caracas
76/69/t
Copenhagen
56/49/r
Dakar
91/81/s
Dublin
55/45/r
Edinburgh
56/47/r
Frankfurt
64/45/sh
Geneva
69/42/pc
Ham., Bermuda 78/72/pc
Helsinki
41/28/pc
Ho Chi Minh City 91/75/t
76/51/pc
55/50/sh
79/62/s
63/58/r
92/59/s
91/76/t
56/41/c
56/43/sh
66/49/r
53/47/sh
64/46/s
82/66/s
78/69/pc
55/47/sh
92/81/s
54/49/c
54/43/sh
53/44/c
52/42/sh
78/72/pc
38/28/pc
88/75/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
81/67/s
93/62/s
71/57/pc
74/57/s
76/56/t
76/40/s
88/79/pc
84/70/r
88/77/pc
69/62/pc
70/52/pc
59/50/pc
73/47/pc
87/78/c
78/53/pc
69/48/pc
37/25/pc
90/78/pc
77/55/pc
95/68/pc
44/39/r
71/46/pc
64/48/sh
59/49/pc
80/70/s
90/62/c
71/58/s
73/55/s
77/59/c
72/39/s
87/78/s
91/73/s
86/78/t
70/62/pc
71/55/pc
55/49/sh
68/46/pc
87/77/pc
78/55/pc
72/50/pc
36/26/pc
90/77/pc
84/57/pc
95/68/pc
41/36/r
71/51/pc
56/49/c
54/42/sh
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
85/74/pc
96/69/s
73/56/s
87/70/pc
82/52/s
68/39/s
73/49/s
71/59/pc
89/77/c
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Style
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
BY PAUL FARHI
KIEL SCOTT
C
ertain people expect certain styles of
music to obey certain laws, but the
rest of us know that it’s the anti-laws
that keep a musical tradition breathing.
Here’s an eternal anti-law of jazz: Anything
can be played. In rap music, where alchemical
producers transform samples of crickets and
gunshots into melody and rhythm, the prevailing anti-law is that anything can be made into
music. Techno artists perform similar miracles,
arranging their any-sounds on a grid and
setting them loose on the nightlife. Anything
can be danced to.
But there’s a difference between anything
and everything, and Christian Scott aTunde
Adjuah knows all about it. This year, the
34-year-old trumpeter has released an exquisite trilogy of albums — “Ruler Rebel,” released
in March, “Diaspora” from June and “The
Emancipation Procrastination,” out this week
— where the music feels both coherent and
vast. It’s jazz, maybe, but it leans toward trap
and techno, starting somewhere between Miles
Davis éclat circa 1985 and Jon Hassell atmospherics circa 1986 and landing somewhere
else. And, sure, Adjuah could be warning us
Christian Scott
aTunde Adjuah’s
trio of albums sinks
listeners into
an anti-lawful fog
of jazz, trap
and techno
C
PolitiFact
lobbies
readers
for trust
AN ATMOSPHERE
OF HIS OWN
BY CHRIS RICHARDS
SU
about the shape of jazz to come, but does every
great jazz recording have to be a lighthouse?
For right now, he’s right here, getting comfortable in a fog that feels gorgeously anti-lawful.
He also has a thing for brushing words off
his shoulders. Adjuah was born and raised in
New Orleans, the birthplace of jazz, and as a
teenager, he performed alongside his uncle,
saxophonist Donald Harrison Jr., before shipping off to Berklee College of Music. Along the
way, the word “jazz” gained an unwelcome
amount of weight, so now Adjuah calls his stuff
“stretch music.” He also claims to hate the
sound of the trumpet and refers to his stunningly customized horns as “B-flat instruments.” On his album credits, he’s the guy
responsible for the “sonic architecture.” It all
seems a little pretentious — until you remember that any artist who ever did anything
meaningful was pretentious. (Can we write
that in bright lights? Progress requires pretension.)
And if you allow yourself to sink into these
recordings, all of Adjuah’s collateral talk starts
to feel more like artful misdirection than
anxious over-promising, anyway. A serialized
triple album probably qualifies as a grand
gesture, but this music is made up of elegant
ADJUAH CONTINUED ON C4
Jazz artist Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah, 34, has released a trilogy of albums this year: “Ruler Rebel,” “Diaspora” and “The
Emancipation Procrastination,” which dropped this week.
charleston, w.va. — It doesn’t
take long before the skepticism
starts percolating through the
crowd in the library meeting room.
“I have discussions with people
about the news all the time on Facebook, and I show them what I consider to be credible sources of information,” a man named Paul Epstein
says from a middle row. “And they
say, ‘Oh, that’s all biased.’ So how can
you, or how can we, convince people
to trust any mainstream media?”
Amy Hollyfield of PolitiFact, the
Pulitzer Prize-winning fact-checking organization, considers the
question. She hesitates a beat before
telling Epstein and about 65 others
in the audience that maybe you
can’t. Not all the time.
“We have a lot of things on our
website” that attest to PolitiFact’s
impartiality and credibility, Hollyfield says. “But I don’t think that
seeps in when you’re having that
kind of conversation. That’s why
we’re trying to tell our story.”
More hands start popping up.
What about your own biases, a lady
in a purple blouse wants to know.
“How do you hire to avoid the biases” that PolitiFact calls out in others,
she asks.
Hollyfield and four of her fellow
PolitiFactors seated up front at the
Kanawha County Public Library expected some of this. They came to
this city of 50,000, capital of a onceblue state now trending redder by
the day, on an unusual outreach mission. The nonprofit website’s journalists have been traveling into the
heart of Red America to explain what
fact-checkers do and to promote
PolitiFact’s version of it. Charleston is
the third and final stop of the tour,
after Tulsa and Mobile, Ala.
In Charleston, the library crowd
— generally older, largely white —
seems to want to know what’s wrong
with America’s politics and the media that covers it. There are questions about “fake news,” the influence of billionaire donors on campaign rhetoric, the overuse of anonymous sources in news stories, and
about whether, just maybe, it might
be time to start licensing journalists
to separate the pros from the poseurs.
The fact-checkers keep steering
the conversation back to PolitiFact
and its 10-year track record of rating
political speech, including how it
assigns its most damning rating,
“Pants on Fire.”
“Our only objective is the truth,”
deputy editor Katie Sanders tells the
crowd at one point.
The room stirs. A murmur starts.
Aaron Sharockman, PolitiFact’s
executive director, explains the organization’s new partnership with
the local paper, the Charleston Gazette-Mail, to fact-check statements
POLITIFACT CONTINUED ON C2
Days before inauguration, Melania Trump called.
Why he shined light again Now, Hervé Pierre’s answer is a part of history.
on ‘His Dark Materials’
BOOK WORLD
BY
BY
S AVANNAH S TEPHENS
Almost two decades after Philip Pullman completed the fantasy
series “His Dark Materials,” the
celebrated British author has begun a new trilogy titled “The
Book of Dust.”
The first volume, “La Belle
Sauvage,” arrived this week
with an enormous
first
printing in the
United States
of 500,000 copTHE BOOK OF
ies. The story
DUST
takes readers
Vol. 1: La Belle
back 10 years to
Sauvage
when the prior
By Philip
heroine, Lyra
Pullman
Belacqua, was
Knopf. 464 pp.
a
foundling
$22.99
baby.
When
disaster strikes
England,
a
brave boy named Malcolm Polstead is determined to save her.
Pullman spoke with The Washington Post about his new series
via Skype. This interview has
been edited for clarity and length.
Q: When did you know that you
wanted to revisit Lyra’s story?
A: I suppose it was about the
year 2005. That was when I
wrote a little book called “Lyra’s
Oxford,” which showed Lyra at
the age of about 15 or 16. I
discovered some interesting
things in that story that made
me want to explore her world a
bit more. So that set the scene
for it. And that was a little — I
don’t know how to put it — a
little ragbag of a book, a book
full of bits and pieces, and one of
the bits and pieces that I put into
that book was a fake shipping
advertisement, for a shipping
line, advertising a voyage to the
eastern Mediterranean. And, I
thought, “There’s a starting
point for something.” So, that’s
where we’re going to go in the
second book. And, eventually to
central Asia.
PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/AP
Q: You gave Lyra your old room
at Oxford. Did you give Malcolm
PULLMAN CONTINUED ON C4
First lady Melania Trump and Hervé Pierre appear Friday at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of
American History, where Trump’s Pierre-designed inaugural-ball gown is now on display.
R OBIN G IVHAN
Hervé Pierre is Melania
Trump’s trusted stylist, the
man keeping watch over her
aesthetic legacy. He’s the artful
technician who accommodates
her preference for tailored silhouettes and the veteran New
York fashion guy who defends
her signature stilettos.
He is also the designer whose
name will be in the history
books, and the Smithsonian,
thanks to a singular call.
It came at about 8 o’clock on
a January morning — a request
from Trump to send some inaugural-gown sketches by 4 that
afternoon. Pierre had only recently met her after being
asked through a mutual friend
to do a bit of styling on her
behalf. He knew her only as
much of the country did — as a
former model, a boldface name
and a mostly inscrutable participant in a bruising, ugly
campaign.
It’s always challenging for a
designer to create a dress for a
particular client; it’s stressful
when that client is the soon-toTRUMP CONTINUED ON C2
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
She wanted fluid and form-fitting,
and Pierre’s gown somehow did both
TRUMP FROM C1
CRAIG HUDSON/CHARLESTON GAZETTE-MAIL
From left, PolitiFact’s John Kruzel, Katie Sanders and Amy
Hollyfield talk with readers in Charleston, W.Va.
PolitiFact’s push for trust
among conservatives
POLITIFACT FROM C1
made by state and city candidates in
upcoming races. The group has similar partnerships in 13 states.
A hand immediately goes up.
“What I’d like to know is,” says a
gray-haired man near the front, “will
your partnership be with the Gazette side of the paper or the Mail
side of the paper?”
A knowing laugh erupts in the
crowd. The Gazette and Mail, once
rivals, merged in 2015 amid the industry’s ongoing financial misery.
The merged paper maintains one
news staff but two independent editorial pages. The Gazette’s generally
liberal opinions appear on the left
side of two facing pages, with the
Mail’s more conservative ones on
the right.
Neither side, replies Sharockman. PolitiFact is teaming with the
paper’s newsroom, not its opinion
slingers, to vet statements uttered by
politicians, political organizations
and pundits, he says. The PolitiFact
website — based in St. Petersburg,
Fla., and maintained by the Tampa
Bay Times, which is in turn owned
by the Poynter Institute, a nonprofit
journalism education organization
— has no stake in any party or ideology, he tells the room.
Sharockman doesn’t get any
pushback on that, but he’s fully
aware of the free-floating cynicism
about fact-checking, a form that has
enjoyed a boomlet in the past few
years with such outfits as PolitiFact,
FactCheck.org, Snopes and The
Washington Post’s Fact Checker on
the scene. In one poll last year,
88 percent of people who supported
Trump during the 2016 campaign
said they didn’t trust media factchecking. (Overall, just 29 percent of
likely voters in the survey said they
did.) PolitiFact itself has come in for
particularly intense criticism; a blog
called PolitiFact Bias is devoted to
“exposing [its] bias, mistakes and
flimflammery.”
The basic critique is that factcheckers cherry-pick statements and
facts to create a false impression —
usually that conservative candidates
are less truthful than the liberal kind.
“We think for our credibility it’s
super important that we reach out to
people who aren’t reading us currently,” Sharockman said during an
interview before the library presentation, noting that only about 15 percent of PolitiFact’s readers said they
were Republicans in a 2015 internal
survey.
At the same time, he bristles a bit
at the conservative critique. “People
say, ‘Why didn’t you fact-check Hillary Clinton’s claim about coming
under fire [as first lady] in Bosnia?’
Well, we did. The person we factchecked more than anyone else is
Barack Obama. . . . The person we
fact-check the most is the president.
We’re going to hold the president
accountable.”
The fact of the matter is that both
sides are becoming less moored to
the truth, Sharockman says. The
number of untrustworthy statements by Republicans and Democrats alike has grown over the past
three presidential cycles, he noted.
Sharockman doesn’t say so, but
Trump has the most dubious track
record of anyone on PolitiFact, with
nearly 70 percent of the statements
on his scorecard rated “Mostly
False,” “False” or “Pants on Fire.”
That last rating is the most serious violation of the truth, a designation assigned by a panel of three
editors — a “star chamber,” the PolitiFactors jokingly call it.
There’s plenty of nuance in the
process. To demonstrate, Sanders
walks the library crowd through a
sample exercise.
She presents a comment made by
Sen. Bernie Sanders (no relation)
during a Democratic debate last
year: “Very little of [the defense]
budget — less than 10 percent —
actually goes into fighting ISIS and
international terrorism.”
Katie Sanders briefly lays out the
budget particulars and the expert
opinion about the claim by the senator from Vermont. The evidence
generally seems to undermine Sanders’s assertion, but there are some
gray areas.
People in the library debate how
to rate the statement. Finally, she
asks for a vote.
There’s no consensus. Some call
Sanders’s statement “Half True.”
Others go for “Mostly False.”
The exercise makes a subtle
point, which seems to be exactly why
PolitiFact chose it: See, this factchecking thing, it isn’t so easy, is it?
paul.farhi@washpost.com
be first lady. And this first lady
was surrounded by an unprecedented degree of animosity,
anger and divisiveness. Indeed,
a significant swath of Seventh
Avenue had preemptively announced that it would not work
with her, because of her husband’s politics.
Was he stunned by the request to design an inaugural
gown? Yes. Was he flattered? Of
course. Any trepidation? Not
even a little.
“If some people don’t want to
dress the first lady, that’s the
beauty of freedom,” says the
French-born Pierre, who became a U.S. citizen in August
2016. “That’s also my right to
say yes. . . . [To say no] would
have been absurd. It was about
the honor of the country.”
At a ceremony Friday morning, the first lady donated her
gown to the Smithsonian National Museum of American
History, taking pains to spotlight Pierre, whom she hailed
as “a true artist and a real
professional.”
It’s true, she acknowledged,
that she called Pierre only
about two weeks before the
inauguration, so preoccupied
was she with the upheaval of
her life after her husband’s
election as president.
“What I would wear to the
inaugural ball was the last
thing on my mind,” she said.
She said she was aware of
Pierre’s “stellar reputation”
and sought him out as someone
who would collaborate with
her for the occasion, “more
than just design a dress.”
Pierre told The Washington
Post his goal was to create a
dress that had “respect for her
point of view and respect for
her style,” even though he
didn’t really have a clear idea of
either.
He asked her for a few key
words — colors or images. She
responded with pale blue, powder and vanilla. She asked for
both fluid and form-fitting,
which seems like the sort of
contradictory request that
would drive a designer mad.
And yet, Pierre accomplished it.
Because he doesn’t have his
own brand, he didn’t have a
label to sew into the dress.
Then he remembered the labels
he’d made up when he was a
student, still dreaming about
his future in the fashion industry. He found one and stitched
it into the gown.
He was there in the White
House, in the hours before the
balls began, to make sure that
once the first lady was zipped
into the dress, it would look
just right. If there was one
thing that a frazzled and divid-
SAUL LOEB/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
ed nation could agree upon, it
was that the gown — with its
economy of line, its single
waterfall ruffle and claret ribbon — was lovely. It was not
ostentatious or extravagant. It
was calm.
“I really love the dress. It was
a moment of grace,” Pierre says.
“I did something for myself and
for my new country.”
Trump’s gown will be exhibited in the First Ladies Collection alongside the inaugural
gowns of her predecessors, including the embroidered ivory
Jason Wu dress worn by Michelle Obama in 2009 and
Laura Bush’s crimson Michael
Faircloth gown from 2001.
Each reflects the personal style
of the woman who wore it —
sometimes even more than the
sensibility of the person who
designed it — but also the spirit
of the occasion and the tenor of
the incoming administration.
The dresses have celebrated
American industry, optimism
and exuberance. They have
spoken of hope, Camelot and a
“shining city on a hill.”
But in this case, the dress
that Pierre designed in collaboration with Trump was more of
a temporary tonic for a wounded nation. It does not exude the
kind of aggressive disruption
that was the hallmark of her
husband’s campaign. It isn’t a
preening showcase of Americana. It is pure restraint. It also
resists any echo of the past and
what is — and is not — great
about it.
“The dress didn’t refer to
anything,” says Pierre, who
didn’t look at previous inaugural gowns or crack open an
First lady Melania Trump
speaks at the Smithsonian
National Museum of
American History on
Friday. Trump donated the
gown she wore to the 2017
inaugural balls to the
museum’s First Ladies
Collection.
“If some people
don’t want to dress
the first lady, that’s
the beauty of
freedom. That’s also
my right to say yes.”
Designer Hervé Pierre,
who became a U.S. citizen
last year
American history book. “It was
very new and never done.”
At 52, Pierre is among the
last of a generation of designers who apprenticed with the
industry’s great craftsmen — at
Christian Dior under Marc Bohan, for Balmain before it
became an Instagram darling,
for Oscar de la Renta and, most
recently, Carolina Herrera.
He continues to work with
Trump on her public wardrobe,
for events big and small. Pierre
organized her wardrobe for her
visits to Saudi Arabia, the Vatican and France — researching
her destinations to decide
which details or color choices
might be appropriate.
Ultimately, however, he
trusts his gut. “Sometimes, it’s
just being dressed for the occasion.”
He chose a red Dior suit for
her July trip to Paris, celebrating the brand’s place in French
culture as well as in the popular imagination. The choice
went over well.
But he was taken aback by
the brouhaha over the stilettos
Trump was wearing when she
boarded Air Force One for a
trip to Houston after Hurricane
Harvey.
She changed her shoes before she arrived in the battered
city, he noted. Besides, heels
are simply what she wears.
They are her personal style.
And they’re part of her legacy.
robin.givhan@washpost.com
Helena Andrews contributed to
this report.
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/ arts-and-entertainment
CHILDREN'S THEATRE
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In this enchanting Spanish fairy tale, a brave young girl
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Discounts available
for groups of 10 or
more.
Call 202-312-1427
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
"An unbroken line of
arabesques that
stops the heart with
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—The Telegraph
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COMEDY
Orange is the
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1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Tix available at ticketmaster.com
202.397.SEAT
DANCE
Mariinsky Ballet:
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Final Three Performances!
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Tomorrow at 1:30
Replete with forbidden love, shocking betrayal, and a
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to a fabled past radiates with colorful characters, vibrant
sets and costumes, and virtuosic moments. Petipa created
La Bayadère for the Mariinsky more than 140 years ago,
and this dazzling ballet continues to be "theirs" well into
the 21st century. Casting available at kennedy-center.org
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
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C054C 6x2.5
YES
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
RE
C3
K
television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
10/21/17
7:00
7:30
8:00
BROADCAST CHANNELS
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
◆ SNL
The Redskins ◆ College Football: USC at Notre Dame (Live)
News
4.1 WRC (NBC)
◆ Football
◆ Extra
◆ College Football: Kansas at TCU (Live)
Fox 5 News
5.1 WTTG (Fox)
◆ Wheel
(7:37) ◆ College Football: Michigan at Penn State (Live)
News
Ravens
7.1 WJLA (ABC)
◆
◆
◆
◆
◆
Edition
Philips!
NCIS
48 Hours
48 Hours
News
Sing Like
9.1 WUSA (CBS)
(7:55) Fútbol Mexicano Primera División (Live)
(9:55) Fútbol Mexicano Primera División (Live)
14.1 WFDC (UNI) ◆ Crónicas de Sábado
◆
◆
◆
◆
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Mod Fam
Anger Mgt
Anger Mgt
20.1 WDCA (MNTV) Family Feud Family Feud Fox 5 News On the Plus
Barns of the Susquehanna Valley
Eric Clapton: Slowhand at 70 -- Live
Eat to Live
22.1 WMPT (PBS) Chesapeake Bay
Midsomer Murders
Movie: Libeled Lady ★★★★ (1936)
(10:38) POV
26.4 WETA (PBS) Doc Martin
France 24 Programming
Bankrobber’s Wife
Homicide Unit Istanbul
30.1 WNVC (MHz) France 24 Programming
◆
Weekend
News
Finding
Your
Roots
The
Vietnam
War
Veterans N Transition
POV
32.1 WHUT (PBS)
◆ Seinfeld
Two Men
Two Men
Friends
Friends
News
Elementary
50.1 WDCW (CW) Mike & Molly Goldbergs
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
Law & Order: SVU
66.1 WPXW (ION) Law & Order: SVU
CABLE CHANNELS
GENE PAGE/AMC
The Walking Dead (AMC at 9, Sunday) Rick (Andrew Lincoln) leads the
fight against Negan and the Saviors in the Season 8 premiere, which
marks the zombie horror drama’s 100th episode.
Too Funny to Fail (Hulu
streaming) This documentary
examines the downfall of ABC’s
very short-lived series “The Dana
Carvey Show,” which bombed
despite having a writer’s room that
included Louis C.K., Steve Carell,
Stephen Colbert, Robert Smigel
and Charlie Kaufman.
George Michael: Freedom
(Showtime at 9) The singer, who
died late last year, narrates this
documentary chronicling his
formative years and early success,
culminating in his 1990 album,
“Listen Without Prejudice: Vol. 1,”
and the ensuing legal battles with
his record label.
This Is America & the World
(WETA at 10 and WHUT at 7:30 p.m.)
Romania’s ambassador, George
Cristian Maior.
SPECIAL
Michel’le: Still Standing
(Lifetime at 10) Wendy Williams
interviews singer Michel’le
Toussaint about her career and
family.
RETURNING
Talking Dead (AMC at 10) Season
8.
Comic Book Men
(AMC at midnight) Season 7.
Graves (Epix at 10) Season 2.
SUNDAY LISTINGS
Fox News Sunday (Fox at 9 a.m.)
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.), California
Attorney General Xavier Becerra (D)
and White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders.
White House Chronicle (WETA at
9) A discussion about working past
age 65.
Sunday Morning Futures (Fox
News at 10) President Trump.
PREMIERE
The Jellies (Adult
Swim at 12:15 a.m.) A teen
explores his identity after
discovering his jellyfish parents
adopted him in this animated
sitcom from rapper Tyler, the
Creator.
— Bethonie Butler
More at washingtonpost.com/tv
(5:00) Live PD
(8:06) Live PD: Rewind
Live PD (Live)
A&E
(6:57) The Walking Dead
(7:59) The Walking Dead
The Walking Dead
(11:15) The Walking Dead
AMC
Dr. Jeff: RMV
Dr. Jeff: Extra Dose
Dr. Jeff: RMV
My Big Fat Pet
Dr. Jeff: RMV
Animal Planet
(4:30) Movie: Coach Carter Movie: Hashtag DigitalLivesMatter (2016) (9:45) Movie: Baby Boy ★★★ (2001)
BET
(5:40) Sweet Home Alabama (8:14) Movie: The Help ★★★ (2011)
The Help
Bravo
Dragon Ball Dragon
Rick, Morty
Rick, Morty
Family Guy
Family Guy
Dragon Ball Dragon Ball Z
Cartoon Network (6:00) The LEGO Movie
CNN Newsroom
CNN Newsroom
The Wonder List-Bill
Anthony Bourdain Parts
Anthony Bourdain Parts
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Futurama
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Movie: Happy Gilmore ★★ (1996)
Movie: Billy Madison ★
Comedy Central Futurama
Naked and Afraid
Naked and Afraid
Monsters Inside Me
Naked and Afraid
Discovery
Movie: Nanny McPhee ★★ (2005)
(8:40) Movie: Nanny McPhee Returns ★★ (2010)
Stuck/Middle Raven
K.C. Under.
Disney
(6:00) Monster-in-Law ★★ Movie: Ghosts of Girlfriends Past ★★ (2009)
Movie: What Lies Beneath ★★ (2000)
E!
(7:15) College Football: LSU at Mississippi (Live)
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College Football
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College Football: South Florida at Tulane (Live)
(10:15) College Football: Wyoming at Boise State
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Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Halloween Wars
Halloween Wars
Halloween Wars
Halloween Wars
Food Network
Fox Report
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Watters’ World
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(7:10) Movie: The Addams Family ★★ (1991)
(9:15) Movie: Addams Family Values ★★ (1993)
Charlie and...
Freeform
(6:30) Movie: Guardians of the Galaxy ★★★ (2014)
Movie: Jurassic World ★★ (2015)
Horror Story
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Movie: Love Struck Café (2017)
Movie: A Harvest Wedding (2017)
Golden Girls Golden Girls
Hallmark
Monk
Monk
Preview
Murder, She Wrote
Hallmark M&M Monk
(5:55) Movie: Constantine
Movie: John Wick: Chapter 2 ★★★ (2017)
(10:05) Boxing: Jezreel Corrales vs. Alberto Machado
HBO
Fixer Upper
Home Town
Home Town
House Hunters Reno
Hunters
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American Pickers
American Pickers
American Pickers
(10:09) American Pickers
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(6:00) Movie: Psycho In-Law Movie: The Watcher in the Woods (2017)
(10:02) Movie: His Secret Past (2016)
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Track Live
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The Rachel Maddow Show
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Movie: The Blind Side ★★★ (2009)
Movie: Friends With Benefits ★★★ (2011)
MTV
Area 51: The CIA’s Secret
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Roswell UFO Secrets
Dark Secrets of the CIA
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Henry Danger Henry Danger Henry
Game
Movie: Journey 2: The Mysterious Island ★★ (2012)
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(6:30) Movie: Green Lantern ★★ (2011)
Movie: Stickman (2017)
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(6:00) Movie: Trapeze (1956) Movie: Brief Encounter ★★★★ (1945)
(9:45) Movie: The Astonished Heart ★★ (1950)
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(5:30) Movie: San Andreas Movie: Avengers: Age of Ultron ★★★ (2015)
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Ghost Adventures
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Imp. Jokers Imp. Jokers Adam Ruins Adam Ruins Adam Ruins Adam Ruins Impractical Jokers
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High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
Jealousy over closeness between husband and daughter? That’s just childish.
Dear Amy: Do you
Ask Amy think it is normal for
a parent to be jealous
AMY
DICKINSON of their partner’s love
for their (shared)
child?
When my dad was alive, my
mother would continually get
jealous of my relationship with
him. I grew up a tomboy, and my
father and I were very close. My
mother would make comments
that disgusted me, insinuating that
our relationship was somehow in
competition with their marriage.
Recently, I became aware that
this isn’t as unusual as I’d
previously believed. I hear and see
comments from parents, jokingly
or otherwise, stating they are
jealous of the attention/affection
their child gets from their partner.
If things are truly unbalanced, I
suppose I can understand it. But
generally, I would think that a
parent would love seeing their kid
be adored by their partner. Am I
missing something?
I am childless and intend to
remain so, therefore I do not offer
my opinions to people who feel this
way (except for my mother, who
would sometimes apologize after
making her comments).
But inside, I can’t help but feel
that jealousy, of all emotions, is
immature for anyone, let alone in
this dynamic.
Can you offer some insight?
Confused by Competition
the triangle is the toughest shape to
navigate.
So yes, I believe that jealousy
among partners is quite common.
I’ve seen marital jealousy expressed
regarding babies, children, house
pets, close friendships, and a
person’s career or hobbies. It can be
tough to witness a child’s
preference toward the other parent.
But, yes, mature and balanced
people learn to not only tolerate,
but celebrate this closeness.
Confused by Competition: I have
Dear Amy: Until recently I was
close friends with a co-worker, until
she told me (an animal lover) that
she had moved and had abandoned
her cat.
I’ve ceased speaking to her,
despite her attempts to regain our
friendship.
Should I give her another
chance?
Unashamed Cat Owner
news for you: Adults can be
immature, and while many parents
rise to the maturing process and
challenge of having children — for
others, the strain of folding another
relationship into the family system
causes them to act out.
If you think of a marriage
relationship as a straight line
between two points, adding a third
point creates a triangle, and in the
geometry of human relationships,
Unashamed Cat Owner: I agree
that this is an outrageous and
upsetting thing to learn about
someone. I can understand why
this knowledge has interfered with
your friendship.
However, in a very loose analogy,
you are doing something similar to
what this friend has done. You are
exiting without offering a reason,
explanation or apology.
You have an opportunity to do
some advocacy here, if you would
be willing to communicate. You
should tell this friend, “The reason
I’m so chilly toward you is because I
am frankly stunned that you would
have abandoned an animal.”
You don’t mention whether this
person surrendered her cat to a
shelter or left it by the side of the
road (there is a difference). In my
home county, our no-kill shelter
will take in surrendered animals,
no questions asked. And then lucky
people (like me) can adopt them
into good homes.
Explain your reasoning to this
person, and — if this is a
dealbreaker for you (it obviously is)
— then tell her so.
People who abandon animals (or
people) need to understand that
this affects other relationships. On
a deep level, a friend would
wonder: If it is so easy for you to
abandon a family member, what’s
to prevent you from abandoning
me?
Dear Amy: I read with amusement
the question from “Too Close!,” who
thought that her husband and his
sister sharing a bathroom mirror
was inappropriate. I completely
agree with your response, and I
have a similar tale for you.
My daughter-in-law is an earthy
person and I love her dearly, but
one day while my son and I were
sharing a bathroom mirror, she
came into the room, hesitated a
moment, then said, “You’re both
okay” — and commenced to sit on
the throne for a pee. It was
definitely outside of my comfort
zone!
What do you think?
Aghast
Aghast: To fracture a popular
expression, this would definitely
not be my “cup of pee” (so to speak).
You know those Road Runner
cartoons, where the bird makes
tracks so fast that its body is a blur?
That would be me.
I’ve enjoyed the responses to this
question. They really underscore
how individual the response is to
bathroom-sharing.
Amy’s column appears seven days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Write to askamy@amydickinson.com or
Amy Dickinson, Tribune Content Agency,
16650 Westgrove Dr., Suite 175,
Addison, TX 75001. You can also
follow her @askingamy.
©2017 by Amy Dickinson distributed
by Tribune Content Agency
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For brother’s sake, stay out of your
sister-in-law’s social media mess
Miss
Manners
Dear Miss
Manners: A
rather odious
problem: My
sister-in-law
posted something
on social media
that was quite
disturbing. She
made a
disparaging remark about my
brother, which referenced their
intimate (or lack thereof )
relations and made a shocking
and vulgar comment about my
brother in that regard. Several
family members saw the
posting, one of whom asked her
to remove it, which she did.
My brother does not know
about this. He doesn’t use social
media, and no one wants to tell
him. I think he should know,
but I can’t bring myself to tell
him, and I’m not sure if I
should.
Can you advise me? Should
one of us tell him about this
unfortunate event? If we tell
him, I doubt he will be able to
forgive her. I know I can’t. I’m
about to make a trip home (I
live in a distant city). I’m
looking forward to seeing my
brother, but I really don’t want
to see my sister-in-law, and I’m
JUDITH
MARTIN,
NICHOLAS
MARTIN AND
JACOBINA
MARTIN
not sure how to deal with this.
Please let me know what you
would do.
Stay as far away from the
situation as possible. Miss
Manners insists that no good
can come from being the
messenger here. Especially since
the posting has since been taken
down, there will be trust issues
on all sides if the family accuses
his wife of something that he
can no longer witness himself
and that she can always deny.
It will be far easier — and less
expensive — for your brother to
engage in a lasting fight with his
relatives than with his wife. If
your brother does, at some
point, find out and chastise you
for not alerting him, you can
rightly tell him that you thought
it was none of your business.
And alert your sister-in-law in
kind.
Dear Miss Manners: Save-thedate cards for my upcoming
wedding went out several
months ago, and we’re
preparing to send formal
invitations in a few weeks. One
of my fiance’s lifelong friends
emailed me to confirm that he
and his wife were still invited
because, he said, “budgets and
venues change.’’
I was a little taken aback that
he felt the need to ask. We
considered all the major details
final, including our guest list,
once save-the-dates were out;
we thought the save-the-date
was itself a form of invitation.
Are we correct in assuming
that? Does rescinding a savethe-date, as our friend implied
we might do, actually happen?
Probably, but that does not
make it correct. Save-the-dates
are binding on the part of the
issuer, but not on the part of the
receiver. They were created out
of convenience for guests who
need to plan their schedules and
travel arrangements, not for
hosts who might have changed
their minds about their guests.
If for no other reason, Miss
Manners urges hosts to
remember the travel
arrangement part when they
play fast and loose with their
own financial decisions.
New Miss Manners columns are
posted Monday through Saturday on
washingtonpost.com/advice. You
can send questions to Miss
Manners at her website,
missmanners.com.
© 2017, by Judith Martin
An atmospheric emancipation of jazz
ADJUAH FROM C1
micro-gestures, with Adjuah consistently blowing soft, elastic
phrases over forward-motion
rhythms. His harmonies rarely
change altitude, which might
thwart our expectations about
which muscles a jazz musician is
supposed to flex — but hey, that’s
how rap and techno producers
work. By necessity, in fact. When
your toolbox contains every sound
in the world, moving in a straight
line keeps you from going insane.
So instead of getting stuck on
Adjuah’s tone, listen to how he
surrounds it. He has a reliable
bassist in Kris Funn, not to mention an entire team of percussionists tapping out codes with a
flickering stylishness that makes it
difficult to tell the difference between drum and machine.
Adjuah’s most sympathetic collaborator is Elena Pinderhughes, a
tenacious flutist who stands near
the center of the triple-album’s
two brightest flares. The first
comes on “Rebel Ruler” during
“Encryption” — over a techno
pulse straight out of Detroit, Pinderhughes begins her solo with a
fluttering, six-step ascent as if
she’s stepping off this doomed
planet, up into heaven. That’s
worth a gasp. The second big
moment is the sigh evoked during
the title track of “Diaspora” where
Adjuah and Pinderhughes gently
blend their telepathic phrases, letting us know that we’re back on
Earth. It’s a lot like feeling the sun
and the breeze on your skin
at once.
This is airy music, predominantly made with human breath
— and even when Adjuah’s electronic textures take on a liquid
quality, they sound like they’re
evaporating. You can hear it best
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
STRETCH MUSIC/ROPEADOPE
on “The Emancipation Procrastination” during “Videotape,” where the faint electric
fizz in the background conjures phantom carbonation, as
if the music itself were literally
effervescing into the air.
Here, and everywhere else,
Adjuah is creating an atmosphere — one with its own
temperature, its own humidity, its own taste, its own scent.
Is this where jazz is going? If
you catch yourself thinking
too hard about it, the best
thing to do is take a deep
breath.
chris.richards@washpost.com
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
BOOK WORLD
6 splendidly spooky treats
for the Halloween season
BY
MICHAEL DIRDA
As the March sisters of “Little
Women” might have said, “It
wouldn’t be Halloween without
any ghost stories.” Below are six
recent books to help you get in
the holiday spirit.
The Ghost
in the Corner
And
Other
by
Stories ,
Lord Dunsany,
edited by S.T.
Joshi and Martin Andersson
(Hippocampus
Press).
Anyone asked
to pick the single most influential fantasy writer of the 20th
century, with the possible exception of J.R.R. Tolkien, would
almost certainly choose Lord
Dunsany. His early stories about
strange gods, as well as his
prose poems such as “Idle Days
on the Yann,” are composed in
sentences of exquisite musicality. H.P. Lovecraft, no less, started out by trying to imitate the
Irishman’s dreamlike narratives
and captivating word magic. A
few of Dunsany’s stories, as well
as his novel “The King of Elfland’s Daughter,” even helped
usher in the sword-and-sorcery
subgenre, while the “club stories” of Mr. Joseph Jorkens
remain the models for all later
round-the-fire tales.
Dunsany wrote some 600 stories, many hitherto uncollected
and some unpublished — until
“The Ghost in the Corner.” To be
fair, none of these is a match for
“The Hoard of the Gibbelins” or
that murderous classic, “Two
Bottles of Relish,” but they do
reveal the older Dunsany’s mastery of an ingratiating, conversational style. “A Witch in the
Balkans” opens: “It was Christmas eve at a country house, in
which the house-party were
gathered in armchairs before a
fireplace that had never been
modernized and still had room
for big logs, which were now
quietly burning.” When asked
for a ghost story, a certain
gentleman declares that he
can’t contribute one because
he’s never seen a ghost. The
assembly
plaintively
asks,
“Don’t you know any tale of
banshees, goblins or witches?”
He replies, “O, witches. That is a
different matter.” Yes, indeed.
The Best of
Richard
Matheson, ed-
Cover art for Christian
Scott aTunde Adjuah's
trilogy of albums. The
third, “The Emancipation
Proscrastination,”
dropped this week. Adjuah
was born in New Orleans,
the birthplace of jazz, but
he calls his interpretations
of the genre “stretch
music” and his horns
“B-flat instruments.”
. SATURDAY,
ited by Victor
LaValle (Penguin).
You
could make a
strong case for
Richard
Matheson as
the most influential American writer of “fantastika” between Lovecraft and
Stephen King. “I Am Legend,”
“The Incredible Shrinking
Man,” “Hell House” — these
novels, eventually transformed
into classic horror movies,
might alone provide sufficient
evidence for that claim. But
Matheson also wrote such fa-
Richard Matheson may be the most influential
American writer of “fantastika” between
H.P Lovecraft and Stephen King.
mous stories as “Duel,” filmed
for TV by the young Steven
Spielberg, and “Nightmare at
20,000 Feet,” a particularly
memorable episode of “The Twilight Zone.” I thought I knew
most of Matheson’s short fiction
— other outstanding examples
include “Born of Man and Woman,” “Third From the Sun” and
“One for the Books” — and yet
editor LaValle has chosen at
least a dozen I can’t remember
ever having read. Which means
this Halloween really will be
filled with treats.
Medieval
Studies and
the Ghost Stories of M.R.
James, by Pat-
rick J. Murphy
(Pennsylvania
State University Press). If
you’ve never
yet
enjoyed
M.R. James’s shivery “Ghost
Stories of an Antiquary” —
available in many editions, including a particularly handsome new one from the Folio
Society — their titles alone
convey something of what the
author called “a pleasing terror”: “Canon Alberic’s Scrapbook,” “Oh, Whistle and I’ll
Come to You, My Lad,” “Casting
the Runes.” Despite James’s preeminence among ghost-story
authors, “Medieval Studies” is
the first full-length book to
tease out the connections between his medieval scholarship
and his fiction. Any Jamesian
will be surprised at how much
new light Murphy casts on these
eerie tales of revenants and
demons.
The Travelling
Grave
and
Other
Stories, by L.P.
Hartley (Valancourt); The
Valancourt
Book of Horror
Stories,
Volume Two,
edited
by
James D. Jenkins and Ryan
Cagle (Valancourt). Nearly
everyone has
heard or read
the
opening
line of L.P.
Hartley’s
haunting, heartbreaking novel,
“The Go-Between”: “The past is
a foreign country; they do
things differently there.” A similar combination of stylishness
and shock can be discovered in
his many macabre tales, the
best-known being his punningly titled classic, “A Visitor from
Down Under.” As well as reissuing Hartley’s “The Travelling
Grave,” with a discerning introduction by John Howard, Valancourt’s editors have also unearthed 14 neglected shockers
for a wide-ranging horror sampler, opening with Bernard Taylor’s “Samhain,” set at Halloween, and including unsettling
work by Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Michael McDowell and
John Metcalfe.
Dawnward
Spire, Lonely
Hill: The Letters of H.P.
Lovecraft and
Clark Ashton
Smith, edited
by David E.
Schultz
and
S.T. Joshi (Hippocampus Press). Few books
have been more eagerly awaited
than this extensive, annotated
correspondence between two
giants of the weird tale. While
Lovecraft is world-famous for
his Cthulhu Mythos, Smith specialized in elegant fantasies set
in various imaginary realms,
such as the decadent Zothique
and medieval Averoigne. At its
most poetical, his style resembles that of early Dunsany, but
in some memorable stories —
such as “The Seven Geases” or
“The Tale of Satampra Zeiros”—
he emphasizes a biter-bit irony
that recalls Jack Vance or the
darker tales of “The Arabian
Nights.”
In these nearly 800 pages, the
two friends — who never met in
person — discuss their writing,
finances, the tribulations of the
literary life and, not least, their
aesthetic ideals. “The more I
consider weird fiction,” notes
Lovecraft, “the more I am convinced that a solidly realistic
framework is needed in order to
build up a preparation for the
unreal element.” The letters can
also be self-deprecatingly funny. When “Klarkash-Ton” sends
Lovecraft a rock that “resembles” one of the latter’s elder
gods, the author of “The Call of
Cthulhu” replies:
“Have just been studying Ranorada-Tsathoggua with a magnifier. God! What half effaced
hieroglyphics are those near the
base? No, no! — it can’t be . . .
not the Elder Script of those
things . . . not the Ultimate
Secret from the void beyond
curves & angles. . . I tremble, I
tremble!” The letter then smilingly closes with “Yrs for additional trembling—E’ch-Pi-El.”
bookworld@washpost.com
Michael Dirda reviews books
every Thursday for The Washington
Post.
‘Book of Dust’ author says his daemon is a ‘fundamentally kind’ raven
PULLMAN FROM C1
anything of yours as well?
A: Malcolm is very good with his
hands. He’s very interested in
mechanical things and how
things work, and that’s
something of me. He’s braver
than I am — certainly braver
than I was when I was his age.
And I never had a boat. I’d liked
to have had a boat, but I never
did. So I gave him some qualities
of mine that I’ve had and one or
two things that I haven’t got.
