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The Washington Post 2017-10-13

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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Cloudy 69/64 • Tomorrow: Rain 79/67 B8
M2 V1 V2 V3 V4
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
Another bitter end for the Nationals
. $2
Trump to end
ACA subsidies
MOVE COULD IMPLODE MARKETPLACES
An earlier order undercuts key Obamacare rules
BY A MY G OLDSTEIN
AND J ULIET E ILPERIN
President Trump is throwing a
bomb into the insurance marketplaces created under the Affordable Care Act, choosing to end
critical payments to health insurers that help millions of lowerincome Americans afford coverage. The decision coincides with
an executive order on Thursday
to allow alternative health plans
that skirt the law’s requirements.
The White House confirmed
late Thursday that it would halt
federal payments for cost-sharing
reductions, although a statement
did not specify when. Another
statement a short time later by
top officials at the Health and
Human Services Department
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
CUBS 9, NATIONALS 8: Catcher Willson Contreras begins the celebration for the visitors at Nationals Park as Bryce Harper strikes out to
end the game — and Washington’s season — in a wild marathon of a game. The Nats have lost in the National League Division Series four
times in the past six years. Chicago will face the Los Angeles Dodgers in the NLCS. More coverage online at washingtonpost.com/sports
Misery has plenty of company — again — for D.C. sports fans as the Nats fall
BY
B ARRY S VRLUGA
This Thursday evening started
in the mist and ended in a mess,
and the educated Washington fan
could have told you that when he
or she woke up. The Washington
Nationals played a game to extend their season. They lost that
game. Their season is over. Those
with strong stomachs, read further. The rest: See you in spring.
By the standards of a normal
town, the fashion in which all this
happened at Nationals Park was
bizarre — funhouse mirror weird,
baseball as a Dali painting. Here,
in strait-laced Washington, it fits
into the athletic fabric perfectly.
The pattern, by now, is well-established. Washington might be
able to muster optimism on a
morning such as Thursday. It
might, over lunch, convince itself
of this advantage or that.
But get through the gate at the
ballpark, and dread is so readily
available. The concessionaires
slip it between the hot dog and
the bun, mix it into the carbonated beverages, slide it into the
programs. By now, babies here
are born with it, ingrained.
The final score at Nationals
Park, in the fifth and decisive
game of this National League
Division Series: Chicago Cubs 9,
Nats 8. The Cubs, champions a
year ago, fly to Los Angeles to face
the Dodgers for the right to reach
the World Series. The Nationals
failed to win a playoff series —
again — the fourth time in the
past six years they have reached
this stage and taken a crowbar
across the knees.
So on this night, everything we
have learned about Washington
sports over the past generation
was reinforced, with arguments
about whether the anguish
caused by the Nationals now
outdoes that caused by football’s
Redskins, basketball’s Wizards or
hockey’s Capitals. Discuss among
yourselves. We’ve got all winter.
But in breaking down this
particular evening — when the
Nationals once held a three-run
lead — consider the simplicity of
NATIONALS CONTINUED ON A6
More Nationals coverage starts
on D1.
said the cutoff would be immediate. The subsidies total about
$7 billion this year.
Trump has threatened for
months to stop the payments,
which go to insurers that are
required by the law to help eligible consumers afford their deductibles and other out-of-pocket
expenses. But he held off while
other administration officials
warned him such a move would
cause an implosion of the ACA
marketplaces that could be
blamed on Republicans, according to two individuals briefed on
ORDER CONTINUED ON A4
More time for ‘dreamers’
Trump would extend the deadline to
end DACA protections if Congress
fails to act, a senator says. A2
President threatens to
halt aid for Puerto Rico
Residents, officials are
outraged as U.S. territory
remains in crisis
BY P HILIP R UCKER,
A RELIS R . H ERNÁNDEZ
AND M ANUEL R OIG- F RANZIA
President Trump served notice
Thursday that he may withdraw
federal relief workers from Puerto Rico and blamed the island for
its failing infrastructure, effectively threatening to abandon the
U.S. territory amid a staggering
humanitarian crisis in the aftermath of twin hurricanes.
Under withering criticism
from Puerto Ricans for his administration’s flawed response to
the devastation there, Trump
sought to hold the territory responsible for its own plight because of chronic mismanagement
— prompting an immediate backlash from Puerto Ricans and
mainland lawmakers in both parties.
More than a month after Hurricane Irma swept ashore and
three weeks after Hurricane
Maria delivered a crushing blow,
much of Puerto Rico remains
without power, and many of its
TRUMP CONTINUED ON A2
A call to tighten asylum system
Attorney General Jeff Sessions cites
“rampant abuse and fraud” in an
appeal to Congress to act. A3
Family freed in Pakistan Exhausted crews battle a ‘once-in-a-career fire’
after 5 years in captivity
BY
Rescue raises hopes
for a warming between
Washington, Islamabad
BY S HAIQ H USSAIN
AND G REG J AFFE
islamabad, pakistan — The
rescue of an American woman,
her Canadian husband and their
three children who were held by a
faction of Taliban-linked militants for more than five years has
raised hopes of a possible warming in the long-fraught relationship between the United States
and Pakistan.
For American Caitlan Coleman
and her husband, Joshua Boyle,
the release marks the end of a
wrenching saga during which
Coleman gave birth to two boys
and a girl and pleaded for their
santa rosa, calif. — The fire
had already come down one side
of the hill and been beaten back.
Now, it was backtracking across
the gully, low tongues of flame
threatening a house with gray
shutters at the end of the cul-desac.
Firefighters watched the smoke
and assessed wind patterns, raking dead leaves and branches
away from the blaze in hopes of
stanching its charge once again.
The men, members of a fire
company from the nearby town of
Windsor, estimated that they had
been awake for more than
70 hours and hadn’t eaten for the
first 16.
Like many of the other 21 wildfires ravaging Northern California, the Tubbs fire has burned
release in videos posted by their
captors on the Internet.
“They have been essentially living in a hole the last five years, and
that’s the kind of people we are
dealing with,” White House Chief
of Staff John F. Kelly told reporters.
The Pakistani military said that
the couple and their three
children were found “through
an intelligence-based operation”
Wednesday in coordination with
U.S. agencies tracking the hostages along the border of Pakistan
and Afghanistan.
The Pakistani government offered scant details of the rescue
effort that freed the family, and
there were conflicting reports
Thursday about whether the captives were secured as a result of a
handover or a shootout.
President Trump in a statement
praised the operation as a hopeful
sign that Pakistan “is honoring
FAMILY CONTINUED ON A7
WILDFIRES CONTINUED ON A10
STUART PALLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
An engine crew from Montecito in Santa Barbara County hoses down a firing operation in Sonoma.
IN THE NEWS
THE NATION
SUHAIB SALEM/REUTERS
Palestinian pact Rival factions Hamas and
Fatah agree to a unity plan after 10 years of
divided leadership in the Middle East. A12
Targeting blindness An FDA panel endorses
an experimental gene therapy for patients
with a rare type of hereditary loss of sight. A14
A LISSA G REENBERG
The White House took
steps to impose “numeric performance standards” on immigration
judges, who said the
move will threaten judicial independence. A3
A report showed evidence that Florida’s
schools are resegregating, a trend seen across
the country. A4
Passengers who were
asked to show identification before deplaning
from a domestic flight
are suing the government. A4
The State Department
announced that the
United States will with-
draw from UNESCO
over the cultural agency’s perceived antiIsrael bias. A7
THE WORLD
Venezuelans are preparing to vote in a key
election that could offer
clues on President Nicolás Maduro’s willingness
to share power. A11
A bomb that recently
killed an American soldier in Iraq was of a particularly lethal design
not seen in years. A12
THE ECONOMY
Facebook took down
data and thousands of
posts, obscuring the
reach of Russian disin-
formation. A13
Designer Donna Karan
came under fire after
she asked whether sexual harassment victims
were “asking for it.” A14
Waymo submitted a
43-page safety report to
the U.S. Transportation
Department, the most
detailed description yet
of its driverless cars’
testing. A15
THE REGION
Two lawsuits were
filed against the organizers of the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville that led to a
woman’s death. B1
Staff and patients at a
D.C. medical facility for
homeless military veterans have endured nox-
ious gas exposure for
nearly two years. B1
Amid disputes, Rep.
Gerald E. Connolly of
Virginia and Maryland
Gov. Larry Hogan
pressed Jack Evans to
resign as Metro board
chairman. B1
An old canal house
was eased 50 feet to a
prominent new status
on the Mall. B1
The booming D.C.
economy is leaving longtime black residents behind, a study found. B2
Members of Congress
from Virginia said
chronic late payments
from the Department of
Veterans Affairs to doctors are jeopardizing
care for veterans. B4
190,000 acres scorched
The death toll in California reaches
31 and is likely to rise as authorities
explore the wreckage. A10
Inside
WEEKEND
Margheritaville!
The $20 Diner ranks the
region’s hottest versions
of the classic pizza.
ST YLE
Light and darkness
Did sci-fi author Philip K.
Dick anticipate Kanye
West’s unraveling? C1
BUSINESS NEWS........................A13
COMICS........................................C4
OPINION PAGES..........................A17
LOTTERIES ................................... B3
OBITUARIES ................................. B6
TELEVISION..................................C3
WORLD NEWS.............................A11
CONTENT © 2017
The Washington Post / Year 140, No. 312
DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
4 5 5 7
A2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
Trump’s tweets raise ire in Puerto Rico
TRUMP FROM A1
3.4 million residents still are
struggling to find clean water,
hospitals are short on medicine,
commerce is slow, and basic services are unavailable.
In a trio of Thursday morning
tweets, Trump declared, “Electric
and all infrastructure [in Puerto
Rico] was disaster before hurricanes.” He said it would be up to
Congress how much federal money to appropriate for recovery
efforts there — and, in an extraordinary statement by an American
president, warned that relief
workers would not stay “forever.”
“We cannot keep FEMA, the
Military & the First Responders,
who have been amazing (under
the most difficult circumstances)
in P.R. forever!” Trump tweeted.
And he quoted Sharyl Attkisson, a television journalist with
Sinclair Broadcasting Group, as
saying, “Puerto Rico survived the
Hurricanes, now a financial crisis
looms largely of their own making.”
Critics contrasted Trump’s
comments about Puerto Rico and
its leaders — during a visit there
last week, he complained that the
recovery had “thrown our budget
a little out of whack” — with the
empathy he showed after storms
ravaged Texas, Louisiana and
Florida.
On the island, residents and
elected officials responded to
Trump’s Thursday tweets with
outrage and disbelief. Radio disc
jockeys gasped as they read aloud
the presidential statements,
while political leaders charged
that he lacked empathy and
pleaded for help from fellow U.S.
citizens on the mainland.
“The U.S. citizens in Puerto
Rico are requesting the support
that any of our fellow citizens
would receive across our Nation,”
Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló, who has publicly praised
Trump’s handling of the crisis,
tweeted in apparent response to
the president.
Carmen Yulín Cruz, the mayor
of Puerto Rico’s capital, San Juan,
who has been feuding publicly
with Trump, strongly condemned
the president’s tweets. In a tweet
of her own, she derided him as a
“Hater in Chief.” And she said in a
statement that he “is simply incapable of understanding the contributions, the sacrifices and the
commitment to democratic values that Puerto Ricans have
shown over decades.”
Trump has been roundly criticized for his seeming reluctance
to come to Puerto Rico’s aid.
During last week’s visit to San
Juan, the president tossed rolls of
paper towels at residents as if
shooting baskets. He also noted
that the death toll was lower than
the “real catastrophe” of 2005’s
Hurricane Katrina.
To many Puerto Ricans,
Trump’s Thursday comments
stung and helped underscore
their feeling that the president
does not view them as deserving
the same level of assistance as
mainland U.S. citizens.
“We are the same kind of
citizens as those in Texas and
New York,” Joan Figueroa, a 44year-old homemaker, said as she
waited for several servings of rice
to take to bedridden elderly
neighbors in her apartment complex on the edge of San Juan.
“He wouldn’t say what he’s said
if the disaster was there,”
Figueroa said. “We depend on the
federal government because our
government can’t handle it. But
we will rise up with or without
Trump.”
On a bus headed for the crowded and sweltering San Juan airport, Isabel Cruz and Ramon
Nieves — a married couple who
lived much of their adult lives in
New Jersey but retired in Puerto
Rico, the island of their births —
sat in a middle row rattling off
several of Trump’s tweets almost
word for word in voices that
dripped with disdain.
“He doesn’t think of us as
Americans,” said Nieves, 71.
“It’s not just that,” Cruz, 78,
said. “He’s racist.”
H A P P ENI NG TO D A Y
For the latest updates all day, visit washingtonpost.com.
All day
President Trump is among the scheduled speakers on
the first day of the Values Voter Summit, a gathering of
socially conservative activists in Washington. Visit
washingtonpost.com/politics for details.
8:30 a.m.
Retail sales are expected to have risen by 1.8 percent in
September. For details, visit washingtonpost.com/
business.
8 p.m.
The American League Championship Series begins
with the New York Yankees visiting the Houston Astros for
Game 1 of the best-of-seven series. Go to postsports.com
to follow the action.
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CO R R ECTI O N S
The Carrot Bread recipe in the
Oct. 11 Food section was
incorrectly credited to “The
Silver Palate Cookbook.” It was
adapted from “Entertaining” by
Martha Stewart (Clarkson Potter,
1982).
An Oct. 8 Business article about
a Denver landscaping business
that hires Mexican migrant
workers incorrectly said that
company founder and owner
Jesus “Chuy” Medrano crossed
the Rio Grande the first time he
entered the United States from
Mexico. It was on a subsequent
trip that he crossed the river.
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That last word, “racist,” she
said slowly and emphatically.
Then she repeated it for emphasis.
In Washington, Trump administration officials sought Thursday to reassure Puerto Ricans
that the U.S. government remained fully committed to the
territory’s long-term recovery, despite the president’s tweets.
Standing beside Trump at a
White House event in which she
was formally nominated to be
secretary of homeland security,
Kirstjen Nielsen addressed longterm hurricane recovery efforts.
“I also know that this rebuilding will take years, and I want to
echo what the president has said
many times: We will remain fully
engaged in the long recovery
effort ahead of us,” said Nielsen,
currently the deputy White
House chief of staff.
John F. Kelly, the White House
chief of staff, similarly told reporters that “our country will
stand with those American citizens in Puerto Rico until the job
is done.” Asked whether Trump
considers Puerto Ricans to be U.S.
citizens, Kelly said he did.
Kelly, who said he spoke with
Rosselló earlier in the day, said
Trump’s tweets were meant to
communicate his hope that Federal Emergency Management
Agency workers and the military
could withdraw and hand off
efforts to the Puerto Rican government “sooner rather than later.”
“They’re not going to be there
forever,” Kelly said. “The whole
point is to start to work yourself
out of a job, and then transition
to the rebuilding process.”
John Rabin, a top FEMA official involved in the response to
Hurricane Maria, said in an interview that “as Puerto Rico needs
assistance from the federal government, we’re there to provide
it.”
“Everybody that’s working in
FEMA, everybody that’s there in
Puerto Rico, is focused on helping Puerto Rico respond and
recover, and that’s what we’re
going to focus on,” said Rabin, the
acting regional administrator for
FEMA Region 2, which oversees
Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and New York and New
Jersey.
Federal recovery and rebuilding efforts from past storms —
such as Hurricane Katrina, which
devastated New Orleans and surrounding areas in 2005 — have
lasted months and in some cases
years.
But White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
said, “Successful recoveries do
not last forever; they should be as
swift as possible to help people
resume their normal lives.”
Trump’s threats to limit the
emergency-worker footprint in
Puerto Rico come as the House
voted Thursday by an overwhelming margin, 353 to 69, to
pass a $36.5 billion disaster aid
package that includes provisions
to avert a potential cash crisis in
Puerto Rico prompted by Maria.
The Senate is expected to take up
the measure next week.
Rosselló warned congressional
leaders over the weekend that the
U.S. territory is “on the brink of a
massive liquidity crisis that will
intensify in the immediate future.” The legislation that passed
the House allows up to $4.9 billion in direct loans to local governments in a bid to ease Puerto
Rico’s financial crunch. Without
congressional action, the territory may not be able to make its
payroll or pay vendors by the end
of the month.
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.) said that Puerto Rico
must eventually “stand on its own
two feet.” But, he said, “at the
moment there is a humanitarian
crisis that has to be attended to,
and this is an area where the
federal government has a responsibility, and we’re acting on it.”
Top Democrats assailed Trump
for his Thursday tweets on Puerto
Rico. House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) called
them “heartbreaking,” adding
that “we are all Americans, and
we owe them what they need.”
Senate
Minority
Leader
Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
tweeted: “There is still devastation, Americans are still dying.
FEMA needs to stay until the job
is done.”
Another New York Democrat,
Rep. Nydia M. Velázquez, who
was born in Puerto Rico, said in a
statement that the president’s
“most solemn duty is to protect
the safety and the security of the
American people. By suggesting
he might abdicate this responsibility for our fellow citizens in
Puerto Rico, Mr. Trump has
called into question his ability to
lead.”
On Thursday morning in San
Juan, Jose Vazquez was listening
to the radio when the programming was interrupted by a special
report. An exasperated announcer read Trump’s tweets about
emergency workers not being in
Puerto Rico “forever.”
The other disc jockeys gasped
in disbelief. Vazquez couldn’t believe it either, he said — and
paused.
Well, actually, he could.
“We don’t want them here
forever,” Vazquez, 35, said. “We
need them until Puerto Rico normalizes. If they can leave soon,
great. That would mean we are
closer to a full recovery.”
But Vazquez, who was waiting
outside the Puerto Rico coliseum
to pick up free meals to deliver to
elderly public housing residents,
said: “FEMA is not a gift. It’s
insurance we pay for.
“It’s their duty to respond,” he
said. “And we really need the
help.”
philip.rucker@washpost.com
arelis.hernandez@washpost.com
manuel.roig-franzia@washpost.com
Rucker reported from Washington,
and Hernández and Roig-Franzia
reported from San Juan, Puerto Rico.
Ed O’Keefe, Joel Achenbach and
Mike DeBonis in Washington
contributed to this report.
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
Trump may extend
deadline to end DACA
Senator says president
would step in if Congress
fails to act in time
BY
E LISE V IEBECK
tulsa — President Trump will
extend a March 5 deadline to
end protections for young undocumented immigrants if Congress fails to act by then, according to a Republican senator who
spoke directly with the president about the issue.
Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said Trump told him he was
willing to “give it some more
time” to allow lawmakers to find
a solution for “dreamers,” unauthorized immigrants brought to
this country as children, if Congress does not pass legislation
extending protections before
time is up.
“The president’s comment to
me was that, ‘We put a sixmonth deadline out there. Let’s
work it out. If we can’t get it
worked out in six months, we’ll
give it some more time, but
we’ve got to get this worked out
legislatively,’ ” Lankford said
outside a town hall here Thursday night.
Trump did not specify how
long an extension might last,
Lankford said.
“He wants a legislative solution,” the senator said. “His
focus was, ‘We’ve got to get a
legislative solution.’ ”
A Lankford spokesman, D.J.
Jordan, said Trump made the
comments during a phone call
with the senator last month.
The White House did not
immediately respond Thursday
to a request for comment.
The president hinted at this
possibility in a tweet Sept. 5, the
day he announced that his administration would end an
Obama-era program, known as
Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals, that allows these immigrants to stay in the country
without fear of deportation.
Trump and Attorney General
Jeff Sessions called the program
an unconstitutional use of executive authority in the face of the
threat of lawsuits from Texas
and other states.
“Congress now has 6 months
to legalize DACA,” Trump wrote
Sept. 5. “If they can’t, I will
revisit the issue!”
There
are
currently
690,000 young people with
DACA status, according to the
Department of Homeland Security.
Extending the program could
potentially restart those legal
threats and create an administrative headache at DHS, which
last week stopped accepting any
more renewal applications for
DACA recipients.
House Democrats are seeking
sufficient GOP support to force
a vote on legislation known as
the Dream Act that would provide permanent legal status to
roughly 1.6 million dreamers.
So far, all House Democrats
and one Republican have signed
a document that would call for
an up-or-down vote on the
measure — far short of the
majority of House lawmakers
needed to bring up the legislation for consideration.
That effort fell into potential
jeopardy after the Trump administration released a list of
hard-line immigration demands
late Sunday, including funding
for a border wall, a crackdown
on the influx of Central American minors and curbs on federal
grants to “sanctuary cities.”
Lankford, a conservative Republican, rose from the House to
the Senate in 2014 after winning
a special election to replace
retiring Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.).
On immigration, Lankford recently co-authored a conservative alternative to the Dream Act
that offers young undocumented immigrants a 15-year path to
citizenship.
“I think we’ll be actually voting on something like this in
January or February,” he said.
The Succeed Act bars dreamers from taking advantage of
existing laws that let legal immigrants petition authorities to
allow foreign relatives come to
the United States.
Sponsors of the bill have said
this provision is meant to ensure that the parents of dreamers covered by the bill do not
receive preferential treatment.
Lankford expressed sympathy for dreamers Thursday
night, noting there are roughly
7,500 in Oklahoma.
“We’ve got to figure out what
to do with these kids,” he told an
audience of about 200 people at
the town hall.
“These are kids that have
grown up here. I’m not interested in deporting them and kicking them out. But I’m also not
interested in them ending up in
a limbo status on this.”
Lankford confirmed Trump’s
comments to him after describing them to several 20-somethings who approached him to
talk about DACA after the
town hall.
“I was trying to set them at
ease and to say, ‘This is going to
get worked out. The president’s
even said to me, we’re going to
get this worked out and find a
solution to this legislatively,’ ”
he said.
Jordan Mazariegos, 24, a
dreamer who is studying at
accounting at Oklahoma State
University, was not fully reassured.
“I don’t know,” he said after
hearing the comments. “I’ll believe it when I see it.”
elise.viebeck@washpost.com
Ed O’Keefe, David Nakamura and
Philip Rucker contributed to this
report.
DIGEST
UTAH
OKLAHOMA
Federal board renames
‘Negro Bill’ Canyon
Man is sentenced
to death for beheading
After years of debate, a U.S.
government board has voted to
rename Utah’s Negro Bill Canyon,
overruling a recommendation by
Utah officials to keep the name.
The U.S. Board on Geographic
Names decided Thursday to
rename it Grandstaff Canyon to
get rid of an offensive name, the
Salt Lake Tribune reports. The
vote was 12 to 0, with one member
declining to vote.
The new name honors black
rancher and prospector William
Grandstaff, whose cattle grazed
there in the 1870s.
“His name was Grandstaff; it
was not Negro Bill,” said WendiStarr Brown, a member of the
federal board, who is Native
American. “I’m pretty sure that’s
not how he wanted to be
addressed in life.”
The Utah Committee on
Geographic Names had
recommended keeping the name,
citing a lack of consensus from
state minority groups.
The canyon is home to a
popular hiking spot in Moab, the
gateway to stunning, massive red
rock formations.
Spurred by complaints from
tourists, the Grand County
Council voted in January to
change the name after refusing to
do so in 2013 and 2015.
A year ago, the federal Bureau
of Land Management changed
signs to say “Grandstaff
Trailhead” instead of “Negro Bill”
trailhead.
A jury Thursday recommended
the death penalty for an
Oklahoma man convicted of
beheading a co-worker in 2014.
Jurors convicted Alton Nolen,
33, on Sept. 29 of killing Colleen
Hufford, 54, and trying to kill
another co-worker at a food
processing plant in Moore, a
suburb of Oklahoma City.
Jurors agreed on Oct. 2 that
Nolen should serve three life
sentences plus 130 years in prison
on assault and battery charges
stemming from his attack on the
co-worker who survived.
Jurors took less than three
hours Thursday to recommend
the death penalty on the firstdegree murder charge.
Investigators said Nolen had
just been suspended from his job
at the Vaughan Foods plant when
he walked inside the company’s
administrative office and
attacked his co-workers.
Nolen had repeatedly tried to
plead guilty and asked to be
executed, but Cleveland County
District Judge Lori Walkley
declined to accept his plea. One of
Nolen’s attorneys had questioned
whether his client was mentally
competent to enter a guilty plea.
— Associated Press
— Associated Press
FLORIDA
First case of Zika virus
reported in couple
Florida health officials on
Thursday reported the state’s first
case this year of the Zika virus
transmitted by a local mosquito.
The state’s Department of
Health said a Manatee County
couple traveled to Cuba, and one
of them contracted Zika while on
the Caribbean island and was
bitten by a mosquito after
returning home. That mosquito
then bit and transmitted the virus
to the other partner.
Florida reported 296 locally
acquired Zika infections last year.
Zika causes relatively mild
symptoms in most adults but can
cause severe birth defects in
babies of some women infected
during pregnancy.
— Associated Press
ARKANSAS
Ex-death row inmate
released after 16 years
A former Arkansas death row
inmate is a free man after
spending more than 16 years in
prison for murder.
Rickey Dale Newman was
released from the Crawford
County jail, after a special
prosecutor dropped charges in a
2001 killing, the Arkansas
Democrat-Gazette reported.
Newman was convicted of firstdegree murder in the mutilation
slaying of Marie Cholette, 46, a
fellow transient, at a camp in Van
Buren.
Arkansas’ Supreme Court in
2014 overturned Newman’s
conviction, citing his intellectual
disability, and last month rejected
an attempt by prosecutors to use
the police interview in a new trial.
Special prosecutor Ron Fields
wrote to the court that, without the
confession, there was insufficient
evidence against Newman. A judge
granted Fields’s request to drop
the case Wednesday.
— Associated Press
OHIO
After alert, boy, 7, found
hidden and fatally shot
A 7-year-old boy was shot dead,
and his body apparently hidden
in a home where three adults
were found fatally shot and a
fourth was stabbed, a sheriff said
Thursday as a manhunt for the
suspect focused on a wooded area
near Ohio’s southern tip.
Authorities had issued a
missing-child alert after the
slayings and spent hours
searching for Devin Holston only
to find the child dead Thursday at
the same house trailer where the
bodies were found.
The suspect, Aaron Lawson, 23,
is being sought on warrants for
charges including aggravated
murder, Lawrence County Sheriff
Jeffery Lawless said.
Deputies spotted Lawson
Thursday in a blue truck in
Ironton, about 15 miles south of
where the victims were found, but
they lost him after a brief chase
when he crashed into a ditch and
ran into the woods, Lawless said.
Three adults were found dead
in a house trailer in an
unincorporated area farther
north on Wednesday evening,
and a fourth adult who came
upon the scene after work was
stabbed there and fled to seek
help, the sheriff said.
— Associated Press
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A3
RE
Justice Dept. proposes quotas for immigration judges
BY
M ARIA S ACCHETTI
The Trump administration is
taking steps to impose “numeric
performance standards” on federal immigration judges, drawing a
sharp rebuke from judges who say
production quotas or similar measures will threaten judicial independence, as well as their ability
to decide life-or-death deportation cases.
The White House says it aims to
reduce an “enormous” backlog of
600,000 cases, triple the number
in 2009, that cripples its ability to
deport immigrants as President
Trump mandated in January.
The National Association of Immigration Judges called the move
unprecedented and says it will be
the “death knell for judicial independence” in courts where immigrants such as political dissidents,
women fleeing violence and children plead their cases to stay in
the United States.
“That is a huge, huge, huge
encroachment on judicial independence,” said Dana Leigh
Marks, spokeswoman and former
president of the association and a
judge for more than 30 years. “It’s
trying to turn immigration judges
into assembly-line workers.”
The White House tucked its
proposal — a six-word statement
saying it wants to “establish performance metrics for immigration judges” — into a broader
package of immigration reforms it
rolled out Sunday night.
But other documents obtained
by The Washington Post show that
the Justice Department “intends
to implement numeric performance standards to evaluate Judge
performance.”
The Justice Department, which
runs the courts through the Executive Office for Immigration Review, declined to comment or otherwise provide details about the
numeric standards.
The Justice Department has expressed concern about the backlog and discouraged judges from
letting cases drag on too long,
though it has insisted that they
decide the cases fairly and follow
due process. On Thursday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions expressed concern that false asylum
cases are clogging up the courts.
The judges’ union says its current contract language prevents
the government from rating them
PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gustavo Torres, center, executive director of CASA de Maryland, speaks to immigrant rights supporters at the Capitol last month. The
White House says the imposition of judicial quotas aims to reduce a backlog of cases that cripples its ability to deport immigrants.
based on the number of cases they
complete or the time it takes to
decide them.
But now, they say, the department is trying to rescind that language, and advocates say it could
violate a federal regulation that
requires judges to “exercise their
independent judgment and discretion” when deciding cases.
Advocates and immigration
lawyers say imposing numerical
expectations on judges unfairly
faults them for the massive backlog. Successive administrations
have expanded immigration enforcement without giving the
courts enough money or judges to
decide cases in a timely way, they
say. An average case for a non-detained immigrant can drag on for
more than two years, though some
last much longer.
“Immigration judges should
have one goal and that goal should
be the fair adjudication of cases,”
said Heidi Altman, director of policy at the National Immigrant Justice Center, a nonprofit that provides legal services and advocacy
to
immigrants
nationwide.
“That’s the only metric that
should count.”
Immigration lawyers say the
proposed standards risk adding to
disadvantages immigrants already face in immigration courts.
Most defendants do not speak
English as their first language if at
all, are not entitled to lawyers at
the government’s expense, and
thousands end up trying to defend
themselves.
Often immigrants are jailed
and given hearings in remote locations, such as rural Georgia or
Upstate New York, which makes it
difficult to gather records and witnesses needed to bring a case.
“People’s lives are at risk in
immigration court cases, and to
force judges to complete cases under a rapid time frame is going to
undermine the ability of those
judges to make careful, well
thought-out decisions,” said Gregory Chen, director of government
relations for the American Immigration Lawyers Association,
which has 15,000 members.
Traditional federal judges are
not subject to quotas.
The rare public dispute be-
“That is a huge, huge,
huge encroachment on
judicial independence.
It’s trying to turn
immigration judges into
assembly-line workers.”
Dana Leigh Marks, spokeswoman and
former president of the National
Association of Immigration Judges
tween the immigration judges
and the Justice Department
comes as the Trump administration is demanding a commitment
to increased enforcement and other immigration restrictions in exchange for legal status for 690,000
young undocumented immigrants who, until recently, were
protected from deportation under
an Obama-era program. Sessions
announced the end of the program last month, and the young
immigrants will start to lose their
work permits and other protections in March.
In January, Trump issued a
slate of executive orders that
sought to crack down on immigration. He revoked President Barack
Obama’s limits on enforcement
and effectively exposed all 11 million undocumented immigrants
in the United States to arrest.
On Sunday, Trump also called
for more immigration-enforcement lawyers and more detention
beds, which would further increase the caseloads of the courts.
He is also planning to seek congressional funding for an additional 370 immigration judges,
which would more than double
the current number.
Immigration arrests are up
more than 40 percent since Trump
took office, and deportation orders are also rising. From Feb. 1 to
August 31, judges have issued
88,383 rulings, and in the majority
of cases — 69,160 — immigrants
were deported or ordered to voluntarily leave the country, a 36
percent increase over the corresponding period in 2016.
The immigration courts have
clamored for greater independence from the Justice Department
for years and also have sought
greater control over their budget.
They have long complained about
a lack of funding, burnout rates
that rival that of prison wardens,
and caseloads exceeding 2,000
each. Some judges are scheduling
cases into 2022.
On Sunday, Sessions — who
appoints the immigration judges
and is the court’s highest authority — called the White House’s
broad immigration proposals
“reasonable.”
“If followed, it will produce an
immigration system with integrity and one in which we can take
pride,” he said.
mara.sacchetti@washpost.com
Citing ‘rampant abuse and fraud,’
Sessions urges tighter asylum rules
BY
S ARI H ORWITZ
Attorney General Jeff Sessions
called on Congress on Thursday
to tighten the rules for people
seeking asylum through a system
he said is filled with “rampant
abuse and fraud.”
In a speech at the Justice
Department’s Executive Office
for Immigration Review, Sessions said the nation’s policies
allow too many asylum seekers
to exploit loopholes in a “broken” and extremely backlogged
process.
“The system is being gamed,”
Sessions said. “Over the years,
smart attorneys have exploited
loopholes in the law, court rulings and lack of resources to
substantially undermine the intent of Congress. . . . There is no
cost or risk for those who make a
baseless asylum claim.”
Tightening standards in the
U.S. asylum system was among
immigration principles and policies the Trump administration
recently said were needed to
protect public safety and jobs for
U.S.-born workers. The administration’s list, sent to Congress,
included funding a wall along
the U.S.-Mexico border, curbing
federal grants to “sanctuary cities” and cracking down on the
influx of Central American minors.
Civil liberties advocates said
Sessions’s comments were inaccurate and unfair to the thousands of people fleeing dangerous, life-threatening situations
in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Venezuela.
“Attorney General [Sessions’s]
remarks today were a mere continuation of the administration’s
efforts to falsely paint asylum
seekers and refugees as threats
and frauds,” said Eleanor Acer,
the senior director of refugee
protection at Human Rights
First. “These individuals are not
criminals and frauds; they are
mothers, teenagers, and children
desperate to escape violence and
persecution.”
Asylum is given to a person on
specific grounds because the person fears or has experienced
persecution on the basis of race,
religion, nationality, political
opinion or membership in a
particular social group. There
are two ways to be granted
asylum: One is “affirmative” asylum through the Department of
Homeland Security. An applicant has to file a claim within a
year of arriving in the United
States.
The second is a “defensive”
application for asylum because
the person has filed late, was
rejected by the DHS or was
apprehended without proper legal documents. The defensive
cases are handled by Justice
Department immigration courts.
Sessions said that many of the
asylum cases “lacked merit” and
are “simply a ruse to enter the
country illegally.”
“As this system becomes overloaded with fake claims, it cannot deal effectively with just
claims,” Sessions said. “The
surge in trials, hearings, appeals,
bond proceedings has been overwhelming.” He said that “credible-fear claims” at the border
increased from about 3,000 cases in 2009 to more than 69,000
cases in 2016. The Justice Department’s immigration review
office has more than 600,000
cases pending, triple the number
pending in 2009, according to
the department.
“We also have dirty immigration lawyers who are encouraging their otherwise unlawfully
present clients to make false
claims of asylum, providing
them with the magic words
needed to trigger the crediblefear process,” Sessions said.
Sessions’s remarks are the latest in a string of anti-immigration stances he has taken since
becoming attorney general. Sessions was the Trump administration official who announced
Sept. 5 the end of the protection
provided by the Obama administration for some 800,000 undocumented immigrants who were
brought to the United States as
children — they are often called
“dreamers” — to live and work in
the United States without fear of
deportation.
Sessions has also threatened
to withhold federal policing
grants to “sanctuary cities” that
do not cooperate with the federal
government in detaining for deportation people who are in the
country illegally. In speeches
across the country, Sessions has
blasted specific cities, such as
Chicago, and tied their crime
rates to their policies on undocumented immigrants.
Separately, the Justice Department on Thursday warned five
jurisdictions considered to have
“sanctuary” policies — Chicago,
New Orleans, New York, Philadelphia and Cook County, Ill.,
whose county seat is Chicago —
that officials had preliminarily
found them to be in violation of a
federal law governing communication with immigration authorities and that they could be at
risk of losing grant funding.
More than $8.3 million is at
stake, a Justice Department
spokesman said.
“Jurisdictions that adopt socalled ‘sanctuary policies’ also
adopt the view that the protection of criminal aliens is more
important than the protection of
law-abiding citizens and of the
rule of law,” Sessions said in a
statement.
Last month, the Trump administration arrested hundreds
of undocumented immigrants in
cities, including Washington,
New York, Baltimore and Los
Angeles, that are some of the
harshest opponents of President
Trump’s immigration policies.
Under Sessions, the Justice Department has defended various
iterations of Trump’s entry ban,
which in its current version
would suspend the issuance of
visas to some citizens of eight,
mostly majority-Muslim, countries.
In his speech Thursday, the
attorney general, who left the
U.S. Senate to lead the Justice
Department, called on his former colleagues in Congress to
revamp the asylum system by
imposing penalties for fraudulent applications, increasing the
use of expedited removals, raising the standard of proof in
“credible fear” interviews and
expanding the ability to send
asylum seekers to safe third
countries.
“What we cannot do — what
we must not do — is continue to
let our generosity be abused,”
Sessions said.
sari.horwitz@washpost.com
Maria Sacchetti and Matt Zapotosky
contributed to this report.
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
Evidence of schools Ex-CDC chief: Ban ‘ultra-high-dosage’ painkillers
in Fla. resegregating multifaceted
Article’s authors urge
approach
BY
M ORIAH B ALINGIT
In the years after the Supreme
Court’s landmark 1954 decision
in Brown v. Board of Education,
many Southern states revolted
against school desegregation orders. Not Florida. There, leaders
accepted the orders.
Florida witnessed more dramatic integration than other
states, in part because desegregation was allowed — and then
embraced — by LeRoy Collins,
who was Florida’s governor in
the late 1950s. The state’s school
systems are also organized by
county — encompassing cities
and their whiter, more affluent
suburbs — making it easier to
create demographically balanced schools.
But there is growing evidence
that the schools in the nation’s
third-most-populous state are
resegregating, according to a
report released last month by
the University of California at
Los Angeles’s Civil Rights Project.
The trend in Florida mirrors
what is happening in the rest of
the nation. A Government Accountability Office report published last year found that the
nation’s schools are resegregating, with the share of schools
that are majority black and Latino growing.
“What’s happening is very
threatening to educational equity in the United States,” said
Gary Orfield, a scholar with the
Civil Rights Project. Orfield and
researcher Jongyeon Ee coauthored the report for the
LeRoy Collins Institute at Florida State University.
The report, called “Patterns of
Resegregation
in
Florida’s
Schools,” concludes that schools
have grown more segregated
since the 1990s, when the Supreme Court empowered federal
district judges to undo desegregation and busing orders in their
communities. The orders have
been lifted in some of Florida’s
largest school districts, including Miami-Dade, Broward, Hillsborough and Palm Beach counties.
This, combined with an influx
of Hispanic students in some
communities, has led to schools
that are racially and economically isolated. The research
found that the percentage of
schools that were “intensely segregated” — meaning more than
90 percent of students were
nonwhite — doubled between
1994 and 2014. The percentage of
schools where more than
99 percent of students were
nonwhite also grew, from
2.1 percent of schools to 3.7 percent.
There is also growing economic
segregation.
Nearly
90 percent of students who attend schools that are more than
99 percent black or Hispanic are
from low-income families. The
typical black or Hispanic student in Florida attends a school
where more than 60 percent of
the other students are from lowincome families. The typical
white or Asian student attends a
school where fewer than half of
the other students are poor.
“This is not just a numerical
gap, but a gap in school resources, education quality, academic
achievement, and the environment around the school,” the
authors wrote in the report.
“We have a system that very
clearly puts privileged kids in
stronger schools and confines
students of color to high-poverty
schools,” Orfield said.
Orfield said the trend cannot
be explained by demographic
changes alone, though the share
of Hispanic students in the state
doubled between 1994 and 2014.
According to the report, this
influx was concentrated in certain schools and communities.
The result: declining academic performance in segregated schools, which tend to have
more poverty and less-experienced teachers and miss out on a
variety of resources available to
whiter, more affluent schools. A
2015 Tampa Bay Times investigation found that after the Pinellas
County School Board ended desegregation, some schools grew
overwhelmingly poor and black.
Teacher turnover increased and
test scores plummeted, making
the schools some of the worst in
the state.
Orfield said there are ways to
reverse the trend — including
creating regional magnet programs that draw from a diverse
set of neighborhoods and communities and providing transportation funding for students
who want to attend schools outside their communities.
“Desegregation can’t deal
with all the problems . . . but it
can deal with some of them,”
Orfield said, “and nothing has
been done.”
moriah.balingit@washpost.com
to tackling opioid crisis
BY
L ENNY B ERNSTEIN
The Food and Drug Administration should consider banning
“ultra-high-dosage” painkillers
from the market and law enforcement must step up efforts
to curb the flow of heroin and
fentanyl into the United States if
the nation hopes to come to
grips with the opioid epidemic,
two authorities on the crisis said
Thursday.
Andrew Kolodny, co-director
of opioid policy research at the
Heller School for Social Policy
and Management at Brandeis
University, and Thomas R. Frieden, former director of the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, said a comprehensive approach to the crisis also
should include greatly restricting or eliminating the marketing of opioids for chronic pain;
better insurance coverage and
access to alternative pain treatments; and expansion of treatment and “harm reduction”
measures such as needle exchange programs.
“There are no simple solu-
2013 PHOTO BY TOBY TALBOT/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ex-CDC director Thomas R. Frieden said the 80-milligram version
of oxycodone, above in 10-milligram form, poses serious risks.
tions to ending this epidemic,”
Kolodny and Frieden wrote in
an opinion article released
Thursday in JAMA, the journal
of the American Medical Association. “Effective programs need
to address two separate priorities: prevention of addiction
among people not currently addicted, and treatment and risk
reduction to prevent overdose
and death among the millions of
individuals in the United States
now addicted.”
About 33,000 people died of
overdoses to prescription narcotics, heroin or fentanyl in
2015, a total thought to have
increased sharply in 2016, although final data is not available. About 92 million people
were prescribed an opioid analgesic — such as oxycodone or
hydrocodone — in 2015.
Many of the recommendations from Kolodny and Frieden
the decision.
Health insurers and state regulators have been in a state of high
anxiety over the prospect of the
marketplaces cratering because
of such White House action. The
fifth year’s open-enrollment season for consumers to buy coverage through ACA exchanges will
start in less than three weeks, and
insurers have said that stopping
the cost-sharing payments would
be the single greatest step the
Trump administration could take
to damage the marketplaces —
and the law.
Ending the payments is
grounds for any insurer to back
out of its federal contract to sell
health plans for 2018. Some
states’ regulators directed ACA
insurers to add a surcharge in
case the payments were not
made, but insurers elsewhere
could be left in a position in
which they still must give consumers the discounts but will not
be reimbursed.
A spokeswoman for America’s
Health Insurance Plans, an industry trade group that has been
warning for months of adverse
effects if the payments ended,
immediately denounced the president’s decision. “Millions of
Americans rely on these benefits to afford their coverage and
care,” Kristine Grow said.
And California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (D), who has
been trying to preserve the payments through litigation, said the
president’s action “would be sabotage.” Becerra said late Thursday
that he was prepared to fight the
White House. “We’ve taken the
Trump Administration to court
before and won, and we’re ready
to do it again if necessary,” he said
in a statement.
Trump’s move comes even as
bipartisan negotiations continue
on one Senate committee over
ways to prop up the ACA marketplaces. Both Sens. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Patty Murray
(D-Wash.) have publicly said the
payments should not end immediately, though they differ over
how long these subsidies should
be guaranteed.
The cost-sharing reductions —
or CSRs, as they are known —
have long been the subject of a
political and legal seesaw. Congressional Republicans argued
that the sprawling 2010 healthcare law that established them
does not include specific language providing appropriations
to cover the government’s cost.
House Republicans sued HHS
over the payments during President Barack Obama’s second
term. A federal court agreed that
they were illegal, and the case has
been pending before the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the D.C.
Circuit.
“The bailout of insurance companies through these unlawful
payments is yet another example
of how the previous administration abused taxpayer dollars and
skirted the law to prop up a
broken system,” a statement from
the White House said. “Congress
needs to repeal and replace the
disastrous Obamacare law and
provide real relief to the American people.”
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan
(R-Wis.) said in a statement that
the administration was dropping
its appeal of the lawsuit — something the White House did not
mention in its announcement.
Ryan called the move to end to
the court case “a monumental
affirmation of Congress’s authority and the separation of powers.”
Meanwhile, the top two congressional Democrats, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
(Calif.) and Senate Minority
Leader Charles E. Schumer (N.Y.),
excoriated the president’s decision. “It is a spiteful act of vast,
pointless sabotage leveled at
working families and the middle
class in every corner of America,”
they said in a joint statement.
“Make no mistake about it,
Trump will try to blame the Affordable Care Act, but this will
fall on his back and he will pay the
price for it.”
For months, administration officials have debated privately
about what to do. The president
has consistently pushed to stop
the payments, according to officials and advisers who spoke on
the condition of anonymity to
leonard.bernstein@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/to-your-health
Passengers sue over post-flight order to show ID
Group says blanket search
was unconstitutional
BY
M ATT Z APOTOSKY
Nine passengers on a domestic
flight for which immigration authorities made everyone show
identification before they could
deplane are suing the government, alleging they were subjected to an unconstitutional search,
an attorney for the group said.
The passengers, represented
by the American Civil Liberties
Union, asked a federal judge
Thursday to bar the government
from requiring people to produce ID before deboarding a
domestic flight without a warrant or individualized reason to
do so.
ACLU Deputy Legal Director
Cecillia Wang said that even
though passengers are required
to show identification before be-
ing allowed into the area where
flights are boarded, those on
board the flight were “shocked”
to be asked to do so before they
could leave.
“There was no lawful justification for detaining every single
passenger on this domestic
flight,” she said.
A Justice Department spokeswoman and a Customs and Border Protection spokesman declined to comment. The Customs
and Border Protection spokesman said the lack of response
“should not be construed as
agreement or stipulation with
any of the allegations.”
The incident occurred in February on Delta Flight 1583 from
San Francisco to New York. Once
on the ground at John F. Kennedy International Airport,
Wang said, those on board were
greeted by Customs and Border
Protection agents, who stood in
the boarding bridge and demanded identification documents.
Those who questioned what
was happening were told it was
routine, Wang said.
Kelley Amadei, 40, was flying
back home to New York with her
wife and 7-year-old son. As the
plane was taxiing to the gate,
Amadei said, a member of the
flight crew announced that “nobody would be allowed to deplane until they showed government-issued identification.”
“That was alarming to me,
because that’s not something I
had heard before,” Amadei said.
At first, Amadei said she was
scared. “My initial instinct was,
‘Has something happened? Are
we in danger?’ ” But as she
watched two agents block people
from leaving, asking each of
them for their IDs, her fear
turned to outrage.
“It felt like a violation,” Amadei said.
Authorities had been searching for an immigrant who had
received a deportation order to
leave the United States. The
Trump order could undermine ACA’s insurance marketplaces
ORDER FROM A1
reflect expert consensus, including their push for expanded
treatment and wider availability
of the overdose antidote naloxone and for doctors to use more
caution prescribing opioids. But
other recommendations, such as
banning high-dose opioids and
improving the gathering of data
on the addiction crisis, have
been heard less often.
In an interview, Frieden said a
small number of people may
need an 80-milligram oxycodone pill for the pain of
cancer or end-of-life illness. But
that dose, taken twice a day, far
exceeds an amount “associated
with a greatly increased risk of
death,” he and Kolodny noted in
their article. An unwary user
who takes a single pill containing that much oxycodone to get
high risks a fatal overdose.
“These are dangerous drugs.
They kill people,” said Frieden, a
member of the journal's editorial board. “And we should use
them very sparingly and carefully.”
President Trump said in August that he would declare the
crisis a national emergency, but
his administration has not formally done so.
discuss private conversations.
Some top health officials within
the administration, including former HHS secretary Tom Price,
cautioned that this could exacerbate already escalating ACA plan
premiums, these Republicans
said. But some government lawyers argued that the payments
were not authorized under the
existing law, according to one
administration official, and
would be difficult to keep defending in court.
Acting HHS secretary Eric
Hargan and Seema Verma, administrator of the department’s
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said they were stopping the payments based on a
legal opinion by Attorney General
Jeff Sessions. “It has been clear
for many years that Obamacare is
bad policy. It is also bad law,” their
statement says. “The Obama Administration unfortunately went
ahead and made CSR payments
to insurance companies after requesting — but never ultimately
receiving — an appropriation
from Congress as required by
law.”
While the administration will
now argue that Congress should
appropriate the funds if it wants
them to continue, such a proposal
will face a serious hurdle on
Capitol Hill. In a recent interview,
Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.), who
chairs the House Appropriations
Subcommittee overseeing HHS,
said it would be difficult to muster support for such a move
among House conservatives.
One person familiar with the
president’s decision said HHS officials and Trump’s domestic policy advisers had urged him to
continue the payments at least
through the end of the year.
The cost-sharing payments are
separate from a different subsidy
that provides federal assistance
with premiums to more than
four-fifths of the 10 million Americans with ACA coverage.
Word of the president’s decision came just hours after he
signed the executive order intended to circumvent the ACA by
making it easier for individuals
and small businesses to buy alternative types of health insurance
with lower prices, fewer benefits
and weaker government protections.
The White House and allies
portrayed the president’s move as
wielding administrative powers
to accomplish what congressional Republicans have failed to
achieve: fostering more coverage
choices while tearing down the
law’s insurance marketplaces.
Until the White House’s announcement late Thursday, the
executive order represented
Trump’s biggest step to date to
reverse the health-care policies of
the Obama administration, a central promise since last year’s
presidential campaign.
Critics, who include state insurance commissioners, most of
the health-insurance industry
and mainstream policy specialists, predict that a proliferation of
these other kinds of coverage will
have damaging ripple effects,
driving up costs for consumers
with serious medical conditions
and prompting more insurers to
flee the law’s marketplaces. Part
of Trump’s action, they say, will
spark court challenges over its
legality.
The most far-reaching element
of the order instructs a trio of
Cabinet departments to rewrite
federal rules for “association
health plans” — a form of insurance in which small businesses of
a similar type band together
through an association to negotiate health benefits. These plans
have had to meet coverage requirements and consumer protections under the 2010 healthcare law, but the administration
is likely to exempt them from
those rules and let such plans be
sold from state to state without
insurance licenses in each one.
In addition, the order is designed to expand the availability
of short-term insurance policies,
which offer limited benefits as a
bridge for people between jobs or
young adults no longer eligible
for their parents’ health plans.
The Obama administration ruled
that short-term insurance may
not last for more than three
months; Trump wants to extend
that to nearly a year.
Trump’s action also is intended
to widen employers’ ability to use
pretax dollars in “health reimbursement arrangements” to
help workers pay for any medical
expenses, not just for health policies that meet ACA rules — another reversal of Obama policy.
In a late-morning signing ceremony in the White House’s
Roosevelt Room, surrounded by
supportive small-business owners, Cabinet members and a few
Republicans from Capitol Hill,
the president spoke in his characteristic superlatives about the effects of his action and what he
called “the Obamacare nightmare.”
Trump said that Thursday’s
move, which will trigger months
of regulatory work by federal
agencies, “is only the beginning.”
He promised “even more relief
and more freedom” from ACA
rules. And although leading GOP
lawmakers are eager to move on
from their unsuccessful attempts
this year to abolish central facets
of the 2010 law, Trump said that
“we are going to pressure Congress very strongly to finish the
repeal and replace of Obamacare.”
The executive order will fulfill
a quest by conservative Republican lawmakers, especially in the
House, who have tried for more
than two decades to expand the
availability of association health
plans by allowing them to be sold,
unregulated, across state lines.
On the other hand, Trump’s approach conflicts with what he and
GOP leaders in Congress have
held out as a main health-policy
goal — giving each state more
discretion over matters of insurance.
Health policy experts in think
tanks, academia and the healthcare industry pointed out that the
order’s language is fairly broad,
so the ensuing fine print in agencies’ rules will determine whether
the impact will be as sweeping or
quick as Trump boasted — his
directive will provide “millions of
people with Obamacare relief,” he
said.
Significant questions that remain include whether individuals will be able to join associations, a point that could raise
incident sparked significant controversy, as it came amid an
ongoing legal fight over President Trump’s first travel ban.
The Trump administration
has promised to crack down on
illegal immigration and has
sometimes employed controversial tactics, such as using courthouses to arrest people suspected of being in the country illegally.
An official with the Department of Homeland Security told
The Washington Post after the
incident that the steps Customs
and Border Protection agents
took were normal and did not
stem from a new policy or executive order.
“When we’re asked by our law
enforcement partners to assist in
searching for a person of interest, we are able to, and will, help,”
the official said.
The person whom agents had
been seeking was not on the
flight, authorities said.
matt.zapotosky@washpost.com
legal issues; whether the administration will start to let association health plans count toward
the ACA’s requirement that most
Americans carry insurance; and
whether such plans can charge
higher prices to small businesses
with sicker workers — or refuse to
insure them.
A senior administration official, speaking to reporters on the
condition of anonymity shortly
before Trump signed the order,
said that the policy changes it sets
in motion will require agencies to
follow customary procedures to
write new rules and solicit public
comment. That means new insurance options will not be available
in time for coverage beginning in
January, he said.
Among policy experts, critics
warned that young and healthy
people who use relatively little
insurance will gravitate to association health plans because of
their lower price tags. That would
concentrate older and sicker customers in ACA marketplaces with
spiking rates.
Selling health plans from state
to state without separate licenses
— the idea underlying much of
the president’s order — has long
been a Republican mantra. It has
gained little traction in practice,
however.
Half a dozen states — before
the ACA was passed in 2010 as
well as since then — have passed
laws permitting insurers to sell
health policies approved by other
states. And since last year, the
ACA has allowed “compacts” in
which groups of states can agree
that health plans licensed in any
of them could be sold in the
others. Under such compacts,
federal health officials must
make sure the plans offer at least
the same benefits and are as
affordable as those sold in the
ACA marketplaces.
As of this summer, “no state
was known to actually offer or sell
such policies,” according to a
report by the National Conference of State Legislatures. A main
reason, experts say, is insurers’
difficulty in arranging networks
of doctors and other providers of
care far from their home states.
amy.goldstein@washpost.com
juliet.eilperin@washpost.com
Abby Phillip contributed to this
report.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
Less big-league buzz at Trump hotels
AND
BY T IM B ONTEMPS
D AVID A . F AHRENTHOLD
Until recently, the Trump SoHo
hotel served as a kind of luxe
clubhouse for NBA teams visiting
New York.
At least 12 teams — more than
a third of the league — had stayed
there since it opened in 2010. The
players loved it so much they
became walking ads for the
Trump brand: Superstar Russell
Westbrook of the Oklahoma City
Thunder praised the hotel in the
press. Toronto Raptors all-star
Kyle Lowry gave interviews on
the lobby’s couch. Then-Thunder
forward Steve Novak tweeted
about the $20 room-service
lattes.
Now, it’s not the same.
All but one of the 12 teams said
they have stopped patronizing
the Trump SoHo since Donald
Trump launched his presidential
bid in 2015, according to team
officials. Among the latest to depart were the Raptors, Phoenix
Suns, Houston Rockets, Sacramento Kings and Washington
Wizards, who all dropped Trump
SoHo this summer and made
different arrangements for the
upcoming season.
Another NBA team quit staying at Trump’s hotel in downtown
Chicago. And at least three National Hockey League teams and
one Major League Baseball club
have stopped frequenting Trump
hotels in the same time, according to interviews with team officials.
Before Trump turned professional athletes into his political
targets in recent weeks — jousting on Twitter with the Golden
State Warriors’ Stephen Curry
and blasting football players for
kneeling during the national anthem — he had been privately
losing their teams’ business. The
trend has sapped his hotels of
revenue and big league buzz, a
survey of teams by The Washington Post found.
In all, The Post found that 17
teams from across the four major
sports had stayed at Trump properties in recent years. Now, at
least 16 are no longer customers.
“The president has seemingly
made a point of dividing us as
best he can,” Warriors coach Steve
Kerr told The Post in an interview
this week, explaining the shift.
His team quit using Trump SoHo
in 2016. “He continually offends
people, and so people don’t want
to stay at his hotel. It’s pretty
simple.”
The Post reached out to all 123
teams in the four major U.S.
sports leagues to find out how
many men’s teams are still Trump
customers. A total of 106 responded. Not a single team confirmed its players stay at Trump
properties.
Some of the teams that have
left Trump hotels cited reasons
outside politics. One, for instance, said it was difficult to get
team buses in and out of Lower
Manhattan.
The loss of pro sports clients at
Trump’s hotels is part of a larger
trend at his businesses, which
appear to be pulled in opposite
directions by his polarizing presidency.
At properties that offer proximity to the president — such as
his Washington hotel and the
Mar-a-Lago Club where he stays
in Florida — business seems to be
strong.
But the Trump Organization
has had customers bleed away
from other locations, particularly
those who eschew political controversy.
His golf clubs in California and
New York have lost charity tournaments. His courses in Scotland
just reported that their losses
doubled in 2016.
The Trump Organization did
not respond to requests for comment. A spokesman for the investment fund that owns Trump
SoHo referred questions to
Trump Organization officials.
In a statement, White House
press secretary Sarah Huckabee
Sanders dismissed the idea that
Trump’s attacks on sports teams
were connected to the loss of pro
athletes as customers.
“The president has repeatedly
said he doesn’t care about his
business, he cares about the
country,” Sanders wrote in an
email. “The president’s position
on athletes standing for the National Anthem is about respecting the flag and the men and
women of the military who sacrifice to defend it and nothing else.”
Trump has given up leadership
positions at his businesses. But he
still owns them through a trust
controlled by his eldest sons. That
means he still can take profits
from properties such as the
Trump International Hotel and
Tower in Chicago, which his company owns, and Trump SoHo,
from which he draws fees.
Trump’s
business
receives
5.75 percent of that hotel’s operating revenue, according to company documents posted online by
Reuters.
Before Trump ran for office,
The Post found, at least three of
the four major U.S. sports provided his properties with regular
business. The exception was football: The Post could not identify
any National Football League
teams that stayed at Trump hotels, although five NFL teams
declined to comment and seven
did not respond to repeated inquiries. NFL teams typically do
not stay at luxury hotels.
The majority of Trump’s pro
sports customers came from the
National Basketball Association.
And the bulk of those clients
stayed at Trump SoHo. The hotel
in Lower Manhattan is convenient to both Madison Square Garden, where the New York Knicks
play in midtown, and to Barclays
Center, the home of the Brooklyn
Nets.
For Trump’s business, those
visits meant money. Teams paid
about $20,000 per night for
rooms and food, according to one
team official’s estimate.
It also meant a connection to
the NBA brand and the luxury
cool that accompanies superstars
on the road.
“When I stay here in New York,
I’m at the Trump SoHo,” Russell
Westbrook told GQ in 2014, saying the hotel’s lobby had inspired
his fashion designs. “. . . Inside
the hotel they have, like, a bunch
of gold in the middle of the hotel,
and I see how colors go together.”
In April 2016, ESPN writer
Kevin Arnovitz said he had interviewed 40 NBA players and staffers to come up with a list of the
NBA’s favorite hotels. Trump
Soho was the top one in New
York, Arnovitz wrote.
The frequent presence of the
NBA players was noted by other
customers.
“Btw, the Trailblazers were
there when we checked in,” one
guest at the hotel posted in a
TripAdvisor review in April 2015,
“and the Indiana Pacers team
were there the day before we
checked-out.”
In 2016, a Trump SoHo ballroom was cited as the scene of a
season-changing moment for the
Cleveland Cavaliers. During a
film session there, coach Tyronn
Lue inspired slumping forward
Kevin Love with a profane pep
talk.
But NBA patronage of Trump
hotels began to change in June
2015, when Trump entered the
White House race as a hard-right
figure, stoking suspicions about
immigrants and resentment of
coastal elites.
Soon after, he began to lose
some customers from the league,
whose ranks of players are threequarters black and include many
who have been outspoken about
issues such as law enforcement’s
treatment of African Americans.
That summer, the Pacers
stopped staying at Trump SoHo.
A spokesman blamed problems
with bus access.
So did the Dallas Mavericks,
whose owner, Mark Cuban, became one of Trump’s loudest critics in 2016. Cuban declined to
comment about the team’s decision.
In 2016, after Trump had captured the GOP nomination, more
NBA teams left.
The Memphis Grizzlies quit
Trump SoHo. No connection to
politics, the coach said.
So did the Thunder. The team
would not comment on why.
The Milwaukee Bucks stopped
being Trump customers the following year — after first trying,
and failing, to pull out of a Trump
Chicago reservation during the
preseason, according to team officials. When the Bucks returned to
Chicago in the regular season,
they had a new hotel.
In that case, the reason for the
departure was Trump himself.
The Trump Organization was
seen as not reflecting the franchise’s values and some players
were not comfortable patronizing its properties, according to a
person familiar with the decision
who requested anonymity to describe internal discussions.
One of those players was Bucks
forward Jabari Parker.
“I’m proud to not stay in
Trump hotels,” Parker told the
Sporting News last November,
reflecting on the decision after
the election. “I don’t support
someone who endorses hate on
other people. He ran his campaign on hate. He’s attacked everything that I am and believe.”
Parker said he felt offended by
Trump’s attacks on immigrants
because his mother is from Tonga.
In some cases, pro teams continued to frequent Trump hotels
but individual players stayed
away. The Los Angeles Dodgers,
for instance, returned to Trump’s
Chicago hotel in May 2016 on a
road trip to play the Cubs. But
Adrian Gonzalez, a Mexican
American first baseman, chose to
stay elsewhere.
“You can draw your own conclusions” about why, Gonzalez
told the Los Angeles Times.
“They’re probably right.”
The team soon followed suit.
When the Dodgers returned to
Chicago for the playoffs that year,
they stayed at a new hotel.
“The decision to stay elsewhere
was not a political one,” Dodgers
spokesman Joe Jareck said.
Then Trump was elected.
Last winter, after the election,
something similar happened
with the Cavaliers. When the
team returned to Trump SoHo,
star LeBron James and several
other players did not join it there,
according to the Akron Beacon
Journal.
“Just my personal preference,”
James said, according to the
Cleveland Plain Dealer, when
asked why.
At the end of the season, the
Cavaliers also decided not to
come back to Trump SoHo, according to a team spokesman.
Trump SoHo also lost the Los
Angeles Lakers as customers. The
team had made plans to stay at
Trump SoHo last season but
pulled out before they arrived,
citing worries about anti-Trump
protests.
All three of the NHL teams that
The Post identified as Trump
clients have also stopped staying
in Trump hotels. The Tampa Bay
Lightning left in 2016. The Carolina Hurricanes and Washington
Capitals left this year.
It is possible that Trump still
has some pro sports teams as
clients.
For instance, the NBA’ s New
Orleans Pelicans, who have frequented Trump SoHo in the past,
declined to say whether they were
returning there this season, despite multiple inquiries.
Of the 106 teams from across
all four sports that The Post
reached, 18 declined to comment
and 72 said they had not stayed at
Trump properties in recent years.
Rick Westhead, a Canadian reporter, said he had verified that a
73rd team, the Toronto Blue Jays,
had not stayed at a Trump property recently.
Sixteen said they had stayed at
a Trump hotel in the past seven
years but had stopped since he
launched his White House run.
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
Does your team stay at Trump hotels?
NBA
NFL
RECENTLY
STOPPED
MLB
NHL
NO
COMMENT
NO
Atlanta Hawks
Milwaukee Bucks
New Orleans Pelicans
Brooklyn Nets
Cleveland Cavaliers
Detroit Lions
Los Angeles Clippers
Golden State Warriors
Green Bay Packers
Miami Heat
Indiana Pacers
New Orleans Saints
Orlando Magic
Memphis Grizzlies
New York Jets
Utah Jazz
Oklahoma City Thunder
Pittsburgh Steelers
Chicago Bulls
Toronto Raptors
Boston Celtics
Washington Wizards
Detroit Tigers
Charlotte Hornets
Phoenix Suns
Baltimore Orioles
Denver Nuggets
Houston Rockets
Houston Astros
Detroit Pistons
Dallas Mavericks
Philadelphia Flyers
New York Knicks
Los Angeles Lakers (recently
Toronto Maple Leafs
San Antonio Spurs
canceled)
Buffalo Sabres
Minnesota Timberwolves
Sacramento Kings
Detroit Red Wings
Portland Trail Blazers
Los Angeles Dodgers
Florida Panthers
Philadelphia 76ers
St. Louis Blues
Washington Capitals
Anaheim Ducks
Arizona Cardinals
Carolina Hurricanes
New Jersey Devils
Buffalo Bills
Tampa Bay Lightning
New York Rangers
Chicago Bears
Colorado Avalanche
Cincinnati Bengals
Cleveland Browns
Houston Texans
Indianapolis Colts
Jacksonville Jaguars
Los Angeles Chargers
NO
Miami Dolphins
RESPONSE
New England Patriots
NFL headquarters (chooses
Baltimore Ravens
playoffs hotels)
Dallas Cowboys
San Francisco 49ers
Minnesota Vikings
Tennessee Titans
Oakland Raiders
Los Angeles Rams
Philadelphia Eagles
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Seattle Seahawks
New York Giants
Atlanta Falcons
Denver Broncos
Arizona Diamondbacks
Washington Redskins
Chicago Cubs
Kansas City Chiefs
Tampa Bay Rays
Carolina Panthers
New York Yankees
Cleveland Indians
Cincinnati Reds
Calgary Flames
Kansas City Royals
Chicago Blackhawks
Los Angeles Angels
New York Islanders
Miami Marlins
Ottawa Senators
Minnesota Twins
Pittsburgh Penguins
New York Mets
Vegas Golden Knights
Philadelphia Phillies
Oakland Athletics
Pittsburgh Pirates
Texas Rangers
Boston Red Sox
St. Louis Cardinals
Chicago White Sox
Colorado Rockies
Milwaukee Brewers
San Diego Padres
Seattle Mariners
Washington Nationals
Atlanta Braves
San Francisco Giants
Toronto Blue Jays
Source: Staff reports
THE WASHINGTON POST
Arizona Coyotes
Boston Bruins
Columbus Blue Jackets
Dallas Stars
Edmonton Oilers
Los Angeles Kings
Minnesota Wild
Nashville Predators
Vancouver Canucks
Winnipeg Jets
San Jose Sharks
Montreal Canadiens
This year, the radio station
WNYC reported that corporate
event bookings were down at
Trump SoHo and staff layoffs
might be required. The hotel’s
sushi restaurant, Koi, closed earlier this year.
On a recent Saturday evening,
bars in the surrounding neighborhood were teeming with patrons. But the bar at the Trump
SoHo was empty. A bartender
predicted it would pick up.
Over the course of the next
hour, two women stuck their
heads in, looked around and left
without saying a word.
tim.bontemps@washpost.com
david.fahrenthold@washpost.com
Chelsea Janes, Candace Buckner
and Isabelle Khurshudyan in
Washington and Philip Bump in New
York contributed to this report.
Anxiety, amazement and ultimately anguish: Nats fall short for another season
NATIONALS FROM A1
this: The Nationals entered the
fifth inning with a 4-3 advantage
and handed the ball to Max
Scherzer, who might well win his
third Cy Young Award this year as
his league’s best pitcher. When
Scherzer left the mound at the
end of that frame, the Nats trailed
7-4.
Slice open that inning and
examine the parts, and the true
Washington nature of this loss is
revealed. Four straight Cubs
reached base in unconventional
ways, some known only to true
baseball seam heads — an intentional walk, a strikeout with a
passed ball (about which there
was some controversy), catcher’s
interference and a hit batsman.
The website baseball-reference.com has 2.73 million half-innings in its database. None of
them contain those four events —
let alone from four consecutive
hitters.
The things that happened
Thursday night, they haven’t happened in the history of baseball.
Yet they happened to the Nationals in what was to be their
biggest, best night. As an organization, the Nats faced a game that
could push them to territory they
have not traversed. They have
only played 13 seasons in the
nation’s capital, and part of their
franchise history is tied to Montreal, where they were born as the
Expos in 1969. They filled a gap
here, baseball’s 33-year absence,
and so for the first few years,
there was joy in their mere existence.
Since they became successful
by winning their first division
title in 2012, the Nationals had
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
Willson Contreras scored on a wild pitch from Nats starter Gio Gonzalez on a wild night in Game 5.
adopted the ways of Washington’s
other professional teams. Or
those ways had adopted them. It’s
hard to tell.
When Washington starting
pitcher Gio Gonzalez gave up a
double to the Cubs’ first batter of
the night, then threw a pitch to
the backstop to allow him to
advance to third, Nationals Park
grew quiet — and not oddly at all.
This is the tension that now
accompanies these events in this
town. Many of the players on the
field may not have been a part of
such events earlier, though Gonzalez himself was the starting
pitcher in a Game 5 five years ago.
But many of the fans, they were
here.
So the crowd of 43,849 carried
past pain with it, a 6-0 lead
against St. Louis in that fifth
game in 2012, five years ago to the
night. It’s nights like these when,
in Washington, little-known
names such as Pete Kozma, a
pesky, light-hitting infielder for
the Cardinals, become infamous.
Kozma’s crime against the District: a tiebreaking single in the
ninth inning, killing those Nats,
providing the foundation for a
past filled with pain.
“You can’t put that pressure on
you,” Nationals Manager Dusty
Baker said before the game. “You
try to simplify the pressure that,
‘Hey, we’ve got to win one game,
regardless of if you’ve never won
a series.”
The problem for some of those
people who hauled all that pain
to the park Thursday night is
that, around here, it’s not just the
Nats. Native Washingtonians in
their 40s and their 60s remember
a time — what a time — when
winning and their home town
weren’t adversaries. But the children here, they had known noth-
ing but abject disappointment.
So spit out all the stats again
because they inform the mood of
the crowd at any Washington
sporting gathering with the
stakes of Thursday. The Redskins
were once a model NFL franchise,
winners of three Super Bowl titles, the last of which came following the 1991 season. They
haven’t played for a conference
championship — a game from the
Super Bowl — since.
The Wizards (nee Bullets) won
the NBA championship in 1978,
reached the finals a year later,
and haven’t returned to the conference finals since. The 1997-98
Capitals made the Stanley Cup
finals in hockey and have three
times finished with the best regular season record in the NHL. Yet
four times in the career of Alex
Ovechkin, the best player in franchise history, the Capitals have
faced a do-or-die game in which a
victory would have pushed them
into the conference finals. They
lost each time.
The teams, they share that
link.
“Sometimes, the reputation of
the town in other sports — basketball, you hear about it,” Baker
said. “In hockey, you hear about
it. Just different things. So you
have to dispel those negative
thoughts on your mind and just
say, ‘Hey, it will be us.’ ”
But it hasn’t been, not for
years. So we go to these games,
and we write these sentences,
and we move the adjectives
around, and we consult the thesaurus. But really, it’s some version of the same story. The characters change, if only slightly. But
the feeling, walking back to the
Metro or the parking lot, is the
same.
The most stunning collapse
Thursday came with Scherzer on
the mound. A starting pitcher by
trade, he was in the bullpen for
Game 5 — even though he had
started Monday’s Game 3 in Chicago — because of the nature of
the event. He had told Baker he
could have pitched an inning
Wednesday, but the Nats didn’t
need him because Stephen Strasburg threw so brilliantly in a 5-0
victory. That he got the first two
outs and then allowed four runs
— it’s not conceivable.
What fits better in the Washington sports psyche: that the
Nationals played their sloppiest
game of the series, fell behind 8-4
— and yet still had a chance to
win it in the late innings.
In the eighth, center fielder
Michael A. Taylor — a hero in
Game 4, when he hit a grand slam
— drilled a two-out single up the
middle, scoring Daniel Murphy
with the run that made it 9-8.
Jose Lobaton, the light-hitting
backup catcher, followed with a
single to keep the rally alive.
And then, disaster. With leadoff man Trea Turner at the plate,
Cubs catcher Willson Contreras,
blessed with an ungodly arm,
threw to first in an attempt to
pick off Lobaton. The umpire
initially called him safe, but the
Cubs asked for a video review.
After consultation with officials
in New York, Lobaton was ruled
out.
So D.C., you thought. So
&$%#@! D.C. We might not have
known the particulars. But we
knew what was going to happen.
Dread is in the air here. Deep
breaths, everyone. Deep breaths.
barry.svrluga@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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U.S. to exit UNESCO, alleging bias against Israel
Departure from U.N.’s
cultural, scientific agency
to happen at end of 2018
BY E LI R OSENBERG
AND C AROL M ORELLO
TALIBAN SOCIAL MEDIA VIA REUTERS
Caitlan Coleman and Joshua Boyle appear with two of their three
children in an image from a video released last year by the Taliban.
U.S., Pakistan coordinate
to rescue captive family
FAMILY FROM A1
America’s wishes for it to do more
to provide security in the region.”
Only about a month ago, Trump
slammed the Pakistani government for accepting “billions and
billions of dollars” in American
aid while “housing the very terrorists we are fighting.” In the
immediate aftermath of the mission, the president suggested that
his tough words had prompted a
change in Pakistani behavior.
“They worked very hard on
this, and I believe they’re starting
to respect the United States
again,” Trump said in brief remarks. “It’s very important.”
But current and former U.S.
officials said it is unclear whether
the Pakistani action represents a
single event or a more substantive
change in policy. U.S. officials
have long complained that Pakistan’s inability or unwillingness to
eliminate extremist havens along
its border with Afghanistan has
badly hindered U.S. efforts to defeat the Taliban and end America’s
longest war.
The Pakistanis, meanwhile,
have accused the United States of
hypocrisy and were infuriated by
Trump’s harsh criticism of their
counterterrorism efforts. Last
week, Pakistan’s foreign minister
met with Secretary of State Rex
Tillerson and let loose with his
frustrations at a luncheon with
American reporters.
“Ask them what they have done
in Afghanistan. What have they
achieved?” Khawaja Muhammad
Asif, the foreign minister, said of
the Americans. “We are wholeheartedly, single-mindedly targeting these terrorists.”
Nadeem Kiani, a spokesman
for Pakistan’s embassy in Ottawa,
said that Boyle, Coleman and
their children were taken over the
border from Afghanistan to Pakistan in the tribal area of Kurram
on Wednesday by their abductors.
U.S. intelligence officials, who had
been tracking their movements,
provided information to Pakistan’s intelligence service, which
planned the operation that secured the family’s release.
“They are safe and they are
being repatriated to their country
of origin, Kiani said.
Even after the family’s release,
however, there was still drama
and confusion surrounding the
rescue and the family’s next steps.
Boyle’s parents spoke with their
son by phone and were hopeful
that he and his family would be on
a plane in a matter of hours.
“First time in five years we got
to hear his voice,” Boyle’s mother,
Linda, said in an interview with
the Toronto Star. “He told us how
much his children were looking
forward to meeting their grandparents.”
At the Coleman home in Stewartstown, Pa., a sign on the door
read, in part: “We know there is
much interest in the joyful news
that they’ve finally been released,
and are overwhelmed with gratitude and emotion. At this time, as
we focus on their wellbeing and
make plans for our family’s future,
we respectfully ask for some privacy.”
Reports later Thursday suggested that Boyle for unexplained
reasons had refused to let his family board an aircraft that would fly
them to the United States. His
father told the Star that previous
reports indicating that the family
was en route to the United States
“were definitely premature.”
Boyle was previously married
to the sister of Omar Khadr, once
the youngest detainee at the U.S.
military detention center at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Khadr
pleaded guilty to murder, among
other charges, at a military commission before being returned to
Canada in 2012 to serve out his
sentence. He was released in 2015.
Coleman and Boyle were abducted in October 2012 while traveling in Afghanistan and were
held in Pakistan by the Haqqani
network, a militant faction with
ties to the Taliban.
Coleman was pregnant when
she was captured, and the couple
has three children, all of whom
were born while their parents
were being held captive. The release came just after the fifth anniversary of the couple’s disap-
pearance while traveling in
Wardak province, a violent and
mountainous region near the Afghan capital, Kabul.
In a video released late last
year, the couple said they feared
that their family could be executed in retaliation for Western attacks and pressure on militants.
Coleman clutched at a headscarf.
Boyle had a long, untrimmed
beard.
“We have waited since 2012 for
somebody to understand our
problems, the Kafkaesque nightmare in which we find ourselves,”
Coleman said in the video. “. . . My
children have seen their mother
defiled.”
Boyle said in an earlier video:
“Our captors are terrified at the
thought of their own mortality
approaching and are saying that
they will take reprisals on our own
family. They will execute us, women and children included.”
In the immediate aftermath of
Wednesday’s apparent rescue by
Pakistani forces, there was, for the
first time in years, some cause for
optimism for improved relations
between Washington and Islamabad.
“This provides a template to
move this relationship forward,
even if incrementally, in a cleareyed, realistic and positive manner,” said Daniel Feldman, who
served as President Barack
Obama’s special representative
for Afghanistan and Pakistan.
“We must find other such discrete
areas of aligned interest.”
But questions remained Thursday about the operation. For example, it wasn’t clear whether the
captors holding Boyle and Coleman were part of the Haqqani
network, a Taliban faction that
has largely been protected by the
Pakistan government, or a splinter group that does not enjoy such
special status.
U.S. officials in recent months
had suspected that Boyle, Coleman and their children were being held inside Afghanistan,
though there was never enough
information to locate them in
“real time,” said a former U.S.
official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive intelligence.
The couple and their children
were being spirited across the
border into Pakistan when U.S.
officials appear to have learned
about their whereabouts and
passed on the intelligence to Pakistani officials, who moved quickly
to act.
“If both sides are highlighting
this as a demonstration of
U.S.-Pakistani cooperation, that
suggests that there may be a will
on both sides to work together,”
said Laurel Miller, also a special
representative for Afghanistan
and Pakistan until earlier this
year when the unit she led in the
State Department was closed.
The Trump administration’s
current strategy in Afghanistan is
built around using more air power and advisers to bolster the Afghan military and punish the Taliban. The end goal is to push the
Taliban and affiliated groups,
such as the Haqqani network, into
peace talks with the hope of reaching a negotiated settlement.
Pakistan’s cooperation has long
been considered critical to any
hope of a durable peace deal in
Afghanistan. The Obama administration had appeared to be making progress in talks with the Taliban, but those efforts came to an
abrupt halt after the U.S. military
killed Taliban leader Akhtar Mohammad Mansour in a drone
strike in May 2016.
Last week, Pakistan’s foreign
minister said that the death of
Mansour had created a “trust deficit” with the Taliban that would
make future negotiations difficult.
“Our influence over the years
[with the Taliban] has diminished,” Asif said.
Tillerson is expected to visit
Pakistan later this month.
greg.jaffe@washpost.com
Jaffe reported from Washington. Brian
Murphy, Andrew deGrandpre and
Philip Rucker in Washington, Roy
Furchgott in Stewartstown, Sayed
Salahuddin in Kabul and Alan
Freeman in Ottawa contributed to this
report.
The United States will withdraw from UNESCO at the end
of next year, the State Department said Thursday, to stop
accumulating unpaid dues and
make a stand on what it said is
anti-Israel bias at the U.N.’s
educational, science and cultural organization.
In notifying UNESCO of the
decision Thursday morning, the
State Department said it would
like to remain involved as a
nonmember observer state. That
will allow the United States to
engage in debates and activities,
although it will lose its right to
vote on issues.
The withdrawal follows longstanding concerns the United
States has had with UNESCO
and does not necessarily foreshadow a further retrenchment
of U.S. engagement with the
United Nations, where the
Trump administration has been
pushing to bring about structural and financial reforms.
“This is pragmatic, not a
grander political signal,” said
John W. McArthur, a fellow in
the Global Economy and Development program at the Brookings Institution and an adviser
to the United Nations Foundation.
The most immediate impact is
that the United States will halt
the arrears it has run up since it
stopped funding the organization in 2011 to protest UNESCO’s
admission of the Palestinian territories as a full member. By the
end of this year, the unpaid U.S.
bill will be $550 million. With no
sign that U.S. concerns will be
addressed, Secretary of State
Rex Tillerson decided to pull out
after Dec. 31, 2018, when the
unpaid balance will top
$600 million.
State Department officials
said they hope the withdrawal
will help push UNESCO to make
changes that would satisfy
Washington so the United States
can resume full membership.
“It sends a strong message
that we need to see fundamental
reform in the organization, and
it raises everyone’s awareness
about continued anti-Israel
bias,” said one official, speaking
on the condition of anonymity
under department ground rules.
The United States helped
found the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural
Organization after World War II
but has been at odds with it in
recent years. State Department
officials cited a 2012 decision
not to expel Syria from its human rights committee after the
civil war in that country began
and repeated resolutions that
refer to Israel as an occupying
power.
Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., said the last
straw was when UNESCO this
summer designated the Old City
of Hebron in the West Bank,
with its Tomb of the Patriarchs, a
Palestinian World Heritage site.
Calling UNESCO’s politicization a “chronic embarrassment,”
Haley added, “Just as we said in
1984 when President Reagan
withdrew from UNESCO, U.S.
taxpayers should no longer be
on the hook to pay for policies
that are hostile to our values and
make a mockery of justice and
common sense.”
Haley said the United States
will evaluate all U.N. agencies
“through the same lens.”
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called the decision to leave UNESCO “brave”
and “moral.” Other Israeli officials, from both the political left
and right, also praised the decision. Netanyahu said he had
instructed the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to prepare for Israel’s withdrawal, as well.
“UNESCO has become a theater of the absurd because, instead of preserving history, it
distorts it,” he said in a statement.
Irina
Bokova,
directorgeneral of UNESCO, expressed
“profound regret” over the decision.
“At the time when the fight
against violent extremism calls
for renewed investment in education, in dialogue among cultures to prevent hatred, it is
deeply regrettable that the United States should withdraw from
the United Nations agency leading these issues,” she said in a
statement, calling it a “loss for
multilateralism.”
The withdrawal marks another decision by the Trump
administration to distance itself
from the international community.
“The continued retrenchment
JACQUES DEMARTHON/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Flags fly at UNESCO’s Paris headquarters. “This is pragmatic, not a grander political signal,” John W.
McArthur, a fellow at the Brookings Institution, said of the Trump administration’s decision.
of the U.S. administration from
active participation in international diplomacy efforts and dialogue is deeply concerning to the
scientific community,” said Rush
Holt, head of the American Association for the Advancement of
Science.
UNESCO is perhaps best
known for the World Heritage
program, which helps maintain
major cultural sites around the
globe. But it runs a wide range of
international programs. It trains
Afghan police officers how to
read and write and is the only
U.N. agency that has a program
to teach the history of the Holocaust.
The withdrawal decision
comes as UNESCO members are
voting on a replacement for
Bokova. Qatar’s Hamad bin Abdulaziz al-Kawari is leading
France’s Audrey Azoulay and
Egyptian hopeful Moushira
Khattab in the first voting
rounds. Israeli officials and
American Jewish groups have
expressed
concerns
about
UP
TO
Kawari for what they have said is
a record of fostering antiSemitism.
UNESCO was established to
help promote global cooperation around the flow of ideas,
culture and information. The
agency’s mission includes programs to improve access to education, preserve cultural heritage, improve gender equality
and promote scientific advances
and freedom of expression.
After the 1984 withdrawal, for
what was described as proSoviet bias, the United States did
not rejoin UNESCO until 2002,
when the George W. Bush administration said it wanted to
emphasize a message of international cooperation. “America
will participate fully in its mission to advance human rights,
tolerance and learning,” Bush
said at the time.
Tensions have returned in recent years. Israel recalled its
ambassador to the Paris-based
organization last year after some
governments supported a reso-
60% OFF
lution that denounced Israel’s
policies on religious sites in East
Jerusalem and the West Bank.
Bokova said the partnership
between the United States and
UNESCO “has never been so
meaningful,” despite the withholding of U.S. funding.
“Together, we have worked to
protect humanity’s shared cultural heritage in the face of
terrorist attacks and to prevent
violent extremism through education and media literacy,” she
said.
She added: “The American
poet, diplomat and Librarian of
Congress, Archibald MacLeish,
penned the lines that open
UNESCO’s 1945 Constitution:
‘Since wars begin in the minds of
men, it is in the minds of men
that the defences of peace must
be constructed.’ This vision has
never been more relevant.”
eli.rosenberg@washpost.com
carol.morello@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/post-nation
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. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
31 dead in deadliest series of Calif. wildfires in 80 years
Authorities face scrutiny
on their methods of
warning and evacuation
C LEVE R . W OOTSON J R.,
B REENA K ERR
AND S ANDHYA S OMASHEKHAR
BY
santa rosa, calif. — The
death toll rose to 31 on Thursday
as California authorities began
assessing the damage from the
deadliest spate of wildfires to
strike the state in more than
80 years, even while the blazes
continued to flatten swaths of
land and drive people from their
homes.
California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection officials said some 190,000 acres
had scorched across the state by
Thursday afternoon as high
winds and dry conditions spread
the fires with frightening speed.
Sonoma County, north of San
Francisco, sustained the most
damage, with 17 people confirmed dead and 400 reported
missing; in the city of Santa
Rosa, officials reported nearly
3,000 homes destroyed.
Taken together, the blazes
have killed more people than the
last disastrous fire to strike the
state, the Oakland Hills fire in
1991.
The death toll also exceeds
that of the 1933 Griffith Park fire
in Los Angeles — and is likely to
rise as authorities continue to
explore the wreckage.
“We all have suffered a trauma
here, and we’re going to be a long
time in recovering from this
incident,” Santa Rosa Mayor
Chris Coursey told reporters
Thursday afternoon. “The city of
Santa Rosa has suffered a serious
blow in these fires.”
Even as emergency personnel
battled 22 blazes, authorities began facing questions about the
cause of the most damaging fire,
in Sonoma, and whether they did
enough to warn vulnerable residents as the flames edged nearer
to populated areas.
The scrutiny marks the next
phase of a disaster that erupted
seemingly out of nowhere Sunday night, prompting panic
among residents who had no
idea that a fire was bearing down
on them and emergency workers
who said they were stunned at
the speed with which the fire
progressed.
The National Weather Service
STUART PALLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A burned residence in the devastated Fountaingrove neighborhood of Santa Rosa at sunrise Thursday morning. Officials have reported
nearly 3,000 homes have been destroyed in Santa Rosa. For more images, see wapo.st/californiafires.
provided a morsel of good news
Thursday, reporting that the
gusts that fueled the blazes and
made them harder to fight had
died down and were projected to
stay light through Friday. The
respite was expected to be brief,
however, as high north winds
were expected to kick up again
over the weekend.
The news was otherwise grim.
Sonoma County Sheriff Robert
Giordano said deputies had begun the task of searching for the
missing and the dead, with bodies showing up in a variety of
conditions.
“We have recovered people
where their bodies are intact,” he
said, “and we have recovered
people where there’s just ash and
bone.”
Of 1,100 missing-person reports in the county, more than
745 had been found safe, he said.
The whereabouts of 400 were
still unknown, though it is possible that a number of them were
found but not reported to au-
thorities. Others may be out of
touch because of power outages
and downed cell towers.
Mike Mohler, Cal Fire battalion chief, said investigators are
looking into reports of downed
power lines Sunday night to
determine whether they caused
some of the wildfires.
The utility PG&E put out repeated warnings to its customers
on Sunday as heavy winds battered the region.
“High winds expected. Be alert
near fallen trees/branches. Report downed lines to 911,” PG&E
tweeted several times. “Always
assume that a fallen power line is
live.”
PG&E spokeswoman Fiona
Chan said in an email that the
company is focused on “life safety” and restoring service.
“We aren’t going to speculate
about any of the causes of the
fires,” she said. “We will support
the reviews by any relevant regulator or agency.”
State and county officials
faced increasing scrutiny Thursday over how they alerted residents to the fast-moving fires.
In Sonoma County, law enforcement officials said they
used a Reverse 911 system to call
residents’ landlines to evacuate.
The county also sent out alerts
through a voluntary text-message system. As of June, however,
just 10,500 of the county’s halfmillion residents had signed up
for the alerts.
A county official said it chose
not to send out a countywide
alert to cellphones out of fear the
message could incite panic and
clog roadways.
State emergency operations
officials said alerts were a local
responsibility and they would
not second-guess the decisions of
county leaders because each jurisdiction faced unique circumstances as the fires progressed.
In yet untouched parts of
Northern California, fear and
uncertainty rippled through
many communities wondering if
they would be struck next.
The resort area of Calistoga
was a ghost town Thursday after
authorities ordered everyone to
evacuate, warning that those
who stayed put could be subject
to arrest.
In Petaluma, about 20 miles
south of Santa Rosa, officials on
Thursday had not issued any
evacuation alerts. But nerves
frayed as a smoky haze filled the
air from not-so-distant fires,
leading some people to wear
masks or wrap their faces in
bandanas.
The town has become a haven
for many of the people who have
evacuated from other scorched
communities. In the historic
downtown, McNear’s Mystic
Theatre — a music hall that plays
host to folk musicians, metal
bands and Michael Jackson tribute shows — had been transformed into a makeshift evacuation center complete with a children’s play area and buffet.
“There’s a degree of risk for
everyone right now until the
fires are contained,” said Faith
Moody, the theater’s general
manager, who said her own
home in Santa Rosa was “so far”
still standing. “The truth is that
all it takes is for the winds to pick
up heavily. Things can change so
fast.”
Meanwhile, in the blackened
Coffey Park subdivision of Santa
Rosa on Thursday, people sifted
through the ashes of what used
to be their homes or stood
shocked to discover their houses
had somehow survived.
The fire hopped over Highway
101, taking out an Applebees, a
McDonald’s and an Arby’s. It left
a Taco Bell standing, then beelined for the community of
wood-framed homes about two
miles north of downtown. It has
approximately 200 homes, and
almost all of them are piles of
ash.
The fire burned so severely
that it incinerated garages and
melted the paint and tires off the
cars inside. The charred remnants of one house bled into
another, with only addresses
painted on curbs to distinguish
one plot from another.
Paul DiStanislao, who has
lived in the neighborhood for
27 years, stood on his driveway
on Thursday morning, marveling at the smoking ruin that was
once a neighbor’s home.
Like so many here, he fled the
neighborhood around 2 a.m.
Monday after awaking to find it
enveloped in an eerie red glow
and a shower of hot embers.
Desperate to know what became of his house, he had found
a way into his neighborhood,
which had been cordoned off by
the authorities. He was stunned
to discover that the fire had
stopped five houses short of his
home.
The flames had somehow
lodged someone’s garage door on
top of a streetlight. The charred
husk of a Harley-Davidson lay in
the middle of a street, one of an
endless stream of burned-out
vehicles.
But a few feet from the fire
line, at DiStanislao’s house, even
the grass was spared.
“Why am I here?” he asked
rhetorically. “Had it jumped the
highway a little bit farther, my
house would be gone.”
cleve.wootson@washpost.com
sandhya.somashekhar@washpost.com
Kristine Phillips, Abigail Hauslohner
and Aaron C. Davis contributed to
this report.
Fire crews are stretched to their limit in round-the-clock shifts in California
ing them makes their execution
more difficult.
“It’s not just put a line on the
ground and the fire is contained,”
Cox said referring to the tactic of
cutting down a line of vegetation
to limit the fire’s fuel. “You have
essentially a jigsaw puzzle of fire
and homes and infrastructure, all
mixed together, and then you add
in topographical features like
slope and hills and trees.”
WILDFIRES FROM A1
largely out of control for days,
stretching fire crews and challenging traditional efforts to tame
the flames. At least 31 people have
been killed in what is now the
deadliest wildfire incident in California since 1933, with the fires
collectively consuming an area
larger than Chicago. More than
20,000 people have been evacuated across the area.
On the ground, though, many
firefighters said they hadn’t seen
the news or heard the statistics.
Most had been on the clock since
the fires started on Sunday night,
sneaking away for swigs of Gatorade and 15-minute naps while
steeling themselves for a long
haul of fighting fires of enormous
size and scope complicated by
drought and development.
For them, the Tubbs fire is a
particularly personal one. Windsor
firefighter Mike Stornetta’s parents lost their house of 30 years, the
home where he grew up, as a
firestorm swept through the Santa
Rosa neighborhood of Fountaingrove on Sunday night.
“Our first assignment was two
blocks away,” he said during a
pause in patrol. “While we were
evacuating an elderly care facility
home, we could see down into the
glow of the neighborhood where I
knew my parents lived.”
They weren’t home, but his
grandmother was housesitting
and just barely escaped. His parents lost everything except the
clothes they were wearing.
Stornetta and his crew were
fighting back the flames at Woodley Place, a line of modest houses
surrounded on three sides by
wooded hills. The prevalence of
this kind of development — a
low-density combination of
homes and wild vegetation — has
increased in California in recent
years, said Jonathan Cox, battalion chief and spokesman for Cal
Fire. Called “Wildland-Urban Interface,” or “intermix” in firefighter parlance, these environments are among the factors that
have made the Tubbs fire in Sonoma and Atlas fire in Napa so
difficult to contain — along with
five years of brutal drought, powerful winds and resources
STUART PALLEY FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Crew members from the Plumas Hotshots observe fire behavior while waiting for air tanker drops off Moon Mountain Road near Sonoma
and Glen Ellen, Calif., on Thursday. Urban growth in these areas has made battling the blazes more complex for firefighters.
stretched thin from simultaneous fires around the state.
Although hard-hit Santa Rosa
neighborhoods such as Coffey
Park are more traditionally urban, intermix areas are part of an
upward trend throughout California.
“Areas that would 20 years ago
have nothing now are interface
environments,” Cox said. “Take
the sheer number of square acres
that are involved with intermix
and wildland-urban spaces, combine that with the frequency and
intensity of fires increasing — it’s
a recipe for disaster.”
‘A jigsaw puzzle of fire’
Firefighter Josh Perucchi
thought the house had probably
been one story tall, perched on a
bluff surrounded by forest, with
vaulted ceilings and a deck out
back overlooking the green hills
of Annadel State Park in the Oakmont neighborhood of Santa
Rosa. It was hard to tell now. Just
a couple of brick columns remained, plus a rubble of concrete,
tile, metal and the hulk of what
was once a washer-dryer. The
deck was gone; the hills across
the way were on fire. Just beyond
the house, scorched eucalyptus
trees blended into a tangle of
burned vegetation, a reminder
that the fire had recently been
through here.
Perucchi and two other men
from the Petaluma Fire Department were at the house on “mopping” duty, where firefighters revisit scenes of previous fires to
target still-smoldering hotspots
that might throw embers and
light new fires in windy weather.
The evening’s forecast called for
high winds, meaning the crew
found itself back at a house where
they had already fought a fire,
turning their hose on the bushes
that covered the still-warm
ground and on the house’s ruined
foundation.
As they went, they sifted
through the broken tile and brick
for anything they might be able to
salvage for the house’s owners.
Perucchi reached into detritus
with a puzzled look, holding up a
partially intact appliance.
“Pasta maker,” firefighter Dale
Keithley said.
“Is that what that is?” Perucchi
replied.
Keithley, the acting captain,
suggested that Perucchi put the
pasta maker to one side; perhaps
its owners would want to refurbish it. He had similarly spearheaded the mission to save the
burned but intact silver convertible that now sat in the driveway,
pushing it out of the garage and
away from the flames during the
fire that had taken the house
down.
Fires move quickly through
wildland, and in the case of intermix, their continuous source of
fuel is broken up only by houses,
making those structures especially difficult to defend and
those fires especially difficult to
stop.
And even though fire codes
require houses in intermix areas
to have fire-resistant roofs, noncombustible siding and 100 feet
of vegetation clearance around
their structures, that doesn’t
change the major challenge: Firefighting tactics for vegetation
and structure fires are fundamentally different, and combin-
A humbling fire
In early evening, Keithley’s men
from Petaluma joined a group of
other firetrucks to refuel, refill water tanks and await next assignments in a staging area on Highway 12, a pitted field of brown, dry
grass featuring a line of porta-potties and a few withered oak trees.
Trevor Hayes, of the Petaluma
company, napped between the
hoses at the back of his truck, his
hat over his eyes. Nearby, Engine
Capt. Greg McCollum of Santa
Rosa Fire changed his boots and
charged his phone in anticipation
of a full night’s work.
Even after 24 years, the sheer
size and power of the Tubbs fire
has humbled him.
“This is a once-in-a-career
fire,” McCollum said. “One of the
other guys said it’s a once-in-twocareers fire.”
He pulled back, circumspect.
“Well, I’m no historian, but I
know a damn big fire when I see
one.”
Like Cox, he also saw a connection between the growth of urban-rural interface development
and the fire’s scale.
“There was a fire that came
over the hill [from Calistoga,
Calif.] similar to the Tubbs fire
in 1967,” he said. “Now, the urban
interface is growing — people
moved out here to live in the
country. There’s a lot more exposure for structures, and Mother
Nature doesn’t care.”
The other Santa Rosa firefighters sat on a nearby stonewall
under a murky pink sunset,
checking their phones and chewing tobacco. A passing firetruck
honked its horn in greeting, and
the men waved back and settled
in to wait for the next call. They
knew it was coming soon.
national@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A11
RE
The World
Venezuelan dictatorship? Key election to o≠er clues.
Ahead of state contests set for Sunday, some anticipate a test of President Nicolás Maduro’s willingness to share power
BY R ACHELLE K RYGIER
AND A NTHONY F AIOLA
maiquetia, venezuela — Ven-
ezuelans vote Sunday in state
elections seen as a test of President Nicolás Maduro’s willingness to share power. But with
polls showing the ruling socialists
at risk of landslide losses, the
authoritarian government appears to be falling back on a
trifecta of tactics.
Manipulation, confusion and
fear.
Two and a half months after the
creation of a super-congress that
gave the government nearly absolute power, Maduro has called the
vote for state governors clear evidence that democracy remains
alive here. But opposition leaders
see a dirty campaign by the Venezuelan government, which President Trump has denounced as a
“socialist dictatorship.”
State media is airing almost
round-the-clock supportive coverage of pro-government candidates, while portraying their challengers as hypocritical and inept.
All candidates, meanwhile, are
being limited to four minutes of
political ads per day on independent networks that now survive by
self-censoring.
As often happened during the
reign of President Hugo Chávez —
who named Maduro his successor
before his death in 2013 — food
baskets are being doled out to
hungry voters at pro-government
rallies. In a move seen as purposely misleading, the ballots for Sunday’s election will include a host
of candidates who lost in the
primaries and are not supposed
to be running. This week, the
government abruptly announced
that it would relocate some voting
centers for “security reasons.” Opposition leaders said the move
involved 205 locations in heavily
anti-government districts in 16
states.
That, critics say, amounts to
manipulation and confusion.
And then there’s fear.
Here in Vargas, a coastal state
just north of Caracas, for instance, the brother of opposition
candidate José Manuel Olivares
was detained last week by intelligence police for allegedly stealing
a car — a charge his family denies.
While stumping for votes, the
candidate is often shadowed, he
said, by state agents.
On a recent afternoon in the
narrow streets of a seaside slum,
Olivares, an oncologist, was going
door to door, shaking hands and
kissing cheeks. As he walked up
to one concrete house, a woman
watched him nervously from her
window before scurrying out of
view.
When he knocked, she answered, begging photographers
following Olivares to lower their
cameras.
“You see?” he said, wiping
sweat off his brow after a short
talk with the woman. “She’s
scared. They think they’ll lose
whatever the government gives
them — even their jobs, if they’re
public workers.”
Winning candidates from the
opposition probably will find
their powers restrained. Maduro
has said that all governors will
come under the authority of
UAE cracks
down on
labor from
N. Korea
A SSOCIATED P RESS
MIGUEL GUTIERREZ/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY/EFE/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
the Constituent Assembly, the
government-controlled
supercongress created in a July vote
marred by allegations of massive
fraud. That body is likely to make
life tough for any governor who is
not in line with Maduro.
Yet the vote still is seen as a key
test. If turnout is high, polls suggest the opposition could capture
governorships in up to 19 of Venezuela’s 23 states. Analysts are
watching to see whether the government faces allegations of voterigging similar to those that
emerged during the July election.
Despite the polls, Maduro last
weekend said his party is “expecting a historic success.”
“There’s a chance we might win
all of the states, the 23 of them,” he
said.
Given their strategy of subordinating
governors
to
the
government-controlled assembly,
authorities might risk little by
allowing a clean vote — while
gaining much from the optics.
The government may be calculating that such an event could defuse international pressure and
appease its domestic opponents.
“I suspect the government
would use a defeat as a kind of
victory — to try to push back
against the evidence that it’s taking total power,” said Guillermo
Zubillaga, head of a working
group on Venezuela at the Americas Society/Council of the Americas, a business and educational
organization based in New York.
Still, the election is an important bellwether for the opposition, which has mostly failed to
sustain the large-scale street protests that rocked the nation earlier this year. The activists’ concern
now is that government tactics —
and a general sense of helplessness among voters — may depress
turnout Sunday.
In a text message to The
RICARDO MORAES/REUTERS
TOP: Military personnel with electoral materials participate
Monday in a ceremony in the Venezuelan capital. ABOVE: Tibisay
Lucena, the country’s top election official, speaks Monday behind a
piece of glass bearing a picture of the late leader Hugo Chávez.
Washington Post, Ernesto Villegas, Venezuela’s communications
minister, called the opposition
allegations “a deja vu.”
“In each election they appeal to
the same stories,” he said. “And
when they win some posts, they
rapidly forget about the fraud
that supposedly was about to be
committed.”
He added: “What’s substantial
is that in this unusual ‘dictatorship’ led by Maduro, there’s an
election in every state in the country. The opposition registered
candidates for every post. . . .
Those complaints are fig leaves to
cover the truth: participating in
elections. The opposition is denying its own argument. In Venezuela, there’s no dictatorship.”
Maduro is deeply unpopular,
in part due to a severe economic
crisis brought on by declining
oil prices and what many view
as government mismanagement.
Recent polls show the president’s
approval rating at 23 percent. But
opposition leaders also have lost
support because of infighting and
alleged disorganization. Some
critics have pilloried them for
even participating in the state
elections, arguing that the move
is validating the government and
playing into Maduro’s hands.
Opposition leaders respond
that by running, they are providing hope to Venezuelans, who are
enduring the world’s highest inflation rate as well as severe
shortages of food and medicine.
“If people understand that
with these elections they’re moving one step forward to overthrow Maduro, they’ll vote,” said
opposition candidate Olivares.
Vargas state has been a
pro-government bastion since
Chávez’s rise in 1999. It is home to
a massive number of public
employees because of its port
and airport, as well as onceprominent government-owned
companies.
But most of those state opera-
tions are now badly run-down or
broke. In addition, there has been
a sharp decline in tourists, who
once filled local hotels. A large
part of the population now struggles to survive off government
benefits.
Olivares sees a possible window here. Five years ago, when he
ran unsuccessfully for governor,
he was not even able to enter the
slums.
“People would chase us out
with rocks and insults,” Olivares
said. “What you’re seeing today
was unthinkable back then.”
He has built support in part by
taking a page from the government’s playbook — establishing
eight public kitchens funded by
private donations that each serve
daily lunches to 100 to 150 children.
As he campaigned in the
streets recently, desperation was
evident. People dragged Olivares
to ill family members and handed
him unfilled prescriptions. At one
point during his visit to a slum
here, residents took him to the
home of an elderly woman whose
foot was covered by a dark bruise.
“I have a venous ulcer, and I
can’t treat it, doctor,” she said,
adding that her medicine was
unavailable.
“We’ll get it for you, my love,”
he said.
Nearby, a government supporter — a retired policeman who
declined to give his name — insisted that the opposition was
wasting its time.
“Voting for Olivares is like spitting on the hand that feeds us,” he
said. “The government gave me a
house. There’s no way he’ll win
here. We’re with the government
until death.”
rachelle.krygier@washpost.com
anthony.faiola@washpost.com
Faiola reported from Miami.
dubai — The United Arab Emirates said Thursday that it would
stop issuing new visas to North
Korean workers, becoming the
latest Persian Gulf country to
limit Pyongyang’s ability to evade
sanctions and raise money
abroad amid tensions with the
United States.
A statement by the UAE Foreign Ministry did not address the
hundreds of North Korean laborers already working in the Emirates.
The statement said the UAE
would pull its nonresident ambassador to North Korea and stop
North Koreans from opening new
businesses in the UAE, a federation of seven sheikhdoms on the
Arabian Peninsula that is a
staunch U.S. ally.
The UAE “looks forward to a
unified global front against North
Korea’s nuclear weapons and
missile program,” the statement
read.
It was not clear what prompted
the decision, though U.S. officials
have been pressuring their allies
in the gulf region to trim their
economic ties to North Korea.
Last month, Kuwait announced that it would expel
North Korea’s ambassador and
four other diplomats, and would
limit visas. North Korea’s Embassy in Kuwait City is its only diplomatic outpost in the gulf region.
Qatar has said that “less than
1,000” North Koreans are in the
country and that their visas will
not be renewed. North Korean
laborers also are in Oman.
The United States and Asian
nations have increased pressure
on their allies to cut ties as Pyongyang has tested a nuclear weapon
and launched ballistic missiles
over Japan.
While the gulf region is a small
market compared with China and
Russia, the money North Korean
laborers there kick back to the
government helps Pyongyang
evade international sanctions,
authorities say. A 2015 U.N. report
suggested that the more than
50,000 North Koreans working
overseas earned Pyongyang
$1.2 billion to $2.3 billion a year.
Thousands of North Koreans
work across the gulf region. Kuwait said in August that 6,064
North Korean laborers worked
there. The UAE has as many as
1,500 North Korean workers, said
two officials with knowledge of
Pyongyang’s tactics.
North Koreans working in the
gulf region earn about $1,000 a
month, with about half being
kept by the North Korean government and $300 going to construction company managers, the officials said.
That leaves workers with $200.
But $200 a month can go a long
way in North Korea, where the
per-capita income is estimated at
$1,700 a year.
The officials said North Korean
workers took part in a recent
expansion of a UAE air base that
is home to some of the 5,000 U.S.
troops stationed in the country.
DIGEST
BURMA
Suu Kyi creates panel
to oversee aid efforts
Aung San Suu Kyi, Burma’s
embattled leader, called for
national unity Thursday and said
she has created a committee that
will oversee all international and
local assistance in violence-struck
Rakhine state.
More than 500,000 Rohingya
Muslims in Rakhine have fled to
neighboring Bangladesh since
Aug. 25, when security forces
responded to attacks by a militant
Rohingya group with a broad
crackdown on the longpersecuted Muslim minority.
Suu Kyi acknowledged in a
speech on state-run television that
Burma, also known as Myanmar,
is facing widespread criticism
over the refugee crisis. The Nobel
Peace Prize winner said her
government is holding talks with
Bangladesh on the return of
“those who are now in
Bangladesh.” She gave no details.
Burma’s Buddhist majority
regards Rohingya Muslims as
illegal migrants from Bangladesh,
although many families have lived
in Burma for generations. Suu Kyi
did not use the word “Rohingya”
with the national government.
On Wednesday, Prime Minister
Mariano Rajoy asked Puigdemont
to clarify whether he had actually
declared independence.
in her speech.
She said that she would head
the new committee and that it
would coordinate all efforts to
create a “peaceful and developed
Rakhine state.” Suu Kyi said her
government has invited U.N.
agencies, financial institutions
such as the World Bank and others
to help develop Rakhine.
