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The Washington Post – October 31, 2017

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Mostly sunny 60/43 • Tomorrow: Shower 58/50 B8
SU V1 V2 V3 V4
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort,
left, and his ex-business partner Rick Gates, right,
entered not-guilty pleas to 12 charges, including
conspiracy against the United States, conspiracy to
launder money and making false statements.
. $2
George Papadopoulos, a former Trump campaign
adviser, has been cooperating with investigators for
three months, after admitting to making false
statements about contacts with a foreigner who
claimed connections to Russian officials.
3 Trump campaign o∞cials charged
INSIDE THE WHITE HOUSE
FIRST INDICTMENTS
IN MUELLER PROBE
In front of TV,
president
fumes with
frustration
Adviser lied about efforts
to meet with Russians
BY M ATT Z APOTOSKY,
R OSALIND S . H ELDERMAN,
C AROL D . L EONNIG
AND S PENCER S . H SU
R OBERT C OSTA,
P HILIP R UCKER
AND A SHLEY P ARKER
BY
President Trump woke before
dawn on Monday and burrowed
in at the White House residence
to wait for the Russia bombshell
he knew was coming.
Separated from most of his
West Wing staff — who fretted
over why he was late getting to
the Oval Office — Trump clicked
on the television and spent the
morning playing fuming media
critic, legal analyst and crisis
communications strategist, according to several people close to
him.
The president digested the
news of the first indictments in
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III’s probe with exasperation and
disgust, these people said. He
called his lawyers repeatedly. He
listened intently to cable news
commentary. And, with rising irritation, he watched live footage
of his onetime campaign adviser
and confidant, Paul Manafort,
turning himself in to the FBI.
Initially, Trump felt vindicated.
Though frustrated that the media
were linking him to the indictment and tarnishing his presidency, he cheered that the
charges against Manafort and his
deputy, Rick Gates, were focused
primarily on activities that began
before his campaign. Trump
tweeted at 10:28 a.m., “there is
NO COLLUSION!”
But the president’s celebration
was short-lived. A few minutes
later, court documents were unsealed showing that George Papadopoulos, an unpaid foreign policy
TRUMP CONTINUED ON A7
The sidestep strategy
GOP members of Congress avoid
saying too much about probe. A6
Podesta brothers entangled
Tony is a powerful lobbyist; John is a
top Democratic operative. A8
BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Paul Manafort leaves U.S. District Court in Washington. To watch a video about the charges in the probe, visit wapo.st/specialcounsel.
BY
POLITICAL FALLOUT
LEGAL STRATEGY
Both sides of the aisle
brace for the next jolt
The message to other
targets: We are not playing
M ICHAEL S CHERER
The hardest part for official
Washington is not knowing what
happens next.
Amid the escalating criminal
investigation into Russian involvement in the 2016 election,
every corner of the city finds
itself preparing for the unexpected.
Democrats fret that President
Trump might try to shut down
the inquiry. Republicans worry
that their last best hope for a
legislative win, a tax overhaul,
could fall victim to the scandal.
And the president’s denial that
his campaign worked in any way
with Russia continues to be tested by new disclosures.
The only person with any significant control over events, special counsel Robert S. Mueller III,
offered no hints Monday on his
next move beyond the day’s
bombshells — legal filings that
included the indictment of two
former Trump campaign officials
and the guilty plea of a third.
And the possibilities seemed
only to grow as the day wore on.
Hours after the first indictments
landed, a leading Democratic lobbyist, Tony Podesta, announced
POLITICS CONTINUED ON A9
D EVLIN B ARRETT,
S ARI H ORWITZ
AND E LLEN N AKASHIMA
BY
With the guilty plea of one
Trump campaign official and a
31-page indictment of two others,
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III spoke volumes more about the
Russia probe than months of
heated public debate. Without
uttering a word, Mueller’s message was clear, according to veteran lawyers: He isn’t bluffing,
and witnesses are talking.
The double-barreled court filings ratchet up the pressure on
everyone under scrutiny in the
Federal judge blocks part of
transgender ban in military
Preliminary injunction is
another legal setback for
Trump administration
BY
J USTIN J OUVENAL
A federal judge in Washington
blocked the Trump administration’s proposed transgender military ban, writing in a strongly
worded opinion that the policy
“does not appear to be supported
by any facts.”
U.S. District Judge Colleen
Kollar-Kotelly issued the prelim-
inary injunction Monday, finding that a group of transgender
service members would have a
strong chance of prevailing in
their lawsuit to have the ban
declared unconstitutional. The
injunction remains in place until
the lawsuit is resolved or a judge
lifts it.
The move is another legal
setback for the president, who
surprised military leaders and
members of Congress when he
announced the proposal via a
series of tweets in late July that
reversed an Obama administration policy allowing transgender
service members to serve openly
MILITARY CONTINUED ON A20
Congressional testimony
will have revelations
from Facebook, Twitter
BY C RAIG T IMBERG
AND E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
ANDREW RENNEISEN/GETTY IMAGES
Fleeing a conflict not their own
Girls from a Nairobi primary school escape a clash there
sparked in part by the results of a controversial presidential
rerun vote that spurred violence in Kenya. A13
THE NATION
Fed leadership President Trump is reportedly
expected to nominate Jerome Powell to
replace Janet L. Yellen as the next chair. A15
MUELLER CONTINUED ON A7
PROBE CONTINUED ON A6
Papadopoulos outreach
Adviser sought a meeting between
the campaign and Russians. A8
Manafort’s lifestyle
Ex-campaign chair had a spending
spree, an indictment says. A10
Reach of Russian content
far wider than first reported
IN THE NEWS
JEROME POWELL. ZACH GIBSON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
investigation, lawyers said, in
part because they show that a
former Trump campaign adviser
began cooperating with the FBI
three months ago.
“This is the way you kick off a
big case,’’ said Patrick Cotter, a
white-collar defense lawyer in
Chicago who once worked as a
federal prosecutor in New York
alongside Andrew Weissmann,
who is spearheading the prosecution of former Trump campaign
chairman Paul Manafort and his
deputy, Rick Gates.
Prosecutors also announced a
guilty plea from former campaign
Special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III on Monday revealed
charges against three former
Trump campaign officials — including onetime campaign chairman Paul Manafort — marking
the first criminal allegations to
come from probes into possible
Russian influence in U.S. political
affairs.
The charges are striking for
their breadth, touching all levels
of the Trump campaign and exploring possible personal financial wrongdoing by those involved, as well as what appeared
to be a concerted effort by one
campaign official to arrange a
meeting with Russian officials.
One of the three charged, former Trump foreign policy adviser
George Papadopoulos, admitted
to making a false statement to
FBI investigators who asked
about his contacts with foreigners claiming to have high-level
Russian connections.
Manafort and longtime business partner Rick Gates, meanwhile, were charged in a 12-count
indictment with conspiracy to
launder money, making false
statements and other charges in
connection with their work advising a Russia-friendly political
party in Ukraine.
The investigation, which the
FBI began last year but which
escalated significantly with
Mueller’s appointment in May,
has taken a heavy toll on the
Trump administration, repeatedly putting the president on the
defensive as reports have
emerged about the work the special counsel’s team is doing. With
A study suggested that
corals have a dangerous
taste for plastic. A3
Obstacles facing the
Affordable Care Act’s
annual enrollment season are likely to leave
fewer Americans with
health coverage under
the law. A4
A Native American
professor at the University of North Dakota
said he will resign because the school
stopped him from lec-
turing on Dakota Access
pipeline protests. A4
THE WORLD
Two millennial women
play key roles in the regime of North Korea’s
Kim Jong Un. A12
The White House said
it would help nations in
Africa’s Sahel region
build a counterterrorism force but balked at
providing multilateral
support through the
United Nations. A13
Spanish authorities
moved aggressively to
quash Catalonia’s bid
for independence, as
separatist leaders appeared to retreat after
declaring their region a
free nation. A14
THE ECONOMY
House Republican
leaders are making lastminute changes to their
tax bill to try to win over
skeptics. A15
REI, the outdoorgoods business, is closing its stores again on
Black Friday and recommending that customers go hiking in-
Facebook plans to tell lawmakers on Tuesday that 126 million of
its users may have seen content
produced and circulated by Russian operatives, many times more
than the company had previously
disclosed about the reach of the
online influence campaign target-
stead of shopping. A20
ing American voters.
The company previously reported that an estimated 10 million users had seen ads bought by
Russian-controlled accounts and
pages. But Facebook has been silent regarding the spread of free
content despite independent researchers suggesting that it was
seen by far more users than the
ads were.
Tuesday’s planned disclosure,
contained in draft company testimony obtained by The Washington Post ahead of three Capitol
Hill hearings this week, comes as
Facebook and other tech giants
face mounting pressure to fully
FACEBOOK CONTINUED ON A5
Inside
THE REGION
Elected officials in
D.C., Maryland and Virginia are scrambling to
find the money to fund
Metro’s budget proposal. B1
D.C. Council members
pressed concerns about
patient safety with the
operator of United
Medical Center. B1
A Maryland judge sentenced a former school
security chief to 18
months in jail for
sexually abusing a
17-year-old student. B4
HEALTH & SCIENCE
ST YLE
Happiness, terror
Bored to death
Four months after her
child was born healthy in
a parking lot, a woman’s
bleeding leads to a rare
diagnosis. E1
A lot of Americans
believe in ghosts. But
often the spooky stories
we tell aren’t, well, that
spooky. C1
BUSINESS NEWS ........................ A15
COMICS........................................C6
OPINION PAGES..........................A18
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B5
TELEVISION..................................C4
WORLD NEWS.............................A12
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 330
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
1 4 2 5
A2
EZ
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
Former president Barack Obama hosts an Obama
Foundation summit in Chicago. For developments, go to
washingtonpost.com/national.
11 a.m.
The Supreme Court hears oral arguments in U.S. Bank
National Association v. Village at Lakeridge. Visit
washingtonpost.com/national for developments.
8 p.m.
The Los Angeles Dodgers host the Houston Astros in
Game 6 of baseball’s World Series. The Astros lead the
series, 3-2. Follow the game at postsports.com.
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CO R R ECTI O N S
An article in the Oct. 29 Arts &
Style section about the gender
divide in competitive pinball
misstated where the Northwest
Pinball Championships were
held. They took place in
Washington state, not Oregon.
The article also incorrectly said
that International Flipper
Pinball Association President
Josh Sharpe is director of
marketing at Stern Pinball; his
brother Zach holds that job. His
name was also misspelled as
“Sharp” on a subsequent
reference.
Because of a production error,
the television grid in the Oct. 28
Style section contained the
broadcast and cable listings for
Monday, Oct. 30.
The Buying New feature in the
Oct. 28 Real Estate section,
about the Westlight
condominium in the District,
misspelled the name of its
architect. He is Enrique Norten,
not Henrique Norton.
A Digest item in the Oct. 26
Sports section misstated the
location of a German Cup soccer
match between Bayern Munich
and Leipzig the previous day.
The match was played in Berlin.
An Oct. 24 Health and Science
article about getting a second
opinion before medical
treatment said such opinions are
typically not covered by private
insurance, Medicare or
Medicaid. In fact, they typically
are covered.
We bring you a richly designed
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new search functionality and
offline reading. Find it in the App
Store.
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
Easy on the Smirnoff, colluders
Robert Mueller’s
conviction of a
former Trump
campaign adviser
and his
indictment of two
Dana
more finally prove
Milbank
it: Hillary is
WASHINGTON guilty!
Technically,
SKETCH
President Trump’s
standard line of
defense in the Russia probe — we
did not collude — suffered a bit
of a blow Monday. In a plea deal
with the special counsel unsealed
Monday (at about the time
Trump was tweeting the phrase
“there is NO COLLUSION!”),
Trump campaign adviser George
Papadopoulos admitted the
Trump adviser had contacts with
Russians offering the Trump
campaign Hillary Clinton’s
emails and other “dirt,” and he
tried to arrange meetings with
Russian officials. That’s pretty
much the dictionary definition of
“collusion.”
But Trump’s deficit of honesty
is offset by a surplus of dexterity.
Though not abandoning the
there-is-no-collusion defense, the
White House is already elevating
a secondary position — the okaymaybe-we-colluded-but-Clintoncolluded-more defense.
“There’s clear evidence of the
Clinton campaign colluding with
Russian intelligence,” White
House press secretary Sarah
Huckabee Sanders proclaimed at
Monday afternoon’s briefing,
after the indictment by Mueller
of former Trump campaign
manager Paul Manafort and a
colleague.
Trump, who often accuses
others of the exact thing he
stands accused of, reacted to the
indictments with abundant
punctuation: “But why aren’t
Crooked Hillary & the Dems the
focus?????” he tweeted.
Trump has been complaining
about “the lack of investigation
on Clinton made Fake Dossier,”
and “GUILT by Democrats/
Clinton.” He tweeted a Hill
article with an exculpatory quote
from Fox News’s Chris Wallace
(Headline: “More evidence of
Dem collusion with Russia than
GOP”) and a New York Post
column arguing that perhaps
Clinton “came closer to colluding
with the Russians” than Trump.
The evidence of Clinton’s
alleged “collusion” with Russia?
She and the Democrats hired an
opposition-research firm that
wrote a dossier on, um, Trump’s
collusion with Russia. She also
colluded with Russia by being
secretary of state at a time when
another arm of the U.S.
government approved a uranium
deal with a Russian-owned
company that had given money
to her husband and his
foundation.
Both of these are about as
compelling as saying the guilty
plea entered by Papadopoulos is
further evidence of Clinton’s
collusion with Russia because
“George Papadopoulos” sounds
like “George Stephanopoulos,”
who once worked for Bill
Clinton, who is married to
Hillary Clinton.
By Trump’s new standard,
“collusion” now covers not just
Russia’s election interference but
anything that has to do with
Russia done by anybody at any
time for any reason. If that’s the
rule, there is indeed plenty of
evidence that Clinton colluded
with Russia. She has visited
Russia often, spoken with
Russians and even tried to reset
relations with Russia. I’d bet she
has also watched Russian ballet
and read Russian novels.
But by that standard there’s
also evidence most everybody
else colludes with Russia, too.
Therefore, the Mueller
investigation will need to expand
significantly. The following
people should present
themselves at the earliest
opportunity to the special
counsel’s office for interviews:
All persons who now
consume or in the past have
consumed vodka. This includes
but is not limited to Black
Russians, White Russians and
Moscow Mules.
All persons who now
consume or in the past have
consumed beluga or osetra
caviar.
All persons who now play, or
previously have played, with
nesting dolls.
All persons who watch or
have watched the FX drama “The
Americans.”
All persons who have viewed
“The Nutcracker” (including
children’s performances) or
“Swan Lake,” or hummed the
“1812 Overture.”
All persons who have dined
at the Russian Tea Room in New
York.
All persons who have
traveled to, or consumed wine
from, the Russian River Valley in
Sonoma County, Calif.
All persons who have read, or
have caused to be read, “Anna
Karenina,” “War and Peace,”
“Crime and Punishment,” “The
Brothers Karamazov” or any play
by Anton Chekhov.
All persons who have heard,
or have caused to be heard, the
work of Rachmaninoff,
Shostakovich, Stravinsky or
Mussorgsky.
All persons who have played
against, or watched a match
involving, Anna Kournikova,
Maria Sharapova or Garry
Kasparov.
All persons who have
experienced the work of Wassily
Kandinsky, Groucho Marx or
John Lennon.
All persons who have played
Russian roulette or flown in a
Sikorsky helicopter.
All persons who own
Siberian huskies, or any dogs
exhibiting Pavlovian responses.
All members of the Russian
Orthodox Church or any other
Eastern Orthodox churches,
Orthodox Jews and anybody who
does anything in an orthodox
manner.
All persons of Russian
ancestry, including but not
limited to those with the
following endings: -ov, -sky, -ski,
-ic, -vic, -in, -enko and -uk.
And all persons whose
ancestors may have once
occupied Russian territory,
including but not limited to all
those of French, German,
Swedish or Mongol ancestry.
Hmm. Mueller: Is that a
German name?
Collusion! Looks as if we’re
going to need a special counsel to
probe the special counsel.
Twitter: @Milbank
The Scrabblegrams feature in
the Oct. 25 Style section
misstated the value of the “m” in
the word “whimsy.” It was worth
three points, not four.
Washington Post
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Comments can be directed to The
Post’s reader advocate, who can be
reached at 202-334-7582 or
readers@washpost.com.
Justices weigh funds for defendants
Attorneys seek more
money to help client
avoid death penalty
BY
R OBERT B ARNES
If not for the fact that a Texas
death row inmate’s life might
hang in the balance, Monday’s
hour-long argument at the Supreme Court could be dismissed
as simply an exercise in semantics.
The federal Capital Justice Act
allows lawyers for indigent defendants facing the death penalty to
apply for money for “investigative,
expert or other services” that are
“reasonably necessary” to assemble the kind of mitigating evidence that might persuade the
jury to forgo a recommendation of
death.
But a judge denied the funds to
attorneys for Carlos Manuel Ayestas, who was convicted of the brutal killing of 67-year-old Santiaga
Paneque during an invasion of her
Houston home in 1995.
In the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the 5th Circuit, which covers Texas, the law has been interpreted to
mean a defendant must show that
there is a “substantial need” for
such services.
As a district court judge and
Ayestas’s lawyers pointed out, that
creates something of a Catch-22:
The defendant would have to
demonstrate that there is some
relevant evidence he could discover without first having the funding to pursue that evidence.
But Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr.
wondered whether the court was
devoting itself to debating a distinction without a difference.
“What is the difference between
‘reasonably necessary’ and ‘substantial need’?” Alito asked Ayestas’s lawyer Lee Kovarsky of Baltimore. “I have been racking my
brain trying to think of something
that it is reasonably necessary for
me to obtain but as to which I do
not have the substantial need.
“And I can’t think of an example.”
Kovarsky could not satisfy Alito. But Kovarsky said that what a
court could not do is speculate
on what kind of evidence might
be gathered if an investigation
was authorized and then base
the decision on whether to grant
the funds on that kind of speculation.
Liberal justices were clearly
more on Ayestas’s side. They signaled they approved of Kovarsky’s
test that “services are reasonably
necessary when they would be
used to identify or develop possible claims by a reasonable attorney representing a paying client of
ordinary means.”
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
said there could be no other choice
in Ayestas’s case.
“This is a horrendous murder;
the only chance in the world that
this defendant has is if he can put
on a . . . mitigation case and convince one juror he shouldn’t get
the death penalty,” she said.
Texas Solicitor General Scott A.
Keller said reports of schizophrenia and head trauma to Ayestas
came after the conviction. But Justice Elena Kagan said that did not
matter when the defendant was
trying to do what Ayestas had
sought to accomplish: prove that
his trial lawyer had been negligent
in mounting a defense at sentencing.
“A person who has since the
incident in question been diagnosed as schizophrenic — you
know, some bell goes off that says I
think maybe we should do some
investigation and try to figure out
whether he was suffering from
mental-health issues at the time of
the incident,” she said.
Justice Sonia Sotomayor pointed out that Ayestas’s trial attorney
provided only “two and a half
pages of mitigation evidence.” She
asked Keller: “How can you stand
here and say that this kind of
investigation meets any constitutional standard?”
Justice Stephen G. Breyer said
there seemed to be a simple way to
resolve the case: Tell the 5th Circuit to use the “reasonably necessary” standard instead of its “substantial need” test.
“Follow the statute. And that’s
it. Goodbye,” Breyer said. “And all
these other arguments are for the
lower court.”
The case is Ayestas v. Davis.
robert.barnes@washpost.com
DIGEST
NATIONAL SECURITY
Capture of suspect in
2012 Benghazi attacks
U.S. Special Operations forces
have captured a militant who was
instrumental in the 2012 attacks
on U.S. facilities in Benghazi,
Libya, officials said Monday.
The attacks resulted in the
death of the U.S. ambassador to
the country and three other
Americans. The Obama
administration’s handling of the
deadly assaults became a
lightning rod for Republican
criticism of Hillary Clinton, who
was secretary of state at the time,
through her presidential
campaign.
The commandos captured the
man in Libya just before
midnight local time on Sunday
and are transporting him back to
the United States, the officials
said. The suspect is in the custody
of the Justice Department and is
expected to arrive on a military
plane within the next two days,
according to one of the officials.
The officials said the mission was
approved by President Trump
and done in coordination with
Libya’s internationally
recognized government.
The officials, who weren’t
authorized to speak publicly and
spoke on the condition of
anonymity, did not identify the
suspect and would not say where
he was captured.
The Sept. 11, 2012, attacks killed
U.S. Ambassador J. Christopher
Stevens, State Department
information management officer
Sean Patrick Smith and contract
security officers Tyrone Woods
and Glen Doherty.
Stevens and Smith died in a
burning diplomatic outpost
despite efforts to rescue them.
Woods and Doherty died nearly
eight hours later in a mortar
attack on a nearby CIA complex.
This month, another man
accused in the attacks, Ahmed
Abu Khattala, went on trial in
federal court in Washington. Abu
Khattala has pleaded not guilty
to the 18 charges against him,
including murder of an
internationally protected person,
providing material support to
terrorists, and destroying U.S.
property while causing death.
and Richard Hall, were arraigned
Monday on a 50-count
indictment that included rape
and kidnapping counts, said
acting Brooklyn district attorney
Eric Gonzalez. He said DNA
recovered from the woman
matched both defendants.
Martins’s attorney, Mark
Bederow, vowed to “vigorously”
challenge the case.
The woman said the detectives
assaulted her on Sept. 15 while
they were on duty.
— Associated Press
CALIFORNIA
— Associated Press
Teen’s death raises
toll in wildfires to 43
WEATHER
East Coast storm cuts
power to thousands
A severe storm packing
hurricane-force wind gusts and
soaking rain swept through the
Northeast early Monday,
knocking out power to nearly
1.5 million homes and businesses
and forcing hundreds of schools
to close in New England.
Falling trees knocked down
power lines across the region, and
some utility companies warned
customers that power could be
out for days. Trees also fell onto
homes and vehicles, but no
serious injuries were reported.
New England got the brunt of
the storm, which brought
sustained winds of up to 50 mph
in spots. A gust of 130 mph was
reported at the Mount
Washington Observatory in New
Hampshire, while winds hit
82 mph in Mashpee on Cape Cod
in Massachusetts.
The storm left 450,000 New
Hampshire residents without
power at its peak and produced
PETER PEREIRA/NEW BEDFORD, MASS. STANDARD-TIMES/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Peter Raymond gets some help retrieving items from his sailboat Monday after high winds overnight sent
sailboats crashing onto Padanaram beach in South Dartmouth, Mass. A powerful storm brought heavy rain
and hurricane-force wind gusts to New England, felling trees and power lines across the region. Maine and
New Hampshire were hit particularly hard.
wind gusts of 78 mph, emergency
officials said.
Maine also was hit hard, with
492,000 homes and businesses
losing electricity. The Portland
International Jetport recorded a
wind gust of 69 mph, and the
Amtrak Downeaster service
canceled a morning run because
of downed trees on the tracks.
Maine Gov. Paul LePage (R)
issued a state of emergency
proclamation, allowing drivers of
electrical line repair vehicles to
work more hours than federal law
allows to speed up power
restoration.
The storm began making its
way up the East Coast on Sunday,
the fifth anniversary of Hurricane
Sandy. That 2012 storm
devastated the nation’s most
populous areas and was blamed
for at least 182 deaths in the
United States and the Caribbean,
as well as more than $71 billion in
damage in the United States alone.
— Associated Press
NEW YORK
Detectives accused
of raping teenager
Two detectives threatened an
18-year-old woman with arrest
over a bottle of prescription pills,
handcuffed her, drove her around
in their police van and then raped
her, authorities said Monday in
announcing charges against the
two.
The detectives, Eddie Martins
A teenage girl died in a hospital
three weeks after she was
severely burned in a fire that tore
through Mendocino County,
raising the death toll in
California’s wildfires this month
to 43.
Kressa Shepherd, 17, died
Sunday night at a Sacramento
hospital, her aunt, Mindi Ramos,
said Monday.
A neighbor found Kressa and
her mother, Sara, lying on the
ground outside their home in a
rural neighborhood in Redwood
Valley. Both had more than half
their bodies burned.
Kressa’s brother, Kai Shepherd,
14, was found dead. He was
among the youngest who died in
the wildfires. First responders
found their father, Jon Shepherd,
separately, on the mountain. He
was also badly burned but alive.
Sara, 40, and Jon Shepherd, 44,
remain hospitalized and have
gone through several grafting
surgeries.
— Associated Press
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Politics & the Nation
Study finds corals’ taste for plastic
During feeding trials,
marine animals ingest
man-made fragments
BY
B EN G UARINO
Ocean plastic is an indiscriminate hazard. It harms fish and
kills seabirds, which wash up
with bellies full of trash. Turtles
swallow it because, the thinking
goes, they mistake the floating
waste for jellyfish. Less well
known are the ways plastic damages the ocean’s smaller inhabitants, plankton and corals, which
sometimes are found with particles wedged in their teeny guts.
For years, biologists and conservationists assumed that most
sea creatures ate plastic by accident, said Alexander Seymour, a
geographic information systems
analyst and marine researcher at
Duke University. Marine life, it
seemed, was too confused or too
hungry to avoid the junk.
A small but growing number
of studies suggest another, more
disturbing reason: Humans may
have invented plastic that is appetizing.
“Plastics may be inherently
tasty,” said Austin Allen, a Duke
marine science doctoral student.
Allen and Seymour are the lead
authors of a study just published
in the journal Marine Pollution
Bulletin. Along with Duke marine ecologist Daniel Rittschof,
they demonstrated that corals
respond to microplastic fragments as though they were food.
The two-part laboratory study
consisted of hand-feeding coral
as well as growing it in seawater
tanks contaminated with plastic
particles less than a millimeter
in diameter.
During the feeding trials, the
scientists picked up a plastic or
sand particle with forceps and
dropped it near a coral polyp. If
the sand came near their
mouths, the animals used tiny
hairs covering their body to
brush themselves clean.
But if a piece of plastic tumbled by, the corals snapped into
action. They fired cellular harpoon guns, called cnidoblasts, to
launch toxic barbs into the plastic particle. The corals scooped
the plastic toward their mouths
with their tentacles, then gobbled up the trash.
The researchers offered up
polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride
and six other types of plastic.
More than 80 percent of the
plastic particles were eaten. But
a coral polyp tried to eat sand
only once in 10 trials. “What
happens when you drop a particle of sand on a coral polyp is
absolutely nothing at all,” Seymour said.
Most of the time, the corals
spat out ingested plastic within
JONATHAN DRAKE/REUTERS
Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, left, said in his testimony that “it was
never my intention for anyone to be hurt.”
Bergdahl describes how
his captors treated him
Army sergeant who was
held by Taliban takes
stand in desertion trial
BY
fort bragg, n.c. — Army Sgt.
Bowe Bergdahl appeared on the
witness stand Monday and described his five years in Taliban
captivity, a graphic and at times
disturbing account delivered
hours after the presiding judge
rejected his attorneys’ appeal to
have the case dismissed over
incendiary remarks made by
President Trump during his campaign for the White House.
“It was never my intention for
anyone to be hurt,” said Bergdahl, 31, while reading from prepared remarks. He apologized for
the “horrible mistake” of abandoning his post in Afghanistan
and endangering other U.S.
troops tasked with finding him
after his disappearance in 2009.
They suffered, he said, “because
of my bad choices.”
Bergdahl has pleaded guilty to
desertion and misbehavior before the enemy. He faces life in
prison.
His testimony came as the
judge, Army Col. Jeffery R.
Nance, weighs Trump’s comments — the president has called
Bergdahl “a dirty rotten traitor”
and suggested he should be executed — against the horrific
treatment Bergdahl endured
while in captivity and the testimony of other troops who were
wounded during the search.
Though Nance denied Bergdahl’s
motion to dismiss the case, he
said he would consider Trump’s
comments as mitigating evidence that could lessen the punishment Bergdahl receives, if any.
During his testimony, Bergdahl described his torture, his
failed escape attempts, his declining health and his dimming
prospects for survival.
In detailing his captivity, he
explained that dirt floors were
preferable to cement because
they allowed him to bury the
chronic diarrhea he experienced,
thus avoiding further abuse from
angry guards who threatened to
cut off his nose and ears if he did
not stop getting sick. He was
ALEX SEYMOUR/DUKE UNIVERSITY
A coral polyp consumes a white fleck of plastic during a lab trial to test plastic’s dangers to the animals.
six hours. But in approximately
8 percent of the dozens of trials,
the plastic became stuck inside
the coral polyps for the duration
of the 24-hour tests.
Corals do not hunt by sight —
they have no eyes — and so must
figure out what is good to eat by
using chemosensors, their version of a tongue. This is a different strategy from using smell,
which draws animals toward or
away from an object. “When an
animal tastes something, that’s
when they make a decision
whether or not to eat it,” said
Matthew Savoca, a postdoctoral
researcher at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Southwest Fisheries Science Center who was not involved with the study.
The Duke scientists tried to
alter the chemical profile of plastic by coating it in a microbial
film. They hypothesized that corals might prefer such “candy,”
with the microorganisms hiding
the taste of plastic and providing
at least a few nutrients.
But they were surprised to
find that corals preferred raw
plastic. In the aquarium tests,
the corals ingested the clean
stuff at a rate of up to five times
how often they ate the bio-fouled
version. This preference, the researchers said, suggests that factory plastic has an appealing
ingredient. “At least some of the
hundreds of additives are acting
as phagostimulant — a fancy
word for compounds that are
tasty,” Seymour said.
Savoca also didn’t expect corals to prefer plastic. In 2016, he
and his colleagues reported that
seabirds were attracted to
smelly, bacteria-covered plastic,
and he recently demonstrated
that anchovy fish swarm around
the odor of fouled plastic.
“We need to be thinking about
the taste of plastic as a paradigm,” Seymour said, “not just a
problem for corals.”
Few studies examine interactions between microplastics and
corals, said Carlie Herring, a
research analyst for NOAA’s Marine Debris Program. The latest
research “provides new insight
into their relationship,” she said.
The Duke authors cautioned
that the relationship between
plastic and coral may be different at sea. Though earlier research demonstrated that wild
corals eat plastic, their study
does not provide evidence that
corals prefer plastic bits to food
items, for instance.
And plastic is unlikely to be as
severe a threat as coral bleaching, acidic oceans and dynamite
fishing. “This is just another
drop in the bucket among the
very large challenges faced by
these species,” Seymour said.
Yet there is no question that
plastic has penetrated the ocean,
and that even its most remote
corner is not beyond human
influence. Robot submersibles
have spotted plastic bags on
slopes leading to the Mariana
Trench, the deepest part of the
Pacific.
Seymour and his colleagues
say they hope their study will be
an ecological call to arms to
discover what plastic ingredient
appeals to coral. Savoca has the
same question: “If in fact there
are phagostimulants in clean
plastic,” he said, “let’s find out
what those are and remove
them.”
ben.guarino@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/speaking-of-science
Chicago says most ‘crime guns’ bought elsewhere
Report links violence to
easy access to weapons
BY
M ARK B ERMAN
After the Las Vegas massacre
this month, which ended with
58 people killed and hundreds
more injured, a reporter asked
the White House whether President Trump’s views on gun control had changed. Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the White House
press secretary, responded by
making an argument Trump offered during the campaign almost
a year earlier.
“If you look to Chicago, where
you had over 4,000 victims of
gun-related crimes last year, they
have the strictest gun laws in the
country,” Sanders said at a White
House briefing. “That certainly
hasn’t helped there.”
The point she was making, and
similar ones Trump made during
a presidential debate last year,
was clear: Even if you impose gun
laws, they won’t avert the bloodshed seen in Chicago, which has
struggled to combat gun violence
in recent years.
But Chicago does not exist in a
vacuum. In a report this week,
police and city officials said the
majority of what they consider
“crime guns” originated outside
Illinois.
The report comes as police in
Chicago have repeatedly cited illegal guns as one of the key factors
driving up the city’s death toll,
which has drawn national attention and repeated criticism from
Trump.
Between 2013 and 2016, 6 in 10
illegal guns recovered in Chicago
came from outside Illinois, according to the report released
Sunday. Neighboring Indiana was
the state with the highest share of
responsibility, with 1 in 5 illegal
guns originating there, the report
found.
“Crime guns” are described in
the report as those recovered by
the Chicago police and “illegally
possessed, used, or suspected to
be used in furtherance of a crime.”
The overwhelming majority of all
illegal guns found in Chicago
were handguns.
“It is self-evident that the availability of illegally circulated firearms in Chicago is directly connected to its deadly street violence,” the report states. “Simply
put, each conflict becomes potentially more lethal due to easy
access to a gun.”
Eddie T. Johnson, the Chicago
police superintendent, said one of
the central issues the city faces is
that a resident who wants guns
can simply hop in a car and head
to a nearby state — the Indiana
border is a little more than a
half-hour drive, and the Wisconsin border a little more than an
hour.
“Somebody from Chicago
could go across the border to a
gun show and fill up a duffel bag
full of guns and bring them back
into the city with no oversight,”
Johnson said at a news briefing
discussing the report. “So that
hurts us.”
While most of the illegal guns
in Chicago originated in Illinois
or Indiana, other states producing a share included Mississippi,
Wisconsin, Ohio and Kentucky,
according to the report.
Gun violence continues to
plague Chicago, though shootings and homicides have declined
from last year, when the city had
762 homicides, more than New
York and Los Angeles combined.
So far this year, more than 3,100
people have been shot in Chicago,
down about 500 from the same
point in 2016, according to a Chicago Tribune database. There
have been 576 homicides in Chicago this year, according to the
newspaper’s tally, down from
more than 600 at this point last
year.
Trump has invoked Chicago’s
violence in speeches, interviews
and tweets, at times criticizing
local authorities and drawing
pointed responses.
Chicago is often described as
having some of the toughest gun
policies nationwide, an image
that is outdated and based on
laws that are no longer in place,
such as a handgun ban that was
struck down and a gun registry
that was eliminated.
Johnson, who disputed suggestions that Chicago’s gun laws are
the nation’s toughest, also criticized what he called an inaccurate picture of the city that has
taken shape as media coverage
has focused on the city’s homicide
rate.
“This national narrative about
Chicago, a lot of it is factually
incorrect,” he said. “This entire
city isn’t on fire. We have certain
parts of the city where we have a
lot of this gun violence, and those
are the parts of the city that we
have to focus on.”
But the report ultimately ties
the issues together, noting that
the parts of the city facing gun
violence are also the places where
illegal guns are recovered.
A LEX H ORTON
“Not surprisingly, Chicago
crime guns are recovered primarily in areas of the city with the
greatest concentration of gun violence, corresponding to the need
for police to focus on illegal gun
possession or use,” the report
states.
mark.berman@washpost.com
beaten with hoses and kept in a
cage much of the time, he said.
As he recalled his ordeal, one
memory caused him to start
shaking. His face turned red. But
rather than tell the court what
had surfaced in his mind, Bergdahl elected to stop.
But the court also heard Monday from the prosecution’s final
witness, Shannon Allen, whose
husband, Mark, a former master
sergeant in the National Guard,
was nearly killed while searching
for Bergdahl. Allen was paralyzed after being shot in the head
while on a mission to collect
intelligence on Bergdahl’s whereabouts.
“He was very loud and outgoing,” Allen said about her husband before he was wounded.
Areas of his brain that affect
memory and motor skills were
removed in surgery, she said, and
he can no longer speak, walk or
care for himself. She takes him to
appointments and emergency
room visits when he appears in
distress.
“He lost me as a wife. I’ve
become his caregiver. It doesn’t
mean I love him any less,” she
said, her voice shaking.
The court was shown a video
of Allen readying her husband
for the day as he lay nearly
motionless. The defense team
had objected to scheduling Allen’s testimony, saying the impact on her was too far removed
from Bergdahl’s actions to be
considered a factor in his sentencing. But Nance allowed it,
saying her testimony conveyed
how one soldier’s life has been
permanently altered.
Bergdahl watched the video.
And he, too, offered how his
actions in 2009 have bled into
the present, where flashbacks
and hyper-vigilance, he said, grip
him day and night.
He works at an administrative
job at Fort Sam Houston in San
Antonio, near a building where
animals are kept. Among the
peacocks and ducks is at least
one rooster, Bergdahl said,
whose call every morning is
haunting.
His captors forced him to
watch execution videos. In one,
Bergdahl said, there’s an eerie
silence before a man’s beheading.
And then, he recalled, “You can
hear the rooster crowing.”
alex.horton@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
Daunting obstacles for ACA sign-ups
Less in-person help,
higher prices, confusion
may mean fewer covered
BY A MY G OLDSTEIN
AND J ULIET E ILPERIN
In Indianapolis, the director of
the state’s largest organization
helping people find Affordable
Care Act insurance had to lay off
nine of 13 staff members last
month because the federal government had just taken away
more than 80 percent of the grant
that paid for their work.
In Atlanta, festivalgoers at the
annual Pride weekend in midOctober were mystified that members of Insure Georgia had a table
set up, because they thought President Trump had gotten rid of the
health-care law.
And across Ohio, residents
starting to phone a call center for
appointments with coaches to renew their coverage are being told
that the service no longer exists
and that for help they should go to
a website, a hotline, an insurance
broker, a county health department or — if all else fails — their
member of Congress.
In the countdown to the annual
ACA enrollment season that starts
Wednesday, such ground-level
disruption suggests that the first
sign-up period of the Trump era
could be as daunting as any since
the fall of 2013, when the federal
website HealthCare.gov debuted
with such serious defects that consumers trying to buy insurance
were stymied for months.
In recent weeks, that website
has been taken down for an unusual number of maintenance sessions. Its “window-shopping” version contained an error in calculating subsidies for certain family
situations until Friday night, federal health officials confirmed.
But the greatest challenges are a
messy mix of higher prices and
fewer options, plus less time to
sign up, less assistance for doing
so and far less government promotion of the opportunity to enroll.
The net effect is rampant public
confusion, surveys show. And
there is a broad expectation that
when sign-ups end — on Dec. 15 in
all but several states that run their
own ACA marketplaces — fewer
Americans will have gotten ACA
coverage.
Unlike in each of the past four
years, federal health officials have
issued no forecast of the number
of people who will be insured
through the law during 2018.
When asked whether such calculations have been made internally,
they sidestepped the question.
The Trump administration also
did not provide an expected quarterly update last month on how
many people were paying their
premiums to keep their ACA plans
in effect; the most recent figures
available show that 10.3 million
people were covered in March.
Outside experts think enrollment will dwindle significantly.
Marilyn Tavenner, the president of
America’s Health Insurance Plans,
a main industry trade group, recently predicted a drop of at least 1
million people nationwide from
the 12.2 million who signed up for
2017 coverage. A Standard &
Poor’s analysis predicts a drop of
800,000 to 1.6 million.
Whatever backsliding occurs
will stem from actions and inactions by an administration whose
posture toward the sprawling
2010 health-care law could not be
further from the cheerleading of
its predecessor. While President
Barack Obama appeared on the
popular online comedy series “Between Two Ferns” to talk up the
ACA and enlisted celebrities in the
effort, Trump has erroneously
claimed that the law’s marketplaces are dead or “virtually dead.”
A narrowed enrollment window — from three months to 45
days — was planned by the Obama
administration for the approximately three dozen states that rely
on the federal insurance exchange. But the change was to
have begun for 2019 coverage; instead, the Department of Health
and Human Services announced
in April that it would take effect
for the sign-up period starting
Nov. 1.
The other impediments are all
Trump administration creations.
One of the most significant was
the president’s long-threatened
move this month to cut off billions
of dollars in payments to ACA
insurers to reimburse them for
discounts the law requires them to
give lower-income customers.
That action is driving a substantial increase in premiums for
the most popular tier of coverage
— 34 percent on average, according to an analysis by the consulting firm Avalere Health, and
37 percent according to an analysis issued early Monday by HHS. A
year ago, congressional Republicans and other opponents of the
law expressed outrage over a
25 percent average jump in rates
for such “silver” plans.
HHS’s report contains a variety
of figures that cast marketplace
health plans’ prices and availability in a negative light. It says that
the average yearly insurance premium for 27-year-olds — a desirable age group because risk pools
benefit from young, healthy cus-
tomers — will be $4,932 for the
most popular tier of coverage.
That is nearly twice as much as in
2014, the analysis says, although it
ignores that most people are buffered from such increases by federal subsidies.
The report also says that the
premium subsidies for which
more than 80 percent of ACA enrollees are eligible are increasing
from $382 on average to $555 —
without noting that many people
will find some tiers of coverage
less expensive as a result.
Most people shopping for
marketplace coverage, which is
available to consumers who cannot get affordable health benefits
through a job, will indeed qualify
for larger federal subsidies to offset the higher prices. Yet many of
those who earn too much for subsidies will face sticker shock. And
of the states in the federal exchange, slightly more than half
will have only one insurer participating — a 21 percent increase
from 2016, Avalere found.
As prices have risen and options have shrunk, the administration has lowered the enrollment season’s visibility. It slashed
federal spending on advertising
and other outreach efforts by
90 percent — to $10 million.
Grants for “navigators,” who guide
consumers seeking coverage,
plummeted by about 40 percent
overall.
No state took a bigger hit than
Indiana, which lost 82 percent of
its anticipated funding from
HHS’s Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services. That is why
Julia Holloway, who directs Affiliated Service Providers of Indiana’s
navigator program, spent her
birthday on Sept. 19 cutting the
staff paid through that grant. It
left her with one full-time and
three part-time navigators, along
with several funded through other
federal programs, who will serve
only Indianapolis and two nearby
counties instead of the entire
state.
At the Palmetto Project in
South Carolina, which has cut 62
navigators to 30 and expects further reductions once the enrollment season ends, the residual
staff will be working in 17 counties
instead of statewide. In the past,
navigators have spread the word
at the 10-day Coastal Carolina
Fair. They’ve canceled that appearance as well as others for the
coming year, including at the “Hell
Hole Swamp Festival.”
“It’s terribly scary,” said Shelli
Quenga, the project’s program director, who is especially worried
about what will happen in rural
areas, where navigators no longer
will be based. She now lacks money to pay mileage for her staff to
drive into smaller communities.
Meanwhile, Insure Georgia has
eliminated nearly 250 of more
than 700 events it had scheduled
for before and during the enrollment season. Though it has never
done fundraising, the group is
scrambling to solicit foundation
donations to make up for some of
its cut in federal money, from
nearly $2.3 million last year to just
to $329,000 now. After laying off
more than half of its 42 navigators,
the group is also racing to train
volunteer replacements.
To try to counteract the loss of
federal advertising, others are
stepping in. Several tech companies with a wide reach among
freelance workers — including
Fiverr, DoorDash, Care.com, Etsy
and Postmates — aim to reach
millions of people through in-app
messages, proprietary email lists,
blog posts and other social media,
said Brent Messenger of Fiverr.
Alaska is also trying new approaches. Its Division of Insurance developed a grass-roots campaign with posters that anyone
can print. The Juneau Arts and
Humanities Council has pledged
to place those posters on every
public bulletin board it can find.
Across the country, the nonprofit Young Invincibles has
broadened its focus beyond young
adults. Filling part of the void
created by the recent disbanding
of another nonprofit group, Enroll
America, it is operating an online
“Get Covered Connector”for consumers to schedule appointments
for help in finding ACA health
plans. In addition, it is running
digital advertising in 10 states.
The catch is whether people
who see the ads or go to the online
scheduler will be able to find
someone with whom to meet. The
Ohio Association of Food Banks,
the only navigator group working
in all 88 of that state’s counties,
found out last month that its grant
will shrink from $1.7 million to
less than $500,000.
Deciding that “we can’t deliver
365 days’ worth of services with
only 29 percent of the funding,”
executive director Lisa HamlerFugitt said, the group made the
painful decision not to accept the
grant. She is trying to persuade
libraries to spread the word.
Ohio’s only other navigator
group had its funding cut by more
than two-thirds. It will work just
in Dayton and some nearby communities.
“It’s sad,” Hamler-Fugitt said.
Some of the consumers who called
for appointments “were pretty
devastated. ‘What am I going to
do? You were always there to answer my questions.’ ”
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
Health officials propose
rule revisions for
insurance marketplaces
States would be given
a more substantial role
in ACA exchanges
BY
A MY G OLDSTEIN
Federal health officials are
proposing changes to rules for
coverage sold through the Affordable Care Act’s insurance
marketplaces that, starting in
2019, would let states alter the
benefits that health plans must
provide and limit enrollment
help for consumers.
The proposals reflect Republicans’ broad desire to weaken
federal powers under the 2010
health-care law and remove various props that have led millions
of Americans to get ACA insurance. Yet as rules, rather than
changes in law, the revisions
would not be as far-reaching as
the GOP bills that Congress
failed to pass this year.
In envisioning a larger role for
states in setting benefits, the
draft rule would still require
ACA plans to cover 10 categories
of medical services. But for the
first time, any state could adopt
benefits standards already in use
by another state — or rewrite its
own standards. This could lead
to fewer visits being covered for
certain types of care or to shorter
hospital stays, health policy experts said.
The proposal also would undo
a requirement that each ACA
marketplace’s geographic area
have at least two enrollment-assistance organizations, known as
navigators, and that one of them
be a consumer-oriented nonprofit. One navigator would suffice,
and it would no longer need to be
physically in the area served. The
reduction, the proposed rule
says, would allow ACA exchanges
“to more easily operate these
programs with limited resources.”
In addition, the draft rules
would shift responsibility entirely to states — or outside
accreditors — to decide whether
each marketplace health plan
has enough doctors and other
providers of care in its network
to guarantee patients “reasonable access.” The move would
reverse government moves in
recent years to strengthen federal network standards under
the ACA.
Yet another proposed rule
would allow states, with federal
permission, to release insurers
selling individual health plans
from a requirement that they
devote at least 80 percent of the
premiums they collect toward
customers’ care. The shift would
essentially allow insurers in volatile markets to take more of their
revenue as profits.
Posted at the end of last week
by the Office of Management and
Budget, without any announcement as has been customary
from the Health and Human
Services Department, the 365page draft is the latest version of
an annual ritual in which federal
health officials suggest updates
to ACA marketplace rules for the
year after next.
In this first “notice of benefit
and payment parameters” since
President Trump took office,
the tone differs substantially
from the three notices of the
Obama era. About a year ago,
the last such notice of the
Obama administration began
its executive summary by saying that the ACA was “making
high quality health insurance
coverage and care more affordable and accessible to millions
of Americans.” The new draft
contains no such statement and
instead reiterates Trump’s frequent contention that the law
has destabilized insurance marketplaces in many parts of the
country.
Several health policy experts
said it is difficult to predict the
impact the draft rules would
have because it would hinge on
what states do. Michael Adelberg, a principal at Faegre Baker Daniels Consulting who
helped to implement parts of
the ACA during the previous
administration, said Monday
that “allowing substitutions”
within the law’s benefit categories could affect available health
plans, “assuming the states
want to go there.”
At Families USA, a liberal
consumer health lobby, Claire
McAndrew said that the prospect of fewer navigators, looser
benefits rules and a decrease in
the percentage of revenue that
insurers must spend on health
services “will harm consumers’
ability to get and maintain
high-quality, affordable, comprehensive health coverage and
care.”
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
Juliet Eilperin contributed to this
report.
Native American professor resigns over lecture series on Standing Rock
BY
J OE H EIM
Standing Rock Sioux reservation,
which spans North and South
Dakota, was the focus of national
A Native American professor
and international attention as
at the University of North Dakota
protests by indigenous and enviannounced last week that he will
ronmental groups targeted the
not renew his position at the end
planned completion of the Dakoof this academic year because the
ta Access pipeline. The nearly
school twice stopped him from
1,200-mile long pipeline was
creating a lecture series about
built to transfer up to
the protests against the
570,000 barrels of oil a
Dakota Access pipeline
day from northern
near the Standing Rock
North Dakota to a refinSioux reservation.
ery in Illinois.
Mark Trahant, a jourThe groups protesting
nalism professor who is
the $3.8 billion pipeline
a member of Idaho’s
said it was built despite
Shoshone-Bannock
objections
that
it
Tribe, wrote in a Facecrossed sacred Native
book post last week that
burial
the university rejected a Mark Trahant American
grounds and presented a
lecture series he prothreat to tribal lands and drinkposed last academic year about
ing water because it went under
media coverage of Standing
the Missouri River at the edge of
Rock. This school year, he sugthe Standing Rock Sioux reservagested a conference looking at
tion. Following a drawn-out legal
the role of social media in the
battle, a federal judge turned
pipeline protests but was once
down a final request to block
again rebuffed. Trahant indicatconstruction in February, and
ed in his post that senior adminthe pipeline became fully operaistration officials were worried
tional in June.
the state legislature would retalTrahant, a veteran reporter
iate for the courses.
and educator and former presi“I am disappointed and disdent of the Native American
gusted that the university is not
Journalists Association, has long
an institutional leader,” Trahant
covered Native American issues
wrote. “It should be a beam of
and often wrote about the Standlight, shining on the protected
ing Rock standoff. In his Facerealm of rational discourse.”
book post, he expressed his frusThe day after Trahant’s post,
tration and said the lack of
the university issued a statesupport from the university led
ment saying the decisions not to
to his decision to resign.
approve the lecture series were
“I understand that it’s impornot based on concerns about the
tant to keep fighting, but when
state legislature. And the school
your institution is absent, well,
also announced it would hold
for me, this chapter ends,” he
an event that looked at news
wrote. In an interview, he said
coverage of the Dakota Access
the university “has really not
pipeline and the protests at
done a lot to reach out to tribal
Standing Rock.
communities.”
Reached by phone Monday,
Two years ago, the University
Trahant said that when he first
of North Dakota changed its
proposed the lecture series, he
mascot from the Fighting Sioux
was told to hold off. “There was a
to the Fighting Hawks after years
lot of concern that it was too hot
of protests by American Indians
a topic,” he said. He said that he is
and others who said the name
delighted that the university will
was offensive. Native Americans
hold a conference on the issue
make up a little more than 5 perbut that he will still leave at the
cent of North Dakota’s populaend of the school year.
tion but just over 1 percent of the
Beginning early last year, the
NIMA TARADJI FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A view last year of the protest camp near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota. Mark Trahant, a University of North
Dakota journalism professor, said the school rejected a lecture series he proposed about coverage of the Dakota Access pipeline protests.
university’s 14,406 students.
A spokesman for the university said the school’s president,
Mark Kennedy, was not aware of
Trahant’s proposals and wasn’t
involved in the decision to reject
them.
“President Kennedy regrets
that there is any perception that
the university would have prevented a faculty-led activity from
taking place based on perceived
fears of legislative response,” Peter Johnson, the University of
North Dakota’s interim vice president for university and public
affairs, wrote in a statement.
Johnson rejected the idea that
any decisions were made based
on concerns about the state legislature.
“The University of North Da-
kota senior administration has
never, to my knowledge — and
that includes conversations in
the past two days, expressed any
fear of retaliation by the North
Dakota legislature or by North
Dakota legislators related to academic content,” Johnson wrote.
“The university has engaged in
all sorts of topics in ways that
explore the full spectrum of posi-
tions related to those topics.”
Trahant said the conference
on media coverage of Standing
Rock will probably be in March
and will include a keynote address by Jenni Monet, a Native
American journalist who was
arrested during her extensive
coverage of the more than yearlong protest.
joe.heim@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A5
SU
Russian content reached more users than firms disclosed
FACEBOOK FROM A1
investigate the Russian campaign
to influence American voters and
reveal their findings to the public.
Google acknowledged for the
first time Monday that it had
found evidence that Russian operatives used the company’s platforms to influence American voters, saying in a blog post that it had
found 1,108 videos with 43 hours
of content related to the Russian
effort on YouTube. It also found
$4,700 worth of Russian search
and display ads.
Twitter also plans to tell congressional investigators that it has
identified 2,752 accounts controlled by Russian operatives and
more than 36,000 bots that tweeted 1.4 million times during the
election, according to a draft of
Twitter’s testimony obtained by
The Post. The company previously
reported 201 accounts linked to
Russia.
Although the Russian effort
sprawled across many U.S.-based
technology platforms, attention
has focused most heavily on Facebook, which has faced repeated
calls from lawmakers and researchers to dig more deeply into
its data and disclose more of what
it has found.
There have been similar calls
within the company, where debates over what to reveal publicly
have yielded cautious compromises that have left members of the
company’s security team frustrated, according to people familiar
with private conversations among
Facebook employees.
Such concerns have focused on
forensic evidence the security
team collected about Russia’s online influence campaign that was,
after months of internal company
wrangling, not included in a 13page “white paper” issued publicly
in April, according to people familiar with the negotiations. The
report spoke in general terms
about “information operations”
but included only a single page on
the U.S. election and did not at any
point use the word “Russia” or
“Russian.”
Several independent researchers also say Facebook likely has the
ability to search for data that
could substantiate allegations of
possible collusion between the
Russian disinformation operation
and the Trump campaign’s social
DAVID PAUL MORRIS/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg initially dismissed the importance of fake news on the social media giant.
media efforts. The possible sharing of content, the timing of social
media posts and other forensic
information known only to the
company could help answer questions central to congressional investigations and the probe led by
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III.
“If there was collusion in the
social media campaign between
the Russians and the Trump campaign, they would have that evidence,” said Philip N. Howard of
Oxford University’s Computational Propaganda Project. “It is a
needle in a haystack for us outside
researchers.”
The president and his campaign officials have denied colluding in any way with the Russians.
The push for more information
is likely to emerge as an important
theme during the congressional
hearings Tuesday and Wednesday,
when lawmakers plan to push for
more details.
“I hope they will be more forthcoming,” said Sen. Mark R. Warner
(Va.), the top Democrat on the
Senate Intelligence Committee,
one of three committees holding
hearings on these issues this week.
“I think there’s a lot more that
Americans deserve to know.”
Facebook’s chief security officer, Alex Stamos, said in a statement to The Post on Monday that
the company is doing everything it
can to assist investigators.
“By publicly describing our understanding of information operations in April, and by fully cooperating with the various investigations into Russian interference,
I’m confident that we are doing
everything we can to be helpful
and contribute our piece of the
broader picture,” Stamos said. He
did not directly respond to a question about reports of frustrations
on his team.
Facebook spokesman Jay Nancarrow acknowledged the importance of probing company data for
the possibility of collusion. “We
believe this is a matter that government investigators need to determine, which is why we are fully
cooperating with them to help
them make their assessment,” he
said.
Facebook has said Russia’s efforts to influence the election involved 470 accounts and pages
that spent more than $100,000 on
3,000 ads that reached 10 millions
users. But outside researchers
have said for weeks that free posts
almost certainly reached much
larger audiences — a point that
Facebook will concede in its testimony on Tuesday.
Facebook’s general counsel, Colin Stretch, plans to tell the Senate
Judiciary Committee that between 2015 and 2017, a single Russian operation in St. Petersburg
generated about 80,000 posts and
that roughly 29 million people
potentially saw that content in
their news feeds.
Because those posts were also
liked, shared and commented on
by Facebook users, the company
estimates that as many as 126 million people may have seen material in their news feeds that originated from Russian operatives,
which was crafted to mimic American commentary on politics and
social matters such as immigration, African American activism
and the rising prominence of Muslims in the United States.
Stretch plans to characterize
that content as a tiny fraction of
what users see every day in their
Facebook news feeds.
The company has long sought
to play down the impact of manipulation of its platform during
the 2016 campaign. Chief executive Mark Zuckerberg initially dismissed the importance of phony
news reports spreading unchecked on Facebook, saying it
was “a pretty crazy idea” to suggest
that “fake news” could have affected the outcome of the election. He
later apologized for the remark.
But from the first days after the
election, many employees expressed frustration and dismay
that a social media platform they
had built helped elect a president
many of them disliked deeply, according to current and former employees and others familiar with
internal company conversations.
Some Facebook employees also
expressed regret that it had removed human editors from the
“trending topics” feature seen in
the news feeds of users after allegations surfaced several months
before the November election
about supposed liberal bias in how
stories were selected and portrayed. Company officials, reluctant to be seen as favoring one part
of the political spectrum, bowed to
demands from conservatives for
changes.
Zuckerberg had met with
prominent conservative media
personalities in the run-up to his
decision to remove human editors
and emphasized that Facebook
was not a media company — even
though the company has taken a
greater role in policing content
published by its 2 billion global
users.
The potential for gaming Facebook’s algorithm with limited human oversight soon became clear,
as demonstrably false news reports spread with increasing
speed during the election. The
company’s security team identified scores of sites that had spread
phony news reports — such as one
about Pope Francis supposedly endorsing President Trump — during the campaign. But a December
blog post said the company intended to focus only on blocking
the “worst of the worst.”
Not all publishers were happy
with the effort. At one point, USA
Today complained to the FBI that
it had lost nearly 40 percent of its
Facebook followers after the social
network quietly removed millions
of accounts.
Internal company debate flared
early in the new year, after Facebook’s security team found exten-
sive evidence supporting the conclusion of U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia had engaged in an
extensive and well-coordinated
campaign to influence the presidential election.
The April white paper included
only a general description of this
effort and the assertion that Facebook’s data “does not contradict”
the conclusions of U.S. intelligence officials.
In the statement Monday, Stamos said, “While we were able to
identify the malicious activity itself, we have to be realistic and
honest about the challenges of
attribution. Ultimately, we decided that the responsible thing to do
would be to make clear that our
findings were consistent with
those released by the U.S. intelligence community, which clearly
connected the activity in their report to Russian state-sponsored
actors.”
But the compromise prompted
grumbling among members of the
security team, some of whom complained privately that the majority
of their groundbreaking work was
kept from reaching the public, according to several people who
heard such complaints and spoke
on the condition of anonymity to
protect their relationships with
Facebook.
Others familiar with internal
company debates, who also spoke
on the condition of anonymity,
said pushes for the most detailed
possible revelations have repeatedly run into broader concerns
from Facebook’s legal and policy
teams, along with fears that some
kinds of deep data-mining might
impinge on the privacy of legitimate users.
“We’re going to have to figure
out what it means for this private
social network to be democratically accountable,” said Peter Eckersley, chief computer scientist for
the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a civil liberties group. “Facebook is going to have to really
think about what their order of
priorities really are. They are first
and foremost a for-profit company, but do they have a responsibility to democracy?”
craig.timberg@washpost.com
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
Dwoskin reported from San Francisco.
Hamza Shaban contributed to this
report.
A6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
the mueller investigation
GOP leaders’ strategy: Avoidance
BY K AROUN D EMIRJIAN
AND S EAN S ULLIVAN
They sidestepped it. They expressed alarm, but not outrage.
They said Congress should consider taking action. But they cautioned against moving too aggressively.
Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s decision to charge three
former officials from President
Trump’s campaign sparked an array of responses from congressional Republicans on Monday.
But there was a common theme:
They saw little to gain in venturing
further into a quickly expanding
political thicket.
Instead, GOP leaders, eager to
move past the explosive revelations, avoid further inflaming tensions with Trump and refocus on
their legislative agenda, tried to
brush aside calls from Democrats
and a handful of their Republican
colleagues to use their powers to
protect Mueller’s probe from interference by the president. They
also avoided discussing the substance of the charges Mueller filed.
Rank-and-file Republican lawmakers who have raised alarms
about the president’s judgment in
recent weeks continued to hold
out the possibility of passing legislation to head off potential meddling into the investigation by
Trump. But few, if any, spoke with
great urgency about taking those
steps, convinced that Trump was
not preparing to fire Mueller imminently.
Some Republicans expressed
more concern than others about
what could come next in Mueller’s
months-long inquiry into possible
coordination between Russia and
the Trump campaign during the
election. And there was disagreement about the merits of the investigation.
But by day’s end, Republicans
had mostly settled on a strategy in
line with the way they have dealt
with the president and his many
controversies for much of the
year: Don’t criticize or defend him
too much. And establish distance
from him when at all possible.
“If you have unlimited time,
unlimited money and unlimited
scope and you’re a prosecutor,
you’re going to wind up indicting
somebody for something, and
we’ll just see where that leads to,”
said Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.).
Rep. Charlie Dent (R-Pa.), a frequent Trump critic, was less casual. “These indictments raise more
questions than they answer,” he
said in an interview. “I suspect at
this moment there is a lot more we
don’t know than what we do.” But
even he was not rushing to any
conclusions.
Leading Democrats sounded
different notes. They said Congress should respond to the news
— the indictment of former campaign chairman Paul Manafort
and the revelation that former
campaign adviser George Papadopoulos had pleaded guilty to making false statements to the FBI
about outreach efforts to Russian
officials — by swiftly passing laws
to protect Mueller from any retaliation from Trump.
“It is imperative that Congress
take action now to protect the
independence of the Special
Counsel, wherever or however
high his investigation may lead,”
Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.), the
vice chairman of the Senate Intel-
ligence Committee, said in a statement. He added that Congress
“must also make it clear” that any
attempts to pardon Manafort
“would be unacceptable, and result in immediate, bipartisan action by Congress.”
Two bipartisan pairs of senators unveiled legislation in August
to prevent Trump from firing
Mueller without cause. Dent said
Monday that he was open to the
idea. But Senate Republican leaders signaled no motivation to
move ahead with those bills.
“He’s not going to be fired by the
president,” Sen. Orrin G. Hatch
(R-Utah) said of Mueller. Asked
why he was so sure, Hatch replied:
“Because I know him. He knows
that’d be a stupid move.”
Asked whether Congress should
shield the Mueller investigation,
Sen. John Cornyn (Tex.), the second-ranking Republican in the
Senate, replied simply, “I think he
knows what to do and he’s doing it.”
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders said
Monday that Trump had “no intention or plan to make any changes
with regard to the special counsel.”
Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), who
has been outspoken in criticizing
Trump, said that “there’s no indication that he’s going to go in and
fire or pardon” right now.
Is protective legislation necessary?
“We’ll see,” he replied.
Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), cosponsor of one of the bills released
in August, said the charges revealed Monday “haven’t influenced my decision” — and he also
isn’t in a rush to get the bill out
there. “It’s not going to run as an
independent bill on the floor.”
Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell (R-Ky.) and House
Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.)
wanted no part of the bombshell
developments Monday. McConnell left a news conference on judicial nominations and religious liberty well before reporters could
ask him about it.
In an interview with a Wisconsin radio station, Ryan did not
discuss it except to promise that it
would not affect the House’s rollout of a sweeping tax bill this
week.
Others followed their lead. Sen.
Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) awkwardly exited the news conference
with McConnell through doors behind flags.
“I probably know less than you,”
Sen. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.) told a
reporter. He declared that he was
“way behind on that issue.”
Some Republicans openly worried about the impact of the news
on their agenda. This week, House
Republicans are planning to unveil their tax bill — which is their
most pressing legislative undertaking.
Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.), who is
close to Ryan, noted that the timing of the indictment and its “very
serious” charges was “not particularly helpful” to the tax bill’s rollout.
He also said the revelations
could compound existing challenges facing congressional committees that are investigating Russian meddling.
“My instinct tells me they’ve
been threatened to some degree
by the Mueller investigation —
and appropriately so,” said Cole,
who does not sit on any of the
panels looking into the matter.
ALEX WONG/GETTY IMAGES
Sens. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.), left, and Richard Burr (R-N.C.)
have run a bipartisan probe in the Senate Intelligence Committee.
Mueller’s charges come as two
of the three congressional investigations into Russian meddling
have been foundering along political lines, with Republicans and
Democrats pursuing separate and
sometimes directly competing
lines of inquiry.
This month, the House Intelligence Committee and the Senate
Judiciary Committee launched
probes of a deal approved by the
Obama administration giving
Russia a significant stake in the
American uranium market, reviving a political cudgel Trump used
against Clinton during the presidential campaign, despite scant
evidence of her personal involvement.
The Senate Judiciary Committee’s ranking Democrat, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (Calif.), told reporters last week that she and the
committee’s chairman, Grassley,
were going their separate ways on
the panel’s Russia probe. She
punctuated that announcement
Friday by releasing a tranche of
written requests for information
Three
campaign
o∞cials
indicted
PROBE FROM A1
Monday’s revelations, a week
that otherwise might have been
spent with Washington focused
on the Republican tax plan will
have talking heads dissecting the
criminal counts against former
Trump campaign officials — and
speculating about the next shoe
to drop.
Papadopoulos’s plea agreement, signed this month and
unsealed Monday, described his
extensive efforts to try to broker
connections with Russian officials and arrange a meeting between them and the Trump campaign. Emails show that his offers
were sometimes looked at warily,
though more-senior campaign officials at least entertained them.
Manafort and Gates pleaded
not guilty in a brief appearance in
D.C. federal court Monday afternoon. A federal magistrate judge
put the men on home confinement, and set a $10 million unsecured bond for Manafort and a
$5 million unsecured bond for
Gates.
That means the men would be
in debt to the government if they
failed to show up for court,
though they do not have to put
any money down. Both surrendered their passports to the FBI.
The next hearing in the case was
scheduled for Nov. 2 before U.S.
District Judge Amy Berman Jackson, a 2011 appointee of President
Barack Obama who previously
worked as a federal prosecutor in
the District.
For their part, Trump, his
spokeswoman and his lawyer
sought to cast the charges as
having nothing to do with the
president.
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders asserted that Papadopoulos had an
“extremely limited,” volunteer
role in the campaign and said
that “no activity was ever done in
an official capacity on behalf of
the campaign in that regard.”
Ty Cobb, a White House lawyer
overseeing the administration’s
handling of the Mueller probe,
said, “The one thing that’s clear is
there’s no reference to collusion,
no reference to the president.”
The president himself took to
Twitter to declare: “Sorry, but this
is years ago, before Paul
Manafort was part of the Trump
campaign. But why aren’t
Crooked Hillary & the Dems the
focus?????”
“. . . Also, there is NO COLLUSION!” he said in a follow-up
tweet.
Sanders said that Trump had
BILL O’LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort pleaded not guilty in U.S. District Court. So did his business partner Rick Gates.
“no intention or plan to make any
changes with regard to the special counsel,” and Cobb said there
had been no talk of possible
pardons for Manafort or Gates.
“No, no, no. That’s never come
up and won’t come up,” Cobb said
in an interview.
Outside the D.C. courthouse,
Kevin Downing, a lawyer for
Manafort, said: “President Donald Trump was correct. There is
no evidence that Mr. Manafort
and the Trump campaign colluded with the Russian government.”
Glenn Selig, a Gates spokesman, said that Gates “welcomes
the opportunity to confront these
charges in court.”
“This fight is just beginning,”
Selig said.
The charges are a major step in
the investigation, but they do not
represent a conclusion. Court
documents revealed that Papadopoulos, for example, has been
cooperating with investigators
for three months — having been
arrested and charged in July after
landing at Dulles International
Airport on a flight from Germany.
The information he provides
could be key to furthering Mueller’s investigation into others,
legal analysts said.
Papadopoulos admitted that
he had lied to the FBI about his
interactions with people he
thought had connections with
the Russian government — essentially understating the conversations and claiming falsely that
they had occurred before he
joined Trump’s campaign.
In a January 2017 interview
with the FBI, Papadopoulos told
agents that a London-based professor claimed to him that he had
“dirt” on Hillary Clinton, including “thousands of emails.” But
Papadopoulos said that initially
he viewed the professor as a
“nothing.”
In reality, according to his plea,
Papadopoulos understood that
the professor had connections to
Russian government officials,
and he treated him seriously. An
email quoted in court filings
appears to match one described
to The Washington Post in August in which Papadopoulos
identified the professor with
whom he met as Joseph Mifsud,
the director of the London Academy of Diplomacy.
After a March 2016 meeting
with the professor, who was not
identified in court records, Papadopoulos emailed a campaign
supervisor and other members of
the campaign’s foreign policy
team. He claimed that the professor had introduced him to “Putin’s niece” and the Russian ambassador in London, and that the
purpose was “to arrange a meeting between us and the Russian
leadership to discuss U.S.-Russia
ties under President Trump,”
court documents say.
The government noted that
the woman was not Russian President Vladimir Putin’s niece, and
while Papadopoulos expected the
professor to introduce him to the
Russian ambassador, that never
happened. But in the months that
followed, Papadopoulos continued to correspond with the woman and the professor about a
meeting between the Trump
campaign, possibly including
Trump himself, and Russian officials.
“The Russian government has
an open invitation by Putin for
Mr. Trump to meet him when he
is ready,” Papadopoulos wrote to
a senior policy adviser for the
campaign on April 25.
At one point, a campaign official forwarded one of Papadopoulos’s emails to another campaign official, saying: “We need
someone to communicate that
DT is not doing these trips. It
should be someone low level in
the campaign so as not to send
any signal.” “DT” would appear to
be a reference to Donald Trump.
Papadopoulos’s effort continued into the summer of 2016, and
in August 2016, a campaign supervisor told Papadopoulos and
another foreign policy adviser
that they should meet with Russian officials. That ultimately did
not take place, according to the
plea.
According to documents and
interviews, the supervisor was
national campaign co-chairman
Sam Clovis, whose lawyer said he
actually opposed the trip and was
just being polite. Other officials
who received emails from Papadopoulos were campaign manager Corey Lewandowski and
Manafort.
Lawyers for Papadopoulos said
in a statement: “We will have the
opportunity to comment on
George’s involvement when
called upon by the Court at a later
date. We look forward to telling
all of the details of George’s story
at that time.”
In a separate indictment, the
special counsel alleged that
Manafort and Gates laundered
money for nearly a decade
through scores of U.S. and foreign corporations and accounts,
and gave false statements to the
Justice Department and others
when asked about their work on
behalf of a foreign entity. The
time period stretched into at
least 2016, though it did not seem
to involve the Trump campaign.
According to the indictment,
Manafort and Gates arranged to
hire two Washington-based lobbying firms to work on behalf of
their Ukrainian clients, arranging meetings with U.S. officials
and boosting their public image
in the United States.
Though it was not named, one
of the firms referenced in the
indictment is the Podesta Group.
Tony Podesta, the head of the
firm, announced to colleagues
Monday that he was stepping
down. The other firm is Mercury
Public Affairs, according to people familiar with the matter. A
partner at Mercury said the firm
“believed our work was intended
to serve an important and proper
purpose.”
Prosecutors say Manafort and
Gates arranged for a Brusselsbased nonprofit to nominally
hire the Washington companies
from the White House; Trump’s
personal attorney, Michael Cohen;
and the heads of social media companies caught up in Russia’s influence campaign.
The Senate Intelligence Committee continues to work in a bipartisan fashion, and a person
with knowledge of that probe said
Monday that “very little” in the
indictment and the Papadopoulos
plea was new information to that
panel’s investigation.
The committee has already spoken with Manafort behind closed
doors and has scheduled an interview with his business partner
Rick Gates, who also was charged
Monday.
That interview may now be
complicated by the fact that
Manafort and Gates are confined
to their homes and can leave only
for medical or religious reasons.
The Senate Intelligence Committee previously attempted to
talk to Papadopoulos but was unable to do so.
karoun.demirjian@washpost.com
sean.sullivan@washpost.com
to hide the fact that the two men
were working for Ukrainian government officials; otherwise they
would have been required to
register under the Foreign
Agents Registration Act.
In fact, prosecutors allege,
Manafort was communicating directly with then-Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych about
the effort, promising in 2012 to
provide him weekly updates.
Prosecutors say that when the
Justice Department approached
Manafort and Gates in 2016 and
2017 about whether they should
have registered as foreign agents
for the work, they responded
with false and misleading letters,
according to the indictment.
Manafort and Gates also were
accused of trying to hide money
kept in foreign bank accounts —
Manafort from 2011 to 2014 and
Gates from 2012 to 2014. And
Manafort was accused of filing
fraudulent tax returns, stating on
tax forms he filed from 2008 to
2014 that he controlled no foreign bank accounts.
All told, more than $75 million
flowed through offshore accounts, the special counsel alleged.
From 2008 to 2014, according
to the indictment, Manafort arranged to wire $12 million from
offshore accounts to pay for personal expenses, including $5 million to a home renovation contractor in the Hamptons, more
than $1.3 million to a home
entertainment and lighting vendor based in Florida, $934,000 to
an antique-rug dealer in Alexandria, and $849,000 to a men’s
clothier in New York.
Law enforcement’s interest in
Manafort dates back to at least
2014, according to a person familiar with the case.
While Mueller’s probe has focused on Manafort and former
national security adviser Michael
Flynn, investigators have shown
interest in a broad array of other
topics.
Those include meetings that
the president’s son-in-law, Jared
Kushner, had with the Russian
ambassador and a banker from
Moscow in December, and a June
2016 meeting at Trump Tower
involving the president’s son
Donald Jr. and a Russian lawyer.
Mueller’s team has requested extensive records from the White
House, covering areas including
the president’s private discussions about firing James B. Comey as FBI director and his response to news that Flynn was
under investigation, according to
two people briefed on the requests.
Mueller is also investigating
whether Trump obstructed justice leading up to Comey’s firing.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
rosalind.helderman@washpost.co
m
carol.leonnig@washpost.com
spencer.hsu@washpost.com
Devlin Barrett, Alice Crites, Sari
Horwitz, Ellen Nakashima, Greg
Miller, Philip Rucker, Ashley Parker
and Adam Entous contributed to this
report.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A7
RE
the mueller investigation
At White
House,
fear of
unknown
TRUMP FROM A1
adviser on Trump’s campaign,
pleaded guilty to making a false
statement to the FBI about his
efforts to broker a relationship
between Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin. The case
provides the clearest evidence yet
of links between Trump’s campaign and Russian officials.
For a president who revels in
chaos — and in orchestrating it
himself — Monday brought a political storm that Trump could not
control. White House chief of
staff John F. Kelly, along with
lawyers Ty Cobb, John Dowd and
Jay Sekulow, advised Trump to be
cautious with his public responses, but they were a private sounding board for his grievances, advisers said.
“This has not been a cause of
great agita or angst or activity at
the White House,” said Cobb, the
White House lawyer overseeing
Russia matters. He added that
Trump is “spending all of his time
on presidential work.”
But Trump’s anger Monday
was visible to those who interacted with him, and the mood in the
corridors of the White House was
one of weariness and fear of the
unknown. As the president
groused upstairs, many staffers —
some of whom have hired lawyers
to help them navigate Mueller’s
investigation — privately speculated about where the special
counsel might turn next.
“The walls are closing in,” said
one senior Republican in close
contact with top staffers who
spoke on the condition of anonymity to speak candidly. “Everyone is freaking out.”
Trump is also increasingly agitated by the expansion of Mueller’s probe into financial issues
beyond the 2016 campaign and
about the potential damage to
him and his family.
This portrait of Trump and his
White House on a day of crisis is
based on interviews with 20 senior administration officials,
Trump friends and key outside
allies, many of whom insisted on
anonymity to discuss sensitive
internal matters.
Trump and his aides were frustrated that, yet again, Russia
steamrolled the start of a carefully planned week of policy news.
Trump is preparing to nominate a
new chairman of the Federal Reserve and is scheduled to depart
Friday for a high-stakes, 12-day
trip across Asia, and House Republicans are planning to unveil
their tax overhaul bill.
“I’d like to start the briefing
today by addressing a topic that I
know all of you are preparing to
ask me about, and that’s tax reform,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
said at Monday afternoon’s news
briefing. It was a lighthearted
prelude to a question-and-answer
session immediately overtaken
by queries about the indictments.
Away from the podium, Trump
staffers fretted privately over
whether Manafort or Gates might
share with Mueller’s team damaging information about other col-
PHOTOS BY JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders started Monday’s news briefing by lightheartedly talking about tax legislation before being overtaken by queries about
the indictments. Away from the podium, Trump staffers fretted privately over what Paul Manafort or Rick Gates might share with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s team.
Amid Monday’s crisis at the White House, President Trump and
first lady Melania Trump took time out to hand out Halloween
treats to children on the South Lawn.
leagues. They expressed concern
in particular about Gates because
he has a young family, may be
more stretched financially than
Manafort, and continued to be
involved in Trump’s political operation and had access to the
White House, including attending West Wing meetings after
Trump was sworn in.
Some White House advisers
are unhappy with Thomas J. Barrack Jr., Trump’s longtime friend
and chair of his inauguration,
whom they hold responsible for
keeping Gates in the Trump orbit
long after Manafort resigned as
campaign chairman in August
2016, according to people familiar with the situation. Barrack has
been Gates’s patron of late, steering political work to him and,
until Monday, employing him as
director of the Washington office
of his real estate investment company.
Trump and his aides tried to
shrug off the ominous headlines,
decorating the South Portico of
the White House in black bats
and faux spider webs to welcome
costumed children for Halloween
trick-or-treating. As the sun set
on Monday, the president and
first lady Melania Trump handed
out goody bags to little princesses
and pirates.
The Russia drama has been
distracting and damaging for
Trump — from a public relations
perspective if not, eventually, a
legal one. The president’s inner
circle on Russia matters has tightened in recent months. In addition to his lawyers, Trump has
been talking mostly with Kelly
and members of his family, including Melania, as well as
daughter Ivanka and son-in-law
Jared Kushner, both senior White
House advisers. Trump also leans
on two senior aides, counselor
Kellyanne Conway and communications director Hope Hicks, as
well as some outside friends for
advice.
Still, Trump has little ability to
influence the ongoing Russia
probe save for firing Mueller —
the sort of rash decision that his
lawyers insisted Monday he is not
considering.
“Nothing about today’s events
alters anything related to our
engagement with the special
counsel, with whom we continue
to cooperate,” Cobb said. “There
are no discussions and there is no
consideration being given to terminating Mueller.”
Sekulow, one of Trump’s outside lawyers, said: “There’s no
firing-Robert-Mueller
discussions.”
Asked whether Trump is considering pardons for Manafort or
Gates, Cobb said, “No, no, no.
That’s never come up and won’t
come up.”
On Capitol Hill, meanwhile,
some of Trump’s allies are privately revving up their own version of a counterattack against
Mueller. Several top Republican
legislators plan to raise questions
in the coming days about the
FBI’s handling of a “dossier” detailing alleged ties between
Trump and Russian interests.
They intend to argue that Mueller’s team has become overly reliant on a document that was funded in part by Democrats, according to two people involved in the
discussions. Mueller does not appear to have relied on the dossier
for the cases revealed on Monday,
however.
For Trump and his team, the
bad news began as disconcerting
drips last Friday, when CNN first
reported that indictments were
probably coming Monday. The
only question: of whom?
The White House had no inside
information beyond what was
public in news reports, officials
said, and were left to scramble
and speculate as to what might
happen. Reliable information
was hard to come by, as Trump’s
team was scattered. Cobb was at
his home in South Carolina until
Monday afternoon, while Trump
spent much of Saturday at his
private golf club in Virginia and
went out to dinner with Melania
and their son, Barron, at the
Trump International Hotel’s
steakhouse in Washington.
Among the many unknowns,
the Trump team arrived at an
educated guess that Manafort
was likely to be indicted — in part,
according to one White House
aide, because they heard that
television news crews were preparing to stake out Manafort’s
Virginia home.
“This wasn’t a shocking development,” Sekulow said.
When the first pair of indictments came naming Manafort
and Gates, there was palpable
relief inside the West Wing. The
31-page document did not name
Trump, nor did it address any
possible collusion between Russia and the president’s campaign.
Moreover, aides were simply
happy that the initial batch of
indictments did not include Michael Flynn, Trump’s former and
controversial national security
adviser, who was fired from his
top White House perch after misleading Vice President Pence
about his contacts with Russian
officials. Flynn had been intimately involved in both the campaign and the early days of the
administration, and a Flynn indictment, most staff believed,
would have been far more damaging.
The indictment of Gates — who
had played a quiet, behind-the-
scenes role in Trump’s orbit —
was more of a surprise, though he
had served as Manafort’s campaign deputy and protege.
Trump’s team quickly settled on a
messaging plan: The duo’s alleged misdeeds, the White House
argued, had nothing to do with
the president or his campaign.
Privately, aides and allies acknowledged that the campaign
had perhaps not sufficiently vetted the two men before bringing
them on board.
Michael Caputo, a former campaign adviser who Trump praised
on Twitter Monday morning for
his appearance on Fox News
Channel’s “Fox & Friends,” later
called the indictments “one big,
huge fail.”
“Rick and Paul, I would consider them friends of the president
because they worked so closely
with him,” Caputo said. “The
president’s watching closely and
he should be concerned for his
friends’ welfare, but he has absolutely no concern about collusion
with Russia because there was
none.”
On Sunday, Trump had attempted to seek refuge from the
political squall with another
round of golf at his Virginia club.
Sens. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.)
and Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) were
set to join him, according to two
people briefed on the plans — an
afternoon of camaraderie and
talk about his tax proposal.
It was not to be. Rainy weather
forced the White House to cancel
the outing — yet another disappointment, beyond the president’s control.
robert.costa@washpost.com
philip.rucker@washpost.com
ashley.parker@washpost.com
John Wagner contributed to this
report.
Indictment will put ‘enormous pressure’ on Manafort, Gates to cooperate
MUELLER FROM A1
adviser George Papadopoulos
about his interactions with people linked to the Russian government. Papadopoulos has admitted to lying to FBI agents who
questioned him about those contacts, according to court records.
“Oh man, they couldn’t have
sent a message any clearer if
they’d rented a revolving neon
sign in Times Square,’’ Cotter
said. “And the message isn’t just
about Manafort. It’s a message to
the next five guys they talk to.
And the message is: ‘We are
coming, and we are not playing,
and we are not bluffing.’ ’’
The special counsel also appears to be moving fast.
White-collar cases often begin
by “flipping’’ bit players far down
the chain of command. The
prosecution team that sent
WorldCom chief executive Bernie
Ebbers to prison for decades began with charges against a lowlevel accountant. Prosecutors
then worked their way up the
corporate ladder, flipping senior
managers until they had a case
against Ebbers.
And as Mueller probes whether Trump associates conspired
with Russian government actors
to influence the 2016 presidential
election, he already has a cooperator at the lower rungs of the
campaign: Papadopoulos. The
prosecutors’ court filings say that
Papadopoulos sought to arrange
a meeting between officials with
the Trump campaign and the
Russian government, and talked
to people connected to the Russian government about providing
“dirt’’ on Democratic candidate
Hillary Clinton.
Peter Zeidenberg, a former federal prosecutor with expertise in
national security, called the Papadopoulos plea “a big deal’’ because it “goes much closer to the
issue of collusion.’’
The fact that he’s been cooperating for three months is important, too, he said. “Who else is
cooperating that we don’t know
about? That’s what people in the
White House need to be worried
about.’’
While the Papadopoulos court
filings offer more links between
Trump associates and Russian
figures, they do not define the
extent to which senior campaign
officials supported that effort.
“It’s not a direct connection as
yet,” said Daniel E. Toomey, a
former prosecutor in Washington. “There are additional bread
crumbs that are missing leading
to the White House.’’
Toomey called the indictment
of Manafort and Gates “extraordinarily intricate’’ and said it will
put “enormous pressure’’ on the
defendants to cooperate.
“This becomes a paper case.
The documents speak for themselves,’’ he said. “This case, by my
estimation, will take months to
try. The cost of the litigation for
Manafort will be in the millions
of dollars.”
Veteran lawyers described the
indictment as daunting — alleging $18 million worth of money
laundering, which prosecutors
said in court could mean more
than a dozen years in prison.
The indictment even seems to
go out of its way to kneecap a
standard defense argument in
such cases — that the defendant
got bad advice from his accountant. The indictment charges that
Manafort wrote specifically to his
accountant that he did not have
foreign bank accounts.
Nick Akerman, a former assistant special Watergate prosecutor, said the court filings “all spell
bad news for President Trump.’’
Akerman said he could not see
any defense to the Manafort indictment.
“He has no choice but to plead
guilty. That’s what the indictment
says to me,’’ he said. “The only
defense that you’ve got is to go in
there and start singing like a
canary to avoid jail time. And
once he starts singing, one of the
tunes is bound to be Donald
Trump.’’
But Jay Nanavati, a former
Justice Department tax prosecutor, said the filing of the indictment shows that so far, prosecutors have “not been able to convince Manafort to cooperate, but
this is still how you start moving
up the ladder in any organization.’’
What’s striking about the indictment, Nanavati said, is the
number of people who worked for
Manafort — accountants, lawyers
and others — who provided key
evidence against him.
That could be an ominous
warning for other subjects of the
probe, like former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who
used lawyers to make official
statements to the government
that have now come into question.
And unidentified lobbying
firms indirectly hired by
Manafort, he said, “are in significant trouble’’ because of the written exchanges referenced in the
indictment alleging that some
people at the firms were aware
that Manafort was lying about
their work together.
Nanavati said a key change in
U.S. tax enforcement that began
in 2008 — going after foreign
bank accounts controlled by
Americans — probably played an
important role in the case against
Manafort. Before the Justice Department
started
cracking
through the layers of Swiss banking secrecy that hid Americans’
accounts in 2008, he said, the
requirement on Americans to declare foreign bank accounts was
on the books but “basically, nobody ever did it, and almost no
one ever got prosecuted for it.
That changed in 2008, and tax
return preparers started asking.’’
With the decline of bank secrecy, Nanavati said, crimes such as
tax evasion and money laundering through foreign accounts became harder to hide, and made
the charges against Manafort easier to bring.
A key leader of the tax enforcement effort was then-Justice Department lawyer Kevin Downing.
Downing is now Manafort’s
defense lawyer. Outside court on
Monday, he blasted the government’s indictment for claiming
his client committed crimes via
foreign bank accounts. To claim
that maintaining such accounts,
“to bring all your funds into the
United States, as a scheme to
conceal from the United States
government,
is
ridiculous,’’
Downing said.
devlin.barrett@washpost.com
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
ellen.nakashima@washpost.com
A8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
the mueller investigation
Podesta brothers Trump o∞cial urged Russia outreach
are drawn into
orbit of scandals
Top campaign aides
knew of adviser’s efforts
to set up a meeting
BY M ARC F ISHER
AND C AROL D . L EONNIG
Last week, Tony Podesta, an
eminence in the annals of Washington lobbying, threw one of his
signature events, a big birthday
bash at his stately stone manse in
Kalorama. His guests thought he
was on top of his world, one of the
men who makes the city go.
On Monday, hours after the
first indictments in the investigation into ties between President
Trump’s campaign and the Russian
government,
Podesta
abruptly quit his post atop the
Podesta Group, the capital’s
eighth-wealthiest lobbying firm.
Podesta’s departure came as
the indictments of former Trump
campaign chief Paul Manafort
and his business partner, Rick
Gates, raised questions about the
work Podesta’s firm did with
Manafort to buff the image of the
Ukrainian government. Podesta,
74, said he was quitting because
of the barrage of criticism he’s
been getting as special counsel
Robert S. Mueller III pursues the
investigation.
“It is impossible to run a public
affairs firm while you are under
attack by Fox News and the right
wing media,” Podesta told employees at the Podesta Group offices on Monday, according to a
person familiar with his remarks.
For decades, Tony and John
Podesta — brothers who share a
Jesuit education, a devotion to
liberal causes and a passion for
politics — have been central players in Washington. And in the
past year, both have been drawn
into the orbit of scandals.
Tony’s Podesta Group is one of
two firms described in Monday’s
indictment as having been hired
by Manafort and Gates to lobby
on behalf of Viktor Yanukovych,
the former president of Ukraine
who fled to Moscow in 2014,
according to people familiar with
the company’s involvement. Federal prosecutors have accused
Manafort of creating a scheme to
mislead the government about
his secret work for Ukraine.
Both the Podesta Group and
the other firm, Mercury Public
Affairs, have said they were hired
to lobby for a European nonprofit
based in Brussels trying to polish
Ukraine’s image in the West. But
behind the scenes, prosecutors
allege, the real client was a political party led by the former
Ukraine president, who was
friendly with Russia.
John Podesta, a longtime Democratic adviser who led the presidential campaign of Hillary Clinton, has spent the past year coping with the publication by
Wikileaks of tens of thousands of
his emails, which were hacked by
someone using a computer with
an address in Ukraine. The release of those emails ensnared
him in the ornate conspiracy theory known as Pizzagate, in which
some anti-Clinton activists came
to believe, without evidence, that
sexually abused children were
being hidden below a pizza place
in Northwest Washington — and
that John Podesta was involved
with satanic rituals there, a notion that police said was bogus.
In an emailed statement Monday, John Podesta said, “I view
being attacked by Donald Trump
and right wing media as a badge
of honor.”
To their opponents, the Podestas are quintessential swamp
rats, exemplars of the permanent
Washington establishment. Their
defenders, however, view them as
the oil that makes the gears of
government turn.
“Advocacy is an important part
of our process and it’s an honorable profession,” said former senator Tom Daschle (D-S.D.), now a
lobbyist. “Both Podestas have
been enormously successful, but
we’re in as toxic an environment
as anyone living today has ever
seen. The quality of governance
has suffered immensely as a result.”
The brothers, although close,
are quite different.
“Tony is more gregarious and
outgoing, and John is more introspective and quiet, but they are
brothers and they are still close,”
said Ron Klain, who was chief of
staff to vice presidents Joe Biden
and Al Gore. “John is the eminence grise of the Democratic
Party, and all the efforts by Republicans and completely crazy
people to discredit him have not
changed that.”
Tony Podesta has been a pivotal figure in the murky connections between policy and politics,
becoming wealthy on fees from
industries and foreign entities
that want something from Congress and the White House. He
also bundles big donations and
dispenses them to politicians
who might someday be helpful to
those lobbying clients.
He and his former wife, Heather Podesta, held lavish fundraisers for Democratic candidates at
their home, which boasted a
world-class art collection and a
wine cellar with thousands of
bottles. The Podesta brothers’
mother made the pesto. Tony
dressed the part of a man in full;
he sported eye-catching neckties
and red Prada loafers. “The pope
wears Prada,” he once told a reporter, “and so do I.”
(Heather and Tony split up
several years ago; according to
court records and news reports,
they spent 109 hours with a mediator before coming to a settlement on how to divide their art
and other properties.)
Although the brothers created
their lobbying firm together in
1988, John Podesta has spent
most of his career inside government. He had several jobs in
Congress and was President Bill
Clinton’s chief of staff and counselor to President Barack Obama.
“They’re brothers, but they
chose different roads to go down
to craft good public policy,” said
Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.),
who knows both Podestas.
Tony Podesta worked on a
string of losing Democratic presidential campaigns — from Eugene McCarthy’s 1968 bid on
through Hubert Humphrey, Ed
Muskie, George McGovern, Ted
Kennedy, Walter Mondale and
finally Michael Dukakis in 1988.
That’s when the brothers created Podesta Associates, which became the Podesta Group, representing some of the country’s
biggest and most powerful businesses, including Walmart, Bank
of America and BP. (The Washington Post employed the firm in the
early 2000s, when it was part of a
public company controlled by the
Graham family, then-owners of
The Post.)
The Podesta Group collected
$252 million in fees over the past
two decades, according to data
compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics. This year, the
firm’s top clients are Mylan, a
pharmaceutical company; Wells
Fargo; Crawford Group, the parent of Enterprise car rentals; and
Lockheed Martin, the defense
contractor, according to federal
records.
Along the way, the firm also
represented a number of foreign
entities, including the government of Egypt under ex-dictator
Hosni Mubarak.
“More and more, foreign countries turn to lobbyists to do work
that diplomats once did themselves,” said James Thurber, a
government professor at American University who studies lobbying. “Things have gotten so much
more complex in the last thirty
years in the business that foreign
companies and foreign countries
do in Washington.”
Monday’s indictments described a multitiered arrangement in which Manafort and
Gates are alleged to have pulled
the strings as the other firms,
cited only as Company A and
Company B, were the publicly
acknowledged lobbyists for the
Brussels group. Sources familiar
with the two companies’ work
said the descriptions in the indictment indicate that Company
A was Mercury, and Company B
was the Podesta Group.
“The Podesta Group has fully
cooperated with the Special
Counsel’s office and taken every
possible step to provide documentation that confirms compliance with the law,” said Molly
Levinson, a spokeswoman for the
firm. She said the work the firm
did “was in support of Ukraine’s
admission to the [European
Union],” and the Brussels group
certified that “it was neither
funded by nor directed by a government or political party.”
Michael McKeon, a partner at
Mercury, said his firm disclosed
that it worked for the Brussels
group “with the intention of
aligning Ukraine with western
democracies generally, and the
European Union specifically.”
In 2012, when Manafort and
Gates first sought out the two
firms to lobby for their business
associate in Ukraine, Gates wrote
to Mercury that the firm would be
“representing the Government of
Ukraine in DC.”
marc.fisher@washpost.com
carol.leonnig@washpost.com
BY
R OSALIND S . H ELDERMAN
AND T OM H AMBURGER
Several weeks after Donald
Trump secured the Republican
presidential nomination, his national campaign co-chairman
urged a foreign policy adviser to
meet with Russian officials to
foster ties with that country’s
government.
“Make the trip, if it is feasible,”
Sam Clovis wrote in an August
email to George Papadopoulos.
The email, included in court
papers unsealed Monday, shows
how an otherwise low-profile adviser has become a focus of the
federal probe into possible coordination between the Trump
campaign and the Kremlin.
Papadopoulos was in contact
with several senior Trump campaign aides about his efforts to
broker a relationship between
Trump and Russian President
Vladimir Putin, the court papers
show. In addition to Clovis, who
now serves as senior White
House adviser to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Papadopoulos wrote to campaign manager
Corey Lewandowski and campaign chairman Paul Manafort,
the newly released documents
show.
The campaign officials are not
identified in court documents,
but some of the emails cited by
federal prosecutors match messages described in August to The
Washington Post by people familiar with their contents.
The newly released documents
show that while senior Trump
officials at times rebuffed or ignored Papadopoulos, they were
well aware of his efforts, which
went on for months. His interactions with them could complicate
the White House’s attempts to
distance the president from Papadopoulos, who pleaded guilty
Oct. 5 to lying to federal agents.
Trump himself knew of Papadopoulos’s claims that he had a
pipeline to Moscow: During a
March 2016 meeting of the campaign’s national security advisers
in Washington that Trump attended, Papadopoulos said he
had connections that could help
arrange a meeting between the
then-candidate and Putin.
On Monday, White House
press secretary Sarah Huckabee
Sanders said she was “not sure
that the president recalls specific
details of the meeting,” calling it
“brief.” She described Papadopoulos’s role with the campaign
as “extremely limited.”
In a statement, Clovis’s attorney Victoria Toensing said Clovis,
a radio host from Iowa who was
one of Trump’s earliest supporters, “always vigorously opposed
any Russian trip for Donald
Trump and/or the campaign.”