Q: Who were you most excited to
revisit besides Lyra?
A: Hannah Relf is someone who
appears near the beginning and
near the end of “His Dark
Materials.” She’s a woman whom
I like very much and someone I
respect a great deal. I was glad to
give her a part that’s important
in “La Belle Sauvage.” She lends
Malcolm books, and she’s
interested in his life, his
thoughts, his education. Her
character pays tribute to an old
lady who had a big house in the
THE ANONYMOUS WHISTLEBLOWER
WHIS
WHO RISKED
EVERYT
EVERYTHING
IN THE NAME OF JUSTICE
“EXTRAORDINARY.”
-Pete Hammond, DEADLINE
“AS TIMELY AS IT GETS.”
-Joshua Rothkopf, TIME OUT NEW YORK
LIAM NEESON
DIANE LANE
MARK FELT
THE MAN WHO BROUGHT DOWN THE WHITE HOUSE
BASED ON THE
BOOKS BY
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village that I used to live in when
I was a boy. She took an interest
in me, and she let me borrow
books from her library. She had
books on every wall — bookcases
all through her house. She very
generously allowed me to come
and borrow a couple of books
every week. She didn’t tell me,
“Oh no, you can’t have that, dear.
That’s not for you.” She said,
“Take anything you like. Read
anything you like. We’ll talk
about it when you bring it back.”
I thought that was so nice, so I
gave that part to Hannah Relf.
Q: How does it feel to write
about trust in a time when it
seems as though honesty isn’t
the most important quality?
A: These are strange times,
aren’t they? We’re in a political
world like nothing I can
remember — where the very
concept of truth is just jettisoned
and made a mockery of. There’s
a very good little book by the
American philosopher Harry
Frankfurt called “On Bullsh--.”
He explains in this book the
difference between truth and lies
and bullsh--. The person who
tells the truth needs to know
where the truth is so he can tell
the truth. The person who is a
liar needs to know where the
truth is so he can avoid it. But
the bullsh--ter doesn’t care
because it’s a performance — it’s
all an act. He doesn’t care if
MICHAEL LECKIE
Philip Pullman, author of the new “Book of Dust” trilogy, says that he gave the character Malcolm some
of his own qualities but that “he’s braver than I am — certainly braver than I was when I was his age.”
people believe him or not. He
just says it because it’s fun and
it’s an act. That’s the world we’re
in now, and it’s a very strange
kind of world.
Q: As in “His Dark Materials,”
each character in “The Book of
Dust” has a daemon, a mystical
animal counterpart. What’s your
daemon?
A: My daemon is a raven. She’s a
bird of the crow family. Could be
a magpie or a jackdaw or a jay, I
suppose, but I think she’s a
raven. She’s a scruffy, grimvisaged old bird that’s cynical
and sharp-beaked, but she’s
quite wise, and she’s seen a lot,
and she’s fundamentally kind
underneath. But she’d never let
you know that.
bookworld@washpost.com
Savannah Stephens works for the
Style section of The Washington Post.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Cardi B makes fans wait
for 5-song Echostage set
BY BRIANA YOUNGER
Thirty minutes before doors
opened at the sold-out Echostage
on Thursday night, a line stretched
all the way down Queens Chapel
Road and around the corner for a
full block. The woman of the hour
was effervescent rapper Cardi B.
Last month, she became the first
solo female rapper to top the Billboard Hot 100 since Lauryn Hill in
1998. The hit? An absurdly contagious victory lap called “Bodak
Yellow.”
The Bronx native’s success felt
like the start of a revolution, led by
Latina and black women from lowincome neighborhoods whose
mannerisms and language contribute so much to mainstream
pop culture without receiving any
of the credit. She’s unabashedly
herself — not too cool to scream
EZ
with excitement and just as willing
to check anyone who steps to her
incorrectly. She dances in the
street when she buys a Bentley and
takes her fans jewelry shopping
with her over social media. She’s
the kind of person people wish
they could be if they weren’t so
preoccupied with what others may
think or say about them, and that
shamelessness makes everything
she does a spectacle for the uninitiated and #goals for those who already adore her.
But for Thursday’s crowd, perhaps Cardi was a little too nonchalant. It became a race against the
clock as doting fans grew aggressively impatient, booing opening
acts who couldn’t live up to their
queen and getting into small scuffles as the tension continued to
grow. Sometime around 12:45 a.m.,
a group of people up front realized
she was live on Instagram getting
her makeup done and chatting up
viewers instead of performing onstage for the paying concertgoers.
It was an unfortunate but unsurprising revelation, considering
the large role social media played
in her ascent to stardom and continues to play in keeping people
tuned in to her larger-than-life personality. For a few, it was too much
a slap in the face, and they left after
four hours of waiting. It was 1:15
a.m. when Cardi’s official DJ took
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 11:302:15-7:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 5:00-10:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 4:00
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG13) CC: 10:40-1:30-4:45-7:40-10:30
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
10:40-1:55-4:45-7:05-10:00
American Made (R) CC: 10:45-1:355:05-7:50-10:35
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) CC:
1:35-7:40-10:50
The Snowman (R) CC: 11:10-1:002:45-4:30-7:30-10:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 5:15
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 10:50AM
The Foreigner (R) CC: 10:45-2:004:45-7:35-10:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
10:35-12:20-2:40-4:20-5:40-7:008:15-9:30-10:45
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:204:10-7:10-10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) CC: 12:10-2:45-5:208:00-10:45
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: 12:00
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
1:30-9:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:40-3:507:00-10:10
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) CC: 12:00-3:407:20-11:00
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Ave N.W.
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
Experience (R) 5:45-8:55
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:2511:50-2:05-5:15
MARYLAND
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr
8633 Colesville Rd
Once a Thief (1965)2:45
Point Blank (1967) (NR) 9:45
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 2:004:30-7:05-9:30
Sexy Beast (R) 7:30
Antboy 3 11:00AM
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:00-3:205:40-8:00
Out of the Past (1947) (NR) 12:30
AMC Academy 8
6198 Greenbelt Road
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:154:40-7:25
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) (!) 2:00-10:10
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
11:25-3:25
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
11:05-1:35-4:10
The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 11:30-2:305:15-8:00-10:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:303:00-6:30-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
12:30-2:05-4:25-7:05-9:30
It (R) CC: 7:00-10:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00-1:454:30-7:30-10:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:45-2:154:45-6:00-7:15-8:30-9:45-11:00
AMC Center Park 8
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 1:55-7:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:00- The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
3:30-7:00-10:30
CC: 11:15-5:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) CC:
AMC Mazza Gallerie
1:50-10:20
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:30-2:10- The Snowman (R) CC: 12:00-2:456:00-9:00
4:50-10:20
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:10-1:50Geostorm 3D (PG-13) (!) 7:40
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 4:40-7:20-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: 11:55CC: 11:10-1:50-4:30-7:10-9:50
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 11:40-2:30- 2:15-4:35-7:15-9:45
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:55-3:005:10-7:50-10:30
6:05-9:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
12:40-3:05-5:30-8:00-10:25
Halloween
(PG-13) CC: (!) 11:30Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00-1:552:00-4:30-7:00-7:45-9:45
4:40-7:30-10:15
Geostorm
3D
(PG-13) 11:15-4:20Professor Marston & the Wonder
10:15
Women (R) CC: (!) 12:00
Blade
Runner
2049 (R) 11:00-2:30Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 6:30
6:00-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:20AMC Columbia 14
2:50-10:00
10300 Little Patuxent Parkway
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 6:40-9:20
6th Street and Independence Ave SW Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
10:50-1:20
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 3:40
American Made (R) CC: 11:05-4:357:20-10:10
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) CC:
12:30-6:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
Angelika Pop-Up
10:50-1:20
at Union Market
The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 11:00-1:45550 Penn Street NE - Unit E
4:35-7:20-10:15
A Silent Voice: The Movie (Koe no Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:15katachi) (NR) 11:00AM
2:45-6:15-9:55
It (R) CC: 3:50-6:55-10:05
Wind River (R) CC: 2:30-5:00Only the Brave (PG-13) (!) 11:307:30-9:40
2:50-6:10-9:30
For Ahkeem CC: 11:15-1:15-3:15Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 10:555:15-7:15-9:15
1:35-4:15-6:55-9:35
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13) CC: Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
10:55-1:30-4:10-6:35-9:20
11:45-2:15-4:40-7:00-9:20
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:05-1:50Avalon Theatre
4:40-7:25-10:20
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Breathe (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:50-1:40Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 2:004:30-7:30-10:20
4:45-7:30
Geostorm: An IMAX 3D Experience
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:15-2:45- (PG-13) (!) 11:35-2:20-5:00-7:405:15-8:00
10:20
Landmark
The Foreigner (R) (!) 11:15-2:05-4:50Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
7:35-10:20
807 V Street, NW
Professor Marston & the Wonder
American Made (R) CC: 12:15-2:45- Women (R) CC: 1:55
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
5:10-7:35-10:00
It (R) CC: 11:00-1:40-4:25-7:10-9:50 Halloween (PG-13) 11:10-1:40-4:207:00-9:40
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:15The Rocky Horror Picture Show
5:00-7:30-8:00-10:05
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 12:20-2:40- (R) (!) 10:00
5:00-7:30-9:55
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
11:00-12:00-1:45-3:45-4:45-7:00Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:3510:15-10:30
3:15-8:35
Landmark E Street Cinema
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
555 11th Street NW
11:50-2:30
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 5:55
Dina 11:00-1:20-4:20-7:20-9:40
Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 7:20
Hamilton CC: 10:40-1:00-9:15
Same Kind of Different as Me (PGGoodbye Christopher Robin CC:
13) CC: (!) 11:15-2:05-4:55-7:45-10:35
10:45-1:30-4:30-7:30-9:55
Human Flow (PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:30- American Made (R) CC: 12:45-6:10
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
4:40-8:00
CC: 5:20-8:30
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
10:35-1:05-4:05-7:05-9:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 10:45- 2:00-4:40
The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 11:20-1:201:10-4:10-7:10-9:40
4:10-7:00-9:50
Breathe (PG-13) CC: 10:30-1:00Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 5:05-8:40
4:00-7:00-9:50
The Florida Project (R) CC: 10:35- Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:251:00-4:05-7:10-10:15
1:15-3:30-4:15-6:30-7:15-10:00
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 11:20-2:25Landmark West End Cinema 4:35-7:20-10:05
2301 M Street NW
Golmaal Again (NR) (!) 12:00-3:20The Big Sick (R) CC: 2:00-7:00
6:30-9:40
Lucky CC: 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:50 Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 11:40Bending the Arc 11:40-4:40-9:40
2:15-4:50-7:55-10:30
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
Down The White House (PG-13) CC: 11:30-1:55-3:10-4:20-5:35-6:45-8:0011:45-2:15-4:45-7:15-9:45
9:10-10:25
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC Secret Superstar (NR) (!) 12:10-3:256:40-9:55
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:00- Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 2:00-4:457:35-10:25
12:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14 Women (R) CC: (!) 12:25
701 Seventh Street Northwest
Geostorm: An IMAX 3D Experience
Geostorm (PG-13) 2:50-8:20
(PG-13) CC: 1:35-4:15-7:15-10:00
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:00-5:35Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
11:00
Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:35Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- 2:05-5:10-7:40-10:10
13) 1:10-4:05-7:00-9:55
The Foreigner (R) (!) 3:30-8:55
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Breathe (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:25-2:1012:00-6:40
5:00-7:30-10:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:10-3:50- Never Here (R) (!) 12:05-2:40
7:30-11:10
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
It (R) 10:10
(R) 10:00
The Foreigner (R) 12:10-2:55-5:40AMC Loews
8:25-11:10
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:1511115 Mall Circle
2:45-5:35-8:15-10:45
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:30-7:00
Marshall (PG-13) 12:20-3:20Geostorm 3D (PG-13) (!) 10:306:30-9:25
4:15-9:45
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-2:30-5:10- The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC:
10:15-4:30-7:15
7:50-10:30
Disney Junior at the Movies - Hal- Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) CC:
1:15-10:00
loween Party! 4:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 2:15-6:00
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 10:00IMAX Theater
12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00
601 Independence Avenue SW
It (R) CC: 11:15-9:30
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR) 2:40 The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:45-2:30A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
3:45-6:30-9:15
Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: 10:15Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
1:00-5:15-8:00-10:30
Dream Big: Engineering Our World: Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:00-2:00An IMAX 3D Experience 12:25
5:00-7:45-10:30
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
One World, One Sky: Big Bird's
Adventure (NR) Please Call
C5
RE
the stage, and his efforts to re-energize the crowd in advance of the
main event were met with even
more boos. Turns out the cult of
Cardi can be just as brash as she is.
A wave of euphoria engulfed the
venue around 1:30 a.m. when she
finally emerged and opened her set
with “Foreva.” “Bodak Yellow” may
be her biggest song, but for these
fans, she is no one-hit wonder. She
ran through a couple more songs,
filling the spaces between with her
notoriously brazen sense of humor
— how she was sick but still going
to “get this money,” and quips such
as, “I know we all God’s children,
but I think he loves me the most.”
The highlight, of course, came
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
'Til Death Do Us Part (PG-13) CC:
Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:454:25-6:50-9:15
11:30-1:30-2:15-4:00-4:45-6:45-7:30Landmark
9:30-10:15
Bethesda Row Cinema
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Stadium 14
6505 America Blvd.
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
3:10-9:50
American Made (R) 6:15-9:15
Same Kind of Different as Me (PGGeostorm (PG-13) 3:30-6:15
13) 12:30-3:40-6:30-9:30
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:45-9:00
7235 Woodmont Ave
AMC Magic Johnson
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
The
LEGO
Ninjago
Movie
(PG)
12:45Capital Ctr 12
Faces, Places (Visages, villages)
11:45-6:30
800 Shoppers Way
(PG) 10:40-1:20-3:30-5:40-7:50-10:00 3:20-6:15-9:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
The
Mountain
Between
Us
(PG-13)
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
10:20-12:50-3:30-6:00
13) CC: 10:30-1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30 Down The White House (PG-13) CC: 1:00-6:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:50-3:20My
Little
Pony:
The
Movie
(PG)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
10:30-1:45-4:00-6:40-10:05
7:00-10:30
1:30-4:15
Halloween (PG-13) 10:30-1:00-3:30- Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 10:00Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- It (R) 8:45
6:00-8:30-11:00
12:50-3:40-6:50-9:00
The Snowman (R) 11:45-2:20-5:001:30-4:45-7:45-10:35
13)
Breathe (PG-13) CC: 10:05-1:10ArcLight Bethesda
7:45-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:00-6:003:50-7:20-9:50
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:30-4:009:45
of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
7:15-10:20
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:30-2:35-5:05- Battle
American
Made
(R)
3:45-9:30
10:20-11:00-1:30-4:20-4:50-7:10-9:50
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:10-3:007:35-9:25
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 10:10- It (R) 1:00-4:05-7:30-10:45
6:00-9:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Kingsman:
The
Golden
Circle
(R)
1:00-1:50-4:10-7:00-7:40-9:35-10:05
The Foreigner (R) 1:00-4:15-7:1512:50-4:40
7:00-10:15
Christopher Robin CC:
10:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Goodbye
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:00-6:4510:50-1:40-4:30-7:30-9:55
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:1510:30
9:45
Old Greenbelt Theatre
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 12:05The Snowman (R) 1:45-4:30-7:15- 2:45-5:30-8:15-10:45
129 Centerway
Golmaal Again (NR) 11:30-2:503:05-7:00
10:00
6:15-9:45
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:30-3:00- Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30Marshall (PG-13) 12:40-3:504:55-10:25
5:30-8:00
3:00-5:30-8:15-10:45
6:45-9:40
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Paragon Kentlands Stadium 10 Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:15-4:45Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
3:10-6:00
7:50-11:00
629 Center Point Way
Halloween (PG-13) 10:10-12:00-2:30The Foreigner (R) 11:55-2:10-5:20Marshall (PG-13) 2:00-5:00-8:00Geostorm (PG-13) 12:25-2:50-5:15- 10:50
5:15-8:00-10:50
7:50-10:45
Disney Junior at the Movies - HalVictoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:40-1:00- 7:40-10:05
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 12:40- Halloween (PG-13) 12:30-1:45-3:00- loween Party! 10:00AM
4:20-7:05-9:50
2:55-5:10-7:25-9:40
Marshall (PG-13) 11:55-2:05-4:454:30-5:45-7:00-8:30-9:45-11:00
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14
American Made (R) 11:55-2:20-4:507:20-9:35
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
7:20-9:50
Breathe (PG-13) CC: 11:05-1:3014716
Baltimore
Avenue
Geostorm
(PG-13) CC: (!) 11:10-2:30My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
2:30-5:10-7:40-10:10
5:20-8:10-11:10
12:25-2:40-4:55-7:10-9:25
The
LEGO
Ninjago
Movie
(PG)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
The
Mountain
Between Us (PG-13)
The
Snowman
(R)
11:55-2:25-4:5512:30-3:15
Halloween (PG-13) 11:35-2:40-5:407:30-10:05
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:45-3:45-7:10 CC: (!) 10:15-1:10-4:20-7:20-8:50
8:00-10:15
Same
Kind
of
Different
as Me (PGDunkirk
(PG-13)
12:25-2:45-7:35
Geostorm
3D
(PG-13)
10:00
American Made (R) 3:20-7:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:20-3:40- The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 13) CC: 11:20-3:30-6:30-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:40Kingsman:
The
Golden
Circle
(R)
7:00-10:20
12:15-3:00-5:35-8:15-10:55
4:05-7:30
CC: 9:50
It (R) 1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00
American Made (R) 6:45
Geostorm (PG-13) 10:55
The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 10:40-1:40Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:20-4:10- Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:454:40-7:30-10:40
7:00-9:50
6:15-9:35
2:25-5:50-8:05-11:00
It (R) CC: 10:50-1:50-4:50-7:50Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:50My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Professor Marston & the Wonder
9:40-11:00
3:00-5:10-7:20-9:30
1:00-3:40
Women (R) CC: 4:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:30- Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:10The Snowman (R) 11:50-2:50-5:30- Professor Marston & the Wonder
11:30-3:10-7:10-10:20
Women (R) 5:10-9:55
7:00-10:30
8:15-10:40
The Foreigner (R) Open Caption; CC:
It (R) 9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:15-9:55
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
The Snowman (R) 1:00-4:00-7:30- 10:30-1:30-4:10-6:50-9:20
The Florida Project (R) 11:40-2:453899 Branch Avenue
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
10:30
5:35-7:55-10:20
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:15-2:5010:00-12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:30-7:20Loving Vincent (PG-13) 11:00-12:45- 5:30-8:05
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:40-2:5010:20
2:20-5:00-7:15-8:25-9:30-10:35
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
6:00-9:00
Only
the
Brave
(PG-13)
12:40-3:50Human Flow (PG-13) 11:10-2:0011:00-1:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
7:15-10:25
3:00-4:30-7:25-8:10-9:40
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 10:30
Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:20Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:10Kingsman: The Golden Circle
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
11:50-12:50-2:40-3:20-5:10-5:502:30-5:00-7:45-10:15
(R)
4:10
1020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
7:40-8:20-10:10-10:50
Marshall (PG-13) 12:20-3:10It (R) 10:15
Blade
Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!) 10:45The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
6:30-9:15
The Foreigner (R) 11:30-2:10-4:50- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
2:20-6:10-10:00
11:10AM
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:00-2:40- 7:25-10:10
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-1:30-2:35- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea HalHappy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30loween (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00-1:206:10-9:40
4:15-5:15-7:00-8:00-9:45-10:45
2:00-3:50-4:30-6:20-7:00-11:30
Only the Brave (PG-13) 10:20-1:20- 2:55-5:30-7:55-10:20
Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
4:20-7:20-10:20
iPic Pike & Rose
199 East Montgomery Ave
The Foreigner (R) 10:10-1:00-3:50- Halloween (PG-13) 11:15-1:0011830 Grand Park Avenue
1:45-3:25-4:10-5:50-6:30-7:30-8:30- Geostorm (PG-13) 11:15-2:00-7:45
7:00-10:00
Geostorm
(PG-13) (!) 12:45-4:159:15-11:00
The
LEGO
Ninjago
Movie
(PG)
10:00Happy Death Day (PG-13) 10:407:30-10:45
11:15-1:45-4:30-7:15
1:30-4:00-7:10-9:50
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) (!)
Geostorm
3D
(PG-13)
5:00-10:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Hal15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 11:00-2:30-6:30-10:00
loween (PG-13) 1:40-4:10-6:40-9:30 Geostorm (PG-13) 1:00-7:10
The Snowman (R) (!) 12:00-3:3011:30-9:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
7:00-10:15
American Made (R) 8:15-11:00
12:30-3:40-6:50-10:10
12:30-3:25
Blade Runner 2049 (R) (!) 11:00-2:45Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:05-10:20
6:45-11:00
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-2:30-5:10- The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 2:45-6:15
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- The Foreigner (R) (!) 12:30-4:007:50-10:30
1:25-7:50
7:15-10:30
11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:45
13)
American Made (R) 6:55-10:00
Bow Tie Harbour 9
Happy Death Day (PG-13) (!) 2:00My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
2474 Solomons Island Road
5:00-8:00-11:30
12:00-2:45-5:30
Geostorm (PG-13) 10:50-1:30-4:10- 4:15-10:35
Marshall (PG-13) (!) 11:30-3:00It
(R)
12:30-3:15-6:30-9:45
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- The Snowman (R) 11:30-2:30-5:15- 6:15-9:30
7:00-9:50
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 13) 12:50-4:10-7:20-10:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
8:00-11:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:00-1:40-4:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:45-3:15- Halloween (PG-13) (!) 1:15-4:301:10-3:50
It (R) 7:20-10:20
7:45-11:15
7:00-10:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 10:40-1:20- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:30- The Foreigner (R) 11:15-2:00-4:457:00-10:30
4:00-6:40-9:10
7:30-10:15
The Snowman (R) 1:15-4:25-7:40- Only
American Made (R) 2:20-5:10the Brave (PG-13) 12:00-3:30AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
10:25
7:50-10:40
7:00-10:00
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
The Snowman (R) 10:30-1:10-3:50- The Foreigner (R) 12:40-3:45Happy
Death Day (PG-13) 11:456:30-9:40
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 11:45-7:156:50-9:30
2:15-4:45-7:15-10:00
10:15
Marshall (PG-13) 11:10-2:10-5:00- It (R) 6:10-9:15
(PG-13) 12:15-3:45Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:10-3:15- Marshall
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:15-4:45
7:40-10:30
6:45-9:30
6:20-9:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Happy
Death
Day
(PG-13)
1:30-4:30Women (R) 11:30AM
Halloween
(PG-13)
11:45-2:30-5:15- 11:30-2:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
The Florida Project (R) 11:20-2:00- 7:30-10:10
8:00-9:45-10:45
Marshall (PG-13) 12:20-3:404:50-7:30-10:10
Disney Junior at the Movies - Hal- CC: 11:00AM
6:50-9:50
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
loween Party! 10:00AM
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
4:30-7:20-10:10
7000 Arundel Mills Circle
Regal Waugh Chapel
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-1:20-2:40American Made (R) CC: 11:10-1:45Geostorm (PG-13) 11:50-5:30-8:25 4:00-5:20-6:40-8:00-9:20-10:40
Stadium 12 & IMAX
4:45-7:30-10:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:40-11:10
1419 South Main Chapel Way
A Question of Faith (PG) 12:25-3:00Same Kind of Different as Me (PGThe Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 5:30-8:10-10:45
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:10-2:55-8:20 13) CC: 11:15-2:00-5:00-7:50-10:30
10:25-1:20-4:10
Disney Junior at the Movies - Hal- The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) CC:
The Snowman (R) 10:55-1:45-4:35- loween Party! 10:00AM
12:30-4:10
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:20
7:30-10:25
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 5:35-11:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:20-2:10Regal
Cinemas
Majestic
It (R) 10:55
The
Mountain
Between
Us
(PG-13)
4:50-7:40-10:30
Stadium 20 & IMAX
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:0010:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 11:30900 Ellsworth Dr
1:35-9:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
1:15-4:15-7:10-9:45
The Foreigner (R) 10:00-1:00-4:00- Geostorm (PG-13) 3:25-6:10-8:50
7:10
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: 11:00Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:35-11:30 (R)
7:00-10:00
My
Little
Pony:
The
Movie
(PG)
2:30-5:15-8:00-10:20
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:40-3:50- The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
1:40-4:25
AMC Hoffman Center 22
12:00-2:30
7:20-10:30
Runner 2049 (R) 12:40-3:10206 Swamp Fox Rd.
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Blade
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 10:357:10-10:00
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 11:45-5:0012:15-1:50-2:50-4:30-5:40-7:10-8:20- 3:55-9:55
It
(R)
6:45-9:50
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- The Snowman (R) 1:10-4:40-8:00- 10:15
9:50-10:45
13) 1:25-4:15-7:15-10:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:30-7:30
Golmaal Again (NR) 2:40-9:40
10:50
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
Secret Superstar (NR) 11:10-6:10
The Foreigner (R) 1:00-3:45-7:0012:05-6:45
11:10-2:00
Raja The Great (NR) 3:10-10:40
10:25
Marshall (PG-13) 11:05-2:00-4:55- American Made (R) 5:50-11:30
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:45-4:00- The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
CC: 10:50-4:20-7:10-9:50
7:45-10:50
7:30-10:30
12:10-2:55
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG-13)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:20CC: 11:00-1:00-3:45-6:30-9:15
Halloween (PG-13) 12:35-3:15-5:55- The Snowman (R) 11:45-2:40-5:35- 2:45-5:20-8:10-10:40
8:30-11:25
American Made (R) CC: 6:20-9:05
8:35-11:15
Marshall
(PG-13)
12:15-3:20It (R) 5:00-8:15-11:25
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) CC:
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 5:10
6:15-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:55-3:45- Geostorm:
1:50-7:30
Tokyo Ghoul (Tokyo Guru) (2017)
An
IMAX
3D
Experience
7:25-11:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
(NR) 7:30
1:30-4:15-7:00-9:45
(PG-13)
Only the Brave (PG-13) 11:35-2:45- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
10:30-1:05-3:40
Mersal (NR) 11:15-6:45
Disney Junior at the Movies - Hal- 5:55-9:15
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-1:20-2:35- It (R) CC: 10:35-1:35-4:35-7:35-10:35
The Foreigner (R) 8:40
The Snowman (R) CC: 10:45-1:30loween Party! 10:00AM
3:55-5:10-6:30-7:45-9:05-10:20
4:30-7:15-10:00
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:50-5:30-8:25 Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:15Regal Westview
2:50-5:25-8:00-9:00-10:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:15Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:40-11:10
Stadium 16 & IMAX
Golmaal Again (NR) 11:30-3:101:40-3:10-5:15-7:00-9:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
5243 Buckeystown Pike
6:50-10:35
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 10:4510:40-1:35
1:45-4:45-7:45-10:45
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Secret Superstar (NR) 12:25-3:50- The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
7:20-10:40
12:00-2:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 10:507:25-10:20
Marshall (PG-13) 1:10-4:00-7:00Geostorm (PG-13) 12:45-7:00
1:35-4:10-6:50-9:25
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
10:00
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:00-10:00
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:30-2:1510:15-1:40-5:10-8:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 5:00-7:45-10:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:00Halloween (PG-13) 11:45-12:40-2:25- 8:30-11:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
1:35-9:00
3:20-5:05-6:00-7:45-8:40-10:25-11:20 Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:15-12:30-1:45-3:05-4:15-5:30-6:45It (R) 4:10
8:00-9:15-10:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Hal- The Foreigner (R) 12:50-3:40-6:20- 1:00-4:30-8:00-11:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:20-2:05loween (PG-13) XD: 11:30-2:10-4:50- 11:30
4:50-7:40-10:25
7:30-10:15
Regal Germantown Stadium 14 11:45-2:30-5:15
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- Breathe (PG-13) CC: 11:05-1:50-4:40Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) 5:10
20000 Century Boulevard
7:25-10:20
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14 Geostorm (PG-13) 11:15-2:00-7:30 13) 12:45-4:15-7:30-11:00
American Made (R) 12:00-3:00Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
1591 West Nursery Road
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
6:00-9:00
Down The White House (PG-13) CC:
12:45-3:30
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 1:10-3:50Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:45-3:30- 11:50-2:20-4:50-7:20-9:55
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:45-10:15 7:15-11:00
6:25-9:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea HalThe Mountain Between Us (PG- It (R) 12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
loween (PG-13) CC: 11:30-12:45-2:0013) 4:30-10:45
CC: 1:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:30-3:15- 3:15-4:30-5:45-7:00-8:15-9:30-10:45
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Same Kind of Different as Me
6:15-9:15
Professor Marston & the Wonder
(PG-13) 12:15-3:15-6:30-9:30
CC: 1:25-4:00-6:35-9:10
Women (R) CC: 4:55-10:40
The Snowman (R) 12:30-3:45Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- American Made (R) 6:45-9:45
Disney Junior at the Movies - Hal7:15-10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) The Foreigner (R) 1:00-4:45-8:1513) CC: 1:05-4:00-6:45-9:30
loween Party! 10:00AM
1:15-7:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) CC:
Only the Brave: The IMAX 2D Experi11:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:301:00-4:05-7:10-10:15
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:15-3:45- ence (PG-13) 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
4:15-8:15
The Snowman (R) CC: 2:10-4:55Geostorm (PG-13) 10:30-1:15-4:007:00-10:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
7:40-10:25-11:45
6:45-9:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:451:15-4:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 3:25Let Her Out (NR) 11:25-10:35
2:30-5:15-8:00-10:45
It
(R)
12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
7:00-10:30
The Bachelors 1:40-4:40-7:20
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:15-7:30The Snowman (R) 12:00-3:00It (R) CC: 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
10:15
5:45-8:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 1:00(R) 10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
The Foreigner (R) 12:30-3:304:00-7:00-10:00
Halloween (PG-13) 11:30-2:15-5:00AMC Potomac Mills 18
6:30-9:30
The Foreigner (R) CC: 1:40-4:256:30-7:45-9:30-10:30
2700 Potomac Mills Circle
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:157:05-9:50-11:35
Geostorm: An IMAX 3D Experience
Geostorm
(PG-13) CC: 1:00-4:00Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: 1:00- 3:45-7:00-10:15
(PG-13) 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:456:35
3:20-5:40-8:00-10:20-11:40
UA Snowden Square
2:30-5:00-7:45-10:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 11:45-9:15
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:25-4:10Stadium 14
Golmaal Again (NR) 1:30-5:15The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
6:55-9:40
9161 Commerce Ctr Dr
11:15-2:00-4:25-7:05
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Hal- 9:00
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:30-2:10-7:30 The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
loween (PG-13) CC: 1:20-2:20-3:45- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 10:00- CC: 11:25-4:35-7:15-10:00
Halloween (PG-13) 11:30-2:155:00-6:30-7:30-9:00-10:00-11:30
12:20-3:15
5:15-6:15-8:00-9:00-10:30
Same Kind of Different as Me (PGProfessor Marston & the Wonder
Mersal (NR) 1:00-4:45-8:30
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:50-10:10
Women (R) CC: 11:50
13) CC: (!) 11:30-2:15-5:00-7:45-10:30
VIRGINIA
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
2:30-5:00
American Made (R) CC: 7:35-10:25
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) CC:
11:15-2:20-5:30-8:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:503:20-6:50-10:35
It (R) CC: 12:00-3:00-6:00-9:00
The Snowman (R) CC: 11:45-2:305:15-8:00-10:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 11:152:15-5:30-8:30
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:25-1:404:20-7:00-9:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: 11:3012:30-2:05-3:00-4:30-5:30-7:00-8:009:30-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:45-3:306:15-9:00
Geostorm: An IMAX 3D Experience
(PG-13) CC: 11:15-2:00-4:45-7:3010:15
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) CC: 2:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) CC: 11:45-1:15-2:304:00-5:10-6:30-7:45-9:15-9:45-10:30
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:00-3:006:00-9:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:50-6:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:30-10:30
Cinema Arts Theatre
9650 Main St
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
12:05-2:35-7:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 9:451:00-4:15-7:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 9:5012:10-2:30-4:55-7:20-9:35
Lucky CC: 9:45-5:05-10:00
Goodbye Christopher Robin CC: 9:4012:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-9:45
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13) CC:
9:55-12:15-2:25-4:45-7:10-9:20
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:00-12:202:20-4:35-7:00-9:15
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:45-2:204:55-7:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 11:301:55-4:20-6:50
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 10:05
American Made (R) 7:20
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:40-2:10-4:40
AMC Shirlington 7
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:00-3:452772 South Randolph St.
7:10-9:45
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
The Snowman (R) 11:30-2:15-5:0510:30-1:15-4:15-7:15-10:10
7:50-10:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 10:00- Marshall (PG-13) 11:50-2:25-5:004:00-10:00
7:40-10:20
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 10:30- Professor Marston & the Wonder
1:30-4:30-7:30-10:30
Women (R) 9:20
Breathe (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:00-1:45- Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:304:30-7:15-10:00
2:50-5:15-7:35-9:55
Goodbye Christopher Robin (!) 11:30- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
2:15-5:00-7:45-10:15
Halloween (PG-13) 12:35-2:00-3:00The Florida Project (R) (!) 11:15-2:00- 4:30-5:30-7:00-8:00-10:25
4:45-7:30-10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:30Professor Marston & the Wonder
7:05-10:30
Women (R) CC: (!) 10:45-1:45-4:15- The Foreigner (R) 11:55-2:40-7:457:00-9:45
10:30
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC:
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:45-2:201:00-7:00
4:55-7:30
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 10:05
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:15-3:157:15-10:15
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:25Tokyo Ghoul (Tokyo Guru) (2017)
2:05-7:30
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) (!) 4:55-10:20 (NR) 10:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: Disney Junior at the Movies - Halloween Party! 10:00AM
10:10-12:40-3:10-5:40
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Manassas 4 Cinemas
CC: 1:15
8890 Mathis Ave.
Same Kind of Different as Me
American Made (R) 11:30-5:00
(PG-13) CC: (!) 10:20-1:10-4:10-7:00- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:45-7:15
9:50-12:20
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
American Made (R) CC: 11:30-2:15- 12:00-2:15-4:30-6:40-8:45
5:05-7:55-10:40
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:00Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) CC: 2:00-4:00-6:00-8:00
10:05-4:00-7:15-10:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: Halloween (PG-13) 12:15-2:20-4:2510:00-12:55-3:25-5:55
6:30-8:30
The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 11:00-1:50Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
4:40-7:45-10:45
6201 Multiplex Drive
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 10:00Geostorm (PG-13) 11:30-4:40-7:15
8:00-11:35
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:05-9:50
It (R) CC: 8:10-11:15
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:15- The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 11:152:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
3:35-6:55-10:10
The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 10:35-1:20- Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
10:05-4:20-10:55
4:05-6:50-9:35
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:30-4:00Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
7:30-11:00
10:25-12:00-1:00-2:25-3:30-4:50It (R) 1:15-7:45
6:00-7:20-8:25-9:55-10:55-12:25
Marshall (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:15-1:05- Only the Brave (PG-13) 10:35-1:354:35-7:35-10:40
4:15-7:25-10:15
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D The Foreigner (R) 11:45-2:30-5:10Experience (R) 11:15-2:55-6:30-10:05 7:50-10:45
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Hal- Golmaal Again (NR) 12:25-3:50loween (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:05-1:40- 7:05-10:25
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 10:204:25-7:05-8:30-9:45-11:00-12:15
12:45-3:10-5:35-8:00-10:35
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Secret Superstar (NR) 12:20-3:35Women (R) CC: (!) 1:35
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 4:20 6:50-10:20
Raja The Great (NR) 12:15-3:30Only the Brave (PG-13) (!) 10:406:45-10:05
2:00-5:10-8:15-11:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
AMC Worldgate 9
Halloween (PG-13) 11:50-2:20-4:5013025 Worldgate Dr
7:20-10:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:45- Mersal (NR) 11:25-3:05-6:40-10:15
3:45-6:45-9:45
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema One Loudoun
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Rave Cinemas
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
11900 Palace Way
Geostorm (PG-13) 8:05-10:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) XD: 10:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
2:10-7:50
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 11:304:55-10:40
American Made (R) 10:55-1:45-4:307:30-10:25
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:40-3:20-7:05-10:10
The Snowman (R) 11:00-1:50-4:457:40-10:30
It (R) 12:40-3:55-6:55-9:55
Golmaal Again (NR) 11:35-3:006:20-9:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:25-2:054:35-7:15-9:50
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:40-4:056:40-9:25
Secret Superstar (NR) 12:10-7:00
Marshall (PG-13) 11:10-2:00-4:507:45-10:35
Angelika Film Ctr Mosaic
Raja The Great (NR) 3:35-10:15
2911 District Ave
Professor
Marston & the Wonder
American Made (R) CC: 12:50-3:20Women (R) 11:05AM
5:45-8:10
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) CC: Mersal (NR) 11:20-2:55-6:30-10:20
Geostorm (PG-13) XD: 11:15-1:5510:10-4:00-7:15-10:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:45- 4:40-7:20
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:05-2:453:15-7:00-10:30
A Silent Voice: The Movie (Koe no 5:25
Happy Death Day (PG-13) XD: 11:55katachi) (NR) 11:00AM
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 10:00- 2:30-5:00-7:35-10:05
Regal Ballston Common
12:25-2:50-5:20-7:50-10:20
Stadium 12
The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 11:05-1:50671 N. Glebe Road
4:30-7:10-9:50
Breathe (PG-13) CC: (!) 11:20-2:00- Despicable Me 3 (PG) 11:30-1:454:40-7:20-10:00
3:55
Goodbye Christopher Robin CC: (!) The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
10:05-12:35-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:25
3:10-9:20
Professor Marston & the Wonder
American Made (R) 12:45-7:05
Women (R) CC: (!) 1:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
The Florida Project (R) CC: (!) 10:15- 12:05-6:10
2:15-4:45-7:30-10:15
The Snowman (R) 11:50-2:45-5:45Invasion of the Body Snatchers
8:00-10:45
(1978) (NR) 11:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:40-1:455:15-9:00
Bow Tie
It (R) 4:00-10:05
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
The Foreigner (R) 11:35-2:15-4:5011940 Market St
8:10-10:45
Geostorm (PG-13) 10:00-1:00-4:00- Golmaal
Again (NR) 11:45-3:308:00-11:00
7:00-10:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Victoria
&
Abdul (PG-13) 12:15-3:4511:15AM
6:45-9:30
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 2:10Happy
Death
Day (PG-13) 11:305:10-8:10-10:55
3:15-5:30-8:25-10:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Secret
Superstar
(NR) 11:30-3:0010:10-1:10-4:10
6:30-9:45
The Snowman (R) 10:40-1:40-4:40- Marshall
(PG-13) 12:30-4:10-7:157:40-10:40
10:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:00-2:30- Tyler
Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
6:00-9:30
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-2:30-5:00It (R) 7:10-10:10
6:15-7:30-9:15-10:30
Only the Brave (PG-13) 10:20-1:20- Disney Junior at the Movies - Hal4:20-7:20-10:20
loween Party! 10:00AM
The Foreigner (R) 11:10-2:00-5:00Regal Countryside Stadium 20
8:20-11:05
45980 Regal Plaza
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 10:30-1:304:30-7:30-10:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 12:15Marshall (PG-13) 10:50-1:50-4:50- 2:45-5:30
7:50-10:50
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Professor Marston & the Wonder
8:00
Women (R) 3:00-9:20
Same Kind of Different as Me (PGGeostorm (PG-13) 12:00-7:00
13) 12:35-3:25-6:15-9:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
10:40AM
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:10-2:10-5:058:00-11:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:40-3:15-6:40-10:05
Dismember the Alamo 5:00
It (R) 2:35-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:00-3:107:00-11:00
American Made (R) 11:20-6:00
The Snowman (R) 10:35-1:30-4:357:40-10:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:25-3:507:20-10:40
The Foreigner (R) 11:50-3:006:20-9:25
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:302:20-5:40-8:20-11:00
with the opening notes of “Bodak
Yellow.” There was no need for her
to rap, since everyone knew every
lyric, but she did anyway, as confetti fell like it was a New Year’s Eve
ball drop. Her set was a brief five
songs, and she filled out the rest of
the time (another 15 minutes) taking selfies with fans and hanging
out onstage, dancing by herself as
her DJ played club bangers by the
likes of Playboi Carti and Migos.