— Associated Press
Floods, landslides kill 43 in
Vietnam: The death toll in floods
— Associated Press
SPAIN
National day celebrated
amid secession crisis
Thousands of Catalans who
want their region to remain in
Spain marked the country’s
national day Thursday, marching
through Barcelona waving
Spanish and Catalan flags and
shouting “I am Spanish,” as the
region’s threats of independence
have left the country in crisis.
Meanwhile, in the national
capital, Madrid, troops and police
paraded in front of King Felipe VI.
Thousands of people waving
Spanish flags lined the sidewalk of
Madrid’s Paseo de la Castellana
avenue to view the parade.
The pilot of a fighter jet taking
part in the parade died when the
plane crashed while landing at a
LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A migrant walks past beds set up in a former skating rink now
used as a pre-admission center for migrants in Cergy, outside Paris. At
the center, which has capacity for 200 people, migrants are advised on
whether and how they can stay in France. Although some migration
flows into Europe may have slowed in recent months, 50 new people
arrived at the facility Wednesday morning, a local official said.
base in Albacete, authorities said.
In Barcelona, Catalonia’s
capital, a crowd that police said
numbered 65,000 marched to a
central square, some with their
faces in the red and yellow colors
of both the Spanish and Catalan
flags, and shouting “Viva España,”
or “Long live Spain.”
The regional president of
Catalonia, Carles Puigdemont,
said Tuesday that he was
proceeding with a declaration of
independence but proposed
freezing its implementation for a
few weeks to allow for dialogue
and landslides in Vietnam caused
by a tropical depression has risen
to at least 43, with 34 missing,
officials said. The storm injured
21 people and destroyed or
damaged more than 1,000 houses,
submerged 16,740 other homes,
and damaged infrastructure and
crops in six central and northern
provinces, the Vietnam Disaster
Management Authority said.
Saw found in Denmark could be
tied to submarine case: Danish
police said that divers have
recovered a saw from the sea off
Copenhagen and that forensic
investigators are determining
whether it was used to dismember
the body of a Swedish journalist,
Kim Wall. Wall’s torso washed
ashore in Copenhagen on Aug. 21,
and her decapitated head, legs and
clothes were found at sea last
week. She was last seen on a
homemade submarine with
inventor Peter Madsen, who is
being held in custody.
3 Syrian rebel groups agree to
Damascus truce: Three Syrian
opposition factions have agreed to
cease-fire in southern Damascus
under an agreement brokered by
Egypt and Russia, officials said.
The deal does not specify the area,
but the groups control a pocket
south of Damascus that is near
areas held by the Islamic State.
The agreement would allow for
humanitarian access but would
not involve the relocation of
militants or residents. Egypt’s
state-run news agency said the
deal does not include the Syrian
government.
Top Indian court says sex with
minor wife is rape: India’s top
court has ruled that having sexual
intercourse with a wife younger
than 18 is rape, a decision that
activists say is an important step
toward ending child marriages.
Indian law says a woman must be
at least 18 to marry and consent to
sex, but there are exceptions, and a
man was permitted to have sex,
even forcibly, with a girl as young
as 15 as long as she was his wife.
Marriages of girls are especially
prevalent among India’s rural poor.
— From news services
A12
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
Especially powerful
bomb resurfaces in Iraq
Device known to breach
armored vehicles
killed a U.S. soldier
BY
K AREEM F AHIM
AND L IZ S LY
irbil, iraq — A roadside bomb
that killed an American soldier
in Iraq this month was of a
particularly lethal design not
seen in six years, and its reappearance on the battlefield suggests that U.S. troops could again
be facing a threat that bedeviled
them at the height of the insurgency here, U.S. military officials
said.
The device was of a variety
known as an explosively formed
penetrator, or EFP, according to
initial investigations, a weapon
notorious for its destructive and
deadly impact on armored vehicles and the service members
inside them, two U.S. military
officials said.
EFPs were among the most
lethal weapons faced by U.S.
forces before a troop withdrawal
in 2011. The devices were considered a hallmark of the Iranianbacked Shiite militias battling
the U.S. occupation after the
toppling of Saddam Hussein. But
the technology used to make
them proliferated, and cruder
versions were also deployed by
Sunni militants.
U.S. military officials were
quick to stress that they had not
determined who was responsible
for the attack. The Islamic State
militant group — the only threat
to U.S. and Iraqi troops over the
past three years — was not
known to have previously used
the weapons, the officials said,
though it may have acquired the
expertise to make them. The
officials talked about the investigation in response to questions
about the circumstances of the
bombing.
The Islamic State did not make
any public claim of responsibility
after the attack, on Oct. 1, which
killed Spec. Alexander W. Missildine and wounded another soldier, according to the U.S. military. At the time it was struck,
Missildine’s vehicle was traveling
south on a major road in Salahuddin province, north of Baghdad, according to Col. Charles D.
Constanza, a deputy commander
for the U.S.-led coalition in Iraq.
Col. Ryan Dillon, a U.S. military spokesman in Iraq, said
“investigations are continuing
into the type and quality of the
bomb to better determine where
it originated. To say whether ISIS
did it or not — we have not
determined that yet. We are not
ruling anything out,” he said.
The question of the type of
bomb used and its origin is
sensitive because it comes amid
an intensifying drive within the
Trump administration to counter
the expansion of Iranian influence in the region in recent years.
It also coincides with threats
from some of the Iranian-backed
Shiite militias who have fought
in uneasy alliance with the United States against the Islamic
State but are making it clear that
they want U.S. troops to leave
now that the militant group is
almost defeated.
The Asaib Ahl al-Haq group,
U.S.ARMY/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spec. Alexander W. Missildine
died Oct. 1 north of Baghdad.
which claimed responsibility for
carrying out many of the attacks
against U.S. troops in the years
before 2011, said in a statement
after the recapture of Mosul in
July that the “resistance factions
expect their return to the country
after the defeat of ISIS.”
“If they are going to stay in any
guise, the resistance factions will
deal with them as occupiers just
like they dealt with them before,”
the statement warned. Another
group, Kitaeb Hezbollah, issued
a similar warning last month.
But it was also possible that
the weapon was used by the
Islamic State or another armed
group “masquerading” in order
to implicate the Shiite militias,
said one U.S. official, who spoke
on the condition of anonymity
because of the sensitivity of the
subject.
Dubbed “superbombs” because of their extraordinary lethality, EFPs are precision-made
bombs with a copper or steel
plate that is propelled in the form
of a projectile whose high temperature and velocity can penetrate even the most heavily
armored vehicles.
The bombs showed up in Iraq
about a year after the U.S. invasion. U.S. officials at the time said
they were being supplied by Iran
with the help of the Lebanese
militant group Hezbollah. Workshops were subsequently discovered in Iraq, including in areas
where Sunni insurgents were
active, and as early as 2007, Iraq’s
al-Qaeda affiliate began using a
crude version of the bomb.
“The proliferation of knowledge of EFPs has been around for
some time. It’s out there,” Dillon
said.
The bombs have since been
used in Afghanistan, by the alQaeda affiliate al-Shabab in Somalia and by the al-Quds Brigades affiliate of the Palestinian
Islamic Jihad group, according to
Greg Robin, an expert in explosive devices for the Sahan Research Group, a security consultancy. He said the quality of the
workmanship can offer clues as
to the provenance of the weapons.
In addition to their sheer destructive power, the cunning design of the EFP has exacted a
psychological toll. Early versions
were set off by the heat of a
passing vehicle, allowing the
weapon to be deployed without
an operator or remote detonator.
Later versions were initiated
by the vehicles’ electronic signal
jammers — effectively using
technology designed to thwart
other IEDs as a trigger.
kareem.fahim@washpost.com
liz.sly@washpost.com
Dan Lamothe and Alex Horton in
Washington contributed to this
report.
KHALED DESOUKI/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Delegation heads Saleh al-Arouri, left, of Hamas and Azzam al-Ahmad of Fatah sign a reconciliation deal Thursday in Cairo. Details of the
deal were yet to be released, and major obstacles remained in the effort to unite the Palestinian groups after a 10-year leadership split.
Palestinian factions reach unity deal
BY
L OVEDAY M ORRIS
jerusalem — The Palestinian
militant group Hamas backed a
plan to begin reconciliation with
its rival, Fatah, on Thursday, after
more than a decade at loggerheads that left the Palestinian territories split between competing
leaderships.
Palestinian officials said the
deal stipulates that a unity government formed in 2014 and led
by Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas’s Fatah party will run the Gaza Strip until a
new administration is formed before the end of the year. But thorny
obstacles that have blocked past
unity bids — including the fate of
Hamas’s powerful armed wing —
have not yet been discussed.
Meanwhile, Israeli objections
also have the potential to derail
unity efforts. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Israel opposes any reconciliation
deal in which Hamas does not
disarm and “end its war to destroy
Israel.” He said reconciliation
makes “peace much harder to
achieve.”
Palestinians have long accused
Israel of obstructing reconciliation efforts to weaken and divide
them.
The split began when Hamas
won Palestinian elections in 2006,
leading to bloody gun battles on
the streets of Gaza when Fatah did
not cede power. Since then,
Hamas has run the Gaza Strip,
while Fatah has administered
parts of the Israeli-occupied West
Bank through the Palestinian Authority.
There have been several abortive attempts at unity over the past
10 years. But after the two sides
agreed to form a unity government three years ago, Hamas continued to run Gaza through a
shadow administration. This
time, though, some Palestinian officials say that the conditions are
more conducive to reconciliation.
Gaza is in the midst of a worsening humanitarian crisis that has
paralyzed daily life for its 2 million
inhabitants. Since Hamas took
control, Israel has imposed restrictive controls on trade and
movement, citing security concerns.
But the stranglehold worsened
this summer as the Palestinian
Authority asked Israel to reduce
the electricity supply to Gaza, demanding Hamas pay its share of
the cost and leaving Gaza inhabitants with just a few hours of power
a day. It also slashed the salaries it
pays to government employees.
Losing support locally, Hamas has
said it is ready to hand over administrative control. Meanwhile,
reconciliation is now increasingly
in the interest of influential regional players.
The deal set a February deadline for merging employees belonging to the Palestinian Authority in Gaza with those of Hamas’s
administration, Palestinian officials said, adding that the deal
paves the way for Abbas to visit
Gaza for the first time in a decade.
A committee will be formed to
merge thousands of Palestinian
Authority security personnel into
Hamas’s police force.
Control of the Palestinian side
of the Erez border crossing with
Israel will be handed to the Palestinian Authority, while the Palestinian side of the Rafah crossing
with Egypt will be ceded to Abbas’s presidential guard. The
opening of the Rafah crossing
would ease pressure on Palestinians in Gaza, only a tiny percentage of whom receive permission
from Israel to leave the enclave.
Egypt, meanwhile, has only sporadically opened its border in recent years.
“Egypt is putting all its weight
behind these efforts,” said Qais
Abdul Karim, a member of the
Palestinian Legislative Council
who belongs to neither faction.
Egypt is attempting to stamp
out an insurgency in its Sinai Peninsula by militants who have
pledged allegiance to the Islamic
State. It has accused Hamas of
aiding the militants, allowing
them to cross the border for medical treatment. Through the deal,
Egypt can pressure Hamas to safeguard Egyptian security in Sinai,
Abdul Karim said.
He added that Cairo also has
interests in drawing Hamas away
from the Muslim Brotherhood,
which has faced brutal crackdowns in Egypt since the ouster of
Egypt’s president, Brotherhood
leader Mohamed Morsi, in 2013.
The United Arab Emirates, Saudi
Arabia and Bahrain are working
in partnership with Egypt to
squeeze the Brotherhood and
curb the influence of their regional rivals Qatar and Turkey in Gaza,
Abdul Karim said.
Israel also has interests in easing the Gaza humanitarian crisis,
which it sees as a security threat.
Israel has fought three wars with
Hamas. Still, Abdul Karim said,
Israeli objections may cause the
deal to stall before any meaningful pact can be forged.
The “so-called reconciliation”
between Hamas and Fatah is “a
convenient cover for Hamas’s continued existence and activity as a
terror organization while relinquishing civilian responsibility
for the Gaza Strip,” Israeli Intelligence Minister Israel Katz said.
He said Abbas’s willingness to
partner with Hamas leaders was a
“cause for concern.”
The question of what to do
about Hamas’s armed wing of
more than 20,000 militants remains a major sticking point.
While Hamas may be willing to
cede administrative control of
Gaza it has given no indication
that it would be willing to give up
control of security.
Analysts say the United States
is also more interested in unity,
which it sees as a necessary step to
bring about peace talks between
Israelis and Palestinians. President Trump has pledged to bring
the two sides together in the “ultimate deal.”
Palestinian Prime Minister
Rami Hamdallah made a rare visit, surrounded by much fanfare, to
Gaza earlier this month after
Hamas asked the unity government to take control and dissolved
its governing administration.
The U.S. Middle East envoy, Jason Greenblatt, said the United
States was watching developments closely, but he said that any
Palestinian government must
“unambiguously and explicitly
commit to nonviolence, recognition of the state of Israel, acceptance of previous agreement and
obligations between the parties,
and peaceful negotiations.”
In Gaza, hope is dampened by
the memory of previous failed negotiation efforts. Restaurant owner Basil Eleina said last month
that the humanitarian situation is
the worst he has ever known.
He has been forced to pay
$8,000 a month for generator fuel
to keep his business open. It is an
achievement every month to keep
his 36 staff members employed,
Eleina said.
“Everybody is hoping, but we
have been disappointed so many
times that you don’t want to let
yourself have too much hope,” he
said.
loveday.morris@washpost.com
Heba Mahfouz in Cairo and Sufian
Taha in Jerusalem contributed to this
report.
Kenya bans protests, indicates election rerun will take place despite boycott
BY R AEL O MBUOR
AND P AUL S CHEMM
nairobi — Tensions rose in Ken-
ya on Thursday as the government
banned demonstrations and indicated that it would go ahead with
an election rerun that the opposition is convinced cannot be free
and fair under the current system.
The order sets authorities on a
collision course with supporters of
opposition leader Raila Odinga,
who earlier this week pulled out of
the Oct. 26 vote. Major demonstrations against the electoral commission, which the opposition
sees as favoring incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta, have been
called for Friday.
Last month, the Supreme Court
invalidated the results of an Aug. 8
presidential election Kenyatta
won, after allegations of widespread irregularities in vote counting. It ordered that new elections
be held within 60 days.
Odinga directed much of the
blame for the lapses at the Independent Electoral and Boundaries
Commission (IEBC) and called for
electoral reforms. But he said this
week that not enough has been
done to address the problems and
boycotted the new vote.
Odinga’s backers have held
weekly demonstrations against
the commission. Some of the pro-
tests have turned violent and damaged property. The decree bans
demonstrations in Kenya’s three
biggest cities: Mombasa, Kisumu
and Nairobi, the capital.
“We cannot go on this way. It is
unfortunate to see people’s cars
being smashed, property being destroyed in the guise of peaceful
demonstrations. We must respect
the law,” Interior Minister Fred
Matiangi said.
Odinga, who has waged four
previous unsuccessful campaigns
for president, accused the IEBC of
refusing to undertake any meaningful reforms and warned that
the revote was shaping up to be
even more flawed than the original election.
Rather than postpone the new
election or address his complaints,
the IEBC said Wednesday that the
vote would go forward and would
include six minor candidates.
Previously, the rerun was to
have involved only Kenyatta and
Odinga. With none of the other
candidates having garnered more
than 1 percent of the vote in August, the incumbent was expected
to notch an easy win in the new
election.
On Tuesday, Kenyatta’s Jubilee
Party, which holds a majority in
parliament, passed amendments
to the electoral law that appeared
designed to legalize many of the
YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Opposition supporters block streets and burn tires during a protest in Kisumu, Kenya, on Wednesday.
Opposition leader Raila Odinga pulled out of the Oct. 26 vote, and protests have been called for Friday.
voting irregularities that prompted the high court to toss out the
original election results.
One amendment says that if any
candidate were to pull out of an
election rerun involving two hopefuls, the remaining candidate
would automatically win. The
amendments await the approval
of the Senate and the president.
Solomon Owuoche, a professor
of political science at the University of Nairobi, warned that such
amendments are dangerous.
“Regardless of what we will witness in the next weeks or months,
these laws will one day come to
haunt us,” Owuoche said. “Changing laws is not the solution to the
crisis.”
He said the political turmoil is
undermining the very purpose of
elections, which is to create political legitimacy.
“The elections will be held, but
there will be one party who will
not agree with the results and
there is a possibility the elections
will be annulled again,” he added.
“Then the shenanigans will continue.”
On Wednesday, thousands of
Odinga supporters demonstrated
in front of IEBC offices in Nairobi,
Mombasa and Kisumu. They were
dispersed with tear gas, and injuries were reported.
Politics in Kenya often has
strong ethnic undertones, and the
2007 elections unleashed weeks of
violence in which at least 1,400
people died.
Kenyatta, who presents himself
as a pro-business candidate, is
from the dominant Kikuyu tribe.
Odinga, who is focusing on combating corruption and helping the
disenfranchised, is from the smaller Luo tribe.
The uncertainty and prolonged
election season have been hard on
Kenya’s economy, normally one of
the region’s most robust. The stock
market has been down, and the
Reuters news agency reported
that the government trimmed
2017 growth forecasts to 5.5 percent from 5.9 percent.
paul.schemm@washpost.com
Schemm reported from Addis Ababa,
Ethiopia.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A13
SU
Economy & Business
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Economist tasked with
selling Trump’s tax cut
New adviser aims to
convince workers they
will benefit most
BY
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook, walks to a meeting with members of the Congressional Black Caucus at the Capitol.
Facebook assailed for removing posts
Company says it fixed a ‘bug,’ but researchers say it’s hiding data on Russian disinformation campaign
BY C RAIG T IMBERG
AND E LIZABETH D WOSKIN
Social-media analyst Jonathan
Albright got a call from Facebook
the day after he published research last week showing that the
reach of the Russian disinformation campaign was almost certainly larger than the company had
disclosed. While the company had
said 10 million people read Russian-bought ads, Albright had
data suggesting that the audience
was at least double that — maybe
much more — if ordinary free
Facebook posts were measured as
well.
Albright welcomed the chat
with three company officials. But
he was not pleased to discover that
they had done more than talk
about their concerns regarding
his research. They also had
scrubbed from the Internet nearly
everything — thousands of Facebook posts and the related data —
that had made the work possible.
Never again would he or any
other researcher be able to run the
kind of analysis he had done just
days earlier.
“This is public-interest data,”
Albright said Wednesday, expressing frustration that such a rich
trove of information had disappeared — or at least moved somewhere the public can’t see it. “This
data allowed us to at least reconstruct some of the pieces of the
puzzle. Not everything, but it allowed us to make sense of some of
this thing.”
Facebook does not dispute it
removed the posts, but it says it
has corrected a “bug” that allowed
Albright, research director of the
Tow Center for Digital Journalism
at Columbia University, to access
information he never should have
been able to find in the first place.
That bug, Facebook says, has been
crushed on the social-media analytics tool CrowdTangle, which
Facebook bought last year.
“We identified and fixed a bug
in CrowdTangle that allowed users to see cached information
from inactive Facebook pages,”
company spokesman Andy Stone
said. “Across all our platforms we
have privacy commitments to
make inactive content that is no
longer available, inaccessible.”
Whatever the reason, researchers expressed frustration that crucial data and thousands of posts
are gone.
Last week, two other researchers who had been working with
the Facebook data, Joan Donovan
and Becca Lewis of the nonprofit
Data and Society Institute, also
noticed that it had disappeared.
“When platforms do not release
data for researchers to analyze,
they set themselves up for drawing their own conclusions based
on their own interests,” said Donovan. “The bits and pieces of data
we found in CrowdTangle are
alarming because of who the Facebook pages target — everyday people with sets of mutual concerns
about the future of our society.”
Albright’s research began when
he tried to determine how far the
Russian disinformation campaign
reached during the campaign. He
knew that Facebook had acknowledged that the company had shut
down 470 Russian-controlled pag-
es and accounts that had bought
more than 3,000 ads, and that
those ads had reached an estimated 10 million people. Facebook has
declined to say how many people
saw the free posts created by the
Russian accounts and pages.
That left open the question of
what else those 470 accounts and
pages had been doing. Six of them
— Blacktivists, United Muslims of
America, Being Patriotic, Heart of
Texas, Secured Borders and LGBT
United — had become publicly
known through news reports. So
Albright decided to use CrowdTangle to answer his question.
The results of his data download startled him. For those six
pages alone, Albright found
19.1 million “interactions,” a term
describing how often a Facebook
user does something concrete
with a post, such as sharing it,
commenting on it, hitting the
“like” button or posting an emoji.
Albright also found that, according to CrowdTangle, this
same content had been “shared”
340 million times. That meant
that the disinformation could
have potentially reached the feeds
of users that many times, but it
didn’t reveal how many users had
read or seen it.
But given that Albright was
working with just six pages out of
470, it was clear to him that the
Russian campaign reached far beyond the 10 million people Facebook had acknowledged saw the
ads alone.
Finally, for each of the six pages,
Albright downloaded 500 posts —
the most available through
CrowdTangle — and published
them online in a visual format Oct.
5. That work soon became the
basis for a Washington Post article
on Albright’s discoveries and a
later story in the New York Times.
Albright also talked about his research on CBS and Fox.
But even as the discussion over
Albright’s research began heating
up, he discovered that the 3,000
Facebook posts were gone, as was
the data on CrowdTangle.
“There was nothing,” he said. “It
was wiped.”
The deletion of the posts and
the related data struck Albright as
a major loss for understanding the
Russian campaign. He still has the
data and the posts for the six pages
he examined, but as others become public, there will be no way
for independent researchers to
conduct a similar examination of
any of the other 470 pages and
accounts — or any others linked to
Russia that may emerge over subsequent weeks or months.
The discomfort is shared even
by a critic of Albright’s work,
George Washington University
professor David Karpf, who has
argued that the CrowdTangle data
is a weak proxy for the most important questions about how
many American voters saw the
content and how it affected their
political choices.
Yet even so, Karpf was unhappy
to learn of Facebook’s removal of
the posts. “Any time you lose data,”
he said, “I don’t like it, especially
when you lose data and you’re
right in the middle of public scrutiny.”
craig.timberg@washpost.com
elizabeth.dwoskin@washpost.com
D AMIAN P ALETTA
President Trump has tasked
his top economist with winning
one of the most important arguments in politics right now: convincing voters and lawmakers
that it is workers who would be
the big winners in the president’s
plan to cut the corporate tax rate.
Whether
Kevin
Hassett,
Trump’s newly minted chairman
of the Council of Economic Advisers, can successfully make that
sales pitch will go a long way
toward determining whether
Trump’s massive tax cut plan
ends in success or failure.
Just a month into his new job,
Hassett has rushed into the debate over the economic impact of
tax cuts with assertions borne of
decades of research in tax policy.
He says the White House’s tax cut
plan would grow the economy
and wages much more than other
economists suggest, and he is
ready to push back on what he
thinks are erroneous forecasts.
“My job is to provide objective
analysis to the president — and
really to the public — about
important economic policy issues,” Hassett said in an interview. This will include offering
opposition when he thinks outside economists are mischaracterizing a White House proposal.
He said he will provide Trump
and the public with a range of
outcomes from different economic proposals while also trying to “guide people into thinking what the right answer is.”
It has not taken long for critics
of Hassett’s new role to pounce.
Former treasury secretary Lawrence Summers on Thursday
called some of Hassett’s assertions about wage growth tied to
corporate tax cuts “ludicrous.”
“I think it’s an absurdity,” Summers said on CNBC.
Hassett brings an articulate
academic voice to a White House
that often resorted to bumpersticker policymaking largely devoid of research and data.
His performance in the past
two weeks suggests he could
become a central figure in the tax
cut push, as he is working to —
perhaps single-handedly — parry
other economists who argue that
Trump’s plan primarily will benefit the wealthy and do little for
the middle class.
“Our job is to present the
results from a variety of models,
not to say — which would be just
incorrect — ‘This is the one
model that solved all the world’s
economic problems,’ ” Hassett
said.
On Wednesday, Hassett said
tax cuts of the size envisaged by
the White House would result in
an economic boom that sends
wages soaring across the economy.
“The truth is a tax cut like this
very conservatively will increase
the median wage about $4,000 a
year,” Hassett said Wednesday at
an event at the Newseum in
Washington, referring to a
change that would allow multinational companies to bring
earnings back to the United
States. He said that over time, the
tax cuts could amount to median
wage increases of between
$10,000 and $20,000 for U.S.
workers.
Hassett described these findings as “back-of-the-envelope,”
and the White House is moving to
publish more-complete models
to show how he reaches his
conclusions. Asked about criticism from Summers and others,
Hassett said he would try not to
take any of it personally, adding
that no economic model is perfect. But he also suggested he will
not back down in the face of
criticism, regardless of who delivers it.
“I’m completely open to criticism, and I understand as a sort
of public figure now that there
are going to be times when people say pretty harsh things about
me,” he said. “My job is to look for
content in even the meaner pieces to make sure that if I do
something wrong, I will correct
it.”
He clearly has already found a
receptive audience in the White
House. Trump cited the $4,000
figure during a speech in Pennsylvania on Wednesday, in a sign
the White House’s tax message
could begin taking on a statistical
foundation.
Hassett’s assertion is that cutting taxes on businesses has a
much larger impact on wage
growth than many economists
say and that wages will get a jolt
when the corporate tax rate is
cut.
But Hassett’s views are much
different from those of other
economists and even Wall Street
firms, which have said the impact
could be minimal while adding
more than $1 trillion to the government’s debt.
“I have no idea what the hell
he’s talking about,” said Mark J.
Mazur, director of the Tax Policy
Center and a former top tax
official at the Internal Revenue
Service and Treasury Department, after Hassett offered an
estimate of what would happen
to wages if companies bring earnings back from overseas. The Tax
Policy Center has found that the
outline of Trump’s tax plan would
provide a disproportionately
large benefit to the wealthiest
Americans, something that Hassett has said is unfair because
details of the tax changes still are
being worked out.
Mazur oversaw a team at the
Treasury Department during the
Obama administration that authored a paper finding that a
corporate tax cut would have
some impact on wage growth but
nowhere near what Hassett has
argued. That paper recently was
removed from the Treasury Department’s website, as Trump
administration officials said it
did not reflect their current
thinking.
damian.paletta@washpost.com
DIGEST
AUTO MANUFACTURING
GM to close Detroit
factory for 5 weeks
General Motors plans to
shutter a Detroit car factory for
five weeks, laying off 1,500
workers as it tries to keep
inventory under control.
The Detroit-Hamtramck plant
makes the Chevrolet Impala,
Cadillac CT6, Buick Lacrosse
and Chevrolet Volt hybrid. It
will be shut down through the
end of the year starting Nov. 20.
GM also plans to lower the
assembly line speed at the plant
starting Oct. 20. The company
said fewer than 200 workers will
be laid off on that date.
Impala sales are off 32 percent
through September. Volt sales
are down 6 percent, and
LaCrosse sales are off 21 percent.
CT6 sales, up 51 percent for the
year, fell 27 percent last month.
— Associated Press
CYBERSECURITY
Equifax takes down
Web page over adware
Equifax said Thursday that its
systems were not compromised
after they looked into a report
by an independent researcher
that one of the company’s credit
assistance pages contained
malicious links.
“Equifax can confirm that . . .
the reported issue did not affect
our consumer online dispute
portal,” a spokesman for the
credit reporting agency said in a
statement. “The issue involves a
third-party vendor that Equifax
uses to collect website
performance data, and that
vendor’s code running on an
Equifax website was serving
malicious content. Since we
learned of the issue, the vendor’s
code was removed from the
webpage and we have taken the
webpage offline to conduct
further analysis.”
Earlier on Thursday, Ars
Technica reported that security
analyst Randy Abrams was
prompted to download
fraudulent Adobe Flash updates
when he visited the Equifax
website to contest his credit
report. Abrams determined that
when those updates were
clicked, adware would infect a
visitor’s computer. Abrams also
encountered those links during
at least three subsequent visits,
according to Ars Technica. The
Web page in question allowed
people to access information
under the “Credit Report
Assistance” heading.
involves vehicles with fold-flat
second-row seats made between
Oct. 28, 2016, and Aug. 16, 2017.
Tesla said some cables in the
seat may have been improperly
tightened, which prevents the
left seat from locking in an
upright position. That could
cause the seat to move forward
during a crash.
— Hamza Shaban
ALSO IN BUSINESS
More than 500,000 child car
seats made by Diono (formerly
Sunshine Kids Juvenile) are
being recalled because they may
not adequately protect children
in a crash. The recall covers the
Radian R100, Radian R120,
Radian RXT, Olympia, Pacifica
and Rainier convertible and
booster seats made between
January 2014 and last month.
The National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration said
Thursday that when the seats
are secured using a lap belt
without the top tether, children
over 65 pounds have a greater
risk of chest injury in a crash.
ASHRAF SHAZLY/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
A man works at a currency exchange office in Khartoum, Sudan, on
Thursday after the lifting of the U.S. trade embargo went into effect.
The United States said the nation had begun addressing terrorism
and human rights concerns. Sudan’s central bank said it had received
its first overseas fund transfer in U.S. dollars in two decades.
— From news reports
COMING TODAY
8:30 a.m.: Commerce
Department releases retail sales
data for September.
Rising energy costs caused
prices at the wholesale level to
climb 0.4 percent in September.
The Labor Department said
Thursday that its producer price
index, which measures inflation
pressures before they reach the
consumer, has risen 2.6 percent
over the past 12 months.
Banking giant Citigroup said
Thursday that its third-quarter
profits increased 8 percent from
a year earlier, helped by a boost
in its investment banking
division. Citigroup said it
earned $4.13 billion, or $1.42 per
share, compared with a profit of
$3.84 billion, or $1.24 per share,
in the same period a year earlier.
September’s burst of inflation is
likely the result of oil refineries
shuttering along the Gulf of
Mexico due to Hurricane Harvey
in August. As a result, gasoline
prices surged 10.9 percent. Food
costs were unchanged last
month. A less volatile measure
of inflation, which excludes
food, energy and trade services,
rose 0.2 percent in September.
Tesla is recalling 11,000
Model X SUVs worldwide
because their rear seats might
not lock into place. The recall
8:30 a.m.: Labor Department
releases consumer price index
for September.
10 a.m.: Commerce Department
releases business inventories for
August.
A14
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
‘She just broke her brand’: Furor over designer’s remarks
Donna Karan asks if
sexual harassment
victims are ‘asking for it’
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
Donna Karan’s clothing lines
were already struggling before
the designer sparked a fury over
remarks she made this week
asking whether victims of sexual
harassment were “asking for it.”
But retail analysts say Karan’s
comments, which she made after a number of women said they
had been sexually harassed and
assaulted by film producer Harvey Weinstein, have further
complicated turnaround efforts
at her namesake brand.
“How do we present ourselves
as women?” Karan was reported
as saying at an awards ceremony
Sunday evening in response to a
question about the accusations
against Weinstein. “What are we
asking? Are we asking for it? By
presenting all the sensuality and
all the sexuality? What are we
throwing out to our children
today? About how to dance, how
to perform and what to wear?
How much should they show?”
Karan, who stepped down
from her leadership role at the
company in 2015, later told the
New York Times: “It’s not Harvey Weinstein, you look at everything all over the world today,
you know, and how women are
dressing and what they’re asking by just presenting themselves the way they do. What are
they asking for? Trouble.”
On social media and elsewhere, the reaction has been
swift: TV host Megyn Kelly and
actresses Mia Farrow and Rose
McGowen have said they will
CRAIG WARGA/BLOOMBERG NEWS
A pedestrian walks past a DKNY store in New York. Shares of the company that owns Donna Karan International fell 2 percent Thursday.
stop buying Donna Karan products, and an online petition with
more than 8,000 signatures is
calling on Nordstrom to drop
DKNY and other Donna Karanbranded apparel, bedding and
accessories. (Beginning in February, Macy’s will be the exclusive retailer of DKNY products.)
Shares of the company that
owns Donna Karan International have fallen nearly 10 percent
since last week. Stocks closed
down more than 2 percent
Thursday to $26.03 a share.
“What she did was a terrible
mistake,” Paula Rosenblum,
managing partner of Retail Systems Research, wrote in an
email. “General consensus is she
just broke her brand.”
Karan has since apologized
for her comments, which she
said were taken out of context. “I
believe that sexual harassment
is NOT acceptable and this is an
issue that MUST be addressed
once and for all regardless of the
individual,” she said in a statement released by her publicists.
“I am truly sorry to anyone that I
offended and everyone that has
ever been a victim.”
Representatives for Donna
Karan International and its parent company, G-III Apparel, did
Gene therapy for inherited disease wins support
FDA panel endorses
treatment for a rare form
of childhood blindness
BY
L AURIE M C G INLEY
A Food and Drug Administration advisory committee unanimously endorsed an experimental gene therapy Thursday for
patients with a rare kind of
hereditary blindness, setting the
stage for a historic approval.
If the agency agrees with the
recommendation, the one-time
treatment would be the first gene
therapy cleared in the United
States for an inherited disorder.
Made by Philadelphia-based
Spark Therapeutics, the therapy
involves injecting a healthy version of the RPE65 gene — responsible for making a protein needed
for sight — into the eyes of
patients who have defective copies of the gene. The treatment
does not give patients perfect
vision but does produce substantial improvements, researchers
said.
The FDA has approved only
one treatment that it calls gene
therapy — Kymriah, which is
used for childhood leukemia.
That approach involves extracting immune cells, genetically altering them in the lab and returning them to the patient.
By contrast, Luxturna, the
Spark product, represents what
is thought of as true gene therapy,
in which a functional gene does
the job of a defective one. About
1,000 to 2,000 people in the
United States have inherited retinal diseases caused by a mutated
RPE65 gene.
The company has not provided
an estimated cost for the treatment, but it’s likely to be steep.
Wall Street analysts are predicting a price of $750,000 to $1 mil-
lion for both eyes. That could fuel
an already heated debate over the
rising cost of pharmaceuticals.
Children with the dysfunctional gene often are diagnosed at an
early age with disorders such as
Leber congenital amaurosis or
retinitis pigmentosa. They have
limited vision that typically gets
worse over time, resulting in
night blindness and a loss of
peripheral and central vision.
Almost all end up completely
blind.
During an all-day committee
meeting Thursday, several young
people told stories about how the
experimental treatment had
transformed their lives, allowing
them, for the first time, to see
stars and their parents’ faces, and
The committee’s vote of confidence is a major advance for a
field that has struggled for decades to overcome devastating setbacks. “One of the hopes of the
Human Genome Project was to
use genes to develop medicines,”
said Katherine High, president
and head of research and development at Spark. “It has been
much more complex than people
imagined, but if we can succeed,
it means a lot for people with rare
inherited diseases.”
Hundreds of gene-therapy
clinical trials are underway
throughout the world, including
for hemophilia and Huntington’s
disease, according to the Alliance
for Regenerative Medicine, an
industry group.
“I may not have gained normal vision,
but I gained all of my independence.”
Katelyn Corey, a 24-year-old Los Angeles resident
who participated in experimental treatment
to go out at night with friends.
A few years ago, “I was at a
precipice of losing it all,” Katelyn
Corey, a 24-year-old Los Angeles
resident, told the panel. She was
falling far behind in her college
work as her vision deteriorated
and her world literally darkened.
After getting the gene therapy in
2013, “I was no longer living in a
black-and-white film,” she said. “I
may not have gained normal
vision, but I gained all of my
independence.” She graduated
from college and earned a master’s degree in epidemiology.
Corey and others who spoke
Thursday acknowledged that
their vision is far from 20-20 and
that it isn’t clear that the improvement will be permanent.
Still, the effects have lasted for
four years or more, researchers
say.
For retinal diseases alone,
there are more than 18 genetherapy trials underway, according to Stephen Rose, chief research officer at the Foundation
Fighting Blindness. The group
financed some of the earlier research for the treatment, whose
generic name is voretigene
neparvovec.
The FDA isn’t required to take
the recommendations of its advisory committee, but it usually
does. Its deadline for deciding
on the Spark treatment is midJanuary.
Spark was founded in 2013
based on research and a substantial investment from Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).
In a pivotal trial involving about
30 patients ages 4 to 44, most
patients who received the treatment showed improvement in
navigating a novel maze — with
obstacles and arrows for directions.
The obstacle course was designed to measure patients’
“functional vision,” or the ability
to handle daily activities in lowlight conditions. The patients
didn’t see statistically significant
gains in “visual acuity” — that is,
in reading an eye chart.
During the meeting, researchers showed a video of a 6-year-old
patient who, before getting the
treatment, bumped into objects
on the obstacle course and was
unable to complete it quickly. At
age 10, years after being treated,
she was able to move through the
course easily in seconds.
Christian Guardino, a 17-yearold high school senior from
Patchogue, N.Y., was diagnosed
with the disorder when he was
less than a year old. “We literally
had to keep all the lights on,” said
his mother, Elizabeth. “He was
going completely blind and he
couldn’t navigate on his own.”
In 2012, Christian, who testified at Thursday’s meeting, got
the treatment as part of the trial
at CHOP and his vision improved
immediately. Now, his mother
said, he can play sports, go out
with friends at night and read
books, albeit ones with large
print.
Christian describes the change
in his life as “incredible.” Recently, he competed on NBC’s “America’s Got Talent,” wowing the judges with his powerful voice. He
was especially happy, he said, to
be able to see the judges so
clearly.
Jean Bennett, an ophthalmologist at the University of Pennsylvania who has been involved in
the development and testing of
the gene therapy, said the treatment allows children to become
much more independent. “They
can walk around, play sports,”
she said.
laurie.mcginley@washpost.com
not respond to requests for
comment.
On Thursday, a Nordstrom
spokeswoman said: “We’ve
heard from some customers,
and we certainly understand
their concerns. We’ll continue to
listen to their feedback.”
G-III Apparel purchased Donna Karen International for
$650 million in December. The
company also owns Calvin Klein
and Tommy Hilfiger. And it
manufactures clothing and accessories for Ivanka Trump’s
brand, which has weathered its
own share of boycotts and negative press.
“The acquisition of Donna
Karan fits squarely into our
strategy to diversify and expand
our business,” the company says
on its website. “We intend to
focus on the expansion of the
DKNY brand, while also reestablishing DKNY jeans, Donna
Karan and other associated
brands.”
Karan, 69, founded her eponymous fashion house in 1984
and eventually sold it to the
French conglomerate LVMH
Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton in
2001. In the years since, analysts
say, the brand has lost much of
its luster.
“DKNY is a brand that has
been struggling for years —
that’s why LVMH got rid of it,”
said Milton Pedraza, chief executive of the Luxury Institute, a
New York-based research firm.
“Somewhere in the past along
the way, it’s lost identity and
direction.”
G-III Apparel, however, has
vowed to reinvigorate the brand.
In the most recent quarter, the
company said the Donna Karan
and DKNY brands brought in
$45 million in sales, accounting
for about 8 percent of the company’s total sales.
But analysts said Karan’s
comments could still introduce
new challenges, even if shoppers
have a short attention span
when it comes to consumer
boycotts.
“Was this a screw-up? Yes,”
said Pedraza of the Luxury Institute. “It might cause some shortterm issues, but I think people
will forgive it in the long term.”
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
Sandberg dings Twitter
for political ad decision
BY
H AMZA S HABAN
Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg criticized
Twitter on Thursday over the
company’s decision to block
Rep. Marsha Blackburn (RTenn.) from promoting an advertisement on the social media
site that Twitter had deemed
“inflammatory.”
“Marsha Blackburn ran an ad,
which is launching her campaign for Senate. And in that ad,
there’s a lot of positions that
people don’t like — that I don’t
like,” Sandberg said in an interview with Axios that was broadcast on Facebook Live. “But the
question is: Should divisive political or issue ads run? Our
answer is yes.”
Earlier this week, Blackburn
launched her campaign for the
Senate through an online video
outlining her political beliefs.
In the video, Blackburn said
that she had worked to stop “the
sale of baby body parts,” a
reference to her opposition to
fetal-tissue research. Her campaign paid to have the video
promoted as an ad on Twitter,
but the social media company
on Monday moved to bar Blackburn from doing so.
According
to
campaign
spokeswoman Andrea Bozek,
Twitter said the ad was “deemed
an inflammatory statement that
is likely to evoke a strong negative reaction.” Blackburn’s campaign and any other Twitter
user could share the ad, but
Blackburn was prevented from
paying to promote it to a broader audience.
In a campaign email, Blackburn seized on what she perceived as politically motivated
censorship, telling her supporters that “Silicon Valley is in the
pocket of the liberal establish-
ment, but our conservative revolution is going to keep on
winning.”
A day later, Twitter reversed
its decision.
“Twitter tried to censor us &
you rose up! This is a victory for
free speech & the conservative
revolution. Let’s carry this to
the Senate!” the Blackburn campaign tweeted Tuesday.
During Thursday’s interview,
Sandberg said that Facebook
allows such divisive, issuebased ads, “because when you
cut off speech for one person,
you cut off speech for all people.” The Blackburn video ad is
running as a sponsored post on
Facebook.
“We don’t check the information people put on Facebook
before they run it,” she said,
“and I don’t think anyone
should want us to do that.”
Sandberg also fielded questions about Facebook’s cooperation with Congress as House
and Senate intelligence committee investigators examine
the role of Russian interference
in the 2016 election.
Last month, the company
said it had identified more than
3,000 advertisements purchased in a Russian-orchestrated campaign to influence the
American public’s views and
exploit divisions around contentious issues.
Sandberg emphasized that
Facebook has shared the content of those ads with the
committees and that the company is also working with other
digital platforms to prevent foreign meddling.
Officials from Facebook,
Twitter and Google are expected
to testify in front of two congressional committees next
month.
hamza.shaban@washpost.com
Amazon predicts teenagers will become its latest lucrative market
Young shoppers can use
their own accounts with
their parents’ approval
BY
A BHA B HATTARAI
Amazon.com, already the most
popular online retailer among
adults, is setting its sights on a
new demographic: teenagers.
The company’s newest efforts
are aimed at getting shoppers
ages 13 to 17 to buy items on its site
— with approval from their parents. Teens can now log into Amazon.com using their own accounts. Their parents can approve
purchases by text message and set
spending limits per order. (Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos owns The Washington Post.)
“As a parent of a teen, I know
how they crave independence, but
at the same time that has to be
balanced with the convenience
and trust that parents need,” Michael Carr, vice president of Amazon Households, said in a statement.
Analysts say the teen market
could be particularly lucrative for
Amazon, as mall staples such as
Aeropostale, Wet Seal and rue21
file for bankruptcy protection and
shutter hundreds of stores.
“Teenagers are at least as comfortable buying things online as
their parents are, so it makes
sense to go after them directly,”
said Jan Dawson, chief analyst at
technology research and advisory
firm Jackdaw. “This is a move that
will get families deeper into Amazon while also cultivating future
Prime members.”
The company also said this
week that it will begin offering
Prime memberships to college
students for $5.49 a month. (An
annual Amazon Prime Student
membership costs $49, compared
with $99 for regular members.)
The announcements come as
Amazon gains popularity among
younger shoppers. Nearly half —
49 percent — of teenagers listed
Amazon as their favorite website,
a nine percentage-point increase
from a year earlier, according to a
survey by the financial firm Piper
Jaffray. Among other teen favorites: Nike, with 6 percent of the
vote, and American Eagle, with
5 percent.
Under Amazon’s new program,
teenagers can log into the site to
shop online, stream videos and
tap into the perks of their parents’
Prime memberships. Amazon notifies parents — by text or email —
of any purchases. Parents can review each item, its cost and the
payment method being used before finalizing the transaction.
“By default, parents approve
every order,” Amazon said. “Parents receive itemized notifications for every order and can
cancel and return any item in
accordance with Amazon’s policies.”
Parenting and child-development experts, though, raised concerns that the move allows Amazon to gather more data on its
customers, including children’s
browsing histories and purchasing habits. Some also worried
about giving teens easier access to
their parents’ credit cards.
“We’re essentially telling our
children they can get whatever
they want, whenever they want
it,” said Betsy Brown Braun, a
child-development and behavior
specialist. “This could create a
whole new set of problems.”
abha.bhattarai@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A15
RE
the markets
6 Monitor your investments at washingtonpost.com/markets
Data and graphics by
Daily Stock Market Performance
Index
Dow Jones Industrial Average
23,000
Close
YTD
% Chg
22,841.01
–0.1
+15.6
21,250
19,500
17,750
Nasdaq Composite Index
6800
Commodities
S&P 500 Industry Group Snapshot
Daily
% Chg
6591.51
–0.2
+22.4
Daily
% Chg
Industry Group
Trading Co's & Distr
Road & Rail
Multi-Utilities
Software
Construction Materials
Auto Components
Consumer Finance
Automobiles
Media
Diversified Telecomm
0
–4.0%
+4.0%
2.46
0.96
0.92
0.76
0.74
–1.32
–1.41
–1.50
–2.33
–3.54
5600
5000
S&P 500 Index
2550.93
–0.2
+13.9
2575
2450
2325
2200
2075
O
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
Americas
Brazil (Bovespa)
Canada (S&P/TSX Comp.)
Mexico (Bolsa)
Europe
Eurozone (DJ Stoxx 600)
France (CAC 40)
Germany (DAX)
U.K. (FTSE 100)
Asia Pacific
Australia (ASX 200)
China (CSI 300)
Hong Kong (Hang Seng)
Japan (Nikkei)
Close
Daily
% Chg
76,659.80
15,742.20
50,030.99
–0.3
–0.4
–0.2
390.28
5360.81
12,982.89
7556.24
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.3
5794.47
3912.95
28,459.03
20,954.72
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.4
YTD % Chg
–30%
0%
+30%
3M Co
AmExp
Apple Inc
Boeing
Caterpillar
Chevron Corp
Cisco Systems
Coca-Cola
DowDuPont Inc
Exxon Mobil
GE
GoldmnSchs
Home Depot
IBM
Intel Corp
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
217.59
91.61
156.00
261.91
129.99
119.14
33.26
46.11
71.40
82.43
23.05
239.80
164.59
147.03
39.19
0.5
–0.4
–0.4
0.2
1.1
–0.2
–1.0
0.0
–0.3
–0.2
–0.1
–1.1
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–0.4
–0.3
21.9
23.7
34.7
68.2
40.2
1.2
10.1
11.2
24.8
–8.7
–27.1
0.1
22.8
–11.4
8.1
Company
Close
Daily
% Chg
YTD
% Chg
J&J
JPMorg Ch
McDonald's
Merck
Microsoft
Nike
P&G Co
Pfizer Inc
Travelers
United Tech
UnitedHealth
Verizon
Visa Inc
Wal-Mart
Walt Disney
136.83
95.99
163.91
63.83
77.12
50.83
92.15
36.35
125.95
118.82
192.92
48.35
108.11
86.10
96.93
0.1
–0.9
0.5
0.1
0.9
–0.4
0.8
–0.3
0.3
0.9
–1.2
–1.0
–0.3
0.4
–1.6
18.8
11.2
34.7
8.4
24.1
0.0
9.6
11.9
2.9
8.4
20.5
–9.4
38.6
24.6
–7.0
Cross Currency Rates
US $
US $ per
EU € per
0.8453
EU €
Japan ¥
Britain £
Brazil R$
Canada $
1.1831
0.0089
1.3266
0.3153
0.8016
0.0529
0.0075
1.1213
0.2663
0.6776
0.0448
35.4011
90.0030
5.9462
0.2377
0.6043
0.0399
Japan ¥ per
112.2800
132.8300
Britain £ per
0.7538
0.8918
0.0067
148.9450
Brazil R$ per
3.1730
3.7655
0.0282
4.2061
Canada $ per
1.2475
1.4758
0.0111
1.6549
0.3933
Mexico $ per
18.8804
22.3376
0.1680
25.0485
5.9550
Mexico $
2.5425
0.1681
0.0661
15.1357
Index
Close
DJ Total Stock Market Index 26,470.10
Russell 2000
1505.16
Post-Bloomberg DC Area Index 528.46
CBOE Volatility (VIX)
9.91
Consumer Rates
Daily % Chg
–0.2
–0.1
0.5
0.6
YTD % Chg
13.7
10.9
18.1
–29.4
+0.8
+0.9
–1.4
+0.6
+3.5
Orange Juice
Silver
Soybeans
Sugar
Wheat
Exchange-Traded
Coffee (COFF.L)
Copper (COPA.L)
Corn (CORN.L)
Cotton (COTN.L)
Crude Oil (CRUD.L)
Gasoline (UGAS.L)
Gold (BULL.L)
Natural Gas (NGAS.L)
Silver (SLVR.L)
Daily
(Ticker) % Chg
Close
Daily
% Chg
$1.5890
$17.27
$9.9200
$0.1428
$4.3050
–2.3
+0.8
+2.8
–0.1
–0.6
day
month
$1100
$1000
$900
–0.8
1.2
–0.6
–1.4
–0.3
–0.9
0.4
0.8
0.6
Gainers
MiMedx Group Inc
CryoLife Inc
Black Box Corp
Universal Corp
DXC Technology Co
Invacare Corp
HostHotels& Resorts
XL Group Ltd
Fastenal
Energizer Holdings
CEVA Inc
LaSalle Hotel Prop
WW Grainger
Nutrisystem Inc
Brooks Automation
CF Industries
Kemper Corp
JB Hunt
B&G Foods Inc
Fossil Group Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$13.21
$21.30
$3.40
$59.65
$91.20
$14.60
$19.40
$40.67
$45.94
$47.88
$45.30
$30.70
$177.55
$59.95
$31.25
$35.84
$56.50
$108.35
$32.55
$8.26
6.7
6.5
6.3
4.3
4.1
3.9
3.9
3.4
3.2
3.2
3.2
3.2
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.7
2.6
2.5
2.5
2.5
Losers
Ulta Beauty Inc
Express Inc
Endo International
Dress Barn Inc
Chico's FAS Inc
AMC Networks Inc
PG&E Corp
Fred's Inc
AT&T Inc
Buckle Inc
Depomed Inc
Juniper Networks
DISH Network Corp
Genesco Inc
Deckers Outdoor
EthanAllenInteriors
Ensco PLC
McDermott
Era Group Inc
Foot Locker Inc
Daily
Close % Chg
$190.16
$5.88
$8.24
$1.86
$7.40
$53.78
$64.50
$5.32
$35.86
$15.35
$5.12
$25.47
$49.03
$24.10
$65.82
$29.00
$5.32
$6.92
$10.71
$31.43
Money market funds
6-Month CDs
1-Year CDs
5-Year CDs
New car loan
Home-equity loan
0.32
0.45
0.76
1.46
2.75
5.34
3.83%
4.25%
Bank Prime
30-Year fixed mortgage
3.08%
1.25%
Federal Funds
10-year note
Yield: 2.32
2-year note
Yield: 1.51
5-year note
Yield: 1.94
6-month bill
Yield: 1.24
15-Year fixed mortgage
1.36%
LIBOR 3-Month
3.23%
1-Year ARM
Note: Bank prime is from 10 major banks. Federal Funds rate is the market rate, which can vary from the federal
target rate. LIBOR is the London Interbank Offered Rate. Consumer rates are from Bankrate. All figures as of
4:30 p.m. New York time.
Waymo unveils self-drive safety list
BY
M ICHAEL L ARIS
To help keep tabs on the safety of
driverless cars rolling around U.S.
cities, the federal government last
year, and again last month, suggested that tech firms and car companies submit safety checklists.
None of the companies rushed to
meet Washington’s wishes.
Now, Waymo, formerly Google’s
self-driving car project, has submitted a 43-page safety report to the
Transportation Department, offering the most detailed description
yet of how it equips and programs
vehicles to avoid the range of mundane and outrageous problems that
are part of driving in America.
“We’ve staged people jumping
out of canvas bags or porta-potties
on the side of the road, skateboarders lying on their boards, and
thrown stacks of paper in front of
our sensors,” according to the report, which was submitted Thursday and describes how company
engineers use a 91-acre California
test facility mocked up like a city, as
well as computer simulations covering hundreds of thousands of
variations of possible road scenarios.
The National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration (NHTSA)
has suggested a set of 28 “behavioral competencies,” or basic things an
autonomous vehicle should be able
to do. Some are exceedingly basic
(“Detect and Respond to Stopped
Vehicles,” “Navigate Intersections
and Perform Turns”) and others are
more intricate (“Respond to Citizens Directing Traffic After a
Crash”).
Waymo lists an extra 19 examples of challenges it uses for testing,
including that its cars must be able
to “detect and respond” to animals,
motorcyclists, school buses, slippery roads, unanticipated weather,
and faded or missing road signs.
The company says it has used
federal data on human crashes to
focus its efforts on improving its
software-and-sensor drivers. Top
problem scenarios for flesh-andblood drivers include rear-end
crashes, turning or crossing at intersections, running off the edge of
the road, and changing lanes. So
those “figure prominently in the
evaluation of our vehicles,” according to the report.
And then numerous permutations are generated from those scenarios. “We can multiply this one
tricky left turn to explore thousands
of variable scenarios and ‘what
ifs?,’ ” the report says. “The scene
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Waymo chief executive John Krafcik displays a Chrysler Pacifica
hybrid with Waymo’s suite of sensors in Detroit in January.
can be made busier and more complex by adding . . . joggers zigzagging across the street.”
NHTSA said in a statement
Thursday that Waymo is “the first
company to make a voluntary safety self-assessment public.” While
such reports are now voluntary, the
House and Senate each passed bills
that would require companies to
submit safety assessments in the
coming years.
Some road safety advocates argue that driverless cars should be
required to pass specific safety tests
before being put on the roads, just
like human drivers. And they say
the federal government has taken a
dangerously laissez-faire approach
to the burgeoning industry.
But with tens of thousands of
people killed each year on U.S.
roads, driverless-vehicle firms
promise big improvements overall.
Waymo executives say their safety
report is part of an effort to be more
transparent about their experiences, which they hope will be good
for public understanding — and
business.
“This overview of our safety program reflects the important lessons
learned through the 3.5 million
miles Waymo’s vehicles have selfdriven on public roads, and billions
of miles of simulated driving, over
the last eight years,” Waymo chief
executive John Krafcik wrote in a
letter Thursday to Transportation
Secretary Elaine Chao.
The report offered a view into
how Waymo’s software breaks
down the 360 degrees of data constantly pouring in from radar, laser
sensors, high-definition cameras,
–8.5
–8.3
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–5.2
–5.2
–5.1
–4.9
–4.9
–4.9
–4.8
–4.8
–4.7
–4.6
Treasury Performance Over Past Three Months
Interest Rates
Other Measures
Daily
% Chg
Gainers and Losers from the S&P 1500 Index
Dow Jones 30 Industrials
Company
Close
$3.1200
$3.4900
$50.60
$1,296.50
$2.99
Value of $1000 invested for the past:
International Stock Markets
6200
Futures
Copper
Corn
Crude Oil
Gold
Natural Gas
GPS and an audio detection system
the company says can hear sirens
hundreds of feet away.
First is perception, which is
where the vehicle classifies objects
and stitches them into a “cohesive
real-time view of the world,” the
company said. That means distinguishing between cars and people,
and also bicycles and motorcycles.
Next is modeling and predicting
the behavior of the object it encounters. So, for example, the software
knows that walkers move more
slowly than bikers of either variety,
but also that pedestrians can
change direction abruptly.
Then the pieces come together in
what the company calls its “planner,” which figures out where the
car actually will go and is imbued
with a “defensive driving” sensibility. It keeps the car out of the blind
spots of nearby human drivers,
gives cyclists extra room and games
out what is coming several steps
ahead of time.
But cars, like humans, cannot
think of everything. How well they
manage that reality — and deal with
the unexpected — will help determine how good they really are.
“You can’t expect to program the
car for everything you’re possibly
going to see,” said Ron Medford,
Waymo’s safety director and a former senior NHTSA official. Extensive driving experiments feed simulations that essentially provide the
car with experience, which helps
greatly, and what it learns is passed
on to the entire fleet.
And if it really doesn’t know what
to do, it can pull over safely, he said.
michael.laris@washpost.com
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THE WASHINGTON POST
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. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
PowerPost
INTELLIGENCE FOR LEADERS WASHINGTONPOST.COM/POWERPOST
“The world doesn’t need to know the secretary of the Interior is in the building.”
Joseph McMillan of the American Heraldry Society
Where’s Zinke? Just look for Interior chief’s special flag.
BY
L ISA R EIN
At the Interior Department’s
headquarters in downtown
Washington, Secretary Ryan
Zinke has revived an arcane
military ritual that no one can
remember ever happening in the
federal government.
A security staffer takes the
elevator to the seventh floor,
climbs the stairs to the roof and
hoists a special secretarial flag
whenever Zinke enters the building. When the secretary goes
home for the day or travels, the
flag — a blue banner emblazoned
with the agency’s bison seal
flanked by seven white stars
representing the Interior bureaus — comes down.
In Zinke’s absence, the ritual is
repeated to raise an equally obscure flag for Deputy Secretary
David Bernhardt.
Responding this week to questions from The Washington Post,
a spokeswoman for Zinke, a
former Navy SEAL commander,
defended the Navy flag-flying
tradition as “a major sign of
transparency.”
“Ryan Zinke is proud and
honored to lead the Department
of the Interior, and is restoring
honor and tradition to the department, whether it’s flying the
flag when he is in garrison or
restoring traditional access to
public lands,” press secretary
Heather Swift said in an email.
Zinke, a Stetson-wearing former Montana congressman who
has cultivated an image as a
rugged outdoorsman, has come
under a harsh spotlight in recent
weeks for behavior criticized as
extravagant for a public official.
The agency’s inspector general
opened an investigation after he
ran up bills for travel on chartered jets and mixed business
with political appearances,
sometimes accompanied by his
wife, Lola. It’s one of five probes
underway of Cabinet secretaries’
travel.
Zinke upset some of the
70,000 employees at the agency
that manages public lands by
stating that 30 percent of the
workers are “not loyal to the flag”
in a speech to oil and gas executives. It is unclear whether the
reference was literal or figura-
ZACH GIBSON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
Ryan Zinke’s special secretarial flag, right, is displayed during the Interior secretary’s speech at the Heritage Foundation in Washington
last month. The flag is hoisted atop the department’s headquarters when Zinke enters the building and is taken down when he departs.
tive.
Zinke rode to work on horseback on his first day in office
and displays animal heads on
his wood-paneled office walls.
For a while, he kept a glass-case
display of hunting knives but
was asked to remove them because of security risks, according to people familiar with the
decision.
He has commissioned commemorative coins with his name
on them to give to staff and
visitors, but the cost to taxpayers is unclear. Zinke’s predecessors and some other Cabinet
secretaries have coins bearing
agency seals, but not personalized ones.
The flag ritual is unique in
President Trump’s administration. The White House does not
raise the presidential flag when
Trump alights at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. There is no defense
secretary’s flag atop the Pentagon.
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, like his predecessors, has a
personal flag that flies beside
the U.S. flag in front of the
department’s Foggy Bottom
headquarters. But it’s there
whether Tillerson is in the
building or not.
“We’re talking about Cabinet
members and federal buildings,
not the Queen of England and
Buckingham Palace,” said Chris
Lu, deputy labor secretary in the
Obama administration, referring
to the British tradition of announcing the queen’s presence
by raising her personal heraldic
flag.
“If we had a secretarial flag at
the Obama Labor Department,
we never bothered to locate it or
use it,” Lu said.
Retired Army Col. Steven Warren, who ran the Pentagon’s press
operation before retiring this
year, could not recall the place in
Washington hierarchy represented by the raising of a federal
official’s personal flag.
“Is he trying to send a message?” Warren wondered.
“Is he big on pomp and circumstance, or is this a case of
‘Look at me?’ ”
Personal flags for federal government officials have a proud, if
arcane, history that originated
with the secretary of the Navy in
1866, to help sailing ships in the
fleet recognize which one carried
the naval commander. The Coast
Guard and secretary of war
wanted one, too.
By the early 20th century, the
civilian heads of the Treasury,
Commerce and Labor departments had flags.
The first one for Interior was
adopted in 1917.
“If you were the secretary of
agriculture, you asked yourself,
‘Hey, the secretary of war has a
flag, how come I don’t have
one?’ ” said Joseph McMillan, a
retired Defense Department official and student of flag history
from Alexandria who is president of the American Heraldry
Society.
The flags proliferated by
World War II, with banners for
subordinate officials from undersecretaries to assistant attorneys general.
Back when security was not a
concern, official government vehicles would display a highranking official’s personal flag
on its left front fender, with the
American flag flanking the right.
They were considered pretentious, McMillan said, and eventually went out of fashion.
At Lady Liberty Flag and
Flagpole in Austin, one of the
largest flag vendors for federal
offices, Sandra Dee Merritt said
she sells 300 to 500 department
flags a year to various Interior
offices.
Secretarial flags are no longer
in demand. “I haven’t sold any of
those individual secretarial flags
to any agency in forever,” Merritt
said.
Raising a personal flag to
mark an official’s presence remains a custom in the military.
Field commanders often display
their unit’s flag when they are at
headquarters to signify that the
boss is in.
But the personal flag, whether
belonging to a general or a
Cabinet secretary, stays behind
the desk, if it’s there at all.
By flying his flag, Zinke is
doing exactly what the flag was
designed for, McMillan said. Yet
he’s skeptical. The Interior Department is not the Navy.
“I’m all about tradition,” McMillan said. “But I kind of have
an aversion to militarizing everything in our government. The
world doesn’t need to know the
secretary of the Interior is in the
building.”
lisa.rein@washpost.com
Trump’s executive order has a history McCain likely a maverick on tax vote
President Trump
Health 202 signed an
executive order
Thursday
expanding what’s
known as
“association
health plans.” But 25 years ago,
federal watchdogs concluded
such plans ripped off hundreds
of thousands of Americans
by refusing to pay their medical
claims while violating state
insurance laws and even
criminal statutes.
Back in 1992, the Government
Accountability Office issued a
scathing report on these multiple
employer welfare arrangements
(known as MEWAs; they’re
pronounced “mee-wahs”) in
which small businesses could
pool funds to get the lower-cost
insurance typically available
only to large employers.
These MEWAs, said the
government, left at least 398,000
participants and their
beneficiaries with more than
$123 million in unpaid claims
between January 1988 and
June 1991.
Furthermore, states reported
massive and widespread
problems with MEWAs. More
than 600 plans in nearly every
U.S. state failed to comply with
insurance laws. Thirty-three
states said enrollees were
sometimes left without health
coverage when MEWAs
disbanded.
In one of the most egregious
cases, a California-based MEWA
called Rubell Helm Insurance
Services enrolled thousands of
Florida residents without their
knowledge but failed to pay any
large claims.
“MEWAs have proven to be a
source of regulatory confusion,
enforcement problems and, in
some instances, fraud,” the GAO
wrote at the time.
Of course, President Trump
described such plans quite
differently during his
announcement after signing
PAIGE
WINFIELD
CUNNINGHAM
the executive order aimed at
making it easier for association
health plans to form, operate
across state lines and duck
coverage regulations under the
Affordable Care Act.
Critics of the action include
state insurance commissioners
and much of the health industry
because, they argue, the new
plans would draw healthy
customers out of the ACA
marketplaces and increase costs
for sicker patients.
Trump said the move was one
of many he will take to weaken
the impact of Obamacare after
Republicans in Congress failed
in multiple attempts to repeal
and replace the law.
The effects of his executive
order could be different from
what the president anticipates.
Association health plans —
which are basically MEWAs that
are tied to a trade association
(such as the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce) — have been around
for a long time, but had to
operate in a single state and were
subject to ACA regulations under
Obama-era rules.
Trump is seeking to broaden
their ability to function by
instructing a trio of Cabinet
departments to rewrite the
federal rules governing them.
In these arrangements, a trade
association acquires health
coverage that small businesses,
individuals or nonprofits could
buy into.
Trump and some Republicans
are billing these association
health plans as a way to offer
lower-cost options to consumers
amid an otherwise toxic ocean of
Obamacare regulations.
By purchasing insurance
through associations, small
businesses and individuals could
potentially duck the ACA’s
coverage requirements —
including its 10 “essential health
benefits” — that don’t apply to
large group plans.
Republicans say this will lead
to lower-cost health insurance
and the ability of Americans to
choose from a broader array of
insurance options that better fit
their needs.
Of course, the details of the
anticipated executive order will
matter. One of the biggest
problems with association plans
— according to the GAO — is that
they often flew under the radar
of state insurance regulators.
“At the heart of regulation and
enforcement problems is the fact
that state regulators are often
constrained by the inability to
identify MEWA until after
MEWA problems occur,” the
report says.
Sometimes plans tried to duck
regulations entirely, the agency
found. Forty-two states said
MEWAs had claimed exemption
from state laws under the
Employee Retirement Income
Security Act (ERISA) of 1974,
which had allowed MEWAs in
the first place. Courts mostly
sided with the states in these
legal battles, but they still cost
states large amounts of staff and
time.
These problems are partly why
the Obama administration
actually cracked down on
association health plans as it was
implementing the ACA. In 2011
guidance, the Department of
Health and Human Services said
association plans must comply
with the health-care law’s
consumer protections just like
any other individual or small
group plan.
Yet Trump is now poised to
rewrite the rules, turning to
the 43-year-old idea of
association health plans — which
the government has found some
serious problems with in the past
— as his way of reshaping
Obama’s ACA.
“What is old is new again,” as
one health-care consultant told
me.
paige.cunningham@washpost.com
More at washingtonpost.com/
news/powerpost
It’s a specter that
should stalk the
nightmares of
Republican
leaders: a
TORY
Senate chamber,
NEWMYER
packed on
Christmas Eve, as
lawmakers gather to decide the
fate of a tax package that will
shape the GOP’s political
fortunes. The bill remains one
vote shy, and then Sen. John
McCain walks in, pauses before
the desk, and delivers his second
thumbs-down dagger of the year.
For that reason, the Arizona
Republican, who is fighting a
public battle with brain cancer,
will be among his party’s most
closely watched votes as the year
winds down and the tax debate
gears up. Yet over his decades in
public life, McCain has traced a
zigzagging line on the subject,
leaving little clear indication of
how he’ll approach a potentially
decisive vote. A look at the
senator’s record on taxes shows
that three things seem
most important to him: public
debate, some help for the middle
class, and not exploding
the deficit.
The senator's vote matters
because with a 52-seat majority,
Republicans can’t afford more
than two defections (Vice
President Pence could push the
package over the line in the event
of a tie).
So far, McCain’s potential
objections sound familiar. The
senator helped tank the GOP’s
Affordable Care Act rewrite by
arguing in part that it hadn’t
followed regular order — that is,
there were no actual hearings on
the measure before it was pushed
to the floor.
“I’ve stated time and time
again that one of the major
failures of Obamacare was that it
was rammed through Congress
by Democrats on a strict partyline basis without a single
Republican vote,” he said after
his vote against the “skinny
The
Finance
202
repeal” bill this summer. If
Republicans can agree on a
budget, it will set the tax package
on the same path. And the
spending blueprint would also
strip some Republican
commitments to transparency,
including a pledge to post an
official accounting of a tax
measure’s budget impact more
than a day before a vote.
But unlike the Obamacare
rollback attempts, tax bills will
be heading through committees
— a development McCain calls
“encouraging.” The senator has
said he is “confident that by
moving through the normal
legislative process we can
produce a bill that reforms our
tax system, boosts our economy,
and improves the lives of the
people we serve.”
On tax policy itself, McCain
has proved a moving target. He
opposed the 2001 Bush tax cuts
— one of only two Republicans to
do so — citing what he called the
bill’s lopsided benefits for the
wealthy. “I cannot in good
conscience support a tax cut in
which so many of the benefits go
to the most fortunate among us,
at the expense of middle-class
Americans who most need tax
relief,” he said. Two years later, he
was one of only three
Republicans to vote against the
next round of Bush cuts, again
citing its skew toward the rich
but also the deficit impact of
another round of breaks as the
country faced mounting war
bills.
McCain reversed himself in
2006, voting to extend the cuts.
He argued at the time that
ending the breaks would amount
to a tax hike. “American
businesses and investors need a
stable and predictable tax policy
to continue contributing to the
growth of our economy,” he said.
Anti-tax activist Grover
Norquist gave him a backhanded
compliment for that, calling it “a
big flip-flop, but I’m happy
he’s flopped.”
Running for president in 2008,
the senator evinced some supplyside thinking, declaring in an
ABC News interview that cuts to
capital gains taxes would yield
more revenue, an effect he said
that history demonstrated “going
back to Jack Kennedy.” (The
Congressional Budget Office has
found those cuts provide a sugarhigh revenue boost that wears off
after a year or two.)
More recently, McCain
sounded more like his
trustbusting political hero, Teddy
Roosevelt, when he confronted
Apple’s tax-dodging strategies. In
a 2013 hearing, he joined with
then-Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.) in
criticizing chief executive Tim
Cook. “U.S. corporations cannot
continue to avoid paying their
appropriate share in taxes,”
McCain told the tech leader. “Our
military can’t afford it. Our
economy cannot endure it. And
the American people will not
tolerate it.”
Now, Doug Holtz-Eakin
— McCain’s top economic adviser
in his 2008 campaign and now
president of the American Action
Forum — said the senator will
want to know first what a tax
measure will mean for the
middle class. It’s not clear
whether that means the package
needs to maintain the current
code’s progressivity, and HoltzEakin noted that he doesn’t
speak for McCain. “Nobody gets
everything they want,” he said.
“He’ll look at the package as a
whole and ask if its beneficial for
the middle class.”
The deficit impact will matter,
too. “He’s cognizant of the fiscal
outlook, which is not good, and
he’s never been fond of big
spending, big government, or big
red ink,” Holtz-Eakin says.
Finally, he says McCain will
zero in on corporate tax
avoidance, as he did in the 2013
hearing. “Does this reform take
care of that problem? I imagine
that conversation will happen.”
tory.newmyer@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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washington forum
FAREED ZAKARIA
DAVID IGNATIUS
How China
is winning
the future
The man
Erdogan is
obsessed with
T
t the center of the increasingly
bitter dispute between the United States and Turkey is a demand
by an irate President Recep Tayyip Erdogan that American prosecutors
free a Turkish-Iranian gold dealer who is
about to go on trial on money-laundering
and fraud charges.
The confrontation sharpened Thursday, as Erdogan protested in Ankara that
the businessman, Reza Zarrab, was being
squeezed as a “false witness” about corruption. Turkey alarmed Washington by
arresting a U.S. consular official last
week, in what some U.S. officials feared
was an attempt to gain leverage for
Zarrab’s release before the scheduled
Nov. 27 start of his trial in New York.
Turkish and American officials plan to
meet next week for talks to ease tensions.
What dirt could Zarrab dish in court?
A possible preview comes in a May 2016
court filing by then-U.S. Attorney Preet
Bharara. Citing a December 2013 Turkish
prosecutor’s report, Bharara’s memo said
the Turkish evidence “describes a massive bribery scheme executed by Zarrab
and others, paying cabinet-level governmental officials and high-level bank officers tens of millions of Euro and U.S.
dollars to facilitate Zarrab’s network’s
transactions for the benefit of Iran” to
evade U.S. sanctions against that country. Bharara’s memo noted that these
“conclusions are corroborated by emails
obtained through the FBI’s investigation.”
Erdogan’s campaign to free Zarrab has
been extraordinary. He demanded his
release as well as the firing of Bharara in
a private meeting with then-Vice President Joe Biden on Sept. 21, 2016, in which
U.S. officials say half the 90-minute conversation was devoted to Zarrab. Erdogan’s wife pleaded the case that night to
Jill Biden. Turkey’s then-justice minister,
Bekir Bozdag, visited then-Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch in October to argue
that the case was “based on no evidence”
and that Zarrab should be released.
Erdogan appealed personally about
the matter in his last two phone calls with
President Barack Obama, in December
and early January, former aides say. “Our
operating assumption was that Erdogan’s obsession with the case was that if it
moved forward, information would come
out that would damage his family, and
ultimately him,” said one former senior
Obama official.
Erdogan’s government began cultivating Donald Trump’s team before the
election. Michael Flynn, then a campaign
aide, was hired as a pro-Turkey lobbyist,
and his firm continued to receive Turkish
money during the transition. After Flynn
resigned as national security adviser in
February, the Turks began working with
Rudy Giuliani, a close Trump adviser.
The case is toxic to Erdogan because it
intersects with his nemesis, the selfexiled Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen,
who lives in Pennsylvania. Erdogan
blames Gulen’s followers for gathering
and leaking the 2013 evidence about
Zarrab, which Turkish media reports say
included allegations against Erdogan’s
family. When Erdogan met with Biden a
year ago, he claimed bizarrely that Bharara was a Gulenist tool, according to a
former official.
Giuliani’s involvement is one of the
many unusual aspects of this case. He
contacted Bharara on Feb. 24 to inform
him that he planned to travel to Ankara
on Zarrab’s behalf. Trump fired Bharara
in March; around that time, Giuliani
began pressing the Justice Department
for “some agreement between the United
States and Turkey” to aid American
“security interests” and help Zarrab, Giuliani said in a filing with the court.
Despite these various attempts to halt
the prosecution, the case rolled forward
— and even broadened in an expanded
indictment last month that named a
former Turkish cabinet minister and
three other prominent Turks. ThenJustice Minister Bozdag on Sept. 11 condemned the expanded charges as another “coup attempt.” Erdogan sees Gulenist plotting behind the 2013 allegations against his inner circle and a failed
July 2016 military coup.
Erdogan may have hoped that Trump
would support his push to free Zarrab.
And Trump initially seemed sympathetic
to the Turkish leader, inviting him to
Washington for a May meeting. But that
visit was marred when Erdogan’s security detail attacked protesters outside the
Turkish ambassador’s residence; and
Trump’s maneuvering room has narrowed because of investigations surrounding his administration.
Some U.S. officials fear that Erdogan
might be seeking bargaining chips in the
detention of pastor Andrew Brunson,
arrested a year ago on charges he backed
Gulen, and the arrest last week of Metin
Topuz, a longtime employee of the U.S.
consulate in Istanbul, who a Turkish
newspaper has alleged was in contact
with a pro-Gulen prosecutor back in
2013. And Erdogan himself suggested
last month a trade of Brunson for Gulen.
The phrase “NATO ally” is repeated so
often about Turkey that it obscures how
adversarial and autocratic recent Turkish actions have been. Washington is
worried about what’s next.
his week, the front page of the
New York Times described
the Trump administration’s
repeal of the Clean Power
Plan, the Obama administration’s attempt to slash carbon emissions from
coal-fired power plants. “The war on
coal is over,” declared Environmental
Protection Agency Administrator
Scott Pruitt. Right under that article
was an article from halfway around
the world detailing China’s massive
new investment in electric vehicles,
part of Beijing’s determination to
dominate the era of clean-energy
technology. It is a tale of two strategies.
The Trump administration has decided to move into a new century: the
19th century. Coal has been in decline
for at least seven decades. In 1950, it
accounted for half of all U.S. electricity generation. It is now down to a
third. Additionally, massive automation of mining has meant that the jobs
in the industry are disappearing,
down from 176,000 in 1985 to 50,000
in 2017. Machines and software are
replacing coal miners just as surely as
in other industries. Demand for coal
is weak because of alternatives, chiefly natural gas. In the past couple of
years, many of the top American coal
companies have been forced to declare bankruptcy, including the largest, Peabody Energy.
Despite President Trump’s policy
shift, these trends are unlikely to
change. Reuters found that, of 32 utilities in the 26 states that filed lawsuits over the Clean Power Plan, “the
bulk of them have no plans to alter
their multi- billion dollar, years-long
shift away from coal.” The reason
utilities are shedding coal is economics — the price of natural gas has
plummeted in recent years, and its
share of U.S. electricity generation
has nearly tripled since 1990. In addition, costs are falling dramatically for
wind and solar energy.
And, of course, coal is the dirtiest
form of energy in use. Coal-fired power plants are one of the nation’s leading sources of carbon-dioxide emissions, and most scientists agree those
emissions lead to global warming.
They also cause terrible air pollution,
with all its attendant health problems
and costs.
That’s one of the reasons China,
which suffers more than a million
deaths a year because of poor air
quality, is making huge investments
in clean energy. The country has become one of the world’s leading producers of wind turbines and solar
panels, with government subsidies
enabling its companies to become
cost-efficient and global in their aspirations. In 2015, China was home to
the world’s top wind-turbine maker
and the top two solar-panel manufacturers. According to a recent report
from the United Nations, China invested $78.3 billion in renewable energy last year — almost twice as much
as the United States.
Now Beijing is making a push into
electric cars, hoping to dominate
what it believes will be the transport
industry of the future. Already China
has taken a large lead in electric cars.
In 2016, more than twice as many
were sold in China as in the United
States, an astonishing catch-up for a
country that had almost no such technologies 10 years ago. China’s leaders
have let it be known that by 2025 they
want 20 percent of all new cars sold in
China to be powered by alternative
fuels. All of this has already translated into jobs, “big league” as President
Trump might say: 3.6 million people
are already working in the
renewable-energy sector in China,
compared with 777,000 in the United
States.
China is still heavily reliant on coal,
which it has in plentiful supply, and it
has tried to find steady sources of
other fossil fuels. It went on a shopping spree over the past two decades,
making deals for natural resources
and energy around the world, often
paying at the peak of the commodities
bubble in the mid-2000s. But over
time, it recognized that this mercantilism was a bad strategy, tying Beijing up with expensive projects in
unstable countries in Africa. Instead,
it watched and learned from the United States as technological revolutions
dramatically increased the supply
and lowered the cost of natural gas
and solar energy. China has now decided to put a much larger emphasis
on this route to energy security, one
that also ensures it will be the world’s
leading producer of clean energy.
Trump has often talked about how
China is “killing us” and that he’s tired
of hearing about China’s huge growth
numbers. He should notice that Beijing is getting its growth by focusing
on the future, the next areas of growth
in economics and technology. The
United States under Trump will be
engaged in a futile and quixotic quest
to revive the industries of the past.
Who do you think will win?
comments@fareedzakaria.com
A
JABIN BOTSFORD/THE WASHINGTON POST
President Trump in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Thursday.
The defining mistake
of Trump’s foreign policy
BY
V ALI N ASR
P
resident Trump is set to roll out his
Iran policy. The first step will be to
“decertify” the Iran nuclear deal,
which will then set the stage for a
broader campaign of economic and military pressure meant to weaken and contain Iran. This risky gambit will undermine U.S. credibility and the international
community’s ability to manage further
nuclear developments in Iran, North Korea and other places down the line for
years. The blowback to U.S. national interests, however, goes much further.
Why do it? It seems clear that Trump
disdains the Iran nuclear deal, at least in
part, because it is a signature accomplishment of the Obama presidency — a legacy
perhaps second only to the Affordable Care
Act in its symbolic significance. That helps
explain why the president has described the
deal as an “embarrassment” and “the worst
deal ever,” hyperbole that has only made it
more difficult for him to regularly report to
Congress that Iran is actually doing its part.
The president prefers to wash his hands
of the deal and let Congress decide its fate.
Refusing to confirm Iran’s compliance
while laying out a broad case against Iran
will, in effect, invite Congress to impose
new sanctions. But if other signatories to
the deal side with Iran in declaring the
United States in violation and resist U.S.
pressure to curtail their business dealings
with Iran, all that “decertification” will
achieve will be to open a rift between the
United States and its European allies,
Russia and China. On the other hand, if the
United States wins over its allies, the deal
will be dead — and everyone can go back to
worrying about war with a nuclear-armed
Iran.
The United States is right to worry about
Iran’s missile program, as well as the scope
of Iran’s regional influence and the man-
ner in which it asserts that influence. But
the course Trump is embarking on will
only plunge an already volatile Middle
East into greater turmoil, which will consume U.S. attention and resources.
Iranian leaders interpret Trump’s hostility to the nuclear deal as proof that
diplomatic engagement with the United
States is a fool’s errand — that Washington
will not abide by any diplomatic agreement and will construe willingness to
pursue diplomacy as weakness and an
invitation to apply more pressure. Already,
the commander of the Revolutionary
Guard Corps has warned that Iran would
retaliate against new sanctions, in particular the designation of the corps as a
terrorist organization, by building and
testing more missiles and labeling in kind
the U.S. military a terrorist organization —
then targeting U.S. bases and personnel.
Iran is not looking for war with the
United States. But it is starting to think
that it is better to act like North Korea. A
recalcitrant, let alone aggressively antiAmerican, Iran would dramatically
change the lay of the land for U.S. foreign
policy in the region.
The nuclear deal removed the threat of
war with Iran. That was an important
strategic win given Iran’s size, location and
importance to stability in a vast region
stretching from Central Asia to the Mediterranean. There were other benefits. The
deal made it possible for Iran and the
United States to tacitly cooperate in the
fight to roll back the Islamic State’s gains in
Iraq. At stake in Trump’s new Iran policy
will be the stability of the central government in Iraq and its ability to arrive at a
political understanding with the country’s
Sunnis and its restless autonomous Kurdish region. It is difficult to see how the
crisis generated by the Kurdish referendum for independence could be defused
without Iran. It is likewise difficult to
envision a quick end to wars in Syria and
Afghanistan if those countries become the
theater for protracted U.S.-Iranian confrontation.
In Iran itself, the nuclear deal has been
the calling card of moderate voices who
wish to reform its economy and anchor the
country’s future in better relations with
the West. Their success in negotiating the
deal has created a constituency for change
in Iran.
That constituency gave President Hassan Rouhani a resounding victory and a
clear mandate in the presidential election
in May. Rouhani ran a campaign built on
the success of the nuclear deal and the
promise of the opening to the West. In
August, an overwhelming majority in the
Iranian parliament — cutting across reformist and conservative party lines —
voted to reconfirm Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, the chief negotiator
of the nuclear deal on the Iranian side. The
deal has increasingly redrawn political
battle lines in Iran along whether to invest
the country’s future in engagement with
the United States.
There are those in the United States who
would welcome the demise of the Iranian
moderates; hard-liners at the helm in
Tehran would make it easier to array U.S.
forces against that country. But America
learned in Iraq that it cannot bring change
through the turret of a tank.
The United States will be better off if it is
Iranians who bring about change in Iran.
Yet Washington is falling victim to the
same flawed logic that paved the way to the
Iraq War. Trump’s Iran policy is not just an
attack on President Barack Obama’s foreign policy legacy; it will also define his
own. History will not be kind to this
strategic blunder.
The writer is dean of Johns Hopkins University’s
School of Advanced International Studies.
Don’t give the blue slip the pink slip
BY
F
D IANNE F EINSTEIN
or 100 years the Senate has allowed
home-state senators to play a central role in approving nominees for
federal judgeships in their states.
For a judicial nomination to move forward, both senators from a nominee’s state
must return a “blue slip” that signals their
agreement that that nominee should receive a hearing in the Judiciary Committee.
The blue-slip process was put in place to
ensure judges nominated by the president
are mainstream and well-suited to the state
in which they would serve — not handpicked by special-interest groups based in
Washington.
Republicans have long been on board
with this tradition. In 2009, the entire
Republican conference wrote to President
Barack Obama, telling him they had to be
consulted and would use the blue-slip process to block any nominees from their home
states they didn’t approve of.
Both parties have defended the blue slip
to ensure senators play a role in selecting
judicial nominees. Up until now.
Senate Republicans are threatening to
eliminate the blue slip, the last remaining
tool that ensures home-state senators of
both parties play a role in the process of
appointing judges.
Despite using the blue slip to block the
nomination of Kentucky Supreme Court
Justice Lisabeth Tabor Hughes to the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit, Senate
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is
leading the charge.
He has now reversed the position he held
during the Obama administration, arguing
that the blue slip should be treated as a
“notification” of how a senator intends to
vote, even though Republicans used it to
block nominees.
If successful, Republicans hope to stack
the nation’s courts with young, ideological
judges who could radically affect civil
rights, women’s rights, workers’ rights and
the ability to check the ever-growing power
of corporations over Americans.
Removing the only tool that prevents
President Trump from choosing anyone he
wants to sit on our federal courts could
further weaken the judiciary’s ability to
serve as an independent check on the executive branch.
It’s important to consider how we got
here. Trump’s ability to reshape our federal
courts was made possible by unprecedented obstruction of Obama’s judicial nominees, often through the use of the very
blue-slip process that Republicans now
want to dispense with.
Republicans allowed just 22 judicial confirmations in the final two years of the
Obama administration, the fewest since
President Harry S. Truman’s administration.
By contrast, during the last two years of
the George W. Bush administration, Senate
Democrats confirmed 68 judicial nominees, including 10 judges on one day less
than two months before the 2008 election.
As a result of this obstruction, Trump
entered office with 88 district court vacancies and 17 circuit court vacancies.
While it’s true that the nomination process has become more partisan, the blue slip
maintains the integrity of the process. Now,
fewer than 300 days into the Trump presidency, Republican senators may be willing
to relinquish the Senate’s responsibility to
vet nominees, allowing ideological groups
to supplant the input of home-state senators.
The Congressional Research Service
found only three examples since 1979 of
judicial nominees being confirmed without
blue slips from both home-state senators.
No circuit or district court nominee has
been confirmed without blue slips from
both home-state senators in nearly
30 years, regardless of which party controlled the Senate or White House.
During the Obama administration, Republican home-state senators weren’t shy
about using the blue slip to block judges —
six circuit court nominees and 12 district
court nominees never received hearings or
votes because they didn’t receive both blue
slips. Nonetheless, Democrats never wavered from enforcing the policy, even though
it meant Obama nominees were stymied.
Eliminating the blue slip now would
prioritize short-term political gain while
permanently diminishing the Senate as an
institution and allowing all future presidents — Republican or Democratic — to
disregard the input of senators on judges
whose rulings would affect their constituents for decades.
The blue slip ensures that nominees are
not only qualified but also chosen after
consultation with senators. During the
Obama administration, the White House
often negotiated with Republican senators
for months, if not years, to find mutually
acceptable candidates. For example, a
10th Circuit nominee from Utah was recommended to the White House by Republican Sens. Orrin G. Hatch and Mike Lee.
The Trump White House thus far has
shown little interest in adhering to norms
around selecting candidates, instead
choosing nominees for the 7th and 9th circuits without waiting for home-state senators’ bipartisan selection committees to
complete their work.
Just as Trump’s judicial nominees will
have an effect long after his presidency, the
way the Senate vets judicial nominees and
whether home-state senators continue to
have a guaranteed seat at the table will also
have a lasting legacy.
Republican senators should ask themselves if they’re willing to permanently cede
the Senate’s “advise and consent” responsibility to the White House. When they’re in
the minority — and make no mistake, all of
us eventually are — will it have been worth
it?
The writer, a Democrat, represents California in
the U.S. Senate.
Twitter: @IgnatiusPost
A18
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
ABCDE
letters@washpost.com
Where is our moral compass?
EDITORIALS
Puerto Rico’s unacceptable state
The millions of Americans on the island deserve a far better response from their government.
I
gotten these past three weeks.
Conditions on the island remain grim and, in
some instances, have been exacerbated by the delay
in getting help. Post reporters detailed an island
plunged into darkness, with roads impassable, communications knocked out and the economy at a
standstill. The New York Times detailed the impacts
on health care, with hospitals running low on
medicine, seriously ill patients going without proper
treatment and an increasing risk of people getting
sick — and dying — from contaminated water. The
Guardian reported on food shortages, with federal
emergency workers unable to meet the demand for
providing meals. “We feel completely abandoned
here,” the mayor of Yabucoa told Post reporters.
Maria was the strongest storm to hit Puerto Rico
in nearly a century. There is no minimizing its
catastrophic effects, nor the logistical challenges of
getting help to an island already suffering from poor
infrastructure and long-standing financial prob-
An act of sabotage
against the ACA
lems. But none of that excuses the federal government’s sluggish response and poor planning. Why,
for example, as the Times reported, were only
82 patients sent to the hospital ship USNS Comfort
over six days when there were so many more sick
people in peril?
Yet, almost incredibly, President Trump on Thursday blasted out a trio of tweets seemingly trying to
shame the U.S. territory for its current problems and
putting its residents on notice that the federal
government might pull out. So much for his promise
to “be there every day” until the people of Puerto
Rico are “safe and sound and secure.”
It is time to stop treating the people of Puerto Rico
like second-class citizens. Congress should give
Puerto Rico the resources it needs. It also should
exercise its oversight over the administration to
demand answers on why, three weeks after disaster
struck, so many Americans are still living in misery
with so little hope for the future.
TOM TOLES
As an octogenarian, I believe I have been reading
The Post for 70 years, but few articles have brought
me to tears as did Petula Dvorak’s Oct. 10 Metro
column, “An impossible choice for an immigrant
mother.” Catia Paz has been told to self-deport by
Friday, leaving her husband and her daughters,
ages 6 and 8, behind. Why? Because she was 17 and
not 16 or younger when she fled her war-torn
country of El Salvador. She has held a responsible
job, is raising her children and is a homeowner, but
the Trump administration rescinded the Deferred
Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful
Permanent Residents executive action, and now
she must leave or face deportation.
What have we as a country become? Where is our
moral compass? Where is basic decency? In this
instance, certainly, it has vanished.
Claire O’Dwyer Randall, Springfield
Thanks for a long, tireless fight
I am deeply grateful to Deborah Jean Bryant for
persisting in her sexual-discrimination lawsuit
against the District for 27 years [“City settles case
after nearly 3 decades,” Metro, Oct. 7]. Thanks to her
and women like her, as well as The Post’s coverage of
the issue, these cases are finally getting the serious
attention they deserve. Her case might have seemed
modest compared with those against the Harvey
Weinsteins and Roger Aileses of the world, but it’s
the quotidian sexism that most profoundly affects
most of us. Her victory is my victory, and I give her a
standing ovation.
Kate Holden, Alexandria
The efforts to fix or undo Obamacare
The Oct. 9 editorial “The wrong way to fix
Obamacare” brought readers closer to the real
meaning of a government-run health-care system.
That is, if I may quote from the editorial, “The right
response is not to cut poor and sick people off
insurance rolls but to stop paying for treatments and
services that are unneeded . . . This is hard, because
it involves telling people to change — and occasionally saying ‘no.’ ” This was solved, the editorial
concluded, by creation of the “Independent Payment
Advisory Board (IPAB), a panel of experts tasked
with making some hard choices.” I have a lot of
questions regarding the IPAB (not a death panel),
though some might think I’m being cynical. But did
the editorial mean what it seemed to suggest: that
the government, to cut costs, intends to ration
treatments and services, as well as “tantalizing but
expensive medical innovations”? Would this apply to
all Americans regardless of ability to pay (Medicare
for all)?
John Conradis, Chevy Chase
The president’s executive order
might devastate the marketplaces.
P
RESIDENT TRUMP on Thursday signed an
executive order directing his administration
to ramp up its sabotage campaign against the
Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, also known as the health-care law without
which millions of needy people would lack coverage.
The only good news is that the order merely
instructs executive agencies to draw up some new,
looser regulations, rather than immediately eroding
Obamacare’s protections. The bad news is that those
looser regulations may nevertheless come soon, and
they could devastate the ACA’s carefully regulated
marketplaces. Much depends on how reckless the
leaders of agencies such as the Labor Department
decide to be.
Obamacare’s underlying logic is that covering
people who get sick or are likely to become sick,
because of their age or preexisting conditions, requires a big insurance pool with enough healthy
people to spread risk evenly. Republicans have
argued that this system is unjust to the healthy and
young, who pay more into the system than they get
out of it, and that they can adjust the system to favor
the fortunate without harming the unlucky. They are
wrong, as analysis after analysis of their various
health-care bills showed. That is one reason GOP
lawmakers failed to pass the bills. Not taking the
hint, Mr. Trump is now trying to undercut Obamacare’s insurance pool by executive fiat, sidestepping
Congress.
The president’s executive order instructs the Labor Department to rewrite rules on health-care
plans that small businesses can band together and
buy into. Instead of being regulated like other
Obamacare insurance plans, these association
health-care plans would potentially not have to
cover a slate of essential benefits. The plans could be
cheaper but also useless for sick people. Also, insurers might be able to charge small employers much
more for plans if they have older or sicker employees.
The result is that healthy people would end up
covered with cheap and scanty association plans
while sick people were left in the normal Obamacare
market that guarantees them needed benefits. Pre-
miums for those sick people then would skyrocket.
The damage would be profound if the Labor Department concluded that individual insurance customers could buy into plans meant for small associations. Then many healthy individuals would exit
Obamacare’s big insurance pool.
The president’s plan to enhance supposedly shortterm insurance policies is similarly dangerous.
Meant as stopgap insurance for people between jobs,
these plans are almost totally unregulated — so they
can be cheap, skimpy and fairly useless for sick
people — but they can run only for three months.
Mr. Trump’s executive order could allow them to run
for 364 days in a year, enabling healthy people to use
skimpy plans as their primary health-insurance
policies. Once again, this would pull healthy people
out of the Obamacare pool and into cheap, substandard plans, triggering a disastrous escalation in
costs for those left behind in the ACA insurance pool.
Mr. Trump constantly criticizes Obamacare’s rising premiums. If his executive order is fully implemented, those premiums will rise a lot more —
especially for some of the Americans who need help
the most.
Ideas destined to die
Loathsome white nationalists will wither under the glare of national scrutiny.
A
FTER A few dozen racists led by Richard
Spencer, the white nationalist, returned to
Charlottesville for 15 minutes of torch-lit
marching and chanting last weekend — a
short-order reprise, without the violence, of their
much larger demonstration in August — Mayor
Mike Signer (D) said he is “looking at all our legal
options” to prohibit future such spectacles in the
city.
It’s easy to sympathize with Mr. Signer’s anger and
disgust: No mayor would want his town, his police
and his constituents exposed to repeat performances by the loathsome Mr. Spencer and his band of
thugs. Still, barring public assemblies and speeches
by fringe groups, no matter how hateful, is the
wrong way to respond to them, not to mention
constitutionally indefensible. Better to let them
march, and wither, in the full glare and gaze of the
public’s revulsion.
No doubt, nativism, revanchism and brazen displays of race-baiting are enjoying a moment in the
United States, provoked and exploited by President
Trump’s tolerance of them. Despite that, the large
majority of white Americans reject racism, and most
were appalled by the summer’s violence in Charlottesville and the noxious ideas that impelled those
marchers to descend on the city, waving Confederate
battle flags and chanting anti-Semitic slogans.
There is no surer way to expose extremism’s
malice and toxicity than to let it bask in the sunlight,
where all Americans can examine it plainly. The
more Mr. Spencer spouts his gospel of hatred — he
advocates “peaceful ethnic cleansing,” by which he
means Jews and nonwhites should have no place in
the United States and should be induced to leave —
the more his countrymen will be repelled.
On his return to Charlottesville last Saturday
night, many of Mr. Spencer’s acolytes appeared
wearing ties, as if that sartorial flourish would
suddenly confer a degree of respectability. In fact,
the effect was like a drop of perfume on a skunk. “We
come again in peace,” said Mr. Spencer, fooling no
one.
Cities and institutions beset by odious fanatics
are right to take seriously his antics and the menace
they represent; they cannot shrug at the venom
injected into their communities. In fact, they have
no choice but to brace for the gut punch to their
collective consciousness and to provide competent,
adequate security that will prevent violence.
Mr. Spencer has planned his next major appearance for the University of Florida, where he has
scheduled a speech on campus this month. University officials, mindful of the events in Charlottesville,
are spending an anticipated $500,000 on security
for the event at the Gainesville campus. Like other
universities where Mr. Spencer has spoken and
wants to speak, the University of Florida neither
wanted nor invited him. But as a public institution,
it has little choice but to allow the event to go ahead.
The content of his speech is unlikely to be
edifying, but the long-term outcome of the spectacles Mr. Spencer and his ilk are staging across the
country is likely to be this: In the free market of
ideas, flash-in-the-pan extremism has rarely carried
the day in America. That’s not likely to change now.
ABCDE
TA K I N G EX C EP TI O N
FREDERICK J. RYAN JR., Publisher and Chief Executive Officer
A false stereotype of the left’s motives
In his Oct. 10 op-ed, “America can rise above its
grievances,” Michael Gerson repeated a cliche that
often plagues The Post’s op-ed page. This is the false
stereotype of the “tenured class” on the left as
coupling honest attention to injustice in the American experience with a call for “the cleansing purity of
social revolution.”
In fact, many of us take our cues from President
Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Second Bill of Rights speech.
Roosevelt, a progressive who sought to secure American capitalist democracy, not to repudiate it, argued
that basic universal economic securities of employment, decent pay and housing, health care, nondiscrimination and education are necessary to the
claims of liberty, equal dignity and pursuit of happiness articulated in the Declaration of Independence.
These are priorities, not bromides — but sincere,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
LE TTE R S TO TH E E D I TOR
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER
T HAS been three weeks since Hurricane Maria
made devastating landfall in Puerto Rico. Three
weeks — and 84 percent of the population is still
without power. Only 63 percent has access to
clean water, and just 60 percent of wastewater
treatment plants are working. Food supplies are
spotty, the health-care system is in crisis and people
are dying. The death toll has risen to 45.
If the Americans enduring these conditions lived
in Connecticut or Montana or Arkansas, would we be
counseling patience? Would we be blithely accepting
predictions of another month — or more — to get
power restored? No. There would be unending
media coverage, people would be furious — and the
president of the United States certainly wouldn’t be
threatening to abandon federal relief efforts.
The state of affairs would simply be seen as
unacceptable, which it is. The 3.4 million American
citizens who live in Puerto Rico are owed a far better
response from their government than they have
. FRIDAY,
accountable, urgent priorities, on which the honor
and decency of our democracy depend. In
Roosevelt’s words: “America’s own rightful place in
the world depends in large part upon how fully these
and similar rights have been carried into practice for
our citizens.”
Notwithstanding our current president, there is
important room — on issues including health care,
immigration, mass incarceration and more — for
cooperative, sober, factually accountable congressional action between Republicans and Democrats
toward these ends. Mr. Gerson’s invocations of
President Abraham Lincoln, the Rev. Martin Luther
King Jr. and President Barack Obama evinced this
spirit of accountable bipartisan engagement; others
he unjustly caricatures share this spirit, too.
Peter Lancelot Mallios, Ellicott City
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Merely reiterating that the efforts of the
Republicans to “dismantle and replace the Affordable Care Act” failed is insufficient [“Republican
lawmakers have little to say about Trump-Corker
war of words,” news, Oct. 10].
Without President Trump’s stated promises as to
what his health-care plan to replace the ACA would
provide, and without some information as to what
Congress actually proposed and what the House
actually voted to do, the cause of the failure of this
legislation is left to speculation. The use of that
failure as a comparison with a proposed “tax
overhaul” is of limited use.
Mr. Trump’s promises of wonderful and cheap
health care for all, congressional Republicans’ actions to try to deny tens of millions of Americans
health care, and the rest of the reality of what was
promised and who actually would have benefited
and suffered, however, provide a firmer comparison
with what might be expected in the upcoming
signature tax “reform” legislation being proposed.
David M. Siegler, Oakton
What it will take to act on Mr. Trump
The Oct. 10 editorial “What to do with an unfit
president” proposed several actions Congress could
take to deal with President Trump’s irrational behavior. However, as the Oct. 7 front-page article “To drain
‘swamp,’ Trump’s base has filled GOP coffers” reported, Mr. Trump continues to be a successful fundraiser
for the GOP. If the Republican members of Congress
were to move against Mr. Trump, they would imperil
their relationship with these donors, both the big,
wealthy ones and the small, under-$200 donors.
Until we reform the campaign finance system and
get money out of politics, our elected officials will be
more interested in what their donors think than
what their constituents think, or even what they
themselves think is best for the country.
David Bazell, Columbia
The writer is lead organizer for Progressive
Maryland, which works for public financing
of campaigns, among other issues.
The Oct. 10 editorial “What to do with an unfit
president” was a sensible approach, except for the
need to treat the implied threat of nuclear war as
emergent. A number of commentators are reporting
recent remarks by President Trump as a revival of
President Richard Nixon’s madman theory: trying to
make others think our leader is irrational and
volatile, thereby causing them to back down from
their threats against the United States out of fear.
The problem with gaining comfort from this
theory is that we don’t know whether our president
is behaving strategically or recklessly putting many
lives in danger. We also don’t know whether there are
checks on the president’s power to prevent a catastrophe. We learned much later that the Pentagon
worried about Nixon’s mental state and that the
defense secretary instructed the Joint Chiefs of Staff
that any 11th-hour orders from the White House
were to be vetted according to the chain of command.
My profession, clinical psychiatry, has been mostly silent because of a warning that it is unethical to
state a professional opinion about the president’s
behavior without a personal examination or his
consent. The dire consequences of a war may transcend protocol and justify a duty to warn — just as it
did in the 1970s when people at high levels of
government fretted about Nixon’s mental stability.
Nuclear war is something we cannot risk.
Jeffrey B. Freedman, New York
Letters and Local Opinions: letters@washpost.com
Op-eds: oped@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
A19
RE
MICHAEL GERSON
CATHERINE RAMPELL
It’s time for Republican
vertebrates
Trump’s
executive hit
on the ACA
I
n the midst of a governing crisis,
House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (RWis.) has once again risen to his
role as the voice of bland complacency. Concerning the open warfare
between President Trump and
Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), Ryan advises “these two gentlemen to sit down
and just talk through their issues.”
But what are Corker’s “issues”? He
has asserted that Trump requires constant handling to control his volatility:
“I know for a fact that every single day
at the White House, it’s a situation of
trying to contain him.” Corker has
accused Trump of lacking strategic
thinking: “A lot of people think that
there is some kind of ‘good cop, bad
cop’ act underway, but that’s just not
true.” Corker has called out Trump’s
routine deceptions: “I don’t know why
the president tweets out things that are
not true.” Corker has talked of Trump’s
vacuity: He acts “like he’s doing ‘The
Apprentice’ or something.” Corker,
who chairs the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has expressed the
fear that Trump’s instability could lead
to conflict: “We could be headed
toward World War III with the kind of
comments that he’s making.”
So how does Ryan imagine a Corker/
Trump conversation might unfold?
Over dinner, Corker accuses the president of being a chaotic, directionless,
shallow liar who could start a nuclear
war. Trump passes the peas and attacks
Corker for being short. This is, after all,
the way gentlemen resolve their differences.
GOP denial about Trump has generally taken Ryan’s form. The president
may be eccentric and divisive, but
Republicans need to keep their heads
down and think of tax reform. This
assumes that the main challenge is to
avoid distraction from essential tasks.
But the real problem has always
been Trump’s fundamental unfitness
for high office. It is not Trump’s
indiscipline and lack of leadership,
which make carrying a legislative
agenda forward nearly impossible. It is
not his vulgarity and smallness, which
have been the equivalent of spraypainting graffiti on the Washington
Monument. It is not his nearly complete ignorance of policy and history,
which condemns him to live in the
eternal present of his own immediate
desires.
No, Corker has given public permission to raise the most serious questions: Is Trump psychologically and
morally equipped to be president? And
could his unfitness cause permanent
damage to the country?
It is no longer possible to safely
ignore the leaked cries for help coming
from within the administration. They
reveal a president raging against enemies, obsessed by slights, deeply uninformed and incurious, unable to
focus, and subject to destructive
whims. A main task of the chief of staff
seems to be to shield him from dinner
guests and telephone calls that might
set him off on a foolish or dangerous
tangent. Much of the White House
senior staff seems bound, not by loyalty
to the president, but by a duty to
protect the nation from the president.
Trump, in turn, is reported to have
said: “I hate everyone in the White
House.” And also, presumably, in the
State Department, headed by a secretary of state who apparently regards
his boss as a “moron.”
It was once urged, “Let Reagan be
Reagan.” Who, besides the oleaginous
Sean Hannity, would say, “Let Trump
be Trump”? The security of our country
— and potentially the lives of millions
of people abroad — depends on Trump
being someone else entirely. It depends
on the president being some wise,
strategic, restrained leader he has
never been.
The time for whispered criticisms
and quiet snickering is over. The time
for panic and decision is upon us. The
thin line of sane, responsible advisers
at the White House — such as Chief of
Staff John F. Kelly, Defense Secretary
Jim Mattis and Secretary of State Rex
Tillerson — could break at any moment. Already, Trump’s protests of
eternal love for Kelly are a bad sign for
the general’s future. The American
government now has a dangerous fragility at its very center. Its welfare is as
thin as an eggshell — perhaps as thin as
Donald Trump’s skin.
Any elected Republican who shares
Corker’s concerns has a political and
moral duty to state them in public. If
Corker is correct, many of his colleagues do have such fears. Their
silence is deafening and damning.
“Brave men are all vertebrates,” said
G.K. Chesterton. “They have their softness on the surface and their toughness in the middle. But these modern
cowards are all crustaceans; their
hardness is all on the cover, and their
softness is inside.”
More than anything else at this
moment, the nation has need of Republican vertebrates.
michaelgerson@washpost.com
EUGENE ROBINSON
The ‘high crime’
of abandoning Puerto Rico
M
ore than 80 percent of Puerto Rico is still in the dark,
more than a third of its
residents still have no clean
drinking water, much of the island’s
infrastructure still lies in ruins — and
President Trump cruelly threatens to
cut off federal aid. Doing so would be
government by spite and should be
considered an impeachable offense.
Puerto Rico, as any fifth-grader
knows, is part of the America that
Trump promises to make great again.
But the mayor of San Juan had the
temerity to criticize the Trump administration’s response to the calamity of
Hurricane Maria as slow and inadequate. For Trump, everything is always all about Trump. He desperately
craves adulation.
The president complained Sunday
on Twitter, “Nobody could have done
what I’ve done for #PuertoRico with so
little appreciation. So much work!”
Note the use of “I” instead of “we” or
even “my administration.” For the record, what Trump has done personally
for the people of Puerto Rico is playfully toss rolls of paper towels into a
crowd.
The administration has done much
more, of course. But desperate people
— still facing critical shortages of food
and water three weeks after the storm
— are demanding more action. This
makes them “ingrates” in Trump’s eyes.
Sadly, those are the kinds of words
we’ve come to expect from this president. But on Thursday he went beyond
his usual self-pitying, self-justifying
blather to make an outrageous threat:
“We cannot keep FEMA, the Military &
the First Responders, who have been
amazing (under the most difficult circumstances) in P.R. forever!”
That culminated a series of blamethe-victim tweets about how Puerto
Ricans face “a financial crisis . . . largely of their own making” and how
“electric and all infrastructure was [a]
disaster before hurricanes.” The need
to solve the island’s debt problem and
update its infrastructure is worthy of
serious discussion, but not while people are having to collect unpurified
water in buckets from mountain
springs — and not as some kind of
justification for cutting off relief aid.