She said Clovis was “being
polite” when he encouraged Papadopoulos to meet with Russian
officials in August, adding that
the campaign had a “strict rule
that no person could travel
abroad as a representative of the
campaign.” Clovis could not stop
an American citizen from traveling abroad “in his personal capacity,” she said.
Clovis has been nominated to
be the top science adviser at the
USDA. His hearing before the
Senate Agriculture Committee is
scheduled for Nov. 9.
Lewandowski did not respond
to a request for comment.
In a statement, Papadopoulos’s
attorneys Thomas Breen and
Robert Stanley said they would
refrain from commenting on the
case.
“We will have the opportunity
to comment on George’s involvement when called upon by the
Court at a later date,” they said.
“We look forward to telling all of
the details of George’s story at
that time.”
Trump first identified Papadopoulos as one of his advisers in a
March 2016 meeting with The
Post’s editorial board, describing
him as “an energy and oil consultant. Excellent guy.”
Papadopoulos was charged under seal in July and was arrested
when he arrived at Dulles International Airport on July 27. His
plea agreement indicates that he
is cooperating with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III. He
pleaded guilty in October to lying
to federal agents about his contacts with people with connections to the Russian government,
filings show.
Papadopoulos’s efforts to arrange a meeting with Russian
officials began days after he was
named to Trump’s campaign
team and continued for months.
COSTAS BEJ/THE NATIONAL HERALD
George Papadopoulos, left, was a foreign policy adviser in the
Trump campaign. Learn more at wapo.st/Papadopoulos1031.
The three former Trump campaign officials
charged in Russia probe
Paul J.
Manafort
Richard
W. Gates
George
Papadopoulos
Pleaded
not guilty
Pleaded
not guilty
Pleaded
guilty
A political consultant and lobbyist
and former Trump campaign
chairman, Manafort was charged
in a 12-count indictment on Oct.
30 that focused on his work
advising a Russia-friendly political
party in Ukraine. Gates has been
Manafort’s business associate
since 2006 and has helped lead a
nonprofit called America First
Policies to bolster Trump’s agenda.
Papadopoulos pleaded guilty
earlier this month to making a
false statement to FBI
investigators who asked about his
contacts with a foreigner who
claimed to have high-level
Russian connections.
CHARGES
Making a false statement to
FBI investigators.
CHARGES
Conspiracy against the U.S.
Conspiracy to launder money
Failure to file reports of foreign
bank and financial accounts
for calendar years 2011-2014
(four counts)
Failure to file reports of foreign
bank and financial accounts
for calendar years 2011-2013
(three counts)
Unregistered agent of a
foreign principal
False and misleading FARA
statements
False statements
PROSECUTORS’ TIMELINE OF EVENTS
Between at least 2006 and 2015
Manafort and Gates acted
as unregistered agents of
the Government of Ukraine,
the Party of Regions (a
Ukrainian political party
whose leader Victor
Yanukovych was president
from 2010 to 2014).
2006 through at least 2016
In order to hide Ukraine
payments from
United States authorities,
from approximately 2006
through at least 2016,
Manafort and Gates
laundered the money
through scores of United
States and foreign
corporations,
partnerships, and bank
accounts.
Nov. 2016 and Feb. 2017
Manafort and Gates
caused false and
misleading letters to be
submitted to the
Department of Justice.
October 10, 2017
Manafort and Gates turned
themselves in to FBI.
Source: Justice Department
At one point, he emailed Lewandowski “to discuss Russia’s interest in hosting Mr. Trump. Have
been receiving a lot of calls over
the last month about Putin wanting to host him and the team
when the time is right,” according
to documents.
A month later, he reiterated
Russia’s interest in an email to
Manafort.
In response, Manafort forwarded Papadopoulos’s offer to
his deputy Rick Gates, writing,
“We need someone to communicate that [Trump] is not doing
these trips. It should be someone
low level in the campaign so as
not to send any signal.”
Papadopoulos’s proposed trip
ultimately did not take place,
court documents show.
PROSECUTORS’ TIMELINE OF EVENTS
Early March 2016
Papadopoulos learned he
would be a foreign policy
adviser for Trump’s campaign.
March 14, 2016
While traveling in Italy,
Papadopoulos met an
individual who was a
professor based in London
and claimed to have
substantial connections
with Russian government
officials.
March 24, 2016
Papadopoulos met with the
professor in London. The
professor brought with him
a female Russian national,
introduced to Papadopoulos
as a relative of Vladimir
Putin with connections to
senior Russian government
officials.
April, 2016
Papadopoulos sent multiple
emails to other members of
the campaign’s foreign
policy team team regarding
his contacts with "the
Russians." He tried to
arrange a meeting between
the Campaign and the
Russian government. On
April 26, he learned that the
Russians had "dirt" on
Clinton, “thousands of
emails."
Jan. 27 and Feb. 16, 2017
Papadopoulos was
interviewed by agents from
the FBI. During the course
of these interviews, he
made false statements and
omitted material facts.
July 27, 2017
On July 27, 2017,
Papadopoulos was
arrested upon his arrival at
Dulles International
Airport.
THE WASHINGTON POST
According to court papers, Papadopoulos lied to federal agents
about one of his key contacts: a
London-based professor he met
in Italy in March 2016, days after
he joined the Trump campaign.
In a subsequent meeting in
April, the professor told Papadopoulos that the Russian government had “dirt” on Democratic
presidential candidate Hillary
Clinton, including thousands of
Clinton’s emails.
That conversation occurred
weeks before the Democratic National Committee revealed that it
had been hacked and believed
that Russians were behind the
attack. It also came about a
month after an email account
belonging to Clinton’s campaign
chairman, John Podesta, was tar-
geted with a phishing attempt
that may have led to the hack of
his emails. Podesta’s emails were
released by WikiLeaks in October
2016.
One email quoted in court
filings regarding the professor
matches an exchange previously
described to The Post in which
Papadopoulos identified the professor as Joseph Mifsud, the director of the London Academy of
Diplomacy.
That document, as well as
emails with Clovis and other top
campaign aides, was among
more than 20,000 pages that the
Trump campaign turned over to
congressional committees after
review by White House and defense lawyers.
Mifsud told The Post in an
email in August that he had
“absolutely no contact with the
Russian government” and said
his only ties to Russia were
through academic links. He did
not respond to a request for
comment Monday.
When asked about the unsealed indictments Monday,
Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said, “We don’t know what
the charges are.” After being sent
a copy of the indictments, he
responded, “My office hours are
over!”
Papadopoulos also communicated with a Russian woman with
ties to the government and a man
in Moscow he believed was connected to the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, filings show.
At the time, Papadopoulos incorrectly believed that the Russian woman was a niece of Putin,
according to court documents.
“We are all very excited by the
possibility of a good relationship
with Mr. Trump,” she wrote to
him in April 2016. “The Russian
Federation would love to welcome him once his candidature
would be officially announced.”
According to court filings, she
told Papadopoulos that she
would like to help set up meetings with her associates to discuss U.S.-Russia ties under a
future President Trump.
After Papadopoulos emailed
campaign officials about her offer, Clovis responded that he
would “work it through the campaign,” but added, “Great work.”
Toensing described Clovis as a
“polite gentleman from Iowa”
who “would always have been
courteous to a person offering to
help the campaign.”
Clovis played a key role in
boosting Trump during the Iowa
caucuses, but his influence within the campaign subsequently
waned amid tense relations with
Trump’s son-in-law and adviser
Jared Kushner.
During a Jan. 27, 2017, interview with FBI agents, Papadopoulos said he had met the Russian woman before he joined the
Trump campaign and falsely stated that he had no relationship
with her, according to court filings.
The day after his second interview with FBI agents, in February, Papadopoulos deactivated
his Facebook account, which had
information about his outreach
to Russian officials — a move
prosecutors said was aimed at
obstructing their investigation.
Papadopoulos, who has a scant
foreign policy background, briefly advised the 2016 presidential
campaign of neurosurgeon Ben
Carson.
When Trump identified Papadopoulos as an adviser in March
2016, the hotel and real estate
executive was rising in the field
of Republican presidential candidates, and his campaign was
eager to show that it had credible
voices offering advice on foreign
policy. Among the other advisers
he named that day was Carter
Page, another energy consultant
whose ties to Russia have been
under scrutiny.
Throughout the summer, Papadopoulos met with foreign officials and gave interviews to media in other countries, sometimes
describing Trump’s views on Putin or Russia.
He told a group of researchers
in Israel that Trump saw Putin as
“a responsible actor and potential partner,” according to a column in the Jerusalem Post; later
he met with a British Foreign
Office representative in London
and a Greek official in New York,
British and Greek embassy
spokesmen have said. He also
criticized U.S. sanctions on Russia in an interview with the
Russian news outlet Interfax.
The Post has also reported that
Sergei Millian, who was a key
source of information contained
in a dossier about Trump’s ties to
Russia, told people around him
that he was in contact with
Papadopoulos during the campaign.
rosalind.helderman@washpost.com
tom.hamburger@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
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the mueller investigation
A rattled Washington braces for whatever might come next
POLITICS FROM A1
that he would leave his firm after
its apparent role in a Ukrainian
lobbying campaign was described in court papers.
“We are in a real testing time
for democracy,” said Thomas
Mann, a scholar at the Brookings
Institution. “You really have to go
back to Watergate to find anything of this scope and dimension.”
Former Democratic strategist
David Axelrod liked to say that
presidential campaigns provide
MRIs of candidates’ souls. The
corollary is that criminal investigations can similarly expose the
hidden malignancies of Washington.
The release of the charges followed the disclosure last week
that a prominent Democratic
lawyer and a news outlet backed
by a major Republican donor had
at different times paid a firm that
compiled opposition research on
Trump alleging ties to Russian
interests that could threaten national security.
Both disclosures were the sort
of tradecraft that rarely becomes
public, but there was little sign
that they would be the last. Mueller has signaled that he will seek
to turn every stone in his search
and use all available legal tools.
Monday’s court papers revealed
that he had decided to file charges under the Foreign Agents Registration Act, a nearly 80-year-old
law that regulates lobbying for
foreign powers but rarely leads to
criminal charges.
Legal experts say the Mueller
investigation is likely to bring
more charges, not to mention a
protracted legal process that is
likely to distract from other priorities.
“The charges brought last
week could easily result in prosecutions extending into 2019, just
on the trial level, not even the
appellate level,” said Jonathan
Turley, a law professor at George
Washington University Law
School. “That is going to continue
to have a dysfunctional impact on
the Trump administration.”
That raises the prospects for
political distractions that could
continue into the 2018 campaign
season, possibly complicating
Republican efforts to hold the
House and Senate. It also undercuts the expectations of White
House aides, who say they expect
the Mueller investigation to conclude soon.
Already, there are signs that
the growing scandal has begun to
distract from a key week for
Republicans looking to build momentum behind tax legislation.
On Capitol Hill, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
(R-Ky.) avoided questions from
reporters on the indictments. At
a separate event, House Speaker
Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) said this
when asked about the indictments: “I really don’t have any-
thing to add, other than nothing’s
going to derail what we’re doing
in Congress.”
But Simon Rosenberg, a Democratic strategist, said: “It has
added a degree of unpredictability and volatility into what was
already an unpredictable environment. It ends up just being a
thing that just started eating up
bandwidth.”
Even the president found himself caught off guard when he
prematurely tweeted his own absolution hours after indictments
were announced against his former campaign chairman Paul
Manafort and a top deputy, Rick
Gates. At 10:25 a.m., Trump felt it
safe to boast that the announcements did not directly reference
his campaign.
“Sorry, but this is years ago,
before Paul Manafort was part of
the campaign,” Trump wrote on
Twitter. “. . . Also, there is NO
COLLUSION!”
Minutes later, Mueller’s team
announced a previously secret
guilty plea of a third Trump
campaign adviser, George Papadopoulos, who worked on foreign
policy in a volunteer capacity. In
court papers, Papadopoulos described in detail his 2016 efforts
to arrange contacts with people
he knew to be Russian agents,
including one person who had
told him about Russian “dirt” on
Democratic candidate Hillary
Clinton, including “thousands of
emails.”
Papadopoulos pleaded guilty
to giving false statements to federal agents in his initial interviews about the interactions. He
now says that he discussed the
Russian overtures he had received with several other people
in the Trump campaign, including a “senior policy adviser,” a
“campaign supervisor” and a
“high-ranking campaign official.”
Among the campaign officials he
emailed were Manafort, campaign manager Corey Lewandowski and national campaign
co-chairman Sam Clovis.
The campaign officials are not
identified in court documents,
but some of the emails cited by
federal prosecutors match messages described in August to The
Washington Post by people familiar with their contents.
White House press secretary
Sarah Huckabee Sanders chose
not to acknowledge that confession later in the day. “Today’s
announcement has nothing to do
with the president, has nothing
to do with the president’s campaign or campaign activity,” she
said, arguing that the work by
Papadopoulos to coordinate a
Russian meeting with the campaign did not amount to a campaign effort.
Podesta’s decision to leave his
firm amounted to the first collateral damage for Democrats from
the Russian investigation. One of
the party’s most powerful lobbyists and effective fundraisers, he
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Media members wait outside U.S. District Court, where former Trump campaign chairman Paul
Manafort and his longtime business partner Rick Gates appeared for a hearing in Washington.
is also the brother of Clinton’s
2016 campaign chairman, John
Podesta.
The Manafort and Gates indictments described the efforts of
“Company B” — which appears to
be Tony Podesta’s firm, the Podesta Group — to help the government of Ukraine. A principal
from Podesta’s firm is described
as privately warning Gates that
his talking points on work on the
lobbying contract could be contradicted by “lots of email traffic.”
Senate
Minority
Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) put
out a warning to Trump not to
interfere with the ongoing probe.
“If he does, Congress must respond swiftly, unequivocally and
in a bipartisan way to ensure that
the investigation continues,” he
said in a statement.
Republicans,
meanwhile,
seemed more concerned that the
scandal not distract from the
effort to pass tax legislation before the end of the year. Lobbyist
Charlie Black, a former business
partner of Manafort, worried
that the focus on the investigation could do so. “The agenda of
politics is dictated by the news
media most of the time,” Black
said. “And the news media will be
consumed by these scandal issues.” Black noted that all of his
65 clients are interested in the
outcome of the tax fight.
Grover Norquist, a conservative activist working on tax legislation, said the situation recalled
moments during the scandals of
the 1990s. “There was a period of
months during Monica Lewinsky
when I could have set my hair on
fire and I would not have gotten
on television,” he said, arguing
that more debate over taxes
would help his side. “It’s a distraction.”
michael.scherer@washpost.com
A10
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
the mueller investigation
Manafort’s ‘lavish lifestyle’ is highlighted in indictment
BY M ICHAEL K RANISH
AND T OM H AMBURGER
A few years before he became
Donald Trump’s campaign chairman, longtime Republican political operative Paul Manafort went
on a spending spree with money
funneled through a network of
offshore bank accounts, a federal
indictment unsealed Monday alleges.
He bought a $1.5 million
brownstone in a trendy New
York neighborhood, and a
$1.9 million home in Arlington,
Va. He paid for three Range
Rovers and a Mercedes-Benz,
landscaping at his Hamptons
getaway, and pricey improvements at his house in Palm
Beach, Fla.
In all, out of more than
$75 million that flowed through
the offshore accounts, more than
$18 million was “laundered,”
with income concealed from the
U.S. government, and was used
in part to cover Manafort’s “lavish lifestyle,” the indictment
says.
The indictment of the refined
and impeccably dressed former
campaign chairman detailed an
alleged scheme in which foreign
clients paid millions in exchange
for Manafort’s consulting services. Manafort’s lawyer, Kevin
Downing, rebutted the charges
Monday, saying Manafort was
not seeking to launder funds.
Manafort, a confidant of presidents dating back to George
H.W. Bush and Ronald Reagan,
was the biggest name charged
thus far in a federal investigation by special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III, who is examining
possible collusion by Trump’s
campaign
with
Russia.
Manafort’s indictment, along
with charges against his former
business partner Rick Gates,
who also worked for the Trump
campaign, brought Mueller
close to the inner circle that
guided Trump’s 2016 victory.
Manafort and Gates pleaded not
guilty and did not speak to
reporters.
“This indictment is tragic for
Paul and his family,” said
Manafort’s former business partner Charles Black, who said he
couldn’t speak to the specifics
because he hasn’t worked with
Manafort for two decades. “For
him and Rick Gates, I just pray
that they are innocent.”
Manafort was brought into
Trump’s presidential campaign
in spring 2016, tasked with tracking delegates before becoming
chairman. The arrival of a seasoned operative had been welcomed at the time by many
Republican leaders as a sign that
Trump was ready to professionalize a largely undisciplined
campaign as he was preparing to
secure the GOP nomination.
But the court papers unsealed
Monday show how Trump, in
tapping Manafort, also brought
aboard a senior strategist with
deep, ongoing and potentially
problematic foreign entanglements.
For decades, Manafort has
been known for his dealings with
foreign leaders, including some
with less-than-savory reputations.
In recent years, in addition to
MATT MCCLAIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
Kevin Downing, Paul Manafort’s attorney, exits the William B. Bryant Annex to the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse after Manafort
and his former business partner Rick Gates were indicted on several charges on Monday.
his work for Trump and for a
Ukrainian presidential candidate, he has made deals with
foreign business titans that have
resulted in controversy, including one with a Russian oligarch
who charged that Manafort and
Gates “disappeared” without
paying money they allegedly
owed him. Manafort and Gates
denied the allegation.
Manafort’s journey from being
one of Washington’s most
sought-after political operatives
to defendant in a high-profile
federal investigation is a story of
a chase for power and money.
Manafort, 68, was raised in
Connecticut, the son of the mayor of New Britain. With a Georgetown University law degree, he
worked for President Gerald
Ford’s 1976 campaign, tracking
delegates at the nominating convention. He ran Ronald Reagan’s
1980 presidential campaign in
the south.
Manafort’s ascendancy in
Washington
reached
new
heights when he became a founding partner in 1980 of the lobbying firm Black, Manafort &
Stone, with Black and Roger
Stone, the latter a longtime
Trump
confidant.
During
Manafort’s 16 years at the firm,
his clients included two dictators, Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire
(now Congo) and Ferdinand
Marcos of the Philippines, who
allegedly stole billions of dollars
from their countries.
In 1989, Manafort testified
before Congress about a deal in
which he lobbied to obtain
$43 million in federal housing
subsidies for a New Jersey project while his firm held an option
to buy a stake in the property.
The firm invested before the
subsidies were awarded, but
Manafort testified that he had a
“high degree of expectation” that
they would win approval.
“The technical term for what
we do and what law firms, associations and professional groups
do is ‘lobbying,’ ” Manafort said.
“For purposes of today, I will
admit that, in a narrow sense,
some people might term it ‘influence peddling.’ ”
Manafort’s globe-trotting lifestyle led friends to dub him “the
Count of Monte Cristo,” a reference to the swashbuckling hero
of a 19th-century French novel.
“This indictment is
tragic for Paul and his
family. For him and
Rick Gates, I just pray
that they are innocent.”
Charles Black, a former business
partner of Paul Manafort
Manafort later became a partner in the firm of Davis
Manafort,
which
Manafort
owned with Richard Davis. As a
partner, Manafort wooed a Russian aluminum magnate, Oleg
Deripaska. Manafort and Davis
had proposed setting up a
$200 million private equity fund
to invest mostly in Russia and
Ukraine, according to a petition
filed by Deripaska, one of a
number of fund contributors.
Derispaka invested in the partnership through a company
called Surf Horizon, incorporated in Cyprus in 2007.
Deripaska sought repayment
of some of his investment after
the 2007 financial crisis, saying
in a petition that he was owed
$19 million from a failed investment in Ukraine. Deripaska said
in a 2014 petition that he was still
waiting to be paid, but “it appears that Paul Manafort and
Rick Gates have simply disappeared.” Deripaska’s representative said in 2016 they were still
seeking the money, but a
Manafort spokesman subsequently told the New York Times
that no funds were owed.
During his time at the Trump
campaign, Manafort sought to
communicate with Deripaska
through an intermediary, suggesting that his new position
provided an opportunity to settle
financial disputes, according to
Manafort’s email correspondence, which was turned over to
investigators this year.
A turning point for Manafort
came in the early 2000s when he
became a consultant for Viktor
Yanukovych, who would later
become Ukraine’s president.
One of Yanukovych’s supporters was a Ukrainian energy
tycoon, Dmitry Firtash, and
Manafort soon tried to do business with him, according to a
filing in a now-dismissed lawsuit. In 2008, Manafort met
with Firtash to discuss a proposal to build an $850 million,
65-story apartment building in
New York City. A lawsuit filed by
former Ukrainian prime minister Yulia Tymoshenko alleged
that Firtash worked with
Manafort to invest illicit profits
from energy deals in Ukraine.
Firtash and Manafort denied
the allegations and the suit was
ultimately dismissed. Spokesmen for Deripaska and Firtash
did not respond to requests
for comment.
Gates, 45, met Manafort when
he interned at his firm, Black,
Manafort & Stone.
Manafort, accompanied by
Gates, worked for Yanukovych
and his Party of Regions, as
Yanukovych won the presidency
of Ukraine in 2010. While
Manafort said he was working
for a pro-Western politician who
embraced democracy, Yanukovych was ultimately seen as
aligned with Russian President
Vladimir Putin. Between 2012
and 2014, Manafort’s firm was
paid $17 million by the Party of
Regions, according to Manafort’s
belated filing under the Foreign
Agents Registration Act. As part
of
Monday’s
indictment,
Manafort and Gates were accused of hiding their lobbying
work for Ukraine in violation of
the registration requirements.
The following year, in 2015,
Manafort owned an apartment
at Trump Tower in New York City
and had invested in other properties.
By early 2016, Manafort wanted to join Trump’s presidential
campaign. He hadn’t been in
close touch with Trump for years,
so he sought out one of Trump’s
oldest and closest friends, Thomas J. Barrack Jr., to serve as a
conduit. Barrack and Manafort
were also longtime friends.
Barrack, a billionaire who
runs a real estate investment
company, said in a recent interview that the only financial deal
he had ever made with Manafort
was around 2004, when he lent
$1.5 million for a house owned by
Manafort’s wife. Barrack said the
loan was paid back at market
rate in 14 months.
Shortly after Trump lost the
Iowa caucuses, Manafort met
Barrack at the Montage Hotel in
Beverly Hills. “Paul came to me
and said, ‘I really need to get to
[Trump], I think I can be really
effective at the convention,’ ”
Barrack said.
Barrack said in the interview
that he sent materials about
Manafort to Trump’s son-in-law,
Jared Kushner, and Kushner’s
wife, Ivanka Trump. Barrack had
known both of them for years. In
the email, Barrack wrote that
Manafort would be “a killer” at
the job.
Trump
agreed
to
hire
Manafort, who said he would
work without pay. Manafort subsequently became campaign
chairman.
During his time in the position, Manafort attended a June 9,
2016, meeting with Kushner and
Donald Trump Jr. at which a
Russian lawyer was said to have
damaging information about
Hillary Clinton. The meeting is
not mentioned in the indictment, but it has been a focus of
Mueller’s investigation into
whether Russia colluded with
the Trump campaign.
Manafort resigned in August
2016 after reports of his ties to
Yanukovych and the publication
of a ledger in Ukraine that
showed millions of dollars of
supposedly “off the books” payments to Manafort from the
Party of Regions, a claim
Manafort has denied.
Barrack invited Manafort to
join him on his yacht off the
coast of Greece. “He got fired,
and I felt terrible,” Barrack said.
“When Manafort called, he was
depressed. I said, ‘I have got five
guys on a boat,’ and ‘Join us.’ He
came over, and he spent four or
five days figuring out what he
would do next.”
Barrack subsequently hired
Gates for two positions: first, to
be deputy chairman of the Presidential Inaugural Committee, of
which Barrack was chairman;
and, second, as a Washingtonbased consultant of his company,
Colony NorthStar. Gates remained in the latter position
until the time of the indictment,
when his contract with the company was terminated, according
to an official familiar with the
matter, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he
wasn’t authorized to speak publicly.
During their work in Ukraine,
starting in 2008, Manafort and
Gates allegedly devised a scheme
to “defraud” banks and other
institutions by wiring money to
accounts in a way that laundered
the funds without paying taxes.
Details of Manafort’s luxurious lifestyle and income were
spread on social media in February, when hackers exposed a
cache of more than 285,000
personal messages purportedly
stolen from the iPhone of
Manafort’s daughter, Andrea.
Manafort’s spokesman previously confirmed that the phone
was hacked and that some of the
texts placed on line were authentic, but he has declined to authenticate the entire cache.
In one of the posted text
messages, Andrea Manafort
wrote to her sister in 2015, “Don’t
fool yourself. The money we have
is blood money.”
michael.kranish@washpost.com
tom.hamburger@washpost.com
Rosalind Helderman and Alice Crites
contributed to this report.
In Ukraine, Manafort’s indictment is reason to cheer
Activists hope move will
aid investigation to stop
political corruption
B Y D AVID L . S TERN
AND A NDREW R OTH
kiev, ukraine — The news of
Paul Manafort’s indictment on
Monday elicited cheers in
Ukraine, where activists and politicians seeking to root out political corruption had seethed at the
American political operative’s
counsel to the country’s ousted
leader, Viktor Yanukovych.
Reports of the millions of dollars Manafort had been paid
under the table by Ukraine’s
former ruling party were particularly galling — and Ukrainians
learned from the indictment
Monday those payments may
have been even larger than
thought.
But while Washington is wondering where the probe led by
special counsel Robert S. Mueller
III into Russian meddling in the
U.S. elections will lead next, people here are wondering more
about what this means for the
investigation into the millions of
dollars in oligarch wealth that
have stubbornly slowed the
country’s program of reform.
“It’s great news. There should
be a precedent of punishment for
the lobbyists who served these
corrupt figures,” said Serhiy
Leshchenko, a Ukrainian member of parliament and investigative journalist who published
documents showing secret payments to Manafort by the ruling
party under Yanukovych and
then invoices to Manafort consulting companies on the same
day. “Manafort worked for a long
time so that Yanukovych could
come to power and use that
power for his own corrupt
schemes, not for reform.”
The investigation, as he saw it,
is far from finished.
“I want investigations into all
of Manafort’s connections and
the people who paid him this
money,” he added, naming several prominent Ukrainian oligarchs.
In a decades-long career,
Manafort made tens of millions
of dollars far beyond the borders
of established democracies,
working for despotic leaders and
their allies in countries such as
the Philippines and Congo.
But his work in one country,
Ukraine, caught up with him on
Monday in a criminal indictment
describing illicit earnings, off-
shore bank accounts and lavish
expenditures funded in part by
nearly a decade of work for
Ukraine’s Party of Regions and
Yanukovych, who fled to Russia
after his regime was toppled by
protesters in 2014.
Despite reports of secret payments, Monday’s 12-count indictment against Manafort and a
former business partner still
yielded new accusations for
Ukrainian prosecutors investigating the former Yanukovych
administration.
Among them: lobbying members of Congress for the Ukrainian government, in one case using
an offshore account to secretly
funnel $4 million to commission
a report about the trial of former
Ukrainian prime minister Yulia
Tymoshenko.
“This was new information for
us,” Serhiy Gorbatyuk, the head
of special investigations for the
prosecutor’s office, said in a telephone interview.
It took an unlikely confluence
of events — the 2014 political
revolution in Ukraine that ousted Yanukovych, the discovery of
secret campaign finance documents at the headquarters of
Ukraine’s ruling Party of Regions, and then Manafort’s leading role as campaign manager for
President Trump — for Mueller
to zero in on Manafort’s alleged
schemes to launder money, evade
U.S. taxes, and engage in “conspiracy against the United
States.”
In Kiev, where politicians have
been careful not to antagonize
the
Trump
administration,
Manafort remains just a witness
as prosecutors pursue corruption
charges against the Yanukovych
administration. Gorbatyuk said
his requests to the U.S. Justice
Department to cooperate had not
received a response.
“In order for the case to move
forward better, we need answers
to our questions. So far, we
haven’t received any. Manafort at
this moment is a witness in the
case,” he said.
While corruption allegations
were already well-known in Kiev,
the extent of Manafort’s wealth
was not. Monday’s indictment
alleged that more than $75 million flowed through offshore accounts Manafort and his partner,
Rick Gates, maintained, and that
Manafort sent more than
$5.4 million to vendors for home
improvements and $934,350 to
an antique rug store. It alleged,
as well, that he spent hundreds of
thousands of dollars more on
antiques, landscaping, Range
Rovers and home entertainment
systems.
He made that money while
working for some of the region’s
richest men, including Russian
oligarch Oleg Deripaska. Deripaska in a 2014 Cayman Islands
court filing had accused
Manafort and Gates of absconding with $19 million of his money
earmarked for investments. Yet
in 2016, Manafort had suggested
providing Deripaska with private
briefings while he was Trump’s
campaign chairman.
But the focus of Monday’s
indictment was the money
Manafort made working as a
political adviser in Ukraine —
developing the election strategies that helped revive the political career of Yanukovych from a
bitter defeat in a contested 2004
presidential election, up until his
ouster by pro-European street
demonstrators in 2014.
Party allies recalled that
Manafort coached unpolished
politicians from the country’s
industrial regions, streamlining
their talking points and improving their choice in suits. Others
said he helped parse demographic polls to take advantage of the
deep divide between the country’s regions.
On Monday, allies and associates of Manafort’s in Ukraine,
where he remains a deeply divisive figure, brushed off the alle-
gations, calling them the result of
a politically motivated witch
hunt following Trump’s unexpected ascendancy to the presidency.
“I have every confidence that
Paul and Rick will be vindicated
by the judicial process currently
ongoing in the U.S.,” said Philip
Griffin, Manafort’s longtime representative in Ukraine. “I am
quite taken by the fact that this
has nothing to do with the president or any alleged collusion
between the Trump presidential
campaign and Russia — and that
this is the result of a politically
driven fishing expedition.”
Previous records from a recovered “black ledger” of payments
to Manafort from Ukraine’s Party
of Regions detailed payments of
$12.7 million, but Monday’s indictment said Manafort had
laundered a larger amount, more
than $18 million. Manafort
pleaded not guilty Monday to the
12 counts brought against him.
While Manafort allies focused
on the absence of collusion allegations in the indictment, the
charges still sent shock waves
through his network of partners
and associates. Speaking on the
condition of anonymity to talk
candidly, one associate called
them “a punch to the gut.”
andrew.roth@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
RE
Quarter of schools DeVos
visited private or religious
Spokesman defends tour;
some say it shows little
regard for public systems
BY
M ORIAH B ALINGIT
When Education Secretary
Betsy DeVos arrived in Omaha
last month for her back-to-school
tour, she bypassed the city’s
82 public schools and decided
instead to go to Nelson Mandela
Elementary, a tuition-free private school.
There, unlike students in nearby public schools, “scholars” at
Nelson Mandela attend class
year-round, take violin lessons —
learning works composed specially by a local conservatory —
and get swim and golf lessons in
the summertime. The school
serves just 180 children, who get
in by lottery, and has a long
waiting list.
For Bryan High, a public
school in Omaha that had received a call from the Education
Department inquiring about a
possible visit, it hurt to be passed
over by the secretary.
“I was very excited for the
opportunity to show her that
Bryan is very diverse and a great
place to be, and for public
schools in general, to show her
that they’re not as bad everyone
else makes them seem,” said
Karen O’Connor, 16, the senior
class president. “I know she’s a
very rich woman who has never
gone to public school. It was a
chance for us to finally prove
ourselves.”
Since becoming the nation’s
schools chief earlier this year,
DeVos has visited 37 K-12 schools
— and about one-fourth have
been private or religious, even
though such schools educate just
one-tenth of the nation’s schoolchildren.
Neither DeVos nor the Education Department have much say
in what happens in the nation’s
private and religious schools,
which have wide latitude in selecting students and are not
bound by federal education laws
that require public schools to
show how much their students
are learning.
Her focus on private schools
became especially stark during a
whirlwind back-to-school trip
she called the Rethink School
tour: Five of the 13 schools and
universities she visited are private. At the start of the tour, she
assailed most of the schools that
educate U.S. children as pushing
an antiquated model of education.
“Most students are starting a
new school year that is all too
familiar. Desks lined up in rows,”
DeVos told students at Woods
Learning Center in Casper, Wyo.,
a public school that is run by
teachers but that has no principal. “Their teacher standing in
front of the room, framed by a
blackboard. They dive into a
curriculum written for the ‘average’ student. They follow the
same schedule, the same routine
— just waiting to be saved by the
bell. It’s a mundane malaise that
dampens dreams, dims horizons
and denies futures.”
DeVos stands apart from her
predecessors for many reasons:
She has never worked in a public
school and comes from immense
wealth, crisscrossing the country
in her personal aircraft. She also
visits far more private schools.
Arne Duncan, who held the job
from 2009 to 2015, visited 34 K-12
public schools and one private
early learning center during his
first eight and a half months
in office.
Over the past eight months,
DeVos has traveled the country to
learn about the nation’s schools,
reading books to youngsters at
Ashland Elementary in Virginia,
taking in a high school football
game in Indiana and comforting
educators following a shooting at
an elementary school in San
Bernardino, Calif.
She’s also visited Catholic,
Episcopal and other kinds of
Christian schools, some of which
benefit from tax-credit scholarships and vouchers — controversial policies that steer public
money into private schools. Her
efforts to direct public dollars to
private schools trouble some civil
rights advocates because she has
not been clear on whether she
believes private schools that receive taxpayer funds should comply with civil rights laws.
Her visits are often marked by
ferocious protests from local parents, teachers unions and college
students, riled by her recent
decision to roll back guidelines
on how schools should investigate sexual assault.
DeVos’s spokesman, Nathan
Bailey, defended the time the
secretary spends in private
schools, even when her department
has
little
purview
over them.
“The department doesn’t ‘have
a lot of say’ in most schools.
Education policy, education
funding is handled primarily at
the state and local level,” Bailey
said. “It’s not as if she’s going to
conduct oversight audits. She’s
going to learn about the kind of
programs that are meeting the
unique needs of individual children.”
Even when DeVos has visited
public schools, she has tended to
bypass traditional neighborhood
schools, instead making stops at
charter schools and other schools
of choice, such as magnet
schools. Bailey said DeVos hopes
to raise the profile of all schools
that are pursuing innovative
strategies that inspire parents,
educators and policymakers.
For advocates of traditional
public schools, DeVos’s visits are
another sign she cares more
about ensuring parents can
choose where their child goes to
school than about the quality of
the schools that educate the vast
majority of young people. DeVos
proposed drastic cuts in money
for after-school programs, career
and technical education, and
teacher preparation in favor of
dedicating $400 million to expand charter schools and private
school vouchers and more than
$1 billion to push states to adopt
policies friendly to school choice.
Bob Farrace, spokesman for
the National Association of Secondary School Principals, said he
was disappointed by where DeVos chose to stop during her
back-to-school tour.
JOHN J. WATKINS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos chats with students at 21st Century Charter School in Gary,
Ind., on Sept. 15. Private and religious schools have wide latitude in selecting students.
“It was more like dismantling
schools then rethinking schools,”
Farrace said.
Those who represent private
schools see the visits as necessary
— and point out that about
one-fourth of schools in the United States are private, even
though they educate only about
10 percent of students.
“It’s important for her to see
what’s going on in all schools,”
said Sister Dale McDonald, the
director of public policy for the
National Catholic Educational
Association. “She is the secretary
of education, not the secretary of
public schools.”
Her predecessors said school
visits provided them with essential insights into the day-to-day
functioning of schools that they
took back to Washington and
that led to concrete changes in
policy. Duncan, managing partner of the Emerson Collective in
Chicago, visited hundreds of
schools while education secretary and said it was one of the
most important parts of his job.
“You don’t learn sitting behind
your desk in Washington,” Duncan said. “You learn by talking to
real principals, real teachers,
real kids.”
Duncan said his eye-opening
visits to schools running innovative vocational training programs — such as Worcester Tech
in Massachusetts, which operates a hair salon and a credit
union — “absolutely changed
how we looked at vocational
learning.” His visit to a high
school in Carrollton, Ga., where
students ran a wire and cable
factory on the first floor in partnership with a local manufacturer, led him to encourage other
schools to adopt that model.
DeVos views her role as getting
out of the way so that innovative
teaching practices can occur —
not encouraging them through
federal policy. She has said she
hopes her visits will highlight
education models that parents
and educators will bring to their
own communities — regardless
of what happens in Washington.
Bailey said the secretary’s focus on private schools should not
be construed as disdain for public schools: “She’s always been
supportive of high-performing,
innovative,
student-centered
public schools. She’s always said
public schools will be a critical
part of the future of education.”
Some schools have welcomed
DeVos — but with reservations.
Susan Toohey, principal of Nelson Mandela Elementary in
Omaha, has been critical of DeVos and was adamant the visit
not be used to sell school choice
or private school vouchers. The
school’s philanthropic backers
are opposed to charter schools in
Nebraska — which has none —
and to private school vouchers.
So Toohey sent a subtle message
by having her students wear
stickers on their uniforms that
signaled support for public education, printed by the philanthropist who underwrites the
school.
Toohey said she was pleased
that DeVos visited Mandela,
which the principal and the
founders see as a testing ground
for new types of instruction. But
the visit did not change her view
of DeVos, whom she regards as
unfit for the job because of her
lack of experience in public
schools.
“There’s trust when somebody
believes that you’ve walked the
walk,” Toohey said.
moriah.balingit@washpost.com
Andrew Ba Tran contributed to this
report.
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A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
The World
The two millennial women behind Kim Jong Un
In service of the North Korean regime, the wife is glamorous and aspirational while the sister represents the value of hard work
BY
A NNA F IFIELD
When Kim Jong Un visited the
newly renovated Pyongyang Cosmetics Factory in North Korea
this month, smiling broadly as he
admired the lotions and potions
and their fancy packaging, he
was accompanied by two women.
They were on the sidelines, but
they were there.
One, in a stylish black suit
with a floral pattern, a clutch
purse under her arm, was Kim’s
wife of seven years, Ri Sol Ju. She
stood beside her husband as he
checked on the production process, according to photos published Sunday.
The other, dressed in the functional black outfit of a Communist Party apparatchik and carrying a notebook, was his younger
sister, Kim Yo Jong.
Each has a job to do in Kim
Jong Un’s North Korea — one to
be glamorous and aspirational,
the other to represent the importance of hard work — and each
offers clues about the running of
the opaque regime.
“His wife enables Kim Jong Un
to present a softer side of himself. They are a modern, young,
virile couple on the go,” said Jung
H. Pak, a former Korea analyst at
the CIA who is now at the
Brookings Institution. “This new
generation of North Koreans
growing up in a nuclear North
Korea now associates being assertive with being glamorous. I
think it inspires hope.”
Kim’s sister, who is about 30, is
one of his closest aides. This
month, he elevated her to the
powerful political bureau of the
ruling Workers’ Party, moving
her closer to the center of the
leadership.
“She’s supporting him. You
know she’s not a leader in her
own right,” Pak said.
Women’s status in North Korea varies widely. Under communism, women are more integrated into the workforce than in
neighboring South Korea. And
it’s the women who are earning
most of the money in North
Saudis to
let women
into sports
stadiums
A SSOCIATED P RESS
KOREAN CENTRAL NEWS AGENCY/KOREA NEWS SERVICE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un visits the Pyongyang Cosmetics Factory with his wife, Ri Sol Ju, at right in flowered suit.
Korea these days.
While their husbands show up
for duty at dilapidated state
factories or farms to earn pitiful
wages, married women go to the
burgeoning markets to sell everything from homemade rice
cakes to imported rice cookers,
often making many times what
their husbands earn.
But in other ways, the hierarchical Confucian ideals that have
endured for centuries on the
Korean Peninsula are still very
much in place, with women
viewed as second-class citizens
whose primary purpose is to
raise the next generation of soldiers.
The concept of motherhood is
strong in North Korea, with the
state often referred to in propa-
ganda as the all-encompassing,
caring “motherland.” Kim Jong
Il, the second leader of North
Korea and father of the current
ruler, had a signature song called
“No Motherland Without You.”
Almost all of the women who
are elevated to senior positions
in North Korea get there through
family relations — such as Choe
Son Hui, the regime’s top interlocutor with the United States.
She’s the daughter of a former
prime minister and is thought to
have a direct line to Kim.
The most famous woman in
North Korea is Kim Jong Suk,
who was the wife of founding
president Kim Il Sung and mother of Kim Jong Il. She is revered
as an anti-imperialist fighter.
Kim Jong Il never appeared in
DAMIR SAGOLJ/REUTERS
Kim Yo Jong, Kim’s sister, is one of his closest aides. This month, he elevated her to the powerful
political bureau of the ruling Workers’ Party, moving her closer to the center of the leadership.
public with any of his five consorts, but since his son became
the country’s leader in 2011, the
regime has started to idolize
Ko Yong Hui, Kim Jong Il’s
second wife and Kim Jong Un’s
mother.
Kim Jong Il’s sister, Kim
Kyong Hui, was also prominent
in the Workers’ Party, serving in a
raft of influential positions and
previously occupying the Politburo seat that her niece, Kim Yo
Jong, now holds. She and her
husband groomed Kim Yo Jong
for the role she would play, said
Michael Madden, who writes the
North Korea Leadership Watch
website.
But she hasn’t been seen in
public since Kim Jong Un had
her husband — his uncle —
executed in 2013 for apparently
building up too much of his own
power.
Kim Yo Jong first appeared in
public at her father’s funeral, at
the end of 2011, and is now
clearly in charge of promoting
her brother’s image, he said.
She runs the Workers’ Party
propaganda and agitation department — a position that led
the U.S. Treasury Department to
sanction her by name this year —
and has been seen organizing
papers and logistics at several
marquee events, including a military parade.
“Kim Yo Jong is always in the
background, kind of lurking in
behind her brother somewhere.
She’s not important in her own
right, but she’s part of this dynastic rule,” Brookings’ Pak said.
In North Korea, blood is definitely thicker than water. The
Kim family has retained power
for more than seven decades by
relying on the loyalty of an inner
circle and claiming a kind of
heaven-ordained birthright.
Kim’s wife comes from this
inner circle of loyal cadres.
Ri, who is thought to be a few
years younger than her 33-yearold husband, is from an elite
family that has helped keep the
Kims in power. Ri Pyong Chol, a
former top air force general who
is always at Kim’s side during
missile launches, is either her
grandfather or great-uncle,
Madden said.
She is reported to have been a
singer with the Unhasu Orchestra, part of the regime’s propaganda efforts, and to have traveled to South Korea in 2005 as a
member of a cheering team at an
athletic competition.
Kim and Ri Sol Ju are thought
to have been set up by Kim’s aunt
and now-executed uncle, and to
have married in 2009 or 2010
with Kim Jong Il’s blessing. They
are thought to have two or three
children, although only one birth
has been confirmed — by basketball player Dennis Rodman.
The former Chicago Bulls
player held the baby, a girl called
Ju Ae, during a visit to North
Korea in 2013. “I held their baby
Ju Ae and spoke with Ms. Ri, as
well. He’s a good dad and has a
beautiful family,” Rodman told
reporters after the visit.
When Ri is seen in public,
playing the role of devoted wife,
she is often wearing chic Chaneltype suits and was once spotted
with a Christian Dior purse — or
at least a knockoff.
In today’s North Korea, the
Kim family is supposed to represent a new kind of socialist ideal:
a modern country that has style
and nuclear weapons.
But that ideal could pose problems for the regime.
“It raises expectations,” Pak
said. “If you’re an ordinary North
Korean and you’re constantly
toiling but your expectations are
not met, you can’t live this consumerist dream.”
anna.fifield@washpost.com
dubai — Saudi Arabia will allow
women into sports stadiums as
of next year, the kingdom’s latest
step toward easing rules on gender segregation — but they will
be seated in the “family” section,
an area separate from the maleonly crowd.
Still, the decision, announced Sunday, marks another incremental step toward
greater women’s rights in the
kingdom.
The General Sports Authority
described the decision as one
that will allow “families” into the
stadiums — a term that authorities use to refer to the public
spaces
that
accommodate
women.
These “family” sections are
meant for women who are out
on their own or who are accompanied by a male relative. Many
restaurants and cafes, which
often also have separate entrances for women, have similarly segregated seating arrangements.
The authority said the three
major sports stadiums in the
capital, Riyadh, and the cities of
Jiddah and Dammam will undergo renovations to accommodate
families.
The decision comes after the
public appeared to welcome a
decision to allow women to
drive for the first time next year.
Many also responded enthusiastically when women were allowed into the Riyadh stadium
for National Day celebrations
last month.
It’s a stark reversal from years
of allowing only men into the
stadiums, many built with hundreds of millions of dollars when
oil prices were nearly double
what they are now. The government spent lavishly on the stadiums in an effort to appease its
majority-young population and
provide spaces for fans eager to
cheer on local clubs, as well as
hold national parades and ceremonies.
Two years ago, a Saudi woman
was arrested while attending a
soccer game in Jiddah’s alJawhara Stadium, which opened
to the public in 2014. Police were
quoted in local media at the time
as saying that security spotted
her at the stadium “deliberately
disguised” in pants, a long-sleeve
top, a hat and sunglasses to avoid
detection.
Most women in Saudi Arabia
cover their hair and face with a
veil, and all women are required
to wear an abaya, a loose black
cloak, in public.
Over the years, though, there
have been some exceptions for
foreign women. In 2015, an
Australian female supporter of
the Western Sydney Wanderers
soccer club was permitted to
attend a match at Riyadh’s main
stadium, and a group of American women traveling with members of the U.S. Congress
watched a local club match, also
in Riyadh.
DIGEST
SOUTH KOREA
Relations back on track
with China after dispute
South Korea and China have
agreed to normalize all forms of
cooperation and exchanges
“expeditiously” following a yearlong standoff over the deployment
of a U.S. antimissile system in
South Korea, the South’s Foreign
Ministry said Tuesday.
“Both sides shared the view that
the strengthening of exchange
and cooperation between Korea
and China serves their common
interests and agreed to
expeditiously bring exchange and
cooperation in all areas back on a
normal development track,” the
ministry said in a statement.
South Korean President Moon
Jae-in will hold a summit meeting
with China’s President Xi Jinping
on the sidelines of a summit of
Asia-Pacific Economic
Cooperation countries in Vietnam
on Nov. 10-11, a Moon spokesman
said Tuesday.
In response to the missile
defense system’s deployment,
China has issued angry rhetoric
and South Korean businesses
operating in China have suffered
economic retaliation.
China believes the system poses
a threat to its own security. Seoul
and Washington say it is purely
aimed at defending South Korea
against North Korean threats.
DENMARK
Police: Inventor admits
dismembering reporter
— From news services
ISRAEL
Gaza militant tunnel
discovered, detonated
The Israeli military said it
discovered and detonated a
militant tunnel on Monday that
was dug from the Gaza Strip into
Israel, in a rare flare-up along the
tense border that has remained
largely quiet since a 2014 war with
Gaza’s Hamas rulers.
Lt. Col. Jonathan Conricus, a
military spokesman, said that this
“active tunnel,” which was still
being dug, was discovered
because of groundbreaking
technology and that forces blew it
up inside Israeli territory.
He called the tunnel a “grave
and unacceptable violation of
Israeli sovereignty” and said Israel
holds Hamas responsible.
A Gaza Health Ministry
spokesman said seven people
were killed in the blast. At least
nine who were wounded were
taken to a hospital. Witnesses
identified five of the casualties as
members of the Iranian-backed
ARI JALAL/REUTERS
Protesters gather late Sunday in Dahuk, in Iraqi Kurdistan, to show
support for Kurdish President Masoud Barzani, who announced that
he would resign after leading an independence vote that triggered a
military response from Baghdad. On Monday, Iraqi Prime Minister
Haider al-Abadi called for calm in semiautonomous Kurdistan, citing
“attempts to create chaos” in Dahuk and the region’s capital, Irbil.
militant group Islamic Jihad.
Hamas said one of its members
died when he entered the tunnel
to evacuate the wounded.
During the 2014 war, Hamas
militants on several occasions
made their way into Israel
through a tunnel network that
caught Israel off guard. Israel
destroyed 32 tunnels during that
conflict, and it has since made
neutralizing the tunnel threat a
top priority.
The military’s discovery
followed word from the United
Nations’ refugee agency that it had
found what appeared to be a
tunnel beneath one of the schools
it operates in Gaza.
— Associated Press
A Danish inventor has admitted
dismembering a Swedish
journalist who disappeared from
his homemade submarine in
August and has changed his
story about how she died but
still denies killing her, police said
Monday.
According to Copenhagen
police, Peter Madsen now says
Kim Wall died as a result of
carbon monoxide poisoning
inside the submarine while he
was on deck. He had previously
said she died after being
accidentally hit by a hatch in the
submarine’s tower.
Madsen acknowledged that he
dismembered her body and threw
it into Koge Bay, southwest of
Copenhagen, police said.
Wall’s torso was found on the
southern Copenhagen coast in late
August, and her head, legs and
clothes were found at sea this
month.
Wall was working on a story
about Madsen and was last seen
aboard his submarine as it left
Copenhagen in August. The next
day, Madsen was rescued from
the sinking submarine without
Wall. Police believe he deliberately
sank the vessel.
Madsen is charged with murder
and mutilating Wall’s body. On
Monday, police said the charges
now include sexual assault without
intercourse.
— Associated Press
Macron signs counterterrorism
law: French President Emmanuel
Macron has signed a sweeping
counterterrorism law that
replaces a two-year-old state of
emergency. The law gives
enforcement agencies greater
authority to conduct searches,
close religious facilities and
restrict the movements of people
suspected of extremist ties. The
state of emergency expires
Wednesday.
Kuwait’s emir orders cabinet
dissolved: Kuwait’s ruler ordered
his cabinet dissolved, heading
off a potentially embarrassing
no-confidence vote by parliament
against one of his ministers.
Sheikh Sabah Ahmed al-Sabah’s
order sets up the current cabinet
as a caretaker government. The
move comes after lawmakers
grilled the acting information
minister, a member of the ruling
family, over budget issues.
— From news services
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
SU
U.S. pledges up to $60 million for counterterrorism force in Africa
BY
K AREN D E Y OUNG
united nations — The Trump
administration said Monday it
would contribute an initial
$60 million to help five nations in
Africa’s Sahel region build a
cross-border counterterrorism
force but balked at a plan to
provide multilateral support
through the United Nations.
U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley
told the U.N. Security Council
that “we have reservations” about
a proposal to expand an existing
peacekeeping operation in the
arid, sub-Saharan region of West
Africa to provide logistical and
other assistance to the force.
The peacekeeping group,
called MINUSMA, “expends most
of its resources protecting and
supplying itself” amid increasing
terrorist attacks, she said.
The Security Council meeting
came amid growing international
concern about the Sahel, where
terrorism is on the rise, and local
criminal and extremist groups
have increasingly sought alli-
ances with al-Qaeda and the Islamic State.
Earlier this month, four U.S.
soldiers, part of a long-term mission to train and assist local
forces in Niger, were killed in a
militant ambush. Three MINUSMA members were killed last
week. Neither the more than 800
American troops in Niger nor the
more than 13,000-strong MINUSMA force in neighboring Mali are
authorized to launch offensive
operations against the militants.
Security forces of the five Sahel
countries — Chad, Niger, Burkina
Faso, Mali and Mauritania —
cannot cross each other’s borders
to pursue attackers, and coordination among them has been
limited. Earlier this year, with
strong support from France, the
former colonial power that has
4,000 troops in the region, the
countries proposed forming their
own 5,000-strong cross-border
force. Since then, the force,
known as the G5, has recruited
troops, built a headquarters, and
written an operational plan and
budget. France has contributed
money, along with other European governments and the European Union.
The United States has objected
to U.N. funding plans. As the force
prepares for its first operations at
the end of the year, the effort is
considerably short of its budget
of about half a billion dollars.
During a tour of Africa last
week, Haley said in an interview
that she wants to know “what the
strategy would be, how they see
this playing out, what’s involved
in it before we ever commit to
U.N.-assessed funding.” President
Trump has frequently questioned
the efficacy of the United Nations.
Monday’s council meeting,
chaired by French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, included a
report from U.N. Secretary General António Guterres and input
from council members who visited the region last month. Following the session, proponents of the
G5 force said they were relieved
the United States did not dismiss
U.N. support out of hand.
Guterres appealed for “greater
coherence amongst various national, international and regional
initiatives” that operate in the
region. The Sahel countries have
launched a “courageous initiative” he said deserves “strong
political, as well as operational
and material support.”
In advance of a donor conference in December, Guterres has
proposed four options with varying degrees of multilateral support, and proponents of the force
hope to persuade the administration to agree.
Malian Foreign Minister Abdoulaye Diop, addressing the
council on behalf of the force,
offered a more advanced description of its formation than what
Haley described. The Mali headquarters, he said, is “fully functional,” as are regional command
posts in Chad, Niger and Mauritania. Troops have been mobilized
and supplied “on the basis of
funds provided by” the members.
But “to achieve full operational
capacity by a March deadline,” he
said, they “will need bilateral and
multilateral support.” Multilateral support, “principally through
the U.N. . . . will ensure predictability and sustainability.” Still
required, he said, are additional
infrastructure, information and
communication technology, antiIED technology, medical training
and medical evacuation capability on land and in the air.
Nearly all 15 members of the
council, with the exception of the
United States and Britain, spoke
in favor of multilateral support.
Russia, as it often has in the past,
blamed the United States and
NATO countries that intervened
in Libya in 2011 for creating a
“catalyst of insecurity in this region” with their contributions to
the overthrow of Libyan leader
Moammar Gaddafi.
Several speakers emphasized
the G5 force must include strong
human rights, development and
governance components. Without education, health and employment programs, Le Drian
said, “we will not be able to
prevent large numbers of young
people” from giving in to “despair” and providing fresh recruits for extremists.
Militant operations in the region, he said, “make a mockery of
borders” and the new force is the
only way to move quickly against
upheaval and lawlessness in the
region, including drug smuggling
and human trafficking.
France, which initially deployed to the region in early 2013
to oust Islamist militants from
northern Mali, subsequently expanded its operations to a permanent counterterrorism mission.
But the French goal is ultimately
to turn those operations over to
an all-African force.
The G5, Le Drian said, “has the
full support of France.” While
challenges remain, he said, “it is
worth noting that eight months
after the initial announcement,
the joint force is a reality.”
karen.deyoung@washpost.com
Anne Gearan contributed to this
report.
Kenyan president reelected after tumultuous rerun vote boycotted by many
BY
K EVIN S IEFF
nairobi — President Uhuru
Kenyatta has won reelection in
Kenya’s rerun vote, the country’s
election commission announced
Monday, after his opponent boycotted last week’s poll, claiming it
was not credible.
Kenyatta’s victory was not a
surprise — he won with more
than 98 percent of the vote. But
the tumultuous election season
that has dragged on for months
has left this country — East
Africa’s most robust economy
and a key U.S. ally — in a political
crisis.
Kenyatta’s win will almost certainly be contested in court. If it
is affirmed, he will confront a
stark political divide, largely
along tribal lines. Aside from the
country’s major geopolitical challenges — notably an Islamist
insurgency in neighboring Somalia that frequently stages attacks
on Kenyan soil — Kenyatta will
have to find a way to govern many
citizens who do not see him as a
legitimate president.
“Now we can begin the process
of reimagining our nationhood,”
Kenyatta said in his acceptance
speech.
But he suggested that he
would not pursue reconciliation
talks with opposition leader
Raila Odinga until any legal challenges to his victory were resolved.
“I’m not going to jump the
gun,” he said.
Authorities said that only
about 39 percent of registered
voters cast ballots Thursday, in
stark contrast to the original vote
in August, when 80 percent participated.
In opposition strongholds,
groups have protested since
Thursday’s poll, and police in
some cases have responded with
lethal force. At least six people
have been killed across the country. Odinga has accused the government of “genocidal pogroms.”
Immediately after Kenyatta’s victory was announced, fresh demonstrations began in Kibera, Kenya’s largest slum, and dozens of
police surged into the area.
ANDREW RENNEISEN/GETTY IMAGES
Police in Nairobi help a girl caught between opposition supporters
and police in a politically driven clash at her school Monday.
Amnesty International on
Monday censured the security
forces’ attempt to intimidate and
punish members of the opposition, particularly in the western
city of Kisumu, an Odinga stronghold.
“In Kisumu, the evidence we
gathered paints a grim picture of
police shooting, aggressively assaulting, and even breaking into
the homes of people suspected to
be protesters,” the human rights
group said.
But on Monday afternoon, the
country’s electoral commission
said it was ready to declare a
winner and end Kenya’s most
chaotic period since 2007, when
more than 1,000 people were
killed in post-election violence.
Western officials have raised concerns that this fraught election
might undo some of the democratic progress made over the
past decade.
“We are transiting . . . legally
uncharted waters,” said Wafula
Chebukati, chairman of the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC).
The rerun election was scheduled after the Supreme Court
annulled the original August balloting, in which Kenyatta won
with 54 percent of the vote to
Odinga’s 44 percent. The court
cited voting irregularities and
unanswered questions about the
electoral commission’s role, casting doubt over the results.
That decision was praised
across the world as proof of
Kenya’s judicial independence,
but it ushered in a period of
immense uncertainty, with the
economy slowing dramatically
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and a crisis of confidence unfolding among the country’s election
officials.
Odinga said this month that he
was withdrawing from the rerun
poll because he believed the electoral commission was still biased
against him. He said he was
turning his party into a “resistance movement.” Odinga’s critics, and some Western officials,
said Odinga might have withdrawn because he had run out of
money to finance his campaign.
On Monday, Odinga said he
wanted the electoral commission
to “carry out a credible election in
90 days,” an outcome that would
seem to depend on another intervention by the Supreme Court.
One issue likely to be raised in
any new court case against the
rerun vote is that election officials were unable to open 3,635
polling stations out of about
41,000. Those stations remained
closed because of opposition protests in western Kenya, which
were seen as a threat to election
officials.
kevin.sieff@washpost.com
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. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
Separatist Catalans retreat as Madrid takes the controls
Just days after declaring
their region a free nation,
leaders are in disarray
BY
M ICHAEL B IRNBAUM
barcelona — Spanish authorities moved aggressively Monday
to quash Catalonia’s bid for independence, as separatist leaders
appeared to retreat just days after
declaring their region a free nation.
With Catalonia’s ousted president fleeing the country, Spain’s
top law enforcement official
pressing charges of rebellion and
sedition, and local government
employees bowing to direct rule
by Madrid, the region showed
signs of acquiescence, not autonomy.
The stark turnabout raised
questions about a lack of preparation by Catalan leaders before the
regional Parliament voted to
break from Madrid on Friday.
Many ordinary Catalans who support independence said they were
crestfallen that the former regional president, Carles Puigdemont, did not push more forcefully against Spanish authorities.
Instead, Catalan politicians
largely appear to be accepting a
Madrid plan to hold new regional
elections on Dec. 21.
As Spanish authorities announced the criminal charges,
they said the former Catalan officials had abused their power by
stoking the secessionist campaign.
“With their decisions and actions over these last two years,
they have provoked an institutional crisis culminating with the
unilateral declaration of independence, realized with total disregard for our constitution,” said
Spanish Attorney General José
Manuel Maza.
With rebellion carrying a
maximum 30-year prison sentence, Puigdemont appeared to
surface Monday in Belgium, a
country where asylum claims are
in the hands of Flemish nationalist politicians who harbor hopes
of establishing their own independent nation. A Belgian lawyer
GONZALO ARROYO/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Demonstrators hold a “Catalonia is Spain” banner at Sunday’s pro-unity rally in Barcelona. The region’s ousted president, Carles
Puigdemont, appeared to have fled to Belgium in the face of criminal charges including rebellion. New elections are set for Dec 21.
who previously defended members of the Basque militant group
ETA, Paul Bekaert, told Spanish
news outlets that Puigdemont
was in Belgium and had hired
him as his lawyer. Catalan outlets
said Puigdemont planned to
speak publicly on Tuesday.
The criminal charges were the
latest step by Spanish officials
seeking to derail Catalonia’s drive
for independence, which was set
in motion this month with a
referendum in which voters
backed a break from Spain.
In a stunning cascade of events
last week, Catalonia’s regional
Parliament formally declared independence, and Spanish authorities countered by stripping Catalan leaders of their powers.
The officials charged were not
immediately arrested on Monday.
They were asked to present themselves at a Madrid court in the
coming days. It was unclear
whether they would be able to
take part in the December elections.
Puigdemont’s Catalan lawyer
said Monday that the charges
were “inappropriate.”
The charge of rebellion “has
the same gravity as terrorism,”
Jaume Alonso-Cuevillas told
RAC1 radio. The lawyer said that
such a crime “requires violence as
an essential element, and there
wasn’t any.”
Despite the legal efforts
against them Monday, some
defiant officials in Catalonia
showed up for work. At least one
minister of the now-ousted regional government was allowed
briefly to enter his offices.
“Continuing with planned
agenda,” tweeted Josep Rull, who
until Friday was the Catalan minister of land and sustainability.
He published a photograph of
himself at his computer in his
office, but left about an hour
later without appearing to have
tried to exercise his contested
power.
Employees at his ministry said
work continued as normal, even if
they were not sure whether they
were working for the independent nation of Catalonia or as an
arm of the government in Madrid.
“We’re waiting to know what’s
going to happen,” said Elisabet
Masana, 50, a draftsman at the
ministry. She said she did not feel
as though she was living in an
independent Catalonia.
Still, she said, “I have faith in
the project and in my country,” meaning Catalonia.
National leaders attacked
Puigdemont for his apparent
travel out of the country.
The move is a sign of “absolute
desperation,” said Fernando Martínez Maíllo, a top official
of Spain’s ruling center-right
Popular Party.
The top Belgian official in
charge of asylum, Theo Francken,
said Sunday that it would be “not
unrealistic” for Catalans to apply
for asylum.
A spokeswoman clarified Monday that Francken was simply
saying that Belgium offers other
E.U. citizens the possibility of
applying for asylum. She said
there had been no contact between Francken and the Catalan
officials.
Francken’s Flemish nationalist
party, a member of Belgium’s ruling coalition, is friendlier to separatist movements than most others in Europe.
In a sign of disarray among
the secessionist leaders, two of
the three main pro-independence
parties said they would probably
run candidates in the regional
elections in December. Spanish
Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy
called those elections after dismissing the Catalan government,
so accepting their legitimacy would tacitly endorse Madrid’s
rule.
“We are going to find a way to
participate in elections,” said
Sergi Sabrià, a spokesman for the
pro-independence Esquerra Republicana party.
On the streets of Barcelona
on Monday, police and other authorities appeared to be operating normally. A new Madridappointed security official took
over Catalonia’s regional police
agency, Mossos, whose previous
director was seen by national
leaders as too sympathetic to the
separatist cause. Ordinary residents, meanwhile, said they did
not feel like they were living in a
new independent republic.
“We don’t know where we are.
We’re confused,” said Oriol Garcia, 41, who works in construction. He said that he supported
independence but that he felt no
more free on Monday than he did
before the split. “We haven’t
moved forward at all,” he said.
Catalonia is deeply divided on
the issue of secession. In the Oct. 1
referendum, more than 90 percent of participants favored leaving Spain, but only about 40 percent of eligible voters cast ballots.
National leaders had urged proMadrid residents to shun the referendum. And on Sunday, a massive pro-unity rally of an estimated 300,000 people flooded Barcelona’s leafy streets.
Even so, many secession advocates said they were not giving up.
At the Catalan Ministry of Land
and Sustainability, where Rull
briefly showed up for work Monday morning, one employee said
the pro-independence minister
was still her boss despite Madrid’s
decision to remove him.
“Rull is still our minister until
he says otherwise,” said Cristina
Jimenez, 47, an IT worker at the
ministry.
michael.birnbaum@washpost.com
Braden Phillips contributed to this
report.
Security chiefs: No need for new war authorization U.S. professor’s health
is failing, Taliban says
Tillerson, Mattis say any
updates cannot constrain
U.S. pursuit of terrorists
C AROL M ORELLO
Two senior members of President Trump’s national security
team told lawmakers Monday
that they believe they have the
legal authority to conduct operations against terrorist groups,
including the Islamic State, and
said there was no need for a new
war authorization to replace the
one passed immediately after the
Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis also told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee that
any attempt to place time limits
or geographical constraints in a
new Authorization for the Use of
Military Force could cripple efforts to fight terrorists.
Some lawmakers have said
Congress needs to update laws
that have provided authority to
ism strategy to focus more on
Africa.
Lawmakers mentioned the
possibility of using military force
in crises involving North Korea,
Iran and Venezuela, as well as the
ongoing efforts against militant
groups that “change their name
as often as a rock-and-roll band,”
Mattis said.
The hearing was propelled by
the killing of four U.S. troops in
Niger on Oct. 4 in an apparent
ambush as they patrolled in an
area with groups loyal to both
“Congress needs to
weigh in.”
Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.)
al-Qaeda and the Islamic State.
Some members of Congress
were taken aback by the size and
scope of U.S. combat forces deployed throughout Africa. About
800 Americans are based in
Niger to run counterterrorism
operations and train and advise
local troops, and hundreds more
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U.S. forces are in other African
countries.
Laws enacted in 2001 and
2002 gave the military the legal
authority to fight international
terrorism. Even though the United States is fighting groups that
didn’t exist back then, including
the Islamic State, the legal basis
remains sound, Mattis said. He
urged Congress not to repeal
existing law, at least without a
new authorization already in
place.
“The uncertainty accompanying that situation could only
signal to our enemies and our
friends that we are backing
away from this fight,” he said. “It
would stall our operations, immediately reduce allied commitments and support, and create
significant opportunities for our
enemies to seize the initiative.”
A number of lawmakers said it
is time to update the law to be
more consistent with current
conditions and threats. Sen. Tim
Kaine (D-Va.) and Sen. Jeff Flake
(R-Ariz.) are co-sponsoring a proposal providing new legal authority to combat al-Qaeda, the
Taliban and the Islamic State.
“This is one of the most important topics the United States
Senate, and this committee,
could ever consider: Under what
circumstances, and legal authorities, should the United States
send our men and women into
war?” said Sen. Benjamin L.
Cardin (Md.), the top Democrat
on the committee.
Flake noted that not a single
member of the committee was in
the Senate when the original war
authorizations were signed by
President George W. Bush more
than a decade ago.
“Congress needs to weigh in,”
he said. “We have to make sure
our adversaries, and our allies,
and most importantly, our troops
know that we speak with one
voice.”
Shortly before Tillerson and
Mattis started testifying, a small
group of protesters in the room
chanted “Stop endless war,” before they were evicted.
“This has been a 16-year struggle,” said Sen. Ron Johnson (RWis.). “I don’t think it’s going to
be over any time soon.”
carol.morello@washpost.com
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fight terrorist groups and detain
militants including al-Qaeda and
the Islamic State on multiple
continents.
If Congress decides to go
ahead and write an updated law,
Tillerson and Mattis said, lawmakers should not constrain the
military’s ability to go after terrorists anywhere in the world.
“The collapse of ISIS’s socalled caliphate in Iraq and Syria
means it will attempt to burrow
into new countries and find safe
havens,” said Tillerson, using an
acronym for the Islamic State.
“Our legal authorities for heading off a transnational threat like
ISIS cannot be constrained by
geographic boundaries. Otherwise, ISIS may reestablish itself
and gain strength in vulnerable
spaces.”
Mattis told the committee that
time restrictions would also undermine combat operations.
“We cannot put a firm timeline
on conflict against an adaptive
enemy who could hope that we
haven’t the will to fight as long as
necessary,” said Mattis, who also
stated that the Pentagon is shifting the military’s counterterror-
BY S AYED S ALAHUDDIN
AND P AMELA C ONSTABLE
kabul — Taliban insurgents said
Monday that an American professor abducted more than a year ago
in Afghanistan is gravely ill and
needs urgent care. They called on
the U.S. government to accede to
their demands in exchange for
releasing him and a colleague.
Kevin King, 60, was seized at
gunpoint along with Australian
Timothy Weeks, 48, in their vehicle outside American University of
Afghanistan here in August 2016.
The pair next appeared in a video
in January, apparently unharmed
but tearfully asking President
Trump to secure their release by
agreeing to free imprisoned militants.
Zabiullah Mujahid, a spokesman for the Taliban, said that the
group had “periodically tried to
treat and cure” King but that
“since we are facing a war situation, we do not really have access
to health facilities to provide him
complete treatment.”
In an email to members of the
news media, Mujahid said that
King was suffering from serious
heart disease, kidney problems
and swollen feet and that the
group would hold the U.S. government responsible if anything happened to him. The spokesman said
the Taliban has presented the
United States with demands it
wants met in return for the pair’s
release, but he did not reveal what
the demands were or how they
had been communicated.
The U.S. Embassy in Kabul said
U.S. officials were aware of the
Taliban statement. On Monday afternoon, the embassy called for
the “immediate and unconditional release” of King and all other
hostages.
Calling the Taliban’s actions “appalling,” the embassy
said in a statement that the U.S.
government “will never stop trying to recover [King and Weeks]
and other Americans held by criminal and terrorist networks
around the world.” It made no
mention of any Taliban demands
or negotiations.
American University officials
also urged the Taliban to immediately release both faculty members unharmed. The men are “innocent victims of a criminal abduction” who came “to teach Afghan youth and contribute to
building a peaceful Afghanistan,”
the university said. “They have
done no harm to anyone.”
A spokeswoman for the university, Zubaida Akbar, said in a statement that everyone connected
with the institution was “saddened and disturbed” by the Taliban message about King’s deteriorating health.
Addressing King directly, the
statement said: “Kevin, we are immensely sad to hear about your
health situation. Please know that
you and Tim remain in our
thoughts and prayers. We will not
stop trying to work for your release. We urge your kidnappers to
release you at once.”
King’s condition has “exponentially worsened, his feet have begun swelling, he frequently loses
consciousness and his health is
deteriorating rapidly,” the Taliban
statement said.
“Since the American side does
not care about the life and death of
its nationals, hence we are warning them to accept the demands of
the Islamic Emirate presented for
the freedom of these two detainees and secure their release,” it
said.
“However, if they insist on delaying this matter and the illness
of Kevin King becomes incurable
or he loses his life, the Islamic
Emirate will not be held responsible,” the Taliban said.
One month after King and
Weeks were abducted, the Pentagon said it had mounted an unsuccessful nighttime mission to recover them, but it did not say
where. Officials said a team of
Navy SEALs made two attempts to
raid a compound where the hostages were thought to be held. In
the second attempt, a firefight
erupted in which seven militants
were killed, but the hostages were
not found, officials said.
After the video appearance in
January, the pair were again seen
in a video in June appealing to
Trump for help. The Taliban has
reportedly demanded the release
of its fighters being held in Afghanistan.
Security analysts have said that
the pair are probably being held by
the Haqqani network, a hard-line
Taliban faction that has orchestrated numerous deadly attacks in
Afghanistan. The Trump administration has repeatedly accused
Pakistan of sheltering Haqqani
militants, a charge Pakistan has
denied.
pamela.constable@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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Trump is likely to name Jerome Powell to replace Janet Yellen as Fed chair
BY H EATHER L ONG
AND D AMIAN P ALETTA
President Trump is expected to
nominate Jerome H. Powell as
the next chair of the Federal
Reserve, according to two people
familiar with the president’s decision who spoke on the condition of anonymity.
The White House intends to
announce the Fed chair selection
on Thursday.
If confirmed by the Senate,
Powell would begin serving as
chair in February, replacing Janet L. Yellen, a Democrat whom
Trump has at times praised but
many Republicans wanted replaced.
Powell, a Republican, is widely
viewed as a safe pick who is
unlikely to make any dramatic
changes to the Fed’s handling of
the economy at a time when the
stock market is soaring and unemployment is at a 16-year low.
Unlike some of the other candidates Trump considered, Powell
has been supportive of Yellen’s
policy of slowly raising interest
rates, which have been at historic
lows for nearly a decade as the
Fed looked to help the economy
recover from a massive recession.
Trump has expressed interest in
keeping rates low as he aims to
stimulate the economy and get
more Americans higher-paying
jobs.
Trump said Friday he has
“someone very specific in mind”
for the Fed. “It will be a person
who, hopefully, will do a fantastic
job,” Trump said in a short video
message posted on Instagram
and Twitter.
The Fed operates independently from the White House.
Much like Supreme Court nominees, once Powell is confirmed,
Trump will not have any sway
over him, making the choice a
critical one since the Fed has so
much power to help stimulate
the economy or tap the brakes if
the central bank governors believe the economy is heating up
too quickly.
“The chairman of the federal
reserve has control of the most
powerful lever to influence world
prosperity,” says Gary Richardson, professor of economics at
the University of California at
Irvine and the former official Fed
historian. “If the chair makes
good decisions about interest
rates, billions of people around
the world will be better off. If the
chair makes mistakes, he or she
can put hundreds of millions of
people out of work around the
globe.”
Powell is no stranger to the
Fed and the important role it
serves at the heart of the global
economy. He’s served as a Fed
governor, a top leadership role
within the central bank, since
2012. He also has deep experience on Wall Street and in Washington. Early in his career, he
served as undersecretary of the
U.S. Treasury Department for
former president George H.W.
Bush. Then he became a partner
at private equity firm the Carlyle
Group, amassing a sizable fortune of between $20 million and
$55 million that allowed him to
then take a job working for $1 as
an expert at the Bipartisan Policy
Center after he left the investment firm.
Although Powell has long been
a Republican, former colleagues
at the Fed and Bipartisan Policy
Center describe him as rightleaning, but not an ideologue.
President Barack Obama originally nominated Powell to the
Fed board. Powell studied law at
Georgetown University, not economics, but many say he has
become well versed in macroeconomics in his time at the Fed.
“When he showed up at the
Fed, he basically did not know
much,” says Seth Carpenter, chief
U.S. economist at UBS who spent
15 years at the Fed, including
time overlapping with Powell.
“He made a conscious decision to
spend a lot of time with staff and
colleagues to learn as deeply and
completely as possible.”
Powell has developed a reputation in Washington as a consensus builder who studies issues
extensively before making decisions. He never dissented on any
of the Fed’s decisions in his time
on the board so far, opting instead to try to work behind the
scenes when he felt it was important to sway the course of action.
People familiar with Trump’s
thinking on selecting Powell,
who spoke on the condition of
anonymity, said the president felt
Powell would bring the stability
and continuity to the Fed since so
many know him there already,
but that Powell was also likely to
help pull back some regulations
on financial institutions.
Treasury Secretary Steven
Mnuchin pushed hard for Trump
to select Powell after working
with him recently to review ways
to roll back regulations on financial firms, a goal of the Trump
administration. In public speeches, Powell has indicated he thinks
that regulations put in place after
the financial crisis went too far.
“There is certainly a role for
regulation, but regulation should
always take into account the
impact that it has on markets — a
balance that must be constantly
weighed. More regulation is not
the best answer to every problem,” Powell said at a speech in
New York in early October.
Most on Wall Street welcomed
the news that Powell is the likely
nominee.
Investment
bank
Deutsche Bank put out a note last
week to clients saying Powell
would be the best choice if Trump
did not want to keep Yellen on.
But some liberal groups, including Fed Up, were disappointed
and see the selection of Powell as
an attempt to make the Fed more
favorable to big banks.
“Jerome Powell’s most important qualification is that he
served with Janet Yellen. His
confirmation should depend on
his willingness to follow in Yellen’s footsteps on both monetary
and regulatory policy,” said
Shawn Sebastian, co-director of
Fed Up, a campaign from the
Center for Popular Democracy.
heather.long@washpost.com
damian.paletta@washpost.com
House GOP plan would allow property tax deductions
Republicans still propose
prohibiting write-offs
of income, sales taxes
BY MIKE DEBONIS
AND DAMIAN PALETTA
House Republican leaders are
making last-minute changes to
their tax bill in an attempt to
win over skeptical members
within their party, crafting a
provision that would allow
Americans to deduct their local
property taxes from their federal taxable income.
House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady
(R-Tex.) had planned for months
to prohibit people from deducting any state or local taxes from
their federal taxable income as
part of a sweeping overhaul of
tax rules, but huge pushback
from Republicans in states such
as New York and New Jersey
precipitated the change. Discussions are ongoing and the precise details of the change
couldn’t be learned.
Brady told reporters Monday
that the ability to deduct property taxes from federal income
would be one of just three items
that Americans could claim on a
postcard-style filing system that
the GOP is trying to market as a
way to simplify the tax code.
“Right now on the postcard
will be the mortgage deduction,
the charitable [giving deduction] and the property tax deduction,” Brady said.
He is working to put the
finishing touches on his draft of
the tax overhaul, which he is
slated to release Wednesday.
Brady plans to begin holding
votes in his committee on the
bill beginning Monday, and the
White House is hopeful that the
J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Concerns that the GOP’s tax plan would hurt homeowners and the real estate industry led House Republicans to make last-minute changes
to their legislation, which they hope to pass by Thanksgiving. The Senate is working on its own version of the bill.
House of Representatives can
pass a full version of the bill by
Thanksgiving.
The Senate is working on its
version of the tax changes, and
Republicans hope they can pass
matching tax-cut bills through
the House and Senate by the end
of the year. This will be a
difficult task given their slim
majority in the Senate and inter-
nal divisions that have delayed
the effort.
Republicans are trying to
blunt criticism that their tax bill
would hurt homeowners and
the real estate industry. The
National Association of Home
Builders announced over the
weekend that they will work to
kill the House bill because they
say that forbidding Americans
from deducting state and local
taxes would remove incentives
for homeownership. It couldn’t
be learned whether the new
property tax change would lessen the opposition from the
NAHB, which is considered one
of Washington’s most powerful
lobbying groups.
The change Brady is looking
to make would probably benefit
property owners, because they
are the ones with property taxes
that they could deduct from
their taxable income. Brady said
the GOP still planned to prohibit people from deducting their
state and local income taxes and
state and local sales taxes from
their federal taxable income, a
distinction that drew attacks
from Democrats.
“No matter how they construct this compromise, Republicans are still socking it to the
middle class and the upper-middle middle class, but this time
picking winners and losers,”
Senate Minority Leader Charles
E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Monday.
Allowing Americans to deduct their property taxes from
their taxable income could make
the broader tax bill more expensive unless other changes are
made to offset the adjustment.
The bill is expected to add
$1.5 trillion to the deficit over
10 years, and Republicans are
trying to ensure that changes
they add don’t make it more
costly.
The broader GOP tax plan
would slash corporate rates,
simplify the taxes paid by individuals and families, and create
new incentives for companies to
bring foreign earnings back to
the United States. But many
details of how these changes
would work have been kept
secret, fueling concern about
the potential impact on companies, families, and a wide range
of taxpayers.
Republicans want to lower
the corporate tax rate from
35 percent to 20 percent.
Brady on Monday denied a
report that the reduction would
be phased in over several years,
saying this was not the case. He
also suggested, however, that
some key details about the tax
plan remain unresolved and
were being worked out. For
example, although he denied
that the corporate tax rate
would be changed in a way that
is phased in, he also wouldn’t
confirm that the corporate rate
would be 20 percent in the first
year the law goes into effect.
“To be determined,” he said.
mike.debonis@washpost.com
damian.paletta@washpost.com
DIGEST
ECONOMY
Consumer spending
increases by 1 percent
Consumers boosted their
spending by 1 percent in
September, the biggest gain in
eight years. The surge was fueled
by robust demand across sectors,
especially autos in the wake of
recent hurricanes.
The sharp jump in spending
was up from a 0.1 percent gain in
August and was the best showing
since an increase of 1.3 percent in
August 2009, the Commerce
Department reported Monday.
Income growth was also solid in
September, rising by 0.4 percent
as wages and salaries climbed.
Consumer spending is closely
monitored because it accounts for
70 percent of economic activity.
The latest result suggests that
Americans were feeling
increasingly confident about the
economy heading into the final
quarter of the year.
That should support solid
growth in the fourth quarter. The
overall economy, as measured by
the gross domestic product, grew
at a solid 3 percent annual rate in
the July-September quarter,
despite the devastation from two
hurricanes.
The spending surge in September
was led by a 14.7 percent increase
in spending for new motor
vehicles, as drivers began
replacing the more than 300,000
vehicles destroyed in the
hurricanes.
Spending on nondurable goods
such as clothing and services such
as utility payments was also
strong.
Consumer confidence has been
bolstered by a Wall Street rally,
which has pushed stocks to new
highs. A key inflation gauge
closely followed by the Federal
Reserve showed consumer prices
rose 1.6 percent in September
compared with a year ago, up
from readings of just 1.4 percent
the past three months.
The 1.6 percent 12-month rise
in prices was the strongest gain
since a 1.7 percent increase in
April. Core inflation, which
excludes food and energy,
remained stuck at an increase of
1.3 percent over the past 12
months, the same as August.
With spending so strong, the
personal saving rate dropped to
3.1 percent of after-tax income,
down from 3.6 percent in
August.
— Associated Press
comparison shop, the agency said
on Monday. The general counsel
for 1-800 Contacts, Cindy
Williams, said that she was
disappointed in the initial ruling
and that the company would
appeal to the commission.
MERGER
Lennar deal will create
largest home builder
Lennar Corp. will buy smaller
rival CalAtlantic Group for
$5.7 billion, creating the largest
home builder in the United States
as it strives to deal with higher
land acquisition costs and a
tighter labor market.
The deal announced by the
companies Monday is the first
major merger in the U.S. housing
sector in more than two years and
will make the unified firm one of
the top three home builders in 24
of the United States’ 30 biggest
markets.
Valued at $5.66 billion in stock
and shares, plus $3.6 billion in
net debt, analysts said the buyout
would give Lennar a better
foothold in booming housing
markets in California, from which
CalAtlantic drew a third of its
revenue last year.
But the move reflects the
pressure on builders because of a
skilled labor shortage constraining
the supply of homes and pushing
costs up even as U.S. house prices
rise for a seventh straight year.
The combined company sold
40,792 homes last fiscal year vs.
Vistra Energy said Monday it
SCOTT OLSON/GETTY IMAGES
Workers load freshly harvested modules of cotton for transport to
the gin on Sunday near Portageville, Mo. The modules are wrapped in
pink plastic to raise awareness for breast cancer. Despite extensive
damage from Hurricane Harvey to the United States’ cotton crop, the
Agriculture Department expects cotton production to exceed last
year’s levels significantly.
Horton’s 40,309, according to the
companies’ SEC filings.
Lennar said it would save
$75 million in costs next year and
$250 million in 2019 in
efficiencies due to the merger of
the two operations.
— Reuters
ALSO IN BUSINESS
A Federal Trade Commission
judge has ruled against the online
seller 1-800 Contacts, which the
agency accused of hammering
out deals with rivals that made it
harder for consumers to
would buy Dynegy in an
all-stock deal worth $1.74 billion,
combining two Texas-based
power producers in the latest
merger in an industry dealing
with shrinking profit margins.
The combined company will be
worth more than $20 billion,
inclusive of debt, and have
integrated power-generating
assets and retail businesses
across six of the largest electricity
markets in the United States.
—From news services
COMING TODAY
9 a.m.: Standard & Poor’s releases
S&P/Case-Shiller index of home
prices for August
10 a.m.: The Conference Board
releases the Consumer
Confidence Index for October.
Earnings: BP, Aetna Inc., Pfizer
Inc.
A16
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
THE MARKETS
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
23,500
Close
YTD
% Chg
23,348.74
–0.4
+18.1
22,000
20,500
19,000
17,500
Nasdaq Composite Index
6800
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6698.96
0.0
+24.4
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Leisure Equipment & Prod
Computers & Peripherals
Health Care Technology
Energy Equipment & Svcs
REITS
Pharmaceuticals
Air Freight & Logistics
Food Products
Multiline Retail
Diversified Consumer Svcs
0
–4.0%
+4.0%
2.21
1.84
1.76
1.21
0.60
–1.64
–1.77
–1.85
–2.00
–3.69
5600
5000
2572.83
S&P 500 Index
–0.3
+14.9
2650
2450
2250
2050
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
74,800.34
16,002.78
48,889.80
–1.5
0.3
–0.6
393.91
5493.63
13,229.57
7487.81
0.1
0.0
0.1
–0.2
5919.08
4009.72
28,336.19
22,011.67
0.3
–0.3
–0.4
0.0
YTD % Chg
–30%
0%
+30%
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
3M Co
231.02
AmExp
95.07
Apple Inc
166.72
Boeing
259.25
Caterpillar
136.49
Chevron Corp 114.39
Cisco Systems 34.04
Coca-Cola
45.86
DowDuPont Inc 71.68
Exxon Mobil
83.54
GE
20.41
GoldmnSchs 240.89
Home Depot
165.31
IBM
154.36
Intel Corp
44.37
–1.6
–0.8
2.3
1.1
–1.0
0.7
–1.1
–0.5
–1.2
–0.2
–1.8
–0.3
–1.2
0.4
–0.1
29.4
28.3
43.9
66.5
47.2
–2.8
12.6
10.6
25.3
–7.4
–35.4
0.6
23.3
–7.0
22.3
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
140.00
101.41
166.23
54.71
83.89
55.27
86.27
35.15
132.62
119.83
209.39
47.83
110.04
86.95
98.04
–1.3
–0.4
0.5
–6.1
0.1
–1.2
–0.9
–1.3
1.2
0.6
–1.5
–2.1
0.3
–1.4
–0.3
21.5
17.5
36.6
–7.1
35.0
8.7
2.6
8.2
8.3
9.3
30.8
–10.4
41.0
25.8
–5.9
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
0.8580
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1656
0.0088
1.3209
0.3049
0.7799
0.0519
0.0076
1.1333
0.2615
0.6691
0.0446
149.4440
34.4873
88.2380
5.8795
0.2308
0.5904
0.0393
2.5616
0.1704
Japan ¥ per
113.1400
131.8700
Britain £ per
0.7571
0.8824
0.0067
Brazil R$ per
3.2805
3.8237
0.0290
4.3444
Canada $ per
1.2822
1.4945
0.0113
1.6937
0.3909
Mexico $ per
19.2425
22.4278
0.1700
25.4270
5.8520
Mexico $
0.0666
15.0102
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 26,636.29
Russell 2000
1490.90
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 527.90
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
10.50
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
–0.4
–1.2
–0.3
7.1
YTD % Chg
14.4
9.9
18.0
–25.2
+0.3
0.0
+0.5
+0.5
+0.1
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
(Ticker) % Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.5465
$16.85
$9.8450
$0.1473
$4.2475
+0.5
+0.6
–0.2
+0.7
–0.6
day
month
$1100
$1000
$900
–0.9
0.5
0.2
1.4
0.6
–0.1
0.5
1.1
0.6
Gainers
Capella Education
Standard Pacific
CARBO Ceramics
Mattel Inc
FARO Technologies
Diamond Offshore
Strayer Education
Dunkin' Brands
AppliedOptoelctrncs
LyondellBasell
Piper Jaffray
Rent-A-Center
eHealth Inc
Kemper Corp
CenturyLink Inc
Cree Inc
SM Energy Co
Mercury General
First Solar Inc
Cray Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$85.45
$49.07
$7.87
$15.58
$51.20
$17.31
$100.00
$59.09
$42.12
$106.00
$70.40
$10.07
$24.90
$64.00
$18.40
$34.32
$20.17
$58.77
$60.43
$18.90
30.5
21.3
12.6
11.3
10.7
9.5
9.0
7.8
7.3
7.1
6.2
5.8
5.6
5.3
5.3
5.1
5.1
4.9
4.8
4.7
Losers
Iconix Brand Group
Office Depot Inc
Century Aluminum
CooperTire & Rubber
CIRCOR
Blucora Inc
Adv Micro Devices
JC Penney
Seneca Foods
Insteel Industries
Hawkins Inc
Ollie'sBargainOutlt
Nutrisystem Inc
Eagle Pharma
DHI Group Inc
Shoe Carnival
Merck
TimkenSteel Corp
OraSure Tech
Omnicell Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$1.85
$3.04
$13.50
$32.20
$45.23
$21.85
$10.89
$2.87
$33.70
$25.60
$36.80
$43.45
$50.30
$52.02
$2.25
$19.90
$54.71
$14.80
$20.00
$47.75
–62.3
–18.3
–11.1
–9.9
–9.4
–8.3
–8.0
–8.0
–7.7
–7.5
–7.5
–7.3
–6.6
–6.5
–6.3
–6.2
–6.1
–6.0
–6.0
–6.0
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
$3.1120
$3.4875
$54.15
$1,277.70
$2.97
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6200
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.32
0.45
0.80
1.47
2.64
5.34
4.25%
Bank Prime
3.88%
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.14%
1.25%
Federal Funds
15-Year fixed mortgage
1.38%
LIBOR 3-Month
1-Year ARM
3.25%
10-year note
Yield: 2.37
2-year note
Yield: 1.57
5-year note
Yield: 1.99
6-month bill
Yield: 1.25
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
For-profit college operators Capella,
Strayer announce $2 billion merger
BY D ANIELLE
D OUGLAS- G ABRIEL
Strayer Education and Capella
Education announced Monday
that they are merging, in a $2 billion deal that will make the combined company one of the largest
for-profit college operators in the
country.
Shareholders in Herndon,
Va.-based Strayer will own 52 percent of the combined company’s
stock, while Capella investors will
hold the rest. Both boards have
voted unanimously for the deal,
which the companies anticipate
will close in the third quarter of
2018. They will need state and
federal approvals, including a
thumbs-up from the Department
of Education.
The agreement arrives as forprofit schools continue to struggle with volatile enrollment and
regulatory uncertainty. While the
Trump administration has relaxed many rules targeting the
sector, Democratic state authorities continue to go after for-profit
colleges for abusive sales and
marketing tactics.
Neither Strayer nor Capella has
endured the legal headaches of
some of their competitors, yet
tepid growth in the number of
people seeking degrees remains a
hurdle — but one that investment
analysts say the combined companies may be able to overcome.
“Combining two of the highestquality names within the sector
could enhance the competitive
positioning of the new enterprise,
allowing increased and more focused student recruitment efforts, potentially driving im-
proved enrollment growth,” Peter
P. Appert, a managing director at
Piper Jaffray and Co., wrote in a
research note on the merger.
Strayer University and Capella
University will maintain their
separate leadership, faculty and
academic support services, although they will combine technology, accounting and other
back-office services. The schools
also plan to share education models such as Capella’s competencybased degree programs, which allow students to learn at their own
pace and move along as they have
mastered the material. Together,
the universities will serve about
80,000 students nationwide.
“It’s likely that we’ll both have
some jobs impacted through the
combination of these functions,
but it’s also true that we’ll be
adding positions,” Strayer chief
executive Karl McDonnell said on
a call with analysts Monday.
Once the deal is closed, McDonnell will become the chief executive of the combined entity, which
will operate under the Strayer
corporate banner and be headquartered in Herndon. The newly
formed company will maintain a
significant presence in Capella’s
home town of Minneapolis.
Capella chairman and chief executive Kevin Gilligan will become vice chairman of the new
company, while Strayer’s executive chairman, Robert S. Silberman, will serve in the same role
for the combined business.
Founded in 1892, Strayer offers
certificates and degrees through
its online operations and campuses. The company has experienced
a 63 percent surge in its shares in
the past year and has a market
value of roughly $1 billion. Strayer
reported a 7 percent increase in
new enrollment in the third quarter, bringing its total student body
to 41,679 students.
While Strayer does provide
graduate education, Capella,
which opened its doors in 1991,
has a more robust offering of
advanced degrees. Nearly threequarters of Capella’s students
were pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees at the end of June,
according to the company.
Capella has not fared as well as
Strayer in the markets. The company’s stock fell 7 percent in the
last year.
“Strayer and Capella complement each other in powerful
ways,” Gilligan said in a statement. “Uniting Strayer University’s degrees in business . . .
accounting, economics and information technology with Capella
University’s competency-based
flexible degree programs, health
care offerings and robust doctoral
portfolio will help us better meet
the educational needs of students
in the modern economy.”
The companies anticipate the
merger will result in an annual
cost savings of about $50 million
through the consolidation of certain corporate functions, marketing and technology operations.
“The cost benefits of achieving
larger scale are clear and could
translate into further sector
merger and acquisition activity,”
Piper Jaffray’s Appert said.
Still, he doesn’t believe this
transaction will trigger a “flood of
industry consolidation.”
douglasd@washpost.com
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.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A17
RE
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INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
Ohio Democrats say focusing on Mueller’s
investigation is not the way to win in 2018
columbus, ohio
— While
Washington elites
are
fixated on
JAMES
Robert S. Mueller
HOHMANN
III, the chairman
of the Ohio
Democratic Party is doing
everything he can to prevent his
activists and candidates from
becoming distracted by the
special counsel and his next
moves in the Russia
investigation.
“Let me just put it this way:
We don’t spend a lot of time
around here talking about
Vladimir Putin and former FBI
director James Comey,” David
Pepper said in an interview here
Sunday. “I’m as frustrated as
anyone by what Comey did and
that Putin interfered, and
Congress should get to the
bottom of that, but if that’s what
we talk about . . . we will lose
again.”
Pepper has spent a year
trying to figure out how
Democrats can win again in a
state that Barack Obama carried
twice but Hillary Clinton lost.
An open governorship and a
competitive Senate race in 2018
have added to the sense of
urgency.
“My attitude is let’s fix the
things we can fix, and the way
we really win is by getting a core
message that appeals across all
88 counties,” Pepper said.
What is that message? In
short: It’s still the economy,
stupid. Democrats feel like they
can both galvanize their own
base and win over people who
voted for Obama but defected to
Donald Trump by prosecuting
the case that the president has
not delivered on his populist
promises.
Nearly a thousand of the
Democratic faithful met down
the street from the state capitol
Sunday night for the state
party’s annual dinner. During a
three-hour program, no one
referenced the Russia
investigation in which three exTrump campaign officials would
soon be indicted by Mueller’s
team. Activists didn’t broach the
topic during interviews, and I
didn’t hear it come up in side
conversations either. Instead,
the biggest applause came
whenever a politician had the
good sense to celebrate Ohio
State’s 39-38 win over Penn
State on Saturday.
Mueller also went
unmentioned during an hourlong debate Sunday between the
four Democrats running in a
wide-open primary to succeed
Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R), who
is term-limited. The lion’s share
of the conversation focused on
the economy, health care and
the opioid epidemic. (Three
issues, by the way, that are
inextricably linked.)