Remarkably, her loyal admirers
continued to stand there and
watch, taking photos and recording Snapchat videos. Apparently,
when you’re Cardi B, just your
presence is more than enough.
style@washpost.com
Saturday, October 21, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:20-4:508:30
American Made (R) 5:00-7:50
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
6:35-9:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:00-2:30
It (R) 1:05-4:15-7:30-10:30
The Snowman (R) 12:40-3:206:00-9:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:553:15-5:45-8:15-10:35
Golmaal Again (NR) 12:10-3:306:50-10:25
Bareilly Ki Barfi (NR) 1:35-4:557:35-10:15
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 1:00-4:057:05-10:20
Secret Superstar (NR) 12:45-4:007:00-10:00
Chef (Hindi) (NR) 1:15-4:30-7:20
Judwaa 2 (NR) 1:25-4:35-7:45
Jai Lava Kusa (NR) 12:00-3:106:30-10:05
The Stray (PG) 1:45-4:20
Raja The Great (NR) 12:30-3:356:45-9:55
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Women (R) 10:10
Mahanubhavudu (NR) 1:30-4:45-8:05
Breathe (PG-13) 12:20-3:00-5:559:05
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13)
1:10-3:50-6:20-9:20
Mersal (NR) 12:25-3:55-7:25
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:20-10:10
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
2:30-8:00
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG13) 12:15-3:00-6:15-9:10
American Made (R) 5:20-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:10-3:106:40-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
7:40-10:50
It (R) 7:10-10:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:10-2:00-5:00
The Snowman (R) 1:40-4:307:15-9:50
The Foreigner (R) 1:20-4:10-6:509:30
Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:30-4:407:45-10:50
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:503:20-5:50-8:30-11:00
Golmaal Again (NR) 12:15-3:407:00-10:20
Secret Superstar (NR) 12:30-3:456:45-9:45
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 12:40-3:15-5:408:15-10:45
Only the Brave: The IMAX 2D Experience (PG-13) 12:20-3:30-6:30-9:40
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:30-4:557:50-11:35
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 11:30Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
2:00-3:50-6:25
21100 Dulles Town Circle
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:10-10:35
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:00-7:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
1:20-4:05-7:05-9:45
1:45-3:45
American Made (R) 1:05-3:55Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:30-10:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 6:40-9:35
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG5:00-10:50
13) 12:45-3:45-6:45-9:50
American Made (R) 2:15-8:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:30-2:40-6:00
6:30-9:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:00-3:00-5:30
12:30-3:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:30- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:30-2:307:00-9:30
6:15-9:55
It (R) 12:10-3:15-6:15-9:15
It (R) 1:00-4:15-7:25-10:40
The Foreigner (R) 11:45-1:30-4:15- The Snowman (R) 11:45-2:35-5:257:30-10:20
8:15-11:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:50The Foreigner (R) 12:55-4:35-7:152:30-5:30-8:00-10:40
10:05
Marshall (PG-13) 1:15-4:00-6:45Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:10-4:1010:30
7:30-10:55
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
American Assassin (R) 8:55
Halloween (PG-13) 12:15-2:45-5:15- Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:306:00-7:45-8:30-10:15-11:00
3:05-5:40-8:10-10:50
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
Marshall (PG-13) 12:40-3:354110 West Ox Road
6:30-9:25
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
13) 10:10-1:00-3:50-6:45-9:40
Down The White House (PG-13)
American Made (R) 10:25
11:35-2:25-5:05-7:40-10:25
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
11:20-2:15-5:00-7:50
Halloween (PG-13) 11:30-2:00-4:30The Snowman (R) 11:15-2:10-5:10- 7:00-8:00-9:05-9:40-10:45-11:35
8:00-10:45
Disney Junior at the Movies - HalBlade Runner 2049 (R) 11:00-2:45- loween Party! 10:00AM
6:30-10:10
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
Only the Brave (PG-13) 10:00-1:056500 Springfield Town Ctr
4:10-7:15-10:20
The Foreigner (R) 10:20-1:10-4:00- Geostorm (PG-13) 1:50-7:20
7:00-9:50
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 11:10-4:30Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:5010:10
2:30-5:20-8:10-10:40
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 11:50Marshall (PG-13) 10:30-1:30-4:30- 2:30-5:10
7:40-10:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
1:10-7:30
Halloween (PG-13) 11:10-2:00-4:45- American Made (R) 8:00-10:50
7:30-10:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Disney Junior at the Movies - Hal- 4:00-10:30
loween Party! 10:00AM
The Fortress (nam-han-san-seong) My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:25-2:00-4:50
(NR) 10:05-1:15-4:25-7:35-10:45
The Snowman (R) 11:20-2:20-5:20Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX 8:10-11:00
22875 Brambleton Plaza
It (R) 7:50-11:10
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 12:45-3:15- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:05-2:405:30-7:45
6:20-10:00
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:15-6:00-9:00
The Foreigner (R) 12:50-3:55Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:30
6:50-9:50
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 12:15- Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:20-3:502:45-5:45
7:10-10:40
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Marshall (PG-13) 12:30-3:3010:20
6:40-9:30
American Made (R) 12:15-3:00Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:00-3:406:15-9:00
6:30-9:10
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
12:15-3:30-6:45-10:00
Halloween (PG-13) 11:00-11:40-1:40My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
2:10-4:20-5:00-7:00-7:40-9:40-10:20
12:00-2:30-5:00-7:45
Same Kind of Different as Me (PGRegal Virginia Gateway
13) 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Stadium 14 & RPX
It (R) 12:45-4:00-7:15-10:30
8001 Gateway Promenade Pl
The Snowman (R) 1:30-4:30-7:30- Geostorm (PG-13) 12:15-2:45-7:45
10:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:30- 12:50-3:30
7:00-10:30
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:45-3:45- Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 5:15-10:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
6:45-9:45
4:20-10:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30American Made (R) 6:30-9:10
3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
The Foreigner (R) 12:00-2:45-5:45- Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
1:20-7:20
8:30-11:15
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:00-4:00- Same Kind of Different as Me (PG13) 1:00-3:45-6:40-9:40
7:00-10:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Professor Marston & the Wonder
1:10-3:50
Women (R) 8:15-11:00
It (R) 6:00-9:00
American Assassin (R) 10:00
Breathe (PG-13) 1:00-3:45-6:30-9:15 The Snowman (R) 12:00-2:40-5:20Geostorm: An IMAX 3D Experience 8:10-10:50
(PG-13) 1:45-4:45-7:30-10:15
The Foreigner (R) 12:40-3:206:45-9:30
Regal Kingstowne
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:10-3:10Stadium 16 & RPX
6:15-9:15
5910 Kingstowne Towne Ctr
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:45The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
3:15-5:45-8:15-10:45
1:40-4:15
Marshall (PG-13) 1:05-4:10-6:50-9:50
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:30-4:10-6:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:15-4:15Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 9:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) 7:30-10:10
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
3:30-10:05
Halloween (PG-13) 11:50-2:15-4:45American Made (R) 6:40-9:20
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
7:15-9:45
12:30-6:55
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:20-4:00My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
7:00-10:40
12:00-3:10-4:05
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
It (R) 6:00-9:15
Halloween (PG-13) 12:30-3:00-5:30Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- 8:00-10:30
13) 12:25-4:25-6:35-10:30
Smithsonian - Airbus
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:45IMAX Theater
6:30-9:05
14390 Air and Space Museum Pkwy
The Foreigner (R) 1:25-4:45-7:30D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
10:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:00-3:40- 10:10AM
6:10-9:00
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 1:10
The Snowman (R) 1:15-4:00Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
7:00-9:45
Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-4:50
Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:10-4:30- Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
7:45-10:15
An IMAX 3D Experience 2:45
Golmaal Again (NR) 12:55-3:15Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
7:10-9:35
Experience (R) 5:45-8:55
Marshall (PG-13) 12:20-3:05-6:05- Journey to Space 3D (NR) 11:55-3:40
10:00
University Mall Theatre
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:4010659 Braddock Rd
1:45-3:00-4:40-5:30-7:15-8:159:40-10:45
Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:20Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
2:35-4:35
Halloween (PG-13) 12:15-2:45-5:15- The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:007:50-10:20
1:45-3:30-5:15
Geostorm (PG-13) 2:30-8:00
Dunkirk (PG-13) CC: 7:30-9:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:00-5:20Spider-Man: Homecoming (PG-13)
10:35
CC: 7:00-9:40-12:00
Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:10Regal Manassas
Stadium 14 & IMAX
2:20-4:20
11380 Bulloch Dr
American Assassin (R) CC: 7:159:35-12:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
12:45-4:45
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:15-7:30
(R) 12:00AM
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH
K6432
QJ
4
96432
WEST
Q98
A642
Q J 10 2
K5
EAST
A J 10
53
K986
J 10 8 7
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH (D)
75
K 10 9 8 7
A753
AQ
The bidding:
SOUTH
WEST
NORTH
1
Pass 1 2
Pass 2 Opening lead — Q
EAST
Pass
All Pass
CLASSIC PEANUTS
imple Saturday” columns are meant to
help aspiring players improve
technique and develop logical
thinking.
When you become declarer, you have undertaken to
win a specified number of
tricks. When you see dummy,
count your winners. If you
see enough sure winners
to make your contract, take
them.
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
At today’s two hearts,
South takes the ace of diamonds and counts seven
more tricks: four trumps in
his hand, a club and two
diamond ruffs in dummy.
He should ruff a diamond
at Trick Two and lead a club
to his ace to ruff a second
diamond.
South shouldn’t risk a
finesse with the queen of
LIO
clubs. If West won, he would
switch to trumps, and South
would lose his second diamond ruff.
What about at matchpoint
duplicate, where overtricks
may be valuable? I would
still play to assure the contract. South has received a
favorable opening lead — a
trump lead would have been
damaging — so he is ahead
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
of the game. Plus scores in
partscore deals can be worth
many matchpoints.
“S
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
7 5 K 10 9 8 7
A753AQ
Your partner opens one
club, you respond one heart
and he bids one spade. What
do you say?
ANSWER: You have enough
strength for game. Your best
spot may be 3NT, but you
need not hurry to bid it. Bid
two diamonds. A new-suit
bid by responder here is forcing. If partner bids 2NT next,
raise. But if he supports your
hearts or otherwise suggests
a distributional hand, you’ll
pursue a suit contract.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | OCTOBER 21
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year you have a
tendency to overthink
situations. Allow a
little more spontaneity
to enter your life, and don’t
insist on so much structure. If
you are single, romance blows
into your life. You might feel as
if you never have experienced
feelings of this nature before.
If you are attached, the two
of you often get into vivid,
energetic conversations. Know
that you both can be right
with different ideas; you don’t
always have to agree. Scorpio
wishes that he or she had the
type of relationship you have!
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
A loved one or dear friend
decides to take an action that
you have been considering.
This person demonstrates
security and a greater
understanding of what might
be necessary. You will enjoy
riding his or her coattails as
you greet what was your idea.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
Be flattered at how a partner
or someone who wants to be
your sweetie befriends you.
This person’s main goal -- at
least right now -- is to put a
smile on your face.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
You might want to pace
yourself and get ahead of a
potential problem. You will
become more relaxed and
easygoing once you clear out
WEINGARTENS & CLARK some errands. A loved one lets
you know how much you are
missed.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
You express depth and
security, yet you might not be
willing to put yourself on the
line or be the first person to
make a move. Wouldn’t it be a
shame to miss out on getting
to know someone better
because of your pride?
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
You might want to stick around
the homefront. Much activity
surrounds your personal life.
An associate or someone in
your day-to-day life could pop
up unexpectedly. Though you
might be uncomfortable at
first, go with the moment.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Don’t stand on ceremony.
Instead, reach out to a friend
or loved one whom you
have not spoken to in a long
time. As you bridge the lost
time, you’ll remember how
connected to this person you
feel.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Be aware of a controlling side
that you frequently cover up.
Let go of possessiveness and
insecurity, if possible, because
you are likely to mess up what
could be a great few days or a
potential romance.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Verify that you want to head
in the present direction.
Sometimes you respond
automatically to situations and
don’t consider whether the
path will really work for you.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You sense that you have left
someone out or you haven’t
completed a situation or
conversation. If you happen
to zero in on the issue, by all
means correct it. You will feel
better.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You seem to be transforming
naturally while living life. What
had worked for you might not
work any longer. Make those
adjustments no big deal.
People change with time,
though you often can maintain
the tie with some mutually
agreed upon changes.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
The spotlight is on you. Usually
you are not comfortable with
so much attention, but right
now you seem to flourish in
that role. Your instincts tell
you what to do with a strong,
demanding person in your life.
Take charge of your life.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Plans could change. For
example, what you thought
would be a quiet get-together
could turn into an outrageous
celebration. Be willing to step
outside your comfort zone.
Don’t restrict yourself to the
same old patterns -- that is, if
you want more excitement in
your life.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
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C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A flirtatious (and married) bestie
Adapted from a recent online discussion.
Hi, Carolyn: I’ve
had a crush on my
brother’s friend for
years. I invited him
to the birthday
party I threw for
my brother, and I also invited my
best friend. Bestie had never met
Crush, but she knew of my crush.
They spent the evening together,
flirting and getting more touchyfeely the more they drank. She was
grinding on him by the end of the
night.
Bestie is married with kids but
has a desperate need for male
attention and has cheated several
times. Putting a man in front of her
is like putting a drink in front of an
alcoholic.
Toward the end of the party
when I finally got Bestie alone, I
reminded her of my crush and
asked her to stop flirting. She
apologized and that was that. But
the next day I saw that they are now
friends on Facebook and feel she
might still be overstepping. Now
I’m wondering if I can trust her.
Could they be talking behind my
back? Would she do this with
someone I was dating or even
married to? And it isn’t the first
Carolyn
Hax
time this has happened.
I can’t stop her from doing these
things (and probably don’t even
have the right to tell her not to flirt
with my crush), so I’m wondering if
I should step back from this
friendship. We’ve been friends
since childhood and she’s been a
great friend otherwise.
— Crushed
Crushed: Of course you can’t trust
her — to be anyone except who she
has always been. Though that’s a
kind of trust, I suppose: You can
trust her to choose cocktails and
tail-chasing over you or anyone
else.
And I think you’re onto a lot
more than you realize with the
drink-in-front-of-an-alcoholic
analogy.
She grabs at male attention even
when she knows it hurts her best
friend, not to mention, presumably,
her husband and kids. That’s the
stuff addicts do — prioritize the
satisfaction of their physical and
emotional cravings above the
consequences to themselves and
others.
And her drinking lowered and
lowered her inhibitions until she
was drunk (right?) and grinding
some guy who wasn’t her husband
and who mattered to someone she
was supposed to care about. There
may be two dependencies here.
Knowing you can’t trust her is
the easy part; she has made it plain.
Whether you choose to distance
yourself from her over this, or
instead to see her as still your friend
in her flawed and compromised
and compartmentalized way, is up
to you and is much more
complicated.
But I urge you to say your piece
about her behaving like an addict
when male temptation is present —
and about your being codependent,
which also isn’t just about
substance abuse. Ask her whether
she can see her role and yours in
shielding her from the
consequences.
Thereafter, when she does this,
say you won’t be a party to it and
then disengage. For the night. For
as long as you need to cool off. For
good. Your call.
Finally, you were available but
your crush opted to grind with the
drunk married mom friend. I hope
he’s looking a lot less crushy today.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her column
delivered to your inbox each morning at
wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
ACROSS
1 Get lovey-dovey
8 Ramble
15 Fertilizes,
in a way
16 Spousal consent
17 Dryer
component
18 Creamy
rice dish
19 Tiruchirappalli
title
20 California region
named for a
literary hero
22 It can lead into
day or night
23 Shade-loving
plant
25 Big chunk
of time
26 State probably
named for a
French province
28 Mobile app?
29 Relay settings
31 Object of
veneration
32 Edible conifer
seed
34 Part
36 Many an
IKEA buy
37 Slangy refusal
38 Brought down a
Giant, say
42 Arrivals
46 Kyrgyzstan
range
47 Interior
design
49 Glitzy affair
50 Informed,
with “in”
52 Sound heard
going up a
mountain,
maybe
53 Film in
which the
title character
says, “I don’t
permit the
suffering.
You do”
54 Yoga class
syllables
55 “Please,
please ...”
58 Half-hearted
59 Asphalt
61 Prevailing
conditions
63 Absinthe
flavoring
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
By Ed Sessa
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
64 Solemnly
commands
65 Gets new
players for
66 Hooks or lures
DOWN
1 Road wreck
2 Capital south
of Addis Ababa
3 Not yet up
4 Bloke’s address
5 Actress Scacchi
6 Siberian river
to the Arctic
Ocean
7 Where the Boss’
band once
rehearsed
8 Hard heads
9 Buttermilk
holder?
10 Indian tea
region
11 Bachelor’s last
words?
12 Rodents on
wheels, perhaps
13 Attended
informally
14 Like the wind
21 Muppet friend
of Elmo
10/21/17
24 Any one of
the male
“Big Bang
Theory” main
characters
27 Shoot for the
moon
29 Softened
30 Man of
La Mancha
33 Nada
35 Whale group
38 Buffet featuring
tortillas and
fixings
39 Hog’s call?
40 Biting
41 Conditioned
response?
42 Repro man?
43 Source of some
annoying online
messages
44 Crowing type
45
48
51
53
56
57
The blues
Gear tooth
Mercury money
Medium board
Source of folic acid
Quaint retail
adjective
60 Letters on some
tee tags
62 Ancient Greek
statuary site:
abbr.
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D
M2
MARINE CORPS MARATHON
HOCKEY
PRO FOOTBALL
Sunday’s 26.2-mile run through
the city is known as “The People’s
Marathon.” Race director Rick
Nealis is a big reason for that. D2
Alex Ovechkin scores a power-play
goal in OT, his 10th of the season,
as Capitals rally to clip the Red
Wings on the road, 4-3. D2
Oakland’s Marshawn Lynch gets a
one-game suspension after making
contact with an official during
Thursday night’s game. D4
Dusty’s done
Houston
pushes
series to
the limit
ASTROS 7,
YANKEES 1
Verlander dominant,
bats come to life late
BY
D AVE S HEININ
houston — At a few seconds
It ended in a paragraph typed on Washington Nationals letterhead and disseminated to
reporters: Dusty Baker will not return as
manager in 2018, the announcement said. The
team thanked him for his service. Then it was
done.
That service included regular seasons of 95
and 97 wins, the first back-to-back division
titles in team history and two losses in the
National League Division Series. Baker, 68,
joined the Nationals by signing a two-year
deal worth $4 million that he felt was below
market value and seemed likely to garner a
raise on his next deal with the team. That deal
never materialized. They didn’t even negotiate.
“This was a pure baseball decision. Again,
before midnight on Aug. 31, the
final signatures were secured, the
official documents were routed
electronically to Major League
Baseball’s Manhattan offices, and
Justin Verlander became a Houston Astro. He flew in the next day,
stepping into the embrace of a
franchise that desperately needed
a veteran ace and a storm-ravaged
city that needed a reason to believe there would be better days
ahead, days that might even include baseball in late October.
Fifty days later, on a Friday
night that pushed two teams’ seasons to their breaking point, Verlander ascended the mound at
Minute Maid Park, rescued the
Astros from the abyss and ensured
there would be baseball in Houston for at least one more night.
With seven shutout innings in a
7-1 win over the New York Yankees
in Game 6 of the American League
Championship Series, Verlander
pitched the Astros to within one
more win of the second World
Series appearance in their history,
and first since 2005. On Saturday
night, baseball will witness the
first Game 7 in an LCS since the
San Francisco Giants outlasted
the St. Louis Cardinals to win the
NL pennant in 2012.
The Astros would almost certainly be finished without Verlander on their side. He shut down
the Yankees in a complete-game
victory in Game 2, then followed it
up with Friday night’s gem. All
told, he has thrown 16 innings in
the series, allowing just 10 hits,
two walks and one run while striking out 21 batters.
On Friday night, Verlander’s
performance veered from overpowering at the beginning to
crafty and gutsy — with a heaping
measure of good fortune tossed in
— at the end. His toughest inning
by far was his last, when he put the
NATIONALS CONTINUED ON D3
ALCS CONTINUED ON D4
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Successor’s bar? Parade
down Pennsylvania Ave.
WHO’S NEXT?
The Nationals could go with an experienced hand
(Ausmus or Farrell) or skew young (Cora).
Our list of possibilities, D3
Welcome to town, seventh
manager of the Washington
Nationals. Have a seat. Meet
your team. Now, your job
description.
“Winning a lot of regular
Barry
season games and winning
Svrluga
divisions is not enough,” said
your new boss, General
Manager Mike Rizzo. “Our goal is to win a
world championship.”
Don’t mind the seat being warm before
you even sit down.
The Nationals’ decision Friday not to bring
Dusty Baker back as manager simultaneously
makes some sense and is absolutely jarring.
Both can be true, and we can talk about why
in a moment.
But the move can’t be evaluated in full
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D3
‘Pure baseball decision’
follows two playoff exits
BY
Ausmus
Cora
Farrell
Hale
Martinez
Perez
Thomas Boswell
The Nationals might be able to find a better
manager than Baker, but it won’t be easy. A1
C HELSEA J ANES
Game 7: Yankees at Astros
Today, 8 p.m., Fox Sports 1
At Penn State, there’s no looking back
No. 2 Nittany Lions were routed the last time they played Michigan. They’ve gone 15-1 since.
BY
C HUCK C ULPEPPER
James Franklin, whose coaching job at Vanderbilt in 2012 and
2013 remains arguably the best
of this young century, and whose
absence from coach-of-the-year
lists in those years should have
caused the shutdown of those
awards, plus all other football
awards, plus all national-awards
TV shows — no, especially all
national-awards TV shows — expressed polite weariness Tuesday.
Ahead of the Penn State-Michigan game Saturday, he keeps
getting questions about the Penn
State-Michigan game of Sept. 24,
2016, and he doesn’t think that
one relates much to this one.
He doesn’t peg that 49-10
beating as any more of a factor
than a bushel of other factors in
Penn State’s mind-altering, 15-1
upturn since.
In an intra-Penn State sense,
he’s indubitable. He knows the
football team he coaches day
upon day.
In a whole-world sense, he’s
NAM Y. HUH/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Coach James Franklin’s record at Penn State was 16-14 after a loss
to Michigan in September 2016. His team has only lost once since.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL SATURDAY
Maryland at
5 Wisconsin
Noon, Fox
North Carolina
at 14 Va. Tech
3:30, ESPN2
20 UCF
at Navy
3:30, CBSSN
19 Michigan at
2 Penn State
7:30, ABC
shortsighted. That dismal game
retold a lesson useful to anybody
trying to do anything: Often,
you’re not as far away as it seems.
Look where the hyperactive
college football spotlight has settled just now for a two-week stay:
It’s the giant Pennsylvanian theater that might have gone dark
after a peerless scandal six years
ago, and it’s the giant Pennsylvanian theater that, in terms strictly football, seemed a ludicrous
long shot for any such spotlight
almost 400 days ago.
For the next two Saturdays,
here’s Penn State and its old,
two-pronged gantlet: home to
Michigan, then at Ohio State.
This puzzle goes way back in
Penn State history, all the way to
the ancient days of 1993, when
the Nittany Lions joined the Big
Ten as a pup — no, actually, as a
bull mastiff. They began 5-0, 2-0
in the league. They won, 31-0, at
Iowa. They beat two future Big
Ten teams, Rutgers and Maryland, in a vain attempt to scare
those teams from ever joining
PENN STATE CONTINUED ON D5
Big Three come through
as Wizards come back
WIZARDS 115,
PISTONS 111
BY
C ANDACE B UCKNER
Otto Porter Jr. carried the load
early Friday night before John
Wall and Bradley Beal shepherded the Washington Wizards
through the late-game rough
patches. The formula worked, as
the Washington Wizards relied
heavily on their stars in a 115-111
win over the Detroit Pistons.
Porter had a workmanlike
game, getting to the rim for most
of his game-high 28 points and
pulling down nine rebounds.
“It was great, man, because
[Porter] really carried us offensively,” said Beal, who scored 25
points on 9-for-18 shooting.
While Porter mastered the nitty-gritties, Wall sprinkled in a bit
of flair for his 26 points and 10
assists. Wall has not ascended to
Air Jordan status, but his fastbreak spectacle at the 4:35 mark
of the third quarter, switching the
ball from his left hand to his right
in midair before kissing it off
glass, was a lot like Jordan’s iconic
moment from the 1991 NBA Finals.
After the game, Wall smiled at
his impromptu creativity. For that
play, he went off instincts, but by
the end of the game, fundamentals had replaced flash as Washington had to fight off the Pistons’
14-0 run through the fourth quarter.
“Defensively, the first two
games we’ve been terrible,” Wall
said. “We show glimpses when
we’re good, but if we don’t pick it
up defensively on the road, we
won’t win any games. We got to
figure out a way of playing defensive consistently.”
With 46 seconds remaining
and the Wizards leading by two,
Porter forced a turnover by deflecting the ball off Detroit’s Avery
WIZARDS CONTINUED ON D10
Wizards at Nuggets
Monday, 9 p.m., NBCSW
D2
EZ
Langer grabs a share
of lead in Richmond
Bernhard Langer birdied the
par-5 18th for a 5-under-par 67
and a share of the first-round lead
Friday in the Dominion Energy
Charity Classic in Richmond, the
first event in the PGA Tour
Champions’ Charles Schwab Cup
Playoffs.
Seeking an unprecedented fifth
Schwab Cup and fourth in a row,
the 60-year-old Langer leads the
season standings and has a tourhigh five victories this season.
“Played really good,” Langer
said after his bogey-free round. “I
hit every fairway, hit 17 greens in
regulation. That means I had 17
chances for birdie, and the one I
missed I made par out of the
bunker. So that was about as bad
as I could have scored, basically.
Didn’t make many putts.”
Rocco Mediate, David Toms
and Joe Durant matched Langer
atop the leader board at the
Country Club of Virginia’s James
River Course. Jay Don Blake,
Olin Browne and Glen Day were
a stroke back. . . .
With the help of an albatross
from 227 yards out, Joost Luiten
shot a 1-under 70 to take a onestroke lead over tournament host
Sergio Garcia and two others at
the Andalucia Valderrama
Masters in Sotogrande, Spain.
The Dutchman holed out with
a four iron from the fairway on
the par-5 11th at Real Club
Valderrama, making it after the
ball hit the front of green and
gently rolled into the cup for his
second career albatross on the
European Tour.
SOCCER
With Bill Hamid planning to
sign overseas and D.C. United’s
season winding down, Sunday’s
finale against the New York Red
Bulls at RFK Stadium seems like
the fitting time for the club and its
supporters to bid a fond farewell
to their exceptional goalkeeper.
In all likelihood, however, he
will not play.
Hamid, 26, missed two days of
practice to travel abroad and,
according to multiple sources,
continues the process of signing
with Danish club Midtjylland. He
is under contract with United
through the end of the year, but
because the deal will expire
within six months, he is free to
begin pursuing other
opportunities.
On Friday, Coach Ben Olsen
wasn’t sure of Hamid’s
whereabouts, saying, “I don’t
have a GPS system on him.”
Danish media reported Friday
that a long-term deal was near.
— Steven Goff
Forward Mallory Pugh has a
hamstring injury and won’t play
for the U.S. national team against
South Korea on Sunday.
Pugh was injured in the U.S.
team’s 3-1 victory over South
Korea in the first match of the
two-game exhibition series on
Thursday night in New Orleans.
U.S. soccer also announced
that midfielder Andi Sullivan
would return to Stanford to play
for the third-ranked Cardinal in
its match against Oregon State on
Sunday. . . .
Sky Blue FC forward Sam Kerr
was named the National Women’s
Soccer League’s most valuable
player for this season.
Kerr, a standout on the
Australian national team, had a
league-record 17 goals for the New
Jersey-based team and became
the league’s fifth Golden Boot
winner to also be named MVP. . . .
In NCAA men’s play, Coastal
Carolina upset No. 2 Maryland,
1-0, in College Park. Frantzdy
Pierrot scored in the 38th minute
for the Chanticleers. . . .
(Whitman) scored his second
golden goal of the year to send
No. 6 Virginia to a 2-1 win in
double overtime over Pittsburgh
in Charlottesville. . . .
Brighton added to West Ham
Manager Slaven Bilic’s troubles
by easing to a 3-0 away win in the
Premier League. Glenn Murray
scored a pair of goals, and Jose
Izquierdo had one.
MISC.
Martin Truex Jr. had already
locked up his spot in the next
round of NASCAR’s playoffs.
Now, he’ll have the prime pit
position for its first race.
Truex won the pole for this
weekend’s elimination race at
Kansas Speedway in Kansas City,
Kan., and with that prize came
the chance to have pit choice at
Martinsville. The paper clip-like
geometry of that track makes stall
selection arguably the biggest
advantage of any track all season.
“We race one week at a time,
try to do the best job we can, but
we knew this was a big one
tonight,” said Truex, whose
victory at Charlotte punched his
ticket to the round of eight. “Just
proud of everybody for making
the right adjustments, the right
calls.” . . .
Evgenia Medvedeva of Russia
was both languid and precise as
she continued her domination of
women’s figure skating, nearly
breaking her own world record
with a superb short program at
the Rostelecom Cup in Moscow.
Nathan Chen of the United
States landed two quads to take a
strong lead after the men’s short
program of the cup, the first of the
six-leg figure skating Grand Prix
series.
Medvedeva’s 80.75 points —
just 0.1 points off her record —
placed her more than six points
ahead of 2014 Olympic bronze
medalist Carolina Kostner of
Italy. . . .
Carlos Nuzman left prison
after his arrest two weeks ago on
eventual charges that he arranged
bribes to land the Olympics he
headed last year in Rio de Janeiro.
Nuzman walked from a Rio
prison wearing a white polo shirt,
accompanied by his defense team
and watched by a handful of
curious bystanders.
The 75-year-old Brazilian is to
stand trial for money laundering,
tax evasion and racketeering,
though it’s unclear how long that
will take under Brazil’s slowmoving justice system. . . .
Julia Goerges will seek to end
a six-year wait for a title when she
faces Daria Kasatkina of Russia
in the Kremlin Cup final in
Moscow. The seventh-seeded
Goerges recovered from a secondset slump to beat Russian player
Natalia Vikhlyantseva, 6-2, 2-6,
7-5, in their semifinal.
Victory for Goerges in
Saturday’s final would end a run
of six losses in finals stretching
back to 2011, when the German
player won in Stuttgart. Three of
those losses came in the space of
two months this summer. . . .
Wimbledon champion
Garbine Muguruza is the WTA
Player of the Year, and U.S. Open
champion Sloane Stephens is the
Comeback Player of the Year.
— From wire services
and staff reports
MLB PLAYOFFS
ALCS Game 7: New York Yankees at Houston » Fox Sports 1, WTEM (980 AM)
NBA
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Golden State at Memphis » NBA TV
Phoenix at Los Angeles Clippers » NBA TV
NHL
7:30 p.m.
Florida at Washington » NBC Sports Network, NBC Sports Washington,
WJFK (106.7 FM)
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
12:20 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
English Premier League: Watford at Chelsea » NBC Sports Network
German Bundesliga: Borussia Dortmund at Eintracht Frankfurt » Fox Sports 1
English Premier League: Manchester United at Huddersfield Town »
NBC Sports Network
English Premier League: Burnley at Manchester City » CNBC
Spanish La Liga: Sevilla at Valencia » beIN Sports
English Premier League: West Brom at Southampton » WRC (Ch. 4),
WBAL (Ch. 11)
Spanish La Liga: Malaga CF at FC Barcelona » beIN Sports
North American Soccer League: San Francisco at Carolina » beIN Sports
TENNIS
6 a.m.
7 a.m.
WTA Kremlin Cup, final » beIN Sports
ATP Stockholm Open, semifinals » Tennis Channel
GOLF
8 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
10 p.m.
European Tour: Andalucia Valderrama Masters, third round » Golf Channel
Champions Tour: Dominion Charity Classic, second round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour: CJ Cup at Nine Bridges, final round » Golf Channel
AUTO RACING
11 a.m.
Noon
1:30 p.m.
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COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL
8:30 p.m.
CAPITALS 4,
RED WINGS 3 (OT)
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
Jean-Christophe Koffi
TELEVISION AND RADIO
COLLEGE FOOTBALL, LISTINGS D5
8 p.m.
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
Ovechkin finally beats his nemesis to power Caps
D I G ES T
GOLF
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
Wisconsin at Minnesota » Big Ten Network
detroit — Alex Ovechkin had
peppered Red Wings goaltender
Petr Mrazek with six shots
through 60 minutes Friday
night, each one more frustrating
than the last. While Ovechkin is a
terror for most netminders,
Mrazek has stymied Ovechkin
over the years, the rare goalie
Washington’s captain had never
beaten.
But less than two minutes into
overtime, Detroit defenseman
Trevor Daley was called for tripping Ovechkin, and Ovechkin’s
seventh shot of the game, his
signature one-timer on the power play 48 second later, finally got
through. The tally lifted the Capitals to a come-from-behind 4-3
win, snapping a two-game losing
streak.
That game-winner was Ovechkin’s 10th goal of the season, and
he has now scored 20 goals in
overtime over his career, the
most in NHL history.
“Obviously, we knew it’s an
important game for us, and we
get the two points,” Ovechkin
said.
After forward Tomas Tatar
scored his second goal of the
game to lift the Red Wings to a
3-2 lead with 7:15 remaining, the
Capitals appeared to be headed
for a third straight loss in regulation. But Dylan Larkin received a
delay-of-game penalty for sailing
a puck over the glass, and that
gave Washington’s power play an
opportunity to equalize with
2:43 left in regulation.
The Capitals put goaltender
Braden Holtby on the bench for a
six-on-four attack, and T.J. Oshie
swatted in a nifty feed from
Andre Burakovsky to tie it and
send the game into overtime,
where both teams would at least
earn a point.
Washington rarely lost backto-back games over the previous
two seasons, and the team’s only
losing streak of three games or
more came in March of last
season. Washington’s players
and coaches have acknowledged
this team is still very much a
work in progress after some
offseason turnover, and rallying
in the final minutes is an encouraging step and potentially something to build on going forward.
“Hopefully you rally around
something there,” Coach Barry
Trotz said.
Through the first seven games,
the Capitals had lacked secondary scoring with 17 of the Capitals’ 22 goals coming from either
Nicklas Backstrom, Ovechkin or
Oshie. In response to that, Trotz
made his first significant line
changes, demoting young sniper
Burakovsky to the third line with
center Lars Eller while promoting power forward Tom Wilson
to a top line with Backstrom and
Oshie.
The Capitals’ bottom-six forward corps answered the call for
balance on Friday night. Just as
Washington had eclipsed more
than 128 minutes without a goal,
dating back to the second period
against the Philadelphia Flyers
last week, Burakovsky ended his
drought along with the team’s.
He tied the game in the last
minute of the second period with
his first goal of the season.
Fourth-line center Jay Beagle
then lifted the Capitals to a 2-1
lead early in the third period
with a shorthanded breakaway.
“That’s how we want to be
most of the year,” Oshie said.
“Obviously, you’ve got [Ovechkin] over there, and he’s going to
get a lot of goals, but we can’t rely
on just him and a couple other
guys to get it. We need to use our
depth, and we’ve got players on
those other two lines that can
TIM FULLER/USA TODAY SPORTS
Alex Ovechkin, center, had never scored on Red Wings goaltender
Petr Mrazek until beating him on the power play in OT on Friday.
score goals, that can bring offense and I think you saw it
tonight.”
While it may be true that
Ovechkin can be counted on to
score on many occasions and
give Washington a lift, he had
historically struggled against
Mrazek entering Friday. Mrazek
famously saved 15 shots by
Ovechkin in one game two years
ago, and Ovechkin hasn’t even
beaten the goalie in a shootout.
Mrazek had stopped 40 shots
from Ovechkin over his career
before Friday night’s overtime.
But after an Ovechkin turnover on the power play that led to
Detroit’s first goal of the game —
a shorthanded score by Darren
Helm — the Capitals’ captain
may have been especially motivated when overtime arrived. He
drove to the net to draw the
penalty from Daley, and unde-
Capitals 4, Red Wings 3 (OT)
WASHINGTON ................... 0
DETROIT ............................ 0
1
1
2
2
1 — 4
0 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: None.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Detroit, Helm 1, 4:31 (sh). 2, Washington,
Burakovsky 1 (Orlov, Wilson), 19:10.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Washington, Beagle 1 (Chiasson), 1:25 (sh).
4, Detroit, Tatar 2 (Larkin, Green), 5:24. 5, Detroit, Tatar
3 (Kronwall, Zetterberg), 12:45 (pp). 6, Washington,
Oshie 6 (Burakovsky, Kuznetsov), 18:59 (pp).
OVERTIME
Scoring: 7, Washington, Ovechkin 10 (Backstrom, Carlson), 1:56 (pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
WASHINGTON ................. 14
11
14
2 — 41
DETROIT .......................... 13
8
15
1 — 37
Power-play opportunities: Washington 2 of 5 Goalies:
Washington, Holtby 4-2-0 (37 shots-34 saves). Detroit,
Mrazek 1-2-1 (41-37). A: 19,515 (20,000). T: 2:35.
terred by his history against
Mrazek, Ovechkin fired again.
“Ovi does what he does,” Trotz
said. “He gets an opportunity,
and he can put it in the net.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
NHL ROUNDUP
Sheary’s late power-play goal propels Pittsburgh
PENGUINS 4,
PANTHERS 3
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Conor Sheary scored a powerplay goal with 2:53 left to give the
Pittsburgh Penguins a 4-3 victory
over the Florida Panthers on Friday night in Sunrise, Fla.
Sheary backhanded the puck
past James Reimer, who came in
to relieve an injured Roberto Luongo with 15:14 left in the third.
Evgeni Malkin had a goal and
an assist, and Sidney Crosby and
Carter Rowney also scored for the
Penguins.
Matthew
Murray
stopped 28 shots, and Phil Kessell
had two assists.
SHARKS 3, DEVILS 0: Martin Jones made 28 saves for his
first shutout of the season and
16th overall as San Jose blanked
New Jersey in Newark.
Melker Karlsson, Joe Pavelski
and Joonas Donskoi scored and
Justin Braun had two assists to
help the Sharks open a five-game
East Coast trip with a win.
CANUCKS
4, SABRES 2:
Derek Dorsett had two goals and
an assist to power Vancouver to
victory in Buffalo.
Daniel Sedin and Markus Granlund also scored to help the Canucks improve to 2-1-0 on a fivegame trip.
At 1-5-2, the Sabres are off to
their worst start since going 1-7-0
in 2014-15.
JETS 4, WILD 3: Blake
Wheeler scored the 200th goal of
his NHL career with 6:46 remaining to vault host Winnipeg.
Wheeler also helped Jets Coach
Paul Maurice become the 17th
NHL coach to reach 600 victories.
League admits review error
The NHL said Friday that a
video review had incorrectly nulli-
fied a late-game goal by the Colorado Avalanche during a 4-3 loss
to the St. Louis Blues, the first
mistake of its kind since coach’s
challenges were added before the
2015-16 season.
The league said it made a mistake by taking away Mikko Rantanen’s goal late in the third period
Thursday night on a coach’s challenge for offside. The review determined that Sven Andrighetto was
offside, but on his previous entry
into the offensive zone — a play
that would not be subject to a
challenge.
The disputed sequence happened in a matter of seconds.
MARINE CORPS MARATHON
After 25 years, still a man of ‘The People’s Marathon’
BY
K ELYN S OONG
In a framed photo displayed
prominently in his office, Rick
Nealis is in the background, looking off to the side. A mischievous
grin appears across his face as he
stands behind talk-show host
Oprah Winfrey.
It’s almost as if he knows he has
pulled off one of the biggest heists
in marathon history.
As the second-year race director of the Marine Corps Marathon
in 1994, Nealis convinced Winfrey
to run in Washington instead of in
the Chicago Marathon, her local
race. Winfrey’s participation on
that cold and rainy fall morning,
her first and only marathon, is
partially credited with inspiring
casual runners to add a marathon
to their bucket lists.
Now in his 25th year in charge
of the race dubbed “The People’s
Marathon,” Nealis has seen the
race evolve from a niche community of mostly competitive runners to one that draws tens of
thousands of participants annually, including this Sunday. The
sport has changed, and Nealis, 63,
has witnessed and assisted its
growth from his perch as race
director of one of the largest road
races in the country.
“When I was running, it was
always about speed,” Nealis said
this month in his office at Marine
Corps Base Quantico. “But now
it’s about coming across the line
and feeling good. . . . Some people
feel the sport has suffered for that,
but I think, if it wasn’t for that,
we’d be this small track and field
event that no one really understood.”
Nealis first served as race director while on active duty for the
Marine Corps in 1993, then was
the first civilian to hold that position when he retired from the
military in 1995.
42nd Marine Corps Marathon
7:55 a.m. Sunday
2016 finishers: 19,683
Last year’s champions: Men’s —
Samuel Kosgei, 2:23:52; Women’s
— Perry Shoemaker, 2:51:47
Course map: In Metro, B2
TRACY A. WOODWARD/THE WASHINGTON POST
Rick Nealis, pictured near the Iwo Jima Memorial in 1998, has
been race director for the Marine Corps Marathon since 1993.
He remembers each year
through the lens of the Marine
Corps Marathon and vividly recalls the public relations and logistics issues of each race. In his
first year, there was controversy
around the men’s champion, who
admitted to cutting corners. The
following year — the “Oprah year”
— gave Nealis clout and fame in
the running community, but there
was also drama stemming from
runners urinating in Arlington
National Cemetery.
In 2001, Nealis wasn’t sure he’d
be able to receive all of the permits needed to hold the race after
the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, and
in 2002, the D.C. sniper shootings
had his team on high alert
throughout the first three weeks
of October.
To Nealis, one of the biggest
changes over the years has been
the amount of security dedicated
to the race. When he began, the
law enforcement bill was zero,
Nealis said, but now “security,
safety and risk assessment is on
the forefront.”
“He’s had a lot of obstacles
thrown at him,” said Al Richmond, a 78-year-old Arlington
resident who has run every Marine Corps Marathon since its
inaugural race in 1976. “I don’t
know how they do it, frankly. Just
thinking about getting the number of people out on the course to
support it, all the young Marines
and bands — logistically, it has to
be a nightmare and an unbelievable process to prepare for.”