This may be the most un-American
thing Trump has ever said or done. I
am serious that if he actually withdraws emergency assistance while
Puerto Rico is still in such condition,
Congress should begin impeachment
proceedings.
Presidents do not get to pick and
choose which Americans to help at
times of disaster. We are one country,
and we do what we must to help fellow
citizens in need. We saw it during this
long, terrible hurricane season, in
Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Texas,
Florida — strangers helping strangers,
regardless of race, income, political
views. We are seeing it now as firefighters from around the country converge
on Northern California to attack the
deadly blazes that are still burning out
of control.
It is wrong to describe Trump as any
kind of nationalist if he fails to grasp
the most fundamental of nationalistic
precepts: We leave none of our own on
the battlefield.
The responsibility of the federal
government is to keep FEMA workers,
military personnel and other first responders in Puerto Rico as long as
necessary. It is important to do so
because their presence will save lives.
It is also important because doing
anything else would violate the American compact. If Trump really were to
turn his back on Puerto Rico, he would
be guilty of a “high crime” and disqualified to continue in office.
I know that Trump delights in
violating political norms and causing
the commentariat to run around with
its hair on fire. I know that he sometimes says provocative things on Twitter to distract from his administration’s failures, to rally his base, to
provoke his enemies or even just to
blow off steam. I know that it’s impossible to take any one tweet too seriously,
because it may be directly contradicted
by the next tweet.
But Trump actually went to Puerto
Rico, and while he did not see the worst
of the devastation, he saw more than
enough. He knows that recovery is
going to be a long, massive and largely
thankless job. But that is the job he
signed up for when he took the oath of
office. Congress must not allow him to
shirk his duty.
To divide the country with rhetoric,
as Trump so often does, is one thing.
But to actually abandon 3.4 million
Americans in their hour of need not
only would be an unprecedented and
shameful act. It would also be grounds
for removing an unfit man from the
high office he dishonors.
eugenerobinson@washpost.com
P
JORGE SILVA/REUTERS
A Rohingya girl carries a baby through a refugee camp near Cox’s Bazar,
Bangladesh, on Tuesday.
The Rohingya
need our help
BY
E RIC P . S CHWARTZ
I
n 1998, President Bill Clinton visited Rwanda, where he formally apologized for the U.S. government’s
inaction during the 1994 genocide
there that claimed approximately
800,000 lives. He lamented that the
international community “did not immediately call these crimes by their
rightful name.” Indeed, this was an
omission of historic proportion, and the
absence of outrage enabled policymakers to avoid considering bold measures
that might have made a difference.
The U.S. government is now risking
the same kind of failure in the case of
Burma’s Rohingya minority. On Oct. 5,
State Department testimony to the
House Foreign Affairs Committee was
strikingly reminiscent of the initial descriptions of the situation in Rwanda
23 years ago. Members of Congress tried
in vain to persuade the department’s
East Asia witness, Deputy Assistant Secretary Patrick Murphy, to affirmatively
declare that ethnic cleansing was taking
place in Burma, also known as Myanmar. Instead, he described the situation
as a “cauldron of complexities.” His
remarks betrayed little sense of urgency.
The facts are hardly in dispute. On a
visit to Bangladesh last month, I heard
repeated testimony from refugees that
confirmed what credible human rights
groups have been reporting for many
weeks. After attacks by a Rohingya
militant group on Burmese security
forces at the end of August, the Burmese
military began systematically setting
fire to Rohingya villages and shooting
civilians as they tried to flee.
By now, more than 500,000 Rohingya
— about half of the Rohingya population
living in Burma before Aug. 25 — have
fled to Bangladesh, joining hundreds of
thousands of Rohingya who were already there as refugees. The exodus
continues even now, and there is little
doubt that the Burmese military is responsible for crimes against humanity.
To be sure, the State Department
testimony on Oct. 5 came after more
pointed statements last month by Vice
President Pence, who declared that the
Burmese military had responded with
“terrible savagery,” and by Nikki Haley,
the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, who referred to “a brutal, sustained campaign to cleanse the country
of an ethnic minority.” But these statements haven’t been followed by a strong
U.S. effort to rally the world to the cause
of the Rohingya. As a result, the State
Department testimony remains the
most detailed discussion of U.S. policy to
date.
Our values demand that we not simply sit by as if there were nothing we
could do to prevent the continuing
tragedy. U.S. interests in regional stability and democracy in Burma also compel
stronger action. The Rohingya population has already attracted the attention
of movements in the Islamic world.
Militant groups may seek recruits
among the roughly 1 million Rohingya
refugees in Bangladesh. Future attacks
by Rohingya insurgents in Burma would
give the military a pretext to reassert
control and end the country’s longfought struggle for democracy.
Bold action is essential to diminish
the likelihood of such an outcome and to
enable the safe return of the Rohingya. It
is true that the challenges are formidable. While Burmese civilian leader and
Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu
Kyi has expressed a willingness to accept
the return of the Rohingya who have
fled, no one knows what obstacles may
be imposed by the Burmese authorities.
It is unrealistic to believe Rohingya,
whose villages have been destroyed by
the military, would have sufficient confidence to dare return. Moreover, action to
bring multilateral pressure to bear at the
United Nations risks being stymied,
above all by the Chinese government,
which supports the Burmese military.
China also has an interest in good
relations with Bangladesh and the Islamic world as well as in the long-term
stability of Burma itself. For all these
reasons, the United States should seek to
join with China to press both Aung San
Suu Kyi and the Burmese military to
agree to the return of the Rohingya
refugees and to provide them with genuine safeguards.
In particular, the United States, China
and other U.N. Security Council members should urge that such safeguards
include rapid deployment of a U.N.
peace observer mission to Rakhine
state, home to the overwhelming majority of the refugees. The mission would
monitor both the return of refugees and
conditions facing all ethnic communities, including those the Burmese government is concerned may be threatened by Rohingya insurgents. The diplomatic involvement of the Chinese, who
now contribute more personnel to U.N.
peace operations than any other permanent member of the Security Council,
could provide reassurance to the Burmese government and military.
The politics of this effort would be
extremely complicated. But it is worth a
try, as it may be the only hope to promote
regional peace and stability and keep
faith with a Rohingya population whose
most fervent desire is to live in peace in
Burma.
The writer is president of Refugees
International.
Punish me, not my community
BY
I’
S AYRA L OZANO
m a “dreamer.” The Trump administration’s list of demands it wants
in exchange for helping us makes
me feel like a traitor.
Among these demands are:
The administration wants a wall that
will perpetuate division rather than
granting actual security.
It wants fewer protections and faster
deportation for child refugees of violence
from Central America.
It wants a crackdown on cities that
refuse to use police officers as immigration officials, because doing so fosters fear
of those who are supposed to protect and
encourages racial profiling.
In exchange for granting legal status
for young people who have never known
any country but the United States, the
administration wants us to agree to
placing a physical barrier between us and
our countries of birth and people. To
shutting the door on others who arrive as
children just as we did. To shoving our
parents back into the shadows of fear.
The America I know and love would never
ask this of me in exchange for her
acceptance.
We are not more human than other
immigrants because we are called
“dreamers.” All that sets us apart is that,
thanks to the soon-to-expire Deferred
Action for Childhood Arrivals program,
we’ve been able to share our stories for a
time without the fear of deportation. If
only the voices of bigotry would go silent
long enough to hear the whispered stories
of the 11 million still-shadowed lives.
We have done nothing more than try to
contribute to the nation we love. Why
must our communities be “punished” for
Republican elected officials to feel better
about “helping” us? Let me pay the fine,
let me risk my security by advocating
publicly, let me bear the burden of this
broken immigration system, not my community. I’ll do it all if it means I get to call
the United States home.
We refuse to bargain at the cost of other
marginalized people. Passing a clean
Dream Act would enrich our country by
building our workforce, improving our
economy and strengthening us all as one
nation under God. That is all we seek.
The writer is a graduate student at
Southeastern University and an immigration
rights activist.
resident Trump has made a lot of
promises on health care.
Somehow, though, I don’t remember him promising stadiums
of cheering fans that he’d take away
protections for preexisting conditions,
increase deductibles, spike premiums,
eliminate basic coverage requirements
and, more generally, destabilize the individual health-insurance market.
But that is what he said he’d do
Thursday, when he signed an executive
order on health care.
Those aren’t the precise words he
used, of course. But they are the consequences of the policy bombs he wants to
set off in two relatively obscure corners of
the insurance market: association health
plans and short-term health plans.
What are these plans, you might ask?
Under current law, an association of
small businesses (such as a group of law
firms) can band together and market
insurance to members. These association
health plans must abide by all the consumer protections of the Affordable Care
Act. They are also subject to the insurance laws and rules of the state in which
they’re sold.
But under Trump’s executive order,
depending on what the final regulations
say, an association could exempt itself
from lots of federal Obamacare requirements (such as essential health benefits),
and choose any state to be its regulator
(regardless of where its members are).
Meaning if it wanted to be regulated
by a state that doesn’t require coverage of
prescription drugs or cancer treatments,
it could.
This would not only rob states of their
sovereignty, which Republicans have so
often claimed to champion, but also
create a race to the bottom. Pursuing
ever-lower premiums, every association
would likely incorporate in the most
Wild-West-like state around, in the way
that credit card companies tend to domicile in South Dakota.
The administration has also left open
the possibility that individuals — and not
just small employers — could buy into
these association plans, further siphoning people out of the individual markets.
What about those “short-term health
plans”?
These can sometimes serve a legitimate purpose — a stopgap to tide you
over for the summer until the school year
starts, for instance.
But after Obamacare passed, there
was a proliferation of scammy “shortterm” plans that weren’t so short term.
Some lasted 364 days! Why?
“They walked and talked like traditional insurance, but as long as they were
less than 12 months, they were not
technically considered ‘insurance,’ ” explains Sabrina Corlette, a research professor at Georgetown University’s Health
Policy Institute.
As such, the plans weren’t subject to
Obamacare consumer protections such
as essential health benefits and guaranteed issue to people with preexisting
conditions. Insurers could offer skimpy
plans and cherry-pick the cheapest, most
profitable enrollees.
The Obama administration ultimately
closed this loophole by determining that
short-term plans must be shorter than
three months.
With his executive order, Trump seeks
to re-lengthen those plans.
Both of these changes, the president
boasts, would give consumers more
“choice.” Which sounds swell. But insurance markets do weird, counterintuitive
things when you introduce more choice.
Two main problems result.
One is that, absent minimums for
quality and regulatory oversight, lots of
Americans are likely to get conned into
plans that cover almost nothing (or that
even turn out to be insolvent). These are
sometimes called min-med or “buffalo
plans,” because they pay out pretty much
only if you’re trampled by a herd of
buffalo.
The bigger problem is called adverse
selection.
That’s the idea that healthy people will
sort into low-cost, bare-bones plans,
while relatively costly people will stay in
the more generous, Obamacarecompliant plans, which can’t legally turn
customers away. Premiums in Obamacare plans would then spike, driving out
more relatively healthy people, further
driving up premiums, and so on.
In the end, the whole individual market falls apart, leaving us with basically
the pre-Obamacare system. Even those
healthy people — even if they stay
healthy! — have no real options.
The only good news is that Trump’s
executive order doesn’t have force of law.
It’s a set of instructions for Cabinet
members to come up with further regulations. These may turn out to be weaker
than Trump has implied, especially because some elements of the order appear
legally dubious. They also won’t be ready
in time for the upcoming 2018 open
enrollment season.
In the meantime, though, Trump’s
executive order will spook a lot of insurers, which have only just recently found
their footing in the existing system. And
it’s also likely to confuse consumers,
which could depress enrollment and
destabilize markets further.
Which would be pretty much on brand
for this nihilistic president: When you
can’t come up with a new system that
works, just blow up the old one.
crampell@washpost.com
A20
EZ
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
KLMNO
METRO
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
High today at
approx. 6 p.m.
8 a.m.
Noon
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
61 65 67 67°
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69°
Precip: 50%
Wind: E
7-14 mph
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WASHINGTONPOST.COM/REGIONAL
EZ
B
SU
THE DISTRICT
MARYLAND
OBITUARIES
Strong economy leaves
behind Washington’s
black residents, a new
study finds. B2
After abuse allegations,
the Prince George’s
school system says it’s
improved practices. B4
Sima Wali became one of
the most visible activists
for the rights of Afghan
women. B6
Noxious gas has sickened VA sta≠ for two years
BY
A LEX H ORTON
Staff and patients at a D.C.
medical facility for homeless military veterans have endured noxious gas exposure for nearly two
years as top hospital administrators, though aware of the problem, have failed to remedy it,
according to interviews with staff
and documents obtained by The
Washington Post.
At least eight clinical workers
at the Department of Veterans
Affairs Community Resource and
Referral Center have tested positive for elevated levels of carbon
Eight reportedly tested positive for carbon monoxide
monoxide, a March internal
email said, describing a potentially dangerous condition that
restricts oxygen circulation. As
many as 30 employees, desperate
to avoid further exposure, have
sought reassignment or permission to work remotely.
One doctor resigned in protest
after VA leaders were unable to
produce solutions, clinic staffers
said.
“Many of my colleagues, in-
cluding myself, have experienced
some type of illness while working in the CRRC,” one staffer
wrote in an August email responding to a VA health official
who appeared to play down
symptoms of concerned workers.
The most recent incident was
Oct. 4, staffers said.
The Post reviewed dozens of
emails and records, and conducted numerous interviews with
clinical workers and others famil-
President
might hit
trail to lift
Gillespie
iar with the problem. What
emerged is an unsettling glimpse
of VA’s struggle to mitigate a
potentially significant health
hazard, and raises questions
about the agency’s ability to fulfill
the promises it has made to
improve accountability. The troubled agency was identified early
on by President Trump as being
in dire need of sweeping reform.
VA spokesman Curt Cashour
said the hospital’s leadership
“took aggressive steps to look
into the problem” once complaints began to circulate. Tests
ILLNESS CONTINUED ON B4
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Staffers at the VA Community Resource and Referral Center say the
gas exposure has occurred intermittently and without warning.
Va. rally
leaders
under
legal fire
RETROPOLIS
‘Serious talks’ underway
for a Trump rally in Va.
before gubernatorial vote
BY
SUITS SEEK END TO
SIMILAR GATHERINGS
L AURA V OZZELLA
Strategy relies upon cases
used to halt KKK activities
richmond — A former chair-
man of Donald Trump’s Virginia
campaign said Thursday that the
White House is in “very serious
talks” with Ed Gillespie’s gubernatorial campaign about having
the president stump for him in
the state.
A Trump rally could fire up
Trump supporters for Gillespie, a
longtime Republican Party fixture who has struggled to find
the right footing regarding the
anti-establishment Trump.
A Trump appearance could
pose risks for Gillespie in purple
Virginia, where Trump’s approval ratings are well below 40 percent. Hillary Clinton beat Trump
by five points in Virginia last year
— the only Southern state won by
the Democrat.
Most public polls show
Gillespie tied or slightly trailing
the Democrat, Lt. Gov. Ralph
Northam.
The White House and
Gillespie campaign are in “very
serious talks” about such a presidential appearance as a means of
boosting
the
Republican’s
chances in his neck-and-neck
race against Northam, said John
Fredericks, a conservative radio
host.
He announced that plans were
in the works on his show Thursday morning and later elaborated in an interview with The
Washington Post.
“The days of Ed Gillespie
threading the needle with President Trump are coming to an
BY
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
An 1832 building served as the home of the keeper of the canal lock, which raised and lowered canal boats as they traveled between
the District and Cumberland, Md. On Thursday, workers shifted it 50 feet from its spot at 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
Moving 50 feet — to prominence
D
istance: 50 feet.
Top speed: roughly 0.3 mph.
Elapsed time: about 30 minutes, with
starts and stops.
The wheels of history turned slowly Thursday, as
they carried a 47-ton piece of Washington’s past to a
new spot and a prominent new status on the Mall.
A work crew using high-tech moving equipment
inched the 1832 lock keeper’s house at 17th Street
and Constitution Avenue NW away from the spot
where it sat, tattered and forlorn, for 100 years.
Boarded up and forgotten for the past 40 years,
the simple stone building once sat at a bustling hub
of Washington’s commerce — the junction of two
shipping canals and a huge wharf on the Potomac
River.
BY
M ICHAEL E .
R UANE
A piece of
Washington’s
history inches
toward a spot
at the Mall’s
welcome plaza
It served as the home of the keeper of the canal
lock, which raised and lowered canal boats as they
traveled between the District and Cumberland, Md.
The operation Thursday moved the house to a
spot off the intersection that will become a new
welcome center and gateway to the Mall, according
to the nonprofit Trust for the National Mall, which
funded the $11 million project.
The house, just north of the National World
War II Memorial, is the oldest building on the Mall,
according to the National Park Service. But since its
heyday, it has been used by squatters, as a police
headquarters, for restrooms and for storage.
Its move — five years in the making — is the first
private construction project on the Mall, said John E.
RETROPOLIS CONTINUED ON B2
CAMPAIGN CONTINUED ON B5
Charlottesville residents, business leaders and elected officials
went to court Thursday to try to
prevent a repeat of the violence at
a white-nationalist rally this
summer that rocked the university town.
The legal response from the
local community, including from
individuals injured during the
confrontations, comes as officials
from Boston to Berkeley are looking for ways to avoid similar
clashes at political protests.
Two filings — one in federal
court, and the other in state court
— target “Unite the Right” rally
leaders and organizers, including
white nationalists Richard Spencer, Jason Kessler and Matthew
Heimbach.
The federal lawsuit, brought
by residents injured in August,
seeks monetary damages and a
ban on similar gatherings. The
complaint cites federal laws enacted during Reconstruction to
counter intimidation of blacks in
the South and more recent cases
targeting antiabortion activists.
The other suit, joined by the
Charlottesville City Council, fixes
on the heavily armed, camo-clad
private militias at the rally using
a rarely invoked provision of
Virginia’s constitution that attorneys say bans military organizaMILITIAS CONTINUED ON B5
Is beaten man no longer the victim?
Here it is — we
have it now — the
defining moment
of this bizarro,
alternate reality
we’re living in
Petula
today.
Dvorak
The black man
who was
surrounded in a
Charlottesville parking garage by
white supremacists during the
heinous “Unite the Right” rally
and beaten bloody — you saw the
horrifying video, everyone did —
is now facing a felony charge
from that incident.
How crazy is that?
It’s true that, in the video,
DeAndre Harris swung a
flashlight at a white supremacist
trying to spear a
counterprotester with the pole of
a Confederate flag. But within
seconds, he was kicked to the
ground by a group of at least five
white supremacists, who
pummeled the 20-year-old with
sticks and a large board.
Somehow, in our new
kingdom of Cruelsville, a guy
A NN E . M ARIMOW
AND J OE H EIM
Connolly, Hogan pressuring Evans
to resign as Metro board chairman
Critics say disputes over
reliable funding path
impede transit agency
AND
ZACH D. ROBERTS VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS
DeAndre Harris is beaten by white supremacists in a garage next to
the Charlottesville police station on Aug. 12.
who winds up with a spinal
injury and 10 stitches in his head
is charged with unlawful
wounding — a crime similar to
the one his three alleged
attackers are facing.
Should we suspend the
California wine country kids
who didn’t show up for classes at
their burned-out school? Or
ticket the cars swept away in
Houston’s flood?
Why not? The parents of
DVORAK CONTINUED ON B5
BY F AIZ S IDDIQUI
R OBERT M C C ARTNEY
Pressure grew on Metro board
chairman Jack Evans to resign
Thursday after he threatened to
exercise a rarely used veto in a
struggle between the District and
Maryland that critics said exemplifies the parochial disputes
hampering the transit agency.
Rep. Gerald E. Connolly
(D-Va.) joined Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) in calling for Evans
to step down. Connolly is the first
Democrat to urge the departure
of Evans, who represents the
District on the Metro board and is
a Democratic D.C. Council member representing Ward 2.
Connolly blamed Evans for inflaming tensions within the region as Metro seeks regionwide
support for increased, reliable
funding.
“I think the time has come for
Jack Evans to step down as chairman and from the board,” Connolly said. “He has now become a
lightning rod that can only create, frankly, opposition to any
attempt at forging a regional
agreement on dedicated funding.”
The escalating criticism of Evans highlighted the tensions
among the District, Maryland
and Virginia over how to govern
Metro and led to renewed calls to
shrink the board and make it less
political.
The board is made up of eight
voting members and eight alternates, evenly divided among the
District, Maryland, Virginia and
the federal government. Evans
was reelected as chairman in
January despite having aroused
ire in Maryland, Virginia and
Congress for his outspoken rhetoric, such as faulting the states for
resisting a penny-per-dollar regionwide sales tax to fund Metro.
Connolly spoke after Evans
warned that the city would exercise a jurisdictional veto to hold
up transferring Metro property to
Maryland, which the state needs
for its light-rail Purple Line, unless Maryland supports a board
reorganization that the District
favors.
Under board rules, two voting
members from the District, Maryland or Virginia can block a
resolution otherwise supported
by the majority. For years, the
veto has been criticized for allowing individual jurisdictions to obstruct measures in the system’s
overall interest.
Hogan’s office condemned Evans’s veto threat as “tantamount
to extortion” and used stronger
language than in the past in
METRO CONTINUED ON B3
B2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
THE DISTRICT
Study: The healthy D.C. economy is leaving behind longtime black residents
Average white household
net worth is $284,000,
vs. $3,500 for blacks
BY
P ERRY S TEIN
The booming and increasingly
dynamic D.C. economy is leaving
the city’s longtime black residents behind, according to a
study released Thursday that examines African American employment, population and housing trends in the nation’s capital.
The Georgetown University report, which culled data from
several recent studies, found that
more than half of all new jobs in
the District between 2010 and
2020 will require at least a bachelor’s degree, although only
12.3 percent of black residents in
2014 had graduated from college.
It noted the average white household in the region has a net worth
of $284,000, while the assets of
the average black household are
just $3,500.
“It’s not a pretty picture,” D.C.
Council Chairman Phil Mendelson (D) said before the findings
were presented to city leaders
and residents.
According to the report, the
median annual income for white
D.C. families is $120,000, while it
is $41,000 for black households.
Between 2007 and 2014, the median household income in the
District increased by about
$10,000 but remained flat for
black households.
While striking, the findings
largely mirror those of other recent studies. As the city becomes
wealthier, younger and more affluent residents are moving in,
raising housing prices and pushing longtime black residents out
of the city. In 2015, the population
of black residents in the District
— which garnered the nickname
“Chocolate City” — dipped below
50 percent for the first time in
60 years.
The Georgetown report traces
the inequities in the District today to discriminatory practices
that once kept black residents
out of the economy. It also pro-
vides recommendations for the
city to help strive for greater
equality.
“One of the contributions of
this report is how much it puts in
one place both the history of the
city and redlining and school
segregation, and connecting it to
how those impacts play out today,” said Ed Lazere, executive
director of the D.C. Fiscal Policy
Institute, whose work is extensively cited in the study. “That
half of all black households in
D.C. have assets of $3,500 or less
— that’s virtually nothing, and it’s
probably a reflection that housing discrimination years ago kept
them from owning homes.”
The report indicates that one
of many reasons black Washingtonians are being left behind is
that after the devastating 1968
riots, many businesses opted to
move to the suburbs. It also notes
that black residents were often
“redlined,” the practice of banks
and loaning institutions refusing
to lend to business owners in
communities with large minority
populations.
“Aspiring black businesspeo-
ple were unable to fill the vacuum
simply because they could not
secure a line of credit to open and
maintain small businesses,
stores, dry cleaners, restaurants
and other outlets,” the report
states.
The report recommends that
the D.C. Chamber of Commerce
and city agencies create a database of minority businesses that
would “outline opportunities and
procedures for small-business
loans and training aids.” Local
universities, the report says,
should offer courses in the “howtos of minority business development.”
Maurice Jackson, a Georgetown history professor and chairman of the city’s Commission on
African
American
Affairs,
stressed the need to invest in
education and training programs
so D.C. residents have the skills
needed to meet modern job demands. Jackson, the report’s lead
author, also suggested that the
city invest in apprenticeship and
job programs for residents returning to society after serving
jail time.
Council member Vincent C.
Gray (D-Ward 7) said that as
mayor, he invested in vocational
and career programs in high
schools that focused on IT, hospitality and other trades.
“Why those curricula?” he
asked. “Because that’s where the
jobs are. That’s where they’re
emerging.”
The report also traces the history and effects of gentrification,
noting that it has led to a dearth
of affordable housing. There are
43,000 D.C. residents who qualify
as
“extremely
low-income,”
which means a family of four
making less than $32,000 a year.
(Ninety-one percent of “extremely low-income” families are African American.)
Beginning in the 1950s,
wealthy and middle-income families started fleeing cities, including the District, for suburbs and
largely left poor people by themselves in city centers.
“This suburbanization led to
economic downturn within several major cities, such as Atlanta,
Chicago and Washington, creating fiscal crises due to shrinking
tax bases,” according to the report. “To alleviate this problem,
many city governments pursued
policies to attract new investments in the city, bring in wealthier residents to increase taxable
income and housing sales, revitalize retail activity and raise
sales tax revenue.”
Now that wealthier residents
have moved back to cities, rent
increases have left longtime residents unable to afford their
homes. The report recommends
building more affordable housing in newly expensive neighborhoods such as Columbia Heights
and NoMa. And, it says, the city
should intervene before poorer
neighborhoods become unaffordable for longtime residents.
“In these communities, policies should offer a path to eventual homeownership, enabling
individuals to eventually purchase a unit at an affordable
price,” the report states. “Rent-toown housing is beneficial because it creates personal equity
for individuals and helps lift residents from poverty.”
perry.stein@washpost.com
Canal house takes 185-year trip to national importance
RETROPOLIS FROM B1
“Chip” Akridge III, founder of
the trust.
And it’s focused on a rare
Washington artifact.
“It’s the only witness left to
that period in time, and
commerce of that time,” said
Teresa Durkin, a landscape
architect and executive vice
president for the trust.
“It persists,” she said. “It’s still
here, for some reason. . . . Every
hundred years, it’s being moved.
But it’s still here. We can’t let it go.”
The house was last moved in
1915, again only a few dozen feet,
from its original 1832 location.
“We’re really pleased to give it
a more graceful and beautiful
place on the Mall and open it up
to the public,” Durkin said.
Under gray skies and flights of
passing geese, the house was
borne on a grid of yellow steel
girders atop four sets of eightwheel dollies that looked like the
landing gear of an airliner.
The house, which had been
raised from the ground, was
encased in four vertical girders
at its corners and bound with
chains. The moving dollies were
powered by a 173-hp diesel
engine, said Jamin Buckingham,
project manager for Wolfe House
and Building Movers.
The move began at 8:26, as
morning rush-hour traffic
rumbled through the
intersection a few blocks from
the White House and the
Washington Monument. Horns
honked, an ambulance screamed
by and jets roared overhead.
The dollies’ 32 tires turned at
glacial speed as they eased the
structure back from the
southwest corner of the
intersection.
It was a world much removed
from the time of the lock house
— a decade before the start of
construction on the Washington
Monument, before Constitution
Avenue, before the western
section of the Mall existed.
“At that time, 1832, this was
still somewhat rural,” Durkin
said. “There were cows walking
around. . . . There was a very
long wharf that extended here
down to the [Potomac] river.”
The house stood at the
junction of two canals. The
shallow Washington City Canal
ran mostly where east-west
Constitution Avenue is today,
through the city toward the
Capitol, and thence to the
Anacostia River.
At 17th Street, the Washington
canal joined a section of the
Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, which
extended northwest more than
180 miles to Cumberland. Canal
boats, pulled along a tow path by
draft animals, carried cargo and
passengers to and from the
mountains of the interior.
But the canal era was quickly
eclipsed by newer transportation
methods.
“As soon as the railroad came
through, they all became
obsolete,” Durkin said.
The city canal, plagued by
river tides and other problems,
NATIONALMALL.ORG
A rendering shows the new location of the lock keeper’s house as part of a new welcome center for the Mall. The stone building has been boarded up for 40 years.
was soon abandoned and
befouled.
“It is the grand receptacle of
nearly all the filth of this city,”
Commissioner of Public
Buildings Benjamin B. French
wrote in 1862, according to the
blog Civil War Washington D.C.
“The waste from all the public
buildings, the hotels, and very
many private residences is
drained into it,” he wrote to
Congress. “Unless something be
done . . . the good citizens of
Washington must during some
hot seasons, find themselves
visited by a pestilence!”
Workers began to fill the canal
in the 1870s, according to the
Park Service.
The connecting stretch of the
C&O canal was also abandoned,
and disappeared with the
westward extension of the Mall.
The shoreline of the Potomac
was pushed south by new fill.
The Washington Monument was
completed. And a new road, at
first called B Street, and later
Constitution Avenue, was built
over the canals.
Museums and new memorials
sprouted nearby. Parades and
funerals passed by. Occupants of
the White House came and went.
The lock keeper’s house kept
watch.
Shortly before 9 a.m. Thursday,
it was positioned over its new
foundation — 185 years after it
first took its place at the site.
This spring, the trust hopes to
“It’s the only
witness left to that
period in time, and
commerce of that
time.”
Teresa Durkin, Trust for the
National Mall
THE DAILY QUIZ
(Hint: Sign in to your account for the answer.)
EARN 5 POINTS: Find the answer, then go to
washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click on
“Quizzes” to enter the correct response.
michael.ruane@washpost.com
SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
A stone marking the Washington City Canal is seen, above, near the lock keeper’s house at 17th Street
and Constitution Avenue NW on Thursday. The lock keeper’s house, at left circa 1900, once sat at the
junction of that canal and the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal.
NATIONALMALL.ORG
PostPoints members can save
15% on select tickets to Antony
and Cleopatra at Folger Theatre.
When does this offer expire?
reopen the old house —
refurbished and with interior
history displays — on a new plaza.
“It’s like a dream, to me, ”
Durkin said. “I’ve been waiting so
long to see the house moved. Every
time I would come over here, it
would look sadder and sadder and
sadder. Now, it’s finally moved.
“I’m just so happy that we can
celebrate this house and the fact
that it endured, and it has stories
to tell us,” she said.
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EARN 5 POINTS AND A CHANCE TO WIN GREAT PRIZES. Answer our Scavenger Hunt questions, then go to washingtonpost.com/postpoints and click “Quizzes” to enter your responses.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
B3
M2
Evans faulted over rhetoric, threat of veto action
L O C A L D IG ES T
THE DISTRICT
VIRGINIA
Assaulted
man turns
himself in
to police
METRO FROM B1
Hill staffer is charged
with filing false form
Prosecutors charged a top
congressional staffer Wednesday
with filing a false security
clearance form nearly a year
after he pleaded guilty to failing
to pay taxes, officials said.
The U.S. Justice Department
alleges that Isaac Lanier Avant,
chief of staff to Rep. Bennie
Thompson (D-Miss.) and
Democratic staff director for the
Homeland Security Committee,
“willfully made a false
statement” on security clearance
forms in 2008 and 2013, officials
said.
Prosecutors allege that Avant
responded “no” to questions on
the form that asked whether he
failed to file or pay federal, state
or other taxes.
Avant pleaded guilty to a
misdemeanor in November 2016,
when he admitted he failed to
file taxes in 2009.
In January, Avant was
sentenced to four months in
prison, to be served by 30 days’
incarceration and followed up
with 12 months of weekend
imprisonment, according to
prosecutors. He also received
one year of supervised release
and was ordered to pay
$149,962 to the Internal
Revenue Service.
— Clarence Williams
Victim of shooting
in NW is identified
D.C. police on Thursday
identified a second man who
died in a Tuesday shooting
in Northwest Washington.
Sefjuan Jones, 22, of
Nashville, N.C., was killed in the
incident, which occurred just
before midnight in the
6200 block of Eighth Street NW
in the Brightwood
neighborhood.
Jones and Renard Marsh, 25,
died, police said. A third man
suffered injuries that were not
life-threatening.
— Ellie Silverman
MARYLAND
Bees sting dozens at
Montgomery school
Thirty-two students were
evaluated for possible bee stings
Thursday morning at a
Gaithersburg high school,
officials said.
The incident unfolded just
after 8 a.m. at Quince Orchard
High School.
Exactly where the bees came
from was not immediately clear.
Montgomery County Fire
spokesman Pete Piringer said
that crews were “searching for
the potential source of the
swarm” but thought the bees
came from off the school’s
campus.
Although dozens of students
were evaluated by fire and
rescue personnel, officials said
only three were taken to a
hospital with injuries that were
not considered life-threatening.
urging the Metro chairman to
quit.
“This latest stunt by Jack Evans is further proof that he is
outrageously unfit to serve on the
board and should resign immediately,” Doug Mayer, Hogan’s communications director, said Thursday.
Hogan’s office had publicly
called for Evans’s departure last
Friday, accusing him of “continued juvenile outbursts.”
Evans, in a phone interview,
declined to comment on Connolly’s criticisms, but at a news
conference earlier in the day, he
suggested that Hogan’s rebuke
seemed beneath the office of the
governor.
“Do you believe that the governor of Maryland is issuing a
statement about this?” Evans
said. “I find it somewhat astonishing that the governor is engaging in this kind of name-calling.”
Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe
(D) expressed unhappiness over
what he called the “unfortunate”
dispute between the District and
Maryland but stopped short of
urging Evans to step down.
He said the disagreement demonstrated the wisdom of a proposal by former U.S. transportation secretary Ray LaHood to
oust the Metro board and replace
it with a temporary, five-member
“reform board.” LaHood, who was
recruited by McAuliffe to study
Metro, is scheduled to issue a
report this month including the
board proposal.
McAuliffe “believes this unfortunate episode is a clear example
of the need to replace the current
[Metro] governance structure
with the nonpolitical five-member interim control board,”
McAuliffe spokesman Brian Coy
said. “The inability of certain
board members to resolve interjurisdictional squabbles over policy should not derail progress on
projects that are important to the
entire region.”
Virginia Transportation Secretary Aubrey Layne, asked specifically whether Evans should go,
said, “I won’t get into personalities, but this kind of behavior is
not helpful to us.”
Evans said the restructuring
plan has broad support within
the board. He conceded it may
seem trivial to use the jurisdictional veto for this purpose but
added that Maryland had been
first to invoke it by suggesting
earlier that it might use the veto
to block Evans’s desire to streamline the board’s committee struc-
Members want new talks
with state to seek more
money for exchange
BY
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BY
knowledged that it’s possible that
the board’s decision could result
in a delay for the project. But
ultimately, he said, as a Metro
board member, it’s not his job to
worry about that.
“We are trying to act expeditiously . . . but we are not responsible for the timeline for managing this particular project,” he
said.
“I don’t know when they
thought they would get these
types of questions considered,
vetted and debated,” McMillin
added, “but presumably when
you’re managing a project, you try
to do that well before the beginning of construction.”
martine.powers@washpost.com
ian.shapira@washpost.com
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
The heightening tension surrounding D.C. Council member and Metro board chairman Jack Evans
highlights concerns among the District, Maryland and Virginia over how to govern Metro.
ture.
Evans and the District’s other
voting board member, Corbett
Price, want to reduce the number
of board committees from seven
to four and allow alternates to
chair committees. Maryland
wants only voting members to
serve as committee heads and
dislikes the plan because it could
counties.
“For an authority that’s in need
of ridership, in need of revenue,
that’s a very parochial, selfish and
unfortunate position for the District of Columbia representative
to take,” Maryland board member
Michael Goldman said.
The property transfer also was
embroiled in a dispute Thursday
“This latest stunt by Jack Evans is further proof
that he is outrageously unfit to serve on the board.”
Doug Mayer, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s communications director
have the effect of extending Evans’s term as board chairman by
six months.
“Fourteen members of the
board plus the general manager
want this reorganization,” Evans
said, citing conversations with
General Manager Paul J. Wiedefeld and other board members.
“Corbett and I, as the District’s
two voting members, will veto
anything else until they agree.”
But the threat dismayed Maryland, which says it needs approval soon of transfer of property
rights at three Metro stations so
construction can begin on the
light-rail Purple Line linking
Montgomery and Prince George’s
over whether Maryland was paying Metro enough for the land
rights at the New Carrollton,
College Park and Silver Spring
Metro stations. The property is
valued between $24 million and
$37 million. It would be given to
Maryland in exchange for a 450space state-owned parking lot
and nearly 500,000 feet of state
property, valued together at
$17.1 million.
In a surprise move, a board
committee approved a substitute
resolution that gives tentative
approval for the transfer — but
only if Metro and Maryland negotiate to come up with a new figure
for “fair compensation” on the
M ARTINE P OWERS
A Metro board committee voted Thursday on an 11th-hour
measure that could delay a multimillion-dollar land transfer critical to the construction of Maryland’s light-rail Purple Line.
Metro is expected to hand over
to Maryland the land rights to
properties at New Carrollton, College Park and Silver Spring Metro
stations so Purple Line work
crews can begin construction.
The properties are valued between $24 million and $37 million.
Maryland wants the rights to
those stations in exchange for a
450-space state-owned parking
lot and a plot of state land, valued
together at $17.1 million.
But Thursday, members of the
board’s capital planning and real
estate committee said they’re concerned that Metro is being underpaid in the exchange. In a surprise
move, the committee passed a
substitute resolution that gives
tentative approval for the transfer
of property rights — but only if
officials from Metro and Maryland enter negotiations and come
up with a new figure for “fair
compensation” on the exchange.
The new resolution mandates
that an agreement on fair compensation be decided by the end
of December. It will go to a final
vote before the full board in two
weeks. Maryland is scheduled to
begin construction work at College Park station in early November.
“No one argues that the Purple
Line is a bad project. It’s a very
good project, and people are very
excited about it,” board member
Paul Smedberg said. “But given
the financial situation of the organization, we want to make sure
that we’re fairly compensated.”
“We’ll do what we can to help
our partners” building the Purple
Line, said Steve McMillin, the
newly appointed chairman of the
committee, “but [Metro] has interests to protect, and we as board
members have a responsibility to
protect them.”
Board member Robert Lauby
said the current deal failed to
account for the future potential
value of the property — particularly if developers wanted to pay
for the rights to build above the
station.
“It seems to me that we don’t
have a full assessment of what the
cost is, and that’s a little disturbing,”
Lauby
said.
“It’s
non-revenue producing land now,
but is it always going to be? . . . We
need to take a good hard look and
understand what exactly we’re
transferring here.”
Notably absent from the meeting: board members Corbett Price
and Jack Evans, who said
Wednesday that they would veto
the land-transfer proposal —
scheduled for a final vote in two
weeks — for an unrelated reason.
They want to use the propertyrights issue as a bargaining chip
in exchange for Maryland’s support for their proposal to restructure the board.
Board members’ concerns
about the fairness of the swap
came despite General Manager
Paul J. Wiedefeld’s recommendation that the board approve it,
citing the potential benefits the
16-mile light-rail line would bring
Metro — namely more riders.
“To me, it makes a lot of sense
that we move forward with this as
quickly as possible, for the sake of
our region and for our riders,”
Wiedefeld said.
Maryland representatives on
the board, particularly Michael
Goldman and Malcolm Augustine, expressed outrage that their
colleagues would put the project
at risk. Goldman suggested that
other board members were trying
to nickel-and-dime the state of
Maryland and that Metro’s real
estate experts failed to take into
account the many ways that
Maryland provides financial and
infrastructure support to Metro.
Augustine said the last-minute
attempts to renegotiate the land
exchange could put more obstacles in front of completion of the
Purple Line.
“It takes nerve for Metro to ask
for money back for land that came
from the state of Maryland,” Augustine said. “I find that a little
tough to take.”
“There have been tremendous
roadblocks that have occurred,”
he added. “I would really hate for
Metro to become another one of
those roadblocks.”
After the meeting McMillin ac-
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I AN S HAPIRA
DeAndre Harris, the 20-yearold black man beaten by white
supremacists in a Charlottesville
parking garage in August, turned
himself in to authorities Thursday after being charged with a
crime in connection with the
attack.
Merlyn Goeschl, a local magistrate, issued the warrant for
Harris on a felony charge of
unlawful wounding Monday,
part of the continuing fallout
from a viral video of the parking
garage assault during the Aug. 12
“Unite the Right” rally.
Harris, a former special-education instructional assistant who sustained a spinal injury and head wound that required
10
stitches,
was released
on bond after
turning himself in to Charlottesville police.
Harold Ray
Crews,
who
identifies himself online as
DeAndre
an
attorney
Harris
and a “Southern Nationalist,” has claimed
that Harris injured him during
the brawl.
Online footage shows Crews
trying to spear another counterprotester with the pole of a
Confederate flag, prompting
Harris to fight back. Harris
swung his flashlight at Crews,
appearing to hit him. But Harris’s attorney, S. Lee Merritt, has
argued that Harris did not injure
Crews “in any way” and that
footage from the rally shows that
Crews was actually hurt by other
counterprotesters in a separate
incident.
Harris’s case is scheduled for
a court hearing Friday morning
at Charlottesville General District Court. Merritt said Harris
will not attend the hearing and
that he does not want to be
interviewed by the media.
Crews has not responded to
calls for comment.
News of Harris’s charge and
the issuance of an arrest warrant
by a local magistrate surprised
many activists, including the
Charlottesville Police Department.
It was Harris, after all, who
was pummeled by at least five
white supremacists inside the
parking garage.
Online sleuths, led by Black
Lives Matter activist and journalist Shaun King, have led the
quest to identify all five men. So
far, three have been found, and
each has been arrested and
charged with malicious wounding: Daniel P. Borden, 18, of
Ohio; Alex Michael Ramos, 33, of
Georgia; and Jacob Scott Goodwin, 22, of Ward, Ark. Goodwin
was taken into custody by U.S.
Marshals on Tuesday night — the
day after the warrant for Harris
was issued.
exchange by the end of December.
Maryland said the action threatens to delay the project.
Top D.C. officials appeared to
continue to back Evans. Mayor
Muriel E. Bowser (D) and D.C.
Council Chairman Phil Mendelson (D) emphasized that the key
issue was not changing the board,
but finding dedicated revenue for
the transit system.
“We all must stay focused on
the long-term health of Metro,
and that comes through dedicated revenue,” John Falcicchio,
Bowser’s chief of staff, said.
“The mayor has agreed with
the concept of a smaller board
with members appointed by the
executives of the District, Maryland and Virginia, and it is time
for Maryland and Virginia to
agree to dedicated revenue,” he
said.
The D.C. Council appointed
Evans to the Metro board, and
Mendelson said he didn’t foresee
any change there.
“Last I checked, I didn’t see
anybody here in the halls at the
Wilson Building advocating a
change in our council appointment,” Mendelson said.
faiz.siddiqui@washpost.com
robert.mccartney@washpost.com
Martine Powers contributed to this
article.
Metro board panel threatens to delay land swap
needed for Purple Line over ‘fair compensation’
L O T T E RIE S
Results from Oct. 12
Charge followed attack
by white supremacists
in Charlottesville brawl
MARYLAND
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VIRGINIA
VA urged
to fix delay
in payment
system
BY
J ENNA P ORTNOY
Members of Congress from Virginia say chronic late payments
from the Department of Veterans
Affairs to doctors are jeopardizing
care for the state’s aging veteran
population.
The state’s two senators and 11
House members urged VA administrators to fix a system that can
leave health-care providers waiting more than four months for
payments they should have received within 30 days. The delays
can damage credit, they said.
Congress created the Veterans
Choice program in 2014 in response to a scandal exposing excessively long wait times at a Phoenix VA hospital that also had been
a problem nationwide.
The program is intended to relieve pressure on VA hospitals by
allowing veterans to receive care
from private providers if they cannot book an appointment at their
local VA facility within 30 days or
access a facility within 40 miles of
their home.
Since its inception, Veterans
Choice has been hobbled by administrative errors, including tens
of millions of dollars in overpayments, according to findings of the
VA inspector general’s office.
“With many health care providers reporting accounts receivable
in the millions of dollars, the level
of late payments is unacceptable,”
the Virginia delegation wrote in
an Oct. 3 letter to Secretary of
Veterans Affairs David Shulkin.
Rep. Rob Wittman (R-Va.) said
Congress requires VA to pay bills
in a timely manner.
“Everyone else in society has to
do that,” he said in an interview. “If
this program is going to work
properly, then these bills need to
be paid on time.”
Wittman, chairman of the House
Armed Services subcommittee on
sea power and projection forces,
said he has talked to the committee’s chairman, Rep. Phil Roe (RTenn.), about calling Shulkin to tes-
tify if VA doesn’t reconcile outstanding bills soon. Virginia is
home to 733,000 veterans.
“This is the law,” he said. “This is
what you’re supposed to be doing.
Why isn’t it getting done?”
VA spokeswoman Paula Paige
said in a statement, “VA appreciates the lawmakers’ concerns and
will respond to them directly.”
She referred specific questions
to a May speech by Shulkin in
which he said it takes more than
30 days to process 20 percent of VA
claims from 25,000 providers nationwide. An additional $50 million in charges are older than six
months. He blamed the backlog in
part on paperwork delays.
Riverside Health System in
eastern Virginia reported that
45 percent of claims totaling
$2 million went unpaid for more
than 120 days. Private insurance
companies as well as Medicare
and Medicaid take about 60 days,
said Mark Duncan, Riverside’s
lobbyist.
Riverside considers it an honor
to care for veterans, but “we need
to have the tools, the resources to
provide that type of service to
these folks over the long term,”
Duncan said in an interview.
“They’ve more than earned that
service.”
The letter details a case relayed
by the office of Rep. Barbara Comstock (R), who represents Northern Virginia, in which a veteran
was denied dentures because VA
failed to pay a private provider
$203,000. Comstock’s spokesman
said the case has been resolved.
Veterans Choice allows veterans to avoid inconvenient travel to
VA facilities in Martinsburg,
W.Va., or the District, but VA “must
get its house in order,” Comstock
said in a statement.
In August, Congress approved
$2.1 billion in emergency funding
intended to shore up the program
until February.
Last month, Sen. John McCain
(R-Ariz.), chairman of the Senate
Armed Services Committee, wrote
a letter to Shulkin demanding a
full accounting of Veterans Choice
spending after the Associated
Press reported that the program
could face another shortfall before
the end of the year.
“We said at the time that it was
essential, given the growing demand for care under the Choice
program, that the VA immediately
correct the failures that created
such a serious shortfall,” McCain
wrote. “It appears as if you have
not done so.”
jenna.portnoy@washpost.com
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
‘This is frightening’: Gas sickens workers for 2 years
ILLNESS FROM B1
conducted by VA health officials
and the local fire department and
gas company, among others, “discovered no leaks, hazardous
fumes or health risks,” he said,
adding that officials continue to
monitor the situation.
But those who work at the
facility say those tests may not
have been performed quickly
enough, before the gas dissipated, or if the contractors brought
in to conduct them knew which
gases to evaluate.
On a given day, the facility is
staffed with about 40 employees
who serve dozens of patients, all
homeless and at-risk veterans
who seek care at the clinic. The
incidents — numbering in the
dozens since winter 2015 — have
occurred intermittently and
without warning.
Though it remains unclear
what’s causing the issue, the clinic’s staff members have speculated that it could be anything from
vehicle exhaust entering the
building’s heating system intake
valves to sewer gas surfacing
through sinks and drains.
They’ve reported a range of
symptoms, including intense
headaches, rashes, stinging eyes,
nausea and others — all of which
are consistent with sewer gas
exposure, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Administrators have not only
allowed the problem to fester,
they have also ordered clinicians
back into the building, staffers
say.
“I felt devalued. It was like our
health wasn’t important and our
concerns weren’t heard,” one
staffer told The Post, saying morale cratered among those tasked
with what they call a rewarding
yet grueling effort to help homeless veterans find housing along
with primary and mental health
care. Those familiar with the
facility’s troubles spoke on the
condition of anonymity, citing
their fear of reprisal.
The Community Resource and
Referral Center, off Rhode Island
Avenue NE, is part of the Washington DC VA Medical Center, the
sprawling federal agency’s selfproclaimed “flagship” facility. Its
acting director, Lawrence B. Connell, has known about the problems there since June, according
MICHAEL S. WILLIAMSON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Pipes at the VA Community Resource and Referral Center, where
clinical workers have complained of noxious gas exposure.
to emails exchanged among staff.
At least two incidents have occurred since then — with 19
verified in all since late 2015,
according to partial records obtained by The Post and data
provided by the D.C. fire department.
Local firefighters responded to
four such calls between February
and November 2016. The last
time was Nov. 30. One day later, a
clinic safety official notified staff
that, in the future, they should
refrain from pulling a fire alarm
if they encounter “noxious
fumes” and to alert Washington
Gas instead.
A spokesman for the utility
company said no gas leak was
found.
Connell “has been briefed regularly on these complaints and
has been personally involved in
the
comprehensive,
multipronged response involving respected investigators from both
inside and outside VA,” said Cashour, VA’s spokesman. He was a
senior adviser to VA Secretary
David Shulkin before becoming
the medical center’s acting director this past summer. Connell
accepted the job after his predecessor, Brian A. Hawkins, was
removed after an internal investigation found patients receiving
treatment at the facility had been
endangered by “the highest levels
of chaos” created by managerial
ineptitude, a VA inspector general’s report concluded.
One months-long email chain
exchanged among several clinicians reveals a problem so persistent that it had become banal.
“Just wanted everyone to know
the gas smell is back,” a staffer
wrote Feb. 21. Another chimed in
nine minutes later: “We smell
something also in our area.” Two
hours later a third staffer wrote,
“Haven’t smelled it in a couple
hours but I do have a bad headache.”
Two days later, on Feb. 23, a
mental health clinician said she
briefed then-director Hawkins
on the issue, saying unspecified
repairs were made.
Hawkins could not be reached
for comment.
On March 30, the emails resumed, when the gas smell returned, and again on May 17,
when a social worker reported
smelling vehicle exhaust.
Nine days later, after another
incident, one staff member
wrote, “I can only say this is
frightening.”
Hawkins was gone by then, but
the problem was inherited by his
successor.
“I raised the issue with Mr.
Connell and the staff . . . this
morning again,” a senior staffer
told colleagues on June 10, a day
after yet another incident.
It is unclear how many clinic
staffers and veterans have been
exposed to the gas or what, if any,
permanent afflictions they may
carry. Staffers say their symptoms seem to improve when they
are away from the clinic. The
documents don’t indicate anyone’s current medical status, including the eight who tested positive for carbon monoxide.
One staffer said the patients
are thought to be less at risk
because they come for appointments and then leave, though
they may not make the connection between potential symptoms and their visit to the clinic.
Staff members, however, can
inhale the gas for hours on end.
VA safety officials and senior
leaders, discussing the issue internally, say they’ve tried to resolve the problem. They point to
numerous air tests for carbon
monoxide, carbon dioxide and
other gases as indication of their
effort.
Two outdoor pipes were adjusted after some speculated that
vehicle exhaust was to blame.
Access to a dumpster was
blocked. Building contractors
even dumped water into drains
to flush any sewer gas. An environmental liaison for the building’s owner, Lincoln Property
Company, acknowledged in December that sewer gas was a
contributing factor that had been
resolved.
A senior VA official visited
Oct. 4, when the most recent gas
exposure occurred, but it is unclear whether he experienced the
problem firsthand.
Staffers at the clinic point to
Todd Williams, one of two acting
assistant directors of the main VA
hospital who report to Connell,
alleging that he too has played
down the problem.
On Aug. 12, he said in an email
that relocating dumpsters and
blocking off two parking spots
near an intake pipe would “further mitigate risk associated”
with vehicle exhaust circulating
in the building. “Given these
efforts,” he wrote, “do we have a
timeline for relocation of providers back to CRRC?”
Cashour declined to address
questions about Williams’s role
in resolving the issue.
Williams does not work at the
clinic. Leadership on site has
been more sympathetic, staffers
say. For instance, a nursing manager advised staff to seek doctor’s
notes if they feared contact with
the gas would adversely impact
their health, emails show.
Staffers asked for health officials to conduct an epidemiological analysis of symptoms and
exposure rates over time.
VA said they completed assessments and found no link between
the clinic and health concerns.
alex.horton@washpost.com
MARYLAND
Fewer Pr. George’s schools sta≠ers put on leave
BY
The Magazine
Fall Dining Guide
Here they are!
Tom Sietsema’s
Top 10
restaurants and
43 of his other
favorites, plus
ideas for the
best cheap eats
and go-to bars.
Special Section
Museums and Galleries: The 10 best places to sit
down, relax and enjoy art in Washington. Plus, a look
at exhibits not to be missed in the year ahead.
Arts & Style
‘Go-Go Live’: The story of how a grass-roots effort
created the monumental concert of homegrown
sound that put D.C. on the musical map.
Business
Happy returns: More people are buying online, but
75 percent of shoppers say they still prefer to return
items in-store. A look at how retailers are tweaking
return policies to keep shoppers happy, even with
their mistakes.
Travel
17-1222 2x10.5
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Some stories may not run due to breaking news.
D ONNA S T. G EORGE
Officials in a Maryland school
system that placed hundreds of
employees on leave amid allegations of abuse and neglect say they
have improved training and procedures this year to strike a better
balance between protecting students and keeping staffers on the
job.
Forty employees were on administrative leave as of early October in Prince George’s County public schools, officials said Thursday,
and just five cases have originated
this school year.
The school system drew a wave
of complaints from parents, educators and elected officials last
year as the number of such cases
soared, with nearly 850 employees
— including more than 400 teachers — placed on leave for alleged
misconduct in the 2016-2017
school year.
The surge reflected a jump of
more than 1,000 percent from
2014-2015, the year before Prince
George’s was roiled by child abuse
scandals and stepped up its emphasis on reporting of suspicious
behavior.
While many lauded efforts to
boost safety, they also complained
that the district went too far and
did not distinguish between serious and lesser allegations. Many
teachers were out of classrooms
for weeks or months; parents and
students did not know when they
would return, and some said classroom instruction was harmed.
This year, officials said they believe the school system — Maryland’s second-largest, with more
than 132,000 students — is showing signs of turning a corner.
“We’re trending down and back
to what it looked like more than a
year ago,” said Lewis Robinson,
director of employee and labor
relations for the school system.
He and others say the district
has added three administrative
procedures and revised six. New
online training was completed by
more than 90 percent of staffers.
There is also a new employee-incident tracking system.
Principals were trained over the
summer in new practices and
about which situations warrant
placing employees on administrative leave, he said.
“Some of it is about making sure
people know what they are looking at,” Robinson said. He noted
that last year, employees were sent
off the job for accidentally bumping into students and in one instance, despite video recordings to
the contrary, allegedly slamming a
student’s hand in a locker, and, in
another, for allegedly hitting a student with a hat.
This year, there is a longer process for considering the use of ad-
ministrative leave. Employees will
be steered to alternative placements for a period that could be a
week or longer while principals
and district administrators consider sending them on leave.
Employees who are awaiting
such a determination may be involved in grading, lesson planning
or other activities that support the
learning process without placing
those employees in contact with
students, officials said.
The school system is not discouraging the reporting of suspicious incidents to Child Protective
Services but will not automatically place employees on administrative leave as a result of suspiciousincident reports, they said.
As the school year started, the
number of reports to Child Protective Services involving allegations
against staffers has dwindled considerably: There were 31 this year,
compared with last year’s 152, for
the month of September.
For the first month of the Prince
George’s County school year,
which started Sept. 6, five employees — including three teachers —
were placed on leave for alleged
abuse, neglect or failure to report,
district data showed. The district
did not immediately have a comparison figure from last year.
“The idea behind it is to be more
thoughtful at the initiation point,”
Robinson said.
The new policies were the focus
of a school board presentation
Thursday evening.
“We remain committed to improving school and student safety
while providing a positive workplace climate for our employees,”
Kevin M. Maxwell, the district’s
chief executive, said in a statement.
Employee conduct has been a
flash point since February 2016,
when Deonte Carraway, then an
elementary school volunteer, was
accused of video-recording students as he directed them to perform sex acts. Carraway, who previously had been a paid classroom
aide, was sentenced last month to
100 years in prison on 23 counts of
child sex abuse and pornography
involving 23 children.
Following Carraway’s arrest in
2016, a student safety task force
was appointed, and the school system looked to change what many
saw as a culture of underreporting.
Robinson said the school system is not looking to reduce the
number of employees on leave to
the level that preceded the safety
efforts. But the school system
wants to come in far below last
year’s high number. “We underreported in the year before, and we
want to get somewhere in the middle,” he said.
donna.stgeorge@washpost.com
MARYLAND
U-Md. police investigating 3 hate-related incidents
Swastika in men’s stall
among latest in string
of reports at school
BY
L YNH B UI
University of Maryland police
are investigating three haterelated reports of graffiti inside a
men’s restroom stall.
Offensive language or drawings scrawled in black marker
were found in a men’s restroom
stall in the Ellicott Dining Hall
between Sept. 28 and Oct. 9,
police said.
The first report was at 10 a.m.
Sept. 28, the second shortly before 6 p.m. Oct. 7, and the third
about 3:50 p.m. Oct. 9, police
said.
The Oct. 7 report was about an
offensive phrase and a swastika,
police said.
Anyone with information
about these incidents is asked
to call 301-405-3555 or email
investigations@umpd.umd.edu.
A reward of $2,000 is available
for information that leads to “the
successful identification of the
individual responsible for these
despicable acts,” campus police
said in a statement.
The writing and drawings in
the restroom stall are the latest
in a string of reported haterelated incidents at the University of Maryland and colleges
nationwide.
In August, police reported a
“person of interest” to university
officials in connection with an
investigation of a noose made of
plastic wrap found in the kitchen
of a fraternity house.
Last week, police said they
charged Ronald Alford Sr., 52, of
Hyattsville with malicious destruction of property in connection with a swastika found spraypainted on a trash cart in a dorm
on Sept. 27. Alford has also been
charged with one count of “disturbing the operations of a
school” and has been banned
from campus, police said.
Authorities said they are also
still trying to determine whether the slaying of Richard Collins
III in May should be prosecuted
as a hate crime. Collins, 23, who
attended Bowie State University, was visiting campus with
friends when he was fatally
stabbed at a bus stop.
Police arrested Sean Christopher Urbanski, 22, of Severna
Park and charged him in the
slaying. Police said Urbanski was
associated with a Facebook page
called “Alt-Reich Nation.”
Urbanski is awaiting trial on
murder charges in Prince
George’s County Circuit Court.
lynh.bui@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
B5
SU
Charlottesville o∞cials join suit against militias
MILITIAS FROM B1
tions other than those controlled
by the state government. That
complaint seeks to avoid another
“invasion of roving paramilitary
bands and unaccountable vigilante peacekeepers.”
“Charlottesville has been besieged repeatedly by these
groups, and key organizers and
leaders of the Unite the Right
rally have pledged to return to
Charlottesville as often as possible,” according to the lawsuit
filed by Georgetown Law School’s
Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection with support from city officials.
Charlottesville exploded into
the nation’s consciousness Aug.
11 and 12, when hundreds of
white supremacists, white nationalists and neo-Nazis from
across the country gathered to
protest the planned removal of a
Confederate statue from a city
park.
At a nighttime torchlight rally,
marchers chanted “Jews will not
replace us!” and “Blood and soil!”
before engaging in a violent confrontation with a small group of
counterprotesters. The next day
— a Saturday — the planned rally,
which had a permit, was canceled
by law enforcement as nationalists
and
counterprotesters
brawled on Charlottesville’s
downtown streets while police
stood back.
In midafternoon, James Alex
Fields Jr., a 20-year-old reported
Nazi sympathizer, allegedly
drove his car into a crowd of
pedestrians. Heather Heyer, 32,
of Charlottesville was killed, and
19 others were injured.
The plaintiffs in the federal
lawsuit include University of Virginia students, Charlottesville
residents and religious leaders
who say they were subjected to
tear gas, physical and verbal
assaults and, in one case, were
targeted online by white supremacists who posted their photos on
a racist website.
The Ku Klux Klan, Vanguard
America, the Nationalist Front
and the League of the South, all
of which support white nationalist or supremacist aims and took
part in the rally, are among the
three dozen individuals and organizations named in the 98page federal complaint.
“The violence in Charlottesville was no accident,” the lawsuit
EVELYN HOCKSTEIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
A group that dubbed itself “The Militia” stands at the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville on
Aug. 12. A lawsuit claims private militias are banned in Virginia according to the state constitution.
reads. “In countless posts on
their own websites and social
media, defendants and their coconspirators promised that there
would be violence in Charlottesville and violence there was.”
Plaintiffs Marissa Blair, 28,
and her fiance, Marcus Martin,
27, were standing among counterprotesters on Fourth Street in
Charlottesville when the Dodge
Challenger plowed into the
crowd. Martin pushed Blair out
of the way, but he was struck and
his leg and ankle were broken.
“I went to look for him, and all
I found was his bloody baseball
cap. I thought he was dead,” Blair
said in an interview Wednesday.
“Freedom of speech, we get it,”
Blair said. “But not when you’re
doing it to terrorize people.
There has to be a stop to it. We
want to let Charlottesville live in
peace.”
The federal case was filed by
New York attorney Roberta A.
Kaplan, who represented Edith
Windsor in the landmark Supreme Court case that ordered
the federal recognition of samesex marriage, and Washington
attorney Karen Dunn, a former
PETULA DVORAK
What’s crazy? Charging
victim in own beating.
DVORAK FROM B1
Tamir Rice received a $500 bill
for his ambulance ride after a
Cleveland police officer killed
him in a park three years ago. (To
his credit, the mayor quickly
apologized and canceled the bill
after it made news.)
In this strange world, victims
are guilty, facts are alternative
and no one can feel safe. (Need
more evidence of the world
turned upside? Rush Limbaugh
just said that President Trump’s
comments are “starting to make
me nervous.” Which is actually
making me nervous.)
Harris had to turn himself in
to authorities Thursday, thanks
to a cunning runaround by white
nationalists who figured out that
in Virginia, an alleged crime
victim can generate a warrant
through a local magistrate after
a police report is filed.
And as Black Lives Matter
activists worked to help identify
Harris’s attackers in the video
and share that information with
police, the white power people
decided to make Harold Ray
Crews the victim.
Crews describes himself on
Twitter as an attorney and a
“Southern nationalist.” He also
runs the North Carolina chapter
of the League of the South,
according to the Southern
Poverty Law Center, which
considers it a hate group.
Harris’s attorney, S. Lee
Merritt, told The Washington
Post that Harris did not injure
Crews in the melee and that the
charge against him is
unjustified.
“We find it highly offensive
and upsetting,” Merritt said, “but
what’s more jarring is that he’s
been charged with the same
crime as the men who attacked
him.”
How can this be happening?
It’s the new Fake Reality, the
culture of Alternative Facts, the
world in which white men —
who hold the majority of the
nation’s wealth, congressional
seats, judgeships, CEO spots and
gun licenses — stage a protest to
chant about being replaced.
The white supremacists and
neo-Nazis returned to
Charlottesville again Saturday,
carrying their torches and
bearing their hatred.
The violence and racial enmity
they’ve unleashed in our country
feels like an extension of the
presidential campaign we
endured last year. Remember
when candidate Donald Trump
promised to pay the legal fees for
supporters “who knock the crap
out of ” protesters from Black
Lives Matter and other groups,
and then wished aloud that he
had been closer to a protester
being escorted from one of his
rallies so that he could “punch
him in the face”?
During the campaign last year,
I wrote about the Trump Effect,
when children listening to the
ugly rhetoric also hurled hateful
phrases like “build that wall” at
immigrant and minority kids.
For all of Trump’s dangerous
declarations since he took office
— provoking North Korea,
trashing freedom of speech,
threatening opponents — it has
been possible to believe others
will protect us from the
president’s worst impulses.
Many of Trump’s supporters
brush his words off as mere
bluster. Some political
moderates remind us that the
nation has survived worse. Even
lawmakers have convinced
themselves that experienced
men like Chief of Staff John F.
Kelly and Defense Secretary Jim
Mattis will keep America from
slipping into chaos or nuclear
war.
But what has happened in
Charlottesville — the gathering
of this country’s worst bigots, the
killing of a counterprotester by
an alleged Nazi sympathizer and
now the deliberate manipulation
of the judicial system by a hate
group — points to a darker
outcome.
Charlottesville is the Trump
Effect, Adult Edition. And we
will be living with the
consequences of the vitriol and
violence captured in that
parking garage video for years to
come.
petula.dvorak@washpost.com
Twitter: @petulad
federal prosecutor. The lawsuit is
funded by Integrity First for
America, a new nonprofit group
aimed primarily at bringing legal
challenges to President Trump’s
businesses.
The legal approach in the federal complaint was inspired in
part by an Oregon case from the
late 1990s in which a group of
doctors successfully sued antiabortion activists over a website
that targeted doctors who perform abortions.
Spencer declined to comment
on the lawsuit. Other defendants,
including Kessler and Heimbach,
did not respond to requests for
comment.
Last Saturday, Spencer returned to the Charlottesville
park, where a statue of Gen.
Robert E. Lee has been covered
by the city in a tarp, and held a
smaller torchlight rally with a
few dozen followers who chanted: “We will be back!”
That evening, Charlottesville
Mayor Mike Signer tweeted: “Another despicable visit by neo-Nazi cowards. You’re not welcome
here! Go home! Meantime we’re
looking at all our legal options.
Stay tuned.”
Spencer told The Washington
Post the next day that the mayor
has “no authority to prevent lawful protests like what we did last
night. . . . He currently thinks the
city of Charlottesville is a sovereign nation or something.”
At an early morning meeting
Thursday, Charlottesville City
Council voted 4 to 0 — with one
member absent — to sign on to
the second lawsuit, filed minutes
after the vote on the state suit.
The complaint lists 22 whitenationalist organizations, leaders and private militia groups as
defendants, saying these “military forces transformed an idyllic
college town into a virtual combat zone.”
Many wore matching uniforms and used command structures to coordinate actions, according to the lawsuit that also
details planning and paramilitary tactics it says were discussed
via social media. The groups of
men dressed in camouflage and
carrying semiautomatic rifles at
the August rally confused even
Virginia’s public safety secretary,
Brian Moran, who first assumed
some were soldiers in the state’s
National Guard.
The lawsuit tries to preempt
likely arguments from defendants, saying it does not seek to
restrict individual rights to gun
ownership or free-speech rights
to assemble and express political
views.
“Our complaint shows that
there are legal tools available to
ensure that the streets do not
become battlefields for those
who organize and engage in paramilitary activity,” said the
Georgetown institute’s senior litigator, Mary B. McCord, a longtime federal prosecutor who was
most recently head of the Justice
Department’s National Security
Division.
Under Virginia law dating to
1776, the state constitution specifies that “in all cases the military
should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil
power.” That means, according to
the court filing, that the “government alone retains a monopoly
on the organized use of force.”
“Whatever their stated intentions, these groups terrified local
residents” and created confusion
about who was in charge, the
complaint asserts.
Among the defendants in the
case invoking Virginia’s constitution is Christian Yingling, a leader of the Pennsylvania Light Foot
Militia, who has said that he and
his troops “convoyed in” to Charlottesville to defend free speech
and maintain civil order.
Yingling declined to comment
Thursday, saying he was reviewing the lawsuit.
Laws similar to Virginia’s have
been used throughout history in
cases filed in Texas and North
Carolina to shut down paramilitary activities by the Ku Klux
Klan. The statutes on the books
in most states make clear that
only the government can control
military organizations in a state.
After the August rally, University of Virginia historian Philip
Zelikow thought of a Texas case
he’d worked on in the 1980s that
relied on state law banning “military companies” not authorized
by the governor. In that case, a
judge stopped the Ku Klux Klan
from
training
paramilitary
groups to harass Vietnamese
American fishermen on the Texas
Gulf Coast.
end,” Fredericks told The Post.
“And he’s got to get on stage with
him, and motivate Trump voters
to get out on November 7th in
huge numbers, enthusiastically,
to support this Republican ticket
if he’s going to win.”
The Northam campaign announced Wednesday that former
president Barack Obama will appear at a rally with Northam in
Richmond next week, upping the
ante for Trump.
“Obama’s coming. They’ve got
to counter it,” Fredericks said.
Fredericks, who was co-chairman and later chairman of
Trump’s Virginia campaign, said
he has heard from “multiple
sources” that the White House
and Gillespie campaign are “trying to get a date for the president
to come to Virginia,” most likely
at the end of the campaign.
A few hours later on Twitter,
Fredericks clarified he was talking about a “potential” Trump
rally and his information was
“not sourced from any official in
the Gillespie campaign.”
White House spokeswoman
Sarah Huckabee Sanders said
there were “no plans that I’m
aware of at this time.”
Gillespie spokesman David
Abrams said only this: “We do
not discuss campaign strategy
with the media.”
Virginia is holding the only
competitive statewide election in
the nation on Nov. 7, an election
that both major parties see as a
test of electoral politics in the
Trump era and a hint of what
may come in the 2018 midterms.
A former chairman of the Republican National Committee,
Washington lobbyist and adviser
to then-President George W.
Bush, Gillespie has been uncomfortable with any association
with Trump even as he has recently launched ads about illegal
immigration and Confederate
statues that could appeal to the
president’s supporters.
Republicans have not won a
statewide election in Virginia
since 2009. Gillespie needs support from both Trump voters as
well as independents to have any
chance of overcoming the advantage Northam has in populous,
heavily blue Northern Virginia.
Gillespie avoided mentioning
the president during the GOP
primary in the spring, which he
nearly lost to Corey A. Stewart, a
bombastic campaigner who ran
in the anti-establishment Trump
mold and lambasted Gillespie as
“Establishment Ed.”
Immediately after the primary,
the White House political team
urged Gillespie to hire Trump
strategists and embrace issues
that resonate with Trump voters.
Gillespie brought on at least one
Trump strategist and started
talking about the dangers of
illegal immigration and the need
to preserve Confederate statues.
The campaign, noting that crime
is a perennial GOP election
theme and polls show a majority
of Virginians do not want the
statues removed, contend those
positions appeal to swing voters
as much as the Trump base.
Still, when the president endorsed Gillespie via tweet last
week, the candidate did not
retweet or even acknowledge it
until reporters asked him about
it the following day. Gillespie
said he did not consider the
Herndon
consultant
indicted
over tweets
Denial of a passport
allegedly led to threats
to murder officials
BY
R ACHEL W EINER
president’s endorsement of a fellow Republican newsworthy.
Gillespie has been more comfortable with Vice President
Pence, a personal friend for several years, who will fly to ruby red
Southwest Virginia on Saturday
to headline a campaign rally for
him. On the same day, former
vice president Joe Biden is appearing in Northern Virginia
with Northam.
William Weaver was denied a
passport, authorities say, so he
began tweeting threats at the State
Department and the CIA.
According to an indictment
filed Thursday in federal court in
Alexandria, the Herndon Web
consultant submitted a passport
application to the State Department in February 2016 and again a
year later. Both were denied.
This past summer, according to
the indictment, Weaver, 36, tweeted at the agency: “You have about 2
weeks 2 get my passport 2 me
before the devices set off and the
shotgun blasts start. Tick-tock
goes the clock.”
He also allegedly tweeted at the
CIA: “Logic continues to dictate
that bombing the cia, and shotgunning them as they line up outside the gate at work in the morn is
my conclusion.”
Weaver was arrested last month
after trying to buy a gun and ammunition, prosecutors said. He
faces several charges of making
threats to assault and kill people.
The day before his Sept. 15 arrest, FBI agents say they went to
his house with police and a diplomatic security agent to tell him
that the issue with his passport
application had been resolved and
that he could try again. The court
documents do not say why his
applications had been denied.
“I am on a set schedule for some
events coming up that your folks
should know about. I’m not who I
once was,” he allegedly responded.
He then went back on Twitter,
the indictment says, to make vulgar threats and complain that police and the State Department had
been at his door “but they seemed
to have forgotten my passport.”
He also went to the Herndon
police, according to authorities,
and then tried to buy a gun and
ammunition in Sterling. He was
told he could not take the weapon
home immediately.
“I tried to buy a shotgun for
home defence. VA state police put
it on delay,” Weaver then tweeted,
according to the indictment.
“Can’t trust police anymore. If denied Will get another way.”
He was arrested the next day.
A website listed in the indictment describes Weaver as having
worked for 14 years in information
technology.
The federal public defender’s
office, which is representing
Weaver, declined to comment.
laura.vozzella@washpost.com
rachel.weiner@washpost.com
ann.marimow@washpost.com
joe.heim@washpost.com
Trump could ‘counter’ visit by Obama
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THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
IN MEMORIAM
MARYLAND
Man indicted in girlfriend’s death
He publicly pleaded
for help finding his
pregnant partner
BY
D AN M ORSE
A 33-year-old Maryland man
accused of luring his pregnant
girlfriend to a field, shooting her
in the back of the head and then
making a dramatic public plea for
help finding her was indicted
Thursday on one count of murder,
according to Montgomery County
Circuit Court records.
The grand jury indictment
against Tyler Tessier was not unexpected. On Sept. 13, he was
charged with murder in the case
by Montgomery County police.
He has been held in jail since. The
legal action Thursday was part of
a regular process of moving cases
from Montgomery’s District
Court to Circuit Court, where felony cases are handled.
No trial date has been set.
Allen Wolf, the public defender
representing Tessier, said his client is innocent of the charges
against him. “Although he has
made mistakes in his personal
life, he cared deeply about Laura
Wallen and never would have
physically hurt her,” Wolf said.
On Sept. 4, a family member of
Wallen reported her missing. The
popular 31-year-old high school
teacher, who lived in the northern
part of Montgomery County,
hadn’t been seen for days by family members. And they couldn’t
reach her on her phone.
Police conducted an intense
search for Wallen, all the while
talking to her longtime on-again,
off-again boyfriend, Tessier. They
learned that he had another girlfriend to whom he was engaged,
but neither she nor Wallen knew
about Tessier’s dual relationships.
On Sept. 11, police officials held
a news conference appealing for
help finding Wallen. They invited
Tessier to attend, even as their
suspicions of him deepened.
Court records filed Thursday
did not include a charge related to
Wallen’s unborn child. In Maryland, it is possible to charge someone with murder or manslaughter of a fetus. In such cases, however, the fetus must be viable,
meaning potentially able to live
outside the womb, according to
Maryland law and several attorneys.
Law enforcement officials have
said Wallen was between 14 and
16 weeks pregnant.
Hal Lawrence, a doctor who is
chief executive of the American
Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, said Thursday said a
14-week fetus would not be viable.
“At 14 weeks’ gestation, there is
no possibility that the fetus will
survive outside the womb,” Lawrence said.
DEATH NOTICE
BERNSTEIN
BRATT
EMILY BERNSTEIN
October 13, 1942 -- August 28, 2004
JANIE E. BRATT
Happy 75th birthday!
On Friday the 13th! All kidding aside, we had
the very good fortune of having you in our lives
and would give anything to be celebrating with
you today.
Your loving family
CONVERS
DARIO ANTONIO CONVERS
In loving memory of our son and brother who
passed away 35 years ago. The loss that we
feel is as intense as that terrible Wednesday in
1982. We miss your company and all the things
we used to do together. Not a day passes
without us praying to the Lord for your eternal
peace. We love you deeply.
Fabio A., Victor F. and Connie E.
On Tuesday, October 3, 2017 of Germantown, MD, passed away after a courageous
but brief battle with cancer. Janie E Bratt,
beloved daughter of the late Donald and
Ruth Bratt, Janie is survived by many loving
family and friends especially Mary Ann,
Dan, and Tori Kenno, Tommy Bell, Doug and
Linda Walker, Nelly Leon and her Giant Food
family.
She was born in Bethesda MD and graduated from Bethesda Chevy Chase High
School. A longtime resident of Germantown, she was a legal secretary in Rockville
and a cashier at Giant Food at Germantown
Commons. She also was an avid sports fan
and a 30 year season ticket holder of the
Washington Capitals. To honor Janie's love
of sports, we suggest that guests wear their
favor Washington sports attire on Friday
evening.
Family will receive friends at PUMPHREY’S
COLONIAL FUNERAL HOME, 300 W. Montgomery Ave, Rockville, MD on Friday, October 13, at 7 to 9 p.m. where a Funeral
Service will be held on Saturday, October 14
at 10 a.m. Interment in Parklawn Memorial
Park. In lieu of flowers donations may be
made to Monumental Sports and Entertainment Foundation 627 North Glebe Road,
Arlington, Va. 22203. Please view and sign
online family guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
BROCKMAN
CLARENCE L. BROCKMAN
SIMA WALI, 66
Sima Wali, who fled her native
Afghanistan before the 1979
Soviet invasion and devoted the
rest of her life to aiding the women
who remained behind through
years of war, deprivation and Taliban oppression, died Sept. 22 at
her home in Falls Church, Va. She
was 66.
The cause was multiple system
atrophy, a degenerative neurological disorder, said her nephew,
Suleiman Wali.
As leader of the Washingtonbased nonprofit organization
Refugee Women in Development,
Ms. Wali became one of the most
visible activists for the rights of
Afghan women.
She spoke before the United
Nations and U.S. officials, played a
critical role in the formation of the
Afghan Ministry of Women’s Affairs after the fall of the Islamist
Taliban regime in 2001, and
helped direct international funding to the country’s women, children and refugees.
The late Tom Lantos, a Holocaust survivor and Democratic
congressman from California,
once lauded her for “pioneering
culturally specific approaches in
assisting refugee women to resist
trauma and violence.”
After the Taliban, which seized
power in 1996, drew international
condemnation for its brutal subjugation of women, Ms. Wali often
acted as a cultural interpreter for
Westerners seeking to understand
the perils facing the country. She
defended Islam, blaming the Taliban’s violation of women’s rights
on a grotesque distortion of the
faith.
“Everybody is talking about the
burqa,” she told Agence FrancePresse in 2001, referring to the
head-to-toe veil the Taliban forced
women to wear. “That is the least
of my problems,” she said, listing
concerns that included access to
medical care, education and work.
She described women who committed suicide by drinking battery
fluid because they were so ill, hungry and oppressed.
Ms. Wali assigned some responsibility for the situation to the
United States, which supported
the Muslim guerrillas known as
ADRIAN L. McCOY
March 27, 1954 - October 13, 2016
William Wallenmeyer,
physicist
William Wallenmeyer, 91, a
physicist who retired from the U.S.
Energy Department in 1987 as director of the division of high energy
physics, died Aug. 25 at a nursing
home in Rockville, Md. The cause
was congestive heart failure and
pneumonia, said a daughter, Wendy Kauffman.
Dr. Wallenmeyer, a resident of
Rockville, Md., was born in Evansville, Ind. He joined what was then
the Atomic Energy Commission in
1962 as a senior physicist. For five
years after his retirement, he was
president of the Southeastern Universities Research Association, a
consortium of universities sharing
research work.
Eleonora Luciano,
National Gallery curator
Eleonora Luciano, 54, associate
curator of sculpture and decorative
arts at the National Gallery of Art
On Tuesday, October 3, 2017. He is survived
by one daughter, Bridget Brockman; one
grandson, Anthony Crosby, Jr.; one granddaughter, Shanay Owens; five great-grandchildren; and a host of nieces; nephews;
other relatives and friends. Family will
receive friends on Monday, October 16
from 10 a.m. until time of service 11 a.m.
at Peace Baptist Church, 712 18th St., NE.
Interment Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.fort-lincoln.com
BURRELLO
I miss you... I miss your laugh... your jokes...
your scolding... your advice... your smile...
your half hugs... I JUST MISS YOU!
Your Loving Sister, Sonja
DEATH NOTICE
ARMBRUSTER
IRENE ARMBRUSTER
Irene Armbruster of Rockville, Maryland,
born April 11, 1924 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, died on October 9, 2017. Services
will be held at St. Rose of Lima Catholic
Church, 11701 Clopper Road, Gaithersburg,
Maryland, on Monday, October 16, 2017,
with viewing at 10:30 a.m. and Services at
11:30 a.m. Interment at Oak Hill Cemetery,
Nyack, New York, with Committal Service
at 2 p.m., October 17, 2017.
GERO BRELOER/REUTERS
Sima Wali, center, at a conference in 2001 in Bonn, Germany, to
bring peace to Afghanistan and reconstitute its government.
mujahideen in their fight against
the Soviet occupation.
“The United States helped create and support the ‘holy warriors,’ ” she once said at a conference hosted by the State of the
World Forum. “It’s played a major
role in the Afghanistan situation
by basically financing the war, and
it now has a responsibility to help
finance peace.”
Ms. Wali was one of the few
women to participate in U.N.
peace talks on Afghanistan held in
Bonn, Germany, in 2001 after the
U.S.-led invasion dismantled the
Taliban regime. She helped secure
the establishment of the country’s
Women’s Affairs Ministry.
The following year, she spoke
before the United Nations in honor of International Women’s Day,
declaring that she had fought her
“own jihad for social justice and
peace.”
“I have carried the shattered
and muted voices of my Afghan
sisters for almost two decades,”
she said. “Our voices went largely
unheeded until the grotesque arm
of terrorism, first against us, in our
homeland, extended its arm to my
country of exile here in the United
States. Now perhaps there is hope.
While Afghanistan remains at the
epicenter . . . of world attention,
we are hopeful to finally embark
on a process of peaceful transition
to democracy.”
Sima Wali was born April 7,
1951, in Kandahar, where her father worked for the Afghan national bank. Both parents, who
belonged to the Afghan aristocracy, encouraged her education.
“When I was growing up in
Afghanistan, female role models
were active members of parliament, as doctors, judges and educators working alongside men,”
she recalled years later.
Ms. Wali studied business administration at Kabul University,
graduating in 1971. She worked for
the Peace Corps mission in Afghanistan before fleeing the country.
She settled in Washington,
where she received a master’s degree in international relations
from American University in 1984.
A complete list of survivors was
not available.
Ms. Wali’s humanitarian work
received recognition from organizations that included Amnesty International. During one of her few
return trips to Afghanistan, in
2005, she narrowly escaped being
taken hostage by insurgents.
“We still have to fight for women to be represented in every sector of Afghan society,” Ms. Wali
had said at the Bonn conference.
“We will not go away.”
emily.langer@washpost.com
O F N O TE
Obituaries of residents from the
District, Maryland and Northern Virginia.
IN MEMORIAM
McCOY
E MILY L ANGER
who also had been curator of special exhibitions over two decades at
the gallery, died Aug. 17 at a hospital in the District. The cause was
cancer, said Anabeth Guthrie, a gallery spokeswoman.
Dr. Luciano, a D.C. resident, was
born in Como, Italy. Before joining
the National Gallery in 1996, she
taught art history at Indiana University.
Martin Biles,
nuclear engineer
Martin Biles, 98, a nuclear engineer who retired from the old
Atomic Energy Commission as director of occupational safety in the
1970s, died Aug. 25 at a senior care
facility in Houston. The cause was
heart ailments, said a daughter,
Jami Jones.
Dr. Biles was born in San Diego.
He was an AAU javelin champion
in the 1940s and competed in the
javelin throw for the U.S. team in
the 1948 Summer Olympics in
London. He later served in the Air
Force, where he was assigned to
work with the Atomic Energy
Commission. He joined AEC as a
civilian in 1957. A former District
resident, he moved to Naples, Fla.,
in 2001 and then to Houston this
past summer.
Marian Fryer,
office worker
Marian Fryer, 79, an administrative officer with several agencies of the D.C. and federal governments, died Sept. 9 at her home in
Wheaton, Md. The cause was complications from multiple myeloma, said a daughter, Alicia Bassar.
Mrs. Fryer was born Marian
Freeman in Jackson, Ga., and
moved to the Washington area in
1952. Between 1961 in 1995, she
was variously an administrative
officer with the American Revolution Bicentennial Commission
and with budget, public affairs,
equal employment opportunity
and human resources offices of
the federal and D.C. governments.
In retirement, she ran a women’s
fashion consignment business
known as Marion’s Collections.
She was a past president of the
Wheaton Citizens Coalition.
— From staff reports
DEATH NOTICE
CHAPMAN
JANE BROOKS (Frazier) CHAPMAN
Joined her husband James A Chapman Sr.
in eternal rest on October 7, 2017. She is
survived by her three adult children, James
Chapman Jr., Cathy Chapman-Tannehill and
William Chapman. She was the loved Grandmother of Carrie Tannehill-Kolyer, Meghan
Chapman, and Kathleen Chapman. and her
great-grandchildren, Cameron Tannehill, and
Cole Kolyer.
Jane was born in 1924 in Washington DC,
and started her adult working life as a phone
operator. Married in June of 1947 and then in
July of 1947 moved to Falls Church, VA. She
lived a full life as a wife and mother. Jane was
active in her church, and community. Jane was
a proud member of the Order of the Eastern
Star. In her later years she worked for Fairfax
County in the voter registration office. Jane
was a percipient in the compilation of the
Providence Perspective, an oral history of the
Providence District within Fairfax County.
In keeping with her wishes there will be
a private family only burial at the National
Memorial Park where her ashes will be
interred.
CHRISTENSEN
JAMES CHRISTENSEN (Age 74)
On October 1, 2017, Jim passed away peacefully at his home in Fairfax, VA. Jim is survived
by his wife of 42 years, Leslie Christensen; his
sons Arne and Lars; his sister Joy Hildeman
(Greg) and many loving relatives and friends.
Jim retired in 2001 after a 37 year career
in Trust and Investment Management. A gathering for friends and family will be held on
Saturday, October 14, 2017, from 2 to 5 p.m.
at the Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home, 9902
Braddock Road, Fairfax, VA 22032. In lieu of
flowers, donations made be made to the Lung
Transplant Program at the Cleveland Clinic
Foundation, P.O. Box 931517, Cleveland, OH
44193-1655.
EDNA LOUISE COHEN
obituaries
BY
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
COHEN
dan.morse@washpost.com
Pressed for rights of Afghan women
. FRIDAY,
On Monday, October 9, 2017,
EDNA "LOUISE" COHEN of Silver
Spring, MD. Beloved wife of the
late Sol Cohen ; loving mother of
Douglas N. Cohen, Jon A. "Andy"
and Kenneth L. (Cindy) Cohen;
dear grandmother of Kacey Lynn, Robyn Beth
and Danielle Alexis. She was also a member
of the Eastern Star. Graveside funeral service
will be held on Monday, October 16, 2017,
11 A.M. at Mt. Lebanon Cemetery, Adelphi,
MD. Memorial contributions may be made
to the charity of your choice. Arrangements
entrusted to TORCHINSKY HEBREW FUNERAL
HOME, 202-541-1001
COLLINS
THOMAS EDWARD COLLINS
Thomas Edward Collins, of McLean, VA
passed away on Monday October 9, 2017.
Tom Collins, born on January 25, 1933,
was predeceased by his father Thomas E.
Collins, his mother Mabel Wilson Collins,
and his brothers Bob and Don Wilson. He is
survived by his wife Martha Wheeler Collins,
his daughter Elisebeth Bridget Collins, his
son Thomas E. Collins III and daughter-inlaw Maria Collins, and his grandchildren,
Yesenia K. Collins and Thomas E. Collins IV.
Visitation is 9:30 to 11 a.m., Saturday, October 14, at McLean Baptist Church, 1367
Chain Bridge Road, McLean, VA 22101. The
funeral service will be held at 11 a.m.
Memorial contributions may be made to
McLean Baptist Church. Online condolences and fond memories may be offered
to the family at:
www.moneyandking.com
DREYER
JACQUELINE ANNE BURRELLO
Jacqueline Anne Burrello, 73, of Frederick,
passed away Saturday, October 7, 2017 at
Kline Hospice House, Mt. Airy, MD. The family
will receive friends from 12 noon to 1 p.m., on
Monday, October 16, 2017 at the Church of the
Redeemer, 5606 Buckeystown Pike, Frederick,
MD 21704. The funeral service will follow at 1
p.m., at the church. Interment will be at 12:30
p.m., on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 at Harmony
Memorial Park Cemetery, 7101 Sheriff Road,
Hyattsville, MD 20785.
CALLAGHAN
STANLEY DREYER "Stan"
DEATH NOTICE
BARLOW
DONALD E. CALLAGHAN (Age 89)
CATHERINE SWANSON BARLOW
Catherine Swanson Barlow, 97, passed
away peacefully on October 3, 2017, in
Silver Spring, Maryland where she resided
for 17 years.
Catherine was born in Danville, Virginia to
Benjamin and Pearl Swanson. She was preceded in death by her husband of 57 years,
Boce W. Barlow, Jr.
She was one of 17 siblings and is survived
by two brothers, Carroll A. Swanson and
Frederick E. Swanson and three sisters-inlaw, Cleatis Swanson, Esther Swanson and
Betty O. Swanson.
Also, she leaves to celebrate her life her
daughter, Cathy A. Barlow and her partner,
Susan Karol Martel; her son, Bryon S. Barlow and his wife, Robina Kerr Barlow; two
granddaughters, Danielle L. Barlow and Lauren M. Barlow. She enjoyed sharing her life
with many nieces and nephews; and a host
of other relatives and friends.
Catherine lived in Hartford, Connecticut
for 51 years with her husband, a Hartford
native. She retired as the head of guidance
for Hartford Public High School and was
active in many civic and social organizations.
A Celebration of her life will take place on
Saturday, October 21, at Peoples Congregational Church at 4704 Thirteenth Street,
NW, Washington DC. Visitation begins at
11:30 a.m. An AKA ceremony begins at
12:30 p.m. followed by the memorial at
1:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to the Interracial
Scholarship Fund of Greater Hartford in
Hartford, Connecticut at www.hfpg.org or
Montgomery Hospice in Rockville, MD.
Died peacefully with his two daughters
at his side on Monday, May 15, 2017 in
Williamsburg, VA. Born in Lawrence, MA
on November 10, 1927, he was the third
child of Eugene F. Callaghan and Kathryn A.
Barrett.
His life revolved around service to his
family, his church, his community and his
country. After graduating from high school
in 1945, he headed to Massachusettes
Institute of Technology (MIT) before being
drafted into the United States Army. What
began as a year of Army service, led to
a 24-year career in the Medical Service
Corps of the US Air Force. Don earned
degrees from The Ohio State University,
and Washington University in St. Louis,
MO. Don married Maureen Lennon, an Air
Force nurse, in 1953, while they were
both stationed in TX. Don retired from the
Air Force in 1970 as a Lt Colonel, and
the family moved to Fort Washington, MD,
where he embarked on a career in hospital
administration, consulting and as a small
business owner. Don and Maureen retired
to Whiting, NJ in 1995 and enjoyed the
vibrant community until Maureen died in
2010. Don moved to Williamsburg, VA in
2015 to be close to his two daughters.
Don was predeceased by his wife of 57
years, Maureen, as well as brothers, Eugene
F. Callaghan II and John W. Callaghan. Don
is survived by daughters, Maureen Sadler
(Gary), Williamsburg, VA and Kittie Abell
(Rob), Charlottesville, VA; five grandchildren, Joseph Sadler (Shannon), Victoria,
TX, Michael Sadler (Erica), Little Rock, AR,
Kathleen Abell Edwards (Brandon), Charlottesville, VA, Mary Sadler, Chattanooga,
TN and Thomas Abell, Charlottesville, VA;
three great-grandsons; sister, Marion E.
Callaghan, Silver Spring, MD; and dozens of
nieces, nephews and cousins.
A Funeral Mass will be said on Monday,
October 16, 2017 at 8:45 a.m. in the Fort
Meyer Chapel. Burial at Arlington National
Cemetery, with Full Military Honors, will
immediately follow. Online condolences
may be shared at:
www.bucktroutfuneralhome.net
CAVANAUGH
He is survived by his wife, Sharron; daughter Beth Kingston (Don) of Elizabethtown,
KY; son, Steven of Gulf Breeze, FL; two
grandsons, Benjamin and Christopher Dreyer and extended family and friends throughout the world.
A celebration of Stan’s life will be held at
Grace Presbyterian Church, 7434 Bath St.,
Springfield at 1 p.m. on Thursday, October
19. In lieu of flowers, donations in Stan’s
memory may be made to Grace Presbyterian Church for Dreyer Endowed Pledge;
Cooperative Development Foundation,
1775 Eye St. NW, 8th floor, Washington,
DC 20006 or Capital Caring, 2900 Telestar
Ct., Falls Church, VA,22042.
ELLIOTT
BETTE J. CARTER ELLIOTT
Bette J. Carter Elliott, of Fort Washington, MD
transitioned Wednesday, October 4, 2017 in
Hospice Care of Chesapeake, after a lengthy
battle with Multiple Sclerosis. She is survived
by her husband, Rev. John W. Elliott; three
sisters, Shirley Davison, Henrietta Brown, and
Catherine Mason; a stepson, Jay Elliott and
two grandchildren, Raja and Raven; and other
family and friends. Bette worked for many
years as a Procurement Specialist before her
health failed. She will be dearly missed.
Services will be held Saturday, October 14,
2017 at Word For Life Church, 11519 Ft.
Washington Road, Ft. Washington, MD, with
viewing at 10 a.m. and Service at 11 a.m.
Funeral Services entrusted to J.B. Jenkins
Funeral Home in Landover MD.
ETTRIDGE
JESSIE EVELYN ETTRIDGE
BLACKER
EDWIN S. BLACKER
Edwin S. Blacker passed on October 6,
2017 in St Petersburg, FL at the age of
80. He was born in Petersburg, Virginia,
the son of Samuel and Dora (Kaplan). After
graduating from the Richmond Professional
Institute, he began his career with the
National Park Service as the manager for
Wolf Trap and Ford’s Theater, followed by
directing the Bat Sheva Dance Company
of Israel. He then joined the staff of the
Kennedy Center where he managed the
Terrace and Eisenhower Theaters, as well
as representing his union. He was active in
the local gay communities of Washington
and St. Petersburg, a founding member of
Bet Mishpachah Synagogue and a volunteer
at the Whitman Walker Clinic. He retired in
2002, and moved to St. Petersburg. He
is survived by his husband of 20 years,
Ervin (Charlie) Cerveny and loving family
and friends. Donations in his memory can
be made to the Metro Community Center
Senior Programs at https://www.metrotampabay.org/product/elder-programs/.
Information regarding his memorial service
can be obtained by contacting:
Blackermem@aol.com
Stanley "Stan" Dreyer, of Springfield, VA
passed away peacefully at home on Saturday evening, October 7, 2017, after a short
battle with cancer. He was 86.
He was born in Brighton, CO, the son of
Jannett and Frank Dreyer and grew up on
the family farm where he was active in 4H. He graduated from the University of
Colorado and received a Master’s degree in
Agricultural Economics from University of
Minnesota. His entire career was devoted
to cooperatives. He was President of the
Cooperative League of the USA (now NCBA)
and later joined the National Cooperative
Bank, which he helped create. He served
on several boards of international associations involved in the cooperative movement. He received numerous honors
throughout his lifetime, including induction
into the Cooperative Hall of Fame, but none
more significant than the love and respect
he received from people in all walks of
life. He was an active member of Grace
Presbyterian Church in Springfield where
he served as Elder and Chair of the Special
Funds Committee.
ELEANOR ANN CAVANAUGH
Of Washington, DC on Saturday,
October 7, 2017. Loving mother of
Michael P. Bruckwick (Annemarie)
Grandmother of
Colin, Emma,
Patrick and Frank Bruckwick.
Friends may call at DeVol Funeral Home 2222
Wisconsin Ave., NW, Washington, DC. (Complimentary Valet Parking) on Monday, October 16,
2017 from 6 to 8 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial
will be offered on Tuesday, October 17, 2017
at 10:30 a.m. at Holy Trinity Catholic Church
36th and O St, NW, Washington, DC. Interment
at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made in her name to
the American Cancer Society. please sign the
guestbook at:
www.DeVolFuneralHome.com
Jessie “Evelyn” Ettridge (née Caywood),
89 years old of Arlington, Virginia, passed
away peacefully on Monday, October 9th
at The Terraces at the Clare in Chicago, IL
while under hospice care at their facility,
from complications after a long struggle
with dementia. She was surrounded by
her immediate family members from Washington, DC, Chicago, IL, New York City
and Groveland, FL. As a mother, sister,
aunt, grandmother and great-grandmother,
Evelyn was deeply beloved and brought
a unique cohesive structure to her family.
Mrs. Ettridge is survived by her children
Timothy and Crystal; by her grandchildren
Raine Ettridge Gray (Rischard), Samuel Seidenberg, Sanderson Ettridge and Honor
Ettridge; her great-grandchildren Reese and
Eve Gray; her siblings, George Caywood,
Ruth Nutter (Edward), and Judy Linscott.
She leaves behind her dozens of nieces,
nephews, great nieces and nephews as
well as great-great nieces and nephews.
She was preceded in death by her son,
Steven Ettridge in 1999, her brother David
Caywood (Donna) in 1994 and her sister
Ruby Wagner (Wayne) in 1988. Memorial
services are scheduled to be held on Saturday, October 14th, at 1 p.m. at the First
Baptist Church of Alexandria, 2932 King
Street, Alexandria, VA 22302 (703-6843720). Burial services will follow for immediate family only at Trinity Episcopal Church
in Upperville, VA.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made
to Operation Smile at:
http://www.operationsmile.org.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
FUTROVSKY
LINOWES
CHARLES J. FUTROVSKY
On Wednesday, October 11,
2017, CHARLES J. FUTROVSKY
of Silver Spring, MD. Beloved
husband of nearly 62 years
of Frances Seigel Futrovsky.
Devoted and cherished father
of Mark (Robyn) Futrovsky, Susan (Larry)
Davis, Beth Cornfield and Julie (Chris) Mottler. Dear brother of Hilda (the late Arnold)
Springer and the late Donald Futrovsky,
Kitty Strauss and Richard Futrovsky. Loving
brother-in-law of Morton Seigel, Ethel
(Mike) Pustilnik and the late Lorraine
Kuritzky. Adored and extremely proud
"Pop" of Erin (Jason), Scott, Cori, Steven
(Courtney), Mitchell, Drew, Liza, Marley,
Vittoria and Alex. Tickled pink great-grandfather of Avery. His family overflowed his
life with nachas. Funeral services will be
held on Sunday, October 15, 2017, 12
noon at Shaare Tefila Congregation, 16620
Georgia Ave., Olney, MD 20832. Interment
following at Judean Memorial Gardens,
Olney, MD. After the interment, the family
will receive relatives and friends at Shaare
Tefila Congregation until 5 p.m. Shiva
minyan will be held Sunday evening at
7:30 p.m. at the Community Room at 3200
N. Leisure World Blvd. Shiva will continue
through Wednesday evening at the home
of Mark and Robyn Futrovsky with minyans
at 7:30 p.m. Memorial contributions may
be made to Shaare Tefila Congregation.
Arrangements entrusted to TORCHINSKY
HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202-541-1001.
ADA H. LINOWES
On Wednesday, October 11,
2017, ADA H. LINOWES of
Chevy Chase, MD. Beloved
wife of 59 years of the late
R. Robert Linowes, devoted
mother of Robin (John)
Thomas, Julie (Dr. David
Roth) Linowes, Lisa Linowes Yates and
Michael (Elissa) Linowes. Dear sister of
Irma Bierman and the late Irving (surviving, Ethel) Hamburger. She is also survived
by ten grandchildren. Ada was a native
Washingtonian. A local philanthropist, she
and her husband supported and were
affiliated with many cultural and fine arts,
including the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the
Phillips Gallery, the Greater Washington
Community Foundation and the Shakespeare Theatre Company. She earned her
Bachelor of Arts from George Washington
University and a Master of Fine Arts from
the Corcoran School of Design. She produced paintings, drawings, collages, silk
screening and sculpture. Her artwork
appeared in many local exhibitions. Funeral services will be held on Monday, October 16, 2017, 11:00 AM at Judean Memorial Gardens Chapel, Olney, MD. Interment
following. Memorial contributions may be
made to the Alzheimer's Association.
Shiva will be observed Monday through
Wednesday evening at the late residence.
Arrangements entrusted to TORCHINSKY
HEBREW FUNERAL HOME, 202-541-1001.
EZ
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
SMITH
COX
LARK
WOODRING
LUCILLE BOWSER SMITH
On October 10, 2017. Survived by many loving
children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held on
Friday, November 3, 2017 at 3 p.m. at the
Guild Chapel at Asbury Methodist Village in
Gaithersburg, Maryland. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be made to Hughes United Methodist Church, 10700 Georgia
Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20902.
SPEARMAN
SHARONDA M. COX (Age 47)
On Friday, October 6, 2017. The beloved wife
and mother of Cody and Elijah Cox. She is
also survived by a host of other relatives and
friends. Family will receive friends on Saturday,
October 14 for 11 a.m., service at St. Paul
Church, 6419 Marlboro Pike, District Heights,
MD 20747. Rev. Pastor Robert J. William, Sr.,
officiating. Interment Lincoln Memorial Cemetery. Arrangements by Pope.
GLOVER
GWENDOLYN L. SPEARMAN “Gwen”
GOHEEN
MARSH
JOSEPH P. GOHEEN, SR.
On Saturday, October 7, 2017 of Rockville,
Maryland. Beloved husband of the late
Patricia A. Goheen. Loving father of Rick
Goheen, James S. (Christine) Goheen, Shannon (Patrick) Flood, Erin (Paul Fetter)
Goheen. and Jeffrey R. (Sherri) Goheen.
Dear grandfather of Patrick J. and Alannah
M. Goheen, Sienna H. and Porter J. Flood,
Shea C., Joseph D. and Zackary R. Goheen.
Also survived by his siblings John Michael
Goheen, Mary Jean Corey, Patty Solice,
and the late Mary Jo Pacifico. Friends will
be received at PUMPHREY’S COLONIAL
FUNERAL HOME, 300 W. Montgomery Ave,
Rockville, MD on Monday, October 16, 2017
from 3 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. A
mass of Christian burial will be offered at
Shrine of St. Jude Catholic Church, 12701
Veirs Mill Road, Rockville, MD 20853. In
lieu of flowers, donations can be made to
Knights of Columbus, 5417 W. Cedar Lane,
Bethesda, MD 20814. Please view and sign
family guestbook at
www.pumphreyfuneralhome.com
JOHNSON
CURTIS J. JOHNSON
On Sunday, October 8, 2017 in Bowie, MD
Curtis Jerrod Johnson lost his battle with stomach cancer. He was an active duty member of
the United States Airforce and assigned to the
16th intelligence squadron at Ft. Meade MD.
He is survived by his wife, Kwanza Johnson and
his children, Mobian Jerrod Johnson, Tiyanna
Monet Johnson, CurNijhe Jerrod Johnson, Ania
Nevaeh Johnson and Kaiden Jerrod Johnson.
He is also survived by his mother, Jessie Fae
Barkley; father, Winfred Johnson; stepmother,
Tammy Johnson; along with seven siblings; and
a host of aunts; uncles and cousins. The funeral
service will be held at JB Jenkins Funeral
Home on October 20, 2017. Visitation from
9:30 a.m. until 10:30 a.m. service will begin
at 10:30 a.m. In lieu of flowers please send
donations to Debbie Dream Foundation for
stomach Cancer research. Interment Maryland
Veterans Cemetery, 2:30 p.m. Cheltenham,
MD.
KUREK
WILLIAM H. MARSH, SR. (Age 86)
Former Ambassador, William H. Marsh, Sr.
peacefully passed away September 26,
2017, in Mitchellville, MD. He is survived
by his sons, William Jr. (Tricia) and Andrew
(Catherine) and grandchildren, Georgia,
Mathilde, William, and James. He was predeceased by his wife, Ruth. A service will
take place on Saturday, October 14, 2017
at 2 p.m., St. Barnabas Episcopal Church,
Upper Marlboro, MD.
PALMER
Dr. JOEL MARTIN PALMER
On Wednesday, October 11,
2017 of Potomac, MD.
Beloved husband of The Late
Ellen Palmer; devoted father
of Andrea (Rob) Green and
Kevin
(Amanda)
Palmer.
Beloved Papa to Jared and
Lainey Green. Funeral services will be held
Sunday October 15, 2017, 11 a.m. at Judean
Memorial Gardens Chapel, 16225 Batchellors Forest Rd, Olney, MD. Interment to
follow. In lieu of flowers, please send
memorial contributions via check to:
Ingleside at King Farm Employee Appreciation Fund, 701 King Farm Blvd., Rockville,
MD 20850.
www.sagelbloomfield.com
LARGE
RITTER
CHARLES WILLIS RITTER
Of Washington, DC, age 77, on September 26,
2017 after a long battle with Parkinson’s. Born
on February 18, 1940 in Baltimore, Maryland to
the late Mary (nee Claiborne) and Roy Ritter.
Willis graduated from the McDonogh School,
Cornell University and the University of Virginia
School of Law, where he made Law Review,
before embarking on a pioneering and highly
successful career in the practice of municipal
bond law. Beloved husband and best friend
to Anne (nee Miller) for 34 wonderful years.
Exceptionally proud father to Andrew (Lee
Anne), David (Julie), and Ben (Cara). Devoted
and doting grandfather to Todd, Patrick, Vivian,
Robbie, Sam, Olivia Sordo, and Angelo. Loving
brother to Mimi O’Neill and Lucy Skeen. Dear
friend to too many to count and a mentor to
many. An avid golfer, raconteur extraordinaire,
and long-suffering Redskins fan. His generous
philanthropy and devotion to education has
provided opportunity to scores of young people. His wit and wisdom will be sorely missed.
There will be a memorial service for family and
friends and St. Columba's Episcopal Church at
4201 Albemarle St NW, Washington, DC 20016
on November 1, at 11 a.m.
WILLIAM R. LARGE (Age 79)
Died on Saturday, October 7, 2017 after
a long illness. A native of New Jersey,
he attended local schools and received a
degree from Colgate University. He also had
masters degrees from UCLA and Stanford.
He is survived by Helen, his loving wife of
forty years.
After a distinguished career at the InterAmerican Development Bank, he retired
in 2005. A Latin American Specialist, his
final assignment was as the Bank’s country
representative in Montevideo, Uruguay. An
accomplished amateur pianist, he was
especially interested in playing tangos and
popular show tunes to the delight of his
many friends.
A memorial service will take place on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 at 11 a.m. at Christ
Church, Georgetown.
In lieu of flowers, donations in his name
may be sent to the Parkinson Foundation.
SULLENGER
Varina Richard Shipe, 91, passed peacefully
of natural causes at Hospice of the Chesapeake on October 10, 2017. She was born
and raised in Washington, DC. She married
Walter Harban Shipe on August 21, 1948
and was married 64 years until his death in
March of 2013.
Died peacefully at his home on September
29, 2017. He is survived by his wife,
Meredith Warren; two sons, James Bard,
Jr. and John Coast; their wives; six grandchildren and his sister, Joryn Koski.
“Two roads diverged in a wood and I I took
the one less travelled by,
And that made all the difference.”