Nan Whaley, the mayor of
Dayton, boasted that she
organized a lawsuit against the
drug companies that have sent
opioids into the state.
Joe Schiavoni, a state senator
from the Mahoning Valley,
replied “it will take years and
years” to see those lawsuits
through to fruition, so he
proposes to spend 10 percent of
the state’s general fund on
fighting the epidemic.
Connie Pillich noted that, as a
state representative, she pushed
legislation to make it easier to
track pill mills. “We have to
come down hard on the pushers
and the dealers — put ’em in jail
— but we can’t do any of this
until we restore local funding to
police departments that are on
the front line,” she added.
Betty Sutton, a former
congresswoman, faulted Trump
for not formally declaring a
state of emergency last week
because that would have made
more money available to states.
“Nothing stops a needle like a
job,” she said.
If talking about Mueller is
Washington’s favorite subject
right now, Ohio politicos like to
argue over whether their state
will be a permanent presidential
battleground.
Clinton lost here by eight
points, about the same as her
margin of defeat in Texas. As a
point of comparison, she fell
short in Arizona by only
3.5 points and Georgia by
five points. Some demographers
believe a realignment is afoot in
which the Midwest moves
toward Republicans while the
Sun Belt becomes more
Democratic. One school of
thought is that Ohio is on a path
like Missouri’s, which used to be
a battleground but has become
reliably red in presidential
elections since 2000.
Democratic leaders insist
reports of Ohio’s death as a
perennial swing state are
greatly exaggerated, and they’re
probably right. The Buckeye
State has voted for the winning
candidate in all but one
presidential election since
World War II (1960). With 18
electoral votes, the state will
remain a linchpin of most
realistic paths to 270 — even
after it loses one more in 2020
reapportionment. That will
deter national Democrats from
writing it off. Culturally and
demographically, it’s likely to
stay competitive.
Pepper, the state chairman,
expects 2018 will be yet another
change election. But this time
Democrats aren’t the ones in
charge. He predicts the
midterms will be like 1982.
Ronald Reagan won Ohio by
double digits in 1980, but
Democrats swept statewide two
years later — winning a Senate
seat and the governorship,
despite a contested primary.
“We have a bounce-back
pattern in Ohio, and we’re
VA whistleblower retaliation is growing
despite Trump order, victims say
When
President Trump
talked about the
importance of
protecting “our
great, great
Federal
people, our
Insider
veterans,” during
a White House
JOE
meeting in March,
DAVIDSON
he said, “No more
games going to be played at the
VA.”
At a White House briefing on
Trump’s executive order to
improve whistleblower
protection in April, Veterans
Affairs Secretary David Shulkin
said, “The message is clear that
we will not tolerate
whistleblower retaliation in the
Department of Veterans Affairs.”
Well, nine months into the
Trump administration, that
message is not clear, and games
continue to be played. Not only
does the cancer of VA
whistleblower retaliation
remain active, but it’s also
growing, according to employees
who have suffered its sting.
Hear Katherine Mitchell, a VA
physician in Phoenix:
“Although I do have a good
relationship with my current
immediate supervisor, the
overall . . . retaliation in my
current job worsened in January
2017 and continues unabated.
The overt retaliation from VA
Central Office (VACO) also
worsened under the Trump
administration.
“In my opinion, based on my
experiences and conversations
with other VA whistleblowers,
since President Trump was
elected, it appears to be open
season across the nation on VA
whistleblowers despite the
passage of the [VA]
Accountability and
Whistleblower Protection Act of
2017,” she added in an email.
“VACO is dragging its feet on
resolving whistleblower
retaliation claims.”
Mitchell and Christian Head,
a doctor in Los Angeles, two
prominent VA whistleblowers,
say the retaliation they suffered
under the Obama
administration still infects their
lives and stymies their careers.
The two physicians were among
those who exposed major
problems in VA hospitals to
Congress. A department
secretary lost his job because of
the scandal, which broke in 2014,
over the coverup of long patient
wait times. It disgraced the
department — despite its many
good works — and imposed a
stigma it still can’t shake off.
In response to Mitchell and
Head, department press
secretary Curt Cashour said, “VA
does not tolerate retaliation. Any
employees who feel they are
experiencing retaliation should
contact the Office of
Accountability and
Whistleblower Protection.” He
would not discuss individual
cases without the written
permission of Mitchell and
Head.
In April 2015, Head said at a
House Veterans’ Affairs
subcommittee hearing that he
saw patients’ requests for
medical care, known as consults,
being removed to reduce the
number of patients on the wait
list. “I witnessed the direct batch
deletion, the order given by my
immediate supervisor,” he said
then, “of 40,000 consults.”
In December that year,
Mitchell told a Senate Veterans’
Affairs field hearing outside
Phoenix about “dangerous ED
(Emergency Department)
patient safety defects,” including
“a significant lack of nurse triage
training, and inadequate
nursing triage protocols” and the
Phoenix VA hospital’s
“dysfunctional institutional
culture.” The hospital was at the
scandal’s epicenter.
Head is a head and neck
surgeon at the West Los Angeles
Medical Center, the largest in the
Veterans Affairs system. In
addition to his doctor’s duties,
Head is the associate directorchief of staff for quality
assurance, but it doesn’t mean
much. Head said the continuing
retaliation against him includes
“isolation, so I’m not really doing
leadership duties at the
hospital,” in addition to actions
affecting patient safety.
“The retaliation against me
has been consistent and
unrelenting,” he said in a letter
sent to Shulkin last month. “I
have been isolated, my medical
expertise marginalized and my
medical career damaged. I also
suffered a heart attack while at
work during several retaliatory
events.”
He once had a C-suite office
but now sits in a former
storeroom with a hole in the
floor and a broken monitor,
according to Head’s letter. He is
no longer a member of the
Medical Executive Committee.
“I was in the executive suite,”
he told the Federal Insider, “right
next to the chief of staff.” He kept
his title, but few of the duties.
“There’s a clear plan to keep me
isolated, to keep me in a little
box, to keep me from
progressing.”
Mitchell also can list
continuing retaliatory measures,
including her complaint that VA
breached an agreement to settle
her grievances. She formally
complained about the breach in
June but said she has received no
response. Among other things,
Mitchell said she has not
received promised training and
mentorship. Also, she said VA
“deliberately misled me in the
negotiation process to believe”
that her job of specialty-care
medicine consultant was fulltime, when it is a quarter-time
position.
“I remain with no
assignments,” she said, “except
what I can scrounge up on my
own in my cubicle.”
Then “in August, the executive
director of Office of
Accountability and
Whistleblower Protection
(OAWP) enthusiastically offered
me a 4 month detail to the OAWP
and I accepted,” Mitchell said by
email. But last Wednesday, “I
received a 2 sentence email from
him stating he ‘would not be
moving forward with the detail’.
No explanation was given and he
has not answered my subsequent
email” requesting one.
Trump created the office with
his April executive order, and it
was codified with a law enacted
in June. Whistleblower
advocates are skeptical of such
in-house offices, considering
them Trojan horses used to
identify whistleblowers for
retaliation as much as protect
them.
The Washington Examiner
reported in June that Scott
Davis, an Atlanta VA
whistleblower who testified
alongside Mitchell and Head
three years ago, was stripped of
his duties.
Mitchell said, “There is a great
deal of fear among
whistleblowers.”
joe.davidson@washpost.com
PATRICK SEMANSKY/ASSOCIATD PRESS
Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) speaks in Newark, Del. Four Democrats who are running in a primary to
succeed the term-limited governor debated on Sunday at the Ohio Democratic Party’s annual dinner.
seeing a lot of the same
elements now that probably
happened then,” Pepper said.
“Democrats are more energized
than they were a year ago. . . .
Ohio independent voters
generally like balance.”
Sen. Sherrod Brown (D), the
state’s senior senator, delivered
a fiery populist stemwinder at
the dinner, but he too was
careful not to disparage Trump
supporters. His biggest pet
peeve is when people describe
Ohio as being part of the “Rust
Belt.” It’s like nails on a
chalkboard. He prefers “the
industrial heartland.”
“People in Ohio are working
harder today than ever. They’re
working longer hours than ever,
but they’re getting less and less
to show for it,” Brown said.
Democrats on the coasts
argue about whether the party
should focus on firing up the
liberal base or making inroads
with moderates who voted for
Trump. Operatives in states like
Ohio dismiss that as a false
choice. In 2016, Democrats had
both a persuasion and a turnout
problem across the industrial
Midwest. To bounce back in
2018, they must address both.
That’s why the quality of
candidates and campaigns
matter, as does fundraising.
The state party is focused on
running up the score in urban
areas like Cleveland but also
making inroads again in rural
places. “Obama basically lost
the red part of Ohio 60 to 40.
Hillary Clinton lost it 73-27. You
can’t win Ohio with that margin
of loss, so we have to be smart
about communicating with all
those voters,” Pepper said. “It
means we all need to sound as
much as possible like Sherrod
Brown sounds. He’s an
economic populist. He’s clear on
things like trade, wages,
workers, working families. The
more we’re disciplined enough
to be really homed in on those
issues, the better we do.”
Democrats also hope to
benefit from GOP infighting.
The Republican primary for
governor is even more crowded
and has already gotten nasty,
pitting three statewide elected
officials against each other and
a sitting congressman.
“The road to winning the
Ohio governor’s race runs
through economic messaging,”
said Jared Leopold, the
Democratic Governors
Association communications
director. “Democrats are racing
to define themselves on the
economy, while Republicans are
racing to appeal to a restive farright base.”
james.hohmann@washpost.com
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Keep our national parks affordable
EDITORIALS
A presidential response
Imagining how a different leader might have responded to Mr. Mueller’s indictments.
H
laundering may have continued through the period
during which they worked for my campaign. Though
I had no involvement in Mr. Manafort’s alleged
activities, I decided to hire him and must take full
responsibility for my poor choice of staff.
“I am also disturbed by the news that my former
foreign policy adviser, George Papadopoulos, has
pleaded guilty to the charge of making false statements to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The
information contained in the recently unsealed court
documents shows that Mr. Papadopoulos worked to
put my campaign in touch with Russian government
officials and was told they had ‘dirt’ on the Democratic
nominee for president, Hillary Clinton. Though I favor
warmer relations between the United States and
Russia, such an attempt to collaborate with a foreign
government is a danger to our democratic process.
“Now is not the time to deflect blame, nor is it the
time to focus on possible wrongdoing by my opponent. As president, it is right and appropriate that I
and those around me face increased scrutiny proportional to the burdens of my office and the seriousness
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
ERE IS how President Trump responded to
the news that special counsel Robert S.
Mueller III has brought charges against
Mr. Trump’s former campaign chairman
Paul Manafort, Mr. Manafort’s deputy and a foreign
policy aide on Mr. Trump’s campaign:
Sorry, but this is years ago, before Paul Manafort
was part of the Trump campaign. But why aren’t
Crooked Hillary & the Dems the focus????? . . . Also,
there is NO COLLUSION!
Here is what a presidential president might have
said:
“I will not deny that the charges made public today
by Mr. Mueller are serious. Mr. Manafort and his
deputy and business associate Richard Gates have
pleaded not guilty and deserve the legal presumption
of innocence foundational to our justice system.
However, if the allegations of money laundering and
tax evasion prove to be true, then all Americans —
including myself and my supporters — should be
troubled by the conduct of Mr. Manafort and
Mr. Gates. I am particularly disturbed that this money
. TUESDAY,
of these allegations.
“For that reason, I recognize that the special counsel must be allowed to continue his probe without
interference, and I pledge my administration’s full
and open cooperation with both Mr. Mueller and the
ongoing congressional investigations into possible
Russian meddling in the election. The principles at
stake are higher than partisan advantage or the fate of
my administration. Foreign interference in our democracy should be of paramount concern no matter
our party affiliation — and I owe it to the American
people to do all I can to prevent such interference
from taking place again.
“Leaders in a democracy must work to earn the
public’s trust anew every day. I hope my efforts to
support the special counsel in his work will reassure
all Americans of my commitment to our nation’s
founding principles, no matter the circumstances of
my election. I am humbled both by the great responsibility you have given me and by the knowledge that in
a democracy, nobody is above the law — not even the
president.”
The National Park Service has proposed raising
entrance fees to some of its most popular parks
[“Park Service explores dramatic entrance fee hike,”
news, Oct. 27]. Consideration should be given to a
high-priced annual permit for those with tourist
visas. Foreign visitors are not paying taxes that
support the parks, as Americans are. I have been in
several major parks over the decades where I heard
not one word of English spoken by visitors for hours.
Without a visitor permit for non-U.S. residents to
enter any national park, we taxpayers are left to pay
for the parks’ upkeep. When I visited Canada, I had
to obtain a park entry permit. We should take a
lesson from our good neighbors.
I support a nominal increase in visitor entrance
and other park fees for everyone, but not the
doubling or more being contemplated. The parks do
need our support.
Jay M. Sheppard, Laurel
It is with alarm that I see the incredible
proposed price hikes to entrance fees to some
national parks. Congress has provided very little for
our natural treasures over the years. Instead of any
tax cuts for corporations or high-net-worth individuals, money should be allocated to these parks.
Many communities depend on the parks for their
economic well-being. Sadly, I believe that Interior
Secretary Ryan Zinke would rather have less use of
the parks so that the Interior Department can sell
some of the land to private companies.
Jesse Greenspan, Bethesda
Elections: Surprising and predictable
Wishful thinking
on taxes
TOM TOLES
Roger C. Altman is probably a decent fellow, but
in his Oct. 27 op-ed, “Expect more election surprises,” when listing the “powerful, entrenched factors
[which] have brought the American dream to an
end,” he left out what is by far the most potent
factor: the political power of Big Money, which over
the past 37 years has captured our government,
regardless of which party is in control of the
presidency or Congress. (That power has also either
captured or confused the public mind to such an
extent that there is no focused opposition to it.)
Catherine Rampell, in her Oct. 27 op-ed, “Rewarding firms that can’t innovate,” listed three
major victories Big Money achieved over the
interests of the general public in just the early
months of President Trump’s term. Maybe she
could hand a copy of her column to Mr. Altman.
Ron Thompson, Fairfax
Why are so many Republican
senators going along with this?
R
EPUBLICANS AIM to unveil Wednesday a
long-awaited tax plan, premised on the
fanciful idea that slashing taxes by $1.5 trillion over 10 years will somehow leave the
federal budget better off. And it is not just the GOP’s
most blinkered ideologues who have bought into
this wishful thinking.
“I think at the end of the day this will actually be
reducing the deficit because it’s going to finally get
this economy moving,” Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio)
said Sunday on “Meet the Press.” In a sentence,
Mr. Portman erased much of the credibility he
developed while decrying deficits during the Obama
years or running the White House Office of Management and Budget during the George W. Bush
presidency.
Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), one of the few
moderate Republicans left in Congress, was hardly
more responsible. “If we have just four-tenths of
1 percent increase in our [gross domestic product],
which is entirely realistic, it will cover the cost of the
tax reform package,” she claimed. In fact, those
growth numbers cannot be assumed, and betting
the federal budget on hopes of loads of new revenue
is highly risky.
Just a couple days earlier, an independent report
on the Republicans’ most recent tax-reform framework found that the plan would wallop the federal
budget, even when effects on economic growth are
considered. The Tax Policy Center concluded that
cutting the corporate tax rate, encouraging business
investment and enhancing incentives to work would
each encourage economic expansion — modestly.
The extra growth would result in maybe $50 billion
in new federal revenue over 10 years. To secure these
small economic gains and that tiny revenue bump,
Republicans would cut taxes by well over a trillion
dollars, leaving a massive hole in the budget. Over
time, the negative consequences of higher federal
borrowing would be a serious drag on the economy.
The bill Republicans present this week will look
somewhat different than the older framework the
Tax Policy Center’s experts assessed. But the warning should still shake Republicans who claimed to be
deficit hawks when Barack Obama was president.
Tax reform could be worthwhile, but only if it is paid
for. Republicans such as Mr. Portman used to
understand as much.
The country faces a huge funding squeeze as the
Baby Boomers retire, raising pension and healthcare costs. The Treasury will need ample revenue
merely to maintain investments in everything else —
roads, college aid, national parks, scientific research. A tax plan based on hopes, prayers and
fiction puts all of that at risk.
The Uzbek dawn
A new president tiptoes toward liberalization.
U
ZBEKISTAN HAS a reputation — dismally
earned by its long-time leader, Islam Karimov, who died last year — for torturing and
incarcerating opposition critics, journalists and others. Mr. Karimov’s iron-fisted 27-year
rule largely wiped out independent media and civil
society. So it is encouraging to hear that President
Shavkat Mirziyoyev may be changing direction. In
Central Asia’s most populous nation, human rights
have been in the basement; the only way to go is up.
Mr. Mirziyoyev, who took office in 2016, quietly
and gingerly began a modest liberalization. He has
released at least 16 political prisoners; tolerated
more free expression on broadcast talk shows;
relaxed notorious forced labor for the cotton
harvest; removed citizens from a “blacklist” kept by
the security services; set up a chain of presidential
offices to hear citizen complaints; moved to
strengthen judicial independence; and promised to
eliminate by 2019 the exit visa, an onerous relic of
Soviet times. “This is a real moment of hope for the
human rights of the Uzbek people,” Human Rights
Watch concluded in a recent report documenting
these and other changes. Some have been calling it
an Uzbek spring, or thaw.
At the very least, it is a dawn. Mr. Mirziyoyev
clearly needs foreign investment and may well
want to put behind him the awful legacy of his
predecessor, under whom he served for 13 years as
prime minister.
Uzbekistan is still governed as a police state. The
authorities released five long-held prisoners over a
short span in October, raising expectations, but
then arrested an author and a journalist on new
charges. Thousands are still held in Uzbekistan’s
prisons on dubious political charges. According to
the report, “Grave abuses such as torture, politically motivated imprisonment, and forced labor in the
cotton fields remain widespread.” Uzbekistan continues to severely restrict the independence of
lawyers and journalists and puts burdensome
regulations on nongovernmental organizations.
One human rights activist, who monitors religious
freedom and civil and political rights, told Human
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FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
The abolitionist you don’t know about
The Oct. 29 Local Opinions essay “Taking note of
Tubman’s Maryland legacy” should have recognized Josiah Henson, who was enslaved even closer to
home in Montgomery County. Henson has been
overshadowed by his fellow Maryland-born abolitionists. After he escaped to freedom in 1830, Henson’s literary impact rivaled that of Frederick Douglass. Harriet Beecher Stowe acknowledged that Henson’s autobiography was the inspiration for her blockbuster novel, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” which helped
spark the Civil War.
In addition, Henson’s activism compares favorably
with Tubman’s. The essay pointed out that Tubman is
credited with leading 70 people out of bondage, but it
overlooked the fact that Henson led 118 enslaved
people to freedom as a conductor on the Underground Railroad. Moreover, Henson established the
Rights Watch he had tried for seven years without
success to get legal registration, including during
Mr. Mirziyoyev’s presidency. A human rights activist, Elena Urlaeva, was forced in March to stay in a
psychiatric hospital for nearly a month in retaliation for her work. The head of the domestic
intelligence agency, who took harsh measures
under Mr. Karimov, remains in office.
In a society long frozen by a tyrant at the top,
reversing course can be agonizing, and a certain
amount of patience is warranted. What matters is
Mr. Mirziyoyev’s intended destination for Uzbekistan. Does he want to enable a free society that
might choose its own leader and, perhaps, speak
out against him? Or is this just a cynical gambit,
enough to polish the image of Uzbekistan among
foreign investors, but without seriously challenging Mr. Mirziyoyev’s grip on power? He might be
eyeing China or Russia as a model — personal
authoritarianism welded onto state capitalism — in
which case the latest opening should be greeted
with caution.
Dawn Settlement in Canada, where he taught these
newly liberated people the trade skills necessary to
earn a living, even gaining him an audience with
Queen Victoria.
Similar to the current effort to put Tubman on the
$20 bill, Henson was honored by being the first black
person on a Canadian postage stamp. Yet there is no
recognition for Henson in his native land. In one of his
last on-air statements, NBC-TV anchor Jim Vance
said it best: “Henson was a man whose life deserves to
be remembered.” To do just that, the Montgomery
Parks Foundation is raising funds to construct a
museum and education center on the property where
Henson was enslaved on Old Georgetown Road.
Michael A. Nardolilli, Arlington
The writer is executive director of the
Montgomery Parks Foundation.
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Roger C. Altman failed in his analysis by not
pointing out that those who supported President
Trump and other Republicans are voting for the
very people who created the problems that they
find so troubling, such as slow economic growth,
stagnating wages, more war, problems with health
care, economic inequality and environmental destruction. Republicans have been masters at getting
people to vote against their self-interests. As long as
Americans still believe Republican lies — such as
that cutting taxes for the rich will somehow
magically make the economy grow — then there
will indeed be election surprises.
Sadly, the Democrats are not much better
because they are so feckless. They continue to allow
themselves to be pulled further to the right by
outlandish Republican policies, and they are either
afraid or unwilling to tell the American public that
there are no easy answers to the country’s problems. Giving more to the rich only makes things
worse. Maybe we do need a third party, which might
begin by bringing integrity back into our national
discourse. That would result in an election surprise!
Bill Mims, Vienna
Expand access to hepatitis C drugs
While I was pleased by the recognition that the
opioid crisis in the United States is leading to an
increase in hepatitis C cases, it is unfortunate the
myth that the drugs to treat it cost tens of thousands
of dollars was perpetuated [“Opioid abuse drives
hepatitis C crisis,” news, Oct. 18].
Numerous states are providing access to hepatitis C
treatment only to Medicaid beneficiaries who are very
sick and who abstain from alcohol and drugs. But the
cost of the drug is just an excuse to deny access.
The initial list price of an early all-oral hepatitis C
cure was $100,000. By law, state Medicaid programs
never pay that price, and new drugs have come on the
market. With this competition, states receive substantial price discounts and rebates. The newest
approved drug carries a list price of only $26,400 and
can cure people in as little as eight weeks, much
shorter than the six months mentioned in the article.
Companies do not impose sobriety restrictions; states
do.
States are dealing with numerous man-made and
natural crises, including opioids and hepatitis C.
Fortunately, there is an easy cure for one of them.
Franklin Hood, Washington
The writer is the hepatitis C policy associate
for the AIDS Institute.
Better ways to measure learning
The Oct. 29 editorial “For Virginia,” which made
endorsements for the upcoming elections in Virginia, stated that Democratic gubernatorial nominee Ralph Northam “would kill Virginia’s current
standardized tests in public schools, on grounds that
they are excessive and unfair to disadvantaged
students. Yet he has no alternative that would
measure achievement or ensure that schools remain
accountable.”
I can’t agree. Virginia’s state tests are excessive
and unfair to students — period. You don’t need state
tests to “measure achievement or ensure that
schools remain accountable.” There are much better
ways to do that. As an educator for 50 years, I
recommend the books of James Popham and Rick
Stiggins.
Ken O’Connor, Scarborough, Ontario
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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
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Don’t overlook the Kremlin’s
threats to our courts
CATHERINE RAMPELL
The GOP’s
turkey of a
tax plan
BY
crampell@washpost.com
S UZANNE S PAULDING
A
P
aul Ryan’s white whale is almost in sight.
On Wednesday, after years
of wishin’ and hopin’ and
thinkin’ and prayin’ (and lately, noseholdin’), the Republican House speaker and his party will finally drop the
text of their long-sought tax bill.
Then, thanks to clever manipulation of Senate rules, the bill will secure
swift passage, requiring only a simple
majority of senators (meaning Democrats cannot obstruct) and a goldSharpied presidential signature for
delivery, at long last, to a cheering
Republican base. Right?
Wrong.
Even with President Trump in Asia
(and if Ryan is lucky, too busy to trash
his own tax plan), the GOP bill faces
enormous challenges.
The first of these is voters, including Republican ones.
Despite all that trickle-down
propaganda, about three-quarters of
Americans — and more than half of
Republicans — believe that wealthy
households and big corporations pay
too little in taxes, according to a September Associated Press-NORC
poll. Maybe they won’t storm town
halls the way they did over threats to
Obamacare, but they’re unlikely to be
supportive.
Especially since the Trump administration has already broken many of
its promises, such as not cutting taxes
on the rich, or raising them on the
middle class.
That said, Republicans’ main problem isn’t what the little people think.
It’s what the lobbyists want and, more
significantly, what complicated budget rules allow.
The first obstacle is the cost of their
plan.
Based on the vague contours we
have, the Republicans’ tax plan is
expected to cost about $2.4 trillion
over the coming decade, according to
a preliminary analysis by the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center. Unfortunately
for Republicans, their final bill is
allowed to cost “only” $1.5 trillion over
the next decade, at least to pass with a
simple majority vote in the Senate.
That’s the maximum deficit increase
allowed under the Senate budget resolution approved last week.
Fitting a $2.4 trillion peg into a $1.5
trillion hole will be tricky. Proposals to
cut the corporate income tax rate to 20
percent and repeal the corporate alternative minimum tax alone cost $2
trillion, according to the Tax Policy
Center. Republicans will have to find
more offsets, or make the cuts less
generous, or both.
If anything, however, Republicans
seem inclined to increase the cost of
their bill, not decrease it. That’s because they’re losing their nerve on the
few major revenue raisers they’ve
included, such as ending the state and
local tax deduction.
If they attempt to close other deductions and loopholes, more interest
groups and lobbyists will descend on
Gucci Gulch and demand that those
pet provisions be protected, too.
As a result, Republican lawmakers
are even more likely than usual to
deploy budgetary gimmicks, such as
ludicrous-speed economic growth or
pretending that a corporate tax break
will expire in five years when everyone knows it will be renewed.
There’s potentially an even bigger
problem for getting this tax cut
through. It has to do with a relatively
obscure law, called “statutory PAYGO,” that hasn’t gotten much attention.
This legislation has been on and off
the books (it’s been on since 2010)
since 1990. It says that if all of the bills
passed by the end of the current
calendar year have the net effect of
increasing deficits, then automatic,
immediate, offsetting cuts to certain
non-discretionary spending programs — including (yikes) Medicare —
go into effect.
Here’s how it would work.
If Congress successfully passes a
$1.5 trillion tax cut before going home
for Christmas, $28 billion would get
automatically slashed from Medicare
between January and September of
next year. And that’s just in Medicare.
Other popular programs, such as
mandatory spending on student loan
administration and farm subsidies,
would be wiped out entirely, according to the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.
And such cuts would continue for a
decade. Not exactly a people-pleaser.
The point of this law is (in theory)
to stop Congress from doing fiscally
irresponsible things. As with most of
its hand-tying exercises, Congress can
always override this automatic sequester, as they did when passing the
Bush tax cuts in 2001.
But here’s the key: A bill to override
these cuts would require 60 votes.
Meaning at least a handful of Democrats would be needed to pave the way
for tax cuts after all.
Republicans seem to believe they
can get the votes by threatening to
cast Democrats as killing Medicare.
But what’s to stop smart Democrats
from pointing out that Republicans
put Medicare at risk in the first place?
A19
RE
BILL O'LEARY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Paul Manafort departs court on Monday in Washington.
MICHAEL GERSON
The path of dishonor
A
t our political costume ball, it is
definitely ’90s nostalgia night. A
president obsessed with attacking
all things Clinton stands accused
of serial sexual harassment, sends out
underlings to dismiss the accusers as liars,
condemns a federal investigation as a
politically motivated fraud and is attempting to destroy the reputation of the leader
of that investigation. Hillary Clinton may
be President Trump’s continuing target,
but the Clinton years are clearly his
inspiration.
It worked the first time around. In
President Bill Clinton’s case, the Democratic Party almost uniformly honored
tribal loyalties above legal or moral principle. Even the feminist left generally fell
into line for partisan reasons. “American
women,” said columnist Nina Burleigh,
“should be lining up with their presidential kneepads on to show their gratitude
for keeping the theocracy off our backs.”
What is a little sexual misconduct and
obstruction of justice among friends when
legal abortion is at stake?
Now Trump appeals to the same type of
team solidarity, this time on the right.
“The Dems are using this terrible (and bad
for our country) Witch Hunt for evil
politics,” tweeted Trump, “but the R’s are
now fighting back like never before.” Note
how a federal investigation of Russian
influence on American democracy has
become “the Dems.” Note also that it is not
the president and his lawyers fighting this
investigation but the “R’s.” Trump is conditioning Republicans and conservatives to
view his upcoming legal defense entirely
through the lens of partisanship. With the
broad cooperation of conservative media,
there is every reason to think he might
succeed.
Trump’s ultimate objective in all this
matters greatly. If he wants to recruit
Republicans into a defense of the shady
political and business dealings of Paul
Manafort and the rest of the president’s
political circle — now exposed by federal
indictment — it will be discrediting and
humiliating. A party that rallies to the
defense of corruption will eventually be
seen as a swamp in need of clearing.
But if Trump’s goal is to escape a
tightening legal investigation by firing
special counsel Robert S. Mueller III and
issuing a string of self-protective pardons,
the participation of the Republican Party
takes on a different meaning. In this case,
Trump would be turning his authoritarian
pose into authoritarian practice, removing an essential check on the abuse of
power. Liberal democracy itself would be
under attack from an American Putinism.
And elected Republicans who enabled this
would be complicit in a crime against the
Constitution and violate the oath they
took to defend it.
As the indictments begin to come down,
Republicans need to ponder what legal
and ethical lines, if any, they are willing to
draw. Continuing the attacks on Hillary
Clinton’s own dishonest dealings is all fun
and games (except to Clinton, I suppose).
Joining the defense of slimy political
figures such as Manafort makes one,
ceteris paribus, into a slimy political
figure. Obscuring or excusing Russian
influence on the American political process is a dangerous disservice to the country. Supporting Trump in a power play
against the special counsel and his investigation would be an attack on the stability
and legitimacy of the Republic — a source
of infamy in American history.
To what circle of hell are Republican
officials about to consign themselves? It
would be useful for members of Congress
to declare that they will never enter the
fourth circle — the demolition of the
integrity and independence of the FBI — if
only to deter Trump from forcing a
constitutional crisis. Sen. Lindsey O.
Graham (R-S.C.) has done so, arguing such
an action would be “the beginning of the
end of the Trump presidency.” But it is
hard to imagine such courage written
broadly in today’s GOP — and even harder
to imagine such courage exhibited preemptively.
It is worth making clear that every
conservative media voice — including,
recently, the editorial voice of the Wall
Street Journal — that attacks the objectivity and legitimacy of Mueller is giving
Trump cover and encouragement to move
against him. They are dropping lit matches in the dry tinder of American politics.
And they would be responsible, in part, for
the resulting wildfire.
Do Republicans and conservatives really want to be remembered as a bodyguard
of enablers for this man? For this cause?
Few enter the fray of political ideas, or
make the considerable sacrifices of entering public life, to defend corruption and
the abuse of power. That is now the calling
of the Republican partisan, and the downward path of dishonor.
michaelgerson@washpost.com
ANNE APPLEBAUM
A U.S.-Russia convergence
Y
ears from now, historians may
study the documents indicting Paul
Manafort to understand just how
the Russification of American public life was accomplished. Manafort is
alleged to have laundered money, to have
cheated on taxes and to have lied about his
clientele. All of this he did in order to “enjoy
a lavish lifestyle in the United States,”
according to the indictment. Among other
things it is alleged that he spent $1,319,281
of his money, illegally hidden from the U.S.
Treasury, to pay a home lighting and
entertainment company in Florida; to purchase $934,350 worth of rugs at a shop in
Virginia; and to drop $655,500 on a landscaper in the Hamptons.
Some will find it ironic that Manafort did
all of this while coaching candidate Donald
Trump to run an “anti-elite” election campaign, one directed at “draining the swamp”
and cleaning up Washington. But in fact,
this is exactly the kind of tactic that
Manafort perfected on behalf of Russia, in
Ukraine, where he worked for more than a
decade.
Manafort was first invited to work in
Ukraine in 2004, by the Russian oligarch
Oleg Deripaska. But Manafort left a real
mark in 2006, when he brought dozens of
American political consultants to Ukraine
to assist in an ethnically charged election
that pit Russian and Ukrainian speakers
against one another, in an attempt to help
Russia retain influence over the country. In
2008, he helped run an anti-NATO campaign, opposing Ukraine’s membership in
the transatlantic alliance. In 2010, he was
one of several advisers — the others were
mostly Russians — who helped remake the
image of Viktor Yanukovych, the ex-con
whom the Russian government then supported for president of Ukraine. Yanukovych charged the sitting government with
corruption, declared that the election
would be “rigged” and finally won.
All of this experience came in handy in
2016. The exploitation of ethnic tension; the
dislike of NATO; the constant talk of
opponents’ corruption, whether warranted
or not; the shouting about falsified elections — these were Trump tactics, too.
Several other things about Yanukovych —
who was eventually chased out of his own
country — stand as a warning. He was an
“anti-elite” candidate who proved far more
corrupt than the existing elite. He used his
public office for private gain. And he sought
to undermine Ukraine’s constitution, first
subtly and then openly.
The indictment published Monday
doesn’t establish Manafort as a link between the Trump campaign and the Russian
government, although it does allege he
broke other laws. Such a link emerges
clearly in Monday’s other news story, the
revelation that George Papadopoulos, a
Trump foreign policy adviser, knew Russian
hackers had attacked the Clinton campaign
long before that fact was known to anyone
else; as early as May 2016, Papadopoulos
knew that Russia had “dirt” on Clinton.
But even if the Manafort indictment isn’t
a smoking gun, it tells us something
important. For a long time now, a part of the
U.S. political and business class has been
merging, ideologically and aesthetically,
with its post-Soviet counterparts. The use of
shell companies and Cypriot bank accounts; the over-the-top spending on
clothes and houses; the profoundly cynical
manipulation of ethnic or racial divides to
win elections — these behaviors are now
common to a particular set of sleazy
operators on two continents. If this indictment is correct, Manafort is the living
embodiment of this Russian-American convergence. And Trump, of course, is its
apotheosis.
applebaumletters@washpost.com
s members of Congress prepare
to question social-media executives this week about Russia’s
use of their platforms, they
need to broaden their focus beyond
elections. Our courts are at risk, too.
It is well understood that Russia is
engaged in a strategic campaign to
undermine support for democracy and
weaken the United States. A key element of the West’s appeal is the idea of
an independent judiciary that protects
the rights of individuals and ensures
the fair and consistent application of
the law. This pillar of democracy is
particularly vulnerable to information
operations because it relies so heavily
on public confidence in the legitimacy
of its outcomes. Active measures such
as those used to undermine elections
could also be used to threaten the
credibility of our legal system. We need
to call out any such efforts and
strengthen the nation’s resilience to
them.
Last month, Russian President
Vladimir Putin announced that he
would sue in U.S. courts for the seizure
of Russian diplomatic facilities in the
United States. Putin taunted, “We will
see how effectively the much-lauded
American judicial system works.” The
next day, the Russian media outlet
Sputnik ran an article headlined, “Russia Unlikely to See Justice in US Courts
Over Diplomatic Property.” This cynical
use of the U.S. legal system goes beyond
advancing Russia’s tactical goal of challenging sanctions against it. If it doesn’t
get the answers it likes, Russia can
simply use the decision to further a
narrative that the U.S. judicial system is
not as fair and independent as it’s
cracked up to be.
We are reminded almost daily of
Russia’s broad use of social media to
foment discord in our country. But
such campaigns have significant potential to fuel a lack of confidence in
the legal system as well. Russian
media outlets circulated a false story
about a state prosecutor in Berlin
failing to prosecute an alleged rape by
immigrants. Russian Foreign Minister
Sergei Lavrov doubled down on the
false stories, accusing German authorities of a coverup. Echoes of this
approach can be found in Russian
propaganda activities surrounding an
incident in Twin Falls, Idaho, including placing a Facebook ad promoting
an anti-immigrant rally at a time when
Twin Falls authorities were falsely
accused of covering up a child rape by
Syrian refugees (there were no Syrian
refugees involved and the case did not
include a charge of rape). Russian
Facebook ads have also sought to stoke
the flames of racial division in the
United States, including efforts to
further polarize discussions of racial
bias in the criminal-justice system.
What form would attacks on our
judicial system take? Russian active
measures often exploit existing weaknesses. Narratives that assert political
biases in judges could be exploited by
hacking and weaponizing information. Imagine the release of highly
unflattering emails by elected judges
or of internal judicial deliberations.
False allegations could also be spread
using social media to exploit polarization over issues in the courts. In
addition, cyber-activity could be used
to create an impression of institutional incompetence, for example, by altering court documents to undermine
their reliability or conducting denial-of-service attacks that shut down
court operations. Similar techniques
could target investigators and prosecutors, particularly those looking
into Russian activities.
In fact, our legal system may be
targeted precisely because it can help to
counter pernicious interference by foreign adversaries. Russia understands
the important role of the judicial system in disclosing and prosecuting corrupt foreign influence. There is evidence that Russia’s European influence
operations have been most active
where law enforcement and the judiciary were attempting to bring corrupt
politicians or businessmen to justice or
when a government attempted to undertake reforms to make its judicial
system more accountable and independent. Tactics included the spontaneous creation of pro-Russia advocacy
organizations or, more commonly, the
spreading of salacious rumors about
judicial branch officials by Russianowned or -influenced media outlets.
Institutions and judicial reform efforts
were stymied, the capacity of the legal
system was diminished, and public
confidence in the rule of law rapidly
decreased.
Given Russia’s goals and success
elsewhere with technology-enabled influence operations, why wouldn’t it use
these same tactics against our legal
system? The Kremlin playbook here is
easy to envision, but our strategy to
counter it has yet to be built. Immigration and refugee policy, equal treatment under the law and racial justice
are legitimate and important issues for
Americans to debate and address. A
foreign power manipulating these debates for its own ends, however, is a
threat to our sovereignty and democracy. We must act before the attacks come.
The writer is the senior adviser for
homeland security at the Center for
Strategic and International Studies, where
she is leading an initiative on countering
operations designed to weaken our judicial
system. From 2013 to 2017, she was an
undersecretary at the Department of
Homeland Security.
RICHARD COHEN
A splash of red for Luther?
I
t’s always the anniversary of something or other. In November, we
have the Russian Revolution and
the Balfour Declaration, and this
week marks the 500th year since
Martin Luther challenged the Roman
Catholic Church with his 95 theses.
Given the loopy zeitgeist of our times, I
should rush into the street and mark
the occasion by defacing Protestant
churches with the customary red paint
of protest. Luther, after all, was more
than the creator of Protestantism. He
was also a rotten anti-Semite.
The red paint has in recent days
been splashed on the statue of Theodore Roosevelt that stands before New
York’s American Museum of Natural
History. The old Rough Rider is accused of championing colonialism
(guilty) and embracing much of the
racism of his times (guilty). For example, he was fond of saying “I don’t go so
far as to think that the only good
Indians are dead Indians, but I believe
nine out of ten are, and I shouldn’t like
to inquire too closely into the case of
the 10th.”
A bit farther downtown, the statue
of Christopher Columbus has been
similarly assailed, he for his brutal,
genocidal treatment of the Arawak
Indians, of whom there are few left.
Chris long ago got his holiday, but he is
finally also getting his due. The same
applies to the many statues of Civil War
figures, extolled in bronze or whatever
for their gallant defense of slavery and
racism. Some of these got the red-paint
treatment and have come down. It’s
about time. Treason can sometimes be
noble; racism never is.
But does Luther also deserve a
splash of red? The evidence is pretty
shocking, not to mention definitive. In
1543, he published “On the Jews and
Their Lies,” in which he called my
ancestors “base and whoring people”
full of the “devil’s feces . . . they wallow
in like swine.” He had all sorts of ideas
for what to do with the Jews, including
the wholesale liquidation of their synagogues, even homes, and a ban on the
teaching of their rabbis “on pain of loss
of life and limb.”
To be sure, Luther’s Jew-hatred was
typical for the time, but Luther himself
was hardly typical. He was a powerful,
colloquial writer, and his words surely
had some effect. He was the founder of
a church, or a movement, that now
numbers nearly 1 billion. But more
pertinently, he provided a religious
imprimatur to German anti-Semitism,
which culminated in the Holocaust.
Luther was often cited by the Nazis,
but it would be wrong to blame him
alone for the murder of 6 million souls.
As far as I’m concerned, Luther is a
flawed figure. I can appreciate — even
applaud — his reforms, but they mean
little to me. Nevertheless, I spare him
the red paint because I know his
Jew-hatred is hugely negligible compared with the Reformation he initiated and, not insignificantly, the role he
played in encouraging literacy. He
wrote in German, not Latin, and like
the Hebrews he so despised, he interposed no one between man and God.
One had to read the Bible.
I apply the same rule to ol’ TR and
Columbus, as well as Woodrow Wilson
(no doubt a racist) and the countless
personages who lent their names and
often ill-gotten fortunes to various
institutions. Roosevelt too was a man
of his times, but he was also the first
president to have a black person as a
guest in the White House. In 1901,
Booker T. Washington came to dinner.
As Roosevelt’s biographer, Edmund
Morris, points out, it was an astonishing act of racial tolerance for the era.
So, I listen to J.S. Bach, even though
some of his sacred works soar on words
of jarring anti-Semitism (it helps not to
understand German), and I read Hemingway even though his depiction of
Robert Cohn in “The Sun Also Rises” as
a “kike” is just plain ugly. I make no
allowance for Charles Lindbergh because his anti-Semitism endangered
lives and because flying solo across the
ocean was a stunt. (In a sense, so was
Columbus’s voyage; someone was going
to do it.)
I pick and choose, my symbolic can
of red paint always at the ready. But
when it comes to those Confederate
generals, they unambiguously stand
for slavery, racism and the vile nostalgia for the so-called Lost Cause that
prompted the erection of so many
memorials. I cherish my Bach, feel
bully about TR and acknowledge the
immense importance of Martin Luther.
He did more good than bad.
Happy anniversary, Martin!
cohenr@washpost.com
A20
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
Two banks drop McKinsey Transgender military ban blocked
in S. Africa scandal fallout
MILITARY FROM A1
Global consulting firm
faces bribery allegations
over work for Zuma allies
BY T . J . S TRYDOM
AND J OE B ROCK
johannesburg — Barclays Africa and Standard Bank said on
Monday they would stop working with McKinsey, a further
blow to the global consulting
firm as it faces allegations of
bribery for work done with
friends of South African President Jacob Zuma.
Privately held McKinsey, the
world’s largest management consulting firm, has denied doing
anything illegal but said this
month that it was embarrassed
by mistakes it made while working with the South African state
utility Eskom last year.
McKinsey said this month that
it regretted working on a 1.6 billion rand ($113 million) contract
at Eskom alongside a company
controlled by the Gupta family,
wealthy friends of Zuma who are
accused of unduly influencing
government contracts.
Zuma and the Guptas deny
wrongdoing.
Barclays Africa and Standard
Bank told Reuters in separate
emailed responses to questions
that they would terminate their
relationships with McKinsey
without giving reasons.
McKinsey declined to comment Monday.
The Gupta brothers, who work
with Zuma’s son, Duduzane,
were accused by South Africa’s
anti-corruption watchdog last
year of using control over state
agencies to siphon public funds.
South Africa’s parliamentary
committee on public enterprises
is investigating whether McKinsey knowingly let funds from
Eskom be diverted to the Guptacontrolled firm Trillian as a way
of securing the deal.
Corruption Watch, a South
African nongovernmental organization fighting graft, is preparing a submission to the U.S.
Justice Department asking it to
investigate McKinsey’s dealings
with Trillian.
McKinsey
first
admitted
wrongdoing earlier this month,
saying that an internal investigation had found “violations of our
professional standards” but did
not uncover any acts of bribery
or corruption. It added that it
had parted ways with some staff
members involved in its work at
Eskom.
“The behaviors of some individuals fell short of our standards. Some of our processes
were inadequate and we have
acted to reinforce compliance
and improve them,” Tom Barkin,
McKinsey’s global chief risk officer, said in a statement on Oct. 17.
“We are embarrassed by these
failings and we apologize to the
people of South Africa,” the statement said.
McKinsey said it never worked
with the Gupta family and did
not have a contractual relationship with Trillian.
A February 2016 letter written
by one of McKinsey’s directors,
Vikas Sagar, authorizing Eskom
to pay Trillian as a McKinsey
subcontractor
“inaccurately
characterized” their relationship, McKinsey said.
South Africa’s political opposition Democratic Alliance says
McKinsey steered funds to Trillian to secure an inflated contract with Eskom that could have
totaled
9.4
billion
rand
($705 million) over four years, a
draft McKinsey-Trillian partnership document, seen by Reuters,
showed.
McKinsey has said it will repay fees it has earned if the
contract with Eskom is found to
be illegal.
McKinsey has said it stopped
working with Trillian after the
company failed due diligence in
March 2016. McKinsey has said it
regrets ever working alongside
the Gupta firm.
— Reuters
and begin enlisting in January.
The tweets were followed by a
presidential directive and a plan
set to take effect in March that
would have blocked military recruitment of transgender people
and would have forced the dismissal of current transgender
service members.
The judge’s injunction effectively reverts Trump’s policy to
the one issued under Obama.
The Obama administration
announced its policy after a
Pentagon review found no basis
to exclude transgender people
from the military after it examined medical care, military readiness and other factors.
The Monday ruling was hailed
by GLBTQ Legal Advocates and
Defenders (GLAD) and the National Center for Lesbian Rights
(NCLR), who sued in August on
behalf of six active-duty transgender service members who
had come out to their superiors
and had roughly 60 years combined in the military. It was the
first of a handful of suits to
challenge the ban and the first
significant ruling by a judge on
Trump’s policy.
“This is a complete victory for
our plaintiffs and all transgender
service members, who are now
once again able to serve on equal
terms and without the threat of
being discharged,” said NCLR
Legal Director Shannon Minter.
Department of Justice spokeswoman Lauren Ehrsam issued a
statement saying the department is “currently evaluating the
next steps.” Department attorneys had previously asked for the
suit to be dismissed.
“Plaintiffs’ lawsuit challenging military service requirements is premature for many
reasons, including that the Defense Department is actively reviewing such service requirements, as the President ordered,
and because none of the Plain-
tiffs have established that they
will be impacted by current policies on military service,” the
statement read.
The six service members in the
lawsuit contended that their
Fifth Amendment rights to equal
protection were being violated —
a claim bolstered by three former
Obama administration service
branch chiefs and a senior Pentagon official, who offered statements saying the ban would
harm readiness, staffing, recruitment and morale.
Kollar-Kotelly was unsparing
in her ruling, saying the hastily
announced Trump policy did not
pass muster on many fronts.
“There is absolutely no support for the claim that the ongoing service of transgender people would have any negative
effect on the military at all. In
fact, there is considerable evidence that it is the discharge and
banning of such individuals that
would have such effects,” KollarKotelly wrote.
Carl Tobias, a professor at the
University of Richmond School
of Law, said the Trump administration would probably have to
go all the way to the Supreme
Court to have any chance of
getting the preliminary injunction nullified.
“If they go to the D.C. Circuit, I
can’t imagine they are going to
overturn this,” Tobias said. “The
judge was strong in her opinion.
She just didn’t see any support
for the policy on the facts.”
More than a dozen states filed
a brief in October supporting the
arguments of the service members in the case, writing that
Trump was pursuing an “irrational” return to discrimination in
the military.
One aspect of the opinion that
continued to be debated Monday
was the barring of military funding for sex-reassignment surgery,
which is part of the ban.
Kollar-Kotelly’s order found
that none of the plaintiffs had
shown they were likely to be
affected by that funding ban, so
the court was not in a position to
rule on “the propriety of this
directive.”
Transgender advocates, however, insisted that the ruling
allowed the military to continue
to pay for such surgeries. The
Department of Justice declined
to comment on its understanding of the ruling as it relates to
the surgery issue.
There is no official tally of
transgender military members,
and estimates vary widely. One
recent study by the Rand Corp.
put the number on active duty at
about 2,500, while another from
the Williams Institute at UCLA
School of Law estimated that
there were 15,500 on active duty,
in the National Guard and in the
reserves. Currently, 18 other
countries allow transgender
troops to serve in the military.
Trump’s proposal was cheered
by many religious conservatives
but outraged transgender advocates and many liberals. Trump
blindsided many when he announced the policy on Twitter.
“After consultation with my
Generals and military experts,
please be advised that the United
States Government will not accept or allow Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity
in the U.S. Military,” Trump
wrote in the tweets. “Our military must be focused on decisive
and overwhelming victory and
cannot be burdened with the
tremendous medical costs and
disruption that transgender in
the military would entail.”
Lesbian, gay and transgender
advocates say the ban is part of a
broader pattern of discrimination by the Trump administration. This month, Attorney General Jeff Sessions reversed a
Justice Department policy protecting transgender workers
from discrimination under federal law.
justin.jouvenal@washpost.com
Here’s how investors could make
money on Congress’s tax legislation
BY
MARVIN JOSEPH/THE WASHINGTON POST
REI’s first store in the District. The outdoor-goods company is doubling down on moves to break away
from the frenzy of Black Friday and urging that people have “a moment to take a breath.”
REI is closing again on Black Friday
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
For the third year in a row, REI
is shutting down its stores — and
its website — on Black Friday.
The outdoor-goods chain says it
is doubling down on efforts to
back away from the commercial
frenzy by giving people “a moment
to take a breath.” Instead of hitting
the malls, the company says shoppers should go for a hike.
“We really want this to be a day
when people are outdoors, spending time with their families,” Jerry
Stritzke, REI’s chief executive, said
in an interview.
The announcement comes as a
number of shopping malls and
big-name retailers, including
Home Depot, Nordstrom and
Costco, say they will remain closed
this Thanksgiving. At Target, executives say they will confront
“Christmas creep” by waiting until
after Thanksgiving to put up holiday signs at store entrances.
“What we were hearing is, ‘Hey
Target, we celebrate Thanksgiving, and we want you to celebrate
Thanksgiving, too,’ ” a Target
spokeswoman said. “Now when
people walk into our stores, they
won’t see a huge splash of Christmas until after Thanksgiving.”
In recent years, the holiday
shopping frenzy has crept further
and further into Americans’ turkey meals, with some stores opening as early as 5 a.m. on Thanksgiving Day. This year, industry analysts say they’re seeing a backlash
as consumers realize they can of-
ten get the same discounts days or
weeks later without having to rush
out on a holiday.
“Black Friday has lost its significance,” Steven J. Barr, consumer
markets leader for PwC, told The
Washington Post this month. “Retailers have conditioned the consumer to believe everything’s on
sale every day, which means the
deals on Black Friday are not
significantly different from any
other time.”
Roughly 35 percent of consumers who plan to shop during
Thanksgiving week this year say
they will do so on Black Friday,
down from 51 percent last year
and 59 percent the year before,
according to consumer markets
research from PwC. But that
doesn’t mean Americans won’t
find other opportunities to spend:
Holiday shopping is projected to
bring in $680 billion this year,
marking a 3.6 percent to 4 percent
increase from last year’s $655.8
billion, according to the National
Retail Federation.
“Black Friday has gotten weaker and weaker,” said Stritzke of
REI. “It’s becoming less important.”
But that wasn’t so clear three
years ago, he says. When REI announced in 2015 that it would
remain closed on Black Friday, it
was regarded as a radical move in
an industry that relies heavily on
holiday shopping. And messing
with Black Friday, which is historically the most lucrative day of the
year for many retailers, seemed
risky.
“Would it be the most stupid
retail decision ever? We weren’t
sure,” Stritzke said. “It was a poke
in the eye to tradition.”
It turned out to be not that big of a
deal. Consumers continued to shop
at REI, and sales and profit rose year
over year. (And, Stritzke added, the
company’s 12,000 employees were
happy, too, because they received an
extra day off with pay.)
This year, the retailer is continuing its “Opt Outside” campaign by creating an online search
engine where people can find
nearby opportunities for activities
such as hiking, rowing and rock
climbing. Its competitors, however, will continue to open for holiday shoppers. Bass Pro Shops, for
instance, plans to open at 8 a.m. on
Thanksgiving and at 5 a.m. on
Black Friday.
“Many customers,” a company
spokeswoman said, “come in to
stock up on outdoor gear before
planning to spend the weekend
outside.”
Cabela’s, meanwhile, says on its
website that Black Friday will be
“the biggest sale event of the year.”
And, it suggests, hopeful shoppers might want to pick up some
gear — tents, water, camouflage
clothing and a stove — ahead of
time to beat the Black Friday rush.
“There’s no telling how long you’ll
be in line,” the company’s website
says. “Bring along some Thanksgiving leftovers and a stove to
stave off starvation.”
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
So handy. So reliable. Home delivery.
T HOMAS H EATH
For people who want to make
a buck off the business in Washington, there’s a new financial
instrument built to profit from
the tax legislation working its
way through Congress.
It’s an exchange-traded fund
— a cross between a mutual
fund and a stock — called U.S.
Tax Reform, a two-week-old
creation that is making a concentrated bet that certain companies will benefit more than
others from the Republican-led
corporate tax overhaul now in
the works.
“We feel tax reform legislation
could have a permanent impact
on companies’ earnings, which
could potentially drive stock valuations for many years to come,”
said Ben Phillips, chief investment officer at EventShares,
which is the firm that started
U.S. Tax Reform Fund.
The fund has 33 publicly held
stocks in its investment portfolio that it thinks will profit from
two key features of the legislation: corporate tax cuts and
allowing companies to expense
their capital investments upfront instead of over 20 or 30
years.
“Investors are looking for a
way to get exposure to certain
themes,” said Todd Rosenbluth,
director of ETF research at
CFRA, an independent research
firm. “Tax reform is top of mind
for many. And this ETF aims to
give you exposure to potential
beneficiaries with one trade.
Whether or not these companies
will benefit — and whether the
stocks will follow suit — is to be
determined.”
Phillips has a decade of investing experience, most recently
working at Goldman Sachs Asset
Management, and Providence
Equity Partners and Lord Abbett
& Co. before that. He said the
idea for the fund dates to April
2016, when he and his co-founders contemplated the market
impact of a Donald Trump or
1-800-753-POST
Hillary Clinton election victory.
“We thought if Trump or Hillary won, it could have a major
impact on the markets, one way
or another,” Phillips said. He
said his fund is investing not on
the basis of politics, but of policy.
“Politics is day-to-day. Policy
is the actual result and what that
impact has on capital markets in
the real world,” he said. “We are
looking at the long-term economic impact of major policy
decisions and working to identify winners and losers.”
So how do they assess which
companies might do well? Let’s
take one called Caleres, best
known as the manufacturer of
Allen Edmonds men’s shoes, as
well as clothing and accessories.
Caleres is one of the few
retailers that manufactures and
sells most of its products in the
United States, exposing it to the
relatively high U.S. corporate tax
rate, Phillips said.
“A permanent tax cut has the
potential to impact the company in perpetuity,” Phillips said.
He and his team have made 17
other investments in companies that they think will benefit
from a tax cut. Those range
from
fast-food
restaurant
chains such as Chipotle to biotech firm United Therapeutics
to used-car retailer CarMax and
energy giant Phillips 66.
“These are high taxpayers,”
Phillips said. “Nearly all the
companies we’ve included pay
over 30 percent tax rates and
would be the largest beneficiaries of a one-time tax cut. A lot of
businesses domiciled in the U.S.
are subject to higher U.S. corporate taxes.”
EventShares is also betting
that a bunch of companies with
high equipment purchases, such
as Air Lease Corp., Southwest
Airlines and energy firm Matador Resources, will see an increase in profits if they are able
to deduct those purchases in the
year they buy them.
In addition to the direct benefit of a corporate tax cut and
changing the way companies pay
taxes on new equipment, Phillips said he has invested in eight
companies that will be able to
price their foreign sales more
competitively if they pay less in
U.S. taxes.
AK Steel Holding and Ford
Motor are two examples.
“They are similar and produce a lot of their goods in the
U.S.,” Phillips said. “AK is inherently an auto play, with twothirds of its steel going to automobiles and 90 percent of the
revenue derived from the U.S.
AK not only has improved export potential, but also an improved earnings situation from
the tax cut. Ford, which is the
largest U.S. producer of any car
company in the world as a
percentage of sales, has the
same issue.”
But what if the tax bill tanks
and people invested in a fund
that is betting on a vaporized
policy?
“The portfolio stands well on
itself,” Phillips said. “But our
view is that there is enough
impetus in D.C. to get something
done on tax reform. If the first
vote failed, we would expect
another bill.”
An exchange-traded fund is a
hybrid of sorts between a mutual
fund and a public stock.
“We are bridging that gap
more than anyone else has
done,” Phillips said. “The gap is
daily transparency. Mutual
funds report quarterly. We report daily and every day at the
market close. It gives transparency to the fund-holder, and it’s
not a black box you are buying.”
The average market capitalization of its portfolio companies is $11.1 billion, and its net
expense to the investor is 0.85
percent — or $85 for every
$1,000 invested.
EventShares also has two nascent ETFs built on companies
that may benefit — or suffer —
from Republican policies and
from Democratic policies.
thomas.heath@washpost.com
washingtonpost.com/subscribe
SF
KLMNO
METRO
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
High today at
approx. 3 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
48 56 60 51°
°
°
°
60°
Precip: 10%
Wind: WNW
7-14 mph
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
JOHN KELLY’S WASHINGTON
MARYLAND
OBITUARIES
The nail-biting conclusion
to the haunting of Halcyon
House, a Washington
horror tale. B3
A former school security
chief is sentenced to 18
months for sexual abuse
of a 17-year-old student. B4
Jane Juska placed a
personal ad that led to a
frank memoir of later-life
sexual pleasures. B6
Hospital
operator
pressed
on death
EXECUTIVES VOW TO
IMPROVE FACILITY
D.C. Council questions
consultants’ contract
BY
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
A Confederate general in limbo
D.C. officials want a monument to Albert Pike gone, but group that placed it doesn’t want it
BY
J ENNA P ORTNOY
Everyone, from Mayor Muriel E.
Bowser (D) to the chair of a congressional committee that would have to
approve its removal, says it’s fine to take
it down.
The problem is that if Congress votes
to remove it, no one wants custody. Pike
would be homeless, a political hot potato.
Even the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, the fraternal organization that commissioned the Pike statue, petitioned
Congress for its installation in 1898 and
reveres Pike as a hero, doesn’t want to
accept responsibility for it.
“I have no clue,” said Arturo de
Hoyos, grand archivist for the Scottish
Rite, when asked what should be done
with the Pike statue. “I haven’t even
thought that far. It’s [federal] property;
they can do with it what they want with
it.”
N
early everyone agrees that Albert Pike should go.
Pike is the Confederate
general memorialized in a
27-foot-tall bronze and marble monument in Judiciary Square, the
busy downtown Washington neighborhood filled with local and federal courts
and museums just north of the Mall.
That a Confederate general who
championed the South’s secession ended up in a place of honor in the middle of
the nation’s capital is odd.
But not as strange as the predicament
the statue faces.
While communities across the country debate the proper treatment of Confederate statues — a tense issue that
triggered summer violence in Charlottesville — there is no argument over
the Pike statue.
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
PIKE CONTINUED ON B2
Leaders in the District and in Congress say the statue of Confederate Gen. Albert Pike in Judiciary Square should be removed,
but no one — not even the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, which considers Pike a hero and approves the statue’s removal —
wants to take it. Pike was a leader in the fraternal organization for more than three decades.
P ETER J AMISON
D.C. Council members said
they were “gravely” worried
about patients’ safety at the District’s only public hospital in a
tense hearing Monday, as the executives who run the troubled
facility pledged to improve.
The D.C. Council health committee hearing focused on the
performance of Veritas of Washington, a firm led by campaign
donors to Mayor Muriel E. Bowser
(D), which has managed United
Medical Center for a fee of
$300,000 per month since 2016.
The council must decide in the
coming weeks whether to renew
the contract.
The hearing came on the same
day The Washington Post published an account of the death of
Warren Webb, a 47-year-old UMC
nursing home resident with AIDS
who died Aug. 25 of a heart attack
HEARING CONTINUED ON B2
O∞cials:
No extra
money
for Metro
Wiedefeld seeks
additional $136 million
to avoid cuts, fare hikes
BY
M ARTINE P OWERS
Several local elected officials
said Monday that they don’t have
the extra money Metro General
Manager Paul J. Wiedefeld is
asking them to contribute for his
proposed budget for the coming
fiscal year.
Rather than raise fares or further cut service, Wiedefeld’s proposed spending plan, released
Monday, seeks a $136 million
increase in capital contributions
from the District, Maryland and
Virginia for the fiscal year that
BUDGET CONTINUED ON B4
D.C. rape case shows why Home of our presidents, and ‘the best ghost stories’
women often stay silent
On a lonely
night in 1946,
President Harry S.
THERESA
Truman went to
VARGAS
bed at 9 p.m.
About six hours
later, he heard it.
Knock. Knock. Knock.
The sound against his bedroom
door awakened him, he wrote to
his wife in a letter that is archived
in his presidential library and
museum.
“I jumped up and put on my
bathrobe, opened the door, and
no one there,” he wrote. “Went out
and looked up and down the hall,
looked in your room and Margie’s.
Still no one. Went back to bed
after locking the doors and there
were footsteps in your room
whose door I’d left open. Jumped
and looked and no one there! The
damned place is haunted sure as
shootin’. Secret Service said not
even a watchman was up here at
Retropolis
Everyone knew.
A year ago at a
Georgetown
Halloween party,
everyone knew
something had
Petula
happened to a
Dvorak
young woman
upstairs. A 21-yearold who screamed and then
sobbed.
It happened during one of the
hottest Halloween parties in
Washington, at a place
appropriately called Dodge
Mansion.
Every year, multimillionaire Bill
Dean hosts an annual bacchanal
that features topless models in
body paint circulating among a
few hundred costumed guests.
Last year’s event was wrapping up
about 4 a.m. when some of the
remaining partyers heard loud
cries of distress coming from the
second floor.
One guest followed the sounds
into a second-floor bedroom and
found a woman on the floor, naked
and saying she’d been raped.
“I was screaming,” the woman
said in an interview with The
Washington Post last year. (The
Post typically does not identify
victims of alleged sexual violence
without their consent.) She
acknowledged that she had
snorted cocaine before the
attacker violently bit, grabbed and
penetrated her.
Two women tried to help her,
but witnesses said the alleged
rapist came back into the room,
threw one of the women against
the wall and bashed the head of
DVORAK CONTINUED ON B3
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PRINTS AND PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION
A winter view of the White House in 1907. Few would be surprised
at finding skeletons in the closets there, but some people —
including presidents — have reported ghosts in the building, too.
that hour.
“You and Margie had better
come back and protect me before
some of these ghosts carry me off.”
In addition to its political
ghosts, the White House has long
housed unsettling specters of a
different, more bump-in-thenight kind, if numerous former
leaders and their staff members
are to be believed.
Whether one embraces or
mocks the paranormal, the many
accounts that have spilled out of
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue over
two centuries give ghosts an
undeniable place in the country’s
history. They also make that
address arguably the nation’s
most famous haunted house.
The sightings, which have been
documented in eerie detail by
scholars and newspapers, involve
a former president who appears
when the nation needs a leader
RETROPOLIS CONTINUED ON B4
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
Bill seeks to remove Confederate statue, but no one has agreed to take it
PIKE FROM B1
The effort to remove the statue
began in earnest during the summer, in the wake of Charlottesville. Protesters in the District descended on the Pike statue. Someone splashed red paint, an activist
projected the words “remove racism,” and a banner draped around
it declared the Trump administration to be “modern confederates.”
Ronald Seale, the bow-tiewearing leader of the Washington-based Scottish Rite, acknowledged that the Pike statue had
become “the subject of contention
and escalating controversy” and
that his group would agree to its
removal.
The Freemasons “will support
an action by the District of Columbia to remove the statue forthwith
so that it shall not serve as a
source of contention or strife for
the residents of our community,”
he wrote in August to D.C. Council
member Jack Evans (D-Ward 2).
Evans called Seale. They
hatched a plan to whisk away the
statue at midnight using a flatbed
truck Seale found and a crane
Evans found, free. Neither man
asked too many questions of the
other.
Seale found a place to send it.
“Do you want to know where?” he
asked, according to Evans. “No
way,” Evans said.
Then Evans called the National
Park Service.
He was told they risked charges
of trespassing and vandalism because the statue sits on federal
land. Evans called off the caper.
He says he regrets checking first
with the Park Service instead of
forging ahead. Seale did not return multiple messages seeking
comment.
“He wasn’t even a good Confederate general,” Evans said. “He
was a bad Confederate general,
but nonetheless he was a Confederate general . . . It should be gone,
for every reason you can think of.”
Enter Del. Eleanor Holmes
Norton (D), the city’s nonvoting
member of Congress. She filed
legislation this month to seek congressional approval for the statue’s removal.
Rep. Tom McClintock (R-Calif.), chairman of the Natural Re-
SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
sources subcommittee that must
approve its removal, said it’s fine
to take it down.
“If the statue honors him for
taking up arms against our Constitution, I would be inclined to
support its removal,” McClintock
said in a statement. “I haven’t seen
the bill, but I’ve never understood
the romanticization of the Confederacy.”
In Pike’s adopted home state of
Arkansas, his name is on a highway, a campground and the Albert
Pike Memorial Temple in Little
Rock.
But C. James Graham, the top
Freemason in the state, said
there’s no room for the statue at
his temple even if funds could be
raised for a 1,000-mile trip.
“I don’t know that we would
necessarily want it,” said Graham,
58, an associate dean at the Uni-
versity of Arkansas medical
school.
To Scottish Rite Freemasons,
Pike was a hero. His bust tops a
grand staircase at their expansive
temple on 16th Street NW.
A shrine there displays relics of
his life and death, including a
plaster mask said to bear a few
errant beard hairs. His body lies
entombed within the temple’s
marble walls.
Pike, a Boston native who relocated to Arkansas before the Civil
War, served as the sovereign
grand commander of the Scottish
Rite of Freemasonry, southern jurisdiction, for more than three
decades.
Six feet tall and 300 pounds
with a beard and billowing hair to
his shoulders, Pike was an imposing figure who grew the largest
Scottish Rite branch — now span-
A public tour of the
Scottish Rite of
Freemasonry Temple in
Washington includes a
stop at the bust of
Confederate Gen. Albert
Pike, a leader in the
fraternal organization.
The Freemasons support
calls to remove a statue of
Pike at Judiciary Square,
but the top Freemason in
Pike’s adopted state of
Arkansas says there’s no
room for it at his temple.
Veritas defends handling of recent death
HEARING FROM B1
after being left on the floor for at
least 20 minutes by his caregivers.
The Post obtained an audio recording of Webb crying out repeatedly for help in the run-up to
his death.
Veritas and UMC executives
defended their handling of the
incident in their testimony, saying they had undertaken “an exhaustive review” of the case and
reported it to the appropriate regulatory authorities. They declined to say what specific steps
they had taken to discipline the
nurses involved, citing employee
confidentiality.
Regulators with the D.C.
Health Department said last
week that the hospital did not
report details of the case that
would have triggered an outside
investigation, and the agency began investigating Webb’s death
based on The Post’s reporting.
Three eyewitnesses to the incident also told The Post that no
hospital officials had interviewed
them about what happened.
“I am gravely concerned about
the quality of care at UMC,” said
council member Elissa Silverman
(I-At Large), pointing to the details of Webb’s death. “What is
described is shocking for a healthcare facility, and simply unacceptable.”
Council member Vincent Gray
(D-Ward 7), the health committee’s chairman, said he was worried that UMC’s management was
not being held accountable because the hospital serves a poor
and heavily Medicaid-reliant
group of patients in Southeast
Washington.
“Veritas’s performance at UMC
would never be tolerated anywhere else in the city — not for six
months, not for a single second,”
Gray said.
The hospital has come under
increasing scrutiny since early
August, when city health regulators abruptly closed its obstetrics
ward without explaining why.
The Post later reported that the
closure came because of danger-
THE DAILY QUIZ
Too much of what good
thing can cause a decline in
kidney health?
(Hint: The answer is in today’s Health and Science
section.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click on
“Quizzes” to enter the correct response.
ning 35 states — and wrote “Morals and Dogma,” a dense, 861-page
opus linking its rituals to a higher
plane. It’s the tome tucked under
Pike’s arm in the sculpture.
Pike was commissioned as a
Confederate Army brigadier general but his wartime career lasted
less than two years; his men were
accused of scalping Union troops,
and he was eventually forced to
resign. He received a reprieve
from President Andrew Johnson
and moved to Washington, where
he died in 1891.
Eight years later, Congress approved the Freemasons’ request
to erect a statue in Pike’s honor.
The organization initially budgeted $5,000 for an Italian-made
sculpture by Gaetano Trentanove,
but it cost three times that, according to Scottish Rite records.
The plan did face objections
City loses bid to
Hong Kong to host
2022 Gay Games
BY
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
“What is described is shocking for a health-care
facility, and simply unacceptable.”
D.C. Council member Elissa Silverman (I-At Large), about the details
of Warren Webb’s death at United Medical Center’s nursing home
ous medical errors that included a
failure to take measures to prevent the transmission of HIV to a
newborn and inadequate screening and treatment for a pregnant
woman with a history of potentially fatal blood-pressure problems.
Veritas is owned by Chrystie
Boucrée, wife of Corbett Price,
whom Bowser appointed in 2015
to the board of the Metro transportation system. Price, his relatives and his companies made
more than $35,000 in political
donations to Bowser in 2014, campaign-finance records show.
At Monday’s hearing, Veritas
employee and interim hospital
chief executive David Boucrée — a
cousin of Chrystie Boucrée — said
Veritas is still struggling with
“legacy problems” it inherited
when it took over the hospital but
was on the way to improving its
financial stability and quality of
care.
David Boucrée said Veritas is
coming up with plans to reopen
the obstetrics ward, which would
ultimately have to be approved by
the hospital board. He also pointed to a prospective contract for a
doctors’ group associated with
George Washington University to
take over UMC’s emergency
room.
However, he cautioned that
both initiatives might require a
taxpayer subsidy, a move that the
mayor has said she wants to
avoid.
David Boucrée recently took
over the helm of UMC after Veritas announced that the prior chief
executive, Luis Hernandez, would
be moved to a new position at the
hospital.
A search for a permanent replacement for Hernandez is underway. But council members repeatedly questioned Boucrée
about whether he is qualified to
run UMC in the meantime.
Boucrée, who told The Post in
August that his professional background is in information technology and outsourcing, said he had
not “explicitly run a hospital” before but had “managed many
large and complex organizations.”
He cited his work for companies including Lockheed Martin
and Inovalon, a health-care data
analytics company.
“All the efforts that I have done
throughout my career have been
industry-agnostic,” he said.
peter.jamison@washpost.com
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
THE DISTRICT
Bowser and delegation
flew to Paris this past
weekend for final pitch
Veritas of Washington manages United Medical Center for a fee of $300,000 per month. The D.C.
Council must decide in the coming weeks whether to renew the contract.
from some quarters, including a
fraternal organization for Union
soldiers.
But on Oct. 23, 1901, amid great
ceremony, the statue was unveiled. A grand master Mason performed the rituals, which included a sprinkling of corn, wine and
oil.
According to legend, Pike
shared the Scottish Rite rituals
with his African American barber,
a Mason in a segregated lodge in
the District. The moment is remembered locally as a seminal
moment in the development of
African American Freemasonry in
the District.
Phillip David, grand master of
an African American D.C. lodge,
said that despite Pike’s stature
within the fraternity, the Confederacy tried to overthrow the U.S.
government.
“I think that should disturb all
Americans,” David, 52, said. “I appreciate what he did for Masonry,
but somethings are a little more
important than the organization
you belong to.”
Online, debate flourishes about
Pike’s true character. Critics call
him a racist and a Ku Klux Klan
member — a persistent criticism
that historians say cannot be
proven — and a member of the
fiercely anti-immigrant KnowNothing Party.
“Looking at his story, he was
not terribly unusual for his time
and place,” said Jane F. Levey,
chief historian of the Historical
Society of Washington, D.C.
De Hoyos, who recorded a June
2017 podcast “Defending Albert
Pike,” said Pike was actually
against slavery but moved to the
South because he believed in
states’ rights. DeHoyos lamented
his reputation as a divider.
“Honestly, I think that’s very
unfortunate,” De Hoyos said.
“Pike was the head of a fraternal
organization that brought people
together.”
Still, Norton wants Congress to
direct the Park Service to remove
the Pike statue. Her two-page bill
is silent on where the statue
should go.
It does make one thing clear:
The federal government would
not foot the bill.
PERRY STEIN
The nation’s capital lost out on
hosting the Gay Games 2022 to
Hong Kong, the federation of Gay
Games announced Monday afternoon.
Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D)
and 23 city representatives flew
to Paris this past weekend to
make their pitch for the games
during a presentation that included proposed security measures and sites for events. Guadalajara, Mexico, also was a finalist.
“Thanks to everyone who
worked so hard on the DC bid for
2022,” the D.C. Gay Games committee tweeted after the announcement. “While we’re disappointed, we’re proud of the work
we did.”
Paris is hosting the games in
August 2018, and the Federation
of Gay Games convened to hear
the pitches of the three finalists
and make a selection Monday in
the French capital.
The federation visited the
three finalist cities in June and
July, spending 31/2 days in each
location.
“The impact that the Gay
Games has in host cities is incredible in terms of culture, sport,
economic impact, history and
most importantly elevating all
matters of LGBT+ equality,” the
federation wrote in a statement.
Bowser said in an interview
last week that the games would
have been a financial boon to the
city, with more than 15,000 par-
2017 PostPoints Scavenger Hunt
Coming soon: Verona Quartet.
Like strings? This group’s a sure bet.
Hear Ravel, Currier and Beethoven, too,
At the Kennedy Center, a definite do.
Washington Performing Arts will present Verona Quartet on Friday, November 10
at the Kennedy Center. What reviewer refers to the foursome as “Cohesive yet full
of temperament…vibrant, intelligent”?
For rousing theater Woolly reigns.
Coming: Nothing to Lose (But Our Chains);
With The Second City’s Felonius Monk,
This satirist’s show is a slam-dunk.
The Second City will present Nothing to Lose (But Our Chains)
beginning November 11 at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company.
For how long will the play run?
(Hint: See WashingtonPerformingArts.org for the answer.)
(Hint: See WoollyMammoth.net for the answer.)
EARN 5 POINTS AND A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES. Answer our Scavenger Hunt questions, then go to washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click “Quizzes” to enter your responses.
ticipants and tens of thousands
of spectators likely to attend. She
said the city committed to putting $2 million toward the
games.
“We think, especially now, it is
important for the United States
to demonstrate that it is an open
and welcoming place, and it is
especially important for us as
Washingtonians to show that we
are an international city and we
celebrate sport,” Bowser said last
week.
After Monday’s announcement, she tweeted “Congrats to
Bowser said in an
interview last week that
the games would have
been a financial boon to
the District, with
thousands of
participants and
spectators attending.
Hong Kong. We hope the 2022
Gay Games spark reforms to
bring about equality for our LGBTQ friends there.”
The Gay Games in Paris are
scheduled for Aug. 4 to Aug. 12
next year. The federation said it
will have 36 sports, 14 cultural
events, an academic conference
and up to 15,000 participants
from 70 countries.
The District also made unsuccessful bids to host the 2014 Gay
Games and the 2024 Olympics.
perry.stein@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B3
M2
The nail-biting conclusion to the haunting of Halcyon House, a D.C. horror tale
John
Kelly's
Washington
This is the final
part of a
Washington ghost
story, “The
Haunting of
Halcyon House.”
To read Part 1,
visit
washingtonpost.
com/johnkelly.
The cab crossed over Rock
Creek Park on the Buffalo Bridge.
On the parkway below, motorists
could look up at the 56 carved
Indian heads gazing down from
the ramparts. I was looking at a
different visage: a man huddled at
the other end of the taxi’s rear
seat. He had forced his way inside,
eager — it seemed to me — to flee
Georgetown by any means.
His story — that for a year he
had rented a room in Halcyon
House, a grand if shabby mansion
at 34th and Prospect — seemed to
have no point. But then he came
to it.
“This morning I found a note in
my mailbox from a lawyer. ‘Your
assistance is needed in a
procedure,’ it read. My landlord
was dead. Or seemed to be.”
I snorted. “ ‘Or seemed to be’?
What does that mean?”
He ignored my question. “You
must remember that I didn’t
really know my landlord, Albert
Adsit Clemons.”
“ ‘Clemens’?” I said. “As in
‘Samuel’? Like Mark Twain?”
“I’d heard those rumors, but I
don’t think he was related. He
spelled his surname differently,
and when I glanced around his
jumbled office before signing the
lease for my flat, I saw no books by
Twain, no prints or busts of the
author. It was clear that A.A.
Clemons was wealthy, though he
was also . . . well, I don’t know the
right word for it. Distracted.
Erratic. There was no rhyme or
reason to what he had filled his
house with or how he had chosen
to display it.”
“The Peruvian pottery, African
gourds and Indian baskets you
mentioned,” I said.
“Yes,” he said. “All was
crammed side by side. There were
expensive antiques and ancient
artifacts — fine clocks,
needlepoint samplers — but also
what you’d call junk: brass
headlamps from an old flivver, for
example.
“He would move objects from
room to room as he worked on the
house. ‘Renovation,’ he called it,
but it was more like plastic
surgery. This wasn’t just taking
down walls, it was putting them
up. It was carving new hallways,
sealing off rooms. Before I’d
moved in he’d added an entire
three-story edifice, enlarging the
house to no purpose that I could
discern. I kept mostly to my room,
but occasionally I’d venture into
the heart of the house and find it
bearing no resemblance to what
I’d encountered only the week
before.
“And always there was the
sound: the hammering, chiseling,
sawing and nailing. It came to be
like a pulse throbbing through the
house.”
The cab had become very quiet.
“And then?” I said.
“And then last night the sound
stopped. The sudden sepulchral
chill was so strange. When I found
the note in my mailbox this
morning, I went around to the
front door of Halcyon House. A
man opened it and introduced
himself as George H. Paltridge,
attorney at law. He ushered me
into the ballroom-cum-office to
which a new artifact had been
added: A.A. Clemons himself, laid
out on a butcher block table, his
shirt open to the sternum.
“Standing nearby was a second
man, in dungarees stained with
plaster dust. ‘He thought he’d live
forever,’ this man said.
“I took in the strange scene,
then asked the obvious question:
‘Why am I here?’
“The lawyer spoke: ‘We need
another witness as a provision of
purpose of absolute certainty of
death. . . .’
“I recoiled. ‘You can’t mean it,’ I
said. ‘There’s no doctor!’
“Alpress spoke up. ‘I suppose
I’ve pounded enough nails in my
time,’ he said. In one hand he held
a hammer, in the other a nail,
though at nearly a foot long it was
more railroad spike than nail. He
rested the point between two ribs
and brought the hammer down!
“I couldn’t look. I stared at the
ceiling as the blows rang out. And
that’s when I saw it.”
“Saw what?” the cabdriver said.
“A spike! It came cracking
through the molding that ran
along the wall. With each blow, it
intruded more into the room. And
from the end dripped blood,
which fell in thick and viscous
drops onto the artifacts below.
“I tore from the house and
jumped in the first cab I could
find. Yours.”
We let him out at Union
Station. He said he would not be
returning to Halcyon House.
PHOTOS BY KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
the will is carried out,’ he said.
‘This is Melvin Alpress, builder.’
“ ‘I expect you’ve heard me,’
Alpress said. ‘Mr. Clemons and I
have been renovating Halcyon
House for decades. He used to say,
“As long as it’s under construction,
nothing can stop me.” ’ ”
I smiled. “He wouldn’t be the
first rich man who thought he
could cheat death with frantic
industry or the accumulation of
possessions,” I said.
The man continued: “Paltridge
pulled a sheaf of documents from
a briefcase and began to read
aloud. ‘I, Albert Adsit Clemons . . .
being of sound and disposing
mind and memory, etc. etc.’ He
skipped ahead: ‘First: I direct that
upon my death having been
definitively determined, the
attending physician shall
thereafter pierce or puncture
my heart sufficiently for the
Rest (of the story) in peace
Save for the gothic ending, the
details in this story are true, the
people real. A.A. Clemons — 18721938 — was an eccentric who
spent years modifying Halcyon
House, giving rise to many
rumors. Items from his collection
are in museums up and down the
East Coast. It is unclear whether
the macabre stipulation of his will
was carried out. He is buried in
Palmyra, N.Y.
In 2016, 3400 Prospect St. NW
was purchased by pharmaceutical
millionaires Ryuji Ueno and
Sachiko Kuno. Today it houses
their nonprofit, Halcyon, a
foundation that, its website says,
is devoted to “the potential of
human creativity, and its power to
create a better world for us all.”
john.kelly@washpost.com
Twitter: @johnkelly
Halcyon House in Georgetown is a national landmark with a long
history — including a period in the 20th century when it was
owned by Albert Adsit Clemons, a wealthy collector and relentless
renovator who left an unusual order in his will.
For previous columns, visit
washingtonpost.com/johnkelly.
PETULA DVORAK
Women who report sexual assaults can face prolonged ordeals and doubts
DVORAK FROM B1
another woman against the floor.
About a dozen police officers
filled the mansion, taking
statements. Everyone knew the
alleged attacker. He’d fled before
police arrived. Everyone was
interviewed, although the alleged
victim did not want to go to the
hospital for an examination.
Instead, she went home and took a
shower.
A year later, no charges have
been filed. Police turned all their
information over to the U.S.
attorney’s office, which is still
investigating the matter, said
spokesman Bill Miller. He can’t
comment on it, he said.
I haven’t lost hope that police
and prosecutors will charge the
alleged attacker. But why is this
taking so long?
Is it any wonder that women
don’t always report sexual assaults
and harassment, knowing the
doubts they’ll face and the
prolonged ordeal that lies ahead?
Which brings me to Harvey
Weinstein, the powerful
Hollywood mogul who has been
accused of preying on women for
decades. Everyone knew, but no
one wanted to do anything about
it.
“I did tell people about it,”
actress Daryl Hannah told the
New Yorker last week. “And it
didn’t matter.” That’s because, she
said, women “are not believed. We
are more than not believed — we
are berated and criticized and
blamed.”
Being doubted, being blamed,
being punished — this is what
Women you might see every day have been
assaulted or harassed and never said anything.
kept women silent for so long
about Bill Cosby, Roger Ailes, Bill
O’Reilly, movie director James
Toback, former Amazon Studios
executive Roy Price, former New
Republic literary editor Leon
Wieseltier, political journalist
Mark Halperin and, of course,
Donald Trump.
The allegations against
Weinstein have set off a #MeToo
avalanche that isn’t close to being
over.
Nearly 150 women working in
California’s state legislature
signed a letter last week
describing years of sexual
harassment, including lawmakers
exposing themselves, groping and
threats. The grievance system
didn’t work for any of those
women, they said.
Hundreds of thousands —
women you’ve probably sat next to
on the train, eaten lunch with
every day, collaborated with on a
work project — have been sexually
assaulted or harassed and never
said anything.
Because even if you’re on the
floor naked and crying, even if
there are witnesses and police
statements, you might be doubted.
And this phenomenon isn’t
limited to Hollywood movies or
Georgetown parties. It’s
everywhere, from law firms to
fast-food fry stations.
“One day, [my shift supervisor]
Derek showed me a photo of his
genitals. That was my breaking
point,” said Cycei Monae, who
alleges that she was repeatedly
harassed by her boss at a Michigan
McDonald’s. She was one of 15
women featured in a film by the
activist group Fight for $15.
Rebekah Havrilla, the only
female member of her bomb
squad in eastern Afghanistan, was
sexually harassed for months by
her supervisor, she told
lawmakers four years ago. But she
kept quiet.
“One week before my unit was
scheduled to return back to the
United States, I was raped by
another service member that had
worked with our team,” she
testified to Congress. “Initially, I
chose not to do a report of any
kind, because I had no faith in my
chain of command, as my first
sergeant previously had sexual
harassment accusations against
him and the unit climate was
extremely sexist and hostile in
nature towards women.”
Extremely sexist and hostile
toward women. Everyone knows
it’s time — beyond time — for this
climate to change.
deaths of Leon Young, 22, and
Delano Wingfield, 23, the U.S.
attorney’s office for the District
said.
Prosecutors said Neal’s body
was found in a house in the
1800 block of Eighth Street NW
on June 12 and Wingfield’s in a
grave in a back yard four days
later.
Both men had been beaten
with a hammer, according to
prosecutors.
Neal was convicted in the
deaths in July after a trial in
D.C. Superior Court, the U.S.
attorney’s office said.
petula.dvorak@washpost.com
Twitter: @petulad
LOCAL DIGEST
Jealous, state Sen. Richard S.
Madaleno Jr., tech entrepreneur
Alec Ross, lawyer Jim Shea and
former Michelle Obama policy
director Krishanti Vignarajah.
MARYL AND
Emily’s List backs
Hogan challenger
Policy consultant Maya
Rockeymoore Cummings, one of
two women vying to unseat
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R)
in 2018, received an
endorsement Monday from
Emily’s List, a political action
committee that pushes to elect
Democratic female candidates
who support abortion rights.
The PAC plans to advise
Rockeymoore Cummings, who
has never run for political office,
and steer campaign
contributions from its national
network to her campaign.
The other Democrats
competing in the June 26
primary are Prince George’s
County Executive Rushern L.
Baker III, Baltimore County
Executive Kevin Kamenetz,
former NAACP president Ben
injured.
Police said the incident
occurred about 2:10 a.m. in the
2400 block of 18th Street NW.
— Peter Hermann
—Ovetta Wiggins
THE DISTRICT
Woman charged with
assault of officer
A 23-year-old woman was
arrested Sunday and charged
with pointing a pellet gun at an
on-duty uniformed D.C. police
officer in Adams Morgan and
pulling the trigger three times,
according to authorities.
Celeste Alejandra Almaguer
of Northwest Washington was
charged with assault with a
dangerous weapon, possession
of a prohibited weapon and
assault on a police officer.
No projectile came out of the
weapon, police said, and neither
the suspect nor the officer was
Police arrest suspect
in 2016 fatal shooting
D.C. police said Monday that
they have arrested a suspect in
the 2016 fatal shooting of a man
in the District’s NoMa
neighborhood.
Stephon Marquis Williams,
24, of Oxon Hill, Md., was
charged with second-degree
murder.
He was arrested Friday at the
D.C. jail, where he was being
held pending trial on a gun
charge from September 2016.
Police said Williams was
charged with killing Jamar
Morris, 28, of Northwest
Washington, on Feb. 9, 2016.
— Peter Hermann
Man gets 60 years
in roommates’ deaths
A D.C. man was sentenced to
prison Monday in connection
with the killings of his two
roommates in 2014.
Jeffrey Neal, 25, was
sentenced to 60 years in the
— Martin Weil
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THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
A busy sta≠ of White House specters?
RETROPOLIS FROM B1
most, a daughter who pleads in
vain to help her doomed mother
and a first lady who is, sadly,
perpetually stuck doing laundry.
Jared Broach is the founder of
the company Nightly Spirits,
which offers tours of haunted
areas in several cities across the
country. But when Broach started
the tours in 2012, he offered only
one: The White House.
“The White House has the best
ghost stories, and I’d call them the
most verified,” Broach said.
“Honestly, we could do a 10-hour
tour if we really wanted to.”
Asked if he believes in ghosts,
Broach said, “For sure” — and
then pointed to more prestigious
authorities.
“If I said no, I’d be calling about
eight different presidents liars,”
he said.
One of them would be
Abraham Lincoln. He reportedly
received regular visits from his
son Willie, who died in the White
House in 1862 at age 11 of what
was probably typhoid fever. Mary
Todd Lincoln, who was so griefstricken by the loss that she
remained in her room for weeks,
spoke of seeing her son’s ghost
once at the foot of her bed. There
are also reports of her hearing
Thomas Jefferson playing the
violin and Andrew Jackson
swearing.
After his assassination in 1865,
Lincoln apparently joined his son
in his phantasmal roaming. First
lady Grace Coolidge spoke in
magazine accounts of seeing him
look out a window in what had
been his office.
Many more sightings would
come in the decades and
presidential administrations that
followed. Queen Wilhelmina of
the Netherlands was sleeping in
the Lincoln Bedroom in 1942
when she reportedly heard a
knock on the door and opened it
to find the bearded president. She
fainted.
Two years earlier, British Prime
Minister Winston Churchill,
according to accounts, had just
stepped out of a hot bath in that
same room and was wearing
nothing but a cigar when he
encountered Lincoln by the
fireplace.
“Good evening, Mr. President,”
Churchill reportedly said. “You
seem to have me at a
disadvantage.”
In his research, Broach said he
found that Lincoln seems to be
the most common visitor among
the White House’s ghosts and also
the one who carries the greatest
burden.
“They say Lincoln always
comes back whenever he feels the
country is in need or in peril,”
Broach said. “They say he just
strides up and down the secondfloor hallways and raps on doors
and stands by windows.”
In a 1989 Washington Post
article, White House curator Rex
Extra Metro funds too costly, some say
BUDGET FROM B1
begins July 1. Of that sum,
$49 million would come from the
District, $47 million would come
from Maryland, and an additional $40 million would be split
among jurisdictions in Northern
Virginia.
But some Northern Virginia
officials said they don’t have the
means to increase their budgets
to cover the extra funding for
Metro, and they’re hoping the
state will step in with more money.
D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser
(D) and Maryland Gov. Larry
Hogan (R) said that they’ve proposed plans to provide Metro
with funding in coming years, but
neither said directly whether
they would increase their contributions for the coming fiscal year
as Wiedefeld has requested.
And while local leaders debated where to get the extra money
Wiedefeld is asking for, Metro
board Chairman Jack Evans said
that the general manager isn’t
asking for enough.
The proposed capital budget,
Evans said, doesn’t represent the
reality of the system’s needs and
insulates the region’s decisionmakers from having to make
tough choices about Metro’s longterm financial health.
“In many ways, I wish he would
have asked for what he needs —
not what he thinks he can get,”
Evans said. “I don’t want the
region to lapse into a feeling of,
‘Well, things are okay,’ when the
fact of the matter is, things are
not okay. ”
In the lead-up to this budget
season, Wiedefeld warned political leaders that Metro is in desperate need of a long-term dedicated revenue source. He said the
system needed $500 million a
year in new funding for equipment and maintenance, and $15.5
billion over the next 10 years for
investments to “remain safe and
reliable.”
But the budget proposal outlined Monday rejiggers the math
— essentially making a smaller
request this year, with the intention that the decade-long ramping-up process will require even
more dramatic year-to-year increases in funding down the road.
If the jurisdictions don’t come
up with the additional money,
Wiedefeld may be left with returning to last year’s budgetbalancing solution: fare hikes
and service cuts.
Sharon Bulova (D), chairman
of the Fairfax County Board of
Supervisors, praised Wiedefeld
for essentially keeping the operating budget flat.
In the nearly $1.84 billion operating budget, Wiedefeld hews
to a promise he made earlier this
year to limit year-to-year growth
in requests for operating subsidies to 3 percent, to match inflation.
But the growth in capital expenses — a $21 million increase
for Fairfax — would be difficult to
finance, Bulova said. However,
the growth in costs is justified,
she said, and county officials are
analyzing whether it would be
possible to use bonds to pay for
the increase.
Another possible option Bulova said she is exploring is seeking
a short-term loan from the state
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
Scouten said that President
Ronald Reagan had commented
that his dog would go into any
room except the Lincoln
Bedroom.
“He’d just stand outside the
door and bark,” Scouten said.
Among other spirited stories
are those about Annie Surratt.
Some have sworn her ghost
knocks on the front doors,
pleading for the release of her
mother, Mary Surratt, who was
convicted of playing a role in
Lincoln’s assassination and later
hanged.
There also are accounts of
hauntings involving two
presidents’ wives. Abigail Adams
was the first first lady to live in
the White House and used the
East Room to dry sheets. Since
her death, there have been
reported sightings of her likeness
in that area. She walks, according
to the accounts, with her arms
outstretched as if holding clean
linens.
Dolley Madison, if the stories
are to be believed, seems to have
chosen a better eternal pastime:
taking care of the garden. During
the Woodrow Wilson
administration, staff members
reported seeing her ghost as they
were about to move the Rose
Garden. They apparently decided
afterward to leave it where she
wanted it.
After Truman wrote to his wife
about the knocks on his door, the
president’s daughter wrote him
back. Margaret Truman, in a 1986
biography of her mother, said she
and her mom were skeptical of
the existence of ghosts,
presidential or otherwise, and she
wrote her father saying so.
In his reply, he said, “I’m sure
they’re here, and I’m not so much
alarmed at meeting up with any
of them.
“I am sure old [Andrew
Jackson] could give me good
advice and probably teach me
good swear words,” he wrote,
according to the book. “And I’m
sure old Grover Cleveland could
tell me some choice remarks to
make to some political leaders. . . .
So I won’t lock my doors or bar
them either if any of the old coots
in the pictures out in the hall
want to come out of their frames
for a friendly chat.”
of Virginia, which would be paid
back once Northern Virginia has
established a long-term revenue
source to pay for Metro’s capital
needs.
“We’ll do the best we can to
fund this budget,” Bulova said.
“We’re committed to doing our
part, but we also know we can’t
keep funding the kind of increases in capital that are needed for
Metro.”
Christian Dorsey — a member
of the Metro board and the Arlington County Board — also
agrees that Wiedefeld’s funding
request is justified but said his
county can’t afford it.
“There’s no possible way, with
the funding sources that are
available to us, that we can meet
that commitment,” Dorsey said.
Dorsey said Arlington has
nearly maxed out its borrowing
capabilities for Metro’s long-term
needs. Like Bulova, he’s hopeful
the county could receive help
from the state, though it’s unclear
whether that’s likely with a Republican-controlled legislature
and upcoming gubernatorial
election.
“Last year, when the increase
in [Metro’s] budget was so pronounced, we really uncovered
every rock to find every source of
funding to meet the needs,” Dorsey said. “But we were very clear
last year: We don’t have the ability to do that again.”
In a statement, Bowser reiterated her calls for a long-term
revenue source for Metro, saying
that “anything short of providing
dedicated revenue” could have a
negative effect on the safety and
reliability of the system.
“The District has made improving Metro a top priority, and
instead of calling for study after
study, we have pushed for dedicated revenue,” Bowser said. “It is
time for Maryland and Virginia to
agree to the same.”
Evans said that the District is
prepared to pay the additional
subsidies for the next fiscal year.