While the race has grown and
the demographics have changed
— the ratio of men to women is far
more balanced now than when
Nealis began — one thing has
remained the same: There is no
prize money.
Because of that, the race typically doesn’t draw an elite field of
the world’s best marathoners, and
Nealis admitted it gnaws at him
that the men’s course record, Jeff
Scuffins’s time of 2 hours 14 minutes 1 second, was set 30 years
ago.
But he said he realizes that’s
what makes the race special. It’s
not about elite runners dropping
in for a cash prize; it’s about the
military and the everyday runners who make up the sport.
“It’s so rewarding to see everyone coming in happy, getting their
medal and smiling,” said Julian
Smith, the longtime race director
of the Cooper River Bridge Run
10K in Charleston, S.C., and a
friend of Nealis’s. “There’s just so
much excitement and happiness.”
Winfrey had run Smith’s race
that April, before her marathon
debut, and Smith provided Nealis
with Winfrey’s contact information. Nealis said he believes his
race’s emphasis on the casual runner was another reason he was
able to entice Winfrey to come.
Over the years, Nealis, a Philadelphia native, has left his mark
on the race in both subtle and
visible ways. One of his first decisions as race director was to order
green race shirts as a nod to the
Philadelphia Eagles. In 2007, he
started presenting a stuffed penguin to the final official finisher of
the race in memory of Megan
McClung, a Marine Corps officer
killed in Iraq.
Nealis’s next mission is to get
more kids from all socioeconomic
backgrounds involved in the
sport. Starting next year, the race
will offer anyone under 17 a discounted entry fee.
“My swan song is to leave the
sport healthy,” he said, “and not
on the downslide.”
kelyn.soong@washpost.com
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
baseball
Baker’s tenure ends after back-to-back exits in the NLDS
“This was a pure baseball decision. Again, our goal is to win a world championship.”
our goal is to win a world championship,” Nationals General Manager Mike Rizzo said. “. . . This
has nothing to do with negotiations or dollars. There was not a
negotiation with Dusty. I talked to
Dusty this morning and told him
about our decision. He took the
news with his usual class and
dignity and professionalism. We
hung up the phone with a good
taste in both of our mouths.”
Baker flew back to California
on Thursday not knowing his
fate. Rizzo said the Nationals
made the decision late Thursday
night before alerting Baker of
their choice Friday morning — via
a phone call. Baker did not respond to initial requests for his
side of the story. He did return a
text message in which he said he
enjoyed his time with the Nationals and “wanted so much to win
for everyone.”
So the Nationals will begin
their second managerial search in
three offseasons immediately.
They have tried the inexperi-
enced, fresh-faced approach in
Matt Williams: After a division
title in 2014, order disintegrated
violently in 2015. They tried the
veteran, players’ manager approach and decided that did not
work, either. They also will need a
new coaching staff, as all of the
coaches on Baker’s staff saw their
contracts expire after this season,
too.
All season, Rizzo said publicly
he expected a deal to get done
with Baker. The two occasionally
disagreed on in-game decisions,
but generally speaking, Rizzo
thought Baker handled the clubhouse and personalities well.
Baker also fit the city well. And he
won. As Rizzo made clear his
intentions, Baker made clear he
wanted to return. He came to love
the city, the people and the mission of bringing optimism back to
the D.C. sports community. So
what changed? According to Riz-
Next man up
BARRY SVRLUGA
The Nationals’ decision not to
extend Dusty Baker’s contract
leaves them back where they were
two years ago — and two years
before that: in search of a
manager. Here are a few names to
keep in mind:
Next manager
has one job:
Get the Nats
a parade
Brad Ausmus
Age: 48
Last job: Tigers manager
A popular name for teams in the
market for a manager, the former
catcher managed the Tigers for
four seasons, reaching the
postseason in 2014 with Max
Scherzer in his starting rotation
only to get swept out of the ALDS.
He was fired after going 64-98 in
Detroit this season. Interviewed for
the Washington job in 2013.
Alex Cora
Age: 42
Current job: Astros bench coach
The consensus is the Red Sox will
name Cora their next manager, but
they need to wait until the Astros’
postseason run is over before
officially making the hire. Could
the delay allow Washington to
make a bid for the bilingual Cora?
A former infielder, Cora spent the
final year of his playing career with
the Nationals in 2011 and
interviewed for the club’s
managerial opening in 2015.
John Farrell
Age: 55
Last job: Red Sox manager
Like Baker, Farrell was let go
despite consecutive division titles
after an unsuccessful playoff run
fell short of expectations. But there
are two significant differences:
Farrell won a World Series in the
first of his five seasons, and Red
Sox President Dave Dombrowski
said Farrell would have been
dismissed no matter how the Red
Sox fared in the playoffs.
DeMarlo Hale
Age: 56
Current job: Blue Jays bench
coach
Another longtime bench coach and
managerial search finalist, Hale
also interviewed with the Nationals
in 2013. After various stints
managing in the minors, Hale
served as a third base coach and
bench coach for the Red Sox and
third base coach for the Orioles
before joining the Blue Jays as
bench coach in November 2012.
Dave Martinez
Age: 53
Current job: Cubs bench coach
Martinez has been interviewing for
managerial openings since at least
2010 and interviewed for the
Nationals’ gig in 2013. A former
outfielder and first baseman,
Martinez, who’s also bilingual,
played 16 seasons in the majors
and has served as Joe Maddon’s
bench coach with the Rays and
Cubs since 2007.
Eduardo Perez
Age: 48
Current job: ESPN analyst
Perez isn’t among the names most
discussed for openings, but he
would probably be in the Nationals’
price range, and he has credentials.
The former big leaguer served as a
hitting coach for the Marlins, a
bench coach for the Astros, and
managed a championship club in
the Puerto Rico winter league. He’s
bilingual and the son of Hall of
Famer Tony Perez and godson of
Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda.
— Jorge Castillo
Mike Rizzo, Nationals general manager
zo, the Nationals did not advance
past the National League Division Series, and that wasn’t
enough.
“It was one of the most difficult
decisions the ownership group
and I have had to make since
we’ve been in Washington,” Rizzo
told reporters in a teleconference
Friday afternoon. “We’ve come
such a long way. Winning a lot of
regular season games and winning divisions is not enough.”
Rizzo praised Baker repeatedly
for his class and dignity and
called him a “Hall of Fame-type”
manager more than once in his
teleconference. Asked what Baker lacked that might help another
manager lead the Nationals further, Rizzo dodged and praised
Baker again. Baker’s missteps in
handling the announcement of
his starting pitcher for Game 4 of
the NLDS caused a stir. After a
rainout seemingly made Stephen
Strasburg available to start, poor
health jeopardized that status,
but in speaking to the media,
Baker mixed up the days Strasburg threw his bullpen session
and cited that as a factor, making
the Nationals appear disorganized and evasive on a national
stage.
Little miscommunications like
that marked Baker’s tenure. By
design, he deferred to pitching
coach Mike Maddux on matters of
the pitching staff. And while his
lineups didn’t always align with
prevailing statistical wisdom,
Baker seemed to have uncommon
feel for the needs of his veteran
stars. He nursed Ryan Zimmerman through a healthy renaissance season, for example. Zimmerman, Werth, Daniel Murphy
and others praised the way he
managed their playing time and
psyches.
“The last thing we were talking
about and thinking about [after
Game 5] is these type of issues,”
Rizzo said. “So no, we didn’t take
any advice or have any comments
from the players on this.”
But Baker’s outspokenness
about his contract and money
rubbed some in the front office
the wrong way. Earlier this season, Baker said he felt he was
underpaid compared to other
winning, veteran managers. Rizzo said money was not the problem, and people close to Baker
confirmed the notion that he did
not negotiate this week at all. No
Nationals manager has lasted
three full seasons on the job. They
have won four division titles in
the past six seasons — with three
managers.
“We’ve hired managers in the
developmental curve of this organization that fit for us at that
particular time,” Rizzo said. “In
the infancy of the Nationals, we
hired managers that could help
us develop through this thing. As
we’ve gotten better, as our expectations grew, we went with managers we thought could get us to
the next level. That’s always been
our goal. That continues to be our
goal. As the managers came and
went, they were indicative of
where we were in the developmental curve of the organization.”
So now the Nationals must
turn their attention elsewhere, to
a managerial market that has
been developing without them.
Up-and-comer Alex Cora seems a
likely candidate, though reports
say he will be named Red Sox
manager after the ALCS. Former
Tigers manager Brad Ausmus
also pops up among potential
candidates. But with the Red Sox,
Phillies, Mets and others still
looking for managers, the Nationals likely will have to bid — in
length of deal and terms — for the
big names. They do not have a
history of committing much to
managers.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
SVRLUGA FROM D1
now, because we don’t yet know
the other foot. Dusty’s out
despite winning 95 and 97 games
in his two seasons and batting
1.000 when it came to division
titles. The club’s stated policy:
That’s not good enough. So we
can assess the entire process only
when we know who gets Baker’s
former seat.
That person, by the club’s own
definition, must be someone who
can win a World Series.
Whenever the hire is made, it
will be pertinent to ask: How do
you know?
How do you outline the
characteristics Rizzo articulated
Friday and then bring in a firsttime manager? Seems difficult.
But does this mean the
candidates are, say, Tony La
Russa and Jim Leyland? Both
have won World Series. Either
could be a short-term solution, a
strategic upgrade over Baker,
whose tactical transgressions in
the Nationals’ excruciating
division series loss to the
Chicago Cubs had to contribute
to his departure. But La Russa is
73 and Leyland 72. They might
represent a chance to win in
2018. But they wouldn’t
represent organizational
stability.
About that: As mentioned
above, whoever is named the
Nats’ next manager will be their
seventh since the club moved
from Montreal in 2005. As I
pointed out before Baker was
dismissed, that will tie the Miami
Marlins for the most in baseball
over that span. The Nationals
and Marlins are at opposite ends
of baseball’s spectrum. Since
2012, only one franchise has
more wins than Washington. In
that same span, just three clubs
have fewer wins than Miami.
So how does a club that keeps
winning churn through dugout
leaders? It’s simple, really:
Ownership doesn’t value the
position. The Lerners can’t be
called “cheap” — writ large —
because their payroll is
competitive and they have
allowed Rizzo and his frontoffice staff to pursue the pieces
necessary at the trade deadline.
But listen to people who work for
them, now and in the past, and
it’s clear: On the fringes, they will
pay for only the bare minimum.
In their view, inexplicably, the
manager lies on the fringes.
“As we’ve gotten better, as our
expectations grew, we went with
managers we thought could get
us to the next level,” Rizzo said.
There’s a line there that actually
makes sense, from rookie Manny
Acta to in-season promotion
baseball lifer Jim Riggleman to
veteran winner Davey Johnson
to rookie disciplinarian Matt
Williams to Baker, an expert
manager of people and proven
winner.
But what the Nationals are
describing as their need right
now is an absolute home run
hire. The new manager will be
handed a roster over which
almost anyone would salivate.
Who is that home run, exactly?
Dave Martinez, Joe Maddon’s
longtime bench coach with both
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Dusty Baker, greeting pitcher Max Scherzer, won 192 games and two National League East titles in two seasons as Washington’s manager.
the Rays and the Cubs, was due
to get a call from Washington the
last time around, when
negotiations with Bud Black
broke down and the Nats turned
to Baker. Maddon spent some of
the National League
Championship Series, in which
the Cubs lost, reiterating that
Martinez would make a
wonderful manager.
That may be true, and at least
some Nats players absolutely
agree. But the Nats have
articulated — and clearly — that
this isn’t time to develop a new
helmsman. The next manager
could win 95 games his first
season, 97 his second, take
division titles both times — and
not be invited back.
Alex Cora, who finished his
playing career with the Nats in
2011, is the hot name on the
market now — if he’s even on the
market. The Nats thought highly
enough of Cora that they wanted
him to manage in their minor
league system when he stopped
playing. Now he is the Houston
Astros’ bench coach and
reportedly is poised to be named
the new manager of the Boston
Red Sox. Had the Nats moved on
from Baker more quickly —
instead of waiting a week after
the loss to the Cubs — might they
have been in position to pursue
Cora?
And yet, even if they could nab
Cora — or whoever might be the
next Dave Roberts — how can
you know a particular
personality is the one to push a
franchise through to the next
level?
That is Rizzo’s charge now as
he prepares to hire his fifth
manager, entering his 10th
season. Dusty’s failings were
almost all in-game and strategic.
That aspect will have to be
evaluated closely while also
trying to find someone who can
handle the clubhouse deftly.
Williams’s tenure is near enough
in the rearview to have relevance
in that regard.
But a pertinent question for
any candidate might be: Mike,
what’s your future? Rizzo’s own
contract runs only through 2018,
one more year. People ask what
will happen when and if Bryce
Harper and Daniel Murphy move
on as free agents. But what about
the guy who assembled this
group? Does the decision on
Baker come in lockstep with the
ownership of the Lerner family?
Or was Rizzo asked to carry
water for ownership, a situation
that has precedent?
“It’s a total group decision
with a consensus at the end,”
Rizzo said.
Fine. Now there must be a
total group decision with a
consensus at the end on who the
new manager will be. Again.
Roberts, the third-year
manager of the Los Angeles
Dodgers, is pertinent to this
discussion. Don Mattingly won
three straight division titles for
the Dodgers — and the new front
office of Andrew Friedman and
Farhan Zaidi, who worked with
Mattingly for the last of those
titles, fired him anyway. The
Dodgers hadn’t reached the
World Series since 1988. Los
Angeles then, like the Nats now,
needed someone who could
knock over a barrier that always
stopped his predecessor.
“It started in the initial
interview,” Friedman said this
week, “where we walked out of
there joking that we had our
answer.”
Roberts, in Friedman’s telling,
left such an impression that the
Dodgers knew. They knew. That’s
easy to say in the hours after the
club wrapped up its first
pennant in 29 years.
Still, that’s in essence the
position the Nats have put
themselves in now. They must
know about the new guy. They let
go of a man who won 192 games
in two seasons but twice failed in
the fifth game of the division
series. The requirement on the
résumé of any potential
successor: Show us how you
would win that Game 5 — and
Game 7 of the next round and
Game 7 of the World Series.
Because if you can’t do that,
we’re moving on. Don’t think
we’re serious? Ask Dusty Baker.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
BASEBALL NOTES
Nationals’ Murphy has surgery on his right knee
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
Amid all the chaos inspired by
the abrupt end of Dusty Baker’s
tenure as manager, the Washington Nationals announced that
second baseman Daniel Murphy
underwent surgery on his right
knee Friday. They said it was
successful.
The procedure, according to
the statement released by the
team, repaired articular cartilage
in Murphy’s right knee. For those
interested in the details, it was a
debridement and microfracture
surgery, and orthopedic surgeon
Timothy Kremchek performed it.
The statement clarified that
Murphy’s rehab “will progress
throughout the offseason” and
did not include a timetable.
But the revelation does make
sense in the wake of a season in
which Murphy missed a few
games at a time, here and there,
for unspecified leg soreness. Murphy hit .322 with a .928 on-base
plus slugging percentage, numbers that did not match his 2016
onslaught but were not so far off
as to suggest injury trouble, either. He never landed on the disabled list. He played 144 games.
— Chelsea Janes
Detroit was certainly familiar with Ron Gardenhire’s managerial résumé. Some
of his most significant accom
TIGERS:
plishments came at their expense.
“It’s going to be nice to have
him on our side of the dugout,”
said Al Avila, Detroit’s general
manager.
The Tigers hired Gardenhire as
their manager, bringing the longtime Minnesota Twins skipper
back to the AL Central to take
over a team in the middle of a
significant rebuilding process.
Detroit announced the move Friday, saying Gardenhire agreed to
a three-year contract, and he was
introduced at a news conference
at Comerica Park.
In other Tigers news, the team
decided to decline its $16 million
option on right-hander Anibal
Sanchez.
The move comes as no surprise
after Sanchez slipped badly over
the past three seasons. He went
3-7 with a 6.41 ERA in 2017.
DODGERS: Corey Seager is
expected to be in the Los Angeles
lineup for the opener of the World
Series after missing the NL Championship Series because of back
pain.
Seager, an all-star shortstop,
watched from home as the Dodgers eliminated the defending
World Series champion Chicago
Cubs in Game 5 on Thursday
night.
Manager Dave Roberts said
Seager is “doing everything he
can to get healthy” and the Dodgers “expect him back for Game 1.”
Verlander lifts Houston into Game 7 in the ALCS
ALCS FROM D1
first two batters of the seventh
inning on base with a walk and a
hit-by-pitch. But he struck out
Aaron Hicks on a 3-2 slider at the
end of a 10-pitch duel, then became a spectator like everyone
else as his epic night hung on the
outcome of a flyball to deep center.
Todd Frazier’s deep blast carried, carried, carried, and George
Springer drifted, drifted, drifted,
until Springer sprung from the
warning track and met the ball at
the apex of his jump, just in front
of the wall — a spectacular catch
that robbed Frazier of extra bases
and prevented two runs from scoring.
“I thought, ‘Holy hell, that ball’s
leaving the yard,’ ” Astros Manager A.J. Hinch said of his initial
reaction when he saw Frazier’s
drive.
At the end of every inning he
pitches, Verlander stalks off the
mound like a predator and goes
down the stairs at the far left end
of the Astros’ dugout, walks the
length of the dugout and descends
the stairwell at the other end that
leads to their clubhouse.
But after his escape in the seventh, Verlander diverted from
form. Near the first base line, he
stopped, pumped his fists and
screamed. And he waited. He waited until Springer made the long
jog in from center field. Verlander
wasn’t going anywhere until he
could thank his center fielder in
person.
“He said something I can’t repeat and then, ‘Yeah!’ ” Springer
said of his brief conversation with
Verlander as he came off the field.
“He was pretty hyped. To see him
that fired up means a lot to me.”
Verlander’s night was over; he
departed with a 3-0 lead, with all
the Astros’ runs to that point coming in the fifth inning on an RBI
double by Brian McCann and a
two-run single by Jose Altuve.
TROY TAORMINA/USA TODAY SPORTS
The Astros’ Justin Verlander
allowed no runs and five hits in
seven innings against the
Yankees in Game 6, his second
win of the ALCS.
If the Astros had been able to
win just one of the three games
this week at Yankee Stadium —
where they instead found themselves outscored 19-5 in a trio of
losses — Verlander could have
been pitching Friday night with a
chance to send them to the World
Series.
For all their many attributes
and charms, the Yankees had been
a mediocre team away from Yankee Stadium, going 40-41 on the
road in the regular season and 1-4
in the postseason entering Friday
night. And everything that went
down at the cavernous ballpark on
Texas Street seemed designed to
remind everyone, the Yankees
most of all, that they weren’t in the
Bronx anymore.
The pregame soundtrack featured both types of music, country
and western. The crowd was earlyarriving, clad in bright orange and
hopped up on Budweisers and salsa verde. Country singer Jack Ingram drawled out the national
anthem, fingerpicking his own ac-
companiment on a Gibson J-45.
And then Verlander ascended
the mound. He isn’t a Texan, but by
the end of this month he might be
an honorary one.
“This is why I’m here,” Verlander said the day before his start.
He ended the second, third and
fourth innings with strikeouts,
getting Aaron Hicks on a changeup, Aaron Judge on a slider and
Greg Bird on another change-up,
respectively. The change-up was a
pitch he used only twice in
Game 2, but brought out of hibernation Friday night to give the
Yankees’ hitters a new look. He
ended the fifth by getting Frazier
to make a feeble, ungainly swing at
a curveball.
Weak swings were one good
measure of Verlander’s dominance. He ended the fifth by getting Frazier to make a feeble, ungainly swing at a curveball, the
fourth straight inning Verlander
ended with a strikeout. At a critical juncture in the sixth, with Verlander facing runners on first and
second and two outs, Gary Sanchez, clearly looking for a fastball,
got a slider instead and was fooled
into taking a weak, checked-swing
hack and grounded out meekly to
shortstop.
An Astros offense that led the
AL in runs with 5.5 per game had
scored only nine in the first five
games of this series and was on the
verge of being shut down yet again
by Yankees starter Luis Severino,
who retired nine of the first 10
batters he faced, firing fastballs
that topped out at 101 mph.
But when the end came for Severino, it came with breathtaking
swiftness. He issued three walks in
the fifth inning — never a great idea
to give free passes to a team whose
collective batting average reads
like a blood alcohol level — and the
Astros made him pay, with McCann, 0 for 11 in the series to that
point, lashing a 98-mph fastball
into the right field corner for an
RBI ground-rule double, and Altuve crushing a first-pitch hanging
slider to left for a two-run single.
“We have the best offense in the
major leagues. You can see that by
[the numbers over] 162 games,”
said Astros shortstop Carlos Correa. “At some point, we had to come
out and hit.”
Interestingly, Yankees Manager
Joe Girardi used two of his best
relievers, right-handers Chad
Green and David Robertson, to try
to keep the deficit manageable, in
hopes the Yankees could mount a
late comeback — a decision that
backfired when Robertson gave
up four runs in the eighth — possibly limiting their availability in
the decisive Game 7.
Game 7s are unlike any other
moments in baseball. The last one
came a year ago in the World
Series; it lasted 10 innings and
instantly immortalized the members of the 2016 Chicago Cubs.
The Yankees will start C.C. Sabathia and the Astros will turn to
Charlie Morton. You are sure to see
quick hooks and starting pitchers
coming on in relief. You will feel
the tension from your box seats or
through your television. You will
hear the phrase “all hands on
deck” a million times.
And one possibility was particularly tantalizing as the teams retreated into Friday night to try to
get some sleep: the possibility Verlander could attempt to pull a
Randy Johnson — defined as starting and winning Game 6, then
pitching in relief in Game 7 on zero
days’ rest, something Johnson did
against the Yankees in the 2001
World Series.
Whether he does or doesn’t,
Verlander has already done his
part. This was why the Astros got
him. This was why he was here.
“He’s been all we could’ve
hoped for and more,” Hinch said.
“He rises to the moment. He chose
to come here for games like this.”
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
NFL NOTES
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
Rumor mill is heating up
for Central Florida’s Frost
With his Knights at 5-0,
ex-Nebraska QB may be
ready for next ‘big step’
BY
A VA W ALLACE
When Scott Frost arrives in
Annapolis to lead his undefeated
Central Florida Knights against
Navy on Saturday afternoon, the
spotlight on the second-year
coach will be as bright as it has
ever been.
It’s not just because the Midshipmen and their triple-option
offense will be one of the toughest tests on No. 20 UCF’s schedule. It’s also because Frost, the
former Nebraska quarterback
and Oregon offensive coordinator who has turned around a
program that went 0-12 the season before he was hired, has
become one of the most-mentioned names in the college
coaching rumor mill.
UCF entered Week 8 as one of
just eight undefeated teams in
the Football Bowl Subdivision. It
is 5-0 for the first time since
moving to college football’s top
tier in 1996. The Knights boast
the No. 1 scoring offense in the
nation and are in good position
to be the Group of Five representative in a New Year’s Six bowl.
Frost has been linked most
often to the not-yet-open head
coaching job with the flailing
Cornhuskers. Other programs
are taking note.
“Scott and his natural connection to Nebraska has started a lot
of that,” CBS Sports Network
analyst Randy Cross said this
week, “but this team has just
really matured and started playing better and better. As that’s
happened, all of a sudden it’s not
just Nebraska, but Oregon State
has to look at him. . . . A lot of
places have to look at him.”
Frost, 42, probably looks even
more appealing after he spent
the week filling in as the Knights’
scout-team quarterback as he
tried to prepare UCF for Navy’s
triple option.
The Midshipmen (5-1, 3-1
American Athletic Conference)
have the top rushing offense in
the
country,
averaging
397.5 yards on the ground. Frost,
who as an option quarterback
had a 24-2 record as a starter and
led Nebraska to a share of the
1997 national title, began acclimating his defense to its altered
assignments during spring ball
because there initially were two
option teams on the schedule. (A
game against Georgia Tech
scheduled for Sept. 16 was canceled because of Hurricane
Irma.) When it came time to drill
his defense this week, he stepped
under center himself.
“I think it’s just a skill,” Frost
said this week. “I can’t tell you
how many repetitions I took and
how many repetitions [Navy’s]
kids get at the reads and the
plays and running with the ball
and pitching last second and the
timing of it. It’s just kind of
different from anything else that
most people ask their quarterbacks to do.”
This wasn’t the first time Frost
has taken reps with his team in
practice. It’s a move that neatly
encapsulates the energy at UCF,
as well as the coaching staff ’s
dedication.
“I know one thing: If they’re
going to hit their coach when he’s
running scout-team quarterback, they better not go at him
easy,” Cross said. “Scott’s a pretty
big dude . . . and people forget
that Nebraska, for all the defensive stuff, they’ve had some pretty good option quarterbacks.
Scott still takes that seriously.”
UCF has heard the increasingly loud buzz about its young
coach, too.
This week, Athletic Director
Danny White announced the establishment of the school’s Football Excellence Fund, a campaign
to raise $1.5 million over the next
five years with a goal “to annually help provide operating resources for the Knights’ football
program,” according to a school
news release.
This comes after the school
signed Frost to a contract extension in May on the heels of his
first season, in which the
Knights went 6-7 and earned a
bowl bid just a year after going
0-12. The extension, which runs
through the 2021 season,
bumped his salary from $1.7 million to around $2 million — on
par with Navy’s Ken Niumatalolo, the AAC’s highest-paid coach
— and increased the salary pool
for his assistant coaches by
$50,000.
UCF can’t compete with what
schools in power conferences
can offer; in 2016, Mike Riley
made $2.8 million at Nebraska,
according to USA Today’s coaches’ salaries database. But White’s
efforts may help close the gap as
Frost goes for the Knights’ first
6-0 start in program history
Saturday afternoon.
“I think everything’s kind of
gone as planned and exceeded
our plans,” Frost said this week.
“One thing I keep mentioning, I
took over this place when it was
0-12 . . . but when I met with the
players here, they believed they
could accomplish a lot more than
that.
“We took a big step last year,
and I knew we were going to be
better this year.”
Whether Frost sticks around
to see improvement in Year 3
remains to be seen.
ava.wallace@washpost.com
R E D S K I N S NOTE S
Lynch suspended for shoving o∞cial
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
The NFL suspended Oakland
running back Marshawn Lynch
for one game for the incident during Thursday night’s game in
which he was ejected after running on the field from the sideline
and making contact with one of
the officials during a brief scuffle
between players from the Raiders
and Kansas City Chiefs.
The league cited unsportsmanlike conduct as the reason for the
suspension and said Lynch also
violated a rule prohibiting unnecessary contact with an official.
Lynch plans to appeal the suspension, a person familiar with
the case confirmed. A hearing
probably will be conducted early
next week before James Thrash or
Derrick Brooks, the former NFL
players who serve as the sport’s
appeals officers for on-field discipline. They are jointly appointed
and paid by the league and the
NFL Players Association.
The suspension was imposed by
Jon Runyan, the NFL’s vice president of football operations.
“You made deliberate physical
contact with one of our game officials as he was diffusing an active
confrontation between players,”
Runyan wrote to Lynch, according
to the league’s announcement of
the suspension.
Lynch, who was not in the game
at the time, ran on the field after a
play on which Chiefs cornerback
Marcus Peters was penalized for a
hit on Oakland quarterback Derek
Carr. Lynch made contact with an
official and was ejected.
— Mark Maske
Green Bay placed
Aaron Rodgers on injured reserve
after the quarterback had surgery
on his broken collarbone a day
earlier.
PACKERS:
. SATURDAY,
KELLEY L COX/USA TODAY SPORTS
The Raiders’ Marshawn Lynch
was called for a personal foul
and ejected after making
contact with an official.
Rodgers is eligible to return after eight weeks and return to practice after six weeks. But Coach
Mike McCarthy has said that there
is no timeline for Rodgers’s return
and that the two-time NFL MVP
might miss the rest of the season.
“Everything went very well is
my understanding, talking with
[team doctor Pat McKenzie], and
he’s recovering,” McCarthy said.
Backup Brett Hundley will
make his first NFL start Sunday
against the New Orleans Saints.
Rodgers posted an Instagram
message thanking well-wishers
for their “love, support, thoughts
and prayers” in a photo of himself
in a hospital bed.
Rodgers gives a “hang loose”
sign with his left hand, with bandages covering the area near his
injured shoulder. He added the
phrase “comeback starts now”
with a hashtag.
BUCCANEERS:
Quarterback Jameis Winston tested his
injured throwing shoulder in
practice and will start Sunday
against the Bills.
Winston had been limited in
practice, taking “mental reps”
while backup Ryan Fitzpatrick
prepared to face the Bills.
BRONCOS: Coach Vance Joseph said that Donald Stephenson
tore his left calf muscle at practice
a day earlier, when linebacker
Corey Nelson also suffered a season-ending elbow injury.
Stephenson, the third right
tackle to get hurt in a five-day
span, and Nelson were expecting
to play big roles Sunday when
Denver visits the Chargers.
PANTHERS:
Linebacker
Luke Kuechly will miss Sunday’s
game against the Chicago Bears
while in the concussion protocol.
Wide receiver Kelvin Benjamin
and two-time all-pro center Ryan
Kalil are expected to start.
JAGUARS: Running back
Leonard Fournette is listed as
questionable to play Sunday at the
Indianapolis Colts because of a
sprained right ankle.
TITANS: Running back DeMarco Murray, who tweaked his
hamstring for the second time this
season Monday night, returned to
practice but was limited in his
workouts. He will be a game-time
decision Sunday at the winless
Cleveland Browns.
FALCONS: After being limited by injuries earlier in the week,
wide receiver Mohamed Sanu and
defensive end Courtney Upshaw
are expected to play Sunday night
against the New England Patriots.
DOLPHINS: Center Mike
Pouncey practiced for the first
time since entering the concussion protocol and is listed as questionable for Sunday’s game
against the New York Jets.
BILLS: Wide receiver Jordan
Matthews is questionable for Sunday’s game against the Buccaneers
because of a thumb injury.
— Associated Press
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/insider
Kelley expects to start
against Philadelphia
No Washington Redskins
tailback has posted as many as
80 yards on the ground in any of
their five games this season. And
on Monday night, they will face
their biggest test to date, a
Philadelphia Eagles defense that
has smothered running backs all
season.
How good has Philadelphia’s
rush defense been? The Chiefs’
Kareem Hunt managed 81 yards
in Week 2, but in the Eagles’
other five games, no other
running back has topped 35.
The Redskins hope they will
be the team that can solve the
Eagles’ dynamic front four, and
they likely will turn to Rob Kelley
to do it. Kelley is coming off an
ankle injury, and while he was
limited in practice both
Thursday and Friday, he said he
expects to be healthy enough to
play Monday. If that’s the case,
Redskins Coach Jay Gruden said
Kelley again will be slotted as the
Redskins’ No. 1 running back.
Kelley missed the Week 3 game
against the Raiders with a rib
injury and missed Sunday’s win
over San Francisco with an ankle
injury.
“I was expecting some rust,”
the second-year running back
said after practice Friday, “but I
had a few good runs the past few
days. . . . We’ll figure out in the
game if there’s rust or not.”
In his absence, Chris
Thompson has shown he’s a
strong receiving threat out of the
backfield — he had 150 receiving
yards against the Raiders and
105 against the 49ers — and
Samaje Perine has been a
serviceable ball-carrier.
Kelley said he’s not too
worried about how the carries
are divided up — as long as the
Redskins can steal a win on the
road.
“I think me getting all the
carries, I think it wouldn’t be
beneficial to the team, especially
at this point,” he said. “Then you
have Chris playing out of his
mind right now, so why would
you do that? Whatever Coach
needs, I’m there for. If he wants
me to run it the whole time, I can
run it the whole time. If he wants
to split carries, I can do that, too.”
Rose hopes to stick
Nick Rose landed in the D.C. area
earlier this week and had no clue
how long he would be sticking
around. He walked off the plane
with just a backpack, prepared
for a quick visit and then a
return flight home.
Instead, he aced his tryout,
earned the Redskins’ vacant
kicking job and probably has
some shopping to do.
“I got two T-shirts and pair of
shorts. That’s all,” the Redskins’
23-year-old kicker said Thursday,
following his first practice with
the team. “I got to go to the mall
today and get some socks.”
The team arranged for a rental
car and temporary housing, and
Rose is hopeful he will be around
for at least a few more weeks. Of
course, he will have to show he
can kick in an NFL game first.
This is the opportunity Rose
has been waiting for since he
finished school at Texas in 2016.
The Falcons signed him as an
undrafted free agent last year,
and he spent training camp this
year with the 49ers, but he has yet
to kick in a regular season game.
Norman is involved
Redskins cornerback Josh
Norman, who met with NFL
owners Tuesday to discuss social
issues related to the players’
protests during the national
anthem, said he plans to attend a
follow-up meeting in the next
two weeks.
Norman was one of 13 players
who met with the owners for
approximately four hours at the
league’s offices. It marked the
first time both sides had a
dialogue about why players were
protesting during the national
anthem, and they plan to
continue the conversation.
“I feel like when guys sit back,
look at certain things and look at
it is as, ‘Oh, we don’t know what’s
going on,’ ” Norman said. “Then
something comes out that you
had no idea what just happened,
and we got to go through with it.
Screw that. I want to know
what’s going on. I want to be in
the know because if anybody
makes a rule that I don’t think is
right, I need to voice my opinion
just as much as you voice your
opinion on it.”
Hall feels healthy
Thirteen months after tearing
the anterior cruciate ligament in
his right knee, Redskins safety
DeAngelo Hall practiced for the
second consecutive day. Hall
started the season on the
physically unable to perform list
as he continued to recover from
the injury suffered in Week 3 last
year against the New York
Giants.
“It’s been different,” Hall said.
“I’ve never been on PUP, so I
kind of didn’t know really what
to expect. It’s definitely giving
my body a chance to really heal.
. . . I’ve followed [the doctors’]
instructions to a T, and I feel
great.”
— Rick Maese
and Master Tesfatsion
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
SU
college football
Terps’ interim AD a source of stability
BY
ADRIAN KRAUS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
After helping Syracuse surprise then-No. 2 Clemson last week,
quarterback Eric Dungey and the Orange take aim at No. 8 Miami.
TOD A Y ’ S TV G A M ES
EARLY SHIFT
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
12:20
12:30
1 p.m.
Maryland at No. 5 Wisconsin » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
Tulsa at Connecticut » ESPNU
No. 10 Oklahoma State at Texas » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
Louisville at Florida State » ESPN
Iowa at Northwestern » ESPN2
Iowa State at Texas Tech » Fox Sports 1
Purdue at Rutgers » Big Ten Network
Temple at Army » CBS Sports Network
Idaho at Missouri » SEC Network
Pittsburgh at Duke » WDCA (Ch. 20)
Boston College at Virginia » NBC Sports Washington
Morgan State at Howard » NewsChannel8
Texas played the nation’s top-ranked offense last weekend, losing by five to
Oklahoma. This week, the Longhorns get Oklahoma State . . . which has
supplanted its Bedlam rival and now has the No. 1 offense in the land,
averaging 610.7 yards per game (more than 33 yards better than No. 2
Ohio State). In thumping Baylor last weekend, the Cowboys had a 200-yard
receiver (James Washington), a 100-yard receiver (Marcell Ateman) and a
100-yard rusher (Justice Hill). The Longhorns gave up two touchdown
passes of at least 50 yards last week against the Sooners, and Oklahoma
State has 10 such plays from scrimmage this season, trailing only Missouri
and Stanford. The Cowboys have gained at least 60 yards on one play eight
times, and no one else in the nation can say that. . . . Louisville quarterback
Lamar Jackson hasn’t done anything to make anyone think last year’s
Heisman Trophy was a fluke. He leads the nation in total offense, and only
two Football Bowl Subdivision quarterbacks — from Navy and Army, both
option teams — have more rushing yards. But here’s the difference: While
Louisville was beating teams such as then-No. 2 Florida State last season,
this year the Cardinals are losing to teams such as Boston College. Dating
from the final three games of last season, Louisville is 4-6, but it can right
things with a second straight win over the Seminoles.
R OMAN S TUBBS
As Damon Evans officially assumed control, at least temporarily, of Maryland’s athletic department this week, he vowed to
embrace the pressure of his new
reality. On his plate were the
daily responsibilities of Athletic
Director Kevin Anderson, who
announced Monday that he was
taking a six-month sabbatical.
Maryland quickly tabbed Evans,
the school’s executive athletic
director since 2014, to take over
on an interim basis.
“It has been fluid,” Evans said
Friday in his first interview since
taking the role.
Anderson’s departure not only
was preceded by a bizarre string
of events, including a three-week
absence from his office and contested reports of his ouster last
weekend, it also came at the
midway point of Maryland’s football season.
It’s hardly an ideal time for a
major college athletic department to undergo a transition in
leadership — and not only because it’s a potential distraction
for a team that has lost three of
its past four games ahead of
Saturday’s visit to No. 5 Wisconsin.
Season ticket sales are down
10 percent this year, and home
attendance has lagged over the
first half of the season. The
school is also facing an uphill
climb in fundraising efforts for
the new Cole Field House project; the initial $155 million price
tag increased by roughly 25 percent to $196 million this summer, with the athletic department on the hook for $19 million.
With Anderson gone and his
path to a potential return unclear, the pressure is on Evans to
pick up the pieces.
“Pressure, that’s part of this
job. That’s just something that
you deal with,” said Evans, 47.
“When you’re an athletic director
— or in this case in an interim or
acting role — what you have to do
is match the expectations of the
people you’re dealing with. And I
want people to have high expectations of us. I don’t mind people
putting pressure on us, because
that shows that they’re committed. That shows that they care.”
For everything that has
changed for Evans over the past
week, his vision for Maryland
football hasn’t. He has served as
the athletic department’s liaison
to the program since he was
hired, negotiating all of the
coaching contracts and building
a strong rapport with secondyear Coach DJ Durkin, whom
Evans met with several times this
week as he officially took over
Anderson’s duties. On that end,
Evans is a symbol of stability in
an uncertain time for the school.
“We’ve been working together
now really since Day One,” Durkin said. “I think Damon and
Kevin were very in sync and in
line in a lot of things. I don’t
think it changes football in any
way.”
Evans did not comment Friday
on whether he remains in contact with Anderson as both assume their new roles, but he did
address the state of the football
program and his ongoing communication with Durkin.
They relate to each other easily. Both are former college football players — Evans played wide
receiver at Georgia, while Durkin
was a defensive end at Bowling
Green — and they often spoke
about their experiences working
at elite programs in the Southeastern Conference.
While Durkin served as an
assistant at Florida earlier in his
career, Evans became the first
African American athletic director in the SEC when he took that
job at Georgia in 2004. Evans was
fired by Georgia in July 2010
after being charged with a DUI in
Atlanta; after several years working in the private sector, Anderson lobbied to hire Evans in 2014.
The following year, Evans played
a crucial role in hiring Durkin.
“I believe that I have a good
working knowledge and understanding of the game. By no
means am I a coach, but I do
understand what we will need
and what it takes to move the
program forward,” Evans said.
“Sitting down and talking to DJ, I
think we have conversations we
can really relate to each other. . . .
We’ve been able to talk about a
lot of things that we can bring
from those different programs to
Maryland. But at the same time,
we’ve talked about the uniqueness of the University of Maryland and how we utilize that
uniqueness.”
That uniqueness has been accompanied by a slew of challenges; season ticket sales have
dipped since Durkin’s first season and “are nowhere where they
need to be,” Evans said. The silver
lining is that the school projects
to increase its overall ticket sale
revenue by as much as 2 percent
by the end of the season thanks
in part to visits to College Park by
Big Ten blue bloods Michigan
and Penn State in November.
Only about 5,000 tickets remain
for each of those games, Evans
said.
The more pressing challenge
for Maryland is sustaining consistent attendance against less
enticing opponents; after a season-high 38,325 attended last
Saturday’s 37-21 loss to Northwestern, Durkin and his players
were forced to address questions
about a lack of energy at Maryland Stadium. The most cheering
from the student section all afternoon came during the first
half, when those seated there
played keepaway with a football
that had been kicked into the
stands.
“Don’t get me started with
attendance. I think attendance
starts with students and supporting their classmates. As a donor,
that gives me heartburn, to tell
you the truth,” said Barry Gossett, a high-level donor.
While Evans believes that Durkin’s rebuild of the program
eventually will drive up season
ticket sales and overall revenue,
he has been devising ways to
improve “the in-game experience” at Maryland Stadium,
which averaged just 39,615 fans
last season. That filled just 73
percent of the 54,000-seat venue
and ranked 12th in the Big Ten,
ahead of only Northwestern and
Purdue.
Evans is also scrambling to
increase fundraising for the Cole
Field House project; the first
phase was completed in August,
and the school has raised
$60 million of its $90 million
goal, Evans said, but the athletic
department also must cover
nearly half of the $41 million
increase to the project’s budget.
Developing a lucrative football
program, one of Evans’s foremost
priorities, certainly would help
cut into that cost. He plans to be
on the ground trumpeting his
vision to donors such as Gossett
in the coming weeks, hoping to
rally support that can help drum
up interest at a time of uncertainty for the program.