(Robert Frost)
Peacefully passed away on, Thursday October
5, 2017. Loving husband of Beverly J. Glover.
Also survived by a son, Scott Glover (Cindy);
stepson, Brian Wall; mother-in-law, Althea Wall;
brother and sister-in-law, Derrick Wall and Connie Glover; three nieces, Tracey, Vicki, Regina;
one nephew, Clifford and a host of other
relatives and friends. On Monday October 16,
friends may visit with the family from 10 a.m.
until time of service at 11 a.m. at Reid Temple
A.M.E. Church, 11400 Glenn Dale Blvd., Glenn
Dale, MD 20769. Interment private.
He lived his life to the fullest and we will
dearly miss him.
DEY
She was a lifetime member of the Christian
Church (Disciples of Christ). In 1974 she was
the first female church Board Chairman and
one of the first two female Elders elected
in the National Capital Area of the Christian
Church. To honor her beloved grandmother
“Mom” and her friend Florence Drum and
her mother, Katherine established two scholarships at the Disciples Divinity House, University of Chicago.
Arlington native Katherine A. Dey passed
away on October 5, 2017 at Arlington’s Virginia Hospital Center due to pneumonia complications.
Born March 21, 1921, she and her sister
Frances were reared on Wilson Blvd. by
their paternal grandparents, M. Elizabeth and
Edward S. Dey. After 1939 graduation from
Washington-Lee High School, she worked
as a typist in the Arlington Circuit Court
Clerk’s office until 1942 when she moved
to Jacksonville, Florida to work on National
Defense projects. For over two and a half
years, she worked as a Class A Welder at the
St. John’s River Shipbuilding Company, where
61 Liberty Ships were built and launched.
When the contract completed, she went to
work as an Aircraft Mechanic for a year at
the Jacksonville Naval Air Base, repairing wardamaged fighter aircraft wings and replacing
glass windows.
In 1948, Katherine began her 32-year service
with the Department of Defense, National
Security Agency, retiring in 1980.
Visitation will be at Murphy Funeral Home,
4510 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22203 on
Tuesday, October 17 from 2 to 4 p.m. and
7 to 9 p.m. On Wednesday, October 18,
private family viewing will be 9 to 10:30 a.m.
at Murphy Funeral Home Chapel. An 11
a.m. funeral service at Murphy Chapel will be
followed by interment at Columbia Gardens
Cemetery, 3411 Arlington Blvd., Arlington, VA
22201.
Memorial contributions can be made to the
M. Elizabeth Dey Scholarship Fund or DrumTenant Scholarship Fund, Disciples Divinity
House/University of Chicago, 1156 E. 57th St.,
Chicago, IL 60637, and First Christian Church,
6165 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22044.
PAID DEATH NOTICES
MONDAY- FRIDAY 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.
To place a notice, call:
202-334-4122
800-627-1150 ext 4-4122
FAX:
202-334-7188
EMAIL:
deathnotices@washpost.com
HERMAN NMI WOOD
Passed peacefully on Saturday, October 7,
2017. Family will receive friends on Saturday,
October 14, visitation with the family 10 a.m.
funeral service 11 a.m. United House of Prayer
for All People, 1721 7th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001.
ROSE LUCILLE PULVIRENTI
(Age 46)
IN MEMORIAM
HOWARD
ELIZABETH JUNE HAND (Age 87)
CARL M. HOWARD "Big Mike"
June 3, 1946 ~ October 13, 2014
My son I love you today, tomorrow and always.
It's been three years since your departure,
but it seems like yesterday.
You are loved and missed beyond measure.
My heart still grieves.
Much Love, Mom~ Vernice Howard
Suddenly on Tuesday, October 10,
2017, of Silver Spring, MD. Born
in Washington D.C., on December
1, 1929. She was the daughter of
the late June and Charles Suraci.
Beloved wife of the late John
Phelps Hand, Jr. She is survived
by her son, Christopher Walter, stepsons David
Hand and Phelps Hand (Linda), and four grandchildren. She is also survived by her sister,
Beverly Spyropolous and late brother, Charles
"Buddy" Suraci. Relatives and friends may
call at Collins Funeral Home, 500 University
Boulevard West, Silver Spring, MD, (Valet Parking), Sunday, October 15, from 2 to 4 p.m.
and 7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial at
St. Bernadette's Church, 72 University Blvd.
East, Silver Spring, MD, on Monday, October
16, at 10 a.m. Interment Gate of Heaven
Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be
made to Alzheimer's Association, P.O. Box
96011, Washington, DC 20090.
www.COLLINSFUNERALHOME.com
On Sunday, October 8, 2017 Rose Lucille Pulvirenti of Hyattsville, MD. Beloved daughter
of Pasquale and Stella Pulvirenti; sister of
Domenic J. (Ruth) Pulvirenti, Suzanne M.
(Richard) Brokenshire, Carl F. Pulvirenti, Christine M. (Carlos) Nazario, Rita L. (Clay) Aulebach
and the late David A. Pulvirenti. Also survived
by many nieces and nephews. Relatives and
friends may call on Sunday, October 15, 2017
from 2 to 5 p.m. at Hines-Rinaldi Funeral Home,
11800 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring,
MD and also at St. John Baptist de la Salle
Catholic Church, 5706 Sargent Rd., Chillum,
MD on Monday, October 16, 2017 from 10 a.m.
until 11 a.m. where Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Interment Gate
of Heaven Cemetery. Memorial Contributions
may be made to the charity of your choice.
Please view and sign the family guest book at:
www.hinesrinaldifuneralhome.com
WADDELL
Email and faxes MUST include
name, home address & home phone #
of the responsible billing party.
Fax & email deadline - 3 p.m. daily
Phone-In deadline
4 p.m. M-F
3 p.m. Sa-Su
CURRENT 2017 RATES:
( PER DAY)
MONDAY-SATURDAY
Black & White
1" - $135 (text only)
2" - $306 (text only)
3" - $441
4" - $482
5" - $611
-----SUNDAY
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1"- $161 (text only)
2" - $339 (text only)
3" - $489
4" - $515
5" - $665
6"+ for ALL Black & White notices
$135 each additional inch wkday
$161 each additional inch Sunday
-------------------MONDAY-SATURDAY
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3" - $502
4" - $545
5" - $680
-----SUNDAY
Color
3" - $535
4" - $621
5" - $770
6"+ for ALL color notices
$160 each additional inch wkday
$186 each additional inch Sunday
Notices with photos begin at 3"
(All photos add 2" to your notice.)
HARRIS
DEATH NOTICE
ALL NOTICES MUST BE PREPAID
MEMORIAL PLAQUES:
All notices over 2" include
complimentary memorial plaque.
CARTER
Additional plaques start at $26 each
and may be ordered.
All Paid Death Notices
appear on our website through
www.legacy.com
VERA CASTELLI WADDELL
On Friday, October 6, 2017. Loving and devoted
mother of Freda Boggs, BJ Carter, Joyce Chapman, Bernard Carter and the late Roy Carter.
She is also survived by six grandchildren; a
host of great-grandchildren; other relatives
and friends. Mrs. Carter will lie in state at the
Brown Memorial AME Church, 130 14th St.
NE on Monday, October 16 from 9 a.m. until
funeral services at 10 a.m. Interment Quantico
National Cemetery. Services by STEWART.
Millie passed away peacefully on Monday,
October 2, 2017 at the Washington Hospital
Center. She is survived by her son, Charles;
three granddaughters, Adrienne, Quran
and Mecca; three great-grandchildren, Brian,
Da Yana and Claudia; two great-great-grandchildren; three sisters, four brothers-in-law;
two sisters-in-law and a host of nieces,
nephews, other relatives and friends. Family
will receive friends on Tuesday, October 17
from 12:30 p.m. until time of service 1:30
p.m. at FORT LINCOLN FUNERAL HOME, 3401
Bladensburg Rd,. Brentwood, MD. Interment
Fort Lincoln Cemetery.
www.fort-lincoln.com
DEATH NOTICE
DEATH NOTICE
MARGARET L. CARTER
KASSIM
In recognition of her exemplary volunteer
service, Katherine was awarded the first
Chapter Board Chairman’s “Inspiration
Award” in 1994. In 2010 she was awarded a
plaque in gratitude for her continued dedication and 27 years of voluntary service to the
Arlington Red Cross Chapter. She had served
a total of 23,375 volunteer hours.
Her sister, Frances predeceased her. She
is survived by loving cousins and devoted
friends who cherish her legacy of humor,
generosity and faith.
VERNON LEONARD PAYNE JR. (Age 58)
Of Woodbridge, VA passed away Sunday October 8, 2017 at Sentara Hospital. He leaves
behind his loving wife, Benthea "Bunny" Payne
and daughter, Brittany Payne. Services will be
held on Saturday October 14, 2017 at Warner
Baptist Church, 3613 Lacey Blvd, Falls Church,
VA. Viewing 9 a.m., Homegoing 11 a.m.
WOOD
In the fall of 1983, she became a volunteer
driver in the Community Volunteer Services
Division of the Arlington Chapter, American
Red Cross. In 1986 she became volunteer
Transportation Coordinator, continuing for
over 10 years.
KATHERINE A. DEY
He is survived by his wife of nearly 61 years,
Martha McGee Woodring; daughter, Melissa
Rosenberg; son-in-law, Jim Rosenberg; grandchildren, Sam and Hannah Rosenberg; sister,
Janet Shobert; and several nieces and
nephews. He was predeceased by his parents;
brothers, Bill, Jack and Joe; and grandson, Joey.
PAYNE
HAND
MILDRED HARPER HARRIS "Millie"
DEATH NOTICE
Lou was past President of the Silver Spring
Jaycees and White Oak Rotary; past Commander of American Legion Cissel Saxon Post 41;
past Commodore of Rotary Yacht Squadron of
the Chesapeake Bay; and a Mason.
PULVIRENTI
Memorial services will be held at St. John’s
Episcopal Church, 1525 H St., NW, Washington, DC 20005 on Tuesday, October 17
at 1:30 p.m.
A Funeral Service will be held Saturday,
October 14, 2017 at 11 a.m. in the Joseph
E. Hagan Chapel of Joseph Gawler’s Sons,
5130 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Washington,
DC 20016. There will be a reception at the
funeral home from Noon until 2 p.m. Burial
will be in Potomac Methodist Cemetery at
3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to the local SPCA, the Humane
Society of America, or to a charity of choice.
DEATH NOTICE
LOUIS L. WOODRING (Age 87)
On Wednesday, September 27, 2017, Louis L.
“Lou” Woodring died, following a very full, rich
life. Lou was born on July 13, 1930 to Helen
and Joseph Blair Woodring in Reynoldsville,
PA. He served in the Air Force then moved
to the Washington, DC area, where he had
a successful career as a salesman and food
broker. In 1982, he purchased Quality Engraving & Design in Kensington, MD, a business
he grew to great success. He retired in 1997.
JOHN AUGUSTUS GLOVER
JAMES BARD SULLENGER
1932-2017
SHIPE
VARINA RICHARD SHIPE
ALMA LEE LARK
Passed away on October 2, 2017. She is
survived by her mother, Lillie Mae Watson,
two daughters, Carolyn Thompson and
Jamilla Wright; one son, Larry Lark, Jr.; and
a host of Friends and family. Services will
be held on Saturday October 14/2017 at
Progressive For God Baptist Church, 501
E Street SE, Washington, DC. Viewing 10
a.m. Service 11 a.m. Internment Private.
Services Entrusted to RN Horton Company
Morticians, Inc.
A gathering of family and friends will be held
on Saturday, October 14, 2017 at Hines Rinaldi
Funeral Home in Silver Spring, MD, with visitation at 10 a.m., until time of service at 11 a.m.
Burial to follow at Union Cemetery. In lieu
of flowers, donations may be made to Joe’s
Movement Emporium, 3309 Bunker Hill Rd., Mt.
Rainier, MD 20712 (www.joesmovement.org).
Please sign and view the family guestbook:
www.hinesrinaldifuneralhome.com
RICE
KATHLEEN GAIL KUREK
Kathleen Gail Kurek, 69, of Sterling, VA,
passed away on October 5, 2017, at 7:00
a.m. Born on February 14, 1948, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, she was the daughter of
the late August and Concetta (Candlena)
Kupco. She served the U.S. government
as a parole administrator and secretary
for the DoI for 37 years, and devoted her
full-time energies to raising her children
in their early years. Fond of family life,
traveling, the beach, criminology, psychology, cooking, music, and fine arts, she
enjoyed her final years attending Catholic
Mass and sharing meals with her son weekly. She is survived by her children, Thomas
E. Kurek and Kelly Lynn Siegel and her
siblings, Johanna (Kupco) Cipolla and Mark
Kupco.
The family will receive friends from 5 p.m.
until 7 p.m. on October 15, 2017, at Adams
Green Funeral Home. A funeral service will
be held at 10 a.m. on October 16, 2017,
at Christ the Redeemer Catholic Church.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may
be made to Alvarism, LLC. Arrangements
entrusted to Adams Green Funeral Home.
Passed away on Monday, October 9, 2017, at
her home in Clinton, MD. Born in Ft. Lee, VA
to Lillian C. McNeill Spearman and the late
Herman William Spearman. She is survived by
her daughter, Roxann R. Spearman of Clinton,
Maryland; three brothers, Herman Curtis
Spearman (Monica) of Clinton, Maryland,
Jerome F, Spearman (Mark) from Upper Marlboro, Maryland, Reginald Smith (Kim) of Prince
George, Virginia; one Sister, Gloria (Terrence)
Mackie from Spring Lake, North Carolina; one
granddaughter, Willa Spearman and several
nieces and nephews. Visitation will be held
Sunday, October 15 from 2 to 4 p.m. followed
by service at 4 p.m. at Lee Funeral Home, 6633
Old Alexandria Ferry Rd., Clinton, MD 20725.
ROBERT JOSEPH RICE "Bob"
On October 7, 2017 of College Park MD
at the age of 94. Beloved husband of the
late Regina Geraldine "Geri" Rice; cherished
father of Robert J. Rice, Michael A. Rice Sr.,
Mary A. Scribner, Regina L. Terry, John G.
Rice, Lynn M. Marion and Patricia A. Rice;
"Grandpa Hook" to 15; (two preceded in
death) and great-grandfather to 13. Friends
may call at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church,
4902 Berwyn Road, College Park, MD on
Monday, October 16 from 9:30 a.m. until
mass time at 10:30 a.m. Interment Fort
Lincoln Cemetery.
www.gaschs.com
B7
RE
Dr. PRINCE AHMED KENNETH KASSIM
Born on November 19, 1953 in Freetown,
Sierra Leone to the late Mr. Yusef Kassim and
Haja Kadijatu Aysha Kassim.
In 1971, Dr. Kassim came to the US. He
attended Lincoln University and later graduated with a degree in zoology from George
Washington University. In 1986, he received
his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Howard University. His early career was spent at the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration and PepsiCo.
In 1986, he started working at the Maryland
Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
where he worked for the next 31 years.
During this time, he rose from Supervisory
Scientist to Chief and ultimately achieved
the level of Deputy Director for Scientific
Programs.
Devoted husband of 44 years to Yatta Kassim. As a young adult, he worked several
jobs while putting himself through school
and raising a growing family. During this time,
he also helped bring family members over
from Sierra Leone. They raised three sons
and welcomed into their home dozens of
their sons’ friends from the neighborhood,
providing them with food, a place to stay,
money and advice.
He possessed many other special qualities,
such as being a great counselor, being
accepting and respectful of all religious
beliefs. and having a wonderful sense of
humor. He resided in Washington, DC for
over 41 years and passed away on October
4, 2017 after battling cancer.
Survived by his mother, Haja Kadijatu Kassim;
wife, Yatta Kassim (nee Conteh); children,
Ahmed, Yusef, and Jamil; siblings, Mary, Margaret, Amude, and Samira; nieces, Aysha
Kassim and Alia Stone; nephews, Essam Kassim, Adnan Kassim, and Alexander Kovacs;
grandchildren, Yusef, Jr., Constance, Krista,
and Madison; siblings-in-law, Mark Elless,
Massah Conteh, and Shirina Kassim; daughters-in law, Kristal, Elise, and Kristen and a
host of relatives in Sierra Leone and Lebanon.
Viewing will be held Friday October 13, 2017
from 4 to 8 p.m. at Hines-Rinaldi Funeral
Home, 11800 New Hampshire Ave., Silver
Spring, MD. Memorial Service will take place
Saturday October 14, 2017 at the Islamic
Society of the Washington Area, 2701 Briggs
Chaney Road, Silver Spring, MD 20905, viewing 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.; service 10:30 to 11
a.m. Interment, Gate of Heaven Cemetery,
13801 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20906.
On Friday, October 6, 2017, Vera Castelli
Waddell, of Silver Spring, Maryland, passed
peacefully. Beloved wife of Lawrence E. Waddell; mother of the late Aleandro E. Waddell;
grandmother of Brendan P. Dempsey Waddell;
sister of Francesca Ferguson. Memorial services will be held at Our Lady of Grace Church,
15661 Norbeck Blvd., Silver Spring, MD, on
Monday, October 16, 2017, at 11 a.m., preceded by family visitation at 10 a.m. Interment
Gate of Heaven Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations may be made in her memory to the American Cancer Society, POB
42040, Oklahoma City, OK 73123.
LEGACY.COM
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The Weather
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/WEATHER
Drizzle and fog
The slow process of moderating this
air mass begins, although it’s
doubtful that will be enough for us
to see much change on the ground.
Drizzle and fog may persist into the
morning but should taper off with time. Highs
will head for the mid-60s. Overnight, clouds
persist but drizzle becomes a rare occurrence.
Winds remain calm, with lows in the mid- to
upper 50s and in the lower 60s downtown.
Today
Cloudy
.
TWITTER: @CAPITALWEATHER
Saturday
Rain
Sunday
Sunny
.
FACEBOOK.COM/CAPITALWEATHER
Monday
Mostly cloudy
Tuesday
Sunny
Wednesday
Sunny
69° 64
79° 67
85° 58
68° 48
66° 49
69° 46
FEELS*: 67°
FEELS: 81°
FEELS: 86°
FEELS: 67°
FEELS: 68°
FEELS: 70°
CHNCE PRECIP: 50%
P: 55%
P: 15%
P: 60%
P: 5%
P: 10%
WIND: E 7–14 mph
W: S 4–8 mph
W: SSW 8–16 mph
W: NNW 7–14 mph
W: NE 6–12 mph
W: ESE 6–12 mph
°
°
°
°
°
OFFICIAL RECORD
Temperatures
NATION
Harrisburg
66/60
Hagerstown
67/60
M
Low
Normal
Philadelphia
71/62
Record high
Record low
Norfolk
76/71
Th
F
Sa
Su
M
Tu
W
Th
F
Sa
Su
through 5 p.m.
yesterday
Dulles
BWI
68° 1:33 a.m.
62° 5:00 p.m.
70°/52°
89° 1962
31° 1906
66° 1:00 a.m.
62° 1:00 p.m.
69°/45°
83° 2010
25° 1964
65° 1:00 a.m.
60° 4:00 p.m.
68°/47°
89° 1954
29° 1964
Difference from 30–yr. avg. (Reagan): this month: +7.9° yr. to date: +3.1°
Precipitation
PREVIOUS YEAR
NORMAL
LATEST
OCEAN: 71°
Virginia Beach
76/71
Past 24 hours
Total this month
OCEAN: 72°
Normal
Kitty Hawk
76/71
Total this year
Normal
OCEAN: 75°
Pollen: Low
Air Quality: Good
Grass
Trees
Weeds
Mold
Dominant cause: Particulates
Low
Low
Low
High
Reagan
Dulles
BWI
0.11"
0.73"
1.32"
31.81"
31.44"
0.75"
1.40"
1.27"
36.15"
33.19"
0.64"
1.30"
1.34"
33.49"
33.22"
Moon Phases
UV: Low
Solar system
1 out of 11+
Blue Ridge: Today, rainy early, afternoon shower, cool. High
56–61. Wind southeast 4–8 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy.
Low 50–54. Wind nearly calm. Saturday, mostly cloudy,
warmer. High 66–70. Wind south 5–10 mph.
Atlantic beaches: Today, cloudy, morning rain, drizzle,
afternoon shower, breezy. High 71–76. Wind northeast
10–20 mph. Tonight, mostly cloudy. Low 61–71. Wind east
7–14 mph. Saturday, mostly cloudy, shower, warmer. High
75–80. Wind south 6–12 mph.
Waterways: Upper Potomac River: Today, mostly cloudy, drizzle,
damp, patchy fog. Wind north 5–10 knots. Waves a foot. • Lower
Potomac and Chesapeake Bay: Today, cloudy, rain, drizzle. Wind
northeast at 10–20 knots. Waves 3 feet on the Chesapeake Bay, 2
feet on the Potomac.• River Stages: Today, the stage at Little Falls
will be around 3.1 feet, rising to 3.2 feet on Saturday. Flood stage at
Little Falls is 10 feet.
(High tides in Bold)
2:33 a.m.
10:10 a.m.
3:21 p.m.
10:18 p.m.
12:17 a.m.
6:47 a.m.
12:16 p.m.
6:28 p.m.
Ocean City
2:14 a.m.
8:26 a.m.
2:53 p.m.
9:27 p.m.
Norfolk
4:28 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
5:02 p.m.
11:27 p.m.
3:18 a.m.
8:18 a.m.
2:22 p.m.
9:04 p.m.
Point Lookout
W
Reagan
OCEAN: 71°
Richmond
73/63
Annapolis
FORECAST
Ocean City
72/67
Lexington
69/58
Washington
ACTUAL
Cape May
70/65
Annapolis
69/65
Charlottesville
69/60
Today’s tides
Tu
High
Weather map features for noon today.
Baltimore
69/60
Dover
71/62
Washington
69/64
RECORD
°
Su
REGION
AVERAGE
T-storms
<–10
Rain
–0s
Showers
0s
10s
Snow
20s
Flurries
30s
Ice
40s
50s
Cold Front
Warm Front
60s
80s
70s
90s
Stationary Front
100s
110+
Yesterday's National
High: Cordele, GA 94°
Low: Bodie State Park, CA –1°
for the 48 contiguous states
NATIONAL
Albany, NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Austin
Baltimore
Billings, MT
Birmingham
Bismarck, ND
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Burlington, VT
Charleston, SC
Charleston, WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne, WY
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Today
65/53/pc
81/53/s
50/37/c
84/68/pc
90/68/pc
69/60/sh
55/34/pc
87/67/s
61/35/pc
52/29/sh
63/56/s
68/58/c
66/54/pc
84/67/sh
83/58/pc
78/60/r
59/34/pc
70/61/pc
74/55/pc
74/59/pc
93/71/s
66/40/s
Tomorrow
73/59/sh
78/42/s
45/33/c
82/66/pc
90/68/pc
78/64/c
51/35/c
85/67/pc
48/26/r
53/31/s
73/62/pc
73/66/sh
69/60/sh
84/68/pc
84/59/pc
82/61/pc
46/27/pc
74/52/r
79/66/s
80/68/pc
94/60/s
55/28/c
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks, AK
Fargo, ND
Hartford, CT
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson, MS
Jacksonville, FL
Kansas City, MO
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Norfolk
65/57/sh
72/57/pc
91/68/pc
43/32/c
61/40/pc
67/52/pc
85/76/t
92/70/pc
73/57/pc
88/64/s
87/70/pc
83/66/s
85/59/s
85/64/s
81/59/s
74/56/pc
83/65/s
87/78/t
67/58/c
61/42/c
78/58/s
89/73/s
67/60/c
76/71/sh
71/40/t
74/64/pc
90/54/pc
42/26/c
50/30/r
75/59/c
86/76/sh
91/70/pc
78/60/pc
90/66/s
85/70/c
81/43/t
80/53/s
90/65/s
88/62/s
82/67/s
89/66/s
87/78/t
70/50/r
56/39/r
86/66/s
88/74/s
74/67/c
80/69/c
Oklahoma City
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland, ME
Portland, OR
Providence, RI
Raleigh, NC
Reno, NV
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
St. Thomas, VI
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
San Juan, PR
Seattle
Spokane, WA
Syracuse
Tampa
Wichita
87/67/s
64/53/c
86/74/t
71/62/sh
95/65/s
73/56/pc
62/49/s
58/39/sh
65/55/pc
76/63/r
66/34/s
73/63/sh
78/51/s
79/65/s
87/78/pc
65/39/s
75/61/pc
71/54/pc
87/77/sh
55/39/sh
46/31/r
66/56/pc
91/77/t
86/64/s
88/49/pc
66/38/t
85/73/t
79/68/c
94/65/s
79/63/pc
70/58/c
61/41/pc
75/62/c
80/63/pc
59/32/s
78/65/c
78/46/s
87/55/pc
87/77/sh
51/31/pc
78/62/s
74/54/s
88/78/sh
56/44/c
49/34/pc
74/62/sh
91/76/pc
83/43/t
World
High: Mecca, Saudi Arabia 109°
Low: Summit Station, Greenland –25°
Oct 19
New
Oct 27
First
Quarter
Nov 4
Full
Sun
Moon
Venus
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Nov 10
Last
Quarter
Rise
7:15 a.m.
12:40 a.m.
5:29 a.m.
5:05 a.m.
8:06 a.m.
12:22 p.m.
Set
6:32 p.m.
3:11 p.m.
5:46 p.m.
5:33 p.m.
7:02 p.m.
9:55 p.m.
excludes Antarctica
WORLD
Today
Addis Ababa
74/48/s
Amsterdam
65/56/pc
Athens
78/61/s
Auckland
64/57/c
Baghdad
92/65/s
Bangkok
87/77/t
Beijing
66/45/s
Berlin
60/51/pc
Bogota
70/47/r
Brussels
66/56/pc
Buenos Aires
64/43/c
Cairo
83/67/s
Caracas
78/68/pc
Copenhagen
58/54/pc
Dakar
88/79/s
Dublin
67/55/r
Edinburgh
65/51/r
Frankfurt
66/50/pc
Geneva
70/49/pc
Ham., Bermuda 80/75/pc
Helsinki
48/36/c
Ho Chi Minh City 90/77/t
Tomorrow
74/51/pc
65/53/pc
77/59/s
65/54/r
93/66/s
89/76/t
54/46/c
67/52/pc
69/47/r
69/54/pc
71/48/s
82/65/s
78/69/pc
61/53/pc
89/80/s
66/54/pc
60/54/r
68/50/pc
73/48/s
80/76/sh
47/39/r
87/77/t
Hong Kong
Islamabad
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston, Jam.
Kolkata
Lagos
Lima
Lisbon
London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
Nairobi
New Delhi
Oslo
Ottawa
Paris
Prague
90/76/pc
93/65/t
70/55/s
74/58/s
75/47/s
78/44/s
86/80/pc
91/79/t
85/76/t
68/60/s
78/64/s
66/58/pc
83/52/s
86/79/t
71/53/pc
64/55/s
51/43/r
91/80/t
77/58/pc
96/72/s
53/48/r
62/54/r
70/51/pc
61/47/pc
89/75/sh
93/65/s
67/55/pc
72/57/pc
76/55/s
78/44/s
89/79/pc
90/76/t
86/76/pc
67/60/pc
87/69/pc
67/56/pc
83/60/s
85/78/t
72/55/pc
67/57/c
45/39/r
91/80/t
81/57/pc
98/71/s
58/44/c
67/53/c
72/53/pc
66/48/pc
Rio de Janeiro
Riyadh
Rome
San Salvador
Santiago
Sarajevo
Seoul
Shanghai
Singapore
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw
91/71/s
97/68/s
74/53/s
87/68/pc
75/45/s
68/41/pc
65/43/s
70/64/c
86/79/c
50/43/pc
74/62/pc
80/77/sh
79/55/s
64/60/r
68/55/pc
68/48/pc
57/45/pc
88/70/s
100/69/s
75/54/s
86/70/pc
81/47/s
66/39/pc
65/46/pc
70/65/c
89/78/pc
58/44/r
64/61/c
86/80/r
73/56/s
64/61/r
69/63/sh
70/48/pc
60/55/c
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, r-rain,
sh- showers, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries,
sn-snow, i-ice
Sources: AccuWeather.com; US Army Centralized
Allergen Extract Lab (pollen data); airnow.gov (air
quality data); National Weather Service
* AccuWeather's RealFeel Temperature®
combines over a dozen factors for an accurate
measure of how the conditions really “feel.”
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KLMNO
Style
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/STYLE
EZ
C
RE
THE WASHINGTON POST . GOINGOUTGUIDE.COM
. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2017
Weekend
MOVIE REVIEWS IN WEEKEND
The Florida Project Amid bad parenting and seedy surroundings, hope glimmers for a little girl. 31
Professor Marston and the Wonder Women The comic-book heroine’s backstory gets a classy sheen. 32
BUON
APPETITO!
THE 10
BEST PIES
The region’s hottest
margherita pizzas,
ranked by the $20 Diner.
PAGE 21
Marshall Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall isn’t given Great Man treatment here, for the better. 33
WASHINGTON POST PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/PHOTOS BY DAYNA SMITH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST AND ISTOCK
DINING
STAGE
MOVIES
Swimsuit season’s over. Have
you ever wondered who makes
the best doughnuts in town? 8
Folger stages a tragedy that
political careerists might relate
to: ‘Antony and Cleopatra ’ 24
Willem Dafoe gives his best
performance in recent memory
in ‘The Florida Project ’ 31
BOOK WORLD
A small
magazine
scores big
with story
by Hanks
Philip K. Dick and Kanye West saw flashes of the future, and it wasn’t pretty.
Could the sci-fi prophet have predicted the rapper’s unraveling?
BY
MARC ASPINALL FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The tunnel at the end of the light
BY
C HRIS R ICHARDS
Kanye West saw his beams during a visit to the dentist.
“I’ve heard that there are colors that are too bright for our eyes to see,” the rap auteur said
during a concert in Washington last summer, explaining how a few puffs of nitrous oxide had
recently enabled him to catch a direct glimpse into heaven. The prismatic
CRITIC’S
rays he described sounded as astonishing as your imagination would allow —
NOTEBOOK
and then you had an opportunity to feel them on your ears during “Ultralight
Beam,” a song that captured all of the beauty and bewilderment of West’s epiphany in the
dental chair. “This is a God dream,” the lyrics went. “This is everything.”
Philip K. Dick saw his beams a few days after seeing the dentist. But once they started, they
didn’t let up for weeks.
R ON C HARLES
This is a happy story about a
very big author and a very tiny
magazine.
The author you know: He’s Tom
Hanks, the Academy Award-winning actor, whose films have
grossed more than $9 billion.
The magazine you probably
don’t know: One Story, a Brooklyn-based nonprofit with 12,000
subscribers.
How these two got connected is
a curious tale of serendipity.
Next week, Hanks will release
his first collection of short stories,
“Uncommon Type,” inspired by
his passion for typewriters. With
blurbs from Steve Martin, Mindy
Kaling and Stephen Fry, the collection is sure to be an instant
bestseller.
In 2014, one of these stories
appeared in the New Yorker. You
might expect that prestigious
magazine — or Vanity Fair or Entertainment Weekly — to print
another one of Hanks’s stories as
the publication date rolls around
for his full collection.
But no.
Instead, in the days leading up
to the release of “Uncommon
Type,” you’ll find one of Hanks’s
stories only in One Story magazine: Issue No. 232 — “A Month on
Greene Street.”
In the publishing world, this is a
very uncommon type of good luck.
It came about because of a man
in Ann Patchett’s basement.
Patchett is the beloved author
of seven novels, including “Bel
Canto” and “Commonwealth.” For
some 20 years, she has been
friends with Patrick Ryan, the editor in chief of the unadorned little
magazine One Story, founded in
2002. In each diminutive issue, it
publishes — as you might have
guessed — one story and just one
story.
But let’s get back to the basement.
Each year, Ryan travels to
BOOK WORLD CONTINUED ON C3
NOTEBOOK CONTINUED ON C2
Ann Patchett
THEATER REVIEW
Hollywood’s history
of shielding the talent
Bruce Springsteen, born to run on Broadway
BY
Tom Hanks
P ETER M ARKS
new york — If you’re still won-
dering whatever happened to
class, consider what’s transpiring
five nights a week at Broadway’s
Walter Kerr Theatre. On a simple,
industrial set, a guy in a T-shirt
and jeans is wrapping lyrical stories of an extraordinary, ordinary
life around moody rock-and-roll
ballads that sing the song of an
America of work boots and whiskey, of waning factory whistles
and a hopeful sun still blazing
over a Western desert.
It’s elegant, it’s austere, it’s
moving. And oh my God, it’s
Bruce.
“Springsteen on Broadway” —
now there’s a Jersey Boy — had its
official opening Thursday night,
in a taut and beautifully turnedout evening as sincerely wrought
as a poetry reading. For sure,
Springsteen rocks out a bit and
tells some funny stories on himself. But onstage for two hours
minus the E Street Band, and
with Patti Scialfa — born like her
THEATER CONTINUED ON C6
ROB DEMARTIN
The boardwalk meets Broadway as Patti Scialfa and Bruce Springsteen take the stage
in the Boss’s show, which has a magical four-month run at the Walter Kerr Theatre.
“Circle the talent.”
When times get
tough — when a
reporter or
newbie or
“civilian” dares to
Ann
challenge the
Hornaday behavior of a
Hollywood
eminence — the
impulse is to close ranks around
who has more power, money,
fame and, perhaps most
crucially, talent. In an industry
whose chief products are works
of novelty and imagination, it’s
creativity that’s prized and
mythologized most highly: that
ineffable, unquantifiable artistic
gift that makes someone unique
and seemingly indispensable to
the entire enterprise.
Every industry has its
supernovas, from difficult-butbrilliant tech entrepreneurs to
dazzlingly skillful
neurosurgeons. But the
entertainment world is rife with
special cases. Did a star lash out
at a clumsy boom operator on a
film set? Circle the talent, fire the
crew member. Does a director
have a drug problem that’s
endangering an entire
production? Circle the talent and
quash the exposé. Is a movie
mogul serially abusing young
women and enlisting his
employees as accomplices? Circle
the talent and lie, ignore, attack,
move on. They’re worth it, goes
the rationalization. No one else
can do what they do.
It’s the same impulse that
drives celebrity worship: that
attraction, even adoration,
audiences feel toward those
possessed of exceptional
charisma and physical
attractiveness. Hollywood
certainly loves its stars but
reserves some of its awe for
behind-the-camera operatives as
well, those brilliant writers and
directors — mostly male, cut in
the heroic mold of John Ford,
Stanley Kubrick, Martin Scorsese
and Quentin Tarantino — whose
“touch” can rescue a floundering
HORNADAY CONTINUED ON C3
C2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
The Reliable Source
Helena Andrews-Dyer and Emily Heil
Anthony Bourdain calls Hillary Clinton’s
response to Weinstein reports ‘shameful’
Army Navy Country Club: A third place
in the DMV for Obama to yell ‘Fore!’
Celebrity chef and
Others had called out
television host Anthony
Clinton for being slow to
Bourdain late Wednesday
condemn Weinstein. After the
blasted Hillary Clinton’s
New York Times dropped its
response to the scandal
blockbuster story, several
engulfing her longtime donor,
Democrats were quick to
producer Harvey Weinstein,
announce they would donate
who has been accused of
Weinstein’s money to charity,
sexually assaulting and
but it took Clinton days to
harassing dozens of women.
publicly comment.
Clinton earlier in the day
But Bourdain went further
had sat for an interview with
and seemed to insinuate that
CNN’s Fareed Zakaria as
Clinton should have been
part of her book-promotion
aware of Weinstein’s behavior,
tour — and talk of course
which has been called in
turned to
several reports
Weinstein. The
this week “an
former
open secret.” In
Democratic
the CNN
presidential
interview,
candidate
Clinton said
declared herself
she “certainly
“appalled” by
didn’t” know of
the allegations
it.
against him. “It
Bourdain
was something
isn’t buying it.
that was just
“Know what
intolerable in
Hillary Clinton
every way,” she
is NOT? She’s
said. “And, you
not stupid,” he
know, like so
tweeted. “Or
many people
unsophisticated
who’ve come
Anthony Bourdain
about the
forward and
world. The
spoken out, this was a
Weinstein stories had been
different side of a person who
out there for years.”
I and many others had
As his comments stirred
known in the past.”
controversy, he sought to
But her condemnation of
clarify that he wasn’t holding
Weinstein, who hosted
Clinton responsible for
fundraisers for Clinton and
Weinstein’s actions, but found
for President Barack Obama
her reaction to be
in addition to giving to many
“uninspiring.”
Democratic pols, wasn’t
“I can assure you that the
enough for some viewers.
victims of Mr. Weinstein’s
Bourdain — whose girlfriend,
three decades of predatory
behavior are disappointed
Asia Argento, accused
too. I’m sitting next to one,”
Weinstein of sexually
he wrote, assumably referring
assaulting her — tweeted a
to Argento.
series of criticisms.
And he joked about
“And I have to say, Hillary’s
provoking the ire of Clinton
interview with Fareed Zakaria
backers: “At least when the
was shameful in its deflection
left is angry with me on
and its disingenuousness,” he
twitter, they can spell.”
began the Twitter thread.
After the dust-up earlier this year about
whether Barack Obama was welcome at the
Woodmont Country Club in Maryland, the
former president is now a card-carrying member
of the Army Navy Country Club in Virginia.
In May, Obama ponied up the 90-plus-year-old
institution’s hefty $75,000 initiation fee,
according to Washingtonian magazine. This new
membership brings Obama’s local country club
count to three. He is an honorary member at
both the Columbia Country Club in Chevy Chase,
Md., and the Robert Trent Jones Golf Club in
Gainesville, Va. He is responsible only for annual
fees and not the initiation fee at either of those
clubs.
Since leaving the White House in January,
Obama — who played nearly 300 rounds of golf
while in office, according to Golf Digest — has
been spotted on greens across the country, from
Rancho Mirage, Calif., to, most recently, the
Presidents Cup tournament in New Jersey.
Obama was last slated to tee up at Army Navy
on Oct. 3, according to Washingtonian. On the
fairways, Obama could’ve easily run into
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who also joined
the Virginia club this summer.
One member described the former president
as “polite and talkative.”
STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama during a 2015 round of golf on Martha’s Vineyard.
HEY, ISN’T THAT . . . ?
Canada’s photogenic prime minister,
Justin Trudeau, and his wife, Sophie
Grégoire Trudeau, having date night at Sei
in Penn Quarter?
Trudeau has had a busy few days in
Washington. On Tuesday evening, he spoke
at a dinner held for Fortune magazine’s
Most Powerful Women Summit — and sat
next to his new buddy, first daughter
Ivanka Trump, adviser to the president.
The next day, Trudeau headed to 1600
Pennylvania Ave. to discuss the North
American Free Trade Agreement with
President Trump, who isn’t a fan of the
trade deal.
Amid mounting tension surrounding the
NAFTA negotiations, Trudeau told the
Telegraph that the talks were “not easy.”
After a business trip like that, the
45-year-old world leader clearly needed a
night off. He and Sophie, who spent time
with first lady Melania Trump on
Wednesday, arrived at the modern Asian
restaurant just after 8 p.m. sans entourage
or interruption. The couple wasn’t
recognized and spent a quiet hour together
noshing on truffle sashimi and pork buns.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks outside the Canadian Embassy on Wednesday.
DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES
GOT A TIP? EMAIL US AT RELIABLESOURCE@WASHPOST.COM. FOR THE LATEST SCOOPS, VISIT WASHINGTONPOST.COM/RELIABLESOURCE
@helena_andrews @emilyaheil
Philip K. Dick and Kanye West: Two visionaries’ dental bridges to the future
the way forward.
But now, if we try to listen to
“The Life of Pablo” as some kind
of spiritual echo of “VALIS,” it
might become easier to forgive
West for his incoherence. Maybe
there is no way forward. Maybe
there never was. Maybe incoherence was the point all along.
Instead of establishing a new
aesthetic center of gravity, maybe West was honoring the power
of disorder. Maybe “Pablo”
sounds messy because reality is a
mess. Maybe he was still telling
the truth.
NOTEBOOK FROM C1
The first one came glinting off a
Christian pendant hanging from
the neck of a pharmacy delivery
girl standing at Dick’s doorstep —
and as subsequent visions arrived, the oracular science-fiction
author famously convinced himself that higher powers were uploading volumes of sacred knowledge into his brain via pink laser
beams. These episodes took place
in February and March of 1974, so
Dick dubbed his revelation “2-374,” and then spent the next eight
years trying to explain it through
his most mystical writings. He’d
already written so presciently
about the delicate fabric of reality
in “The Minority Report,” “The
Man in the High Castle” and “Do
Androids Dream of Electric
Sheep?” — the spore of the “Blade
Runner” franchise. Now, the line
that separated Dick’s life from his
fiction was dissolving in a halo of
laser light.
Before 2-3-74, Dick’s novels anticipated our latter-day anxieties
about virtual reality, artificial intelligence, the surveillance state
and more. After 2-3-74, his work
may have predicted West’s great
unraveling.
In the wake of their respective
religious hallucinations, both
Dick’s and West’s work became
increasingly muddled and intermittently profound. In 1981, Dick
published “VALIS,” a quasiautobiographical novel about a
man who can’t discern whether
he’s experiencing a spiritual
awakening or a psychotic collapse. In 2016, West released “The
Life of Pablo,” an untethered album teeming with crazy talk and
God dreams. “I can’t let these
people play me,” West sneers in
the first act. “Name one genius
that ain’t crazy.”
Or instead, answer this: If
you’re an artist ahead of your
time, how do you keep from losing
your mind once the future you’ve
predicted starts coming true?
C
ould Dick have dreamed up
the afternoon of Dec. 13?
That’s when West — having
recently kiboshed 21 tour dates
after an eight-day visit to UCLA’s
Neuropsychiatric Hospital Center — materialized in the lobby of
Trump Tower for a surprise photo
op with the president-elect of the
United States. Suddenly, the guy
who once said “George Bush
doesn’t care about black people”
M
ROBB COHEN/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kanye West performs in Atlanta during his Saint Pablo Tour. West
ended up in a psychiatric hospital, canceling the tour’s last 21 dates.
was posing next to the guy who
never apologized to the Central
Park Five, and the cameras
flashed and clicked, capturing
two highly impulsive, famethirsty egomaniacs who would do
anything to generate attention,
even if it was ugly or wrong, even
if it was as bizarre as this. (For
people as deeply insecure as Donald Trump and Kanye West, attention must feel something like
power.)
But wait, wait, wait — was
Kanye okay? Was he all the way
there? Was this really happening?
Reality is still a guiding force in
rap. And with nearly every artist
in the game touting themselves as
the realest, the music continues
to generate a patchwork of competing realities — something Dick
probably would have gotten a
kick out of. To assert your unassailable realness, you must be
skeptical of whatever reality
you’ve been dealt — which means
that rap music, much like science
fiction, perpetually refuses to accept the world as it stands. Disbelief becomes the fuel of imagination. “There is nothing fantastic
or ultradimensional about crabgrass,” Dick wrote in 1977, “unless
you are an SF writer, in which case
pretty soon you are viewing crabgrass with suspicion.”
West’s music has always crack-
led with suspicion, and like Dick’s
writing, it has always felt prophetic. West’s knack for habitual
reinvention has made him the
most consequential pop star of
our young century — something
that first felt apparent in 2008
with the release of “808s & Heartbreak,” an album on which the
COURTESY OF THE PHILIP K. DICK ESTATE
Philip K. Dick’s revelatory episodes occurred in 1974. For him and
West, seeing the future may have been more of a curse than a gift.
Both Dick and West were raised
by single moms. Both were college dropouts, bitter and proud.
Both started their careers as hyper-prolific workaholics, then
quickly transformed into self-mythologizing narcissists. Both felt
belittled by their job descriptions
(sci-fi author, rapper). Both suf-
“There is nothing fantastic or ultradimensional
about crabgrass, unless you are an SF writer, in
which case pretty soon you are viewing
crabgrass with suspicion.”
Philip K. Dick
rapper chose to sing his paranoiac
blues through Auto-Tune software. He was roundly mocked for
it at the time, but West’s big pivot
eventually changed the entire
mood of popular music, while his
big mouth foreshadowed the sayanything culture of the social-media age. Since then, he’s remained
a disgruntled futurist, blazing an
angry path into a doomed tomorrow. Just like Dick.
H
ere’s everything else these
great American malcontents have in common:
fered delusions of grandeur. Both
had an appetite for spiritual chaos. It’s unclear whether West has
read Dick’s books, but he’s probably seen the movies. The stage
design for his retina-burning
2016 tour looked as though it
could have floated out of Ridley
Scott’s “Blade Runner.”
Surely those commonalities
are enough to make you wonder if
Dick’s crisis following 2-3-74
might illuminate the unknown
head space where West currently
resides. Dick’s definitive novel
from that era is “VALIS,” in which
the author conveys the book’s
tangled essence in 11 words: “It is
sometimes an appropriate response to reality to go insane.”
And while many view “VALIS”
as an example of Dick’s failure to
wrangle his wild religious visions
into a tautly plotted novel, Lawrence Sutin, one of Dick’s biographers, deemed it a masterwork —
“a breviary of the spiritual life in
America, where the path to God
lies through scattered pop-trash
clues.”
Is “The Life of Pablo” littered
with the same golden garbage?
“Ultralight Beam” is clearly one
of West’s most magnificent
songs — a hallucinogenic neogospel plea for universal peace
in which West seems to have
acquired some sort of godly
knowledge. “This is everything,”
he sings — but after that, everything goes lukewarm, mishmash
or haywire. Across the tracklist,
his rapping feels petty and aimless, while the motley rhythms
supporting his voice lurch and
skid. “I’m not out of control,”
West promised toward the end of
the album. “I’m just not in they
control . . . I can see a thousand
years from now in real life.” It
was difficult to believe him. And
it hurt. For the first time in his
career, West’s music had failed to
convince our ears that he knew
aybe that’s being charitable.
But if the arc of West’s
career continues to bend
to the contours of Dick’s, that
means the rapper is currently
plunging into a deeper, murkier
spirituality — a zone Dick explored most ferociously in his
“Exegesis,” an epic 8,000-page
journal that the author filled with
theological speculations until his
death in 1982.
Throughout the pages of this
hulking manuscript, Dick believed he was teasing out Godsent “messages disclosing the deceitful nature of reality,” writes
Kyle Arnold in “The Divine Madness of Philip K. Dick,” a book
chronicling Dick’s work following the “psycho-spiritual emergency” of 2-3-74. By most accounts, these were Dick’s most
imaginative and difficult years,
his relentless quest for selfknowledge often resembling a
prolonged act of self-annihilation.
We don’t want Kanye West to
self-annihilate, but he seems entirely capable of it, which is what
makes the months when he’s gone
invisible feel so worrisome. We
need him around. We need him to
keep moving the music forward
(or outward, or inward) — and
especially right now, when so
many things in this country feel
as though they’re sinking in reverse.
West reportedly spent the
warm months of 2017 sequestered
in the mountains of Wyoming, or
Utah, or some other high-altitude
shrine where he could work on
new music in solitude. When he
finally comes down the hillside,
we should remember to recalibrate our expectations. If he
sounds as though he’s lost his
mind, it might mean he’s found
himself.
chris.richards@washpost.com
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
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SCOTT EVERETT WHITE/CW
Crazy Ex-Girlfriend (CW at 8) Rebecca (Rachel Bloom) is out for revenge
in the comedy’s Season 3 premiere. Expect catchy musical numbers.
MacGyver (CBS at 8) Mac attempts
to break into a diamond-filled vault
using cuff links and wire.
Hell’s Kitchen (Fox at 8) Chef
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Once Upon a Time (ABC at 8) Henry
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The Exorcist (Fox at 9) Tomas and
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Great Performances: Grammy
Salute to Music Legends 2017
(MPT at 9; WETA at 9:30) Shirley
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PREMIERES
Mindhunter (Netflix streaming) This
David Fincher drama, set in 1979,
stars Holt McCallany and Jonathan
Groff as FBI agents who study crime
by conducting extended interviews
with imprisoned serial killers.
Lore (Amazon streaming) This
anthology series, based on Aaron
Mahnke’s podcast of the same
name, examines real-life events that
inspired scary nightmare stories
and looks at how our horror legends
(vampires, body-snatchers) are
rooted in truth.
Sigmund and the Sea Monsters
(Amazon streaming) David Arquette
stars in this revival of the Saturdaymorning children’s series that aired
in the ’70s.
RETURNING
Voltron: Legendary Defender
(Netflix streaming) Season 4.
Jane the Virgin (CW at 9) Season 4.
FINALES
Vice (HBO at 7:30) The weekly
docu-series ends its season with a
look at the fight to rebuild Mosul
and other areas of Iraq after
victories over the Islamic State.
Room 104 (HBO at 11:40) In the
Season 1 finale, an octogenarian
couple returns to Room 104 in
hopes of reliving their first night
together.
LATE NIGHT
Fallon (NBC at 11:34) Blake Lively,
Gabrielle Union, Wu-Tang Clan.
Colbert (CBS at 11:35) Conan
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— Bethonie Butler
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ANN HORNADAY
Hollywood’s history of closing ranks
HORNADAY FROM C1
script or turn a workmanlike
film into a genuine work of art.
It’s the same auteur worship that
takes over Cannes every year,
when a revered filmmaker can
deliver a subpar film and still be
greeted with awed standing
ovations and fawning pats on the
back.
Inflating mediocre work is one
thing. Protecting pathology is
another. Harvey Weinstein, who
now faces mounting allegations
of sexually assaulting and
exploiting young women over
nearly 30 years, has always been
propped up by a phalanx of
publicists, lawyers and enablers;
he’s earned a reputation as a
practiced bully in his own right.
But power and intimidation
obscure the nuances of
Weinstein’s status as that rare
executive who achieved auteurlike creative status in his own
right, projecting a starlike aura
that was partly based on his own
Barnum-esque persona, but also
on subtler gifts that made people
believe only he could do what he
did, so well and so profitably.
Weinstein’s instincts — his
ability to anoint actors and
filmmakers as the Next Big
Things, his nose for turning
movies into events — made his
first studio, Miramax, a cultural
force of nature in the 1990s,
when to attend the premiere of
“Pulp Fiction” or “Kids” was to be
at the precise center of the hip,
young universe. In 1992, he
launched a brilliant whisper
campaign urging viewers not to
give away the shock ending of
“The Crying Game,” catapulting
a modest indie thriller into a
must-see pop phenomenon; he
made similar marketing hay
from tussles with the Motion
Picture Association of America’s
ratings board and trips to
Capitol Hill, where he leveraged
public-policy debates on mental
health and transparency in
adoption to burnish “Silver
Linings Playbook” and
“Philomena.”
Hollywood has always made
Oscar-bait movies, usually bigscreen epics, socially important
“problem pictures” or sturdy
biopics. But, with such plummy
literary adaptations as “The
English Patient” and “Emma” —
movies whose tone and bona
fides were completely at odds
with the boorish, possibly
criminal behavior Weinstein is
alleged to have been engaged in
— he turned awards movies into
a reliable, audience-friendly
VALERY HACHE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESS/
GETTY IMAGES
Harvey Weinstein.
genre.
And, at a time when the
industry was largely turning its
attentions to comic books and
special effects, he fashioned
them into a viable business
model. Thanks to the free
advertising of their stars’
appearances on the red carpet
and at congressional hearings,
small and midrange movies
actually stood a chance of
making money. Weinstein’s
Oscar campaigns could get
brutal, but they gave Hollywood
a potentially lucrative alternative
to the comic-book spectacles it
had pinned its future on. As the
director Paul Feig told The
Washington Post in an article
published Thursday, Hollywood
is a business, “and all business,
all corporate culture, is going to
make excuses for the person who
is making them a lot of money.”
But Weinstein’s importance
transcended money and power:
He allowed an increasingly
corporate industry to convince
itself that it could still make art.
In recent years, it’s become
clear that the man who once
disrupted the movie industry has
been disrupted himself, his
uniqueness threatened by the
natural evolution of technology,
competition and social norms.
As his financial and corporate
powers have waned, so has his
mystique, with his awardsseason dominance being
usurped by such boutique
distributors as Sony Pictures
Classics and Fox Searchlight, as
well as such shrewd, zeitgeist-y
upstarts as A24.
Meanwhile, the filmmakers
and stars Weinstein once so
assiduously cultivated are now
flocking to Netflix and Amazon
— even, heaven forfend,
premium cable. Harvey
Weinstein is no longer the sole
proprietor of turning littlemovies-that-could into
juggernauts.
And as his industry has
changed, so has the outside
world, where women are
claiming the power to call out
the kind of predatory behavior
that was rationalized and
overlooked for so long. In
addition to trauma, guilt and
shame, the movie business is
now left to contend with the
wages of their idolatry, however
artistically high-minded. Which
“genius” actor, comedian,
director or producer are they
protecting now, and at what
human cost? Circling the talent
always means turning your back
on someone, whether it’s an
expendable apparatchik, an
innocent victim or your own best
self.
ann.hornaday@washpost.com
◆
High Definition Movie Ratings (from TMS) ★★★★ Excellent ★★★ Good ★★ Fair ★ Poor No stars: not rated
How a publisher landed actor’s story
BOOK WORLD FROM C1
Patchett’s home in Nashville for
what they call their own private
“writing camp.”
“I stay in her basement, which
is larger than my apartment in
New York, and work on whatever
book I’m working on,” Ryan says.
“And she, two floors up, works on
whatever book she’s working on,
and we meet on the first floor for
meals, moral support and to read
aloud to each other.”
When Ryan arrived at Patchett’s house this year, she was raving about a collection of stories
she had read by — of all people —
Tom Hanks. Curious, Ryan got
hold of an early copy, too, and was
just as impressed.
He dreamed of publishing one
of Hanks’s stories in his little magazine, but that seemed like asking
one of the world’s most famous
actors to — well — publish one of
his stories in a little magazine. In
response to his first entreaty to
Penguin Random House, Ryan
was told he was too small. He
pointed out that One Story had
published works later included in
“The Best American Short Stories” and “The O. Henry Prize
Stories.” He wooed. He pleaded.
This is where Patchett came in.
KNOPF
The small magazine One Story published a
story from Tom Hanks’s “Uncommon Type.”
She had recently agreed to write a
blurb for “Uncommon Type” and
to fly to Washington to interview
Hanks on Oct. 20 at the Warner
Theatre.
Could she ask the publisher for
a favor in return?
How about a story for a certain
magazine?
“I’ve been a huge One Story fan
since I edited ‘Best American
Short Stories’ in 2006,” she says. “I
hoped that the Hanks story would
be a boost for them, but I also
know that One Story readers
would love to get such a great
story in their mailboxes. It was a
perfect storm. Everything about
this deal, and everything about
‘Uncommon Type,’ confirms my
long-held suspicion that Tom
Hanks is a good guy.”
From the famous actor’s point
of view, this long-winded tale of a
little magazine getting a big break
sounds different.
“It was a very difficult process,”
Hanks says. “First, One Story
asked. I admire what they do, so I
said yes.”
The end.
bookworld@washpost.com
Ron Charles is the editor of Book
World and host of
TotallyHipVideoBookReview.com.
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C4
EZ
CLASSIC DOONESBURY
THE WASHINGTON POST
RE
GARRY TRUDEAU
RED AND ROVER
BRIDGE
PICKLES
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
BRIAN CRANE
BRIAN BASSET
AGNES
TONY COCHRAN
TOM THAVES
WUMO
MIKAEL WULFF & ANDERS MORGENTHALER
BOTH SIDES VULNERABLE
NORTH (D)
52
K63
KQ9763
75
EAST
63
J 10 9 2
A 10 4 2
A86
WEST
J 10 9 8 7
Q84
5
K432
FRANK AND ERNEST
SOUTH
AKQ4
A75
J8
Q J 10 9
The bidding:
NORTH
EAST
SOUTH
2
Pass
2 NT
3
Pass
3 NT
Opening lead — J
WEST
Pass
All Pass
I
play golf as well as bridge,
and Murphy’s Law applies
at both games. In golf the
shortest distance between
two points is a straight line
that goes through a large
tree; hazards attract, fairways
repel; and if you’re having
your best round ever, it will
rain.
In bridge, if you need a 3-2
break, the suit will break 4-1.
In today’s deal, South
took the ace of spades and
led the jack and then a low
diamond to the king. East
took his ace and led the jack
of hearts. South couldn’t
run dummy’s diamonds,
and when he went after
the clubs, the defense got
two clubs, two hearts and a
diamond.
At Trick Two, South can
lead his eight of diamonds
to dummy’s nine. If East
takes the 10 and shifts to
hearts, South wins in his
hand and overtakes the
jack of diamonds to set up
the diamonds, winning four
diamonds, three spades and
two hearts.
If East plays low on the
first diamond, dummy leads
a low diamond. East must
duck again, and then South
attacks the clubs for nine
tricks.
CLASSIC PEANUTS
RHYMES WITH ORANGE
LIO
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
CHARLES SCHULZ
HILARY PRICE
MARK TATULLI
CHRIS BROWNE
MIKE DU JOUR
MIKE LESTER
MARK TRAIL
JAMES ALLEN
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
MIKE PETERS
BALDO
HECTOR CANTU & CARLOS CASTELLANOS
DAILY QUESTION
You hold:
52K63
KQ976375
Your partner opens one
spade, you bid 1NT and
he rebids two spades. The
opponents pass. What do
you say?
ANSWER: It looks odd to
leave your diamonds on the
shelf, but partner promises
minimum values with at least
six spades, hence you’ve
found a playable trump suit,
and your chances for game
are nil. Pass. You would run
to three diamonds with a
hand such as 2, A 6 3, Q J 10
9 7 4 3, 7 5.
BLONDIE
DEAN YOUNG & JOHN MARSHALL
SALLY FORTH
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & JIM KEEFE
— Frank Stewart
© 2017, TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.
SUDOKU
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
CURTIS
BREWSTER ROCKIT: SPACE GUY!
JIM TOOMEY
RAY BILLINGSLEY
TIM RICKARD
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
MUTTS
EZ
PATRICK McDONNELL
C5
RE
ZITS
JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN
HOROSCOPE
BIRTHDAY | OCTOBER 13
DILBERT
SCOTT ADAMS
FRAZZ
JEF MALLETT
JUDGE PARKER
FRANCESCO MARCIULIANO & MIKE MANLEY
CANDORVILLE
DARRIN BELL
This year you seem
more upbeat than you
have been in quite a
while. You will have
a tendency to overindulge in
some way. If you are single,
you will meet potential
sweeties with ease. You might
feel as if you have fallen in
love and met the right person
more than once this year.
Take your time committing. If
you are attached, the two of
you love having a good time
together with friends. You
and your sweetie are likely to
manifest a mutual goal. Leo
knows how to brighten your
day.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19).
You are full of energy, which
makes you more vulnerable
to fighting or becoming
impatient. Focus on making
an adjustment at home. You
might have a lot of options,
but don’t feel as if you need to
push yourself to make a fast
decision.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20).
You seem to be focused on
a loved one or a potential
sweetie. You could feel pushed
by others and by familial
obligations. You have a caring
attitude that attracts others’
attention and sometimes
devotion.
GARFIELD
JIM DAVIS
DUSTIN
STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER
PRICKLY CITY
SCOTT STANTIS
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 20).
Keep expressing your views
about what you expect from
WEINGARTENS & CLARK another person. Your gentle
nature mixes well with your
intellectual side. Don’t hesitate
to show off your skills right
now. You seem to have a lot of
energy.
BARNEY AND CLYDE
CANCER
(JUNE 21-JULY 22).
Be careful with your spending,
especially since you might
want to spruce up your image.
Try not to do any wild spending
or go overboard in any way.
Your creativity comes out, no
matter what you are doing.
Others will seek your feedback.
THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN
STAN LEE & LARRY LIEBER
LOOSE PARTS
DAVE BLAZEK
LEO
(JULY 23-AUG. 22).
Your charisma and energy
soar to new heights, making
it easier for you to share
your ideas with a roommate
or loved one. You might
be prepared to open up a
personal situation.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22).
You could feel out of kilter.
Give yourself several days to
recover and get back on track.
You have been dealing with
strong energy lately, which
could have manifested itself
emotionally and/or physically.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22).
You feel upbeat and energized.
Make sure you clear out as
much work as possible. Reach
out to a close friend or loved
one, and you will feel very
content as a result. Express
your willingness to open up
and do more sharing.
NON SEQUITUR
WILEY
BABY BLUES
RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21).
With Jupiter in your sign,
whatever you opt to do will
prove to be successful.
Though this planet can provide
wisdom, it also can encourage
overindulgence and good luck.
You might see the benefits of
this today.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21).
You could experience some
ups and downs for a while, but
in the end you will land well.
Let go of your anxiety. You will
be pleased with the results,
even though it might take a
while. Trust your intuition.
BIG NATE
LINCOLN PEIRCE
BEETLE BAILEY
MORT, BRIAN & GREG WALKER
ON THE FASTRACK
BILL HOLBROOK
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
STEPHAN PASTIS
CAPRICORN
(DEC. 22-JAN. 19).
A loved one might opt to share
some important details with
you. You’ll need to work with
this person, especially if the
matter in question involves
finances, a major life decision
and/or a strong premonition.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18).
You might want to perform
to the max and complete
some work. A loved one could
interfere, as they seem to be
in weekend mode already. Go
with the flow, and you will be
happier as a result. Know that
you can’t please everyone all
the time.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH 20).
Get more involved with certain
elements of your daily life. A
new interest could be evolving,
which you might want to share
with others. Relax more with
your co-workers and loved
ones.
— Jacqueline Bigar
© 2017, KING FEATURES SYNDICATE, INC.
PREVIOUS SUDOKU SOLUTION
SPEED BUMP
DAVE COVERLY
DENNIS THE MENACE
H. KETCHAM
FAMILY CIRCUS
BIL KEANE
REPLY ALL LITE
DONNA A. LEWIS
PREVIOUS SCRABBLEGRAMS SOLUTION
More online: washingtonpost.com/comics. Feedback: 1301 K St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071; comics@washpost.com; 202-334-4775.
Plus, in Comic Riffs, Michael Cavna blogs about all things comics.
C6
EZ
LA TIMES CROSSWORD
DOWN
1 “Star Wars”
warrior
2 Nerve cell part
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
By Morton J. Mendelson
NICK GALIFIANAKIS FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
ACROSS
1 Yanks’ foes
5 Operation
designed to
hurt
10 Shipboard
resident
14 CFO, e.g.
15 Not as likely
to mess up
16 Walk without
getting
anywhere?
17 TW ...
20 Shoelace site
21 Shipboard
chums
22 Tenn.
neighbor
24 Apartment
listing abbr.
25 DCYC ...
34 Nice with?
35 Gobs and
gobs
36 Cart for
heavy loads
37 Filly’s brother
38 Fighter
eulogized
by Bill Clinton,
among others
39 Old-time
teacher
40 “The Grapes of
Wrath” figure
41 Beams
43 Prime real
estate?
44 CI ...
47 Downed a
sub, say
48 In-law’s wife,
possibly
49 Refrigerates
53 One of a
biblical 10
58 AGT ...
62 Like quality
beef
63 One “sitting
lonely on the
placid bust,” in
a classic poem
64 Course with
relevant
tangents
65 Regular guys
66 Finals, e.g.
67 Spot
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
No, love can’t overcome everything
© 2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
3 Cravings
4 Ewan McGregor,
for one
5 They’re often
free
6 Sched.
question
mark
7 Kind
8 Once called
9 Sir Georg Solti’s
record 31
10 Rotating rod
11 Conduct
12 Hurting
13 Puts money
(on)
18 Dash
19 Not at all
reflective
23 On the lam
24 Backs up
a videotape
25 Cobb salad
ingredient
26 Bring to mind
27 Composer
Mendelssohn
28 Good-sized
wedding band
29 Prefix for “sun”
30 Madison Ave.
pitchers
10/13/17
31 Carpentry, e.g.
32 Worries
33 Church
numbers
41 Reacted
to an arduous
workout
42 Shoes
without
laces
45 Gymnast’s
powder
46 Ibiza, por
ejemplo
49 Key of the
finale of
Brahms’
Symphony No. 1
50 “Les
Misérables”
author
51 “Now it’s
clear”
52 Old Fords
54 Hard-working
colonizers
55 Spice Girl
Halliwell
56 Second, e.g.
57 Sharp side
59 Reach capacity,
with “out”
60 Actress
Mendes
61 President
pro __
THURSDAY’S LA TIMES SOLUTION
Dear Carolyn:
I’ve been dating
“Z” off-and-on for
21/2 years. He is 39
and never had a
serious
Carolyn
relationship
Hax
before; I’m 33 and
have been in love
once and had one
other long-term relationship that
ended in a healthy way.
Z and I love each other, but he
has a hard time communicating
with me about his feelings for
me, or making tangible plans for
our future. He does give me a
hard time most of the time and
has broken up with me multiple
times for no clear reason, which
has been difficult for me,
needless to say.
We recently spent six months
apart due to his saying he was
“sorry” he was “not the one for
me.”
We came back together a few
months ago and were thrilled to
realize our mutual love. But a
recent snag has brought up this
gnawing question: If I love him,
shouldn’t I accept him for who he
is and love him unconditionally?
Or should I keep trying to get
him to communicate with me in
a way I need, since we are still
learning how the other wants
and needs to be loved?
— Should I Stay or Should I Go?
Should I Stay or Should I Go?:
That’s actually several gnawing
questions.
The first part alone is two: 1.
Shouldn’t I accept him? And 2.
Shouldn’t I love him
unconditionally?
The answer to the first is an
easy, solid, unqualified yes.
Accept him. If taking what you
see as what you get from people
isn’t the key to happiness unto
itself, then it’s at least a massive
step toward eliminating needless
frustration. And/or eliminating
multiyear off-and-on
relationships with people who
give you “a hard time most of the
time.”
The second question is very
different from the first. Once you
accept someone as-is, it is not
automatic that you then love this
person unconditionally. Au
contraire. You accept, then you
see whether there’s love.
Accepting that someone is who
he is and isn’t going to change
could be just the truth-dosage
you need to realize you don’t in
fact love him. Or like him much.
So to recap: 1. See Z for who he
is instead of who you keep
wanting him to be, then 2. Ask
yourself whether you love this
real version of Z enough to stay
with him as-is.
Then we get to the third
gnawing question in your
gnawing question, which is,
should you keep trying to
articulate your unmet needs in
hopes of getting them met, or get
off the hamster wheel?
The answer to that is, you tell
me — or better, let the evidence
tell you. In response to your
spelling out your needs, has Z
made any lasting adjustments to
meet them?
Forget what you think you
deserve, what couples “should”
do for each other, what Z has
done for a few weeks to humor
you then gradually stopped
doing, what is or isn’t a lot to ask
of someone. Just look at what
this 39-year-old (i.e., fully
realized) person has
demonstrated in these 21/2 (i.e.,
plenty informative) years, with
special consideration for what he
has done consistently and
recently.
Is this how you want to live, or
not?
By the way — I won’t say
“unconditionally” and “person”
are mutually exclusive, but they
aren’t the likeliest mix.
Write to Carolyn Hax at
tellme@washpost.com. Get her
column delivered to your inbox each
morning at wapo.st/haxpost.
Join the discussion live at noon
Fridays at live.washingtonpost.com
Springsteen crosses the Hudson to deliver his followers to the promised land
THEATER FROM C1
husband on the Jersey Shore —
appearing with him for two of the
show’s 16 songs, Springsteen is
determined to maintain a mostly
elegiac tone on this occasion. He’s
a musician on a mission. And it’s a
quest for a New York audience to
listen for the craft in an American
voice ringing with simple truths.
“I’ll handle this myself,” he
politely advises the 975 or so
theatergoers in the Kerr during a
rendition of one of his biggest
hits, “Dancing in the Dark.”
Bruce’s fans at Tuesday night’s
press preview had the temerity to
begin to clap to the beat of a song
they loved, and he wasn’t having
it. Nope, didn’t like it, wasn’t
interested. He had a clear vision
of the evening, and the onlookers
were fogging up the windows. A
momentary hint of the control
freak within. All it took were four
words from the Boss and the
rhythmic response shut off, like a
spigot instantaneously gone dry.
What Springsteen has turned
on, in his sold-out, four-month
stand at the Kerr, is something on
the order of revolutionary: a
world-class
singer-songwriter
from the precincts of rock, a
megastar parking his talent on
Broadway for an extended period.
His suburban New York contem-
porary, Billy Joel, has had his
music translated into the musical
“Movin’ Out,” farther down Seventh Avenue, and he has been
such a fixture at Madison Square
Garden that the venue has designated him a franchise, like the
Knicks. But it was Springsteen’s
notion to stake out an intimate
Broadway
house,
relatively
speaking, for a long-term solo
engagement. And it’s fair to say
he is blazing a trail for other
recording artists of his mass appeal and rarefied caliber to come
to midtown and create something
just as artfully interesting.
And why not? “Springsteen on
Broadway” erases any last whiffs
of Broadway squareness that
were not totally eradicated by
“The Book of Mormon” and
“Hamilton.” He also has a story to
tell; the show is almost as much
spoken word as music. It’s a
Concert-Plus. (The Playbill —
Bruce gets a Playbill — describes
the show as “written and directed
by Bruce Springsteen.” The prospect of Springsteen being nominated for a Tony as best director
of a musical is sort of hilarious.)
“I come from a boardwalk
town where everything is tinged
of fraud. As am I,” Springsteen
tells us, near the top of the evening. The long prose passages
of “Springsteen on Broadway” —
ROBERT DEMARTIN
Bruce Springsteen’s Broadway show is part spoken-word
performance, part confession, part concert and all-around great.
he relies on some strategically
placed screens with the words of
the script, an unfortunate, limiting crutch — are deeply emotional. Sections are devoted to his
mom, his dad, to Freehold, where
he grew up, and to the late
Clarence Clemons, a.k.a. the Big
Man, the saxophonist Springsteen first played with when he
was getting started in the ear-
ly ’70s. “Nobody captured an audience’s imagination like Clarence,” he says, adding that he
was “a character out of a rockand-roll storybook.”
That storybook feeling, fused
with the every-American-kid accessibility of his working-class
background, gives Springsteen a
galvanizing narrative rationale.
(He likes the word “magic” a lot,
and it seems a counterpoint to the
details of a rather unmagical
childhood.) I grew up a few Jersey
towns over from Springsteen, in
Old Bridge and East Brunswick,
and listening to Springsteen’s
new delivery of old songs
like “Growin’ Up” (from his first
album, “Greetings From Asbury
Park, N.J.”) and “My Hometown”
(from 1984’s “Born in the U.S.A.”),
I suddenly felt nostalgic for my
own tract-house early life. They
didn’t seem like noteworthy places when I was a kid, and here was
Springsteen, reminding me that
we all come from somewhere
worth singing about. Central Jersey never struck me that way
before.
Springsteen occupies a small
swath of the stage, wandering
back and forth from a piano to a
microphone stand, where a stagehand brings him one of the several acoustic guitars he uses during the production. The song list
— it’s unfair, I think, to label it a
mere set list — ranges over career-defining hits such as “Born
to Run” to lesser-known songs
like “The Wish.” The voice, of
course, is not made for an angels’
choir; it’s a powerful, lived-in
instrument, a melodic gravel
road. It sounds particularly good
for “The Rising” and “Long Walk
Home” and in the two duets with
Scialfa, “Tougher Than the Rest”
and “Brilliant Disguise.” And
when he walks away from the mic
for an unamplified stanza of
“Promised Land,” you can feel
that this 68-year-old rocker,
bathed in an orangy halo by
Broadway lighting whiz Natasha
Katz, has still got stuff to sing to
us.
The occupant of the seat next
to me was a member of Springsteen’s base — a woman from
Ortley Beach, N.J., who was celebrating her 55th birthday on this
evening, accompanied by a
friend. At the evening’s end, she
turned to me to gauge my reaction, but hers was the one that
had more meaning. She looked as
if she were the luckiest person on
earth. Imagine possessing the
magic to make someone feel like
that.
peter.marks@washpost.com
Springsteen on Broadway, written
and directed by Bruce Springsteen.
Set, Heather Wolensky; lighting,
Natasha Katz; sound, Brian Ronan.
About 2 hours. Through Feb. 3 at
Walter Kerr Theatre, 219 W. 48th St.,
New York. All performances sold out,
but a lottery will be held 24 hours
before each show that will sell 26
tickets for $75 each, with a limit of
two to each buyer. Visit
luckyseat.com/springsteen-broadway.
MUSIC REVIEW
National Symphony o≠ers a mixed but satisfying bag under guest conductor
BY
R OBERT B ATTEY
This week’s National Symphony Orchestra program is a mélange — nothing really going
with anything else — but the
debut of a fine guest conductor,
an always-welcome soloist, and
one of the most popular symphonies in the repertoire added up to
a satisfying evening nonetheless.
Juanjo Mena, a Spanish maestro in his early 50s, is the music
director of a provincial British
orchestra, but regularly guest
conducts all of the top U.S. and
European orchestras; it’s odd
that it took the NSO this long to
engage him. At last night’s performance, his relaxed, collegial
style gave the musicians involvement and empowerment, which
you could see in their body
language. They need, perhaps,
more familiarity with each other,
though.
In the Tchaikovsky “Pathétique” Symphony, he and the
bassoonist didn’t seem to agree
on the opening tempo, and the
big, keening climax of the first
movement was incoherent as the
strings couldn’t be heard (All
playing in unison!). The sloppy
beginning of the march/scherzo
could’ve been avoided if he’d
conducted in four rather than in
two, but perhaps it will go better
tonight. Still, Mena’s warm, confident musicianship paid many
dividends, and he should be
brought back soon.
The concert began with a local
premiere of “Auditorium” by Mason Bates, the Kennedy Center’s
composer-in-residence, whose
tenure was just extended for two
more seasons. The work is a sort
of dialogue, between past (Baroque music), present (the modern orchestra) and future (electronics). Bates, from the back of
the stage on his laptop, mixed an
electronically processed “Ba-
roque ensemble” into the orchestral texture, which sometimes
blended and sometimes disrupted.
Invoking earlier music is an
idea as old as composed music
itself, of course; everyone does it
to one degree or another. But the
first part of “Auditorium” just
sounded gimmicky and annoying. Only in the middle section,
when things settled into an
“earthy groove” (per the composer) did the piece seem to be
saying something rather than
just being cute. As for the electronics, rather than “haunting”
the orchestra players with shreds
of music from the past, the
apparition here was of a dystopian future in which their jobs
were taken over by technology.
Bates is an artist of real imagination and one who speaks to the
next generation. I just hope his
vision will stay grounded in what
remains timeless about this
art form.
Garrick Ohlsson then offered
the Barber Piano Concerto, his
rich, Brahmsian sound bringing
quite a different color to the
piece than its longtime proponent John Browning did. The
concerto is a strong work, though
with oddities — long stretches
where the soloist is silent, a
lyrical second theme that
should’ve brought an infringement lawsuit from Shostakovich,
and a slow movement whose
plein-air texture cannot mask a
limp sense of development.
Mena and the NSO were not all
together at all times, either. But
there is much beauty in the piece,
and Ohlsson’s magisterial playing carried the day, as it often
does.
The program is repeated Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
style@washpost.com
Battey is a freelance writer.
KLMNO
SPORTS
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
WASHINGTONPOST.COM/SPORTS
M2
D
A painful fall classic
KATHERINE FREY/THE WASHINGTON POST
High drama, at once ugly,
unforgettable and beautiful
If you can win baseball fans in the
process of suffering a brutally bitter
season-ending defeat, perhaps the
Washington Nationals did it in their
exhilarating, exhausting, 9-8
donnybrook defeat to the World
Thomas
Series champion Chicago Cubs on
Boswell
Thursday night at a jam-packed
Nationals Park that never knew
what hit it.
Time will tell whether so much pain,
administered in a nearly five-hour battle full of so
many pleasures, will be considered by those lucky
and miserable enough to attend as a thing they
wish to experience much more. Or never again.
The Nats lost because their leader, their
competitive exemplar, Max Scherzer, pitching in
relief on two days of rest, normally considered
plenty to be effective, was clubbed for four runs in
his only inning and took the loss. He arrived to
start the fifth inning, oh, happy days and standing
ovations with a 4-3 lead. Mad Max left with the
CUBS 9, NATIONALS 8:
Bryce Harper walks off the field
following his strikeout to end Game 5
of the National League Division Series.
The Nationals, winners of 97 games
during the regular season, failed to
advance out of the NLDS for the fourth
time in six years and haven’t won a
postseason series since the franchise
moved to Washington.
More coverage online at
washingtonpost.com/sports
A fifth to forget
The game turned in a calamitous top
of the fifth inning that started with
Max Scherzer on in relief and ended with
the Nats trailing by three runs. D5
Nationals again fall short
in the NL Division Series
BY
C HELSEA J ANES
Maybe, after all this pain, it doesn’t matter
anyway. Maybe, after another agonizingly early
October exit, the manner of defeat neither explains
nor excuses anything that happened. It does not
provide consolation.
But that the Washington Nationals fell to the
Chicago Cubs, 9-8, in Game 5 of the National
League Division Series because Max Scherzer
endured an unprecedented debacle, because eight
runs were not enough and because Jose Lobaton’s
foot was inches off the first base bag only provides
unnecessary confirmation of something everyone
in this city senses. Something changes in the
biggest moments and not for the better. And
nothing the Nationals do seems to be able to change
that.
The Nationals lost their fourth NLDS in four
chances Thursday. They handed a one-run lead to
Scherzer, the reigning Cy Young Award winner, in
the fifth, needing six outs from him and three each
BOSWELL CONTINUED ON D6
NATIONALS CONTINUED ON D7
Well-grounded Gruden sheds his rep At season’s quarter mark, Redskins
and caters to his team’s strengths
have altered appraisal for the better
PRO FOOTBALL
Court reinstates RB Ezekiel
Elliott’s ban, keeping Dallas
star out for six games. D3
SOCCER
After failed World Cup bid,
Bruce Arena stays coy on
national team future. D2
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
The AAC looks like the
league that serves as a
coaching springboard. D4
Contrary to perception,
Jay Gruden’s middle
name is not Pass. It is
Michael, as a matter of
fact. And Jay Michael
Gruden would like to set
Jerry
the record straight about
Brewer
the belief that he runs his
offense like a chuckin’ old
quarterback living vicariously through
his younger players.
“No, I don’t think it’s ever been true,
really,” the Washington Redskins coach
said. “But if the play doesn’t work and
you throw it, then you should’ve run it. If
the play doesn’t work when you run it,
you should’ve thrown it. That’s just the
way it is.”
Ah, the can’t-win card. Gruden uses it
often. Blame the unsophisticated nature
of second-guessing. Present it as the
curse of coaching. It is a more persuasive
way of countering criticism than, say,
cursing, especially when there are facts
to support the claim.
Gruden has more evidence than the
first four games of this season. Yes,
Washington has been one of the most
effective and committed rushing
offenses in the NFL, but the promising
start is not as much a break from the
norm as it is an opportunity to realize
that Gruden has a stronger history of
balance than his passing reputation
suggests.
With Gruden calling plays for the first
time since 2014, Washington has run the
BREWER CONTINUED ON D3
BY
R ICK M AESE
Oddsmakers pegged them as a six- or
seven-win team. Media experts figured
the Washington Redskins would finish
third or fourth in the NFC East. “Lots of
small moves don’t spell big improvement,” Pro Football Weekly wrote in its
season preview magazine.
While no one knew quite what to make
of this Redskins team in the offseason, at
the season’s quarter mark, football analysts agree they have impressed at times
and are in good position to compete in a
surprisingly wide-open division.
“There’s something about this team,”
NBC analyst Cris Collinsworth said. “I
think you’re going to get a really good
fight out of them every week. As a fan,
that’s pretty good. You want that.”
The Redskins face the winless San
Francisco 49ers on Sunday and have a
shot at a winning record and a jolt of
confidence heading into a pair of pivotal
games against division rivals. Even coming off a loss and a bye week, there’s
already optimism in the locker room —
and for good reason, analysts say. After
all, their last time taking the field, the
Redskins nearly stunned the Kansas City
Chiefs, the league’s only undefeated team,
on “Monday Night Football.”
“If Josh Doctson comes down with that
catch, everyone has a totally different
REDSKINS CONTINUED ON D3
49ers at Redskins
Sunday, 1 p.m., WTTG-5
D2
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
SU
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
washingtonpost.com/sports
WIZARDS
EARLY LEAD
Smith has
a chance
to start
the opener
BY
TV ratings
for Game 5
might set
Nats’ record
SOCCER INSIDER
C ANDACE B UCKNER
Jason Smith has started more
preseason games as the Washington Wizards’ power forward than
any of his teammates. Mike
Scott, who was signed over the
summer as a backup power forward, has played in every exhibition game but always as a reserve.
Yes, Wizards Coach Scott
Brooks is leaning toward either
Smith, Scott or Otto Porter Jr. to
start Wednesday’s regular season
opener. And, no, Brooks isn’t
telling which one.
“Well, we’re still in the thinking stages,” Brooks said, “but we
got to narrow it down in a few
more games.”
Brooks has only one more
game to evaluate the potential
replacement for Markieff Morris,
who is entering the third week of
his six- to eight-week recovery
timeline from sports hernia surgery.
Washington wraps up its preseason Friday night against the
New York Knicks.
But if the matchup at the
Miami Heat served as any indication, Smith could be the frontrunner.
Before the game, Brooks said
he wanted to “give Jason another
try” after sitting him Sunday.
Smith took advantage, making
7 of 8 shots and drilling 4 of 5
from three-point territory to
score 20 points in 22 minutes.
“He definitely was on fire,”
Brooks said following the Wizards’ 117-115 loss. “Every time he
touched the ball, you know he
had a good feel that it was going
in. Just had a good rhythm
tonight. John [Wall] and the
guys were finding him open
looks. He’s really developed his
three-point shot. Give credit to
him and the staff. They worked
on it last year, and it’s paying
off.”
Smith’s statistical line proved
plenty: If the Wizards want a
floor-spacing, knockdown big
man, then he could hold down
the position until Morris comes
back.
candace.buckner@washpost.com
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/wizards
QUOTABLE
“We’re prepared to
chip our dogs, and it
doesn’t seem to harm
them.”
MIKE MILLER,
World Olympians chief executive,
of his idea of microchipping athletes
to stop them from doping.
(via Early Lead)
BY
DAVID ZALUBOWSKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
“I have no interest in going on a four-year cycle” to the 2022 World Cup, said U.S. men’s Coach Bruce Arena, 66.
Arena will do ‘whatever is right’
BY
S TEVEN G OFF
Bruce Arena, who oversaw the failed
U.S. bid to qualify for the 2018 World Cup
this summer in Russia, said Thursday he
will “do whatever is right” in terms of his
coaching future with the men’s national
soccer team.
Two days after a 2-1 defeat at Trinidad
and Tobago ended seven consecutive
appearances in the sport’s biggest
competition, Arena said he has yet to
discuss the matter at length with U.S.
Soccer Federation officials.
He and USSF President Sunil Gulati
were on the team charter flight
Wednesday, and “we talked about
things,” Arena said. “We know where
everything is at, the status of things.
We’re all on the same page. We’ll talk
again.”
He was hired last winter to replace
Jurgen Klinsmann, the 2014 World Cup
coach who led the U.S. to the round of 16
but was fired after losing the first two
final-round qualifiers this time around.
Arena’s contract was believed to run
through next summer, but he said
Thursday that, because of the qualifying
failure, it might expire this fall. The USSF
did not immediately respond to a
request for clarification.
“Obviously, I have no interest in going
on a four-year cycle right now” to the
2022 World Cup, said Arena, 66. “I’ll do
whatever is right. That is the approach I
am going to take.”
Gulati is scheduled to address Arena’s
future and the program at large on a
Friday conference call with reporters.
In a 10-minute telephone interview
from his home in Manhattan Beach,
Calif., Arena addressed several subjects
related to what is probably the lowest
moment in U.S. soccer history.
Needing just a draw against a lastplace opponent, the Americans fell from
third to fifth in the six-nation qualifying
group and missed the World Cup for the
U.S. men’s soccer coach
hints he might not be back
after failing to qualify for Cup
first time since 1986.
Arena, a Hall of Famer who guided the
2002 and 2006 World Cup squads, said
that “despite the fact we didn’t play well
in the first half, we should have still
walked off that field with at least a point.
We have no excuses.”
The Americans yielded two goals
before halftime — an own goal by
defender Omar Gonzalez and a blazing
shot from great distance by Alvin Jones.
Christian Pulisic scored early in the
second half, but the United States missed
several opportunities to pull even.
“Look at the two goals we conceded.
How bizarre,” he said. “Does it get any
more bizarre than that? So you are down
two goals, you get a goal early in the
second half, and there’s plenty of time to
get a second goal. We had our chances.
But what can you say? Even despite
conceding those two bizarre goals, we
still positioned ourselves to get out of
there with a point. I can’t look anywhere
else except inside our team.”
Asked whether he has second-guessed
himself about using the same lineup that
started in the 4-0 win over Panama four
days earlier, Arena responded forcefully.
“You can lay all the [stuff ] you want on
the thing,” he said. “You can say I
could’ve played this guy, that guy, and
then you’d come back the next day if we
had lost and said, ‘Why did you make
those changes and play those guys?’
“The job we have doesn’t allow us to be
the Monday morning quarterback.
[Trinidad and Tobago] played almost the
same team that played against Mexico
on Friday, so there’s no difference. So
that’s all a bunch of baloney. It has
nothing to do with formations or not
making changes. We didn’t get the job
done.”
Arena did not think fatigue over the
two matches was a major factor, saying:
“You have a little bit of a heavy field, and
it’s hot. Yeah, there’s fatigue. Did you
notice their players going down with
cramps? We weren’t cramping.”
Arena said the qualifying campaign
was an uphill battle since the two early
defeats. The Americans went 2-0-2 in the
first four qualifiers under Arena,
including a 1-1 draw at Mexico, but
earned just one point from the two
matches in September.
Despite the defeat, the Americans still
could have reached the playoff against
Australia had Panama not come from
behind to defeat Costa Rica, 2-1.
Panama’s tying goal clearly did not cross
the line.
“That’s CONCACAF,” Arena said. “If
the officiating is right, probably half of
those [Panamanian] guys aren’t even
playing in that game because of what
they did to us on Friday.
“They are punching people, kicking
people, throwing elbows. It was
ridiculous” that the referee did not issue
more yellow cards in the U.S.-Panama
match. “But that’s CONCACAF. It’s all
part of the exercise.”
Arena came to the defense of Gulati,
the longtime USSF executive with whom
he has had a hot-and-cold relationship
over two decades. On social media, many
fans are blaming Gulati for the program’s
shortfalls
and
demanding
his
resignation.
“We’re not catching up with the big
countries in the world just because of
what we’ve been doing the last five years.
It takes time,” Arena said. “We have a
ways to go.”
steven.goff@washpost.com
Excerpted from washingtonpost.com/
soccerinsider
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/dcsportsbog
TELEVISION AND RADIO
MLB PLAYOFFS
8 p.m.
PSG president accused
of World Cup bribery
The Qatari president of one of
Europe’s most glamorous soccer
clubs, Paris Saint-Germain, is
under investigation by Swiss
prosecutors for suspected bribery
of a top FIFA executive to get
World Cup broadcasting rights.
Criminal proceedings against
Nasser Al-Khelaifi, PSG
president and chief executive of
Qatar-owned BeIN Media Group;
former FIFA secretary general
Jerome Valcke; and an unnamed
“businessman in the sports rights
sector” were announced by the
office of Switzerland’s attorney
general Thursday in Geneva.
The case involves the award of
broadcast rights for the next four
World Cups, from 2018 to 2030.
The proceeding against AlKhelaifi is one of the first direct
links to Qatar in sweeping
investigations by federal law
enforcement authorities in
Switzerland, the United States
and France of FIFA, international
soccer and the 2018-2022 World
Cup bidding contests.
The Paris offices of BeIN Sports
were searched by two magistrates
from the French financial
Five years to the day after
setting a franchise record for
local TV ratings, the Washington
Nationals finally could be ready
to challenge that mark.
The Nats drew a massive
16.7 rating in the Washington
market for their Game 5 matchup
against the St. Louis Cardinals in
2012, that unforgettable heartbreaker in which Washington
took a huge lead that gradually
disappeared and ended in silence.
No game since has come close.
But consider the context
around Game 5 of the Nats-Cubs
National League Division Series,
which was broadcast on TBS on
Thursday night.
While the Cardinals are a
glamour opponent with a national fan base, the Cubs are an even
more glamorous opponent with
an even larger national fan base
— and also are the defending
World Series champions.
Washington’s fan base has
grown since 2012 — grown more
cynical, sure, and more scarred
and more weary and more
wounded and more wary and
more familiar with the different
ways life can press its cruel boot
upon your face. But also grown
in, like, numbers. Sports Business Journal’s John Ourand reported this week that the Nats
posted their highest TV ratings
this season, averaging a 2.91 rating on MASN and MASN2, up
8 percent from 2016.
In that 2012 division series,
the Nationals drew an 8.4 rating
for Game 1, a 7.8 rating for Game
2 and a 9.1 rating for Game 4.
(Game 3 was on MLB Network in
the middle of a work day and did
considerably worse.) This time
around, the Nats drew a 7.2 rating
for Game 1, a 6.8 rating for Game
2, a 9.0 rating for Game 3 and an
8.8 rating for Game 4. That’s at
least in the same neighborhood,
setting the stage for a Game 5
eruption.
And the Nats got that 8.8 rating Wednesday despite Game 4
having been rained out the previous day and despite the game
starting just after 4 p.m. Eastern
and despite there being almost
no scoring for the first seven
innings.
Last year’s Game 5 against
the Dodgers got just a 10.3 rating
in the D.C. market for a broadcast
on FS1. But there’s certainly more
optimism in Washington this
time around, absent the crushing
late-season injuries to Wilson
Ramos and Stephen Strasburg.
And after Strasburg’s Wednesday
night gem and Michael A. Taylor’s Wednesday night grand
slam, the Nationals haven’t had
this sort of postseason momentum — which could prompt the
most casual of fans to flip to TBS
— since, that’s right, Jayson
Werth in 2012.
dan.steinberg@washpost.com
DIG ES T
SOCCER
D AN S TEINBERG
prosecutor’s office, the federal
agency said.
Properties also were searched
in Greece, Italy and Spain, while
Valcke was questioned in
Switzerland, the Swiss federal
prosecution office said. . . .
The United States stumbled to
a 3-1 loss to Colombia in its final
group-stage game at the Under-17
World Cup in India and will play
Paraguay, Germany or Iran in the
second round next week.
TENNIS
Rafael Nadal won his 14th
consecutive match to reach the
Shanghai Masters quarterfinals,
beating Fabio Fognini, 6-3, 6-1.
Roger Federer, seeded second to
Nadal, defeated Alexandr
Dolgopolov, 6-4, 6-2. . . .
Johanna Konta, who has an
injured foot, withdrew from the
Kremlin Cup next week in
Moscow, meaning Caroline
Garcia has secured the eighth
and last berth in the WTA Finals.
GOLF
Justin Thomas made a rocky
start in his bid to win a third
successive CIMB Classic when he
managed only a 2-under-par 70 to
sit six strokes behind leader
Cameron Smith in Kuala
Lumpur. . . .
Sung Hyun Park birdied her
last two holes for a 6-under 66
and a share of the lead in the
LPGA Tour’s KEB Hana Bank
Championship in Incheon in her
home country of South Korea,
bolstering her bid to win rookie of
the year and player of the year.
PRO BASKETBALL
The WNBA’s San Antonio Stars
are in negotiations to be sold and
relocated, and a person with
knowledge of the situation told
the Associated Press the buyer is
based in Las Vegas. The person
spoke on the condition of
anonymity because neither the
team nor the WNBA has disclosed
information about the buyer. . . .
Rodney McGruder
(Archbishop Carroll), who started
at small forward for the Miami
Heat last season and was a strong
candidate to open this season in
the same role, is scheduled for
have surgery next week to repair a
stress fracture in his left leg and
could miss three months or more.
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
The Pacific-12 Conference is
launching its own task force to
develop reform proposals in the
wake of a federal bribery
investigation that includes two
assistant coaches in the league.
Commissioner Larry Scott
expects the 10 to 12 members on
his task force “to address issues
that are threatening the integrity
of collegiate athletics and to
protect our student-athletes.” . . .
Federal prosecutors seeking
more information about the
involvement of Oklahoma State
in a wider corruption scandal
have asked the school to detail its
communications with three key
players in the investigation, as
well as players and their parents.
A grand jury subpoena
provided to the Associated Press
asked Oklahoma State to produce
all communications between any
member of the coaching or
athletic staff and former agent
Christian Dawkins, financial
adviser Martin Blazer and
investment adviser Munish Sood.
MISC.
Pittsburgh quarterback Max
Browne had surgery on his right
shoulder, ending his season and
his college football career. A
graduate transfer from Southern
California, Browne had one
season of eligibility left. . . .
Portland (Ore.) International
Raceway will replace Watkins
Glen International on the
IndyCar Series schedule in 2018.
— From news services
ALCS, Game 1: New York Yankees at Houston » Fox Sports 1, WTEM (980 AM)
NHL
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
Washington at New Jersey » NBC Sports Washington, WJFK (106.7 FM)
New York Rangers at Columbus » NHL Network
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
Clemson at Syracuse » ESPN
Washington State at California » ESPN
NBA PRESEASON
8 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Houston » TNT
Los Angeles Lakers at Los Angeles Clippers » TNT
GOLF
6 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
11 p.m.
European Tour: Italian Open, second round » Golf Channel
Champions Tour: SAS Championship, first round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour: CIMB Classic, third round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
6 a.m.
ATP: Shanghai Masters, quarterfinals » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
10:30 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
2:40 p.m.
7 p.m.
FIFA U-17 World Cup: Guinea vs. Germany » Fox Sports 2
FIFA U-17 World Cup: Niger vs. Brazil » Fox Sports 2
Bundesliga: Cologne at Stuttgart » Fox Sports 2
Ligue 1: Monaco at Lyon » beIN Sports
Men’s college: Wisconsin at Maryland » ESPNU
AUTO RACING
Noon
1 p.m.
2 p.m.
3 p.m.
NASCAR Truck Series: Fred’s 250, practice » Fox Sports 1
NASCAR Cup Series: Alabama 500, practice » NBC Sports Network
NASCAR Truck Series: Fred’s 250, final practice » Fox Sports 1
NASCAR Cup Series: Alabama 500, final practice »NBC Sports Network
MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY
7 p.m.
Denver at Notre Dame » NBC Sports Network
CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE
7 p.m.
Calgary at Hamilton » ESPN2
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
Appeals court reinstates Elliott’s ban
BY
M ARK M ASKE
The NFL’s six-game suspension
of Dallas Cowboys running back
Ezekiel Elliott stemming from domestic violence allegations was reinstated by a federal appeals court
Thursday.
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the
5th Circuit granted the league’s
request for an emergency stay of
the injunction that was issued by a
federal judge to keep Elliott’s suspension on hold while his case
proceeds in court.
The NFL said it would enforce
Elliott’s suspension beginning immediately. If that stands, Elliott
would be eligible to return to the
Cowboys on Nov. 24, the league
said, which is the day after their
game against the Los Angeles
Chargers.
“Earlier today, the Fifth Circuit
Court of Appeals vacated the preliminary injunction that prohibited the league from imposing the
six-game suspension issued to Ezekiel Elliott for a violation of the
Personal Conduct Policy,” the
league said in a written statement.
“The Court also directed the district court to dismiss the union’s
lawsuit which was filed on Elliott’s
behalf. As a result, Elliott’s suspension will begin effective immediately.”
The Cowboys, who have a record
of 2-3, are on their bye week. They
next play Oct. 22 at San Francisco.
Elliott will miss games against
the San Francisco 49ers, Washington Redskins, Kansas City Chiefs,
Atlanta Falcons, Philadelphia Eagles and Chargers. He will be eligible to return for Dallas’s Nov. 30
game against the Redskins.
The Cowboys declined to comment “at this time” through a
spokesman.
The ruling came after oral arguments were conducted last week in
New Orleans before a three-judge
panel of the court.
The appeals court judges voted,
2-1, to grant the NFL’s request to lift
the injunction. The league had argued that the district court in Texas that granted the injunction did
not have proper jurisdiction be-
D3
M2
NFL ROUNDUP
Wentz, Eagles improve to NFC-best 5-1
EAGLES 28,
PANTHERS 23
A SSOCIATED P RESS
RON JENKINS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The NFL said it would enforce Ezekiel Elliott’s six-game suspension
beginning immediately. He will be eligible to return Nov. 24.
cause the players’ union filed its
case on Elliott’s behalf before his
appeal was completed. Two of the
three appeals court judges agreed
with that. The dissenting judge
ruled that there could be merit to
Elliott’s claim that the NFL’s appeal process was not fair.
The union and Elliott’s attorneys could appeal the ruling of the
three-judge panel to the entire appeals court. They could attempt to
put the suspension back on hold by
seeking an injunction or temporary restraining order in federal
court in New York, where the NFL
filed a lawsuit attempting to affirm
the arbitration decision that upheld the suspension. Or Elliott’s
legal team could refile the case in
Texas and seek an injunction.
The union said in a written
statement: “The NFLPA is reviewing the decision and considering
all options. The appellate court
decision focuses on the jurisdictional issues. The failures of due
process by the NFL articulated in
the District Court’s decision were
not addressed.”
The league concluded after a
lengthy investigation that Elliott
was guilty of violence in a series of
incidents last year involving his
former girlfriend. Authorities in
Columbus, Ohio, did not charge
Elliott with a crime. League-appointed arbitrator Harold Hender-
son rejected the NFL Players Association’s appeal on Elliott’s behalf
and upheld the suspension imposed by NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell under the sport’s personal conduct policy.
The NFLPA took its challenge to
federal court in Texas. U.S. District
Judge Amos L. Mazzant granted
the NFLPA’s request for a preliminary injunction. Mazzant ruled
that Elliott did not receive a fair
appeal hearing before Henderson,
in large part because Elliott’s accuser and Goodell did not testify.
The NFL, maintaining that it
adhered properly to the league’s
disciplinary procedures, quickly
sought the intervention of the New
Orleans-based appeals court.
The NFL previously prevailed at
the appellate level in cases involving Adrian Peterson and Tom Brady in which the NFLPA challenged
disciplinary measures and scored
victories at the district court level.
In Brady’s case, his four-game
suspension for his alleged role in
the Deflategate scandal was enforced at the outset of last season
after he played the entire 2015 season based on a ruling by a federal
judge.
Elliott, the league’s leading
rusher last season as a rookie, has
totaled 393 rushing yards in five
games this season.
mark.maske@washpost.com
Carson Wentz threw for
222 yards and three touchdowns
to help the Philadelphia Eagles
beat the Carolina Panthers, 28-23,
on Thursday night in Charlotte to
improve to an NFC-best 5-1.
The Eagles turned two interceptions deep in Carolina territory into 15 points, with touchdown passes to Zach Ertz and
LaGarrette Blount’s two-point
conversion to take an 18-10 lead in
the third quarter. Wentz added a
24-yard scoring pass to Nelson
Agholor in the fourth quarter.
Wertz completed 16 of 29 passes.
Cam Newton threw three interceptions for Carolina (4-2).
Wildfires may impact Raiders
The NFL is keeping an eye on
the wildfires in Northern California and has been exploring options to move Sunday’s game between the Oakland Raiders and
Los Angeles Chargers if it becomes
necessary.
Michael Signora, the NFL’s vice
president of football communications, said Thursday that the
league is getting updates on the
situation from both teams and
from city officials in Oakland.
“We continue to monitor air
quality conditions in the Bay Area
and are in close communication
with both the Raiders and Chargers, as well as local authorities,”
Signora said. “At this point, the
game remains scheduled for Sunday in Oakland.”
Oakland, which is about
45 miles south of the fires, has
been blanketed by smoke.
BENGALS: Cincinnati tight
end Tyler Eifert will miss the rest
of the season with a back injury
that has put his career in jeopardy.
The fifth-year veteran missed
half of last season with ankle and
STREETER LECKA/GETTY IMAGES
Carson Wentz threw for 222 yards and three touchdowns Thursday
as Philadelphia won a battle of NFC heavyweights in Charlotte.
back injuries. He had surgery on a
disc in his back last December. He
aggravated it in the second game
this season, forcing him to consider another procedure. He has been
inactive for the past three games
and was put on injured reserve
Thursday.
GIANTS: Suspended cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie met with New York Coach
Ben McAdoo and was told that his
suspension is indefinite.
Neither Rodgers-Cromartie nor
McAdoo was immediately available to comment.
Players can be suspended a
maximum of four weeks under the
collective bargaining agreement.
The Giants suspended RodgersCromartie on Wednesday for leaving the team facility before practice. He had been told by McAdoo
on Tuesday night that he would be
inactive for Sunday night’s game
in Denver because he left the
bench in the second half of a loss to
the Chargers and went to the locker room. He later returned.
DOLPHINS: Miami wide receiver Jarvis Landry lashed out at
fans who lobbied for quarterback
Jay Cutler to be benched, saying
they’re an embarrassment to players.
“Jay is our quarterback, and we
stand by him,” Landry said. “We
don’t buy into the fans — ‘Who do
you want to play quarterback?’ I
believe it’s disrespectful. A man
who comes out here and works his
butt off, for people to not understand what’s going on or not to
have even touched the field before.
. . . They don’t understand the situation. They just want to be on
Twitter or start a damned chant.
“It’s embarrassing as a player to
have fans like that. It’s embarrassing.”
49ERS: San Francisco won’t
be forcing its players to stand during the national anthem, safety
Eric Reid said.
Reid, the first player to join
Colin Kaepernick in protest last
season, said he had a conversation
recently with 49ers chief executive
Jed York, who indicated he will
continue to support his players if
they decide to kneel during the
national anthem to protest social
injustice.
RAMS: Los Angeles linebacker Alec Ogletree agreed to a fouryear contract extension through
the 2021 season.
The Rams (3-2) announced the
deal Thursday night with their top
tackler and key defensive leader.
Washington now seen as a team that is expected to be competitive every week
REDSKINS FROM D1
vibe about Washington,” NFL
Network analyst Shaun O’Hara
said of the would-be game-winning catch that bounced away
from the wide receiver’s grasp in
the final minutes. “The game is
crazy like that. One or two plays
here or there can change things.”
Entering the season, O’Hara
said he wanted to see how the
Redskins would replace DeSean
Jackson’s and Pierre Garcon’s
production at wide receiver,
whether the running game could
have a bigger impact and whether
the linebackers and secondary
show improvement. The early
signs are promising, he said.
“I think they’re sitting pretty
good now at 2-2. If you start the
year 4-0, people start changing
expectations. Usually that first
month, you’re still trying to figure
things out, get in a rhythm,” said
O’Hara, a three-time Pro Bowl
lineman for the New York Giants.
“The next stretch is when you
really find out who you are.”
As the Redskins’ record suggests, they are not among the
conference elite and certainly not
among the NFC’s bottom-dwellers. But it’s the next stretch of the
schedule that could really define
them. Their next four opponents
have a combined record of 9-11,
JOHN MCDONNELL/THE WASHINGTON POST
Expectations are higher for Ryan Grant (14), Josh Doctson and the Redskins after the team’s bye week.
skewed heavily by Sunday’s opponent, the 0-5 49ers.
Two of the next four opponents
happen to be division foes, the
Philadelphia Eagles and Dallas
Cowboys, which should provide
some clarity in the NFC East hierarchy. While Philadelphia looks
formidable, the Giants have im-
ploded and the Cowboys already
have as many losses through five
games as they posted all of last
season. Analysts see an opening
for the Redskins.
“It’s there. The potential is
there,” said Fox analyst Chris
Spielman, the four-time Pro Bowl
selection who worked the Red-
skins’ Week 2 game at the Los
Angeles Rams. “The quarterback
continues to play at a high level
and avoid some of the mistimed
decision-making he’s made in
past. . . . It’s a quarterback-driven
league, it’s a throwing league, and
if the quarterback play is consistent, they can be as explosive
offensively as anybody in the
league.”
While Kirk Cousins has topped
240 yards just once, he also has
thrown only one interception. His
yards per game are down (307 last
season to 251 through four games
this year), but his yards per attempt are slightly up (8.3 yards
this year from 8.1 a season ago).
“Kirk Cousins hasn’t fundamentally changed,” said Collinsworth, who worked the Redskins’
Week 3 win over the Oakland
Raiders on “Sunday Night Football.” “I think he still wants to get
the ball down the field, and I
think Jay Gruden still wants to
get the ball down the field. I think
they’re just working to that level.
It takes time. It takes work.”
When the experts talk about
improvement, they focus on the
defensive side of the ball. London
Fletcher, the former Redskins
linebacker who’s now an analyst
for CBS Sports, liked some of the
offseason additions and thought
they would be improved defensively. “But even I didn’t think
they’d be this good,” he said.
Analysts praise the additions
of draft pick Jonathan Allen and
free agent pickups D.J. Swearinger and Zach Brown but are quick
to point out that new defensive
coordinator Greg Manusky seems
to have altered the unit’s person-
ality.
“It all kind of starts with him,”
Collinsworth said. “He makes you
think of a Marine sergeant. It’s
not all about X’s and O’s and the
coverage and the schemes. For
those guys, it’s about: Is he going
to kick our [butt], or are we going
to go kick that team’s [butt]?”
Fletcher also notes that defensive line coach Jim Tomsula has
injected the same level of excitement upfront and the result is a
group that’s both energetic and
disciplined.
“Your culture is set in practice,
from the defensive coordinator,
from the position coach, from the
leaders in each group,” Fletcher
said. “And then it all trickles
down.”
If the first quarter of the schedule was about finding out who
they are, this next stretch could
find the Redskins delving deeper,
figuring out what they can be.
Analysts agree that the pieces
seem to be in place, and Washington is poised to at least be competitive from week to week.
“I think they’re in a good position, sort of lurking in the weeds,”
O’Hara said. “I think they’re under the radar a bit. They’re a team
that’s been in this position before
and realizes the big push has yet
to come.”
rick.maese@washpost.com
JERRY BREWER
Gruden sheds pass-first persona in attempt to bring more balance to Redskins
BREWER FROM D1
football 116 times in 244 plays —
47.5 percent of the time. It ranks
sixth in the NFL in run
percentage, sixth in yards per
carry at 4.5 and seventh in
rushing yards at 130 per game.
Although the sample size is tiny,
here is something truly
remarkable: The offense has
done this despite not having a
player who ranks among the
league’s top 40 in rushing yards.