But when asked whether the city
is prepared to pay an additional
$49 million in subsidies for next
year’s capital budget without a
dedicated revenue source, Bowser spokeswoman LaToya Foster
was noncommittal.
“We’re reviewing it,” Foster
said.
Bowser has advocated for a
regional sales tax as a dedicated
funding source for the transit
agency, and the idea has been
endorsed by the D.C. Council,
Montgomery County Executive
Isiah Leggett (D) and Montgomery County Council President
Roger Berliner (D-PotomacBethesda), along with a technical
panel of the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments.
Hogan, along with some advocacy groups, has warned that a
sales tax would have a disparate
effect on low-income residents.
The Maryland governor has offered to give the transit system an
extra $500 million over four years
if Virginia, the District and the
federal government each do the
same. But the plan has gained
little traction.
“Governor Hogan has proposed the only real, actionable
offer to address the funding
needs repeatedly expressed by
Mr. Wiedefeld and others,” Amelia Chassé, a spokeswoman for
Hogan, said Monday. “So far,
leaders in Virginia and Washington, D.C., have failed to adequately respond to this offer, or make
any productive counterproposals.”
Wiedefeld will present his proposal to the Metro board Thursday.
MATHEW BRADY/LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PRINTS
AND PHOTOGRAPHS DIVISION
Willie Lincoln died in the
White House in 1862, and,
according to some reports, his
spirit stuck around.
theresa.vargas@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/
retropolis
martine.powers@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Ex-school security chief gets 18-month sentence for sexual abuse of student
AND
BY D AN M ORSE
D ONNA S T. G EORGE
The criminal charges against
Mark Yantsos seven months ago
stunned parents in Montgomery
County. Yantsos wasn’t just a
school employee. He was head of
security at a high school — responsible for protecting students
such as the 17-year-old whom he
pursued and had sex with at a hotel.
In a courtroom Monday, as the
case drew to a close, a judge
emphasized those sentiments.
“You did the direct opposite of
that which you were hired to do —
that is, you exploited this young
student,” Montgomery County
Circuit Judge Michael Mason told
the 58-year-old Yantsos.
Mason handed down an 18month jail sentence, the maximum possible under the terms of
a plea agreement between prosecutors and Yantsos’s attorneys.
He also imposed conditions that
prosecutors had made part of the
plea deal, which will make it difficult if not impossible for Yantsos
to ever work in a school again.
Yantsos must be listed on Maryland’s online sex offender registry
for the rest of his life and cannot
try to expunge his felony conviction.
After he gets out of jail, he will
be placed on five years of supervised probation, during which he
won’t be allowed to be around
minors other than his daughter.
His case appears to be the latest
of several in which a Montgomery
school employee was admonished for repeated incidents of
inappropriate behavior with students but stayed on the job and
allegedly crossed the line again.
Yantsos, a former New York
City police officer, had worked for
the school system for a decade
and led the security team at Richard Montgomery High School in
Rockville since 2008.
In spring 2016, he became in-
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creasingly close to a female student. He bought her gifts — a
North Face jacket, Ugg boots, a
diamond pendant necklace for
Christmas, a ring for Valentine’s
Day — and bestowed at least some
of the items while at school.
Around December 2016, they met
every couple of days to “hang out.”
Their outward interactions, at
school, caught the attention of
school officials. Yantsos received
several write-ups for “the inappropriate close contact that he
had with the victim at the school
leading up to these events,” prosecutors would later say in court.
In March, Yantsos picked the
teenager up from her home about
10 p.m. one Friday and took her to
the hotel in Rockville. After they
engaged in sex, he brought
her home.
The teenager’s mother discovered the relationship April 3 and
went to the high school to report
it, according to prosecutors and
court documents.
Police say when Yantsos saw
the student’s mother arrive at the
school to speak with school staff,
he quickly met up with the teenager, retrieved an iPhone she
used to communicate with him
and left the school. Detectives
later charged him with one count
of sex abuse of a minor and one
count of fourth-degree sex offense. The latter charge was
dropped as part of the plea agreement.
Attention to the case widened
after Yantsos was released from
jail on bond in April and, according to court records, violated orders to stay away from the victim.
He saw her four days in a row and
engaged her in sex on the fifth day,
prosecutors said in court filings.
As his trial approached, Yantsos’s attorneys and prosecutors
negotiated a plea agreement, one
that would spare the 17-year-old
from appearing at a trial.
Prosecutor Hannah Gleason
said it was her understanding —
based on conversations with attorneys for the victim’s family —
that the victim feared having to
testify at a trial. Gleason also
worried that having the victim
testify could do more harm than
good for her. The teenager and
her family did not make a statement at the sentencing.
Yantsos has been in jail for
nearly six months, which will
count toward the 18-month sentence. He could be moved to a
halfway house
within three
weeks,
said
Donny Knepper, one of his
attorneys.
“He’s going
to live a totally
law-abiding
life,” Knepper
Mark Yantsos
said.
Yantsos declined to address the
court Monday.
Mason, the judge, stressed to
Yantsos that the case against him
— had he been convicted after a
trial — could have netted him a
sentence of four or five years, or
more, inside a state prison. Instead, Yantsos will serve his time
in the county jail. “Your attorneys
from my point of view have done a
remarkable job in negotiating for
you,” Mason said.
Mason referred to a psychological report that he said discussed
Yantsos’s “inability to have insight into the exploitive nature” of
his actions.
“You at some level, at least at
the time, sort of almost saw this
as a natural relationship,” Mason
said. “You weren’t finding any
satisfaction in the relationship
you were in, and somehow you
were just able to look past the
fact that you were dealing with a
17-year-old girl, 40 years your
junior, and how you were able to
ignore that and look beyond it,
frankly, even having read this
report, I don’t fully understand.”
Mason pointed out that Yantsos had not heeded warnings.
“The other thing that is somewhat amazing is that fact that you
continued to pursue her even after receiving repeated warnings
from the principal and other people at the school about the inappropriateness of this particular
relationship,” Mason said.
Montgomery school district officials said Monday that they will
review the case but did not comment in detail, citing a notice of
pending civil litigation. Yantsos
was placed on administrative
leave April 4 and fired June 20,
officials said.
School officials said their
thoughts were with the victim
and her family. “The behavior of
Mr. Yantsos is completely unacceptable and goes against the core
values of our school system,” they
said in a statement.
dan.morse@washpost.com
donna.stgeorge@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
MARYLAND
Top state Democrats vow action on bill terminating rapists’ parental rights
Officials say the
legislation will be a
top priority in 2018
BY
OVETTA WIGGINS
A Maryland bill that would
allow women who become
pregnant as a result of a rape to
terminate their attackers’ parental rights has received key
legislative support and, after
nine years of failed attempts,
appears likely to be approved
next year.
Senate President Thomas V.
Mike Miller Jr. (D-Calvert) said
last week on social media that
he plans to co-sponsor the bill
during the next legislative session, which begins in January.
“I have shared publicly and
privately my disappointment
that the Rape Survivor Family
Protection Act did not make it
to the floor until Sine Die and
did not pass the Legislature in
time,” Miller wrote on Facebook. “Senate Democratic leadership is going to make clear
this [is] a priority and the bill
will be taken up early.”
Miller said he would co-sponsor the bill when the legislature
reconvenes in January and
would make it a top priority, to
“make sure victims of rape are
protected and not forced to
co-parent with their rapist.”
Earlier this month, House
Speaker Michael E. Busch (DAnne Arundel) said he also
planned to co-sponsor the bill
and said it would be a top
priority in the new session
Del. Kathleen M. Dumais and
Sen. Brian J. Feldman, Montgomery County Democrats,
“This protection is long overdue and victims of
sexual assault need us to take action.”
House Speaker Michael E. Busch (D-Anne Arundel), in a Facebook post
have been lead sponsors on the
legislation for years.
“This protection is long overdue and victims of sexual assault need us to take action,”
Busch wrote on Facebook.
Almost 25 other states have
passed similar laws.
The Maryland bill most recently died on the final day of
the 2017 session, after key
members of a conference committee panel could not reach a
compromise over the House
and Senate versions.
Advocates were outraged
that two committee chairmen
who appointed the conference
panel did not include female
lawmakers in the group and
waited until the end of the
90-day session to try to resolve
the differences in the House
and Senate versions.
Much of last year’s debate on
the bill centered around whether an alleged rapist would have
to be criminally convicted to
have his parental rights revoked. About 20 of the states
who have such a bill require a
rape conviction before terminating parental rights.
Advocates argued that Mary-
land allows parental rights to
be terminated in child-abuse
cases even when there is no
criminal child-abuse conviction. The same standard should
apply, they say, in cases of
sexual assault.
Under the bill, a woman who
sought to terminate a man’s
parental rights would have to
prove through “clear and convincing evidence,” the standard
used in civil court, that the man
had sexually assaulted her. The
burden-of-proof standard is
higher in criminal court, where
charges must be proved “beyond a reasonable doubt.”
With days left in the 2017
session, the Senate Judicial
Proceedings Committee struck
language from the bill that said
that courts could not require
publication of the name of the
mother or child in such cases
and added language that said
the father could refuse to testify or offer evidence in court.
The amendment forced the
need for the conference committee.
Jake Weissmann, deputy
chief of staff for Miller, said
Monday that there were no
details available about a compromise bill, just a commitment that “we’re going to get
this done.”
Lisae C. Jordan, executive
director of the Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assaults,
said it has been “incredibly
frustrating and disappointing”
over the past decade to tell
women who were raped and got
pregnant “that the law is not
there for them.”
“I look forward to the time
when we can explain how the
law can help women in their
situation,” she said.
ovetta.wiggins@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Administrative trial begins for driver of van where Freddie Gray was hurt
Baltimore officer faces
20 charges of violating
department policies
BY JESSICA ANDERSON
AND KEVIN RECTOR
During the first day of Baltimore
police officer Caesar Goodson Jr.’s
administrative trial in the death of
Freddie Gray, prosecutors said he
was neglectful of his duty to keep
Gray safe and dishonest with investigators trying to figure out
what happened.
Neil Duke, the lawyer prosecuting Goodson on more than 20
charges of violating department
policies, said the officer’s actions as
the driver of the police van in
which Gray suffered a fatal spine
injury in 2015 showed both professional and personal failings.
After writing the words “duty,”
“responsibility” and “integrity” on
a whiteboard during his opening
remarks, Duke told the threemember panel hearing the case
that Goodson had failed in all three
regards.
He said Goodson failed to secure the shackled Gray in a seat
belt, properly investigate dangers
to his safety, inspect his surroundings to ensure Gray’s safety, speak
with him to ensure his well-being
or call for a medic when he requested one.
The administrative trial at the
University of Baltimore is not a
criminal proceeding — Goodson
was acquitted of murder in Gray’s
death last year — but is about
“consequences,” Duke said, in an
apparent nod to Gray’s death and
to Goodson’s possible termination.
Sean Malone, Goodson’s defense attorney, in contrast, cast his
client as a victim of failed city and
police leadership.
He said city leaders are seeking
to make the officer “the face of
their failure” to improve training
and equipment for years, despite
knowing that what was in place
left officers unsafe when transporting detainees.
Malone said Goodson had simply focused on his role driving the
van and trusted his colleagues and
superiors in their assessments of
Gray that day — including that he
did not need to be secured in a seat
belt as the van stopped multiple
times and did not truly need a
medic when he asked for one.
“This is a team,” Malone said.
“They back each other up.”
Goodson faces more than 20
internal charges in the case, which
is being heard by a trial board of
police officers and is expected to
continue through at least next
Monday.
The charges include providing a
false statement about the circumstances surrounding Gray’s arrest
and neglecting his duty to keep
Gray safe by failing to secure him
in a seat belt.
The panel can clear Goodson or
sustain any or all of the charges
against him. If the panel clears
him, the decision is final. If it finds
him guilty, it will recommend punishment to Police Commissioner
Kevin Davis, who can accept its
recommendation or choose his
own punishment for Goodson, up
to termination.
Duke’s and Malone’s opening
remarks took up about half the day.
The second half was dominated by
the playing of Goodson’s recorded
interview with two suburban internal affairs investigators in February, one of whom took the stand
Monday to answer questions about
the interview and provide context.
In the interview, Goodson, 48,
said he “didn’t pay it no mind”
when Gray began banging around
in the back of the van he was
driving.
He said he didn’t secure Gray in
a seat belt or check on him at
several stops because other officers
were doing so, or because he felt
unsafe doing so himself.
He said he didn’t call a medic
after Gray asked another officer to
get him one because that officer
hadn’t made it seem like an emergency, and because he had glanced
at Gray once himself and hadn’t
noticed a problem.
“You can look at somebody and
tell if they need to go to the hospital
or if they’re lying,” Goodson said.
His recollections repeatedly
drew stern questions from the two
investigators, including Montgomery County Police Detective Sgt.
Thomas Curtis, who took the witness stand Monday.
“I’m just having a problem understanding why you’re not taking
an active role that day as the wagon
driver,” Curtis said during the interview.
In his opening remarks, Duke
said that a recorded interview was
“confused, confusing and did not
comport with the evidence.”
Duke said Goodson had a duty
and responsibility to monitor prisoners being transported and
should have taken Gray to the
hospital.
He said that “the evidence will
show the officer had no intention
of taking Gray to the hospital that
morning” and that through all the
van’s stops, he never made an
attempt to assess Gray’s well-being
despite Gray’s banging in the van.
Malone argued that the department had failed to properly train
officers and did not have a proper
policy in place on how to restrain
combative arrestees.
“Police officers in Baltimore City
are put in a perilous position,”
Malone said.
During the hearing, Goodson
sat at a table between his attorneys
with his arms folded.
He has not spoken publicly
about the case but has maintained
his innocence.
Two other officers charged in
Gray’s arrest and death have accepted department discipline in
the case.
Two others are fighting punishment like Goodson and face similar administrative trials in coming
months.
— Baltimore Sun
obituaries
ROBERT BLAKELEY, 95
Marines veteran oversaw development of fallout shelter sign, led Toastmasters
BY HARRISON SMITH
Robert Blakeley, whose yellowand-black fallout shelter sign became a grim symbol of the Cold
War and, in many places across
the country, a now-rusting reminder of the perils of nuclear
brinkmanship, died Oct. 25 at a
senior-living community in Jacksonville, Fla. He was 95.
The cause was complications
from a bacterial infection, said
his daughter, Dot Carver.
Mr. Blakeley was a logistics
official at the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers when he devised and
perfected the shelter sign, an
ominous image of three downward-pointing triangles that
called to mind the international
symbol for radiation and, in the
event of a nuclear explosion,
pointed toward the nearest public shelter.
The shelter system, created by
newly elected President John F.
Kennedy in 1961, was designed to
safeguard millions of Americans
in the event of a nuclear strike,
offering a more substantial, concrete-walled means of protection
than the oft-repeated suggestion
to “duck and cover.”
At the time, a strike seemed
imminent, if not inevitable. A
summer standoff with the Soviet
Union over the control of Berlin
placed U.S. military forces on
high alert, and later in 1961, Life
magazine ran a cover story showing a helmeted, plastic-gloved
man in a “civilian fallout suit.”
The story promised that “97 out
of 100 people can be saved” from
nuclear fallout if they take proper
measures. Meanwhile, a 46-page
civil defense pamphlet elaborated on the dark arts of “fallout
protection.”
That October, the first federally backed shelters were unveiled
to the public. Located in the
basements of churches, bank
buildings, apartment complexes
and municipal structures, the
shelters were stocked with food
and water and designed to prevent radiation exposure as well
as the kind of mass chaos envisioned by television’s “The Twilight Zone,” where neighbors in
one episode came to blows over
access to a small private shelter.
Mr. Blakeley, a Marine veteran
who served in two of the fiercest
BILL GEERHART
battles of World War II and the
Korean War, was an expert on
chaos but not graphic design.
Still, he knew enough to dismiss
an early suggestion that the signs
be made of railroad board, a
papery material that would be
difficult to hang and likely go up
in flames after an atomic blast.
“Whatever we developed,” he
told writer Bill Geerhart for a
2011 post on the Cold War blog
Conelrad Adjacent, “it would
have to be usable in downtown
New York City, Manhattan, when
all the lights are out and people
are on the street and don’t know
where to go.”
Mr. Blakeley enlisted Blair
Inc., a design company based in
Fairfax County, Va., to come up
with a few options for the aluminum sign’s image. Blair was instructed to include at least one
design inspired by the radiation
symbol and to focus on crafting a
straightforward, easily reproducible logo with room for directional arrows and details on a shelter’s capacity.
The results, Mr. Blakeley recalled, included a preliminary
sketch of a family of three moving toward a shelter. There was
also a distinctive triangular de-
JOHN KELLY/THE WASHINGTON POST
TOP: Robert Blakeley holds a
miniature version of the fallout
shelter sign, which became an
icon of the anxieties of the Cold
War. ABOVE: Some of the signs
still remain, like this one at
16th and Irving streets NW, in
the District’s Mount Pleasant
neighborhood.
sign that may have been drawn
from Clarence P. Hornung’s
“Handbook of Designs and Devices,” a commonly used reference work first published in 1932.
The book featured a selection of
triangle designs, including the
one that Mr. Blakeley settled on
while meeting with a visibly impatient Powell Pierpoint, the
Army’s general counsel.
“I’m used to vacuum cleaner
salesmen,” Mr. Blakeley recalled
Pierpoint telling him. “What do
you recommend?”
Mr. Blakeley’s choice, and subsequent development, proved
fateful. Working with what is
now the manufacturing company
3M, he settled on a durable form
of reflective paint that has helped
thousands of his signs remain
visible (if faded) signifiers of
shelters that have long gone out
of use.
In time, the design Mr. Blakeley developed also became an
instantly recognizable emblem of
Cold War fear and uncertainly,
visible in films and television
shows as well as on concert posters and record covers, including
Bob Dylan’s 1965 album “Bringing It All Back Home” and 1973
advertisements for the Who’s
North American tour.
When asked about the legacy
of his creation, Mr. Blakeley was
nonchalant, treating the shelter
signs as hardly more significant
than his work as a president of
Toastmasters International, the
public-speaking organization.
When his children were
young, he told Conelrad Adjacent, “we’d go down the street,
and one of the kids would say,
‘Hey, Dad, there’s one of your
signs.’ But you know, other than
that it’s just like many of the
other things that happen in life.
It’s just one of those routine
things. I don’t know if I’ve ever
had an occasion to tell anybody
that I was involved in it because I
don’t think it’s ever been high on
my priorities.”
Robert Wilson Blakeley was
born in Ogden, Utah, 40 miles
north of Salt Lake City, on Aug.
30, 1922. His parents ran a farm
together, and his father also
worked as a machinist at a nearby Air Force base.
Mr. Blakeley studied at Weber
Junior College (now Weber State
University) and Utah State University before enlisting in the
Marines during World War II. He
fought on the beaches of Iwo
Jima. Later, called up from the
reserves during the Korean War,
he was one of the “Chosin Few”
who escaped encirclement by
overwhelming Chinese forces at
the Chosin Reservoir.
A marriage to Jean Brown in
the 1940s ended in divorce. He
married Dorothy McArthur in
1952. She died in 1992. In 2003,
Mr. Blakeley married Irene Davis.
In addition to his wife, of
Jacksonville, survivors include a
daughter from his second marriage, Dot Carver of Chantilly,
Va.; three grandchildren; and
four great-grandchildren. Robert
Blakeley, a son from his second
marriage, died in 1991.
Mr. Blakeley studied landscape architecture at the University of California at Berkeley and
graduated in 1954. He also received a master’s degree in business administration, Carver said.
Mr. Blakeley worked for two
years at the Veterans Administration before moving to the Washington area and joining the Corps
of Engineers as a civilian. He
joined Toastmasters after giving
what he described as an unsuccessful presentation to corps
leaders.
Mr. Blakeley helped change
Toastmasters’ bylaws to allow
women to become full members,
and after being elected its international president in 1976 he
traveled across Africa, Europe
and the United States to expand
the group’s reach. He remained
with the Corps of Engineers until
1981, retiring as chief of administrative services.
Among his unfinished projects
was a small fallout shelter in the
family’s back yard in Alexandria,
Va., his daughter said. Mr. Blakeley had drawn up the plans, but
apple trees filled the space instead. The blast never came.
harrison.smith@washpost.com
B6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
IN MEMORIAM
BRYANT
obituaries
DOROTHY L. BRYANT
2/23/1924 ~ 10/31/2003
You are missed beyond Measure!!!
Your Devoted Children, Edith, Janice and
William, Jr.; Grandchildren, Rochelle and
Lionel P.S. - I Love You, Ma (Billy)
DEATH NOTICE
AUSTIN
AUDREY G. AUSTIN (Age 88)
FAMILY PHOTO
Jane Juska, who wrote the widely read 2003 memoir “A Round-Heeled Woman: My Late-Life
Adventures in Sex and Romance,” became a go-to interpreter of later-life desire.
Like any dater, she had experiences running from the sublime
to the less-than-sublime. In the latter category was Jonah, an 80-something,
who ended up stealing Ms. Juska’s champagne flutes and silk pajama pants.
married,” she once told the New
York Times.
She spent much of her career
in California, teaching at San
Quentin prison as well as in
schools as she raised her son,
Andy Juska of Chester, Calif.
Besides her son — whose
permission she sought before
placing her personal ad, but
who, she joked, had “no intention of reading the book” about
what came from it — survivors
include a sister; and two granddaughters.
Ms. Juska struggled at times
with obesity and addiction,
which she discussed in her writing as candidly as she discussed
her romantic life. In a sequel,
called “Unaccompanied Women” (2006), she wrote of her
sadness when Graham, a 30something, married a younger
lover.
“I am moved to tears with
longing and love for this man,”
she confessed, “with despair
and regret for what cannot be.”
What she did not regret, she
said, was having taken out the
personal ad; she wished she had
done it years earlier. And for
those who wondered, she insisted that her allusion to Trollope,
the English Victorian novelist,
was not a pun.
emily.langer@washpost.com
Mae Goldie Belson Bernstein
wife of Joseph Bernstein (z"l),
mother of Arlene Bernstein and
Allen Bernstein, sister of Libby
(Lou) Pohoryles, Norma Belson
Honick (z"l), Estelle (Jay) Dobbs
(z"l); beloved Aunt of 12 and extraordinarily
beloved Great Aunt of more than 20; surrogate grandmother to dozens and Teacher
of Hebrew and Judaica to hundreds for 50
years at Congregation Temple Israel / Tikvat
Israel. She also leaves behind a special
aide and friend, Tessie Constantino. Family
and Judaism were her passions. May her
memory be a blessing. Funeral Services will
be held on Wednesday November 1, 2017,
11 a.m. at Judean Memorial Garden Chapel,
16225 Batchellors Forest Rd., Olney, MD
20832. Interment to follow. Family will be
receiving following the services at the Late
residence. Shiva will be Wednesday and
Thursday 7 to 9 p.m. with a Minyan at 7:30
p.m. Memorial Contributions may be made
to Tikvat Israel of Rockville, MD, Beth Israel
of San Diego, CA or charity of your choice
in support of Israel Education and children.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
BERNSTEIN
MAE GOLDIE BELSON BERNSTEIN
Passed away on October
29, 2017. Wife of Joseph
Bernstein z”l; mother of
Arlene Bernstein and Allen
Bernstein; sister of Libby
(Lou) Pohoryles, Norma Belson Honick z”l, Estelle (Jay)
Dobbs z”l; beloved aunt of
of 12 and extraordinarily beloved great aunt
of more than 20; surrogate grandmother to
dozens and Teacher of Hebrew and Judaica
to hundreds for 50 years at Congregation
Temple Israel / Tikvat Israel. She also leaves
behind a special aide and friend, Tessie
Constantino. Family and Judaism were her
passions.
Mae along with her husband Joe z”l and
then her aide Tessie Constantino came to
San Diego for High Holidays and Pesach
and longer visits for 21 years. She loved
children and teaching. In particular, at Beth
Israel she loved the new friends she made
in the West, the Tizmoret, Youth and Teen
Choirs and Chai Band and would stay for
double High Holiday Services to hear the
music and the sermons. A traditional Jew,
Mae came to love the reform tradition and
the creativity it brought to prayer.
She will be missed
May her memory be a blessing.
Funeral Services will be held on Wednesday
November1, 2017 11 a.m. at Judean Memorial Garden Chapel, 16225 Batchellors Forest Rd., Olney, MD 20832 Interment to
follow.
Family will be receiving following the services at the late residence. Shiva will be
Wednesday and Thursday 7 to 9 with a
Minyan at 7:30 p.m. Memorial contributions
may be made to Tikvat Israel of Rockville,
MD, Beth Israel of San Diego, CA or charity
of your choice in support of Israel Education
and children.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
HERMINE ELIZABETH BLOUNT (Age 94)
Innovative guitarist co-founded Marilyn Manson
BEN CRANDELL
Of Upper Marlboro, MD, departed this life on
Thursday, October 26, 2017. Celebration of life
will be held at her beloved Tabernacle Baptist
Church, 719 Division Ave., NE, on Saturday,
November 4, 2017, Visitation10 a.m., Service
11 a.m. Services by J.B. Jenkins Funeral Home.
BRITT
ROBERT LEE BRITT (Age 84)
Of King George, VA died peacefully on his farm,
Friday, October 27, 2017. Survivors include his
beloved wife of 51 years, Constance Britt; his
sons, William (Nancy), Christopher (Linda) and
Charles (Christie); his beloved grandchildren,
Kevin, Erin, Ashley, Matthew and Johnathan.
The family will receive friends at Storke Funeral
Home, Nash and Slaw Chapel, 11089 James
Madison Parkway, King George on Friday,
November 3 from 6 to 8 p.m. A funeral will
be held Saturday, November 4 at 2 p.m. in
the funeral home chapel, with burial to follow
in Historyland Memorial Park. Online condolences may be left for the family at
www.storkefuneralhome.com
When the need
arises, let families
find you in the
Funeral Services Directory.
To be seen in the Funeral
Services Directory, please
call paid Death Notices at
202-334-4122.
John was an avid stamp collector and dealer
throughout his life, taking him across the
country and to Europe. At one point, John
owned a stamp business along C&O Canal
in Georgetown, Washington, DC. He was an
active member of American Stamp Dealers
Association and American Philatelic Society.
After his retirement in 1999, John and his
wife moved to Rehoboth Beach, DE, where he
enjoyed cooking, gardening, and travel.
John is survived by his wife of 50 years,
Melinda Chaite of Rehoboth Beach, DE; son,
A. Maurice Chaite of Baltimore, MD; daughter
in law, Cortney (Powell); grandchildren: Maisie
O'Neal and Alexander "Ryce" Chaite; and his
brother, Arthur M. Chaite of Altamonte Springs,
FL.
A Memorial Service will be held on Thursday,
November 2, 2017 at 3 p.m., at Parsell Funeral
Homes and Crematorium, Atkins-Lodge
Chapel, where friends may visit beginning at 2
p.m.
In lieu of flowers, the family suggests contributions in John's memory to Delaware Hospice:
www.delawarehospice.org/donate, or Beebe
Medical Foundation: www.beebemedicalfoundation.org.
FLYNN
THOMAS J. FLYNN
Members of the Alexandria
Retired Police, Fire & Sheriff Association are notified of the death
of Thomas J. Flynn on October 28,
2017.
Kenneth Howard, President
GOLDEN
ALICE V. GOLDEN
On October 23, 2017. Viewing will be held
Wednesday, November 1, 2017, 10 a.m. followed by service 11 a.m. at Beulah Baptist
Church, 5820 Dix St. NE. Interment Maryland
National Cemetery. Arrangements by McGuire.
www.mcguire-services.com
GOON
JOHN GOON
Of Rockville, MD passed away on October 22,
2017 at age 68. John is survived by daughter
Amy Goon (Roy) Monitor; son Martin Travis
(Megan) Goon and grandchildren Zoe and
Romy. He is also survived by brother Lyman
(Donna) Goon and sister Dorleen (Patrick)
Black. A memorial service will be held November 18, 2017, at Rockville United Church, 355
Linthicum Dr., Rockville, MD from 2:30 to 5 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, please send donations to
either WETA Public TV or St. Jude’s Children’s
hospital.
HANNAWALD
DORRIS LORRAINE HANNAWALD
Of Silver Spring, MD passed away on October 26, 2017 at the age of 97. She is
survived by her three children James (Terry)
Hannawald, Karen (Floyd) Van AackenClark, Janice Davis; eight grandchildren and
11 great grandchildren. Memorial service
will be Friday November 3, 2017 at 1 p.m.
at Ashton United Methodist Church, 17314
New Hampshire Ave., Ashton, MD 20861.
In lieu of flowers donations may be made
to the church or to Casey House, 6001
Muncaster Mill Road, Rockville, MD 20855.
HANSON
RAYMOND D. HANSON
Beloved father, devoted husband, concert
pianist and teacher, died peacefully of natural
causes in his home in Heath, Massachusetts
on Thursday, October 26, 2017 at the age of
98. Born October 5, 1919 to David and Martha
Hanson of Evanston, Illinois, Raymond began
studying piano at the age of 12. By the age
of 15, he appeared as a featured soloist with
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Raymond
attended Northwestern University until the
beginning of WWII, and his commitment to
non-violence and peaceful protest led him to
become a Conscientious Objector. This eventually brought him to Middletown, Connecticut.
After the War, in 1945, Raymond met Moshe
Paranov and was offered a teaching job at Hartt
College of Music. While at Hartt, Raymond
worked with the renowned pianist and pedagogue, Harold Bauer, who took him under
his wing and mentored him. Raymond was
promoted to full Professor of Piano and eventually served as Head of the Piano Department
where he remained for over 40 years. Throughout this time, he performed as a soloist with
Hartford Symphony, Boston Symphony and
Boston Pops; performed concerts and world
tours with noted artists such as Roman Totenberg, Pinchas Zukerman, and Elisabeth Schwarzkopf; and he appeared on his own weekly
television program, Piano Pops, with Leonard
Seeber. In addition, he created the piano series
En Blanc et Noir, which featured young and
upcoming pianists. In 1973, he married pianist
Anne Koscielny. For generations thereafter,
their home was a center of laughter and
inspiration for family, friends and students.
Raymond is survived by his children, Krystyn
Kelley (from his first marriage to Cesidia DiPillo)
and spouse, Dana (Maine), Cecile Audette and
spouse, James (Maryland); his grandchildren,
Heather LaCasse, David Veslocki, Michael
Picard, Renee Audette and great grandchildren, Olivia and Drew LaCasse. He is predeceased by his wife, Anne Koscielny; and
two daughters, from his first marriage, Karen
Hanson and Lisa Picard. Visiting hours will be
held on Friday, November 3, 2017 from 4 to
7 p.m. at the Sheehan-Hilborn-Breen Funeral
Home, 1084 New Britain Avenue, West Hartford, CT 06110, and funeral services will be
held on Saturday, November 4, 2017, 10:30
a.m. at the Covenant Congregational Church,
I Westminster Dr., West Hartford, CT 06107.
The Hanson family would like to express their
gratitude for the loving Care Team, the members of the Emergency Firefighter Association,
and Compassus Hospice Care. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the Heath
Firefighter Association, 1 East Main Street, P.O.
Box 45, Heath, MA 01346. Online condolences
may be made at
wwwSheehanHilbornBreen.com
LAURA KOKUS/ SUN SENTINEL
Scott Mitchell Putesky, a.k.a. Daisy Berkowitz, center, with members of Marilyn Manson and the
Spooky Kids in the early 1990s. He co-founded the band with Brian Warner, a.k.a. Marilyn Manson,
second from left. The group shortened its name with the release of “Portrait of an American Family.”
cians, especially, know that the
only good songs and music they
had was when Scott was in the
band,” Elba said. “The first two
records had such interesting
musicality to them, aside from
all the gothness and all that.
Brian may have been a good
lyricist, but the whole music
part of Marilyn Manson was
90 percent Scott.”
Citing “creative differences,”
Mr. Putesky left Manson during
the recording of the band’s 1996
breakout album, “Antichrist Su-
perstar.” He told an interviewer
in 2014 that Manson and Reznor
let it be known that they weren’t
interested in the music he had
composed.
“We had a number of unreleased songs that were contenders for ‘Antichrist’ that [Manson] didn’t want to do or Trent
didn’t want to record, so I was
being slowly muscled out as far
as my contribution,” Mr.
Putesky said. He sued Manson
for royalties from the six songs
he is credited for on “Antichrist
Superstar,” a case settled in
1998 for an amount that wasn’t
disclosed.
In the late 1990s Mr. Putesky
recorded with Fort Lauderdale
alt-rock band Jack Off Jill and
made several releases under the
name Three Ton Gate. Mr.
Putesky also had an associate
degree in advertising design
from the Art Institute of Fort
Lauderdale and had been creating collages and drawings with
markers and colored pencil.
— Sun Sentinel
Because your loved one served proudly...
Military emblems are available with death notices and in-memoriams
To place a notice call 202-334-4122 or 800-627-1150, ext. 44122
C0979 2x3
Scott Mitchell Putesky, a
founding member of the South
Florida goth-rock band Marilyn
Manson and the Spooky Kids
and who used the stage alias
Daisy Berkowitz, died Oct. 22 in
Boca Raton, Fla. He was 49.
He had colon cancer, the Sun
Sentinel of Fort Lauderdale reported.
Known by the name of its
singer, Marilyn Manson, the
band first stirred to life in 1989
as the invention of Mr. Putesky
and Boca Raton resident Brian
Warner. With kooky names and
the kinky brashness of Warner’s
title character, Marilyn Manson
and the Spooky Kids found local
success and then national
prominence beginning with
their 1994 Trent Reznorproduced debut album, “Portrait of an American Family,”
and the 1995 EP “Smells Like
Children.”
While the band drew attention for its theatrical excesses, it
prospered in large part because
of the musical credibility provided by the gleaming, industrial-gear shredding of Mr.
Putesky’s guitar on early Manson songs such as “Lunchbox,”
“Dope Hat” and their hit cover
of the Eurythmics’ “Sweet
Dreams (Are Made of This).”
Rob Elba, who played the
same South Florida clubs in the
early 1990s with his band the
Holy Terrors, said most musically creative songs made by
Marilyn Manson came from Mr.
Putesky.
“He was such an inventive
player. Marilyn Manson has his
fans, and that’s fine, but musi-
BERNSTEIN
BLOUNT
SCOTT MITCHELL PUTESKY, 49
BY
On Thursday, October 26, 2017 of Hollywood, MD, formerly of New Port Richey,
FL. Beloved wife of the late Clifton "Pete"
L. Austin, who affectionately called her
"Monk". Wonderful mother of Bradley C.
Austin and Deborah (Jamie) L. Dudley. Sister
of the late Paul Franklin Simmers, Jr. and
Donna Bengtson. Grandmother of eight;
great-grandmother of seven. Friends may
call at Gasch's Funeral Home, P.A., 4739
Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville, MD on Monday, October 30 from 7 to 9 p.m. A service
will be offered at Colmar Manor Bible
Church, 4110 Newton Street, Colmar
Manor, MD on Tuesday, October 31 at
11 a.m. Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
Memorial contributions may be made in her
name to the American Heart Association,
4217 Park Place Court, Glen Allen, VA
23066.
www.gaschs.com
MAE G. BERNSTEIN
a book reviewer wrote in the
San Jose Mercury News, that
“ ‘Moby-Dick’ is about far more
than a madman’s search for a
whale.” Ms. Juska had revealed
what too many people were
missing.
“I have a girlfriend in the
Midwest who said to me, ‘I want
to hear all about the book, but I
don’t want to hear about the
sex,’ ” Ms. Juska told the National Post of Canada. “I think that’s
because sex is a sad reminder to
some people that they’ve been
without it for so long.”
Jane Murbach was born
March 7, 1933, in Ann Arbor,
Mich., and raised in Archbold,
Ohio, where many of her neighbors were Mennonites. Her father was a doctor, and her
mother was a homemaker.
Ms. Juska received a bachelor’s degree in English from
the University of Michigan in
1955. Her most recent book was
a novel, “Mrs. Bennet Has Her
Say” (2015), a takeoff on Jane
Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice.”
Ms. Juska moved to California in the early 1970s after
divorcing from her husband,
Joe Juska, whom she had married young, and with whom she
said she had little emotional
connection. “The loneliest I
have ever been was when I was
CHAITE
John was raised in Chevy Chase, MD. He
attended George Washington University after
graduating from Brooks School in North
Andover, MA. John proudly served in the US
Army Reserves. He became a home builder
in Northern Virginia, developing several communities in what is now the Oakton-Reston
area, as well as Alexandria, VA. Later in his
career, John transitioned to commercial development and was responsible for many restaurants and retail establishments throughout the
metropolitan D.C. area. John lived for 29 years
in Old Town Alexandria.
EMILY LANGER
identities, if not their anatomy
or habits, were safe with Ms.
Juska; in her memoir, she
changed their names and referred to them by such titles as
“Danny the Priest, Jonah the
Thief, Robert the Liar, Sidney
the Peculiar and Graham the
Younger.”
Like any dater, she had experiences running from the
sublime to the less-than-sublime. In the latter category was
Jonah, an 80-something, who
traveled from the East Coast for
their rendezvous at the Claremont Hotel in Berkeley, which
ended with Jonah stealing Ms.
Juska’s champagne flutes and
silk pajama pants.
At least twice, she said, her
heart was broken. “And I would
like to say that that experience
is no easier at 67 than it is at 17,”
she told NPR. “It’s just at 67, one
has less time to get over it.”
“A Round-Heeled Woman” —
the title referred to the oldfashioned name for a lady easily
tipped into the horizontal position — became a one-woman
play written by Jane Prowse and
starring Sharon Gless, performed in San Francisco, Miami
and London.
The story, however graphic,
was about more than carnal
pleasure, much in the same way,
DEATH NOTICE
Of Rehoboth Beach, DE, passed away peacefully on Thursday, October 26, 2017, at his
home. He was born Friday, August 18, 1939 in
Washington, DC, son of the late Arthur M. and
Miriam (Siegel) Chaite.
Author of frank memoir of later-life sexual pleasures
“Before I turn 67 — next
March — I would like to have a
lot of sex with a man I like.”
So began the personal ad that
Jane Juska, a retired English
teacher living in Berkeley,
Calif., placed in the New York
Review of Books in 1999. Perhaps to reassure more timid
respondents, her offer continued, “If you want to talk first,
Trollope works for me.”
The trysts that followed —
and there were many of them —
became the stuff of her widely
read 2003 memoir, “A RoundHeeled Woman: My Late-Life
Adventures in Sex and Romance.” The subject of national
attention if not titillation, Ms.
Juska became a go-to interpreter of later-life desire, entertaining and perhaps inspiring readers with her spicy spirit.
Ms. Juska, 84, died Oct. 24 at
a care facility in Chico, Calif.
Her daughter-in-law, Mary Juska, confirmed her death but did
not cite a cause.
Ms. Juska, a divorcée, said
she was inspired to take out the
personal ad by “Autumn Tale,” a
1998 film by French director
Eric Rohmer in which a woman
turns to the newspaper to seek a
companion for her middle-aged
friend.
At the time, Ms. Juska estimated she had gone 30 years
without sex, a drought due neither to lack of interest nor of
effort on the dating scene.
“A deep-seated emotion —
desire — unseated itself, rose up
and began to knock insistently
at the door of my sexuality,” the
San Francisco Chronicle quoted
her as writing later. “I wanted to
invite a man into my life. The
problem was that, despite senior hikes, senior birdwatching,
senior mixers, even a couple of
senior dances at a church the
doors of which I had not darkened in over fifty years, I
couldn’t find one.”
Tired of waiting, she turned
to the New York Review of
Books, a venue that she hoped
might attract intellectual men
who shared her love of literature. The eminent literary review proved fertile ground: Ms.
Juska reported receiving 63 replies from men ranging in age
from 85 to 32 — but “a very old
32,” she told CBS News.
Some respondents were
classier than others. One
mailed a picture of himself
wearing sunglasses and nothing else. Ms. Juska did not reply.
In all, the letters yielded
eight or nine dates, which, in
turn, yielded five sexual encounters, she said. Her suitors’
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
JOHN JOSEPH CHAITE (Age 78)
JANE JUSKA, 84
BY
. TUESDAY,
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
DEATH NOTICE
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B7
RE
DEATH NOTICE
IN MEMORIAM
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
HIGGINBOTHAM
SMITH
BLACKWELL
BISCARDI
GORMLEY
LOCKWOOD
DARRELL WAYNE HIGGINBOTHAM
TOMMY D. SMITH (Age 75)
Loving and devoted son of James Clifton, Jr.
and the late Ludella Ida (Haynie) Higginbotham
passed away suddenly Monday, October 16,
2017. He is survived by his father, James, Jr.
and stepmother, Jeanette; son, Daron Pierce;
four grandchildren, Nazeeh, Darionna, Lola and
Breyanna; two brothers, Dennis and James,
III; three sisters, Janice, Monica and Karen;
a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives
and friends. Memorial services will be held
Saturday, November 4, 2017 from 10 a.m. to
12 noon at Forestville New Redeemer Baptist
Church, 7808 Marlboro Pike, Forestville, MD
20747. Online condolences can be made to
www.JBJenkinsFuneralHome.com
Of Beckley, West Virginia passed away Thursday, October 26, 2017 at Bowers Hospice
House of Southern West Virginia after a lengthy
illness. Among his survivors is his wife, Kari
Kay Smith. To read more about Tommy’s life
journey go to www.meltonmortuary.com
STIER
MILLER
RENA K. BLACKWELL
October 31, 1960 – September 11, 2015
MARY W. MILLER
Born August 29, 1919 in Ardmore, PA. Died
October 26, 2017 in Falls Church, VA. Mary was
a long-time congregant at St. Alban’s Episcopal
Church, Annandale, VA. She is survived by her
daughter, Mary M. Taft; and her granddaughters, Catherine A. Taft and Caroline O. Taft
Funeral service and interment will be held
on Sunday, December 10 at 2 p.m. at St.
Alban’s Episcopal Church, 6800 Columbia Pike,
Annandale, VA 22003.
Memorial contributions in lieu of flowers may
be made the Guide Dog Foundation for the
Blind, Inc., 371 East Jericho Turnpike, Smithtown, NY 11787-2976, or to St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 6800 Columbia Pike, Annandale,
VA 22003.
PRITT
FANNIE E. PRITT
On Sunday, October 29, 2017, Fannie E. Pritt of Silver Spring, MD.
Beloved wife of the late Jerome
Pritt; mother of Neil (Kimberly)
Pritt; grandmother of Danielle and
Jacob Pritt. Graveside service and
interment will be held at 1 p.m. on
Wednesday, November 1, 2017 at Mt. Lebanon
Cemetery, Adelphi, MD. Arrangements by
Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home, LLC, under Jewish
Funeral Practices Committee of Greater Washington Contract.
RAKESTRAW
ROBERT W. RAKESTRAW
Of Lansdowne, VA passed away on October
24, 2017. Beloved husband of 55 years to
Shirley V. Rakestraw. Loving father of Sheryl L.
Rakestraw and her husband Helge P. Volden.
He was a retired aeronautical engineer, an avid
motorcyclist, outdoors enthusiast and had a
kind heart. There will be a service at Colonial
Funeral Home in Leesburg, VA on Tuesday
October 31, 2017 at 11:30 a.m. A private
burial will be held at Ebenezer Cemetery in
Bluemont, VA. Mr. Rakestraw is survived by
his wife Shirley, daughter Sheryl, and favorite
and only brother Donald E. Rakestraw. In lieu of
flowers, the family requests a tribute/memorial
gift to the Alzheimer's Association.
www.colonialfuneralhome.com
RHINEHART
RENARD RHINEHART "Rhino"
On Tuesday, October 24, 2017. Devoted husband of Tracy Gray-Rhinehart; loving father of
Kalin Rhinehart and Sean Bullock. He is also
survived by two grandchildren, Sean and Riley
Bullock; one brother/cousin, Kelvin Hatcher
and a host of other relatives and friends.
Visitation Thursday, November 2, 2017 from
9:30 a.m. until hour of service 11 a.m. at Reid
Temple AME Church, 11400 Glenn Dale Blvd.,
Glenn Dale, MD 20769. Interment Heritage
Memorial Cemetery. Services by BIANCHI.
ROY
LELIA ANN ROY
Peacefully on October 26, 2017 at her residence. Survived by her daughter, Brenda Roy
Drennon (Darren) of Manassas, VA; one sister,
Theresa S. Smart (Al) of Dumfries, VA and
one brother, Curtis Smith of Warrenton, VA.
Family will receive friends Friday, November
3, 2017 from 10 a.m. until 11 a.m. service
time at Beulah Baptist Church, 3124 Beulah
Rd., Markham, VA 22643. Dr. Lindsay Green,
Eulogist. Interment Mt. Morris Community
Cemetery, Hume, VA. Online condolences may
be made at
www.joynesfuneralhome.com
SHAW
CARROLL R. SHAW (Age 86)
Took his final breath on the morning of
Wednesday October 18, 2017 in INOVA Fairfax Hospital, after a hemorrhagic stroke late
Monday evening on October 9, 2017.
Carroll was born July 11,1931 to Elsie and
Orlan Shaw and was raised with his brother
Lyle on the family farm in Illinois. After
graduating from high school he was drafted
into the Army and served his country four
years. The Army experience and training
prepared him for a 35 year-long career
with AT&T. Shortly after his retirement he
moved to Sun City Center, FL and practiced
whittling. He also became active in the
community volunteering with Neighborhood Watch, served as President of a couple Community Associations, and he taught
introduction to wood carving classes.
He married Helen E. McNelis in April 1955
and they settled down and raised their
family in Falls Church, VA. Helen passed
in February 1992. Carroll found love and
companionship again in Florida, and he
married Jane LaBate in July 2001. Jane
passed May 16, 2012. Carroll is survived
by his brother Lyle (Marge) Shaw; the five
children he raised with Helen; sons, Edward
Shaw of Culpeper, VA, Michael (Connie)
Shaw of Fairfax, VA, John (Alice) Shaw
of Falls Church, VA; daughters, Barbara
(Mark) Bergstrom of Annandale, VA, and
Susan Shaw of Arlington, VA. Grandchildren
Christopher (Regina) Donovan, Kevin Donovan, Megan Shaw, Erin Shaw (James Sagan),
Andrew (Becca) Shaw, and great grandson,
Blake Donovan. He will also be missed by
many nieces, nephews, the carpool guys,
and good friends he made over the years.
You were designed in the heart of God,
fashioned by His loving Hands
and given to our family as His precious gift.
Happy Birthday in Heaven,
I will miss you and love you forever,
Stephanie
MARY PASCUTTI STIER
Born May 15, 1953 - Died October 23, 2017
Mary Pascutti Stier passed away peacefully,
surrounded by family in Salt Lake City, Utah on
October 23, 2017. Mary was a beloved wife,
mother, sister, and friend who enjoyed nothing
more than spending time with her friends
and family. She loved being in the mountains,
hiking, walking and taking picnics with her
family.
SIGUR
ESTELLE S. SIGUR (Age 93)
Estelle passed away with her family around her
after a short illness on Sunday, October 29,
2017. Beloved wife of the late Gaston J. Sigur
Jr.; mother of Christopher J. (Hannah), Gaston J.
III (Brenda), Paul D. (Suzi), Katherine A. (Craig)
and Thomas P. (deceased). She is survived by
10 grandchildren; six great grandchildren, and
her brother, Walter Smotrys. Estelle enjoyed
a long and full life, moving from her home
in Chicago to become a registered nurse in
San Francisco during World War II, moving to
Ann Arbor to meet and marry Gaston and to
spend the next 45 years accompanying him to
Japan (Okayama and Tokyo) and Afghanistan
in the 1950s and 1960s, before settling in the
Washington area where her husband served in
the National Security Council and as Assistant
Secretary of State for East Asia and the Pacific
in the State Department during the Reagan
Administration.
In addition to keeping her RN status and
volunteering at Suburban and other local hospitals, she supported the Sigur Center named
for her late husband at the George Washington
University, and pursued her passions in painting and bridge. She entertained family and
friends, impressing all with her cooking skills.
She was strong in character, and strong in her
faith. Most importantly, she was a devoted
wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother.
A memorial service will be held at Church
of the Little Flower in Bethesda on Saturday,
November 4, at 11 a.m. Interment will be at
Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.
Memorial contributions may be made to Children’s National Medical Center.
Lea was an artist (acrylic, watercolor and
oil), seamstress, avid gardener, and kept
her home with meticulous care. She loved
crafts and her crafting friends at church.
She was a devoted mother and lived selflessly serving others in Jesus' name. She
is survived by her sisters, Marcella and
Rosetta and her four children and their
families, Gemma Potts (John and Lisa),
Diana Hott (Greg, Jessica and Jonathon,
Christopher and Chealsea and great-grandchildren, Owen, and Grayson), Dr. Frank
Biscardi (Jacqueline, Andrew, and Claire)
and Alessandra Grieco (Stephen and Jason).
Born in Kansas City, MO, Mary was a proud
Royals baseball fan. She moved to Atlanta, GA
as a teenager, eventually residing in Alexandria, VA after college. There Mary served as
a flight stewardess, traveling the world with
Eastern Airlines through the 1970s and 80s.
She was married on October 27, 1984 to
Frederick M. Stier at St. Mary’s Church in
Alexandria, VA. They had two beautiful children
together, Natalie Elizabeth and Arthur Frederick. Always eager to give her time to others,
Mary spent her free time volunteering with
St Mary's Catholic Church and the Woodbine
Nursing Home in Alexandria.
To know Mary was to know a friend for life.
Her warm smile and tinkling laugh brightened
every room, and her grace and openness were
a comfort to all around her. She loved to cook
and her pasta dishes will be greatly missed.
Mary Stier’s funeral service will be held on
Thursday, November 2 at St. Mary’s Catholic
Church in Alexandria, VA at 10:30 a.m. In lieu
of flowers donations can be sent to Catholic
Charities.
The wake will be held at Miller Funeral
Home, Woodbridge, VA on Thursday,
November 2, 2017 from 4 to 8 p.m.
SAMMIE J. HARRIS, III "Ju-Ju"
August 5, 1975 - October 31, 1995
Happy 42nd Birthday!
We miss you and love you,
but God loved you best.
Love, Ma, Sam, Luciana, Family & Friends
The Funeral Mass will be held on Friday,
November 3, 2017 at 11 a.m. at Holy Family
Church. Interment is a Quantico National
Cemetery at 1 p.m. The family suggests in
lieu of flower that you make a contribution
to the building fund at Holy Family.
DUNN
LaCURTO
Survivors include her husband Frederick M.
Stier, MD; daughter, Natalie E Stier; son, Arthur
F. Stier; siblings: Judy Fuller (Rusty), Paul Pascutti (Barbara), John Pascutti (Carol), Jane
Smith (Patrick), James Pascutti (Sally); and
sister-in-law Margaret Ann Storch.
MILDRED MAE GORMLEY "Millie"
(Age 98)
Of Cambridge, Maryland passed away on
Wednesday morning, October 18, 2017 at University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at
Dorchester.
Born on January 3, 1919 in Philadelphia, PA she
was a daughter of the late Eugene and Mae
Baker.
Millie attended the local schools in Philly and
graduated from Lynnhurst High School. She
then attended Glassboro State College where
she earned her Bachelor’s Degree in education.
After graduation Millie and her best friend
opened a nursery school called Woodland
School in Plainfield, New Jersey.
She then taught school in Montgomery County
at the Rocking Horse Elementary School and
retired after 35 years of teaching.
Millie married Robert C. Gormley in 1982 and
soon after, relocated to the Eastern Shore
from Rockville, Maryland. Mr. Gormley died on
February 23, 2013.
She was a member of the Garden Club, Grand
National Waterfowl Scholarship Committee,
Yacht Club and previous board member of the
YMCA.
Anyone who knew Millie loved her and she will
truly be missed by all.
Surviving her is her son Norman Welch of
Ocean City, MD; grandsons Preston Scot Welch
and Gregory Byron Welch; great grandchildren
Tori and Tyler Welch; sister, Barbara Pelzner
and caregiver and devoted friend Lorie Walter.
Preceding her in death besides her parents
and husband was a brother Edgar Baker and a
sister Margie Ehmann.
A Celebration of Life will be held on Sunday,
November 12, 2017 from 2 until 6 p.m. at
Millie’s home, 6043 Corners Wharf Road, Cambridge, MD 21613.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can
be made in Millie’s name to Grand National
Waterfowl Association Educational Trust Fund,
P.O. Box 106, Cambridge, MD 21613, Dorchester County YMCA 201 Talbot Avenue, Cambridge, MD 21613 or the Dorchester Garden
Club Scholarship Fund, c/o Kathe Scanlon,
5705 Morris Neck Road, Cambridge, MD 21613.
Arrangements entrusted to Newcomb and
Collins Funeral Home, P.A., Cambridge, MD.
To share online condolences with the family,
please visit
www.newcombcollins.com
PETER VAN NORDEN LOCKWOOD
Of Washington, DC, passed away on October
24, 2017, at his home, after a long illness. He
is survived by his wife of 43 years, Lee; his
son, John; his daughter, Lizzie, a brother, John;
sisters, Eleanor and Susan; and a host of first
cousins. Born in New York City, Peter was
raised in St. Louis, MO. He attended Harvard
College, and Harvard Law School, graduating in
1966. Following a clerkship for Judge Bailey
Aldrich on the U.S. Court of Appeals for
the First Circuit, in 1967 Peter became one
of two clerks for U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Thurgood Marshall, in that Justice’s first term.
Peter then joined the Washington law firm
of Caplin & Drysdale, where he enjoyed a
multifaceted practice until retirement in 2016.
Peter will be remembered for his trenchant wit,
his tremendous intellect, and his bottomless
generosity. He loved the out-of-doors, especially hiking and diving. A special source of
pride was the role he played in co-founding
an environmental group, Clean Water Action
in the 1970’s, and which is still going strong
today. He will be missed by all who knew him.
A time to share favorite memories of Peter will
be held at a future date.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
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JONES
TALBERT
GEORGE F. TALBERT
On Saturday, October 28, 2017, of Gambrills,
MD, formerly of Bowie, MD. Beloved husband
of Emma L. Talbert and the late Edna Talbert;
loving father of Barbara Graham (Stephen),
Christopher Talbert (Deborah) and the late
Linda, Donna, Patricia and James. Dear brother
of Elizabeth Dumas, C. Richard Talbert and the
late James R. Talbert. Loving grandfather of
six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.
Family will receive friends on Wednesday,
November 1, 2017 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6
to 8 p.m. at the family-owned BEALL FUNERAL
HOME, 6512 NW Crain Hwy. (Rte. 3 South),
Bowie, MD. A Funeral Mass will be held at
Sacred Heart Chapel, 16501 Annapolis Rd.,
Bowie, MD, on Thursday, November 2, 2017 at
11 a.m. Interment at Sacred Heart Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers donations may be made
to Hospice of the Chesapeake, 90 Ritchie
Highway, Pasadena, MD, 21122. Please view
and sign the family’s guestbook at:
www.beallfuneral.com
TALBERT
GEORGE F. TALBERT
The members of the DC Fire Fighters Association, Local 36 and the
Retired Firefighters of Washington regret to announce the death
of retired Brother GEORGE F. TALBERT on October 28, 2017. Brother TALBERT was appointed to the Department
on April 16, 1950 to Engine 18 and retired
on June 1, 1974 as a Captain from Truck
11. A viewing will be held at Beall Funeral
Home, 6512 NW Crain Hwy., Bowie, MD on
Wednesday, November 1, 2017 from 2 to 4
p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Funeral Services will take
place at Sacred Heart Chapel, 16501 Annapolis
Rd., Bowie, MD on Thursday, November 2, 2017
at 11 a.m. Interment to follow at the Chapel.
RAYMOND EUGENE DUNN "Gene"
(Age 93)
JOSEPH LaCURTO
October 5, 1940 - October 31, 2007
It’s been ten years. While we have many good
memories, we can’t help but think of how
different life would be if you were still here. You
would have seen your two children graduate
from college. Mike’s high school lacrosse teammates would still be getting emails with job
leads from you. You would probably want to
drive Amanda to work every day, and you
would have taken over her football fantasy
league with great success. We would all be
driving better cars, and you would have kept
them clean with the gas tanks filled! You
would have calmed me down about changes at
EPA, and I would do the same to you for NASA.
You would have had ten more heartbreaking
ice hockey seasons. We would have gone as
a family to the Outer Banks every year. Our
dogs would be slavishly devoted to you. If
you had moved with me to my town house
community, you would know every neighbor,
their children’s names and where they went to
school. We miss you terribly, but we still smile
at how unique and special you were.
Phyllis, Mike and Amanda
DEATH NOTICE
On October 28, 2017, of Asbury
Methodist Village, Gaithersburg,
MD, joined hands once again with
his late wife, Alberta V. Hood, as they began
to walk down memory lane together. He
was a loving father to Susan Diane Dunn of
Gaithersburg, MD, Richard Eugene (Darrylin)
Dunn of Myrtle Beach, SC, and Robert Russell
(Nicole) Dunn of Longwood, FL. Predeceased
by daughter Lynda Jean Dunn in 1997. He was
also the beloved "Poppy" to grandchildren
Kimberly Dee (Matt) Jones of Lake Forest
Park, WA, Kasey Christine (Evan) Downey
of Norwalk, CT, and Alexander Ronan Dunn
of Longwood, FL; and great-granddaughter
Natalie Quinn Jones of Lake Forest Park, WA.
Visitation to be held Tuesday, October 31, from
2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m., and Wednesday,
November 1, from 2 to 4 p.m. at DeVol Funeral
Home, 10 E. Deer Park Dr., Gaithersburg, MD.
A Masonic Lodge ceremony will be held for
Brother Dunn on Tuesday afternoon. Private
interment at Mt. Olivet Cemetery in Frederick,
MD, on Thursday, November 2.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions be made to the Asbury Benevolent
Care Fund, 201 Russell Ave., Gaithersburg, MD
20877.
A special memorial celebration of Gene's life
and laugh is planned for a later date. Online
guestbook at
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
BERRY
ELLIS
WEST
TRUDY WEST #1131
Members of the Prince Georges County Police
Retired Association are notified of the passing
of Sister Trudy West on October 28, 2017. Our
heartfelt sympathy to her family and friends.
WILSON
Of Laurel, MD fell into eternal rest October
19, 2017. She was a professor emeritus of
Delaware State University, adjunct professor
Howard University and worked for the department of social services for Washington, DC. She
is survived by a loving family. Please join them
Wednesday at People’s Community Baptist
Church, 31 Norwood Road, Silver Springs,
MD for an hour of Visitation Starting at 10
a.m. and a memorial celebration at 11 a.m.
with Dr. Haywood A. Robinson, officiating. If
you’re unable to join them please do so via
livestream through “tpcbc.org “click worship
online button. In lieu of flowers make contributions to St. Jude Children’s Hospital.
WINSTON
SUSAN LEHRER JONES (Age 73)
Of Chevy Chase, MD died peacefully from
cancer on October 29, 2017. Surviving are her
husband, David Jones of Chevy Chase, MD; her
sons Morgan and Cooper, her daughters-inlaw Annie and Maureen, and her grandchildren
Abigail and Crosby.
Susan was born on June 2, 1944 in Brooklyn,
NY and grew up on Long Island, NY with her
parents Frieda and Morton Lehrer, and her
sister Randy. She graduated with a BS from
Cornell University in 1965 and received a MSW
from New York University in 1968. She lived her
life with great intention and purpose -- which
permeated her diverse fields of psychology,
entrepreneurship, and education. She practiced psychotherapy in Washington, DC for
40 years, later expanding her career path
to include educational consulting at Dunbar
and app development as co-founder of
Quad2Quad.
Her wit, humor and intellectual energy were
infectious. When she was in your presence,
there was never a dull moment. Susan would
light up a room and make strong connections
with everyone she met along the way. Her
friends and family would certainly agree: she
was not only a force of nature – she was The
Force.
Susan poured so much of her heart into
her family. From her husband David to her
sons Morgan and Cooper, to her grandchildren
Abigail and Crosby, she mindfully set intentions
and goals for each of them – whether they
liked it, or not. Her humor, her drive, and
her indomitable spirit will forever be missed.
Dr. SHIRLEY ITENSIL WILSON
JEANETTE LUCAS BERRY
Dr. ANDREW J. ELLIS, DDS (Age 85)
On Tuesday, October 24, 2017
beloved wife of James D. Berry,
Sr. Loving mother of Carolyn
J. Green, Cynthia B. Clarke
(Russell), James D. Berry, Jr.
(Maria) and Stanley D. Berry (Julietta). She
is also survived by grandchildren, Stephen,
Staci, Lisa, Danielle, Nichole. Stanley, Jr., Santino, Ornella, Tiziana and Rachel; She is also
survived by siblings, Lucy Lucas, Alex P. Lucas,
Jr. (Michelle) and John Lucas (Rosie); a host
of great-grandchildren; other relatives and
friends. On Thursday, November 2 the visitation will be held from 10 a.m. until hour
of service 11 a.m. at Turner Memorial AME
Church, 7201 16th Pl. Hyattsville, MD Interment Ft. Lincoln Cemetery Condolences to:
www.Pridgenfuneralservice.com
On Saturday, October 28, 2017,
of Olney, MD. Beloved husband
of the late Carol Ann Ellis; father
of Andrew J. (Maria L.) Ellis, Jr.,
Cathleen M. (Brian J.) McNamara,
Patricia A. (Stephen H.) Long, Amy
E. (Robert C.) Rohan, and John P.
(Ingrid Ventura) Ellis; brother of Emory (Jean)
Ellis, Jr. Also survived by 18 grandchildren.
Relatives and friends may call at St. Peter's
Church, 2900 Sandy Spring Road, Olney, MD,
Wednesday, November 1, 2017, from 10 to
11 a.m. where Mass of Christian Burial will
be celebrated at 11 a.m. Interment Gate of
Heaven Cemetery. Memorial contributions may
be made to The National Children's Oral Health
Foundation or the Little Sisters of the Poor.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
A memorial service will be held on Friday,
November 3 at 2 p.m. at Temple Sinai on
3100 Military Rd NW, Washington DC. In lieu of
flowers, memorial donations may be made to
the League of Women Voters (http://lwv.org/)
or to Temple Sinai (http://www.templesinaidc.org/donate).
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
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YOUR LOVED ONES
December 17, 2017
OWEN-WEBSTER
A Celebration of Life will be held 10:30
a.m. Friday, November 3 at The Lake House,
11450 Baron Cameron Ave., Reston, VA
20190. The family will lay him to rest with
Helen on Saturday, November 4 in St. James
Cemetery, Falls Church at 11 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations can be made
to the Sun City Center Emergency Squad,
720 Ray Watson Drive, Sun City Center, FL
33573. POC Marty Gifford 813-633-1411,
ext. 414; or the charity of your choice.
HARRIS
LEA SONIA BISCARDI
1935 - 2017
Passed away on October 26, 2017. Lea
Sonia Massarese was a devoted Roman
Catholic and a survivor of WWII. She was a
Montessori teacher who married Salvatore
Frank Biscardi in 1957 and immigrated to
the United States of America in 1959. She
left her hometown of Palermo, Sicily and
her parents, Ugo and Ursolina Mazzarese,
and her siblings, Angelo Mazzarese, Rosetta
Sammarco, Marcella Lo Cascio and Mapy
Brai.
her death. That same year, she entered
private practice in a tax and international law
firm named Surrey and Morse (later Surrey,
Karasik and Morse). She became a partner
in the firm in 1968 and rose to become its
president. In 1975, Marguerite and another
partner, Michael Nussbaum, left to form their
new firm of Nussbaum and Owen in Washington, D.C. (which later became Nussbaum,
Owen and Webster). She left that firm in 1990
during the savings and loan crisis to take
the first of three government positions, all of
which involved financial matters. From 1990
to 1995, she worked as an attorney with the
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. She
then served as Deputy General Counsel of
the DC Financial Control Board, which was
chartered by Congress to take control of
District of Columbia financial matters at a
time then the District government DC was
close to insolvency.
TIMOTHY JEROME WINSTON (Age 65)
On Tuesday, October 24, 2017, Timothy J.
Winston of Fort Washington, MD passed away
at Holy Cross Hospital, Silver Spring, MD. He
leaves to cherish his memories a loving wife,
Aliece Shivers-Winston; children, Tomika Winston, Nicole Winston, Ebonique Shivers and
Jamal Shivers; 10 grandchildren, four sisters
and brothers, Kay Wilson, Marion Jackson
(Esther), Jacqueline Shuler, Michael Winston
(Connie); a best friend Michael Davis, and a
host of relatives and friends.
Family will receive friends on Wednesday,
November 1, 2017 at Ebenezer AME Church,
7707 Allentown Road, Fort Washington, MD
20744 at 9:30 a.m. until the time for services at
10:30 a.m., Pastor Grainger Browning officiating. Interment Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery,
Cheltenham, MD. Arrangements by J.B. Jenkins
Funeral Home, Inc.
WOLFE
ELEANOR RUTH WOLFE
We report with great sadness that Eleanor
passed away in her home on Tuesday, October
17, 2017. She is preceded in death by her
husband of 63 years, Howard Dale Wolfe;
parents, Frank and Sylvia Shomo; brother,
Robert (Bob) Shomo; sister, Doris Whittall. Survived by her sons, Gary (Kim), Glen (Marlene),
and Roger (Diana); sisters Virginia Saunders,
Mary Talbott, and Nancy Fullerton. Also eight
grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and
a host of nieces and nephews. Eleanor was
a long time resident of Vienna and a well
known piano teacher in the area. She was
a lifetime member of the Wesley United
Methodist Church in Vienna. A celebration of
Eleanors life will be held on Friday, November 3
at 11 a.m. at Wesley United Methodist Church,
711 Spring St. Vienna, VA. In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made to Wesley UMC. The
online guestbook is available at:
www.moneyandking.com
MARGUERITE S. OWEN-WEBSTER
Of Oxford, Maryland died peacefully at home
in her sleep, without pain, on October 14,
2017. She was born at the Women's and
Children's Hospital in Washington, DC on
September 1, 1938.
In her home at the time she died (7:37
p.m.), she was surrounded by members of
her family. Present were her two brothers,
Ted and Steve Schimpff; Ted's wife Alice;
Ted and Alice's son Dr. Scott Schimpff, a
physician from Jacksonville, Florida, whose
practice focuses on pain management, who
came to Oxford to minister to Marguerite
in the final days of her life, and who kept
her pain free; Scott's wife Gina; Marguerite's
husband, David Webster; David's son Steven
and his wife Lora.
Marguerite was brought up in College Park,
Maryland, attended local public schools, and
graduated from Northwestern High School
in 1956. She entered Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York, as a freshman that September and graduated Phi Beta Kappa four
years later with a Bachelor of Arts Degree.
Her education continued at Yale Law School
ending in 1963 with a law degree. During her
law school career, she was elected to the
Yale Law Journal and to the Order of the Coif,
both of which are academic honors.
Marguerite took and passed the DC Bar in
1963 and was a member of the bar until
After five years as Deputy General Counsel,
she became the General Counsel (and sole
employee) of the Emergency Loan Guarantee
Board, a new entity chartered by Congress,
which administered three government loan
guarantee programs in the airline, steel, and
oil and gas industries, all of which were
suffering economic problems at the time.
The three loan guarantee programs were
overseen by the Chairman of the Federal
Reserve Board, Washington, DC.
Marguerite was active in the DC Lawyers'
Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, serving
as the group's Co-Chair, on its Board of
Trustees, and as Trustee Emeritus. She
retired fully from law practice in 2007 and
lived in Oxford, Maryland until her death.
A private interment will occur at the Oxford
Cemetery. A funeral service, open to the
public, will be held on Saturday, November
4, 2017, at 2 p.m. at The Church of the Holy
Trinity at 502 South Morris Street in Oxford,
Maryland, followed by a Celebration of Her
Life at the Tred Avon Yacht Club, 102 West
Strand, also in Oxford.
In lieu of flowers, donations to honor Marguerite may be made to The Church of
the Holy Trinity Mission Fund, P.O. Box 387,
Oxford, Maryland.
For online tributes, please visit
www.fhnfuneralhome.com
TheWashington Post Magazine will publish
an Annual Commemorative Section.
Plan to be a part of this annual tradition!
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Mostly sunny
Expect another somewhat cool but
delightful fall day. Mostly sunny,
with highs in the upper 50s to lower
60s and winds from the northwest
about 10 mph. For trick-or-treaters,
there’s no precipitation anywhere close by to
think about. Temperatures will drop through the
50s in the early evening and into the 40s for the
western suburbs by 8 p.m., with winds turning
lighter. Overnight, most spots should dip into the
frosty 30s, except areas downtown, which
probably settle around the low 40s.
Today
Mostly sunny
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Wednesday
Shower
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Thursday
Mostly cloudy,
warmer
Friday
Partly sunny,
shower
Saturday
Partly sunny,
cooler
Sunday
Shower
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
60° 43
58° 50
71° 58
76° 52
60° 53
65° 56
FEELS*: 60°
FEELS: 57°
FEELS: 70°
FEELS: 77°
FEELS: 60°
FEELS: 64°
CHNCE PRECIP: 10%
P: 55%
P: 10%
P: 55%
P: 25%
P: 60%
WIND: WNW 7–14 mph
W: SE 6–12 mph
W: S 6–12 mph
W: SSW 6–12 mph
W: NE 6–12 mph
W: E 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
NATION
Hagerstown
55/36
Sa
High
Low
Normal
Record high
Record low
Baltimore
58/36
Dover
60/41
Washington
60/43
F
Weather map features for noon today.
Philadelphia
57/40
Harrisburg
54/34
FORECAST
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
60° 3:32 p.m.
45° 2:48 a.m.
64°/46°
82° 1996
26° 1873
59° 2:43 p.m.
43° 1:00 a.m.
64°/40°
84° 2016
20° 1969
57° 4:00 p.m.
44° 3:00 a.m.
63°/41°
83° 2016
26° 1965
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +5.6° yr. to date: +3.2°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 67°
Ocean City
62/46
OCEAN: 63°
Lexington
58/38
Richmond
64/42
Norfolk
66/50
Virginia Beach
66/48
Past 24 hours
OCEAN: 67°
Total this month
Normal
Total this year
Kitty Hawk
65/52
OCEAN: 68°
Normal
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
Moderate
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.85"
2.02"
3.29"
33.10"
33.41"
1.11"
3.15"
3.14"
37.90"
35.06"
1.07"
2.99"
3.22"
35.18"
35.10"
Moon Phases
UV: Moderate
Solar system
3 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, mostly sunny. High 42–46. Wind west
8–16 mph. Tonight, increasingly cloudy. Low 30–34. Wind
south–southwest 6–12 mph. Wednesday, mostly cloudy,
shower. High 45–49. Wind south 7–14 mph. Thursday,
partly sunny. High 55–59.
Atlantic beaches: Today, mostly sunny. High 60–66. Wind
west–northwest 7–14 mph. Tonight, partly cloudy. Low
41–50. Wind north 6–12 mph. Wednesday, partly sunny.
High 61–71. Wind east–southeast 7–14 mph. Thursday,
partly sunny. High 70–75. Wind south 6–12 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly sunny. Wind west–
northwest 4–8 knots. Waves 1 foot. Visibility unrestricted. • Lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, mostly sunny. Wind west–
northwest 7–14 knots. Waves 1 foot on the lower Potomac, 1–2 feet
on the Chesapeake Bay.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls
will be about 5.1 feet, rising to 5.3 feet on Wednesday. Flood stage
at Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
Washington
5:19 a.m.
12:17 p.m.
5:50 p.m.
none
Annapolis
2:25 a.m.
8:53 a.m.
3:00 p.m.
9:06 p.m.
Ocean City
4:52 a.m.
10:59 a.m.
5:13 p.m.
Norfolk
12:38 a.m.
6:50 a.m.
1:05 p.m.
7:16 p.m.
5:04 a.m.
10:59 a.m.
5:11 p.m.
11:06 p.m.
Point Lookout
ACTUAL
Cape May
60/44
Annapolis
59/43
Charlottesville
63/38
Today’s tides
RECORD
°
Th
REGION
AVERAGE
11:28 p.m.
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Needles, CA 89°
Low: Angel Fire, NM 14°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
53/34/pc
60/43/c
43/29/pc
70/49/s
63/50/r
58/36/s
53/38/c
69/52/s
44/29/pc
57/37/pc
58/41/s
46/34/sh
54/36/r
74/50/s
52/31/pc
69/44/s
50/36/c
43/31/pc
45/30/pc
45/33/pc
59/48/r
51/40/sf
Tomorrow
50/41/pc
71/45/s
40/30/s
72/54/pc
80/62/sh
55/46/c
44/26/r
68/58/pc
48/26/pc
63/35/s
54/48/pc
48/39/pc
51/42/pc
77/59/s
52/46/sh
72/52/pc
66/36/pc
49/45/c
48/44/r
51/43/c
78/62/pc
72/39/pc
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
43/31/pc
45/32/pc
71/52/c
32/22/pc
37/27/pc
57/33/s
85/74/sh
74/63/pc
44/33/pc
75/55/s
76/50/s
43/31/pc
80/58/pc
57/41/pc
70/60/pc
50/36/s
58/45/pc
79/66/pc
43/31/pc
37/28/pc
57/41/s
77/62/pc
56/43/s
66/50/s
52/43/pc
49/43/c
78/54/pc
30/19/pc
44/27/sn
55/42/pc
87/73/t
80/68/t
50/44/r
71/63/c
79/58/pc
55/48/pc
79/57/s
60/56/t
68/58/pc
52/50/r
63/61/t
81/69/pc
48/44/c
42/34/sn
63/56/c
77/66/c
55/50/pc
71/56/pc
THE REGION
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
53/38/r
43/32/pc
75/57/s
57/40/s
82/62/pc
46/29/pc
57/35/s
60/43/s
59/37/s
67/44/s
65/35/s
64/42/s
71/46/s
47/37/pc
87/77/pc
58/42/pc
69/62/sh
66/51/pc
86/77/pc
59/46/s
49/36/pc
49/33/pc
76/59/s
45/34/r
70/52/pc
59/40/pc
78/62/pc
56/51/c
83/62/s
46/42/r
52/42/s
57/44/c
57/46/pc
71/51/c
72/39/s
67/49/c
69/46/s
52/49/c
86/76/pc
70/48/s
69/60/pc
66/53/s
86/75/s
54/43/sh
49/33/c
48/40/pc
79/63/pc
60/46/pc
World
High: West Roebuck, Australia 113°
Low: Verkhoyansk, Russia –36°
Nov 4
Full
Nov 10
Last
Quarter
Nov 18
New
Nov 26
First
Quarter
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Rise
7:34 a.m.
4:25 p.m.
6:09 a.m.
4:51 a.m.
7:15 a.m.
11:18 a.m.
Set
6:08 p.m.
3:19 a.m.
5:29 p.m.
4:49 p.m.
6:01 p.m.
8:50 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
75/48/pc
Amsterdam
55/51/r
Athens
67/53/pc
Auckland
67/57/pc
Baghdad
85/60/s
Bangkok
89/75/c
Beijing
60/39/pc
Berlin
47/44/c
Bogota
66/47/sh
Brussels
51/42/pc
Buenos Aires
77/58/s
Cairo
81/66/pc
Caracas
74/66/pc
Copenhagen
51/48/c
Dakar
89/78/s
Dublin
58/47/c
Edinburgh
57/51/sh
Frankfurt
50/41/c
Geneva
53/36/s
Ham., Bermuda 78/73/sh
Helsinki
34/22/pc
Ho Chi Minh City 86/75/t
Tomorrow
75/48/pc
57/48/pc
65/50/pc
66/58/pc
87/65/s
86/75/pc
63/40/s
53/46/sh
67/48/r
57/45/pc
76/61/pc
80/64/pc
74/66/pc
56/48/sh
90/80/s
56/43/pc
55/39/c
54/42/pc
60/40/pc
79/72/sh
35/32/pc
84/75/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
78/70/pc
84/58/pc
54/42/s
69/58/pc
81/53/s
78/40/pc
86/79/pc
84/69/pc
87/78/c
69/61/pc
74/59/s
57/46/pc
67/49/s
87/76/sh
74/55/t
51/31/pc
37/30/sn
95/77/s
80/55/pc
88/65/s
43/34/pc
49/28/sh
52/38/s
46/38/c
81/71/s
84/57/s
54/45/s
68/54/c
83/54/s
75/41/s
86/79/pc
85/68/s
88/78/c
68/61/c
71/60/c
59/43/c
69/51/c
82/78/sh
75/57/pc
48/40/pc
32/23/sf
97/76/s
79/60/pc
87/64/s
44/38/sh
46/33/r
57/46/c
47/43/sh
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
83/69/c
93/63/s
67/45/pc
86/68/t
75/46/pc
46/24/pc
64/50/s
64/52/c
84/74/t
39/32/pc
68/54/c
74/67/c
77/56/s
61/52/c
47/33/pc
48/36/sh
44/36/pc
74/66/c
92/63/s
66/45/s
86/69/pc
70/51/pc
51/30/s
66/51/c
71/56/s
85/78/c
46/42/sh
68/59/c
81/70/s
75/56/pc
67/54/pc
48/39/pc
50/39/pc
48/46/c
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
MARYLAND
Local women look to keep marching Graduation requirements revised
Detroit convention
offered guidance for
their next steps
BY
State school board delays
higher standards set last
year for high schoolers
P ERRY S TEIN
detroit — Some attended because they didn’t know what else
to do for the movement. Others
made the trip from Washington
to Detroit to strategize what their
roles should be in helping Democrats win in 2018. And some
women just wanted to network
with other progressive activists
from across the country.
Dozens of women from the
District, Maryland and Virginia
joined thousands of activists this
past weekend at the Women’s
Convention in Detroit — a gathering that served as a next step
after the massive women’s
marches around the world on
President Trump’s first full day in
office.
While the marches served as
an emotional and fiery rebuke to
Trump, organizers say the weekend convention was intended to
instruct people on what they can
do to propel the “resistance”
movement.
Kristina Romines, a D.C. resident and a field director at Women’s Action for New Directions,
said that she is plugged in to the
robust activism scene in the nation’s capital and that the convention allowed her to broaden connections with women elsewhere.
Romines’s organization, which
aims to empower women to reduce violence and militarism,
sent her to the convention so she
could return with collaborative
ideas.
“In D.C., we think we are the
center of the universe, all this
policy going on, and it’s really
exciting to see all this grass-roots
energy that’s not from the regular
players,” said Romines, who collected phone numbers, business
cards and social-media handles
from many women she met. “I
think the connections made here
are going to birth something
powerful.”
At the three-day convention —
themed “Reclaiming Our Time”
after the viral words of Rep.
Maxine Waters (D-Calif.) — panel
BY
RACHEL WOOLF FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Adrianne Burke, center right, who owns a social-justice-themed
yoga studio in Richmond, attends the convention in Detroit.
discussions included “How to Organize a Protest/Rally in Less
Than 24 Hours!” and “Lawyering
for Gender Equity in the Age of
Trump.” Other sessions instructed women how to run for office.
The women wore shirts with
feminist mantras such as “The
Future is Female.” Some donned
the pink, knitted triangular hats
they wore at the Women’s March
on Washington named in defiance of the president’s infamous,
lewd comments captured in a
2005 “Access Hollywood” tape.
They gave standing ovations
during speeches from Sens. Amy
Klobuchar (D-Minn.) and Kirsten
Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) as they spoke
about the history of American
feminism and the importance of
getting women to run for office.
During lunchtime Saturday, they
joined Waters in a booming chant
of “Impeach 45.”
Adrianne Burke, who recently
moved from the District to Richmond and opened a socialjustice-themed yoga studio, said
she went to the convention to
learn how self-care and healing
play into this era of heightened
social activism.
She sat on a panel in front of a
packed audience, saying she was
motivated to incorporate more
conversations and volunteer opportunities around progressive
issues into her BareSoul yoga
studio.
“That’s what we need in the
movement,” she said. “Take time
to refuel, so we can get back to
work.”
She also attended a panel on
environmental problems in poor
neighborhoods and wanted to
know what she could do to help
rebuild these communities. “At
what point do we stop fighting
and start re-creating?” she asked.
A panelist gave her the idea to
start a community organization
that works to revitalize a neighborhood. She said she might just
do that.
“My question with the march
has always been, ‘What’s next?’ ”
Burke said. “And this is what’s
next.”
Women from Virginia ensured
that other activists were aware of
the stakes in the commonwealth’s
Nov. 7 gubernatorial election.
Nancy Stalnaker of Sterling,
Va., recently started a business to
help political candidates create
databases of potential voters and
donors. She paid $1,500 in travel
and admission costs and came to
the convention in search of clients. The registration fee to attend the convention was $295 per
person and $125 for those under
25, though some scholarships
were offered.
“There’s a lot of interest here,”
she said. “I’m hoping I get enough
clients that I can pay for the trip
here.”
Romines said that the weekend left her hopeful and empowered but that it was also fun.
“You imagine the future you
see, and you make new friends
and build it with them,” she said.
“What’s not to love about that?”
perry.stein@washpost.com
LIZ BOWIE
Sixth-graders this year will
be the first Maryland students
who must meet tougher passing
standards on statewide high
school English and math exams
to graduate in 2024.
The new standard set by the
Maryland State Board of Education last week pushes back
more aggressive requirements
put in place about a year ago.
Board members said they had
little choice, given that about
60 percent of students are
failing the tests.
“The challenge is to find the
right balance between a target
for high school graduation that
is rightly ambitious . . . and a
target that is, frankly, fantasy,”
school board member David
Steiner said.
Some educators, including
Steiner, are worried that even
once the new standard takes
effect, many of the state’s students will be unable to earn a
diploma or will use an alternative method to graduate.
need to score a 3 or better on
the Partnership for Assessment
of Readiness for College and
Careers — PARCC — tests in
Algebra I and 10th-grade English to be eligible to graduate.
The PARCC tests are scored
on a scale of 1 to 5. A score of 4
is considered passing and indicates that a student will be
ready to do college-level work
or to get a job that can sustain a
family. A score of 5 is considered advanced.
In passing the new standard,
the school board reversed a
decision last year that would
have gradually raised the raw
score needed to merit passing
the test each year.
For many years, students
have also needed to pass American government and science
tests.
The Maryland State Education Association, a union representing the majority of the
state’s teachers, doesn’t support such high-stakes testing as
a bar for graduation.
“Educators strongly disagree
with tying PARCC scores to
graduation requirements,” said
Betty Weller, the union’s president. “We know that a student’s
PARCC score is not an accurate
reflection of their educational
experience or ability to contribute to society.”
“Educators strongly disagree with tying PARCC
scores to graduation requirements.”
Betty Weller, Maryland State Education Association president
“It is an aspirational standard at this point, and it is a
heavy lift,” said Russell Brown,
chief accountability officer for
the Baltimore County school
system, who welcomed the
deadline’s delay.
Brown said current sixthgrade students will be better
prepared for the standardized
tests because they will have had
more years learning under the
Common Core curriculum. Introduced statewide in 2013, the
curriculum is more difficult
than past standards.
Until 2024, students will
She said that the PARCC test
is “an arbitrary standard that
was set by a private testing
company.”
State school board members
debated for several months
whether to allow students to
graduate with a score of 3
rather than 4.
Steiner said most states, like
Maryland, have a high school
graduation rate above 80 percent. But only 40 percent of
Maryland students could pass
the PARCC tests.
“So you are looking at a
40-point gap,” Steiner said.
Even if students made enormous progress in the next six
years, he said, it would be hard
to imagine 80 percent of students passing the tests.
Andrew Smarick, president
of the state school board, voted
against the new proposal. He
said parents should understand
that earning a diploma with a
score of 3 on the exams may
mean their children aren’t
ready for college.
He said the board voted to
examine whether the state
ought to award two different
diplomas, one for students who
pass their tests with a 4, and a
second for students who simply
pass their high school courses.
Smarick said there is no
consensus on the board about
the possibility of such a twotiered diploma.
They agreed only to look at
what other states are doing.
Some school board members
are concerned that two different diplomas could lead to
tracking of low-income students into fewer high-level
classes.
The board also decided to
scrutinize students’ use of a
“bridge project” to graduate if
they don’t pass the tests. The
alternative path to graduation
has been available for years.
It requires students to do a
project under the supervision
of a teacher that proves they
have learned the concepts that
are being tested. About 35 percent of the state’s graduates
complete a bridge project.
A number of school board
members said they believe the
projects require less of students.
Smarick said nearly everyone
on the board is “worried or
upset about just how many
kids, especially in the low-income districts, are graduating
with bridge projects. . . . Members are pretty alarmed.”
Steiner said he believes that
students will gradually begin to
live up to the higher standard,
but until that time the board
cannot set the bar too high.
“Politically,” he said, “it is not
conceivable in any state that a
high school graduation rate
would go below 70 percent.”
— Baltimore Sun
KLMNO
Style
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
SU
C
THE RELIABLE SOURCE
CAROLYN HAX
MUSIC REVIEW
KIDSPOST
See how much ground you can cover in
five minutes with Amber Tamblyn. C2
Daughter wants boyfriend to sleep over.
Answer should reflect who you are. C3
Steven Osborne’s Messiaen marathon
of strength and tenderness. C8
Around the world, cultures have special
days to commemorate the dead. C8
BOOK WORLD
Sylvia Plath
letters add
a valuable
postscript
BY
P AUL A LEXANDER
Many who see
Sylvia Plath may have died at
the age of 30, but in her short life
she produced an enormous body
of writing. She wrote a radio play,
a children’s book, dozens of short
stories and numerous incidental
pieces of journalism and memoir.
She started two novels and published a third, “The Bell Jar,” now
regarded as a coming-of-age classic. She wrote more than 200
poems. Gathered into her “Collected Poems,” which posthumously won a
1982 Pulitzer
Prize,
they
showcased her
as a master of
the
“confessional” style.
She also kept
an extensive
journal
and
carried on voluminous corTHE LETTERS
OF SYLVIA
respondence
with a range of
PLATH
family memVolume 1:
bers, friends
1940-1956
and business
By Sylvia Plath
contacts. It has
Edited by Peter
K. Steinberg and fallen to Plath
experts Peter
Karen V. Kukil
K. Steinberg
Harper. 1,424
and Karen V.
pp. $45
Kukil to gather
Plath’s correspondence into “The Letters of
Sylvia Plath,” a collection so
mammoth it will be published in
two volumes. Volume 1, covering
1940 to 1956, is being released
now. Volume 2, covering 1957 to
1963, will appear next October.
Often using vivid and compelling language, Plath addresses
many topics in her letters — from
politics and literature to her
education and love life to her
own unbridled literary ambitions
and her plans to achieve them.
The sheer quantity of the letters
— Volume 1 runs to more than
1,300 pages — is as impressive as
their quality. “I am in awe of her
output,” Frieda Hughes, her
daughter, writes in a foreword,
“and the way in which she recorded so much of her life so that
it was not lost to us.”
The letters begin in 1940, when
Plath was 8, with notes to her
parents, Otto and Aurelia. They
go on to document her youth in
Wellesley, a quaint town outside
Boston where she grew up in a
“cozy little ‘matchbox.’ ” Tellingly,
Plath almost never mentions the
apparitions,
real or
imagined, make
accommodations
WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION; ISTOCK
T
hey saw her only once. That was
before Linda Roberts-Antinoro and
her husband, Mike Antinoro, had
moved into the historic stone house
surrounded by sloping hills and a scenic
stream.
As they visited the Baltimore County property on a blustery afternoon in January 1990
and stood gazing at the locked and empty
home, they noticed a shadowy figure in the
window above the front door.
Linda didn’t say anything. Her husband
was a New York City firefighter, a no-nonsense
type of guy. It’s probably just reflections of
trees, Linda told herself. But then Mike turned
Happy
to host
ghosts
BY
to her, perplexed: “Did you just see something
in the window?” She felt a chill.
During the more than 25 years they lived
there, they grew accustomed to the occasional
sound of footsteps above them when no one
was upstairs, or the inexplicable relocation of
a candle from the fireplace mantel to other
corners of the room.
And — well, that’s the whole story. Linda
and Mike never actually saw their ghost
again.
For all our delight with horror films and
supernatural folklore, the rather underwhelming truth about many real American
C AITLIN G IBSON
GHOSTS CONTINUED ON C2
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C8
NBC cuts ties with Halperin
in wake of harassment claims
BY
P AUL F ARHI
The last major piece of political journalist Mark Halperin’s
mini-empire crumbled on Monday as NBC News terminated its
contract with him following reports last week that he had
sexually harassed multiple women.
Halperin, 52, will no longer
work for NBC or its sister cable
network MSNBC, a network
spokesman confirmed. He had
been a senior political analyst on
NBC and a semiregular guest on
MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”
Until last week, Halperin was
the star of multiple projects involving his political reporting
and commentary. But the allegations against him have caused his
media partners to sever their
agreements and dissociate themselves from him, leaving him
without any professional affiliation.
HALPERIN CONTINUED ON C3
LGBT advocates denounce
Spacey’s response to claim
BY A MY B W ANG
AND E LAHE I ZADI
STEPHEN LOVEKIN AND ROBYN BECK/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Anthony Rapp, left, accused Kevin Spacey of sexual misconduct.
For a few hours after Sunday’s
bombshell BuzzFeed story in
which actor Anthony Rapp alleged Kevin Spacey had made a
sexual advance toward him when
Rapp was just 14, Spacey remained silent.
Then, at precisely midnight,
the veteran actor posted a twoparagraph statement on Twitter.
In the first paragraph, Spacey
said he was “beyond horrified” to
hear Rapp’s story but that he did
not remember the 1986 encounter, which would have taken
place when Spacey was 26. However, he added, “if I did behave
then as he describes, I owe him
the sincerest apology for what
would have been deeply inappropriate drunken behavior, and I
am sorry for the feelings he
describes having carried with
him all these years.”
SPACEY CONTINUED ON C3
PHOTOS BY MARY ELLEN MATTHEWS
PREVIEWS BEGIN TONIGHT.
BOOK BY
MUSIC BY
LYRICS BY
DIRECTED & CHOREOGRAPHED BY
TINA
JEFF
NELL
CASEY
FEY RICHMOND BENJAMIN NICHOLAW
NOW THROUGH DECEMBER 3 ONLY
THENATIONALDC.COM
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
5 minutes with
Amber Tamblyn
I don’t want
him to fail.
I want him
to succeed.
I do. I
honestly do.”
Amber Tamblyn is busy. Busting up the
patriarchy is hard work — but she’s here for
it, in person and on Twitter (despite a short
mental-health break from the latter). In the
past week alone, Tamblyn, whom you may
remember from her role in “Sisterhood of
the Traveling Pants” or as one of the
sounding bells in Hollywood’s reckoning
with sexual harassment, appeared on panels
at the Women’s Convention in Detroit and
onstage at the Kennedy Center and then
later spoke at Planned Parenthood’s Pink
Ball in Northeast. No wonder she planned
on grabbing a “hard scotch” at some point
while in town. We caught up with the 34year-old actress before that drink.
Q: You’ve been involved with Planned
Parenthood for more than a decade. Why?
A: There’s literally no other organization like
them that does what they do. In the climate
of the country that we live in right now, it’s
more important than ever to support them.
Q: Speaking of that climate, you recently
took a Twitter break . . .
A: Rose McGowan was the one actually who
was like, ‘Go unplug and recharge and come
back. We need you.’ Over time, it takes its
toll. But just because I took a break off of
Twitter doesn’t mean I’m not keeping the
ball rolling in other ways quietly.
Q: Is this a watershed moment?
A: Absolutely. To me the watershed moment
wasn’t even when Donald Trump was
elected. It was during the debate when
Donald Trump brought up the women who
Bill Clinton had had affairs with to sit in
EVAN AGOSTINI/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
front of Hillary Clinton as though that was
a measure of her character and her grace,
and as a way to demean her. That, to me,
changed everything.
Q: How so?
A: I was also seven months pregnant,
carrying a girl. So the experience of
watching that was so meta for me. That
moment in history fundamentally changed
me. I can never unsee a man in power doing
something to a woman like that that is so
aggressive and so awful. It forever turned me
Actress Amber
Tamblyn says
candidate
Donald Trump
tried to demean
Hillary Clinton
by inviting her
husband’s
accusers to a
debate: “That,
to me, changed
everything.”
— Actor Bryan
Cranston on his
hope for the Trump
administration in
an interview with
the Hollywood
Reporter. The
“Breaking Bad”
star once joked
that he’d move to
Canada if Donald
Trump was
elected president.
(Has anyone
actually done
that?)
into the person I am today, which is just
someone who won’t be silenced.
Q: In the letter you wrote to James Woods,
who you said hit on you when you were 16,
you mention the word “hope” several times.
Do you have it?
A: I am of the mind that everyone’s anger
right now is relevant. People need to be able
to feel, and we can all come back together
later on the other side of it and see who we
are. So I do have hope on the other side of
everything.
Bryan Cranston
HEY, ISN’T THAT . . .?
Common, real name Lonnie
Rashid Lynn Jr., hanging out in
Reston on Sunday night?
The actor/rapper, who’s no
stranger to the District (he was a
regular guest of the Obama
White House), was spotted
dining at PassionFish in Virginia.
The Oscar winner was in town for
the Washington West Film
Festival, which blends
philanthropy and cinema, to
discuss his short film “Black
America Again.”
According to our tipster,
Common was in a party of eight
that included some of the
Chicago native’s family members
(no word on whether his
rumored girlfriend, CNN political
commentator Angela Rye, was
there, too). The group sat down
for a quiet dinner (no selfies).
The previous night, another
Hollywood heavyweight was out
DANNY MOLOSHOK/INVISION/AP
RICHARD SHOTWELL/INVISION/AP
Common
Tina Fey
and about in the DMV. Actress,
comedian and executive
producer Tina Fey and her
husband, Jeff Richmond, dined
at Mastro’s on Saturday night.
Fey and Richmond were
spotted out at the downtown
restaurant enjoying a quiet date
night before their new musical
“Mean Girls” premieres at the
National Theatre on Tuesday
night. Fey wrote the book, and
Richmond composed the music.
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
The couple, according to our
tipster, noshed on steak and
potatoes and topped off their
meal with cake.
Fey should be a regular A-list
sighting in town while “Mean
Girls” cycles through its preBroadway run in Washington
through Dec. 3. Last week, the
“Saturday Night Live” alumna
dined at Ocean Prime with
former boss Lorne Michaels, one
of the musical’s producers.