“Football has the ability to
generate a significant amount of
revenue for our athletics program. That revenue just doesn’t
go to football. . . . So as football
goes, well, it helps all of our other
sports,” Evans said. “Is it a challenge? Yes. But we have to embrace the challenge.”
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
SWING SHIFT
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
3:30
4
4
4
North Carolina at No. 14 Virginia Tech » ESPN2
No. 20 Central Florida at Navy » CBS Sports Network
Tennessee at No. 1 Alabama » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
Syracuse at No. 8 Miami » ESPN
Indiana at No. 18 Michigan State » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
Arizona State at Utah » Fox Sports 1
Illinois at Minnesota » Big Ten Network
No. 9 Oklahoma at Kansas State » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
Kentucky at Mississippi State » SEC Network
SMU at Cincinnati » ESPNU
Does Syracuse have a second act ready to go? The Orange scored its first
truly special win since the days of Donovan McNabb last Friday against
Clemson and will try to follow that up against Miami. In fact, McNabb is
the most recent Syracuse quarterback to beat the Hurricanes, way back in
1998, which coincidentally was pretty much the last time anyone thought
of Syracuse as a football entity. Miami certainly isn’t overlooking its
opponent Saturday: The Hurricanes watched the Clemson upset from their
team hotel, where they were staying ahead of Saturday’s win against
Georgia Tech. “Our guys were watching it live and saw for themselves what
was about to come up this weekend,” Coach Mark Richt told the
Associated Press. “I didn’t have to really explain much of anything.”
NIGHT SHIFT
6:30
7
7
7:15
7:30
7:30
7:30
7:30
8
10:15
10:30
10:45
Alabama-Birmingham at Charlotte » beIN Sports
No. 16 South Florida at Tulane » ESPN2
BYU at East Carolina » CBS Sports Network
No. 24 LSU at Mississippi » ESPN
No. 19 Michigan at No. 2 Penn State » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
No. 11 Southern Cal at No. 13 Notre Dame » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
No. 21 Auburn at Arkansas » SEC Network
Wake Forest at Georgia Tech » ESPNU
Kansas at No. 4 TCU » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
Wyoming at Boise State » ESPN2
Fresno State at San Diego State » CBS Sports Network
Colorado at No. 15 Washington State » ESPN
Speaking of the Heisman Trophy, Penn State running back Saquon Barkley
is considered the man to beat at the moment. Leading the FBS in allpurpose yards per game (217) will do that, but those gaudy numbers came
against the likes of overmatched Group of Five teams (Akron and Georgia
State), bad ACC teams (Pittsburgh) and the Big Ten’s muddled middle
(Iowa, Northwestern and Indiana). Penn State’s postseason destination
should be decided over its next three games, starting against Michigan.
Games at Ohio State and Michigan State follow. . . . Even Kansas fans are
having trouble understanding why their 1-5 Jayhawks are on prime-time
network television for the first time since 2009, especially considering that
TCU is a 37.5-point favorite. Of course, we’re living in an era when Indiana —
Indiana football — is getting a national ABC afternoon slot for the second
straight weekend. These are truly weird times. Anyway, Kansas visits TCU.
On Fox. For some reason.
— Matt Bonesteel
Other area games
Urbana (3-4)
at Shepherd (6-0), noon
Virginia Union (5-2)
at Bowie State (6-1), 1
Catholic (3-3) at Springfield (7-0), 1
Husson (5-1) at Gallaudet (2-4), 1
Liberty (3-3) at Monmouth (5-1), 1
Fordham (1-6)
at Georgetown (1-5), 2
Florida A&M (2-5)
at Hampton (4-2), 2
Norfolk State (2-4)
at N.C. Central (5-1), 2
Towson (2-4)
at New Hampshire (4-2), 2
James Madison (6-0)
at William & Mary (2-4), 3:30
Richmond (4-2)
at Delaware (4-2), 3:30
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Penn State running back Saquon Barkley is a leading Heisman Trophy candidate but faces his biggest challenge so far this season Saturday.
As Penn State’s rise continues, Michigan looms large
PENN STATE FROM D1
the conference.
Then Michigan came to town,
outfoxed and outmuscled Penn
State on a goal-line stand, won,
21-13, and had running back
Tyrone Wheatley snootily refer
to the Big Ten debutant having to
pay its “dues.” Then Penn State
took a week off and went to Ohio
State and took a 24-6 beatdown
in late-October snow, after which
an Ohio State player said that,
preparation-wise, Penn State
was “no more important than
Purdue or Northwestern or any
other Big Ten team.”
Note: The next year, Penn
State went 12-0, went 8-0 in the
Big Ten, beat Ohio State, 63-14,
and finished No. 2 in the nation.
Now that the Nittany Lions
have re-alighted at No. 2 this
week, it’s helpful to remember
the statistics of Sept. 24, 2016,
just for their uncommon atrocity.
Penn State got 12 first downs.
It got 191 total yards. It rushed
28 times for 70 yards. Michigan
got 515 total yards, six sacks and
11 third-down conversions out of
16 tries. Multiple media outlets
quoted Michigan quarterback
“I could list out a number of things,
and every single one of them is important.”
James Franklin, Penn State football coach,
on his team’s rapid improvement
Wilton Speight as saying: “We
called the same play eight times
in a row. I started laughing,
looking at the play call.”
Whereas two weeks earlier,
Pittsburgh had rushed for a harrowing 341 yards in a 42-39
victory over Penn State, Michigan chimed in with a harrowing
326. Three injured starting linebackers couldn’t play for the
Nittany Lions. A fourth linebacker got tossed for targeting. A fifth
replaced the fourth, got injured
and couldn’t play the rest of the
year.
Franklin’s record stood at 1614 across two-plus seasons and
0-7 against the three intradivisional colossi (Michigan, Ohio
State and Michigan State), including two routs by 39 points
each (to the Michigan teams)
and another by 28 (to Ohio
State). David Jones of PennLive.com said of the rout by the
Wolverines, “I’ve got to say, that’s
one of the most dispiriting losses
I’ve ever seen this program take,
in 26 years of doing this.”
One week later, Penn State
trailed Minnesota 23-20 with
54 seconds left and faced third
and 10 from its 25-yard line.
Backing up to his own 13,
quarterback Trace McSorley
launched a back-footed throw up
the middle to a lunging Chris
Godwin for 20 yards. Moments
later, McSorley scrambled for 26,
enabling a game-tying Tyler Davis field goal that led to a 29-26
overtime win.
Now, this?
Penn State is 15-1 in its past
16 games, the lone loss 52-49 to
Southern California in a kaleidoscopic Rose Bowl. It won its
second outright Big Ten title.
Franklin has inched up to 2-7
against the three leviathans,
beating Ohio State (if not physically) and beating Michigan
State (thoroughly).
In the meantime, marvel at
running back Saquon Barkley’s
2017 national ranking in all-purpose yards: 1. The Lions’ national
scoring-defense ranking this season: 1. Total defense ranking: 9.
Yards-per-play-defense ranking:
4.
What a lousy position into
which to hurl that subset of your
fan base that had concluded
you’re no good.
“Everybody kind of wants me
to say that [the Michigan game]
was like the ‘aha’ moment,”
Franklin said. “And don’t get me
wrong: Obviously, I do think it
was a factor. But like I say with a
lot of things, there’s 25 slices in
this pie. And the Michigan loss
last year was a factor. Development was a factor. Players taking
responsibility and accountability
was a factor. The coaches building relationships and chemistry
with the players was a factor. I
could list out a number of things,
and every single one of them is
important.”
Here’s another factor: Sports
is sometimes horrible, often
wonderful and occasionally
ready to remind us of something
worthwhile.
chuck.culpepper@washpost.com
D6
EZ
. SATURDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
S C O R E B O AR D
FOOTBALL
SOCCER
NFL
MLS
NFC
EASTERN
W
Toronto FC .....................20
New York City FC ...........16
Chicago ..........................16
Atlanta United FC ..........15
Columbus .......................16
New York .......................13
New England ..................12
Philadelphia ...................10
Montreal ........................11
Orlando City ...................10
D.C. United .......................9
L
5
9
10
9
12
12
15
14
16
14
19
T PTS
8
68
8
56
7
55
9
54
5
53
8
47
6
42
9
39
6
39
9
39
5
32
GF
72
54
61
68
51
51
50
44
50
38
30
GA
35
41
44
38
47
46
59
46
55
52
58
WESTERN
W
Vancouver ......................15
Seattle ...........................13
Portland .........................14
Sporting KC ....................12
Houston .........................12
San Jose .........................12
Dallas .............................10
Real Salt Lake ................12
Minnesota United ..........10
Colorado ...........................9
Los Angeles .....................8
L
11
9
11
8
10
14
10
15
17
18
17
T PTS
7
52
11
50
8
50
13
49
11
47
7
43
13
43
6
42
6
36
6
33
8
32
GF
49
49
58
39
54
36
43
47
45
31
44
GA
47
39
49
27
45
58
47
54
67
48
62
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 5
Washington .................. 3
Dallas ............................ 2
N.Y. Giants .................... 1
L
1
2
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.600
.400
.167
PF
165
117
125
105
PA
122
113
132
132
SOUTH
W
Carolina ......................... 4
New Orleans ................. 3
Atlanta .......................... 3
Tampa Bay .................... 2
L
2
2
2
3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.600
.600
.400
PF
128
145
121
118
PA
122
116
109
121
NORTH
W
Minnesota ..................... 4
Green Bay ..................... 4
Detroit .......................... 3
Chicago ......................... 2
L
2
2
3
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.667
.500
.333
PF
122
147
161
105
PA
103
135
149
148
WEST
W
L.A. Rams ...................... 4
Seattle .......................... 3
Arizona ......................... 3
San Francisco ................ 0
L
2
2
3
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.600
.500
.000
PF
179
110
119
113
PA
138
87
158
146
AFC
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
“Last year, he was really good, but he had no idea what he was
doing,” Maryland Coach Mark Turgeon said of Anthony Cowan Jr.
Following a year playing with the ex-Terps star,
Cowan is eager to be the leading man
BY
R OMAN S TUBBS
new york — Maryland Coach
Mark Turgeon and sophomore
point guard Anthony Cowan Jr.
sat with their backs to each other
at separate tables during Big Ten
basketball media day in Madison
Square Garden, their voices overlapping for nearly an hour
Thursday morning.
“Most of my questions today
are about Melo,” Turgeon said at
one point. “ ‘How will we replace
Melo?’ ”
Cowan was within earshot and
could relate because most of the
questions sent his way were also
about Melo Trimble, the former
Maryland guard who turned pro
this spring after serving for three
seasons as the face of a basketball renaissance in College Park.
Trimble’s final season at Maryland was hit-or-miss, but it was
his mentorship of Cowan that
helped spawn the new undisputed leader of the Terrapins.
Cowan gladly accepts that
role. While he doesn’t need to
lean on Trimble so much anymore, he still regularly texts his
old teammate. This week, before
Trimble was cut by the Minnesota Timberwolves, Cowan
reached out to ask Trimble about
the differences between college
and professional basketball.
“Melo is somebody I look up
to. Just what he did at Maryland,
that’s something that I hopefully
can do also,” Cowan said. “I just
want to ask him: Whatever he
did, I want to do the same.”
Their conversations are more
about life than basketball at this
point, and Cowan spent part of
Thursday explaining that he has
never felt caught in Trimble’s
shadow on the court. He handled
most of the point guard duties as
a freshman a year ago, averaging
10.3 points and 3.7 assists, which
allowed Trimble to play more off
the ball.
But it was still a major transition for Cowan who, after starring as a scorer at St. John’s (D.C.)
in high school, was all of a
sudden forced to defer on the
offensive end during his first
year of college. In a league
stacked with talented guards,
Cowan made his mark more as a
rookie on the defensive end.
“He’s a quick jitterbug. . . . I
thought he was a pretty good
defender as a freshman last year.
As he continues to get older, I
think that’s something he will
really excel at,” Northwestern
guard Bryant McIntosh said.
“He’s going to be the guy running
EAST
W
New England ................. 4
Buffalo .......................... 3
Miami ............................ 3
N.Y. Jets ....................... 3
L
2
2
2
3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.600
.600
.500
PF
172
89
61
109
PA
159
74
84
130
SOUTH
W
Tennessee ..................... 3
Jacksonville .................. 3
Houston ........................ 3
Indianapolis .................. 2
L
3
3
3
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.500
.500
.500
.333
PF
146
156
177
119
PA
164
110
147
195
NORTH
W
Pittsburgh ..................... 4
Baltimore ...................... 3
Cincinnati ...................... 2
Cleveland ...................... 0
L
2
3
3
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.667
.500
.400
.000
PF
118
114
84
94
PA
102
124
83
157
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 5
Denver ........................... 3
Oakland ......................... 3
L.A. Chargers ................ 2
L
2
2
4
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.714
.600
.429
.333
PF
207
108
155
116
PA
161
97
156
131
WEEK 7
THURSDAY’S RESULT
at Oakland 31, Kansas City 30
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Baltimore at Minnesota (-6), 1
Tampa Bay at Buffalo (-4), 1
New Orleans (-4) at Green Bay, 1
Tennessee (-51/2) at Cleveland, 1
N.Y. Jets at Miami (-3), 1
Jacksonville (-3) at Indianapolis, 1
Arizona vs L.A. Rams (-3) at London, UK, 1
Carolina (-3) at Chicago, 1
Dallas (-6) at San Francisco, 4:05
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh (-5), 4:25
Seattle (-41/2) at N.Y. Giants, 4:25
Denver at L.A. Chargers (PK), 4:25
Atlanta at New England (-3), 8:30
BYE: Detroit, Houston
Maryland preparing
for life after Trimble
MONDAY’S GAME
Washington at Philadelphia (-5), 8:30
the team now. Everyone is going
to be looking toward him.”
Trimble ran 71 percent of the
team’s pick and rolls last season,
Turgeon said, and it was clear by
the end of the year that Cowan
was not fully comfortable looking for his shot on the perimeter.
Alongside Trimble, Maryland
also found viable scoring from
freshmen Justin Jackson and
Kevin Huerter, which left Cowan
grappling with his role as a
scorer.
That spurred change over the
summer: Cowan vowed to turn
back into the scorer he was in
high school. He took hundreds of
three-pointers every day (Cowan
shot 42.4 percent from the field
last year but just 32.1 percent
from beyond the arc), and he
joined the Kenner League to
sharpen his game against older
professional and college players.
He also changed back to his old
high school uniform number (1).
Anything to help solidify his
mind-set.
“Last year, he was really good,
but he had no idea what he was
doing,” Turgeon said. “This year,
he’s really good, and he has a
total understanding of what is
expected of him and what is
expected of the team.”
Said Cowan: “Just trying to get
back to my scoring ways and just
get my confidence up.”
Turgeon’s ball screen-heavy offense will be much more balanced this season, he promised,
and will feature Cowan as a point
guard with a scoring mentality.
Trimble went through long
stretches of his career struggling
with the same issue, going back
and forth between being a shooter and a facilitator. But Turgeon
will need more scoring out of
Cowan this year.
While Huerter will be able to
play more shooting guard, Maryland doesn’t have the deepest
stable of guards. It will rely on
redshirt junior Dion Wiley, who
has dealt with lingering injuries
over the past two seasons, as well
as freshman Darryl Morsell.
“I don’t want anyone to ever
compare [Cowan] to Melo, because he’s different than Melo.
He’s more [of a] point guard than
Melo. Melo was 6-3, dynamic
scorer. But I think the whole
team will step out of his shadow,”
Turgeon said. “Melo earned that.
He was a terrific player. He
changed everything for our program. But I think our whole
program will come out of that
this year — especially Anthony.”
roman.stubbs@washpost.com
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SF
B AS E BALL
SUNDAY’S MATCHES
New York at D.C. United, 4
Chicago at Houston, 4
Colorado at Seattle, 4
Columbus at New York City FC, 4
Los Angeles at Dallas, 4
Minnesota United at San Jose, 4
New England at Montreal, 4
Orlando City at Philadelphia, 4
Sporting KC at Real Salt Lake, 4
Toronto FC at Atlanta United FC, 4
Vancouver at Portland, 4
GOLF
Ravens: OUT: WR Breshad Perriman (concussion), C
Matt Skura (knee), RB Terrance West (calf), TE Maxx
Williams (ankle), LB Tim Williams (thigh). DOUBTFUL:
WR Chris Matthews (thigh). QUESTIONABLE: DT Carl
Davis (thigh), CB Jaylen Hill (thigh), S Anthony Levine
(thigh), WR Jeremy Maclin (shoulder), CB Jimmy Smith
(achilles), T Ronnie Stanley (mouth), WR Mike Wallace
(back), TE Benjamin Watson (knee), S Lardarius Webb
(knee), DT Brandon Williams (foot). Vikings: OUT: QB
Sam Bradford (knee), WR Stefon Diggs (groin), G Nick
Easton (calf). QUESTIONABLE: CB Mackensie Alexander
(hip), CB Tramaine Brock (hamstring), WR Michael Floyd
(hamstring), T Riley Reiff (ankle).
NCAA
THURSDAY'S RESULTS
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas St. 47, Louisiana Lafayette 3
Memphis 42, Houston 38
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
EAST
Princeton 52, at Harvard 17
SOUTH
W. Kentucky 35, at Old Dominion 31
Marshall 38, at Middle Tennessee 10
FAR WEST
Air Force at Nevada, Late
Colorado St. at New Mexico, Late
SATURDAY’S GAMES
EAST
Temple (3-4) at Army (5-2), Noon
Elon (5-1) at Rhode Island (2-4), Noon
Purdue (3-3) at Rutgers (2-4), Noon
Tulsa (2-5) at U-Conn. (2-4), Noon
Columbia (5-0) at Dartmouth (5-0), 12:30
Liberty (3-3) at Monmouth (NJ) (5-1), 1
Yale (4-1) at Penn (2-3), 1
Fordham (1-6) at Georgetown (1-5), 2
Towson (2-4) at New Hampshire (4-2), 2
Brown (2-3) at Cornell (1-4), 3
Maine (2-3) at Albany (NY) (3-3), 3:30
Richmond (4-2) at Delaware (4-2), 3:30
UCF (5-0) at Navy (5-1), 3:30
Georgia Southern (0-5) at U-Mass. (0-6), 3:30
Michigan (5-1) at Penn St. (6-0), 7:30
SOUTH
Louisville (4-3) at Florida St. (2-3), Noon
Pittsburgh (2-5) at Duke (4-3), 12:20
Boston College (3-4) at Virginia (5-1), 12:30
Morgan St. (1-5) at Howard (3-3), 1
W. Carolina (5-2) at VMI (0-7), 1:30
SC State (2-4) at Delaware St. (0-6), 2
Troy (4-2) at Georgia St. (3-2), 2
Norfolk St. (2-4) at NC Central (5-1), 2
Va. Lynchburg (0-0) at MVSU (1-5), 3
Tennessee (3-3) at Alabama (7-0), 3:30
Coastal Carolina (1-5) at Appalachian St. (4-2), 3:30
Syracuse (4-3) at Miami (5-0), 3:30
North Carolina (1-6) at Virginia Tech (5-1), 3:30
James Madison (6-0) at William & Mary (2-4), 3:30
Kentucky (5-1) at Mississippi St. (4-2), 4
North Texas (4-2) at FAU (3-3), 5
UAB (4-2) at Charlotte (0-7), 6:30
BYU (1-6) at East Carolina (1-6), 7
Southern U. (3-3) at Jackson St. (0-6), 7
Southern Miss. (4-2) at Louisiana Tech (3-3), 7
South Florida (6-0) at Tulane (3-3), 7
LSU (5-2) at Mississippi (3-3), 7:15
Wake Forest (4-2) at Georgia Tech (3-2), 7:30
MIDWEST
Maryland (3-3) at Wisconsin (6-0), Noon
Idaho (2-4) at Missouri (1-5), Noon
Iowa (4-2) at Northwestern (3-3), Noon
Akron (4-3) at Toledo (5-1), Noon
W. Michigan (4-3) at E. Michigan (2-4), 2
Youngstown St. (3-3) at N. Iowa (3-3), 2
Kent St. (2-5) at Ohio (5-2), 2
Buffalo (3-4) at Miami (Ohio) (2-5), 2:30
Cent. Michigan (2-5) at Ball St. (2-4), 3
Indiana (3-3) at Michigan St. (5-1), 3:30
Illinois (2-4) at Minnesota (3-3), 3:30
SMU (4-2) at Cincinnati (2-5), 4
Oklahoma (5-1) at Kansas St. (3-3), 4
Southern Cal (6-1) at Notre Dame (5-1), 7:30
SOUTHWEST
Oklahoma St. (5-1) at Texas (3-3), Noon
Iowa St. (4-2) at Texas Tech (4-2), Noon
Rice (1-5) at UTSA (3-2), 7
Auburn (5-2) at Arkansas (2-4), 7:30
West Virginia (4-2) at Baylor (0-6), 8
Kansas (1-5) at TCU (6-0), 8
FAR WEST
Arizona St. (3-3) at Utah (4-2), 3:30
Oregon (4-3) at UCLA (3-3), 4
Utah St. (3-4) at UNLV (2-4), 6
E. Washington (5-2) at S. Utah (4-2), 7:05
Arizona (4-2) at California (4-3), 8
Wyoming (4-2) at Boise St. (4-2), 10:15
Fresno St. (4-2) at San Diego St. (6-1), 10:30
Colorado (4-3) at Washington St. (6-1), 10:45
AMERICAN LEAGUE
YANKEES AND ASTROS TIED, 3-3
Game 1: at Houston 2, New York 1
Game 2: at Houston 2, New York 1
Game 3: at New York 8, Houston 1
Game 4: at New York 6, Houston 4
Game 5: at New York 5, Houston 0
Game 6: at Houston 7, New York 1
Game 7: Saturday: New York (Sabathia 14-5) at Houston
(Morton 14-7), 8:08 (FS1)
WORLD SERIES
N.Y. YANKEES-HOUSTON WINNER VS. L.A. DODGERS
Best of seven; x-If necessary
All Games Televised by Fox
Game 1: Tuesday: N.Y. Yankees-Houston winner at L.A.
Dodgers, 8:09
Wednesday: N.Y. Yankees-Houston winner at L.A. Dodgers, 8:09
Friday, Oct. 27: L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Yankees-Houston
winner, 8:09
Saturday, Oct. 28: L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Yankees-Houston winner, 8:09
x-Sunday, Oct. 29: L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Yankees-Houston winner, 8:16
x-Tuesday, Oct. 31: N.Y. Yankees-Houston winner at
L.A. Dodgers, 8:09
x-Wednesday, Nov. 1: N.Y. Yankees-Houston winner at
L.A. Dodgers, 8:10
NEW YORK
AB
Gardner lf .......................4
Judge rf ..........................4
Gregorius ss ...................4
Sanchez c .......................4
Bird 1b ............................3
Castro 2b ........................3
Hicks cf...........................3
Frazier 3b .......................4
Headley dh .....................4
TOTALS
33
R
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
H
1
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
2
7
BI BB SO AVG
0 0 0 .130
1 0 2 .300
0 0 0 .292
0 0 1 .182
0 1 2 .250
0 0 0 .238
0 1 3 .091
0 0 1 .200
0 0 1 .467
1 2 10
—
HOUSTON
AB
Springer cf......................4
Reddick rf .......................4
Altuve 2b........................4
Correa ss ........................4
Gurriel 1b .......................3
Bregman 3b ....................3
Gonzalez lf .....................3
Gattis dh ........................2
McCann c ........................4
TOTALS
31
R
0
0
1
1
1
2
0
1
1
7
H
0
0
2
2
1
1
0
0
2
8
BI BB SO AVG
0 1 2 .091
0 0 1 .000
3 0 1 .318
0 0 0 .304
0 1 0 .250
2 1 1 .150
0 1 1 .111
1 1 1 .000
1 0 0 .143
7 5 7
—
NEW YORK .................000
HOUSTON ...................000
000 010 —
030 04X —
At Nine Bridges; In Jeju Island, South Korea
Purse: $9.25 million
Yardage: 7,196; Par: 72
SECOND ROUND
Luke List ............................................
Lucas Glover ......................................
Scott Brown ......................................
Justin Thomas ...................................
Cameron Smith .................................
Marc Leishman ..................................
Patrick Reed ......................................
Chez Reavie .......................................
Whee Kim ..........................................
Branden Grace ...................................
Ollie Schniederjans ...........................
Kyle Stanley ......................................
Charles Howell III ..............................
Thomas Pieters .................................
Robert Streb ......................................
Anirban Lahiri ....................................
Brian Harman ....................................
Nick Taylor .........................................
Pat Perez ...........................................
Rafa Cabrera Bello .............................
Stewart Cink ......................................
Harold Varner III ................................
Hudson Swafford ..............................
68 67
69 67
66 70
63 74
69 68
66 72
66 72
66 72
68 70
72 67
67 72
68 71
67 72
71 68
69 71
69 71
68 72
68 72
69 71
71 70
71 70
69 72
68 73
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
135
136
136
137
137
138
138
138
138
139
139
139
139
139
140
140
140
140
140
141
141
141
141
-9
-8
-8
-7
-7
-6
-6
-6
-6
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-3
-3
-3
-3
At Miramar Resort and Country Club; In Taipei, Taiwan
Purse: $2.2 million
Yardage: 6,504; Par: 72
SECOND ROUND
Jenny Shin ......................................... 70 67 — 137 -7
Eun-Hee Ji ......................................... 66 71 — 137 -7
Brittany Altomare ............................. 70 68 — 138 -6
Su Oh ................................................. 73 66 — 139 -5
Madelene Sagstrom .......................... 72 68 — 140 -4
Megan Khang ..................................... 69 71 — 140 -4
So Yeon Ryu ...................................... 73 68 — 141 -3
Brittany Lang .................................... 71 70 — 141 -3
Carlota Ciganda ................................. 72 70 — 142 -2
Shanshan Feng .................................. 72 70 — 142 -2
Brittany Lincicome ............................ 71 71 — 142 -2
Angel Yin ........................................... 71 71 — 142 -2
Azahara Munoz ................................. 70 72 — 142 -2
Alena Sharp ....................................... 75 68 — 143 -1
Pei-Ying Tsai ..................................... 74 69 — 143 -1
Cristie Kerr ........................................ 73 70 — 143 -1
Lizette Salas ..................................... 76 68 — 144 E
Chella Choi ......................................... 75 69 — 144 E
Jacqui Concolino ................................ 74 70 — 144 E
Jodi Ewart Shadoff ........................... 74 70 — 144 E
Na Yeon Choi ..................................... 73 71 — 144 E
Nelly Korda ........................................ 73 71 — 144 E
Ally McDonald ................................... 73 71 — 144 E
Amy Yang .......................................... 73 71 — 144 E
Jeong Eun Lee ................................... 72 72 — 144 E
Lydia Ko ............................................. 70 74 — 144 E
Ariya Jutanugarn .............................. 69 75 — 144 E
BALTIMORE RAVENS AT MINNESOTA VIKINGS
NATIONAL LEAGUE
DODGERS ELIMINATED CUBS, 4-1
Game 1: at Los Angeles 5, Chicago 2
Game 2: at Los Angeles 4, Chicago 1
Game 3: Los Angeles 6, at Chicago 1
Game 4: at Chicago 3, Los Angeles 2
Game 5: Los Angeles 11, at Chicago 1
CJ CUP
LPGA Tour
WASHINGTON: DNP: G Tyler Catalina (concussion), T Ty
Nsekhe (core muscle), S D.J. Swearinger (not injury
related), T Trent Williams (knee). LIMITED: CB Bashaud
Breeland (knee), S Deshazor Everett (hamstring), LB
Mason Foster (shoulder), RB Rob Kelley (ankle), S
Stefan McClure (knee), CB Josh Norman (rib). FULL: LB
Ryan Anderson (back), CB Fabian Moreau (shoulder,
hamstring), S Montae Nicholson (shoulder). Eagles:
LIMITED: CB Ronald Darby (ankle), LB Jordan Hicks
(calf), LB Mychal Kendricks (hamstring). FULL: DT Beau
Allen (foot), DT Fletcher Cox (calf), DE Brandon Graham
(shoulder), DT Timmy Jernigan (ankle), T Lane Johnson
(concussion), RB Wendell Smallwood (knee), DT Destiny
Vaeao (wrist).
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Best of seven
Astros 7, Yankees 1
SUNDAY, OCT. 29
Dallas at Washington, 4:25
Minnesota vs Cleveland at London, UK, 9:30 a.m.
San Francisco at Philadelphia, 1
Oakland at Buffalo, 1
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 1
Carolina at Tampa Bay, 1
Chicago at New Orleans, 1
Atlanta at N.Y. Jets, 1
L.A. Chargers at New England, 1
Houston at Seattle, 4:05
Pittsburgh at Detroit, 8:30
BYE: L.A. Rams, Arizona, N.Y. Giants, Jacksonville,
Tennessee, Green Bay
WASHINGTON REDSKINS
AT PHILADELPHIA EAGLES
NBA
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
PGA Tour
THURSDAY’S GAME
Miami at Baltimore, 8:25
Week 7 inury report
MLB postseason
ALCS GAME 6
WEEK 8
MONDAY, OCT. 30
Denver at Kansas City, 8:30
BAS K E TBALL
SWINGING SKIRTS CLASSIC
LOCAL GOLF
COLUMBIA
Andy Hill and Pat Flynn won the 2017 Travis Cup Season
Long Member Member. Jed Tenhoeve And Mike Ridgway
finished second.
TENNIS
ATP/WTA
KREMLIN CUP
At Olympic Stadium; In Moscow
Purse: Men: $745,940 (WT250); Surface: Hard-Indoor
MEN’S SINGLES — QUARTERFINALS
Damir Dzumhur (6), Bosnia-Herzegovina, def. Andreas
Seppi, Italy, 4-6, 6-2, 6-4; Adrian Mannarino (3), France,
def. Dudi Sela, Israel, 6-7 (8-6), 6-1, 6-2; Mirza Basic,
Bosnia-Herzegovina, def. Daniil Medvedev, Russia, 3-6,
6-4, 6-1; Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, def. Alexander
Bublik, Kazakhstan, 7-5, 6-1.
WOMEN’S SINGLES — SEMIFINALS
Daria Kasatkina, Russia, def. Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, 6-2, 6-3; Julia Goerges (7), Germany, def. Natalia
Vikhlyantseva, Russia, 6-2, 2-6, 7-5.
ATP
STOCKHOLM OPEN
At Kungliga Tennishallen; In Stockholm
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Purse: $696,300 (WT250)
HOUSTON
IP
Verlander .........................7
Peacock ............................1
Giles .................................1
H
5
1
1
1
0
R ER BB SO ERA
0 0 1 8 0.56
1 1 0 1 7.71
0 0 1 1 9.00
WP: Verlander (2-0); LP: Severino (0-1). Robertson
pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. Inherited runnersscored: Green 2-0, Betances 1-1. HBP: Verlander (Castro). T: 3:23. A: 43,179 (42,060).
METROPOLITAN
W
New Jersey ..................... 6
Pittsburgh ....................... 5
Columbus ........................ 5
Washington .................... 4
Philadelphia .................... 4
Carolina ........................... 3
N.Y. Islanders ................. 3
N.Y. Rangers ................... 1
L
2
2
2
3
3
1
3
5
OL PTS.
0
12
1
11
0
10
1
9
0
8
1
7
1
7
2
4
GF
31
29
21
27
26
14
19
20
GA
24
32
15
27
17
12
21
30
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay ...................... 6
Toronto ........................... 6
Ottawa ............................ 3
Detroit ............................ 4
Boston ............................. 3
Florida ............................. 2
Buffalo ............................ 1
x-Montreal ...................... 1
L
1
1
1
3
3
4
5
5
OL PTS.
1
13
0
12
3
9
1
9
0
6
0
4
2
4
1
3
GF
29
34
24
26
20
20
20
11
GA
23
22
18
25
21
24
32
27
WESTERN CONFERENCE
CENTRAL
W
St. Louis .......................... 6
Chicago ........................... 4
Nashville ......................... 4
Winnipeg ........................ 4
Dallas .............................. 4
Colorado .......................... 4
Minnesota ....................... 1
L
2
2
2
3
3
4
2
OL PTS.
0
12
2
10
1
9
0
8
0
8
0
8
2
4
GF
27
28
19
22
19
23
18
GA
21
20
17
26
18
21
20
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................... 5
Vegas .............................. 5
Calgary ............................ 4
Vancouver ....................... 3
San Jose .......................... 3
x-Anaheim ...................... 2
Edmonton ....................... 2
Arizona ........................... 0
L
0
1
3
3
3
3
4
6
OL PTS.
1
11
0
10
0
8
1
7
0
6
1
5
0
4
1
1
GF
21
20
18
19
16
12
13
16
GA
10
15
19
22
16
17
20
30
x-Late game
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
Tampa Bay 2, at Columbus 0
at Boston 6, Vancouver 3
N.Y. Islanders 4, at N.Y. Rangers 3 (SO)
Nashville 1, at Philadelphia 0
New Jersey 5, at Ottawa 4 (OT)
Edmonton 2, at Chicago 1 (OT)
St. Louis 4, at Colorado 3
Carolina 2, at Calgary 1
Dallas 5, at Arizona 4
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Florida at Washington, 7:30
Nashville at N.Y. Rangers, 12:30
Edmonton at Philadelphia, 1
Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 7
San Jose at N.Y. Islanders, 7
Buffalo at Boston, 7
Toronto at Ottawa, 7
Los Angeles at Columbus, 7
Carolina at Dallas, 8
Chicago at Arizona, 9
Minnesota at Calgary, 10
St. Louis at Vegas, 10:30
SINGLES — SEMIFINALS
Carina Witthoeft, Germany, def. Pauline Parmentier,
France, 7-6 (7-2), 1-6, 6-3; Monica Puig, Puerto Rico, def.
Elise Mertens (5), Belgium, 6-2, 7-5.
AUTO RACING
NASCAR Cup
HOLLYWOOD CASINO 400 LINEUP (TOP 30)
After Friday’s qualifying
At Kansas Speedway; In Kansas City, Kan.
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 188.029 mph
2. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 187.682
3. (21) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 187.617
4. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 187.604
5. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 187.461
6. (19) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 186.909
7. (77) Erik Jones, Toyota, 186.716
8. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 186.329
9. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 185.637
10. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 185.599
11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 184.849
12. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 184.093
13. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 185.957
14. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 185.880
15. (24) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 185.765
16. (41) Kurt Busch, Ford, 185.274
17. (95) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet, 185.185
18. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 184.976
19. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 184.970
20. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 184.824
21. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 184.679
22. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 184.533
23. (10) Danica Patrick, Ford, 184.496
24. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 184.212
25. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 183.542
26. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 183.492
27. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 182.723
28. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 182.088
29. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 182.063
30. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 181.928
GB
—
1
1
1
11/2
CENTRAL
W
Cleveland .....................................2
Indiana .........................................1
Detroit .........................................1
Milwaukee ...................................1
Chicago ........................................0
L
Pct
0 1.000
1 .500
1 .500
1 .500
1 .000
GB
—
1
1
1
11/2
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .......................................2
Memphis ......................................1
San Antonio .................................1
x-New Orleans.............................0
Dallas ...........................................0
L
Pct
0 1.000
0 1.000
0 1.000
1 .000
2 .000
GB
—
NORTHWEST
W
Portland .......................................2
Oklahoma City .............................1
Minnesota....................................1
Utah .............................................1
Denver..........................................0
L
Pct
0 1.000
0 1.000
1 .500
1 .500
1 .000
GB
—
PACIFIC
W
L.A. Clippers.................................1
x-Sacramento ..............................1
x-Golden State.............................0
x-Phoenix.....................................0
L.A. Lakers ...................................0
L
Pct
0 1.000
1 .500
1 .000
1 .000
1 .000
GB
—
WESTERN CONFERENCE
1/
2
1/
2
11/2
2
1/
2
1
1
11/2
1/
2
1
1
1
x-Late game
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
at Toronto 117, Chicago 100
at Oklahoma City 105, New York 84
L.A. Clippers 108, at L.A. Lakers 92
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
at Washington 115, Detroit 111
at Charlotte 109, Atlanta 91
Boston 102, at Philadelphia 92
Cleveland 116, at Milwaukee 97
Portland 114, at Indiana 96
at Brooklyn 126, Orlando 121
at Minnesota 100, Utah 97
Sacramento 93, at Dallas 88
Golden State at New Orleans, Late
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, Late
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Philadelphia at Toronto, 7:30
Dallas at Houston, 8
Detroit at New York, 8
Golden State at Memphis, 8
Indiana at Miami, 8
Orlando at Cleveland, 8
San Antonio at Chicago, 8
Portland at Milwaukee, 8:30
Oklahoma City at Utah, 9
Sacramento at Denver, 9
Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Atlanta at Brooklyn, 3:30
Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 7
New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 9:30
22
29
23
22
33 — 102
20 — 92
PHILADELPHIA: Redick 7-16 1-1 19, Covington 5-10 0-0
12, Embiid 4-16 3-3 11, Simmons 4-11 4-7 12, Bayless
7-12 0-0 18, Johnson 0-2 0-0 0, Saric 4-10 1-2 9, Fultz 2-9
2-2 6, McConnell 1-2 2-2 4, Luwawu-Cabarrot 1-4 0-0 2,
Anderson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-92 13-17 92.
Three-point Goals: Boston 10-29 (Horford 3-7, Larkin
2-2, Rozier 2-6, Yabusele 1-1, Brown 1-4, Irving 1-4,
Nader 0-1, Theis 0-1, Bird 0-1, Tatum 0-2), Philadelphia
10-32 (Bayless 4-6, Redick 4-7, Covington 2-6, McConnell 0-1, Luwawu-Cabarrot 0-2, Saric 0-4, Embiid 0-6).
Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Boston 55 (Horford 9),
Philadelphia 47 (Embiid 14). Assists: Boston 16 (Larkin,
Irving 4), Philadelphia 20 (Simmons 5). Total Fouls:
Boston 24, Philadelphia 30. Technicals: Redick. A: 20,816
(21,600).
Hornets 109, Hawks 91
ATLANTA ........................... 28
CHARLOTTE ....................... 18
28
31
17
35
18 — 91
25 — 109
ATLANTA: Prince 6-13 1-1 15, Ilyasova 0-4 0-0 0,
Dedmon 5-9 0-0 11, Schroder 11-21 3-3 25, Bazemore 5-9
0-0 11, Brussino 0-1 0-0 0, Babbitt 2-7 2-2 7, Collins 2-4
1-2 5, Muscala 3-8 2-2 9, Magette 0-1 0-0 0, Delaney 1-6
1-2 3, Belinelli 1-10 2-2 5, Dorsey 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 36-95
12-14 91.
CHARLOTTE: Williams 0-6 0-0 0, Bacon 2-4 0-0 6,
Howard 8-12 4-8 20, Walker 6-13 10-12 26, Lamb 7-17
1-1 15, O’Bryant III 2-6 2-2 6, Kaminsky 7-14 5-5 21,
Monk 2-7 0-0 6, Graham 3-6 2-2 9, Stone 0-1 0-0 0. Totals
37-86 24-30 109.
Three-point Goals: Atlanta 7-30 (Prince 2-4, Dedmon
1-1, Bazemore 1-2, Belinelli 1-3, Muscala 1-4, Babbitt
1-6, Brussino 0-1, Schroder 0-2, Dorsey 0-2, Delaney 0-2,
Ilyasova 0-3), Charlotte 11-36 (Walker 4-8, Bacon 2-3,
Monk 2-5, Kaminsky 2-5, Graham 1-4, O’Bryant III 0-1,
Stone 0-1, Williams 0-4, Lamb 0-5). Fouled Out: Collins.
Rebounds: Atlanta 38 (Dedmon 7), Charlotte 57 (Howard
15). Assists: Atlanta 19 (Schroder 5), Charlotte 17
(Walker 9). Total Fouls: Atlanta 29, Charlotte 18.
Technicals: Atlanta coach Hawks (Defensive three
second), Schroder, Bazemore, Charlotte coach Hornets
(Defensive three second). A: 18,417 (19,077).
CLEVELAND ....................... 25
MILWAUKEE ...................... 25
30
24
31
24
30 — 116
24 — 97
CLEVELAND: James 10-16 2-2 24, Crowder 6-8 0-0 14,
Love 5-12 7-7 17, Rose 3-4 6-6 12, Wade 2-7 0-0 4, Osman
0-0 0-0 0, Green 4-7 2-2 10, Frye 1-1 0-0 3, Thompson 4-6
0-0 8, Calderon 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 3-11 0-0 7, Korver 6-8 0-0
17, Shumpert 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 44-81 17-17 116.
Washington 4, at Detroit 3 (OT)
Vancouver 4, at Buffalo 2
San Jose 3, at New Jersey 0
Pittsburgh 4, at Florida 3
at Winnipeg 4, Minnesota 3
Montreal at Anaheim, Late
MILWAUKEE: Middleton 3-10 2-2 8, Antetokounmpo
15-22 4-6 34, Maker 3-5 0-0 7, Brogdon 6-12 0-0 16, Snell
3-7 0-0 9, Henson 1-1 2-2 4, Teletovic 1-4 0-0 3, Wilson
0-0 0-0 0, Monroe 4-8 0-0 8, Dellavedova 1-5 0-0 3, Terry
0-4 2-2 2, Brown 1-3 0-0 3, Vaughn 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 38-82
10-12 97.