Will this seem like a four-game
mirage by season’s end? It could.
Consistent habits have not
materialized at this point. But
even if the Washington offense
starts to skew more toward the
pass, it is doubtful that the
imbalance will be as
preposterous as it was last
season, when the team finished
25th of 32 teams in run
percentage, rushing on just 37.6
percent of its plays.
“He likes to run the ball,”
running back Chris Thompson
said. “He made that known when
he first got here.”
More than anything, Gruden
plays to the strengths of his team.
Gruden brought his variation of
the West Coast offense to the
NFL in 2011, when the Cincinnati
Bengals hired him as their
offensive coordinator. After three
seasons there, he became the
Washington head coach in 2014.
He handed over play-calling
duties to Sean McVay during the
2015 and 2016 seasons, but his
system remained in place.
In the previous six years,
Gruden’s offense ranked 13th,
16th, 12th, 18th, 14th and 25th in
run percentage, according to
teamrankings.com. So we’re
talking about a middle-of-thepack commitment, which is not
exactly an Air Raid offense and
quite typical for West Coast
offenses that like to mix in short
passes as faux runs. Gruden is far
from a run-first coach, but even
supposed run-first teams rarely
run more than they pass.
“We like to be balanced, and
that’s the key to pro football in
my opinion: to be balanced,”
Gruden said. “It helps the
quarterback. It helps the whole
entire team. Offensive linemen
perform better, produce better,
because they’re not always in a
pass stance, working on stunts
and blitzes and all that stuff. You
can put your hand on the ground
and knock some people off the
ball. It’s a key component to pro
football, being balanced, but you
also have to understand who
your players are and get the ball
to your playmakers.”
Through four games,
Washington is not where it
should be. The team is averaging
just 22.8 points. It has converted
38 percent of its third downs; an
ideal percentage is something
closer to 45. You have seen the
dropped passes and missed
opportunities and moments of
poor pass protection.
Nevertheless, the offense has
made progress since a poor
Week 1 showing against
Philadelphia because of its ability
to adapt and play with restraint.
The running game has served
as a chance to take a deep breath
and focus simply on being a
physical and athletic team.
Washington does not have a
running back who commands 18
carries a game. With injuries
limiting starter Rob Kelley, the
offense has had to go deep into
its running back corps. There is
no certain 1,000-yard rusher in
the group, but it could wind up
with three rushers — Kelley,
Thompson and rookie Samaje
Perine — producing between 500
and 700 yards. Even quarterback
Kirk Cousins, who has 77 yards,
has tried to channel Michael
Vick.
Right now, with the defense
looking much improved,
Washington can slow down the
game a little. It can focus on
controlling the time of
possession and taking fewer risks
to try to score points. The offense
is operating in a conventional —
some would say conservative —
manner, trying to limit
turnovers, appreciating the value
of a field goal and accepting that
punting is okay.
“When the defense is playing
well, you have that luxury to be
able to keep handing it off and
stay patient,” Cousins has said a
few times.
But for all the criticism the
passing game has received,
Cousins remains on pace to
throw for 4,000 yards. Despite
the drops, he’s still completing
66.1 percent of his passes. He has
seven touchdown passes and one
interception. His passer rating is
107.6, ranking fourth among
quarterbacks with at least
100 pass attempts. And he’s
averaging 8.3 yards per pass
attempt, better than the 8.1 yards
from last season, when he threw
for 4,917 yards.
Cousins has not been great,
but if this now qualifies as merely
functional for him, Gruden will
take it, especially after
considering that the team does
not have a receiver with more
than 14 receptions. That should
change if Jordan Reed and
Jamison Crowder play to their
standards and Terrelle Pryor Sr.
gets more comfortable.
In the meantime, the running
game is there for stability.
“I think, over time, Coach
Gruden has come to trust us as a
unit,” Thompson said of the
running backs. “And for the
players, we trust his play-calling.
He’s been doing such a good job
at his play-calling, and it’s all
been because our offensive line
has been blocking great and
really helping us move the ball
and being in some efficient
second-down situations. It makes
play-calling easy for him, and if
he sees us executing, he’s one of
the coaches that’s going to keep
coming at it.”
The notion goes against
Gruden’s reputation. It is more
fun to scrutinize the offense’s
tendency to pass too much in
high-pressure situations and
question Gruden’s infatuation
with red-zone fade routes (he just
loves that topic). But the truth is
nuanced. In adjusting to an
offense in transition, Gruden has
been able to illustrate that.
jerry.brewer@washpost.com
For more by Jerry Brewer, visit
washingtonpost.com/brewer.
D4
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
Suspension-wary Wilson rethinks hits
BY
I SABELLE K HURSHUDYAN
After every game, when Tom
Wilson reviews his shifts to grade
his performance, he also analyzes
his hits. For each one, he asks
himself, “What were my instincts
on the hit? Why did I make that
hit?” He has developed a reputation for his physical play, so he put
that part of his game under his own
microscope by questioning his decision-making every time he landed one of his signature bone-crushing checks.
His reaction most of the time?
“Wow, that was a great hit. It was a
huge hit, but it was a great hit.”
It’s easy to slow down the video
of Wilson’s hits and pinpoint what
he did wrong or right on each one.
It’s harder to apply that same reasoning during a game in real time,
when Wilson has seconds to decide
whether to hit a player and how he
should do it. Now that he has been
suspended by the NHL twice within two weeks this season, with the
most recent causing him to miss
the Washington Capitals’ first four
games, the fine line between a
clean hit and an illegal one has
never been more important.
As Wilson returns to the lineup
Friday night against the New Jersey Devils, he’s trying to strike a
balance between staying true to his
identity as a bruising power forward and staying out of trouble
with the NHL’s department of
player safety.
“For the majority of the past four
seasons, you watch pretty much
every one of my hits in frame by
frame, 10th by 10th seconds, and
you can’t find one thing that’s
wrong with it,” Wilson said.
“They’re textbook body checks broken down even slow. You have to
trust yourself. It’s such a fast game.
“That being said, you know
what, [being out of the lineup]
wasn’t a good feeling. Maybe when
I’m approaching a hit, think about
it a little more and make sure,
100 percent, that the outcome is
going to be clean and make sure
the guy’s going to be in a good spot
after I hit him and take into account all of those things.”
Wilson was suspended for two
preseason games for interference
Stamkos scores his first
since return from injury
A SSOCIATED P RESS
NICK WASS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sept. 23 after his hit on St. Louis
Blues forward Robert Thomas was
deemed late and excessively forceful. In Washington’s last exhibition
game, also against St. Louis, Wilson was ejected for boarding forward Samuel Blais and then suspended for the first four games of
the season. That second suspension came in Wilson’s second game
back from the interference infraction.
After the first suspension, Wilson said he didn’t intend on shying
away from physical play because
it’s part of what got him to the
NHL.
“I know it didn’t sound good,
because I went out and got suspended right away, but that’s two
hits in five years that have been
suspendable,” Wilson said Thursday.
He acknowledged it’s on him to
adapt to the player safety department’s standards and said a critique he got was that his hits are
“excessively hard.”
So when it comes to those huge
hits he’s so often admired, “maybe
you can’t really finish a guy like you
used to be able to,” he said.
A third suspension this season
probably would carry even harsher
discipline than four games because of Wilson’s status as a repeat
offender.
“Just recognize if someone is
vulnerable,” Coach Barry Trotz
said. “A lot of guys turn their numbers now, which is unfair to the
physical players. It’s a weak way to
— you know, guys actually expose
themselves. Back in the old days,
there was not a chance that would
happen because you’d get run
through the end boards, so you
protected yourself and got yourself
turned sideways a bit so you could
absorb a hit. . . . It’s lessened, so the
players that are more physical or
get on the forecheck and want to
hit, they’ve just got to be more
cautious with those type of guys
that will expose their numbers the
whole time.”
It’s not just the suspension-worthy plays Wilson will have to avoid.
While Wilson’s 133 penalty minutes last year were the fewest he
has had in a season, they were still
82 more than the next Washington
player. The Capitals have racked
up 20 minor penalties in the four
games without Wilson in the lineup as the team has struggled to
adapt to the NHL’s stricter standards for slashing. Wilson’s return
will help Washington’s penalty-kill
unit because he typically logs a lot
of shorthanded time, and watching these games might have helped
him get a feel for how the league is
calling certain infractions.
“I don’t know if sitting out was
necessarily the right thing for
that,” Wilson said. “You see all of
the instant replays, and those
slashes that aren’t even hitting
guys are getting called. It’s obviously a little bit of an adjustment
period for the NHL right now, and
it’s such a fast game. It’s tough for
the refs to see if you got him on the
hand or not or whatever. If there’s
one thing I take from it, it’s don’t
put your stick anywhere near the
guy or you can get a penalty.”
Wilson chuckled that this hasn’t
been “the best start” to a pivotal
season for him. Trotz has said this
is the year Wilson’s goal production needs to hit double digits —
the 23-year-old has never scored
more than seven goals in a season.
Wilson is eager to get back in the
lineup and perhaps change his reputation.
“That just makes me more motivated to get out there and show
everyone that I can play and show
everyone that I can play multiple
aspects of the game,” Wilson said.
“Enough people call you a goon,
you want to get out there and
prove to them that you can score
some goals.”
isabelle.khurshudyan@washpost.com
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
NHL ROUNDUP
LIGHTNING 5,
PENGUINS 4
Tom Wilson, fighting the Blues’ Dmitrij Jaskin, said he wants to make sure his hits are clean.
. FRIDAY,
Steven Stamkos scored his first
goal since he underwent right
knee surgery last November, and
the Tampa Bay Lightning beat the
visiting Pittsburgh Penguins, 5-4,
on Thursday night.
Stamkos made it 3-1 with a power-play goal at 3:49 of the second
period from the low left circle. The
Lightning star previously scored
Nov. 15 at Detroit, the same game
in which he had a season-ending
lateral meniscus tear in the knee.
Stamkos entered with five assists in three games this season.
Slater Koekkoek got his first
two NHL goals, and Victor Hedman and Nikita Kucherov also
scored for the Lightning. Alex Killorn had four assists, while Andrei
Vasilevskiy made 36 saves.
Pittsburgh got goals from Jake
Guentzel, Conor Sheary, Bryan
Rust and Matt Hunwick. Antti
Niemi, who allowed four goals on
13 shots over 9:16 against Chicago
on Oct. 5 in his Penguins debut,
stopped 29 shots.
After Stamkos tied Vincent
Lecavalier for the Lightning team
record with 112 power-play goals,
Sheary and Kucherov traded goals
later in the second. Rust scored on
the power play to cut the deficit to
4-3 with 5:36 to go in the period.
PANTHERS 5, BLUES 2: In
Sunrise, Fla., Roberto Luongo
moved into a tie for fourth on the
NHL career victory list with 474,
making 37 saves to help Florida
beat St. Louis.
The 38-year-old Luongo is tied
with Curtis Joseph on the career
list.
Vincent Trocheck scored the
go-ahead goal, Ian McCoshen had
his first NHL goal, and Jared McCann, Aaron Ekblad and Nick
Bjugstad also connected for Florida.
Paul Stastny and Vince Dunn —
also with his first career goal —
countered for St. Louis. Jake Allen
stopped 33 shots in the Blues’ first
loss in five games this season.
Trocheck put the Panthers
ahead 2-1 with a shorthanded goal
at 2:45 of the second period. Trocheck skated in on a breakaway
and shot over Allen’s glove. It was
the first time the Blues trailed
since the first period in their
opener at Pittsburgh.
PREDATORS 4, STARS 1:
Samuel Girard scored his first
NHL goal and added an assist to
lead Nashville to a home win over
Dallas.
Filip Forsberg and P.K. Subban
also had a goal and an assist, and
Viktor Arvidsson also scored for
the Predators, winners of two
straight. Pekka Rinne made
30 saves.
Jamie Benn had Dallas’s lone
goal. The Stars have lost three of
four to open the season.
Benn scored the game’s first
goal at 8:04 of the opening period.
With Dallas on a power play,
Rinne stopped John Klingberg’s
shot from the left point, but Benn
was able to swat in the rebound
from just outside the crease on the
right side.
Nashville has surrendered the
first goal in three of its four games.
WILD 5, BLACKHAWKS 2:
Chris Stewart broke a tie midway
through the third period with the
first of his two goals, and Minnesota earned its first win of the
season in Chicago.
Jason Zucker had a goal and an
assist, and Devan Dubnyk made
36 saves to help the Wild (1-1-1)
hand Chicago (3-1-1) its first regulation loss.
Stewart tapped Zucker’s feed
past Corey Crawford from the
doorstep at 9:28 of the third to
give Minnesota a 2-1 lead.
Stewart and Zucker broke in
two-on-one against Duncan Keith
after fellow defenseman Brent
Seabrook fell down on the play.
The goal withstood a video review
after the Blackhawks challenged
Zucker was offside.
With Norvell, Frost and Morris, AAC again looks like a coaching springboard
BY
A VA W ALLACE
When No. 25 Navy faces Memphis on Saturday at Liberty Bowl
Memorial Stadium, Coach Ken
Niumatalolo will be matching
wits with a buzzy young college
football coach, relatively new to
the conference, who is frequently
mentioned as a candidate to
move into whatever flashy job
opens up next at a power-conference program.
The same goes for the week
after, when Navy will host Central Florida. And again three
weeks after that, against SMU.
The pattern isn’t an accident,
nor is it anything revolutionary
in the American Athletic Conference.
Mike Norvell of Memphis,
Scott Frost of Central Florida and
Chad Morris of SMU represent
the new normal in the AAC, a
conference that in five seasons of
existence has made a name for
itself as a proving ground for
rising coaching talents and as a
pipeline to some of the country’s
most distinguished programs.
Last season, AAC coaches filled
slots at Texas, Oregon and Baylor.
In 2015, Justin Fuente left a
Memphis program he turned
around in two years for Frank
Beamer’s job at Virginia Tech.
This year, Frost and Norvell
could be ripe for the picking. The
42-year-old Frost, who took over
a program that went 0-12 before
his arrival last season and led the
Knights to a bowl game followed
by a 4-0 start and the No. 22
ranking this year, has been listed
repeatedly as a potential candidate at Nebraska. Norvell, 36,
who is 12-6 overall as Fuente’s
successor at Memphis, started
garnering buzz when the Tigers
upset UCLA this season. And
Morris, who has SMU off to its
best start since 2011 at 4-2, could
be next. All are first-time head
coaches.
“You see the guys that have
come from this league that have
gone on to other big-time
schools, and it’s a testament,”
Niumatalolo said. “. . . There’s a
lot of really good, young coaches
now. It’s a really good league. It
shows that our conference ADs
are smart; they’re hiring up-andcoming coaches.”
But those smart hires create a
high level of turnover in the AAC.
Navy’s remaining conference
schedule is evidence of that.
Of the five remaining AAC
head coaches Niumatalolo will
face, Morris, 48, is the most
experienced. He has two full
seasons under his belt at SMU.
Everyone else is in his first or
second year helming a program.
In the AAC, Niumatalolo’s
10 years leading the Midshipmen
make him an extreme outlier.
“I don’t know if it’s sad or
depressing to be called one of the
older guys in coaching,” Niumat-
JESSICA HILL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Memphis Coach Mike Norvell, like Justin Fuente before him, is
garnering buzz for Power Five jobs. Fuente left for Virginia Tech.
alolo joked on a recent conference call, “but I guess it’s also
flattering because you’re still in
the profession.”
The conference seems to have
created a cycle consistent with
its self-branded identity as a
“Power Six” league: full of
enough attractive jobs to lure
young talent but not quite prominent enough to compete directly
with the sport’s traditional powers.
AAC Commissioner Mike
Aresco doesn’t mind that the
league is looked at as a steppingstone. To him, the league’s history of sending coaches to jobs in
the Power Five conferences — the
ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pacific-12
and Southeastern — only makes
the AAC more attractive to the
country’s best young football
minds.
That the conference is able to
hire the Norvells and Frosts of
the world sets the AAC on a
different level from its secondtier “Group of Five” brethren, the
Mountain West, Mid-American,
Conference USA and Sun Belt.
That’s what matters to Aresco.
“We’ve been able to hire some
of the finest young coaches in the
country, the top assistants,” Aresco said. “We’re only hiring the
top people . . . and we can pick up
an occasional veteran coach like
[South Florida’s] Charlie Strong.
We have a certain level of coaching, and the coaches’ salaries —
we’re paying coaches that are far
higher than any other school
that’s in the Group of Five.”
Indeed, according to USA Today’s coaches’ salaries database,
AAC coaches are compensated,
on the whole, better than other
coaches from Group of Five
schools. At Houston, Tom Herman was the 35th-highest-paid
coach in the country in 2016,
earning $3 million, before he left
for Texas. Of Group of Five coaches ranked on the list, the top
seven were from the AAC.
The money isn’t a defense
against poaching — the conference simply can’t compete with
what Power Five schools can
offer. Before Fuente went to Virginia Tech, Memphis reportedly
offered him a deal that would
have made him the highest-paid
football coach outside of a Power
Five conference, something that
compared favorably with Herman’s salary.
Fuente left anyway and earned
$3.2 million in his first year in
Blacksburg. He signed a two-year
extension in April.
Still, relatively higher salaries
do help attract bright young
coaching minds. That’s part of
how the AAC has become a
springboard to the Power Five,
along with the location of its
schools in competitive hotbeds
such as Florida, Texas, Ohio and
Louisiana and a general willingness by the AAC’s athletic directors to hand the reins to young
assistant coaches.
Fuente noted that the AAC has
“programs in and around some
really hot places for high school
football talent, and I think
they’ve got some administrators
that are doing their best with
their limited means to make
football important and give
those coaches as many things as
they can give them. I know when
we were at Memphis, we knew
we didn’t have an unlimited
budget, but we also knew we had
an administration that was going
to do whatever they could do to
try and help us out.”
Frost, who was a highly regarded offensive coordinator at
Oregon before making the move
to Central Florida, seconded that
notion. “The university right
here in Orlando, the second-largest university in the country with
a ton of football talent around it,
made this job really attractive to
me and something worth leaving
where I was to come try to take
this program over,” he said.
“I think there’s a lot of those
situations in this conference. I
don’t think there’s any accident
that there’s such good coaching
in the American.”
ava.wallace@washpost.com
After win over Louisville, this may be the year N.C. State doesn’t pack it in
BY
G ENE W ANG
Three months ago during ACC
football media day, Bradley
Chubb fielded a question about
North Carolina State’s identity.
“We just want to be that team
that you don’t want to play,” the
senior defensive end said.
Chubb’s concise answer has
proved prescient on the heels of
the Wolfpack’s fifth consecutive
victory, 39-25 last week against
visiting Louisville, which helped
push N.C. State’s national ranking
to 20th and kept it in step with
No. 2 Clemson atop the ACC Atlantic Division.
A 5-1 mark might not have been
totally unexpected for a group
that returned 16 starters from a
7-6 team. But the demands of its
division — which features defending national champion Clemson,
perennial contender Florida State
and Louisville, led by returning
Heisman Trophy winner Lamar
Jackson — figured to keep N.C.
State locked a notch below. So did
its history.
The Wolfpack has earned a
bowl berth in five of the past six
seasons but lost at least five games
each year. It has never finished a
season ranked higher than No. 12
or won more than 11 games, both
of which it achieved in 2002. In
the 14 full seasons since, its record
was 88-87.
That gives some indication of
the excitement over this season’s
start. The Wolfpack has defeated
two ranked teams in the same
season (No. 12 Florida State on
Sept. 23 and No. 17 Louisville last
week) for the first time since
2006. Its 3-0 start in the ACC is its
best since that 2002 team, which
finished 11-3, began 4-0 in league
play.
“They don’t want to be denied
what they feel like is theirs right
now,” Wolfpack Coach Dave Doeren said of his players. “They’ve
had to learn what the word ‘perseverance’ means. It’s one of our
core values. You don’t just choose
to persevere. You have to have
adversity. You have to have struggle. You have to face your fears,
and to do that you have to grow up
and you’ve got to dig deep.”
N.C. State stared down just
such a challenge when preseason
hopes gave way to a season-opening loss to South Carolina, 35-28,
on Sept. 2 in Charlotte.
Following the game, in which
the Wolfpack doubled up the
Gamecocks in yards but fell short
after reaching the opposing
8-yard line in the final seconds,
Doeren asked his players in the
locker room whether that effort
was the best they could have mustered.
A resounding no was the response.
Offensive players were particularly disappointed in having lost
two fumbles in the opener. They
have committed one turnover
since, and quarterback Ryan Finley has yet to throw an interception. The redshirt senior has been
especially efficient against ranked
opponents, going a combined
42 for 63 (66.7 percent) with
597 yards and three touchdowns
in the matchups with Florida
State and Louisville.
Finley threw for 367 yards
against the Cardinals as N.C. State
rolled up 520 yards of offense and
its second-most points this season. Three players had at least
99 receiving yards: Kelvin Harmon with 133, Jaylen Samuels
with 104 and Stephen Louis with
99.
Nyheim Hines, a do-it-all player for ascending offensive coordinator Eliah Drinkwitz, added
102 rushing yards and two touchdowns on 18 carries.
“We have so many weapons on
offense, and I think it’s just a
matter of executing,” redshirt ju-
nior guard Garrett Bradbury said.
“If Ryan wants to throw for
450 yards a game, he can. If we
want to run the ball for 250 yards
a game, we believe we can.”
With wins over two of its most
prominent foes, a breakthrough
record appears within reach given
what’s left on the Wolfpack’s
schedule, beginning with Saturday afternoon’s game against
Pittsburgh (2-4, 0-2) at Heinz
Field.
The Panthers are one of three
remaining opponents for N.C.
State that has yet to collect a
conference win. The others are
Boston College and North Carolina, a combined 0-6 in the ACC. A
fourth opponent, Wake Forest, is
1-2 in the conference.
But where N.C. State stands
with regard to top contenders
largely will be revealed in roughly
three weeks.
One of the most anticipated
games in program history is set
for Nov. 4, with Clemson visiting
Carter-Finley Stadium.
The reigning national champions became the first school in
college football history to beat
three top-15 opponents in September. Two of those wins came
on the road, most recently a 31-17
victory at No. 12 Virginia Tech on
Sept. 30.
The Wolfpack has lost five in a
row to Clemson, although last
season it forced overtime before
falling, 24-17, at Memorial Stadium. N.C. State committed
13 penalties for 120 yards in that
game, and Finley threw two interceptions.
“We can’t ever think that we’ve
made it, because we haven’t,” said
Doeren, who reportedly is negotiating a contract extension. We’re
at the halfway point right now,
and we want to continue this ride,
and the only way to do that is to
improve.”
gene.wang@washpost.com
KLMNO
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2017
.
PAGE D5
EZ
GAME 1
GAME 2
GAME 3
GAME 4
GAME 5
at Washington
Chicago 3, Washington 0
at Washington
Washington 6, Chicago 3
at Chicago
Chicago 2, Washington 1
at Chicago
Washington 5, Chicago 0
at Washington
Chicago 9, Washington 8
M2
TONI L. SANDYS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Cubs shortstop Addison Russell scores during a wild fifth inning Thursday while Nationals catcher Matt Wieters argues with umpire Jerry Lane that he was interfered with on the play.
An excruciating turn of events
BY
J ORGE C ASTILLO
Max Scherzer shed his red pullover in the
Washington Nationals’ bullpen at 9:36 p.m.
on Thursday. It was time to warm up on a
nippy night. He initiated his preparation with
light throws, slowly extending the distance
and increasing the intensity until he was
crow hopping from the side. He then began
throwing out of his windup off one of the two
mounds beyond the wall in right field.
He emerged from the bullpen at 9:52 for
his first relief appearance since the 2013
American League Division Series, when he
was a member of the Detroit Tigers. He was
announced a minute later to booming cheers
as a disturbing graphic — zeroed in on his
blue eye and brown eye — flickered on the
video board. It was the fifth inning. The
Nationals held a one-run lead, and they were
turning to their best pitcher — a 33-year-old
right-hander who has made a strong case for
a second straight National League Cy Young
Award — to shut down the Chicago Cubs for a
couple innings three days after he delivered a
gritty performance in Game 3 at Wrigley
Field.
What ensued was the most bizarre and
excruciating meltdown in Nationals postseason history, a series of unfortunate events
that paved the way for a 9-8 season-ending
Game 5 loss.
Scherzer began his night by retiring Kris
Bryant and Anthony Rizzo — the Cubs’ most
dangerous hitters — on six pitches for two
quick outs. He was attacking the strike zone,
How the inning unfolded
Game 5 of the Nationals-Cubs NLDS turned in a four-run top of the fifth inning that included an
intentional walk, a hitter reaching on a passed ball after a strikeout, catcher interference and a
hit by pitch. According to baseball-reference.com, which has 2.73 million half-innings in its
database, those four events had never happened in a single inning.
Top of the fifth, Nationals leading 4-3, Max Scherzer pitching in relief:
Kris Bryant grounds out to SS for first out. Anthony Rizzo hits flyball to CF for second out.
Willson Contreras singles. Ben Zobrist singles, Contreras to second.
Addison Russell doubles, Contreras scores, Zobrist scores. (Cubs lead, 5-4)
Jason Heyward intentionally walks.
Javier Baez strikes out swinging. Ball gets away from C Matt Wieters, who commits an error on
throw to first. Russell scores, Heyward to third, Baez to second. (Cubs lead, 6-4)
Tommy La Stella reaches on catcher interference, loading bases.
Jon Jay hit by pitch. Heyward scores. (Cubs lead, 7-4)
Bryant pops out to shortstop for third out.
22
Half-innings when three of these events
occurred
touching 98 mph on the radar gun. He was a
suped-up Max Scherzer, and the tight right
hamstring that delayed his postseason debut
was long forgotten. Then he and the Nationals crumbled.
First, Willson Contreras legged out an
infield single and pinch-hitter Ben Zobrist
blooped a single to left field. Addison Russell
5
Instances when all four of these occurred
in a single game.
then pounced on the first pitch he saw — an
85-mph change-up — and hit a groundball
that tugged along the third-base line, just
inside the bag and out of a diving Anthony
Rendon’s reach. Contreras and Zobrist
scored. The Cubs had a 5-4 lead. It would
grow with a stranger sequence of events.
After Jayson Heyward was intentionally
walked, Scherzer struck out the free-swinging Javier Baez on three pitches, finishing
him off with a slider. It should have been the
third out. But the ball bounced past catcher
Matt Wieters, and instead of eating it,
Wieters hurled a rushed throw into right field
trying to throw Baez out at first base. The
strikeout-passed-ball-E2 combination allowed Russell to score and moved Baez to
second base.
But Wieters immediately began pleading
his case to umpires for interference, claiming
Baez’s backswing hit him. He had a case, but
umpire Jerry Lane, the crew chief and also
the game’s home plate umpire, assembled his
group to discuss the matter. Nationals Manager Dusty Baker emerged to share his take to
no avail. The crew decided not to change the
call. Interference isn’t a reviewable play. The
ruling stood.
Fittingly, Tommy La Stella, pinch-hitting
for pitcher Kyle Hendricks, was then awarded
first base for catcher interference to load the
bases before Scherzer plunked Jon Jay with a
1-1 cutter. Heyward scored to make it 7-4.
Scherzer finally secured that elusive out,
getting Bryant, the reigning NL MVP, to hit a
pop fly on his 28th pitch. Bryant and Rizzo
combined to go 0 for 3 in the inning. The
other seven Cubs batters reached base on
three hits, an intentional walk, a strikeout,
and a hit by pitch. The Nationals gave the ball
to Scherzer with great confidence. They were
going with their best. They went down with it
in the most inexplicable of ways.
jorge.castillo@washpost.com
Missed call amid all the chaos was painful for Nationals in the fifth
BY
A DAM K ILGORE
In the middle of the catastrophic fifth
inning that threatened to sink the Washington Nationals’ season Thursday night, an
apparently missed call severely worsened the
damage at a pivotal moment of Game 5 of the
National League Division Series against the
Chicago Cubs.
The Cubs scored a run on a two-out
strikeout and continued to rally until they led
by three. But the umpires either missed a call
or misinterpreted a non-reviewable rule that,
legislated correctly, would have ended the
inning with the Nationals trailing by only a
run.
With two outs and runners on first and
second, Javier Baez swung and missed at Max
Scherzer’s 0-2 slider in the dirt. The ball
skidded through catcher Matt Wieters’s legs
to the backstop. Wieters scampered to retrieve the ball and fired a panicked, wide
throw to first base. Addison Russell scored
from second, extending the Cubs’ lead to 6-4.
The Cubs would tack on another run after a
catcher’s interference call and a hit batsman
concluded a remarkable chain of events.
When the inning ended, the Cubs led 7-4.
But when Baez swung, his backswing
appeared to hit Wieters in the mask. If so,
Baez should have been out, under rule
6.03(a). The pertinent section of the rule
states:
“If a batter strikes at a ball and misses and
swings so hard he carries the bat all the way
around and, in the umpire’s judgment, unintentionally hits the catcher or the ball in back
of him on the backswing, it shall be called a
strike only (not interference). The ball will be
dead, however, and no runner shall advance
on the play.”
Wieters gestured at umpires after the play
unfolded. The crew, led by crew chief and
home plate umpire Jerry Layne, met in the
infield. Manager Dusty Baker walked out to
talk with the umpires. At the end of the
discussion, the result of the play stood.
Under MLB challenge rules, catcher interference is not listed as a reviewable play. An
MLB official confirmed that play cannot be
challenged.
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
D6
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THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Nationals’ Trea Turner is tagged out by Cubs catcher Willson Contreras at the plate in the first inning Thursday night. Turner was trying to score on a grounder to second base by Bryce Harper.
THOMAS BOSWELL
A painful finish, as they always are, but there was something di≠erent this time
BOSWELL FROM D1
Nats trailing 7-4, a deficit from
which they tried, time after
grimly time, to escape, with rally
after heart-stopping rally. But
never did.
The Nats lost because two of
those runs off Scherzer were
unearned because Matt Wieters,
a four-time all-star catcher
known for his soft hands and
glovework, turned into a oneman circus act at the worst
possible time. Wieters, the
brainy fellow from Georgia Tech,
the calm center of every team on
which he has played, suddenly
found himself spinning like dirty
laundry in the tumble cycle.
First, in Scherzer’s one bizarre
frame, Wieters committed a
passed ball on a third strike to
Javier Baez that should have
ended that nightmare of a fifth
inning. Just an instant after
missing that pitch in the dirt,
Wieters chased the ball toward
the backstop but threw wildly to
first base as a run scored.
As if caught in a vortex of
exactly the kind of mistakes the
cerebral Wieters never makes,
the Nats catcher then committed
one of the game’s oddest and
rarest sins: catcher interference.
With his head perhaps
swimming, Wieters allowed his
glove to flick the swinging bat of
pinch-hitter Tommy La Stella to
load the bases. Scherzer, perhaps
wondering what parallel
universe of horrors had
swallowed him, hit the next
batter in the foot with a pitch.
There are endless twists in any
high-scoring morass of thrilling,
brain-twisting detail. But the
idea of a season-ending loss
coming on a margin that was
created by poor pitching from
Scherzer and hallucinogenic
defense by Wieters staggers even
the baseball imagination. And
the baseball imagination has
been staggered, stretched,
folded, spindled and mutilated
for generations.
The Nats also lost because,
once again in Game 5 of a
Division Series, just as in 2012,
starting pitcher Gio Gonzalez
came up small. The first man he
faced doubled and scored. He
barely escaped the first inning,
leaving the bases loaded. And
presented with a 4-1 lead
entering the third inning, thanks
to a solo homer by Daniel
Murphy and a three-run blast by
Michael A. Taylor — making it
two homers in as many at-bats,
for a tidy seven RBI after his
grand slam Wednesday in
Chicago — Gonzalez handed
back two runs immediately. Gio,
supposedly the new, improved
and more mature Gio, aided the
Cubs with two of his four walks
in that inning, plus a wild pitch
that sent home a run.
The Nats even lost because
Jayson Werth, 38 and playing
probably his last game as a
National, misjudged a line drive
that he should have caught so
badly that he never even touched
it, gifting Addison Russell with
an RBI double.
Finally, as the Nats mounted a
two-on, two-out rally in the
bottom of the eighth against
tiring closer Wade Davis, who
was being asked to get the final
seven outs, the vagaries, or some
would say viciousness of the
sport jumped up one last time.
With Trea Turner, who already
had two hits, at the plate,
Willson Contreras tried to catch
Jose Lobaton, the Nats catcher,
off first base. Contreras is
famous for the move, and
Lobaton beat the play back to
the bag — clearly.
But in the new world of
baseball challenges and replays,
doing things that would have
been satisfactory since the 19th
century is no longer good
enough. Lobaton’s foot came off
the base for an instant. The Cubs
challenged. And he was ruled
“out” after the crowd of 43,849
waited in agony for 96 seconds.
All of this will remain one
long, blurred, gruesome memory
all winter, and perhaps longer,
because the heretofore
somnolent Nats offense did its
job, battering out 14 hits. But
rally after rally died just short.
In Chicago, some may say,
“The Nats crumbled, just like we
said they would.” Although I
actually doubt anybody in
Chicago is that cruel or that
oblivious to how closely matched
these teams were and how
fortunate the winner —
whichever it had been — would
have to be.
Few games are the true sage
that this one evolved into over
several hours.
Baseball at its best is living
theater where the blood on the
stage, even if it is merely the
blood of broken hearts, and the
heroism, even if it is just poise
under pressure with millions
watching, has the added power
of being real with a plot that is
undetermined and often
impacted by events that bend
credibility.
Nationals Park on a chilly,
moody night was just such living
theater, performed by the Cubs
and Nationals before a standing
room audience, rowdier than
any at Shakespeare’s Globe, full
to the top rows with red-clad
fans who would have paid a
princely ransom just to know the
last act — who lived, who died
and how — before the first act
ever began.
But this was a baseball play in
which even the number of acts
was unknown. Before the game,
with a trip to Los Angeles to play
the Dodgers in the National
League Championship Series as
a prize, few would have
imagined that, before the game’s
midpoint, there would have been
a half-dozen distinct and
blatantly melodramatic acts.
This shameless torturing of the
emotions had the crowd, more
than 90 percent Nationalists,
swinging between early
fretfulness to elation to
mounting concern to delight at
the appearance of their favorite
prince to disconsolate shock at
his undoing.
Perhaps this night would have
been much different if stolid
combative Tanner Roark had
been named the starting pitcher
rather than the more talented,
but mercurial, sometimes-rattled
Gonzalez.
However, Manager Dusty
Baker picked Gonzalez, and for
admittedly theatrical reasons.
“Gio had a Game 5 a couple years
ago and didn’t do too well,”
Baker said. “So I’m sure
redemption is on his mind as
well.”
Didn’t do well? Given a 6-0
lead, Gonzalez, who was then a
21-game winner and a much
more powerful pitcher then than
now, came apart quickly, giving
back half of the lead, largely due
to four walks, in just five innings.
Much the same, in fact worse,
befell him in this Game 5. His
second pitch was lashed into
right field for a double by Jon
Jay. Gonzalez sent him to third
with a wild pitch worthy of those
that beaned the bull mascot in
“Bull Durham.” He might as well
have help up a sign: “Dusty, pay
close attention.”
The third Cub drove home Jay
with a groundout and before this
kindergarten finger-painting
mess of a first inning was over,
the Cubs had loaded the bases
but let Gonzalez escape when
Jason Heyward grounded out.
The next act, the perfect
counterpoint, was one of the best
eruptions the Nats offense has
ever had in postseason. Murphy,
emerging from a series-long
slump, smashed Kyle Hendricks’
first pitch of the second inning
deep into the right-centerfield
bleachers. That “crack” was like
a call to arms for a Nats offense
that had scored just 12 runs in
four games and was batting .140.
The next few minutes, relish
them because winters are long,
were the highlight of the night
for the Nats and the kind of
classy outburst that often
establishes a sort of territorial
dominance in October winnertake-all games.
Anthony Rendon singled to
center, then Wieters, who has
been hitting under .200 since the
all-star break and an easy-toremember .000 against the Cubs
in this series, performed the act
of a desperate man to perfection.
A long and distinguished of
squatting and crouching as a
four-time all-star catcher has left
him the slowest man on the Nats
and perhaps in entire quadrants
of the District. Teams “give him
the bunt” because he could only
beat out an ideal one.
So Wieters easily beat out a
bunt that rolled dead a foot from
the third base line. Such
unexpected twists excite both a
crowd and a team. The next
hitter was Taylor who, in his
previous at-bat in Game 4 in
Chicago had hit a victory-icing
grand slam through a stiff wind
off elite Cubs reliever Wade
Davis.
On the third pitch from
Hendricks, a cap-high fastball on
an 0-2 pitch designed to get
Taylor to chase, Michael A.
delivered the Nats’ best shock of
the night — a three-run rocket of
a home run deep into the
Washington bullpen in left field.
The Nats led 4-1.
How many punches could
Chicago take? Turns out, the
Cubs were playing rope-a-dope,
and the crazy fifth inning put the
Nationals on the canvas.
That devil-sent inning put the
Cubs in front, and hard as the
Nats battled to pull even, they
never made it.
All defeats are not created
equal. This one, because of all
the bizarre, self-inflicted
mistakes and weird
misadventures that befell the
Nats, will be seen as just as
painful as their exits in the same
round in 2012, 2014 and 2016.
The game was there to be won in
a dozen ways. But this defeat
also had a redoubtable dignity, a
defiance about it that any team
can, after coming out from under
its bed in about a month, can
appreciate.
If you have to lose, making
43,000 people stand and scream
for nearly five hours — and
turning plenty of them into
baseball believers in the process
— isn’t the worst way to expire.
thomas.boswell@washpost.com
For more by Thomas Boswell, visit
washingtonpost.com/boswell.
BEST & WORST
Best matchup
Worst struggle
Unlike last year, when
Wilmer Difo made the
final out of the
Nationals’ season
against Clayton
Kershaw in Game 5 of
the NLDS, Bryce
Harper stepped into
the batter’s box with
Washington trailing by
a run and down to its
final out against the
Cubs. Harper worked
the count full before
striking out against
Wade Davis, who
finished an incredible
seven-out save and
sent the Nationals to
their fourth NLDS loss
in as many
appearances.
Davis never threw
more than 34 pitches
in any outing during
the regular season. He
took the mound in the
ninth inning having
thrown 27 pitches in
11/3 innings and
needing three outs to
preserve a one-run
lead against the top of
the Nationals’ order.
Best
performance
Davis fell behind Trea
Turner 3-1 but kept the
Nationals’ speedy
leadoff hitter off the
bases by getting him
to fly out for the first
out. In what was likely
his final at-bat as a
National, Jayson
Werth swung through
a 2-2 fastball for out
No. 2.
Worst replay
With Michael A. Taylor
representing the tying
run at second base
and Turner up to bat
after a Jose Lobaton
single, the Cubs
caught a huge break
with the aid of replay
review. Catcher
Willson Contreras
fired behind Lobaton
after Turner took
Davis’s third pitch for
a ball, and while
Lobaton got back to
the bag in time, replay
showed that his foot
came off the base for
a split-second as
Anthony Rizzo applied
the tag. Umpires
initially ruled Lobaton
safe but called him
out to end the inning
after the Cubs
challenged.
Worst
TOOTBLAN
The replay review was
brutal, but Lobaton
had no business
taking such a big
secondary lead
against a catcher who
isn’t afraid to make
snap throws like
Contreras. (For the
uninitiated, that’s
Thrown Out On the
Bases Like a
Nincompoop.)
Worst first
playoff out
Davis got two outs on
huge outs earlier in
the eighth on a
curveball that
Nationals pinch-hitter
Adam Lind, who was 2
for 2 in the first
postseason of his
career, hit into a 5-4-3
double play.
Best inning
The Nationals scored
nine of their 12 runs in
the first four games of
the series in the
eighth inning. They
added one more
Thursday on Taylor’s
two-out single up the
middle to score Daniel
Murphy and cut the
Cubs’ lead to 9-8.
Best drama
With one out and the
Nationals trailing 9-6
in the seventh inning,
Harper stepped into
the batter’s box
against Jose Quintana
representing the goahead run. Unlike
Game 2, when he got
every bit of a Carl
Edwards Jr. pitch on a
game-tying home run,
Harper just missed
mashing a Quintana
curveball, but his
sacrifice fly to center
pulled the Nats within
two runs.
Worst sight
The Cubs mounted a
two-out rally against
reigning National
League Cy Young
Award winner Max
Scherzer. After singles
from Willson Conteras
and pinch-hitter Ben
Zobrist, Addison
Russell doubled into
the left field corner to
score both runners
and give the Cubs a 54 lead. The Nationals
Park crowd was
stunned.
Worst error
The Nationals should
have been out of the
inning when Scherzer
struck out Javier Baez
with two men on two
batters later, but
strike three went
between Matt Wieters
legs, and the catcher’s
ill-advised, off-target
throw to first base
rolled into shallow
right field. Russell
scored on the play.
Worst
meltdown
The Cubs would tack
on yet another run
after catcher’s
interference on
Wieters during Tommy
La Stella’s at-bat
loaded the bases
again and Scherzer
plunked Jon Jay with a
slider. By the time Kris
Bryant’s pop up
settled into Turner’s
glove to end the
inning, the Cubs had
pushed across four
runs to take a 7-4
lead.
Worst timing
“It may have been the
ugliest inning the
Nationals have played
all season long,” TBS
analyst Ron Darling
said of the top of the
fifth. Without
question, it was.
— Scott Allen
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D7
M2
PHOTOS BY JONATHAN NEWTON/THE WASHINGTON POST
Nationals center fielder Michael A. Taylor, who hit a grand slam in Game 4 of the National League Division Series against the Cubs, smacked a three-run homer in the second inning of Game 5 on Thursday.
Nationals again head into o≠season searching for answers
NATIONALS FROM D1
from their shiny new trio of
relievers to vanquish all the
demons.
The
demons
vanquished them instead.
They scored eight runs on
14 hits, including homers from
Daniel Murphy and Michael A.
Taylor and multi-hit nights from
Jayson Werth and Bryce Harper.
But Ryan Zimmerman, who had
seemingly shed his Cubs
complex, left seven men on base
at moments when the Nationals
desperately needed them. The
Nationals left 13 men on base in
all.
Two of those men, including
the tying run, were left there in
the eighth when Lobaton got
picked off first base. He was
ruled safe initially. The Cubs
challenged. He got back to the
bag, the video replay showed, but
his foot came off it for a moment,
the
prototypical
Nationals
playoff moment. But Lobaton
was not the only victim of
October’s D.C. vengeance.
The evening also victimized
Scherzer, whose charge in from
the bullpen was the stuff of
legend and whose collapse was
the stuff of something far more
sinister. The Cubs staged a twoout, four-run rally built on an
infield single, a bloop hit, a
groundball double, an error, an
intentional walk, a catcher’s
interference and a hit by pitch to
turn a one-run lead into a
three-run deficit on Scherzer’s
watch.
He could pitch 10 years more
and never throw an inning filled
with a such a compilation of
calamity. He will spend the next
12 months thinking about that
inning, waiting for a chance to
redeem himself again.
This is the life of the
Nationals, a vicious and
unrelenting cycle of waiting,
then winning, then losing in the
playoffs — a cycle that
demolishes
faith
as
it
undermines all that they have
achieved. They have won their
division four times in six years.
They have won 95 or more games
four times in six years. And at
this point, none of that seems to
mean much at all.
The Nationals have now lost
all four games they have played
with a chance to advance. Dusty
Baker-managed teams have now
lost 10 straight games in which
they could have advanced.
Who knows why it happened
again Thursday, or why it has
happened before, or what will
finally make it stop happening.
But this team now faces another
winter spent wondering how the
most talented team in their
history could go the way of all the
others.
Hope is what makes the whole
thing hurt more. Baker’s teams
had lost nine straight playoff
games in which they could have
advanced, and yet he entered
this October like any other —
expecting
good,
whatever
anyone said. He has yet to win a
World Series as manager and is
not under contract next season.
When starting pitcher Gio
Gonzalez struggled through
three innings, Baker got him out,
then brought in his ace, choosing
the unorthodoxy that has
become the new October
orthodox. Some wondered if he
would.
As it happened, that Scherzer
inning was the pivot point, the
moment — which feels like an
inevitable
component
of
Nationals’ elimination games —
at which all the good that came
before slides into oblivion.
After Gonzalez left after three
innings with a one-run lead and
Matt Albers threw a perfect
fourth, debacle arrived in the
form of a two-out rally that
pivoted on a strike-three pitch
from Scherzer that bounced
through catcher Matt Wieters’s
Cubs 9, Nationals 8
Washington ace Max Scherzer pitched the fifth inning, allowing
four runs, including two earned, three hits and one walk.
legs. Javy Baez’s backswing hit
Wieters, which slowed his
pursuit of the ball. Wieters
eventually threw wide to first
base, which allowed one run to
score and runners to advance to
second and third.
Major league rules dictate that
if a batter’s backswing hits the
catcher with two strikes, he is out
and no one advances. Home
plate umpire Jerry Layne did not
appear to see the swing, because
he did not make a call. The
inning continued, and Scherzer
allowed four runs, two of them
earned. He allowed four or more
runs five times all season.
But the Nationals charged
back, thanks in part to Werth
reaching base four times. Werth’s
Nationals teams had never
advanced to the World Series,
but he hoped for better. He
hoped publicly, explicitly, saying
that the success of his
transformative Nationals tenure
would
depend
on
what
happened this year.
Baker struck with Werth
despite the fact that he had
struggled all series, bet on the
man with the long playoff track
record instead of the numbers.
Werth doubled, singled and hit a
line drive to deep center to move
a runner.
He also slid right by a line
drive right at him that turned
into an RBI double. A few fans
booed him when he stepped to
bat for one of his final Nationals
Park at-bats. If happy endings
were earned, Werth and Baker
would get them. But happy
endings, it seems, are given —
and never to anyone in a
Nationals uniform.
Because when the Nationals
battled back against the Cubs
bullpen, when Lobaton seemed
to slide harmlessly back into first
CHICAGO
AB
Jay lf-cf..........................4
Davis p ...........................0
Bryant 3b .......................5
Rizzo 1b .........................5
Contreras c ....................3
Almora cf .......................1
Zobrist ph-lf ..................2
Russell ss ......................4
Heyward rf.....................4
Baez 2b ..........................5
Hendricks p....................2
La Stella ph....................0
Duensing p.....................0
Strop p ...........................0
Montgomery p ...............0
Schwarber ph.................1
Edwards p ......................0
Quintana p .....................0
Martin cf........................1
TOTALS
37
R
1
0
1
0
2
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
9
H
2
0
1
0
1
1
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
9
WASHINGTON
AB
Turner ss........................6
Werth lf .........................4
Harper rf ........................4
Zimmerman 1b ..............4
Murphy 2b .....................3
Rendon 3b......................3
Wieters c .......................4
Madson p .......................0
Lind ph ...........................1
Doolittle p......................0
Taylor cf.........................4
Gonzalez p .....................1
Albers p .........................0
Robles ph .......................1
Scherzer p......................0
Kintzler p .......................0
Difo ph ...........................1
Solis p ............................0
Lobaton c .......................2
TOTALS
38
R H
0 2
1 2
1 2
0 0
2 2
1 1
1 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 1
8 14
HOW THEY SCORED
BI BB SO AVG
1 0 1 .273
0 0 0
--1 0 1 .200
1 0 1 .200
0 2 0 .214
0 1 0 .333
0 1 0 .235
4 1 1 .222
0 1 2 .167
0 0 2 .000
0 0 1 .000
0 0 0
--0 0 0
--0 0 0
--0 0 0
--0 0 0 .200
0 0 0
--0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
7 6 9
—
BI BB SO
0 0 2
0 2 1
1 1 1
0 1 3
2 2 1
0 2 0
0 0 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
4 1 1
0 0 1
0 0 0
0 0 1
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
7 9 12
AVG
.143
.167
.211
.150
.211
.176
.143
--.667
--.333
.000
--.000
.000
--.000
--.500
—
0
9
CHICAGO ...................... 102
041
100
—
9
WASHINGTON ............. 040
002
110
—
8 142
E: Wieters 2 (2). LOB: Chicago 9, Washington 13. 2B:
Jay (2), Bryant (2), Russell 2 (2), Werth (1), Harper
(1), Murphy (1). HR: Murphy (1), off Hendricks; Taylor
(2), off Hendricks. RBI: Jay (1), Bryant (2), Rizzo (6),
Russell 4 (4), Harper (3), Murphy 2 (2), Taylor 4 (8).
SB: Turner (1). SF: Harper.
DP: Chicago 1 (Baez, Russell, Rizzo).
CHICAGO
IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Hendricks ....................4 9 4 4 1 7 81 3.27
Duensing ..................0.2 0 0 0 1 1 19 0.00
Strop............................1 0 1 1 1 1 16 2.70
Montgomery.............0.1 2 1 1 2 0 14 27.0
Edwards.......................0 0 1 1 1 0
5 23.1
Quintana ..................0.2 1 0 0 1 0 12 0.00
Davis ........................2.1 2 1 1 2 3 44 4.15
WASHINGTON
IP
Gonzalez ......................3
Albers ..........................1
Scherzer ......................1
Kintzler........................1
Solis..........................0.1
Madson.....................1.2
Doolittle ......................1
H
3
0
3
1
2
0
0
R ER BB SO NP ERA
3 3 4 5 67 6.75
0 0 0 0 16 0.00
4 2 1 1 28 3.68
1 1 1 0 23 5.40
1 1 0 0 12 9.00
0 0 0 1 19 2.25
0 0 0 2 13 0.00
WP: Duensing, (1-0); LP: Scherzer, (0-1); S: Davis, (3).
Edwards pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scored: Strop 1-0, Montgomery 1-1,
Quintana 1-1, Davis 2-0, Madson 2-1. HBP: Scherzer
(Jay). WP: Gonzalez 2, Montgomery. PB: Wieters (1).
T: 4:37. A: 43,849 (41,418).
base with the tying run on
second, the call was overturned.
His foot came inches off the bag
as Anthony Rizzo held the tag.
CUBS FIRST
Jay doubles. On wild pitch, Jay to third. Bryant strikes
out. Rizzo grounds out. Jay scores. Contreras walks.
Almora singles. Contreras to third. Russell walks. Almora to second. Jason Heyward grounds out.
Cubs 1, Nationals 0
NATIONALS SECOND
Murphy homers. Rendon singles. Wieters singles .
Rendon to second. Taylor homers.Wieters scores. Rendon scores. Gonzalez strikes out. Turner strikes out.
Werth doubles. Harper is intentionally walked. Ryan
Zimmerman strikes out.
Nationals 4, Cubs 1
CUBS THIRD
Bryant doubles. Rizzo called out on strikes. Contreras
walks. Almora walks. Contreras to second. Bryant to
third. Russell grounds out. Almora to second. Contreras to third. Bryant scores. On wild pitch, Contreras
scores. Jason Heyward strikes out.
Nationals 4, Cubs 3
CUBS FIFTH
Bryant grounds ou. Rizzo flies out. Contreras singles.
Zobrist singles. Contreras to second. Russell doubles.
Zobrist scores. Contreras scores. Heyward is intentionally walked. On passed ball, Heyward to third. Addison
Russell scores. Baez reaches on third strike, advances
to 2nd. Heyward to third. Russell scores. Throwing error by Wieters. La Stella pinch-hitting for Hendricks.
Interference error by Wieters.Jay hit by pitch. La Stella
to second. Baez to third. Jason Heyward scores. Bryant
pops out.
Cubs 7, Nationals 4
CUBS SIXTH
Rizzo grounds out. Contreras grounds out. Zobrist
walks. Russell doubles. Ben Zobrist scores. Jason Heyward flies out.
Cubs 8, Nationals 4
NATIONALS SIXTH
Difo grounds out. Turner grounds out. Werth walks.
Harper doubles. Werth to third. On wild pitch, Harper
to third. Werth scores. Zimmerman walks. Murphy
doubles. Zimmerman to third. Harper scores. Rendon is
intentionally walked. Wieters flies out.
Cubs 8, Nationals 6
CUBS SEVENTH
Baez grounds out. Schwarber singles. Jay singles. Kyle
Schwarber to third. Jay out at second. Kyle Schwarber
scores. Rizzo grounds out.
Cubs 9, Nationals 6
NATIONALS SEVENTH
Taylor walks. Lobaton flies out. Turner singles. Taylor
to second. Werth walks. Turner to second. Taylor to
third. Harper out on a sacrifice fly. Michael Taylor
scores. Zimmerman strikes out.
Cubs 9, Nationals 7
NATIONALS EIGHTH
Murphy walks. Rendon walks. Murphy to second. Lind
grounds out to second base. Rendon out at second.
Murphy to third. Taylor singles. Murphy scores. Lobaton singles. Taylor to second. With Turner batting, Lobaton picked off.
Cubs 9, Nationals 8
This is the margin by which the
Nationals fell, the margin
between being labeled as
chokers and throttling the
demons.
Over and over, again and
again, they are so close. Over and
over, again and again, they
provide reason to believe. Once
again, a season full of hope left
only deafening silence on South
Capitol Street, and scolded
anyone who had hoped before
for doing so again.
chelsea.janes@washpost.com
NATIONALS NOTES
Excerpted from
washingtonpost.com/nationals
Taylor’s grand slam
in Game 4 was rare
Michael A. Taylor’s opposite-field
grand slam off Wade Davis in the
eighth inning Wednesday at
Wrigley Field gave the Nationals
some breathing room in an
elimination game they had led,
to that point, 1-0.
Taylor’s into-the-wind blast,
which came on the five-year
anniversary of Jayson Werth’s
walk-off homer in Game 4 of the
2012 National League Division
Series against the Cardinals, is
probably the second-most
memorable in team history and
helped Washington force a
decisive Game 5.
Nationals Manager Dusty
Baker said he was surprised the
ball landed in the basket that
juts out above the ivy-covered
right field wall.
“I didn’t think any righthanded hitter could hit that ball
out of the ballpark like he did
tonight,” Baker said.
The Elias Sports Bureau noted
Taylor joined his manager
among the four players who have
hit a postseason grand slam after
entering the at-bat without an
extra-base hit or RBI in their
playoff careers. The other two:
Troy O’Leary for the Red Sox in
1999 and Eddie Perez for the
Braves in 1998.
Baker’s grand slam came for
the Dodgers during his 10th
season, in Game 2 of the 1977
National League Championship
Series against the Phillies. Bill
Russell and Reggie Smith led off
the fourth inning of a 1-1 game
with singles before Dodgers
Manager Tommy Lasorda asked
his No. 4 hitter, Ron Cey, to bunt.
Cey moved Russell and Smith
into scoring position with a
successful sacrifice, and Phillies
pitcher Jim Lonborg walked the
next batter, Steve Garvey, to load
the bases. The Dodgers then got
four runs on one swing.
The Dodgers went on to win,
7-1, to even the best-of-five series.
Los Angeles won the next two
games to advance to the World
Series, where they lost to the
Yankees in six games. Baker was
named MVP of the NLCS after
hitting .357 with two home runs
and eight RBI.
Device check was okay
When video appeared to show a
member of the Cubs using an
electronic watch in the dugout
during Game 4, social media
began buzzing.
Was another team using
technology for an edge? Was a
team really that bold after all the
recent controversy surrounding
the new cheating frontier?
The clip caught Major League
Baseball’s attention. After
investigating the matter, the
league concluded rules were not
violated. According to a person
with knowledge of the situation,
the league examined the device
and the coach’s phone, which
wasn’t in the dugout, after the
game and found it wasn’t
connected to the Internet. The
league decided it was a mistake.
MLB investigated Arizona
Coach Ariel Prieto after a
photograph showed him
wearing an electronic watch
during Arizona’s 11-8 wild-card
victory over Colorado. MLB
found Prieto innocent of using
the technology to gain an
advantage, but it still fined
Arizona and Prieto for wearing
“an illegal electronic device in
the dugout.”
Wednesday’s clip showed a
Cubs player or coach tapping an
electronic watch twice, then
covering it with the sleeve of his
hooded sweatshirt.
MLB prohibits the use of
electronics connected to the
Internet during games. The rule
surfaced in August when the
New York Yankees accused the
Boston Red Sox of using an
Apple Watch to relay signs from
a clubhouse monitor to the
dugout and, ultimately, the
hitter. Commissioner Rob
Manfred fined the Red Sox an
undisclosed amount and warned
teams that future penalties
would be harsher.
— Scott Allen and Adam Kilgore
D8
EZ
THE WASHINGTON POST
M2
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13 , 2017
Bullpen is armed to take the young Yankees all the way
BY
A DAM K ILGORE
cleveland — The New York Yan-
kees of the mid- to late 1990s have
acquired their own mythology.
Derek Jeter and Mariano Rivera
and Jorge Posada and the rest of
those dynastic Yankees seem,
through the lens of the present, to
have emerged fully formed as a
colossus.
Brian Cashman has a different
perspective because he witnessed
them come together. “That team,”
Cashman said, “was young, too, at
one point.”
The common refrain has it that
the current Yankees have arrived
ahead of schedule. Maybe that’s
true in part. For Cashman and for
the rest of the Yankees, both the
Baby Bombers and ancient pinstripers such as CC Sabathia and
Brett Gardner, they have arrived —
period. They’re here, among the
final four teams standing in a season flush with uncommonly great
teams, with a sole expectation:
While they have a chance, win the
World Series.
“ ‘Arriving early’ implies some
guarantee of arriving in the future,” Cashman said. “I’ve been
around the block long enough to
know, listen, you just seize the
moment.”
The Yankees will not face the
Houston Astros in the American
League Championship Series as
wide-eyed overachievers. They
leave their stunning comeback
from a 2-0 series deficit capped by
their 5-2 victory in Game 5 of the
AL Division Series over the Cleveland Indians as a threat to hoist
the trophy. They have a powerful
lineup, a blend of robust youth
and gutty experience and, most
important, a bullpen that will not
quit.
The bullpen makes the Yankees
perhaps the most dangerous team
remaining. In six postseason
games, the bullpen has performed
miracles. It recorded 26 outs and
allowed one run after the Yankees
fell behind 3-0 before starter Luis
Severino could record the second
out in the wild-card game against
Minnesota. It closed out Game 5
with 42/3 scoreless innings.
Yankees relievers have allowed
10 earned runs in 291/3 innings
while striking out 42 in this postseason. Remove the ill-fated performance of Chad Green in
JASON MILLER/GETTY IMAGES
Right-hander David Robertson is a key part of a Yankees bullpen
that has racked up 42 strikeouts in 291/3 postseason innings.
Game 2 of the ALDS, when a phantom hit-by-pitch call victimized
him, and the Yankees’ bullpen has
a 2.17 ERA with 13.03 strikeouts
per nine innings.
“They get a lead, man, they’re
capable of going as far as they
want,” Indians outfielder Jay
Bruce said. “You kind of feel who-
ever gets to the bullpen with a lead
first is in pretty good shape.”
“It’s incredible,” Sabathia said.
“It’s the best I’ve ever seen. We’ve
got four or five closers down
there.”
The Yankees qualified for the
playoffs as a wild card, but they are
part of the raft of “superteams,” to
use Cashman’s phrase, dominating the playoffs. The Yankees finished the season with the secondbest run differential in baseball,
behind only the Indians, and won
91 games.
The Yankees are cast in these
playoffs as an upstart. They sold
off Andrew Miller, Aroldis Chapman, Carlos Beltran and Brian McCann and shed Alex Rodriguez
last season. But they re-signed
Chapman in free agency, and
when young stars Aaron Judge
and Gary Sanchez led the Yankees
to a strong start, Cashman added
reinforcements, dealing prospects
for Todd Frazier, Tommy Kahnle
and David Robertson.
By the end of the season, they
mixed experience and huge talent
that had matured quickly with a
monstrous bullpen. Their starting
pitching surged in the ALDS, with
inconsistent Masahiro Tanaka
throwing bowling-ball splitters,
Severino bouncing back in Game 4
and Sabathia whiffing five in
Game 5. If their starters continue
to pitch into even the middle innings, they can beat the Astros.
“They have a lot of talent,” Miller said. “They have a pocketbook
that they can go out and get things
that make them better. I was there
in spring training. I saw it. They
were talented.”
“Nobody really expected us to
be here,” Gardner said. “In spring
training, I think we were expected
to be about a .500 team and [have]
a rebuilding year. I think everybody kind of wrote us off early.
We’ve got a couple veteran guys on
the team, but a lot of these young
guys have just arrived on the
scene.”
It is difficult to recognize the
start of something as it happens,
to pinpoint a beginning without
the benefit of hindsight. But
Wednesday felt like one of those
moments. The Yankees have so
much talent that they could knock
off the 102-win Indians even with
Judge, their MVP candidate, setting a record by striking out
16 times in a playoff series.
In the clubhouse, it did not feel
like a beginning. It was, as Gardner said, “a little step along the
way.”
These Yankees have big ambitions. Someday, maybe, someone
will say they were young once, too.
SOCCER
TE NNI S
adam.kilgore@washpost.com
SCOREBOARD
FO O T B A LL
B A S EB A L L
NFL
NFC
EAST
W
Philadelphia .................. 5
Washington .................. 2
Dallas ............................ 2
N.Y. Giants .................... 0
L
1
2
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.833
.500
.400
.000
PF
165
91
125
82
PA
122
89
132
122
SOUTH
W
Atlanta .......................... 3
Carolina ......................... 4
New Orleans ................. 2
Tampa Bay .................... 2
L
1
2
2
2
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.750
.750
.500
.500
PF
104
104
93
85
PA
89
89
78
83
NORTH
W
Green Bay ..................... 4
Detroit .......................... 3
Minnesota ..................... 3
Chicago ......................... 1
L
1
2
2
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.800
.667
.600
.200
PF
137
128
99
78
PA
112
122
93
124
WEST
W
Seattle .......................... 3
L.A. Rams ...................... 3
Arizona ......................... 2
San Francisco ................ 0
L
2
2
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.600
.600
.400
.000
PF
110
152
81
89
PA
87
121
125
120
L
2
2
2
2
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.600
.600
.600
.500
PF
89
92
148
41
PA
74
106
142
67
AFC
EAST
W
Buffalo .......................... 3
N.Y. Jets ....................... 3
New England ................. 3
Miami ............................ 2
SOUTH
W
Jacksonville .................. 3
Houston ........................ 2
Tennessee ..................... 2
Indianapolis .................. 2
L
2
3
3
3
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.600
.400
.400
.400
PF
139
144
110
97
PA
83
130
142
159
NORTH
W
Pittsburgh ..................... 3
Baltimore ...................... 3
Cincinnati ...................... 2
Cleveland ...................... 0
L
2
2
3
5
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
.600
.600
.400
.000
PF
99
90
84
77
PA
89
97
83
124
WEST
W
Kansas City ................... 5
Denver ........................... 3
Oakland ......................... 2
L.A. Chargers ................ 1
L
0
1
3
4
T
0
0
0
0
PCT.
1.000
.750
.400
.200
PF
164
98
108
99
PA
111
74
109
115
x-late game
Philadelphia 28, at Carolina 23
NHL
WILD CARD
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Tuesday, Oct. 3: New York 8, Minnesota 4
Wednesday, Oct. 4: Arizona 11, Colorado 8
METROPOLITAN
W
New Jersey ..................... 3
Washington .................... 2
Pittsburgh ....................... 2
Columbus ........................ 2
Philadelphia .................... 2
Carolina ........................... 1
N.Y. Islanders ................. 1
N.Y. Rangers ................... 1
L
0
1
2
1
2
0
2
3
OL PTS.
0
6
1
5
1
5
0
4
0
4
1
3
1
3
0
2
GF
16
16
16
8
13
6
10
10
GA
6
12
22
6
13
6
14
15
ATLANTIC
W
Toronto ........................... 3
Tampa Bay ...................... 3
Florida ............................. 2
x-Detroit ......................... 2
Ottawa ............................ 1
Boston ............................. 1
Montreal ......................... 1
Buffalo ............................ 0
L
1
1
1
1
0
2
3
2
OL PTS.
0
6
0
6
0
4
0
4
2
4
0
2
0
2
1
1
GF
22
18
13
8
8
7
5
7
GA
16
15
11
7
9
13
13
15
L
1
1
1
2
2
3
1
OL PTS.
0
8
1
7
0
6
0
4
0
2
0
2
1
3
GF
17
23
15
13
10
8
11
GA
14
12
9
14
15
12
11
DIVISION SERIES
Best of 5
AMERICAN LEAGUE
HOUSTON 3, BOSTON 1
Thursday, Oct. 5: Houston 8, Boston 2
Friday, Oct. 6: Houston 8, Boston 2
Sunday, Oct. 8: Boston 10, Houston 3
Monday, Oct. 9: Houston 5, Boston 4
NEW YORK 3, CLEVELAND 2
Thursday, Oct. 5: Cleveland 4, New York 0
Friday, Oct. 6: Cleveland 9, New York 8, 13 innings
Sunday, Oct. 8: New York 1, Cleveland 0
Monday, Oct. 9: New York 7, Cleveland 3
Wednesday, Oct. 11: New York 5, Cleveland 2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
CHICAGO 3, WASHINGTON 2
CENTRAL
W
St. Louis .......................... 4
Chicago ........................... 3
Colorado .......................... 3
Nashville ......................... 2
x-Winnipeg ..................... 1
Dallas .............................. 1
Minnesota ....................... 1
Friday, Oct. 6: Chicago 3, Washington 0
Saturday, Oct. 7: Washington 6, Chicago 3
Monday, Oct. 9: Chicago 2, Washington 1
Tuesday, Oct. 10: Washington at Chicago, ppd., rain
Wednesday, Oct. 11: Washington 5, Chicago 0
Thursday, Oct. 12: Chicago 9, at Washington 8
LOS ANGELES 3, ARIZONA 0
PACIFIC
W
Vegas .............................. 3
Calgary ............................ 3
Los Angeles .................... 2
Anaheim ......................... 2
x-Vancouver .................... 1
Edmonton ....................... 1
x-Arizona ........................ 0
x-San Jose ...................... 0
Friday, Oct. 6: Los Angeles 9, Arizona 5
Saturday, Oct. 7: Los Angeles 8, Arizona 5
Monday, Oct. 9: Los Angeles 3, Arizona 1
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
Best of 7
AMERICAN LEAGUE
HOUSTON VS. NEW YORK
San Francisco at Washington (-10 1/2), 1
Green Bay (-3) at Minnesota, 1
Cleveland at Houston (-10), 1
Detroit at New Orleans (-5), 1
Miami at Atlanta (-12), 1
New England at N.Y. Jets (-9), 1
Chicago at Baltimore (-6), 1
Tampa Bay at Arizona (-11/2), 4:05
L.A. Rams at Jacksonville (-3), 4:05
L.A. Chargers at Oakland (-3), 4:25
Pittsburgh at Kansas City (-41/2), 4:25
N.Y. Giants at Denver (-111/2), 8:30
BYE: Buffalo, Dallas, Seattle, Cincinnati
Friday, Oct. 13: New York at Houston (Keuchel 14-5)
(FS1), 8:08
Saturday, Oct. 14: New York at Houston (Verlander
15-8) (Fox), 4:08
Monday, Oct. 16: Houston at New York (FS1), 8:08
Tuesday, Oct. 17: Houston at New York (Fox or FS1)
x-Wednesday, Oct. 18: Houston at New York (Fox or
FS1)
x-Friday, Oct. 20: New York at Houston (Fox or FS1)
x-Saturday, Oct. 21: New York at Houston (Fox or FS1)
Yankees 5, Indians 2
Indianapolis at Tennessee, 8:30
Eagles 28, Panthers 23
7
7
11
6
7 — 28
7 — 23
FIRST QUARTER
Philadelphia: FG Elliott 50, 6:57.
Carolina: FG Gano 39, 2:17.
SECOND QUARTER
Carolina: Newton 16 run (Gano kick), 10:34.
Philadelphia: Ertz 1 pass from Wentz (Elliott kick),
2:32.
THIRD QUARTER
Philadelphia: Ertz 17 pass from Wentz (Blount run),
13:59.
Carolina: FG Gano 20, 11:19.
Philadelphia: FG Elliott 48, 8:02.
Carolina: FG Gano 46, 3:23.
FOURTH QUARTER
Philadelphia: Agholor 24 pass from Wentz (Elliott kick),
14:55.
Carolina: McCaffrey 1 pass from Newton (Gano kick),
8:04.
Attendance: 74,373.
EAGLES PANTHERS
First Downs .......................................... 15
23
Total Net Yards ................................... 310
305
Rushes-Yards ............................... 27-101
25-80
Passing ................................................ 209
225
Punt Returns ....................................... 1-0
3-35
Kickoff Returns ................................... 0-0
3-65
Interceptions Ret. ............................... 3-8
0-0
Comp-Att-Int ............................... 16-30-0
28-52-3
Sacked-Yards Lost ............................ 3-13
2-14
Punts .............................................. 6-50.8
3-45.3
Fumbles-Lost ...................................... 2-1
1-0
Penalties-Yards ............................ 10-126
1-1
Time Of Possession ......................... 28:04
31:26
OL PTS.
0
6
0
6
1
5
1
5
1
3
0
2
1
1
0
0
GF
9
12
9
10
5
7
7
4
GA
4
9
5
11
5
8
12
9
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
New Jersey 6, Toronto 3
Pittsburgh 3, Washington 2
Colorado 6, Boston 3
Anaheim 3, N.Y. Islanders 2
Calgary 4, Los Angeles 3 (OT)
NEW YORK
AB
Gardner lf .......................5
Judge rf ..........................5
Gregorius ss ...................4
Sanchez c .......................4
Bird 1b ............................4
Castro 2b ........................4
Hicks cf...........................3
Ellsbury dh .....................0
Headley ph-dh ................2
Frazier 3b .......................3
TOTALS
34
R
1
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
5
H
3
0
3
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
8
BI BB SO AVG
1 0 1 .286
0 0 4 .050
3 0 0 .235
0 0 3 .174
0 0 3 .222
0 0 2 .273
0 1 1 .316
0 1 0 .000
0 0 1 .000
0 1 1 .235
4 3 16
—
Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 4
Florida 5, St. Louis 2
Nashville 4, Dallas 1
Minnesota 5 at Chicago 2
Winnipeg at Vancouver, Late
Detroit at Arizona, Late
Buffalo at San Jose, Late
CLEVELAND
AB
Lindor ss.........................4
Kipnis cf .........................4
Ramirez 2b .....................3
Encarnacion dh...............4
Santana 1b .....................4
Jackson lf .......................4
Bruce rf...........................2
Perez c............................3
Urshela 3b ......................3
TOTALS
31
R
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
2
H
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
5
BI BB SO AVG
0 0 1 .111
0 0 3 .182
0 1 0 .100
0 0 3 .000
0 0 2 .211
0 0 3 .214
0 1 1 .278
1 0 0 .300
1 0 2 .167
2 2 15
—
NEW YORK .................102
CLEVELAND................000
000
020
002 —
000 —
5
2
8
5
0
3
E: Jackson (1), Bruce (1), Perez (1). LOB: New York 6,
Cleveland 4. HR: Gregorius (1), off Kluber; Gregorius
(2), off Kluber.
NEW YORK
IP
H R ER BB SO ERA
Sabathia........................4.1 5 2 2 0 9 3.72
Robertson .....................2.2 0 0 0 1 2 1.93
Chapman ..........................2 0 0 0 1 4 0.00
CLEVELAND
IP
H R ER BB SO ERA
Kluber ...........................3.2 3 3 3 2 6 12.7
Miller................................2 2 0 0 0 5 1.80
Shaw ................................2 1 0 0 0 3 1.50
Allen.................................1 2 2 1 1 2 1.69
Smith ............................0.1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00
WP: Robertson (1-0); LP: Kluber (0-1); S: Chapman (2).
Inherited runners-scored: Robertson 2-0, Miller 1-0,
Shaw 1-0, Smith 1-0. T: 3:38. A: 37,802 (35,051).
RUSHING
2
3
1 —
0 —
4
5
Scoring: 1, Tampa Bay, Koekkoek 1 (Stralman, Kunitz),
6:07. 2, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 2 (Rust, Letang), 13:46. 3,
Tampa Bay, Hedman 1 (Killorn, Kucherov), 19:59 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Tampa Bay, Stamkos 1 (Killorn, Namestnikov), 3:49 (pp). 5, Pittsburgh, Sheary 3 (Ruhwedel,
Niemi), 8:58. 6, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 4 (Coburn, Killorn),
9:49. 7, Pittsburgh, Rust 1 (Guentzel, Maatta), 14:24
(pp). 8, Tampa Bay, Koekkoek 2 (Johnson, Killorn), 17:55.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 9, Pittsburgh, Hunwick 1 (McKegg, Kessel),
10:01.
SHOTS ON GOAL
16
12
PASSING
Philadelphia: Wentz 16-30-0-222.
Carolina: Newton 28-52-3-239.
RECEIVING
Philadelphia: Jeffery 4-71, Agholor 4-55, Hollins 2-38,
Ertz 2-18, M.Johnson 1-16, Burton 1-9, Barner 1-9,
Smith 1-6.
Carolina: McCaffrey 10-56, Benjamin 9-99, Dickson
4-36, Funchess 3-36, Shepard 2-12..
T RA NSA C T IONS
Indians postseason history
Power-play opportunities: Pittsburgh 1 of 5; Tampa Bay
2 of 5. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Niemi 0-2-0 (34 shots-29
saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 3-1-0 (40-36). A: 19,092
(19,092). T: 2:41.
Wild 5, Blackhawks 2
1
0
4 —
2 —
5
2
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Minnesota, Staal 2 (Coyle), 19:25.
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Chicago, Hartman 2 (Kero, Kane), 8:21. 3,
Minnesota, Stewart 3 (Zucker), 10:32. 4, Minnesota,
Zucker 2 (Reilly, Cullen), 12:29 (pp). 5, Minnesota,
Stewart 4 (Spurgeon, Ennis), 15:56. 6, Minnesota, Koivu
2 (Quincey, Eriksson Ek), 17:59. 7, Chicago, Toews 3
(Forsling, Hartman), 19:04 (pp).
WORLD SERIES (WON 2, LOST 4)
2016 _ Lost to Chicago Cubs, 4-3
1997 _ Lost to Florida Marlins, 4-3
1995 _ Lost to Atlanta Braves, 4-2
1954 _ Lost to New York Giants, 4-0
1948 _ Beat Boston Braves, 4-2
1920 _ Beat Brooklyn Dodgers, 5-2-x
x-series was best-of-9
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
(WON 3, LOST 2)
2016 _ Beat Toronto Blue Jays, 4-1
2007 _ Lost to Boston Red Sox, 4-3
1998 _ Lost to New York Yankees, 4-2
1997 _ Beat Baltimore Orioles, 4-2
1995 _ Beat Seattle Mariners, 4-2
MLB
DIVISIONAL PLAYOFF SERIES (WON 5 LOST 4)
Texas Rangers: Purchased the Hickory Crawdads (SAL).
2017 _ Lost to New York Yankees, 3-2
2016 _ Beat Boston Red Sox, 3-0
2007 _ Beat New York Yankees, 3-1
2001 _ Lost to Seattle Mariners, 3-2
1999 _ Lost to Boston Red Sox, 3-2
1998 _ Beat Boston Red Sox, 3-1
1997 _ Beat New York Yankees, 3-2
1996 _ Lost to Baltimore Orioles, 3-1
1995 _ Beat Boston Red Sox, 3-0
NBA
Nba: Named Air Force Lt. Gen. Michelle D. Johnson
senior vice president and head of referee operations.
Los Angeles Lakers: Signed F Travis Wear.
NFL
Cincinnati Bengals: Placed TE Tyler Eifert on injured
reserve.
New York Giants: Signed CB Donte Deayon from the
practice squad.
WILD CARD (LOST 1)
2013 _ Lost to Tampa 4-0
MINNESOTA ............................ 8
CHICAGO .................................. 6
9
16
17 — 34
16 — 38
Power-play opportunities: Minnesota 1 of 4; Chicago 0 of
5. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 1-1-0 (38 shots-36
saves). Chicago, Crawford 3-1-0 (32-29). A: 21,386
(19,717). T: 2:33.
Predators 4, Stars 1
DALLAS .................................... 1
NASHVILLE .............................. 0
GF
71
53
68
58
50
51
42
50
48
38
30
GA
35
39
38
42
47
46
43
54
58
51
54
WESTERN
W
Vancouver ......................15
Sporting KC ....................12
Seattle ...........................12
Portland .........................13
Houston .........................12
Dallas .............................10
Real Salt Lake ................12
San Jose .........................12
Minnesota United ..........10
Colorado ...........................8
Los Angeles .....................7
L
11
8
9
11
10
9
14
14
16
18
17
T PTS
6
51
12
48
11
47
8
47
10
46
13
43
6
42
6
42
6
36
6
30
8
29
GF
48
39
45
54
54
43
47
35
45
30
41
GA
46
27
39
49
45
43
53
57
64
48
62
ATLANTIC
W
Boston..........................................4
Brooklyn.......................................3
Toronto ........................................2
Philadelphia .................................1
New York .....................................0
L
Pct
0 1.000
1 .750
2 .500
3 .250
4 .000
GB
—
1
2
3
4
SOUTHEAST
W
Washington .................................3
Orlando ........................................3
Miami...........................................3
Atlanta.........................................2
Charlotte......................................1
L
1
2
2
3
3
Pct
.750
.600
.600
.400
.250
GB
—
CENTRAL
W
Indiana .........................................3
Chicago ........................................3
Detroit .........................................2
Milwaukee ...................................0
Cleveland .....................................0
L
1
2
2
3
4
Pct
.750
.600
.500
.000
.000
GB
—
SOUTHWEST
W
Houston .......................................4
Dallas ...........................................4
San Antonio .................................2
Memphis ......................................2
New Orleans ................................1
L
Pct
0 1.000
1 .800
2 .500
2 .500
2 .333
GB
—
NORTHWEST
W
Utah .............................................5
Portland .......................................4
Oklahoma City .............................3
Minnesota....................................2
Denver..........................................3
L
Pct
0 1.000
1 .800
1 .750
1 .667
2 .600
GB
—
1
11/2
2
2
PACIFIC
W
Golden State................................1
L.A. Clippers.................................1
Phoenix ........................................1
Sacramento .................................1
L.A. Lakers ...................................1
L
2
2
3
3
4
GB
—
—
1/
2
1/
2
11/2
2
1/
2
1
21/2
3
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Pct
.333
.333
.250
.250
.200
1/
2
2
2
21/2
1/
2
1/
2
1
0
2
0 —
2 —
1
4
FIRST PERIOD
Scoring: 1, Dallas, Benn 1 (Klingberg, Spezza), 8:04 (pp).
SECOND PERIOD
Scoring: 2, Nashville, Girard 1 (McLeod, Subban), 3:27. 3,
Nashville, Forsberg 4 (Girard, Johansen), 6:21 (pp).
THIRD PERIOD
Scoring: 4, Nashville, Arvidsson 2 (Forsberg), 15:09. 5,
Nashville, Subban 1, 18:06.
SHOTS ON GOAL
DALLAS .................................. 13
10
8 — 31
NASHVILLE ............................ 10
10
11 — 31
Power-play opportunities: Dallas 1 of 1; Nashville 1 of 3.
Goalies: Dallas, Bishop 1-1-0 (30 shots-27 saves).
Nashville, Rinne 2-1-0 (31-30). A: 17,113 (17,113). T:
2:31.
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Houston 2, Sporting KC 1
SATURDAY’S MATCHES
Atlanta United FC at New York, 5
Columbus at Orlando City, 5
Montreal at Toronto FC, 5
New York City FC at New England, 5
Philadelphia at Chicago, 5
D.C. United at Portland, 7:30
Dallas at Seattle, 7:30
Houston at Sporting KC, 7:30
Minnesota United at Los Angeles, 7:30
Real Salt Lake at Colorado, 7:30
San Jose at Vancouver, 7:30
Mihaela Buzarnescu, Romania, and Oksana Kalashnikova, Georgia, def. Nicola Geuer and Anna Zaja, Germany,
7-5, 6-3; Kiki Bertens, Netherlands, and Johanna Larsson
(1), Sweden, def. Maria Irigoyen, Argentina, and Cornelia Lister, Sweden, 6-1, 6-2.
L
7
5
6
7
8
11
9
14
13
15
T PTS
1
49
5
47
7
40
6
39
7
34
3
33
7
31
3
24
7
19
4
19
GF
38
37
45
33
44
42
29
23
24
30
GA
22
20
31
30
36
51
31
39
35
48
Playoffs
2018 World Cup
CURRENT QUALIFIERS
EUROPE (14 QUALIFY)
Belgium, England, France, Germany, Iceland, Poland,
Portugal, Russia (host), Serbia, Spain
Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Uruguay
At Tianjin (China) Tuanbo International Tennis Centre
Purse: $426,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Aryna Sabalenka, Belarus, def. Duan Ying-Ying, China,
6-3, 6-3; Zhu Lin, China, def. Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, 6-3,
6-1; Christina McHale, United States, def. Maria Sakkari
(6), Greece, 6-0, 6-4; Maria Sharapova, Russia, def.
Magda Linette, Poland, 7-5, 6-3; Sara Sorribes Tormo,
Spain, def. Wang Yafan, China, 6-4, 2-6, 6-3; Sara Errani,
Italy, def. Beatriz Haddad Maia, Brazil, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3;
Peng Shuai (3), China, def. Wang Xiyu, China, 6-2, 6-2;
Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, def. Yulia Putintseva
(5), Kazakhstan, 6-2, 6-3.
DOUBLES — QUARTERFINALS
Dalila Jakupovic, Slovenia, and Nina Stojanovic (3),
Serbia, def. Xun Fang Ying and You Xiaodi, China, 6-3,
1-6, 13-11; Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, and Sara
Errani, Italy, def. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, and
Alla Kudryavtseva (1), Russia, 7-6 (7-4), 2-6, 10-6; Aryna
Sabalenka, Belarus, and Xu Yifan, China, def. Liang Chen
and Lu Jing-Jing (4), China, 6-4, 6-3.
Mavericks 108, Hawks 94
Dallas .................................. 31
Atlanta ............................... 19
26
22
24
30
27 — 108
23 — 94
DALLAS
Ashley
Powell
Noel
Ferrell
Smith Jr.
Clavell
Dozier
Kleber
Wayns
Withey
Motley
Mejri
TOTALS
FT O-T A PF PTS
0-0 1-7 0 6
5
0-0 0-4 4 2 11
2-2 1-7 0 3
6
0-0 0-0 5 2 11
0-0 1-1 3 2
9
0-1 0-5 5 2 19
2-2 2-2 1 1 16
0-0 1-4 2 3 16
2-2 0-4 6 3 10
1-2 3-8 1 2
5
0-0 2-3 0 1
0
0-0 0-1 1 2
0
7-9 11-46 28 29 108
Percentages: FG .494, FT .778. 3-Point Goals: 19-48, .396
(Clavell 5-10, Kleber 4-8, Powell 3-6, Dozier 2-4, Wayns
2-7, Smith Jr. 1-2, Ashley 1-3, Ferrell 1-4, Motley 0-2,
Withey 0-2). Team Rebounds: 2. Team Turnovers: 20 (18
PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Mejri 2, Dozier, Withey).
Turnovers: 20 (Wayns 4, Kleber 3, Smith Jr. 3, Ferrell 2,
Noel 2, Ashley, Clavell, Dozier, Mejri, Motley, Withey).
Steals: 10 (Noel 2, Ashley, Clavell, Dozier, Ferrell,
Kleber, Motley, Wayns, Withey). Technical Fouls: None.
MIN
FG
FT O-T A PF PTS
21:49
2-6 2-2 2-3 1 1
7
23:19
3-6 4-6 0-4 1 1 11
19:44
2-7 3-3 4-10 0 0
7
25:19 8-12 1-3 1-6 6 0 20
17:48 2-10 5-6 0-1 0 0
9
23:30
2-7 2-2 0-2 2 2
6
22:25
3-7 3-6 2-3 1 2
9
19:30
2-8 2-2 1-2 3 2
6
14:45
1-3 0-0 0-1 1 0
3
13:54
3-4 1-2 0-2 1 1
8
11:08
1-3 0-0 0-2 1 1
3
10:16
0-1 0-0 0-2 2 1
0
7:01
1-2 0-0 0-1 1 0
2
6:09
0-1 0-0 0-0 1 0
0
3:23
1-3 0-0 0-0 0 1
3
240 31-80 23-32 10-39 21 12 94
Percentages: FG .388, FT .719. 3-Point Goals: 9-27, .333
(Bazemore 3-5, Prince 1-1, Dorsey 1-2, Muscala 1-2,
Babbitt 1-3, Cavanaugh 1-3, Ilyasova 1-4, Bembry 0-1,
Brussino 0-1, Collins 0-1, Cook 0-1, Delaney 0-1, Magette
0-1, Schroder 0-1). Team Rebounds: 15. Team Turnovers:
19 (23 PTS). Blocked Shots: 2 (Cavanaugh, Dedmon).
Turnovers: 19 (Bembry 4, Prince 3, Delaney 2, Ilyasova 2,
Schroder 2, Brussino, Collins, Cook, Dedmon, Magette,
Muscala). Steals: 10 (Babbitt, Bazemore, Bembry, Collins, Cook, Dedmon, Delaney, Ilyasova, Muscala, Schroder). Technical Fouls: None.
HONG KONG OPEN
AFRICA (5)
At Victoria Park Tennis Stadium in Hong Kong
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Egypt, Nigeria
SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Iran, Japan, Saudi Arabia, South Korea
ATLANTA
Ilyasova
Prince
Dedmon
Bazemore
Schroder
Bembry
Collins
Delaney
Babbitt
Muscala
Dorsey
Magette
Brussino
Cook
Cavanaugh
TOTALS
TIANJIN OPEN
SOUTH AMERICA (4 OR 5)
ASIA (4 OR 5)
MIN
FG
30:16
2-5
20:25
4-7
16:34
2-2
21:24
5-9
12:41
4-9
34:02 7-12
25:02 6-10
24:28 6-11
23:42 3-10
15:12
2-5
8:24
0-3
7:50
0-0
240 41-83
Ivan Dodig, Croaita, and Marcel Granollers (5), Spain,
def. Marcin Matkowski, Poland, and Aisam-ul-Haq
Qureshi, Pakistan, 6-4, 6-7 (7-5), 10-7; Jean-Julien
Rojer, Netherlands, and Horia Tecau (3), Romania, def.
Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah, Colombia, 3-6,
6-4, 10-6; Santiago Gonzalez, Mexico, and Julio Peralta,
Chile, def. Ryan Harrison, United States, and Michael
Venus (8), New Zealand, 6-4, 7-6 (7-5); Oliver Marach,
Austria, and Mate Pavic (7), Croatia, def. Wu Di and Wu
Yibing, China, 7-6 (7-5), 6-3; Jamie Murray, Britain, and
Bruno Soares (4), Brazil, def. Kevin Anderson, South
Africa, and Nenad Zimonjic, Serbia, 7-5, 6-2; Lukasz
Kubot, Poland, and Marcelo Melo (2), Brazil, def.
Feliciano Lopez and Marc Lopez, Spain, 7-5, 4-6, 13-11.
DOUBLES — QUARTERFINALS
Portland vs. North Carolina, 4:30
Brooklyn at Indiana, 7
Charlotte at Detroit, 7
Miami at Orlando, 7
Philadelphia at Washington, 7
Milwaukee at Boston, 7:30
New Orleans at Memphis, 8
Atlanta at Dallas, 8:30
Denver at Utah, 9
Minnesota at San Antonio, 9:30
Houston at Sacramento, 10
Portland at Phoenix, 10
DOUBLES — SECOND ROUND
Barbora Strycova (2), Czech Republic, def. Jana Fett,
Croatia, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3; Johanna Larsson, Sweden, def.
Varvara Lepchenko, United States, 6-2, 6-3; Magdalena
Rybarikova (1), Slovakia, def. Carina Witthoeft, Germany, 7-6 (7-4), 6-3; Viktorija Golubic, Switzerland, def.
Viktoriya Tomova, Bulgaria, 4-6, 6-4, 6-1; Sorana Cirstea
(5), Romania, def. Natalia Vikhlyantseva, Russia, 7-6
(14), 6-4.
SATURDAY’S FINAL
WEDNESDAY’S GAMES
Grigor Dimitrov (6), Bulgaria, def. Sam Querrey (10),
United States, 6-3, 7-6 (7-3); Juan Martin del Potro (16),
Argentina, def. Alexander Zverev (3), Germany, 3-6, 7-6
(7-5), 6-4; Albert Ramos-Vinolas, Spain, def. Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany, 7-6 (7-4), 6-4; Richard Gasquet,
France, def. Gilles Simon, France, 7-5, 6-7 (5), 6-3; Marin
Cilic (4), Croatia, def. Steve Johnson, United States, 7-6
(1), 6-4; Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Fabio Fognini, Italy,
6-3, 6-1; Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Alexandr
Dolgopolov, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-2; Viktor Troicki, Serbia, def.
John Isner (12), United States, 6-4, 7-6 (7-4).
SINGLES — SECOND ROUND
Chicago at Houston, 4
Colorado at Seattle, 4
Columbus at New York City FC, 4
Los Angeles at Dallas, 4
Minnesota United at San Jose, 4
New England at Montreal, 4
New York at D.C. United, 4
Orlando City at Philadelphia, 4
Sporting KC at Real Salt Lake, 4
Toronto FC at Atlanta United FC, 4
Vancouver at Portland, 4
Portland 4, Orlando 1
North Carolina 1, Chicago 0
Boston at Cleveland, 8
Houston at Golden State, 10:30
SINGLES — THIRD ROUND
At Tips Arena Linz (Austria)
Purse: $226,750 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
SEMIFINALS
TUESDAY’S GAMES
At Qizhong Tennis Center in Shanghai
Purse: $6.52 million (Masters 1000)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
GENERALI LADIES LINZ
SUNDAY, OCT. 22
W
North Carolina ...............16
Portland .........................14
Orlando ..........................11
Chicago ..........................11
Seattle .............................9
Sky Blue FC ....................10
Kansas City ......................8
Houston ...........................7
Boston ..............................4
Washington .....................5
SHANGHAI MASTERS
WTA
NWSL
Dallas at Charlotte, 6
Cleveland at Orlando, 7
Washington at New York, 7:30
New Orleans at Memphis, 8
San Antonio at Houston, 8
Toronto at Chicago, 8
Detroit at Milwaukee, 8:30
Miami vs. Philadelphia at Kansas City, Mo., 8:30
Brisbane Bullets at Phoenix, 10
Haifa Maccabi at Portland, 10
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
Sacramento at Golden State, 10:30
12 — 40
6 — 34
SHOTS ON GOAL
Philadelphia: Blount 14-67, Wentz 6-25, Barner 5-7,
Clement 2-2.
Carolina: Newton 11-71, Samuel 1-8, McCaffrey 4-8,
Whittaker 1-(minus 3), Stewart 8-(minus 4).
T PTS
8
65
8
56
8
53
7
52
5
50
7
46
9
39
6
39
6
39
9
39
5
32
FRIDAY’S GAMES
FIRST PERIOD
MINNESOTA ............................ 0
CHICAGO .................................. 0
L
5
8
9
10
12
12
13
15
15
13
18
Dallas 108, Atlanta 94
Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, Late
Washington at New Jersey, 7
N.Y. Rangers at Columbus, 7
Anaheim at Colorado, 9
Ottawa at Calgary, 9
Detroit at Vegas, 10:30
PITTSBURGH ......................... 12
TAMPA BAY .......................... 16
EASTERN
W
Toronto FC .....................19
New York City FC ...........16
Atlanta United FC ..........15
Chicago ..........................15
Columbus .......................15
New York .......................13
Philadelphia ...................10
Montreal ........................11
New England ..................11
Orlando City ...................10
D.C. United .......................9
THURSDAY’S RESULTS
FRIDAY’S GAMES
PITTSBURGH ........................... 1
TAMPA BAY ............................ 2
MLS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Boston 108, Charlotte 100
Miami 117, Washington 115
Philadelphia 133, Brooklyn 114
Houston 101, Memphis 89
Portland 113, Phoenix 104
THURSDAY’S GAMES
ATP
NBA preseason
WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS
Lightning 5, Penguins 4
Late Wednesday
MONDAY’S GAME
L
0
1
0
1
0
2
2
2
x-late game
Saturday, Oct. 14: Chicago at Los Angeles, TBA (TBS),
8:08
Sunday, Oct. 15: Chicago at Los Angeles, TBA (TBS), 7:38
Tuesday, Oct. 17: Los Angeles at Chicago, TBA (TBS)
Wednesday, Oct. 18: Los Angeles at Chicago, TBA (TBS)
x-Thursday, Oct. 19: Los Angeles at Chicago, TBA (TBS)
x-Saturday, Oct. 21: Chicago at Los Angeles, TBA (TBS)
x-Sunday, Oct. 22: Chicago at Los Angeles, TBA (TBS)
SUNDAY’S GAMES
BASKETBALL
MLB postseason
NATIONAL LEAGUE
LOS ANGELES VS. CHICAGO
THURSDAY’S RESULT
EAGLES .................................... 3
PANTHERS ............................... 3
HOCKEY
OCEANIA (0 OR 1)
Wang Qiang, China, def. Luksika Kumkhum, Thailand,
6-4, 6-4; Jennifer Brady, United States, def. Zhang Shuai
(8), China, 6-3, 6-4; Nicole Gibbs, United States, def.
Elina Svitolina (1), Ukraine, walkover; Lizette Cabrera,
Australia, def. Caroline Wozniacki (3), Denmark, walkover.
None.
DOUBLES — QUARTERFINALS
NORTH AND CENTRAL AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN (3 OR 4)
Costa Rica, Mexico, Panama
H I GH S C HOOLS
VOLLEYBALL
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
School Without Walls def. Cardozo (25-12, 25-11, 0-0)
MARYLAND
Eleanor Roosevelt def. Bowie (10-25, 25-13, 25-18,
25-21)
Marriotts Ridge def. Reservoir (25-18, 25-22, 20-25,
25-17)
VIRGINIA
Colgan def. Hylton (25-8, 25-13, 15-25, 25-19)
Oakton def. Westfield (25-17, 25-16, 30-28)
Robinson def. Lake Braddock (25-17, 25-19, 25-14)
PRIVATE
St. John’s Catholic Prep def. Glenelg Country
St. John’s def. Good Counsel (19-25, 25-14, 25-19, 25-20)
BOYS’ FALL SOCCER
MARYLAND
Bladensburg 1, Bowie 0
Broadneck 7, Glen Burnie 1
Crossland 6, Fairmont Heights 1
Huntingtown 5, Great Mills 3
Lackey 5, McDonough 2
Meade 3, Old Mill 0
Northwest 7, Seneca Valley 3
Severna Park 3, Northeast 0
FIELD HOCKEY
MARYLAND
Churchill 1, Blake 0
Glenelg 5, Atholton 0
River Hill 2, Mount Hebron 1
VIRGINIA
Centreville 2, Chantilly 0
PRIVATE
Stone Ridge 3, Potomac School 0
GIRLS’ FALL SOCCER
MARYLAND
Blake 2, Paint Branch 0
Linganore 3, Middletown 0
Walter Johnson 2, Wootton 1
PRIVATE
Rockbridge 6, Riverdale Baptist 0
Eri Hozumi and Miyu Kato (4), Japan, def. Katherine Ip
and Zhang Ling, Hong Kong, 6-0, 6-4; Lu Jing-Jing and
Wang Qiang, China, def. Luksika Kumkhum and Peangtarn Plipuech, Thailand, 4-6, 7-6 (7-4), 10-7; Chan
Hao-ching and Yung-jan (1), Taiwan, def. Eugenie
Bouchard, Canada, and Shelby Rogers, United States,
6-2, 6-2.
GOLF
European Tour
ITALIAN OPEN
At Golf Club Milano in Monza, Italy
Purse: $7 million
Yardage: 7,156
FIRST ROUND
Eddie Pepperell, England.................. 33-31
Matt Wallace, England..................... 31-33
Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Thailand ....... 33-31
Alexander Bjork, Sweden ................. 32-32
Francesco Molinari, Italy.................. 34-30
Jamie Donaldson, Wales.................. 32-32
George Coetzee, South Africa.......... 33-32
Byeong Hun An, South Korea........... 33-32
Matthieu Pavon, France ................... 34-32
Gregory Havret, France .................... 31-35
Marc Warren, Scotland .................... 33-33
Sergio Garcia, Spain ......................... 32-34
Alejandro Canizares, Spain .............. 33-33
Andrea Pavan, Italy .......................... 32-34
Chris Paisley, England...................... 33-33
Alex Noren, Sweden ......................... 34-32
64
64
64
64
64
64
65
65
66
66
66
66
66
66
66
66
ALSO
Jon Rahm, Spain ...............................33-34
Martin Kaymer, Germany .................35-33
Matthew Fitzpatrick, England..........34-34
Ross Fisher, England.........................35-33
Graeme McDowell, N.Ireland............36-33
Tyrrell Hatton, England ....................34-35
Bernd Wiesberger, Austria...............33-36
Daniel Im, United States ..................38-31
Tommy Fleetwood, England .............35-36
Julian Suri, United States.................37-34
Padraig Harrington, Ireland ..............40-33
67
68
68
68
69
69
69
69
71
71
73
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 , 2017
.
THE WASHINGTON POST
EZ
D9
M2
HIGH SCHOOLS
TOP 20
S C HE D U LE
TODAY
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Anacostia at Dunbar, 6
Coolidge at Bell, 6
H.D. Woodson at Eastern, 6
McKinley at Phelps, 6
Theodore Roosevelt at Cardozo, 6
Wilson at Ballou, 6
1. Wise (6-0)
Next: Today vs. Oxon Hill (4-2),
7 p.m.
2. Gonzaga (6-1)
Next: Saturday vs. Carroll (3-3),
2 p.m.
MARYLAND
Annapolis at Arundel, 6:30
Atholton at Mount Hebron, 7
Bethesda-Chevy Chase at Wootton, 6:30
Blake at Churchill, 6:30
C.H. Flowers at Friendly, 6:30
Calvert at Patuxent, 7
Caravel Academy (Del.) at Howard, 7
Chopticon at Lackey, 7
Clarksburg at Wheaton, 6:30
Einstein at Quince Orchard, 6:30
Gaithersburg at Paint Branch, 6:30
Gwynn Park at Northwestern, 7
Huntingtown at Great Mills, 7
La Plata at Thomas Stone, 7
Leonardtown at Northern, 7
Linganore at Kennedy, 6:30
Long Reach at Marriotts Ridge, 7
McDonough at Westlake, 7
North County at Glen Burnie, 6:30
Northeast at Southern, 6:30
Northwood at Sherwood, 7
Old Mill at Chesapeake, 6:30
Oxon Hill at Wise, 7
Reservoir at Oakland Mills, 7
Richard Montgomery at Northwest, 7
Rockville at Magruder, 6:30
Seneca Valley at Poolesville, 6:30
Severna Park at Meade, 6:30
Sherwood at Northwood, 6:30
South River at Broadneck, 6:30
Springbrook at Blair, 6:30
St. Charles at North Point, 7
Suitland at Largo, 7
Walter Johnson at Whitman, 6:30
Watkins Mill at Damascus, 6:30
3. Damascus (6-0)
Next: Today vs Watkins Mill (3-2),
6:30 p.m.
4. St. John’s (3-2)
Next: Saturday vs. McNamara (0-6),
1 p.m.
5. DeMatha (4-2)
Next: Today vs. Good Counsel (4-2),
7 p.m.
6. Stone Bridge (6-0)
Next: Today vs. Rock Ridge (1-5),
7 p.m.
7. Westfield (6-0)
Next: Today at Oakton (1-5), 7 p.m.
8. Centreville (6-1)
Next: Oct. 20 vs. Westfield (6-0),
7 p.m.
9. Spalding (3-2)
Next: Saturday at Calvert Hall (4-3),
noon
10. North Point (6-0)
Next: Today vs. St. Charles (2-5),
7 p.m.
11. C.H. Flowers (6-0)
Next: Today at Friendly (1-5),
6:30 p.m.
12. Madison (5-2)
Next: Today vs. Chantilly (0-6),
7 p.m.
13. Good Counsel (4-2)
Next: Today at DeMatha (4-2),
7 p.m.
14. South Lakes (5-1)
Next: Today at Washington-Lee
(1-5), 7 p.m.
15. Friendship Collegiate (3-3)
Next: Saturday at Riverdale Baptist
(4-3), 2 p.m.
16. H.D. Woodson (4-2)
Next: Today at Eastern (3-3), 6 p.m.
17. Bullis (5-0)
Next: Saturday at Landon (6-0),
1 p.m.
18. Quince Orchard (5-1)
Next: Today vs. Einstein (4-2),
6:30 p.m.
19. Broad Run (6-0)
Next: Today vs. Parkdale (2-4),
7 p.m.
20. Freedom-Woodbridge (6-0)
Next: Today vs. Woodbridge (6-0),
7 p.m.
More online
For game summaries, video recaps
and photo galleries for matchups
throughout the region, visit the
High School Sports section at
washingtonpost.com.
For video highlights of the
weekend’s top plays, along with
score updates and links to the
Post’s latest high school sports
content, follow us on Twitter
@WashPostHS.
To learn how to submit scores and
stats to appear in the newspaper
and online, email us at
hss@washpost.com.
DOUG KAPUSTIN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Under Coach DaLawn Parrish, top-ranked and defending Maryland 4A state champion Wise is scoring 40.6 points a game.
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL NOTES
With new QB, Pumas more explosive
F ROM
STAFF REPORTS
Wise cruised to a Maryland 4A
state championship last year
with a dominant offense that
scored at least 35 points in every
game.
Through six games in 2016, it
averaged 44.6 points. This season, Wise is on the same track
against better competition —
while its offense looks as explosive as it has been in recent years.
Wise is averaging 40.6 points
in 2017, a number dragged down
by a 15-13 win against Baltimore’s
Calvert Hall.
That consistency is remarkable given what the Pumas lost
from a year ago. Quarterback
Jabari Laws, around whom
Coach DaLawn Parrish and offensive coordinator Steve Rapp
designed this high-octane offense, is playing college football
for Army.
Laws, a gifted passer and
slippery runner, was the All-Met
offensive player of the year in
his senior season. Parrish liked
to let Laws work outside the
pocket, where he could extend
plays with his legs to let receivers get open or take off downfield.
But
at
5-foot-9,
165 pounds, Laws was not a
threat from inside the pocket.
To replace him, Parrish wooed
Quinton Johnson away from
Good Counsel. Johnson, at 6-4,
185 pounds, is a pure passer who
can stand in the pocket and
deliver the ball downfield. He
has thrown for 15 touchdowns
with one interception through
six games and is completing
almost 65 percent of his passes.
He has also transformed the
Pumas’ quick-strike, big-play offense into one that can march
down the field and grind out
possessions. Against Calvert
Hall, Parrish put the game in
Johnson’s hands. He completed
11 of 17 passes for 126 yards and a
score and rushed eight times for
33 yards.
“He allows us to get to every
part of the field,” Parrish said.
“That makes us much more explosive because you can’t take
away anything.”
It makes Wise that much more
dangerous — and that much
more of a favorite — these next
two weeks against Oxon Hill and
Eleanor Roosevelt, two rivals
and two of the top teams in
Prince George’s County.
— Jacob Bogage
Mason’s surprise start
After his team started 5-0,
George Mason Coach Adam Amerine started receiving congratulatory texts and emails. That’s
just how long it had been.
“Yeah, I’d say people were
surprised,” Amerine said. “There
were people that had been working at the school for 20 or
30 years saying they couldn’t
remember a 5-0 team.”
The Mustangs are now 5-1
after a 22-21 loss to Strasburg
(Shenandoah County) last week.
A close loss is a bit easier to
stomach when it’s the first of the
year.
Last season, the team started
2-0 only to lose eight straight.
Amerine, then the defensive coordinator, took over as head
coach in the offseason and aimed
to implement a new culture.
“I wanted to take what we had
been doing and run it slightly
different,” he said. “I needed the
players to buy into that, and they
have, especially the seniors.”
Amerine decided not to
change the Mustangs’ long-held
run-first mentality. This year’s
offense has been led by a talented
tandem of running backs, junior
Jack Felgar and senior Finn
Roou.
This weekend, the Mustangs
will take their running backs and
hot start up the road to Marshall,
also 5-1, and face a team that,
despite the proximity, they rarely
come across.
“We just don’t play each other
in football — I can’t remember
ever playing them,” Amerine
said. “It will be an interesting
game.”
— Michael Errigo
Battle for Dulles District
Woodgrove
compiled
a
19-1 record over the past two
regular seasons, but it only faced
Loudoun County opponents who
were also in Virginia Class 4A.
This fall, the Wolverines challenged themselves with games
against Class 5A foes Broad Run
and Tuscarora. While Woodgrove
(4-2) lost both those contests, the
Wolverines are better off from
the experience, players say.
“We’ve gotten better by playing against better athletes. Playing those games helps us prepare
for the playoffs by showing us
what we need to work on,” junior
wide receiver Ben Castellano
said. “If you only play teams you
know you’ll beat, you’re not going to get any better.”
The 6-4, 220-pound Castellano has caught 52 passes for
680 yards and seven touchdowns. On Friday night, Woodgrove hosts Dominion (4-2) in a
game that likely will decide the
Dulles District regular season
champion.
The last time the Titans visited
Purcellville, they ended Woodgrove’s undefeated season with a
30-23 victory in last November’s
Virginia 4A West semifinals.
Like Woodgrove, Dominion
has learned from facing a bigger
school. The Titans lost, 42-10, at
Class 6A South Lakes in September.
“That loss was a great eyeopener. If you miss an assignment, you’re going to pay for it,”
Dominion Coach Karl Buckwalter said. “Woodgrove is a very,
very good team that is really
physical, but in that win last year
we learned that the Titans can
get physical as well.”
— Dillon Mullan
Undefeated IAC clash
In the past two weeks, Bullis
has spoiled the undefeated aspirations of both Quince Orchard
and St. Mary’s Ryken. The Bulldogs travel to Bethesda on Saturday with a plan to do it again
against Landon, the only other
undefeated team in the Interstate Athletic Conference.
Defending the Bulldogs (5-0)
is no easy task. They have a
knack for wearing down opponents as workhorse back Eric
McKan (23 carries, 116 yards and
four
touchdowns
against
St. Mary’s Ryken) plows between
the tackles. They also use endaround runs, getting the ball into
electric
playmaker
Bryson
Shaw’s hands, where it often
ends up on the inevitable home
run play through the air.