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
About 45% of Americans believe in ghosts, poll shows
GHOSTS FROM C1
ghost stories is that they’re just a
wee bit . . . boring. Too subtle or
ambiguous, really, to become the
stuff of legend. Yet these are the
most ubiquitous: Most of us
know someone who thinks they
once saw something.
About 45 percent of Americans
believe in ghosts, according to a
2013 Huffington Post and YouGov
poll; Pew research shows that
18 percent of American adults are
convinced that they’ve seen or
been in the presence of a spirit.
Colin Dickey, author of “Ghostland: An American History in
Haunted Places,” and his wife
host annual ghost-story parties.
“Everybody’s a bit skeptical, until
the first couple of stories come
out,” he says, “and then everybody seems to have a story. That’s
kind of the enduring popularity
of this genre, because for so many
MD (301) 841-6897
people, they have, somewhere in
their history, something they
can’t quite explain, but yet don’t
want to dismiss out of hand.”
Ashley Jones, a 28-year-old arborist from Gaithersburg, is one
of them. She grew up as one of 15
cousins who spent a lot of time at
her grandmother’s historic farm
on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.
As a child, she often slept in a
front room of the farmhouse.
That’s where she once woke in
the middle of the night and
glimpsed a whitish, translucent
figure of a man striding past her,
wearing a uniform-like suit and a
top hat. On another occasion, she
awakened to see the same apparition, this time accompanied by a
ghostly woman in a long gown.
On both occasions, she says, she
forced herself to close her eyes
and go back to sleep, convinced
that it must have been a lingering
fragment of a dream.
DC
(202) 897-3737
“I didn’t want to be seen as the
nut in the family, so I didn’t bring
it up to anyone,” Jones says.
But things kept happening in
the house, she says — a Christmas
train set that suddenly started
running without anyone turning
it on, the sound of creaking stairs
when no one was walking on
them. Then one of her younger
cousins, who had slept in the
same front room of the house,
announced one morning that she
woke in the night and saw a pale,
shimmering man sitting on the
hearth, wearing a top hat.
“My stomach dropped,” Jones
recalls. “There was no way, with
nobody knowing what I saw, that
she would come up with that
exact same outfit for the guy.”
Jones never knew the exact
history of her late grandmother’s
farmhouse, which was sold last
year, or the identities of residents
who might have lived there long
VA (703) 382-6844
ago.
But Dickey thinks many ghost
stories are ultimately fueled by
our curiosity about those who
have gone before us — that
hauntings ultimately reveal more
about the person who perceives
the phantom than the phantom
itself.
“If it’s a house where there’s
not a famous haunting — maybe
it’s not a well-known property,
and yet it’s been around since the
19th century and has changed
hands a number of times — I
think there is for many of us this
sense of wanting to feel connected to that past,” he says. “We want
a connection to a history that we
perceive but feel is just out of
reach, and ghosts are a really
common way for us to express
that.”
In some cases, that history is
more clearly defined. Fay Hobbs
Manthey has always known that
her home, an apartment on the
third floor of a historic building
on North Fairfax Street in Old
Town Alexandria, was the setting
of a tragedy in 1879. Laura Schafer died there on her wedding
day, when the embers of a fire set
her gown ablaze as she dressed
for her ceremony. The building,
which Manthey has owned for 15
years, is a popular stop on local
ghost tours.
Other visitors — and especially
tenants in the commercial space
downstairs — have reported a
slew of bizarre experiences:
strange noises, whooshing air,
extreme coldness or heat.
And yet, Manthey has never
witnessed any of that herself.
“I don’t doubt that Laura’s
here, I really don’t,” she says. “It’s
just a gut feeling, and because I
know the history.”
Jennifer Cornell, who works in
business development in Orlando, is similarly certain that the
former resident of her rented
1920s-era bungalow is still
around. A neighbor across the
street told Cornell all about Ella,
the elderly widow who had lived
and died in the house in the late
1960s, even sharing photographs
of the kindly former schoolteacher.
That helped Cornell make
sense of certain inexplicable phenomena in Ella’s former home.
JENNIFER CORNELL
“I’ve already told
Ella that she can
come with me if
she wants.”
Jennifer Cornell, who sold her
Orlando house, above, which
is set for demolition. Cornell
believes that the spirit of Ella,
a former resident who died in
the house in the late 1960,
gently haunts the abode.
Cornell once watched a heavy
bath towel swing wildly on a
hook, “but there wasn’t a draft in
the house,” she says. Her dogs
would sometimes pace and stare
in an empty backroom, as though
they were watching someone.
Lights would occasionally shut
off for no discernible reason.
But Cornell found all of this
oddly comforting: “I’ve always
felt protected here,” she says.
Now, the house has been sold and
will soon be demolished, and
Cornell is thinking of moving to
New York. “I’ve already told Ella
that she can come with me if she
wants,” she says.
Last fall, Linda and Mike bade
farewell to their own allegedly
haunted house, retiring to another home in Maryland. The
property is still on the market,
Linda says; when it sells, she will
pass along the records she’s kept
about the original owners of the
house, who are rumored to have
offered shelter to runaway slaves
on the underground railroad. As
for the less tangible aspects of the
house’s history — Linda hopes a
prospective buyer won’t be
thwarted by the possibility of a
benign, if supernatural, presence.
Linda’s skeptical husband
once devised his own test to
determine whether there truly
was an all-knowing spirit hanging around.
“He left a Powerball ticket out,
with a pencil,” she says, “but the
ghost never filled it out for him.”
caitlin.gibson@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
C3
RE
Spacey’s response to sexual misconduct claim prompts ire
SPACEY FROM C1
Then, in the second paragraph, Spacey came out as gay.
“This story has encouraged me
to address other things about my
life,” he wrote. “As those closest
to me know, in my life I have had
relationships with both men and
women. I have loved and had
romantic encounters with men
throughout my life, and I choose
now to live as a gay man. I want
to deal with this honestly and
openly and that starts with examining my own behavior.”
His late-night statement outraged many, particularly in the
LGBT community, who accused
Spacey of trying to deflect a
serious accusation — making a
sexual advance on a minor — by
coming out and implying that it
was his choice to be gay. For
years, the actor has danced
around rumors he had relationships with men.
“Coming-out stories should
not be used to deflect from
allegations of sexual assault,”
GLAAD president Sarah Kate
Ellis said in a statement. “This is
not a coming-out story about
Kevin Spacey, but a story of
survivorship by Anthony Rapp
and all those who bravely speak
out against unwanted sexual advances.”
In an essay for the Daily Beast,
Ira Madison III called Spacey’s
decision to come out of the closet
“cold and calculated.”
“There’s never truly a wrong
time to come out and I’d never
begrudge anyone for accepting
their sexuality,” Madison wrote.
“But the seediness of using your
coming out to deflect from a
sexual assault allegation is something else entirely.”
“Kevin Spacey really tried to
throw the entire LGBT community under a bus and call it
solidarity in an effort to mask his
personal failings,” tweeted activist DeRay Mckesson.
Even worse, some said, was the
implication that coming out as a
gay man might be related to
possibly making inappropriate
sexual advances toward a minor.
“Conflating those things is disgusting,” tweeted film critic
Richard Lawson. “This exposes
DIA DIPASUPIL/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Actor Anthony Rapp says he was 14 when Kevin Spacey made
sexual advances toward him at a party at Spacey’s home.
the gay community to a million
tired old criticisms and conspiracies.”
Soon, Twitter was flooded with
memes from people who were
equally dumbfounded and an-
gered by Spacey’s approach to
the allegations. Some criticized
Spacey for seeming to qualify his
apology with the fact that he was
drunk at the time of the alleged
encounter with Rapp.
“Nope,” author and LGBT activist Dan Savage tweeted, adding that “there’s no amount of
drunk or closeted that excuses or
explains away” such alleged behavior.
Rapp told BuzzFeed he was in
Spacey’s apartment for a party,
and that at the end of the night,
Spacey picked him up, placed
him on a bed and climbed on top
of him. The two had met through
the Broadway community, when
Rapp was starring in “Precious
Sons” and Spacey was in “Long
Day’s Journey Into Night.”
Reports detailing allegations
of ongoing sexual harassment
and abuse by movie mogul Harvey Weinstein prompted Rapp to
speak publicly about Spacey; he
had told close friends about the
encounter throughout the 1990s
and 2000s, BuzzFeed reported.
“I came forward with my story,
standing on the shoulders of the
Halperin posted apology
online for past actions
HALPERIN FROM C1
A dozen women have accused
Halperin of unwanted contact,
including assault, while he was
political director at ABC News
over a period from 1994 to 2004.
HBO said last week it was
dropping a miniseries based on
“Game Change,” the best-selling
book series about presidential
campaigns that Halperin co-authored with John Heilemann.
Showtime has dropped Halperin
from “The Circus,” a show about
the 2016 campaign and the
Trump administration, and Penguin Press has scrapped plans to
publish Halperin’s book about
the 2016 campaign.
NBC’s decision to terminate
Halperin’s contract makes permanent a preliminary announce-
ment last week from the network
saying he would not appear on
NBC pending a review of the
allegations.
In a statement posted on Twitter on Friday, Halperin wrote, “I
am profoundly sorry for the pain
and anguish I have caused by my
past actions. I apologize sincerely
to the women I mistreated.”
He added, “Toward the end of
my time at ABC News, I recognized I had a problem. . . . I was a
selfish, immature person, who
was behaving in a manner that
had to stop. For several years
around my departure from ABC
News, I had weekly counseling
sessions to work on understanding the personal issues and attitudes that caused me to behave in
such an inappropriate manner.”
Halperin said he did not en-
PAUL MORIGI/GETTY IMAGES FOR SHOWTIME
Mark Halperin on Showtime’s “The Circus,” which also severed ties with the political journalist.
gage in such “outrageous” behavior in subsequent jobs at Time
magazine, Bloomberg News, NBC
News and Showtime.
The statement appeared on
Halperin’s Twitter feed just below
a pinned tweet from March showing photos of his infant son.
NBC disssociated itself from
many courageous women and
men who have been speaking
out, to shine a light and hopefully
make a difference, as they have
done for me,” Rapp said on
Twitter after Spacey’s statement.
“Everything I wanted to say
about my experience is in that
article, and I have no further
comment about it at this time.”
A Netflix representative confirmed Monday the upcoming
sixth season of “House of Cards,”
which stars Spacey, would be the
show’s last, but said its cancellation was decided months ago, not
in response to Rapp’s allegations.
Beau Willimon, the creator of
“House of Cards,” released a
statement Monday calling Rapp’s
story “deeply troubling.”
“During the time I worked
with Kevin Spacey on ‘House of
Cards’ I neither witnessed nor
was aware of any inappropriate
behavior on set or off,” Willimon
said. “That said, I take reports of
such behavior seriously, and this
is no exception. I feel for Mr.
Rapp and I support his courage.”
amy.wang@washpost.com
elahe.izadi@washpost.com
Halperin at almost the same time
Monday that one of the women
who accused him of harassment,
Eleanor McManus, appeared on
NBC’s “Megyn Kelly Today” to
discuss her allegations against
him. McManus, a former TV
producer, said Halperin tried to
kiss her “and to do a bit more”
when he invited her to a meeting
in his office in the late 1990s. At
the time, she was a college student.
She told host Megyn Kelly that
she regretted remaining silent
about the encounter because her
silence had enabled Halperin to
accost other women.
Emily Miller, a journalist who
has alleged that Halperin sexually assaulted her, said in an
interview Monday that she was
“thrilled” to see McManus go
public with her accusation so
that potential future victims are
protected. “It’s not coincidental
that NBC finally cut his contract
right before one of his victims
went on NBC,” Miller said.
paul.farhi@washpost.com
Daughter wants boyfriend to have sleepover benefits
Adapted from a
recent online discussion.
Dear Carolyn:
My daughter is
home from
college and wants
her boyfriend
from another
state to visit . . . including
sleepover benefits. I have
younger kids at home. What do
you suggest?
— Sleepless
Carolyn
Hax
Sleepless: Figure out now what
you believe, top to bottom,
including what rules you’ll have
for the younger kids when they
get older.
Too often we act reflexively,
declaring that kids shouldn’t see
X or be permitted Y because
that’s what everyone says and it
seems right so ya, okay. But
situations like yours are good at
forcing us to prioritize our
values, beliefs and enforcement
thereof.
What message do you want to
send your younger kids — that
no unmarried adults can ever
share a room? Or is it just adults
who are your children? Or just
adults still under your
household umbrella (e.g., under
age XX and/or accepting tuition
money) — and you wouldn’t
presume to tell their unmarried
45-year-old Aunt Susie she can’t
share a room with her partner?
Will whatever rules you make
now hold up later for your
youngest, with no younger sibs
around?
Or do you want your message
to be that adults have agency to
make these decisions, and your
younger kids will, too, when
they’re old enough to handle the
consequences of these decisions
themselves?
If it’s the latter, are they old
enough to have a nuanced
conversation about this? Or,
alternately, are you ready to
choose not to explain, except to
say that the rules evolve as
people get older, and you’ll talk
about it when they’re older, too?
Of course you can just say it’s
your home, your rules — heads
of households have that
prerogative. And some people
really do find black and white to
be the best colors for their
parental worldview.
But people with comfortably
gray value systems often go
black-and-white in discrete
situations just because it’s easier
to do that than it is to come up
with a more nuanced, grayfriendly solution that stands up
over time and remains
applicable in many different
scenarios. And I think copping
out like that tends to come back
to bite people when future gray
situations come up.
So, yeah. What’s your
message? That’s my message.
Re: Sleepless: There are plenty
of reasons they might want to
share a room that don’t involve
sex — for instance, meeting your
significant other’s family is a
stressful experience, and there’s
always the opportunity for
misunderstandings. Having a
shared room lets your daughter
and her boyfriend talk these
issues out together in privacy. If
they’re both still in college, they
might not be able to afford to
get a hotel room. It might even
be a big deal for him to travel to
SunSuitesSunrooms
Lifetime
Warranty
see your family.
They’re doing a nice thing by
reaching out to you in this way.
Do you want to feel welcoming?
If not, there should be a really
good reason for it, not just one
that you can articulate, but
which is backed up by your
values and the way you’ve
always lived your life.
— Perspective
Re: Sleepover: This is a hard
issue to face given the physical
and emotional negatives of
casual sex. Isn’t this a big
consideration?
— Anonymous
Anonymous: Sex between
adults in an established
relationship isn’t “casual sex.”
So, no.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
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EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
Television
TV HIGHLIGHTS
10/31/17
BYRON COHEN/ABC
Fresh Off the Boat (ABC at 8:30) A death in the family takes the Huangs
to Houston, where Louis tries to encourage a reconciliation between
Jessica (Constance Wu) and her father (guest star Ping Wu).
The Middle (ABC at 8) Mike asks
Sue to plan a celebration for his
and Frankie’s 25th wedding
anniversary.
Finding Your Roots (WETA and
MPT at 8) Scarlett Johansson, Paul
Rudd and John Turturro learn about
their immigrant ancestors.
This Is Us (NBC at 9) The tearjerker drama flashes back to a
Halloween that changed everything
for the big three.
The Mayor (ABC at 9:30) Courtney
struggles to reach a deal with the
transit union amid a strike.
Leah Remini: Scientology and
the Aftermath (A&E at 10) The
actress sits down with two of her
longtime friends to discuss the
effects Scientology had on their
childhoods.
Law & Order True Crime: The
Menendez Murders (NBC at 10)
Lyle and Erik Menendez take the
stand in the latest installment of
this eight-part miniseries.
Drop the Mic (TBS at 10:30)
“Dawson’s Creek” alum James Van
Der Beek battles “Fresh Off the
Boat” star Randall Park. New
England Patriots tight end Rob
Gronkowski goes up against “Jane
the Virgin’s” Gina Rodriguez.
streaming) The streaming giant
brings this popular Australian
baking series stateside.
SPECIAL
Judah Friedlander: America Is
the Greatest Country in the
United States (Netflix streaming)
The comedian tackles a wide range
of politically charged issues in this
stand-up special.
RETURNING
Major Crimes (TNT at 9) Season 6.
LATE NIGHT
Conan (TBS at 11) JB Smoove,
Whitney Cummings, Joel Kim
Booster.
Daily Show (Comedy Central at 11)
Gretchen Carlson.
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Millie Bobby
Brown, Kelly Clarkson.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Mark
Ruffalo, Chris Matthews, Gilbert
Gottfried.
Kimmel (ABC at 11:35) Kristen
Bell, Dave Grohl, Alice Cooper.
Corden (CBS at 12:37) Allison
Janney, Nancy Pelosi, Laurence
Fishburne, Iliza Shlesinger.
Meyers (NBC at 12:37) Anthony
Bourdain, Aya Cash, Todd Barry.
— Bethonie Butler
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In-laws’ donations to college have parent asking: What about your grandkids?
Ask Amy
Dear Amy: My
husband and I
are parents to
AMY
three college-age
DICKINSON
children. All three
are good students
who attend flagship state
universities. Of course, as
parents, we think they are great
and well-rounded young adults.
They have never given us a lick
of trouble and have no trouble
speaking and holding
conversations with other adults,
teachers, bosses, etc.
We own our own home and
drive old cars but still struggle
to pay our kids’ tuition. We have
saved money since our children
were small to help defray their
university costs, but even with
the kids each taking $5,000 per
year in loans it is still a struggle.
My in-laws have always
recognized birthdays and
Christmas with modest gifts,
and they always compliment us
on how we raised them. That’s
the problem!
We recently became aware
that the in-laws have given tens
of thousands of dollars to a local
junior college foundation!
We are hurt terribly by this,
as it seems to us that they would
rather give to kids they don’t
even know than support their
own grandkids’ educations.
(They also give to multiple
animal charities.)
They are in their early 80s,
and, although they seem to be
relatively sane, we think they
are being taken advantage of.
Without coming across as
greedy, how could we approach
this?
Wondering
Wondering: Inquiring about
this isn’t greedy. Judging your
in-laws’ financial decisions does
make you sound greedy,
however.
You and your spouse could
approach the in-laws with a
proposition: Perhaps they would
be willing to invest in your kids’
educations by offering these
students no-interest loans, so
that they could complete their
educations without owing
money (and interest) to an
outside entity.
Upon completing their
educations, the grandchildren
could repay the loans directly to
their grandparents, or (if the
grandparents chose) directly
into a charity the grandparents’
chose.
Approach this with the very
clear understanding that they
have the right to make any
financial decision they choose to
make — even if you don’t like it.
Investing in the educational
future of deserving local
students seems like a wise and
generous choice for them to
make. If you could put your
children in this category, they
might be willing to expand their
investment.
Dear Amy: I could use advice in
helping my 6-year-old with
attention-seeking.
An example: After dance
class, my daughter walked up to
her teacher. The teacher skipped
over her and disregarded her to
talk to another student’s
mother.
After a while, I asked my
daughter if she wanted to leave.
She said no.
We waited in the lobby. The
teacher walked right past us and
left!
My girl said, “. . . but I waited
patiently!”
I was crushed for her! She
just wanted to tell her teacher a
joke, but the teacher didn’t care!
I’m torn between anger at the
teacher and wondering how to
better teach social cues to my
daughter.
What do you suggest?
Curious Mom
Curious Mom: Your daughter
did everything right: She had
something to share, and she
waited patiently for her
opportunity. But the
opportunity didn’t present itself.
But please don’t blame the
teacher for missing her own
teacher cues during this
particular encounter.
Sometimes teachers are
swamped after class and simply
don’t continue to focus their
attention onto the little ones
(although they should).
This should not be a crushing
blow for either of you, but more
of a “Dang! That’s frustrating!”
situation. You could ask your
daughter to strategize about
how she can get her teacher’s
attention before or after the
next class to share her joke. She
might want to write it down and
put it in an envelope to give to
her instructor. She could also
get there a little early and say,
“Excuse me, can I tell you a
short joke?” while the other
students are changing their
shoes.
Your daughter deserves eye
contact, a moment of
undistracted attention and an
appreciative smile from her
teacher. I hope she gets it.
response to “Concerned Dad,”
the man who didn’t want his
brother-in-law to bring his gun
into the dad’s household. I
assume you’ve caught a lot of
heat for being so passionately
anti-gun, but I appreciated it.
Another Concerned Dad
Another Concerned Dad: Yes —
I am completely anti-gun when
it comes to young children,
because research clearly shows
that kids are at great risk
around firearms.
And because I believe in a
person’s individual rights and
freedom, this includes their
right not to have guns brought
into their household.
Amy’s column appears seven days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Write to askamy@amydickinson.com
or Amy Dickinson, Tribune Content
Agency, 16650 Westgrove Dr., Suite
175, Addison, TX 75001. You can
also follow her @askingamy.
© 2017 by Amy Dickinson distributed by
Dear Amy: Thank you for your
Tribune Content Agency
THEATRE
Shear Madness
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This wildly popular interactive comedy whodunit keeps
the audiences laughing as they try to outwit the suspects
and catch the killer. New clues and up to the minute
improvisation deliver “the most fun I ever had at the
Kennedy Center.” (Arch Campbell ABC News)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Great Group Rates
for 15 or More
MUSIC - CONCERTS
First Wednesday Concert
with Brent Erstad,
organist
Wednesday, November 1st
from 12:10-12:45 p.m.
Organ recital titled “For All the Saints,” with works by
Alain, Bach, Duruflé, & Shearing
Thursday at 7
Saturday at 8
Former NSO Music Director Leonard Slatkin leads two
Bernstein compositions: the lively fanfare Slava! A Political
Overture and Songfest, a tribute to American perspectives and
writers. He concludes with Stravinsky's legendary ballet score
The Rite of Spring. Part of Leonard Bernstein at 100
St. John’s Church, Lafayette Square
at the corner of 16th & H Streets NW
Washington, D.C. 20005
( 202) 270-6265
Free
The church is
fully wheelchair
accessible
MUSIC - ORCHESTRAL
Slatkin conducts
Bernstein /
Stravinsky's “The
Rite of Spring”
Kennedy Center
Concert Hall
nationalsymphony.org
or call (202) 467-4600
ForeWords, with Ted Libbey
Beginning at 6:45 p.m. before the Sat., Nov. 4 performance.
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
Does this page look familiar? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
AfterWords postconcert discussion
immediately
following the Thu.,
Nov. 2 performance.
16-2898
NF407 6x.5
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Higher-octane gas doesn’t
mean a car will run better
Dear Heloise:
Hints from What does octane
Heloise
rating mean?
Would my car
benefit from a higher-octane
gasoline?
Dana B. in Michigan
Dana B. in Michigan: First,
follow the owners manual to find
out the best gasoline for your car.
According to the Federal Trade
Commission (ftc.gov), there is no
advantage to using a higheroctane gasoline than what’s
recommended for your vehicle,
unless you hear “engine knock,”
which happens rarely.
Higher-octane gas does not
clean your engine, and it won’t
make your car run better. Most
vehicles use fuel with an octane
rating of 87; that’s typically the
lowest rating.
Luxury and sports cars usually
require a higher-octane gas — this
will be stated in the paperwork
for the vehicle.
Cindy M.: Easier to grip, too!
Dear Heloise: I work in a beauty
Dear Heloise: I’m ashamed to
salon. It is one of the best places
to find referrals for workmen,
house cleaners, doctors and
anything you need. I pass on what
I hear, good and bad, knowing we
all have opinions.
June W., Hot Springs Village, Ark.
admit that I failed to take my
phone out of my trousers before
putting them in the laundry. I lost
my pictures, stored data, etc.
What I’ve done to solve the
problem is to tape a red-lettered
note to the washing machine start
dial that says “cellphone.”
Ron N., Alexandria, Va.
Dear Heloise: To be sure that I
don’t use a toothbrush on my
teeth that is designated for
household cleaning, I wrap a
rubber band around the handle.
Cindy M., Post Falls, Idaho
Dear Heloise: I can’t keep up a
diary, but I love the idea of
sharing experiences with our
children and grandkids. Each
January, I pull out the previous
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 2:15-7:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 5:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
1:20-7:10
American Made (R) CC: 1:504:45-7:40
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 12:45
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 1:00
The Snowman (R) CC: 4:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 6:45
It (R) CC: 12:30-4:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 12:303:35-6:45
The Foreigner (R) CC: 4:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
2:00-4:35-7:10
Jigsaw (R) CC: 8:00
All I See Is You (R) CC: 2:105:00-7:40
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:503:40-6:30
Suburbicon (R) CC: 1:30-4:10-6:50
Thank You For Your Service (R) CC:
1:45-4:30-7:20
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) CC: 2:00-4:40-7:15
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience
(R) 1:45-4:30-7:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:40
It (R) 7:15
AMC Loews Uptown 1
3426 Connecticut Avenue N.W.
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 4:00
It (R) CC: 7:30
AMC Mazza Gallerie
5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!) 2:20-5:00
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 7:40
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
CC: 1:10-3:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:20-3:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
2:10-4:40-7:20
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 7:00
Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 12:30-3:005:30-8:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:30-4:207:10
Thank You For Your Service (R) CC:
(!) 12:50-4:50-7:30
Albert Einstein Planetarium National Air and Space Museum
6th Street and Independence Ave SW
To Space and Back 11:00AM
Dark Universe Space Show (NR)
11:30-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30-4:30
Journey to the Stars (NR) 12:001:00-2:00-3:00-4:00-5:00
The Stars Tonight (NR) 10:30AM
Angelika Pop-Up
at Union Market
550 Penn St NE - Unit E
Psycho (R) 7:00-7:40
Suburbicon (R) CC: 12:00-1:302:30-3:45-4:45-7:00
Wind River (R) CC: 2:00
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13)
CC: 11:45-4:30
Lucky (2016)11:30-6:00
Avalon Theatre
5612 Connecticut Avenue
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 11:152:00-4:45-7:30
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 12:15-2:455:15-8:00
Landmark
Atlantic Plumbing Cinema
807 V Street, NW
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 12:20-2:405:00-7:30-9:55
It (R) CC: 1:40-4:25-7:10-9:50
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:30-3:157:15-9:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:0012:45-3:30-6:45-7:00-10:15
Suburbicon (R) CC: 12:15-2:454:00-5:10-7:30-10:00-10:15
Landmark E Street Cinema
555 11th Street NW
The Paris Opera (L'Opera) (NR)
12:45-3:45-6:45-9:30
Wonderstruck (PG) Open Caption:
1:00-4:00-7:00-9:30
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R)
CC: 1:15-4:15-7:15-9:45
Jane 12:45-3:00-5:15-7:30-9:45
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
1:05-4:05-7:05-9:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:104:10-7:10-9:40
Human Flow (PG-13) CC: 1:00
The Florida Project (R) CC: 1:054:05-7:05-9:35
Landmark West End Cinema
2301 M Street NW
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13)
CC: 2:15-4:45-7:15
Chavela (NR) 2:30-5:00-7:30
Goodbye Christopher Robin CC:
2:00-4:30-7:00
Medal of Honor Theater - NMMC
18900 Jefferson Davis Highway
We, the Marines (NR) 10:00-11:0012:00-1:00-2:00-3:00-4:00
Regal Gallery Place Stadium 14
701 Seventh Street Northwest
Tim Burton's The Nightmare
Before Christmas (PG) 2:00-7:00
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:00-8:00-10:40
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:35-5:25
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG13) 12:00-2:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00-7:00
The Foreigner (R) 5:25-8:05-10:45
Jigsaw (R) 12:45-3:00-5:30-8:0010:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 3:255:50-8:15-10:40
Suburbicon (R) 12:45-3:15-5:458:15-10:45
Marshall (PG-13) 4:00-8:50
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 12:30-4:309:35-10:30
Little Shop of Horrors The Director's Cut 2:00-7:00
It (R) CC: 6:00-8:45
The Foreigner (R) CC: 2:30-5:158:00-9:35
Jigsaw (R) CC: 1:00-3:15-5:307:45-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
2:00-4:35-7:00
AMC Academy 8
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:35-4:206198 Greenbelt Road
9:45
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 2:00-7:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea HalGeostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: 4:40
loween (PG-13) CC: 1:15-2:10-3:45My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: 4:45-6:15-7:15-9:00-10:00
1:30-4:00
Marshall (PG-13) 7:05
The Snowman (R) CC: 1:45Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience
4:30-7:20
(R) CC: 2:15-4:30-6:45-9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
Thank You For Your Service (R)
3:30-7:00
1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
It (R) CC: 7:30
Keep Watching (R) 10:00
Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 1:00-3:20ArcLight Bethesda
5:40-8:00
7101 Democracy Boulevard
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: 1:15Geostorm (PG-13) 11:35-1:05-4:453:00-5:20-7:45
7:25-10:35
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:15-4:00The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 4:30
6:45
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 1:00-3:30- 12:35-5:30
American Made (R) 3:20-6:40
6:00-8:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) 3:25
AMC Center Park 8
The Snowman (R) 3:15-8:10
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
It (R) 10:00
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 1:15-6:30
The Foreigner (R) 12:30-2:40-5:15Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: 3:50-9:05 7:10-10:30
The Snowman (R) CC: 3:30
All I See Is You (R) 11:40-2:30-4:55Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
7:30-9:10
12:00-6:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:05-2:45It (R) CC: 8:55
5:45-7:45-10:10
The Foreigner (R) CC: 12:45-3:30- Marshall (PG-13) 12:15-2:50-5:506:15-9:00
7:35-10:05
Jigsaw (R) CC: 12:30-2:45-5:00Thank You For Your Service (R)
7:15-9:45
11:45-2:10-5:40-8:30-9:40
Keep Watching (R) (!) 10:00
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (R) CC:
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: 1:00- 11:30-2:25-5:00-7:00-8:05-9:50
3:45-6:10-8:45
The Florida Project (R) 12:05-2:20Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 1:30-4:00- 5:20-7:40-10:15
6:30-9:10
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 11:45-2:15-4:35Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 1:457:05-9:55
4:15-6:45-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:25-4:50-8:15
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:15Jigsaw (R) 12:00-2:35-5:05-8:003:00-6:00
10:25
AMC Columbia 14
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 11:50-2:2010300 Little Patuxent Parkway
5:10-7:15-9:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:35-9:15
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 9:35
Suburbicon (R) 11:55-2:00-3:00-4:40Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 1:30-6:55
The Snowman (R) CC: 11:00-10:00 5:25-7:55-9:35
Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 12:00-2:30-4:50
Bow Tie Annapolis Mall 11
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:151020 Westfield Annapolis Mall
2:50-6:20-9:55
Halloween (1978) (R) 7:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Jigsaw (R) 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:3011:40-2:20-5:00-7:35-10:10
10:00
It (R) CC: 7:10-10:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
Only the Brave (PG-13) (!) 9:30
(R) 3:20
Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 11:20-1:50- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:10-9:30
4:30-7:10-9:50
Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:20-4:20Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
7:20-10:20
10:55-1:25-4:00-6:40-9:20
Jigsaw (R) 1:00-6:30
Thank You For Your Service (R) CC: Keep Watching (R) 10:00
(!) 11:10-2:00-4:40-7:20-10:10
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:55-1:45- 12:30-2:30-5:10-6:50-7:50-10:30
4:35-7:25-10:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea HalLittle Shop of Horrors The Direc- loween (PG-13) 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:50
tor's Cut (!) 2:00-7:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:30Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience 4:00-9:55
(R) (!) 11:00-1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00
Bow Tie Harbour 9
Geostorm (PG-13) 10:50-4:15
2474 Solomons Island Road
It (R) 12:30-4:10
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:10-1:50-4:30Jigsaw (R) (!) 7:30-10:00
7:10-9:50
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 10:40Halloween (PG-13) 11:05-1:401:20-4:10-7:00-10:10
4:20-7:00-9:40
Suburbicon (R) 11:20-2:00-4:40Only the Brave (PG-13) 11:307:20-10:00
2:40-6:10
American Made (R) 1:10-4:00-9:40
The Foreigner (R) 10:50-1:30The Snowman (R) 11:40-2:30-5:104:10-7:05
7:50-10:40
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
Marshall (PG-13) 10:30-6:40
(R) (!) 10:00
AMC Loews Rio Cinemas 18 Goodbye Christopher Robin 10:501:40-4:20-6:50-9:30
9811 Washingtonian Ctr.
The Florida Project (R) 11:30-2:20Seven Sundays (NR) (!) 11:40-1:10- 5:00-7:40-10:20
4:10-7:30-10:25
Cinemark Egyptian 24 and XD
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 11:457000 Arundel Mills Circle
1:40-7:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: Seven Sundays (NR) 10:55-2:055:10-8:10
12:55-3:30
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:45-5:20-8:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: 4:35Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:35
10:05
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience Kingsman: The Golden Circle
(R) CC: (!) 1:00-3:20-5:40-8:00-10:20 (R) 10:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) The Snowman (R) 10:55-1:45-4:407:30-10:20
CC: 6:35-9:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: Blade Runner 2049 (R) 10:552:45-6:20
1:15-3:50
It (R) 10:10
The Snowman (R) CC: 6:00-8:50
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:45Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
3:50-7:00
5:05-8:40
The Foreigner (R) 12:10-3:05It (R) CC: 2:50-8:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 12:25- 5:50-8:40
Jigsaw (R) 11:00-1:30-4:003:35-6:45
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:35-2:20- 6:30-9:00
Keep Watching (R) 10:00
5:00-7:45-10:25
Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 11:30-1:50-4:20- Happy Death Day (PG-13) 10:551:20-4:05-6:35-9:15
6:50-9:10
Suburbicon (R) 11:40-2:20-5:05Golmaal Again (NR) 3:10-6:30
7:40-10:15
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
Marshall (PG-13) 10:55AM
11:45-2:20-4:55-7:35-10:10
All I See Is You (R) CC: (!) 2:05-4:40- Thank You For Your Service (R)
11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
7:20-10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
Halloween (PG-13) 11:15-2:0011:40-1:55-4:25-7:10-9:35
Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 2:35-5:05- 4:35-7:20-10:10
Little Shop of Horrors The Direc7:40-10:15
Secret Superstar (NR) 12:00-3:15- tor’s Cut 2:00-7:00
Vunnadi Okate Zindagi (Unnadi
6:40-9:55
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:05-5:55 Okate Zindagi) (NR) 11:25-3:00Thank You For Your Service (R) CC: 6:45-10:15
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:45-5:20-8:15
(!) 2:15-4:50-7:25-10:10
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:35
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:00- Jigsaw (R) 11:00-1:30-4:006:30-9:00
4:30-7:00-9:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 12:35-3:15Women (R) CC: 12:30
6:20-9:00
Keep Watching (R) (!) 10:00
Jigsaw (R) XD: 12:15-2:45-5:15Crash Pad (R) (!) 12:15-2:40
7:45-10:15
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
(R) 10:00
Hoyt's West Nursery Cinema 14
1591 West Nursery Road
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 1:10-3:506:25-9:00
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG13) CC: 1:05-3:50
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
CC: 7:05-10:10
The Snowman (R) CC: 2:10-4:557:40-10:25
It (R) CC: 1:15-4:15-7:15-10:15
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 1:004:00-7:00
The Foreigner (R) CC: 1:40-4:257:10-9:55
Jigsaw (R) CC: 1:15-3:30-5:458:00-10:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: 2:004:40-7:00-9:20
Keep Watching (R) CC: 10:00
Suburbicon (R) CC: 2:15-4:507:20-9:50
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:25-4:106:55-9:40
Thank You For Your Service (R) CC:
1:30-4:05-6:50-9:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) CC: 1:20-2:20-3:454:45-6:30-7:30-9:00-10:00
Let There Be Light (PG-13) CC:
1:45-4:15-6:45-9:15
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:45-6:30
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:003:30-9:15
The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 1:15-7:15
It (R) CC: 11:45-6:00
The Foreigner (R) CC: 10:15-4:15
Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 11:55-2:30-5:007:15-9:30
Keep Watching (R) (!) 10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
11:45-1:30-5:15-7:45-10:15
Smithsonian - Lockheed Martin Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 10:00-12:303:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
IMAX Theater
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 3:00-9:15
601 Independence Avenue SW
Thank You For Your Service (R) CC:
D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
(!) 10:45-2:15-4:00-6:45-9:30
2:40
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 4:20
Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:30Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the 11:30-1:15-2:00-3:45-4:30-6:15Sea 3D (NR) 11:00-1:15-3:30
7:00-9:00-9:45
Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
AMC Magic Johnson
An IMAX 3D Experience 12:25
Capital Center 12
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
800 Shoppers Way
Experience (R)
Journey to Space 3D (NR) 10:25- Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 2:007:00-9:30
11:50-2:05-5:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
Landmark
CC: 2:05-4:40-7:25
AFI Silver Theatre Cultural Ctr Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Bethesda Row Cinema
8633 Colesville Road
7235 Woodmont Avenue
CC: 6:35
Loving Vincent (PG-13) 1:00-3:00- My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
5:05-7:10-9:15
Down The White House (PG-13)
1:00-3:30
Phantasm: Remastered (R) 9:15
The Snowman (R) CC: 3:40-9:45
CC: 2:00-4:30-6:50-10:00
MARYLAND
year’s calendar, checkbook and
bank statements.
I jot down important events
that these things remind me of (a
rental-car charge might remind
me of a trip).
I work month to month, and
then I write up a narration of the
events of the past year. Thanks to
computers, I can keep these
remembrances and share them.
Mary F., Erie, Pa.
Mary F.: This time of year is a
good time to get your pieces
organized.
Dear Heloise: My doctor said I’d
have to get rid of my houseplants
(!) No Pass/No Discount Ticket
Goodbye Christopher Robin 12:302:45-4:55-7:05
Night of the Living Dead (4K
Restoration) (NR) 9:30
Suspiria (R) 7:15
Cat People (1942) (NR) 5:30
AMC Loews
St. Charles Town Ctr. 9
11115 Mall Circle
C5
RE
Wonderstruck (PG) Open Caption:
1:10-3:50-7:10-9:45
Faces, Places (Visages, villages)
(PG) 1:20-3:30-5:40-7:50-10:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 12:503:40-6:40-9:10
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
1:00-4:10-7:00-9:40
Breathe (PG-13) CC: 1:50
Suburbicon (R) CC: 1:30-4:207:20-9:45
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:404:40-7:30-9:50
Goodbye Christopher Robin CC:
4:35-10:05
Old Greenbelt Theatre
129 Centerway
Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:154:45-7:50
Jigsaw (R) 12:45-3:30-6:00-8:30
Keep Watching (R) 10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:303:00-5:30-8:15-10:45
Suburbicon (R) 1:30-4:15-7:1510:00
Marshall (PG-13) 2:00-5:00-8:00
Thank You For Your Service (R)
1:30-4:45-7:45-10:35
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) 12:30-1:45-3:004:30-5:45-7:00-8:30-9:45
Regal Laurel Towne Centre 12
14716 Baltimore Avenue
Tim Burton's The Nightmare
Before Christmas (PG) 2:00-7:00
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:45-3:30-6:50
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 9:50
Paragon Kentlands Stadium 10 The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 1:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
629 Center Point Way
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:25-2:50-5:15- 4:00-9:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
7:40-10:05
1:25-4:15
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
The Snowman (R) 4:25-10:45
12:25-2:40-4:55
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:50-7:15
American Made (R) 11:55-2:20It (R) 9:10
4:50-7:20-9:50
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:40My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
3:40-6:40
12:50-3:05-5:20
The Foreigner (R) 7:30-10:35
The Snowman (R) 7:10-9:45
Jigsaw (R) 12:30-3:00-5:30-8:00Dunkirk (PG-13) 7:35-9:55
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:20-3:40- 10:30
Keep Watching (R) 10:10
7:00-10:20
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:15It (R) 1:30-4:20-7:10-10:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:20-4:10- 2:55-5:25-8:15-10:40
Suburbicon (R) 12:00-2:35-5:107:00-9:50
Jigsaw (R) 11:50-1:50-3:50-5:50- 8:10-10:45
Marshall (PG-13) 12:20-3:10-6:15
7:55-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:50- Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) 12:10-2:45-4:003:00-5:10-7:20-9:30
5:15-6:30-7:50-9:15-10:20
Suburbicon (R) 12:45-3:05-5:25Thank You For Your Service (R)
7:45-10:05
1:00-3:45-7:20-10:15
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) 7:45
Faces, Places (Visages, villages)
(PG) 5:30
Phoenix Theatres Marlow 6
3899 Branch Avenue
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:15-2:505:30-8:05
The Foreigner (R) 2:35-5:10-7:45
Jigsaw (R) 1:30-3:45-6:30-9:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:302:55-5:30-7:55
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 1:00-1:45-3:254:10-5:50-6:30-8:30-9:15
Regal Rockville Ctr Stadium 13
199 East Montgomery Avenue
Tim Burton's The Nightmare
Before Christmas (PG) 2:00-7:00
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:15-8:30
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:30-5:45
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
12:45-3:15-6:15
American Made (R) 8:45
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
3:30-10:00
Regal Bowie Stadium 14
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
15200 Major Lansdale Blvd
1:30-4:00
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:30-7:40
The Snowman (R) 4:15-9:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:35-10:25 Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 5:45 4:45-8:30
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) It (R) 6:45-9:45
1:10-4:10-7:05
Only the Brave (PG-13) 9:30
The Snowman (R) 2:45-8:15
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:00-6:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:20-10:05 Jigsaw (R) 12:15-2:45-5:15-7:45It (R) 6:55
10:30
Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:05-4:15- Keep Watching (R) 10:00
7:25-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:00The Foreigner (R) 3:10-6:40-9:30 3:45-4:30-6:15-9:00
Jigsaw (R) 3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
Suburbicon (R) 12:30-3:15-5:45Keep Watching (R) 10:00
8:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 3:10Marshall (PG-13) 12:45-7:00
5:40-8:10-10:30
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Suburbicon (R) 2:35-5:10-7:4512:15-3:00-5:45-8:30
10:20
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Marshall (PG-13) 1:00-3:50Halloween (PG-13) 12:30-3:006:50-9:50
5:30-8:00-10:30
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Little Shop of Horrors The Direc1:00-3:40-6:20-9:05
tor’s Cut 2:00-7:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Regal Waugh Chapel
Halloween (PG-13) 1:30-2:30-4:00Stadium 12 & IMAX
5:00-6:30-7:30-9:00-10:00
1419
South Main Chapel Way
A Question of Faith (PG) 2:40-5:25Tim Burton's The Nightmare
8:00-10:30
Before
Christmas
(PG) 2:00-7:00
Regal Cinemas Majestic
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:00-2:40-8:00
Stadium 20 & IMAX
Geostorm
3D
(PG-13)
5:20-10:45
900 Ellsworth Drive
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 12:05
Tim Burton's The Nightmare
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Before Christmas (PG) 2:00-7:00 12:40-4:00
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:30-6:10
Snowman (R) 9:50
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:45-9:10 The
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:20-6:40
American Made (R) 1:00
It (R) 3:35-9:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:10(R) 12:00
3:10-6:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
The Foreigner (R) 3:50-10:10
12:50-3:55
Jigsaw
The Snowman (R) 3:45-6:45-9:50 10:40 (R) 1:00-3:25-5:50-8:15Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:30Keep Watching (R) 10:00
7:05-10:40
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:05-3:20- Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:303:20-6:00-8:30-10:50
7:20-10:25
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:25-7:10 Suburbicon (R) 1:10-4:20-7:30Jigsaw (R) 12:15-2:50-5:25-8:00- 10:20
Marshall (PG-13) 6:50
10:35
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea HalKeep Watching (R) 10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30- loween (PG-13) 12:50-2:30-3:405:10-6:30-7:45-9:15-10:30
3:00-6:00-8:35-11:00
Suburbicon (R) 1:00-4:10-7:05-9:45 Thank You For Your Service (R)
Secret Superstar (NR) 6:45-10:25 1:20-4:10-7:00-10:00
Marshall (PG-13) 1:30-4:25-7:15- Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience
(R) 12:00-2:20-4:50-7:15-9:40
10:05
Regal Westview
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Stadium 16 & IMAX
12:25-3:05-5:50-9:10
5243 Buckeystown Pike
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) 12:05-2:35-3:10- Tim Burton's The Nightmare
5:15-5:50-7:50-8:30-10:30-11:00
Before Christmas (PG) 2:00-7:00
Jane 12:05-2:35-5:15-7:40-10:05 Geostorm (PG-13) 1:00-7:15
It (R) 9:25
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:00-10:00
Regal Germantown Stadium 14 The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
1:15-4:00
20000 Century Boulevard
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Tim Burton's The Nightmare
Before Christmas (PG) 2:00-7:00 12:45-4:30-7:45-11:00
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Geostorm (PG-13) 2:30-8:00
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 5:15-10:45 1:00-3:45
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:45-3:157:00-10:45
13) 12:00-6:45
It (R) 1:15-4:15-7:30-10:45
American Made (R) 3:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) 4:30 American Made (R) 4:15-9:15
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:30The Snowman (R) 4:15-9:15
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:00-9:45 3:30-6:45-9:45
The Snowman (R) 6:30-9:30
It (R) 12:30-6:30-9:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:30-3:45- The Foreigner (R) 12:15-3:00-6:15
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:00-3:307:00-10:15
The Foreigner (R) 2:15-5:00-7:45- 6:45-10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:3010:30
Jigsaw (R) 12:15-3:00-5:45-8:15- 3:15-6:00-8:30-11:15
Jigsaw (R) 11:30-2:00-4:45-7:3010:45
10:15
Golmaal Again (NR) 10:00
Marshall (PG-13) 6:30-9:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:30Keep Watching (R) 10:00
4:00-6:30-9:00
Suburbicon (R) 11:45-2:15-5:00Suburbicon (R) 2:00-4:45-7:307:45-10:30
10:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-2:301:45-4:30-7:15-10:00
5:15-8:00-10:30
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-2:4511:30-12:45-3:45-7:15-10:15
5:15-8:00-10:30
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience
Mersal (NR) 1:00-4:45-8:30
Little Shop of Horrors The Direc- (R) 12:15-2:45-5:30-8:15-11:00
tor’s Cut 2:00-7:00
UA Snowden Square
Vunnadi Okate Zindagi (Unnadi
Stadium 14
Okate Zindagi) (NR) 12:00-3:459161 Commerce Center Drive
7:30
Tim Burton's The Nightmare
Regal Hyattsville Royale
Before Christmas (PG) 2:00-7:00
Stadium 14
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:20-7:15
6505 America Blvd.
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:30-9:50
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Tim Burton's The Nightmare
Before Christmas (PG) 2:05-7:05 3:40-9:10
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:30-6:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:30-9:00 1:10-3:50-6:20
The Snowman (R) 1:15-4:00The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
6:40-9:30
1:00-4:00-6:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:20American Made (R) 1:00
3:45-7:10
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
It (R) 10:30
(R) 9:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) 4:10-10:20
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
The Foreigner (R) 12:45-3:30-6:15
1:40-4:15
Jigsaw (R) 12:25-2:50-5:15-7:40The Snowman (R) 4:10-9:30
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:00-6:45 10:10
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:45-7:30 Keep Watching (R) 10:00
It (R) 6:50-10:15
Golmaal Again (NR) 9:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:203:15-6:00-8:40
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:403:05-5:40-8:05-10:25
Suburbicon (R) 1:00-4:30-7:20-9:30
Marshall (PG-13) 12:50-3:406:30-9:20
Thank You For Your Service (R)
1:00-4:10-7:15-10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 12:30-3:005:30-8:00-10:35
Little Shop of Horrors The Director’s Cut 2:00-7:00
Jigsaw (R) CC: 3:40
All I See Is You (R) CC: 11:40-2:205:05-7:50-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
11:30-2:00-4:40-7:15-9:50
Suburbicon (R) CC: 11:35-2:255:00-7:45-10:20
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:10-6:45
Thank You For Your Service (R) CC:
11:30-2:10-5:00-7:40-10:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 11:35-2:003:00-4:30-5:30-7:10-8:00-9:40-10:30
Professor Marston & the Wonder
Xscape Theatres Brandywine 14 Women (R) CC: 12:30
American Satan (R) 7:20-10:05
7710 Matapeake Business Drive
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:20(R) CC: 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
1:30-4:20-7:10-10:50
It (R) 3:15
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Jigsaw (R) 12:45-6:30-9:00
CC: 3:30-6:10-8:50
AMC Shirlington 7
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG2772 South Randolph St.
13) CC: 12:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 11:404:00-10:00
3:10-6:40-9:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:30It (R) CC: 9:50
4:15-7:30-10:15
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: (!)
Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 2:15-4:4510:40-2:50-6:00
The Foreigner (R) Open Caption; CC: 7:45-10:15
Wonderstruck (PG) CC: (!) 1:4510:30-1:10-4:10-6:50-9:40
4:30-7:15-10:00
Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 8:20-11:00
Goodbye Christopher Robin (!)
Keep Watching (R) CC: (!) 10:00
2:00-4:40-7:30-10:10
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
The Florida Project (R) 1:30-4:1512:30-3:00-5:30-8:00-10:20
7:00-9:45
Suburbicon (R) CC: 11:10-2:10Professor Marston & the Wonder
5:00-7:50-10:40
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:00-12:40- Women (R) CC: 1:45
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R) CC: 6:45
3:40-6:30-9:20
Thank You For Your Service (R) CC: Jane (!) 2:00-4:45-7:00-9:30
11:00-1:50-4:40-7:30-10:30
AMC Tysons Corner 16
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
7850e Tysons Corner Center
Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:10- Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 11:3512:10-12:50-2:40-3:20-5:10-5:502:15-7:55
7:40-10:10
3D (PG-13) 5:15-10:35
Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 11:50-2:20-4:50- Geostorm
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC:
7:20-10:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Hal- 10:50-1:55
Made (R) CC: 10:25-1:10loween (PG-13) CC: (!) 10:50-11:30- American
4:25-7:15-10:20
1:20-2:00-3:50-4:30-6:20-7:00-9:00 Kingsman:
The Golden Circle (R)
iPic Pike & Rose
CC: 10:40-4:15-7:25-9:35
11830 Grand Park Avenue
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC:
11:05-1:45-4:45
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:30-3:45The Snowman (R) CC: 7:30-10:25
7:00-10:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
6:30-10:05
2:50-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:30-6:30- It (R) CC: 4:35-7:40-10:50
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 10:3010:30
1:35-4:40-7:45
The Foreigner (R) 12:45-4:00The Foreigner (R) CC: 10:30-1:157:15-10:15
Jigsaw (R) (!) 1:30-4:30-7:45-10:50 4:00-6:55-9:45
Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 11:15-1:40-4:05
The Snowman (R) 12:00-6:15
Suburbicon (R) (!) 1:15-4:15-7:30- Keep Watching (R) (!) 10:00
All I See Is You (R) CC: (!) 10:4510:40
1:30-4:10-7:05-9:50
Marshall (PG-13) 12:15-3:15Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
6:45-9:45
10:35-1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 11:30-2:20Halloween (PG-13) 2:00-5:004:55-7:35-10:10
8:00-11:00
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:35-1:254:20-10:45
Thank You For Your Service (R) CC:
AMC Courthouse Plaza 8
(!) 11:10-2:10-5:10-7:50-10:30
2150 Clarendon Blvd.
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 7:45-10:20 Halloween (PG-13) CC: 11:00-1:50Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: 2:45-5:15 4:30-7:10-10:55
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
Little Shop of Horrors The Direc1:30-10:15
tor’s Cut (!) 2:00-7:00
American Made (R) CC: 4:15-7:30 Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) (R) (!) 10:25-12:50-3:15-5:40-8:10CC: 4:15-7:00-10:00
10:40
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 2:30- Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:20-2:55
4:30-7:30-10:00
Jigsaw (R) (!) 6:40-9:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: 1:45AMC Worldgate 9
5:30-8:00-10:30
13025 Worldgate Drive
Jigsaw (R) CC: 2:45-5:15-7:45Geostorm
(PG-13) CC: (!) 1:10-6:45
10:00
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: (!)
Suburbicon (R) CC: 2:20-5:004:05-9:25
7:30-10:20
American Made (R) CC: 1:20-7:15
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 1:45
Thank You For Your Service (R) CC: The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 12:403:40-6:30-9:20
1:45-4:20-7:00-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: (!)
AMC Hoffman Center 22
2:30-6:00-9:30
206 Swamp Fox Rd.
It (R) CC: 4:10-9:55
Seven Sundays (NR) 12:45-3:45- Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 12:006:45-9:40
3:00-6:05-9:05
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 11:45-2:25- The Foreigner (R) CC: (!) 1:30-4:155:00-7:40-10:15
7:00-9:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 1:00-3:40Jigsaw (R) CC: (!) 12:35-2:55-5:156:20-9:10
7:35-10:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC: (!)
1:05-3:45
1:40-4:00-6:20-9:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
CC: 4:50-10:30
Halloween (PG-13) CC: (!) 12:00Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- 2:25-5:05-7:35-10:00
13) CC: 10:25
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema American Made (R) CC: 11:25-2:10One Loudoun
4:55-7:35
20575 East Hampton Plaza
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:30
CC: 1:40-7:25
The Snowman (R) CC: 11:00-1:50- Kingsman: The Golden Circle
(R) 12:10
4:40-7:35-10:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:10- The Snowman (R) 11:30AM
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 11:20AM
2:45-6:15-9:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) 10:20-1:40
It (R) CC: 2:30-7:45
Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 11:50- The Foreigner (R) 11:00AM
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
3:05-6:10-9:15
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:30-2:15- 10:15-1:00
Suburbicon (R) 11:50AM
5:10-7:50-10:25
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 1:35- Geostorm (PG-13) 3:25-6:20-10:10
Thank You For Your Service (R)
4:10-6:50-9:25
Jigsaw (R) CC: 11:00-12:15-5:30- 11:10AM
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
6:15-8:45-10:30
3:40-7:40-11:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) CC:
It (R) 2:40-9:15
11:05-1:30-4:00-6:30-9:05
Exorcist (R) 7:00
All I See Is You (R) CC: 11:20-2:05- The
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:20-7:204:40-7:20-10:00
11:10
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 11:10-2:05- The Snowman (R) 6:00
4:50-7:40
Only the Brave (PG-13) 5:00Suburbicon (R) CC: 11:15-1:458:20-11:35
4:30-7:00-9:45
The Foreigner (R) 2:00-3:40Thank You For Your Service (R) CC: 6:40-9:35
11:15-2:00-4:45-7:25-10:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 5:00Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
9:00-11:35
Halloween (PG-13) CC: 11:00Suburbicon
(R) 2:45-5:35-8:4012:00-1:30-2:30-4:00-5:00-6:3011:30
7:30-9:00-10:00
Thank
You
For
Your Service (R)
Professor Marston & the Wonder 2:00-4:55-8:00-11:05
Women (R) CC: 11:05AM
Angelika Film Center Mosaic
Little Shop of Horrors The Direc2911 District Ave
tor’s Cut 2:00-7:00
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience Psycho (R) 7:00
(R) 11:30-2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
American Made (R) CC: 12:45-3:20It (R) 12:00-5:15-10:30
5:45-8:10
Jigsaw (R) 3:00-8:15
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
10:05-12:35-3:30-9:45
(R) 10:00
The Snowman (R) CC: (!) 10:0510:35
AMC Potomac Mills 18
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 11:452700 Potomac Mills Circle
3:15-7:00-10:30
Geostorm (PG-13) CC: 11:35Suburbicon (R) CC: (!) 10:00-12:304:50-10:20
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) CC: 2:10-7:40 2:50-5:20-7:45-10:25
(PG) CC: (!) 10:45The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) CC: Wonderstruck
11:40-1:30-2:20-4:15-5:05-7:10-9:50
11:30-2:05-4:30
Killing of a Sacred Deer (R)
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) The
CC: (!) 10:30-1:15-4:05-7:05-7:50CC: 7:00-9:40
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- 10:00-10:45
The Florida Project (R) CC: 11:3013) CC: 1:30-4:20
Let There Be Light (PG-13) 11:50- 2:10-4:45-7:30-10:05
Bow Tie
2:30-5:10-7:50-10:25
Reston Town Ctr 11 & BTX
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11940 Market Street
CC: 12:00-3:20-6:30-9:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG) CC: Halloween (1978) (R) 7:30
12:00-2:40
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:50-4:20The Snowman (R) CC: 4:00-9:35
7:20-10:10
It (R) CC: 12:10-6:00-9:15
The Snowman (R) 1:30-4:30Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
7:30-10:15
5:15-8:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:40Only the Brave (PG-13) CC: 12:15- 6:10-9:40
3:15-6:15-9:15
It (R) 6:30-9:30
The Foreigner (R) CC: 12:05-3:00- Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:40-3:405:45-8:30
6:40-10:00
VIRGINIA
The Foreigner (R) 12:20-3:206:35-9:35
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:303:30-9:35
All I See Is You (R) 1:40-4:407:40-10:20
Marshall (PG-13) 1:00-3:50
Thank You For Your Service (R)
1:10-4:10-7:10-9:55
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00
Suburbicon (R) 2:30-5:00-8:0010:30; 4:00-7:00-9:50
due to my allergies. Why?
Linda Y. in Chicago
Linda Y. in Chicago: If you are
sensitive to mold — and many
people are — you’ll find that mold
grows in the soil and on the pots.
Some plants also produce pollen,
which may aggravate your
allergies. Replace the real plants
with silk plants, but remember to
keep them dusted.
Heloise’s column appears six days a
week at washingtonpost.com/advice.
Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box 795000,
San Antonio, Tex. 78279-5000, or email
it to Heloise@Heloise.com.
©2017, King Features Syndicate
Tuesday, October 31, 2017
www.washingtonpost.com/movies
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG13) 3:00-5:50-9:25
American Made (R) 12:25-3:055:45-8:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:45-4:30-7:05-9:35
The Snowman (R) 1:20-4:05-6:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:154:45-8:15
It (R) 12:55-4:20-7:30
Golmaal Again (NR) 1:30-5:05-8:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:35-4:357:25-10:00
Cinema Arts Theatre
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 2:309650 Main St
5:15-8:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13) CC:
All I See Is You (R) 1:50-5:00-7:45
2:30-7:30
Raju Gari Gadhi 2 (NR) 12:45-4:00Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC: 7:50
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC: 9:50- 7:10-10:00
Secret Superstar (NR) 12:5012:10-2:30-4:55-7:20-9:35
4:15-7:15
Suburbicon (R) CC: 9:55-12:15Judwaa 2 (NR) 12:30-3:30-6:302:25-4:45-7:10-9:20
9:50
Lucky CC: 2:00
Raja The Great (NR) 12:30-3:40Goodbye Christopher Robin CC:
6:40-9:45
9:40-12:00-2:35-5:00
Faces, Places (Visages, villages) Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought
Down The White House (PG-13)
(PG) CC: 10:05-12:05-4:00-6:001:00-3:35-6:05-9:00
8:00-9:45
Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Mersal (NR) 4:10-9:30
Vunnadi Okate Zindagi (Unnadi
Down The White House (PG-13)
Okate Zindagi) (NR) 1:00-4:10-7:20
CC: 9:45-12:10-5:05-9:50
Bhalwan Singh (NR) 12:40-3:45Loving Vincent (PG-13) 10:006:45-9:40
12:20-2:20-4:35-7:00-9:15
Mersal (NR) 12:50-7:30
Cobb Village 12 Leesburg
1600 Village Market Boulevard
Geostorm (PG-13) 11:45-2:254:55-7:40
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
2:15-4:45
American Made (R) 7:25
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:30
The Snowman (R) 1:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:30-7:05
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:153:15-7:10
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:20-3:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:252:50-5:20-7:45
Suburbicon (R) 11:50-2:30-5:007:30
Thank You For Your Service (R)
12:10-2:40-5:15-7:50
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 12:05-2:455:10-7:35
The Foreigner (R) 7:15
Jigsaw (R) 11:45-1:00-3:20-4:305:40-7:00-8:00
Little Shop of Horrors The Director’s Cut 2:00-7:00
Jigsaw (R) 1:00-3:20-5:40-8:00
Manassas 4 Cinemas
8890 Mathis Ave.
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 2:004:00-6:00-8:00
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
2:15-4:30-6:40-8:45
Marshall (PG-13) 1:50-4:106:30-8:55
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) 2:20-4:25-6:30-8:30
Rave Cinemas Centreville 12
6201 Multiplex Drive
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:05-5:157:55-10:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 2:40
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
10:30-1:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:254:00-7:30
It (R) 11:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) 10:05-1:054:05-7:05
The Foreigner (R) 11:45-2:25-5:057:45-10:30
Jigsaw (R) 10:20-12:40-3:00-5:207:40-10:00
Keep Watching (R) 10:05
Golmaal Again (NR) 2:45-9:35
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 10:1012:35-3:05-5:30-8:00-10:25
Suburbicon (R) 11:50-2:20-4:557:25-10:40
Secret Superstar (NR) 3:30-6:5010:10
Thank You For Your Service (R)
11:25-2:05-4:40-7:15-9:50
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 11:30-2:004:30-7:00-9:30
Mersal (NR) 11:10-6:00
Vunnadi Okate Zindagi (Unnadi
Okate Zindagi) (NR) 12:10-3:256:40-9:55
Rave Cinemas
Fairfax Corner 14 + Xtreme
11900 Palace Way
Geostorm (PG-13) 2:45-8:05-10:45
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) XD: 9:55
American Made (R) 12:30-3:20-6:40
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
11:40-2:50-7:10-10:20
The Snowman (R) 11:05-1:50-4:407:25-10:35
It (R) 12:40-4:00-7:05-10:25
Jigsaw (R) 12:20-2:40-5:00-7:4010:00
Golmaal Again (NR) 9:30
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 11:101:45-7:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:552:30-5:05-7:30-10:05
Suburbicon (R) 11:20-2:00-4:357:45-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) 4:30-9:50
Thank You For Your Service (R)
11:45-2:20-4:55-7:35-10:15
Mersal (NR) 10:55-2:35-6:05-9:45
Vunnadi Okate Zindagi (Unnadi
Okate Zindagi) (NR) 11:30-2:556:25-9:45
Geostorm (PG-13) XD: 11:15-1:554:45-7:20
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 12:05-5:25
Jigsaw (R) XD: 11:00-1:20-3:406:10-8:30-10:50
Regal Ballston Common
Stadium 12
671 N. Glebe Road
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
1:20
The Snowman (R) 4:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 3:006:30-9:50
It (R) 4:00-7:10
The Foreigner (R) 4:10-6:50-9:30
Jigsaw (R) 2:30-5:00-7:30-10:00
Golmaal Again (NR) 2:20-6:15-9:40
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 4:156:45-9:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:05-3:306:00-8:25-10:40
Suburbicon (R) 2:00-5:30-8:10-10:10
Secret Superstar (NR) 3:45-7:0010:15
Marshall (PG-13) 1:00
Thank You For Your Service (R)
1:00-2:15-5:15-8:00-10:15
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 1:15-2:05-4:307:15-10:05
Little Shop of Horrors The Director’s Cut 2:00-7:00
Regal Countryside Stadium 20
45980 Regal Plaza
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 1:053:50-6:20-9:05
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
12:35-3:20-6:00-9:15
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:00-3:50-6:15
The Snowman (R) 4:00-9:20
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:20-3:156:50-10:15
It (R) 6:30-9:30
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:40-3:406:45-9:50
The Foreigner (R) 12:30-5:208:00-10:45
Jigsaw (R) 2:20-4:50-7:15-9:40
Golmaal Again (NR) 9:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:302:50-5:50-8:15-10:40
Suburbicon (R) 1:50-5:00-7:4510:20
Secret Superstar (NR) 12:45-3:206:40-9:45
Thank You For Your Service (R)
1:40-4:40-7:30-10:10
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
Halloween (PG-13) 1:45-4:457:50-10:30
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience
(R) 1:10-3:30-6:00-8:30-10:50
Regal Potomac Yard Stadium 16
3575 Potomac Avenue
Tim Burton's The Nightmare
Before Christmas (PG) 2:00-7:00
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:25-4:55-7:50
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 10:30
Regal Dulles Town Ctr 10
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 1:3021100 Dulles Town Circle
4:10-6:45-9:15
Tim Burton's The Nightmare
Before Christmas (PG) 2:00-7:00 The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
4:05-9:05
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:15-6:15
American Made (R) 9:55
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 3:15-9:00
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
American Made (R) 12:45
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) 1:15-3:45-6:55
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
5:00-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:301:10-4:25
6:00-9:45
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 2:10It (R) 3:30-6:30-10:00
6:00-9:45
The Foreigner (R) 1:15-4:00-6:45 The Snowman (R) 1:45-4:40Jigsaw (R) 11:50-2:45-5:15-7:45- 7:35-10:20
10:20
The Foreigner (R) 1:55-4:45-7:30Keep Watching (R) 10:00
10:10
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 11:40It (R) 7:10-10:15
2:20-4:15-8:30-11:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) 1:00-4:15Suburbicon (R) 11:45-2:10-4:457:25-10:30
7:30-10:30
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:40Marshall (PG-13) 11:50AM
4:20-7:40-10:05
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Jigsaw (R) 1:00-3:20-5:40-8:0012:00-1:30-4:30-7:15-10:10
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
10:25
Halloween (PG-13) 12:30-3:00Keep Watching (R) 10:05
5:30-8:15-10:45
Marshall (PG-13) 1:00-3:506:50-9:55
Regal Fairfax Towne Ctr 10
Suburbicon (R) 1:50-4:35-7:354110 West Ox Road
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- 10:10
Thank You For Your Service (R)
13) 12:45-3:40
2:05-4:50-7:45-10:20
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
12:00-2:35
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea HalThe Snowman (R) 6:35-9:45
loween (PG-13) 1:35-4:30-7:05-9:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:50-3:20- Little Shop of Horrors The Direc7:10-9:40
tor’s Cut 2:00-7:00
Only the Brave (PG-13) 5:05
Regal Springfield Town Ctr 12
The Foreigner (R) 5:10-7:55-10:40
6500 Springfield Town Center
Keep Watching (R) 10:00
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:05- The Shining (R) 7:00-10:00
2:35-4:30-8:10-9:40
Geostorm (PG-13) 12:30-6:20
Suburbicon (R) 12:10-2:45-5:20Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 3:30-9:10
8:00-10:35
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG) 12:10
Thank You For Your Service (R)
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
12:05-2:50-5:30-8:10-10:50
2:30-8:10
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
American Made (R) 11:20-5:20Halloween (PG-13) 12:00-2:3011:00
5:00-7:30-10:40
The Fortress (nam-han-san-seong) My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
1:00-3:50
(NR) 12:40-4:00-7:20-10:30
Little Shop of Horrors The Direc- The Snowman (R) 11:05-4:50-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 6:30-10:20
tor’s Cut 2:00-7:00
Let There Be Light (PG-13) 12:30- Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:004:30-7:00-10:45
3:10-6:40
Regal Fox Stadium 16 & IMAX The Foreigner (R) 1:10-4:10
Jigsaw (R) 11:30-2:00-4:3022875 Brambleton Plaza
Despicable Me 3 (PG) 2:00-4:15- 7:00-9:30
Keep Watching (R) 10:00
6:30-8:45
Geostorm (PG-13) 4:00-6:45-10:45 Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:204:20-7:10-9:40
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 1:15-9:30
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Suburbicon (R) 11:00-1:40-4:4012:15-2:45-5:15-8:00
7:20-10:10
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Marshall (PG-13) 1:50-7:40
12:30-3:45-7:00-10:15
Thank You For Your Service (R)
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
11:10-2:10-5:10-7:50-10:50
12:30-3:00-5:45
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea HalSame Kind of Different as Me (PG- loween (PG-13) 11:40-2:20-2:5013) 1:45-7:45
5:00-5:30-7:30-8:00-10:00-10:30
American Made (R) 4:30-10:45
The Snowman (R) 8:15-11:00
Regal Virginia Gateway
Blade Runner 2049 (R) 12:00-3:30Stadium 14 & RPX
7:00-10:30
8001 Gateway Promenade Place
It (R) 12:00-3:15-6:30-9:45-11:00 Tim Burton's The Nightmare
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:15-3:15- Before Christmas (PG) 2:00-7:00
6:15-9:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:30- Geostorm (PG-13) 2:20-8:10
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 5:00-10:50
3:00-5:30-8:00-10:30
The Foreigner (R) 1:30-4:15-7:15- American Made (R) 2:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R)
10:00
Jigsaw (R) 12:00-2:30-5:00-7:30- 12:55-6:45
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
10:00
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:00-4:00- 1:15-3:45
7:15-10:15
The Snowman (R) 4:15-9:15
Suburbicon (R) 12:15-2:45-5:15Blade Runner 2049 (R) 6:15-9:55
7:45-10:15
It (R) 9:10
Thank You For Your Service (R)
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:5012:45-3:45-6:45-9:45
3:50-6:50
Jigsaw: The IMAX 2D Experience The Foreigner (R) 1:10-3:55-6:30
(R) 1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30-11:00
Jigsaw (R) 2:15-4:45-7:30-9:50
Regal Kingstowne
Keep Watching (R) 10:00
Stadium 16 & RPX
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 1:20-4:205910 Kingstowne Towne Center
7:10-10:20
Tim Burton's The Nightmare
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 1:00Before Christmas (PG) 2:00-7:00 3:30-6:00-9:00
Geostorm (PG-13) 3:50-5:10Suburbicon (R) 1:30-4:10-7:459:15-10:25
10:15
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 1:05-6:35
Marshall (PG-13) 4:00-10:10
The LEGO Ninjago Movie (PG)
Thank You For Your Service (R)
12:45-4:40
1:50-4:50-7:50-10:40
American Made (R) 12:15
Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) 5:15
6:15-9:30
My Little Pony: The Movie (PG)
Jigsaw (R) 3:00-5:30-8:15-10:30
1:15-3:45
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
The Snowman (R) 4:20-9:20
Halloween (PG-13) 1:45-4:30-7:15Blade Runner 2049 (R) 1:00-3:15- 8:00-9:45-10:45
7:05-10:00
Smithsonian - Airbus
It (R) 6:50-9:55
IMAX Theater
Only the Brave (PG-13) 12:30-3:3014390 Air and Space Museum Pkwy
6:45-9:50
The Foreigner (R) 1:45-4:45-7:25 D-Day: Normandy 1944 3D (NR)
Jigsaw (R) 1:25-4:00-6:30-9:00
11:10-4:00
Keep Watching (R) 10:00
A Beautiful Planet 3D (G) 12:35
Golmaal Again (NR) 2:50-6:05-9:35 Aircraft Carrier: Guardians of the
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) 12:30Sea 3D (NR) 10:20-1:30-3:10
3:20-6:00-9:05
Happy Death Day (PG-13) 12:40- Dream Big: Engineering Our World:
An IMAX 3D Experience 2:20
3:05-5:30-8:00-10:30
Blade Runner 2049: The IMAX 2D
Suburbicon (R) 1:30-4:15-7:05Experience (R)
10:30
Journey to Space 3D (NR)
Marshall (PG-13) 2:30-7:45
12:00-4:50
Thank You For Your Service (R)
1:10-4:30-7:30-10:10
University Mall Theatre
Tyler Perry's Boo 2! A Madea
10659 Braddock Road
Halloween (PG-13) 12:25-3:00Despicable Me 3 (PG) CC: 12:205:30-8:00-10:30
Jigsaw (R) 12:15-2:45-5:15-7:50- 2:35-4:35
The Mountain Between Us (PG-13)
10:30
CC: 7:30-9:50
Regal Manassas
American Made (R) CC: 7:00-9:25
Stadium 14 & IMAX
The Emoji Movie (PG) CC: 12:0011380 Bulloch Drive
1:45-3:30-5:15
Tim Burton's The Nightmare
Before Christmas (PG) 2:00-7:00 Leap! (Ballerina) (PG) CC: 12:102:20-4:20
Geostorm (PG-13) 1:30-7:20
Geostorm 3D (PG-13) 4:30-10:00 American Assassin (R) CC: 7:15
Same Kind of Different as Me (PG- The Rocky Horror Picture Show
13) 12:50-3:45
(R) 9:45
C6
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH
975
J875
A92
J 10 7
EAST
KQ3
96
K 10 6 5
Q862
WEST (D)
2
10 4 2
Q73
AK9543
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
A J 10 8 6 4
AKQ3
J84
None
The bidding:
WEST
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
Pass
Pass
Pass
1
2
Pass
3
3
Pass
4
All Pass
Opening lead — K
CLASSIC PEANUTS
he Grand National Teams
starts with local eliminations and ends with finals at
the Summer NABC.
Teams from Florida
and San Francisco have
dominated the championship flight, and they met in
this year’s final in Toronto.
Florida, which had survived
its semifinal when its opponents made major errors on
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
the last two deals, was out of
gas, and the Bay Area team
(Grainger-Rosenberg, MartelWoolsey, Stansby-Stansby)
won by a lot.
In today’s deal, Lew
Stansby played at four
spades. He ruffed the club
opening lead, led a diamond
to dummy and returned a
trump to ... his jack. He won
10 tricks, plus 620.
LIO
In the replay, David
Grainger, West for the Bay
Area, stirred the pot by opening three clubs, and East
bluffed with a 3NT bid. South
doubled, and North bid four
hearts and played there.
East led a club, and declarer ruffed in dummy and
could have succeeded by
drawing trumps and guessing
the spades. But he took the
ace of spades at Trick Two
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
and was doomed to fail.
CHARLES SCHULZ
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
T
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
A J 10 8 6 4 A K Q 3
J 8 4 None
Your partner opens one
diamond, you respond one
spade, he bids two clubs,
and you try two hearts.
Partner then bids three diamonds. What do you say?
ANSWER: Partner suggests
six diamonds, four clubs
and extra strength. Bid six
diamonds. You might make
a grand slam, but to bid
one with assurance would
be tough. (Incidentally, in
today’s deal, South’s oneclub opening bid was artificial and strong.)
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
C7
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
BIRTHDAY | OCTOBER 31
This year you increase
the possibilities in
your life. You seem
capable of working
through nearly any situation
and landing on your feet. You
can also quickly understand
where others are coming from.
You are entering a very lucky
birthday year. If you are single,
you might meet someone
unexpectedly who could be
Mr. or Ms. Right. You will know
immediately that this person
is different. Do not settle. If
you are attached, you might
be so upbeat this year that
your partner could feel a little
left out. Share more of yourself
with your sweetie. Pisces
understands you almost a
little too well!
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
Follow your instincts with
a higher-up, and you’ll be
content with the results. Be
willing to make an adjustment.
Allow others to speak their
mind. You could hear some
remarkable suggestions.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
A friendship could play a
significant role in what goes
on. Someone has much to
share, which clearly comes
from this person’s unique
perspective. Once a partner
starts revealing what is on his
or her mind, you won’t be able
to stop him or her.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
WEINGARTENS & CLARK You might not be sure where
someone else is coming from.
You’ll need to revise certain
ideas and financial decisions.
Open up talks, but don’t be
upset if the other party backs
off for a while.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Reach out to an expert. You
might not think that you need
feedback, but you will gain
from the discussion. You need
to be aware of your limits, as
you could be more tired than
you realize.
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
One-on-one relating
determines the success of
proceeding as you have. You
will get the feedback you
need and desire. You might
want to change your schedule
accordingly.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
Your popularity soars and
allows you to share more of
your thoughts, especially the
imaginative ones. Know that
you can’t avoid a domestic
issue; in fact, the longer you
put it on hold, the longer it will
take to resolve.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
Your imagination often can
affect your daily life and
broaden your horizons.
Conversations could be
unusually insightful right now.
You might opt to head in a new
direction as a result.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
Reach out for new ideas,
and weigh the pros and
cons of each one. You might
want to find an expert to
discuss a key matter. Your
ability to communicate grows
as you stretch to understand
a different mindset from
your own.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
Reach out to a family member
who could feel left out. You
understand where this person
is coming from, yet you don’t
seem to have enough time to
visit with everyone you want to.
Communication flows.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
You beam in whatever you
want. Understand that you
need to follow your instincts
closely, or else you could feel
left out. A friend will give you
news that might surprise you.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
Be sensitive to your selfimposed limits. A certain
amount of confusion swirls
around you, which seems to
imply that any decisions made
right now might not be as solid
as you’d like them to be.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Do whatever is necessary to
get past an issue or problem.
A conversation enlightens
you as to what someone else
expects from you. You might
want to let this person know
whether you can meet his or
her expectations.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
kidspost
CHIP SAYS
TODAY
KIDSPOST.COM
The term jack-o’-lantern comes from an Irish folk tale
about a man called Stingy Jack who made a deal
with the devil. Before pumpkins were used, people
carved turnips and potatoes.
Sunny, with a high near 60 degrees.
Add an extra layer under your
costume to stay warm tonight.
Find more stories along
with photo galleries,
quizzes, recipes and
events on our website.
ILLUSTRATION BY OLIVIA ROSENGART, 7, RESTON
How the living
celebrate the
dead around
the world
BY
B RIDGET R EED M ORAWSKI
N
ot many U.S. holidays celebrate our ancestors or the
spirit world. Halloween and
Día de los Muertos are two
occasions to do so in the
United States, but around the world
there are many more festivals and
holidays for commemorating the dead.
Costa Ricans began celebrating Día
de las Mascaradas — Masquerades Day
— after colonization influenced the
native culture. The Spanish colonists
brought the customs of European medieval festivals and the “gigantes y cabezudos,” or giants and bigheads. The gigantes y cabezudos were elaborately and
ornately made of papier-mache, and
they are still fashioned this way in Costa
Rica.
Towns stage parades with the costumed characters teetering about with
their larger-than-life heads. Traditionally, costumes draw their inspiration from
Costa Rican mythical creatures, but
many share the Halloween spirit of
making fun of politicians, athletes and
other celebrities.
In 1997, the Costa Rican government
declared October 31 as Día de las
Mascaradas, according to Tania Robles,
an anthropologist and artist with the
Costa Rican Ministry of Culture and
Youth.
“In Costa Rica, there is an important
influence from [U.S.] culture, so Halloween was an extended celebration at the
time,” Robles said by email from Costa
Rica. Defining the date of celebration,
she added, was “intended to be the
beginning of the return to the local
traditions.”
Near the end of summer, the Chinese
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
ACROSS
1 Capital of
Poland
7 Actress Moore
11 Dick and Jane’s
dog
15 Tropical lizard
16 Large-scale
17 Vagrant
18 “Evita” Tonywinning actress
20 __-ran
21 Diminutive
suffix
22 Fort full of gold
23 Guitarist
Clapton
24 Spanish king
25 Coast Guard
rank
29 Prefix with sol
30 Flight height:
abbr.
31 Ambient music
pioneer Brian
32 Rural road
surface
34 Carpal or tarsal
lead-in
36 Prilosec target
37 Roberto
Clemente,
notably
41 “__-daisy!”
42 Approximately
43 Small fishing
boat
44 D.C. United’s
org.
45 Sweetie pie
46 Urge
48 Ceramics
shaper
52 34-Down, in
Toledo, Sp.
55 Naturalist John
56 “__ Lang Syne”
57 Truant GI
58 Fatherly
nickname
59 Tinker in the
workshop
62 Move a bit
63 “__, Brute?”
64 Not inclined (to)
65 Meat safety org.
66 Loch with a
mystery
67 Blowtorch user
DOWN
1 Windshield
cleaner
2 Striped quartz
SONIA GÓMEZ
In Costa Rica, people observe Día de las Mascaradas, or Masquerades Day, by
wearing large papier-mache heads that depict mythical creatures or celebrities.
them into the spirit world. Additional
offerings are also burned to please the
spirits of those who don’t have living
relatives.
In nearby Nepal, there are several
holidays similar to Halloween in the
United States. Tihar, the festival of
lights, is held each year in late autumn.
celebrate the Hungry Ghost Festival,
when it is believed that the gates to the
spirit world open and ghosts scour the
earth for offerings. Families place the
offerings — usually food and paper
made to look like money or personal
items — on an altar outside their home.
The paper items are then burned to send
Children dress up, walk door-to-door
and perform for their neighbors, who
give them candy and money.
Families place lights around their
homes and celebrate animals, such as
crows and cows, that are culturally
important. Dogs, for example, are given
floral garlands and red tikas, or
marks, on their brows as a sign of
admiration.
During Gai Jatra, another Nepali
holiday, families bring cows into the
streets to commemorate the spirits of
their deceased loved ones. Cows are
sacred in Nepal, as well as in other
countries such as India, and represent
the deep respect families have for their
ancestors and gods.
While the holiday is about remembering the dead, there’s a lot of fun to be had
during the festivities.
“Recently, it has become a festival
where you can make people laugh, you
have satires, comedy shows [and] festivals,” said Santosh Lamichhane, the
president of the Nepali American
Friendship Association.
These holidays, full of lights and
memories of loved ones, make the spirit
world a little less spooky. Whether you
decide to celebrate Halloween, Día de
los Muertos or another otherworldly
holiday, there are plenty of ways to keep
the spirit alive this fall.
KUMAR SHRESTHA
kidspost@washpost.com
KUMAR SHRESTHA
LEFT: Girls dress up in traditional attire for the Gai Jatra holiday in Nepal. RIGHT: During Gai Jatra, families bring cows
into the streets to commemorate their deceased relatives. The animal is considered sacred in Nepal and other countries.
TOD AY ’ S NE WS
JUSTIN LANE/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/
EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Paul Manafort was the chairman
of Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign.
Two former Trump
officials face charges
Former campaign officials for President Trump were charged Monday
with crimes related to the investigation of whether the campaign worked
with the Russian government to influence the 2016 election.
Paul Manafort, who was campaign
chairman, and his former business
associate Rick Gates were charged
with representing the Ukrainian government and a pro-Russian political
party in Ukraine from 2008 to 2014
without telling the U.S. government
they were doing so. The two also were
charged with lying when U.S. officials
asked them about ties to those groups.
The Justice Department says
Manafort and Gates worked together
to break U.S. laws and then tried to
hide those crimes.
The other eight charges involve
money. They include not telling the
U.S. government about bank accounts in foreign countries and not
paying taxes on millions of dollars
transferred to the United States.
If found guilty, Manafort and Gates
face fines and decades in prison.
It was announced Monday that a
third campaign official, George Papadopoulos, admitted that he lied to the
FBI about his contacts with Russians
during the campaign.
— Associated Press
MUSIC REVIEW
By Jeffrey Wechsler
A Messiaen marathon of strength and tenderness
BY
T OM H UIZENGA
Some music is so audacious, so
wildly provocative and potent, it
seems built for life-altering effect.
Think Ring Cycle, “Rite of
Spring,” “Einstein on the Beach.”
To this list we should add “Vingt
Regards sur l’Enfant-Jésus” by
Olivier Messiaen, especially in the
agile hands of Steven Osborne.
The Scottish pianist performed
the two-hour-plus piano cycle
without a break Sunday afternoon at a Phillips Collection concert at the nearby Cosmos Club.
Composed in 1944 in Nazioccupied Paris, Messiaen’s massive canvas, translated as “Twenty
Contemplations of the Christ
Child,” sings ecstatically, dances
violently and occasionally rests in
spacious meditation. The sections range from the practical,
“Contemplation of the Virgin,” to
the abstract, “Contemplation of
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
3 Like old
wagon trails
4 Appease,
as hunger
5 Smart gameshow vowel
purchase for
“F_LM CR_T_C”
6 “The Color
Purple” author
Alice
7 Bus terminus
8 Modeling glue
9 60 secs.
10 Devils’ playing
surface,
ironically
11 Puppeteer
Lewis
12 Patrol vehicle
13 Target of
captioning
censorship
14 “That’s __ bad”
19 “Do __
others ...”
23 Young
salamander
25 Caresses,
as a dog
26 Inaugural
recitation
27 Envelope part
28 Used a bike
10/31/17
29 Superficially
cultured
32 Embassy workers
33 “What a harebrained idea!”
34 52-Across, in
Toledo, OH
35 Self-esteem
36 Retired Yankee
slugger, to fans
37 Gas station
machine
38 Crude dude
39 Catering
coffeepots
40 Big screen star
45 Ship’s pronoun
46 One-named
soccer great
47 Change, as
map details
49 Sparkly crown
50 Lightbulb units
51 Many Rwandans
52
53
54
57
58
See 59-Down
Shake awake
Change
Brother of Cain
Nittany Lions’
sch.
59 It’s mightier
than the
52-Down,
so they say
60 4x4, for short
61 Blvd.
MONDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
‘The Letters
of Sylvia Plath’
lift the bell jar
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
death in 1940 of her father, a
highly regarded biologist and
Boston University professor who
misdiagnosed himself with cancer, refused treatment, and died
from what turned out to be a
treatable form of diabetes. “My
father is dead now,” Plath wrote
as a teenager in a rare reference
to him to a German pen pal, “so
my mother teaches instead.”
A vast number of the letters
document her education at
Smith College, where Plath excelled on a scholarship funded by
Olive Higgins Prouty, the novelist
who would serve as a sponsor
and mentor for the rest of Plath’s
life. The litany of successes at
Smith — studying with figures
such as W.H. Auden, acceptances
from publications such as the
Nation and the Christian Science
Monitor, a guest editorship at
Mademoiselle — were eclipsed by
what happened in the summer of
1953 when she was not accepted
into Frank O’Connor’s fiction
class at Harvard University.
“I began to frequent the offices
and couches of the local psychiatrists,” Plath wrote to her friend
Time,” and are splashed with prismatic colorations and extremes
in dynamics and rhythm.
Osborne not only surmounted
the punishing obstacles but
seemed to relish them. The psychedelic “By Him Everything Was
Made” seems to probe the universe, roaring one moment and
sprinkling delicate stardust the
next. Osborne easily muscled
through the jagged, almost jazzy
qualities of “Contemplation of the
Spirit of Joy” as if he had transformed into a superhuman fusion
of Franz Liszt and Art Tatum.
Messiaen, a Catholic, seems to
insist that religious music needn’t
be demure. Take the contemplation called “Christmas.” No silent
night here, as dissonant bells
clanged and Osborn finished by
fist-pounding the piano’s lowest
keys.
Amid all the bass chord detonations and whiplash rhythms,
Messiaen makes space for calm
reflection. “The Virgin’s First
Communion” is suffused with soft
light and serenity, while “I Sleep
but My Heart Wakes” moves slowly in quiet, airy chords. Osborne’s
precise control
of touch, in
barely whispered
moments and unrelenting thunder, was extraordinary.
To open, Osborne
exOsborne
plained why he
takes no intermission. It fosters a
“communal experience,” he said.
If only that hadn’t shattered at the
closing seconds, when an audience member began applauding
as the final notes were struck. The
look on Osborne’s face said it all:
Thanks for ruining the moment.
Edward Cohen. “I underwent a
rather brief and traumatic experience of badly-given shock
treatments on an outpatient basis. Pretty soon, the only doubt in
my mind was the precise time
and method of committing suicide.” She stole a bottle of 50
sleeping pills from her mother’s
safe, hid in the crawl space under
the front porch of the family
home and swallowed many of
them. “I . . . blissfully succumbed
to the whirling blackness that I
honestly believed was eternal
oblivion [but] I had stupidly
taken too many pills, vomited
them, and came to consciousness
in the dark hell. . . . My brother
finally heard my weak yells.”
A stint at McLean Hospital was
followed by her return to Smith
to complete her degree. A Fulbright scholarship allowed her to
study at Cambridge University.
There, she met the man who
would alter the direction of her
life. Through her high school and
college years, Plath had enjoyed
romances with a variety of young
men, but this time it was different.
In March 1956, Plath mentioned her new love interest to
her mother for the first time:
“Met, by the way, a brilliant
ex-Cambridge poet at the wild St.
Botolph’s Review party last week;
will probably never see him again
(he works for J. Arthur Rank in
London) but wrote my best poem
about him afterwards: the only
man I’ve met yet here who’d be
strong enough to be equal with.”
In another letter she named him:
“His name is Ted Hughes: he is
tall, hulking, with rough brown
hair, a large-cut face, hands like
derricks, a voice more thundering and rich than Dylan Thomas.”
Four months after meeting,
Plath and Hughes were married
in a secret ceremony in London
— Plath feared losing her Fulbright — attended only by Plath’s
mother. Volume 1 ends with a
decision by Plath to reveal her
marriage so that Hughes could
join her at Cambridge. Readers
will have to wait a year for the
letters that chronicle their marriage — one of the most discussed
in literary history — the dissolution of which contributed to
Plath’s suicide in 1963.
Engaging and revealing, “The
Letters of Sylvia Plath” offers a
captivating look into the life and
inner thinking of one of the most
influential writers of the 20th
century. “Through the publication of her poems, prose, diaries,
and now her collected letters,”
Frieda Hughes writes, “my mother continues to exist.”
style@washpost.com
bookworld@washpost.com
Paul Alexander is the author of,
among other books, “Rough Magic,”
a biography of Sylvia Plath, and
“Salinger,” a biography of J.D.
Salinger.
KLMNO
SPORTS
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
Game 1: L.A. won, 3-1, behind Clayton Kershaw’s seven strong innings.
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
Game 2: George Springer’s HR lifted the Astros to a 7-6, 11-inning victory.
SU
D
Game 3: Houston prevailed, 5-3, with Brad Peacock stellar in relief.
ARMS RACe
WILL DECide
champion
BY
D AVE S HEININ
IN HOUSTON
Game 4: Joc Pederson’s three-run blast capped a 6-2 Dodgers triumph.
Game 5: Alex Bregman’s single gave the Astros a thrilling 13-12 win in 10.
With the Astros’ and Dodgers’ pitching staffs running on fumes, the one that performs best will give its team the title
P
layed with no clock and on a
near-daily basis from roughly
early March to early October —
and for its two best teams, sometimes early November — baseball imposes order and enforces limitations by means other than time. Its
fundamental currency is outs, 27 of which
must be secured to win a nine-inning
game. Its guiding, overarching test, that
which leaves one team standing at the end
of a season’s impossible, eight-month
grind, is the limits of human endurance.
There will be a winner of the World
Series determined within the next two
nights, perhaps as early as Tuesday night’s
Game 6 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles.
The Houston Astros, ahead three games to
two, need to secure 27 more outs, somehow, to win the first championship in
franchise history. The Los Angeles Dodg-
Runs
12
ERA
6.33
Game 5 on Sunday night
was the second game in
World Series history in
which each team scored at
least 12 runs. The first was
in 1993’s Game 4, in which
the Toronto Blue Jays beat
the Philadelphia Phillies,
15-14.
The combined earned run
average for the Astros’ and
Dodgers’ bullpens in this
year’s World Series. Kenley
Jansen, Los Angeles’
dominant closer, gave up
the winning run on Alex
Bregman’s single Sunday
and also blew a save in
Game 2.
ers, somehow, need to secure 27 to force a
Game 7, then, somehow, 27 more to win
their first since 1988.
But in the aftermath of a dizzying,
thrilling and exhausting Game 5 on Sunday night, a 5-hour 17-minute and 10-inning marathon of tectonic shifts and
towering home runs — which the Astros
didn’t so much win as survive, by a 13-12
score, on Alex Bregman’s RBI single in the
10th — the principal factor from this point
forward may be endurance. Both teams
are approaching the edge of what the
body, specifically the throwing arms of
their pitchers, can tolerate, and in some
cases may have breached it.
“Everybody’s pretty exhausted after
that,” Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw told
reporters at Minute Maid Park in the wee
hours of Monday morning. “Emotionally
Verlander
4-0
Record of Astros ace Justin
Verlander (2.05 ERA) this
postseason. Verlander is
slated to start Tuesday
night’s Game 6 as visiting
Houston tries to close out
the Dodgers.
Game 6: Astros at Dodgers Today, 8:20 p.m., Fox
PHOTOS (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT): SEAN M. HAFFEY/GETTY IMAGES, CHRISTIAN PETERSEN/GETTY IMAGES,
EZRA SHAW/GETTY IMAGES, SHANNA LOCKWOOD/USA TODAY, MATT SLOCUM/ASSOCIATED PRESS
SERIES CONTINUED ON D5
Ten innings. Twenty-five runs. Five hours plus. And in an instant, a classic.
houston — The
greatest testament to
Game 5 and to the
delicious madness of
the whole AstrosDodgers maelstrom in
Thomas
the World Series is that
Boswell
the players themselves
can hardly believe what
they, and their opponents, are
accomplishing.
Many teams in many sports respect
each other. But the Houston Astros
and Los Angeles Dodgers almost seem
in awe of their foes and, a bit
sheepishly, of themselves, too. Is this
really happening? Are we truly this
evenly matched, this obstinate and,
under incredible pressure, performing
so superlatively, inning after breathless
inning?
After the Astros’ 13-12 victory in 10
innings Sunday night — a 5-hour 17minute game that had so many thrills
that it never lost its almost insane pace
and pressure — Houston’s Carlos
Correa, a 23-year-old superstar in the
peak of health said, with a straight
face, “I feel like I’m going to have a
heart attack out there.
“It’s [so] high pressure. The game is
going back and forth. Both teams are
great, scoring runs. Hopefully we can
win one more game and take a break,
because this is hard on me.”
Correa did not say he hoped to win
one more game to become World
Series champions; he meant he did not
know how many more games —
especially all-time classics such as
Games 2 and 5 — he could take. He was
kidding. But not by a lot.
I have covered every World Series
game since 1975. Game 5 was the most
insanely entertaining I have ever seen.
That’s not the same thing as “best,” a
distinction usually reserved for World
Series games with the highest stakes,
such as the torturously thrilling
Game 7 just 361 days ago when the
Cubs won their first title in 108 years.
The amazements of Game 5 fall into a
different category: glorious games of
continuous disbelief when all our
baseball expectations, built over our
lifetimes, are shredded by an unseen
clown and tossed in our grinning faces.
The obvious comparison is the Toronto
Blue Jays’ 15-14 win over the
Philadelphia Phillies and reliever
Mitch (Wild Thing) Williams in
Game 4 in 1993. But there is little
comparison.
That game was a mess, a slashed
canvas of 14 walks, hit batters and
sloppy play in rainy conditions, plus
bad pitching by several hurlers whose
BOSWELL CONTINUED ON D5
Nats take a leap into the unknown
with hiring of Martinez as manager
As their injury list continues to grow,
Redskins are running out of options
Here’s the thing with
Dave Martinez: We don’t
know. We can’t know. Not
yet, anyway.
In the coming days and
weeks and months, we
Barry
will read stories and
Svrluga
absorb anecdotes about
how the Washington
Nationals’ new manager — as he was
formally proclaimed Monday — is
prepared for this job. We’ll dig into his
16-year big league career as an
outfielder and occasional first baseman,
digest the qualities he had on the
diamond that would translate well to
the dugout, assess his leadership and
note how it was refined during a decade
Jay Gruden’s black T-shirt said it all
Monday, even before he launched into the
injury update that precedes each regular
season news conference at Redskins Park.