Three-point Goals: Cleveland 11-26 (Korver 5-6, Crowder
2-2, James 2-4, Frye 1-1, Smith 1-6, Wade 0-1, Shumpert
0-1, Green 0-2, Love 0-3), Milwaukee 11-35 (Brogdon
4-9, Snell 3-7, Brown 1-1, Maker 1-1, Dellavedova 1-3,
Teletovic 1-4, Antetokounmpo 0-1, Vaughn 0-1, Terry
0-3, Middleton 0-5). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds:
Cleveland 43 (Love 12), Milwaukee 31 (Antetokounmpo
8). Assists: Cleveland 25 (James 8), Milwaukee 23
(Antetokounmpo 8). Total Fouls: Cleveland 10, Milwaukee 17. Technicals: Milwaukee coach Bucks (Defensive
three second). A: 18,717 (18,717).
Nets 126, Magic 121
ORLANDO ........................... 27
BROOKLYN ......................... 29
Canucks 4, Sabres 2
VANCOUVER ........................... 1
BUFFALO ................................. 2
L
Pct
0 1.000
1 .500
1 .500
1 .500
1 .000
1
1
11/2
Cavaliers 116, Bucks 97
LUXEMBOURG OPEN
At CK Sportcenter Kockelsheuer; In Luxembourg
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington .................................2
Charlotte......................................1
Orlando ........................................1
Atlanta.........................................1
Miami...........................................0
1/
2
BOSTON: Tatum 3-8 9-9 15, Horford 5-16 4-4 17, Baynes
5-8 0-1 10, Irving 7-17 6-7 21, Brown 4-13 0-3 9, Nader
0-2 0-0 0, Yabusele 1-2 0-0 3, Theis 0-1 0-0 0, Rozier 6-11
0-3 14, Larkin 4-5 0-0 10, Bird 0-1 3-5 3. Totals 35-84
22-32 102.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
At Lotto Arena; In Antwerp, Belgium
Purse: $696,300 (WT250); Surface: Hard-Indoor
GB
—
BOSTON ............................. 24
PHILADELPHIA .................. 21
NHL
EUROPEAN OPEN
L
Pct
0 1.000
1 .500
2 .333
1 .000
2 .000
Celtics 102, 76ers 92
HOCKEY
FRIDAY’S RESULTS
WTA
7
8
E: Gregorius (2). LOB: New York 8, Houston 6. 2B: Correa (3), Bregman (1), McCann (1). HR: Judge (3), off
Peacock; Altuve (1), off Robertson.
NEW YORK
IP
H R ER BB SO ERA
Severino........................4.2 3 3 3 4 3 4.15
Green ............................2.1 0 0 0 1 3 0.00
Robertson ........................0 4 4 4 0 0 15.0
Betances ..........................1 1 0 0 0 1 9.00
SINGLES — QUARTERFINALS
Fabio Fognini (6), Italy, def. Jack Sock (3), United States,
6-7 (7-3), 7-6 (7-2), 7-5; Grigor Dimitrov (1), Bulgaria,
def. Mischa Zverev (5), Germany, 6-3, 6-4; Juan Martin
del Potro (4), Argentina, def. Yuichi Sugita (7), Japan,
6-2, 7-6 (8-6); Fernando Verdasco (8), Spain, def. Kevin
Anderson (2), South Africa, 7-6 (7-1), 7-6 (7-1).
SINGLES — QUARTERFINALS
Ruben Bemelmans, Belgium, def. Joao Sousa, Portugal,
4-6, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4; Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (2), France, vs.
Julien Benneteau, France, 7-6 (7-5), 6-2; Stefanos
Tsitsipas, Greece, def. David Goffin (1), Belgium, 2-6,
7-6 (7-1), 7-6 (7-4); Diego Schwartzman (4), Argentina,
def. David Ferrer (5), Spain, 7-5, 6-2.
1
7
ATLANTIC
W
Toronto ........................................1
Brooklyn.......................................1
Boston..........................................1
New York .....................................0
Philadelphia .................................0
2
0
1 —
0 —
4
2
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Buffalo, Bailey 2 (O’Reilly, Okposo), 1:00. 2,
Vancouver, Granlund 1 (Sutter, Dorsett), 11:56. 3,
Buffalo, Eichel 3 (Ristolainen, Scandella), 17:20.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Vancouver, Dorsett 3 (Sutter, Tanev), 5:52
(sh). 5, Vancouver, D.Sedin 2 (H.Sedin, Virtanen), 8:10.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Vancouver, Dorsett 4 (Granlund, Del Zotto),
19:38.
SHOTS ON GOAL
VANCOUVER ......................... 17
20
4 — 41
BUFFALO ................................. 5
8
9 — 22
Power-play opportunities: Vancouver 0 of 4; Buffalo 0 of
3. Goalies: Vancouver, Markstrom 2-2-1 (22 shots-20
saves). Buffalo, Johnson 1-2-1 (40-37). A: 18,050
(19,070). T: 2:43.
28
29
36
31
30 — 121
37 — 126
ORLANDO: Fournier 8-21 4-4 22, Isaac 4-5 0-0 9, Vucevic
17-22 1-2 41, Payton 2-6 0-0 4, Ross 4-9 1-1 11, Speights
1-2 0-0 3, Biyombo 1-2 1-1 3, Augustin 3-5 2-2 10, Mack
1-3 0-0 3, Afflalo 0-3 2-3 2, Hezonja 1-5 0-0 3, Simmons
3-6 2-2 10. Totals 45-89 13-15 121.
BROOKLYN: Carroll 6-9 2-2 17, Hollis-Jefferson 5-10 5-7
15, Mozgov 2-5 0-0 4, Russell 8-16 1-2 17, Crabbe 1-5 6-6
9, Acy 1-1 0-0 3, Booker 6-11 5-8 17, Allen 3-3 3-4 9,
Dinwiddie 6-15 2-3 16, Harris 4-6 0-0 10, LeVert 4-11 1-3
9. Totals 46-92 25-35 126.
Three-point Goals: Orlando 18-33 (Vucevic 6-8, Augustin
2-3, Simmons 2-3, Ross 2-4, Fournier 2-6, Isaac 1-1,
Speights 1-1, Hezonja 1-2, Mack 1-2, Payton 0-1, Afflalo
0-2), Brooklyn 9-27 (Carroll 3-4, Harris 2-4, Dinwiddie
2-5, Acy 1-1, Crabbe 1-4, Hollis-Jefferson 0-1, Mozgov
0-1, Russell 0-3, LeVert 0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 40 (Vucevic 12), Brooklyn 48 (Booker
11). Assists: Orlando 30 (Fournier, Augustin 5), Brooklyn 22 (Russell 6). Total Fouls: Orlando 27, Brooklyn 17.
A: 16,144 (17,732).
Timberwolves 100, Jazz 97
UTAH .................................. 16
MINNESOTA ...................... 19
Sharks 3, Devils 0
SAN JOSE ................................ 1
NEW JERSEY ........................... 0
2
0
0 —
0 —
3
0
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, San Jose, Karlsson 1 (Hertl, Heed), 14:11.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, San Jose, Pavelski 2 (Thornton, Braun), 5:49.
3, San Jose, Donskoi 1 (Braun), 18:50.
SHOTS ON GOAL
SAN JOSE .............................. 13
11
9 — 33
NEW JERSEY ......................... 13
6
9 — 28
Power-play opportunities: San Jose 0 of 5; New Jersey 0
of 5. Goalies: San Jose, Jones 3-2-0 (28 shots-28 saves).
New Jersey, Kinkaid 2-1-0 (33-30). A: 14,381 (16,514). T:
2:27.
26
27
23
24
32 — 97
30 — 100
UTAH: Ingles 5-8 0-0 14, Favors 8-15 0-0 16, Gobert 5-10
0-0 10, Rubio 4-10 10-11 19, Hood 7-12 3-3 20, Sefolosha
4-4 0-0 9, Johnson 2-7 0-0 4, Udoh 1-2 1-2 3, Burks 0-2 0-0
0, Mitchell 1-7 0-1 2. Totals 37-77 14-17 97.
MINNESOTA: Wiggins 7-19 5-6 21, Gibson 2-5 0-0 4,
Towns 7-12 6-8 20, Teague 3-10 4-4 10, Butler 5-14 3-3
13, Muhammad 1-2 0-0 2, Bjelica 4-5 0-0 10, Dieng 1-2
1-3 3, Jones 0-2 0-0 0, Crawford 6-10 2-2 17. Totals 36-81
21-26 100.
Three-point Goals: Utah 9-22 (Ingles 4-5, Hood 3-7,
Sefolosha 1-1, Rubio 1-3, Favors 0-1, Mitchell 0-2,
Johnson 0-3), Minnesota 7-22 (Crawford 3-5, Bjelica 2-2,
Wiggins 2-6, Gibson 0-1, Towns 0-1, Jones 0-2, Butler
0-2, Teague 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Utah 38
(Gobert 13), Minnesota 44 (Towns 10). Assists: Utah 23
(Rubio 10), Minnesota 17 (Jones 5). Total Fouls: Utah 21,
Minnesota 17. Technicals: Jones, Butler. A: 18,978
(19,356).
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
high schools
MONTGOMERY COUNTY FOOTBALL
Preparation pays as Panthers avenge last year’s loss, stop Warriors’ rally
PAINT BRANCH 22,
SHERWOOD 20
BY
C ALLIE C APLAN
Paint Branch Coach Mike Nesmith worried that his defense
might lose focus, that the “wrong”
fourth-down call — ruled a Sherwood catch but, to him, a visible
drop on the far side of the field —
would discourage his team in the
final moments Friday night.
The next 11 plays toyed with
Nesmith’s nerves, too, as the Warriors drove for a touchdown, cut-
ting Paint Branch’s lead to two
before a two-point conversion attempt with 13 seconds left.
But after Warriors quarterback
Michael Mbony’s rush came up
short, the Panthers celebrated
their defensive stand and Nesmith exhaled after a 22-20 win,
pleased to know his players had
the stamina and mettle to move
past last year’s shortcomings.
“The boys stood up and got the
stop when we had to at the last
moment,” Nesmith said. “I’m just
really proud of them because
there were several calls that went
against us and they kept their
composure.
“They kept on fighting.”
On the field, however, the Panthers (7-1) didn’t share Nesmith’s
apprehension.
Throughout the past offseason,
Paint Branch’s workouts were
crowded — at least 50 attendees
per session. Sometimes 90 players
stuffed into the weight room,
looking to toughen up from last
year’s 5-5 record.
In that 2016 campaign, the Panthers held a two-score lead at
home against Sherwood in the
third quarter before Mbony had a
hand in three unanswered touchdowns for a 27-20 victory.
That sting hadn’t eased for
Paint Branch’s defense as the Warriors (6-2) marched down the field
Friday.
So what did the players think
after that fourth-and-seven pass
that officials first ruled incomplete but then credited to Warriors wide receiver Aubrey Hobbs
for 14 yards?
“Next play, next play,” senior
linebacker Durell Nchami said.
“We knew it hit the ground, but
we had to keep playing. That’s
what you got to do.”
And what about when Mbony, a
second-year starter charged with
balancing Sherwood’s offense,
scored from a yard out — he had
63 yards of total offense on the
final drive — and the game-tying
conversion loomed?
“No matter what they did, we
were going to stop them,” Nchami
said. “We’ve been there before. We
were prepared.”
The effort preserved the offense’s production — junior quarterback Norman Douglas Jr. completed 11 of 20 passes for 202
yards and a touchdown and ran
for two more, while the team
finished with 101 rushing yards —
for Paint Branch’s first win over
Sherwood since 2014.
The Panthers, two weeks removed from an ugly loss to Quince
Orchard, are well positioned for a
top-two seed in the 4A North
region with two games left in the
regular season. The Warriors had
entered the game four points and
two spots ahead in the standings.
Up next for Paint Branch is a
test against Blake, a playoff contender in 3A West, but Nesmith
has little doubt his team will be
ready.
“If you’ve been working out and
training since December, it’s a lot
harder to quit and not do what
you’re supposed to do,” Nesmith
said. “The boys are very invested
because of that.”
callie.caplan@washpost.com
VIRGINIA FOOTBALL
Behind Kim, unbeaten Bulldogs roll past rival Wildcats
WESTFIELD 27,
CENTREVILLE 11
BY
K ELYN S OONG
A few hours before his team’s
game against Westfield, Centreville Coach Chris Haddock predicted the team that had the best
quarterback play would win. By
the second half and to his team’s
detriment, it was clear he would
be correct.
The No. 6 Bulldogs remained
undefeated with a 27-11 victory
over their crosstown rivals in
Clifton behind a superb performance from sophomore quarterback Noah Kim, who finished 14
for 20 for 277 yards and two
touchdowns with no interceptions. He added a rushing touchdown. This was Westfield’s fourth
consecutive win over the No. 7
Wildcats (6-2, 1-1 Concorde District).
“There was a lot of hype coming into this game,” Kim said.
“Centreville is really good. Leading up to the game, we’ve been
watching a lot of film, and it was
just kind of knowing what they’re
going to do.”
The Bulldogs (8-0, 2-0) struck
first with 6:15 left in the second
quarter on Kim’s quarterback
keeper from two yards out. Kim
connected with three receivers on
the drive, including a 16-yard
pass to junior Taylor Morin to set
up first and goal, and got help
from junior running back Eugene
Asante, who finished with 102
yards and a touchdown on 22
carries.
Centreville responded on the
next drive. Junior quarterback
Presley Egbers hit senior running
back Keenan Anunay for a 39yard gain on third and long. But
the Bulldogs’ defense limited the
Wildcats to a 32-yard field goal
from junior Griffin Greer.
In the third quarter, Westfield
broke the game open.
Less than two minutes after
halftime, Kim sprinted out of the
pocket and found junior wide
receiver Gavin Kiley for an 85yard touchdown.
“We’re been running that play a
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
No. 6 Westfield’s Eugene Asante outruns several Centreville defenders for a late third-quarter touchdown. Asante finished with 102 yards and the touchdown on 22 carries.
lot,” Kim said. “Once I knew Gavin
beat him, I just had to give him
the ball, and I knew he would take
care of the rest.”
On the Bulldogs’ next drive,
Kim connected with junior wide
receiver Bizett Woodley for a 57-
yard touchdown, and Westfield
took a 27-3 lead into the fourth
quarter. Woodley led all receivers
with six receptions for 95 yards.
In the fourth quarter, Edgers
scored on a 15-yard run and completed a pass to junior tight end
Tre Maxwell for a two-point conversion, but Centreville did not
score again.
Egbers went 11 for 20 for 94
yards and lost a fumble. Anunay
led Centreville with four receptions for 60 yards, and senior
running back Daequan Williams
was the team’s leading rusher
with seven carries for 66 yards.
As the clock winded down in
the fourth quarter, Westfield
turned to Asante to maintain
possession, and with that came
another victory over its biggest
rival.
“I think we’re going to take a lot
from this game and progress and
go forward into the playoffs and
beyond,” Asante said.
RECEIVING LEADERS: LV: Winnett 10-158, Allen 8-78,
Sedmak 2-14, Cutrara 2-5. R: Selman 3-40, Speroni 3-21,
Weeren 2-2.
Khan 1-12, Stoffel 1-8.
MARSHALL 59, LEE 35
Stone Bridge (8-0, 3-0) ...... 8
Tuscarora (6-2, 3-1) ........... 7
kelyn.soong@washpost.com
HIGH SCHOOL SCOREBOARD
FOOTBALL
DISTRICT
Ballou 46, Eastern 0
Phelps 48, Coolidge 18
Theodore Roosevelt 39, Bell 14
MARYLAND
Annapolis 56, North County 37
Arundel 49, Chesapeake 22
Blair 37, Clarksburg 0
Blake 42, Rockville 22
Broadneck 28, Meade 21
Chopticon 14, Huntingtown 12
Damascus 49, Walter Johnson 7
Einstein 53, Northwood 0
Gaithersburg 41, Kennedy 6
Glenelg 34, Oakland Mills 0
Gwynn Park 34, Douglass 24
Howard 41, Hammond 6
La Plata 46, Calvert 29
Lackey 35, Thomas Stone 0
Long Reach 35, Mount Hebron 0
Marriotts Ridge 16, Wilde Lake 13
North Point 62, Leonardtown 3
Northeast 24, Severna Park 21
Northern 42, McDonough 7
Northwest 42, Whitman 14
Northwestern 34, Largo 18
Old Mill 24, Glen Burnie 22
Paint Branch 22, Sherwood 20
Poolesville 48, Watkins Mill 41
Quince Orchard 43, Wheaton 13
River Hill 17, Reservoir 0
South River 34, Southern 7
Springbrook 31, Magruder 21
St. Charles 17, Great Mills 16
Walkersville 76, Wootton 7
Westlake 40, Patuxent 14
Wise 21, Eleanor Roosevelt 14
VIRGINIA
Brentsville 19, Culpeper 14
Broad Run 49, Freedom-South Riding 19
Champe 41, Rock Ridge 7
Dominion 30, Loudoun County 14
Falls Church 42, Wakefield 14
Forest Park 41, Gar-Field 7
Freedom-Woodbridge 56, Potomac (Va.) 14
Hayfield 40, West Potomac 30
Heritage 24, Woodgrove 20
Hylton 28, Battlefield 10
Lake Braddock 31, Fairfax 10
Langley 35, Washington-Lee 28
Loudoun Valley 16, Riverside 14
Marshall 59, Lee 35
Mount Vernon 47, Annandale 15
Oakton 52, Chantilly 21
Patriot 56, Osbourn 0
Potomac Falls 21, Briar Woods 7
South County 45, Robinson 14
South Lakes 77, McLean 7
Stone Bridge 14, Tuscarora 13
Stonewall Jackson 26, Osbourn Park 0
Stuart 49, Jefferson 6
W.T. Woodson 17, West Springfield 7
Westfield 27, Centreville 11
Woodbridge 45, Colgan 10
Yorktown 27, Herndon 7
DAMASCUS 49, WALTER JOHNSON 7
PRIVATE
Good Counsel 42, Carroll 7
Maret 28, Sidwell Friends 7
National Collegiate 50, Capitol Christian 0
Norfolk Academy 27, John Paul the Great 6
Potomac School 41, Paul VI 13
St. Frances 42, Spalding 7
St. Mary's-Annapolis 45, St. Paul's 21
Damascus (7-0, 4-0) .......... 21 21
Walter Johnson (2-6, 0-4) . 0 0
0
7
PAINT BRANCH 22, SHERWOOD 20
7
0
—
—
49
7
D: Wentzlaff 16 run ( Baires kick )
D: Ayo-Durojaiye 11 run ( Baires kick )
D: Ayo-Durojaiye 23 pass from Furgeson ( Baires kick )
D: Purkey 5 run ( Baires kick )
D: Betterelli 4 pass from Furgeson ( Baires kick )
D: Lokos 30 run ( Baires kick )
WJ: Diomande 75 run ( Cortes kick )
D: Christian 1 run ( Baires kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: D: Wentzlaff 4-44, Freeman 2-32,
Beall 2-31, Lokos 1-30, Roland 1-29, Ayo-Durojaiye 3-28,
Purkey 1-5, Christian 2-4. WJ: Diomande 11-76, Griffin
12-18, Barnes 3-4. PASSING LEADERS: D: Furgeson
9-12-0-146. WJ: Diomande 5-7-0-34. RECEIVING LEADERS: D: Betterelli 4-55, Fehlinger 1-37, Kitzmiller 2-33,
Ayo-Durojaiye 1-23. WJ: Stroud 2-15, Barnes 1-12,
Griffin 1-6, Van O'Linda 1-1.
BOYS' SOCCER
MARYLAND
Great Mills 3, Calvert 1
PRIVATE
Bullis 2, St. Albans 1
Good Counsel 0, DeMatha 0
O'Connell 2, Paul VI 0
St. Mary's Ryken 2, Bishop Ireton 1
The Heights 2, St. Andrew's 0
GIRLS' SOCCER
DISTRICT
Washington International 2, Wilson 1
PRIVATE
Episcopal 5, Madeira 0
McNamara 3, Holy Cross 0
National Cathedral 4, Bullis 2
EINSTEIN 53, NORTHWOOD 0
Einstein (5-3, 1-1) ............. 19 14
Northwood (0-8, 0-2) ......... 0 0
7
0
13
0
—
—
53
0
MARYLAND
Eleanor Roosevelt def. Laurel (25-4, 25-14, 25-8)
PRIVATE
Episcopal def. Madeira (25-18, 25-21, 25-19)
Maret def. Georgetown Day (25-18, 22-25, 19-25, 25-15,
15-13)
National Cathedral def. Washington International (2524, 25-18, 25-13)
St. John's def. Paul VI (25-16, 17-25, 25-21, 25-19)
E: Cham 58 pass from Wills ( Cham kick )
E: Thomas 17 run ( kick failed )
E: Rinaldo 53 pass from Wills ( run failed )
E: Cham 10 run ( Martin pass from Lewsey )
E: Alston 7 run ( run failed )
E: Thomas 11 run ( Cham kick )
E: Prather 7 run ( Cham kick )
E: Dennis 75 interception return
RUSHING LEADERS: E: Prather 7-66, Remoe-Doherty
1-20, Ward 1-18, Cham 1-10, Alston 4-9, Parker 2-8.
RECEIVING LEADERS: E: Cham 2-90, Lewsey 1-17, Ward
1-12, Martin 1-2.
PRIVATE
McDonogh 3, Spalding 3
GWYNN PARK 34, DOUGLASS 24
VOLLEYBALL
FIELD HOCKEY
Douglass (5-2, 4-0) ............ 0
Gwynn Park (6-1, 2-0) ....... 7
FOOTBALL
DISTRICT
BALLOU 46, EASTERN 0
Eastern (3-4, 0-0) .............. 0 0
Ballou (5-3, 4-1) ................. 26 14
0
0
0
6
—
—
0
46
B: Johnson 80 kickoff return ( Jackson kick )
B: Buchanan 53 run ( Jackson kick )
B: Winslow 10 pass from Buchanan ( kick failed )
B: Winslow pass from Buchanan ( kick failed )
B: Gater 6 pass from Buchanan ( kick failed )
B: Gray 36 pass from Buchanan ( Gater run )
B: Richardson 30 pass from Penny ( run failed )
RUSHING LEADERS: B: Buchanan 5-88, Gater 2-46,
Williams 7-43, Jackson 4-21, Gray 1-3.
PASSING LEADERS: B: Buchanan 6-14-120, Penny 2-438.
RECEIVING LEADERS: B: Winslow 2-48, Gray 1-36, Gater
2-35, Johnson 1-11.
MARYLAND
8
7
8
14
8
6
—
—
24
34
GP: Nelson 30 pass from Brown ( kick failed )
D: 1 run ( Smith run )
GP: Laster 7 run ( Muhummand kick )
GP: Brown 2 run ( Muhummand kick )
GP: Issac 35 pass from Brown ( Muhummand kick )
D: Smith 10 run ( Smith run )
GP: Towsend 1 run ( kick failed )
D: Epps, Jr. 2 run ( Smith run )
7
0
28
0
7
0
—
—
0
7
7
7
0
6
—
—
22
20
PB: Agbodzah 19 pass from Douglas Jr. ( PRYZGOCKI
kick )
PB: Douglas Jr. 1 run ( RAMEY run )
PB: Douglas Jr. 1 run ( PRYZGOCKI kick )
S: Dumas 13 run ( Salgado kick )
S: Mbony 18 run ( Salgado kick )
S: Mbony 1 run ( run failed )
RUSHING LEADERS: S: Mbony 25-110, Dumas 8-32.
RECEIVING LEADERS: S: Hunt 8-144, Webb 2-41, Hobbs
4-28.
QUINCE ORCHARD 43, WHEATON 13
Quince Orchard (7-1, 0-0) .. 20 10
Wheaton (2-6, 0-0) ............ 0 0
6
7
7
6
—
—
43
13
QO: Wade 34 interception return ( kick failed )
QO: Cooper 1 run ( Judge kick )
QO: Cooper 9 run ( Judge kick )
QO: Wade 9 run ( Judge kick )
QO: Judge 27 field goal
QO: Wade 4 run ( kick failed )
QO: 1 run ( Judge kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: QO: Cooper 17-165, Wade 5-74, Bell
3-37, Titus 5-20, Jones 1-14, Wasikye 2-8, Wong 2-4.
PASSING LEADERS: QO: Wong 5-9-99.
RECEIVING LEADERS: QO: Hodges 1-28, Derwin 1-25,
Titus 1-20, Payne 1-15, McGonagle 1-11, Bernard 1-10.
SPRINGBROOK 31, MAGRUDER 21
Magruder (3-4, 1-3) ........... 14 0 7
Springbrook (3-4, 0-1) ....... 7 10 14
0
0
—
—
21
31
M: David 27 run ( Juarez kick )
M: David 9 run ( Juarez kick )
M: Baxter 1 run ( Juarez kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: M: Claggett 16-22. RECEIVING
LEADERS: M: Douglas 5-32, White 2-21, Taylor 1-14.
VIRGINIA
HERITAGE 24, WOODGROVE 20
Woodgrove (5-3, 3-0) ........ 6
Heritage (7-2, 3-1) ............. 6
0
15
0
0
14
3
—
—
20
24
RUSHING LEADERS: H: Calderon 15-52, Hogan 5-35,
Johnson 10-24. PASSING LEADERS: H: Johnson 14-27-0209. RECEIVING LEADERS: H: Wooten 6-121, Moss 4-55,
Maisus 2-19, Holland 2-14.
NORTHWEST 42, WHITMAN 14
Northwest (7-1, 3-0) ......... 0
Whitman (1-7, 1-2) ............ 14
Paint Branch (7-1, 3-0) ...... 15
Sherwood (6-2, 2-0) ........... 0
42
14
W: Carone 1 run ( Bobbitt kick )
W: Kelly 1 run ( Bobbitt kick )
N: Craddock 4 run ( Patterson kick )
N: Bishop 34 run ( Patterson kick )
N: Craddock 5 run ( Patterson kick )
N: Bishop 43 run ( Patterson kick )
N: Foray 12 pass from Craddock ( Patterson kick )
N: Black 5 pass from Craddock ( Patterson kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: W: Carone 26-65, Roegge 7-36,
Roegge 7-22, Gutierrez 1-6, Kelly 1-1.
PASSING LEADERS: W: Kelly 8-18-1-74.
RECEIVING LEADERS: W: Roegge 1-30, Vipulis 3-24,
Roegge 2-7, Cibel 1-7, Horton 1-6.
LANGLEY 35, WASHINGTON-LEE 28
Washington-Lee (1-7, 1-2) 0
Langley (1-7, 1-2) .............. 7
14
7
0
7
14
14
—
—
28
35
RUSHING LEADERS: L: Keys 22-111. RECEIVING LEADERS: L: Vasiliadis 4-41, Brown 2-12, Norris 1-6.
LOUDOUN VALLEY 16, RIVERSIDE 14
Loudoun Valley (2-5, 1-1) .. 0
Riverside (3-6, 0-5) ............ 7
3
0
7
0
6
7
—
—
16
14
RUSHING LEADERS: LV: Swartz 20-81, Allen 4-27. R:
Bryant 24-90, Jackson 15-60, Lipson 4-12.
PASSING LEADERS: LV: Goings 22-37-255. R: Jackson
8-15-63.
Marshall (6-1, 2-0) ............. 14 7 17 21
Lee (3-5, 3-1) ..................... 0 13 8 14
—
—
59
35
M: Margiotta 46 run ( Chang kick )
M: Margiotta 22 run ( Chang kick )
L: Wickliffe 22 pass from Noory ( Mulatu kick )
M: Nininger 5 run ( Chang kick )
L: Mulatu 41 run ( kick failed )
M: Margiotta 10 run ( Chang kick )
M: Margiotta 53 run ( Chang kick )
L: Menefee 32 run ( Noory run )
M: Chang 21 field goal
L: Samuel 32 pass from Noory ( kick failed )
M: Margiotta 20 run ( Chang kick )
M: Margiotta 26 run ( Chang kick )
M: Gonzales-Pinto 10 run ( Chang kick )
L: Menefee 3 run ( Elmohtaseb pass from Cook )
—
—
Westfield (8-0, 2-0) ........... 0
Centreville (6-2, 1-1) ......... 0
52
21
RUSHING LEADERS: O: Cole 10-134, Campo 8-88,
Mejia-Salmeron 7-3, Mink 1-1. C: Imperato 13-86.
PASSING LEADERS: O: Campo 5-7-163. C: O'Reilly
4-8-35.
RECEIVING LEADERS: O: Harris 2-54, Mink 1-49, Corgnati 1-47, Benson 1-13. C: Parana 4-63, Johnson 1-8.
POTOMAC FALLS 21, BRIAR WOODS 7
Potomac Falls (4-4, 1-2) .... 7
Briar Woods (1-7, 1-3) ....... 0
0
0
7
0
7
7
—
—
21
7
PF: Mpanya 46 pass from Lawall ( Choo kick )
PF: Garcia 27 pass from Lawall ( Choo kick )
BW: 20 pass from Broker ( Moreno kick )
PF: Lawall 1 run ( Choo kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: PF: Lipscomb 25-164, Lawall 14-76,
Mpanya 8-38. RECEIVING LEADERS: PF: Garcia 3-52.
SOUTH LAKES 77, MCLEAN 7
McLean (0-8, 0-2) .............. 0 0
South Lakes (7-1, 3-0) ....... 21 35
7
7
0
14
—
—
0
0
6
6
0
0
—
—
14
13
T: Allen 5 run ( Pauly kick )
SB: Rubino 66 pass from Tatum ( Lawyer run )
T: Allen 1 run ( pass failed )
SB: Mell 9 run ( pass failed )
RUSHING LEADERS: SB: Mell 18-89, Johnson 6-18,
Tatum 4-13, Lawyer 1-2. T: Lundy 22-58, Allen 11-33,
Coombs 1-9.
PASSING LEADERS: SB: Tatum 8-13-130. T: Allen
14-19-157.
RECEIVING LEADERS: SB: Mell 1-66, Johnson 4-49,
Williams 2-9, Moss 1-6. T: Thorne 5-51, Jenkins 4-48,
Coombs 2-42, Lundy 2-11, Atkinson 1-5.
WESTFIELD 27, CENTREVILLE 11
OAKTON 52, CHANTILLY 21
Oakton (2-6, 1-2) ............... 10 28 14 0
Chantilly (0-8, 0-2) ............ 7 0 0 14
STONE BRIDGE 14, TUSCARORA 13
7
77
M: Govan 9 run ( Schram kick )
SL: Alston 45 pass from Miles ( Madden kick )
SL: Miles 6 run ( Madden kick )
SL: Alston 9 run ( Madden kick )
SL: Alston 15 run ( Madden kick )
SL: Seneca 10 pass from Miles ( Madden kick )
SL: Alston 45 run ( Madden kick )
SL: Alston 9 run ( Madden kick )
SL: Akuetteh 3 run ( Madden kick )
SL: Beuchert-Irvine 41 interception return ( Madden kick )
SL: Akuetteh 28 pass from Miles ( Madden kick )
SL: White 28 run ( Madden kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: M: Govan 7-75, Chung 15-45. SL:
Alston 8-120, Akuetteh 5-44, White 3-39, Mensah 4-39,
Miles 5-27, Miles 3-4, Kumi-Darfour 1-2.
PASSING LEADERS: M: Varela 3-5-20. SL: Miles 11-130-209, Miles 3-5-0-48.
RECEIVING LEADERS: M: Govan 2-8. SL: Mohler 3-71,
Alston 2-51, Seneca 3-44, May 3-43, Akuetteh 1-28,
7
3
20
0
0
8
—
—
27
11
W: Kim 2 run ( Nugent kick )
C: Greer 32 field goal
W: Kiley 85 pass from Kim ( Nugent kick )
W: Woodley 57 pass from Kim ( kick failed )
W: Asante 10 run ( Nugent kick )
C: Egbers 15 run ( Maxwell pass from Egbers )
RUSHING LEADERS: W: Asante 22-102, Kim 4-4, Daniel
2-4, Goodman 1-2. C: Williams 7-66, Wright 9-63, Kanu
10-34, Egbers 5-12.
PASSING LEADERS: W: Kim 14-20-277. C: Egbers
11-20-94.
RECEIVING LEADERS: W: Woodley 6-95, Kiley 2-85,
Cockrill 3-58, Morin 3-35, Soto 2-6. C: Anunay 4-60, Kanu
4-27.
YORKTOWN 27, HERNDON 7
Herndon (3-5, 0-0) ............. 7
Yorktown (7-1, 3-0) ........... 0
0
21
0
0
0
6
—
—
7
27
H: Ricks 5 run ( Geyer kick )
Y: Wall 21 run ( Luncher kick )
Y: Wall 25 pass from Wilson ( Luncher kick )
Y: Patterson 42 pass from Porter ( Luncher kick )
Y: Alvarez 5 run ( kick failed )
RUSHING LEADERS: Y: Alvarez 7-82, Wall 4-44, Patterson 1-16.
PASSING LEADERS: Y: Wilson 6-11-72.
RECEIVING LEADERS: Y: Wall 4-73, Patterson 2-43,
Dalzell 3-24.
PRIVATE
MARET 28, SIDWELL FRIENDS 7
Sidwell Friends (1-7, 0-3) .. 7
Maret (5-3, 0-0) .................
0
7
0
14
0
7
—
—
7
28
SF: Chichester 7 run ( Landy kick )
M: Greenberg 32 run ( Lieber kick )
M: Glenn 35 run ( Kreisberg kick )
M: Parks 6 run ( Kreisberg kick )
M: Parks 12 run ( Kreisberg kick )
RUSHING LEADERS: SF: Chichester 14-51, Landy 2-8. M:
Glenn 17-92, Parks 22-91, Eady 1-10, Lewis 2-9.
PASSING LEADERS: M: Parker 3-7-82.
RECEIVING LEADERS: SF: Landy 3-15, Ward 1-15. M:
Glenn 1-41, Eady 1-31, Peltier 1-10.
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
homes for sale,
commercial real estate
rentals
merchandise, garage
sales, auctions, tickets
dogs, cats, birds, fish
washingtonpost.com/jobs
cars.com
washingtonpost.com/
realestate
apartments.com
washingtonpost.com/
merchandise
washingtonpost.com/pets
Electronics
210
255
Art
ETCHING PRESS- Like new, bed
36.25"X52" Rock, MD. $4,999. You
pick up/deliver. 321 GR. Ratio
diam wheel 5 FT steel.
240-778-4979
Collectibles
AURORA SLOT CARS Wanted—$100 &
up, cars/sets. +Atlas, AFX, Tyco,
Cox, Monogram. 703-960-3594
CHRISTMAS VILLAGE—$100 MAKE
OFFER. 4 LARGE CERAMIC HOUSES. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
TEDDY BEAR TEA SET—$50 VINTAGE
MINIATURE PORCELAIN. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
GLASS BLOCKS—$30
14 GLASS
BLOCKS. EXCELLENT CONDITION.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Krebs
electric
airless
sprayer—100.00 never used still
in box . Call 410-302-8075.
Furniture
Bar counter reception counter—
$200, Springfield, VA, 202-5493395
DINING ROOM TABLE- Henkel Harris,
queen anne #2209, exquisite double
pedestal table, mahogany, W48 L66
H30. Extends to 114" with four 12"
leaves. $1,095. 404-915-9209
Dining Room Table, Chairs—$249.99
LEESBURG,
VA,
703-771-1799
44x68" w/3 12" extns. "Madeira"
Antiques & Auctions
205
Antiques
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
291
Sporting Goods
& Services
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$195
Great cardio workout, Folds to fit in
car, EXC, $800 new, 571-606-0319
Antiques
KENSINGTON
ANTIQUE ROW
Antiques & Specialty Shops
Antique & Vintage Furniture.
Lighting, Jewelry, Art, Linens,
China, Silver, Mirrors, Books...
Multi-Dealer Mall B Stay 4 Lunch
Toys
Garage Sales, MD
Glen Echo—Thru out Glen Echo, MD
Firewood—$225, Northern VA, 703397-6936 1 cord of oak firewood.
Free delivery
FIREWOOD—$240, fairfax, VA, 703297-6936 1 cord of seasoned hardwood firewood. Free delivery
Sat. 10/21/2017, 9 am - 2 pm,
Rain: Town Hall, Harvard Ave.
HUGE SALE- 6806 99th Ave.
Seabrook, Sat 10/21, 8am-5pm.
Entire Contents of house.
355
Garage Sales, VA
Reston—Unique items from all over
Sleepy Hollow Woods—Community Yard Sale, Columbia Pk & Moss
Dr or Sleepy Hollow Rd & Fern Ln,
Annandale, VA, 10/21/2017,
8am - 1pm. Rain date: 10/28/2017
Vienna—Everything Must Go! 1412
Wynhurst Lane, 10/20-10/22, 9a-4p.
Art, antique furniture & collectibles,
women's clothing, handyman tools,
silk flower arrangements, holiday
collectibles & decorations. 10-speed
bicycles, new golf clubs/shoes,
cameras, 32-foot HD ladder, household items. Cash Only, Please.
358
Moving Sale
ANNANDALE, VA -3916 Malcolm Ct.
10/21 9AM- 3PM. Tools, Tool boxes,
Yard Equipment, Cars & Furniture.
Silver
Spring—1617 Gamewell
Road, Silver Spring, MD, 10/21/2017,
9:00AM, Furn, Hummel, Sterling,
Hunting, Tractor, African, Jewelry
GREAT ARLINGTON ESTATE SALE!
DIR: Military Rd, 30th St N.
Sat 9-3; Sun 9-1.
See Web 4 Details.
3864. BR sets, Dining table, sectional
Pool table, Gym, HH.
Barkley/Armistead Park—
Jewelry & Watches
NECKLACES
HANDCRAFTED—$10
UP. VARIETY
STYLES/COLORS.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
275
Garage Sales, VA
COMMUNITY YARD SALE in one
location! Mainstone Dr & Lee HWY,
Fairfax, 10/21/2017, 9AM-12PM,
703-280-5050 Sponsored by
Ann & Randy Real Estate
www.FOURSALES.com
Need a Quality Sale?
18255 Glen Oak Way
Leesburg, Va. 20176
"Rivercreek"
Sat, Sun & Mon 10 - 3
www.emeraldestatesales.com
703-582-1135
Merchandise Wanted
FAIRFAX- 11333 Edenderry. 1 mile W
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—I drive of RT 123 (GMU), off Braddock Rd.
to you, pay CASH, and haul them Large sale inc antiques from closed
away. Call 571-830-5871
Michigan Lake House, tools, clocks,
fishing, collectibles, furn, household
items & a multitude of other old &
new items. Fri 10/20 & Sat 10/21, 8-4
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266
Will Come to you!
FAIRFAX- Brecon Ridge Woods
Community Garage Sale. Homes on
280
Bentonbrook, Edenderry, Tydfil.
Directions: 1 mile W of RT 123 (GMU).
Fri 10/20 & Sat 10/21, 8am-4pm.
BONTEMPI ORGAN—$50
CHILDS
SMALL BATTERY OP KBRD. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Musical Instruments
Newington—Raceway Farms comJUNIOR ZITHER—$25 CHILDS EARLY
60s HARBERT ITALIANA. ORIG. BOX.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
munity Yard Sale and treasure
trove,Telegraph Rd at Blanche Dr.,
VA, Kingstowne, 10/21/2017,
8AM - 1PM, Rain date 10/22
703-256-8300
Alexandria
Fri -Sun, 10am-4pm
WELLS ESTATE SALES
opens the doors to a great treasure
trove of quality antiques & collectibles, Cornices from The Carlisle
house, ironworks, beautiful antique
furn., china incl. Meissen, Minton,
& Dresden, & Johnson Brothers
(Friendly Village) antique oriental
rugs, piano, books. This is a fabulous
sale, don't miss! Quaker Land to Janneys Ln, to Taylor Run Pkwy EAST,
left to 315 Lamond Pl
See website estatesales.net.
703-536-7816.
Tickets, Wanted
ALL REDSKINS/COWBOYS TICKETS
NEEDED. 2-6, plus parking.