While Bullis has played a pair
of competitive, hard-fought battles, Landon (5-0) has blown past
lighter competition by a combined 80-0 score. Landon Coach
Paul Padalino was tight-lipped
about the Bears’ game plan for
slowing Bullis, but he has no
doubt they will be mentally
ready for the IAC clash.
“It’s our first IAC contest,”
Padalino said. “I am not worried
about our guys being ready.”
— Dan Roth
VIRGINIA
Annandale at West Potomac, 7
Brentsville at William Monroe, 7
Briar Woods at Champe, 7
Chantilly at Madison, 7
Colgan at Gar-Field, 7
Dominion at Woodgrove, 7
Falls Church at Edison, 7
Freedom-South Riding at Tuscarora, 7
George Mason at Marshall, 7
Jefferson at Loudoun Valley, 7
Lee at Wakefield, 7
Loudoun County at Park View, 7
Mount Vernon at Stuart, 7
NVK at Jefferson, 7:30
Osbourn at Stonewall Jackson, 7:30
Osbourn Park at Battlefield, 7
Parkdale at Broad Run, 7
Patriot at Forest Park, 7
Potomac at Hylton, 7
Riverside at Heritage, 7
Robinson at Fairfax, 7
Rock Ridge at Stone Bridge, 7
Skyline at Manassas Park, 7
South County at West Springfield, 7
South Lakes at Washington-Lee, 7
W.T. Woodson at Lake Braddock, 7
Westfield at Oakton, 7
Woodbridge at Freedom-Woodbridge, 7
Yorktown at Langley, 7
PRIVATE
Archbishop Curley at St. Mary’s-Annapolis, 7
Avalon at St. Mary’s Ryken, 7
Concordia Prep at John Paul the Great, 7
Good Counsel at DeMatha, 7
John Carroll at Pallotti, 7
Kingsman Academy at Maryland School for
the Deaf, 7
O’Connell at Collegiate, 4
St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes at Georgetown Prep,
7
SATURDAY
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
National Christian at Richard Wright, 2
National Collegiate at KIPP, 2
MARYLAND
Bladensburg at Douglass, 2
Bowie at Eleanor Roosevelt, 2
Central at Crossland, 2
DuVal at Potomac, 2
Glenelg at Wilde Lake, 1
High Point at Fairmont Heights, 2
Laurel at Surrattsville, 2
River Hill at Hammond, 12
VIRGINIA
Hayfield at T.C. Williams, 1
McLean at Herndon, 1
PRIVATE
Bishop Ireton at Flint Hill, 2
Bullis at Landon, 1
Carroll at Gonzaga, 2
Episcopal at St. Albans, 1:30
Friends (Baltimore) at Annapolis Area Christian, 7
Friendship Collegiate at Riverdale Baptist, 2
Maret at Potomac School, 2
McNamara at St. John’s, 1
Paul VI at St. Christopher’s, 3
Severn School at Boys’ Latin, 1:30
Silver Oak Academy at Sidwell Friends, 2:30
Spalding at Calvert Hall, 12
WEEKEND ON THE AIR
TOMORROW
MLB PLAYOFFS
4 p.m.
8 p.m.
ALCS, Game 2: New York Yankees at Houston » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
NLCS, Game 1: Chicago Cubs at Los Angeles Dodgers » TBS, WTEM (980 AM)
NHL
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
Nevada at Colorado State » ESPN2
Boise State at San Diego State » CBS Sports Network
Washington at Arizona State » ESPN
Oregon at Stanford »Fox Sports 1
SOCCER
Washington at Philadelphia » NBC Sports Washington, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Toronto at Montreal » NHL Network
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
Noon
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:45 p.m.
4 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:15 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
8 p.m.
8 p.m.
10:15 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
10:45 p.m.
11 p.m.
TCU at Kansas State » Fox Sports 1
Michigan at Indiana » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
Texas Tech at West Virginia » ESPNU
Florida State at Duke » ESPN2
Rutgers at Illinois » Big Ten Network
Eastern Michigan at Army » CBS Sports Network
BYU at Mississippi State » SEC Network
South Carolina at Tennessee » ESPN
Connecticut at Temple » ESPNews
Northwestern at Maryland » ESPN2, WTEM (980 AM)
Purdue at Wisconsin » Big Ten Network
Auburn at LSU » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
Georgia Tech at Miami » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
Oklahoma vs. Texas » ESPN, WJFK (106.7 FM)
Baylor at Oklahoma State » Fox Sports 1
Vanderbilt at Mississippi » SEC Network
Akron at Western Michigan » CBS Sports Network
Navy at Memphis » ESPNU
Houston at Tulsa » ESPNews
East Carolina at UCF » CBS Sports Network
Texas A&M at Florida » ESPN2
Arkansas at Alabama » ESPN
Missouri at Georgia » SEC Network
Ohio State at Nebraska » Fox Sports 1
Cincinnati at South Florida » ESPNU
Utah at USC » WJLA (Ch. 7), WMAR (Ch. 2)
Michigan State at Minnesota » Big Ten Network
7:30 a.m.
7:30 a.m.
7:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
12:15 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
FIFA U-17 World Cup: France vs. Honduras » Fox Sports 1
FIFA U-17 World Cup: Japan vs. New Caledonia » Fox Sports 2
English Premier League: Manchester United at Liverpool »
NBC Sports Network
German Bundesliga: Freiburg at Bayern Munich » Fox Sports 2
Spanish La Liga: Real Madrid at Getafe » beIN Sports
English Premier League: Bournemouth at Tottenham » CNBC
English Premier League: Chelsea at Crystal Palace » NBC Sports Network
Italian Serie A: Lazio at Juventus » beIN Sports
German Bundesliga: Leipzig at Borussia Dortmund » Fox Sports 2
English Premier League: Arsenal at Watford » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
Spanish La Liga: Barcelona at Atletico Madrid » beIN Sports
NWSL championship: North Carolina vs. Portland » Lifetime
SUNDAY
NFL
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
4:25 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
MLB PLAYOFFS
7:30 p.m.
European Tour: Italian Open, third round » Golf Channel
Champions Tour: SAS Championship, second round » Golf Channel
PGA Tour: CIMB Classic, final round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
6 a.m.
ATP: Shanghai Masters, doubles semifinal » Tennis Channel
AUTO RACING
1 p.m.
4 p.m.
NASCAR Truck Series: Fred’s 250 » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
NASCAR Cup Series: Alabama 500, qualifying » NBC Sports Network
BOXING
7:30 p.m.
6:30 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
European Tour: Italian Open, final round » Golf Channel
Champions Tour: SAS Championship, final round » Golf Channel
TENNIS
4:30 a.m.
ATP: Shanghai Masters, singles final » Tennis Channel
SOCCER
8:30 a.m.
9 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
11 a.m.
Noon
1 p.m.
2:40 p.m.
5 p.m.
6 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
English Premier League: Everton at Brighton & Hove Albion »
NBC Sports Network
Italian Serie A: Atalanta at Sampdoria » beIN Sports
German Bundesliga: Wolfsburg at Bayern Leverkusen »Fox Sports 1
English Premier League: Newcastle at Southampton » NBC Sports Network
German Bundesliga: Monchengladbach at Werder Bremen » Fox Sports 2
Men’s college: Rutgers at Northwestern » Big Ten Network
Italian Serie A: AC Milan at Inter » beIN Sports
MLS: Atlanta at New York Red Bulls » Fox Sports 1
Women’s college: Alabama at Mississippi State » ESPNU
MLS: Dallas at Seattle » Fox Sports 1
MLS: D.C. United at Portland » WJFK (106.7 FM)
AUTO RACING
Premier Boxing Champions: Leo Santa Cruz vs. Chris Avalos; Abner Mares
vs. Andres Gutierrez » WTTG (Ch. 5), WBFF (Ch. 45)
COLLEGE HOCKEY
6 p.m.
NLCS, Game 2: Chicago Cubs at Los Angeles Dodgers » TBS, WTEM (980 AM)
GOLF
GOLF
6:30 a.m.
2:30 p.m.
11 p.m.
San Francisco at Washington » WTTG (Ch. 5), WTEM (980 AM),
WMAL (105.9 FM and 630 AM)
Chicago at Baltimore » WBFF (Ch. 45), WIYY (97.9 FM)
Pittsburgh at Kansas City » WUSA (Ch. 9), WJZ (Ch. 13)
New York Giants at Denver » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11), WJFK (1580 AM)
Denver at Notre Dame » NBC Sports Network
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
NASCAR Cup Series: Alabama 500 » WRC (Ch. 4), WBAL (Ch. 11)
NHRA: Texas FallNationals » Fox Sports 1
EFGHI
washingtonpost.com/classifieds
820
Official Notices
820
Official Notices
The United States Air Force is issuing this notice to inform the public
of the availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)
for the Presidential Aircraft Recapitalization (PAR) Program at Joint
Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility, Washington, Maryland (JBA). The
Final EIS has been prepared in accordance with Section 102(2)(c) of
the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the Council
on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for implementing the
procedural provisions of the NEPA (Title 40 Code of Federal
Regulations [CFR], Parts 1500-1508), and the Air Force Environmental
Impact Analysis Process (EIAP) [32 CFR Part 989]. This notice also
serves as final public notification of impacts to wetlands and
floodplains in accordance with Section 2(a)(4) of Executive Order
(EO) 11988, Floodplain Management and Section 2(b) of EO 11990,
Protection of Wetlands.
The EIS analyzes potential impacts associated with the Air Force’s
proposal to construct a new Presidential Aircraft Complex with
a multi-bay hangar facility at JBA, make other necessary facility
improvements, and relocate select facilities at JBA displaced by PAR
activities. Relocated facilities would potentially include the Hazardous
Cargo Pad (HCP), the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Proficiency
Range, the Joint Air Defense Operations Center (JADOC) Satellite Site,
portions of the existing golf course, and the Military Working Dog
(MWD) Kennel. The Final EIS considers reasonable alternatives for
these actions at JBA, including a No Action Alternative.
The Final EIS evaluates the effects of the Air Force’s proposal on
the following resource areas: air quality; biological resources; cultural
resources; floodplains; hazardous materials/hazardous waste/solid
waste; transportation; noise; land use; safety; socioeconomics, environmental justice and the protection of children; water quality; and
wetlands. For areas where significant impacts are assessed, the EIS
proposes mitigation measures to reduce or eliminate those impacts.
The Final EIS also responds to substantive comments received on the
Draft EIS, which were registered during the Draft EIS 45-day public
comment period (February 3rd, 2017 through March 20th, 2017).
The Final EIS will be made available for public inspection for a
thirty-day period beginning on October 13th, 2017 and ending on
November 13th, 2017. Electronic copies of the Final PAR EIS can be
downloaded from the project website at www.parprogrameis.com.
Printed copies of the Final EIS are available for public inspection
for a thirty day period beginning on October 13th, 2017, at the
following repositories: Joint Base Andrews Library, 1442 Concord
Ave., Joint Base Andrews, MD 20762; Surratts-Clinton Branch Library,
9400 Piscataway Rd., Clinton, MD 20735; Spauldings Branch Library,
5811 Old Silver Hill Rd., District Heights, MD 20747; Oxon Hill Branch
Library, 6200 Oxon Hill Rd., Oxon Hill, MD 20745; and Upper Marlboro
Branch Library, 14730 Main St., Upper Marlboro, MD 20772.
Inquiries regarding this Notice or the Final EIS can be made through
the project website at www.parprogrameis.com; or by mail to:
Antiques
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!— I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
208
Appliances
electric oven. GE four burner. Good
condition—$75.00, silver spring,
MD, 301-384-1855
KIRBY Generation Vacuum Cleaner—$135 Excel'nt Cond, HEPA filtration, Cost $1300. 571-606-0319
Student Desk & Chair—$55 24x42
top with drawers, v/good cond.
roller chair, 301-345-1693
225
COCA COLA COOLER STORE DISPLAY—65 inches tall coke bottle,
$49, Burke, VA, 703-455-8306
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
229
350
Clothing, Shoes
& Accessories
Garage Sales, MD
BETHESDA- 8107 Thoreau Dr. Sat
10/14, 7:30a-11:30a, Multi-Family,
PEO yard sale, all proceeds for
Women's education.
CITY WIDE YARD SALE!
Mount Rainer(20712) - 28 homes,
toys clothes, furn, household items
and more! 10/14 7AM-3PM
3202 Sheperd St (336)473-8525
ROCKVILLE - Sat 10/14, 9am-4pm.
4415 Judith Street. Furniture,
knick-knacks, China, etc
355
Garage Sales, VA
Alexandria—BIG COMMUNITY
YARD SALE 7137 Beulah Street,
Alexandria, VA, 10/14/2017,
7am-1pm, 607-279-3077
Burke—Special Treasures Sale! Sat
10/14, Good Shepherd Church, 9350
Braddock Rd, 9-2. Toys, housewares,
furniture, books, sports & more!
Falls Church—Clothes Galore
7138 Noland Rd, Falls Church, VA,
10/14, 8 am-2 pm, 703-876-6209
Stratford Landing—Community
Men's White Pants— $15, Hyattsville,
MD, 301-322-6449NEW, Izod 36 x
32 with tags.
Yard Sale Londonderry & Camden,
Alexandria, VA, 10/14, 8am-12pm
www.stratfordlanding.org/aboutslca
Suede Purses—$30, Hyattsville, MD,
301-322-6449NEW, twoBlack and
Red with straps.
Virginia Beach—2405 Strawflower
Ct, 23453. 10/12/2017. 1999 Winnebago Minnie Winnie 619-981-7635
Virgin Hair Bundles—97.00 GRAND 360
OPENING for Hair over Heels virgin
hair. www.shophairoverheels.com
Alexandria, VA- 7300 Park Terrace Dr.
Fri-Sun, 10-3. Full house sale.
Women's Thigh high Boots—$125,
www.caringtransitionsnova.com
Hyattsville, MD, 301-322-6449NEW,
for pics and details.
black suede size 11
Estate Sales
Yard Sale—5 Sa-Sun 8-1, Oct 14-15,
kids & wmn Cls,11004 Burywood Ln,
Reston, VA 20194.
237
Firewood
EARLY WINTER SPECIAL: 1 cord $200.
2 cords $380. 3 cords $540.
4 cords $600. Call 703-357-2180
FIREWOOD SALES, seasoned Oak,
$350/full cord. Delivered. NOVA.
Robert 703-424-4064 or 703-855-4691
CENTREVILLE, VA- 60 yrs accm., art
deco, "waterfall" BR set, depression glass, crystal, wrought iron
outdoor furn., BR furn., solid cherry DR set, antique jewelry, vintage
kit., lawn tools, vint. clothing, vint.
linens, much, much more! Fri Oct.
13th by appt only,
Call 703-209-7312 or 757-5618112, Sat Oct 14th, 8am-4pm,
1336 Sleek Woodruff Ln.
KENSINGTON, MD (20895) - 10001
Crestwood Rd. Fri-Sat 10/13-10/14
10AM-3PM. Antiques, sterling, silver
Aquarium—$225, wheaton, MD, 240- artwork and rugs. 301-593-5433
671-4352
240
Crafts & Hobbies
245
Electronics
Therapy Lamp—$39.99 NatureBright
Light and Ion Therapy Lamp $39.99,
Alexandria, VA, 571-431-1501
255
Heavy Equipment,
Machinery & Tools
SW DC - 1308 4th st. Sat.-Sun.
10/14, 15, 9am-5pm.Furn., artwork
, china, silver, antique dolls.
Vienna, VA
Fri & Sat 10-3.
288 Windover Ave
The first of 2 great sales.
See estatesales.net
Encore Estate Sales 703-922-6260
BRICK—$249 550 New 10 Hole Bldg 416
Size, less or more if need (apprx
1500) .45 each, 301-345-1693
Tickets, Wanted
John Deere Gator 825i ( 2013 )
2013 John Deere Gator 825i, 4X4,
420 hours. Asking $3645.
Call or text : (804) 293-5595
260
Furniture
BUNKBED—$185 Solid Dark Wood,
W/mattress, vgood cond. deliv for
$20 in DC area, 301-345-1693
WALDORF, MD- Liv room furn & more!
exc cond. Leather/fabric set. $1K ea
set OBO. Mercedes 2005 Benz E320
98K mi. $8,799 OBO 202-553-7522
265
Home & Garden
Aluminum Extension Ladder (20 ft.)—
$65, Burke, VA, 703-978-2723
FIREWOOD—$240, fairfax, VA, 703297-6936 1 cord of seasoned hardwood firewood. Free delivery
Solid
Hardwood
Brazilian
Cherry Flooring - 3600 S.F.,
$2.50 per SF. 301-860-1190
275
Merchandise Wanted
FREON WANTED—Old R-12 collecting
dust? We buy cylinders & cans of
R-12! EPA Certified. (312) 291-9169
www.RefrigerantFinders.com
HOC will hold a public hearing on these documents at 3:30 p.m. on
December 6, 2017 at its Detrick Avenue location.
All written public comments may be directed by mail to Stacy Spann,
Executive Director, at 10400 Detrick Avenue, Kensington, Maryland
20895 or e-mailed to Plancomments@hocmc.org.
The public comment period for this document ends on December
6, 2017. To be considered, all comments must be received no later
than December 5, 2017. There will be an opportunity to provide oral
comments on the day of the public hearing.
622
Adopt Cats
I BUY RECORD COLLECTIONS!—I drive
to you, pay CASH, and haul them
away. Call 571-830-5871
4Paws—Adopt fr 20+ cat/
kitten $v Sun 1-4 Sterling
Petco www.fourpaws.org
571-434-6562 CFC34517
Birds & Other Animals
820
Official Notices
ABC LICENSE: TB Reston LLC trading as Ted's Bulletin Reston, 11948
Market St, Reston (Fairfax County), Virginia 20190-5614. The above
establishment is applying to the
VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC)
for a Wine and Beer/Mixed Beverage On Premises Restaurant license
to sell or manufacture alcoholic
beverages. Troy Vallier CFO. NOTE:
Objections to the issuance of this
license must be submitted to ABC no
later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first of two required
newspaper legal notices. Objections
should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.
ABC LICENSE: TB Merrifield LLC trading as Ted's Bulletin Merrifield, 2911
District Ave #160, Fairfax (Fairfax
County), Virginia 22031-2281. The
above establishment is applying to
the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL
(ABC) for a Wine and Beer/Mixed
Beverage On Premises Restaurant
license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Troy Vallier CFO.
NOTE: Objections to the issuance of
this license must be submitted to
ABC no later than 30 days from the
publishing date of the first of two
required newspaper legal notices.
Objections should be registered at
www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-5523200.
ABC LICENSE: Northside FC, LLC
trading as Northside Falls Church,
205 Park Ave Falls Church, Virginia
22046. The above establishment is
applying to the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE
CONTROL (ABC) for a Wine and Beer
on Premises license to sell Wine
& Beer On & Off Premises w/keg
& Mixed Beverage. Brian Normile,
Managing Member NOTE: Objections to the issuance of this license
must be submitted to ABC no later
than 30 days from the publishing
date of the first of two required
newspaper legal notices. Objections
should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.
ABC LICENSE: K'S GLOBAL DINING,
LLC trading as HANABI RAMEN,
3024 Wilson Boulevard Arlington,
(Arlington County), Virginia 222013810. The above establishment is
applying to the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE
CONTROL (ABC) for a Wine and Beer
on Premises license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Kenji
Hisatsune Managing Member NOTE:
Objections to the issuance of this
license must be submitted to ABC no
later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first of two required
newspaper legal notices. Objections
should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.
825
Bids & Proposals
Purchasing Cooperative of
America (PCA) will receive electronically generated proposals
(.pdf) until 11:00 a.m. CT on
601
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
for Region III ESC, 1905 Leary
Ln, Victoria, TX 77901, and PCA
Members for the following four
national contracts: (1) RFP 3180-17 Conservation and Efficiency Products and Programs;
(2) RFP 3-181-17 Employee
Assistance Programs; (3) RFP
3-182-17 Paper and Paper
CAT- Lost 1 yr ago- Burke/Fairfax Products; (4) RFP 3-183 -17
area. Female, 3 yrs old, Silver/grey Document Management Softmarble Tabby. Believe she's in ware/Programs for Administrasomeone's home. 703-627-5651 tive Records. All proposals
will be submitted in electronic
610
format and uploaded into the
PCA
Bonfire
application.
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES
NOTICE: PCA is holding a Pre11 weeks, Red Tri and black bi, S/W.
Proposal Meeting on Wednesregistrable, $700-$750
Call Jim 540-371-6939
day, October 18, 2017 at 11811
Belgian Malinois Puppies - 9 weeks, North Freeway (I-45N), 5th
AKC, family, home protection, world Floor, Houston, TX @ 10 a.m.
shenkin lines, vaccinated, $1500 – Noon. RSVP is required. Call
571-643-2107
844-722-6374 x700. Go to
www.pcamerica.org/solicitaBOSTON TERRIER PUPPIEStions for more information.
AKC reg., 3 Males, S&W, 15
835
weeks, parents on prem. $550
Lost
Dogs for Sale
Dobes, Yorkies & more—PUPPY SALE
304-904-6289,Cash,CC,EasyFinance
wvpuppy.com 59 East Rd Martinsburg,WV.exit16E.AcrossFromBigLots
Radio tubes—WANTED ham radios
huge speakers tube hif amps 202
527 9501, vcvdc@msn.com
RECORDS - I pay cash for
50s, 60s, & 70s .
Categories: Jazz, Soul, R&R, R&B.
Call 703-865-6050.
SMALL COLLECTOR PAYS CASH
FOR COINS/COLLECTIONS.
Call Al, 301-807-3266
Will Come to you!
280
Musical Instruments
Electric Organ— Beautiful Wood case
organ. Needs repair. $200, 703-4766460. Herndon, VA
291
Sporting Goods
& Services
ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES- Cute,
cuddly & wrinkly, ready now, call
for price. S&W, vet checked
Call 814-793-2008
GERMAN SHEPHERD WORKING
LINE PUPPIES- 6 F's, blk & sable,
ready 10/16. vt chkd, UTD shts,
hlth guar., $1,800. World class
ped., AKC reg. 301-956-4635
Havanese,Morkies,more—Best Prices
304-904-6289,Cash,CC, EasyFinance
wvpuppy.com 59 EastRd MartinsburgWV exit16E AcrossFrom Big Lots
Nordic Track Exercise Skier—$195
Great cardio workout, easy fold up;
Exc Cond, $800 new, 571-606-0319
SCUBAGEAR Large—$249
Wetsuit,Fins,Gloves,Boots,Mask/Snrkl,
Wght belt/wghts, 301-345-1693
Two Car Seats—39 Generic infant
$39 Graco child car seat,$49($79
both)Alexandria, VA 571431-1501
Weightlifting Equipment—$200 Fairfax, VA, 703-203-1618 text e-mail
address for list and pictures
345
Garage Sales, D.C.
CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS - Huge MultiFamily Yard/Bake Sale at 3526 Mass.
Ave. NW. Sat. 10/14, 10-2pm. Furniture, Linens, Household, Toys, Books
and more. GREAT DEALS! Everything
must go. RAIN OR SHINE.
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
JACK RUSSELL PUPS - Smooth,
Broken & rough NKC reg $800. S/W.
Ready now. Donna 301-751-0892
djackrussells@gmail.com
LAB PUPPIES - AKC, FC champion
line, yellow & choc females,
shots,dewormed. Vet checked, POP.
crate trained $600+ 540-582-5769
LAB PUPS- AKC, Yellow Females,
Ready 10/20. Deposit. S&W, health
guar. Convenient to I 95 VA.
$750. Call 804-994-3171
LAB RET/GOLDEN RET CROSS& AKC
GOLDEN PUPS & ADULTS
8 weeks - 5 yrs. Vet checked, parents
on prem, health guar. 301-605-0543
W www.VictoriasPups.com W
Poodle, Standard - AKC—M/F, 4 mths.
Vet. Cert., current shots wormed.
Champion pedigree. Family raised.
House trained. $850 727-742-8759
ShiChon—Teddybear Puppies- DC's
Fav family puppy. 5year Health
Warr/Vet ck, Local In home breeder
,raised with TLC. 9/10wks $750&850
703-577-1069
www.DCDogFinders.com
SHIH TZU POODLE MIX PUPS & TOY
POODLE PUPS- Shots, wormed, mother & father on premises. Mix 11 wks
old. Toys ready 10/14. 540-406-0740
1370
Business /
Entrepreneurial
Opportunities
Public Sale Notices
IN ORDER TO ENFORCE ITS LIEN
FOR UNPAID RENT, AMERICAN
SELF STORAGE WILL SELL AT A
PUBLIC AUCTION ON Thursday
10/19/2017
AT
12:00PM
NOON, FOR CASH, THE CONTENTS OF THE FOLLOWING
UNITS
256- R. Bacchus
491- J. Campos
670- W. Argueta
849- M. Buckingham
915- R. Abraham
3135- T. Jackson
4130- R. Cifuentes
4210- A. Villareal
5127- J. Young
5433- M. Gill
5506- A. Mathews
6130- M. Gill
Sale to be held at
American Self Storage
3700 Plyers Mill Road
Kensington, MD 20895
301-933-3300
10/19/2017 at 12:00pm.
Victor Jones
851
GOLF CLUB SET—$45 Set of clubs
with Spalding Bag, wood drivers,
also have golf shoes,301-345-1693
Yorkie—$1100, 8 weeks ready to go.
4 boy litter, shots, tails/dew claws
docked. CKC. Lovely little teddy
bears. Parents here. 304-620-8390.
Yorkies, Morkies, Shihtzus & more
304-904-6289,Cash,CC,EasyFinance
wvpuppy.com 59 EastRd Martinsburg WV exit16E AcrossFromBigLots
Have you heard about bitcoin? Learn
how to make money with cryptocur- Yorkshire Terrier—$1200, Female, 8
rency! www.agamnow.com Text months, vaccines UTD, registered,
"BTC" to 797979. Call 800-385-0381. comes w/everything, 301-467-1921
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
Season Tickets Wanted.
Buying all locations. Top $ paid.
Please call 1-800-786-8425
each. Call 240-346-7818
850
Bids & Proposals
The new FFY 2017 CFP Five-Year Action Plan and the proposed
changes to HOC’s Administrative Plan are available for review at
HOC’s main office at 10400 Detrick Avenue in Kensington, HOC’s UpCounty Office at 231 East Deer Park Drive in Gaithersburg, and at
HOC’s two Customer Service Centers: 8241 Georgia Avenue 3rd Floor,
in Silver Spring, and 101 Lakeforest Blvd., #200, in Gaithersburg. The
new FFY 2017 CFP Five-Year Action Plan and Administrative Plan
changes are also available on HOC’s website at www.hocmc.org.
HOC’s hours are 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday through Friday.
REDSKINS, WIZARDS, CAPS
Heavy Duty Electric Motors—$70,
Hyattsville, MD, 301-322-6449Two,
NEW 1/2 hp, used 1/6 hp.
825
The Housing Opportunities Commission of Montgomery County (HOC)
has developed its new Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2017 Capital Fund
Program (CFP) Five-Year Action Plan. This Plan will replace HOC’s
current FFY 2016 CFP Five-Year Action Plan. HOC has also developed
proposed revisions and new additions for its Administrative Plan
for the Housing Choice Voucher program (“Administrative Plan”).
The proposed changes involve waiting list related changes to the
admissions process. The Administrative Plan document defines and
describes the policies for the operation of HOC’s Housing Choice
Voucher program. These revisions will go into effect following
approval by HOC’s Commission.
Canaries — Young singing canaries,
Buy a male $60 , get female FREE!
Mr.Domingo - 703-992-8468
Collectibles
AURORA SLOT CARS Wanted—$100 &
up, cars/sets. + Atlas, AFX, Tyco,
Cox, Revell, AMT. 703-960-3594
Bids & Proposals
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2017
Notice of Publication
Housing Opportunities Commission of Montgomery County
FFY 2017 CFP Five-Year Action Plan
HOC Administrative Plan Revision
October 2017
640
Ms. Jean Reynolds
EIS Project Manager
AFCEC/CZN
2261 Hughes Ave., Ste. 155
JBSA Lackland, TX 78326-9853
205
825
CLASSIFIED
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Thomas W. Hodge, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs,
V.
Norma P. Neale, et al.
Defendant(s).
Case No. CAEF1714821
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this 18th
day of September, 2017, that the
sale of the property in this case,
6221 Kenilworth Avenue, Riverdale,
Maryland 20737, reported by
THOMAS W. HODGE, GENE JUNG,
LAURA D. HARRIS, ROBERT M. OLIVERI, CHRISTINE JOHNSON, SCOTT
ROBINSON AND LOUIS GINGHER,
Substitute Trustees, be ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary be shown on or before
the 18th day of October, 2017 provided a copy of this Notice be
inserted in The Washington Post,
a newspaper published in Prince
George's County, Maryland, once
in each of three (3) successive
weeks on or before the 18th day of
October, 2017.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $257,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison (#619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Prince Georges County, MD
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 Viking Drive
Suite 203
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 213-2959
Sept 29 Oct 6, 13, 2017 12132903
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
D10
STEPHEN B. JACKSON and
STEVEN P. HENNE
Substituted Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
MICHELLE LYNN MILLARD
Defendant
Civil Action No. CAEF17-15644
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 21st
day of September, 2017, by the
Circuit Court for Prince George's
County, Maryland, that the sale
of the property identified as 4625
Captain Covington Place, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, made
by Stephen B. Jackson and Steven
P. Henne, Substituted Trustees, to:
The Community Development
Administration of the Department
of Housing and Community Development for the State of Maryland
and reported in the above-entitled
cause be ratified and confirmed
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 23rd
day of October, 2017, provided a
copy of this NOTICE be inserted
in some newspaper published
in said Prince George's County
once a week for three consecutive
weeks on or before the said 23rd
day of October, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $227,700.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Attorney Louis S.Pettey, Esq
Heise Jorgensen & Stefanelli P.A.
18310 Montgomery Village
Avenue, Suite 400
Gaithersburg, MD 20879
(301) 977-8400
Sept 29, Oct 6, 13, 2017 12132915
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
DANIEL J WILLIAMS
THELMA A WILLIAMS
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF15-20092
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 22nd
day of September, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 7007
Antock Place, Upper Marlboro, MD
20772, and reported in the above
entitled cause, will be finally
ratified and confirmed, unless
cause to the contrary thereof be
shown on or before the 23rd day
of October, 2017 next; provided a
copy of this Order be inserted in
The Washington Post, 1150 15th
Street, Washington, DC, MD in said
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S
once a week for three successive
weeks before the 23rd day of October, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $353,400.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Montgomery County
850
840
Montgomery County
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
851
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
SANTOS E ALBERTO MELGAR A/K/A
SANTOS E ALBERTO A/K/A SANTOS
E MELGAR
RUTH M REYES
IGNACIO ALBERTO
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-01437
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 22nd
day of September, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 4229
Rail St, Capitol Heights, MD 20743,
and reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 23rd day of October,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
three successive weeks before the
23rd day of October, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $94,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Khalid D. Walker
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Jinny M. Zwolak
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-00081
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 21st day of September 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 2263 Prince Of Wales Court,
Bowie, Maryland 20716 made and
reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon
Menapace, Khalid D. Walker, Christine M. Drexel and Brian Thomas,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 23rd day of October,
2017, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 23rd day of
October, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $144,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Sept 29, Oct 6,13, 2017 12132908
12133142
851
Prince Georges County
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Erin M. August
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Paris Rowser and the Estate of Lucy
Rowser
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF16-24934
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 22nd day of September 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 2719 Millvale Avenue, District
Heights, Maryland 20747 made and
reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin M.
August, Hugh J. Green and Patrick
M. A. Decker, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 23rd day
of October, 2017, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 23rd day of October, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $155,665.00.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sept 29, Oct 6,13, 2017 12132928
Sept 29, Oct 6, 13, 2017 12132920
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
ADELE BOYDE
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al.
Trustee(s)
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
PATRICK ARNOLD
JENNIFER ARNOLD
Defendant(s)
Mortgagor(s)
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-09986
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 22nd
day of September, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 1602
Pittsfield Ln, Bowie, MD 20716, and
reported in the above entitled
cause, will be finally ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary thereof be shown on or
before the 23rd day of October,
2017 next; provided a copy of this
Order be inserted in The Washington Post, 1150 15th Street, Washington, DC, MD in said COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S once a week for
three successive weeks before the
23rd day of October, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $219,441.62.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
CIVIL NO: CAEF17-11000
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 22nd
day of September, 2017 by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
PRINCE GEORGE'S, Maryland and
by the authority thereof, that the
sale made by Kristine D. Brown,
William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone, Trustees, of the
Real Property designated as 1209
Capitol Heights Blvd, Capitol
Heights, MD 20743, and reported
in the above entitled cause, will
be finally ratified and confirmed,
unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the
23rd day of October, 2017 next;
provided a copy of this Order be
inserted in The Washington Post,
1150 15th Street, Washington, DC,
MD in said COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S once a week for three
successive weeks before the 23rd
day of October, 2017.
The report states the amount of
the sale to be $124,000.00.
BY THE COURT:
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Sept 29, Oct 6, 13, 2017 12132922
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Brian Thomas
Erin M. Cohen
Hugh J. Green
Patrick M. A. Decker
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Charles E. Moulden
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF16-25639
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 22nd day of September 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located at 10100 Quinlin Court, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772 made
and reported by James E. Clarke,
Renee Dyson, Brian Thomas, Erin
M. Cohen, Hugh J. Green and
Patrick M. A. Decker, Substitute
Trustees, be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the
23rd day of October, 2017, provided
a copy of this Order be inserted
in The Washington Post once in
each of three (3) successive weeks
before the 23rd day of October,
2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $399,238.00
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sept 29, Oct 6,13, 2017 12132930
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Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs,
V.
Edilberto M. Atienza a/k/a Edliberto
M. Atienza, et al.
Defendant(s).
Case No. CAEF16-25284
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this 18th
day of September, 2017, that the
sale of the property in this case,
12524 Monterey Circle, Fort Washington, Maryland 20744, reported
by Robert E. Frazier, Gene Jung,
Laura D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge,
Thomas J. Gartner, Robert M. Oliveri, and David M. Williamson, Substitute Trustees, be ratified and
confirmed, unless cause to the
contrary be shown on or before
the 18th day of October, 2017 provided a copy of this Notice be
inserted in The Washington Post,
a newspaper published in Prince
George's County, Maryland, once
in each of three (3) successive
weeks on or before the 18th day of
October, 2017.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $592,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison (#619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Prince Georges County, MD
Sept 29 Oct 6, 13, 2017 12132901
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
Sept 29 Oct 6, 13, 2017 12132906
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY
MARYLAND
861
Calvert County
RIDBERG ARONSON LLC
6411 Ivy Lane
Suite 405
Greenbelt MD 20770
TRUSTEES’ SALE OF
VALUABLE IMPROVED PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
8270 SYCAMORE RD
LUSBY MD
By virtue of the power of sale
contained in a certain Deed of
Trust dated December 13, 2014
from Bay Area Housing, LLC to
Joel Aronson and Jeffrey Levin,
Trustees, recorded among the
Land Records of Calvert County,
Maryland on January 6, 2015 in
Liber 4496 folio 58 was given to
secure a loan evidenced by a
Promissory Note(s) in the amount
of One Hundred Nineteen Thousand
and
No/100
Dollars
($119,000.00), dated December
13, 2014 payable to JCL Funding
Group LLC (the “Beneficiary”) the
current holder of the Note secured
thereby, and default having
occurred under the terms thereof,
the undersigned Trustees will offer
for sale at public auction, at the
Courthouse for the County of
Calvert, 175 Main Street, Prince
Frederick, MD 20678 on
October 18 at 11:00 AM
All that lot of ground, the improvements, and personal property
thereon situated in Calvert County
Maryland and more fully described
in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.
The property is believed to be
improved.
The property will be sold in “AS IS”
condition, subject to any existing
building violations, etc., and also
subject to conditions, restrictions,
easements and agreements of
record and tenancies affecting
same. Neither the Trustees nor
their agents, successors or assigns
make any representation or warranties, either expressed or
implied, with respect to the property including, without limitation,
description, use, recorded or
unrecorded leases or other occupancy agreements, senior liens,
operating and management agreements, physical conditions or environmental conditions of the property.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash or certified
check in the amount of $20,000.00
will be required of the purchaser
(other than the above-named
Holder or its designee) at the time
and place of sale, balance in cash
the earlier of ten days after ratification or November 30, 2018,
time being of the essence, and to
bear interest at the rate of 8% per
annum from date of sale to date
of settlement. In the event the
Holder or its designee purchases
the property as the high bidder,
no deposit shall be required, and
the requirement of interest on the
balance is waived. If the purchaser
defaults, the Substitute Trustees
may declare the entire deposit
forfeited and resell the property
at the risk and expense of the
defaulting party. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason,
there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water, rent, all
public
charges/assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan
district charges, if applicable, to
be assumed by purchaser. Cost of
all documentary stamps, transfer
taxes and settlement expenses
shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for
obtaining physical possession of
the property. Purchaser assumes
the risk of loss or damage to the
property from the date of sale
forward. If the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey insurable
title, the purchaser's sole remedy
in law and equity shall be limited to
a refund of the deposit. Additional
terms may be announced at the
sale.
Joel S. Aronson
Substitute Trustee
All Inquiries should be directed to
Joel S. Aronson
301-474-3290
Sept 29, Oct 6,13, 2017 12131616
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CALVERT COUNTY,
MARYLAND
Thomas W. Hodge, et al.
Substitute Trustees,
Plaintiffs,
V.
Debra Simmons, et al.
Defendant(s)
CASE NO. 04C17000353
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this 21st
day of September, 2017, that the
sale of the property in this case,
1490 Ash Road, Saint Leonard,
Maryland 20685, reported by
Thomas W. Hodge, Gene Jung,
Laura D. Harris, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson,
and Louis Gingher, Substitute
Trustees, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the
21st day of October, 2017, provided
a copy of this Notice be inserted
in The Washington Post, a newspaper published in Calvert County,
Maryland, once in each of three (3)
successive weeks on or before the
21st day of October, 2017.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $243,637.00.
Kathy P. Smith
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Calvert County, MD
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 Viking Drive, Suite 203
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 213-2959
Sept 29, Oct 6, 13, 2017 12133228
Civil No. CAEF17-11650
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 21st day of September 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 3323 Huntley Square Drive, Unit
T-2, Temple Hills, Maryland 20748
made and reported by James E.
Clarke, Renee Dyson, Hugh J.
Green, Shannon Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and Brian Thomas,
Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED
and CONFIRMED, unless cause to
the contrary be shown on or
before the 23rd day of October,
2017, provided a copy of this Order
be inserted in The Washington Post
once in each of three (3) successive weeks before the 23rd day of
October, 2017.
ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for
Prince George's County, Maryland,
this 21st day of September 2017,
that the foreclosure sale of the
property described in the deed of
trust docketed herein and located
at 5646 46th Place, Hyattsville,
Maryland 20781 made and reported by James E. Clarke, Renee
Dyson, Hugh J. Green, Shannon
Menapace, Christine M. Drexel and
Brian Thomas, Substitute Trustees,
be RATIFIED and CONFIRMED,
unless cause to the contrary be
shown on or before the 23rd day
of October, 2017, provided a copy
of this Order be inserted in The
Washington Post once in each of
three (3) successive weeks before
the 23rd day of October, 2017.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $93,604.15.
The Report of Sale states the
amount of the sale at $387,755.42.
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sydney J. Harrison #619
Clerk of the Circuit Court For
Prince George's County, Maryland
Sept 29, Oct 6,13, 2017 12132913
Sept 29, Oct 6,13, 2017 12132911
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The property will be sold in “AS IS”
condition, subject to any existing
building violations, etc., and also
subject to conditions, restrictions,
easements and agreements of
record and tenancies affecting
same. Neither the Trustees nor
their agents, successors or assigns
make any representation or warranties, either expressed or
implied, with respect to the property including, without limitation,
description, use, recorded or
unrecorded leases or other occupancy agreements, senior liens,
operating and management agreements, physical conditions or environmental conditions of the property.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash or certified
check in the amount of $20,000.00
will be required of the purchaser
(other than the above-named
Holder or its designee) at the time
and place of sale, balance in cash
the earlier of ten days after ratification or November 30, 2018,
time being of the essence, and to
bear interest at the rate of 8% per
annum from date of sale to date
of settlement. In the event the
Holder or its designee purchases
the property as the high bidder,
no deposit shall be required, and
the requirement of interest on the
balance is waived. If the purchaser
defaults, the Substitute Trustees
may declare the entire deposit
forfeited and resell the property
at the risk and expense of the
defaulting party. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason,
there shall be no abatement of
interest. Taxes, water, rent, all
public
charges/assessments
payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan
district charges, if applicable, to
be assumed by purchaser. Cost of
all documentary stamps, transfer
taxes and settlement expenses
shall be borne by the purchaser.
Purchaser shall be responsible for
obtaining physical possession of
the property. Purchaser assumes
the risk of loss or damage to the
property from the date of sale
forward. If the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey insurable
title, the purchaser's sole remedy
in law and equity shall be limited to
a refund of the deposit. Additional
terms may be announced at the
sale.
Joel S. Aronson
Substitute Trustee
All Inquiries should be directed to
Joel S. Aronson
301-474-3290
Sept 29, Oct 6,13, 2017 12131610
872
Fairfax County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
4603 GRAMLEE CIRCLE,
FAIRFAX, VA 22032
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $508,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
September 6, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 18749,
Page 1626, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on November 15, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0691 04 0088
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-256499.
12135154
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $937,500.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.000000% dated
December 20, 2005, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 18084,
Page 1541, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on November 15, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 0773 12 0058A
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All that lot of ground, the improvements, and personal property
thereon situated in St. Mary’s
County Maryland and more fully
described in the aforesaid Deed of
Trust. The property is believed to
be improved.
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
6191 FREDS OAK RD,
FAIRFAX STATION, VA 22039
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to home delivery.
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By virtue of the power of sale
contained in a certain Deed of
Trust dated August 19, 2014 from
Christina Thompson LLC to Joel
Aronson and Jeffrey Levin,
Trustees, recorded among the
Land Records of St. Mary’s County,
Maryland on September 8, 2014
in Liber 4076 folio 729 was given
to secure a loan evidenced by a
Promissory Note(s) in the amount
of One Hundred Twenty One Thousand Two Hundred and No/100
Dollars
($121,200.00),
dated
August 19, 2014 payable to Specialty Lending Group, LLC (the
“Beneficiary”) the current holder
of the Note secured thereby, and
default having occurred under the
terms thereof, the undersigned
Trustees will offer for sale at public
auction, at the Courthouse for the
County of St. Mary’s, 41605 Court
House Dr. Leonardtown, MD 20650
on
October 18 at 12:01 PM
Oct 13, 20, 2017
1-800-753-POST
SF
KNOWN AS
2610 THREE NOTCH RD.
MECHANICSVILLE MD
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
v.
Gayle A. Dilla
Defendant(s)
Civil No. CAEF17-17795
NOTICE PURSUANT
TO MD RULE 14-215 (A)
Trustees Sale
Other MD Co.
RIDBERG ARONSON LLC
6411 Ivy Lane
Suite 405
Greenbelt MD 20770
TRUSTEES’ SALE OF
VALUABLE IMPROVED PROPERTY
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
James E. Clarke
Renee Dyson
Hugh J. Green
Shannon Menapace
Christine M. Drexel
Brian Thomas
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs
v.
Barbara J. Adams
Defendant(s)
1-800-753-POST
SF
Substitute Trustees
Plaintiffs,
V.
Loretta L. Windsor,
Defendant(s).
Case No. CAEF1703772
NOTICE
Notice is hereby issued this 18th
day of September, 2017, that the
sale of the property in this case,
8410 Oak Drive, Brandywine, Maryland 20613, reported by Robert
E. Frazier, Gene Jung, Laura D.
Harris, Thomas W. Hodge, Robert
M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson, and
Scott
Robinson,
Substitute
Trustees, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the
18th day of October, 2017 provided
a copy of this Notice be inserted in
The Washington Post, a newspaper published in Prince George's
County, Maryland, once in each
of three (3) successive weeks on
or before the 18th day of October,
2017.
The report states the amount of
sale to be $136,000.00.
Sydney J. Harrison (#619)
Clerk of the Circuit Court
for Prince Georges County, MD
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 Viking Drive
Suite 203
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 213-2959
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 Viking Drive
Suite 203
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 213-2959
Wake up to
home delivery.
Sept 29, Oct 6, 13, 2017 12132926
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853
Trustees Sale - DC
Pardo & Drazin, LLC
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
Russell S. Drazin, Attorney
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
4400 Jenifer Street, NW, Suite 2
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
Washington, DC 20015
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
202-223-7900
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
TRUSTEE’S SALE
KNOWN AS
OF REAL PROPERTY
5576 BURNSIDE DRIVE, APARTMENT 2
1202 Decatur Street, NW, Washington, DC 20011
Rockville, MD 20853
(Lot 0033 in Square 2921)
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to SUELLEN WOHLFARTH, Trustee(s), dated Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust in
the
original
principal
amount of $770,000.00 dated December
January 19, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of
MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 29212, folio 15, 2016 and recorded December 28, 2016 as Instrument
No.
2016135461
with
the Recorder of Deeds of the District
450, the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by of Columbia ("Land Records") from 1202 Decatur Street LLC,
as
Grantor,
to
Daniel
Huertas,
as Trustee, for the benefit of DP
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at Capital LLC, as Beneficiary (“Deed of Trust”), default having
the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned occurred under the terms thereof, and following the mailing
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at and recordation in the Land Records of an Affidavit of NonTHE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 Residential Mortgage Foreclosure and a Notice of Foreclosure
Sale of Real Property or Condominium Unit, at the request of
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
the current noteholder, the Trustee will sell at public auction
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 10:00AM
at the office of Harvey West Auctioneers, Inc., 5335 Wisconsin
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015, on
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
OCTOBER 24, 2017 AT 10:30 AM
as follows:
ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS CONDOMINIUM UNIT THEREON situated in the City of Washington, District of ColumNO. TWO (2) IN BUILDING NO. 5576 IN "NORTH CREEK bia, known as 1202 Decatur Street, NW, Washington, DC 20019
PLACE CONDOMINIUM", ROCKVILLE, MONTGOMERY COUN- (Lot 0033 in Square 2921), and more fully described in the
TY, MARYLAND, AND THE PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE Deed of Trust.
COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO, PURSUANT
TO THE DECLARATION RECORDED IN LIBER 6580 AT FOLIO The property will be sold in an “AS IS” condition, with no
248, RE-RECORDED IN LIBER 6581 AT FOLIO 1, AND ANY warranty of any kind, and subject to conditions, restrictions,
AND ALL SUBSEQUENT AMENDMENTS THERETO RECORDED agreements, liens, and encumbrances of record affecting the
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, same – except those encumbrances of record that are extinMARYLAND AND THE PLAT RECORDED IN CONDOMINIUM guished by operation of District of Columbia law by virtue of the
PLAT BOOK 36, PLAT NO. 3742, ET SEQ., AND ANY AND ALL foreclosure of the Deed of Trust.
SUBSEQUENT AMENDMENTS THERETO RECORDED AMONG Purchaser will take title to the property subject to all taxes, water
THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND. and sewer charges, and other utility charges, if any. Purchaser
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the
without either express or implied warranty or representation, date of sale forward. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a physical possession of the property.
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $80,000.00 by cash or
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, cashier’s check will be required of the purchaser at the time and
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- place of sale. Purchaser shall settle within thirty (30) days of
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other sale. TIME SHALL BE OF THE ESSENCE WITH RESPECT TO
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and SETTLEMENT BY PURCHASER. Balance of the purchase price
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record to be paid in cash or certified funds at settlement. Interest to
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold be paid on the unpaid purchase money from the date of sale
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of to the date of settlement at the interest rate set forth in the
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA debt instrument secured by the Deed of Trust. Purchaser shall
be responsible for payment of all settlement costs.
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $12,000.00 payable in certified The noteholder and its affiliates, if a bidder, shall not be required
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser to post a deposit or to pay interest.
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon In the event that purchaser does not settle as required for any
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY reason, purchaser shall be in default. Upon such default, the
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.125% deposit shall be forfeited to the Trustee and all of the expenses
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of of this sale (including attorneys’ fees and full commission on
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be the gross sale price) shall be charged against and paid out of
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the the forfeited deposit. The Trustee may resell the property at the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the resulting from any resale of the property.
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. If the Trustee does not settle as set forth herein, the purchaser’s
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, sole remedy at law and in equity shall be limited to a refund of
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be the deposit and the sale shall be considered null and void and of
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and no effect whatsoever.
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement The Trustee reserves the right, in Trustee's sole discretion, to
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium reject any and all bids, to withdraw the property from sale at any
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be time before or at the auction, to extend the time to receive bids,
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for to waive or modify the deposit requirement, to waive or modify
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute the requirement that interest be paid on the unpaid purchase
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to money, and/or to extend the period of time for settlement.
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law Additional terms may be announced at the sale. The successful
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned bidder will be required to execute and deliver to the Trustee
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against a memorandum or contract of the sale at the conclusion of
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These bidding.
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
Daniel Huertas, Trustee
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe OCTOBER 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 2017
12130412
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-07006)
851
Prince Georges County 851 Prince Georges County
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
Laura D. Harris, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
FOR PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher and Gene Jung,
MARYLAND
MARYLAND
Robert E. Frazier, et al.
Robert E. Frazier, et al.
Substitute Trustees
Shapiro & Brown, LLP
10021 Balls Ford Rd, Suite 200
Manassas, Virginia 20109
703 449-5800
Sept 29, Oct 6, 13, 2017 12132918
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY,
MARYLAND
840
Trustees Sale - DC
EZ
SF
Home delivery is so easy.
1-800-753-POST
SF
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-266461.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 13, 20, 2017
12135787
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
5906 COVE LANDING ROAD
UNIT #203,
BURKE, VA 22015
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $224,000.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
December 15, 2006, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 18994,
Page 2086, the undersigned
appointed Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction
all that property located in the
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at the front of the
Circuit Court building for the
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on November 8, 2017 at 2:30
PM, the property with improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 077-2-16-14-0203-B
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-269213.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 6, 13, 2017
12133327
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2017
Montgomery County
850
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
14323 BRAIRWOOD TERRACE
Rockville, MD 20853
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to DAVID F. SKAF, Trustee(s), dated April 8,
2002, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 21310, folio 259, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY (30) IN BLOCK NUMBERED TEN (10)
IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT THIRTEEN, MANOR
WOODS", AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN LAT BOOK 76 AT PLAT
NO. 7550, AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $5,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 6.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-00300)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Laura D. Harris, Thomas W. Hodge, Robert M. Oliveri,
Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
12132889
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
15000 SPRING MEADOWS DRIVE
Darnestown, MD 20874
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to VICKI L. PARRY, Trustee(s), dated October 3,
2005, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 30943, folio 528, the holder
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE,
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 10:00AM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described
as follows:
LOT NUMBERED THIRTY-EIGHT (38) IN BLOCK LETTERED
"C" IN THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "SPRING MEADOWS",
AS PER PLAT THEREOF DULY RECORDED AMONG THE LAND
RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY COUNT, MARYLAND IN PLAT
BOOK 100 AT PLAT NO. 11189.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $71,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.125%
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (14-22715)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
Jason L. Hamlin, Glen H. Tschirgi,
Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
OPQRS
EZ
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
850
Montgomery County
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
3513 Mullin Ln, Bowie, MD 20715
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
premises known as 3513 Mullin Ln, Bowie, MD 20715. By
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated June 15, 2006, and recorded in Liber 25606 at Page
KNOWN AS
641 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
463 STERNWHEELER COURT
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $495,000.00.
Gaithersburg, MD 20877
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
Deed of Trust to SMART CHOICE SETTLEMENTS OF MD LLC, COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
Trustee(s), dated January 2, 2007, and recorded among the of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Land Records of MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
34360, folio 579, the holder of the indebtedness secured by all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
this Deed of Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute not limited to:
Trustees, by instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Tax ID# 14-1677848
Records, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and
at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
THE MONTGOMERY COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
MARYLAND AVENUE, ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 10:00AM
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
as follows:
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NUMBERED TWEN- on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
TY-EIGHT (28), IN BLOCK LETTERED "A, " IN A SUBDIVI- will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
SION KNOWN AS "PLAT 1, AUDUBON SQUARE" AS PER by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 108 AT PLAT association dues and assessments that may become due after
12512 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF MONTGOMERY the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
COUNTY, MARYLAND. THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON BEING Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
KNOWN AS 463 STERNWHEELER COURT, GAITHERSBURG, taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
MARYLAND 20877.
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
without either express or implied warranty or representation, property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi- are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, Trustee's File No. 17-265642.
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $32,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
www.hwestauctions.com
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
12129273
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
TRUSTEE'S SALE
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.5% on
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
7209 Cross Street, UNIT 7209,
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
District Heights, MD 20747
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
Trustee's
Sale
of valuable fee simple property improved by
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of premises known as 7209 Cross Street, UNIT 7209, District
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the Heights, MD 20747. By virtue of the power and authority
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be contained in a Deed of Trust, dated May 2, 2006, and recorded
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. in Liber 26239 at Page 601 among the land records of
All other public charges and private charges or assessments, the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be amount of $86,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24,
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for 2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trust including but not limited to:
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to Tax ID# 06-0439760
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These affect same, if any.
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash or
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The balance
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the of the purchase price with interest at 8.499% per annum from
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (15-04416)
association dues and assessments that may become due after
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Jason L. Hamlin, Glen H. the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Tschirgi, Keith M. Yacko, and Gene Jung,
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
Substitute Trustees
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
12133195 Trustee's File No. 17-266208.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
3950 BEL PRE ROAD, APARTMENT 8
Silver Spring, MD 20906
www.hwestauctions.com
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12130925
Deed of Trust to LARRY F. PRATT, Trustee(s), dated April 20,
TRUSTEE'S SALE
2006, and recorded among the Land Records of MONTGOMERY
COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 32275, folio 048, the holder
6011 Emerson St #504, Bladensburg, MD 20710
of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument premises known as 6011 Emerson St #504, Bladensburg, MD
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default 20710. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of of Trust, dated April 21, 2009, and recorded in Liber 31581 at
the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee Page 597 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
will offer for sale at public auction at THE MONTGOMERY GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $118,437.00.
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 50 MARYLAND AVENUE, Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 ON,
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 10:00AM
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
thereon situated in MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD and described Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
as follows:
not limited to:
ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND AS
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN A DEED RECORDED AT Tax ID# 02-0183475
DEED BOOK 31238, PAGE 001 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND.
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
without either express or implied warranty or representation, affect same, if any.
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition, or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials, balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, mer- from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
chantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of association dues and assessments that may become due after
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $17,500.00 payable in certified taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of MONTGOMERY property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 6.375% purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
on unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
settlement. The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
required to post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the Trustee's File No. 17-265389.
secured party) will be required to complete full settlement of
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
the purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
of the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
www.hwestauctions.com
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
12130927
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06774)
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris,
Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
Substitute Trustees
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5204 Church Road, Bowie, MD 20720
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5204 Church Road, Bowie, MD 20720.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated August 30, 2010, and recorded in Liber 32462 at
Page 335 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $374,950.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-3701216
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-260795.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
851
Prince Georges County
851
D11
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6927 Lamont Dr, Lanham, MD 20706
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6927 Lamont Dr, Lanham, MD 20706. By
virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
dated November 4, 2005, and recorded in Liber 25657 at
Page 663 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $213,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 21-2357234
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-264259.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131411
TRUSTEE'S SALE
4009 Vine St, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 4009 Vine St, Capitol Heights, MD 20743.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated July 16, 2007, and recorded in Liber 28436 at
Page 028 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $399,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-0529586
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266655.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131495
TRUSTEE'S SALE
9309 Eldon Drive, Clinton, MD 20735
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 9309 Eldon Drive, Clinton, MD 20735.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated April 24, 2008, and recorded in Liber 29930 at
Page 418 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $292,300.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 09-0951426
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-264279.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131421
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5616 Coolidge St, Capitol Heights, MD 20743
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5616 Coolidge St, Capitol Heights, MD
20743. By virtue of the power and authority contained in
a Deed of Trust, dated November 20, 2009, and recorded
in Liber 31397 at Page 457 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $199,267.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24,
2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 18-2022960
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266342.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133193
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1205 Pickering Circle, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1205 Pickering Circle, Upper Marlboro, MD
20774. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated February 22, 2011, and recorded in Liber 32497
at Page 481 among the land records of the County of Prince
George's, in the original principal amount of $194,930.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 13-1448851
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-258992.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133305
12131479
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D12
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
5910 CLEVELAND AVE, Riverdale, MD 20737
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 5910 CLEVELAND AVE, Riverdale, MD
20737. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated January 17, 2006, and recorded in Liber 30108
at Page 377 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $160,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 19-2138279
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 15-250997.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
851
Prince Georges County
851
Prince Georges County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
7314 15Th Pl, Takoma Park, MD 20912
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 7314 15Th Pl, Takoma Park, MD 20912.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated July 6, 2007, and recorded in Liber 29044 at
Page 389 among the land records of the County of Prince
George's, in the original principal amount of $544,185.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 17-1850114
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266270.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
852
OPQRS
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
8577 Pioneer Drive Unit 21B, Severn, MD 21144
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 8577 Pioneer Drive Unit 21B, Severn, MD
21144. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed
of Trust, dated May 17, 2013, and recorded in Liber 26190 at
Page 0288 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $173,400.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 04-912-06609601
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-262108.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133306
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12238 Goldstone Ct, Waldorf, MD 20601
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12238 Goldstone Ct, Waldorf, MD 20601.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust dated November 25, 2013, and recorded in Liber 08442
at Page 0164 among the land records of the COUNTY OF
CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $357,717.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between
Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on October 24, 2017
at 12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 06-337783
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-245093. LOAN TYPE= VA
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131483
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6450 FOREST RD, Cheverly, MD 20785
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6450 FOREST RD, Cheverly, MD 20785.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated June 29, 2007, and recorded in Liber 28322 at
Page 061 among the land records of the COUNTY OF PRINCE
GEORGE'S, in the original principal amount of $360,000.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees
will offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front of the Duval Wing
of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735 Main Street, Upper
Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24, 2017 at 2:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-0086405
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 7.85% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-243243.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133178
TRUSTEE'S SALE
230 Sweet Pine Dr #23, Laurel, MD 20724
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 230 Sweet Pine Dr #23, Laurel, MD 20724.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated October 22, 2013, and recorded in Liber 26802
at Page 055 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $200,969.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 04-566-90039349
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-265765.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133177
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133307
TRUSTEE'S SALE
12426 Ronald Beall Drive, Upper Marlboro, MD 20774
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 12426 Ronald Beall Drive, Upper Marlboro,
MD 20774. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated December 11, 2006, and recorded
in Liber 26949 at Page 302 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, in the original principal
amount of $211,022.92. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF PRINCE GEORGE'S, at the front
of the Duval Wing of the Courthouse Complex located at 14735
Main Street, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772, on October 24,
2017 at 2:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of
Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 03-0195305
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-264360.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
852
Anne Arundel County
12131414
852
Anne Arundel County
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1443 Chatham Ct Unit 53YB, Crofton, MD 21114
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1443 Chatham Ct Unit 53YB, Crofton,
MD 21114. By virtue of the power and authority contained
in a Deed of Trust, dated November 17, 2014, and recorded
in Liber 27821 at Page 183 among the land records of the
COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount
of $235,000.00. Upon default and request for sale, the
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church
Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM,
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but
not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-208-90005646
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-259580.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
1016 MURDOCH CT, Crofton, MD 21114
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 1016 MURDOCH CT, Crofton, MD 21114.
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of
Trust, dated March 25, 2006, and recorded in Liber 17663 at
Page 752 among the land records of the COUNTY OF ANNE
ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount of $178,500.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland,
on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 02-213-90069774
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 7.75% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 14-239977.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133314
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12133318
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12134334
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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2017
EZ
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
852
Anne Arundel County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
TRUSTEE'S SALE
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
201 Bowie Street, Annapolis, MD 21401
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
premises known as 201 Bowie Street, Annapolis, MD 21401.
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust,
KNOWN AS
dated September 9, 2013, and recorded in Liber 26683 at Page
1545 FALLING BROOK COURT
033 among the land records of the County of Anne Arundel,
ODENTON, MD 21113
in the original principal amount of $309,294.00. Upon default
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF Deed of Trust to DAVID SILVERMAN, Trustee(s), dated October
ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on 28, 2009, and recorded among the Land Records of ANNE
October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 21721, folio 355,
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
MODIFIED SEPTEMBER 1, 2011 IN LIBER 23942, FOLIO
0292 the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Tax ID# 06-000-90215231
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
affect same, if any.
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE ANNE
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash ARUNDEL COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401 ON,
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
OCTOBER 24, 2017 at 10:00 AM
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon
situated
in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed described as follows:
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. SIXTY-SIX (66),
association dues and assessments that may become due after AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT ENTITLED "PLAT FIVE OF SIX,
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. SEVEN OAKS, PARCEL 6B, PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT",
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer WHICH PLAT IS RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND, IN PLAT BOOK 244,
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for FOLIO 19.
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting without either express or implied warranty or representation,
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiof sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateTrustee's File No. 17-266320.
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $29,000.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
www.hwestauctions.com
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131482 final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of ANNE ARUNDEL
COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 4.0% on
TRUSTEE'S SALE
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
1826 Chesapeake Road, Pasadena, MD 21122
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
premises known as 1826 Chesapeake Road, Pasadena, MD party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
21122. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
of Trust, dated June 7, 2012, and recorded in Liber 24795 the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
at Page 0249 among the land records of the County of Anne purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
Arundel, in the original principal amount of $487,500.00. resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM, all that property described in transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
said Deed of Trust including but not limited to:
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
Tax ID# 03-385-07182000
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
affect same, if any.
or equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
association dues and assessments that may become due after is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-07738)
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
Gene Jung,
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
Substitute Trustees
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-259829.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
www.hwestauctions.com
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12126601
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
www.hwestauctions.com
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
KNOWN AS
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12125870
1214 Waugh Chapel Road
TRUSTEE'S SALE
Gambrills, MD 21054
8602 BLACK ROCK HARBOUR, Pasadena, MD 21122
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by certain Deed of Trust to MARK H. FRIEDMAN AND KENNETH
premises known as 8602 BLACK ROCK HARBOUR, Pasadena, J. MACFADYEN, Trustee(s), dated December 21, 2004, and
MD 21122. By virtue of the power and authority contained recorded among the Land Records of ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY,
in a Deed of Trust, dated August 24, 2010, and recorded in MARYLAND in Liber 15789, folio 0304, the holder of the
Liber 22612 at Page 0155 among the land records of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having appointed the
COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, in the original principal amount undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument duly recorded
of $276,540.00. Upon default and request for sale, the among the aforesaid Land Records, default having occurred
undersigned trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
Courthouse for the COUNTY OF ANNE ARUNDEL, at 8 Church secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer
Circle, Annapolis, Maryland, on October 24, 2017 at 4:00 PM, for sale at public auction at THE ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY
all that property described in said Deed of Trust including but COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 8 CHURCH CIR, ANNAPOLIS, MD
not limited to:
21401 ON,
Tax ID# 03-244-90024778
OCTOBER 24, 2017 at 10:00AM
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, thereon situated in ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MD and
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may described as follows:
affect same, if any.
ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND AS
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN A DEED RECORDED AT
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The DEED BOOK 8578, PAGE 464 AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum ANNE ARUNDEL, MARYLAND.
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments without either express or implied warranty or representation,
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiassociation dues and assessments that may become due after tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, matethe time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $13,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser
Trustee's File No. 17-265589.
at time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of ANNE ARUNDEL
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200, COUNTY, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
unpaid purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement.
The secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to
post a deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured
party) will be required to complete full settlement of the
purchase of the property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of
the ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the
purchaser's deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be
www.hwestauctions.com
resold at the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser.
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131494 All other public charges and private charges or assessments,
including water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be
872
872
Fairfax County
Fairfax County
adjusted to date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
transfer taxes and all other costs incident to the settlement
6803 WESTCOTT RD,
5832 COLFAX AVENUE,
FALLS CHURCH, VA 22042
ALEXANDRIA, VA 22311
shall be borne by the purchaser. If applicable, condominium
and/or homeowner association dues and assessments will be
In execution of a Deed of Trust
In execution of a Deed of Trust
adjusted to date of sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for
in the original principal amount
in the original principal amount
of $337,500.00, with an annual
of $671,533.00, with an annual
any reason, including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
interest rate of 3.750000% dated
Trustees are unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to
September 2, 2005, recorded
April 6, 2012, recorded among
among the land records of the
the land records of the Circuit
take place for any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRor equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned
FAIRFAX as Deed Book 17709,
FAX as Deed Book 22237, Page
Page 1114, the undersigned
1518, the undersigned appointed
deposit. The purchaser waives all rights and claims against
appointed Substitute Trustee will
Substitute Trustee will offer for
the Substitute Trustees whether known or unknown. These
offer for sale at public auction
sale at public auction all that
all that property located in the
property located in the COUNTY
provisions shall survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit,
COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courOF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse
this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser
thouse steps at the front of the
steps at the front of the Circuit
Circuit Court building for the
Court building for the County of
shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees.
County of Fairfax located at 4110
Fairfax located at 4110 Chain
The sale is subject to post-sale review of the status of the
Chain Bridge Road, Fairfax, VirBridge Road, Fairfax, Virginia on
ginia on November 8, 2017 at 2:30
November 15, 2017 at 2:30 PM,
loan and that if any agreement to cancel the sale was entered
PM, the property with improvethe property with improvements
ments to wit:
to wit:
into by the lender and borrower prior to the sale then the sale
Tax Map No. 0504 17 0072
Tax Map No. 061-4-34-0036
is void and the purchaser's deposit shall be refunded without
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
interest. Additional terms and conditions, if applicable, maybe
DEBT COLLECTOR.
DEBT COLLECTOR.
announced at the time and date of sale. File No. (17-06583)
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
sale price, will be required in cash,
sale price, will be required in cash,
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
certified or cashier's check. Setcertified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
tlement within fifteen (15) days
Gene Jung,
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
Substitute Trustees
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-269039.
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 17-265252.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 13, 20, 2017
Oct 6, 13, 2017
12129714
12134849
www.hwestauctions.com
A181, A316, A311, A182, A183, A425, A426, A461, A463
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131461
855
Charles County
855
EZ
Charles County
857
857
Howard County
857
Howard County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
15125 SAPLING RIDGE DRIVE
Dayton, MD 21036
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to LAND AMERICA LAWYERS TITLE, Trustee(s),
dated November 3, 2006, and recorded among the Land
Records of HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 10384,
folio 676, MODIFIED: JUNE 12, 2012 IN LIBER 14249, FOLIO
264 the holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of
Trust having appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by
instrument duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records,
default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the
request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute
Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at THE HOWARD
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY
BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 12:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS PRESERVATION PARCEL
A AS SHOWN ON A PLATS ENTITLED "HIGH FOREST ESTATES,
LOTS 1 THROUGH 50, BUILDABLE PRESERVATION PARCEL
A, NON-BUILDABLE PRESERVATION PARCEL B, SHEETS 2 OF
5 AND 3 OF 5" SAID PLATS BEING RECORDED AMONG THE
LAND RECORDS OF HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND AS PLAT
NOS. 13959 AND 13960.
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
without either express or implied warranty or representation,
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condition,
construction, extent of construction, workmanship, materials,
liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or other
laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, and
subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $93,500.00 payable in certified
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
12131485 time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY,
TRUSTEE'S SALE
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on unpaid
17172 Russell Dr, Cobb Island, MD 20625
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
premises known as 17172 Russell Dr, Cobb Island, MD 20625. deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
By virtue of the power and authority contained in a Deed of Trust, be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
dated January 29, 2007, and recorded in Liber 6196 at Page property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
736 among the land records of the COUNTY OF CHARLES, in of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
the original principal amount of $340,000.00. Upon default deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will offer for the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY OF public charges and private charges or assessments, including
CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between Circuit water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
& District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on October 24, 2017 at 12:00 date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust including and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
but not limited to:
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
Tax ID# 05-027292
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants, unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
affect same, if any.
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to poston all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
association dues and assessments that may become due after be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser. applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer No. (17-02480)
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner,
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
Laura D. Harris, Robert M. Oliveri, Christine Johnson,
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and Gene Jung,
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
Substitute Trustees
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 16-261003.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
12134827
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
TRUSTEE'S SALE
6604 Captain Johns Ct, Bryans Road, MD 20616
Trustee's Sale of valuable fee simple property improved by
premises known as 6604 Captain Johns Ct, Bryans Road, MD
20616. By virtue of the power and authority contained in a
Deed of Trust, dated April 19, 2006, and recorded in Liber
05803 at Page 0641 among the land records of the COUNTY
OF CHARLES, in the original principal amount of $164,500.00.
Upon default and request for sale, the undersigned trustees will
offer for sale at public auction at the Courthouse for the COUNTY
OF CHARLES, at 200 Charles St (in the Breezeway between
Circuit & District Courts), LaPlata, MD, on October 24, 2017
at 12:00 PM, all that property described in said Deed of Trust
including but not limited to:
Tax ID# 07-053967
Said property is in fee simple and is improved by a dwelling and
is sold in "as is condition" and subject to all superior covenants,
conditions, liens, restrictions, easement, rights-of-way, as may
affect same, if any.
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of 10% of the sale price, cash
or certified funds shall be required at the time of sale. The
balance of the purchase price with interest at 6.00% per annum
from the date of sale to the date of payment will be paid within
TEN DAYS after the final ratification of the sale. Adjustments
on all taxes, public charges and special or regular assessments
will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed
by purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowners
association dues and assessments that may become due after
the time of sale will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
Title examination, conveyancing, state revenue stamps, transfer
taxes, title insurance, and all other costs incident to settlement
are to be paid by the purchaser. Time is of the essence for
the purchaser, otherwise the deposit will be forfeited and the
property may be resold at risk and costs of the defaulting
purchaser. If the sale is not ratified or if the Substitute Trustees
are unable to convey marketable title in accord with these terms
of sale, the purchaser's only remedy is the return of the deposit.
Trustee's File No. 17-266067.
Kristine D. Brown, et al., Substitute Trustees.
SHAPIRO & BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200,
Manassas, Virginia 20109 (410) 769-9797
876
Loudoun County
876
Loudoun County
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
PIN Number: 092-45-4795-000
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 6, 13, 20, 2017
871
City of Alexandria
12131422
871
City of Alexandria
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
Map-Block-Lot Number: 058.01-0B-2.111
Account No. 50560100
Pursuant to Virginia Code § 55-79.84, and by virtue of a Deed of
Appointment of Trustee dated August 17, 2017 and recorded on August
23, 2017 among the land records of the City of Alexandria, Virginia as
Instrument No. 170012852, the Unit Owners Association for Reynolds
Prospect, a Condominium, a/k/a Reynolds Prospect Condominium Unit
Owners Association (the “Association”), by its appointed Trustee, Mazin I.
Elias will offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidder on: October
31, 2017 at 3:00 p.m., at the main outside entrance to the Courthouse
for the Circuit Court for the City of Alexandria, Virginia, 520 King Street,
Alexandria, Virginia 22314, the real property and improvements, along
with any limited common elements appurtenant thereto with the street
address of 240 S. Reynolds St. #111, Alexandria, Virginia 22304 and legally
described as:
Condominium Unit No. 111, REYNOLD’S PROSPECT, a Condominium, and
the Limited Common Elements appurtenant thereto, established by Condominium Instruments recorded on June 17, 1988, in Deed Book 1244, at
page 1978, and any and all amendments thereto whether now existing
or hereafter recorded, among the land records of the City of Alexandria,
Virginia. (collectively the “Property”)
The sale is being conducted in order to satisfy the liens securing
unpaid assessments, less any payments made, if any, as perfected by
the Association recording of the Memorandum of Lien among the land
records of the City of Alexandria, Virginia on March 24, 2017 as Instrument
No. 170004380 (“Lien(s)”).
The Property will be sold in “AS IS” condition and without any warranty
either expressed or implied, as to any aspect or condition of the property,
including, but not limited to the conditions, restrictions, rights of ways,
easements, reservations, community association instruments, any other
instruments and/or amendments thereto and subject to all liens, existing
housing and zoning code violations, filed or unfiled mechanic’s and/or
materialmen’s liens, if any, and all matters of record taking priority over
the Association’s Lien, including, but not limited to, any Deed of Trust. The
sale is further subject to all provisions, restrictions, easements, covenants,
and conditions as contained in the aforementioned Association’s original,
if applicable, amended, instruments, Declaration, and Bylaws and or any
other governing instrument.
The successful bidder at the foreclosure sale shall assume all risk of loss
and shall be responsible for any damage to the Property immediately upon
the conclusion of bidding on the date of sale. A nonrefundable deposit in
the amount of ten percent (10%) of the sale price to be paid by certified or
cashier’s check will be required of the successful bidder at the time and
place of the sale. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Association reserves
the right to waive the requirements of the deposit. The successful bidder
shall be required to sign a Memorandum of Sale at the conclusion of the
bidding incorporating all terms of sale. Settlement in full must be made
within thirty (30) days from the date of the sale, time being of the essence.
In the event the purchaser fails to settle in full as required and within
the required time period, the aforementioned deposit shall be forfeited
by purchaser and will be retained by Trustee, the purchaser’s contract
rights shall also be forfeited, and the Property may be resold at the risk,
cost and expense of the purchaser with the deposit applied to the costs
and expenses of sale, including trustees' fees. At settlement the deposit
retained by Trustee, without interest, shall be applied to the purchase
price and the balance shall be paid in cash or its equivalent. All costs
of the conveyance, which shall be by special warranty deed, examination
of title, state and local recordation taxes, grantor taxes, recording and
clerk's fees, notary fees, settlement fees, including preparation of deed,
etc., to be at the cost of the purchaser. Taxes, water, rent and all
other municipal charges and assessments payable and including, but not
limited to, sanitary and/or city charges, if any, shall be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale and assumed therein by the purchaser.
Trustee shall not have a duty to deliver possession of the Property to the
successful bidder. Interest to be paid by the purchaser at a rate of ten
percent (10%) per annum from the date of the sale to the date of the
settlement. The Association, if a bidder, shall not be required to post the
deposit or pay interest.
If Trustee is unable for any reason, in his sole discretion, to convey title
to the Property, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy at law
or in equity shall be the return of its deposit, without interest, and upon
the return of the deposit the sale shall be void and of no effect. To the
extent permitted by the applicable law, Trustee reserves the right, in his
sole discretion, to (1) announce additional terms at the time of sale, (2)
waive or modify the requirement with respect to the bidder's deposit,
(3) accept or reject any or all bids, (4) extend the time to receive bids,
(5) withdraw the Property from the sale at any time, and (6) postpone
settlement following sale for a reasonable period of time as determined
by Trustee. The information contained herein was obtained by sources
deemed to be reliable, but is offered for information purposes only. The
Association cannot make any representations or warranties with respect
to the accuracy of this information.
Inquiries should be directed to counsel for the Association, Joseph J.
Shannon, Esq., Rees Broome, PC, 1900 Gallows Road, Suite 700, Vienna,
Virginia 22182, (703) 790-1911.
Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27, 2017
12135021
COULD YOU USE
SOME EXTRA CASH?
CLASSIFIED
KLMNO
202.334.6200
washingtonpost.com/classified
Open 24/7
C054B 2x2
Pursuant to Virginia Code § 55-516, and by virtue of a Deed of Appointment
of Trustee dated August 31, 2017 and recorded on September 18, 2017 in
the land records of Loudoun County, Virginia as Instrument No. 201709180057956, LVE III Homeowners Association, Inc. (“Association”), by its
appointed Trustee, Mazin I. Elias will offer for sale at public auction to the
highest bidder on: October 31, 2017 at 11:30 a.m., at the main entrance
to the Courthouse for the Circuit Court of Loudoun County, Virginia, 18
E. Market St., Leesburg, Virginia 20176, the real property improvements,
along with any limited common elements appurtenant thereto located
at the street address of: 23288 Rogerdale Place, Sterling, Virginia 20166,
legally described as:
Lot 201, Section 2, Loudoun Valley Estates, Phase III, as the same
appears duly dedicated, platted and recorded as Instrument Number
200405250051926 and as shown on plat recorded as Instrument Number
200405250051927, among the land records of Loudoun County, Virginia
(collectively “Property”).
The sale is being conducted in order to satisfy the liens securing unpaid
assessments, less any payments made, if any, as perfected by the
memoranda of liens recorded in the land records of Loudoun County,
Virginia on (i) September 13, 2016 as Instrument No. 20160913-0060466;
and (ii) April 18, 2017 as Instrument No. 201704180022813 (“Lien(s)”).
The Property will be sold in “AS IS” condition and without any warranty
either expressed or implied, as to any aspect or condition of the property,
including, but not limited to the conditions, restrictions, rights of ways,
easements, reservations, community association instruments, any other
instruments and/or amendments thereto and subject to all liens, existing
housing and zoning code violations, filed or unfiled mechanic’s and/or
materialmen’s liens, if any, and all matters of record taking priority over
the Association’s Liens, including, but not limited to, any Deed of Trust. The
sale is further subject to all provisions, restrictions, easements, covenants,
and conditions as contained in the aforementioned Association’s original,
if applicable, amended, instruments, declaration, and bylaws and or any
other governing instrument or controlling instrument, etc.
The successful bidder at the foreclosure sale shall assume all risk of loss
and shall be responsible for any damage to the Property immediately upon
the conclusion of bidding on the date of sale. A nonrefundable deposit in
the amount of ten percent (10%) of the sale price to be paid by certified or
cashier’s check will be required of the successful bidder at the time and
place of the sale. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Association reserves
the right to waive the requirements of the deposit. The successful bidder
shall be required to sign a Memorandum of Sale at the conclusion of the
bidding incorporating all terms of sale. Settlement in full must be made
within thirty (30) days from the date of the sale, time being of the essence.
In the event the purchaser fails to settle in full as required and within
the required time period, the aforementioned deposit shall be forfeited
by purchaser and will be retained by Trustee, the purchaser’s contract
rights shall also be forfeited, and the Property may be resold at the risk,
cost and expense of the purchaser with the deposit applied to the costs
and expenses of sale, including trustees' fees. At settlement the deposit
retained by Trustee, without interest, shall be applied to the purchase
price and the balance shall be paid in cash or its equivalent. All costs
of the conveyance, which shall be by special warranty deed, examination
of title, state and local recordation taxes, grantor taxes, recording and
clerk's fees, notary fees, settlement fees, including preparation of deed,
etc., to be at the cost of the purchaser. Taxes, water, rent and all
other municipal charges and assessments payable and including, but not
limited to, sanitary and/or city charges, if any, shall be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale and assumed therein by the purchaser.
Trustee shall not have a duty to deliver possession of the Property to the
successful bidder. Interest to be paid by the purchaser at a rate of ten
percent (10%) per annum from the date of the sale to the date of the
settlement. The Association, if a bidder, shall not be required to post the
deposit or pay interest.
If Trustee is unable for any reason, in his sole discretion, to convey title
to the Property, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy at law
or in equity shall be the return of its deposit, without interest, and upon
the return of the deposit the sale shall be void and of no effect. To the
extent permitted by the applicable law, Trustee reserves the right, in his
sole discretion, to (1) announce additional terms at the time of sale, (2)
waive or modify the requirement with respect to the bidder's deposit,
(3) accept or reject any or all bids, (4) extend the time to receive bids,
(5) withdraw the Property from the sale at any time, and (6) postpone
settlement following sale for a reasonable period of time as determined
by Trustee. The information contained herein was obtained by sources
deemed to be reliable, but is offered for information purposes only. The
Association cannot make any representations or warranties with respect
to the accuracy of this information.
Inquiries should be directed to counsel for the Association, Joseph
Shannon, Esq., Rees Broome, PC, 1900 Gallows Road, Suite 700, Vienna,
Virginia 22182, (703) 790-1911.
Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27, 2017
12135020
LEGAL
NOTICES
To place your
legal notice in the
Classified section:
Call:
202-334-7007
e-mail:
legalnotices@washpost.com
WP 2x3
OPQRS
Howard County
857
D13
857
Howard County
857
Howard County
Howard County
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
BROCK & SCOTT, PLLC
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
484 VIKING DRIVE, SUITE 203
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 23452
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
KNOWN AS
KNOWN AS
8729 HAYSHED LANE APARTMENT 31
7944 PETTIGREW STREET
Columbia, MD 21045
Elkridge, MD 21075
Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain
Deed of Trust to FIRST MERIT SETTLEMENT, Trustee(s), dated Deed of Trust to LYNDE SELDON, Trustee(s), dated May 27,
September 8, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of 2015, and recorded among the Land Records of HOWARD
HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 09487, folio 588, the COUNTY, MARYLAND in Liber 16270, folio 525, the holder
holder of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having of the indebtedness secured by this Deed of Trust having
appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument appointed the undersigned Substitute Trustees, by instrument
duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having duly recorded among the aforesaid Land Records, default having
occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party
secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE sale at public auction at THE HOWARD COUNTY COURTHOUSE
LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX LOCATED AT THE THOMAS DORSEY BUILDING, 9250 BENDIX
ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
ROAD, COLUMBIA, MD. 21045 ON,
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 12:00PM
OCTOBER 31, 2017 at 12:00PM
ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and improvements
thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as thereon situated in HOWARD COUNTY, MD and described as
follows:
follows:
BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS UNIT NUMBER 31 BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 108, IN
IN BUILDING 3, WING A, LOCATED AT 8729 HAYSHED THE SUBDIVISION KNOWN AS "PLAT OF RE-SUBDIVISION
LANE, LONGREACH HOUSE CONDOMINIUM, HORIZONTAL BLUE STREAM LOTS 1-125, OPEN SPACE LOTS 126 & 127
PROPERTY REGIME, AS SAID UNIT AND SAID CONDO- AND BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL J-1, A RE-SUBDIVISION
MINIUM ARE ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO MASTER DEED OF BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL J-2 "BLUE STREAM", PLATS
AND BY-LAWS DATED JANUARY 26,1973 AND RECORDED 21737-21738, BUILDABLE BULK PARCEL K, "BLUE
AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF HOWARD COUNTY IN LIBER STREAM", PLATS 21558-21564, AND EASEMENTS ON PARCMP NO. 623, FOLIO 461, ET SEQ., AND THE AMENDED CEL J-1, "BLUE STREAM", PLATS 21737-21738", AS PER
MASTER DEED AND BY-LAWS DATED AUGUST 27, 1973 PLATS THEREOF RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF HOWARD HOWARD COUNTY, MARYLAND IN PLAT NOS. MDR 21981,
COUNTY IN LIBER CMP NO. 657, FOLIO 635, ET SEQ.,AND MDR 21984 AND MDR 21986. THE IMPROVEMENTS THERETHE REVISED AMENDED MASTER DEED DATED OCTOBER ON BEING KNOWN AS NO.: 7944 PETTIGREW STREET.
18, 1973 AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition
OF HOWARD COUNTY IN LIBER CMP NO. 657, FOLIO without either express or implied warranty or representation,
550, AND PURSUANT TO THE PLANS OF THE BUILDING including but not limited to the description, fitness for a
AND UNITS SHOWN BY THE PLATS OF THE CONDOMINIUM particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condiPROJECT DESCRIBED IN THE AFORESAID MASTER DEED tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mateAND THE AFORESAID AMENDED MASTER DEED AND REVISED rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition,
AMENDED MASTER DEED AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or
RECORDS OF HOWARD COUNTY IN PLAT BOOK NO. 24, other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters,
FOLIOS 37 THROUGH 44 INCLUSIVE AND PLAT BOOK NO. 25, and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record
FOLIOS 94 THROUGH 106 INCLUSIVE, AND PLAT BOOK NO. which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold
26, FOLIO 20. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of
LIBER 3319 FOLIO 211, AMONG THE SAID LAND RECORDS.
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA
The property will be sold in an "AS IS WHERE IS" condition assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
without either express or implied warranty or representation, TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $37,500.00 payable in certified
including but not limited to the description, fitness for a check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at
particular purpose or use, structural integrity, physical condi- time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final
tion, construction, extent of construction, workmanship, mate- ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY,
rials, liability, zoning, subdivision, environmental condition, MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 3.875% on unpaid
merchantability, compliance with building or housing codes or purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The
other laws, ordinances or regulations, or other similar matters, secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a
and subject to easements, agreements and restrictions of record deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will
which affect the same, if any. The property will be sold be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the
subject to all conditions, liens, restrictions and agreements of property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification
record affecting same including any condominium and of HOA of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's
assessments pursuant to Md Real Property Article 11-110.
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at
TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $9,000.00 payable in certified the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other
check or by a cashier's check will be required from purchaser at public charges and private charges or assessments, including
time of sale, balance in immediately available funds upon final water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to
ratification of sale by the Circuit Court of HOWARD COUNTY, date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes
MARYLAND interest to be paid at the rate of 2.0% on unpaid and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by
purchase money from date of sale to date of settlement. The the purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner
secured party herein, if a bidder, shall not be required to post a association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of
deposit. Third party purchaser (excluding the secured party) will sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason,
be required to complete full settlement of the purchase of the including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are
property within TEN (10) CALENDAR DAYS of the ratification unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for
of the sale by the Circuit Court otherwise the purchaser's any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall
deposit shall be forfeited and the property will be resold at be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The
the risk and expense, of the defaulting purchaser. All other purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
public charges and private charges or assessments, including Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
water/sewer charges, ground rent, taxes if any, to be adjusted to survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
date of sale. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
and all other costs incident to the settlement shall be borne by claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postthe purchaser. If applicable, condominium and/or homeowner sale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
association dues and assessments will be adjusted to date of cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
sale. If the sale is rescinded or not ratified for any reason, to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
including post sale lender audit, or the Substitute Trustees are be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
unable to convey insurable title or a resale is to take place for applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
any reason, the purchaser(s) sole remedy in law or equity shall No. (17-05601)
be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. The Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
purchaser waives all rights and claims against the Substitute
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
Trustees whether known or unknown. These provisions shall
Gene Jung,
survive settlement Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be
Substitute Trustees
void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further
claim against the Substitute Trustees. The sale is subject to postsale review of the status of the loan and that if any agreement to
cancel the sale was entered into by the lender and borrower prior
to the sale then the sale is void and the purchaser's deposit shall
be refunded without interest. Additional terms and conditions, if
www.hwestauctions.com
applicable, maybe announced at the time and date of sale. File
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
12129394
No. (17-07804)
878
878
Robert E. Frazier, Thomas J. Gartner, Laura D. Harris, Robert M.
Stafford County
Stafford County
NOTICE OF TRUSTEES' SALE
Oliveri, Christine Johnson, Scott Robinson, Louis Gingher, and
134 KEATING CIRCLE
Gene Jung,
STAFFORD, VA 22554
Substitute Trustees
www.hwestauctions.com
OCTOBER 13, 20, 27, 2017
876
Loudoun County
12133198
876
Loudoun County
Pursuant to Virginia Code § 55-516, and by virtue of a Deed of
Appointment of Trustee dated October 24, 2016 and recorded on
November 16, 2016 in the Land Records of Loudoun County, Virginia
as Instrument No. 201611160077801, South Village Homeowners Association (“Association”), by its appointed Trustee, Mazin I. Elias will offer for
sale at public auction to the highest bidder on October 31, 2017 at 11:00
a.m., at the main entrance to the Courthouse for the Circuit Court of
Loudoun County, Virginia, 18 E. Market St., Leesburg, Virginia 20176, the
real property improvements, along with any limited common elements
appurtenant thereto, located at the street address of 43010 Matties
Terrace, South Riding, Virginia 20152, legally described as:
Lot 127, SOUTH VILLAGE, Section 2, as the same is duly dedicated, platted
and recorded as Instrument #200311240154898 and as shown on Plat
recorded as Instrument #200311240154899, among the Land Records of
Loudoun County, Virginia ( “Property”).
The sale of the Property is being conducted in order to satisfy the
liens securing unpaid assessments, less any payments made, if any, as
perfected by the memoranda of liens recorded in the Land Records of
Loudoun County, Virginia on (i) April 11, 2014 as Instrument No. 201404110018158; and (ii) March 14, 2016 as Instrument No. 20160314-0014120
(“Lien(s)”).
The Property will be sold in “AS IS” condition and without any warranty
either expressed or implied, as to any aspect or condition of the property,
including, but not limited to the conditions, restrictions, rights of ways,
easements, reservations, community association instruments, any other
instruments and/or amendments thereto and subject to all liens, existing
housing and zoning code violations, filed or unfiled mechanic’s and/or
materialmen’s liens, if any, and all matters of record taking priority over the
Association’s Lien(s), including, but not limited to, any Deed of Trust. The
sale is further subject to all provisions, restrictions, easements, covenants,
and conditions as contained in the aforementioned Association’s original,
if applicable, amended, instruments, Declaration, and Bylaws and or any
other governing instrument.
The successful bidder at the foreclosure sale shall assume all risk of loss
and shall be responsible for any damage to the Property immediately upon
the conclusion of bidding on the date of sale. A nonrefundable deposit in
the amount of ten percent (10%) of the sale price to be paid by certified or
cashier’s check will be required of the successful bidder at the time and
place of the sale. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Association reserves
the right to waive the requirements of the deposit. The successful bidder
shall be required to sign a Memorandum of Sale at the conclusion of the
bidding incorporating all terms of sale. Settlement in full must be made
within thirty (30) days from the date of the sale, time being of the essence.
In the event the purchaser fails to settle in full as required and within
the required time period, the aforementioned deposit shall be forfeited
by purchaser and will be retained by Trustee, the purchaser’s contract
rights shall also be forfeited, and the Property may be resold at the risk,
cost and expense of the purchaser with the deposit applied to the costs
and expenses of sale, including trustees' fees. At settlement the deposit
retained by Trustee, without interest, shall be applied to the purchase
price and the balance shall be paid in cash or its equivalent. All costs
of the conveyance, which shall be by special warranty deed, examination
of title, state and local recordation taxes, grantor taxes, recording and
clerk's fees, notary fees, settlement fees, including preparation of deed,
etc., to be at the cost of the purchaser. Taxes, water, rent and all
other municipal charges and assessments payable and including, but not
limited to, sanitary and/or city charges, if any, shall be adjusted for the
current year to the date of sale and assumed therein by the purchaser.
Trustee shall not have a duty to deliver possession of the Property to the
successful bidder. Interest to be paid by the purchaser at a rate of ten
percent (10%) per annum from the date of the sale to the date of the
settlement. The Association, if a bidder, shall not be required to post the
deposit or pay interest.
If Trustee is unable for any reason, in his sole discretion, to convey title
to the Property, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy at law
or in equity shall be the return of its deposit, without interest, and upon
the return of the deposit the sale shall be void and of no effect. To the
extent permitted by the applicable law, Trustee reserves the right, in his
sole discretion, to (1) announce additional terms at the time of sale, (2)
waive or modify the requirement with respect to the bidder's deposit,
(3) accept or reject any or all bids, (4) extend the time to receive bids,
(5) withdraw the Property from the sale at any time, and (6) postpone
settlement following sale for a reasonable period of time as determined
by Trustee. The information contained herein was obtained by sources
deemed to be reliable, but is offered for information purposes only. The
Association cannot make any representations or warranties with respect
to the accuracy of this information.
Inquiries should be directed to counsel for the Association, Joseph
Shannon, Esq., Rees Broome, PC, 1900 Gallows Road, Suite 700, Vienna,
Virginia 22182, (703) 790-1911.
Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27, 2017
12135019
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(And your subscription up-to-date.)
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Democracy Dies in Darkness
Dem
In execution of a Credit Line Deed of Trust dated June 28, 2005, in
the original amount of $55,950.00, recorded as Instrument Number
LR050024033 in the Clerk's Office of the Circuit Court of Stafford County,
Virginia, the undersigned Trustees, any of whom may act, will on October
31, 2017, at 10:00 a.m., by the front main entrance to the Stafford County
Judicial Center, 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia 22554, offer for
sale at public auction to the highest bidder the following property with
improvements thereon:
LOT 50, SECTION ONE (1), TAMARLANE, AS THE SAME IS DULY
DEDICATED, PLATTED AND RECORDED AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA IN PB41 PAGES 298-302.
Parcel Number 30-GG-1-50
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
PIN: 129-35-2211-000
Tax Map #: 106//17////127/
This sale is subject to the restrictions, rights of way, conditions, easements, and mechanic's liens, if any, whether of record or not of record, to
the extent any of the foregoing apply and take priority over the lien of the
Deed of Trust. This sale further is subject to a Deed of Trust recorded as
Instrument Number LR050024032 in the original amount of $298,500.00.
Deposit of $2,500.00 by cashier's check shall be required to qualify as a
bidder prior to the sale, except from the Noteholder.
The deposit, without interest, is applied to the purchase price at settlement. Settlement will be held on or before fifteen (15) days after sale;
time being of the essence. Upon purchaser's default, the deposit shall
be forfeited and the Property shall be resold at the risk and costs of the
defaulting purchaser.
The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by bank or cashier’s
check or wire transfer. Settlement shall be at the offices of the Substitute
Trustees or other mutually agreed location. The Property and any
improvements thereon shall be sold in "as is" condition without any
warranties. The successful bidder shall assume all loss or damage to
the Property from and after the strike down of the final bid at the sale.
Purchaser shall be responsible for all costs of the conveyance, which shall
be by special warranty including, but not limited to, the preparation of
the deed, the grantor's tax, and the congestion relief fee. In addition,
at settlement, the successful bidder shall pay all past due and current
assessments, sewer or water charges, and real estate taxes, and any
penalties and interest due on any of the foregoing, with respect to the
Property prorated to and including the date of the foreclosure sale.
The purchaser shall be responsible for all assessments, sewer or water
charges, and real estate taxes due from and after the sale date. The sale is
subject to such additional terms as the Substitute Trustees may announce
at the time of sale. The purchaser will be required to sign a Memorandum
of Sale incorporating all the terms of the sale.
William H. Casterline, Jr.
Jeremy B. Root
James R. Meizanis
For Information contact:
William H. Casterline, Jr.
BLANKINGSHIP & KEITH, PC
4020 University Drive #300
Fairfax, Virginia 22030
(703) 691-1235
October 13, 20, 2017
872
878
Stafford County
Loudoun County
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
4104 MAPLE ST,
FAIRFAX, VA 22030
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
38591 STEVENS RD,
LOVETTSVILLE, VA 20180
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $312,262.35, with an annual
interest rate of 8.790000% dated
April 14, 2007, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX
as Deed Book 19268, Page 0570,
the undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF FAIRFAX, on the courthouse steps at
the front of the Circuit Court building for the County of Fairfax located at 4110 Chain Bridge Road,
Fairfax, Virginia on November 15,
2017 at 2:30 PM, the property with
improvements to wit:
Tax Map No. 57 1 23 060
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $719,200.00, with an annual
interest rate of 2.000000% dated
January 26, 2007, recorded
among the land records of the
Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN as Deed Instrument
Number 20070130-0008064, the
undersigned appointed Substitute Trustee will offer for sale
at public auction all that property
located in the COUNTY OF
LOUDOUN, on the courthouse
steps in front of the Circuit Court
building for the County of
Loudoun located at 18 East Market Street, Leesburg Virginia on
November 15, 2017 at 9:30 AM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 403-36-4023-000
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 16-260536.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 13, 20, 2017
12135196
Wake up to
home delivery.
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: Conventional. Reference
Number 15-254412.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 13, 20, 2017
12135155
Career Training - Emp Svcs
TERMS OF SALE: Cash. A ten percent (10%) bidder's deposit in cash
or certified check payable to the Trustee(s) shall be required of the
successful bidder at the time of sale before the bidding will be closed;
settlement must be made within twenty (20) days from the date of sale
or property to be resold at cost of defaulting purchaser. All costs of
conveyancing, examination of title, recording charges, etc. will be at
cost of purchaser. Neither the Substitute Trustees, nor any other party
guarantees or covenants to deliver, or in any way, to obtain possession
of the premises for any third party purchaser. Additional terms may be
announced at the time of sale. Sale will also be subject to additional terms
contained in the Memorandum of Sale to be executed by the successful
bidder upon purchase.
Commonwealth Asset Services, LLC
Sole Acting Substitute Trustees
This communication is from a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect
a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Commonwealth Asset Services, LLC
281 Independence Boulevard, Pembroke One Building, 5th Floor,
Virginia Beach, VA 23462
www.sykesbourdon.com
(757) 965-5097 BETWEEN HOURS OF 9:00 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. ONLY
Our Case No: CA17-190322-1
October 6, 13, 2017
12133833
873
Prince William County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$64,999.00, dated November 29,
1999, recorded among the land
records of the Circuit Court for
Prince William County on December 1, 1999, as Instrument Number
34606, in Deed Book 2828, at Page
0224, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction, at the main
entrance of the courthouse for
the Circuit Court of Prince William
County, 9311 Lee Ave, Manassas,
VA on November 10, 2017 at 9:00
AM, the property described in said
deed of trust, located at the above
address and briefly described as:
UNIT NO. 226, GEORGIAN HAMLET,
A CONDOMINIUM, established by a
Declaration duly recorded in Deed
Book 1316, at page 1811, as
amended in Deed Book 1326 at
page 666, as amended in Deed
Book 1338 at page 810 as amended in Deed Book 1344 at page 120,
as amended in Deed Book 1350 at
page 96, as amended in Deed Book
1355 at page 1431, as amended
in Deed Book 1359 at page 1542,
as amended in Deed Book 1361 at
page 1541, as amended in Deed
Book 1364 at page 1856, as
amended in Deed Book 1365 at
page 1603, as amended in Deed
Book 1369 at page 229, as amended in Deed Book 1391 at page
1344, as amended in Deed Book
1396 at page 1678, as amended
in Deed Book 1406 at page 1383,
as amended in Deed Book 1412 at
page 2006, as amended in Deed
Book 1421 at page 765, as amended in Deed Book 1424 at page
307 and as amended in Deed Book
1432 at page 761, among the land
records of Prince William County,
Virginia, together with the exclusive right to the use of the Limited
Common Elements appurtenant to
said Unit as set forth in said Declaration and an undivided interest
in the Common Elements of GEORGIAN HAMLET, a Condominium, as
provided in said Declaration.. Tax
ID: 22179.
TRUSTEE SALE
2004 Mill Garden Drive,
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Spotsylvania County
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount of
$162,011.00, dated March 5, 2013
recorded in the Clerk's Office of
the Circuit Court of the Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in Document No. 130005146 and modified in Document No. 150002292,
default having occurred in the
payment of the Note thereby
secured and at the request of
the holder of said Note, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will
offer for sale at public auction at
the entrance to the Spotsylvania
County Judicial Center, 9107 Judicial Center Lane, Spotsylvania, on
November 7, 2017 at 12:00 PM the
property described in said deed,
located at the above address and
briefly described as:
Lot 82, Section 2, Mill Garden, with
improvements thereon.
Subject to any and all covenants,
conditions, restrictions, easements, and all other matters of
record taking priority over the
Deed of Trust, if any, affecting the
aforesaid property.
Loan Type: FHA (Trustee # 579637)
Substitute Trustee: ALG Trustee,
LLC, C/O Orlans PC PO Box 2548,
Leesburg, VA 20177, (703) 7777101,
website:
http://www.orlans.com
The Vendor Auction.com will be
used in conjunction with this sale
Towne #: 5000.0321
878
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $6,400.00 or 10%
of the sale price, whichever is
lower, will be required in the form
of a certified or cashier’s check.
Cash will not be accepted as a
deposit. Settlement within fifteen
(15) days of sale, otherwise Trustee
may forfeit deposit. Additional
terms to be announced at sale.
This is a communication from a
debt collector. This notice is an
attempt to collect on a debt and
any information obtained will be
used for that purpose.
10/6, 10/13, 10/20/2017 12131178
TRUSTEE'S SALE OF
4851 EBB TIDE CT,
DUMFRIES, VA 22026
In execution of a Deed of Trust
in the original principal amount
of $138,400.00, with an annual
interest rate of 3.750000% dated
May 28, 1993, recorded among
the land records of the Circuit
Court for the COUNTY OF PRINCE
WILLIAM as Deed Book 2004, Page
1600, the undersigned appointed
Substitute Trustee will offer for
sale at public auction all that
property located in the COUNTY
OF PRINCE WILLIAM, on the Court
House steps in front of Main
Entrance for the Circuit Court
building for the County of Prince
William located at 9311 Lee
Avenue, Manassas, Virginia on
December 12, 2017 at 4:00 PM,
the property with improvements
to wit:
Tax Map No. 8091-80-6811
THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A
DEBT COLLECTOR.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A
bidder's deposit of 10% of the
sale price, will be required in cash,
certified or cashier's check. Settlement within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Trustees may
forfeit deposit. Additional terms
to be announced at sale. Loan
type: FHA. Reference Number
17-266498.
PROFESSIONAL
FORECLOSURE
CORPORATION OF VIRGINIA, Substitute Trustees, C/O SHAPIRO &
BROWN, LLP, 10021 Balls Ford
Road, Suite 200, Manassas, Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800.
Oct 13, Nov 10, 17
12135788
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District of
Columbia
Capitol Hill
Stafford County
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
202 DOVER PLACE APT 203,
STAFFORD, VA 22556-4568.
In execution of a certain Deed of
Trust dated December 21, 2006,
in the original principal amount
of $140,997.00 recorded in the
Clerk’s Office, Circuit Court for
Stafford County, Virginia as Instrument No. LR070002214 . The
undersigned Substitute Trustee
will offer for sale at public auction
in the front of the Circuit Court
building for Stafford County, 1300
Courthouse Road, Stafford, Virginia on November 9, 2017 , at
2:00 PM, the property described
in said Deed of Trust, located at
the above address, and more particularly described as follows: ALL
THAT CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY
WITH ALL RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES
THERETO APPURTENANT, AND ALL
IMPROVEMENTS THEREON, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA,
KNOWN AND DESCRIBED AS UNIT
NUMBER 28, PHASE 3, SUNNINGDALE MEADOWS CONDOMINIUM,
ESTABLISHED PURSUANT TO THE
DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM
RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 705,
PAGE 311, IN THE CLERK‘S OFFICE
OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
STAFFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA.
TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of ten percent (10%)
of the sale price or ten percent
(10%) of the original principal balance of the subject Deed of Trust,
whichever is lower, in the form
of cash or certified funds payable
to the Substitute Trustee must be
present at the time of the sale.
The balance of the purchase price
will be due within fifteen (15) days
of sale, otherwise Purchaser's
deposit may be forfeited to
Trustee. Time is of the essence.
If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale
shall be entitled to a return of the
deposit paid. The Purchaser may,
if provided by the terms of the
Trustee’s Memorandum of Foreclosure Sale, be entitled to a $50
cancellation fee from the Substitute Trustee, but shall have no
further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Additional terms
to be announced at the sale. A
form copy of the Trustee's memorandum of foreclosure sale and
contract to purchase real property
is available for viewing at
www.bwwsales.com. This is a
communication from a debt collector and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. The
sale is subject to seller confirmation. Substitute Trustee: Equity
Trustees, LLC, 2101 Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 1004, Arlington, VA 22201.
For more information contact:
BWW Law Group, LLC, attorneys for
Equity Trustees, LLC, 6003 Executive Blvd, Suite 101, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-961-6555, website:
www.bwwsales.com. VA-3181821.
Oct 6, 13, 2017
12134845
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Spotsylvania County
TERMS OF SALE: CASH: A deposit
of $20,000.00 or 10% of the sales
price, whichever is lower, cash or
certified check will be required
at the time of sale, but no more
than $10,000.00 of cash will be
accepted, with settlement within
fifteen (15) days from the date of
sale. Sale is subject to post sale
confirmation that the borrower
did not file for protection under
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code prior to
the sale which affects the validity
of the sale, as well as to postsale confirmation of the status of
the loan with the loan servicer
including, but not limited to,
determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or
paid off the loan prior to the
sale. In any such event, the sale
shall be null and void, and the
Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law
or equity, shall be the return of
his deposit without interest. Additional terms may be announced
at the time of sale. Pursuant to
the Federal Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, we advise you that
this firm is a debt collector
attempting to collect the indebtedness referred to herein and
any information we obtain will be
used for that purpose.
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C.,
Substitute Trustee
This is a communication from a
debt collector.
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
SAMUEL I. WHITE, P.C. (50686)
5040 Corporate Woods Drive #120
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462
757-457-1460 - Call Between
9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
or visit our website at
www.siwpc.net
Oct 13, 20, 2017
12135955
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877
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF
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Manassas, VA 20110
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Stafford County
Pursuant to the terms of a certain 1 Deed of Trust, in the original principal
amount of $419,000.00 , dated May 18, 2015, and recorded in the Clerk's
Office of the Circuit Court of Stafford, Virginia (the "Clerk's Office"), as
Instrument Number 150007897, default having been made in the payment
of the note thereby secured, the undersigned Sole Acting Substitute
Trustees, pursuant to the request of the holder of the Note thereby
secured, will offer for sale at public auction outside of the Stafford Circuit
Court, located at 1300 Courthouse Road, Stafford, VA 22555 on October
26, 2017 at 10:00 AM, the property briefly described as 233 STILL WATER
LANE, FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22406, and more particularly described in
said Deed of Trust as follows:
Lot 3, HERBERT FAMILY SUBDIVISION, originally shown on plat of H. Aubrey
Hawkins Associates, Ltd., dated June 22, 2001, entitled "Family Subdivision
Plat Boundary Line Adjustment Plat Subdivision Plat Property of Keith A.
Herbert and Katherine M. Herbert", and recorded in the Clerk‘s Office of the
Circuit Court of Stafford County, Virginia, at PM010000217, said property
revised per Deed of Boundary Line Adjustment and Easement recorded
as Instrument Number LR060025134; Plat recorded in PM060000151, for a
total of 4.57693 acres, more or less.
, with improvements thereon.
12135793
876
Fairfax County
878
TRUSTEE‘S SALE OF
233 STILL WATER LANE
FREDERICKSBURG, VA 22406
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SF
If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
Ford 1955 Custom Line 2dr, no motor, $550 OBO
240-435-1094
Home delivery
is convenient.