“By Any Means” it proclaimed. And that
is the level of determination, spiced with
luck, that will be required for the Washington Redskins’ cobbled-together roster
to weather the team’s upcoming stretch of
games — three consecutive against NFL
division leaders — without tumbling precipitously in the standings.
With Gruden citing nine starters and
four key backups as injured in the wake of
Sunday’s 33-19 loss to the Dallas Cowboys
— including four members of the starting
at the side of Joe Maddon, regarded as
one of baseball’s most progressive
managers during his time with the
Tampa Bay Rays and Chicago Cubs.
Those stories will all be true. I’ll
probably write a few. The people
offering tales from Martinez’s past and
predicting his future success will speak
from the heart. General Manager Mike
Rizzo, when he takes questions on the
process, will outline the qualities that
attracted him, and they will make sense.
But exactly how Martinez will do,
when it’s the eighth inning in October
SVRLUGA CONTINUED ON D6
Inside: Nationals hire Dave Martinez to be
seventh manager in team history. D6
BY
PRO FOOTBALL
Ezekiel Elliott suspension
is back on for now. D4
HOCKEY
Capitals stress positives
despite limitations. D6
PRO BASKETBALL
Wizards out to prove they
are a real contender. D7
L IZ C LARKE
offensive line — the Redskins are scrambling to find enough healthy bodies to send
onto the field. Among the ailing, Gruden
said he was least optimistic about tight end
Jordan Reed and defensive lineman Matt
Ioannidis playing Sunday at Seattle.
An extended absence by the 6-foot-2,
246-pound Reed, who had only recently
returned to health before suffering a hamstring injury Sunday, would hamper a Redskins passing game that has managed to be
productive through Week 8 despite limited
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D3
Redskins at Seahawks
Sunday, 4:05 p.m., Fox
Inside: Dan Steinberg on Trent Williams’s
struggle with his knee injury. D3
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
FANCY STATS
SOCCER INSIDER
Georgia,
Alabama
look like
CFP faves
Maryland
in a slump
not seen
since 1993
D.C. SPORTS BOG
BY C ADE M ASSEY
AND R UFUS P EABODY
When the College Football
Playoff committee unveils its first
rankings Tuesday night, we’ll find
out what teams committee members believe are the best so far.
But the rankings tend to blur
“best” and “most deserving,”
which makes forecasting the
process tricky. With three years of
hindsight and continuing algorithmic tweaks, we’re getting
closer to understanding what the
committee is looking for.
We expect the top four teams in
the first rankings to be Georgia,
Alabama, Clemson and Notre
Dame. We give the first three
teams a better than 50 percent
chance of remaining in the top
four when the season ends.
The committee’s criteria for
choosing the “best” teams vs. the
“most deserving” ones are complex, and our understanding of
them is imperfect, but analyzing
three years of rankings gave us an
objective basis for forecasting
this subjective process.
Of the two factors, “best” is
easiest to fathom because it’s
what we do every week: Evaluate
how good each team is in terms of
how well they’ll do in the future.
A convenient way to think about
“most deserving” is what ESPN
calls Strength of Record (SOR).
It’s related to strength of schedule
but considers a team’s record in
addition to whom they played.
Technically, SOR is the probability an average top 25 team
would have at least as many wins,
given its schedule, as a given team
has achieved. In our analysis, an
average top 25 team would have a
9 percent chance of winning as
many games as Georgia has — all
of them — if it played the Bulldogs’ schedule. That’s the lowest
probability of any team, thus
Georgia’s top SOR ranking.
We’ll learn how the committee
views this year’s contenders Tuesday. But keep in mind that how
things play out on the field is a
greater source of uncertainty
than the committee’s preferences.
sports@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/news/
fancy-stats
QUOTABLE
“The optimism of it
is we are 5-3.
The negative of it
is that we are 5-3.”
CAM NEWTON,
Panthers quarterback,
sounding equally hopeful and
downtrodden following Carolina’s
17-3 victory at Tampa Bay
on Sunday (via Early Lead)
BY
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Former Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III said Jay Gruden “didn’t believe in me and I didn’t really fit his system.”
RGIII, unfiltered and on the air
BY D AN S TEINBERG
AND S COTT A LLEN
In his most reflective and expansive
comments on his tenure in Washington,
former Redskins quarterback Robert
Griffin III said Monday that he was
drafted by a coach who didn’t want him
and by a team that wasn’t sold on him,
and that the short life span of his time in
Washington wasn’t in the best interest
of him or the organization.
During a nearly 30-minute interview
with 106.7 The Fan, Griffin said
repeatedly he made many mistakes
during his tenure, and he praised the
city, the fans and his former teammates.
But he expressed frustration with the
portrayal of his behavior in
Washington, and with the local media
for continuing to mention his name.
“It’s really you guys, honestly. It’s the
local D.C. media, constantly pulling my
name into things,” he told Grant
Paulsen and Danny Rouhier, while
explaining his series of cryptic Sunday
night tweets about the team. “I was a
pro’s pro my last year there, didn’t make
any noise with the team, did everything
I possibly could, played scout-team
safety, ran routes for the QBs that
weren’t playing and were active. And I
felt like there’s no need for my name to
be dragged in the dirt with those types
of things anymore.”
In detailing his shortcomings, Griffin
went through things both on the field
(his inability to stay healthy) and off
(knowing what to say to the media, and
when to say it). He said he hopes to play
more football and that he continues to
work out in Florida. He said he
continues to root for the Redskins, but
he pushed back on how he has been
portrayed in some media accounts,
talked about his dedication to studying
film and took issue with suggestions
that he demanded read-option plays be
eliminated from the team’s offense in a
meeting after his rookie season.
“Not once in that meeting did I ever
say that I didn’t want to run the zone
Griffin opens up on Gruden,
Redskins fans and the media
in a lengthy radio interview
read,” he said. “Not once in that meeting
did I ever say that I want to be a pure
drop-back passer.”
Griffin also argued he wasn’t drafted
into a situation that was conducive for
him to become the best player he could
be, saying that realization bothers him
more than any of the anonymously
sourced accounts or media criticism.
“It’s really just the reality of the
situation,” he said. “I was drafted to a
team with a coach who didn’t want me,
with an organization that wasn’t sold on
me. And I think, when you make that
many trades and trade that many picks,
you don’t do that for a guy that you’re
not sold on.”
Griffin once seemed on track to
become one of the most beloved players
in franchise history. Five years later, he’s
out of the NFL, which remains stunning
in the context of his rookie year. (“In
2012, we were able to achieve those
things and go out and put on a show and
really electrify the city,” he said.) And he
admitted that few players have had such
a precipitous drop in such a short time.
“I felt like my time there was cut
short, partially due to injury, partially
due to some other things,” he said. “And
just the fact that at the end of the day, a
coach [Jay Gruden] was brought in that
didn’t believe in me and I didn’t really
fit his system. So really and truly, as a
No. 2 pick in the draft, and so many
draft picks traded for a player, I got
legitimately two years. And I don’t think
that was in my best interest or in the
organization’s best interest. But I’ve
been able to accept that and move on
from it, and I just want people to be able
to realize that and not try to drag my
name through the mud, when I’ve done
everything that I was supposed to since
the mistakes that I made in D.C. to
rectify anything negative that was said
about me.”
In perhaps his most fiery comments,
Griffin fiercely defended his father from
suggestions that he meddled in his
career, talking of his dad’s military
service and insisting he attended just
two practices over four years.
“To just make up things about him
and attack his character, those things
bother me,” Griffin said. “He never once
stepped foot in a meeting with Mike
Shanahan and/or Jay Gruden, or any
other coach for that matter. He never
once told a coach what he should or
shouldn’t do.
“And those are things that people
continually say, and the one thing that I
know is that perception becomes
reality,” he went on. “And the longer you
guys keep pushing this perception that
I’m this ignorant, African American,
arrogant, egotistical person, it makes
people start to believe those things. And
I feel that it’s not just unfair; it’s not
right. Because those types of things,
when you inaccurately portray
somebody’s character or who they are or
their family, it hurts their family, it
hurts those people, and I don’t think
that that’s right.”
The main thrust of his message was
that he has come to a better
understanding of why his career
declined — and that he doesn’t look
back with bitterness.
“I’m with everybody else in D.C.,” he
said. “I want to see the Redskins win
games, and I understand why [Gruden]
made the decision that he made.”
His Sunday night tweets, he said,
were “just my way of saying, ‘Look, I get
it. Just let me live. Let me move on with
my life and don’t keep pulling me back
into certain things that don’t need to be
said.’ That was kind of my piece.”
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
scott.allen@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
dcsportsbog
Play it again, Tiger Woods.
For the second straight year,
Woods will return from back
surgery at his holiday
tournament in the Bahamas the
week after Thanksgiving, he
announced Monday in a story on
his website.
Woods has not played since he
withdrew from the Dubai Desert
Classic on Feb. 3 with back
spasms. Two months later, he
had his fourth back surgery in
just over two years.
Woods will be part of the 18man field at the Hero World
Challenge, which starts Nov. 30
at Albany Golf Club. While
sponsor exemptions are limited
to the top 50 in the world, Woods
is exempt as the tournament
host. The tournament has no cut.
A year ago, Woods returned
after 15 months recovering from
two back surgeries. He finished
15th out of 18 players.
Woods made his first PGA
Tour start at Torrey Pines and
missed the cut, and he then went
to Dubai and didn’t make it past
the first round before his back
began acting up.
steven.goff@washpost.com
TELEVISION AND RADIO
WORLD SERIES
8:20 p.m.
Woods will return
to competition Nov. 30
The Maryland men’s soccer
team is stuck in its worst rut since
Coach Sasho Cirovski’s first season in College Park, which came
24 years ago.
With a 2-1, extra-time defeat
against Michigan on Sunday, the
Terrapins (10-4-3) continued
their free fall, losing their fourth
consecutive match — all at home
— to end the season.
They will try to get back on
track in the Big Ten tournament,
starting with a quarterfinal Sunday against Wisconsin (8-4-4) at
Ludwig Field. The winner most
likely will visit Michigan (11-4-2),
which won the conference’s regular season title for the first time
and secured the No. 1 seed in the
tournament.
Indiana (13-0-4) is No. 2, followed by Michigan State (11-2-3),
Maryland, Wisconsin, Ohio State
(7-9-1), Penn State (5-9-2), Northwestern (6-11-0) and Rutgers (412-1).
The semifinals are slated for
Nov. 10-12 at Grand Park in Westfield, Ind.
“Thankfully we have a week
before our next game, and we
need it,” Cirovski said. “We need
to regroup and re-energize and
refocus and get ready for the
playoffs. That’s never how you
want it to be, but that’s our reality.
We have a lot of winners, and
we’re going to find a way to win.”
Maryland
was
unbeaten
through 13 matches (10-0-3) and
regarded as a College Cup threat
before hitting the late-season
skid, its worst since the 1993
campaign. The home slump is the
team’s longest since it suffered
five consecutive defeats that
same year.
Even if they don’t win the Big
Ten championship, the Terrapins
are expected to receive an invitation to the 48-team NCAA tournament. The late downturn, however, is damaging to their hopes of
earning one of the 16 seeds and a
first-round bye.
In the ACC men’s tournament,
Virginia (10-3-3) is the No. 6 seed
and will host No. 11 Boston College (6-9-1) in a first-round match
Wednesday in Charlottesville.
The winner will visit No. 3 Louisville (11-2-3) in Sunday’s quarterfinals. Wake Forest (15-1-1) and
North Carolina (14-2-1) are the
top seeds. The higher seeds will
host matches until the final,
which is scheduled for Nov. 12 in
Charleston, S.C.
The ACC women’s tournament
has reached the final four, which
is set for Friday and Sunday in
Charleston. In the semifinals,
top-seeded Duke (18-1-0) will face
No. 4 Virginia (11-4-4), and second-seeded North Carolina (132-2) will play No. 3 North Carolina
State (14-4-1). All are expected to
receive NCAA tournament berths
next week.
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/soccerinsider
DIG ES T
GOLF
S TEVEN G OFF
Woods made the
announcement just three days
after he pleaded guilty to reckless
driving in a deal that allows him
to avoid jail time if he doesn’t
violate terms of his probation.
The deal stems from an arrest
on a DUI charge on Memorial
Day, when Woods was found
asleep at the wheel of his car,
which was still running and
parked about 15 minutes from
his home in Florida.
Woods attributed it to a bad
combination of prescription
medicine. He completed a drug
treatment program in July.
Woods has 79 PGA Tour wins
and 14 majors but has not won
since the Bridgestone
Invitational in August 2013.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Randy Shannon is shaking
things up as Florida’s interim
coach.
The former Miami coach
replaced Jim McElwain on
Sunday and needed less than a
day to make changes.
Shannon, who was the Gators’
defensive coordinator before he
was named interim coach,
opened up the quarterback job,
giving former Notre Dame
starter Malik Zaire a chance to
compete with struggling
incumbent Feleipe Franks. He
promoted defensive line coach
Chris Rumph to defensive
coordinator and elevated former
Idaho coach Robb Akey from
quality control assistant to
defensive line coach.
Florida and McElwain parted
ways after two-plus tenuous
seasons. The Gators (3-4, 3-3
Southeastern Conference) will
play at Missouri (3-5, 0-4) on
Saturday. . . .
Quarterback Luke Falk will
start for No. 25 Washington State
when it hosts No. 18 Stanford on
Saturday, Coach Mike Leach
said.
Falk is just 136 yards shy of the
Pacific-12 Conference career
passing record, but Leach
benched him in the Cougars’ 5831 loss to Arizona on Saturday.
Falk was replaced by Tyler
Hilinski, who passed for
509 yards and two touchdowns
with four interceptions. . . .
Washington freshman tight
end Hunter Bryant is expected
to be out indefinitely for the
No. 12 Huskies after suffering a
left leg injury in Saturday’s
victory over UCLA.
SOCCER
Victor Vazquez and Sebastian
Giovinco scored to help Toronto
FC beat the New York Red Bulls,
2-1, in Harrison, N.J., in the
opener of their MLS Eastern
Conference semifinal.
Giovinco drew a foul conceded
by Felipe Martins just outside
the box and then bent the free
kick over a four-man wall to
make it 2-1 in the 72nd minute.
The second of the two-game
aggregate series is Sunday in
Toronto.
Toronto set the MLS singleseason record for points (69). . . .
The Houston Dynamo and
visiting Portland Timbers battled
to a 0-0 draw in the opening leg
of their Western Conference
semifinal.
Portland will host the second
leg Sunday. . . .
Sean Dyche celebrated his
fifth anniversary as Burnley
manager with a 1-0 victory over
visiting Newcastle that moved
the modest northwest England
team up to seventh in the English
Premier League.
Jeff Hendrick’s 74th-minute
goal from close range was the
winner.
MISC.
Hyeon Chung swept aside
Mischa Zverev, 6-0, 6-2, at the
Paris Masters to set up a secondround match against Rafael
Game 6: Houston at Los Angeles » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45), WTEM (980 AM)
NBA
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Milwaukee » NBA TV
Detroit at Los Angeles Lakers » NBA TV
SOCCER
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
UEFA Champions League: Benfica at Manchester United » Fox Sports 1
UEFA Champions League: Chelsea at Roma » Fox Sports 2
MLS Eastern Conference semifinal, first leg:
New York City FC at Columbus » ESPN
TENNIS
6 a.m.
2 p.m.
ATP Paris: early-round play » Tennis Channel
ATP Paris: early-round play » Tennis Channel
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
8 p.m.
8 p.m.
College Football Playoff rankings show » ESPN
Miami (Ohio) at Ohio » ESPN2
Bowling Green at Kent State » ESPNU
COLLEGE GOLF
3 p.m.
East Lake Cup, match-play semifinals » Golf Channel
Nadal.
Nadal will begin his quest for a
record 31st Masters title — but
first in Paris — on Wednesday.
The last two spots for the
season-ending ATP Finals in
London will be decided in Paris,
while Nadal needs just one win
to end the year ranked No. 1
ahead of Roger Federer, who
pulled out of Paris after winning
the Swiss Indoors in Basel for the
eighth time Sunday. Federer is
skipping Paris so he can stay
fresh for London. . . .
Gun Runner, the top older
horse on the East Coast, is the
slight 9/5 favorite for the
$6 million Breeders’ Cup Classic
on Saturday at Del Mar (Calif.).
He breaks from the No. 5 post
while defending champion
Arrogate starts from the rail as
the 2-1 second choice.
Del Mar is hosting the
$28 million, 13-race Breeders’
Cup for the first time. The
season-ending championships
open with four races Friday
followed by nine, including the
Classic, on Saturday.
— From news services
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D3
SU
professional Football
Season of pain leaves Redskins’ Williams with plenty to think about
In this autumn of
pain, Trent
Williams has
watched game
film of a proud
and stubborn 310Dan
pound man
Steinberg attempting to play
offensive tackle
through a damaged right knee
ligament, accompanied by a
miserable deep bone bruise.
Listen to Williams talk about
that game film, and it almost
sounds like he is describing an
out-of-body experience. He
watches the man’s leg — his leg
— plant in the grass and then
give out. He doesn’t remember
that happening.
“Every time that kneecap
shifts to that certain spot, your
body just shuts your leg down,”
he said Sunday evening. “So I’m
numb, but I’m watching plays on
film where I’m planting, and my
leg is giving out, and I’m not
even noticing.”
According to Williams, there’s
a chance that one of those times
his leg gives out, his knee will
buckle, putting major ligaments
at risk. And that’s not even
accounting for the pain, which
he described rather vividly as he
leaned back against his locker
Sunday evening.
“Like somebody’s stabbing you
in the knee,” he explained
matter-of-factly. “Just think if
you had a bruise in your arm,
and somebody just kept
punching that bruise for days
and days and days on out.
Eventually that bruise is going to
feel like you broke your arm. And
that’s essentially what I’m
dealing with.”
These are the sort of realities
— along with his reduced
effectiveness and his sense that
the injury was actually getting
worse — that finally, finally
forced the Washington Redskins’
best player off the field Sunday.
As he watched from the sideline,
his team — using a mismatched
offensive line ultimately reduced
to its fourth-string left tackle —
got pushed around by the rival
Dallas Cowboys in a 33-19 home
loss.
His emotions? Pride in a
ragtag group that probably had
no business hanging around
until the final minute.
ABBIE PARR/GETTY IMAGES
Redskins offensive tackle Trent Williams missed Sunday’s loss to Dallas with a knee injury.
Helplessness that he couldn’t
assist. (“It’s torture,” he said. “It’s
torture.”) And some sort of
complicated, deep-in-his-gut
understanding that this wasn’t
the day for him to numb up his
battered knee yet again and
trudge back on the field.
“Basically, I let people think
for me. Because if you let me
make my own decision, I’m going
to be suiting up until they’ve
basically got to replace my leg
with another one,” Williams said.
“I mean, I could be effective. I
could go out there and I could
play. But I wouldn’t be the Trent
that you guys know, that you’ve
watched for years before. You
could see flashes of him, but I
wouldn’t be at my all. [And]
there comes a time where even
numbing it up really doesn’t do
the trick. It doesn’t get all the
way numb anymore.”
Fun stuff, huh? And that’s
without Williams even talking
about the bone-on-bone
sensation and the way his
kneecap “is going to float
around” until the medial
patellofemoral ligament gets
fixed.
Williams is, in some ways, an
outlier in the world of pro
football. He is unusually blunt
and honest about both his
thoughts and his injuries. He is
introspective but also willing to
share that quality with the
strangers sticking recorders in
his face. He is okay punishing his
body for some greater good, even
in the dying days of lost seasons.
He already set his current
recovery back by playing
through the knee injury earlier
this month, because the
Redskins needed him.
Now — facing a potential
surgery that he admits is
terrifying, with a six- to ninemonth recovery time, and with
his team still hovering near .500
and in desperate need of his help
— he might be facing a weekly
decision. Should he play through
the pain? Should he take on the
risks of further damage? Should
he just wait and hope for the
best? Should he consider the
horrifying prospect of getting
surgery sooner rather than later,
to make sure he is healthy for the
start of the 2018 season?
To an outsider, that might feel
like the most logical choice,
especially with this season
already hanging by a thread.
Common sense would almost
certainly keep Williams out of
next week’s game at Seattle. But
common sense might have had
him sit out the game against San
Francisco a few weeks ago. Yet
Washington’s dire left tackle
situation instead forced him on
the field, which he acknowledged
made his injury worse.
“I hate sitting out, man,
especially with the injury
situation we’re looking at,” he
said Sunday. “Who knows? I
could cut [the current] timeline
short or be forced to. And I’m all
right with that. I just have to do
what I’ve got to do.”
Williams is wrestling here not
just with Washington’s 3-4
record but with the way he has
imagined his legacy. He wants to
be one of the all-time greats. He
wants to play into his mid-30s.
He is 29 now, and “if I put
[surgery] off for a couple more
years, your body just don’t heal
the same when you’re entering
that third decade of life, so I’ve
got to weigh that type of decision
out, too,” he said.
But he also wants to help the
Redskins, “and then sitting here
watching games that I know I
can help my team in some
capacity, it’s tough, man; it’s
tough,” he said. “I’ve never been
in a situation like this.”
Players grapple with such
issues in all corners of every NFL
locker room. Managing your
health might be even thornier for
fringe players clinging to their
careers, who might not have a
starting spot waiting for them if
they take a breather. Williams
isn’t asking for sympathy — “I’ve
got comrades who are all dealing
with something, so I don’t want
too much attention drawn to my
struggle,” he said — and he isn’t
conceding anything about the
rest of this season.
He’s still hoping that time off
will get him back on the field this
year, and that the inevitable
surgery can be pushed into the
future. He guessed it’s 50/50 that
rest will improve the injury and
said there was only a small
chance that his season is already
over, saying, “If I get the bruise
to calm down, I’m going to test it
again for sure.”
But there’s nothing simple or
obvious about this process, not
when watching is torture and
playing might as well be. The
injury “runs my life right now,”
Williams said. And yet the
prospect of surgery, he said, is
“like a black cloud hanging over
my head.” He played through the
pain “until I really just basically
couldn’t bear it anymore.” And
he also said, “There’s not a
second of the day that goes by
where it’s not on my mind.”
So he was set to talk to doctors
again Monday and throughout
the week, and they will reach a
conclusion about his status as
Sunday’s game approaches.
Outside observers who care both
about this elite player and the
team’s long-term fortunes might
want to drag Williams to the
surgeon this week — discretion
and valor and all that. But when
you’re trying to balance your
responsibilities as a teammate
with your responsibilities to
yourself, none of the options is
appealing.
“For one time in my career, I
can’t let my heart make the
decision,” Williams said. “I’ve got
to actually think this thing out.”
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
For more by Dan Steinberg, visit
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog.
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S0903 1x12
Injury-ridden Washington running out of options
REDSKINS FROM D1
production from the largely remade wide receiver corps.
Gruden essentially ruled out Ioannidis for the upcoming game
against the Seahawks and seemed
skeptical about a short-term return after explaining that the defensive lineman will undergo surgery Tuesday on his broken hand.
That’s a major blow, further winnowing a defensive line that lost
its best player, first-round draft
pick Jonathan Allen, to a foot injury in Week 6.
And even before the Redskins’
lone healthy starting offensive
lineman, Shawn Lauvao, was injured Sunday, the toll of injuries to
the unit exceeded anything
Gruden had experienced in
20 years in coaching — a sentiment
echoed by virtually every player in
the locker room.
“If we’d go out to practice tomorrow, I don’t know who my left
tackle would be,” Gruden said,
without a trace of hyperbole. “I
really don’t have one right now.”
He ran down the list: Five-time
Pro Bowl left tackle Trent Williams
can’t practice because of searing
pain from a knee injury that requires reconstructive surgery;
backup Ty Nsekhe isn’t ready to
practice, easing back from surgery
on an abdominal muscle; and
third-string tackle T.J. Clemmings,
who played the bulk of snaps
against the Cowboys until spraining an ankle, probably can’t practice.
While holding out hope that
Nsekhe and Clemmings might be
available later in the work week,
Gruden said he would likely tap
Tyler Catalina to work at left tackle
if his first-, second- and thirdstring players couldn’t go. A rookie
guard from Georgia who had never appeared in an NFL game before Sunday, Catalina mopped up
at left tackle after Clemmings
went down.
With the Redskins’ bye week
behind them and no chance to rest
players without suffering the consequences, the stark truth is that
Gruden has few options as the
team heads into arguably the
toughest stretch of its schedule.
Their next three games are
against teams that boast a combined 16-6 record, and two of those
games are on the road at particularly inhospitable venues: Sunday
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Redskins tight end Jordan Reed suffered a strained hamstring in Sunday’s loss to the Cowboys and could miss the next game at Seattle.
at Seattle (5-2), leading the NFC
West; followed by Nov. 12 against
Minnesota (6-2), leading the NFC
North; and Nov. 19 at New Orleans
(5-2), leading the NFC South.
“The issue is we have 13 guys
that are questionable [with injury], and we only have seven guys
that we can put as inactive [on
game day],” Gruden said. “That’s
the major issues that we have right
now. We have to try to get six of
those guys up, at least — somehow.”
While midseason trades are
rare in the NFL, the league’s trade
deadline is Tuesday at 4 p.m.
Gruden tamped down speculation that the Redskins’ front office
might be working on a trade but
acknowledged an urgent need
along the defensive line, in the
wake of Sunday’s loss, and at safety, with starter Montae Nicholson
suffering a stinger and AC shoulder joint injury and backup Stefan
McClure a hamstring strain.
“We have to add a defensive
lineman somewhere, somehow,”
Gruden said. “We are short at safety possibly. Obviously, offensive
line we are in limbo because we are
waiting to see who can play and
who can’t play. But we can’t really
make a lot of roster moves because
of all these injuries. You can’t put
any of these guys on IR and you
can’t cut any of these guys. They
are all major parts of our football
team. So we will have to figure it
out and we will do it.”
The Redskins would likely draw
interest from other NFL teams if
they were willing to trade wide
receiver Terrelle Pryor Sr., given
his 1,007-yard production in 2016
and despite a relatively slow start
in Washington.
There is no evidence the Redskins are willing to part with Pryor,
whom they signed to a one-year
deal in March to complement second-year wide receiver Josh Doctson. The hope was that between
them, the 6-5 Pryor and 6-2 Doctson would compensate for the
2,000-plus receiving yards lost
when the team let DeSean Jackson
and Pierre Garcon depart via free
agency. But Pryor and Doctson
rank fourth and seventh among
the team’s leading receivers to
date. Pryor has 18 receptions for
223 yards and one touchdown;
Doctson has eight receptions for
130 yards and three touchdowns.
If Pryor were on the market,
former NFL general manager
Charley Casserly, now an analyst
for the NFL Network, believes he
would draw interest.
“He has proven he could be productive,” Casserly said. “It hasn’t
clicked yet in Washington. But
there was interest in him in free
agency by other teams. Money
probably was a deterrent then, but
now probably money doesn’t
mean a lot if a team needs a receiver and has an injury. It would be a
half-season rental job. But I like
Pryor; I think he has got ability.”
But with the Redskins’ tight end
corps battered, Gruden acknowledged Monday that he needs to get
his wide receivers more involved
in the offense.
At the moment, the team’s top
two receivers are running back
Chris Thompson (31 catches, 442
yards) and tight end Vernon Davis
(17 catches, 312 yards).
Wide receiver Jamison Crowder
ranks third (28 catches, 272 yards),
but he, too, was injured Sunday en
route to a season-high nine catches for 123 yards. As a result, he is
among the 13 players Gruden listed as questionable Monday, with a
hamstring injury and lower-leg
contusion.
“Without Crowder possibly and
without Jordan [Reed], I think
Chris Thompson will still have a
major workload, and, obviously,
the receivers are going to have to
step up,” Gruden said. “Ryan
[Grant] had some clutch catches
again. Obviously we have got to get
[Josh] Doctson going and Terrelle
[Pryor]. Maybe it is [Brian] Quick,
whoever it is.”
liz.clarke@washpost.com
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Democracy Dies in Darkness
S0833-2 1x12
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
professional Football
Dallas’s Elliott loses latest court battle
BY
ADAM GLANZMAN/GETTY IMAGES
With Jimmy Garoppolo heading to San Francisco, the 49ers would
appear unlikely to pursue Redskins quarterback Kirk Cousins.
NFL NOTES
49ers acquire new QB
in Patriots’ Garoppolo
F ROM NEWS SERVICES
AND STAFF REPORTS
In a mini-blockbuster trade
that could have significant implications league-wide and in Washington, the San Francisco 49ers on
Monday agreed to send a secondround draft choice to the New
England Patriots for their backup
quarterback, Jimmy Garoppolo.
Garoppolo played well last season while Tom Brady was serving
his four-game Deflategate suspension, and the Patriots held on to
him last offseason despite apparent interest from several teams.
But now they are parting with him
on the eve of Tuesday’s NFL trade
deadline.
The 49ers, winless in eight
games this season, land a potential franchise quarterback for
their new regime of Coach Kyle
Shanahan and General Manager
John Lynch. The trade likely takes
the 49ers out of the running for
one of the top quarterbacks in next
year’s NFL draft and removes
them from the potential bidding
for Kirk Cousins, the twice-franchise-tagged quarterback of the
Redskins who formerly played for
Shanahan in Washington when
Shanahan was offensive coordinator.
The trade agreement was confirmed by a person familiar with
the deliberations after being first
reported by ESPN.
The Patriots receive what
amounts to nearly a first-round
pick next spring for Garoppolo,
given the Niners’ 0-8 record that is
tied with that of the Cleveland
Browns (who are also 0-8) for the
league’s worst.
Garoppolo turns 26 this week.
He is eligible for unrestricted free
agency during the upcoming offseason, meaning that the 49ers
must re-sign him to a new deal or
use their franchise-player tag to
retain him.
The deal is good news for the
Redskins in their bid to retain
Cousins. The Los Angeles Rams—
who have another former Redskins offensive coordinator, Sean
McVay, as their first-year head
coach — are having success with
their second-year quarterback,
Jared Goff, the top overall selection in last year’s NFL draft. There
undoubtedly will be bidders for
Cousins if he becomes available.
But the 49ers, like the Rams, no
longer appear to be a prospective
landing spot for him.
— Mark Maske
Seahawks bolster line
The Seattle Seahawks, until
Monday, were a good but flawed
team in a season in which the NFC
is lacking honest-to-goodness
powerhouses.
The Seahawks have a still-formidable defense, even if it
didn’t appear that way during
Sunday’s triumph at home over
the Houston Texans in a captivating quarterback duel between Seattle’s Russell Wilson and Houston’s rookie sensation, Deshaun
Watson. The Seahawks’ offense remained a work in progress, leaning heavily on Wilson’s improvisational mastery behind an offensive line that had been too often
neglected in recent years.
That changed with a trade for
Duane Brown, the Texans’ threetime Pro Bowl left tackle.
The Seahawks sent cornerback
Jeremy Lane and draft picks, reportedly a fifth-rounder next year
and a second-rounder in 2019, to
Houston for Brown, who played
his first game of the season Sunday in Seattle against the Seahawks. A day later, he became a
member of the Seahawks.
He had held out in a contract
dispute and then reported to the
Texans just before the controversy
erupted over the recent comments
made by the team’s owner, Robert
McNair, during an NFL owners’
meeting. Brown was among the
Texans players who were the most
vocal in their public criticism of
McNair’s comments, in which Mc-
Nair reportedly said that owners
“can’t have the inmates running
the prison.”
It was clear there was a chance
that the Texans would part with
Brown before the NFL’s trade
deadline at 4 p.m. Tuesday. It also
was clear the Seahawks probably
were in the market for a left tackle.
The deal should surprise no one,
especially given that the NFL no
longer is the no-trade league that
it once was. Making trades, even
during the season, has become a
far more accepted form of rosterbolstering, and this was a blockbuster for Seattle.
— Mark Maske
Bears TE Miller has surgery
Chicago Bears tight end Zach
Miller had surgery to save his left
leg after he tore an artery while
dislocating his knee during Sunday’s loss at New Orleans.
The team said the “urgent” operation Sunday to repair a torn
popliteal artery was successful.
Miller remained at University
Medical Center New Orleans along
with team medical personnel.
Coach John Fox said a vein was
taken from the right leg to fix his
left one. He said the pulse in Miller’s lower leg was good and that
he had feeling in his foot.
“Not that he’s out of the woods
by any stretch, but it’s as good as
could be expected at this point,”
Fox said.
Asked whether Miller remains
in danger of losing his leg, Fox
said: “I don’t want to go down that
path, I’m not a doctor, I don’t
know. I’m not right there, but I
think they feel good about where
he is right now, as it relates to that.”
Fox also wasn’t sure whether
Miller tore any ligaments.
Miller dislocated his knee when
he landed in the end zone attempting to catch a 25-yard touchdown
pass from Mitchell Trubisky. The
injury, which was replayed several
times on the scoreboard, forced
the tight end to be carted off and
taken to the hospital.
After a review, officials ruled
the ball hit the ground when Miller bobbled it on his way down. . . .
In other Bears news, the NFL
suspended injured linebacker Jerrell Freeman 10 games for violating the league’s policy against performance-enhancing drugs.
It was the second PED suspension in as many years for Freeman,
who received a four-week punishment last season. The league said
he will begin serving this one immediately.
RAVENS: Joe Flacco is recovering nicely from the concussion
he received last week, and Coach
John Harbaugh said “there’s a
good chance” the quarterback will
play Sunday at Tennessee.
Flacco suffered a concussion
and a gash that required stitches
after absorbing a late, high hit from
Miami linebacker Kiko Alonso in
Baltimore’s 40-0 victory Thursday
night. Flacco was on the ground at
the end of a protective slide when
Alonso slammed into him.
The second-quarter tackle
caused Flacco to lose his helmet
and left him dazed. He was subsequently escorted to the locker
room and did not return.
Harbaugh said Monday that
“symptoms are zero” for Flacco.
But he will remain in the concussion protocol at least until Baltimore (4-4) resumes practice
Wednesday, and maybe longer.
If Flacco is cleared by Sunday,
however, he will start against the
Titans (4-3). “If he’s ready, he’s
playing,” Harbaugh said.
COLTS: Coach Chuck Pagano
said Andrew Luck will miss his
third consecutive week of practice
with lingering soreness in his
right shoulder.
Pagano would not confirm the
starting quarterback was getting a
second opinion on the surgically
repaired shoulder. But he did say
the Colts (2-6) would exhaust “all
resources” to assure Luck is
healthy when he comes back.
— Associated Press
M ARK M ASKE
A federal judge in New York
rejected the NFL Players Association’s latest request for a preliminary injunction for Ezekiel Elliott, potentially clearing the way
for the NFL to enforce its sixgame suspension of the secondyear running back for the Dallas
Cowboys.
The ruling was made by U.S.
District Judge Katherine Polk
Failla after a hearing Monday.
The league has been prevented
from enforcing Elliott’s suspension, imposed under the league’s
personal conduct policy, all season by a series of court rulings.
But barring further legal developments, the NFL now is free to
put Elliott’s suspension into effect.
He would miss the Cowboys’
game Sunday against the Kansas
City Chiefs and then subsequent
games against the Atlanta Falcons, Philadelphia Eagles, Los
Angeles Chargers, Washington
Redskins and New York Giants.
He would be eligible to return for
the final three games of the regular season, beginning Dec. 17 at
Oakland.
Elliott and the NFLPA can appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the 2nd Circuit.
The implementation of Monday’s order was delayed for 24
hours, allowing the union and
Elliott time to consider their options to appeal.
“After reviewing the parties’
comprehensive written submissions and hearing extensive oral
argument earlier today, the Court
concludes that, on this record,
the NFLPA has failed to demonstrate a substantial question war-
CRAIG RUTTLE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ezekiel Elliott, right, exits federal court after his hearing. The
ruling clears the way for the NFL to levy his six-game suspension.
ranting the extraordinary remedy of injunctive relief or a balance of hardships that decidedly
weighs in its favor,” Failla wrote.
The NFL and NFLPA did not
immediately respond to request
for comment Monday night.
The NFLPA, Elliott’s legal representatives and the Cowboys
have contended that Elliott was
not treated fairly during the process that led to NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell imposing the sixgame suspension and Harold
Henderson, a league-appointed
arbitrator, upholding it after the
NFLPA appealed on Elliott’s behalf.
The players’ union was granted a preliminary injunction by a
federal judge in Texas. But that
injunction was lifted by a federal
appeals court in New Orleans,
which ruled that the district
court in Texas lacked jurisdiction
because the NFLPA filed its lawsuit there before Henderson decided Elliott’s appeal. The case
shifted to New York, where the
NFL had filed a lawsuit seeking to
have Henderson’s ruling on the
appeal affirmed. U.S. District
Judge Paul A. Crotty granted the
union’s request for a temporary
restraining order, which remained in effect pending this
ruling on a temporary injunction.
Failla wrote in her ruling Monday that while “reasonable minds
could differ on the evidentiary
decisions made by the arbitrator,
the proceedings in their totality
accorded with the” sport’s collective bargaining agreement and
were fundamentally fair.
“The arbitrator gave Mr. Elliott
ample opportunity, in terms of
both proceedings and evidence,
to challenge the Commissioner’s
decision before the arbitrator;
the arbitrator’s ultimate decision
against Mr. Elliott does not render these proceedings any less
fair,” she wrote.
The NFL had said it remained
confident in its legal arguments
and believed that it eventually
would prevail in court. The case
is playing out in New York, where
a federal appeals court reinstated
the four-game suspension of New
England Patriots quarterback
Tom Brady in the Deflategate
case. Brady sat out the first four
games of last season after playing
the entire 2015 season following a
ruling by a federal judge overturning the suspension.
The ultimate outcome of the
Brady case seemed to reinforce
Goodell’s authority in player disciplinary matters. The NFL has
stressed that the precedent from
the Brady case applies to the
Elliott case as it proceeds in New
York.
The league concluded following a lengthy investigation that
Elliott, in its view, was guilty of
domestic violence in a series of
incidents last year involving his
former girlfriend. Elliott was not
charged with a crime by authorities in Columbus, Ohio.
The Cowboys have a record of
4-3 after beating the Redskins on
Sunday at FedEx Field. Elliott,
who led the NFL in rushing last
season as a rookie, has been very
productive on the field in recent
weeks, totaling 413 rushing yards
in the Cowboys’ past three games.
mark.maske@washpost.com
JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES
Cornerback Marcus Peters kept his eye on the ball and returned this Jamaal Charles fumble 45 yards for a touchdown Monday night.
Kansas City forces five turnovers, halts Denver
BRONCOS 29,
CHIEFS 19
BY
D AVE S KRETTA
kansas city, mo. — Harrison
Butker kicked five field goals, Marcus Peters returned a fumble 45
yards for a touchdown and the
Kansas City Chiefs beat the turnover-prone Denver Broncos, 2919, on Monday night.
Alex Smith threw for 202 yards
and a touchdown, most of it going
to tight end Travis Kelce, who
hauled in seven balls for 133 yards
and the score. The Chiefs (6-2) also
intercepted Trevor Siemian three
times and hopped on two fumbles
to beat Denver (3-4) for the fourth
straight time.
Siemian finished 19 of 36 for 198
yards and a touchdown, and has
now thrown eight picks and only
three touchdown passes in the
past five games. The Broncos have
lost all but one of them.
It was a crucial bounce-back
win for the Chiefs, who had their
12-game AFC West winning streak
snapped 10 days ago at Oakland.
The Chiefs had won five straight to
start the season before losing to
the Steelers and then to the Raiders on Derek Carr’s last-second
touchdown throw.
ED ZURGA/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chiefs place kicker Harrison Butker converted one of his five field
goals in the first half as Kansas City upped its record to 6-2.
It started just like old times,
too: Jamaal Charles with a run, the
Chiefs with a touchdown.
The only difference was
Charles, who went to four Pro
Bowls with the Chiefs, was back in
Kansas City with the Broncos. And
the score came when the opportunistic Peters stripped him, picked
up the loose ball and returned it 45
yards for the opening score.
When the Chiefs were on offense, they went right to Kelce,
who also had success against the
Broncos in both of their meetings
last season. He beat Darian Stewart for a 29-yard touchdown catch
and a 14-0 lead.
The Chiefs were threatening to
put the game out of reach later in
the first quarter when Coach Andy
Reid got cute with the play-calling.
Rather than keep the ball in the
hands of Smith, who hasn’t
thrown a pick all season, he let
wide receiver Tyreek Hill throw it
— and he was intercepted in the
end zone.
Kansas City still led 20-3 when
the Broncos’ offense finally found
some rhythm. They marched 60
yards to set up their second field
goal by Brandon McManus, and
then capped an 80-yard drive with
DeVontae Booker’s scoring run. It
was just the second time Denver
had reached the end zone in 13plus quarters, but it got Coach
Vance Joseph’s team within 20-13
with a quarter to play.
Butker answered with another
field goal, and the Chiefs’ defense
held on fourth and four near midfield to get the ball back. Butker
added two more field goals, the
last with 4:41 left, giving him 18
consecutive made attempts and
putting the game out of reach.
Note: The Chiefs renamed the
broadcast booths at Arrowhead
Stadium in honor of Hall of Fame
player and broadcaster Len Dawson before the game.
The 82-year-old Dawson joined
the Dallas Texans in 1962 and followed the franchise to Kansas City,
where he led the renamed Chiefs
to the Super Bowl IV title. He went
into the Hall of Fame as a player in
1987 and a broadcaster in 2012,
and announced earlier this year
that he would retire as a radio
color analyst after the season.
“I really don’t know what to
say,” Dawson said, “because it’s a
great, great honor for me.”
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D5
SU
world series
World Series is an arms race as it shifts to L.A.
SERIES FROM D1
and physically.”
Game 5 will linger in the minds
and hearts of anyone who witnessed it for a long time. It was
the second-longest and secondhighest-scoring World Series
game of all time, and it featured
the second-most homers — seven, one fewer than were smashed
four nights earlier in Game 2, the
majority of them Sunday night
either tying the game or putting
one team ahead. The ball may or
may not be juiced, but the game
certainly is. Game 5 was merely a
distillation of baseball at the end
of 2017, marked by towering
home runs and a parade of relievers to the mound, in which the
final out remained elusive to the
end.
The mind reeled. The heart
soared and crashed and soared
again.
But what matters most of all
now is the arms. To accrue the
outs necessary to hoist the World
Series trophy at the end will
require wringing some final
drops of effort out of two groups
of pitchers who, almost uniformly, are reaching the point of
diminishing returns, if not fullsystem failure. The first to make a
go of it, Tuesday night’s starters,
will be Houston ace Justin Verlander and Los Angeles lefthander Rich Hill.
Heaven help them.
Fuel light is on for both teams
Confronted with two relentless
offenses and a specially stamped
World Series baseball that may or
may not be slicker than normal —
as well as the built-up effects of
thousands of pitches thrown this
season, too many of them coming
in recent days — no pitcher on
either team can be said to be at
his peak performance here on the
doorstep of November, and more
than a few appear to be fully
spent. There are pitchers on both
teams of whom it must be asked
whether another stint on the
mound is an acute injury risk.
Consider Brandon Morrow. On
Sunday night, the right-handed
reliever was supposed to have
been off-limits for the Dodgers,
having already gone beyond his
established limitations by pitching in four straight games, bisected by one day off, and in 11 of the
Dodgers’ 12 total postseason
games to that point.
But he was also one of the
Dodgers’ two or three best —
responsible for nearly a quarter
of the 28 consecutive scoreless
innings the team’s bullpen had
amassed at one point this postseason — and he thought he had
an inning in his arm Sunday
night. He phoned the dugout and
told Manager Dave Roberts he
BASEBALL NOTES
Phillies take
a chance on
Kapler as
next manager
A SSOCIATED P RESS
JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES
Alex Bregman hits a game-winning single against the Dodgers’ Kenley Jansen in the bottom of the 10th inning Sunday to end an epic Game 5.
wanted to pitch the seventh, with
the Dodgers up by a run — a
decision Morrow would later
characterize as “selfish.”
“In the seventh inning,” Roberts said, “you can’t turn him
down.”
Morrow would last just six
awful, lifeless pitches, two of
which left the park, propelled by
the bats of Astros stars George
Springer and Carlos Correa, two
others of which produced hits
and still another of which
bounced away from the catcher
for a wild pitch. By the time the
Dodgers could get another reliever ready, Morrow had given up
four runs and squandered the
lead. Roberts was only taking the
word of one of his most trusted
men, but with the benefit of
hindsight it looks like a borderline case of medical malpractice.
The ranks of the overcooked
and the flat-out burnt is long. It
likely includes Astros closer (in
name only) Ken Giles, a stalwart
all season but someone the Astros studiously avoided Sunday
night — even as they blew leads of
11-8 and 12-9 — and probably
can’t put into another highleverage situation the rest of the
series.
There is no telling what the
Dodgers can expect any more
from Kenta Maeda or Kenley
Jansen — the latter widely re-
garded as the best closer on the
planet, but who appeared a shell
of himself, his velocity down, in
giving up the winning run on
Bregman’s single Sunday night —
or the Astros from top relievers
Will Harris, Chris Devenski or
Joe Musgrove. All told, relievers
for both teams have a combined
ERA of 6.33 in the series.
“I think you can always dig
deeper and find one more level,”
Devenski said defiantly after
Game 5. “I’m going to do it one
more time.”
The well-done list may also
include Kershaw, the premier
pitcher of his generation, and
someone who could be relied on
for a lock-down relief stint between postseason starts in the
past. The evidence of Kershaw’s
doneness is overwhelming, beginning with the fact he couldn’t
protect leads of 4-0 and 7-4 in the
first half of Sunday night’s madness.
“Everybody’s taxed right now,”
Roberts said.
Advantage for Astros?
The Astros may have the upper
hand in Game 6, in that they have
Verlander, the 2011 AL Cy Young
winner and a sturdy 4-0 with a
2.05 ERA this postseason, to start
it, and they may be prepared to
“piggyback” starter Lance McCullers Jr. in relief, whenever
Verlander gives out. McCullers, a
starter by trade, famously secured the AL pennant with a
four-inning save in the Astros’
Game 7 win over the New York
Yankees in the AL Championship
Series.
Nobody would be surprised in
the least if Verlander and McCullers are the only pitchers who take
the mound for the Astros on
Tuesday night. But this is a highwire act for Astros Manager A.J.
Hinch. If they falter, and the
Astros lose, McCullers was to
have been their Game 7 starter, a
job that would at that point
probably fall to Charlie Morton,
who would have to make that
start on three days’ rest.
The Dodgers, needing two
wins, would probably need to
save Game 3 starter Yu Darvish
for a potential Game 7 on
Wednesday, rather than use him
in relief in Game 6, leaving them
precious few options for a plan B
if Hill should falter Tuesday
night.
Here, at the end, the Dodgers
are almost surely paying dearly —
in dead arms — for the decision
to pull Hill after four mostly
effective innings in Game 2, and
Darvish’s subsequent, 12/3-inning
dud in Game 3. Both exits, one
forced and one unforced, necessitated long, grueling nights for the
Dodgers’ bullpen, the toll of
which has brought them to this
point of danger.
What has also brought the
Dodgers to the brink, of course, is
the ferocious ability of the Astros’
offense, which, in a year of unprecedented home run and
strikeout totals across the sport,
managed the difficult trick of
leading the majors in slugging
percentage while striking out at
the lowest rate. Using the advanced metric of wRC+ — or
weighted runs created plus, a
measure of a player’s offensive
output, adjusted for factors such
as park effect and era — the
Astros this year rated as the best
offense the game has seen since
the 1931 Yankees of Babe Ruth
and Lou Gehrig.
“We knew going into this series [that] this is the best offensive ballclub that we were going
to see all year,” Roberts said.
“They can slug you. They spoil
pitches. They’re athletic.”
And now, Roberts must stitch
together enough outs out of the
tattered shreds of his pitching
staff to beat these Astros. He
must do it with some key pieces
diminished, and others completely useless. He must do it
without getting anybody hurt.
And if he manages to do it
Tuesday, he has to come back
Wednesday and do it again.
dave.sheinin@washpost.com
The Philadelphia Phillies went
outside the organization and perhaps outside the box to get a new
manager.
Former major league outfielder
Gabe Kapler was hired Monday to
be Philadelphia’s manager, completing a one-month search.
“I’m equal parts honored, humbled and excited by the opportunity with the Phillies, an elite franchise in a city rich in history, tradition, sports excellence and with
amazingly passionate fans,” Kapler said in a statement. “I believe
there is no better place to build a
winning environment, and I take
that task very seriously.”
Kapler has served as director of
player development for the Los
Angeles Dodgers since 2014. The
Dodgers trail the Houston Astros
3-2 in the World Series. Game 6 is
Tuesday night in Los Angeles.
Kapler will be introduced at a
news conference after the Series
ends. The 42-year-old Kapler replaces Pete Mackanin, who moved
into a front-office position.
Kapler batted .268 with 82
homers and 386 RBI over 12 seasons with six teams between 1998
and 2010. He had no previous ties
to the Phillies.
“Gabe has a track record of leadership, winning, progressive
thinking and working with young
players, and we fully believe that
he is the right person to guide this
organization into the future,” Phillies General Manager Matt Klentak said.
ATHLETICS: Police say Oakland catcher Bruce Maxwell
showed signs of intoxication when
he was arrested following accusations that he pointed a handgun at
the head of a woman in Scottsdale
who had delivered food to his
home.
Court documents show Maxwell denied pointing a gun at the
driver, and say once the driver
explained why she was there, Maxwell lowered the gun.
The driver became frightened,
handed the food over to Maxwell
at the doorstep and left.
When officers arrived there,
they say Maxwell had alcohol on
his breath, showed signs of intoxication, often yelled during the police encounter and made anti-police statements.
Maxwell was booked on suspicion of aggravated assault with a
deadly weapon and disorderly
conduct. He was released Sunday
night on a $10,000 bond.
THOMAS BOSWELL
Back and forth the Astros and Dodgers go. Where they end up, nobody knows.
BOSWELL FROM D1
names were barely known then
and forgotten now. That was a
crazy game, but also one that
didn’t make you a baseball fan.
More likely the opposite.
In Sunday night’s classic —
and yes, we have now had two
genuine classics in a week — the
Astros were not making their
early comeback against (no
disrespect) Tommy Greene of the
1993 Phillies, but against Clayton
Kershaw, the ace of the age,
having the best postseason of his
career and working on full rest.
And the Astros just stomped
him. In his regular season career,
Kershaw has been given six or
more runs of support 61 times.
He has won 59 of those games.
On Sunday, he got seven runs of
support in the biggest game of
his life and left with a nodecision after allowing six runs
and being so wild that he
couldn’t escape the fifth inning.
Also, the Astros were not
defeating a goofy Wild Thing late
in the game but, for the second
time in this Series, winning an
extra-inning thriller in which
they battered the best reliever of
this decade, Kenley Jansen.
Marwin Gonzalez nailed him for
the game-preserving, saveblowing homer in Game 2. Alex
Bregman, a glorious defensive
prodigy with outrageous
confidence at third base, got the
game-winning, line-drive single
to left to beat Jansen in Game 5.
If the Astros go on to win this
Series — and they have Justin
Verlander, in perhaps the hottest
streak of his future Hall of Fame
career, lined up to start Game 6
on Tuesday at Dodger Stadium —
then Game 5 will drip with
symbolism. That will be the
famous night when the Astros’
JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES
Jose Altuve, left, and Yuli Gurriel exulted after teammate Carlos Correa’s seventh-inning blast Sunday.
ferocious, MLB-leading offensive
attack, and their erupting fans,
defeated both Kershaw and
Jansen. Also add that the
Dodgers’ second-best reliever in
October has been Brandon
Morrow, whose fastball reaches
99 mph. He faced four men,
allowed four runs, got no outs
and allowed 11 total bases.
How does any team recover
from that? Southpaw Rich Hill,
who was trusted to work just
four innings and throw 60
pitches in Game 2, will suddenly
be captain, first mate and
lookout on the Dodgers’ life raft.
Part of the power, and the
shock-thrill impact, of Game 5
was watching what happened to
Kershaw. Bad things definitely
can happen to good people. Most
of the fine work he has done
recently to repair his tattered
October reputation will be
reversed by the shaky, fretful
way he helped blow leads of 3-0
(before he took the mound), 4-0
(after three innings) and 7-4 in
the fifth when his teammates
seemed determined to salvage
both the game and his World
Series dignity.
But almost every aspect of this
game made you ask, “Have I ever
seen that before? Wait, has
anyone ever seen that before?”
For just the second time in
postseason history, three-run
deficits were overcome three
times. The Dodgers led 4-0 and
were tied at 4 on a three-run
homer by rookie Yuli Gurriel.
Then the Dodgers went back
ahead 7-4 on a three-run homer
by rookie Cody Bellinger, only to
be caught again at 7 on a threerun homer by Jose Altuve.
If you see one such dramatic
three-run bomb in a World
Series game, you have a special
memory. To see three crucial,
clutch three-run homers — all of
which transformed the game
with one swing — in the span of
two innings is almost
preposterous.
Three-run homers at crucial
moments in World Series games
are so rare that people still talk
about Bernie Carbo’s three-run
homer to tie Game 6 of the 1975
World Series between Boston
and Cincinnati as one of the
game’s lasting memories because
it helped set up Carlton Fisk’s
famous foul-pole homer. On
Sunday, we had a trio of Carbos,
named Gurriel, Bellinger and
Altuve.
And they have so much
company in the collective Hero
Photo that it’s almost comical.
The third blown three-run lead
was an Astro sin, coughing up a
12-9 lead in the ninth to force
extra innings; it was perhaps the
most “I-really-don’t-believe-thisis-happening” moment of the
entire night.
You know the ghouls in all the
Nights of the Living Dead are
never truly dead. But baseball
teams truly do expire — except
in this World Series. When Yasiel
Puig hit a lucky two-run homer
into Minute Maid Park’s
Crawford Boxes to get the
Dodgers within 12-11, you almost
felt that baseball itself was
trying to rub raw the last nerve
ending of every player. But, come
on, the rally will stop there,
surely. Yet it didn’t, because
neither of these teams will
relent, will give, will meet the
moment with anything but the
corniest, most wonderful spit-inyour-eye.
Down to the last Dodger
strike, Chris Taylor slapped an
RBI single up the middle — the
first lesson in hitting, back
through the box — to tie the
score at 12.
This game was a magic box.
And you never knew what would
jump out of it next. In this
season of the home run, these
teams have combined for a
World Series record 22 blasts. In
Game 5, the Astros became just
the third team to hit five homers
in a Series game. The 5-foot-5
Altuve, probably the best allaround player in baseball and
surely the most infectiously
energizing, has seven homers in
a single postseason. The record
is eight. Feel free to root.
In the 2004 World Series,
Cardinals Manager Tony
La Russa said that, in his long
experience, he believed that
there was often one game in a
World Series that both teams
could have “won in a dozen
ways, but only one team wins.”
La Russa thought that the team
that won that swing game
usually won the Series. And
La Russa said those words after
his team had just lost such a
game, 11-9, to the Red Sox, who
swept the Cardinals to win their
first championship since 1918.
This Series already has had
two such melodramatic “swing
games” that could have gone
either team’s way in a dozen
crisis moments. Houston won
both.
There is a 30-year history of
teams being incredibly hard to
beat if they can just get back to
their own home field for Game 6,
even if they trail in the Series.
Can these teams, especially
the Dodgers, still keep punching
after all the emotional damage,
or at least incredible energy
drainage, of Game 5?
“It was tough. What can you
do?” Jansen said afterward. “But
I’m already looking for Tuesday.”
Tuesday will come soon
enough.
But trust this: Baseball will be
looking back at Game 5 of the
2017 World Series for decades.
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
For more by Thomas Boswell, visit
washingtonpost.com/boswell.
D6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
Nationals make it o∞cial, hand over the reins to Martinez
BY J ORGE C ASTILLO
AND C HELSEA J ANES
The Washington Nationals officially named Dave Martinez the
seventh manager in club history
Monday morning, wrapping up a
pointed search for the man tasked
to take over a talented veteran
club with World Series aspirations. Martinez signed a threeyear deal with a team option for a
fourth year, a notable departure
from the Nationals’ previous
dealings with managers. A news
conference is slated for Thursday,
the team announced.
“We are delighted to bring
Dave aboard and excited about
what he will bring to our clubhouse and our dugout,” Nationals
managing principal owner Ted
Lerner said in a statement. “We
have been very clear about our
goals as an organization and we
feel confident we’ve found the
right man to help us reach them.”
General Manager Mike Rizzo
plainly outlined those goals after
the Nationals decided not to renew Dusty Baker’s contract, leaving them in search of a manager
to replace someone who led the
team to 192 victories and consecutive division titles for the first
time in franchise history but
couldn’t guide the club beyond
the National League Division Series. The list really boiled down to
one objective: winning a World
Series, which will take advancing
beyond the NLDS for the first
time in club history after four
first-round exits.
“I am excited to bring Dave into
our family,” Rizzo said. “As we
went through this process it became clear the type of manager
we were looking for — someone
who is progressive, someone who
can connect with and communicate well with our players, and
someone who embraces the analytical side of the game. We came
CHICAGO TRIBUNE/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE/GETTY IMAGES
As bench coach, Dave Martinez won a World Series with the Cubs a year ago. The Nats have the same objective in naming him manager.
away from the process feeling like
there was absolutely no one better suited — who matched up to
what this organization needs
right now — than Dave.”
Martinez, 53, has spent the
past decade as Joe Maddon’s
bench coach with the Tampa Bay
Rays and Chicago Cubs — two
clubs at the forefront of the analytics movement that has steadily
altered the way rosters are constructed, teams are handled and
games are managed in recent
years. The 10-year run included
an American League pennant
with the Rays in 2008 and a World
Series title with the Cubs last year.
But he has no managerial experience. He interviewed for several
managerial openings across baseball at least since 2010, including
in 2013 when the Nationals considered him for their position.
Washington hired Matt Williams,
a fellow rookie manager at the
time, instead.
A Cubs draft pick in 1983, Martinez played for nine teams across
16 seasons, including a four-year
stint with the Montreal Expos. He
spent the majority of his playing
career as an outfielder, though he
also played some first base, and
recorded the first hit in Tampa
Bay history with a single on Open-
ing Day in 1998. The son of Puerto
Rico natives, Martinez is the third
active Latino manager in baseball, joining Rick Renteria of the
Chicago White Sox and Alex Cora
of the Boston Red Sox.
But while securing a new manager represented the most highprofile order of business for the
organization this offseason, Monday’s announcement does not signal a slowdown. Now the Nationals must build a coaching staff,
and do so after many of the more
high-profile candidates have
signed elsewhere. While Baker
had years of managerial staffs
from which to choose, Martinez
has not yet had to build one.
The Nationals likely will not
give him free rein to do so. They
hired Mike Maddux as pitching
coach before the 2016 season, a
process that began before the
Nationals hired Baker. But Rizzo
will almost certainly allow Martinez to surround himself with familiar faces. The question is how
much continuity the Nationals
will want between Baker’s staff
and the new one. When the Nationals brought in Williams, they
kept longtime Nationals staffers
such as Randy Knorr and Matt
LeCroy to foster continuity. When
they fired Williams, they kept
hitting coach Rick Schu and third
base coach Bob Henley to serve
on Baker’s staff. Continuity has
mattered before and likely will
again.
But Maddux is gone to the
St. Louis Cardinals, meaning
there will be turnover with the
pitching staff he learned inside
and out for the past two seasons.
High-profile pitching coach options such as Jim Hickey and
Martinez’s former colleague in
Chicago, Chris Bosio, already
have been hired elsewhere. Other
options exist, of course. But the
choices are more limited now
than they were a week ago, and
the Nationals have decisions to
make.
Washington does not need to
fill out its coaching staff immediately and will likely wait until
after Martinez is officially introduced to start filling vacancies.
The general manager meetings
are in two weeks, and those often
offer the opportunity to interview
many candidates at once. When
the Nationals hired Baker, they
did not fill out his coaching staff
until those meetings.
Besides the coaching staff, the
general offseason machinations
begin this week, too. Free agency
starts the day after the World
Series. Trades become fair game,
too. The Nationals could be hunting starting pitching, a reliable
infielder to serve as insurance for
the injured Daniel Murphy, bullpen help and a brand new bench.
They are also beginning this offseason after crossing the luxury
tax threshold for the first time,
which could complicate their
dealings.
For now, the biggest story of
their offseason has reached a resolution. But the Nationals have
much more to address. The work
is just beginning.
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
BARRY SVRLUGA
What we know about Martinez now is nothing compared with what we’ll learn
SVRLUGA FROM D1
and one reliever is reeling and
another is overworked and the
crowd is closing in and the game
is suddenly moving at warp
speed?
We. Don’t. Know.
In a vacuum, the Nationals’
decision to hand the 53-year-old
Martinez a three-year deal to be
their manager makes complete
sense. But this decision wasn’t
made in a vacuum. It was made
by pushing aside Dusty Baker, a
known quantity in both good
ways and bad.
There’s a feeling in the game
that it would be hard for a firsttime manager to be more
prepared than Martinez is. He
has seen the game as a player. He
has seen the game as a coach. He
speaks English and Spanish. And
he probably is a strict
disciplinarian who is also a
player’s manager, a vegan who
eats meat, a conservative
Democrat or a liberal
Republican. Right now, he can be
all things to all people, because
he hasn’t managed a game. We’re
going to be finding out together.
What we do know is that
Martinez is being handed a
roster that is capable of winning
a World Series, a clubhouse that
has that expectation and a front
office and ownership group that
are all but demanding it.
“We have been very clear
about our goals as an
organization,” Ted Lerner, the
Nats’ managing principal owner,
said in a statement Monday
announcing the move, “and we
feel confident we’ve found the
right man to help us reach them.”
But if history is any guide,
Martinez — and the Nats — may
need to wait for such a lofty goal.
If Dave Roberts can lead his Los
Angeles Dodgers to victories over
the Houston Astros in Games 6
and 7 of this here World Series,
then he will become the first
manager to win a championship
in his first job since Ozzie
Guillen did so with the Chicago
White Sox in 2005. Guillen, back
then, was in his second year at
the helm, as Roberts is now.
There is precedent for what
the Nationals are trying to get
from Martinez. In 2001, Bob
Brenly took over for the ousted
Buck Showalter in Arizona, and
those Diamondbacks — loaded
with Randy Johnson and Curt
Schilling — managed to squeeze
past the New York Yankees in
seven games, making Brenly
something of a unicorn: a firsttime manager winning the whole
shebang in his first season.
The last manager to pull that
off: Ralph Houk, who did it with
the Yankees. You remember that,
right? Back in 1961 and ’62, his
first two seasons in his first job.
Now, everyone needs to get a
first chance at something.
Indeed, the question with
Martinez, who has been wellregarded for years and spent
most of the past several
offseasons interviewing for one
job or another, might be more,
“Why did it take so long?” than
“Why now?”
Roberts is, of course, an
example of a first-time manager
who is working out. He took the
Dodgers to the National League
Championship Series in his first
season and won the pennant in
his second — a trajectory that
might seem peachy to the Nats,
who have lost in all four of their
division series appearances.
More than that, though,
Roberts stands as a symbol of
what franchises tend to want
now: a manager who is an
extension of the front office, who
game-plans in concert with the
quants in front of the computers
and also can crystallize that
information for the guys who
throw the ball and swing the bat.
“The ability to communicate
with your players is a critical
component of managing today,”
said Andrew Friedman, the
Dodgers’ president of baseball
operations. “. . . As far as the
C A P I TA L S ’ N EX T TH R EE
vs. New York Islanders
Caps stress positives
while eyeing red flags
Perhaps the best illustration of
where the Washington Capitals
are as a team came after their 2-1
loss to the Calgary Flames on
Sunday night, capping a threegame road trip in which they
emerged with just two points.
Last season or the one before that,
it would have been considered a
failure. But this time, Coach Barry
Trotz was positive about his
team’s play over the past week.
“We’ve had a pretty tough
schedule — we’ve had eight road
games,” Trotz said. “We have a lot
of people out, we’ve got some new
people, so there’s a lot of positives
at the same time. We’re at the
.500 level with all of the things
that have happened to us in the
first 12 games. But I think there’s
been a lot of growth. . . . I think
our guys believe we’re going to be
headed in the right direction.”
The last time the Capitals won
just one game on their western
Canada swing was in Trotz’s first
year, the 2014-15 campaign. Trotz
has already compared this season
to that one in some ways — that
there might be some growing
pains to start as Washington finds
an identity with some new and less
experienced players in the lineup.
In 2014, the Capitals had
10 points through the end of
October, a span of nine games.
After Washington played its last
game of the month Sunday night,
Thursday
7 NBCSW
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Saturday
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vs. Arizona Coyotes
Monday
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it has 11 points through the first
12 games with a 5-6-1 record. The
2014-15 team ultimately finished
second in the Metropolitan
Division.
“The talent level is nowhere
close to what we had in the past,”
defenseman Brooks Orpik said.
“It’s talent level and experience.
There’s going to be more mistakes
made; that’s just the nature of the
game when you have
inexperienced guys playing.
You’ve got to expect that and help
those guys along.”
The Capitals are also dealing
with injuries as three players are
on injured reserve — defenseman
Matt Niskanen and forwards
Andre Burakovsky and Tyler
Graovac — and forward Brett
Connolly has also missed the past
two games after he was placed in
the concussion protocol during
the team’s game in Vancouver on
Thursday.
Trotz is right that there has
been some growth, particularly in
the play of rookie defensemen
Christian Djoos and Madison
Bowey and 21-year-old forward
Jakub Vrana, who has three goals
this season. Devante Smith-Pelly,
an inexpensive free agent signing
this past summer, has been a good
complement on a line with
Evgeny Kuznetsov and Alex
Ovechkin in the small sample of
two games, potentially allowing
the Capitals to bring more
balance to the lineup. After the
penalty kill allowed at least one
power-play goal in seven of its
previous eight games, it
rebounded over the weekend, not
allowing Edmonton or Calgary
any goals with a man advantage.
But there also continue to be
some red flags. The Capitals have
surrendered the first goal in
seven straight games, exhausting
themselves by having to play
catch-up too much, and they
have allowed at least 36 shots on
goal in seven games, matching
their total from all of last season.
Trotz and some players have
pointed to the team often still
wanting to play the same way it
did last season, when it had a
highly skilled and deep lineup
that won the most games in the
regular season.
“The team we had the last
couple of years, if we wanted to
trade chances with teams, a lot of
times, that was in our favor just
with the lineup we had,” Orpik
said. “I think there’s a lot of times
now where you look at our lineup
versus other lineups, we can beat
any team, but we’ve got to play a
lot more disciplined and
structured than maybe we did the
last few years.”
the roster, and the manager’s job
is to, well, manage it. So this
angle is worth pursuing: Will
Martinez want more information
from the front office, and how
will he deploy it? And will Rizzo,
a scout’s scout in every fiber of
his being, empower his analytics
people to develop strategies with
his new manager?
Which gets us back to where
we started: We just don’t know.
“We came away from the
process feeling like there was
absolutely no one better suited —
who matched up to what this
organization needs right now —
than Dave,” Rizzo said in the
statement.
That’s a feeling, though, not a
fact. It’ll be fun to read — and
write — about Martinez before
next season begins. But it’ll be
even more fun to watch him
manage. Only then will we know.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
For more by Barry Svrluga, visit
washingtonpost.com/svrluga.
NHL ROUNDUP
C A PIT A L S N O T ES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/capitals
information, [Roberts] and our
coaches do a tremendous job
with synthesizing the
information and delivering it in
nuggets to our players. Some
want more. Some want less.”
Martinez must have an
understanding of this, because
his coaching tenure began with
Tampa Bay when Friedman ran
the Rays. In that sense, the
statement the Nats released
Monday was somewhat striking.
The club won’t comment further
until after the World Series, per
MLB custom. Still . . .
“As we went through this
process, it became clear the type
of manager we were looking for,”
Rizzo said in the statement.
“Someone who is progressive,
someone who can connect with
and communicate well with our
players, and someone who
embraces the analytical side of
the game.”
Rizzo has spent most of his
decade as general manager here
believing his job is to assemble
Orpik pointed to last season’s
Ottawa Senators as an example. “I
think they had a team on paper
that not a lot of people at the
beginning of the year gave high
hopes,” Orpik said. But the
Senators bought into Coach Guy
Boucher’s 1-3-1 defensive system,
and it carried them to the Eastern
Conference finals.
“We don’t want to take away
creativity,” Trotz said. “I’ve never
said to a player, ‘Don’t make a
play.’ Just understand when you
can make a play and when you
can’t and make your decisions of
high quality. That’s what we’ve
tried to implement. . . . Just
because the first-line guys are
making those plays doesn’t mean
a guy who maybe can’t make
those plays should try those plays
all of the time and be
unsuccessful. It’s just
understanding what your game is
within our game.”
Said Orpik: “Just the amount of
goals we’re going to score this
year probably isn’t going to be
close to what we did in the past.
So I think you have to find ways to
win closer games and lowerscoring games, and a lot of that is
buying into the system a little bit
more. I think before, there was
room where we obviously had a
system in place that was kind of
our baseline and our structure,
and I think with the talent we
had, there was probably a little
more freedom to be a little bit
more creative. And the coaches
definitely aren’t telling us not to
be creative, but they’re telling us
to pick our spots a little better.”
— Isabelle Khurshudyan
Arizona wins first game
in 12th try to start season
COYOTES 4,
FLYERS 3 (OT)
A SSOCIATED P RESS
The Arizona Coyotes finally got
their first victory of the season,
beating the host Philadelphia Flyers, 4-3, on Alex Goligoski’s overtime goal after blowing a two-goal
lead in the final minute of regulation Monday night.
Goligoski scored with 14.4 seconds left in OT as Arizona (1-10-1)
avoided setting an NHL record for
most consecutive losses to start a
season. The Coyotes had matched
the 1943-44 New York Rangers
(0-11) by losing their first 11 games.
Sean Couturier scored twice for
the Flyers. He tipped a shot past
goalie Scott Wedgewood with 16
seconds left in regulation to tie the
game at 3.
Goligoski scored the winner
from a sharp angle in the three-onthree overtime period after a pass
from Clayton Keller.
Vegas saw its five-game winning streak end and lost another
goalie to an injury. With starter
Marc-Andre Fleury and backup
Malcolm Subban already sidelined, Oscar Dansk left with an
apparent leg injury.
BLUES 4, KINGS 2: Vladimir Tarasenko and Jaden
Schwartz each had a goal and an
assist to lead host St. Louis past
Los Angeles in a matchup of two of
the NHL’s top teams.
Carl Gunnarsson scored the goahead goal for the Blues, who improved to 10-2-1 to match the franchise’s best start set in 1997.
Tanner Pearson and Dustin
Brown scored for the Kings, who
saw their three-game winning
streak end and fell to 9-2-1.
LIGHTNING 8, PANTHERS
5: Andrei Vasilevskiy won his
ninth straight start and Steven
Stamkos scored twice to lift Tampa Bay over Florida in Sunrise, Fla.
Vasilevskiy made 18 saves and
shares the longest winning streak
by a goalie in franchise history
with John Grahame.
ISLANDERS 6, GOLDEN
KNIGHTS 3: John Tavares scored
BLUE JACKETS 4, BRUINS
3 (SO): Artemi Panarin and Oliver
two more goals, and host New
York handed expansion Vegas its
second loss of the season.
Jaroslav Halak stopped 31 shots
to help the Islanders win for the
fifth time in six games. Tavares has
eight goals in the past four games
and 11 on the season.
Bjorkstrand scored in the shootout, and host Columbus beat Boston after squandering a two-goal
lead in the third period.
CANADIENS 8, SENATORS
3: Charles Hudon scored his first
two career goals and had an assist
as visiting Montreal beat Ottawa.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
NBA ROUNDUP
Irving, Brown lift Boston
to its fifth straight victory
CELTICS 108,
SPURS 94
A SSOCIATED P RESS
Kyrie Irving scored 24 points,
Jaylen Brown added 18 and Al
Horford had 13 rebounds Monday
night to help the host Celtics beat
the San Antonio Spurs 108-94, for
Boston’s fifth straight victory.
Irving scored 24 for the third
straight game, rookie Jayson Tatum had 11 rebounds and Terry
Rozier had 10 of his 12 points in
the fourth quarter. Boston lost its
first two games of the season on
back-to-back nights — and star
free agent Gordon Hayward, too —
but have not lost since.
Brandon Paul had 18 points and
Rudy Gay scored 14 for San Antonio, which remains without starters Tony Parker and Kawhi Leonard. The Spurs lost on back-toback nights and fell to 1-3 on a
four-game road trip, leaving
Coach Gregg Popovich waiting for
career victory No. 1,155, which
would tie him with Phil Jackson at
sixth on the NBA’s all-time list.
Boston led 54-49 at halftime
and scored 10 of the first 12 points
in the third quarter — eight from
Irving on a pair of three-pointers
and a layup. The Celtics point
guard was 10-for-15 shooting, including 3 for 6 from three-point
range.
KNICKS 116, NUGGETS
110: Kristaps Porzingis scored a
career-high 38 points, and Kyle
O’Quinn added 15 points and 12
rebounds to help New York beat
Denver at Madison Square Garden.
Tim Hardaway Jr. scored all 13
of his points in the fourth quarter
after the Knicks had blown all of
their 23-point third-quarter lead.
Nikola Jokic led the Nuggets
with 28 points, and Jamal Murray
scored 20.
The Knicks led, 69-46, in the
third quarter when the Nuggets
responded by scoring the next 13
points to ignite a 27-2 run.
The game was tied at 77 when
Doug McDermott’s three-pointer
put the Knicks back in front for
good with 1:09 left in the third
quarter.
TIMBERWOLVES
125,
HEAT 122 (OT): Jeff Teague
scored 23 points, Andrew Wiggins
added 22 and visiting Minnesota
scored the first six points of over-
time before holding on to beat
Miami.
Karl-Anthony Towns scored 20
points and grabbed 12 rebounds
for the Timberwolves, who got 16
points from Jimmy Butler and 13
from Jamal Crawford.
Dion Waiters tied a career high
by scoring 33 for Miami, 14 of
those coming in the fourth quarter, including a layup that sent the
game to overtime.
MAGIC 115, PELICANS 99:
Marreese Speights highlighted an
18-point performance by hitting
five of his career-high six threepointers during a decisive 22-6
run, and Orlando soundly defeated host New Orleans.
Speights’s second three of the
game made it 87-83 in the final
minute of the third quarter. He
drained four more early in the
fourth, after which Orlando led
106-89.
Nikola Vucevic, Evan Fournier
and Jonathon Simmons each
scored 20 points for Orlando.
76ERS 115, ROCKETS 107:
Ben Simmons had 24 points, nine
assists and seven rebounds, and
Joel Embiid added 22 points to
lead Philadelphia to a win in
Houston.
After losing 105-104 on a buzzer-beating three-pointer from Eric
Gordon in Philadelphia on Oct. 18,
the 76ers snapped an eight-game
losing streak against the Rockets,
winning in Houston for the first
time since Feb. 16, 2011.
James Harden scored 29 points
and Gordon had 25 for the Rockets.
HORNETS
104,
GRIZ-
ZLIES 99: Kemba Walker scored
27 points and keyed a fourth-quarter rally to erase a double-digit
deficit as Charlotte won at Memphis.
Memphis held a 10-point lead
with just under eight minutes left,
but Walker re-entered the game
and kick-started the Charlotte rally. Walker had nine points in the
stretch, part of which included an
18-4 run by the Hornets.
JAZZ 104, MAVERICKS 89:
Rodney Hood scored 15 of his season-high 25 points in the third
quarter to help host Utah rally
past Dallas.
The Mavericks hit 9 of 14 threepointers in the first half as the Jazz
struggled to defend their driveand-kick action. But Utah came
alive in the second half thanks to
Hood and a 25-4 run to start the
third quarter.
EZ
Wizards intent on fulfilling expectations
BY
T IM B ONTEMPS
sacramento — The Washington Wizards aren’t accustomed
to high expectations.
For the better part of four
decades, the Wizards have resided at the bottom of the NBA,
flitting between irrelevance and
futility with an occasional burst
of competence mixed in. Even as
the team reached the second
round of the NBA playoffs three
times in the past four seasons,
they were never really considered a true contender. Instead,
they have been seen as a respectable, competitive bunch that had
no shame in losing to higherseeded foes in the conference
semifinal.
This year is different.
Following an excruciating,
Game 7 playoff ouster courtesy of
the Celtics in May, the Wizards
entered this season with hopes of
surpassing Boston and reaching
the Eastern Conference finals for
the first time in four decades.
After Boston’s season opener,
when Gordon Hayward was lost
for the season with a dislocated
ankle and fractured tibia, those
hopes were replaced by expectations.
If the Wizards don’t reach the
conference finals, it now can’t be
dismissed as an acceptable outcome. Instead, it will become the
latest D.C. sporting disappointment, something Washington’s
fans have come to know far too
well over the past 20 years.
“The regular season is great,”
Wizards guard Bradley Beal
said, “but if we don’t win in the
playoffs, and get over that second-round hump, we know
we’re not going to be successful.”
Both publicly and privately,
the Wizards acknowledge newfound expectations for a franchise that isn’t exactly used to
having any placed upon it. They
see the same landscape of the
Eastern Conference others do, as
well as the same opportunity to
take advantage of it.
Unlike baseball or hockey,
where postseason success and
failure often comes down to
plays that can be attributed to
little more than chance or luck,
playoff basketball is far simpler:
The more talented team almost
always wins a series.
This is the first time since the
franchise’s glory days of the
1970s that the Wizards can usually say they are the more talented team. With John Wall and
Beal, Washington should have a
Cavs, Warriors have a caring problem
This is an excerpt
of what Cleveland
Cavaliers Coach
Tyronn Lue said
TIM
to reporters after
BONTEMPS
his team lost at
home to the New York Knicks on
Sunday:
“Tonight’s loss and the last
couple are unacceptable, and the
only way we’re going to be able
to get out of it is to put the work
in — as players, as coaches. And
we’re going to do that. So, [I’m]
not concerned. . . . But, when you
lose to teams the way we’ve been
getting beat, it’s unacceptable.”
Now, here’s an excerpt of what
Golden State Warriors Coach
Steve Kerr had to say to
reporters after his team lost at
home to the Detroit Pistons later
that evening:
“We’ve had 16 or more
turnovers in every single one of
our games this year. At some
point, the ball just has to matter.
The game has to matter enough
for us to win. Teams are coming
after us every single night, and
we know that. We’re getting
everybody’s best shot, and if
you’re not matching that energy
and play with some intelligence
and discipline, you’re not going
to win.”
Strikingly similar, right?
That’s because both Lue and
Kerr, after their teams have met
in each of the past three NBA
Finals, find themselves facing a
strikingly similar problem: Their
teams simply don’t care.
That’s the only logical way to
square how both the Cavaliers
and Warriors have played over
the first two weeks of this NBA
season. The Cavs, a team
featuring the best player in the
league and a roster they bragged
is far deeper than a year ago
(even after trading Kyrie Irving),
are 3-4, having lost four of their
past five games, with the defeats
coming to the Orlando Magic,
Brooklyn Nets, New Orleans
Pelicans and Knicks, none of
whom are expected to be
anywhere near their level.
The only Cavaliers win in that
stretch? A close victory — at
home, no less — over the
Chicago Bulls, who are widely
considered to be the worst team
On
the NBA
TONY DEJAK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kevin Love and the Cavaliers
fell to 3-4 after a 114-95 loss to
the Knicks on Sunday night.
in the NBA.
Golden State, meanwhile, was
4-3 entering its game late
Monday against the Los Angeles
Clippers, despite being
universally considered to have
improved a team that coasted to
67 wins a year ago before going
16-1 in the playoffs and winning
a second championship in three
years. Three of those four wins
came in decidedly inconsistent
performances, including
victories last week at home over
the Toronto Raptors and
Washington Wizards that both
required second-half surges.
The Warriors tried to do that
again Sunday, closing within
three in the late stages after a 3711 Detroit run put them in a 13point hole in the fourth quarter.
This time, however, their luck
had run out and they fell, 115-107.
“We finally started caring
when there were six minutes left,
and we immediately cut it to
three,” Kerr said. “But the right
team won. Karma was in the
right place tonight. They
deserved that.
“They outplayed us. They
outhustled us. We didn’t deserve
to win that game by showing
effort in the last six minutes, so
the right thing happened.”
At least, when it comes to
D7
M2
Golden State, the obvious
problem is a lack of effort. No
one is questioning the Warriors’
ability to figure things out for
the simple reason that their
talent advantage is so
overwhelming that they’re
managing to win more often
than not while only trying for
brief stretches.
The same, however, can’t be
said for the Cavaliers. Cleveland
was outscored by a combined
62 points in its losses to Orlando,
New Orleans and New York. The
Cavaliers ranked 27th in the
NBA in defensive rating entering
Monday — ahead of only the
Timberwolves, Mavericks and
Nets. (For the record, Golden
State was ranked 26th.)
Cleveland continues to juggle
lineups, moving players in and
out because of both injury and
performance, and it’s hard to
blame Lue for trying different
things. Still, at least one person
— LeBron James — isn’t worried.
“What month is this for me?
What is this? October? I’m not
about to go crazy over it right
now,” James said. “It’s too long of
a season and I’ve been a part of
this too many times, so I’m the
wrong guy to ask. I’m too
positive right now.”
He might be the only positive
person in either Cleveland or
Oakland these days, at least
when it comes to those cities’
professional basketball teams.
His is a well-earned perspective,
and there is plenty of time for
both of these teams to right the
ship, find the proper effort levels
and get things going in the right
direction.
Effort is often used as a crutch
when a team simply isn’t good
enough. That isn’t the case for
the Cavaliers and Warriors,
though. Both teams are more
than good enough to follow
through on everyone’s
expectations, and they likely will
wind up doing just that.
It will require both teams
remembering that to win games
in the NBA, some level of effort
is required regardless of talent
level. Thus far, the Cavaliers and
Warriors are learning that lesson
the hard way.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
ROB CARR/GETTY IMAGES
Bradley Beal and John Wall are united in welcoming the high
expectations placed on the Wizards after last year’s playoff run.
WIZ ARDS’ NEX T THREE
vs. Phoenix Suns
Tomorrow
7 NBCSW
vs. Cleveland Cavaliers
Friday
7 ESPN
at Toronto Raptors
Sunday
6 NBCSW
Radio: WFED (1500 AM)
pair of all-stars for the first time
in a decade. While Markieff Morris has been sidelined because of
sports hernia surgery, both Otto
Porter Jr. and Morris’s replacement in the starting lineup, Kelly
Oubre Jr., have taken steps forward.
The bench remains a question
mark, but Tim Frazier is an
upgrade over Trey Burke and
Brandon Jennings as Wall’s understudy, Jodie Meeks and Mike
Scott provide more shooting and
versatility than Washington had
from the second unit a year ago,
and big man Ian Mahinmi is
finally healthy after being
sapped by knee injuries.
“I think we’re as good as any
team,” Wizards Coach Scott
Brooks said. “Now we have to go
out and prove it every night.”
That’s why last week’s 102-99
overtime loss to the Los Angeles
Lakers was so disappointing to
Washington. Those are the kinds
of games elite teams don’t let slip
away, and the Wizards heard that
from Brooks in the days that
followed. It wasn’t a coincidence
that performance was followed
by a narrow 120-117 loss to the
Golden State Warriors, which
could have easily been a win even
with Beal missing the second
half after his fight with Draymond Green, and then Sunday’s
110-83 evisceration of the Sacramento Kings.
It’s that kind of response to a
lackluster effort that gives credence to the idea this year might
very well be different for the
Wizards — and, finally, for Washington, a city that craves to see
one of its teams finally break
through in the postseason. Assuming the Wizards don’t lay an
egg Wednesday against the Phoenix Suns back at Capital One
Arena, they will get another
chance to showcase themselves
at home Friday night against
LeBron James and the Cleveland
Cavaliers.
Not surprisingly, both of the
team’s star guards view it as a
chance to make a statement to
the team they expect to be facing
in the Eastern Conference finals
this season.
“For sure it’s a statement
game,” Wall said. “They’ve been
there plenty of times, and we
know that’s a team we have to try
to get through.
“I think we challenge them the
best out of anybody in the East
throughout the regular season.
We did last year. We had one of
the best games in the regular
season, I think the best game of
the year, and LeBron then hits
that unbelievable shot.
“Even though they don’t have
all their players and they have
new guys and aren’t fully healthy,
I think it’s going to be an exciting
game and fun and people are
going to be ready to see it.”
Now in his eighth season, Wall
has been through everything in
Washington. He has seen the
Wizards slowly climb the ladder
and become a factor in the
Eastern Conference. He has lived
through the disappointment of
three losses in four seasons in
the second round of the playoffs.
He has watched the other teams
in the city fall short over and
over.
But Wall believes this year is
different. He senses the new level
of expectations for his team, both
internally and externally. Even
before Boston’s Hayward went
down, the Wizards were openly
talking about how they expected
to be in the East finals this year,
how they planned to make it one
step farther than the painful loss
they suffered to the Celtics in
Game 7 of the Eastern Conference semifinals last spring.
And, as he said before the
season, he wants to be part of the
team to finally end D.C.’s streak,
now two decades long, of falling
short in the postseason.
“I definitely want to be that
team. I’ve been here for eight
years. This is going on my eighth
year, and I’ve seen the good and
the bad. I’ve been through everything.
“I want to be that team that
can get this team to where everybody wishes we can be. We fell
short last year. We were 12 minutes away from it, and I think we
have a great opportunity this
year.”
Almost everyone agrees on
that. Now the Wizards have to
take advantage of it. Unlike in
the past, they’re now expected to
do so.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
COLLEGES
NCAA’s Emmert sees need for change
BY
W ILL H OBSON
In a deeply divided nation,
NCAA President Mark Emmert
said Monday, most Americans
can agree on one thing: Major
college sports is broken, and the
people in charge might not be the
right ones to fix it.
A recent NCAA-commissioned
poll, Emmert said, found widespread distrust in both the NCAA
and its schools, with 79 percent of
Americans agreeing with the
statement that major colleges put
money ahead of the interests of
their athletes.
“I can’t think of anything right
now that 79 percent of Americans
would agree on, but they agreed
on that,” Emmert said. More than
half of Americans agreed the
NCAA was part of the problem,
not a solution, Emmert said, and
nearly 70 percent felt the same
way about schools.
“Those are numbers that
should cause us a lot of anxiety,”
Emmert told the members of the
Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics, an advocacy
group that examines major college sports.
In one of his first public appearances since the arrests of 10
men — including four assistant
coaches and an Adidas executive
— as part of an ongoing FBI
investigation into the shadow
economy surrounding major college basketball, Emmert re-stated
Monday what he said in a news
release earlier this month: College basketball is in need of significant change. Determining the
specifics of that change, Emmert
said, is up to a committee, led by
former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice, that the NCAA
formed in response to the FBI
investigation.
“We cannot go into the next
basketball season without seeing
fundamental change with the
way college basketball is operating,” Emmert said. “We need to
act. We need to demonstrate that
we are, in fact, capable of resolving these issues.”
The coaches arrested face
charges of taking bribes to steer
college players to preferred finan-
cial advisors and agents. The Adidas executive is charged with arranging bribes, with the assistance of other coaches, to direct
high school recruits to Adidassponsored schools. When they announced the charges in late September, prosecutors emphasized
that more arrests could come.
“I don’t know anything about
the investigation that you don’t
know,” Emmert said. “Whether
it’s the tip of the iceberg or it’s the
whole iceberg doesn’t really matter. It’s disgusting as it is, and
we’ve got to recognize that we
own that.”
Emmert seemed most supportive of some kind of change that
would end the practice of players
leaving after their freshman year
to play in the NBA. High school
players projected as likely “oneand-dones” — able to leap to the
NBA after just one season in
college — are more likely to find
their services at the center of
backroom deals between coaches,
agents and shoe company executives.
“Only in America do we force
someone to go to a university in
order to pursue a professional
sports career,” Emmert said.
“Nobody else does that. Nobody
else would even think that’s rational.”
Before the NBA instituted an
age limit of 19 in 2006, teenagers
could go straight from high
school into the league’s draft.
NBA Commissioner Adam Silver
has said he is interested in changing the rule, and potentially raising the age limit to 20, while the
NCAA could impose its own rule
requiring basketball players to
stay a minimum of two years.
Other areas that Rice’s commission will examine, Emmert
said, include the relationships between schools and apparel companies, and the relationships between schools and the independent basketball leagues, some
sponsored by apparel companies,
that long have been suspected of
complicity in backroom deals to
send star teenagers to preferred
colleges and agents.
Emmert touched briefly on the
NCAA Committee on Infractions’
recent decision to spare the University of North Carolina for any
significant punishment for running academically deficient “paper courses” for nearly two decades taken by thousands of students, many of them athletes.
Emmert implied support for the
decision — which found the classes weren’t an unfair benefit for
athletes because regular students
could take them as well — while
noting he was aware the ruling
was another public relations hit
for the NCAA.
“We can all agree or disagree on
whether the Committee on Infractions made the right choice
. . . a very small portion of Americans believe that that was the
right decision,” Emmert said.
Former secretary of education
Arne Duncan, former NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue and
Hall of Fame NBA player David
Robinson were among the Knight
Commission members in attendance Monday. In an interesting
exchange, Robinson expressed
support for one potential change
that would be highly controversial at some schools: allowing
college players to earn money
through endorsements and sponsorship deals.
The bribes an Adidas executive
is accused of arranging to ensure
star high school players landed at
Adidas-sponsored schools, some
have argued, are only considered
illicit because of NCAA rules.
“I would argue that Johnny
Manziel, his greatest earning potential was in college, when he
was ‘Johnny Football,’ and we
took away his ability to capitalize
on ‘Johnny Football,’ ” said Robinson, who is serving on Rice’s commission. “I know you’ve made
comments in the past about these
‘bad actors’ [in college sports]. . . .
I would argue that there aren’t as
many bad actors; I think it’s just
not being handled correctly.”
Emmert began to answer
when, in a moment of convenient
technological difficulties, his microphone shut off.
“Well, I think I’m done,” Emmert said. “I hear you loud and
clear.”
will.hobson@washpost.com
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
high schools
FOOTBALL NOTES
Topsy-turvy WCAC season has one more twist in store
LE AD E R S
St. John’s-Gonzaga game
could settle seeding
or create chaos at top
Top rushers
A. Margiotta, Marshall
A. Squire, Suitland
D. Marshall, Falls Church
C. Garmon III, Champe
T. Rush, Annandale
J. Houston, Flint Hill
T. Baldwin, Broad Run
L. Djieya, Wheaton
C. Oberman, Poolesville
J. Johnson, Woodgrove
E. Asante, Westfield
S. Alston, South Lakes
D. Cleveland, West Potomac
M. Salahuddin, H.D. Woodson
D. Dupree, DuVal
D. Harris, Loudoun County
B. Gonzales-Pinto, Marshall
J. Hampton, Georgetown Prep
C. Bell, St. Mary's Ryken
J. Mulatu, Lee
F ROM STAFF REPORTS
All the confusion in the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference boils down to one last game.
If St. John’s beats Gonzaga at
Paint Branch High on Saturday,
the Cadets would lock up the top
seed in the conference’s fourteam playoff. They would face
arch rival DeMatha, which they
beat, 38-22, earlier this month,
in the semifinals, with the winner advancing to face the winner
of Gonzaga and Good Counsel.
But if Gonzaga beats St.
John’s, all hell breaks loose. St.
John’s, Gonzaga and Good Counsel would have identical conference records. Their only losses
would be to one another. To
break the three-way tie for the
top seed, the schools’ athletic
directors would draw numbers
from a hat.
In any scenario, Good Counsel
would be the big winner. The
Falcons entered the year as the
conference’s presumed weak
link after the retirement of longtime coach Bob Milloy. Freshman team coach Andy Stefanelli
took over the role, and Good
Counsel promptly posted a discouraging loss to Baltimore’s
Mount St. Joseph in Week 2 and
squeaked out a 3-0 victory over
Virginia Beach’s Bishop Sullivan
in Week 4.
As September unfolded, DeMatha played well in a seasonopening loss to Bishop Gorman
(Nev.) in Las Vegas, and St. John’s
knocked off Jones High of Florida. Gonzaga beat Baltimore’s
Gilman behind a stifling defense
and emerging freshman quarterback Caleb Williams.
But Good Counsel emerged
when conference play began and
posted a competitive showing in
a loss to St. John’s. It knocked off
DeMatha, then beat Gonzaga on
Friday.
Wide receiver Cam Hart has
developed into perhaps the
WCAC’s top deep threat. Defensive end Jay Green set the
school’s single-season sack record (11) once held by current
Houston Texans linebacker
Jelani Jenkins and 2016 All-Met
linebacker Joshua Paschal, who
is now at Kentucky.
“We just knew that we can
play up to a potential that people
didn’t think we would play up
to,” Hart said Friday after the
Falcons scored 27 unanswered
points to shock Gonzaga. “We
made it happen, and we’re going
to keep making it happen.”
— Jacob Bogage
Seahawks fly to district title
South Lakes Coach Trey Taylor said his team doesn’t script
the first quarter, instead choosing its offensive plays based on
what the defense throws at it.
But if Taylor could have written a
script for the beginning of his
team’s game against Yorktown,
penciling in three touchdowns
from senior Spencer Alston
might have seemed a little extreme.
The Seahawks ran past Yorktown in the Liberty District’s deciding game, scoring a 52-14 win
after posting 35 first-half points.
An injury to running back Albert
Mensah, a fixture of their dynamic offense, meant Alston had to
take on more responsibility
against the Patriots. He responded with 23 carries for 255 yards
and five rushing touchdowns as
well as six catches for 69 yards
and a receiving score.
“The only worry we had was
confusion about the new packages and personnel we had to use
with Albert out,” Taylor said. “We
knew Spencer could do whatever
we asked him to do.”
— Michael Errigo
Att Yds
146 1,835
203 1,768
207 1,662
229 1,658
296 1,657
118 1,482
178 1,231
180 1,229
196 1,197
171 1,167
192 1,152
71 1,137
180 1,112
102 1,055
162 1,038
138 981
126 971
127 938
146 932
125 922
TD
26
19
14
22
12
19
21
10
11
10
8
17
12
10
13
3
7
11
5
11
Top passers
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Falcons on the move
After a slow start under Coach Andy Stefanelli, Micah McNeil and his Good Counsel teammates have won three in a row to reach 7-2.