Call 202-345-0511
Found
FAIRFAX CO. ANIMAL SERVICES
GREAT DANE MIX F W
FFX CO
APBT MIX M GRAY/W
FFX CO
KOR JINDO MIX M CRM
FFX CO
ROTTW F BLK/TN
FFX CO
AM STAFF TERR M TN/W
FFX CO
AM STAFF TERR M BLK/W
FFX CO
AM STAFF TERR M CHOC
FFX CO
LAB RETR MIX M YELL
FFX CO
DSH MIX (F & M) GRAY/W
FFX CO
DSH MIX (U & M) GRAY
FFX CO
FOR MORE INFO CALL (703) 830-1100
HOWARD CO. ANIMAL CONTROL
If you have lost an animal in the
Howard County/
Washington Metro area:
CALL 410-313-2780
MONTGOMERY CO. ANIMAL SHELTER
If you have lost an animal in the
Washington Metro area: Please call
the Montgomery Co. Animal Shelter
at 240-773-5960 or online for found
animals at www.mchumane.org
610
610
Dogs for Sale
Australian Shepherd- pure bred, 3 F,
ready 10/19, blue merles & black
tri's, blue eyes, mother stand. size,
father mini size $800+, 240-217-3730
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD MINI MIX
PUPS- Adorable, Blue merle, $380,
black tri, $340 cash. First shots,
dewormed, 8 weeks. 301-797-5645
FREE UNDER $250
Dogs for Sale
610
C
Dogs for Sale
Doberman, Cavachons & more—SALE
304-904-6289,Cash,CC,Easy Finance
wvpuppy.com 59 EastRd Martinsburg WV exit16E AcrossFromBigLots
Yorkie — 4 Males, shots, CKC,
cuddly teddy bears, 9 weeks old,
$1100, 304-620-8390
DOBERMAN PUPPIES - AKC, big
boned, family raised, great temperament, parents on premises. 8 weeks
old. $600-$800. Call 240-674-2844
YORKIES - 8 weeks, adorable
females, registered, 1st shots,
dewormed, paper trained,
$550. 301-423-0643
620
ENGLISH BULLDOGS, M's, AKC,
Fat, Sassy, Lots of Wrinkles, S
& W, Health Guaranteed, Family
Raised, $1800+, Call or Text For
More Info. rdy 10/14 240-925-1545
FRENCH BULLDOG PUPPIES- Male,
brindle & white, $2500, 8 weeks,
S&W, AKC reg.
Call Danny 540-645-2992
GERMAN SHEPHERD WORKING
LINE PUPPIES- 6 F's, blk & sable,
ready 10/16. vt chkd, UTD shts,
hlth guar., $1,800. World class
ped., AKC reg. 301-956-4635
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS- AKC/UKC,
shots/wormed, micro chipped,
black/silver parents on premises.
M/F $600 beach. 301-478-5094
Goldendoodle—puppies! wavy &
cute! S&W Hlth Guar. Potti and
crate started $1200, 540-729-6365
www.doodledogpups.com
Golden Retriever—Golden Retriever
Puppies AKC, Exceptional Quality,
Champ Lines, $695, 540-789-4000 or
email: dross@swva.net
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Miniature Schnauzers —Purebred
Puppies - Please visit us at
taylorstoyschnauzers.com
Or call: 540-937-4332
SCHNOODLE—10 weeks old, F1 puppies. Home raised M & F. Up to
date shots, deworming. text/call 240
723-6573. $950 Silver Spring, MD
Cats
SPHYNX Female named Plum,
spayed, wonderful friend, 13 mons,
happy and healthy, mink color, workmove regret! $800, 206-335-7381.
820
LAB RET/GOLDEN RET CROSS& AKC
Cavachon Shih-chon—Sale. 304-904GOLDEN PUPS & ADULTS
6289, Cash, CC, Easy Finance 8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
wvpuppy.com 59 East Rd Martins- on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
burg,WV,exit16E.AcrossFromBigLots
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
CHOCOLATE LAB PUPPIES - 9 weeks,
AKC, lovable healthy puppies, shots
and wormed, health cert. $575
610-857-1932
mypublicnotices.com/
washingtonpost/PublicNotice.asp
If the merchandise you’re selling is priced under $250, your 3-line, 3-day ad is FREE!
Go to washingtonpostads.com for complete details and to order your free ad.
Lost
Boston Terrier—$1,000 reward, Male,
8 yrs old, white and brindle, approx
19 lbs, goes by Vinnie. Got lost in
Hyattsville, near Magruder Park, on
Oct 9. He is a companion dog,
beloved and needed. Please return
him to us. 787-249-6998.
602
Estate Sales
TIGER STAINLESS STEEL THERMAL AIR 355
POT—$25 3.0 LITER HOT/COLD.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
416
the world - all priced to go. Come
on out!
See you on Saturday,
21 October. 11797 Great Owl Circle,
Reston, VA, 0/21/2017, 08:30hrs. 601
360
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F., POTOMAC- Moving Sale Sun. 10908
3871 N 30TH ST, ARLINGTON, VA
Balantre, 10/22, 10a-5pm, 301-602$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
KensingtonAntiqueRow.com
E. Howard Ave., Kensington,
MD N. on Conn., R. on Howard,
2 mi. N of Beltway (I-495)
Free Parking!
295
Aluminum Extension Ladder (20 ft.) —
$65, Burke, VA, 703-978-2723
TOMY TODDLIN TRAIN—$50 OLD.
RIDE ON. TOOTS. EXCELL COND.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
CUTLERY SET—$20 KUCHESTOLZ 6
350
PC SET W/CUTTING BOARD. NEW..
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Frederick We are having a yard sale
at 120 Burges Hill Way Apt 105
on October 21th 2017 10am-4pm
DISHES—$60 CUNNINGHAMPICKETT
SPRINGVIOLET. 6 PLATES/1 PLATTER. Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
269
205
Furniture
Homelegance Prenzo King Bed Headboard—$249.00 Unopened box.
Paid $550.00. Can't use.
Home & Garden
Firewood
FIREWOOD SALES, seasoned Oak,
$350/full cord. Delivered. NOVA.
Robert 703-424-4064 or 703-855-4691
260
KENMORE REFRIGERTOR - recent
model, black, freezer included. 2
year warranty, some scratches, $475 Two Car Seats—39.99 Generic infant
DEWALT
RECIPROCATING
SAW CASH ONLY 571-659-2187
or 49.99 Graco child car seat(79.99
(SAWZALL)—$50 CASE/INST BOOK.
both) Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
265
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them 260
away. Call 571-830-5871
MOTOROLA RADIO—$25 VINTAGE IN
CABINET.
DOES NOT WORK.
$25, Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Non-commercial advertisers can now place ads 24/7
by calling 202-334-6200
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
FISKARS
TREE
TRIMMER/PRUNER—$30
LIKE NEW.
Alexandria, VA, 703-941-8206
Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
Official Notices
ABC LICENSE: MCA TH ACP JV, LLC,
trading as Pizza Hut, 1 Saarinen
Circle- IAD Concourse D D-DM330B,
Dulles (Loudoun County), Virginia
20166-7547. The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) for a Wine &
Beer On-Premises and Mixed Beverage Restaurant license to sell or
manufacture alcoholic beverages.
William Alberni, Director, Master
Concessionair, LLC, Member NOTE:
Objections to the issuance of this
license must be submitted to ABC no
later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first of two required
newspaper legal notices. Objections
should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.
C
JOBS
Newspapers carriers
needed to deliver
The Washington Post
in
DC, MD and VA area.
Great part-time
income opportunity!
Transportation
required.
To apply, go to
deliverthepost.com
or call
202-334-6100
(Please press “0”
once connected)
Newspaper Delivery
Carriers
are needed to deliver
The Washington
Post
for the following
areas:
For routes in
Landover, Capital
Heights, Hyattsville
&
District Heights
Call Mrs. Tompkins
at 240-432-1914
Excellent part-time
income!
Reliable transportation
required.
M
JOBS
MAINTENANCE
Applicant must have exp in
apartment maint & have
your own transp & tools.
Good refs & pass criminal
bckgr chk. Fax resume:
703-567-4063
Home delivery
makes good
sense.
1-800-753-POST
SF
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SF
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C054E 2x3
COB
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clock allows. An early dinner, happy hour, shopping with
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245
Appliances
To place an ad, go to washingtonpostads.com
Therapy Lamp—39.99 NatureBright
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $39.99,
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
237
EZ
new and pre-owned
cars, trucks and suvs
KIRBY Generation Vacuum Cleaner—$135 Excel'nt Cond, HEPA filtration, Cost $1300. 571-606-0319
225
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2017
the local expert
on local jobs
For Jobs advertisements, go to
washingtonpost.com/recruit
or call 202-334-4100
(toll free 1-800-765-3675)
208
CLASSIFIED
D8
Cars
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2017
OPQRS
EZ
BMW
FORD
MAZDA
PONTIAC
FORD
2008
FOCUS
SE
30K MILES, MGR SPECIAL. $6995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HONDA
2008
CIVIC
LX
MANAGER
SPECIAL.
$6,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
MAZDA 2008 MAZDA5 SPORT
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $4,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
PONTIAC 2008 G6
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $4,495
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
CHEVROLET
HONDA
HYUNDAI
MERCEDES-BENZ
HYUNDAI 2016 ELANTRA SE FWD
IMMACULATE.
ONLY
$9,999
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
JAGUAR 2009 XK 2DR CONV
Clean Carfax, low miles. Call!
Jaguar Tysons
888-600-4487
MERCEDES-BENZ 2008 C-300 SPORT
IMMACULATE COND. ONLY $10,999
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
How about some
home delivery?
HONDA 2016 ACCORD SEDAN LX
Clean Carfax, 1 owner. Must see!
Landmark Honda
877-300-4382
INFINITI
RANGE ROVER 2013 EVOQUE
Pure Premium 4WD, lthr. Must see!
Land Rover Tysons 888-600-4487
NISSAN
HONDA 2014 CIVIC LX
1 owner, clean carfax. Must see!
Fairfax Honda
877-687-6563
1-800-753-POST
SF
CHRYSLER 2015 200 LIMITED FWD
SUPER CLEAN. ONLY $10,999
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Wake up to
home delivery.
CHRYSLER 2004 CONCORDE - automatic, 116k mi, MD Inspc, all power,
leathr int, AM/FM/CD, very good
condition $2,200 OBO 240-347-5362
1-800-753-POST
SF
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
VOLVO 2017 V60 PREMIER
Station wagon, like new. Call!
Fairfax Volvo/VW
877-687-6563
1-800-753-POST
RosenthalAuto.com
JAGUAR 2015 XF I4 PREMIUM
Nav, pwr sunroof & more. Call!
Jaguar Chantilly
888-900-6946
RosenthalAuto.com
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
NISSAN 2016 SENTRA SV FWD
IMMACULATE COND. ONLY $10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN 2016 VERSA 1.6 SV
FWD, IMMACULATE. ONLY $8,999
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN 2014 ALTIMA 2.5 SV
Showroom cond, 35k miles, white
w/ black int. Falls Church area.
$15,600. Call 703-573-2308
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
TOYOTA
2009
COROLLA
LE
MANAGER SPECIAL. ONLY $7,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
VOLVO
VOLVO 2004 S60 -automatic, 156k mi,
lth int, very good running cond, clean
in/out, all power, serviced, asking
$1400 OBO 301-219-5551
VOLVO 2000 S80- 4 door, auto, sedan,
pwr windows, pwr doors, sunroof,
alloy wheels, 127k mi, MD insp,
$2500 OBO 240-615-7707
(Well...some of it.)
FORD
2016
FIESTA
SE
FWD, IMMACUILATE. ONLY $8,995.
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2015 FOCUS SE FWD
IMMACULATE.
ONLY
$9,799
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
Stars shine
as Wizards
rally to win
over Pistons
OCTOBER 21 , 2017
NBA ROUNDUP
Korver’s threes are key
in Cleveland’s victory
CAVALIERS 116,
BUCKS 97
WIZARDS FROM D1
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Bradley. Then, in the closing seconds with the outcome still in
doubt and most of the announced
16,337 fans on their feet inside
Capital One Arena, Wall stuffed
Reggie Jackson’s shot while Porter
created a loose-ball scrum. He
didn’t win the jump ball against
Detroit big man Jon Leuer, but in
the chaos, the Wizards again
earned possession and controlled
the final frantic moments to improve to 2-0. The Pistons fell to 1-1.
Since the Wizards lacked frontcourt depth without Jason Smith,
who missed the game due a right
shoulder injury, Coach Scott
Brooks shortened the rotation,
usually keeping at least one starter on the floor while working in
his reserves. Porter handled that
responsibility by stabilizing the
offense for 20 points through the
first half, but his presence could
not keep the Wizards from falling
into a hole, 65-58 at halftime.
“It was an easy 65,” Brooks said.
“We have to play with a toughness.
We’re not going to stop them from
scoring every time, but we’ve got
to give ourselves the best chance
and you do that by playing with
toughness.”
Through the first half, the Wizards’ defensive effort inspired
groans from the crowd and sulking on the sideline. Early into the
second quarter, Washington assistant coach Tony Brown stood and
held up two fingers in the shape of
horns to signal the Pistons’ next
play. Still, Washington wasn’t
ready to keep up with the action as
backup point guard Ish Smith
sliced through the perimeter defense and sent a pass to Luke
Kennard, who was open beyond
the arc. A simple pump fake lost
the defender, and Kennard drilled
the wide-open 17-foot jumper.
Brown watched the shot find the
net, then leaned back into his seat
after another failed possession.
The problem wasn’t just poor
team defense but that the Wizards
could not stop the Pistons’ role
players. That Kennard jumper,
. SATURDAY,
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Wizards’ John Wall, stripping the ball from Avery Bradley, had 26 points and 10 assists Friday.
part of a 9-2 run, illustrated his
team’s depth as the Detroit bench
outscored Washington in the first
half, 30-9.
Although Porter played as the
finisher while on the floor with his
second-unit teammates, scoring
layups and dunks before halftime,
the lack of stops muted his scoring
impact. Detroit center Andre
Drummond’s dominance under
the glass was a big reason the
Pistons held a plus-10 rebound
advantage at intermission.
Late in the second quarter,
Drummond blew a chance for a
monster putback dunk, but his
offensive rebound set in motion a
clinic in unselfish ball movement
that unhinged Washington’s defensive rotations. After Tobias
Harris corralled Drummond’s
missed dunk, the Pistons made
four passes, sending Wizards’ defenders flying out of position, before Jackson hit an open three.
Detroit drilled six three-pointers by halftime while Washington
walked off the court after missing
all five of its deep attempts.
Brooks walked through the tunnel on a mission, eager to share
strongly worded reminders about
competing for each other.
“He put the film on, and then he
was like, ‘There’s no point in
watching the film,’ and we felt the
same way,” Wall said. “We were
just being soft. They were being
the more physical team.”
Just before that long walk to
locker room, Wall tilted his head
to the ceiling in disbelief after
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
Detroit ................................ 31
Washington ........................ 29
at Denver Nuggets
Monday
DETROIT
Harris
Johnson
Drummond
Bradley
Jackson
Leuer
Kennard
I.Smith
Moreland
Galloway
TOTALS
9 NBCSW
at Los Angeles Lakers
Wednesday 10:30 NBCSW,
ESPN
at Golden State Warriors
Friday
Wizards 115, Pistons 111
34
29
16
33
30 — 111
24 — 115
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
33:32 5-10 4-5 1-3 1 2 15
23:41
3-3 3-4 0-5 3 3 10
26:31
4-9 1-1 6-12 2 6
9
32:58 6-13 3-4 1-2 2 3 18
32:27 8-21 2-2 0-4 6 5 24
32:01
4-7 2-2 0-1 1 3 10
18:40
5-8 0-0 0-0 2 1 11
15:34 6-12 0-2 2-3 3 2 12
12:23
0-0 0-0 0-3 0 3
0
12:13
2-3 0-0 0-2 1 3
5
240 43-86 15-20 10-35 21 31 114
Percentages: FG .500, FT .750. 3-Point Goals: 10-23, .435
(Bradley 3-6, Jackson 3-7, Harris 1-1, Johnson 1-1,
Galloway 1-2, Kennard 1-4, I.Smith 0-2). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 18 (28 PTS). Blocked Shots:
1 (Leuer). Turnovers: 18 (Jackson 5, Bradley 4, I.Smith 3,
Kennard 2, Moreland 2, Drummond, Leuer). Steals: 13
(Jackson 5, Bradley 2, Kennard 2, Drummond, Harris,
I.Smith, Johnson). Technical Fouls: None.
10:30 NBCSW,
NBA TV
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
watching Detroit end the half
with one more jump shot. That
frustration, however, turned into
focus by the third quarter as Wall
began demoralizing the Detroit
defense.
After Marcin Gortat, who did
not grab a rebound through the
first half, laid out to save a loose
ball, Wall took the possession and
then pulled up for the long-range
three that gave Washington the
72-69 lead, its first since the 3:33
mark of the opening quarter.
Joining Wall, Porter added two
more triples and Washington hit 5
of 6 from beyond the arc through
the third quarter. The improved
shooting paired with a cameo appearance for the defense — Detroit missed 13 of 20 shots —
propelled Washington to a 33-16
quarter.
Though Washington appeared
in control, Detroit swung back on
an extended scoring run after go-
WASHINGTON
Oubre Jr.
Porter Jr.
Gortat
Beal
Wall
Scott
Meeks
Frazier
Mahinmi
TOTALS
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
35:55
1-5 2-2 1-7 1 3
4
37:50 11-19 4-4 2-9 3 3 28
34:56
4-6 2-4 2-9 1 4 10
34:52 9-17 6-7 0-4 4 4 25
33:34 8-12 9-12 0-3 10 1 26
20:21
3-4 2-2 0-0 1 0
8
15:02
2-5 3-3 0-1 0 0
9
14:26
0-3 0-0 0-1 4 2
0
13:04
2-3 1-2 2-3 2 1
5
240 40-74 29-36 7-37 26 18 115
Percentages: FG .541, FT .806. 3-Point Goals: 6-16, .375
(Meeks 2-3, Porter Jr. 2-4, Beal 1-2, Wall 1-3, Frazier 0-2,
Oubre Jr. 0-2). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 17
(22 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Beal 2, Wall 2, Porter Jr.,
Scott). Turnovers: 17 (Wall 9, Frazier 3, Beal 2, Meeks,
Oubre Jr., Porter Jr.). Steals: 12 (Porter Jr. 4, Frazier 2,
Oubre Jr. 2, Gortat, Mahinmi, Meeks, Wall). Technical
Fouls: None. A: 16,337 (20,356).
ing small when Drummond
fouled early in the fourth. Beal
gave Washington some breathing
room by driving to rim on consecutive plays in the final minutes.
Then, a handful of defensive plays
— Wall’s block, Porter’s hustle —
sealed the win.
“We did a better job in the
second half,” Wall said, “and
locked in a little more.”
candace.buckner@washpost.com
LeBron James and Kevin Love
took care of the paint. Once Kyle
Korver got going from three-point
range, the Cleveland Cavaliers became nearly unstoppable.
James had 24 points and eight
assists, Korver hit three straight
three-pointers during a decisive
third-quarter run and the Cavaliers beat the Bucks, 116-97, on
Friday night to spoil Milwaukee’s
home opener.
Love added 17 points and 12
rebounds for the Cavs. Their 15-5
spurt over the final 4:25 of the
third quarter, sparked by Korver’s
long-range shooting, opened a 13point lead. They led by double
digits most of the rest the way.
“Kyle, he came out and he really
gave us a spark shooting the basketball,” Coach Tyronn Lue said.
“With his movement and him running around, he kind of throws
defenses off.”
The Cavs handed Milwaukee its
first loss of the season. The defending Eastern Conference
champions opened with a second
straight victory over an East contender after beating Boston in
their home opener.
HORNETS 109, HAWKS 91:
Dwight Howard, who played last
season for hometown Atlanta before being traded away one year
after signing a three-year, $71 million contract, had 20 points and 15
rebounds in his first home game
with Charlotte.
The Hornets trailed by as many
as 20 in the first half but used a
24-0 run in the third quarter to
blow open the game.
CELTICS
102, 76ERS 92:
Kyrie Irving scored 21 points, Al
Horford had 15, and visiting Boston won for the first time since
losing Gordon Hayward.
The Celtics lost their first two
games after Hayward went down
in the opener with a mangled ankle that might cost him the season.
Horford and Irving took over
down the stretch to quiet a raucous Philadelphia crowd.
TRAIL BLAZERS 114, PACERS 96: CJ McCollum scored 28
points on 12-of-18 shooting to lead
Portland in Indianapolis.
With Indiana starting center
Myles Turner out with a concussion, McCollum teamed with
backcourt mate Damian Lillard to
take advantage of an inexperienced Pacers interior defense.
NETS
126, MAGIC 121:
D’Angelo Russell, Trevor Booker
and DeMarre Carroll each scored
17 points to help Brooklyn win its
home opener.
Nikola Vucevic scored a careerhigh 41 points for Orlando.
KINGS 93, MAVERICKS 88:
George Hill scored 21 points as
visiting Sacramento earned its
first victory of the season.
TIMBERWOLVES
100,
JAZZ 97: Jamal Crawford scored
all 17 of his points in the fourth
quarter and hit a three-pointer
with 27.5 seconds to go to lift Minnesota in its home opener.
Kings hire WNBA’s Boucek
Former WNBA coach and player Jenny Boucek has joined the
Sacramento Kings staff as an assistant player development coach.
The Kings announced that the
former Seattle Storm coach was
now on Dave Joerger’s staff, returning to Sacramento where she
coached the defunct Monarchs
from 2007 to 2009. She coached
the Storm from 2015 to 2017.
Boucek joins San Antonio’s
Becky Hammon as active female
NBA assistant coaches.
MAVERICKS: Guard Devin
Harris was granted a leave of absence after his brother, Bruce, was
killed in a car crash Thursday. “He
can take as long as he needs,”
Coach Rick Carlisle said.
HEAT: Center Hassan Whiteside has a bone bruise in his knee
and will miss the team’s home
opener Saturday against Indiana.
HAWKS: Guard/forward DeAndre’ Bembry has a fracture in
his right wrist, and his status will
be updated after he meets with
team physicians Monday.
76ERS: Center Joel Embiid
said he has not been cleared to
play back-to-back games and does
not expect to be in the lineup
Saturday at Toronto.
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THE WASHINGTON POST . SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2017
Real Estate
What you can buy for
$3 million
Defining a luxury property in the Washington area
can be tricky, but location, a noteworthy history
and craftsmanship are some of the characteristics. 9
WASHINGTON POST, ISTOCKPHOTO
WHERE WE LIVE: CENTRAL SHAW
HARNEY
BUYING NEW
Residents love the diversity in this Northwest D.C.
community, but it’s still a work in progress. 3
Your title insurer may have
a conflict of interest. 4
Upscale townhouses in
Fairfax City. 16
3.88
Mortgage rates slip. 6
2
EZ
New Homes and New Communities
MD
Michael Harris Homes
at King Farm
1444 Piccard Drive
Rockville, MD 20850
MD Cabin Branch
13725 Lapwing Way
Clarksburg, MD 20871
1,800+ sq. ft.
2+ BR/2.5+ BA
From the Mid $500s
3,500 sq. ft.
5BR/3.5BA
$599,900
Visit King Farm this weekend
during our Model Open House,
and enjoy a delicious treat with
your tour. This award-winning
community’s finely crafted,
4-story brownstones feature
spacious, open floorplans with
luxury appointments. Don’t
miss seeing our newly released
homesites, convenient to the
Shady Grove Metro! Our first
phase is already 60% SOLD!
The Manhattan greets you
with a stately brick front and a
spacious front porch running
the full width of the home.
Inside, you’ll find a flowing,
open floor plan filled with
upgraded spaces, including an
expansive owner’s suite with
a sitting room. Plus, enjoy a
bonus loft on the third level.
MHBR #3552
LiveAtKingFarmWP.com
MD
Cabin Branch
22403 Egret Alley
Clarksburg, MD 20871
MD Cabin Branch
THE WASHINGTON POST
WinchesterHomes.com
301-273-7525
VA
301-273-7525
2067 River Heritage Blvd.
Potomac Shores, VA 22026
Potomac Shores
2,100 sq. ft.
3BR/2 full, 2 half BA
$407,297
2,527-3,625+ sq. ft.
4BR/2BA
From the upper $400s
Come home to 3 finished levels
of contemporary style at the
Hadden at Cabin Branch.
This brick-front manor townhome
comes equipped with a luxurious
private owner’s suite, expansive
gourmet kitchen and two-car
garage. Entertain or unwind—
this home is designed for life at
whatever pace you choose.
Woods Village is a brand new
collection of 94 single-family
homesites by Ryan Homes
welcoming you to the 2016
community of the year.
These expansive Tidewater
homes feature well-appointed
designs that live large, offer
Built-Smart energy efficiency
and back up to the beauty of
Northern Virginia forests.
301-273-7525
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21, 2017
WinchesterHomes.com
WinchesterHomes.com
240-285-2338
www.potomacshores.com 855-808-6051
22235 Fulmer Ave
Clarksburg, MD 20871
VA
Potomac Shores
2304 Sweet Pepperbrush Loop
Potomac Shores, VA 22026
3,400 sq. ft.
3BR/3.5BA
$559,900
2,392 - 3,951+ sq. ft.
2+BR/2+BA
From the upper $400s
The Denver is the epitome of
modern, open-concept home
design. With the kitchen and
breakfast area opening into
a large family room, this floor
plan is made for family time.
And you’ll love the finished
lower level, featuring a
recreation room, a bonus room
and a full bath.
With a mix of homesites and
variety of floorplans, there’s
something for everyone at
Fairways Crossing. A family
friendly neighborhood where
kids can walk to our new
elementary school. Ryan
Homes offers 96 homes and
NVHomes has 38 homesites
with breathtaking views of
woods and fairways.
www.potomacshores.com
855-808-6051
Where We Live
3
EZ
Central Shaw
A historic D.C. community confronts change
Wine bars, restaurants and stores sprout up in a neighborhood where newer residents tackle issues such as violence and rats
BY
H ARRIET E DLESON
she believes in working with everyone in the neighborhood to solve
problems. From the first, said Hart,
now 72, she “became friendly to everyone.”
She recalls a time when she knew
everybody and remembers the
block parties between the 1500 and
1600 blocks of Eighth Street NW.
“Change is inevitable,” she said.
“How you grow with it or your attitude about it is optional. The neighborhood is not as cohesive as it used
Schools: Seaton Elementary,
Cardozo Education Campus (middle and high schools).
CENTRAL
SHAW
Seaton
Elementary
School
P ST. NW
John F.
Kennedy
Recreation
Center
Detail
Va.
Md.
N ST. NW
D.C.
250 FT.
Source: maps4news.com/here
THE WASHINGTON POST
equidistant from two Metro stops:
Mount Vernon Square/Seventh
Street-Convention Center and
Shaw-Howard University, both on
the Green and Yellow lines.
Crime: In the past 12 months,
according to D.C. police, four burglaries, three aggravated assaults
and five robberies were reported
within the neighborhood’s boundaries.
Transit: Central Shaw is roughly
realestate@washpost.com
Coard A. Benson • 410-310-4909
www.coardbenson.com
cbenson@bensoandmangold.com
Mayport Farm
24 N. Washington Street, Easton, Maryland 21601 • 410-770-9255 Office
OCTOBER 21, 2017
49 acres with a commanding presence on Leadenham Creek just outside of St. Michaels.
Over 4,000 feet of shoreline secured with rip rap and living shoreline. The property
has been carefully maintained and cared for through stewardship and CRP programs.
Buffer strips for careful farming practice and game management have provided a haven
for wildlife and a staging area for wintering waterfowl. 5 Bedroom farmhouse with pool,
dock and waterside accessory buildings. Additional waterfront development right conveys.
Offered for $2,900,000
. SATURDAY,
Eastern Shore Brokerage for over 50 years – Benson & Mangold Real Estate
THE WASHINGTON POST
in 2010 and have watched the
changes unfold. “We knew that
there was planned development
and this neighborhood was to have
revitalization,” said Lesly McNitt,
34, president of the Central Shaw
Neighborhood Association. “We
didn’t know the timeline.”
What they didn’t necessarily anticipate was the sound of gunshots
they heard after moving into their
rowhouse. “We’re been on this crazy
journey together,” she said.
Central Shaw includes part of the
Shaw Historic District, established
in 1999 by the D.C. Historic Preservation Office’s Office of Planning.
“Initially an ethnically and economically diverse neighborhood,”
according to the brochure developed by the preservation office,
“Shaw was home to European immigrants and free African Americans, and, during and after the Civil
War, increasing numbers of southern Freedmen flooding to cities in
search of work.”
The brochure says that the name
Shaw was first used in the mid-20th
century to describe the area surrounding Shaw Junior High School,
which was named for Col. Robert
Gould Shaw (1837-1863), white leader of the all-black 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment during the
Civil War.
Individuals rather than developers built the original frame and
brick houses in Shaw in the 1870s
and 1880s, and later, developers
built small rows of speculative houses, according to the Shaw Historic
District brochure.
One of the issues the neighborhood association is grappling with is
rats, according to Lesly McNitt and
some longtime central Shaw residents.
Jackie Hart, who bought her
house in central Shaw in 1989, said
MARION ST. NW
To see more photos of central
Shaw, go to washingtonpost.com/
realestate.
JUSTIN T. GELLERSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
“Change is inevitable,” said Jackie Hart, who bought her house in
central Shaw in 1989. “How you grow with it or your attitude about
it is optional. The neighborhood is not as cohesive as it used to be.”
bounded roughly by P Street NW to
the south, Ninth Street NW to the
west, Rhode Island Avenue NW to
the north and Seventh Street NW to
the east.
In the past 12 months, according
to Suzanne DesMarais, a real estate
agent with Compass, seven residential properties have sold in the
neighborhood, including five houses and two condominiums. They
range from a two-bedroom, onebath condo in a rowhouse for
$580,000 to a three-bedroom,
three-bath 1912 house for
$1.325 million.
The only residential property on
the market is a two-bedroom, twobath condominium in a building
dating to 1898, listed for $625,000.
. NW
AVE
AND
L
S
EI
OD
RH
7TH ST. NW
Neighborhood concerns: Relative newcomers to central Shaw enjoy the conveniences of the neighborhood — the O Street Market,
including a Giant Food, as well as
access to two Metro stations, an easy
walk to work, wine bars and restaurants. Yet they are aware of issues
that have become a focus of some of
the Central Shaw Neighborhood Association’s meetings. Shaw is broken
up into several associations representing various geographic areas of
the neighborhood.
Central Shaw has undergone
change throughout much of its history. For example, some of the buildings that have been boarded up
since being burned during the 1968
riots are beginning to be developed.
The wine bars and new restaurants
have sprung up in the past seven
years or so.
Lesly Weber McNitt and her husband, Dave, are among those newcomers who arrived in central Shaw
Living there: Central Shaw is
Shaw Jr.
High School
9TH ST. NW
When Julia Mirabella’s husband,
Kyle Thomson, told her he’d found a
house for them on Craigslist in the
central part of the District’s Shaw
neighborhood, she said she didn’t
think it was “legitimate.”
But it was: a three-level attached
rowhouse dating to 1875, with a back
yard. It was a home they could live
in, at least for a while, and it had a
space they could rent out in the
basement.
“Our first reaction was, it was too
good to be true,” said Mirabella, 32,
an attorney with a D.C. law firm. “I
like walking to work downtown and
like living in an urban environment.” Thomson, who is an attorney
with the Food and Drug Administration, commutes to White Oak, Md.
The couple, who just celebrated
their second anniversary, closed on
their house in February and have
been getting to know their environment and neighbors since then.
“There’s a lot of diversity here,”
Mirabella said. “I really enjoy that. I
feel like we’re part of a community in
the best way.”
The couple bought their house
from their neighbors, whose residence is very similar to theirs. When
they first moved in, the previous
owners gave a party in their honor.
Mirabella and Thomson are at
work renovating their home. “We
have no regrets about the neighborhood, about the house,” she said. Yet
they face challenges. “The house
needs a lot of work. It’s our very first
house, the only thing we’ve owned.”
to be. There are some really nice
people who have moved in.”
Some of the older people in the
neighborhood have died or sold
their homes for considerable sums,
and moved to Prince George’s County, according to Alexander Padro, a
6E Advisory Neighborhood Commission member.
4
EZ
Market Analysis
Million-dollar settlement shows it’s wise to shop for title insurance
A recent legal settlement
between the federal
government and a title
insurance agency is
drawing fresh attention to
one of the murkiest, least
The
understood and costly
Nation's
items you get charged for in
Housing
a real estate closing: title
insurance.
KENNETH R.
You are hardly alone if,
HARNEY
like many buyers and
mortgage borrowers, you
didn’t shop for the lowest cost and best title
insurance coverage and settlement services
the last time you closed on a home loan.
Instead, you probably went along with the
recommendation made by your realty
agent or lender. Although the title
insurance charge came to $1,500 or more,
you may not have been exactly sure what
your money paid for and who got most of it.
For example, you might not have
understood that the insurance underwriter
— the company that actually insures
against title problems affecting your new
home — didn’t end up with the majority of
the premium charges you paid. In fact, it
may have received just 10 to 20 percent of
your total fees; the title agent or settlement
attorney pocketed the other 80 to 90
percent. You could also have missed the
monetary side deals that may exist
between the realty brokerage firm and the
title agency or settlement attorney.
It can all get rather incestuous and laden
with conflicts of interest, which is why
federal law requires real estate settlement
service providers to disclose whether there
are any financial arrangements among the
parties involved in your transaction. The
disclosure itself often comes across as part
of a paper blitz that may not get the
attention it deserves from consumers
whose eyes are glazed by the overwhelming
details and emotions inherent in many
home purchase transactions.
It can all get rather
incestuous and laden with
conflicts of interest.
Mandatory though they may be, not all
relevant financial arrangements and
conflicts of interest are always disclosed, as
the latest legal settlement from the federal
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
illustrates. The bureau charged that
Meridian Title, a title and settlement
agency headquartered in South Bend, Ind.,
failed to disclose its overlapping ownership
interests in the title underwriter, Arsenal
Insurance, to which it routinely sent its
title insurance business.
The CFPB found that three of Meridian’s
executives were part-owners in Arsenal,
but that fact was never disclosed to
consumers, as the Real Estate Settlement
Procedures Act requires. By choosing
Arsenal instead of competing
underwriters, Meridian “was able to keep
extra money beyond the commission it
would normally have been entitled to
collect,” the bureau said.
During a three-year period, according to
the CFPB, more than 7,000 consumers who
should have received a disclosure about the
arrangement between Meridian and
Arsenal were left in the dark. The CFPB
ordered the company to pay up to
$1.25 million in redress to customers who
were harmed by the failure to disclose the
ownership conflicts and to “properly
disclose” them in future referrals of
business.
In a statement for this column, Meridian
denied that “any consumers were
negatively affected by its actions” and
denied any wrongdoing. CFPB Director
Richard Cordray had a starkly different
take: “Meridian Title illegally steered
consumers into purchasing a product from
an affiliated company to add to its bottom
line,” he said.
Marx Sterbcow, a lawyer based in New
Orleans who represented Meridian in the
case, said in an interview that the failure to
disclose the overlapping ownerships was a
“technical” issue and that Meridian had
been advised by state regulators that
providing consumer disclosures about the
overlapping ownership in Arsenal was not
required. The CFPB, the federal regulator
with oversight and legal authority in the
matter, strongly disagreed.
So what should you make of all this?
Most important, be aware that federal law
guarantees you the right to shop around
for title insurance and settlement services,
and you should make the most of it. Even in
states where regulators set premium rates,
there can be significant differences in the
total closing fees for which you get
charged.
Be aware also that many realty
brokerages — and some individual agents
— have lucrative sideline affiliate deals
with title agencies, including what are
called marketing services agreements.
Your agent’s or broker’s affiliate may not
necessarily provide you the lowest costs
and best total services available in the
market, which is why comparison
shopping — including checking with
independent title agencies that refuse to
participate in such arrangements — can
save you real money.
Ken Harney’s email address is
kenharney@earthlink.net.
LUXURIOUS TURN-KEY LIVING AT YOUR FINGER TIPS
Tour our featured two bedroom + den model residence today from Noon-4pm and learn more about
our exclusive model pricing before time runs out. With homes available for immediate ownership,
now is the time to discover the luxurious lifestyle that awaits you in the heart of Bethesda.
OCTOBER 21, 2017
RESIDENCE 201
2 BED | DEN | 2.5 BATH + TERRACE | DIRECT ELEVATOR ACCESS
BALCONY
10’ x 3’
10’ x 3’
D.O.
BEDROOM 2
12’ x 14’
S
WORK
ISLAND
LIBRARY
12’ x 12’ 8”
4’8” x 2’6”
DINING AREA
11’ 8” x 17’ 8”
LIVING AREA
KITCHEN
D.W.
21’ x 17’ 8”
C.T.
17’4” x 16’
TERRACE
6’0” x 24’ 4”
P
REF.
FRZ.
GRAND SALON
32’ 8” x 17’ 8”
FIREPLACE
7’ 8” CLOSET
FOYER
5’ 4” CLOSET
SHOWER
3’ x 5’
SEAT
21’ x 8’
. SATURDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
BALCONY
BATH 2
MASTER
BEDROOM
6’ x 11’ 4”
A/C
18’ x 14’ 4”
LAUNDRY
MASTER
BATH
PRIVATE
ELEVATOR
FOYER
11’ 4” x 14’ 4”
10’ x 6’
W.H.
A/C
SHOWER
D
W
6’ x 3’ 4”
W.I.C.
12’ x 6’ 9”
P.E.1
TWO AND THREE BEDROOM RESIDENCES | SPECIAL MODEL PRICING ON SELECT HOMES
3 0 1 .9 0 9 .8 8 4 6 | T H E L A U R E N M D.C O M
SEAT
10’ 6” x 7’
5
EZ
Yours.Truly.
FALL FESTIVALOF SAVINGS
UP TO IN UPGRADES ON US*
ADDITIONAL SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE ON MOVE-IN READY HOMES
At Van Metre, we want you to live in the home of your dreams, not fix up someone else’s dream home.
That’s why we invite you to take a look at a newly-built Van Metre home, where you’re free to start living
the life you want. Find the right house, in the right neighborhood at a price that’s right for you—truly.
And this Fall, save up to $10,000 on upgrades for your dream kitchen or a home entertainment package.
VanMetreHomes.com/Fall-Festival
THE WASHINGTON POST
LET OUR FAMILY BUILD A HOME FOR YOURS
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21, 2017
*Available only for new contracts wrien and accepted at Van Metre Homes communities between October and November . A maximum of toward a kitchen upgrade
or home entertainment package for single-family homes, townhomes or a multi-family home purchased, notwithstanding the number of purchasers for a specific new home. Purchasers shall not
be entitled to any rebate, refund or other consideration in the event that the full value of the credit is not used. Other terms and conditions may apply. Maximum credit varies by community.
Visit VanMetreHomes.com/Fall-Festival or see a Sales Manager for details.
6
EZ
Town Square
Real Estate News & Notes
Affordable
house of the
week: Reston
condominium
If you’re looking for space and
a place in move-in condition, the
townhouse-style condo at 11405
Windleaf Ct. #17 in Reston, Va.,
priced at $360,000, has been
updated and includes 1,250
square feet of living space and a
one-car garage.
The condo was initially priced
at $395,000. This condo has a
monthly fee of $307 plus an
annual fee of $692. Annual taxes
are $4,342. The fees provide
access to swimming pools, tennis
courts and an array of activities
through the Reston Association.
Built in 1996, the two-level
condo has two bedrooms and
three bathrooms. The main level
has an open floor plan with
hardwood floors, a gas fireplace
and a bay window in the living
and dining area.
This level has a closet with a
washer and dryer, and a powder
BY REDFIN
The condo at 11405 Windleaf Ct. #17 in Reston, Va., has an open
floor plan with hardwood floors, a gas fireplace and a bay window
in the living and dining area.
room with tile flooring and
partially tiled walls. The upper
level has a master bedroom with
a private full bathroom, a second
bedroom and a second full
bathroom.
For more information, contact
real estate agent Tom Moffett
with Redfin at 877-973-3346.
Eastern Market apartments
are ready for residents
Since 1873, Eastern Market
has provided District residents
with fresh produce, meats and
dairy products as well as a
central place to gather to meet
neighbors and friends.
Now the Residences at
Eastern Market, a 128-unit
apartment building, adds more
opportunities for people to live
across the street from the
historic market.
The apartments were built by
700 Penn, a partnership led by
EastBanc and Stanton
Development. Leasing has
CITY LIFE. SUBURBAN EASE.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21, 2017
Multi-Level Townhomes | 2-Car Garages | Roof Terraces & Lofts
COMING SOON FROM THE $700s
Your first opportunity to own in South Alexandria's hottest new
development – just minutes to Old Town Alexandria shopping & dining.
Minutes to Metro | Easy access to George Washington Parkway & the Capital Beltway
Convenient to the Pentagon, Ft. Belvoir, Joint Base Andrews, & downtown D.C.
(571) 349-8841 | BY APPOINTMENT | TownsAtSouthAlex.com
Sales Office: 1029 N. Royal St., #301, Alexandria, VA 22314
Prices and details subject to change without notice. See Sales Manager for details.
begun for the apartments, which
are part of the Hines School
Redevelopment project, a
mixed-use development
including offices and shops as
well as the apartments.
Residents are anticipated to
move in this month.
Located at 700 Pennsylvania
Ave. SE, the Residences at
Eastern Market is across the
street from the Eastern Market
Metro station. The building, to
be managed by Bozzuto,
includes a rooftop pool, a club
room, a fitness center, a
residents’ lounge, a courtyard,
several landscaped terraces for
grilling, secured parking and
bike storage.
The six-story apartment
building has one-, two- and
three-bedroom units with high
ceilings, hardwood floors, white
cabinets, white Caesarstone
counters, upgraded appliances
and pantries in the kitchen,
porcelain tiles in the bathrooms,
and in-unit washers and dryers.
The apartments were
designed to accommodate
families and are larger than
many new units in the city. The
one-bedroom apartments range
from 787 to 1,177 square feet, with
rents ranging from $3,200 to
$4,800.