Wake up to home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
1-800-753-POST
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TOYOTA
TOYOTA 2010 COROLLA LE $7,995
MGR SPECIAL
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HONDA 2006 CR-V EX $7995
MGR SPECIAL
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How about some
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SF
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Hyundai
2010 Accent
GS
$5989
Auto,
pw., pl., remote start, nice
Alexandria Hyundai
703-535-6840
Home delivery is so easy.
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SF
MERCURY
Mercury 2006 Milan Primier $4494
Leather, V6, 4door, Va. Inspected
Alexandria Hyundai
703-535-6840
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home delivery?
1-800-753-POST
SF
SF
TOYOTA 1999 TACOMA $3000 Pre
Runner truck, Green, Driven daily,
295,000 miles, very good condition .
Call 703-580-6012
CARS 10K OR LESS
$
CHEVROLET
CHRYSLER
CHEVROLET
2016
SONIC
LT
7K MILES**IMMACULATE
$9,995
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Chevrolet 2014 Camaro SS - $24,900
18,450 mi, garaged, blck, 6.2L V8, 6
SPD auto w/ tap shift & remote start.
Fully loaded. (571)-286-6161
CHEVROLET 2016 CRUZE LIMITED
IMMACULATE
$10,995
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CHEVROLET
2013
SONIC
LS
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$6,995
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If only you had home delivery.
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Home delivery is so easy.
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CHRYSLER 2015 200 LIMITED
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$10,995
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CHRYSLER 2004 SEBRING CONV
80K MILES**IMMACULATE $4,395
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FORD
2015
FUSION
SE
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$11,995
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HONDA
2014
CIVIC
LX
SUPER
NICE
ONLY
$10,995
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FORD
2014
FOCUS
SE
SUPER
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ONLY
$8,995
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HONDA
2013
CR-Z
MGER
SPECIAL
ONLY
$9,999
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FORD
2014
FUSION
SE
SUPER
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ONLY
$10,995
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HONDA
2010
INSIGHT
EX
SUPER
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ONLY
$6,995
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CHRYSLER 2004 CONCORDE - automatic, 115k mi, MD Inspc, all power,
2013
FOCUS
SE
leathr int, AM/FM/CD, very good FORD
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$7,995
condition $2,300 OBO 240-347-5362
2016
ELANTRA
SE
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SUPER
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FORD
2013
FIESTA
SE
MGR
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FORD
2016
FIESTA
SE Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422 HYUNDAI
2011
SONATA
SE
IMMACULATE
ONLY
$9,999
MGR
SPECIAL
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$9,995
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FORD 2011 EDGE LIMITED 4X4
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$10,995
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HYUNDAI
SF
Aviation, Boats, RVs
Motorcycles Directory
FORD
INFINITI
62
Power Boats
'08 370 Rinker - 1 owner, Low Hrs
Exc. Cond. Lift Slip kept, Outdrives & Boat bottom looks nearly
New. Lift Slip Opt'l. at South River
Marina, Edgewater 540-270-5403
Recreational Vehicles
Roadtrek 2002 190- 112,000
miles. Needs $3500 +/- work,
selling as is for $8000. Gets
15 MPG.540-405-1502
FORD 2016 EXPLORER SPORT
TURBO - under warranty,
inspected, like new, by owner
Call 301-518-2726 OR
301-843-2476
Ford 1955 Custom Line 2dr, no motor, $550 OBO
240-435-1094
FORD
2015
FOCUS
SE
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$9,995
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HONDA 2015 ACCORD SPORT
IMMACULATE
ONLY
$15,888
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HONDA
INFINITI 2008 G35 X SDN AWD
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$8,995
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INFINITI
2008
G37
CPE
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$12,995
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If only you had home delivery.
1-800-753-POST SF
TOYOTA
TOYOTA
2014
PRIUS
C
SUPER
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ONLY
$10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
1475
Commercial &
Specialized Vehicles
WHEEL CHAIR ACCESIBLE VANS
32 in stock. Starting at $7,000.
VA Dealer #12069.
MERCEDES-BENZ 2004 E500 4MATIC- TOYOTA
2010
COROLLA
LE 1-800-420-6470
ASK FOR STEVE.
AWD, 74,600 mi, silver ext, black MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$7,995
lthr, heat vent seats, Nav, sunroof, Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
1480
Bose w/ 6CD, great snow driver,
Michelins, good cond, all records. 1408
DODGE 1990 150 POWER RAM - Blck,
$7,200. DC, Call Zu 202-255-4370
approx 134,000 miles, 2nd owner,
Chevrolet 1966 Impala - Convertible tool chest incl, newly painted, excel327 engine, AC, White with Black lent condition $7,000 202-832-1237
Original Top, good condition, 1
owner, $18,000 call (301) 733-2670
NISSAN
2016
VERSA
1.6SV
TOYOTA 1999 TACOMA Pre Runner
IMMACULATE
ONLY
$9,995
truck, Green, Driven daily, 295,000
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
miles, very good condition $3,000.
WANTED VINTAGE SPORTS CARS &
Call 703-580-6012
CLASSICS, Especially Mercedes,
Porsche, Jaguar, Old Hot Rods and
NISSAN
2016
SENTRA
SV
Race Cars. Prefer Unrestored Car. 1485
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$10,995
Call Bob 703-966-0122
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Chevrolet 2005 Uplander - White, 6
1447
passenger, automatic, 50K miles,
Md. Inspected, Very good condition.
$4,100 call 240-876-0494
DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S.
PONTIAC
2008
G6
LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your
1490
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$4,995
donation helps local families with
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
food, clothing, shelter, counseling.
FORD 2015 ESCAPE S FWD
Tax deductible. MVA License
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$12,995
#W1044. 410-636-0123 or
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
www.LutheranMissionSociety.org
Antiques & Classics
Trucks
NISSAN
Vans
PONTIAC
Autos Wanted
Sports Utility Vehicles
SATURN
SATURN
2009
AURA
XE
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FORD 2014 ESCAPE S FWD
SUPER
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$11,995
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1490
Sports Utility Vehicles
1490
Sports Utility Vehicles
FORD 2013 EDGE LIMITED 4WD
LOADED
ONLY
$13,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
JEEP 2016 COMPASS LATITUDE
SUPER
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$12,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
FORD 2012 ESCAPE LIMITED 4X4
LOW
MILES
IMMACULATE
ONLY
$10,995
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JEEP 2016 COMPASS SPORT FWD
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$12,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
GMC
2008
ENVOY
SLT
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$8,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
GMC
2005
YUKON
DENALI
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$8,999
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
HONDA
2006
CR-V
EX
MGR
SPECIAL
ONLY
$7,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
Home delivery
is convenient.
NISSAN 2012 ROGUE S FWD
SUPER
CLEAN
ONLY
$10,995
Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
NISSAN
2010
ROGUE
SE
IMMACULATE
ONLY
$8,995
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Home delivery
is convenient.
1-800-753-POST
SF
1-800-753-POST
SF
Wake up to home delivery.
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FROM
"NO FOOD ALLOWED."
TO
"HOW OLD ARE THESE FRIES?"
You know us for shopping, and now Cars.com is the site for
the entire life of your car. So for every turn, turn to Cars.com.
C3748 6x10.5
10
MERCEDES-BENZ
MERCEDES
2008
C300
GARAGE
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Ted Britt Smart Wheels 703-659-8422
THE WASHINGTON POST . GOINGOUTGUIDE.COM
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
Weekend
BUON
APPETITO!
THE 10
BEST PIES
The region’s hottest
margherita pizzas,
ranked by the $20 Diner.
PAGE 21
WASHINGTON POST PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/PHOTOS BY DAYNA SMITH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST AND ISTOCK
DINING
STAGE
MOVIES
Swimsuit season’s over. Have
you ever wondered who makes
the best doughnuts in town? 8
Folger stages a tragedy that
political careerists might relate
to: ‘Antony and Cleopatra.’ 24
Willem Dafoe gives his best
performance in recent memory
in ‘The Florida Project.’ 31
2
EZ
TWO-STEP CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING
3 AREAS AND A FREE HALL!
$99!
Expires 10/28/17
4 AREAS AND A FREE HALL!
$129!
SAVE $76!
Expires 10/28/17
SAVE $91!
Offers may not be available outside the service territory. An area is defined as a room up to 250 square
feet. Combination areas and areas over 250 square feet are considered as separate areas.
Baths, staircases, landings, additional halls, walk-in closets, and area rugs are additional cost.
Valid for residential areas only. Not valid with other coupons or offers.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
AIR DUCT CLEANING
ARE YOUR AIR DUCTS CLEAN?
1.888.805.2372
SERVING VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, & DC
$99
SAVE $195
Additional vents $20 each. Includes FREE System Inspection.
Expires 10/28/17
I N SID E
Nightlife
Forget the bar
crawls and
costume
contests: 10
lesspredictable
Halloween
events. 14
Best Bets
3
Noteworthy events this week
EZ
Virginia Wine Festival
All you’ll need to bring to Old
Town is a blanket, because the
Virginia Wine Festival’s got
everything else covered for the
perfect picnic. That includes
unlimited tastings of more than
200 Virginia wines and ciders
for ticket holders, along with
food trucks, a Virginia oyster
pavilion, music and riverfront
views. Also included: a souvenir
glass and the opportunity to buy
bottles and cases to take home.
When: Saturday and Sunday
from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Exhibits
Bells, brass,
cats and
enlightenment
on display at
Sackler
reopening. 18
Where: Oronoco Park, 100
Madison St., Alexandria.
virginiawinefest.com.
Tickets: $29 in advance, $45 at
the gate.
LCD Soundsystem
Music
Kali Uchis;
Ashley
McBryde;
Noriel; and
Manila Killa. 5
Back in 2011, LCD Soundsystem
broke up in the most grandiose
way possible: A sold-out four-hour
concert at Madison Square
Garden captured for a pair of
documentaries and a live album.
Six years later, to the surprise of
almost no one, James Murphy’s
beloved dance-punk band has
come out of semiretirement. What
is a surprise is that the group now
has its first chart-topping album,
“American Dream,” which is
packed with rubbery disco-funk
bass lines and anthemic choruses
— the kind hipsters were singing
along with a decade ago.
When: Tuesday and Wednesday
at 6:30 p.m. (Tuesday is sold
out.)
Where: The Anthem, 901 Wharf
St. SW. theanthemdc.com.
GIFTS AND PROMISED GIFTS FROM THE ALICE S. KANDELL COLLECTION/SMITHSONIAN FREER AND SACKLER GALLERIES
At the Sackler Gallery, a re-created Tibetan aristocrat’s shrine room is stuffed with pieces from Tibet,
China and Mongolia from the 13th through 20th centuries.
Reopening of the Freer and Sackler galleries
After a lengthy renovation, the Freer/Sackler is planning a weekend-long event to celebrate
its reopening. “IlluminAsia,” inspired by Asian night markets, will bring art and cooking
demos, light displays, music and performances to the museums’ ground, plus food stalls run
by notable restaurants, including Himitsu and Tiger Fork. Inside, check out the refreshed
galleries and new temporary exhibits. (For more on the exhibitions, see Page 18.)
When: Saturday from 5 p.m. to 12 a.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Where: 1050 Independence Ave. SW. asia.si.edu.
Admission: Free.
Tickets: $61.75-$81.75.
More than a dozen Columbia
Heights restaurants, including
the modern Ethiopian eatery
Letena, homestyle Dominican
spot Los Hermanos and the
recently revamped Good Silver,
are participating in a
neighborhood dining crawl in
support of the CentroNía
education center. Feel free to
explore at your own pace: Two
“bites” from each restaurant are
included per ticket.
In this series of 15 lithographs,
acclaimed artist Kara Walker
arranges her signature cutpaper silhouettes of African
Americans atop woodcut prints
of the Civil War, imbuing a
deeper meaning into the historic
scenes. This exhibition places
Walker’s works alongside the
original unaltered images,
allowing the viewer to compare
the original narrative with
Walker’s message.
When: Through March 11.
Where: Smithsonian American
Art Museum, Eighth and F
streets NW. americanart.si.edu.
Where: Starts at Tynan Coffee
and Tea, 1400 Irving St. NW.
centronia.org.
DIXIE D. VEREEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Tickets: $35.
Roast pork with pigeon pea rice and plantains at Los Hermanos, one
of the places participating in the restaurant crawl Wednesday.
Admission: Free.
— Fritz Hahn and Adele Chapin
OCTOBER 13, 2017
When: Wednesday from 6 to 9
p.m.
. FRIDAY,
Dining
Tom Sietsema
answers
readers’
questions. 16
‘Kara Walker:
Harper’s Pictorial
History of the Civil
War (Annotated)’
¡Buen Provecho! A
Taste of Columbia
Heights
THE WASHINGTON POST
Movies
“Professor
Marston the
Wonder
Women” tells a
fascinating
tale: The origin
of the origin
story. 32
4
EZ
Plan Ahead
Noteworthy events over the next two weeks
Oct. 20 Carrie Mae Weems
President Barack Obama’s rendition of “Amazing Grace” at the
funeral of one of nine African American worshipers murdered in a
2015 mass shooting in Charleston, S.C., is the inspiration for “Grace
Notes: Reflections for Now,” a contemplative new work by artist
Carrie Mae Weems that explores racism and violence in America.
Known for her photography and video art — which earned her a
MacArthur “genius grant” — Weems blends the spoken word, music,
video projection and dance into the performance, which makes its
D.C. premiere on the Kennedy Center stage. 8 p.m. Kennedy Center,
2700 F St. NW. kennedy-center.org. $19-$65.
Oct. 24 Q&A with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s
Personal Trainer
Skip SoulCycle and Solidcore and hit the gym like Justice Ginsburg.
Bryant Johnson, the octogenarian’s personal trainer and a court clerk by
day, just published a book titled “The RBG Workout: How She Stays
Strong . . . and You Can Too!” For an only-in-Washington evening, head to
Johnson’s book signing at Sixth & I, where he’ll talk through the D.C.
fitness icon’s exact sequence of planks, squats and push-ups. 7 p.m.
Sixth & I, 600 I St. NW. sixthandi.org. $15-$40.
Nov. 1 Pop-Up Magazine
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
While the magazine industry flounders, the folks behind Pop-Up
Magazine are translating the standard general-interest magazine
format into a lavish live show. Pop-Up Magazine tours the country,
landing in historic theatres like the Lincoln to tell true stories by
acclaimed writers, filmmakers and artists. It’s all paired with such
visuals as animation and shadow theater and set to an original score
performed onstage by an orchestra. This is one of those “you had to
be there” experiences, too: Pop-Up Magazine doesn’t post any video
or audio online. 6:30 p.m. Lincoln Theatre, 1215 U St. NW.
popupmagazine.com. $29.
KYLE GUSTAFSON FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
The band the War on Drugs, fronted by Adam Granduciel, has been hailed as a rock crusader.
Oct. 23 The War On Drugs
The War on Drugs’ latest album, “A Deeper Understanding,” has critics anointing them as America’s next
great rock band. Find out why when frontman Adam Granduciel and company play the Anthem, the new
music venue from the 9:30 Club’s co-owner at the Wharf. The Philadelphia band’s hooky melodies are
layered under a haze of reverb and synthesizers, and its six-minute songs seem to stretch out as far as the
open road. 8 p.m. The Anthem, 901 Wharf St. SW. theanthemdc.com. $41-$56.
Music
5
EZ
free-flowing
and going up
Kali Uchis
ASHLEY MCBRYDE
Ashley McBryde
Show: With High Valley and Adam
Doleac on Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
at the Hamilton. 202-787-1000.
thehamiltondc.com. $10-$20.
— Geoffrey Himes
On the eve of summer last
year, D.C. DJ-producer Manila
Killa released “Youth,” a breezy
but propulsive bit of electronica
that’s a microcosm of his sound
— Chris Richards
— Julyssa Lopez
LUKE GILFORD
Indie pop/R&B singer Kali Uchis, who will tour with Lana Del Rey next year, grew up in Northern
Virginia but is chasing her pop dreams in California.
— singalong melody, windswept
synthesizers, EDM pulse. The
song features breathy vocalist
Satica, whose “is this really real?”
is less a lovesick lyric than a
rhetorical question about Manila
Killa’s recent ascendance.
The 24-year-old musician
(a.k.a. Chris Gavino) was born in
the Philippines and grew up
there, in Indonesia and in Wash-
ington. Like many of his peers in
the electronic dance music
world, Gavino taught himself
Ableton and started producing
tracks and uploading them online. His twinkling, buoyant
dance remixes of such artists as
Lana Del Rey and Tegan and Sara
garnered hundreds of thousands
of plays, and he soon started
playing clubs and festivals
around the world, all while
studying at George Mason University (he graduated in December).
Finding success in the music
world requires talent, luck and
hard work. To the latter point,
Gavino hasn’t been content to
make music only as Manila Killa.
He co-founded a global art and
fashion collective — the anime-
inspired Moving Castle — and
scored SoundCloud hits as half of
Hotel Garuda alongside friend
Aseem Mangaokar, who produces under the name Candle
Weather. In just a few short
years, Gavino has created his
own dreamlike world in the limitless land of EDM. And it is
really real.
— Chris Kelly
OCTOBER 13, 2017
Show: With Robotaki and Seba Yuri
on Friday at 10:30 p.m. at U Street
Music Hall. 202-588-1889.
ustreetmusichall.com. $12.
the best kind of music. The stuff
that happens based off intuition.”
Trusting her gut has served
Uchis well. She’s finishing her
debut album, and next year she’ll
hit the road, opening for Lana
Del Rey. But first there’s a show
at Washington’s relatively cozy U
Street Music Hall — Uchis’s first
hometown gig as a headliner. “I
wanted it to be really intimate,
because the next time I come
home, it’ll be an arena,” she says.
Of course, Uchis would love to be
headlining cavernous venues on
her own someday, but following
her lead, we’ll have to wait and
see what happens next.
Trap music has soared
since its early days in Atlanta
and, as it gained momentum,
has tugged a cadre of Spanishspeaking rappers into its gravitational pull. The strongest
legion of traperos has
emerged from Puerto Rico,
and Noriel is one of the slickest and most irreverent. The
23-year-old from Hato Rey
has made a name for himself
by dropping heavy-tongued
rhymes over languorous
beats, helping trap en español
catch on like wildfire in major
Latin American markets.
Trap en español’s ascension
hasn’t always been a welcome
addition to the Latin urban
genre. Listeners have rejected
the genre’s explicit themes as
too violent, misogynistic and
problematic. But for some, the
music’s allure is its forbidden
quality, and a sense of danger
that Noriel embraces. His collaborations frequently include other young, unapologetically provocative trap artists such as Anuel Aa and
Bryant Myers — fellow Puerto
Ricans.
Still, Noriel’s recent music
has softened a bit. He said he
toned down the language
slightly (if not the themes) on
songs such as 2016’s “Diablita.” He also has branched out
by bringing bigger stars into
his trap universe — the icyhaired rapper has worked
with reggaeton juggernauts
including Yandel, Arcangel
and Baby Rasta. For “Trap
Capos,” a trap compilation album Noriel led last year, he
roped in Colombian pop-reggaeton golden boy Maluma
for the track “Cuatro Babys.”
Some fans were shocked to see
Maluma trying his hand at the
genre, but the song proved
what Noriel has seen all
along: trap’s power and potential.
. FRIDAY,
Manila Killa
‘I
never had a backup plan,”
says Kali Uchis, a pop
dreamer now making her
dreams come true in starry Los Angeles. “I felt like if I had
a backup plan, it was like saying
to the universe that I didn’t believe in myself.” As for her other
conversations with the cosmos,
they’ve convinced the coolheaded, hyper-ambitious pop singer
that she can go with the flow all
the way to the top.
She’s certainly en route. The
currents that first swept Uchis
off to California a couple of years
ago have since guided her into
collaborations with the likes of
Snoop Dogg, Bootsy Collins, Tyler the Creator, Juanes and other
notables who’ve invited the singer to stretch her elastic voice
over reggaeton rhythms, rap
pulses and more. Uchis says she
first learned how to make her
voice — and her brain — flexible
in the “musically enhanced” environment of Northern Virginia,
where she grew up listening to
jazz, rock, go-go and whatever
else happened to be floating in
the air. “When I’m making a
song, I try not to think about
audience or genres,” she says.
“It’s free-flowing. Natural. That’s
Show: Saturday at 9 p.m. at
Club One. 703-780-0123.
tickeri.com. $25.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Ashley McBryde’s recent single, “A Little Dive Bar in Dahlonega,” recently hit No. 1 on the
Highway, SiriusXM’s mainstream-country station. And why
not? She has the big voice and ’70s
country-rock arrangements so
beloved of country radio. But
McBryde’s blue-collar storytelling and straightforward singing
set her apart from the polished
production and airbrushed fantasies of such acts as Florida Georgia Line and Delta Rae, which
shared the chart with her.
McBryde’s bar is not the kind
where you go to get the party
started; it’s where you go to lick
your wounds after a lover has left
and after your full-time minimum-wage job has you searching
the sofa cushions for gas money.
The guitar lick isn’t boisterous,
but languid and melancholy. So is
the dented-but-not-denied vocal
describing this “makin’ the best of
the worst day kinda night.”
McBryde is trying to hit that
sweet spot on the left edge of
country music where one can be
gritty and still have hits. Eric
Church and Chris Stapleton have
done that, and McBryde has
opened shows for both of them.
Maybe she can follow in their
footsteps. When she sings about
her influences on the single “Radioland,” she name-drops Townes
Van Zandt as well as Johnny Cash.
And when she remembers all the
people who told her she was a “Girl
Goin’ Nowhere,” she directs their
attention to all the people cheering
from every chair in the club.
Show: Tuesday at 7 p.m. at U
Street Music Hall.
ustreetmusichall.com. Sold out.
Noriel
6
On the Town
EZ
PO P MU SI C
Prices listed where available
FRIDAY
AGAINST ME!, BLEACHED AND THE DIRTY
NIL 9:30 Club. 930.com. 8 p.m. $25. AMY
HELM, CONNOR KENNEDY Pearl Street
Warehouse. pearlstreetwarehouse.com. 8:30
p.m. $25. BLIND PILOT, CHARLIE
CUNNINGHAM Lincoln Theatre.
thelincolndc.com. 8 p.m. $35. CASH'D OUT
Hill Country. hillcountrywdc.com. 9:30 p.m.
$15. DAVID GRISMAN BLUEGRASS
EXPERIENCE, CIRCUS NO 9 The Hamilton.
thehamiltondc.com. 6:30 p.m. $35-$80.
INCOGNITO Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper
Club. bethesdabluesjazz.com. 7 p.m. $60.
LUCE UNPLUGGED COMMUNITY
SHOWCASE Smithsonian American Art
Museum. americanart.si.edu. 6 p.m. Free.
MADEINTYO, K SWISHA AND 24HRS The
Fillmore. fillmoresilverspring.com. 8 p.m.
$20. MANILA KILLA & ROBOTAKI U Street
Music Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. 10:30 p.m.
AMY HARRIS/INVISION/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Trombone Shorty, seen at the Pilgrimage music festival in Franklin,
Tenn., will play at the new venue Anthem on Sunday.
Email: goingoutguide@washpost.com Telephone: 202-334-6808 Get listed: Our
listings include events in the following categories: pop music, classical music, museums,
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name, description, date, time, location and price at events.washpost.com. Listings are subject to space restrictions.
We cannot acknowledge every submission. Advertising: Ron Ulrich, ronald.ulrich@washpost.com, 202-334-5289
W EEKEND
HANDMADE
HEAVEN
By Tom
ns
Bur
WA S H I N G T O N R E D S K I N S V S . S A N F R A N C I S C O 4 9 E R S
1:00 PM
/
FEDEXFIELD
HAIILTOTHEFIGHTERS
ON
N SALE THROUGHOUT
OCTOBER ONLY
THE WASHINGTON POST
OCTOBER 13, 2017
/
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 15
250+
AMERICAN
ARTISTS
LIVE!
LIMITED-EDITION REDSKINS
T-S H I RTS O N SA L E N OW
•Exciting Demos
•Tasty Treats
•Shopping Fun
•Kids’ Entertainment
REDSKINS.COM/FIGHTBREASTCANCER
PROCEEDS
BENEFIT
OCT 20, 21, 22, 2017
Montgomery Co. Fairgrounds
GAITHERSBURG, MD • EXIT 11 OFF I-270
Admission: $8 online; $10 at the door
Admission good all 3 days
Children under 12 & parking are FREE
Fri. & Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-5
DISCOUNT TICKETS,
show info, exhibitor lists,
directions and more at:
SugarloafCrafts.com
SUGARLOAF MOUNTAIN WORKS, INC. • 800-210-9900
You, too, could have home delivery. 1-800-753-POST
SF
On the Town
$12-$15. MARTIN BARRE Amp by
Strathmore. ampbystrathmore.com. 8 p.m.
$30-$40. MDOU MOCTAR Georgetown
University. bit.ly/2gaU7SW. 1:15 p.m. Free.
RENÉE FLEMING & CHRISTIAN MCBRIDE
The Kennedy Center. kennedy-center.org. 7
p.m. $69-$79. RUNAWAY GIN: A TRIBUTE
TO PHISH Gypsy Sally's. gypsysallys.com. 9
p.m. $15. SUSTO, ESMÉ PATTERSON U
Street Music Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. 7
p.m. $20. THE COURTNEYS, VERSING
AND VENN DC9. dcnine.com. 9 p.m. $14.
THE DUSTY 45S, DEAR CREEK State
Theatre. thestatetheatre.com. 7 p.m. $15.
THE UNDERACHIEVERS, INJURY
RESERVE AND WARM BREW Rock & Roll
Hotel. rockandrollhoteldc.com. 8 p.m. $20.
TIM MCGRAW, FAITH HILL Capital One
Arena.
capitalonearena.monumentalsportsnetwork.c
om. 7:30 p.m. $69.50-$119.50. TOMMY
CASTRO & THE PAINKILLERS The Barns at
Wolf Trap. wolftrap.org. 8 p.m. $25-$30.
SATURDAY
CARL'S RARE ROAST BEEF BAND
Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club.
bethesdabluesjazz.com. 8 p.m. $10. DREW
HOLCOMB & THE NEIGHBORS, LEWIS
WATSON 9:30 Club. 930.com. 7 p.m. $25.
KALEO, ZZ WARD AND WILDER The
Anthem. theanthemdc.com. 8 p.m. $40-$55.
KAT WRIGHT & THE INDOMITABLE SOUL
BAND, KARIKATURA The Hamilton.
thehamiltondc.com. 6:30 p.m. $12-$17. LISA
MEZZACAPPA, CIGARETTE, DOUGIE
POOLE AND BONG WISH Safari DC
Restaurant & Lounge. bit.ly/2wOeGaT. 8 p.m.
$5-$10. NAH., FELLOWCRAFT AND
COSMIC ROMP Rock & Roll Hotel.
fellowcraftband.com. 8 p.m. $12. NEA JAZZ
MASTER LEE KONITZ AT 90 The Kennedy
Center. kennedy-center.org. 7 p.m. $30.
POCO, RUSTY YOUNG AND TISH
HINOJOSA Birchmere. birchmere.com. 7:30
p.m. $39.50. SUM The Kennedy Center.
kennedy-center.org. 6 p.m. Free. THE
GARCIA PROJECT, COUSIN EARTH AND
ACOUSTICALLY SPEAKING Gypsy Sally's.
gypsysallys.com. 9 p.m. $15-$18.
TOKIMONSTA, KAMI AND MOZADO U
Street Music Hall. ustreetmusichall.com.
10:30 p.m. $20. TOWN MOUNTAIN, BUD'S
COLLECTIVE Pearl Street Warehouse.
pearlstreetwarehouse.com. 8:30 p.m. $15$20.
SUNDAY
A TRIBUTE TO THE MUSIC OF GERALD
LEVERT, DONNY HATHAWAY AND MORE
Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club.
bethesdabluesjazz.com. 7:30 p.m. $30.
BLUE OCTOBER The Fillmore.
fillmoresilverspring.com. 8 p.m. $26. BLUES
TRAVELER, LOS COLOGNES The Fillmore.
fillmoresilverspring.com. 8 p.m. $30.
CHEYENNE JACKSON The Barns at Wolf
Trap. wolftrap.org. 8 p.m. $45-$55. CULTS
Rock & Roll Hotel. rockandrollhoteldc.com. 8
p.m. $21-$23. KIM RICHEY, TAYLOR
CARLSON Pearl Street Warehouse.
pearlstreetwarehouse.com. 7 p.m. $20.
LESLIE ODOM JR. The Kennedy Center.
kennedy-center.org. 8 p.m. $49-$125.
ORFEIA Hill Center at the Old Naval
Hospital. hillcenterdc.org. 4 p.m. $12.
RACHELLE FERRELL Blues Alley.
7
EZ
bluesalley.com. 10 p.m. $65-$70. THE
STEEL WHEELS, THE HONEY DEWDROPS
The Hamilton. thehamiltondc.com. 7:30 p.m.
$15-$34.50. TROMBONE SHORTY &
ORLEANS AVENUE, VINTAGE TROUBLE
The Anthem. theanthemdc.com. 8 p.m. $37$57. WEAVES, TANCRED AND CASPER
SKULLS DC9. dcnine.com. 8 p.m. $12-$14.
MONDAY
ATLAS GENIUS, MAGIC GIANT AND HALF
THE ANIMAL Sixth & I Historic Synagogue.
TOWN CONTINUED ON 11
AAFSW
Jason Moran, Artistic Director for Jazz
USED BOOKS
of all kinds
Emil de Cou, conductor | October 26–28, 2017 | Concert Hall
TICKETS ON SALE NOW! KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
Tickets also available at the Box Office. Groups call (202) 416-8400.
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries, call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
David and Alice Rubenstein
are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO.
AARP is the Presenting Sponsor
of the NSO Pops Season.
ART & BOOKFAIR
October 7 & 8;
October 14 & 15
Two Weekends Only!!
Exhibit Hall
Department of State
www.AAFSW.org
with China Forbes
Stamps and Coins
ASSOCIATES OF THE AMERICAN FOREIGN SERVICE WORLDWIDE
Pink Martini
International ART
& COLLECTIBLES
C Street Entrance Between
21st and 23rd Streets NW
Nearest Metro: Foggy Bottom
Visa / MasterCard / AmEx
Discover cards / Checks
accepted
10AM – 3PM
Last Day Books
Half Price
NEA JAZZ MASTER
LEE KONITZ’S
BIRTHDAY
CELEBRATION
OCTOBER 14 AT 7 & 9 P.M.
MARTIN BARRE
{Jethro Tull guitarist}
TONIGHT! FRI, OCT 13
PAULA COLE
Public Welcome!!
{“I Don’t Want to Wait”}
(Photo ID required)
THU, OCT 19
Questions?
202-223-5796
office@aafsw.org
THE GIBSON BROTHERS
{Bluegrass stalwarts}
SUN, OCT 22
AMP & COMEDY ZONE PRESENT
Mariinsky Ballet
TONIGHT!
Valery Gergiev,
Artistic Director
OCTOBER 21 AT 8 P.M.
Yuri Fateev, Deputy Director
of the Ballet Company
MOUNTAIN HEART
Sat, Oct 28
SAT, OCT 14
SUN, OCT 15
TROKER
WED, OCT 18
PACO PEÑA
THU, OCT 19
Tickets also available at the Box Office. Groups call (202) 416-8400.
FRI, OCT 20
International Programming at the Kennedy Center
is made possible through the generosity of the
Kennedy Center International Committee on the Arts.
CHAMBER MUSIC AT THE BARNS
AND MANY MORE!
{Authentic tribute to pop icons}
NEA JAZZ MASTER
RON CARTER TRIO
OCTOBER 27 AT 7 & 9 P.M.
(202) 467-4600
KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG
Tickets also available at the Box Office.
Groups (202) 416-8400
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries,
call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540
Support for Jazz at the Kennedy Center is
generously provided by C. Michael Kojaian.
1 6 3 5 T R A P R D, V I E N N A , VA 2 2 1 8 2
SUN, OCT 29
Lydia Loveless
{Roots punk & country}
Thu, Nov 2
11810 Grand Park Ave, N. Bethesda, MD
Red Line–White Flint Metro
AMPbyStrathmore.com
OCTOBER 13, 2017
LARA ST. JOHN, VIOLIN
MATT HERSKOWITZ, PIANO
FOUNDER’S DAY
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries, call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
THE EVERLY BROTHERS
EXPERIENCE
CHEYENNE JACKSON
. FRIDAY,
Oxana Skorik and Andrei Yermakov,
photo by Natasha Razina
GENERAL ADMISSION
TICKETS ON SALE NOW! KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
Russian Cultural Initiatives are supported by
The Vladimir Potanin Foundation.
{A new take on the ’60s}
TEDXTYSONSSALON
“LESSONS LEARNED”
Casting available at kennedy-center.org
HAROLD LÓPEZ-NUSSA TRIO
NELLIE McKAY
STOMPIN’ GROUND RECORD
RELEASE TOUR
with the Kennedy Center
Opera House Orchestra
THU, OCT 26
THE WASHINGTON POST
& THE PAINKILLERS
October 17–22
Opera House
{Comedy + music}
FRI, OCT 27
THU,
OCT 12
TOMMY
CASTRO
NEXT WEEK!
ADAM DODD
{Cuban jazz pianist}
FRI, OCT 13
La Bayadère
Support for Ballet at the Kennedy Center
is provided by C. Michael Kojaian.
DIZZY GILLESPIE
CENTENNIAL
CELEBRATION
8
EZ
Dining
D.C.’s best
doughnuts: An
investigation
BY
H OLLEY S IMMONS
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
A doughnut is a doughnut is a
doughnut, right?
Not quite.
Although the sweet, fluffy
rounds are usually made with the
same base, bakers lend their own
finesse to the treat. Frying time,
temperature and toppings also
play a role. The best versions,
fresh, pillowy rounds of fried
dough, aren’t overly sweet.
To find the top one in Washington, we enlisted a baker’s dozen of
Washington Post staffers to sample 24 varieties — and it wasn’t
long before they all requested
naps.
We rated classic glaze, chocolate glaze and “wild card” flavors
from several of the area’s most
notable doughnut shops, judging
them on flavor, texture and appearance, then ranked them
based on the shop’s total score. A
few notes: If a shop lacked a
chocolate-glaze
option,
we
bought the closest thing. We focused on shops specializing in
doughnuts, so those with only one
or two on the menu didn’t qualify.
Below, behold our sugar-fueled
findings, starting with sixth place.
6. Dunkin’ Donuts
Overall score: 17.8 out of 45
We were shocked at the high
score of Dunkin’ Donuts’ classic
glaze (it was our third-favorite in
its category), although the poor
showing of the other flavors ultimately made it our least favorite
shop overall.
Classic glaze
“Cakey, pillowy.” “Well-distributed glaze.” “Leaves a weird residue in my mouth.” “Looks like a
traditional doughnut. Poofy and
pretty.” “Very fluffy.” “Meh.”
“Sticky, slightly tougher than
cake.” “Ugh. Dry.”
Chocolate glaze
“Too much dough, not enough
chocolate.” “Soft and fresh, but
starting to degrade from air.”
“Barely frosted.” “This has got to
be Dunkin’, right?” “Classic and
plastic.” “Unobjectionable taste.”
“Bland.” “Really dry, stale.” “Oddtasting.” “Stale and waxy. Dunkin’
Donuts?”
Purple Potion
“Traditional, icing-doughnut
taste.”
“Dry
and
messy.”
“SOOOOO dry.” “The icing has
flavor . . . the flavor of empty calories.” “Dry and stale and awful. I
hate everything.” “I’m offended.”
“Plastic, not really sure what’s
going on here.” “Too hipster.”
Several area locations.
dunkindonuts.com.
5. Krispy Kreme (tied)
Overall score: 19.9 out of 45
When that “Hot Now” sign’s on,
people run over to this cult-favorite chain for its just-fried doughnuts. Overall, though, their offerings did not impress our tasters.
Classic glaze
“Tastes like plastic, feels like
plastic and looks like plastic.”
“Stale! Dry!” “Very strong vanilla
taste.” “Lemony, sugary. Is this
Krispy Kreme?” “Firm, good
crispness from the glaze.” “Ugh,
syrupy.” “Chalky, leaves a film on
the roof of your mouth.”
Chocolate glaze
“Krispy Kreme!” “Classic frosting flavor.” “Light, chewy.” “Very
sweet, overpoweringly so.” “Had
nice texture, but glaze felt chalky.”
“Too sugary and not chocolaty.”
“Are there two types of glaze on
this?” “Gritty.” “Looks plasticized.”
MAURA JUDKIS/THE WASHINGTON POST
Staff members of The Washington Post taste-tested 24 flavors of doughnuts in a sugar-dusted search to
find the best in the area. (Someone had to do it.)
outpost in Shaw, where you can get
late-night doughnuts until 2 a.m.
on weekends.
Cake batter
“Raw, unadulterated sugar in
lava form.” “I took a bite, was hit
with a flood of liquid sugar that
tastes vaguely of vanilla.” “Looks
like a Muppet with a rare form of
measles. Also, it dyed my finger
yellow.” “Cloyingly sweet birthday
cake.” “Reminds me of being a
kid.” “It’s just sugar. But these are
doughnuts after all.” “Oh God, the
food coloring.”
Several area locations.
krispykreme.com.
5. Sugar Shack (tied)
Overall score: 19.9 out of 45
You may know Sugar Shack’s
Alexandria location as the front for
Captain Gregory’s, a sultry speakeasy in the back of the sweet shop.
The Richmond-based doughnut
company recently opened its first
Classic glaze
“Could use more sugar.” “Feels a
little stale, there’s not much
spring in the dough.” “It looks
pale. Like your first visit to the
beach of the summer.” “Not overly
sweet.” “Very sad-looking.” “Sweet
but not overly so.” “Pillowy and
dense.” “Chewy, on the verge of
dense.” “Least sweet of the
bunch.”
Chocolate glaze
“Tastes like bad candy.” “Richer
frosting than the others.” “Light,
nice mouthfeel.” “Fluffy!” “Appealing sheen.” “Bitter, needs sugar.” “Too spongy.” “Big yeasty interior with a thin layer of chocolate.” “Too dry.” “Dense, with a
plastic finish.”
“Way too much sweetness.” “Some
people may think this is nostalgic.
They are wrong.” “Nobody likes
dry Lucky Charms.” “All novelty,
not well executed.” “The cereal is
what you know it’s going to be:
STALE.” “Well, it’s fun. And
doughnuts are supposed to be
fun.” “Honestly, it’s not as bad as it
looks.” “It’s like a 5-year-old’s
birthday party.”
tastes soggy, as if it wasn’t fried in
hot-enough oil.” “This looks like a
doughnut Homer Simpson would
appreciate.” “Spongy.” “Tastes medicinal.” “Airy texture.” “Like licking your sugar-covered fingers after eating a doughnut.” “I think I
can taste individual pieces of sugar.” “Factory-issued?” “Looks like
a poor attempt at a Krispy Kreme.”
Thin Mint
Several area locations.
sugarshackdonuts.com.
4. 202 Donuts
Overall score: 23.7 out of 45
Made every morning in small
batches, 202 serves Bethesda with
fresh, doughy bites. Doughnuts
tend to be on the smaller side, so
consider doubling your order if
your cravings are particularly
strong.
Lucky Charms
Classic glaze
“Tastes like Saturday morning.”
“I detect a little cinnamon.” “It
“Deep-dark chocolate flavor accents with mint, a classic counterpoint.” “Nice, soft fresh interior.”
“Big yeasty interior.” “Tastes like
toothpaste.” “The mint is too
many competing flavors, like
someone squirted toothpaste on a
chocolate doughnut.” “I can’t remember the texture, but I don’t
want to try another bit.” “Really
froufrou.” “No. Bad.” “Looks deceivingly normal. I feel betrayed.”
“It’s complicated, like a Faberge
egg.”
DOUGHNUTS CONTINUED ON 9
9
EZ
PHOTOS BY HOLLEY SIMMONS/THE WASHINGTON POST
The Washington Post conducted a taste test of the region’s best doughnuts, sampling selections from Duck Donuts and B. Doughnut
DOUGHNUTS FROM 8
Sweet potato
“It’s a little soggy.” “Thought it
was s’mores but it tasted like
pumpkin spice.” “Too squishy — it
fell apart.” “Pumpkin spice. Lord
help us all.” “Well, it looks like a
s’more, so there’s that.” “Lots of
spice, reminds me of fall.” “Not a
doughnut. It’s too moist.” “Soft,
smooth and cakey.”
4901B Fairmont Ave., Bethesda. 202donuts.com.
3. District Doughnut (tied)
Overall score: 24.3 out of 45
This small doughnut shop
opened on Barracks Row in 2014,
serving seasonal flavors with a
gourmet twist. Founded by a
group of young entrepreneurs, it
has since expanded to Cady’s Alley in Georgetown as well as a
forthcoming location at the
Wharf. The shop serves our favorite overall doughnut — a savory
option that may have benefited
from being among all the sweet
varieties. Or perhaps it’s just that
good.
Classic glaze
“Went back for seconds.” “What
the hell? Unpleasant, upsetting.”
“Weird
melted-Hershey’s-bar
taste. Tasted burned.” “Weird flavor, terrible aftertaste.” “Immediately spit it out, tasted like pure
sugar and was overwhelming.” “Is
this chocolate?” “Dense, unpleasant.”
Everything-cream-cheese
(best in category!)
“Savory doughnuts are the new
doughnuts.” “Maybe I just loved
this because there were too many
sweets, but I am 100-percent proeverything-spice
doughnuts.”
“Long live savory doughnuts!
Down with sweets!” “I appreciate
the savory change-up, but this
isn’t a doughnut.” “As a bagel
lover, I love this doughnut.”
“Smooth and delicious.”
Several area locations.
districtdoughnut.com.
3. Astro Doughnuts and Fried
Chicken (tied)
Overall score: 24.3 out of 45
Fried chicken and doughnuts
have always been a winning combination. Aside from a slight
stumble in the classic-glaze category, this D.C.-born doughnut
darling fared well in our taste test.
Classic glaze
“Lacks sweetness.” “Turns
gummy in the mouth.” “Square
and grids . . . why?” “Really artificial vanilla.” “Tastes chemical-y.”
“Dry but soft.” “Bloated, doughy,
bland.” “Undercooked dough,
gummy.” “Has a sweet Wonder
Bread taste.”
Candy bar
“Not as much flavor as I’d
hoped.” “Wrong and bad combination of flavors.” “Pretzels don’t
belong on a doughnut.” “Very
busy, but probably the best chocolate flavor of them all.” “I wanted
the pretzels to be harder/saltier.”
“Doesn’t know what it wants to
be.” “Very cute with stripes and
decorations.” “Too salty, not
enough chocolate.” “Cake doughnut is good, why is it ruined with
pretzels?”
Crème brûlée
“Tastes like apple strudel.”
“Meh.” “Crunches on top, looks
pretty.” “Crispy crème brûlée top
is true to form. Creamy in the
middle.” “The doughnut itself is
just okay.” “Very decadent.” “Really good crust.”
1308 G St. NW. 7511 Leesburg
Pike, Falls Church.
astrodoughnuts.com.
2. B. Doughnut
Overall score: 24.4 out of 45
This Leesburg-based shop,
with a small outpost in Union
Market, serves malasadas. The
Portuguese-style rounds — with-
out a hole in the center — are
made
using
yeast-leavened
dough, which makes them a bit
more breadlike than most doughnuts. That texture appealed to
most of our tasters.
Classic glaze (best in category!)
“This feels closer to bread.” “No
hole . . . What gives?” “Doughy
and yeasty and yum.” “Brioche!”
“Gummy, reminds me of challah.”
“More roll than doughnut.”
Chocolate glaze
“Nice and pillowy. Big fermented spongy interior, cracked, dry
frosting.” “Plasticky.” “I’d like to
take a nap on this doughnut.”
“Super-weird frosting.” “Fake
chocolate taste. I had to spit it
out.” “Chewy and pleasant.” “Gluey.” “Chocolate tastes like real
chocolate.”
Lemon curd
“Granulated sugar, oozing lemon.” “Looks like a little cake.”
“Pine-Sol. Spread it on your
countertops.” “The goodness is
hidden.” “A good lemon curd to
offset the sweetness.”
7 Loudoun St. SW, Leesburg,
Va.; Union Market, 1309 Fifth St.
NE. bdoughnut.com.
1. Duck Donuts
Overall score: 26.4 out of 45
Founded in Duck, N.C., in 2006,
this chain has more than four
dozen locations across the country. They serve made-to-order
doughnuts that are so fresh and
sticky that they can stick onto the
box. Freshness surely helped
them land the No. 1 spot on our
list.
Classic glaze
“Not too sweet, a little sour,
even.” “Thick and old-fashioned,
with a crunchy glaze.” “Thick and
cakey.” “Nice golden color.” “Soft
and mushy.” “Generic, storebought.” “Appealing yellow hue.”
Chocolate glaze (best in category!)
“Kind of a hybrid doughnut,
part yeast, part cake.” “Cakelike.”
“Reminds me of Entenmann’s
doughnuts.” “Frosting is like a
Berger cookie.” “Bland, vaguely
chemical frosting.” “Blah.” “Looks
like a doughnut from an
old-fashioned shoppe — spelled
with an ‘e.’”
Maple bacon
“Bacon overpowers the maple.”
“It’s ugly.” “Full disclosure, I hate
bacon on doughnuts.” “Mmm. Bacon. With sugar. It’s like waffles
with bacon on top. I can dig it.”
“Nothing worse than soggy bacon.” “Bacon!”
Several area locations.
duckdonuts.com.
holley.simmons@washpost.com
THE WASHINGTON POST
“A little stale.” “Nice yeasty
notes.” “Chunky and poofy.”
“Bready and light.” “Sweet but
processed.” “Sweet with a hint of
lemon?” “A nice, even glaze.”
“Flat.”
Chocolate glaze
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
Classic and festive flavors from Sugar Shack and Dunkin’ Donuts.
10
EZ
Dining
Get woozy from this
towering stack of sweets
BY
H OLLEY S IMMONS
Do not order a Doffle Bomb if
you don’t like talking to strangers.
The ridiculously indulgent,
multilevel dessert at B Too attracts stares and comments from
passersby, including “What is
that?!” and “Can I have a bite?”
To prepare the Doffle Bomb
($12), available only at brunch,
executive chef Dieter Samijn
starts with a half-doughnut, halfwaffle dough made with butter,
flour, milk eggs, yeast and sugar.
The dense dough is shaped into
two doughnuts and pressed gently in a waffle machine. Next, the
doughnuts are deep-fried until
puffy and covered in a powdered
sugar glaze.
As if that weren’t sweet
enough, the rounds are topped
with sprinkles and a scoop of
vanilla ice cream then finished
with whipped cream and chocolate drizzle.
“We used to sell only the Doffle
It’s called a Doffle Bomb
(think: waffle-doughnut
hybrid dough), which the
restaurant B Too has added
to its vast brunch arsenal.
at brunch, and then someone
asked to put ice cream on it,” says
Samijn, of how the dessert came
to be. “And at another brunch,
someone asked to put whipped
cream on it.” So he decided to put
it all together.
Eat quickly: The towering dish
is served warm, meaning the ice
cream can melt and make the
dough mushy. The texture, closer
to a funnel cake’s, has crispy
dimples that collect melted ice
cream for bites that gush with
sugar.
“It’s best to just attack it,” Samijn says. Considering the dish’s
imposing size, do so with friends.
1324 14th St. NW. 202-6272800. btoo.com.
HOLLEY SIMMONS/THE WASHINGTON POST
holley.simmons@washpost.com
EXPLORE THE 2017/18 SEASON AT ARENA STAGE
“BITINGLY FUNNY.”
NATIVE
GARDENS
EMMY AND TONY WINNER
HAL LINDEN IN
“TERRIFIC SONGS ... SASSY DANCING.”
THE PRICE
THE PAJAMA
GAME
NOW PLAYING
BEGINS OCTOBER 27
BY ARTHUR MILLER
DIRECTED BY SEEMA SUEKO
BOOK BY GEORGE ABBOTT AND RICHARD BISSELL
MUSIC AND LYRICS BY RICHARD ADLER AND JERRY ROSS
BASED ON THE NOVEL 7½ CENTS BY RICHARD BISSELL
DIRECTED BY ALAN PAUL | CHOREOGRAPHED BY PARKER ESSE
MUSIC DIRECTION BY JAMES CUNNINGHAM
— Washington Post
“A MOVING AND GORGEOUS TESTIMONIAL.”
NINA SIMONE:
FOUR WOMEN
— Star Tribune
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
— Broadway World
NOW PLAYING
BY KAREN ZACARÍAS
DIRECTED BY BLAKE ROBISON
CO-PRODUCTION WITH GUTHRIE THEATER
Photo of Dan Domingues, Jacqueline Correa,
Sally Wingert and Steve Hendrickson in Native Gardens
by Dan Norman for Guthrie Theater.
Photo of Hal Linden by Tony Powell.
ORDER TODAY!
Photo of Tim Rogan and Britney Coleman by Tony Powell.
202-488-3300
ARENASTAGE.ORG
BEGINS NOVEMBER 10
BY CHRISTINA HAM
DIRECTED BY TIMOTHY DOUGLAS
On the Town
TOWN FROM 7
sixthandi.org. 8 p.m. $20-$23. DEAD
RIDER, MOCK IDENTITY DC9. dcnine.com.
9 p.m. $12. PETER WHITE, MARC ANTOINE
Birchmere. birchmere.com. 7:30 p.m.
$39.50. PHOENIX The Anthem.
theanthemdc.com. 8 p.m. $45-$55.
YEHME2, BORTZ AND DON CAMPBELL U
Street Music Hall. ustreetmusichall.com. 8
p.m. $10-$20.
TUESDAY
ANUHEA, SAMMY J AND MAHI Gypsy
Sally's. gypsysallys.com. 8 p.m. $20-$23.
HOLLY BOWLING The Hamilton.
thehamiltondc.com. 7:30 p.m. $10-$25.
JULIEN BAKER, HALF WAIF 9:30 Club.
930.com. 7 p.m. $20. PROPAGANDHI,
IRON CHIC AND HEARTSOUNDS Rock &
Roll Hotel. rockandrollhoteldc.com. 7 p.m.
$20. TOADIES, LOCAL H Black Cat.
blackcatdc.com. 7:30 p.m. $22-$25. VITA
AND THE WOOLF, QUEEN OF JEANS AND
MARIAN MCLAUGHLIN DC9. dcnine.com.
8:30 p.m. $10-$12.
WEDNESDAY
CILANTRO BOOMBOX Bossa Bistro.
bossadc.com. 9:30 p.m. $10. DRIFTWOOD,
GINA CLOWES AND JOHNNY CALAMARI
Pearl Street Warehouse.
pearlstreetwarehouse.com. 8:30 p.m. $15$20. HAMILTON LEITHAUSER, COURTNEY
MARIE ANDREWS 9:30 Club. 930.com. 7
p.m. $25. HIGH VALLEY, ASHLEY
MCBRYDE AND ADAM DOLEAC The
Hamilton. thehamiltondc.com. 7:30 p.m. $10$20. KAZUNORI KUMAGAI, YUMI
KUROSAWA The Kennedy Center. kennedycenter.org. 7:30 p.m. $29-$49. LCD
SOUNDSYSTEM The Anthem.
theanthemdc.com. 8 p.m. $61.75-$81.75.
MESSER CHUPS, BLACK FLAMINGOS
AND ATOMIC MOSQUITOS State Theatre.
thestatetheatre.com. 8:30 p.m. $10-$15.
R
OCTOBE
017
4 - 29, 2
Tickets from $30!
240.644.1100 | RoundHouseTheatre.org
Bethesda Metro: 1 Block | Convenient Parking!
GREAT PERFORMANCES
AT MASON
CFA.GMU.EDU
PETER ROWAN, TODD SHEAFFER Gypsy
Sally's. gypsysallys.com. 8 p.m. $25.
RACQUET CLUB, JARED HART AND TEEN
MORTGAGE DC9. dcnine.com. 8 p.m. $12$15. THE FIX Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper
Club. bethesdabluesjazz.com. 8 p.m. $20.
TROKER The Barns at Wolf Trap.
wolftrap.org. 8 p.m. $20-$22.
THURSDAY
ACES IN CHAINS: A TRIBUTE TO ALICE IN
CHAINS State Theatre. thestatetheatre.com.
7 p.m. $12-$15. CARDI B Echostage.
echostage.com. 9 p.m. $48.40.
soundcheckdc.com. 10 p.m. $15-$20. ELI
PAPERBOY REED, HIGH & MIGHTY BASS
BAND Pearl Street Warehouse.
pearlstreetwarehouse.com. 8:30 p.m. $15$20. GUNS N' ROSES Capital One Arena.
capitalonearena.monumentalsportsnetwork.c
om. 7 p.m. $102-$395. HOPE SANDOVAL &
THE WARM INVENTIONS, HOLY WAVE
9:30 Club. 930.com. 7 p.m. $30. LA SANTA
CECILIA Library of Congress. loc.gov. 8 p.m.
Free. MINISTRY, DEATH GRIPS The
Fillmore. fillmoresilverspring.com. 8:30 p.m.
$35. NAHKO, 1,000 FUEGOS AND
CHRISTINA HOLMES The Hamilton.
thehamiltondc.com. 6:30 p.m. $29.75-
11
EZ
$34.75. NAI PALM U Street Music Hall.
ustreetmusichall.com. 7 p.m. $20. PACO
PEÑA The Barns at Wolf Trap. wolftrap.org. 8
p.m. $35-$45. PAULA COLE Amp by
Strathmore. ampbystrathmore.com. 8 p.m.
$30-$40. PET SYMMETRY, BROKEN HILLS
DC9. dcnine.com. 8:30 p.m. $12. SERGIO
MENDES Music Center at Strathmore.
strathmore.org. 8 p.m. $29-$69. SHAB-EMEHREGAN Hill Center at the Old Naval
Hospital. hillcenterdc.org. 7 p.m. $12-$15.
THE SIDLEYS, THE ERIC SCOTT BAND
Bethesda Blues & Jazz Supper Club.
TOWN CONTINUED ON 12
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Romance-Sensuality-Drama. Dance!
. FRIDAY,
TANGO BUENOS AIRES
The Spirit of Argentina
This performance is also at the Hylton Performing Arts Center on
Fri., Oct. 13 at 8 p.m. Information at HyltonCenter.org.
Located on the Fairfax campus, six miles west of Beltway exit 54
at the intersection of Braddock Road and Rt. 123.
WINCHESTER | LOUDOUN | FAIRFAX
OCTOBER 13, 2017
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 AT 8 P.M.
TICKETS 888-945-2468 OR CFA.GMU.EDU
THE WASHINGTON POST
national universities, according to U.S. News & World Report’s
On the Town
Prices listed where available
FRIDAY
FRIDAY MORNING MUSIC CLUB: CALVARY
BAPTIST CHURCH SERIES Olivia Johann,
oboe, and Jeongseon Choi, piano, perform
Strauss’s Concerto in D and Haydn’s
Concerto in C; early works by David Robert
Jones are performed by Karen Mercedes,
contralto and Ruth Locker, piano. Calvary
Baptist Church, 755 Eighth St. NW.,
WORLD-CLASS SHOW JUMPING
ENTERTAINING EXHIBITIONS
FUN FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
TICKETS START AT $20 FOR SELECTED NIGHTS.
CHILDREN 12 AND UNDER FREE FOR DAYTIME SESSIONS.
DISCOUNTS FOR GROUPS, MILITARY, STUDENT AND SENIORS.
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT TICKETMASTER.COM
FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO WIHS.ORG
p.m. Through Sunday. $15-$89.
SATURDAY
ARIEL QUARTET The group performs works
by Schumann, Kurtág and Beethoven.
Harold J. Kaplan Concert Hall, Center for the
Arts, Towson University, Towson. 3 p.m. Free.
Reservations required. Recommended
donation: $10.
FRIDAY MORNING MUSIC CLUB:
GREENSPRING CONCERT SERIES Albert
Hunt, clarinet, and Jeongseon Choi, piano,
perform Poulenc’s Sonata for clarinet and
piano and Rabaud’s Solo de
Concours. Vocalise (trans. Richardson) and
Richard Foo, piano, perform Schumann’s
Waldscenen and Rachmaninoff. Jeongseon
Choi and Chen-li Tzeng, four-handed piano,
perform Dello Joio’s “Stage Parodies.”
Greenspring, 7410 Spring Village Drive,
Springfield. fmmc.org/event/greenspringconcert-series-10/. 3 p.m. Free.
NATIONAL CHAMBER ENSEMBLE This
season premiere features Spanish works by
Joaquín Turina, Pablo Casals, Enrique
Granados and others. The Bowen McCauley
Dance company performs a commissioned
dance. Gunston Arts Center Theatre I, 2700
South Lang Street, Arlington.
parks.arlingtonva.us/locations/gunstoncommunity-center/. 7:30 p.m. $18-$36.
Group discounts for 10 or more are available
by calling (703) 685-7590.
NATIONAL PHILHARMONIC The group
performs Beethoven’s Egmont Overture,
Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor and
TO
SUNDAY
BEST OF BRONZE HANDBELL CONCERT
The group performs works from Faure’s
Pavane to Abba’s “Dancing Queen” to
Adele’s “Rolling in the Deep.” George
Washington Masonic National Memorial,
101 Callahan Dr., Alexandria.
gwmemorial.org. 4 p.m. $10.
CATHEDRAL CHORAL SOCIETY The season
premiere begins with Mozart’s Requiem in D
minor and other selections. Kent Tritle
conducts. Washington National Cathedral,
3101 Wisconsin Ave. NW.
cathedralchoralsociety.org/events/mozartrequiem. 4 p.m. $25-$80.
CELLIST MATT HAIMOVITZ: A MOVEABLE
FEAST The solo cellist performs Bach’s
Suites for Unaccompanied Cello in a
program pairing each of the works with
newly commissioned suites by Philip Glass,
Du Yun, Vijay Iyer and others. This concert
will feature six suites and their
TIME
TRAVEL
Maryland
Renaissance
Festival
CROWNSVILLE, MD
Sat & Sun
through Oct 22
10 am - 7 pm
Rain or Shine
ON
Ma
la
ry
DESIGN, BUILD
& CONSTRUCT
Dvorák ‘s Cello Concerto in B minor. Music
Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman
Lane, North Bethesda.
nationalphilharmonic.org. 8 p.m. Through
Sunday. $30-$82.
OPERA: SHINING BROW Miriam Khalil,
Sidney Outlaw, Rebecca Ringle and Robert
Baker star in an UrbanArias production
exploring the mad genius of Frank
Lloyd Wright. Featuring the Inscape
Chamber Orchestra. Atlas Performing Arts
Center, 1333 H St. NE. urbanarias.org. 8 p.m.
$39-$42.
FT!
bethesdabluesjazz.com. 8 p.m. $12.50.
THE STEVE HERBERMAN, DONATO
SOVIERO, MICHAEL BOWIE AND LENNY
ROBINSON Smithsonian American Art
Museum. americanart.si.edu. 5 p.m. THE
WEEKS, DAN LUKE AND THE RAID Rock
& Roll Hotel. rockandrollhoteldc.com. 8
p.m. $15-$18. WHAT SO NOT & BAAUER,
KIDD MARVEL 9:30 Club. 930.com. 10
p.m. $25.
Washington. fmmc.org. 12 p.m. Free.
FROM MARTIN LUTHER TO J. S. BACH
AND BRAHMS A concert that follows a 6:30
p.m. exhibit: Maestro Julien Benichou
conducts Lukasz Szyrner on cello and
Maciej Szyrner on piano performing works
by Bach, Brahms and Schumann. La Maison
Française, 4101 Reservoir Rd. NW.
franceintheus.org. 6:30 p.m. $15-$40.
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The
orchestra performs Tchaikovsky’s
“Pathétique” Symphony and Barber’s Piano
Concerto featuring soloist Garrick Ohlsson.
Juanjo Mena conducts. The Kennedy
Center, 2700 F St. NW. kennedy-center.org. 7
LE
CL A S S I C A L
LY
nd
2 W K E N Dv a l
EE s i
o
TOWN FROM 11
S
EZ
.c
12
enai
s s a n c e Fe
“A SPRIGHTLY METATHEATRICAL TOUCH”
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
- WASHINGTON POST
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“POSNER SHOCKS US INTO SEEING THE PLAY ANEW IN WELCOME WAYS.”
Just you wait, Henry Higgins... - DC THEATRE SCENE
WRITTEN BY THORNTON
DIRECTED BY AARON
WILDER
POSNER
NOW THRU NOV 12
Tickets/Info: olneytheatre.org
301.924.3400
WE’RE CLOSE BY! Just 10 min from the ICC, 30 min from DC, 15 min from Rockville and Columbia, and 40 min from Baltimore!
On the Town
accompanying partner works. Old
Firehouse, 1440 Chain Bridge Rd. McLean.
mcleancenter.org/alden-theatre/
performance/icalrepeat.detail/2017/10/15/
6798/-/cellist-matt-haimovitz-a-moveablefeast. 2 p.m. $14-$20.
DE MAEYER-KENDE DUO The duo performs
works by Schubert, Beethoven and others.
Dumbarton Oaks Museum, 1703 32nd St.
NW. doaks.org/events/music/concert-series. 7
p.m. Through Monday. $54.
ENSEMBLE 4.1 The group performs
chamber works by Francis Poulenc, “Elégie”
for horn and piano and the “Clarinet
Sonata,” commissioned by Benny
Goodman, followed by “Quintet for Piano
and Wind” by pianist Walter Gieseking. The
Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW.
phillipscollection.org/. 4 p.m. $20-$40.
Advance reservations are strongly
recommended; tickets can be reserved
online until 12 hours before each concert.
FRIDAY MORNING MUSIC CLUB: LYCEUM
CONCERT SERIES Robyn Tessin and
Carolyn Esko Carlson, violins; Julia Moline,
viola and Valerie Matthews, cello, perform
Prokofiev’s String Quartet No. 1. Simon
Finlow, piano, performs Beethoven’s Sonata
in D and Debussy’s L’isle Joyeuse. The
Lyceum, Alexandria's History Museum, 201
S. Washington St., Alexandria. fmmc.org/
event/calvary-baptist-church-concert-series61/. 3 p.m. Free.
SPHINX VIRTUOSI The ensemble of top
black and Latino classical soloists perform
for their 20th anniversary. The Kennedy
Center, 2700 F St. NW. kennedy-center.org. 2
p.m. $29.
STEINWAY SERIES: MENDELSSOHN
PIANO TRIO Trio members Ya-Ting Chang,
pianist, Peter Sirotin, violinist, and Fiona
Thompson, cellist, perform Felix
Mendelssohn-Bartholdy’s Piano Trio in D
minor and Piano Trio in C minor, and Piano
Trio in D minor, by Fanny Mendelssohn
Hensel. Smithsonian American Art Museum,
Eighth and F streets NW.
dcculturecalendar.org/event/steinway-seriesmendelssohn-piano-trio/. 3 p.m. Free.
music-concert-sang-eun-lee. 7:30 p.m. Free.
WEDNESDAY
ENSEMBLE SIGNAL AND STEVE REICH
Brad Lubman conducts Ensemble Signal’s
East Coast premiere of “Runner,” with a
cameo appearance by Steven Reich
performing “Clapping Music.” Presented by
the Library of Congress with co-presenters,
Washington Performing Arts. Library of
Congress, 101 Independence Ave. SE. loc.gov/
concerts/tickets.html. 8 p.m. Free. All events
are free, but require tickets.
SANG-EUN LEE The cellist performs. National
Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York
Ave. NW. nmwa.org/events/shenson-chamber-
THURSDAY
FRIDAY MORNING MUSIC CLUB: OLD
TOWN HALL CONCERT SERIES Charles
Mokotoff, guitar, performs works by Purcell,
Weiss and Rudnev; Peggy McNulty, soprano,
and Gillian Cookson, piano, perform works
by Persichetti, Copland, Baksa, Hoiby and
Gordon: Songs on poems by Emily
Dickinson; and Frank Conlon, piano,
perform’s Chopin’s Nocturne in C minor,
Villa-Lobos’s Prole do Bebe, and Book I
(selections). Old Town Hall, 3999 University
13
EZ
Dr. Fairfax City. fmmc.org/event/old-town-hallconcert-series-15/. 12 p.m. Free.
POST CLASSICAL ENSEMBLE Pianist
Vladimir Feltsman performs selections from
Scriabin, Roslavets, Mosolov and
Protopopov. Feltsman also gives a
symposium with members of the
PostClassical ensemble. This is a coproduction with American University’s
Carmel Institute of Russian Culture &
History. Katzen Arts Center, 4400
Massachusetts Ave. NW. 7 p.m. Free. Tickets
are free but must be reserved in advance.
THE LOVER and THE COLLECTION
THE BLUE HOUR
A Far Cry
Luciana Souza, vocalist
by Harold Pinter
directed by Michael Kahn
WOR
PREM LD
IERE!
SAT, NOV 4, 8pm • SIXTH & I
Featuring music by Pulitzer Prizewinner Caroline Shaw, My Brightest
Diamond’s Shara Nova, and more
TICKETS: (202) 785-9727
WashingtonPerformingArts.org
Co-presented with
“Mad Men-era
SEX APPEAL...
an absolutely
STELLAR CAST.”
–Broadway World
Orchestra dell’Accademia
Nazionale di Santa
Cecilia - Rome
Sir Antonio Pappano, conductor
Martha
Argerich
plays Prokofiev
October 25 at 8 p.m.
Concert Hall
Special thanks: Jeanne W. Ruesch
TICKETS ON SALE NOW! KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG | (202) 467-4600
Tickets also available at the Box Office. Groups call (202) 416-8400.
“DAZZLINGLY WITTY…a tantalizing
unsolved mystery.”
–The Washington Post
For all other ticket-related customer service inquiries, call the Advance Sales Box Office at (202) 416-8540.
NOW EXTENDED
NOW PLAYING
THE WASHINGTON POST
THE EFFECT
WRITTEN BY LUCY PREBBLE
SK
EL
DI
RE
Mc PA CTE
GR TR D B
EG ICIA Y
OR
Photos of Lisa Dwan, Patrick Kennedy, Patrick Ball and Jack Koenig by Carol Rosegg.
A sexy and
provocative play about
the chemistry of love.
202.332.3300 | STUDIOTHEATRE.ORG
ORDER TODAY!
Must close October 29
ShakespeareTheatre.org
202.547.1122
The Lover and The Collection are sponsored by the Robert and Arlene Kogod Family Foundation.
Restaurant Partner: Asia Nine
OCTOBER 13, 2017
EW
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MI EA
DO ISS
BY OR
M
CR
. FRIDAY,
ET
ON
DIRECTED BY DAVID MUSE
14
EZ
10 Halloween parties
that go beyond the norm
BY H OLLEY S IMMONS
AND F RITZ H AHN
Halloween is around the corner, which means weekends full
of bar crawls and costume contests. After awhile, though, both
prospects sound as exciting as a
party packed with people
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Espookio at Estadio, through
Oct. 31
In addition to its daily menu,
Estadio is offering Halloween
treats: “boo-cadillo” (a riff on bocadillo, a small, Spanish sandwich)
and “monster-ditos” (open-face
sandwiches known as montaditos). Edible eyeballs top the manchego cheesecake, and festive
cocktails include a pumpkin slushito and a gin and tonic mixed with
blood-red, house-made tonic. The
festivities come to a head Oct. 31
when the restaurant, which is appropriately decorated for the season, throws its second annual Halloween party. 1520 14th St. NW.
estadio-dc.com.
Port City’s Long Black Veil
happy hour at Gadsby’s, Satur-
OFF
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dressed as David S. Pumpkins.
There’s far more seasonal fun
out there: Here are 10 Halloween
events that actually sound like
something worth going to.
DC #67004413
Entertain
VA #2705 108835A
in your
new
ies in Alexandria’s history is the
story of the Female Stranger, a
woman who died at Gadsby’s Tavern on Oct. 14, 1816. Her face was
concealed by a long black veil,
and she never told anyone her
true identity. Her male companion disappeared right after she
died. Buried in the nearby St.
Paul’s Cemetery, the unknown
woman reputedly haunts room
eight of Gatsby’s. On the 201st
anniversary of her death, the tavern remembers the Female
Stranger with a Halloween happy
hour. Tickets include tours,
snacks and a pint of Port City
Brewing’s Long Black Veil IPA. 6
to 9 p.m. 134 N. Royal St., Alexandria. $25. alexandriava.gov.
Soul Strolls at Congressional
Cemetery, Oct. 20-21 and 27-28
The Congressional Cemetery is
the resting place for soldiers, politicians, madams, spiritualists and
one of the Lincoln assassination
conspirators. You’ll “meet” some
of the cemetery’s famous resiHALLOWEEN CONTINUED ON 15
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On the Town
Denizens for beers and costume
contests before making their way
through the streets, beginning at
9 p.m. Movie showtimes vary. AFI
Silver: $13 adults, $10 seniors, $8
children. The Silver Spring Zombie Walk is free. afi.com/silver.
HALLOWEEN FROM 14
dents during “Soul Strolls” of the
grounds at twilight and after
dark. (BYO flashlight.) Wine and
beer are sold in the cemetery’s
chapel before and after tours; a
VIP ticket includes three drinks
in a “speakeasy” in the public
vault — a burial chamber where
the bodies of three presidents
have been temporarily interred.
5:30 to 10 p.m. 1801 E St. SE. $22
adults, $12 children. $55 VIP.
congressionalcemetery.org.
Halloween cover benefit
show at the Pinch, Oct. 21
Members of some of the city’s
finest hardcore and punk bands
— including Kombat, the Rememberables, Bacchae, Rashomon
and Pure Disgust — form cover
bands and play the songs of their
favorite groups, including Weezer, Jawbreaker and Rage Against
the Machine, to raise money for
Hurricane Harvey relief efforts.
It’s organized by the team behind
the annual Damaged City punk
festival, so you know it’s going to
be good. Remember to wear a
costume: Prices go up if you don’t
dress up. 7 p.m. to midnight. 3548
14th St. NW. $10 if wearing a
costume, $15 if not. thepinchdc.com.
Night of the Living Zoo, Oct.
27
ASTRID RIECKEN FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
An angel statue at the historic Congressional Cemetery, where Soul
Strolls tours will be held Oct. 20-21 and 27-28.
this one. The adult-only party,
which includes craft beer, a costume contest and performance
artists, culminates in a DJ-led
dance party. Food trucks supply
the fuel, including cake pops from
Baked by Yael, empanadas from
D.C. Empanadas, pizza from D.C.
Slices and barbecue from Rocklands Barbeque and Grilling
Company. You’ll also get afterhours access to such exhibits as
the small-mammal house, reptile
center and the Great Cats Circle.
3001 Connecticut Ave. NW. $40.
nationalzoo.si.edu.
Leave the kiddos at home for
Halloween on Screen at AFI
Silver Theatre, Oct. 27-Nov. 2,
and the Silver Spring Zombie
Walk, Oct. 28
This annual scary movie festival includes the 1922 silent film
“Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror” and the creepy 1977 Italian
horror movie “Suspiria,” but the
biggest draw will be the only
Washington-region screenings of
the newly restored version of
“Night of the Living Dead.” On
Oct. 28, the screening will be
preceded by the annual Silver
Spring Zombie Walk, when elaborately costumed hordes gather at
Moments that bring us all together.
Del Ray Halloween parade,
Oct. 29
Live music, pets in costume
and spooky decorated homes
make up the Del Ray Halloween
parade. Don’t want to participate? Grab a seat on the sidelines
at one of the bar patios nearby or
along the route, including Evening Star Cafe and the Front
Porch. Many bars offer drink specials and provide just as good of a
view. 2 p.m. Begins at Mount
Vernon Ave., south of E. Bellefonte
Ave. Free. visitdelray.com.
Jos. A. Magnus Halloween
cocktail menu, through Oct. 29
The bar at the Ivy City distillery
recently debuted a cocktail menu
dedicated to scary movie villains
and boogie monsters. The Freddy
Kruger is made with vodka, rosemary, lemon and Axia Bianco
vermouth; the Candy Man features the distillery’s bourbon
along with tonic and pomegranate brains; and the Hannibal
Lecter is mixed with Jos. A. Mangus bourbon, maple syrup, lemon, blueberry, egg white and Chianti. Fava beans not included.
Own your favorite
Washington Post photos.
Buy online, where you can
view galleries, search, or
just browse for brilliant
news photography you’ll
want for your own.
15
PG
2052 West Virginia Ave. NE.
$12-$14. josephmagnus.com.
PUB Dread Halloween Benefit for Puerto Rico, Oct. 31
Drink Company’s latest pop-up
bar is full of creepy dolls, spooky
cocktails and sinister things that
rattle in the night. On Halloween,
the Shaw bar is using evil as a
force for good: A $20 cover charge
will be donated to José Andrés’s
World Central Kitchen, which has
fed more than 130,000 Puerto
Ricans in the wake of Hurricane
Maria. Buying tickets in advance
guarantees at least two hours
inside the bar on what will probably be its busiest night. 1843
Seventh St. NW. 5 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.
$20. pubdreadpr.eventbrite.com.
‘Halloween’ and pumpkin
carving at the Red Derby, Oct. 31
“Arts and crafts for adults” is
the theme at the Red Derby’s
annual pumpkin-carving contest,
which finds artists and groups
carving intricate designs into
gourds to win bar tabs and other
prizes. (The bar provides a limited number of pumpkins and carving tools.) While you work, you
can watch the original “Halloween” film on a big screen, or enjoy
seasonal beers and drinks on the
patio or rooftop deck. 8 p.m. 3718
14th St. NW. Free. redderby.com.
holley.simmons@washpost.com
fritz.hahn@washpost.com
October is Domestic Violence
Awareness Month
Debbi Morgan
The Monkey on My Back
Go on a journey through a legacy of abuse
spanning three generations of women
through the eyes of this award winning
actress and star Debbi Morgan.
S AT U R D AY
S U N D AY
10 21 2017 10 22 2017
@ 8PM @ 2PM
TICKETS: $35/PERSON
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$30 for students & seniors
visit arts.pgparks.com
M1680-C 4x4
@ the B-Side theater
Fine & Performing Arts Center
Bowie State University
14000 Jericho Park Road Bowie, MD
$10 of each ticket will be donated to the
Family Crisis Center.
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. FRIDAY,
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OCTOBER 13, 2017
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16
PG
Ask Tom
Excerpts from Post Food Critic
Tom Sietsema’s online discussion
Q: My brother and I had a blast at
the chef’s counter at Pineapple and
Pearls. How to choose between
Métier and Minibar for the next
adventure? Minibar will be $150
more for the evening, but it seems
their chef’s counter would be just as
fun. What’s your take?
A: Boy, that’s a tough call, given
how closely they rank on my Top
10 list of favorites, now all online.
I like them both a lot, for
different reasons. I guess it
depends on what you’re looking
for: Minibar is the more
adventurous meal, and requires
some participation by the diner;
Métier is the more romantic and
leisurely experience.
Q: Growing up in Connecticut,
there was an abundance of
“mom-and-pop”-type Italian
restaurants. A place to get
comfort food and where items
may not be the best you’ve ever
had, but they’d hit the spot and
wouldn’t break the bank. Is there
anything like this in D.C.?
A: The place in D.C. that
probably comes closest to what
you’re looking for is Rosario in
Adams Morgan. If some of the
comforts are dressier than the
ones you might recall from your
youth (the newcomer’s Caesar
salad is dropped off in a fluted
Parmesan bowl), the pastas run
to such standards as spaghetti
puttanesca and fettuccine
Bolognese.
Harvest the
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Arena Stage
35% on tickets to The Pajama Game, through October 13
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15% on tickets to Antony and Cleopatra, through November 19
■
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$5 on tickets to Charlotte’s Web, through October 29
■
The Kennedy Center
Q: I attended a work-related dinner
at Bourbon Steak last week —
Sukhishvili Georgian National Dance Company at Lisner Auditorium
delicious, by the way, and great
service — but dang, that place is so
expensive! The hosts were picking
up the check, but I felt so weird
about eating a meal the cost of
which could have fed a family of
four for a week. How do places in
that price range stay open? Is it all
Other People’s Money?
A: Not necessarily. According to
the U.S. Census Bureau, the
median household income in the
District of Columbia for 2015 was
$75,628 — a 5.5 percent increase
over the previous year and a
figure well above the national
median of $56,500. That’s a lot of
disposable income.
25% on tickets for children 12 and under; 10% for children up to 18; 10% for groups of 10+, October 20
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Signature Theatre
20% on tickets to The Gershwins® and Ken Ludwig’s Crazy for You®, through November 11
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Bethesda Blues and Jazz Supper Club
The Sidleys and Eric Scott Band, October 19
Wayne Linsey Howard Homecoming Concert, October 20
BJ Jansen and Common Ground, October 25
Music Tribute to Stephanie Mills, Chaka Khan & Aretha Franklin, October 22
■
The Birchmere
Shawn Colvin and Her Band, October 30
■
Black Cat
Drunk Education with Ryan Cooper, Taylor Lorenz and Sabrina Siddiqui, October 19
Cold Specks, November 3
Blitzen Trapper, November 5
■
Bobby McKey’s Dueling Piano Bar
Q: Sometimes a reservation is
Free reservations and cover for 10 guests on any Friday night
■
made for, say, four people and,
late in the day, only three can
attend. Is it best to telephone the
restaurant (if possible) to advise
the change? Or is all right to let
the host/hostess know when
checking in? In many cases, it
may not matter, though I sense
sometimes that three might be
seated differently if the
restaurant had advance notice.
What’s the fair approach?
A: I think a change in the number
of diners merits a call to the
Can He Do That? Live Podcast
At Warner Theatre, November 7 (3 winners)
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D.C. United vs. New York Red Bulls, October 22
■
The Hamilton Live
Reckless Kelly, October 28
Imagination Stage
4-pack of tickets to Opening Night of Charlotte’s Web, November 18 (6 winners)
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University of Maryland
5 suite tickets and 2 parking passes to University of Maryland vs. Bucknell, November 18 (4 winners)
■
Sukhishvili Georgian National Dance Company
At Lisner Auditorium, October 20
■
restaurants. I know they want
ambiance, but do they have to
turn the lighting so low that you
can’t even read the menu? This is
especially irksome to people, in
particular seniors, with vision
problems that are exacerbated by
low light. I can put up with
cramped tables, but insufficient
lighting to read the
establishment’s menu puts me
off — and often just out the door.
A: Sunday in Saigon in
Alexandria offers customers
illuminated menus in its dim
dining room. Fun idea.
staff attitudes shift if you don’t
order alcohol on a particular
evening? Is it the realization of a
lower bill, and ultimately lower
tip, that seems to prompt a subtle
but noticeable change attitude?
Or am I just imaging this?
A: No question, ordering booze
increases profits for restaurants
and tips for servers. But a
responsible and conscientious
operation should never look
down on anyone for not
imbibing. Plus, more than a few
places are offering creative
mocktails, among them Hank’s
on the Hill and Quill at the
Jefferson hotel.
Q: Have you tried Nobu yet? I
was finally able to get a
reservation on Saturday night
and left feeling underwhelmed.
Although the service was good,
the dinner dragged on for three
hours. The decor of the place was
very disappointing — very drab
and unassuming. And while the
food was good, nothing to justify
the $400 tab. Maybe Nobu is past
its prime?
A: My review of the 38th branch
of the Japanese chain made
famous by Nobu Matsuhisa
comes out next week.
ASK TOM CONTINUED ON 17
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Brad Garrett and Rita Rudner, October 24 (5 winners)
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THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
■
Q: My pet peeve is bad lighting in
Q: Do you ever notice that wait
20% on tickets to Fortas Chamber Music Concerts: Sphinx Virtuosi, October 15
■
restaurant, for the reason you cite.
Going from four to three diners
might land you at a triangular table
(they exist). For planning purposes,
restaurants always appreciate
knowing about changes ahead of
show time.
APRIL GREER FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
Consider Alta Strada in Mount Vernon Square if you’re hoping to
have dinner for two on a Saturday night without a long wait.
17
PG
ASK TOM FROM 16
Q: My sister and I are looking to
gift our parents with a “dinner
date” for their anniversary this
weekend that won’t break the
bank. We’re also sending them to
a show at AFI in downtown
Silver Spring (showtime isn’t set
yet, so timing is flexible), so
preferably looking for something
convenient to that area.
Atmosphere is a priority. Mom
likes to eat healthy, and Dad
loves his steak/potatoes type of
thing, so hopefully you can help
us figure out something that
would fit everyone! And they
generally like most cuisines but
we wouldn’t call them super
“adventurous.”
A: Your best bet is probably the
Classics on Colesville Road, a
spare but modestly priced
steakhouse that offers
alternatives to beef, including
grilled shrimp, for your mom.
A: Check out Woodward Table
on H Street NW, with a creative
menu — pork “wings,” hearthbaked pizza, potato-tiled halibut
— from chef Eddie Moran.
Q: Could you kindly recommend
a place for dinner reasonably
close to George Washington
University on a Friday night?
West End, Georgetown, etc. Good
food of any cuisine, not too
formal, and we don’t want to
wait forever for a table.
A: How about a seat on the patio
at the very good Rasika West
End, for a night of modern
Indian dishes? In Georgetown,
I’m fond of the bistro cooking at
Chez Billy Sud, which has the
bonus of a patio, too.
Q: My work group is looking for a
food preference is Thai. Do you
have any suggestions?
A: Soi 38 — downtown, on 22nd
and L streets, near a Metro — is
where you want to book.
nice place to have a year-end
party not that far from the
Department of Agriculture
(Smithsonian station), and the
Tom Sietsema hosts a Q&A
on Wednesdays at 11 a.m. at
live.washingtonpost.com.
Membership is rewarding.
PostPoints gives you points
just for having a chat.
Q: Love your Top 10 list — but
many of the restaurants on the
list (rightly) have long lines or
require long-planned
reservations. What are your
favorite restaurants where you
have a decent shot of scoring a
table or two seats at the bar with
no more than a short wait on a
Saturday night?
A: I’d definitely put Alta Strada
in Mount Vernon Square,
Johnny’s Half Shell in Adams
Morgan and Stable on H Street
NE on such a list.
Q: I know this seems ridiculously
(Mondays, 2:00 p.m.)
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Home Front
On Parenting
(every other Wednesday, 11:00 a.m.)
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(every other Thursday, 1:00 p.m.)
(Thursdays, 11:00 a.m.)
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S2936 4x10.5
OCTOBER 13, 2017
staff dinner of 10 people in
downtown D.C. in two weeks. It
would be great if it was close to
the Connecticut and K area.
Looking for a place that is not too
loud, is moderately priced, and
has great food and service.
American cuisine, varied menu.
What do you recommend?
Talk about Travel
. FRIDAY,
Q: I have to pick a place for a
From columnists and politicians to actors and authors, earn
points when you participate in these live Washington Post chats:
THE WASHINGTON POST
early, but I have to plan now for our
annual Christmas Eve dinner. I’d
like to go to a nice place in
downtown D.C. for an elegant
dinner with a “Christmas-y”
atmosphere. I’ve gone to Bourbon
Steak at the Four Seasons, BLT
Steak at the Trump hotel and the
Willard in the past. I checked Fiola
Mare for this year but didn’t like
their fixed menu. I was thinking
about 1789, but there isn’t a lot of
“atmosphere” there, I think, and
wasn’t even sure what you think of
it anymore. American/French/
Italian food are all fine — we are
dining with ages 25 to 85.
A: Have you considered Plume in
the Jefferson hotel? It’s one of the
most beautiful dining rooms in
the city, and I can only imagine
how holiday trimmings might
transform the interior into your
fantasy Christmas destination.
18
EZ
On Exhibit
Sackler
reopens
with four
shows
“Encountering the
Buddha: Art and Practice
Across Asia,” opening this
weekend, features a
collection of statues and
artifacts and attempts to
convey their significance.
Museum curators wanted
the pieces to speak to
novices as well as actual
Buddhists.
Chinese bells, Egyptian cats,
Indian brass and Buddha in Asian
art are themes of the exhibitions
BY
M ARK J ENKINS
W
hen the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
reopens this weekend, it will premiere four exhibitions. One is a
contemporary installation, and another is a traveling show. But the two most
interesting ones strikingly repurpose some permanent holdings of the Sackler and its sibling
museum, the Freer Gallery of Art.
The Freer closed in January 2016 for a major
makeover; the Sackler has been dark just since
July 10. The Sackler has more leeway than the
Freer, which can display only objects from the
collection begun by its namesake, Charles Lang
Freer. The Sackler
exhibits items from
outside sources, yet
SUBODH GUPTA:
it didn’t reach far for
TERMINAL; DIVINE
the pieces in “ReFELINES: CATS OF
sound: Bells of AnANCIENT EGYPT;
cient China” and
ENCOUNTERING THE
“Encountering the
BUDDHA: ART AND
Buddha: Art and
PRACTICE ACROSS
Practice
Across
ASIA; AND RESOUND:
Asia.”
BELLS OF ANCIENT
Visitors who enCHINA
ter the refreshed
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery,
Sackler from its
1050 Independence Ave.
street-level pavilion
SW. 202-357-3200.
will
encounter
Subodh
Gupta’s
asia.si.edu.
“Terminal,”
which
Dates: All four exhibitions
assembles simple inopen Saturday; closing
gredients to conjure
dates vary.
a symbolic temple
Admission: Free.
town. The Indian
artist took brass
containers — everyday household items in his
homeland — and stacked them into spires that
reach as high as 15 feet. The towers are
connected by a lattice of thread that defines a
sort of roof, as well as a path through the
installation. That passage leads to the stairs
down to the other new exhibitions — and toward
the edge of prehistory.
Many of the 80 antiquities in “Divine Felines:
Cats of Ancient Egypt” are more than 2,000 years
old. They include statues of cat-headed gods and
god-headed cats, animal-shaped coffins for feline
companions and a mummified cat. There also are
a few dog tributes and talismans in this show,
organized by the Brooklyn Museum of Art. (Egypt
is not in Asia, but it is part of “the Orient” as that
realm was understood by Charles Freer.)
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
If you go
FREER CONTINUED ON 19
ALICE S. KANDELL COLLECTION/ARTHUR M. SACKLER GALLERY
19
EZ
This jackal-handle wooden spoon, circa 1539-1292 B.C., might
have been used by ancient Egyptians for holding cosmetics or
ointments. The antiquities in “Divine Felines” are cat-heavy,
but dog tributes such as this can be spotted.
BROOKLYN MUSEUM/CHARLES EDWIN WILBOUR FUND
FREER FROM 18
Some of the objects in “Resound” are even older than the
ROBERT HARRELL/CHARLES LANG FREER ENDOWMENT FREER GALLERY OF ART/GIFT OF ARTHUR M. SACKLER GALLERY
that haven’t been exhibited in 50
years. Other items are from
Southeast Asia, China and Japan.
Alcoves offer immersive experiences, whether physical or
virtual. A reconstruction of a
Tibetan aristocrat’s shrine room
is packed with golden devotional
statues and elaborate decorated
chests, surrounded by red tapestries. In one nook, video screens
present three views of a stupa, or
holy shrine, in Sri Lanka.
The objects can be appreciated
as they often are in Western
museums, for their grace, elegance and craftsmanship. But the
wall text goes beyond that, and a
touch-screen device is ready for
what Diamond calls “questions
that visitors have asked for years.”
“Encountering the Buddha” is
designed to answer those queries
and perhaps spark others. Who
looking at a set of miniature
“Weapons of Ego Destruction”
wouldn’t want to know more?
goingoutguide@washpost.com
OCTOBER 13, 2017
Bronze bell sets were
in decline by the time
China’s first emperor
unified the country
22 centuries ago. The
“Resound” display
features some of the
earliest known
Chinese chimes,
probably worn by
animals.
. FRIDAY,
an attempt to convey their significance. “We wanted to speak to
novices and to actual Buddhists,”
says co-curator Debra Diamond,
the museum’s curator of south
and southeast Asian art.
The earliest of the more than
200 pieces is a 1,900-year-old
sandstone head from India,
where Buddhism began but
largely disappeared. The most
recent acquisition is a healing
Buddha from Java, shown alongside some Freer-owned items
THE WASHINGTON POST
oldest in “Divine Felines.” But
what’s most fascinating about the
show’s bells is that they survive
while the musical tradition they
represent ended in the distant
past. “It’s really a Bronze Age
story,” says J. Keith Wilson, the
Freer and Sackler’s curator of
ancient Chinese art.
Cast bronze bells are a feature
of many a museum’s Chinese
galleries, distinguished by their
characteristic lens-shaped contours and such features (probably decorative) as rows of metal knobs. Today, some troupes
play replicas of the bells, although the music originally performed on them is long lost. But
bronze bell sets were in decline
by the time China’s first emperor unified the country 22
centuries ago.
“Resound” features some of
the earliest known Chinese
chimes, small jingles likely made
to be worn by animals. There are
also bigger ones, including six
excellent specimens that probably came from a larger grouping,
and a pair of bronze tigers that
may have been supports for a bell
set. The tigers are the only ones
like them in the world, Wilson
notes.
Videos and interactive displays
allow people to hear the bells,
compare them with Western
counterparts and understand
their acoustical properties. (Because they’re not round, Chinese
bells produce two tones, depending on where they’re struck.)
Visitors can hit bells, play simulated versions via a video keyboard or listen to compositions
for the ancient instruments by
contemporary composers.
Clanging a bell may be simpler
than achieving enlightenment,
but “Encountering the Buddha”
shares “Resound’s” emphasis on
the purpose of the museum pieces. This show isn’t simply a selection of statues and artifacts, but
20
EZ
On Exhibit
M USE U M S
OPENINGS
“DIVINE FELINES: CATS OF ANCIENT
EGYPT” An exhibition of more than 80 catrelated works dating from the Middle
Kingdom to the Byzantine period, including
cat coffins, representations of the cat
goddess, Bastet, and statues and amulets
decorated with feline features, which
enjoyed special status among Egyptians.
Opening Saturday. Arthur M. Sackler
Gallery, 1050 Independence Ave. SW.
asia.si.edu.
“ENCOUNTERING THE BUDDHA: ART AND
PRACTICE ACROSS ASIA” An exhibition
of Buddhist art from India, China,
Afghanistan, Pakistan, Cambodia, Thailand,
Indonesia and Japan. Opening Saturday.
Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, 1050
Independence Ave. SW. asia.si.edu.
“KARA WALKER: HARPER’S PICTORIAL
HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR
(ANNOTATED)” An exhibition of
Walker’s prints alongside a selection of the
original Harper’s images on which they are
based, revealing Walker’s artistic
process.The scenes assert the influence of
racial history on contemporary life. Opening
Friday. Smithsonian American Art Museum,
Eighth and F streets NW. americanart.si.edu.
“MAGNETIC FIELDS: EXPANDING
AMERICAN ABSTRACTION, 1960S TO
TODAY” An exhibition that explores
historical and formal dialogue on
abstraction among black women artists,
featuring works by more than 20 women,
including Mavis Pusey, Shinique Smith,
Alma Woodsey Thomas and Chakaia
Booker. Opening Friday. National Museum of
Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Ave. NW.
nmwa.org/explore/exhibitions/upcomingexhibitions.
“RESOUND: BELLS OF ANCIENT CHINA”
An exhibition that explores the musical
innovations in the Bronze Age in which
Chinese musicians and foundry technicians
created bronze bells of different sizes that
produced a range of tones. Opening
Saturday. Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, 1050
Independence Ave. SW. asia.si.edu/press/
2017/resound.asp.
“SPIRAL PLAY: LOVING IN THE ’80s” An
exhibition of 12 three-dimensional collages
in brilliant colors. Artist Al Loving said of his
works: “I chose the spiral as a symbol of
life’s continuity. It became an overall wish
for everyone.” Opening Wednesday.
Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum
Dr., Baltimore. artbma.org/exhibitions/alloving.
“SUBODH GUPTA: TERMINAL” An
installation by the internationally acclaimed
artist known for his use of familiar
household objects in creating wondrous
structures. Opening Saturday. Arthur M.
Sackler Gallery, 1050 Independence Ave.
SW. asia.si.edu.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
ONGOING
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM AT THE
KATZEN ARTS CENTER “Tethered to the
Cradle: Kinetic Work by Sculptor
Christopher Carter,” through Dec. 17. An
exhibition of ready-made forms that draw on
the artist’s experiences and memories of
adolescence. Carter is a contemporary
American artist and sculptor of African
American, American Indian and European
descent. ““Barjeel Art Foundation
Collection, United Arab Emirates,” through
Dec. 17. An exhibition of works that illustrate
an array of technologies of conflict and
explore mechanisms of power. 4400
Massachusetts Ave NW. american.edu/cas/
museum/index.cfm?hardrefresh.
ANACOSTIA COMMUNITY MUSEUM
“Gateways/Portales,” through Jan. 7.
Through the gateways of social justice,
community access and public festivals, this
exhibition explores the experiences of
Latino migrants and immigrants in
Washington, Baltimore, Charlotte and
Raleigh-Durham, N.C. 1901 Fort Pl. SE.
anacostia.si.edu.
ARTHUR M. SACKLER GALLERY
“Turquoise Mountain: Artists Transforming
Afghanistan,” through Oct. 29. Artisans from
the Murad Khani district of Old Kabul
demonstrate their work and share their
experiences. 1050 Independence Ave. SW.
asia.si.edu.
ART MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAS “Human
Landscapes,” through Nov. 28. An
exhibition of contemporary Argentine art.
201 18th St. NW. museum.oas.org.
DUMBARTON OAKS MUSEUM “Early Bliss
Acquisitions: Collecting in Paris and London
1912–1919,” through March 31. An
exhibition of the acquisitions of Robert and
Mildred Bliss, collected when they lived in
ESTATE OF JAMES KARALES
An image from the Selma to Montgomery March of 1965, from “More Than a Picture: Selections From
the Photography Collection,” at the National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Paris from 1912 to 1919, including artworks
and unusual, decorative objects that were
newly available via avant garde art dealers,
including medieval, Islamic and preColumbian artworks. “ 1703 32nd St. NW.
doaks.org.
FOLGER SHAKESPEARE LIBRARY
“Painting Shakespeare,” through Feb. 11. An
exhibition of the Folger's collection of
Shakespeare and Shakespeare-related art
and memorabilia, including oil sketches,
posters, scrapbooks, programs, prints,
figurines, photographs and paintings. A
highlight is Henry Fuseli's Gothic
masterpiece “Macbeth Consulting the
Vision of the Armed Head,” painted for the
Irish Shakespeare Gallery in Dublin in 1793
and still in its original frame. 201 E. Capitol
St. SE. folger.edu.
GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
MUSEUM AND THE TEXTILE MUSEUM “A
Collector’s Vision: Creating the Albert H.
Small Washingtoniana Collection,” through
Nov. 30. In 2011, Small gave George
Washington University his collection of
1,000 maps, prints, rare letters,
photographs and drawings that document
the history of the District. This exhibition
presents highlights of the collection,
including Small’s first acquisition: a
handwritten 1905 scrapbook of a survey of
the city’s boundary stones. 701 21st St. NW.
museum.gwu.edu/collectors-vision .
HILLWOOD ESTATE, MUSEUM AND
GARDENS “Spectacular Gems and Jewelry
From the Merriweather Post Collection,”
through Jan. 7. An exhibition of more than 50
pieces of jewelry that once belonged to
Marjorie Merriweather Post, including pieces
she commissioned from Cartier, Van Cleef &
Arpels, Harry Winston and Verdura. 4155
Linnean Ave. NW. hillwoodmuseum.org/
Spectacular-Gems-and-Jewelry.
HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE
GARDEN “Ilya and Emilia Kabakov: The
Utopian Projects,” through March 4. An
exhibition that features more than 20
maquettes, whimsical models, including
architectural structures, allegorical
narratives and commissioned outdoor
works. The Russian artist couple has been
working collaboratively for nearly 30 years,
creating installation-based works. Seventh
Street and Independence Avenue SW.
hirshhorn.si.edu.
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS “Echoes of the
Great War: American Experiences of World
War I,” through Jan. 1, 2019. The exhibition
depicts the U.S. involvement in and
experience of the Great War. “Drawing
Justice: The Art of the Courtroom
Illustration,” through Oct. 28. This exhibition
of courtroom drawings highlights the Library
of Congress’s collection, featuring political
figures, celebrities and notorious criminals.
101 Independence Ave. SE. loc.gov.
NATIONAL AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM
“Artist Soldiers,” through Nov. 11, 2018. An
exhibition that examines the work of
professional artists who were recruited by
the U.S. Army and were considered the first
true combat artists, along with the artwork
of soldiers, including Jeff Gusky’s photos of
stone carvings made in underground
shelters, that provide a unique perspective
on the First World War. Sixth Street and
Independence Avenue SW.
airandspace.si.edu.
NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM
“Architecture of an Asylum: St. Elizabeths
1852-2017,” through Jan. 15, 2018. An
exhibition exploring the architecture and
landscape architecture of St. Elizabeths as it
changed over time, including architectural
drawings and plans from the 1850s through
the 1980s, medical instruments, patientcreated art, photographs, scrapbooks,
furnishings and paintings on loan from
museums and archives. 401 F St. NW.
nbm.org.
NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART, WEST
BUILDING “Fragonard: The Fantasy
Figures,” through Dec. 3. An exhibition that
presents scientific research into the
mysterious series of thumbnail-sized
sketches of brightly colored portraits of
lavishly costumed individuals relating to 14
of Fragonard’s known paintings. Sixth Street
and Constitution Avenue NW.
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MUSEUM
“Sharks,” through Sunday. An exhibition of
photos by National Geographic
photographer Brian Skerry, videos, artifacts,
models and interactive experiences on the
subject of sharks. “Wild: Michael Nichols,”
through Jan. 12. An exhibition of images of
wildlife and wild places through the eyes of
photographer and former National
Geographic magazine editor at large for
photography Michael “Nick” Nichols. 17th
and M streets NW. nationalgeographic.org.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN
AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE “More
Than a Picture: Selections From the
Photography Collection,” through Jan. 1. An
exhibition of more than 150 photographs
and related objects that demonstrates the
slavery era, Jim Crow, Black Lives Matter
and other key historical and cultural events
that illuminate African American life. 14th
Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
nmaahc.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN ART
“Healing Arts,” through Jan. 1, 2020. An
exhibition of paintings and sculptures from
the permanent collection that attempt to
counter physical, social and spiritual
problems, including global issues such as
the HIV/AIDS crisis. 950 Independence Ave.
SW. africa.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN
HISTORY “Righting a Wrong: Japanese
Americans and World War II,” through
Feb. 19. An exhibition that commemorates
the 75th anniversary of Executive Order
9066, the document signed by Franklin D.
Roosevelt that challenged the constitutional
rights and led to the imprisonment of
Japanese Americans during World War II.
14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
americanhistory.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL
HISTORY “Objects of Wonder,” through Jan.
1, 2019. The exhibition includes the “Blue
Flame,” one of the world’s largest and finest
pieces of gem-quality lapis lazuli; Martha,
the last known passenger pigeon; the
Pinniped fossil, a fossil of one of the earliest
members of the group of animals that
includes seals, sea lions and walruses; and
the 1875 Tsimshian House Front, one of the
best examples of Native Alaskan design
artwork. “Narwhal: Revealing an Arctic
Legend,” through Jan. 1, 2019. An exhibition
on the research and collaboration by Inuit
and scientists on the narwhal reveals the
latest in scientific knowledge on the animal
and illuminates the interconnectedness
between people and ecosystems. 10th
Street and Constitution Avenue NW.
naturalhistory.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN
INDIAN “Nation to Nation: Treaties Between
the United States and American Indian
Nations,” through April 1, 2020. An
exhibition exploring the relationship
between Native American nations and the
United States. “Our Universes: Traditional
Knowledge Shapes Our World,” through
April 30, 2019. The exhibition focuses on
indigenous cosmologies, worldviews and
philosophies related to the creation and
order of the universe and the spiritual
relationship between humankind and the
natural world. “Fourth Street and
Independence Avenue SW. nmai.si.edu.
NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE
ARTS “Magnetic Fields: Expanding
American Abstraction, 1960s to Today,”
through Jan. 21. An exhibition that explores
historical and formal dialogue on
abstraction among black women artists,
featuring work by more than 20 women,
including Mavis Pusey, Shinique Smith,
Alma Woodsey Thomas and Chakaia
Booker. 1250 New York Ave. NW. nmwa.org.
NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY “One Life:
Sylvia Plath,” through May 20. An exhibition
of personal letters, family photographs,
objects and her own artwork from the
archives at Smith College and the University
of Indiana’s Lilly Library, that shows the
writer and poet’s struggle to understand
herself and to navigate the social pressures
of the time placed on young women. Eighth
and F streets NW. npg.si.edu.
NATIONAL POSTAL MUSEUM “Trailblazing:
100 Years of Our National Parks,” through
March 25, 2018. Featuring original postagestamp art from the Postal Service and
artifacts loaned by the National Park
Service, the exhibition explores the ways in
which mail moves to, through and from our
national parks. 2 Massachusetts Ave. NE.
postalmuseum.si.edu.
NEWSEUM “1967: Civil Rights at 50,”
through Jan. 2. An exhibition examining the
events of 1967, exploring the relationship
between the First Amendment and the civil
rights movement of the 1960s. “Creating
Camelot: The Kennedy Photography of
Jacques Lowe,” through Jan. 7. An exhibition
to mark the 100th anniversary of the birth
of President John F. Kennedy, of more than
70 intimate and iconic images of President
John F. Kennedy, first Lady Jacqueline
Kennedy and their children, Caroline and
John, taken by Kennedy’s personal
photographer, Jacques Lowe. 555
Pennsylvania Ave. NW. newseum.org.
RENWICK GALLERY “Parallax Gap,”
through Feb. 11. A site-specific installation of
drawings of ceilings of nine iconic American
buildings, designed by the architectural
design practice FreelandBuck. The images
are layered so that the changes in
perspective create a parallax (the effect of
shifting depth or distance) as viewers move
underneath. 17th Street and Pennsylvania
Avenue NW. americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/
archive/2017/parallax.
SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM
“Lumia: Thomas Wilfred and the Art of
Light,” through Jan. 7. An exhibition of light
compositions that display changing colored
forms against a black background, similar
to the aurora borealis. Eighth and F streets
NW. americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/
2017/lumia.
THE KENNEDY CENTER Mark Twain Prize
for American Humor Exhibit: The Art of
Robert Risko, through Oct. 27. A showcase
of work by the celebrated caricaturist, who
has created the art for the Kennedy Center
Mark Twain prize since 2002. 2700 F St.
NW. kennedy-center.org.
THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION “Renoir and
Friends: Luncheon of the Boating Party,”
through Jan. 7. An exhibition that focuses on
the painting by Pierre-Auguste Renoir and
the diverse circle of friends who inspired it.
The exhibition will display 40 more works—
paintings, drawings, pastels, watercolors,
and photographs from public and private
collections around the world — that reveal
the story of “Luncheon of the Boating
Party.”. 1600 21st St. NW.
phillipscollection.org.
VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS “Hear
My Voice: Native American Art of the Past
and Present,” through Nov. 26. An exhibition
of 56 works that illustrate the ways in which
native art speaks of a shared knowledge
and history yet shows an incredible level of
diversity. It serves as an exploration of
conversations between Native American
artists and their art across the continent,
35 indigenous cultures and the centuries.
200 N. Boulevard. Richmond. vmfa.museum.
WOODROW WILSON HOUSE “The Ghost
Fleet of Mallows Bay,” through Feb. 28. This
exhibition tells the history of the “Ghost
Fleet,” in the middle of the Potomac in
Mallows Bay, the largest shipwreck fleet in
the Western Hemisphere. A legacy of WWI,
in April 1917, President Woodrow Wilson
approved an order for 1,000 ships to make
up the shortage of transport vessels needed
for the war effort. The war ended before any
ships were put into service and hundreds
were simply scrapped in the Bay. 2340 S St.
NW. woodrowwilsonhouse.org.
$20 Diner
21
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DAYNA SMITH FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
T IM C ARMAN
At Inferno in Darnestown, Md., the pie’s
perfectly charred, baguette-like crust and its
Bianco DiNapoli tomatoes impressed.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
OCTOBER 13, 2017
BY
za Napoletana — automatically mean that
a pizzeria serves a superior margherita?
Or, conversely, does the lack of certification mean a pizzeria sells an inferior one?
I sampled 25 margheritas, covering a
geographic area from Centreville, Va., to
Gaithersburg, Md. The list that follows is
based on my recent pies only, which is
important to remember for the reasons
laid out above. One wrong move by a
pizzeria during my visit was likely to sink
its chances to crack the list — or at least
to appear higher on it.
This fact was not lost on Peter Pastan,
the chef and restaurateur who raised the
bar for all pizzamakers in the District
when he opened 2 Amys in 2001. Had I
visited the 25 pizzerias a week later, Pastan
noted, I probably would have 25 “totally
different impressions” of the margheritas.
He’s right. But here’s another truth:
Pizza in Washington has never been
better. A shop that’s not firmly in control
of its operations can easily suffer by
comparison to those pizzerias that are.
So, with these caveats, I offer up my 10
favorite margheritas. As of today.
. FRIDAY,
When you can’t jet to Naples,
these margherita pizzas pass the
test with flying Italian-flag colors.
batch of mozzarella on an unsuspecting
pizzeria. A pie can even be thrown out of
balance by a prep cook who absentmindedly ladles too much sauce on a
round.
The ingredients are few, the pitfalls
many.
The margherita is an Italian invention,
ostensibly named after a 19th-century
queen, although some have raised serious doubts about that origin story. Regardless, Italy owns the margherita. The
country’s rules for producing the redwhite-and-green pizza — colors that, not
coincidentally, mirror the Italian flag’s —
have been granted official protection
within the European Union. If a pizzeria
wants to sell a genuine Neapolitan margherita pizza, it first must get certified.
Dozens of pizzerias in America have
now been certified, including a number in
the Washington area, such as Il Canale in
Georgetown, Menomale in Brookland,
Pupatella in Arlington and Pizzeria Orso
in Falls Church. But does a certification
from VPN Americas — which handles
inspections in the United States for the
umbrella group, Associazione Verace Piz-
THE WASHINGTON POST
SALUTE!
TO THE
RED,WHITE
AND GREEN
The margherita is not just a pizza. It’s a
litmus test. Limited to dough, tomato
sauce, mozzarella, salt, basil and olive oil,
a margherita instantly reveals a pizzeria’s commitment to the art of the pie.
A margherita forgives no shortcut. Is
your dough dry and devoid of flavor? Are
you too cheap to buy San Marzano tomatoes grown in the volcanic soil near Mount
Vesuvius? Do you try to skate by with
squeaky, tasteless mozzarella? A margherita will rat you out at every turn.