THE POST TOP 20
BY
D ILLON M ULLAN
1. Wise (9-0) LW: 1
8. North Point (9-0) LW: 8
15. DeMatha (5-4) LW: 15
Senior running back John Oliver carried
nine times for 170 yards and three touchdowns as the Pumas beat Potomac (Md.),
47-10.
Next: Saturday at DuVal, 2 p.m.
After falling into a 14-0 hole against Northern,
the Eagles rallied to a 45-21 win. Jemichael
Jones rushed for 205 yards and threw for 215
yards and three touchdowns.
Next: Friday vs. Chopticon, 7 p.m.
Seven players scored a touchdown as the
Stags stopped their three-game losing streak
with a 49-6 win over McNamara.
Next: Saturday at Carroll, 2:30 p.m.
2. St. John’s (6-2) LW: 4
9. C.H. Flowers (9-0) LW: 9
Quinten Johnson and Sam Serrano both
intercepted two passes and returned one for
a touchdown in a 49-6 win over Carroll.
Next: Saturday vs. Gonzaga, 3 p.m. at Paint
Branch
The Jaguars trailed Douglass at halftime
before coming back to win, 25-22, for their
fourth single-digit victory of the season.
Next: Saturday vs. Bladensburg, 2 p.m.
16. Friendship Collegiate (5-3) LW: 16
The Swarmin’ Hornets trailed Seneca Valley
13-9 in the third quarter before pulling away
to win, 44-20, for their 37th straight victory.
Next: Friday vs. Wootton, 6:30 p.m.
4. Stone Bridge (9-0) LW: 5
11. Freedom-Woodbridge (9-0) LW: 11
Santana Moss Jr. ran for three touchdowns
as the Bulldogs beat Freedom-South Riding,
59-20.
Next: Friday vs. Broad Run, 7 p.m.
Junior running back Tyquan Brown carried
nine times for 210 yards and three touchdowns as the Eagles celebrated senior night
with a 58-6 win over Gar-Field.
Next: Friday at Colgan, 7 p.m.
5. Westfield (9-0) LW: 6
West Potomac scored 14 straight points in
the third quarter to tie the game before Noah
Kim’s one-yard touchdown run in the fourth
lifted Westfield to a 21-14 win.
Next: Friday vs. Chantilly, 7 p.m.
12. Centreville (7-2) LW: 12
6. Good Counsel (7-2) LW: 7
13. South Lakes (8-1) LW: 13
The Falcons scored 27 unanswered points in
the second half of a 27-7 victory over Gonzaga.
Next: Saturday at McNamara, 7 p.m.
The Seahawks won the Liberty District behind
255 rushing yards and five touchdowns from
Spencer Alston in a 52-14 victory over Yorktown.
Next: Friday vs. Herndon, 7 p.m.
Senior Charlie Salette rushed 17 times for 123
yards and two touchdowns as the Wildcats beat Chantilly, 35-7.
Next: Friday vs. Madison, 7 p.m.
7. Gonzaga (7-2) LW: 2
The Eagles’ typically high-flying offense was
grounded in the second half of a 27-7 loss at
Good Counsel.
Next: Saturday vs. St. John’s, 3 p.m. at Paint
Branch
Howard’s still perfect
After Bruce Strunk resigned as
Howard’s coach in January with a
73-29 record and six postseason
trips in nine seasons, Ross Hannon took the lead. The Lions,
reigning three-time county and
regional champions, haven’t
missed a beat.
Howard (9-0), which has lost
only once to a Howard County foe
since 2013, is positioned to earn at
The Knights did not play this past week and
will not play this weekend, either.
Next: Saturday, Nov. 11, at Silver Oak Academy, 1 p.m.
17. H.D. Woodson (7-2) LW: 17
John Finney caught an 80-yard TD pass in the
first quarter as the Warhawks beat Oakton,
31-10. For the first time since 1999, Madison
has beaten its rival in back-to-back seasons.
Next: Friday at Centreville, 7 p.m.
3. Damascus (9-0) LW: 3
14. Spalding (5-3) LW: 14
Five players scored a touchdown in the
second quarter of a 50-0 win over Anacostia
on Thursday.
Next: Thursday at Ballou, 6 p.m.
18. Quince Orchard (8-1) LW: 18
Safety Aaron Derwin’s second interception
sealed a 38-29 win over Montgomery County
rival Northwest on Friday night.
Next: Friday at Gaithersburg, 6:30 p.m.
19. Broad Run (9-0) LW: 19
One-win Briar Woods nearly upset its Ashburn rival, but Broad Run’s Attila Buri made
three field goals for a 16-14 win.
Next: Friday at Stone Bridge, 7 p.m.
20. Eleanor Roosevelt (7-2) LW: NR
A week after a seven-point loss at Wise, the
Raiders beat Oxon Hill, 37-22. Running back
Elisha McDonald had 19 carries for 148 yards
and three touchdowns.
Next: Saturday vs. Potomac, 2 p.m.
Dropped out: No. 20 Northern (8-1)
On the bubble: National Collegiate
(10-0), Broadneck (9-0), Flint Hill (8-0),
Howard (9-0), Tuscarora (7-2)
The Cavaliers and Gilman combined for 134
points Saturday. Spalding prevailed, 76-58,
behind 213 passing yards and 189 rushing
yards from junior Jayden Umbarger.
Next: Saturday at Mount St. Joseph, 7 p.m.
least a share of the county title
with a win Friday against Oakland
Mills.
While undefeated River Hill
could also share the title, the Lions said local dominance was just
one of their preseason goals. Getting past Maryland 4A powers
such as Wise and Quince Orchard
in the playoffs — teams that have
ended recent postseason runs —
ranks as another.
Cmp-Att
185-293
112-217
135-231
145-252
120-190
176-285
128-224
73-130
108-210
118-189
90-136
73-104
148-230
91-141
96-166
78-139
68-130
93-140
81-168
85-132
Yds TD
2,911 31
2,155 22
2,096 20
2,004 32
1,949 16
1,737 382
1,697 22
1,600 20
1,545 16
1,488 12
1,468 16
1,367 15
1,351 7
1,330 13
1,329 17
1,323 14
1,318 21
1,288 10
1,262 9
1,253 16
Top receivers
Following Gonzaga’s loss at Good Counsel on Friday, public schools now occupy four of the top five spots in the rankings. Wise, Damascus,
Stone Bridge and Westfield all won big to keep alive the possibility of undefeated runs to a state championship.
Alone in first in the WCAC, St. John’s jumps Damascus for the second spot. Good Counsel handled Gonzaga to move to No. 6, one spot ahead
of the Eagles.
There are no changes to the rankings between No. 8 and No. 19; everyone won or did not play. No. 8 North Point knocked off No. 20 Northern
to make room for Eleanor Roosevelt in the rankings. The Raiders’ losses are to No. 1 Wise and No. 9 C.H. Flowers.
Tuscarora is back on the bubble after senior Adam Thorne’s 78-yard touchdown as time expired earned the Huskies a 34-29 win at Champe
on Friday.
10. Madison (7-2) LW: 10
G. Saylor, Wootton
T. Heltzel, Mount Vernon
A. Yenican, Stuart
N. Barts, Loudoun County
K. Doyle, St. John's
J. Darcy, Lake Braddock
M. Grant, Watkins Mill
M. Tatum, Stone Bridge
B. Johnson, Heritage
M. Janis, Churchill
T. Jarman, Dominion
D. Bonner, Quince Orchard
T. Marchiando, Fairfax
M. Griffis, Broad Run
C. Parson, Champe
P. Jones, Edison
R. St. John, Bell
J. Allen, Tuscarora
T. Ruffin, Springbrook
N. Kim, Westfield
In that aim, Howard will rely on
its running game, which generated more than 350 yards Friday in a
40-0 win over Atholton. On defense, Hannon looks to linebacker
Ryan Kearney, whom Hannon
called “the best high school linebacker I’ve ever coached,” to guide
a unit that has pitched four shutouts.
“We’re balanced,” Hannon said
of his unbeaten team. “We just
dillon.mullan@washpost.com
have not been giving up any big
plays, and we’re making everybody earn every inch.”
— Callie Caplan
Stunning finish for Tuscarora
Tuscarora led all night. Then
Carl Garmon’s third touchdown
and subsequent two-point conversion gave Champe a 29-28 lead
with 17 seconds left.
The home sideline in Aldie
N. Miller, Wootton
E. Trent, Wootton
D. Newton, Mount Vernon
D. Spalding, South County
E. Jeffries, Stuart
D. Thompson, Stone Bridge
B. Castellano, Woodgrove
D. Rush, Watkins Mill
D. Alexander, Richard Montgomery
D. Webb, West Potomac
T. Wall, Yorktown
D. Easley, Stuart
N. Datis, Blair
Z. Beal, Loudoun County
G. Richardson, Dominion
D. Patterson, Yorktown
S. Alston, South Lakes
A. Diomande, Walter Johnson
A. Abu-Jamous, Edison
L. Gater, Ballou
Rec Yds TD
68 1,200 14
71 1,145 11
49 927 9
41 900 14
55 861 6
29 837 12
61 804 9
47 733 7
27 727 10
27 693 8
46 683 9
33 679 8
45 670 7
31 618 9
24 602 9
25 595 10
27 594 10
27 568 6
28 560 7
25 558 11
went berserk.
The Huskies, it appeared,
would need a miracle.
After a kickoff return and a
quick pass to the 22-yard line,
Tuscarora lined up for one final
play.
“We had the play in our playbook, but it’s not necessarily a
situation that we practice all that
much,” wide receiver Adam
Thorne said.
Junior quarterback Justin Allen took the shotgun snap. A
Champe defensive lineman
slipped through and forced the
right-handed passer to roll to his
left. Downfield, the cornerback
covering Thorne slipped as he
turned to run with the senior.
Allen set his hips and unleashed a 50-yard rocket. After
Thorne hauled in the pass at the
Champe 35, three defenders
bounced off him. Another tripped.
Thorne raced to the end zone as
time expired for a 78-yard touchdown.
Tuscarora 34, Champe 29.
“Everyone on the sideline was
discombobulated. Just shock.
Like, ‘What now?’ ” Thorne said.
“Personally, it never sunk in that
we were going to lose.”
Tuscarora defensive coordinator Brandon Wheelbarger was
the first to meet Thorne in the
end zone. In the week leading up
to the game, the Huskies mourned the death of Wheelbarger’s
father, Doug. The former assistant at Centreville died Tuesday
at 68.
“It sounds cliche, but you always think about scoring a touchdown like that,” Thorne said. “It’s
an honor to score one like that for
my team and Coach Wheelbarger.”
— Dillon Mullan
hss@washpost.com
WCAC GIRLS’ TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIP
Grayson and Yan pack a 1-2 punch, lift Good Counsel to second straight title
BY
K ELYN S OONG
Good Counsel junior Melinda
Yan didn’t expect to be in this role
heading into the season. After
leading the Falcons last fall to
their first Washington Catholic
Athletic Conference girls’ tennis
title since 1996 as the team’s top
singles player, Yan was bumped to
the No. 2 singles position this
year.
But she didn’t mind: Yan was
proud and even happy when
freshman Jordan Grayson took
over the top spot.
It meant the Falcons would
almost certainly be the team to
beat.
“I knew Jordan was a better
player than me,” Yan said. “It’s fun
playing on the team either way.”
On Monday at Olney Manor
Recreational Park, Grayson and
Yan clinched the WCAC championship for Good Counsel with an
8-2 win over Bishop O’Connell
freshman Isabelle Chang and ju-
nior Ola Barrett at No. 1 doubles.
The Falcons finished with 37
points, followed by St. John’s (26)
and O’Connell (20).
Good Counsel had to hold off a
strong showing from the Cadets,
who were leading by four heading
into Monday’s final.
Grayson got things started for
the Falcons on a chilly day that
featured wind gusting to nearly
20 mph. In No. 1 singles, Grayson
used her big forehand to defeat
Chang, 8-0, in about 45 minutes,
followed closely by an 8-0 win by
Yan over St. John’s sophomore
Amber Brown in the No. 2 singles
match.
The Falcons’ confidence continued to build with singles victories from senior Tessa Batz, who
beat St. John’s senior Amelia
Mitchell, 8-2, at No. 3, and from
freshman Melissa Yan (Melinda’s
sister), an 8-3 winner over
St. John’s junior Sophie Valdez at
No. 4.
“From the beginning, we knew
there was a chance we were going
to win,” Grayson said. “Going in,
there was definitely confidence in
the fact that not only do we want
to win, but we knew we were
going to.”
Paul VI junior Adri Cristofari
defeated St. John’s freshman Zoe
Walker, 9-7, at No. 5, and St. John’s
senior Grace Segreti scored an
8-6 win over O’Connell freshman
Elena Turner at No. 6 to round out
singles play.
Shortly after Grayson and Me-
linda Yan’s clinching victory, Batz
and Melissa Yan teamed to beat
St. John’s Mitchell and Valdez,
8-3, and the Falcons ran onto the
court to celebrate defending their
WCAC title and going undefeated
in conference play for the second
straight year.
To wrap up the tournament,
O’Connell’s Segreti and Walker
held off Turner and senior Sarah
Tran of St. John’s, 9-8 (7-3), in
No. 3 doubles.
kelyn.soong@washpost.com
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D9
M2
scoreboard
FOOTBA LL
BASKETBALL
NFL
NFC individual leaders
NBA
NFC
Entering Monday’s game
EASTERN CONFERENCE
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 7
Dallas ............................ 4
Washington .................. 3
N.Y. Giants .................... 1
L
1
3
4
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.875
.571
.429
.143
PF
232
198
160
112
PA
156
161
180
156
SOUTH
W
New Orleans ................. 5
Carolina ......................... 5
Atlanta .......................... 4
Tampa Bay .................... 2
L
2
3
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.714
.625
.571
.286
PF
191
148
153
148
PA
145
142
152
168
NORTH
W
Minnesota ..................... 6
Green Bay ..................... 4
Detroit .......................... 3
Chicago ......................... 3
WEST
W
Seattle .......................... 5
L.A. Rams ...................... 5
Arizona ......................... 3
San Francisco ................ 0
L
2
3
4
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.571
.429
.375
PF
179
164
176
134
PA
135
161
169
171
L
2
2
4
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.714
.714
.429
.000
PF
175
212
119
133
PA
132
138
191
219
L
2
2
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.714
.571
.375
PF
216
153
92
157
PA
179
115
152
186
AFC
QUARTERBACKS
Att
Wentz, PHL..................... 264
R. Wilson, SEA ............... 258
Palmer, ARI .................... 267
Brees, NOR ..................... 248
Cousins, WAS................. 237
Winston, TAM ................ 246
Stafford, DET.................. 270
M. Ryan, ATL .................. 232
Newton, CAR .................. 263
Goff, LA .......................... 222
Com
161
164
164
175
161
152
163
153
166
133
Yds
2063
2008
1978
1951
1900
1853
1851
1844
1841
1719
TD
19
15
9
11
13
10
12
9
10
9
Int
5
4
7
4
4
6
4
6
11
4
RUSHERS
Att
E. Elliott, DAL ................. 164
J. Howard, CHI ................ 162
Gurley, LA ....................... 145
Blount, PHL..................... 100
D. Freeman, ATL............. 103
Ingram, NOR ................... 107
Hyde, SNF ....................... 112
Abdullah, DET................. 101
Cook, MIN ......................... 74
A. Jones, GBY ................... 62
Yds
690
662
627
467
466
464
453
369
354
346
Avg
4.2
4.1
4.3
4.7
4.5
4.3
4.0
3.7
4.8
5.6
LG
30
53
29
68
44
51
61
34
33
46t
TD
6
4
5
2
5
4
4
1
2
3
Yds
627
540
528
519
500
494
480
475
449
442
Avg
13.1
14.6
12.3
13.3
12.5
11.0
11.4
14.8
10.4
14.3
LG
45
53
53
41
59
37
33
43
45t
74
TD
1
1
6
4
0
3
2
2
2
3
Yds
282
161
157
173
83
95
86
135
89
80
Avg Long
21.7 88t
14.6 76
11.2 39
10.8 46
9.2
33
8.6
17
8.6
27
7.9
21
7.4
17
7.3
21
TD
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Yds
494
312
230
188
Avg LG
30.9 103t
26.0 39
23.0 43
20.9 30
TD
1
0
0
0
229
20.8
29
0
Ke. Williams, ARI ............. 13 269
Bolden, SNF ...................... 12 242
A. Roberts, ATL ................ 17 339
20.7
20.2
19.9
28
34
61
0
0
0
RECEIVERS
EAST
W
New England ................. 6
Buffalo .......................... 5
Miami ............................ 4
N.Y. Jets ....................... 3
SOUTH
W
Jacksonville .................. 4
Tennessee ..................... 4
Houston ........................ 3
Indianapolis .................. 2
L
3
3
4
6
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.571
.571
.429
.250
PF
183
158
215
142
PA
110
173
188
246
NORTH
W
Pittsburgh ..................... 6
Baltimore ...................... 4
Cincinnati ...................... 3
Cleveland ...................... 0
L
2
4
4
8
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.500
.429
.000
PF
167
170
122
119
PA
131
148
135
202
No
Thielen, MIN ..................... 48
Ju. Jones, ATL .................. 37
Ertz, PHL........................... 43
Mi. Evans, TAM ................ 39
Garcon, SNF ...................... 40
Fitzgerald, ARI.................. 45
Mic. Thomas, NOR............ 42
Benjamin, CAR.................. 32
Tate, DET .......................... 43
C. Thompson, WAS........... 31
PUNT RETURNERS
WEST
W
x-Kansas City ................ 6
x-Denver ....................... 3
L.A. Chargers ................ 3
Oakland ......................... 3
L
2
4
5
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.429
.375
.375
PF
236
127
150
169
PA
180
147
152
190
No
Agnew, DET ...................... 13
Barner, PHL ...................... 11
T. Taylor, SNF ................... 14
Sherels, MIN..................... 16
Tr. Davis, GBY..................... 9
Reedy, TAM ...................... 11
A. Roberts, ATL ................ 10
Cohen, CHI ........................ 17
Ginn, NOR ......................... 12
Switzer, DAL .................... 11
x-late game
KICKOFF RETURNERS
THURSDAY’S RESULT
No
P. Cooper, LA .................... 16
McKinnon, MIN................. 12
Lockett, SEA..................... 10
Dw. Harris, NYG ................. 9
Deonte Thompson,
...... 11
CHI ..............................
Baltimore 40, Miami 0
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Dallas 33, Washington 19
Minnesota 33, Cleveland 16
Carolina 17, Tampa Bay 3
New England 21, L.A. Chargers 13
Buffalo 34, Oakland 14
Atlanta 25, N.Y. Jets 20
Philadelphia 33, San Francisco 10
New Orleans 20, Chicago 12
Cincinnati 24, Indianapolis 23
Seattle 41, Houston 38
Pittsburgh 20, Detroit 15
BYE: L.A. Rams, Arizona, N.Y. Giants, Jacksonville,
Tennessee, Green Bay
MONDAY’S RESULT
at Kansas City 29, Denver 19
THURSDAY’S GAME
Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, 8:25
SUNDAY’S GAMES
Washington at Seattle, 4:05
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 1
Baltimore at Tennessee, 1
L.A. Rams at N.Y. Giants, 1
Cincinnati at Jacksonville, 1
Indianapolis at Houston, 1
Atlanta at Carolina, 1
Denver at Philadelphia, 1
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:05
Kansas City at Dallas, 4:25
Oakland at Miami, 8:30
BYE: Chicago, Minnesota, New England, L.A. Chargers,
Cleveland, Pittsburgh
Detroit at Green Bay, 8:30
Chiefs 29, Broncos 19
BRONCOS ................................. 0
CHIEFS ................................... 14
3
3
10
3
6 — 19
9 — 29
FIRST QUARTER
Kansas City: Peters 45 fumble return (Butker kick),
9:29.
Kansas City: Kelce 29 pass from A.Smith (Butker kick),
6:11.
SECOND QUARTER
Denver: FG McManus 27, 11:48.
Kansas City: FG Butker 25, 5:02.
THIRD QUARTER
Kansas City: FG Butker 32, 12:30.
Denver: FG McManus 34, 8:11.
Denver: Booker 6 run (McManus kick), 1:14.
Kansas City: FG Butker 43, 12:30.
Kansas City: FG Butker 51, 7:03.
Kansas City: FG Butker 42, 4:41.
Denver: Derby 11 pass from Siemian (pass failed), 1:55.
Attendance: 76,573.
BRONCOS
First Downs .......................................... 23
Total Net Yards ................................... 364
Rushes-Yards ............................... 31-177
Passing ................................................ 187
Punt Returns ....................................... 4-3
Kickoff Returns ................................. 4-69
Interceptions Ret. ............................... 1-0
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 19-36-3
Sacked-Yards Lost ............................ 3-11
Punts .............................................. 4-40.5
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 2-2
Penalties-Yards ................................ 7-53
Time Of Possession ......................... 31:23
CHIEFS
16
276
26-79
197
1-0
3-54
3-18
14-32-1
1-5
5-41.8
1-1
7-69
28:37
RUSHING
Denver: C.Anderson 15-78, Booker 6-40, Charles 8-39,
Siemian 2-20.
Kansas City: K.Hunt 22-46, A.Smith 4-33.
PASSING
Denver: Siemian 19-36-3-198.
Kansas City: A.Smith 14-31-0-202, Hill 0-1-1-0.
RECEIVING
Denver: Dem.Thomas 5-66, Booker 3-14, Fowler 2-35,
Derby 2-21, Latimer 2-15, Green 1-16, Heuerman 1-11,
Taylor 1-8, C.Anderson 1-7, Charles 1-5.
Kansas City: Kelce 7-133, K.Hunt 3-22, Hill 2-38, Robinson 1-5, West 1-4.
Att
Brady, NE........................ 309
Roethlisberger, PIT ........ 275
Rivers, LAC ..................... 286
Al. Smith, KC .................. 228
McCown, NYJ.................. 254
D. Watson, HOU ............. 204
D. Carr, OAK.................... 240
Brissett, IND................... 240
Dalton, CIN ..................... 218
Siemian, DEN.................. 211
Com
206
168
173
165
179
126
155
145
138
133
Yds
2541
2062
2028
1979
1840
1699
1654
1642
1603
1471
TD
16
10
13
15
12
19
12
5
11
8
Int
2
9
6
0
7
8
6
4
8
7
RUSHERS
Att
Bell, PIT .......................... 194
K. Hunt, KC ..................... 124
Fournette, JAC ............... 130
Gordon, LAC.................... 131
McCoy, BUF .................... 137
A. Collins, BAL.................. 80
Ajayi, MIA....................... 138
L. Miller, HOU ................. 119
Gore, IND ........................ 110
C.. Anderson, DEN ............ 92
Yds
760
717
596
526
521
478
465
426
404
391
Avg
3.9
5.8
4.6
4.0
3.8
6.0
3.4
3.6
3.7
4.2
LG
27
69t
90t
87t
48t
50
21
19
21
40
TD
5
4
6
4
3
0
0
2
2
1
No
A. Brown, PIT.................... 57
D. Hopkins, HOU ............... 45
A. Green, CIN .................... 38
Cooks, NE.......................... 33
K. Allen, LAC..................... 40
T. Hilton, IND.................... 29
T. Hill, KC .......................... 36
Gronkowski, NE ................ 34
C. Hogan, NE ..................... 33
R. Anderson, NYJ.............. 27
Yds
835
606
572
563
548
527
515
509
438
435
Avg
14.6
13.5
15.1
17.1
13.7
18.2
14.3
15.0
13.3
16.1
LG
51t
72t
77t
54
50
63
75t
53t
47t
69t
TD
3
7
4
3
1
1
3
5
5
3
Yds
193
152
113
157
148
139
156
187
109
79
Avg Long
13.8 77t
11.7 82t
11.3 40
11.2 40
10.6 46
9.9
31
9.8 65t
7.8
29
6.4
25
6.1
14
TD
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
Yds
316
340
243
413
266
207
275
200
Avg
31.6
30.9
27.0
24.3
24.2
23.0
22.9
22.2
TD
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
PUNT RETURNERS
No
Campanaro, BAL............... 14
T. Hill, KC .......................... 13
Tate, BUF.......................... 10
Amendola, NE................... 14
A. Jackson, TEN................ 14
McKenzie, DEN ................. 14
Benjamin, LAC .................. 16
Erickson, CIN .................... 24
Peppers, CLE..................... 17
J. Grant, MIA .................... 13
No
Rainey, BAL ...................... 10
Patterson, OAK ................ 11
A. Hunt, KC ......................... 9
Bray, IND .......................... 17
D. Lewis, NE...................... 11
C. Thompson, HOU ............. 9
Erickson, CIN .................... 12
A. Jackson, TEN.................. 9
LG
96t
49
42
60
71
42
41
48
TOP 25 SCHEDULE
FRIDAY
No. 22 Memphis at Tulsa, 8
SATURDAY
No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 19 LSU, 8
No. 2 Georgia vs. South Carolina, 3:30
No. 3 Ohio State at Iowa, 3:30
No. 4 Wisconsin at Indiana, Noon
No. 5 Notre Dame vs. Wake Forest, 3:30
No. 6 Clemson at No. 20 NC State, 3:30
No. 7 Penn State at No. 24 Michigan State, Noon
No. 8 Oklahoma at No. 11 Oklahoma State, 4
No. 9 Miami vs. No. 13 Virginia Tech, 8
No. 10 TCU vs. Texas, 7:15
No. 12 Washington vs. Oregon, 10
No. 14 Iowa State at West Virginia, 3:30
No. 15 UCF at SMU, 7:15
No. 16 Auburn at Texas A&M, Noon
No. 17 Southern Cal vs. No. 23 Arizona, 10:45
No. 18 Stanford at No. 25 Washington State, 3:30
No. 21 Mississippi State vs. UMass, Noon
Rushing
Att
Thompson ............................... 47
Kelley ...................................... 44
Perine ...................................... 55
Cousins .................................... 23
M.Brown ................................... 8
Crowder ..................................... 4
Paul ........................................... 1
Team ..................................... 182
Opp. ....................................... 182
TD
13
13
10
Int Rtg
4 103.3
4 103.0
6 88.0
Yds Avg Lg
231 4.9 61t
166 3.8 21
166 3.0 12
121 5.3 18
29 3.6 11
26 6.5 11
-1 -1.0 -1
738 4.1 61t
736 4.0 32
Receiving
No. Yds
Thompson ............................... 31 442
Crowder ................................... 28 272
Reed ........................................ 27 211
Grant ....................................... 21 215
Pryor ........................................ 18 223
Davis ....................................... 17 312
Doctson ..................................... 8 130
Perine ........................................ 5 30
Paul ........................................... 2 29
Kelley ........................................ 2 14
M.Brown ................................... 1 11
Quick ......................................... 1 11
Team ..................................... 161 1900
Opp. ....................................... 141 1655
Avg Lg
14.3 74
9.7 41
7.8 20
10.2 34
12.4 44t
18.4 69
16.2 52t
6.0 16
14.5 32
7.0
9
11.0 11
11.0 11
11.8 74
11.7 69
TD
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
4
6
TD
3
0
2
2
1
1
3
1
0
0
0
0
13
10
INTs
No. Yds TD Sacks
Fuller ....................... 2
3 0 Kerrigan
Kerrigan .................. 1 24 1 Smith
Foster ...................... 1 10 0 Ioannidis
Dunbar .................... 1
0 0 Z.Brown
Nicholson ................ 1
0 0 Allen
Galette
McClain
Foster
Hood
Swearinger
Team
6 37 1 Team
Opp.
4 50 1 Opp.
No.
6.0
4.5
3.5
1.5
1.0
1.0
1.0
0.5
0.5
0.5
20.0
16.0
Punting
No.
Way .................................... 29
Team .................................. 29
Opp. .................................... 30
In20
13
13
13
Avg.
45.4
45.4
45.7
Net
39.6
39.6
42.7
Scoring
TD XP-Att FG-Att
Hopkins .......................... 0 12-13
9-11
Thompson ...................... 5
0-0
0-0
Doctson .......................... 3
0-0
0-0
Rose ............................... 0
4-5
3-4
Grant .............................. 2
0-0
0-0
Reed ............................... 2
0-0
0-0
Cousins ........................... 1
0-0
0-0
Team ............................ 18 16-18 12-15
Opp. .............................. 19 16-17 16-20
S
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Pts
39
30
18
13
12
12
6
160
180
L
2
2
3
4
6
Pct
.714
.667
.571
.333
.143
GB
—
CENTRAL
W
Detroit .........................................5
Milwaukee ...................................4
Indiana .........................................3
Cleveland .....................................3
Chicago ........................................1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
James Madison (26)
North Dakota State
Jacksonville State
Central Arkansas
Sam Houston State
South Dakota
North Carolina A&T
South Dakota State
Wofford
Elon
Eastern Washington
Grambling State
Illinois State
Weber State
Samford
Northern Arizona
Nicholls
Western Illinois
New Hampshire
Villanova
Stony Brook
McNeese
Southern Utah
Monmouth
Kennesaw State
RECORD
8-0
8-0
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-1
8-0
6-2
7-1
7-1
5-3
7-1
6-2
6-2
5-3
6-2
6-2
5-3
4-4
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-2
7-1
7-1
PTS
650
624
595
548
540
488
485
462
453
413
346
344
319
261
258
201
183
177
172
160
148
125
89
88
79
2
GB
—
1/
2
11/2
2
3
SOUTHWEST
W
Memphis ......................................5
Houston .......................................5
San Antonio .................................4
New Orleans ................................3
x-Dallas........................................1
L
2
3
3
4
6
Pct
.714
.625
.571
.429
.143
GB
—
NORTHWEST
W
x-Portland....................................4
Minnesota....................................4
Utah .............................................4
Oklahoma City .............................3
Denver..........................................3
L
2
3
3
3
4
Pct
.667
.571
.571
.500
.429
GB
—
PACIFIC
W
x-L.A. Clippers .............................4
x-Golden State.............................4
L.A. Lakers ...................................2
Phoenix ........................................2
Sacramento .................................1
L
1
3
4
4
5
Pct
.800
.571
.333
.333
.167
GB
—
1
21/2
21/2
31/2
1/
2
1
2
41/2
1/
2
1/
2
1
11/2
x-late game
Pvs
3
2
4
5
6
7
8
1
9
12
12
11
14
16
15
17
18
10
19
20
21
22
25
24
—
MLB postseason
NHL
WORLD SERIES
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Best of seven; x-if necessary
All Games Televised by Fox
HOUSTON 3, L.A. DODGERS 2
Game 1: L.A. Dodgers 3, Houston 1
Game 2: Houston 7, L.A. Dodgers 6, (11)
Game 3: Houston 5, L.A. Dodgers 3
Game 4: L.A. Dodgers 6, Houston 2
Game 5: Houston 13, L.A. Dodgers 12, 10 innings
Tuesday: Houston (Verlander 15-8) at L.A. Dodgers (Hill
12-8), 8:20
x-Wednesday: Houston at L.A. Dodgers, 8:20
Astros 13, Dodgers 12
Late Sunday
L.A.
AB R H
Taylor cf-2b....................5 1 2
Seager ss........................5 1 1
Turner dh........................4 2 1
Hernandez lf-2b .............3 2 0
Ethier ph-lf.....................2 0 1
Bellinger 1b ....................5 2 2
Forsythe 3b ....................6 1 2
Puig rf.............................5 1 1
Barnes c..........................5 1 2
Culberson 2b ..................2 0 1
Pederson ph-lf-cf ...........2 1 1
TOTALS
44 12 14
BI BB SO AVG
1 0 1 .222
1 1 2 .250
0 2 0 .150
0 1 1 .231
0 0 0 .333
4 1 2 .200
2 0 2 .308
2 0 2 .143
1 0 2 .188
0 0 0 .500
0 1 0 .364
11 6 12
—
HOUSTON
AB R H
Springer cf-rf .................3 3 2
Bregman 3b....................5 2 2
Altuve 2b........................5 3 3
Correa ss ........................5 2 3
Gurriel 1b .......................5 1 2
Reddick rf-lf ...................5 0 0
Gattis dh ........................4 0 1
Gonzalez lf-1b ................5 0 0
McCann c ........................4 1 1
Fisher pr .........................0 1 0
TOTALS
41 13 14
BI BB SO AVG
1 3 0 .333
1 1 0 .273
4 0 1 .250
3 0 0 .333
3 0 1 .250
0 0 2 .211
0 1 0 .333
0 0 1 .118
1 0 1 .211
0 0 0
--13 5 6
—
L.A. .........................300 130 113
HOUSTON...............000 430 410
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Washington 110, Sacramento 83
Milwaukee 117, Atlanta 106
Indiana 97, San Antonio 94
Charlotte 120, Orlando 113
Denver 124, Brooklyn 111
New York 114, Cleveland 95
Detroit 115, Golden State 107
MONDAY’S RESULTS
Sacramento at Indiana, 7
Phoenix at Brooklyn, 7:30
Oklahoma City at Milwaukee, 8
Detroit at L.A. Lakers, 10:30
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Phoenix at Washington, 7
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7
Indiana at Cleveland, 7
Milwaukee at Charlotte, 7
Chicago at Miami, 7:30
Sacramento at Boston, 7:30
Houston at New York, 8
Minnesota at New Orleans, 8
Orlando at Memphis, 8
Portland at Utah, 9
Toronto at Denver, 9
Dallas at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
1
1
KNOCKOUT ROUND
EASTERN CONFERENCE
L
2
4
4
5
5
6
4
7
OL PTS.
0
16
0
16
1
15
1
15
1
13
1
11
2
10
2
8
GF
40
37
45
36
41
36
28
34
GA
31
30
38
50
35
41
30
43
ATLANTIC
W
Tampa Bay .................... 10
Ottawa ............................ 5
x-Toronto ........................ 7
Boston ............................. 4
Detroit ............................ 5
Florida ............................. 4
Montreal ......................... 4
Buffalo ............................ 3
L
2
2
4
3
6
6
7
7
OL PTS.
1
21
5
15
0
14
3
11
1
11
1
9
1
9
2
8
GF
53
44
45
30
32
40
31
29
GA
36
41
40
33
35
44
45
44
Home-and-home
CENTRAL
W
St. Louis ........................ 10
Winnipeg ........................ 5
Colorado .......................... 6
x-Dallas ........................... 6
Nashville ......................... 5
Chicago ........................... 5
Minnesota ....................... 4
L
2
3
5
5
4
5
3
OL PTS.
1
21
2
12
0
12
0
12
2
12
2
12
2
10
GF
44
31
34
32
27
38
30
GA
30
31
34
32
31
34
28
SECOND LEG
EASTERN CONFERENCE
PACIFIC
W
Los Angeles .................... 9
Vegas .............................. 8
x-Vancouver .................... 6
Anaheim ......................... 6
Calgary ............................ 6
x-San Jose ...................... 5
Edmonton ....................... 3
Arizona ........................... 1
L
2
2
3
4
6
5
6
10
OL PTS.
1
19
0
16
1
13
1
13
0
12
0
10
1
7
1
3
GF
40
37
30
35
28
27
22
30
GA
24
25
25
33
33
26
33
51
WESTERN CONFERENCE
x-late game
SUNDAY’S RESULTS
Calgary 2, Washington 1
Anaheim 4, Carolina 3 (SO)
Winnipeg 7, Pittsburgh 1
MONDAY’S RESULTS
HOUSTON
IP
Keuchel .........................3.2
Gregerson .....................0.1
McHugh............................2
Peacock .........................1.1
Harris ............................0.1
Devenski .......................1.1
Musgrove.........................1
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
R ER BB SO ERA
4 3 2 4 5.23
0 0 0 1 0.00
3 3 3 4 13.5
2 2 0 2 3.38
0 0 0 0 0.00
3 3 1 1 7.71
0 0 0 0 6.00
MLS playoffs
METROPOLITAN
W
New Jersey ..................... 8
Columbus ........................ 8
N.Y. Islanders ................. 7
Pittsburgh ....................... 7
Philadelphia .................... 6
Washington .................... 5
Carolina ........................... 4
N.Y. Rangers ................... 3
Two outs when winning run scored.
E: Forsythe (1), Gurriel (1). LOB: Los Angeles 9, Houston 5. 2B: Seager (1), Turner (2), Forsythe (1), Barnes
(1), Pederson (2), Altuve (2), Correa (1), Gurriel (3).
3B: Bellinger (1). HR: Bellinger (1), off McHugh; Puig
(2), off Devenski; Gurriel (2), off Kershaw; Altuve (2),
off Maeda; Springer (3), off Morrow; Correa (2), off
Morrow; McCann (1), off Cingrani.
L.A.
IP
H R ER BB SO ERA
Kershaw........................4.2 4 6 6 3 2 5.40
Maeda ...........................0.2 2 1 1 1 1 1.93
Watson .........................0.2 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
Morrow ............................0 4 4 4 0 0 11.2
Cingrani.........................1.1 1 1 1 0 2 3.00
Stripling........................0.2 1 0 0 0 0 0.00
Jansen...........................1.2 2 1 1 1 1 4.76
H
5
0
1
3
1
3
1
S OC C E R
Wednesday, Oct. 25: New York 4, Chicago 0
Thursday, Oct. 26: Columbus 0, Atlanta 0, Columbus
wins shootout 3-1
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Wednesday, Oct. 25: Vancouver 5, San Jose 0
Thursday, Oct. 26: Houston 1, Sporting Kansas City 0, OT
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
FIRST LEG
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Monday, Oct. 30: Toronto 2, at New York 1
Tuesday, Oct. 31: New York City FC at Columbus, 8
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Sunday, Oct. 29: Vancouver 0, Seattle 0, tie
Monday, Oct. 30: Portland 0, at Houston 0
Sunday, Nov. 5: New York at Toronto, 3
Sunday, Nov. 5: Columbus at New York City FC, TBA
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Thursday, Nov. 2: Vancouver at Seattle, 10:30
Sunday, Nov. 5: Houston at Portland, TBA
HI GH S C HOOLS
VOLLEYBALL
VIRGINIA
Heritage def. Park View (25-11, 25-8, 25-12)
Loudoun Valley def. Dominion (25-21, 22-25, 25-21,
30-28)
PRIVATE
Langley def. McLean School (25-13, 25-15, 25-11)
Washington International def. Model (25-15, 22-25,
25-18, 25-27, 15-5)
FIELD HOCKEY
MARYLAND
Churchill 2, Wootton 0
Clarksburg 2, Quince Orchard 0
River Hill 8, Hammond 0
Sherwood 3, Paint Branch 1
South River 2, Broadneck 1
Blake 4, Rockville 0
Huntingtown 3, Chopticon 1
Arizona 4, Philadelphia 3 (OT)
N.Y. Islanders 6, Vegas 3
Columbus 4, Boston 3 (SO)
Tampa Bay 8, Florida 5
Montreal 8, Ottawa 3
St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 2
Dallas at Vancouver, Late
Toronto at San Jose, Late
VIRGINIA
Westfield 2, Langley 0
VIRGINIA 6A Fairfax 4, Mount Vernon 0
PRIVATE
Spalding 5, Roland Park 1
TUESDAY’S GAMES
Vegas at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Arizona at Detroit, 7:30
Winnipeg at Minnesota, 8
BOYS’ FALL SOCCER
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Wilson 2, Theodore Roosevelt 1
PRIVATE
St. Mary’s Ryken 1, McNamara 0
St. Albans 3, Episcopal 0
Washington International 1, Sandy Spring 0
Philadelphia at Chicago, 8
Pittsburgh at Edmonton, 8:30
Toronto at Anaheim, 10
New Jersey at Vancouver, 10
Nashville at San Jose, 10:30
GIRLS’ FALL SOCCER
Canadiens 8, Senators 3
MONTREAL .............................. 4
OTTAWA .................................. 2
2
1
2 —
0 —
8
3
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Wilson 3, Eastern 1
PRIVATE
Bullis 4, Maret 1
FIRST PERIOD
HOW THEY SCORED
76ers 115, Rockets 107
PHILADELPHIA .................. 37
HOUSTON ........................... 27
21
29
34
24
23 — 115
27 — 107
PHILADELPHIA: Saric 6-14 0-0 14, Covington 2-8 0-0 5,
Embiid 9-12 4-6 22, Simmons 10-15 4-9 24, Bayless 3-6
2-2 10, Johnson 6-10 0-0 12, McConnell 4-7 0-0 11,
Luwawu-Cabarrot 4-7 7-7 17, J.Anderson 0-1 0-0 0.
Totals 44-80 17-24 115.
HOUSTON: Ariza 3-12 0-0 7, R.Anderson 4-11 1-2 11,
Capela 4-6 4-7 12, Harden 8-21 10-12 29, Gordon 8-18 4-4
25, Tucker 1-6 2-2 5, Nene 1-2 5-9 7, Mbah a Moute 4-7
2-2 11. Totals 33-83 28-38 107.
Three-point Goals: Philadelphia 10-24 (McConnell 3-3,
Luwawu-Cabarrot 2-3, Bayless 2-5, Saric 2-6, Covington
1-4, Embiid 0-1, J.Anderson 0-1, Simmons 0-1), Houston
13-47 (Gordon 5-14, Harden 3-7, R.Anderson 2-9, Mbah a
Moute 1-2, Tucker 1-5, Ariza 1-9, Nene 0-1). Fouled Out:
Tucker. Rebounds: Philadelphia 48 (Johnson 10), Houston 35 (Capela 15). Assists: Philadelphia 27 (Simmons
9), Houston 17 (Harden 7). Total Fouls: Philadelphia 31,
Houston 23.
Celtics 108, Spurs 94
SAN ANTONIO ................... 26
BOSTON ............................. 30
23
24
18
26
27 — 94
28 — 108
SAN ANTONIO: Anderson 2-8 0-0 2, Aldridge 5-13 1-5 11,
Gasol 4-10 2-4 11, Murray 5-11 0-2 10, Green 2-7 1-2 7,
Bertans 1-2 1-2 3, Gay 5-12 2-2 12, Forbes 3-6 0-0 8,
White 0-0 0-0 0, Mills 3-10 0-0 7, Paul 6-8 3-3 18. Totals
36-87 10-20 94.
BOSTON: Tatum 2-7 1-2 7, Horford 7-11 0-0 14, Baynes
3-6 0-0 6, Irving 10-16 1-1 24, Brown 6-11 5-5 18, Nader
1-3 0-0 2, Ojeleye 2-5 2-3 7, Yabusele 1-1 0-0 3, Theis 2-3
2-2 6, Rozier 5-13 0-0 12, Larkin 0-2 0-0 0, Smart 3-10 2-3
9. Totals 42-88 13-16 108.
18
30
38
19
29 — 110
32 — 116
Three-point Goals: Denver 18-41 (Jokic 6-10, Harris
4-10, Mudiay 3-3, Millsap 2-3, Murray 2-9, Barton 1-3,
Chandler 0-1, Arthur 0-2), New York 13-32 (Porzingis
4-7, McDermott 3-6, Hardaway Jr. 3-10, Lee 2-4,
Ntilikina 1-3, Mi.Beasley 0-1, Dotson 0-1). Fouled Out:
Millsap. Rebounds: Denver 36 (Millsap 10), New York 49
(O’Quinn 12). Assists: Denver 20 (Chandler, Millsap 4),
New York 27 (Jack 10). Total Fouls: Denver 22, New York
27. A: 19,812 (19,812).
DODGERS FIRST
Chris Taylor singles. Corey Seager called out on strikes.
Justin Turner walks. Chris Taylor to second. Kike
Hernandez walks. Justin Turner to second. Chris Taylor
to third. Cody Bellinger strikes out swinging. Logan
Forsythe singles. Kike Hernandez to third. Justin Turner
scores. Chris Taylor scores. Logan Forsythe steals
second. Yasiel Puig grounds out.
Dodgers 3, Astros 0
DODGERS FOURTH
Cody Bellinger called out on strikes. Logan Forsythe
doubles to deep left center field. Yasiel Puig strikes out
swinging. Austin Barnes singles to deep left field. Logan
Forsythe scores. Charlie Culberson singles. Austin
Barnes to second. On Luke Gregerson’s wild pitch,
Austin Barnes to third. Chris Taylor strikes out.
Dodgers 4, Astros 0
ASTROS FOURTH
George Springer walks. Alex Bregman flies out to left
center field. Jose Altuve singles to left field. George
Springer to second. Carlos Correa doubles to deep left
field. Jose Altuve to third. George Springer scores.
Yulieski Gurriel homers to left field. Carlos Correa
scores. Jose Altuve scores. Josh Reddick pops out. Evan
Gattis flies out.
Dodgers 4, Astros 4
DODGERS FIFTH
Corey Seager walks. Justin Turner walks. Corey Seager
to second. Kike Hernandez called out on strikes. Cody
Bellinger homers to center field. Justin Turner scores.
Corey Seager scores. Logan Forsythe flies out to right
field. Yasiel Puig strikes out swinging.
Dodgers 7, Astros 4
ASTROS FIFTH
Marwin Gonzalez flies out. Brian McCann called out on
strikes. George Springer walks. Alex Bregman walks.
George Springer to second. Jose Altuve homers to center
field. Alex Bregman scores. George Springer scores.
Carlos Correa singles to third base. Throwing error by
Logan Forsythe. Yulieski Gurriel grounds out.
Dodgers 7, Astros 7
DODGERS SEVENTH
Justin Turner doubles to deep right center field. Kike
Hernandez reaches on a fielder’s choice. Justin Turner
out at third. Cody Bellinger triples to deep center field.
Kike Hernandez scores. Logan Forsythe called out on
strikes. Yasiel Puig flies out.
Dodgers 8, Astros 7
ASTROS SEVENTH
George Springer homers to left field. Alex Bregman
singles to shallow center field. Jose Altuve doubles to
deep left center field. Alex Bregman scores. On Brandon
Morrow’s wild pitch, Jose Altuve to third. Carlos Correa
homers to left field. Jose Altuve scores. Yulieski Gurriel
strikes out. Josh Reddick strikes out. Evan Gattis lines
out.
Astros 11, Dodgers 8
DODGERS EIGHTH
Austin Barnes called out on strikes. Joc Pederson
doubles to deep left field. Chris Taylor hit by pitch. Corey
Seager doubles to deep left center field. Chris Taylor to
third. Joc Pederson scores. Justin Turner lines out to
right field to Josh Reddick. Andre Ethier grounds out.
Astros 11, Dodgers 9
ASTROS EIGHTH
Marwin Gonzalez lines out to deep left field to Andre
Ethier. Brian McCann homers to right field. George
Springer singles to right center field. Alex Bregman
grounds out to third base. George Springer out at
second.
Astros 12, Dodgers 9
DODGERS NINTH
Cody Bellinger walks. Logan Forsythe strikes out swinging. Yasiel Puig homers to left field. Cody Bellinger
scores. Austin Barnes doubles to deep center field. Joc
Pederson grounds out. Austin Barnes to third. Chris
Taylor singles to shallow center field. Austin Barnes
scores. Corey Seager lines out.
Dodgers 12, Astros 12
ASTROS TENTH
Evan Gattis grounds out. Marwin Gonzalez strikes out
swinging. Brian McCann hit by pitch. George Springer
walks. Brian McCann to second. Derek Fisher pinch-running for Brian McCann. Alex Bregman singles to left
center field. George Springer to second. Derek Fisher
scores.
Astros 13, Dodgers 12
ORLANDO ........................... 33
NEW ORLEANS .................. 24
27
40
TRANSACTIONS
27
20
28 — 115
15 — 99
NEW ORLEANS: Cunningham 3-9 0-0 11, Davis 13-20
13-15 39, Cousins 5-14 0-1 12, Holiday 5-9 1-2 11, Moore
4-11 0-0 8, Miller 0-1 0-0 0, Smith 0-1 0-0 0, Diallo 1-2 0-0
2, Nelson 2-6 0-0 5, Clark 2-6 0-0 5, Allen 4-6 0-0 9. Totals
39-85 14-18 99.
Three-point Goals: Orlando 16-34 (Speights 6-10,
Fournier 4-7, Gordon 3-5, Vucevic 1-2, Simmons 1-3,
Ross 1-3, Mack 0-1, Isaac 0-1, Augustin 0-2), New
Orleans 7-30 (Cunningham 2-6, Cousins 2-8, Allen 1-2,
Clark 1-3, Nelson 1-4, Miller 0-1, Holiday 0-1, Davis 0-2,
Moore 0-3). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Orlando 42
(Vucevic 8), New Orleans 42 (Cousins 12). Assists:
Orlando 27 (Vucevic, Mack, Fournier, Simmons 4), New
Orleans 28 (Holiday 8). Total Fouls: Orlando 19, New
Orleans 22.
T-Wolves 125, Heat 122 (OT)
19
20
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 7, Ottawa, DiDomenico 2 (Karlsson, Hoffman),
10:34 (pp). 8, Montreal, Galchenyuk 4 (Benn), 17:41. 9,
Montreal, Gallagher 4 (Danault), 19:29.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 10, Montreal, Plekanec 2 (Hudon, Gallagher),
5:10. 11, Montreal, Lehkonen 2 (Byron, Weber), 13:24.
SHOTS ON GOAL
MONTREAL .............................. 7
8
14 — 29
OTTAWA ................................ 11
8
9 — 28
Power-play opportunities: Montreal 1 of 4; Ottawa 2 of
5. Goalies: Montreal, Montoya 1-1-0 (28 shots-25
saves). Ottawa, Anderson 4-2-3 (15-9), Condon 1-0-2
(14-12). A: 15,069 (18,572). T: 2:36.
Blue Jackets 4, Bruins 3 (OT)
BOSTON ............................. 0
COLUMBUS ........................ 2
1
1
2
0
0 — 3
0 — 4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Columbus, Savard 2 (Wennberg, Calvert),
1:59. 2, Columbus, Jenner 1 (Anderson, Nutivaara),
17:08.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Columbus, Motte 1 (Nutivaara, Bobrovsky),
8:27. 4, Boston, Bergeron 2 (Pastrnak, Heinen), 15:37
(pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 5, Boston, Krug 2 (Miller, Pastrnak), 10:26. 6,
Boston, Marchand 8 (Pastrnak, Bergeron), 11:47 (pp).
SHOOTOUT
Boston 0 (Agostino NG, Marchand NG), Columbus 2
(Wennberg NG, Panarin G, Bjorkstrand G).
SHOTS ON GOAL
BOSTON ............................. 6
12
9
3 — 30
COLUMBUS ...................... 11
10
9
2 — 32
Power-play opportunities: Boston 2 of 4; Columbus 0 of
5. Goalies: Boston, Rask 1-3-2 (32 shots-29 saves).
Columbus, Bobrovsky 7-2-0 (30-27). A: 13,396 (18,500).
T: 2:41.
Islanders 6, Golden Knights 3
VEGAS ..................................... 2
N.Y. ISLANDERS ...................... 1
0
2
1 —
3 —
3
6
31
28
15 — 125
12 — 122
MINNESOTA: Wiggins 7-23 7-8 22, Gibson 3-4 1-1 7,
Towns 7-11 3-4 20, Teague 7-18 6-6 23, Butler 5-13 5-5
16, Muhammad 2-4 0-0 4, Bjelica 3-4 2-2 9, Dieng 2-3 2-3
6, Jones 2-4 0-0 5, Crawford 3-7 6-6 13. Totals 41-91
32-35 125.
MIAMI: Richardson 2-10 0-0 5, J.Johnson 0-3 2-4 2,
Adebayo 5-9 3-6 13, Dragic 8-16 1-2 18, Waiters 14-28
4-5 33, White 2-2 1-2 6, Winslow 5-5 0-0 10, Olynyk 9-12
2-2 23, T.Johnson 4-7 4-4 12, Ellington 0-1 0-0 0. Totals
49-93 17-25 122.
Three-point Goals: Minnesota 11-23 (Towns 3-4, Teague
3-5, Jones 1-1, Bjelica 1-2, Crawford 1-3, Butler 1-3,
Wiggins 1-5), Miami 7-27 (Olynyk 3-5, White 1-1, Dragic
1-4, Richardson 1-6, Waiters 1-8, Ellington 0-1, T.Johnson 0-2). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 40
(Towns 12), Miami 50 (Adebayo 13). Assists: Minnesota
20 (Teague 11), Miami 17 (Dragic 5). Total Fouls:
Minnesota 25, Miami 28. A: 19,600 (19,600).
MLB
Seattle Mariners: Named Lorena Martin director of high
performance.
Cincinnati Reds: Named Buddy Bell vice president, senior
advisor to president of baseball operations, general
manager, Dick Williams.
New York Mets: Released OF Nori Aoki.
Philadelphia Phillies: Named Gabe Kapler manager.
San Diego Padres: Announced RHP Jarred Cosart and
LHP Christian Friedrich cleared outright waivers and
elected free agency.
San Francisco Giants: Designated C Tim Federowicz for
assignment. Claimed INF Micah Johnson off waivers
from Cincinnati.
Washington Nationals: Named Dave Martinez manager
and agreed to terms with him on a three-year contract.
TE NNI S
ATP
PARIS MASTERS
At Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy in Paris
Purse: $4.96 million
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SINGLES — FIRST ROUND
Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Steve Johnson, United
States, 6-2, 6-1; Peter Gojowczyk, Germany, def. Ryan
Harrison, United States, 7-6 (7-5), 6-3; Chung Hyeon,
South Korea, def. Mischa Zverev, Germany, 6-0, 6-2; Filip
Krajinovic, Serbia, def. Yuichi Sugita, Japan, 6-4, 6-2;
Nicolas Mahut, France, def. Vasek Pospisil, Canada, 5-7,
7-5, 7-6 (7-4); Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Gilles Simon,
France, 6-3, 6-0; Richard Gasquet, France, def. Benoit
Paire, France, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4; Julien Benneteau, France,
def. Denis Shapovalov, Canada, 6-4, 6-4.
DOUBLES — FIRST ROUND
Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico, and Julio Peralta, Chile, def.
John Isner and Sam Querrey, United States, 7-6 (9-7),
7-6 (8-6); Feliciano Lopez and Marc Lopez, Spain, def.
Karen Khachanov and Andrey Rublev, Russia, 4-6, 6-4,
10-6; Diego Schwartzman, Argentina, and Fernando
Verdasco, Spain, def. Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi, Pakistan,
and Mischa Zverev, Germany, 4-6, 6-3, 13-11.
ATP WORLD TOUR RANKING
Through Oct. 29
SINGLES
1. Rafael Nadal, Spain, 10465
2. Roger Federer, Switzerland, 9005
3. Andy Murray, Britain, 4790
4. Alexander Zverev, Germany, 4400
5. Marin Cilic, Croatia, 4185
6. Dominic Thiem, Austria, 3935
7. Novak Djokovic, Serbia, 3765
8. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 3650
9. Stan Wawrinka, Switzerland, 3360
10. David Goffin, Belgium, 2975
11. Pablo Carreno Busta, Spain, 2650
12. Milos Raonic, Canada, 2555
13. Sam Querrey, United States, 2525
14. John Isner, United States, 2505
15. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France, 2490
DOUBLES
1. Henri Kontinen, Finland, 9560
2. John Peers, Australia, 9560
3. Marcelo Melo, Brazil, 7980
4. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 7600
5. Nicolas Mahut, France, 5755
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Vegas, Karlsson 3 (Eakin), 9:31 (sh). 2, N.Y.
Islanders, Ladd 3 (Boychuk, Leddy), 13:50. 3, Vegas, Tuch
3 (Hunt, Miller), 15:46 (pp).
AU TO R AC I NG
SECOND PERIOD
NASCAR Monster Energy Cup
Scoring: 4, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares 10 (Bailey, Leddy),
14:50 (pp). 5, N.Y. Islanders, Barzal 3 (Bailey, Lee), 17:44
(pp).
POINTS LEADERS
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 6, N.Y. Islanders, Clutterbuck 2 (Seidenberg,
Kulemin), 4:44. 7, N.Y. Islanders, Kulemin (Seidenberg),
8:26. 8, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares 9 (Lee, Bailey), 12:38. 9,
Vegas, Miller 1 (Tuch, Hunt), 14:41 (pp).
SHOTS ON GOAL
VEGAS ................................... 15
11
8 — 34
N.Y. ISLANDERS .................... 10
13
7 — 30
Power-play opportunities: Vegas 2 of 5; N.Y. Islanders 2
of 5. Goalies: Vegas, Dansk 3-1-0 (19 shots-17 saves),
Lagace 0-0-0 (11-7). N.Y. Islanders, Halak 5-2-0 (34-31).
A: 11,113 (15,795). T: 2:31.
Through Oct. 29
1. Martin Truex Jr. ................................................ 4117
2. Kyle Busch ........................................................ 4100
3. Brad Keselowski ............................................... 4079
4. Kevin Harvick .................................................... 4053
5. Jimmie Johnson ................................................ 4050
6. Ryan Blaney ...................................................... 4047
7. Denny Hamlin ................................................... 4045
8. Chase Elliott ..................................................... 4027
MILES LED LEADERS
Through Sunday
ARIZONA ......................... 13
9
7
5 — 34
PHILADELPHIA .................. 3
10
17
1 — 31
Power-play opportunities: Arizona 0 of 4; Philadelphia 1
of 1. Goalies: Arizona, Wedgewood 3-1-0 (31 shots-28
saves). Philadelphia, Elliott 5-2-1 (34-30). T: 2:44.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
Lightning 8, Panthers 5
LAPS IN TOP 15
ARIZONA ........................... 2
PHILADELPHIA .................. 0
0
0
1
3
1 — 4
0 — 3
FIRST PERIOD
ORLANDO: Fournier 7-12 2-2 20, Gordon 7-13 0-1 17,
Vucevic 9-17 1-2 20, Augustin 1-5 4-4 6, Ross 3-7 1-2 8,
Isaac 2-4 0-0 4, Speights 6-11 0-0 18, Birch 0-0 0-0 0,
Biyombo 0-0 0-2 0, Mack 0-3 0-0 0, Hezonja 1-1 0-0 2,
Simmons 7-12 5-5 20, Afflalo 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-85
13-18 115.
37
30
Scoring: 1, Ottawa, Pyatt 3, 0:21. 2, Montreal, Hudon 1
(Montoya, Petry), 4:27 (pp). 3, Montreal, Pacioretty 4,
7:20 (sh). 4, Ottawa, Dzingel 4 (Hoffman, DiDomenico),
8:15 (pp). 5, Montreal, Lehkonen 1 (Weber, Drouin),
13:17. 6, Montreal, Hudon 2 (Weber, Plekanec), 16:00.
Coyotes 4, Flyers 3 (OT)
Magic 115, Pelicans 99
MINNESOTA .................. 23
MIAMI ............................ 32
0 — 12 14
1 — 13 14
WP: Musgrove (1-0); LP: Jansen (0-1). Morrow pitched
to 4 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Maeda 2-2, Watson 1-0, Gregerson 2-0, Harris 2-1, Devenski 2-0. HBP: Peacock (Taylor), Jansen (McCann). WP:
Gregerson, Morrow. T: 5:17. A: 43,300 (42,060).
NEW YORK: Hardaway Jr. 4-11 2-2 13, Porzingis 14-26
6-6 38, Kanter 5-8 2-2 12, Jack 3-5 0-0 6, Lee 4-8 2-2 12,
Mi.Beasley 2-4 0-1 4, Dotson 0-1 0-0 0, McDermott 4-10
0-0 11, O’Quinn 3-4 9-10 15, W.Hernangomez 0-0 0-0 0,
Ntilikina 2-5 0-0 5. Totals 41-82 21-23 116.
PVS
1
2
3
4
5
7
6
t8
10
11
12
13
21
22
t8
24
23
14
16
25
NR
18
NR
NR
NR
HOCKEY
4
DENVER: Chandler 1-3 4-4 6, Millsap 2-13 2-4 8, Jokic
9-15 4-6 28, Murray 8-16 2-2 20, Harris 6-15 2-2 18,
Barton 5-10 2-4 13, Plumlee 1-4 0-3 2, Arthur 0-2 0-0 0,
Faried 0-0 0-0 0, Mudiay 3-6 6-6 15, Ma.Beasley 0-1 0-0 0.
Totals 35-85 22-31 110.
AFCA DIVISION II TOP 25
Pts
822
820
777
717
710
683
625
577
558
516
510
483
405
402
399
347
295
289
215
214
190
159
100
88
48
Pct
.714
.667
.500
.429
.200
1
1/
2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
DENVER .............................. 25
NEW YORK ......................... 35
Others receiving votes: Richmond 58, Western Carolina
46, Northern Iowa 32, The Citadel 27, Furman 20,
Delaware 13, Youngstown State 11, Montana 9, N.C.
Central 7, Dartmouth 6.
Record
1. Minnesota State (10)...................... 9-0
2. Shepherd (22).................................. 8-0
3. Indiana (Pa.) (2) .............................. 9-0
4. Midwestern State ........................... 7-0
5. Indianapolis ..................................... 9-0
6. Fort Hays State ............................... 9-0
7. Central Washington ........................ 9-0
8. Northwest Missouri State (34) ...... 8-1
9. Texas A&M-Commerce ................... 7-1
10. Assumption ................................... 8-0
11. Ashland.......................................... 8-1
12. Ferris State ................................... 7-1
13. Sioux Falls ..................................... 8-1
14. Wingate......................................... 8-0
15. Colorado Mesa............................... 8-1
16. Virginia State ................................ 8-0
17. Humboldt State............................. 7-1
18. Winona State ................................ 8-1
19. Grand Valley State ........................ 7-2
20. Bowie State................................... 8-1
21. Eastern New Mexico ..................... 7-1
22. Findlay ........................................... 8-1
23. West Alabama............................... 7-2
24. Colorado State-Pueblo .................. 7-2
25. West Georgia................................. 7-2
L
2
2
3
4
4
1/
2
Knicks 116, Nuggets 110
FCS TOP 25
Att Yds
237 1900
237 1900
226 1655
SOUTHEAST
W
Orlando ........................................5
Washington .................................4
Charlotte......................................4
Miami...........................................2
Atlanta.........................................1
Three-point Goals: San Antonio 12-26 (Paul 3-4, Gay 2-3,
Forbes 2-4, Green 2-4, Gasol 1-2, Anderson 1-2, Mills 1-4,
Bertans 0-1, Aldridge 0-2), Boston 11-30 (Irving 3-7,
Tatum 2-4, Rozier 2-5, Yabusele 1-1, Brown 1-2, Smart
1-4, Ojeleye 1-4, Larkin 0-1, Nader 0-1, Theis 0-1). Fouled
Out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 41 (Gasol 8), Boston
54 (Horford 13). Assists: San Antonio 24 (Gasol,
Bertans, Mills 4), Boston 25 (Smart 7). Total Fouls: San
Antonio 14, Boston 22. A: 18,624 (18,624).
NCAA
None.
Passing
Cmp
Cousins ............... 161
Team ................... 161
Opp ...................... 141
GB
—
1
11/2
2
2
TUESDAY’S GAMES
MISSED FIELD GOALS
REDSKINS LEADERS
Pct
.714
.600
.500
.429
.429
Entering Monday’s game
KICKOFF RETURNERS
FOURTH QUARTER
L
2
2
3
4
4
AFC individual leaders
RECEIVERS
MONDAY’S GAME
ATLANTIC
W
Boston..........................................5
x-Toronto .....................................3
New York .....................................3
Brooklyn.......................................3
Philadelphia .................................3
Boston 108, San Antonio 94
Minnesota 125, Miami 122, OT
New York 116, Denver 110
Charlotte 104, Memphis 99
Orlando 115, New Orleans 99
Philadelphia 115, Houston 107
at Utah 104, Dallas 89
Toronto at Portland, Late
Golden State at L.A. Clippers, Late
QUARTERBACKS
BASEBALL
Scoring: 1, Arizona, Martinook 1 (Hjalmarsson, Richardson), 2:20. 2, Arizona, Dvorak 1 (Ekman-Larsson, Demers), 7:46.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 3, Arizona, Perlini 2 (Hjalmarsson, Goligoski),
1:34. 4, Philadelphia, Couturier 8 (Provorov, Giroux), 2:14
(pp). 5, Philadelphia, Weal 2 (Filppula, Provorov), 19:07.
6, Philadelphia, Couturier 9 (Giroux, Provorov), 19:44.
SHOTS ON GOAL
Martin Truex Jr. ............................................ 278073
Kyle Busch ...................................................... 25176
Kevin Harvick .................................................. 12911
Kyle Larson ................................................... 127826
Brad Keselowski ........................................... 104092
Denny Hamlin ................................................. 65831
Chase Elliott ................................................... 60799
Ryan Blaney .................................................... 49522
Joey Logano .................................................... 47123
Matt Kenseth ................................................. 35661
Erik Jones ....................................................... 25908
Jimmie Johnson .............................................. 23824
Ricky Stenhouse Jr. .......................................... 1367
Daniel Suarez .................................................... 9956
Kasey Kahne ....................................................... 938
Dale Earnhardt Jr. ............................................. 6895
Ty Dillon ............................................................ 5748
Clint Bowyer ....................................................... 536
Ryan Newman ..................................................... 472
Jamie McMurray ............................................... 4399
Matt DiBenedetto ............................................ 3192
Kurt Busch ........................................................ 2704
Austin Dillon ....................................................... 255
Trevor Bayne ...................................................... 198
Elliott Sadler ..................................................... 1782
NFL
Nfl: Suspended Chicago LB Jerrell Freeman 10 games for
violating the league’s policy against performance-enhancing drugs.
Green Bay Packers: Released G Darrell Greene from the
practice squad. Signed FB Joe Kerridge to the practice
squad.
Kansas City Chiefs: Activated CB Steven Nelson from
injured reserve.
Minnesota Vikings: Activated S Andrew Sendejo from
the suspended list. Claimed RB Mack Brown off waivers
from Washington. Waived WR Rodney Adams and C
Cornelius Edison.
San Francisco 49Ers: Placed S Jimmie Ward and T Garry
Gilliam on injured reserve.
NHL
Arizona Coyotes: Recalled G Hunter Miska from Tucson
(AHL).
Carolina Hurricanes: Assigned F Janne Kuokkanen to
Charlotte (AHL).
Colorado Avalanche: Reassigned F Andrew Agozzino to
San Antonio (AHL).
Detroit Red Wings: Assigned F Tyler Bertuzzi to Grand
Rapids (AHL).
Vegas Golden Knights: Assigned D Griffin Reinhart to
Chicago (AHL). Recalled D Shea Theodore from Chicago.
COLLEGES
Big Ten Conference: Named Randy Lieberman as director
of communications.
Nyit: Named Frank Battaglia as assistant baseball coach
and athletic business manager.
TAMPA BAY ............................ 3
FLORIDA .................................. 2
3
1
2 —
2 —
8
5
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Tampa Bay, Point 6 (Coburn, Girardi), 2:48. 2,
Tampa Bay, Kucherov 13 (Stamkos), 4:55. 3, Florida,
Ekblad 3 (Barkov, Huberdeau), 10:31. 4, Tampa Bay,
Stamkos 4 (Hedman, Killorn), 14:40 (pp). 5, Florida,
Barkov 4 (Dadonov), 19:07.
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 6, Florida, Huberdeau 5 (Barkov, Dadonov),
5:32. 7, Tampa Bay, Palat 4 (Point, Gourde), 7:17. 8,
Tampa Bay, Gourde 1 (Palat, Sergachev), 9:38 (pp). 9,
Tampa Bay, Namestnikov 4 (Hedman, Kucherov), 15:41.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 10, Florida, McGinn 3 (Vrbata, Bjugstad), 5:32.
11, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 5 (Namestnikov, Dotchin),
9:02. 12, Florida, Dadonov 6 (Huberdeau, Barkov), 11:29.
13, Tampa Bay, Stralman 2, 19:41.
SHOTS ON GOAL
TAMPA BAY .......................... 13
18
7 — 38
FLORIDA .................................. 9
6
8 — 23
Power-play opportunities: Tampa Bay 2 of 5; Florida 0 of
3. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 10-1-0 (23 shots-18
saves). Florida, Niemi 0-3-0 (18-16), Reimer 3-4-1
(19-14). T: 2:39.
Through Sunday
PCT.
1. Martin Truex Jr........................... 88.7
2. Kyle Busch .................................. 82.8
3. Chase Elliott ............................... 82.4
4. Kyle Larson ................................. 81.5
5. Kevin Harvick.............................. 78.7
6. Denny Hamlin ............................. 78.6
7. Matt Kenseth ............................. 74.5
8. Jimmie Johnson.......................... 74.0
9. Jamie McMurray......................... 72.4
10. Brad Keselowski ....................... 72.1
LAPS
8571
7992
7956
7874
7602
7596
7193
7144
6992
6964
AVERAGE RUNNING POSITION
Through Sunday
RACES
1. Martin Truex Jr.............................. 33
2. Kyle Busch ..................................... 33
3. Kyle Larson .................................... 33
4. Kevin Harvick................................. 33
5. Denny Hamlin ................................ 33
6. Chase Elliott .................................. 33
7. Matt Kenseth ................................ 33
8. Brad Keselowski ............................ 33
9. Ryan Blaney ................................... 33
10. Joey Logano ................................. 33
POS.
7.500
8.659
10.108
10.177
10.687
10.808
11.625
11.989
13.055
13.191
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840
Official Notices
The Prince William County School Board will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
At 7 p.m.
in the School Board Meeting Room, Edward L. Kelly Leadership Center,
14715 Bristow Road, Manassas, VA on the following issue(s):
To Receive Input on the Sale of Excess School Board Property at
8225 Linton Hall Road (13th High School) and Retention of Proceeds
Pursuant to Virginia Code §22.1-129
ACCESSIBILITY TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES: The hearing is being
held at a public facility believed to be accessible to persons with
disabilities. Any persons with questions on the accessibility of
the facility should contact the Clerk to the School Board at the
Prince William County School Board Office, P.O. Box 389, Manassas,
VA 20108 or by telephone at 703-791-8709, or by e-mail to pwcsclerk@pwcs.edu. Citizens who wish to address the School
Board during the public hearing must notify the Board Clerk
by noon on October 18, 2017 in writing at P.O. Box 389,
Manassas, VA 20108, by phone at 703-791-8709, or by email
at pwcsclerk@pwcs.edu. Please include your address, phone
number, and topic of discussion. Your contact information will
not be shared with the public. Citizens may also sign in the
School Board Meeting Room prior to 6:55 p.m. on the evening
of the public hearing. The Prince William County School Board
complies with the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA). If you have a disability, such as deafness or blindness, and
need assistance when attending a Board meeting, please call the
Community Relations Office at 703-791-8720. A qualified reader or
interpreter will be present if you notify us of your needs three days
prior to the meeting. Please contact the School Board Office at
703-791-8709 for additional information, or you may appear at the
designated place, date and time to present your views.
825
Bids & Proposals
825
Bids & Proposals
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
WATER AND SEWER AUTHORITY
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
STATEMENTS
BASIC ORDERING AGREEMENT
INFRASTRUCTURE
(DCFA #495-WSA)
The District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (DC
Water) requests Qualifications Statements for the performance of professional architectural/engineering and related
services for DC Water infrastructure and facilities under
a proposed Basic Ordering Agreement – Infrastructure
with task orders assigned on an as needed basis. It is
anticipated that the selected firms will provide conceptual
design, final design, services during bidding, services during
construction, NEPA Compliance, and other permitting needs.
Services are anticipated to include work in the civil engineering (final design); structural engineering (final design);
bidding services; topographical survey; subsurface utility
engineering (SUE), research in the office of the surveyor to
determine right-of-way, easement, and other access rights;
geotechnical and/or geophysical investigation; NEPA compliance; wetlands and other environmental permitting and
design. Projects will be located in the water distribution
and sewer collection systems throughout the District of
Columbia as well as Montgomery, Fairfax, and Loudoun
Counties. Projects are likely to include rehabilitation and
replacement of water and sewer pipelines. DC Water will
award one agreement as a result of this procurement.
The agreement resulting from this request for Qualifications
Statements will be subject to a Fair Share Objective for
Minority and Women Business Enterprises participation in
this work of 28% and 4%, respectively. The program
requirements are fully defined in the EPA’s Participation
by Disadvantaged Enterprises in Procurement under EPA
Financial Assistance Agreements, May 27, 2008.
Interested firms should contact Ms. Senail Manley by email at
senail.manley@dcwater.com to obtain the more detailed
Request for Qualifications Statements. Request must refer
to DCFA #495-WSA. Firms are invited to attend a information
session on Friday, November 17, 2017 from 9am-11am at
DC Water, Blue Plains, COF, Board Room. Reservations are
required no later than noon on Tuesday, November 14, 2017.
In the RSVP include the full name of attendee(s), company
name, phone number, and email address. Space is limited
to two (2) attendees per firm. RSVP to the A/E Coordinator,
Ms. Senail Manley, by e-mail senail.manley@dcwater.com.
Qualifications Statements are due Wednesday, Dec 13, 2017
at 2:00 p.m. EST.
1405
Cars
1405
Cars
CHEVROLET
NISSAN
CHEVROLET 2002 CORVETTE
Red, like new, 39k orig miles,
garage kept. $19,500.
Call 301-884-0377
NISSAN 2010 Maxima SV, fully
loaded w/premium & tech packages, spoiler, panoramic roof,
flash quards, 5 piece flr/trunk
mats, 91,000 mi. Mystic Jade,
Charcoal leather int. Original
owner, excl. cond. $11,000. 202262-4355
FORD
FORD
2007
7
PASSENGER
FREESTYLE- 85,300 miles, excellent condition, recent MD emissions check. $4000. 202-368-0684
JAGUAR
JEEP 2002 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO
109K mi MD Insp 6cyl lthr 4x4 $7,000
Auto
Plaza
301-340-1390
LEXUS
LEXUS 2002 ES300-1 owner, like new.
MD insp. only 50,415 mi. $7,999
Auto
Plaza
301-340-1390
MERCEDES-BENZ
MERCEDES BENZ 2009 ML350 4WD
SUV, 102K, beige ext, beige lthr, mercedes maint, loaded,,$11,990/obo
301-312-1291 docpradeep@aol.com
MERCEDES 2006 CLK 500 - 2 DR.
CONVERTIBLE, 1 OWNER, MERCEDES
BENZ SERVICED, LIKE NEW. $9,900
Auto
Plaza
301-340-1390
Aviation, Boats, RVs
Motorcycles Directory
TOYOTA
TOYOTA 2011 COROLLA LE, vin #
2T1BU4EE5BC666000.
Held at auction. War Recovery Inc.
Monday 10/30 2pm. Sold at auction
for storgae and lien fees.
540-422-0480
TOYOTA 2004 AVALON XLS,
91,000 miles, silver, MD
inspected, $4800. 301-908-8188
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1-800-753-POST
SF
840
Trustees Sale - DC
850
Trustees Sale - DC
1324 Q Street, N.W., Unit A,
Washington, DC 20009.
Pursuant to the District of Columbia Condominium Act and
the Declaration of Condominium and the
By-Laws of
Condominium recorded on October 22, 2002 as Instrument
Nos. 2002122239 and 2022122240, respectively, among the
Land Records of the District of Columbia, according to the Notice
of Foreclosure Sale of Condominium Unit for Assessments Due
filed September 26, 2017, and at the request of the Board
of Directors of the Condominium, the following real property
shall be sold at public auction On November 14, 2017 at
10:45 A.M. within the office of: HARVEY WEST AUCTIONEERS,
INC., 5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington,
DC 20015: Unit No. A in 1324 Q Street Condominium as
described in the aforementioned Declaration and By-Laws of
Condominium and as per Plat of Condominium Subdivision
recorded in the Condominium Book 46 at Page 31 in the office
of the Surveyor for the District Of Columbia, together with all
of the appurtenances incident to said unit as contained in the
aforementioned Declaration of Condominium and any and all
amendments thereto, subject, however, to all the provisions,
restrictions, easements and conditions as set forth in the
Declarations of Condominium, the By-Laws relating thereto, and
any and all amendments thereto. The Unit is known for taxation
and assessment purposes as Lot No. 2066 in Square No. 0241
and having a mailing address of 1324 Q Street, N.W., Unit A,
Washington, DC 20009.
TERMS OF SALE: The purchase price must be paid in cash.
Unit A shall be sold subject to real estate taxes, if any, and shall
also be sold subject to any other superior liens, encumbrances,
and municipal assessments if any, the further particulars of
which may be announced at the time of sale. Other oral
information regarding Unit A may be disclosed at the time of
sale. A deposit of $10,000 will be required at time of sale,
such deposit to be in cash, certified check, or in such other
form, as the Board of Directors of the Condominium, in its sole
discretion, requires. All conveyance, recording, recordation tax,
transfer taxes, etc., shall be at purchaser’s cost. The balance
of the purchase price, together with interest at the rate of ten
(10)% per annum from date of sale to date of receipt of the
balance of the purchase price, must be paid in cash or by
cashier’s certified check and all other terms to be complied
with within 30 days. Otherwise deposit is forfeited and the
property may be re-advertised and sold at the discretion of the
Board of Directors of the Condominium at the risk and cost of
the defaulting purchaser. The Condominium Association shall
convey a deed pursuant to 42 D.C., Code Section 1903.13,
and makes no further representations of warranties as to title.
The Condominium association cannot guarantee clear title or the
purchaser's ability to obtain title insurance. For this reason,
the purchaser may not be able to obtain financing and therefore
must be able to pay the entire purchase price balance, in any
case, within 30 days. In the event of the failure on the part of the
Condominium association to convey such deed, the purchaser's
sole remedy shall be the return of the deposit.
Contact Brian D. Bichy 301-961-5253
Attorney for the 1324 Q Street Condominium
1-800-753-POST
SF
OCTOBER 24, 31, NOVEMBER 7, 2017
C JOBS
1408 Antiques & Classics
1-800-753-POST
SF
851
Montgomery County
Law Offices
GOOZMAN, BERNSTEIN & MARKUSKI
9101 Cherry Lane, Suite 207
Laurel, Maryland 20708
(301) 953-7480
(410) 792-0075
TRUSTEES' SALE
Case No. 435919V
Of Valuable Improved Real Estate
located in Montgomery County, MD
at 13112 Briarcliff Terrace, Unit #5-101
Germantown, MD 20874
Under and by virtue of a Power Of Sale contained in a certain
Deed Of Trust from John G. Markle and Linda D. Markle to Ronda
McDowell and Steve Anderson, Trustees, dated January 20, 2004,
and duly recorded among the Land Records of Montgomery County,
Maryland, in Liber 26692, at Folio 065, as modified, docketed for
foreclosure in Civil No 435919V, the holder of the indebtedness
secured by the Deed Of Trust having appointed Martin L. Goozman
and Jeffrey W. Bernstein as Substitute Trustees by instrument duly
executed, acknowledged and recorded among the Land Records of
the said County, default having occurred under the terms thereof
and at the request of the holder of the Note secured thereby, the
undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction
at the Circuit Court for Montgomery County, at the Court House
Door, 50 Maryland Avenue, Rockville, Maryland 20850 on:
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2017 AT 12:00 PM (NOON)
all that Property described in the said Deed Of Trust as follows:
Being known and designated as Unit 5-101, Building No. 5,
Phase 3 in the horizontal property regime known as “SENECA
KNOLLS CONDOMINIUM”, as being part of all that property more
particularly described in a certain Declaration of Condominium,
dated February 27, 1992, and recorded among the Land Records
of Montgomery County, Maryland in Liber 10201, Folio 494,
and any amendments or supplements thereafter, by the Ryland
Group, Inc. a Maryland Corporation the Declarant thereof, and
as shown on plats entitled, “2nd Expansion, Phase 3, Building
No. 5, Plat of Condominium Subdivision, SENECA KNOLLS
CONDOMINIUM, Plat No. 174, Parcel E, Block 19, Section 11,
Churchill Town Sector”, which plats are recorded among the
Land Records of Montgomery County, Maryland in Condominium
Plat Book 62, at Plat Nos. 6352, 6353 and 6355.
Together with a prorated undivided percentage interest in the
common elements thereof, common with the other owners, as
established for this unit pursuant to the aforesaid Declaration
and the By-Laws attached thereto, and any amendments or
supplements thereof.
Parcel Identifier:
02-03003317
The property is believed to be improved by a 953 ± square foot
condominium unit that contains 2 bedrooms and 2 full baths.
The Property will be sold in "AS-IS" condition, subject to all
conditions, restrictions, easements, covenants, rights-of-way and
agreements of record affecting the Property, and subject to whatever an accurate survey or inspection of the Property would disclose,
without any express or implied warranty of any kind.
A deposit of $10,000.00 cash, certified or cashier's check, payable
to the undersigned Trustees, shall be required at the time and place
of sale. The balance of the purchase price shall bear interest at the
rate of 3.75% per annum from the date of sale to the date of delivery
of payment to the Substitute Trustees. No deposit shall be required
of the noteholder where the noteholder bids on the Property at
sale and payment of the purchase price by the noteholder shall be
made by crediting the purchase price against the foreclosure costs
and expenses and the indebtedness secured by said Deed Of Trust.
In the event that settlement is delayed for any reason, including,
but not limited to, exceptions to the sale, bankruptcy filings by
interested parties, court administration of the foreclosure sale or
unknown title defects, there shall be no abatement of interest.
Adjustment of all taxes, public charges and special or regular
assessments, annual front foot benefit charges and deferred
connection fees, if any, shall be made as of the date of sale and
thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or
homeowner's association fees, if any, shall be assumed by the
purchaser from the date of sale. Title examination, conveyancing,
transfer taxes, recordation tax and all other costs of conveyance
and settlement shall be paid by the purchaser.
MERCEDES-BENZ 1987 560SL
$15,000. Excellent condition.
Beautiful. Must see to appreciate.
Call 703-670-3698
C
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825
Bids & Proposals
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Capitol Paving is soliciting qualified
MBE/WBE subcontractors to perform DC Water Sol # 150180 – Small
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Recreational Vehicles
850
Montgomery County
The Property is sold subject to the right of any persons in possession
of all or any part of the Property under recorded or unrecorded
leases or rights of occupancy, if any. Purchaser shall be responsible
for obtaining possession of the Property.
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Legal Notices - 202-334-7007
Auctions, Estate Sales, Furniture 202-334-7029
Biz Ops/Services - 202-334-5787
or call 202-334-6200
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC HEARING
PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD
62
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2017
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
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C054B 2x2
Compliance with the terms of sale shall be made and the balance
of the purchase price shall be paid within ten (10) days after final
ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Montgomery County,
Maryland, unless said time is extended by the undersigned Trustees
in their sole and absolute discretion for good cause shown, time
being of the essence; otherwise the deposit shall be forfeited and
the Property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting
purchaser. In the event of resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not
be entitled to any benefit, surplus proceeds or profits resulting from
such resale.
The Trustees and Auctioneers are not liable, individually or otherwise, for any reason. If title to the Property is not or cannot be
transferred consistent with the terms hereof for any reason, the
Trustees' liability is limited, at its sole discretion, to return any
deposit, without interest, thereby rescinding the sale, and there
is no other right or remedy against the Trustees at law or in
equity. The Trustee, Auctioneer and Secured Party do not make any
representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy of this
information
Martin L. Goozman and
Jeffrey W. Bernstein
Substitute Trustees
October 24, 31, November 7, 2017
850
12138020
851
Montgomery County
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MONTGOMERY COUNTY,
MARYLAND
ROBERT E. FRAZIER, et al.
Substitute Trustees,
Plaintiffs,
V.
DALE CURTIS BURDETTE,
Defendant(s).
CASE NO. 422231V
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this 17th
day of OCTOBER, 2017, that the
sale of the property in this case,
9911 WATKINS ROAD, GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND 20882, reported
by Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung,
Laura D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge,
Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson and Keith
M. Yacko, Substitute Trustees, be
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 16th day of NOVEMBER 2017, provided a copy of this
Notice be inserted in The Washington Post, a newspaper published
in Montgomery County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks on or before the 16th
day of NOVEMBER 2017 .
The report states the amount of
sale to be $263,000.00.
Barbara H. Meiklejohn
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Montgomery County, MD
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Robert E. Frazier, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs,
V.
Troy E. Smith, et al.
Defendant(s).
Case No. CAEF16-25747
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this 3rd
day of October, 2017, that the sale
of the property in this case, 6412
Halleck Street, District Heights,
Maryland 20747, reported by
Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura
D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge,
Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri, David M. Williamson and Keith
M. Yacko, Substitute Trustees, be
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary be shown on
or before the 3rd day of November,
2017 provided a copy of this Notice
be inserted in The Washington
Post, a newspaper published in
Prince George's County, Maryland,
once in each of three (3) successive weeks on or before the 3rd
day of November, 2017.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $129,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison (#619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Prince Georges County, MD
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIking Drive, Suite 203
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 213-2959
Oct 31, Nov 7, 14, 2017 12137377
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 Viking Drive
Suite 203
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 213-2959
Oct 17, 24, 31, 2017
You, too, could have
home delivery.
1-800-753-POST
SF
12136941
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Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
10002 CARNOT DRIVE
Cheltenham, MD 20623
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to THOMAS P. DORE, Trustee(s), dated February
18, 2015, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 36798, folio 333, the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
NOVEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
LOT NUMBERED FIVE (5), BLOCK LETTERED "E", IN THE
SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "ROLLING ACRES", AS PER PLAT
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK WWW-64, PLAT NO. 19 AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $17,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.75% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (16-13491)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
Erin M. August, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
6004 SEAT PLEASANT DRIVE
Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to VICKI L. PARRY, Trustee(s), dated October
22, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 28930, folio 257,
MODIFIED APRIL 19, 2010 IN LIBER 32237, FOLIO 602 the
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
NOVEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEGINNING FOR THE SAME AT A PIPE AT THE INTERSECTION
OF THE WEST LINE OF SHORT STREET AND THE NORTH LINE
OF CARMODY ROAD, SAID PIPE BEING SOUTH 78 DEGREES
1 MINUTE WEST 40.44 FEET FROM A FOUND PIPE AT THE
INTERSECTION OF THE EAST LINE OF SHORT STREET AND
THE NORTH LINE OF CARMODY ROAD, THENCE FOLLOWING
ALONG SAID NORTH LINE OF CARMODY ROAD, (1) SOUTH
78 DEGREES 1 MINUTES WEST 91.5 FEET TO A SET PIPE,
(2) NORTH 26 DEGREES 25 MINUTES WEST 151 FEET TO A
SET PIPE, (3) NORTH 71 DEGREES 1 MINUTE 10 SECONDS
EAST 90.54 FEET TO A SET PIPE, ON THE WEST LINE OF
SHORT STREET, (4) SOUTH 20 DEGREES 26 MINUTES EAST
162.15 FEET TO A POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING .3253
ACRES OR 14,172 SQUARE FEET OF LAND, MORE OR LESS.
SAID PROPERTY BEING LOCATED ON THE 18TH ELECTION
DISTRICT OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $19,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.0% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
www.hwestauctions.com
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
OCTOBER 31, NOVEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12140132 announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-27459)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
Erin M. August, and Gene Jung,
How
about
some
Home delivery starts
Substitute Trustees
home delivery?
your day off right.
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
LEGAL NOTICES
To place your
legal notice in the
Classified section:
Call:
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 31, NOVEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12136431
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(And your subscription up-to-date.)
202-334-7007
e-mail:
SF
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1-800-753-POST SF
Trustee Sales
202-334-5782
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Dem
S0833-1 6x2
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ENROLL TODAY Visit sub.wpsubscribe.com/easy or call 202-334-6100.
S0833-2 10x3
851
Prince Georges County
851
OPQRS
EZ
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUITE
100
SUITE 100
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
KNOWN AS
VALUABLE
FEE
SIMPLE
PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
3837 SAINT BARNABAS ROAD UNIT T203
KNOWN AS
4909 Sharon Road
KNOWN AS
Suitland , MD 20746
Temple Hills, MD 20748
4504 Weldon Drive
7105 Mad Anthony Court
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Temple Hills, MD 20748
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
Brandywine, MD 20613
Deed of Trust to LESLIE J. KEIDEL, Trustee(s), dated November
certain
Deed
of
Trust
to COLLEEN SCHOFIELD AND CAROLYN
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
9, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain certain Deed of Trust to PRLAP, INC. , Trustee(s), dated October CARI, Trustee(s), dated May 1, 2009, and recorded among
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29145, folio 194, the Deed of Trust to RECONTRUST COMPANY, Trustee(s), dated 8, 2008, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE the Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having April 22, 2008, and recorded among the Land Records of GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 30093, folio 050, the in Liber 30640, folio 211, the holder of the indebtedness
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29680, folio holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having 293, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the
party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby,
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER ON,
NOVEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
NOVEMBER 15, 2017 at 3:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
NOVEMBER 2, 2017 at 2:30 PM
NOVEMBER 16, 2017 at 10:00 AM
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and described as follows:
CONDOMINIUM UNIT NUMBERED AND LETTERED 3837-T- described as follows:
described as follows:
203, IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "MARLOW TOWERS
LOT NUMBERED TWENTY (20), IN BLOCK LETTERED "J", IN LOT 5 IN BLOCK E, PLAT 2, STAN HAVEN, AS PER PLAT
CONDOMINIUM", AS ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO THE CON- LOT NUMBERED ELEVEN (11), IN BLOCK LETTERED "F", THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT TWO, SECTION TWO, THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK W.W.W. 24 AT PLAT
DOMINIUM MASTER DEED MADE BY MARLOW MADISON IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT OF CORRECTION, ALLENWOOD ACRES", AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED 4 OF THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
CONDOMINIUM LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, A LIMITED PART- PLAT SIX, MCKENDREE VILLAGE", AS PER PLAT THEREOF AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND.
NERSHIP, ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE MARYLAND IN THE PLAT BOOK WWW 49, AT PLAT 44.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
THE STATE OF MARYLAND, DATED SEPTEMBER 15, 1972 GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT BOOK REP 197,
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition without either express or implied warranty or representation,
AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF PRINCE AT PLAT 16.
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN LIBER 4127 AT FOLIO The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition without either express or implied warranty or representation, particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi366, AND PURSUANT TO THE PLATE AND PLANS FOR without either express or implied warranty or representation, including but not limited to the description, fitness for a tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateMARLOW TOWERS CONDOMINIUM, DESCRIBED IN SAID including but not limited to the description, fitness for a particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
MASTER DEED, RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
SAID COUNTY AND STATE, IN CONDOMINIUM PLAN BOOK construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
79 AT PLATS NUMBERED 83 THROUGH 100 INCLUSIVE, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
AND CONDOMINIUM PLAT BOOK 81 AS PLATS NUMBERED 1 chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
THROUGH 15 INCLUSIVE.
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
without either express or implied warranty or representation, which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $28,500.00 payable in certified
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 5.5% on
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance of the purchase price with interest at 4.375% per annum from unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record the purchase price with interest at 3.875% per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
association dues and assessments that may become due after
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $7,000.00 payable in certified by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at association dues and assessments that may become due after Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of PRINCE GEORGE'S Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.0% on taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
Trustee's File No. (38750)
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement Trustee's File No. (41818)
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-07737)
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deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
OCTOBER 17, 24, 31, 2017
12135167 Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
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provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, OCTOBER 31, NOVEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12138856
Gene Jung,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
Substitute Trustees
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
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announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-09173)
SUITE 100
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
OCTOBER 31, NOVEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12132104
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
852
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scot Robinson,
Anne Arundel County 852 Anne Arundel County
SUITE 100
SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEES'
SALE
OF
Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
Substitute Trustees
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
KNOWN AS
VIRGINIA
BEACH, VA 23452
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
1309 Asheville Road
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
KNOWN AS
District Heights, MD 20747
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
9915 Worrell Avenue
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
KNOWN AS
Glenn Dale, MD 20769
Deed of Trust to WILLIAM H. POFFENBARGER, SR. , Trustee(s),
4957 ELM STREET
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Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain dated April 2, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of
Shady
Side, MD 20764
OCTOBER 31, NOVEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12135967 Deed of Trust to ECHOLS, PURSER AND GLENN, PLLC. , PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 35884, folio
Trustee(s), dated October 23, 2008, and recorded among the 156, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Land Records of PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by Deed of Trust to LESLIE J. KEIDEL, Trustee(s), dated January
in Liber 30592, folio 556, the holder of the indebtedness instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, 24, 2011, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE
secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 23160, folio 355, the
Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.
aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred under the Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
611 ROCKVILLE PIKE
terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby, GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
SUITE 100
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY COURTHOUSE
NOVEMBER 2, 2017 at 2:30 PM
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER MARLBORO, MD 20772
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
ON,
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and 21401 ON,
KNOWN AS
NOVEMBER 2, 2017 at 2:30 PM
described as follows:
NOVEMBER 9, 2017 at 10:00AM
8704 Dorian Lane
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements LOT NUMBERED FIFTEEN (15) IN BLOCK LETTERED "C"
Clinton, MD 20735
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "RITCHIE HEIGHTS" AS ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain described as follows:
PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
Deed of Trust to JOHN J. ROMANO, Trustee(s), dated June ALL THAT PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED OF TRUST RECORDS OF PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND IN described as follows:
23, 2006, and recorded among the Land Records of PRINCE RECORDED MAY 7, 2009 IN LIBER 30592, FOLIO 556.
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOTS NUMBERED
PLAT BOOK WWW 27 AT PLAT 26.
GEORGE'S COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 25712, folio 337, the
THIRTY-SIX (36), THIRTY-EIGHT (38) AND FORTY (40) IN
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition BLOCK NUMBERED EIGHTEEN (18) IN A SUBDIVISION
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument without either express or implied warranty or representation, without either express or implied warranty or representation, KNOWN AS "SECTION A, AVALON SHORES", AS PER PLAT
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having including but not limited to the description, fitness for a including but not limited to the description, fitness for a THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8 AT PLAT 36 AMONG
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYparty secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, LAND.
offer for sale at public auction at THE PRINCE GEORGE'S liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merCOUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 14735 MAIN ST, UPPER chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and without either express or implied warranty or representation,
MARLBORO, MD 20772 ON,
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
NOVEMBER 16, 2017 at 10:00 AM
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
thereon situated in PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD and record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
described as follows:
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
LOT NUMBERED SIXTEEN (16) IN BLOCK NUMBERED TWO TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
(2) IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT ONE, PLAT OF certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
CORRECTION, CHELTENHAM KNOLLS CLUSTERS" AS PER NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK REP 209 AT PLAT of the purchase price with interest at 5.5% per annum from of the purchase price with interest at 3.75% per annum from subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
99
the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
without either express or implied warranty or representation, on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $24,500.00 payable in certified
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, association dues and assessments that may become due after association dues and assessments that may become due after final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of ANNE ARUNDEL
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.5% on
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $20,000.00 PAYABLE ONLY BY Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
certified funds, shall be required at the time of sale. CASH WILL Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
NOT BE AN ACCEPTABLE FORM OF DEPOSIT. The balance the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
of the purchase price with interest at 2% per annum from the convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within TEN purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments on
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
Trustee's File No. (48613)
all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments Trustee's File No. (18322)
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
association dues and assessments that may become due after
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
www.hwestauctions.com
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting OCTOBER 17, 24, 31,www.hwestauctions.com
2017
12135160 OCTOBER 17, 24, 31, 2017
12135165 shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
purchaser. The purchaser agrees to accept service by first class
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
mail and certified mail addressed to the address provided by
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
said Purchaser as identified on the Memorandum of Sale for any
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
Motion or Show Cause Order incident to this sale including a
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
Motion to Default Purchaser and for Resale of the Property. If
To place your
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees are unable to
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-04202)
convey marketable title in accord with these terms of sale, the
legal notice in the
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris
purchaser's only remedy is return of the deposit.
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Classified section:
Trustee's File No. (45078)
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
JOHN E. DRISCOLL III, et al
Call:
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES
LEGAL NOTICES
e-mail:
legalnotices@washpost.com
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 31, NOVEMBER 7, 14, 2017
12138855
WP 2x2
Anne Arundel County
852
D11
Anne Arundel County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
2000 CROSBYSIDE COURT
Odenton, MD 21113
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to MICHAEL N. SCHLEUPNER JR, Trustee(s),
dated November 16, 2011, and recorded among the Land
Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber
24080, folio 252, the holder of the indebtedness secured by
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at
THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8
CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
NOVEMBER 9, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
described as follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED SEVENTY-EIGHT (78), AS SHOWN ON PLATS ENTITLED, "SEVEN
OAKS, SECOND REVISION PARCEL 13-SECTION ONE, RESIDENTIAL TOWNHOUSE SUBDIVISION" WHICH PLATS ARE
RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK 195, PAGES 22, 23 AND 24, PLAT
NOS. 10297, 10298 AND 10299.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $19,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-13402)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris
Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 24, 31, NOVEMBER 7, 2017
12136470
856
Frederick County
856
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
806 E. 16TH ST.
FREDERICK, MD 21701
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated January
5, 2006 and recorded in Liber 5814, Folio 742 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $252,000.00
and a current interest rate of 2%, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for
Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick,
MD 21701, on
NOVEMBER 3, 2017 AT 10:47 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 203589-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING
SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 17, Oct 24 & Oct 31
12135669
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A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 24, 31, NOVEMBER 7, 2017
12134398
S2929 2x4
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2017
OPQRS
D12
856
Frederick County
856
857
Frederick County
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
6506 SLEET CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated May 25,
2005 and recorded in Liber 5396, Folio 496 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $360,000.00
and a current interest rate of 6.5%, default having occurred under the
terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit
Court for Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St.,
Frederick, MD 21701, on
NOVEMBER 3, 2017 AT 10:46 AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $33,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 302153-1)
870
12135667
6809 KINGFISHER CT.
FREDERICK, MD 21703
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or
improvements thereon situated in Frederick County, MD and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is"
condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record
affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.
Terms of Sale: A deposit of $40,000 in the form of certified check,
cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time
and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest
on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed
of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by
the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of
the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due
from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before
settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment
of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale,
and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years
including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser
is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public
and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts
survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent,
whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any
deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost
during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed
by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be
paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation
between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or
assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount
for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by
contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not
limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges
assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are
payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time
Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession
of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from
the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the
loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of
whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated
or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall
be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall
be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle
within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees
that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees
as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default
and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall
not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if
such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted
purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or
marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court
for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return
of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 183316-1)
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING
SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
12135665
You, too, could have
home delivery.
SF
1-800-753-POST
Arlington County
Under and by virtue of the power of sale granted it in the Virginia
Condominium Act and the condominium instruments for Arlington Court
Condominium, Inc. (“Association”), the Association will offer for sale at
public auction to the highest bidder on:
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at 11:00 a.m.
Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated October
5, 2007 and recorded in Liber 7477, Folio 293 among the Land Records of
Frederick County, MD, with an original principal balance of $405,000.00
and a current interest rate of 3%, default having occurred under the terms
thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for
Frederick County, at the Court House Door, 100 W. Patrick St., Frederick,
MD 21701, on
NOVEMBER 3, 2017 AT 10:45 AM
1-800-753-POST
870
Arlington County
12135144
CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION’S SALE OF
2900 16TH ROAD SOUTH #A
ARLINGTON, VA 22204
BWW Law Group, LLC
6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101
Rockville, MD 20852
(301) 961-6555
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE
OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON
Wake up to
home delivery.
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 24, 31, NOVEMBER 7, 2017
ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.
908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204
410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com
Oct 17, Oct 24 & Oct 31
873
Howard County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
11793 Stonegate Ln, Columbia, MD 21044
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 11793 Stonegate Ln, Columbia, MD
21044. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated February 28, 2006, and recorded in Liber
9856 at Page 553 among the land records of the COUNTY OF
HOWARD, in the original principal amount of $256,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Thomas Dorsey
Building, located at 9250 Bendix Rd., Columbia MD 21045, on
November 9, 2017 at 10:00 AM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 15-082976
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-249758.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING
SALES
Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees
Oct 17, Oct 24 & Oct 31
857
Howard County
By the main entrance of the Arlington County Courthouse,
located at 1425 North Courthouse Road, Arlington, VA 22201
ALL OF THAT UNIT together with all improvements located therein,
situated in Arlington County, Virginia and more particularly described as:
Condominium Unit No. 2900A, Arlington County Condominium, Inc.,
Arlington County, Virginia, and the Limited Common Elements appurtenant thereto, pursuant to the Condominium Instruments recorded in
the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of the County of Arlington,
Virginia in Deed Book 2736, page 1928.
R.P.C.#:32-001-659
TERMS OF SALE: This property will be sold in an “AS IS” condition and
without any warranty, either expressed or implied, and subject to all
restrictions, covenants, conditions, rights of ways, easements, violations,
filed or unfiled mechanics’ and/or materialmen’s liens, if any, to the
extent any of the foregoing may lawfully apply to the property being sold.
The satisfaction of all statutory prior liens set forth in Section 55-79.84(A)
of the Code of Virginia, as amended, shall be a condition of sale. Upon
information and belief, as of September 26, 2017, no such statutory prior
liens exist. Assessment liens filed by the Association are recorded at
Instrument No. 20150100026259 and Instrument No. 20160100020093
among the Land Records; it is the aforementioned assessment liens upon
which this foreclosure is based.
A bidder's deposit of $3,400.00 in cash, certified check, wire transfer, or
cashier's check payable to the Association shall be required to qualify as a
bidder before the sale, except from the Association. Notwithstanding the
foregoing, the Association reserves the right to waive the requirements
of the deposit. The balance of the purchase price shall be in cash or its
equivalent and shall be due within fifteen (15) days from the date of the
sale; otherwise the deposit shall be forfeited and the property may be
resold at the discretion of the Association and at the risk and cost of the
defaulting purchaser. Time is of the essence. The successful bidder shall
assume all loss or damage to the property from and after the time of the
sale. If the Association or trustee cancels or rescinds the sale prior to
settlement due to a bankruptcy filing or other cause, the purchaser's sole
remedy shall be the refund of the deposit, plus interest.
Interest to be paid by the purchaser at a rate of 12% per annum from
the date of the sale to the date of the settlement. Settlement shall be
at the offices of the Association's legal counsel or appointed Trustee or
other mutually agreed location. Real estate taxes pro-rated to the date
of sale. All costs of conveyance, which shall be by special warranty
deed, including, but not limited to, recordation charges, notary fees and
settlement fees shall be at the cost of the purchaser. The sale is subject
to such additional terms as the Association may announce at the time of
sale. At the time of sale, the successful bidder shall be required to sign a
Memorandum of Sale incorporating all the terms of the sale.
The information contained herein was obtained by sources deemed to be
reliable but is offered for informational purposes only. The Association
cannot make any representations or warranties with respect to the
accuracy of this information. It is the responsibility of the potential
bidders to confirm the chain of title for the subject unit.
For information, contact:
Chadwick, Washington,
Moriarty, Elmore & Bunn, P.C.
Attorneys for Arlington Court
Condominium Inc.
3201 Jermantown Road Ste. 600
Fairfax, Virginia 22030
(703) 352-1900/telephone
Gelber and Associates, PLLC, Trustee
201 Park Washington Court, First Floor
Falls Church, VA 22046
(703) 237-1200/telephone
October 24, 31, November 7, 13, 2017
SF
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$427,709.00, dated December 21,
2011, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on December 22, 2011, as Instrument Number 201112220105201, the undersigned
appointed
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction, at the main entrance of
the courthouse for the Circuit Court
of Prince William County, 9311 Lee
Ave, Manassas, VA on November
17, 2017 at 9:00 AM, the property
described in said deed of trust,
located at the above address and
briefly described as: Lot 30, Section 2, WENTWORTH GREEN, as the
same is duly dedicated in Instrument Number 200909230092729,
and as shown on a plat at Instrument Number 200909230092730,
recorded among the land records
of Prince William County, Virginia.
Tax ID: 7397-92-1470.
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated March 29, 2006, in
the original principal amount of
$75,000.00 recorded in the Clerk’s
Office, Circuit Court for Fauquier
County, Virginia, in Book 1211 at
Page 1625 as Instrument No. 200600005710. The undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at
public auction in the front of the
Circuit Court building for Fauquier
County, 40 Culpeper Street, Warrenton, Virginia on December 7,
2017, at 12:00 PM, the property
described in said Deed of Trust,
located at the above address, and
more particularly described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR
PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE, LYING
AND BEING ON MARSHALL MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, FAUQUIER, VIRGINIA,
MORE
PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 2,
CONTAINING
3,7586
ACRES,
"PROPERTY OF PEGGY CAVETT
WALDEN", BY PLAT OF SURVEY
BY JAMES H. HARRIS AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JULY 31,
1992, AND RECORDED IN DEED
BOOK 692, PAGE 1015, AMONG
THE LAND RECORDS OF FAUQUIER
COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
Substitute Trustee has identified
an unreleased security instrument
which may be superior to the subject deed of trust. Substitute
Trustee disclaims any implication
that the Property will be sold free
and clear of all liens. If the sale
is set aside for any reason, the
Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled to a return of the deposit paid.
The Purchaser may, if provided by
the terms of the Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be
entitled to a $50 cancellation fee
from the Substitute Trustee, but
shall have no further recourse
against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
Additional terms to be announced
at the sale. A form copy of the
Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and contract to purchase real property is available for
viewing at www.bwwsales.com.
This is a communication from a
debt collector and any information
obtained will be used for that purpose. The sale is subject to seller
confirmation. Substitute Trustee:
Equity Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson
Blvd., Suite 1004, Arlington, VA
22201. For more information contact: BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003
Executive
Blvd, Suite
101,
Rockville, MD 20852, 301-9616555,
website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3214461.
Loan Type: Conv/Conv (Trustee #
572271)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
Towne #: 5000.0484
10/24/2017 10/31/2017 12138179
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
7608 SHELLEY LN,
MANASSAS, VA 20111
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $130,072.00, with an annual
interest rate of 4.000000% dated
September 13, 2002, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 200209160118882,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on December 26, 2017
at 4:00 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 7797-92-2599
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-265277.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 31, Nov 27, Dec 4, 2017
12140014
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6721 MADISON ST,
HAYMARKET VA, 20169
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $233,100.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.875000% dated
December 31, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 200801110004006,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM, on the Court House
steps in front of Main Entrance for
the Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on November 21, 2017
at 4:00 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 083485
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-266040.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 24, 31, 2017
12138423
Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, 14, 2017
12138184
876
Loudoun County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
3545 MAPLE STREET,
DUMFRIES, VA 22026
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $134,300.00, with an annual
interest rate of 5.750000% dated
April 1, 2004, recorded among the
land records of the Circuit Court
for the COUNTY OF PRINCE WILLIAM as Deed Instrument Number 200404230068610, the undersigned appointed Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction all that property located
in the COUNTY OF PRINCE WILLIAM, on the Court House steps
in front of Main Entrance for the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Prince William located
at 9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas,
Virginia on November 21, 2017
at 4:00 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 8289-04-6542
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-269046.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 24, 31, 2017
12137383
Home delivery
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to home delivery.
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FOOD ALLOWED."
TO "HOW OLD ARE THESE
FRIES?"
Spotsylvania County
TRUSTEE SALE
6044 Battlefield Green Drive,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407-6402
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $157,325.00, dated February 22,
2007 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in
Document No. LR200700006034
and modified in Document No.
150001565,
default
having
occurred in the payment of the
Note thereby secured and at the
request of the holder of said Note,
the
undersigned
Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public
auction at the entrance to the
Spotsylvania County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane,
Spotsylvania, on December 5, 2017
at 12:00 PM the property
described in said deed, located
at the above address and briefly
described as:
Lot 68, Section 3, Battlefield Green,
with improvements thereon
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (57400)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Oct 31, Nov 7, 2017
12138895
878
Stafford County
TRUSTEE SALE
12 Idlebrook Way,
Fredericksburg, VA 22406
Stafford County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $414,968.00, dated February 11,
2008 recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of the
Stafford County, Virginia, in Document No. LR080002897, default
having occurred in the payment
of the Note thereby secured and
at the request of the holder of said
Note, the undersigned Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
at the entrance to the Judicial
Center, 1300 Courthouse Road,
Stafford, on December 5, 2017 at
11:00 AM the property described
in said deed, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
Lot 717, Section 11-B, Stafford
Lakes Village, with improvements
thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (26133)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Oct 31, Nov 7, 2017
12139645
883
Rappahannock County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
9892 OBANNONS MILL ROAD,
BOSTON, VA 22713
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated December 19, 2014,
in the original principal amount
of $320,000.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Rappahannock County, Virginia as
Instrument No. 140001126 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Rappahannock County,
238 Gay Street, Washington, Virginia on November 15, 2017, at
5:00 PM, the property described
in said Deed of Trust, located at
the above address, and more particularly described as follows: ALL
THAT CERTAIN TRACT OR PARCEL
OF LAND, TOGETHER WITH ALL
BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON AND PRIVILEGES AND
APPURTENANCES
THEREUNTO
BELONGING, SITUATED, LYING AND
BEING ON THE WEST SIDE OF STATE
SECONDARY ROUTE NUMBER 650,
IN STONEWALL MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, RAPPAHANNOCK COUNTY,
VIRGINIA AND ACCORDING TO A
SURVEY BY BRAIN THROSSELL, LS,
ON NOVEMBER 10, 1989, A PLAT
OF WHICH IS ATTACHED TO AND
RECORDED WITH THAT CERTAIN
DEED RECORDED IN DEED BOOK
177, PAGE 810, SAID TRACT OR
PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINS 4.500
ACRES, MORE OR LESS. AND ALL
THAT CERTAIN TRACT OR PARCEL
OF LAND, TOGETHER WITH ALL
BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS
THEREON AND PRIVILEGES AND
APPURTENANCES
THEREUNTO
BELONGING, SITUATED, LYING AND
BEING IN STONEWALL MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT, RAPPAHANNOCK
COUNTY, VIRGINIA AND ACCORDING TO A SURVEY BY BRIAN
THROSSELL, LC, DATED JUNE 29,
2001, ATTACHED TO THAT CERTAIN
DEED RECORDED AS INSTRUMENT
NUMBER 01-925, SAID PARCEL OF
LAND CONTAINS 0.094 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3210801.
Oct. 24, 31, 2017
12138181
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Roommates
MARYLAND
237
Roommates
Firewood
FIREWOOD SALES, seasoned Oak,
$350/full cord. Delivered. NOVA.
Robert 703-424-4064 or 703-855-4691
ADELPHI - Nice bsmt room for rent,
pvt ent., $550/mo. all util incl., nr 245
metro.
301-906-5681
ANDREWS AFB Area- Nice furn room,
nice area, kit privs. w/w. $600/mo
+ $100 sec dep. Call 301-395-6738
CAPITAL HEIGHTS - Senior home to
share. Furn rooms. $600. + $300
SD W/D.Privacy sence. All utils incl.
Near Metro. N/S inside. 1 wk free.
Text/Call
202-568-0792
CAPITAL HEIGHTS - Furn room for
rent, share bath & kitchen.
$650 +utilities. 301-502-6581
CLARKSVILLE MD AREA- 15 min.
drive to Olney & Columbia, 30
mins to Baltimore & DC, N/S, N/P,
rustic parklike setting, clean,
quiet, share ground lvl w/1, pvt
pkng, ent., LR, lg BR, total 4 closets, shr kit., BA, avail 11/01,
$799/mo + elec., 240-351-5150
DERWOOD - Large room w/ pvt BA
for rent. $650+ $400 sec dep. Inc
utils & cable. Near Shady Grove
Metro & shopping. 240-386-9587
Electronics
HP2g
110mpg
V-8
Hybrid
Engine—The HP2g V-8 Hybrid engine
uses two energy sources within the
same power plant, achieving over
110 miles per gallon, producing up to
400 horsepower. The patented HP2g
Skip-Fire Variable Displacement System and patented HP2g Electromagnet Pulse Motor built inside the
engine. HP2g delivers record setting
fuel economy and EPA tested emissions far below the 2022 standards.US and International Patents
Issued. As Seen at NAIAS Detroit
Auto Show 2008, 2009 and Washington DC Auto Show 2010.
Looking to stay in the USA
For more info: www.hp2g.com
275
Merchandise Wanted
FREON R-12 WANTED—Certified
buyer picks up & pays CA$H for
cylinders and cans. RefrigerantFinders.com (312) 291-9169
PAYING CASH!
Antiques & collectibles.
Carl 312-316-7553
RECORDS - I pay cash for
50s, 60s, & 70s .
Categories: Jazz, Soul, R&R, R&B.
Call 703-865-6050.
FORT WASHINGTON - Rooms with
pvt BA. Kitn. Vets welcome. 5 min
to Nat'l Harbor. Inc cable/internet.
Starts @ $850. Call 301-292-6147
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266.
Will Come to you!
FORT WASHINGTON- Large house to 350
share. Free cable. Close to MGM.
W/D. $150/wk. Call 240-882-8973
Garage Sales, MD
Bethesda—Huge Rummage
FORT WASHINGTON - Furn BR $550.
Shr kitchen, dining area & BA. Close
to 495 & VA. Call 240-441-6773
Sale & Silent Auction. Saturday
November 4, 8am-3pm, RRUUC,
6310 River Rd. 301-229-0400,
rruuc.org; bazaar2017@rruuc.org
HYATTSVILLE- Furn room $175/wk + 610
security. Includes all utils inc cable.
Near Metro. No pets. 301-675-2016
ACA COCKER SPANIEL PUPPIES ready 11/4, cute, friendly and
Landover - Pref Male to share house.
Furn BR. $150/wk inc all utils. No playful! vet checked and first shots.
beautiful colors. 814-793-4920
sec dep. Near Metro. 301-516-1243
Dogs for Sale
LANHAM- Rooms to rent includes
cable, shared kitchen & private
Bath, on bus line.
Call 301-938-4614
LARGO ROOM FOR RENT$650 incl utils,free cable/net,shared
BA. N/P,N/S Call 240-338-0955
SILVER SPRING- Lrg rm, priv BA, off st
parking, kit privileges, close to DT Sil
Spr, NS $550/m+ utils. 301-526-8204
SPRINGDALE - Female pref,
1 BR w/ full bed, shrd BA $600/mo.
1 Rm w/ queen bd prvt bath
$750/mo. $250 security deposit.
utils incl.N/S. Call 336-708-5657
SUITLAND- 1 room available,
$550/mo includes utilities, $300 SD,
close to metro. Call 202-340-6959
SUITLAND - Share house. Rooms for
rent. 2 blocks from Suitland Metro.
$190/week + dep. Call 301-537-5032
Wheaton— $725, Shared SFH, 1 BR,
Cable Wifi, AC, util incl, nr pub trans,
furn avail, 301-503-1753. Avail Now
VA H FAIRFAX CO.
Houses
FAIRFAX 3063 White Birch Ct. 3 BR,
3.5 bath twnhme fin. bsmt, 1,540 sq
ft. $2250/mo. Call 703-473-6295
VIRGINIA
BOXERS - AKC, M + F, fawn/brindle,
tails and declaws done, vaccinated &
wormed, 12 weeks 301-639-8636
CHOCOLATE LAB PUPPIES - 9 weeks,
AKC, lovable healthy puppies, shots
and wormed, health cert. $350
610-857-1932
COCKER SPANIELS - AKC, 1 M brown
and white party, 1 F brown merle,
vaccainated, wormed, crate training
started, 5 months old 301-639-8636
GERMAN SHEPHERD WORKING
LINE PUPPIES- 6 F's, blk & sable,
ready 10/16. vt chkd, UTD shts,
hlth guar., $1,800. World class
ped., AKC reg. 301-956-4635
Giant Schnauzer Pups- show quality
at pet prices, 9 weeks old $900 Mother and father on prem Call Ray 301752-9135
golden retriever puppies—$1800,
Males & female, 8-9 weeks yrs old,
301-325-1296, AKC, champion lines,
genetic clearances for both parents
Min Shcnauzer—$1,200-$1,500, 443684-0664 Puppies come dewormed
current Vaccine tails docked dewclaws removed puppy kit hair cut
Yorkiepoos Malt—304-904-6289
Roommates
SPRINGFIELD / FT. BELVOIR /
WOODBRIDGE - Responsible person
to share 3 bedroom house.
$700 util & cable incl. 703-919-4381
Woodbridge— Room w/ walk-in closet. $575/mo. All utils included. $300
sec dep. 571-343-1160
D.C. - $150/wk. + $150 security
deposit. no pets. furnished, cable
included. Call 202-498-2806
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MOVING OUT?
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Business /
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Opportunities
INVESTOR WANTED- experienced
DC / VA contractor looking for
investor/partner to flip houses.
GREAT returns! 202-528-4600
HandymanMastersLLC.com
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PLACE OUT?
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You know us for shopping, and
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FROM "NO
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
9373 WALDEN LANE,
MARSHALL, VA 20115
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $13,000.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2017
EZ
877
Fauquier County
SF
1-800-753-POST
1-800-753-POST
875
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
13742 Hastenbeck Drive
Gainesville, VA 20155
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12137451
Prince William County
Membership is rewarding.
From dramas and musicals to stand-up and
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HEalth&Science
TUESDAY , OCTOBER 31 , 2017 . WASHINGTONPOST.COM/HEALTH-SCIENCE
EE
E
Do I have
Alzheimer’s
or don’t I?
MEDICAL MYSTERIES
BY
M ICHAEL E LLENBOGEN
Twenty years ago, at age 39, I began
having memory and cognitive problems.
My primary-care doctor and my neurologists said I was stressed and depressed.
I also was diagnosed with mild cognitive
impairment, or MCI. Ten years later, I
received another diagnosis. Well, really
two. One doctor said I had Alzheimer’s
disease, and another thought it was
semantic dementia.
Alzheimer’s is a devastating chronic
neurodegenerative disease. It is a progressive mental deterioration that advances to affect bodily functions such as
walking and swallowing, and always
leads to death. Semantic dementia leads
to losses of vocabulary, fluency of speech
and meanings of familiar words. It also
is progressive.
After another year of testing, physicians decided that I had Alzheimer’s.
While it was a relief to finally get a
diagnosis, I realized that I had been
given a death sentence. There is no
prevention or cure for Alzheimer’s, and
no survivors. Overwhelmed, I decided to
help the search for a cure by advocating
for Alzheimer’s and dementia.
I got involved with clinical trials and
advocacy. My huge network on LinkedIn
allowed me to connect with advocates
and information. It gave me access to
many tests, including gene tests, free.
Two contacts — health-care professionals — even read my medical records and
ALZHEIMER'S CONTINUED ON E6
Drugs for
alcoholism go
largely unused
BY
N ATHANIEL M ORRIS
Excessive alcohol use is one of the
most pressing public health issues in the
United States. Some 88,000 Americans
died of alcohol-related causes every year
between 2006 and 2010, according to
estimates from the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention. That’s far higher than the latest numbers of annual
deaths from drug overdoses (64,000),
breast cancer (42,000) or prostate cancer (28,000). Surveys suggest that more
than 15 million American adults suffer
from alcohol dependence or abuse within a given year.
Numerous treatment options exist for
people who drink to an unhealthy degree, including 12-step programs and
inpatient rehabilitation centers. Many
patients and health-care providers are
less likely to be aware that medications
can also help treat alcohol use disorder.
(That’s the term now used by medical
professionals for people with recurrent
problems related to drinking.) Three
such medications have been approved by
the Food and Drug Administration.
Naltrexone has become well known
over the past few years as an option for
people with opioid addiction; it also
seems to blunt alcohol cravings and the
pleasurable effects of drinking in some
people. Dozens of randomized-controlled trials suggest naltrexone can help
reduce drinking, with the risk of heavy
drinking nearly 20 percent lower for
Bleeding
after
childbirth
was a sign
of trouble
Baby was fine;
mom wasn’t
CAMERON COTTRILL FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
B Y S ANDRA G . B OODMAN
Barreling down an empty two-lane highway in California’s southern Mojave Desert, Cindy Lupica told
her husband through gritted teeth that she wasn’t going to make it to the closest hospital, more than
20 miles away. ¶ Lupica, then 37, had seen her obstetrician that morning and knew their fourth child
would be born soon — but she didn’t expect this soon. A little after 6 p.m. on Sept. 30, 2013, the couple
was just three miles from home when Michael Lupica pulled his pickup truck to the side of Highway 18
and punched 911 on his cellphone. Minutes later, a firetruck and an ambulance staffed mostly with trainee paramedics roared up beside them. They loaded Cindy into the ambulance before speeding to St. Mary
Medical Center in Apple Valley. ¶ Kylie Lupica was born just as they pulled into the parking lot. ¶ Although the baby turned out to be fine, Lupica most would not be. She would not learn what was wrong
until four months later, after suffering a massive hemorrhage in the restroom of another hospital. ¶ Her
last pregnancy and delivery would in her mind link one of life’s happiest experiences with one of its most
terrifying. ¶ “It took a long time to process,” she said. “We’re still digesting it.”
ALCOHOL MEDS CONTINUED ON E5
MYSTERY CONTINUED ON E4
Protein is good for you, but too much of it may not be
BY
R ACHEL C ERNANSKY
If there’s one claim that’s almost certain to boost sales of a food these days, it’s
to say the item is high in protein.
Consumers cannot seem to get enough
protein — they often turn to it because
they’ve shunned carbohydrates, and also
associate it with increased muscle mass.
While many nutritionists say eating extra
is usually harmless — if it’s part of a
balanced diet and doesn’t all come from
animal sources — and small increases
can indeed help with weight control by
increasing satiety, others are not convinced, citing the lack of long-term research on high-protein diets.
They’re especially uncertain about
how the body reacts to or uses processed
protein isolates and powders, which have
skyrocketed in popularity.
A growing body of evidence suggests
that some segments of the population
should be cautious about hopping on the
high-protein bandwagon, infants and
young children in particular. Some studies have linked high protein intake in
early childhood to a risk of obesity later in
life. Researchers are still trying to understand what accounts for that link.
Pregnant women, meanwhile, are
commonly advised to boost protein intake. But in a recent study of a group of
women who consumed relatively high
amounts of protein, children born to the
mothers who consumed the most during
pregnancy were shorter at birth and
through mid-childhood than children of
mothers who consumed the least protein.
Karen Switkowski, lead author of the
study, said that “while it’s important for
women to eat enough protein to support
the growth of their baby, they might want
to be cautious about going far beyond the
recommended amounts.” (She said
PROTEIN CONTINUED ON E5
CLIMATE
Lessons learned from
Hurricane Sandy. E2
INSURANCE
Medicare vs. Medicare
Advantage plans. E4
HEALTH
Americans’ cholesterol
numbers hold steady. E6
SHINGLES
ISTOCK
Nutritionists say extra protein is usually harmless if it’s part of a balanced diet.
A Q and A about the new
shingles vaccine. E6
E2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
S C I E NC E S C AN
CROWDSOURCING
Multitasking: Playing a computer game
while helping rid the world of a fungal menace
SERGIO TAPIRO VELASCO/NATURE’S BEST PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS
A mountain’s midnight majesty
The Nature’s Best Photography exhibit, now on display at the National Museum of Natural History, includes a view of the Colima volcano in
Mexico. “After 15 years of constantly documenting this volcano,” Sergio Tapiro Velasco wrote, “I finally captured the power of nature in one
image” of a “dirty storm,” which occurs when ash particles in a plume collide, producing static charges and a massive lightning strike.
Need a break? A computer
game might do the trick — and if
researchers at the University of
California at Davis have anything to do with it, your leisurely
clicking could yield a major scientific breakthrough. According to the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, up to
4.5 billion people in developing
countries are exposed to aflatoxin, a fungal toxin that contaminates crops, every year.
Scientists think enzymes
might one day be used to neutralize aflatoxin. Computers
could be dedicated to tackling
the problem, but the effort takes
a huge amount of processing
power.
Instead, researchers want
you to help by playing a Tetrislike computer game.
UC Davis, Mars Inc., the University of Washington, Northeastern University and Thermo
Fisher Scientific have launched
a crowdsourcing project aimed
at unlocking ways to neutralize
aflatoxin. It’s more fun than you
might think. To participate, you
simply play a computer game
called Foldit. Players tinker with
3-D puzzles that mimic the
shapes of proteins — in this
case, enzymes that may one day
be used to destroy aflatoxin.
The puzzles are competitive,
and they’re so immersive that
Foldit
Crowdsourcing project
it’s easy to forget that you’re
helping scientists understand
protein structures. Researchers
use the crowd’s solutions to each
puzzle to develop insights into
how proteins, which are made
of amino acid chains, fold up to
become specific molecules.
In this case, scientists have
identified some enzymes that
may neutralize aflatoxin, and
they’re hoping that players will
find ways to redesign those enzymes beneficially. Players will
then redesign the enzymes
through their puzzles.
Foldit has already been credited with scientific discoveries,
such as helping figure out the
structure of an enzyme that
helps HIV spread. Perhaps the
same will be said for this round
of play.
If the game does yield insight
into aflatoxin-fighting enzymes,
the effort could help solve a
massive health problem. It’s
thought that aflatoxin is responsible for 90,000 cases of liver
cancer a year, with people in
certain developing countries
particularly susceptible.
Want to play? Head to fold.it
to get going.
— Erin Blakemore
After Hurricane Sandy, lots of ideas but little action
BY F RANK E LTMAN
AND W AYNE P ARRY
Five years after Hurricane Sandy was supposed to have taught
the United States a lesson about
the dangers of living along the
coast, disaster-planning experts
say there is no place in America
truly prepared for climate change
and the tempests it could bring.
That is true even in New York
and New Jersey, where cities and
towns got slammed by deadly
floodwaters that rose out of the
Atlantic on the evening of Oct. 29,
2012, destroying homes, flooding
tunnels and crippling the electrical grid.
Some coastal-protection projects are moving forward, but the
most ambitious ideas spurred by
Sandy’s onslaught are still in the
design stage, with questions
about whether they will ever be
built.
“It felt after Sandy as if we
might have finally had our wakeup call. We’d start to take these
things seriously,” said Eric
Klinenberg, director of the Institute for Public Knowledge, a
think tank at New York University. “We’d make the kind of
investment in climate security
that we made in homeland security after Sept. 11. But of course
nothing of the sort has happened.”
Big ideas
After Sandy, which was
blamed for at least 182 deaths in
the United States and Caribbean
and an estimated $65 billion in
damage in this country alone, a
ISTOCK
Billions of people in developing countries are exposed to
aflatoxin, a fungal toxin that contaminates crops, every year.
Hunt for a pink-headed
duck: Is it a lost cause?
BY
THE BIG TEAM/REBUILD BY DESIGN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
An illustration shows portions of a 10-mile flood-mitigation system for southern Manhattan. A new
study predicts that New York could soon experience storm surges of over 7.4 feet every five years.
government-funded competition
called Rebuild by Design produced audacious ideas for defending the coast.
One concept, dubbed the Big
U, would create 10 miles of flood
walls, berms and gates around
Lower Manhattan. Other ideas
include erecting breakwaters
around Staten Island that would
double as oyster beds and reconfiguring the Meadowlands, the
SETH WENIG/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sand bags lies on a beach on Staten Island, where construction is
scheduled to begin in 2019 on a seawall and promenade.
REBUILD BY DESIGN/ASSOCIATED PRESS
An illustration shows a flood-mitigation design for Hoboken, N.J.
Implementing one of the concepts is due to take at least three years.
wetlands of urban New Jersey,
with berms and marshes.
The Department of Housing
and Urban Development put up
$1 billion to get those projects
started, but construction hasn’t
begun on any of them.
Amy Chester, Rebuild by Design’s managing director, said it
will take years just to complete all
the planning and gain government approvals and community
support. And it’s not clear how
much these projects would ultimately cost.
Progress and doubt
While the grandest ideas about
post-Sandy protections are still
far from reality, there has been
progress.
Communities on the New Jersey shore built sand dunes to
hold back surf, or fortified existing ones. Power companies and
New York’s subway system have
put flood protections around key
infrastructure. Hospitals moved
electrical equipment out of basements.
The Army Corps of Engineers
is scheduled to begin construction in 2019 on a five-mile-long,
20-foot-high sea wall and promenade that would run along Staten
Island in front of the neighborhoods hit hardest by Sandy. The
project, with an estimated price
tag of $600 million, is scheduled
for completion by 2022.
Over the summer, Hoboken,
N.J., a city of 50,000 across the
Hudson River from New York
City, hired an engineering firm to
carry out one of the Rebuild by
Design concepts: a $230 million
anti-flooding project, funded by
HUD, involving flood walls,
pumping
stations
and
water-retention tanks. Construction is due to start in 2019 and
take at least three years.
But Klaus Jacob, a Columbia
University scientist specializing
in climate-change adaptation,
said the pace is too slow.
“And if that snail’s pace continues,” he said, “there’s a good
chance that we may have another
severe storm in town or in the
region that will outpace that slow
pace of improving the systems.”
Money and politics
The huge cost of extensive
protection — easily hundreds of
billions of dollars, perhaps even
trillions — is obviously a major
hurdle.
And some of the projects are
politically fraught. New York and
other cities, for example, have
been reluctant to curtail coastal
building or obstruct people’s
views of the water. Also, the
threat posed by climate change
feels hypothetical to some.
Bill Golden, president of the
National Institute for Coastal
and Harbor Infrastructure, said
worrying about spending too
much is shortsighted, and he
blames the inaction on “a misunderstanding of the new reality
that we face.”
A new study by an international team of scientists predicted
that between 2030 and 2045,
New York City could experience
storm surges of over 7.4 feet every
five years, primarily because of
sea-level rise. That’s up from
every 25 years in recent decades.
No retreat
After Sandy, New York and
New Jersey bought and emptied
1,250 homes in areas it deemed
too difficult to protect from
floods. But most people in the
wrecked communities returned,
whether because they were skeptical of the risk, confident about
the planned Staten Island sea
wall or simply unwilling to say
goodbye to their homes.
Some houses were rebuilt on
elevated foundations or pilings.
Others were restored to the way
they were before Sandy, leaving
them just as vulnerable.
Dexter Dugan, whose Staten
Island home got nine feet of
water, took steps to make it more
storm-resistant, including putting heating and electrical systems on the second floor.
“You live near the water, it’s
going to flood,” he said.
— Associated Press
S ETH B ORENSTEIN
Hope is the thing with feathers, poet Emily Dickinson wrote.
For Richard Thorns, the feathers
are pink.
Thorns’s hope? To prove that a
colorful duck is not extinct. Last
week, he was set to launch a
seventh expedition into the
wilds of Myanmar to search for
the pink-headed duck that hasn’t
been seen alive since it was spotted in India in 1949. No one has
seen the bird alive in Myanmar
in more than a century.
Thorns, a British writer who
quit his shop-clerk job 20 years
ago after reading about the pinkheaded duck in a book titled
“Vanishing Birds,” has spent
$20,000 of his own money on
previous trips. His birder brother called him mad.
“I could have had a lot of nice
things,” the 53-year-old said. “I
don’t want nice things. I want to
see a pink-headed duck.”
This time, he is backed by
Global Wildlife Conservation,
an Austin-based organization
that has mounted a hunt for
“lost species “ — 25 quirky and
elusive plants and animals, beginning with the duck. An American sports optics company and
British cheesemaker are also
helping pay.
Thorns and three others plan
to head to the wetlands north of
the vast Indawgyi Lake where,
they say, they have the best
chance of spotting the duck. And
Thorns has a novel weapon: elephants.
He used canoes in the past
and thinks he probably spooked
the shy birds. Now he plans to
bring elephants stomping
through the wetlands.
“Clearly a bird isn’t going to
hunker down if there are twoton elephants,” Thorns said.
As crazy as it may seem,
Thorns may be onto something,
said Cornell University ornithologist Kevin McGowan, who isn’t
part of the expedition.
“Fairly regularly birds get rediscovered,” says McGowan,
who has gone on unsuccessful
expeditions for the ivory-billed
woodpecker. “We don’t see all
the world that is in front of our
eyes.”
A Cornell student found Bermuda petrels, rare seabirds
thought to be extinct for 300
years. Other rediscovered animals include a crow species in
Asia and a nocturnal parrot in
Australia. These birds survive by
not being noticed, “so what’s
your certainty that it’s gone?”
McGowan asked.
— Associated Press
MARILU LOPEZ FRETTS/CORNELL UNIVERSITY MUSEUM OF VERTEBRATES/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Extinct, or just hiding? Pink-headed ducks, such as this museum
specimen, haven’t been seen alive in decades.
HE ALTH & S C I E NC E
Editor: Laura Helmuth • Assistant Editors: Kathy Lally, Margaret
Shapiro • Art Director: Alla Dreyvitser • Designer: Joanne Lee
• Advertising Information: Ron Ulrich, 202-334-5289,
ronald.ulrich@washpost.com • To contact us: Email: healthscience@washpost.com Telephone: 202-334-5031 Mail: The
Washington Post, Health, 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
ONLINE EXHIBITION
Beating back disease is important enough, but
antibodies are doing good in other ways, too
The Antibody Initiative
Smithsonian National Museum of
American History online exhibition
rash. The poster is an example
of how vaccination efforts
spread worldwide in the 20th
century. In 1980, the WHO declared the disease eradicated.
Antibody tech has another
side, too: diagnosis. For example, when a woman becomes
pregnant, her placenta produces human chorionic gonadotropin, or HCG. Pregnancy tests
incorporate an antibody that
reacts to HCG when a woman’s
urine contains the hormone,
and the exhibition has a large
number of early examples that
show the ways the tests’ design
has changed over the years.
The website also includes
signs once used to warn people
of diseases such as whooping
cough and a set of forceps used
to force open the jaws of people
with tetanus, or lockjaw.
Every object has its own history, but collectively they illustrate the larger sweep of antibody technology and the ways it
has changed health and daily
life. “The Antibody Initiative” is
part trip down memory lane,
part warning about how bad the
diseases of the past could be.
—Erin Blakemore
QUI CK S TUD Y
Early menopause may be tied to low weight
The question
Who may be affected?
Some women reach menopause much earlier than others,
often for reasons unknown.
Might weight be a factor in
this?
Women. Menopause marks
the end of a woman’s menstrual
cycle. In the United States, most
women reach menopause in
their 40s or 50s, most at about
age 51. Menopause occurs naturally as the amount of estrogen
and progesterone produced by
the body declines, eventually
causing the ovaries to stop producing eggs and periods to
cease. After menopause, a woman cannot become pregnant.
This study
The researchers analyzed
data on 78,759 women, all premenopausal and most in their
mid-30s at the start of the study,
which spanned about 22 years.
In that time, 2,804 women
reached menopause before age
45, which is considered early. All
of the women reached menopause naturally, none because of
a hysterectomy, oophorectomy,
radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Compared with normalweight women, those who were
underweight — with a body
mass index (BMI) below 18.5 —
were 30 percent more likely to
have experienced early menopause. By contrast, early menopause was less likely for overweight women than for those of
normal weight: 21 percent less
for those with a BMI of 25 to 27.4
and 30 percent for a BMI of 27.5
to 29.9. The chances of early
menopause also were greater —
by 50 percent — for women who
had been underweight at age 18
vs. those whose weight was normal at that age.
E3
EE
FROM CONSUMER REPORTS
H EA LTH S CA N
Antibodies — the proteins
your immune system uses to
fight disease — were once a
scientific mystery. Today, technology based on antibodies harnesses the body’s immune system to diagnose disease, halt
epidemics and increase immunity.
Now, an online exhibition at
the Smithsonian National Museum of American History celebrates the history of that technology. It’s more fascinating
than you might think. “The
Antibody Initiative” is a website
that tells the story of antibodies
through more than 1,000 objects in the museum’s collection.
Antibody tech reaches back
to the 18th century, when such
scientists as Edward Jenner
started tinkering with ways to
provoke the body’s immune response. His smallpox vaccine,
introduced in the 1790s, opened
up a whole new world of scientific possibility.
In the “Eradicating Smallpox” area of the site, two very
different cards help tell that
story. A quaint, handwritten
card celebrates the effectiveness of the vaccine in 12 Massachusetts children in 1809. In
contrast, a World Health Organization poster shows a hand
covered in a swollen, pustular
EZ
Caveats
Some data came from responses on questionnaires. Most
participants were white, so the
results may not apply to others.
Find this study
Online Oct. 25 in Human Reproduction (academic.oup.com/
humrep; click on “More Content,” then “Advance Articles”).
Learn more
Information on menopause
can be found at womenshealth.
gov/menopause
and
at
menopause.org (search for
“menopause 101”).
— Linda Searing
The research described in Quick
Study comes from credible, peerreviewed journals.
How to fight pain while curbing risk
Whether it’s a nagging backache or a pounding migraine,
the search for relief can be frustrating.
In a nationally representative
Consumer Reports survey of
3,562 people with back pain,
more than half said they had seen
two or more professionals and
had tried five or more treatments.
Some medications can cause
bothersome effects or pose risks.
Case in point: 57 percent of the
surveyed back-pain sufferers who
said they used prescription drugs
had turned to powerful opioids.
But taking opioids for longer
than several days can increase
addiction and overdose risks.
Although they are generally
considered safe, nonsteroidal
anti-inflammatory
drugs
(NSAIDs), available in prescription and over-the-counter, or
OTC formulations, can slightly
increase heart attack and stroke
risks.
So, how can you ease pain
safely? Here’s a guide from CR’s
Best Buy Drugs experts.
Acetaminophen
Acetaminophen (Tylenol and
generic) is available OTC.
Best use: For mild to moderate
pain, such as headaches and osteoarthritis. Acetaminophen is
gentler on the stomach than
NSAIDs are, thus a good option
for people with acid reflux or
ulcers. It also won’t increase
heart attack and stroke risk, as
NSAIDs may.
Safety smarts: Our experts
recommend no more than 3,250
milligrams a day. Taking more or
mixing it with alcohol can damage your liver. In rare cases,
acetaminophen can cause serious
skin reactions that may include
blisters or a rash. If that occurs,
stop taking it and seek immediate
medical attention.
NSAIDs
NSAIDs are available in OTC
and prescription-strength versions of aspirin (Bayer, Bufferin
and generic), ibuprofen (Advil
and generic) and naproxen (Aleve
and generic). Prescription-only
meds include celecoxib (Celebrex
and generic) and diclofenac
(Cambia, Voltaren and generic).
Best use: For mild to moderate
pain such as headaches and muscle aches, and to manage osteoarthritis. If an OTC doesn’t bring
relief, your doctor might prescribe a higher-dose version.
Safety smarts: Take the lowest
dose for the shortest period of
time — and for pain, for no longer
than 10 days without talking to
your doctor. If you use OTC
NSAIDs three or more times
weekly, ask your doctor about
other options. NSAIDs can hike
the risk of stomach and intestinal
bleeding and ulcers, particularly
if used regularly in high doses or
if you combine one NSAID with
another. If you have heart disease, heart disease risk factors,
gastrointestinal bleeding, ulcers
or risk factors for ulcers, ask your
doctor what you should take.
WASHINGTON POST ILLUSTRATION; IMAGES FROM ISTOCK
Opioids
These prescription drugs include fentanyl (Actiq, Abstral,
Duragesic, Fentora, Onsolis and
generic), hydrocodone (Vicodin
and generic) and oxycodone
(OxyContin, Percocet and generic).
Best use: For severe acute pain
after surgery or from serious
injuries.
Safety smarts: Start with the
lowest dose and use for only a few
days. If pain persists, ask your
doctor about non-opioid alternatives.
Muscle relaxers
These prescription drugs include cyclobenzaprine (Amrix,
Fexmid and generic), metaxalone
(Skelaxin and generic) and carisoprodol (Soma and generic).
Best use: For acute, severe neck
or back spasms; muscle spasticity
associated with cerebral palsy,
multiple sclerosis or a stroke; or if
you have liver disease and can’t
tolerate OTC painkillers.
Safety smarts: Muscle relaxers
can cause sedation and be addictive, and are only marginally
effective. They’re also associated
with a higher fall risk for older
adults. Most people are better off
skipping them. If you use them,
do so for no longer than three
weeks.
Nondrug options
Nondrug treatments can reduce pain and improve function.
Ask your doctor about the following:
For back pain: Gentle movement — swimming, tai chi, walking and some forms of yoga — can
be helpful. Acupuncture, massage, physical therapy and spinal
manipulation (preferably by a
chiropractor or osteopathic physician) are also good options.
For headaches: Cutting back
on alcohol, avoiding foods that
trigger headaches and controlling stress with meditation or
relaxation therapy may help.
Studies suggest aerobic exercise
may reduce migraine frequency
and intensity.
For osteoarthritis: Low-impact exercise such as walking,
biking and yoga can ease pain
and improve function.
For fibromyalgia: Regular tai
chi and restorative yoga may
reduce pain and fatigue. Cognitive behavioral therapy and meditation are also good choices.
© Copyright 2017, Consumer Reports Inc.
Consumer Reports is an
independent, nonprofit organization
that works side by side with
consumers to create a fairer, safer,
and healthier world. CR does not
endorse products or services, and
does not accept advertising. CR has
no financial relationship with
advertisers in this publication. Read
more at ConsumerReports.org.
This pregnancy complication is scary, but its impact is often overlooked
BY
J ANICE N EUMANN
It has been nearly seven years
since Sarah Hughes had preeclampsia, but she still remembers the anguish of missing her
newborn’s first three days of life
when this pregnancy complication sent her back to the hospital
with dangerously high blood
pressure.
Hughes said she could tolerate
the gasping for breath and intense headache as well as the
painful, intravenous magnesium
sulfate she received to reduce the
chances of a seizure, but she
could not stand being away from
her new child, who was at home
being cared for by relatives.
Although her baby girl, Hayley,
was born healthy, the entire family was anxious for days afterward, worried that Hughes might
become ill again.
A new study shows that preeclampsia also has effects beyond
individual families such as
Hughes’s, according to William
Callaghan of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
“When we talk in public
health, we may be using the story
of the individual to make our case
because that can be a pretty
compelling story, but we have the
obligation of looking at what the
burden is on the entire population,” said Callaghan, who is chief
of the Maternal and Infant
Health Branch in the CDC’s Division of Reproductive Health.
The study, published in the
American Journal of Obstetrics
and Gynecology, reported that
preeclampsia increased the likelihood that mothers and babies
would develop medical problems
(from 4.6 percent to 10.1 percent
for mothers and from 7.8 percent
to 15.4 percent for babies). The
condition also lowered babies’
gestational age by 1.7 weeks.
The associated medical problems cost more than $2.18 billion
in care for mothers and babies in
the year after birth. Some mothers developed significant problems such as renal failure, stroke,
heart disease and seizures. Babies suffered from breathing
trouble, vision problems and
long-term developmental issues.
Preeclampsia can interfere
with the blood flow to the placenta and the fetus, leading to low
birth weight, prematurity and
even death. The only cure for
preeclampsia is delivery of the
baby.
“There is very little work on the
national epidemiology of preeclampsia, which is surprising
given that it is a leading cause of
maternal mortality and maternal
mortality rates in the U.S. and
exceeds those in other similarly
developed countries,” Anupam B.
Jena, one of the study authors
and a professor at Harvard Medical School, wrote in an email.
“Preeclampsia is a condition
that has additional relevance because it affects mothers and families at arguably one of the happiest times in a family’s life and the
condition is often unexpected
and unsuspected.”
Jena and colleagues used data
from California hospital discharges and birth certificates
from 2008 to 2011, as well as
other nationally representative
data to estimate the medical and
financial costs for 156,681 mothers and babies affected by pre
eclampsia in 2012.
The researchers also noted
that the preeclampsia rate has
climbed in recent years, from
2.4 percent of pregnancies in
1980 to 3.8 percent in 2010, partly
because of obesity and because
women are becoming pregnant at
a later age.
“Some of it could be driven by
risk factors we know about, other
differences could be driven by
risk factors we don’t know very
well, and part of it could be
differential access to health-care
providers who are screening
moms for preeclampsia,” Jena
said in an interview. “There could
also be a difference in the quality
of prenatal obstetrical care for
mothers in the U.S. versus other
countries.”
Callaghan also said that even
though the condition is “probably
the most common severe problem for women in pregnancy,” it
hasn’t been sufficiently researched. He noted that in 1931,
the Chicago Lying-In Hospital —
now part of University of Chicago
Medicine — displayed four
plaques honoring doctors who
made significant contributions to
obstetrics. A fifth plaque — reserved for whoever discovers a
way to prevent and cure preeclampsia — remains blank.
“It reflects the truly enigmatic
quality of this disease,” Callaghan
said.
The costs of preeclampsia are
probably even higher than the
study estimates, said Cindy Anderson, associate dean for academic affairs and educational innovation in the College of Nursing at Ohio State University.
“If the women had more-mild
forms, which can still have consequences, they may have been less
likely to be reported,” Anderson
said. “That makes the problem
even bigger.”
The study also didn’t account
for the long-term effects, costs
that are harder to quantify, she
said.
Anderson said one way to help
pregnant women get treatment
before the condition becomes too
dangerous is to educate them
about symptoms early. Those
symptoms, which can be difficult
to distinguish from the typical
effects of pregnancy, include
headache, vision changes, pain in
the upper abdomen, shortness of
breath, difficulty breathing and
swelling of the hands and face,
Anderson said.
Doctors also need to do a
better job warning women that
preeclampsia is associated with a
risk of heart disease, Anderson
said.
“If they knew they were at risk,
they could do some preventive
measures . . . so that as soon as
this risk is identified, it could be
managed,” she said.
Eleni Tsigas, chief executive of
the Preeclampsia Foundation,
said her nonprofit has been promoting more awareness of the
condition among health-care
providers and patients.
“Many, many women get
through their prenatal care never
hearing about preeclampsia, never being tuned in to the warning
signs they should be,” said Tsigas.
Tsigas said the study showed
the crucial need for more research.
“Our hope is it really makes
everybody sit up and realize this
is a significant issue — physically,
emotionally and, now, clearly financially,” said Tsigas.
It’s an experience Hughes, who
writes about it on her blog, will
not forget.
“I remember being in the
emergency department, and anybody who would walk by, I would
say, ‘Excuse me, I need to go
home,’ ” said Hughes, who lives in
Cherry Hill, N.J., with her husband and two children and is a
former volunteer for the Preeclampsia Foundation in Florida. “I
think it took a few months for me
to feel secure in going out and
doing things. . . . It was a huge
shock to our family.”
health-science@washpost.com
Kim Campbell, Wife of Singer Glen Campbell
Alzheimer’s: Honoring the Journey
Thursday
November 9, 2017
12:30 pm to 1:00 pm
Registration
1:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Presentation and Q&A
Event to be held at:
Aiton Auditorium
(Lower Level)
7100 Connecticut Avenue
Chevy Chase, MD 20815
Kim Campbell, wife of Grammy Hall of Fame
& Award-Winning Music Artist Glen Campbell,
is an impassioned speaker who has an intimate
understanding of the complex challenges faced
by people living with dementia and their families.
From the early to the more advanced stages of
Alzheimer’s, Kim Campbell lived through it all with
her husband and will share on a very intimate level
her personal anecdotes and humor. You won’t
want to miss this boldly honest discussion about
g toll that Alzheimer’s can have.
the devastating
Seating is limited. Kindly
advise in advance if
accessible accommodations
will be necessary.
RSVP by Monday,
November 6, 2017 by calling
(703) 407-5429 or find event
and register directly online at
Eventbrite.com
arden-courts.com
Annandale • Fair Oaks
Kensington • Potomac
Silver Spring
E4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
MEDICAL MYSTERIES
Her doctor had seen a similar case — decades ago
MYSTERY FROM E1
A chaotic delivery
Lupica was accustomed to being self-sufficient. She lived in the
sparsely populated desert community of Lucerne Valley in San
Bernardino County and homeschooled her older children. At the
time of Kylie’s birth, they were 14,
12 and 4.
During her previous pregnancies, there had been complications
involving the placenta, the organ
that develops during pregnancy
and provides nutrients to the fetus. In 2009, after her third child
was born, she underwent a
dilation-and-curettage procedure
to treat a retained placenta.
Lupica’s fourth pregnancy was
uneventful until about the 25th
week, when she began having regular contractions.
Her obstetrician, Om Prakash,
told Lupica that she was probably
having normal Braxton Hicks contractions, which are a precursor of
labor. When they persisted,
Prakash advised her to take it easy
and stop exercising.
“These didn’t feel like Braxton
Hicks,” Lupica said, but otherwise
she felt well. Her prenatal exams
and ultrasounds were normal,
Prakash said. He met Lupica at the
hospital when the ambulance arrived and delivered the placenta,
which looked healthy.
A month after giving birth, Lupica said, she began bleeding.
Postpartum vaginal bleeding,
Prakash said, is not uncommon.
“Ninety-nine percent of the time,”
he said, “it’s normal spotting.”
But Lupica said she felt uneasy.
A Pap smear was normal, and Lupica said she was relieved when
the intermittent bleeding stopped
after about a month. A few weeks
later, when it recurred, Prakash
told her she was probably getting
her period.
“I thought, ‘Well, my hormones
must really be out of whack,” she
recalled.
‘Something suspicious’
About four months after Kylie’s
birth, Lupica said, she awoke in
the middle of the night to discover
that she was drenched in blood.
“I woke up my husband, and I
was crying and told him something is really wrong,” she recalled,
although the bleeding by then had
abated. The next morning, she
telephoned Prakash, who told her
to come to his office.
Lupica vividly remembers the appointment. Given the quantity of
blood she had lost, “I already knew
something serious was going on.”
That ominous feeling was underscored
when
the
obstetrician-gynecologist “took us
straight back,” escorting her past the
other patients in the waiting room.
Prakash performed an ultrasound, which revealed something
distinctly alarming: a large
growth that resembled a cluster of
grapes on the right side of Lupica’s
uterus.
“It scared the heck out of me”
Prakash recalled. He was fairly
certain he knew what it was, having seen a similar case about 30
years earlier.
“There’s something suspicious,”
he told the couple. Because he
didn’t want to panic them, he said,
he didn’t tell them what he suspected. He advised the Lupicas to
go toa public hospital several
hours from their home first thing
the next morning.
Because Lupica had no health
insurance at the time, Prakash
said, seeking care there would allow her to receive the expensive
treatment he suspected she would
need without bankrupting her
family.
Around 8 a.m. the next morning, the couple arrived at the ER. It
would take nearly 12 hours, Lupica
said, for doctors to admit her.
“First I was told I was miscarrying, then I was told I was pregnant,”
she recalled. “I was tossed from
team to team.” No one seemed sure
what to do with her, she said. Lupica said she adamantly refused to
leave the hospital, fearing that she
might bleed to death at home in the
middle of the night.
Late in the afternoon, Lupica
realized she had begun bleeding
again and ducked into a bathroom. She quickly realized she was
hemorrhaging and, “terrified and
embarrassed,” managed to attract
the attention of a passing nurse.
The nurse summoned a doctor,
who took one look at her and
COURTESY OF CINDY LUPICA
Shortly after the birth
of her fourth child,
Kylie, Cindy Lupica
experienced vaginal
bleeding that alarmed
her doctor and sent her
to a hospital for
lifesaving care.
barked an order for a “STAT beta
hCG,” an immediate blood test to
measure beta human chorionic
gonadotropin. The test is used to
confirm a pregnancy or to detect
certain abnormalities.
“At that point, it was sort of like
in the movies where everything
goes blurry,” she said, as nurses
and doctors rushed in to try to stop
the bleeding.
Thirty minutes later, Lupica recalled, a trio of grim-faced doctors
trooped into the room where she
lay on a gurney.
A shocking diagnosis
“We finally have an answer,”
Lupica recalls one doctor saying.
“You have choriocarcinoma.”
“It sounds like cancer,” Lupica
replied.
“It is,” one doctor confirmed.
Her postpartum bleeding was the
Should you choose a Medicare Advantage plan?
As health insurers
struggle with
shifting
government
JUDITH
policies and
GRAHAM
considerable
uncertainty, one
market remains remarkably
stable: Medicare Advantage plans.
That’s good news for seniors
as they select coverage for the
year ahead during Medicare’s
annual open enrollment period,
which runs through Dec. 7.
For 2018, 2,317 Medicare
Advantage plans will be available
across the country, “the most we’ve
seen since 2009,” said Gretchen
Jacobson, associate director of the
Kaiser Family Foundation’s
program on Medicare policy.
(Kaiser Health News is an
editorially independent program
of the foundation.)
Medicare Advantage is an
alternative to traditional
Medicare. Run by private
insurance companies, the plans
— mostly health maintenance
organizations (HMOs) and
preferred provider organizations
(PPOs) — are expected to serve a
record 20.4 million people next
year, or slightly more than onethird of Medicare’s 59 million
members.
On average, seniors will have a
choice of 21 plans, although at
least 40 plans will be accessible in
some counties and large
metropolitan areas, Jacobson
said. Availability tends to be far
more restricted in rural locations.
While a few insurers are
entering or exiting the Medicare
Advantage market, most
established players are
remaining in place. Eight
insurers dominate the market:
UnitedHealthcare, Humana,
Anthem, plans affiliated with
Blue Cross and Blue Shield,
Kaiser Permanente, Aetna, Cigna
and WellCare. (Kaiser Health
News is not affiliated with Kaiser
Permanente.)
Despite Medicare Advantage
plans’ increasing popularity,
several features — including the
costs that older adults face in
these plans and the extent to
which members’ choice of doctors
and hospitals is restricted —
remain poorly understood.
Here are some essential facts
to consider:
Navigating
Aging
The basics
Medicare Advantage plans must
provide the same benefits
offered through traditional
Medicare (services from
hospitals, physicians, home
health care agencies,
laboratories, medical equipment
companies and rehabilitation
facilities, among others). Nearly
90 percent of plans also supply
drug coverage.
In 2018, 68 percent of plans
offered will be HMOs, while
27 percent will be PPOs, Jacobson
said. The remainder are small,
specialized plans that are expected
to have relatively few members. In
general, HMOs require members to
seek care from a specific network of
hospital and doctors, while PPOs
allow members to obtain care from
providers outside the network, at a
significantly higher cost.
Pros and cons
The Center for Medicare
Advocacy, a nonprofit founded
in 1986, recently summarized the
pros and cons of Medicare
Advantage plans. On the plus
side, it cited:
Little paperwork. (Plan
members don’t have to submit
claims, in most cases.)
An emphasis on preventive
care.
Extra benefits, such as vision
care, dental care and hearing
exams, that aren’t offered under
traditional Medicare.
An all-in-one approach to
coverage. (Notably, members
typically don’t have to purchase
supplemental Medigap coverage
or a stand-alone drug plan.)
Cost controls, including a
cap on out-of-pocket costs for
physician and hospital services
(Medicare Part A and B benefits).
On the negative side, it cited:
Access that is limited to
hospitals and doctors within
plan networks. (Traditional
Medicare allows seniors to go to
whichever doctor or hospital
they want.)
Rules that can erect barriers
to accessing care (for example,
getting approval from a primarycare doctor before seeing a
specialist).
Financial incentives to limit
services. (Medicare Advantage
plans receive a set per-memberper-month fee from the
government and risk losing
money if medical expenses
exceed payments.)
Limits on care that members
can get when traveling.
(Generally, only emergency care
and urgent care is covered.)
The potential for higher costs
for specific services in some
circumstances. (For instance, some
plans charge more than traditional
Medicare for a short hospital stay,
home health care or medical
equipment such as oxygen.)
Lack of flexibility. Once
someone enrolls in Medicare
Advantage, they’re locked in for
the year. There are two exceptions:
a special disenrollment period
from Jan. 1 to Feb. 14 (anyone who
leaves during this time must go
back to traditional Medicare) and
a chance to make changes during
open enrollment. (Shifting to a
different plan or going back to
traditional Medicare are options
at this point).
Medigap implications
Choosing a Medicare Advantage
plan has implications for the
future as well as the present. For
example, if someone enrolls in a
Medicare Advantage plan when
she first joins Medicare and stays
with a plan for at least a year, she
may not qualify for supplemental
Medigap coverage if she joins
traditional Medicare at a later date.
Medigap policies cover
charges such as deductibles, coinsurance and co-payments that
seniors with Medicare coverage
are expected to pay out of pocket.
People who join Medicare for the
first time are guaranteed access
to Medigap policies, no matter
what their health status is, only
for a limited time. Afterward,
they can be denied coverage
based on their health in most
states.
Parsing costs
There’s a widespread perception
that Medicare Advantage plans
cost less than traditional
Medicare. But actual costs
depend on an individual’s
circumstances and aren’t always
easy to calculate.
Seniors often first consider
what they’ll pay in monthly
premiums. This year, the average
monthly premium for Medicare
Advantage plans is $30, almost
$2 below last year’s. But nearly
half of Medicare Advantage
members are enrolled in plans
that don’t charge a monthly
premium — what are called zeropremium plans. (Seniors also
need to pay Medicare Part B
premiums, although some
Medicare Advantage plans cover
some or all of that charge.)
To get a full picture of plan
costs, which can vary annually,
seniors should look beyond
premiums to drug expenses
(including which drugs are
covered by their plan, at what
level and with what restrictions);
deductibles (plans can charge
deductibles for both medical
services and drugs); what plans
charge for hospital care (some
have daily co-payments for the
first week or so); and coinsurance rates for services such
as home health care or skilled
nursing care, experts said.
“It’s really critical that folks
dig deep and find out about all
possible costs they may incur in
a plan before they sign up for it,”
said Chris Reeg, director of
Ohio’s Senior Health Insurance
Information Program. (Every
state has a program of this kind;
find one near you at
shiptacenter.org.)
“Part of the equation has to be
what you’ll have to pay if you need
lots of care,” said David Lipschutz,
senior policy attorney at the
Center for Medicare Advocacy “In
our experience, that’s often more
than people expected.”
Information about Medicare
Advantage plans’ deductibles, copayments and co-insurance rates
as well as coverage details for
medications can be found at
Medicare’s plan finder.
Finding a doctor
One way that Medicare Advantage
plans try to control costs and
coordinate care is by working with a
limited group of physicians and
hospitals. But reliable information
about these networks is hard to
find, and published directories
often contain mistaken or out-ofdate information.
“It’s not easy to determine
who’s in-network for a Medicare
Advantage plan,” said Fred
Riccardi, director of client
services at the Medicare Rights
Center. “This information isn’t
on Medicare’s website, and
there’s no one, streamlined way
to search for information about
provider networks across plans.”
His advice to consumers: Call all
of your doctors to ask whether
they’re participating in a plan
you’re considering. (Make sure
you have your plan number
when you do, because a single
company may offer multiple
plans in your market.)
Making matters even more
difficult: Plans can drop
physicians or hospitals from
their networks during the year,
leaving members without access
to trusted sources of care.
— Kaiser Health News
result of a rare and aggressive malignancy that grows in the uterus
and is sometimes called placenta
cancer. As she and her husband sat
in stunned silence, doctors told
Lupica that they were admitting
her immediately and that she
would begin chemotherapy as
soon as possible, after testing to
determine whether her cancer had
spread.
Choriocarcinoma occurs in
about 2 to 7 of every 100,000 pregnancies in the United States. It
results when a tumor — also known
as a mole — develops after conception. Instead of a viable embryo, the
result is a molar pregnancy, which
can mimic a normal pregnancy.
Most moles are benign, but
some become malignant, resulting in a cancer that tends to be
fast-growing but curable, especially if caught early. Among the
risk factors for malignancy is age:
Women younger than 20 and older
than 35 are at elevated risk. The
most common symptom is vaginal
bleeding. Choriocarcinoma can
spread to distant parts of the body,
usually the brain, liver or lungs.
Although Lupica’s liver and
brain showed no sign of cancer, a
spot was found on her lung. Her
bhCG reading was sky-high:
221,000 milli-international units
per milliliter of blood. The normal
level in pre-menopausal women
who are not pregnant should be
less than 5.
It is not clear when Lupica’s
tumor developed. Although some
moles form during a pregnancy,
about 25 percent occur after a
normal delivery, a miscarriage or
an abortion. Although the oncologists who treated her cancer could
not be reached, Lupica said that
they told her she was carrying the
tumor during her pregnancy with
Kylie. (A healthy birth accompanied by a complete molar pregnancy is an extremely rare event.)
But Prakash said he doubts the
tumor was present then: Nothing
was ever visible on the ultrasounds performed during her
pregnancy, which was otherwise
normal. So too, he said, was her
delivery, other than the fact that it
occurred in an ambulance.
“During her pregnancy, there
was nothing to suggest that some-
thing was going on,” Prakash said.
He suspects the mole developed
after Kylie was born. And until the
night when she awoke bleeding
heavily, Prakash said, her postpartum bleeding did not seem out of
the ordinary.
Lupica began chemotherapy
soon after she was admitted. Because methotrexate, the standard
drug, did not work, she was placed
on an aggressive regimen involving five medicines.
“It was very tough,” Lupica recalled.
By July 2014, the date of her
final chemo treatment, her bhCG
level had dropped to zero and the
spot on her lung had disappeared.
For patients with metastatic disease, the probability of a cure can
exceed 80 percent, according to
the American Cancer Society.
Three years out, Lupica remains
cancer-free.
“I can’t believe I’m a survivor,”
she said.
The aftermath
After her recovery — a process
that involved dealing with the
trauma suffered by her three older
children who worried she would
die — Lupica decided to raise
awareness of her rare disease, one
that many people have never
heard of.
She has become an advocate for
choriocarcinoma patients and
those with similar diseases, and
she is active on Facebook. From
her home in the Mojave, she said,
she has sought to raise money for
research being conducted at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Donald Goldstein, an eminent OB/GYN there, pioneered
treatment for choriocarcinoma
and related cancers.
Lupica said that her oncologists
twice consulted with Goldstein
about her case.
She credits her faith and her
family with helping her endure
the ordeal. “I’m still getting little
bits of healing,” she said. “Helping
other women is helping me.”
Submit your solved medical mystery
to sandra.boodman@washpost.com.
No unsolved cases, please. Read
previous mysteries at wapo.st/
medicalmysteries.
Study shows why fevers
can cause birth defects
BY
A IMEE C UNNINGHAM
Certain birth defects of the face
and heart can occur when babies’
mothers have a fever during the
first trimester of pregnancy, a
crucial time in an embryo’s development. Now scientists have figured out the molecular players
that make it so.
In an experiment with chicken
embryos, a temporary rise in incubation temperature — meant to
mimic feverlike conditions — was
enough to produce defects to the
face and heart. Such an elevation
in temperature, called hyperthermia, affects the activity of
heat-sensitive channels in cells
necessary for an embryo’s development, researchers report online in the journal Science Signaling.
Although a connection between fever and these birth defects has been known for decades,
says report co-author Eric Benner,
a neonatologist at the Duke University School of Medicine, there
has been some debate as to
whether the fever itself or an
infectious agent behind the fever
is the culprit.
The new work shows that “hyperthermia in and of itself can
cause these birth defects, and, on
a molecular level, here’s how it
happens,” Benner says.
While birth defects of the heart
and face can have a genetic cause,
that doesn’t explain all cases of
these common health problems.
In the United States, more than
35,000 babies are born with congenital heart defects each year.
Nearly 4,500 infants are born
with a malformation of the lip
called cleft lip, which can occur
with or without a cleft palate, and
more than 2,500 babies are born
with a cleft palate only.
Although the face and heart
don’t end up so close together,
they arise from the same type of
precursor cells, called neural crest
cells. These cells orchestrate the
development of the jaws and other facial bones as well as the heart
and its major vessels, Benner says.
The researchers discovered that
two members of a class of ion
channels that can sense a change
in temperature were present in
neural crest cells from chickens
and mice. (Ion channels are passages through a cell’s membrane
that allow charged particles, or
ions, into or out of the cell.) A
temperature change can affect
the activity of these two channels,
called TRPV1 and TRPV4.
The scientists heated chicken
embryos to about 105 degrees for
an hour and compared them with
embryos incubated at a standard
laboratory temperature of 98.6
degrees. Those chicks exposed to
a high “fever” developed craniofacial defects, such as a shorter
upper beak, and cardiovascular
defects. Chicks that developed
continuously at the standard temperature did not. What’s more,
treating the embryos with a molecule that blocked TRPV1 before
temporarily raising the temperature prevented craniofacial defects and reduced cardiovascular
defects. And using a drug that
activates
TRPV4
in
regular-temperature conditions
induced birth defects.
“The vast majority
of the time, women
who have had fevers
are going to deliver
healthy babies.”
Eric Benner, a neonatologist at the
Duke University School of Medicine
The research is the first to detail the mechanism that connects
a fever to birth defects, “and it will
hopefully get people thinking
about this,” says medical geneticist Richard Finnell of the Baylor
College of Medicine in Houston,
who was not involved in the study.
“I was awfully impressed.”
Still, it’s unclear how high a
fever has to be, how long it needs
to last and exactly when within
the first trimester it needs to
occur to cause such birth defects,
Benner says. “Fevers are very
common in pregnancy, and the
vast majority of the time, women
who have had fevers are going to
deliver healthy babies,” he says.
He also points to two clinical
studies that have shown that the
fever-reducer acetaminophen —
commonly sold as Tylenol — decreased fever-associated birth defects, and he suggests that doctors and patients consider the
drug’s use to treat fevers early in
pregnancy.
— Science News
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
E5
EE
In some cases, too much protein can accelerate a decline in kidney health
PROTEIN FROM E1
there’s not enough data yet,
though, to set specific pregnancyrelated recommended levels, adding, “I think that more research
needs to be conducted in this area
in different populations before
translating the findings into any
guidelines.”)
Walter Willett, a professor of
epidemiology and nutrition at the
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, extends that caution to
people of all ages, citing protein’s
role in cell multiplication. He
explains that protein — especially
from animal sources, and in particular from dairy — boosts a
growth-promoting hormone that
makes cells multiply faster, which
is vital early in life but not necessarily later on in life.
“Overly rapid cell multiplication is one of the underlying factors for cancer,” Willett said. “It
seems pretty clear that we don’t
want to have our cell-growth accelerator to the floor from the day
we’re born until the day we die.”
Some studies on later-life protein consumption, meanwhile,
have raised an important concern.
One preliminary study, which
evaluated the self-reported diets
of more than 100,000 women
between ages 50 to 79, appeared
to find a significantly higher rate
of heart failure among those who
ate a lot of animal protein than
among those who ate less of it.
Older adults are often told to
seek out extra protein, largely to
help them maintain muscle mass,
which deteriorates as one ages.
Willett said that’s not bad advice,
but not to go overboard. “Having
some hormonal boost from protein sources may not be a bad
thing. It may be good — although
the most important way to maintain muscle mass is resistance
training,” he said.
How much protein, then is
good?
Most nutrition experts are reluctant to cite a single number
because individual needs are so
variable, but Willett offers some
guidance — along with a few qualifications.
“I think a range for total protein between about 12 to 20 percent of calories is okay; pushing
higher, especially with protein
supplements, is certainly not necessary and has potential longterm hazards,” he said.
“I am particularly concerned
about adding protein supplements, such as whey protein,
which has a strong effect on cell
multiplication,” he said, then added some practical advice: If protein is taking the place of foods
high in sugar or refined starch —
white bread, for example — it will
benefit the body. But if it’s replacing foods rich in whole grains and
healthy fats, it won’t.
John Swartzberg, a professor
emeritus at the University of California at Berkeley School of Public Health, said certain groups
definitely should ignore the
increase-your-protein message.
It has long been known that too
much protein is harmful for people with chronic kidney disease.
(Kidneys are responsible for eliminating the products of protein
metabolism, and those products
accumulate in the blood when
ISTOCK
Nutritionists are especially uncertain about how the body reacts to or uses processed protein isolates
and powders, which have skyrocketed in popularity.
kidneys don’t function well.) But
it can also exacerbate damage to
kidneys that someone may not yet
know are already impaired, before clear evidence of poor kidney
function is apparent.
Swartzberg said some studies
show that about 1 in 9 Americans
have impaired kidney function,
many of them unaware of it. For
such people, following the highprotein trend will accelerate a
decline in kidney health. “It’s an
asymptomatic problem until it’s
mid-stage kidney disease,” he
said. People who want to assess
their kidney status, he advises,
can request a blood test for creatinine for initial screening.
Even for those with healthy
kidneys, Swartzberg urges caution about excess protein. While
some nutrition experts say there’s
no evidence suggesting eating
even twice the recommended daily allowance for protein, Swartz-
burg says there isn’t enough longterm data to conclude that such a
high number is either good for
you or safe. He suggests an
amount somewhere between 100
and 150 percent of the recommended daily allowance, which is
0.8 grams per kilogram of body
weight; that translates to between about 54 grams and 82
grams of protein for an adult who
weighs 150 pounds. “I certainly
would not eat excessive protein. I
would never take any protein
supplements. And I wouldn’t advise my children to, either,” he
says.
Preventive cardiologist Stephen Devries, the executive director of the nonprofit Gaples Institute for Integrative Cardiology in
Deerfield, Ill., recommends avoiding or only eating only minimal
amounts of animal protein; he is
also cautious about what he calls
“artificially enhanced protein,”
such as protein powders, even
ones derived from plants. He recommends getting your protein
instead from beans, lentils, nuts
and tofu. “These are terrific
sources of protein, and they’re the
ones we should concentrate on,
rather than the artificial sources,
whether they come from animals
or plants.”
Some people think the benefits
of extra protein give them a free
pass to simply eat more — but
protein calories are still calories.
Marion Nestle, a professor of
nutrition, food studies and public
health at New York University,
said, “If you eat a lot of extra
protein, you’re either breaking it
down for energy or you’re turning
it into sugar and into fat — one or
the other.”
Her general advice is for people
to stop obsessing over protein. “It
is most definitely not a nutrient of
concern. Most people get twice as
much as they need without thinking about it,” she said. “My nutrition pet peeve is calling foods
‘protein,’ as in ‘Would you like
some protein with that salad?’ If
the salad has beans or grains or
cheese, it already has protein.”
health-science@washpost.com
People with drinking problems rarely receive drugs Surge in liver transplants
for young people is tied
to nonalcoholic diseases
ALCOHOL MEDS FROM E1
patients taking naltrexone vs. a
placebo.
Acamprosate also may help
decrease alcohol consumption,
although the mechanisms by
which it achieves this remain
unclear. Clinical trials have
found patients taking acamprosate are about 15 percent less
likely to drink any alcohol compared with people taking a placebo, with significantly more cumulative periods of abstinence.
Disulfiram, also known as Antabuse, can be used to disrupt the
metabolism of alcohol, making
patients feel ill if they drink and
therefore discouraging alcohol
consumption. (Because of these
effects, many patients stop taking the medication or need constant encouragement to continue.) Some studies suggest disulfiram can help patients limit
drinking in the short term, but
other trials have shown mixed
results in terms of efficacy.
All three of these drugs have
been around for years. (Disulfiram received FDA approval for
treating alcoholism in 1951.) And
organizations such as the American Psychiatric Association and
the National Institute on Alcohol
Abuse and Alcoholism support
using these medications to help
certain patients. Yet these treatments remain widely underutilized, according to a variety of
studies.
For example, a study published in 2009 estimated that
fewer than 1 in 10 Americans in
need of treatment for alcoholism
received prescription medication
for the illness. A 2012 study of
more than 330,000 patients with
alcohol use disorder at the Veterans Health Administration found
that just 3.4 percent of them
received drugs for the condition.
Another study looked at substance abuse treatment programs across the country and
found that fewer than 20 percent
sustained their use of medications including naltrexone or disulfiram.
If these medications work for
some people, why aren’t we using
them?
Part of the problem is that
people with alcohol use disorder
often don’t get treated at all.
According to one nationwide survey, fewer than 8 percent of
people with alcohol use disorder
in the year prior sought treatment for the condition. If people
aren’t going to health-care providers for treatment, medications can’t enter the equation.
Stigma also remains an important barrier to treatment. Although growing numbers in the
medical community and the public accept the idea of alcoholism
as a neurobiological disease
caused by genetics, environmental triggers and chemical imbalances, many remain unconvinced. In fact, a 2010 study
found that 65 percent of the U.S.
public attributed alcohol dependence to “bad character” in
2006, up from 49 percent in
1996.Research has shown that
people who perceive greater levels of stigma toward those with
BY
ISTOCK
If people
aren’t going to
health-care
providers for
treatment,
medications
can’t enter the
equation.
alcoholism are less likely to get
medical care for the condition.
Among those who pursue
treatment, many seek out nonpharmacologic options, such as
cognitive behavioral therapy — a
form of talk therapy that has
been found to be helpful for those
with substance abuse problems
— or programs such as Alcoholics
Anonymous, which promote
meetings and support networks.
The availability of free meetings
and informal settings can be
attractive, although the effectiveness of such programs continues
to be debated.
Some may have difficulty with
costs or administrative hurdles;
according to a 2016 study, many
insurance plans require prior
authorization for medications
such as injectable naltrexone and
may place them in expensive
tiers that require greater co-payments or cost-sharing from patients.
Lack of training among medical professionals may also contribute to the underuse of these
medications. In a recent national
study, 67 percent of psychiatrists
and 88 percent of family physicians said they would be more
likely to prescribe medications
for alcohol use disorder if they
received additional training. A
survey published in 2009 of more
than 1,100 addiction treatment
counselors found that most of
them did not know whether naltrexone or acamprosate were effective treatments for alcohol
dependence.
The picture may be changing,
though.
Some medical institutions
have begun ramping up outreach
about these medications to both
patients and providers. The Veterans Health Administration is
providing additional training to
clinicians about these drugs and
distributing information to veterans. More medical centers are
training physicians in addiction
medicine. Last year, the Surgeon
General’s Report on Alcohol,
Drugs and Health included a
review of medications for alcohol
use disorder and advised that
they can play an important role
along with counseling.
And new medications may be
on the way, according to a recent
article in JAMA. Research suggests that some drugs long used
by physicians to treat seizures
and other ailments — among
them gabapentin and topiramate
— may be effective for treating
alcohol use disorder as well.
Millions of Americans suffer as
a result of alcohol use disorder,
too often not getting the care
they need. Meanwhile, evidencebased treatments that might
change these patients’ lives for
the better are not being used
enough.
It’s past time that changed.
C AROLYN C RIST
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
and its more aggressive form,
nonalcoholic
steatohepatitis,
have become the fastest-growing
reasons for liver transplants in
young Americans, according to a
recent study.
Typically, older adults experience the slow progression of fatty
liver disease that is not related to
alcohol but can lead ultimately to
liver cirrhosis. As a result of increasing childhood obesity, hypertension and diabetes, however,
more young adults are reaching
end-stage liver disease early in
life, researchers say.
“I see kids at ages 7 and 8 with
this problem, and one of my
youngest patients developed cirrhosis at 13,” said senior study author Naim Alkhouri, who directs
the metabolic program at the Texas Liver Institute in San Antonio.
“In Texas in particular, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is the No. 1
indicator for transplants in
adults,” he said in a phone interview. “It now affects 1 in 3 adults
and 1 in 10 children.”
Alkhouri and colleagues analyzed nationwide data from the
United Network for Organ Sharing on liver transplants in young
adults between 2002 and 2012 to
examine the reasons they needed
a transplant.
During those years, there were
5,157 transplants in people ages 18
to 40, of whom 23 percent were
obese, the researchers found. The
top reason for transplant, accounting for 25 percent, was autoimmune/cholestatic liver disease,
which includes conditions such as
bile duct infections, immune system-related hepatitis, hereditary
bile duct problems and drug-related liver damage.
About 18 percent of transplants
were for acute liver failure; other
important causes were hepatitis C
and B as well as liver cancers.
Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, also
called NASH, accounted for just
3.3 percent of transplants across
the entire study period, but it was
the fastest-growing reason for
transplant.
The number of liver transplants
performed for NASH increased
from 0.53 percent in 2002 to
4.46 percent in 2012, a ninefold
jump, the study team reports in
the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology.
Survival rates were similar
among NASH and non-NASH liver recipients, but graft survival
was lower and re-transplantation
rates were higher in NASH recipients, the researchers note.
“Following the childhood
obesity explosion in the ’80s and
’90s, we’re seeing young adults
with old bodies,” Alkhouri said.
“Although they’re 30, their organs
are sick.”
Fatty liver disease and NASH
can often go unrecognized and
untreated in young adults because
pediatricians and primary-care
doctors don’t look for signs of the
disease in younger people, the
study authors write.
New studies are investigating
ways to treat fatty liver disease
early in life and prevent it from
recurring after transplantation,
Alkhouri said. Although the Food
and Drug Administration has not
approved any medications for
NASH, clinical trials underway
now could lead to such drugs in a
few years, he added.
“The other looming question is
about fatty liver disease developing into liver cancer,” said Robert
Wong of the University of California at San Francisco, who wasn’t
involved in the study.
“In medical school, we’re
taught that cirrhosis is a prerequisite for cancer, but we’re seeing
more reports that fatty liver can
develop into cancer with little cirrhosis,” he said by phone. “If our
only indicator to screen for cancer
is to look for cirrhosis, that’s scary.
We’re not going to look for it or
find it.”
Liver specialists still don’t
know why fatty liver disease and
NASH develop so rapidly, Wong
added. Factors could include differences in metabolism, demographics and lifestyle, which researchers are still trying to pinpoint so they can better diagnose
patients.
“The best treatment is still prevention,” Wong said. “If we can ID
it early and then focus on blood
pressure, diabetes, weight loss
and a healthy lifestyle, we can
better help patients with fatty liver disease.”
— Reuters
health-science@washpost.com
Morris is a resident physician in
psychiatry at the Stanford University
School of Medicine.
ISTOCK
E6
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
EE
. TUESDAY,
OCTOBER 31 , 2017
10 years ago, doctors said he had Alzheimer’s. He thinks that may be untrue.
ALZHEIMER'S FROM E1
scans and gave me their opinions.
Alzheimer’s is a complex disease to diagnose. The science is
just not there yet. Sixty to 80
percent of dementia cases are
said to be due to Alzheimer’s. But
postmortem tests of elderly patients have found that dementia
has several causes. “Up to onethird are primarily attributable
to pathologies” other than [Alzheimer’s disease], primarily cerebrovascular disease and synucleinopathy,” said one study. The
latter is a neurodegenerative disease with three types, one of
which is Parkinson’s.
Despite my Alzheimer’s diagnosis, I always felt I had other
issues — such as losing my
temper, a lack of patience and
being very reactive to minor
issues — that aren’t normally
related to Alzheimer’s. As the
years wore on and I moved from
one clinical trial to another,
failing them all, I wondered
whether I had been misdiagnosed.
Five years ago, the Food and
Drug Administration approved a
test called Amyvid, by Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Eli Lilly. It is a diagnostic
scan
that
checks
for
beta-amyloid neuritic plaque
density in the brain. If sparse to
no amyloid plaques are seen on
the scan, it is likely that a person
does not have Alzheimer’s disease. This test costs about
$10,000 and was not covered by
insurance. It also was not a
definitive test, but one to be used
with others to diagnose a cause
for cognitive decline.
It took me about two years to
get the test. I signed up and was
approved for a study by Avid,
which was trying to identify
subjects for their next clinical
trials. I was now 59. It had been
two decades since I first raised
memory issues with my doctor.
Waiting to learn the results
was tough. It takes special expertise to read these scans, and the
error rate in reading them was
very high. Avid had to send my
results to another expert for a
second reading, after the first
reader had difficulty reading the
scan.
Four long weeks later, I got the
results. My scan was negative.
Was I ever shocked. I also felt like
a fraud because, for years, I had
been in the public eye telling
everyone I had Alzheimer’s.
If I had known this result early
on, I never would have wasted all
that time in clinical trials for
Alzheimer’s. When you are told
you are dying, the last thing you
want to do is waste time. Not
only that, I contributed to the
likely failure of those trials because I did not have the amyloid
plaques that a particular drug
was trying to clear.
Two neurologists have stated
that I fall into a fairly new
category called suspected nonAlzheimer’s pathophysiology, or
SNAP. According to one study,
about 23 percent of clinically
normal people ages 65 and older
and about 25 percent of people
with MCI have SNAP. For people
with both MCI and SNAP, the
risk of cognitive decline and
dementia is higher than for clinically normal people with SNAP.
I was initially diagnosed with
MCI. But for the past 10 years,
the diagnosis has been Alzheimer’s. It is still officially the diagnosis
because
information
gained in trials — which is how I
found out that my amyloid scan
was negative and that I probably
did not have Alzheimer’s — does
not go on a medical record.
If I had known this
result early on, I never
would have wasted all
that time in clinical
trials for Alzheimer’s.
That reminded me of a friend,
an educational scientist who
read my medical records about a
year ago and insisted I did not
have Alzheimer’s. He said I had
semantic dementia. So, for now, I
will have to accept that I may
have either semantic dementia
or SNAP.
I will have to wait for science to
catch up before I know for sure.
Who knows, I may even be part of
the next new term. I just hope it
means that what I have will not
be progressive and lead to death.
The one thing we all should
learn from my experience is to
take advantage of all the tools we
have access to so we can make
the best decision possible.
health-science@washpost.com
Michael Ellenbogen: “I felt like
a fraud” after a plaque test.
COURTESY OF MICHAEL ELLENBOGEN
What you need to know about the new
two-dose vaccine against shingles
Obesity may be at a record high, but
there’s good news about cholesterol
BY
W ILLIAM W AN
When it comes to our health as
a nation, we’re not doing so great.
Some cancer rates are climbing
sharply. Nearly 1 in 8 Americans
has diabetes. And we are ballooning in weight, with obesity rates
at record highs.
Amid that grim picture, government researchers last week
had a glimmer of good news: Our
cholesterol numbers, which have
improved significantly over the
past 17 years, are holding steady.
Since 1999, the portion of
Americans with high total cholesterol has declined from 18.3 percent to 12.4 percent in 2016.
“It’s gratifying news,” said
Margaret Carroll, health statistician at the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention and the
author of the new data brief.
Health experts attribute the
positive results to several factors:
the public’s growing awareness of
high cholesterol’s dangers, more
people’s health-conscious diets,
the phaseout of artificial trans
fats in the food supply and the
use of cholesterol-lowering statin
medications.
Carroll, who has worked at
CDC’s National Center for Health
Statistics for more than four decades, has watched our relationship with cholesterol change dramatically.
BY
It wasn’t until the 1950s and
1960s that scientists began to
understand and push the idea
that we could battle the negative
effects of high cholesterol. Since
then, there have been periodic
declines in the nation’s high cholesterol rates, CDC data show. But
the trend since the turn of the
century has been a sustained
decrease.
That time period overlaps
neatly with the years when
cholesterol-lowering medication
became widespread, particularly
among adults 40 and older who
are most at risk for high cholesterol and heart disease. From
2003 to 2012, the percentage of
adults older than 40 and taking
statins and other cholesterol
medications increased from
20 percent to 28 percent, according to a 2014 CDC report.
Carroll’s report shows where
particular progress needs to continue. The prevalence of high
total cholesterol was greatest
among adults ages 40 to 59 —
particularly for women. By race
and gender, white women also
had the greatest prevalence of
high total cholesterol.
There are two primary kinds of
cholesterol: “bad” cholesterol
(low-density lipoprotein, or
LDL), which can lead to plaque
buildup that clogs arteries; and
“good” cholesterol (high-density
lipoprotein, or HDL), which
helps ferry that bad cholesterol
through your bloodstream to
your liver to be expunged.
And the latest brief reports
that Americans now have more
good cholesterol overall. From
2007 to 2016, people with low
levels of good cholesterol declined from 22 percent to 18 percent.
Without more data, it’s difficult to pin that HDL improvement on a single factor, said
Robert Eckel, a professor of medicine at the University of Colorado and a former president of the
American Heart Association.
“It can’t be because we’re losing weight, because that’s still
going up, but it could be statin
use. It could be a result of the
decline in smoking. Or a combination of factors,” Eckel said.
“Regardless, the message here is
a good one. And it reflects other
things we’re seeing, like the number of heart attacks, which have
gone down, too.
“But we should also keep in
mind that the problem isn’t
solved. More than 800,000 people die a year of cardiovascular
disease,” he said. “We have to
continue the progress.”
william.wan@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
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Ellenbogen is the author of “From
the Corner Office to Alzheimer’s.”
OB/GYN
Clinical Study for
Symptoms of
Uterine Fibroids
B
L ENA S UN
arbara Campbell has
twice had shingles. Each
time, she said, one side of
her body was covered in
“thousands of these horrid blisters.” She could wear only the
lightest silk blouse. Anything else
touching her skin hurt too much.
“I’m in terror of having it happen again,” said Campbell, 79, of
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., describing
the painful rash that will affect almost 1 out of 3 people in their lifetime. Because of allergies, she
couldn’t get the Zostavax vaccine,
which is made with live, albeit
weakened, virus.
But Campbell and millions of
other older Americans at risk of
shingles — a condition caused by
the same virus that causes chickenpox — may soon have another
option. A more effective vaccine,
Shingrix, was licensed by the
Food and Drug Administration
on Oct. 20. The federal panel that
helps guide U.S. vaccination policy last week recommended the
new vaccine for use in adults 50
and older with normal immune
systems.
The panel noted that Shingrix,
made by GlaxoSmithKline, provides substantially greater protection than Zostavax, made by
Merck. Shingrix’s protection is
also maintained at a high level for
at least four years. The panel recommended that anyone previously vaccinated with the one-dose
Zostavax be revaccinated with
Shingrix, which is given in two
doses.
The Washington Post spoke
with Edward Belongia, an
infectious-disease epidemiologist
who chaired the shingles vaccine
work group of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. The group spent two years reviewing evidence on the two vaccines. (The interview has been edited for length and clarity.)
Q: Who’s at risk for getting
shingles?
A: Shingles is a serious and
very common condition. When
people get chickenpox as children, the virus lays dormant in
their nerves, held in check by an
individual’s immune system. As
you get older, your immune system starts to decline. People over
50 have an increased risk of developing shingles, which is a reactivating of the dormant virus.
There are about 1 million cases
of shingles in the United States
every year. It typically resolves in
one to three weeks, and it’s painful while you have it.
Q: What are some of the complications associated with shingles?
A: About 15 percent of people
who get shingles develop chronic
severe pain, known as postherpetic neuralgia, or PHN. It’s severe pain that can last for months.
Your risk increases as you get older. There are also rare complications, such as increased risk for
stroke and vision loss. But PHN is
the most common complication.
It can be very, very debilitating.
Q: Can people with compromised immune systems get Shingrix?
A: At this point, the license is
for prevention in people ages 50
and older with normal immune
systems. But there are studies underway, and over the next year we
expect to be looking at results
that have the potential to be helpful for this population.
The only absolute reason why
you should not get [Shingrix], if
you’re 50 and older, is if you have
a history of allergic or severe reactions to any component of the
vaccine.
Q: Why should someone who
has already gotten Zostavax get
revaccinated with Shingrix?
A: Zostavax provides a moderate level of protection. That protection declines over time, and by
five years, that protection is only
about 35 percent.
Q: Should people who have received Zostavax and also had
shingles get Shingrix?
A: Yes. The clinical trials did
not include people who had already had shingles. But there was
a small study of 96 people over
age 50 who had a previously documented episode of shingles.
They got a strong response [with
Shingrix]. They did not find any
adverse events.
Q: What about side effects or
problems with Shingrix?
A: The clinical trials did not
find any evidence of increased
risk for serious adverse events,
such as death, hospitalization or
disability. However, about 80 percent of individuals had some type
of vaccine reaction, compared to
30 percent of people who got a
placebo. Most symptoms were
mild or moderate. Most common
was a sore arm and pain after injection. About half the people also
developed more general side effects, such as muscle ache, fatigue
and headaches that resolved in
two to three days. It’s important
to understand that these side effects are expected and resolve
fairly quickly, and they should not
discourage anyone from getting
the second dose.
About 15 percent of people who
got the vaccine had a reaction
that interfered with their normal
daily activities. Those resolved
within two to three days.
Q: What information is there
about the effectiveness of just one
dose of Shingrix?
A: Almost nothing [is known
about that].
Q: Will it be hard to persuade
patients to return for a second
dose? What’s the recommended
interval between doses?
A: Education is going to be key
so we can manage expectations.
We don’t want people feeling like
they have to go to the emergency
room for reactions that are normal and expected. The recommendation for the second dose is
anywhere from two to six months.
Q: Will insurance cover Shingrix if you’ve already gotten
Zostavax?
A: Our expectation is that it
will be covered.
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
Are you suffering from heavy
menstrual periods or other
symptoms associated with
uterine fibroids?
Inova Fairfax Hospital is doing
a study for women who want
treatment for their symptoms
but who do not want a
hysterectomy.
You may qualify if you are 18
years of age or older and have
symptomatic uterine fibroids.
To find out more about the
study and to see if you qualify,
please contact
Inova Fairfax
Department of OB GYN
Research at
703-776-4600
1-800-753-POST
SF
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