Weekly averages for popular
mortgage types
5%
3.88
4
30-YEAR FIXED
3.19
15-YEAR FIXED
3.17
3
5-YEAR ARM
2
1
0
’16
’17
Source: Freddie Mac
THE WASHINGTON POST
The two-bedroom apartments
range from 973 to 1,578 square
feet, with rents ranging from
$4,530 to $7,050.
The three-bedroom
apartments range from 1,782 to
1,854 square feet, with rents
ranging from $7,970 to $8,850.
For more information, visit
www.liveateasternmarket.com.
— Michele Lerner
To pass on a tip or item, contact us at
realestate@washpost.com and put
“Town Square” in the subject line.
7
EZ
Move In
Now And
Save
Thousands
Before
NOV
Now You See It.
Now It’s Home.
2017
15
VISIT TODAY AND TOUR YOUR NEW HOME.
BEFORE IT DISAPPEARS.
Montgomery County Move-In-Ready Homes
For more information, Contact New Home Specialists
Amy Dooling and Dawn Martin.
(301) 273-7525 | NewHomes@whihomes.com
GLENMONT METROCENTRE
Townhomes from the mid $400’s
2429 Glenallan Avenue
Silver Spring, MD 20906
POPLAR RUN
Single Family Homes
from the mid $600’s
13371 Redspire Drive
Silver Spring, MD 20906
POTOMAC HIGHLANDS
Townhomes from $1.19M
141 Bytham Ridge Lane
Potomac, MD 20854
WinchesterHomes.com/SeeIt
The prices of our homes, included features, plans, specifications, promotions/incentives, neighborhood build-out and available locations are subject to change without notice. Stated dimensions, square footage and acreage are approximate and should not be used as a representation of any home’s or homesite’s precise or actual size, location or orientation. There is no guarantee that any particular homesite or home
will be available. No information or material herein is to be construed to be an offer or solicitation for sale. Not all features and options are available in all homes. Unless otherwise expressly stated, homes do not come with hardscape, landscape, or other decorator items. Community maps, illustrations, plans and/or amenities reflect our current vision and are subject to change without notice. Maps not to scale. Some
amenities may not yet be constructed. Builder reserves the right to change the size, design, configuration and location of amenities not yet constructed and does not warrant the suitability thereof for any use or for any person. There is no guarantee that any particular homesite, home or common area will offer a view or that any particular view will be preserved. Views may also be altered by subsequent development,
construction, and landscaping growth. Any photographs or renderings used herein reflect artists’ conceptions and are for illustrative purposes only. Photographs or renderings of people do not depict or indicate any preference regarding race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, handicap/physical disability, familial status, or national origin. A link to a third party website does not imply endorsement of that site nor
any ability to control that site’s privacy practices. Marketing promotions/incentives, if any, are subject to conditions or restrictions and are subject to change without notice. No warranty or guarantee is made regarding any particular area public school/school district or that any particular public school/school district will service any given community. Schools/school districts may change over time. Builder does not
warrant the suitability of any trail for any use or for any person. You must visit a Company New Home Gallery to purchase a home. Please consult a New Home Advisor for specific price and other information for each community. Please see the actual purchase agreement for additional information, disclosures, and disclaimers relating to any home, homesite and/or the features thereof. A Broker/Agent must register
their client in person on client’s first visit at each community for a Broker/Agent to receive a commission or referral fee, if available. Our name and the logos contained herein are registered trademarks of TRI Pointe Group, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries. Winchester is a registered trademark and is used with permission. MHBR No. 57. © 2017 Winchester Homes Inc., a member of the TRI Pointe Group. All rights reserved. 1
BUILDER Magazine named TRI Pointe Group the Builder of the Year in 2015. The Builder of the Year Award is BUILDER’S highest yearly honor. 2 Builder and Developer Magazine, a national homebuilding publication, named TRI Pointe the Developer of the Year in 2014.
OCTOBER 21, 2017
Winchester Homes, Inc., A Member of the TRI Pointe Group. | 2015 BUILDER OF THE YEAR1 AND 2014 DEVELOPER OF THE YEAR2. | Copyright ©2017 Winchester Homes Inc. All rights reserved.
. SATURDAY,
Choose Your Move-In-Ready Home
THE WASHINGTON POST
CABIN BRANCH
Townhomes from the
upper $300’s and low $400’s
Single Family Homes from the
low $500’s and upper $600’s
22826 Broadway Avenue
Clarksburg, MD 20871
8
EZ
Healthier living is part of today’s American Dream. And
it’s a routine that’s easy to get into at our new Fitness
Barn, with advanced cardio equipment and free weights,
as well as a movement studio, yoga garden and 8-lane
competition pool. Come discover Potomac Shores’
award-winning homes, exciting amenities, and all the
ways for you to be your healthiest and happiest.
Recreation Center with Swimming Pools
New On-Site Elementary School
Future On-Site VRE Train Station
Hiking & Biking Trails
Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course & Clubhouse
30 Miles from DC with 2 Miles of Shoreline
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21, 2017
Homes from the $300s to $800s
Potomac Shores Parkway, Potomac Shores, VA 22026
PotomacShores.com
Features and products vary by community. Price, offers,
financing and availability are subject to change
without notice.
9
Cover Story
EZ
JOE MUSCATELLO/HOUSELENS
Falkland Farm is a 19th-century home in Gainesville, Va., that is listed for sale for $2.9 million. The farmhouse sits on 64 acres.
Defining the $3 million home
Location, provenance and craftsmanship are key factors for properties in this price range
BY
K ATHY O RTON
HOMEVISIT
kathy.orton@washpost.com
To see more photos of the $3 million homes for sale, go to washingtonpost.com/realestate.
OCTOBER 21, 2017
almost $3 million.
Rankin describes the luxury market in
Washington as strong, but it suffers from a
similar problem as the rest of the housing
market: low inventory. There is more demand for these homes than supply.
“These families hold these houses for 15, 20
years,” he said. “We don’t get the inventory.”
It is impossible to describe the typical
luxury buyer in this market. They are as
varied as the reasons that brought them to
. SATURDAY,
This 1850 home in Georgetown, listed
for $2,995,000, has four bedrooms.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Luxury is a word often overused in today’s real estate market. Peruse descriptions
of properties for sale — be they $200,000
condos or $12 million estates — and you’ll
probably come across it. Its ubiquitousness
has diminished the term.
Because luxury is seemingly everywhere,
defining what constitutes the luxury market
in Washington can be tricky.
To Michael Rankin, managing partner of
TTR Sotheby’s International Realty, the luxury market is more than just lavish homes.
What elevates a home to that desirable
category could be one of the following:
Sought-after location — the Kalorama,
Georgetown or Massachusetts Heights
neighborhoods in the District; Bethesda in
Maryland; or McLean in Virginia.
Coveted provenance — a famous original architect or noteworthy former owners.
Impeccable craftsmanship — the architect, builder and materials are all high
quality.
Homes with some combination of these
characteristics usually sell for $3 million or
more, putting them into what is considered
in Washington the luxury market.
“When I think not of a luxurious home
but a luxury property, I think of more of the
upper end part of the market,” Rankin said.
Having spent nearly three decades selling
real estate in Washington, Rankin knows
the luxury market well. His average sale is
the city. Other than immense wealth, about
the only other characteristic they share is
owning multiple homes.
And although Washington is a cosmopolitan city, it doesn’t have an influx of international buyers like New York or Miami. The
D.C. luxury buyer is as likely to be from
Charlotte or Chicago as China.
One characteristic that has changed over
time is their age.
“The luxury buyer is younger,” Rankin
said. “There’s a whole class of wealth that
has started at a younger generation than
before.”
The luxury buyer is also a more discerning buyer, requiring quality in construction
and finishes.
“It has driven the skill set,” Rankin said.
“This quality of materials and pedigree of
builders has really driven the marketplace.”
To give readers an idea of what homes in
Washington’s luxury market look like, we
put together a random selection of properties across the region priced at $3 million
with the help of Realtor.com.
Because we also wanted to know how
Washington’s $3 million dwellings stack up
against similarly priced ones around the
country, we added homes from Alabama,
New Mexico and New York for comparison.
From a rowhouse on Capitol Hill to a
19th-century estate in Virginia to a loft-style
co-op in Manhattan, turn the page for a
sampling of $3 million homes for sale.
10
EZ
THE DISTRICT
HOMEVISIT
HOMEVISIT
$2,995,000
$2,950,000
$2,995,000
3013 Dumbarton St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20007
1809 Kalorama Sq. NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
TOD CONNELL
630 East Capitol St. NE
Washington, D.C. 20003
3 bedrooms, 6 bathrooms.
Price per square foot: $653.
4 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms.
Price per square foot:: $1,093.
5 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms.
Price per square foot: $595.
Square footage: 4,520. Lot size: 0.06 acre.
Square footage: 2,740. Lot size: 0.08 acre.
Square footage: 5,030. Lot size: 0.07 acre.
Features: The 1976 townhouse is in the Kalorama Square
community of the Kalorama neighborhood. The fully
renovated home has Thai-silk-covered walls in the living room,
media room and master bedroom. Gas fireplaces are in the
living room and bedroom. The sunny breakfast room leads to
a large, private terrace with a grill. An elevator serves all
floors. The two garage parking spaces include an outlet for
electric cars. Community amenities include a 24-hour desk,
concierge, swimming pool and courtyard. Homeowners
association fees are $2,000 monthly.
Features: The 1850 detached home in Georgetown retains
many period details. The wood floors in the entry hall and
family room were painted to look like limestone. Roughhewed beams on the ceiling and reclaimed antique pine
floors add a rustic touch to the sleek, modern kitchen. The
master suite has one of the home’s six fireplaces. The topfloor loft, which can be used as an artist’s studio, opens to a
rooftop deck. The lower level can easily be converted to an inlaw suite. A parking space rental around the corner has been
paid until 2018.
Features: The 1908 semidetached Victorian rowhouse on
Capitol Hill has high ceilings, decorative crown molding,
ornate fireplace mantels, elegant corbels and stylish
wainscoting. The vestibule has an attractive inlaid tile
mosaic. The spacious master suite takes up the entire third
floor and has a sitting area with a fireplace. The two-story
carriage house has a two-car garage. The fully finished lower
level of the main house can be a rental unit. The front garden
is landscaped, while the back yard is a grassy expanse.
Agent: Michael Marriott, Compass.
Agent: Nancy Taylor Bubes, Washington Fine Properties.
Agent: Brent Jackson and Rob Sanders, TTR Sotheby’s
International Realty.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2017
MARYLAND
MCWILLIAMS BALLARD
$2,925,000
4960 Fairmont Ave., No. 1703
Bethesda, Md. 20814
HOMEVISIT
$2,990,000
752 Broadwater Way
Gibson Island, Md.
BOB LUCIDO TEAM
$3 million
12707 Maryvale Ct.
Ellicott City, Md. 21042
3 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms
Price per square foot: $1,059.
5 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms.
Price per square foot: $659.
6 bedrooms, 8 bathrooms
Price per square foot: $226.
Square footage: 2,763. Lot size: N/A.
Square footage: 4,534. Lot size: 1.43 acres.
Square footage: 13,281. Lot size: 3 acres.
Features: The Cheval is a newly built, 71-unit condominium
building in the heart of downtown Bethesda. The corner unit
has wide-plank hardwood floors and floor-to-ceiling windows
that invite abundant natural light and offer spectacular views.
The kitchen has an island, stainless steel appliances and
Caesarstone countertops. The bathrooms have porcelain tile
floors. The unit delivers in early 2018. The building includes a
fitness center, yoga studio, club room, rooftop deck with bar,
and garage parking. Concierge services include dry cleaning,
dog walking and grooming, and car detailing.
Features: The 2007 New England shingle-style home on
Gibson Island, a private island in the Chesapeake Bay, has
been featured in Home and Design, Coastal Style, Annapolis
Home, Traditional Home, and The Washington Post. The main
living and dining area has a coffered ceiling. French doors
lead to front and back terraces. Hand-scraped dark walnut
floors can be found throughout the main and upper levels. A
screened porch is off the large family room. A two-level
carriage house has a studio and a golf cart storage.
Features: The 2005 home in the Second Discovery
community features plenty of indoor and outdoor activities.
Water spouts into the swimming pool and spa, creating a
delightful aquatic display. A covered outdoor living room is
warmed by a fireplace and overlooks a stone fountain. The
flagstone terrace provides ample room for an outdoor dinner
party. Inside the home, the lower level includes a basketball
court, a home theater, a horseshoe-shaped bar, a fitness
room and a karaoke stage. Monthly homeowners association
fees are $54.
Agent: Laura Henne, McWilliams Ballard.
Agent: Sarah Kanne, TTR Sotheby’s International Realty.
Agent: Bob Lucido, Keller Williams Integrity.
11
EZ
VIRGINIA
JENNIFER CLARK
$2.9 million
HOMEVISIT
$2,995,000
7570 Falkland Dr.
Gainesville, Va. 20155
BTW IMAGES
$2,999,995
2501 Lincoln St. North
Arlington, Va. 22207
1031 Towlston Rd.
McLean, Va. 22102
4 bedrooms, 6 bathrooms
Price per square foot: $290.
5 bedrooms, 6 bathrooms
Price per square foot: $414.
5 bedrooms, 7 bathrooms.
Price per square foot: $320.
Square footage: 10,000. Lot size: 64 acres.
Square footage: 7,238. Lot size: 0.33 acre.
Square footage: 9,369. Lot size: 2 acres.
Features: Known as Falkland Farm, the 19th-century Federalstyle stone farmhouse is one of the few remaining manor
houses in Prince William County associated with Robert
“King” Carter. A report filed with the Virginia Historic
Landmarks Commission noted that the craftsmanship that
went into building the house — such as the three-foot stone
walls at its base — is rarely seen. The spiral staircase was
featured in Architectural Digest. It had been a working farm,
raising alpacas. The property includes a tenant house,
multiple run-in sheds, barns, a pond and fenced pastures.
Features: Built by McLean builder John Joy, the 2007 home
in the Crystal Spring Knolls community has a two-story
paneled foyer. The formal dining room has deep crown
molding, wainscoting, a ceiling medallion and one of the
home’s four gas fireplaces. The family room and kitchen have
a coffered ceiling and large windows that overlook the
wooded back yard. French doors in the master suite open to a
private balcony. The lower level has a wet bar and home
theater.
Features: Past wrought iron gates and down a long driveway,
the 1994 white brick house is secluded by mature trees. The
landscaped grounds include rose gardens, tall magnolias,
sculptured hedges, patios, terraces, a 10-foot cascading
stone water wall and sport court. A large arched window
above the double entry door showers the two-story foyer with
natural light. A curved, floating staircase winds to the upper
and lower levels. The spacious master suite has a sitting area
with a private balcony. The wine cellar features a stained
glass panel.
Agent: Daniel Heider, TTR Sotheby’s International Realty.
Agent: Sharon Brown, Century 21 Redwood Realty.
Agent: Lilian Jorgenson, Long & Foster.
NATIONAL
$2.9 million
Mariposa Ranch
Arroyo Seco, N.M. 87514
CORCORAN GROUP
DREW THOMPSON
$2,995,000
300 Williams Ave. SE
Huntsville, Ala. 35801
$2,995,000
25 E. Fourth St. No. 2 FL
New York, N.Y. 10003
5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms
Price per square foot: $411.
3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms
Price per square foot: $1,498.
Square footage: 5,000. Lot size: 35 acres.
Square footage: 7,284. Lot size: 2.77 acres
Square footage: 2,000. Lot size: N/A.
Features: Antoine Predock, winner of an American Institute of
Architects gold medal, described the house as “a poem on the
landscape.” The home was designed as a surrogate mountain
nestled on the vast plain between Taos and the Taos ski valley.
Because the property is surrounded by 1,000 acres of largely
undeveloped land, the unimpeded vistas include the Cerro
Pedernal mesa and the Sangre de Cristos and Truchas mountains.
The living and dining areas have 35-foot ceilings. The Mariposa
Ranch property includes a corral, stable, exercise room,
greenhouse and 16 acres of water rights.
Features: Thomas Bibb, the second governor of Alabama,
built this circa 1830 Greek Revival home in what is now the
middle of the historic Twickenham district. According to the
historic plaque, Bibb’s descendants have lived in the house
since 1927. Gen. William T. Sherman occupied the house
during the Civil War. The home has 13-foot ceilings, original
hardwood floors and retains many of its period details.
Matching crystal chandeliers adorn the library and parlor. The
black marble mantel in the dining room may be original to the
house.
Features: The loft in the heart of the trendy NoHo
neighborhood (North of Houston Street) was completely
renovated in 2009. It has 11½-foot ceilings, exposed brick
walls, oversized windows and exposed duct work for an
industrial vibe. The kitchen is a sleek, modern Bulthaup
design. The bathrooms have marble. Custom-built cabinets
provide ample storage. A washer and dryer are in-unit. The
eight-apartment co-op has a private, key-operated elevator
and a new roof. The building allows pets.
Agent: Jolie Jones, Piñon Investments of Taos.
Agent: Scott Averbuch, Averbuch Realty.
Agents: Kenny and Meris Blumstein, Corcoran Group Real
Estate.
. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2017
4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms
Price per square foot: $580.
THE WASHINGTON POST
SAM LAMBIE
12
EZ
New Homes and New Communities
VA
Potomac Shores
www.potomacshores.com
VA
2155 Potomac River Blvd.
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For GPS: Dunnington Place
Potomac Shores, VA 22026
VA
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21, 2017
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13
EZ
LIVE IN THE
TWO RIVERS
T W O G R E AT L I F E S T Y L E S . O N E G R E AT C O M M U N I T Y.
Private neighborhoods exclusively for Active Adults from the $400s.
Single family homes for All Ages from the mid $600s.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CLASSIC GROUP | NVHOMES | RYAN HOMES | STANLEY MARTIN HOMES | WINCHESTER HOMES
. SATURDAY,
FITNESS CENTER
NATURE TRAILS
INDOOR POOL & OUTDOOR POOLS
L O V E T W O R I V E R S . C O M | 410.220.6810
TENNIS COURTS
OCTOBER 21, 2017
DOG PARK
14
EZ
House of the Week
Historic Md. spot, with original details to boot
BY
K ATHY O RTON
Not far from the boundary
that separates the District from
Maryland is the Linden Historic
District in Silver Spring, where
this circa 1887 Second Empire
home is found.
Linden was one of the first
railroad communities in Montgomery County, propelling the
county’s transformation from rural farming district to commuter
suburb.
In 1873, the same year the
Metropolitan Branch of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad was
completed, Charles M. Keyes
subdivided part of his 185-acre
farm and created Linden.
The early houses were built
along Salisbury Road, which was
originally known as Maple Drive.
By the turn of the century, about
a dozen homes dotted Linden,
including the one known today
as the Curtis W. and Elizabeth
Holcomb house.
“Linden has many charms,” an
1889 story in the Washington
Star proclaimed. “There are a
number of beautiful homes there
owned by well-known Washingtonians. . . . Linden is daily
growing in the popular esteem
and will soon be quite a populous
place.”
Montgomery County included
the Linden Historic District,
which includes 17 houses, in its
TRUPLACE
The 2,576-square-foot home at 2200 Salisbury Rd. in Silver Spring was built circa 1887 in one of the
first railroad communities in Montgomery County.
master plan for historic preservation in 1993.
Holcomb was a Connecticut
lawyer who came to Washington
to work in the General Land
Office of the Department of the
Interior. In his 11 years, he rose
from chief of the preemption
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21, 2017
absolutely beguiling
SUMMER CREEK
A new signature community from Gulick Group in Great Falls. These nine~1-acre homesites offer
rare luxury, privacy and quiet in a convenient suburban setting. Each home is ingeniously designed
and hand crafted with the care you’ve come to expect from Gulick Group. Starting from the $1.8Ms.
Inquiries: 703.674.0350 | summer_creek@gulickgroup.com | www.gulickgroup.com | Brokers Warmly Welcomed
division to acting commissioner.
After leaving government, he
opened a law office on F Street in
the District and practiced before
the U.S. Supreme Court.
The Holcomb house retains
some of its original features,
including a mansard roof, bracketed cornice and three-sided
wraparound porch. Inside, wood
trim around the doorways and
windows adds elegance. Colorful
leaded glass transoms are striking. A wood-burning fireplace
warms the living room.
The master bathroom on the
second level has its original tub
and tile. The hardwood floors on
the upper levels are original
heart pine.
A wall of windows in the
family room overlooks a flagstone patio.
A spacious deck is just off the
breakfast area in the kitchen. A
two-car garage is detached from
the home.
The house has had six owners
in the past 130 years. It has
remained in the same family for
nearly 50 years, with the current
owners buying it from the wife’s
parents.
Because the house is in a
historic district, homeowners
are eligible for a tax credit equal
to 25 percent of documented
expenses for maintenance restoration or preservation work. The
credit is applied to real property
taxes.
The four-bedroom, four-bathroom 2,576-square-foot house is
listed at $925,000. An open
house is scheduled for Sunday
from 2 to 4 p.m.
kathy.orton@washpost.com
Eddy Palanzo contributed to this
report.
2200 SALISBURY RD., SILVER SPRING, MD.
$925,000
Features: Known as the Curtis W. and Elizabeth Holcomb house, the
Second Empire home was built circa 1887. The house has had just six
owners in the past 130 years. It has remained in the same family for nearly
50 years. The home retains some of its original features, including a
mansard roof, bracketed cornice and a three-sided, wraparound porch.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 4/4
Approximate square footage: 2,576
Lot size: 0.62 acre
Open house: Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m.
Agents: Peggy Speaker and Cindy Holland, Long & Foster
For more photos of this home and other houses for sale in the area, go
to washingtonpost.com/wherewelive.
15
EZ
MODELS
OPEN
CONDOMINIUMS
-OF-
BETHESDA
N E W LY B U I LT 3 - B E D R O O M M A S T E R P I E C E S .
OVERSIZED TERRACES
S PA C I O U S I N T E R I O R S
O N O V E R 1 3 G L O R I O U S A C R E S I N B E T H E S D A F R O M $ 1 ,9 9 0 ,0 0 0 .
/ SAT & SUN 11-4
quarrysprings.com / 3 0 1 . 8 1 2 . 4 4 5 3
OCTOBER 21, 2017
Sales and marketing by The Mayhood Company. Developed by 1788 Holdings.
. SATURDAY,
OPEN HOUSE THIS WEEKEND
THE WASHINGTON POST
S P E C T A C U L A R N E W 3 -B E D R O O M C O N D O M I N I U M R E S I D E N C E S
16
EZ
Buying New
Mayfair on Main
Lavish townhouses not far from food, shopping
BY
A UDREY H OFFER
Mayfair on Main is an up-andcoming neighborhood of 25 luxury townhouses in the heart of Old
Town Fairfax in Fairfax City, Va.,
about 22 miles from the District.
It’s distinguished by easy walking
to shops and eateries and an urban vitality visible in pedestrian
traffic during the day and at
night, too.
Four groupings of six and seven
townhouses are in construction
on a rectangular block bounded
by Main Street, East Street and
Sager Avenue. Red-brick exteriors are up on a few of the houses,
others are covered in Typar wrap,
and some are still being framed
with sheets of wood. There will be
two floor plans — the 17-foot-wide
Regent is the smaller, and the
20-foot-wide Parklane is the larger. Delivery is scheduled from
November to February.
‘One big suite’: All the townhouses have roof decks, which are
spacious enough for a dining table and chairs, plus a reclining
lounge chair. An optional doublesided indoor-outdoor gas fireplace adds a glint of sparkling
orange-red light to the fading
sunset in the distance. And with
area temperatures that stay above
chill till December, it’s likely that
you can enjoy drinks on the roof
BENJAMIN C TANKERSLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A loft and bedroom are on the third level of the townhouses, with two more bedrooms one level down.
The loft opens onto a roof deck big enough to fit a dining table and chairs and a reclining lounge chair.
With area temperatures that stay above chill till
December, it’s likely that you can enjoy drinks
on the roof for a good part of the year.
3-
Community Center with Sport Court
18
Public Park & Covered Amphitheater
ac
Paved Exercise Trails
re
Enjoy Fishing & Kayaking
in the Ni River Reservoir
lo
OCTOBER 21, 2017
. SATURDAY,
THE WASHINGTON POST
ts
Minutes from Spotsylvania
Farmers Market
High Speed Internet Available
Live Simply
Spotsylvania, Va
Exclusive Waterfront Community
Minutes from I95, VRE, Downtown Fredericksburg, & Central Park Shopping
Fortunes Landing Sales Center
8636 Highclere Lane
Spotsylvania, VA 22553
Simply Home:
Melanie Pascal | 540.786.0817
SimplyHomeVa.com - FortunesLandingVa.com
Coldwell Banker Elite:
Charlotte Rouse | 540.419.9206
crouse@cbeva.com - MLS# SP9940801
*Prices, financing, and other offers subject to change without notice. Contact Sales Representative for details.
for a good part of the year.
Behind the roof terrace, on the
third level, is a small loft and
bedroom. “The builder is amenable to some modest structural
changes such as eliminating the
wall between this loft and bedroom,” said Laurie Hargadon,
sales manager with McWilliams
Ballard, the company handling
sales for the developer, Pillars
Development Group. “Some people who’ve visited said, ‘I’d like
this to be one big suite.’ ”
One level down, on the second
floor, are two bedrooms. The master has a walk-in closet, a big
window and a spacious bathroom
suite whose features include a
soaking tub with a ledge on which
to sit or set candles, a separate
shower with a seat and a water
closet with a toilet. From the
window in the model unit, one
can see the regional public library
and the flag flying at the county
courthouse.
The entrance to the main living
MAYFAIR ON MAIN
10340 Main St., Fairfax City, Va.
There will be 25 townhouse
condominiums ranging from
$819,900 to $869,900. One has
been sold.
Builder: Pillars Development
Group
Features: The facades are red
brick with natural stone accent
perimeter walls. Each residence
comes with two underground
parking spaces immediately
adjacent to the unit’s entrance and
a rooftop terrace. Oak floors are
installed on the garage entry level,
main level, second level hallway
and owner’s suite. The kitchen is
outfitted with GE stainless-steel
appliances, granite counters and
island topped by three pendant
lights, an undermount stainlesssteel sink, and maple cabinets with
soft close doors and drawers. The
master bathroom has a soaking
tub, a shower with a built-in seat
and a double sink.
Bedrooms/bathrooms: 3/4
Square footage: 1,710 to 2,434
Condo association fee: $185 for
Regent model and $213 for
Parklane model
View model: From 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. Thursday to Monday
Contact: Laurie Hargadon at
703-570-6037 or livemayfair.com
level is through the front door at
street level or up from the garage.
Through the garage door is a
small room. If a few wall hooks
and shelves are installed, the
space could become a mudroom
suitable for dropping off coats,
umbrellas and shoes.
Then it’s a short climb to the
main living level with kitchen,
dining and living rooms. The
kitchen has an island but is big
enough for a table and chairs or a
small sofa, too. It adjoins the
living room, where there’s plenty
To see more photos of Mayfair on
Main, go to washingtonpost.com/
realestate.
17
EZ
fountains that block street noise.
It’s the perfect spot to hang out
with a friend or to join your
neighbors for concerts.
Daniels Run Park is 48 acres of
hiking and biking trails in the
woods. Van Dyck Park comprises
20 acres and offers lighted basketball, tennis and volleyball courts
and a picnic pavilion with three
grills. Fairfax Memorial Park is a
landscaped cemetery on 128
acres.
of space to encourage family and
friends to congregate on the
couch or floor. Natural light coming in from large double-paned
windows makes the area bright.
Some units have fenced backyard
patios at the house rear; others
have decks.
Underground parking: “The
community is built on top of the
parking structure,” Hargadon
said. “Because we have limited
space, the developer said, ‘Let’s
build a garage underneath and
everything else on top of that.’ ”
The underground podium garage is unique to the property and
similar to the Torpedo Factory
condos in Alexandria. “It makes
for a cleaner, neater property,” she
said, “because there are no garage
doors or driveways with parked
cars.” Cars access the underground garage via a garage-level
service bay on Sager Avenue. Each
townhouse is assigned two spots
next to their unit, and there are
six for visitors. It couldn’t be more
convenient to unload groceries,
packages or suitcases after a trip.
What’s nearby: Mayfair is in
Old Town Fairfax, which is registered as a national and state his-
Schools: Daniels Run Elementary, Lanier Middle, Fairfax High.
BENJAMIN C TANKERSLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The luxury townhouses at Mayfair on Main are in Old Town Fairfax, a national and state historic
district, with Fairfax Regional Library and Old Town Square only a couple of blocks away.
toric district. Fairfax County
court buildings and Fairfax Re-
gional Library are a couple of
blocks away. So is Old Town
Square, a city park with grass,
flowers, stones to perch on and
Transit: Driving from the District, Mayfair is reached via Interstate 66 West. Take Exit 60 onto
Virginia Route 123 South/Chain
Bridge Road to North Street and
then to Main Street. Park in the
public lot at East and Main
streets.
Vienna/Fairfax-GMU Metro
station on the Orange Line is
about 10 minutes away. The station is served by several Fairfax
Connector bus routes, including
the City-University Energysaver
(CUE) that runs weekdays from
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and also stops
at George Mason University.
realestate@washpost.com
AT LAKE MANASSAS
YEAR-END SAVINGS
UP TO $25,000!*
THE WASHINGTON POST
3,000+ sq. ft. Luxury Townhomes Featuring
3 - 4 BR’s & 3.5 - 4.5 BA’s with Exquisite Options
Including Elevators, Verandas, Patios, Private
Gardens and 2-car Garages in the Prestigious
Gated Lake Manassas Community.
. SATURDAY,
The Veranda Collection from $522,900
Immediate Availability
8024 Turtle Creek Circle, Gainesville, Virginia 20155
Model Open Fri. - Tues., 11am - 5pm
BasheerAndEdgemoore.com
*Receive up to $25,000 to be used towards options or allowable closing costs. Offer is valid on qualifying homes only. This is a limited time offer, subject to
change and may be withdrawn at the discretion of Basheer & Edgemoore without prior notice and may not be used in conjunction with any
other discount. Prices subject to change without notice. Certain restrictions apply. For more details, see Sales Manager. 10/2017.
OCTOBER 21, 2017
703.727.4603
18
Real Estate Guide
EZ
Capitol Hill
ATTENTION ADVERTISERS:
Capitol Hill
Logan Circle - NW
Logan Circle - NW
All advertisements for the sale or rental of dwelling units published in The Washington Post are subject
to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or
discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or
intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.' State law forbids, discrimination,
based on factors in addition to those protected under Federal law.
The Washington Post will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal
opportunity basis.
16th St. Heights - NW
Silver Spring
16th Street Heights
1340 Nicholson St NW, WDC
NEW CONDOS | SALES START OCT 28TH & 29TH
Join our VIP Priority list today and be among the
first to learn more about this boutique collection
of two-bedroom, two-bath condominiums coming
to the heart of the 16th Street Heights neighborhood. Homes priced from the $300s.
Sil Spg/ Clifton Park Village
$325,000
915 Heron Drive
Open 1-3
Cute 3BR Cape w/GAR. Gorgeous lot. Koi pond!
Robert Suggs
410-469-0059
202-966-1400
C E L E B R AT E T H E R E L E A S E O F P H A S E I I
nicholsonliving.com | 202.792.0051
N E W D I S T I N C T I V E LY M O D E R N T O W N H O M E S O N C A P I T O L H I L L
Immediate Move-In | PRICED FROM $1.29M
Hyattsville
HYATTSVILLE
$350,000
OPEN HOUSE - Saturday 1PM-4PM
Capitol Hill
900 11th St. SE, WDC
Schedule Your Private Appointment Today
Two Bedroom Condo #211
$769,900
Gorgeous new two bedroom condominium. Large
windows with southern exposure. Spacious home
with 1,318 square feet, featuring gourmet kitchen
and en suite bathrooms. Amenities include an
outdoor terrace with a fire pit and rooftop with
monument views. Low condo fees. Moments to
Barracks Row and the Metro.
Craig Souza, Sales Director
202-368-7229
Capitol Hill
418 13th St. SE, WDC
Open House Sunday 1-3 PM
New 3 Bed + Den Townhome
$1.289 million
New construction luxury townhome on Capitol
Hill. 3 bedroom + Den, 4.5 baths, gourmet kitchen,
private garage, private roof deck. Central location.
Contact sales agent for showing.
David Klimas, Vice President
202-431-1272
Sales By McWilliams Ballard
Beautiful Remodeled rambler w/5BR, 4 BA, living
& dining RM w/hdwd flrs. & kit. w/stainless steel
appliances. LW LV offers In law suite w/fam rm,
& kitchenette. Deck & Lgebkyd.. Close to shops,
public transportation, DC, & 495. From I-495, exit
on New Hampshire Ave S, L on University Blvd, R
on Riggs Rd, L onto Amherst Rd, 1st R on 20th Ave,
and L onto 2000 Van Buren St. For Info, please
contact Lina Guerra Flores w/Elite Properties, Inc.
of USA at 240-723-1431 or 301-439-3990.
LE ARN MORE | ELYSIUMDC .COM
W W W. B U C H A N A N PA R K H O M E S . C O M | 2 0 2 . 4 3 1 . 1 2 7 2
Inquire about our accessible homes.
Dupont Circle - NW
Dupont Circle - NW
Northeast - Other
Springfield
Springfield
$400,000
Sales center open daily: 11am to 5pm
$740K to $3.2M | 202.293.2501
2 5 01 M S T. N W | 2 5 01M . C O M
Wesley Heights
S A L E S BY M AY H O O D C O M PA N Y
Fairfax County
Fairfax County
7-DAY ONLINE AUCTION
OCTOBER 21, 2017
Northwest - Other
Luxury condo building near Georgetown, with
floor-to-ceiling windows, rich amenities and 24-hour
concierge. Landscaped rooftop and Nobu, the
world-famous restaurant.
Seller to give $15,000 closing help- 3 bdrm, 1.5
ba semi-detached split-level - large rear yard, offstreet parking, near Metro (Red & Green).
Cliftine Jones Ltd.
202.347.5593 202.285.4247
. SATURDAY,
Northwest - Other
WEST END LIVING
$585,000
Detached Home
5825 Dawes Ave
Price Reduced! 4BR, 3BA. Large Fam. Rm, Hrdwd
Flrs, Fin. Bsmt., Garage, Treed Lot. 10 mins to DC.
For info: 703.402.4556
Simmons Realty Group
703.533.2855
$525,000
4 1 8 1 3 TH S T R E E T S E , W D C 2 0 0 0 3
Alexandria
Columbia Heights
$524,000
Great 2BR 1.5BA row house w/outdoor space
blocks from metro, shops & restaurants. Driveway off alley behind house. Freshly updated
& move-in ready! Open 2-4, 782 Irving St. NW
Jennifer Morrow
301-922-8295
Betheda
240-497-1700
823 Kennedy St, NE
NOW SELLING | 2 BEDROOMS FROM $1.4M+
College Park
$424,900
OPEN 2-5 New build! 5BR/4FB colonial with
flexible floor plan, off street parking.
5202 Huron Street
Long & Foster
(O)301-388-2600
Alex/FFX Co
THE WASHINGTON POST
of 2 bedroom residences at Elysium Logan.
Prince George's Co
MD
Columbia Heights - NW
Open 1-4
Spacious living can still be intimate and luxurious. Schedule
your appointment today and explore our remaining selection
O N O C T O B E R 28 T H F R O M 1-4 P M
Capitol Hill
Riggs Park
Yo u’re Invited
Wesley Heights
$1,895,000
GREAT NEW PRICE!
2923 45th St NW
Charming home in prime Wesley Heights
location a few blocks from parkland. Handsome
4 bedroom home with additional top floor guest
room/office, 3 full & 2 half bathrooms. Features
include a very spacious and sunny eat-in Chefs
kitchen with center island and breakfast area
with 10 1/2 foot ceiling; updated bathrooms, a
cozy paneled library with 10 foot ceiling, and
many upgrades. Complete with a level fenced
lot, beautiful views and short distance to Horace
Man School. Open 2-4pm
Benjamin Tessler
202-494-3111
202-362-1300
Bethesda
BETHESDA
$899,900
5015 Baltimore Ave Open 1-3
Bethesda Gem! 1st Presentation. 3BR, 3FB
includes in-law suite, updated kitchen, sun
porch, room to grow, detached workshop/shed.
Close to Crescent Trail, shops, schools and more!
Carole Kay
240-645-6655
Long & Foster
301-468-0606
Home delivery starts
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Ask me about home delivery!
1-800-753-POST SF
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
5 bedrm, 2.5 ba, 2-Story Brick/ Frame, 6017
Nassau Dr, 2494sf+/-, Bsmt, 2-CarGar, LR, DR,
EIK, FR w/FP, High Bid Wins! (Area Comps:
$550k-$675k) 804-358-0500 (vaf#777), Open
Hse: Sun 10/22 2pm-4pm, Info/Bidding at:
EBIDLOCAL.com
PRESERVE AT WESTFIELDS
IN CHANTILLY, VA
GEORGIA ROW
at Walter Reed • Washington, D.C.
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
How about some
home delivery?
TOWNHOMES FROM THE UPPER $500s
1-800-753-POST
SF
SELLING QUICKLY! BIG BACKYARDS!
• Private Driveways & 1-2 Car Garages • Rooftop Terraces
• Walk to Shopping, Fitness & Transportation
Home delivery
is convenient.
(703) 214-6658
WestfieldsChantilly.com
1-800-753-POST
4900 Stonecroft Blvd., Chantilly, VA 20151
SF
Open: Daily 11 am – 5 pm • Brokers Warmly Welcomed
Multi-Level Condominiums from the $500s.
• Customizable 2-3 bedroom floor plans
• Rooftop terraces available
• Less than a mile from Takoma Metro Station & minutes from Downtown D.C.
• Directly across from the Walter Reed Redevelopment
(202) 792-0057 • GeorgiaRowDC.com
Sales Office: 1416 P St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20001
Open: By Appointment Only. Brokers Welcome.*
*Must register and
comply with policy terms.
19
Real Estate Guide
Bethesda
Bethesda
Prince George's Co
MD
EZ
VA Real Estate
Auctions
Prince George's Co
MD
VA Real Estate
Auctions
PUBLIC AUCTION
Valuable Commercial Lot - Prime Location
in Dahlgren, VA 22485
Rt. 301 (James Madison Parkway) and
Commerce Drive, Dahlgren, VA 22485
A HIGHER STYLE.
A Stunning Sight to See.
October 24, 2017 @ 1:00 PM
Property is believed to be 1.40+/- Acres, unimproved single parcel.
Zoned C-2, General Trade
Prime Commercial location with direct frontage on Route 301.
Large lot in high growth area with huge potential.
Schedule a Hard Hat Tour and Choose Your View
Do not miss this opportunity! ~ Investors welcome! ~ No Buyer’s Premium!
Bethesda’s Tallest Condominium Residences from the $700’s
TERMS: A deposit of $50,000.00 will be required at time of sale by certified funds or cashier’s check.
Settlement is to occur within Thirty (30) days from date of sale or
sooner, time is of the essence, with the balance to be paid at settlement. Additional terms may be announced at time of sale.
ChevalOnFairmont.com | 301.476.1637
Prices, financing and offers subject to change without
notice. Please see a sales representative for details.
Broker Participation Welcome. Property sold As-Is, Where-Is.
Sales by
For complete terms & conditions visit:
www.atlanticauctions.com or contact Jack Levi at (410)803-4161.
Va. Lic. # 2905000893
GRAND OPENING
Seashore Sales
$965,000
Fawn Lake
Calvert County
St. John's Creek
959 Curtis Rd, Dowell, MD
Home
delivery
makes good
sense.
Stunning Home in the Luxury Gated Community - Fawn Lake
4 bedrm, 4 ba, One 1/2ba, Built in 2002.
11400 Stonewall Jackson Dr.
703-328-0532
THIS WEEKEND
Easy Pay keeps you in-the-know.
8302 Woodmont Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814
Chris McNelis, Broker
410-394-0990 Office
410-610-4045 Mobile
www.mcnelisgroup.com
(And your subscription up-to-date.)
ENROLL TODAY
Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy
or call 202-334-6100.
LiveStonehall.com | 301.747.3899
Sales by
Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
1-800-753-POST
S0833-1 6x2
Two-Bedroom Residences from $599K
Two-Bedroom + Den Residences from $999K
Prices, financing and offers subject
to change without notice. Please see
a sales representative for details.
OPEN HOUSE TODAY 12-3PM
Solomons waterfront
Protected water w/private pier
6BR/6BA, 2 gas FP, HW
Main lvl MBR suite
NEW PRICE, $739,900
Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
THE WASHINGTON POST
HAVE YOU ACCOMPLISHED ANYTHING LATELY?
WE HEAR YOU
GOT RID OF
NO
WHAT IF YOU
GOT RID OF
12 MONTHS
12 YEARS
WORTH OF STUFF AND SOLD
IT FOR DECENT CASH
CLASSIFIED
. SATURDAY,
YES
KLMNO
C054C 5x3.5
Source: Scarborough 2012, Release 2. Washington Post newspaper 7-day cumulative reach; Express 5-day reach.
OCTOBER 21, 2017
2.1 million readers, bargain hunters included • 202.334.6200 • washingtonpost.com/classified • Open 24/7
Or place your ad in Express, our daily commuter read, and reach 536,000 readers.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 21, 2017
20
EZ
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