“Whenever I go to a pizza shop, that’s
what I order,” says Frank Linn, the owner
and pizzaiolo of Frankly . . . Pizza! in
Kensington, Md. “That’s the best way to
know what the chef is all about.”
A great margherita is simple, and it is
complex: It is dependent on a few
ingredients and techniques, any one of
which, if imperfect or imperfectly followed, can dull the quality of a pie. A
dough that’s not developed or handled
properly can devolve into a coarse,
crackerlike base, unfit for any topping.
A margherita can be deprived of its
silky, milky component should, say, a
creamery try to foist off an inferior
22
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$20 Diner
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9
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2017
10. 2 AMYS
9. FRANKLY . . . PIZZA!
8. TIMBER PIZZA
7
7. IL CANALE
6. PIZZERIA ORSO
Crust: With an outer lip inflated
Crust: Frank Linn’s dough
Crust: The base of this margherita
Crust: Everything about this
Crust: The first thing you’ll notice
like an inner tube and spotted
almost geometrically with char,
this crust is a supermodel, the
kind that will instantly light up
your Instagram account. But
even after a 36-hour
fermentation, mostly in
refrigeration, the soft, chewy
crust tastes too crackery.
benefits from a nearly three-day
fermentation, including a 24hour period when it develops at
room temperature, when the
yeast produces these subtle
sourdough-like flavors.
— which must be special-ordered
— is crustier and sweeter than
those found at traditional
Neapolitan pizzerias. There’s a
reason for that: Timber co-owner
Andrew Dana created a dough
with King Arthur high-gluten
flour, the kind often used in bagels.
To help kick-start the yeast, he also
adds sugar.
flatbread reminds me of Naples,
the birthplace of pizza. Its
rustic, asymmetrical shape. Its
fearless embrace of char, and its
depth of flavor, derived from a
dough fermented at least 24
hours in a specially designed
room set at temperatures below
70 degrees.
about the crust is its tang, courtesy
of a sourdough starter used by
Bertrand Chemel, a French chef
trained in the ways of Italian pizza.
Yes, a starter is allowed under the
formal rules for margherita pizza.
Sauce/toppings: The plum
tomatoes, sourced from the fertile
Campania region on Italy’s west
coast, are freshly milled into a
bright, sweet sauce, the perfect foil
to the relaxed creaminess of the
buffalo mozzarella.
Sauce/toppings: Unlike many
pizzamakers, Linn cooks down
his plum tomatoes into a
concentrated soup, more pasta
sauce than traditional
Neapolitan pizza sauce. Its
sweetness contrasts nicely with
the cow-milk mozzarella and the
salty goat-milk Romano.
Overall: This is a margherita
Overall: I expected Pastan’s temple
of Neapolitan pie to rank higher.
Has the mighty fallen? Or was this
just an off night? I suspect the
latter.
$12.95. 3715 Macomb St. NW.
202-885-5700. 2amysdc.com.
unlike any other in the area,
sweet and obsessive. A pie that’s
not beholden to the Neapolitan
rules.
$11. 10417 Armory Ave.,
Kensington, Md. 301-832-1065.
franklypizza.com.
Sauce/toppings: Timber bucks
tradition with its basil, too, which
is added after the pie is pulled
from the oven. The uncooked
greens radiate floral aromas,
holding their own against the cowmilk mozzarella and the Bianco
DiNapoli tomatoes, a plum variety
developed, in part, by Chris
Bianco, the pizza guru who
inspires trips to Phoenix just to
taste his pies.
Overall: Timber established its
reputation with a line of more-ismore pizzas, densely constructed
pies that pile flavor upon flavor.
But this margherita proves that the
place has the fundamentals down
pat.
$12. 809 Upshur St. NW.
202-853-9746. timberpizza.com.
Sauce/toppings: The plum
tomatoes and buffalo mozzarella
are Italian imports. The former is
applied with a generous ladle,
emphasizing the tomato’s
fruitiness, while the latter is
sprinkled sparingly, a nod to owner
Giuseppe “Joe” Farruggio’s belief
that pizza should not have too
much cheese.
Overall: A superb, certified
margherita that would have rated
higher had the mozzarella not
melted into the sauce, creating
cream of tomato soup in the
middle of the pie, a mistake in the
rarefied world of Neapolitan pizza.
$12 for lunch, $14 for dinner. 1065
31st St. NW. 202-337-4444.
ilcanale.com.
Sauce/toppings: The sauce, milled
from Italian San Marzano
tomatoes, barely stains the crust.
It’s the very definition of a lightly
sauced pizza. And yet: The
tomato’s sweetness is fully
integrated with the buffalo
mozzarella and crust.
Overall: For this certified
margherita, Chemel doesn’t tinker
much with Neapolitan tradition.
Instead, he channels it loud and
clear, reminding us of its essential
perfection.
$13. 400 South Maple Ave., Falls
Church, Va. 703-226-3460.
pizzeriaorso.com.
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IL CANALE AND ETTO PIZZAS BY
EMILY CODIK/THE WASHINGTON POST;
ALL OTHERS BY DAYNA SMITH
FOR THE WASHINGTON POST
4. MENOMALE
3. ETTO
Crust: Chef and partner Michael
Friedman has developed what he
calls an “all-American dough,”
using a finely ground Italianstyle flour from Vermont and a
whole-wheat flour from
California. It produces a complex,
sweet and nutty crust that’s not
as soft as classic Neapolitan
bases.
Crust: Co-owner and Naples native
Crust: Like All-Purpose, Etto
mixes an atypical dough, one
prepared with hard winter
wheat and spelt, which are
milled in-house. Lipped with
dark, almost foreboding bubbles
of char, the resulting crust
boasts a nutty, bready
personality, though one baptized
by fire.
Crust: As a card-carrying
Ettore Rusciano pushes the
extremes of char on his crust,
which arrives almost blackened
from the wood-burning oven.
Fortunately, his dough, fermented
at least 24 hours at room
temperature, can embrace the
bitterness without compromising
its own flavors.
member of the Verace Pizza
Napoletana Association,
Pupatella co-owner Enzo Algarme
follows the rules for Neapolitan
pies, although he ferments his
dough far longer than required,
which explains my desire to eat
every last piece of his pillowy,
evenly charred crust.
Crust: Blistered and unabashedly
Sauce/toppings: Accessorized
Sauce/toppings: Menomale relies
Sauce/toppings: Etto uses canned
more than its peers, this
margherita is finished with Sicilian
oregano and a grating of grana
padano cheese. Interestingly, one
small technique seems to have a
large impact: the cut ribbons of
basil appear to release their oils
straight into the Bianco DiNapoli
tomato sauce, perfuming the
whole pie.
on freshly milled San Marzano
tomatoes from Campania and cowmilk mozzarella from the States,
which together serve as sweet and
creamy counterpoints to the crust.
Italian plum tomatoes and lowmoisture buffalo mozzarella,
which ensures that the cheese,
when baked, won’t turn the
margherita into a swamp in the
middle. They may like soupy pizza
in Naples, but they don’t in
Washington.
Sauce/toppings: Imported from
Naples, the buffalo mozzarella is
applied liberally (and equally)
across the pie, offering a creamy
contrast to the sweet-tart Italian
plum tomatoes.
Sauce/toppings: Inferno doesn’t
use buffalo mozzarella or Italian
tomatoes. Instead, chef and owner
Tony Conte relies on a creamy cowmilk mozzarella and those trendy
Bianco DiNapoli tomatoes, which
are adapted from San Marzanos.
Both ingredients are sublime.
alters the interactions with all the
other ingredients, in a
fundamental way. Original and
delicious.
$17. 1541 14th St. NW. 202-2320920. ettodc.com.
Overall: Conte, a former fine-
dining chef, produces a neoNeapolitan margherita, informed
by tradition, but not a slave to it.
His pizza is bright. It’s bready. It’s
brilliantly constructed.
$13. 12207 Darnestown Rd.,
Darnestown, Md. 301-963-0115.
inferno-pizzeria.com.
Just missed the cut: Pizzeria
Vetri on 14th Street NW; Pizza CS
in Rockville; Ghibellina on 14th
Street NW; and Pete’s New Haven
(multiple locations).
tim.carman@washpost.com
. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2017
margherita, dubbed the Bayside, is
more New York than Naples, but I
suggest it’s neither. It’s a D.C.
original.
$17. 1250 Ninth St. NW. 202-8496174. allpurposedc.com.
Overall: The crust is so unique, it
Overall: This pie appeals to the
eyes as well as to the palate. “I
wanted to make something
beautiful for people as well,”
Algarme says.
$13. 5104 Wilson Blvd., Arlington.
571-312-7230. pupatella.com.
charred, this flatbread has the airy,
irregular hole structure of a fine
baguette. The dough, a mix of three
flours ground more coarsely than
most used for Neapolitan pizza, is
fermented at room temperature
for at least 24 hours. It bakes into a
robust, full-flavored crust.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Overall: Friedman argues that his
Overall: Like some pizzerias in
Naples, Menomale downplays the
basil, with only a few skimpy
leaves scattered on its certified
margherita. You won’t miss them.
$13. 2711 12th St. NE.
202-248-3946. menomale.us.
2. PUPATELLA
1. INFERNO PIZZERIA
NAPOLETANA
5. ALL-PURPOSE
24
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On Stage
TERESA WOOD
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
Director kept a long-distance lust alive
BY
A
G EOFFREY H IMES
s an associate artist at the
Folger Theatre, Robert
Richmond is obligated to
direct one play per season. When artistic producer Janet
Griffin is deciding which show to
give him, she usually avoids the
Bard’s most popular shows
(“Hamlet,” “A Midsummer Night’s
Dream,” “Romeo and Juliet” and
the like) and steers Richmond to
the infrequently produced titles,
the histories and the dramas that
fall through the cracks between
tragedy and comedy. He’s her
go-to guy when she needs to build
a bridge between the audience
and challenging plays such as
“Timon of Athens” or “Henry
VIII.”
“Robert can take a very complex story — a thorny problem
play or a mammoth history — and
A visit to Rome inspired Folger production about
history’s most famous lovers
energize the stage, visually as well
as verbally,” Griffin says. “He can
create the great, big gesture with
a theatrical sweep that’s almost
cinematic.”
For this season, Richmond’s
assignment is “Antony and Cleopatra,” which opens this weekend. “If we had to burn all Shakespeare’s plays, bar one — luckily
we don’t — I’d save ‘Antony and
Cleopatra,’ ” W.H. Auden once
said. He’s not alone in this estimation, but it’s staged far less than
its immediate predecessors,
“King Lear” and “Macbeth.” Why?
“Antony & Cleopatra” is long, and
it bounces around locations all
over the Mediterranean. Its characters don’t evolve on a recognizable trajectory, but zigzag be-
tween selfless heroism and selfish
pleasure, between clever strategies and boneheaded mistakes in
a way that makes it difficult for an
audience to get a fix on them.
Such real-world ambiguity, of
course, is the basis of the play’s
greatness, but it requires an
imaginative director to clarify
those paradoxes, even if they
can’t be resolved. To prepare himself for the play, Richmond spent
several days in Rome in June,
visiting the ruins. There was
something about this former imperial capital that felt different
from the powerful capital where
the Folger is located. There was
something about the wine and
the way the light glanced off the
marble that felt very Mediterra-
nean and linked Antony’s Rome
to Cleopatra’s Alexandria.
This connection is reinforced
by the dialogue. “Our separation
so abides and flies,” Antony tells
Cleopatra as he’s leaving her to
return home to Rome, “that thou
residing here goes yet with me,
and I hence fleeting here remain
with thee.” Each lover will be
present in the other’s mind, even
when they’re separated by a sea.
“I asked myself, ‘Is it possible to
keep both worlds happening at
the same time?’ ” Richmond recalls. “Could we have Rome and
Egypt onstage simultaneously
and leave it to the lights, costumes and sounds to tell the
audience which realm to focus
on? But the other actors wouldn’t
go away — the Egyptian actors
might still be onstage even when
they have no lines. While Antony
ANTONY CONTINUED ON 25
If you go
ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA
Folger Theatre,
201 East Capitol St. SE. 202-5447077.
folger.edu/folger-theatre.
Dates: Through Nov. 19.
Tickets: $35-$79.
Mark Antony (Cody Nickell)
flirts with Cleopatra (Shirine
Babb) in their namesake
tragedy by Shakespeare. Its
director at the Folger, Robert
Richmond, “can take a very
complex story . . . and energize
the stage,” says Folger’s Janet
Griffin, which was crucial for
the epic love story, which takes
place in sites across the
Mediterranean.
25
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ANTONY FROM 24
Prices are for the entire run
of the show; individual shows
may vary.
OPENINGS
ASSASSINS A dark musical revue
about nine misfits who have killed or
tried to kill American presidents.
NextStop Theatre Company, 269
Sunset Park Dr., Herndon. 866-8114111. theatredance.columbian.gwu.edu.
Opening Thursday at 7:30 p.m. $10$20.
INTIMATE APPAREL A talented African
American seamstress falls for a Jewish
fabric merchant in this turn-of-thecentury play. Everyman Theatre, 315
W. Fayette St., Baltimore. 410-7522208. everymantheatre.org. Opening
Wednesday.
PEPPA PIG LIVE! A program about the
children’s TV character. Warner
Theatre, 513 13th St. NW. 202-7834000. warnertheatredc.com. Opening
Sunday.
HAMLETA modern adaptation of
Shakespeare’s tragedy. Sleepy Hollow
United Methodist Church, 3435 Sleepy
Hollow Rd. Falls Church. 703-5346461. Opening Friday at 8 p.m. $20.
SOLO: 2017 DC QUEER THEATRE
FESTIVALSeven shows by LGBTQ+
solo performers. Anacostia Arts
Center, 1231 Good Hope Rd. SE. 202631-6291. anacostiaartscenter.com.
Opening Friday at 7:30 p.m. $20-$50.
THE ADVENTURES OF PETER PAN An
aerobatic production of J.M. Barrie’s
novel. Best for age 7 and older. Synetic
Theater, 1800 S. Bell St., Arlington.
866-811-4111. synetictheater.org.
Opening Wednesday at 8 p.m. $15$55.
THE SECOND CITY’S WHEN LIFE
GIVES YOU CLEMENS A Second City
tribute to American writer Mark Twain.
The Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW.
202-467-4600. kennedy-center.org.
Opening Thursday at 7 p.m. $39-$49.
ONGOING
Fearing the death of his beloved
Cleopatra, Mark Antony (Cody
Nickell, left) asks Eros
(Anthony Michael Martinez) to
end his life in “Antony and
Cleopatra.”
others. And politics haven’t really
changed. The ruthless way that
Octavius pursues power is just as
prevalent today as it was in ancient Rome.”
goingoutguide@washpost.com
STAGE CONTINUED ON 26
OCTOBER 13, 2017
learn from the play? Mature people can behave very immaturely.
Very important people can make
bad decisions. Men and women
can coexist harmoniously at certain times and not very well at
. FRIDAY,
TERESA WOOD
A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC Stephen
Sondheim’s 1973 musical, based on
the Ingmar Bergman film “Smiles of a
Summer Night,” is staged. Signature
Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave.,
Arlington. 703-820-9771. signaturetheatre.org. Through Sunday. $40-$79.
AN ACT OF GOD The D.C. premiere of
Daily Show alum David Javerbaum’s
comedy. Signature Theatre, 4200
Campbell Ave., Arlington. 703-8209771. signature-theatre.org. Through
Nov. 26.
ANTIGONE An ancient play about a
young woman who speaks truth to
power, but her king is convinced that
his word is law. Clarice Smith
Performing Arts Center, University of
Maryland, Route 193 and Stadium
Drive, College Park. 301-405-2787.
theclarice.umd.edu. through Friday.
$10-$25.
ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA Shirine
Babb and Cody Nickell headline the
Shakespearean play. Folger Theatre,
201 East Capitol St. SE. 202-544-7077.
folger.edu/events/antony-and-cleopatra.
Through Nov. 19. $35-$79.
ARE YOU NOW, OR HAVE YOU EVER
BEEN . . . A dramatization of poet
Langston Hughes’s struggle to
compose a poem on the eve of his
appearance in front of Sen. Joseph
McCarthy’s Un-American Activities
subcommittee on investigations.
MetroStage, 1201 N. Royal St.,
Alexandria. 800-494-8497.
metrostage.org. Through Nov. 5. $55$60.
BLANCAFLOR, THE WIZARD GIRL A
bilingual fairy tale about a prince who
enlists the help of a brave and
beautiful maiden. GALA Hispanic
Theatre, 3333 14th St. NW. 202-2347174. en.galatheatre.org. Through Oct.
21. $10-$12.
DEATH OF A SALESMAN Actor Craig
Wallace stars as Willy Loman in this
production of Arthur Miller’s Pulitzer
Prize-winning play. Best for ages 13
and older. Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St.
NW. 202-347-4833. fords.org. Through
Oct. 22. $17-$64.
EMILIE: LA MARQUISE DU CHÂTELET
THE WASHINGTON POST
is in Rome, Cleopatra might be
right there on the other half of the
stage. It would be as if he and
Octavius are imagining her as
they talk about her.”
When Richmond started rehearsing, he found that this approach sped up the show’s tempo.
No longer did you have to wait
while one crew of actors exited
and another entered. With a refocusing of the lights, you could
shift from Europe to Africa with
the suddenness of a movie jump
cut rather than the deliberation
of a theatrical scene change.
The next challenge was to give
the personal relationships as
much weight as the geopolitical
maneuvering. On the one hand,
Antony and Octavius Caesar are
trying to gain control of the entire
Mediterranean world — first as
allies and then as rivals. On the
other hand, Antony deserts his
new wife, Octavius’s sister Octavia, to sail back to his lover
Cleopatra, herself the ruler of an
empire and the former mistress
of Octavius’s great-uncle Julius.
What the characters do at work is
affected by what they do at home
— and vice versa.
“I didn’t want to make another
Roman spectacle like ‘Spartacus’
or Richard Burton’s ‘Cleopatra,’ ”
Richmond says. “I wanted to
show what these people are like
behind closed doors. I wanted
you to feel you were in the room
with them, making love with
them, arguing with them.
“So I took the seats out of the
center of the room and put the
stage there, so the audience is
four-sided. Suddenly the show
becomes very intimate. It challenges everyone — cast, crew and
audience alike — to give up the
safe distance provided by the
proscenium. It also becomes a
shared experience, because you
can see other people reacting to
the show at the same time you
are. And that harks back to the
Globe, where Shakespeare’s actors performed in daylight.”
Antony’s problem becomes the
problem of every white-collar careerist in Washington: How much
time and energy do you give to
your job and how much to your
loved ones at home? Not just
Octavius, but nearly every Roman
soldier condemns Antony’s love
affair as a dereliction of duty.
Shakespeare, a writer self-disciplined enough to write 38 plays
and to live apart from his wife
and children for most of each
year, surely agrees with them
intellectually. But he gives his
richest language to the lovers and
seems intoxicated by their ill-advised romance. The author may
be as torn as Antony. The director,
too.
“It’s a difficult play,” Richmond
concedes, “because it’s ambivalent in so many ways. What do we
ALS O PLAYIN G
26
EZ
On Stage
STAGE FROM 25
DEFENDS HER LIFE TONIGHT A play
inspired by French mathematician and
physicist Emilie du Châtelet. Gunston Arts
Center Theater II, 2700 S. Lang St.,
Arlington. Through Nov. 12.
I’LL GET YOU BACK AGAIN A world
premiere of Sarah Gancher’s musical
comedy about a stand-up comedian who
joins her father’s rock band. Round House
Theatre, 4545 East-West Hwy., Bethesda.
240-644-1100. roundhousetheatre.org.
Through Oct. 29. $36-$65.
IN THE HEIGHTS Lin-Manuel Miranda’s
Tony Award-winning show about
Washington Heights, directed and
choreographed by Marcos Santana. Olney
Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring
Rd., Olney. 301-924-3400. olneytheatre.org.
Through Oct. 22. $37-$84.
KEN LUDWIG'S MOON OVER BUFFALO
The Providence Players kick off their 20th
anniversary season with this fast-paced
comedy. James Lee Community Center,
2855 Annandale Rd., Falls Church.
providenceplayers.org. Through Oct. 21. $17$20.
LOVE AND INFORMATION The D.C.
premiere of British playwright Caryl
Churchill’s play on modern communication.
Forum Theatre, 8641 Colesville Rd., Silver
Spring. 301-588-8279. forum-theatre.org.
Through Oct. 21. $18-$38.
NATIVE GARDENS A play from Karen
Zacarías about a neighborly rivalry between
two couples. Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth St.
SW. 202-488-3300. arenastage.org.
Through Oct. 22. $56-$111.
We’re not
afraid of
peer
pressure.
WE POSITIVELY LOVE IT when it puts us in the company
of the best colleges for 2018, as determined by U.S. News
& World Report. So thank you, UVA, VCU, Virginia Tech,
William & Mary and George Mason. You’ve been wonderful
role models, and we’re proud to be the only Virginia private
Get the whole scoop at su.edu/toptier
into chaos when she shows up with at their
Pennsylvania home with a young boyfriend.
The Highwood Theatre, 914 Silver Spring
Ave., Silver Spring. 301-587-0697.
thehighwoodtheatre.org. Through Oct. 29.
$21.75-$25.
WIDOWERS’ HOUSES George Bernard
Shaw’s comedy examines the ethics of
making money. Washington Stage Guild at
the Undercroft Theatre, 900
Massachusetts Ave. NW. 240 582-0050.
Stageguild.org. Through Oct. 22. $50-$60.
WILDERNESS A multimedia documentary
theater piece that explores modern day
parenting. Best for age 12 and older. The
Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW. 202-4674600. kennedy-center.org. Through Sunday.
$25.
COMEDY
IN THE LAB COMEDY SHOWCASE Jason
Weems (NBC’s Last Comic Standing,
Montreal Just for Laughs, “Wit’s End” film)
brings his touring production to the stage.
Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St.
NE. 202-399-7993. atlasarts.org. Saturday
at 7:30 p.m. $25.
MARGARET CHO: FRESH OFF THE BLOAT
Comedy from the “All-American Girl” star
and humorist. Warner Theatre, 513 13th St.
NW. 202-783-4000. warnertheatredc.com.
Saturday at 8 p.m. $27.
WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU CLEMENS A
Second City tribute to American writer Mark
Twain. The Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW.
202-467-4600. kennedy-center.org.
Thursday at 7 p.m. Through Oct. 20. $39$49.
WHOOPI GOLDBERG The comedian,
author, actress and activist returns for a
night of stand-up comedy, as part of a 20th
anniversary celebration of the Mark Twain
Prize, which she won in 2001. The Kennedy
Center, 2700 F St. NW. 202-467-4600.
kennedy-center.org. Friday at 8 p.m. $49$125.
DANCE
14TH FALL FESTIVAL OF SOUTH ASIAN
ARTS Dakshina’s Annual Fall Festival of
South Asian arts. Atlas Performing Arts
Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993.
atlasarts.org. Friday. Through Sunday. $30.
JAPANESE CONNECTIONS Tap dancer
Kazunori Kumagai performs with koto
player Yumi Kurosawa and other musical
guests. The Kennedy Center, 2700 F St.
NW. 202-467-4600. kennedy-center.org.
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. $29-$49.
LA BAYADÈRE The Mariinsky Ballet
presents “La Bayadère,” choreographed for
them by Marius Petipa more than 140
years ago. The Kennedy Center, 2700 F St.
NW. 202-467-4600. kennedy-center.org.
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. Through Oct. 22. $39$150.
NIGHT IN THE GARDEN OF SPAIN A
performance by the National Chamber
Ensemble and Bowen McCauley Dance set
to live music by Manuel de Falla. Gunston
Arts Center Theatre I, 2700 S. Lang St.,
Arlington. nationalchamberensemble.org.
Saturday at 7:30 p.m.
SHADOWLAND The Pilobolus performance
is set to original music by musician and
composer David Poe. George Mason
University Center for the Arts, 4373 Mason
Pond Dr., Fairfax. 703-993-8888.
cfa.gmu.edu. Friday at 8 p.m. $29-$48.
THE RED SHOES Matthew Bourne
presents a production based on the Hans
Christian Andersen fairy tale. The Kennedy
Center, 2700 F St. NW. 202-467-4600.
kennedy-center.org. Friday at 7:30 p.m.
Through Sunday. $29-$129.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
institution to join you in the top tier of national universities.
OUR TOWN Directed by Aaron Posner, this
adaptation of Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer
Prize-winning drama features Japanese
Bunraku-style puppets. Olney Theatre
Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Rd.,
Olney. 301-924-3400. olneytheatre.org.
Through Nov. 12. $49-$74.
SHE RODE HORSES LIKE THE STOCK
EXCHANGE An absurdist farce about two
New England couples coping with the
global financial crisis. Taffety Punk, 545
Seventh St. SE. 202-355-9441.
taffetypunk.com. Through Saturday. $5-$15.
SKELETON CREW Dominique Morisseau’s
drama about displaced Detroit
autoworkers. Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St.
NW. 202-332-3300. studiotheatre.org.
Through Sunday. $20-$85.
SOTTO VOCE A love story from Pulitzer
Prize-winner Nilo Cruz inspired by the
Jewish passengers on the ill-fated ocean
liner SS St. Louis, who fled Nazi Germany.
Theater J, 1529 16th St. NW. 202-7773210. edcjcc.org. Through Oct. 29. $15$69.
STONES IN HIS POCKETS Residents of a
rural Irish town take jobs as extras in a
Hollywood film. Andrew Keegan Theatre,
1742 Church St. NW. 202-265-3767.
keegantheatre.com. Through Sunday. $35$45.
THE EFFECT A love story between two
volunteers in a clinical trial to test a new
anti-depressant by playwright Lucy Prebble.
Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St. NW. 202332-3300. studiotheatre.org. Through Oct.
29. $20-$55.
THE INFINITE WRENCH Thirty short plays
set in a random order for a live audience.
Georgetown University, 37th and O streets
NW. 202-687-2787.
performingarts.georgetown.edu. Through
Saturday. $10-$18.
THE LOVER AND THE COLLECTION A
double bill of comedic one-act plays by
Harold Pinter. Lansburgh Theatre, 450
Seventh St. NW. 202-547-1122 or 877-4878849. shakespearetheatre.org. Through Oct.
29.
THE MISTRESS CYCLE Historical figures
are musicalized in the 90-minute play
featuring French writer Anais Nin and New
Orleans madame Lulu White. Creative
Cauldron, 410 S. Maple Ave., Falls Church.
703-436-9948. creativecauldron.org.
Through Oct. 29. $20-$30.
THE PRICE Arthur Miller’s play about a
police sergeant who returns to Manhattan
to sell his parents’ estate. Arena Stage,
1101 Sixth St. SW. 202-488-3300.
arenastage.org. Through Nov. 12. $81-$111.
THE RED SHOES Matthew Bourne
produces a rendition of “The Red Shoes.”
The Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW. 202467-4600. kennedy-center.org. Through
Sunday. $29-$129.
THE SMARTEST GIRL IN THE WORLD Two
siblings work together to compete on a
local TV competition. Imagination Stage,
4908 Auburn Ave., Bethesda. 301-2801660. imaginationstage.org. Through Oct.
29.
THE WILD PARTY Queenie and Burrs try to
one-up each other in throwing great parties
in this jazz musical with a score by Andrew
Lippa. Clarice Smith Performing Arts
Center, University of Maryland, Route 193
and Stadium Drive, College Park. 301-4052787. theclarice.umd.edu. Through Nov. 11.
$10-$25.
THE WILD PARTY A musical based on a
Joseph Moncure March poem. Source
Theatre, 1835 14th St. NW. 202-204-7800.
constellationtheatre.org. Through Oct. 29.
$15-$25.
VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND
SPIKE A movie star throws her sisters’ lives
WINCHESTER | LOUDOUN | FAIRFAX
TERESA WOOD
Jason Bowen and Caroline Stefanie Clay in “Skeleton Crew,”
Dominique Morisseau’s play about displaced Detroit autoworkers.
27
EZ
B FEATURED LISTING B
20th Annual
Bethesda Row
Arts Festival
Saturday, October 14th
11am to 6pm
Sunday, October 15th
10am to 5pm
Fine Arts Festival in Bethesda,
Maryland featuring 190 Master Artisans
showcasing original work at every price
point. Live musical entertainment and
fabulous dining options. Streets are
closed to traffic.
Bethesda, Maryland
(Woodmont Ave, Elm Street,
Bethesda Ave)
GPS Address:
4841 Bethesda Ave
Bethesda, MD 20814
http://bethesdarowarts.org
Free
Rain or
Shine
190 Master
Artisans
showcasing
original work
Live Musical
Entertainment
THEATRE
Folger Theatre presents
Antony and
Cleopatra
Now on stage
through Nov. 19
Are You Now or Have
You Ever Been…
By Carlyle Brown
Thru Nov 5
Wed, Th & Fri at 8,
Sat 3 & 8, Sun 3 & 7
Dreamgirls
August 31November 12
Follow the rise and fall of “The Dreams”,
an all-female, black singing group who
learn the reality of show “business”.
Studio Theatre
presents
Now playing!
A sexy and provocative play about the
chemistry of love, directed by Studio’s
Artistic Director David Muse.
The Effect
By Lucy Prebble
Emilie
by Lauren Gunderson,
directed by
Rick Hammerly
The Mistress
Cycle
Book & Lyrics by
Beth Blatt
Music By Jenny Giering
The
Edge . . .
Mark Antony, at the peak of his
political power, is ensconced in Egypt
at the side of the irresistible Cleopatra.
Shakespeare’s epic tale of politics and
power is sweepingly staged in the
Folger’s intimate theater, converted to
the round. With Cody Nickell and Shirine
Babb in the title roles.
Poetry by Langston Hughes, musical
underscoring of his evocative poetry,
and the politics of Sen Joseph McCarthy
of the early 1950s.
The Edge of the Universe
Players 2 present
Mystery School
Pippin
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Now Extended
Call for
tickets and
info
$20-$55
A brainy woman. A hot romance. A smart
comedy. The 18-century math genius
Emilie Du Châtelet revisits her life & loves
and makes some amazing discoveries.
"Vixen. Paramour. Mistress. Five women,
separated by time, distance, and culture,
emerge from the shadows to tell their
stories, each unique and yet, somehow
the same.
"Come see the DC area premiere of this
intelligent new musical work."
-MD Theater Guide
Gunston Arts Center
2700 S Lang St, Arlington, VA
Tix & info: 703-418-4808;
AvantBard.org/tickets
PWYW to
$35
Pay What You
Will previews
Oct 12-14 & 16
at 7:30 pm
Creative Cauldron
ArtSpace Falls Church
410 S Maple Avenue
Falls Church, VA 22046
703-436-9948
www.creativecauldron.org
$30 GA
$26
Seniors &
Military
$20
Student
2-for-1 GA
Thursdays &
Sundays(only)
With code
WASHPOST
Limited
availability
1 actor—5 characters—5 cosmic
views—5 individual crises that get solved
or don’t
Directed by Aly B. Ettman
Featuring Nora Achrati
Melton Rehearsal Hall
Woolly Mammoth Theatre
Company
641 D St., N.W.
Washington, DC 20004
$25
Universe
Players2.org
202-355-6330
October 6 – 21
Fri & Sat 8:00
Sun 2:30
This classic musical follows the young
prince, Pippin, as he encounters love,
glory, and war in his search for the
meaning of life.
Thomas Jefferson
Community Theatre
125 S. Old Glebe Rd.
Arlington, VA 22204
Regular Schedule:
Tuesday–Friday at 8
Saturday at 6 & 9
Sunday at 3 & 7
This wildly popular interactive comedy
whodunit keeps the audiences laughing
as they try to outwit the suspects and
catch the killer. New clues and up to the
minute improvisation deliver “the most
fun I ever had at the Kennedy Center.”
(Arch Campbell, ABC News)
The Kennedy Center
Theater Lab
Student Rush
Tickets Available
Tickets: 202-467-4600
Groups: 202-416-8400
www.shearmadness.com
As rumors spread through one of the last
auto-stamping plants in Detroit, a
tight-knit family of workers face what
they’re willing to sacrifice to survive.
Skeleton Crew is an important work by an
important writer that excavates the lives
of working class people in America today.
Studio Theatre
1501 14th Street NW
Washington, DC 20005
202.332.3300,
studiotheatre.org
A smoldering seductress and a vaudeville
clown invite you over for drinking,
dancing and a sizzling score of jazz, rock
& gospel.
Constellation at Source
1835 14th St. NW
202.204.7741
ConstellationTheatre.org
Tues-Sat @ 7:30pm
Sat & Sun @ 2:30pm
Now playing to Nov 12;
Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm;
Sat & Sun at 2:00 pm.
NOW through
October 29
Oct. 28 to Nov. 19
Sats. 8:00, Suns. 7:00
Check website for
complete schedule.
DC’s Hottest Musical!
8 shows a week
through Oct. 29
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
$15-25
Tickets
Available
at the
Box Office
Tickets
available
online and
at the box
office
$25-55
www.the
arlington
players.org
Great Group
Rates for 15 or
More
“A deeply
moral and
deeply
American
play.”
—The New
York Times
“Spirited and
Flavorful”
-WaPo
16-2898
OCTOBER 13, 2017
by Dominique Morisseau
directed by
Patricia McGregor
“An astonishingly rich and rewarding
play, as intelligent as it is deeply felt.”
—Daily Telegraph (UK)
. FRIDAY,
Skeleton Crew
On stage now!
The Wild Party
Poetry, Music
discount and Politics.
tickets
The critics are
Thru Oct 15 raving.
THE WASHINGTON POST
Shear Madness
MetroStage
1201 N. Royal St. Alex. VA
703-548-9044
www.metrostage.org
Toby’s Dinner Theatre
of Columbia
410.730.8311
Tobysdinnertheatre.com
Tix starting Brews &
at $35
Banter w/
Discounts select cast
available - members
on Oct. 26,
visit web- 6:30pm
site
Studio Theatre
1501 14th Street NW
Washington, DC 20005
202.332.3300,
studiotheatre.org
by Paul Selig
The Arlington Players
Folger Theatre
201 East Capitol St., SE, DC
202.544.7077
www.folger.edu/theatre
28
PG
THEATRE
October 11–13, 2017
8 p.m.
October 14, 2017
2 p.m.
Urinetown
The Musical
Vanya and Sonia
and Masha and
Spike
Written by
Christopher Durant
Directed by
Howard Vincent Kurtz
Wed - Sat @ 8pm;
Sun @ 3pm
Oct 21 - Nov 11, 2017
Written by Greg Kotis
Music and lyrics by Mark Hollman and
Greg Kotis
Winner of three Tony Awards, Urinetown
the Musical is the hilariously touching tale
of love, greed, and
revolution.
Robert E. Parilla
Performing Arts Center
Montgomery College
51 Mannakee Street
Rockville, MD 20850
Tickets are
$10
Regular,
$8 Seniors
& $5
Students
w/ID
Winner of the 2013 Tony Award for Best
Play, this story follows middle-aged
siblings Vanya and Sonia. Hilarity ensues
as this kooky clan works out their
differences.
Little Theatre of Alexandria
600 Wolfe Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
www.thelittletheatre.com
Tickets:
$19-22
GALA Theatre
3333 14th Street, NW
202-234-7174
www.galatheatre.org
$10-$12
Bilingual
StageCoach Theatre
Ashburn ~ Hillsboro Old
Stone School ~ Leesburg
Brewing Co. ~ Salamander
Resort ~ 1757 Golf Club ~
Lansdowne Woods ~
Bright Box Winchester
$25 – 85
based on
menu
StageCoach
TC.com
571-477-9444
Brucker Hall
400 McNair Rd
Fort Myer in
Arlington, VA
Valid ID 18+
usarmyband.com
facebook.com/usarmyband
youtube.com/usarmyband
Free!
No tickets
required.
Live web
broadcast.
Visit
usarmy
band.com
for full
schedule.
Free
tickets
required.
Call:
717.337.
8200
Visit
usarmy
band.com
for full
schedule.
www.
montgomery
college.
edu/pac
Box Office:
240-567-5301
For
information
and tickets,
see website:
www.
thelittle
theatre.com
CHILDREN'S THEATRE
GALita
Oct 16 – 20 at 10:30 am
Oct 14 & 21 at 3 pm
Blancaflor
The Girl Wizard
In this Spanish fairy tale, a brave young
girl helps her prince defeat evil and
accomplish the impossible.
DINNER THEATRE
Alexander Hamilton lies dying on the
ground. Aaron Burr stands nearby,
smoking gun in hand. Historians have
told their side of the story. Hear the
untold version, choose the real killer, &
prepare to change the course of history!
InterACTive Theatre
The Hamilton
Murders
Oct 14 – Nov 12
Murder Mystery
MUSIC - CONCERTS
Army Blues and
Army Voices
Special Guest:
Tish Oney
Autumnal
Offerings
Sounds of Fall
Next week!
Sun, October 22
3:00 p.m.
Dynamic vocal ensemble, The U.S. Army
Voices, will join forces with The U.S. Army
Blues and guest vocalist, Tish Oney for a
program of exciting vocal jazz. Selections
include Birdland, Desafinado, and The
Best is Yet to Come. Live web broadcast.
Valid photo ID for 18+
Next week!
Fri, October 20
8:00 p.m.
The premier music organization of the
nation's more senior service breaks free
of the Beltway to perform an evening of
musical selections that will conjure the
spirit of fall. This performance is free, but
tickets are required.
Visit: www.gettysburgmajestic.org to get
FREE tickets.
Majestic Theater
25 Carlisle St
Gettysburg, PA
Sarah Chang, violin
Zuill Bailey, cello
Piotr Gajewski, conductor
National Philharmonic
The Music Center
at Strathmore
5301 Tuckerman Lane
North Bethesda, MD 20852
nationalphilharmonic.org
301-581-5100
From $25;
Kids 7-17
Free!
For group
sales of 10+
and special
packages, call
301-493-9283,
ext. 111.
National Philharmonic
The Music Center
at Strathmore
5301 Tuckerman Lane
North Bethesda, MD 20852
nationalphilharmonic.org
301-581-5100
From $25;
Kids 7-17
Free!
For group
sales of 10+
and special
packages, call
301-493-9283,
ext. 111.
FREE,
no tickets
required
Free parking in
garage at 7th
& K Sts, SE;
Please allow
extra time for
ID checks at
the gate.
$60
Pre-concert
wine & cheese
Free Parking
Sat Oct 14, 8pm
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
Star-Studded
Season Opening
Star-Studded
Season Opening
Free pre-concert lecture
at 6:45pm
Sponsors:
Ameriprise Financial &
Ingleside at King Farm
Sun Oct 15, 3pm
Meet the Instruments
2-2:30pm
Beethoven Egmont Overture
Bruch
Violin Concerto No. 1 in
G minor
Dvorák
Cello Concerto in B minor
Sarah Chang, violin
Santiago Rodriguez, piano
Piotr Gajewski, conductor
usarmyband.com
facebook.com/usarmyband
youtube.com/usarmyband
Sponsor:
Ameriprise Financial
Beethoven
Egmont Overture
Bruch
Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor
Grieg
Piano Concerto in A minor
Chamber Music
Series
Sunday, Oct. 15
at 2 p.m.
Chamber ensembles from “The
President’s Own” will perform Georg
Christoph Wagenseil’s Sonata No. 1 in D;
Heitor Villa-Lobos’ Trio for Oboe,
Clarinet, and Bassoon; Steven Simpson’s
Flow; and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s
String Quintet No. 3 in C.
John Philip Sousa Band
Hall, Marine Barracks
Annex, 7th & K Sts, SE
Washington, DC
202-433-4011
Live streaming at:
www.marineband.marines.mil
Harpsichord
Concert
Friday, Oct. 20, 8:00pm
Acclaimed harpsichordist Jean Rondeau,
with Thomas Dunford, Lute, & Lea
Desandre, Mezzo, perform works by
famed Baroque composers.
Chevy Chase Village, MD
Tix online only at:
www.CapriccioBaroque.org
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
Does this page look familiar? The Washington Post is printed using recycled fiber.
16-2898
NF407 5x.25
29
PG
MUSIC - CONCERTS
Chamber Players
Series
Deranged with
Downrange Rock
Orchestra
Pop/rock Halloween
Washington Bach Consort
From the Archives
Gala Benefit
Concert for
Hurricane Relief
Season Opening
Night In The
Garden Of Spain
Renée Fleming
“VOICES”:
Renée Fleming &
Christian McBride
Songs Celestial
Join us for an Evening of Music for Jazz
Combo featuring members of the Airmen
of Note.
Lyceum
201 S. Washington Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
In 2 weeks!
Thursday and Saturday
Oct 26 and 28
7:30 p.m.
We are setting the stage to rock the
house at Brucker Hall. Join us for a
full-scale rock show production featuring
The U.S. Army Band Downrange in a
fun family-friendly pop/rock show with a
Halloween feel. Costumes are
encouraged! Saturday show will be live
web broadcast. Valid photo ID for 18+
Brucker Hall
400 McNair Rd
Fort Myer in
Arlington, VA
Valid ID 18+
usarmyband.com
facebook.com/usarmyband
youtube.com/usarmyband
Friday, October 20,
7:00 pm
Music from our first concert in 1977,
including the Brandenburg Concerto
No. 6
Featuring:Todd Fickley, harpsichord
William Neil, harpsichord (back from‘77)
Colin St-Martin, flute
Marlisa del Cid Woods, violin
Paul Miller,viola & Scott McCormick, viola
First Congregational United
Church of Christ
945 G Street, NW
(202)429-2121
www.bachconsort.org
Free!
No tickets
required.
Live web
broadcast.
Visit
usarmy
band.com
for full
schedule.
Single
tickets $35
$10 parking
after 5:00 PM
in attached
garage
Post-concert
beer tasting
w/Right Proper
Brewing Co.
free-will
offerings
accepted
A reception
will follow.
There is ample
free parking
and the church
has an
entrance
ramp.
Celebrate the
150th
Anniversary of
great Spanish
composer
Enrique
Granados
Please vist the web site for a full list of
performers
www.annunciationdc.org/roth-concert
Exciting and sensual music of Spain:
Granados, Turina, Casals, de Falla and
Albeniz. Music and dance unite for the
premiere of exciting new creation with
Bowen McCauley Dance. Carlos Cesar
Rodriguez piano, Leo Sushansky violin,
Uri Wassertzug viola, Sean Neidlinger
cello, Bowen McCauley Dance
Gunston Arts Center Theater 1
2700 S. Lang St. Arlington,
VA 22206 (Free Parking) Nearby:Shirlington, Crystal City
restaurants. Tickets at:
www.NationalChamber
Ensemble.org
$36 Gen
Adm,
$18 Stdnt
Tonight at 7 & 9
Superstar soprano and Kennedy Center
Artistic Advisor at Large Renée Fleming
pairs her radiant vocals with the
iconic sounds of jazz bassist, 5-time
Grammy Award® winner, and Kennedy
Center favorite Christian McBride.
Accompanied by pianist Dan Tepfer.
Kennedy Center
Terrace Theater
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
Sunday,
October 29, 2017
at 4:00 PM
Thomas Beveridge conducts and
organist Paul Skevington accompanies
the Chorale in works by Schubert,
Bernstein, Rachmaninov, Faure, and
Vaughan Williams, including a premiere
performance of Maestro Beveridge's
"Song of Celestial Love" (Vedantic Hymn
on text by Sri Ramakrishna).
Sunday, Oct.15 at 2 pm
Renowned cellist Matt Haimovitz
performs Bach’s “Suites for
Unaccompanied Cello” paired with newly
commissioned overtures to each suite
composed by Philip Glass, Du Yun, Vijay
Iyer and others.
Sunday, October 22nd
5:00 P.M.
Sat, Oct 14, 2017
7:30pm
A Reception will follow
the performance.
Friday, October 13,
at 7:30 pm
All donations will be forwarded to
Catholic Charities U.S.A. to benefit
victims of the recent hurricanes.
Seven-member brass ensemble
performs “Renaissance and Baroque
Improvisations”
Wickre Memorial Concert Series
St. Luke Catholic Church
7001 Georgetown Pike
McLean, VA 22101
www.newdominion.org
202-244-7191
The Alden
This performance is
being held at
The Old Firehouse,
1440 Chain Bridge Rd.,
McLean, Va. 22101
703-790-0123 /TTY: 711
www.aldentheatre.org
Chevy Chase Presbyterian
Church
One Chevy Chase Circle NW
202-363-2202
Saint Luke Lutheran Church
9100 Colesville Rd at Dale Dr.
Silver Spring, MD
301.588.4363
$35 Adult
$30
Seniors
(62+)
$15 youth
(Ages 525)
Free Parking
Tickets:
$20
$14 MCC
tax district
residents
Free
Free-will
offering
Free,
onsite parking
47th Season of
Chevy Chase
Concerts
Free parking
www.saint
luke.us
it’s not live art without a live audience.
ise in The Guide to the Lively
l Arts!
202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
16-2898
OCTOBER 13, 2017
The Guide to the Lively Arts appears: • Sunday in Arts & Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Monday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
• Tuesday in Style. deadline: Mon., 12 noon • Wednesday in Style. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Thursday in Style. deadline: Wed., 12 noon
• Thursday in Express. deadline: Wed., 12 noon • Friday in Weekend. deadline: Tues., 12 noon • Saturday in Style. deadline: Friday, 12 noon
For information about advertising, call: Raymond Boyer 202-334-4174 or Nicole Giddens 202-334-4351
To reach a representative, call: 202-334-7006 | guidetoarts@washpost.com
. FRIDAY,
organist
www.usaf
band.af.mil
Annunciation Catholic
Church
3810 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20016
(one block west of Wisconsin
Avenue)
Info: 202-441-7678
Washington Cornett & Sunday, October 15
4pm
Sackbutt Ensemble
Stefan Engels
All perf.
FREE, no
tickets
required
THE WASHINGTON POST
Cellist
Matt Haimovitz:
“A Moveable
Feast”
Thurs. Oct 19, 7:30 p.m.
30
PG
MUSIC - CHAMBER
Dumbarton Concerts
Dumbarton United
Methodist Church
3133 Dumbarton St. NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-965-2000
Dumbartonconcerts.org
$42 Adults
$39 Senior
202-965-2000
Sunday, November 5,
4:30 PM
Barber’s achingly beautiful Adago for
Strings has become “the nation’s funeral
music.” The City Choir also presents the
first performance of Bruckner’s Mass in
F minor in DC in fifty years—a fitting
opening to Mo. Shafer’s 50th anniversary
season.
National Presbyterian
Church
4101 Nebraska Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20016
Free parking available.
$15-50
Group and
student
disc. avail.
For more
information,
visit
citychoir.org or
call (571) 2068525
Sunday, October 15,
4:00 p.m.
Written as Mozart approached death, his
Requiem provides profound moments of
great vastness and sublime tenderness.
Centered on the theme of light, Morten
Lauridsen’s “non-liturgical requiem,” Lux
Aeterna, emanates hope, reassurance,
and serenity. Kent Tritle, guest conductor.
Washington
National Cathedral
3101 Wisconsin Ave. NW
cathedralchoralsociety.org
202-537-2228 / 877-537-2228
Dumbarton Concerts
Steven Honigberg
& Friends
October 21 at 8pm
A Schubertiade
Steven Honigberg,cellist for the National
Symphony Orchestra, along with his
colleagues will perform a Schubert
program in honor of the composer’s
220th birthday.
MUSIC - CHORAL
The City Choir of
Washington
Barber Adagio for
Strings and
Bruckner Mass in
F minor
Cathedral Choral Society
Mozart Requiem
National Lutheran Choir
"Holy Spirit Mass"
On the Migration
of Souls
Sunday, October 22nd
7pm
October 14, 2017
7:30p.m.
Join the National Lutheran Choir for the
world premiere of a major choralinstrumental work. Holy Spirit Mass,
by Norwegian composer Kim André
Arnesen, commemorates the 500th
Anniversary of the Reformation, and
welcomes all to celebrate shared joy in
faith.
Join The Thirteen in a concert of works
from the Jewish Dispora, the African
American experience, and works relevant
to our shared society.
Basilica of the
National Shrine of the
Immaculate Conception
400 Michigan Ave NE
Washington DC 20017
Starting at
$25;
students/
youth $15
Pre-concert
talk at 3 p.m.,
7th floor of the
Cathedral.
RSVP
requested:
Free
http://bit.ly/
HSMTixDC
NLCA.com
St. Columba's Church
4201 Albemarle St. NW
Washington, DC 20016
www.TheThirteenChoir.org
$30 at the
door
$25 in
advance
Tenleytown
metro!
Ample street
parking!
OPERA
An Evening of
Monteverdi
Tues., October 24, 2017
7:30 p.m.
Experience an emotional journey of
love and war with music from
Claudio Monteverdi’s Seventh and
Eighth Books of Madrigals, featuring Il
Combattimento di Tancredi et Clorinda, a
theatrical madrigal.
Tchaikovsky’s
Eugene Onegin
Saturday October 14
at 7:30 p.m.
Tchaikovsky’s romantic opera, in
costume and sung in Russian with
English supertitles.
www.belcantanti.com
Orange is the
New Barack
Fridays & Saturdays
at 7:30pm
No Show on
Oct. 13 & 14
Opera Lafayette
The Kennedy Center
Terrace Theater
2700 F Street NW
(202) 467-4600
Kennedy-Center.org
$25-$100
Season &
Single Tix:
Opera
Lafayette.org
202-546-9332
Concord-St. Andrews
United Methodist Church
5910 Goldsboro Road
Bethesda, MD
$15 - $40
See
website
Tickets online
and at the
door
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
COMEDY
A musical, political satire.
We put the MOCK in Democracy!
www.capsteps.com | Info: 202.312.1555
Ronald Reagan Building
1300 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Tix available at 202.397.SEAT
ticketmaster.com
$36
Discounts available for groups
of 10+. Call:
202-312-1427
DANCE
Manassas Ballet
Theatre presents
The Legend Of
Sleepy Hollow
October 20-21, 7:30pm
October 22, 3:00pm
Manassas Ballet Theatre and the
Manassas Ballet Theatre Orchestra will
send a chill up your spine just in time
for Halloween with The Legend of Sleepy
Hollow-original choreography sets the
scene for an eerie tale, true to the original
classic
Hylton Performing Arts
Center, George Mason
University, Manassas
Tickets: hyltoncenter.org or
call (888) 945-2468
Info & discounts at
www.manassasballet.org
Free Parking
International
cast of 29
Tickets
dancers & live
start at $25 orchestra, all
at the awardwinning Hylton
Tonight & Tomorrow
at 1:30 & 7:30
Sun at 1:30
A beloved fairy tale and an Academy
Award–winning movie, The Red Shoes
has seduced audiences and inspired
generations of dancers with its story of
obsession, possession, and one young
woman's dream to be the greatest
dancer in the world.
Kennedy Center
Opera House
kennedy-center.org
or call (202) 467-4600
Tickets
available
at the
Box Office
D.C. Premiere
Matthew Bourne /
New Adventures –
“The Red Shoes”
This production
includes
mature themes.
Recommended
for age 8 and
up.
AUDITIONS
Anne Of Green
(7-13 & 14-24):
Gables:The Musical Youth
Fri 10/13 @ 7pm & Sat
17 F (several ages); 10 M (several ages)
See website for complete descriptions.
10/14 @ 1pm*
Adult auditions will be
held 10/21 & 10/22
Please sign up on website for audition
time. Please bring current headshot
(if you have one), resume, and accurate
conflict list.
Written by Don Harron &
Norman Campbell
Directed by
Michael J. Baker
Little Theatre of Alexandria
600 Wolfe Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
NA
thelittle
theatre.com
Movies
31
EZ
The Florida Project
IMAGES FROM A24
Making their own magic kingdom
In the tawdry shadows of
Disney World, neglected
lives are given dignity
BY
A NN H ORNADAY
‘T
ABOVE: Willem Dafoe gives a particularly fine performance as the manager of a dingy hotel where
a young, single mother and her impish daughter live on the outskirts of Disney World in Orlando.
TOP: Brooklynn Prince, center, plays Moonee, the nominal heroine, along with Christopher Rivera
and Valeria Cotto.
titution when she can’t make the
Magic Castle’s weekly rent, is
little more than a kid herself.
Moonee’s street hustles and
street-urchin scams may look
adorably spunky now, but they
suggest a far less rosy future
down the road.
Baker doesn’t superimpose
those judgments. Instead, he presents “The Florida Project” as a
respectful glimpse of a part of
contemporary life that is often
R. At area theaters. Contains profanity throughout, disturbing behavior, sexual references and some drug material. 115 minutes.
ann.hornaday@washpost.com
OCTOBER 13, 2017
games and the occasional sweetfaced panhandling gambit to
cadge some ice cream from unsuspecting tourists.
Baker, whose breakout 2015
film “Tangerine” was filmed entirely on an iPhone, here trades
that modest platform for lush
35mm film, fashioning a big,
bright, improbably optimisticlooking canvas for a story steeped
in heartbreak. The volatile, unreliable Halley, who resorts to pros-
. FRIDAY,
who are struggling with addiction, homelessness, mental illness or simple bad luck. It’s a
harsh, hardscrabble life, but Baker is determined to infuse it with
wonder and its own brand of
profane dignity. An independent,
precocious heroine in the tradition of Scout in “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Moonee navigates circumstances not of her making,
but ones she nonetheless makes
her own by way of fantasies,
THE WASHINGTON POST
he Florida Project,”
Sean Baker’s exuberant, ungovernable ode
to the innocence and
resilience of childhood, takes
place in a ramshackle lavenderpainted hotel called the Magic
Castle, hard by Orlando’s Disney
World. Along with its neighboring oxymoronically named fleabags, the Magic Castle evokes the
American Dream, while denying
it at every downbeat, threadbare
turn. It’s American Dream-adjacent, with such middle-class advantages as financial security, leisure and cozy domestic stability
tantalizingly visible but always
just out of reach.
But that doesn’t mean that the
margins don’t possess their share
of enchantment. As “The Florida
Project” opens, its spirited 6-yearold protagonist, Moonee (newcomer Brooklynn Prince), is busy
leading her friends on a game of
mayhem and mischief throughout the stucco complex, which
serves as cheap housing for her
young mother, Halley (Bria
Vinaite), and a handful of folks
invisible to mainstream society.
While the impulse is admirable, it
results in a film that veers dangerously close to the kind of aestheticized poverty porn that bedeviled
such similar enterprises as
“Beasts of the Southern Wild” and
“American Honey.”
And,
too
often,
Baker
over-directs Prince, Halley and
their fellow young cast members,
most of whom are nonprofessional actors and whose performances are so keyed-up and theatrical that the viewer can almost
hear the director asking for another take, only this time with
more. That over-the-topness
stands in particularly unflattering relief compared with “The
Florida Project’s” most revelatory
moments, which belong to Willem Dafoe, who plays the Magic
Castle’s patient, gently paternalistic manager, Bobby.
Although Moonee is the nominal heroine of “The Florida Project,” it’s Bobby who emerges as
the indefatigable moral center of
a movie that pulses with life, if
not hope. Dafoe delivers his finest
performance in recent memory,
bringing to levelheaded, unsanctimonious life a character who
offers a glimmer of hope and
caring within a world markedly
short on both.
32
EZ
Movies
Ratings guide
Professor Marston and the Wonder Women Masterpiece
Very good
Okay
Poor
Also reviewed
Loving Vincent
An animated biopic
paints a portrait of
Vincent van Gogh.
34
Human Flow
A documentary
looks at the global
refugee crisis. 35
Plus
Common Sense
Media 38
Opening next
week
The Earth’s satellitecontrolled weather
goes haywire in the
climate thriller
Geostorm.
Michael Fassbender
is a detective
investigating a
series of murders in
The Snowman.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
Only the Brave is a
fact-based thriller
about firefighters.
Tyler Perry’s Boo
2: A Madea
Halloween is a
horror-comedy.
Actor Andy Serkis
makes his
directorial debut
with Breathe.
Dina is a
documentary about
an eccentric couple.
The documentary
Faces Places looks
at a French muralist.
For Ahkeem is a
documentary about
an at-risk St. Louis
teenager.
CLAIRE FOLGER/ANNAPURNA PICTURES
Heroine’s roots aren’t rated R. Try PhD.
The engrossing and true
story of the origins of
“Wonder Woman”
BY
A NN H ORNADAY
As the movie we need right
now, “Professor Marston and the
Wonder Women” could not be
better timed. News reports might
be awash in abuses of authority
and grievous misconduct within
the movie industry, but here’s a
story that not only celebrates female power and open-minded
idealism, but also embodies those
values in its very warp and woof.
As its title suggests, the factbased film tells the story of William Moulton Marston (Luke Evans), the psychologist and inventor who, under the pen name
Charles Moulton, created the
comic book heroine Wonder
Woman. The character’s origin
story was adapted by Patty Jenkins into a rousing action-adven-
ture this past summer. Here, writer-director Angela Robinson
delves into the real-life inspirations behind Marston’s creation,
which included: progressive politics; the psychological theories of
Freud and Jung; a long-term romantic and domestic relationship
between Marston, his psychologist wife, Elizabeth (Rebecca
Hall), and their student Olive
Byrne (Bella Heathcote); and the
trio’s discovery and enjoyment of
the world of fetish objects and
role-playing.
If that all sounds terribly edgy
— maybe even a little dark — rest
assured: Robinson gives “Professor Marston” the classy, highgloss sheen of a rich period piece,
introducing William and Elizabeth as they pursue their research
at Harvard, and following them
through the 1940s, when Marston
introduced his feminist archetype, kitted out with a form-fitting corset, lasso, metal wrist
cuffs and diadem. As the movie
makes clear, these sartorial details didn’t emerge from a leering
sense of kink or voyeurism. Rather, Marston was determined to
give boys a positive role model of
a female hero they could respect
and look up to. The attraction to
accoutrements of bondage and
submission had its roots in his
and Elizabeth’s research, which
included human behavior, dissembling and ultimately inventing an early lie-detecting machine.
The theme of honesty — living
according to one’s principles, embracing sometimes taboo sexual
desires, pursuing love and friendship in good faith — pervades
“Professor Marston,” which is
consistently absorbing, sensuous
and lovely to look at, but most
interesting when it focuses on
Olive and Elizabeth. Hall delivers
a prickly, tour-de-force performance as the brilliant, disarmingly
frank Elizabeth, who despite her
superior intelligence is relegated
to second banana in her husband’s academic career. In one of
the film’s finest, most judiciously
calibrated scenes, she and Olive
embark on a tentative seduction,
eventually inviting William to
join them with a simple outstretched hand and direct, know-
From left: Rebecca Hall, Luke
Evans and Bella Heathcote as
Elizabeth and William Marston
and their student — and
partner — Olive Byrne. Writerdirector Angela Robinson gives
the backstory of the comic-book
superhero a high-gloss sheen.
ing look.
It’s a moment, like so many in
“Professor Marston,” that could
easily have been played for maximum titillation or prurient appeal. Instead, Robinson invests it
with emotion, maturity and, perhaps surprisingly, a tone of wholesome reassurance. Oddly enough,
Marston himself isn’t nearly as
vividly drawn as his female companions and collaborators; here,
he comes across as little more
than a well-meaning but relatively insipid man who had the good
sense to surround himself with
far more interesting women. Still,
he’s a sympathetic figure in an
engrossing and beautifully told
glimpse at the not-so-recent past
that feels vital, groundbreaking
and forward-leaning.
ann.hornaday@washpost.com
R. At area theaters. Contains strong sexual content, including brief graphic images, and obscenity. 108 minutes.
Movies
33
EZ
Marshall The making of a robed crusader from legal hero
BY
A LAN Z ILBERMAN
In the fact-based drama “Marshall” — a throwback to such
courtroom-focused procedurals
as “Witness for the Prosecution”
and “To Kill a Mockingbird” —
Thurgood Marshall is seen as
something of a legal superhero.
The late Supreme Court justice
cuts a striking figure as he prepares to don his judicial robes
before the film flashes back to the
early 1940s, when, as a young
attorney for the NAACP, he
brought to the job an unwavering
commitment to justice (and a
willingness to get into bar
brawls). This oversimplified rendering, however, is complicated
by the fact that the film is set in
the Jim Crow era and centers on
the case of a black man who has
been accused of raping a white
woman. Director Reginald Hudlin handles the story with just
enough finesse to make its details more thrilling than uneasy.
Chadwick Boseman plays the
title character, a confident young
attorney who heads wherever the
NAACP sends him. When a black
chauffeur, Joseph Spell (Sterling
K. Brown), is accused of sexual
assault by his employer’s wife,
Connecticut socialite Eleanor
Strubing (Kate Hudson), Marshall’s boss (Roger Guenveur
Smith) assigns him to Spell’s
defense. But before the trial can
even begin, there is a minor
procedural delay: Because Marshall is not licensed to practice in
Connecticut, another attorney
(Josh Gad) must vouch for him.
Gad’s Sam Friedman is drafted
for the hearing by a judge (James
Cromwell), who arrives at an odd
BARRY WETCHER/OPEN ROAD FILMS
From left: Sam Friedman (Josh Gad), Thurgood Marshall (Chadwick Boseman) and client Joseph Spell
(Sterling K. Brown) in “Marshall,” about the legendary lawyer and eventual Supreme Court justice.
decision: The accused will be
defended by Friedman, not Marshall, who although he may act as
co-counsel, is not allowed to
speak in court.
There are two concurrent stories that play out here, informing
each other in ways both direct
and subtle. The first involves the
case itself, with Spell declaring
his innocence and his lawyers
preparing his defense. The second concerns the relationship
between Spell’s two attorneys,
each of whom resents the other
and yet must work as part of a
team. Hudlin takes the natural
chemistry between Boseman and
Gad — or the utter lack of it —
and makes that work in the film’s
favor. Although the men eventually arrive at a certain rapport
— made plausible by the performers’ unforced acting styles —
their eventual camaraderie still
retains the awkwardness you
would expect between a black
man and a Jew forced to work
together in lily-white Connecticut.
Their fight to prove Spell’s
innocence entails some forensic
investigation, but primarily relies on testimony, which Hudlin
supplements with flashbacks
that have been drained of color,
creating a noirish aesthetic that
deepens the lurid aspects of the
case — a classic he said/she said
scenario that puts Friedman in
the awkward position of impugning Strubing’s integrity on the
stand. That’s a tough needle to
thread, as it risks coloring Strubing as a victim and Friedman as
cruel. To its credit, the script
(co-written by Jacob Koskoff and
his father, lawyer Michael Koskoff ) finds a solution to this
problem through a morally complex series of events that involves
two people worried about saving
face. The scenes with Spell and
Strubing, on the witness stand,
are the best in the film.
“Marshall” includes too many
perfunctory biographical scenes
that distract from, rather than
add to, the tale. Subplots about
Marshall’s relationship with
writer Langston Hughes (Jussie
Smollett) and his marriage —
which helps inform Marshall’s
legal strategy — offer little more
than historical footnotes. Other
characters are underdeveloped,
including the prosecuting attorney, played as a churlish, smarmy
bigot by Dan Stevens, who does
what he can in a thankless role.
For the most part, though, the
cast of characters is complex and
challenging.
Despite simplistic moments
and needless digressions, “Marshall” still makes for an engaging
legal drama that largely avoids
giving its subject the Great Man
treatment. Boseman plays Marshall as cocky and smart but with
no inkling of the giant he would
become. Many of us know about
Thurgood Marshall because of
the landmark case striking down
school segregation, Brown v.
Board of Education, which he
argued before the Supreme
Court. By avoiding his most famous case, while at the same
time preserving history — and
adding pulpy thrills — “Marshall” is more involving than any
textbook or documentary could
be.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
PG-13. At area theaters. Contains
strong language, violence, sexual
situations and rape. 118 minutes.
THE WASHINGTON POST
The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) Another slice of Baumbach’s Big Apple
BY
M ICHAEL O ’ S ULLIVAN
family, including: three adult children (Adam Sandler, Ben Stiller
and the appropriately named
Elizabeth Marvel); a teenage
grandchild (Grace Van Patten);
and his fourth wife (Emma
Thompson, in peak loopy mode,
channeling a hybrid of Nanny
. FRIDAY,
STORIES CONTINUED ON 37
Ben Stiller, left, and Dustin
Hoffman in “The Meyerowitz
Stories,” about three
generations of a quirky clan of
artist-types in New York —
well-trodden territory for
director Noah Baumbach.
ATSUSHI NISHIJIMA/NETFLIX
OCTOBER 13, 2017
The latest film by Noah Baumbach, which is being released simultaneously on Netflix streaming and in select theaters, feels
like a finely textured but unfinished suit. With a title evoking a
collection of literary vignettes,
“The Meyerowitz Stories (New
and Selected)” tells a tale that, like
the writer-director’s best work
(“The Squid and the Whale,”
“Frances Ha”), is stitched together from the incisively cut fabric of
life among New York City’s striving, neurotic culturati. Baum-
bach, the son of film critics Georgia Brown and Jonathan Baumbach, grew up swimming in waters teeming with Manhattan’s
artsy — and, at times, sharky —
elites. And he gets one thing exactly right here: the depiction of
the embittered and too-smart-forhis-own-good artist.
But structurally, “The Meyerowitz Stories” is a shapeless and
baggy thing.
The artist in question is aging
sculptor Harold Meyerowitz
(Dustin Hoffman), and the story
(or assemblage of half-stories) revolves around his dysfunctional
34
EZ
Movies
Take Every Wave:
The Life of Laird Hamilton Documentary
about surfer only
skims the surface
BY
K RISTEN P AGE- K IRBY
It takes a lot of work to be a surf bum.
“Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird Hamilton,”
the latest documentary from Rory Kennedy (“Last
Days in Vietnam”), is partly the life story of Hamilton, widely considered the world’s best big-wave
surfer, and partly a study in obsession. Kennedy
bounces back and forth between times in Hamilton’s
life: his unconventional upbringing on Oahu, his
surfing career and his startlingly ordinary (and very
wealthy) family life with volleyball player Gabrielle
Reece and their daughters.
What ties all the time-hopping together is Hamilton’s drive to push against every limit the ocean puts
in front of him. While the nonlinear structure gives a
good sense of Hamilton’s journey from counterculture to mainstream culture, it also means that
“Take Every Wave” lacks narrative focus. Kennedy is
skilled at interweaving home movies and video shot
by Hamilton’s Strapped Crew — a group of men who
developed tow-in surfing, where water scooters pull
riders to waves that are unreachable by paddling
alone. But the intimate, immediate style of the
Strapped Crew’s work outshines much of Kennedy’s
original footage.
What’s more, there’s little sense of revelation.
Although Hamilton — who is not widely known to a
general audience — is inarguably a legend in his
sport, and an engaging enough subject, “Take Every
Wave” doesn’t give us a reason to invest deeply in his
story. The film’s last shot is a gasp-inducing long look
at Hamilton triumphantly skimming across a wave
for what seems like minutes. In the end, that ride
isn’t worth the work it takes to get there.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
OCTOBER 13, 2017
Unrated. At Landmark’s E Street Cinema. Contains
strong language. 118 minutes.
Loving Vincent Van Gogh’s art, literally brought to life
BY
S TEPHANIE M ERRY
“Loving Vincent” is, indisputably, a technical achievement.
Each one of the ambitious animated film’s 65,000 frames is an
oil painting, created by a classically trained artist in the style —
or, rather, in the various styles —
of painter Vincent van Gogh.
More than 100 painters worked
together to create the film, which
follows an acquaintance of the
artist who is trying to uncover
how and why van Gogh died in
1890, at 37.
Visually, it’s spectacular. Conceptually, it’s jaw-dropping to
simply consider the effort that
went into this.
The story, however, doesn’t always hold its own.
Husband-and-wife filmmakers
Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman directed the drama, which
they wrote with Jacek Dehnel. All
are fairly new to feature filmmaking. Kobiela — an animator with
the most experience of the three
— has co-directed only one other
feature, making this accomplishment all the more impressive.
The tale begins one year after
van Gogh has died, purportedly
from a self-inflicted gunshot
wound. Joseph Roulin (voice of
Chris O’Dowd), a postman and
friend of the artist whom van
Gogh immortalized in portraiture, tasks his son Armand
(Douglas Booth) with delivering
the last letter that van Gogh
wrote before dying — one addressed to the artist’s brother
Theo.
Armand’s journey takes the
first of several detours once he
realizes that Theo, too, is dead. So
Armand travels to Auvers-sur-
AN OIL PAINTING OF ROBERT GULACZYK AS VAN GOGH FROM GOOD DEED ENTERTAINMENT
Oise, the town where van Gogh
died, to meet with the people who
knew the painter in an effort to
understand what exactly happened. What starts out as an
investigation into the suicide of a
man — whose depression and
anxiety seemed to be lifting just
before his death — turns into a
whodunit.
In reality, much of the potential
murder mystery feels like an excuse to merely revisit characters
and scenes from van Gogh’s art.
Watching “Loving Vincent” involves something of an Easter egg
hunt, as viewers may try to pick
out the famous works of art from
among its scenes. There are portraits of van Gogh’s doctor, Paul
Gachet (Jerome Flynn), and his
daughter Marguerite (Saoirse Ronan), along with a glimpse of
“The Starry Night” and of boats
on the Oise River bank.
Van Gogh’s 1890 portrait of
Adeline Ravoux — the daughter of
innkeepers at the house where
van Gogh died — may not be his
best known work, but the character of Adeline (Eleanor Tomlinson), who has plenty of theories
about the enigmatic artist, makes
a deep impression.
Some exchanges between Armand and the people he meets
are more meaningful than others.
At times, the narrative drags, as
Armand plays sleuth in pursuit of
a solution to a mystery that may
not even be one.
There is nevertheless a thrill in
watching static images spring to
life as complex characters and
dynamic landscapes. “Loving
Vincent” is itself an imaginative
work of art. And what better way
than that to honor its subject?
stephanie.merry@washpost.com
PG-13. At the Avalon. Contains
discussions of suicide, some
violence, sexual material and
smoking. 94 minutes.
Also Opening
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
“The Pathological
Optimist” is a
profile of Andrew
Wakefield, a
controversial figure
in the debate over
the safety of
vaccines whose
research on the
subject suggested a
link between
vaccines and autism.
Unrated. At the
Angelika Pop-Up at
Union Market. 93
minutes.
SUNDANCE SELECTS
A new movie explores the life and work ethic of
surfing star Laird Hamilton, who worked to
overcome every limit the ocean tossed at him.
THE FILM ARCADE
Movies
Human Flow So B. It Looks at the global refugee
crisis and doesn’t blink
Adaptation of
children’s novel is
drained of all fun
BY
M ICHAEL O ’ S ULLIVAN
BY
The Chinese contemporary visual artist Ai Weiwei — whose portraits of political dissidents,
formed from Lego blocks, are on
view at the Hirshhorn Museum
and Sculpture Garden in Washington — has never limited himself to
a single medium. Over his career,
the 60-year-old has produced powerful sculptures, installations, photographs, videos, even a stream of
social-media postings that can be
read as both a form of performance
art and as political statement. Ai’s
heartbreaking new documentary,
“Human Flow,” about the global
refugee crisis, continues a tradition
of making work that is pungent
conceptually and aesthetically.
(The movie is distributed by Amazon Studios. Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos owns The
Washington Post.)
Shot in 23 countries and culled
from 900 hours of footage of
refugees from the Middle East,
Africa, Mexico and other places,
the film largely avoids the tropes
of standard documentaries, using
on-screen facts and figures only
sparingly or in the margins, and
narration not at all. “News
crawls,” featuring headlines from
PBS, the New York Times and
other journalism outlets, regularly creep across the screen, adding
minimal context, and contrasting
sharply with fragments of poetry.
If at times it is not immediately
clear which of the 40 refugee
encampments Ai visited we are
looking at — Greece? Kenya?
Italy? The West Bank? — or who is
AMAZON STUDIOS/PARTICIPANT MEDIA
Refugees walking near the camp at Idomeni, on Greece’s northern
border with Macedonia, in a scene from the documentary.
on-screen, that’s part of his point.
In place of talking-head interviews that might lend clarity, Ai’s
signature shot seems to be the
overhead drone sequence, offering breathtaking bird’s-eye views
of, say, a refugee-packed boat on
the open sea or an expanse of
cubicle-like shelters inside a massive airplane hangar. Aestheticizing the tragic does not undercut
it, but reinforces it.
In other scenes, Ai simply turns
his unblinking camera on an individual — who may or may not
speak — forcing the audience to
confront, over an uncomfortably
long time, the common humanity
we share with those who are, all
too often, rendered as statistics. At
nearly 21/2 hours, the film is long,
and it sags here and there, but the
cumulative effect is not exhaustion
or boredom, but rather sorrow and
outrage at the violence, economic
despair and persecution — whether religious, ethnic or political —
that have driven these people from
their homes.
At a couple of points, Ai turns
his gaze from the flow of humanity
to focus on an animal. One wordless sequence features a cow limping unsteadily down an unidentified street. Another segment details the herculean effort and expense undertaken, in 2016, to
relocate a single tiger from a zoo in
Gaza to the South African wild. At
these times, by deliberately playing on our sympathy for nonhuman suffering, “Human Flow”
asks us, implicitly, why we seem to
care so much about certain living
creatures and not others.
35
EZ
S USAN W LOSZCZYNA
Don’t let the cutesy title fool you. “So B. It” might
be based on a popular 2004 children’s novel, but
director Stephen Gyllenhaal (father of actors Jake
and Maggie) and writer Garry Williams have taken
this tale of a 12-year-old girl who goes on a journey of
self-discovery and fashioned a moody family melodrama that seems mostly aimed at adult tastes.
Talitha Bateman plays Heidi, a bright yet sheltered
girl who lives with her childlike, mentally challenged mother (Jessica Collins) and agoraphobic
guardian (Alfre Woodard, her character doing what
she can between panic attacks) in a modest Reno
apartment. While she looks the part, the young
actress never quite settles comfortably into her role.
Bateman’s best moments arrive early, in a couple
of flash-forwards that reveal Heidi showing off her
so-called luck in a sheriff’s office as he flips a coin
and she correctly guesses heads or tails, 10 times in a
row. Bateman herself is lucky to play off Cloris
Leachman — still a stitch at 91 — as well as a clutch of
kittens, as the girl travels by bus to Liberty, N.Y., in
search of answers about her past. But there’s
something rather artificial about this somber fairy
tale, including the way that Woodard’s Bernie dolls
Heidi up in makeup, heels and grown-up garb
whenever she sends her underage ward out as her
surrogate to the outside world. To the detriment of
their story, the filmmakers seem to have forgotten
that even the most serious of kid-friendly films can
benefit from an injection of fun while attempting to
jerk tears.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
PG-13. At the Angelika Pop-Up at Union Market.
Contains mature thematic elements. 98 minutes.
michael.osullivan@washpost.com
THE WASHINGTON POST
PG-13. At Landmark’s E Street Cinema. Contains disturbing images and themes. 145 minutes.
Also Opening
. FRIDAY,
The documentary
“Bending the Arc”
looks at a group of
doctors and activists
who have been
fighting for
universal health
care for patients in
such places as rural
Haiti, left, Peru and
Rwanda. Unrated. At
Landmark’s West End
Cinema. 102 minutes.
ABRAMORAMA/CROWING ROOSTER ARTS INC.
OCTOBER 13, 2017
BONNIE OSBORNE/OUTSIDE THE BOX/BRANDED PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT
Talitha Bateman plays Heidi, a sheltered preteen
who goes on a journey to learn more about her
background in this somber tale.
36
EZ
Movies
Happy Death Day Brawl in Cell Block 99 Recycling a classic
comedy as horror
BY
P AT P ADUA
Here’s a simple — and potentially chilling —
concept: What if someone remade “Groundhog Day,”
in which a TV weatherman relives the same day over
and over, as a horror movie? Director Christopher
Landon (“Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones”)
and writer Scott Lobdell (of TV’s “X-Men” series)
have done just that, paying fond homage to Harold
Ramis’s 1993 comedy classic with a tale of a college
student who must go through the day she’s murdered, again and again. Sadly, “Happy Death Day”
proves that the clever notion is ill-suited to horror.
Set at a fictional Louisiana university, the movie
opens on Tree (Jessica Rothe of “La La Land”), a
popular sorority girl who wakes up on her birthday
to find that she has spent the night with — gasp — an
unpopular boy, whose name she doesn’t even remember (Israel Broussard).
From Tree’s smug, dismissive interactions with
fellow students and former bedmates, it’s clear she
isn’t a nice person. Later that evening, as students
wander around campus wearing masks fashioned
after the school’s grotesque infant mascot, a masked,
hooded assailant stalks and kills Tree. Just at the
moment of death, she wakes up in the boy’s bed,
living through the same day, until she is killed by the
same attacker.
Slaughter, rinse, repeat.
Like a character in a PG-13 after-school special,
Tree comes to see this vicious cycle as an opportunity
to become a better person. Unfortunately, while the
movie’s cast is not unappealing, Tree’s journey to
self-knowledge feels abrupt and unconvincing.
What’s more, the cycle makes it impossible to build
tension. We already know that Tree is going to die.
Details and methods may change, but they aren’t
particularly inventive.
With its circular arc of soul-searching and redemption, “Groundhog Day” has become a modern
cautionary tale — “A Christmas Carol” for contemporary times that people watch, again and again. By
borrowing that same premise, the makers of “Happy
Death Day” hope to cash in on the earlier film’s
enduring appeal. But this is one movie that no one
needs to relive.
BCB99/RLJE FILMS
Vince Vaughn as Bradley Thomas (unseen: his cross back-of-head tattoo) in “Brawl in Cell Block 99,”
which grinds the corrupt-prison and torture-prison genres into a pulpy mash-up of violence.
Lovable bro Vince Vaughn
is a bone-breaking machine
BY
M ARK J ENKINS
Although it features bonecracking violence, “Brawl in Cell
Block 99” is not exactly a scuffle.
This pulpy mash-up of two
genres — corrupt-prison and torture-horror — is more of a death
march: a deliberate plod toward
retribution. In place of catharsis,
the climax provides gross-out
slapstick, but writer-director S.
Craig Zahler takes his handiwork
so seriously that viewers may do
the same.
The brawler of the title is
phlegmatic
Bradley
(Vince
Vaughn), who becomes a drug
courier when he loses his job in
an auto-repair shop. With his
hulking frame and a large cross
tattooed on the back of his shaved
head, Bradley is obviously trouble. Yet everything he does is to
support — and, later, to protect —
his family.
Arrested after an abortive drug
run, Bradley is sent to jail. A drug
lord’s emissary (the reptilian Udo
Kier) informs him that hideous
things will happen to his wife
(Jennifer Carpenter) and their
unborn daughter if Bradley
doesn’t get himself sent to the
maximum-security cell block 99.
What awaits him there is sadistic
torment, overseen by a soft-spoken warden (Don Johnson), and a
showdown with his ultimate enemy (Dion Mucciacito).
Aside from letting “Brawl” run
a half-hour too long, Zahler indulges himself with intentionally
lousy-looking cinematography
and fake 1970s soul tunes that he
co-wrote (and got the O’Jays and
Butch Tavares to sing). But
there’s no fat on the action
scenes, which are shot in long
takes, without the usual quick
cuts. When Bradley finally claims
his vengeance, we see the full
price he extracts.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
goingoutguide@washpost.com
Also Opening
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
Unrated. At AMC’s Magic Johnson Capital Center 12. Contains violence, obscenity and nudity. 132 minutes.
PG-13. At area theaters. Contains sexual situations,
strong language and graphic violence. 96 minutes.
UNIVERSAL PICTURES
College student and mean girl Tree (Jessica Rothe
of “La La Land”) keeps reliving the day of her
murder.
HAYDEN BANKS/SABAN FILMS
John Cusack, right,
and Ellar Coltrane
star in “Blood
Money,” a thriller
about a group who
chances upon a large
stash of stolen money.
The film is loosely
inspired by the 1948
classic “The Treasure
of the Sierra Madre.”
PG-13. At AMC Loews
Rio Cinemas 18. Also
available on demand.
Contains crude
language throughout,
including sexual
references, and some
violence. 89 minutes.
Movies
37
EZ
Goodbye Christopher Robin Biopic bares the Milne family’s Eeyorish past
BY
J ANE H ORWITZ
In the 1920s, A.A. Milne gave a
world reeling from World War I
gentle books inspired by his only
child and the boy’s stuffed-animal
friends. The British author rendered them in verse and prose,
brimming with humor and nestled among perfect illustrations
by E.H. Shepard.
Such books as “When We Were
Very Young” and “Winnie-thePooh” were great gifts, but their
success took a toll, as the well-intentioned, but flawed film “Goodbye Christopher Robin” aims to
show. Christopher Robin Milne —
called by his nickname, “Moon,”
in the film — had a painful public
childhood. His father felt guilt
about that, and he saw his literary
ambitions limited by “Pooh.”
Inspired by Ann Thwaite’s 1990
biography of the author and the
memoirs of Christopher Milne,
the script, while well researched,
is stuffed with more shifts in time
and tone than it can gracefully
handle. Though “Goodbye Christopher Robin” has moments of
delight and even profundity, and
looks PBS-pretty, too often it
stumbles. From the trivial to the
serious — ranging from an awkward close-up of smudged makeup to inconsistencies of character
— director Simon Curtis doesn’t
pull the thing together. Milne’s
wife, Daphne (Margot Robbie),
for example, is alternately portrayed as flighty, distant and affectionate, with each iteration
seemingly unrelated to the last.
Domhnall Gleeson struggles,
too, playing the writer as an introverted, shellshocked veteran
whose moods shift abruptly. As
Moon, Will Tilston seems alternately stilted and hesitant. Stephen Campbell Moore and Kelly
Macdonald fare better, delivering
understated performances as
Milne’s friend Shepard and the
boy’s nanny, respectively.
Yet there are pleasures. Father
and son have a charming time
bonding. One memorable sequence shows Milne and Shepard
wandering in the Sussex countryside with little Moon and his bear
in tow. While the boy plays, the
men imagine life in the Hundred
Acre Wood. Then these fellow
veterans gaze out on the valley
and try not to let it remind them
of battlefields past.
goingoutguide@washpost.com
PG. At area theaters. Contains
disturbing battlefield flashbacks, a
nongraphic childbirth scene,
emotional upsets and school
bullying. 101 minutes.
DAVID APPLEBY/FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES
From left: Margot Robbie, Will Tilston and Domhnall Gleeson as the Milnes in 1920s England. The
portrait of Winnie-the-Pooh’s creator is warm and PBS-pretty but bumbles a bit like the famous bear.
Also Opening
STORIES FROM 33
TV-MA. At Landmark’s Bethesda
Row Cinema. Also on Netflix.
Contains obscenity, including
sexual dialogue, nudity and a
drug reference. 110 minutes.
OCTOBER 13, 2017
The members of an up-and-coming rock band become involved with the occult while trying to make it big in
“American Satan.” This movie did not screen for critics. R. At AMC’s Hoffman Center 22. Contains strong sexual
content, nudity, drug use throughout, pervasive crude language and some violence. 115 minutes.
michael.sullivan@washpost.com
. FRIDAY,
Jackie Chan, left, and Pierce Brosnan star in “The Foreigner,” an action thriller about a businessman
(Chan) seeking vengeance for his daughter’s murder. This movie did not screen in time for review in
Weekend. R. At area theaters. Contains violence, strong language and some sexual material. 114 minutes.
THE WASHINGTON POST
CHRISTOPHER RAPHAEL/COURTESY OF STX ENTERTAINMENT
McPhee and “Harry Potter’s” Sybill Trelawny).
Presented in distinct segments — some of which have
chapter titles referring to Harold’s children, before Baumbach gives up on the gimmick —
the film is set before, during and
after a medical crisis reroutes
the well-worn ruts that the colorful Meyerowitz clan is used to
traveling in. These ruts include
bickering, talking — or texting
— behind each other’s backs and
whining about coulda, shoulda,
woulda. The most common refrain of Harold, who never
achieved the critical renown of
his sculptor friend (Judd
Hirsch), is that he is still waiting
for something — a show, a review, a museum acquisition —
that will put him “on the map.”
Underscoring that theme of
the habitual, Baumbach cuts
away from several scenes in
mid-word, as if to suggest that
there’s no point in continuing,
since we — or at least the Meyerowitzes — have heard all this
before.
Other themes emerge and
then disappear, including: sibling rivalry; a long-hidden secret about sexual misbehavior;
and paternal resentment that
none of Harold’s kids pursued a
creative career of his or her own.
The grandchild, who is just entering Bard College, where Harold taught for three decades, is
said to be a talented filmmaker,
but the clips we’re shown of her
work are laughably bad.
The acting is impeccable all
around, and there is an undeniable, if perverse, appeal to
spending time with these damaged but entertaining individuals. Though rarely laugh-outloud funny, “The Meyerowitz
Stories” succeeds in putting a
smile on the face of anyone who
recognizes the thin slice of the
Big Apple that it depicts. It’s
hardly a meal, but “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)” makes for a bag of tasty
snacks.
38
Movies
EZ
DC’s only nonprofit film center
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weekend family matinees presents:
Goodbye Christopher
Robin (PG)
YOU & ME SONG CIRCLE W/ IMAGINATION STAGE:
WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE 10am Sat 10/14
french cinématheque presents:
DALIDA 8pm Wed 10/18
5612 Connecticut Ave NW • (202) 966-6000
tickets online: www.theavalon.org
SF
EMPIRE
MIRROR
TOTAL FILM
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METRO
Age 10+
Poignant father-son drama deals
with heavy themes.
“Goodbye Christopher Robin”
is a biographical drama about
how English author-poetplaywright Alan Alexander
(A.A.) Milne went from being a
shellshocked World War I
veteran to the creator of Winniethe-Pooh. Starring Domhnall
Gleeson and Margot Robbie as
the Milnes, the movie may
appeal to Pooh-loving parents
with young children. But the
film deals with themes and
subject matter that are too
mature for little ones: posttraumatic stress, war and peace,
wartime death, marital strain,
tension between parents and
full-time caregivers, etc. You’ll
also see flashbacks to Milne’s
time in WWI (including scenes
of men dead, injured and dying
in trenches, shots whizzing by,
etc.), and he shuts down or
becomes aggressive during
moments when he’s triggered
and remembers the war. He even
lashes out physically (though
unintentionally) at his young
son. A young boy is bullied by
classmates, and kids may be
upset by scenes of a young child
missing a beloved caretaker.
There’s also some kissing,
drinking, smoking (accurate for
the era) and mild language. With
a strong sense of melancholy
underlining much of what
happens, the movie is
occasionally heartbreaking and
is likely to make sensitive
moviegoers cry. (101 minutes)
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
So B. It
EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS START TODAY
FAIRFAX
BETHESDA
WASHINGTON, DC
Landmark’s E Street Cinema Landmark’s Bethesda Row Cinema Angelika at Mosaic
(571) 512-3301
(301) 652-7273
(202) 783-9494
What parents need to know
(PG-13)
Age 13+
Beautiful coming-of-age drama
tackles tough topics.
“So B. It” is a touching
coming-of-age drama about a 12year-old girl named Heidi
(Talitha Bateman) who’s growing
up in isolation because she lives
with her intellectually disabled
mother and a family friend who
has agoraphobia and can’t leave
the house. These characters’
limitations are treated with
respect, and they’re loved and
given dignity and
understanding, with their needs
considered. Heidi goes on a long
journey alone, essentially
running away in the middle of
the night, but she’s never in any
real danger and meets people
who treat her with kindness. A
tragic death late in the movie
may upset young or sensitive
viewers; Heidi’s plight may also
be disturbing to some viewers.
But tweens and teens will relate
to the character and may be
DAVID APPLEBY/FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES
A.A. Milne (Domhnall Gleeson), left, and Christopher Robin
(Will Tilston) in the melancholy “Goodbye Christopher Robin.”
inspired by her strength,
perseverance and courage. The
movie is based on the samenamed novel by Sarah Weeks.
(98 minutes)
Marshall
(PG-13)
Age 13+
Inspirational, entertaining
biopic of a very human hero.
“Marshall” is a biopic about
Thurgood Marshall (Chadwick
Boseman). He eventually became
the first African American U.S.
Supreme Court justice, but this
movie focuses on one of his
earlier court cases. Despite some
iffy material, its excellent role
models and strong messages
about courage, teamwork and
tolerance make it a great movie
for families with teens. Expect to
see fistfights and beatings, with
bloody wounds and bruises.
There’s also a flashback to a
suggested rape, with violent acts
against a woman. A fairly mild
sex scene includes kissing but no
nudity; the main character also
kisses his wife and is shown
lying with her in bed. Language
includes several uses of the nword as well as the slur “kike,” a
use of “f---,” uses of “s---” and
more. Characters drink alcohol
in a social context (sometimes to
excess), and there’s background
smoking. (118 minutes)
Happy Death Day
(PG-13)
Age 13+
Playful tone lightens timebending slasher movie’s
violence.
“Happy Death Day” is a
slasher movie with fantasy and
comedy overtones. The main
character (Jessica Rothe) is
stuck in a time loop, a la
“Groundhog Day,” suffering a
violent death over and over
again until she figures out how
to break the cycle. Considering
the movie’s premise and genre,
the violence is actually on the
milder side. Stabbings happen
off-screen, but blood is shown on
knife blades, and there’s a brief
spatter when a character falls
from a high window. Characters
are also hit with blunt objects
and run over by a car. There’s
also some racy content. Sex
among college students is
spoken of, although not shown.
But a male college student is
shown preparing to masturbate
to porn (there’s a computer
image of two men kissing), and a
young woman walks naked
through the quad (nothing
graphic shown). Characters also
kiss, and the main character has
a short-lived affair with a
teacher. Language includes a use
of “f---,” plus “s---,” “p----,” “a-hole” and more. Teens talk about
drinking and being drunk, but
no one is shown drinking. The
movie is gleefully aware of its
silliness and could be a strong
draw for teens. Luckily, there’s
an underlying message about
thinking about others instead of
just yourself. (96 minutes)
Common Sense
Media helps
families make smart media choices.
Go to commonsensemedia.org for
age-based and educational ratings
and reviews for movies, games,
apps, TV shows, websites and books.
Movies
39
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ALSO P L AYING
Star ratings are from Post reviews;
go to goingoutguide.com/movies for
the full-length reviews. Movies not
reviewed by The Post are marked
“NR.” For showtimes, see the
Movie Directory.
AMERICAN ASSASSIN
Dylan O’Brien stars a baby-faced
CIA operative in this lumbering
thriller based onVince Flynn books.
(R, 111 minutes, contains strong
violence throughout, some torture,
crude language and brief nudity. At
area theaters.)
AMERICAN MADE
The fact-based comedy tells the
story of 1980s drug-runner Barry
Seal. (R, 115 minutes, contains
strong language, sex, nudity and
some violence. At area theaters.)
BATTLE OF THE SEXES
Timely comedy looks back at a
match when tennis star Billie Jean
King struck a blow for feminism.
(PG-13, 121 minutes, contains
some sexual material and partial
nudity. At area theaters.)
THE BIG SICK
Kumail Nanjiani stars in this
winning rom-com inspired by his
courtship with his wife (and cowriter), Emily V. Gordon. (R, 119
minutes, contains obscenity,
including sexual references. At
Landmark’s West End Cinema.)
BLADE RUNNER 2049
Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford costar in the follow-up to Ridley
Scott’s 1982 sci-fi masterwork.
(Rating, 160 minutes, contains
violence, some sexuality, nudity
and crude language. At area
theaters.)
STEPHEN VAUGHAN/WARNER BROS. PICTURES
Harrison Ford, left, and Ryan Gosling as a former and a current robot hunter in “Blade Runner 2049,” a beautifully bleak sequel that
continues the 1982 sci-fi classic’s deep dive into the soul.
“HYPNOTIC AND BEGUILING...”
FILM BY
AI WEIWEI
“AN ANIMATED
MASTERPIECE.
I have never seen anything
like it before.”
“THE RARE MOVIE THAT DESERVES
TO BE CALLED ‘STUNNING’.’’
-PETE HAMMOND, DEADLINE
“A MIRACULOUS
TRIBUTE...”
- Alan Scherstuhl,
★★★★.
-JOE McGOVERN, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY
“
EVERYONE DESERVES A HOME.
AI WEIWEI’S CAMERA SHOWS US
THE ENORMITY OF THE PROBLEM.
DOLORES
NOW IT’S OUR TURN TO DO SOMETHING.’’
STARTS
TODAY
WASHINGTON, DC
AVA L O N T H E AT R E
5612 Connecticut Ave NW
(202) 966-6000
- Jordan Hoffman,
OFFICIAL SELECTION
TELLURIDE
FILM FESTIVAL
2017
LOVINGVINCENT.COM
“UNFORGETTABLE.”
- David Ehrlich,
★★★★
IMPOSSIBLE TO IGNORE
“
MOVIES CONTINUED ON 40
.
‘‘REGARDLESS OF WHERE YOU STAND ON THE VACCINATION ISSUE,
IT’S POSSIBLE TO RELISH MIRANDA BAILEY’S
HIGHLY INFORMATIVE, ANGER-AROUSING FILM.’’
”
.
- Dave Calhoun,
- Lisa Jo Sagolla, FILM JOURNAL
L I A R
HUMAN FLOW
M O N S T E R
THE
S A V I O R
PATHOLOGICAL OPTIMIST
a film by MIRANDA BAILEY
ThePathologicalOptimistFilm.com
/ThePathologicalOptimist
EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS TODAY
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ANGELIKAPOPUP.COM • WASHINGTON, DC
STARTS
TODAY
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OCTOBER 13, 2017
W H E N T H E R E I S N O W H E R E T O G O,
NOWHERE IS HOME.
. FRIDAY,
H E A L E R
THE WASHINGTON POST
The documentary offers a
corrective to 50-plus years of
American history. (Unrated, 97
minutes, contains footage of
police brutality, the Robert
Kennedy assassination and
A
-A.O. SCOTT, THE NEW YORK TIMES
40
EZ
Movies
MOVIES FROM 39
children with medical deformities.
In English and Spanish with
subtitles. At Landmark’s West End
Cinema.)
DUNKIRK
Christopher Nolan tells a rousing
story of the Battle of Dunkirk in
1940. (PG-13, 107 minutes,
contains scenes of intense warfare
and some coarse language. At area
theaters.)
THE HITMAN’S
BODYGUARD
Ryan Reynolds and Samuel L.
Jackson team up for action and an
unlikely bromance. (R, 111
minutes, contains strong violence
and crude language throughout. At
University Mall Theatre.)
Kentlands Stadium 10 and Regal
Virginia Gateway Stadium 14 &
RPX.)
HOME AGAIN
IT
Reese Witherspoon looks for love
and career success in sunny Los
Angeles. (PG-13, 96 minutes,
contains some mature thematic
material and sexuality. At Paragon
The Stephen King adaptation
features an entity that doesn’t just
feed on fear, but curates it. (R, 135
minutes, contains bloody violence,
horror and strong language. At area
theaters.)
THE KING’S CHOICE
UVA, VCU,
Virginia Tech,
Shenandoah,
William & Mary,
George Mason
FEEL FREE TO JUDGE US BY THE COMPANY WE KEEP.
You’ll find Shenandoah listed among Virginia’s top
universities in U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 Best Colleges
This slow-moving period drama has
the feel of a chess game, not of life
and death. (Unrated, 133
minutes, contains some violent
war imagery. In Norwegian and
German with subtitles. At
Landmark’s West End Cinema.)
KINGSMAN: THE
GOLDEN CIRCLE
Taron Egerton is back in sequel to
2015 film — along with a couple of
seemingly deceased characters.
(R, 141 minutes, contains copious
violence, drug use, strong language
throughout and some sexual
situations. At area theaters.)
THE LEGO NINJAGO
MOVIE
Third Lego movie lacks the popcultural touchstones of the first two
animated films. (PG, 101 minutes,
contains mild action and rude
humor. At area theaters.)
Prolific character actor Dean
Stanton, who died in September,
plays a cranky old loner. (Unrated,
88 minutes, contains strong
language. At Landmark’s Bethesda
Row Cinema.)
THE MOUNTAIN
BETWEEN US
Kate Winslet and Idris Elba suffer
and smolder in this thriller that’s
part survival drama, part romance.
(PG-13, 112 minutes, contains
sexuality, peril, injury images and
brief obscenity. At area theaters.)
MY LITTLE PONY: THE
MOVIE
The animated adventure expands
on the ‘Friendship Is Magic’ TV
series. (PG, 99 minutes, contains
a few tempestlike sequences and
brief moments of sadness, but
most of the action is mild and
sparkly. At area theaters.)
SPIDER-MAN:
HOMECOMING
Tom Holland’s 15-year-old
webslinger is torn between
attending the school dance and
saving the world from evil in this
“TERRIFICALLY ENTERTAINING.”
SHAWN EDWARDS, FOXTV
“JUDI DENCH IS PERFECTION.
AN EXTRAORDINARY FILM.”
PETE HAMMOND, DEADLINE
“Judi Dench Is A Royal Pleasure.
A Fun Time At The Movies.”
PETER TRAVERS
in Virginia to make the top tier in the national universities
category. Get the whole scoop at su.edu/toptier
An untold true story
of a queen and her
new best friend.
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
MOTHER!
Darren Aronofsky’s elegant
meditation on art, nature and
spirituality gives way to pulp
excess. (R, 121 minutes, contains
strong disturbing violent content,
some sexuality, nudity and
obscenity. At Regal Cinemas
Majestic Stadium 20 & Imax.)
LUCKY
rankings. In fact, Shenandoah is the only private institution
THE WASHINGTON POST
MARK FELT: THE MAN
WHO BROUGHT DOWN THE
WHITE HOUSE
This story of Deep Throat is an
absorbing alternative to the 1976
thriller’s, presenting the
informant’s psychological and
emotional motives. (PG-13, 103
minutes, contains some obscenity.
At area theaters.)
WINCHESTER | LOUDOUN | FAIRFAX
SOME THEMATIC
ELEMENTS AND
LANGUAGE
VictoriaAndAbdulFilm.com
© 2017 FOCUS FEATURES LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
NOW PLAYING IN THEATERS EVERYWHERE
CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATER LOCATIONS AND SHOWTIMES
Movies
refreshing reboot of a familiar
superhero story. (PG-13, 133
minutes, contains sci-fi action
violence, some strong language
and brief suggestive comments. At
Rave Cinemas Fairfax Corner 14 +
Xtreme and University Mall
Theatre.)
41
EZ
Diane Lane and Liam
Neeson as Audrey and
Mark Felt in “Mark Felt.”
The drama depicts, with
suspense and dynamisn,
how Felt became the
secret informant “Deep
Throat” during the
Watergate era.
VICTORIA AND ABDUL
For the most part, the drama —
starring Judi Dench and Ali Fazal —
plays like broadly clownish comedy.
(PG-13, 112 minutes, contains
strong language and mature
thematic material. At area
theaters.)
Independence Avenue SW. 202633-1000. hirshhorn.si.edu.
UTOPIA FILM FESTIVAL 2017
Saturday. Through Sunday. $7. Old
Greenbelt Theater, 129 Centerway,
Greenbelt. 301-466-9524.
utopiafilmfestival.org.
WASHINGTON IN THE ’80S
Wednesday at 11 a.m. Free.
Anacostia Community Museum,
1901 Fort Pl. SE. 202-633-4820.
anacostia.si.edu.
WASHINGTON JEWISH FILM
FESTIVAL Through Dec. 5. $13.50$28.13. Edlavitch DCJCC, 1529
16th St. NW. 202-518-9400.
wjff.org.
WIND RIVER
Taylor Sheridan’s directorial debut
is set amid the poverty and
foreshortened prospects of a
Native American community. (R,
107 minutes, contains strong
violence, a rape, disturbing images
and obscenity. At area theaters.)
BOB MAHONEY/SONY PICTURES CLASSICS
R EP E R TO R Y
ALETSCH: OF ICE AND MEN
Thursday at 6 p.m. Free. Anacostia
Community Museum, 1901 Fort Pl.
SE. 202-633-4820. dceff.org.
CINEMA ART BETHESDA Sunday
at 10 a.m. $14. Landmark's
Bethesda Row Cinema, 7235
Woodmont Ave., Bethesda. 301652-7273. bit.ly/2yFkQP7.
DON MURRAY: UNSUNG HERO
Through Friday. $8-$13. AFI Silver
Theatre, 8633 Colesville Rd., Silver
Spring. 301-495-6700. afi.com/
silver.
DOUBLE EXPOSURE FILM
FESTIVAL Thursday. Through Oct.
22. $15-$250. National Portrait
Gallery, Eighth and F streets NW.
202-633-1000.
doubleexposurefestival.com/
2017-films.
FAMILY FUN MOVIE NIGHTS
Through Dec. 15. Free. Stacy C.
Sherwood Center, 3740 Old Lee
Hwy. Fairfax. fairfaxva.gov/home.
FRIDAY THE 13TH Friday at 7:30
p.m. Free. Adventure Links at
Hemlock Overlook Regional Park,
13220 Yates Ford Road, Clifton.
571-281-3556. bit.ly/2zdU7WE.
MIDDLEBURG FILM FESTIVAL
Through Oct. 22. $10-$15. Various
locations around Middleburg.
middleburgfilm.org.
NOIR CITY DC 2017 Saturday.
Through Nov. 7. AFI Silver Theatre,
8633 Colesville Rd., Silver Spring.
301-495-6700. afi.com/silver.
OIL & WATER Sunday at 4 p.m. $7.
BlackRock Center for the Arts,
12901 Town Commons Dr.,
Germantown. 301-528-2260. bit.ly/
2yYmA1M.
PERSEPOLIS Thursday at 7 p.m.
Free. Hillyer Art Space, 9 Hillyer Ct.
NW. 202-338-0325. bit.ly/2gaQpc2.
THE ROAD Sunday at 2 p.m.
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture
Garden, Seventh Street and
THE ANONYMOUS WHISTLEBLOWER WHO RISKED
EVERYTHING IN THE NAME OF JUSTICE
“A WONDERFUL CAST.”
 THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER
“ADAM SANDLER
IS A REVELATION.”
 THE NEW YORK TIMES
“DUSTIN HOFFMAN
IS MASTERFUL.”
 INDIEWIRE
“INSPIRED.”
 VANITY FAIR
“BEN STILLER
IS BRILLIANT.”
 INDIEWIRE
“EXCEPTIONAL.”
 VANITY FAIR
“NOAH BAUMBACH MAY BE AMERICAN CINEMA’S
GREATEST CHRONICLER OF FAMILY DYSFUNCTION.”
 VOX
“
ᗂᗂᗂᗂ ”
EMPIRE  THE TELEGRAPH  THE GUARDIAN
“EXTRAORDINARY.”
-Pete Hammond, DEADLINE
“AS TIMELY AS IT GETS.”
LIAM NEESON
THE WASHINGTON POST
-Joshua Rothkopf, TIME OUT NEW YORK
DIANE LANE
MARK FELT
I N S E L E C T T H E AT E R S A N D O N
THE MAN WHO BROUGHT DOWN THE WHITE HOUSE
. FRIDAY,
MARK FELT AND JOHN O’CONNOR WRIDIRTECTEDTEN ANDBY PETER LANDESMAN
WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM
Washington, DC LANDMARK’S E STREET Bethesda ARCLIGHT BETHESDA Bethesda LANDMARK’S BETHESDA ROW Fairfax ANGELIKA AT MOSAIC Fairfax CINEMA ARTS THEATRE
CINEMA (202) 783-949
(301) 365-0213
CINEMA (301) 652-7273
(571) 512-3301
(703) 978-6991
VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.MARKFELTMOVIE.COM
CINEMA NOW LANDMARK BETHESDA ROW
10/13-10/19 SHOWTIMES:
10:30 (Sat & Sun only), 1:40 , 4:20 , 7:20
PLAYING
7235 Woodmont Ave, Bethesda, MD 20814
AM
PM
PM
PM,
9:50PM
OCTOBER 13, 2017
BASED ON THE
BOOKS BY
42
EZ
MOVIE DIRECTORY
DISTRICT
AMC Loews Georgetown 14
3111 K Street N.W.
THE WASHINGTON POST
. FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 13, 2017
Brave (PG) 2:00
The LEGO Ninjago Movie
(PG) CC: 10:30AM
The Mountain Between Us
(PG-13) CC: 11:30-2:155:00-7:45-10:30
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
(R) CC: 1:20-4:30-7:45-9:50
My Little Pony: The Movie
(PG) CC: 10:40-12:05-2:404:25-7:00
Battle of the Sexes (PG-13)
CC: 10:35-1:25-4:20-7:2010:15
American Made (R) CC:
10:45-1:30-4:15-7:10-10:00
It (R) CC: 1:15-9:30
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
CC: 5:15
Victoria & Abdul (PG-13) CC:
11:20-1:55-4:35-7:15-11:00
The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:152:00-4:45-7:30-10:20
Blade Runner 2049: The
IMAX 2D Experience (R) CC:
12:00-3:45-7:30-11:15
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
CC: 11:25-12:30-3:00-4:305:30-7:00-8:00-9:30-10:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 10:301:00-4:00-7:00-10:00
Professor Marston & the
Wonder Women (R) CC:
12:00-2:35-5:15-7:55-10:40
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
CC: 9:00
Blade Runner 2049 (R)
11:00-2:45-6:30-10:10
It (R) CC: 1:40-4:25-7:109:50
Blade Runner 2049 (R) CC:
12:00-3:30-4:45-7:00-10:1510:30
Marshall (PG-13) CC: 12:001:00-3:15-7:15-8:00-9:45
My Little Pony: The Movie
(PG) CC: 11:15-1:45-4:156:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
CC: (!) 11:00-12:10-2:305:00-7:30-10:30
Blade Runner 2049 3D (R)
Landmark E Street Cinema CC: (!) 1:30-8:45
The Mountain Between Us
555 11th Street NW
(PG-13) (!) 11:05-1:45-4:30Take Every Wave: The Life of 7:15-10:00
Laird Hamilton 7:00
AMC Center Park 8
Goodbye Christopher Robin
4001 Powder Mill Rd.
CC: 12:30-1:30-4:30-7:30Kingsman: The Golden Circle
9:00-10:00
(R) CC: 12:00-3:15-6:25-9:30
Mark Felt: The Man Who
It (R) CC: 11:00-5:30
Brought Down The White
House (PG-13) CC: 12:45- The Foreigner (R) CC: 11:001:45-4:30-7:30-10:15
3:45-6:45
Happy Death Day (PG-13)
Human Flow (PG-13) CC:
CC: (!) 11:30-2:00-4:301:30-4:45-8:15
Halloween (1978) (R) 11:59 7:00-9: